Citation
The Merry ballads of the olden time

Material Information

Title:
The Merry ballads of the olden time : illustrated in pictures & rhyme
Creator:
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Emrik & Binger ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
F. Warne & Co.
Manufacturer:
Emrik & Binger, Chromolithographer
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Kings and rulers -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Clergy -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1880 ( lcsh )
Ballads -- 1880 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1880
Genre:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
ballad ( fast )
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Content Advice:
The King and the Abbot of Canterbury -- Sir Richard Whittington -- Tom Thumb -- The marriage of Allan-a-Dale -- Sir Francis Drake -- Robin the Conjurer -- The blind beggar of Bethnal Green -- The child born to be a king.
General Note:
Without music.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026641131 ( ALEPH )
ALG4501 ( NOTIS )
03195191 ( OCLC )

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S1 hearth, the family listened to the
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Sales of the Gesla Bomans (orm, orthe
suto the songcts of the) hae been popularing



minstrels.
"amon Pblist the ho that th manold
chenearm lingers round them stimell, and
thaten, therein sunny nook, or by fireside,
they may sthe fill delighstened the fresh
tales of the Gesliz Romaizo;-=,, or



minds of the childrenson of the wanderine-
mi~nstrels.
ZC Publishers hope that the old
ii chain linuer-s roundly them still, and
that in sunny nook, or b~y fireside,
they may~ still dellorht the fresh
M incls of the children of the nine-
teenth century, as the), did those of
the little ones of the days long ago.
. . .

........ ----- ..... .. .












099 amusing Ballad is
very od. It was first called
King John and the Bishop
"of Canterbury "; but in King
JAMES Ist's time it was written
-.. again as we have it here. It
is almost the only time when
"we hear anything merry or
S good-humoured of King John,
"/ the most wicked of all our
'kings. Children must espe-
cially dislike the cruel Uncle,
i ": who caused his poor little
nephew Arthur to be killed,
that he might take his crown.
SBut I think before that time
John may have been rather a
better man, and able to laugh
Sat a good joke.
It was the fashion in those
days to ask these puzzling
kinds of questions. .',x-:

















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lttle r ht.
^^ ~might,
| :.K iFor he did great wrong and maintained
S .. v little right.
S And I'll tell you a story, a story so merrie,
Concerning the Abbot of Canterbury;
How for his housekeeping and high renown,
They rode post for him to fair London .town.

















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An hundred men, the King did hear say,
The Abbot kept in his house every day,
"-? r.) And fifty gold chains without any
.U I3 ~doubt,
In velvet coats waited the Abbot ,0 !.
About. '/.



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I Thou-keepest a far better house than me;
And for thy housekeeping and high renown.
""I fear thou worst treason against m cro
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I fear thou work'st treason against my' crown
B ,,d o hhuespn n ihrnl








" My liege," quo' the Abbot, I would it were known,
I never spend nothing but what is my own;
And I trust your Grace will not put me in fear, j
For spending of my own true gotten gear."
















high,
'Yes, yes, Father Abbot, thy fault- it is

And now for the same thou needest
must die,
For except thou can't answer me
questions three.
Thy head shall be, smitten from thy
bodies!








"And first,' quo' the King, "when I'm in this stead,
SWith my crown of gold so
/ fair on my head,
i 1 /l
i 'i. / Among all my liegemen so
.-I ..j : noble of birth,

"I "" -Thou must tell me to one
"i J penny what I am worth.
"^ : ( /' '

"" ,s 7 Secondly, tell me without
i'' any doubt,
How soon I may ride the
Whole world about;
And at the third question
-thou must not shrink,
But tell me here truly what
.I do think."

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',. Oh! these are hard questions
\- for my shallow wit.
P/ 'Now I cannot answer your
"/"'( o' ( Grace as yet;
But if thou wilt give me but
three weeks' space,
S'I. i I'll do my endeavour to answer
S; i 'I your Grace."

--" r'" Now three weeks' space to
S'thee will I give,
SL) And that is the longest time
j thou hast to live;
:. For if thou dost not answer
my questions three,
^y^ .Thy lands and thy livings are
forfeit to me.










So away rode the Abbot, all sad at that word,
And he rode to Cambridge and Oxenforde:
But never a doctor there was so wise,
That could with his learning an answer devise.




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Then home rode the Abbot of comfort so cold.
And he met his shepherd aging to fold;
"And now. my Lord Abbot, you are welcome home, ,
W\\hat news do you bring us from good King John ? "


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"Sad news. sad news, shepherd, I must give.
That I have but three days more to live;
For if I do not answer him questions three,
My head will be smitten from my bodie









THE DOCTOR, A __E PUZZLED:
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The first is to tell him there in that stead
With his crown of gold so fair on his head,
Among all his liegemen so noble of birth,
To within one penny of what he is worth.
The second, to tell him without any doubt,
How soon he may ride this whole world about;
And at the third question I must not shrink,
But tell him there truly what he does think."






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"" Now, cheer up, Sir Abbot,
did you never hear yet
SThat a fool he may learn a
wise man wit ?
Lend me horse and serving
/ men and your apparel,
And I'll ride to London to
.;'P answer your quarrel.

Nay, frown not, for it hath
Been told unto me,
S.-. I am lik e y ou r L ord sh ip as
f ever may be;
And if you will but lend me
your gown.
There is none shall know us
at fair London town."

S' Now horses and serving-
men thou shalt have,
S_ With sumptuous array most
., .gallant and brave,
With crozier and mitre and
rochet and cope,
S_ Fit to appear'fore our father
the Pope."








No\v \wclm,. Sir Abb-,t.' th,- K'ing dhc id say'
'Tis well thou'rt come back to keep thy day;
For if thou can't answer my questions three,
Thy life and thy living both saved shall be.
And first, when thou see'st me here in this stead,
With my crown of gold so fair on my head,
Among all my liegemen so noble of birth,
Tell me to one penny what I am worth ?"




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For twenty pence St. Joseph
was sold
[ To the Ishmaelites, as I have
been told,
SAnd just nineteen is the worth
of thee,
, [ For I think thou'rt one penny
worse than he."

The King he laughed, and he
swore by St. Bittel,
"I did not think I had been
worth so little
Now, secondly, tell me, without
any doubt,
How soon I may ride this whole
world about ? "









" You must rise with the sun, and ride with the same,
Until the next morning he rises again;
And then your Grace need not make any doubt,
But in twenty-four hours you'll ride it about."












The King he laughed, and swore by St. John,

/But tell me here truly what I do think."
.-./ -
'" --..-" : --









The Kig'.he lg.h ad s b .. o
(' ', : ,' .. ....







I did not think it could be done so soon!
Now from the third question you must not shrink,
But tell me here truly what I do think."
~~E- M










" Yea, that shall I do, and make your Grace merry,
You think I'm the Abbot of Canterbury;
But I'm his poor shepherd, as here you may see,
That am come to beg pardon for him and for me."
"The King he laughed, and swore by the Mass,
I'll make thee Lord Abbot to-day in his place."
" Now nay, my liege, be not in such speed,
For, alack I can neither write nor read."










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" Four nobles a week, then, I will give thee,
For this merry jest thou hast shown unto me;
And tell the Abbot when thou comest home,
Thou hast brought him a pardon. from good
King John."




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as the old books called him,
i, was the youngest son of
S\ Sir William de Whitting-
"ton, of Pauntley, Gloucester-
shire. He had to get his
own living, and really
walked to London, where
he was apprenticed to a
-- Mercer. He ran away,
but at the foot of Highgate
Hill the bells called him
back; and he returned, and
X grew rich, and married his
.master's daughter, Alice
..Fitzwarren.
He lent money to King
Henry IV., and to- King
Henry V.; and was much
loved for his goodness and
charity.
Buying and selling for profit was then known in France
under the name of 'acat,' which the English pronounced
' acat.' It is thought this word 'acat' made people believe
that Whittington had made his money by selling his cat.
But we still believe in poor Pussy, and so we are sure
will our little readers. ----
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-.,: -^1 I. N'^never ii the w\\(r7Ild around

,-.. tI hl us in the tle renowned

SOf .Lord MIavor Whittington.
.With stick and wallet, poorly clad.
"l-i trud cig'd to London vast,
A siImple-hearted country lad,
'iAnd found some work at last.
A scullion's place, a weary lot
---" For one so blithe and gay;
Of temper, too, the cook was hot,
And scolded night and day.







































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fHe lodging hadl, with meat and drink,
S But wages were refused.
No wonder Dick began to think
That he had been ill-usd.














S .o, resolute, he left the
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His thoughts were
Shomeward bound,
And with a stealthy,
rapid pace,
He soon his freedom
"found.







>I But, pausing for a while to rest,
S ,/ The London bells he heard:
S From north to south, from east to west,
-' They seemed like magic stirred.




















Return," they cried, "to London quick,
Lord Mayor you'll one day be !
"Now. surely this is news," thought Dick,
"That must be meant for me."
. "- eun he"cid toLno -ic
Lord~ ~ ~~~i Mao o'loedyb"
~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~` No;ueyti snes"togtDc ,

That ust bemeant or me







So, Whittington, with happy mind,
Went back the way he came,
And soon a worthier place did find,
With merchants known to fame.
ri He had with him, as 'prentice bold,
" i- A Cat tot fa11ous breed,













But little knew the store of gold
That Puss would bring indeed.
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It so fell out, Dick's master sent
A ship to foreign shore,
S/ And 'ere it left, the 'prentice went
"/ / With Pussy,-ail his store.
SAnd to the Captain said, "I hear

/, With rats and mice, in deadly fear
SKeep Moors, both high and low,

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.the vermin kill,
The wealth o I





will obtain
Bri home, and I yoLr p rse ill fill
iKMuchl profit you will gain.
And sn it prov'de tihe Captain n
The Moors in great affright,
For rats and mice, in myriads round.
Were feasting day and night.








But when they loos'd Dick's fearless Cat,
A wond'rous change was seen;
.i' For not the strongest mouse nor rat,
Could stand good Puss, I ween.

Away they scamper'd, but not long,
The Cat soon clear'd the land,
And gold, in coffers large and strong,
Was soon at Dick's command. 'i




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His master gave his daughter fair,
To Dick with ample dower,
So fortune smil'd upon the pair,
And brighten'd every hour.







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A merchant grave he now became,
And o'er his ledgers ran,
Sure, London, with its men of fame,
Saw never such a man!




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And WNhittington to honours rose
Within that city great,
And one and all for Sheriff chose
A man of such estate.
The civic chair as Mayor he grac'd,
And thrice he held the trust;
His portraits in Guildhall were plac'd,
So lov'd he was and just.








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He lent some thousands to his King,
For he could spare them well;
In fact, the treasures he could bring
No living man could tell.
And at a civic feast, for jest,
The bonds to flames were sent
That freed from debt his royal guest,
Much to the King's content.




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And not alone for King or Earl
Did Dick his wealth bestow,
But many a poor and honest churl
His kindly care would know.



















The men in prison he would feed,
And he1p'd them in distress
He paid their dcbts. and, with God Speed,"
The boon would, pitying, bless.









Of Newg\cate, noisomen, dark, and drear,
He made a durance mild;
At Christchurch too, with tfelingIs dear,
He Idower'd each poor child.










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Throughout Old England lives the name
Of this great-milded man.
fDick \Whittiiton of lasting fame
\Vhose life so strange began ;










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But who the Bells did loudly hail
Thrice Mayor of London high
I Whose actions no one could assail,
Whose virtues none deny














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,i I s ,nl a
S- Fair Tale.
b -- h, but there really was a Turn
T- Thumb once upon a time, a
"L ^ very little dwarf, who was the
toy slave of King Edgar, one
of our Saxon kings. This poor
little man must have been
brave and good, or he wout1ld
Snot have been remembered so
"lono or have had a balld
w -ritten on him. Ever\ very small
S/dwarf since his days has been
\ / called after him, ToM TLnUMB."
SeThe Ballad was sung hundreds
S1 of 'ea rs ag o a nd in C harles Ist's
time it was written as it now is,
S and we are sure amused all the
... _:_ little children as much as it (toes
"youI. for childi-n are very much
alike in all ges, and the avourite s on),s
and stories of the vyoiung inI old la,\s
are the favourite songs and stories (of
-_, the little ones still.



















































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/ /N A.RTHUR s Court of old renown
S-There li\ d a gallant wight,
/Tom THU MB, a name so often
heard
t \With wonder and delight.

S' So called because his tiny form,
Though fashioned wel!, was
small,
Si ii\IMaybe a ploughman's thumb in
height,
Though scarce, perhaps, so
tall.











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ToNr THUMB, however, had his ills,
And once at Christmas-tide.
He mounted on a dish to see
The rich minced meat inside.







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"For such a dwarfish hand-



And headlong in the dish he fell,
Amidst the liquid mess:








.' And lay unconscious, while his loss
"- Caused great and deep distress.
.: ',, i .--_ The mother ran from place to place,
"'; To find her missing son,
-----i :And then returned with heavy heart
"-- ..r' e .- To see the minced meat done.
-- Strange were the throbbings in that mass
"i- Of rich and unctuous meat,
".-'r.. il.I As though a witch had charmed the dish,
N' By some uncanny feat.

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Dismay'd, she placed it in a bag,
And, fearing mischief sore,
She gave it to a tinker old,
Then passing near the door.









He opened it soon after, when,
ToM getting free at last,
Quick found his way to home again,
All dangers, so far, past.







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"- But not for long; his mother went
.. To milk the cows one ay,
And tied him to a thistle near,
In dread lest he should stray.
"A hungry cow, it seems, came by,
And o'er the thistle bent,
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With mouth out-stretched, rejoiced to find
A meal so succulent.




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So Tom was swallowed with the food,
And heard his mother cry,
" Where art thou, son ? Why, in the cow!"
TOM THUMB did sad reply.
The cow, unused to antics wild,
That made her somewhat queer,
Gave up TOM THUMB to earth again,
Whose end seemed almost near.









B[ut troubles soon came on again,
And thus it happened now,
The father took him to the field
To help him at the plough.
ToM had a whip of barley straw
To drive the cattle on,
But soon, the father looking round,
Found out that he was gone.
















A raven great and strong,
Who held poor TOM within his beak,
And bore him swift along.









To sea the iaven few, then loosed
Tom. TH'UMB in sore aftright,
\Who, in a fish's open mouth,
Did, strange to say, alight.







S -

=i


-.----- 4 -


SThe fsh was caught, a royal prize,
And to KING ARTHUR sent;
SToM THUMB was found alive within,
Much to the court's content.
ToM then became the Monarch's dwarf,
And shared the sports and feast,
As gallant as the tallest knight,
Although he was the least.
- T. ^ ritW '^,t-~-, .-.--n<:*-- - i ,t~ -s -f.--f .srf~n*iiif v~r sSPf'- *- -* >. r. rm-p-' : .- .. -i-*. .














TO)v\ THUM$ re-ap eD s at court.














.,. .." ., ..




; '


;~:I ~-~b ~ ~ri C~3'a s I























































e*
AnL~;i nd dances a GALR op QENS a
li


jvo)























fAf

,_E_









S- A favourite with KING ARTHUR too,
I He craved one day a boon;
Now tell me, TOM," the Monarch said,
fsn B' "'Tis yours, and that right soon."
"A father and a mother old
I have," TOM THUMB replied.
"I want to help them in their need.
SI have no wish beside."



',.. ..











With money, much as he could bear.

"TOM sallied forth elate,









And though the silver was but scant,
- TP.J. "' ro him it was of weight.
H e travelled on two days and
nights,
\'With weary heart and slow,
Until he reached his parents
home,
) And heard the cattle low.
"In truth, 'tis said, the distance
from
SKing Arthur's court was short
.. '. / And what was painful to TOM
TVUMB,
T o others would be sport.

-10

V









i.-__-. i ,
S _/ ,I ,
,/ .,.









And when his parents joy he saw,
Who thought their son was dead,
ToM THUMB his troubles soon forgot, AO
With loving arms outspread.













H mother raised him in her arms







And near the reside,
She placed him in a walnut shell,
Within the hearth-place wide.





"His mother raised him in her arms,
And near the fireside,
She placed him in a walnut shell,
Within the hearth-place wide.
She ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ f~-s -lcdhm nawlntse








,) .- Tor THUMB was happy for a time,
/ But .is the days went by,
',.. (-)f Arthur's pleasant King and Court,
,^ I--I c ,ft would think and sigh.








".N- J t ..









.Z-.> At length he started forth from home,
7An1 in a sylvan bower
ilJ ^ Of s\'weet wild flowers on his way,
t Withstood an April shower.
2.. I, .^ \. .\ ." /












_:Jt_:.__"-__._,__--








And now at court the merriest wight,
At banquets, tilts, and ball,
TOM THUMB was welcomed everywhere,
In prowess matching all.








(I'








The bravest knights would praise his skill,
And through the land his name
Was sounded out both far and wide,
With loud and just acclaim.
K_ __)^aN~^iriM~~imatfafii^^^ai^^~f^8^ .~tiiitij~it~tit^"''- ~.--n^-









But glory cannot always last,
And this no man would doubt,
So Tom fell sick, and then the truth
Full sad, at length, found out.












. .- .; .,






Instead of gallant roysterlin,

He lay upon his bed;
Kin, Arthur's Doctor tried his art,
But ev'erl hope soon fled.
.................................






I

.. -_. ".-- -- :---- .'









", "- "t -
,. *X,
nd thus fro er h passed ay, whle as
4 --













borne inEfnln odel
~;; ~.e~gI46~ s; )9

i~l*uhL~"? `~~$~~'' ~9i15.~, ~95a~~l1.-n-i ;j ~- 7~ ~









King Arthur and his noble knights,
Mourned ToMf's unhappy fate :
And for some forty days or more.
The Court seemed desolate.
A tomb was built of marble grey,
And thither, year by year,
Came many to bemoan ToM THUMB,
And shed a heart-felt tear.










0 M T I A
--ql








I n y A (N T1 ,, C, x 1


"LOrr"~ n1








. .... ,, .

was one of Robin
fiHood's friends.
-i S Robin Hood was
a real person. He
was the Earl of
Huntingdon, who,
"! .-_having been un-
justly banished,took
refuge in Sherwood
forest, and drew
round him a large
number of outlaws. They
used to rob the rich Priests
"" and proud Barons who came
... through the wood, but they
". never harried the poor.
Robin gave them part of
I Id "'"whatever he took from the
" rich. For in the days of
King Richard I.,and King
John, no man could get
AI justice done to him, aad the
poor were cruelly treated
by the Barons.
Robin did ;any kind
"actions, of which this to
..Allan-a-Dale is one.



















^ist M uyy&E1
ALLANO KI 'I'
ofj^Mr-jm



~oi'








^i i~fARRIAGK of




.. .m .T --.-

,6fl 'IS a mettlesome day, for a
"J') buck to slay,
i- j When Sherwood's glades
9 (. look brightest,"
Sang stout Robin Hood, as
he wended his way
: With spirits the gayest and
Slightest.
'. "Ay, sweet is the deer, and
its savoury cheer,
But sweeter the bell when an
Abbot draws near.
.' With his purse full of nobles,
And a ransom in prospect to
add to our gains.
"Y J By St. Hubert, I would such
S' a chance I had now,
lob For the coffer is empty of
metal I trow !














44W










IN,










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im,
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17





el









nR Wr.

." . ...... . 12,










7tl,














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vr
14







jlf









Not an Abbot, or Friar, nor Bishop, or Prior
Met Robin that day in the Forest,
", But a yoeman drew nigh, with
c:. a tear in his eye,
SAnd a look that seemed
one of the sorest.












SQ Quoth Robin, "Good fellow,

\ while summer is mellow,
Is I

........'--'.-.---" And nature around looks

1 < .~c "delightful,
t;1

. : ;,* -- ** !. ../._..; v ----- t.fflr rW- -*.-- -r.-. #" I1<..^ fJ VWUII^W SXS'S:








^. L cn^--- ',r'r, f-

I *31., 'Why are you cast down,

,,; .and so bitterly frown,

SHas fortune been fickle or

: '~ ^^ ',- ,--,,-spiteful ?'







"Alas, worthy woodman,
you guess well my grief,
I have much to distress

and to vex me,
I. ,. ,, .


















and perplex me.
.








"I woo d a fair maiden, who trothedd in return;
The mother is timid, the father is stern;
"To-day she will marry against her own will,
But she loves her poor Allan most faithfully
still."


















I will be,
I will sto this eeer wedding, and m Ind you
.-. : -. ,- "



_' i ". "l




I,' w pi weding n,



Say, you so," cried bold Robin, "your friend
I will be,
I will stop this queer wedding, and, mind you,



1, '









Be ready at hand, when I give you command,
And a wife I will certainly find you "
I,





i K
"L- I -











The Outlaw then took off his jerkin of green,
And sent for a tatter'd and worn gaberdine,
Took a staff in his hand, put' a patch on his
face,
And trudg'd off to town at a forester's pace.
-- ... ,.


And trudg'd off to~ tow~n at a forester's pace.








H e arrived just in time, for he heard the last
chime
Ring merrily out from the steeple;
And enter'd the church with a shuffle and
lurch
As a beggar might do 'midst fine people.

__., ,pi e 1


P I
f I













(Z- ;
"tl ! i
"", ,.-.
.. __- . -. .








The bridegroom, ungainly, had taken his place,
The bride she hung back with a sorrowful face,
The guests were all dressed in true holiday trim,
The parson was looking both solemn and prim :
He opened his book, and the service began,
When, "STOP! exclaimed Robin, "I'll show
you some fun !"







M , .B .....

... ,
P 'r /

I-
iS!:~/

A \B












A STRANGE ARRIVAL* ,-



















1 1* t,








5t5



















k~Q



~ ~ .r,


5... .- -~~q~~d~j~P~B~P~
'-liQ~nPSBl geBFPT~ ) I'-Y:?II,









" ~ 0 -IN HOOD'S JEST:



















rf








-- If
g -- :- / -


--'I
SIAll looked at the beggar,
4-J
1,-~
--who, stepping forth.
7 _1 i- -eager,
Clear'd the way with a
bound to the railing,
-- -'And said he, ."Worthy
- N:, N n t,, m,,iw ,.,.', .m, ,-mrsn,,,TT,,Oi Priest, let me tell you,
S-..(-(. at least,
.,-I ) 'IJl ', Your words are, thus far,
unavailing.


I M I Ili l l i W i I' I I k l r lll: j lll. ll l I IN IIIIT









The bride is unwilling, you plainly can see,
To mate with a
scarecrow, or worse I
if there be,
A right proper man
I can find for N t=
the maid,
So the wedding need --CA
not for a husband
be stayed
















L









All look'd quite aghast, some took courage at
last,
And pressed on the beggar most hotly,



, |















a I


But he wav'd them aside, and then smilingly
cried,
My garb may appear to you motley.










"But you see ROBIN HooD, of merry Sherwood,
Who is not to the world quite a stranger,






--.


Sol, I N
;- ..,- i


S--A


" fll back' .










or your
._ * ,..-. ,-- sS o a l ., a ck-












"addlepates may

"Be in some tribulation or danger "
I '















I r


So he sounded his horn,
and in tunics of green. ,
His men of the woodlands j
were speedily seen. .
Quoth Robin. "Good people,
I wish 'you 110o evi,
Stay awhile in your places, I
be quiet and civil I.




T.. .













-,; ft^ ^ / u-" *-- I

"Now, Allan, stout l; i
yeoan, -
I-


come, marry this woman.
Worthy Priest, 'tis a
change for the better; (':
Right willing you find them, '
so, hasten to bind them, "
And a fat buck// V
I will be your debtor /



'. .. B ---^ ,.










the REJECTED RdOVER -4














II
4I


.--
-









So the marriage took place, with a heartier grace,
Than it had been, if otherwise fated,
And this "lytle geste," one of ROBIN HooD's
best,
May well to his praise be related.







Lq ,..










j ; r.r '' "I'

was born in
'a" /small cottage
", _'' _--_-- ---:, ,, in D evonshire,
"" '- and was the son
Sof a poor clergy-
j .' man, who, when
SI --- he was old
enough, sent
him to sea as
an apprentice in
a small vessel.
The boy was so
good that his Captain, when he died, left him his ship; and
from that time Drake began to rise in the world till he
became a Vice-Admiral.
He was the first person who ever sailed all round the
world. When he came home from this long voyage, Queen
Elizabeth went on board his ship to dine with him, and
knighted him on his own deck. Sir Francis Drake was one
of those brave sailors who fought the Spanish Armada. He
was a very clever man, and knew so much more than other
people did in those days that they took him for a conjurer,
and told many strange stories about him; but he was really
a wise, -brave, and good man.

c~(2

~Lha-2

































r17

i




14II















I R Francis Drake was a singular
man
S(A sturdier Briton find out if you can);
All knew his deeds in the Spanish
Main,
How he scattered his foes like

Till they said that he dealt with the
Si : Spirits of Night,
SAnd scampered away in wild affright.
'Twas whispered at home as well as
abroad .

sv 'word,
Had Goblins ready at beck and word
To scour the land and ocean
Snd matters so strange just then
fell out,
Which no one could make head or
tail about,
That it caused some slight commotion.
















'C
I

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I-'
1'
rihr_Y?-;r;sE7
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ij r
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r.l u
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;F8 -..PAi3-h'-: I;":liSrYpllglgpeiBsEI4?: ,: II:
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J i,I iJi: 2-r

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g a : aslahu:llsRassPnP lacrE;R'ILlp-;;-:
:. S'i
I '"%saElolLpllcreraneaisqp*lb' \ .r
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1[--: :

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i.

r ,
.??
j- -







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;







-:
:: .d t6e SPxRxrlrS of )VXFMT.











.; i I/A ., A -I




HERE was crashing of bells
Sfr om Buckland steeple,
-- And a hurry and flurry of holiday people:
G* -. Such a bright exhibition of ribbons and
Flowers,
Such triumphal arches and festival bowers,
) As if Cupid were gilding the passing hours.
--., And why all this hubbub, and clamour,
j-/i and haste,
!.-- Heads disordered, bewildered, and
prodigal waste ?
The bells as they clatter ask what is
the matter,
S And a triple bob major in jubilee scatter.

X. ,7 Sj6




~CCI
'-








Ask the Lady of Buckland
herself, who is standing, /.
Half trembling, half pleased,
on the old Abbey landing;
Nowwringing her hands, and
now smiling thr-ough tears;
Half doubting, half hoping,
half wishing, half fears;
No news of her husband for i .
seven long years!
"Alack, lackadav !" would -
the good Lady say;
" Sir Francis has passed to
his shrift far away !
And here is Sir C'.urtenay- .;
t'were hard to discover
A man, in all points, so i
approved for a lov


-- ----









H'er words were cut short,

For a noise in the Court

Gave rude indications of

I boisterous sport.

Si Then rose, far and near,

'i ,l A true Devonshire cheer.

'- \ 4 \As Sir Courtenay, in double

.|', of satin, drew near,

SLaw n frill, an d a lov e-k n ot,

SS besides a rapier

S, C A s th e fash ion w as th en ,

"half as long as a spear.









Thus equipped, Knight and Lady declare
themselves ready;
A procession is formed, rather frisky, unsteady,
For the ale has to some proved a trifle too heady;
The barrels were broached by a prodigal hand,
And their lively effects are displayed by
the band.















No .matter; with shouting, and laughing, and
singing,
The Church is soon reached, and the Service
beginning.










Sir Courtenay he smiled, 'twas a proud day
for him; [were dim.
The Lady smiled too, but her bright eyes
The guests, too, were smiling in holiday trim.

.., -,^ O-._.I-: -.T


S-- I .


A halo of sunshine is beaming around,
When, lo! comes a crash! such a smash
such a sound !
It threatens to shake theold church to the ground!
A cannon ball shoots through thedoorwitha bound
Piping hot, hissing madly, it speeds on its course,
When the Priest was then saying, "for better,
for worse ;"
So unpleasantly near, and so hot in its flight,
That it curls the moustache of Sir Courtenay
the Knight,

-t'",^. ; 'l.' .,
ilKi
. -. -, ,'- ,o < a ,-
such asoun*








And singes the lace in the bride's pretty wimple,
And shaves from the nose of the Clerk a large pimple!
S -With a racket like thunder
it then disappears,
SLeaving all in the Church
half bewitched by
their fears.
The Lady herself is the
first to recover;
/ With a glance full of
meaning, she looks at
her lover.

S. She speaks: "It is clear
"that our marriage is
broken;
"That DRAKE is still living
I know by this token."'