Citation
The Swiss family Robinson

Material Information

Title:
The Swiss family Robinson in words of one syllable
Creator:
Wyss, Johann David, 1743-1818
Mayo, Isabelle Fyvie, 1843-1914
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros., Publishers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
112 p., [6] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 23 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Survival after airplane accidents, shipwrecks, etc -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1879 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Approximate date based on inscription in UCLA copy.
General Note:
Translation and adaptation of: Die schweizerische Robinson.
General Note:
Color printed (chromotypographed?) plates.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisement, back cover.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
abridged and adapted from the original story by I. F. M., author of "The boy's first reader," "The girl's first reader," "Queer characters," etc. ; with colored illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027029758 ( ALEPH )
32315509 ( OCLC )
ALJ0683 ( NOTIS )

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The Tub-Raft, leaving the Ship.





af



bie

SWISS PAMILY ROBINSON.

IN

WORDS Om OVE Si A be

ABRIDGED AND ADAPTED FROM THE ORIGINAL STORY BY

I Ey Me

AUTHOR OF “THE BOY’S FIRST READER,” ‘‘THE GIRL’S FIRST READER,”
“QUEER CHARACTERS,” ETC. °

WITH COLORED ILLUSTRATIONS.

NEW YORK.
MCLOUGHLIN BROS., PUBLISHERS.



PRE ACE

THE kind reception given to the system of ae
im words of one syllable has encouraged the Author to
add the popular story of “ The Swiss Family Robinson”
as a twin book to “Robinson Crusoe.” The monosyt-
labic rule has been strictly adhered to throughout, the
only exception occurring necessarily in the title of the
book itself. The Author's olject has been to provide “a
field of exercise for a child who has gust learnt to
conquer words; and it is a great point im all teaching
to let the first imdependent exercise be one im which

‘victory is really to be won by moderate effort.



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



CHAPTER I.

Wuen one has a, good
tale to tell, he should try
to be brief, and not say
more than he can help ere
he makes a fair start; so
I shall not say a word of
what took place on board
the ship till we had been
six days in a storm. The
bark had gone far out of
her true course, and no one
on board knew where we
were. The masts lay in
splints on the deck, the
sails were torn, a leak in
the side of the ship let
more in than the crew
could pump out, and each
one felt that ere long he
would find a grave in the

deep sea, which rose and
fell in great white waves
of Ifeam, Janeen sent its
spray from side to side
of what was now but a
mere hulk.

Most of those on board
sought the best means they
could think of to save their
own lives; but some knelt
down to pray that God
would quell the storm and
still the waves, for they felt
that none but He could
help them now.

“Come, boys,” said I to
my four sons, who were
with me, and were struck
dumb with fear, “God can
save us if it please Him so



6 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to do; but, if this is to be
our last hour, let us bow to
His will—we shall at least
all go down side by side.”

My dear wife could not
hide the tears that fell down
her cheeks as I thus’ spoke
to my sons, but she was
calm, and knelt down to
pray, while the boys clung
round her as if they thought
she could help them.

Just then we heard a cry
Gre leand) Vland) steltva
shock, and were thrown
down upon the deck.’ It
was clear that we had struck
on a rock, for we heard a
loud cry from one of the
men, “We are lost! Launch
the boat; try for your lives!”
These words went, as it
were, through my heart like
a knife; but, as I felt that
I ought to cheer my sons,
I said to them, “Now is

the time to show that we
are brave; we still have
life, the land is near, and we
know that God helps those

who trust in him. Keep

up your hearts, then, while

I go and see if there be not
some hope yet left for us.”

I went at once on deck,
and was met by a wave
that threw me down, and
wet me through to the skin.
When I got up, and went
to the side of the ship, I
found that all the boats had ©
been let down, and that
the last of the crew had just
left it. I cried out for the
men to come back and take
us with them, but it was in
vain, for the sound of my
voice did not reach them
through the roar of the
waves.

I then thought that our
last chance was gone. Still,





as I felt that the ship did
not sink, I went to the stern,
and found, to my joy, that
she was held up by a piece
of rock on each side, and
made fast likea wedge. At
the same time I saw some
trace of land, which lay to
the south, and this made
me go back with some hope
that we had still a faint
chance, though how to get
from the ship I could not
tell.

As soon as I got down-
stairs I took my wife by the
hand, and said, “Be of good
cheer, we are at least safe
for some time, and if the
wind should veer round, we
may yet reach the land that
lies but a short way off.”

I said this to calm the
fears of my wife and sons,
and it did so far more than

I had a right to hope. ,

LAND IN SIGHT. 7

“Let us now take some
food,” said my wife. “We
are sure to need .it, for this
will no doubt be a night to
try our strength.”

We still heard the roar
of the sea, and now and
then the planks would creak
as if they were torn up
from the deck, so that we
had still good cause to fear
that we might go down.

My wife got some food
for her boys, which we were
glad to see them eat, poor
as it was; but we could not
share their meal. Three
out of the four were put
to bed in their berths, and
soon went to sleep; but
Fritz, who was our first
child, would not leave us.
He said, like a good son,
that he would try to be of
some use, and think what
could be done.



8 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

“Tf we could but find
some cook,” said Fritz to
me in a low tone, “we
might make floats. You
and I will not need them,
for we can swim, but the
rest will want some such
means to keep them up, and
then we can help them to
reach the land.”

“A good thought,” said
[Pee ctsuceery titthie migiat
to find what things there
are in the ship that we can
thus make use of.”

We soon found some
casks and ropes, and with
these we made a kind of
float for each of the three
boys, and then my wife
made one for her own use.
This done, we got some
knives, string, and such
things as we could make
fast to our belts. We did
not fail to look for and find

a flint and steel, and the
box in which the burnt
rags were kept, for these
were at that time in use as
the means to strike a light.

Fritz, who was now well
nigh worn out, laid down
on his bed, and ‘slept like
the rest. As for me and
my poor wife, we kept
watch, each in fear lest the
next wave should lift the
ship off the rock and break
it ups, Wesspent parton
the night in thought as to
our plans for the next day,
and sought God to bless
the means we had in view
to save our lives. —

I need not tell you how
glad we were when we saw
the first gleam of light shine
through the chink of the
door that shut us in from
the cold night air. At
dawn the wind did not



WE SET TO WORK. : 9

blow so strong, the sky was
clear of clouds, and we saw
the sun rise, and with it
- rose our hopes. I soon had
my wife and sons on deck.
The boys did not know till
then that all the men had
left the ship, and that there
was no one but us on
board.

“Where are the men?”
said they. “How can we
Bectcce ic ship |

“My dear boys,” said I,
“He who has kept us safe
till now will still aid us, if
we do not give way to fear.
Let all hands set to work,
and leave the rest to God.”

At these words we all
went to work with a will.
My wife went to feed the
live stock; Fritz set off in
search of arms, and the
means to make use of them;
and Ernest made his way

to the tool chest. Jack ran
to pick up what he could
find, but as he got to one
of the doors he gave it a
push, and two huge dogs
sprang out and leapt at him.
Fle thousinteciiueainst a teey
would bite him, but he soon
found that they meant him

|no harm, and one of them
let him get on his back and

ride up to me as I came
from the hold of the ship.
could ct "keep" baela) a
smile, but I told him that
it was not safe thus to play
with dogs which had not
been fed for so long a time.

When the boys had done
their search, and the spoil
was brought on deck, we
thought we had found all
that we should need. “As
forumie, Saleh tye iicws a
have brought good news,
for I find we have still on



10

beardmancows, alt acsenwio
goats esix Sheep, a Tame
pig, and a sow, and I have
found food for them.all.”

“ All that you bring will
ber oluse, caideles “but |
fear that Jack’s dogs will do
us more harm than good.”

ie Noumea ialte scar: aiaelks
in his pert way, for they
can help us to hunt when
we get to land.”

“Well said, Jack. And
now let us see what we can
do that will aid us to get
there.”

We then took the casks
that we had found, and as
both Ernest and I could
use the saw, we soon cut
them in half. With these

tubs, which were bound

round with strong hoops,

we made a kind of raft,
though it was no slight
jack: = hee tubs e in tact

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

were a fleet of eight small
round boats, made so fast
to some planks that no one
of them could float from
the rest. When we had
done this, we sat down to
a good meal, which we ate
with great zest, for we now
felt that we had done our
best to earn it.

hichmext) tie wior sinc
done was to launch the raft..
This we at length did, and
when the boys saw it slide
down the side of the ship
and float on the sea, they
gave a loud shout, and each
one tried who should be
the #iiretestomact OnmiGamen
miaeen iutase ten tnems min
and there left it.
- It was late ere our work
was thus far brought to
an end; and, as we had to
spend at least one night
more on the wreck, I told



WE FREIGHT OUR RAFT. II

the boys to get a good
nights rest, so that they
might be fresh for the toils
of the next day.

I then told my wife to
change her dress for, that
of one of the crew which
she had found, as her skirts
would have got in her way

when she had to climb.
She did. notiateunes aike

this, but did) so as soomas

she saw the truth of what

I told her.

At last, when all was
done, we went to bed, and
slept as sound as if we had
been on land.



CHAPTER II.

WE were‘all up at the
brcakwotwday,) and knelt
down to thank God that
He had kept us from harm
through the night.

“My dear boys,” said I,
“we have now, with the
help) of ))(Ged,\fotry joug
best to reach the shore. We
must, ere we go, give the
poor beasts on board both
food and drink to last them

for some days. I hope we
may yet find means to come
back and take them on
shore with us.”

Wie lithen ,.out))allmaiie
things on the raft, and ten
live hens .and two cocks
were put in one of the tubs.
Some ducks and geese we
let go, in the hope that they
would swim to the shore;
and a pair of doves were



12 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



set free, as they could fly
to the land.

There was a place in the
raft for each of us. In the
first tub sat my wife; in the
next Frank, who was eight
years old; in the third Fritz,
not quite twice the age of
Frank; in the fourth were
the fowls, and some old sails
that would make us a tent;
the fifth was full of good
things in the way of food;
in the sixth stood Jack,
a bold lad, ten years old;
in the next Ernest, twelve
years of age, well taught,
but too fond of self, and
less fond of work than the
rest; while I sat in the
eighth, to guide the raft
that was to save all that
was dear to me in the
world.

As soon as the dogs (Bill
and Jack by name) saw us

push off from the ship they
leapt in the sea, swam near
the raft, and kept well up
with us.

The sea was calm; so
that we felt quite safe. We
made good use of the oars,
and the raft bore its freight
straight to the land; but as
we drew near to the shore
the sight of the bare rocks
led us to think that we
might still be in need of —
food and drink’ when that
which we had was gone.
We could see that casks,
chests, spars, and splints
from the masts of the wreck
lay on the shore.

As we got near, the coast
lost its bare look, and we
were glad to see that there
was no lack of trees. .We
soon found a bay, to which
the ducks and geese had
found their way, and here



we saw a place where we
could land, which we were
not slow to do.

As soon as we had made
the raft fast with a strong
rope, we took out all our
wealth, and made a tent
with the old sail-cloth we
had brought with us, and
stuck a pole in the ground
to keep it up. This done,
I sent the boys to get some
moss and dry grass to make
our beds with. With the
flint and steel we soon set
fire to some dry twigs, and
my wife made a pot of soup
with what she had brought
from the ship.

Fritz, who had charge of
the guns, chose one, and
took a stroll by the side of
a stream, while Jack went
in search of shell fish, which
he thought he might find
on the rocks. My share

WE LAND SAFELY. 13

of the work was to save
two large casks which were
near the shore. Whilst I
was up to my knees in the
sea Laneardsalishimlnen
which I knew to come from
Jack. )paicoteout -ateonee,
took up an axe, and ran to
his help. I found him with
his legs in a rock pool,
where a large crab held
him by his toes. It soon
made off as I came near;
but I struck at it with the
axe, and brought it out of
the pool. Jack then took
it up, though it gave him a
pinch or two ere he found
out how to hold it, and ran
off in high glee to show
his dear Ma what he had
caught. ~

When I got back to the
tent, I found that Ernest
had brought us news that
he had seen salt in the



14 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



chinks of the rocks, and
that shell fish were not
scarce.

“Then why have you
not brought some with
Doles siceilue bain

“To get at them,” said
he, “I should have had to
wet my feet.”

“Well, my boy, if you
are sure you saw them, I
will ask you to go back for
some. We must each do
some work for the good of
all; and as for your feet,
the sun will dry them as
you walk back.”

He went, and soon found
the salt, left by the sea on
the rocks, which the sun
had made quite dry. There
was some sand with it, and
this I said would spoil our
soup; but my wife did not
take long to find a way to
cure that. She had been

to a fresh stream with a
large jug; from this I saw
her pour some on the salt,
strain it through a cloth,
and let it drip in a cup, so
that all the sand was left on
the cloth.

When the soup was made
hot we had each a taste, and
all said that it was good:

“ Benot in too great haste,”
said my wife, “we must
wait for Fritz; but if he
were here, I do not see how
we are to take our soup,
for we have no plates nor
spoons; we can't lift this
huge pot to our mouths and
sup from it.”

“If we had but. some
large nuts,” said Ernest,
“we might cut them in half,
and they would make good
bowls.”

“Quite true,” said I ; “but
as there are none, we may



A SURPRISE. i 15



as well wish for delf bowls|I knew, from what I had

and real spoons at once.”

“Now I have it,” quoth
Ernest. “Let us use the
shells I saw on the shore.”

On srani Mac} tom the
shore, with Ernest at his
heels, and back they both
came with large and small
shells for us all.

Just then Fritz came in,
with a look of gloom on
his face, which I could see
was a sham.

“You do not mean to,

tell me you have come back
with nought?” said I, as
he put out his hands as if
to prove that such was the
case. But Jack, who had
been round him, cried out,
“No, no! he’s got a pig !—
such a fine one. Tell us
where you found it.”

Fritz now brought forth
his prize. When I saw it,

read, that it was not a pig,
but a swift beast, known in
these parts, that lives on

fruit and nuts, and hides

in the earth* 1 felt it
right to tell my son that
he should not try to make
us think that he had not
brought any thing back.
Though a jest, it was still
a lie, and to act a lie was
just as wrong as to tell one.
Fritz now saw the truth of
this, and said so. He then
told us how that he had
been to the banks of the
stream.
“T like the place much
more than I do this spot,”
said he. “The shore lies
low, and there are planks,
casks, chests, and all sorts
of things, that the sea has:
thrownup. Why not leave

The A-gou-ti.
*



16

this place at once, and go
there ?”

“There is a time for all
things,” said I. “ We must
at least rest here for one
night. But did you see
no trace of the men who
left the ship ?”
= “None, on land or
sea, said he; “but I saw
some strange hogs on the
shore, that have feet like
hares.”

We all sat down to take
our soup with the shell
spoons. Ernest took from
his coat a large shell, which
he had hid till now, put it
in the soup, and then set it
down to cool.

“You do not show want
of thought,” said I to him.
“But I am not glad to see
that you think so of your
self, and do so much for
your own ease, when all

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the rest do so much for
yours. Now, that shell full
of soup you must give to
our two dogs. We can all
dip our small shells in the
pot, and you must do as
we do; but as we have
nought else that the poor
dogs can eat out of, that
shell shall be theirs.”

I knew he felt hurt at
this, but he gave it to the
dogs at once, and they soon
made quick work of their
share of the soup.

The sun was low when
our meal came to an end.
The fowls came round us
to pick up the stray crumbs
we had let fall, and my wife
took out her bag of grain
and fed the cocks and hens
that we had brought with
us, and sent them to roost
on the top of our tent. The
ducks and geese left us to



The young Ape brought Home on Turk’s back.





WE SET OUT ON A TOUR. 17

find some place of rest near|fire-arms, in case we might
the stream, and the dogs/need them in the night ;
lay down at the door of|sang a hymn of praise to

the tent.

God, and then left our fate

We took care to load our|in his hands.



CPAP TEN EPL

As soon as I heard the
cock crow, and saw by the
light that it was break of
day, got out of bed and
spoke to my wife as to
what we should do next.

sale tists) wsatclinly uty Ee Titz,
and I will make a tour of
the coast, and try to find
some of the men who left
the ship, for if they are
Metemmthey, ) imnay) abe, in
want.”

“But,” said Fritz, who

heard me from his bed, |

“why should we search

for those who left us to die
on the wreck 2”

“Well, I will tell you,”
Said eis Eiichi should
do to them as we would |
wish them to do to us, not

as they have done; next,

'we know that they took

no food with them, and we
should not leave them to
starve; and last, it may
be that they can help us,
though now theystand more
in need of our aid.”

The boys were soon up,
and we all sat down to



18

a good meal. That done,
Fritz and I got our guns.
I put a pair of small arms
in his belt, gave him a game
bag,.and told him to take
an axe. I took some food
for us both, and a full flask,
out of which we could drink
if we should stray far from
astream. Fritz was now in
haste to be off, but Ernest
said that there was one
thing still left to do ere we
could start.

« And what is that ?” said
Fritz.

“We have yet to bray
to God,” said Ernest.

“That is right, my dear
boy,” said I. “We are all
too apt to think less than
we ought of what God tells
us to do, and you know that
he tells us to pray to Him
day by day.”

When we took our*leave,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

my wife and the three boys

were intears. The dog Bill

we left to guard the tent, but
Turk went with us, and ran
by our side. |

We soon got to the banks:
of a stream; but then had
to make our way down its
course through the tall, rank
grass. It took us some
time to reach the sea shore.
There was not a boat to be
seen, or any sign that the
ship’s crew had found the
land. We left the shore,
and went through a wood
full of tall trees. Here

Fritz struck some _ hard
thing on the ground with

his foot, which we found
fon beman @o-cosan Ui ante
gave it a blow with his axe,
and broke the shell, and we
both sat down to rest, and
eat the nut. We drank the
milk to quench our thirst,



ANOTHER SURPRISE. 19

and made a fair meal of the
fruit.

At the end of the wood
we came to a plain which
gave us a clear view of the
place. Fritz, who was on
the look out, ran off with
Turk to some strange trees
that he saw on the right.

“Do come here,” hecried,
“and tell me what these
are.)

When I got up to him,
it gave me no small joy to
find that it was a gourd
ihe ee,

SErya carlton ciel you
eanecct, noldvrompotici or
those queer lumps _ that
grow on it.”

With that he brought
‘ one down, and we had a
look at it.

PON wotetais! isaidel le
Wercanmmake ai qalatc ve

dish omartackenlt 4s) by.

no means a nice kind of
food, but wild men set great
store by its shell, which
they use to hold their food
and drink.”

We then set to work to
make plates of the gourds,
which we did in this way:
I tied a string round the
shell, and then made nicks
all round it with a sharp
knife. In these we put the
string, and then gave it a
tight pull, which cut it in
half, and made two bowls.
When we had thus made
some eight or ten bowls,
and some flat ones for
plates, we laid them out in
the sun to dry, and then
went on our way.

We could see, not far off,
a grove of fine palm trees,
but to reach them we should
have to pass through reeds
and long grass, which grew



20

so thick that we made Turk
go on first and tread a path
for us. I knew this was
just the place to find snakes,
so we each cut a cane, that
we might beat them off
should we meet with any.
As I took hold of my staff,
I felt a gum or juice ooze
out of the end. I put my
tongue to it, and found it
of a sweet taste. This led
me to suck the reed, and
I then knew that we had
met with the Su-car Cane.
By inscretime )Paitz had
done the same, for I could
see that he held his cane
to his mouth.

“Do not suck too much
Of it esaidinl is on ite wall
make you ill; but let us cut
some of the best and take
them back with us, for those
at home will prize so great
a treat.” This we did, and

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

bound them in a bunch,
which Fritz took on his back.

It did not take us long
to reach the place where
the palms grew, and then
we sat down in the shade.
to eat the food we had
brought with us. “Do you
see those nuts at the top of
the trees, Fritz?” said I.

‘lot ibe Sure “indo vn bur
they are far too iichmioss
reach. Look, look!” he
cried, “there are some Mon-
KEys; let me have a shot at
them.” - :

“Do nor doithat) [isaids
and held his arm; “it will
do us no good to kill them,
and I think I can make
use of them.” With that I
threw some stones up at
the tree where they were,
though they had got safe
out of my reach. They
then made a loud noise,



A TROOP OF APES. 21

took hold of the nuts that
were near, and flung them
straight at us. This. was
not new to me, for I had
read that it is oft done by
men who live in the woods,
and have to get their food
as best they can; but the
trick made Fritz laugh, who
soon had hard work to
pick up the nuts that were
thrown at him.

We broke some of the
nuts, and put the juice of
the canes in the thick white

cream which forms close to
the shell; and this made us
a dish so sweet and nice

‘that Fritz said it was fit for

aking. Turk did not seem
to like it, so we gave him
some of the meat in our
bag, which we could now
well spare.

Fritz and I then made
fast some nuts to a string,
which I tied round my
waist, while he took up
his canes, and we both set
off on our road home.



CHAPTER.

On our way back we
‘took up the gourd bowls
and plates, which we found
quite dry and hard as bone,
and put them in our bags.
We had scarce got through

the wood, when Turk made
a datti in Hrontanmicn atid
we saw a troop of apes rush
out of his way. But he
gave a leap and brought
down one that could not



22 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

climb so fast as the rest,
for she had a young one
in her arms. Turk made
short work of the poor
thing, for ere Fritz could
call the dog off, the ape
was dead. The young one,
Asmooormeas it isawy) E rity,
sprang on his back, put
its paws in his curls, and
would not let go, but made
a noise as if to chide him.
Fritz did not like this, for
he was in fear lest it should
item PEC knew ltnere
was but small risk of that,
for the poor thing was as
much in dread as he was.
Pe lenatmeconmine lane
from Fritz’s back, and took
i eup ine my) arms ikera
child. We found that it
was too young to seek its
own food, and, as Fritz
said he should like to take

it home, we put it on Turk’s

back.) ““Sitice’ you’ have
been the cause of its grief,”
Saidluib 1s itis butter inate elt
you should act the part of
its dam.” Turk did not at
first like this, but we soon
got him to bear the ape,
which held so tight by the
hair on the dog’s neck, that
it could not well fall off.
Fritz then led Turk with a
string, that he: might not
stray out of sight, or throw
off his charge, which I think
he would have done had
we not been on the watch.

It did not take us long
to reach the bank of the
stream near to our home.
Just as we came in sight of
the tent we heard Bill bark,
and saw him run off as fast
as he could to meet us.
This put Turk in asad way,
and made him leap up at
Uisvancutnyatoumeuntvee, 1s



A GOOD MEAL. 23



Fritz at last took the ape
from him and let him go.

I need not tell you how
glad my wife and sons were
to see us safe back, or with
what joy the boys took
pies eal live ape woulnes
Frizs arms. “How did
roullicatchn num?” \)'sard
Ernest; “what does he live
nly jecaian Hanke ant wit
fun we shall have with
him!” cried Jack.

At length, when they got
more staid, I told them that
we had brought them all
sorts of good things, but
that we had not met with
any of the men of whom
we went insearch. “God's
will be done,” said my wife,
Svetmucaiianey edna) thet
you have come back safe
tous. This day to me has
been an age; but put down
your loads, for we must

now go in and hear what
you have to tell.”
Frtz.and) 1) thenstold
them, by turns, where we
found the things we brought
with us, how we made and
dried the plates and bowls,
cut the canes, and caught
the ape in the wood. Our
tales had not come to an
end, when we were told
that it was time to sup.
Ernest had shot a wild
goose, and some fish had
been caught in the stream.
With these, and the Dutch
cheese that we brought from
the ship, we made a good
meal; but the boys would
not rest till we broke some
of the nuts, from which
they drank the milk, made
sweet with the juice of the
canes. I must tell you that
we ate our food in great
state from our gourd rind



24
plates, which my wife said
she should prize more than
if they were made of pure
gold.

“We can at least eat out
Olitheme seaidieeis anc
they were gold we could
do no more.”

That night the ape went
to bed with Jack and Fritz,
and we all slept in peace
till the cocks on the roof of
the tent woke us up.

INeximeayoritzearich) E
went back to the wreck to
save the live stock, and get
what else we had left that
might be of use to us. We
found it no light task, for
we had to make floats for
the cow, the ass, the sheep,
and the goats, throw them
in the sea, and tie them
with ropes to our raft. For
the sow we did the same,

though she soon broke

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

loose; but we were glad
to see the tide float her
straight to the shore. We
put on board the raft a
vast deal of food that had
not been spoilt by the sea,
though the waves had made
a breach in the sides of the
wreck. We then put to
sea with our train of live
stock made fast to the stern,
and drew them like a flock
of huge ducks in the water.

We had not gone far
when I heard a loud cry of
fear from Fritz, “We are
lost! We are lost ! See what
a great shark is on its way
to us!”

Though pale with fright,
he took aim with his gun,
and shot the fish in the
head. It sank at once, but
left a track of blood in the
sea, which I knew to bea
sign that we were once



A STRANGE SITE FOR A HOUSE. 25

more safe. We then got
to. land, and made fast our
freight to the shore. Ere
we had done this our friends
came to greet us, and give
us what help they could to
get the beasts out of the
stream, and take them up to
the tent. The poor things
were well nigh worn out;

but we took good care of

them, and put them to rest
on some dry grass that

my wife had laid out for
~ them.

That night we did not
sup on the ground. My
wife had spread a cloth on
the top of a cask, and we
Eden eat (On ae vue). WViikh
the knives and forks that
we had found in the ship
we ate a dish of hot ham
and eggs, nor did we fail
to. test the wine that I
had brought with me in

a small cask from the
wreck,

I can now well call to
mind the strange scene, as
we sat there round the cask,
with our two dogs, the
fowls, the ape, and the
doves, all in the light of
the red glow that came
from the fire which burnt
on the ground just by the
tert: ‘

Ere bed time my wife
had told me that while I
was at the wreck she had
gone in search of some
place in which we could
build a house, and be safe
from the wild beasts that
we had heard growl in the
night.

“And did you find one,
my dear?” I said.

“Qh, yes,” said she. “We
can take you to a great tree
that will serve us well, if

*



26

we can but get across the
stream with our goods.”

“But would you have
us roost, like fowls, in a
tree? How do you think
Wye COMlGmGeiNI UDI LO / OU
perch ?”

“Was there not a large
lime tree in our town in
which they built a_ ball
room, with stairs up the
trunk ?”

“To be sure there was,”
ec wleueane it we can not
build in it, we can at least
make use of its shade,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

and dwell in a hut on the
roots.”

Ernest said that he took
a string, and found that it
was twelve yards round.
This led me to think that
my wife's scheme was by
no means a bad one, and
that I would have a look
at the tree the next day.

Wiens ly nadine anciear
they had to tell, we knelt
down to pray, and then
sought a good night's rest,
which the toils of the day
made us much in need of.



CHAPTER V.

Wuen I rose from my
Dedierneminerxt cay.) livcatc|

to my wife; “Does it not

seem, my dear, as if God
had led us to this place,

and that we should do
wrong to leave it?”
“What you say may be
quite true, so far as it goes,”
she said; “but I must tell



PLANS FOR OUR SAFETY. 27

you that the mid day heat
is more than we can bear,
and that if we stay here
we may have to keep watch
aimee, oc (there are.
doubt, wild beasts of some
kind that will find us out;
and we should not trust

too much to our dogs, who

may lose their lives in a
fight with them.”

Pligdare cay jyouljare
Giclee Wearic. ye raat) Ido
not yet see how we can
cross the stream. We shall
first have to build a bridge.”

Beng te aigiave y Irilist
stay where we are, said
my wife.

elvdo) net thinke-so, my
om ale said. IN.o;.one
knows what he can do till
emuiices|

The boys were now all
out of their beds; and
while my wife went to milk

the cow and cook some
food, I made my plans
known tothem. They were
all glad when they heard
that we were to leave, and
each said he would help,
as far as he could, to build
the bridge.

The first thing to be done
was to find some strong
planks; and Fritz, Ernest,
and I went down to the
shore, and got in the boat,
which the tide soon took
down to the bay.

On a piece of land which
layah Core titemireh ve. corel
see some large dark thing,
round which flew a flock
of sea gulls. As we had
a wish to learn what it was,:
we put up a sail and caught
a gust of wind which had
sprung up, and this soon
brought the boat to the
spot. We made no noise,



28

but crept up the shore step
by step, and we got so near
that Ernest brought down
some of the birds with a
stick. Fritz was the first to
find out that what the sea
gulls had just left was the
huge fish he had shot in the
sea. It was a large shark,
and we could see the wound
in its head made by the
two balls from Fritz’s gun.
We cut off some parts of
the rough skin, which we
thought might serve us for
files, and then went back
tothe boat. I took a glance
at. the shore ere I got in,
and to my great joy saw
that some of the planks
‘and spars from the wreck
lay on the ground not far
off, Our next care was to
bind these so as to make
a raft, which we tied to, the
stern of the boat, and then,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

by the use of our oars, soon
made our way to the bay,
and up the stream to the
place where the bridge was
to be built. Our young
friends were glad to see us
back isotsoon) and rane
meet us; Jack had a cloth
in his hand, in which was
a store of cray fish and
crabs just caught in some
of the nooks of a rock up
the stream; Frank was full
of glee, and told how that
he had been the first to
find them out, and how
Jack had to wade up ‘to his
knees to get them.

“Do not fail to give God
thanks” \said ‘Te thatvour
lot has been cast where we
can pick up more food than
we can eat.”

It would take a long time
to tell how we brought all
the wood up to the spot,



THE BRIDGE. 29

how we built piers of stone
in the stream, and how we
. put the planks one by one
in their place; but we did
it at last, though it was late
at night when we left off
work, and once more sought
our tent. |
The next day we saw
the sun rise, and took our
first meal in haste, for we
knew we should have a
levemre ayey toil. (vil) the
stores that we could not
take with us were laid by
in the tent, the door of
which was made safe by a
row of casks that we put
round it. Each of us took
pare ainic bag) anat. ay Cun,
My wife and Fritz soon
led the way; the cow went
next; then the ass, with
Piamlemonmicndnaci.) |) lacks
led the goats, and on the
back,of one of them sat the

ape. Ernest took charge
of the sheep, and I brought
up the rear as chief guard.
Our dogs ran from the
front to the rear rank, and
Went tonana Hive. as’ \ihto
see that all was right, and
fom keep rus inellincwn\\ @
left the sow near the tent,
but we had not gone far
when she set off with a
loud grunt, and soon came
up with us. Our march
was slow, for the live stock
would stray here and there
to graze on the rich grass
that grew by the way; but
still we got on. We took
care to cross the bridge
one at a time, and found it
bear our weight well; but
once or twice we thought
the cow would step in
the stream, or fall off the
boards, when she went to
the sides to drink.



30 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Just as we had left the
bmege, lack criediout,) be
quick! here is a strange
beast with quills as long as
my) ara, oy Eberdogsi ran,
and I with them, and
found a large Por-cu-PINE
in the grass. It made a
loud noise, and shot out
its quills at the dogs, and
made them bleed. At this
Jack put his hand to his
belt, drew forth one of the
small arms I gave him, and
shot straight, with good
aiid tie (beast niwhich
fell dead on the spot. Jack
was proud of his feat, but
Fritz, who did not like to
be beat by one so young
as Jack, told him to use
more care, or he might
shoot one of the dogs, if
not one of us. My wife's
first thought was to dress
the wounds made by the





quills, which had stuck in
the nose of one of the
dogs, while the. boys made .
haste to pluck some of the
quills. \trom) ithe ysiiiaer
their strange prize.

At last our march came
to an end, and I saw for
the inser tiem tnenoredtn
trees that my wife had told
me of. They were of vast
size, and were, I thought,
fig trees. “If we can but
fix our tent up there,” I
said, “we shall have no
cause to dread, for no wild
beasts can reach us.” We
cent wlerank sot toe vane
sticks, with which to make
a fire, and my wife made
some’soup of the flesh of
the beast we had slain,
though we did not like it
so well as we did the ham.
and cheese we brought
with us.



THE FLAMINGO. ; 31



CA EL

Tue meal at an end, my
first thought was to make
some steps by means of
which we could reach the
first strong branch of the
mee One hanantrrot ite
root which rose high up
out of the earth, so as to
form an arch some six feet
from the ground, we laid a
large piece of sail cloth,
and this kept off both the
dew and the flies. Ernest
and I then went in search
of some thick canes that
grew in the sands hard by.

These we cut down, and,.

with the aid of some strong
string, we bound them to
four long poles, and thus
made a pair of steps that
would, we thought, reach
far up the trunk.

On our way back from
the sands, one of the dogs
made a dart at a clump
Oly reeds, wancheetitnOomy ait
large birds rose on the
wing with a loud noise.
Fritz let fly at them, and
brought down two at a
shot. One of them fell
quite dead, but its mate,
though hurt in the wing,
made use of its long legs
so well, that it would have
Cou Ol Mime had) net
held it till we came up.
The joy of Fritz, to have
caught such a strange bird,
was so great that he would
have us at once bind it
by the neck and take it
back with us. “Look,” said
Ernest, “what fine plumes
he has, and you see he has



32 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

web feet like a goose, and
has long legs like a stork:
thus he can run on land
as fast as he can swim.”
soViGs, i Sdtelenlieecdanich ene
can fly with more speed
through the air, for these
birds have great strength
in their wings. In fact,
few birds have such means
of flight as the Fia-mty-co.”

Loud were the cries of
Jack and Frank when we
calle aiemstonbs |) out. imy
wife thought the great bird
might need more food than
we could spare. I told
her that it would feed on
small fish and worms, and
not rob our geese of their
grain. I then tied him to
a stake near the stream by
a cord that left him room
LOulis ue aienicneace) anicein
a few days we were glad
to find that he knew us,

and would come at a call,
like a tame bird.

While I sat on the grass
with my sons, late in the
day, I thought I would try
to make a bow that might
be of some use to kill
birds, and thus save our
shot. This I did with a
long cane and a piece of
string, and then made a
dart with a sharp point,
which I shot off and found
it would go straight. The
branch of the tree on which
we were to fix our hut
was so high that our steps
would not near reach it.
“What shall we do now?”
said 4d ritze WV alge and
you shall see, my lad.”
I then tied some strong
thread to the dart, and
shot it over the branch;
then tied a piece of rope
to the, end of the, thread,





Ned driving the Birds away from the dead Shark.



I MAKE A BOW AND ARROW. 33

and drew that up, and at
last made a long row of
cane steps, with a rope at
each side, which we drew
Upmeoewtiie, first
branch. The boys were
now all in haste to climb
the tree, but I chose that
Jack, who was light of
build and sure of foot,
should go up first and try
the strength of our work.
Fritz went up next with
some nails, and made the
ropes fast to the tree, while
irciove sstalcesmin tlic
ground to keep them firm
at the foot. It was now
time for me to mount, and
up I went with an axe to lop
off the twigs and smooth
the bough that was to form
the ground of our new
house. I sent the boys
down out of my way, and
kept hard at work till it

strong

was late, for the sky was
clear, and the moon lent
me her beams of light to
Seenbin -
When I came down I
found that my two sons,
whom I sent down, had
not been there. I was at
a loss to think where they
could be, but my fears
were soon gone, for just
then I heard them sing a
hymn, the sound of which
came from one of the top
boughs of the tree. |
When they came down,
my wife spread a good
meal on the ground, which
we ate as best we could,
and then made our beds
of dry moss, round which
we put heaps of twigs.
These we set light to, as
watch fires to keep off
wild beasts and _ snakes.

The toils of the day had



34 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



made the boys tired, and
they were soon in a sound
sleep, but my wife and I
took it in turns to watch
through the whole night
long. |

We were all out of our
beds as soon as light was
in the sky, and set to work
to hoist up the planks that
were to form the floor of
our ‘hut. These we laid
down on the branch, with
their ends made fast to a
cross piece of wood that
we had to fix to the trunk
Ounce w tree, )) Cur) (nails
were long, and we drove
each one of them home, so
that we had no cause to
fear the strength of our
work. Some parts were

rough, but we. took care
to make our floor quite
smooth, and put up a large

sail cloth to serve for a

roof till we had time to
make one of wood. By
the time we had done this
the day was far spent, and
we Wete alli welad to, lang
by our tools and rest our
limbs. That night we lit
our fires round the tree,
tied the dogs to the roots,
and went up to sleep out
of harm's way for the first
time weiice we “leit tie
ship. When the steps were
drawn up we all felt that
we were now safe at last,
and that we had brought
the toils of the day to a
good end. |



THE LORD'S DAY. 35

CHAPTER VII.

We did not wake next
day till the sun shone in
upon us. I told my wife
and sons that as it was the
Lord’s day we would do
no work. Our beasts and
birds had first to be fed.
This was done by my wife,
who then brought us some
hot milk, and made us sit
down on the grass and take
it. When our meal was
done, I got on a log in
front of my sons, and we
all sang a psalm we knew
by heart. Then I sought
to teach them in the best
way I could think of, and
spoke to them thus :—

“There was once on a
time a Great King, who
had two vast realms, one

_ known as the Land of Light

and Truth, and one as the
Land of Night and Sloth.
Those who dwelt in the
first were full of life and
joy. The King held his
court at the Place of Rest,
where all was bright. The
Create aim. and, joy, Oneal
who dwell there was to
wait on Him, for they were
bound by a bond of love.
“This King had a land,
not far off, which He made
for a time the place where
those for whom He had
so much love should dwell
ere they went one by one
to the Place of Rest. This
land was the Home of
Earth. He told each of
them that this was to be
their home but for a time,

and that all who did His



36 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

will and kept His laws
should go to the Land of
Light and Truth. He gave
to His Son the right to
rule the host that dwelt in
the Home of Earth, and
set forth to them what they
were to do, and all the ills
that would come to them
if they did not do as they
were bid. The Prince told
them that ships would be
sent from time to time to
bring off such as did His
will, and take them to the
Land of Light.

“At first they were all
glad to hear the way in
which they were to live,
and the terms on which
they could ‘reach the Land
of Light and Truth. Sad
to tell, they soon broke the
King’s laws, and paid no
heed to what they knew
fo be His will; each, in

fact, did as he chose, and
thought more of his ease,
sloth, or self will, than of
the Place of Rest or the
Land of Light. Still there ©
were a few who did as
they had been taught, and
dwelt in peace, in the hope
that they would please the
King and at last reach the
place where He held his
court.

“The King was true to
his word. From time to
time ships came to the
Home of Earth, and each
bore the name of some
dire evil. . At last a great
ship was sent, the name
of which was Zhe Grave,
which bore the flag of
Death. The flag was of
green and black. To the
good it was a sign of hope,
but the bad were thrown
by the sight of it into



THE LORD'S DAY. an

a state of gloom. These’

ships were not seen till
they came close to the
shore, and then the crew
were sent forth to find
those whom they were told
to seize. Some went back
with them full of joy, but
mosteiwere seen to,, weep
and mourn their fate. So
soon as they were brought
in sight of the Great -King,
the Prince took those who
had done well, and put a
white robe on them; but
those who went their own
way when on the Home
of Earth, He sent down
to toil in deep dark mines
till time shall be no more.”

When my sons had heard
my tale to the end they
all knew what it meant; I
then drew from them their
views of what they ought
to do to please and serve

the Great King, and did
my best to teach them the
truths that would guide
them safe to the Place of
Rest, when the time should
come for them to leave

the Home of Earth. We

then Saticaeay lytmr, sane

my wife drew from her
bag the Br-stz, which I-
gave to one of the boys,
who read from it in a
clear, loud voice. When
this was brought to a close,
we all knelt down on the
grass to pray, and to ask
God to bless the means
we took to learn His will. ©
We did no work that
day, but took a long stroll
up the banks of the stream,
and spoke of such things
as we felt would cause our
minds to dwell on the
truths we had heard read
out of the Word of God.



38 Pie SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



The next day Ernest and
Jack tried their skill with
the bow, and brought down
some small birds that came
to the great tree in quest
of figs. I gave them leave
to kill what they could;
for I knew that, if put in
casks made air tight with
grease, they would keep
Momearchetn of mime, and
might prove a boon, if our
stock of food should get
low.

When we sat down to
dine, the thought struck
me that it would be as
well to give some name to
each part of the strange
land that was now known
to us. “We can, then,”
said I, “speak. of a place
as we did when we were
at home, and not have to
say so much ere we can
tell the spot we mean.”

This was at first the source
of some fun, for Fritz said
we should call the bay
where we had found the
shell spoons by the name
of Spoon Bay; but Jack,
who still had a mark on
his toe where the crab
gave him a pinch, thought
we ought to term it Crab
Bay.

“Tf you will let me give
ity a fame, ‘said myavalics
“T should wish to know
it by some term that will
make us bear in mind how
good God was to us to
lead our raft there, and
L' done think Sate Bay,
will be a bad name for
it.”

“Somat it became
and from that time Safe
Bay had a name.

“What shall be the name

of the spot where we spent



THE NEST.

our first night on shore?
You shall give that its
flamer esata to Eritz,

@ieew ius, .call ‘iti ent
House,” said he.
raiivat will, do.esaid pb

“And now for the spot
Sie ene ami@uiin OF )) atc
Bay, where we found our
planks ?”

onagic "| Pome... \, Said
Ernest, and we gave it
that name, frotn the fact
that the great fish which
Fritz shot had been found
tere. Ihe place from
which Fritz and I sought
iinnain Ton, vagthaee, Ol,’ Out
ship mates was to be
known as No Man’s Cape.
Then we had the Boys
Bridge, which name I gave
it from a wish to please
my sons, who had done
so much to build it.

“But what shall we call

*39

the place which is now
mess deat to Ws) alla meal
le

Fritz thought we should
Cale peae ost, Fark
said he should like us to
give it the name of Zhe
Perch, while Frank chose
Dove Cote as the best he

jcould think of.

“Now, my dear,” said
Petoumiy wate, “it -ts) acim

What © shall

turn. we |
say?”

etl) us); callin yamee
Nest,’ said she; and with

that I gave each of my
young birds a glass of
sweet wine.

“Here's to ‘The Nest, ”
said I; “and may we live
long to bless the day and
the means that mcuent us
Rietic.

| themeold |) britz ae
draw a map of the place



40

in his spare time, and to
mark down the name of
each spot as near as he
could.

When the heat of the
day was past, I told my
sons that I should be glad
- to take a walk with them.

iiteyerall lett otf work,
threw down their tools, and
made haste to join me.
My- wife said that she
should like to go with us;
so we left The Nest in
charge of Turk, and bent
our course to the banks of
the stream. On eur way
we went past some shrubs
and rare herbs, which my
wife knew well how to
make use of should we fall
sick; and Ernest, who had
read much, and knew most
kind of plants, found a
large spot of ground on

which grew a fine kind of

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Po-ta-ro. At these the
boys set to work with such
zeal, that we soon had a
full bag of the ripe fruit.
We then went on to Tent
House, which we found in
the same state as when we
left it to cross the stream
on our way to the great
EEE; |

We found that our ducks
and geese, had grown so
wild that they would not
come near us; so, while my
wife and I went to pick up
such things as we thought
we might take back with
us, Ernest and Fritz were
sent to catch them, and to
tie their legs and wings,
and in this way we got
them at last to The Nest.
It was late at night when
we came in sight* of the
tree, and the weight of the
fowls and bags that we



THE WRECK. 4I

brought back tried our|found, which we ate with

strength.

My wife soon} milk from the cow and the

made a fire to boil some| goat, and then went up to

of the fruit that Ernest had |The Nest for the night.



Chir EE Re Te

Ir took the whole of the
next day to make a sledge,
to which we tied the ass,
and drove to Tent House.
On our sledge we put such
of the casks which held
food, and took them back
to The Nest. Inthe course
of the same week, Fritz
and I went once more to
the wreck, and this time
we brought off chests of
clothes, pigs of lead, cart
wheels, sacks of maize,
oats, peas, and wheat, and
a small mill that had been
used by the cook on board

to grind the peas with
which he made soup for
the crew. When we thad
put these on board the
raft, there was not an inch
of room to spare. With a
strong bar we broke down
some of the doors, and.
took such parts of the ship
as we thought would aid
us to build our house,
which as yet was far less
safe than I could wish.
These we bound: with
cords, and made them float
back at the stern of the.
raft.



42

When we got to the
shore, my wife and the
three boys were there to
greet us. My first care
was to send for the sledge,
and with this we took
most of our new wealth

up to The Nest.

See bsttzerold ranks thatiic
had seen a chest of gold
coin on the wreck.

Oly Do wash you had
brought it with you,” said
ie

“And what would you
have done with it when
you hadssot iu: \saie yl.

“T would buy some nice
sweet cakes, for the bread
we have is so hard.”

This made us all laugh,
and Frank with the rest,
for he soon saw that the
coin would be of no use
in a place where there
were no shops.

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

The next day I told my
sons that they must now
leaunt to 1 Tun, ecomles py mto
climb, and to throw stones
Siiaielt. "at a, malar
these things would be of
great use to them in their
new mode of life.

I next taught them to
use the Las-so, by means
of which men catch the
wild horse on the vast
plains of the New World.
I tied two stones to the
ends of a cord some yards
in length, and flung off
one of them at the trunk
OL a VvOune itee. the. cond
went round and round it
in a coil, and bound it so
tight that I could have
drawn it to me had it not
been fast in the ground.
This trick the boys were
not slow to learn; and
riz, i) aashontetimne



THE LASSO. — 43

could take an aim as well
with a stone as he could
with his gun.

As yet we had not seen
muen of the isle: for
though Fritz and I had
gone some few miles round
.the place where we dwelt,
it took most of our time
to build the house, and
this kept us hard at work
Medi the tree, whut, one
day we made up our minds
that we would all start on
a tour. We rose at dawn,
put the ass in the sledge,
took what food we thought

we should need, and set

out from The Nest just as
the sun rose.

My sons and I took our
guns, Prank «sat in; the
sledge, my wife led the
ass, and the ape rode on
the back of our dog Turk.

When we came to the

wood where Fritz found
the ape, he told them by
what means we got the
nuts, but now there were
no apes there to throw
them down.

“Oh, if one would but
fall from the trees,” he said.

The words had but just
left his lips when a large
nut fell at his feet. He
made a start back, and two
more came down near the
same spot.

elt seeins* «SalG@ielta was
if we had but-to wish for
a thing and we get it.”

As the nuts were far
from ripe, I was at a loss to
know how they could fall
off the tree, for I could not
see an ape nor a bird near.
All at once Jack cried
out, “See, see! here comes
our friend, but I can't say
much for his looks.”



With that I went close
up to the tree, and saw a
large land crab on its way
down the trunk. Jack
struck a blow at him with
a stick, but did not hit the
beast. He then took off
his coat and threw it on
the crabs head, while I
made an end of him with
an axe. I told them that
these crabs climb the trees
and break off the nuts, as
we had seen, and then
come down to feast on
them at their ease.

“But how do they crack
the nuts?” said Jack.

Shey finale ma) witiole
through the shell at the
thin end, and then suck
them dry.”

The dead crab was put
in the sledge, and we went
on through the wood. The
wild plants which lay in

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

our path made us stop now
and then to clear the way
with an axe, so that we did
not get on fast and the
heat was so great that I
thought we should have
had to seek the shade of
thew next iilarce) tccemmae
could find. When we
came to the Gourd Wood,
we sat down to make some
more bowls and flasks to
take back with us. Ernest
had gone to try what new
thing he could find, but he

had not been from us long,

‘when we heard him call

out—

“A wild boar! A great
wild boar! Come here,
pray !”

We took up our guns,
and went at once with the.
dogs to the spot. We
soon heard Turk give a

loud bark, and a long deep



.8

THE IGUANA.

grunt told us that the dogs
had found the beast, and
were no doubt at his
throat. But just then we
heard Ernest laugh, and
saw the two dogs come
through a clump of brush
wood, with our old sow
fast by the ears. She did
not seem to like the way
in which they had put an
end to her feast of fruit, so
she ran back as soon as
we told the dogs to let go
their hold of her ears.
“But with all our sport,’
Said. Ptiize we shave.” a
poor show of game. Let
us leave the young ones,
and set off to see what we
can meet with.” Ernest,
who was not so fond of
field sports as the rest, sat
down with Frank, and. we
left them and my wife at
the gourd tree, while Fritz

45



and Jack set off with me
to a high rock which we
saw on the right.. Jack
went first and broke off
the twigs, to let him pass
through, with as much ease
as if he had been born to
that kindvot wonkmcal rit Z
look here,” said he, as he
made his way to the rock.

“What have you found
now?” said Fritz.

“T don’t know what it is,
butatsractinerizes!

When I went up I saw
at once that it was a large
I-cu-a-wa, the flesh and
eggs of which are both
good for food. Fritz would
have shot at it, but I told
him that its scales were no
doubt shot proof, and that
I knew a way to catch it
that I thought would do
quite as well. I had heard
that these and such like



46

beasts will stand still if you
Bebe air On aapipem so
I crept near, and made a
low sound with my lips,
while I held in my right
hand a stout stick, to which
I had tied a cord with a
noose, and in my left hand
a slight wand. It soon
woke from its sleep, but
did not seem to fear us. I
saw it first move its tail,
and then draw its head
from side to side, as if to
look where the sound came
from. I then threw the
noose round its neck, drew
it tight, got on its back
with a leap, and thrust the
-wand up its nose, which is
the sole part of the beast
where there are no hard

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

scales. It bled at once,
and was soon dead, nor
did it seem to feel any
pain, Our prize eangiieh
was near five feet long, was
no slight weight to lift. I
got it at last on my back;
while Jack, in his fun, held
up my train, which was,
of course, its long tail, and
thus we went back to the
gourd tree, where we found
the rest quite safe.

It took us a long time to
reach The Nest that night. |
My wife did her best to
dress some of the flesh of
the land crab, but it was
tough, and did not taste
so nice as the soup made
from the beast that we had
caught by the nose.



THE WAX TREE.

47

CEUAE PER x,

TuErRE was to be seen so
much that was new to us,
and so much to be found
that we could make good
mec of, Maem niz) andi.
spent the whole of the next
day in the woods. We
took the ass and one of
the dogs with us, but left
all else at home.

Our way first lay through
a dense wood, where we
saw no end of small birds,
but such game could not
now tempt Fritz to waste
his shot. We then had to
wonosc a vast plata and, to
wade through the high
grass, which we did with
care, lest we should tread
on some strange thing that
might turn and bite us.

Wercame at laste toa

grove of small trees, and
in their midst. |). sawegae
bush, which I knew to be
the wax tree, for the wax
grew on it like white beads.
I need not say how glad
I was to find so great a
prize. We had up to this
time gone to bed ‘as soon
as the sun went down, for
we had no lamp to use;
but as we could now make
Wax) (Hahtswelymeol | Enity
that we had found what
would add two or three
hours per day to our lives.
We took as much of the
wax as would serve us for
some time, and then made
our way out of the grove.
Fritz here found a nest, in ©
which was a young green

and gold bird. This he



48

took home with him, in
the hope that he might
tate il) ang geteaeubmitnto
speak. |

Our path was now so
clear that we could walk
side by side with ease, and
talk.of what we had seen.

“How came you,’ said
Fritz, “to know so much
of the queer beasts, trees,
and plants that we have
found here?”

“When young,’ said I,
“TI used to read all the
books that fell in .my
way; and those that told
of strange lands and what
was to be seen in them
NaG stor) Me as oreat ea
charm as they have for
Ernest, who has read a
great deal, and knows more
of plants than you do.”

“Well,” said he, “I will
do the same if I but get

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the chance. Can you tell
what is the name of that
huge tree oneeane sfioht:
It must be at least three
score feet high. See, there
are balls on the bark.”

We went close to it, and
found that these balls were
of thick gum, which the
sun had made quite hard.
Fritz tried to pull one of
them off,.but felt that it
clung tight to the bark,
though he could change
its shape with his warm
hanes. ss ook, esateusire
“T feel sure that this 1s
the In-pi-a Rus-Ber which
we used to clean our
school books with.” I
£00k; aa piece: OF aitmnamnny,
hand, and said, “To be
sure it is. . What shall we
not find in this rich land 2”
I then told him how the
men in the New World



3
(ox
3
=,
an
Ss
3
n
5S)
Ss
cS
N
yy
os
be





THE SAGO TREE.

made flasks of this gum,
in which form it is sent
to all parts of the world.
“And I do not see why
we should not make boots
imei the sesame way.
hye have! butitovmlllarsock
with sand, then put gum
ally rounds it. swhile inva
soft state, till it is as thick
as we need, then pour the
sand out, and we _ shall
have made a shoe or a
boot that will at least keep
out the damp, and that is
more than mine do just
now. |

Fritz now gave full play
comic (Oy. marl ehave | not
done a bad day's work,”
said he, “to have found
such a tree as this.”

Not far from this we
came to a bush, the leaves
of which were strewn with
a white dust; and close

by were two or three more
in the same state. I cut a
slit in the trunk of one of
these, which had been torn
up by the wind, and found
it full of the white dust,
which I knew by the taste
to be Sa-co. We took all
of this that we could get
out of the tree, for it would
add to our stock of food;
and when our bags were
full we laid them on the
back of the ass, and set
off to find our way back
to The Nest. »

“Each day brings us
fresh wealth,” said my wife,
when she saw what we
had brought her; “but
think we might now try to
add to our goods.” I knew
that she had some fear lest ,
we should one day get lost
in the woods, or meet with
wild beasts, so I at once



50

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

said that we would now

stay at home, at least for
some days.

My first work was to
make some wax lights, for
my wife could then mend
our clothes at night, while
we sat down to talk. This
done, the next task they
gave me was to make a
churn. What with my lack
of skill, and want of tools,
I thought it best not to
aim too high, so I took a
large gourd, made a small
hole in the side, and cut
out as much as I could, so
as to leave but the rind.
In this I put the cream,
laid a piece on the hole,
and bound it up so that
none could come out. The
. boys then held a_ cloth,
and on it I put the gourd,
which they made to roll
from side to side. They

kept up this game with
great mirth for near an
hour, when my wife took
off the string, and found
that the churn had done
its work well.

“We shall not have to
eat dry bread now,” said
Frank; and I was as glad
as he that such was the
case.

As our sledge was not
fit to use on rough roads,
my next work was to make
a, cat, ulishadi breug nie
pair of wheels from the
wreck, so that my task did
not prove a hard one. It
is true I did not make
what you might call a neat
job of it, but for all that
we found it of great use.

While I was thus at
work, my wife and the
boys took some of the
fruit trees we had brought



A NEW TASK. 3 5

with us, and put them in
the ground where they
thought they would grow
best. The vines were put
round the roots of our
tree, in the hope that they
would grow up the trunk.
On each side of the path
that led. from The Nest to
the Boys Bridge they put
a row of young nut trees,
which would, as they grew
up, shade us from the sun
all the way to the stream.
To make the path hard we
laid down sand from the
sea shore, and then beat
it down with our spades.
We were for six weeks
at this and such like work.
Each day brought with it
health and strength for us
all, and we were loth to
spare any pains to make
The Nest, and all that

could be seen near it, look

neat and trim, though there
were no eyes but our own
to view the scene.

One day I told my sons
that I would at last try
to make a flight of stairs
in place of the cane steps
with rope sides, which were
a source of fear to my
wife, and, to tell the truth,
the worst part of our house.
As yet we had not used
them much, for we came
down as soon as we got
out of bed, and did not go
up till it was time for rest;
but the rain would some
day force us to keep in
The Nest, and then we
should like to go up and
down stairs with more ease
than we could now climb
the rude steps. To make
a flight of stairs of such
great length was no slight
task, and each time that T



52 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



thought of it I gave it up
as a thing we could not do.
But I now had a mind to
try our skill at this kind
of work. I knew that a
swarm of bees had built
their nest in the trunk of
our tree, and this led me
to think that there might
be a void space in it some
way up. “Should this
prove to be the case,’ I
said, “our work will be
half done, for we shall
then have but to fix the
stairs in the tree round the
trunk.” As soon as I had
thus spoke, the boys got
up and went to the top of
the root to tap the trunk,
and to judge by the sound
how far up the hole went.
But they had to pay for
their want of thought: the
whole swarm of bees came
out as soon as they heard

the noise, stung their cheeks,
stuck to. their hair and
clothes, and soon put them
to flight.

It took my wife and I
some time to drive off the
bees, and to put fresh earth
on the wounds to ease the
pain the poor boys felt
from the stings. We found
that Jack, who was at all
times rash, had struck the
bees’ nest with his axe, and
was much more hurt by
them than the rest; in fact,
his face was so bad, that
we had to swathe the whole
OL Mein cloths), These
who went to his work in

his slow way, got up to it

last, and was the first to
run off when he saw the
bees; thus he did not get
more than a sting or two,
but the rest were some
hours ere they could see



WE SMOKE THE BEES.

out of their eyes. When
they were free from pain,
we took means to deal
with the bees. I took a
large gourd, which had
long been meant to serve
for a hive, and put it ona
Send. Nether made 1a
straw roof to keep it from
the sun and wind, and as
by this time it grew dark,
we left the hive there for
the night.

Next day we rose at the
first glimpse of dawn, and
the boys, whose wounds
were now quite well, went
with me to help to move
the bees to the new home
we had made for them.
©ur first work was to stop
with clay all the holes in
the tree but one through
which the bees were wont
to go in to their nest. To
this I put the bowl of

53

a pipe, and blew in the
smoke of the weed as fast
as I could, with a view to
drug them with its fumes.
At first we heard a loud
buzz like the noise of a
SiOrim) aia om aout ome
more I blew my pipe the
less grew the sound, till at
last the bees were quite
stil) sand? then l (took seme
pipe out of the hole.

We now cut out a piece
of the trunk, three feet
square, and this gave us,a
full view of the nest. Our
joy was great to find such
a stock of wax, for I could
see the comb reach far up
the tree. I took some of
the comb, in which the
bees lay in swarms, and
put it by on the plank.
Me rest euveiniea Gasle
which my wife tied down
with sail cloth, lest the bees,



54

led by the smell, should
come to claim their own.

We then put the gourd
on the comb that held the
swarm, and took care that
the queen bee was not left
out. By these means we
EOOmmAOt ea ive: Ol fine
bees, and the trunk of the
tree was left free for our
use.

We had now to try the
length of the hole. This
we did with a long pole,
apd found it reach as far
up as the branch on which
our house stood.

“You see,’ said I to my
sons, “that this tree has no
sap in its trunk, but, like
some that grow in the land
we came from, it draws its
means of life through the
bark.”

We now cut:a square
hole in that side of the

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

trunk next the sea shore,
and made one of the doors
that we had brought from
the ship to fit in the space.
We then made the sides
smooth all the way up, and
with planks and the staves
of some old casks, built
up the stairs round a pole
which we made fast in the .
ground. To do this we
had to make a notch in the
pole and one in the side
of the trunk for each stair,
and thus go up step by
step till we came to the top.
We had a good store of
strong nails, and with them,
and such toolsas we brought
back on the raft, which we
had now learnt to use with
some skill, we got on well
with our task. Each day
we spent a part of our
time at what we could now
call the farm, where the



THE BOYS PETS. ie

beasts and fowls were kept,
and did odd jobs as well,
so that we should not make
too great a toil of the flight
of stairs, which took us
some six weeks to put
up.
One day Fritz caught a
fine Ea-crz, which he tied
by the leg to a branch of
the tree, and fed with small
birds. It took him a long
while to tame, but in time
he taught it to perch on
his wrist, and to feed from
his hand. He once let it
go, and thought he would
have lost it, but the bird
knew it had a good friend,
for it came back to the tree
at night. From that time
it was left free, though we
thought that some day its
love of war and wild sports
would tempt it to leave us
for the rocks of the sea

shore, where Fritz had first
found it.

Each of my boys had
now some pet to take care
of; and, I may say, to tease,
for they all thought they
had a fair right to get some

fun out of the pets they

could call their own; but
they were kind to them,
fed them well, and kept
them clean.

In what I may term my
spare time, which was
when I left off work out
of doors, I made a pair of
gum shoes for each of my
SOnswingnumce way 1) slag
told Fritz it could be done.
I do not know what we
should have done had we
not found the gum tree,
for the stones soon wore
out the boots we had,
and we could not have
gohe. through the woods



56

or trod the hard rocks with
bare feet.

By this time our sow had
brought forth ten young
pies) and eanewiens had
each a brood of fine chicks.
Some we kept near us, but
most
the wood, where my wife
said she could find them
when she had need to use
them.

I knew the time must
now be near when, in this

clime, the rain comes down

day by day for weeks, and
that it would wash us out
of The Nest if we did not
make a good roof to our
house. Then our live stock
would need some _ place
where they could rest out

Grete went | to;

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

of the rain. The thatch for
The Nest was of course
our first care; then we
made a long roof of canes
for our live stock, and on
this we spread clay and
moss, and then a thick coat
Of tar.wso thagit) was) vane
proof (from vena) tomvencds
This was held up by thick
canes stuck deep in the
ground, with planks made
fast to them to form the
walls, and round the whole
we put a row of cask staves
to serve for rails. ‘In this
way we soon had a barn,
store room, and hay loft,
with stalls for the cow, the
ass, and what else we kept
that had need of a place to
live in.



THE FLAX PLANT. 57

CRAP a Pain.

Frank one day found
some long leaves, to which,
from their shape, he gave
the name of sword leaves.
These he brought home to
play with, and then, when
he grew tired of them,
threw them down. As
they lay on the floor, Fritz
took some of them in his
hand, and found them so
limp; that he said he could
plait them, and make a
whip for Frank to drive
the sheep and goats with.
As he split them up to do
this, 1 could not but note
their strength. This led
me to try them, and I found
that we had now a kind
of flax plant, which was a
source of great joy to my
wife.

“You have not yet found
aljinine, (ismersaid,, “they
will be of more use to us
than this. Go at once and
search for some more of
these leaves, and bring me
the most you can of them.
With these I can make you
hose, shirts, clothes, thread,
rope; in short, give me
flax, and make me a loom
and some frames, and I
shall be at no loss for work
when the rain comes.”

I could not help a smile
at my wife's joy when she
heard the name of flax;
for there was still much to
do ere the leaves could take
the shape of cloth. But two
of the boys set off at once
to try to find some more of
the flax.



58 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

While they were gone,
my wife, full of new life,
and with some show of
pride, told me how I should
make the loom by means
of which she was to clothe
us from head to foot. Ina
short time they came back,
and brought with them a
good load of the plant,
which they laid at her feet.
She now said she would
lay by all else till she had
tried what she could make
of it. The first thing to be
done was to steep the flax.
To do this we took the
plant down to the marsh,
tied up in small bales, as
they pack hemp for sale.
The leaves were then
spread out in ‘the pond,
and kept down with stones,
and left there in that state
till it was time to take them
out and set them in the sun

to dry, when they would
be so soft that we could
peel them with ease. It
was two weeks ere the flax
was fit for us to take it out
of the marsh. We spread
it out on the grass in the
sun, where it dried so quick
that we took it home to
The Nest the same day.
It was then put by till we
could find time to make the
wheels, reels, and combs
which my wife said that
she would want to turn our
new found plant to its best
use. |

We now made haste to
lay (upasstore Lot Veamec:
nuts, wood, and such things
as we thought we might
want; and took care, while
it was still fine, to sow

wheat, and all the grain we

had left in our bags was
soon put in the ground.



THE RAINY SEASON.

The fear that the rain might
come and put a stop to our
work led us to take our
meals in haste, and to make
the days as long as we
could see. We knew that
the rain was close at hand,
for the nights were cold;
large clouds could be seen
in the sky, and the wind
blew as we had not felt
it since the night our ship
struck on the rock. |

The great change came
at last. One night we were
woke up out of our sleep
‘with the noise made by the
rush of the winds through
the woods, and we could
hear the loud roar of the
sea far off. Then the dense
storm clouds which we had
seen in the sky burst on us,
and the rain came down in
floods. The streams, pools,
and ponds on all sides were

59

soon full, and the whole
plain round us met our
view as one vast lake. By
good luck, the site of our
house stood up out of the
flood, and our group of
trees had the look of a
small isle in the midst of
the lake. |

We soon found that The
Nest was not built so well
as we thought, for the rain
came in at the sides, and
we had good cause to fear
that the wind would blow
the roof off. Once the
storm made such a rush at
it, that we heard the beams
creak, and the planks gave
signs that there was more

istrain on them than they

could bear. This dtove us
from our room to the stairs
in the trunk, on which we
sat in a state of fear till
the worst of the storm was



60

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



past. Then we went down
to the shed we had built
on the ground at the root
of the tree, and made the
best shift we could. All
our stores were kept heré,
so that the space was too
small to hold us, and the
smell from the beasts made

it far from a fit place for

six of us to dwell in; but
it was at least safe for a
time, and this was of course
the first thing to be thought
of. To dress our food we
had to make a fire in the
barn, and as there was no
place to let out the smoke,
it got dqwn.our throats and
made us cough all the day
long.

It was now for the first
time that my wife gave a
sigh for her old Swiss
home. But we all knew
Giaedumita Was PORTION TGe nt

grieve, and each set to
work to do all he could to
make the place look neat
and clean. Some of our
stores we took up the stairs
out of our way, and this
gave uS more room. As
we had cut square holes
in the trunk of the tree all
the way up, and put in
frames of glass that we
got from the ship, my wife
could sit on the stairs, with
Frank at her feet, and mend
our,,clothes.|)/ Bach dave
drove from the barn such
of the beasts as could bear:
to be out inthe rain. That
we might not lose them, I
tied bells round their necks ;
and if we found that they
did not come back when
the sun went down, Fritz
and I went out to bring
them in. We oft got wet
through to the skin, which



LIFE IN A BARN. 61

gave us a chill, and might

have laid us up if my wife
had not made cloth capes
and hoods for us to wear.
To make these rain proof,
I spread some of the gum
on them while hot, and this,
when dry, had the look of
oil cloth, and kept the head,
arms, chest, and back free
from damp. Our gum
boots came far up our legs,
so that we could go out
in the rain and come back
quite free from cold and
damp.

We made but few fires,
for the air was not cold,
save for an hour or two
late at night, and we did
not cook more than we
could help, but ate the
_ dried meat, fowls, and fish
we lrad by us.

The care of our beasts
took us a great part of the



day; then we made ours
cakes and set them to bake |
inva din) plate on Palen
fire. I had cut a hole in
the wall to give us light,
gnc put yavipaie Ol! ielace
in: it to keep eut the wind,
but the thick clouds hid
the sun from the earth, and
the shade of the tree threw
a gloom round our barn,
so that our day light was
but short, and night came
on far too soon. We then
made use of our wax lights,
and all sat round a bench.
My wife had as much as
she could well do to mend
the rents we made in our
clothes. I kept a log, in
which I put down, day by
day, what we did and what
we had seen; and then
Ernest wrote this out in a
neat clear hand, and made
a book of it, Fritz’ and



$

62

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



Jack drew the plants, trees, |some wild duck soup; and

and beasts which they had
found, and these were stuck
in our book. Each night
we took it in turns to read
the Word of God, and then
all knelt down to pray ere
we went to bed. Ours was
not a life of ease, it is true,
but it was one of peace and
hope; and we felt that
God had been so kind to
us that it would be a great
sin to wish for what it did
not please Him to grant us.

My wife did all she could
to cheer us, and it was no
strange thing for us to find
that while we were out in
the rain with the live stock
she had made some new
dish, which we would scent
as soon aS we put our
heads in at the door. One
night it was a thrush pie,
the next a roast fowl, or

once in a way she would
give us a grand feast, and

bring out some of all the

good things we had in
store.

In the course of our stay
in doors we made up our
minds that we would not
spend the next time of
storm and rain, when it
should come round, in the
same place. The Nest
would serve us well in that
time of the year when it
was fine and dry, but we
should have to look out for
some spot where we could
build a house that would
keep us from the rain the
next time the storms came.

Fritz thought that we
might find a cave, or cut ,
one out of the rocks by the
sea shore. I told him that
this would be a good plan,



SPRING TIME. 63



but would take a long while
to do. By this time the
boys were all well used
to hard work, and_ they
thought they would much
like to try their skill at
some new kind of work.

“Well,” said I, “we will
go to the rocks round Tent
House the first fine day
that comes, and try to find
some place that will serve
to keep us from the next
year's storms.”



CEPA Te RX,

I can not tell how glad
we all were when we. at
last saw a change in the
sky, and felt once more the
warm rays of the sun. In
a few days the floods sank
in the earth, and left the
ground of a bright green
hue; the air grew warm
and dry, and there were no
more dark clouds to be
seen in the sky.

We found our young
trees had put forth new

leaves, and the seed we
had sown had come up
through the moist ground.
The air had a fresh sweet
smell, for it bore the scent
of the bloom which hung
like snow flakes on the
boughs of the fruit trees;
the songs and cries of the
birds were to be heard on
all sides, and we could see
them fly from tree to tree
in search of twigs to build
their nests. This in fact



64

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



was the spring of the year, |and what there was left of

when all things put forth
new life; and we knew
that the time was now come
when we could once more
range the woods and till
the soil, and this made the
boys leap for joy.

Some planks had been
blown off the roof of The
Nest, and the rain had got
me nete) and there; so our
first job was to mend our
house, and make it fit to
sleep in.

This done, Jack,
ance LM sebiout if0
House. We found it in
asad) stateui) ihe storm
had thrown down the tent,
blown off some of the sail
cloth, and let in the rain
on our casks, some of which

Heitz,
Tent

held a store of food. Our

boat was still safe, but the
raft of tubs had broke up,

it lay in splints on the shore.

Our loss in the storm
had been so great that I
felt we ought at once to
seek for some place on the
rocks where we could put
what was left.

We went all round the
cliffs, in the hope that we
might find a cave, but in
vain. ‘

“There is no way but to
hew one out of the rock,”
said ttizs! itor) wermast
not be beat.”

Nell saidhy bat? sara
Jack; “we have each an
axe.) Why not. try iis
cliff at once 2”

I gave them leave to try,
and we soon set to work at
the rock. From this spot
we had a good view of the
whole bay, and could see
both banks of the stream.



The Fight with the Bears at the Cave.





WORK AT THE CAVE. 65

With a piece of chalk I
made a mark on the side
of the cliff, to show the
width and height that the
cave should be cut. Then
each took an axe to try
what kind of stuff our rock
was made of. We found
it a hard kind of stone;
and, as we were not used
to this sort of work, we
had not done much when
the time came for .us to
leave off.

We came back next
day, and got on with more
speed, though we thought
it would not take us less
than six months to make
the cave, if our work were
done at the same rate each
day.

At the end of five or six
days we had got through
the face of the rock, and
' we found the stone soft.

In a day or two more we
came to what was but hard
clay, which gave way at a
slight blow from the axe.

“We need not fear now,”
said I, “for we shall soon
have a hole as large as we
want.” |

With the earth we took
out we made a ridge in
front woh (the; acme mune
boys now got on so well,
and dug so much out, that
I had hard work to throw
up the earth on the bank.

One day, as Jack stuck
his pick in at the back of
the cave, which was now
more than eight feet from
the front, a great mass of
the rock fell in, and he
enedoute Looehere) I
have got through.”

“ Through what ?” ‘said I,
“Not through your hand,
I hope.”



66

“No, no, but through

neaoek.

PA ty thisy \ bagitzaeere ty ult
loud laugh.

“Why not say through
the world at’ orice, and
push your crow bar in till
you reach Ev-roer, which,
istmest) says, (lies) )iny ina
straight line from our feet.
Pe chouldd likelitowharve)ia
peep down such a hole, for
I might thus get a sight of
our dear Swiss home.”

Fritz and I went up to
the wall and found that
Jack was right, for he had
come \to a Clearspace.» | MHis
first thought was to jump
foeebut as) 1 (knew? that
there might be foul air in

the cave, I would not let

him risk his life. |

The boys then set fire to
some dry grass, and thrust
it in the hole, but it went





. THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

out at once, which was a
sure sign that the air was
not fit to breathe.

t ikiew ))¢hateeacumcatl
brought from the wreck a
box full of fire works, which
were used on board to make
signs to ships far out at sea.
I sent Fritz to Tent House
for these, though I thought
that they might be too
datip (Ho! //imalke )iicemnon
When he came back, I set
light to some of them, and
threw them in) the “hole.
They flew round, and threw
out a stream of sparks that
Lita up ened cave: | U\Vivem
these were burnt out, we
put in a heap of straw and
threw, @ dehitionmiien el bis
was now soon in a blaze,
and gave us a clear view
of the cave; but it was too
deep for us to see the end.

Our joy was so great ~



THE CAVE OF ROCK SALT.

that we sent Jack off home
oy iemesy 10) tell) tlre
good news, and to bring
back some wax lights. I
did not deem it safe for us
to go in the cave in the
dark, for there might be
pools or deep dry pits in
the ground.

Pigcapanay) Doihadk) qtist
thrown up on the bank the

67

one to each. I went in
first and led the way, and
the rest kept close at my
back. We had not gone
on more than a few steps
when we came to a dead
stop, struck with awe at
the grand sight that met
our view. The walls and
roof of the cave were lit
up, as it were, with star-

last spade full of earth that, like gems, while some hung

had been dug out, when
we heard a loud shout.
We got up on the top of
the cave, and saw that Jack
had brought back a tribe
gar iis >neelsy muniteniianse
car, drawn by the cow and
the ass, came on at a slow
facemtccd by | jiaekwom! ia
black ox, and in it were my
wife, Frank, and Ernest.
By the) help of -a flint
and steel I soon lit some
of the wax lights, and gave

down like glass drops from
the roof, and some rose up
from the ground at its sides
like blocks of spar. I broke
off a piece and put it to
my tongue.

“What does it taste like?”
said Jack. )

ol stind,)satds Weaunatrwie
are in a cave of rock salt.”

“We shall not have to
scrape the rocks to get our
salt now,” said Ernest, “ for
there is more here than



68

would serve a whole town
for a life time.”

When we went back to
The Nest that night we
laid out a plan for our new
home, for there could be
no doubt that the cave was
the best place for us to
dwell in, though we should
still sleep in The Nest
when. we went on that side
of the stream.

The next day we all set
to work; the floor of the
cave was quite smooth, and
the walls dry, so that we
could build at once. We
first cut holes in the sides
of the rock to let in the
light, and then brought
frames and panes of glass
from The Nest, and put
themin. We then brought
all the planks and wood we
could find, and built a

strong wall in the midst of

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



the cave. On the right side
of this wall we made three
rooms, two of which were
to be used as bed rooms,
and one to take our meals
in. -On the left side was a
room for my wife to cook in,
one to work in, to which we
gave the name of the shop,
and a place with stalls in it
for our live stock. At the
tback of these was a store
house, where we could keep
our stock of food and the
whole of our spare goods.

I need not say that it took
us some months to do all
this, nor that we had to toil
hard day by day, from morn
till night, ere we got to the
end of our task; but the
end did come at last, and
then the joy we felt that we
had done all this with our
own hands more than paid
us for our toil.



HARVEST TIME.

OPEAE ST Eine IT

Our fields near Tent
House had by this time
brought forth good crops
of wheat, maize, beans, and
peas; but as the work of
the Cave had for some
weeks kept us on this side
of the stream, we did not
know in what state we
should find our crops at
The Nest.

One day we all set out
for our old home. We
found our corn fields of a
rich brown hue, and saw
that the wheat was, for the
most part, fit to reap. This,
and a large patch of rye,
we cut down, and, as we
did so, whole flocks of birds

took to wing when we got
~ near them, while quails were
seen to run off at the sight

of our dogs, who had no
lack of sport that day.

We laid by the seed that
was quite ripe till the time
should come for us to sow
it, and put the rest in sacks.
Some of the wheat was
laid up in sheaves till we
should have time to beat
out the grain.

When we left The Nest
for the Cave, we could not
find the hand mill that we
had brought from the ship.
This now came to light, and
we took care to pack it up
to take with us, as we should
want it to grind our corn.

That night we slept once
more in the great tree; but
I must say that we did not
now sleep so sound there
as we used to do, nor did



70

we feel so safe as we did in
our rooms at Rock House.
The next day we were
to start a plan by means of
which our live stock would
not want so much of our
care. They had bred so
fast that we could well
spare some of them, and
these I thought might be
left in some place to seek
their own food, and yet be
in reach should we want
them. Vi:
~My wite took from her
hen roost ten young fowls,
and I took four young pigs,
four sheep, and two goats.
These we put in our large
cart, with such tools as we
thought we should need,
~ tied the black ox, the cow,
and the ass to the shafts,
and then set off from The
Nest.

We had to cross a wide

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

plain, anedeeinere: vel miet
with some dwarf plants, on
which, as Jack would have
it, grew snow balls.

Fritz ran to see what
they were, and brought me
a twig to which clung balls
of snow white down. I
held it up to show my wife,
for I knew the sight would
please her still more than
ier somse 31)

“Seco ) said tii thicmris
the Cort-ton plant, which
you have oft tried to find.
It seems to grow here as.
thick as weeds, and, if I
am a judge, it is of the
best kind.”

We got as much of this
as our bags could hold,
and my wife took care to
pluck some of the ripe seed,
that we might raise a crop
in our grounds at Tent
House.



A NEW FARM. 71

At the end of the plain
we came to the brow of a
high hill, from which the
eye fell on a view the like
_of which we had not yet
een) Prees fol cally chide
grew on the sides of the
hill, and a clear stream ran
ciiougiy diel plain iat}, 1s
base, and shone bright in
the rays of the sun.

Wesaid at once that this
should be the site of our
-new farm. Close by we
found a group of trees, the
trunks of which, as they
stood, would do for the
main props of the house.

I had long had a mind
to build a boat, and here I
at last came on a tree that
would suit. Fritz and I
went for a mile or two in
search of what we could
find, and by the time we
came back my wife had



put up our tent for the
mistts), We}\ thenpaligmeac
down to sup, and went to
rest on. beds made of the
bags of the white down
that we brought from the
trees on the plain.

The next day we rose at’
dawns); (hey trcess wiiela
were to form the frame of
our farm house stood on
a piece of land eight yards
long by five wide. I made
a deep cut in each of the
trunks, ten feet from the
ground, and put up cross
beams to -form a roof, on
which we laid some bark
in such a way that the rain

would run off.

We were hard at work
for some days at the Farm
House. The walls we built
of thin laths and long reeds,
wove close for six feet from
the ground, but the rest we



72 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



made of thin cross bars to
let-in both light and air.
We made racks to store
hay and such like food for
the live stock, and put by
some grain for the fowls,
for our plan was to come
from time to time to feed
them, till they got used to
the place.

Our work took us more

time than we thought; and |

as our store of food got
low, we sent Fritz and Jack
home to bring us a fresh
stock, and to feed the beasts
we had left at Tent House.

While they were gone,
Ernest and I made a tour
of the woods for some miles
round the new Farm. We
first took the course of the
stream that ran by the foot
of the hill) Some way up
we came to a marsh on the
edge of a small lake, and



here in the swamp grew a
kind of wild rice, now ripe
on the stalk, round which
flew flocks of birds. We
shot five or six of these,
and I was glad to note the
skill with which Ernest now
used his gun. I took some
of the rice, that my wife
might judge how far it was
of use to us as food.

We went quite round
the lake, and saw plants
and trees that were not
known to me, and birds
that Ernest said he had not
seen in any of the woods
nearei he! Nest) butawe
were most struck with the
sight of a pair of black.
swans, and a troop of young
ones that came in their
train. Ernest would have

‘shot at them, but I told

him not to kill what we
did not want for use.



A HALF WAY HOUSE.

We did not get back till
late in the day. Jack and
Fritz, whom we met just
as we came round the foot
of the hill, had done their
task well, for they had a
good stock of food in a
sack that lay on the back
of the ass, and they brought
the good news that all was
well at home.

We spent four more days
at the Farm, and then left
ie inesticl a stateias: to. be
fit for our use when we
chose to go back to it.

ite
but a part of our plan, for
we had made up our minds
to build a sort of half way
house, or cot, in which we
could rest on our way to
the Farm. This took us
six days to do. The spot
we chose lay by the side of
a brook, and was just such



Farm House was’

73

a place as would tempt one
forpstop dnd) | resumen
shade of the trees that grew
on the bank. While at the
brook, I made a boat out
of the tree we found at the
Pam ancmetagie wit. bac
with us to Tent House in
the cart.

We had still two months
ere the rain would set in,
and this left us time to put
the last touch to our cave.
We laid the whole floor
with clay, and spread on it
some fine sand, which we
beat down till it was quite
smooth and firm. On this
we put sail cloth, and threw
down goats’ hair and wool
made moistwith gum. This
was well beat, and, when
dry, made a kind of felt
mat that was warm and soft
to tread on, and would keep
the damp from our feet.



74 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

By the time these works
were done our cave was in
a fit state for us to dwell in.
We did not now dread the
rain, for we were safe out
of its reach, and there was
no need that we should go
out init. We had a warm
‘light shop to work in by
day, a snug place. where
we could take our meals,
and dry bed rooms in which
we could sleep in peace.
Our live stock we kept in
a shed at the back of the
cave, and our store room
held all that we could want.

When the rain at length
set in, we all had some task
that kept us close at work
in the cave, My wife took
her wheel or her loom, both
of which I had: made for
her, for this kind of work
fell to her share from choice.

By the help of the wheels

‘who





of one of the ship's guns I
had made a lathe, and with
this I could turn legs for
stools and chairs. Ernest,
too, was fond of the lathe,
and soon learnt to do such
work quite as well as I.

At dusk, when we had
done our work for the day,
we brought out our stock
of books, and sat down to
read by the light of a lamp.

At times, Jack and Frank
would play a tune on their
flutes, which I had made
out of reeds; and my wife,
had a sweet voice,
would sing some of the old
Swiss songs, that brought
to our minds the joys of
home.

Though we were by no
means dull, nor in want of
work to fill up our time, we
were glad when the time
came for the rain to cease,



THE WHALE.

and when we could gaze
once more on the green
fields) We went out the
first fine day, and took a
long walk by the base of
the cliff’ On the shore we
found a dead whale, which
the sea had no doubt thrown
up in the storm. We had
long felt the need of oil;
for though we had a lamp,
we had naught but our wax
lights to put in it, and these
gave a poor light to read
by. The next day we cut
up the whale, and put the
flesh in tubs. It was far
from a clean job, for the oil
ran down our clothes and

made them smell; but as:

we could change them for
new ones, thanks to the
hemp and my wife's skill,
we did not mind that, for
the oil was now worth more
to us than our. clothes,

75

though at one time we
should not have thought so.

One day we all set out
on a tour to the Farm.
Jack and Frank had gone
on first, while my wife and
I were as yet close to the
Cave. iu Fagmonce )\ tic
boys came back, and Fritz
said: “ Look at that strange
thing on its way up the
path. What can it be?”

Iieast, my ‘eye |.on) ihe
spot, and cried out, “ Fly
all of you to the Cave! fly
for your lives!” for I saw
it was:a huge snake, or boa,
that would make a meal of
one of us, if we did not get
out of its way.

We all ran in doors, and
put bars up to the doors of
the Cave. A large dove
cote had been made on the
roof, and to this we got up
through a hole in the rock.



76

Ernest took aim with his
gun, and shot at the snake,
so did Fritz and Jack, but
it gave no sign that they
had hit it. I then tried my
skill, but it did not seem to
feel my shot any more than
theirs, though I was sure I
must have struck its head.
Just as we took aim at it
once more, we saw it turn
round and glide through
the reeds in the marsh.

Our fears kept us’ for
three long days in the Cave.
The snake gave no sign
that could lead us to think
it was still near, but the
ducks and geese had left
the spot where their nests
were, and this we knew to
be a bad sign. On the
fourth day I went to the
door, with a view to let out
some of the beasts to graze,
‘for we were short of food

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

for them. The ass was just
at my back, and as soon
as it saw the light, made
a rush to get out. Off it
went, straight to the sands,
with its, heels in the air, but
just as it got to the marsh
we saw the boa glide out
from the reeds, part its wide
jaws, and make for its prey.
The ass at once saw its foe,
but stood still as if struck
with fear, and in less time
than I take to tell it, our
old friend was tight in the
folds of the boa.

This was a sad sight for
all of us, yet we could not
take our eyes off the snake,
but saw it crush the poor
beast, and then gorge its
prey. When it had put the
whole of the ass out of
sight, it laid down on the
sand quite still, as if it had
gone to sleep or died.



THE END OF THE BOA. 77

“ Now is the time to seal
the fate of our foe,” said I
to Fritz; and with that we
went out with our guns.
When we got near, we
both took a straight aim,
and each put a ball in its
head. This made it move
with a start, and writhe as
if in pain.

“See how its eyes glare
on us with rage. Now
load your gun, and let us
put) a, bit’ more lead in
him.”

Our next shot went in
its eyes. It then shook:as
with a strong spasm, and
fell dead on the sand.

A shout of joy brought
my wife and the three boys
to the spot. The state of
fear they had been kept in
for three whole days had
made them quite ill, but
now the joy of Jack and

Frank knew no bounds, for
they leapt on the snake and
beat it as if they would
go mad.

My wife said that the
death of the boa took a
great weight off her mind,
for she thought it would
lie in wait for us near the
Cave, starve us out, and
then kill us as it had done
the poor ass.

We slit up the snake,
and took out the flesh of
the ass, which the boys
laid in a grave near Tent
House. The boa’s skin we
hung up at the door of the
Cave, over which Ernest
wrote the words, “ No ass
to be found here,” which
we all thought to be a
good joke.

One day late in the
spring I went with my
three sons a long way from



78

the Cave. My wife and
Frank were left at our
Half Way House, to wait
till we came back, but the
dogs went with us. Our
route lay far up the course
of a small stream, which
had its source some miles
north of the Farm House.
The ground was new to us,
but we could not well lose
our way, for on the right
stood a hill from which we
could see the whole of the
plain.

Ernest had gone with
one of the dogs to a cave
that ie had spread at!the
foot of the hill, but we saw
him turn round and run
back with Turk at his heels.
As soon as he thought his
voice would reach us, he
cried out, “ A bear! a bear!
come to my help!”

We could now see that

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

there were two great beasts
at the mouth of the cave.
At a word from us both
the dogs flew to fight the
bear that stood in front.
Fritz took up his post at
my side, while Jack and
Ernest kept in the rear.
Our first shot was “a miss,”
as Jack said; but we took
a sure aim the next. time,
and both shots told. .

We would have let fly
at them once more from
this spot, but as we thought
we might hit our brave
dogs, who were now in the
heat of a hard fight with
their foes, we ran up close
to them.

«NGA ain tit Zz) eee kale
“take a straight aim at the
head of the first, while I
fire Von!) fiemmome mae) sie
Back?’

We both shot at once;



A FIGHT WITH BEARS. 79

the bears gave a loud growl,
and then, with a low moan,
fell dead at our feet.

As it was now time to
go back, we put the. bears
in the cave, but took care
to cut off their paws, which
form a dish fit to grace the
feast Ol arieiivot

We had a long walk
back to the place where
I had left my wife. The
boys told her what a hard
fight the dogs had with the
bears, and how Fritz and
I had shot them, and then
gave her the paws. With
the aid of Frank she had

fed our live stock and



brought in wood to make
tip) oun watch ire tomuahie
night, so we sat down to
sup at once, and then went
tOshest:

Next day we put. our
beasts to the cart and drove
asiitar tasy the beats ) dem
As we came near to the
spot a flock of birds flew
out of the mouth of the
cave, two or three of which
Fritz brought down with
his gun. It took us the
whole day to cut up the
bears. The hams were laid
by to be smoke dried;
while my wife took charge
of the fat and the skins.



80

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

CHAPTER XIII.

We had now so much
work to do, and the days
and weeks came and went
so quick, that I do not
think weshould have known
the time of year had it not
been for our log. |

Some days were spent at
the Cave, where we made
our goods, ground our flour,
stored our food, and kept
our tame live stock. Then
we had to take care of our
crops on the fields near
The Nest, and this took us
two or three days in each
month. Once in ten days
at least we went to the
Barimone tie. hills anc eat
the same time made a call
at the Half Way House;
so that there was not a day
that we had not our hands

quite full. Now and then
we went out to hunt for
sport or to add to our stock
of beasts, which had grown
so large that there were
few we could name that
had not been caught and
brought home. We had
birds of the air, fowls of
the land, and beasts of all
kinds, from the great black

ox of the plain to the small

wild Ras-sit that came and
made its hole close by our
cave.

But there was one bird
that we had not yet caught,
though we had seen it two
or three times in the woods.
This was, the Os-rrien,
Fritz found a nest with
some eggs in it, and this
led us to make a tour with





The Boys take Home the Ostrich,



THE OSTRICH HUNT. 81

a view to catch one of the
old birds. We rose that
day ere it was light, and
set out at dawn, each on
the back of a good steed.

As we should have to
hunt through the woods,
my wife was left at home;
and Ernest, who did not
like rough work, chose to
stay with her. We made
it a rule to take one of the
dogs with us when we went
out to hunt, but on this day
we thought it wise to let
them both come.

Fritz took us straight to
where he had seen the nest,
which was not more than
a few miles up the stream.
When we came in sight of
the spot, we saw four great
birds, as if on their way to
meet us. As they drew
near we kept the dogs well
in, and made no noise, so

that they did not stop till
they came near us.

Fritz had brought his
Ea-gle with him, which he
now let fly. At one swoop
the bird came down on the
head of the Os-trich, held
on with its beak, and struck |
out its wings with great
force, as if to stun it. We
now rode up close to the
scene of war. Jack first
flung a cord round the legs
of the bird, which made it
fall to the ground. I then
threw my pouch on its
head, and, strange to say,
it lay down as still as a
lamb.

I now tied both its legs
with cords, but left it just
room to walk. We then
made it fast to the two
bulls that had brought Jack
and Frank all the way from
home, and put one of them



| &2 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Gimmeden ssiden yh news text
cot up on their steeds, and
I. took the pouch from the
head of the bird. As soon
as it could see, it gave a
wild stare, and then fought
(Ou Cetinee:

The boys then put spurs
to the flanks of their steeds,
and when the bird had
made a’ few starts back, as
if to try the strength of the
cords which held it, it set
off with a run, and the bulls
jcachiecid=r Eade men keep
up a smart pace.

Fritz and I now went in
search of the nest, which
we soon found. I took the
eggs from it and put them
ina bag I had brought to
hold them, in which I put
some wool and moss, so
that they should not break.

It did not take us long

to get up to the two boys,

who had gone on first, and
we were glad to find that
the poor bird had made up
its) aind Sto) nitse dates and
kept up well with the pace
of the bulls.

When we got in sight of
home, my wife and Ernest,
who had been on the look
out for us, came forth to
meet us; and,the strange
way in which we brought
home our new prize made
them laugh. I need not
say that we took great care
of it.

The next day we built it
a house, with a space in
front for it to walk up and
down, round which were
put rails, so that it could
not get out. At first it
was shy, and would not
take any food, so that we
had to force some balls of
maize down its throat; but



A STRANGE STEED.

in a short time it took grain
from the hands of my wife,
and soon grew quite tame.
The boys now set to
work to break it in for use.
They taught it first to bear
them on its back. Then
they put a pair of string
reins in its mouth, and
made it turn which way
they chose to pull, and to
walk, or run, or stand still,
asvit wasebidan, UUs. 1nya
month from the time we
caught it, the boys made it
take them on its back to
and from the Farm or The
Nest, in less than half the
time an ox would go; so
that it came to be the best
steed we had to ride on.
The eggs we found in
the nest were put in a warm
dry place, and though we
scarce thought our care
would bring live birds out

83
of the shells, we had the
joy to hatch three of them,
and this led us to hope that
we should ere long have a
steed for each of our sons.

My work at this time was
by no means light. Our
hats and caps were all worn
out, and with skins of the
musk cat I had to make
new ones. The bears’ skins
were laid in the sun to dry,
and of these we made fur
coats, which would keep us
warm when the cold wet
nights came round, and
there were some left to serve
as quilts or rugs for our
beds.

I now tried my hand at
a new craft. I dug some
clay out of the bed of the
stream, and taught the boys
to knead it up with sand,
and some talc that had been
ground as fine as road drift.



84

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

I had made a lathe with albe told that our wants did

wheel, and by its aid the
clay left my hands in the
shape of plates, cups, pots,
and pans. We then burnt
them in a rude kiln, and
though at least one half
broke with the heat and
our want of skill, still those
that came out whole more
than paid me for my toil,
and kept up my wife’s stock
of delf. Some of the jars
were set round with red
and blue glass beads, and
these were put on a shelf
as works of art, and kept
full of long dried grass.
The time was now at
hand when we must reap
our grain and store the ripe
crops that were still on the
ground; and, in fact, there
was so much to be done,
that we scarce knew what
to do first. The truth must

not keep pace with the
growth of our wealth, for
the land was rich, and we
had but a few mouths to
fill. 7

We knew that we might
leave theroots in the ground
for some time, as the soil
was dry, but that the grain
would soon spoil; so we
made the corn our first
care. When it was all cut
and brought home, our

‘next task was to thresh it.

The floor of our store room
was now as hard as a rock,
for the sun had dried it,
and there was not 4 crack
to be seen. On this we
laid the ears of ripe corn,
from which the long straw
had been cut, and sent the
boys to bring in such of our
live stock as were fit for
the work to be next done.



WE TREAD OUT OUR CORN. 85

Jack and Fritz were soon
on the backs of their steeds,
and thought it fine fun to
make them course round
the floor and tread out the
grain. Ernest and I had
each a long fork, with which
we threw the corn at their
feet, so that all of it might
be trod on. The ox on
which Jack sat put down
his head and took a bunch
of the ears in his mouth.

“Come,” said Jack, “it
is not put there for you to
eat, off you go!” and with
that he gave it a lash with
his whip.

“Nay,” said I, “do you
not know what God has
said’ in his Word ?—We
must not bind up the mouth
of the ox that treads out
the corn. This brings to
my mind the fact that the
means we now take to

thresh our wheat were those
used by the Jews in the
days of old.”

To sort the chaff from
the grain we threw it up
with our spades while the
land or sea breeze blew
strong. The draught which
came in at the door took
the light chaff with it to
one side of the room, while
the grain fell straight to the
ground by its own weight.

The maize we left to dry
in the sun, and then beat
out the grain with long:
skin thongs. By this means
we got a store of the soft

‘leaves of this plant, which

my wife made use of to
stuff our beds.
When all the grain had

been put in our store room,

some in sacks and the rest
in dry casks, we took a
walk one day to our fields,



86

and found that flocks of
birds, most of which were
quails, had come there to
feed. This gave usa fine
day’s sport with our guns,
and the next year we did
not fail to look for them, so
that the fields were made
to yield a stock of game as
well as a crop of grain.

With but slight change
in our mode of life, we
spent ten long years in our
strange home. Yet the
time did not seem long
to us. Each day brought
with it quite as much work
as we could do, so that
weeks and months and
years flew past, till at last
we gave up all hope that
we should leave the isle or
see our old Swiss home,
the thought of which was
still dear to us. -

But the lapse of ten years

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

had wrought a great change
in our sons. Frank, who
was but a mere child when
we first came, had grown
up to be a strong youth;
and Jack was as brave a
lad as one could wish to
see. Fritz, of course, was
now a young man, and.
took a large share of the
work off my hands. Ernest
had just come of age, and
his shrewd mode of thought
and great tact was as great
a help to us as was the
strength and skill *of the
rest.

‘To crown all, it was a
rare thing for them to be
ill; and they were free from
those sins which too oft
tempt young men to stray
from the right path, My
wife and I did our best to
train them, so that they
might know right from



WHAT TEN YEARS HAD DONE.



wrong; and it gave us
great joy to find that what
we told them sunk deep in
their hearts, and, like ripe
seed sown in rich soil,
brought forth good fruit.

I need not say that in
the course of ten years we
had made great strides in
those arts which our wants
had first led us to learn.
When we first came the
land near Tent House was
a bare waste; now it bore
fine crops, and was kept as
neat as a Swiss farm. At
the foot of. the hill by the
side of Rock Cave, was a
large plot of ground, which
we laid out in beds, and
here we grew herbs and
shrubs, and such plants as
we used for food. Near
this we dug a pond, and by
means of a sluice which
led from the stream, we

87

kept our plants fresh in
times of drought. Nor was
this the sole use we made
of the pond; for in it we
kept small fish and crabs,
and took them out with a
rod and line when we had
need of food, and time to
spare for that kind of sport.
In the ground round the
mouth of the Cave we
drove a row of strong canes,
bound at the top to’a piece
of wood, so as to form a
fence, up which grew a
Viens ciii¢ mea ume cell ware:
plants that threw a good
show of gay bloom crept
up to meet it. Shells of
great size and strange
shapes were got from the
shore, and these we built
up here and there with

burnt clay, so as to form —

clumps of rock work, on
which grew ferns and rare



88 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

plants.
charm to our home, and
made the grounds round it
a source of joy when we
laid by our work for the
day. In fact, we thought
there was now scarce a
thing to wish for that we
had not got.

Our cares were few, and
our life was as full of joy
_and peace as we could well
wish; yet I oft cast a look
on the sea, in the hope
that some day I should spy
a sail, and once more greet
a friend from the wide
world from which we had
been so long shut out. This
hope, vague as it was, led
me to store up such things
as would bring a price, if
we had the chance to sell
them; they might prove a
source of wealth to us if
a ship came that way, or

All this gave a|

would at least help to pay
the charge of a cruise back

to the land we came from.

It is but just to say that
the boys did not share my
hopes, nor did they seem
to wish that we should
leave the place where they
had been brought up. It
was their world, and the
cave, to. which we gave the
name Rock House, was
more dear to them than
any spot on the earth.

“Go back!” Fritz would
say; vito leave, ourmcave,
that we dug with our own
hands; to part with our
dear kind:beasts and birds;
to bid good by to our
farms, and so much that is
our own, and which no one
in the world wants. No,
no. You can not wish us
to leave such a spot.”

My dear wife and I both



A SURPRISE.

felt that age would soon
creep on us, and we could
not help some doubts as
COMmiiteN tate: | O14) eu? sons:
Should we stay and end
_our days here, some one of
us would live out the rest,
and this thought came oft
to my mind, and brought
with it a sense of dread I
couldn not ioct rid von 1 /it
made me pray to God that
he would save us all from
so dire a fate as to die far
from the sound of the voice

89

of man, with no one to hear
our last words, or lay us in
the earth when He should
call us to our rest.

My wife did not share
this dread. “Why should

swe go. back?” she would

say. “We have here all
that we can wish for. The
boys lead a life of health,
free from sin, and live with .
us, which might not be the
case if we went out in the
world. Let us leave our

fate in the hands of God.”



CHAPTER XIV.

PomPeiritz 1, ange ernest
were now men, they were
of course free to go where
they chose, and to come
back when their will led

them home. Thus, from

time to time they took long
trips, and went far from
Rock House. They had
fine boats and strong steeds,
and of these they made
such good use that there



go

was scarce a spot for leagues
round that was not well
known to them.

At one time, Fritz had
been so long from home
that we had a dread lest
he should have lost his
way, or fell a prey to wild
beasts. When he came
back he told us a long tale
of what.he had seen and
where he had been, and
how he had brought with
him birds, beasts, moths,
and such strange things as
he thought Ernest would
like to see. When he had
done, he drew me out into
our grounds and said he
had a strange thing to tell
me. Itseems that he found
a piece of white cloth tied
to the foot of a bird which
he had struck down with a
stick, on which were these
words: “Save a poor soul,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

who is on the rock from
which you may see the
smoke rise.”

He thought that this rock
could not be far off, and
that he ought to set off at
once in search of it.

“T have a thought,” said
he ER willl tea‘ piece or
cloth, like that I found, to
the leg of the bird, and on
it I will write, ‘Have faith
in God: help is near.” If
the bird goes back to the
place from whence it came,
our brief note may reach
the eye of the lone one on
the rock. At any rate, it
can do no harm, and may
do some good.”

He at once took the bird,
which was an AL-BA-TROSS,
tied the strip of cloth to
its foot, and let it go.

“And now,’ said he,

“tell me what you think of



DEATH OF THE EAGLE. g!

this. If we should find a
new friend, what a source
of joy it will be. Will you
join me in the search ?”

- “To be sure I will,” said
I; “and so shall the rest;
but we will not yet tell
them of this.”

They were all glad to
Ntakew-a trip im: the large
boat, but they could not
make out why we went in
such haste.

jinetiacttisuicaid Jack,
“Fritz has found some
queer thing on the coast
that he can’t bring home,
and wants us to see it.
But I dare say we shall
know what it all means in
good time.”

Fritz was our guide, and
went first in his bark boat,
or Ca-noz. In this he could
go round the rocks and
shoals that girt the coast,

which would not have been
safe for the large boat. He
went up all the small creeks
we met with on the way,
and kept a sharp look out
for the smoke by which he
would know the rock we
came out to find.

I must tell you that once
when he came to these
parts with Ernest he met
with a Ti-cer, and would
have lost his life had it not
been for his pet the Ea-gle.
The brave bird, to save
Fritz from the beast, made
a swoop down on its: head.
Fritz thus got off with a
scratch or two, but the poor
bird was struck dead by a
blow from the paw of its foe.
This was a sad loss to Fritz,
for his pet had been a kind
friend, and would go with
him at all times when he
went far from home.



92

There was scarce a spot
we came to that did not
bring to the mind of one of
us some such tale as this,
so'that we were full of talk
while the boat bore us on.

We had been out some
days, but could find no trace
of what we went in search.
I rose from my berth at
dawn,’and went on deck
with Fritz. I told him
that as we had no clue to
the place, we must now give
up the search. He did not
seem to like this, but no
more was said. That day
_ we spent on shore, and came
back to our boat to sleep
at night. Next day we
were to change our course,
and trace our way back, for
the wind now blew from
the sea.

When I went on deck
next day I found a short

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

note from Fritz, in which
he told me that he could
not give up the search, but
had gone some way up the
soast. im) thisvismalluaboat
“Let me beg of you,’ he
wrote, “to lie in wait for
me here till I come back.”

When he had been gone
two days, I felt that I ought |
to tell my wife the cause of
our trip, as it might ease
her mind, and she now had
some fear lest her son
should not be safe. She
heard me to the end, and
then said that she was sure
he would not fail, but soon
bring back good news.

As we were all on the
look out for Fritz, we saw
his boat a long way off.

“There is no one with
him in the boat,” said I to
my wife; “that does not
say much for our hopes.”





GOOD NEWS.

93



“Oh, where have you
been?” said the boys, all
at once, as he came on
board. But they scarce
got a word from him. He
then drew me on one side,
and said, with a smile of
joy, “ What do you think
is the news’ I bring ?”

“ Let me hear it,” said I.

“Then I have found
what I went forth to seek,
and our search has not
been in vain.”

“ And who is it that you
have found 2”

‘ON Ot eavciniam emnie \sard:
“but a girl. The dress
she wears is that of a man,
and she does not wish at
first that her sex should be
known to more than we can
help, for she would not like
to meet Ernest and the rest
in that ‘state, if they knew
that she was a girl. And,

strange to tell,” said Fritz,
“she has been on shore
three years.”

While I went to tell the
news to my wife, Fritz had
gone down to his berth to
change his clothes, and I
must say that he took more
care to look neat in his
dress than was his wont at
home.

He was not long, and
when he came on deck he
bid me say no word to the
rest of whom he had found.
He leapt like a frog in
to his light craft, and led
the way. We were soon
on our course through the
rocks and shoals, and an
hour's sail, with the aid of
a good breeze, brought us
to a small tract of land the
trees of which hid the soil
from our view. Here we
got close in to the shore,



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The Baldwin Library

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The Tub-Raft, leaving the Ship.


af
bie

SWISS PAMILY ROBINSON.

IN

WORDS Om OVE Si A be

ABRIDGED AND ADAPTED FROM THE ORIGINAL STORY BY

I Ey Me

AUTHOR OF “THE BOY’S FIRST READER,” ‘‘THE GIRL’S FIRST READER,”
“QUEER CHARACTERS,” ETC. °

WITH COLORED ILLUSTRATIONS.

NEW YORK.
MCLOUGHLIN BROS., PUBLISHERS.
PRE ACE

THE kind reception given to the system of ae
im words of one syllable has encouraged the Author to
add the popular story of “ The Swiss Family Robinson”
as a twin book to “Robinson Crusoe.” The monosyt-
labic rule has been strictly adhered to throughout, the
only exception occurring necessarily in the title of the
book itself. The Author's olject has been to provide “a
field of exercise for a child who has gust learnt to
conquer words; and it is a great point im all teaching
to let the first imdependent exercise be one im which

‘victory is really to be won by moderate effort.
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



CHAPTER I.

Wuen one has a, good
tale to tell, he should try
to be brief, and not say
more than he can help ere
he makes a fair start; so
I shall not say a word of
what took place on board
the ship till we had been
six days in a storm. The
bark had gone far out of
her true course, and no one
on board knew where we
were. The masts lay in
splints on the deck, the
sails were torn, a leak in
the side of the ship let
more in than the crew
could pump out, and each
one felt that ere long he
would find a grave in the

deep sea, which rose and
fell in great white waves
of Ifeam, Janeen sent its
spray from side to side
of what was now but a
mere hulk.

Most of those on board
sought the best means they
could think of to save their
own lives; but some knelt
down to pray that God
would quell the storm and
still the waves, for they felt
that none but He could
help them now.

“Come, boys,” said I to
my four sons, who were
with me, and were struck
dumb with fear, “God can
save us if it please Him so
6 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to do; but, if this is to be
our last hour, let us bow to
His will—we shall at least
all go down side by side.”

My dear wife could not
hide the tears that fell down
her cheeks as I thus’ spoke
to my sons, but she was
calm, and knelt down to
pray, while the boys clung
round her as if they thought
she could help them.

Just then we heard a cry
Gre leand) Vland) steltva
shock, and were thrown
down upon the deck.’ It
was clear that we had struck
on a rock, for we heard a
loud cry from one of the
men, “We are lost! Launch
the boat; try for your lives!”
These words went, as it
were, through my heart like
a knife; but, as I felt that
I ought to cheer my sons,
I said to them, “Now is

the time to show that we
are brave; we still have
life, the land is near, and we
know that God helps those

who trust in him. Keep

up your hearts, then, while

I go and see if there be not
some hope yet left for us.”

I went at once on deck,
and was met by a wave
that threw me down, and
wet me through to the skin.
When I got up, and went
to the side of the ship, I
found that all the boats had ©
been let down, and that
the last of the crew had just
left it. I cried out for the
men to come back and take
us with them, but it was in
vain, for the sound of my
voice did not reach them
through the roar of the
waves.

I then thought that our
last chance was gone. Still,


as I felt that the ship did
not sink, I went to the stern,
and found, to my joy, that
she was held up by a piece
of rock on each side, and
made fast likea wedge. At
the same time I saw some
trace of land, which lay to
the south, and this made
me go back with some hope
that we had still a faint
chance, though how to get
from the ship I could not
tell.

As soon as I got down-
stairs I took my wife by the
hand, and said, “Be of good
cheer, we are at least safe
for some time, and if the
wind should veer round, we
may yet reach the land that
lies but a short way off.”

I said this to calm the
fears of my wife and sons,
and it did so far more than

I had a right to hope. ,

LAND IN SIGHT. 7

“Let us now take some
food,” said my wife. “We
are sure to need .it, for this
will no doubt be a night to
try our strength.”

We still heard the roar
of the sea, and now and
then the planks would creak
as if they were torn up
from the deck, so that we
had still good cause to fear
that we might go down.

My wife got some food
for her boys, which we were
glad to see them eat, poor
as it was; but we could not
share their meal. Three
out of the four were put
to bed in their berths, and
soon went to sleep; but
Fritz, who was our first
child, would not leave us.
He said, like a good son,
that he would try to be of
some use, and think what
could be done.
8 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

“Tf we could but find
some cook,” said Fritz to
me in a low tone, “we
might make floats. You
and I will not need them,
for we can swim, but the
rest will want some such
means to keep them up, and
then we can help them to
reach the land.”

“A good thought,” said
[Pee ctsuceery titthie migiat
to find what things there
are in the ship that we can
thus make use of.”

We soon found some
casks and ropes, and with
these we made a kind of
float for each of the three
boys, and then my wife
made one for her own use.
This done, we got some
knives, string, and such
things as we could make
fast to our belts. We did
not fail to look for and find

a flint and steel, and the
box in which the burnt
rags were kept, for these
were at that time in use as
the means to strike a light.

Fritz, who was now well
nigh worn out, laid down
on his bed, and ‘slept like
the rest. As for me and
my poor wife, we kept
watch, each in fear lest the
next wave should lift the
ship off the rock and break
it ups, Wesspent parton
the night in thought as to
our plans for the next day,
and sought God to bless
the means we had in view
to save our lives. —

I need not tell you how
glad we were when we saw
the first gleam of light shine
through the chink of the
door that shut us in from
the cold night air. At
dawn the wind did not
WE SET TO WORK. : 9

blow so strong, the sky was
clear of clouds, and we saw
the sun rise, and with it
- rose our hopes. I soon had
my wife and sons on deck.
The boys did not know till
then that all the men had
left the ship, and that there
was no one but us on
board.

“Where are the men?”
said they. “How can we
Bectcce ic ship |

“My dear boys,” said I,
“He who has kept us safe
till now will still aid us, if
we do not give way to fear.
Let all hands set to work,
and leave the rest to God.”

At these words we all
went to work with a will.
My wife went to feed the
live stock; Fritz set off in
search of arms, and the
means to make use of them;
and Ernest made his way

to the tool chest. Jack ran
to pick up what he could
find, but as he got to one
of the doors he gave it a
push, and two huge dogs
sprang out and leapt at him.
Fle thousinteciiueainst a teey
would bite him, but he soon
found that they meant him

|no harm, and one of them
let him get on his back and

ride up to me as I came
from the hold of the ship.
could ct "keep" baela) a
smile, but I told him that
it was not safe thus to play
with dogs which had not
been fed for so long a time.

When the boys had done
their search, and the spoil
was brought on deck, we
thought we had found all
that we should need. “As
forumie, Saleh tye iicws a
have brought good news,
for I find we have still on
10

beardmancows, alt acsenwio
goats esix Sheep, a Tame
pig, and a sow, and I have
found food for them.all.”

“ All that you bring will
ber oluse, caideles “but |
fear that Jack’s dogs will do
us more harm than good.”

ie Noumea ialte scar: aiaelks
in his pert way, for they
can help us to hunt when
we get to land.”

“Well said, Jack. And
now let us see what we can
do that will aid us to get
there.”

We then took the casks
that we had found, and as
both Ernest and I could
use the saw, we soon cut
them in half. With these

tubs, which were bound

round with strong hoops,

we made a kind of raft,
though it was no slight
jack: = hee tubs e in tact

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

were a fleet of eight small
round boats, made so fast
to some planks that no one
of them could float from
the rest. When we had
done this, we sat down to
a good meal, which we ate
with great zest, for we now
felt that we had done our
best to earn it.

hichmext) tie wior sinc
done was to launch the raft..
This we at length did, and
when the boys saw it slide
down the side of the ship
and float on the sea, they
gave a loud shout, and each
one tried who should be
the #iiretestomact OnmiGamen
miaeen iutase ten tnems min
and there left it.
- It was late ere our work
was thus far brought to
an end; and, as we had to
spend at least one night
more on the wreck, I told
WE FREIGHT OUR RAFT. II

the boys to get a good
nights rest, so that they
might be fresh for the toils
of the next day.

I then told my wife to
change her dress for, that
of one of the crew which
she had found, as her skirts
would have got in her way

when she had to climb.
She did. notiateunes aike

this, but did) so as soomas

she saw the truth of what

I told her.

At last, when all was
done, we went to bed, and
slept as sound as if we had
been on land.



CHAPTER II.

WE were‘all up at the
brcakwotwday,) and knelt
down to thank God that
He had kept us from harm
through the night.

“My dear boys,” said I,
“we have now, with the
help) of ))(Ged,\fotry joug
best to reach the shore. We
must, ere we go, give the
poor beasts on board both
food and drink to last them

for some days. I hope we
may yet find means to come
back and take them on
shore with us.”

Wie lithen ,.out))allmaiie
things on the raft, and ten
live hens .and two cocks
were put in one of the tubs.
Some ducks and geese we
let go, in the hope that they
would swim to the shore;
and a pair of doves were
12 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



set free, as they could fly
to the land.

There was a place in the
raft for each of us. In the
first tub sat my wife; in the
next Frank, who was eight
years old; in the third Fritz,
not quite twice the age of
Frank; in the fourth were
the fowls, and some old sails
that would make us a tent;
the fifth was full of good
things in the way of food;
in the sixth stood Jack,
a bold lad, ten years old;
in the next Ernest, twelve
years of age, well taught,
but too fond of self, and
less fond of work than the
rest; while I sat in the
eighth, to guide the raft
that was to save all that
was dear to me in the
world.

As soon as the dogs (Bill
and Jack by name) saw us

push off from the ship they
leapt in the sea, swam near
the raft, and kept well up
with us.

The sea was calm; so
that we felt quite safe. We
made good use of the oars,
and the raft bore its freight
straight to the land; but as
we drew near to the shore
the sight of the bare rocks
led us to think that we
might still be in need of —
food and drink’ when that
which we had was gone.
We could see that casks,
chests, spars, and splints
from the masts of the wreck
lay on the shore.

As we got near, the coast
lost its bare look, and we
were glad to see that there
was no lack of trees. .We
soon found a bay, to which
the ducks and geese had
found their way, and here
we saw a place where we
could land, which we were
not slow to do.

As soon as we had made
the raft fast with a strong
rope, we took out all our
wealth, and made a tent
with the old sail-cloth we
had brought with us, and
stuck a pole in the ground
to keep it up. This done,
I sent the boys to get some
moss and dry grass to make
our beds with. With the
flint and steel we soon set
fire to some dry twigs, and
my wife made a pot of soup
with what she had brought
from the ship.

Fritz, who had charge of
the guns, chose one, and
took a stroll by the side of
a stream, while Jack went
in search of shell fish, which
he thought he might find
on the rocks. My share

WE LAND SAFELY. 13

of the work was to save
two large casks which were
near the shore. Whilst I
was up to my knees in the
sea Laneardsalishimlnen
which I knew to come from
Jack. )paicoteout -ateonee,
took up an axe, and ran to
his help. I found him with
his legs in a rock pool,
where a large crab held
him by his toes. It soon
made off as I came near;
but I struck at it with the
axe, and brought it out of
the pool. Jack then took
it up, though it gave him a
pinch or two ere he found
out how to hold it, and ran
off in high glee to show
his dear Ma what he had
caught. ~

When I got back to the
tent, I found that Ernest
had brought us news that
he had seen salt in the
14 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



chinks of the rocks, and
that shell fish were not
scarce.

“Then why have you
not brought some with
Doles siceilue bain

“To get at them,” said
he, “I should have had to
wet my feet.”

“Well, my boy, if you
are sure you saw them, I
will ask you to go back for
some. We must each do
some work for the good of
all; and as for your feet,
the sun will dry them as
you walk back.”

He went, and soon found
the salt, left by the sea on
the rocks, which the sun
had made quite dry. There
was some sand with it, and
this I said would spoil our
soup; but my wife did not
take long to find a way to
cure that. She had been

to a fresh stream with a
large jug; from this I saw
her pour some on the salt,
strain it through a cloth,
and let it drip in a cup, so
that all the sand was left on
the cloth.

When the soup was made
hot we had each a taste, and
all said that it was good:

“ Benot in too great haste,”
said my wife, “we must
wait for Fritz; but if he
were here, I do not see how
we are to take our soup,
for we have no plates nor
spoons; we can't lift this
huge pot to our mouths and
sup from it.”

“If we had but. some
large nuts,” said Ernest,
“we might cut them in half,
and they would make good
bowls.”

“Quite true,” said I ; “but
as there are none, we may
A SURPRISE. i 15



as well wish for delf bowls|I knew, from what I had

and real spoons at once.”

“Now I have it,” quoth
Ernest. “Let us use the
shells I saw on the shore.”

On srani Mac} tom the
shore, with Ernest at his
heels, and back they both
came with large and small
shells for us all.

Just then Fritz came in,
with a look of gloom on
his face, which I could see
was a sham.

“You do not mean to,

tell me you have come back
with nought?” said I, as
he put out his hands as if
to prove that such was the
case. But Jack, who had
been round him, cried out,
“No, no! he’s got a pig !—
such a fine one. Tell us
where you found it.”

Fritz now brought forth
his prize. When I saw it,

read, that it was not a pig,
but a swift beast, known in
these parts, that lives on

fruit and nuts, and hides

in the earth* 1 felt it
right to tell my son that
he should not try to make
us think that he had not
brought any thing back.
Though a jest, it was still
a lie, and to act a lie was
just as wrong as to tell one.
Fritz now saw the truth of
this, and said so. He then
told us how that he had
been to the banks of the
stream.
“T like the place much
more than I do this spot,”
said he. “The shore lies
low, and there are planks,
casks, chests, and all sorts
of things, that the sea has:
thrownup. Why not leave

The A-gou-ti.
*
16

this place at once, and go
there ?”

“There is a time for all
things,” said I. “ We must
at least rest here for one
night. But did you see
no trace of the men who
left the ship ?”
= “None, on land or
sea, said he; “but I saw
some strange hogs on the
shore, that have feet like
hares.”

We all sat down to take
our soup with the shell
spoons. Ernest took from
his coat a large shell, which
he had hid till now, put it
in the soup, and then set it
down to cool.

“You do not show want
of thought,” said I to him.
“But I am not glad to see
that you think so of your
self, and do so much for
your own ease, when all

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the rest do so much for
yours. Now, that shell full
of soup you must give to
our two dogs. We can all
dip our small shells in the
pot, and you must do as
we do; but as we have
nought else that the poor
dogs can eat out of, that
shell shall be theirs.”

I knew he felt hurt at
this, but he gave it to the
dogs at once, and they soon
made quick work of their
share of the soup.

The sun was low when
our meal came to an end.
The fowls came round us
to pick up the stray crumbs
we had let fall, and my wife
took out her bag of grain
and fed the cocks and hens
that we had brought with
us, and sent them to roost
on the top of our tent. The
ducks and geese left us to
The young Ape brought Home on Turk’s back.


WE SET OUT ON A TOUR. 17

find some place of rest near|fire-arms, in case we might
the stream, and the dogs/need them in the night ;
lay down at the door of|sang a hymn of praise to

the tent.

God, and then left our fate

We took care to load our|in his hands.



CPAP TEN EPL

As soon as I heard the
cock crow, and saw by the
light that it was break of
day, got out of bed and
spoke to my wife as to
what we should do next.

sale tists) wsatclinly uty Ee Titz,
and I will make a tour of
the coast, and try to find
some of the men who left
the ship, for if they are
Metemmthey, ) imnay) abe, in
want.”

“But,” said Fritz, who

heard me from his bed, |

“why should we search

for those who left us to die
on the wreck 2”

“Well, I will tell you,”
Said eis Eiichi should
do to them as we would |
wish them to do to us, not

as they have done; next,

'we know that they took

no food with them, and we
should not leave them to
starve; and last, it may
be that they can help us,
though now theystand more
in need of our aid.”

The boys were soon up,
and we all sat down to
18

a good meal. That done,
Fritz and I got our guns.
I put a pair of small arms
in his belt, gave him a game
bag,.and told him to take
an axe. I took some food
for us both, and a full flask,
out of which we could drink
if we should stray far from
astream. Fritz was now in
haste to be off, but Ernest
said that there was one
thing still left to do ere we
could start.

« And what is that ?” said
Fritz.

“We have yet to bray
to God,” said Ernest.

“That is right, my dear
boy,” said I. “We are all
too apt to think less than
we ought of what God tells
us to do, and you know that
he tells us to pray to Him
day by day.”

When we took our*leave,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

my wife and the three boys

were intears. The dog Bill

we left to guard the tent, but
Turk went with us, and ran
by our side. |

We soon got to the banks:
of a stream; but then had
to make our way down its
course through the tall, rank
grass. It took us some
time to reach the sea shore.
There was not a boat to be
seen, or any sign that the
ship’s crew had found the
land. We left the shore,
and went through a wood
full of tall trees. Here

Fritz struck some _ hard
thing on the ground with

his foot, which we found
fon beman @o-cosan Ui ante
gave it a blow with his axe,
and broke the shell, and we
both sat down to rest, and
eat the nut. We drank the
milk to quench our thirst,
ANOTHER SURPRISE. 19

and made a fair meal of the
fruit.

At the end of the wood
we came to a plain which
gave us a clear view of the
place. Fritz, who was on
the look out, ran off with
Turk to some strange trees
that he saw on the right.

“Do come here,” hecried,
“and tell me what these
are.)

When I got up to him,
it gave me no small joy to
find that it was a gourd
ihe ee,

SErya carlton ciel you
eanecct, noldvrompotici or
those queer lumps _ that
grow on it.”

With that he brought
‘ one down, and we had a
look at it.

PON wotetais! isaidel le
Wercanmmake ai qalatc ve

dish omartackenlt 4s) by.

no means a nice kind of
food, but wild men set great
store by its shell, which
they use to hold their food
and drink.”

We then set to work to
make plates of the gourds,
which we did in this way:
I tied a string round the
shell, and then made nicks
all round it with a sharp
knife. In these we put the
string, and then gave it a
tight pull, which cut it in
half, and made two bowls.
When we had thus made
some eight or ten bowls,
and some flat ones for
plates, we laid them out in
the sun to dry, and then
went on our way.

We could see, not far off,
a grove of fine palm trees,
but to reach them we should
have to pass through reeds
and long grass, which grew
20

so thick that we made Turk
go on first and tread a path
for us. I knew this was
just the place to find snakes,
so we each cut a cane, that
we might beat them off
should we meet with any.
As I took hold of my staff,
I felt a gum or juice ooze
out of the end. I put my
tongue to it, and found it
of a sweet taste. This led
me to suck the reed, and
I then knew that we had
met with the Su-car Cane.
By inscretime )Paitz had
done the same, for I could
see that he held his cane
to his mouth.

“Do not suck too much
Of it esaidinl is on ite wall
make you ill; but let us cut
some of the best and take
them back with us, for those
at home will prize so great
a treat.” This we did, and

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

bound them in a bunch,
which Fritz took on his back.

It did not take us long
to reach the place where
the palms grew, and then
we sat down in the shade.
to eat the food we had
brought with us. “Do you
see those nuts at the top of
the trees, Fritz?” said I.

‘lot ibe Sure “indo vn bur
they are far too iichmioss
reach. Look, look!” he
cried, “there are some Mon-
KEys; let me have a shot at
them.” - :

“Do nor doithat) [isaids
and held his arm; “it will
do us no good to kill them,
and I think I can make
use of them.” With that I
threw some stones up at
the tree where they were,
though they had got safe
out of my reach. They
then made a loud noise,
A TROOP OF APES. 21

took hold of the nuts that
were near, and flung them
straight at us. This. was
not new to me, for I had
read that it is oft done by
men who live in the woods,
and have to get their food
as best they can; but the
trick made Fritz laugh, who
soon had hard work to
pick up the nuts that were
thrown at him.

We broke some of the
nuts, and put the juice of
the canes in the thick white

cream which forms close to
the shell; and this made us
a dish so sweet and nice

‘that Fritz said it was fit for

aking. Turk did not seem
to like it, so we gave him
some of the meat in our
bag, which we could now
well spare.

Fritz and I then made
fast some nuts to a string,
which I tied round my
waist, while he took up
his canes, and we both set
off on our road home.



CHAPTER.

On our way back we
‘took up the gourd bowls
and plates, which we found
quite dry and hard as bone,
and put them in our bags.
We had scarce got through

the wood, when Turk made
a datti in Hrontanmicn atid
we saw a troop of apes rush
out of his way. But he
gave a leap and brought
down one that could not
22 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

climb so fast as the rest,
for she had a young one
in her arms. Turk made
short work of the poor
thing, for ere Fritz could
call the dog off, the ape
was dead. The young one,
Asmooormeas it isawy) E rity,
sprang on his back, put
its paws in his curls, and
would not let go, but made
a noise as if to chide him.
Fritz did not like this, for
he was in fear lest it should
item PEC knew ltnere
was but small risk of that,
for the poor thing was as
much in dread as he was.
Pe lenatmeconmine lane
from Fritz’s back, and took
i eup ine my) arms ikera
child. We found that it
was too young to seek its
own food, and, as Fritz
said he should like to take

it home, we put it on Turk’s

back.) ““Sitice’ you’ have
been the cause of its grief,”
Saidluib 1s itis butter inate elt
you should act the part of
its dam.” Turk did not at
first like this, but we soon
got him to bear the ape,
which held so tight by the
hair on the dog’s neck, that
it could not well fall off.
Fritz then led Turk with a
string, that he: might not
stray out of sight, or throw
off his charge, which I think
he would have done had
we not been on the watch.

It did not take us long
to reach the bank of the
stream near to our home.
Just as we came in sight of
the tent we heard Bill bark,
and saw him run off as fast
as he could to meet us.
This put Turk in asad way,
and made him leap up at
Uisvancutnyatoumeuntvee, 1s
A GOOD MEAL. 23



Fritz at last took the ape
from him and let him go.

I need not tell you how
glad my wife and sons were
to see us safe back, or with
what joy the boys took
pies eal live ape woulnes
Frizs arms. “How did
roullicatchn num?” \)'sard
Ernest; “what does he live
nly jecaian Hanke ant wit
fun we shall have with
him!” cried Jack.

At length, when they got
more staid, I told them that
we had brought them all
sorts of good things, but
that we had not met with
any of the men of whom
we went insearch. “God's
will be done,” said my wife,
Svetmucaiianey edna) thet
you have come back safe
tous. This day to me has
been an age; but put down
your loads, for we must

now go in and hear what
you have to tell.”
Frtz.and) 1) thenstold
them, by turns, where we
found the things we brought
with us, how we made and
dried the plates and bowls,
cut the canes, and caught
the ape in the wood. Our
tales had not come to an
end, when we were told
that it was time to sup.
Ernest had shot a wild
goose, and some fish had
been caught in the stream.
With these, and the Dutch
cheese that we brought from
the ship, we made a good
meal; but the boys would
not rest till we broke some
of the nuts, from which
they drank the milk, made
sweet with the juice of the
canes. I must tell you that
we ate our food in great
state from our gourd rind
24
plates, which my wife said
she should prize more than
if they were made of pure
gold.

“We can at least eat out
Olitheme seaidieeis anc
they were gold we could
do no more.”

That night the ape went
to bed with Jack and Fritz,
and we all slept in peace
till the cocks on the roof of
the tent woke us up.

INeximeayoritzearich) E
went back to the wreck to
save the live stock, and get
what else we had left that
might be of use to us. We
found it no light task, for
we had to make floats for
the cow, the ass, the sheep,
and the goats, throw them
in the sea, and tie them
with ropes to our raft. For
the sow we did the same,

though she soon broke

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

loose; but we were glad
to see the tide float her
straight to the shore. We
put on board the raft a
vast deal of food that had
not been spoilt by the sea,
though the waves had made
a breach in the sides of the
wreck. We then put to
sea with our train of live
stock made fast to the stern,
and drew them like a flock
of huge ducks in the water.

We had not gone far
when I heard a loud cry of
fear from Fritz, “We are
lost! We are lost ! See what
a great shark is on its way
to us!”

Though pale with fright,
he took aim with his gun,
and shot the fish in the
head. It sank at once, but
left a track of blood in the
sea, which I knew to bea
sign that we were once
A STRANGE SITE FOR A HOUSE. 25

more safe. We then got
to. land, and made fast our
freight to the shore. Ere
we had done this our friends
came to greet us, and give
us what help they could to
get the beasts out of the
stream, and take them up to
the tent. The poor things
were well nigh worn out;

but we took good care of

them, and put them to rest
on some dry grass that

my wife had laid out for
~ them.

That night we did not
sup on the ground. My
wife had spread a cloth on
the top of a cask, and we
Eden eat (On ae vue). WViikh
the knives and forks that
we had found in the ship
we ate a dish of hot ham
and eggs, nor did we fail
to. test the wine that I
had brought with me in

a small cask from the
wreck,

I can now well call to
mind the strange scene, as
we sat there round the cask,
with our two dogs, the
fowls, the ape, and the
doves, all in the light of
the red glow that came
from the fire which burnt
on the ground just by the
tert: ‘

Ere bed time my wife
had told me that while I
was at the wreck she had
gone in search of some
place in which we could
build a house, and be safe
from the wild beasts that
we had heard growl in the
night.

“And did you find one,
my dear?” I said.

“Qh, yes,” said she. “We
can take you to a great tree
that will serve us well, if

*
26

we can but get across the
stream with our goods.”

“But would you have
us roost, like fowls, in a
tree? How do you think
Wye COMlGmGeiNI UDI LO / OU
perch ?”

“Was there not a large
lime tree in our town in
which they built a_ ball
room, with stairs up the
trunk ?”

“To be sure there was,”
ec wleueane it we can not
build in it, we can at least
make use of its shade,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

and dwell in a hut on the
roots.”

Ernest said that he took
a string, and found that it
was twelve yards round.
This led me to think that
my wife's scheme was by
no means a bad one, and
that I would have a look
at the tree the next day.

Wiens ly nadine anciear
they had to tell, we knelt
down to pray, and then
sought a good night's rest,
which the toils of the day
made us much in need of.



CHAPTER V.

Wuen I rose from my
Dedierneminerxt cay.) livcatc|

to my wife; “Does it not

seem, my dear, as if God
had led us to this place,

and that we should do
wrong to leave it?”
“What you say may be
quite true, so far as it goes,”
she said; “but I must tell
PLANS FOR OUR SAFETY. 27

you that the mid day heat
is more than we can bear,
and that if we stay here
we may have to keep watch
aimee, oc (there are.
doubt, wild beasts of some
kind that will find us out;
and we should not trust

too much to our dogs, who

may lose their lives in a
fight with them.”

Pligdare cay jyouljare
Giclee Wearic. ye raat) Ido
not yet see how we can
cross the stream. We shall
first have to build a bridge.”

Beng te aigiave y Irilist
stay where we are, said
my wife.

elvdo) net thinke-so, my
om ale said. IN.o;.one
knows what he can do till
emuiices|

The boys were now all
out of their beds; and
while my wife went to milk

the cow and cook some
food, I made my plans
known tothem. They were
all glad when they heard
that we were to leave, and
each said he would help,
as far as he could, to build
the bridge.

The first thing to be done
was to find some strong
planks; and Fritz, Ernest,
and I went down to the
shore, and got in the boat,
which the tide soon took
down to the bay.

On a piece of land which
layah Core titemireh ve. corel
see some large dark thing,
round which flew a flock
of sea gulls. As we had
a wish to learn what it was,:
we put up a sail and caught
a gust of wind which had
sprung up, and this soon
brought the boat to the
spot. We made no noise,
28

but crept up the shore step
by step, and we got so near
that Ernest brought down
some of the birds with a
stick. Fritz was the first to
find out that what the sea
gulls had just left was the
huge fish he had shot in the
sea. It was a large shark,
and we could see the wound
in its head made by the
two balls from Fritz’s gun.
We cut off some parts of
the rough skin, which we
thought might serve us for
files, and then went back
tothe boat. I took a glance
at. the shore ere I got in,
and to my great joy saw
that some of the planks
‘and spars from the wreck
lay on the ground not far
off, Our next care was to
bind these so as to make
a raft, which we tied to, the
stern of the boat, and then,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

by the use of our oars, soon
made our way to the bay,
and up the stream to the
place where the bridge was
to be built. Our young
friends were glad to see us
back isotsoon) and rane
meet us; Jack had a cloth
in his hand, in which was
a store of cray fish and
crabs just caught in some
of the nooks of a rock up
the stream; Frank was full
of glee, and told how that
he had been the first to
find them out, and how
Jack had to wade up ‘to his
knees to get them.

“Do not fail to give God
thanks” \said ‘Te thatvour
lot has been cast where we
can pick up more food than
we can eat.”

It would take a long time
to tell how we brought all
the wood up to the spot,
THE BRIDGE. 29

how we built piers of stone
in the stream, and how we
. put the planks one by one
in their place; but we did
it at last, though it was late
at night when we left off
work, and once more sought
our tent. |
The next day we saw
the sun rise, and took our
first meal in haste, for we
knew we should have a
levemre ayey toil. (vil) the
stores that we could not
take with us were laid by
in the tent, the door of
which was made safe by a
row of casks that we put
round it. Each of us took
pare ainic bag) anat. ay Cun,
My wife and Fritz soon
led the way; the cow went
next; then the ass, with
Piamlemonmicndnaci.) |) lacks
led the goats, and on the
back,of one of them sat the

ape. Ernest took charge
of the sheep, and I brought
up the rear as chief guard.
Our dogs ran from the
front to the rear rank, and
Went tonana Hive. as’ \ihto
see that all was right, and
fom keep rus inellincwn\\ @
left the sow near the tent,
but we had not gone far
when she set off with a
loud grunt, and soon came
up with us. Our march
was slow, for the live stock
would stray here and there
to graze on the rich grass
that grew by the way; but
still we got on. We took
care to cross the bridge
one at a time, and found it
bear our weight well; but
once or twice we thought
the cow would step in
the stream, or fall off the
boards, when she went to
the sides to drink.
30 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Just as we had left the
bmege, lack criediout,) be
quick! here is a strange
beast with quills as long as
my) ara, oy Eberdogsi ran,
and I with them, and
found a large Por-cu-PINE
in the grass. It made a
loud noise, and shot out
its quills at the dogs, and
made them bleed. At this
Jack put his hand to his
belt, drew forth one of the
small arms I gave him, and
shot straight, with good
aiid tie (beast niwhich
fell dead on the spot. Jack
was proud of his feat, but
Fritz, who did not like to
be beat by one so young
as Jack, told him to use
more care, or he might
shoot one of the dogs, if
not one of us. My wife's
first thought was to dress
the wounds made by the





quills, which had stuck in
the nose of one of the
dogs, while the. boys made .
haste to pluck some of the
quills. \trom) ithe ysiiiaer
their strange prize.

At last our march came
to an end, and I saw for
the inser tiem tnenoredtn
trees that my wife had told
me of. They were of vast
size, and were, I thought,
fig trees. “If we can but
fix our tent up there,” I
said, “we shall have no
cause to dread, for no wild
beasts can reach us.” We
cent wlerank sot toe vane
sticks, with which to make
a fire, and my wife made
some’soup of the flesh of
the beast we had slain,
though we did not like it
so well as we did the ham.
and cheese we brought
with us.
THE FLAMINGO. ; 31



CA EL

Tue meal at an end, my
first thought was to make
some steps by means of
which we could reach the
first strong branch of the
mee One hanantrrot ite
root which rose high up
out of the earth, so as to
form an arch some six feet
from the ground, we laid a
large piece of sail cloth,
and this kept off both the
dew and the flies. Ernest
and I then went in search
of some thick canes that
grew in the sands hard by.

These we cut down, and,.

with the aid of some strong
string, we bound them to
four long poles, and thus
made a pair of steps that
would, we thought, reach
far up the trunk.

On our way back from
the sands, one of the dogs
made a dart at a clump
Oly reeds, wancheetitnOomy ait
large birds rose on the
wing with a loud noise.
Fritz let fly at them, and
brought down two at a
shot. One of them fell
quite dead, but its mate,
though hurt in the wing,
made use of its long legs
so well, that it would have
Cou Ol Mime had) net
held it till we came up.
The joy of Fritz, to have
caught such a strange bird,
was so great that he would
have us at once bind it
by the neck and take it
back with us. “Look,” said
Ernest, “what fine plumes
he has, and you see he has
32 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

web feet like a goose, and
has long legs like a stork:
thus he can run on land
as fast as he can swim.”
soViGs, i Sdtelenlieecdanich ene
can fly with more speed
through the air, for these
birds have great strength
in their wings. In fact,
few birds have such means
of flight as the Fia-mty-co.”

Loud were the cries of
Jack and Frank when we
calle aiemstonbs |) out. imy
wife thought the great bird
might need more food than
we could spare. I told
her that it would feed on
small fish and worms, and
not rob our geese of their
grain. I then tied him to
a stake near the stream by
a cord that left him room
LOulis ue aienicneace) anicein
a few days we were glad
to find that he knew us,

and would come at a call,
like a tame bird.

While I sat on the grass
with my sons, late in the
day, I thought I would try
to make a bow that might
be of some use to kill
birds, and thus save our
shot. This I did with a
long cane and a piece of
string, and then made a
dart with a sharp point,
which I shot off and found
it would go straight. The
branch of the tree on which
we were to fix our hut
was so high that our steps
would not near reach it.
“What shall we do now?”
said 4d ritze WV alge and
you shall see, my lad.”
I then tied some strong
thread to the dart, and
shot it over the branch;
then tied a piece of rope
to the, end of the, thread,


Ned driving the Birds away from the dead Shark.
I MAKE A BOW AND ARROW. 33

and drew that up, and at
last made a long row of
cane steps, with a rope at
each side, which we drew
Upmeoewtiie, first
branch. The boys were
now all in haste to climb
the tree, but I chose that
Jack, who was light of
build and sure of foot,
should go up first and try
the strength of our work.
Fritz went up next with
some nails, and made the
ropes fast to the tree, while
irciove sstalcesmin tlic
ground to keep them firm
at the foot. It was now
time for me to mount, and
up I went with an axe to lop
off the twigs and smooth
the bough that was to form
the ground of our new
house. I sent the boys
down out of my way, and
kept hard at work till it

strong

was late, for the sky was
clear, and the moon lent
me her beams of light to
Seenbin -
When I came down I
found that my two sons,
whom I sent down, had
not been there. I was at
a loss to think where they
could be, but my fears
were soon gone, for just
then I heard them sing a
hymn, the sound of which
came from one of the top
boughs of the tree. |
When they came down,
my wife spread a good
meal on the ground, which
we ate as best we could,
and then made our beds
of dry moss, round which
we put heaps of twigs.
These we set light to, as
watch fires to keep off
wild beasts and _ snakes.

The toils of the day had
34 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



made the boys tired, and
they were soon in a sound
sleep, but my wife and I
took it in turns to watch
through the whole night
long. |

We were all out of our
beds as soon as light was
in the sky, and set to work
to hoist up the planks that
were to form the floor of
our ‘hut. These we laid
down on the branch, with
their ends made fast to a
cross piece of wood that
we had to fix to the trunk
Ounce w tree, )) Cur) (nails
were long, and we drove
each one of them home, so
that we had no cause to
fear the strength of our
work. Some parts were

rough, but we. took care
to make our floor quite
smooth, and put up a large

sail cloth to serve for a

roof till we had time to
make one of wood. By
the time we had done this
the day was far spent, and
we Wete alli welad to, lang
by our tools and rest our
limbs. That night we lit
our fires round the tree,
tied the dogs to the roots,
and went up to sleep out
of harm's way for the first
time weiice we “leit tie
ship. When the steps were
drawn up we all felt that
we were now safe at last,
and that we had brought
the toils of the day to a
good end. |
THE LORD'S DAY. 35

CHAPTER VII.

We did not wake next
day till the sun shone in
upon us. I told my wife
and sons that as it was the
Lord’s day we would do
no work. Our beasts and
birds had first to be fed.
This was done by my wife,
who then brought us some
hot milk, and made us sit
down on the grass and take
it. When our meal was
done, I got on a log in
front of my sons, and we
all sang a psalm we knew
by heart. Then I sought
to teach them in the best
way I could think of, and
spoke to them thus :—

“There was once on a
time a Great King, who
had two vast realms, one

_ known as the Land of Light

and Truth, and one as the
Land of Night and Sloth.
Those who dwelt in the
first were full of life and
joy. The King held his
court at the Place of Rest,
where all was bright. The
Create aim. and, joy, Oneal
who dwell there was to
wait on Him, for they were
bound by a bond of love.
“This King had a land,
not far off, which He made
for a time the place where
those for whom He had
so much love should dwell
ere they went one by one
to the Place of Rest. This
land was the Home of
Earth. He told each of
them that this was to be
their home but for a time,

and that all who did His
36 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

will and kept His laws
should go to the Land of
Light and Truth. He gave
to His Son the right to
rule the host that dwelt in
the Home of Earth, and
set forth to them what they
were to do, and all the ills
that would come to them
if they did not do as they
were bid. The Prince told
them that ships would be
sent from time to time to
bring off such as did His
will, and take them to the
Land of Light.

“At first they were all
glad to hear the way in
which they were to live,
and the terms on which
they could ‘reach the Land
of Light and Truth. Sad
to tell, they soon broke the
King’s laws, and paid no
heed to what they knew
fo be His will; each, in

fact, did as he chose, and
thought more of his ease,
sloth, or self will, than of
the Place of Rest or the
Land of Light. Still there ©
were a few who did as
they had been taught, and
dwelt in peace, in the hope
that they would please the
King and at last reach the
place where He held his
court.

“The King was true to
his word. From time to
time ships came to the
Home of Earth, and each
bore the name of some
dire evil. . At last a great
ship was sent, the name
of which was Zhe Grave,
which bore the flag of
Death. The flag was of
green and black. To the
good it was a sign of hope,
but the bad were thrown
by the sight of it into
THE LORD'S DAY. an

a state of gloom. These’

ships were not seen till
they came close to the
shore, and then the crew
were sent forth to find
those whom they were told
to seize. Some went back
with them full of joy, but
mosteiwere seen to,, weep
and mourn their fate. So
soon as they were brought
in sight of the Great -King,
the Prince took those who
had done well, and put a
white robe on them; but
those who went their own
way when on the Home
of Earth, He sent down
to toil in deep dark mines
till time shall be no more.”

When my sons had heard
my tale to the end they
all knew what it meant; I
then drew from them their
views of what they ought
to do to please and serve

the Great King, and did
my best to teach them the
truths that would guide
them safe to the Place of
Rest, when the time should
come for them to leave

the Home of Earth. We

then Saticaeay lytmr, sane

my wife drew from her
bag the Br-stz, which I-
gave to one of the boys,
who read from it in a
clear, loud voice. When
this was brought to a close,
we all knelt down on the
grass to pray, and to ask
God to bless the means
we took to learn His will. ©
We did no work that
day, but took a long stroll
up the banks of the stream,
and spoke of such things
as we felt would cause our
minds to dwell on the
truths we had heard read
out of the Word of God.
38 Pie SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



The next day Ernest and
Jack tried their skill with
the bow, and brought down
some small birds that came
to the great tree in quest
of figs. I gave them leave
to kill what they could;
for I knew that, if put in
casks made air tight with
grease, they would keep
Momearchetn of mime, and
might prove a boon, if our
stock of food should get
low.

When we sat down to
dine, the thought struck
me that it would be as
well to give some name to
each part of the strange
land that was now known
to us. “We can, then,”
said I, “speak. of a place
as we did when we were
at home, and not have to
say so much ere we can
tell the spot we mean.”

This was at first the source
of some fun, for Fritz said
we should call the bay
where we had found the
shell spoons by the name
of Spoon Bay; but Jack,
who still had a mark on
his toe where the crab
gave him a pinch, thought
we ought to term it Crab
Bay.

“Tf you will let me give
ity a fame, ‘said myavalics
“T should wish to know
it by some term that will
make us bear in mind how
good God was to us to
lead our raft there, and
L' done think Sate Bay,
will be a bad name for
it.”

“Somat it became
and from that time Safe
Bay had a name.

“What shall be the name

of the spot where we spent
THE NEST.

our first night on shore?
You shall give that its
flamer esata to Eritz,

@ieew ius, .call ‘iti ent
House,” said he.
raiivat will, do.esaid pb

“And now for the spot
Sie ene ami@uiin OF )) atc
Bay, where we found our
planks ?”

onagic "| Pome... \, Said
Ernest, and we gave it
that name, frotn the fact
that the great fish which
Fritz shot had been found
tere. Ihe place from
which Fritz and I sought
iinnain Ton, vagthaee, Ol,’ Out
ship mates was to be
known as No Man’s Cape.
Then we had the Boys
Bridge, which name I gave
it from a wish to please
my sons, who had done
so much to build it.

“But what shall we call

*39

the place which is now
mess deat to Ws) alla meal
le

Fritz thought we should
Cale peae ost, Fark
said he should like us to
give it the name of Zhe
Perch, while Frank chose
Dove Cote as the best he

jcould think of.

“Now, my dear,” said
Petoumiy wate, “it -ts) acim

What © shall

turn. we |
say?”

etl) us); callin yamee
Nest,’ said she; and with

that I gave each of my
young birds a glass of
sweet wine.

“Here's to ‘The Nest, ”
said I; “and may we live
long to bless the day and
the means that mcuent us
Rietic.

| themeold |) britz ae
draw a map of the place
40

in his spare time, and to
mark down the name of
each spot as near as he
could.

When the heat of the
day was past, I told my
sons that I should be glad
- to take a walk with them.

iiteyerall lett otf work,
threw down their tools, and
made haste to join me.
My- wife said that she
should like to go with us;
so we left The Nest in
charge of Turk, and bent
our course to the banks of
the stream. On eur way
we went past some shrubs
and rare herbs, which my
wife knew well how to
make use of should we fall
sick; and Ernest, who had
read much, and knew most
kind of plants, found a
large spot of ground on

which grew a fine kind of

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Po-ta-ro. At these the
boys set to work with such
zeal, that we soon had a
full bag of the ripe fruit.
We then went on to Tent
House, which we found in
the same state as when we
left it to cross the stream
on our way to the great
EEE; |

We found that our ducks
and geese, had grown so
wild that they would not
come near us; so, while my
wife and I went to pick up
such things as we thought
we might take back with
us, Ernest and Fritz were
sent to catch them, and to
tie their legs and wings,
and in this way we got
them at last to The Nest.
It was late at night when
we came in sight* of the
tree, and the weight of the
fowls and bags that we
THE WRECK. 4I

brought back tried our|found, which we ate with

strength.

My wife soon} milk from the cow and the

made a fire to boil some| goat, and then went up to

of the fruit that Ernest had |The Nest for the night.



Chir EE Re Te

Ir took the whole of the
next day to make a sledge,
to which we tied the ass,
and drove to Tent House.
On our sledge we put such
of the casks which held
food, and took them back
to The Nest. Inthe course
of the same week, Fritz
and I went once more to
the wreck, and this time
we brought off chests of
clothes, pigs of lead, cart
wheels, sacks of maize,
oats, peas, and wheat, and
a small mill that had been
used by the cook on board

to grind the peas with
which he made soup for
the crew. When we thad
put these on board the
raft, there was not an inch
of room to spare. With a
strong bar we broke down
some of the doors, and.
took such parts of the ship
as we thought would aid
us to build our house,
which as yet was far less
safe than I could wish.
These we bound: with
cords, and made them float
back at the stern of the.
raft.
42

When we got to the
shore, my wife and the
three boys were there to
greet us. My first care
was to send for the sledge,
and with this we took
most of our new wealth

up to The Nest.

See bsttzerold ranks thatiic
had seen a chest of gold
coin on the wreck.

Oly Do wash you had
brought it with you,” said
ie

“And what would you
have done with it when
you hadssot iu: \saie yl.

“T would buy some nice
sweet cakes, for the bread
we have is so hard.”

This made us all laugh,
and Frank with the rest,
for he soon saw that the
coin would be of no use
in a place where there
were no shops.

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

The next day I told my
sons that they must now
leaunt to 1 Tun, ecomles py mto
climb, and to throw stones
Siiaielt. "at a, malar
these things would be of
great use to them in their
new mode of life.

I next taught them to
use the Las-so, by means
of which men catch the
wild horse on the vast
plains of the New World.
I tied two stones to the
ends of a cord some yards
in length, and flung off
one of them at the trunk
OL a VvOune itee. the. cond
went round and round it
in a coil, and bound it so
tight that I could have
drawn it to me had it not
been fast in the ground.
This trick the boys were
not slow to learn; and
riz, i) aashontetimne
THE LASSO. — 43

could take an aim as well
with a stone as he could
with his gun.

As yet we had not seen
muen of the isle: for
though Fritz and I had
gone some few miles round
.the place where we dwelt,
it took most of our time
to build the house, and
this kept us hard at work
Medi the tree, whut, one
day we made up our minds
that we would all start on
a tour. We rose at dawn,
put the ass in the sledge,
took what food we thought

we should need, and set

out from The Nest just as
the sun rose.

My sons and I took our
guns, Prank «sat in; the
sledge, my wife led the
ass, and the ape rode on
the back of our dog Turk.

When we came to the

wood where Fritz found
the ape, he told them by
what means we got the
nuts, but now there were
no apes there to throw
them down.

“Oh, if one would but
fall from the trees,” he said.

The words had but just
left his lips when a large
nut fell at his feet. He
made a start back, and two
more came down near the
same spot.

elt seeins* «SalG@ielta was
if we had but-to wish for
a thing and we get it.”

As the nuts were far
from ripe, I was at a loss to
know how they could fall
off the tree, for I could not
see an ape nor a bird near.
All at once Jack cried
out, “See, see! here comes
our friend, but I can't say
much for his looks.”
With that I went close
up to the tree, and saw a
large land crab on its way
down the trunk. Jack
struck a blow at him with
a stick, but did not hit the
beast. He then took off
his coat and threw it on
the crabs head, while I
made an end of him with
an axe. I told them that
these crabs climb the trees
and break off the nuts, as
we had seen, and then
come down to feast on
them at their ease.

“But how do they crack
the nuts?” said Jack.

Shey finale ma) witiole
through the shell at the
thin end, and then suck
them dry.”

The dead crab was put
in the sledge, and we went
on through the wood. The
wild plants which lay in

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

our path made us stop now
and then to clear the way
with an axe, so that we did
not get on fast and the
heat was so great that I
thought we should have
had to seek the shade of
thew next iilarce) tccemmae
could find. When we
came to the Gourd Wood,
we sat down to make some
more bowls and flasks to
take back with us. Ernest
had gone to try what new
thing he could find, but he

had not been from us long,

‘when we heard him call

out—

“A wild boar! A great
wild boar! Come here,
pray !”

We took up our guns,
and went at once with the.
dogs to the spot. We
soon heard Turk give a

loud bark, and a long deep
.8

THE IGUANA.

grunt told us that the dogs
had found the beast, and
were no doubt at his
throat. But just then we
heard Ernest laugh, and
saw the two dogs come
through a clump of brush
wood, with our old sow
fast by the ears. She did
not seem to like the way
in which they had put an
end to her feast of fruit, so
she ran back as soon as
we told the dogs to let go
their hold of her ears.
“But with all our sport,’
Said. Ptiize we shave.” a
poor show of game. Let
us leave the young ones,
and set off to see what we
can meet with.” Ernest,
who was not so fond of
field sports as the rest, sat
down with Frank, and. we
left them and my wife at
the gourd tree, while Fritz

45



and Jack set off with me
to a high rock which we
saw on the right.. Jack
went first and broke off
the twigs, to let him pass
through, with as much ease
as if he had been born to
that kindvot wonkmcal rit Z
look here,” said he, as he
made his way to the rock.

“What have you found
now?” said Fritz.

“T don’t know what it is,
butatsractinerizes!

When I went up I saw
at once that it was a large
I-cu-a-wa, the flesh and
eggs of which are both
good for food. Fritz would
have shot at it, but I told
him that its scales were no
doubt shot proof, and that
I knew a way to catch it
that I thought would do
quite as well. I had heard
that these and such like
46

beasts will stand still if you
Bebe air On aapipem so
I crept near, and made a
low sound with my lips,
while I held in my right
hand a stout stick, to which
I had tied a cord with a
noose, and in my left hand
a slight wand. It soon
woke from its sleep, but
did not seem to fear us. I
saw it first move its tail,
and then draw its head
from side to side, as if to
look where the sound came
from. I then threw the
noose round its neck, drew
it tight, got on its back
with a leap, and thrust the
-wand up its nose, which is
the sole part of the beast
where there are no hard

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

scales. It bled at once,
and was soon dead, nor
did it seem to feel any
pain, Our prize eangiieh
was near five feet long, was
no slight weight to lift. I
got it at last on my back;
while Jack, in his fun, held
up my train, which was,
of course, its long tail, and
thus we went back to the
gourd tree, where we found
the rest quite safe.

It took us a long time to
reach The Nest that night. |
My wife did her best to
dress some of the flesh of
the land crab, but it was
tough, and did not taste
so nice as the soup made
from the beast that we had
caught by the nose.
THE WAX TREE.

47

CEUAE PER x,

TuErRE was to be seen so
much that was new to us,
and so much to be found
that we could make good
mec of, Maem niz) andi.
spent the whole of the next
day in the woods. We
took the ass and one of
the dogs with us, but left
all else at home.

Our way first lay through
a dense wood, where we
saw no end of small birds,
but such game could not
now tempt Fritz to waste
his shot. We then had to
wonosc a vast plata and, to
wade through the high
grass, which we did with
care, lest we should tread
on some strange thing that
might turn and bite us.

Wercame at laste toa

grove of small trees, and
in their midst. |). sawegae
bush, which I knew to be
the wax tree, for the wax
grew on it like white beads.
I need not say how glad
I was to find so great a
prize. We had up to this
time gone to bed ‘as soon
as the sun went down, for
we had no lamp to use;
but as we could now make
Wax) (Hahtswelymeol | Enity
that we had found what
would add two or three
hours per day to our lives.
We took as much of the
wax as would serve us for
some time, and then made
our way out of the grove.
Fritz here found a nest, in ©
which was a young green

and gold bird. This he
48

took home with him, in
the hope that he might
tate il) ang geteaeubmitnto
speak. |

Our path was now so
clear that we could walk
side by side with ease, and
talk.of what we had seen.

“How came you,’ said
Fritz, “to know so much
of the queer beasts, trees,
and plants that we have
found here?”

“When young,’ said I,
“TI used to read all the
books that fell in .my
way; and those that told
of strange lands and what
was to be seen in them
NaG stor) Me as oreat ea
charm as they have for
Ernest, who has read a
great deal, and knows more
of plants than you do.”

“Well,” said he, “I will
do the same if I but get

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the chance. Can you tell
what is the name of that
huge tree oneeane sfioht:
It must be at least three
score feet high. See, there
are balls on the bark.”

We went close to it, and
found that these balls were
of thick gum, which the
sun had made quite hard.
Fritz tried to pull one of
them off,.but felt that it
clung tight to the bark,
though he could change
its shape with his warm
hanes. ss ook, esateusire
“T feel sure that this 1s
the In-pi-a Rus-Ber which
we used to clean our
school books with.” I
£00k; aa piece: OF aitmnamnny,
hand, and said, “To be
sure it is. . What shall we
not find in this rich land 2”
I then told him how the
men in the New World
3
(ox
3
=,
an
Ss
3
n
5S)
Ss
cS
N
yy
os
be


THE SAGO TREE.

made flasks of this gum,
in which form it is sent
to all parts of the world.
“And I do not see why
we should not make boots
imei the sesame way.
hye have! butitovmlllarsock
with sand, then put gum
ally rounds it. swhile inva
soft state, till it is as thick
as we need, then pour the
sand out, and we _ shall
have made a shoe or a
boot that will at least keep
out the damp, and that is
more than mine do just
now. |

Fritz now gave full play
comic (Oy. marl ehave | not
done a bad day's work,”
said he, “to have found
such a tree as this.”

Not far from this we
came to a bush, the leaves
of which were strewn with
a white dust; and close

by were two or three more
in the same state. I cut a
slit in the trunk of one of
these, which had been torn
up by the wind, and found
it full of the white dust,
which I knew by the taste
to be Sa-co. We took all
of this that we could get
out of the tree, for it would
add to our stock of food;
and when our bags were
full we laid them on the
back of the ass, and set
off to find our way back
to The Nest. »

“Each day brings us
fresh wealth,” said my wife,
when she saw what we
had brought her; “but
think we might now try to
add to our goods.” I knew
that she had some fear lest ,
we should one day get lost
in the woods, or meet with
wild beasts, so I at once
50

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

said that we would now

stay at home, at least for
some days.

My first work was to
make some wax lights, for
my wife could then mend
our clothes at night, while
we sat down to talk. This
done, the next task they
gave me was to make a
churn. What with my lack
of skill, and want of tools,
I thought it best not to
aim too high, so I took a
large gourd, made a small
hole in the side, and cut
out as much as I could, so
as to leave but the rind.
In this I put the cream,
laid a piece on the hole,
and bound it up so that
none could come out. The
. boys then held a_ cloth,
and on it I put the gourd,
which they made to roll
from side to side. They

kept up this game with
great mirth for near an
hour, when my wife took
off the string, and found
that the churn had done
its work well.

“We shall not have to
eat dry bread now,” said
Frank; and I was as glad
as he that such was the
case.

As our sledge was not
fit to use on rough roads,
my next work was to make
a, cat, ulishadi breug nie
pair of wheels from the
wreck, so that my task did
not prove a hard one. It
is true I did not make
what you might call a neat
job of it, but for all that
we found it of great use.

While I was thus at
work, my wife and the
boys took some of the
fruit trees we had brought
A NEW TASK. 3 5

with us, and put them in
the ground where they
thought they would grow
best. The vines were put
round the roots of our
tree, in the hope that they
would grow up the trunk.
On each side of the path
that led. from The Nest to
the Boys Bridge they put
a row of young nut trees,
which would, as they grew
up, shade us from the sun
all the way to the stream.
To make the path hard we
laid down sand from the
sea shore, and then beat
it down with our spades.
We were for six weeks
at this and such like work.
Each day brought with it
health and strength for us
all, and we were loth to
spare any pains to make
The Nest, and all that

could be seen near it, look

neat and trim, though there
were no eyes but our own
to view the scene.

One day I told my sons
that I would at last try
to make a flight of stairs
in place of the cane steps
with rope sides, which were
a source of fear to my
wife, and, to tell the truth,
the worst part of our house.
As yet we had not used
them much, for we came
down as soon as we got
out of bed, and did not go
up till it was time for rest;
but the rain would some
day force us to keep in
The Nest, and then we
should like to go up and
down stairs with more ease
than we could now climb
the rude steps. To make
a flight of stairs of such
great length was no slight
task, and each time that T
52 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



thought of it I gave it up
as a thing we could not do.
But I now had a mind to
try our skill at this kind
of work. I knew that a
swarm of bees had built
their nest in the trunk of
our tree, and this led me
to think that there might
be a void space in it some
way up. “Should this
prove to be the case,’ I
said, “our work will be
half done, for we shall
then have but to fix the
stairs in the tree round the
trunk.” As soon as I had
thus spoke, the boys got
up and went to the top of
the root to tap the trunk,
and to judge by the sound
how far up the hole went.
But they had to pay for
their want of thought: the
whole swarm of bees came
out as soon as they heard

the noise, stung their cheeks,
stuck to. their hair and
clothes, and soon put them
to flight.

It took my wife and I
some time to drive off the
bees, and to put fresh earth
on the wounds to ease the
pain the poor boys felt
from the stings. We found
that Jack, who was at all
times rash, had struck the
bees’ nest with his axe, and
was much more hurt by
them than the rest; in fact,
his face was so bad, that
we had to swathe the whole
OL Mein cloths), These
who went to his work in

his slow way, got up to it

last, and was the first to
run off when he saw the
bees; thus he did not get
more than a sting or two,
but the rest were some
hours ere they could see
WE SMOKE THE BEES.

out of their eyes. When
they were free from pain,
we took means to deal
with the bees. I took a
large gourd, which had
long been meant to serve
for a hive, and put it ona
Send. Nether made 1a
straw roof to keep it from
the sun and wind, and as
by this time it grew dark,
we left the hive there for
the night.

Next day we rose at the
first glimpse of dawn, and
the boys, whose wounds
were now quite well, went
with me to help to move
the bees to the new home
we had made for them.
©ur first work was to stop
with clay all the holes in
the tree but one through
which the bees were wont
to go in to their nest. To
this I put the bowl of

53

a pipe, and blew in the
smoke of the weed as fast
as I could, with a view to
drug them with its fumes.
At first we heard a loud
buzz like the noise of a
SiOrim) aia om aout ome
more I blew my pipe the
less grew the sound, till at
last the bees were quite
stil) sand? then l (took seme
pipe out of the hole.

We now cut out a piece
of the trunk, three feet
square, and this gave us,a
full view of the nest. Our
joy was great to find such
a stock of wax, for I could
see the comb reach far up
the tree. I took some of
the comb, in which the
bees lay in swarms, and
put it by on the plank.
Me rest euveiniea Gasle
which my wife tied down
with sail cloth, lest the bees,
54

led by the smell, should
come to claim their own.

We then put the gourd
on the comb that held the
swarm, and took care that
the queen bee was not left
out. By these means we
EOOmmAOt ea ive: Ol fine
bees, and the trunk of the
tree was left free for our
use.

We had now to try the
length of the hole. This
we did with a long pole,
apd found it reach as far
up as the branch on which
our house stood.

“You see,’ said I to my
sons, “that this tree has no
sap in its trunk, but, like
some that grow in the land
we came from, it draws its
means of life through the
bark.”

We now cut:a square
hole in that side of the

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

trunk next the sea shore,
and made one of the doors
that we had brought from
the ship to fit in the space.
We then made the sides
smooth all the way up, and
with planks and the staves
of some old casks, built
up the stairs round a pole
which we made fast in the .
ground. To do this we
had to make a notch in the
pole and one in the side
of the trunk for each stair,
and thus go up step by
step till we came to the top.
We had a good store of
strong nails, and with them,
and such toolsas we brought
back on the raft, which we
had now learnt to use with
some skill, we got on well
with our task. Each day
we spent a part of our
time at what we could now
call the farm, where the
THE BOYS PETS. ie

beasts and fowls were kept,
and did odd jobs as well,
so that we should not make
too great a toil of the flight
of stairs, which took us
some six weeks to put
up.
One day Fritz caught a
fine Ea-crz, which he tied
by the leg to a branch of
the tree, and fed with small
birds. It took him a long
while to tame, but in time
he taught it to perch on
his wrist, and to feed from
his hand. He once let it
go, and thought he would
have lost it, but the bird
knew it had a good friend,
for it came back to the tree
at night. From that time
it was left free, though we
thought that some day its
love of war and wild sports
would tempt it to leave us
for the rocks of the sea

shore, where Fritz had first
found it.

Each of my boys had
now some pet to take care
of; and, I may say, to tease,
for they all thought they
had a fair right to get some

fun out of the pets they

could call their own; but
they were kind to them,
fed them well, and kept
them clean.

In what I may term my
spare time, which was
when I left off work out
of doors, I made a pair of
gum shoes for each of my
SOnswingnumce way 1) slag
told Fritz it could be done.
I do not know what we
should have done had we
not found the gum tree,
for the stones soon wore
out the boots we had,
and we could not have
gohe. through the woods
56

or trod the hard rocks with
bare feet.

By this time our sow had
brought forth ten young
pies) and eanewiens had
each a brood of fine chicks.
Some we kept near us, but
most
the wood, where my wife
said she could find them
when she had need to use
them.

I knew the time must
now be near when, in this

clime, the rain comes down

day by day for weeks, and
that it would wash us out
of The Nest if we did not
make a good roof to our
house. Then our live stock
would need some _ place
where they could rest out

Grete went | to;

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

of the rain. The thatch for
The Nest was of course
our first care; then we
made a long roof of canes
for our live stock, and on
this we spread clay and
moss, and then a thick coat
Of tar.wso thagit) was) vane
proof (from vena) tomvencds
This was held up by thick
canes stuck deep in the
ground, with planks made
fast to them to form the
walls, and round the whole
we put a row of cask staves
to serve for rails. ‘In this
way we soon had a barn,
store room, and hay loft,
with stalls for the cow, the
ass, and what else we kept
that had need of a place to
live in.
THE FLAX PLANT. 57

CRAP a Pain.

Frank one day found
some long leaves, to which,
from their shape, he gave
the name of sword leaves.
These he brought home to
play with, and then, when
he grew tired of them,
threw them down. As
they lay on the floor, Fritz
took some of them in his
hand, and found them so
limp; that he said he could
plait them, and make a
whip for Frank to drive
the sheep and goats with.
As he split them up to do
this, 1 could not but note
their strength. This led
me to try them, and I found
that we had now a kind
of flax plant, which was a
source of great joy to my
wife.

“You have not yet found
aljinine, (ismersaid,, “they
will be of more use to us
than this. Go at once and
search for some more of
these leaves, and bring me
the most you can of them.
With these I can make you
hose, shirts, clothes, thread,
rope; in short, give me
flax, and make me a loom
and some frames, and I
shall be at no loss for work
when the rain comes.”

I could not help a smile
at my wife's joy when she
heard the name of flax;
for there was still much to
do ere the leaves could take
the shape of cloth. But two
of the boys set off at once
to try to find some more of
the flax.
58 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

While they were gone,
my wife, full of new life,
and with some show of
pride, told me how I should
make the loom by means
of which she was to clothe
us from head to foot. Ina
short time they came back,
and brought with them a
good load of the plant,
which they laid at her feet.
She now said she would
lay by all else till she had
tried what she could make
of it. The first thing to be
done was to steep the flax.
To do this we took the
plant down to the marsh,
tied up in small bales, as
they pack hemp for sale.
The leaves were then
spread out in ‘the pond,
and kept down with stones,
and left there in that state
till it was time to take them
out and set them in the sun

to dry, when they would
be so soft that we could
peel them with ease. It
was two weeks ere the flax
was fit for us to take it out
of the marsh. We spread
it out on the grass in the
sun, where it dried so quick
that we took it home to
The Nest the same day.
It was then put by till we
could find time to make the
wheels, reels, and combs
which my wife said that
she would want to turn our
new found plant to its best
use. |

We now made haste to
lay (upasstore Lot Veamec:
nuts, wood, and such things
as we thought we might
want; and took care, while
it was still fine, to sow

wheat, and all the grain we

had left in our bags was
soon put in the ground.
THE RAINY SEASON.

The fear that the rain might
come and put a stop to our
work led us to take our
meals in haste, and to make
the days as long as we
could see. We knew that
the rain was close at hand,
for the nights were cold;
large clouds could be seen
in the sky, and the wind
blew as we had not felt
it since the night our ship
struck on the rock. |

The great change came
at last. One night we were
woke up out of our sleep
‘with the noise made by the
rush of the winds through
the woods, and we could
hear the loud roar of the
sea far off. Then the dense
storm clouds which we had
seen in the sky burst on us,
and the rain came down in
floods. The streams, pools,
and ponds on all sides were

59

soon full, and the whole
plain round us met our
view as one vast lake. By
good luck, the site of our
house stood up out of the
flood, and our group of
trees had the look of a
small isle in the midst of
the lake. |

We soon found that The
Nest was not built so well
as we thought, for the rain
came in at the sides, and
we had good cause to fear
that the wind would blow
the roof off. Once the
storm made such a rush at
it, that we heard the beams
creak, and the planks gave
signs that there was more

istrain on them than they

could bear. This dtove us
from our room to the stairs
in the trunk, on which we
sat in a state of fear till
the worst of the storm was
60

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



past. Then we went down
to the shed we had built
on the ground at the root
of the tree, and made the
best shift we could. All
our stores were kept heré,
so that the space was too
small to hold us, and the
smell from the beasts made

it far from a fit place for

six of us to dwell in; but
it was at least safe for a
time, and this was of course
the first thing to be thought
of. To dress our food we
had to make a fire in the
barn, and as there was no
place to let out the smoke,
it got dqwn.our throats and
made us cough all the day
long.

It was now for the first
time that my wife gave a
sigh for her old Swiss
home. But we all knew
Giaedumita Was PORTION TGe nt

grieve, and each set to
work to do all he could to
make the place look neat
and clean. Some of our
stores we took up the stairs
out of our way, and this
gave uS more room. As
we had cut square holes
in the trunk of the tree all
the way up, and put in
frames of glass that we
got from the ship, my wife
could sit on the stairs, with
Frank at her feet, and mend
our,,clothes.|)/ Bach dave
drove from the barn such
of the beasts as could bear:
to be out inthe rain. That
we might not lose them, I
tied bells round their necks ;
and if we found that they
did not come back when
the sun went down, Fritz
and I went out to bring
them in. We oft got wet
through to the skin, which
LIFE IN A BARN. 61

gave us a chill, and might

have laid us up if my wife
had not made cloth capes
and hoods for us to wear.
To make these rain proof,
I spread some of the gum
on them while hot, and this,
when dry, had the look of
oil cloth, and kept the head,
arms, chest, and back free
from damp. Our gum
boots came far up our legs,
so that we could go out
in the rain and come back
quite free from cold and
damp.

We made but few fires,
for the air was not cold,
save for an hour or two
late at night, and we did
not cook more than we
could help, but ate the
_ dried meat, fowls, and fish
we lrad by us.

The care of our beasts
took us a great part of the



day; then we made ours
cakes and set them to bake |
inva din) plate on Palen
fire. I had cut a hole in
the wall to give us light,
gnc put yavipaie Ol! ielace
in: it to keep eut the wind,
but the thick clouds hid
the sun from the earth, and
the shade of the tree threw
a gloom round our barn,
so that our day light was
but short, and night came
on far too soon. We then
made use of our wax lights,
and all sat round a bench.
My wife had as much as
she could well do to mend
the rents we made in our
clothes. I kept a log, in
which I put down, day by
day, what we did and what
we had seen; and then
Ernest wrote this out in a
neat clear hand, and made
a book of it, Fritz’ and
$

62

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



Jack drew the plants, trees, |some wild duck soup; and

and beasts which they had
found, and these were stuck
in our book. Each night
we took it in turns to read
the Word of God, and then
all knelt down to pray ere
we went to bed. Ours was
not a life of ease, it is true,
but it was one of peace and
hope; and we felt that
God had been so kind to
us that it would be a great
sin to wish for what it did
not please Him to grant us.

My wife did all she could
to cheer us, and it was no
strange thing for us to find
that while we were out in
the rain with the live stock
she had made some new
dish, which we would scent
as soon aS we put our
heads in at the door. One
night it was a thrush pie,
the next a roast fowl, or

once in a way she would
give us a grand feast, and

bring out some of all the

good things we had in
store.

In the course of our stay
in doors we made up our
minds that we would not
spend the next time of
storm and rain, when it
should come round, in the
same place. The Nest
would serve us well in that
time of the year when it
was fine and dry, but we
should have to look out for
some spot where we could
build a house that would
keep us from the rain the
next time the storms came.

Fritz thought that we
might find a cave, or cut ,
one out of the rocks by the
sea shore. I told him that
this would be a good plan,
SPRING TIME. 63



but would take a long while
to do. By this time the
boys were all well used
to hard work, and_ they
thought they would much
like to try their skill at
some new kind of work.

“Well,” said I, “we will
go to the rocks round Tent
House the first fine day
that comes, and try to find
some place that will serve
to keep us from the next
year's storms.”



CEPA Te RX,

I can not tell how glad
we all were when we. at
last saw a change in the
sky, and felt once more the
warm rays of the sun. In
a few days the floods sank
in the earth, and left the
ground of a bright green
hue; the air grew warm
and dry, and there were no
more dark clouds to be
seen in the sky.

We found our young
trees had put forth new

leaves, and the seed we
had sown had come up
through the moist ground.
The air had a fresh sweet
smell, for it bore the scent
of the bloom which hung
like snow flakes on the
boughs of the fruit trees;
the songs and cries of the
birds were to be heard on
all sides, and we could see
them fly from tree to tree
in search of twigs to build
their nests. This in fact
64

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



was the spring of the year, |and what there was left of

when all things put forth
new life; and we knew
that the time was now come
when we could once more
range the woods and till
the soil, and this made the
boys leap for joy.

Some planks had been
blown off the roof of The
Nest, and the rain had got
me nete) and there; so our
first job was to mend our
house, and make it fit to
sleep in.

This done, Jack,
ance LM sebiout if0
House. We found it in
asad) stateui) ihe storm
had thrown down the tent,
blown off some of the sail
cloth, and let in the rain
on our casks, some of which

Heitz,
Tent

held a store of food. Our

boat was still safe, but the
raft of tubs had broke up,

it lay in splints on the shore.

Our loss in the storm
had been so great that I
felt we ought at once to
seek for some place on the
rocks where we could put
what was left.

We went all round the
cliffs, in the hope that we
might find a cave, but in
vain. ‘

“There is no way but to
hew one out of the rock,”
said ttizs! itor) wermast
not be beat.”

Nell saidhy bat? sara
Jack; “we have each an
axe.) Why not. try iis
cliff at once 2”

I gave them leave to try,
and we soon set to work at
the rock. From this spot
we had a good view of the
whole bay, and could see
both banks of the stream.
The Fight with the Bears at the Cave.


WORK AT THE CAVE. 65

With a piece of chalk I
made a mark on the side
of the cliff, to show the
width and height that the
cave should be cut. Then
each took an axe to try
what kind of stuff our rock
was made of. We found
it a hard kind of stone;
and, as we were not used
to this sort of work, we
had not done much when
the time came for .us to
leave off.

We came back next
day, and got on with more
speed, though we thought
it would not take us less
than six months to make
the cave, if our work were
done at the same rate each
day.

At the end of five or six
days we had got through
the face of the rock, and
' we found the stone soft.

In a day or two more we
came to what was but hard
clay, which gave way at a
slight blow from the axe.

“We need not fear now,”
said I, “for we shall soon
have a hole as large as we
want.” |

With the earth we took
out we made a ridge in
front woh (the; acme mune
boys now got on so well,
and dug so much out, that
I had hard work to throw
up the earth on the bank.

One day, as Jack stuck
his pick in at the back of
the cave, which was now
more than eight feet from
the front, a great mass of
the rock fell in, and he
enedoute Looehere) I
have got through.”

“ Through what ?” ‘said I,
“Not through your hand,
I hope.”
66

“No, no, but through

neaoek.

PA ty thisy \ bagitzaeere ty ult
loud laugh.

“Why not say through
the world at’ orice, and
push your crow bar in till
you reach Ev-roer, which,
istmest) says, (lies) )iny ina
straight line from our feet.
Pe chouldd likelitowharve)ia
peep down such a hole, for
I might thus get a sight of
our dear Swiss home.”

Fritz and I went up to
the wall and found that
Jack was right, for he had
come \to a Clearspace.» | MHis
first thought was to jump
foeebut as) 1 (knew? that
there might be foul air in

the cave, I would not let

him risk his life. |

The boys then set fire to
some dry grass, and thrust
it in the hole, but it went





. THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

out at once, which was a
sure sign that the air was
not fit to breathe.

t ikiew ))¢hateeacumcatl
brought from the wreck a
box full of fire works, which
were used on board to make
signs to ships far out at sea.
I sent Fritz to Tent House
for these, though I thought
that they might be too
datip (Ho! //imalke )iicemnon
When he came back, I set
light to some of them, and
threw them in) the “hole.
They flew round, and threw
out a stream of sparks that
Lita up ened cave: | U\Vivem
these were burnt out, we
put in a heap of straw and
threw, @ dehitionmiien el bis
was now soon in a blaze,
and gave us a clear view
of the cave; but it was too
deep for us to see the end.

Our joy was so great ~
THE CAVE OF ROCK SALT.

that we sent Jack off home
oy iemesy 10) tell) tlre
good news, and to bring
back some wax lights. I
did not deem it safe for us
to go in the cave in the
dark, for there might be
pools or deep dry pits in
the ground.

Pigcapanay) Doihadk) qtist
thrown up on the bank the

67

one to each. I went in
first and led the way, and
the rest kept close at my
back. We had not gone
on more than a few steps
when we came to a dead
stop, struck with awe at
the grand sight that met
our view. The walls and
roof of the cave were lit
up, as it were, with star-

last spade full of earth that, like gems, while some hung

had been dug out, when
we heard a loud shout.
We got up on the top of
the cave, and saw that Jack
had brought back a tribe
gar iis >neelsy muniteniianse
car, drawn by the cow and
the ass, came on at a slow
facemtccd by | jiaekwom! ia
black ox, and in it were my
wife, Frank, and Ernest.
By the) help of -a flint
and steel I soon lit some
of the wax lights, and gave

down like glass drops from
the roof, and some rose up
from the ground at its sides
like blocks of spar. I broke
off a piece and put it to
my tongue.

“What does it taste like?”
said Jack. )

ol stind,)satds Weaunatrwie
are in a cave of rock salt.”

“We shall not have to
scrape the rocks to get our
salt now,” said Ernest, “ for
there is more here than
68

would serve a whole town
for a life time.”

When we went back to
The Nest that night we
laid out a plan for our new
home, for there could be
no doubt that the cave was
the best place for us to
dwell in, though we should
still sleep in The Nest
when. we went on that side
of the stream.

The next day we all set
to work; the floor of the
cave was quite smooth, and
the walls dry, so that we
could build at once. We
first cut holes in the sides
of the rock to let in the
light, and then brought
frames and panes of glass
from The Nest, and put
themin. We then brought
all the planks and wood we
could find, and built a

strong wall in the midst of

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



the cave. On the right side
of this wall we made three
rooms, two of which were
to be used as bed rooms,
and one to take our meals
in. -On the left side was a
room for my wife to cook in,
one to work in, to which we
gave the name of the shop,
and a place with stalls in it
for our live stock. At the
tback of these was a store
house, where we could keep
our stock of food and the
whole of our spare goods.

I need not say that it took
us some months to do all
this, nor that we had to toil
hard day by day, from morn
till night, ere we got to the
end of our task; but the
end did come at last, and
then the joy we felt that we
had done all this with our
own hands more than paid
us for our toil.
HARVEST TIME.

OPEAE ST Eine IT

Our fields near Tent
House had by this time
brought forth good crops
of wheat, maize, beans, and
peas; but as the work of
the Cave had for some
weeks kept us on this side
of the stream, we did not
know in what state we
should find our crops at
The Nest.

One day we all set out
for our old home. We
found our corn fields of a
rich brown hue, and saw
that the wheat was, for the
most part, fit to reap. This,
and a large patch of rye,
we cut down, and, as we
did so, whole flocks of birds

took to wing when we got
~ near them, while quails were
seen to run off at the sight

of our dogs, who had no
lack of sport that day.

We laid by the seed that
was quite ripe till the time
should come for us to sow
it, and put the rest in sacks.
Some of the wheat was
laid up in sheaves till we
should have time to beat
out the grain.

When we left The Nest
for the Cave, we could not
find the hand mill that we
had brought from the ship.
This now came to light, and
we took care to pack it up
to take with us, as we should
want it to grind our corn.

That night we slept once
more in the great tree; but
I must say that we did not
now sleep so sound there
as we used to do, nor did
70

we feel so safe as we did in
our rooms at Rock House.
The next day we were
to start a plan by means of
which our live stock would
not want so much of our
care. They had bred so
fast that we could well
spare some of them, and
these I thought might be
left in some place to seek
their own food, and yet be
in reach should we want
them. Vi:
~My wite took from her
hen roost ten young fowls,
and I took four young pigs,
four sheep, and two goats.
These we put in our large
cart, with such tools as we
thought we should need,
~ tied the black ox, the cow,
and the ass to the shafts,
and then set off from The
Nest.

We had to cross a wide

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

plain, anedeeinere: vel miet
with some dwarf plants, on
which, as Jack would have
it, grew snow balls.

Fritz ran to see what
they were, and brought me
a twig to which clung balls
of snow white down. I
held it up to show my wife,
for I knew the sight would
please her still more than
ier somse 31)

“Seco ) said tii thicmris
the Cort-ton plant, which
you have oft tried to find.
It seems to grow here as.
thick as weeds, and, if I
am a judge, it is of the
best kind.”

We got as much of this
as our bags could hold,
and my wife took care to
pluck some of the ripe seed,
that we might raise a crop
in our grounds at Tent
House.
A NEW FARM. 71

At the end of the plain
we came to the brow of a
high hill, from which the
eye fell on a view the like
_of which we had not yet
een) Prees fol cally chide
grew on the sides of the
hill, and a clear stream ran
ciiougiy diel plain iat}, 1s
base, and shone bright in
the rays of the sun.

Wesaid at once that this
should be the site of our
-new farm. Close by we
found a group of trees, the
trunks of which, as they
stood, would do for the
main props of the house.

I had long had a mind
to build a boat, and here I
at last came on a tree that
would suit. Fritz and I
went for a mile or two in
search of what we could
find, and by the time we
came back my wife had



put up our tent for the
mistts), We}\ thenpaligmeac
down to sup, and went to
rest on. beds made of the
bags of the white down
that we brought from the
trees on the plain.

The next day we rose at’
dawns); (hey trcess wiiela
were to form the frame of
our farm house stood on
a piece of land eight yards
long by five wide. I made
a deep cut in each of the
trunks, ten feet from the
ground, and put up cross
beams to -form a roof, on
which we laid some bark
in such a way that the rain

would run off.

We were hard at work
for some days at the Farm
House. The walls we built
of thin laths and long reeds,
wove close for six feet from
the ground, but the rest we
72 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



made of thin cross bars to
let-in both light and air.
We made racks to store
hay and such like food for
the live stock, and put by
some grain for the fowls,
for our plan was to come
from time to time to feed
them, till they got used to
the place.

Our work took us more

time than we thought; and |

as our store of food got
low, we sent Fritz and Jack
home to bring us a fresh
stock, and to feed the beasts
we had left at Tent House.

While they were gone,
Ernest and I made a tour
of the woods for some miles
round the new Farm. We
first took the course of the
stream that ran by the foot
of the hill) Some way up
we came to a marsh on the
edge of a small lake, and



here in the swamp grew a
kind of wild rice, now ripe
on the stalk, round which
flew flocks of birds. We
shot five or six of these,
and I was glad to note the
skill with which Ernest now
used his gun. I took some
of the rice, that my wife
might judge how far it was
of use to us as food.

We went quite round
the lake, and saw plants
and trees that were not
known to me, and birds
that Ernest said he had not
seen in any of the woods
nearei he! Nest) butawe
were most struck with the
sight of a pair of black.
swans, and a troop of young
ones that came in their
train. Ernest would have

‘shot at them, but I told

him not to kill what we
did not want for use.
A HALF WAY HOUSE.

We did not get back till
late in the day. Jack and
Fritz, whom we met just
as we came round the foot
of the hill, had done their
task well, for they had a
good stock of food in a
sack that lay on the back
of the ass, and they brought
the good news that all was
well at home.

We spent four more days
at the Farm, and then left
ie inesticl a stateias: to. be
fit for our use when we
chose to go back to it.

ite
but a part of our plan, for
we had made up our minds
to build a sort of half way
house, or cot, in which we
could rest on our way to
the Farm. This took us
six days to do. The spot
we chose lay by the side of
a brook, and was just such



Farm House was’

73

a place as would tempt one
forpstop dnd) | resumen
shade of the trees that grew
on the bank. While at the
brook, I made a boat out
of the tree we found at the
Pam ancmetagie wit. bac
with us to Tent House in
the cart.

We had still two months
ere the rain would set in,
and this left us time to put
the last touch to our cave.
We laid the whole floor
with clay, and spread on it
some fine sand, which we
beat down till it was quite
smooth and firm. On this
we put sail cloth, and threw
down goats’ hair and wool
made moistwith gum. This
was well beat, and, when
dry, made a kind of felt
mat that was warm and soft
to tread on, and would keep
the damp from our feet.
74 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

By the time these works
were done our cave was in
a fit state for us to dwell in.
We did not now dread the
rain, for we were safe out
of its reach, and there was
no need that we should go
out init. We had a warm
‘light shop to work in by
day, a snug place. where
we could take our meals,
and dry bed rooms in which
we could sleep in peace.
Our live stock we kept in
a shed at the back of the
cave, and our store room
held all that we could want.

When the rain at length
set in, we all had some task
that kept us close at work
in the cave, My wife took
her wheel or her loom, both
of which I had: made for
her, for this kind of work
fell to her share from choice.

By the help of the wheels

‘who





of one of the ship's guns I
had made a lathe, and with
this I could turn legs for
stools and chairs. Ernest,
too, was fond of the lathe,
and soon learnt to do such
work quite as well as I.

At dusk, when we had
done our work for the day,
we brought out our stock
of books, and sat down to
read by the light of a lamp.

At times, Jack and Frank
would play a tune on their
flutes, which I had made
out of reeds; and my wife,
had a sweet voice,
would sing some of the old
Swiss songs, that brought
to our minds the joys of
home.

Though we were by no
means dull, nor in want of
work to fill up our time, we
were glad when the time
came for the rain to cease,
THE WHALE.

and when we could gaze
once more on the green
fields) We went out the
first fine day, and took a
long walk by the base of
the cliff’ On the shore we
found a dead whale, which
the sea had no doubt thrown
up in the storm. We had
long felt the need of oil;
for though we had a lamp,
we had naught but our wax
lights to put in it, and these
gave a poor light to read
by. The next day we cut
up the whale, and put the
flesh in tubs. It was far
from a clean job, for the oil
ran down our clothes and

made them smell; but as:

we could change them for
new ones, thanks to the
hemp and my wife's skill,
we did not mind that, for
the oil was now worth more
to us than our. clothes,

75

though at one time we
should not have thought so.

One day we all set out
on a tour to the Farm.
Jack and Frank had gone
on first, while my wife and
I were as yet close to the
Cave. iu Fagmonce )\ tic
boys came back, and Fritz
said: “ Look at that strange
thing on its way up the
path. What can it be?”

Iieast, my ‘eye |.on) ihe
spot, and cried out, “ Fly
all of you to the Cave! fly
for your lives!” for I saw
it was:a huge snake, or boa,
that would make a meal of
one of us, if we did not get
out of its way.

We all ran in doors, and
put bars up to the doors of
the Cave. A large dove
cote had been made on the
roof, and to this we got up
through a hole in the rock.
76

Ernest took aim with his
gun, and shot at the snake,
so did Fritz and Jack, but
it gave no sign that they
had hit it. I then tried my
skill, but it did not seem to
feel my shot any more than
theirs, though I was sure I
must have struck its head.
Just as we took aim at it
once more, we saw it turn
round and glide through
the reeds in the marsh.

Our fears kept us’ for
three long days in the Cave.
The snake gave no sign
that could lead us to think
it was still near, but the
ducks and geese had left
the spot where their nests
were, and this we knew to
be a bad sign. On the
fourth day I went to the
door, with a view to let out
some of the beasts to graze,
‘for we were short of food

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

for them. The ass was just
at my back, and as soon
as it saw the light, made
a rush to get out. Off it
went, straight to the sands,
with its, heels in the air, but
just as it got to the marsh
we saw the boa glide out
from the reeds, part its wide
jaws, and make for its prey.
The ass at once saw its foe,
but stood still as if struck
with fear, and in less time
than I take to tell it, our
old friend was tight in the
folds of the boa.

This was a sad sight for
all of us, yet we could not
take our eyes off the snake,
but saw it crush the poor
beast, and then gorge its
prey. When it had put the
whole of the ass out of
sight, it laid down on the
sand quite still, as if it had
gone to sleep or died.
THE END OF THE BOA. 77

“ Now is the time to seal
the fate of our foe,” said I
to Fritz; and with that we
went out with our guns.
When we got near, we
both took a straight aim,
and each put a ball in its
head. This made it move
with a start, and writhe as
if in pain.

“See how its eyes glare
on us with rage. Now
load your gun, and let us
put) a, bit’ more lead in
him.”

Our next shot went in
its eyes. It then shook:as
with a strong spasm, and
fell dead on the sand.

A shout of joy brought
my wife and the three boys
to the spot. The state of
fear they had been kept in
for three whole days had
made them quite ill, but
now the joy of Jack and

Frank knew no bounds, for
they leapt on the snake and
beat it as if they would
go mad.

My wife said that the
death of the boa took a
great weight off her mind,
for she thought it would
lie in wait for us near the
Cave, starve us out, and
then kill us as it had done
the poor ass.

We slit up the snake,
and took out the flesh of
the ass, which the boys
laid in a grave near Tent
House. The boa’s skin we
hung up at the door of the
Cave, over which Ernest
wrote the words, “ No ass
to be found here,” which
we all thought to be a
good joke.

One day late in the
spring I went with my
three sons a long way from
78

the Cave. My wife and
Frank were left at our
Half Way House, to wait
till we came back, but the
dogs went with us. Our
route lay far up the course
of a small stream, which
had its source some miles
north of the Farm House.
The ground was new to us,
but we could not well lose
our way, for on the right
stood a hill from which we
could see the whole of the
plain.

Ernest had gone with
one of the dogs to a cave
that ie had spread at!the
foot of the hill, but we saw
him turn round and run
back with Turk at his heels.
As soon as he thought his
voice would reach us, he
cried out, “ A bear! a bear!
come to my help!”

We could now see that

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

there were two great beasts
at the mouth of the cave.
At a word from us both
the dogs flew to fight the
bear that stood in front.
Fritz took up his post at
my side, while Jack and
Ernest kept in the rear.
Our first shot was “a miss,”
as Jack said; but we took
a sure aim the next. time,
and both shots told. .

We would have let fly
at them once more from
this spot, but as we thought
we might hit our brave
dogs, who were now in the
heat of a hard fight with
their foes, we ran up close
to them.

«NGA ain tit Zz) eee kale
“take a straight aim at the
head of the first, while I
fire Von!) fiemmome mae) sie
Back?’

We both shot at once;
A FIGHT WITH BEARS. 79

the bears gave a loud growl,
and then, with a low moan,
fell dead at our feet.

As it was now time to
go back, we put the. bears
in the cave, but took care
to cut off their paws, which
form a dish fit to grace the
feast Ol arieiivot

We had a long walk
back to the place where
I had left my wife. The
boys told her what a hard
fight the dogs had with the
bears, and how Fritz and
I had shot them, and then
gave her the paws. With
the aid of Frank she had

fed our live stock and



brought in wood to make
tip) oun watch ire tomuahie
night, so we sat down to
sup at once, and then went
tOshest:

Next day we put. our
beasts to the cart and drove
asiitar tasy the beats ) dem
As we came near to the
spot a flock of birds flew
out of the mouth of the
cave, two or three of which
Fritz brought down with
his gun. It took us the
whole day to cut up the
bears. The hams were laid
by to be smoke dried;
while my wife took charge
of the fat and the skins.
80

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

CHAPTER XIII.

We had now so much
work to do, and the days
and weeks came and went
so quick, that I do not
think weshould have known
the time of year had it not
been for our log. |

Some days were spent at
the Cave, where we made
our goods, ground our flour,
stored our food, and kept
our tame live stock. Then
we had to take care of our
crops on the fields near
The Nest, and this took us
two or three days in each
month. Once in ten days
at least we went to the
Barimone tie. hills anc eat
the same time made a call
at the Half Way House;
so that there was not a day
that we had not our hands

quite full. Now and then
we went out to hunt for
sport or to add to our stock
of beasts, which had grown
so large that there were
few we could name that
had not been caught and
brought home. We had
birds of the air, fowls of
the land, and beasts of all
kinds, from the great black

ox of the plain to the small

wild Ras-sit that came and
made its hole close by our
cave.

But there was one bird
that we had not yet caught,
though we had seen it two
or three times in the woods.
This was, the Os-rrien,
Fritz found a nest with
some eggs in it, and this
led us to make a tour with


The Boys take Home the Ostrich,
THE OSTRICH HUNT. 81

a view to catch one of the
old birds. We rose that
day ere it was light, and
set out at dawn, each on
the back of a good steed.

As we should have to
hunt through the woods,
my wife was left at home;
and Ernest, who did not
like rough work, chose to
stay with her. We made
it a rule to take one of the
dogs with us when we went
out to hunt, but on this day
we thought it wise to let
them both come.

Fritz took us straight to
where he had seen the nest,
which was not more than
a few miles up the stream.
When we came in sight of
the spot, we saw four great
birds, as if on their way to
meet us. As they drew
near we kept the dogs well
in, and made no noise, so

that they did not stop till
they came near us.

Fritz had brought his
Ea-gle with him, which he
now let fly. At one swoop
the bird came down on the
head of the Os-trich, held
on with its beak, and struck |
out its wings with great
force, as if to stun it. We
now rode up close to the
scene of war. Jack first
flung a cord round the legs
of the bird, which made it
fall to the ground. I then
threw my pouch on its
head, and, strange to say,
it lay down as still as a
lamb.

I now tied both its legs
with cords, but left it just
room to walk. We then
made it fast to the two
bulls that had brought Jack
and Frank all the way from
home, and put one of them
| &2 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Gimmeden ssiden yh news text
cot up on their steeds, and
I. took the pouch from the
head of the bird. As soon
as it could see, it gave a
wild stare, and then fought
(Ou Cetinee:

The boys then put spurs
to the flanks of their steeds,
and when the bird had
made a’ few starts back, as
if to try the strength of the
cords which held it, it set
off with a run, and the bulls
jcachiecid=r Eade men keep
up a smart pace.

Fritz and I now went in
search of the nest, which
we soon found. I took the
eggs from it and put them
ina bag I had brought to
hold them, in which I put
some wool and moss, so
that they should not break.

It did not take us long

to get up to the two boys,

who had gone on first, and
we were glad to find that
the poor bird had made up
its) aind Sto) nitse dates and
kept up well with the pace
of the bulls.

When we got in sight of
home, my wife and Ernest,
who had been on the look
out for us, came forth to
meet us; and,the strange
way in which we brought
home our new prize made
them laugh. I need not
say that we took great care
of it.

The next day we built it
a house, with a space in
front for it to walk up and
down, round which were
put rails, so that it could
not get out. At first it
was shy, and would not
take any food, so that we
had to force some balls of
maize down its throat; but
A STRANGE STEED.

in a short time it took grain
from the hands of my wife,
and soon grew quite tame.
The boys now set to
work to break it in for use.
They taught it first to bear
them on its back. Then
they put a pair of string
reins in its mouth, and
made it turn which way
they chose to pull, and to
walk, or run, or stand still,
asvit wasebidan, UUs. 1nya
month from the time we
caught it, the boys made it
take them on its back to
and from the Farm or The
Nest, in less than half the
time an ox would go; so
that it came to be the best
steed we had to ride on.
The eggs we found in
the nest were put in a warm
dry place, and though we
scarce thought our care
would bring live birds out

83
of the shells, we had the
joy to hatch three of them,
and this led us to hope that
we should ere long have a
steed for each of our sons.

My work at this time was
by no means light. Our
hats and caps were all worn
out, and with skins of the
musk cat I had to make
new ones. The bears’ skins
were laid in the sun to dry,
and of these we made fur
coats, which would keep us
warm when the cold wet
nights came round, and
there were some left to serve
as quilts or rugs for our
beds.

I now tried my hand at
a new craft. I dug some
clay out of the bed of the
stream, and taught the boys
to knead it up with sand,
and some talc that had been
ground as fine as road drift.
84

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

I had made a lathe with albe told that our wants did

wheel, and by its aid the
clay left my hands in the
shape of plates, cups, pots,
and pans. We then burnt
them in a rude kiln, and
though at least one half
broke with the heat and
our want of skill, still those
that came out whole more
than paid me for my toil,
and kept up my wife’s stock
of delf. Some of the jars
were set round with red
and blue glass beads, and
these were put on a shelf
as works of art, and kept
full of long dried grass.
The time was now at
hand when we must reap
our grain and store the ripe
crops that were still on the
ground; and, in fact, there
was so much to be done,
that we scarce knew what
to do first. The truth must

not keep pace with the
growth of our wealth, for
the land was rich, and we
had but a few mouths to
fill. 7

We knew that we might
leave theroots in the ground
for some time, as the soil
was dry, but that the grain
would soon spoil; so we
made the corn our first
care. When it was all cut
and brought home, our

‘next task was to thresh it.

The floor of our store room
was now as hard as a rock,
for the sun had dried it,
and there was not 4 crack
to be seen. On this we
laid the ears of ripe corn,
from which the long straw
had been cut, and sent the
boys to bring in such of our
live stock as were fit for
the work to be next done.
WE TREAD OUT OUR CORN. 85

Jack and Fritz were soon
on the backs of their steeds,
and thought it fine fun to
make them course round
the floor and tread out the
grain. Ernest and I had
each a long fork, with which
we threw the corn at their
feet, so that all of it might
be trod on. The ox on
which Jack sat put down
his head and took a bunch
of the ears in his mouth.

“Come,” said Jack, “it
is not put there for you to
eat, off you go!” and with
that he gave it a lash with
his whip.

“Nay,” said I, “do you
not know what God has
said’ in his Word ?—We
must not bind up the mouth
of the ox that treads out
the corn. This brings to
my mind the fact that the
means we now take to

thresh our wheat were those
used by the Jews in the
days of old.”

To sort the chaff from
the grain we threw it up
with our spades while the
land or sea breeze blew
strong. The draught which
came in at the door took
the light chaff with it to
one side of the room, while
the grain fell straight to the
ground by its own weight.

The maize we left to dry
in the sun, and then beat
out the grain with long:
skin thongs. By this means
we got a store of the soft

‘leaves of this plant, which

my wife made use of to
stuff our beds.
When all the grain had

been put in our store room,

some in sacks and the rest
in dry casks, we took a
walk one day to our fields,
86

and found that flocks of
birds, most of which were
quails, had come there to
feed. This gave usa fine
day’s sport with our guns,
and the next year we did
not fail to look for them, so
that the fields were made
to yield a stock of game as
well as a crop of grain.

With but slight change
in our mode of life, we
spent ten long years in our
strange home. Yet the
time did not seem long
to us. Each day brought
with it quite as much work
as we could do, so that
weeks and months and
years flew past, till at last
we gave up all hope that
we should leave the isle or
see our old Swiss home,
the thought of which was
still dear to us. -

But the lapse of ten years

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

had wrought a great change
in our sons. Frank, who
was but a mere child when
we first came, had grown
up to be a strong youth;
and Jack was as brave a
lad as one could wish to
see. Fritz, of course, was
now a young man, and.
took a large share of the
work off my hands. Ernest
had just come of age, and
his shrewd mode of thought
and great tact was as great
a help to us as was the
strength and skill *of the
rest.

‘To crown all, it was a
rare thing for them to be
ill; and they were free from
those sins which too oft
tempt young men to stray
from the right path, My
wife and I did our best to
train them, so that they
might know right from
WHAT TEN YEARS HAD DONE.



wrong; and it gave us
great joy to find that what
we told them sunk deep in
their hearts, and, like ripe
seed sown in rich soil,
brought forth good fruit.

I need not say that in
the course of ten years we
had made great strides in
those arts which our wants
had first led us to learn.
When we first came the
land near Tent House was
a bare waste; now it bore
fine crops, and was kept as
neat as a Swiss farm. At
the foot of. the hill by the
side of Rock Cave, was a
large plot of ground, which
we laid out in beds, and
here we grew herbs and
shrubs, and such plants as
we used for food. Near
this we dug a pond, and by
means of a sluice which
led from the stream, we

87

kept our plants fresh in
times of drought. Nor was
this the sole use we made
of the pond; for in it we
kept small fish and crabs,
and took them out with a
rod and line when we had
need of food, and time to
spare for that kind of sport.
In the ground round the
mouth of the Cave we
drove a row of strong canes,
bound at the top to’a piece
of wood, so as to form a
fence, up which grew a
Viens ciii¢ mea ume cell ware:
plants that threw a good
show of gay bloom crept
up to meet it. Shells of
great size and strange
shapes were got from the
shore, and these we built
up here and there with

burnt clay, so as to form —

clumps of rock work, on
which grew ferns and rare
88 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

plants.
charm to our home, and
made the grounds round it
a source of joy when we
laid by our work for the
day. In fact, we thought
there was now scarce a
thing to wish for that we
had not got.

Our cares were few, and
our life was as full of joy
_and peace as we could well
wish; yet I oft cast a look
on the sea, in the hope
that some day I should spy
a sail, and once more greet
a friend from the wide
world from which we had
been so long shut out. This
hope, vague as it was, led
me to store up such things
as would bring a price, if
we had the chance to sell
them; they might prove a
source of wealth to us if
a ship came that way, or

All this gave a|

would at least help to pay
the charge of a cruise back

to the land we came from.

It is but just to say that
the boys did not share my
hopes, nor did they seem
to wish that we should
leave the place where they
had been brought up. It
was their world, and the
cave, to. which we gave the
name Rock House, was
more dear to them than
any spot on the earth.

“Go back!” Fritz would
say; vito leave, ourmcave,
that we dug with our own
hands; to part with our
dear kind:beasts and birds;
to bid good by to our
farms, and so much that is
our own, and which no one
in the world wants. No,
no. You can not wish us
to leave such a spot.”

My dear wife and I both
A SURPRISE.

felt that age would soon
creep on us, and we could
not help some doubts as
COMmiiteN tate: | O14) eu? sons:
Should we stay and end
_our days here, some one of
us would live out the rest,
and this thought came oft
to my mind, and brought
with it a sense of dread I
couldn not ioct rid von 1 /it
made me pray to God that
he would save us all from
so dire a fate as to die far
from the sound of the voice

89

of man, with no one to hear
our last words, or lay us in
the earth when He should
call us to our rest.

My wife did not share
this dread. “Why should

swe go. back?” she would

say. “We have here all
that we can wish for. The
boys lead a life of health,
free from sin, and live with .
us, which might not be the
case if we went out in the
world. Let us leave our

fate in the hands of God.”



CHAPTER XIV.

PomPeiritz 1, ange ernest
were now men, they were
of course free to go where
they chose, and to come
back when their will led

them home. Thus, from

time to time they took long
trips, and went far from
Rock House. They had
fine boats and strong steeds,
and of these they made
such good use that there
go

was scarce a spot for leagues
round that was not well
known to them.

At one time, Fritz had
been so long from home
that we had a dread lest
he should have lost his
way, or fell a prey to wild
beasts. When he came
back he told us a long tale
of what.he had seen and
where he had been, and
how he had brought with
him birds, beasts, moths,
and such strange things as
he thought Ernest would
like to see. When he had
done, he drew me out into
our grounds and said he
had a strange thing to tell
me. Itseems that he found
a piece of white cloth tied
to the foot of a bird which
he had struck down with a
stick, on which were these
words: “Save a poor soul,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

who is on the rock from
which you may see the
smoke rise.”

He thought that this rock
could not be far off, and
that he ought to set off at
once in search of it.

“T have a thought,” said
he ER willl tea‘ piece or
cloth, like that I found, to
the leg of the bird, and on
it I will write, ‘Have faith
in God: help is near.” If
the bird goes back to the
place from whence it came,
our brief note may reach
the eye of the lone one on
the rock. At any rate, it
can do no harm, and may
do some good.”

He at once took the bird,
which was an AL-BA-TROSS,
tied the strip of cloth to
its foot, and let it go.

“And now,’ said he,

“tell me what you think of
DEATH OF THE EAGLE. g!

this. If we should find a
new friend, what a source
of joy it will be. Will you
join me in the search ?”

- “To be sure I will,” said
I; “and so shall the rest;
but we will not yet tell
them of this.”

They were all glad to
Ntakew-a trip im: the large
boat, but they could not
make out why we went in
such haste.

jinetiacttisuicaid Jack,
“Fritz has found some
queer thing on the coast
that he can’t bring home,
and wants us to see it.
But I dare say we shall
know what it all means in
good time.”

Fritz was our guide, and
went first in his bark boat,
or Ca-noz. In this he could
go round the rocks and
shoals that girt the coast,

which would not have been
safe for the large boat. He
went up all the small creeks
we met with on the way,
and kept a sharp look out
for the smoke by which he
would know the rock we
came out to find.

I must tell you that once
when he came to these
parts with Ernest he met
with a Ti-cer, and would
have lost his life had it not
been for his pet the Ea-gle.
The brave bird, to save
Fritz from the beast, made
a swoop down on its: head.
Fritz thus got off with a
scratch or two, but the poor
bird was struck dead by a
blow from the paw of its foe.
This was a sad loss to Fritz,
for his pet had been a kind
friend, and would go with
him at all times when he
went far from home.
92

There was scarce a spot
we came to that did not
bring to the mind of one of
us some such tale as this,
so'that we were full of talk
while the boat bore us on.

We had been out some
days, but could find no trace
of what we went in search.
I rose from my berth at
dawn,’and went on deck
with Fritz. I told him
that as we had no clue to
the place, we must now give
up the search. He did not
seem to like this, but no
more was said. That day
_ we spent on shore, and came
back to our boat to sleep
at night. Next day we
were to change our course,
and trace our way back, for
the wind now blew from
the sea.

When I went on deck
next day I found a short

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

note from Fritz, in which
he told me that he could
not give up the search, but
had gone some way up the
soast. im) thisvismalluaboat
“Let me beg of you,’ he
wrote, “to lie in wait for
me here till I come back.”

When he had been gone
two days, I felt that I ought |
to tell my wife the cause of
our trip, as it might ease
her mind, and she now had
some fear lest her son
should not be safe. She
heard me to the end, and
then said that she was sure
he would not fail, but soon
bring back good news.

As we were all on the
look out for Fritz, we saw
his boat a long way off.

“There is no one with
him in the boat,” said I to
my wife; “that does not
say much for our hopes.”


GOOD NEWS.

93



“Oh, where have you
been?” said the boys, all
at once, as he came on
board. But they scarce
got a word from him. He
then drew me on one side,
and said, with a smile of
joy, “ What do you think
is the news’ I bring ?”

“ Let me hear it,” said I.

“Then I have found
what I went forth to seek,
and our search has not
been in vain.”

“ And who is it that you
have found 2”

‘ON Ot eavciniam emnie \sard:
“but a girl. The dress
she wears is that of a man,
and she does not wish at
first that her sex should be
known to more than we can
help, for she would not like
to meet Ernest and the rest
in that ‘state, if they knew
that she was a girl. And,

strange to tell,” said Fritz,
“she has been on shore
three years.”

While I went to tell the
news to my wife, Fritz had
gone down to his berth to
change his clothes, and I
must say that he took more
care to look neat in his
dress than was his wont at
home.

He was not long, and
when he came on deck he
bid me say no word to the
rest of whom he had found.
He leapt like a frog in
to his light craft, and led
the way. We were soon
on our course through the
rocks and shoals, and an
hour's sail, with the aid of
a good breeze, brought us
to a small tract of land the
trees of which hid the soil
from our view. Here we
got close in to the shore,
94

and made our bark safe.
We all got out, and ran up
the banks, led by the marks
that Fritz had made in the
soil with his feet. We soon
found a path that led toa
clump of trees, and there
saw a hut, with a fire in
front, from which rose a
stream of smoke.

As we drew near I could

see that the boys did not

know what to make of it,
for they gave me a stare,
as if to ask what they were
to see next. They did not
know how to give vent to
their joy when they saw
Fritz come out of the hut
with a strange youth, whose
slight make, fair face, and
~ grace of form, did not seem
to match well with the
clothes that hung upon his
limbs.

It was so long since we

THE SWISS FAMILY. ROBINSON.

had seen a strange face,
that we were all loth to
speak first. When I could
gain my speech I took our
new friend by the hand,
and told her in words as
kind as I could call to my
aid, how glad we were to
| have thus found her.

Fritz, when he _ bade
Ernest and Jack shake
hands with her, spoke of
our new friend as James;
but she could not hide her
sex from my wife, for her
first act was to fall on
her breast and weep. The
boys were not slow to see
through the trick, and
made Fritz tell them that
“James” was ‘not the name
they should call her by.

I could not but note that
our strange mode of life
had made my sons’ rough,
and that years of rude toil
THE SECRET FOUND OUT. 95



had worn off that grace and
ease which is one of the
charms of well bred youth.
I saw that this made the
girl shy of them, and that
the garb she wore brought
eebluish i tombemiemeeks i!
bade my wife take charge
of her, and lead her down
to the boat, while the boys
and I stood a while to
speak of our fair guest.
When we got on board

we sat down to hear Fritz

tell how he came to find

Miss Jane, for that was her
real name; but he had not
‘told half his tale when we
saw my wife and her new
friend come up on deck.
Sitemedt|) had amsiielook,
but as soon as she saw
Fritz she held out her hand
to him with a smile, and
this made us feel- more at
our ease.

~The next day we were
to go back to our home,
and on the way Fritz was
to tell us what he knew of
Miss Jane, for his tale had
been cut short when she
came on the deck with my
Wiles sl EitembOyemaice all
they could to make her
feel at home with them,
andi) Dye) thew cnclmoumsllT:
day they were the best of
friends.

The next day we set sail
at sun rise; for we had far
to go, and the boys had a
strong wish to hear Fritz
tell his tale.

When the boat had made
a fair start, we all sat down
on the deck, with Jane in —
our midst, while Fritz told
his tale to the end.

Jane Rose was born in.
In-p1-a. She was the child

of one Cap-tain Rose, whose
96

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



wife died when Jane was
but a babe in arms. When
ten years of age he sent
her to a first class school,
where she was taught all
that was fit for the child
of a rich man to know. In
course of time she could
ride a horse with some
skill, and she then grew
fond of most of the field
sports of the East. As
the Cap-tain had to go
from place to place with
his troops, he thought that
this kind of sport would
train her for the mode of
life she would lead when
she came to live with him.

But this was not to be, for

one day he told Jane that
he must leave the East, and
take home the troops. As
it was a rule that no girl
should sail in a ship with
troops on board, he left Ker

to the care of a friend who
was to leave near the same
time. He thought fit that
she should dress in the
garb of a young man while
at sea, as there would then
be no need for her to keep
in her berth, and he knew
that she was strong and
brave, and would like to
go on deck,.and see the
crew at their work. It
gave the Cap-tain pain to
part with ‘his child, but

there was no help for it.

The ship had been some
weeks at sea, when one day
a storm broké over it, and
the wind drove it for days
out of its course. The
crew did their best to
steer clear of rocks, but
she struck on a reef and
sprung a leak. The boats
then put off from the wreck,
but a wave broke over the
FANE'S HISTORY.

one in which Jane left, and
she was borne, half dead
with fright, to the place
where we found her. She
had been thrown high up
on the beach, and though
faint and sick, got out of
the reach of the waves.
She did not know if those
who were in the boat with
her had lost their lives, but
she had seen no trace of
them since. —

When she had strength
to walk, she found some
birds’ eggs and shell fish,
which she ate, and then
went in search of some safe
place where she could rest
for the night. By good
chance she had a flint and
a knife; with these she set
light to some dry twigs,
- and made a fire, which-she
did not once let out till the
day she left. Her life was

97

at first hard to bear, but
she was full of hope that
some day a ship would
come near the shore, to
which she could make signs
for help. The wild sports
of the East in which she
took part had made her
strong of limb, and she had
been taught to make light
of such things as would
vex most of her sex.

She built a hut to sleep
in, and made snares to
catch birds. Some of them
she made use of for food,
and some she let go, with
bits of cloth tied to their
legs, on which she wrote
words, in the hope that
they might meet the eye of
some one who could’ help
her. This, as we knew,
had led Fritz to make his
search, the end of which
had. brought as much joy
98 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to us as to the young: friend | feast of our best food—fish,
who now sat in our midst. | fowls, and fruit, and some

When Fritz had told us| of my wife’s choice jam—
this, and much more, we} whilst our burnt clay plate
came in sight of Safe Bay.}|made a great show on the
He then took Ernest with|board, for it was set out
him in his small boat, and! with some taste. We had
|z, wish to show Jane that,
as fast as he could to Rock | though the coast was a wild
House, so as to make the!kind of place, still there
place look neat by the time | were means to make life a
we brought home our guest. , joy to those who dwelt on
The two boys—for to usiit, if they chose to use
they were still boys—met! them, As for Jane, the





us on the beach.
with a look of pride, gave
his hand torupane,aneial
could see a slight blush
rise to her cheek as she
gave him hers. He then
led her up the path, on
each side of which grew a
row of young trees, and
took her to a seat in our
grounds. There he and
Ernest had spread out a

Fritz, | sight of our home, the style
iof our feast, and the kind

words of the boys, were
things so new to her, that
she knew not what to say.

“1 shall stella nemmonre
than truth,” she said, “ when
I say that what you have
shown me is of far more
worth than all the wealth
I have seen in the East,
and that I feel more joy

it
‘ov
FANE AT HOME.

this day than I have felt in
all the days of my life. I
can use no terms less strong
than these to show how
much I thank you.”

This was just the kind of
speech to please the boys,
for there had been no one
to praise their work till
now. When the meal was
done, my wife brought out
some of her best wine, and
we drank to the health of
our guest in great state, and
with loud cheers. We then
made a tour of our house
and grounds, that Jane
might see the whole of the
place that from this time!

99

wife’s room, in which were
kept the pots and pans to
dress our food, and the
plates, bowls, and cups, out
of which we ate, took her
some time to view; for she
had long felt the want of
such things as she now saw
we had made for our use
out of what we could find.
(Mie vinextn day we seal
went to The Nest, and by
when the rainy season came
round, Jane knew the place
quite as well as we did.

‘My wife found in her a

true friend, for she soon
took a large share of the

work off her hands, and

she was to make her home.| did it with so much skill,

It would take me a long
time to tell what she thought
of all she saw, or the neat
things she said in praise of
our skill, as we took her
from place to place. My

and with so strong a wish
to please us, that we grew
to love her as if she had
been our own child.

When the time came for
us to keep in doors from
100

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



the rain, the boys would
oft lay by their work, and
sit to hear Jane talk of
what she had seen in the
East, and Ernest and Fritz
would read to her by turns
such books as. she might
choose. I was glad to see
that this wrought a great
change in’ my sons, whose
mode of life had made
them rough in their ways
and loud «in their speech—
faults which we did not
think of so long as there
was no one to see or hear
them.

When the spring came,
the boys went in our boat
to the spot where they had
found Jane, which we now
knew by the name
“Jane's Isle,” and brought
back some beans, which
were new to them. These

On,

Jane told us'that they were
by no means scarce, but
that she had not made use
of them, as she knew no
way to roast or grind the
beans, which she found in
a green state. _

“Do you think,” said my
wife, “that the plant would
grow here?”

I then thought for the
first time how fond she
was of it. There had been
some bags on board the
ship, but I had not brought
them from the wreck; and
my wife had but once said
that she would like to see
the plant in our ground.
Now that we knew where
to get it, she told me that
it was one of the few things
that she felt the loss of.
When the boys heard this,

they set out on a trip to

we found to be Cor-rzez.| Jane's Isle, and while there
LAE DOVE POST

they went to the spot where
she had dwelt for so long,
and sought for what things
she had left when she came
to live with us.

All these were brought
to Rock House, and I may
tell you that Fritz set great
store by them. There were
all sorts of odd_ clothes,
which she had made of the
skin of the sea calf; fish
lines wrought out of the
hair of her head; pins
made from the bones of
fish; a lamp made out of
a shell, with a wick of
the threads which she had
drawn from herhose. There
were the shells she used _ to
cook her food in; a hat
made from the breast of
a large bird, the tail of
which she had spread out
so as to shade her neck
from the sun; belts, shoes,

Tor

and odd things of a like
kind.

My wife, who had nowa
friend of her own sex to
talk with, did not feel dull
when the boys left us for a
time, so they had leave to
roam where their wish led
them, and to stay as long
as they chose. In the
course of time they knew
the whole of the isle on
which we dwelt. Ernest
drew a map of it to scale,
so that we could trace their
course from place to place

with ease. When they
went for a long trip they
took some doves. with
them, and _ these © birds

brought us notes tied to
their wings from time to
time, so that we knew
where they were, and could
point out the spot on the
map.
102)

I will not dwell on what
took place now for some
time, for I find that each
year was very much like
the last. We had our fields
to sow, our crops to reap,
our beasts to feed and
train; and these cares kept
our hands at work, and our



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

minds free from the least
thought of our lone mode
of life.

I turn to my log as I
write this, and on each page
my eye falls on some thing
that brings back to my
mind the glad time we
spent at Rock House.



CHAPTER XV.

In the spring time of the
year, when the rain was
past, Fritz and Jack set off
on a trip in their boat to
Shark Isle. The day was
fine, the sky clear, and there
was no wind, yet the waves
rose and fell as in a storm.

“See!” cried Jack, “here
comes a shoal of whales.
They will eat us up.”

“There is no fear of that,”



said Fritz; “whales will do
us no harm, if we do not
touch them.” This proved
to be the case. Though
any one of them might have
broke up the boat with a
stroke of its tail, they did
not touch it, but swam by
in a line, two by two, like
a file of troops.

On Shark Isle, near the

shore, we had thrown up a
A STRANGE SOUND.

mound, and built a fort,
on which were set two of
the ship’s guns. These the
boys made a rule to fire
off, with a view to let us
know that they were safe,
and to try if the guns were
still fit for use. This time

they found their charge’

quite dry, and the guns
went off with a loud bang.

They had just put a
plug: in the ‘hole of one of

the guns, to keep out the

wet, when they heard a
sound roll through the air.

ides cit) Wear! that”
Bald laGi eee ulna iisume
that noise must have come
from some ship at sea. Let
us fire once more.”

But Fritz thought they,

ought to go home at once
and tell me what they had
heard. They both ran to
the boat with all speed, and



103

put out their strength to

reach home ere the sun

went down.

The day was fine, and as
the rain had kept us in
doors for two months, we
were glad to go down on
the beach for a change.
All at once I saw the boys
come up the stream in their
boat, at a great speed, and
the way they used their
sculls led me to think that
all was not right.

“What have you seen,
that should thus: put two
brave youths to: suns oe
Sareea

They then er us what
had brought them back so
sdon,, 7 1 had heard the
sound of the two guns
which they had fired off,
but no more. I told them
I thought their ears must
be at fault, and that the
104

sounds they had heard were

no more than those of their

own guns, which the hills
had sent back through the
air. This view of the case
did not at all please them,
as by this time they well
knew what sounds their
guns made.

“Tt will be a strange
thing,” said I, “if the hope
to which I have so long
clung should at last come
to be a fact; but we must
have a care that we do
not hail a ship the crew of
which may rob and kill us
for the sake of our wealth.
I feel that we have as much
cause to dread a foe as we
have grounds of hope that
we may meet with friends.”

Our first course was to
make ‘the cave quite safe,
and then to mount guard
where we could see a ship

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

if one should come near
the coast. That night the
rain came down in a flood,
and a storm broke over us,
and we were thus kept in
doors for two days and two
nights.

On the third day I set
out with Jack to Shark
Isle, with a view to seek
for the strange ship which
he said he knew must be
in some place not far from
the coast. I went to the
top of a high rock, but
though my eye swept the
sea for miles round, I could
see no signs of a sail. I
then made Jack fire three
more shots, to try if they
would give the same sound
as the two boys had heard.
You may judge how I felt,
when I heard one! two!
three! boom through the
alr.
A SHIP AT LAST.

105



_ There was now no room
for doubt that, though I
could not see it, there must
be a ship near Shark’s Isle.
Jack heard me say this
with great glee, and cried
out, “What can we now
do to find it ?”

We had brought a flag
with us, and I told Jack to
haul this up twice to the
top of the staff, by means
of which sign those who
saw it would know that
we had good news to tell
them.

I then left Jack on th
fort with the guns, and told
Muy tol tire eassoonm asia
ship hove in sight. I bent
my way at once back to
-Rock House, to talk with
my wife, Jane, and the boys,
as to what steps we should
now take. They all met
me on the beach, and made

me tell them the news while
I was still in the boat.
“We know no more,”
said I, “than the fact that
there is still a ship on the
coast. You must all now
keep in doors, while Fritz
and I go in search of it.”
We set off at noon, and
went straight to the west
part of the coast, where we
thought the sound must
have come from. We knew
a cape there from which
we: could get a good view
of the sea, and by the side
of which lay a small bay.
When we got round the
cape, great was our joy to:
find a fine ship in the bay.
It was not far away from
us, for we could see the
Ene-tisu flag float in the
breeze from one of its masts.

I seek in vain to find words

by means of which I can
106

set forth in print what I
then felt. Both Fritz and
I fell on our knees and
gave thanks to God that
He had thus led the ship
to our coast. If I had not
held him back, Fritz would
have gone into the sea with
a leap and swam off to the
ship.

LaStayy saiduby i ibhiave
are quite sure what they
are. There are bad men
on the seas who put up
false flags to lure ships out
of their couzse, and then
rob and kill the crew.”

We could now see all
that took place on board.
Two tents had been set up
on the shore, in front of
which was a fire; and we
could see that men went to
and fro with planks. There
were two men left on guard

on the deck of the ship,





THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

and to these we made signs.
When they saw us they
spoke to some one who
stood near, and whom we
thought had charge of the
ship. He then put his
glass up to his eye and
took a good view of us
through it.

We did not at first like
to go too near, but kept
our boat some way off.
Fritz said he could see that
the faces of the men were
not so dark as our own.

‘Glie-tinatiebearthewease.
said J, “we are safe, and
we may trust their flag.”

We both sang a Swiss
song, and then I cried out
at the top of my voice
these words: “Ship hoy!
good men!” But they
made no sign that they
heard us. Our song, our

| boat, and, more than all,
A CHANGE-IN PROSPECT.



our dress, made them no
doubt guess that we were
wild men of the woods;
for at last one of the crew
on board held up knives
and glass beads, which I
knew the wild tribes of the
New World were fond of.
This made us laugh, but
we would not as yet draw
nigh to the ship, as we
thought we ought to meet

our new friends in our best’

trim.

We then gave a shout
and a wave of the hand,
and shot off round the cape
as fast as our boat would
take us. We soon got back
to Rock House, where our
dear ones were on the look
out for us. My wife said
we had done quite right
to come back, but Jane
thought we should have
found out who they were.



107

That night none of us
slept well; our guest thought
there might now be a chance
for her to reach her home,
and she dreamt she heard
the well known voice of
her sire call her to come to
him. The boys were half
crazed with vague hopes,
and lay for hours ere they
went to sleep. My wife
ance IMsaty up blatcutons ims
and talk of the use that
might be made of this
chance. We felt that we
were now full of years, and
should not like in our old
age to leave the place
where we had spent the
best part of our lives; still
we might do some trade
with the land from which
the ship came, if it were but
known that we were here,
and we might hear news of
our dear Swiss home.
108

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



At break of day we put
on board our boat a stock
of fruit and fresh food of
all kinds, such as we thought
the crew of the ship would
like to have, and Fritz and
I set sail fer the bay. We
took with us all the arms
we could find, so as not to
be at a loss should the
crew prove false to their
flag, and turn out to be a
set of thieves.

As we drew near the
ship I fired a gun, and told
Fritz to hoist a flag like
theirs to the top of our
mast, and as we did so the
crew gave a loud cheer, I
then went on board, and
“the mate of the ship led
me to his chief, who soon
put me at my ease by a
frank shake of the hand.
I then told him who we
were, and how we came

to dwell on the isle. I
learnt from him, in turn,
that he was bound for New
South Wales; that he knew
Captain Rose, who had lost
his child, and that he had
made a search for her on
the coast. He told me
that a storm had thrown
him off his course, and that
the wind drove him on this
coast, where he took care
to fill his casks from a fresh
stream that ran by the side
of a hill, and to take in a
stock of wood.

“Tt was then,” he said,
“that we first heard your
guns; and when on the
third day the same sound
came to our ears, we knew
that there must be some one
on the coast, and this led us
to put up our tents and wait
till the crew should search
the land round the bay.
NEW FACES AT ROCK HOUSE.

I then made the crew a
gift of what we had brought
inMeOlomnOat, \ainal satan te
Cap-tain Stone, for that
wast nistname=s ©) whope,
sir, that you will now go
with me to Rock House,
the place where we live, and
where you will see Miss
Rose, who will be glad to
hear some news of home.”

“To be suré I will, and
thank you much,” said he;
“and I have no doubt that
Mr. West would like to go
with us.” This Mr. West
was on his way, with his
wife and two girls, to New
South Wales, where he
meant to build a house
and clear a piece of land.

We all three then left
the ship in our boat, and
as. we came in sight of
Shark Isle, Jack, who was
on the fort, fired his guns.

LOQ

When we came to the
beach, my wife and the
rest were there to meet us.
Jane was half wild with
joy when she heard that
Cap-tain Stone had brought
her good news from home.

We led them round our
house and through the
grounds, and Mr. West
took note of all he saw.
When we came to talk, I
found that he had made up
his mind to stay with us.
I need not say how glad |
was to hear this, for he
had brought out with him
a large stock of farm tools,
of which we had long been ©
in want.

The boys were of course
in high glee at all this, but
I did not share their joy
so much as I could wish.
The ship which now lay
close to our shore was the
110

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



first we had seen since we
came to the isle, and no
one could tell when the
next might come. My wife
and I did not wish to
leave. I had a love for
the kind of life we led,
and we were both at an
age when ease and rest
should take the place of
toil. But then our sons
were young—not yet in the
prime of life—and I did
not think it right that we
should keep them from the
world. Jane, I could tell,
would not stay with us, nor

did she hide from us the

fact that her heart drew.

her to the dear one at
home, from whom she had
been kept so long. So I
told my wife that I would
ask my boys to choose
what they would do—to
stay with us on the isle, or

leave with Cap-tain Stone
in the ship.

Fritz and Jack said they
would not leave us; Ernest _
spoke not a word, but I
saw that he had made up
his mind to go. I did not
grieve at this, as I felt that
our isle was too small for
the scope of his mind, and
did not give him the means
to learn all he could wish.
I told him to speak out,
when he said he should
like to leave the place for
a few years, and he knew
Frank had a wish to go

with him.

I thought this would give
my wife pain, but she said
that the boys had made a
good choice, and that she
knew Ernest and Frank
would make their way in
the world.

Captain Stone gave Jane,
THE END DRAWING NEAR.

it



Ernest, and Frank, leave to
go with him, as there was
room in the ship now that
the Wests were to stay
with us.

The ship was brought
round to Safe Bay, and
Fritz and Jack went on
board to fetch Mrs. West
and her, two girls, who
were glad to find that they
were not to go back to the
ship, for the storm had
made them dread the sea.

I may here say, by the
way, that my wife soon
found that her two sons
grew fond of their fair
friends, and gave me a hint
that some day we should
see them wed, which would
be a fresh source of joy
EOS,

I have not much more
to tell. The stores I had

laid up—furs, pearls, spice,

and fruits—were put on
board the ship, and left to
the care of my sons, who
were to sell them. And
then the time came for us
to part. I need not say
that it was a hard trial for
my wife; but she bore up
well, for she had made up
her mind that it was all
for the best, and that her
'sons would some day come
| back to see her. I felt,
‘too, that with the help of
lour new friends, we should
not miss them so much as
we at first thought, and
this we found to be the
case. :

As the next day my
boys were to leave me, I
had a long talk with them.
I told them to act well
their part in the new sphere
in which they were to
move, and to take as their
12

guide the Word of God.
They then knelt down for
me to bless them, and went
tomethiein!) beder in Nock
House for the last time.

I got no sleep all that
night, nor did the two
boys, who were to start
the next day.

As Ernest takes this
Tale with him—which I
give him leave to print,
that all may know how
good God has been to
us—I have no time to add
more than a few words.

The ship that is to take
from us our two sons and
our fair guest will sail from

THE

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

this coast in a few hours,
and by the close of the
day three who are dear to
us will have gone from
our midst. I can not put
down what I feel, or tell
the grief of my poor wife.

I add these lines while
the boat waits for my sons.
May God grant them health -
and strength for the trials
they may have to pass
through; may they gain
the love of those with
whom they are now to
dwell; and may they keep
free from taint the good
name of the Swiss Family
Robinson.

END.
q



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TE



THE LORD'S DAY. an

a state of gloom. These’

ships were not seen till
they came close to the
shore, and then the crew
were sent forth to find
those whom they were told
to seize. Some went back
with them full of joy, but
mosteiwere seen to,, weep
and mourn their fate. So
soon as they were brought
in sight of the Great -King,
the Prince took those who
had done well, and put a
white robe on them; but
those who went their own
way when on the Home
of Earth, He sent down
to toil in deep dark mines
till time shall be no more.”

When my sons had heard
my tale to the end they
all knew what it meant; I
then drew from them their
views of what they ought
to do to please and serve

the Great King, and did
my best to teach them the
truths that would guide
them safe to the Place of
Rest, when the time should
come for them to leave

the Home of Earth. We

then Saticaeay lytmr, sane

my wife drew from her
bag the Br-stz, which I-
gave to one of the boys,
who read from it in a
clear, loud voice. When
this was brought to a close,
we all knelt down on the
grass to pray, and to ask
God to bless the means
we took to learn His will. ©
We did no work that
day, but took a long stroll
up the banks of the stream,
and spoke of such things
as we felt would cause our
minds to dwell on the
truths we had heard read
out of the Word of God.
THE NEST.

our first night on shore?
You shall give that its
flamer esata to Eritz,

@ieew ius, .call ‘iti ent
House,” said he.
raiivat will, do.esaid pb

“And now for the spot
Sie ene ami@uiin OF )) atc
Bay, where we found our
planks ?”

onagic "| Pome... \, Said
Ernest, and we gave it
that name, frotn the fact
that the great fish which
Fritz shot had been found
tere. Ihe place from
which Fritz and I sought
iinnain Ton, vagthaee, Ol,’ Out
ship mates was to be
known as No Man’s Cape.
Then we had the Boys
Bridge, which name I gave
it from a wish to please
my sons, who had done
so much to build it.

“But what shall we call

*39

the place which is now
mess deat to Ws) alla meal
le

Fritz thought we should
Cale peae ost, Fark
said he should like us to
give it the name of Zhe
Perch, while Frank chose
Dove Cote as the best he

jcould think of.

“Now, my dear,” said
Petoumiy wate, “it -ts) acim

What © shall

turn. we |
say?”

etl) us); callin yamee
Nest,’ said she; and with

that I gave each of my
young birds a glass of
sweet wine.

“Here's to ‘The Nest, ”
said I; “and may we live
long to bless the day and
the means that mcuent us
Rietic.

| themeold |) britz ae
draw a map of the place
22 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

climb so fast as the rest,
for she had a young one
in her arms. Turk made
short work of the poor
thing, for ere Fritz could
call the dog off, the ape
was dead. The young one,
Asmooormeas it isawy) E rity,
sprang on his back, put
its paws in his curls, and
would not let go, but made
a noise as if to chide him.
Fritz did not like this, for
he was in fear lest it should
item PEC knew ltnere
was but small risk of that,
for the poor thing was as
much in dread as he was.
Pe lenatmeconmine lane
from Fritz’s back, and took
i eup ine my) arms ikera
child. We found that it
was too young to seek its
own food, and, as Fritz
said he should like to take

it home, we put it on Turk’s

back.) ““Sitice’ you’ have
been the cause of its grief,”
Saidluib 1s itis butter inate elt
you should act the part of
its dam.” Turk did not at
first like this, but we soon
got him to bear the ape,
which held so tight by the
hair on the dog’s neck, that
it could not well fall off.
Fritz then led Turk with a
string, that he: might not
stray out of sight, or throw
off his charge, which I think
he would have done had
we not been on the watch.

It did not take us long
to reach the bank of the
stream near to our home.
Just as we came in sight of
the tent we heard Bill bark,
and saw him run off as fast
as he could to meet us.
This put Turk in asad way,
and made him leap up at
Uisvancutnyatoumeuntvee, 1s
A CHANGE-IN PROSPECT.



our dress, made them no
doubt guess that we were
wild men of the woods;
for at last one of the crew
on board held up knives
and glass beads, which I
knew the wild tribes of the
New World were fond of.
This made us laugh, but
we would not as yet draw
nigh to the ship, as we
thought we ought to meet

our new friends in our best’

trim.

We then gave a shout
and a wave of the hand,
and shot off round the cape
as fast as our boat would
take us. We soon got back
to Rock House, where our
dear ones were on the look
out for us. My wife said
we had done quite right
to come back, but Jane
thought we should have
found out who they were.



107

That night none of us
slept well; our guest thought
there might now be a chance
for her to reach her home,
and she dreamt she heard
the well known voice of
her sire call her to come to
him. The boys were half
crazed with vague hopes,
and lay for hours ere they
went to sleep. My wife
ance IMsaty up blatcutons ims
and talk of the use that
might be made of this
chance. We felt that we
were now full of years, and
should not like in our old
age to leave the place
where we had spent the
best part of our lives; still
we might do some trade
with the land from which
the ship came, if it were but
known that we were here,
and we might hear news of
our dear Swiss home.
94

and made our bark safe.
We all got out, and ran up
the banks, led by the marks
that Fritz had made in the
soil with his feet. We soon
found a path that led toa
clump of trees, and there
saw a hut, with a fire in
front, from which rose a
stream of smoke.

As we drew near I could

see that the boys did not

know what to make of it,
for they gave me a stare,
as if to ask what they were
to see next. They did not
know how to give vent to
their joy when they saw
Fritz come out of the hut
with a strange youth, whose
slight make, fair face, and
~ grace of form, did not seem
to match well with the
clothes that hung upon his
limbs.

It was so long since we

THE SWISS FAMILY. ROBINSON.

had seen a strange face,
that we were all loth to
speak first. When I could
gain my speech I took our
new friend by the hand,
and told her in words as
kind as I could call to my
aid, how glad we were to
| have thus found her.

Fritz, when he _ bade
Ernest and Jack shake
hands with her, spoke of
our new friend as James;
but she could not hide her
sex from my wife, for her
first act was to fall on
her breast and weep. The
boys were not slow to see
through the trick, and
made Fritz tell them that
“James” was ‘not the name
they should call her by.

I could not but note that
our strange mode of life
had made my sons’ rough,
and that years of rude toil
92

There was scarce a spot
we came to that did not
bring to the mind of one of
us some such tale as this,
so'that we were full of talk
while the boat bore us on.

We had been out some
days, but could find no trace
of what we went in search.
I rose from my berth at
dawn,’and went on deck
with Fritz. I told him
that as we had no clue to
the place, we must now give
up the search. He did not
seem to like this, but no
more was said. That day
_ we spent on shore, and came
back to our boat to sleep
at night. Next day we
were to change our course,
and trace our way back, for
the wind now blew from
the sea.

When I went on deck
next day I found a short

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

note from Fritz, in which
he told me that he could
not give up the search, but
had gone some way up the
soast. im) thisvismalluaboat
“Let me beg of you,’ he
wrote, “to lie in wait for
me here till I come back.”

When he had been gone
two days, I felt that I ought |
to tell my wife the cause of
our trip, as it might ease
her mind, and she now had
some fear lest her son
should not be safe. She
heard me to the end, and
then said that she was sure
he would not fail, but soon
bring back good news.

As we were all on the
look out for Fritz, we saw
his boat a long way off.

“There is no one with
him in the boat,” said I to
my wife; “that does not
say much for our hopes.”


PLANS FOR OUR SAFETY. 27

you that the mid day heat
is more than we can bear,
and that if we stay here
we may have to keep watch
aimee, oc (there are.
doubt, wild beasts of some
kind that will find us out;
and we should not trust

too much to our dogs, who

may lose their lives in a
fight with them.”

Pligdare cay jyouljare
Giclee Wearic. ye raat) Ido
not yet see how we can
cross the stream. We shall
first have to build a bridge.”

Beng te aigiave y Irilist
stay where we are, said
my wife.

elvdo) net thinke-so, my
om ale said. IN.o;.one
knows what he can do till
emuiices|

The boys were now all
out of their beds; and
while my wife went to milk

the cow and cook some
food, I made my plans
known tothem. They were
all glad when they heard
that we were to leave, and
each said he would help,
as far as he could, to build
the bridge.

The first thing to be done
was to find some strong
planks; and Fritz, Ernest,
and I went down to the
shore, and got in the boat,
which the tide soon took
down to the bay.

On a piece of land which
layah Core titemireh ve. corel
see some large dark thing,
round which flew a flock
of sea gulls. As we had
a wish to learn what it was,:
we put up a sail and caught
a gust of wind which had
sprung up, and this soon
brought the boat to the
spot. We made no noise,
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



CHAPTER I.

Wuen one has a, good
tale to tell, he should try
to be brief, and not say
more than he can help ere
he makes a fair start; so
I shall not say a word of
what took place on board
the ship till we had been
six days in a storm. The
bark had gone far out of
her true course, and no one
on board knew where we
were. The masts lay in
splints on the deck, the
sails were torn, a leak in
the side of the ship let
more in than the crew
could pump out, and each
one felt that ere long he
would find a grave in the

deep sea, which rose and
fell in great white waves
of Ifeam, Janeen sent its
spray from side to side
of what was now but a
mere hulk.

Most of those on board
sought the best means they
could think of to save their
own lives; but some knelt
down to pray that God
would quell the storm and
still the waves, for they felt
that none but He could
help them now.

“Come, boys,” said I to
my four sons, who were
with me, and were struck
dumb with fear, “God can
save us if it please Him so
48

took home with him, in
the hope that he might
tate il) ang geteaeubmitnto
speak. |

Our path was now so
clear that we could walk
side by side with ease, and
talk.of what we had seen.

“How came you,’ said
Fritz, “to know so much
of the queer beasts, trees,
and plants that we have
found here?”

“When young,’ said I,
“TI used to read all the
books that fell in .my
way; and those that told
of strange lands and what
was to be seen in them
NaG stor) Me as oreat ea
charm as they have for
Ernest, who has read a
great deal, and knows more
of plants than you do.”

“Well,” said he, “I will
do the same if I but get

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the chance. Can you tell
what is the name of that
huge tree oneeane sfioht:
It must be at least three
score feet high. See, there
are balls on the bark.”

We went close to it, and
found that these balls were
of thick gum, which the
sun had made quite hard.
Fritz tried to pull one of
them off,.but felt that it
clung tight to the bark,
though he could change
its shape with his warm
hanes. ss ook, esateusire
“T feel sure that this 1s
the In-pi-a Rus-Ber which
we used to clean our
school books with.” I
£00k; aa piece: OF aitmnamnny,
hand, and said, “To be
sure it is. . What shall we
not find in this rich land 2”
I then told him how the
men in the New World
78

the Cave. My wife and
Frank were left at our
Half Way House, to wait
till we came back, but the
dogs went with us. Our
route lay far up the course
of a small stream, which
had its source some miles
north of the Farm House.
The ground was new to us,
but we could not well lose
our way, for on the right
stood a hill from which we
could see the whole of the
plain.

Ernest had gone with
one of the dogs to a cave
that ie had spread at!the
foot of the hill, but we saw
him turn round and run
back with Turk at his heels.
As soon as he thought his
voice would reach us, he
cried out, “ A bear! a bear!
come to my help!”

We could now see that

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

there were two great beasts
at the mouth of the cave.
At a word from us both
the dogs flew to fight the
bear that stood in front.
Fritz took up his post at
my side, while Jack and
Ernest kept in the rear.
Our first shot was “a miss,”
as Jack said; but we took
a sure aim the next. time,
and both shots told. .

We would have let fly
at them once more from
this spot, but as we thought
we might hit our brave
dogs, who were now in the
heat of a hard fight with
their foes, we ran up close
to them.

«NGA ain tit Zz) eee kale
“take a straight aim at the
head of the first, while I
fire Von!) fiemmome mae) sie
Back?’

We both shot at once;
THE OSTRICH HUNT. 81

a view to catch one of the
old birds. We rose that
day ere it was light, and
set out at dawn, each on
the back of a good steed.

As we should have to
hunt through the woods,
my wife was left at home;
and Ernest, who did not
like rough work, chose to
stay with her. We made
it a rule to take one of the
dogs with us when we went
out to hunt, but on this day
we thought it wise to let
them both come.

Fritz took us straight to
where he had seen the nest,
which was not more than
a few miles up the stream.
When we came in sight of
the spot, we saw four great
birds, as if on their way to
meet us. As they drew
near we kept the dogs well
in, and made no noise, so

that they did not stop till
they came near us.

Fritz had brought his
Ea-gle with him, which he
now let fly. At one swoop
the bird came down on the
head of the Os-trich, held
on with its beak, and struck |
out its wings with great
force, as if to stun it. We
now rode up close to the
scene of war. Jack first
flung a cord round the legs
of the bird, which made it
fall to the ground. I then
threw my pouch on its
head, and, strange to say,
it lay down as still as a
lamb.

I now tied both its legs
with cords, but left it just
room to walk. We then
made it fast to the two
bulls that had brought Jack
and Frank all the way from
home, and put one of them
A SURPRISE. i 15



as well wish for delf bowls|I knew, from what I had

and real spoons at once.”

“Now I have it,” quoth
Ernest. “Let us use the
shells I saw on the shore.”

On srani Mac} tom the
shore, with Ernest at his
heels, and back they both
came with large and small
shells for us all.

Just then Fritz came in,
with a look of gloom on
his face, which I could see
was a sham.

“You do not mean to,

tell me you have come back
with nought?” said I, as
he put out his hands as if
to prove that such was the
case. But Jack, who had
been round him, cried out,
“No, no! he’s got a pig !—
such a fine one. Tell us
where you found it.”

Fritz now brought forth
his prize. When I saw it,

read, that it was not a pig,
but a swift beast, known in
these parts, that lives on

fruit and nuts, and hides

in the earth* 1 felt it
right to tell my son that
he should not try to make
us think that he had not
brought any thing back.
Though a jest, it was still
a lie, and to act a lie was
just as wrong as to tell one.
Fritz now saw the truth of
this, and said so. He then
told us how that he had
been to the banks of the
stream.
“T like the place much
more than I do this spot,”
said he. “The shore lies
low, and there are planks,
casks, chests, and all sorts
of things, that the sea has:
thrownup. Why not leave

The A-gou-ti.
*
A GOOD MEAL. 23



Fritz at last took the ape
from him and let him go.

I need not tell you how
glad my wife and sons were
to see us safe back, or with
what joy the boys took
pies eal live ape woulnes
Frizs arms. “How did
roullicatchn num?” \)'sard
Ernest; “what does he live
nly jecaian Hanke ant wit
fun we shall have with
him!” cried Jack.

At length, when they got
more staid, I told them that
we had brought them all
sorts of good things, but
that we had not met with
any of the men of whom
we went insearch. “God's
will be done,” said my wife,
Svetmucaiianey edna) thet
you have come back safe
tous. This day to me has
been an age; but put down
your loads, for we must

now go in and hear what
you have to tell.”
Frtz.and) 1) thenstold
them, by turns, where we
found the things we brought
with us, how we made and
dried the plates and bowls,
cut the canes, and caught
the ape in the wood. Our
tales had not come to an
end, when we were told
that it was time to sup.
Ernest had shot a wild
goose, and some fish had
been caught in the stream.
With these, and the Dutch
cheese that we brought from
the ship, we made a good
meal; but the boys would
not rest till we broke some
of the nuts, from which
they drank the milk, made
sweet with the juice of the
canes. I must tell you that
we ate our food in great
state from our gourd rind
A GOOD MEAL. 23



Fritz at last took the ape
from him and let him go.

I need not tell you how
glad my wife and sons were
to see us safe back, or with
what joy the boys took
pies eal live ape woulnes
Frizs arms. “How did
roullicatchn num?” \)'sard
Ernest; “what does he live
nly jecaian Hanke ant wit
fun we shall have with
him!” cried Jack.

At length, when they got
more staid, I told them that
we had brought them all
sorts of good things, but
that we had not met with
any of the men of whom
we went insearch. “God's
will be done,” said my wife,
Svetmucaiianey edna) thet
you have come back safe
tous. This day to me has
been an age; but put down
your loads, for we must

now go in and hear what
you have to tell.”
Frtz.and) 1) thenstold
them, by turns, where we
found the things we brought
with us, how we made and
dried the plates and bowls,
cut the canes, and caught
the ape in the wood. Our
tales had not come to an
end, when we were told
that it was time to sup.
Ernest had shot a wild
goose, and some fish had
been caught in the stream.
With these, and the Dutch
cheese that we brought from
the ship, we made a good
meal; but the boys would
not rest till we broke some
of the nuts, from which
they drank the milk, made
sweet with the juice of the
canes. I must tell you that
we ate our food in great
state from our gourd rind
34 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



made the boys tired, and
they were soon in a sound
sleep, but my wife and I
took it in turns to watch
through the whole night
long. |

We were all out of our
beds as soon as light was
in the sky, and set to work
to hoist up the planks that
were to form the floor of
our ‘hut. These we laid
down on the branch, with
their ends made fast to a
cross piece of wood that
we had to fix to the trunk
Ounce w tree, )) Cur) (nails
were long, and we drove
each one of them home, so
that we had no cause to
fear the strength of our
work. Some parts were

rough, but we. took care
to make our floor quite
smooth, and put up a large

sail cloth to serve for a

roof till we had time to
make one of wood. By
the time we had done this
the day was far spent, and
we Wete alli welad to, lang
by our tools and rest our
limbs. That night we lit
our fires round the tree,
tied the dogs to the roots,
and went up to sleep out
of harm's way for the first
time weiice we “leit tie
ship. When the steps were
drawn up we all felt that
we were now safe at last,
and that we had brought
the toils of the day to a
good end. |
THE BOYS PETS. ie

beasts and fowls were kept,
and did odd jobs as well,
so that we should not make
too great a toil of the flight
of stairs, which took us
some six weeks to put
up.
One day Fritz caught a
fine Ea-crz, which he tied
by the leg to a branch of
the tree, and fed with small
birds. It took him a long
while to tame, but in time
he taught it to perch on
his wrist, and to feed from
his hand. He once let it
go, and thought he would
have lost it, but the bird
knew it had a good friend,
for it came back to the tree
at night. From that time
it was left free, though we
thought that some day its
love of war and wild sports
would tempt it to leave us
for the rocks of the sea

shore, where Fritz had first
found it.

Each of my boys had
now some pet to take care
of; and, I may say, to tease,
for they all thought they
had a fair right to get some

fun out of the pets they

could call their own; but
they were kind to them,
fed them well, and kept
them clean.

In what I may term my
spare time, which was
when I left off work out
of doors, I made a pair of
gum shoes for each of my
SOnswingnumce way 1) slag
told Fritz it could be done.
I do not know what we
should have done had we
not found the gum tree,
for the stones soon wore
out the boots we had,
and we could not have
gohe. through the woods
A TROOP OF APES. 21

took hold of the nuts that
were near, and flung them
straight at us. This. was
not new to me, for I had
read that it is oft done by
men who live in the woods,
and have to get their food
as best they can; but the
trick made Fritz laugh, who
soon had hard work to
pick up the nuts that were
thrown at him.

We broke some of the
nuts, and put the juice of
the canes in the thick white

cream which forms close to
the shell; and this made us
a dish so sweet and nice

‘that Fritz said it was fit for

aking. Turk did not seem
to like it, so we gave him
some of the meat in our
bag, which we could now
well spare.

Fritz and I then made
fast some nuts to a string,
which I tied round my
waist, while he took up
his canes, and we both set
off on our road home.



CHAPTER.

On our way back we
‘took up the gourd bowls
and plates, which we found
quite dry and hard as bone,
and put them in our bags.
We had scarce got through

the wood, when Turk made
a datti in Hrontanmicn atid
we saw a troop of apes rush
out of his way. But he
gave a leap and brought
down one that could not
84

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

I had made a lathe with albe told that our wants did

wheel, and by its aid the
clay left my hands in the
shape of plates, cups, pots,
and pans. We then burnt
them in a rude kiln, and
though at least one half
broke with the heat and
our want of skill, still those
that came out whole more
than paid me for my toil,
and kept up my wife’s stock
of delf. Some of the jars
were set round with red
and blue glass beads, and
these were put on a shelf
as works of art, and kept
full of long dried grass.
The time was now at
hand when we must reap
our grain and store the ripe
crops that were still on the
ground; and, in fact, there
was so much to be done,
that we scarce knew what
to do first. The truth must

not keep pace with the
growth of our wealth, for
the land was rich, and we
had but a few mouths to
fill. 7

We knew that we might
leave theroots in the ground
for some time, as the soil
was dry, but that the grain
would soon spoil; so we
made the corn our first
care. When it was all cut
and brought home, our

‘next task was to thresh it.

The floor of our store room
was now as hard as a rock,
for the sun had dried it,
and there was not 4 crack
to be seen. On this we
laid the ears of ripe corn,
from which the long straw
had been cut, and sent the
boys to bring in such of our
live stock as were fit for
the work to be next done.
40

in his spare time, and to
mark down the name of
each spot as near as he
could.

When the heat of the
day was past, I told my
sons that I should be glad
- to take a walk with them.

iiteyerall lett otf work,
threw down their tools, and
made haste to join me.
My- wife said that she
should like to go with us;
so we left The Nest in
charge of Turk, and bent
our course to the banks of
the stream. On eur way
we went past some shrubs
and rare herbs, which my
wife knew well how to
make use of should we fall
sick; and Ernest, who had
read much, and knew most
kind of plants, found a
large spot of ground on

which grew a fine kind of

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Po-ta-ro. At these the
boys set to work with such
zeal, that we soon had a
full bag of the ripe fruit.
We then went on to Tent
House, which we found in
the same state as when we
left it to cross the stream
on our way to the great
EEE; |

We found that our ducks
and geese, had grown so
wild that they would not
come near us; so, while my
wife and I went to pick up
such things as we thought
we might take back with
us, Ernest and Fritz were
sent to catch them, and to
tie their legs and wings,
and in this way we got
them at last to The Nest.
It was late at night when
we came in sight* of the
tree, and the weight of the
fowls and bags that we
42

When we got to the
shore, my wife and the
three boys were there to
greet us. My first care
was to send for the sledge,
and with this we took
most of our new wealth

up to The Nest.

See bsttzerold ranks thatiic
had seen a chest of gold
coin on the wreck.

Oly Do wash you had
brought it with you,” said
ie

“And what would you
have done with it when
you hadssot iu: \saie yl.

“T would buy some nice
sweet cakes, for the bread
we have is so hard.”

This made us all laugh,
and Frank with the rest,
for he soon saw that the
coin would be of no use
in a place where there
were no shops.

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

The next day I told my
sons that they must now
leaunt to 1 Tun, ecomles py mto
climb, and to throw stones
Siiaielt. "at a, malar
these things would be of
great use to them in their
new mode of life.

I next taught them to
use the Las-so, by means
of which men catch the
wild horse on the vast
plains of the New World.
I tied two stones to the
ends of a cord some yards
in length, and flung off
one of them at the trunk
OL a VvOune itee. the. cond
went round and round it
in a coil, and bound it so
tight that I could have
drawn it to me had it not
been fast in the ground.
This trick the boys were
not slow to learn; and
riz, i) aashontetimne
A STRANGE SITE FOR A HOUSE. 25

more safe. We then got
to. land, and made fast our
freight to the shore. Ere
we had done this our friends
came to greet us, and give
us what help they could to
get the beasts out of the
stream, and take them up to
the tent. The poor things
were well nigh worn out;

but we took good care of

them, and put them to rest
on some dry grass that

my wife had laid out for
~ them.

That night we did not
sup on the ground. My
wife had spread a cloth on
the top of a cask, and we
Eden eat (On ae vue). WViikh
the knives and forks that
we had found in the ship
we ate a dish of hot ham
and eggs, nor did we fail
to. test the wine that I
had brought with me in

a small cask from the
wreck,

I can now well call to
mind the strange scene, as
we sat there round the cask,
with our two dogs, the
fowls, the ape, and the
doves, all in the light of
the red glow that came
from the fire which burnt
on the ground just by the
tert: ‘

Ere bed time my wife
had told me that while I
was at the wreck she had
gone in search of some
place in which we could
build a house, and be safe
from the wild beasts that
we had heard growl in the
night.

“And did you find one,
my dear?” I said.

“Qh, yes,” said she. “We
can take you to a great tree
that will serve us well, if

*
WE SET TO WORK. : 9

blow so strong, the sky was
clear of clouds, and we saw
the sun rise, and with it
- rose our hopes. I soon had
my wife and sons on deck.
The boys did not know till
then that all the men had
left the ship, and that there
was no one but us on
board.

“Where are the men?”
said they. “How can we
Bectcce ic ship |

“My dear boys,” said I,
“He who has kept us safe
till now will still aid us, if
we do not give way to fear.
Let all hands set to work,
and leave the rest to God.”

At these words we all
went to work with a will.
My wife went to feed the
live stock; Fritz set off in
search of arms, and the
means to make use of them;
and Ernest made his way

to the tool chest. Jack ran
to pick up what he could
find, but as he got to one
of the doors he gave it a
push, and two huge dogs
sprang out and leapt at him.
Fle thousinteciiueainst a teey
would bite him, but he soon
found that they meant him

|no harm, and one of them
let him get on his back and

ride up to me as I came
from the hold of the ship.
could ct "keep" baela) a
smile, but I told him that
it was not safe thus to play
with dogs which had not
been fed for so long a time.

When the boys had done
their search, and the spoil
was brought on deck, we
thought we had found all
that we should need. “As
forumie, Saleh tye iicws a
have brought good news,
for I find we have still on
54

led by the smell, should
come to claim their own.

We then put the gourd
on the comb that held the
swarm, and took care that
the queen bee was not left
out. By these means we
EOOmmAOt ea ive: Ol fine
bees, and the trunk of the
tree was left free for our
use.

We had now to try the
length of the hole. This
we did with a long pole,
apd found it reach as far
up as the branch on which
our house stood.

“You see,’ said I to my
sons, “that this tree has no
sap in its trunk, but, like
some that grow in the land
we came from, it draws its
means of life through the
bark.”

We now cut:a square
hole in that side of the

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

trunk next the sea shore,
and made one of the doors
that we had brought from
the ship to fit in the space.
We then made the sides
smooth all the way up, and
with planks and the staves
of some old casks, built
up the stairs round a pole
which we made fast in the .
ground. To do this we
had to make a notch in the
pole and one in the side
of the trunk for each stair,
and thus go up step by
step till we came to the top.
We had a good store of
strong nails, and with them,
and such toolsas we brought
back on the raft, which we
had now learnt to use with
some skill, we got on well
with our task. Each day
we spent a part of our
time at what we could now
call the farm, where the
106

set forth in print what I
then felt. Both Fritz and
I fell on our knees and
gave thanks to God that
He had thus led the ship
to our coast. If I had not
held him back, Fritz would
have gone into the sea with
a leap and swam off to the
ship.

LaStayy saiduby i ibhiave
are quite sure what they
are. There are bad men
on the seas who put up
false flags to lure ships out
of their couzse, and then
rob and kill the crew.”

We could now see all
that took place on board.
Two tents had been set up
on the shore, in front of
which was a fire; and we
could see that men went to
and fro with planks. There
were two men left on guard

on the deck of the ship,





THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

and to these we made signs.
When they saw us they
spoke to some one who
stood near, and whom we
thought had charge of the
ship. He then put his
glass up to his eye and
took a good view of us
through it.

We did not at first like
to go too near, but kept
our boat some way off.
Fritz said he could see that
the faces of the men were
not so dark as our own.

‘Glie-tinatiebearthewease.
said J, “we are safe, and
we may trust their flag.”

We both sang a Swiss
song, and then I cried out
at the top of my voice
these words: “Ship hoy!
good men!” But they
made no sign that they
heard us. Our song, our

| boat, and, more than all,
80

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

CHAPTER XIII.

We had now so much
work to do, and the days
and weeks came and went
so quick, that I do not
think weshould have known
the time of year had it not
been for our log. |

Some days were spent at
the Cave, where we made
our goods, ground our flour,
stored our food, and kept
our tame live stock. Then
we had to take care of our
crops on the fields near
The Nest, and this took us
two or three days in each
month. Once in ten days
at least we went to the
Barimone tie. hills anc eat
the same time made a call
at the Half Way House;
so that there was not a day
that we had not our hands

quite full. Now and then
we went out to hunt for
sport or to add to our stock
of beasts, which had grown
so large that there were
few we could name that
had not been caught and
brought home. We had
birds of the air, fowls of
the land, and beasts of all
kinds, from the great black

ox of the plain to the small

wild Ras-sit that came and
made its hole close by our
cave.

But there was one bird
that we had not yet caught,
though we had seen it two
or three times in the woods.
This was, the Os-rrien,
Fritz found a nest with
some eggs in it, and this
led us to make a tour with
36 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

will and kept His laws
should go to the Land of
Light and Truth. He gave
to His Son the right to
rule the host that dwelt in
the Home of Earth, and
set forth to them what they
were to do, and all the ills
that would come to them
if they did not do as they
were bid. The Prince told
them that ships would be
sent from time to time to
bring off such as did His
will, and take them to the
Land of Light.

“At first they were all
glad to hear the way in
which they were to live,
and the terms on which
they could ‘reach the Land
of Light and Truth. Sad
to tell, they soon broke the
King’s laws, and paid no
heed to what they knew
fo be His will; each, in

fact, did as he chose, and
thought more of his ease,
sloth, or self will, than of
the Place of Rest or the
Land of Light. Still there ©
were a few who did as
they had been taught, and
dwelt in peace, in the hope
that they would please the
King and at last reach the
place where He held his
court.

“The King was true to
his word. From time to
time ships came to the
Home of Earth, and each
bore the name of some
dire evil. . At last a great
ship was sent, the name
of which was Zhe Grave,
which bore the flag of
Death. The flag was of
green and black. To the
good it was a sign of hope,
but the bad were thrown
by the sight of it into
110

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



first we had seen since we
came to the isle, and no
one could tell when the
next might come. My wife
and I did not wish to
leave. I had a love for
the kind of life we led,
and we were both at an
age when ease and rest
should take the place of
toil. But then our sons
were young—not yet in the
prime of life—and I did
not think it right that we
should keep them from the
world. Jane, I could tell,
would not stay with us, nor

did she hide from us the

fact that her heart drew.

her to the dear one at
home, from whom she had
been kept so long. So I
told my wife that I would
ask my boys to choose
what they would do—to
stay with us on the isle, or

leave with Cap-tain Stone
in the ship.

Fritz and Jack said they
would not leave us; Ernest _
spoke not a word, but I
saw that he had made up
his mind to go. I did not
grieve at this, as I felt that
our isle was too small for
the scope of his mind, and
did not give him the means
to learn all he could wish.
I told him to speak out,
when he said he should
like to leave the place for
a few years, and he knew
Frank had a wish to go

with him.

I thought this would give
my wife pain, but she said
that the boys had made a
good choice, and that she
knew Ernest and Frank
would make their way in
the world.

Captain Stone gave Jane,
DEATH OF THE EAGLE. g!

this. If we should find a
new friend, what a source
of joy it will be. Will you
join me in the search ?”

- “To be sure I will,” said
I; “and so shall the rest;
but we will not yet tell
them of this.”

They were all glad to
Ntakew-a trip im: the large
boat, but they could not
make out why we went in
such haste.

jinetiacttisuicaid Jack,
“Fritz has found some
queer thing on the coast
that he can’t bring home,
and wants us to see it.
But I dare say we shall
know what it all means in
good time.”

Fritz was our guide, and
went first in his bark boat,
or Ca-noz. In this he could
go round the rocks and
shoals that girt the coast,

which would not have been
safe for the large boat. He
went up all the small creeks
we met with on the way,
and kept a sharp look out
for the smoke by which he
would know the rock we
came out to find.

I must tell you that once
when he came to these
parts with Ernest he met
with a Ti-cer, and would
have lost his life had it not
been for his pet the Ea-gle.
The brave bird, to save
Fritz from the beast, made
a swoop down on its: head.
Fritz thus got off with a
scratch or two, but the poor
bird was struck dead by a
blow from the paw of its foe.
This was a sad loss to Fritz,
for his pet had been a kind
friend, and would go with
him at all times when he
went far from home.
HARVEST TIME.

OPEAE ST Eine IT

Our fields near Tent
House had by this time
brought forth good crops
of wheat, maize, beans, and
peas; but as the work of
the Cave had for some
weeks kept us on this side
of the stream, we did not
know in what state we
should find our crops at
The Nest.

One day we all set out
for our old home. We
found our corn fields of a
rich brown hue, and saw
that the wheat was, for the
most part, fit to reap. This,
and a large patch of rye,
we cut down, and, as we
did so, whole flocks of birds

took to wing when we got
~ near them, while quails were
seen to run off at the sight

of our dogs, who had no
lack of sport that day.

We laid by the seed that
was quite ripe till the time
should come for us to sow
it, and put the rest in sacks.
Some of the wheat was
laid up in sheaves till we
should have time to beat
out the grain.

When we left The Nest
for the Cave, we could not
find the hand mill that we
had brought from the ship.
This now came to light, and
we took care to pack it up
to take with us, as we should
want it to grind our corn.

That night we slept once
more in the great tree; but
I must say that we did not
now sleep so sound there
as we used to do, nor did
THE BRIDGE. 29

how we built piers of stone
in the stream, and how we
. put the planks one by one
in their place; but we did
it at last, though it was late
at night when we left off
work, and once more sought
our tent. |
The next day we saw
the sun rise, and took our
first meal in haste, for we
knew we should have a
levemre ayey toil. (vil) the
stores that we could not
take with us were laid by
in the tent, the door of
which was made safe by a
row of casks that we put
round it. Each of us took
pare ainic bag) anat. ay Cun,
My wife and Fritz soon
led the way; the cow went
next; then the ass, with
Piamlemonmicndnaci.) |) lacks
led the goats, and on the
back,of one of them sat the

ape. Ernest took charge
of the sheep, and I brought
up the rear as chief guard.
Our dogs ran from the
front to the rear rank, and
Went tonana Hive. as’ \ihto
see that all was right, and
fom keep rus inellincwn\\ @
left the sow near the tent,
but we had not gone far
when she set off with a
loud grunt, and soon came
up with us. Our march
was slow, for the live stock
would stray here and there
to graze on the rich grass
that grew by the way; but
still we got on. We took
care to cross the bridge
one at a time, and found it
bear our weight well; but
once or twice we thought
the cow would step in
the stream, or fall off the
boards, when she went to
the sides to drink.
50

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

said that we would now

stay at home, at least for
some days.

My first work was to
make some wax lights, for
my wife could then mend
our clothes at night, while
we sat down to talk. This
done, the next task they
gave me was to make a
churn. What with my lack
of skill, and want of tools,
I thought it best not to
aim too high, so I took a
large gourd, made a small
hole in the side, and cut
out as much as I could, so
as to leave but the rind.
In this I put the cream,
laid a piece on the hole,
and bound it up so that
none could come out. The
. boys then held a_ cloth,
and on it I put the gourd,
which they made to roll
from side to side. They

kept up this game with
great mirth for near an
hour, when my wife took
off the string, and found
that the churn had done
its work well.

“We shall not have to
eat dry bread now,” said
Frank; and I was as glad
as he that such was the
case.

As our sledge was not
fit to use on rough roads,
my next work was to make
a, cat, ulishadi breug nie
pair of wheels from the
wreck, so that my task did
not prove a hard one. It
is true I did not make
what you might call a neat
job of it, but for all that
we found it of great use.

While I was thus at
work, my wife and the
boys took some of the
fruit trees we had brought
LIFE IN A BARN. 61

gave us a chill, and might

have laid us up if my wife
had not made cloth capes
and hoods for us to wear.
To make these rain proof,
I spread some of the gum
on them while hot, and this,
when dry, had the look of
oil cloth, and kept the head,
arms, chest, and back free
from damp. Our gum
boots came far up our legs,
so that we could go out
in the rain and come back
quite free from cold and
damp.

We made but few fires,
for the air was not cold,
save for an hour or two
late at night, and we did
not cook more than we
could help, but ate the
_ dried meat, fowls, and fish
we lrad by us.

The care of our beasts
took us a great part of the



day; then we made ours
cakes and set them to bake |
inva din) plate on Palen
fire. I had cut a hole in
the wall to give us light,
gnc put yavipaie Ol! ielace
in: it to keep eut the wind,
but the thick clouds hid
the sun from the earth, and
the shade of the tree threw
a gloom round our barn,
so that our day light was
but short, and night came
on far too soon. We then
made use of our wax lights,
and all sat round a bench.
My wife had as much as
she could well do to mend
the rents we made in our
clothes. I kept a log, in
which I put down, day by
day, what we did and what
we had seen; and then
Ernest wrote this out in a
neat clear hand, and made
a book of it, Fritz’ and
GOOD NEWS.

93



“Oh, where have you
been?” said the boys, all
at once, as he came on
board. But they scarce
got a word from him. He
then drew me on one side,
and said, with a smile of
joy, “ What do you think
is the news’ I bring ?”

“ Let me hear it,” said I.

“Then I have found
what I went forth to seek,
and our search has not
been in vain.”

“ And who is it that you
have found 2”

‘ON Ot eavciniam emnie \sard:
“but a girl. The dress
she wears is that of a man,
and she does not wish at
first that her sex should be
known to more than we can
help, for she would not like
to meet Ernest and the rest
in that ‘state, if they knew
that she was a girl. And,

strange to tell,” said Fritz,
“she has been on shore
three years.”

While I went to tell the
news to my wife, Fritz had
gone down to his berth to
change his clothes, and I
must say that he took more
care to look neat in his
dress than was his wont at
home.

He was not long, and
when he came on deck he
bid me say no word to the
rest of whom he had found.
He leapt like a frog in
to his light craft, and led
the way. We were soon
on our course through the
rocks and shoals, and an
hour's sail, with the aid of
a good breeze, brought us
to a small tract of land the
trees of which hid the soil
from our view. Here we
got close in to the shore,
88 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

plants.
charm to our home, and
made the grounds round it
a source of joy when we
laid by our work for the
day. In fact, we thought
there was now scarce a
thing to wish for that we
had not got.

Our cares were few, and
our life was as full of joy
_and peace as we could well
wish; yet I oft cast a look
on the sea, in the hope
that some day I should spy
a sail, and once more greet
a friend from the wide
world from which we had
been so long shut out. This
hope, vague as it was, led
me to store up such things
as would bring a price, if
we had the chance to sell
them; they might prove a
source of wealth to us if
a ship came that way, or

All this gave a|

would at least help to pay
the charge of a cruise back

to the land we came from.

It is but just to say that
the boys did not share my
hopes, nor did they seem
to wish that we should
leave the place where they
had been brought up. It
was their world, and the
cave, to. which we gave the
name Rock House, was
more dear to them than
any spot on the earth.

“Go back!” Fritz would
say; vito leave, ourmcave,
that we dug with our own
hands; to part with our
dear kind:beasts and birds;
to bid good by to our
farms, and so much that is
our own, and which no one
in the world wants. No,
no. You can not wish us
to leave such a spot.”

My dear wife and I both
THE BOYS PETS. ie

beasts and fowls were kept,
and did odd jobs as well,
so that we should not make
too great a toil of the flight
of stairs, which took us
some six weeks to put
up.
One day Fritz caught a
fine Ea-crz, which he tied
by the leg to a branch of
the tree, and fed with small
birds. It took him a long
while to tame, but in time
he taught it to perch on
his wrist, and to feed from
his hand. He once let it
go, and thought he would
have lost it, but the bird
knew it had a good friend,
for it came back to the tree
at night. From that time
it was left free, though we
thought that some day its
love of war and wild sports
would tempt it to leave us
for the rocks of the sea

shore, where Fritz had first
found it.

Each of my boys had
now some pet to take care
of; and, I may say, to tease,
for they all thought they
had a fair right to get some

fun out of the pets they

could call their own; but
they were kind to them,
fed them well, and kept
them clean.

In what I may term my
spare time, which was
when I left off work out
of doors, I made a pair of
gum shoes for each of my
SOnswingnumce way 1) slag
told Fritz it could be done.
I do not know what we
should have done had we
not found the gum tree,
for the stones soon wore
out the boots we had,
and we could not have
gohe. through the woods
q



Se
THE WAX TREE.

47

CEUAE PER x,

TuErRE was to be seen so
much that was new to us,
and so much to be found
that we could make good
mec of, Maem niz) andi.
spent the whole of the next
day in the woods. We
took the ass and one of
the dogs with us, but left
all else at home.

Our way first lay through
a dense wood, where we
saw no end of small birds,
but such game could not
now tempt Fritz to waste
his shot. We then had to
wonosc a vast plata and, to
wade through the high
grass, which we did with
care, lest we should tread
on some strange thing that
might turn and bite us.

Wercame at laste toa

grove of small trees, and
in their midst. |). sawegae
bush, which I knew to be
the wax tree, for the wax
grew on it like white beads.
I need not say how glad
I was to find so great a
prize. We had up to this
time gone to bed ‘as soon
as the sun went down, for
we had no lamp to use;
but as we could now make
Wax) (Hahtswelymeol | Enity
that we had found what
would add two or three
hours per day to our lives.
We took as much of the
wax as would serve us for
some time, and then made
our way out of the grove.
Fritz here found a nest, in ©
which was a young green

and gold bird. This he
54

led by the smell, should
come to claim their own.

We then put the gourd
on the comb that held the
swarm, and took care that
the queen bee was not left
out. By these means we
EOOmmAOt ea ive: Ol fine
bees, and the trunk of the
tree was left free for our
use.

We had now to try the
length of the hole. This
we did with a long pole,
apd found it reach as far
up as the branch on which
our house stood.

“You see,’ said I to my
sons, “that this tree has no
sap in its trunk, but, like
some that grow in the land
we came from, it draws its
means of life through the
bark.”

We now cut:a square
hole in that side of the

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

trunk next the sea shore,
and made one of the doors
that we had brought from
the ship to fit in the space.
We then made the sides
smooth all the way up, and
with planks and the staves
of some old casks, built
up the stairs round a pole
which we made fast in the .
ground. To do this we
had to make a notch in the
pole and one in the side
of the trunk for each stair,
and thus go up step by
step till we came to the top.
We had a good store of
strong nails, and with them,
and such toolsas we brought
back on the raft, which we
had now learnt to use with
some skill, we got on well
with our task. Each day
we spent a part of our
time at what we could now
call the farm, where the
66

“No, no, but through

neaoek.

PA ty thisy \ bagitzaeere ty ult
loud laugh.

“Why not say through
the world at’ orice, and
push your crow bar in till
you reach Ev-roer, which,
istmest) says, (lies) )iny ina
straight line from our feet.
Pe chouldd likelitowharve)ia
peep down such a hole, for
I might thus get a sight of
our dear Swiss home.”

Fritz and I went up to
the wall and found that
Jack was right, for he had
come \to a Clearspace.» | MHis
first thought was to jump
foeebut as) 1 (knew? that
there might be foul air in

the cave, I would not let

him risk his life. |

The boys then set fire to
some dry grass, and thrust
it in the hole, but it went





. THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

out at once, which was a
sure sign that the air was
not fit to breathe.

t ikiew ))¢hateeacumcatl
brought from the wreck a
box full of fire works, which
were used on board to make
signs to ships far out at sea.
I sent Fritz to Tent House
for these, though I thought
that they might be too
datip (Ho! //imalke )iicemnon
When he came back, I set
light to some of them, and
threw them in) the “hole.
They flew round, and threw
out a stream of sparks that
Lita up ened cave: | U\Vivem
these were burnt out, we
put in a heap of straw and
threw, @ dehitionmiien el bis
was now soon in a blaze,
and gave us a clear view
of the cave; but it was too
deep for us to see the end.

Our joy was so great ~
NEW FACES AT ROCK HOUSE.

I then made the crew a
gift of what we had brought
inMeOlomnOat, \ainal satan te
Cap-tain Stone, for that
wast nistname=s ©) whope,
sir, that you will now go
with me to Rock House,
the place where we live, and
where you will see Miss
Rose, who will be glad to
hear some news of home.”

“To be suré I will, and
thank you much,” said he;
“and I have no doubt that
Mr. West would like to go
with us.” This Mr. West
was on his way, with his
wife and two girls, to New
South Wales, where he
meant to build a house
and clear a piece of land.

We all three then left
the ship in our boat, and
as. we came in sight of
Shark Isle, Jack, who was
on the fort, fired his guns.

LOQ

When we came to the
beach, my wife and the
rest were there to meet us.
Jane was half wild with
joy when she heard that
Cap-tain Stone had brought
her good news from home.

We led them round our
house and through the
grounds, and Mr. West
took note of all he saw.
When we came to talk, I
found that he had made up
his mind to stay with us.
I need not say how glad |
was to hear this, for he
had brought out with him
a large stock of farm tools,
of which we had long been ©
in want.

The boys were of course
in high glee at all this, but
I did not share their joy
so much as I could wish.
The ship which now lay
close to our shore was the
12 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



set free, as they could fly
to the land.

There was a place in the
raft for each of us. In the
first tub sat my wife; in the
next Frank, who was eight
years old; in the third Fritz,
not quite twice the age of
Frank; in the fourth were
the fowls, and some old sails
that would make us a tent;
the fifth was full of good
things in the way of food;
in the sixth stood Jack,
a bold lad, ten years old;
in the next Ernest, twelve
years of age, well taught,
but too fond of self, and
less fond of work than the
rest; while I sat in the
eighth, to guide the raft
that was to save all that
was dear to me in the
world.

As soon as the dogs (Bill
and Jack by name) saw us

push off from the ship they
leapt in the sea, swam near
the raft, and kept well up
with us.

The sea was calm; so
that we felt quite safe. We
made good use of the oars,
and the raft bore its freight
straight to the land; but as
we drew near to the shore
the sight of the bare rocks
led us to think that we
might still be in need of —
food and drink’ when that
which we had was gone.
We could see that casks,
chests, spars, and splints
from the masts of the wreck
lay on the shore.

As we got near, the coast
lost its bare look, and we
were glad to see that there
was no lack of trees. .We
soon found a bay, to which
the ducks and geese had
found their way, and here




*
4
es i
4 ae













The Baldwin Library

RmB


THE WRECK. 4I

brought back tried our|found, which we ate with

strength.

My wife soon} milk from the cow and the

made a fire to boil some| goat, and then went up to

of the fruit that Ernest had |The Nest for the night.



Chir EE Re Te

Ir took the whole of the
next day to make a sledge,
to which we tied the ass,
and drove to Tent House.
On our sledge we put such
of the casks which held
food, and took them back
to The Nest. Inthe course
of the same week, Fritz
and I went once more to
the wreck, and this time
we brought off chests of
clothes, pigs of lead, cart
wheels, sacks of maize,
oats, peas, and wheat, and
a small mill that had been
used by the cook on board

to grind the peas with
which he made soup for
the crew. When we thad
put these on board the
raft, there was not an inch
of room to spare. With a
strong bar we broke down
some of the doors, and.
took such parts of the ship
as we thought would aid
us to build our house,
which as yet was far less
safe than I could wish.
These we bound: with
cords, and made them float
back at the stern of the.
raft.
96

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



wife died when Jane was
but a babe in arms. When
ten years of age he sent
her to a first class school,
where she was taught all
that was fit for the child
of a rich man to know. In
course of time she could
ride a horse with some
skill, and she then grew
fond of most of the field
sports of the East. As
the Cap-tain had to go
from place to place with
his troops, he thought that
this kind of sport would
train her for the mode of
life she would lead when
she came to live with him.

But this was not to be, for

one day he told Jane that
he must leave the East, and
take home the troops. As
it was a rule that no girl
should sail in a ship with
troops on board, he left Ker

to the care of a friend who
was to leave near the same
time. He thought fit that
she should dress in the
garb of a young man while
at sea, as there would then
be no need for her to keep
in her berth, and he knew
that she was strong and
brave, and would like to
go on deck,.and see the
crew at their work. It
gave the Cap-tain pain to
part with ‘his child, but

there was no help for it.

The ship had been some
weeks at sea, when one day
a storm broké over it, and
the wind drove it for days
out of its course. The
crew did their best to
steer clear of rocks, but
she struck on a reef and
sprung a leak. The boats
then put off from the wreck,
but a wave broke over the
68

would serve a whole town
for a life time.”

When we went back to
The Nest that night we
laid out a plan for our new
home, for there could be
no doubt that the cave was
the best place for us to
dwell in, though we should
still sleep in The Nest
when. we went on that side
of the stream.

The next day we all set
to work; the floor of the
cave was quite smooth, and
the walls dry, so that we
could build at once. We
first cut holes in the sides
of the rock to let in the
light, and then brought
frames and panes of glass
from The Nest, and put
themin. We then brought
all the planks and wood we
could find, and built a

strong wall in the midst of

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



the cave. On the right side
of this wall we made three
rooms, two of which were
to be used as bed rooms,
and one to take our meals
in. -On the left side was a
room for my wife to cook in,
one to work in, to which we
gave the name of the shop,
and a place with stalls in it
for our live stock. At the
tback of these was a store
house, where we could keep
our stock of food and the
whole of our spare goods.

I need not say that it took
us some months to do all
this, nor that we had to toil
hard day by day, from morn
till night, ere we got to the
end of our task; but the
end did come at last, and
then the joy we felt that we
had done all this with our
own hands more than paid
us for our toil.


as I felt that the ship did
not sink, I went to the stern,
and found, to my joy, that
she was held up by a piece
of rock on each side, and
made fast likea wedge. At
the same time I saw some
trace of land, which lay to
the south, and this made
me go back with some hope
that we had still a faint
chance, though how to get
from the ship I could not
tell.

As soon as I got down-
stairs I took my wife by the
hand, and said, “Be of good
cheer, we are at least safe
for some time, and if the
wind should veer round, we
may yet reach the land that
lies but a short way off.”

I said this to calm the
fears of my wife and sons,
and it did so far more than

I had a right to hope. ,

LAND IN SIGHT. 7

“Let us now take some
food,” said my wife. “We
are sure to need .it, for this
will no doubt be a night to
try our strength.”

We still heard the roar
of the sea, and now and
then the planks would creak
as if they were torn up
from the deck, so that we
had still good cause to fear
that we might go down.

My wife got some food
for her boys, which we were
glad to see them eat, poor
as it was; but we could not
share their meal. Three
out of the four were put
to bed in their berths, and
soon went to sleep; but
Fritz, who was our first
child, would not leave us.
He said, like a good son,
that he would try to be of
some use, and think what
could be done.
28

but crept up the shore step
by step, and we got so near
that Ernest brought down
some of the birds with a
stick. Fritz was the first to
find out that what the sea
gulls had just left was the
huge fish he had shot in the
sea. It was a large shark,
and we could see the wound
in its head made by the
two balls from Fritz’s gun.
We cut off some parts of
the rough skin, which we
thought might serve us for
files, and then went back
tothe boat. I took a glance
at. the shore ere I got in,
and to my great joy saw
that some of the planks
‘and spars from the wreck
lay on the ground not far
off, Our next care was to
bind these so as to make
a raft, which we tied to, the
stern of the boat, and then,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

by the use of our oars, soon
made our way to the bay,
and up the stream to the
place where the bridge was
to be built. Our young
friends were glad to see us
back isotsoon) and rane
meet us; Jack had a cloth
in his hand, in which was
a store of cray fish and
crabs just caught in some
of the nooks of a rock up
the stream; Frank was full
of glee, and told how that
he had been the first to
find them out, and how
Jack had to wade up ‘to his
knees to get them.

“Do not fail to give God
thanks” \said ‘Te thatvour
lot has been cast where we
can pick up more food than
we can eat.”

It would take a long time
to tell how we brought all
the wood up to the spot,
70

we feel so safe as we did in
our rooms at Rock House.
The next day we were
to start a plan by means of
which our live stock would
not want so much of our
care. They had bred so
fast that we could well
spare some of them, and
these I thought might be
left in some place to seek
their own food, and yet be
in reach should we want
them. Vi:
~My wite took from her
hen roost ten young fowls,
and I took four young pigs,
four sheep, and two goats.
These we put in our large
cart, with such tools as we
thought we should need,
~ tied the black ox, the cow,
and the ass to the shafts,
and then set off from The
Nest.

We had to cross a wide

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

plain, anedeeinere: vel miet
with some dwarf plants, on
which, as Jack would have
it, grew snow balls.

Fritz ran to see what
they were, and brought me
a twig to which clung balls
of snow white down. I
held it up to show my wife,
for I knew the sight would
please her still more than
ier somse 31)

“Seco ) said tii thicmris
the Cort-ton plant, which
you have oft tried to find.
It seems to grow here as.
thick as weeds, and, if I
am a judge, it is of the
best kind.”

We got as much of this
as our bags could hold,
and my wife took care to
pluck some of the ripe seed,
that we might raise a crop
in our grounds at Tent
House.
60

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



past. Then we went down
to the shed we had built
on the ground at the root
of the tree, and made the
best shift we could. All
our stores were kept heré,
so that the space was too
small to hold us, and the
smell from the beasts made

it far from a fit place for

six of us to dwell in; but
it was at least safe for a
time, and this was of course
the first thing to be thought
of. To dress our food we
had to make a fire in the
barn, and as there was no
place to let out the smoke,
it got dqwn.our throats and
made us cough all the day
long.

It was now for the first
time that my wife gave a
sigh for her old Swiss
home. But we all knew
Giaedumita Was PORTION TGe nt

grieve, and each set to
work to do all he could to
make the place look neat
and clean. Some of our
stores we took up the stairs
out of our way, and this
gave uS more room. As
we had cut square holes
in the trunk of the tree all
the way up, and put in
frames of glass that we
got from the ship, my wife
could sit on the stairs, with
Frank at her feet, and mend
our,,clothes.|)/ Bach dave
drove from the barn such
of the beasts as could bear:
to be out inthe rain. That
we might not lose them, I
tied bells round their necks ;
and if we found that they
did not come back when
the sun went down, Fritz
and I went out to bring
them in. We oft got wet
through to the skin, which
42

When we got to the
shore, my wife and the
three boys were there to
greet us. My first care
was to send for the sledge,
and with this we took
most of our new wealth

up to The Nest.

See bsttzerold ranks thatiic
had seen a chest of gold
coin on the wreck.

Oly Do wash you had
brought it with you,” said
ie

“And what would you
have done with it when
you hadssot iu: \saie yl.

“T would buy some nice
sweet cakes, for the bread
we have is so hard.”

This made us all laugh,
and Frank with the rest,
for he soon saw that the
coin would be of no use
in a place where there
were no shops.

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

The next day I told my
sons that they must now
leaunt to 1 Tun, ecomles py mto
climb, and to throw stones
Siiaielt. "at a, malar
these things would be of
great use to them in their
new mode of life.

I next taught them to
use the Las-so, by means
of which men catch the
wild horse on the vast
plains of the New World.
I tied two stones to the
ends of a cord some yards
in length, and flung off
one of them at the trunk
OL a VvOune itee. the. cond
went round and round it
in a coil, and bound it so
tight that I could have
drawn it to me had it not
been fast in the ground.
This trick the boys were
not slow to learn; and
riz, i) aashontetimne
48

took home with him, in
the hope that he might
tate il) ang geteaeubmitnto
speak. |

Our path was now so
clear that we could walk
side by side with ease, and
talk.of what we had seen.

“How came you,’ said
Fritz, “to know so much
of the queer beasts, trees,
and plants that we have
found here?”

“When young,’ said I,
“TI used to read all the
books that fell in .my
way; and those that told
of strange lands and what
was to be seen in them
NaG stor) Me as oreat ea
charm as they have for
Ernest, who has read a
great deal, and knows more
of plants than you do.”

“Well,” said he, “I will
do the same if I but get

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the chance. Can you tell
what is the name of that
huge tree oneeane sfioht:
It must be at least three
score feet high. See, there
are balls on the bark.”

We went close to it, and
found that these balls were
of thick gum, which the
sun had made quite hard.
Fritz tried to pull one of
them off,.but felt that it
clung tight to the bark,
though he could change
its shape with his warm
hanes. ss ook, esateusire
“T feel sure that this 1s
the In-pi-a Rus-Ber which
we used to clean our
school books with.” I
£00k; aa piece: OF aitmnamnny,
hand, and said, “To be
sure it is. . What shall we
not find in this rich land 2”
I then told him how the
men in the New World
12

guide the Word of God.
They then knelt down for
me to bless them, and went
tomethiein!) beder in Nock
House for the last time.

I got no sleep all that
night, nor did the two
boys, who were to start
the next day.

As Ernest takes this
Tale with him—which I
give him leave to print,
that all may know how
good God has been to
us—I have no time to add
more than a few words.

The ship that is to take
from us our two sons and
our fair guest will sail from

THE

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

this coast in a few hours,
and by the close of the
day three who are dear to
us will have gone from
our midst. I can not put
down what I feel, or tell
the grief of my poor wife.

I add these lines while
the boat waits for my sons.
May God grant them health -
and strength for the trials
they may have to pass
through; may they gain
the love of those with
whom they are now to
dwell; and may they keep
free from taint the good
name of the Swiss Family
Robinson.

END.
A TROOP OF APES. 21

took hold of the nuts that
were near, and flung them
straight at us. This. was
not new to me, for I had
read that it is oft done by
men who live in the woods,
and have to get their food
as best they can; but the
trick made Fritz laugh, who
soon had hard work to
pick up the nuts that were
thrown at him.

We broke some of the
nuts, and put the juice of
the canes in the thick white

cream which forms close to
the shell; and this made us
a dish so sweet and nice

‘that Fritz said it was fit for

aking. Turk did not seem
to like it, so we gave him
some of the meat in our
bag, which we could now
well spare.

Fritz and I then made
fast some nuts to a string,
which I tied round my
waist, while he took up
his canes, and we both set
off on our road home.



CHAPTER.

On our way back we
‘took up the gourd bowls
and plates, which we found
quite dry and hard as bone,
and put them in our bags.
We had scarce got through

the wood, when Turk made
a datti in Hrontanmicn atid
we saw a troop of apes rush
out of his way. But he
gave a leap and brought
down one that could not
A FIGHT WITH BEARS. 79

the bears gave a loud growl,
and then, with a low moan,
fell dead at our feet.

As it was now time to
go back, we put the. bears
in the cave, but took care
to cut off their paws, which
form a dish fit to grace the
feast Ol arieiivot

We had a long walk
back to the place where
I had left my wife. The
boys told her what a hard
fight the dogs had with the
bears, and how Fritz and
I had shot them, and then
gave her the paws. With
the aid of Frank she had

fed our live stock and



brought in wood to make
tip) oun watch ire tomuahie
night, so we sat down to
sup at once, and then went
tOshest:

Next day we put. our
beasts to the cart and drove
asiitar tasy the beats ) dem
As we came near to the
spot a flock of birds flew
out of the mouth of the
cave, two or three of which
Fritz brought down with
his gun. It took us the
whole day to cut up the
bears. The hams were laid
by to be smoke dried;
while my wife took charge
of the fat and the skins.
A STRANGE STEED.

in a short time it took grain
from the hands of my wife,
and soon grew quite tame.
The boys now set to
work to break it in for use.
They taught it first to bear
them on its back. Then
they put a pair of string
reins in its mouth, and
made it turn which way
they chose to pull, and to
walk, or run, or stand still,
asvit wasebidan, UUs. 1nya
month from the time we
caught it, the boys made it
take them on its back to
and from the Farm or The
Nest, in less than half the
time an ox would go; so
that it came to be the best
steed we had to ride on.
The eggs we found in
the nest were put in a warm
dry place, and though we
scarce thought our care
would bring live birds out

83
of the shells, we had the
joy to hatch three of them,
and this led us to hope that
we should ere long have a
steed for each of our sons.

My work at this time was
by no means light. Our
hats and caps were all worn
out, and with skins of the
musk cat I had to make
new ones. The bears’ skins
were laid in the sun to dry,
and of these we made fur
coats, which would keep us
warm when the cold wet
nights came round, and
there were some left to serve
as quilts or rugs for our
beds.

I now tried my hand at
a new craft. I dug some
clay out of the bed of the
stream, and taught the boys
to knead it up with sand,
and some talc that had been
ground as fine as road drift.
WHAT TEN YEARS HAD DONE.



wrong; and it gave us
great joy to find that what
we told them sunk deep in
their hearts, and, like ripe
seed sown in rich soil,
brought forth good fruit.

I need not say that in
the course of ten years we
had made great strides in
those arts which our wants
had first led us to learn.
When we first came the
land near Tent House was
a bare waste; now it bore
fine crops, and was kept as
neat as a Swiss farm. At
the foot of. the hill by the
side of Rock Cave, was a
large plot of ground, which
we laid out in beds, and
here we grew herbs and
shrubs, and such plants as
we used for food. Near
this we dug a pond, and by
means of a sluice which
led from the stream, we

87

kept our plants fresh in
times of drought. Nor was
this the sole use we made
of the pond; for in it we
kept small fish and crabs,
and took them out with a
rod and line when we had
need of food, and time to
spare for that kind of sport.
In the ground round the
mouth of the Cave we
drove a row of strong canes,
bound at the top to’a piece
of wood, so as to form a
fence, up which grew a
Viens ciii¢ mea ume cell ware:
plants that threw a good
show of gay bloom crept
up to meet it. Shells of
great size and strange
shapes were got from the
shore, and these we built
up here and there with

burnt clay, so as to form —

clumps of rock work, on
which grew ferns and rare
12 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



set free, as they could fly
to the land.

There was a place in the
raft for each of us. In the
first tub sat my wife; in the
next Frank, who was eight
years old; in the third Fritz,
not quite twice the age of
Frank; in the fourth were
the fowls, and some old sails
that would make us a tent;
the fifth was full of good
things in the way of food;
in the sixth stood Jack,
a bold lad, ten years old;
in the next Ernest, twelve
years of age, well taught,
but too fond of self, and
less fond of work than the
rest; while I sat in the
eighth, to guide the raft
that was to save all that
was dear to me in the
world.

As soon as the dogs (Bill
and Jack by name) saw us

push off from the ship they
leapt in the sea, swam near
the raft, and kept well up
with us.

The sea was calm; so
that we felt quite safe. We
made good use of the oars,
and the raft bore its freight
straight to the land; but as
we drew near to the shore
the sight of the bare rocks
led us to think that we
might still be in need of —
food and drink’ when that
which we had was gone.
We could see that casks,
chests, spars, and splints
from the masts of the wreck
lay on the shore.

As we got near, the coast
lost its bare look, and we
were glad to see that there
was no lack of trees. .We
soon found a bay, to which
the ducks and geese had
found their way, and here


Ned driving the Birds away from the dead Shark.
WE SET OUT ON A TOUR. 17

find some place of rest near|fire-arms, in case we might
the stream, and the dogs/need them in the night ;
lay down at the door of|sang a hymn of praise to

the tent.

God, and then left our fate

We took care to load our|in his hands.



CPAP TEN EPL

As soon as I heard the
cock crow, and saw by the
light that it was break of
day, got out of bed and
spoke to my wife as to
what we should do next.

sale tists) wsatclinly uty Ee Titz,
and I will make a tour of
the coast, and try to find
some of the men who left
the ship, for if they are
Metemmthey, ) imnay) abe, in
want.”

“But,” said Fritz, who

heard me from his bed, |

“why should we search

for those who left us to die
on the wreck 2”

“Well, I will tell you,”
Said eis Eiichi should
do to them as we would |
wish them to do to us, not

as they have done; next,

'we know that they took

no food with them, and we
should not leave them to
starve; and last, it may
be that they can help us,
though now theystand more
in need of our aid.”

The boys were soon up,
and we all sat down to
| &2 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Gimmeden ssiden yh news text
cot up on their steeds, and
I. took the pouch from the
head of the bird. As soon
as it could see, it gave a
wild stare, and then fought
(Ou Cetinee:

The boys then put spurs
to the flanks of their steeds,
and when the bird had
made a’ few starts back, as
if to try the strength of the
cords which held it, it set
off with a run, and the bulls
jcachiecid=r Eade men keep
up a smart pace.

Fritz and I now went in
search of the nest, which
we soon found. I took the
eggs from it and put them
ina bag I had brought to
hold them, in which I put
some wool and moss, so
that they should not break.

It did not take us long

to get up to the two boys,

who had gone on first, and
we were glad to find that
the poor bird had made up
its) aind Sto) nitse dates and
kept up well with the pace
of the bulls.

When we got in sight of
home, my wife and Ernest,
who had been on the look
out for us, came forth to
meet us; and,the strange
way in which we brought
home our new prize made
them laugh. I need not
say that we took great care
of it.

The next day we built it
a house, with a space in
front for it to walk up and
down, round which were
put rails, so that it could
not get out. At first it
was shy, and would not
take any food, so that we
had to force some balls of
maize down its throat; but
A NEW TASK. 3 5

with us, and put them in
the ground where they
thought they would grow
best. The vines were put
round the roots of our
tree, in the hope that they
would grow up the trunk.
On each side of the path
that led. from The Nest to
the Boys Bridge they put
a row of young nut trees,
which would, as they grew
up, shade us from the sun
all the way to the stream.
To make the path hard we
laid down sand from the
sea shore, and then beat
it down with our spades.
We were for six weeks
at this and such like work.
Each day brought with it
health and strength for us
all, and we were loth to
spare any pains to make
The Nest, and all that

could be seen near it, look

neat and trim, though there
were no eyes but our own
to view the scene.

One day I told my sons
that I would at last try
to make a flight of stairs
in place of the cane steps
with rope sides, which were
a source of fear to my
wife, and, to tell the truth,
the worst part of our house.
As yet we had not used
them much, for we came
down as soon as we got
out of bed, and did not go
up till it was time for rest;
but the rain would some
day force us to keep in
The Nest, and then we
should like to go up and
down stairs with more ease
than we could now climb
the rude steps. To make
a flight of stairs of such
great length was no slight
task, and each time that T
bie

SWISS PAMILY ROBINSON.

IN

WORDS Om OVE Si A be

ABRIDGED AND ADAPTED FROM THE ORIGINAL STORY BY

I Ey Me

AUTHOR OF “THE BOY’S FIRST READER,” ‘‘THE GIRL’S FIRST READER,”
“QUEER CHARACTERS,” ETC. °

WITH COLORED ILLUSTRATIONS.

NEW YORK.
MCLOUGHLIN BROS., PUBLISHERS.
THE CAVE OF ROCK SALT.

that we sent Jack off home
oy iemesy 10) tell) tlre
good news, and to bring
back some wax lights. I
did not deem it safe for us
to go in the cave in the
dark, for there might be
pools or deep dry pits in
the ground.

Pigcapanay) Doihadk) qtist
thrown up on the bank the

67

one to each. I went in
first and led the way, and
the rest kept close at my
back. We had not gone
on more than a few steps
when we came to a dead
stop, struck with awe at
the grand sight that met
our view. The walls and
roof of the cave were lit
up, as it were, with star-

last spade full of earth that, like gems, while some hung

had been dug out, when
we heard a loud shout.
We got up on the top of
the cave, and saw that Jack
had brought back a tribe
gar iis >neelsy muniteniianse
car, drawn by the cow and
the ass, came on at a slow
facemtccd by | jiaekwom! ia
black ox, and in it were my
wife, Frank, and Ernest.
By the) help of -a flint
and steel I soon lit some
of the wax lights, and gave

down like glass drops from
the roof, and some rose up
from the ground at its sides
like blocks of spar. I broke
off a piece and put it to
my tongue.

“What does it taste like?”
said Jack. )

ol stind,)satds Weaunatrwie
are in a cave of rock salt.”

“We shall not have to
scrape the rocks to get our
salt now,” said Ernest, “ for
there is more here than
PLANS FOR OUR SAFETY. 27

you that the mid day heat
is more than we can bear,
and that if we stay here
we may have to keep watch
aimee, oc (there are.
doubt, wild beasts of some
kind that will find us out;
and we should not trust

too much to our dogs, who

may lose their lives in a
fight with them.”

Pligdare cay jyouljare
Giclee Wearic. ye raat) Ido
not yet see how we can
cross the stream. We shall
first have to build a bridge.”

Beng te aigiave y Irilist
stay where we are, said
my wife.

elvdo) net thinke-so, my
om ale said. IN.o;.one
knows what he can do till
emuiices|

The boys were now all
out of their beds; and
while my wife went to milk

the cow and cook some
food, I made my plans
known tothem. They were
all glad when they heard
that we were to leave, and
each said he would help,
as far as he could, to build
the bridge.

The first thing to be done
was to find some strong
planks; and Fritz, Ernest,
and I went down to the
shore, and got in the boat,
which the tide soon took
down to the bay.

On a piece of land which
layah Core titemireh ve. corel
see some large dark thing,
round which flew a flock
of sea gulls. As we had
a wish to learn what it was,:
we put up a sail and caught
a gust of wind which had
sprung up, and this soon
brought the boat to the
spot. We made no noise,
32 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

web feet like a goose, and
has long legs like a stork:
thus he can run on land
as fast as he can swim.”
soViGs, i Sdtelenlieecdanich ene
can fly with more speed
through the air, for these
birds have great strength
in their wings. In fact,
few birds have such means
of flight as the Fia-mty-co.”

Loud were the cries of
Jack and Frank when we
calle aiemstonbs |) out. imy
wife thought the great bird
might need more food than
we could spare. I told
her that it would feed on
small fish and worms, and
not rob our geese of their
grain. I then tied him to
a stake near the stream by
a cord that left him room
LOulis ue aienicneace) anicein
a few days we were glad
to find that he knew us,

and would come at a call,
like a tame bird.

While I sat on the grass
with my sons, late in the
day, I thought I would try
to make a bow that might
be of some use to kill
birds, and thus save our
shot. This I did with a
long cane and a piece of
string, and then made a
dart with a sharp point,
which I shot off and found
it would go straight. The
branch of the tree on which
we were to fix our hut
was so high that our steps
would not near reach it.
“What shall we do now?”
said 4d ritze WV alge and
you shall see, my lad.”
I then tied some strong
thread to the dart, and
shot it over the branch;
then tied a piece of rope
to the, end of the, thread,
72 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



made of thin cross bars to
let-in both light and air.
We made racks to store
hay and such like food for
the live stock, and put by
some grain for the fowls,
for our plan was to come
from time to time to feed
them, till they got used to
the place.

Our work took us more

time than we thought; and |

as our store of food got
low, we sent Fritz and Jack
home to bring us a fresh
stock, and to feed the beasts
we had left at Tent House.

While they were gone,
Ernest and I made a tour
of the woods for some miles
round the new Farm. We
first took the course of the
stream that ran by the foot
of the hill) Some way up
we came to a marsh on the
edge of a small lake, and



here in the swamp grew a
kind of wild rice, now ripe
on the stalk, round which
flew flocks of birds. We
shot five or six of these,
and I was glad to note the
skill with which Ernest now
used his gun. I took some
of the rice, that my wife
might judge how far it was
of use to us as food.

We went quite round
the lake, and saw plants
and trees that were not
known to me, and birds
that Ernest said he had not
seen in any of the woods
nearei he! Nest) butawe
were most struck with the
sight of a pair of black.
swans, and a troop of young
ones that came in their
train. Ernest would have

‘shot at them, but I told

him not to kill what we
did not want for use.
THE SECRET FOUND OUT. 95



had worn off that grace and
ease which is one of the
charms of well bred youth.
I saw that this made the
girl shy of them, and that
the garb she wore brought
eebluish i tombemiemeeks i!
bade my wife take charge
of her, and lead her down
to the boat, while the boys
and I stood a while to
speak of our fair guest.
When we got on board

we sat down to hear Fritz

tell how he came to find

Miss Jane, for that was her
real name; but he had not
‘told half his tale when we
saw my wife and her new
friend come up on deck.
Sitemedt|) had amsiielook,
but as soon as she saw
Fritz she held out her hand
to him with a smile, and
this made us feel- more at
our ease.

~The next day we were
to go back to our home,
and on the way Fritz was
to tell us what he knew of
Miss Jane, for his tale had
been cut short when she
came on the deck with my
Wiles sl EitembOyemaice all
they could to make her
feel at home with them,
andi) Dye) thew cnclmoumsllT:
day they were the best of
friends.

The next day we set sail
at sun rise; for we had far
to go, and the boys had a
strong wish to hear Fritz
tell his tale.

When the boat had made
a fair start, we all sat down
on the deck, with Jane in —
our midst, while Fritz told
his tale to the end.

Jane Rose was born in.
In-p1-a. She was the child

of one Cap-tain Rose, whose
A STRANGE SOUND.

mound, and built a fort,
on which were set two of
the ship’s guns. These the
boys made a rule to fire
off, with a view to let us
know that they were safe,
and to try if the guns were
still fit for use. This time

they found their charge’

quite dry, and the guns
went off with a loud bang.

They had just put a
plug: in the ‘hole of one of

the guns, to keep out the

wet, when they heard a
sound roll through the air.

ides cit) Wear! that”
Bald laGi eee ulna iisume
that noise must have come
from some ship at sea. Let
us fire once more.”

But Fritz thought they,

ought to go home at once
and tell me what they had
heard. They both ran to
the boat with all speed, and



103

put out their strength to

reach home ere the sun

went down.

The day was fine, and as
the rain had kept us in
doors for two months, we
were glad to go down on
the beach for a change.
All at once I saw the boys
come up the stream in their
boat, at a great speed, and
the way they used their
sculls led me to think that
all was not right.

“What have you seen,
that should thus: put two
brave youths to: suns oe
Sareea

They then er us what
had brought them back so
sdon,, 7 1 had heard the
sound of the two guns
which they had fired off,
but no more. I told them
I thought their ears must
be at fault, and that the
98 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to us as to the young: friend | feast of our best food—fish,
who now sat in our midst. | fowls, and fruit, and some

When Fritz had told us| of my wife’s choice jam—
this, and much more, we} whilst our burnt clay plate
came in sight of Safe Bay.}|made a great show on the
He then took Ernest with|board, for it was set out
him in his small boat, and! with some taste. We had
|z, wish to show Jane that,
as fast as he could to Rock | though the coast was a wild
House, so as to make the!kind of place, still there
place look neat by the time | were means to make life a
we brought home our guest. , joy to those who dwelt on
The two boys—for to usiit, if they chose to use
they were still boys—met! them, As for Jane, the





us on the beach.
with a look of pride, gave
his hand torupane,aneial
could see a slight blush
rise to her cheek as she
gave him hers. He then
led her up the path, on
each side of which grew a
row of young trees, and
took her to a seat in our
grounds. There he and
Ernest had spread out a

Fritz, | sight of our home, the style
iof our feast, and the kind

words of the boys, were
things so new to her, that
she knew not what to say.

“1 shall stella nemmonre
than truth,” she said, “ when
I say that what you have
shown me is of far more
worth than all the wealth
I have seen in the East,
and that I feel more joy

it
‘ov
28

but crept up the shore step
by step, and we got so near
that Ernest brought down
some of the birds with a
stick. Fritz was the first to
find out that what the sea
gulls had just left was the
huge fish he had shot in the
sea. It was a large shark,
and we could see the wound
in its head made by the
two balls from Fritz’s gun.
We cut off some parts of
the rough skin, which we
thought might serve us for
files, and then went back
tothe boat. I took a glance
at. the shore ere I got in,
and to my great joy saw
that some of the planks
‘and spars from the wreck
lay on the ground not far
off, Our next care was to
bind these so as to make
a raft, which we tied to, the
stern of the boat, and then,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

by the use of our oars, soon
made our way to the bay,
and up the stream to the
place where the bridge was
to be built. Our young
friends were glad to see us
back isotsoon) and rane
meet us; Jack had a cloth
in his hand, in which was
a store of cray fish and
crabs just caught in some
of the nooks of a rock up
the stream; Frank was full
of glee, and told how that
he had been the first to
find them out, and how
Jack had to wade up ‘to his
knees to get them.

“Do not fail to give God
thanks” \said ‘Te thatvour
lot has been cast where we
can pick up more food than
we can eat.”

It would take a long time
to tell how we brought all
the wood up to the spot,
I MAKE A BOW AND ARROW. 33

and drew that up, and at
last made a long row of
cane steps, with a rope at
each side, which we drew
Upmeoewtiie, first
branch. The boys were
now all in haste to climb
the tree, but I chose that
Jack, who was light of
build and sure of foot,
should go up first and try
the strength of our work.
Fritz went up next with
some nails, and made the
ropes fast to the tree, while
irciove sstalcesmin tlic
ground to keep them firm
at the foot. It was now
time for me to mount, and
up I went with an axe to lop
off the twigs and smooth
the bough that was to form
the ground of our new
house. I sent the boys
down out of my way, and
kept hard at work till it

strong

was late, for the sky was
clear, and the moon lent
me her beams of light to
Seenbin -
When I came down I
found that my two sons,
whom I sent down, had
not been there. I was at
a loss to think where they
could be, but my fears
were soon gone, for just
then I heard them sing a
hymn, the sound of which
came from one of the top
boughs of the tree. |
When they came down,
my wife spread a good
meal on the ground, which
we ate as best we could,
and then made our beds
of dry moss, round which
we put heaps of twigs.
These we set light to, as
watch fires to keep off
wild beasts and _ snakes.

The toils of the day had
52 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



thought of it I gave it up
as a thing we could not do.
But I now had a mind to
try our skill at this kind
of work. I knew that a
swarm of bees had built
their nest in the trunk of
our tree, and this led me
to think that there might
be a void space in it some
way up. “Should this
prove to be the case,’ I
said, “our work will be
half done, for we shall
then have but to fix the
stairs in the tree round the
trunk.” As soon as I had
thus spoke, the boys got
up and went to the top of
the root to tap the trunk,
and to judge by the sound
how far up the hole went.
But they had to pay for
their want of thought: the
whole swarm of bees came
out as soon as they heard

the noise, stung their cheeks,
stuck to. their hair and
clothes, and soon put them
to flight.

It took my wife and I
some time to drive off the
bees, and to put fresh earth
on the wounds to ease the
pain the poor boys felt
from the stings. We found
that Jack, who was at all
times rash, had struck the
bees’ nest with his axe, and
was much more hurt by
them than the rest; in fact,
his face was so bad, that
we had to swathe the whole
OL Mein cloths), These
who went to his work in

his slow way, got up to it

last, and was the first to
run off when he saw the
bees; thus he did not get
more than a sting or two,
but the rest were some
hours ere they could see
22 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

climb so fast as the rest,
for she had a young one
in her arms. Turk made
short work of the poor
thing, for ere Fritz could
call the dog off, the ape
was dead. The young one,
Asmooormeas it isawy) E rity,
sprang on his back, put
its paws in his curls, and
would not let go, but made
a noise as if to chide him.
Fritz did not like this, for
he was in fear lest it should
item PEC knew ltnere
was but small risk of that,
for the poor thing was as
much in dread as he was.
Pe lenatmeconmine lane
from Fritz’s back, and took
i eup ine my) arms ikera
child. We found that it
was too young to seek its
own food, and, as Fritz
said he should like to take

it home, we put it on Turk’s

back.) ““Sitice’ you’ have
been the cause of its grief,”
Saidluib 1s itis butter inate elt
you should act the part of
its dam.” Turk did not at
first like this, but we soon
got him to bear the ape,
which held so tight by the
hair on the dog’s neck, that
it could not well fall off.
Fritz then led Turk with a
string, that he: might not
stray out of sight, or throw
off his charge, which I think
he would have done had
we not been on the watch.

It did not take us long
to reach the bank of the
stream near to our home.
Just as we came in sight of
the tent we heard Bill bark,
and saw him run off as fast
as he could to meet us.
This put Turk in asad way,
and made him leap up at
Uisvancutnyatoumeuntvee, 1s
46

beasts will stand still if you
Bebe air On aapipem so
I crept near, and made a
low sound with my lips,
while I held in my right
hand a stout stick, to which
I had tied a cord with a
noose, and in my left hand
a slight wand. It soon
woke from its sleep, but
did not seem to fear us. I
saw it first move its tail,
and then draw its head
from side to side, as if to
look where the sound came
from. I then threw the
noose round its neck, drew
it tight, got on its back
with a leap, and thrust the
-wand up its nose, which is
the sole part of the beast
where there are no hard

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

scales. It bled at once,
and was soon dead, nor
did it seem to feel any
pain, Our prize eangiieh
was near five feet long, was
no slight weight to lift. I
got it at last on my back;
while Jack, in his fun, held
up my train, which was,
of course, its long tail, and
thus we went back to the
gourd tree, where we found
the rest quite safe.

It took us a long time to
reach The Nest that night. |
My wife did her best to
dress some of the flesh of
the land crab, but it was
tough, and did not taste
so nice as the soup made
from the beast that we had
caught by the nose.
100

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



the rain, the boys would
oft lay by their work, and
sit to hear Jane talk of
what she had seen in the
East, and Ernest and Fritz
would read to her by turns
such books as. she might
choose. I was glad to see
that this wrought a great
change in’ my sons, whose
mode of life had made
them rough in their ways
and loud «in their speech—
faults which we did not
think of so long as there
was no one to see or hear
them.

When the spring came,
the boys went in our boat
to the spot where they had
found Jane, which we now
knew by the name
“Jane's Isle,” and brought
back some beans, which
were new to them. These

On,

Jane told us'that they were
by no means scarce, but
that she had not made use
of them, as she knew no
way to roast or grind the
beans, which she found in
a green state. _

“Do you think,” said my
wife, “that the plant would
grow here?”

I then thought for the
first time how fond she
was of it. There had been
some bags on board the
ship, but I had not brought
them from the wreck; and
my wife had but once said
that she would like to see
the plant in our ground.
Now that we knew where
to get it, she told me that
it was one of the few things
that she felt the loss of.
When the boys heard this,

they set out on a trip to

we found to be Cor-rzez.| Jane's Isle, and while there
FANE AT HOME.

this day than I have felt in
all the days of my life. I
can use no terms less strong
than these to show how
much I thank you.”

This was just the kind of
speech to please the boys,
for there had been no one
to praise their work till
now. When the meal was
done, my wife brought out
some of her best wine, and
we drank to the health of
our guest in great state, and
with loud cheers. We then
made a tour of our house
and grounds, that Jane
might see the whole of the
place that from this time!

99

wife’s room, in which were
kept the pots and pans to
dress our food, and the
plates, bowls, and cups, out
of which we ate, took her
some time to view; for she
had long felt the want of
such things as she now saw
we had made for our use
out of what we could find.
(Mie vinextn day we seal
went to The Nest, and by
when the rainy season came
round, Jane knew the place
quite as well as we did.

‘My wife found in her a

true friend, for she soon
took a large share of the

work off her hands, and

she was to make her home.| did it with so much skill,

It would take me a long
time to tell what she thought
of all she saw, or the neat
things she said in praise of
our skill, as we took her
from place to place. My

and with so strong a wish
to please us, that we grew
to love her as if she had
been our own child.

When the time came for
us to keep in doors from
With that I went close
up to the tree, and saw a
large land crab on its way
down the trunk. Jack
struck a blow at him with
a stick, but did not hit the
beast. He then took off
his coat and threw it on
the crabs head, while I
made an end of him with
an axe. I told them that
these crabs climb the trees
and break off the nuts, as
we had seen, and then
come down to feast on
them at their ease.

“But how do they crack
the nuts?” said Jack.

Shey finale ma) witiole
through the shell at the
thin end, and then suck
them dry.”

The dead crab was put
in the sledge, and we went
on through the wood. The
wild plants which lay in

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

our path made us stop now
and then to clear the way
with an axe, so that we did
not get on fast and the
heat was so great that I
thought we should have
had to seek the shade of
thew next iilarce) tccemmae
could find. When we
came to the Gourd Wood,
we sat down to make some
more bowls and flasks to
take back with us. Ernest
had gone to try what new
thing he could find, but he

had not been from us long,

‘when we heard him call

out—

“A wild boar! A great
wild boar! Come here,
pray !”

We took up our guns,
and went at once with the.
dogs to the spot. We
soon heard Turk give a

loud bark, and a long deep
40

in his spare time, and to
mark down the name of
each spot as near as he
could.

When the heat of the
day was past, I told my
sons that I should be glad
- to take a walk with them.

iiteyerall lett otf work,
threw down their tools, and
made haste to join me.
My- wife said that she
should like to go with us;
so we left The Nest in
charge of Turk, and bent
our course to the banks of
the stream. On eur way
we went past some shrubs
and rare herbs, which my
wife knew well how to
make use of should we fall
sick; and Ernest, who had
read much, and knew most
kind of plants, found a
large spot of ground on

which grew a fine kind of

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Po-ta-ro. At these the
boys set to work with such
zeal, that we soon had a
full bag of the ripe fruit.
We then went on to Tent
House, which we found in
the same state as when we
left it to cross the stream
on our way to the great
EEE; |

We found that our ducks
and geese, had grown so
wild that they would not
come near us; so, while my
wife and I went to pick up
such things as we thought
we might take back with
us, Ernest and Fritz were
sent to catch them, and to
tie their legs and wings,
and in this way we got
them at last to The Nest.
It was late at night when
we came in sight* of the
tree, and the weight of the
fowls and bags that we
THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



CHAPTER I.

Wuen one has a, good
tale to tell, he should try
to be brief, and not say
more than he can help ere
he makes a fair start; so
I shall not say a word of
what took place on board
the ship till we had been
six days in a storm. The
bark had gone far out of
her true course, and no one
on board knew where we
were. The masts lay in
splints on the deck, the
sails were torn, a leak in
the side of the ship let
more in than the crew
could pump out, and each
one felt that ere long he
would find a grave in the

deep sea, which rose and
fell in great white waves
of Ifeam, Janeen sent its
spray from side to side
of what was now but a
mere hulk.

Most of those on board
sought the best means they
could think of to save their
own lives; but some knelt
down to pray that God
would quell the storm and
still the waves, for they felt
that none but He could
help them now.

“Come, boys,” said I to
my four sons, who were
with me, and were struck
dumb with fear, “God can
save us if it please Him so
WE SET OUT ON A TOUR. 17

find some place of rest near|fire-arms, in case we might
the stream, and the dogs/need them in the night ;
lay down at the door of|sang a hymn of praise to

the tent.

God, and then left our fate

We took care to load our|in his hands.



CPAP TEN EPL

As soon as I heard the
cock crow, and saw by the
light that it was break of
day, got out of bed and
spoke to my wife as to
what we should do next.

sale tists) wsatclinly uty Ee Titz,
and I will make a tour of
the coast, and try to find
some of the men who left
the ship, for if they are
Metemmthey, ) imnay) abe, in
want.”

“But,” said Fritz, who

heard me from his bed, |

“why should we search

for those who left us to die
on the wreck 2”

“Well, I will tell you,”
Said eis Eiichi should
do to them as we would |
wish them to do to us, not

as they have done; next,

'we know that they took

no food with them, and we
should not leave them to
starve; and last, it may
be that they can help us,
though now theystand more
in need of our aid.”

The boys were soon up,
and we all sat down to
30 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Just as we had left the
bmege, lack criediout,) be
quick! here is a strange
beast with quills as long as
my) ara, oy Eberdogsi ran,
and I with them, and
found a large Por-cu-PINE
in the grass. It made a
loud noise, and shot out
its quills at the dogs, and
made them bleed. At this
Jack put his hand to his
belt, drew forth one of the
small arms I gave him, and
shot straight, with good
aiid tie (beast niwhich
fell dead on the spot. Jack
was proud of his feat, but
Fritz, who did not like to
be beat by one so young
as Jack, told him to use
more care, or he might
shoot one of the dogs, if
not one of us. My wife's
first thought was to dress
the wounds made by the





quills, which had stuck in
the nose of one of the
dogs, while the. boys made .
haste to pluck some of the
quills. \trom) ithe ysiiiaer
their strange prize.

At last our march came
to an end, and I saw for
the inser tiem tnenoredtn
trees that my wife had told
me of. They were of vast
size, and were, I thought,
fig trees. “If we can but
fix our tent up there,” I
said, “we shall have no
cause to dread, for no wild
beasts can reach us.” We
cent wlerank sot toe vane
sticks, with which to make
a fire, and my wife made
some’soup of the flesh of
the beast we had slain,
though we did not like it
so well as we did the ham.
and cheese we brought
with us.
A STRANGE SOUND.

mound, and built a fort,
on which were set two of
the ship’s guns. These the
boys made a rule to fire
off, with a view to let us
know that they were safe,
and to try if the guns were
still fit for use. This time

they found their charge’

quite dry, and the guns
went off with a loud bang.

They had just put a
plug: in the ‘hole of one of

the guns, to keep out the

wet, when they heard a
sound roll through the air.

ides cit) Wear! that”
Bald laGi eee ulna iisume
that noise must have come
from some ship at sea. Let
us fire once more.”

But Fritz thought they,

ought to go home at once
and tell me what they had
heard. They both ran to
the boat with all speed, and



103

put out their strength to

reach home ere the sun

went down.

The day was fine, and as
the rain had kept us in
doors for two months, we
were glad to go down on
the beach for a change.
All at once I saw the boys
come up the stream in their
boat, at a great speed, and
the way they used their
sculls led me to think that
all was not right.

“What have you seen,
that should thus: put two
brave youths to: suns oe
Sareea

They then er us what
had brought them back so
sdon,, 7 1 had heard the
sound of the two guns
which they had fired off,
but no more. I told them
I thought their ears must
be at fault, and that the
WORK AT THE CAVE. 65

With a piece of chalk I
made a mark on the side
of the cliff, to show the
width and height that the
cave should be cut. Then
each took an axe to try
what kind of stuff our rock
was made of. We found
it a hard kind of stone;
and, as we were not used
to this sort of work, we
had not done much when
the time came for .us to
leave off.

We came back next
day, and got on with more
speed, though we thought
it would not take us less
than six months to make
the cave, if our work were
done at the same rate each
day.

At the end of five or six
days we had got through
the face of the rock, and
' we found the stone soft.

In a day or two more we
came to what was but hard
clay, which gave way at a
slight blow from the axe.

“We need not fear now,”
said I, “for we shall soon
have a hole as large as we
want.” |

With the earth we took
out we made a ridge in
front woh (the; acme mune
boys now got on so well,
and dug so much out, that
I had hard work to throw
up the earth on the bank.

One day, as Jack stuck
his pick in at the back of
the cave, which was now
more than eight feet from
the front, a great mass of
the rock fell in, and he
enedoute Looehere) I
have got through.”

“ Through what ?” ‘said I,
“Not through your hand,
I hope.”




*
4
es i
4 ae













The Baldwin Library

RmB


102)

I will not dwell on what
took place now for some
time, for I find that each
year was very much like
the last. We had our fields
to sow, our crops to reap,
our beasts to feed and
train; and these cares kept
our hands at work, and our



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

minds free from the least
thought of our lone mode
of life.

I turn to my log as I
write this, and on each page
my eye falls on some thing
that brings back to my
mind the glad time we
spent at Rock House.



CHAPTER XV.

In the spring time of the
year, when the rain was
past, Fritz and Jack set off
on a trip in their boat to
Shark Isle. The day was
fine, the sky clear, and there
was no wind, yet the waves
rose and fell as in a storm.

“See!” cried Jack, “here
comes a shoal of whales.
They will eat us up.”

“There is no fear of that,”



said Fritz; “whales will do
us no harm, if we do not
touch them.” This proved
to be the case. Though
any one of them might have
broke up the boat with a
stroke of its tail, they did
not touch it, but swam by
in a line, two by two, like
a file of troops.

On Shark Isle, near the

shore, we had thrown up a


The Boys take Home the Ostrich,
78

the Cave. My wife and
Frank were left at our
Half Way House, to wait
till we came back, but the
dogs went with us. Our
route lay far up the course
of a small stream, which
had its source some miles
north of the Farm House.
The ground was new to us,
but we could not well lose
our way, for on the right
stood a hill from which we
could see the whole of the
plain.

Ernest had gone with
one of the dogs to a cave
that ie had spread at!the
foot of the hill, but we saw
him turn round and run
back with Turk at his heels.
As soon as he thought his
voice would reach us, he
cried out, “ A bear! a bear!
come to my help!”

We could now see that

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

there were two great beasts
at the mouth of the cave.
At a word from us both
the dogs flew to fight the
bear that stood in front.
Fritz took up his post at
my side, while Jack and
Ernest kept in the rear.
Our first shot was “a miss,”
as Jack said; but we took
a sure aim the next. time,
and both shots told. .

We would have let fly
at them once more from
this spot, but as we thought
we might hit our brave
dogs, who were now in the
heat of a hard fight with
their foes, we ran up close
to them.

«NGA ain tit Zz) eee kale
“take a straight aim at the
head of the first, while I
fire Von!) fiemmome mae) sie
Back?’

We both shot at once;
104

sounds they had heard were

no more than those of their

own guns, which the hills
had sent back through the
air. This view of the case
did not at all please them,
as by this time they well
knew what sounds their
guns made.

“Tt will be a strange
thing,” said I, “if the hope
to which I have so long
clung should at last come
to be a fact; but we must
have a care that we do
not hail a ship the crew of
which may rob and kill us
for the sake of our wealth.
I feel that we have as much
cause to dread a foe as we
have grounds of hope that
we may meet with friends.”

Our first course was to
make ‘the cave quite safe,
and then to mount guard
where we could see a ship

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

if one should come near
the coast. That night the
rain came down in a flood,
and a storm broke over us,
and we were thus kept in
doors for two days and two
nights.

On the third day I set
out with Jack to Shark
Isle, with a view to seek
for the strange ship which
he said he knew must be
in some place not far from
the coast. I went to the
top of a high rock, but
though my eye swept the
sea for miles round, I could
see no signs of a sail. I
then made Jack fire three
more shots, to try if they
would give the same sound
as the two boys had heard.
You may judge how I felt,
when I heard one! two!
three! boom through the
alr.
PRE ACE

THE kind reception given to the system of ae
im words of one syllable has encouraged the Author to
add the popular story of “ The Swiss Family Robinson”
as a twin book to “Robinson Crusoe.” The monosyt-
labic rule has been strictly adhered to throughout, the
only exception occurring necessarily in the title of the
book itself. The Author's olject has been to provide “a
field of exercise for a child who has gust learnt to
conquer words; and it is a great point im all teaching
to let the first imdependent exercise be one im which

‘victory is really to be won by moderate effort.
The Tub-Raft, leaving the Ship.


WORK AT THE CAVE. 65

With a piece of chalk I
made a mark on the side
of the cliff, to show the
width and height that the
cave should be cut. Then
each took an axe to try
what kind of stuff our rock
was made of. We found
it a hard kind of stone;
and, as we were not used
to this sort of work, we
had not done much when
the time came for .us to
leave off.

We came back next
day, and got on with more
speed, though we thought
it would not take us less
than six months to make
the cave, if our work were
done at the same rate each
day.

At the end of five or six
days we had got through
the face of the rock, and
' we found the stone soft.

In a day or two more we
came to what was but hard
clay, which gave way at a
slight blow from the axe.

“We need not fear now,”
said I, “for we shall soon
have a hole as large as we
want.” |

With the earth we took
out we made a ridge in
front woh (the; acme mune
boys now got on so well,
and dug so much out, that
I had hard work to throw
up the earth on the bank.

One day, as Jack stuck
his pick in at the back of
the cave, which was now
more than eight feet from
the front, a great mass of
the rock fell in, and he
enedoute Looehere) I
have got through.”

“ Through what ?” ‘said I,
“Not through your hand,
I hope.”
THE OSTRICH HUNT. 81

a view to catch one of the
old birds. We rose that
day ere it was light, and
set out at dawn, each on
the back of a good steed.

As we should have to
hunt through the woods,
my wife was left at home;
and Ernest, who did not
like rough work, chose to
stay with her. We made
it a rule to take one of the
dogs with us when we went
out to hunt, but on this day
we thought it wise to let
them both come.

Fritz took us straight to
where he had seen the nest,
which was not more than
a few miles up the stream.
When we came in sight of
the spot, we saw four great
birds, as if on their way to
meet us. As they drew
near we kept the dogs well
in, and made no noise, so

that they did not stop till
they came near us.

Fritz had brought his
Ea-gle with him, which he
now let fly. At one swoop
the bird came down on the
head of the Os-trich, held
on with its beak, and struck |
out its wings with great
force, as if to stun it. We
now rode up close to the
scene of war. Jack first
flung a cord round the legs
of the bird, which made it
fall to the ground. I then
threw my pouch on its
head, and, strange to say,
it lay down as still as a
lamb.

I now tied both its legs
with cords, but left it just
room to walk. We then
made it fast to the two
bulls that had brought Jack
and Frank all the way from
home, and put one of them
ANOTHER SURPRISE. 19

and made a fair meal of the
fruit.

At the end of the wood
we came to a plain which
gave us a clear view of the
place. Fritz, who was on
the look out, ran off with
Turk to some strange trees
that he saw on the right.

“Do come here,” hecried,
“and tell me what these
are.)

When I got up to him,
it gave me no small joy to
find that it was a gourd
ihe ee,

SErya carlton ciel you
eanecct, noldvrompotici or
those queer lumps _ that
grow on it.”

With that he brought
‘ one down, and we had a
look at it.

PON wotetais! isaidel le
Wercanmmake ai qalatc ve

dish omartackenlt 4s) by.

no means a nice kind of
food, but wild men set great
store by its shell, which
they use to hold their food
and drink.”

We then set to work to
make plates of the gourds,
which we did in this way:
I tied a string round the
shell, and then made nicks
all round it with a sharp
knife. In these we put the
string, and then gave it a
tight pull, which cut it in
half, and made two bowls.
When we had thus made
some eight or ten bowls,
and some flat ones for
plates, we laid them out in
the sun to dry, and then
went on our way.

We could see, not far off,
a grove of fine palm trees,
but to reach them we should
have to pass through reeds
and long grass, which grew
64

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



was the spring of the year, |and what there was left of

when all things put forth
new life; and we knew
that the time was now come
when we could once more
range the woods and till
the soil, and this made the
boys leap for joy.

Some planks had been
blown off the roof of The
Nest, and the rain had got
me nete) and there; so our
first job was to mend our
house, and make it fit to
sleep in.

This done, Jack,
ance LM sebiout if0
House. We found it in
asad) stateui) ihe storm
had thrown down the tent,
blown off some of the sail
cloth, and let in the rain
on our casks, some of which

Heitz,
Tent

held a store of food. Our

boat was still safe, but the
raft of tubs had broke up,

it lay in splints on the shore.

Our loss in the storm
had been so great that I
felt we ought at once to
seek for some place on the
rocks where we could put
what was left.

We went all round the
cliffs, in the hope that we
might find a cave, but in
vain. ‘

“There is no way but to
hew one out of the rock,”
said ttizs! itor) wermast
not be beat.”

Nell saidhy bat? sara
Jack; “we have each an
axe.) Why not. try iis
cliff at once 2”

I gave them leave to try,
and we soon set to work at
the rock. From this spot
we had a good view of the
whole bay, and could see
both banks of the stream.
A SHIP AT LAST.

105



_ There was now no room
for doubt that, though I
could not see it, there must
be a ship near Shark’s Isle.
Jack heard me say this
with great glee, and cried
out, “What can we now
do to find it ?”

We had brought a flag
with us, and I told Jack to
haul this up twice to the
top of the staff, by means
of which sign those who
saw it would know that
we had good news to tell
them.

I then left Jack on th
fort with the guns, and told
Muy tol tire eassoonm asia
ship hove in sight. I bent
my way at once back to
-Rock House, to talk with
my wife, Jane, and the boys,
as to what steps we should
now take. They all met
me on the beach, and made

me tell them the news while
I was still in the boat.
“We know no more,”
said I, “than the fact that
there is still a ship on the
coast. You must all now
keep in doors, while Fritz
and I go in search of it.”
We set off at noon, and
went straight to the west
part of the coast, where we
thought the sound must
have come from. We knew
a cape there from which
we: could get a good view
of the sea, and by the side
of which lay a small bay.
When we got round the
cape, great was our joy to:
find a fine ship in the bay.
It was not far away from
us, for we could see the
Ene-tisu flag float in the
breeze from one of its masts.

I seek in vain to find words

by means of which I can
THE END DRAWING NEAR.

it



Ernest, and Frank, leave to
go with him, as there was
room in the ship now that
the Wests were to stay
with us.

The ship was brought
round to Safe Bay, and
Fritz and Jack went on
board to fetch Mrs. West
and her, two girls, who
were glad to find that they
were not to go back to the
ship, for the storm had
made them dread the sea.

I may here say, by the
way, that my wife soon
found that her two sons
grew fond of their fair
friends, and gave me a hint
that some day we should
see them wed, which would
be a fresh source of joy
EOS,

I have not much more
to tell. The stores I had

laid up—furs, pearls, spice,

and fruits—were put on
board the ship, and left to
the care of my sons, who
were to sell them. And
then the time came for us
to part. I need not say
that it was a hard trial for
my wife; but she bore up
well, for she had made up
her mind that it was all
for the best, and that her
'sons would some day come
| back to see her. I felt,
‘too, that with the help of
lour new friends, we should
not miss them so much as
we at first thought, and
this we found to be the
case. :

As the next day my
boys were to leave me, I
had a long talk with them.
I told them to act well
their part in the new sphere
in which they were to
move, and to take as their
16

this place at once, and go
there ?”

“There is a time for all
things,” said I. “ We must
at least rest here for one
night. But did you see
no trace of the men who
left the ship ?”
= “None, on land or
sea, said he; “but I saw
some strange hogs on the
shore, that have feet like
hares.”

We all sat down to take
our soup with the shell
spoons. Ernest took from
his coat a large shell, which
he had hid till now, put it
in the soup, and then set it
down to cool.

“You do not show want
of thought,” said I to him.
“But I am not glad to see
that you think so of your
self, and do so much for
your own ease, when all

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the rest do so much for
yours. Now, that shell full
of soup you must give to
our two dogs. We can all
dip our small shells in the
pot, and you must do as
we do; but as we have
nought else that the poor
dogs can eat out of, that
shell shall be theirs.”

I knew he felt hurt at
this, but he gave it to the
dogs at once, and they soon
made quick work of their
share of the soup.

The sun was low when
our meal came to an end.
The fowls came round us
to pick up the stray crumbs
we had let fall, and my wife
took out her bag of grain
and fed the cocks and hens
that we had brought with
us, and sent them to roost
on the top of our tent. The
ducks and geese left us to
WE SET TO WORK. : 9

blow so strong, the sky was
clear of clouds, and we saw
the sun rise, and with it
- rose our hopes. I soon had
my wife and sons on deck.
The boys did not know till
then that all the men had
left the ship, and that there
was no one but us on
board.

“Where are the men?”
said they. “How can we
Bectcce ic ship |

“My dear boys,” said I,
“He who has kept us safe
till now will still aid us, if
we do not give way to fear.
Let all hands set to work,
and leave the rest to God.”

At these words we all
went to work with a will.
My wife went to feed the
live stock; Fritz set off in
search of arms, and the
means to make use of them;
and Ernest made his way

to the tool chest. Jack ran
to pick up what he could
find, but as he got to one
of the doors he gave it a
push, and two huge dogs
sprang out and leapt at him.
Fle thousinteciiueainst a teey
would bite him, but he soon
found that they meant him

|no harm, and one of them
let him get on his back and

ride up to me as I came
from the hold of the ship.
could ct "keep" baela) a
smile, but I told him that
it was not safe thus to play
with dogs which had not
been fed for so long a time.

When the boys had done
their search, and the spoil
was brought on deck, we
thought we had found all
that we should need. “As
forumie, Saleh tye iicws a
have brought good news,
for I find we have still on
A HALF WAY HOUSE.

We did not get back till
late in the day. Jack and
Fritz, whom we met just
as we came round the foot
of the hill, had done their
task well, for they had a
good stock of food in a
sack that lay on the back
of the ass, and they brought
the good news that all was
well at home.

We spent four more days
at the Farm, and then left
ie inesticl a stateias: to. be
fit for our use when we
chose to go back to it.

ite
but a part of our plan, for
we had made up our minds
to build a sort of half way
house, or cot, in which we
could rest on our way to
the Farm. This took us
six days to do. The spot
we chose lay by the side of
a brook, and was just such



Farm House was’

73

a place as would tempt one
forpstop dnd) | resumen
shade of the trees that grew
on the bank. While at the
brook, I made a boat out
of the tree we found at the
Pam ancmetagie wit. bac
with us to Tent House in
the cart.

We had still two months
ere the rain would set in,
and this left us time to put
the last touch to our cave.
We laid the whole floor
with clay, and spread on it
some fine sand, which we
beat down till it was quite
smooth and firm. On this
we put sail cloth, and threw
down goats’ hair and wool
made moistwith gum. This
was well beat, and, when
dry, made a kind of felt
mat that was warm and soft
to tread on, and would keep
the damp from our feet.
A NEW FARM. 71

At the end of the plain
we came to the brow of a
high hill, from which the
eye fell on a view the like
_of which we had not yet
een) Prees fol cally chide
grew on the sides of the
hill, and a clear stream ran
ciiougiy diel plain iat}, 1s
base, and shone bright in
the rays of the sun.

Wesaid at once that this
should be the site of our
-new farm. Close by we
found a group of trees, the
trunks of which, as they
stood, would do for the
main props of the house.

I had long had a mind
to build a boat, and here I
at last came on a tree that
would suit. Fritz and I
went for a mile or two in
search of what we could
find, and by the time we
came back my wife had



put up our tent for the
mistts), We}\ thenpaligmeac
down to sup, and went to
rest on. beds made of the
bags of the white down
that we brought from the
trees on the plain.

The next day we rose at’
dawns); (hey trcess wiiela
were to form the frame of
our farm house stood on
a piece of land eight yards
long by five wide. I made
a deep cut in each of the
trunks, ten feet from the
ground, and put up cross
beams to -form a roof, on
which we laid some bark
in such a way that the rain

would run off.

We were hard at work
for some days at the Farm
House. The walls we built
of thin laths and long reeds,
wove close for six feet from
the ground, but the rest we
16

this place at once, and go
there ?”

“There is a time for all
things,” said I. “ We must
at least rest here for one
night. But did you see
no trace of the men who
left the ship ?”
= “None, on land or
sea, said he; “but I saw
some strange hogs on the
shore, that have feet like
hares.”

We all sat down to take
our soup with the shell
spoons. Ernest took from
his coat a large shell, which
he had hid till now, put it
in the soup, and then set it
down to cool.

“You do not show want
of thought,” said I to him.
“But I am not glad to see
that you think so of your
self, and do so much for
your own ease, when all

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

the rest do so much for
yours. Now, that shell full
of soup you must give to
our two dogs. We can all
dip our small shells in the
pot, and you must do as
we do; but as we have
nought else that the poor
dogs can eat out of, that
shell shall be theirs.”

I knew he felt hurt at
this, but he gave it to the
dogs at once, and they soon
made quick work of their
share of the soup.

The sun was low when
our meal came to an end.
The fowls came round us
to pick up the stray crumbs
we had let fall, and my wife
took out her bag of grain
and fed the cocks and hens
that we had brought with
us, and sent them to roost
on the top of our tent. The
ducks and geese left us to
46

beasts will stand still if you
Bebe air On aapipem so
I crept near, and made a
low sound with my lips,
while I held in my right
hand a stout stick, to which
I had tied a cord with a
noose, and in my left hand
a slight wand. It soon
woke from its sleep, but
did not seem to fear us. I
saw it first move its tail,
and then draw its head
from side to side, as if to
look where the sound came
from. I then threw the
noose round its neck, drew
it tight, got on its back
with a leap, and thrust the
-wand up its nose, which is
the sole part of the beast
where there are no hard

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

scales. It bled at once,
and was soon dead, nor
did it seem to feel any
pain, Our prize eangiieh
was near five feet long, was
no slight weight to lift. I
got it at last on my back;
while Jack, in his fun, held
up my train, which was,
of course, its long tail, and
thus we went back to the
gourd tree, where we found
the rest quite safe.

It took us a long time to
reach The Nest that night. |
My wife did her best to
dress some of the flesh of
the land crab, but it was
tough, and did not taste
so nice as the soup made
from the beast that we had
caught by the nose.
$

62

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



Jack drew the plants, trees, |some wild duck soup; and

and beasts which they had
found, and these were stuck
in our book. Each night
we took it in turns to read
the Word of God, and then
all knelt down to pray ere
we went to bed. Ours was
not a life of ease, it is true,
but it was one of peace and
hope; and we felt that
God had been so kind to
us that it would be a great
sin to wish for what it did
not please Him to grant us.

My wife did all she could
to cheer us, and it was no
strange thing for us to find
that while we were out in
the rain with the live stock
she had made some new
dish, which we would scent
as soon aS we put our
heads in at the door. One
night it was a thrush pie,
the next a roast fowl, or

once in a way she would
give us a grand feast, and

bring out some of all the

good things we had in
store.

In the course of our stay
in doors we made up our
minds that we would not
spend the next time of
storm and rain, when it
should come round, in the
same place. The Nest
would serve us well in that
time of the year when it
was fine and dry, but we
should have to look out for
some spot where we could
build a house that would
keep us from the rain the
next time the storms came.

Fritz thought that we
might find a cave, or cut ,
one out of the rocks by the
sea shore. I told him that
this would be a good plan,
72 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



made of thin cross bars to
let-in both light and air.
We made racks to store
hay and such like food for
the live stock, and put by
some grain for the fowls,
for our plan was to come
from time to time to feed
them, till they got used to
the place.

Our work took us more

time than we thought; and |

as our store of food got
low, we sent Fritz and Jack
home to bring us a fresh
stock, and to feed the beasts
we had left at Tent House.

While they were gone,
Ernest and I made a tour
of the woods for some miles
round the new Farm. We
first took the course of the
stream that ran by the foot
of the hill) Some way up
we came to a marsh on the
edge of a small lake, and



here in the swamp grew a
kind of wild rice, now ripe
on the stalk, round which
flew flocks of birds. We
shot five or six of these,
and I was glad to note the
skill with which Ernest now
used his gun. I took some
of the rice, that my wife
might judge how far it was
of use to us as food.

We went quite round
the lake, and saw plants
and trees that were not
known to me, and birds
that Ernest said he had not
seen in any of the woods
nearei he! Nest) butawe
were most struck with the
sight of a pair of black.
swans, and a troop of young
ones that came in their
train. Ernest would have

‘shot at them, but I told

him not to kill what we
did not want for use.
FANE'S HISTORY.

one in which Jane left, and
she was borne, half dead
with fright, to the place
where we found her. She
had been thrown high up
on the beach, and though
faint and sick, got out of
the reach of the waves.
She did not know if those
who were in the boat with
her had lost their lives, but
she had seen no trace of
them since. —

When she had strength
to walk, she found some
birds’ eggs and shell fish,
which she ate, and then
went in search of some safe
place where she could rest
for the night. By good
chance she had a flint and
a knife; with these she set
light to some dry twigs,
- and made a fire, which-she
did not once let out till the
day she left. Her life was

97

at first hard to bear, but
she was full of hope that
some day a ship would
come near the shore, to
which she could make signs
for help. The wild sports
of the East in which she
took part had made her
strong of limb, and she had
been taught to make light
of such things as would
vex most of her sex.

She built a hut to sleep
in, and made snares to
catch birds. Some of them
she made use of for food,
and some she let go, with
bits of cloth tied to their
legs, on which she wrote
words, in the hope that
they might meet the eye of
some one who could’ help
her. This, as we knew,
had led Fritz to make his
search, the end of which
had. brought as much joy
WE FREIGHT OUR RAFT. II

the boys to get a good
nights rest, so that they
might be fresh for the toils
of the next day.

I then told my wife to
change her dress for, that
of one of the crew which
she had found, as her skirts
would have got in her way

when she had to climb.
She did. notiateunes aike

this, but did) so as soomas

she saw the truth of what

I told her.

At last, when all was
done, we went to bed, and
slept as sound as if we had
been on land.



CHAPTER II.

WE were‘all up at the
brcakwotwday,) and knelt
down to thank God that
He had kept us from harm
through the night.

“My dear boys,” said I,
“we have now, with the
help) of ))(Ged,\fotry joug
best to reach the shore. We
must, ere we go, give the
poor beasts on board both
food and drink to last them

for some days. I hope we
may yet find means to come
back and take them on
shore with us.”

Wie lithen ,.out))allmaiie
things on the raft, and ten
live hens .and two cocks
were put in one of the tubs.
Some ducks and geese we
let go, in the hope that they
would swim to the shore;
and a pair of doves were
.8

THE IGUANA.

grunt told us that the dogs
had found the beast, and
were no doubt at his
throat. But just then we
heard Ernest laugh, and
saw the two dogs come
through a clump of brush
wood, with our old sow
fast by the ears. She did
not seem to like the way
in which they had put an
end to her feast of fruit, so
she ran back as soon as
we told the dogs to let go
their hold of her ears.
“But with all our sport,’
Said. Ptiize we shave.” a
poor show of game. Let
us leave the young ones,
and set off to see what we
can meet with.” Ernest,
who was not so fond of
field sports as the rest, sat
down with Frank, and. we
left them and my wife at
the gourd tree, while Fritz

45



and Jack set off with me
to a high rock which we
saw on the right.. Jack
went first and broke off
the twigs, to let him pass
through, with as much ease
as if he had been born to
that kindvot wonkmcal rit Z
look here,” said he, as he
made his way to the rock.

“What have you found
now?” said Fritz.

“T don’t know what it is,
butatsractinerizes!

When I went up I saw
at once that it was a large
I-cu-a-wa, the flesh and
eggs of which are both
good for food. Fritz would
have shot at it, but I told
him that its scales were no
doubt shot proof, and that
I knew a way to catch it
that I thought would do
quite as well. I had heard
that these and such like
THE SAGO TREE.

made flasks of this gum,
in which form it is sent
to all parts of the world.
“And I do not see why
we should not make boots
imei the sesame way.
hye have! butitovmlllarsock
with sand, then put gum
ally rounds it. swhile inva
soft state, till it is as thick
as we need, then pour the
sand out, and we _ shall
have made a shoe or a
boot that will at least keep
out the damp, and that is
more than mine do just
now. |

Fritz now gave full play
comic (Oy. marl ehave | not
done a bad day's work,”
said he, “to have found
such a tree as this.”

Not far from this we
came to a bush, the leaves
of which were strewn with
a white dust; and close

by were two or three more
in the same state. I cut a
slit in the trunk of one of
these, which had been torn
up by the wind, and found
it full of the white dust,
which I knew by the taste
to be Sa-co. We took all
of this that we could get
out of the tree, for it would
add to our stock of food;
and when our bags were
full we laid them on the
back of the ass, and set
off to find our way back
to The Nest. »

“Each day brings us
fresh wealth,” said my wife,
when she saw what we
had brought her; “but
think we might now try to
add to our goods.” I knew
that she had some fear lest ,
we should one day get lost
in the woods, or meet with
wild beasts, so I at once
WE SMOKE THE BEES.

out of their eyes. When
they were free from pain,
we took means to deal
with the bees. I took a
large gourd, which had
long been meant to serve
for a hive, and put it ona
Send. Nether made 1a
straw roof to keep it from
the sun and wind, and as
by this time it grew dark,
we left the hive there for
the night.

Next day we rose at the
first glimpse of dawn, and
the boys, whose wounds
were now quite well, went
with me to help to move
the bees to the new home
we had made for them.
©ur first work was to stop
with clay all the holes in
the tree but one through
which the bees were wont
to go in to their nest. To
this I put the bowl of

53

a pipe, and blew in the
smoke of the weed as fast
as I could, with a view to
drug them with its fumes.
At first we heard a loud
buzz like the noise of a
SiOrim) aia om aout ome
more I blew my pipe the
less grew the sound, till at
last the bees were quite
stil) sand? then l (took seme
pipe out of the hole.

We now cut out a piece
of the trunk, three feet
square, and this gave us,a
full view of the nest. Our
joy was great to find such
a stock of wax, for I could
see the comb reach far up
the tree. I took some of
the comb, in which the
bees lay in swarms, and
put it by on the plank.
Me rest euveiniea Gasle
which my wife tied down
with sail cloth, lest the bees,
110

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



first we had seen since we
came to the isle, and no
one could tell when the
next might come. My wife
and I did not wish to
leave. I had a love for
the kind of life we led,
and we were both at an
age when ease and rest
should take the place of
toil. But then our sons
were young—not yet in the
prime of life—and I did
not think it right that we
should keep them from the
world. Jane, I could tell,
would not stay with us, nor

did she hide from us the

fact that her heart drew.

her to the dear one at
home, from whom she had
been kept so long. So I
told my wife that I would
ask my boys to choose
what they would do—to
stay with us on the isle, or

leave with Cap-tain Stone
in the ship.

Fritz and Jack said they
would not leave us; Ernest _
spoke not a word, but I
saw that he had made up
his mind to go. I did not
grieve at this, as I felt that
our isle was too small for
the scope of his mind, and
did not give him the means
to learn all he could wish.
I told him to speak out,
when he said he should
like to leave the place for
a few years, and he knew
Frank had a wish to go

with him.

I thought this would give
my wife pain, but she said
that the boys had made a
good choice, and that she
knew Ernest and Frank
would make their way in
the world.

Captain Stone gave Jane,
A SURPRISE.

felt that age would soon
creep on us, and we could
not help some doubts as
COMmiiteN tate: | O14) eu? sons:
Should we stay and end
_our days here, some one of
us would live out the rest,
and this thought came oft
to my mind, and brought
with it a sense of dread I
couldn not ioct rid von 1 /it
made me pray to God that
he would save us all from
so dire a fate as to die far
from the sound of the voice

89

of man, with no one to hear
our last words, or lay us in
the earth when He should
call us to our rest.

My wife did not share
this dread. “Why should

swe go. back?” she would

say. “We have here all
that we can wish for. The
boys lead a life of health,
free from sin, and live with .
us, which might not be the
case if we went out in the
world. Let us leave our

fate in the hands of God.”



CHAPTER XIV.

PomPeiritz 1, ange ernest
were now men, they were
of course free to go where
they chose, and to come
back when their will led

them home. Thus, from

time to time they took long
trips, and went far from
Rock House. They had
fine boats and strong steeds,
and of these they made
such good use that there
we saw a place where we
could land, which we were
not slow to do.

As soon as we had made
the raft fast with a strong
rope, we took out all our
wealth, and made a tent
with the old sail-cloth we
had brought with us, and
stuck a pole in the ground
to keep it up. This done,
I sent the boys to get some
moss and dry grass to make
our beds with. With the
flint and steel we soon set
fire to some dry twigs, and
my wife made a pot of soup
with what she had brought
from the ship.

Fritz, who had charge of
the guns, chose one, and
took a stroll by the side of
a stream, while Jack went
in search of shell fish, which
he thought he might find
on the rocks. My share

WE LAND SAFELY. 13

of the work was to save
two large casks which were
near the shore. Whilst I
was up to my knees in the
sea Laneardsalishimlnen
which I knew to come from
Jack. )paicoteout -ateonee,
took up an axe, and ran to
his help. I found him with
his legs in a rock pool,
where a large crab held
him by his toes. It soon
made off as I came near;
but I struck at it with the
axe, and brought it out of
the pool. Jack then took
it up, though it gave him a
pinch or two ere he found
out how to hold it, and ran
off in high glee to show
his dear Ma what he had
caught. ~

When I got back to the
tent, I found that Ernest
had brought us news that
he had seen salt in the
LAE DOVE POST

they went to the spot where
she had dwelt for so long,
and sought for what things
she had left when she came
to live with us.

All these were brought
to Rock House, and I may
tell you that Fritz set great
store by them. There were
all sorts of odd_ clothes,
which she had made of the
skin of the sea calf; fish
lines wrought out of the
hair of her head; pins
made from the bones of
fish; a lamp made out of
a shell, with a wick of
the threads which she had
drawn from herhose. There
were the shells she used _ to
cook her food in; a hat
made from the breast of
a large bird, the tail of
which she had spread out
so as to shade her neck
from the sun; belts, shoes,

Tor

and odd things of a like
kind.

My wife, who had nowa
friend of her own sex to
talk with, did not feel dull
when the boys left us for a
time, so they had leave to
roam where their wish led
them, and to stay as long
as they chose. In the
course of time they knew
the whole of the isle on
which we dwelt. Ernest
drew a map of it to scale,
so that we could trace their
course from place to place

with ease. When they
went for a long trip they
took some doves. with
them, and _ these © birds

brought us notes tied to
their wings from time to
time, so that we knew
where they were, and could
point out the spot on the
map.
106

set forth in print what I
then felt. Both Fritz and
I fell on our knees and
gave thanks to God that
He had thus led the ship
to our coast. If I had not
held him back, Fritz would
have gone into the sea with
a leap and swam off to the
ship.

LaStayy saiduby i ibhiave
are quite sure what they
are. There are bad men
on the seas who put up
false flags to lure ships out
of their couzse, and then
rob and kill the crew.”

We could now see all
that took place on board.
Two tents had been set up
on the shore, in front of
which was a fire; and we
could see that men went to
and fro with planks. There
were two men left on guard

on the deck of the ship,





THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

and to these we made signs.
When they saw us they
spoke to some one who
stood near, and whom we
thought had charge of the
ship. He then put his
glass up to his eye and
took a good view of us
through it.

We did not at first like
to go too near, but kept
our boat some way off.
Fritz said he could see that
the faces of the men were
not so dark as our own.

‘Glie-tinatiebearthewease.
said J, “we are safe, and
we may trust their flag.”

We both sang a Swiss
song, and then I cried out
at the top of my voice
these words: “Ship hoy!
good men!” But they
made no sign that they
heard us. Our song, our

| boat, and, more than all,
THE SECRET FOUND OUT. 95



had worn off that grace and
ease which is one of the
charms of well bred youth.
I saw that this made the
girl shy of them, and that
the garb she wore brought
eebluish i tombemiemeeks i!
bade my wife take charge
of her, and lead her down
to the boat, while the boys
and I stood a while to
speak of our fair guest.
When we got on board

we sat down to hear Fritz

tell how he came to find

Miss Jane, for that was her
real name; but he had not
‘told half his tale when we
saw my wife and her new
friend come up on deck.
Sitemedt|) had amsiielook,
but as soon as she saw
Fritz she held out her hand
to him with a smile, and
this made us feel- more at
our ease.

~The next day we were
to go back to our home,
and on the way Fritz was
to tell us what he knew of
Miss Jane, for his tale had
been cut short when she
came on the deck with my
Wiles sl EitembOyemaice all
they could to make her
feel at home with them,
andi) Dye) thew cnclmoumsllT:
day they were the best of
friends.

The next day we set sail
at sun rise; for we had far
to go, and the boys had a
strong wish to hear Fritz
tell his tale.

When the boat had made
a fair start, we all sat down
on the deck, with Jane in —
our midst, while Fritz told
his tale to the end.

Jane Rose was born in.
In-p1-a. She was the child

of one Cap-tain Rose, whose
100

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



the rain, the boys would
oft lay by their work, and
sit to hear Jane talk of
what she had seen in the
East, and Ernest and Fritz
would read to her by turns
such books as. she might
choose. I was glad to see
that this wrought a great
change in’ my sons, whose
mode of life had made
them rough in their ways
and loud «in their speech—
faults which we did not
think of so long as there
was no one to see or hear
them.

When the spring came,
the boys went in our boat
to the spot where they had
found Jane, which we now
knew by the name
“Jane's Isle,” and brought
back some beans, which
were new to them. These

On,

Jane told us'that they were
by no means scarce, but
that she had not made use
of them, as she knew no
way to roast or grind the
beans, which she found in
a green state. _

“Do you think,” said my
wife, “that the plant would
grow here?”

I then thought for the
first time how fond she
was of it. There had been
some bags on board the
ship, but I had not brought
them from the wreck; and
my wife had but once said
that she would like to see
the plant in our ground.
Now that we knew where
to get it, she told me that
it was one of the few things
that she felt the loss of.
When the boys heard this,

they set out on a trip to

we found to be Cor-rzez.| Jane's Isle, and while there
THE WHALE.

and when we could gaze
once more on the green
fields) We went out the
first fine day, and took a
long walk by the base of
the cliff’ On the shore we
found a dead whale, which
the sea had no doubt thrown
up in the storm. We had
long felt the need of oil;
for though we had a lamp,
we had naught but our wax
lights to put in it, and these
gave a poor light to read
by. The next day we cut
up the whale, and put the
flesh in tubs. It was far
from a clean job, for the oil
ran down our clothes and

made them smell; but as:

we could change them for
new ones, thanks to the
hemp and my wife's skill,
we did not mind that, for
the oil was now worth more
to us than our. clothes,

75

though at one time we
should not have thought so.

One day we all set out
on a tour to the Farm.
Jack and Frank had gone
on first, while my wife and
I were as yet close to the
Cave. iu Fagmonce )\ tic
boys came back, and Fritz
said: “ Look at that strange
thing on its way up the
path. What can it be?”

Iieast, my ‘eye |.on) ihe
spot, and cried out, “ Fly
all of you to the Cave! fly
for your lives!” for I saw
it was:a huge snake, or boa,
that would make a meal of
one of us, if we did not get
out of its way.

We all ran in doors, and
put bars up to the doors of
the Cave. A large dove
cote had been made on the
roof, and to this we got up
through a hole in the rock.
66

“No, no, but through

neaoek.

PA ty thisy \ bagitzaeere ty ult
loud laugh.

“Why not say through
the world at’ orice, and
push your crow bar in till
you reach Ev-roer, which,
istmest) says, (lies) )iny ina
straight line from our feet.
Pe chouldd likelitowharve)ia
peep down such a hole, for
I might thus get a sight of
our dear Swiss home.”

Fritz and I went up to
the wall and found that
Jack was right, for he had
come \to a Clearspace.» | MHis
first thought was to jump
foeebut as) 1 (knew? that
there might be foul air in

the cave, I would not let

him risk his life. |

The boys then set fire to
some dry grass, and thrust
it in the hole, but it went





. THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

out at once, which was a
sure sign that the air was
not fit to breathe.

t ikiew ))¢hateeacumcatl
brought from the wreck a
box full of fire works, which
were used on board to make
signs to ships far out at sea.
I sent Fritz to Tent House
for these, though I thought
that they might be too
datip (Ho! //imalke )iicemnon
When he came back, I set
light to some of them, and
threw them in) the “hole.
They flew round, and threw
out a stream of sparks that
Lita up ened cave: | U\Vivem
these were burnt out, we
put in a heap of straw and
threw, @ dehitionmiien el bis
was now soon in a blaze,
and gave us a clear view
of the cave; but it was too
deep for us to see the end.

Our joy was so great ~
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TE


The Tub-Raft, leaving the Ship.


go

was scarce a spot for leagues
round that was not well
known to them.

At one time, Fritz had
been so long from home
that we had a dread lest
he should have lost his
way, or fell a prey to wild
beasts. When he came
back he told us a long tale
of what.he had seen and
where he had been, and
how he had brought with
him birds, beasts, moths,
and such strange things as
he thought Ernest would
like to see. When he had
done, he drew me out into
our grounds and said he
had a strange thing to tell
me. Itseems that he found
a piece of white cloth tied
to the foot of a bird which
he had struck down with a
stick, on which were these
words: “Save a poor soul,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

who is on the rock from
which you may see the
smoke rise.”

He thought that this rock
could not be far off, and
that he ought to set off at
once in search of it.

“T have a thought,” said
he ER willl tea‘ piece or
cloth, like that I found, to
the leg of the bird, and on
it I will write, ‘Have faith
in God: help is near.” If
the bird goes back to the
place from whence it came,
our brief note may reach
the eye of the lone one on
the rock. At any rate, it
can do no harm, and may
do some good.”

He at once took the bird,
which was an AL-BA-TROSS,
tied the strip of cloth to
its foot, and let it go.

“And now,’ said he,

“tell me what you think of
64

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



was the spring of the year, |and what there was left of

when all things put forth
new life; and we knew
that the time was now come
when we could once more
range the woods and till
the soil, and this made the
boys leap for joy.

Some planks had been
blown off the roof of The
Nest, and the rain had got
me nete) and there; so our
first job was to mend our
house, and make it fit to
sleep in.

This done, Jack,
ance LM sebiout if0
House. We found it in
asad) stateui) ihe storm
had thrown down the tent,
blown off some of the sail
cloth, and let in the rain
on our casks, some of which

Heitz,
Tent

held a store of food. Our

boat was still safe, but the
raft of tubs had broke up,

it lay in splints on the shore.

Our loss in the storm
had been so great that I
felt we ought at once to
seek for some place on the
rocks where we could put
what was left.

We went all round the
cliffs, in the hope that we
might find a cave, but in
vain. ‘

“There is no way but to
hew one out of the rock,”
said ttizs! itor) wermast
not be beat.”

Nell saidhy bat? sara
Jack; “we have each an
axe.) Why not. try iis
cliff at once 2”

I gave them leave to try,
and we soon set to work at
the rock. From this spot
we had a good view of the
whole bay, and could see
both banks of the stream.
With that I went close
up to the tree, and saw a
large land crab on its way
down the trunk. Jack
struck a blow at him with
a stick, but did not hit the
beast. He then took off
his coat and threw it on
the crabs head, while I
made an end of him with
an axe. I told them that
these crabs climb the trees
and break off the nuts, as
we had seen, and then
come down to feast on
them at their ease.

“But how do they crack
the nuts?” said Jack.

Shey finale ma) witiole
through the shell at the
thin end, and then suck
them dry.”

The dead crab was put
in the sledge, and we went
on through the wood. The
wild plants which lay in

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

our path made us stop now
and then to clear the way
with an axe, so that we did
not get on fast and the
heat was so great that I
thought we should have
had to seek the shade of
thew next iilarce) tccemmae
could find. When we
came to the Gourd Wood,
we sat down to make some
more bowls and flasks to
take back with us. Ernest
had gone to try what new
thing he could find, but he

had not been from us long,

‘when we heard him call

out—

“A wild boar! A great
wild boar! Come here,
pray !”

We took up our guns,
and went at once with the.
dogs to the spot. We
soon heard Turk give a

loud bark, and a long deep
38 Pie SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



The next day Ernest and
Jack tried their skill with
the bow, and brought down
some small birds that came
to the great tree in quest
of figs. I gave them leave
to kill what they could;
for I knew that, if put in
casks made air tight with
grease, they would keep
Momearchetn of mime, and
might prove a boon, if our
stock of food should get
low.

When we sat down to
dine, the thought struck
me that it would be as
well to give some name to
each part of the strange
land that was now known
to us. “We can, then,”
said I, “speak. of a place
as we did when we were
at home, and not have to
say so much ere we can
tell the spot we mean.”

This was at first the source
of some fun, for Fritz said
we should call the bay
where we had found the
shell spoons by the name
of Spoon Bay; but Jack,
who still had a mark on
his toe where the crab
gave him a pinch, thought
we ought to term it Crab
Bay.

“Tf you will let me give
ity a fame, ‘said myavalics
“T should wish to know
it by some term that will
make us bear in mind how
good God was to us to
lead our raft there, and
L' done think Sate Bay,
will be a bad name for
it.”

“Somat it became
and from that time Safe
Bay had a name.

“What shall be the name

of the spot where we spent
A STRANGE STEED.

in a short time it took grain
from the hands of my wife,
and soon grew quite tame.
The boys now set to
work to break it in for use.
They taught it first to bear
them on its back. Then
they put a pair of string
reins in its mouth, and
made it turn which way
they chose to pull, and to
walk, or run, or stand still,
asvit wasebidan, UUs. 1nya
month from the time we
caught it, the boys made it
take them on its back to
and from the Farm or The
Nest, in less than half the
time an ox would go; so
that it came to be the best
steed we had to ride on.
The eggs we found in
the nest were put in a warm
dry place, and though we
scarce thought our care
would bring live birds out

83
of the shells, we had the
joy to hatch three of them,
and this led us to hope that
we should ere long have a
steed for each of our sons.

My work at this time was
by no means light. Our
hats and caps were all worn
out, and with skins of the
musk cat I had to make
new ones. The bears’ skins
were laid in the sun to dry,
and of these we made fur
coats, which would keep us
warm when the cold wet
nights came round, and
there were some left to serve
as quilts or rugs for our
beds.

I now tried my hand at
a new craft. I dug some
clay out of the bed of the
stream, and taught the boys
to knead it up with sand,
and some talc that had been
ground as fine as road drift.
58 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

While they were gone,
my wife, full of new life,
and with some show of
pride, told me how I should
make the loom by means
of which she was to clothe
us from head to foot. Ina
short time they came back,
and brought with them a
good load of the plant,
which they laid at her feet.
She now said she would
lay by all else till she had
tried what she could make
of it. The first thing to be
done was to steep the flax.
To do this we took the
plant down to the marsh,
tied up in small bales, as
they pack hemp for sale.
The leaves were then
spread out in ‘the pond,
and kept down with stones,
and left there in that state
till it was time to take them
out and set them in the sun

to dry, when they would
be so soft that we could
peel them with ease. It
was two weeks ere the flax
was fit for us to take it out
of the marsh. We spread
it out on the grass in the
sun, where it dried so quick
that we took it home to
The Nest the same day.
It was then put by till we
could find time to make the
wheels, reels, and combs
which my wife said that
she would want to turn our
new found plant to its best
use. |

We now made haste to
lay (upasstore Lot Veamec:
nuts, wood, and such things
as we thought we might
want; and took care, while
it was still fine, to sow

wheat, and all the grain we

had left in our bags was
soon put in the ground.
12

guide the Word of God.
They then knelt down for
me to bless them, and went
tomethiein!) beder in Nock
House for the last time.

I got no sleep all that
night, nor did the two
boys, who were to start
the next day.

As Ernest takes this
Tale with him—which I
give him leave to print,
that all may know how
good God has been to
us—I have no time to add
more than a few words.

The ship that is to take
from us our two sons and
our fair guest will sail from

THE

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

this coast in a few hours,
and by the close of the
day three who are dear to
us will have gone from
our midst. I can not put
down what I feel, or tell
the grief of my poor wife.

I add these lines while
the boat waits for my sons.
May God grant them health -
and strength for the trials
they may have to pass
through; may they gain
the love of those with
whom they are now to
dwell; and may they keep
free from taint the good
name of the Swiss Family
Robinson.

END.
24
plates, which my wife said
she should prize more than
if they were made of pure
gold.

“We can at least eat out
Olitheme seaidieeis anc
they were gold we could
do no more.”

That night the ape went
to bed with Jack and Fritz,
and we all slept in peace
till the cocks on the roof of
the tent woke us up.

INeximeayoritzearich) E
went back to the wreck to
save the live stock, and get
what else we had left that
might be of use to us. We
found it no light task, for
we had to make floats for
the cow, the ass, the sheep,
and the goats, throw them
in the sea, and tie them
with ropes to our raft. For
the sow we did the same,

though she soon broke

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

loose; but we were glad
to see the tide float her
straight to the shore. We
put on board the raft a
vast deal of food that had
not been spoilt by the sea,
though the waves had made
a breach in the sides of the
wreck. We then put to
sea with our train of live
stock made fast to the stern,
and drew them like a flock
of huge ducks in the water.

We had not gone far
when I heard a loud cry of
fear from Fritz, “We are
lost! We are lost ! See what
a great shark is on its way
to us!”

Though pale with fright,
he took aim with his gun,
and shot the fish in the
head. It sank at once, but
left a track of blood in the
sea, which I knew to bea
sign that we were once
NEW FACES AT ROCK HOUSE.

I then made the crew a
gift of what we had brought
inMeOlomnOat, \ainal satan te
Cap-tain Stone, for that
wast nistname=s ©) whope,
sir, that you will now go
with me to Rock House,
the place where we live, and
where you will see Miss
Rose, who will be glad to
hear some news of home.”

“To be suré I will, and
thank you much,” said he;
“and I have no doubt that
Mr. West would like to go
with us.” This Mr. West
was on his way, with his
wife and two girls, to New
South Wales, where he
meant to build a house
and clear a piece of land.

We all three then left
the ship in our boat, and
as. we came in sight of
Shark Isle, Jack, who was
on the fort, fired his guns.

LOQ

When we came to the
beach, my wife and the
rest were there to meet us.
Jane was half wild with
joy when she heard that
Cap-tain Stone had brought
her good news from home.

We led them round our
house and through the
grounds, and Mr. West
took note of all he saw.
When we came to talk, I
found that he had made up
his mind to stay with us.
I need not say how glad |
was to hear this, for he
had brought out with him
a large stock of farm tools,
of which we had long been ©
in want.

The boys were of course
in high glee at all this, but
I did not share their joy
so much as I could wish.
The ship which now lay
close to our shore was the
THE FLAX PLANT. 57

CRAP a Pain.

Frank one day found
some long leaves, to which,
from their shape, he gave
the name of sword leaves.
These he brought home to
play with, and then, when
he grew tired of them,
threw them down. As
they lay on the floor, Fritz
took some of them in his
hand, and found them so
limp; that he said he could
plait them, and make a
whip for Frank to drive
the sheep and goats with.
As he split them up to do
this, 1 could not but note
their strength. This led
me to try them, and I found
that we had now a kind
of flax plant, which was a
source of great joy to my
wife.

“You have not yet found
aljinine, (ismersaid,, “they
will be of more use to us
than this. Go at once and
search for some more of
these leaves, and bring me
the most you can of them.
With these I can make you
hose, shirts, clothes, thread,
rope; in short, give me
flax, and make me a loom
and some frames, and I
shall be at no loss for work
when the rain comes.”

I could not help a smile
at my wife's joy when she
heard the name of flax;
for there was still much to
do ere the leaves could take
the shape of cloth. But two
of the boys set off at once
to try to find some more of
the flax.
we saw a place where we
could land, which we were
not slow to do.

As soon as we had made
the raft fast with a strong
rope, we took out all our
wealth, and made a tent
with the old sail-cloth we
had brought with us, and
stuck a pole in the ground
to keep it up. This done,
I sent the boys to get some
moss and dry grass to make
our beds with. With the
flint and steel we soon set
fire to some dry twigs, and
my wife made a pot of soup
with what she had brought
from the ship.

Fritz, who had charge of
the guns, chose one, and
took a stroll by the side of
a stream, while Jack went
in search of shell fish, which
he thought he might find
on the rocks. My share

WE LAND SAFELY. 13

of the work was to save
two large casks which were
near the shore. Whilst I
was up to my knees in the
sea Laneardsalishimlnen
which I knew to come from
Jack. )paicoteout -ateonee,
took up an axe, and ran to
his help. I found him with
his legs in a rock pool,
where a large crab held
him by his toes. It soon
made off as I came near;
but I struck at it with the
axe, and brought it out of
the pool. Jack then took
it up, though it gave him a
pinch or two ere he found
out how to hold it, and ran
off in high glee to show
his dear Ma what he had
caught. ~

When I got back to the
tent, I found that Ernest
had brought us news that
he had seen salt in the
LIFE IN A BARN. 61

gave us a chill, and might

have laid us up if my wife
had not made cloth capes
and hoods for us to wear.
To make these rain proof,
I spread some of the gum
on them while hot, and this,
when dry, had the look of
oil cloth, and kept the head,
arms, chest, and back free
from damp. Our gum
boots came far up our legs,
so that we could go out
in the rain and come back
quite free from cold and
damp.

We made but few fires,
for the air was not cold,
save for an hour or two
late at night, and we did
not cook more than we
could help, but ate the
_ dried meat, fowls, and fish
we lrad by us.

The care of our beasts
took us a great part of the



day; then we made ours
cakes and set them to bake |
inva din) plate on Palen
fire. I had cut a hole in
the wall to give us light,
gnc put yavipaie Ol! ielace
in: it to keep eut the wind,
but the thick clouds hid
the sun from the earth, and
the shade of the tree threw
a gloom round our barn,
so that our day light was
but short, and night came
on far too soon. We then
made use of our wax lights,
and all sat round a bench.
My wife had as much as
she could well do to mend
the rents we made in our
clothes. I kept a log, in
which I put down, day by
day, what we did and what
we had seen; and then
Ernest wrote this out in a
neat clear hand, and made
a book of it, Fritz’ and
8 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

“Tf we could but find
some cook,” said Fritz to
me in a low tone, “we
might make floats. You
and I will not need them,
for we can swim, but the
rest will want some such
means to keep them up, and
then we can help them to
reach the land.”

“A good thought,” said
[Pee ctsuceery titthie migiat
to find what things there
are in the ship that we can
thus make use of.”

We soon found some
casks and ropes, and with
these we made a kind of
float for each of the three
boys, and then my wife
made one for her own use.
This done, we got some
knives, string, and such
things as we could make
fast to our belts. We did
not fail to look for and find

a flint and steel, and the
box in which the burnt
rags were kept, for these
were at that time in use as
the means to strike a light.

Fritz, who was now well
nigh worn out, laid down
on his bed, and ‘slept like
the rest. As for me and
my poor wife, we kept
watch, each in fear lest the
next wave should lift the
ship off the rock and break
it ups, Wesspent parton
the night in thought as to
our plans for the next day,
and sought God to bless
the means we had in view
to save our lives. —

I need not tell you how
glad we were when we saw
the first gleam of light shine
through the chink of the
door that shut us in from
the cold night air. At
dawn the wind did not
A HALF WAY HOUSE.

We did not get back till
late in the day. Jack and
Fritz, whom we met just
as we came round the foot
of the hill, had done their
task well, for they had a
good stock of food in a
sack that lay on the back
of the ass, and they brought
the good news that all was
well at home.

We spent four more days
at the Farm, and then left
ie inesticl a stateias: to. be
fit for our use when we
chose to go back to it.

ite
but a part of our plan, for
we had made up our minds
to build a sort of half way
house, or cot, in which we
could rest on our way to
the Farm. This took us
six days to do. The spot
we chose lay by the side of
a brook, and was just such



Farm House was’

73

a place as would tempt one
forpstop dnd) | resumen
shade of the trees that grew
on the bank. While at the
brook, I made a boat out
of the tree we found at the
Pam ancmetagie wit. bac
with us to Tent House in
the cart.

We had still two months
ere the rain would set in,
and this left us time to put
the last touch to our cave.
We laid the whole floor
with clay, and spread on it
some fine sand, which we
beat down till it was quite
smooth and firm. On this
we put sail cloth, and threw
down goats’ hair and wool
made moistwith gum. This
was well beat, and, when
dry, made a kind of felt
mat that was warm and soft
to tread on, and would keep
the damp from our feet.
SPRING TIME. 63



but would take a long while
to do. By this time the
boys were all well used
to hard work, and_ they
thought they would much
like to try their skill at
some new kind of work.

“Well,” said I, “we will
go to the rocks round Tent
House the first fine day
that comes, and try to find
some place that will serve
to keep us from the next
year's storms.”



CEPA Te RX,

I can not tell how glad
we all were when we. at
last saw a change in the
sky, and felt once more the
warm rays of the sun. In
a few days the floods sank
in the earth, and left the
ground of a bright green
hue; the air grew warm
and dry, and there were no
more dark clouds to be
seen in the sky.

We found our young
trees had put forth new

leaves, and the seed we
had sown had come up
through the moist ground.
The air had a fresh sweet
smell, for it bore the scent
of the bloom which hung
like snow flakes on the
boughs of the fruit trees;
the songs and cries of the
birds were to be heard on
all sides, and we could see
them fly from tree to tree
in search of twigs to build
their nests. This in fact
6 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to do; but, if this is to be
our last hour, let us bow to
His will—we shall at least
all go down side by side.”

My dear wife could not
hide the tears that fell down
her cheeks as I thus’ spoke
to my sons, but she was
calm, and knelt down to
pray, while the boys clung
round her as if they thought
she could help them.

Just then we heard a cry
Gre leand) Vland) steltva
shock, and were thrown
down upon the deck.’ It
was clear that we had struck
on a rock, for we heard a
loud cry from one of the
men, “We are lost! Launch
the boat; try for your lives!”
These words went, as it
were, through my heart like
a knife; but, as I felt that
I ought to cheer my sons,
I said to them, “Now is

the time to show that we
are brave; we still have
life, the land is near, and we
know that God helps those

who trust in him. Keep

up your hearts, then, while

I go and see if there be not
some hope yet left for us.”

I went at once on deck,
and was met by a wave
that threw me down, and
wet me through to the skin.
When I got up, and went
to the side of the ship, I
found that all the boats had ©
been let down, and that
the last of the crew had just
left it. I cried out for the
men to come back and take
us with them, but it was in
vain, for the sound of my
voice did not reach them
through the roar of the
waves.

I then thought that our
last chance was gone. Still,
14 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



chinks of the rocks, and
that shell fish were not
scarce.

“Then why have you
not brought some with
Doles siceilue bain

“To get at them,” said
he, “I should have had to
wet my feet.”

“Well, my boy, if you
are sure you saw them, I
will ask you to go back for
some. We must each do
some work for the good of
all; and as for your feet,
the sun will dry them as
you walk back.”

He went, and soon found
the salt, left by the sea on
the rocks, which the sun
had made quite dry. There
was some sand with it, and
this I said would spoil our
soup; but my wife did not
take long to find a way to
cure that. She had been

to a fresh stream with a
large jug; from this I saw
her pour some on the salt,
strain it through a cloth,
and let it drip in a cup, so
that all the sand was left on
the cloth.

When the soup was made
hot we had each a taste, and
all said that it was good:

“ Benot in too great haste,”
said my wife, “we must
wait for Fritz; but if he
were here, I do not see how
we are to take our soup,
for we have no plates nor
spoons; we can't lift this
huge pot to our mouths and
sup from it.”

“If we had but. some
large nuts,” said Ernest,
“we might cut them in half,
and they would make good
bowls.”

“Quite true,” said I ; “but
as there are none, we may
A FIGHT WITH BEARS. 79

the bears gave a loud growl,
and then, with a low moan,
fell dead at our feet.

As it was now time to
go back, we put the. bears
in the cave, but took care
to cut off their paws, which
form a dish fit to grace the
feast Ol arieiivot

We had a long walk
back to the place where
I had left my wife. The
boys told her what a hard
fight the dogs had with the
bears, and how Fritz and
I had shot them, and then
gave her the paws. With
the aid of Frank she had

fed our live stock and



brought in wood to make
tip) oun watch ire tomuahie
night, so we sat down to
sup at once, and then went
tOshest:

Next day we put. our
beasts to the cart and drove
asiitar tasy the beats ) dem
As we came near to the
spot a flock of birds flew
out of the mouth of the
cave, two or three of which
Fritz brought down with
his gun. It took us the
whole day to cut up the
bears. The hams were laid
by to be smoke dried;
while my wife took charge
of the fat and the skins.
18

a good meal. That done,
Fritz and I got our guns.
I put a pair of small arms
in his belt, gave him a game
bag,.and told him to take
an axe. I took some food
for us both, and a full flask,
out of which we could drink
if we should stray far from
astream. Fritz was now in
haste to be off, but Ernest
said that there was one
thing still left to do ere we
could start.

« And what is that ?” said
Fritz.

“We have yet to bray
to God,” said Ernest.

“That is right, my dear
boy,” said I. “We are all
too apt to think less than
we ought of what God tells
us to do, and you know that
he tells us to pray to Him
day by day.”

When we took our*leave,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

my wife and the three boys

were intears. The dog Bill

we left to guard the tent, but
Turk went with us, and ran
by our side. |

We soon got to the banks:
of a stream; but then had
to make our way down its
course through the tall, rank
grass. It took us some
time to reach the sea shore.
There was not a boat to be
seen, or any sign that the
ship’s crew had found the
land. We left the shore,
and went through a wood
full of tall trees. Here

Fritz struck some _ hard
thing on the ground with

his foot, which we found
fon beman @o-cosan Ui ante
gave it a blow with his axe,
and broke the shell, and we
both sat down to rest, and
eat the nut. We drank the
milk to quench our thirst,
102)

I will not dwell on what
took place now for some
time, for I find that each
year was very much like
the last. We had our fields
to sow, our crops to reap,
our beasts to feed and
train; and these cares kept
our hands at work, and our



THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

minds free from the least
thought of our lone mode
of life.

I turn to my log as I
write this, and on each page
my eye falls on some thing
that brings back to my
mind the glad time we
spent at Rock House.



CHAPTER XV.

In the spring time of the
year, when the rain was
past, Fritz and Jack set off
on a trip in their boat to
Shark Isle. The day was
fine, the sky clear, and there
was no wind, yet the waves
rose and fell as in a storm.

“See!” cried Jack, “here
comes a shoal of whales.
They will eat us up.”

“There is no fear of that,”



said Fritz; “whales will do
us no harm, if we do not
touch them.” This proved
to be the case. Though
any one of them might have
broke up the boat with a
stroke of its tail, they did
not touch it, but swam by
in a line, two by two, like
a file of troops.

On Shark Isle, near the

shore, we had thrown up a
THE FLAMINGO. ; 31



CA EL

Tue meal at an end, my
first thought was to make
some steps by means of
which we could reach the
first strong branch of the
mee One hanantrrot ite
root which rose high up
out of the earth, so as to
form an arch some six feet
from the ground, we laid a
large piece of sail cloth,
and this kept off both the
dew and the flies. Ernest
and I then went in search
of some thick canes that
grew in the sands hard by.

These we cut down, and,.

with the aid of some strong
string, we bound them to
four long poles, and thus
made a pair of steps that
would, we thought, reach
far up the trunk.

On our way back from
the sands, one of the dogs
made a dart at a clump
Oly reeds, wancheetitnOomy ait
large birds rose on the
wing with a loud noise.
Fritz let fly at them, and
brought down two at a
shot. One of them fell
quite dead, but its mate,
though hurt in the wing,
made use of its long legs
so well, that it would have
Cou Ol Mime had) net
held it till we came up.
The joy of Fritz, to have
caught such a strange bird,
was so great that he would
have us at once bind it
by the neck and take it
back with us. “Look,” said
Ernest, “what fine plumes
he has, and you see he has
32 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

web feet like a goose, and
has long legs like a stork:
thus he can run on land
as fast as he can swim.”
soViGs, i Sdtelenlieecdanich ene
can fly with more speed
through the air, for these
birds have great strength
in their wings. In fact,
few birds have such means
of flight as the Fia-mty-co.”

Loud were the cries of
Jack and Frank when we
calle aiemstonbs |) out. imy
wife thought the great bird
might need more food than
we could spare. I told
her that it would feed on
small fish and worms, and
not rob our geese of their
grain. I then tied him to
a stake near the stream by
a cord that left him room
LOulis ue aienicneace) anicein
a few days we were glad
to find that he knew us,

and would come at a call,
like a tame bird.

While I sat on the grass
with my sons, late in the
day, I thought I would try
to make a bow that might
be of some use to kill
birds, and thus save our
shot. This I did with a
long cane and a piece of
string, and then made a
dart with a sharp point,
which I shot off and found
it would go straight. The
branch of the tree on which
we were to fix our hut
was so high that our steps
would not near reach it.
“What shall we do now?”
said 4d ritze WV alge and
you shall see, my lad.”
I then tied some strong
thread to the dart, and
shot it over the branch;
then tied a piece of rope
to the, end of the, thread,
THE RAINY SEASON.

The fear that the rain might
come and put a stop to our
work led us to take our
meals in haste, and to make
the days as long as we
could see. We knew that
the rain was close at hand,
for the nights were cold;
large clouds could be seen
in the sky, and the wind
blew as we had not felt
it since the night our ship
struck on the rock. |

The great change came
at last. One night we were
woke up out of our sleep
‘with the noise made by the
rush of the winds through
the woods, and we could
hear the loud roar of the
sea far off. Then the dense
storm clouds which we had
seen in the sky burst on us,
and the rain came down in
floods. The streams, pools,
and ponds on all sides were

59

soon full, and the whole
plain round us met our
view as one vast lake. By
good luck, the site of our
house stood up out of the
flood, and our group of
trees had the look of a
small isle in the midst of
the lake. |

We soon found that The
Nest was not built so well
as we thought, for the rain
came in at the sides, and
we had good cause to fear
that the wind would blow
the roof off. Once the
storm made such a rush at
it, that we heard the beams
creak, and the planks gave
signs that there was more

istrain on them than they

could bear. This dtove us
from our room to the stairs
in the trunk, on which we
sat in a state of fear till
the worst of the storm was
WE TREAD OUT OUR CORN. 85

Jack and Fritz were soon
on the backs of their steeds,
and thought it fine fun to
make them course round
the floor and tread out the
grain. Ernest and I had
each a long fork, with which
we threw the corn at their
feet, so that all of it might
be trod on. The ox on
which Jack sat put down
his head and took a bunch
of the ears in his mouth.

“Come,” said Jack, “it
is not put there for you to
eat, off you go!” and with
that he gave it a lash with
his whip.

“Nay,” said I, “do you
not know what God has
said’ in his Word ?—We
must not bind up the mouth
of the ox that treads out
the corn. This brings to
my mind the fact that the
means we now take to

thresh our wheat were those
used by the Jews in the
days of old.”

To sort the chaff from
the grain we threw it up
with our spades while the
land or sea breeze blew
strong. The draught which
came in at the door took
the light chaff with it to
one side of the room, while
the grain fell straight to the
ground by its own weight.

The maize we left to dry
in the sun, and then beat
out the grain with long:
skin thongs. By this means
we got a store of the soft

‘leaves of this plant, which

my wife made use of to
stuff our beds.
When all the grain had

been put in our store room,

some in sacks and the rest
in dry casks, we took a
walk one day to our fields,
10

beardmancows, alt acsenwio
goats esix Sheep, a Tame
pig, and a sow, and I have
found food for them.all.”

“ All that you bring will
ber oluse, caideles “but |
fear that Jack’s dogs will do
us more harm than good.”

ie Noumea ialte scar: aiaelks
in his pert way, for they
can help us to hunt when
we get to land.”

“Well said, Jack. And
now let us see what we can
do that will aid us to get
there.”

We then took the casks
that we had found, and as
both Ernest and I could
use the saw, we soon cut
them in half. With these

tubs, which were bound

round with strong hoops,

we made a kind of raft,
though it was no slight
jack: = hee tubs e in tact

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

were a fleet of eight small
round boats, made so fast
to some planks that no one
of them could float from
the rest. When we had
done this, we sat down to
a good meal, which we ate
with great zest, for we now
felt that we had done our
best to earn it.

hichmext) tie wior sinc
done was to launch the raft..
This we at length did, and
when the boys saw it slide
down the side of the ship
and float on the sea, they
gave a loud shout, and each
one tried who should be
the #iiretestomact OnmiGamen
miaeen iutase ten tnems min
and there left it.
- It was late ere our work
was thus far brought to
an end; and, as we had to
spend at least one night
more on the wreck, I told
34 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



made the boys tired, and
they were soon in a sound
sleep, but my wife and I
took it in turns to watch
through the whole night
long. |

We were all out of our
beds as soon as light was
in the sky, and set to work
to hoist up the planks that
were to form the floor of
our ‘hut. These we laid
down on the branch, with
their ends made fast to a
cross piece of wood that
we had to fix to the trunk
Ounce w tree, )) Cur) (nails
were long, and we drove
each one of them home, so
that we had no cause to
fear the strength of our
work. Some parts were

rough, but we. took care
to make our floor quite
smooth, and put up a large

sail cloth to serve for a

roof till we had time to
make one of wood. By
the time we had done this
the day was far spent, and
we Wete alli welad to, lang
by our tools and rest our
limbs. That night we lit
our fires round the tree,
tied the dogs to the roots,
and went up to sleep out
of harm's way for the first
time weiice we “leit tie
ship. When the steps were
drawn up we all felt that
we were now safe at last,
and that we had brought
the toils of the day to a
good end. |
WE TREAD OUT OUR CORN. 85

Jack and Fritz were soon
on the backs of their steeds,
and thought it fine fun to
make them course round
the floor and tread out the
grain. Ernest and I had
each a long fork, with which
we threw the corn at their
feet, so that all of it might
be trod on. The ox on
which Jack sat put down
his head and took a bunch
of the ears in his mouth.

“Come,” said Jack, “it
is not put there for you to
eat, off you go!” and with
that he gave it a lash with
his whip.

“Nay,” said I, “do you
not know what God has
said’ in his Word ?—We
must not bind up the mouth
of the ox that treads out
the corn. This brings to
my mind the fact that the
means we now take to

thresh our wheat were those
used by the Jews in the
days of old.”

To sort the chaff from
the grain we threw it up
with our spades while the
land or sea breeze blew
strong. The draught which
came in at the door took
the light chaff with it to
one side of the room, while
the grain fell straight to the
ground by its own weight.

The maize we left to dry
in the sun, and then beat
out the grain with long:
skin thongs. By this means
we got a store of the soft

‘leaves of this plant, which

my wife made use of to
stuff our beds.
When all the grain had

been put in our store room,

some in sacks and the rest
in dry casks, we took a
walk one day to our fields,
98 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to us as to the young: friend | feast of our best food—fish,
who now sat in our midst. | fowls, and fruit, and some

When Fritz had told us| of my wife’s choice jam—
this, and much more, we} whilst our burnt clay plate
came in sight of Safe Bay.}|made a great show on the
He then took Ernest with|board, for it was set out
him in his small boat, and! with some taste. We had
|z, wish to show Jane that,
as fast as he could to Rock | though the coast was a wild
House, so as to make the!kind of place, still there
place look neat by the time | were means to make life a
we brought home our guest. , joy to those who dwelt on
The two boys—for to usiit, if they chose to use
they were still boys—met! them, As for Jane, the





us on the beach.
with a look of pride, gave
his hand torupane,aneial
could see a slight blush
rise to her cheek as she
gave him hers. He then
led her up the path, on
each side of which grew a
row of young trees, and
took her to a seat in our
grounds. There he and
Ernest had spread out a

Fritz, | sight of our home, the style
iof our feast, and the kind

words of the boys, were
things so new to her, that
she knew not what to say.

“1 shall stella nemmonre
than truth,” she said, “ when
I say that what you have
shown me is of far more
worth than all the wealth
I have seen in the East,
and that I feel more joy

it
‘ov
74 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

By the time these works
were done our cave was in
a fit state for us to dwell in.
We did not now dread the
rain, for we were safe out
of its reach, and there was
no need that we should go
out init. We had a warm
‘light shop to work in by
day, a snug place. where
we could take our meals,
and dry bed rooms in which
we could sleep in peace.
Our live stock we kept in
a shed at the back of the
cave, and our store room
held all that we could want.

When the rain at length
set in, we all had some task
that kept us close at work
in the cave, My wife took
her wheel or her loom, both
of which I had: made for
her, for this kind of work
fell to her share from choice.

By the help of the wheels

‘who





of one of the ship's guns I
had made a lathe, and with
this I could turn legs for
stools and chairs. Ernest,
too, was fond of the lathe,
and soon learnt to do such
work quite as well as I.

At dusk, when we had
done our work for the day,
we brought out our stock
of books, and sat down to
read by the light of a lamp.

At times, Jack and Frank
would play a tune on their
flutes, which I had made
out of reeds; and my wife,
had a sweet voice,
would sing some of the old
Swiss songs, that brought
to our minds the joys of
home.

Though we were by no
means dull, nor in want of
work to fill up our time, we
were glad when the time
came for the rain to cease,
36 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

will and kept His laws
should go to the Land of
Light and Truth. He gave
to His Son the right to
rule the host that dwelt in
the Home of Earth, and
set forth to them what they
were to do, and all the ills
that would come to them
if they did not do as they
were bid. The Prince told
them that ships would be
sent from time to time to
bring off such as did His
will, and take them to the
Land of Light.

“At first they were all
glad to hear the way in
which they were to live,
and the terms on which
they could ‘reach the Land
of Light and Truth. Sad
to tell, they soon broke the
King’s laws, and paid no
heed to what they knew
fo be His will; each, in

fact, did as he chose, and
thought more of his ease,
sloth, or self will, than of
the Place of Rest or the
Land of Light. Still there ©
were a few who did as
they had been taught, and
dwelt in peace, in the hope
that they would please the
King and at last reach the
place where He held his
court.

“The King was true to
his word. From time to
time ships came to the
Home of Earth, and each
bore the name of some
dire evil. . At last a great
ship was sent, the name
of which was Zhe Grave,
which bore the flag of
Death. The flag was of
green and black. To the
good it was a sign of hope,
but the bad were thrown
by the sight of it into
THE SAGO TREE.

made flasks of this gum,
in which form it is sent
to all parts of the world.
“And I do not see why
we should not make boots
imei the sesame way.
hye have! butitovmlllarsock
with sand, then put gum
ally rounds it. swhile inva
soft state, till it is as thick
as we need, then pour the
sand out, and we _ shall
have made a shoe or a
boot that will at least keep
out the damp, and that is
more than mine do just
now. |

Fritz now gave full play
comic (Oy. marl ehave | not
done a bad day's work,”
said he, “to have found
such a tree as this.”

Not far from this we
came to a bush, the leaves
of which were strewn with
a white dust; and close

by were two or three more
in the same state. I cut a
slit in the trunk of one of
these, which had been torn
up by the wind, and found
it full of the white dust,
which I knew by the taste
to be Sa-co. We took all
of this that we could get
out of the tree, for it would
add to our stock of food;
and when our bags were
full we laid them on the
back of the ass, and set
off to find our way back
to The Nest. »

“Each day brings us
fresh wealth,” said my wife,
when she saw what we
had brought her; “but
think we might now try to
add to our goods.” I knew
that she had some fear lest ,
we should one day get lost
in the woods, or meet with
wild beasts, so I at once
A NEW TASK. 3 5

with us, and put them in
the ground where they
thought they would grow
best. The vines were put
round the roots of our
tree, in the hope that they
would grow up the trunk.
On each side of the path
that led. from The Nest to
the Boys Bridge they put
a row of young nut trees,
which would, as they grew
up, shade us from the sun
all the way to the stream.
To make the path hard we
laid down sand from the
sea shore, and then beat
it down with our spades.
We were for six weeks
at this and such like work.
Each day brought with it
health and strength for us
all, and we were loth to
spare any pains to make
The Nest, and all that

could be seen near it, look

neat and trim, though there
were no eyes but our own
to view the scene.

One day I told my sons
that I would at last try
to make a flight of stairs
in place of the cane steps
with rope sides, which were
a source of fear to my
wife, and, to tell the truth,
the worst part of our house.
As yet we had not used
them much, for we came
down as soon as we got
out of bed, and did not go
up till it was time for rest;
but the rain would some
day force us to keep in
The Nest, and then we
should like to go up and
down stairs with more ease
than we could now climb
the rude steps. To make
a flight of stairs of such
great length was no slight
task, and each time that T
DEATH OF THE EAGLE. g!

this. If we should find a
new friend, what a source
of joy it will be. Will you
join me in the search ?”

- “To be sure I will,” said
I; “and so shall the rest;
but we will not yet tell
them of this.”

They were all glad to
Ntakew-a trip im: the large
boat, but they could not
make out why we went in
such haste.

jinetiacttisuicaid Jack,
“Fritz has found some
queer thing on the coast
that he can’t bring home,
and wants us to see it.
But I dare say we shall
know what it all means in
good time.”

Fritz was our guide, and
went first in his bark boat,
or Ca-noz. In this he could
go round the rocks and
shoals that girt the coast,

which would not have been
safe for the large boat. He
went up all the small creeks
we met with on the way,
and kept a sharp look out
for the smoke by which he
would know the rock we
came out to find.

I must tell you that once
when he came to these
parts with Ernest he met
with a Ti-cer, and would
have lost his life had it not
been for his pet the Ea-gle.
The brave bird, to save
Fritz from the beast, made
a swoop down on its: head.
Fritz thus got off with a
scratch or two, but the poor
bird was struck dead by a
blow from the paw of its foe.
This was a sad loss to Fritz,
for his pet had been a kind
friend, and would go with
him at all times when he
went far from home.

THE WAX TREE.

47

CEUAE PER x,

TuErRE was to be seen so
much that was new to us,
and so much to be found
that we could make good
mec of, Maem niz) andi.
spent the whole of the next
day in the woods. We
took the ass and one of
the dogs with us, but left
all else at home.

Our way first lay through
a dense wood, where we
saw no end of small birds,
but such game could not
now tempt Fritz to waste
his shot. We then had to
wonosc a vast plata and, to
wade through the high
grass, which we did with
care, lest we should tread
on some strange thing that
might turn and bite us.

Wercame at laste toa

grove of small trees, and
in their midst. |). sawegae
bush, which I knew to be
the wax tree, for the wax
grew on it like white beads.
I need not say how glad
I was to find so great a
prize. We had up to this
time gone to bed ‘as soon
as the sun went down, for
we had no lamp to use;
but as we could now make
Wax) (Hahtswelymeol | Enity
that we had found what
would add two or three
hours per day to our lives.
We took as much of the
wax as would serve us for
some time, and then made
our way out of the grove.
Fritz here found a nest, in ©
which was a young green

and gold bird. This he
3
(ox
3
=,
an
Ss
3
n
5S)
Ss
cS
N
yy
os
be


94

and made our bark safe.
We all got out, and ran up
the banks, led by the marks
that Fritz had made in the
soil with his feet. We soon
found a path that led toa
clump of trees, and there
saw a hut, with a fire in
front, from which rose a
stream of smoke.

As we drew near I could

see that the boys did not

know what to make of it,
for they gave me a stare,
as if to ask what they were
to see next. They did not
know how to give vent to
their joy when they saw
Fritz come out of the hut
with a strange youth, whose
slight make, fair face, and
~ grace of form, did not seem
to match well with the
clothes that hung upon his
limbs.

It was so long since we

THE SWISS FAMILY. ROBINSON.

had seen a strange face,
that we were all loth to
speak first. When I could
gain my speech I took our
new friend by the hand,
and told her in words as
kind as I could call to my
aid, how glad we were to
| have thus found her.

Fritz, when he _ bade
Ernest and Jack shake
hands with her, spoke of
our new friend as James;
but she could not hide her
sex from my wife, for her
first act was to fall on
her breast and weep. The
boys were not slow to see
through the trick, and
made Fritz tell them that
“James” was ‘not the name
they should call her by.

I could not but note that
our strange mode of life
had made my sons’ rough,
and that years of rude toil
18

a good meal. That done,
Fritz and I got our guns.
I put a pair of small arms
in his belt, gave him a game
bag,.and told him to take
an axe. I took some food
for us both, and a full flask,
out of which we could drink
if we should stray far from
astream. Fritz was now in
haste to be off, but Ernest
said that there was one
thing still left to do ere we
could start.

« And what is that ?” said
Fritz.

“We have yet to bray
to God,” said Ernest.

“That is right, my dear
boy,” said I. “We are all
too apt to think less than
we ought of what God tells
us to do, and you know that
he tells us to pray to Him
day by day.”

When we took our*leave,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

my wife and the three boys

were intears. The dog Bill

we left to guard the tent, but
Turk went with us, and ran
by our side. |

We soon got to the banks:
of a stream; but then had
to make our way down its
course through the tall, rank
grass. It took us some
time to reach the sea shore.
There was not a boat to be
seen, or any sign that the
ship’s crew had found the
land. We left the shore,
and went through a wood
full of tall trees. Here

Fritz struck some _ hard
thing on the ground with

his foot, which we found
fon beman @o-cosan Ui ante
gave it a blow with his axe,
and broke the shell, and we
both sat down to rest, and
eat the nut. We drank the
milk to quench our thirst,
24
plates, which my wife said
she should prize more than
if they were made of pure
gold.

“We can at least eat out
Olitheme seaidieeis anc
they were gold we could
do no more.”

That night the ape went
to bed with Jack and Fritz,
and we all slept in peace
till the cocks on the roof of
the tent woke us up.

INeximeayoritzearich) E
went back to the wreck to
save the live stock, and get
what else we had left that
might be of use to us. We
found it no light task, for
we had to make floats for
the cow, the ass, the sheep,
and the goats, throw them
in the sea, and tie them
with ropes to our raft. For
the sow we did the same,

though she soon broke

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

loose; but we were glad
to see the tide float her
straight to the shore. We
put on board the raft a
vast deal of food that had
not been spoilt by the sea,
though the waves had made
a breach in the sides of the
wreck. We then put to
sea with our train of live
stock made fast to the stern,
and drew them like a flock
of huge ducks in the water.

We had not gone far
when I heard a loud cry of
fear from Fritz, “We are
lost! We are lost ! See what
a great shark is on its way
to us!”

Though pale with fright,
he took aim with his gun,
and shot the fish in the
head. It sank at once, but
left a track of blood in the
sea, which I knew to bea
sign that we were once
$

62

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



Jack drew the plants, trees, |some wild duck soup; and

and beasts which they had
found, and these were stuck
in our book. Each night
we took it in turns to read
the Word of God, and then
all knelt down to pray ere
we went to bed. Ours was
not a life of ease, it is true,
but it was one of peace and
hope; and we felt that
God had been so kind to
us that it would be a great
sin to wish for what it did
not please Him to grant us.

My wife did all she could
to cheer us, and it was no
strange thing for us to find
that while we were out in
the rain with the live stock
she had made some new
dish, which we would scent
as soon aS we put our
heads in at the door. One
night it was a thrush pie,
the next a roast fowl, or

once in a way she would
give us a grand feast, and

bring out some of all the

good things we had in
store.

In the course of our stay
in doors we made up our
minds that we would not
spend the next time of
storm and rain, when it
should come round, in the
same place. The Nest
would serve us well in that
time of the year when it
was fine and dry, but we
should have to look out for
some spot where we could
build a house that would
keep us from the rain the
next time the storms came.

Fritz thought that we
might find a cave, or cut ,
one out of the rocks by the
sea shore. I told him that
this would be a good plan,
A SHIP AT LAST.

105



_ There was now no room
for doubt that, though I
could not see it, there must
be a ship near Shark’s Isle.
Jack heard me say this
with great glee, and cried
out, “What can we now
do to find it ?”

We had brought a flag
with us, and I told Jack to
haul this up twice to the
top of the staff, by means
of which sign those who
saw it would know that
we had good news to tell
them.

I then left Jack on th
fort with the guns, and told
Muy tol tire eassoonm asia
ship hove in sight. I bent
my way at once back to
-Rock House, to talk with
my wife, Jane, and the boys,
as to what steps we should
now take. They all met
me on the beach, and made

me tell them the news while
I was still in the boat.
“We know no more,”
said I, “than the fact that
there is still a ship on the
coast. You must all now
keep in doors, while Fritz
and I go in search of it.”
We set off at noon, and
went straight to the west
part of the coast, where we
thought the sound must
have come from. We knew
a cape there from which
we: could get a good view
of the sea, and by the side
of which lay a small bay.
When we got round the
cape, great was our joy to:
find a fine ship in the bay.
It was not far away from
us, for we could see the
Ene-tisu flag float in the
breeze from one of its masts.

I seek in vain to find words

by means of which I can
THE LORD'S DAY. 35

CHAPTER VII.

We did not wake next
day till the sun shone in
upon us. I told my wife
and sons that as it was the
Lord’s day we would do
no work. Our beasts and
birds had first to be fed.
This was done by my wife,
who then brought us some
hot milk, and made us sit
down on the grass and take
it. When our meal was
done, I got on a log in
front of my sons, and we
all sang a psalm we knew
by heart. Then I sought
to teach them in the best
way I could think of, and
spoke to them thus :—

“There was once on a
time a Great King, who
had two vast realms, one

_ known as the Land of Light

and Truth, and one as the
Land of Night and Sloth.
Those who dwelt in the
first were full of life and
joy. The King held his
court at the Place of Rest,
where all was bright. The
Create aim. and, joy, Oneal
who dwell there was to
wait on Him, for they were
bound by a bond of love.
“This King had a land,
not far off, which He made
for a time the place where
those for whom He had
so much love should dwell
ere they went one by one
to the Place of Rest. This
land was the Home of
Earth. He told each of
them that this was to be
their home but for a time,

and that all who did His
GOOD NEWS.

93



“Oh, where have you
been?” said the boys, all
at once, as he came on
board. But they scarce
got a word from him. He
then drew me on one side,
and said, with a smile of
joy, “ What do you think
is the news’ I bring ?”

“ Let me hear it,” said I.

“Then I have found
what I went forth to seek,
and our search has not
been in vain.”

“ And who is it that you
have found 2”

‘ON Ot eavciniam emnie \sard:
“but a girl. The dress
she wears is that of a man,
and she does not wish at
first that her sex should be
known to more than we can
help, for she would not like
to meet Ernest and the rest
in that ‘state, if they knew
that she was a girl. And,

strange to tell,” said Fritz,
“she has been on shore
three years.”

While I went to tell the
news to my wife, Fritz had
gone down to his berth to
change his clothes, and I
must say that he took more
care to look neat in his
dress than was his wont at
home.

He was not long, and
when he came on deck he
bid me say no word to the
rest of whom he had found.
He leapt like a frog in
to his light craft, and led
the way. We were soon
on our course through the
rocks and shoals, and an
hour's sail, with the aid of
a good breeze, brought us
to a small tract of land the
trees of which hid the soil
from our view. Here we
got close in to the shore,
SPRING TIME. 63



but would take a long while
to do. By this time the
boys were all well used
to hard work, and_ they
thought they would much
like to try their skill at
some new kind of work.

“Well,” said I, “we will
go to the rocks round Tent
House the first fine day
that comes, and try to find
some place that will serve
to keep us from the next
year's storms.”



CEPA Te RX,

I can not tell how glad
we all were when we. at
last saw a change in the
sky, and felt once more the
warm rays of the sun. In
a few days the floods sank
in the earth, and left the
ground of a bright green
hue; the air grew warm
and dry, and there were no
more dark clouds to be
seen in the sky.

We found our young
trees had put forth new

leaves, and the seed we
had sown had come up
through the moist ground.
The air had a fresh sweet
smell, for it bore the scent
of the bloom which hung
like snow flakes on the
boughs of the fruit trees;
the songs and cries of the
birds were to be heard on
all sides, and we could see
them fly from tree to tree
in search of twigs to build
their nests. This in fact
THE NEST.

our first night on shore?
You shall give that its
flamer esata to Eritz,

@ieew ius, .call ‘iti ent
House,” said he.
raiivat will, do.esaid pb

“And now for the spot
Sie ene ami@uiin OF )) atc
Bay, where we found our
planks ?”

onagic "| Pome... \, Said
Ernest, and we gave it
that name, frotn the fact
that the great fish which
Fritz shot had been found
tere. Ihe place from
which Fritz and I sought
iinnain Ton, vagthaee, Ol,’ Out
ship mates was to be
known as No Man’s Cape.
Then we had the Boys
Bridge, which name I gave
it from a wish to please
my sons, who had done
so much to build it.

“But what shall we call

*39

the place which is now
mess deat to Ws) alla meal
le

Fritz thought we should
Cale peae ost, Fark
said he should like us to
give it the name of Zhe
Perch, while Frank chose
Dove Cote as the best he

jcould think of.

“Now, my dear,” said
Petoumiy wate, “it -ts) acim

What © shall

turn. we |
say?”

etl) us); callin yamee
Nest,’ said she; and with

that I gave each of my
young birds a glass of
sweet wine.

“Here's to ‘The Nest, ”
said I; “and may we live
long to bless the day and
the means that mcuent us
Rietic.

| themeold |) britz ae
draw a map of the place
WE SMOKE THE BEES.

out of their eyes. When
they were free from pain,
we took means to deal
with the bees. I took a
large gourd, which had
long been meant to serve
for a hive, and put it ona
Send. Nether made 1a
straw roof to keep it from
the sun and wind, and as
by this time it grew dark,
we left the hive there for
the night.

Next day we rose at the
first glimpse of dawn, and
the boys, whose wounds
were now quite well, went
with me to help to move
the bees to the new home
we had made for them.
©ur first work was to stop
with clay all the holes in
the tree but one through
which the bees were wont
to go in to their nest. To
this I put the bowl of

53

a pipe, and blew in the
smoke of the weed as fast
as I could, with a view to
drug them with its fumes.
At first we heard a loud
buzz like the noise of a
SiOrim) aia om aout ome
more I blew my pipe the
less grew the sound, till at
last the bees were quite
stil) sand? then l (took seme
pipe out of the hole.

We now cut out a piece
of the trunk, three feet
square, and this gave us,a
full view of the nest. Our
joy was great to find such
a stock of wax, for I could
see the comb reach far up
the tree. I took some of
the comb, in which the
bees lay in swarms, and
put it by on the plank.
Me rest euveiniea Gasle
which my wife tied down
with sail cloth, lest the bees,
104

sounds they had heard were

no more than those of their

own guns, which the hills
had sent back through the
air. This view of the case
did not at all please them,
as by this time they well
knew what sounds their
guns made.

“Tt will be a strange
thing,” said I, “if the hope
to which I have so long
clung should at last come
to be a fact; but we must
have a care that we do
not hail a ship the crew of
which may rob and kill us
for the sake of our wealth.
I feel that we have as much
cause to dread a foe as we
have grounds of hope that
we may meet with friends.”

Our first course was to
make ‘the cave quite safe,
and then to mount guard
where we could see a ship

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

if one should come near
the coast. That night the
rain came down in a flood,
and a storm broke over us,
and we were thus kept in
doors for two days and two
nights.

On the third day I set
out with Jack to Shark
Isle, with a view to seek
for the strange ship which
he said he knew must be
in some place not far from
the coast. I went to the
top of a high rock, but
though my eye swept the
sea for miles round, I could
see no signs of a sail. I
then made Jack fire three
more shots, to try if they
would give the same sound
as the two boys had heard.
You may judge how I felt,
when I heard one! two!
three! boom through the
alr.
WHAT TEN YEARS HAD DONE.



wrong; and it gave us
great joy to find that what
we told them sunk deep in
their hearts, and, like ripe
seed sown in rich soil,
brought forth good fruit.

I need not say that in
the course of ten years we
had made great strides in
those arts which our wants
had first led us to learn.
When we first came the
land near Tent House was
a bare waste; now it bore
fine crops, and was kept as
neat as a Swiss farm. At
the foot of. the hill by the
side of Rock Cave, was a
large plot of ground, which
we laid out in beds, and
here we grew herbs and
shrubs, and such plants as
we used for food. Near
this we dug a pond, and by
means of a sluice which
led from the stream, we

87

kept our plants fresh in
times of drought. Nor was
this the sole use we made
of the pond; for in it we
kept small fish and crabs,
and took them out with a
rod and line when we had
need of food, and time to
spare for that kind of sport.
In the ground round the
mouth of the Cave we
drove a row of strong canes,
bound at the top to’a piece
of wood, so as to form a
fence, up which grew a
Viens ciii¢ mea ume cell ware:
plants that threw a good
show of gay bloom crept
up to meet it. Shells of
great size and strange
shapes were got from the
shore, and these we built
up here and there with

burnt clay, so as to form —

clumps of rock work, on
which grew ferns and rare
q



Se

I MAKE A BOW AND ARROW. 33

and drew that up, and at
last made a long row of
cane steps, with a rope at
each side, which we drew
Upmeoewtiie, first
branch. The boys were
now all in haste to climb
the tree, but I chose that
Jack, who was light of
build and sure of foot,
should go up first and try
the strength of our work.
Fritz went up next with
some nails, and made the
ropes fast to the tree, while
irciove sstalcesmin tlic
ground to keep them firm
at the foot. It was now
time for me to mount, and
up I went with an axe to lop
off the twigs and smooth
the bough that was to form
the ground of our new
house. I sent the boys
down out of my way, and
kept hard at work till it

strong

was late, for the sky was
clear, and the moon lent
me her beams of light to
Seenbin -
When I came down I
found that my two sons,
whom I sent down, had
not been there. I was at
a loss to think where they
could be, but my fears
were soon gone, for just
then I heard them sing a
hymn, the sound of which
came from one of the top
boughs of the tree. |
When they came down,
my wife spread a good
meal on the ground, which
we ate as best we could,
and then made our beds
of dry moss, round which
we put heaps of twigs.
These we set light to, as
watch fires to keep off
wild beasts and _ snakes.

The toils of the day had
56

or trod the hard rocks with
bare feet.

By this time our sow had
brought forth ten young
pies) and eanewiens had
each a brood of fine chicks.
Some we kept near us, but
most
the wood, where my wife
said she could find them
when she had need to use
them.

I knew the time must
now be near when, in this

clime, the rain comes down

day by day for weeks, and
that it would wash us out
of The Nest if we did not
make a good roof to our
house. Then our live stock
would need some _ place
where they could rest out

Grete went | to;

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

of the rain. The thatch for
The Nest was of course
our first care; then we
made a long roof of canes
for our live stock, and on
this we spread clay and
moss, and then a thick coat
Of tar.wso thagit) was) vane
proof (from vena) tomvencds
This was held up by thick
canes stuck deep in the
ground, with planks made
fast to them to form the
walls, and round the whole
we put a row of cask staves
to serve for rails. ‘In this
way we soon had a barn,
store room, and hay loft,
with stalls for the cow, the
ass, and what else we kept
that had need of a place to
live in.
FANE'S HISTORY.

one in which Jane left, and
she was borne, half dead
with fright, to the place
where we found her. She
had been thrown high up
on the beach, and though
faint and sick, got out of
the reach of the waves.
She did not know if those
who were in the boat with
her had lost their lives, but
she had seen no trace of
them since. —

When she had strength
to walk, she found some
birds’ eggs and shell fish,
which she ate, and then
went in search of some safe
place where she could rest
for the night. By good
chance she had a flint and
a knife; with these she set
light to some dry twigs,
- and made a fire, which-she
did not once let out till the
day she left. Her life was

97

at first hard to bear, but
she was full of hope that
some day a ship would
come near the shore, to
which she could make signs
for help. The wild sports
of the East in which she
took part had made her
strong of limb, and she had
been taught to make light
of such things as would
vex most of her sex.

She built a hut to sleep
in, and made snares to
catch birds. Some of them
she made use of for food,
and some she let go, with
bits of cloth tied to their
legs, on which she wrote
words, in the hope that
they might meet the eye of
some one who could’ help
her. This, as we knew,
had led Fritz to make his
search, the end of which
had. brought as much joy
30 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Just as we had left the
bmege, lack criediout,) be
quick! here is a strange
beast with quills as long as
my) ara, oy Eberdogsi ran,
and I with them, and
found a large Por-cu-PINE
in the grass. It made a
loud noise, and shot out
its quills at the dogs, and
made them bleed. At this
Jack put his hand to his
belt, drew forth one of the
small arms I gave him, and
shot straight, with good
aiid tie (beast niwhich
fell dead on the spot. Jack
was proud of his feat, but
Fritz, who did not like to
be beat by one so young
as Jack, told him to use
more care, or he might
shoot one of the dogs, if
not one of us. My wife's
first thought was to dress
the wounds made by the





quills, which had stuck in
the nose of one of the
dogs, while the. boys made .
haste to pluck some of the
quills. \trom) ithe ysiiiaer
their strange prize.

At last our march came
to an end, and I saw for
the inser tiem tnenoredtn
trees that my wife had told
me of. They were of vast
size, and were, I thought,
fig trees. “If we can but
fix our tent up there,” I
said, “we shall have no
cause to dread, for no wild
beasts can reach us.” We
cent wlerank sot toe vane
sticks, with which to make
a fire, and my wife made
some’soup of the flesh of
the beast we had slain,
though we did not like it
so well as we did the ham.
and cheese we brought
with us.
THE WHALE.

and when we could gaze
once more on the green
fields) We went out the
first fine day, and took a
long walk by the base of
the cliff’ On the shore we
found a dead whale, which
the sea had no doubt thrown
up in the storm. We had
long felt the need of oil;
for though we had a lamp,
we had naught but our wax
lights to put in it, and these
gave a poor light to read
by. The next day we cut
up the whale, and put the
flesh in tubs. It was far
from a clean job, for the oil
ran down our clothes and

made them smell; but as:

we could change them for
new ones, thanks to the
hemp and my wife's skill,
we did not mind that, for
the oil was now worth more
to us than our. clothes,

75

though at one time we
should not have thought so.

One day we all set out
on a tour to the Farm.
Jack and Frank had gone
on first, while my wife and
I were as yet close to the
Cave. iu Fagmonce )\ tic
boys came back, and Fritz
said: “ Look at that strange
thing on its way up the
path. What can it be?”

Iieast, my ‘eye |.on) ihe
spot, and cried out, “ Fly
all of you to the Cave! fly
for your lives!” for I saw
it was:a huge snake, or boa,
that would make a meal of
one of us, if we did not get
out of its way.

We all ran in doors, and
put bars up to the doors of
the Cave. A large dove
cote had been made on the
roof, and to this we got up
through a hole in the rock.
108

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



At break of day we put
on board our boat a stock
of fruit and fresh food of
all kinds, such as we thought
the crew of the ship would
like to have, and Fritz and
I set sail fer the bay. We
took with us all the arms
we could find, so as not to
be at a loss should the
crew prove false to their
flag, and turn out to be a
set of thieves.

As we drew near the
ship I fired a gun, and told
Fritz to hoist a flag like
theirs to the top of our
mast, and as we did so the
crew gave a loud cheer, I
then went on board, and
“the mate of the ship led
me to his chief, who soon
put me at my ease by a
frank shake of the hand.
I then told him who we
were, and how we came

to dwell on the isle. I
learnt from him, in turn,
that he was bound for New
South Wales; that he knew
Captain Rose, who had lost
his child, and that he had
made a search for her on
the coast. He told me
that a storm had thrown
him off his course, and that
the wind drove him on this
coast, where he took care
to fill his casks from a fresh
stream that ran by the side
of a hill, and to take in a
stock of wood.

“Tt was then,” he said,
“that we first heard your
guns; and when on the
third day the same sound
came to our ears, we knew
that there must be some one
on the coast, and this led us
to put up our tents and wait
till the crew should search
the land round the bay.
6 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

to do; but, if this is to be
our last hour, let us bow to
His will—we shall at least
all go down side by side.”

My dear wife could not
hide the tears that fell down
her cheeks as I thus’ spoke
to my sons, but she was
calm, and knelt down to
pray, while the boys clung
round her as if they thought
she could help them.

Just then we heard a cry
Gre leand) Vland) steltva
shock, and were thrown
down upon the deck.’ It
was clear that we had struck
on a rock, for we heard a
loud cry from one of the
men, “We are lost! Launch
the boat; try for your lives!”
These words went, as it
were, through my heart like
a knife; but, as I felt that
I ought to cheer my sons,
I said to them, “Now is

the time to show that we
are brave; we still have
life, the land is near, and we
know that God helps those

who trust in him. Keep

up your hearts, then, while

I go and see if there be not
some hope yet left for us.”

I went at once on deck,
and was met by a wave
that threw me down, and
wet me through to the skin.
When I got up, and went
to the side of the ship, I
found that all the boats had ©
been let down, and that
the last of the crew had just
left it. I cried out for the
men to come back and take
us with them, but it was in
vain, for the sound of my
voice did not reach them
through the roar of the
waves.

I then thought that our
last chance was gone. Still,
LAE DOVE POST

they went to the spot where
she had dwelt for so long,
and sought for what things
she had left when she came
to live with us.

All these were brought
to Rock House, and I may
tell you that Fritz set great
store by them. There were
all sorts of odd_ clothes,
which she had made of the
skin of the sea calf; fish
lines wrought out of the
hair of her head; pins
made from the bones of
fish; a lamp made out of
a shell, with a wick of
the threads which she had
drawn from herhose. There
were the shells she used _ to
cook her food in; a hat
made from the breast of
a large bird, the tail of
which she had spread out
so as to shade her neck
from the sun; belts, shoes,

Tor

and odd things of a like
kind.

My wife, who had nowa
friend of her own sex to
talk with, did not feel dull
when the boys left us for a
time, so they had leave to
roam where their wish led
them, and to stay as long
as they chose. In the
course of time they knew
the whole of the isle on
which we dwelt. Ernest
drew a map of it to scale,
so that we could trace their
course from place to place

with ease. When they
went for a long trip they
took some doves. with
them, and _ these © birds

brought us notes tied to
their wings from time to
time, so that we knew
where they were, and could
point out the spot on the
map.
THE BRIDGE. 29

how we built piers of stone
in the stream, and how we
. put the planks one by one
in their place; but we did
it at last, though it was late
at night when we left off
work, and once more sought
our tent. |
The next day we saw
the sun rise, and took our
first meal in haste, for we
knew we should have a
levemre ayey toil. (vil) the
stores that we could not
take with us were laid by
in the tent, the door of
which was made safe by a
row of casks that we put
round it. Each of us took
pare ainic bag) anat. ay Cun,
My wife and Fritz soon
led the way; the cow went
next; then the ass, with
Piamlemonmicndnaci.) |) lacks
led the goats, and on the
back,of one of them sat the

ape. Ernest took charge
of the sheep, and I brought
up the rear as chief guard.
Our dogs ran from the
front to the rear rank, and
Went tonana Hive. as’ \ihto
see that all was right, and
fom keep rus inellincwn\\ @
left the sow near the tent,
but we had not gone far
when she set off with a
loud grunt, and soon came
up with us. Our march
was slow, for the live stock
would stray here and there
to graze on the rich grass
that grew by the way; but
still we got on. We took
care to cross the bridge
one at a time, and found it
bear our weight well; but
once or twice we thought
the cow would step in
the stream, or fall off the
boards, when she went to
the sides to drink.
THE END OF THE BOA. 77

“ Now is the time to seal
the fate of our foe,” said I
to Fritz; and with that we
went out with our guns.
When we got near, we
both took a straight aim,
and each put a ball in its
head. This made it move
with a start, and writhe as
if in pain.

“See how its eyes glare
on us with rage. Now
load your gun, and let us
put) a, bit’ more lead in
him.”

Our next shot went in
its eyes. It then shook:as
with a strong spasm, and
fell dead on the sand.

A shout of joy brought
my wife and the three boys
to the spot. The state of
fear they had been kept in
for three whole days had
made them quite ill, but
now the joy of Jack and

Frank knew no bounds, for
they leapt on the snake and
beat it as if they would
go mad.

My wife said that the
death of the boa took a
great weight off her mind,
for she thought it would
lie in wait for us near the
Cave, starve us out, and
then kill us as it had done
the poor ass.

We slit up the snake,
and took out the flesh of
the ass, which the boys
laid in a grave near Tent
House. The boa’s skin we
hung up at the door of the
Cave, over which Ernest
wrote the words, “ No ass
to be found here,” which
we all thought to be a
good joke.

One day late in the
spring I went with my
three sons a long way from
38 Pie SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



The next day Ernest and
Jack tried their skill with
the bow, and brought down
some small birds that came
to the great tree in quest
of figs. I gave them leave
to kill what they could;
for I knew that, if put in
casks made air tight with
grease, they would keep
Momearchetn of mime, and
might prove a boon, if our
stock of food should get
low.

When we sat down to
dine, the thought struck
me that it would be as
well to give some name to
each part of the strange
land that was now known
to us. “We can, then,”
said I, “speak. of a place
as we did when we were
at home, and not have to
say so much ere we can
tell the spot we mean.”

This was at first the source
of some fun, for Fritz said
we should call the bay
where we had found the
shell spoons by the name
of Spoon Bay; but Jack,
who still had a mark on
his toe where the crab
gave him a pinch, thought
we ought to term it Crab
Bay.

“Tf you will let me give
ity a fame, ‘said myavalics
“T should wish to know
it by some term that will
make us bear in mind how
good God was to us to
lead our raft there, and
L' done think Sate Bay,
will be a bad name for
it.”

“Somat it became
and from that time Safe
Bay had a name.

“What shall be the name

of the spot where we spent


Ned driving the Birds away from the dead Shark.
THE LASSO. — 43

could take an aim as well
with a stone as he could
with his gun.

As yet we had not seen
muen of the isle: for
though Fritz and I had
gone some few miles round
.the place where we dwelt,
it took most of our time
to build the house, and
this kept us hard at work
Medi the tree, whut, one
day we made up our minds
that we would all start on
a tour. We rose at dawn,
put the ass in the sledge,
took what food we thought

we should need, and set

out from The Nest just as
the sun rose.

My sons and I took our
guns, Prank «sat in; the
sledge, my wife led the
ass, and the ape rode on
the back of our dog Turk.

When we came to the

wood where Fritz found
the ape, he told them by
what means we got the
nuts, but now there were
no apes there to throw
them down.

“Oh, if one would but
fall from the trees,” he said.

The words had but just
left his lips when a large
nut fell at his feet. He
made a start back, and two
more came down near the
same spot.

elt seeins* «SalG@ielta was
if we had but-to wish for
a thing and we get it.”

As the nuts were far
from ripe, I was at a loss to
know how they could fall
off the tree, for I could not
see an ape nor a bird near.
All at once Jack cried
out, “See, see! here comes
our friend, but I can't say
much for his looks.”
A STRANGE SITE FOR A HOUSE. 25

more safe. We then got
to. land, and made fast our
freight to the shore. Ere
we had done this our friends
came to greet us, and give
us what help they could to
get the beasts out of the
stream, and take them up to
the tent. The poor things
were well nigh worn out;

but we took good care of

them, and put them to rest
on some dry grass that

my wife had laid out for
~ them.

That night we did not
sup on the ground. My
wife had spread a cloth on
the top of a cask, and we
Eden eat (On ae vue). WViikh
the knives and forks that
we had found in the ship
we ate a dish of hot ham
and eggs, nor did we fail
to. test the wine that I
had brought with me in

a small cask from the
wreck,

I can now well call to
mind the strange scene, as
we sat there round the cask,
with our two dogs, the
fowls, the ape, and the
doves, all in the light of
the red glow that came
from the fire which burnt
on the ground just by the
tert: ‘

Ere bed time my wife
had told me that while I
was at the wreck she had
gone in search of some
place in which we could
build a house, and be safe
from the wild beasts that
we had heard growl in the
night.

“And did you find one,
my dear?” I said.

“Qh, yes,” said she. “We
can take you to a great tree
that will serve us well, if

*
A SURPRISE. i 15



as well wish for delf bowls|I knew, from what I had

and real spoons at once.”

“Now I have it,” quoth
Ernest. “Let us use the
shells I saw on the shore.”

On srani Mac} tom the
shore, with Ernest at his
heels, and back they both
came with large and small
shells for us all.

Just then Fritz came in,
with a look of gloom on
his face, which I could see
was a sham.

“You do not mean to,

tell me you have come back
with nought?” said I, as
he put out his hands as if
to prove that such was the
case. But Jack, who had
been round him, cried out,
“No, no! he’s got a pig !—
such a fine one. Tell us
where you found it.”

Fritz now brought forth
his prize. When I saw it,

read, that it was not a pig,
but a swift beast, known in
these parts, that lives on

fruit and nuts, and hides

in the earth* 1 felt it
right to tell my son that
he should not try to make
us think that he had not
brought any thing back.
Though a jest, it was still
a lie, and to act a lie was
just as wrong as to tell one.
Fritz now saw the truth of
this, and said so. He then
told us how that he had
been to the banks of the
stream.
“T like the place much
more than I do this spot,”
said he. “The shore lies
low, and there are planks,
casks, chests, and all sorts
of things, that the sea has:
thrownup. Why not leave

The A-gou-ti.
*
af
THE CAVE OF ROCK SALT.

that we sent Jack off home
oy iemesy 10) tell) tlre
good news, and to bring
back some wax lights. I
did not deem it safe for us
to go in the cave in the
dark, for there might be
pools or deep dry pits in
the ground.

Pigcapanay) Doihadk) qtist
thrown up on the bank the

67

one to each. I went in
first and led the way, and
the rest kept close at my
back. We had not gone
on more than a few steps
when we came to a dead
stop, struck with awe at
the grand sight that met
our view. The walls and
roof of the cave were lit
up, as it were, with star-

last spade full of earth that, like gems, while some hung

had been dug out, when
we heard a loud shout.
We got up on the top of
the cave, and saw that Jack
had brought back a tribe
gar iis >neelsy muniteniianse
car, drawn by the cow and
the ass, came on at a slow
facemtccd by | jiaekwom! ia
black ox, and in it were my
wife, Frank, and Ernest.
By the) help of -a flint
and steel I soon lit some
of the wax lights, and gave

down like glass drops from
the roof, and some rose up
from the ground at its sides
like blocks of spar. I broke
off a piece and put it to
my tongue.

“What does it taste like?”
said Jack. )

ol stind,)satds Weaunatrwie
are in a cave of rock salt.”

“We shall not have to
scrape the rocks to get our
salt now,” said Ernest, “ for
there is more here than
108

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



At break of day we put
on board our boat a stock
of fruit and fresh food of
all kinds, such as we thought
the crew of the ship would
like to have, and Fritz and
I set sail fer the bay. We
took with us all the arms
we could find, so as not to
be at a loss should the
crew prove false to their
flag, and turn out to be a
set of thieves.

As we drew near the
ship I fired a gun, and told
Fritz to hoist a flag like
theirs to the top of our
mast, and as we did so the
crew gave a loud cheer, I
then went on board, and
“the mate of the ship led
me to his chief, who soon
put me at my ease by a
frank shake of the hand.
I then told him who we
were, and how we came

to dwell on the isle. I
learnt from him, in turn,
that he was bound for New
South Wales; that he knew
Captain Rose, who had lost
his child, and that he had
made a search for her on
the coast. He told me
that a storm had thrown
him off his course, and that
the wind drove him on this
coast, where he took care
to fill his casks from a fresh
stream that ran by the side
of a hill, and to take in a
stock of wood.

“Tt was then,” he said,
“that we first heard your
guns; and when on the
third day the same sound
came to our ears, we knew
that there must be some one
on the coast, and this led us
to put up our tents and wait
till the crew should search
the land round the bay.
PRE ACE

THE kind reception given to the system of ae
im words of one syllable has encouraged the Author to
add the popular story of “ The Swiss Family Robinson”
as a twin book to “Robinson Crusoe.” The monosyt-
labic rule has been strictly adhered to throughout, the
only exception occurring necessarily in the title of the
book itself. The Author's olject has been to provide “a
field of exercise for a child who has gust learnt to
conquer words; and it is a great point im all teaching
to let the first imdependent exercise be one im which

‘victory is really to be won by moderate effort.
3
(ox
3
=,
an
Ss
3
n
5S)
Ss
cS
N
yy
os
be


8 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

“Tf we could but find
some cook,” said Fritz to
me in a low tone, “we
might make floats. You
and I will not need them,
for we can swim, but the
rest will want some such
means to keep them up, and
then we can help them to
reach the land.”

“A good thought,” said
[Pee ctsuceery titthie migiat
to find what things there
are in the ship that we can
thus make use of.”

We soon found some
casks and ropes, and with
these we made a kind of
float for each of the three
boys, and then my wife
made one for her own use.
This done, we got some
knives, string, and such
things as we could make
fast to our belts. We did
not fail to look for and find

a flint and steel, and the
box in which the burnt
rags were kept, for these
were at that time in use as
the means to strike a light.

Fritz, who was now well
nigh worn out, laid down
on his bed, and ‘slept like
the rest. As for me and
my poor wife, we kept
watch, each in fear lest the
next wave should lift the
ship off the rock and break
it ups, Wesspent parton
the night in thought as to
our plans for the next day,
and sought God to bless
the means we had in view
to save our lives. —

I need not tell you how
glad we were when we saw
the first gleam of light shine
through the chink of the
door that shut us in from
the cold night air. At
dawn the wind did not
FANE AT HOME.

this day than I have felt in
all the days of my life. I
can use no terms less strong
than these to show how
much I thank you.”

This was just the kind of
speech to please the boys,
for there had been no one
to praise their work till
now. When the meal was
done, my wife brought out
some of her best wine, and
we drank to the health of
our guest in great state, and
with loud cheers. We then
made a tour of our house
and grounds, that Jane
might see the whole of the
place that from this time!

99

wife’s room, in which were
kept the pots and pans to
dress our food, and the
plates, bowls, and cups, out
of which we ate, took her
some time to view; for she
had long felt the want of
such things as she now saw
we had made for our use
out of what we could find.
(Mie vinextn day we seal
went to The Nest, and by
when the rainy season came
round, Jane knew the place
quite as well as we did.

‘My wife found in her a

true friend, for she soon
took a large share of the

work off her hands, and

she was to make her home.| did it with so much skill,

It would take me a long
time to tell what she thought
of all she saw, or the neat
things she said in praise of
our skill, as we took her
from place to place. My

and with so strong a wish
to please us, that we grew
to love her as if she had
been our own child.

When the time came for
us to keep in doors from
26

we can but get across the
stream with our goods.”

“But would you have
us roost, like fowls, in a
tree? How do you think
Wye COMlGmGeiNI UDI LO / OU
perch ?”

“Was there not a large
lime tree in our town in
which they built a_ ball
room, with stairs up the
trunk ?”

“To be sure there was,”
ec wleueane it we can not
build in it, we can at least
make use of its shade,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

and dwell in a hut on the
roots.”

Ernest said that he took
a string, and found that it
was twelve yards round.
This led me to think that
my wife's scheme was by
no means a bad one, and
that I would have a look
at the tree the next day.

Wiens ly nadine anciear
they had to tell, we knelt
down to pray, and then
sought a good night's rest,
which the toils of the day
made us much in need of.



CHAPTER V.

Wuen I rose from my
Dedierneminerxt cay.) livcatc|

to my wife; “Does it not

seem, my dear, as if God
had led us to this place,

and that we should do
wrong to leave it?”
“What you say may be
quite true, so far as it goes,”
she said; “but I must tell
10

beardmancows, alt acsenwio
goats esix Sheep, a Tame
pig, and a sow, and I have
found food for them.all.”

“ All that you bring will
ber oluse, caideles “but |
fear that Jack’s dogs will do
us more harm than good.”

ie Noumea ialte scar: aiaelks
in his pert way, for they
can help us to hunt when
we get to land.”

“Well said, Jack. And
now let us see what we can
do that will aid us to get
there.”

We then took the casks
that we had found, and as
both Ernest and I could
use the saw, we soon cut
them in half. With these

tubs, which were bound

round with strong hoops,

we made a kind of raft,
though it was no slight
jack: = hee tubs e in tact

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

were a fleet of eight small
round boats, made so fast
to some planks that no one
of them could float from
the rest. When we had
done this, we sat down to
a good meal, which we ate
with great zest, for we now
felt that we had done our
best to earn it.

hichmext) tie wior sinc
done was to launch the raft..
This we at length did, and
when the boys saw it slide
down the side of the ship
and float on the sea, they
gave a loud shout, and each
one tried who should be
the #iiretestomact OnmiGamen
miaeen iutase ten tnems min
and there left it.
- It was late ere our work
was thus far brought to
an end; and, as we had to
spend at least one night
more on the wreck, I told
14 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



chinks of the rocks, and
that shell fish were not
scarce.

“Then why have you
not brought some with
Doles siceilue bain

“To get at them,” said
he, “I should have had to
wet my feet.”

“Well, my boy, if you
are sure you saw them, I
will ask you to go back for
some. We must each do
some work for the good of
all; and as for your feet,
the sun will dry them as
you walk back.”

He went, and soon found
the salt, left by the sea on
the rocks, which the sun
had made quite dry. There
was some sand with it, and
this I said would spoil our
soup; but my wife did not
take long to find a way to
cure that. She had been

to a fresh stream with a
large jug; from this I saw
her pour some on the salt,
strain it through a cloth,
and let it drip in a cup, so
that all the sand was left on
the cloth.

When the soup was made
hot we had each a taste, and
all said that it was good:

“ Benot in too great haste,”
said my wife, “we must
wait for Fritz; but if he
were here, I do not see how
we are to take our soup,
for we have no plates nor
spoons; we can't lift this
huge pot to our mouths and
sup from it.”

“If we had but. some
large nuts,” said Ernest,
“we might cut them in half,
and they would make good
bowls.”

“Quite true,” said I ; “but
as there are none, we may
THE LORD'S DAY. an

a state of gloom. These’

ships were not seen till
they came close to the
shore, and then the crew
were sent forth to find
those whom they were told
to seize. Some went back
with them full of joy, but
mosteiwere seen to,, weep
and mourn their fate. So
soon as they were brought
in sight of the Great -King,
the Prince took those who
had done well, and put a
white robe on them; but
those who went their own
way when on the Home
of Earth, He sent down
to toil in deep dark mines
till time shall be no more.”

When my sons had heard
my tale to the end they
all knew what it meant; I
then drew from them their
views of what they ought
to do to please and serve

the Great King, and did
my best to teach them the
truths that would guide
them safe to the Place of
Rest, when the time should
come for them to leave

the Home of Earth. We

then Saticaeay lytmr, sane

my wife drew from her
bag the Br-stz, which I-
gave to one of the boys,
who read from it in a
clear, loud voice. When
this was brought to a close,
we all knelt down on the
grass to pray, and to ask
God to bless the means
we took to learn His will. ©
We did no work that
day, but took a long stroll
up the banks of the stream,
and spoke of such things
as we felt would cause our
minds to dwell on the
truths we had heard read
out of the Word of God.
THE FLAMINGO. ; 31



CA EL

Tue meal at an end, my
first thought was to make
some steps by means of
which we could reach the
first strong branch of the
mee One hanantrrot ite
root which rose high up
out of the earth, so as to
form an arch some six feet
from the ground, we laid a
large piece of sail cloth,
and this kept off both the
dew and the flies. Ernest
and I then went in search
of some thick canes that
grew in the sands hard by.

These we cut down, and,.

with the aid of some strong
string, we bound them to
four long poles, and thus
made a pair of steps that
would, we thought, reach
far up the trunk.

On our way back from
the sands, one of the dogs
made a dart at a clump
Oly reeds, wancheetitnOomy ait
large birds rose on the
wing with a loud noise.
Fritz let fly at them, and
brought down two at a
shot. One of them fell
quite dead, but its mate,
though hurt in the wing,
made use of its long legs
so well, that it would have
Cou Ol Mime had) net
held it till we came up.
The joy of Fritz, to have
caught such a strange bird,
was so great that he would
have us at once bind it
by the neck and take it
back with us. “Look,” said
Ernest, “what fine plumes
he has, and you see he has
84

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

I had made a lathe with albe told that our wants did

wheel, and by its aid the
clay left my hands in the
shape of plates, cups, pots,
and pans. We then burnt
them in a rude kiln, and
though at least one half
broke with the heat and
our want of skill, still those
that came out whole more
than paid me for my toil,
and kept up my wife’s stock
of delf. Some of the jars
were set round with red
and blue glass beads, and
these were put on a shelf
as works of art, and kept
full of long dried grass.
The time was now at
hand when we must reap
our grain and store the ripe
crops that were still on the
ground; and, in fact, there
was so much to be done,
that we scarce knew what
to do first. The truth must

not keep pace with the
growth of our wealth, for
the land was rich, and we
had but a few mouths to
fill. 7

We knew that we might
leave theroots in the ground
for some time, as the soil
was dry, but that the grain
would soon spoil; so we
made the corn our first
care. When it was all cut
and brought home, our

‘next task was to thresh it.

The floor of our store room
was now as hard as a rock,
for the sun had dried it,
and there was not 4 crack
to be seen. On this we
laid the ears of ripe corn,
from which the long straw
had been cut, and sent the
boys to bring in such of our
live stock as were fit for
the work to be next done.
52 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



thought of it I gave it up
as a thing we could not do.
But I now had a mind to
try our skill at this kind
of work. I knew that a
swarm of bees had built
their nest in the trunk of
our tree, and this led me
to think that there might
be a void space in it some
way up. “Should this
prove to be the case,’ I
said, “our work will be
half done, for we shall
then have but to fix the
stairs in the tree round the
trunk.” As soon as I had
thus spoke, the boys got
up and went to the top of
the root to tap the trunk,
and to judge by the sound
how far up the hole went.
But they had to pay for
their want of thought: the
whole swarm of bees came
out as soon as they heard

the noise, stung their cheeks,
stuck to. their hair and
clothes, and soon put them
to flight.

It took my wife and I
some time to drive off the
bees, and to put fresh earth
on the wounds to ease the
pain the poor boys felt
from the stings. We found
that Jack, who was at all
times rash, had struck the
bees’ nest with his axe, and
was much more hurt by
them than the rest; in fact,
his face was so bad, that
we had to swathe the whole
OL Mein cloths), These
who went to his work in

his slow way, got up to it

last, and was the first to
run off when he saw the
bees; thus he did not get
more than a sting or two,
but the rest were some
hours ere they could see
| &2 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

Gimmeden ssiden yh news text
cot up on their steeds, and
I. took the pouch from the
head of the bird. As soon
as it could see, it gave a
wild stare, and then fought
(Ou Cetinee:

The boys then put spurs
to the flanks of their steeds,
and when the bird had
made a’ few starts back, as
if to try the strength of the
cords which held it, it set
off with a run, and the bulls
jcachiecid=r Eade men keep
up a smart pace.

Fritz and I now went in
search of the nest, which
we soon found. I took the
eggs from it and put them
ina bag I had brought to
hold them, in which I put
some wool and moss, so
that they should not break.

It did not take us long

to get up to the two boys,

who had gone on first, and
we were glad to find that
the poor bird had made up
its) aind Sto) nitse dates and
kept up well with the pace
of the bulls.

When we got in sight of
home, my wife and Ernest,
who had been on the look
out for us, came forth to
meet us; and,the strange
way in which we brought
home our new prize made
them laugh. I need not
say that we took great care
of it.

The next day we built it
a house, with a space in
front for it to walk up and
down, round which were
put rails, so that it could
not get out. At first it
was shy, and would not
take any food, so that we
had to force some balls of
maize down its throat; but
The young Ape brought Home on Turk’s back.


THE LORD'S DAY. 35

CHAPTER VII.

We did not wake next
day till the sun shone in
upon us. I told my wife
and sons that as it was the
Lord’s day we would do
no work. Our beasts and
birds had first to be fed.
This was done by my wife,
who then brought us some
hot milk, and made us sit
down on the grass and take
it. When our meal was
done, I got on a log in
front of my sons, and we
all sang a psalm we knew
by heart. Then I sought
to teach them in the best
way I could think of, and
spoke to them thus :—

“There was once on a
time a Great King, who
had two vast realms, one

_ known as the Land of Light

and Truth, and one as the
Land of Night and Sloth.
Those who dwelt in the
first were full of life and
joy. The King held his
court at the Place of Rest,
where all was bright. The
Create aim. and, joy, Oneal
who dwell there was to
wait on Him, for they were
bound by a bond of love.
“This King had a land,
not far off, which He made
for a time the place where
those for whom He had
so much love should dwell
ere they went one by one
to the Place of Rest. This
land was the Home of
Earth. He told each of
them that this was to be
their home but for a time,

and that all who did His
86

and found that flocks of
birds, most of which were
quails, had come there to
feed. This gave usa fine
day’s sport with our guns,
and the next year we did
not fail to look for them, so
that the fields were made
to yield a stock of game as
well as a crop of grain.

With but slight change
in our mode of life, we
spent ten long years in our
strange home. Yet the
time did not seem long
to us. Each day brought
with it quite as much work
as we could do, so that
weeks and months and
years flew past, till at last
we gave up all hope that
we should leave the isle or
see our old Swiss home,
the thought of which was
still dear to us. -

But the lapse of ten years

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

had wrought a great change
in our sons. Frank, who
was but a mere child when
we first came, had grown
up to be a strong youth;
and Jack was as brave a
lad as one could wish to
see. Fritz, of course, was
now a young man, and.
took a large share of the
work off my hands. Ernest
had just come of age, and
his shrewd mode of thought
and great tact was as great
a help to us as was the
strength and skill *of the
rest.

‘To crown all, it was a
rare thing for them to be
ill; and they were free from
those sins which too oft
tempt young men to stray
from the right path, My
wife and I did our best to
train them, so that they
might know right from
The Fight with the Bears at the Cave.


76

Ernest took aim with his
gun, and shot at the snake,
so did Fritz and Jack, but
it gave no sign that they
had hit it. I then tried my
skill, but it did not seem to
feel my shot any more than
theirs, though I was sure I
must have struck its head.
Just as we took aim at it
once more, we saw it turn
round and glide through
the reeds in the marsh.

Our fears kept us’ for
three long days in the Cave.
The snake gave no sign
that could lead us to think
it was still near, but the
ducks and geese had left
the spot where their nests
were, and this we knew to
be a bad sign. On the
fourth day I went to the
door, with a view to let out
some of the beasts to graze,
‘for we were short of food

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

for them. The ass was just
at my back, and as soon
as it saw the light, made
a rush to get out. Off it
went, straight to the sands,
with its, heels in the air, but
just as it got to the marsh
we saw the boa glide out
from the reeds, part its wide
jaws, and make for its prey.
The ass at once saw its foe,
but stood still as if struck
with fear, and in less time
than I take to tell it, our
old friend was tight in the
folds of the boa.

This was a sad sight for
all of us, yet we could not
take our eyes off the snake,
but saw it crush the poor
beast, and then gorge its
prey. When it had put the
whole of the ass out of
sight, it laid down on the
sand quite still, as if it had
gone to sleep or died.
96

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



wife died when Jane was
but a babe in arms. When
ten years of age he sent
her to a first class school,
where she was taught all
that was fit for the child
of a rich man to know. In
course of time she could
ride a horse with some
skill, and she then grew
fond of most of the field
sports of the East. As
the Cap-tain had to go
from place to place with
his troops, he thought that
this kind of sport would
train her for the mode of
life she would lead when
she came to live with him.

But this was not to be, for

one day he told Jane that
he must leave the East, and
take home the troops. As
it was a rule that no girl
should sail in a ship with
troops on board, he left Ker

to the care of a friend who
was to leave near the same
time. He thought fit that
she should dress in the
garb of a young man while
at sea, as there would then
be no need for her to keep
in her berth, and he knew
that she was strong and
brave, and would like to
go on deck,.and see the
crew at their work. It
gave the Cap-tain pain to
part with ‘his child, but

there was no help for it.

The ship had been some
weeks at sea, when one day
a storm broké over it, and
the wind drove it for days
out of its course. The
crew did their best to
steer clear of rocks, but
she struck on a reef and
sprung a leak. The boats
then put off from the wreck,
but a wave broke over the
WE FREIGHT OUR RAFT. II

the boys to get a good
nights rest, so that they
might be fresh for the toils
of the next day.

I then told my wife to
change her dress for, that
of one of the crew which
she had found, as her skirts
would have got in her way

when she had to climb.
She did. notiateunes aike

this, but did) so as soomas

she saw the truth of what

I told her.

At last, when all was
done, we went to bed, and
slept as sound as if we had
been on land.



CHAPTER II.

WE were‘all up at the
brcakwotwday,) and knelt
down to thank God that
He had kept us from harm
through the night.

“My dear boys,” said I,
“we have now, with the
help) of ))(Ged,\fotry joug
best to reach the shore. We
must, ere we go, give the
poor beasts on board both
food and drink to last them

for some days. I hope we
may yet find means to come
back and take them on
shore with us.”

Wie lithen ,.out))allmaiie
things on the raft, and ten
live hens .and two cocks
were put in one of the tubs.
Some ducks and geese we
let go, in the hope that they
would swim to the shore;
and a pair of doves were
20

so thick that we made Turk
go on first and tread a path
for us. I knew this was
just the place to find snakes,
so we each cut a cane, that
we might beat them off
should we meet with any.
As I took hold of my staff,
I felt a gum or juice ooze
out of the end. I put my
tongue to it, and found it
of a sweet taste. This led
me to suck the reed, and
I then knew that we had
met with the Su-car Cane.
By inscretime )Paitz had
done the same, for I could
see that he held his cane
to his mouth.

“Do not suck too much
Of it esaidinl is on ite wall
make you ill; but let us cut
some of the best and take
them back with us, for those
at home will prize so great
a treat.” This we did, and

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

bound them in a bunch,
which Fritz took on his back.

It did not take us long
to reach the place where
the palms grew, and then
we sat down in the shade.
to eat the food we had
brought with us. “Do you
see those nuts at the top of
the trees, Fritz?” said I.

‘lot ibe Sure “indo vn bur
they are far too iichmioss
reach. Look, look!” he
cried, “there are some Mon-
KEys; let me have a shot at
them.” - :

“Do nor doithat) [isaids
and held his arm; “it will
do us no good to kill them,
and I think I can make
use of them.” With that I
threw some stones up at
the tree where they were,
though they had got safe
out of my reach. They
then made a loud noise,
86

and found that flocks of
birds, most of which were
quails, had come there to
feed. This gave usa fine
day’s sport with our guns,
and the next year we did
not fail to look for them, so
that the fields were made
to yield a stock of game as
well as a crop of grain.

With but slight change
in our mode of life, we
spent ten long years in our
strange home. Yet the
time did not seem long
to us. Each day brought
with it quite as much work
as we could do, so that
weeks and months and
years flew past, till at last
we gave up all hope that
we should leave the isle or
see our old Swiss home,
the thought of which was
still dear to us. -

But the lapse of ten years

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

had wrought a great change
in our sons. Frank, who
was but a mere child when
we first came, had grown
up to be a strong youth;
and Jack was as brave a
lad as one could wish to
see. Fritz, of course, was
now a young man, and.
took a large share of the
work off my hands. Ernest
had just come of age, and
his shrewd mode of thought
and great tact was as great
a help to us as was the
strength and skill *of the
rest.

‘To crown all, it was a
rare thing for them to be
ill; and they were free from
those sins which too oft
tempt young men to stray
from the right path, My
wife and I did our best to
train them, so that they
might know right from
The young Ape brought Home on Turk’s back.


THE FLAX PLANT. 57

CRAP a Pain.

Frank one day found
some long leaves, to which,
from their shape, he gave
the name of sword leaves.
These he brought home to
play with, and then, when
he grew tired of them,
threw them down. As
they lay on the floor, Fritz
took some of them in his
hand, and found them so
limp; that he said he could
plait them, and make a
whip for Frank to drive
the sheep and goats with.
As he split them up to do
this, 1 could not but note
their strength. This led
me to try them, and I found
that we had now a kind
of flax plant, which was a
source of great joy to my
wife.

“You have not yet found
aljinine, (ismersaid,, “they
will be of more use to us
than this. Go at once and
search for some more of
these leaves, and bring me
the most you can of them.
With these I can make you
hose, shirts, clothes, thread,
rope; in short, give me
flax, and make me a loom
and some frames, and I
shall be at no loss for work
when the rain comes.”

I could not help a smile
at my wife's joy when she
heard the name of flax;
for there was still much to
do ere the leaves could take
the shape of cloth. But two
of the boys set off at once
to try to find some more of
the flax.
58 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

While they were gone,
my wife, full of new life,
and with some show of
pride, told me how I should
make the loom by means
of which she was to clothe
us from head to foot. Ina
short time they came back,
and brought with them a
good load of the plant,
which they laid at her feet.
She now said she would
lay by all else till she had
tried what she could make
of it. The first thing to be
done was to steep the flax.
To do this we took the
plant down to the marsh,
tied up in small bales, as
they pack hemp for sale.
The leaves were then
spread out in ‘the pond,
and kept down with stones,
and left there in that state
till it was time to take them
out and set them in the sun

to dry, when they would
be so soft that we could
peel them with ease. It
was two weeks ere the flax
was fit for us to take it out
of the marsh. We spread
it out on the grass in the
sun, where it dried so quick
that we took it home to
The Nest the same day.
It was then put by till we
could find time to make the
wheels, reels, and combs
which my wife said that
she would want to turn our
new found plant to its best
use. |

We now made haste to
lay (upasstore Lot Veamec:
nuts, wood, and such things
as we thought we might
want; and took care, while
it was still fine, to sow

wheat, and all the grain we

had left in our bags was
soon put in the ground.
74 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

By the time these works
were done our cave was in
a fit state for us to dwell in.
We did not now dread the
rain, for we were safe out
of its reach, and there was
no need that we should go
out init. We had a warm
‘light shop to work in by
day, a snug place. where
we could take our meals,
and dry bed rooms in which
we could sleep in peace.
Our live stock we kept in
a shed at the back of the
cave, and our store room
held all that we could want.

When the rain at length
set in, we all had some task
that kept us close at work
in the cave, My wife took
her wheel or her loom, both
of which I had: made for
her, for this kind of work
fell to her share from choice.

By the help of the wheels

‘who





of one of the ship's guns I
had made a lathe, and with
this I could turn legs for
stools and chairs. Ernest,
too, was fond of the lathe,
and soon learnt to do such
work quite as well as I.

At dusk, when we had
done our work for the day,
we brought out our stock
of books, and sat down to
read by the light of a lamp.

At times, Jack and Frank
would play a tune on their
flutes, which I had made
out of reeds; and my wife,
had a sweet voice,
would sing some of the old
Swiss songs, that brought
to our minds the joys of
home.

Though we were by no
means dull, nor in want of
work to fill up our time, we
were glad when the time
came for the rain to cease,
20

so thick that we made Turk
go on first and tread a path
for us. I knew this was
just the place to find snakes,
so we each cut a cane, that
we might beat them off
should we meet with any.
As I took hold of my staff,
I felt a gum or juice ooze
out of the end. I put my
tongue to it, and found it
of a sweet taste. This led
me to suck the reed, and
I then knew that we had
met with the Su-car Cane.
By inscretime )Paitz had
done the same, for I could
see that he held his cane
to his mouth.

“Do not suck too much
Of it esaidinl is on ite wall
make you ill; but let us cut
some of the best and take
them back with us, for those
at home will prize so great
a treat.” This we did, and

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

bound them in a bunch,
which Fritz took on his back.

It did not take us long
to reach the place where
the palms grew, and then
we sat down in the shade.
to eat the food we had
brought with us. “Do you
see those nuts at the top of
the trees, Fritz?” said I.

‘lot ibe Sure “indo vn bur
they are far too iichmioss
reach. Look, look!” he
cried, “there are some Mon-
KEys; let me have a shot at
them.” - :

“Do nor doithat) [isaids
and held his arm; “it will
do us no good to kill them,
and I think I can make
use of them.” With that I
threw some stones up at
the tree where they were,
though they had got safe
out of my reach. They
then made a loud noise,
76

Ernest took aim with his
gun, and shot at the snake,
so did Fritz and Jack, but
it gave no sign that they
had hit it. I then tried my
skill, but it did not seem to
feel my shot any more than
theirs, though I was sure I
must have struck its head.
Just as we took aim at it
once more, we saw it turn
round and glide through
the reeds in the marsh.

Our fears kept us’ for
three long days in the Cave.
The snake gave no sign
that could lead us to think
it was still near, but the
ducks and geese had left
the spot where their nests
were, and this we knew to
be a bad sign. On the
fourth day I went to the
door, with a view to let out
some of the beasts to graze,
‘for we were short of food

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

for them. The ass was just
at my back, and as soon
as it saw the light, made
a rush to get out. Off it
went, straight to the sands,
with its, heels in the air, but
just as it got to the marsh
we saw the boa glide out
from the reeds, part its wide
jaws, and make for its prey.
The ass at once saw its foe,
but stood still as if struck
with fear, and in less time
than I take to tell it, our
old friend was tight in the
folds of the boa.

This was a sad sight for
all of us, yet we could not
take our eyes off the snake,
but saw it crush the poor
beast, and then gorge its
prey. When it had put the
whole of the ass out of
sight, it laid down on the
sand quite still, as if it had
gone to sleep or died.
68

would serve a whole town
for a life time.”

When we went back to
The Nest that night we
laid out a plan for our new
home, for there could be
no doubt that the cave was
the best place for us to
dwell in, though we should
still sleep in The Nest
when. we went on that side
of the stream.

The next day we all set
to work; the floor of the
cave was quite smooth, and
the walls dry, so that we
could build at once. We
first cut holes in the sides
of the rock to let in the
light, and then brought
frames and panes of glass
from The Nest, and put
themin. We then brought
all the planks and wood we
could find, and built a

strong wall in the midst of

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



the cave. On the right side
of this wall we made three
rooms, two of which were
to be used as bed rooms,
and one to take our meals
in. -On the left side was a
room for my wife to cook in,
one to work in, to which we
gave the name of the shop,
and a place with stalls in it
for our live stock. At the
tback of these was a store
house, where we could keep
our stock of food and the
whole of our spare goods.

I need not say that it took
us some months to do all
this, nor that we had to toil
hard day by day, from morn
till night, ere we got to the
end of our task; but the
end did come at last, and
then the joy we felt that we
had done all this with our
own hands more than paid
us for our toil.
THE LASSO. — 43

could take an aim as well
with a stone as he could
with his gun.

As yet we had not seen
muen of the isle: for
though Fritz and I had
gone some few miles round
.the place where we dwelt,
it took most of our time
to build the house, and
this kept us hard at work
Medi the tree, whut, one
day we made up our minds
that we would all start on
a tour. We rose at dawn,
put the ass in the sledge,
took what food we thought

we should need, and set

out from The Nest just as
the sun rose.

My sons and I took our
guns, Prank «sat in; the
sledge, my wife led the
ass, and the ape rode on
the back of our dog Turk.

When we came to the

wood where Fritz found
the ape, he told them by
what means we got the
nuts, but now there were
no apes there to throw
them down.

“Oh, if one would but
fall from the trees,” he said.

The words had but just
left his lips when a large
nut fell at his feet. He
made a start back, and two
more came down near the
same spot.

elt seeins* «SalG@ielta was
if we had but-to wish for
a thing and we get it.”

As the nuts were far
from ripe, I was at a loss to
know how they could fall
off the tree, for I could not
see an ape nor a bird near.
All at once Jack cried
out, “See, see! here comes
our friend, but I can't say
much for his looks.”
A NEW FARM. 71

At the end of the plain
we came to the brow of a
high hill, from which the
eye fell on a view the like
_of which we had not yet
een) Prees fol cally chide
grew on the sides of the
hill, and a clear stream ran
ciiougiy diel plain iat}, 1s
base, and shone bright in
the rays of the sun.

Wesaid at once that this
should be the site of our
-new farm. Close by we
found a group of trees, the
trunks of which, as they
stood, would do for the
main props of the house.

I had long had a mind
to build a boat, and here I
at last came on a tree that
would suit. Fritz and I
went for a mile or two in
search of what we could
find, and by the time we
came back my wife had



put up our tent for the
mistts), We}\ thenpaligmeac
down to sup, and went to
rest on. beds made of the
bags of the white down
that we brought from the
trees on the plain.

The next day we rose at’
dawns); (hey trcess wiiela
were to form the frame of
our farm house stood on
a piece of land eight yards
long by five wide. I made
a deep cut in each of the
trunks, ten feet from the
ground, and put up cross
beams to -form a roof, on
which we laid some bark
in such a way that the rain

would run off.

We were hard at work
for some days at the Farm
House. The walls we built
of thin laths and long reeds,
wove close for six feet from
the ground, but the rest we
60

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.



past. Then we went down
to the shed we had built
on the ground at the root
of the tree, and made the
best shift we could. All
our stores were kept heré,
so that the space was too
small to hold us, and the
smell from the beasts made

it far from a fit place for

six of us to dwell in; but
it was at least safe for a
time, and this was of course
the first thing to be thought
of. To dress our food we
had to make a fire in the
barn, and as there was no
place to let out the smoke,
it got dqwn.our throats and
made us cough all the day
long.

It was now for the first
time that my wife gave a
sigh for her old Swiss
home. But we all knew
Giaedumita Was PORTION TGe nt

grieve, and each set to
work to do all he could to
make the place look neat
and clean. Some of our
stores we took up the stairs
out of our way, and this
gave uS more room. As
we had cut square holes
in the trunk of the tree all
the way up, and put in
frames of glass that we
got from the ship, my wife
could sit on the stairs, with
Frank at her feet, and mend
our,,clothes.|)/ Bach dave
drove from the barn such
of the beasts as could bear:
to be out inthe rain. That
we might not lose them, I
tied bells round their necks ;
and if we found that they
did not come back when
the sun went down, Fritz
and I went out to bring
them in. We oft got wet
through to the skin, which


The Boys take Home the Ostrich,
THE WRECK. 4I

brought back tried our|found, which we ate with

strength.

My wife soon} milk from the cow and the

made a fire to boil some| goat, and then went up to

of the fruit that Ernest had |The Nest for the night.



Chir EE Re Te

Ir took the whole of the
next day to make a sledge,
to which we tied the ass,
and drove to Tent House.
On our sledge we put such
of the casks which held
food, and took them back
to The Nest. Inthe course
of the same week, Fritz
and I went once more to
the wreck, and this time
we brought off chests of
clothes, pigs of lead, cart
wheels, sacks of maize,
oats, peas, and wheat, and
a small mill that had been
used by the cook on board

to grind the peas with
which he made soup for
the crew. When we thad
put these on board the
raft, there was not an inch
of room to spare. With a
strong bar we broke down
some of the doors, and.
took such parts of the ship
as we thought would aid
us to build our house,
which as yet was far less
safe than I could wish.
These we bound: with
cords, and made them float
back at the stern of the.
raft.
56

or trod the hard rocks with
bare feet.

By this time our sow had
brought forth ten young
pies) and eanewiens had
each a brood of fine chicks.
Some we kept near us, but
most
the wood, where my wife
said she could find them
when she had need to use
them.

I knew the time must
now be near when, in this

clime, the rain comes down

day by day for weeks, and
that it would wash us out
of The Nest if we did not
make a good roof to our
house. Then our live stock
would need some _ place
where they could rest out

Grete went | to;

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

of the rain. The thatch for
The Nest was of course
our first care; then we
made a long roof of canes
for our live stock, and on
this we spread clay and
moss, and then a thick coat
Of tar.wso thagit) was) vane
proof (from vena) tomvencds
This was held up by thick
canes stuck deep in the
ground, with planks made
fast to them to form the
walls, and round the whole
we put a row of cask staves
to serve for rails. ‘In this
way we soon had a barn,
store room, and hay loft,
with stalls for the cow, the
ass, and what else we kept
that had need of a place to
live in.
THE END DRAWING NEAR.

it



Ernest, and Frank, leave to
go with him, as there was
room in the ship now that
the Wests were to stay
with us.

The ship was brought
round to Safe Bay, and
Fritz and Jack went on
board to fetch Mrs. West
and her, two girls, who
were glad to find that they
were not to go back to the
ship, for the storm had
made them dread the sea.

I may here say, by the
way, that my wife soon
found that her two sons
grew fond of their fair
friends, and gave me a hint
that some day we should
see them wed, which would
be a fresh source of joy
EOS,

I have not much more
to tell. The stores I had

laid up—furs, pearls, spice,

and fruits—were put on
board the ship, and left to
the care of my sons, who
were to sell them. And
then the time came for us
to part. I need not say
that it was a hard trial for
my wife; but she bore up
well, for she had made up
her mind that it was all
for the best, and that her
'sons would some day come
| back to see her. I felt,
‘too, that with the help of
lour new friends, we should
not miss them so much as
we at first thought, and
this we found to be the
case. :

As the next day my
boys were to leave me, I
had a long talk with them.
I told them to act well
their part in the new sphere
in which they were to
move, and to take as their
HARVEST TIME.

OPEAE ST Eine IT

Our fields near Tent
House had by this time
brought forth good crops
of wheat, maize, beans, and
peas; but as the work of
the Cave had for some
weeks kept us on this side
of the stream, we did not
know in what state we
should find our crops at
The Nest.

One day we all set out
for our old home. We
found our corn fields of a
rich brown hue, and saw
that the wheat was, for the
most part, fit to reap. This,
and a large patch of rye,
we cut down, and, as we
did so, whole flocks of birds

took to wing when we got
~ near them, while quails were
seen to run off at the sight

of our dogs, who had no
lack of sport that day.

We laid by the seed that
was quite ripe till the time
should come for us to sow
it, and put the rest in sacks.
Some of the wheat was
laid up in sheaves till we
should have time to beat
out the grain.

When we left The Nest
for the Cave, we could not
find the hand mill that we
had brought from the ship.
This now came to light, and
we took care to pack it up
to take with us, as we should
want it to grind our corn.

That night we slept once
more in the great tree; but
I must say that we did not
now sleep so sound there
as we used to do, nor did
70

we feel so safe as we did in
our rooms at Rock House.
The next day we were
to start a plan by means of
which our live stock would
not want so much of our
care. They had bred so
fast that we could well
spare some of them, and
these I thought might be
left in some place to seek
their own food, and yet be
in reach should we want
them. Vi:
~My wite took from her
hen roost ten young fowls,
and I took four young pigs,
four sheep, and two goats.
These we put in our large
cart, with such tools as we
thought we should need,
~ tied the black ox, the cow,
and the ass to the shafts,
and then set off from The
Nest.

We had to cross a wide

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

plain, anedeeinere: vel miet
with some dwarf plants, on
which, as Jack would have
it, grew snow balls.

Fritz ran to see what
they were, and brought me
a twig to which clung balls
of snow white down. I
held it up to show my wife,
for I knew the sight would
please her still more than
ier somse 31)

“Seco ) said tii thicmris
the Cort-ton plant, which
you have oft tried to find.
It seems to grow here as.
thick as weeds, and, if I
am a judge, it is of the
best kind.”

We got as much of this
as our bags could hold,
and my wife took care to
pluck some of the ripe seed,
that we might raise a crop
in our grounds at Tent
House.
The Fight with the Bears at the Cave.


af
A CHANGE-IN PROSPECT.



our dress, made them no
doubt guess that we were
wild men of the woods;
for at last one of the crew
on board held up knives
and glass beads, which I
knew the wild tribes of the
New World were fond of.
This made us laugh, but
we would not as yet draw
nigh to the ship, as we
thought we ought to meet

our new friends in our best’

trim.

We then gave a shout
and a wave of the hand,
and shot off round the cape
as fast as our boat would
take us. We soon got back
to Rock House, where our
dear ones were on the look
out for us. My wife said
we had done quite right
to come back, but Jane
thought we should have
found out who they were.



107

That night none of us
slept well; our guest thought
there might now be a chance
for her to reach her home,
and she dreamt she heard
the well known voice of
her sire call her to come to
him. The boys were half
crazed with vague hopes,
and lay for hours ere they
went to sleep. My wife
ance IMsaty up blatcutons ims
and talk of the use that
might be made of this
chance. We felt that we
were now full of years, and
should not like in our old
age to leave the place
where we had spent the
best part of our lives; still
we might do some trade
with the land from which
the ship came, if it were but
known that we were here,
and we might hear news of
our dear Swiss home.
go

was scarce a spot for leagues
round that was not well
known to them.

At one time, Fritz had
been so long from home
that we had a dread lest
he should have lost his
way, or fell a prey to wild
beasts. When he came
back he told us a long tale
of what.he had seen and
where he had been, and
how he had brought with
him birds, beasts, moths,
and such strange things as
he thought Ernest would
like to see. When he had
done, he drew me out into
our grounds and said he
had a strange thing to tell
me. Itseems that he found
a piece of white cloth tied
to the foot of a bird which
he had struck down with a
stick, on which were these
words: “Save a poor soul,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

who is on the rock from
which you may see the
smoke rise.”

He thought that this rock
could not be far off, and
that he ought to set off at
once in search of it.

“T have a thought,” said
he ER willl tea‘ piece or
cloth, like that I found, to
the leg of the bird, and on
it I will write, ‘Have faith
in God: help is near.” If
the bird goes back to the
place from whence it came,
our brief note may reach
the eye of the lone one on
the rock. At any rate, it
can do no harm, and may
do some good.”

He at once took the bird,
which was an AL-BA-TROSS,
tied the strip of cloth to
its foot, and let it go.

“And now,’ said he,

“tell me what you think of
92

There was scarce a spot
we came to that did not
bring to the mind of one of
us some such tale as this,
so'that we were full of talk
while the boat bore us on.

We had been out some
days, but could find no trace
of what we went in search.
I rose from my berth at
dawn,’and went on deck
with Fritz. I told him
that as we had no clue to
the place, we must now give
up the search. He did not
seem to like this, but no
more was said. That day
_ we spent on shore, and came
back to our boat to sleep
at night. Next day we
were to change our course,
and trace our way back, for
the wind now blew from
the sea.

When I went on deck
next day I found a short

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

note from Fritz, in which
he told me that he could
not give up the search, but
had gone some way up the
soast. im) thisvismalluaboat
“Let me beg of you,’ he
wrote, “to lie in wait for
me here till I come back.”

When he had been gone
two days, I felt that I ought |
to tell my wife the cause of
our trip, as it might ease
her mind, and she now had
some fear lest her son
should not be safe. She
heard me to the end, and
then said that she was sure
he would not fail, but soon
bring back good news.

As we were all on the
look out for Fritz, we saw
his boat a long way off.

“There is no one with
him in the boat,” said I to
my wife; “that does not
say much for our hopes.”


A SURPRISE.

felt that age would soon
creep on us, and we could
not help some doubts as
COMmiiteN tate: | O14) eu? sons:
Should we stay and end
_our days here, some one of
us would live out the rest,
and this thought came oft
to my mind, and brought
with it a sense of dread I
couldn not ioct rid von 1 /it
made me pray to God that
he would save us all from
so dire a fate as to die far
from the sound of the voice

89

of man, with no one to hear
our last words, or lay us in
the earth when He should
call us to our rest.

My wife did not share
this dread. “Why should

swe go. back?” she would

say. “We have here all
that we can wish for. The
boys lead a life of health,
free from sin, and live with .
us, which might not be the
case if we went out in the
world. Let us leave our

fate in the hands of God.”



CHAPTER XIV.

PomPeiritz 1, ange ernest
were now men, they were
of course free to go where
they chose, and to come
back when their will led

them home. Thus, from

time to time they took long
trips, and went far from
Rock House. They had
fine boats and strong steeds,
and of these they made
such good use that there
80

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

CHAPTER XIII.

We had now so much
work to do, and the days
and weeks came and went
so quick, that I do not
think weshould have known
the time of year had it not
been for our log. |

Some days were spent at
the Cave, where we made
our goods, ground our flour,
stored our food, and kept
our tame live stock. Then
we had to take care of our
crops on the fields near
The Nest, and this took us
two or three days in each
month. Once in ten days
at least we went to the
Barimone tie. hills anc eat
the same time made a call
at the Half Way House;
so that there was not a day
that we had not our hands

quite full. Now and then
we went out to hunt for
sport or to add to our stock
of beasts, which had grown
so large that there were
few we could name that
had not been caught and
brought home. We had
birds of the air, fowls of
the land, and beasts of all
kinds, from the great black

ox of the plain to the small

wild Ras-sit that came and
made its hole close by our
cave.

But there was one bird
that we had not yet caught,
though we had seen it two
or three times in the woods.
This was, the Os-rrien,
Fritz found a nest with
some eggs in it, and this
led us to make a tour with
bie

SWISS PAMILY ROBINSON.

IN

WORDS Om OVE Si A be

ABRIDGED AND ADAPTED FROM THE ORIGINAL STORY BY

I Ey Me

AUTHOR OF “THE BOY’S FIRST READER,” ‘‘THE GIRL’S FIRST READER,”
“QUEER CHARACTERS,” ETC. °

WITH COLORED ILLUSTRATIONS.

NEW YORK.
MCLOUGHLIN BROS., PUBLISHERS.


as I felt that the ship did
not sink, I went to the stern,
and found, to my joy, that
she was held up by a piece
of rock on each side, and
made fast likea wedge. At
the same time I saw some
trace of land, which lay to
the south, and this made
me go back with some hope
that we had still a faint
chance, though how to get
from the ship I could not
tell.

As soon as I got down-
stairs I took my wife by the
hand, and said, “Be of good
cheer, we are at least safe
for some time, and if the
wind should veer round, we
may yet reach the land that
lies but a short way off.”

I said this to calm the
fears of my wife and sons,
and it did so far more than

I had a right to hope. ,

LAND IN SIGHT. 7

“Let us now take some
food,” said my wife. “We
are sure to need .it, for this
will no doubt be a night to
try our strength.”

We still heard the roar
of the sea, and now and
then the planks would creak
as if they were torn up
from the deck, so that we
had still good cause to fear
that we might go down.

My wife got some food
for her boys, which we were
glad to see them eat, poor
as it was; but we could not
share their meal. Three
out of the four were put
to bed in their berths, and
soon went to sleep; but
Fritz, who was our first
child, would not leave us.
He said, like a good son,
that he would try to be of
some use, and think what
could be done.
88 THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

plants.
charm to our home, and
made the grounds round it
a source of joy when we
laid by our work for the
day. In fact, we thought
there was now scarce a
thing to wish for that we
had not got.

Our cares were few, and
our life was as full of joy
_and peace as we could well
wish; yet I oft cast a look
on the sea, in the hope
that some day I should spy
a sail, and once more greet
a friend from the wide
world from which we had
been so long shut out. This
hope, vague as it was, led
me to store up such things
as would bring a price, if
we had the chance to sell
them; they might prove a
source of wealth to us if
a ship came that way, or

All this gave a|

would at least help to pay
the charge of a cruise back

to the land we came from.

It is but just to say that
the boys did not share my
hopes, nor did they seem
to wish that we should
leave the place where they
had been brought up. It
was their world, and the
cave, to. which we gave the
name Rock House, was
more dear to them than
any spot on the earth.

“Go back!” Fritz would
say; vito leave, ourmcave,
that we dug with our own
hands; to part with our
dear kind:beasts and birds;
to bid good by to our
farms, and so much that is
our own, and which no one
in the world wants. No,
no. You can not wish us
to leave such a spot.”

My dear wife and I both
THE RAINY SEASON.

The fear that the rain might
come and put a stop to our
work led us to take our
meals in haste, and to make
the days as long as we
could see. We knew that
the rain was close at hand,
for the nights were cold;
large clouds could be seen
in the sky, and the wind
blew as we had not felt
it since the night our ship
struck on the rock. |

The great change came
at last. One night we were
woke up out of our sleep
‘with the noise made by the
rush of the winds through
the woods, and we could
hear the loud roar of the
sea far off. Then the dense
storm clouds which we had
seen in the sky burst on us,
and the rain came down in
floods. The streams, pools,
and ponds on all sides were

59

soon full, and the whole
plain round us met our
view as one vast lake. By
good luck, the site of our
house stood up out of the
flood, and our group of
trees had the look of a
small isle in the midst of
the lake. |

We soon found that The
Nest was not built so well
as we thought, for the rain
came in at the sides, and
we had good cause to fear
that the wind would blow
the roof off. Once the
storm made such a rush at
it, that we heard the beams
creak, and the planks gave
signs that there was more

istrain on them than they

could bear. This dtove us
from our room to the stairs
in the trunk, on which we
sat in a state of fear till
the worst of the storm was
.8

THE IGUANA.

grunt told us that the dogs
had found the beast, and
were no doubt at his
throat. But just then we
heard Ernest laugh, and
saw the two dogs come
through a clump of brush
wood, with our old sow
fast by the ears. She did
not seem to like the way
in which they had put an
end to her feast of fruit, so
she ran back as soon as
we told the dogs to let go
their hold of her ears.
“But with all our sport,’
Said. Ptiize we shave.” a
poor show of game. Let
us leave the young ones,
and set off to see what we
can meet with.” Ernest,
who was not so fond of
field sports as the rest, sat
down with Frank, and. we
left them and my wife at
the gourd tree, while Fritz

45



and Jack set off with me
to a high rock which we
saw on the right.. Jack
went first and broke off
the twigs, to let him pass
through, with as much ease
as if he had been born to
that kindvot wonkmcal rit Z
look here,” said he, as he
made his way to the rock.

“What have you found
now?” said Fritz.

“T don’t know what it is,
butatsractinerizes!

When I went up I saw
at once that it was a large
I-cu-a-wa, the flesh and
eggs of which are both
good for food. Fritz would
have shot at it, but I told
him that its scales were no
doubt shot proof, and that
I knew a way to catch it
that I thought would do
quite as well. I had heard
that these and such like
THE END OF THE BOA. 77

“ Now is the time to seal
the fate of our foe,” said I
to Fritz; and with that we
went out with our guns.
When we got near, we
both took a straight aim,
and each put a ball in its
head. This made it move
with a start, and writhe as
if in pain.

“See how its eyes glare
on us with rage. Now
load your gun, and let us
put) a, bit’ more lead in
him.”

Our next shot went in
its eyes. It then shook:as
with a strong spasm, and
fell dead on the sand.

A shout of joy brought
my wife and the three boys
to the spot. The state of
fear they had been kept in
for three whole days had
made them quite ill, but
now the joy of Jack and

Frank knew no bounds, for
they leapt on the snake and
beat it as if they would
go mad.

My wife said that the
death of the boa took a
great weight off her mind,
for she thought it would
lie in wait for us near the
Cave, starve us out, and
then kill us as it had done
the poor ass.

We slit up the snake,
and took out the flesh of
the ass, which the boys
laid in a grave near Tent
House. The boa’s skin we
hung up at the door of the
Cave, over which Ernest
wrote the words, “ No ass
to be found here,” which
we all thought to be a
good joke.

One day late in the
spring I went with my
three sons a long way from
26

we can but get across the
stream with our goods.”

“But would you have
us roost, like fowls, in a
tree? How do you think
Wye COMlGmGeiNI UDI LO / OU
perch ?”

“Was there not a large
lime tree in our town in
which they built a_ ball
room, with stairs up the
trunk ?”

“To be sure there was,”
ec wleueane it we can not
build in it, we can at least
make use of its shade,

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

and dwell in a hut on the
roots.”

Ernest said that he took
a string, and found that it
was twelve yards round.
This led me to think that
my wife's scheme was by
no means a bad one, and
that I would have a look
at the tree the next day.

Wiens ly nadine anciear
they had to tell, we knelt
down to pray, and then
sought a good night's rest,
which the toils of the day
made us much in need of.



CHAPTER V.

Wuen I rose from my
Dedierneminerxt cay.) livcatc|

to my wife; “Does it not

seem, my dear, as if God
had led us to this place,

and that we should do
wrong to leave it?”
“What you say may be
quite true, so far as it goes,”
she said; “but I must tell
following list embraces some sof the iat stories for’

childy nm ever published. ° They are pr pon fine paper,

éar legible type, and are fully illus’ in: colors. They

‘are elégantly, bound in cloth, with-beveled, edges; émbossed in

black and gold; “andy "mounted with fine illustrations, in oil.

lors and varnish. . In beauty-of finish and the durability of

pBiCE. 50. CEN TS EA CH.
‘| SUNSHINE, STORY BOOK. >.
FAIRY He STORY BOOK. '

*
.

by hundred Fables, “literally t translated : from tthe
dred and Voice bos fine ill sttations. +216 rae:

REASON . IN RHYME.

12mo.

Satie People: 96° pages
rinted i in colors.” Fifty illustrations.

Stories The Old Woman and her Pig,

The House that Jack Built, The Courtship
ren, Deathvand Burial-of Poor.Cock Robin,

Red Riding-Hood, and The History

ith 'Seventy- -two illustrations. Royal 16mo.,

MELODIES—(Complete.)

_ twenty-four stories, with one hundred
2 2 Pages as ak ‘16mo.

ser" ror Bip poe ye ngs “Doge? Sains Pari, King
3 8 Feast, Wandering Bunny, Spoilt Piggy Wiggy, and Cat's

y—with forty- eigh:

MOUS JINGLES. °
u Queei rot Heart Bright Thoughts, ‘Old
Dame Trot; Rich Mrs. Duck, and Joyful Tales—with forty-eight
. tWo-third page illustrations. BYO, 7A; {

mes, adapted to the understanding of all
‘Twenty-four. full-page ‘illustrations.
OF FAMILL STORIES, ;
B rsery Friends, in a new dress. 4to cap. trent:
four full-page: illustrations. jPrinted § in colors.

MOTHER ‘GOOSE SET TO ‘MUSIC.

Oa to suit the compass of children’s voices,
Lior. Sixty-four illustrations. 8vo,

ains the Charming Stories 6f—Hector, the Dog, Frisky, the
Squirrel, The Robin’s Christmas Eve, and Little Anna and her
Mamma—with scotty fonts pasa: illustrations in colors.
Ri ; Z

op

Rev. Gro. “TYLER. ‘Townsenp, M, ‘A. - One hun- |



strations. ‘Printed in colors. ore

| Four capital Stories for Children. -

~» in colors,

NURSERY. ‘COLORED. PICTURE BOOK.
Contains sixteen stories, each accom} nied by sixteen fall-
paged illustrations in.colors. Royal 8yo.

SIMPLE ADDITION AND NURSERY JINGLES.

Contains Simple Addition and fifty-five. Nursery Jingles, A LE

_ thirty illustrations in'eolors, “Syo.

*| LITTLE FOLKS COLORED PICTURE BOOK.

Contains thirty-six stories, with sixteen full- -paged illustrations
~ Royal:8vo. -

UNCLE JOHN'S ‘DROLLERIES.

3 -|Contains—The Ark Alphabet, Dash’ s Holiday, Miss Mouser s- Tea

° Party;and The Ten pie Niggers, - forty: -four. ilusieations: ;
~ Royal 8vo.. °

ROBINSON CRUSOE (hn Words of One Syllable.) >

"| Spiritedly written. 93 pages. 4td: cap. Six full- “page, illustra-
tions. Printed i in colors. :

| SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. fade of One Sytlante.

One of the best. Juvenile books. 112 pages:
full-page illustrations. Printed in colors. :
SANDFORD AND MERTON (In Words of One Syllable.)

A charming story. 142° pages: Sto, ey: Six full- ee illus:
trations. ‘Printed i in colors.

| PRIOR $1. 50 EA CH.
HALF HOURS WITH THE BIBLE. -

An epitome of the Histories contained “dias old ag New ,
Testament. 350 Pages:: Boyes j6m0.§ ame. hundred and
fifty illustrations. =

MOTHER G00SE—BEST. EBITION. © j

350 illustrations. 320 pages. Royal ino

AUNT LOUISA’S LITTLE TREASURE,

Contains four stories— Tit, Tin ny and Tittens, Three Good Faenas, 4
Four-Footed Friends, and Three Little. Kittens—with Leys

sate Sab"

:

four full-paged illustrations in colors. ~ 4to,

| AUNT LOUISA’S WEE-WEE: STORIES. e

Comprises four stories— Country Alphabet, ‘Baby, wy Diddle
Diddle, and My Mother—with Bae Ue eee ae .
trations. 4to, .-

AUNT LOUISA’S CHILD'S DELIGHT: rosy

| Contains four standard stories—Rip Van Winkle, Yankee Doodle,
Pocahontas anid Dufoaingg MN Preah four full- ree ee
‘tions in colors. 4to. —— .

AUNT LOUISAV’S FAIRY. ‘LEGENDS, ts '

Contains four popular ‘stories—Puss ‘in’ Boots, Jack ana the
~ Pean-Stalle, White Cat,” ‘and Cinderella—with iments
“full- -paged illustrations i in colors. Ato. ey

AUNT LOUISA’S, GERMS OF KINDNESS. ;

A collection of Moral Rhymes afd S‘ori*s, | 50 pages. Ato.
‘Twenty-four illustrations. . Printed in colors.

AUNT LOUISA’S CHARMS FOR CHILDREN. .

50 pages. to. medium.
Twenty-four illustrations. - “Printed j in Piers:

GOOD OLD STORIES... - xt .

Contains four stories— Mother Hbbard, Three Behe Chek Robin,

and Tom’ Thumb—with oo full- papas illustrations
in'colors. . 4to. . ‘ £

os

sae oy"
ees

OFT-TOLD TALES— -(New,.

Contains four stories—Robinson Crusoe, Cliéldren in: the Woods:
Hare and Tortoise, and World-Wide Fables—with aes four *
~full- “paged illustrations i in gor sdto. : *



TE


50

THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.

said that we would now

stay at home, at least for
some days.

My first work was to
make some wax lights, for
my wife could then mend
our clothes at night, while
we sat down to talk. This
done, the next task they
gave me was to make a
churn. What with my lack
of skill, and want of tools,
I thought it best not to
aim too high, so I took a
large gourd, made a small
hole in the side, and cut
out as much as I could, so
as to leave but the rind.
In this I put the cream,
laid a piece on the hole,
and bound it up so that
none could come out. The
. boys then held a_ cloth,
and on it I put the gourd,
which they made to roll
from side to side. They

kept up this game with
great mirth for near an
hour, when my wife took
off the string, and found
that the churn had done
its work well.

“We shall not have to
eat dry bread now,” said
Frank; and I was as glad
as he that such was the
case.

As our sledge was not
fit to use on rough roads,
my next work was to make
a, cat, ulishadi breug nie
pair of wheels from the
wreck, so that my task did
not prove a hard one. It
is true I did not make
what you might call a neat
job of it, but for all that
we found it of great use.

While I was thus at
work, my wife and the
boys took some of the
fruit trees we had brought
ANOTHER SURPRISE. 19

and made a fair meal of the
fruit.

At the end of the wood
we came to a plain which
gave us a clear view of the
place. Fritz, who was on
the look out, ran off with
Turk to some strange trees
that he saw on the right.

“Do come here,” hecried,
“and tell me what these
are.)

When I got up to him,
it gave me no small joy to
find that it was a gourd
ihe ee,

SErya carlton ciel you
eanecct, noldvrompotici or
those queer lumps _ that
grow on it.”

With that he brought
‘ one down, and we had a
look at it.

PON wotetais! isaidel le
Wercanmmake ai qalatc ve

dish omartackenlt 4s) by.

no means a nice kind of
food, but wild men set great
store by its shell, which
they use to hold their food
and drink.”

We then set to work to
make plates of the gourds,
which we did in this way:
I tied a string round the
shell, and then made nicks
all round it with a sharp
knife. In these we put the
string, and then gave it a
tight pull, which cut it in
half, and made two bowls.
When we had thus made
some eight or ten bowls,
and some flat ones for
plates, we laid them out in
the sun to dry, and then
went on our way.

We could see, not far off,
a grove of fine palm trees,
but to reach them we should
have to pass through reeds
and long grass, which grew



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