Citation
Baron Munchausen

Material Information

Title:
Baron Munchausen
Uniform Title:
Baron Munchausen's narrative of his marvellous travels
Added title page title:
Adventures of Baron Munchausen
Creator:
Thomson, Peter G ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Cincinnati
Publisher:
P.G. Thomson,
P.G. Thomson
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1882
Language:
English
Physical Description:
18 p. : col. ill. ; 27 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre:
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Ohio -- Cincinnati

Notes

General Note:
Caption title: The Adventures of Baron Munchausen.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALK9694 ( NOTIS )
10263993 ( OCLC )
027415301 ( AlephBibNum )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

im. M



.7')



.. .... 4
r























If
4-:
ac
~~:: .,? ,:,.








6e.





. ..". ;' .. .
-':: '

















C ' .. :: ;i



. . .. .
'S
"-i .. . . " : i,.: ,.. :2 -















-.- ."-. _.".__ _,..
'.i ..: *' -:




















NO W -
'1





_S..... ::a.A
A' J' R3ThPSQ



















Arir
-. : "' " . '.:
..Q. .:

., I .., .. ,. ,. ,. :...:,. ..;. -., .. .. ... ,..,-

















.: .,:. : ",: ... ..,'" ,': ..... ..





THE ADV aI adie

OF

mAt@IN IMECIN@ i AG ean:

QoMe years before my beard an-
ho

in other words, when I was. neither

nounced approaching manhood, or,

man nor boy, I expressed in repeated
conversations a strong desire of seeing
the world, from which I was discour-
aged by my parents. A cousin or my
mother’s took a fancy to me, and _ his
eloquence had more effect than mine,
for my father consented to my accom-
panying him.

I set off on a journey to Russia, in
the midst of winter. I went on horse-
back, as the most convenient manner

of traveling. I was but lightly clothed,

Se)

and of this I felt the inconvenience the

more | advanced north-east. I went

on: night and darkness overtook me.

No villaze was to be seen. ‘The coun-
.



try was covered with snow, and I was
unacquainted with the road. Pired, 1
alighted and fastened my horse to
something, like a poimted stump of a
tree, which appeared above the snow.
For the sake of safety, [ placed my
pistols under my arm, and lay down
on the snow, where | slept so soundly
that I did not open my eyes until full
daylight. It is not easy to concefve
my astonishment to find myself in the
midst of a village, lying in a church-
yard; nor was my horse to be seen,
but I heard him soon after neigh some-
where above me. On looking upwards
I beheld him hanging by his bridle to
the weather-cock of the steeple. Mat-
ters were now very plain to me: the

village. had been covered with snow

The Baldwin Library
University
RMB ve
Florida







oO

overnight; a sudden change of weather |
| that,—but I own that this hare puz-

had taken place; I had sunk down to

the churchyard while asleep, gently, and |

in the same proportion as the snow had
melted away; and what in the dark I
had taken to be a stump of a little tree
appearing above the snow, to which I
had tied my horse, proved to be the
cross or weather-cock of the steeple.
Without long consideration I took one
of my pistols, shot the bridle. in two,
brought down the horse, and proceeded
on my journey to St. Petersburg.

It was some time before I could ob-
tain a position in the army, as I had
intended, and for several months I was

time and money in the most gentleman-
like manner. The very recollection of
the amusements I had, gives me fresh
spirits, and creates a warm wish for a
repetition of them.

First of all, I will tell you of my
wonderful greyhound, and of a curious
incident which occurred when I had
her. For two days I had been pur-
suing a hare. My dog always started
her, but I could never hit her. I do

not believe in magic,—I have seen too





BARON MUNCHAUSEN.

many wonderful things in my day for

zled me. Day after day I followed
her, but my coursing was always
vain. At length I got near enough
to shoot her: she fell,—and what do
you think I discovered, gentlemen?
She had four feet on her back, as
well as those on the earth. When
the four ordinary ones were tired,
she turned over with the greatest
ease, and fled on with her four fresh
feet instead. I never saw a _ hare
like this one, and I should assuredly
never have taken it without Diana’s



| assistance.
perfectly at liberty to sport away my |

I remember one day reaching the
banks of a lake, on which I perceived
some dozens of wild ducks swim-
ming,—too much scattered about the
lake for me to hope to hit more than
one or two at the most by a single
discharge of my gun, and my last
charge was now in it. . 1 remembered
suddenly that I had in my bag a
piece of bacon fat. I fastened this
piece of fat to my dog’s leash, which
I divided into two parts. Then I

| squatted down amongst the reeds on







5 ‘ BARON MUNCHAUSEN.

the bank, threw my bait, and soon had
the pleasure of seeing a duck approach

The others

swam hastily after their companion, and

and eagerly swallow it.

the greasiness of the bacon was so great
that my bait passed right through the
first duck, and was swallowed up by the
second. The third followed, and then,
in their turn, all the others.
minutes my piece of bacon fat had gone
through all the ducks without leaving
its string, and they were threaded on it
like a row of pearls. I advanced joy-
fully to the brink again, and drew the

dicks in. I passed the string five or

six times around my body, and over my -

shoulders, and set off on my road home.

I had an adventure which greatly re-
sembled this wonderful catch’ of ducks
once with some pheasants. I had’ gone
out to try a new gun, and my bird-shot
was exhausted, when, ‘against all expec-
tation, I saw rise almost from beneath
my feet a covey of partridges. As soon
as | had marked the place where they

had. settled,. I rapidly loaded my gun,
and put into it, instead of shot, my ram- -
rod, one end of which projected from
the muzzle. I stole softly to where the |

In a few ©





partridges were, and fired at the very
moment they took flight, and in a few
seconds I found my ramrod a few rods
off, ornamented with seven birds, which
must have been greatly surprised to find
themselves suddenly on the spit.

But to return to my story: As I had
a long way to go, and the quantity and
weight of the ducks greatly inconven-
ienced me, I began to regret having
taken so many. But now a very sin-
gular circumstance caused me some un-
easiness. The ducks were still alive
and strong; they had recovered from

their fright at being thus captured, and

began to struggle to fly away. Their
efforts lifted me from the earth. Any
one else would, I am convinced, have
been greatly embarrassed. But I util-
ized the circumstance to my profit, and,
using the tails of my coat as oars, I
guided my course through the air by

| them till } reached my own dwelling.

Arrived above my home, I had to think
how I could descend safely. [ wrung

the neck of each duck in succession,

thus gradually descending till I gained

the top of my chimney, down which I

_easily glided, to the great amazement





>



7 BARON MUNCHAUSEN,

of my cook, whom I astonished by
knocking over his sauce-pans, and fall-
ing nearly on him in a shower of ducks!
Happily for me, his fire was not yet
lighted. at .
I was not always successful, as I
have said. During the war with Tur-
key, I had, at last, the misfortune to be
overpowered by numbers, and be made
prisoner of war; and, what is worse,
but always usual among the Turks, to
In that state of
humiliation my daily task was not very

be sold for a slave.

hard or laborious, but rather singular
It was to drive the Sul-

tan’s bees every morning to their past-

and irksome.

ure-grounds, to attend them all the day
long, and at night to drive them back
to their hives.

One evening I missed a bee, and soon
observed that two bears had fallen upon
her to tear her to pieces for the honey
she carried. I had no weapon but the
silver hatchet which is the badge of
the Sultan’s gardeners and farmers. I
threw it at the robbers, with the inten-
tion to frighten them away and set the
poor bee at liberty; but, by an unlucky
turn of my arm, it flew upwards, and



continued rising until it reached the
moon. How was I to recover it? how
fetch it down again?

I recollected that Turkey-beans grow
very quickly, and run up to an aston-
ishing height. I planted one immedi-
ately; it grew, and actually fastened
itself on one of the moon’s horns. I
had no more to do now, but to climb
up by it into the moon, where J safely
arrived, and had a troublesome piece
of business before I could find my sil-
ver hatchet, in a place where every
thing has the brightness of silver; in
fact, I was detained there some time.
At last, however, I found it in a heap
of chaff and chopped straw.

I now thought of returning; but,
the heat of the sun had dried

up my bean; it was totally useless for

alas !

my descent; so I fell to work and
twisted a rope of that chopped straw
as long and as well as I could make it.
This I fastened to one of the moon’s
horns and slid down to the end of it.
Here I held myself fast with my left
hand, and with the hatchet in my right

I cut the long, now useless, end of the

upper part, which, when tied to the



BARON MUNCHAUSEN. &

lower end, brought me a good deal | He finished by drawing the whole length

lower. This repeated splicing and ty-

ing of the rope did not improve its ‘|

quality or bring me down to the Sul-
tan’s farm.
I was four or five miles from the

I fell

to the ground with such amazing’ vi0-

earth at least when it broke.

lence that I found myself stunned, and
in a hole nine fathoms deep at least,
made by the weight of my body fall-
ing from so great a height. I recov-
ered, but knew not how to get out
again; however, I dug slopes or steps
with my finger-nails and easily accom-
plished it.

On returning to the land I had left,
I resumed my duty as bee-keeper, hav-
ing explained my absence, to the in-
finite amusement of the Sultan; and,
taught by my recent experience, I found
a better method of defending my bees
and their hives from the attacks of
the bears. I rubbed the shaft of a
cart with honey, and I placed myself
in ambuscade near it during the night.
An enormous bear, attracted by the
scent of the honey, arrived, and began

greedily licking the end of the pole.

ic regained my liberty.

|



gradually, by licking, on and on, into
his mouth, down his throat and stom-
ach, and thus completely through him.
When he was thus: spitted, I fixed in
the hole at the end of the shaft a
huge peg, thus cutting off the retreat
of the glutton, and I left him till the
next day. The Sultan, who chanced to
walk that way early, nearly died with
laughter when he saw the trick I had
played on the bear.

Peace was, soon after this, concluded
between Turkey and Russia, and prison-
ers were exchanged, and I consequently
All the earth was
frozen over, and as snow had _ fallen
first, and since been covered by a layer
of ice, one could only move about on
At length,
of a slight thaw, I set out on my jour-

skates. taking advantage

ney. Never can I forget the difficulties
The fam-

ished wolves came out in packs, and

and dangers of that j journey.

late one evening, the moon being high
up in the sky, we were crossing a wide
plain bordered by a thick forest, when
we heard the howlings of a pack pur-

suing oo



sincamcamatatroiei
ie ee

Aina

‘Sit milla cpeageae
as









41 BARON MUNCHAUSEN.

Happily, the post-chaise in which I
traveled was built strongly of wood at
the back and sides.

window at the back of the carriage,

There was a small

through which I could watch the ad-
vancing foes. The horses flew at whirl-
wind speed, but the steady gallop of
the wolves gained on us nevertheless.
At length they came within range. I
fired through the window, and: my shot
killed one immediately. others gathered round the body to de-
vour it at once; the others pursued us
still.

possible, and I did so much execution

T had to load and fire as fast as

that we approached a town before they
had reached us. I think, on a moderate
calculation, a hundred wolves fell to my
The inhabitants of the town re-

turned me public thanks for the benefit

rifle.

I had thus conferred on them, as the
wolves had been in the habit of eating
two or three of their children da‘ly for
some time.

I determined, however, henceforth to
keep in the high road, and not allow
my postillion to take any short cuts.
We pursued our journey the next day,
and towards evening found we had to

other.

g0 through a lane so narrow that two

carriages could not possibly pass each

In order to prevent accidents I
ordered the postillion to give a signal
He blew with all his

might, but his endeavors were in vain ;

with his horn.

he could not make the horn sound,
which was unaccountable and _ rather
unfortunate, for, soon after, we found
ourselves in the presence of another
coach. There was no proceeding ; how-
ever, I got out of my carriage, and, be-
ing pretty strong, placed it, wheels and
all, upon my head and shoulders. I
then jumped over a hedge about nine
nine feet high (which, considering the
weight of the coach, was rather difficult)
into a field, and came out again by an-
other jump into the road beyond the
other carriage.

I then went back for the horses, and
placing one upon my head, and the
other under my left arm, by the same
means brought them to my coach, put
them to, and proceeded to an inn at the

I should have told

you, that the horse under my arm was

end of our stage.

very spirited, and not above four years

old.

In making my second spring over



BARON MUNCHAUSEN. 2 12

the hedge, he expressed great dislike to
that violent kind of action by kicking
and snorting; however, I contined his
hind legs by putting them into my coat-
pocket. After we arrived at the inn
my postillion and I refreshed ourselves.
He hung his horn on a peg, near the
kitchen fire; I sat on the other side.
Suddenly we heard a “Tereng! te-
reng! teng! teng!’ We looked round,
and now found the reason why the pos-
tillion had not been able to sound his
horn: his tunes were frozen up in the

horn, and came out now by thawing.

g

Shortly after these events I visited
England, and, after, a short stay, em-
barked in an English man-of-war for
North America.

ing happened till we arrived within

Nothing worth relat-

three hundred leagues of the river St.
Lawrence, when the ship struck with

amazing force against (as we supposed)

a rock; however, upon heaving the lead,
we could find no bottom, even with three
hundred fathoms. What made this cir-





cumstance the more wonderful, and in- |

deed beyond all comprehension, was that
the violence of the shock was such that
we lost our rudder, broke our bowsprit in

the middle, and split all our masts from
top to bottom, two of which went by the
board.
furling the main-sheet, was flung at
least three leagues from the ship; but
he fortunately saved his life by laying
hold of the tail of a large sea-gull, who
brought him back to the very spot from
whence he was thrown.

Whilst we were all in a state of aston-

ishment at the unaccountable confusion

in which we were involved, the whole

was suddenly explained by the appear-
ance of a large whale which had been
basking, asleep, within sixteen feet of
the surface of the water. This animal
was so much displeased with the disturb-
ance which our ship had given him—for
in our passage we had with our rudder
scratched his nose—that he beat in all
the gallery and part of the quarter-deck
with his tail, and almost at the same in-
stant took the main-sheet anchor (which
was suspended, as it usually is, from the
head) between his teeth, and ran away
with the ship at least sixty leagues, at
the rate of twelve leagues an _ hour,
when fortunately the cable broke, and
we lost both the whale and the anchor.







BARON MUNCHAUSEN. 14

_ However, upon our return to Europe
some months after, we found the same
whale,
spot, floating dead upon the water. It
measured above half a mile in length.
With difficulty

much we cut

the anchor and about forty fathoms of

the cable concealed in the left side of

his mouth, just under his tongue. Per-

haps this was the cause of his death, —

as that side of his tongue was much
swelled, with a great degree of inflam-
mation. We reached England without
any further mishaps. ;

A. few vears later I traveled down the
Red Sea to Madras, and, at the head of
a few Sepoys, pursued the flying army
of Tippoo to the gates of Seringapatam.
I challenged him to mortal combat, and,
mounted on my steed, rode up to the
walls of the fortress amidst a storm of
As fast as the

bombs and eannon-balls came upon me

‘shells and cannon-balls.

I caught them in my hands like so many
pebbles, and, throwing them against the
fortress, demolished the strongest ram-

parts of the place. It was of the high-

est importance that we should know what |

a few leagues from the same -.

. that it was a rash proceeding.



was taking place inside the town, and
one day, as I was standing by one of
the largest field-guns, an idea suddenly
occurred to me, which I carried out at

_ once,
off his oe

head, where, to our great joy, we found: sprang on. the bullet, intending to let it

fired I

At the;moment the gunner

bear me inside the fortress; but when I

was half way there. it occurred to me
‘low,

I thought, “shall L get back? Once in

- the place, what will happen to me? Tf

Tam taken. for a

a spy L’shall suffer dis-

gracefully; -if T am made prisoner, my

-entrance into the fort will be of no. use to

my general.” As these thoughts passed.
through my mind I perceived a bullet,
directed from the fortress against our
camp, passing a few feet from me. I
leaped on it at once, and returned: to
our army; without, it is true, having
accomplished my project, bui at least
safe and sound. : |
Tippoo, fearing that all’ would be lost,
came forth upon his elephant to fight
me. I saluted him. and insisted that he
should fire first; on, which he instantly
discharged his- carbine, the ball from
which, hitting my horse’s ear, made him







BARON MUNCHAUSEN. 16

In
return I discharged my pistol at 'Tippoo,
and shot off his turban.

fit of despair, and rushed against my

plunge with rage and indignation.
He rose, in a

steed and myself. I could not withstand
the rage and impulse of that moment,
and, with one blow of my sword, sepa-
rated his head from his. body.

turned overland from India to Europe

Ltes

with admirable velocity, so that the ac-
count of Tippoo’s defeat by me did not
arrive by the ordinary passage, and the
glory has been unjustly ascribed to an-
other. C

Hilario Frosticos, my true friend and
faithful partisan, did his best to increase
my popularity with the people. He re-
lated many of my adventures ‘to them,
with which they were greatly delighted.
One day, after they had given utterance
to a perfeet burst of applause, Hilario
exclaimed: “The Baron once, when he
was in England, performed some extraor-
dinary feats of strength, which I shall

now relate to you. He wished, one day,

to leap on his wonderful horse over a

very wide and deep pond. I represented
.to him that it was not possible to make
this leap; but when he has made up his

|





horses and ourselves.

mind it is impossible to prevail on him
He

persisted in his resolution, and made the

to change it, as you all well know.

Half way over he perceived that
He

turned his horse suddenly in the air,

leap.
it was wider than he anticipated.

and alighted on the bank from whence
he had leaped!

“Whilst I gazed in amazement, he
rode a little further back, to give him-
self more room for the leap, tried it
again, and fell into the pond up to his
neck! I thought he and his steed were
lost, for the pool was evidently very
deep, when, to my astonishment, he tock
hold of his queue of hair and actually
lifted himself out of the pool, with his
horse under him, drawing. the creature
up with him by the mere pressure of his

{7

knees This anecdote made a great
impression on his hearers. .
Thavé neglected to tell you about one
of my servants who was an extraordina-
rily strong man, so will tell you how I
happened to find him. During my. mis-
sion to Egypt we were on a flat plain
near. Cairo, when a furious whirlwind
arose, which threatened to upset our

To the left of







BARON MUNCHAUSEN. i8

the road there was a row of seven wind-
mills, the sails of which turned round
more swiftly than the swiftest wheel of
a good spinner. At no great distance
stood a person as fat as Sir John Fal-
staff, who held his forefinger pressed
against his right nostril. As soon as
he perceived our distress—for our hats
were blown off and our horses stagger-
ing, two riders having been swept off
them—he turned towards us, took off
his hat, and bowed respectfully.

The wind instantly fell as if by en-
chantment, and the mills stood still.
Astonished at this circumstanée, I cried
to the man,—“Hi! my funry fellow!
‘Are you Old Nick?” “Pardon the in-
convenience I have put your honor to,”
he said. “1 was blowing a little for my
master the miller, and really, for fear of
making the arms of the mill revolve too



fast, I had stopped one nostril.” “Upon
my word,” said | to myself, “this is a
useful man. He would be of great use
to me when I return home, and my
breath fails in relating the wonderful

We

The blower quit-

adventures | meet in my travels.”
soon made a bargain.
ted his mills, and remained with me ever
afterwards.

Having been away from home so many
years, I began to tire of adventure, and

to long for my old home. I soon after,

therefore, paid a visit to my friends, and
related these adventures. Amazement
stood in every countenance; their con-
gratulations on my returning in safety
were repeated with an unaffected degree
of pleasure, and we passed the evening
pleasantly, every person present paying
the highest compliments to my COURAGE

and VERACITY.









Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20100515_AAAANP' PACKAGE 'UF00049818_00001' INGEST_TIME '2010-05-15T12:06:21-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:14:17-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300505; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-10T05:49:16-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '19195' DFID 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVGT' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.pro'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 1e8354822bbca4990733cb3f9c6b9238
'SHA-1' ccee338f48fe38793ab6bbe1cd4b0f780a761f76
EVENT '2012-06-20T10:06:29-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'162217' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVGU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
fddf1812d96d571f6338fd92a397b3ba
262090d2d58b432421316dca0e84c78abebdcfa3
'2012-06-20T10:06:35-04:00'
describe
'7744552' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVGV' 'sip-files00004.tif'
9f694649f3710a228912df50755b707e
eb2bc006664e5750d72de66a62ce93fe4aa065ab
'2012-06-20T10:08:31-04:00'
describe
'37582' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVGW' 'sip-filesUF00049818_00001.xml'
15ea8a7fb363356d97124cadf3e38836
9741e94ab57d95d329fcc8a33e5459ca05fbe182
'2012-06-20T10:06:41-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'2013-12-10T05:46:43-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'455579' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVGZ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
600015b29f5da94821a5e23b576df155
b4b9358c98baedcc174d195d505ab81cdba2a0de
'2012-06-20T10:08:12-04:00'
describe
'377324' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHA' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
7982bae5bd02693411f585e153afd6a5
4c6a46cc266362b9ab66d29f36b7cdc0a42cc728
'2012-06-20T10:06:27-04:00'
describe
'527163' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHB' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
a737d195e5e3deb79a7b97eba012104b
2cbc78cb52c67d189dbfff9529d1f72a8143044c
'2012-06-20T10:06:37-04:00'
describe
'463432' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHC' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
90975c7c830ab1761ae84ba5c7a4edec
2295f03bc76b2b1aa749cf0870abac1044deece7
'2012-06-20T10:06:33-04:00'
describe
'554502' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHD' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
d9e6e95597177a4c7d17bfb19ab95d4f
c5c954637cb6f882a49b3f6258e02193be899046
'2012-06-20T10:08:38-04:00'
describe
'466076' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHE' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
1c2eefffe059ac01a75f95d3082471c6
8a840533d1f918f74499d34c8ef89829b7411706
describe
'571845' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHF' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
effddad101bf2c19df4a4f3b4d144e6c
ff7eb9b381faf473bca852486b08ae5368537c3e
describe
'452624' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHG' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
19ed3e591da7134c9d1a36f216b98e2c
62a83d55b5e833025e7f2458637667b02bce65f9
'2012-06-20T10:06:28-04:00'
describe
'448800' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHH' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a01ee9e06d86d45f80a49f2c80cc5fd7
a76f4ef11302e52abf1ac61fcbed650d69a613f6
'2012-06-20T10:06:26-04:00'
describe
'575847' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHI' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
4659e989dba3a188a558d0f7e21bf733
bc919030629b7bd4279155a3d53cf045e186f8f8
'2012-06-20T10:07:37-04:00'
describe
'443153' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHJ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
300af3dcb448be9e2804f2eb39c14990
8559a24fdc68ac9edee44d2938d3240feae863c1
'2012-06-20T10:07:45-04:00'
describe
'453495' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHK' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
295f0b81adeae94a793f759cffc478d8
3f7f35c50128abdb30b84386bea65485f857314b
'2012-06-20T10:08:34-04:00'
describe
'464593' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHL' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
332a3a3c7a0d63caef16adcfa673d90c
ee20ad6508533176502243956d22fa1d19c0e139
'2012-06-20T10:08:36-04:00'
describe
'610250' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHM' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
65f5f51b1a0057cb6181f8ab86157264
f18b6047e40707cb22f18c4f7d9e3d9a842d02a1
'2012-06-20T10:08:37-04:00'
describe
'450774' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
01364bb4b443e46823560ce7bffadbf5
dc7b639ebe30e36e9eb0cefe75a596c21da41c4c
'2012-06-20T10:06:34-04:00'
describe
'595236' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHO' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
952f9d282b5ab0ed57f41817b22b851b
8a588b85662b6fed614fc6208f6ff273ec1d9981
'2012-06-20T10:08:56-04:00'
describe
'447303' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHP' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
3891250998d149d84c5033dc5bb3912a
91a5b2627773799803ce98a3c604d27c410de44b
'2012-06-20T10:07:40-04:00'
describe
'566722' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHQ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
1ea61d0d258f2e6fa5d8fc93eee9f018
4a8809609ef4ad6c71af3b193af95ec28726ce5f
describe
'375599' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHR' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f1c5c4ce1a557bd425553da8fb666d0e
af4c61ba2cbeb1d51dc884a3720d431f8dbc1eb6
'2012-06-20T10:06:56-04:00'
describe
'524717' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHS' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c4cb404c4fc370af1471f9bc0f373711
a6bba6ffb05f9f65b1db51e4a455ae793ed32dde
'2012-06-20T10:07:32-04:00'
describe
'1020875' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHT' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
c7582fe860c0b81f2dbb38f75bb7e8c4
d619194d8f97fa4f2d74e788f8930dcbc067c6c4
'2012-06-20T10:06:36-04:00'
describe
'1043933' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHU' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
af95f60971d6004e91768528b13399e7
77623def82e1fb18696d38e9ceb7396b52ff7c4e
'2012-06-20T10:06:31-04:00'
describe
'966037' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHV' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
11dda30ae6fbb93bf66642514c44ea7d
c5c9b85bca4acd92dad6a576e7884a7fb728dddf
'2012-06-20T10:07:10-04:00'
describe
'1024326' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHW' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
c31bdd3bfc7eef013806b48c440c156e
f121a4e2a4ccd310e9fa30185f5f0319b2548f7f
'2012-06-20T10:08:41-04:00'
describe
'992444' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHX' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
3301916a26809a95806e98da1f277d47
4f4e00ac2fc8c29cce1d8ea26c32898a87cacac0
'2012-06-20T10:07:02-04:00'
describe
'1019574' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHY' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
9afefa56edd48dbc89aaf52a2c60e755
55d4a0a880472983ce38668a7d40397611355277
'2012-06-20T10:08:24-04:00'
describe
'994214' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVHZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
44d2d72d1c5a2f896b303928a93d5100
b5ee7ecd617fe823967504ae99b85f8fc8187a05
'2012-06-20T10:08:32-04:00'
describe
'999295' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
11b840310e06dc0537af3b0ec0bae82b
62672cddb06359fa1ee5519465cb2c3f89108f7f
'2012-06-20T10:06:30-04:00'
describe
'933241' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIB' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
f60b3f5f89454c27e1fa0cbc6c4b0ce0
7233f36d5e9e60c3332ca095a085f3d4352d9cd7
'2012-06-20T10:07:43-04:00'
describe
'987614' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIC' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
eb227ea34eced226c6cf3f7bf42362ab
edbe96fe756b398d16d7462f73adb2d6b146f532
'2012-06-20T10:08:48-04:00'
describe
'947615' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVID' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
0d588739cf510a7295db4a7f5952043b
31e63695d54fbd4bb1cb53e25931e0b54f5e87b7
describe
'933309' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
7d4cd09054833b87b8547bc117430b44
f5e13a32df24d64e36b1467122adaeac02244c8e
'2012-06-20T10:06:38-04:00'
describe
'998858' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
4bebb811ee4bae97f71dae6abf6eb1a5
812868e1702f37ecf84ed2e803690fb458cdf08d
'2012-06-20T10:08:39-04:00'
describe
'971278' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIG' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
2242fbd1fc8d8770d0a15d104b2fa9f9
cdf40ca533b6c2badda89370e5023a9a5727af37
'2012-06-20T10:06:25-04:00'
describe
'957409' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
8fc622cb002d39ec7b8da49c4485096b
bc8d7014affb775840a81f16c0575835f676d3f1
'2012-06-20T10:08:33-04:00'
describe
'988325' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVII' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a9240d785139c5fcad690294de3a9f90
3156f53f8f07ce628992b951d8c91c43b5f0fe67
describe
'974230' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
16df27304fdc41fb251c307e89977566
ee7bc0ba5cdc64dc1bbbbc2c9aaacfd1ddfe05dc
'2012-06-20T10:07:17-04:00'
describe
'1001256' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ccedac1e20da2b72bd6a8e9153c1c29b
4f1021e689e980884fcd414dcb574401ecd37c27
'2012-06-20T10:08:28-04:00'
describe
'1062531' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f91366e3d9abcd5f2fcb170f0b31829c
a52f55fe13bb1fb7cc0141f6652f2e4365b1d928
describe
'25295112' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIM' 'sip-files00001.tif'
4d52318e08ffda65afd8db0e8cd96c91
1af88ac5a99520daef35862af708d122c37a059f
'2012-06-20T10:07:15-04:00'
describe
'8180488' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIN' 'sip-files00002.tif'
a0d8afd5532ba1a83fbb9cf9b991df04
167da97126d57055d0191d21da9ef172d4b389ab
'2012-06-20T10:08:35-04:00'
describe
'25066396' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIO' 'sip-files00003.tif'
37c8ce38133f987cf43a4a13f596cc99
2c6cca62bb37edabbeedb79382a0996e82e528d4
'2012-06-20T10:06:40-04:00'
describe
'24596028' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIP' 'sip-files00005.tif'
67e2e276c82681ea37faec145d2df78c
83b6d6ee429f58bf941971f6dd6cd5e3b036e337
'2012-06-20T10:08:50-04:00'
describe
'7955336' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIQ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
35b4abe45e1a6522cc968ba638bb4d71
4eb330a6a40e7d8a60a5ad672fc5d6cf3dbc9ac8
'2012-06-20T10:07:53-04:00'
describe
'24481632' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIR' 'sip-files00007.tif'
5e218195dc66fc3443b4121406c02726
829b61a3374b83d9c735575ae995b3648e26bba7
'2012-06-20T10:07:01-04:00'
describe
'7969464' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIS' 'sip-files00008.tif'
45abe4250dc8c2810aa97a2c0e38657f
c20984ef3166374a52af9467ce4f4fbd61ead95b
'2012-06-20T10:08:44-04:00'
describe
'8010040' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIT' 'sip-files00009.tif'
01b1fc6ce9c0dd30a51164e1a5704f2c
18001de666cbc99946c019b451af6e78c48a903e
'2012-06-20T10:07:54-04:00'
describe
'22411576' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIU' 'sip-files00010.tif'
50ea9e539efb79e8c3b0fe6e14a22005
dbd0419ffe2036f656b202528b5ee21e7dff35b9
'2012-06-20T10:08:21-04:00'
describe
'23712380' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b715edcfd342260c63235e085238f741
0c0b998bd8bbea009450b244be0394312287696a
'2012-06-20T10:06:43-04:00'
describe
'7596960' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIW' 'sip-files00012.tif'
d61e1b1e4cbba7306a1e2728e17060a3
56de3bab7384009c4edcbe52f180fe846b0b7ce0
'2012-06-20T10:06:47-04:00'
describe
'7482840' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIX' 'sip-files00013.tif'
0ca584bd366da69ae29de0903bac844d
41b2723d849d52fedcdd6d4459ad480a97eb53f5
'2012-06-20T10:08:40-04:00'
describe
'23986432' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIY' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e7e0135c5e32634352ca87b7da3cb8e9
7fdc0e09e58db7e1d3f91423ffedc0234956ace0
'2012-06-20T10:07:36-04:00'
describe
'7785488' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVIZ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
143ac9ffa05676fecda6b8e9f5fab5cb
37c8737efb6a0e8bd21dfc4b3d704b23294e8de7
'2012-06-20T10:08:05-04:00'
describe
'22990832' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJA' 'sip-files00016.tif'
acb44bf6b273f4acda560b322c0213e1
cdcadba74b2c9b8c3f2d6abfe65df0aad45580e8
'2012-06-20T10:08:17-04:00'
describe
'7921880' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJB' 'sip-files00017.tif'
696eb42e0a24bbc43736ad55efb5f997
abf9441764cbf55e59a1650c36d4993e6e8f490a
'2012-06-20T10:07:24-04:00'
describe
'23394012' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJC' 'sip-files00018.tif'
25a3f1d64ea9edcbfed530debafe5b5f
aadd0922b8b8fdc55d27fa417c22b912c8394751
'2012-06-20T10:07:21-04:00'
describe
'8023240' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJD' 'sip-files00019.tif'
0109bbe2895667265849832a235b9b70
a1393f8707676f265a9f5ea2db3b489e43ceda06
'2012-06-20T10:08:43-04:00'
describe
'25514616' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJE' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ac2fc8b400b66cea592ac62c184825dd
840d89f9a720ecb194a410825aae254321ea5fa6
'2012-06-20T10:07:06-04:00'
describe
'40140' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJF' 'sip-files00002.pro'
20060002166d62d5e680348e980a0c74
d88802fe0b99760f18489ee95fcff14db6f0b6e0
'2012-06-20T10:06:59-04:00'
describe
'1991' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJG' 'sip-files00003.pro'
27d50afd2a19dbcf54bddb63e872f412
f83415f15b670870a6d6f3cf097eb35d709df47e
'2012-06-20T10:08:54-04:00'
describe
'56270' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJH' 'sip-files00004.pro'
fccb406de89c806f26cc4a71e051056d
fd0a958dc7edd2cd11d81103badc96c6d9ca405e
describe
'6169' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJI' 'sip-files00005.pro'
99e5c4c13003e63089c9bd60ecf5713c
e9d81c88708fbf2695779c8c0bd49a10f7d1331f
'2012-06-20T10:07:55-04:00'
describe
'59810' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJJ' 'sip-files00006.pro'
b35131bb7e4f1d39075977ac8ba3d8df
e7be4f30f78e00b3a1a312576805d6abd5362c11
'2012-06-20T10:08:46-04:00'
describe
'5929' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJK' 'sip-files00007.pro'
98f5558df6eb4fa787fee8ff08835ce7
11ac0ab082a143e8eaac9b209b4d8a74bd5c22b3
'2012-06-20T10:08:06-04:00'
describe
'58440' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJL' 'sip-files00008.pro'
3175db604c5c3ef7062e716f03d340dc
ed38def526f59b22dffd36b6e64c0b16df5fe174
'2012-06-20T10:06:48-04:00'
describe
'57413' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJM' 'sip-files00009.pro'
1392be9706a0f7e54d8c42ac944a8310
d6e73aa9125c29a74e0322d16cadc8a173b8e768
'2012-06-20T10:06:44-04:00'
describe
'12575' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJN' 'sip-files00010.pro'
2e580df5b900fa9dd63fc3aeaf2e8abb
97aa3dff32152b75886d101198acb54b9b0b1d87
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJO' 'sip-files00011.pro'
ec9511ef1407b80105d8128c7466f538
87fdb25b4a82477349c77d436c94a8ef6f5aab28
describe
'58637' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJP' 'sip-files00012.pro'
f0f54ea16b8264dc460e5620faddab38
cd5ab26e7f7226376ea7ba8631ddc1cf23cef9b7
'2012-06-20T10:07:34-04:00'
describe
'60199' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJQ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
2bcb8ffe79174fe7353b17e70dac20ca
925923936a64c94811d30e5bf4ea5ca03f2b831c
describe
'20786' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ebedfed1491ad828af10b1ec6793e0e4
4bfe80a04e27e6f6223ff9ebb0bbe2027281f892
'2012-06-20T10:08:10-04:00'
describe
'59305' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJS' 'sip-files00015.pro'
08d9d2a9121bf0c8030ed7695bc07b4f
7fcaec91ef2941803eeda51ab9a47c8b3e748e73
'2012-06-20T10:08:27-04:00'
describe
'6484' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJT' 'sip-files00016.pro'
7e2a78bacf0eaa8a27de332ed16c3fde
34570e37d209070bf163637bba5210b89a735a3e
'2012-06-20T10:08:01-04:00'
describe
'59674' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
a14f0a9665eaa295877712a209dd439d
d777b1b7db66fd298fb2674f40009eb4d811ce00
'2012-06-20T10:08:13-04:00'
describe
'4770' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJV' 'sip-files00018.pro'
36723e52899a088cad40cfec567ed723
4e02be2fafe297306dfecb639820fe49f6e3f515
describe
'42554' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
9866e51ff7515b1d6d26e84f9884cbfd
13a0401d2023347e4f9faef17f6b03fd53f95d25
'2012-06-20T10:06:32-04:00'
describe
'46369' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
9e16ebf1dcd4920894d33eb359c9e630
7e179dba136acd1bf0f6c28255de5c4c8d751902
'2012-06-20T10:08:00-04:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJY' 'sip-files00001.txt'
459ff43e1d80b5e04206052e730d881d
0ad4e7d4fa21a744eed18ea84be208cc1369f5e6
describe
Invalid character
'1911' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVJZ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
0dddd112fa8b1430743a0100897bfbb3
c23f20f611b9f48bf576f66f94c35630baa9816d
'2012-06-20T10:06:52-04:00'
describe
'266' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKA' 'sip-files00003.txt'
3f2d7ecfe9f31487e571106c8090007d
a482f6a7eecaf5445f57422f652c53d2b6debe63
'2012-06-20T10:07:25-04:00'
describe
'2219' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKB' 'sip-files00004.txt'
6885061a83fcee0265700347610880da
c89b4f957c688fdb17c25d303fb1642b81ebea6c
'2012-06-20T10:06:46-04:00'
describe
'274' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKC' 'sip-files00005.txt'
61c8d36ee4665e31b9418b1ed68e5904
1ab55e4b980c007bb2bab12fe9dd432e371baecf
'2012-06-20T10:08:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2362' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKD' 'sip-files00006.txt'
6e1333b75b878e80bbeeb85c21c25df9
5024c0b9e0891b0ff33c1ae44c9d3424a5ffb8e5
'2012-06-20T10:08:03-04:00'
describe
'757' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKE' 'sip-files00007.txt'
1e05d8ee9a919742cda49cc0ed51416b
99f26996a54f1ea0e87936892cb3ff0185536fad
describe
'2333' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKF' 'sip-files00008.txt'
a28c65c535e2c93605c0b555758fd524
65cea16c8698e7f4a5a3581fcaf8fba284a57061
'2012-06-20T10:06:45-04:00'
describe
'2313' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKG' 'sip-files00009.txt'
3b576e18482a99f46c680b6e30a05651
4685c811ac5e29a8c423726782e6dc1f79ff9916
'2012-06-20T10:08:29-04:00'
describe
'2924' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKH' 'sip-files00010.txt'
4d34e0a9a02e35521ef6e563ce26554c
52f26118c5fe83e63edefe40fe2b2f28e1d038d4
'2012-06-20T10:08:14-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'288' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKI' 'sip-files00011.txt'
b4bd8e8d8c7567eaa199db0e8ee16225
8fa3f37375cfed3c80ab96142dcb4ea7b7dabf7a
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKJ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
8c8b7b3b7f945022f420481acc81de98
406b16477b0a52d5728d0ba165d1207051a81df4
'2012-06-20T10:08:22-04:00'
describe
'2400' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKK' 'sip-files00013.txt'
dc101b20753f1af69b09cd63f689da28
6d862b86e198d701ea8a2c9150b219f98c11525c
'2012-06-20T10:07:46-04:00'
describe
'2889' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKL' 'sip-files00014.txt'
db9b4fa35d2722dfb2e09ed9d318b1ea
5ac0af7b7063e765465beb70588e831f69459faa
describe
Invalid character
'2432' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKM' 'sip-files00015.txt'
e5d1003c04a8570b03dc279900b6e4e9
dea8cd5dda6c80494b1f8a19d776938600dff74a
describe
'339' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKN' 'sip-files00016.txt'
e10d0a686d2d8551af8d8ec47667236b
566c7f2444c09be8a1f9e8ebff3101b158b6a477
'2012-06-20T10:07:44-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2439' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKO' 'sip-files00017.txt'
b70aca43f9cc8c66b875511272b83a56
520dd079e627b8fe1b6ffe090f6950fc3456afa4
'2012-06-20T10:08:08-04:00'
describe
'316' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKP' 'sip-files00018.txt'
a92475b6569077588b0f78aa673fbd6a
638d4cbf7864424e27c267df656833dcb37cf8e2
describe
Invalid character
'1744' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKQ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
cb91368ab43083ddf44345726ca986e6
0885eff33de51e82347579877d7b1b3e1169a08b
'2012-06-20T10:08:09-04:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKR' 'sip-files00020.txt'
f60551033707a23eb0755feff7eec20b
8c376d0b6ad96c221cb3f3406bba5f9a0ce5d9d1
'2012-06-20T10:07:28-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'129550' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKS' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
e0749270cd72d0558db48233d069ed60
e51ea938cb8e66de8ac07f411516b45d0152e538
describe
'71325' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKT' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
b7893c978c1e870bec2f7886fbadb9d5
38dfada3fd9ad3737012c6ddbaf9d3292bde86b0
describe
'128640' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKU' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
13cdd5205c41c5ef082dede20c35dde4
ddd1e42de8824c0461ab543fbf984118148282ed
describe
'42306' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKV' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
c01c4244a31e090223357574a4f872f1
418f7bb6319e8d8212b73265f75a836f67686f83
'2012-06-20T10:08:53-04:00'
describe
'153863' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKW' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
5faac3b2970ea642379f8f2364c9b18b
77f92e38f6ddec3561f268ab5333995685fdfc7a
'2012-06-20T10:07:08-04:00'
describe
'49618' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKX' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
283deeb178d865b41c580c2f3973757d
f481ad94e80e6bb111745b8f7dd9d214705d8c5c
describe
'160256' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKY' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
fe907a2ad6b6750f81f2bd3d2c5159f0
ac1d5506696c67507cd99a72094e4b6af6f1bf52
'2012-06-20T10:07:11-04:00'
describe
'51972' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVKZ' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
09b5d9a6b7d5eb6b1a02eb8233f2843f
15b736650e3d79c92de61f37f5f9f75139be0df6
'2012-06-20T10:08:45-04:00'
describe
'158854' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLA' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
1565b406a6cd29ecf34caadde59730ff
2a58520dffe9ed0949cee2c937342bab02af4cdd
'2012-06-20T10:07:27-04:00'
describe
'51041' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLB' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
ad9bab9979a8f65b15ba1b20d376bd2c
dcda23ecbcc525f11fd1a7eb97f3f54c089897b5
describe
'158387' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLC' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
c281341c913b9fe994f888294ac23a67
ac20f3a59ae8a78d46f6598a8f902d1aaf59b7a5
'2012-06-20T10:07:56-04:00'
describe
'50530' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLD' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
b514eb3dd1f52cfd5bdc78a77a13dffe
cfb4a2f6b32fbccf246f5922a2d69f888fd415d9
describe
'163480' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
92c3b1c6bb1f5ed5905b421d3829847d
2aebc1eee7919e25e2247410e97838ab63d46815
describe
'51435' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
a5379ae922709f5348400907678efb9c
198738dfd0acacf7b537233cff04ea0133334e82
describe
'157415' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
0b0a38417c4d86b1a3ffdf099e5b3cf6
075b5d2ec3b37cddba317a60c5c41bf1a6f897ff
'2012-06-20T10:07:58-04:00'
describe
'51196' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLH' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
d723f108f14333464fdad028a438df2b
05c8f8303ba5225e35dbc16137accc71e098cb91
describe
'153868' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLI' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
3264189b80ac465cb4de18530c367ac4
e000bcf7b466fdb51024e481619d5bc77314653d
'2012-06-20T10:08:26-04:00'
describe
'50176' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
1c9d345ae93c14204ae88498601ccfbe
0d79b46e4d5aa2942f7f24b70b2a868128b77bd0
describe
'168405' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
33fc29a534a0b24d6a25e768b529db38
85f11023bbba3eb18dc6415f2906c599a06aff7e
'2012-06-20T10:07:49-04:00'
describe
'55311' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
933f551f27beb8d0892f47fe6a7708fd
d0224b818ecf6e07c1c6a7530357022c47d9288a
describe
'127107' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
a353f377e9fa96b32283e593785726fb
ba2cd76de362ab371832cf64472726de118c3c7c
describe
'41271' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
74c475dda6a49ed01cf1f799bde9973d
8d0919201551f46a3b3b70e515a129beb44e5c93
describe
'158049' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLO' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
b6d5f5824b69fe66c82eb379aa7322fb
8781eac92cc05b6994354e1f8ffc5a38fc5d3b2f
describe
'51033' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLP' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
00dc5c01152d92186d275bc31bfff955
a850a49ea6143e0048a543d67046c8f5dd5a43a5
'2012-06-20T10:07:57-04:00'
describe
'158303' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLQ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
dd4f42120d26e07ddb10476b17f67c49
896d5d5ac898d77f9d108501d8bbf07da182f66e
'2012-06-20T10:06:51-04:00'
describe
'51912' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLR' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
15b8f986aea6de8476ce1f41b5ebe6a2
e38bf7b8f630ca28f432c98a2cc2c83aa7c3eb78
describe
'174432' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c161f342d2a238d0d36eb16da82769a3
898092ff7a7817014094548fef30aae6af432c59
describe
'55178' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLT' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
ee2523f74603526bba416620961a4d92
479008751844f82c35a1bf8a7d4df256ecdef330
describe
'152984' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
76fc810fbb20f71369d2799b414951f7
bc3145193733a9e0506d6223114a55be6cc53817
'2012-06-20T10:08:11-04:00'
describe
'49197' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5a3c32cad5987af32b546222788551e0
05b604aaf4dd71878ea0df20ed2f0b04520b8557
describe
'169146' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
053a53fc65732595ae5bca1197b9fb00
e48c911d0ce8a081ac2f83b4469faa937b81ae25
'2012-06-20T10:08:47-04:00'
describe
'53414' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLX' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
40fff6db3f235852a2552ef98b4b2104
b3c27221d01d39bd434a537a4f893c64f8806890
'2012-06-20T10:07:50-04:00'
describe
'147953' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLY' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
00351145b42f14475d8f23ca13efdfcb
d9c449f4e958c2f7be3c579c12396bf45218f1f8
'2012-06-20T10:07:04-04:00'
describe
'49133' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVLZ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
7091f83a58ddec83d59c90a7d256dde4
dc48828e6f96119a0bd9ce739565a44677171dba
describe
'50767' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVMA' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
3ce66fda8cbe2571b4d648d1f0ae3c60
90077fd608bb2eceed8668aa832ce37d48f15331
'2012-06-20T10:06:50-04:00'
describe
'125205' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVMB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
3dfc35d31ac9904cfc08fd49e5262783
04bd39124c37521c8321a4d4e6512fbf17ecf873
'2012-06-20T10:07:19-04:00'
describe
'41174' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVMC' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
5b86d5dd242038f369f987e4e39b141b
5d41a76c297a7233fa6324bb3c34eb44b2805955
'2012-06-20T10:06:53-04:00'
describe
'159189' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVMD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
38f86f132643b1faab246ecc51183576
d8ba2825d98dee14f167139aae9abbcb586278cc
describe
'52850' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVME' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
cbf09a39dd62f3a0d7c7c688b5cae2d6
e7f85987b0b8e524fa78542ddb67d1e31f70c8c6
'2012-06-20T10:07:47-04:00'
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVMF' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
310510a3b3638778e36e590d503539be
5c1166a8e6e5d3c51d28355296a8482c1c009365
'2012-06-20T10:06:55-04:00'
describe
'30078' 'info:fdaE20100515_AAAANPfileF20100515_AABVMG' 'sip-filesUF00049818_00001.mets'
c64cf92d29c9653f57cd8bd7ada0b68d
8fcb69d0e0e8627f8ef9108b95874af2394b4f2f
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'2013-12-10T05:46:44-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.




THE ADV aI adie

OF

mAt@IN IMECIN@ i AG ean:

QoMe years before my beard an-
ho

in other words, when I was. neither

nounced approaching manhood, or,

man nor boy, I expressed in repeated
conversations a strong desire of seeing
the world, from which I was discour-
aged by my parents. A cousin or my
mother’s took a fancy to me, and _ his
eloquence had more effect than mine,
for my father consented to my accom-
panying him.

I set off on a journey to Russia, in
the midst of winter. I went on horse-
back, as the most convenient manner

of traveling. I was but lightly clothed,

Se)

and of this I felt the inconvenience the

more | advanced north-east. I went

on: night and darkness overtook me.

No villaze was to be seen. ‘The coun-
.



try was covered with snow, and I was
unacquainted with the road. Pired, 1
alighted and fastened my horse to
something, like a poimted stump of a
tree, which appeared above the snow.
For the sake of safety, [ placed my
pistols under my arm, and lay down
on the snow, where | slept so soundly
that I did not open my eyes until full
daylight. It is not easy to concefve
my astonishment to find myself in the
midst of a village, lying in a church-
yard; nor was my horse to be seen,
but I heard him soon after neigh some-
where above me. On looking upwards
I beheld him hanging by his bridle to
the weather-cock of the steeple. Mat-
ters were now very plain to me: the

village. had been covered with snow

The Baldwin Library
University
RMB ve
Florida

oO

overnight; a sudden change of weather |
| that,—but I own that this hare puz-

had taken place; I had sunk down to

the churchyard while asleep, gently, and |

in the same proportion as the snow had
melted away; and what in the dark I
had taken to be a stump of a little tree
appearing above the snow, to which I
had tied my horse, proved to be the
cross or weather-cock of the steeple.
Without long consideration I took one
of my pistols, shot the bridle. in two,
brought down the horse, and proceeded
on my journey to St. Petersburg.

It was some time before I could ob-
tain a position in the army, as I had
intended, and for several months I was

time and money in the most gentleman-
like manner. The very recollection of
the amusements I had, gives me fresh
spirits, and creates a warm wish for a
repetition of them.

First of all, I will tell you of my
wonderful greyhound, and of a curious
incident which occurred when I had
her. For two days I had been pur-
suing a hare. My dog always started
her, but I could never hit her. I do

not believe in magic,—I have seen too





BARON MUNCHAUSEN.

many wonderful things in my day for

zled me. Day after day I followed
her, but my coursing was always
vain. At length I got near enough
to shoot her: she fell,—and what do
you think I discovered, gentlemen?
She had four feet on her back, as
well as those on the earth. When
the four ordinary ones were tired,
she turned over with the greatest
ease, and fled on with her four fresh
feet instead. I never saw a _ hare
like this one, and I should assuredly
never have taken it without Diana’s



| assistance.
perfectly at liberty to sport away my |

I remember one day reaching the
banks of a lake, on which I perceived
some dozens of wild ducks swim-
ming,—too much scattered about the
lake for me to hope to hit more than
one or two at the most by a single
discharge of my gun, and my last
charge was now in it. . 1 remembered
suddenly that I had in my bag a
piece of bacon fat. I fastened this
piece of fat to my dog’s leash, which
I divided into two parts. Then I

| squatted down amongst the reeds on

5 ‘ BARON MUNCHAUSEN.

the bank, threw my bait, and soon had
the pleasure of seeing a duck approach

The others

swam hastily after their companion, and

and eagerly swallow it.

the greasiness of the bacon was so great
that my bait passed right through the
first duck, and was swallowed up by the
second. The third followed, and then,
in their turn, all the others.
minutes my piece of bacon fat had gone
through all the ducks without leaving
its string, and they were threaded on it
like a row of pearls. I advanced joy-
fully to the brink again, and drew the

dicks in. I passed the string five or

six times around my body, and over my -

shoulders, and set off on my road home.

I had an adventure which greatly re-
sembled this wonderful catch’ of ducks
once with some pheasants. I had’ gone
out to try a new gun, and my bird-shot
was exhausted, when, ‘against all expec-
tation, I saw rise almost from beneath
my feet a covey of partridges. As soon
as | had marked the place where they

had. settled,. I rapidly loaded my gun,
and put into it, instead of shot, my ram- -
rod, one end of which projected from
the muzzle. I stole softly to where the |

In a few ©





partridges were, and fired at the very
moment they took flight, and in a few
seconds I found my ramrod a few rods
off, ornamented with seven birds, which
must have been greatly surprised to find
themselves suddenly on the spit.

But to return to my story: As I had
a long way to go, and the quantity and
weight of the ducks greatly inconven-
ienced me, I began to regret having
taken so many. But now a very sin-
gular circumstance caused me some un-
easiness. The ducks were still alive
and strong; they had recovered from

their fright at being thus captured, and

began to struggle to fly away. Their
efforts lifted me from the earth. Any
one else would, I am convinced, have
been greatly embarrassed. But I util-
ized the circumstance to my profit, and,
using the tails of my coat as oars, I
guided my course through the air by

| them till } reached my own dwelling.

Arrived above my home, I had to think
how I could descend safely. [ wrung

the neck of each duck in succession,

thus gradually descending till I gained

the top of my chimney, down which I

_easily glided, to the great amazement


>
7 BARON MUNCHAUSEN,

of my cook, whom I astonished by
knocking over his sauce-pans, and fall-
ing nearly on him in a shower of ducks!
Happily for me, his fire was not yet
lighted. at .
I was not always successful, as I
have said. During the war with Tur-
key, I had, at last, the misfortune to be
overpowered by numbers, and be made
prisoner of war; and, what is worse,
but always usual among the Turks, to
In that state of
humiliation my daily task was not very

be sold for a slave.

hard or laborious, but rather singular
It was to drive the Sul-

tan’s bees every morning to their past-

and irksome.

ure-grounds, to attend them all the day
long, and at night to drive them back
to their hives.

One evening I missed a bee, and soon
observed that two bears had fallen upon
her to tear her to pieces for the honey
she carried. I had no weapon but the
silver hatchet which is the badge of
the Sultan’s gardeners and farmers. I
threw it at the robbers, with the inten-
tion to frighten them away and set the
poor bee at liberty; but, by an unlucky
turn of my arm, it flew upwards, and



continued rising until it reached the
moon. How was I to recover it? how
fetch it down again?

I recollected that Turkey-beans grow
very quickly, and run up to an aston-
ishing height. I planted one immedi-
ately; it grew, and actually fastened
itself on one of the moon’s horns. I
had no more to do now, but to climb
up by it into the moon, where J safely
arrived, and had a troublesome piece
of business before I could find my sil-
ver hatchet, in a place where every
thing has the brightness of silver; in
fact, I was detained there some time.
At last, however, I found it in a heap
of chaff and chopped straw.

I now thought of returning; but,
the heat of the sun had dried

up my bean; it was totally useless for

alas !

my descent; so I fell to work and
twisted a rope of that chopped straw
as long and as well as I could make it.
This I fastened to one of the moon’s
horns and slid down to the end of it.
Here I held myself fast with my left
hand, and with the hatchet in my right

I cut the long, now useless, end of the

upper part, which, when tied to the
BARON MUNCHAUSEN. &

lower end, brought me a good deal | He finished by drawing the whole length

lower. This repeated splicing and ty-

ing of the rope did not improve its ‘|

quality or bring me down to the Sul-
tan’s farm.
I was four or five miles from the

I fell

to the ground with such amazing’ vi0-

earth at least when it broke.

lence that I found myself stunned, and
in a hole nine fathoms deep at least,
made by the weight of my body fall-
ing from so great a height. I recov-
ered, but knew not how to get out
again; however, I dug slopes or steps
with my finger-nails and easily accom-
plished it.

On returning to the land I had left,
I resumed my duty as bee-keeper, hav-
ing explained my absence, to the in-
finite amusement of the Sultan; and,
taught by my recent experience, I found
a better method of defending my bees
and their hives from the attacks of
the bears. I rubbed the shaft of a
cart with honey, and I placed myself
in ambuscade near it during the night.
An enormous bear, attracted by the
scent of the honey, arrived, and began

greedily licking the end of the pole.

ic regained my liberty.

|



gradually, by licking, on and on, into
his mouth, down his throat and stom-
ach, and thus completely through him.
When he was thus: spitted, I fixed in
the hole at the end of the shaft a
huge peg, thus cutting off the retreat
of the glutton, and I left him till the
next day. The Sultan, who chanced to
walk that way early, nearly died with
laughter when he saw the trick I had
played on the bear.

Peace was, soon after this, concluded
between Turkey and Russia, and prison-
ers were exchanged, and I consequently
All the earth was
frozen over, and as snow had _ fallen
first, and since been covered by a layer
of ice, one could only move about on
At length,
of a slight thaw, I set out on my jour-

skates. taking advantage

ney. Never can I forget the difficulties
The fam-

ished wolves came out in packs, and

and dangers of that j journey.

late one evening, the moon being high
up in the sky, we were crossing a wide
plain bordered by a thick forest, when
we heard the howlings of a pack pur-

suing oo
sincamcamatatroiei
ie ee

Aina

‘Sit milla cpeageae
as



41 BARON MUNCHAUSEN.

Happily, the post-chaise in which I
traveled was built strongly of wood at
the back and sides.

window at the back of the carriage,

There was a small

through which I could watch the ad-
vancing foes. The horses flew at whirl-
wind speed, but the steady gallop of
the wolves gained on us nevertheless.
At length they came within range. I
fired through the window, and: my shot
killed one immediately. others gathered round the body to de-
vour it at once; the others pursued us
still.

possible, and I did so much execution

T had to load and fire as fast as

that we approached a town before they
had reached us. I think, on a moderate
calculation, a hundred wolves fell to my
The inhabitants of the town re-

turned me public thanks for the benefit

rifle.

I had thus conferred on them, as the
wolves had been in the habit of eating
two or three of their children da‘ly for
some time.

I determined, however, henceforth to
keep in the high road, and not allow
my postillion to take any short cuts.
We pursued our journey the next day,
and towards evening found we had to

other.

g0 through a lane so narrow that two

carriages could not possibly pass each

In order to prevent accidents I
ordered the postillion to give a signal
He blew with all his

might, but his endeavors were in vain ;

with his horn.

he could not make the horn sound,
which was unaccountable and _ rather
unfortunate, for, soon after, we found
ourselves in the presence of another
coach. There was no proceeding ; how-
ever, I got out of my carriage, and, be-
ing pretty strong, placed it, wheels and
all, upon my head and shoulders. I
then jumped over a hedge about nine
nine feet high (which, considering the
weight of the coach, was rather difficult)
into a field, and came out again by an-
other jump into the road beyond the
other carriage.

I then went back for the horses, and
placing one upon my head, and the
other under my left arm, by the same
means brought them to my coach, put
them to, and proceeded to an inn at the

I should have told

you, that the horse under my arm was

end of our stage.

very spirited, and not above four years

old.

In making my second spring over
BARON MUNCHAUSEN. 2 12

the hedge, he expressed great dislike to
that violent kind of action by kicking
and snorting; however, I contined his
hind legs by putting them into my coat-
pocket. After we arrived at the inn
my postillion and I refreshed ourselves.
He hung his horn on a peg, near the
kitchen fire; I sat on the other side.
Suddenly we heard a “Tereng! te-
reng! teng! teng!’ We looked round,
and now found the reason why the pos-
tillion had not been able to sound his
horn: his tunes were frozen up in the

horn, and came out now by thawing.

g

Shortly after these events I visited
England, and, after, a short stay, em-
barked in an English man-of-war for
North America.

ing happened till we arrived within

Nothing worth relat-

three hundred leagues of the river St.
Lawrence, when the ship struck with

amazing force against (as we supposed)

a rock; however, upon heaving the lead,
we could find no bottom, even with three
hundred fathoms. What made this cir-





cumstance the more wonderful, and in- |

deed beyond all comprehension, was that
the violence of the shock was such that
we lost our rudder, broke our bowsprit in

the middle, and split all our masts from
top to bottom, two of which went by the
board.
furling the main-sheet, was flung at
least three leagues from the ship; but
he fortunately saved his life by laying
hold of the tail of a large sea-gull, who
brought him back to the very spot from
whence he was thrown.

Whilst we were all in a state of aston-

ishment at the unaccountable confusion

in which we were involved, the whole

was suddenly explained by the appear-
ance of a large whale which had been
basking, asleep, within sixteen feet of
the surface of the water. This animal
was so much displeased with the disturb-
ance which our ship had given him—for
in our passage we had with our rudder
scratched his nose—that he beat in all
the gallery and part of the quarter-deck
with his tail, and almost at the same in-
stant took the main-sheet anchor (which
was suspended, as it usually is, from the
head) between his teeth, and ran away
with the ship at least sixty leagues, at
the rate of twelve leagues an _ hour,
when fortunately the cable broke, and
we lost both the whale and the anchor.

BARON MUNCHAUSEN. 14

_ However, upon our return to Europe
some months after, we found the same
whale,
spot, floating dead upon the water. It
measured above half a mile in length.
With difficulty

much we cut

the anchor and about forty fathoms of

the cable concealed in the left side of

his mouth, just under his tongue. Per-

haps this was the cause of his death, —

as that side of his tongue was much
swelled, with a great degree of inflam-
mation. We reached England without
any further mishaps. ;

A. few vears later I traveled down the
Red Sea to Madras, and, at the head of
a few Sepoys, pursued the flying army
of Tippoo to the gates of Seringapatam.
I challenged him to mortal combat, and,
mounted on my steed, rode up to the
walls of the fortress amidst a storm of
As fast as the

bombs and eannon-balls came upon me

‘shells and cannon-balls.

I caught them in my hands like so many
pebbles, and, throwing them against the
fortress, demolished the strongest ram-

parts of the place. It was of the high-

est importance that we should know what |

a few leagues from the same -.

. that it was a rash proceeding.



was taking place inside the town, and
one day, as I was standing by one of
the largest field-guns, an idea suddenly
occurred to me, which I carried out at

_ once,
off his oe

head, where, to our great joy, we found: sprang on. the bullet, intending to let it

fired I

At the;moment the gunner

bear me inside the fortress; but when I

was half way there. it occurred to me
‘low,

I thought, “shall L get back? Once in

- the place, what will happen to me? Tf

Tam taken. for a

a spy L’shall suffer dis-

gracefully; -if T am made prisoner, my

-entrance into the fort will be of no. use to

my general.” As these thoughts passed.
through my mind I perceived a bullet,
directed from the fortress against our
camp, passing a few feet from me. I
leaped on it at once, and returned: to
our army; without, it is true, having
accomplished my project, bui at least
safe and sound. : |
Tippoo, fearing that all’ would be lost,
came forth upon his elephant to fight
me. I saluted him. and insisted that he
should fire first; on, which he instantly
discharged his- carbine, the ball from
which, hitting my horse’s ear, made him

BARON MUNCHAUSEN. 16

In
return I discharged my pistol at 'Tippoo,
and shot off his turban.

fit of despair, and rushed against my

plunge with rage and indignation.
He rose, in a

steed and myself. I could not withstand
the rage and impulse of that moment,
and, with one blow of my sword, sepa-
rated his head from his. body.

turned overland from India to Europe

Ltes

with admirable velocity, so that the ac-
count of Tippoo’s defeat by me did not
arrive by the ordinary passage, and the
glory has been unjustly ascribed to an-
other. C

Hilario Frosticos, my true friend and
faithful partisan, did his best to increase
my popularity with the people. He re-
lated many of my adventures ‘to them,
with which they were greatly delighted.
One day, after they had given utterance
to a perfeet burst of applause, Hilario
exclaimed: “The Baron once, when he
was in England, performed some extraor-
dinary feats of strength, which I shall

now relate to you. He wished, one day,

to leap on his wonderful horse over a

very wide and deep pond. I represented
.to him that it was not possible to make
this leap; but when he has made up his

|





horses and ourselves.

mind it is impossible to prevail on him
He

persisted in his resolution, and made the

to change it, as you all well know.

Half way over he perceived that
He

turned his horse suddenly in the air,

leap.
it was wider than he anticipated.

and alighted on the bank from whence
he had leaped!

“Whilst I gazed in amazement, he
rode a little further back, to give him-
self more room for the leap, tried it
again, and fell into the pond up to his
neck! I thought he and his steed were
lost, for the pool was evidently very
deep, when, to my astonishment, he tock
hold of his queue of hair and actually
lifted himself out of the pool, with his
horse under him, drawing. the creature
up with him by the mere pressure of his

{7

knees This anecdote made a great
impression on his hearers. .
Thavé neglected to tell you about one
of my servants who was an extraordina-
rily strong man, so will tell you how I
happened to find him. During my. mis-
sion to Egypt we were on a flat plain
near. Cairo, when a furious whirlwind
arose, which threatened to upset our

To the left of

BARON MUNCHAUSEN. i8

the road there was a row of seven wind-
mills, the sails of which turned round
more swiftly than the swiftest wheel of
a good spinner. At no great distance
stood a person as fat as Sir John Fal-
staff, who held his forefinger pressed
against his right nostril. As soon as
he perceived our distress—for our hats
were blown off and our horses stagger-
ing, two riders having been swept off
them—he turned towards us, took off
his hat, and bowed respectfully.

The wind instantly fell as if by en-
chantment, and the mills stood still.
Astonished at this circumstanée, I cried
to the man,—“Hi! my funry fellow!
‘Are you Old Nick?” “Pardon the in-
convenience I have put your honor to,”
he said. “1 was blowing a little for my
master the miller, and really, for fear of
making the arms of the mill revolve too



fast, I had stopped one nostril.” “Upon
my word,” said | to myself, “this is a
useful man. He would be of great use
to me when I return home, and my
breath fails in relating the wonderful

We

The blower quit-

adventures | meet in my travels.”
soon made a bargain.
ted his mills, and remained with me ever
afterwards.

Having been away from home so many
years, I began to tire of adventure, and

to long for my old home. I soon after,

therefore, paid a visit to my friends, and
related these adventures. Amazement
stood in every countenance; their con-
gratulations on my returning in safety
were repeated with an unaffected degree
of pleasure, and we passed the evening
pleasantly, every person present paying
the highest compliments to my COURAGE

and VERACITY.