Citation
Paul Arnold : a tale of life in Peru.

Material Information

Title:
Paul Arnold : a tale of life in Peru.
Creator:
Hoffmann, Franz, 1814-1882
William and Robert Chambers.
Publisher:
W. and R. Chambers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
128 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Poverty
Miners
Mothers and sons
Race discrimination
Youth
Conduct of life
Baldwin -- 1886.
Genre:
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London.
Scotland -- Edinburgh.
Peru

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Translated from the German of Franz Hoffmann.
General Note:
Frontispiece and title page printed in colors.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in Special Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026812464 ( ALEPH )
ALH1957 ( NOTIS )
65335427 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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UO Oe aS EF SPL LT ERO EEE





* 2 SON NEP
peor ERS
STATIONERS 5
51, SOUTH ST





Ballers me Syne sal. JAAS
we ze a $s. Begs ‘ Of 4

0

PA in aed |.

fry pt Xe Si

Ly SPRE



PAUL ARNOLD;

AND

ANNIE AND JULIA.





M‘Farlane & Erskine, Edin®

PAUL ARNOLD ENTERS LIMA.

P23.





W. & R. CHAMBERS,
LONDON ano EDINBURGH.





PAUL ARNOLD.

CHAPTER I

In one of the smallest cottages, situated in the
poorest quarter of a small town in Germany,
lived, many years ago, a widow named Arnold,
with a family of five children. She was still
young, but care and grief had sharpened her
features, bleached her once dark and glossy
hair, and robbed her youthful figure of all its
grace and attractiveness. She was no longer
the happy and contented mother she had
formerly been; for although she loved her
children with the greatest tenderness, it was
they who formed the subject of her heaviest
care, and burdened her heart with the gloomiest
anticipations for their future welfare,

How changed her life had become! While
her husband was spared to her, she had known
nothing of poverty and distress. He had been



4° PAUL ARNOLD.

the manager of a mine, and his family lived in
the enjoyment of the greatest comfort, and
were complete strangers to want or sorrow.
But since his sudden and terrible death, every-
thing had been reversed. The support of the
house—the bread-winner of the family—had
been taken away, and the poor widow found
herself reduced from a position of comparative
luxury, to the deepest privation and misery.

When the unexpected blow came, Mrs Arnold
could scarcely bear up against it; and the terror
and grief which she experienced had been too
deep to be easily forgotten. The terrible picture
was always before her eyes of her husband
being brought home pale, covered with blood,
and scarcely breathing. An accident had over-
taken him while in the discharge of his duties ;
a support in the mine had given way, and
buried him beneath the ruins. When rescued,
he was in a dying state, and was carried three
days afterwards to his last resting-place in the
churchyard. All the earthly hopes of his weep-
ing family were buried in his grave, and his
widow stood alone in the world without a friend
or supporter.

When the first bitter and _heart-breaking
shock was over, the afflicted woman was enabled
to look up to heaven, and to cast her burden on
the Lord, and she experienced the help which
believing prayer never fails to bring. Friends
were raised up to supply the most pressing



PAUL ARNOLD. 5

wants of herself and her children. This help,
however, although so valuable and comforting
to the distressed family, did not last long;
there were very few rich people in the town,
and the stream of assistance which had flowed
so freely at first, began to dry up, and the
widow was at length reduced to a small pit-
tance, which barely covered her most pressing
necessities.

Mrs Arnold was a brave woman though, and
determined not to forget the duty she owed to
her family; so, leaving her comfortable dwell-
ing, she took a cottage at the outskirts of the
town, and having saved only the most necessary
articles of furniture, sold all the rest. It was
not without a pang that she parted with so
many things which reminded her of the happy
past, but she said to herself: “I can do without
comfort, but my children cannot do without
learning; everything for them, nothing for
myself, must be my motto.”

Thus saying, she went to her new home, and
worked with the greatest industry and perse-
verance day by day, and year by year. The
first beams of the sun aroused her to her daily
labour, and midnight frequently approached
before she lay down to rest; her food was of
the simplest kind, and she allowed herself no
recreation or amusement, in the earnest endea-
vour to live honestly, and provide her children
with all of which they stood in need.



6 PAUL ARNOLD.

Three years passed away in this manner, often
saddened with anxiety, and anon cheered with
hope, when another terrible event happened
which swept away all the resources of the
family. War broke out; the country was taken
possession of by foreign soldiers, who seized the
mine, and deprived the poor widow Arnold of
the small pension which she had received since
her husband’s death.

This was a hard blow and a heavy loss to the
unhappy woman, and was soon after followed
by another. Paul, her eldest son, who was now
a strong lad, fourteen or fifteen years old, came
home one day from the mine, where he had
been working for about a year, looking so pale
and downecast, that his mother no sooner
saw him than she sprang from her seat in
alarm.

“Paul, my boy,” she exclaimed, “what is
the matter? Has anything happened 2?”

“Nothing more, mother,” replied the youth,
“than that the half of the miners have been
dismissed to-day, and I among the rest. I shall
now be a burden to you again.”

The poor mother grew paler than her son,
the blood chilled in her veins, and with a sigh
of anguish she sank back upon a chair, and
would have swooned away had not her sorrow
found vent in a flood of tears.

“ God’s will be done,” said she faintly. “We
have fought hard against all our misfortunes,



PAUL ARNOLD. 7

but this last blow has taken away all my
strength ; I can struggle no longer.”

“But I can, mother,” exclaimed Paul, who
forgot his own sorrow and vexation at the sight
of his mother’s tears. ‘“ You have worked too
hard, and it is time now for you to rest, and
Ernest, Frederick, and I will work for you till
better times come.”

“But what can you do, Paul?” inquired his
mother in astonishment.

“We will work at anything, mother. Boys
are always wanted in the mine to break up the
ore, and we will go there to-morrow morning
and ask them to employ us.”

“What! Paul, will you become a pounding-
boy, after being a miner? It would be very
sad for you to turn to that after having had
such a good education.”

“Not so sad as to see you killing yourself
with toil and suffering,” replied Paul. “ Besides,
mother, you mustn’t lose courage; we shall not
always be so badly off, and the poorest employ-
ment is better than beggary or starvation.”

“But Ernest and Frederick haven’t left
school yet,” said the mother.

“That is very true,” answered the youth;
“but as you have no money to pay for their
schooling, they must leave now, and go back
again when times are better. They are quite
strong enough, and it will be far better for
them to work than to do nothing.”



8 : PAUL ARNOLD.

Mrs Arnold was obliged to submit ; but it was
a bitter humiliation to see her boys working
at such acommon employment after she had
striven so hard to prepare them for something
better. The disappointment was great, but she
tried to bear it with patience and cheerfulness,
and thus the load was rendered lighter than it
would otherwise have been. She was glad to
see that her sons soon became as much accus-
tomed to the new work as if they had been used
to it from their childhood, and the love which
they felt for her was sufficient to make them
endure any amount of toil which would lessen
the burden of their support ; but Paul, who had
grown very thoughtful, soon came to the con-
clusion that, however hard he and his two
brothers might work, they could earn very little
towards their own support. The great question,
however, was, what else could he do? He might
become a soldier; but he knew that little or
nothing would remain over from his pay for his
mother.

Paul was turning these thoughts over in his
mind one day, as he sat in front of a heap of
ore which it was his work to break up into
small pieces, when he heard some one exclaim:
“ Good-morning, Paul;” and looking up, he saw
an old miner with snow-white hair, who regarded
him with interest and sympathy.

“Good-morning, Father Lorenz,” he replied,
without ceasing to ply his hammer.



PAUL ARNOLD. 9

“JT am very sorry for you,” said the old man.
“When I think of your father, who was always
such a good friend and counsellor to us, and see
that nothing better can be done for his son
than to give him work which any boy of ten
years old can do, it makes me grieved and
angry.”

“But what else could Ido, Father Lorenz?”
replied the youth. “ You know that it wasn’t
my fault that I was turned away from the
mine, although”

“ Although you did your duty honestly ; yes,
that I know well, my boy,” said the old miner.
“ But you mustn’t think that I mean to blame
you. God forbid! I have known you too long
to do that. No, no, Paul, nothing of the kind;
but I think you might do something better
than this, after the schooling you ’ve had.”

Paul listened attentively. The old man
seemed to have something good to recommend.
“What do you think I ought to do, then,
Father Lorenz?” he inquired anxiously.

“Well, Paul, there is a good old proverb

- which says: ‘ Every man is the architect of his
own fortune.’ You are working very hard, but
I think you are not in the right place, or work-
ing at the right thing.”

“But what is that, Father Lorenz ?—what is
that ?”

“That you must know better than I do; but
you haven't thought of it yet, I suppose. When





10 PAUL ARNOLD.

I first saw you sitting here, and hammering
away, it was like a knife at my heart; for I
thought of your father, and wondered what he
would have said if he had seen you, and so I
began to think what I should do if I were in
your place, and it struck me”

“What was it, Father Lorenz?” eagerly
inquired Paul.

“Well, I thought that America was not so
very far away, and that clever miners were
always wanted; and if one is in good health,
with nothing to lose, why, it would be the best
thing in the world to go to a country where so
many people have got a comfortable living, if
they haven’t made their fortunes. That, thought
I, would be the very place for Paul Arnold to
go to. He has had a good schooling, is indus-
trious and honest, like his good father, and is
sure to get on if only he has a good chance.
So it seems to me, Paul, that you would succeed
far better if you were to go to Peru, where there
are rich silver mines, as I’ve been told, if you
only have courage to face the long journey.”

Paul sat lost in. thought, and no answer
came from his lips. The words of his good old
friend had made a deep impression on his
mind, and opened up quite a new field before
his eyes.

“T wouldn’t give you such advice,” continued
the old man after a pause, “if I had any hope
that you would be successful at home; but





PAUL ARNOLD. 11

there is very little likelihood of any improve-
ment taking place as long as the French are in
the country.”

“And my mother, Father Lorenz?—my
mother?”

“Well, I know it would be hard work for
you to part from her, and she will not like you
to leave her; but what use can you be to your
mother, Paul, if you remain here? You can
scarcely earn enough to keep yourself, while in
America you would make as much in a month
as you can here in a year.”

“That is very likely,” said Paul thoughtfully.
“ But at anyrate I couldn’t go away so soon as
you seem to think. The people there speak
Spanish, which I don’t understand.”

“Then learn it at once,” replied the old man
in a cheerful tone. “I think I know some one
who will help you with it; a man who has
worked in the Spanish quicksilver mines of
Almada. I mean Fred Burgmuller: you know
him as well as I do.”

“That is true, that is true,” exclaimed Paul,
his eyes sparkling with delight. “He can help
me, and I’m sure he will, if I ask him. But
then there will be another difficulty in my way
after that.”

“ Another difficulty ?” replied Lorenz. “Well,
it will be funny if we can’t get over it. What
is it?”

“The long journey—the expense,” answered



12 PAUL ARNOLD.

Paul with a sigh. “ How will it be possible to
raise so much money ?”

“Well, that is certainly a hard nut to crack ;
very hard,” said the old man, shaking his head.
“ But you should set to work and learn Spanish,
and some plan may turn up in the meantime
for getting the money. Could you not ask your
mother for some? she must have some saved up
—if she would”

“No, no, Father Lorenz,” replied the youth,
interrupting him; “I will not take a penny
from her! My poor mother needs every farthing
she has for my brothers and sisters. I would
rather beg my way to the sea-coast.”

“ Certainly,” said the miner; “I can’t blame
you, for the poor woman has quite trouble
enough on her shoulders. So we must try
some other plan. Hm—hm—now I have it,
Paul!”

“ Well, what is it?”

“The passage-money, my boy; or at least a
way of getting it.”

“Impossible, Father Lorenz,” said the youth
doubtfully.

“Impossible? Not at all! It seems to me
that it will be the very thing for you.”

“ But how is it to be done?” inquired Paul.

“Well, it just strikes me,” rejoined the old
man with a smile, “that I have got among the
lumber at home an old model of a mine, shew-
ing all the men at work, which used to belong





PAUL ARNOLD. 13

to my father. If it hasn’t been broken up, it
could easily be repaired. I will look after it as
soon as I get home.”

“But, Father Lorenz, what use would the
model be to me?” asked Paul with a dis-
appointed look.

“Don’t you understand, my boy? Well, I
thought you were sharp enough for that. That
model was a regular silver mine for my father.
He took it on his back, and went all over the
country with it, shewing it to everybody for a
trifle, and made a lot of money. Things were
just as bad then as they are now, you know.
There was no work to be had, and those who
didn’t wish to starve had to find some other
way of getting a living. So he set to work
and made this model, for he was very clever
at such things; and if you are not ashamed
to follow his example, I will make you a
present of it very readily, for it is of no use
to me.”

“ Father Lorenz,” exclaimed Paul, whose eyes
sparkled, while his heart beat for joy, “you are
my good angel! Yes, yes; I see it all clearly
now: I must do as you say; and if you will
really ”

“Certainly, I will,’ broke in the old man,
“or I wouldn’t have offered it. You and I can
look at the old thing, and patch it up together.
Yes, yes; it’s a capital idea, although I say it





14 PAUL ARNOLD.

myself. If you only go at it in good earnest,
you will make something of it.”

“Tt is a splendid idea,” said Paul in the
greatest delight. “That is just what I wanted.
As soon as winter is over, I will try and get off
to Peru to make my fortune. Rest assured,
Father Lorenz, that I shan’t be idle, for my
fortune will be the fortune of my poor mother
and her children; but don’t say a word to her
about it yet. She mustn’t know till everything
is ready, for she would only distress herself
before the time, and she has plenty to bear as
it is. Don’t you think, Father Lorenz, it will
be best to keep it a secret ?”

“Not a syllable shall escape my lips,” said
the old man. “And now, good-bye, Paul. I
will go home and hunt up the model.”

“ Accept my thanks, Father Lorenz, my
warmest thanks. You have made me happy,”
said Paul, his eyes filled with tears. “I don’t
know what reason there is to make you take so
much interest in me.”

“Well, Ill tell you, my boy,” replied the
old man as he gave Paul’s hand a hearty
squeeze. “You owe it to your good father,
who was always a kind and friendly man to the
miners, and helped a great many of us very
much while he lived. He sowed blessings, and
it is only natural that his children should reap
the benefit. That is one thing; and then,
without wishing to praise you, I must say that



PAUL ARNOLD. 15

I was glad to see that, although the son of the
overseer of the mine, you were not too proud to
take the poorest work, rather than be a burden
to your widowed mother. I have often thought
about you, and this is what has come of it.
Now, not another word about it; but come to
my house to-night, and we will see what can be
made of the old model. Good-bye; God bless
you!”





CHAPTERIL

Tue spark which the old miner had kindled in
the breast of Paul soon burst into a flame, and
urged the courageous youth to the greatest
exertions. Burgmuller, who was generally sur-
named the Spaniard, from having lived several
years in Spain, became Paul’s teacher with the
greatest readiness, and the lessons were com-
menced the next day. It was soon clear that
his knowledge of the language was not equal
to his willingness; but as he was thoroughly
acquainted with all the terms used by the
miners in their work, he proved of the greatest
use to his pupil.

Meanwhile the old model was not forgotten.
Old Lorenz had found it in the lumber-room in
a somewhat shattered condition; but as he and
Paul set themselves diligently to work to repair
it, it was as good as new in a few months;
and when spring returned with its birds and
blossoms, and all nature wore a gay and cheer-
ful appearance, nothing remained to prevent
Paul from starting on his travels, but the neces-
sity of breaking the news to his mother, which
distressed him so much, that he could hardly
make up his mind to the idea of parting with



PAUL ARNOLD. 17

her. But this difficulty was soon removed. His
mother had long noticed that he had something
on his mind, and when he returned wearied
from his work one evening, she took him by
the hand and led him out to the little garden,
that they might talk without being disturbed.

“ Paul,” said she, “there is something press-
ing on your mind. Have you so little confidence
in your mother, that you try to keep a secret
from her? Have I not always been a loving
and tender mother to you ?”

Paul looked at her with a smile of affection,
and his eyes filled with tears. “It is just
because of that,’ he replied. “It is because
you love me so much, that I wished to sparé
you pain; but now that you have asked the
question, I will tell you everything.”

Encouraged by her loving words and glances,
’ Paul told his mother the whole story of his con-
versation with old Lorenz, and the consequences
which had followed it. More surprised than
grieved, she listened to his account of his plans,
and when he had finished, a beam of joy lit
up her eyes.

“And so you have made up your mind to
leave me, Paul?” she inquired.

“Yes, mother; that is, if you have no objec-
tion, for I will never be a disobedient son.”

“No; I am sure you never will,” said the
widow as she pressed the hand of her brave boy.

“O Paul, I shall be sad when you are far away,
B



18 PAUL ARNOLD.

when I can only think of you and pray for you ;
but it will at anyrate be better than to see you
in such a position as you have here, without any
hope or prospect. Go, my boy! You have
a long and perilous journey before you; but it
seems to be God’s will, and He will protect and
bless you.”

A silent but loving embrace followed this
conversation. Paul felt glad that his mother
approved of his plans, and she was comforted
in the thought that her son was about to leave
a place in which there was no scope for his
energies, for a country where he was pretty sure
‘of obtaining a good situation, and making his
way in the world. And then, the parting,
though a sorrowful one, would not be for ever.
She might look forward to the pleasure of seeing
him come back again older and wiser. He was
honest and good, an industrious workman, and
a devoted son; and she looked across the gulf
of years that would separate them, and in
imagination saw him come back again to
gladden her motherly heart.

It was on a bright spring morning that Paul
bade farewell to his mother, brothers and
sisters, and home. The model had received
the valuable addition of a hand-organ; and
with it strapped on his back, and a stout stick
in his hand, he started forth on the first journey
of his life. It was some time before he got over
the grief which his parting had caused. But



PAUL ARNOLD, 19

his heart was young and full of hope, and the
prospect of success in his enterprise soon dis-
pelled the dark clouds from his brow. The
weather was lovely, the sky cloudless, and all
nature seemed clothed in her gayest attire; the
music of the birds and the rustling of the breeze
through the woods cheered him on, and every-
thing seemed to smile upon him, and to promise
that his object would be fully accomplished.

“Courage!” he said to himself—“ courage!
He that chooses the right course and honestly
follows it, may often be disappointed, but he
is sure, sooner or later, to reach the goal of
his wishes. I have not been rash or reckless,
and my mother has given me her sanction and
her blessing, so there must be no more fear or
trembling. ‘Every man is the architect of his
own fortune,’ as old Lorenz said; it will not be
my fault if I fail.”

Having banished his desponding fears, he
pursued his way with greater energy and a
lighter heart, and soon reached a small town,
where he exhibited the model for the first time,
and succeeded beyond all his expectations. His
fine open countenance, and his modest and
unassuming ways, opened nearly every door, and
won for him expressions of friendship and good-
will. Of course, there were some people who
treated him roughly, and drove him away; but
he found that by far the greater number were
kind and good-natured, and their kindness



20 PAUL ARNOLD.

soothed all feelings of anger, and made him
forget the rebuffs which he met with. When
he left the place he found his pockets were
well filled ;-and he went on with a light heart
from town to town, and from village to village,
learning the value of his model more and more the
longer he carried it. It proved, in fact, a silver
mine to him as it had been to its former pos-
sessor ; and when he reached the port of Bremen,
after travelling about for three months, he was
delighted to find that he had accumulated the
large sum of two hundred dollars. The money
looked very tempting when he had spread it
out before him; he had never had so much
before, and he was glad that at last he was able
to help his poor mother in her distress; so, like
a good and dutiful son, he sent half the sum
home, and kept the rest to pay for his passage
when he should find a ship bound for Peru.

It was not long before he met with a suitable
vessel; and having succeeded, by bargaining
with the captain, in getting a berth at a very
cheap rate, he waited, under the influence of
contending emotions of hope and fear, for the
day which should separate him for many years,
and perhaps for ever, from his native land and
his childhood’s home. Commending himself
and his mother, with her family, to the care of
God, he went on board the ship; and when he
went on deck on the following morning, the land
was almost entirely out of sight,









CHAPTER IIL

THE sun poured down its burning rays from a
cloudless sky upon a young man of pleasant
appearance, whose somewhat sun-burned face;
fair hair, and blue eyes clearly betokened his
northern origin, who might have been seen pur-
suing the road leading from the port of Callao
to Lima, the capital of Peru. He carried a large
box, made of polished wood, on his back, and a
stout walking-stick, more for use than orna-
ment, in his right hand. His dress was simple,
and suited to the hot climate of that tropical
country. A light broad-brimmed sombrero
shaded his face from the sun, and a striped
nankeen jacket and trousers, with shoes of white
leather, completed his costume. Although he
seemed young and strong, the great heat ap-
peared to be almost too much for him, for he
often stood still to wipe the perspiration from
his face ; and at last, after putting the box which
he carried carefully on the ground, he threw him-
self down under the spreading branches of some
mulberry trees, whose shade was too inviting to
be resisted.



22 PAUL ARNOLD.

In the broad valley which lay before him,
bounded in the distance by the mighty chain of
the Cordilleras, lay Ciudad de los Reyes, the
City of the Kings, as it was named by Pizarro,
its founder, divided into two unequal parts by
the river Rimac. The environs presented a
most charming appearance. Verdure and luxu-
riance abounded on every hand. Large fields of
maize and cotton, extensive plantations of olive,
fig, and pomegranate trees, besides plantains
and vines, bore testimony to the fertility of the
soil, and gladdened the eyes of the wanderer,
who for so many months had been obliged to
content himself with a prospect which was vast
indeed, but of which he had long been weary.
It seemed delightful to him to exchange the
monotony of the sea for such a splendid sight;
and as he lay on the grassy bank, and enjoyed
the scene spread out before him, the sound of
bells struck upon his ear, and increased his
delight. It was a holiday, and from the lofty
towers and spires which rose above the flat roofs
of the city, the bells called the people forth to
worship in the fifty-seven churches and the
numerous cloisters of Lima.

After some time the young man found vent
for his feelings in words. “Here I am at last,”
said he to himself, “thousands of miles from
home, solitary and alone, without friends or any
one to help me, and in a foreign land; but full
of hope, and confidence, and trust in Thee, O



PAUL ARNOLD. 23

God, who hast watched over me hitherto! Be
comforted, my good mother! Whatever diffi-
culties may be before me shall be met with a
stout heart and a steadfast determination to
overcome them all.—I wonder whether they are
thinking of me at home now,” he continued,
while a smile played around his lips. “My
mother will at least never forget me. I feel
her presence always with me; her wishes and
prayers have followed me hither, and God has
answered them all) And my brothers and
sisters, and my good old friend Lorenz, and
Fred Burgmuller! None of them will forget
me, and therefore I have no reason to fear that
my enterprise will fail.”

The youth lay for some time longer indulging
in these musings, until the sun had passed the
meridian and begun to sink slowly towards the
west ; then springing up, he plucked some fruit
from the branches over his head, strapped his
box across his shoulders, and after a short and
cheerful walk entered the city.

From the glittering spires and domes which
had gladdened his eyes when he first came in
sight of the town, he expected to find broad
streets, and lofty and splendid houses, but in
this he was greatly disappointed. Narrow, dirty
lanes, with small and ruinous buildings which
were more like huts than houses, were the first
to meet his eye; and it was not until he had
reached the centre of the town that he found



24 PAUL ARNOLD.

the streets grow broader, and the houses assume
a more stately appearance, although there were
very few that were more than one story high.
Paul Arnold, however (for our young readers
need scarcely to be told that the wanderer was
no other than he), paid far less attention to the
streets and buildings of the town, than to the
people who surrounded him on every side. He
had never before seen such a mixture of colours
and costumes, although the vessel had stopped
for a few days at Rio Janeiro and Valparaiso.
There was every shade and variety of colour,
from the white creole to the ebony-skinned
negro. But in the market-place he found the
most. varied assemblage of people and the
greatest bustle. The pale-faced creoles were
the most prominent in the crowd, and seemed
to regard all others around them with contempt.
They were of tall and slender figure, with sharp,
well-defined features, dark hair, and sparkling
and scornful eyes. Negroes, Indians, mulattoes,
and half-breeds wandered up and down, laughing
and talking, and in some cases wearing dark and
gloomy countenances. It was quite evident that
all hard work was over for the day with most of
the motley group, and that they had gathered
in the open square to enjoy the cool evening
breeze which swept down from the snow-covered
peaks of the Cordilleras. Some were seated
carelessly on the ground playing at cards, while
others lingered near the refreshment bootlis,



PAUL ARNOLD. 25

and enjoyed the various articles offered for sale,
consisting of lemonade, ice-cream, and other
cooling delicacies.

Paul was both hungry and thirsty, but he did
not venture to mix with the people who were
sitting at the tables partaking of the refreshing
drinks that were provided for them. The
company seemed likely to look with some sur-
prise and perhaps contempt at him, and being
unwilling to expose himself to any annoyance,
he left the market-place and turned down a
narrow street, in the hope of finding some quiet
and modest house in which he could obtain
the rest and food of which he felt himself in
need.

Paul soon found himself in front of a house
which promised to supply his wants. It was
called, in the language of the country, a pican-
teria, and was overflowing with a noisy crowd
of guests, who seemed to be luxuriating upon
cancha, a kind of roasted Indian corn; picante,
a strongly peppered mixture of mashed potatoes
and meat; and chicha, a kind of beer. Having
nothing to fear from the appearance of this
company, Paul walked in boldly, deposited his
box on a seat in the corner, and sat down
beside it to wait until some one came to attend
to him. His patience was not put to a severe
trial; he had not been seated long before an
ugly old mulatto woman hastened towards him,
and without asking what he wanted, brought



26 PAUL ARNOLD.

a goodly quantity of roasted ears of Indian
corn in a hollow pumpkin, a plate of picante,
and a large glass of chicha, and set them
before him. After paying the small sum asked
for these dainties, Paul proceeded to quench his
thirst from the glass of chicha; but scarcely
had the glass touched his lips, and he had taken
a mouthful of the tempting liquid, than he
put it down on the table again with a shudder,
and pushed it as far away from him as he
could.

“Don’t you like chicha, my friend?” asked a
ragged mulatto who sat in front of him, and
seemed amused at the expression of horror and
fright with which he regarded the drink.

“No; it’s most. abominable stuff!” answered
Paul. “Detestably sharp and bitter! I shall
take good care never to try it again. What is
it?”

“Tt’s made from Indian corn,” replied the
mulatto. “If you don’t like it, you can give it
to me.”

“With all my heart, if you will only get me a
glass of water instead.”

The mulatto jumped up, ran off, and soon
returned with a large glass of water. Then
seizing the glass of chicha, he emptied it
with such delight, that Paul was completely
astonished at anybody having any liking for-
such a nauseous composition.

Paul’s hunger now began to make itself felt,



PAUL ARNOLD. 27

and he set the plate of picante before him,
which sharpened his appetite by its savoury
smell. It struck him that his coloured friend
had a peculiar grin on his face; not suspecting
anything wrong, however, he began to eat, but
suddenly threw down his fork, coughed terribly,
and almost shrieked aloud. As may be imagined,
the mulatto broke out in loud laughter again,
and went nearly into convulsions with merriment.

“JT thought so, I thought so,” he said at last,
as soon as his boisterous fun permitted him to
take breath. “My friend is a stranger, and the
picante is a little too sharp for him. Don’t
you like it, senor?”

“Like it!” exclaimed Paul in a rage; “I
should think not indeed! That is not food, but
burning coals to scorch one’s mouth and tongue.
How can people eat such things?”

“T’ll eat it in a moment, if you will allow
me,” replied the obliging mulatto with the
greatest readiness, while his eyes sparkled with
greed.

“Take it, then ; I don’t envy you your taste.”

“Oh, you will soon learn to like it, senor,”
said the man confidently, hastily demolishing
the hot and savoury dish, and rolling his eyes
wildly as a proof of his satisfaction. “This is
splendid, senor; and when you’ve been here a
couple of weeks you will not be so ready to give
away your chicha and picante.”

Paul did not seem thoroughly satisfied with



28 PAUL ARNOLD.

this assurance, for he shook his head, and looked
with very little pleasure at the Indian corn,
which was the only portion of his meal remaining.
He succeeded, however, in eating one or two
ears, which, although not very tasty, stilled the
pangs of hunger without taking the skin off his
lips and tongue; and then quietly surveyed the
scene around him. The company presented a
more diversified spectacle even than that which
he had seen in the market-place. Round the
small tables sat people of all colours and of all
grades of society. Here a couple of serious-
looking Spaniards, whose fair complexions and
proud demeanour betokened ancient lineage ;
there some monks with brown cowls; to the
right, a black African negro, surrounded by
mulattoes and half-breeds; to the left, groups
of soldiers, merchants, workmen, and muleteers
—men and women, white and black, yellow and
brown, wearing the strangest dresses, and all
eating picante, and drinking large glasses of
the detestable chicha, with a relish which
again called up Paul’s astonishment.

After he had indulged himself in this survey
for about half an hour, the door opened, and a
tall figure entered, whose graceful and athletic
form instantly attracted Paul’s attention. The
new-comer was a young man; long dark hair fell
thickly on his broad shoulders ; he was copper-
coloured, and his countenance wore an uncom-
monly gloomy and reserved expression. His



PAUL ARNOLD. 29

dress was limited to a dark sack-like shirt
without sleeves, confined round his waist by a
girdle. He carried a heavy bundle on his back,
which he took off on entering, and put under a
seat, upon which he sat down without paying
any attention to the people sitting at the table.

“What sort of a man is that?” inquired Paul
of the mulatto who had helped him with his
dinner, and was still sitting near him. “Isn’t
he an Indian ?”

“Yes, senor,” he replied with a glance of
contempt. ‘An Indio brato—an Indian beast
from the mountains, who trades in salves and
plasters, seeds, roots, and the bark of trees
which he has collected in the woods. He is an
impudent fellow, and will soon be kicked out of
the house !”

“TImpudent! How so?” asked Paul. “He
seems to sit there very quietly, and annoys
nobody with his presence.”

“Tt is easy to see that you’re a stranger in
this country, senor,’ responded the mulatto.
“Don’t you see that he has taken his seat at a
table where there are only whites and creoles
sitting? I wouldn’t venture to do such a thing,
although I have got only a few drops of black
blood in my veins; but these stupid Indians
are impudent enough Aha! there we are
—now he’ll catch it! I thought he wouldn’t be
allowed to sit there long!”

Paul’s curiosity was excited to the highest







30 PAUL ARNOLD,

pitch, and at the same time mingled with a
feeling of alarm for the poor Indian, as he saw
a gigantic fellow, whose dark colour shewed him to
be an African negro, go up to the Indian, whom
he seized and shook violently by the shoulder.

“Indio brato!” he cried, “how dare you be
so forward as to sit down here, when even I,
Hercules, wouldn’t do so?”

A deep silence followed these words, and the
eyes of all the guests were turned towards the
Indian and negro, who, as it seemed to Paul,
had commenced the quarrel without the least
provocation. The Indian raised his head, cast
a look of scorn and contempt at the negro, and
with a rapid movement released himself from
his grasp.

“Go!” said he with a commanding voice and
flashing eye. “ Hualpa has nothing to do with
negroes.”

“ Hualpa, Hualpa!” repeated the negro with
scornful mockery and laughter. “He call him-
self Hualpa, the son of a dog! Away with
Hualpa! Away with you, or you’ll be sent:
spinning !”

The Indian shrugged his shoulders in con-
tempt, and turned his back proudly on the
black man. “Go!” he repeated with the same
tone of authority. “Hualpa is a son of the
woods, and despises the common slaves.”

“Son of the woods, Hualpa!” growled the



PAUL ARNOLD. 31

negro, seizing the Indian again with both hands.
“Out with the Indio brato! Out with him!”

Twenty voices joined in the cry, and threaten-
ing glances were directed from all sides against
the son of the woods, as Hualpahad called himself.
It seemed certain that a violent scene would take
place if the Indian did not go away quietly,
for the hatred between the two races that had
existed in the New World for hundreds of years
was stimulated by the fumes of the chicha, which
had been plentifully drunk by nearly the whole
company. Paul trembled more than ever for
the Indian, who, notwithstanding the tumult
that was rising against him, preserved, out-
wardly at least, the greatest calmness and
indifference. +

When the enraged negro seized him a second
time, he turned round, and Paul saw by the fire
of his eye and the trembling of his nostrils that
his anger was rapidly reaching the boiling-point.

“ Back!” said he in a firm and quiet tone.
“Don’t touch me a third time, nigger, or you
will be sorry for it. I don’t wish to quarrel
with you, so leave me in peace.”

The negro would probably have been cowed
by the threatening countenance of the Indian,
if the cries of the people around had not urged
him to renew his attack.

“Sambo laugh at Indio!” he exclaimed, and
seized Hualpa again,

The patience of the Indian was at last ex-



32 PAUL ARNOLD.

hausted, and a furious outburst of rage shewed
the anger which he had tried to suppress. With
a loud yell he seized his assailant by the body,
lifted him from the ground, and after swinging
him two or three times to and fro, dashed him
suddenly with.such violence against the_wall,
that he fell senseless to the ground, knocking
“down a table and seat which was full of eager
spectators. A cloud of: dust arose, and the
deepest silence reigned for a minute or two, as
if every one had been stunned by the proof
which the Indian had given of his extraordinary
strength,

But it was only the calm which precedes the
hurricane. All at once a wild uproar broke
out.

“The Indio brato has killed the, negro!”
cried a voice. “ Knock him down!”

“Down with him! Murder him!” cried ten
other voices.

Several glasses of chicha were thrown at the
Indian, and the next instant Paul saw him sur-
rounded by a furious mob of half-drunken men,
who attacked him with the greatest violence.

“ Haye mercy upon the unhappy man; he is
innocent,” cried Paul; but no one paid the least
attention to him. :

Hualpa dashed two or three of his assailants
to the ground; but six or seven others flew at °
him, roaring and howling like wild beasts;



PAUL ARNOLD. 33

daggers were brandished in the air, and it
seemed certain that in spite of his coolness and
strength the Indian would soon fall a victim to
the overpowering number of his enemies.

Suddenly Paul bethought himself of the
“organ attached to his model, and a gleam of
happiness ‘darted like lightning through his
soul. To open his case, set the organ on the
table, and commence playing it, was the work
of a few seconds. The loud and musical tones
soon resounded above the uproar, and exercised
an almost magical influence on the angry multi-
tude. The enraged mulattoes and negroes
ceased their assaults on the Indian; the knives
and daggers disappeared ;, the general tumult
suddenly gave way to astonishment and sur-
prise; the eyes that had just flashed with
passion now sparkled with delight; and all at
once Paul saw himself surrounded by smiling
.faces, with eyes and mouths wide open; while
the Indian, still panting from the exertions he
had made, stood as deserted as if his existence.
had been entirely forgotten. He cast a wild
glance around, then, seizing his bundle, slipped
quietly out of the room, without being noticed
or followed by any one.

With.quiet satisfaction Paul saw him depart,
and continued to play his organ, in order to fix
the attention of the listening crowd for a little
while, until a sufficient time had elapsed for the
Indian to make good his escape; he then

Cc



4 PAUL ARNOLD.

brought the performance to a close, and allowed
the wonder-working strains to cease.

Those who know the effect which music of
any kind, however discordant, has upon the
African race, will not be surprised that the
murmuring notes of the organ should have put
a sudden stop to the uproar and fighting, nor
that the moment Paul left off playing, instead
of thinking of the Indian again, they should
all have been filled with the desire to hear the
splendid music once more. When Paul ceased, a
-” strange scene instantly followed. The coloured
people pressed around him, fell at his feet, and
begged in the most earnest tones that he would
commence again.

“QO senor, once more! Only a very little! .
Oh, your grace, let us have the magic again!
Your grace, great magician! Nigger will
dance, jump, and be jolly. Beat nigger, kick
nigger, abuse nigger—only a little more music.
We all slaves when senor give more music!”

Such were the cries and appeals, mingled
with clapping of hands and screams of delight,
which came to Paul from all sides. Those. .
nearest to him kissed his hands, his clothes, - -
and even his feet, throwing themselves on the



ground ; while tears stood in the eyes of others;"~,

and Hercules, who had only a few moments
before been mad with rage, shewed himself the
humblest and most cringing of beggars. The .
noise and confusion soon became so great that’



PAUL ARNOLD. 85

Paul began to be concerned on account of the
excited condition into which the passionate and
hot-blooded children of Africa had been thrown
by his simple performance.

“Very well, then,” he cried at last, in order
to free himself from the crowd that surrounded
him, like flies around a sugar-cask; “ one tune
more, but then it will be all over for this
evening.”

A universal shout of delight and satisfaction
followed these words; and when the music
commenced again, the black, brown, and yellow ..
faces could scarcely restrain themselves “from
expressing the transports they felt. They
embraced and caressed each other, leaped over
_ the tables and seats, and at last joined in a
general dance, which raised so much dust that
the room became almost insupportable. Paul
seized this moment to slip away; and having
gradually approached the door, organ in
hand, suddenly disappeared before the excited
dancers observed that he had changed his
position.

Paul had reached a distance of about a

-- hundred paces from the saloon, when a dark

figure suddenly appeared before him with out-
-- stretched arm, which so astonished him that
he started back in fright.

“O senor, don’t be frightened,” said a pleasant
‘voice with a soft expression. ‘“ You know me;
_*T am Hualpa.”

.



36 PAUL ARNOLD.

“Hualpa! Are you here still?” replied
Paul, stretching out his hand without any
further alarm to the young Indian, who seized
and pressed it to his breast, in token of respect.
“What are you doing here, Hualpa? Why
don’t you make your escape? Your enemies
may find you out, and their rage and anger are
perhaps not yet cooled down.”

“Hualpa fears no enemies, and least of all
the miserable blacks!” answered he proudly.
“T waited here to thank you, for you have
saved my life, senor.”

“You have to thank your own bravery rather
than my assistance,” replied Paul.

“The jaguar is brave, but he must yield to
the hounds when they come in great numbers,”
was the Indian’s answer. ‘ Enough, senor ;
. Hualpa is your friend; you can reckon on him
in danger. The son’of the woods never forgets
the person who has done him a service.”

“Well, then, Hualpa, if you really think you
owe me any gratitude,” replied Paul, smiling,
“T will lay claim to your friendship this very
moment.”

“Command me, senor,” said the Indian, his
eyes sparkling like those of a panther in the
darkness, from joy at being able to shew grati-:
tude to his deliverer. ‘“Hualpa is ready.
Demand his life, senor; it is yours.”

“No, my friend, it is not a matter of life and
death,” replied Paul, laughing; “I only want



PAUL ARNOLD. 37

quarters for the night. I am a stranger in
Lima, and have only arrived to-day. If you
can shew me an inn where I can sleep com-
fortably, I shall be as thankful to you as you
are to me.”

“Be good enough to follow me, senor,” said
the Indian, stepping out with a light and rapid
stride.

After a few minutes they reached a ¢amdo, or
inn, where Paul got a pleasant room. When
he was comfortably settled, the Indian bade
him farewell, and expressed the hope of seeing
him again sooner or later. Paul then threw
himself on his mattress; and, tolerably pleased
with the events of his first day in Lima, soon
fell into that sound sleep which can only be
thoroughly enjoyed by those who have a good
conscience and a sound mind.





CHAPTER ILIV.

Paut had at first the intention of staying only
a short time in Lima, and then pushing on to
Cerro de Pasco, where he hoped to find a
situation of some kind in the extensive silver
mines there. But the adventure in the pican-
teria altered his plans. A hand-organ was a
new and strange thing in Lima, and its harsh
and piercing tone, although not likely to please
a refined ear, found the greatest favour among
the coloured population of the capital of Peru.
Paul and his organ became celebrated in a few
days, and crowds stared with astonishment at
the box from which came the melodies that
charmed them so much. Not only the negroes,
mulattoes, and other people of colour, pure and
mixed, but even the Spaniards and Creoles,
seemed greatly taken with the novel and
unheard-of instrument. In a few days Paul
was invited to play at the houses of some of the
best families in the town; and when he opened
the case containing the model in a large party



PAUL ARNOLD, 389

composed of the richest inhabitants of Lima,
and shewed them the numerous figures engaged
at work, his fame reached its highest point.

The model was exceedingly neat, and well
worthy of the inspection it received. When
Paul turned the handle of the organ, all the
figures were set in motion. Some hammered
‘away at the rocks, others worked with pick-
axes, while others drew little wagons to and fro
filled with the ore which had been dug out.
Some were working down at the bottom of the
mine, others went up and down ladders leading
from one ledge of rock to another; in a word,
the whole work of a mine was shewn at one
view to the astonished beholders, and the
greatest delight was felt by them all.

When Paul began to grow weary of turning
the handle of the organ, a shower of small
silver coins rained down upon him from the
liberal hands of the company ; and he received
so many pressing invitations, that it was
impossible for him to think of leaving Lima for
several days. He therefore prolonged his stay,
and found the exhibition a very prosperous
experiment ; indeed, the success which he
enjoyed would have satisfied even those who
were greedy of gain.

“TI must strike while the iron is hot,” said
he to himself, as he returned with well-filled
pockets to his little inn. “ How my good friend
Lorenz would rejoice if he only knew how I am



40 PAUL ARNOLD.

getting on! He shall know it some day, though,
and I will prove to him that good fortune has
made me neither proud nor ungrateful.”

Paul hammered away at the iron as long as
it remained hot, and reaped such a rich harvest,
that he was at last in some difficulty as to how
to guard the money he had acquired. It would
not do to take it to Pasco, and he did not like
to intrust it to any stranger in Lima. But as
the landlord of the house in which he was
lodging seemed to be an honest and well-
disposed man, he determined to ask his advice.

“What you have to do, senor,” replied the
man, without much reflection, “is very easy
and simple. Go to some respectable merchant
and buy a bill of exchange upon Germany or
England, and then send it home, or change it
into money again when you arrive at Pasco.”

“Thanks, senor; your advice is good, and
shall be followed on the spot,’ replied Paul,
who lost no time in going to a rich English
banker, who had been spoken of as very honest
and friendly. Mr Wilson received him kindly,
and soon settled the business, by giving Paul
notes which he could change for gold at any
moment either in England, Germany, or Peru;
and when he expressed the wish to send some
money to his mother, Mr Wilson undertook that
it should be given into her own hands through
a business friend in Germany.

“And now, my young friend,” he added, “I



PAUL ARNOLD. 4]

should like to have a few words with you. You
are a miner, are you not?”

Paul answered in the affirmative.

“ Are you willing to make use of your know-
ledge here, or have you left your fatherland
with some other object in view ?”

In reply to this question, Paul related in a
brief and modest way the circumstances which
had led him to visit Lima, and delayed him
longer in the town than he had intended.

“But what are your intentions and plans
now ?”

“Now that you have been good enough to
send my money home for me, I shall try my
luck as a miner,” replied Paul. “TI see that
my organ has begun to lose the charm of
novelty, and I must try some other way of
getting a living.”

“Well, I shall perhaps be able to help you.
I am very much pleased with your appearance
and your frugality, and especially to find that
you have not forgotten your widowed mother,
but have sent her something as a token of your
love, instead of wasting your money in folly, as
hundreds would have done were they in your
place. I have got a silver mine at Cerro de
Pasco, and although there is no scarcity of
workmen, a conscientious, diligent, and intelli-
gent young man would be of some service. I
know the extent neither of your knowledge nor
your diligence; but I feel convinced of your



42 PAUL ARNOLD.

integrity and good character, and if you will
enter my service you shall be welcome.”

Paul’s face beamed with joy.- “I am quite
at your disposal,” said he. “When shall I
leave for Pasco, and to whom shall I apply
there?”

“You can leave as soon as you like, and I
will give you a letter to my manager, Don Jose
Ugarto. When will you be ready to start ?”

“To-day —to-morrow—or the day after;
whenever it will be most convenient for you.”

“Very well. We will say to-morrow morn-
ing, then. You will find a mule and the letter
to Don Ugarto waiting for you. But you
haven’t inquired what salary you are to
receive ?”

“No,” answered Paul; “I trust entirely to
your opinion of the value of my services; and
as it will be impossible at the outset to find out
what I can do, I think it would be well to wait
a little.”

“You are quite right. I will see that you
are comfortably provided for in the meantime,
and then we can make some other arrangement
afterwards. I shall expect you at ten to-morrow
morning. Good-day.”

As the appointed hour struck, Paul found
himself once more at Mr Wilson’s house, which
he left an hour later, mounted on a good mule,
and carrying the letter to Don Ugarto in his
pocket, hoping it would open the way for his



PAUL ARNOLD. 43

future fortune. He proceeded at a sharp and
merry trot, for he was neither burdened with a
load nor oppressed with anxiety. He had left
his model and organ at the house of Mr Wilson,
as it would have been almost impossible to
carry it over a pass of the Cordilleras sixteen
thousand feet high; besides which, it was now
of no further use to him; he had other pros-
pects before him, and had determined to follow
out the new career so wonderfully opened with
all the abilities he possessed.

It was a difficult and rather dangerous road
which Paul had to traverse. At the commence-
ment of the journey the path lay through a flat
country, and everything went easily. Following
the course of the Rimac, he found numerous
farms, in which he was hospitably received, and
greatly enjoyed the abundance and variety of
the meals provided for him. But when the
road grew steep, and the lofty ridge of the
Cordilleras had to be crossed, the scene was
altered. He had to force his way along the
most break-neck roads, and the prospect be-
came wilder and wilder, notwithstanding its
magnificence. The farms disappeared, and
for many weary miles there was no human
dwelling visible except the wretched Indian
huts, whose miserable occupants had scarcely
a friendly look, and still less a hospitable
reception to give him. He pressed on, however,
without any fear, mounting higher and higher,



44, PAUL ARNOLD.

till he reached the elevation at which all
vegetation ceased, and only the naked rocks
were visible.

At last, as the short twilight was deepen-
ing into night, Paul arrived at the last ascent,
called by the natives the Piedra Parada, which
rose dark and threatening before him, covered
with huge and shapeless blocks of stone. He
encouraged his tired and almost breathless
animal to make one last effort, and succeeded
in gaining the summit of the pass, which com-
manded a splendid view, and banished from his
mind all the fatigues and perils he had under-
gone. Towards the west, he saw the small
valleys gradually melting into the sandy coast-
line of Peru, washed by the Pacific Ocean. To
the north and south, the mighty and precipitous
Cordilleras extended as far as the eye could
reach, the peaks of which were covered with
perpetual snow. Turning eastward, his eye first
swept over the immeasurable grassy plains of
the table-land and the fertile valleys of the
Sierra, till the lofty chain of the Andes ter-
minated the prospect.

He stood for a long time absorbed in the
beauty of this magnificent panorama, till dark-
ness began to settle on the landscape, and the
sharp east wind reminded him of the necessity
of seeking shelter for the night. Refreshed by
the short rest, the mule jogged on till they
reached a little Indian hut, which, although



PAUL ARNOLD. 45

destitute of every comfort, afforded protection
from the raw night-wind.

After descending the terraced slope of the
eastern side of the Cordilleras for a distance of
between two and three thousand feet, the
traveller reaches an extensive and undulating
table-land, stretching away as far as Pasco,
called the Puna of Peru, the climate of which
is aS severe and unpleasant as that of the
highest mountain regions. This Puna, Paul
was now obliged to cross before he could reach
the end of his journey.

Morning was breaking, and the rising sun
began to redden the snow-covered peaks of the
mountains around, as he left the hut of the poor
shepherd where he had passed the night. He
raised the cow-skin at the opening of the
wretched dwelling, and stepped out to look
after his mule, which he found trembling with
cold. In spite of the advice of his host to stay
with him until some other travellers should pass
with whom he could travel in company, Paul
mounted his animal, and pressed forward on his
way.

“ Beware of the veta and the surumpe!” cried
the shepherd after him. But Paul paid very
little regard to the warning, and hastened on.

A thick and heavy fog lay over the entire
landscape, and, mingling with the snow which
had fallen during the night, gave the scene a
melancholy and monotonous whiteness. He



46 PAUL ARNOLD.

pressed along over wretched roads until the
sun gained power enough to pierce through
the gloom and melt the snow. Cheered and
warmed by the increasing light and heat,
which gave new life to his half-frozen limbs,
Paul pursued his weary journey with renewed
interest and pleasure. On either side, the icy
peaks of the Cordilleras reared their lofty heads
fourteen thousand feet above the level of the
sea; behind him lay the darkening valleys of
the lower hill-country, dotted here and there
with scarcely perceptible Indian villages, while
before him stretched the bare and cheerless
plateau, only varied occasionally by low ridges
of rock and steep precipices.

Paul rode farther and farther, and the Puna
began by degrees to grow more lively and
animated; the monotony of the region dis-
appeared ; herds of vicunas approached him, as
though urged by curiosity; in the distance,
large flocks of huanacos were seen; the wild
deer roamed about the rocky precipices uttering
a loud piping cry; the strangely horned Puna
stag came slowly from its cave, and looked with
astonishment at the solitary rider, about whose
path the frisky mountain hares gambolled
innocently, and nibbled the herbage which
sparingly covered the rocks.

When the sun had passed its mid-day height,
and began to descend westward, Paul’s mule
shewed symptoms of weariness, and he dis-



PAUL ARNOLD, 47

mounted in order to give the poor creature a
little ease, and to stretch his own limbs, which
began to grow stiff and cramped after being so
many hours in the saddle. He walked on
rapidly up a steep ascent, but in a very few
minutes felt himself obliged to stand still and
take breath. It seemed, however, almost im-
possible for him to breathe, and he was alarmed
to discover that the thinness of the atmosphere
at such a height was beginning to have an
injurious effect upon him. He had never
experienced such a strange sensation before;
he tried to walk on, but his limbs refused their
office, and an indescribable terror overpowered
him. He ‘could hear his heart beating against
his ribs; his breathing became short and
irregular; a tremendous load seemed to be
lying on his chest; his lips turned blue, then
swelled and burst ; blood started from his eye-
lids, and his senses seemed to be forsaking him.’
He could neither see, hear, nor feel anything ;
a dark gray fog seemed to swim before his eyes,
his head grew dizzy, and he was compelled at
last to lie down trembling on the ground.

“This must be the veta,” thought he, “of
which the shepherd warned me, and which has
proved fatal to so many travellers in this
desolate region. O God, haye mercy upon
me and my poor mother, who has no other
support !”

The thought of his mother and of his home



48 PAUL ARNOLD.

far away, seemed to inspire him with new
strength. After a few minutes, he roused him-
self, and, rising from the ground, managed with
some difficulty to remount his mule. It was
high time. Black and stormy clouds began to
shew themselves on the horizon, and the flashes
of lightning, and the roar of distant but ever
approaching thunder, threatened a terrible hur-
ricane. Fortunately, however, the storm was
attracted by the metallic masses of the Cordil-
leras, and the lonely traveller experienced only
a faint idea of what it might otherwise have
been. But it was followed by a driving snow-
storm, which covered the whole landscape in a
short time to the height of a foot, and by
destroying all traces of the road, made his
position every moment more and more dangerous.

The mule plodded slowly on, picking out its
own path, until it sunk at last in a morass, from
which it was unable to extricate itself. Paul
dismounted very cautiously, and after a great
deal of trouble succeeded, with the aid of the
dagger which he had with him, in freeing the
animal, and getting it once more on to solid
ground. He rode to and fro for some time
seeking the road, which he had great difficulty
in finding, although it was marked out here and
there with terrible plainness by the skulls and
bones of numerous animals which had sunk down
and perished under their burdens.

After the snow had ceased, the clouds suddenly



PAUL ARNOLD. 49

parted, and the tropical sun shone down with
such dazzling brilliancy upon the snow, that
Paul experienced terrible pain in his eyes, which
was only relieved by covering them with his
handkerchief.

“Can this be the surumpe?” he sighed.
“Why did I not follow the advice of the friendly
shepherd? Now, perhaps, I shall suffer for my
obstinacy with perpetual blindness ! ”

After the interval of half an hour, the previous
spectacle repeated itself. The heavens grew
suddenly black, a terrific thunder-storm burst
forth, followed by heavy snow; then the sun
_ reappeared, but only to hide himself again under
renewed tempests. Paul struggled on with
great energy and trouble, but his poor mule
was becoming rapidly exhausted, and night was
fast approaching. Stiff with cold, and weakened
with hunger and the fatigue of the journey, the
unhappy rider could scarcely hold the reins,
and his feet were perfectly benumbed, although
protected to some extent by the large wooden
stirrups used in that country. In addition to
this, there was the distressing certainty that
the nearest house was several miles distant, and
that it would be impossible to reach it until
after nightfall. The wearied animal, which had
travelled fourteen hours without rest or food,
could not go on any longer, and Paul began to
give himself up for lost, and to fear lest he

should fall a victim to the increasing cold, or be
D



50 PAUL ARNOLD.

buried beneath a heavy fall of snow, when he
saw an overhanging rock on his right hand, in
the side of which there seemed to be a cave,
which promised some shelter, however poor.
God, to whom he had cried in his want and
despair, had heard his prayer—he was not to
fall a prey to the fury of the elements.

The joyful surprise caused new warmth to
flow through his frame, and he hastily dis-
mounted to examine the cavern. It did not
seem to offer a very comfortable place of abode,
but it would at least shelter him from the wind
and snow, and he determined to avail himself
of it. He unsaddled his mule, and spread the
saddle-cloths and his poncho on the ground, to
serve for a bed, and then fastened the animal
to a stone inside the cave, where it would be
protected from the storm.

Not less hungry than his poor mule, which
had begun to crop the scanty herbage growing
at its feet, Paul opened his saddle-bags, took
out some bread, some hard cheese, and a bottle
of wine with which he had provided himself,
and was just about to commence his frugal
meal, when he observed, as his eyes had grown
accustomed to the darkness of the cavern, the
body of a man stretched at full length upon the
ground, and motionless as if in death,

With a loud exclamation of surprise and”
alarm, he started to his feet, and a cold
perspiration bedewed his face at the thought



PAUL ARNOLD. 51

of finding himself in the company of a dead
body in such a wild and desolate region.

“But what if a spark of life should still be
in him?” he asked himself. “Can I do nothing

to save this unhappy fellow-traveller ?”

With these words he pushed his untasted
food on one side, and took a taper from his
pocket and lit it; but what was his astonish-
ment, when he approached the body, to recognise
the features of the Indian, Hualpa!

“ Hualpa!” he exclaimed. “ What a wonder-
ful meeting! But he lives—his heart. still
beats, although but feebly. If it is possible,
the poor man shall be saved.”

The feeble taper, which had dimly lighted up

- the darkness of the cave, soon went out, but
Paul did not require it longer. Filled with
sympathy, he devoted all his attention to the
Indian. He brought the bottle of wine, laid
the head of the poor man on his lap, poured a
few drops of wine into his mouth, rubbed his
cold and benumbed hands and temples, and had
continued these efforts for only a few minutes,
when a faint sigh convinced him that they were
about to be crowned with success. He redoubled
his efforts, and was delighted to observe that
the signs of life were increasing. In a few
moments, the Indian raised himself up, and
asked in a faint voice: “ Where am I? and who
is the good spirit that has poured fire into my
veins, and thawed my frozen blood?”



52 PAUL ARNOLD.

“Ask afterwards,” answered Paul in a soft
and friendly tone of voice. “Drink a little
more wine; and if you are hungry, take a little
bread and cheese.”

The Indian took the food which was offered,
and was soon fully restored ; while Paul, whose
hunger was greatly sharpened by his exertions,
joined him in the repast, reserving a little wine
for the following morning.

“* Now, senor,” said the Indian, after he had
tried in vain to pierce the darkness of the cave,
and to recognise the countenance of his deliverer
—“‘after you have not only restored me to life,
but permitted me to share your food, to fill up
the measure of your goodness—may I not learn
whom I have to thank? I beg you to speak.”

“Then you haven’t found out who I am,
Hualpa?” said Paul. “This is not the first
time that we have met.”

“ Ah, that voice !—it sounds pleasant in my
ear!” exclaimed the Indian. “Senor Paulo—
it is you: you have a second time saved my
life. Yes, yes; it is you. Just now, when I
was starved with cold and hunger, I could not
remember your voice; but now—now I am
deceived no longer. Senor Don Paulo, Hualpa
owes you two lives.”

“Say nothing about that, my friend. I am
very fortunate in having found a companion in
this terrible Puna, and now I only want to hear
how you came here.”



PAUL ARNOLD. 53

“Hualpa was seeking herbs on the hills and
ravines of the Puna,” answered the Indian. “He
had not slept for two nights; he was weary
and hungry ; and the snow-storm surprised him
. on the way to Pasco. The snow blinded him;
the hunger was stronger than his limbs; he
wandered about a long time, and knows not
how he came to this cave.”

“Tired, hungry, lightly clad, and with such a
terrible storm, it is no wonder that human
strength should fail,” said Paul. “I am very
thankful that God has guided my footsteps to
this cave. God alone has saved us both. Had
I not found this shelter, I should certainly have
perished, and you also, my friend.”

“And where are you going, Senor Paulo?”
inquired the Indian, after Paul had described
all the dangers through which he had passed.

“The end of my journey is the same as your
own,” replied Paul. “I hope we shall reach
Pasco to-morrow in good time,”

“Hualpa knows the way,’ answered the
Indian. “He will act as guide to his deliverer.
But what is Senor Paulo going to do there?”

In answer to this inquiry, Paul related the
story of his life, of the poverty into which his
father’s death had plunged the family, the
advice of old Lorenz, his travels through Ger-
many, and his arrival in Peru; so that Hualpa
soon knew almost as much about his young
friend as if he had been brought up with him.



54 PAUL ARNOLD.

“Senor Paulo seeks his fortune in Peru.
Good! He shall find it. It is now late, and
we must start early in the morning. Let us
sleep now, if it is agreeable to you.”

Paul would willingly have asked Hualpa
what he meant by the prophetical assertion
that he should make his fortune, for the tone
in which the words were spoken had aroused
his curiosity, but the Indian did not seem
disposed to enter into any further conversation;
so, after bringing his mule into the cave, and
allowing it to lie down, he threw himself on the
ground, and feeling more comfortable by the
warmth of the animal beside him, soon fell
sound asleep. The fatigue and excitement of
the day had so exhausted the whole party, that
the two men slept as soundly -as if they had
been stretched on comfortable beds, and the
mule seemed to enjoy the dark cave as well as
a snug stable.







CHAPTER V.

THE distance to Pasco was still very great, and
the road rough and unpleasant; the Indian
‘therefore rose early, and prepared for the
journey. The breakfast was a very simple one;
and after Paul had shared the remains of the
wine with his companion, he mounted his mule
and set forth. Fortunately, the weather had
greatly improved during the night, and the sun
shone down upon the landscape, from which the
snow was rapidly disappearing.

“Everything seems promising, Senor Don
Paulo,” said the Indian as he took a long
breath of the pure fresh mountain air. “In
less than six hours we shall be at Pasco.”

He went forward with light and elastic steps ;
and the mule, which had recovered from the
toil of the previous day, trotted merrily after
him. Although our travellers had many diffi-
culties to surmount, they reached the little
village of Pasco about noon, after having left
the flat and monotonous plateau of Bombon
behind them, and climbed the steep and marshy



56 PAUL ARNOLD. -

road to the summit of the chain of hills, where

Paul suddenly beheld a populous city, which in

such a wild and desolate region produced a most

cheering effect upon him. It lay in a natural
amphitheatre, surrounded by steep and barren

rocks; and the stately houses, with their

smoking chimneys and gray roofs, seemed to

promise a pleasant and agreeable residence.

“This, then, is the celebrated Cerro de Pasco,
my friend?” said he to Hualpa after a short
and silent glance.

“This is the Cerro de Pasco,” replied the
Indian. “You cannot lose your way now, for
the end of your journey lies before you.”

“But what mean you?” asked Paul in sur-
prise. ‘Are you going to leave me, Hualpa,
as you say that I am at my journey’s end?”

“Hualpa leaves you,” was the reply, “but
not for long.”

“ But you said you were going te the town.
Why will you not remain in my company ?”

“ Hualpa has changed his mind,” he answered.
“He has something important to-do, and must
seek his father in the mountains. Farewell,
senor. We shall soon meet again.”

“TI am sorry to part from you,” said Paul,
“for your company has been very pleasant to
me; but if other duties call you away, I will
not hold you back.”

“Yes; another duty calls me,” answered
Hualpa, pressing with great warmth the hand



PAUL ARNOLD. 57

which Paul extended towards him. “I must
visit my father before I see you again, senor ;
but I will be sure to come. One warning, how-
. ever, Senor Don Paulo: beware of Don Jose
Ugarto!”

Before Paul had time to inquire the meaning
of this strange advice, the Indian had given his
hand. a parting squeeze, and was already hasten-
ing down the hill which they had just ascended
together.

“Hualpa! Hualpa!” he cried; but the
Indian either could not or would not hear, and
continued his flight without turning back to
take another farewell of his companion.

“What a strange man!” thought Paul, as
he watched him rapidly vanishing out of
sight. “He seems to have a very great liking
for me, and to be very thankful for what
I have done for him; but he is so secret and
reserved, that I don’t know what to make of
his sudden departure. And then this mysterious
warning about Jose Ugarto. Why did he not
tell me that during our long journey from the
cave? However, he means well, that is clear;
so I shall pay attention to what he has said,
and wait for the explanation till we meet
again.”

Still wondering at the strange conduct of his
late guide, Paul put spurs to his mule, and
descended the hill towards Cerro de Pasco.
He soon reached the outskirts of the town, and



58 PAUL ARNOLD,

had little difficulty in finding the house of Don
Jose Ugarto, the manager of Mr Wilson’s mine.
A few minutes later, he stopped in front of a
lofty and splendid building; a negro came out
to take his mule; and in answer to his inquiries,
directed him to the room in which his master
was to be seen.

Following the directions, Paul soon found
himself in a large and lofty apartment, very
richly furnished. Five or six clerks were seated
at large mahogany tables busily engaged in
writing; and in a comfortable arm-chair near
the spacious bow-window which lighted the
room, sat a tall thin man, with a pale counte-
nance, closely-cropped black hair, and piercing
eyes, which sparkled with the gleam of a bird
of prey, over a nose resembling the beak of a
hawk. .

“That must be Don Ugarto,” thought Paul,
feeling in his pocket for Mr Wilson’s letter.

“Who are you?) What do you want?” in-
quired the man in the arm-chair in a sharp
voice.

“TI wish to see Don Jose Ugarto,” replied
Paul with a polite bow; “and, if I am not
mistaken, I have the honour of speaking to
him, senor.”

“Quite right. Well?”

“Well, I have brought a letter for you from
Mr Wilson of Lima, which will introduce me,
and explain everything to you.”



PAUL ARNOLD. 59

He had scarcely mentioned Mr Wilson’s name
- when Don Ugarto started from his seat, and
surveyed him from head to foot with a half-
suspicious, half-surprised glance. He then tore
the letter from his hand, turned with it to the
window, and remained standing in deep thought
after rapidly scanning its contents. When he
turned round again, Paul observed that he was
still paler than before, and that deep wrinkles
had formed themselves between his bushy
eyebrows.

“You are Paul Arnold, a German by birth,
and have the intention of finding a situation,
_here,” said he, in a cold and repulsive tone.

“Yes, that is my name; but I have not an
engagement to seek,” replied Paul. “If you
will read the letter carefully, you will see that
Mr Wilson has provided me with one.”

“Hm—yes,” said Don Ugarto with a still
more unfriendly look; “there is certainly some-
thing of that kind here; but nothing is said as
to what situation you are to have. We have
far too many people here already, and I can’t
give work or money to every beggar that
chooses to come here, It will be far better,
young man, for you to look for employment
elsewhere.”

A deep blush of anger and surprise passed
over Paul’s countenance; but instead of allow-
ing himself to be frightened by the rough
manner of Don Ugarto, he straightened himself



60 PAUL ARNOLD.

up proudly, and advanced a step nearer to
him.

“‘T don’t know, senor, who has given you the
right to talk to me in this way,” said he. “I
have not come here as a beggar, but under
directions from Mr Wilson, your employer, and
recommended to you in a letter written by his
own hand. But I shall force myself as little
upon you as I have done upon Mr Wilson, who
shall soon learn from me the way in which his
orders are respected here. Good-morning,
Senor Ugarto!”

Having come to the full determination to
leave such an unfriendly house, Paul turned upon
his heel, and walked towards the door. But he
had scarcely reached it, when he felt a hand
upon his shoulder.

“Wait, Senor Arnoldo,” said Ugarto; “we
must exchange a few civilities before you go.”

He turned round with some surprise, and was
astonished to mark the change which had
suddenly come over the features of Ugarto.
The deep wrinkles had vanished from his brow, —
and the proud and scornful mouth was lighted
up by a friendly and pleasant smile.

“What can you possibly wish from me, senor,
after shewing me the door in such a plain and ~
unmistakable way ?” he inquired.

“ Nothing further at present,” was the polite
answer, “than the request that you will pardon
my harsh and repulsive behaviour. I must tell



PAUL ARNOLD. 6]

you, Senor Arnoldo, that we are often overrun
with ignorant adventurers ; and I must confess,
that at first I feared you were one of that class.

But your prompt and decided, even proud and
dignified conduct, has convinced me that I was
mistaken. None but those who know their
own value can manifest such decision of char-
acter; and now that you have so thoroughly
commanded my respect, I don’t doubt that we
shall soon be very good friends. Your hand,
young man, and forgive my rashness and
error !”

_If Paul had not been warned by Hualpa, he
would have certainly been led to accept Don
Ugarto’s apologies as genuine, for his manner
seemed perfectly open and friendly, and the
reasons upon which his excuses were grounded
had all the appearance of truth. But the
warning of the Indian was not forgotten, and
Paul was rather inclined to regard the polished
courtesy of Ugarto as assumed and hypocritical,
than to think that the enmity which he had at
first displayed was merely to test his character.
He took the hand, however, which was stretched
out towards him, but determined to be on his
guard against Ugarto under all circumstances.

“Very well, senor,’ he replied, after a
moment’s thought; “Iam not in the habit of
weighing every word, and if we can become
good friends, I shall be very glad.”

“Then you will stay here, my friend; that is



62 PAUL ARNOLD.

settled,” said Don Ugarto. “I will set a room
apart for you, and it will, of course, be clearly
understood that you will always dine with me.
Mr Wilson has given directions to that effect,
and now that I know you, all his wishes shall
be strictly complied with.— Antonio !”

The negro who had taken charge of Paul’s
mule, appeared in answer to this call.

“Take this gentleman to the green room on
the first floor,” said Don Ugarto. “Take care
that everything is in proper order; I shall come
and see it myself. Sancho will attend Senor
Arnoldo !—And now, sir,” said he, turning to
Paul, “have the goodness to follow this man,
and make yourself at home in your new
quarters. I shall expect you to dine with me
in an hour, and we shall then be able to talk
about your future post over a glass of wine.
Farewell for the present, Senor Arnoldo !”

Paul bowed politely, and followed the servant,
who conducted him up a broad flight of stairs
covered with a soft carpet, and ushered him
into an apartment, the luxurious furniture of
which struck the young man very much, who
had hitherto been accustomed to only the
poorest accommodation. He carefully avoided
any sign of surprise, however; and having
directed the negro to bring up the small amount
of luggage which he had brought with him,
resigned himself to his thoughts.

“Hualpa was right,” said he at length;



PAUL ARNOLD. . 63

“this man is not to be trusted, and I
must keep a sharp look-out. But, after all,
what injury can he do to me if I perform my
duty? He may perhaps try to slander me to
Mr Wilson, in order to get rid of me; but even
then. I should have truth on my side, and that
is always stronger than falsehood. No, no,
Don Ugarto, an honest man doesn’t fear you;
and if you seek a dishonourable quarrel, you
shall at least find a straightforward opponent
in me!”

Having arrived at this conclusion, Paul felt
his usual calmness gradually returning; and
after taking a little rest, he dressed himself, and
descended to the dining-room. He met with a
cordial reception from the head of the establish-
ment, who introduced to him the young men
whom he had already seen in the counting-
house, and then asked him to take a seat by
his side. He was exceedingly attentive to him
during dinner, loaded his plate with the finest
dainties, and kept his glass always filled with
the best and strongest wines, which seemed to
course through his veins like fire. The way in
which Don Ugarto urged him to take more and
more wine at last aroused Paul’s attention, and
he put his glass on one side with the remark,
that he had always been accustomed to the
greatest moderation, and had no intention of
making any alteration in his habits. The
glance of vexation and surprise which passed



64 PAUL ARNOLD.

over Ugarto’s features was observed by Paul,
but without the. slightest change of counte-
nance. The repast was finished soon afterwards,
and all rose from the table, with the exception
of Paul, with whom Don Ugarto wished to have
some private conversation.

“Well, my young friend,” said he, “I have
considered the question as to how you can be
employed in the best and most advantageous
way to yourself, and have decided to take you
as one of my clerks. Your duties will be light
and simple, and when you have grown used to
it, you can earn a very comfortable salary.”

Had any one else than Don Ugarto made
this proposition, Paul would probably have
agreed to it without hesitation ; but he felt so
little confidence in him, and had at the same
time so little desire to become a mere clerk,
which he felt sure was not Mr Wilson’s inten-
tion, that he politely but firmly declined the
proposal.

“J thank you, senor,” said he. “ Although
I don’t doubt that you have my benefit and
advantage in view, I cannot feel it my duty to
accept your proposition. I have been brought
up as a miner, and as a miner I will live and
die. Besides this, Mr Wilson left it to my own
choice as to what special branch I should turn
my attention to; so, with your permission, I
will wait a little while and look around me, so



PAUL ARNOLD. 65

as to be able to make up my mind without
haste.”

“But you forget, sir—you seem to forget
that I am Mr Wilson’s manager and sole repre-
sentative here!” replied Don Ugarto, visibly
excited. “You will find it advisable to obey
my orders.”

“Certainly, senor,” returned Paul with cold-
ness. “You will always find me obedient as
far as your orders agree with those of our com-
mon master; but I must repeat to you that Mr
Wilson has engaged me for his silver mine, and
not for his counting-house, and you will easily
see that I must first follow his wishes.”

“Very well, senor, as you wish,” replied Don
Ugarto, with scarcely concealed anger. “But
you must permit me to remark, that as a miner
you can never hope to obtain any position here,
for you would either have to become one of the
barreteroes, who break up the ore, or one of the
hapiries, who dig it out, and work among them
with your own hands like a slave. You might
certainly have the good fortune to discover a
new vein of silver, which would entitle you to
a handsome reward; but such discoveries are
very rare; and you would only degrade yourself
by such work, and have none but wretched
Indians for your companions. As a book-keeper,
you would have a position in which you could
rise ; and I would therefore, as a friend, strongly
recommend you to agree to my proposition.”

E



66 PAUL ARNOLD.

“ Give me time for consideration, senor,” said —
Paul. “I will decide within ten days or a
fortnight at the furthest, but I cannot before.
Besides barreteroes and hapiries, there must
surely be several persons who superintend the
work in the mine, and I daresay I shall find
something to do in that direction that will
justify the confidence which Mr Wilson has
placed in my knowledge.”

“QObstinate fool!” muttered Don Ugarto, as
he turned away in a passion. “ Have it as
you will have it—All right, Senor Paulo,” he
repeated, turning again towards him ; “ follow
your own opinion, and see how far you will be
able to get. You will soon regret not taking
my advice. Good-day, senor.”

Paul withdrew, feeling glad that the con-
versation had ended thus; but scarcely had he
left the room, when Ugarto stamped violently
upon the floor, and pulled the bell with such
vehemence, that a servant answered it instantly
in great alarm.

“Let the major-domo Rivero come to me
immediately !” was his order. ©

The negro hurriedly obeyed the command ;
and in a short time the person sent for entered
the apartment, and saluted Don Ugarto with
the greatest submissiveness. He was short and
crooked, and his countenance bore an expression
of slyness, cunning, and wickedness,



PAUL ARNOLD. 67

“What are your commands, sir?” he in-
quired.

“Sit down, Rivero,” said Don Ugarto, walk- |
ing up and down the room in great excitement.
“Old Wilson has tried to play us a trick. If
we don’t look out for ourselves, this fellow will
get upon our track, and we shall be driven out
in disgrace—unless we turn honest, and note
down every pound of silver that comes out of
the mine.”

“ But, sir, I do not understand your mean-
ing,” replied Rivero, who was the major-domo
or head inspector of the mine. “ What fellow
do you allude to?”

“A German beggar that Wilson has sent
here. You can read his letter yourself. Old
Wilson recommends him to me, instructs me
to introduce him to all the details of the busi-
ness, and to leave him to choose his own work ;
and the fellow seems to be so terribly honest,
and has so little respect for me, that I expect we
shall have enough to do to keep him in order.”

“ Honest, senor!” replied the inspector, with
a scornful laugh. “I should think there is
precious little honesty that would resist a few
silver bars.”

“Ah, you judge of the fellow from yourself
and from me, but I can assure you, you’re
mistaken. He is a German, and one of the
right sort. Would you believe it, that I offered
him a clerk’s situation, with the prospect of



68 PAUL ARNOLD.

becoming first book-keeper, and instead of
jumping at it, he refused it with the greatest
contempt! He will first see if he can’t be
more useful in the mine than in the counting-
house! He is a regular German bear that we
shall never be able to make a tool of.”

“Well, well, senor, we must try him first,”
replied Rivero. “We have managed so many ~
that I don’t believe this fellow will prove any
difficulty. Anything can be done by bribery.”

“Yes, with most people, but not with this
scoundrel. I can assure you he is a stiff-necked
animal.”

“Every man has his price, and although we
may not be able to buy him over very cheaply,
we shall manage him at last. I have had too
much experience in this sort of thing.”

“This fellow will baffle all your skill,”
repeated Don Ugarto, with a determination
that seemed to shut the mouth of the inspector,
whose only reply was a hateful grin.

“Very well,” said he, “we must try; and if
we fail, there are plenty of holes and corners
here where people sit drinking and playing
cards to all hours of the night, and get their
daggers out occasionally ; now, if one of these
should by accident happen to hurt our young
friend, we should have no particular reason to
regret it.”

“But he will neither drink nor gamble. I
have tried him already, Rivero! He would



PAUL ARNOLD. 69

only drink just what pleased him, not a drop
more.”

“That makes the matter worse than I
thought,” replied the inspector, while his small
and wicked eyes gleamed with secret rage.
“ A German that doesn’t drink, and is honest,
and obstinate, and clever, as it seems to me—
for otherwise old Wilson wouldn’t have sent
him—he will certainly be a stone of stumbling
to us. But, senor, all sensible men get such
stones out of their way, and that is what we
must do somehow or other. If we can’t succeed
at the gambling-table, then we must send him
with an important commission to some place
forty or fifty miles distant; the roads are very
unsafe—all filled with Indians and other dan-
gerous characters; and if we only give the hint
that he would be a good prize, why, I would lay
anything that he wouldn’t be allowed to go
very far without a hindrance. Many a fellow
has started on a good mule without being heard
of again.”

“But that would not be much better than
murder,” said Ugarto.

“Murder! We shouldn’t murder any one,
senor,” replied Rivero, with a loud laugh. “I
didn’t think you had such a tender conscience,
my good sir! But just as you please. If we
are hunted away from here—well, I should
find another situation somewhere; while you—
I really don’t know, my dear sir, whether you



70 PAUL ARNOLD,

would easily find such a comfortable post again.
I should certainly not give up such a situation
for the sake of a wandering German beggar.
But as you please, sir, as you please.”

“ Rivero, you are right. I am a fool to think
so much about the affair,’ exclaimed Don
Ugarto, after a short pause. “ But let us tempt
him first, before we take any severe measures.
If he is determined to be obstinate, then away
with him.”

“Yes, yes; leave that to me, senor,” replied
Rivero, with a cunning smile. “But if I were
you, I-should make short work with him. He
is a stranger now; nobody knows him, and
nobody will miss him. But later on, it will
be different, and—how are we to know that
he won’t use his eyes, and report all our
secrets to old Wilson before we know where
we are? If he were only to have the least
suspicion ”

“Oh, I have attended to that already,” said
Don Ugarto, interrupting him. “I have given
him the green room—where, you know, one can
hear and see everything—and besides that, I
have told Sancho to wait on him. He won’t let
him go out of his sight; I have given him a
wink already.”

“That is all very well for the present,”
replied Rivero; “but you know with certainty
that he hasn’t a single friend or acquaintance
here yet. I don’t need to tell you how people





PAUL ARNOLD. 71

whisper about us here in Pasco; and if any-
thing should occur to excite the suspicion of
this fellow, he might be more on the alert than
would be pleasant.” *

“Don’t be afraid, Rivero; he is a stranger
here, and doesn’t know a soul.”

“Well, then, we will try what we can do;
and if we don’t succeed, then—a short journey !
Farewell, senor. I suppose I shall soon make
the acquaintance of this honourable youth ?”

“He will be sure to visit the mine to-
morrow,” replied Don Ugarto.

“He shall be welcome; but I fancy our
acquaintance will be rather short,” said Rivero,
with a malicious smile; and with a deep bow
took his departure.







CHAPTER VIL

Tur morning of the following day had scarcely
dawned when Paul sprang from his bed, after a
refreshing night’s sleep, and having dressed
himself, called his servant, who stood in readi-
ness to obey his commands.

“What is your name?” he inquired.

“T called Sancho, your honour,” was the
answer. -

“Sancho; very well. I am told you are to
be my servant. Will you serve me honestly
and faithfully ? Speak out, my friend.”

“Sancho will be, yes,” replied the negro,
quite confused by the friendliness and kindly
manner of his new master.

“Well, then, Sancho, I shall trust you,” con-
tinued Paul, stretching out his hand to the
smiling negro, who scarcely ventured to put
it to his lips, being quite unused to such kind
treatment. ‘You will have very little to do,
Sancho, for I attend to myself as much as
possible; but whenever I give you any orders,



PAUL ARNOLD. 73

I must be able to depend on your careful and
immediate attention. Do you understand me,
friend Sancho ?”

“Yes, your honour,” replied Sancho with a
happy grin.

“Very well, then; we shall see,” said Paul.
“If you please me, we shall be good friends
together ; but if not, if I find any unfaithful-
ness on your part, we shall separate at once.
And now, Sancho, shew me the way to the
Dolores silver mine. That is the name of Mr
Wilson’s mine, isn’t it?”

“Yes, senor. But will you not take breakfast
first? Everything is ready.”

“Look sharp, then, for time is precious, and
I have none to spare.”

In a few moments, the table was spread; and
after a hasty meal, Paul set out for the mine,
escorted by his new servant. It was just six
o’clock when they reached Dolores; and the
Indians who had worked all night were leaving
to make room for the second division, or punta,
who worked during the day. About thirty
half-naked, miserable, starving, downcast-looking
Indians came along the road, with an inspector
at their head, and vanished in the entrance to
the mine, from which the others had just
emerged like ghosts. Paul could not look at
the poor creatures without sympathy, for their
wretched appearance shewed that they were
accustomed to very bad treatment.



74 PAUL ARNOLD.

“We must see who is to blame for that,” said
he to himself; and after he had told Sancho to
amuse himself during the forenoon, and call for
him at twelve, he followed the punta into the
mine.

If Paul had expected to find the same order
and regularity that he had been used to at
home, where mining was carried on with the
greatest energy and skill, he soon found himself
thoroughly deceived. Even the shaft or entrance
of the mine gave proof of the grossest neglect.
The steep road led over half-rotten wood and
loose stones, which served as steps, and Paul
found it necessary to be very careful to avoid
falling as he made his way slowly along. But
bad as the entrance was, he found the mine
itself still worse, after he had succeeded in
reaching it with great risk to his life. All
the shafts and passages were in a wretched
condition, and he saw at every step that the
work had been carried on with the greatest
meanness and avarice. Nothing had been done
to render the mine safe; the most dangerous
parts had been left without any support; and
it was a perfect wonder to him that there had
been no accident through the mine falling in.
Full of anger at such carelessness, he went to
the inspector, who was idly smoking a cigar,
and looking at the workmen.

“Do you not think it is very dangerous and
wicked,” said he, “to carry on mining in this



PAUL ARNOLD. 75

reckless way? You must know very well that
the lives of these unfortunate men are exposed
to the greatest risk. A slight accident at any
moment might destroy the mine, and bury you
all beneath the ruins, without hope of escape.”

“You -are quite right, senor,” replied the
inspector with the greatest indifference. ‘We
lead a dangerous life here, but we can’t alter
it: that belongs to the major-domo.”

“ And where is he?” asked Paul. ‘He goes
to work in a most careless way, either from
negligence or ignorance.”

“Indeed, senor! Who are you, that you ven-
ture to speak in such a way of our major-domo,
Senor Don Rivero?” inquired the inspector in
the greatest surprise, while the Indians left off
their work to listen.

“Who am I? You will find that out soon
enough,” replied Paul. “It is high time Mr
Wilson sent some one here to put things to
rights. Where is the major-domo?”

“Here. Have you anything to say to me,
senor?” inquired Rivero himself in a sarcastic
tone, coming out of a corner where he had been
hidden by one of the galleries of the mine. “I
am Rivero, the major-domo of the Dolores mine,
and I ask who you are to take upon yourself to
talk here?”

“Ask your superior, Don Jose Ugarto,”
replied Paul quietly, looking at the major-domo
with such a severe and piercing glance, that he



76 PAUL ARNOLD.

was compelled to change colour. “It will be
sufficient for the present, if I assure you that
I have full right to be here, and see all that is
going on. My name is Paul Arnold; and now
to business.”

“ Ah, Senor Don Arnoldo; yes, yes, I have
heard of you,” said Rivero with a malicious grin.
“You are the German that Don Ugarto told
me of.”

“Yes; and he will also have told you that I
have come here by Mr Wilson’s orders,” replied
Paul. “Don’t you know, sir, that it is shameful
for property to be wasted as it is here? The
precious metal is destroyed, instead of being got
out carefully. There doesn’t seem to be the
slightest thought of the future safety of the
mine.”

The major-domo shrugged his shoulders in
contempt. “What do you know about mining
in this country?” said he. “When you have
been here for a year or two, and have got your
horns out a little, it will be quite time enough
to talk; but for the present it will be as well
for you to hold your tongue, young man.”

“ Hold my tongue at such mismanagement as
this!” exclaimed Paul in indignation. “ Will
you deny, sir, that the way of carrying on the
work here shews the greatest neglect or igno-
rance? Step this way, if you please. The
slightest shock of an earthquake would be
enough to bring the whole concern down about



PAUL ARNOLD. 77

your ears. Wherever I have been, there seems
to be the same neglect. Do you regard the
lives of these poor Indians so little, that you
expose them to danger in this way ?”

“Pah! Indians!” replied Rivero with ridi-
cule. ‘Who cares a straw for them? There
is no such scarcity of these miserable hounds.
Mr Wilson would be very little pleased if we
were to run up a lot of expenses, and ruin him
on their account.”

“T think I know Mr Wilson better than
that,” said Paul in noble anger. “But I see
very clearly that you are not disposed to make
any alteration; so it will be necessary to take
other steps. I will speak to Don Ugarto in the
meantime, and see what can be done.”

“Speak to him, my good sir, and say what-
ever pleases you,” was Rivero’s answer; “but
for the present, if you please, don’t hinder the
work, for these Indian beasts won’t do a stroke
so long as they can catch a word of our friendly
conversation. Another time, Senor Arnoldo,
and up above, if you please.”

With these words he turned on his heel;
and Paul left the mine full of anger, and
hastened to Don Ugarto, to whom he gave a
description of the recklessness and want of
order which seemed to prevail in all parts
of the mine. To his astonishment, Ugarto
listened to him with the greatest indifference,
and said that he would pay a visit to the mine



78 PAUL ARNOLD,

himself in a few days; and with this answer
Payl was obliged to be content.

Although always received with the greatest
coldness and unfriendliness by Rivero, Paul
visited the mine every day, observed the work
that was going on, spoke sometimes to the
Indians, who in the sweat of their brows hewed
out the silver ore, and carried it to the surface;
and waited patiently for the fulfilment of Don
Ugarto’s promise to make a personal examina-
tion of the works. But the manager took good
care not to shew his face, and the major-domo
persisted with the most contemptuous assurance
in his former method of carrying on the labour,
without paying the least attention to Paul’s
presence. This circumstance aroused Paul’s
attention, and led him to believe that Ugarto
and Rivero were in league together; and his
suspicions were confirmed by observing that
the ore was not taken to be separated from the
rock by the men belonging to the same gang
that had extracted it. He watched the opera-
tions carefully, but could not find out the reason
of this proceeding until he asked an old Indian,
who had worked in the mine for many years.

‘Not now,” the Indian whispered: “when
we leave work. Take care, senor, and follow
me: I will lead you to a safe spot.”

Paul was struck by the man’s words and
manner, but waited quietly till six o’clock,
when the men left off their work. Leaving the



PAUL ARNOLD. 79

mine a few minutes before them, he waited at
a little distance till the Indians made their
appearance. He then followed the old man to
a small hut, and took the seat which he offered
him.

“ Now, senor, ask me any questions you like,”
said he, “and I will give you an answer.”

“But why do you make such a secret of it,
my friend?” inquired Paul.

“For your safety, senor,” replied the Indian
with a significant look. “You don’t know the
ground on which you stand. You neither know
Rivero nor Don Ugarto. You don’t know that
you are surrounded by rogues and scoundrels,
who would put you out of the way without any
hesitation, if they had the least idea that you
watched them. Don’t you guess where the silver
ore goes to that is left in the mine overnight ?”

“How should I? I shouldn’t have asked you
if I had known.”

“Well, Senor Don Arnoldo, you would not
have found it out from me, if you had not been
of a different stamp from those villains who
trample us poor Indians under foot, and wish
to keep us in perpetual slavery. You regard us
as men, but they treat us as mere beasts of
burden. We are all kept in a state of slavish
dependence, because we have been compelled to
borrow money from Don Ugarto when times
were hard. Once in debt, the poor Indian can
never free himself from the yoke, for he meets



80 PAUL ARNOLD.

with no justice from the white man who needs
his labour. If he runs away, he is pursued and
shot like a wild beast; if he struggles against
his fate, he is thrown into a dungeon, where
neither sun nor moon can be seen; if he com-
plains that he is cheated, he is laughed at,
beaten, and driven away, because he can’t prove
the cheating ; and so there is nothing else for
him to do but to drag along his miserable life
till death puts an end to his slavery. It’s as
bad everywhere else as it is here; the owners
of the mines can’t do without our labour, and
so they make us work either through cunning
or force.”

“That is horrible!” exclaimed Paul, filled
with indignation and sympathy. “ But if you
knew your fate, why did you plunge blindly
into misery by borrowing money from your
master ?” ,

“ Distress, senor, and—I say it with sorrow—
the love of drinking,” replied the old man with
a downeast look. “These sly men know that
our people can scarcely ever resist the tempta-
tion of strong drink, and so they lure the Indian
on from one thing to another, until he falls a
helpless prey to them.”

“But Mr Wilson knows nothing of such
wickedness,” exclaimed Paul. “I could almost
swear that he is quite ignorant of such things
being done.”

“You may be right, senor,” answered the



PAUL ARNOLD. 81

Indian. “Perhaps if you will take an interest
in our miserable condition, it may be improved.
We hope so, because we heard the way you
_ spoke to the major-domo, and our hearts were
rejoiced. You are not like him, and therefore
the Indians love you. None of them will lift
a hand against you, senor. But be cautious, and
remember what I tell you, for these wicked
fellows are very cunning, and you may not
always have any one to protect you.”

“Never mind that, my friend, but tell me
what becomes of the silver ore that I asked
you about.”

“Well, it is put on one side, and then sold by
the major-domo and Don Ugarto,” replied the
Indian. “These two men cheat their master;
and if a hundred loads of ore are brought out
of the mine, they take fifty of the richest and
best for themselves. To prevent discovery,
they never allow one gang of men to know
what the others have worked at, but we
find it out in spite of them; and all their
caution would be in vain if we only dared to
speak. But a word, or even a look, would be
certain death. You heard yourself what the
major-domo said: ‘Who ever cares about an
Indian? There are enough and to spare of
these wretches’ ”

“That can’t be true,” exclaimed Paul in
horror. “Such wholesale cheating is out of
the question.”

F



§2 PAUL ARNOLD.

“Well, senor, inquire yourself, if you don’t
believe me,” answered the Indian. “Find out
whether Don Ugarto keeps an account of all the
ore that is got out every day, but do it secretly,
so that he can’t notice it; and then look at the
books, and see if they agree. It is very easy
for you to find out the deception.”

“Tt shall be done, depend upon it,” replied
Paul; “and woe to them, if”

“Stop, senor! Do nothing in haste!” said
the Indian, interrupting him. “Be warmed.
These scoundrels are very dangerous.”

“Not to me, for Jam in the hand of God!”
replied the young man with a determined look.
“T do what is right, and fear nobody. Don’t
be alarmed on my account. No one shall ever
find out that it is you that have put me on the
track of these wretched swindlers. And if God
assists me—of which I have no doubt—then, my
friend, both your lot and that of your country-
men in the mine will be better than it has been
hitherto.”

During the whole of the next week, Paul
took an account of all the ore that was brought
out of the mine, without, however, allowing
Don Ugarto to know anything about it. At
last, on a holiday, when the work was stopped,
and none of the clerks were in the office, he
called upon Don Ugarto, and after greeting him
coldly, asked for the principal account-book, in
which the weight of all the ore was entered





PAUL ARNOLD. 83

which had been taken out during the preceding

week. The manager was greatly startled, and

inquired the reason of such an extraordinary
demand.

~ You will soon see, senor,” replied Paul in

an indifferent tone. ‘I only wish to make a

little memorandum.”

The quiet demeanour of the young man
seemed to reassure Don Ugarto; and taking
the book from the place in which it was kept,
he shewed it to Paul, who took a brief glance
at its contents,

“T suppose you have reported to Mr Wilson
the amount of ore that was got out last week ?”
he asked.

“Certainly. That is done regularly at the
end of every week, as you must have observed
already.”

“Then you have stated the amount that is
set down in this book?”

“To be sure. Why do you ask such a
question, and in such a peculiar tone, Senor
Arnoldo?”

“Simply because you are a liar, a thief, and
a swindler!” answered Paul with the greatest
contempt. “You have only reported the half
of what has been got out; and here is the proof
of it. Compare this list with yours. I have
noted it down carefully, Senor Ugarto, and
your fraud is discovered.”

Don Ugarto turned pale, and trembled so



84 PAUL ARNOLD.

violently, that he was obliged to Jean against
his desk for support. Then suddenly summon-
ing all his strength and energy, he seized a
dagger which lay near at hand, and rushed at
Paul like a tiger. Paul was, however, on the
alert, and taking a pistol from his belt, pointed
it at Ugarto, who started back with a cry of
rage.

“Don’t be so hasty, senor,” said Paul. “I
was quite prepared for an attack like this;
and at anyrate, Don Ugarto, I am always on
my guard. Your game is played out here, for
I shall inform Mr Wilson to-day with what
honesty and fidelity his manager and inspector
have worked hand in hand for his benefit. Mr
Wilson will find out that it is high time some
one was sent here to conduct all his affairs
properly. Farewell, senor.”

Paul was about to leave, but Ugarto hastened
towards him, and held him fast by one arm.
“Senor Arnoldo,” said he, “do nothing rashly.
Reflect upon what you are doing, and listen to
what I have to tell you.”

“ And what is that?”

“Well, then, senor,” continued Don Ugarto
with his usual coolness, which he had fully
recovered after the first surprise was over, “if
you should really write to Mr Wilson, how will
you prove to him that your list is correct, and
that mine is false? Suppose I deny it? And
suppose Rivero denounces you as a slanderer



PAUL ARNOLD. 85

who is only anxious to drive me away that you
may get my post, what then, senor?”

“Then I should simply ask the under-
inspector and the Indians to tell all that they
know about the matter.”

Don Ugarto laughed in mockery. “The
evidence of the Indians would be of no value
at all,” said he; “and as regards the inspector,
he wouldn’t venture to say a word against the
major-domo. You fight with very poor weapons,
my good sir.”

“That matters not: I have truth and upright-
ness on my side,” replied Paul.

“Well, you will see how far that will carry
you,” repeated Ugarto. “I can tell you before-
hand how it will go. If Mr Wilson pays any
attention to your complaint, and should come
here to see for himself, the major-domo would
ask the hapiries how much ore they have
carried to the store, and their answer would
agree exactly with my accounts.”

“Quite so; because they leave the best ore
in the shaft, to be carried away by the next
gang. The barreteroes must be asked how
much ore they have dug out.”

“Well, even then their account would agree
with mine. The barreteroes of the first gang
would of course be asked, because they dig out
the ore which the hapiries of the second gang
carry away. You would find it very hard work
to prove anything ; so the best thing will be to



86 PAUL ARNOLD.

let the matter drop, and not expose yourself to
ridicule.”

Paul looked down thoughtfully, and seemed
uncertain what to do. Ugarto, who watched
him attentively, observed this appearance of
doubt, and took instant advantage of it.

“Listen to me, my friend,” said he, going up
to him in a confidential way. “I will shew
you a much better way than that you are
taking. Say nothing of what you have seen,
become a partner with us, share our gains, and
—your fortune is made! I speak freely to you,
for you have found out our game, although it
would be very hard to betray us. Agree to
this, and we part as friends. Don’t hesitate a
moment. Fortune will perhaps never be so
close within your reach again as it is now.”

“Fortune! What do you call fortune?”
replied Paul thoughtfully, as if considering
Ugarto’s proposition. “When the spoil is
divided among three, there can’t be much for
each.”

“Enough to make you a rich man in a few
years,” said Don Ugarto.

“But you—you are not rich, so far as I
know.”

“Certainly not. But it is my own fault.
Gambling and drinking, and the fact that I
can fill my pockets at any time—this explains
everything. And now, declare yourself, senor:
friend or foe?”



PAUL ARNOLD. 87

Paul raised his clear bright eyes from the
ground, and fixed them upon Don Ugarto, who
grew once more pale as he saw that their
expression boded no good to him.

“Enough!” said Paul calmly. “ You will never
persuade me to take part in a system of robbery
which must be carried on upon a very large
scale if a fortune is to be made by it in a few
years. Every man must make his own fortune ;
but to make it in such a way as that, I can
never agree to. You have deceived yourself in
me, Don Ugarto. I wish you good-day.”

“Senor Arnoldo, bethink yourself! ” exclaimed
Ugarto in alarm.

“There is nothing to think about,” replied
Paul. “After you have laid the foundation of
your own misery, disgrace, and ruin, would you
have me follow your example? No, never! Mr
Wilson shall learn the whole of it, and then he
can decide between us.”

Without another word, Paul left the room.
Don Ugarto followed him with a wild and
vindictive look, and shook his fist at him. “You
have made up your mind—well, have it so,”
said he; and seizing his hat, he hastened to
his confederate, Rivero, to tell him what had
happened, and to consult with him as to what
measures were necessary to avert the storm that
seemed to threaten their destruction.









CHAPTER VII.

In deep silence, with wrinkled brow, and a
smile upon his lips that boded mischief, Rivero
listened to the report of Don Ugarto.

“You now see the consequences of your
miserable weakness and indecision,’ said Rivero
harshly. “If you had gone to work at once,
and either deprived the young serpent of his
fangs, or trampled him under foot at the
outset, we should have been spared this diffi-
culty. But it is not too late yet, as the young
fool was so simple as to tell you what he
intended to do.”

“ But what can we do?” inquired Ugarto in
the greatest alarm. “If Mr Wilson comes to
know ”

“Folly! How is he to know anything?”
said Rivero, interrupting him. “ You surely
won’t be such a child as to let this fellow send
his letter to old Wilson? We should have
no hope in that case. But there are many ways
of preventing that, and I suppose we shan’t
be very particular in choosing them. You
must, above all things, keep a sharp look-out





PAUL ARNOLD. 89

on the traitor, so that he can’t take a single
step without our knowledge. That will be
enough for to-day, for there are none of the
men to be had that we can depend on. They
are all drinking as hard as they can, and spend-
ing their money; but to-morrow there will be
time enough to do all that we want.”

“ But what can we do?” repeated Ugarto.

“We can let him disappear,” said the major-
domo. |

“ And when any one inquires for him 2?”

“What should we know about him? If any
search is made, we shall have to join in it; but,
of course, nothing will be found out. People
disappear often enough out here, and are soon
forgotten.”

Don Ugarto breathed more freely as he
observed the assurance of his accomplice. “ And
where shall it take place?” he asked.

“Near the mine, I think,’ replied Rivero.
“He is almost sure to pay us a visit there, as
usual; and I will manage to keep him engaged
until after dark, and the men have gone home,
so that when he leaves, everything will be as
black as midnight, and the coast clear. You
may leave the affair quite safely in my hands;
I promise you the sneaking vagabond shan’t
get the better of us; but be sure that he doesn’t
send a letter to old Wilson.”

“T’ll take care of that,” said Ugarto.
“Sancho and I will keep a sharp look-out on



90 PAUL ARNOLD.

him. But stop a moment—what are we to
do with him? Where can we hide him?”

“Leave that to my people,” answered Rivero.
“For a couple of gold coins, and as much
brandy as they can drink, they will hide him so
securely that not a ray of light will ever fall
upon him again. And now to your post, senor.
Are you quite certain that you can trust to
Sancho ?”

“Well, he has always been faithful, so I have
no reason to distrust him now. But I will not
tell him any more of our secret than I can
possibly help.”

“You will be quite right in that, senor; the
fewer that know it the better. Farewell,
senor.”

Don Ugarto, relieved from the fear and
anxiety which had oppressed and tormented
him, returned home, and called Sancho to him.
In answer to his inquiries, he found that Paul
had been busily engaged for above an hour in
writing a letter. There could be no doubt for
whom it was intended.

“ Yes, yes; I know,” said Ugarto to Sancho.
“Senor Arnoldo is writing to Mr Wilson in
Lima, by my. direction. But look here, Sancho;
that letter is not to be taken to the post before
I see it, as I shall have something more to add.
Do you understand me?”

“Sancho understands,” replied the negro.

“Well, then, see that you pay attention, if

2



PAUL ARNOLD. 91

you want to escape a sound thrashing. If you
deceive me, I’ll send you into the mine, and
then your easy idle life here is at an end. I
want you to stay with Senor Arnoldo the whole
of the day, and see what he does; but, of course,
without his noticing it. I have my reasons for
it. You understand, Sancho?”

“Sancho understand quite good. He bring
letter to Senor Don Ugarto, and not go away
from Senor Arnoldo.”

“Quite right,” said Ugarto with a smile.
“Tf you manage the business cleverly, so that
Don Arnoldo doesn’t observe it, I will speak to
Mr Wilson for you, and he will then perhaps
give you your freedom.”

Sancho grinned in token of his pleasure and
delight, and returned to the ante-room of his
young master. As soon as he found himself
alone, the glad expression disappeared from his
face, and he fell into a reverie.

“There is something going on here not good
for Massa Arnoldo,” said he at length. “What
can I do? Ino dare tell Don Ugarto lies; but
I no like Massa Arnoldo to be unhappy. A
good man; he call Sancho friend. What must
I do?”

He thought for a long time how he could give
a warning to his young master without danger
to himself, but his fear of Don Ugarto was
greater than his love for Paul. He knew that
Ugarto would carry out his threats the instant



92. PAUL ARNOLD.

that he had the least suspicion; and Sancho
shuddered when he thought of the hard work in
the mine, to which he might be driven at any
moment. At last, he came to a conclusion
which seemed to remove all his difficulties.

“J will tell old Huari,” said he. “Thats
the best. I know the Indians love Massa
Arnoldo, and Huari will help him and tell
nobody.”

Huari was the name of the old miner whom
Sancho had often seen in conversation with
Paul, and he thought he could trust him with
the secret without any fear. He had scarcely
made up his mind to steal away to his hut in
the evening or during the night, when Paul
called him.

“Sancho, my friend,’ said he, “take this
letter to the post-office as fast as ever you can,
and come straight back to me. Be careful not
to lose it, for it is of great importance.”

“Yes, senor,” replied Sancho, taking the
letter.

Instead, however, of going to the post with it,
he took it to Don Ugarto, who broke the seal
at once, and read it. The letter was directed
to Mr Wilson, and contained an exact account
of the fraud and robbery which Paul had dis-
covered in the course of the last few days.

“ All right, Sancho,” said Don Ugarto, quietly
putting the letter in his pocket; “I see that
you are a sharp fellow, and you shan’t lose



PAUL ARNOLD. 93

your reward. Now take this letter, and post
it. Our sly young gentleman may perhaps ask
you if you have posted his letter properly, and
you must be prepared to tell him that you have,
Run, Sancho, and be sure that you give him the
right answer if he should inquire. Be as quick
as you can, for I may want you for something
else.”

Sancho took the letter which Don Ugarto
had given him, and lost no time in posting it.
On his way back, it struck him that he might
as well take advantage of the opportunity to
tell his suspicions to Huari; and he ran at the
top of his speed to the hut of the old Indian.
Fortunately, he found him at home, and told
him everything without reserve.

“That doesn’t surprise me in the least,” said
Huari. “They hate him because he is honest
and is a friend to the poor Indian. But I will
keep my eyes open. All right, Sancho! You
can be quite easy. Although Huari is old, his
eyes are still sharp. Go, and speak to no
one.”

Sancho was glad that he had been able to
give a hint to the old Indian without causing
any suspicion, and hastened back to the
house,

The day passed without anything occurring
worthy of notice. Paul remained at home, and
Sancho’s post as spy was not at all difficult.

On the following morning, Paul went to the



94 PAUL ARNOLD.

mine as usual to assist the overseers in direct-
ing the work. | Everything proceeded in the
customary manner; and the only difference
which Paul observed was, that Rivero was more
friendly and polite than he had ever been
before.

“Ugarto will have told him that I have
found it all out,” thought he, “and he hopes
perhaps that I will change my mind, and join
them in their roguery. But nothing of the
kind! Honesty is the best policy.”

Towards evening, Rivero left the mine, but
asked Paul to remain and superintend every-
thing till the men were changed for the night,
to which he readily agreed. Scarcely, however,
had Rivero left, when Huari went up to Paul,
and whispered in his ear: “ Be on your guard,
senor. There is some wicked plot being made
against you.”

“That may be,” replied Paul in a whisper ;
“but I have prepared myself for that.”

With these words he opened his coat and
shewed a pair of pistols in his belt,

“That is something, certainly,” replied the
Indian. “But remember that old Huari is on
the watch, whatever may happen.”

After these words, the Indian returned to his
work, and Paul gave his orders with as much
calmness as if nothing of the least importance
had passed between them.

At last, six o’clock struck, and the workmen



PAUL ARNOLD. 95

left the mine, and were replaced by the night-
gang. Paul gave them the necessary orders,
and after having fulfilled all Rivero’s instruc-
tions, prepared to return home. The inspector
who had charge during the night detained him,
however, with several questions for nearly an
hour, so that when he reached the mouth of the
shaft it was quite dark, and nothing was visible
but the faint light of the stars. The deepest
silence reigned around, and Paul could not help
saying to himself, with a shudder: “ This is just
the very night for a deed of darkness.” With-
out, however, dwelling on such gloomy thoughts,
he struck out at a sharp pace, and had nearly
reached Pasco, whose bright windows seemed to
invite him onwards, when three dark figures
suddenly darted out of a ruined hut by the side
of the road, and rushed upon him. Before he
had time to draw his pistols, or to cry for help, he
was seized, robbed of his weapons, bound hand
and foot, and carried into the hut. His assail-
ants then opened a door leading to a passage,
which might have communicated with an old
mine. The place was in perfect darkness, but
the bandits appeared to know the way exactly.
After carrying him about two hundred paces,
they laid him on the ground, fastened a strong
rope round his body, and lowered him into a
hole where the air was so impure that he could
hardly breathe. Paul had no means of knowing
how deep the hole was; but after about a



96 ~ . PAUL ARNOLD.

second he reached the bottom and struck the
ground. The rope was then slipped with a jerk
from his shoulders, and immediately drawn out
of reach.

“ Good-night, and pleasant dreams!” cried a
rough voice from above in a scornful tone. “We
have made a bed for you in which you can sleep
as long as you like—till the end of the world,
in fact !”

The voice awoke a low echo in the galleries
of the old mine; Paul heard the retreating
footsteps of the bandits grow fainter and fainter,
and then all was silent as the grave. A loud
noise like the shutting of a door broke the
silence a minute or two afterwards, and every-
thing became again perfectly still. The deepest
darkness and silence surrounded the helpless
prisoner.

A dull stupor followed the first sensations of
surprise and horror which had almost over-
powered the usually stout and resolute heart of
Paul. Full of confidence that he was in the
right, he had not thought it possible that he
could so soon fall a victim to the revenge of the
man whose dishonesty he had exposed ; and yet
he found himself, as if by a stroke of magic,
suddenly cast into the most hopeless and
miserable position. Bound hand and _ foot,
hidden in the depths of the earth, buried in
a living grave, there seemed not the least
glimmer of hope to comfort or sustain him.



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'2012-05-18T13:21:38-04:00'
describe
'417648' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTL' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
672f825ba425ce9a8870a27360025142
4fd28f314ad89461d114e5c8ad428ed76ee4f157
'2012-05-18T13:23:23-04:00'
describe
'556' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTM' 'sip-files00134.pro'
cace3f76a9a9c7abc1940d61d0807931
272be7383d5a843271147cfa45960882c77a1d7f
'2012-05-18T13:20:43-04:00'
describe
'440491' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTN' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
1ad94d11180e97473688e26cb193af2e
4cdac303a6dac5a7d2069ab49b5151e8667f24d6
'2012-05-18T13:19:25-04:00'
describe
'390763' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTO' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c62d787fd1e0535961ae84d5548c2807
c3300aac40c1bfbf08a137cbc51b1019d286eea1
'2012-05-18T13:19:46-04:00'
describe
'64031' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTP' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
ccf3d91d4e69d197175aa798193467bd
3dc0f5d0887aca3cb80f88e906e3b0330ff9a5e8
'2012-05-18T13:20:30-04:00'
describe
'274356' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTQ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
232a243b4ddca148f87a28628937114a
ee4cc7be8ba24f4e2ce0f284a10ec49944df598e
'2012-05-18T13:21:04-04:00'
describe
'55538' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTR' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
9da386da0090a8ac382fc2a1163570d6
681248273ae1f3bbac552183a24a9bc83d7c9c13
'2012-05-18T13:17:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTS' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
e91d5d69ca26a351b6dc4f67daa29037
06c04841aa723eb9cb9191b910539ef0b71e8ba5
'2012-05-18T13:19:45-04:00'
describe
'60571' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTT' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
4c75068f829a42cdd0214493465a6122
a17285204b79bb66db945f19108b91bf4508a283
'2012-05-18T13:19:34-04:00'
describe
'57956' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTU' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
5351d9784aa46fc321b6fe2001ac0398
936366a29e8b47146edf8fae3643cc3cd99b85df
'2012-05-18T13:22:12-04:00'
describe
'274274' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
78ea5edd25c431ef31a1d69436422d8a
d222a1f7d396026ea123c2f490489244f8bf2d9e
describe
'22873' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTW' 'sip-files00058.pro'
e0601445c33b3a51e4abb28d91268bcc
550b167c7938f46d5edca6ad4e86ec0a9d62659d
'2012-05-18T13:19:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTX' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
025d317eb6b513ea34ab04e94c2fb4d2
2aa1d24e9801c32081a8c44d71202480043a7f5c
describe
'431545' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
70cd9f0f050a668c3eec54365715aded
9d016acba2b1f8b5d9c72289bcc8c34377d6a6be
'2012-05-18T13:19:54-04:00'
describe
'433927' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPTZ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
02b3ad13d43ea450bd36d6b76ce9b82d
aace7729e6b07de7cc519d1d1016619624851252
'2012-05-18T13:20:27-04:00'
describe
'427997' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUA' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
6cd277540e12d4ba3b0f318bc72868cf
235014d929038c2a5926a166fd66e96a2c9c9f11
'2012-05-18T13:18:01-04:00'
describe
'56385' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUB' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b2c2e0491fedec1ddc31f69c2fc6c4af
8c54b7a206e1341c6c906c00eddb90e2bc38f571
'2012-05-18T13:20:41-04:00'
describe
'274262' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUC' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d7d6e07f2943457e69f1fb0984b3a259
840fb2a0cbd646baef02336d03682adac840faa5
'2012-05-18T13:21:20-04:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUD' 'sip-files00097.txt'
e4df65b587d7400e4fc35a5d93e0a9ee
32dab582d127f1c4215fc521d3a4cc45a73a6b45
describe
'55728' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUE' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
a4526a3c69f58872b07faed7e0b9e6f3
35a04507b906955ba6c8437068b047ac78ce4e2b
'2012-05-18T13:21:21-04:00'
describe
'274325' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUF' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
c0415d09a38f2c02d635f6a966314bf0
28fcc065499c18c0f84827ba498a7db4c75a6385
'2012-05-18T13:19:21-04:00'
describe
'445296' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
a70352bd48e482f83f3262087a6548e2
b37307280a6edef8323c30b93035612d413dde57
'2012-05-18T13:24:29-04:00'
describe
'2217036' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUH' 'sip-files00064.tif'
30ef30532bc545b60902a74fbab007ca
1a2f4014a0a4940bc9c114e876d536c5fe716f36
'2012-05-18T13:21:23-04:00'
describe
'61638' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
8aa87d85036a63e9448b4b0d4271bfab
c218d29a2240c055a48f0d09a5048cbbab82ff65
'2012-05-18T13:19:02-04:00'
describe
'159149' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
35f2bd494bc730470676673b51fe9c82
61dc67aa0b028bec5d494dcaebf9d140800fffdc
'2012-05-18T13:20:08-04:00'
describe
'161388' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUK' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
055267c88806c7a3a102224f0bd61389
bfe17ab1a764d9c2da1855bfd3dcfcdfcb616ca9
'2012-05-18T13:18:45-04:00'
describe
'37972' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUL' 'sip-files00028.pro'
e0c7e4391164699da50cf6d8e0ccd9b9
d709d22002383d71e446e36964df933614ea9b96
'2012-05-18T13:25:39-04:00'
describe
'483' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUM' 'sip-files00132.txt'
eb1ba069890060d147dc40236c7d6b0b
bd49b143793a16865abda6d598265da4984bf62e
'2012-05-18T13:19:24-04:00'
describe
'33976' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUN' 'sip-files00126.pro'
b8c22e532af280787d76a078f9f39b2f
ed3bf1e04aef7cf91627dde683ef79ff470a83b4
'2012-05-18T13:19:09-04:00'
describe
'2217096' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUO' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b48a8bbc36cc8d514d44722c9fa250f7
49ad8fb8cdba1184ee1e6c14f369b4e91d8038fd
'2012-05-18T13:19:52-04:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUP' 'sip-files00018.txt'
39f4ac629a4cc8fa66c8af0d223c77cf
2da022a9bc968a9ddf20795b932e543f4d14b837
'2012-05-18T13:18:06-04:00'
describe
'17044' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUQ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
a2dd237715e8b055ff2cdea68042ccaf
5b803713115d372a31b3c273d6c7d1d0df281bf9
'2012-05-18T13:24:47-04:00'
describe
'7087252' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUR' 'sip-files00005.tif'
e47146e05361f6c37216b6836954fda3
99b431739ecb16c8cf53460d57ac021dcd0a1763
'2012-05-18T13:24:14-04:00'
describe
'430205' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUS' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
0401d879ffa671a262139fa65cb6b3ea
35f4473bf0844ed0745769b177c49d7701a8eaef
'2012-05-18T13:25:16-04:00'
describe
'438031' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUT' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
97c481992424c72283b67bc1d05b788e
5900a97c2234f8af662d9245f426f03a3304c403
'2012-05-18T13:20:15-04:00'
describe
'274354' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUU' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
b1840c16cfdb0698d78417c8c0948705
ba1ba7f9e8d38e92687a722c9cb1b5ba3b922ca3
'2012-05-18T13:18:16-04:00'
describe
'2216760' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUV' 'sip-files00020.tif'
7d4d52f9a83aa3be3cee61386a34199f
9584a9bef8d68698b5708c64e5a83c31199b38ed
'2012-05-18T13:25:36-04:00'
describe
'36970' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUW' 'sip-files00118.pro'
ca127522defc88d203cf5a6ac4c0b572
1bdbd6907dcbc024570b6b1b3575ca3226bee7d4
'2012-05-18T13:19:08-04:00'
describe
'274304' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUX' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
af57cd5252ad5ffc923058c7eb7a9d5e
abd6f99f90729490227216d25f2a4d408b724453
'2012-05-18T13:17:46-04:00'
describe
'35612' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUY' 'sip-files00009.pro'
b47d0e25b3c37abb80140c2a2622ce73
9b75a77e4be91bbc254d871f97dc4d2233120d52
'2012-05-18T13:21:05-04:00'
describe
'274267' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPUZ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
c8237c1127fb817a02f31ef109524c2f
3fc14579188e5579b5633ab2925fd047b64c36d2
'2012-05-18T13:19:04-04:00'
describe
'272691' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVA' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
22b1e0966a80fe981496bdf777c75895
32d8c06ca283a32c2bb8a7989b9f02bfb5535035
'2012-05-18T13:19:33-04:00'
describe
'158861' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVB' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
765839b1aeb79f9dfae2fbd6b619d25f
908d7702f89fe4faf8a85be05663151339095ecf
'2012-05-18T13:20:39-04:00'
describe
'274326' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVC' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
7c645c096d8b6d182829a93908f92f5d
969d71645186afc1a73257c2903c543096abc50d
'2012-05-18T13:17:58-04:00'
describe
'274340' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVD' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
b4015242f269decb7b72df01c1f38dad
51ba3cb66248fa5583dfe58298bdf17d251e3d9b
'2012-05-18T13:21:54-04:00'
describe
'62912' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
0f9b326140edf76a6573aef6d2f5e5ae
22f04d1cd57fe38868835cb863ff4280b057eea6
'2012-05-18T13:20:07-04:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVF' 'sip-files00051.txt'
65d9ba2ee6d74bc00b4af761e5ad773d
d90811453ff3dfa80167a352f6ab7e68861396b3
'2012-05-18T13:25:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVG' 'sip-files00028.tif'
91540b8b83c88a9e73273da1704df06c
ab105fec5f9dfb66123a0bce365783d3d38b24f3
'2012-05-18T13:18:27-04:00'
describe
'274339' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVH' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
70d0b60f774d0cfa5b9d12025e2bdf3b
67930ee8a1ea3819f0fd887dfa263d07c28a6c1d
describe
'426796' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVI' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
660b16c4162891e8d238159465c11c17
d94bd3f1e2470a74bb0c0fe41c51d8daabc6f145
'2012-05-18T13:18:36-04:00'
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVJ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
fcab5c8946d93e1326a0bb0aa03a62a3
87a6558de158df391f246685d76a9e02697775e1
'2012-05-18T13:20:13-04:00'
describe
'162841' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVK' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
4e23128ac2bc1daf57c0aa336c1c767c
673f1651d81f02934e43d9eb467c6883ed20c68f
'2012-05-18T13:20:31-04:00'
describe
'2217004' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVL' 'sip-files00056.tif'
a81d1a6eb5416420a86765fad767ca36
f480cd84e3514d7305959a1b112b26d454603bd3
'2012-05-18T13:17:34-04:00'
describe
'7615128' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVM' 'sip-files00002.tif'
481ade11902732c35508962eb427d3cc
193c9fcd39d6fa646643c8b189a123c9d24c2959
'2012-05-18T13:18:34-04:00'
describe
'279467' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVN' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
684a92ef9b8e7d3e7f328f6937a6b674
dd5d188d0cbbc912862b7bbc9682f8c1932273ba
'2012-05-18T13:24:58-04:00'
describe
'459143' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
88ff8a60ef9c87701d5300d15e60f982
e89cdaa05cd9b6f49892734ec590e97f5c004d82
'2012-05-18T13:18:55-04:00'
describe
'2216868' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVP' 'sip-files00008.tif'
7262c20d637703c6880ab52ba0e3c24d
81b712d908e5badd41cf12f3ece8795780821bc7
'2012-05-18T13:18:29-04:00'
describe
'445520' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
5c3265933338e293f6fcee85d218b845
a3f85d1bd1c18f3667f684061c695b45ae2de4cf
'2012-05-18T13:17:59-04:00'
describe
'432477' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVR' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
4ba63756608fb420fbd039d8930a8ad4
bf6c7c71ba6a81c1b3d61a8636a3adb72a487409
'2012-05-18T13:22:23-04:00'
describe
'62172' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVS' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
a7f67f7a96e482aa143bdffa4570813f
be710bb70adeadf50903ed352463bd5e9ebd3b55
'2012-05-18T13:19:18-04:00'
describe
'2217160' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
1db94f256a7b61615c2e34cee2d00ec8
ce15e6e673c69eb9ade580bb81a4cb0af5639213
'2012-05-18T13:18:54-04:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVU' 'sip-files00121.txt'
0ea61173420607278f9d1aea27640d58
92004066e1b632a7e3a03cb4292457e4b69e6eff
'2012-05-18T13:18:44-04:00'
describe
'432321' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVV' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
1d19cf4232485c9659d60b66e20bdb93
d3c3cedaf7289d7980de8084b431cbdeb1e8b5ab
'2012-05-18T13:21:16-04:00'
describe
'64305' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVW' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
b2f1cadeacd5066a1d41565ad46ea478
aff77b37c899be6e6974f065402769efb397d886
'2012-05-18T13:19:32-04:00'
describe
'405847' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
9c9c54b7d2b10fa1482dce7659bec431
6f80a83d67d75eb4ef2f5761e1a1d56dbe98bfa7
describe
'274313' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
ce90105eb0fb35d75288557bcfa9d522
e312b72d4c63ca6ed1823de709ec2a7a44769319
describe
'37939' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPVZ' 'sip-files00099.pro'
11ab39b85bbcc67c29db7e5b81b59175
7c146c4f9860627204a18850ebd523d3fb8a7f64
'2012-05-18T13:20:11-04:00'
describe
'2139928' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWA' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9116eac0282d96533235fee702cf0a57
2f1a1750fd79d04c7f770182d8e2c8de14aef767
'2012-05-18T13:19:56-04:00'
describe
'274327' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWB' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
ac9d62b25de6a7d9c4689aa052ced139
e19397a1129158f73f852edfb3020ca7c8952414
'2012-05-18T13:18:33-04:00'
describe
'36631' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWC' 'sip-files00008.pro'
d375218343ee7bee33d068bca7f116c1
8ffdd90d30488fdf61f6295b0a73ba0713c14c20
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWD' 'sip-files00108.txt'
1fa91ba71c95ece5d06b3bc9928c1f5c
82a3a74161613750266b251b0b1f94a356901743
'2012-05-18T13:22:46-04:00'
describe
'16184' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWE' 'sip-files00117.pro'
368f697e2328ed768f54c359c318a12a
1b2d344bea71c0100dc025e1880a395191b08c34
'2012-05-18T13:19:28-04:00'
describe
'168593' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWF' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
c147ad37e4803af8b3ca99d2241f04a8
f0426d3873205029897b3ae97463b1e205d64bdd
'2012-05-18T13:20:47-04:00'
describe
'63359' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWG' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
0465b51d42db150a26e604646e50802a
9a8fb3b44ad3c1f7747342769d435f097f14719c
'2012-05-18T13:25:15-04:00'
describe
'167706' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWH' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
271d6884d64a6f3db6ae09cd58269fe0
8f4812ff9a213006f0b1622e07ffab7330a6a6b3
describe
'63169' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWI' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
512c2930d92cc10b5e488142b0a280a1
28afebf29e2fa03c4e9c1b64e77f7d700fef4fbb
'2012-05-18T13:23:03-04:00'
describe
'16' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWJ' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
8d2832472e19bff4b9e9e64343b29a91
7fc0a2954d335b8e2cc70ffa2da1972f260ece5c
describe
'274266' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWK' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
161e53598eadf7eeb0622fb6252a2fe5
54f11f6d538bf39320aebe0f3374b825b8978ff9
'2012-05-18T13:21:01-04:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
634b1b9a8f8a3cee7ecdba06d77977ce
df96b2205e88f3fe12b030522712dc801fe5d398
'2012-05-18T13:17:42-04:00'
describe
'413756' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWM' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
d5ac451bfeb8979334365ce51210f50c
778cc37cb9c5f3cab81fa30d741964e2602aeca0
'2012-05-18T13:19:42-04:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWN' 'sip-files00093.txt'
aca7bc2afd4ce6fedda5e7f00a2ddc1b
5a8ca374f37b2443140b6819a2718ba8a941eabf
'2012-05-18T13:18:43-04:00'
describe
'472498' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWO' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
c5e5503331627a804e6f34a3866586e6
6b3065ca4ea4c87d647a08bad90b8cc94e9b26a8
describe
'449789' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
f2a710c699ffc38194f8938cf3bed7d7
2fa8229fd3bd0905fcf498c7f4d444b97f5e3b83
'2012-05-18T13:25:08-04:00'
describe
'64525' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
6f7c81e987a6e1800e6e45c95531ede0
9a667c304945325cce8ba3b21c9b315045629464
'2012-05-18T13:22:24-04:00'
describe
'274286' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWR' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
d015a2cc2bc06115b6992828687a3c58
d5635b59525bd02f55b9e9d07d5e38f9bcc3e802
'2012-05-18T13:22:47-04:00'
describe
'36216' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWS' 'sip-files00027.pro'
5b4479ba49c39c91996a5ecbe56703d4
cf1f9cef6d9d00e39f44e4b7eaffca3f21f47b7c
describe
'2217048' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWT' 'sip-files00080.tif'
bbb4a832f79eb4474a7fa6d1cf0223ad
9ab49ac8964a0f518fddcc4cecc0d2945cdbdf0f
'2012-05-18T13:20:52-04:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWU' 'sip-files00104.txt'
033b52c0e49af0f1dbb58f8d7ac2986c
c0291d1b45546e9a48f20f970206eb1c1a980090
'2012-05-18T13:22:35-04:00'
describe
'274236' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWV' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
b357010239b1505ce81659f865149f4d
6d29f53ba0028b8b8e5d26edc5fe78be2ed8ebed
'2012-05-18T13:17:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWW' 'sip-files00135.pro'
28a1c7985f9b383ed8d4eb96d4c52674
78aced54b38dabb0b910ee5fb84500d12e569e72
'2012-05-18T13:20:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
f5721f78d885ac52190af22a3a29dc29
6be88e78f118b0ae597cb5e359e308b8c1b5df3b
'2012-05-18T13:20:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWY' 'sip-files00038.tif'
ed0a6cf91efc5f5da7d64c70fd343d69
7c40d66f631f52c44897647c5d6835cb1a4dfbab
'2012-05-18T13:22:25-04:00'
describe
'438810' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPWZ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
49f1d18b73562a8ea0123d685bf93b19
e4b1ef77d6b17a49ab6af378d8e9d9756b3ba655
describe
'437541' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXA' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
c50bddb9cfc11136073b7b78096c0592
10f340fd42b3cd8ca82dca7976d12cc4ca7b78fc
'2012-05-18T13:20:22-04:00'
describe
'448182' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXB' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
2e455fd683bb1658a19837be390a3eda
1ed720127e427a137c3bb17a7f34c9d4f6bad567
describe
'269851' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXC' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
67fbf5504d9461329e3a90683fd751f6
4bee28e8a534dadb55dc3ca55b872f1523e15fb1
'2012-05-18T13:18:17-04:00'
describe
'32038' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXD' 'sip-files00015.pro'
d741df7e5d7ba07bb88466d8ed1742c7
62f0733e306cc9778c8dfd5004eccfef1826e575
'2012-05-18T13:18:13-04:00'
describe
'64175' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXE' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
5e573c04c7532f5dc923ac4e23754189
7b5aeadc326242d38540853df415d6e22710b5e6
describe
'173058' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXF' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
53fdc04577076d65df6e56234ca65daa
705465edc03e796dc58f935e78561948786f775a
describe
'274324' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXG' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
f4585bdf715dcd4684f905cadedefc92
8a5cf1226c711c8ff000b618fe5ec81acb8319de
'2012-05-18T13:24:07-04:00'
describe
'159420' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXH' 'sip-filesUF00054254_00001.mets'
8d929eb76c54437a1ea23c9c0ec04008
4beffd51c641c8c85bba170ac7d1fb09be019eb2
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T15:02:32-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'831348' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXK' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
23b8ee1f290c392960e987edcf57baf9
04d337357c28b7d555eede02dd31254d404273f9
describe
'332513' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXL' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
58ec27c7ddf508b5d0a344886725e230
d218e86bb03109d61f2709fb33c2aa6e21d84708
'2012-05-18T13:19:07-04:00'
describe
'220724' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXM' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
d47ab2cc316c8ea100cabf50ff5cebf5
2cec86ecb7c8343e21b644c2cb4d0b544e5cc822
'2012-05-18T13:24:46-04:00'
describe
'513999' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXN' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
fa9855d1d2bc903093444f365f9f7e95
de6b457cdf45e06bf89e8d444281f9fa33a4cf2a
'2012-05-18T13:25:18-04:00'
describe
'388525' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXO' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
cebec8472eef2fd267e55354401c06ae
759fffb5fb3e535260f51d30a709ab050977a75f
'2012-05-18T13:20:45-04:00'
describe
'434519' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXP' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4a09f63a94bfb90bef075efdcb880ef7
8ce32c637a9d3dca3116f945abc1883e68a119d0
'2012-05-18T13:18:35-04:00'
describe
'438453' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXQ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
e518ae8a38ab54aacb14607930029bbd
20d3e772d602908e0e3d70f0989ea14220696e93
describe
'409731' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXR' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
dbb82bee93cc751106ad47a4d150661c
0e46dab609fc144dd3402f46a283c24e2e8a69b8
describe
'463192' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXS' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
ba03fd03d6c2bd1324f3ab572e7bf655
27522ebf954f3211c8a6356a4abe779a575c9113
describe
'427329' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXT' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
a88bb44c2f53a9d44695fe52cb72461e
31e5595e44d4908f5821c8f6621f909cf6e1509b
'2012-05-18T13:18:59-04:00'
describe
'433127' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXU' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
34b5defa9b915b6f7bee8f14bc46e637
039ad4498ee61ee44ecc941e96a76bc17e44ec46
'2012-05-18T13:20:21-04:00'
describe
'413507' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXV' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
1c02bd34649ec9219dea728a28ec0eba
b0f1a2ccec81ce86414f9993694fa0095477f49b
'2012-05-18T13:24:04-04:00'
describe
'409960' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXW' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
92ca7880e9e907047e0d94d732ca5727
d4cafbbccd91725ddcaedcb3bb05499b365a63ea
'2012-05-18T13:19:00-04:00'
describe
'427919' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXX' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
3ae005862a01a7603eb45c95b2fc9390
dffa6b1b5be19b79999837f6864a96d6efe682c2
'2012-05-18T13:18:10-04:00'
describe
'286279' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXY' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f8a174088680b4619d15b3716db8ab75
713233988e0ad0b3245ed3bdd2b487706676d719
'2012-05-18T13:22:52-04:00'
describe
'427214' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPXZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
734a05eca3240e926d9cef2023a1bf5e
732383c1d41cbb35aee89cfe4cc736e89b6750f4
'2012-05-18T13:20:10-04:00'
describe
'436899' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYA' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
c28338b405318257cfe7d5dae4250401
751330258f3faef2e7e5b1fc80874e20fdb0e120
'2012-05-18T13:19:40-04:00'
describe
'448072' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2c7f2960ab1231d3780ede3b69aee1d7
b57d2002d9a80628bec265485e9280c85db9840b
'2012-05-18T13:22:13-04:00'
describe
'479297' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d628a709a795408d3eb52111b976fecc
7a1fab4c365de06a842c4cdd34cdb823434e1446
'2012-05-18T13:18:39-04:00'
describe
'449365' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYD' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
3c24a440886cb36e8b8f72bb04ce1936
71c061d634133f8af4257b4711eba3fb7ec78f91
'2012-05-18T13:17:36-04:00'
describe
'436273' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYE' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
ad0d6e62e4a2d4b4ef1ba4ec95d0ae5e
5fb3af6efb3fea990d6ccb137ea6cb3a76b12e17
'2012-05-18T13:19:48-04:00'
describe
'468820' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYF' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
04ad2786eeaef1f62300cda309f6cb7b
b00b3d43f02b3b4aa22e2b9fb5664662c4e75028
'2012-05-18T13:23:05-04:00'
describe
'462529' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYG' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
53fc609e73a628b0fa566a1bd61ea9cc
075e8dc3b7feaa7ad4c74af5322af10bb431a6e1
'2012-05-18T13:22:53-04:00'
describe
'447874' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYH' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
cd58c57e224e4a7f5f83f28d653f1abb
753bfb731d59c2a6c07d8da3e54069807dca2045
'2012-05-18T13:19:10-04:00'
describe
'480425' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYI' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
2c64ff13747d247a721a0e560a8bfdb5
881961c77379aece826796dc8609acb244e326cd
'2012-05-18T13:19:35-04:00'
describe
'462903' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYJ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
98d50651196462738312280a381d2fb2
181a9431af81e79a489d804e3e251393e3eb3066
'2012-05-18T13:18:22-04:00'
describe
'454437' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYK' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
466a1c97d9d9943935d4ea8c0a3c78e9
6b380c5c48c82b27e60e793180812b6bbd02c6bd
describe
'364828' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYL' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
1453f604eefc306eac34a5f0247e0375
3698624c6906435cd84960e2fcff80f74aa54865
'2012-05-18T13:19:13-04:00'
describe
'433141' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYM' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
4da86dd934f821b849f4b4ef622c98e6
ae43146492efe89879053bc7153405ae272719c2
describe
'475585' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
95fd65548174be9bdc23c92b45b218d5
adf35bf616b9983f8317c03461362f5e40358545
'2012-05-18T13:22:19-04:00'
describe
'453253' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
86a983bdc53284966fed50eeac9c1d92
68af673819967ab22c2d357cd0f00be05dac5bb0
'2012-05-18T13:25:43-04:00'
describe
'437448' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYP' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
7309aad1bfc5a6dcc398a6228fd39424
f2a14764be1b8bfc12ac178bdb702100a906e0b1
describe
'463113' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
6dddad3f5e0b4e86cac52784b25a6314
1b39ead92dad5aa7f7343b42181cabaed64cd4ec
describe
'470774' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
08b41eb579dfdb439b3379fc9645b517
3acb4603c9bd80f1c5acb30aff2bd48d963e0de1
describe
'463279' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYS' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
4348d6950faf741cde0ba7e8c6a9ca0b
b803c2a709c5699c9aad82d938e2b1006da6b154
'2012-05-18T13:19:29-04:00'
describe
'456079' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYT' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
161c8f2764c6e732e6c3180c9d26ea0a
dfe6610fa2f8e053ad52873c0fc5aa46e97eec6d
describe
'461566' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYU' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
397785682c7b2878a3f2b34c4c0cdb86
37da2cf19dd97f65e70e7b720e7fde79ba906f1e
describe
'476957' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYV' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
59425ef77fc05e8b92db28edc5a49ad8
b88c5bf805526f150d8b5dd1966dbdaa1498dd85
describe
'479050' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
5bc564bd6236ca679580f515c0cf5c4d
cccc626bf1eed37268dff8c19d2bf022ccaf9829
'2012-05-18T13:18:23-04:00'
describe
'449796' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
9ca04be147b561011a2172317b7ac41a
a48e6f8896f264dfe80a4fccba0360cad9e7ffd9
describe
'453684' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
97eca38059c34778d6b57deb3e0d1ca7
56406b405320e821a5236e3183c1cfdce1c3e0fd
'2012-05-18T13:18:21-04:00'
describe
'453740' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPYZ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
b7289d9214172b3692f76fe73a61f60c
6d0ec45b4ddf4cc2d493e0b72a12a47c0fe45c11
'2012-05-18T13:23:04-04:00'
describe
'372979' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZA' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
5a57d9cef03accc4007f966f389a5628
ea556737450a58d42833372d699bebfecf987d10
describe
'400032' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZB' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
e5f02bc1303d42df47e0d4ab7be25ccc
6f815144f67ff447fbcc51eca4f7896135c3ca30
describe
'439415' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
d9fa8b7ea86ec6f6310762f78558fac3
cf53439db9711e3374948a37517f51278e1e6837
describe
'444879' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZD' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
a47f83fba8682bc8396ba5c43899c69c
773e40d3557adb5001d58b101b502602979fdc17
'2012-05-18T13:17:43-04:00'
describe
'430037' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZE' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
8eb399cdf3ad0633e9d743611cd755ec
65ecf5c9e4c02e5c8b0f8b1581d0b5288bb8063d
'2012-05-18T13:18:14-04:00'
describe
'441891' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZF' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
efe35c5320ac3056ff88472d6bc3c4f0
8b88a1572ccfdfb5905bcf66629c48dbff89120f
'2012-05-18T13:18:50-04:00'
describe
'453659' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZG' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
0e8f975c75bd6ffa7ca1d4d180f04ba5
45cf9d6df5461c09f92b4393f38e95a74bcd9aed
'2012-05-18T13:19:58-04:00'
describe
'455278' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZH' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
5c2d9700ebb76c4583b21c353b3cadce
bb543a40aa8a15a0bd9d2fe55df9e7d6644c96b3
'2012-05-18T13:24:53-04:00'
describe
'458625' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZI' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
c9d7c389b3a2b1fc7accd5c93a2cd585
e276c7af64348eb790761f88aa2d100e67baa10d
'2012-05-18T13:19:27-04:00'
describe
'442469' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
960d7d153f2db6c68b89e1fb9bccf26b
6eff6b5868f14acc3d86a7ddc59bbc56ce514b37
'2012-05-18T13:18:42-04:00'
describe
'425076' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZK' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
35ef3a52d86b8a7b793ef6abfb5492ee
aa691a1c037deb314e253ce0e8f4c080efbb548b
'2012-05-18T13:21:30-04:00'
describe
'436938' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZL' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
a6d4f456bcb11c7fc4e7d6fe9fd310d1
6203b4626b2f4ab7114b5fa9c6ea06c95cbf16d3
'2012-05-18T13:18:49-04:00'
describe
'441002' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZM' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
301933d43337e87c87ed106cd604c334
e85932b28b450593a6f5205c01181462653317f5
describe
'440382' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZN' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
44c08d6c9b1932c96ee49d92df3c1cc8
fc6e6b11a11f67c2d86ffcbc3cb75e4b7dd30a06
describe
'356909' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZO' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7a0ff15bcc8ce89a245e5902784b417f
46a2a7503914fee6c6b4763d8d53c5920ebf9c5a
'2012-05-18T13:20:14-04:00'
describe
'434411' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZP' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
61af63d3afaacbc37549b081e14a0fcf
538290691262ec6dadc3a10226f622c370b4e72f
'2012-05-18T13:25:35-04:00'
describe
'455525' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZQ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
6d4d9061526a1f8e203c4f2be6dd5da8
07189e3d4da0c17e68a7a314480c1fb83694b380
'2012-05-18T13:25:07-04:00'
describe
'437196' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZR' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
10f2cff1d270a15de0180c232b975d23
c15c311b83fb4b21f7e4318eb22a3afab755777f
describe
'434216' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZS' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a6d853d7b3c41c7e3131222653054e15
5955fcc5af121ac1391c6ebc52af68d44138c3f4
describe
'447045' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZT' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a0056d265a891f9eeec9140102c87040
6b4b9c4957635699464972a4b38eb9898ac3fd8a
'2012-05-18T13:20:20-04:00'
describe
'431262' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZU' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
d7c383b52cbf3027d9df58ff20553d40
4a6959687c8b789f21048fc5c8cd7ee03203a45a
describe
'440582' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZV' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
17226a6dc154701ab249b8f264e85289
9fc5e9ba17d688f7be3431c52ea182d057216826
describe
'455770' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
7222bf0c8c53b0696c48450cf38c140a
a7c1aa72565f6a1fa71ed5e78794606629f38460
describe
'433614' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
77aa2ff3a0190dbcfe6a8034c16fae57
3c7dbccc45860959af05ed135e1cb465fc2521e8
'2012-05-18T13:18:56-04:00'
describe
'431509' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZY' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
031007e49af681c5bbff0421a85d82e2
f1277f368461b4ed0589af64eada48b22538973a
'2012-05-18T13:20:09-04:00'
describe
'438947' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAPZZ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
1c5849cb704d2119a782b40fa7adcd22
6266ae54e1f1c640caf16651e764805f2d341bbc
'2012-05-18T13:17:51-04:00'
describe
'441430' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAA' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c8b189238ec5a9afb6bc6424adf3510b
d1d4bfe57203dfede1b149ca619d03603777b695
'2012-05-18T13:17:50-04:00'
describe
'436193' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAB' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
235d331ea230e5a319cd9eec2c33b516
d4dee4bace6781a2f770512c6335d1bec5a4d39a
'2012-05-18T13:22:41-04:00'
describe
'425731' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAC' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
4285bdbde832e37107365835b7050e9a
9514bcb04bae3873c97deedbd22f432fd169fc00
describe
'444556' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
a26fd476626c015bbe704c7b95b2318a
bcf0f0977810f7363602c3e4778bef23da217c71
describe
'472599' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAE' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
fe666ec17450f64ffd63744c3f61084b
6387ebaa3deda70b599ce74848f2c6e871dd0147
'2012-05-18T13:19:53-04:00'
describe
'429268' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAF' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
f65a772c81e7599dba9d45dab528f5d4
655bfeac8dd2d8cae5efa44a489b4f7e348029cc
'2012-05-18T13:20:00-04:00'
describe
'451027' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAG' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
873ea2732e68c62b572b5ebaa8b98ee8
d622d3389b305a6038edf4756c69839f35dde82f
'2012-05-18T13:17:53-04:00'
describe
'408998' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAH' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
ec9c41cc2322e6bed3c216c08b1a8068
01dd091301958fae33132b5ee22e21b0ad2e232c
'2012-05-18T13:19:16-04:00'
describe
'434072' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAI' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
58d1d414bd446228bfc66988ba9dfea0
2195c32bca8d60533b92329ece5f31e7e62c2853
describe
'423287' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAJ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
0c6d8ecfd0260bba3eb8904eacd55923
e840d7b6d7a8882855d36fa03f86203ab091215b
describe
'448606' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAK' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
b58eb07b3c1170c03f107774ac70f643
5327eee798b73c262cb571dc42edadbb7203effa
'2012-05-18T13:17:37-04:00'
describe
'458244' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAL' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
44555b38b26686de8fbf47196efb6fad
3a664e8e3637f2d8f8163ddc448aa33a4888d847
'2012-05-18T13:17:49-04:00'
describe
'436119' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAM' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
b15e872e173ad2beff2cdf7976434cf9
05d357eb5aab977a93f1eba58dd9677ef98cc3a2
'2012-05-18T13:17:56-04:00'
describe
'439860' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
086fec29f7cd7c31ee70aae8ff7be904
5b17dadceea7a18bbda6990833f8b703a88594d3
'2012-05-18T13:21:08-04:00'
describe
'431607' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAO' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
ba38cb4c037975f627e4b20c9267c949
07eadbfef9ec0d8a92abb8d7b62aaab1d8ab9993
'2012-05-18T13:24:16-04:00'
describe
'440594' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAP' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
c74eed2a4e6489b8e8d1f8b40ae2b67c
1d85cd1f0bcc6c0c3d3359da1aa340409c9aa307
'2012-05-18T13:19:38-04:00'
describe
'448483' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
9adbe66827b62a8361c8eecc8201f655
4e2f8b5b0d9dcc2016437be421133500ae5d21c2
'2012-05-18T13:21:31-04:00'
describe
'440863' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAR' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
e0e45389a29b8f96cd245dbd5ad10dd7
22662f6ddf130342e4b56ede5a89914083d0b324
describe
'448051' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAS' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
c750bd36cae64fc4a9de680523ac6381
54e7e3ff3b7dbffbc604485927c61cabfc507a9d
describe
'448260' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAT' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
59ad9aecd6c43d82c7d38291f05e7cef
10f06ead84417154f8d6261628a11ee27c31bb6d
'2012-05-18T13:24:18-04:00'
describe
'415612' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAU' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
ca8ff698bb6647b25b5829d3e2b5daf1
c64237d1f4ad9284974599e7161019434c1589ec
'2012-05-18T13:20:26-04:00'
describe
'374584' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAV' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
b21b8b5a4daff9324929f2ad5235927d
20ad19f707e3360d2713e8b005864cd38794fde2
'2012-05-18T13:20:35-04:00'
describe
'451441' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAW' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b6fe6c77d73f2e98b603477462805fbd
c14b954c5e5185b5aa233a9ed0a555a2f363b4a3
describe
'423293' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAX' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
7948addbba38ca73412785d91fbc516e
5ffd7f8d80ffdac66dd2a9fd591ebd18ab60406d
'2012-05-18T13:20:49-04:00'
describe
'399167' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
9e738d0a85cbcb85e51fd0b4da3680e4
98a37d154aefce889c0f45dac7b704b70cf18861
'2012-05-18T13:18:03-04:00'
describe
'417922' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQAZ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
9b19b792d1d86a7005a0ee1b120612e0
018bff4dadebe413f996a6c87cc48010416e8998
describe
'394335' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBA' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
283091e8a761fd2ff5f4971d96e8dc08
88139b330d9cf2937cd1ff307fc5bccb943dc971
'2012-05-18T13:25:10-04:00'
describe
'436392' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBB' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
886ed50d2287bacc7a4fd0cfcfb62316
90ebc6e735fc574776325b638e4ead493022b1cd
'2012-05-18T13:18:37-04:00'
describe
'429010' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBC' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
df6193de21c2ede77a6342f7c1709914
737501f323f7b4eaf4b467782cce72d913f43b1d
'2012-05-18T13:20:56-04:00'
describe
'427745' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBD' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
5bb4991295e9ff6f263e78fb9e6a1bc7
2063e9e92e1bd03f3cff4b2ea1c2d51a3aa6b28b
describe
'432848' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBE' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
f79b41af0f57c10bc4244c6036c0709d
0dea947cf170be2e6a41a41f16a2eebfae1cdc2b
describe
'416097' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBF' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
3cea89d022d330495a98881df6aa1093
74da84b42842d1808d2548fd9ef89c70feda7312
'2012-05-18T13:18:58-04:00'
describe
'437454' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBG' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
d38f32c46c4bfb0ba82cb9441e95a370
11c7764dbeaba51a070958037c1b380d5741526b
'2012-05-18T13:19:30-04:00'
describe
'444779' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBH' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
d35172cd1ee69fe361d10c14811ab7d1
efac8479e8c6db08749fe4b89fb4488dd0459d49
describe
'287339' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBI' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
a29544d47183ec7c1df85d0c83aefa87
12720543808a16193b0a5d94db0a3ecce874e868
'2012-05-18T13:21:02-04:00'
describe
'423220' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBJ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
f11a8f7fa1494232ed5226ff6785c9b3
d9d9c02b7dda5a1efb9b1f0ecc56c370ad7e7658
'2012-05-18T13:19:17-04:00'
describe
'684836' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBK' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
cabe020d8a8df3690908c70cd308d0c9
03d1fe0270324f3a1459abb540076595ce8a7cc4
describe
'196568' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBL' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
f2030ed1c8a28f7581f151d1f8cf4a44
639a55c06c2390b30b8e5b407fc2e8fb0528c519
'2012-05-18T13:22:40-04:00'
describe
'313937' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBM' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
3485c8e00437ed0a21720e18981b0d0f
901043fee91491670ef2d454ad85b816f65fd12a
'2012-05-18T13:21:53-04:00'
describe
'316534' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBN' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
548b0651f52e787b15a7a1e0eda2700b
bd4fed6c241c36da31153d9e46ae8cfaf4a24fdb
describe
'290304' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBO' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
7a02ad5de06ca113ff6a3a06d2d4e2b9
e6857a2e5b140e2f2c32bdf9481182d7aa0aeadc
describe
'274041' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBP' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
c411da1889753b6972d5185b21d95ac3
e9c2881e67eed75e331373c896fd7c3f4de5e333
describe
'294322' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBQ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
c145db3e6b869f50a4d190bf924e8430
c99002b76ae1802150a4e82446a3f0c4e451291a
'2012-05-18T13:21:09-04:00'
describe
'284421' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBR' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
b0146066741f721b15372a26a1452054
75f450ce57d2454f4a35b961f3aec24e6df5e009
'2012-05-18T13:23:32-04:00'
describe
'274347' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBS' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
c12ef55dccfa21c83e1922d6ffbac23c
d22ea357d7f6eaac72166a86ef43f74b9e991826
'2012-05-18T13:18:57-04:00'
describe
'274288' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBT' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
98910c4e70217b36fdc96bf9f3f365ce
014b98974c67d2d29582d900163ef97becfb8ec0
describe
'274312' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBU' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
e499271555f0fcebf2520edbc6c72623
cba137663205d05acdfc3a49e6bf6343bc518bee
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBV' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5991ee06d26bd987277550de78bc1ba1
678eaf570342296888d8a85538a3075379960c3c
'2012-05-18T13:18:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBW' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
9bf0dfe4e049af09a93e0fe341a15612
a57eb1a422bc52554890018943e8dd539a37f7db
describe
'274290' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBX' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
9f61e23403868e4008a5966cb7d68f4d
fa428e29025aca7e4b17946c039bcbe128d89915
'2012-05-18T13:19:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBY' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
396588471d33c3a3741c5636a6b5c8e2
8634ae5f65ea2f138db0ab4acc6faa0d848ef289
'2012-05-18T13:20:42-04:00'
describe
'274342' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQBZ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
8ed431bc3f76d3fbf58d0827587d7b56
459fff9bed72a0e1203db56b62a3ab0a4c954836
describe
'265571' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCA' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
d68d4a06a8f4f2aa2391b2be86b02c76
b62d63f3f447f07e32b30675b24e6342cf3d9c51
describe
'274297' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCB' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
07704544bd2d61c1a9936717d6a45e00
ee9c2e09befa497cb588f8bb655ec448cb3d9c94
'2012-05-18T13:18:31-04:00'
describe
'274238' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
c66c61952d9633a4192d43170840c953
2669aa1a58aa36db32df60707e12e85a968d3ec6
describe
'274269' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCD' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
49e77af782bc23542173128e5bb39f40
46a790337968a3bac33eb71eea09620304bb090c
describe
'274308' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCE' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
8d7bffed2ec95831c0a18b5f0881f449
8dab923948fe41813747e18c53475b430c12a36f
'2012-05-18T13:19:03-04:00'
describe
'274355' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2a80ccc302c9d9e9cee2e131cfc6ab19
50f0ff8939049712932df3ffd9f55ce183e36ccd
'2012-05-18T13:18:07-04:00'
describe
'274303' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
6faa4a947fc1c62b938b7aa80dcffbf4
082cdaf70a1104ffb0c770cad237cc3a2ae2897d
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCH' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
0a852cfa2074ec1d94be741bfc5f4af7
f213daa80e1c16f5c0e93b338bbec149d4b8a470
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCI' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
c124e13df6ea5207260cd3fa2d379ce2
1054779b2a37d8e8c3905dd83cbdcec43afa9f6d
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4959dc3e927e4c281759ee065242175e
cbd93bfec858bc302126479fc36817dc86619f5f
describe
'274359' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
a6cd9e9e477ac918283801d239c67cc0
51d02ad500b098fe879e1e380486e45171529230
'2012-05-18T13:23:55-04:00'
describe
'274307' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCL' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0b0334b93774e57f005e512fd4825fa7
af39e366965f54fa214b5a4369b6021866355c4b
describe
'274345' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
586245b4563f2b90904c36a374ed7962
5923ae666a9141800ad4114576e5648d8a1db631
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCN' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
eeea34e5a27ac4b106877bd3441cac0d
c9ddbfcc3001ec6f725af81efc5d46c545bdf930
'2012-05-18T13:23:33-04:00'
describe
'274270' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCO' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ef90dc12a1aeacd30712813b955adff7
286f4a34514ccb858effd8862d6888fc91744da3
'2012-05-18T13:22:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCP' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
90592f98badc4c94691d75a55f00eeae
bec335e22e399caaf62483263f8290813a85c5fe
'2012-05-18T13:18:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCQ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
454ccf784528a013f53a7e9e0bd2930a
a137047269e775257fd4a648ecc1ca55e586defa
'2012-05-18T13:20:46-04:00'
describe
'274322' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
3efed43b7a48c602374d9703482eb49c
501ceb0679317a06474e4af938a989e7a9761a60
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCS' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
759245e94a330faf93e0cd3490e27881
f6dbc4e8b13588ab41089fc951228aa39a2a5538
describe
'274279' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCT' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
4f5ce201783d0c1ad729b649885af03f
9122a890b98efd3efac6e1237d0db93303c66c33
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
e96bebc9ee732243409fef29ef3a9945
80c04055eaaf8833e5ea85e9a58940354bab9d0b
'2012-05-18T13:22:36-04:00'
describe
'274337' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCV' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
791d75eabb39cb436bd2c0e2d1af7dc9
e7ea80197f5a3aa1874d3f57c135ea6f8aa340ea
'2012-05-18T13:18:24-04:00'
describe
'274344' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCW' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
4cc875a388b6709d2f452d832566c57a
f806f4a68086d3333d2a1c7676c1f955ea7c2250
describe
'274333' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
537ea254bf3b05b76af6fb3c58879978
27609c89e8ecdede2f47c347279d0410047d9dd4
'2012-05-18T13:19:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCY' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
ecb507ddc82dfe8c25bb8a6472166abb
f651f4e4c349bb59abf3b54e9e8f36d5a3b7e13f
describe
'274348' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQCZ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
a78fddaf5098ecd48b4e313f8b654b87
4dae43d7da9b4f9e1365489f77633c32b8e26ea9
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDA' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
f78a213682c66135657c92f919e37928
c407446a46f4f0a49d47ecdccf8200937eb4fd72
'2012-05-18T13:21:14-04:00'
describe
'274353' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
73a0debeda3637978ad97764668aa97c
594f2505d8f85b467d3cdd0769eb2bc49fdcb90d
describe
'274281' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDC' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
af9a3e46db82d8a9e77f4626847974bf
eae4f5e3b8183087e0067153a71e79853197b2ca
describe
'274349' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDD' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
8c42c4dbdd895404913df74e5e5297ab
aaadfb9227e9c77657c45171983b63a51a65b790
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
e7330a615ce9ec5d2b672358461fe592
a0dd7e6eb2f42a7368e7ba0c587679f06867b50c
'2012-05-18T13:25:11-04:00'
describe
'274357' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDF' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
3c91832a9ab6c465b7df718c021a79b9
bc00d22933b121ccbf92e88ab63774ff2d8ae750
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDG' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
07ccaf21268e856668e47ccd8104ede1
1da4732cb6c3c907ac61bce2ad1dc279c91779da
'2012-05-18T13:21:03-04:00'
describe
'274330' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDH' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
0e096a0a94d7277eeae028f1f8738875
9f64ab67e3fe779f116fc0d55f54096be7d8fb42
describe
'274194' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDI' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
8ebf632ab84b656a400cce6642f7c26d
de9277a38b13172ab6d47fe247f433671fdc4bde
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
8912ca222c84ce799d6c84e2b828e465
b77852a3da9d3747d06d6658aa4d1b35fa29ccc8
'2012-05-18T13:25:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDK' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
68bdc7fe4f7611c90a2cf34849578aa4
ce1de20931b43e436d9b466be35545c13adaccac
describe
'274292' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDL' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
9b74d29cf6a1d5eabe01f3fee2a94705
d71aca5dcb207fd88023a2b24c2cb792e75a02a5
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDM' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
81a4ecf0ab340e824ad383bf1bbdc83d
3ca19bbf836581a0b1df9f1d45fe613417b3425d
'2012-05-18T13:18:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDN' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
e6b367a3726f97048bc0c86f0e05d712
4aeb93c42a7ba433f7cd26cef3f0d70a56f6789e
describe
'270714' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDO' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c8357df0399ded4780539bc8bb114e2a
3768b2bf6c720d6d7ec93d34b62dd60c6d1c6027
'2012-05-18T13:23:45-04:00'
describe
'274331' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDP' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
926e0a49536ad26bccae23fd3ace14e6
e623736059914d247b25845c4495e85677685dad
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDQ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
01f03309936961f44f694364cbb66d76
411feb78c7f9084c876b84491db21519e816a61a
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDR' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
56b9e444fe0e56474f0a9d5bdc4f6aa6
c20444c369bd968706cf1e46d700e4d2cdc001be
'2012-05-18T13:24:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDS' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
7f3397fe5d402f443384701263a05e82
d91d502f9b0611ec9d7f6e188586e776608a2ade
'2012-05-18T13:17:33-04:00'
describe
'274265' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDT' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
6e7bb4bb913946cf2ed37c289106de1b
8c855eb1ea3c993922ad4dcb191b95baf43083dc
'2012-05-18T13:21:12-04:00'
describe
'274314' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDU' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
e2e8846c7bc920afeb82cd0baa5ae3a1
8a06c62616df7256e3ed38c6a3cb2925ec10f67b
describe
'274296' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDV' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
8ad1de42f48673f48ec763e8e2405d32
3d8c0904eb5a80b0f3c8b2d355163c83dc122a74
describe
'274352' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDW' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
2fec98d4069120f9d627f8952be4e3f9
f93188f7f04fbe8ffe1843304ec373f08121da9a
describe
'274323' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDX' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
af75e839acbaaa50463c64f8ec20cd0a
d5ba94e8c7d6a35a3a9a6ad77a69d54b4163c9e9
'2012-05-18T13:19:20-04:00'
describe
'274293' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDY' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
a12d842d14e224f06f42eb087da17bb0
a5a578d82821d11235506098e5fc8744ad078996
'2012-05-18T13:18:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQDZ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
88a23763e330cac3a56c6c744f8bbc80
96402f3cf709024135343d912e1dd121ad4f72eb
'2012-05-18T13:20:58-04:00'
describe
'274285' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEA' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
a0c01ab07c5cab281bed47cc82f66691
2c5d961be4d2201a94f6cabea4e073e72f1c4b6a
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
fc428b94df259bd5a0e73f58ba48c0c3
217493dc63155e9ffe5d2123938dc9fc5558886d
'2012-05-18T13:20:44-04:00'
describe
'274306' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEC' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
39289cc6f972e5b87f77670a42078a32
630f62ab96b1b8bc45a1e50ef958969818dfd708
describe
'274299' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQED' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
04afd04615c16a021d17b7cb6f475e9d
10507312751d226649451dd45d6caeda8929eba9
'2012-05-18T13:19:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEE' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
e1e37d0af6373c0d13af53742ee0a8ef
402cf1e541b1addae878295b10d20dedfe74e559
'2012-05-18T13:24:44-04:00'
describe
'274341' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEF' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
4d9c5df131bf80611e73a13f5cf2de34
a1db45f0d80e8269c13fd92f99f3be1cd7abc6d4
'2012-05-18T13:21:22-04:00'
describe
'274282' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEG' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
bab92afdd73e9d21fe9674fc9cd4077a
3546e07e9a0a9c116fdb7f12b6e68fb4827a97dc
describe
'274334' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEH' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
a5b585bea0c09361f3ea4f16b7b6948e
94629639337c5540ad6ce489e63b0e8f537dd09d
'2012-05-18T13:22:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEI' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
23cbb4907c646b930d98bb529e3a7a6e
55497aa0dfa2fe2da0bc50109462b3b59803076a
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEJ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
2380afe703003553595c3a1540964487
8b6b33c61cb3fd6c63d45db143ca6e74317ed62d
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEK' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
573a30fc4dd53c8c40bdd28f9e3085b5
b8728853f54c94305fac14e87c74fe04f5956259
'2012-05-18T13:20:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEL' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
638d1f2f02641dd1f1058eb2a48034ba
3d3c737cdce8a6b35c8438eee82ffa37087cb747
'2012-05-18T13:21:52-04:00'
describe
'274309' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEM' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
a5bf74b8018e902549dbc061e0a86642
caf0625aefb6ba854287963ec39be1279859c4d6
describe
'274278' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEN' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
6187f443ec7968c80902d55745694bd7
7087ea4cc8e12eebbeb34f1955efefc50ba4d40c
'2012-05-18T13:20:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEO' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
fc21d7d7aa47633de98ee8339dd290c2
b15120df452690281de9f1d5ba5eed875fcb345e
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEP' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
0950f05e8decb3855945f11ecd18ee06
7405b2213e11e40cb3db43dfeb9c9a69410d87a5
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEQ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
a5fc99c7e40c45da222bfa2d9e90f8ba
33074dc60c946616b288b9840d9b024501e07fd8
'2012-05-18T13:17:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQER' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
24c6d47dc8773f454948629f8b092568
1a1b4a1012ef290cf54aa89e54738c2973db93d2
describe
'274272' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQES' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
67445c0bd6dfd021599fbb6c45e2e6e6
1c90458e6dfd08ac42a1dc70f1cd8697f8e544b4
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQET' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
58cdd2cf34d89b54fab9d013a60bcd03
c156344f1eeb1120fbab54c813f2cce900321626
describe
'274280' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEU' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
ee5b678858b6de4b5777b0417f233d80
06db66286decd4a8e3799134468d2109f3732e1d
describe
'274284' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEV' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
11e81a68b42a9dc9586120c42e3d7b29
ac424a7aebdda2ba9f62e07004e0014eabe2181f
'2012-05-18T13:17:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEW' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
caff773019999144e03b47e88e9665f5
e99cb7814969fdd042abe7f88098326506d6e336
'2012-05-18T13:25:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEX' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
71afd3de0a8ad32162bf9f9af36a3d21
72719ad94279099bff39c63f57df21078e9e6f67
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEY' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
b88f83209a16086d6c38775bccb2a910
f59b8991611c7aae05c251bdd6c82c4b7e7e4543
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQEZ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
25225594e5a5f1dfc88e0115bfba7824
9eb5915b49f8286391dad3ed018f83863828daf4
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFA' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
1842d0a874dfec1d8697aaaafa811cb5
1e515be4b6f97a7c8c8af753f530ba0d7921c797
'2012-05-18T13:23:31-04:00'
describe
'274224' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFB' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
02d16529f965fd7ed9e91d621b909f85
8ff19d51c2ecb1d9c43a6f82977800128ba284f7
describe
'274316' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFC' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
a5e60020b4257f7388e79fd9d988cb3b
eb181c17961c7a8c128a1328b07a85812873b764
'2012-05-18T13:23:21-04:00'
describe
'274300' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFD' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
4f1a7bfd2e9946b4127ea59ef93e94c3
46eb2b7d65c6564fa4cdacc97139b14204ddd37d
describe
'274358' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFE' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
a086a3073c241655f81f1170acb27b2b
08fa5448cd6ae7816ff26b4a9dbc65a919dc0e1c
'2012-05-18T13:20:23-04:00'
describe
'273565' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFF' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
7ed9746fb6a42b96a2379099d3419270
c51bf3d84c259285fdfc6af50dc00cac26f0ca24
'2012-05-18T13:25:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFG' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e8503ba548a962b6c693fafd0881ba02
09df309289aa8873aff3f7cbf2934b629596306f
'2012-05-18T13:17:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFH' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
f51bf04e82999a4d311af996ab1c1d4f
d9f9a3d509a0647ae996ef0c1ed271d6bd8699ba
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFI' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
5a349b5c51af92a0960ddfddd225a769
cc742d1d2494d0940688aea0eb746a674f454d8c
describe
'274263' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFJ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
e0f64c3ebe822c954c05b19bac8c619f
8380f39f9032086bf61c70025900b8886985157b
describe
'274305' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFK' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
dd3f6507cae57835c8158d4bc1111cc5
04ceecb9ba5358a5634c887bee1edd3bb30f9075
describe
'274291' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFL' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
546bc4af49e07b0d5c0069b1da250d5d
51deafab82daf2e4179c1986e53761c0cfb23c8d
'2012-05-18T13:18:11-04:00'
describe
'274343' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFM' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
b90ce2ed9ba83ed1916a20b6e5219681
7ed4e941c89d812315a17d0ab7648bc5e3b23eb8
describe
'274248' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFN' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
1978a85dac8b092878aa22703260ac8d
d5dd305b9e0ef00f0e41039dac378d0fc0098c81
describe
'322740' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFO' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
a047e34870b4a6319db9b857394ba72f
3c0be19510aa67391e78f4bc42ea05090baef0c1
'2012-05-18T13:18:26-04:00'
describe
'323281' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFP' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
762ece3b17a0bf8ed0788f91b54f3594
c12c31269593725aea9088432e76492f52ed80c9
'2012-05-18T13:24:56-04:00'
describe
'63720' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFQ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
081a39092da88169d08db52b61aa693f
eac9270c5521f85c7b737b6e42f25ba7153f5888
'2012-05-18T13:20:18-04:00'
describe
'7560608' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFR' 'sip-files00001.tif'
e5db46526673c9411c1d99627ca085b7
3bb452c069398e0bb3a40fc5d6aa92664fbcb7b8
describe
'2343856' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFS' 'sip-files00003.tif'
deedcac9277ebbe7fa6691f9d8512ee0
7b1b6a850926a6a89af3cb4128024b0a638d5182
describe
'6845364' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFT' 'sip-files00006.tif'
171b4e0b8b9132fa0c3374a4d5eb6bdf
5d62081afb09d4a6c338be3f43fdc50428025d1d
'2012-05-18T13:17:55-04:00'
describe
'2216088' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFU' 'sip-files00007.tif'
204498d23241aae23d654dd70e691c12
b7db376258a350f69627454b9f1c7c48294da2fa
describe
'2216948' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFV' 'sip-files00009.tif'
450ef2568dc2b146b9f3238a3685e19a
bda5a9d459ea5cce24bf8b426acab710002fd34f
describe
'2216724' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFW' 'sip-files00010.tif'
20d739f65588ed9a78cde7ac98021898
55c2d1a3ccbcbd1274a7c7ada69d0a3cd5295845
'2012-05-18T13:25:42-04:00'
describe
'2216720' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFX' 'sip-files00011.tif'
d16a543eaf2f9dacaa7ac1be6406e014
c20e6950337336d28c113b189e9c80d7457d8792
'2012-05-18T13:18:08-04:00'
describe
'2216792' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
d71ed76c504885588c5b015fb33f1322
48206265b183d68fabedfe7f376bb200da76a5ce
describe
'2216960' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQFZ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
2f5145accd7242c708f7107b7ceb25e5
e2a3581e99d597fd75a87262b16437be01869c4b
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
06575d58e6df5e3d2e931d6401b9a401
0bd0fb9b12f5a9cb57b362812a89027664b10a75
'2012-05-18T13:18:25-04:00'
describe
'2217044' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
fcb69b5b0f15cac5c510b6eaf599fc1d
1ac01fd9bab3578a910d4aec405d6c0caa25f861
describe
'2216692' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGC' 'sip-files00016.tif'
696f13a2f008b2bc0bb37a513bdae414
dbaabaad3a79b256347f8dad9c37d751aec657e2
'2012-05-18T13:21:48-04:00'
describe
'2217088' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGD' 'sip-files00017.tif'
a12bb2c52a080f18d42c825b4ba38a33
ba47a8e2a28237f2cb83c2e17b1e49c8a60c045d
'2012-05-18T13:24:55-04:00'
describe
'2213628' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGE' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b37086d7b41df0c7389cb09a029dd13b
348c456071c1917c132cea893be546738143690e
'2012-05-18T13:19:41-04:00'
describe
'2217032' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGF' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ef9e24b1cb59b7619881c0137988332a
2a4724152d686146cbc41cbcd16e0841c7f36081
describe
'2216864' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGG' 'sip-files00022.tif'
956bb5f4c955c34ee0ebf042797f1ee8
d72ef4db2dfad7afc0ff9848fd276e20d8dd1aab
'2012-05-18T13:20:05-04:00'
describe
'2216804' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGH' 'sip-files00023.tif'
1348cdeba1ca8583e31d84f3f6558207
1fde5dc93910548d5ac252773020843bb29c253c
'2012-05-18T13:19:57-04:00'
describe
'2216744' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGI' 'sip-files00024.tif'
e4de14595e72a5b764834a0fd7254ed1
c9cebd9d536d2ab37da13214340b4cb3a38b5345
describe
'2216168' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGJ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
a228f6c528df2f0786f89b949f307b7e
607d9dc7073c08b9ad1dbb7067a9e1e004364cd7
'2012-05-18T13:19:50-04:00'
describe
'2216964' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
0c27060d61d535120ead4ec361346d49
e941542b4318f15bd32ed6f3ca5cfcc39682fd97
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGL' 'sip-files00029.tif'
c13cf82f3729bfc7329d798b490c3ce6
b700708728daf0303e88148f446504a2003a2313
'2012-05-18T13:19:55-04:00'
describe
'2217108' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGM' 'sip-files00030.tif'
9577278ef390740a3bdf7492853df1e8
66f0fe320b70a1fc0fdb0f78728ef107a7fd7532
'2012-05-18T13:20:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGN' 'sip-files00031.tif'
03e87db0984ea1926f6e74584fb514ad
9f9209ec50dcd92a88232e3ae9b9d669df210f92
describe
'2216612' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGO' 'sip-files00032.tif'
4cd4efd07e8ecad814fc327e053f85ce
b0368ee47053fec9cd8eae57f896b04f6813de04
describe
'2216884' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
e6c6fd294298192108c8a8ad871a47fb
300c7e6ef452bff9bccaf1fec50fb510924aac66
describe
'2217056' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGQ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
a0df35a2b7a1f4dbc00fd3784174c9aa
4a1ad53d09a02ef165ea356cbae8f3f03e3db35b
'2012-05-18T13:21:00-04:00'
describe
'2217276' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGR' 'sip-files00035.tif'
139221022fa37dc15b5f90925d689038
d1977117ba3bf3d518336efc5ec69411daa5b2da
describe
'2216800' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGS' 'sip-files00036.tif'
273ee6e357b8df0e938638cdd6315f7f
3f40c40ceff40b40e9e6f4c85203086b47fc62d0
describe
'2217364' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGT' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b199017eaadc4b93b07c7ecbfd5de51a
bd8a9e0a033d4f3efea8aede68a01c4ca0b2c489
describe
'2216888' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGU' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ae085606f38b3103cabea7a7ceade0ab
cb86c0a67f02705124f7dd4d21123a26e298cd51
'2012-05-18T13:24:41-04:00'
describe
'2215068' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
06ae7d3847589fcfbe175da5ee62fd46
992db1716600d779620dc69581e372ade02d9f5e
describe
'2217232' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGW' 'sip-files00043.tif'
e783e82c9d44119ac998c3a1895fcfe9
b0a9a98f26f48185d5214b034bd6485649a6b70f
describe
'2217076' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGX' 'sip-files00044.tif'
1f9ce7531acdbc6a543af05f63ae9478
96dc33873e3c47f37dd620d6b33740b89fe6a7be
'2012-05-18T13:19:23-04:00'
describe
'2217080' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGY' 'sip-files00045.tif'
af8f3779d2d41f37ffe57539fef9dc46
044b0c8c3147717fede90393f298f2e809c24f44
'2012-05-18T13:21:28-04:00'
describe
'2217272' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQGZ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
061d54a139551f0c762d3b7dc08467a0
614cf0f0e3019d4dbc0e047d546fae92c2bc7ae0
'2012-05-18T13:20:29-04:00'
describe
'2217016' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHA' 'sip-files00048.tif'
8119c59155bd8d7080010b85806733dc
209bb28d29a4546fba86dedb189975b556555f28
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
ca93a8a3f5381c67d34ae1eef4c5fe4d
73a764538c909adb5471b8be101a8d855fd1024a
describe
'2217280' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHC' 'sip-files00050.tif'
5c9037d8e1b19ab487c3c172cff9b57c
ba63ddcca6a78e9f48455ff5b8fb3aded7905b48
'2012-05-18T13:20:02-04:00'
describe
'2217216' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHD' 'sip-files00051.tif'
11b3e7438409c2ab509cebf70026caed
53cf41ccd334dd79f2042aceabef741d485da10f
describe
'2217060' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHE' 'sip-files00052.tif'
b27c88fc9bc639a3dac395a3f22d60ed
b63f0ff6015deaf058df3bbf53c221aa50fe121c
describe
'2217292' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
9f6712c6e96f741e4a30d52825796e40
180734c80ce0518d013af8894d3a28c74111f071
describe
'2216992' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
3c56e630fd4c52004d3e1fe614b1a6f5
324a61902a9c8e204f31a7439d510e51ccb35fb6
'2012-05-18T13:17:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHH' 'sip-files00055.tif'
0218e3ff540fb8e9d788d0cef9b196be
679c792700267033853ee8c39015472d1910aaa9
describe
'2217200' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
018ef78fd6822181d6a76860ccadec16
608e84068e5e1ee7294b33f38550069a70b8f13f
'2012-05-18T13:18:02-04:00'
describe
'2215256' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHJ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
f793734f0255af7610e42bb70eb27357
aad4e745b2d7030cbbd850ecb13c2002d48fcdc8
describe
'2216332' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHK' 'sip-files00059.tif'
f21b8bcf337d58917580b54e34d61d7f
3d9b9700841ec6ea8e92124812e6e699c48db8d1
describe
'2217208' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHL' 'sip-files00060.tif'
84e0d4d542463c4db887ee44cfb7a6fa
68047f0029f0921f2b0f59e951334c891fe8607f
describe
'2217228' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHM' 'sip-files00061.tif'
eaa2b0fc5895fefdd808fc4abd01bffc
dc9c2703a78fea66584ac6bfc924d9d7a90429a5
'2012-05-18T13:24:43-04:00'
describe
'2217024' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHN' 'sip-files00062.tif'
9cb67aab52745f10fb910770b79ae989
294e40acfa69ae3ed7978012bc382ae471b10c6a
'2012-05-18T13:25:48-04:00'
describe
'2217252' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
9453a1d290f6e07c5e77ebed5941a041
09e9a2a03c206ded7f94c95310af549d9c9c2199
'2012-05-18T13:21:29-04:00'
describe
'2217368' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
bfb5063b5ff3e7e5ff6c9973c79f831e
a354f207b0f53db9b9450b0865d208e1d282d237
'2012-05-18T13:25:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
b3e2b577e4d84e007e889bd26e3edd02
5e3b21c635f5131b7b412a76f400ea94dca0d6fd
describe
'2217196' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHR' 'sip-files00067.tif'
63bdfd3f85f92949ea3892c626d77963
9f5fe11928e9bcca719f57bb1bfcee8a72934242
'2012-05-18T13:18:38-04:00'
describe
'2216976' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHS' 'sip-files00068.tif'
8fd323ec9971fb8ec47c065b2e941faa
053331e40c08f3a195eff56888f08c639b86f6f3
'2012-05-18T13:19:49-04:00'
describe
'2217156' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHT' 'sip-files00069.tif'
d12849ef0d5755539aec00ceb2e9c6f6
fa8802cb92269eefe7a5632b96930dea6b2adbb7
describe
'2180696' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHU' 'sip-files00070.tif'
85cda36daaa48ea8d819b81d6a49e8c5
2b0087b843ec3a8eb13f52e7c33a51efab07c8af
describe
'2216816' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
08ed89fece1ae141f4687bcfc301a2a8
c1fcaec2b384df834607ec36e9a4b5ab80f2d4af
describe
'2217212' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHW' 'sip-files00072.tif'
dc87ea3d50b236dd1006e5d118a5de92
abcc7b01ca43e2fe7a802296c0154985500e617c
'2012-05-18T13:18:04-04:00'
describe
'2216984' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHX' 'sip-files00073.tif'
ffee766d5d4ca22a7e6d6a39190f587f
b3c6cf5b83268310a10b6a576fd73eaf338e399e
'2012-05-18T13:18:19-04:00'
describe
'2217224' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHY' 'sip-files00074.tif'
1683e2516aea3fe779a4530fd68b9936
d1fd4116407fadbf2004a2ee2bcc0b5d6ccfe4ca
'2012-05-18T13:20:01-04:00'
describe
'2214660' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQHZ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
7c33f7b378e61d372b3c3aa383020460
a3eca602ba342820b5d921f38870b857902bf77d
'2012-05-18T13:25:40-04:00'
describe
'2216016' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIA' 'sip-files00076.tif'
c1d552210ce528a76373733938f8adf9
733173fae4bff52a97efb370e47db81a8489251b
'2012-05-18T13:25:26-04:00'
describe
'2217132' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIB' 'sip-files00077.tif'
626520f9c8c18931a3eb91177e2ce278
968747530c61481eab96bf9fad23515b5ec188e8
describe
'2173276' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIC' 'sip-files00078.tif'
2c63170147005c610a6d0e2a29dca066
777bd34a6d5cfc9d1fdb35f6100df71c4a65eb8b
'2012-05-18T13:21:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQID' 'sip-files00079.tif'
a77fdd6b9274581a5acc7b789bc05f6a
ee5a715aa6d93ea4498aa1dc7a87cdb70f925e7c
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIE' 'sip-files00081.tif'
91b0a67576a8d73cccce70d698b3f21d
cd61f71cf70007e968c8b9044d15a7f25a5e7239
'2012-05-18T13:17:47-04:00'
describe
'2216980' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIF' 'sip-files00082.tif'
ff375bdeeefec97b9ec5f87e96fd89f5
8eee3f6b9a3198e2e9f3d023cafd4359de85f469
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIG' 'sip-files00083.tif'
a2e0450f3b464ea73b3a52cd2e60da23
18b233ffd27de48e94fffa79815a8f7c349f057e
'2012-05-18T13:19:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIH' 'sip-files00084.tif'
d53079dc9b200e8066ccf58c5c2344cc
4116b4beda82c5f7e69b1049b1f5b65cc9fd4ac1
describe
'2216704' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQII' 'sip-files00085.tif'
158c9fabaed25f9307b7f943bba117d1
1d6216f3e9bf29a4557c16c4191b9e3e7198070c
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIJ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
3ade4f79a3831de71fef65f4ced63222
4ffaf0539d2faefcda9cfa44e78bda128ec3c9da
'2012-05-18T13:25:30-04:00'
describe
'2216728' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
2177db5b321752f801de25487441ec43
d63fdff07b0bfd49e580476311f6e58d3461dd92
'2012-05-18T13:20:28-04:00'
describe
'2216632' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIL' 'sip-files00089.tif'
f2772249d85ac6ced2701e2a5f4790f7
cc9f2a742ae9b6a18103cd00cf1e29498c5c9f72
'2012-05-18T13:25:23-04:00'
describe
'2216732' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIM' 'sip-files00090.tif'
9c7aa0b74ba9e543bc87411e58a5b817
d0e768a74bd3d3d6a801738c87d6a2be609bcc59
'2012-05-18T13:22:06-04:00'
describe
'2216452' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIN' 'sip-files00092.tif'
9873824456a94b82005d350b7fb6e152
737fee7d59b4f230fd7a1bae918cf9aa5031610f
'2012-05-18T13:20:06-04:00'
describe
'2216996' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIO' 'sip-files00094.tif'
61159c670573f0737b2e76bbd2adf520
6b0e86370281aea26a8102117bb2adf09dc43e79
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIP' 'sip-files00095.tif'
58de1a0676e70b312eac3721a0c17125
ea683a71085451661a64f0786c0fdc382d1c5229
'2012-05-18T13:18:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIQ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
0a65b0334b9b5398dcc3a6eed54e04e2
45c8af94b92d8163dc27ee1c1c578bdaab079c8d
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIR' 'sip-files00097.tif'
9162eeea1677f3880ff158d6053163eb
73110ff21adbdc8b7f497e48973dc37970a96622
describe
'2216856' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIS' 'sip-files00098.tif'
c4eb511d4db6c4aa4770b9288d69b1e0
b43588366a0d3d80398685f75883fa5521a00725
'2012-05-18T13:23:22-04:00'
describe
'2217136' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIT' 'sip-files00099.tif'
ee5e41ddf59fcf5558ba414b8442d1c2
a21802c878a2c9a2370a29a83bdcd81c5b3c9fad
'2012-05-18T13:18:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
7f0d94249ae8e822431eac752b815c05
3a3d722cd2a00ba04a1d34f1088029c174162dbd
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIV' 'sip-files00101.tif'
ce30e90de9a876bf00fafcf9cda8d7de
54f9cf81747a7a17e6b4d6aa9731d85368f3e8e5
'2012-05-18T13:22:15-04:00'
describe
'2258944' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIW' 'sip-files00102.tif'
a960c6e9629939acb8c1e876614d6f17
87c0dfdf3c754c6ae4e68d760948bc598b4489a7
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIX' 'sip-files00104.tif'
c63ac6c1d4676c366dcca5aeb3fbf5e2
60584ceca2565ea76532c0d771bc63b91bdfaea6
'2012-05-18T13:19:59-04:00'
describe
'2216896' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIY' 'sip-files00105.tif'
e67c94e4a9138580bdfb9a6fb19f044d
290e12b88f8aed1a140c7f0b64b0cd352a9a971f
'2012-05-18T13:20:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQIZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
f765f0e3b91375cba2163812cc6fb427
043fc0b5522a15fa21c3774b248afd71dc209de5
'2012-05-18T13:18:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJA' 'sip-files00107.tif'
4dc04d6a3ae1f1afea73b328844c8585
f6f7622e68f3661d3e95b86cf4a27c1a9b22c806
describe
'2216812' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJB' 'sip-files00108.tif'
9e0d739f0ff5932e26fe53e60ab474d5
74d609e3eedc51e77b9f8124e3a963f61e68600e
describe
'2216620' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJC' 'sip-files00110.tif'
8787ae497d9b910070b0cfe2d10d39bc
82281c9b2172b0900e8dea72931adfd9d689d469
describe
'2217064' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJD' 'sip-files00111.tif'
0c6744d3e924da63c364e0fe4f5871da
4419bc6f064ef3643985558c1f5e4ae117a46f25
'2012-05-18T13:18:28-04:00'
describe
'2216928' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJE' 'sip-files00112.tif'
85eb0fcba5278aff9dd8657bd9b33f9f
8e0568f7bddc996b7607fea62a9901a02168fd71
describe
'2217020' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJF' 'sip-files00113.tif'
2f20a615d1c40003935c5d9f87483091
4f0e25ff96dc43ef491c4a23388cf14f737cc124
'2012-05-18T13:21:44-04:00'
describe
'2217028' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJG' 'sip-files00114.tif'
be611df95b0c7dcef67c46036278d343
ff8063f2cf1ecef9713785db6b5017bb01d4c207
describe
'2217000' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJH' 'sip-files00115.tif'
f3a8a58c9200bd6f97d7a0a1572595a6
1cc648590bf5a1c9ace473f9a9fd28e351656321
describe
'2216228' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJI' 'sip-files00116.tif'
4a1da50b99c6e60b5acd7df26c62631a
b303fb010ea903bfd0f30ca6d1d3aaa7875e035f
describe
'2215384' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJJ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
c1ec25a04df62bdd49eaad900119257d
e181758d50e75290b8663b942033cbd859844728
describe
'2217404' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJK' 'sip-files00119.tif'
388b4cf9727540f6d58a7b34b3f48a37
1de309a04514590ae075b7bda082301921488335
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJL' 'sip-files00120.tif'
643597ab2097e457ae048d95c21084f6
0aa1438255ea1928847c2c6bbe267ec23fb9ee3b
'2012-05-18T13:21:11-04:00'
describe
'2216056' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJM' 'sip-files00121.tif'
466e1009e67d45c152e33c467eebbe90
84e413cb5f2b9cfb543043108a211d264411ad1d
'2012-05-18T13:17:52-04:00'
describe
'2203256' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJN' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ac78432a936a463bcfb394d27645031f
6f980a1ba021120f237064486bde72c73a8a40b9
'2012-05-18T13:19:26-04:00'
describe
'2216972' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
fdd4e5a80118031c2dad47e3e4985a70
72d463666cb6d6ba856f929d7b5858c850ffe778
'2012-05-18T13:21:10-04:00'
describe
'2216736' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJP' 'sip-files00124.tif'
93371a0bb0d271d219ccd5080d0f06f4
e868d175b0dd3a67bc07702154330514a71307b2
'2012-05-18T13:24:40-04:00'
describe
'2217164' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJQ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
856aa5cd5490461c83ee27ade3c0ce9c
3044e03eed3c819f5fd3a68da74fcb92725b5e42
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJR' 'sip-files00126.tif'
69b29536021e3aaf12a44032a503ffb4
5277ccdc6426ba0dad4bd57eda15b921c101a404
'2012-05-18T13:24:23-04:00'
describe
'2217116' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJS' 'sip-files00128.tif'
a0fa37fb43a1cf24e143fda6597d5194
b439adbd088592fcbd829f43a87cbbd7105aacfd
describe
'2217112' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJT' 'sip-files00129.tif'
d3249aabda72ec4bf9e524e94b77258f
9321ba09d930e56a7ed96f761eb1d5ae84251b0d
describe
'2196264' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJU' 'sip-files00130.tif'
8d8c6cb261e93788e549b505fc701c99
558038d4e8b2519a15499741be99911eaa6dc292
describe
'2217388' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJV' 'sip-files00131.tif'
3987c612e66bdc25fe1fff544f845d3c
43d536907e2b45daa638cec42a697d520eeb13e0
'2012-05-18T13:21:06-04:00'
describe
'2213304' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJW' 'sip-files00132.tif'
178c33ab2614096917323bfd26f9bb9d
4c74c643cc08cdb15f46479becc418e3d75a7290
describe
'7764372' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJX' 'sip-files00134.tif'
b88d9a1552a552e0e134ec6bc621f74b
9c9d3c96a2c31f3eff6bf79fc267930e53e11c1d
describe
'7780128' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJY' 'sip-files00135.tif'
8b08dd7f18e631ad30c9ede152a2f0d1
bcae7cffa4890f355ad8a4299365480ea2845c47
'2012-05-18T13:20:24-04:00'
describe
'1549468' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQJZ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
a24b9e6ea4d812df7a18896c503a11dd
343fdf63bb0a9c6f25e6d0353d5ec51c628cfc98
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKA' 'sip-files00002.pro'
c0faa519a0e09aef6301a058e657d425
c3876765af89085b6ce358ae4d7bf5da4942c5b8
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKB' 'sip-files00003.pro'
168210d53e27524916a18225add2848a
1460aa940bea423a97f16e984c42e448944ce19d
'2012-05-18T13:24:03-04:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKC' 'sip-files00004.pro'
cc595f6070093f2b60c21e6d8ee25254
0956fd88e38c2a61172fa3f95f80a5f793bede2e
describe
'1769' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKD' 'sip-files00005.pro'
3c50e35a66a426b650dd4c927837a8b3
b2dbe2b984873cdb905c03d16347210460d75ece
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKE' 'sip-files00006.pro'
a789a8c6b43dcd0b9acc794b2847726c
37d0a0aa955122bc9f6bee52a7a8f8cc31ca045f
describe
'20409' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKF' 'sip-files00007.pro'
ed2cb678f2dd467972335a428cb8dda1
f1883c04c13b263cd697d9b4a3fa63c6ea15a31c
describe
'34465' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKG' 'sip-files00010.pro'
e780208b1ad8f21dd1abb64dfc2c0ed7
bbe511ecc8bd9dedb43806eba6fcca033711f8f0
describe
'33369' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKH' 'sip-files00011.pro'
3d835e57d5a2f0f28c7c9056c12c7127
9b9baa368f3f5e98931bad7e3af12bee8fbc7f41
describe
'33051' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKI' 'sip-files00013.pro'
d6296e717720a93ab6957ce17e8031e1
3743f8b7bbafd5741084974e75b472ad654e2012
describe
'35091' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
4fcd17894defbf2714b73c9724a0da98
7293aafb4d7565403a7fa45ce40eed819e295b0a
describe
'32065' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKK' 'sip-files00016.pro'
a1b92504f867619359337ef835d8841f
29ae867bd1cf1630c5c618475a78d63d788389e4
describe
'32670' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKL' 'sip-files00017.pro'
6e526c49df9233dc5095bdfbd1f8cf84
7ba21771c6fba0a7392a0937d7e519bfd1975da8
describe
'35521' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKM' 'sip-files00018.pro'
b778655fe2ff92bb5d35549b17f220aa
1eb0e74d985c5aae01d4117f6001c1200f89a0ae
describe
'10283' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKN' 'sip-files00019.pro'
a8dcc40c70b0593ac04ab5a2c25786da
af8de14340c5394a4596c0f8635371730428670b
describe
'29773' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
5bf6646cb2e2fda8f4ab03ed51323696
34dcda5c38f5a0d83e44151a3cfe8fd88d1533fb
describe
'35283' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKP' 'sip-files00021.pro'
c05a087461ec05505ee3b1ea4dec6ae9
44c03dd0ad7a11deb2ac056efcdbe95d06cff509
describe
'36173' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
4c4206c6f8f0d9a4674d3847fb427e28
7ee8b3f6e1774873f151a209fea385d330d6af76
describe
'36832' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKR' 'sip-files00023.pro'
47b6081c0242b42ca3b9e4bcb61f0dc6
67e1628cddf8b5b09b7027efb2dec5b3b52b2079
describe
'37563' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKS' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ef96607bbb9a48ffd54fa355c5e4519b
9ef5b0e862672d551ca3709d469e33b12df413be
describe
'27339' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKT' 'sip-files00025.pro'
e5bdde53ef827366f6f0f4bb4eadc879
0cb38bf8474d33da2f94bc6cd70f9c5beaef5230
describe
'37690' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
4c12fe9bf7655842b4b6498e60f186aa
156ba4f62b46fbce4e52e30df4fc4e6702bfadaf
describe
'35643' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKV' 'sip-files00029.pro'
dd0a8a103e461c8e29ea3195c3ed655f
8a6af8119272a9a71c40459c901d90e5d0e5c9a3
describe
'32860' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKW' 'sip-files00030.pro'
823ba392155413ff77900493a4a24304
e7cc4eb1a8514d965acc2aa0212f257fbeaf4d29
'2012-05-18T13:23:54-04:00'
describe
'35663' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKX' 'sip-files00031.pro'
0f698f3d722f89107ebb2e5cc19029ee
e7b475527ba671e2a11a3d472787fcea7def4086
describe
'37754' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKY' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c4627d2167499d5bcadb7b6844d01b6c
50b8863d00118a29f07cc8b08444012b6e043ce9
describe
'34634' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQKZ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8392c70c0e01a9e22b024cb5037b497f
819199e79acc06b6ff301cacd77722ef4e9ecdff
describe
'35460' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLA' 'sip-files00035.pro'
f9bb5d2e82b1b41cda126e6b2b098dac
0245fa6863d64a2b4195c7181a3aadcb7e3e7a8f
describe
'32528' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLB' 'sip-files00036.pro'
bf14c0345e669f02a0636a1e8a02fa12
d69c05f593735cd9339d066ca44268eb204187d6
describe
'36854' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLC' 'sip-files00037.pro'
18567713ca20cc297f8d7ad44711ea96
cf2239dbd9041903add33c414f330520d6892286
describe
'36349' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLD' 'sip-files00038.pro'
f6d814538ab383d86a162a2188c38a35
7371c1e67a23c21ab41ab54a17576c5ac8bb88b7
describe
'33426' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLE' 'sip-files00039.pro'
89bd28f20cf01d055803d35675e859e8
2a9395be6d31aadccc50108a2e12e00cd35d92fb
describe
'19366' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLF' 'sip-files00041.pro'
c1c42d13d47ad2e012d68d6b68aac963
dba7653181b9ccdeea38fbbe441858f513cd60d5
describe
'25439' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLG' 'sip-files00042.pro'
f3cb7663215a1f566d2f7a8625a8d8fe
857a194bf7747a25b7bc208f2eeee63b99802de9
describe
'35770' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
333611060884aa823a718f8a06a238bc
50b6e7ccfdaeebb11da811183a200c9ed5054d50
describe
'36442' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLI' 'sip-files00044.pro'
366664a760ab8a484ba78e8a5721f919
f0c11b80cf7c6c9b3c61bc3699ea38268d5657b7
describe
'33834' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLJ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
0f9e32db5791fa4e556355bea7e14692
a443cad20842ba91297404db27bf9ff70fa8db57
'2012-05-18T13:19:22-04:00'
describe
'33102' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
f3e102d613c5738a96382324868c412b
cd4eca341773eb0c48a1620e01ed6ccc0c97222b
'2012-05-18T13:20:53-04:00'
describe
'36554' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
0c578875032b974d53bb69a3c80dbf9d
8c8d64eac7f3f13c9c18b5e9fcdee2867e4b0e69
'2012-05-18T13:23:46-04:00'
describe
'36290' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLM' 'sip-files00048.pro'
077492e96f0f8dabe24d249ea1e967c8
e3bda2a55aa8035307f6438c5e1e7172a41ce4a7
describe
'34979' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLN' 'sip-files00049.pro'
b07bbdefd7338298a47c54e97f682c0a
c9a46aa61b84f5baec88673f4843505c5a101eec
describe
'36280' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLO' 'sip-files00050.pro'
9677707e71963c7c143e54f57c3692a2
4a55383f4081adb0a9b91c6449cfa97785fb46f7
describe
'36103' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLP' 'sip-files00051.pro'
5f478d318abd5faf2fe103954ef27ca5
57417855609164978e62e8759827779fa34ffeb6
describe
'37741' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
1f4181cc074f256a45b915cae3752126
6c8e26f504ea2c75a7e229c83b63bd3669573d27
describe
'36968' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLR' 'sip-files00053.pro'
36d5d15173cac985aee478a8a978bc99
71bd3c8fb0ff854bf1b6dc4343f580f1b36d9ed9
describe
'36284' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
8414249e72c9b98376b5a4c1205f79e0
90b373145f250b7ea459d80cfa3b90c1a05e46e3
describe
'36194' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLT' 'sip-files00055.pro'
637d9f46a00a7606c8dccb4e27a1b757
cc11fb219cb56ecb515b5a5aec06fa897d0360a2
describe
'34125' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
7ed5edf0ca288eed689d525accb8b96b
2ec500b353fad0682a7bd478dabdaa54e25e4530
describe
'35690' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLV' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8b83cfc7cc5bea5df974fdbf33d0ee0c
97b6371062bccf2c6d3698f288e8b99d2a2cbb0a
describe
'25856' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLW' 'sip-files00059.pro'
d5209f1602fdcdeb00e1250fe61296c9
d7efc7fb4e0fd9a3e954c032028f85ffff2eeb3f
describe
'33968' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLX' 'sip-files00060.pro'
b9b48868778531f99f363860ce4bc042
46dc06fdd2dd92bb5b0bc6df671b2e9678910f63
'2012-05-18T13:23:40-04:00'
describe
'33756' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLY' 'sip-files00061.pro'
1757bdd4cfc3b8a66491c58910bb0bfc
58283aa25cd67caad36f720696933b382a87cbec
describe
'32395' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQLZ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
8070817485bf9a06b3bd8934ec5adcdd
cab7b56bb7e6d7e8dcc18e98421770dfdfcf185d
describe
'34898' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMA' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ab60ad9a3288d08722936f2aab897ed4
84c5cc09528f9248cc3a701f611954ed320a3a96
describe
'33914' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
d0feb0e77b89c64250af9f1ac0bae3f9
f48eacf6b2aa346de8d0fe0314773b730bfec167
describe
'35829' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMC' 'sip-files00065.pro'
2ee966ebf45569ebac2f19bf7d43be68
4e0040dbfcdc494b7bdbe16709de8f82d801cb09
describe
'36096' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMD' 'sip-files00066.pro'
259cb7d32abd3a7dbe1aa016648efc1b
a56d901e7fe3cb2f8de21520fc188a6c6ac3c266
'2012-05-18T13:23:49-04:00'
describe
'36297' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQME' 'sip-files00067.pro'
620951e0de78cc7f92cda194a78ce75f
3621e6b23e444d447eea95acd69499bfe54fb36b
describe
'34676' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMF' 'sip-files00068.pro'
64c125e864d2c646de67d306dfc79dda
993fdcc4dc4d4acc32166a4bb247f0864d9bcfdb
describe
'35537' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMG' 'sip-files00069.pro'
c1d6514652afbac4bbba7e9d8b761a24
fc63de5ad766876042e738b75b9e7b4907af648a
'2012-05-18T13:23:50-04:00'
describe
'33388' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMH' 'sip-files00070.pro'
b127c78ecf5ad538e40a331f87311fbe
ba7c017251d7e2e1c05952b7cccdddb45aff1cfa
'2012-05-18T13:25:28-04:00'
describe
'33606' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMI' 'sip-files00071.pro'
d48c2258a46d7c5c53a3265521d6962b
ec7768580074b12c39bff3832193b410233dfee7
describe
'34570' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMJ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
7020b7bedae5166ef4248f187c738a13
e99bb345f1bd7cfab3caf4f46fa19658aaf3e49b
'2012-05-18T13:24:48-04:00'
describe
'34085' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMK' 'sip-files00073.pro'
323fe86744a120278c15786805fece98
8eecda519f4b1d9deb9f1d7f04a73192b7b54692
describe
'34143' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQML' 'sip-files00074.pro'
45bb445ec0f85c2bda4bb3ccf03a209f
b24ee44a755ef19db0dfb53077b05a1b30da11e7
describe
'22872' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMM' 'sip-files00076.pro'
f64d53e69a9e640cd7e6aa04673746f1
070a1a16a1b4f362cee1b450a405575ee974b269
describe
'33577' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMN' 'sip-files00077.pro'
57fad718bfec29bf70b00b4fabe9a87f
2e667d4213bc524a46d6b848da2a87f158cdfea8
describe
'35766' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMO' 'sip-files00078.pro'
63a9c036628c799482ca690c8e363f02
fcf3bb11fff153c4affb601447457dd68f9423fe
'2012-05-18T13:19:43-04:00'
describe
'34750' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMP' 'sip-files00079.pro'
40d587dfe903a38cde81590a615f3da1
98782c6d89febb4d6b045b700c8061585c030f7c
'2012-05-18T13:20:38-04:00'
describe
'34140' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMQ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
2ba102f059e0ae97278a0974131c776c
1fd1700fb9282107fc704c4aa453ea771c9b083e
describe
'35491' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMR' 'sip-files00081.pro'
e6c2540a80fec043a52ce9a983c5471f
e49fcab7d4d15447d024bcb4257d36a71a8ee0ae
describe
'36480' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMS' 'sip-files00082.pro'
7a745404317c5aebcd8744544d18029e
b5d7433a9458e41776f25eceb5ada5cdfa7c756e
describe
'34682' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMT' 'sip-files00083.pro'
b8d0cffb560e2a0fbd030ad6c93af62b
c559cd36f04b027016801d578d7e49396239331f
'2012-05-18T13:23:30-04:00'
describe
'33944' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMU' 'sip-files00084.pro'
0a21d8f0aeaa2aad738f00e085b6bf61
fdbb4116b680b668c6c5ff8feb2a8d357a465aee
'2012-05-18T13:21:19-04:00'
describe
'33640' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMV' 'sip-files00085.pro'
637cc55ddd8e73496dbc0b9188137843
16187315c820685edf40efea10c778013efd30f6
describe
'35823' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMW' 'sip-files00086.pro'
0f513003f23262e2bda2ed0df51cbf4e
f1d018bace4626c32b6e0210d7a98aae638c6d8d
describe
'30051' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMX' 'sip-files00087.pro'
44e6c6f3f1ae3c68f6980b1c82de562f
b3fd22a6ee9617ed516138774669fcd38d6e5bb6
describe
'31953' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMY' 'sip-files00090.pro'
87bdeb5ef3ab8c25846f203a0c7f4543
0406b0bc009a56118e2a1ea546d4ec1af10e2acf
describe
'32708' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQMZ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c869363ae20d4cf648b120a51af7dae1
79c9b30f857038e0985a8926eeb478664cdcdd5e
describe
'25348' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNA' 'sip-files00092.pro'
312fbf16ea0b2178666da24df884b863
ea1a8bfe6ae8ab075c3bf6fbf52d271a93f3dc97
describe
'33857' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNB' 'sip-files00093.pro'
786f376edfa8d3e4263935982161da04
195b26411e7af3236887f5ed682dc5634b646bdd
describe
'32817' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
3dc38787ec43e579a9978ea2f5801eb2
08b1697cb38d50fbbd13eea1a4a2c510fbd40515
describe
'34116' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQND' 'sip-files00095.pro'
ef8287634778fc43542cc5b86b320ae6
533ff1d4e182e35a7a528b896aa586675bd10225
describe
'33847' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNE' 'sip-files00096.pro'
4fd3dcdc5265913e07338a3aa42c3c2b
14ed49b593860af3590630690c679ab6121fd1b0
describe
'33592' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNF' 'sip-files00097.pro'
2ad7cc30b5641cf431a3b7a7a8c81a06
f794f36980b755fcbc0ece73ba2321fc8b9ae8ea
'2012-05-18T13:25:29-04:00'
describe
'33358' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNG' 'sip-files00098.pro'
0366fc09ea4d5097b3376e9d29086ceb
c6529b4fa45faa960bb158319a08cb95abcbc0a5
'2012-05-18T13:24:28-04:00'
describe
'34638' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNH' 'sip-files00100.pro'
824977a110c8a0d8e426d20ebf70f9ba
36d3fc80b66d1ccdbe91891a03b3693f015b6e4b
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNI' 'sip-files00101.pro'
bc5b05fed37d5656ee00990cb75d62e3
f64e5e8a5336156f162b112fb6f07bfeb561c503
'2012-05-18T13:25:01-04:00'
describe
'37465' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNJ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
a35bec96a3ff7572921fa84ad5d40d66
e1a5fb1a994717b15031b3b85b9e27c78a205c3a
describe
'32541' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNK' 'sip-files00103.pro'
879c0b35faa0df4dfff10a8512715332
33002532f0dfef64dd6745c4f1d635e9a9a309bd
describe
'35279' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNL' 'sip-files00104.pro'
b6c004c47332908a53a4cdbdb1374f17
d4b216e8204333d267ee0146a690aa00f8e47f03
'2012-05-18T13:21:56-04:00'
describe
'33637' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNM' 'sip-files00105.pro'
b7528e35f2a9b267a30dcb77e16a9759
6fbe428d0ad7f6bb1e3ea76e64984d0cd223946a
describe
'34344' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNN' 'sip-files00106.pro'
8e129c58e96bdf272940d95920ae39d4
8d0b758b4ba12f7193da0a0cde15c05573ae277b
describe
'34297' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNO' 'sip-files00107.pro'
50c44dcbffb07b8a4cf68e468843bf5a
8d7c49160f7367b5a72bfb752f0cc051417b1000
describe
'33648' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNP' 'sip-files00109.pro'
d58803a9242fc36376b4a0c07aa5c922
60b5aaa95037dbbf054b2fef0e7800cc88ce9be5
describe
'29113' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNQ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
0352fafc0de93d93a7015dbc5b499fcf
8644f5dab49388fc1b5d1b9625e4b834345074be
describe
'35989' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNR' 'sip-files00112.pro'
2a3e54d0ad0b54f76e6cd69d6fde2775
c646c8f524aa32cf55e312976ee4f50b3ac08575
'2012-05-18T13:20:54-04:00'
describe
'35456' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNS' 'sip-files00113.pro'
5c89bbc7de9deed08a9f7eee5d5357ba
094083d95804a431ceb3c2e8133e94bb7350b8df
describe
'36517' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNT' 'sip-files00114.pro'
b9a0bf49ce53f7ae83a8e592ef307ce4
ee0ec3994584364e8633b0070425020ad9a43e7c
describe
'35255' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNU' 'sip-files00115.pro'
e4322e884a4788d24f7df55edec451ad
963c6e2f9490bfda8bfcde96e587e2dc4f3f7e98
describe
'36012' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNV' 'sip-files00119.pro'
c8818a954f4828b0abd52175c072be1e
7fcf5284ba3866ed7ae30142abeecdfe67ac99e9
'2012-05-18T13:25:17-04:00'
describe
'36593' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNW' 'sip-files00120.pro'
8d9afd47be9249f4de6bd7c0bc46d8e4
6db78a2d2cc06e23dd4ce5c9c128896f543be77a
describe
'30801' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNX' 'sip-files00121.pro'
d5b9f7a4b33213620a8d1052c4453ee0
ea4b4f13d5a8eaeb8680b9c0af6a6ad5adc4b6d7
describe
'34579' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNY' 'sip-files00122.pro'
933e7aa054deb92c8e41028c55a342a5
fdadaaecc19d77fddeaf2b602555c2bb768fdfca
describe
'34669' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQNZ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
d02fd03519b411f04b70bf98b0ced963
fbc0a44a82e24a45aed51e55bfd62d5dfdc2f05c
describe
'33008' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOA' 'sip-files00124.pro'
4e479e30cb354adb94e4b6767743ba6d
b7855f7b028da9dc99c093b7c8a58742e192a65e
describe
'36673' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOB' 'sip-files00125.pro'
076422dc63e92e6592b2521bf21dba25
cde29979f64d32c4f421b443e1432c341bc0c2a2
describe
'33109' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOC' 'sip-files00127.pro'
f9ca80ef16e27c5a5ea8721c1d277633
c482e9f8e4051d0f3353fdef4073f9062febe6e6
describe
'37183' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOD' 'sip-files00128.pro'
4fa74882574258f27a7a59b6d40802e6
cb85be74888d6420ed1074eacf071560a4cc7930
'2012-05-18T13:22:30-04:00'
describe
'34737' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOE' 'sip-files00129.pro'
dec065e22522270c4990b5e04f90a317
858b6b31a51eb92272ebbcb3d5e05512a04aeb09
describe
'36632' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOF' 'sip-files00130.pro'
50d3347ad1ba88b76b8cc46745117c78
97992b07899929ac2ea750a1bd43e05dec1e953c
describe
'37443' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOG' 'sip-files00131.pro'
3d0b0f2d8190540126ab5d38a8337f16
ea00903e766ca896509d466ae596e0475f6f2d0a
describe
'9324' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOH' 'sip-files00132.pro'
534474fb7fa4226834c9dd8355841981
9634b3b5f929b8efb4fea012d282c3f8ae829304
describe
'412' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOI' 'sip-files00136.pro'
72dc5fdbeac99d3846d0bd062cf4f9ce
1a021a46b2de319b4c9ab567c0ecefe106ef36a8
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOJ' 'sip-files00001.txt'
81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877
ba8ab5a0280b953aa97435ff8946cbcbb2755a27
describe
No printable characters
No printable characters
No printable characters
'213' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOK' 'sip-files00002.txt'
6a8a704ddfd6e60fa4de5ca9b944246c
6d4c7c8faa1e932becea3681c44d329f236787dd
describe
'57' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOL' 'sip-files00003.txt'
68964b8de88b7d4a91e6306fc4848db3
c455aa937a8821b0f868baed05c5c466bdfdbdcc
describe
'78' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOM' 'sip-files00004.txt'
c3568f6d467181414a70863b6286b622
017d0ab27b262a1be60352c85c836fae8262d596
'2012-05-18T13:22:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQON' 'sip-files00005.txt'
360a129ee939c2dea0fc17eae398bf56
670ba0aa8cdecf85823be5461eaca44b1f1152d2
'2012-05-18T13:18:51-04:00'
describe
'164' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOO' 'sip-files00006.txt'
816ab89aae374ab5efe17ea53da302c6
7826f39bfef7db50706f7a67ed904cb4adf0dd55
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOP' 'sip-files00007.txt'
92e64b5c00ae81ea33194ef27eb51bd6
6ac25b3767b1f185980cd039ea39361eca51c4d2
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOQ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
059730b5df35d7edc2330138302f677b
53d7bfb19a6dffd83a1b16fc41386113ea9313c6
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOR' 'sip-files00010.txt'
c4529417f723d759ccd2f3aec58ad062
c8e2d2e68c8183718c96eabc0128459906365f91
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
ec75ff923f7a5c711586b7ef7211f5f9
d8920cada001b96519b6107a518cfb19691488a8
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOT' 'sip-files00012.txt'
8eaef232286a051e6ac404e49faafa8f
1ab385c2ca36e8d8b169f8d2c1382b08caa3c24a
'2012-05-18T13:20:19-04:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOU' 'sip-files00013.txt'
574f2e04a1d966353ad931e02051e6de
326a5d3986908157eb672007a7281cf3ed8036a9
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOV' 'sip-files00014.txt'
4b2d3000d3e70762ce9e5840a4af9439
8daed8623915f3f5ad502b1bf472ea31cb90f0c6
'2012-05-18T13:22:29-04:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOW' 'sip-files00015.txt'
5829a5a09c16dacfea671adb352aa67f
ab2bc03f9f50a187a1b1adb55a8178f5a4ade88f
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOX' 'sip-files00016.txt'
519f8928ffbd2177b18e3381c501b6a2
acde62c0a52213ab206dff486104e1dd9ffcf328
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOY' 'sip-files00017.txt'
1c0f4b32fc3893b664357eff3d31b9d1
b2e8a65a512bd041d837bcb640e1afd79ad90d09
describe
'435' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQOZ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4e5c07176e1831f9bb1f4a0be46b54e2
b0fbbaab13cbf2e7869e80e9c29f70330c4a3d34
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPA' 'sip-files00020.txt'
431c0d7e15b6ad9da1d081a0ec155e23
e51266971e5e235323d95b7ed1aa4edc584dc3f5
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPB' 'sip-files00021.txt'
641133f08aa584e01af3a30701180b91
bee2e59c9c8e5063d19aa550ac8cbfb8a6e1f275
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
59e3edc52a5d5b7edc645937419cbf08
e463dd256d02422304ae36aa97a67a07e651f1ec
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPD' 'sip-files00023.txt'
4d2907c70f48f7a1199d49bc8ca3f5a6
f9b164d1d1dfbc9a9583acf94cdd897d460721e8
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
64f32f406af3f36e4a946522a92483aa
1954b1294cd18b022050eec01fa40fbb638b4658
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPF' 'sip-files00026.txt'
6638b789fa29aef7fac0897bfb6bcbbd
e40f903d0759e43829d974d7d2b44a2e8ec9a68d
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPG' 'sip-files00027.txt'
7ec1a932d57449ef9a4bbee7d07a45e1
8b5385b453963340aaa99beca5c696d8128275a3
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPH' 'sip-files00028.txt'
5dbc98b93f6792cf13fbdda005984580
2abab26fcf5c9da221b0c70c0a21b11334a77596
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
ec22f7675bf9e4781a3639159f33c16e
2e360618ff0acbf8e13a1066484c4ffa17a9bff6
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPJ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e006112a5804554c4428e9ad54ad86ad
b71f2ce40ba4f1ed04ed2b7f45bffe3f92ead343
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
c77596faae22d119aa09d28601316b9f
3654d1d26e268b02a29f7d72f12bc0fa4e458320
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a95c6945ea16440a92e192e5740808e2
757918f7462b162e4b1788399574f081a23a7a18
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
26b5388e89d18ead9fb0c07b96be06d5
9c1ac2be203648b0f2665cbab6f6805af6127b55
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPN' 'sip-files00034.txt'
53d64d4c8fb3d823fb10c5d8fa35f44a
b014938759fdf277cec607180497ab09e7e70927
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPO' 'sip-files00035.txt'
c620cbc6d244c137756fecb848cf873d
b8aaa319f4efb1ccf22ac760fb6fee2951d6c33f
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
8d9dc9e195d47b14d4606ac1a3245299
42e3746ec7435bdf5bcb22f174f7e99dff098d1f
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPQ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
d77e08bb81d7e3419aeda0f1147a8479
b268c223ae223cf14cbbf41960bf6a993c82fa4b
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
7f6d450dfb2829cba668a487ca3e414b
23655835c911d09e74815ecb1cde1856cd6c41d9
'2012-05-18T13:25:46-04:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPS' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5064003cb5f54318e89d3d627bd8e074
a46898116060a5dab7438f87bc90e1397ede13e2
describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPT' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4055b53c2e9df3660e9563f903aa28ea
95f87a6bcc068a2c6a33154feeab2fd11b09f0f4
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
c6ca57869ce8652baef208b52a6f91a4
027b916d93f04df7213b7ec5e43c9e0ec1d80b11
'2012-05-18T13:19:15-04:00'
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
77fa04bee027bcdc8cc4d3f8642a78c5
c51df1d820ebc944a466e703f47be42d59db1564
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
13e5e32c06c79427857537ba3160310d
7d5f81a3eea6ef46e80b22786c220c02bf266f93
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPX' 'sip-files00045.txt'
20b5b79c780be0b87fc739386b2063c7
8f3d75cd927ce4e194ab5ad699681cbf14df3091
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPY' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3e44743565c9ddc39d6bd63ca0546030
a7f31c69f6693ee667d26e6d91c7c5285b227ee5
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0910e1819fd84ea77eeec1a0893407d0
b922cfa2a4d1e42ac318a1152aeb9ab969d9eff9
'2012-05-18T13:24:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQA' 'sip-files00048.txt'
bc7850ab037e78853b780ac3f7b0eae4
842bb5fd0a99de48fedff07b6ae1712f9e99d241
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQB' 'sip-files00049.txt'
3bd910c5da6bec5a0e74039e9d408962
dfd669a56689d6e10b2f7df0ebcdca7e6e90ffc2
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQC' 'sip-files00050.txt'
fd8d9b453f1d7d69a289af12065c5ec2
6254469ee92596e052115738d662b0230d931a19
'2012-05-18T13:22:42-04:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQD' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8c846cbfb87071f3d639a3f96673320c
89813b22b544588cd37e57febf7bb16e8ad0a6c5
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQE' 'sip-files00053.txt'
b86cac7db422558657021a8f0416aa5d
98ed521cc0a90ea260f7846b9fd35c506f3af301
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQF' 'sip-files00054.txt'
4530b59948ea1f69a4a2432d4759f092
3aec2416a1137a47cccb231e22015977562d99cc
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQG' 'sip-files00056.txt'
4138c1ee38798bf84ddfe7ce7d00f31e
99575de7ace6f04ce296f9faa736496431665051
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
4ae520bcc96b2dd6fb198f07b3a8ef95
ad6354f9938c2be551d533093e5440a74d4dc6d8
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQI' 'sip-files00058.txt'
eef9cdaa7eb46e30f1abdc22d451fb66
3078da6b20f57a77b86d65e22c70509f2251ab1b
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b87f721c749c95fbaa9ad621784b6615
269b397dddb4c8f0fd89d547b69aa97946be5871
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00060.txt'
2678ec33712d75ccf646a2f8c1644eb6
e48e9fb67ae24340c6020b310ff73f424348c24d
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00061.txt'
46103f02420c2ad46627203238396588
43afe606d28b698862dc1ff25328f20124175cfa
'2012-05-18T13:24:54-04:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00062.txt'
31008b39947592a6b4387dd213e93f53
92d0747a3a60cc725d27e34d5c4ce085bf4c37c0
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00063.txt'
fc46f8dfe09eba1888f487922e5f0e7b
056a66392a5019ae11250b24bcc264dc2c257989
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00064.txt'
0881912ef99ffbed861ce4c5a962dbc4
104689bf45c52932af7f85c23b96217d11f055ec
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00065.txt'
bd033bf24d30e77b15e38b977993f693
2affdb3eec336fef88fba156bf54ee079c608596
'2012-05-18T13:23:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
99aec47a70e22b9ea093714d0b17fe36
597226472109a2e3f1a76e841907afe0f498cf92
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
b23dcb7ed2c0fd25b7bec4d4ce574623
f04fcd5ddd74afd186f8a18c7c3b79cb27720108
'2012-05-18T13:24:24-04:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00068.txt'
89a8dae21d9b9a4b2a7e544711cee289
402d3b58207abbdd192b56e43458088460fada23
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00069.txt'
ecc5a76bd40258db67cfaa42c3ca3b4b
b2d5a2a812839cc296c4fa8f7e958b99ba0671b4
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
11139746174595e6d2e9e04c95e2f9aa
30807985686c333d6f70f4a371bdd0b22c8410d2
'2012-05-18T13:23:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00071.txt'
dd4d50eb10846588dc4f324281713e44
42cd7badfb96a7734dbf08ae9a7a0e2349c10a06
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00072.txt'
fded6efc0d8b64691aa36cacc4042997
5d0a3fe5c55bab1e4284f9706d7290290a29f189
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00073.txt'
d168cdb35809f744034687eb379e54cd
341736a8a022fbf993f1b704b19168348d59953e
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00074.txt'
f45b939f6cbf22469dab2c130cf2ff9a
8ae8bb9ce85d5436d81afc389d5cb569a5c3c932
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00075.txt'
d9155eafb9b67565bb8af672d63684a4
d8644705ce0d40d6e689680de73ba9b1e6a521ba
describe
'949' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00076.txt'
649d2cbba4169a1f7a72505ad987e294
4c937c8b56a4fabd68dee148d316a2909377ce8b
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00078.txt'
a88ad258b4fa40b977d56a007ba0d2e4
fbdb2ef501a540d666c74b2fd4d1e5c1835f5378
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00079.txt'
24f2e475bb9a140c20b41c7ee1790fa6
6f8903fa78af284a0aec71f0a27a57eea5e90676
describe
'1391' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00080.txt'
dd990732f5d201a3190d0dc1f6951a74
f6538451c2f5dfe934c8496e08a5946866d91b28
'2012-05-18T13:25:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00081.txt'
a856a4febb48a84b78867c561ef2c1bc
2381dbad401081df4c6ea84b9bbd877485413433
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00082.txt'
5ba980a586c97d7ad8747bdc09157228
2219960956968407bd6231041e349d3880e7040c
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
32eefcff779a5feb002bde1fff143797
688eff3dc49107e3832a9bcb5466db8476866e36
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00084.txt'
2cc5eb3d1c38223d1bb74d5a306493cf
0fbfdc4608765fd12c67bc9e02c290ce9d944cf5
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00085.txt'
177e795f59ead4d6a088e78fcdd0f359
a43fe18897103ea8e9c2e982992384447d81a2c1
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
07014d33e711a998c60bd06b2b16d93d
a3f421e54893666aa3adbfd1315152f6758c67e0
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00087.txt'
4ae1455616824054bd36e5f821d55f47
193395f5dd28660222b9f28d4e222d0b732580d6
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00088.txt'
23fe8b522ea0647506d391f3f617d38c
e587d2bbd0868c25435468fc06573c799964fc66
'2012-05-18T13:24:38-04:00'
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00090.txt'
ee293a732b5599b7db66918b1cd5ea73
13ed2f60a86ff848e464240475de59859377a437
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00091.txt'
6e22c90a4d9e9d2ae6947527d748582d
e9ca43ffa34657ad2fd98f1fa0fc2f6efe2b79e1
'2012-05-18T13:23:11-04:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00092.txt'
a2fc5b43e4b6c3384bf993ab1ff6f659
ecfb02536bce79642ef33345f8a7e052412ba998
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00094.txt'
2ff3231a3e966e848dd3f2e998625c22
68ae33ef4b44c3e4053f815e4a4d8b0551ba231c
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00095.txt'
4df00309b42a25d7e1579a7cb48bd781
1760a61839c24505cd305941ba852d9e53eb2c77
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00096.txt'
03a792a73c251423566dabc007a05d8b
45d977de93b295012d00c3f5a94bc4fe8500b066
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00098.txt'
f47106d7eccf6662b6e2932105f8f788
2e64f32442ab366fe5db7c1abbbdde89c9ffc67e
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00099.txt'
bcd7521551b3d446286c58e6573751f8
cfac7abc0555728189084f8593fa7627fd30c1ec
'2012-05-18T13:25:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00100.txt'
c2e7649b4fd4dbfdad8701454aef7b05
3abc03e0fef721fbdc67f9138a8156c596968de3
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00101.txt'
a784e5bd846f4943a9b9667d2885c5a1
8340dd6c5762bac6f546dbd0c7cf46128905fa99
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00102.txt'
79bdb2c615d26c48ed820ab0cfd23259
bf3d97f28cf061e94fe2a5eefa83f3304fb182e2
'2012-05-18T13:23:37-04:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00103.txt'
28cdbfda344619a1e1180ef5dd2f7ddc
15670f88b1af42181ebe238d1f7a50ac4d07e351
'2012-05-18T13:22:00-04:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ee19d54837b0ae9993999d83dd501053
ed04c732958302dc9caa7eff9723b34af3db587b
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
5b762c74580c2cb1bfac197ed6a9f442
6f2615cdbe40d27cfb9a935e03c508964c9494f9
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00107.txt'
510052ae397adbc1507ab98350216181
2f4311918000bc1c2145e7f329b7b4c9b0526c4e
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00109.txt'
a45d29769d54440f8f0db1a2e1e227a0
bdeae417f1655cdd08452c7d7ad2bd6291ff736f
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00110.txt'
d08aacfd2e343010c9b522d44b392a03
1e984b0ff0fc0f89723970e373e9e23068760b0a
'2012-05-18T13:25:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00111.txt'
6257623d7fe80f44a0dc5e46fdff0826
49a05436c39f5ea7c0321a4e00541f63d2425d2e
'2012-05-18T13:21:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00112.txt'
d6c22755e0ee92674679d8ff488651ed
d91da161d1bb6a5f82f0e0d804e21d8f978ca236
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00113.txt'
e9ab7ff345f9fc8ce003f3a3e951ce7c
dbabf2c0b48fc936c46d9cfaec878683c73316bc
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
ccc511b4fa9c9d7b4815bee5d22449c0
48a8a4fede1ba460167ce0bca9d729c40aedc286
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
2736573dca9ead04aa9ccedbdfa1d256
f399488a1699c895cb50221423eaed3db8dc878e
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00116.txt'
e1918d09e6b94a58aa5c2275d1b04385
dce987966d94c5f22b74461866d6cf10ee52531b
'2012-05-18T13:24:34-04:00'
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
2ad85c383e4c0e014189b70ebbb80ca0
fe3dfab2575c7497b1168e98a087e8c0d1dffbf2
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSK' 'sip-files00118.txt'
04914fd363bf01b9b54c7a4b9667341d
184dde331e7f62803213b500097e62344389ee2f
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSL' 'sip-files00119.txt'
af04f89c9c733dea8ef9f0ea80448819
6c9f56648b8dce02efa43bd3dada31946109ade1
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSM' 'sip-files00120.txt'
d15e8895803dbcd5128f351862393086
091931a01c093e5ec873b4533c37c71b230569c5
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSN' 'sip-files00122.txt'
fd0e2978757fa4e25cbb4731a86000d6
8ed5caf0a203e40d0a577c6aa23607295408c812
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSO' 'sip-files00123.txt'
c9c1303c072286df48c1d9d0ead96459
6cc2e5918268b6acb3ddaa94fd08c15d21e9c663
'2012-05-18T13:17:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSP' 'sip-files00124.txt'
ee4dda040712247dc677fe070112f8dc
9165e9e32f794b3d0bcee76aafa5d44ef2a52175
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
3064acfff585c9fd2c442ed86bda00bf
246e18ea0809e2a7beb3a0dc228e23672a2476df
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSR' 'sip-files00126.txt'
4a4d6bb56bd8f95792c5c1feac8bc35c
a9d5a7df3036dcb49dd9e74c29d6030750a09e49
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSS' 'sip-files00127.txt'
928a61adbcd1bf6a7b34e7eaf7d24535
6949d8f7ef46e9fd96b1936db95aac80cf87b916
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQST' 'sip-files00128.txt'
a1a8b3b2fc778824c3a5300e90fcfa4e
5b64f79ef201d7cf6b81cb6b0800f49f96be1acd
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSU' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d52d988d5307491b1749c7e7ed57a3f9
7781a0a7fa6e5f9f9d5149ceba22347ffeb5218f
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSV' 'sip-files00130.txt'
867a84752313ca6215cc34dd3aecdbb5
ec442d9b67d276303acf2a7710993b4aa0db9987
describe
'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSW' 'sip-files00131.txt'
2e8613cb9c55b373c8359d709452876b
cf2a291e9b5a9b889c92bf89fe87ceb2f9925206
'2012-05-18T13:23:57-04:00'
describe
'34' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSX' 'sip-files00134.txt'
431255da54c90f61b760776ff797ff16
e9e0a4c96dc8c5c68ef9592a3e2223db95286950
describe
Invalid character
'119' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSY' 'sip-files00136.txt'
0fe03d5dd42f3814a1d1870dfc6cc9e2
00d2889eba7792083b585c9f077de5963f677d32
describe
'155540' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
a0525976aee871551ed60be344c23cfd
90390460d99cea838883b9fd10af7c6831038976
describe
'162597' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTA' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
90d5f7d65c873ae03a405558ae8f0e79
df1f50203d829732c24167f4dc9f3dcd9a835b8e
describe
'55421' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTB' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
db8e1c54d9f910a4fbaa8d3610e97b77
ebd49834324e74d7f0f146f784e9d19810f75278
describe
'60927' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTC' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
8292df1fbe85cada8787acdfd3f783bf
6a3364e11befe74ed7bce3ae4f6e686a98093cd0
describe
'167720' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTD' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
b611c9b105f4c2f266004f65fbf3259a
19b651e724fb6482511775d1fcddc335a506c761
describe
'58041' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTE' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
05c1ad12296f5d34806bc8ac6fe83c4c
58ff3017b89e742a2fd654fccf22460d9ad61491
describe
'51465' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTF' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
949c20f852833e08cd04258088561819
5052523e8289792269b98bbc23b9556bf6b2b468
describe
'62870' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTG' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
68570f6a432d7ab3740749d150acbaea
5e1d4b297e34b3beb9a27f41dcec4cb88b2717fe
describe
'60785' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTH' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
66744cb260ab43c876f65f8043ed34ac
26dc6fae5b9c7f895335a0442fc85e25a2774449
describe
'164911' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTI' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
e566dfbbe58d9119143ae455d77a3c61
adacf2e104be598a40c57a4fda2b7d1f163d18a2
describe
'61552' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTJ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
ef396538c6bd09eb8238521319772651
c64942f083846fd0b496a032088057f5e6d5fdc3
describe
'163910' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTK' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
1ea1a912c7fe064dbf37fed34bd9eecc
8f51b991757c543146935cf33516f871dfd8178a
describe
'60202' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTL' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
b8d905819f74d14c4e9605c7324b1342
418bdf78a3bd745600b940ffe926102828a2da05
'2012-05-18T13:20:40-04:00'
describe
'62485' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTM' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
6e74841373178650123f3e35bebe00a5
8e7a35d558199d2e3684c8663f60de8c3813533b
describe
'136866' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTN' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
8bce3c6d7ec1301a2763a1b1dff3a7ac
7c42f1e0ec012a5a323360b9d01233d8b7a6ffb2
'2012-05-18T13:21:55-04:00'
describe
'158587' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTO' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
ec6781be7bf5b1b5b00bdb31d5754b90
d9cd70b78602218fcbf2c50c76f389d06fde2c20
describe
'168385' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTP' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
22f079b036e492052cd6a687faf3b588
288b73f855a4a3a21603dfcfa9d799aea283e94f
'2012-05-18T13:22:20-04:00'
describe
'142679' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTQ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
99566c728df8e614c133d8a01a826bdc
b9507ec7401332bd7df1b6a4376ade3470b5e22b
describe
'163900' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTR' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
541e05af355ab37621a07b43755f7ac4
76deaf92ef501a4e04dc9754ccca0fb80477c836
describe
'63540' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTS' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
c9ec3402929a98b4d808de3ba6fbb8c8
052e83e7b1dec34b022fc58e5992cd003a7bcf6b
describe
'61584' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTT' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
97534fe3bc5a654a98ca946f2cc09169
ec949139126421f6e5e54100b90bcaea3e53d64a
describe
'62507' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTU' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
68a0b6cb0f31c1ba15798c05e540d9b9
6cd89cf4e8e7e009b981d0a8cf16cf50276fa363
describe
'155439' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
5507b1f60b1daa3af16df7bd2b4fee89
555f275cb14f3839344a4605946d179bfc1fc97b
describe
'167545' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
1234c75b4a3f6b5f680f3e5e55db8aea
74603ce2c84726086ebf978d02e1acbc6eb4c24c
describe
'167852' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTX' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
545b7bcfe20ebcf0dfb6ac4dbf6b9958
c55d60f5140531323a4fe9a2f57b9b39f622e257
describe
'62731' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTY' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
40996c2ec12cf32542ef759e0df9f2e3
4cafe11c07768e660ec886bddeee3633476af42d
'2012-05-18T13:21:47-04:00'
describe
'100147' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQTZ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
12e35c0391729febfbc529acc050cb1b
14389899ed5f398a66503efd91558ec8ab943afc
describe
'174184' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUA' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
53e2ba4dd45384cdc096cc8b8e114387
0bb21136b95be2d97b5de888b1293d00484a0576
describe
'48338' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUB' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
689965d0228e12d40c0631a0c2cbcee7
5337b45573e0cafb9d1a7152b60b169966a952c5
describe
'61446' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUC' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
e4b676c0736175cb3164301371c47a66
d12ea45030d853b2681d6c23e0010cde46e3326d
describe
'171489' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUD' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
100b5222b34b068d04aa52966915e3eb
bdcf375128011544468dc23b87a15a8742c34977
describe
'62416' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUE' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
010300c936163f383e361054653966c4
ae1fe54730956e6caa5a727f02ca3b342f9d6c02
describe
'63178' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUF' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
7c67f385e8f1df692d168c9722077283
dda99eb1c66580ba19990fa7abd134796e1323fa
describe
'176140' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
c88fc6010f2ff4d63475e53e3032eaeb
f2955ae65adbbdb06382d6d3c9dcb639da7bde2a
describe
'166154' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
cc51d8a7a3cb007a35dcc8f48e5179c9
571400c93baf44a2a51f76205489d146941b9d95
describe
'170986' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
db2d645bc497e1c998a20b6c91d67c7a
432fe1b7f28675e13429041edf3ca99c91d2f896
describe
'204585' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUJ' 'sip-filesUF00054254_00001.xml'
6a71f81f8cb2487a1845330576925023
527a89bfe185b827cfc95b0b801d886a78d15aa9
'2012-05-18T13:21:18-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T15:02:34-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'239793' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
4fac2ab98b44eae74b639713134643e6
ab530a52b64ddc8267c75c4a42acc074cfa34d4f
describe
'75181' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
22a59c253e0bd52840212860e07a399d
03f4d5fdece55d2a51b723e29976994936b323ea
describe
'133666' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
7167af61f73cbf3eecf26c70442841b5
640a7b0f3bf7066ced5485560ea04510688b6147
describe
'49836' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
f3f2bef159b6b3247cb434a554117a25
1b1b96c407e016222b53bad5b2493cebae3ac04c
'2012-05-18T13:25:37-04:00'
describe
'115002' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
e42ec95a97c1a27f05ef2df11373b72f
160825f15e2d7044c99535096045a6f8cf3d9af8
describe
'47485' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
e78d20a6e6c59ca88401617a4d151a7c
ac034e7e69783f921efb9d16f0384e3f2fc45726
'2012-05-18T13:25:41-04:00'
describe
'75664' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
abf82b91b8823aa1627654f7bbca4c68
3961a7318644a53b9004e5bbe6be59de9b32e20c
describe
'174714' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
52d5b37b1564a5f3129315fd62f4121c
c2e632f558bf5be944bd7e229f6bbb09cecbc514
describe
'160715' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
ea9a51ad3c9d9c5f375e02275a92f59c
ecd69f762580c8ad5105ab7a16742e98c4e570cc
describe
'61516' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
1c32a204e854d051983042c3810ff0b5
117fcbcdcb629cdc6ab8da9bd4e32de009a2300e
'2012-05-18T13:22:26-04:00'
describe
'141947' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
8be414a981335f2aa8f21e0584482a48
41aca044b0da462919c2594678e766681fb5e8e2
describe
'56105' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
00637d38901dffbc04c94887c6593867
fb20b41379e83e92078635517f947c8b275cb5c6
describe
'165218' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
542af8ad5e4a58f0cfe32bee255f6a0d
a5cbf3b9e24127f4986832d61ec9c6b28fd53f70
describe
'166913' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
7a4bac113e177e2b37aac8bf52d5426e
70c0bf12e78f0b57e264f660082ad9b4d5b6c9a4
describe
'62199' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
9a803d67a1625266285799c53d16d59a
d7391d263a418cc8fb672b1ccc0f146e809bf9f7
describe
'61028' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
73fdaa055c979d84408a9b32ca2f869f
f14f659cc3ec6c22774bde44cf75b50d5dfbacbf
'2012-05-18T13:22:05-04:00'
describe
'60804' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
a57237dec5b55034264c0f0c22a2750e
34076b66c79d51f1789f9238f1bd9c90beca0df5
describe
'170355' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
480cfea0ab3b20d0a57619bb31c3dcf6
6c52bc48fa894b4ca2431b963139030139f3ef34
describe
'61617' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
2236e25bd46211cba697af23b2db6dc6
972af6fc098008370d038ef16ceaea2eaed58b8f
describe
'162122' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
b9e85bedc96d328e2c42d966ab7e9b70
f47bf5ba61281ba28fda0c7d5da0afaa4ea0f8fc
describe
'163935' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
e27d5133957aa9d244a35e4b15e31819
4c12f24d92d42d21f8379e9008d226515a5ae4aa
describe
'62169' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
48036fcacfdcf46e1a5edf48817b01a5
28dcd743d6ba6068f3a9a01ccd96caa61b3cd1e3
describe
'158779' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
678beb357e0b32fc18f49995567c2d4e
e2163e6ce26aba65d744dd65802b43dbe37f1a4b
describe
'62401' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c552682ad733ec8886e7f82246070b85
1e3f417929b07b0ca765a6a1819df672817ef296
'2012-05-18T13:25:38-04:00'
describe
'59893' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
9faa8d0cc6fef1c4fe111736daf52189
59f1571f7e47f746e8f7e8888d9ee4ed692148ed
describe
'160665' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
949d561e6777787d78c1a1552d5dbf5e
498647b787b1e2d1a672a25d36d187f8016049d8
describe
'61450' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
89f2dcad2a0d1873204b8bd4b08be8e4
ec0beee78e5d99991bd24c3843e8026243241a8e
'2012-05-18T13:24:42-04:00'
describe
'41788' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
112eb9407ff22d0e08be746006ce803a
a39199a5de04f62ace9f15517f401c2b51fdbd85
describe
'162812' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
c28531647805081e74570ce7247412d4
ea79faece435c560d10a823daae4c66363a8d86f
'2012-05-18T13:23:27-04:00'
describe
'169614' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
87d1ebf6e786fd40b1c7cd86af75e231
83a315dc4af6936743d9b55186a9f8f76a31c41d
describe
'63116' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
2593231d34a2cfe5e27c45597f38732b
dd07ec10b994d9be2f4deb1b592e312504ac30cc
describe
'165082' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
dfd6b88b87d24c2c425c9a9f5995d50a
eeaad287c55bb5b226e5253a67ea61d2bb15753e
describe
'171519' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
b90996dece4114c35c606feeff6ba8f0
c994808db4e4d4a216302cf199fcdba9c824a4c9
'2012-05-18T13:22:14-04:00'
describe
'62428' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
568fe7fe98461071c09cba948b371219
85fdf6191d46a71e8b4f5940f959a7ebe4ee0d4f
describe
'174820' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
1bb1265b0e2fe5c974958975adeb8592
944647f778d37c11fe4b6021d6c6c3c4c9d0eaa4
describe
'62963' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
b0c4a298576cfcb4cf07c419cde43363
219e60551a6398741bb0e0876e0913225c0ba301
describe
'57773' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
fc57b70014cde408b07631dbf85b246e
44ce95f59b19b9508d412bb879899e0e2fa546ef
describe
'170178' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
6b4cfdc7a14b651acc7027deac570930
5f6b72fd3f3481ddd90a2af6db2724300551c6f8
describe
'61419' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
1b9316b9e85db709662504cea85e04ad
1ff973d78f73b6d1940bbcd2a29566ab8d65e576
describe
'172941' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
538acb83675da33a380f05ac8a4cd03f
dacd6618d062803bf970ed87ece536bd40bd411b
describe
'63542' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c318af1e20623c8cea431f9293286d90
5d17900e98d7f5558e82a4db721bc3431a1d23a7
describe
'63326' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
9d9ce7b60dda7b0d7b0d70edbaa3f828
69143781af6baef79341012184f0bfed85adcf3c
describe
'169141' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
58f99536cbc9419d362417a4d5ad2ce9
c252e26a3683b95a78294a30f98c11f5e94980c7
describe
'63095' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
7d6785a27438295d0efc93f5775e01b6
1aa5e46cd4351788a7fd70efb8cf7c4a3c020c8f
describe
'164342' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
c92e0b15016de7c046abe89d40d9a0f6
7b01c9663717c4a207473204f6e0309ffea32c96
'2012-05-18T13:21:17-04:00'
describe
'62211' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
028cc7343fa4321f6292b496b20d991f
a3b5e7dbe4f5cb69152f04d039d3695b7484be08
describe
'167458' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
c8613a32f9662d7cddf1a1d5469c0a61
8629b2cca4bab493605fc8d16f2e4fc38bec0ba2
describe
'173218' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
6fa9a2763effdb8bcbbe7c0a582d1513
27f4813a05f98f216cf5a4acd14628eb58188f97
describe
'62487' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
c74c33491f12f2b49fabf9ec24168cb2
78a55057afd7d9634b21d3e8340fa8494bf80124
describe
'168998' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
becf8a898e57b3141f32915a0a35b95b
f0ad22da3ea6a2c15fe1949314a4f407d5ca7731
describe
'63861' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
12d8008973e34c181668e81c52ef144a
59c3f1012c011963826cb2d1ecb3454872653c89
describe
'60324' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
111732572bca94d11c15c90a75497f74
9a53793e570e9e94a82a1aaeca76d671c51b1475
describe
'64269' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c866782c35aa1363048bbcb90458def0
f31d07139598548d80a2876a34f894a81553a7bc
describe
'164723' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
6578e7539511603bc933df4b8db1cf33
ce1931038263ab4c0939c4127b72dc7e7822188a
describe
'177633' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
c2855e563ddafd3dd446336e30709dbc
08e1be287a401fd8cac0dc81a7627d0ae9fdf83a
describe
'173845' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
05d088cd4b7a5dbf8e9325a4b3e66079
5496a09e7d12a5f379ffd12774338b978d6f9678
describe
'163257' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
55b199725e927d1d61e17be59726562a
69f19a8e57562809719c8e5c409ca5ed2a294285
describe
'60845' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
98aaeeb57193a0a5f219645e7d68cab2
719ba6839f6cc6a7f8aad9b56ff3ea15efdd27af
describe
'166753' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
e6c9888a2d8ff39cf80a4fbbfefd6482
5231ca3886cecbf11fca75ee4a7e3ab90dfb6b85
describe
'61130' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
bf4228ae9e10e2262ecd6a59ffbecbe8
d28af8ec4c4cd2977f4f46f4426200995e63504c
describe
'129810' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
48db92eb504cbf363291a45abe8a69db
e51bc7d4d763a0c1a349d749b502e68558d1e1ec
describe
'50328' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
eeaf3a583f08615e1cb352206f7c0849
ab5fbffa4ff6701e8680da744c3acdc10a757750
describe
'155406' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
eeafeb787d6f13c1c04d3b40bbcae682
08f806b18cccc92391e617e94813aeaf5ec77f0b
'2012-05-18T13:21:42-04:00'
describe
'175167' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
b2bf380e1fa4d36a51b8a4e7cfa98f27
c93faf6283166f133c888acc17a78c0a050f996d
describe
'65174' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
3f90e1731b398cd486ebd22e365ac7d8
0462cfc750904e40a694d5ff69ec0a4d7768bb1c
describe
'174442' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c017cd45d3b90c78b0a85a8d62cce226
7523a98367416847e950f53024f33df34b7dcb11
describe
'62934' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
7a2dd8aa44af3dfd2b698ba338a5e946
4ac5d6f8b2e06e5c2c13ed6b79bc1513824ee26c
describe
'170090' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
3e0704ee053a6c7fffa59fdd595b6c2d
9f3f1a452c2ab5f30ede9f9a69aa79cf2669b193
describe
'64716' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
28c2f394a77cb0405e10e7c3aeddd42d
6da311ffcba53c796ae5942d40a3c88f32d104e9
describe
'165053' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e6119c6de9932307d2922acd51e1fbdc
d45c417509ca2919003e0381cbe9da62676ef9a2
'2012-05-18T13:23:34-04:00'
describe
'64003' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
aa2b6542d1b64faa28831deeb65c6a84
1cf321f08bd7053bac10e3b4cf3adac66f76e56d
describe
'173719' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
123cd1061be6dd06c6f86ca14fce9c74
9ebb2146bb1c00434a65b4edfa7cd583b2fb0a55
'2012-05-18T13:20:50-04:00'
describe
'63391' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
e76a4126430cad539db257b6f3efb045
10e327e85bd454eb87dd0e046e17f6580f7e65d2
describe
'63875' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
60faabf14ed3aab901450063941d485d
648872b2e061024f38e6b79f90d7f86a143792e9
describe
'169472' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
aa4497112f39aa08070269fcb7fbf0e3
4c6053d165f4a7ef64b0c11757667978c3f8d123
describe
'63328' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
6cb522951e0d308bf1735bc4b294de87
1ca292c813da28536b438196631cf2366f5dbc82
describe
'174298' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d0565bd9ac916485852bd8e6ed1c145f
6fd9c8f10a8280735d7092e5fc2b58acdec33f27
describe
'171857' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
389b0f20d251166d2a288a7683aa64de
fa4db34742e26bf6527fedd551b2bf44fce58507
describe
'64659' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
7689078c86200226880beccdae56da28
e132083528362c025f56bcc80621e509a16e706d
describe
'176353' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
b1de59899388a9f9b00cde2c0d6c37ef
6b96bc281e80521e83a46a2897a399bfeb7b432e
'2012-05-18T13:24:12-04:00'
describe
'63897' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
c24640b6e56475779edb1c299a0af631
cb21b35d3a5edf536c27716ba2d0ad45f850ce7f
'2012-05-18T13:24:05-04:00'
describe
'175372' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
edd246395e090fe7977550d61c079789
9b1c31b799c5034838afd803d81333d0a2c2f722
describe
'63511' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
4a36adaa63cb690cf3789ac7a3843e19
99602d49f86a0285e97320dd6a667a76dc595bd1
describe
'171151' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
b4b4ce2f399ec0e14759e57ab78e1d60
0293382ab2aa84294a33565f8957704b22334caa
describe
'63343' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
04eb43d2540e240eebb182519595a16d
1e9416eef5d8a2a29b66110915187b34dd588f25
describe
'64099' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
bc49d587ec9165517c12d67b18e2b495
013ff5b6ca38049bb203b2273c33c1143f8280db
describe
'63045' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
7e168ae5217678107c5ce7baeeef79ac
673eb28370a7bbf7692ac4649c58785e12fd70f7
describe
'172617' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
c9ac64a07a6af939615014476b4c5d7e
c47581ee6cda8bf108d8b3fbf6aec31947faa970
describe
'63744' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
139a47c0a6e2d3129d1dc755bee97941
3c676b14c29660d019a1c22ef464ecffb6ddfb55
describe
'52091' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
6ad373640519aa8ce8f34c1f60fcf23a
cf8a6191f2a4029bfe2e19df3296356fcc496237
describe
'148869' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
040da4b81e6bab57f6d643d45576723e
0cb0f7012750c7d2c5e3b5a6fd95f9a02fae5903
describe
'57510' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
05b1b9af526daeed70fa7f862d8d98c4
227adbcdb540bb0db466cc6983eec6d903c8c280
describe
'166577' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
54fc581d99f819652669563397d3f7da
f630995cfb407bc0ccb94eec5e082a7fb36bae3e
describe
'167355' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
9df61b49ab570143cd057a847d280585
ba9393e5759ee9bd49c1176cb1c150bd0ada47ca
describe
'169797' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d2fb329cf3510c4c752c0ecfc2d93916
b0d70f36e7f3c1c3f9dd2da147ba066c02aa487a
describe
'63028' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
c348e9edb954ea4d511f129c30191301
f35e5b14e24060ae84ea5791a310b547ab9c144c
describe
'162673' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
82a5c9e32eed635c405d6b5466b7ba18
3c91611352dc051161f14fbcff18378bd9a29dc7
describe
'171963' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
d889eb213f89cc449e9098356ae352a8
37b41a29ae519a03e1815f686ec94bb766a059ea
describe
'63672' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
84d92c3bcdd99e0cead854a402364397
6815601cf874472dbafc7eaf2cd04eca06677944
describe
'172185' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
51c5f40e710bf36c467702f9421892f0
422aed4a88d50bd320d26bc3db524b4ac4183472
describe
'64097' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
f3833601ac6a804f7c98cf1111b6b4af
0071117651390f4367af3039143b8d738fb9828e
describe
'168754' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
ff78baa081b5a7e0dd7f9acbf052dc26
75b896accf24d355a3912a72ab55a90f34b1daf0
describe
'169253' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
1b381adfa3bbddee4fbde54bd6965d49
9e46a47d42dc2cea194aa9508693c884362b5a6f
describe
'63363' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
8d52270497aa4331f4e764ae15e77b21
24d8d775be74f4742d40396a07341dc7669b5b22
describe
'153570' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
9d20a370bb92161c73942ea3657abc31
3678882b38e6b58f5e7402331f0f0cfc2fdcb86c
describe
'54678' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
614404bbbe056d3e3fac5c8a0173c3de
3fde240563a90afe92a717b2ba754f024b17bcc6
describe
'163862' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
bb06dc521a67ba3118734d68abd9939d
1013118957efc5f4f4a0b0bd5006c0b8b7241204
describe
'63673' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
7680cba083424bd91567bc93b0abc041
e9d988778930cb8cfc746a16e366e0ff385cb261
describe
'165935' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
dfdb033117dd1a3afa542cd3439f4d81
169db405c22c6f8342dbc06718f8534cd478e0ad
describe
'167287' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
96ace674f7ef547b404f2ab0df1e2315
d5d7337333f7676aa218194e620daf0fdc161013
describe
'63441' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
af30032719e876470f0130069ff6482d
4b73cbc4bc672c2745f37f2a7102a76ee0e0dfe9
describe
'168188' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
246d06070ad9795065c62aad8789aa0d
19a4961b76c33008f7812482608e4553fdec4c0d
'2012-05-18T13:19:19-04:00'
describe
'126372' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
fed855c836c88221ce74e3bf407c39ba
741a4ffcad6bf466f5348aede02110782d306598
describe
'146507' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
7eec4630fdd8ac1637c2f53cede3d850
c034266d0f5c52a386fbabdd5f630dd87089a048
describe
'163242' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
fafb0b22234c120077b9addea36d08b5
73ba99bf9537b711c6052cbc2e2a8f66fd5d0c57
describe
'62434' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
4ff470c32e213787d62545e496d4a28c
47ac11a4e15a0206120dab6d722bdce318f3f421
'2012-05-18T13:23:56-04:00'
describe
'169599' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
db91b3841ed32f5843e85641cadbfb56
b3240f2febdc2278f3c336c682e95cfd91011765
'2012-05-18T13:24:15-04:00'
describe
'63143' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
78457b7d70b913f14d2d95b0a1470b45
7e155e7f94017da5caee506b34fabb3772678b05
describe
'167389' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
75b1cc8e8bde86ccdadeb17cdfb5cc96
bd37efcd7630ee1bac60e00d5f36ceb068de12e5
describe
'62898' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
e1b4fd9d1987c566f570e56a3b859a84
6d8220ff5275298b4fdde1215e71a161e184aca7
describe
'62915' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
8b23464406e95ac2db18279b6ff5e269
a26b08cbfeba3caf2136a883126bc677190fcd6b
describe
'168804' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
2a985548378ef5c8909a6b40c7a56771
7779866069947f84f8bae1cea1cf28ff1dde433c
describe
'61705' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
761f56b7e1e5c67b76fe40d9ccd26c9e
5da8754b8976d9b7c2a04c28295ec8a64882db11
describe
'169852' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
4d7aef35130abff154a0000b52ed0f35
5dea81ff93e13d6c22dcb5b9ffa33f7c0161a072
'2012-05-18T13:18:18-04:00'
describe
'63970' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
3282bf2974420f72d4d7790a40d1b198
1850d7c92eb5e25334e2a44aec00d9f707405cf2
describe
'165284' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
7619fd0b14d3afa9d324caad54b71f10
524155a47c1a3b05ad7035673c3d864a5d53aa67
describe
'62156' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
d86a3fc5b964094dbd0d3b735f4f5d03
8b816b936296c05db9f10dc7535c5c080ba1cf7b
describe
'62121' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
b17045db9e43b6cdea82b84c5397f577
340a0086bc6a5ae0ade4a27869883f17f9b9fa44
describe
'170245' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
03ecf61334fa5faf0017eda81ee99295
35c55b7870bfd701218680ef3c41d4f3ed2557e3
describe
'163357' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
20b26c5a411458a657dd4cea96e3ef36
4a5b9116d2f23cbc7e11222671f7745be42c4ff1
'2012-05-18T13:24:39-04:00'
describe
'61188' 'info:fdaE20100130_AAAACFfileF20100130_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
006de8e34cf80195dc3e2f63fdc1797a
690d9650527aa5e2f2362092bf7366e40f7ce0ab
describe
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le a ltl le pe

UO Oe aS EF SPL LT ERO EEE


* 2 SON NEP
peor ERS
STATIONERS 5
51, SOUTH ST


Ballers me Syne sal. JAAS
we ze a $s. Begs ‘ Of 4

0

PA in aed |.

fry pt Xe Si

Ly SPRE
PAUL ARNOLD;

AND

ANNIE AND JULIA.


M‘Farlane & Erskine, Edin®

PAUL ARNOLD ENTERS LIMA.

P23.


W. & R. CHAMBERS,
LONDON ano EDINBURGH.


PAUL ARNOLD.

CHAPTER I

In one of the smallest cottages, situated in the
poorest quarter of a small town in Germany,
lived, many years ago, a widow named Arnold,
with a family of five children. She was still
young, but care and grief had sharpened her
features, bleached her once dark and glossy
hair, and robbed her youthful figure of all its
grace and attractiveness. She was no longer
the happy and contented mother she had
formerly been; for although she loved her
children with the greatest tenderness, it was
they who formed the subject of her heaviest
care, and burdened her heart with the gloomiest
anticipations for their future welfare,

How changed her life had become! While
her husband was spared to her, she had known
nothing of poverty and distress. He had been
4° PAUL ARNOLD.

the manager of a mine, and his family lived in
the enjoyment of the greatest comfort, and
were complete strangers to want or sorrow.
But since his sudden and terrible death, every-
thing had been reversed. The support of the
house—the bread-winner of the family—had
been taken away, and the poor widow found
herself reduced from a position of comparative
luxury, to the deepest privation and misery.

When the unexpected blow came, Mrs Arnold
could scarcely bear up against it; and the terror
and grief which she experienced had been too
deep to be easily forgotten. The terrible picture
was always before her eyes of her husband
being brought home pale, covered with blood,
and scarcely breathing. An accident had over-
taken him while in the discharge of his duties ;
a support in the mine had given way, and
buried him beneath the ruins. When rescued,
he was in a dying state, and was carried three
days afterwards to his last resting-place in the
churchyard. All the earthly hopes of his weep-
ing family were buried in his grave, and his
widow stood alone in the world without a friend
or supporter.

When the first bitter and _heart-breaking
shock was over, the afflicted woman was enabled
to look up to heaven, and to cast her burden on
the Lord, and she experienced the help which
believing prayer never fails to bring. Friends
were raised up to supply the most pressing
PAUL ARNOLD. 5

wants of herself and her children. This help,
however, although so valuable and comforting
to the distressed family, did not last long;
there were very few rich people in the town,
and the stream of assistance which had flowed
so freely at first, began to dry up, and the
widow was at length reduced to a small pit-
tance, which barely covered her most pressing
necessities.

Mrs Arnold was a brave woman though, and
determined not to forget the duty she owed to
her family; so, leaving her comfortable dwell-
ing, she took a cottage at the outskirts of the
town, and having saved only the most necessary
articles of furniture, sold all the rest. It was
not without a pang that she parted with so
many things which reminded her of the happy
past, but she said to herself: “I can do without
comfort, but my children cannot do without
learning; everything for them, nothing for
myself, must be my motto.”

Thus saying, she went to her new home, and
worked with the greatest industry and perse-
verance day by day, and year by year. The
first beams of the sun aroused her to her daily
labour, and midnight frequently approached
before she lay down to rest; her food was of
the simplest kind, and she allowed herself no
recreation or amusement, in the earnest endea-
vour to live honestly, and provide her children
with all of which they stood in need.
6 PAUL ARNOLD.

Three years passed away in this manner, often
saddened with anxiety, and anon cheered with
hope, when another terrible event happened
which swept away all the resources of the
family. War broke out; the country was taken
possession of by foreign soldiers, who seized the
mine, and deprived the poor widow Arnold of
the small pension which she had received since
her husband’s death.

This was a hard blow and a heavy loss to the
unhappy woman, and was soon after followed
by another. Paul, her eldest son, who was now
a strong lad, fourteen or fifteen years old, came
home one day from the mine, where he had
been working for about a year, looking so pale
and downecast, that his mother no sooner
saw him than she sprang from her seat in
alarm.

“Paul, my boy,” she exclaimed, “what is
the matter? Has anything happened 2?”

“Nothing more, mother,” replied the youth,
“than that the half of the miners have been
dismissed to-day, and I among the rest. I shall
now be a burden to you again.”

The poor mother grew paler than her son,
the blood chilled in her veins, and with a sigh
of anguish she sank back upon a chair, and
would have swooned away had not her sorrow
found vent in a flood of tears.

“ God’s will be done,” said she faintly. “We
have fought hard against all our misfortunes,
PAUL ARNOLD. 7

but this last blow has taken away all my
strength ; I can struggle no longer.”

“But I can, mother,” exclaimed Paul, who
forgot his own sorrow and vexation at the sight
of his mother’s tears. ‘“ You have worked too
hard, and it is time now for you to rest, and
Ernest, Frederick, and I will work for you till
better times come.”

“But what can you do, Paul?” inquired his
mother in astonishment.

“We will work at anything, mother. Boys
are always wanted in the mine to break up the
ore, and we will go there to-morrow morning
and ask them to employ us.”

“What! Paul, will you become a pounding-
boy, after being a miner? It would be very
sad for you to turn to that after having had
such a good education.”

“Not so sad as to see you killing yourself
with toil and suffering,” replied Paul. “ Besides,
mother, you mustn’t lose courage; we shall not
always be so badly off, and the poorest employ-
ment is better than beggary or starvation.”

“But Ernest and Frederick haven’t left
school yet,” said the mother.

“That is very true,” answered the youth;
“but as you have no money to pay for their
schooling, they must leave now, and go back
again when times are better. They are quite
strong enough, and it will be far better for
them to work than to do nothing.”
8 : PAUL ARNOLD.

Mrs Arnold was obliged to submit ; but it was
a bitter humiliation to see her boys working
at such acommon employment after she had
striven so hard to prepare them for something
better. The disappointment was great, but she
tried to bear it with patience and cheerfulness,
and thus the load was rendered lighter than it
would otherwise have been. She was glad to
see that her sons soon became as much accus-
tomed to the new work as if they had been used
to it from their childhood, and the love which
they felt for her was sufficient to make them
endure any amount of toil which would lessen
the burden of their support ; but Paul, who had
grown very thoughtful, soon came to the con-
clusion that, however hard he and his two
brothers might work, they could earn very little
towards their own support. The great question,
however, was, what else could he do? He might
become a soldier; but he knew that little or
nothing would remain over from his pay for his
mother.

Paul was turning these thoughts over in his
mind one day, as he sat in front of a heap of
ore which it was his work to break up into
small pieces, when he heard some one exclaim:
“ Good-morning, Paul;” and looking up, he saw
an old miner with snow-white hair, who regarded
him with interest and sympathy.

“Good-morning, Father Lorenz,” he replied,
without ceasing to ply his hammer.
PAUL ARNOLD. 9

“JT am very sorry for you,” said the old man.
“When I think of your father, who was always
such a good friend and counsellor to us, and see
that nothing better can be done for his son
than to give him work which any boy of ten
years old can do, it makes me grieved and
angry.”

“But what else could Ido, Father Lorenz?”
replied the youth. “ You know that it wasn’t
my fault that I was turned away from the
mine, although”

“ Although you did your duty honestly ; yes,
that I know well, my boy,” said the old miner.
“ But you mustn’t think that I mean to blame
you. God forbid! I have known you too long
to do that. No, no, Paul, nothing of the kind;
but I think you might do something better
than this, after the schooling you ’ve had.”

Paul listened attentively. The old man
seemed to have something good to recommend.
“What do you think I ought to do, then,
Father Lorenz?” he inquired anxiously.

“Well, Paul, there is a good old proverb

- which says: ‘ Every man is the architect of his
own fortune.’ You are working very hard, but
I think you are not in the right place, or work-
ing at the right thing.”

“But what is that, Father Lorenz ?—what is
that ?”

“That you must know better than I do; but
you haven't thought of it yet, I suppose. When


10 PAUL ARNOLD.

I first saw you sitting here, and hammering
away, it was like a knife at my heart; for I
thought of your father, and wondered what he
would have said if he had seen you, and so I
began to think what I should do if I were in
your place, and it struck me”

“What was it, Father Lorenz?” eagerly
inquired Paul.

“Well, I thought that America was not so
very far away, and that clever miners were
always wanted; and if one is in good health,
with nothing to lose, why, it would be the best
thing in the world to go to a country where so
many people have got a comfortable living, if
they haven’t made their fortunes. That, thought
I, would be the very place for Paul Arnold to
go to. He has had a good schooling, is indus-
trious and honest, like his good father, and is
sure to get on if only he has a good chance.
So it seems to me, Paul, that you would succeed
far better if you were to go to Peru, where there
are rich silver mines, as I’ve been told, if you
only have courage to face the long journey.”

Paul sat lost in. thought, and no answer
came from his lips. The words of his good old
friend had made a deep impression on his
mind, and opened up quite a new field before
his eyes.

“T wouldn’t give you such advice,” continued
the old man after a pause, “if I had any hope
that you would be successful at home; but


PAUL ARNOLD. 11

there is very little likelihood of any improve-
ment taking place as long as the French are in
the country.”

“And my mother, Father Lorenz?—my
mother?”

“Well, I know it would be hard work for
you to part from her, and she will not like you
to leave her; but what use can you be to your
mother, Paul, if you remain here? You can
scarcely earn enough to keep yourself, while in
America you would make as much in a month
as you can here in a year.”

“That is very likely,” said Paul thoughtfully.
“ But at anyrate I couldn’t go away so soon as
you seem to think. The people there speak
Spanish, which I don’t understand.”

“Then learn it at once,” replied the old man
in a cheerful tone. “I think I know some one
who will help you with it; a man who has
worked in the Spanish quicksilver mines of
Almada. I mean Fred Burgmuller: you know
him as well as I do.”

“That is true, that is true,” exclaimed Paul,
his eyes sparkling with delight. “He can help
me, and I’m sure he will, if I ask him. But
then there will be another difficulty in my way
after that.”

“ Another difficulty ?” replied Lorenz. “Well,
it will be funny if we can’t get over it. What
is it?”

“The long journey—the expense,” answered
12 PAUL ARNOLD.

Paul with a sigh. “ How will it be possible to
raise so much money ?”

“Well, that is certainly a hard nut to crack ;
very hard,” said the old man, shaking his head.
“ But you should set to work and learn Spanish,
and some plan may turn up in the meantime
for getting the money. Could you not ask your
mother for some? she must have some saved up
—if she would”

“No, no, Father Lorenz,” replied the youth,
interrupting him; “I will not take a penny
from her! My poor mother needs every farthing
she has for my brothers and sisters. I would
rather beg my way to the sea-coast.”

“ Certainly,” said the miner; “I can’t blame
you, for the poor woman has quite trouble
enough on her shoulders. So we must try
some other plan. Hm—hm—now I have it,
Paul!”

“ Well, what is it?”

“The passage-money, my boy; or at least a
way of getting it.”

“Impossible, Father Lorenz,” said the youth
doubtfully.

“Impossible? Not at all! It seems to me
that it will be the very thing for you.”

“ But how is it to be done?” inquired Paul.

“Well, it just strikes me,” rejoined the old
man with a smile, “that I have got among the
lumber at home an old model of a mine, shew-
ing all the men at work, which used to belong


PAUL ARNOLD. 13

to my father. If it hasn’t been broken up, it
could easily be repaired. I will look after it as
soon as I get home.”

“But, Father Lorenz, what use would the
model be to me?” asked Paul with a dis-
appointed look.

“Don’t you understand, my boy? Well, I
thought you were sharp enough for that. That
model was a regular silver mine for my father.
He took it on his back, and went all over the
country with it, shewing it to everybody for a
trifle, and made a lot of money. Things were
just as bad then as they are now, you know.
There was no work to be had, and those who
didn’t wish to starve had to find some other
way of getting a living. So he set to work
and made this model, for he was very clever
at such things; and if you are not ashamed
to follow his example, I will make you a
present of it very readily, for it is of no use
to me.”

“ Father Lorenz,” exclaimed Paul, whose eyes
sparkled, while his heart beat for joy, “you are
my good angel! Yes, yes; I see it all clearly
now: I must do as you say; and if you will
really ”

“Certainly, I will,’ broke in the old man,
“or I wouldn’t have offered it. You and I can
look at the old thing, and patch it up together.
Yes, yes; it’s a capital idea, although I say it


14 PAUL ARNOLD.

myself. If you only go at it in good earnest,
you will make something of it.”

“Tt is a splendid idea,” said Paul in the
greatest delight. “That is just what I wanted.
As soon as winter is over, I will try and get off
to Peru to make my fortune. Rest assured,
Father Lorenz, that I shan’t be idle, for my
fortune will be the fortune of my poor mother
and her children; but don’t say a word to her
about it yet. She mustn’t know till everything
is ready, for she would only distress herself
before the time, and she has plenty to bear as
it is. Don’t you think, Father Lorenz, it will
be best to keep it a secret ?”

“Not a syllable shall escape my lips,” said
the old man. “And now, good-bye, Paul. I
will go home and hunt up the model.”

“ Accept my thanks, Father Lorenz, my
warmest thanks. You have made me happy,”
said Paul, his eyes filled with tears. “I don’t
know what reason there is to make you take so
much interest in me.”

“Well, Ill tell you, my boy,” replied the
old man as he gave Paul’s hand a hearty
squeeze. “You owe it to your good father,
who was always a kind and friendly man to the
miners, and helped a great many of us very
much while he lived. He sowed blessings, and
it is only natural that his children should reap
the benefit. That is one thing; and then,
without wishing to praise you, I must say that
PAUL ARNOLD. 15

I was glad to see that, although the son of the
overseer of the mine, you were not too proud to
take the poorest work, rather than be a burden
to your widowed mother. I have often thought
about you, and this is what has come of it.
Now, not another word about it; but come to
my house to-night, and we will see what can be
made of the old model. Good-bye; God bless
you!”


CHAPTERIL

Tue spark which the old miner had kindled in
the breast of Paul soon burst into a flame, and
urged the courageous youth to the greatest
exertions. Burgmuller, who was generally sur-
named the Spaniard, from having lived several
years in Spain, became Paul’s teacher with the
greatest readiness, and the lessons were com-
menced the next day. It was soon clear that
his knowledge of the language was not equal
to his willingness; but as he was thoroughly
acquainted with all the terms used by the
miners in their work, he proved of the greatest
use to his pupil.

Meanwhile the old model was not forgotten.
Old Lorenz had found it in the lumber-room in
a somewhat shattered condition; but as he and
Paul set themselves diligently to work to repair
it, it was as good as new in a few months;
and when spring returned with its birds and
blossoms, and all nature wore a gay and cheer-
ful appearance, nothing remained to prevent
Paul from starting on his travels, but the neces-
sity of breaking the news to his mother, which
distressed him so much, that he could hardly
make up his mind to the idea of parting with
PAUL ARNOLD. 17

her. But this difficulty was soon removed. His
mother had long noticed that he had something
on his mind, and when he returned wearied
from his work one evening, she took him by
the hand and led him out to the little garden,
that they might talk without being disturbed.

“ Paul,” said she, “there is something press-
ing on your mind. Have you so little confidence
in your mother, that you try to keep a secret
from her? Have I not always been a loving
and tender mother to you ?”

Paul looked at her with a smile of affection,
and his eyes filled with tears. “It is just
because of that,’ he replied. “It is because
you love me so much, that I wished to sparé
you pain; but now that you have asked the
question, I will tell you everything.”

Encouraged by her loving words and glances,
’ Paul told his mother the whole story of his con-
versation with old Lorenz, and the consequences
which had followed it. More surprised than
grieved, she listened to his account of his plans,
and when he had finished, a beam of joy lit
up her eyes.

“And so you have made up your mind to
leave me, Paul?” she inquired.

“Yes, mother; that is, if you have no objec-
tion, for I will never be a disobedient son.”

“No; I am sure you never will,” said the
widow as she pressed the hand of her brave boy.

“O Paul, I shall be sad when you are far away,
B
18 PAUL ARNOLD.

when I can only think of you and pray for you ;
but it will at anyrate be better than to see you
in such a position as you have here, without any
hope or prospect. Go, my boy! You have
a long and perilous journey before you; but it
seems to be God’s will, and He will protect and
bless you.”

A silent but loving embrace followed this
conversation. Paul felt glad that his mother
approved of his plans, and she was comforted
in the thought that her son was about to leave
a place in which there was no scope for his
energies, for a country where he was pretty sure
‘of obtaining a good situation, and making his
way in the world. And then, the parting,
though a sorrowful one, would not be for ever.
She might look forward to the pleasure of seeing
him come back again older and wiser. He was
honest and good, an industrious workman, and
a devoted son; and she looked across the gulf
of years that would separate them, and in
imagination saw him come back again to
gladden her motherly heart.

It was on a bright spring morning that Paul
bade farewell to his mother, brothers and
sisters, and home. The model had received
the valuable addition of a hand-organ; and
with it strapped on his back, and a stout stick
in his hand, he started forth on the first journey
of his life. It was some time before he got over
the grief which his parting had caused. But
PAUL ARNOLD, 19

his heart was young and full of hope, and the
prospect of success in his enterprise soon dis-
pelled the dark clouds from his brow. The
weather was lovely, the sky cloudless, and all
nature seemed clothed in her gayest attire; the
music of the birds and the rustling of the breeze
through the woods cheered him on, and every-
thing seemed to smile upon him, and to promise
that his object would be fully accomplished.

“Courage!” he said to himself—“ courage!
He that chooses the right course and honestly
follows it, may often be disappointed, but he
is sure, sooner or later, to reach the goal of
his wishes. I have not been rash or reckless,
and my mother has given me her sanction and
her blessing, so there must be no more fear or
trembling. ‘Every man is the architect of his
own fortune,’ as old Lorenz said; it will not be
my fault if I fail.”

Having banished his desponding fears, he
pursued his way with greater energy and a
lighter heart, and soon reached a small town,
where he exhibited the model for the first time,
and succeeded beyond all his expectations. His
fine open countenance, and his modest and
unassuming ways, opened nearly every door, and
won for him expressions of friendship and good-
will. Of course, there were some people who
treated him roughly, and drove him away; but
he found that by far the greater number were
kind and good-natured, and their kindness
20 PAUL ARNOLD.

soothed all feelings of anger, and made him
forget the rebuffs which he met with. When
he left the place he found his pockets were
well filled ;-and he went on with a light heart
from town to town, and from village to village,
learning the value of his model more and more the
longer he carried it. It proved, in fact, a silver
mine to him as it had been to its former pos-
sessor ; and when he reached the port of Bremen,
after travelling about for three months, he was
delighted to find that he had accumulated the
large sum of two hundred dollars. The money
looked very tempting when he had spread it
out before him; he had never had so much
before, and he was glad that at last he was able
to help his poor mother in her distress; so, like
a good and dutiful son, he sent half the sum
home, and kept the rest to pay for his passage
when he should find a ship bound for Peru.

It was not long before he met with a suitable
vessel; and having succeeded, by bargaining
with the captain, in getting a berth at a very
cheap rate, he waited, under the influence of
contending emotions of hope and fear, for the
day which should separate him for many years,
and perhaps for ever, from his native land and
his childhood’s home. Commending himself
and his mother, with her family, to the care of
God, he went on board the ship; and when he
went on deck on the following morning, the land
was almost entirely out of sight,






CHAPTER IIL

THE sun poured down its burning rays from a
cloudless sky upon a young man of pleasant
appearance, whose somewhat sun-burned face;
fair hair, and blue eyes clearly betokened his
northern origin, who might have been seen pur-
suing the road leading from the port of Callao
to Lima, the capital of Peru. He carried a large
box, made of polished wood, on his back, and a
stout walking-stick, more for use than orna-
ment, in his right hand. His dress was simple,
and suited to the hot climate of that tropical
country. A light broad-brimmed sombrero
shaded his face from the sun, and a striped
nankeen jacket and trousers, with shoes of white
leather, completed his costume. Although he
seemed young and strong, the great heat ap-
peared to be almost too much for him, for he
often stood still to wipe the perspiration from
his face ; and at last, after putting the box which
he carried carefully on the ground, he threw him-
self down under the spreading branches of some
mulberry trees, whose shade was too inviting to
be resisted.
22 PAUL ARNOLD.

In the broad valley which lay before him,
bounded in the distance by the mighty chain of
the Cordilleras, lay Ciudad de los Reyes, the
City of the Kings, as it was named by Pizarro,
its founder, divided into two unequal parts by
the river Rimac. The environs presented a
most charming appearance. Verdure and luxu-
riance abounded on every hand. Large fields of
maize and cotton, extensive plantations of olive,
fig, and pomegranate trees, besides plantains
and vines, bore testimony to the fertility of the
soil, and gladdened the eyes of the wanderer,
who for so many months had been obliged to
content himself with a prospect which was vast
indeed, but of which he had long been weary.
It seemed delightful to him to exchange the
monotony of the sea for such a splendid sight;
and as he lay on the grassy bank, and enjoyed
the scene spread out before him, the sound of
bells struck upon his ear, and increased his
delight. It was a holiday, and from the lofty
towers and spires which rose above the flat roofs
of the city, the bells called the people forth to
worship in the fifty-seven churches and the
numerous cloisters of Lima.

After some time the young man found vent
for his feelings in words. “Here I am at last,”
said he to himself, “thousands of miles from
home, solitary and alone, without friends or any
one to help me, and in a foreign land; but full
of hope, and confidence, and trust in Thee, O
PAUL ARNOLD. 23

God, who hast watched over me hitherto! Be
comforted, my good mother! Whatever diffi-
culties may be before me shall be met with a
stout heart and a steadfast determination to
overcome them all.—I wonder whether they are
thinking of me at home now,” he continued,
while a smile played around his lips. “My
mother will at least never forget me. I feel
her presence always with me; her wishes and
prayers have followed me hither, and God has
answered them all) And my brothers and
sisters, and my good old friend Lorenz, and
Fred Burgmuller! None of them will forget
me, and therefore I have no reason to fear that
my enterprise will fail.”

The youth lay for some time longer indulging
in these musings, until the sun had passed the
meridian and begun to sink slowly towards the
west ; then springing up, he plucked some fruit
from the branches over his head, strapped his
box across his shoulders, and after a short and
cheerful walk entered the city.

From the glittering spires and domes which
had gladdened his eyes when he first came in
sight of the town, he expected to find broad
streets, and lofty and splendid houses, but in
this he was greatly disappointed. Narrow, dirty
lanes, with small and ruinous buildings which
were more like huts than houses, were the first
to meet his eye; and it was not until he had
reached the centre of the town that he found
24 PAUL ARNOLD.

the streets grow broader, and the houses assume
a more stately appearance, although there were
very few that were more than one story high.
Paul Arnold, however (for our young readers
need scarcely to be told that the wanderer was
no other than he), paid far less attention to the
streets and buildings of the town, than to the
people who surrounded him on every side. He
had never before seen such a mixture of colours
and costumes, although the vessel had stopped
for a few days at Rio Janeiro and Valparaiso.
There was every shade and variety of colour,
from the white creole to the ebony-skinned
negro. But in the market-place he found the
most. varied assemblage of people and the
greatest bustle. The pale-faced creoles were
the most prominent in the crowd, and seemed
to regard all others around them with contempt.
They were of tall and slender figure, with sharp,
well-defined features, dark hair, and sparkling
and scornful eyes. Negroes, Indians, mulattoes,
and half-breeds wandered up and down, laughing
and talking, and in some cases wearing dark and
gloomy countenances. It was quite evident that
all hard work was over for the day with most of
the motley group, and that they had gathered
in the open square to enjoy the cool evening
breeze which swept down from the snow-covered
peaks of the Cordilleras. Some were seated
carelessly on the ground playing at cards, while
others lingered near the refreshment bootlis,
PAUL ARNOLD. 25

and enjoyed the various articles offered for sale,
consisting of lemonade, ice-cream, and other
cooling delicacies.

Paul was both hungry and thirsty, but he did
not venture to mix with the people who were
sitting at the tables partaking of the refreshing
drinks that were provided for them. The
company seemed likely to look with some sur-
prise and perhaps contempt at him, and being
unwilling to expose himself to any annoyance,
he left the market-place and turned down a
narrow street, in the hope of finding some quiet
and modest house in which he could obtain
the rest and food of which he felt himself in
need.

Paul soon found himself in front of a house
which promised to supply his wants. It was
called, in the language of the country, a pican-
teria, and was overflowing with a noisy crowd
of guests, who seemed to be luxuriating upon
cancha, a kind of roasted Indian corn; picante,
a strongly peppered mixture of mashed potatoes
and meat; and chicha, a kind of beer. Having
nothing to fear from the appearance of this
company, Paul walked in boldly, deposited his
box on a seat in the corner, and sat down
beside it to wait until some one came to attend
to him. His patience was not put to a severe
trial; he had not been seated long before an
ugly old mulatto woman hastened towards him,
and without asking what he wanted, brought
26 PAUL ARNOLD.

a goodly quantity of roasted ears of Indian
corn in a hollow pumpkin, a plate of picante,
and a large glass of chicha, and set them
before him. After paying the small sum asked
for these dainties, Paul proceeded to quench his
thirst from the glass of chicha; but scarcely
had the glass touched his lips, and he had taken
a mouthful of the tempting liquid, than he
put it down on the table again with a shudder,
and pushed it as far away from him as he
could.

“Don’t you like chicha, my friend?” asked a
ragged mulatto who sat in front of him, and
seemed amused at the expression of horror and
fright with which he regarded the drink.

“No; it’s most. abominable stuff!” answered
Paul. “Detestably sharp and bitter! I shall
take good care never to try it again. What is
it?”

“Tt’s made from Indian corn,” replied the
mulatto. “If you don’t like it, you can give it
to me.”

“With all my heart, if you will only get me a
glass of water instead.”

The mulatto jumped up, ran off, and soon
returned with a large glass of water. Then
seizing the glass of chicha, he emptied it
with such delight, that Paul was completely
astonished at anybody having any liking for-
such a nauseous composition.

Paul’s hunger now began to make itself felt,
PAUL ARNOLD. 27

and he set the plate of picante before him,
which sharpened his appetite by its savoury
smell. It struck him that his coloured friend
had a peculiar grin on his face; not suspecting
anything wrong, however, he began to eat, but
suddenly threw down his fork, coughed terribly,
and almost shrieked aloud. As may be imagined,
the mulatto broke out in loud laughter again,
and went nearly into convulsions with merriment.

“JT thought so, I thought so,” he said at last,
as soon as his boisterous fun permitted him to
take breath. “My friend is a stranger, and the
picante is a little too sharp for him. Don’t
you like it, senor?”

“Like it!” exclaimed Paul in a rage; “I
should think not indeed! That is not food, but
burning coals to scorch one’s mouth and tongue.
How can people eat such things?”

“T’ll eat it in a moment, if you will allow
me,” replied the obliging mulatto with the
greatest readiness, while his eyes sparkled with
greed.

“Take it, then ; I don’t envy you your taste.”

“Oh, you will soon learn to like it, senor,”
said the man confidently, hastily demolishing
the hot and savoury dish, and rolling his eyes
wildly as a proof of his satisfaction. “This is
splendid, senor; and when you’ve been here a
couple of weeks you will not be so ready to give
away your chicha and picante.”

Paul did not seem thoroughly satisfied with
28 PAUL ARNOLD.

this assurance, for he shook his head, and looked
with very little pleasure at the Indian corn,
which was the only portion of his meal remaining.
He succeeded, however, in eating one or two
ears, which, although not very tasty, stilled the
pangs of hunger without taking the skin off his
lips and tongue; and then quietly surveyed the
scene around him. The company presented a
more diversified spectacle even than that which
he had seen in the market-place. Round the
small tables sat people of all colours and of all
grades of society. Here a couple of serious-
looking Spaniards, whose fair complexions and
proud demeanour betokened ancient lineage ;
there some monks with brown cowls; to the
right, a black African negro, surrounded by
mulattoes and half-breeds; to the left, groups
of soldiers, merchants, workmen, and muleteers
—men and women, white and black, yellow and
brown, wearing the strangest dresses, and all
eating picante, and drinking large glasses of
the detestable chicha, with a relish which
again called up Paul’s astonishment.

After he had indulged himself in this survey
for about half an hour, the door opened, and a
tall figure entered, whose graceful and athletic
form instantly attracted Paul’s attention. The
new-comer was a young man; long dark hair fell
thickly on his broad shoulders ; he was copper-
coloured, and his countenance wore an uncom-
monly gloomy and reserved expression. His
PAUL ARNOLD. 29

dress was limited to a dark sack-like shirt
without sleeves, confined round his waist by a
girdle. He carried a heavy bundle on his back,
which he took off on entering, and put under a
seat, upon which he sat down without paying
any attention to the people sitting at the table.

“What sort of a man is that?” inquired Paul
of the mulatto who had helped him with his
dinner, and was still sitting near him. “Isn’t
he an Indian ?”

“Yes, senor,” he replied with a glance of
contempt. ‘An Indio brato—an Indian beast
from the mountains, who trades in salves and
plasters, seeds, roots, and the bark of trees
which he has collected in the woods. He is an
impudent fellow, and will soon be kicked out of
the house !”

“TImpudent! How so?” asked Paul. “He
seems to sit there very quietly, and annoys
nobody with his presence.”

“Tt is easy to see that you’re a stranger in
this country, senor,’ responded the mulatto.
“Don’t you see that he has taken his seat at a
table where there are only whites and creoles
sitting? I wouldn’t venture to do such a thing,
although I have got only a few drops of black
blood in my veins; but these stupid Indians
are impudent enough Aha! there we are
—now he’ll catch it! I thought he wouldn’t be
allowed to sit there long!”

Paul’s curiosity was excited to the highest




30 PAUL ARNOLD,

pitch, and at the same time mingled with a
feeling of alarm for the poor Indian, as he saw
a gigantic fellow, whose dark colour shewed him to
be an African negro, go up to the Indian, whom
he seized and shook violently by the shoulder.

“Indio brato!” he cried, “how dare you be
so forward as to sit down here, when even I,
Hercules, wouldn’t do so?”

A deep silence followed these words, and the
eyes of all the guests were turned towards the
Indian and negro, who, as it seemed to Paul,
had commenced the quarrel without the least
provocation. The Indian raised his head, cast
a look of scorn and contempt at the negro, and
with a rapid movement released himself from
his grasp.

“Go!” said he with a commanding voice and
flashing eye. “ Hualpa has nothing to do with
negroes.”

“ Hualpa, Hualpa!” repeated the negro with
scornful mockery and laughter. “He call him-
self Hualpa, the son of a dog! Away with
Hualpa! Away with you, or you’ll be sent:
spinning !”

The Indian shrugged his shoulders in con-
tempt, and turned his back proudly on the
black man. “Go!” he repeated with the same
tone of authority. “Hualpa is a son of the
woods, and despises the common slaves.”

“Son of the woods, Hualpa!” growled the
PAUL ARNOLD. 31

negro, seizing the Indian again with both hands.
“Out with the Indio brato! Out with him!”

Twenty voices joined in the cry, and threaten-
ing glances were directed from all sides against
the son of the woods, as Hualpahad called himself.
It seemed certain that a violent scene would take
place if the Indian did not go away quietly,
for the hatred between the two races that had
existed in the New World for hundreds of years
was stimulated by the fumes of the chicha, which
had been plentifully drunk by nearly the whole
company. Paul trembled more than ever for
the Indian, who, notwithstanding the tumult
that was rising against him, preserved, out-
wardly at least, the greatest calmness and
indifference. +

When the enraged negro seized him a second
time, he turned round, and Paul saw by the fire
of his eye and the trembling of his nostrils that
his anger was rapidly reaching the boiling-point.

“ Back!” said he in a firm and quiet tone.
“Don’t touch me a third time, nigger, or you
will be sorry for it. I don’t wish to quarrel
with you, so leave me in peace.”

The negro would probably have been cowed
by the threatening countenance of the Indian,
if the cries of the people around had not urged
him to renew his attack.

“Sambo laugh at Indio!” he exclaimed, and
seized Hualpa again,

The patience of the Indian was at last ex-
32 PAUL ARNOLD.

hausted, and a furious outburst of rage shewed
the anger which he had tried to suppress. With
a loud yell he seized his assailant by the body,
lifted him from the ground, and after swinging
him two or three times to and fro, dashed him
suddenly with.such violence against the_wall,
that he fell senseless to the ground, knocking
“down a table and seat which was full of eager
spectators. A cloud of: dust arose, and the
deepest silence reigned for a minute or two, as
if every one had been stunned by the proof
which the Indian had given of his extraordinary
strength,

But it was only the calm which precedes the
hurricane. All at once a wild uproar broke
out.

“The Indio brato has killed the, negro!”
cried a voice. “ Knock him down!”

“Down with him! Murder him!” cried ten
other voices.

Several glasses of chicha were thrown at the
Indian, and the next instant Paul saw him sur-
rounded by a furious mob of half-drunken men,
who attacked him with the greatest violence.

“ Haye mercy upon the unhappy man; he is
innocent,” cried Paul; but no one paid the least
attention to him. :

Hualpa dashed two or three of his assailants
to the ground; but six or seven others flew at °
him, roaring and howling like wild beasts;
PAUL ARNOLD. 33

daggers were brandished in the air, and it
seemed certain that in spite of his coolness and
strength the Indian would soon fall a victim to
the overpowering number of his enemies.

Suddenly Paul bethought himself of the
“organ attached to his model, and a gleam of
happiness ‘darted like lightning through his
soul. To open his case, set the organ on the
table, and commence playing it, was the work
of a few seconds. The loud and musical tones
soon resounded above the uproar, and exercised
an almost magical influence on the angry multi-
tude. The enraged mulattoes and negroes
ceased their assaults on the Indian; the knives
and daggers disappeared ;, the general tumult
suddenly gave way to astonishment and sur-
prise; the eyes that had just flashed with
passion now sparkled with delight; and all at
once Paul saw himself surrounded by smiling
.faces, with eyes and mouths wide open; while
the Indian, still panting from the exertions he
had made, stood as deserted as if his existence.
had been entirely forgotten. He cast a wild
glance around, then, seizing his bundle, slipped
quietly out of the room, without being noticed
or followed by any one.

With.quiet satisfaction Paul saw him depart,
and continued to play his organ, in order to fix
the attention of the listening crowd for a little
while, until a sufficient time had elapsed for the
Indian to make good his escape; he then

Cc
4 PAUL ARNOLD.

brought the performance to a close, and allowed
the wonder-working strains to cease.

Those who know the effect which music of
any kind, however discordant, has upon the
African race, will not be surprised that the
murmuring notes of the organ should have put
a sudden stop to the uproar and fighting, nor
that the moment Paul left off playing, instead
of thinking of the Indian again, they should
all have been filled with the desire to hear the
splendid music once more. When Paul ceased, a
-” strange scene instantly followed. The coloured
people pressed around him, fell at his feet, and
begged in the most earnest tones that he would
commence again.

“QO senor, once more! Only a very little! .
Oh, your grace, let us have the magic again!
Your grace, great magician! Nigger will
dance, jump, and be jolly. Beat nigger, kick
nigger, abuse nigger—only a little more music.
We all slaves when senor give more music!”

Such were the cries and appeals, mingled
with clapping of hands and screams of delight,
which came to Paul from all sides. Those. .
nearest to him kissed his hands, his clothes, - -
and even his feet, throwing themselves on the



ground ; while tears stood in the eyes of others;"~,

and Hercules, who had only a few moments
before been mad with rage, shewed himself the
humblest and most cringing of beggars. The .
noise and confusion soon became so great that’
PAUL ARNOLD. 85

Paul began to be concerned on account of the
excited condition into which the passionate and
hot-blooded children of Africa had been thrown
by his simple performance.

“Very well, then,” he cried at last, in order
to free himself from the crowd that surrounded
him, like flies around a sugar-cask; “ one tune
more, but then it will be all over for this
evening.”

A universal shout of delight and satisfaction
followed these words; and when the music
commenced again, the black, brown, and yellow ..
faces could scarcely restrain themselves “from
expressing the transports they felt. They
embraced and caressed each other, leaped over
_ the tables and seats, and at last joined in a
general dance, which raised so much dust that
the room became almost insupportable. Paul
seized this moment to slip away; and having
gradually approached the door, organ in
hand, suddenly disappeared before the excited
dancers observed that he had changed his
position.

Paul had reached a distance of about a

-- hundred paces from the saloon, when a dark

figure suddenly appeared before him with out-
-- stretched arm, which so astonished him that
he started back in fright.

“O senor, don’t be frightened,” said a pleasant
‘voice with a soft expression. ‘“ You know me;
_*T am Hualpa.”

.
36 PAUL ARNOLD.

“Hualpa! Are you here still?” replied
Paul, stretching out his hand without any
further alarm to the young Indian, who seized
and pressed it to his breast, in token of respect.
“What are you doing here, Hualpa? Why
don’t you make your escape? Your enemies
may find you out, and their rage and anger are
perhaps not yet cooled down.”

“Hualpa fears no enemies, and least of all
the miserable blacks!” answered he proudly.
“T waited here to thank you, for you have
saved my life, senor.”

“You have to thank your own bravery rather
than my assistance,” replied Paul.

“The jaguar is brave, but he must yield to
the hounds when they come in great numbers,”
was the Indian’s answer. ‘ Enough, senor ;
. Hualpa is your friend; you can reckon on him
in danger. The son’of the woods never forgets
the person who has done him a service.”

“Well, then, Hualpa, if you really think you
owe me any gratitude,” replied Paul, smiling,
“T will lay claim to your friendship this very
moment.”

“Command me, senor,” said the Indian, his
eyes sparkling like those of a panther in the
darkness, from joy at being able to shew grati-:
tude to his deliverer. ‘“Hualpa is ready.
Demand his life, senor; it is yours.”

“No, my friend, it is not a matter of life and
death,” replied Paul, laughing; “I only want
PAUL ARNOLD. 37

quarters for the night. I am a stranger in
Lima, and have only arrived to-day. If you
can shew me an inn where I can sleep com-
fortably, I shall be as thankful to you as you
are to me.”

“Be good enough to follow me, senor,” said
the Indian, stepping out with a light and rapid
stride.

After a few minutes they reached a ¢amdo, or
inn, where Paul got a pleasant room. When
he was comfortably settled, the Indian bade
him farewell, and expressed the hope of seeing
him again sooner or later. Paul then threw
himself on his mattress; and, tolerably pleased
with the events of his first day in Lima, soon
fell into that sound sleep which can only be
thoroughly enjoyed by those who have a good
conscience and a sound mind.


CHAPTER ILIV.

Paut had at first the intention of staying only
a short time in Lima, and then pushing on to
Cerro de Pasco, where he hoped to find a
situation of some kind in the extensive silver
mines there. But the adventure in the pican-
teria altered his plans. A hand-organ was a
new and strange thing in Lima, and its harsh
and piercing tone, although not likely to please
a refined ear, found the greatest favour among
the coloured population of the capital of Peru.
Paul and his organ became celebrated in a few
days, and crowds stared with astonishment at
the box from which came the melodies that
charmed them so much. Not only the negroes,
mulattoes, and other people of colour, pure and
mixed, but even the Spaniards and Creoles,
seemed greatly taken with the novel and
unheard-of instrument. In a few days Paul
was invited to play at the houses of some of the
best families in the town; and when he opened
the case containing the model in a large party
PAUL ARNOLD, 389

composed of the richest inhabitants of Lima,
and shewed them the numerous figures engaged
at work, his fame reached its highest point.

The model was exceedingly neat, and well
worthy of the inspection it received. When
Paul turned the handle of the organ, all the
figures were set in motion. Some hammered
‘away at the rocks, others worked with pick-
axes, while others drew little wagons to and fro
filled with the ore which had been dug out.
Some were working down at the bottom of the
mine, others went up and down ladders leading
from one ledge of rock to another; in a word,
the whole work of a mine was shewn at one
view to the astonished beholders, and the
greatest delight was felt by them all.

When Paul began to grow weary of turning
the handle of the organ, a shower of small
silver coins rained down upon him from the
liberal hands of the company ; and he received
so many pressing invitations, that it was
impossible for him to think of leaving Lima for
several days. He therefore prolonged his stay,
and found the exhibition a very prosperous
experiment ; indeed, the success which he
enjoyed would have satisfied even those who
were greedy of gain.

“TI must strike while the iron is hot,” said
he to himself, as he returned with well-filled
pockets to his little inn. “ How my good friend
Lorenz would rejoice if he only knew how I am
40 PAUL ARNOLD.

getting on! He shall know it some day, though,
and I will prove to him that good fortune has
made me neither proud nor ungrateful.”

Paul hammered away at the iron as long as
it remained hot, and reaped such a rich harvest,
that he was at last in some difficulty as to how
to guard the money he had acquired. It would
not do to take it to Pasco, and he did not like
to intrust it to any stranger in Lima. But as
the landlord of the house in which he was
lodging seemed to be an honest and well-
disposed man, he determined to ask his advice.

“What you have to do, senor,” replied the
man, without much reflection, “is very easy
and simple. Go to some respectable merchant
and buy a bill of exchange upon Germany or
England, and then send it home, or change it
into money again when you arrive at Pasco.”

“Thanks, senor; your advice is good, and
shall be followed on the spot,’ replied Paul,
who lost no time in going to a rich English
banker, who had been spoken of as very honest
and friendly. Mr Wilson received him kindly,
and soon settled the business, by giving Paul
notes which he could change for gold at any
moment either in England, Germany, or Peru;
and when he expressed the wish to send some
money to his mother, Mr Wilson undertook that
it should be given into her own hands through
a business friend in Germany.

“And now, my young friend,” he added, “I
PAUL ARNOLD. 4]

should like to have a few words with you. You
are a miner, are you not?”

Paul answered in the affirmative.

“ Are you willing to make use of your know-
ledge here, or have you left your fatherland
with some other object in view ?”

In reply to this question, Paul related in a
brief and modest way the circumstances which
had led him to visit Lima, and delayed him
longer in the town than he had intended.

“But what are your intentions and plans
now ?”

“Now that you have been good enough to
send my money home for me, I shall try my
luck as a miner,” replied Paul. “TI see that
my organ has begun to lose the charm of
novelty, and I must try some other way of
getting a living.”

“Well, I shall perhaps be able to help you.
I am very much pleased with your appearance
and your frugality, and especially to find that
you have not forgotten your widowed mother,
but have sent her something as a token of your
love, instead of wasting your money in folly, as
hundreds would have done were they in your
place. I have got a silver mine at Cerro de
Pasco, and although there is no scarcity of
workmen, a conscientious, diligent, and intelli-
gent young man would be of some service. I
know the extent neither of your knowledge nor
your diligence; but I feel convinced of your
42 PAUL ARNOLD.

integrity and good character, and if you will
enter my service you shall be welcome.”

Paul’s face beamed with joy.- “I am quite
at your disposal,” said he. “When shall I
leave for Pasco, and to whom shall I apply
there?”

“You can leave as soon as you like, and I
will give you a letter to my manager, Don Jose
Ugarto. When will you be ready to start ?”

“To-day —to-morrow—or the day after;
whenever it will be most convenient for you.”

“Very well. We will say to-morrow morn-
ing, then. You will find a mule and the letter
to Don Ugarto waiting for you. But you
haven’t inquired what salary you are to
receive ?”

“No,” answered Paul; “I trust entirely to
your opinion of the value of my services; and
as it will be impossible at the outset to find out
what I can do, I think it would be well to wait
a little.”

“You are quite right. I will see that you
are comfortably provided for in the meantime,
and then we can make some other arrangement
afterwards. I shall expect you at ten to-morrow
morning. Good-day.”

As the appointed hour struck, Paul found
himself once more at Mr Wilson’s house, which
he left an hour later, mounted on a good mule,
and carrying the letter to Don Ugarto in his
pocket, hoping it would open the way for his
PAUL ARNOLD. 43

future fortune. He proceeded at a sharp and
merry trot, for he was neither burdened with a
load nor oppressed with anxiety. He had left
his model and organ at the house of Mr Wilson,
as it would have been almost impossible to
carry it over a pass of the Cordilleras sixteen
thousand feet high; besides which, it was now
of no further use to him; he had other pros-
pects before him, and had determined to follow
out the new career so wonderfully opened with
all the abilities he possessed.

It was a difficult and rather dangerous road
which Paul had to traverse. At the commence-
ment of the journey the path lay through a flat
country, and everything went easily. Following
the course of the Rimac, he found numerous
farms, in which he was hospitably received, and
greatly enjoyed the abundance and variety of
the meals provided for him. But when the
road grew steep, and the lofty ridge of the
Cordilleras had to be crossed, the scene was
altered. He had to force his way along the
most break-neck roads, and the prospect be-
came wilder and wilder, notwithstanding its
magnificence. The farms disappeared, and
for many weary miles there was no human
dwelling visible except the wretched Indian
huts, whose miserable occupants had scarcely
a friendly look, and still less a hospitable
reception to give him. He pressed on, however,
without any fear, mounting higher and higher,
44, PAUL ARNOLD.

till he reached the elevation at which all
vegetation ceased, and only the naked rocks
were visible.

At last, as the short twilight was deepen-
ing into night, Paul arrived at the last ascent,
called by the natives the Piedra Parada, which
rose dark and threatening before him, covered
with huge and shapeless blocks of stone. He
encouraged his tired and almost breathless
animal to make one last effort, and succeeded
in gaining the summit of the pass, which com-
manded a splendid view, and banished from his
mind all the fatigues and perils he had under-
gone. Towards the west, he saw the small
valleys gradually melting into the sandy coast-
line of Peru, washed by the Pacific Ocean. To
the north and south, the mighty and precipitous
Cordilleras extended as far as the eye could
reach, the peaks of which were covered with
perpetual snow. Turning eastward, his eye first
swept over the immeasurable grassy plains of
the table-land and the fertile valleys of the
Sierra, till the lofty chain of the Andes ter-
minated the prospect.

He stood for a long time absorbed in the
beauty of this magnificent panorama, till dark-
ness began to settle on the landscape, and the
sharp east wind reminded him of the necessity
of seeking shelter for the night. Refreshed by
the short rest, the mule jogged on till they
reached a little Indian hut, which, although
PAUL ARNOLD. 45

destitute of every comfort, afforded protection
from the raw night-wind.

After descending the terraced slope of the
eastern side of the Cordilleras for a distance of
between two and three thousand feet, the
traveller reaches an extensive and undulating
table-land, stretching away as far as Pasco,
called the Puna of Peru, the climate of which
is aS severe and unpleasant as that of the
highest mountain regions. This Puna, Paul
was now obliged to cross before he could reach
the end of his journey.

Morning was breaking, and the rising sun
began to redden the snow-covered peaks of the
mountains around, as he left the hut of the poor
shepherd where he had passed the night. He
raised the cow-skin at the opening of the
wretched dwelling, and stepped out to look
after his mule, which he found trembling with
cold. In spite of the advice of his host to stay
with him until some other travellers should pass
with whom he could travel in company, Paul
mounted his animal, and pressed forward on his
way.

“ Beware of the veta and the surumpe!” cried
the shepherd after him. But Paul paid very
little regard to the warning, and hastened on.

A thick and heavy fog lay over the entire
landscape, and, mingling with the snow which
had fallen during the night, gave the scene a
melancholy and monotonous whiteness. He
46 PAUL ARNOLD.

pressed along over wretched roads until the
sun gained power enough to pierce through
the gloom and melt the snow. Cheered and
warmed by the increasing light and heat,
which gave new life to his half-frozen limbs,
Paul pursued his weary journey with renewed
interest and pleasure. On either side, the icy
peaks of the Cordilleras reared their lofty heads
fourteen thousand feet above the level of the
sea; behind him lay the darkening valleys of
the lower hill-country, dotted here and there
with scarcely perceptible Indian villages, while
before him stretched the bare and cheerless
plateau, only varied occasionally by low ridges
of rock and steep precipices.

Paul rode farther and farther, and the Puna
began by degrees to grow more lively and
animated; the monotony of the region dis-
appeared ; herds of vicunas approached him, as
though urged by curiosity; in the distance,
large flocks of huanacos were seen; the wild
deer roamed about the rocky precipices uttering
a loud piping cry; the strangely horned Puna
stag came slowly from its cave, and looked with
astonishment at the solitary rider, about whose
path the frisky mountain hares gambolled
innocently, and nibbled the herbage which
sparingly covered the rocks.

When the sun had passed its mid-day height,
and began to descend westward, Paul’s mule
shewed symptoms of weariness, and he dis-
PAUL ARNOLD, 47

mounted in order to give the poor creature a
little ease, and to stretch his own limbs, which
began to grow stiff and cramped after being so
many hours in the saddle. He walked on
rapidly up a steep ascent, but in a very few
minutes felt himself obliged to stand still and
take breath. It seemed, however, almost im-
possible for him to breathe, and he was alarmed
to discover that the thinness of the atmosphere
at such a height was beginning to have an
injurious effect upon him. He had never
experienced such a strange sensation before;
he tried to walk on, but his limbs refused their
office, and an indescribable terror overpowered
him. He ‘could hear his heart beating against
his ribs; his breathing became short and
irregular; a tremendous load seemed to be
lying on his chest; his lips turned blue, then
swelled and burst ; blood started from his eye-
lids, and his senses seemed to be forsaking him.’
He could neither see, hear, nor feel anything ;
a dark gray fog seemed to swim before his eyes,
his head grew dizzy, and he was compelled at
last to lie down trembling on the ground.

“This must be the veta,” thought he, “of
which the shepherd warned me, and which has
proved fatal to so many travellers in this
desolate region. O God, haye mercy upon
me and my poor mother, who has no other
support !”

The thought of his mother and of his home
48 PAUL ARNOLD.

far away, seemed to inspire him with new
strength. After a few minutes, he roused him-
self, and, rising from the ground, managed with
some difficulty to remount his mule. It was
high time. Black and stormy clouds began to
shew themselves on the horizon, and the flashes
of lightning, and the roar of distant but ever
approaching thunder, threatened a terrible hur-
ricane. Fortunately, however, the storm was
attracted by the metallic masses of the Cordil-
leras, and the lonely traveller experienced only
a faint idea of what it might otherwise have
been. But it was followed by a driving snow-
storm, which covered the whole landscape in a
short time to the height of a foot, and by
destroying all traces of the road, made his
position every moment more and more dangerous.

The mule plodded slowly on, picking out its
own path, until it sunk at last in a morass, from
which it was unable to extricate itself. Paul
dismounted very cautiously, and after a great
deal of trouble succeeded, with the aid of the
dagger which he had with him, in freeing the
animal, and getting it once more on to solid
ground. He rode to and fro for some time
seeking the road, which he had great difficulty
in finding, although it was marked out here and
there with terrible plainness by the skulls and
bones of numerous animals which had sunk down
and perished under their burdens.

After the snow had ceased, the clouds suddenly
PAUL ARNOLD. 49

parted, and the tropical sun shone down with
such dazzling brilliancy upon the snow, that
Paul experienced terrible pain in his eyes, which
was only relieved by covering them with his
handkerchief.

“Can this be the surumpe?” he sighed.
“Why did I not follow the advice of the friendly
shepherd? Now, perhaps, I shall suffer for my
obstinacy with perpetual blindness ! ”

After the interval of half an hour, the previous
spectacle repeated itself. The heavens grew
suddenly black, a terrific thunder-storm burst
forth, followed by heavy snow; then the sun
_ reappeared, but only to hide himself again under
renewed tempests. Paul struggled on with
great energy and trouble, but his poor mule
was becoming rapidly exhausted, and night was
fast approaching. Stiff with cold, and weakened
with hunger and the fatigue of the journey, the
unhappy rider could scarcely hold the reins,
and his feet were perfectly benumbed, although
protected to some extent by the large wooden
stirrups used in that country. In addition to
this, there was the distressing certainty that
the nearest house was several miles distant, and
that it would be impossible to reach it until
after nightfall. The wearied animal, which had
travelled fourteen hours without rest or food,
could not go on any longer, and Paul began to
give himself up for lost, and to fear lest he

should fall a victim to the increasing cold, or be
D
50 PAUL ARNOLD.

buried beneath a heavy fall of snow, when he
saw an overhanging rock on his right hand, in
the side of which there seemed to be a cave,
which promised some shelter, however poor.
God, to whom he had cried in his want and
despair, had heard his prayer—he was not to
fall a prey to the fury of the elements.

The joyful surprise caused new warmth to
flow through his frame, and he hastily dis-
mounted to examine the cavern. It did not
seem to offer a very comfortable place of abode,
but it would at least shelter him from the wind
and snow, and he determined to avail himself
of it. He unsaddled his mule, and spread the
saddle-cloths and his poncho on the ground, to
serve for a bed, and then fastened the animal
to a stone inside the cave, where it would be
protected from the storm.

Not less hungry than his poor mule, which
had begun to crop the scanty herbage growing
at its feet, Paul opened his saddle-bags, took
out some bread, some hard cheese, and a bottle
of wine with which he had provided himself,
and was just about to commence his frugal
meal, when he observed, as his eyes had grown
accustomed to the darkness of the cavern, the
body of a man stretched at full length upon the
ground, and motionless as if in death,

With a loud exclamation of surprise and”
alarm, he started to his feet, and a cold
perspiration bedewed his face at the thought
PAUL ARNOLD. 51

of finding himself in the company of a dead
body in such a wild and desolate region.

“But what if a spark of life should still be
in him?” he asked himself. “Can I do nothing

to save this unhappy fellow-traveller ?”

With these words he pushed his untasted
food on one side, and took a taper from his
pocket and lit it; but what was his astonish-
ment, when he approached the body, to recognise
the features of the Indian, Hualpa!

“ Hualpa!” he exclaimed. “ What a wonder-
ful meeting! But he lives—his heart. still
beats, although but feebly. If it is possible,
the poor man shall be saved.”

The feeble taper, which had dimly lighted up

- the darkness of the cave, soon went out, but
Paul did not require it longer. Filled with
sympathy, he devoted all his attention to the
Indian. He brought the bottle of wine, laid
the head of the poor man on his lap, poured a
few drops of wine into his mouth, rubbed his
cold and benumbed hands and temples, and had
continued these efforts for only a few minutes,
when a faint sigh convinced him that they were
about to be crowned with success. He redoubled
his efforts, and was delighted to observe that
the signs of life were increasing. In a few
moments, the Indian raised himself up, and
asked in a faint voice: “ Where am I? and who
is the good spirit that has poured fire into my
veins, and thawed my frozen blood?”
52 PAUL ARNOLD.

“Ask afterwards,” answered Paul in a soft
and friendly tone of voice. “Drink a little
more wine; and if you are hungry, take a little
bread and cheese.”

The Indian took the food which was offered,
and was soon fully restored ; while Paul, whose
hunger was greatly sharpened by his exertions,
joined him in the repast, reserving a little wine
for the following morning.

“* Now, senor,” said the Indian, after he had
tried in vain to pierce the darkness of the cave,
and to recognise the countenance of his deliverer
—“‘after you have not only restored me to life,
but permitted me to share your food, to fill up
the measure of your goodness—may I not learn
whom I have to thank? I beg you to speak.”

“Then you haven’t found out who I am,
Hualpa?” said Paul. “This is not the first
time that we have met.”

“ Ah, that voice !—it sounds pleasant in my
ear!” exclaimed the Indian. “Senor Paulo—
it is you: you have a second time saved my
life. Yes, yes; it is you. Just now, when I
was starved with cold and hunger, I could not
remember your voice; but now—now I am
deceived no longer. Senor Don Paulo, Hualpa
owes you two lives.”

“Say nothing about that, my friend. I am
very fortunate in having found a companion in
this terrible Puna, and now I only want to hear
how you came here.”
PAUL ARNOLD. 53

“Hualpa was seeking herbs on the hills and
ravines of the Puna,” answered the Indian. “He
had not slept for two nights; he was weary
and hungry ; and the snow-storm surprised him
. on the way to Pasco. The snow blinded him;
the hunger was stronger than his limbs; he
wandered about a long time, and knows not
how he came to this cave.”

“Tired, hungry, lightly clad, and with such a
terrible storm, it is no wonder that human
strength should fail,” said Paul. “I am very
thankful that God has guided my footsteps to
this cave. God alone has saved us both. Had
I not found this shelter, I should certainly have
perished, and you also, my friend.”

“And where are you going, Senor Paulo?”
inquired the Indian, after Paul had described
all the dangers through which he had passed.

“The end of my journey is the same as your
own,” replied Paul. “I hope we shall reach
Pasco to-morrow in good time,”

“Hualpa knows the way,’ answered the
Indian. “He will act as guide to his deliverer.
But what is Senor Paulo going to do there?”

In answer to this inquiry, Paul related the
story of his life, of the poverty into which his
father’s death had plunged the family, the
advice of old Lorenz, his travels through Ger-
many, and his arrival in Peru; so that Hualpa
soon knew almost as much about his young
friend as if he had been brought up with him.
54 PAUL ARNOLD.

“Senor Paulo seeks his fortune in Peru.
Good! He shall find it. It is now late, and
we must start early in the morning. Let us
sleep now, if it is agreeable to you.”

Paul would willingly have asked Hualpa
what he meant by the prophetical assertion
that he should make his fortune, for the tone
in which the words were spoken had aroused
his curiosity, but the Indian did not seem
disposed to enter into any further conversation;
so, after bringing his mule into the cave, and
allowing it to lie down, he threw himself on the
ground, and feeling more comfortable by the
warmth of the animal beside him, soon fell
sound asleep. The fatigue and excitement of
the day had so exhausted the whole party, that
the two men slept as soundly -as if they had
been stretched on comfortable beds, and the
mule seemed to enjoy the dark cave as well as
a snug stable.




CHAPTER V.

THE distance to Pasco was still very great, and
the road rough and unpleasant; the Indian
‘therefore rose early, and prepared for the
journey. The breakfast was a very simple one;
and after Paul had shared the remains of the
wine with his companion, he mounted his mule
and set forth. Fortunately, the weather had
greatly improved during the night, and the sun
shone down upon the landscape, from which the
snow was rapidly disappearing.

“Everything seems promising, Senor Don
Paulo,” said the Indian as he took a long
breath of the pure fresh mountain air. “In
less than six hours we shall be at Pasco.”

He went forward with light and elastic steps ;
and the mule, which had recovered from the
toil of the previous day, trotted merrily after
him. Although our travellers had many diffi-
culties to surmount, they reached the little
village of Pasco about noon, after having left
the flat and monotonous plateau of Bombon
behind them, and climbed the steep and marshy
56 PAUL ARNOLD. -

road to the summit of the chain of hills, where

Paul suddenly beheld a populous city, which in

such a wild and desolate region produced a most

cheering effect upon him. It lay in a natural
amphitheatre, surrounded by steep and barren

rocks; and the stately houses, with their

smoking chimneys and gray roofs, seemed to

promise a pleasant and agreeable residence.

“This, then, is the celebrated Cerro de Pasco,
my friend?” said he to Hualpa after a short
and silent glance.

“This is the Cerro de Pasco,” replied the
Indian. “You cannot lose your way now, for
the end of your journey lies before you.”

“But what mean you?” asked Paul in sur-
prise. ‘Are you going to leave me, Hualpa,
as you say that I am at my journey’s end?”

“Hualpa leaves you,” was the reply, “but
not for long.”

“ But you said you were going te the town.
Why will you not remain in my company ?”

“ Hualpa has changed his mind,” he answered.
“He has something important to-do, and must
seek his father in the mountains. Farewell,
senor. We shall soon meet again.”

“TI am sorry to part from you,” said Paul,
“for your company has been very pleasant to
me; but if other duties call you away, I will
not hold you back.”

“Yes; another duty calls me,” answered
Hualpa, pressing with great warmth the hand
PAUL ARNOLD. 57

which Paul extended towards him. “I must
visit my father before I see you again, senor ;
but I will be sure to come. One warning, how-
. ever, Senor Don Paulo: beware of Don Jose
Ugarto!”

Before Paul had time to inquire the meaning
of this strange advice, the Indian had given his
hand. a parting squeeze, and was already hasten-
ing down the hill which they had just ascended
together.

“Hualpa! Hualpa!” he cried; but the
Indian either could not or would not hear, and
continued his flight without turning back to
take another farewell of his companion.

“What a strange man!” thought Paul, as
he watched him rapidly vanishing out of
sight. “He seems to have a very great liking
for me, and to be very thankful for what
I have done for him; but he is so secret and
reserved, that I don’t know what to make of
his sudden departure. And then this mysterious
warning about Jose Ugarto. Why did he not
tell me that during our long journey from the
cave? However, he means well, that is clear;
so I shall pay attention to what he has said,
and wait for the explanation till we meet
again.”

Still wondering at the strange conduct of his
late guide, Paul put spurs to his mule, and
descended the hill towards Cerro de Pasco.
He soon reached the outskirts of the town, and
58 PAUL ARNOLD,

had little difficulty in finding the house of Don
Jose Ugarto, the manager of Mr Wilson’s mine.
A few minutes later, he stopped in front of a
lofty and splendid building; a negro came out
to take his mule; and in answer to his inquiries,
directed him to the room in which his master
was to be seen.

Following the directions, Paul soon found
himself in a large and lofty apartment, very
richly furnished. Five or six clerks were seated
at large mahogany tables busily engaged in
writing; and in a comfortable arm-chair near
the spacious bow-window which lighted the
room, sat a tall thin man, with a pale counte-
nance, closely-cropped black hair, and piercing
eyes, which sparkled with the gleam of a bird
of prey, over a nose resembling the beak of a
hawk. .

“That must be Don Ugarto,” thought Paul,
feeling in his pocket for Mr Wilson’s letter.

“Who are you?) What do you want?” in-
quired the man in the arm-chair in a sharp
voice.

“TI wish to see Don Jose Ugarto,” replied
Paul with a polite bow; “and, if I am not
mistaken, I have the honour of speaking to
him, senor.”

“Quite right. Well?”

“Well, I have brought a letter for you from
Mr Wilson of Lima, which will introduce me,
and explain everything to you.”
PAUL ARNOLD. 59

He had scarcely mentioned Mr Wilson’s name
- when Don Ugarto started from his seat, and
surveyed him from head to foot with a half-
suspicious, half-surprised glance. He then tore
the letter from his hand, turned with it to the
window, and remained standing in deep thought
after rapidly scanning its contents. When he
turned round again, Paul observed that he was
still paler than before, and that deep wrinkles
had formed themselves between his bushy
eyebrows.

“You are Paul Arnold, a German by birth,
and have the intention of finding a situation,
_here,” said he, in a cold and repulsive tone.

“Yes, that is my name; but I have not an
engagement to seek,” replied Paul. “If you
will read the letter carefully, you will see that
Mr Wilson has provided me with one.”

“Hm—yes,” said Don Ugarto with a still
more unfriendly look; “there is certainly some-
thing of that kind here; but nothing is said as
to what situation you are to have. We have
far too many people here already, and I can’t
give work or money to every beggar that
chooses to come here, It will be far better,
young man, for you to look for employment
elsewhere.”

A deep blush of anger and surprise passed
over Paul’s countenance; but instead of allow-
ing himself to be frightened by the rough
manner of Don Ugarto, he straightened himself
60 PAUL ARNOLD.

up proudly, and advanced a step nearer to
him.

“‘T don’t know, senor, who has given you the
right to talk to me in this way,” said he. “I
have not come here as a beggar, but under
directions from Mr Wilson, your employer, and
recommended to you in a letter written by his
own hand. But I shall force myself as little
upon you as I have done upon Mr Wilson, who
shall soon learn from me the way in which his
orders are respected here. Good-morning,
Senor Ugarto!”

Having come to the full determination to
leave such an unfriendly house, Paul turned upon
his heel, and walked towards the door. But he
had scarcely reached it, when he felt a hand
upon his shoulder.

“Wait, Senor Arnoldo,” said Ugarto; “we
must exchange a few civilities before you go.”

He turned round with some surprise, and was
astonished to mark the change which had
suddenly come over the features of Ugarto.
The deep wrinkles had vanished from his brow, —
and the proud and scornful mouth was lighted
up by a friendly and pleasant smile.

“What can you possibly wish from me, senor,
after shewing me the door in such a plain and ~
unmistakable way ?” he inquired.

“ Nothing further at present,” was the polite
answer, “than the request that you will pardon
my harsh and repulsive behaviour. I must tell
PAUL ARNOLD. 6]

you, Senor Arnoldo, that we are often overrun
with ignorant adventurers ; and I must confess,
that at first I feared you were one of that class.

But your prompt and decided, even proud and
dignified conduct, has convinced me that I was
mistaken. None but those who know their
own value can manifest such decision of char-
acter; and now that you have so thoroughly
commanded my respect, I don’t doubt that we
shall soon be very good friends. Your hand,
young man, and forgive my rashness and
error !”

_If Paul had not been warned by Hualpa, he
would have certainly been led to accept Don
Ugarto’s apologies as genuine, for his manner
seemed perfectly open and friendly, and the
reasons upon which his excuses were grounded
had all the appearance of truth. But the
warning of the Indian was not forgotten, and
Paul was rather inclined to regard the polished
courtesy of Ugarto as assumed and hypocritical,
than to think that the enmity which he had at
first displayed was merely to test his character.
He took the hand, however, which was stretched
out towards him, but determined to be on his
guard against Ugarto under all circumstances.

“Very well, senor,’ he replied, after a
moment’s thought; “Iam not in the habit of
weighing every word, and if we can become
good friends, I shall be very glad.”

“Then you will stay here, my friend; that is
62 PAUL ARNOLD.

settled,” said Don Ugarto. “I will set a room
apart for you, and it will, of course, be clearly
understood that you will always dine with me.
Mr Wilson has given directions to that effect,
and now that I know you, all his wishes shall
be strictly complied with.— Antonio !”

The negro who had taken charge of Paul’s
mule, appeared in answer to this call.

“Take this gentleman to the green room on
the first floor,” said Don Ugarto. “Take care
that everything is in proper order; I shall come
and see it myself. Sancho will attend Senor
Arnoldo !—And now, sir,” said he, turning to
Paul, “have the goodness to follow this man,
and make yourself at home in your new
quarters. I shall expect you to dine with me
in an hour, and we shall then be able to talk
about your future post over a glass of wine.
Farewell for the present, Senor Arnoldo !”

Paul bowed politely, and followed the servant,
who conducted him up a broad flight of stairs
covered with a soft carpet, and ushered him
into an apartment, the luxurious furniture of
which struck the young man very much, who
had hitherto been accustomed to only the
poorest accommodation. He carefully avoided
any sign of surprise, however; and having
directed the negro to bring up the small amount
of luggage which he had brought with him,
resigned himself to his thoughts.

“Hualpa was right,” said he at length;
PAUL ARNOLD. . 63

“this man is not to be trusted, and I
must keep a sharp look-out. But, after all,
what injury can he do to me if I perform my
duty? He may perhaps try to slander me to
Mr Wilson, in order to get rid of me; but even
then. I should have truth on my side, and that
is always stronger than falsehood. No, no,
Don Ugarto, an honest man doesn’t fear you;
and if you seek a dishonourable quarrel, you
shall at least find a straightforward opponent
in me!”

Having arrived at this conclusion, Paul felt
his usual calmness gradually returning; and
after taking a little rest, he dressed himself, and
descended to the dining-room. He met with a
cordial reception from the head of the establish-
ment, who introduced to him the young men
whom he had already seen in the counting-
house, and then asked him to take a seat by
his side. He was exceedingly attentive to him
during dinner, loaded his plate with the finest
dainties, and kept his glass always filled with
the best and strongest wines, which seemed to
course through his veins like fire. The way in
which Don Ugarto urged him to take more and
more wine at last aroused Paul’s attention, and
he put his glass on one side with the remark,
that he had always been accustomed to the
greatest moderation, and had no intention of
making any alteration in his habits. The
glance of vexation and surprise which passed
64 PAUL ARNOLD.

over Ugarto’s features was observed by Paul,
but without the. slightest change of counte-
nance. The repast was finished soon afterwards,
and all rose from the table, with the exception
of Paul, with whom Don Ugarto wished to have
some private conversation.

“Well, my young friend,” said he, “I have
considered the question as to how you can be
employed in the best and most advantageous
way to yourself, and have decided to take you
as one of my clerks. Your duties will be light
and simple, and when you have grown used to
it, you can earn a very comfortable salary.”

Had any one else than Don Ugarto made
this proposition, Paul would probably have
agreed to it without hesitation ; but he felt so
little confidence in him, and had at the same
time so little desire to become a mere clerk,
which he felt sure was not Mr Wilson’s inten-
tion, that he politely but firmly declined the
proposal.

“J thank you, senor,” said he. “ Although
I don’t doubt that you have my benefit and
advantage in view, I cannot feel it my duty to
accept your proposition. I have been brought
up as a miner, and as a miner I will live and
die. Besides this, Mr Wilson left it to my own
choice as to what special branch I should turn
my attention to; so, with your permission, I
will wait a little while and look around me, so
PAUL ARNOLD. 65

as to be able to make up my mind without
haste.”

“But you forget, sir—you seem to forget
that I am Mr Wilson’s manager and sole repre-
sentative here!” replied Don Ugarto, visibly
excited. “You will find it advisable to obey
my orders.”

“Certainly, senor,” returned Paul with cold-
ness. “You will always find me obedient as
far as your orders agree with those of our com-
mon master; but I must repeat to you that Mr
Wilson has engaged me for his silver mine, and
not for his counting-house, and you will easily
see that I must first follow his wishes.”

“Very well, senor, as you wish,” replied Don
Ugarto, with scarcely concealed anger. “But
you must permit me to remark, that as a miner
you can never hope to obtain any position here,
for you would either have to become one of the
barreteroes, who break up the ore, or one of the
hapiries, who dig it out, and work among them
with your own hands like a slave. You might
certainly have the good fortune to discover a
new vein of silver, which would entitle you to
a handsome reward; but such discoveries are
very rare; and you would only degrade yourself
by such work, and have none but wretched
Indians for your companions. As a book-keeper,
you would have a position in which you could
rise ; and I would therefore, as a friend, strongly
recommend you to agree to my proposition.”

E
66 PAUL ARNOLD.

“ Give me time for consideration, senor,” said —
Paul. “I will decide within ten days or a
fortnight at the furthest, but I cannot before.
Besides barreteroes and hapiries, there must
surely be several persons who superintend the
work in the mine, and I daresay I shall find
something to do in that direction that will
justify the confidence which Mr Wilson has
placed in my knowledge.”

“QObstinate fool!” muttered Don Ugarto, as
he turned away in a passion. “ Have it as
you will have it—All right, Senor Paulo,” he
repeated, turning again towards him ; “ follow
your own opinion, and see how far you will be
able to get. You will soon regret not taking
my advice. Good-day, senor.”

Paul withdrew, feeling glad that the con-
versation had ended thus; but scarcely had he
left the room, when Ugarto stamped violently
upon the floor, and pulled the bell with such
vehemence, that a servant answered it instantly
in great alarm.

“Let the major-domo Rivero come to me
immediately !” was his order. ©

The negro hurriedly obeyed the command ;
and in a short time the person sent for entered
the apartment, and saluted Don Ugarto with
the greatest submissiveness. He was short and
crooked, and his countenance bore an expression
of slyness, cunning, and wickedness,
PAUL ARNOLD. 67

“What are your commands, sir?” he in-
quired.

“Sit down, Rivero,” said Don Ugarto, walk- |
ing up and down the room in great excitement.
“Old Wilson has tried to play us a trick. If
we don’t look out for ourselves, this fellow will
get upon our track, and we shall be driven out
in disgrace—unless we turn honest, and note
down every pound of silver that comes out of
the mine.”

“ But, sir, I do not understand your mean-
ing,” replied Rivero, who was the major-domo
or head inspector of the mine. “ What fellow
do you allude to?”

“A German beggar that Wilson has sent
here. You can read his letter yourself. Old
Wilson recommends him to me, instructs me
to introduce him to all the details of the busi-
ness, and to leave him to choose his own work ;
and the fellow seems to be so terribly honest,
and has so little respect for me, that I expect we
shall have enough to do to keep him in order.”

“ Honest, senor!” replied the inspector, with
a scornful laugh. “I should think there is
precious little honesty that would resist a few
silver bars.”

“Ah, you judge of the fellow from yourself
and from me, but I can assure you, you’re
mistaken. He is a German, and one of the
right sort. Would you believe it, that I offered
him a clerk’s situation, with the prospect of
68 PAUL ARNOLD.

becoming first book-keeper, and instead of
jumping at it, he refused it with the greatest
contempt! He will first see if he can’t be
more useful in the mine than in the counting-
house! He is a regular German bear that we
shall never be able to make a tool of.”

“Well, well, senor, we must try him first,”
replied Rivero. “We have managed so many ~
that I don’t believe this fellow will prove any
difficulty. Anything can be done by bribery.”

“Yes, with most people, but not with this
scoundrel. I can assure you he is a stiff-necked
animal.”

“Every man has his price, and although we
may not be able to buy him over very cheaply,
we shall manage him at last. I have had too
much experience in this sort of thing.”

“This fellow will baffle all your skill,”
repeated Don Ugarto, with a determination
that seemed to shut the mouth of the inspector,
whose only reply was a hateful grin.

“Very well,” said he, “we must try; and if
we fail, there are plenty of holes and corners
here where people sit drinking and playing
cards to all hours of the night, and get their
daggers out occasionally ; now, if one of these
should by accident happen to hurt our young
friend, we should have no particular reason to
regret it.”

“But he will neither drink nor gamble. I
have tried him already, Rivero! He would
PAUL ARNOLD. 69

only drink just what pleased him, not a drop
more.”

“That makes the matter worse than I
thought,” replied the inspector, while his small
and wicked eyes gleamed with secret rage.
“ A German that doesn’t drink, and is honest,
and obstinate, and clever, as it seems to me—
for otherwise old Wilson wouldn’t have sent
him—he will certainly be a stone of stumbling
to us. But, senor, all sensible men get such
stones out of their way, and that is what we
must do somehow or other. If we can’t succeed
at the gambling-table, then we must send him
with an important commission to some place
forty or fifty miles distant; the roads are very
unsafe—all filled with Indians and other dan-
gerous characters; and if we only give the hint
that he would be a good prize, why, I would lay
anything that he wouldn’t be allowed to go
very far without a hindrance. Many a fellow
has started on a good mule without being heard
of again.”

“But that would not be much better than
murder,” said Ugarto.

“Murder! We shouldn’t murder any one,
senor,” replied Rivero, with a loud laugh. “I
didn’t think you had such a tender conscience,
my good sir! But just as you please. If we
are hunted away from here—well, I should
find another situation somewhere; while you—
I really don’t know, my dear sir, whether you
70 PAUL ARNOLD,

would easily find such a comfortable post again.
I should certainly not give up such a situation
for the sake of a wandering German beggar.
But as you please, sir, as you please.”

“ Rivero, you are right. I am a fool to think
so much about the affair,’ exclaimed Don
Ugarto, after a short pause. “ But let us tempt
him first, before we take any severe measures.
If he is determined to be obstinate, then away
with him.”

“Yes, yes; leave that to me, senor,” replied
Rivero, with a cunning smile. “But if I were
you, I-should make short work with him. He
is a stranger now; nobody knows him, and
nobody will miss him. But later on, it will
be different, and—how are we to know that
he won’t use his eyes, and report all our
secrets to old Wilson before we know where
we are? If he were only to have the least
suspicion ”

“Oh, I have attended to that already,” said
Don Ugarto, interrupting him. “I have given
him the green room—where, you know, one can
hear and see everything—and besides that, I
have told Sancho to wait on him. He won’t let
him go out of his sight; I have given him a
wink already.”

“That is all very well for the present,”
replied Rivero; “but you know with certainty
that he hasn’t a single friend or acquaintance
here yet. I don’t need to tell you how people


PAUL ARNOLD. 71

whisper about us here in Pasco; and if any-
thing should occur to excite the suspicion of
this fellow, he might be more on the alert than
would be pleasant.” *

“Don’t be afraid, Rivero; he is a stranger
here, and doesn’t know a soul.”

“Well, then, we will try what we can do;
and if we don’t succeed, then—a short journey !
Farewell, senor. I suppose I shall soon make
the acquaintance of this honourable youth ?”

“He will be sure to visit the mine to-
morrow,” replied Don Ugarto.

“He shall be welcome; but I fancy our
acquaintance will be rather short,” said Rivero,
with a malicious smile; and with a deep bow
took his departure.




CHAPTER VIL

Tur morning of the following day had scarcely
dawned when Paul sprang from his bed, after a
refreshing night’s sleep, and having dressed
himself, called his servant, who stood in readi-
ness to obey his commands.

“What is your name?” he inquired.

“T called Sancho, your honour,” was the
answer. -

“Sancho; very well. I am told you are to
be my servant. Will you serve me honestly
and faithfully ? Speak out, my friend.”

“Sancho will be, yes,” replied the negro,
quite confused by the friendliness and kindly
manner of his new master.

“Well, then, Sancho, I shall trust you,” con-
tinued Paul, stretching out his hand to the
smiling negro, who scarcely ventured to put
it to his lips, being quite unused to such kind
treatment. ‘You will have very little to do,
Sancho, for I attend to myself as much as
possible; but whenever I give you any orders,
PAUL ARNOLD. 73

I must be able to depend on your careful and
immediate attention. Do you understand me,
friend Sancho ?”

“Yes, your honour,” replied Sancho with a
happy grin.

“Very well, then; we shall see,” said Paul.
“If you please me, we shall be good friends
together ; but if not, if I find any unfaithful-
ness on your part, we shall separate at once.
And now, Sancho, shew me the way to the
Dolores silver mine. That is the name of Mr
Wilson’s mine, isn’t it?”

“Yes, senor. But will you not take breakfast
first? Everything is ready.”

“Look sharp, then, for time is precious, and
I have none to spare.”

In a few moments, the table was spread; and
after a hasty meal, Paul set out for the mine,
escorted by his new servant. It was just six
o’clock when they reached Dolores; and the
Indians who had worked all night were leaving
to make room for the second division, or punta,
who worked during the day. About thirty
half-naked, miserable, starving, downcast-looking
Indians came along the road, with an inspector
at their head, and vanished in the entrance to
the mine, from which the others had just
emerged like ghosts. Paul could not look at
the poor creatures without sympathy, for their
wretched appearance shewed that they were
accustomed to very bad treatment.
74 PAUL ARNOLD.

“We must see who is to blame for that,” said
he to himself; and after he had told Sancho to
amuse himself during the forenoon, and call for
him at twelve, he followed the punta into the
mine.

If Paul had expected to find the same order
and regularity that he had been used to at
home, where mining was carried on with the
greatest energy and skill, he soon found himself
thoroughly deceived. Even the shaft or entrance
of the mine gave proof of the grossest neglect.
The steep road led over half-rotten wood and
loose stones, which served as steps, and Paul
found it necessary to be very careful to avoid
falling as he made his way slowly along. But
bad as the entrance was, he found the mine
itself still worse, after he had succeeded in
reaching it with great risk to his life. All
the shafts and passages were in a wretched
condition, and he saw at every step that the
work had been carried on with the greatest
meanness and avarice. Nothing had been done
to render the mine safe; the most dangerous
parts had been left without any support; and
it was a perfect wonder to him that there had
been no accident through the mine falling in.
Full of anger at such carelessness, he went to
the inspector, who was idly smoking a cigar,
and looking at the workmen.

“Do you not think it is very dangerous and
wicked,” said he, “to carry on mining in this
PAUL ARNOLD. 75

reckless way? You must know very well that
the lives of these unfortunate men are exposed
to the greatest risk. A slight accident at any
moment might destroy the mine, and bury you
all beneath the ruins, without hope of escape.”

“You -are quite right, senor,” replied the
inspector with the greatest indifference. ‘We
lead a dangerous life here, but we can’t alter
it: that belongs to the major-domo.”

“ And where is he?” asked Paul. ‘He goes
to work in a most careless way, either from
negligence or ignorance.”

“Indeed, senor! Who are you, that you ven-
ture to speak in such a way of our major-domo,
Senor Don Rivero?” inquired the inspector in
the greatest surprise, while the Indians left off
their work to listen.

“Who am I? You will find that out soon
enough,” replied Paul. “It is high time Mr
Wilson sent some one here to put things to
rights. Where is the major-domo?”

“Here. Have you anything to say to me,
senor?” inquired Rivero himself in a sarcastic
tone, coming out of a corner where he had been
hidden by one of the galleries of the mine. “I
am Rivero, the major-domo of the Dolores mine,
and I ask who you are to take upon yourself to
talk here?”

“Ask your superior, Don Jose Ugarto,”
replied Paul quietly, looking at the major-domo
with such a severe and piercing glance, that he
76 PAUL ARNOLD.

was compelled to change colour. “It will be
sufficient for the present, if I assure you that
I have full right to be here, and see all that is
going on. My name is Paul Arnold; and now
to business.”

“ Ah, Senor Don Arnoldo; yes, yes, I have
heard of you,” said Rivero with a malicious grin.
“You are the German that Don Ugarto told
me of.”

“Yes; and he will also have told you that I
have come here by Mr Wilson’s orders,” replied
Paul. “Don’t you know, sir, that it is shameful
for property to be wasted as it is here? The
precious metal is destroyed, instead of being got
out carefully. There doesn’t seem to be the
slightest thought of the future safety of the
mine.”

The major-domo shrugged his shoulders in
contempt. “What do you know about mining
in this country?” said he. “When you have
been here for a year or two, and have got your
horns out a little, it will be quite time enough
to talk; but for the present it will be as well
for you to hold your tongue, young man.”

“ Hold my tongue at such mismanagement as
this!” exclaimed Paul in indignation. “ Will
you deny, sir, that the way of carrying on the
work here shews the greatest neglect or igno-
rance? Step this way, if you please. The
slightest shock of an earthquake would be
enough to bring the whole concern down about
PAUL ARNOLD. 77

your ears. Wherever I have been, there seems
to be the same neglect. Do you regard the
lives of these poor Indians so little, that you
expose them to danger in this way ?”

“Pah! Indians!” replied Rivero with ridi-
cule. ‘Who cares a straw for them? There
is no such scarcity of these miserable hounds.
Mr Wilson would be very little pleased if we
were to run up a lot of expenses, and ruin him
on their account.”

“T think I know Mr Wilson better than
that,” said Paul in noble anger. “But I see
very clearly that you are not disposed to make
any alteration; so it will be necessary to take
other steps. I will speak to Don Ugarto in the
meantime, and see what can be done.”

“Speak to him, my good sir, and say what-
ever pleases you,” was Rivero’s answer; “but
for the present, if you please, don’t hinder the
work, for these Indian beasts won’t do a stroke
so long as they can catch a word of our friendly
conversation. Another time, Senor Arnoldo,
and up above, if you please.”

With these words he turned on his heel;
and Paul left the mine full of anger, and
hastened to Don Ugarto, to whom he gave a
description of the recklessness and want of
order which seemed to prevail in all parts
of the mine. To his astonishment, Ugarto
listened to him with the greatest indifference,
and said that he would pay a visit to the mine
78 PAUL ARNOLD,

himself in a few days; and with this answer
Payl was obliged to be content.

Although always received with the greatest
coldness and unfriendliness by Rivero, Paul
visited the mine every day, observed the work
that was going on, spoke sometimes to the
Indians, who in the sweat of their brows hewed
out the silver ore, and carried it to the surface;
and waited patiently for the fulfilment of Don
Ugarto’s promise to make a personal examina-
tion of the works. But the manager took good
care not to shew his face, and the major-domo
persisted with the most contemptuous assurance
in his former method of carrying on the labour,
without paying the least attention to Paul’s
presence. This circumstance aroused Paul’s
attention, and led him to believe that Ugarto
and Rivero were in league together; and his
suspicions were confirmed by observing that
the ore was not taken to be separated from the
rock by the men belonging to the same gang
that had extracted it. He watched the opera-
tions carefully, but could not find out the reason
of this proceeding until he asked an old Indian,
who had worked in the mine for many years.

‘Not now,” the Indian whispered: “when
we leave work. Take care, senor, and follow
me: I will lead you to a safe spot.”

Paul was struck by the man’s words and
manner, but waited quietly till six o’clock,
when the men left off their work. Leaving the
PAUL ARNOLD. 79

mine a few minutes before them, he waited at
a little distance till the Indians made their
appearance. He then followed the old man to
a small hut, and took the seat which he offered
him.

“ Now, senor, ask me any questions you like,”
said he, “and I will give you an answer.”

“But why do you make such a secret of it,
my friend?” inquired Paul.

“For your safety, senor,” replied the Indian
with a significant look. “You don’t know the
ground on which you stand. You neither know
Rivero nor Don Ugarto. You don’t know that
you are surrounded by rogues and scoundrels,
who would put you out of the way without any
hesitation, if they had the least idea that you
watched them. Don’t you guess where the silver
ore goes to that is left in the mine overnight ?”

“How should I? I shouldn’t have asked you
if I had known.”

“Well, Senor Don Arnoldo, you would not
have found it out from me, if you had not been
of a different stamp from those villains who
trample us poor Indians under foot, and wish
to keep us in perpetual slavery. You regard us
as men, but they treat us as mere beasts of
burden. We are all kept in a state of slavish
dependence, because we have been compelled to
borrow money from Don Ugarto when times
were hard. Once in debt, the poor Indian can
never free himself from the yoke, for he meets
80 PAUL ARNOLD.

with no justice from the white man who needs
his labour. If he runs away, he is pursued and
shot like a wild beast; if he struggles against
his fate, he is thrown into a dungeon, where
neither sun nor moon can be seen; if he com-
plains that he is cheated, he is laughed at,
beaten, and driven away, because he can’t prove
the cheating ; and so there is nothing else for
him to do but to drag along his miserable life
till death puts an end to his slavery. It’s as
bad everywhere else as it is here; the owners
of the mines can’t do without our labour, and
so they make us work either through cunning
or force.”

“That is horrible!” exclaimed Paul, filled
with indignation and sympathy. “ But if you
knew your fate, why did you plunge blindly
into misery by borrowing money from your
master ?” ,

“ Distress, senor, and—I say it with sorrow—
the love of drinking,” replied the old man with
a downeast look. “These sly men know that
our people can scarcely ever resist the tempta-
tion of strong drink, and so they lure the Indian
on from one thing to another, until he falls a
helpless prey to them.”

“But Mr Wilson knows nothing of such
wickedness,” exclaimed Paul. “I could almost
swear that he is quite ignorant of such things
being done.”

“You may be right, senor,” answered the
PAUL ARNOLD. 81

Indian. “Perhaps if you will take an interest
in our miserable condition, it may be improved.
We hope so, because we heard the way you
_ spoke to the major-domo, and our hearts were
rejoiced. You are not like him, and therefore
the Indians love you. None of them will lift
a hand against you, senor. But be cautious, and
remember what I tell you, for these wicked
fellows are very cunning, and you may not
always have any one to protect you.”

“Never mind that, my friend, but tell me
what becomes of the silver ore that I asked
you about.”

“Well, it is put on one side, and then sold by
the major-domo and Don Ugarto,” replied the
Indian. “These two men cheat their master;
and if a hundred loads of ore are brought out
of the mine, they take fifty of the richest and
best for themselves. To prevent discovery,
they never allow one gang of men to know
what the others have worked at, but we
find it out in spite of them; and all their
caution would be in vain if we only dared to
speak. But a word, or even a look, would be
certain death. You heard yourself what the
major-domo said: ‘Who ever cares about an
Indian? There are enough and to spare of
these wretches’ ”

“That can’t be true,” exclaimed Paul in
horror. “Such wholesale cheating is out of
the question.”

F
§2 PAUL ARNOLD.

“Well, senor, inquire yourself, if you don’t
believe me,” answered the Indian. “Find out
whether Don Ugarto keeps an account of all the
ore that is got out every day, but do it secretly,
so that he can’t notice it; and then look at the
books, and see if they agree. It is very easy
for you to find out the deception.”

“Tt shall be done, depend upon it,” replied
Paul; “and woe to them, if”

“Stop, senor! Do nothing in haste!” said
the Indian, interrupting him. “Be warmed.
These scoundrels are very dangerous.”

“Not to me, for Jam in the hand of God!”
replied the young man with a determined look.
“T do what is right, and fear nobody. Don’t
be alarmed on my account. No one shall ever
find out that it is you that have put me on the
track of these wretched swindlers. And if God
assists me—of which I have no doubt—then, my
friend, both your lot and that of your country-
men in the mine will be better than it has been
hitherto.”

During the whole of the next week, Paul
took an account of all the ore that was brought
out of the mine, without, however, allowing
Don Ugarto to know anything about it. At
last, on a holiday, when the work was stopped,
and none of the clerks were in the office, he
called upon Don Ugarto, and after greeting him
coldly, asked for the principal account-book, in
which the weight of all the ore was entered


PAUL ARNOLD. 83

which had been taken out during the preceding

week. The manager was greatly startled, and

inquired the reason of such an extraordinary
demand.

~ You will soon see, senor,” replied Paul in

an indifferent tone. ‘I only wish to make a

little memorandum.”

The quiet demeanour of the young man
seemed to reassure Don Ugarto; and taking
the book from the place in which it was kept,
he shewed it to Paul, who took a brief glance
at its contents,

“T suppose you have reported to Mr Wilson
the amount of ore that was got out last week ?”
he asked.

“Certainly. That is done regularly at the
end of every week, as you must have observed
already.”

“Then you have stated the amount that is
set down in this book?”

“To be sure. Why do you ask such a
question, and in such a peculiar tone, Senor
Arnoldo?”

“Simply because you are a liar, a thief, and
a swindler!” answered Paul with the greatest
contempt. “You have only reported the half
of what has been got out; and here is the proof
of it. Compare this list with yours. I have
noted it down carefully, Senor Ugarto, and
your fraud is discovered.”

Don Ugarto turned pale, and trembled so
84 PAUL ARNOLD.

violently, that he was obliged to Jean against
his desk for support. Then suddenly summon-
ing all his strength and energy, he seized a
dagger which lay near at hand, and rushed at
Paul like a tiger. Paul was, however, on the
alert, and taking a pistol from his belt, pointed
it at Ugarto, who started back with a cry of
rage.

“Don’t be so hasty, senor,” said Paul. “I
was quite prepared for an attack like this;
and at anyrate, Don Ugarto, I am always on
my guard. Your game is played out here, for
I shall inform Mr Wilson to-day with what
honesty and fidelity his manager and inspector
have worked hand in hand for his benefit. Mr
Wilson will find out that it is high time some
one was sent here to conduct all his affairs
properly. Farewell, senor.”

Paul was about to leave, but Ugarto hastened
towards him, and held him fast by one arm.
“Senor Arnoldo,” said he, “do nothing rashly.
Reflect upon what you are doing, and listen to
what I have to tell you.”

“ And what is that?”

“Well, then, senor,” continued Don Ugarto
with his usual coolness, which he had fully
recovered after the first surprise was over, “if
you should really write to Mr Wilson, how will
you prove to him that your list is correct, and
that mine is false? Suppose I deny it? And
suppose Rivero denounces you as a slanderer
PAUL ARNOLD. 85

who is only anxious to drive me away that you
may get my post, what then, senor?”

“Then I should simply ask the under-
inspector and the Indians to tell all that they
know about the matter.”

Don Ugarto laughed in mockery. “The
evidence of the Indians would be of no value
at all,” said he; “and as regards the inspector,
he wouldn’t venture to say a word against the
major-domo. You fight with very poor weapons,
my good sir.”

“That matters not: I have truth and upright-
ness on my side,” replied Paul.

“Well, you will see how far that will carry
you,” repeated Ugarto. “I can tell you before-
hand how it will go. If Mr Wilson pays any
attention to your complaint, and should come
here to see for himself, the major-domo would
ask the hapiries how much ore they have
carried to the store, and their answer would
agree exactly with my accounts.”

“Quite so; because they leave the best ore
in the shaft, to be carried away by the next
gang. The barreteroes must be asked how
much ore they have dug out.”

“Well, even then their account would agree
with mine. The barreteroes of the first gang
would of course be asked, because they dig out
the ore which the hapiries of the second gang
carry away. You would find it very hard work
to prove anything ; so the best thing will be to
86 PAUL ARNOLD.

let the matter drop, and not expose yourself to
ridicule.”

Paul looked down thoughtfully, and seemed
uncertain what to do. Ugarto, who watched
him attentively, observed this appearance of
doubt, and took instant advantage of it.

“Listen to me, my friend,” said he, going up
to him in a confidential way. “I will shew
you a much better way than that you are
taking. Say nothing of what you have seen,
become a partner with us, share our gains, and
—your fortune is made! I speak freely to you,
for you have found out our game, although it
would be very hard to betray us. Agree to
this, and we part as friends. Don’t hesitate a
moment. Fortune will perhaps never be so
close within your reach again as it is now.”

“Fortune! What do you call fortune?”
replied Paul thoughtfully, as if considering
Ugarto’s proposition. “When the spoil is
divided among three, there can’t be much for
each.”

“Enough to make you a rich man in a few
years,” said Don Ugarto.

“But you—you are not rich, so far as I
know.”

“Certainly not. But it is my own fault.
Gambling and drinking, and the fact that I
can fill my pockets at any time—this explains
everything. And now, declare yourself, senor:
friend or foe?”
PAUL ARNOLD. 87

Paul raised his clear bright eyes from the
ground, and fixed them upon Don Ugarto, who
grew once more pale as he saw that their
expression boded no good to him.

“Enough!” said Paul calmly. “ You will never
persuade me to take part in a system of robbery
which must be carried on upon a very large
scale if a fortune is to be made by it in a few
years. Every man must make his own fortune ;
but to make it in such a way as that, I can
never agree to. You have deceived yourself in
me, Don Ugarto. I wish you good-day.”

“Senor Arnoldo, bethink yourself! ” exclaimed
Ugarto in alarm.

“There is nothing to think about,” replied
Paul. “After you have laid the foundation of
your own misery, disgrace, and ruin, would you
have me follow your example? No, never! Mr
Wilson shall learn the whole of it, and then he
can decide between us.”

Without another word, Paul left the room.
Don Ugarto followed him with a wild and
vindictive look, and shook his fist at him. “You
have made up your mind—well, have it so,”
said he; and seizing his hat, he hastened to
his confederate, Rivero, to tell him what had
happened, and to consult with him as to what
measures were necessary to avert the storm that
seemed to threaten their destruction.






CHAPTER VII.

In deep silence, with wrinkled brow, and a
smile upon his lips that boded mischief, Rivero
listened to the report of Don Ugarto.

“You now see the consequences of your
miserable weakness and indecision,’ said Rivero
harshly. “If you had gone to work at once,
and either deprived the young serpent of his
fangs, or trampled him under foot at the
outset, we should have been spared this diffi-
culty. But it is not too late yet, as the young
fool was so simple as to tell you what he
intended to do.”

“ But what can we do?” inquired Ugarto in
the greatest alarm. “If Mr Wilson comes to
know ”

“Folly! How is he to know anything?”
said Rivero, interrupting him. “ You surely
won’t be such a child as to let this fellow send
his letter to old Wilson? We should have
no hope in that case. But there are many ways
of preventing that, and I suppose we shan’t
be very particular in choosing them. You
must, above all things, keep a sharp look-out


PAUL ARNOLD. 89

on the traitor, so that he can’t take a single
step without our knowledge. That will be
enough for to-day, for there are none of the
men to be had that we can depend on. They
are all drinking as hard as they can, and spend-
ing their money; but to-morrow there will be
time enough to do all that we want.”

“ But what can we do?” repeated Ugarto.

“We can let him disappear,” said the major-
domo. |

“ And when any one inquires for him 2?”

“What should we know about him? If any
search is made, we shall have to join in it; but,
of course, nothing will be found out. People
disappear often enough out here, and are soon
forgotten.”

Don Ugarto breathed more freely as he
observed the assurance of his accomplice. “ And
where shall it take place?” he asked.

“Near the mine, I think,’ replied Rivero.
“He is almost sure to pay us a visit there, as
usual; and I will manage to keep him engaged
until after dark, and the men have gone home,
so that when he leaves, everything will be as
black as midnight, and the coast clear. You
may leave the affair quite safely in my hands;
I promise you the sneaking vagabond shan’t
get the better of us; but be sure that he doesn’t
send a letter to old Wilson.”

“T’ll take care of that,” said Ugarto.
“Sancho and I will keep a sharp look-out on
90 PAUL ARNOLD.

him. But stop a moment—what are we to
do with him? Where can we hide him?”

“Leave that to my people,” answered Rivero.
“For a couple of gold coins, and as much
brandy as they can drink, they will hide him so
securely that not a ray of light will ever fall
upon him again. And now to your post, senor.
Are you quite certain that you can trust to
Sancho ?”

“Well, he has always been faithful, so I have
no reason to distrust him now. But I will not
tell him any more of our secret than I can
possibly help.”

“You will be quite right in that, senor; the
fewer that know it the better. Farewell,
senor.”

Don Ugarto, relieved from the fear and
anxiety which had oppressed and tormented
him, returned home, and called Sancho to him.
In answer to his inquiries, he found that Paul
had been busily engaged for above an hour in
writing a letter. There could be no doubt for
whom it was intended.

“ Yes, yes; I know,” said Ugarto to Sancho.
“Senor Arnoldo is writing to Mr Wilson in
Lima, by my. direction. But look here, Sancho;
that letter is not to be taken to the post before
I see it, as I shall have something more to add.
Do you understand me?”

“Sancho understands,” replied the negro.

“Well, then, see that you pay attention, if

2
PAUL ARNOLD. 91

you want to escape a sound thrashing. If you
deceive me, I’ll send you into the mine, and
then your easy idle life here is at an end. I
want you to stay with Senor Arnoldo the whole
of the day, and see what he does; but, of course,
without his noticing it. I have my reasons for
it. You understand, Sancho?”

“Sancho understand quite good. He bring
letter to Senor Don Ugarto, and not go away
from Senor Arnoldo.”

“Quite right,” said Ugarto with a smile.
“Tf you manage the business cleverly, so that
Don Arnoldo doesn’t observe it, I will speak to
Mr Wilson for you, and he will then perhaps
give you your freedom.”

Sancho grinned in token of his pleasure and
delight, and returned to the ante-room of his
young master. As soon as he found himself
alone, the glad expression disappeared from his
face, and he fell into a reverie.

“There is something going on here not good
for Massa Arnoldo,” said he at length. “What
can I do? Ino dare tell Don Ugarto lies; but
I no like Massa Arnoldo to be unhappy. A
good man; he call Sancho friend. What must
I do?”

He thought for a long time how he could give
a warning to his young master without danger
to himself, but his fear of Don Ugarto was
greater than his love for Paul. He knew that
Ugarto would carry out his threats the instant
92. PAUL ARNOLD.

that he had the least suspicion; and Sancho
shuddered when he thought of the hard work in
the mine, to which he might be driven at any
moment. At last, he came to a conclusion
which seemed to remove all his difficulties.

“J will tell old Huari,” said he. “Thats
the best. I know the Indians love Massa
Arnoldo, and Huari will help him and tell
nobody.”

Huari was the name of the old miner whom
Sancho had often seen in conversation with
Paul, and he thought he could trust him with
the secret without any fear. He had scarcely
made up his mind to steal away to his hut in
the evening or during the night, when Paul
called him.

“Sancho, my friend,’ said he, “take this
letter to the post-office as fast as ever you can,
and come straight back to me. Be careful not
to lose it, for it is of great importance.”

“Yes, senor,” replied Sancho, taking the
letter.

Instead, however, of going to the post with it,
he took it to Don Ugarto, who broke the seal
at once, and read it. The letter was directed
to Mr Wilson, and contained an exact account
of the fraud and robbery which Paul had dis-
covered in the course of the last few days.

“ All right, Sancho,” said Don Ugarto, quietly
putting the letter in his pocket; “I see that
you are a sharp fellow, and you shan’t lose
PAUL ARNOLD. 93

your reward. Now take this letter, and post
it. Our sly young gentleman may perhaps ask
you if you have posted his letter properly, and
you must be prepared to tell him that you have,
Run, Sancho, and be sure that you give him the
right answer if he should inquire. Be as quick
as you can, for I may want you for something
else.”

Sancho took the letter which Don Ugarto
had given him, and lost no time in posting it.
On his way back, it struck him that he might
as well take advantage of the opportunity to
tell his suspicions to Huari; and he ran at the
top of his speed to the hut of the old Indian.
Fortunately, he found him at home, and told
him everything without reserve.

“That doesn’t surprise me in the least,” said
Huari. “They hate him because he is honest
and is a friend to the poor Indian. But I will
keep my eyes open. All right, Sancho! You
can be quite easy. Although Huari is old, his
eyes are still sharp. Go, and speak to no
one.”

Sancho was glad that he had been able to
give a hint to the old Indian without causing
any suspicion, and hastened back to the
house,

The day passed without anything occurring
worthy of notice. Paul remained at home, and
Sancho’s post as spy was not at all difficult.

On the following morning, Paul went to the
94 PAUL ARNOLD.

mine as usual to assist the overseers in direct-
ing the work. | Everything proceeded in the
customary manner; and the only difference
which Paul observed was, that Rivero was more
friendly and polite than he had ever been
before.

“Ugarto will have told him that I have
found it all out,” thought he, “and he hopes
perhaps that I will change my mind, and join
them in their roguery. But nothing of the
kind! Honesty is the best policy.”

Towards evening, Rivero left the mine, but
asked Paul to remain and superintend every-
thing till the men were changed for the night,
to which he readily agreed. Scarcely, however,
had Rivero left, when Huari went up to Paul,
and whispered in his ear: “ Be on your guard,
senor. There is some wicked plot being made
against you.”

“That may be,” replied Paul in a whisper ;
“but I have prepared myself for that.”

With these words he opened his coat and
shewed a pair of pistols in his belt,

“That is something, certainly,” replied the
Indian. “But remember that old Huari is on
the watch, whatever may happen.”

After these words, the Indian returned to his
work, and Paul gave his orders with as much
calmness as if nothing of the least importance
had passed between them.

At last, six o’clock struck, and the workmen
PAUL ARNOLD. 95

left the mine, and were replaced by the night-
gang. Paul gave them the necessary orders,
and after having fulfilled all Rivero’s instruc-
tions, prepared to return home. The inspector
who had charge during the night detained him,
however, with several questions for nearly an
hour, so that when he reached the mouth of the
shaft it was quite dark, and nothing was visible
but the faint light of the stars. The deepest
silence reigned around, and Paul could not help
saying to himself, with a shudder: “ This is just
the very night for a deed of darkness.” With-
out, however, dwelling on such gloomy thoughts,
he struck out at a sharp pace, and had nearly
reached Pasco, whose bright windows seemed to
invite him onwards, when three dark figures
suddenly darted out of a ruined hut by the side
of the road, and rushed upon him. Before he
had time to draw his pistols, or to cry for help, he
was seized, robbed of his weapons, bound hand
and foot, and carried into the hut. His assail-
ants then opened a door leading to a passage,
which might have communicated with an old
mine. The place was in perfect darkness, but
the bandits appeared to know the way exactly.
After carrying him about two hundred paces,
they laid him on the ground, fastened a strong
rope round his body, and lowered him into a
hole where the air was so impure that he could
hardly breathe. Paul had no means of knowing
how deep the hole was; but after about a
96 ~ . PAUL ARNOLD.

second he reached the bottom and struck the
ground. The rope was then slipped with a jerk
from his shoulders, and immediately drawn out
of reach.

“ Good-night, and pleasant dreams!” cried a
rough voice from above in a scornful tone. “We
have made a bed for you in which you can sleep
as long as you like—till the end of the world,
in fact !”

The voice awoke a low echo in the galleries
of the old mine; Paul heard the retreating
footsteps of the bandits grow fainter and fainter,
and then all was silent as the grave. A loud
noise like the shutting of a door broke the
silence a minute or two afterwards, and every-
thing became again perfectly still. The deepest
darkness and silence surrounded the helpless
prisoner.

A dull stupor followed the first sensations of
surprise and horror which had almost over-
powered the usually stout and resolute heart of
Paul. Full of confidence that he was in the
right, he had not thought it possible that he
could so soon fall a victim to the revenge of the
man whose dishonesty he had exposed ; and yet
he found himself, as if by a stroke of magic,
suddenly cast into the most hopeless and
miserable position. Bound hand and _ foot,
hidden in the depths of the earth, buried in
a living grave, there seemed not the least
glimmer of hope to comfort or sustain him.
PAUL ARNOLD. : 97

The infamous deed had been too well devised
and carried into execution to render any chance
of deliverance probable. If he were missed,
and a search made for him, how was it possible
that he could ever be found? No human eye
had witnessed his seizure; and the scoundrels
who had carried out their cruel intention so
successfully, would take good care not to reveal
it. Even if Mr Wilson received his letter, and
came to Pasco to see with his own eyes how his
affairs were managed, it couldn’t help him at
all; for whatever suspicions might rest upon
Ugarto and Rivero, no one could prove that
they had been concerned in putting the young
stranger out of the way. They would be sure
to assert that he had left the mine as usual,
and had never been seen or heard of since. A
murder on the highway was not at all uncom-
mon in those parts, and who could tell into
whose hands he might have fallen !

Such thoughts as these coursed each other
through the brain of the unfortunate youth,
and so completely deprived him of the least
ray of hope, that he gave himself up for lost,
and never expected to see the blessed light
of the sun again, or to return to the home of
his childhood.

_ But what was to hinder him from making a
struggle, at least, to liberate himself, without
waiting for any other help? No sooner had

this idea occurred to him, like a gleam of light
G
98 PAUL ABNOLD.

from heaven, than he roused himself from the

«stupor into which he was sinking. He was
bound, but he had his teeth at liberty, and he
gnawed at the,cords with such vigour that they
gave way one after another, and he soon had
the pleasure of finding his arms once more free.
The work of releasing his feet was less difficult ;
and when that was accomplished, he was able
to rise and grope about, in spite of the i impene-
trable darkness, for some way of escape.

Paul clung cautiously to the wall, and felt
carefully with his feet at every step, lest there
should be any hole into which he might fall.
No danger of that. kind appeared to threaten
him; but he was distressed to find that there
was not the least ground for the faint hopes of
rescue which he had ventured to entertain. far up as he could reach, there seemed to be
nothing but bare rock, which rose all around in
a solid wall,. He could no longer doubt that he
had been confined in the bottom of an old shaft
which had formerly been reached by ladders,
but of which there was no longer the slightest
remains.

’ The despair which had at first seized him
returned in all its power, and he again sank
into a deep fit of depression and stupor, For
more than an hour he sat motionless on the
ground, with his back against the*wall, when he
was suddenly aroused from his mournful reverie

by the sound of approaching footsteps, and a

faint glimmer of light.

fe

“
PAUL ARNOLD. 99

“Who is there?” he exclaimed. “For God’s
sake, is it a friend ?”

“Look at me, and then ask yourself again
if it is a friend that has come to see you,”
replied a voice, with whose malicious tone Paul
was too well acquainted; and a wicked and ugly
countenance, with eyes lighted up by passion,
- looked down upon him from above.

“ Rivero!” cried Paul. “Wretched man! Was
it your hand, then, that cast me into this
grave?”

“You have guessed rightly,” was the reply.
“My hand, through the hands of three brave
negroes, who will keep the affair as dark as
these walls that surround you.”

“And what do you want from me? Have
you only come to enjoy the sight of my mis-
fortune ?”

“Not only that, but also to let you know
what you have yet to expect and to hope for,”
replied the overseer. “You see, my boy, every
man is the architect of his own fortune, as you
said to Don Ugarto, and you haven’t been long
in making yours ; for you are sitting there like
a millionaire, surrounded by walls of silver, and
no king could ever enjoy a more valuable coffin
than yours will be in a few days, after you have
been starved to death.”

“Starved to death!” exclaimed Paul in
terror; “you surely won’t leave me here to
die of slow starvation?”
100 PAUL ARNOLD.

“That is just what I mean to do, my son,”
said Rivero. “That isn’t murder, you know.
I shan’t kill you; I merely shut you up for the
sake of my own safety, so that you can’t chatter
about anything that might bring me into diffi-
culty. Nothing else troubles me, far less your
dying down there. But I must give you one
piece of advice, out of sympathy with your
youth and innocence. Hunger, my child, is a
slow, painful, and miserable death; so, if I
were you, I should try to batter my brains out
against the hard wall. It would certainly hurt
you a little, but it would be over all the sooner.
Take my advice, my little man, for there will
be no other way to get out of the scrape you’ve
brought yourself into.”

“ Miserable wretch!” replied Paul in a de-
pressed tone. “God cannot permit me to come
to such a dreadful end for having acted
according to His laws. Beware for yourself!
Mr Wilson knows of all your fraud and
robbery, and will come here without delay.
Your wicked deed will soon be found out,
and you will meet with the punishment you
deserve !”

A loud and scornful laugh was the answer.
“Don’t flatter yourself with any vain hopes of
that kind,” replied Rivero. “You think old
Wilson knows everything? Nothing of the
kind. There’s your precious letter! Catch
it, my man, and run away and post it!”
PAUL ARNOLD. 101

A white sheet of paper fluttered like a dove
over Paul’s head ; he seized it with both hands,
and looked at it by the faint light of the torch
held by Rivero. Alas! there could be no doubt
that it was his own letter, and his cry of horror
and surprise was mingled with the loud and
malicious laughter of his enemy.

“Die, boy!” he exclaimed; “you see very
well that there is no hope for you! You have
made your fortune; so now you can enjoy it
with no one to disturb you!”

“Mercy!” cried Paul, from the depth into
which he had been plunged, with a voice of
despair—‘“‘mercy! Do not leave me to perish
in this way, for God’s sake, Rivero!”

“You will get no mercy from me!” replied
the major-domo, quite unmoved by the appeal
of the unfortunate youth; “you have got your
reward, so make the best of it!”

With these words the horrid countenance
of Rivero disappeared from the edge of the
shaft, and Paul uttered a second cry of
despair and lamentation. “No merey! O
God, no mercy!” he exclaimed, while the
torch -light still glimmered faintly above
him. |

“No! No mercy for the wretched man!”
said a loud voice, while a dark and strange
form suddenly appeared behind Rivero, and,
with the rapid and unerring movement of
a bird of prey, seized the scoundrel by the
102 PAUL ARNOLD,

throat. A loud yell of alarm reverberated
through the subterranean passages of the mine,
followed by a dull and muffled groan. The
light was extinguished, and for some seconds
Paul waited in the greatest agony for the result
of the struggle which had evidently taken place
between Rivero and the stranger. Another-
loud cry was heard—a groan—a heavy fall—
and all seemed over. Who had been the victor
in the terrible combat ?

This dreadful doubt was, however, not long
to torment the heart of the poor captive.
“Have only a little more patience, brother,”
exclaimed the new-comer. “The traitor, the
murderer, lies helpless on the ground, and I am
looking for the light which has fallen down. —
Ha ! here it is.”

“ But who are you, my friend ?—what is your
name?” asked Paul, with a voice that trembled
with the excitement caused by such sudden and
unexpected help.

“You will soon see,” was the answer; “have
only a little more patience.”

The torch was rekindled, and at the edge of
the shaft the tall form and expressive counte-
nance of a young Indian was clearly seen.

“Hualpa!” exclaimed Paul; “what wonder-
ful and blessed destiny brought you here, to
rescue me from such a dreadful death ?”

“You shall soon hear, brother,’ replied
Hualpa; “but you must first be got out of that
PAUL ARNOLD. 1038

hole. Catch hold of this rope, and tie it firmly
round your body under your arms, and I will
haul you up out of your grave.”

With these words the Indian threw the end
of a strong rope down to Paul, who followed the
directions, and in a few minutes stood breath-
less with joy by the side of his liberator, who
embraved him tenderly and pressed him to his
breast, while another Indian, old Huari, looked
on with admiration at the happy countenances
of the two youths.

“And Rivero?” inquired the old man, “ what
is to be done with him, Hualpa ?”

“He shall have the punishment which he
has brought down on his own head,” replied
the young Indian in a firm and decided tone.
“Down with him, Huari! ”

Rivero lay on the ground bound hand and
foot, just as Paul had been a short time before,
and rolled his eyes in fury and despair. Huari
fastened the rope round the body of the help-
less man, pushed him over the edge of the
abyss, and while he hung suspended, cut the
cord that bound his hands. Rivero instantly
took the gag from his mouth, and uttered a
loud and piercing cry.

‘Mercy ! mercy!” he exclaimed; “kill me,
but don’t leave me to starve to death in such a
hole!”

“No mercy!” replied Hualpa. “Did he have
any mercy for my brother? Down with him!”
104 PAUL ARNOLD.

The despairing cries of the unhappy man
echoed wildly through the vaulted passages,
while Huari lowered the rope till the prisoner
reached the bottom of the shaft.

“Die!” cried Hualpa to him. “You said just
now that my brother had made his fortune ; just
see how you can enjoy yours. Die, wretched
man!”

“J will not die!” he cried in the greatest
agony. “Senor Arnoldo,. have mercy on me!
Save me, save me!”

Paul turned a beseeching look upon Hualpa.

“No,” he replied with horrible determina-
tion; “he shall stay where he is. Come away,
brother ; follow me.”

Paul left the gloomy place reluctantly, for
the fearful cries of Rivero pierced his heart.
“Never mind him,” said Hualpa, when they
had gone a little distance from the edge of the
shaft. “His punishment is quite just ; we have
not been revengeful, but have given him only
what he deserves. More to-morrow !”

Leaving the wretched man to his fate, they
went away, Hualpa arm in arm with Paul,
while Huari led the way with the torch. The
cries of Rivero followed them till they reached
the end of the passage. Huari opened the
heavy door, and closed it behind them with a
loud bang. Paul passed through the dilapidated
hut, and the next moment found himself under
the open canopy of heaven, whose thousand
PAUL ARNOLD. 105

stars looked down upon him with a bright
and friendly welcome; the gentle night-breeze ~
fanned his cheek, and with an exclamation of
delight and gratitude, he fell on the neck of
Hualpa.

“ How can I thank you for this rescue from
death and the grave?” he cried.

“Don’t thank me, brother, but thank the
Great Spirit, who has planted love and pity in
your breast,” replied-Hualpa. “ Who took the
part of the poor Indian when the negroes were
ready to kill him? Who saved the life of the
poor Indian when he was overcome by the
snow-storm on the Puna? Who called the red
man his friend, and felt pity for his sorrows?
Who took the part of the poor miners against
their cruel masters, and risked the vengeance
of the white man? It was you—you did all
this, brother! And now, should the red man
leave his friend to perish by the hands of the
wicked? No more thanks; but come home as
fast as you can, for Mr Wilson is waiting for
you, and these two wicked men will have to be
punished.”

“Mr Wilson!” inquired Paul in astonish-
ment; “how did he come here?”

“Tualpa brought him,’ was the simple
answer of the young Indian. ‘“ Hualpa knew
that his brother was in the claws of the pan-
ther, and was too weak to help him alone.
But you will hear all about it. Come along.”




CHAPTER VIIL

Arter the lapse of about a twelvemonth or
more from the time in which the occurrences
just mentioned had transpired, several persons
were gathered in the drawing-room of Mr
Wilson’s mansion, which an unusual destiny
had drawn together from distant lands. First
among the number was Mr Wilson himself,
stretched in a large and comfortable arm-chair ;
then Paul, who cast frequent glances of affec-
tion at a pale and elderly lady at whose feet he
sat, and who pressed his hands warmly ; beside
them were four young people whose features
bore a striking resemblance to those of Paul;
a tall white-haired old man stood at a table
examining a model of a mine with. great inte-
rest ; and lastly, a young Indian, with a quiet
and dignified bearing, whose eyes sparkled
whenever they fell upon Paul, whose happiness
he seemed thoroughly to enjoy.

Paul was engaged in the narration of all his
adventures; and it may easily be conceived
with what interest the story was listened to by
his mother, brothers and sisters, and old Lorenz,
whom our readers have already recognised in
Mr Wilson’s guests.
PAUL ARNOLD. 107

Hualpa suddenly interrupted the tale by
beckoning Paul to the window at which he was
standing. Paul had searcely cast a glance into
the street below when he uttered a loud excla-
mation of surprise.

“There they go!” he cried; “Rivero and
Don Ugarto fastened by the same chain. What
a lamentable sight !”

The others hastened to the window, and
going out on the balcony, looked down with the
greatest curiosity at the number of convicts,
chained two and two, who were being driven
along to work upon the roads.

“Point them out to me, Paul,” said Mrs
Arnold in a whisper ; “which are they?”

“Those two in the middle,” replied her son.
“There; they are looking up at us now, and
shaking their fists; but don’t be frightened at
them; they cannot hurt us now. They are
sentenced to imprisonment with hard labour for
life.”

“Oh, Iam not frightened at them,” said his
mother; “I pity them, although they have
been so wicked. What a change, after a life of
riches and plenty !”

“No pity for them,” said Hualpa, with a
dark frown, and a look in which not a trace of
sympathy was visible. ‘“ They are only suffer-
ing what they deserve. They have made their
own chains.”

“But, my son, don’t you pity their dreadful
108 | PAUL ARNOLD.

fate?” inquired Mrs Arnold, shuddering at the
pitiless severity of the Indian.

“J forgive them all the evil they have done
to me,” replied Paul quietly. “But I must say,
like Hualpa, that they have deserved their fate.”

“Certainly, they have, both of them,” said Mr
Wilson. “If they had only been half as faith-
ful and honest as our friend Paul—if, at any-
rate, they had never tried to take his life, but
had openly confessed their misdeeds, and shewn
some sorrow for all the injury they had done—
I should simply have dismissed them from my
service, and never have thought of punishing
them. But to heap one crime on the other, and
then to murder, in order to carry on their
system of robbery and fraud more easily, that
was too much. They have prepared the rod for
their own backs, and it is true of them as our
old friend Lorenz says: ‘Every man is the
architect of his own fortune.’ Look at Paul—
he has just reaped what he has sown. His
wages have been according to his work, and he
has as richly deserved his reward as those
fellows have deserved their punishment.—Go
on with your story, Paul. When we were inter-
rupted by their passing, you were describing
your rescue by Hualpa, and I see by your good
mother’s face that she is anxious to hear the
Test.”

“Yes, indeed, my son,” said Mrs Arnold,
returning to her chair. “You haven’t told us’
PAUL ARNOLD. 109

how it was that your friend saved you just at
the right time.”

“That is very easily told,’ answered Paul,
resuming his seat. “It was really a wonderful
and unlooked-for rescue, for I had begun to fear
that I should never see the light of day again.
It was all owing to Hualpa and Huari, who had -
becomé attached to me because I pitied the
hard fate of the Indians in the mine, and tried
to help them and improve their wretched
condition.

“ Hualpa,” continued Paul, “knew the two
men who managed Mr Wilson’s business in
Pasco, and guessed that I should find it very
difficult to get on with them, so he parted from
me near the town, after having guided me
through the Puna, and went in search of his
father, who might be able to protect me; but
he was, unfortunately, sick ; and Hualpa was at
a loss to know what to do, as he could not be
seen near me without exciting suspicion. At
last he determined to hasten to Lima to seck
Mr Wilson; and after informing him of all the
frauds which Rivero and Ugarto were known to
practise, told him that he had sent me into a
den of lions. It was well for me that Mr Wilson
believed him, and took measures to accompany
Hualpa to Pasco without delay. They arrived
on the very evening which was fixed for my
destruction, and Mr Wilson instantly asked Don

‘ Ugarto where I was. As was to be expected,
110 PAUL ARNOLD,

Ugarto, without any hesitation, denied all know-
ledge of me; but Hualpa wouldn’t be put off
with his lies.

“¢You have murdered him,’ he cried, ‘ but
his blood will be on your head!’

“ Filled with the greatest anxiety about my
fate, he hurried off to the mine to make inquiries
there. But the Indians, his countrymen, knew
nothing about me; and the cunning scheme of
Rivero to get rid of me at once and for ever
would, without doubt, have perfectly succeeded,
if old Huari had not watched over me. Warned
by my servant Sancho, that there was something
wrong, Huari had made up his mind not to lose
sight of me for an instant. He hid himself in
the neighbourhood of the mine till I left it, and
was a concealed spectator of the violence which
my enemies exercised against me. As, however,
he was too weak to rescue me from their hands
without assistance, he determined to wait till
all was quiet, and then rescue me, for he knew
every inch of the old mine, having worked there
himself before it was closed.

“He waited patiently on the look-out till the
night was pretty far advanced, and then, feeling .
secure from any disturbance, was about to start,
when he suddenly observed Hualpa, who, as I
just now said, had been to the mine to inquire
about me. Fortunately for me, Hualpa was a
friend of his, and was delighted to find that
there was a chance of rescuing me if still alive,
PAUL ARNOLD. 111

No sooner had they determined upon searching
for me than they observed a dark figure hastily
approach the ruined hut, within which it dis-
appeared,

“« Rivero !’ said Hualpa ; ‘he is giving himself
into our hands. Let us follow him.’

“They crept after him as silently as his own
shadow, ‘heard all the bitter mockery that he
addressed to me, and then suddenly overpowered
him, just as he was on the point of leaving me
to dark and hopeless despair. As a punishment
for his cruelty, Hualpa lowered him into the
hole that was to have been my grave, where he
spent a horrible night, expecting that he would
be left to die the same dreadful death to which
he had doomed me. The punishment was hard,
but just; but he was taken up again the next
morning ; and as Don Ugarto, who had been put
to complete shame by my reappearance, had
confessed the whole scheme, both he and his
accomplice were given up to justice. Mr Wilson
treated me with the most fatherly kindness,
appointed me manager of the mine and head of
the business, and has now made me the happiest
man in the world by sending for you, my dear
mother, to come here and live with me.—Oh,
Mr Wilson,” exclaimed Paul, starting to his feet
and grasping the worthy man by the hand, who
looked at him with a happy smile, “you have
really behaved to me and my family like a
father.”
112 PAUL ARNOLD,

“How could I do anything else, you foolish
boy?” replied Mr Wilson cordially. “I have
quite as much reason for gratitude as you have,
if not far more—I can assure you, Mrs Arnold,”
said the banker, turning towards her—“I can
assure you; that since your son has had the
management of my business it has been wonder-
fully increased. Hualpa and Huari deserved
some reward for their services, and I made them
inspectors; and I am very happy to say that
not only has the produce of the mine doubled,
but there is so much order and contentment
among the workmen, that the Dolores mine
stands at the head of all the mines in Pasco,
and has become so famous that Iam quite envied
by the other proprietors. Your son is so modest
that he is surprised at his services being valued
and rewarded as they deserve; but let us hear
no more of that.—You have laid the foundation
of your own fortune, my good Paul,” continued
Mr Wilson; “and if there is to be any other
expression of gratitude, let us one and all thank
Him who reigns on high for the faithfulness,
honesty, and brotherly love you have always
manifested, and through whose blessing it is
that we have all been brought safely and happily
together this day.”






ANNIE AND JULIA;

oR,

THE FAIRIES’ TWO VISITORS.

A uirTLe girl, whose name was Annie, was
never weary of talking about the beautiful
fairies, and the splendour of the brilliant halls
in which she believed she had seen them; nor
did she forget their words, and the advice
which they had given her, for she was a good
and gentle, as well as thoughtful child) Though
she had always been fond of flowers, she now
became doubly so, seeming to read a lesson in
each fragrant leaf and bud, while those who
knew her thought she was herself as bright a

blossom as any that surrounded her.
H
114 ANNIE AND JULIA; OR,

Amongst her playmates was one named
Julia, who, I'am sorry to say, did not resemble
her in any respect. While Annie’s loving,
unselfish temper, and sweet and gentle man-
ners, made her welcome and beloved wherever
she came, Julia was either absolutely disliked,
or, at best, uncared for by her companions;
indeed, some of them refused to play with her,
saying she always spoiled. the pleasure of all
that were with her; but Annie bore so sweetly
and patiently with her ill-humour, was so ready
to yield to all her wishes, and so kindly endea-
voured to hide her faults from others, that even
Julia, who seldom cared for any one but herself,
could not help loving her, and would sometimes
wish that she were as much beloved as little
Annie; but, like many other foolish children,
she did not see that the sole cause of all this
love was the goodness and gentleness of her
little playmate, but imagined that it was a
fairy gift. At last, she entreated Annie to
procure for her also an interview with the
fairies.

It was in vain for Annie to represent to her
that she knew not where to find them; that
they had, at the first, been unsought by her;
and that she should probably not succeed in
finding them, even were she to attempt to do so.

Julia only grew angry, and at last put herself
in such a passion, that, frightened at her vehe-
mence, Annie yielded so far as to promise to
THE FAIRIES’ TWO VISITORS. 115

accompany her to the mound where she had
seen the fairies, and where, if they both fell
asleep, perhaps a similar favour might be
granted them.

It was a beautiful day in the height of sum-
mer; the sun darted his fierce rays on the heads
of the little girls, who were soon glad to take
shelter under a wide-spreading beech-tree.

Little Annie amused herself with watching
the checkered light and shade which played
on the turf, as the sunbeams found their way
through the thick leaves. Then she saw a
number of little ants, who were busily running
to and from their nests. As she watched how
some contrived to drag a load greater than
their own size, and how each assisted the other,
and marked the order and regularity that per-
vaded all their arrangements, her heart was
filled with wonder and admiration, and she felt
an increased love and gratitude towards the
Almighty Power who has so marvellously
ordered all things, and provided for the wants
of even the smallest of His creatures.

Turning round, she beheld Julia busily
engaged in crushing all the hapless ants that
came within her reach, while a number of dead
flies shewed that her enmity was not confined
to one class of insects. Annie’s earnest
remonstrances had no other effect than that
of increasing her ill-temper, which, as they
continued their walk, she shewed by a sullen
116 ANNIE AND JULIA; OR,

silence, and by trampling on every flower that
grew in her path. At last the two little girls
reached the fairy mound, and as they were
tired with their walk, they both soon fell fast
asleep.

Little Annie was presently roused by a strain
of music so soft and sweet, that she thought
it the most beautiful she had ever heard, and
starting up, she found herself in the same hall
which she had seen on her former visit. She
was surrounded, too, by fairies, but among them
she could recognise but few of her former
friends; in fact, most of the flowers that had
there been blooming were unable to bear the
heat of summer, and had retired to some cool
and shady retreat till another spring should
come. While she was gazing around, and vainly
trying to discover some familiar face, one of the
fairies advanced to her, and said: “ Little girl,
when last you were here, our queen, fairest and
loveliest of us all, was buried in slumber; but
if you now desire to see her, follow me. First,
however, let me point out to you some of my
companions who now surround you. Look at
the gracefully drooping form by your side—no
bright colours, no gaudy dress are hers, and
yet how few are more beloved and prized!
Distrustful of her own powers, she clings for
support to those near her; and go unpre-
tending is she, that her presence is often
unsuspected till the surpassing sweetness of
THE FAIRIES TWO VISITORS. 117

her perfume betrays her influence on our
pleasure.

‘The fair wild Honeysuckle flower
Seemeth of her to speak,
Who clings to home, her sheltering bower,
With loving heart and meek.
Careless for self, but full of care
That home be ever sweet and fair.’

By the side of this true English maiden, behold
a fair foreigner, the Heliotrope, ever turning her
steadfast gaze to the source of her beauty and
fragrance ; and, further still, an imperial-
looking flower, like her a native of another
clime, but long since domesticated even in the
cottage-homes of this. Beautiful Fuschia, how
“few flowers can compare with thy royal colours,
or the grace of thy form! and yet

‘ There are, of beauty rare,
In holy calm upgrowing,
Of minds whose richness might compare
E’en with thy deep tints glowing:
Yet all unconscious of the grace they wear.

Like flowers upon the spray—
All lowliness—not sadness :
Bright are their thoughts, and rich, not gay—
Grave in their very gladness :
Shedding calm summer light over life’s changeful day.’

“ But see, little girl, here are we arrived in
the presence of our queen;” and, as she spoke,
they stood before a throne that seemed com-
118 ANNIE AND JULIA; OR,

posed-of emeralds and diamonds, which sparkled
with a brilliancy and lustre that could not be
equalled by the crown of any earthly. queen.
Above the throne was a canopy of the same
precious materials, but so delicately carved and
‘wrought, that it seemed to tremble in the breeze ;
and the azure dome of the hall, also gleaming
with diamonds, was distinctly visible through its
interstices. But beautiful and gorgeous as this
throne was, the little girl’s attention was
instantly fixed on its occupant, who, as her
conductors had truly said, far surpassed all her
subjects in grace and beauty ; and whom, by her
robe of crimson, varying from the deepest shade
to the lightest pink, edged with the softest
green, as well as by her surpassing loveliness,
and the perfume that filled the air, she knew to
be the Spirit of the Rose. And whence came it
that her beauty so far surpassed that of her
companions? The question is best answered in
the words of the poet—

“Can love so written be
In any flower that blows ?
Well, therefore, may we see
That lovely is the Rose ;
Like to love’s holy fount, whence sweetness ever flows.”

The beautiful queen smiled graciously on her,
and said: “Once more, Annie, it is permitted
to you to visit us. More favoured than the
generality of mortals, you have been allowed to
THE FAIRIES TWO VISITORS. 119

penetrate the mystery of our hidden existence.
On yourself it will depend whether you will still,
through life, have occasional glimpses of that
existence—of the spirit-world—or whether it
will become to you, as to most, indeed a hidden
and secret thing. But I will now shew you one,
whose friendship, far more than even mine, you
must cultivate, if you wish to continue the
intercourse with us, which you have thus early
begun.”

Obedient to the gesture that accompanied
these words, Annie turned to where, close by
the throne, stood a majestic figure, whose robe
of dazzling white fell in graceful folds to her
feet. Taller than any of her companions, her
erect unassuming mien, and grave though
placid countenance, gave her at first a somewhat
severe look; but the awe which this inspired
was soon tempered by the exceeding sweetness
of her smile; and when Annie marked the
dignified yet beaming look of kindness which
she turned upon her, she felt that she was one,
to win whose love she would almost lay down
her life.

“My child,” said the queen, “you have seen
that from every flower you may learn an import-
ant lesson. Each is the type of some grace or
virtue; but what are all the virtues without
Faith and Purity? Or rather, what virtues can
exist in a vigorous and healthy state without
120 ANNIE AND JULIA; OR,

them? The type of these, the Lily, lifts her
calm and spotless brow to heaven, ever looking
up, her very meekness seems to speak of high
resolve.
‘ And if midst holiest words the Lily’s name
Doth written lie,
More earnest gaze the snow-white blossoms claim
From youthful eye.’
Take her for your companion, friend, and guide,
and you will not fail to add grace to grace, till,
like her, you can calmly abide the sun or storm:
the ensnaring pleasures, or the sufferings of this
world—
‘And meekly, steadfast, wait the heavenly hand
That seeks where lilies grow.’

But come, my child, our time grows short, and I
would fain, before we part, shew you some of
our pleasures and diversions. You must know
that we, though differing in many respects from
other fairies, are still, in some degree, subject
to the same laws, and acknowledge the govern-
ment of one king, elected by the general consent.
To-day is appointed for a grand hunting-match
for the king and his attendants, and they will
pass by immediately. Unlike, however, to the
hunters among men, their chase is unstained by
cruelty. They only rifle the flowers of their
sweetness—an innocent theft, which it is our
task to repair, and gladly do we yield to them
our choicest treasures.”
THE FAIRIES’ TWO VISITORS. 121

Even as she spoke, there was a faint sound,
as of horns in the distance, which gradually
approached, till at last a swarm of bees flew
gaily by, and settling on the flowers, began
their busy toil. Now darting their probosces
into the sweet store, now sending their trumpet-
call to point to their companions where they
might find the richest spoil, and now making
the air resound with their notes of triumph, they
flew hither and thither, first to one flower, then
to another, and all was bustle, activity, and
enjoyment. These “musical hounds of the Fairy
King” were followed by a number of brilliant
butterflies, on each of which rode a tiny form,
resplendent with gold and jewels. Among these
the king might easily be distinguished—not
alone by the circlet of gold that crowned his
brow, but also by his air of superior grace and
dignity. Had his dress been plainer than that
of his attendants, “the majesty of Oberon”
would still have been discernible. And now,
to welcome their king, the fairy bells rang out
a merry peal—fairy music filled the air; and
emulous of the brightness of the stars, the glow-
worms lit their lamps of coloured fire, and
produced a brilliant illumination in his honour.
Little Annie gazed with delight on the scene;
then, as the glittering pageant passed away,
she turned round, and was for the first time
conscious that Julia was by her side.
122 ANNIE AND JULIA; OR,

“Oh, Julia!” she exclaimed, “is it not
beautiful ?”

“What?” said Julia in a fretful tone; “Iam
sure I have seen nothing beautiful yet—only
some weeds and common flowers that one
can see every day—nothing worth looking
at.”

“But, Julia, look there at that magnificent
throne, how curiously it is wrought, and the
diamonds, too, how beautiful! and see, even
now, there is a shower of gold falling close
beside it.”

“Throne!” said Julia, “I see nothing but a
common rose-bush growing on some moss—oh !
and how wet it is; it is all covered with great
drops of dew. Throne—indeed! I think your
eyes must be bewitched ; and as for gold, I only
see a heap of withered leaves.”

“So it is ever,” said the soft voice of the
fairy queen. “The selfish and earthbound
spirit cannot penetrate beyond the surface. To
the cold hearts and measured intellects of mere
worldlings, we are but useless weeds; destitute
alike of imagination and of purity of heart,
they look with contemptuous indifference on
the intercourse which finer minds maintain with
us. Leave to them their boasted strength of
mind, and freedom from the delusions of fancy. -
They know not that the pleasures they resign
with such indifference would be cheaply pur-
chased by the sacrifice of almost all that the
THE FAIRIES TWO VISITORS. 123

world holds dear. But your companion is
impatient to be at home—farewell !”

And once again the same soft sweet music
was heard around, and echo responded to the
farewells of the fairies, till the sound grew
fainter and fainter, and at length the last note
died away in the distance, and all was hushed
into silence and repose.

The two little girls set out on their homeward
walk together; but with what different feelings !
Annie was musing on all she had seen and
heard, and her young heart was full almost to
overflowing of love and gratitude. “How
beautiful,” she thought, “is the world! and
how full of wonders! and how great is the
Goodness that has permitted me, a helpless
child, to see a portion of these wonders. Well,
indeed, may I say:

‘Thou who hast given me eyes to see
And love this sight so fair,

Give me a heart to find out Thee,
And read Thee everywhere.’ ”

And then she remembered that the fairies had
told her it was on account of her gentleness,
and meekness, and obedience, and truth, that
she had been allowed to see them; and she
thought how much she owed to the kind parents
and friends who had so early trained her in the
paths of piety and goodness. “Had they not
been so careful of me,” she thought, “I might
124 ANNIE AND JULIA; OR,

now be as unhappy as poor Julia, who cannot
see any of the beautiful things that give me
such delight. How grateful I ovght to be for
their kindness, and how anxiously should I study
to please them, and fulfil all their wishes !”

While these thoughts were passing through
her mind, Julia walked sullenly by her side,
angry with herself, with Annie, and with all
the world. Vexed and disappointed at not
seeing any of the beauties Annie had described,
she tried to perstiade herself they existed only
in the dreams of her little companion ; but still
she could not help a lingering suspicion entering
her mind, that it was in some way the conse-
quence of her own evil temper and feelings that
they had not been visible to her; and the con-
sciousness that she was to blame, made her still
more cross, till at last she burst into a vehement
accusation against Annie, of having purposely
deceived her, nor could all the assurances of
her companion convince her to the contrary.
Having at last exhausted all the angry words
and reproaches that her passion led her to utter,
she walked on in sullen silence, but took every
opportunity of annoying her companion, and
rendering the walk to her as disagreeable as
possible.

At last they reached a little stream, which
they had to cross by a narrow wooden bridge.
Julia had just reached the other side, when,
on a brier that overhung the stream, she per-
THE FAIRIES’ TWO VISITORS. 125

ceived a beautiful butterfly, and eagerly put
out her hand to seize it.

“Oh, spare the pretty butterfly!” cried
Annie, laying her hand upon her arm. But
Julia shook off her hold; and the moment’s
delay saved the insect, which now flew away
Filled with rage and anger, she turned to
Annie, who was still standing on the plank,
and exclaiming: “Take that for your med-
dling!” struck her with all her force. Totally
unprepared for the blow, poor Annie lost her
balance; there was a splash—a faint cry—and
the waters closed over her !

Horror-stricken at her own act, Julia re-
mained for an instant as if rooted to the spot,
and then rushed precipitately away to hide
herself in the thickest part of the wood.

For some time she ran without looking where
she was going; and at last, faint and exhausted
with terror and fatigue, she flung herself on the
ground, and sobbed aloud. She had not lain
there long before she heard a voice say: “ Ha,
ha! go this is the little girl who wished to
see us, and who was not afraid to come into our
presence after having destroyed many of the
fairest of our kind!”

“Nay,” said another voice ; “can you wonder
at her destroying ws, when she did not spare
those whom she knew had life, when even the
industrious ant and the harmless fly fell victims
to her fury ?”
126 ANNIE AND JULIA; OR,

“Nay more, sisters,” said a third voice, “our
king himself but narrowly escaped being crushed
to death, to satisfy her caprice, as he rode on his
favourite butterfly. But even this is nothing ;
has she not just now attempted to murder her
best friend—the only one of her companions who
still retained any regard for her, who had never
injured her, but had always tried to promote
her happiness? Say, sisters, what shall we do
to her?”

“Pinch her!” said oné. “ Beat her!” cried
another. “(all the bees, and the wasps, and the
other insects, to revenge the harm she has so
often done them!” exclaimed a third. “Send
for our guards—the thistle, the bramble, and
the nettle!” shouted they all together. “She
has doubted our existence, now we will make
her feel our power ;” and they immediately
began to carry their threats into execution,
and pinched, and beat, and scratched, and
stung her, till she was nearly mad with pain
and fright, And in this situation we will
leave her, and return to little Annie.

When she felt herself falling into the stream,
she tried at first to cry aloud for help, but the
water soon choked her utterance, and she sank
to the bottom, thinking, with intense agony, of
the grief her loss would occasion her parents.
At that instant, however, and even before she
had time to breathe a prayer that she might
yet be spared to them, she felt herself borne
THE FAIRIES’ TWO VISITORS. 127

up, as if by unseen hands, and a voice whis-
pered: “Fear not!” and the next instant her
hands came in contact with something on
the surface of the water, which she grasped
convulsively. It was a water-lily. Too feeble
to support her weight, it gave way with the
effort; but in the moment something bright
and dazzling caught Annie’s eye, and, looking
up, she saw the beautiful butterfly fluttering
above her, and then settling on a bough that
almost touched the water. Exerting all her
remaining strength, Annie grasped the bough,
and by its help drew herself to the shore. As
she lay, faint and exhausted, on the bank, fairy
hands smoothed her tangled hair, and dried
her dripping garments, fairy voices sang her
lullaby, and soothed her into slumber, from
which she awoke refreshed and able to retum
home. Julia also at length reached home; and
we will hope that the events of the day were
not wholly without effect upon her, but that she
endeavoured, from time to time, to follow the
example of her little companion; but of this I
cannot speak positively, nor can I say whether
Annie, as she grew up, still maintained her
intercourse with the fairies. These are points
that must be left to the imagination of my
readers; and I would only, at parting, beg to
assure them, that if, like Julia, they give way
to ill-humour and selfishness, they need never
expect to be visited by the fairies, or any good
128 ANNIE AND JULIA.

spirits; but if, like Annie, they are gentle,
obedient, and truthful, though they may not be
able to see the beautiful forms of the Summer
Fairies, they may be sure that, summer or
winter, waking or sleeping, at all times and
seasons, good spirits will be ever watching over
them.

THE END.

Edinburgh :
Printed by W. & R. Chambers.