Citation
Florida National Guard yearbook, 1939

Material Information

Title:
Florida National Guard yearbook, 1939
Series Title:
Special archives publication
Creator:
Florida -- Dept. of Military Affairs
Florida -- National Guard
Place of Publication:
St. Augustine, Fla.
Publisher:
St. Francis Barracks
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xxviii, 156 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Militia -- Florida ( lcsh )
Militia -- Registers -- Florida ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Reprint. Originally published: Jacksonville, Fla. : [s.n.], 1939.
Funding:
The Florida National Guard's Special Archives Publications was digitized, in part by volunteers, in honor of Floridians serving both Floridians in disaster response and recovery here at home and the nation oversees.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Florida National Guard
Holding Location:
Florida National Guard, St. Augustine Barracks
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the Florida National Guard. Digitized with permission.
Resource Identifier:
001783147 ( ALEPH )
23611343 ( OCLC )
AJK6491 ( NOTIS )

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UF00047720 ( .pdf )

UF00047720_pdf.txt


Full Text



Digitized with the permission of the
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS

FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD





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RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS

Items collected here were originally published by the
Florida National Guard, many as part of its SPECIAL
ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series. Contact the Florida
National Guard for additional information.

The Florida National Guard reserves all rights to
content originating with the Guard.



DIGITIZATION

Titles from the SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series
were digitized by the University of Florida in
recognition of those serving in Florida's National
Guard, many of whom have given their lives in
defense of the State and the Nation.





Florida

Department of

Military Affairs







j WE^

SpGcial ArGhives
Publication NumibGr


66
FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD YEARBOOK
1939 (REPRINT)



State Arsenal
St. Frailis
Barracks
St. Augustine,
Florida













'. _V -. '-.'^



























BY SERGEANT FRANK H. CROWE ing back to the age of romance in the middle of the six-
Service Company, 124th Infantry teenth century. This was the age when Columbus had
pierced the cloud of ystery and gloom shutting out
The Florida National Guard was not known by this the west, and all Eur pe was ringing with tales of the
name during the first 344 years of its history. Begin- wondrous new-found realms beyond the sunset.
ning with the Timucuan allies of the first French and
Spanish explorers, through the Florida Rangers of the THE EARLY PERIOD
British Period, and later to the period of the State Mili-
tia or Florida State Troops, its organization has per- With the discovery of Florida in 1513 by Ponce De
sisted to the present day. Its battalions have fought Leon, Spain arrogated to herself entire dominion of the
under the Sacred Stag of Timucua, the Lion and Castle vast unknown Continep, t of America. Other Spanish ex-
of Spain, the Fleur de Lis of France, the Lion and the plorers came in rapid succession; Mireulo, who entered
Unicorn of England, the Stars and Bars of the Con- Pensacola Bay in 151; Cordova, who fought the first
THE '





































federacy, and, lastly, the Stars and Stripes of a united battle between white men and natives; Pineda, who in
nation. 1519 sailed along the | Gulf Coast as far as Mexico; de
As a component part of the United States Army in Ayllon, who in 1526 tried to make a settlement in the
the program for National Defense, and through the Carolinas; Narvaez, who in 1528 landed near Tampa
successful administration of its staff officers, the Florida and explored the northwest portion of Florida. In 1539,
National Guard today stands second to none in physical DeSoto made the fifth attempt to conquer and colonize
equipment and training program. Florida, but his campaign ended in his death and burial
But not only in material possessions and in manpower in the Mississippi River, which he had discovered.
is the Florida National Guard rich. It is wealthy in the Expedition after ex edition, made up of the flower of
resources of historical tradition-a military heritage dat- Spanish chivalry, hac landed on the shores of Florida,

[XV]
BY SERGEANT FRANK H. CROWE ing back to the age of romanin the middf of the six-
Service Company, 124th Infantry teenth century. This e age when Columbus had
pierced the cloud of t mystery and gloom shutting out
The Florida National Guard was not known by this the west, and all Europe was ringing with tales of the

fing with the Timucuan allies of the first French and
Spanish explorers, through the Florida Rangers of the In 1539,
British Period, and later to the period of the State Mili- THe EARLY Pe RIo D
Bta or Florida State Troops, its organization has per- With the discoveryof Florida in 1513 by Ponce De
listed to the present day. Its battalions have fought Leon, Spain arrogated to herself entire dominion of the

of Spain, the Fleur de Lis of France, the Lion and the plorers came in rapid succession; Mireulo, who entered











[XV]








and set out with buoyant step upon a triumphal march been subdued by the flame of a few hundred harque-
to win the fabled treasures of the interior, and the for- buses.
ests had closed behind them. But the dream of glory in CHARLESTON
Florida was not dispelled, and still there remained brave
men to accomplish its colonization. After 1670, the Spaniards drove their captive workers
In 1564, the Huguenots, under Laudonniere and Jean with more than ordinary zeal, for northward a new men-
Ribaut, explored the east coast of Florida and founded ace reared its head. Charleston, called by the Spanish
a small fort on the St. John's River which they named San Jorge, took root in abandoned Spanish fields and
Fort Caroline. The French were welcomed by the Timu- waxed strong by its trade with the Indians. Soon there
cuans, who inhabited the coast, and were given every was a continuous friction between the English and their
assistance in their attempt at colonization. Spanish neighbors, which the Spanish met by sending
Great was the surprise of the French to learn that .their Indian allies to burn and destroy the Carolina set-
these Indians had a highly organized army. Outina, a elements. By 1708, the Timucuans were a lost race.
Timucuan chief of this period, seems to have been one The English could not brook such conduct long, and
of the first Indian officers to have a knowledge of mili- retaliated by sending expeditions under Moore in 1702,
tary formations. When going into battle, his ranks were and Oglethorpe in 1740, to destroy St. Augustine and
drawn up in the shape of a half-moon, the chief in the break the Spanish rule. Both expeditions were doomed
center and the youngest and swiftest men in the wings. to failure. By 1744, the savage Yemassees had turned
These were the scouts who preceded the army on the against their English allies and had fled to Florida. Now
march and tracked the enemy, returning when contact the Spanish were stronger than ever, being augmented
was made. As the forces approached to join battle, her- by a new militia of well-trained Indian warriors.
aids transmitted their officers' commands by various So the fruitless warfare went on for 20 years longer,
high-pitched cries, each pitch of voice having a different and might have continued to this day, had not the action
meaning. of the mother countries put an end to the contentions of
When the command was given, the warriors on both the colonies. By the treaty of 1763, England, having
sides flung themselves into battle at a headlong pace, for previously by force of arms gained possession of Cuba,
whichever side first slew an enemy, no matter how insig- restored that island to Spain, and Spain in return made
nificant, that side claimed the victory, even if they even- over to England her possessions in Florida.
tually lost more men, or were soundly trounced by the From the country that they had defended for 200
enemy. years, the Spaniards departed in a body. Even the In-
dian mission towns were deserted, for many of the cop-
FRENCH, SPANISH FIGHT per-hued people de arted for Cuba with their Spanish
But soon the French and their Indian militia were masters.
doomed to destruction. Spain had no desire to have a By this exchange, Florida's first capital, San Augus-
foreign settlement upon her lands, so in 1565, Menen- tine of the Spaniards, became the Saint Augustine of
dez, foremost admiral of Spain, was sent to destroy the the English; and over the ramparts of the huge San
French fort and drive out the Huguenots. These objec- Marcos, which had so long and so bravely held out
tives were soon accomplished, and again the New World against the shock of British cannon balls, floated the
was in sole possession of Spain. Cross of St. George.
Menendez was the greatest historical figure ever asso-
ciated with Florida. He founded St. Augustine and BRITISH OCCUPATION
made it the headquarters for a chain of forts and mis- When England first came into possession of Florida,
sion towns which extended from Virginia to Florida and the new province was so vast that it was decided to
far into the interior, divide it into East and West Florida for the purposes
Succeeding years of Spanish occupation brought only
defeat and enslavement for the Indian warriors. Indian
slaves erected the huge coquina fort of Castillo de San
Marcos, Indian slaves built the great military road now
called the Old Spanish Trail, and Indian slaves worked
the mission gardens and tended the mission flocks. Their
military glory was over and their numberless legions had





7 ,


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of administration, and for a short time the government to the English in the formation of the provincial mili-
of both provinces was under the Military. tia, "The Florida Rangers."
There were only three towns of any size in the new Meanwhile the military forces had not been idle. The
territory and these had been practically destroyed by the unrest of the American colonies was becoming serious,
disgruntled Spanish. Pensacola consisted of only 40 and in spite of numerous conflicts between military and
thatched huts; St. Augustine was little better off, as its civil authority, the southern outpost of England began
fine gardens and many of its stone houses had been torn, to prepare for war.
destroyed or injured by the vindictive Spaniards. Mo- PREPARE FOR WAR
bile was in better condition, with numbers of brick build- Castillo de San Marcos (called Fort St. Marks by the
ings and well-kept public structures. English) was repaired and equipped with the finest
Major Ogilvie commanded in East Florida until Oc- armament of the day. Addition joists were put across
tober, 1763, when James Grant, the first Governor, ar- the casemates, making "double-deckers" for the accom-
rived, but it was not until 1764 that the military rule of modation of the coming concentration of troops. The
Col. William Taylor was displaced by the coming of St. Francis Friary was rebuilt and occupied "because of
George Johnstone, first Governor of West Florida. its good water," and great wooden barracks were erected
Both Governors issued proclamations extolling the "sufficient to house five regiments."
advantages of the provinces and inviting settlers. Soon the treasury kept the King's accounts; laborers
worked on the King's fort, wrought in the King's forge,
GREAT PLANTATIONS manned the King's pilot boats, bought their "bisket" at
The English soon flocked in and great plantations the King's bakery and their meat at the King's market.
arose near the population centers. Soldiers in the late Pensacola and Mobile were likewise reconstructed,
wars were offered special inducements to immigrate. A with the Military building good roads, draining swamps,
field officer was granted 5,000 acres; a captain, 3,000; a and constructing forts.
subaltern, 2,000; every non-com, 200; and every private, REVOLUTIONARY WAR
50 acres of ground. In 1775 came the American Revolution. Of the 14
Most interesting of all settlements was that attempted colonies of England, Florida alone remained loyal, even
at New Smyrna by Dr. Turnbull and his associates. burning in effigy the two arch-rebels, John Hancock and
These partners received a grant of 60,000 acres and Samuel Adams.
employed 1,403 persons from Greece, Italy, and Minorca The State was a haven of refuge for the King's serv-
to cultivate the land. These colonists gave valuable aid ants and Tories, who fled from the revolted col.nies.

Of the 14 colonies, Florida alone remained loyal to England during the American Revolution. It served as a haven of refuge for
the King's servants and Tories, who later banded together in the troops of the Florida Rangers, who joined with the Hessians from
New York in the siege of Savannah and the reduction of Charleston.


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Soon an oddly assorted throng came flocking in. From brightened the peninsular coast. Murderous outlaw,
Georgia appeared the Tory Colonel Thomas Browne- cruel pirate, savage Yemassee and Seminole, and thiev-
the tar and feathers given him by the Liberty Boys still ing runaway slave inhabited the interior or the coast of
sticking to his skin, and not long after followed Daniel Florida.
McGirth, once as stout-hearted a Liberty Boy as any in Spain kept up a half-hearted attempt at jurisdiction
the South, then victim of official wrong, and now de- over these rough citizens, but could not make much
serter to the King's cause. Still another accession was headway. The towns of St. Augustine and Pensacola
the valorous Scot, Rory Macintosh, captain in his Maj- were jammed full with troops, but these seldom ven-
esty's Highlanders, who, attended always by his pipers, tured farther than the city gates. Their time was en-
paraded the narrow streets, breathing out oaths of tirely taken up with such duties as guarding powder
slaughter against the rebels. houses, noting the marking of high noon on the sun-
dial in order to ring the various bells, guarding the poor
INDIAN AND MILITIA ACT devils of convicts slaving on fortifications, and partici-
pating in military balls and fiestas.
With such an element Florida was not long content To keep the savages in the interior from molesting
with passive loyalty. When the "Indian and Militia the Spanish towns, the authorities fomented and encour-
Act" was passed in 1778 and Governor Tonyn called aged, with great success, guerilla attacks upon the bor-
for volunteers to aid in suppressing the rebellion, citi- der American towns.
zens, Tory refugees, Scopholites, Minorcans, and In- For many years the Georgia colonists suffered this
dians banded together in the troops of the Florida state of affairs to continue, but finally began to make
Rangers. In command was Colonel Thomas Browne, counter raids into Spanish territory. The United States
eager to revenge himself upon the Georgians. McGirth, Government also regarded with apprehension the pres-
also thirsting for retaliation, mustered a desperate band ence of a foreign power on its southern boundary and
of cut-throats mounted on stolen horses, and carried fire decided that the indolent Don must no longer stand in
and sword through the southern provinces. the way of the new nation's development.
It was the old story of warfare between Florida and
Georgia; but more bitter than the conflicts between O UAR WAR W SA
English and Spaniard were the contentions of Liberty OUR UNDECLARED WAR WITH SPAIN
Boy and Florida Ranger. Within the years 1811-1813 occurred an episode
The Florida Rangers were active, aggressive, and suc- wherein a group of adventurers, with the tacit assistance
cessful in their campaigns. In cooperation with the of part of the United States Army, took it upon them-
Hessians from New York, they joined in the siege of selves to make a private war for the annexation of Flor-
Savannah, and afterwards took part in the reduction of ida. This was a thoroughly American piece of insouci-
Charleston. ance which would be repeated in other places with better
When Charleston fell, many notable American pa- success for many years to come.
triots were brought to Florida as prisoners; these in- Spain itself was under the thumb of Napoleon and
cluded General Gadsden, Governor of South Carolina, most of her American colonies in revolt, so that she had
and three signers of the Declaration of Independence, little strength in Florida. France, England, and the
Middleton, Rutledge, and Hayward. United States regarded Florida as the key to the Gulf
In 1779, Spain declared war against the English and of Mexico and watched each other to check any move
captured the province of West Florida. With the suc- for control there. The Spanish Governor of Florida
cess of the 13 colonies, the British decided that East begged in vain for reinforcements from Spain and
Florida was untenable and withdrew in 1783. To Eng- finally in disgust wrote Robert Smith, United States
land, Spain yielded Jamaica, and to Spain, England, in Secretary of State, that if help did not come before the
exchange, gave Florida. first of the year (1811), he would give both the Floridas
The 20 years' occupation of Florida by the British, to the United States.
however, left an indelible impression upon its shores.
This period was so productive and constructive that
hardly a section of the Florida coast today does not WAR CLOUDS
contain some relic of this great period of colonization. Madison was quick to act and on January 15, 1811,
Congress passed an act enabling the President to take
SECOND SPANISH OCCUPATION possession of any part of Florida which might be under
With the return of the Spaniard a change came over the hungry eye of England, before that nation could
Florida. There was no more planting and harvesting; occupy some convenient inlet as a war base. This was
the Indian stalked through the deserted indigo fields when the clouds of war with England were gathering
and camped in abandoned sugar mills; industry was at and the United States feared that Spain, ever mindful
an end; the crowding sails of merchant ships no longer of American yearning for her golden isles and luxuriant

[XVIII I






























The full cost of the War with the Seminoles, which lasted seven years. 1835 to 1842, is estimated at more than $4000,000, Nearly
1,500 regular soldiers were killed or died of disease, besides heavy losses among the volunteer forces.


mainlands, might permit that nation to seize a base of berman, John McIntosh, consented to become "Direc-
operations against the unruly western republic. tor" of the projected "Republic of Florida." Under the
President Madison appointed secret commissioners to leadership of these men a paper republic was formed
negotiate with the Spanish, with general directions "to under which the self-appointed authorities were to trans-
conceal from general observation the trust," but nego- fer their property to the United States.
tiations failed. Whereupon American initiative took General Matthews next demanded regular troops
matters into its own hands, and, while Andrew Jackson from the United States, but Major Laval, officer in
invaded West Florida, the militia or "patriots" from charge of the southern post, refused, saying that his
Georgia did the same thing in the eastern part of th2 orders did not mean that he should invade foreign soil.
province. In spite of the blandishments of General Matthews,
George Matthews, an ex-member of Congress from Major Laval's command also stood firm, so he was
Georgia, a general of that state's militia, and one of the forced to appeal to the Navy.
disappointed commissioners of President Madison, The Navy, or at least Commodore Campbell, gave
promptly proceeded to create his own "local authori- Matthews a hearty response. He soon had the guns of
ties" in East Florida and to carry out his official duties his squadron trained on Fernandina, and when he was
in a quite unofficial way. For his purposes, he had at required by the Spanish Commandant to give reason for
hand numerous Georgia and Florida frontiersmen who such action, he replied that "it was to prevent an effu-
were more than willing to go into Spanish territory to sion of blood and to protect American citizens." There-
recapture their slaves (protected by the Spanish) and upon, Commandant Lopez decided to march to St. Au-
to administer a deserved drubbing to the Indians who gustine "for orders," and the town was left in the hands
had been harrying the border settlements. of the Patriots.
During the surrender, Captain Lopez, in accordance
EAST FLORIDA PATRIOTS with the custom of war, handed his sword to Colonel
Matthews, himself a hot-tempered, rough son of the Ashley. The latter gentleman, ignoring the further re-
new world, lost little time in leading a band of from 50 quirement of those customs, failed to return the weapon
to 100 self-styled "East Florida Patriots" over the St. and, "putting it on, wore it ever after."
Marys. Many of the settlers of the invaded territory In spite of the complaints of Spain and the hot let-
were of English birth, so General Matthews soon had ters between the ambassadors of the two countries,
his little force augmented by many new converts. United States militia occupied Spanish Florida until
Ludovick Ashley, a wealthy lumberman, agreed to May 6, 1813. In 1817, they returned again to chase out
furnish funds to the invading army, while another lum- the French pirate, Luis Aury, and incidentally estab-

[ XIX]








lished a United States garrison at Fernandina until the teers," but as each individual had been his own quar-
whole territory was ceded in 1819. termaster, no two were either armed or mounted alike.
In this robust fashion, worthy of some of the modern Nearly all carried rifles, though there were quite a few
dictators, was the road paved for the purchase of Flor- who shouldered the old Revolutionary musket, and some
ida. The curious mixture of patriotism, interest, de- were simply armed with single or double-barreled shot-
fense, and frontier democracy, which the Patriots repre- guns. These, however, loaded with "buck for bear,"
sented, thus worked itself out as they wished. England were no contemptible weapons in a skirmish with the
did not get her Florida sea base and another star was Indians.
added to the flag. There were pistols of many sorts-from the huge
brass-butted horse pistols to small single and double-
FIRST YEARS OF AMERICAN RULE barreled "hide-out guns." Every volunteer carried his
Immediately after final ratification of the Florida knife, some dagger-shaped with ornamental hafts, while
treaty was accomplished in 1821, Congress passed a bill the greater number were long, keen blades, similar to
placing the newly-acquired territory directly under the those in use among butchers. In the bels of many were
President, and Andrew Jackson was commissioned Gov- stuck small hatchets, an imitation of the Indian toma-
ernor of Florida. For many years the territory was in hawk. These were to serve the double purpose of cut-
the most wild and lawless condition imaginable. Pirates ting a way through the tangled woods, or breaking in
and smugglers infested the coast towns, savage Seminole the skull of a savage, as opportunity might offer.
and runaway slave made the interior uninhabitable to The accoutrements consisted of powder-horns, bullet-
colonizers. pouches, and shot belts; in short, the ordinary sporting
The years 1817-1818 had seen one severe uprising of gear of the hunter and frontiersman.
the Seminole, which had been put down by General The "mount" of the troop was as varied as the arms
Jackson and his militiamen, but Indians remained a seri- and equipment; horses from 13 hands to 17; the tall
ous problem. Little bands of militia were forced to wage raw-boned steed, the plump cob-shaped roadster, the
unceasing warfare against the tribes in order to protect tight, wiry native of the soil. Many of the horses were
their small log houses scattered throughout the state, of the Andalusian race, descendants of the horses first
In spite of all these difficulties, however, the first 10 brought to the New World by the Spanish.
years of Florida under American rule saw the influx of The lean, wornout "critter" carried on his back the
great numbers of settlers from the Southern States. half-ragged squatter, side by side with the splendid Ara-
The development of the territory continued a few years bian charger of a dashing young planter. Not a few of
longer, but was soon destined to receive a serious set- the militia were mounted on mules, both of American
back. and Spanish origin, and these, when well trained to the
WARS WITH THE SEMINOLES saddle, were quite equal to the horse in a campaign
The Florida War, which may be said to have begun against the Indian.
with the Dade Massacre, December 28, 1835, had many The uniforms of the men were as motley as their
underlying causes. The United States desired to reunite mounts. There were uniforms or half-uniforms, worn
the runaway Creeks (Seminoles) with the main bodies by some of the officers, but among the men no two were
of the Creek nation, or at least force the Seminole to dressed alike. Blanket-coats of red, blue and green; lin-
confine himself within smaller territorial limits. Either sey-woolseys of coarse texture, gray or copper-colored;
plan was unacceptable to the Seminole and hostility soon red flannel shirts, jackets of brown linen or white, some
kindled between Indian and white, of sky-blue cottonade; hunting shirts of dressed deer-
The slaughter of Dade's command and the ambush- skin, with moccasins and leggings of the same, boots of
ing of General Thompson and Lieutenant Smith, both horse or alligator hide; in short, every variety of cos-
occurring in 1835, aroused the War Department to the tume known throughout the States.
need of a sufficient military force in Florida. In 1836,
General Winfield Scott was placed in command of the FANTASTIC HEADGEAR
forces engaged to fight the Seminoles. Soon after Gen-
eral Scott's appointment, General Edmond P. Gaines, The headgear was equally varied and fantastic. No
without orders from the War Department, made a brief stiff shakos were to be seen there, but caps of skin and
but not very successful campaign in the region of the hats of wool, straw, and palmetto leaf, broad-brimmed,
lower Withlacoochee. scuffed, and slouching. A few had forage caps of blue
The records show that in the Seminole Wars of 1835- cloth that gave somewhat of a military character to the
43 the force employed is reported as 10,169 regulars wearers.
and 29,953 volunteers. Perhaps it will be amusing, in The Florida militia was indeed in a bad state of af-
the light of today, to consider the appearance of the fairs at the beginning of the Indian wars, but the terri-
Florida militia or volunteer of this period. trial Legislature of 1836 soon moved to insure better
Many of the militiamen were called "mounted volun- organization and equipment.




I I^









A corps of military exempts was formed at Sr. Augus-
tine and the counties of Franklin, Columbia, \Vashing- .
ton, Walton, and Leon were all ordered to form addi.
tional militia units. A -.
The Governor issued a proclamation calling for %ol-
unteers, and by virtue of his authority given by the ,'
Legislature, was empowered, "in time of imminent dan-
ger," to draft troops from each count%. said troops to
serve for four months. Another act of this year per-
tained to the election of Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel. '
and Major. Inasmuch as the militia had failed to elect
these officers, the Governor was authorized to appoint
officers considered necessary to -an efficient organization.
Twenty thousand dollars was appropriated to pa the
militia, and a law was passed making it a crime to attach
property of militiamen on active dut\. or ser' e upon '
them any summons in civil suit. In addition a morao-
rium was declared on all liens against militiamen on
active duty.
The following year the sum for defense %,as increased
to $30,000 and a bounty of $16.50 a month %%as given
to a soldier enlisting for one year's service on the "-
frontier.
-".*" "P -
WAR WITH THE SEMINOLE
Meanwhile the war with the Seminole had been pro. 4. 4
ceeding in a desultory fashion, with the Indian more
than holding his own against the Regulars. Scott's cam.
paign did not prove a success, and he was called as,ay
to fight the Creeks in Western Georgia. General Thom.
as S. Jesup was named to succeed Scott. bur General
R. K. Call was in charge of military operations during
the latter part of 1836. His troops did some fighting n
the Big Wahoo Swamp and along the \'ithlacoochee.
but these battles led to no permanent results. While the
savages retreated, they were unconquered.
During the period when General Jesup was com-
mander, December, 1836, to May, 1838. there %ere-
2,400 Indians either killed or captured. Among these




At n the time of the War with,Mex.ico ;
Florida was so scantily populated and so h.wt
engrossed with fighting the Indians that .- "
only two companies of FIc,,;d volunel.,s
went to Mee:co. .,.', "

S- ,-"
-1'.--" "- -' '


V_
.. '. '"







."'.. ,-



.5 (
:








was Osceola, the guiding spirit of the Seminoles He General W. J Worth succeeded Armistead in 1841-
... -: I.., -.-,



With the death of Osceola, the backbone of the In only a few hundred were left. This remnant of a great








Indians estimated at about 380 warriors. After this de or Seminole War closed on August 14, 1842. -'
feat at Okechobee, the Indian never fought a pitched .
.m. -- .. ..,- ",-'.n'. ..
-/ ..{ ,.i -. ., .-']., : -.C
S. : -- .---. -- ,. .' .






Flwas Osceola the guiding spirit of the Seminoles. Heorida. General TaylorW. J. Worth succeed Armistead in 1841

died most of his men. Other bands were brought in until
With the death of Osceola, the backbone of the In- only a few hundred were left. This remnant of a great
an resance wa. bro I 1a, oone aca naon ed no










May, 1841, during which period 450 Indians were cap- After the removal of the Indians to the western res-
Taylor with aboutured a sentthousand men defeated wea forst. ervations, Florget thtraisted more homeseek the Floridand the
Indians estim ated at about 380 warriors. After this de- e



Statefeat at Okechobee, the Indian never fought a pitched n r to promote
FIRSbattle again, but continued to harass the RONAUTICS settlement of Floried seven lgress passedars thand harmed Oc-been
opporunity. Colonel Taylor was promoted to General, theation graveyard of many a General's on hopes. It is estimate











the first attempts at military mronautics in the United o tlement and cultivation for a term of years.
During his two years of leadership he captured and sent that the full coseffect of the war exceeded 40,000,000.
west hundreds of Indians, had nearly a thousand miles Nearly 1,500 regular soldiers were killed or died of dis-
of wagon roads built, and his forces, in search of the on choie, besides heavy losses among the volunteer forces.
Seminole, explored much of the unknown territory of
Florida. General Taylor was succeeded in May, 1840,these frontiersmen knew that no military aid could be
by General W. R. Armistead, who commanded until ARMED OCCUPATION ACT
May, 1841, during which period 450 Indians were cap- After the removal of the Indians to the western res-
tured and sent west. ervations, Florida attracted more homeseekers and the
State began to grow and develop. In order to promote
FIRST ATTEMPT AT MILITARY AERONAUTICS settlement of Florida, Congress passed the Armed Oc-
It was during General Armistead's appointment the locat cupation Act, donating lands on condition of actual set-
the first attempts at military aeronautics in the United tby ob- ement and cultivation for a term of years.
States were made. As the war dragged on, with no pros- This had the intended effect of inducing a consider-
pect of a speedy conclusion, Colonel John Sherburne able number of pioneers, with musket in hand, to locate
suggested that balloons be assigned for service with the on choice lands in advance ofgislature previous settlements. As
Government forces in Florida. these frontiersmen knew that no military aid could be
The difficulty of locating the elusive bands of hostile expected from either State or regular Army, they soon
red men, Sherburne claimed, was largely responsible for banded themselves into little groups for their mutual
the failure of the Army to bring the war to a close. For protection, and new militia units were formed.
this reason, he recommended that a balloon be attachedough form militia duty, except clergymen and ferrymen, and
As Florida continued to grow, it was accepted as a
Sn tin a in i State in 1845. One of the first acts passed by the First
ing night ascensions unknown to the enemy, the location
of their camps could be accurately determined by ob- General Asmy was one rltn to the development
serving the camp fires, and with instruments, their direc- of the militia. Titled "An act to organize the militia of
tion and distance would be calculated. Forces couldfor the past 50 years. such persons exempted by the law of ture provided that
be sent to surround and surprise the encampments. "Every able-bodied free white male inhabitant of the
Secretary of War Poinsett apparently approved Sher- State between the ages of 18 and 45 years, who has re-
burne's plan, but General Armistead vetoed its applica- sided in the same four weeks in time of peace, and 10
tion to Florida, and it was not until the Civil War that days in time of war, shall be enrolled and liable to per-
the United States Army had a balloon corps, although form militia duty, except clergymen and ferrymen, and
France had used balloons for the past 50 years, such persons exempted by the law of the United States."
[- X~'i~~lI.~;i: ]=---




































By provisions of this act: "In the equipment of a THE MEXICAN WAR
ognized as a company unless ... it consists of one cap. country and Mexico in 1846. Mexico claimed Texas,
:4, 1 6. -


























tain, two lieutenantstory of the cFloridanet, four sergeants, fouWar Between the Santates is that ofn the great Confhead of the Mex whican Gov-ed
northwacorporalsrd o the 32 privery gates in of Washington before being stopped by superior numbers and military force to back these

member fully equipped with saddle, bridle, halter, mar- claims. General THE MEXaylor in turn introduced counter mili-
prtingales, and spurskete,and mounted upotgun a shall be indispensa- Chiefly, if not solely, owingrt time annexatcollision and open
efficient horse"; "There shall not be moreceived or rec- Texas to the United States, war broke out between this



ogunteer as artillery company to unless.., it consists of infantry. countryda and Mexico in 1846. Mexico cpulatimed Texand so
ta, two lieutenants, one ornet, four sergeants, four and Santa Anna, with fighting at the heIndiansd of that only two cov-
Thcorporals, act provided th32 privates in fullthe uniform of the company each enent, insisted on a military force to back. Due these



officers shall consist of a blue coat and sword," but it is the absence of data concerning these troops, the number
presumed that an officer was allowed to wear some sort of men engaged and their casualties cannot be estimated.
of trousers also. That there were losses is certain, as witnessed by the
In 1846, the Militia Act was amended to govern the resolution of the Legislature in 1848, asking Congress
election of officers, and another act was passed that all "to make provision for the relief of the widows and
persons subject to militia duty should be subject to do orphans of those gallant defenders of our country who
Shave lost their lives in conflicts in Mexico.
and perform all patrol duty which was required by the
commanding officer. INDIAN UPRISINGS
This patrol duty consisted of taking up all slaves In 1853-57, another series of Indian uprisings oc-
found without the limits of their owner's plantation and cured in the southern part of Florida. In the war that
"to correct such slaves by a moderate whipping with a followed, both Federal and State troops were used and
switch or cowhide, not exceeding 20 lashes, unless said the small regular force was increased to 800 men. Flor-
slave shall have a ticket to show cause of absence." ida men who fought were mainly from Hernando, Hills-
In 1846, the Legislature asked Congress for the St. borough, and Manatee Counties, but there were many
f .rom other sections. A few minor engagements and
Francis Barracks at St. Augustine, "to be. used as an skirmishes were fought, but the principal work of the
arsenal," but it was not until 61 years later that the re- soldiers was hunting the Indian through the swamps of
quest was granted. Lake Okeechobee. As the result of this war, which
off~ersshal cnsit o a luecoa andswod,"butit s te asene o dat coceringthee toop, te nmbA
prsmd htanofce a alwdtowa sm or fme nagdadthi asatescnotb sAmtd
Oftosrsas.Thttee eelsssi eran s insJdb h
In 146,theMiltiaAct as mened o gvernthe tesluton f th Leisltur in1848 asingConrnv
elecionof ffiers andanoheractwaspassd tat ll to ake rovsio fo th relef f te 4 -4 .n
peron sbjcttomiita:duy holdbesuiet o o ophnsofthsegalat efndrsofouA'.7rywh























eletin f ffcesan aoterac ws asedtht ll "t mkeprviio fr hereie o te idwsan








closed before the end of 1857, Chief Billy Bowlegs and RECONSTRUCTION
about 160 Indians were sent west. There still .remained
about 300 in the Everglades, ard their descendants live After the war, the lot of Florida was the same un-
there today. Their nation has never signed a peace happy one as that of the other Confederate States. The
treaty with the United States, and technically are still soldier returned home to find his slaves freed, his fields
at war with the invader, laid waste, his buildings burned, his money of no value,
and his property taxed beyond possibility of payment.
WAR BETWEEN THE STATES Worse than all, he found that his right of franchise
had been taken away from him, and that his servants
The history of the Florida soldiers in the War Be- were now his masters. The "carpet-baggers" now ran
tween the States is that of the great Confederate armies the government, and he had no voice in his government.
which surged northward to the very gates of Washing- So with heavy heart, but with the indomitable spirit
ton before being stopped by superior numbers and lack that he had displayed on so many battlefields, he set to
of equipment and arms. work to rebuild his fortunes.
From its secession on January 3, 1861, Florida re- With the fall of the Confederacy and the advent of
mained the storehouse of the Confederacy. The great Reconstruction under Federal military rule, there began
battles of the war were fought in other states, leaving a long period of inactivity for the regular State Militia.
Florida unmolested to raise crops as usual. But after eight and a half years of carpet-bag rule, Flor-
It was well for the Confederacy that this was so, for ida returned to her own.
soon long lines of oxen dragged Florida beef and Flor- By 1893, according to the reports of Adjutant General
ida corn to the soldiers fighting desperately in Virginia Patrick Houstoun, the Florida State Troops consisted
and Tennessee. The coastal sky was soon bright at night of 20 companies of infantry and two batteries of light
with the flames of the salt-makers, preparing that pre- artillery, with very little increase until 1898.
servative and necessary mineral. In fact, Florida salt
was so important that at one time the Union Navy had THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR
one-half of their gunboats engaged in operations against THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR
the salt-makers of the peninsula. The war with Spain will cause the year 1898 to be
The military operations in Florida prior to 1864 had always memorable in the history of the Florida State
been comparatively unimportant. At the beginning of Troops. Owing to the large numbers of Cuban cigar-
the war the militia had seized the Florida forts and pow- makers in Tampa and Key West, the citizens of Florida
der storehouses of the United States, with the exception were cognizant of the cruelties of the Spanish long be-
of Fort Pickens, Key West, and Fort Jefferson. But fore the rest of the nation was aroused. Indeed, for
soon the Union Navy took possession of the Florida many months before the entrance of the United States
coast and began a blockade, into the war, secret juntas had been formed to help the
By 1863 the Federal troops were in possession of Jack- insurgents, and night after night filibusters slipped out
sonville and St. Johns River and were making extensive of Florida ports. Loaded with guns and ammunition,
expeditions. into the interior. During this time the Con- the American sympathizers did much to stiffen the re-
federates bombarded Jacksonville with a 32-pound rifled distance of the Cubans, while Federal authorities looked
gun mounted on a railroad flat car, perhaps the first the other way.
instance of a "steam gun" being used. As the war clouds began to darken, the Governor is-
In 1864, the Union troops decided to invade the State sued an order on April 4, "directing Company Com-
and destroy the commissary of the Confederacy. In Feb- manders to use all diligence in recruiting their com-
ruary they marched to Olustee, where they were de- panies to the complement authorized by law," and by
feated in a ard-fought battle. While the Federals were April 19, Congress had authorized and passed resolu-
having./ "rd time in the east, West Florida was tions of intervention. Following the declaration of war,
bei'- rom Pensacola. The invaders reached April 23, President McKinley issued a call for 125,000
to turn back. volunteers, and, in keeping with their traditions, the
United States Navy landed troops Florida militia units were among the first to respond.
\hed on the capital at Tallahas- On April 24, the Secretary of War notified the Gov-
ere met at Natural Bridge by ernor that the State was expected to furnish one regi-
men, mostly militia, under ment of infantry and that the State Militia should be
er a sharp engagement of used. As all the Florida companies had volunteered
forced to withdraw, their services and only 12 could be accepted, it was the
likewise the granaries decision of the State to select the companies in the order
0e, *1 e saved to the Con- in which their services were tendered. However, it was
tioi bible effect on the found impossible for any of the companies to recruit up
the Unit. a close. to full strength, so eventually the entire 20 coNpanies
France had use
f XXIV I








were ordered to Tampa. By May 12, all the Militia JACKSONVILLE FIRE
were camped in the "Cigar City," and on May 23 the The attempt to inaugurate a better training plan in
ceremonies were completed for the "muster-in," and the the militia had hardly started when they were again
First Regiment of Florida Volunteers, numbering 1,001, called into active service. In 1901, while the great Jack-
was accepted into the service of the United States. sonville fire was raging, a call went out for troops. Com-
panies from Live Oak, Lake City, Palatka, and St. Au-
FEAR SPANISH ATTACK gustine were rushed to the scene to preserve order. By
this time the flames had assumed such gigantic propor-
F During the mobilization, citizens on the coasts of tions that additional companies from Starke, Gaines-
Florida, fearing that on account of their nearness to ville, Orlapdo, and Jasper were ordered out. It was de-
Cuba, an attack might be made by Spanish gunboats, cided to put the stricken city under martial law imme-
appealed to the Governor for ordnance and ammunition diately, and the militia soon had the gutted city under
for their protection. They also asked to be allowed to firm control. The companies acted so swiftly and effi-
organize coast guard companies. Both of these requests ciently that a report made to the Governor stated: "Mil-
were granted, and 17 companies for coast defense were itary control city entirely without friction. Presence of
formed. At the same time the naval militia was put at military has preserved order and prevented possible trou-
the service of the Coast Signal organization and Auxil- ble. No excitement."
iary Naval Force vessels. In addition to furnishing No excitement.
these units, Florida contributed cash as well, lending the Service during the Jacksonville fire had a far-reaching
sum of $7,000 to the United States for the purpose of effect upon the growth and training plans of the State
equipping and subsisting the volunteer forces of the Troops. Although the men, as a rule, had acquitted
State in national service, themselves in a soldierly manner, much was left to be
desired in "esprit de corps." Petty jealousies among
During the stay in Tampa rumors of all kinds were companies caused much unpleasantness. It was realized
heard concerning the departure to Cuba, something that that an annual encampment should be held at which all
all the troops ardently desired. The possibility of see- companies should participate in order to accustom them
ing service in Cuba was finally completely dissipated by to act as a single unit. It was also decided that officers
the destruction of the Spanish fleet and the battle of should be required to pass regular examinations to prove
Santiago. their ability to command. These recommendations were
One outfit of Florida men, however, did see some approved by the Legislature of that year.
actual fighting, although they were not members of the The following years brought a great improvement
regularly enlisted militia. These were a group of wag- along all lines. Florida, in 1903, became the first State
owners suddenly beset by the Spanish upon a beach in in the Union to conform to the new national law by
Cuba. According to the press of that day: "The wag- prescribing for its militia the same organization, arma-
oners pulled out spokes from the wheels and with them ment, and discipline prescribed for co-relative branches
and wagon tongues did cover themselves with glory and of the Regular or Volunteer Armies of the United
the enemy with gore!" States. The obsolete .45 calibre Springfields were re-
The Florida Volunteers did some little extempora- placed by the "Krags," a magazine rifle, calibre .30,
neous fighting in camp also, when they came to the aid 1898 model, and, as could be expected, a general revival
neous fighting in camp also, when they came to the aid
of a Georgia regiment. The Georgia unit had arrived of interest in musketry arose. For the first time in seven
in camp wearing the Confederate gray and were billeted years the Florida State Troops were ordered into camp
next to the New York troops, who were uniformed in for field instruction. During this encampment the Hon-
blue. It was not long before an argument started and orable James P. Taliaferro gave a handsome and valu-
c able silver loving cup, called "The Taliaferro Trophy,
soon the camp assumed the appearance of a riot. Flor- able silver loving cup, called "The Taliaerro Trophy,
ida troops could not long resist the opportunity of such to be competed for annually by the teams from the vari-
a cause and waded in to help their southern neighbors. ous organizations composing the Florida State Troops.
To this day, the Taliaferro Trophy tournament is a
After the war with Spain, the militia of the State was great event in the Florida National Guard.
reorganized and an era of improvement began. The call During 1903 another forward impetus to the State
to arms had brought together the militia of the several military service was given by the formation of the Na-
states, organized and officered each upon a plan unto tional Guard Association.
itself, equipped with obsolete arms of various patterns,
and garbed to suit their respective tastes. The troops of FIRST MACHINE GUN COMPANIES
Florida alone displayed not less than 20 varieties of
"uniforms"-if such a term may be so applied. Not For the next five years the militia went about their
wanting patriotism were these soldiers, nor in intelli- routine duties with little change. The first machine gun
gence, nor courage, but woefully lacking in the strictly companies of the infantry regiment were organized and
necessary military information, issued .45 calibre Gatlings taken from the inactive artil-

[XXV]








lery. New olive-drab uniforms replaced the blues, and THE WORLD WAR
in 1908 the old Krags were replaced by United States O 19, F S
Army rifle, calibre .30, model 1903. On April 13, 1917, the First Separate Battalion of
Infantry and detachment of Sanitary Troops were mo-'
As an interesting example of the new spirit of friend- bilized and mustered into Federal service. The several
lines manifested by the North and South, since the uni- companies of this battalion were distributed throughout
fiction of the Spanish-American War, Secretary of the State at various points where their service was con-
War Taft, in 1905, returned to the State seven Confed- sidered most necessary for the guarding of bridges, rail-
erate battle flags of the Florida State Militia. road crossings, and public utilities. Upon the call into
In 1907, two very important acquisitions were made. Federal service, this battalion was combined with other
by the State. Black Point was formally approved as a new companies that had been recently organized, and
permanent camp, and the St. Francis Barracks were all were consolidated, forming the First Regiment In-
turned over to the State under a lease. The new State fantry.
Arsenal was thoroughly needed. There had never ex- The First Infantry was, just prior to its muster into
isted any facilities for the care of public military prop- national service, practically reorganized and recruited at
erty in Florida, and such limited supply of this property state expense by the Adjutant General's office. Eleven
as was kept on hand was stored in the cellar and lower new organizations were formed, including headquarters
halls of the State Capitol. For the first time the State company, supply company, and machine gun company.
had a well-equipped building suitable for storage of a These organizations were consolidated into regimental
complete supply of clothing and equipment, a safe place formation, and with the addition of the First Separate
to provide for the care and keeping of unused military Battalion completed the regiment, thus allowing the
property, and repair shops for ordnance and ordnance State to furnish two complete regiments of infantry.
stores. The entire force of the National Guard was taken
Shortly after the occupation of the new State Arsenal into the Federal service on August 5, 1917. The Coast
the Legislature adopted an amended military code which Artillery, after being federalized, was mobilized at Fort
further adapted the State Militia to the requirements of Dade. The First and Second Regiments of Infantry,
the Federal militia law. During the year 1909, the name with Sanitary Troops attached, and the First Field Hos-
of the Florida State Troops was changed to the "Flor- pital Company, were mobilized at Camp Wheeler for
ida National Guard," as the most fitting term to be further preparation.
applied to an organized militia, in that it expressed the In the absence of the National Guard'units from the
chief purpose for which that force was provided by the State, the counties were authorized to raise and main-
Constitution. tain units of Home Guards, and a reliable and efficient
MEXICAN BORDER force was actually organized in most of these counties.
The history of the Florida National Guard from
It was on the Mexican Border in 1916 that many of April 5, 1917, until November 11, 1918, is the glorious
the present-day high-ranking officers of the Florida Na- history of the United States in the World War. The
tional Guard received their first taste of warfare. On Second Florida became the 124th Infantry, while the
June 18, 1916, the National Guard of Florida was mo- First Florida was split and distributed through the units
bilized into the national service, Florida having been of the 31st or "Dixie Division."
called upon to furnish one regiment of infantry. As the main line of defense behind the skeleton-sized
Owing to the general excellence of the Second Regi- regular Army, these National Guard soldiers were sent
ment, it was selected by the War Department, recruited to France and served on foreign soil from October 4 to
to full strength, and sent to the Texas-Mexico border. November 26, 1918. Officers and privates were scattered
It was during the mobilization that the new camp through every branch of the Army in active service. It
facilities at Black Point showed their true value. Flor- would be impractical to attempt to detail here the activi-
ida troops encamped without any confusion, or without ties of the Florida men. It will suffice to say that total
one cent of outlay or expense to the Federal Govern- enlistments, commissions, and inductions of Floridians
ment or State. This was not true of all the states, for numbered 42,030 men, 1,287 of whom were killed or
many of them, much larger than Florida, had made no died in the service. The valor of the Florida troops
provision for billeting such a large number of troops. brought immortal credit to the State, 221 of the men
The Second Regiment of Infantry and Field Hospital being either cited or decorated. Following their trium-
Company remained on the border until they were re- phant return, they were accorded the most enthusiastic
turned to their home state, April, 1917, for the purpose home-coming welcome ever given to returning soldiers
of demobilization and muster out of the Federal service, from war.
The Second was not inactive for long, however, for in Many of the present high-ranking officers of the Na-
August of the same year they were again called to the tional Guard saw service in France and returned to
colors. 'direct reorganization of the State unit after the war.

SXXVI








THE POST-WAR PERIOD In 1923, the reconstruction of the main office building
On January 1, 1919, this State had no active Fed- of the State Arsenal was completed. From a report
erally-recognized National Guard. Under the provisions made by Major John C. Fairfax upon the annual Fed-
of the National Defense Act, the troops serving in the eral inspection of the National Guard posts, the follow-
World War, upon discharge from the Army, automat- ing statement is quoted: "The State Arsenal is in the
ically became private citizens, thus leaving the various Old St. Francis Barracks. It is the best military plant
states without guard units. ever seen by the writer."
Up to this time, the Militia Bureau of the War De- The mustering in of the 116th Field Artillery in 1923
apartment had had but little opportunity to formulate brought intd the State an investment of half a million
plans for the recognition of the National Guard within dollars of Federal funds and gave added impetus to the
the several states. During 1919, however, the provisions steadily growing demands for modern and adequate
of the Defense Act of 1916 were put into active play armories. Many of the counties met this need by liberal
and new regulations were published as a guide for re- donations and grants of land.
organization. Under the above authority, the State or- The providing of suitable armories was one of the
ganized and presented for inspection three companies of most difficult problems with which the State Military
infantry, of which two obtained Federal recognition. Department had to contend. Finally, it was decided at
Despite the reluctance shown by ex-service men and the meeting of the State Armory Board held August
others to enlist, and other circumstances militating 24, 1923, that in the formation of additional Guard
against active organization, the Florida National Guard units it would be considered a prerequisite that the com-
began to revive, although as late as 1920 it numbered munities where such units were to be located should
ohly 836 officers and enlisted men. It was a very effi- agree to provide appropriate and necessary housing.
cient organization, at that, for the majority of officers In spite of the many difficulties and annoyances con-
and non-cors were men who had seen service not only nected with lack of funds, the unit as a whole had a
in the World War but in previous activities, and in con- phenomenal growth during these trying years.
sequence the companies were better trained than ever HURRICANE RELIEF
before. It was well that the Guard was ready for action by
By 1921, the Guard had an aggregate of 1,550 men, 1926, because on the morning of September 19 of that
showing an increase over the previous year of 41 officers year a relayed radiogram was received from the sheriff
d 3 m. Te Gard nw c o t year a relayed radiogram was received from the sheriff
and 673 men. The Guard now consisted of the pre- of Dade County briefly advising of the devastation cre-
scribed Staff Corps and Department, one complete regi- ated by the hurricane that visited South Florida on the
ment of infantry with 16 units, one Motor Transport day previous. The sheriff requested that troops be sent
Company, one Motorcycle Company, and three Field immediately to protect property and maintain the public
Artillery Batteries, making a total of 22 organizations, peace. Preparatory orders were issued to the nearest
as compared with the 12 companies at the end of the available units at once, and communication with the
previous year. Governor was obtained by long distance telephone. All
EX-SERVICE MEN'S BUREAU organizations in the storm area were immediately placed
on duty and directed to report to Major Robert N.
During 1921, the Florida Ex-Service Men's Bureau Ward, 124th Infantry, at Miami.
began to function and an increasing interest in military When the call for troops came, Adjutant General
affairs was shown by the public. Over'l,200 inquiries Foster was en route to Washington. Upon the receipt
regarding the CMTC poured into the Adjutant Gen- of telegraphic news of the disaster, he returned immedi-
eral's office during July. ately and en route to Miami met Henry Baker, Na-
The reservation, which was originally provided as tional Director of the Red Cross. General Foster laid
campgrounds and rifle range for the Guard, but which his plans on the train and arranged to take Mr. Baker
was used by the Federal Authority during the World by motor all over the storm area.
War and designated "Camp Johnson," was returned to Meanwhile, the Guard was functioning smoothly.
the custody of the State in 1921. The original plan of Colonel Vivian B. Collins, with his field and staff offi-
the camp had been changed, and many of the perma- cers, and practically all of the 124th Infantry, had been
nent structures had either been destroyed or were ir- sent to Miami.
reparable. Effort was begun to obtain funds to make All troops at Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and Holly-
the camp again available. The St. Francis Barracks wood were placed under the command of Colonel Col-
were also in bad condition, having been injured by the lins, who also acted as co-ordinator of the other organi-
fire of 1915, and the Legislature of this year voted zations and agencies in the stricken area.
$40,000 for its repair, at the same time requesting a
transfer of the property from the War Department to TRAGEDY AT MOORE HAVEN
the State. Senator Trammell introduced a bill in Con- On September 21, report was received from the mili-
gress for this purpose. It was passed March 1, 1922. tary commander at Moore Haven, calling attention to the

[XXVII ]









CONTINUATION OF HISTORIES

very serious conditions at that point and urging that dated total for road patrol and baggage inspection of
additional troops be sent there. Orders were issued di- 9,657,708 pieces.
reacting Colonel Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., with his staff and This incident offers an example which is believed more
the Headquarters and Service Batteries of the 116th or less unique, of a state military force performing non-
Field Artillery, to proceed to Moore Haven. Colonel military duty and meeting an emergency for which there
Lowry was assigned supervision over the military opera- appeared no other possible solution. The manner of
tions in the storm area west of Lake Okeechobee. performance of this duty was highly commended by the
It is impossible within a limited scope to single out Federal authorities appointed to investigate the problem.
instances of particularly noteworthy service performed
by individuals or the various organizations that partici- THE PRESENT PERIOD
pated in this particularly trying tour of duty. It is suf-
ficient to say that the officers and enlisted men as a With the appointment of Adjutant General Collins,
whole acquitted themselves with credit and rendered June 29, 1928, the Florida National Guard embarked
valuable assistance not only in aiding civil authority to upon its present and greatest program of training and
preserve the peace and police the devastated area, but expansion.
by cooperating in every practical and effective way in On December 31, 1938, the strength of the Florida
extending immediate relief wherever required. National Guard was 2,552 officers and enlisted men, a
During 1928 occurred the death of that distinguished gain of 1,716 since 1920. In addition to those on active
citizen and able soldier, Brigadier General J. Clifford status, the Florida National Guard had a reserve of 634
R. Foster, Adjutant General of the State of Florida on inactive status.
during the years 1901-1916 and 1923-1928. The follow- Through the medium of Service Schools, Army Ex-
ing year Camp Johnson was redesignated "Camp Fos- tension Course studies, and United States Army instruc-
ter" in honor of the memory of the General. tors, the standard of military education has been consid-
General Foster was succeeded by Brigadier General erably raised, and training schedules and programs re-
Vivian Collins, who, by direction of the Governor, took flect the more serious study and consideration of all
over the duties of the Adjutant General and has occu- commanding officers.
pied that position to the date of this writing (1939). Field and armory inspection reports of the War De-
partment inspectors indicate that all branches of the
MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY Florida Guard measure up to War Department stand-
ards, and the recent concentration and maneuver of the
In 1929, there arose an unusual emergency in Flor- Third Army demonstrated to all military authorities
ida. The Mediterranean fruit fly was found in an that the Florida contingent was well prepared to per-
orange grove in the central portion of the State. This form any reasonable war mission to which it might be
discovery caused great consternation to the owners of assigned.
millions of dollars invested in citrus groves. The United All divisional units of the Florida National Guard,
States Department of Agriculture and the State Plant which include Infantry, Field Artillery, Engineers, Med-
.Board likewise took a grave view of the situation. To ical and Quartermaster branches, participated in the
prevent the spread of this pest over the entire country maneuvers of the Third Army, DeSoto National For-
it was necessary that immediate quarantine of the in- est, Mississippi, July 31 -to August 14, 1938. The re-
fested area be instituted, and no organized force was port of the field umpires indicates a well-founded knowl-
available to enforce this quarantine except the Florida edge of interior administration and military tactics, a
National Guard. high state of troop morale'and discipline, and probably
It was recognized that this was not a military duty, outstanding ability of the Florida Infantry and Field
but the emergency was such that the Governor felt jus- Artillery in maintaining efficient wire and radio com-
tified in using the Guard to enforce the quarantine and munications.
save the United States from the possible permanent in- In this maneuver, 140 Reserve Officers of the several
festation of this pest. branches were assigned to organizations of the Florida
Soon the National Guard had established two lines National Guard and rendered valuable and cooperative
across the State, and the men on patrol duty from June service.
1, 1929, to June 30, 1930, inspected 4,578,572 vehicles. CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM
There were guards stationed at 42 towns within the
area, and the train riders traveled a distance of 5,100 The armory construction program is rapidly ap-
miles daily over the railroads. Guards on baggage in- preaching completion, and within another year it is ex-
spection checked 5,079,136 pieces of baggage and found pected that all units of the National Guard will occupy
19,863 hosts of the "Med Fly." This made a consoli- modern quarters. During the years 1937-1938, local
(Continued on page 154)
SXXVIII]













tIhe Militia is certainly an
object of primary importance,
whether viewed in reference
to the national security, to
the satisfaction of the com-
munity or to the preserva-
tion of order."
-GEORGE WASHINGTON.














LOIHFI NHIIONHIHUHRD









Side S9iaj


CORPS AND DEPARTMENT











apartment, and Finance Department constitute the
VIVIAN COLLINS branches represented on this date. All officers
Brigadier General, The Adjutant General
are assigned definite duties in their departments.
The officers of the State Staff have been as-
State Staffs and State Detachments are author- signed the duty of completing all plans within the
ized by the Secretary of War under an Act of State for the rapid and successful mobilization of
Congress, May 12, 1917. The purpose of the the National Guard in case of emergency. In
State Administrative Staff Corps is to constitute addition to this, they have enrolled in the required
a nucleus of personnel for the administration, sup-
S courses assigned by the Joint Army and Navy
ply, mobilization and recruiting of the National and i
Guard in both State and Federal service. Selective Service Committee and have submitted
Under present tables of organization, Florida plans for recruiting prior to M-day. Coordina-
is allotted nine officers and 26 enlisted men. The tion of effort in all branches of the service in
Adjutant General's Department, Inspector Gen- Florida is the desire of the Adjutant General,
eral's Department, Judge Advocate General's De- and through the State Staff such an effort can
apartment, Quartermaster Corps, Ordnance De- be realized.

THOMAS B. SPARKMAN HEBER E. COUCHMAN RUPERT SMITH
Major, Inspector General Major. Judge Advocate Major, Ordnance Officer












[2]

/ E2]








































ROBERT G. WHITE GEORGE E. GRACE
Lieutenant Colonel Lieutenant Colonel
Assistant Adjutant General and State 9. M. Finance Officer, U. S. P. & D. 0.


LIEUTENANT COLONEL WHITE LIEUTENANT COLONEL GRACE
Entered military service during World War, enlisting in Enlisted in United States Army, November 2, 1914. Served in
S. A. T. C., University of Florida, Gainesville, October i, 1918. Fourth Cavalry, 301st Cavalry, and 46th Field Artillery, as
Discharged December x12, z918. Enlisted in Third Separate private, corporal, sergeant and regimental sergeant major. Ap-
Company at Live Oak on February xc, 1920. Served as private, pointed Second Lieutenant, Cavalry, United States Army, Sep-
sergeant, and first sergeant. Commissioned First Lieutenant, tember 16, 1918. Honorably discharged, December 28, 1918.
November 14, 1921. On February 26, 1923, was appointed Cap- Reenlisted June 6, 1919, and served in grades of private first
tain, assigned to Company E, 154th Infantry, Live Oak. Federal class, corporal, sergeant, technical sergeant, and master sergeant,
recognition in this grade from June 4, 1923. Appointed Major D. E. M. L. and Field Artillery. Honorably discharged, October
of Infantry, assigned as C. 0., Second Battalion, 124th Infantry, 20, 1935. Enlisted in xr6th Field Artillery, Florida National
May 25, 1934. Assigned as Assistant to the Adjutant General, Guard, and appointed Master Sergeant, Regimental Sergeant
in addition to other duties, June 9, 1937. Transferred to State Major, October 27, 1925. Commissioned Captain, Field Artillery,
Staff, assigned to Adjutant General's Department on August so, and assigned as Adjutant, xz6th Field Artillery, March 1, 1926.
1937. Appointed Lieutenant Colonel, A. G. D., assigned as As- Promoted to Major, Field Artillery, June 9, 1937. Transferred
sistant Adjutant General, State of Florida, May 2, 1938. Grad- .
uate of Company Officers Course (Rifle), Fort Benning, Georgia, to Finance Department, March 4, 1938, and appointed United
May 29, 1925. Attended National Rifle Matches as firing member States Property and Disbursing Officer. Appointed Lieutenant
of Florida National Guard Team in 1927 and as Team Captain Colonel, Finance Department, December 14, 1938.
in 1938.


CHARLES R. TULLY HAROLD C. WALL J. RUSSELL INGRAM
Captain First Lieutenant Captain
Assistant to Adjutant General Assistant to Adjutant General Assistant to State Q. M.























[31

















*t th .iW. 'P .










Left, Top: State Detachment in Office of the Adjutant General. Left, Bottom: Two members of Enlisted Detachment, State Staff, with Mstr. Sgt. Ralph C.
Crawford, Headquarters Company, 124th Infantry, seated at desk. Right, Left to Right, First Row: Tech. Sgt. C. L. Mickler, Staff Sgt. H. C. Pittman, Mstr.
Sgt. W. L. Wiler, SgJt. W reen, Pvt. First Class G.t. s D. Bilger. Sgt. A. J. Coffman. Second Row: Tech. Sgt. R. B. Murphy, Cpl. B. L. Hildebrand, Staff
Sgt. S. B. Smith, Sgt. W. P. Wade.

S T A T E D E TA C H M E N T

ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA
The State Detachment of the Florida National attached to the Headquarters Company, 124th
Guard was Federally recognized March 10 1933, Infantry, and the member in Haines City is as-
with Captain J. B. Rousseau in command. On signed to Headquarters Second Battalion, 106th
November 1, 1937, the strength of the unit was Engineers.
increased to 15 enlisted men.
SUnder the command of Captain John Heilich, ,
The duties of the members are varied, the 10 t the a em ad Pr ts e h
men in St. Augustine being divided into two radio 106th Quartermaster Regiment, this unit rendered
operators, two assigned to administrative duties, efficient and valuable service during the Third
one to finance, and the remaining five to the sup- Army Maneuvers held in the DeSoto National
ply section. The four men in Jacksonville are Forest, Mississippi, July 31 to August 14, 1938.


Left to Right: Radio Section. Physical Examination. Corporal Walter E. Spencer and Corporal Edward E. Walker. Staff Sergeant Richard G. Pittman
and Sergeant John T. Heston.




__1i' --- ,
, II e -- :






......4 .....




.1 ee ,, .a. .- .. ., .


















*m
































MAJOR GENERAL

Commanding Thirty-first Division

Born in Lyons, lowa, November 9, 1876. Moved to Florida with he was ordered to the Twenty-seventh American Division to com-
parents in December, 1878. Graduate, East Florida Seminary mand the Fifty-third Brigade, taking over on the night of August
(State Military Academy), number one in 1894 class, with rank of 30 with the Brigade in the line in Deckaboush Lake sector between
cadet first lieutenant and battalion adjutant. Enlisted in Gaines- Ypres and Mt. Kemmel, Belgium. Commanded the troops of this
ville Guards, F. S. T., in 1895, serving as enlisted man until unit's Division which were used in the taking of Vierstraate Ridge and in
disbandment (prior to Spanish-American' War). Commissioned the assault on Wycheate Ridge, August 31 to September 2.
Captain in National Guard of Florida, September 23, 1899, and From there with the Twenty-seventh Division to the Somme Area.
assigned as Regimental Adjutant, Second Infantry. Commissioned Commanded the troops used in the preliminary attack on the
Major, 1906; Lieutenant Colonel, 1908; Colonel, 1909. Commanded Hindenburg Line September 27, 1918, and the Fifty-third Brigade
Second Florida Infantry in Mexican Border service, June, 1916, to in the main attack on September 29, 1918, and on the afternoon of
March, 1917. that day was placed in command of all the infantry of the Division.
Mustered into Federal service for the World War, August 5, Commanded his brigade in the advance after the breaking of the
1917. Appointed Brigadier General by the President, August 30, Hindenburg Line to the vicinity of Le Cateau, including the Battle
1917, and assigned to command the Fifty-sixth Depot Brigade, of the Celle River, October 17-22, 1918. On the final withdrawal
Thirty-first Division. Upon the breaking up of this Brigade in Oc- of the Twenty-seventh Division from the line, was ordered to com-
tober, 1917, he was attached to command the Fifty-sixth Artillery mand the 184th Brigade of the Ninety-second Division. Joined it
Brigade of the same division. Was assigned to command the 185th November 2, 1918, near Pont A Mousson opposite Metz, being in
Infantry Brigade, Ninety-third Provisional Division, in December, the line there at the declaration of the Armistice. Relinquished
1917, and went overseas with this Brigade in April, 1918. Sent to command of this Brigade in Brest, France, in February, 1919, and
the front three days after arrival in France and attached to the returned to the United States as troop commander on U. S. S.
Sixteenth (French Infantry Division) for observation and instruction, President Grant, with part of the Forty-first Division and casuals.
serving with them approximately ten days. Was discharged March I, 1919.
Was then attached to the Second American Division (late in A ., e d l c f
April) and served with it until June 15, 1918, when ordered at- Awarded the D. S. M., one divisional citation from Headquarters,
tached to Sixty-third Brigade, Thirty-second American Division, Twenty-seventh Division, and one citation from G. H. 9., A. E. F.
serving with it in defensive operations in the Rouge Mont sector Appointed Major General of the line and assigned to command the
in Alsace until about July 10, 1918, at which time he was ordered Thirty-first Division on October 15, 1924. Command continuous
to the Fifth American Division in the St. Die sector in Lorraine, to date. Awarded Active Service Medal, April 8, 1929. Awarded
where he commanded the north sub-sector of the line held by that Florida Cross, July 21, 1932, for meritorious service in the organiza-
Division and manned by the Sixtieth U. S. Infantry, the 137th French tion and development of the Florida National Guard, with more
Infantry, and one battalion of the First Alpine Chasseurs. On than thirty-two years service with Florida troops.
the withdrawal of the Fifth Division from the line of that sector, Is present Chief of the National Guard Bureau.
'I]























LOPER B. LOWRY JEROME A. WATERMAN
Lieutenant Colonel, Inf. (G-3) Captain, F. A., Aide







INSIGNIA
A Shoulder Sleeve Insignia, approved bh the A. G., A. E. F., March 7, 1919, consists: Within a red
circle 22 inches in diameter and 3/16 inch in width on a white disk, the red letters DD back to
back in the form of an Octagon; elements of letters I /8 inch in width.
A distinctive insignia has been adopted as a badge: Between the extremities of a blue bastioned
fort, the crest of the Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana National Guard proper.





STI AFf OfflHCES 1ST DIVISION
(Florida Allotment)

On July 18, 1917, the War Department designated Na- January 14, 1919, and Camp Gordon, Georgia, was selected
tional Guard troops of Alabama, Florida and Georgia to as the camp for demobilization.
form the Thirty-first Division. Camp Wheeler, Macon, After the World War, the Thirty-first Division was re-
Georgia, was selected for the training camp. The Division organized as a National Guard Division and includes troops
was drafted into Federal service on August 5, 1917, under from Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Florida. Head-
the command of Major General Francis J. Kernan. The quarters of the Thirty-first Division, located at Bartow,
Division, officered largely from the Organized Reserve ri rci r rc ii
Corps and National Army, totaled 24,100. Florida, received Federal recognition as of october 15,
The Division moved from Camp Green, Camp Jackson, 1924, and Major General A. H. Blanding, Florida Na-
and Camp Wheeler, via Camp Mills to the ports of em- tional Guard, the present Chief of the National Guard
barkation of Brooklyn, Hoboken and New York. As a Bureau, assumed command of the Division on that date.
unit, the Thirty-first Division was in France in the latter Besides Major General Francis J. Kernan, the Division
part of September, 1918. Once in France, 'the Division Commanders during the World War period included
was broken up to be used as replacements. Although the Brigadier General John L. Hayden, Brigadier General
Division was not privileged to act as a unit, its personnel, Walter A. Harris, Major General Francis H. French, and
assigned to various organizations of the A. E. F., served Major General LeRoy S. Lyon.
well, and in many cases heroically, through the last few The Thirty-first Division assignments to Florida include
weeks of the war. This Division was known as the Dixie the Division Commander, Major General A. H. Blanding,
Division, with the motto: "It Shall Be Done." Chief of the National Guard Bureau; G-3, Assistant Chief
The return of the Division to the United States was :of Staff, Lieutenant Colonel Loper B. Lowry, and Aide,
effected during the period from November 27, 1918, to Captain Jerome A. Waterman, Field Artillery.

1 I6

















































JHi D H. S PNllED




Commanding One Hundred and Sixth Quartermaster Regiment


Enlisted Troop C, Third Cavalry, April 30, 1900. Honorably gium, Italy, and Germany, 1918-1919. Assistant to Military At-
discharged, April 29, 1903. Served in Philippine Insurrection, July tachee, Rome, Italy, 1919. Received citation for meritorious serv-
14, 1900, to June 22, 1902. Re-enlisted in Troop A, Second Cavalry, ices Commander in Chief, A. E. F., 1919. Duty with National
July 7, 1903. Discharged July 6, 1906. Served in Philippine Islands Museum, Washington, D. C., 1920. Honorably discharged as Major,
February 18, 1904, to January 5, 1906. Appointed Squadron Ser- Quartermaster Corps, October 20, 1920. Re-enlisted Senior Grade
geant Major, First Squadron, Second Cavalry, December 23, 1906. Quartermaster Sergeant, October 30, 1920. Retired from active
Discharged and re-enlisted July 7, 1909, in the Second Cavalry. service, May 15, 1921. Promoted to Major, Retired List Regular
Served in the Ute Indian disturbance, South Dakotd. 1907. Ap- Army, by act of Congress, May 7, 1932. Appointed Captain of
pointed Post Quartermaster Sergeant, November, 1911. Discharged Infantry, Florida National Guard, September 14, 1921.. Designated
and re-enlisted, July 7, 1912. Served in the Philippine Islands U. S. P. & D. O., October 6, 1921. Appointed State Quarter-
from January 3, 1910, to May 15, 1915. Participated in skirmishes master, Florida, September 14, 1921.
with hostile Moros in Jolo in 1911. Discharged and re-enlisted, Promoted to Major, Quartermaster Corps, Florida National
July 7, 1915. Appointed Senior Grade Quartermaster Sergeant, Guard, October 31, 1921. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Quar-
Quartermaster Corps, March 23, 1917. Instructor in Quartermaster termaster Corps, Florida National Guard; June 13, 1924. Appointed
Corps School, Philadelphia, Pa., 1917. Division Quartermaster, Thirty-first Division (Dixie Division), June 5,
Appointed Captain, Quartermaster Corps, August 6, 1917. Des- 1924. Relieved U. S. P. & D. O., February 12, 1938. Relieved
ignated as an Executive Officer, Camp Johnston, Florida, October, State Quartermaster, November I, 1938. Awarded Purple Heart
1917. Relieved, 1918. Administrative Division, Office of the Quar- Ifor meritorious services with A. E. F. Diploma Command and Gen-
termaster General, 1918. Promoted to Major in Quartermaster eral Staff, Extension Course, 1938. Certificate of Proficiency,
Corps, July 6, 1918. Served with A. E. F. in England, France, Bel- Fourth Corps Area Command Staff School, 1939.
[8]
E 8


























V.






MARK W. LANCE JOHN HEILICH
Major. Commanding Second Captain, Adjutant
Battalion



STAFF -AND UNIT OFFICERS

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH QUARTERMASTER REGIMENT
(Florida Allotment)
(Continued from page 7)
1, 1936. Company "F," organized as the 106th Motor- in the Third Army Maneuvers in DeSoto National Park,
cycle Company, June 17, 1926, was redesignated as Com- Mississippi,, July 31 to August 14, 1938. During these
pany "F," 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Alabama Na- maneuvers, the Regiment performed the normal functions
tional Guard, May 1, 1936. of Supply and Transportation for the Thirty-first Division.
. Due to the dispersion of its units, the 106th Quarter. For these services, it received the commendation of the
master Regiment was never assembled until it participated Division Commander, Brigadier General L. F. Guerre.


JULIAN F. PFAFF
JOHN W. SNYDER First Lieutenant, Adjutant. Second JOSEPH M. INGRAM
Captain, Company C Battalion, Headquarters Staff Second Lieutenant, Company C


















1[9









0.
















7,_C-










SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: C. F. Riggle, G. L. Reier, J. F. Armstrong, L. H. Captain . . . JOHN W. SNYDER
Williams, H. C. Buckland, R. P. McRae, E. C. Cook, M. J. Kin- Second Lieutenant . . JOSEPH M. INGRAM
nebrew, R. H. Mizelle, V. W. Rawls.
SECOND Row: B. R. Witherington, B. H. Harris, J. L. Niven, NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
D. E. Burner, A. W. Monk, R. A. Wells, W. P. Phillips, A. J. First Sergeant . . .. WILLIAM J. GAINES
Luten, E. C. Mann, E. M. Pierce, H. F. Rowe, T. E. McClamma.
SERGEANTS
BUCKLAND, HARRY C. MIZELLE, ROBERT H.
COOK, EDWARD C. REIER, GARLAND L.
KINNEBREW, MELVIN J. RIGGLE, CHARLES F.
MCRAE, ROY P. WILLIAMS, LONNIE H.

CORPORALS
SARMSTRONG, JENNINGS F. GRUBER, RALPH H.
CONNORS, WILLIAMS G. RAWLS, VIRGIL W.
SROCKWOOD, PERRY W.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
CROFT, ORSON J. MARSH, PRESTON C.
GEORGE, ALFORD T. MCCLAMMA, THOMAS E.
HARRIS, BENJAMIN H. MONK, DRAIN W.
HESTER, WILLIAM H.- NIVEN, JOSEPH L.
KIVI,. HANS E. PHILIPS, WILLIAM D.
LAMAR, WORTH W. ROWE, HAROLD F.
S. WITHERINGTON, BEATEN R.

PRIVATES
ARSENAULT, GEORGE A. GATLIN, FRED L.
BETHEA, WINSTON M. HARRISON, PIILLIP W.
BRAZIL, WALTER P. HARVEY, VALLEY F.
BURNER, ALPHEUS W. HAWARAII, ABRAHAM G.

S eco d CAMERON, JAMES HOU.GHTON, FRANK B.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH QUARTERMASTER

[10]
















QHRRIERMMHXIE REHMENT

The following coat of arms for the 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Lou-
isiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida National Guard, was approved
under the provisions of Par. 5, AR 260-10:
SHIELD: Per bend sanguine and buff, to chief a prickly pear cactus, to
base a fleur-de-lis all argent.
CRESTS: Those for the regiments of the Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama,
and Florida National Guard, in the following order:
LOUISIANA: On a wreath of the colors (argent and sanguine) a
pelican in her piety affronte with three young in nest, argent
armed and vulned proper.
/ MISSISSIPPI: On a wreath of the colors (argent and sanguine) a
r slip of magnolia full flower with leaves proper behind a trident
sable.
ALABAMA: On a wreath of the colors (argent and sanguine) a
slip of cotton plant with full bursting boll proper.
FLORIDA: On a wreath of the colors (argent and sanguine) an
alligator statant proper.
MOTTO: Pret d'accomplir (Ready to accomplish).

The 106th Quartermaster Regiment was organized in Company "B," organized as the 123rd Motor Trajport
January, 1924, as the Thirty-first Division Quartermaster Company, December 3, 1924, was redesignated as Com-
Train, in the National Guard of Florida, Alabama, Mis- pany "B," 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Louisiana Na-
sissippi and Louisiana, and was redesignated as the 106th tional Guard, on May 12, 1936. Headquarters, Second
Quartermaster Regiment, May 1, 1936. It is entitled to a Battalion, was organized and recognized in the Florida
streamer in the colors of the Victory ribbon, without in- National Guard, May 21, 1936. Company "C," organized
scription, to commemorate the services of Companies "A" as the 220th Motor Transport Company, April 27, 1921,
and "D" (one-third of the lettered companies of the Regi- was redesignated the 124th Motor Transport Company,
ment) during the World War. January 1, 1928, and as Company "C," 106th Quarter-
Headquarters was organized June 13, 1924, as Quarter- master Regiment, Florida National Guard, May 19, 1936.
master Section, Headquarters, Thirty-first Division, and Company "D," organized in June, 1916, as the First
redesignated as Headquarters, 106th Quartermaster Regi- Ambulance Company, Alabama National Guard, was mus-
ment, Florida National Guard, May 19, 1936. Headquar. tered into Federal service on July 2, 1916, for the Mexican
ters Company and the Medical Detachment were organized Border duty and mustered out February 2, 1917. It was
and recognized in the Mississippi National Guard on June again mustered into Federal service on April 2, 1917, for
1, 1936, while Headquarters, First Battalion, was organized the World War, expanded into the 121st, 122nd, 123rd,
and recognized in the Louisiana National Guard, May 12, and 124th Ambulance Companies, 106th Sanitary Train, in
1936. September, 1917. It served overseas with the Thirty-first
Company "A," organized in July, 1917, as Troop "E," Division, returned to the United States and was demobilized
Second Separate Squadron Cavalry, Mississippi National June 2, 1919. It was reorganized as the 140th Ambulance
Guard, was mustered into Federal service on August 9, Company, April 1, 1922, redesignated as the 116th Ambu-
1917, and redesignated as Company "F," 114th Supply lance Company, January 16, 1924, converted into the
Train, serving in France with the Thirty-ninth Division. Eleventh Wagon Company, March 24, 1934, converted into
After the Armistice, the personnel was transferred to other the 121st Motor Transport Company, September 1, 1934,
units, the records returned to the United States by cadre, and redesignated as Company "D," 106th Quartermaster
and the unit demobilized on January 23, 1919. It was re- Regiment, Alabama National Guard, May 1, 1936.
organized April 21, 1922, as the 154th Motor Transport Headquarters, Third Battalion, was organized and recog-
Company, redesignated as the 122nd Motor Transport nized in the Alabama National Guard, June 4, 1936. Com-'
Company, January 29, 1924, and as Company "A," 106th pany "E," organized as the Eleventh Motor Repair Section,
Quartermaster Regiment, Mississippi National Guard, May June 19, 1924, was redesignated as Company "E," 106th
13, 1936. Quartermaster Regiment, Alabama National Guard, May
(Continued on page 9)
[71














STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS
OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL




POST OFFICE BOX 1008
STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE
32085-1008





The special Archives Publication Series of the Historical
Services Division are produced as a service to Florida
communities, historians, and to any other individuals, historical
or geneological societies, and national or regional governmental
agencies which find the information contained herein of use or
value.

At present, only a very limited number of copies of these
publications are produced and are provided to certain state and
national historical record repositories at no charge. Any
remaining copies are provided to interested parties on a first
come, first served basis. It is hoped these publications will
soon be reproduced and made available to a wider public through
the efforts of the Florida National Guard Historical Foundation
Inc.

Information about the series is available from the Historical
Services Division, Department of Military Affairs, State Arsenal,
St. Augustine, Florida.


Robert Hawk
Director









FLORIDA STATE DEPOSITORIES

State documents are distributed to the following depository libraries and are available
to Florida citizens for use either in the libraries or on interlibrary loan, subject to
each library's regulations. An asterisk (*) indicates libraries that are obligated to
give interlibrary loan service. Requests should be directed to the nearest repository.

Bay County Public Library (1968) *State Library of Florida (1968)
25 West Government Street Documents Section
Panama City, Florida 32402 R. A. Gray Building
Tallahassee, Florida 323 9-0250
Bay Vista Campus Library (1982)
Documents Department Stetson University (1968)
Florida International University Dupont-Ball Library
North Miami, Florida 33181 Deland, Florida 32720-3769

Broward County Division of Libraries (1968) Jacksonville University (1968)
100 South Andrews Avenue Carl S. Swisher Library
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301 University Blvd., North
Jacksonville, Florida 32211
Cocoa Public Library (1968)
430 Delannoy Avenue *Tampa-Hillsborough County Public (1968
Cocoa, Florida 32922 Library System
900 North Ashley Street
*Florida Atlantic University (1968) Tampa, Florida 33602
Library
P. 0. Box 3092 *University of Central Florida (1968)
Boca Raton, Florida 33431 Library
Post Office Box 25000
*Florida International University (1971) Orlando, Florida 32816-0666
Documents Section
Tamiami Campus Library Tamiami Trail *University of Florida Library (1968)
Miami, Florida 33199 Documents Department
Gainesville, Florida 32611
*Florida State University Library (1968)
Documents Maps Division *University of Miami Library (1968)
Tallahassee, Florida 32306 Gov't Publications
P. 0. Box 248214
*Jacksonville Public Library (1968) Coral Gables, Florida 33124
122 North Ocean Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32202 *University of North Florida Library
Documents Division
*Miami-Dade Public Library (1968) Post Office Box 17605
101 West Flagler Street Jacksonville, Florida 32216
Miami, Florida 33130-1504
*University of South Florida (1968)
*Ocala Public Library (1972) Library Special Collections
15 Southeast Osceola Avenue 4204 Fowler Avenue
Ocala, Florida 32671 Tampa, Florida 33620

Orange County Library District (1968) University of West Florida (1968)
101 East Central Boulevard Documents John Pace Library
Orlando, Florida 32801 Pensacola, Florida 32514-5750

St. Petersburg Public Library (1968) Wt Pm B P L
3745 Ninth Avenue, North West Palm Beach Public Library (1968,
3745 Ninth Avenue, NorthClematis
St. Petersburg, Florida 33713 100 Clematis
West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

Rev. 1-7-89






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THIS COPY
OF THE
NATIONAL GUARD
HISTORICAL ANNUAL
STATE OF FLORIDA

IS PRESENTED

To
By

1939




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THIS CERTIFIES
THAT




AS OF THIS DATE
JANUARY 1, 1959
IS A MEMBER OF



Commanding Officer
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A. OF THI DAT
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HISTORICAL ANNUAL




NATIONAL GUARD
of the

STATE OF FLORIDA

1959














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CAMP FOSTER. FLORIDA"---




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P -4 ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA

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Historic Landmark.

Changing the Guard.
Arch.
Chapel.

Watch Tower.










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Panama City




PLANT CITY ARMORY





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Lieutenant Colonel Robert G. White,
Assistant Adjutant General and Ex-
ecutive Officer.


Lieutenant Colonel George E. Grace, 7
Finance Officer, U. S. P. & D. 0.



Captain John Heilich, Commanding
State Detachment, Assistant U. S. P.
& D. 0.



First Lieutenant Owen W. Griffin, 124th
Infantry, Secretary to the Adjutant
General.








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To the Officers and Enlisted Men
of the Florida National Guard:

It is hoped that this historical annual will not only be a source of pride to
all members of the Florida National Guard, but a valuable medium through
which the people of Florida may become better acquainted with the service
and value of the State's military forces.
The State looks to you for the maintenance of those high and patriotic
ideals which are indispensable attributes of a dependable protective force,
and which have always been characteristics of the Florida soldier. I con-
gratulate you upon your outstanding military accomplishments.
As Commander-in-Chief of the State's armed forces, I send official greetings
and best wishes to each officer and enlisted man.




Governor and Commander-in-Chief.





[II I























As we scan the pages of this pictorial annual of the Florida National Guard
we feel a sense of growingpride. Included here are the likenesses of many
officers and enlisted men who have served with us in times of danger and
who, under most trying circumstances, have conducted themselves according
to the best traditions of the service.

That the Florida National Guard is recognized by military authorities as an
efficient and dependable force, is due to the willing and intelligent coopera-
tion of this group of Florida's finest men, who patriotically assume military
service as an obligation of citizenship.

We know that this book will be a long-cherished possession to those of us
who still "follow the flag." We feel also that such citizens of the state as
may on occasion review its contents, will possess a heartening sense. of se-
curity in the knowledge that this highly-trained group of men stands always
ready to answer any call in the alleviation of suffering, if disaster should
overtake us, or in defending and upholding the principles of law and order
from within or without as necessity demands.






Brigadier General, Florida National Guard,
THE ADJUTANT GENERAL.

















































































Entered Florida State Troops is Second Lieutenant, Coast Artillery, July 21, 1908. Promoted I I A
to Captain, February 17, 1909, and commanded First Company, Coast Artillery Corps. Resigned, IA N C O L L IN S
September 11, 1912. Commissioned First Lieutenant, Second Floiida Infantry, August 19, 1913,
assigned to Company "F." Promoted to Captain of Infantry, December 26, 1913, assigned to
command Company "F," Second Florida Infantry. Promoted to Major and assigned to command BRIGADIER GENERAL
Second Battalion, Second Florida Infantry, November 29, 1914. Inducted into Federal service
(Mexican Border service), June 5, 1916, until April 17, 1917.
Inducted into Federal service (World War), August 5, 1917. Commanded Second Battalion.
124th Infantry, Thirty-first Division, at Camp Wheeler, Georgia. Detached and attended special FLORIDA NATIONAL
Field Officers' School at Langres, France, September 9, 1918. Transferred to command First
Battalion, 154th Infantry, Thirty-seventh Division, January 1, 1919. Mustered out of Federal GUARD
service, April 30, 1919.
Aided in reorganizing the Florida National Guard after the World War. Appointed Lieutenant
Colonel and Executive Officeq, 124th Infantry, May 9, 1921. Promoted to Colonel, commanding
the Regiment, September 30, 1925. Appointed Adjutant General and promoted to Brigadier Gen-
eral, June 25, 1928. Service continuous to date. More than twenty-eight years service with TI H E
Florida trops. Graduate, Infantry S.hool of Arms. Served as Divisional Instructor in Musketry
during Camp Wheeler concentration in 1918. Graduatre, Field Officers School, Langres, France.
Awarded Florida Cross for meritorious service in command of National Guard troops at Miami,
Florida, incident to the hurricane disaster of 1926. A *X4 4 qe w6
irl












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Military Department Building.



Brigadier General Vivian Collins, the
Adjutant General.

77-
The Adjutant General's Office Person-
nel.


Major James B. Rousseau, Assistant to
the Adjutant General.
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HISTORY OF


CAMP J. CLIFFORD R. FOSTER


LOCATION AND AREA WATER
The site of the Florida camp grounds and rifle range Water is supplied from a 10-inch artesian well,
was selected by a commission appointed by act of the driven to a depth of 720 feet. This well has an esti-
Florida Legislature of 1905. This commission visited mated flow of 2,500,000 gallons per day. The water
various sections of the State and inspected a large is reasonably soft, palatable and healthful.
number of sites that were proposed, finally deciding
upon the location near Yukon, Duval County, Florida, THE RIFLE RANGE
as being most suitable because of its healthfulness,
The plan of constructing a large rifle range adjacent
general physical characteristics and central location The plan of conducting a large rifle rane adjacent
with relation to means of transportation. The original to the camp grounds was adopted in pursuance of a
tract acquired by the State consisted of 300 acres. As resolution adopted by the National Board for the Pro-
additional land was at that time available, and as it motion of Rifle Practice, which advocated the estab-
was deemed desirable that there should be a well lishment of a large range in each State, of sufficient
equipped and suitable rifle range immediately adjacent size and capacity to provide for the training of the
to the camp grounds, the approval of the War De- entire National Guard of such States, and civilians
apartment was secured of a plan by which additional as well. The Florida range at the time of its con-
land should be acquired by purchase from Federal struction was second only in size to tha range at Camp
funds allotted for the equipment and support of the Perry, Ohio; being equipped with 150 targets, in
organized militia of this State, and set aside for the groups of 50 in echelon and with firing points at 200,
promotion of rifle practice. In pursuance of this policy, 300, 600 and 1,000 yards; pistol and machine gun
purchases were made for the Federal Government as targets have subsequently been added with "temporary
follows: August 10, 1907, tract of 400 acres; Septem- appointments." The firing direction on the Florida
ber 11, 1908, two tracts, one of 85 and the other of
range is a few degrees east of north, and firing condi-
108 1-3 acres, and November 18, 1913, 100 acres.
tions and all range equipment and accessories are
The total area of both Federal and of State owned i r iiin r
ideal. The Army Divisional Matches were held on
land is 993 1-3 acres. It is located eight miles from the i r i i
this range in 1914, and the National Matches in 1915
City of Jacksonville by (well-paved) road and seven
and 1916.
and a half miles by water.
WORLD WAR USE
GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS During the World War this camp site was con-
In its original state this was a beautiful tract of verted into one of the Nation's largest cantonments
land, heavily wooded and a natural park, extending, in and occupied as a Quartermaster Corps Training
peninsular form, from the west shore of the St. Johns Camp, with a large remount station. It was then
River. It is ornamented with a magnificent growth designated Camp Joseph E. Johnston.
of magnolia and oak trees, and even without artificial
beautification could just be described as one of the FACILITIES
most attractive natural parks in the South. High Modern kitchens and latrines have been constructed
bluffs overlook the St. Johns River on three.sides and for the accommodation of a brigade of Infantry. At-
its favorable location in this respect adds much to the tractive administration building, officers club, ware-
comfort of the camp during the summer season when houses, caretaker quarters, swimming pool, post ex-
field exercises are usually held. The land is high, with change building, and dance pavilion are also part of
sandy soil and good natural drainage, the camp.

[XIV]








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PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
LUTEN, HENRY A. POPE, ROY H., JR. FIRST Row: A. G. Hawarah, H. E. Kivi, G. A. Arsenault,
MANN, EVERETT C. PRIVETT, PARK D. W. D. Corners, P. W. Rockwood, W. W. Lamar, W. J. Gaines,
MERRILL, CHESTER E., JR. RANEY, THOMAS L. T. L. Raney, F. L. Gatlin, R. H. Pope, Jr., P. D. Privett.
MITCHELL, JOSEPH D. RUDD, PAUL H. SECOND Row: W. H. Hester, T. J. Sabiston, A. T. George, P.
MULLINS, JIM L., JR. SABISTON, THOMAS J. C. Marsh, A. W. Burner, J. D. Mitchell, P. H. Sweat, W. F.
Harvey, J. Mullins, C. E. Merrill, Jr., J. Cameron, R. C. Nobles.
NOBLES, RICHARD C. SWEAT, PAUL H.
PIERCE, ELDREDGE M. TOUCHTON, REMER Y.
WELLS, ROBERT A.
with the 106th Engineers. Again in 1937, the company
attended field training at Fort McClellan, being attached
FACTUAL HISTORY to the 62nd Infantry Brigade. At this camp the corn-
Company "C" was Federally recognized on April 27, pany for the first time served with another unit of the
1921, as the 121st Motor Transport Company, 31st Di- 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Company "D" of Ramer,
vision Train. The organization was later redesignated as Alabama, the other company of the Second Battalion.
the 220th Motor Transport Company, and again redesig- Major Mark Lance, Battalion Commander, was in com-
nated the early part of 1938 as the 124th Motor Trans- mand. With the other units of the regiment, the com-
port Company, stationed at Jacksonville, Florida. Upon pany took part in the Third Army Maneuvers at DeSoto
formation of the 106th Quartermaster Regiment, this National Forest, near Biloxi, Mississippi, from July 31
company was designated Company "C" on May 12, 1936. to August 14, 1938, gaining great benefit in training, with
This organization attended annual field training en- resultant hopes of participating in another such movement
campments with the 124th Infantry, FNG, from 1921 in the near future. The 1939 encampment will find this
through 1935. The assigned motor equipment during these organization again training at Camp J. Clifford Foster,
years consisted of 14 Liberty trucks. In 1915, new 1y2- for the first time since 1935.
ton Chevrolet trucks were received by the State and the This organization is proud of the fact that practically
company has operated these trucks since that date. every Sergeant on the roll at the present time has seven
In 1936, the company left the an ft t state for encampment or more years service to his credit, proving the interest
for the first time, serving at Fort McClellan, Alabama, and good fellowship prevailing in the company.



REGIMENT, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

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Room. (4) Non-Commissioned Officers. (5) Supply Room. (6) Head-










IOBIH M I REIH MENI

Stc4 a#ud l4ml Qcjfeice.e
(FLORIDA ALLOTMENT)










CORREN P. YOUMANS
Lieutenant Colonel, Regimental Staff

The 106th Medical Regiment is composed of troops 28, 1936, with the appointment of Captain Anees
from Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, Mogabgab to the grade of Colonel in command.
with regimental headquarters at New Orleans, Louisi- On January 1, 1937, the companies in the Regiment
ana. The Florida allotment consists of two regimental were redesignated, including the Florida unit. The
officers and Company "F," which is located at Fort 118th Ambulance Company, 106th Medical Regiment,
Myers, with Captain Baker Whisnant in command St. Petersburg, was redesignated as Company "F,"
and First Lieutenant Arthur D. McLean assisting him.
orren P. Y an Lieutenant A r D. MLean assisting h. 106th Medical Regiment, but it was transferred to the
Corren P. Youmans, Lieutenant Colonel, stationed Field Artillery, and on January 13, 1937, Headquar
at Miami, and Shuler H. Etheredge, Major, stationed Field Artillery, and on January 13, 1937, Headquar-
at Tampa, are the two regimental officers assigned to ters Battery, 116th Field Artillery, Fort Myers, was
Florida. converted to Company "F," 106th Medical Regiment.
The history of the Regiment, through the various The entire Regiment attended the encampment in
units that went into its organization, can be traced 1937 at Camp J. Clifford R. Foster,. Jacksonville,
back many years. The headquarters of the Regiment, Florida. In 1938, it took part in the Third Army
though, was organized and Federally recognized July Maneuvers at DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi.

SHULER H. ETHEREDGE BAKER WHISNANT ARTHUR D. McLEAN
Major, Regimental Staff Captain, Company F First Lieutenant, M. A. C., Company F













[13]









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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: V. N. Kantz, A. B. Sumner, H. E. Gibbs, H. C. Captain . . . BAKER WHISNANT
Raulerson, C. W. Johnson, M. H. Infinger, A. L. Hord, H. A. First Lieutenant . . ARTHUR D. McLEAN
Ford, F. Skinner.
SECOND Row: G. R. Herington, J. W. Roan, C. E. Hall, D. F. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
Lessey, F. C. Campbell, G. F. Futral, C. R. Forbes, G. McGee, First Sergeant . . RICHARD B. BOWDEN
W\. B. Cowart, J. T. Roberts.
SERGEANTS
GILBERT, SAMUEL S. POWERS, CHARLES J.
MATHIS, NOLAN S. SANTINI, JOSEPH G.

CORPORALS
BENNETT, WALTER E. HISLER, CHARLES C.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
CAIN, LESTER J. McGEE, WESLEY E.
COWART, WILLIAM B, PENNINGTON, HARRY W.
HALL, CHARLES E. RAULERSON, HERMAN C.
HENDERSON, JAMES J. SPARKS, HENRY E.
HOGAN, SIMON P. SUMNER, ALBERT B.

PRIVATES
BARTLESON, MARK F. HALL, TOM J.
BROUGHT, THOMAS G. HANCHEY, HOMER L.
CAMPBELL, FRED C. HERINGTON, GILBERT R.
CHANDLER, ANDREW L. HORD, ALFRED L.
S| FORBES, CLAUDE R. INFINGER, MARK H.
I FORD, HENRY A. JOHNSON, CHARLES W.
I FUTRAL, GEORGE F. KANTZ, VOLNEY N.
FUTRAL, RAY W. KERSEY, ALLEN G.
GIBBS, HARRY E. LESSEY, DANIEL F.
GRISSETTE, GUY R. MAKER, EDWARD F.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH MEDICAL REGIMENT

[ 14














S" 1 .. '.


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PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
MCGEE, GORDON ROAN, JOHN W. FIRST Row: W. E. McGee, W. E. Bennett, J. G. Santini, R.
MURPHY, FRANCIS L. ROBERTS, JOHN T. B. Bowden, S. S. Gilbert, C. J. Powers, H. E. Sparks, H. W.
NAYLOR, WALLACE E. RUSSELL, JERRY C. Pennington.
NYE, ALFRED SAPP, CHARLES H. SECOND Row: E. F. Maker, A. G. Kersey, A. Nye, J. C. Rus-
POPE, EDGAR O. SKINNER, FRED sell, G. R. Grissette, E. O. Pope, A. L. Chandler, T. G. Brought,
WHITAKER, ROY J. S. P. Hogan, T. J. Hall, H. L Hanchey.



FACTUAL HISTORY Besides Captain Sherwood, other commanders of the

First organized as 118th Ambulance Company, 106th unit have been Captain Elmer M. Jenkins, Lieutenant
Medical Regiment, at St. Petersburg, Florida, on April George H. Craven (later Captain), Lieutenant William
15, 1936, this unit was redesignated as Company "F," G. Gibson (later Captain, retired as Major), and Captain
Baker Whisnant.
106th Medical Regiment, on January 1, 1937, and con-
verted to Headquarters Battery, 116th Field Artillery, on The organization was in State service after the 1926
January 13, 1937. At the same time, Headquarters Bat- and 1928 storms, which hit the Lake Okechobee region,
tery, 116th Field Artillery, with station at Fort Myers, was and during the trial of a Negro for rape in Hendry
converted to Company "F," 106th Medical Regiment. County, Florida, in 1935. During the 1926 relief duty,
Headquarters Battery, 116th Field Artillery, (Animal the Battery was the first organization to arrive and render
Drawn), was first organized at Fort Myers, Florida, on aid. It reestablished communication with the outside world.
October 24, 1923, by Captain Horace M. Sherwood and Wires and poles were gone, but in 12 hours messages
a group of ex-wartime soldiers. It was mustered into were being sent and received without interruption. The
the service by General Vivian Collins, who at that time Battery performed this and other duties for 14 days, then
was a Lieutenant Colonel. the commercial companies had their services in operation
again.
The unit took part in the Third Army Maneuvers,

FO RT M YERS, FLO RIDA DeSoto National Forest, in 1938.
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COAT OF ARMS: Approved April 12, 1927; amended July 25, 1931.
SHIELD: Per fess indented argent and gules, in chief a fleur-de-lis azure.
CRESTS: Th oe for regiments of Mississippi and Florida National Guard.
MOTTO: Virtute Et Armis (By valor and arms).
DESCRIPTION: The shield is white and red, the CE colors, and the
partition line is indented (a saw-tooth line) to indicate the regi-
ment is a combat unit; the fleur-de-lis represents service in
France.
DISTINCTIVE INSIGNIA: Approved April 12, 1927. Shield and motto
of coat of arms.
STREAMERS AUTHORIZED: World War-Mause-Argonne.
JAMES P. COOMBS
Lieutenant Colonel, 106th Engineers, Executive Officer

The 106th Engineers had its beginning during the Entered Florida National Guard and served as private and sergeant
World War when it was organized as the 114th Engineers, in Company "L," First Florida Infantry, October 11, 1910. Pro-
39th Division, from Company "A," Engineers, on Sep- moted to First Lieutenant, Infantry, January 25, 1912. Promoted to
Captain, Commanding Company "L," April 19, 1912. Promoted to
member 27, 1917, and new units then or subsequently or- Major, January 8, 1915. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, July 15,
ganized. This organization participated in the Meuse- 1916. Resigned upon disbandment of regiment, June 5, 1917.



units organized largely from the personnel of the First Engineers, 31st Division at Camp Wheeler, Ga. Attended Field
units of the First Officers Service School at Langres, France. Commanded 106th
Florida National Guard. It served in France, but not in Engineers at Brest, France. Honorably discharged September 15,
actual combat, then was mustered out on July 12, 1919. 1919. Entered reorganized Florida National Guard as Captain,
Reorganized as 114th Engineers in 1921-1922, it was re- commanding Company "E," 106th Engineers, February 3, 1927.
designated the 106th Engineers on January 29, 1924. The Promoted to Major, May 11, 1928. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel
World War 106th Engineers organization was reconstituted and Executive Officer of Regiment, March 1, 1934.
and a consolidation effected on October 9, 1926.
The Second Battalion of the 106th Engineers is in
Florida, with the rest located in Mississippi. Headquarters The 106th Engineers has received nine commendations
of the Second Battalion, Company "D," Company "E," in the last four years, one from the Chief of Engineers,
Company "F," and the Medical Detachment have home one from the Chief of the Map Reproduction Plant, and
stations in Florida. Lieutenant Colonel James P. Coombs, several each from the Chief of the National Guard Bureau,
Apalachicola, Florida, is a member of the Regimental Staff. Corps Area Commander, and the Adjutants General of
Priding itself on its "esprit de corps" and morale, this Florida and Mississippi.
St 1 T h During the 1938 Third Army Maneuvers, the Regiment
organization has never held a summary court. No charges During the 18 Third Army Maneuvers, the Regiment
gave assistance wherever needed, maintaining roads and
have ever been preferred against either officer or enlisted supplying water under great difficulties. The men's zeal
man, and no one has been confined in the guard house or and attention to duty and eagerness to work on through
in quarters for seven years. The Regiment also prides the rest periods were very commendable. Their objective
itself upon having always carried out its field training is to do the job thoroughly and efficiently regardless of any
program in its entirety. obstacles.

(171










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106/M Ch#inees



LIONEL E. ROBINSON
Major, Commanding

















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HIRAM W. SPERRY JAMES A. FORT, JR. BERNARD E. FULGHUM HERBERT 0. MARSHALL
Captain, Company D Captain, Company F First Lieutenant, Company D First Lieutenant, Company E






JESSE V. SMITH ALEXANDER H. MILLER JAMES M. HENRY JOSEPH S. BURROWS HARRY T. MOREHEAD
Second Lieutenant, Adjutant Second Lieutenant, Company D Second Lieutenant, Company E Second Lieutenant, Company F Second Lieutenant, Company F







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COMPANY D
SECOND BATTALION
AI '.
ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH
ENGINEERS
PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA

(I) Gas Mask Instruction. (2) Anti-Aircraft Defense. (3)
Non-Commissioned Officers. (4) Physical Training. (5) Con-
struction. (6) Supply Room. (7) Informal Gathering Around '
Fireplace. -




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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRsr Row: S. NV. Blackburn, R. L. McCall, II. T. Sorenson, Captain . . . HIRAM W. SPERRY
L. E. Stevens, M. S. Kennedy, A. F. Titus, F. Vickers. First Lieutenant . . BERNARD E. FULGuUM
SECOND Row: C. C. Hubbard, L. Emanual, Jr., J. utchin-
son, T. L. Wilkes, N. G. Goss, C. F. Brown, W. 0. Wilson, NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
0. L. Duncan, A. L. Lee. First Sergeant GROVER C. AUHMOODY
THIRD Row: P. W. Gore, G. J. Gainer, H. B. Hayes, F. P. Staff Sergeant . . HUBERT T. MALOY
Peach, E. R. Gray, Maloy, J. A. Sorenson, W. II. Masker,
G. M. Adams. SERGEANTS
BLACKBURN, SAMUEL W. SORENSON, HENRY T.
SI KENNEDY, MARTIN S. STEPHENS, LEO E.
FI.T McCALL, RUSSELL L. TITUS, ARTMUR F.
Ste VICKERS, FRED

CORPORALS
SBRYANT, FRED C. JENNINGS, WILLIAM H.
SECOND CHAMPION, JAMES L. JOYNER, CHARLES L.
ST. i HAGAN, LONNIE W. SCHIVER, COLON L.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
SARD, WALTER L. MOLOY, BASWELL D.
BROWN, CHARLES F. MAYO, JAMES F.
CAMPBELL, LAYMON C. MOZLEY, HUGu A.
MANUAL, DALLAS R. PEACH, FRED P.

HUBBARD, CARY C. SORENSON, JOHN A.
JACOBS, LLOYD D. WEEKS, DANIEL R.
PRIVATES
I | ADAMS, GEORGE M. Cox, SAM S., JR.
ADAMS, JOHN B. DUNCAN, OLEN L.
BROWN, CHARLES E. EMANUAI., D. L., JR.
BRYANT, L. E. GAINER, GuY J.
S c *i CLANTON, JAMES E. GORE, PHILIP W.
CANTON, TOM GRAY, ELMER R.
JACox, COYD D. GSS, NEIL G.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH ENGINEERS

t201














JJ
















-0 1.




PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
GWALTNEY, RANDALL R. MOODY, DAVID P. FIRST Row: G. C. Auchmoody, 11. T. Maloy, M. Jernigan, J.
HAYES, HENRY B. MOSELEY, JOE E. L. Champion, W. H. Jennings, C. L. Schiver, F. C. Bryant,
HOLBROOK, FRANK M., JR. O'DONNELL, EDWIN J. C. L. Joyner, H. C. Smith.
HOLMAN, RUFUS PRESLEY, JOHN T.
HUTCHISON, JUSTUS RIGELL, JOSEPH S. SECOND Row: F. M. Holbrook, Jr., J. T. Presley, T. Clanton,
JERNIGAN, MAXWELL ROLLINS, JAMES A. H. E. Skipper, J. B. Adams, D. R. Emanual, W. L. Ard, L .E.
JOHNSON, ROBERT L. SKIPPER, HARRY E. Bryant, J. S. Rigell.
JOYNER, RAYMOND D. SULLIVAN, DANIEL M.
LEE, AMMIE L. THOMPSON, JAMES T. THIRD Row: E. J. O'Donnell, D. M. Sullivan, L. C. Campbell,
MASKER, WILLIAM H. WILKES, TIMOTHY L. J. F. Mayo, D. R. Weeks, J. T. Thompson, B. D. Moloy, J. M.
MALOY, HOMER E. WILSON, WILLIAM 0. Hooten, R. L. Johnson.



FACTUAL HISTORY Freeman, Jr. Captain Hiram W. Sperry, having corn-

Company "D," 106th Engineers, Panama City, manded Company "E," 106th Engineers, at Apalachi-
Florida, was organized and Federally recognized on cola, Florida, for the period November 20, 1932, to
December 5, 1922, with Captain M. B. Hawkins as March 17, 1937, was transferred to command Corn-
the first commanding officer. Following Captain pany "D," 106th Engineers, Panama City. He is
Hawkins were Captains R. J. Bennett, A. S. Brake, assisted by Lieutenant B. E. Fulghum and Lieutenant
and Lieutenant Coy C. Rushing, Captain Brake hav- A. H. Miller. The organization has been maintained
ing served the longest period, from 1928 to 1935. continuously since first organized at Panama City, has
Lieutenant Rushing served until March 18, 1937, at attended every field training camp, and was called on
which time the present commanding officer assumed State duty on October 27, 1934, to aid in quelling a
command. Lieutenants serving during the period 1922 riot at Marianna, Florida.
to 1927 include J. R. Asbell, M. J. Daffin and H .0. A new armory was completed recently, with a flood

lighted drill field adjacent to it. The organization
PANAMA C ITY, FLO RIDA maintains a high state of proficiency.

[211
Ir rr BI':r'.~~~w'in-Ha -.ir~r~~-r




















L









A .










SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: J. D. Glass, C. F. Jenkins, F. G. Lovett, D. P. First Lieutenant . . HERBERT 0. MARSHALL
Totman, R. F. Duggar, N. E. Marshall, J. R. Buzzett, J. 0. Second Lieutenant . . JAMES M. HENRY
Mahoo.
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
SECOND Row: W. T. Henderson, A. M. Pace, J. F. Zingarelli,
C. R. Russell, R. P. Coombs, R. G. Power, G. P. Patronis, H. B. First Sergeant . . BENJAMIN F. BLOODWORTH
Roberts, W. M. Bass. Staff Sergeant . . .. FRANCIS G. LOVETT
THIRD Row: R. L. Dunne, L. C. Buzzett, A. C. Glass, G. M. SERGEANTS
Counts, Jr., HI. C. Brown, F. L. Wages, L..A. Scott, A. L. Har- "-.BUZZETT, JULIAN R. MAHON, JAMES 0.
rison, R. E. Littles. GEORGE, COSTA D. MARSHALL, NEUMAN E.
JENKINS, CHARLES F. RICHARDS, FRED W.


CORPORALS
DUGGAR, RUDOLPH F. LOVETT, JOHN C.
GLASS, JOHN D. MARSHALL, EARL R.
KEITH, GEORGE A. TOTMAN, DONALD P.

14 PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
BARBER, GEORGE E. LITTLE, JEFFERSON E.
BASS, WILLIAM M. MORE, LUKE V.
COOMBS, ROGER P. PACE, CHARLES A.
S 11 ICROrrS, DORTHAL R. PACE, REGINALD C.
GUNN, OLLIE L. PATRENOS, FRANCIS P.
HENDERSON, WILLIAM T. POWER, RICHARD G.
HENDLES, GEORGE W. REEVES, LESLIE L.
HOLLAND, KARL E. ROBERTS, HARLEY B.
WAGES, FRED L.

PRIVATES
ADKISSON, ALBERT H. BLOODWORTH, MINOR K.
S eco d &ia 4 BARBER, JOHN E. BOHANNON, WOODROW B.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH ENGINEERS

1221




























V.









PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
BROOKS, JOHN F. LOVEIT, CLARENCE J. FIRST Row: J. V. Gander, R. C. Pace, J. C. Lovett, C. D.
BROWN, HENRY C. LITTLES, ROBERT E. George, G. A. Keith, R. V. Smith, Jr., E. R. Marshall, B. F.
BUZZErT, LAWRENCE C. MONTGOMERY, LOYD 0. Bloodworth, F. W. Richards.
COUNTS, GEORGE M., JR. PACE, AUGUST M.
COUNS, GEORGE M., JR. PACE, AUGUST M. SECOND Row: C. W. Proctor, J. R. Hlammett, R. F. Stansberry,
CDUA, EARL M. PATRENOS, A TE. GB. R. Glass, C. A. Pace, J. C. Lovett, M. Duggar, J. P. Scott,
DUCGAR, MELL PHILIPS, ALBERT E. A H Ad
DUNNE, ROBERT L. PROCTOR, CLARENCE W.
GANDER, JAMES V. RUSSELL, CHARLES R. THIRD Row: J. P. Goodson, M. K. Bloodworth, J. E. Barber,
GLASS, ALBERT C. RUSSELL, WILLIAM C. K. E. Holland, J. E. Littles, J. Wilson, Jr., L V. Moren, G. W.
GLASS, BEN R. SCOTT, JOHN P. Hendles, F. P. Patronis, L. 0. Montgomery.
GOODSON, JAMES P. SCOTT, LAWRENCE A.
HAMMETT, JESSE R. STANSBERRY, ROBERT F.
HARRISON, ALFRED L. WILSON, JOE, JR.
ZINGCARELLI, JOSEP F. In 1898, this Company was ordered to Tampa, Florida,

where troops were being mobilized for the Spanish-Amer-
FACTUAL HISTORY ican War. A portion of this Company enlisted with
companies that had been selected to serve in the war,
The Franklin Guards, a company of Infantry, was or- and the remainder of the Company was ordered home.
ganized in Apalachicola in 1884 by J. H. Coombs and It was called out in October, 1907, to protect a prisoner
Fred Butterfield. Existing as an independent company during a street car strike. Again in 1912, it served dur-
at first because no vacancy existed in the number of ing a street car strike.
companies provided for by the State, the unit was finally On February 3, 1927, Company "E," 106th Engineers,
accepted as part of the Florida State Troops in 1890, was organized and Federally recognized. In 1929, it saw
when it was designated as Company "C," Third Battalion, active duty in the Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine.
there being no regimental unit at that time. The Company has had the following commanders:
In 1898, the Florida State Troops were formed into Captains J. H. Coombs, Robert Knickmeyer, Patrick S.
regiments, and this company was designated as Company Hickey, A. S. Mohr, John P. Lovett, Domnick Brown

nation until its merger in the World War in 1917 at (later Major, later Lieutenant Colonel), T. J. Moore,
Camp Wheeler, Georgia. Joseph P. Hickey (later Major, later Colonel, First Flor-
ida Infantry), J. Farley Warren, R. R. Rice, J. P. Coombs
(later Major, later Lieutenant Colonel), W. J. Glasgow,
John Marshall, George A. Dodd, Hiram W. Sperry, and
A PA LA C H IC LA, FLO RIDA Lieutenant Herbert 0. Marshall, present commander.

23 1











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(6) Second Baltal on Cor.nand.ng OffIc-r and Staff. (7) Barbed
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COMPANY Fn


SECONDBATTALON : ,
ONE~~~~ HU D E N IT ..,
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VJ~~~~reii Erlalu:o t; .,















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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: J. C. Newton, E. L. Loop, H. T. Passmore, A. Captain . . ... JAMES A. FORT, JR.
Chaffin, L. E. Davis, J. A. Gore. Second Lieutenant .. . JOSEPII S. BURROWS
Second Lieutenant ....... HARRY T. MOREHEAD
SECOND Row: E. E. Brinkworth, H. L. Prestwood, F. S. Baker, Second LieutenantHARRY MOREEAD
V. B. Bridges, J. J. Kierce, T. L. Bowen, H. D. Youngblood.
THIRD Row: A. M. Strickland, V. E. McAlum, W. J. Brown- NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
ing, J. W. Richard, C. W. Fortson, I. L. Padgett, J. T. Han-
cock. SERGEANTS
cock.
CHAFFIN, ARLES Loop, EARL L.
JAEGER, HENRY N. NEWTON, J. C.
JOWERS, TALMAGE M. OWENS, SAMUAL
KOERNER, PAUL C. PASSMORE, HENRY T.
WATERS, BUTLER E.

CORPORALS
ALFORD, JOHN R. GORE, JACKSON A.
CANNON, JOHNNIE N. HEATH, CARL H.
DAVIS, LAWRENCE E. SMITH, WILLIAM G.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
BOWEN, TALBOT L. HARVEY, HOMER L.
BRINKWORTII, E. E. PASSMORE, THOMAS C.
BROWNING, WILLIAM J. PRESTWOOD, HENRY L.
SCHESNUT, ARTHUR K. RICHARDS, JOBEE W.
NOBLE, JULIAN A. STRICKLAND, ALTON M.

l PRIVATES
ADDISON, CLARENCE L. BRIDGES, VERNON B.
J I BAKER, TURNER S. BRUCE, ERNEST H.
BOOZER, CARL T. CANNON, WILLIAM G.
BOSSE, OSCAR J. CHUMMEY, DEWEY W.
cecOd ^ ij tGt BRIDGES, JOIN L. COI.LLINSWORTHI, CLIFTON D.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH ENGINEERS

[263






































PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
COLLINSWORTII, WALTER L. LOOP, ROBERT E. FIRST Row: T. M. Jowers, B. E. Waters, H. N. Jaeger, C. II.
CROMER, RAY E. McALuM, VIVIEN Heath, A. K. Chestnut, S. Owens, P. C. Koerner, W. G. Smith,
CROMER, ROBERT L. MASSEY, MORRIS L. J. N. Cannon.
DEATON, CHARLES H. NOBLE, KERMIT A. SECOND Row: W. G. Cannon, D. C. Collinsworth, J. A. Noble,
DOUGLAS, LENORE D. O'DONNELL, JAMES E. H. Bruce, W. L. Collinsworth, H. E. Gill, O. H. Smith, J. L.
FORTSON, CHARLES W. PADGETT, ISHMAEL L. Bridges, M. L. Massey.
GILL, ERNEST S. PETTUS, JOHN F.
GILL, HOMER E. SASSER, LEWIS C. THIRD Row: A. M. Hendrix, W. D. Chumney, K. A. Noble,
HANCOCK, JAMES T. SAYRE, MORRIS E. C. I. Deaton, M. E. Sayre, R. E. Cromer, L. D. Douglas, J.
HENDRIX, ALVIN M. SMITH, OLIVER H. O'Donell, P. D. Walker, O. J. Bosse.
KEEN, JAMES W. YOUNCBLOOD, HOLLIS D.
KIERCE, JAMES J. YOEMANS, CHARLES T.
KIMBALL, KENNETH B. GRINER, HILTON

Battalion Commander on June 12, 1935. Under
IW




































FACTUAL HISTORY his guidance, the organization reached a high
state of efficiency, being awarded the Regimental
Company "F," Second Battalion, 106th Engi- Cup for attaining highest standards for three

neers, was organized in Haines City, Florida, by successive years.

W. H. Morton, who was appointed Captain The unit has served its community on several

when the organization received Federal recogni- occasions and is an important factor in all civic

tion on April 27, 1927. development. It has an excellent drill field,

Lionel E. Robinson was appointed Captain on which has been beautified and is well lighted. A







[27]
r271



































LEFT, ToP: Battalion Aid Station.
LET', BOTTOM: Applying Head Bandage.


COMMISSIONED OFFICER
Captain .... ............. EMMETr E. MARTIN

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
DOUGLAS, AMON C. MOREHEAD, NEAL


PRIVATES
EMMETT E. M N BRAXTON, JESS JOWERS, JEFF
C MMETT R. MPAiN BACHELOR, WILLIS MCCURRY, ANDREW
Captain. Commanding Medical DOUGLASS, OREN ROCHIIEL, ROBERT





The Medical Department Detachment, Second Bat-
talion, 106th Engineers, was organized in Haines City,
,_ *Florida, on June 24, 1930, by Dr. J. R. Sample, who
M/ eTiC,,Bl was later appointed Captain.
Captain Sample developed a first class organization and
served faithfully until May 21, 1938, at which time Cap-
tain Emmett Edward Martin was given command of the
B unit.
D E TM e Nc Under the command of Captain Martin, the personnel
and equipment have been rapidly improved and the unit


HAINES CITY, FLO RIDA program of National Defense.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH ENGINEERS

[28]1
ONE U N REDA N S XTH N GI N E R













































































Organized Company H, Second Florida Infantry (National Guard) and promoted to Colonel, January 15 1924 (Federal recognition to date
appointed Captain in command, September 14, 1914. Mustered into from January 20, 1924.) Saw active State military duty as follows: 1917
Federal service with organization. June 20, 1916, and served for 90 days commanded provisional battalion of Infantry in defending county jail
at State Camp. Served in Laredo District. Mexican Border, with inten- at Tampa, Florida during serious riot and attack on jail; commanded
sive outpost and patrol duties extending from Laredo to San Ygnacio Company H, Second Florida Infantry, in hazardous riot duty at Bradenton,
on the Rio Grande River during the winter of 1916-1917. Relieved from Florida. Service commended. 1926, in command of the 116th Field
Federal service and assumed National Guard status, March 17, 1917. Artillery in the Moore Have n sector of Lake Okeechobee, exceptional
inducted into Federal service August 5, 1917. with Second Florida Infantry, ability was displayed by this officer in the patrol, guard and relief
(redesignated 124th Infantry), and served with 31st Division at Camp activities incident to the hurricane and flood disaster. As a reward
Wheeler, Georgia, until September 18, 1918. During this period, attended for outstanding and meritorious work in this disaster, General Lowry
Infantry School of Arms, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, graduated as a bayonet was awarded the Florida Cross by the Governor of Florida and his per-
instructor and appointed Divisional Bayonet Instructor upon return to formance was cited in General Orders. 1927, commanded all armed
31st Division. The organization and operation of this important task forces at ost of Tampa in defense of the Hillsborough County jail
was an outstanding example of ability and efficiency. Served in France against a determined attack of 1,000 armed and excited men. With cool
with A. E. F. until January 27, 1919. Honorably discharged from Federal and outstanding judgment and strategy, this mob was repulsed with a
service, February 4, 1919, and returned to civil status. Organized First minimum of casualties. Commended by Governor. 1928, commanded the
Battalion, 116th Field Artillery, at Tampa, Florida, and appointed Major 116th Field Artillery on rescue and relief duty on the North and West
of Field Artillery, November 14. 1921. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, sectors of the Lake Okeechobee flood disaster. Commended by the
September 22, 1922. Completed the organization of the regiment and Governor.

[29]
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ROBERT H. GIVENS, JR. PERRY M. TEEPLE
Captain, Adjutant First Lieut., Intelligence Officer


FIFTY-SIXTH FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE




The 56th Field Artillery Brigade was established as a unit during 1924-1925, with the 116th and 117th Field
unit in September, 1917, when the 116th, 117th and 118th Artillery Regiments, under the command of Brigadier
Field Artillery Regiments were mobilized as part of the General Allison Owen. The 114th Field Artillery was
31st Division. The Brigade began intensive training at organized during 1933.
Camp Wheeler, Georgia. Brigadier General Owen retired during 1934 and Colonel
As a unit of the 31st Division, the Brigade was in Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., 116th Field Artillery, was promoted
France in the latter part of September, 1918. In France, to the grade of Brigadier General and assigned to com-
the Division was broken up to be used as replacements. mand the Brigade.
The Brigade did not act as a unit. Its personnel as-
signed to various organizations of the A. E. F. served Stations of the regiments composing the Brigade are
well, and in many cases, heroically, through the latter as follows: 114th Field Artillery, Mississippi; 116th
part of the war. Field Artillery, Florida, and 117th Field Artillery,
The 56th Field Artillery Brigade was reorganized as a Alabama.


OFFICERS, HEADQUARTERS BATTERY

CHESTER R. YATES RICHARD D. REDDICK
Captain Second Lieutenant













U N
r 39 1









,-** I ',,'. ..5. .... ", "|. .:-, W. Geay, H' L. H -ll"'-"


9' -.




















G. W. Greenamyre, H. L. Hill.
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS SECOND Row: I. W. Harden, W. F. Woodard, M. A. Lan-

First Sergeant . .. RAYMOND A. GERRARD C. L. Allyn, S. P. Robinson, P. E. Allyn.
Staff Sergeant . . .. PAUL E. ALLYN THIRD Row: E. C. Clark, G. G. Wells, J. 0. Bridges, H. W.
Staff Sergeant . . .. EULIE V. RICE Wild, A. J. Ebi, H. Stebbins, A. A. Bates, K. M. Ryall, J. E.
SERGEANTS Mathis, D. E. Moore, A. L. Pope.
CLARK, ELMER C. DEMOREST, ALBERT A.
SADLER, WOODSON A.
CORPORALS
BRIDGES, JAMES 0. PARNELLE, MILTON H.
EBI, ALBIN J. REYNOLDS, JOHNNIE 0.
WELLS, GARVICE G.
PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
DERKMAN, OREN T. LANDRESS, MERLE A.
HARDEN, ISAAC W. MATHIS, JOHN E.
WOODARD, WILLIAM F.
PRIVATES
ALLYN, CHARLES L. ROGERS, RALPH T.
BATES, ARTHUR A. RYALL, KEITH M. t
GREENAMYRE, G. :W. ROBINSON, LONNIE B.
HILL, HARVEY L. ROBINSON, SAMUEL P.
MOORE, DAVID E. WILD, HENRY W.
POPE, ALVA L. WILLIAMS, CLIFTON D..
ROGERS, MELVIN L. WILLIS, MILTON L. |



FACTUAL HISTORY
Headquarters Battery, 56th Field' Artillery Brigade,
was organized and Federally recognized January 25, 1927,
with Captain Mark W. Lance, Second Lieutenant Good- A V N P A R K, F L O R I D A
(Continued on page 154)


FIFTY-SIXTH FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE

[31]












56TH FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE
I Ag- AVON PARK, FLORIDA





1. Non-Commissioned Officers.
. .. .. --, 2. Radio Section.
--3. Motor Section.
4. Message Center.
5. Mess Detail.
6. Switchboard.
.. U .





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ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH



















"The 116th Field Artillery has had a singular history in Bartow. The Second Battalion participated in sum-
in the period covered since the date of its organization mer encampment in 1923, and on August 23, 1923, was
in Florida. Perhaps no regiment of the National Guard Federally recognized as a unit with Major Fred Hampton
within the United States has had such dramatic calls commanding. The regiment received official recognition,)
upon its services. Woven into the pattern of everyday at Tampa on January 20, 1924. The Service Battery
life, the work of the peace time soldier calls forth little with band section was placed at Winter Haven and later
notice from the general public. However, when disaster at Arcadia. Battery "F" was transferred to Winter
threatens the structure of the commonwealth, either man- Haven. The regiment was the first to abandon the band
made, or by the hand of Providence, the National Guard section in line with the National Guard Bureau's wishes.
steps promptly into the breach, and, with a steady hand The Medical Detachment was first organized in Tampa,
firmly applied, brings aid and comfort to the stricken and October 6, 1922. Regimental Headquarters Battery was
punishment to the law breaker." (From the official regi- placed in Ft. Myers but in 1937 was moved to St. Peters-
mental history, compiled by Lieutenant Colonel George burg. On the date of Federal recognition, Major Lowry
E. Grace, FNG.) was promoted to Colonel and regimental commander. Cap-
This Regiment was originally organized at Camp tain Hesterly became regimental executive officer and a
Wheeler, Georgia, during the World War as part of the Lieutenant Colonel.
31st (Dixie Division), was transported overseas, but saw Effective July 16, 1933, a radical change in the trans-
no combat action and was mustered from Federal service port equipment of the theretofore horsedrawn regiment
on January 16, 1919. On December 5, 1921, Sumter L. was made. The horses, picturesque part of the transport,
Lowry, Jr., of Tampa, Florida, upon commisison issued were transferred, and one and one-half ton trucks issued
by the Adjutant General, State of Florida, presented for in their places. Since that time, the 116th Field Artillery
Federal recognition three batteries to constitute units of a has been a completely motor-transported unit.
regiment to be known as the 116th Field Artillery. Thus, On October 4, 1934, the Regiment was signally honored
on December 5, 1921, there firing batteries, "A," "B" by the promotion of Colonel Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., to
and "C," formed the basis of the First Battalion, 116th Brigadier General and commanding general, 56th Field
Field Artillery, Major Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., command- Artillery Brigade, of which the 116th Field Artillery is
ing. The battalion was inspected and mustered into serv- a part. Lieutenant Colonel Homer W. Hesterly was ad-
ice by then Lieutenant Colonel Vivian Collins, present vanced to Colonel in command of the regiment on Octo-
Adjutant General of Florida. ber 23, 1934. Major Byron E. Bushnell was transferred
Completion of the First Battalion was effected February from C. O., Second Battalion, to regimental executive, as
15, 1922, with the establishment of Headquarters Battery a Lieutenant Colonel.
and Combat Train, First Battalion. In 1922, the City The Regiment has held annual field training exercises
of Tampa and Hillsborough County furnished land and at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, and Camp Jackson, South
funds for the construction of stables, gunsheds and armory Carolina. At. Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, in 1937, through
buildings. the suggestion of Colonel A. L. P. Sands, the Field Ar-
An expansive movement was made for the establish- tillery Board selected the regiment to test by firing the
ment of a full regiment by the founding of the Second theretofore untried fire control data sheets calculated for
Battalion. Firing batteries "D," "E" and "F" were lo- the reservation area. During the Third Army Maneuvers
cated at Lakeland, Plant City and Arcadia, with Head- held in DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi, in August,
quarters Battery and Combat Train, Second Battalion, 1938, the regiment participated as-a unit of the 56th
(Continued on page 35)
[331







































HOMED W. HESTIRLY

Goloacl
Commanding One Hundred and Sixteenth Field Artillery

Was Cadet student at Georgia Tech, 1906-1910. Enlisted in Company G, Second Florida Infantry,
June I, 1916. Resigned, August 16, 1916. Appointed First Lieutenant, Engineers Reserve, May
13, 1917. Inducted into Federal service (World War), September 2, 1917. Served with Company
C, Sixth U. S. Engineers overseas until July 4, 1918. Promoted to Captain, attended service
schools, August 28, 1918. Honorably discharged, July 21, 1919. Entered reorganized Florida
National Guard as Captain, commanding Battery B, 116th Field Artillery, at Tampa, Florida, on
December 5, 1921. Promoted to Major, October I, 1922. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel,
February 5, 1924. Promoted to Colonel, commanding 116th Field Artillery, October 23, 1934.
Member of State Armory Board. Graduate of Command and General Staff School, Fort Leaven-
worth, Kansas, 1938. Rendered valuable service in civil disorders and hurricane disasters.




E343


























national recognition, and the highest efficiency standing of -.,-/
any National Guard regiment in the United States.
During 1938, Major General George Van Horn Mosely, "' 7 /
Lnen Commander of Fourth Corps Area, twice publicly .B
SBYRON E. BUSHNELL
stated that the 116th Field Artillery was "the finest regi. Lieutenant Colonel, Regimental Staff
meant in the world."
Upon 14 occasions, the Regiment has been called into
active state duty for the suppression of riot, protection of

prisoners, and during storm disasters. For the excellent
manner in which it dischad it s duties at Moore Haven,ding of
Florida, during the great flood catastrophe on September
20, 1926, the War Department issued special commen-
dation to the then Commanding Colonel, Sumter L. icly O BU H J
Lowry, Jr., his officers and men. Despite the numerous
calls into action in aid of civil authorities, the Regiment
has never lost a man nor suffered serious injury.
The 116th Field Artillery is at its peak of training ex- {t
cellence and performance ability. Skilled and experienced
army officers as instructors have enhanced and increased
the material equipment and combat efficiency of the
ntRegiment.


IRVING S. TILLOTSON DANIEL VAN DUSEN PATRICK E. NOLAN BAYA M. HARRISON, JR.
Captain, P. & T. O. Captain, Adlutant Captain, Chaplain First Lieutenant, L. O.















[35]



















a .


























B. A. Dahler. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS



FIRST Row: J. Rognkgs, F. Pheenix, E. D. Embtter, FL. Master Sergeant . . ROBERT R. HLLOYD
Bulman, G. J. Gibson, A. H. Garver, A. J. Rollman. Second Lieutenant .......... GEORGE H. CRILL
SECOND ROW: F. C. Dorman, 1I. E. Colman, G. S. Hershmer,
K. V. Rettstatt, D. G. Williams, A. M. Archibald, W. Hogan,
1B. A. Dahler. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
TIIIRD Row: J. T. Rankin, J. A. Dietrich, E. A. Whittier, L. Master Sergeant ........... ROBERT R. HICKS
T. Dicks, W. O. Pounds, C. E. Paulsen, H. J. Dietrich, F. G. First Sergeant . . .. FRANCIS L. CLAUSS
Brinker, H. M. Clayton. Staff Sergeant. . . PHILIP H. CONNER
Staff Sergeant ........... NORBERT I. FULLER
Staff Sergeant ... ......... LESLIE W. MOT'r

SERGEANTS
ARCHIBALD, ALEX M. HERSHMER, GENE S.
BREEDING, AVERY L. REITSTATT, KARL V.
WILLIAMS, DONALD G.

CORPORALS
BOGART, WALTER J. MEEK, NOAL N.
BREAKER, WILLIAM B. PFEIFFER, ROBERT A.
]HILL, HENRY E. RUSmING, WILBUR O.
LANG, DONALD R.. VANDERVORT, JOHN R.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
BOGGS, JACK E. GARVER, ALVIN H.
BRITTIAN, FRANK A. HERMAN, MAYNARD
DAHLER, BERNARD A. PHIEENIX, HARRISON F.
CYRIL S. LLOYD GEORGE H. CRILL DICKS, LESLIE T. POWER, GEORGE B., JR.
Captain Second Lieutenant EMBREE, HOWARD D. TUBse, WARREN G.
WHITTIER, EVAN A.

PRIVATES
ALLEN, LEE A. CAIN, JULIUS C.
BRINKER, FRANKLIN G. CHENEY, ARTHUR A.
BULMAN, FREDERICK J. CLAYTON, HAROLD M.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

[361







































PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
COLMAN, HUBERT E. JORDA, LOUIS FIRST Row: J. R. Griffith, M. Herman, L. A. Allen, R. E.
DIETRICH, JACK B. MENSER, THORN W. Claeson, H. R. Dodge, J. B. Dietrich, W. 0. Rushing.
DIETRICH, JAMES A. PAULSEN, CARL E.
DIETRICH, HARRY J. PEDEN, ROBERT M. SECOND Row: T. W. Menser, H. E. Hill, D. R. Lang, A. L.
DODGE, HAROLD R. POUNDs, WILBUR Breeding, P. H. Conner, F. L. Clauss, L. W. Mott, R. A. Pfeif-
DORMAN, FRANK C. POWER, ALBERT M. fer, N. N. Meek.
GIBSON, GORDON, JR. ROLLMAN, ALLEN J. T
GLOVER, GEORGE R. RANKIN, JACK T. THIR Row: G. B. Power A. M P .


GRIFFITH, JOHN R. SPENCER, MYRON C. W. J. Bogart, R. R. Hicks, N. L. Fuller, G. R. Glover, W. B.
HOGAN, WALTER STAGG, JOHN E. Breaker, M. C. Spencer.
WALKER, WILLIAM


duty as a Field Artillery unit. A very successful camp
FACTUAL HISTORY was enjoyed by the personnel in this new branch of serv-
ice. During this time, the Battery participated in a three-
First organized on April 15, 1936, as the 118th Am- day field maneuver at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. In
bulance Company, 106th Medical Regiment, this unit was 1938, the unit took part in the Third Army Maneuvers,
mustered into the service at the Florida Military Academy, DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi.
St. Petersburg, Florida, by Brigadier General Vivian Col- In October, 1938, First Lieutenant Edward J. Heney,
lines, the Adjutant General, and Colonel A. L. P. Sands, Executive Officer since the Battery was organized, trans-
Field Artillery Instructor of the 116th Field Artillery. Its ferred to the inactive list' due to business reasons. He was
first tour of duty was at Camp Clifford J. R. Foster, succeeded by Second Lieutenant George H. Crill, who
Jacksonville, Florida, from July 23 to August 8, 1936. was transferred from Battery "C," 116th Field Artillery.
On January 1 7,1937, it was redesignated Company "F," Captain N. W. Gable, who had commanded the organi-
106th Medical Regiment, and on January 13, 1937, was nation since its formation, was transferred to the Medical
converted to Headquarters Battery, 116th Field Artillery. Department and promoted to Major. Captain C. S.
On July 3, 1937, the unit moved from its home station to Lloyd was transferred from Headquarters, Second Bat-
Columbiaa,South Carolina, by motor to its first tour of talion, 116th Field Artillery, to fill this vacancy.
Quartered in the American Legion Armory, St. Peters-
burg, the unit hopes to move into its new armory now
ST. PETERSBURG FLO RIDA under construction at an early date.

[ 37]














ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA

A *


(I) Motor Section. (2) Radio Section. (3) Scout Section. (4)
Headquarters Section. (5) Instrument Section. (6) Meage
Center. (7) Non-Commissioned Officers.

















1cl
-'




































% .r
















O. .. d r.R .Ilk*W, .. ..








































SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: F. K. Core, L. G. Gamage, B. Raulerson, A. J. Captain . . .. STANHOPE C. SMITH
Turner, J. I. IIollingsworth, Jr., V. B. Bishop, W. Kerce, P. First Lieutenant . ... .THOMAS R. BROWN
Craft, B. Carlton, H. Cravey. Second Lieutenant ... ..... .MAURICE B. CARLTON
SECOND ROW: J. Sullivan, B. Sullivan, R. Summerall, J. C. Second Lieutenant . . JAMES A. SCOTT
Barrs, G. T. Fountain, J. Rogers, H. Hollingsworth, V. Cochran, NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
B. Stribling, J. T. Hall, W. H. Blackmon, P. J. Sloan. Master Sergeant . . .. FRED K. CORE
THIRD Row: C. I. Chancey, J. Bretton, G. Smith, W. L. Master Sergeant . .. WILLIAM H. HANCOCK
Myers, S. Stribling, J. B. Belflower, P. Cochran, R. L. Cleve- First Sergeant . . LELAND G. GAMMAGE
land. D. Bragdon, W. H. Saxon, R. Bradley, F. H. Carroll. Staff Sergeant .. .... BERNARD RAULERSON

SERGEANTS
BISIIOP, VIRGIL B. HOLLINGSWORTH, JESSE L., JR.
TURNER, ALBERT J.
CORPORALS
CARLTON, BRUCE W. CRAVEY, HARRY C.
CRAFT, J. A., JR. KERCE, WOODROW
PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
BLRETTON, ERVIN J. SAXON, WILLIAM H.
MYERS, WI.LIAM L. STRIPLING, SAMUEL L.
ROCERS, JAMES V. SUMMERALL, R. L., JR.
PRIVATES
BARS, JOHN C. FOUNTAIN, GEORGE T.
BRADLEY, ROBERT F. HALL, JAMES T.
BRACDON, DAVID R. HARRELL, PAUL L.
BRAGDON, J. G. HOLLINGSWORTH, IIAROI.D
BEI.F.LOWVER, JESSE 1. SLOAN, PAUL L.
BLACKMON, WILLIAM K. SMITH, GLEN D.
O CARROLL, FRANK SH. STRIBLING, WILLIAM J.
CHANCEY, CEDERIC I. SULLIVAN, BIRK C.
CCLEVELAND, ROBERT L. SULLIVAN, BUDDY W.
STANHOPE C. SMITH THOMAS R. BROWN COCHRAN, PERCY D. SULLIVAN, JOHNNIE B.
Captain First Lieutenant COCIIRAN, VERNON J. WHITrLE, BUFORD F., JR.



SERVICE BATTERY FACTUAL HISTORY
Battery "F," 116th Field Artillery, was organized
A R C A D I A, F L O R I D A September 3, 1923, and Federal recognition was ex.
(Continued on page 154)


ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

[39]










=40,















6 -
j,""Q .,8w

















MAURICE B. CARLTON JAMES A. SCOTT
Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant



SERVICE BATTERY
I I 6TH FIELD ARTILLERY
ARCADIA, FLORIDA






(1) Personnel Section. (2) Non-Commissioned Officers. (3)
Motor Instruction. (4) Map Section. (5) Drivers and Trucks.
(6) Anti-Aircraft.




























Major, Commanding
FRANK C. PAUL HAROLD M. CLAR'OE RALH J.










GEORGE E BAYA and Combat Train EARL E. WHITEHEAD
I 1 TH FIELD ARTILLERY n Captain, Battery C







MARCUS N. OWEN EDMOND J. SWANN ROBERT F. NUNEZ, JR. HARRY P. BAYA EDMURALPHND J. McKIMULLEN
First Lieutenant, P. & T. 0. First Lieutenant, Headquarters First Lieutenant, Battery A First Lieutenant, Battery B First Lieutenant, Battery C
WILLIAM A. HEMPHILL Battery and Combat Train MARSDEN G. KELLY THOMAS P. KELLY, JR. MARTIN CARABALLO, JR.
Second Lieutenant, Headquarters OSCAR D. HOWELL, JR. Second Lieutenant, Battery A Second Lieutenant, Battery B Second Lieutenant, Battery C
Battery and Combat Train Second Lieutenant, Battery A









jI,
d~ ,' i g








,,--,


S.



,.A, -7 -, 4. -- '



















2.. ..
1

















SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: C. H. Brown, 0. L. Mayo, J. W. Thaxton, Jr., Captain . . HAROLD M. CLARVOE
0. 0. Dodson, 0. C. Whitehead ,(j.V. Smit-,. W. Tice. First Lieutenant . .. EDMOND J. SWANN
SECOND Row: E. E. Leavine, J. A. Gibson, H. D. Whidden, Second Lieutenant . .. .WILLIAM A. HEMPHILL
J. W. Mulholland, G. W. Abrames, J. F. Greene, J. Smith.
TIIIR Row: G. G. Frissell, J. E. Hackney, I. L. Scott, W. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
Byrd, P. San Martin, W. L. Holden, E. F. Greene, E. L. Pierce. First Sergeant . . . E. E. E. I.AVINE
Staff Sergeant . . . J. GIBSON
Staff Sergeant . . . JOSEPH SMITH

SERGEANTS
BENNErr, N. J. PIERCE, E.
DODSON, 0, G. SIIAW, B.
GUNTER, E. SCOTTrr, 1.

CORPORALS
BYRD, WILLIE FRISSELL, D. E.
BROWN, CHARLIE FRISSELL, G. G.
COWART, L. J. GREENE, E. F.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
ALEXANDER, C. H1. HOLDEN, W. L.
SI L BYRD, E. OLSEN, B. P.
HALL, 0. I. STONE, F. B.
HARPER, W. R. TICE, B. W.



ABRAMES, G. W. DAVIDSON, T. E.
ANNESS, A. C. FILOGAMO, L. M.
FIRST BATTALION BROWN, K. D., JR. GOLDEN, L. L.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

[421
'UTR .SoI


CORPORAj










ir 'r (











II











PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
GREENE, J. RIGCIO, J. FIRST Row: E. C. Gunter, D. E. Frissell, O. I, Hall, C. II.
HACKNEY, J. E. SAN MARTIN, P. Alexander, W. R. Harper, L. L. Golden, B. T. Shaw.
HACKNEY, W. L. SMITH, J. SEcoNO Row: E. II. Walker, N. J. Bennett, J. R. Mills, L. M.
HOLLOWAY, C. TERRY, M. Filogamo, A. C. Anness, F. L. Wilson, Jr., W. L. Hackney.
KEATIILEY, M. N. THAXTON, J. W., JR. THIRD Row: M. Terry, E. Byrd, R. E. Mayo, C. F. Holloway,
MAYO, O. L. WALKER, E. H. L. J. Cowart, T. E. Davidson, K. O. Brown, Jr., M. N. Keathley.
MAYO, R. E. WIIDDEN, H. D.
MILLS, J. WHITEHEAD, O. C.
MULHOLLAND, J. W. WILSON, F. L., JR.
mand then passed to First Lieutenant Henry

Woodward who was promoted to Captain De-

FACTUAL HISTORY cember 22, 1924. Captain Woodward was re-

Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, First lived on April 1, 1936, by First Lieutenant Har-

Battalion, 116th Field Artillery, was accepted by old M. Clarvoe, who was promoted to Captain

the Federal Government under command of Cap- July 2, 1936.

tain Jack Hedrick on February 15, 1922. Cap- This organization has been called upon a

tain Henry H. Cole was appointed commander number of times to assist local civil authorities.

of the organization upon resignation of Captain The most notable ones being the riot at the county

Hedrick on December 12, 1922, and the com- jail in Tampa May 31-June 2, 1927, and Sep-
tember 2-3, 1935, which was election day in


TA M PA, F LO R I D A Tampa and mob spirit was rampant.
(431


















1. Wire Laying Detail. 2. Surveying Section. 3. Non-Commissioned Officers.
-r Mir




















'6AA 4i&/ A;Allh



Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, First Battalion, I I6th Field Artillery, in the Third Army Maneuvers.
r,.; .


,,,T '' ** '"



























r -
.p ~;:~ ~ .. , ;'.: ....

























OF
. t





HdOQRTR[ BHNIORY ANO COMB AIN







~r ; 1: ., _- . .,, .... ,'. l t l ili















FIRST BATTALION


H16/h 4je/d 4/Ide

TAMPA, FLORIDA



















.,I. Non-Commissioned Officers.
2. Instrument Section.
3. Swearing in a Recruit.
e"* 4. Gun in Action.
5. Trucks.
6. Wire Section.


73











" 0















MIIM Rpm











ML. oe ., .OA Hoa.. JR. T.
























S-. T. .. .. S E
fi, W C .. M .. .y L P I., Cr.

















SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: 0. F. Lamberson, A. P. Barfield, A. B. Boykin, Caain...............RALPH J. KING
J. L. Slattery, J. J. Hill, F. Palmer, D1). W. Embry, W. Shaw. Firt Lieutenant .. ......... ROBERT F. NUNEZ, JR.
SECONI Row: R. J. Gatliff, W. M. French, 0. L. Bower, W. Second Lieutenant . .. .OSCAR I). HOWELL, JR.
L. Waller, J. H. Bunkley, T. A. Kersey, L. L. Priest, J. R. Cof- Second Lieutenant . . MARSDEN G. KELLY
fey, W. C. Mills, M. D. Kirby, L. P. Crandon.
THIRD Row: C. W. MeClintock, E. W. Sampson, R. M. Brant- NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
ley, R. L. Tucker, C. A. Joyner, C. R. Flynt, A. 11. Ekker, J. A. First Sergeant . . . JACK J. HILL
Campbell, R. J. Barnwell, M. H. Robarts, P. C. Ainsworth.
SERGEANTS
BARFIELD, ALVA P. LAMBERSON, OWEN F.
BOYKIN, AUBREY B. PALMER, FRANK E.
EMBRY, DURWARD W. SHAW, WILLIAM B.
SLATTERY, JOSEPH L.

CORPORALS
DONNELLY, JAMES W. GROUT, WILLIARD E.
FENDER, BURTON C. KANEY, THOMAS E.
GLASS, GEORGE L. STUMP, GEORGE L.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
ADAMS, CLARENCE T. JOYNER, CHARLES A.
AINSWORTH, PHILLIP C. MILLER, JOHN J.
AVRIETT, ROBERT J. ROBARTS, MERRILL H.
SBUNKLEY, JAMES H. TUCKER, ROBERT L. C.
WALLER, WILLIAM L.

PRIVATES

BARKER, LARRY N. COOPER, ROLLINS
BOWER, ORIS COUNE, FRANCIS L.
BRANTLEY, ROBERT M. CRANDON, LEO P.
BURNETT, ROBERT L. CROMARTIE, DAVID J.
J CAMPBELL, JULIUS A. CROSBY, RAY
C U.LJ .a' .S .Fr J COFFEY, JAMES R. DIEZ, RA.LPH
a "0 COMPTON, HARMON W. EKKER, ALFRED HI.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

1461





































PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
FI.VNT, CHARLES R. NicitoIs, CUE F. FIRST Row: W. F. Grut, G. L. Glass, Jr., J. W. Donnclly,
FRENCII, WALLACE M. NORT.iiiP, EDWARD A. (. L. Stump, I. Fenuer, '. 1. Kaiiy, II. W. Comptoi, I. A.
GANT, ARI. 1I. NORIIuI, GARDINER L. Nava, Jr., G. L. Northup.
GATLIFF, RENE J. NAVA, Louis A.
GOULDING, FRANK R. PARRA, RoY P. SECOND Row: W. L. Weber, E. A. Northup, Jr., R. Dicz, R.
HATCIIETT, PAUL E. PRIEST, LLOYD L. J. Avriett, R. Cooper, Jr., P. E. Hatchett, M. E. VanSickle, L.
KERSEY, THVINDRE A. R EED ROBERT E. A. Purdom, R. E. Reed, L. S. Lovell, C. T. Adams.
KIRBY, MURR D. SEARJEANT, H. M., JR. THIRD Row: R. Crosby, J. J. Miller, F. L. Coune, E. Ii. Gant,
LOVELL, LONNIE S. VAN SICKEL, MARCUS E. R. L. Burnett, W. H. Williams, L. N. Barker, II. M. Searjeant,
MCCLINTOCK, CHiAs. WV. WEBER, WALTER L. F. R. Goulding, G. F. Nichol
MILLS, WILBUR C. WILLIAMS, WINTON H. F.R. Gouldng, G. F. Nichols.
WHITE, HOWARD C.


31 resulted in six deaths and 19 wounded. No Battery
FACTUAL HISTORY
member was killed or severely hurt.
Battery "A," 116th Field Artillery, was organized De- Captain Laird was transferred to the National Guard
cember 5, 1921, under the command of the late Captain Reserve on August 22, 1928, and Captain J. W. McNeer
Claiborne Phipps, who was made a Major on February was in command until June 25, 1931, at which time he
5, 1924, and was succeeded by Captain Loper Lowry as resigned and was succeeded by Captain Daniel Van Dusen.
Battery Commander. Captain Davis Walker succeeded Under Captain Van Dusen, the Battery saw active service
Captain Lowry, who resigned, on June 18, 1925. on July 5 and 6, 1933, when 20 men were sent to Road
On November 28, 1925, Captain Laird succeeded Cap- Prison Camp No. 33 to assist in quelling a riot.
tain Walker. The Battery saw its first active service Captain Ralph J. King, present commander, took over
from May 30 to June 2, 1927, when it assisted Hillsbor- the Battery on December 8, 1934, to fill the vacancy
ough County authorities to protect a prisoner held by the caused by Captain Van Dusen's transfer to the National
sheriff. Brushes between the mob and troops on May Guard Reserve. The last active duty of the Battery, with
the exception of the annual two weeks summer encamp-
ment, occurred September 2-4, 1935, when it assisted
T A M P A F L O R I D A county officials in maintaining order during a city election.

[471








































SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRsT Row: E. J. Brend, S. C. Wright, W. C. Hubbard, P. Captain . . . GEORGE E. BAYA
M. Grahn, Jr., C. G. Brockington, J. B. Gremer, F. H. Collins, First Lieutenant . . . HARRY P. BAYA
S n L.,n- .- UT,

























E. OMara, A. B. Cherry. Second Lieutenant . WILLIAM F. HUNTER, JR.
SECOND Row: F. G. McAlister, E. L. Barber, E. J. Bell, B. F.
Shaw, G. N. McClintock, L. L. Hardin, 0. J. Giles, H. -A. Per- NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
rette, T. E. Taaffe, E. B. Lussier. First Serueant . . PETER M. GRAHN, JR.
TuIRD Row: R. A. Tullis, L. A. Shinlever, B. F. Braxton, J.



COLLINS, FRED H. MOORE, AUBREY A.


CORPORALS
i. E. CLINE, JAMES D. MCALISTER, FOREST G.
TIIIROCORDELL, B. C., JR. MILLS, EDGAR L.
HOPE, WILLIAM H. SHEPPARD, HARLO J., JR.
TAAFFE, THOMAS E.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
BOSTICK, CHARLES E. MANNER, JOSEPH M.
BRAXTON, BEN F. MATHENEY, HOWARD R.
BREND, ELMORE J. McGAIIEE, MARTIN F.
).BRI, JIMMY C. MILLER, EMMET H.
SJ C E L F H P GILES, OCKLY J. PLAGEMAN, FRED H.
GRANTHAM, VERNON C. SABA, CHARLES N.
GUTKIN, MAX L. SHINLEVER, LEE A.
HARDIN, LEONARD L. STARLING, LEE R.


-ARBER, ELBERT L. CASTOR, GEORGE L.
BELL, EARL J. CHERRY, ALVIN B.
BENNETT, ELWOOD E. DANGELO, JAMES J.
SBUNc, ROBERT E. DIMAIOTHENEY, FREOERICK B.
aBRe CAMAL, ALBERT J. GARDNER, EDWIN L.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

1481
[48]

















AI




















PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
HAMPTON, HOOD C., JR. MILLER, SAMMIE FIRST Row: G. F. Mangan, A. J. Camalo, M. C. Morgan, E.
IENRIOUEZ, GEO. E. O'MARA, EDWIN A. Biggs, A. A. Moore, R. J. Jandreau, F. W. Hiller, B. L.
HILLER, FRANK W. PERRETTE, HARRY A. Kelley.
HUBBARD, WILLIS C. PETTIGREW, ARTHUR D. ey.
KELLEY, BARNEY L. PUCKETT, Louis L. SECOND Row: H. J. Sheppard, Jr., R. E. Bunch, G. E. Hen-
KELTNER, C. M., JR. REID, WILLIAM T. riquez, A. B. Sanchez, C. R. Thomas, C. M. Keltner, Jr., C. N.
KICKLITER, JOSEPH F. SANCHEZ, ALBERT B.
KIEFFER, RICHARD 0. SANCHE, BEN F. Saba, M. L. Gutkin, B. C. Cordell,'Jr., R. 0. Kieffer.
MAEFAE, GIORE 0. STIAW BEN F.
LOGGINS, CHARLIE E. STEWART, C. H., JR. THIRD Row: J. M. Maner, E. H. Miller, C. E. Bostick, W. II.
LUSSIER, EDWARD B. THOMAS, CHARLES R.II
MANGAN, GEORGE F. TULLIS, CARL L. Hope, W. T. Reid, E. E. Bennett, A. D. Pettigrew, F. B. Di-
MCCLINTOCK, GEO. N. TULLIS, RALPH A. Maio, V. C. Grantham, L. R. Starling, H. R. Matheney.
WRIGHT, SEYMOUR C.

as a horse-drawn unit, but after many years with the
FACTUAL HISTORY horses it was, in 1933, converted to the truck-drawn unit
After the close of the World War and pursuant to the that it now is. The Battery has seen active State service
provisions of the then newly enacted National Defense on two occasions. In 1927 it aided civil authorities in
Act providing for a Federally organized and recognized defending the Hillsborough County Jail, and in 1935, it
National Guard, there was organized at Tampa, Florida, was called out to preserve order during municipal election
three batteries of Field Artillery and on December 5, 1921, day riots in the City of Tampa. On both occasions it
these three units were given Federal recognition and desig- performed its duties creditably and honorably.
nated Batteries "A," "B," and "C," 116th Field Artillery. Its first Battery Commander was Captain William E.
Battery "B" was therefore one of the original units Hamner. Succeeding Battery Commanders were as fol-
around which the regiment was built, and it has since re- lows: Captian John A. Smith, December 12, 1922, to
mained one of the regiment's most dependable and effi- September 27, 1925; Captain Samuel G. Harrison, Sep-
cient firing batteries. Organized at Tampa, it has ever member 27, 1925 to October 28, 1925; Captain Arlie C.
since been stationed in this city. Luther, October 28, 1925, to January 17, 1928; Captain
A French 75 mm. Gun Battery, it was originally equipped Ray V. S. Rudd, January 27, 1928, to September 30, 1936,
and Captain George E. Baya, present Battery Com-
mander, who was placed in command on September 30,
T A M P A F L O R I D A 1936, and has served since that date.

[491











UHTI1RY B

FIRST BATTALION


r6M qiel A4i&leV

TAMPA, FLORIDA
















I. Instrument Section.
2. Gun Crew in Action.
3. Battery Column of Platoons.
4. Motor Section.
5. Signal Section.
6. Non-Commissioned Officers.








r--V


a m
44 1*W _4
4.CL~III~I4 ~
~gp9C' t~ip yS~ r ~~iS.'A~y






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I. Non-Commissioned Officers.
2. On the March.
3. Telephone Section.
4. Instrument Detail.
5. Laying Wire by Hand.
6. Section Coupling.
7. Battery in Action. t b c
8. Gun in Recoil.
9. Laying Wire.
TAMPA, FLORIDA





O[51]
ONE HUNDREDAND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY



fl


















I' h





















SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: C. F. Hall, N. W. Benjamin, H. F. Sheppard, J. Captain . . . RAY V. S. RUDD
T. Specht, J. B. Richardson, M. N. Jones, W. P. Gillstrap, Jr., First Lieutenant . . EDMUND J. McMULLEN
0. P. Hall, E. R. Hill. Second Lieutenant . . MARTIN CARABALLO, JR.
SECOND Row: G. M. Bryant, F. Fairchild, R. W. Milam, R.
L. Stephens, R. B. Gouch, L. E. Curtis, H. L. Nelson, A. G. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
Sims, E. V. Gerow, C. W. Henderson. First Sergeant . . . JAMES T. SPECIIT
THIRD Row: C, R. Banks, E. P. Barnwell, J. C. Heard, D. A.
Riley, C. M. Tittsworth, C. P. Hand, H. H. Wester, R. Rodri- SERGEANTS
guez, F. 0. Calohan, Jr., F. T. Sanz. GILLSTRAP, WILLIAM P. LOPEZ, ANTONIO J.
HILL, ELLIS R. MANSON, HERMAN W.
JONES, MANSFIELD N. RAMIREZ, ERNEST L.
SHEPPARD, HUBERT F.

CORPORALS
BARNWELL, EMANUEL P. HEARD, JOHN C.
BRYANT, GEORGE M. OLSON, PHILLIP W.
HALL, OSCAR P. PRATER, OWEN J.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
BEARD, MALCOLM MCRAE, DONALD C.
BENJAMIN, NATHAN W. NICHOLAS, HERBERT S.
CALOHIAN, FRANK 0. RILEY, DAVID A.
CAMPO, JOSEPH RODRIGUEZ, RENE
fCOOKE, LUTHER A. Rojo, ALBERT R.
CRAWFORD, HERBERT E. SCHUMACHER, CHAS. L.
GARCIA, RALPH SIMS, ALBERT G.
JONES, ELBERT E. 'TITTSWORTII, C. M.

PRIVATES
BANKS, CLIVE R. CURTIS, LORAN E.
BOYDE, GEORGE E. FAIRCHILD, FRANK
J hi % CARTER, ROBERT B. GEROW, EDWARD V.
CROFT, BILLIE D. GoucGi, ROBERT B.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

[521
















,- i ,.,


















PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
FALL, CHARLES F. PADGETT, CECIL F. FIRST Row: E. L. Ramirez, M. E. Beard, C. L. Schumacher,
HAND, ALBERT E. PEERMAN, ROY W., JR. L. A. Cooke, E. S. Newcity, J. H. Spencer, H. S. Nicholas, A. J.
HAND, CHARLES P. RICHARDSON, JAMES B. Lopez, H. W. Manson.
liAND, WI.LL M. RILEY, WILLIAM E.
HAND, WILL. M. RILEY, WILLIAM E. SECOND Row: D. C. McRae, A. R. Bojo, C. F. Padgett, O. J.
HlANNON, WILLIAM A. Ross, ERNEST W. Prater, R. R. Wakely, E. E. Jones, E. W. Ross, B. D. Croft, R.
HENDERSON, CHAS. W. SANZ, FRANK T. Garcia, P. W. Olon
HOWE, VICTOR E. SESSIONS, OTIS M.
HU-CIES, AVERY E. StHURTLEFF, ROBERT E. THIRD Row: R. W. Peerman, Jr., J. Campo, .L.Williams,
JACKSON, RAYMOND D. SPENCER, JOHN H. W. E. Riley, A. E. Hughes, D. P. Walker, R. E. Shurtleff, V. E.
LYNN, VELNA V. STEPHENS, RICHARD L. Howe, R. B. Carter, G. E. Boyd.
MILAM, RICIIARD W. WAKELEY, RAYMOND R.
NELSON, HARRY L. WALKER, DONALD P.
NEWCITY, EDWARD S. WESTER, HERBERT H.
WILLIAMS, HERBERT P. County during the jail riots, and fortunately completed
its tour without casualty. On May 13, 1930, Captain
Herbert E. Harley took command, to be succeeded on
FACTUAL HISTORY July 1, 1930, by Captain Byron E. Bushnell. At camp
in 1930, the Battery won the Tampa Board of Trade
Battery "C" was mustered into service on December 5, t y the et frn battery n the rem t fr
1, h n H W r c trophy for the best firing battery in the regiment for the
1921, with Captain Homer W. Hesterly commanding.
1921, with Captain Homer W. Hestery commanding third time, and thus permanent possession. On Septem-
Fifty men were present of whom three are still in the r Captan ere Sin s ssine to
ber 17, 1931, Captain George N. Sagin was assigned to
organization. On October 1, 1922, Captain T. Byrd command. In June, 1933, the organization bid farewell
Sparkman took command and continued until October 1, to the horses and welcomed the new motor equipment
to the horses and welcomed the new motor equipment
1925, when Captain Thomas H. Dunn took over. During frn r
furnished by the Government.
this period the Battery was building up an excellent rec-
On September 3, 1935, the Battery was again called
ord for efficiency and attendance, a notable point being
that at the first summer camp in 1922, the Battery had out on active State service to maintain order at the elec-
that at the first summer camp in 1922, the Battery had
tion polls. Although the situation was very tense at
present 96 per cent of its strength.
Times, particularly after nightfall, the mission was ac-
On May 31, 1927, Battery "C" was called out on
On May 31, 1927, Battery "C" was called out on complished without serious incident, and the organization
active State duty to aid the sheriff of Hillsborough
active State duty to aid the sheriff of Hillsborough was relieved early the next morning at the height of a

tropical hurricane. On November 1, 1935, command
passed to Captain Daniel Van Dusen, who was succeeded
TA M PA F L O R I D A on October 1, 1937, by Captain Ray V. S. Rudd.

[ 53 1








P-"














Captain, Adjutant Captain, Headquarters Battery f
and Combat Train
[ /o










OFFICERS, SECOND BATTALION EG
W. EUGENE JONES
ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY Major,Commanding


ALBERT W. CONNOR, JR.
MILTON E. HULL GEORGE R. HARDY MAURICE J. WILSON First Lieutenant, L. 0. HENRY W. HOUSE, JR.
Captain, Battery E Captain, Battery F First Lieutenant, P. & T. 0. JOEL C. GARRARD Captain, Battery D
WILLIAM S. MYRICK, JR. JOHN E. MARTIN HENRY M. FULTON Second Lieutenant, Headquarters DONALD R. PIERCE
First Lieutenant, Battery D First Lieutenant, Battery E First Lieutenant. Battery F Battery and Combat Train Second Lieutenant, Battery D
BALDWIN WYLIE ROBERT M. WILBUR HENRY R. HARPER ROBERT C. HOLTZCLAW, JR. EUGENE A. LAURENT
Second Lieutenant, Battery D Second Lieutenant, Battery E Second Lieutenant, Battery E Second Lieutenant, Battery F Second Lieutenant, Battery F















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HEADQUARTERS BATTERY

AND COMBAT TRAIN
SECOND BATTALION

I I16TH FIELD ARTILLERY
BARTOW FLORIDA

(i) Iorn.C omr:i o d OrU..r.. (21 Tru i ~Jj D...r. I(3
Sw;i.,hboard Oprdtor,. (4) Intrum.:nt D.I,.I. ( F. '" C:-
ler. (6) Rddio D-: :l (161) I:I L.r. ..





.1"



















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IL.






















SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: C. T. Burgess, T. W. Holland, C. C. Wilson, H. Captain . . ... ROBERT L. HUGHES
S. Speice, J. J. Barush, F. W. Reynolds, R. G. Paterson, J. S. Second Lieutenant . . JOEL C. GARRARD
Huggart, D. Fletcher, H. C. Mercer.
SECOND Row: H. C. Floyd, J. P. Schuck, C. W. Mercer, B. B. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
Brock, R. E. Stenger, R. J. Stenger, W. H. Terry, F. W. Schuck,
V. D. Cameron, F. Z. Lawrence. First Sergeant . . .. ROBERT P. HUGHES
Staff Sergeant . .. WATSON S. GARRARD
Staff Sergeant . . SYLVESTER 0. HARRISON

SERGEANTS
SAPP, KENNETH N. STEWART, RALPH W.
WIIIDDEN, JAMES F.

CORPORALS
BASS, NELSON E. BURGESS, CASSELL T.
BROOKS, ROBERT N. CHATHAM, GEORGE T.
MERCER, HARRY C.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
BARUSH, JOHiiN J. HOLLAND, THOMAS W.
BLACK, MARVIN D. REYNOLDS, FLOYD W.
CAMERON, WILLIAM D. SPEICE, HOWARD S.
HAWKINS, RICHARD C. WILSON, CLARENCE C.

PRIVATES
BROCK, BENJAMIN B. FI.EICHER, DOZIER

SECOND BATTALION CONNER, W'ILLIAM II. GIBSON, JAMES C.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY
jJ~~~ 561 -






























LAWRENCE, FRANCIS Z. SCUCK, JOE P. F Whien, G. T. Chatham, C. Voigt, R. N. Brooks, N. .


MERCER, CARLTON W. STENGER, RAYMOND J. K N Spp
ii





























MERCER, CIIARLTON W. STENGER, RAYMOND J. Bass, K. N. Sapp.

PATERSON, ROBERT G. STENGER, RALPH E. SECOND Row: R. E. Phillips, T. Burnett, B. Reynolds, H. L.
PII.ILLIPS, ROBERT E. TERRY, WARREN H. Wilbanks, R. C. Hawkins, M. D. Black, C. M. Ryals, A. L.
REYNOLDS, BUSTER L. VOIT, EDWARD C. Wojteczko, J. C. Gibson, W. H. Conner.
RYA.LS, CARLOS M. WILBANKS, HENRY L.
WOJTECZKO, ADOLPH L.
of which occurred in September, 1926, following the hur-
ricane of that year, when the Battery did patrol work at
FACTUAL HISTORY
Moore Haven, Florida. Again, in May, 1927, the Battery
Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, Second Bat- was ordered to Tampa to aid the civil authorities in
talion, 116th Field Artillery, was organized during the subduing a riot there. Then, immediately following the
summer of 1923 by Major Roger B. Lyle. The Battery hurricane in September, 1928, the Battery performed
was extended Federal recognition on August 21, 1923. relief work for more than two weeks at Okeechobee.
The first officers of the Battery were Captain Roger B. In 1929, in connection with the campaign for the eradi-
Lyle, First Lieutenant Charles D. Appling and Second cation of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Florida, the unit
Lieutenant C. C. Harper. Following Captain Lyle, in served two months on patrol work in the Tampa area.
the order named, Captains A. T. Hackl, W. E. Jones, On March 27, 1932, the Battery was sent to Lakeland
C. S. Lloyd and George R. Hardy commanded the Bat- to aid the civil authorities there in protecting a prisoner
tery. from mob violence.
During its existence, the Battery has responded to orders The year 1939 will be commemorative of the completion
for active State duty on five different occasions, the first of a modern brick armory, replacing the outmoded 15-

year-old wooden building which has housed the unit since
B A R T O W F L O R I DA its beginning.
S57]
5~71













i. I. .'



























SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: L. E. Smith, J. H. Miller, H. D. Wafford, J. E. Captain . . HENRY W. HOUSE, JR.
Albritton, C. L. Howell, L. L. Lawrence, H. W. Fussell, W. D. First Lieutenant . . WILLIAM S. MYRICK, JR.
Helm, D. B. McCorkle. Second Lieutenant . . DONALD R. PIERCE
SECOND Row: L. A. Westberry, D. W. McCormick, A. G. Second Lieutenant . . BALDWIN WYLIE
Simmons, R. T. Williams, R. B. Palmer, J. R. Davenport, C. G. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
Covering, P. R. Bennett, R. Lang. First Sergeant . . CIIARIES R. PINSON
THIRD Row: I. F. Johnson, C. S. Johnson, E. G. Thompson,
B. L. Brandon, H. E. Halden, B. B. Safar, W. J. Rentz, A. H. SERGEANTS
English, W. E. Bradley, J. K. Carter. BOOKER, VANCE W. HUCKABAY, GEORGE S.
CARTER, JOHN K. PHILLIPS, HERBERT J.
GRIFFIN, JAMES A. PUTNAM, JOE F.
WOOD, HAROLD 0.

CORPORALS
BRANDON, BYRON L. PUTNAM, RALPH D.
COLLIER, J. B. SMITH, JOHN J., JR.
HALLER, ROBERT P. WILBANKS, JAMES L.
HELM, WILLIAM D.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
DOHANY, ANDREW J., JR. PALMER, RALPH B.
DOOLEY, MAX L. REGISTER, CLYDE 0.
SEDWARDS, ISAAC A. SAFAR, BENJAMIN B.
ENGLISH, ALEXANDER H. SIMMONS, JOHN W.
SHOWELL, CHESTER L. SMITH, LEWIS E.
LEFFERS, RICHARD THIIGPEN, DAVID C.
LOVERING, CURTIS G. THOMPSON, E. G.
WESTBERRY, LEONARD A.
PRIVATES
9 ALBRITTON, JAMES E. BENNETT, PAUL R.
C C O B4 BALLARD, CHARLES H. BRADLEY, WAYNE E.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

S58]
















dlA, o

















PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
CLOUD, T. E. JOINSON, CHARLES S. FIRST Row: C. R. Pinson, J. A. Griffin, V. W. Booker, G. S.
DAVENPORT, JANSEN R. JOnINSON, INMAN F. lluckabay, II. 0. Wood, J. F. Putnam, A. R. Mathews, Jr., R.
ENGLISH, WARREN G. KEEN, II. M. D. Putnam, D. C. Thigpen.
FERGUSON, R. T., JR. KENNEDY, ILLIAM L. SECOND Row: J. L. Wilbanks, L. A. Fraser, H. M. Keen, J.
FRASER, LAWRENCE A. KEARSE sco F. W. McCullen, W. H. Garrison, C. G. Hall, T. E. Cloud, R. E.
FUSSELL, HERMAN W. LANG, R.
FUSSELL, HERMAN W. LANG, R Howell, F. Harper, 0. T. Harper, A. J. Dohany, Jr.
GARRISON, WILLIAM H. LAWRENCE, LUCION L.
HALDrEN, HARRY E., III. MATtHEWS, ARTHUR, JR. THIRD Row: G. M. Hardin, J. W. Howell, R. F. Kearse, J.
HALL, CHARLES G. MCCORKEL, DON B. W. Simmons, C. 0. Register, J. J. Smith, Jr., W. L. Kennedy,
IHALLER, RUSSELL A. MCCORMICK, D. F. Hancock, I. A. Edwards, W. G. English, C. HI. Ballard.
HANCOCK, F. MCCULLEN, JOSEPH W.
HARDIN, GRANT M. MILLER, JOE H.
HARPER, FRANK RENTZ, WILLIAM J.
HARPER, 0. T. SIMMONS, A. G.
HOWELL, JULIAN W. WAFFORD, H. D. Hughes, William Mcllwain, Jr., William S. My-
HOWELL, R. E. WILLIAMS, R. T. T
HOWELL, R. E. WILLIAMS, R.T. rick, Jr., and Second Lieutenants Robert Y. Pope,

SDonald R. Pierce, and Baldwin Wylie.
FACTUAL HISTORY
This unit was mobilized for riot duty in Tampa
This unit was organized by Captain Jesse Gil- /
,in 1926 and again on Easter Sunday, 1932, in
liam, Federally recognized and furnished with
horses and equipment on October 10, 1923. Offi-
cer personnel also included First Lieutenant Wat- Trucks replaced the horses in 1933, when the
son and Second Lieutenant Hicks. The following unit was motorized. I In 1937, a new $32,000
officers have served with the Battery: Captains armory was dedicated.
Frank Merrin, Frank J. Poitras, Robert L. When President Roosevelt visited Florida in

1936, this organization had the honor of firing
LA K E LA N D, F L O R I D A the Presidential salute at Winter Park.

t59I







BATTERY D
SECOND BATTALION

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH
FIELD ARTILLERY "
LAKELArJD FLORIDA

(I) Ncr. Cn mn:,;cned C'rtcr. (,) Cldsroom Instruct;on. (31
krPoj, (4) TrlqiKrfe GFOLF. (SI Instrument SeclIon. (6) D;.
n.:.rI a.r P.tk. (7) M.I;nl-n.ncs Deal.j;l.






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BATTERY E
SECOND BATTALION


PLANT CITY FLOPID1.
..I(1) NonJ Co.n cn d C'iI.ti.. 12) Bi.
ferf Front. (3) NFor-Ccrr.r .c ed O1cZerS
Sergeant-Ma. or. (6) P'h.ng lrud. (7)
Firsl Surgedn. (8) %".';F Spct.on CI.mkeo .
,4 ,
....
,
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SecoND Row: L. M. Hunter, L. T. Bridges, L. H. Cooper, J.
-i



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W. Booth, A L. Dyal JT. Blan.on, J.. .-Young, J. A. Ker- .-M.' OFFI-ERS
SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: V. C. Dempsey, C. E. Connor, W D.Ad Pearson, Captain .n. ... . MILTON E. HULL
B. Loveluggins, E. G. Snowden, U. S. Anderson, C. A. Christen- First LieutenantA............ JOHN E. MARTIN
berry, J. W. Chambers, N. H1. Rentz. Second Lieutenant .... .......... HENRY R. HARPER
SEcON*ts Row: L. M. Hunter, L. T. Bridges, L. H. Cooper, J. Second Lieutenant............... ROBERT M. WILBUR
XV. Booth, A. L. Dyal, J. T. Blanton, J. C. Young, J. A. Ker-

THIlIR Row: 0. S. Tershansey, A. E. Ham, 0. Adams, W. H. First Sergeant . ..... WILLIAM C. DEMPSEY
Lovelace, S. L. Thomas, W. A. Wilkes, L. S. Parnell, C. A.
Ogden, L. E. DeMontmollin, R. II. Cason, Jr., W. 0. Hodges, Jr. SERGEANTS
ANDERSON, ULIS S. HIUGcGNS, BROWARD
CHAMBERS, JOHN W. PEARSON, WIL.IAM 1).
CHRISTENBERRY, C. A. RENT, NORMAN H.
CONNOR, CHARLES E. SNOWDEN, EDWARD G.

CORPORALS
BOLANDER, PAUL H. KUCSMA, ERNEST E.
HAGAN, VINCENT T. MOORE, GEORGE M.
HOLBROOK, JAMES R. PARNELL, WM. C., JR.
RAY, ROBERT A.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
ADAMS, OLIVER LOVELACE, WILLIAM H.
CASON, ROBT. H., JR. OGDON, CLAUDE A.
CONNOR, NATHAN H. PARNELL, LINDSEY S.
CROSBY, HENRY C. PASCHALL, RAYMOND A.
DEMONTMOLLIN, L. E. SMITI, CHARLIE N.
DRISKELL, EUGENE E. CURRENCY, G. W., JR.
HAM, ARTHUR E. TERSHANSEY, OLIVER S.
HODGES, WILLIAM 0., JR. THOMAS, SAM L.
WILKES, WILLIAM A.

PRIVATES
BLANTON, JOHN T. BUCHMAN, MANUEL
BLANTON, WILBURN L. CONNELL, GEORGE V.
BOOTH, JAMES V. COOPER, LUTHER II.
S.BOOTH, JOSEPH H. CROSBY, JULIAN T.
BRIDGES, LEWIS T. DYAI,, ALviN L.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

[621












4,
,r ' ,-,? i















. .-. '.. ._... -",-- -- _-----i.?-


PRIVATES SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH
IIXSON, JOHN B. PEARSON, MONROE II. FIRST Row: P. II. Bolander, G. W. Moore, E. E. Kucsma, J.
EInDGMON, WILLIAM 11. PONDER, RALPH E., JR. R. Holbrook, V. T. Hagan, N. II. Connor, E. E. Driskell, P. G.
HAGAN, MFLOYD E. RAY, PEARL G. Ray, H. C. Crosby, G. W. Surrency, Jr.
HAGAN, FLOYD L RAY. CHARLES F.
HOOKER, LORANZO T. SCARBOROUGH, WM. J. SECOND Row: L. T. Hooker, H. M. Wood, N. W. Fleming,
HUNTER, LEONARD M. SIMMONS, WILLIAM J. J. H. Booth, M. E. Futch, J. B. Dixson, C. J. Weeks, J. H. Pea-
HUTTO, ELDRIDGE TUCKER, LOUIs 0., JR. cock, C. C. Waldron, C. N. Smith.
KERSEY, JAMES A. WALDRON, CECIL C.
KITE, MARKEY WEEKS, CALVIN J. THIRD Row: M. H. Pearson, C. F. Ray, L. 0. Tucker, Jr.,
KNIGHT, HOMER B. WEST, DOUGLAS B. R. E. McDaniels, M. Kite, R. E. Ponder, Jr., D. B. West, W. J.
McDANIELS, ROBERT E. WOOD, HENRY M. Scarborough, J. T. Crosby, H. B. Knight, M. Buchman.
PEACOCK, JIMMIE II. YOUNG, JAMES C.



FACTUAL HISTORY City with General Vivian Collins and other prominent
National Guard and Army officers present.
Battery "E," "116th Field Artillery, on August 15, Captain Nat Cemons, Word War veteran, was
Captain Nat Clemons, World War veteran, was
1923, succeeded Company "E," 124th Infantry, which the first commanding officer of Battery "E," with
the first commanding officer of Battery "E," with
served during the War with Mexico and the World
First Lieutenant Frank G. Merrin, Second Lieutenants
War. Battery "E" has enjoyed more than 15 years Lewis G. Carlton and Calvin G. Moore (deceased).
of steady progress and today is quartered in one of Carlton succeeded Clemons as Captain in June, 1926.
'Carlton succeeded Clemons as Captain in June, 1926.
the finest armory buildings in the State. The truck He was succeeded in June, 1933, by Captain Irving
He was succeeded in June, 1933, by Captain Irving
and gun sheds and caretaker's home were completed S. Tillotson, who served until May, 1938, when Cap-
last year at an approximate cost of $40,000. On No- Milton E. Hull took command. Other present
tain Milton E. Hull took command. Other present
vember 14, 1938, the armory, truck and gun sheds
commissioned officers are First Lieutenant John E.
and caretaker's home, all built of stone taken from Martin, Second Lieutenants Robert H. Harper and
Martin, Second Lieutenants Robert H. Harper and
the nearby Hillsborough River, were dedicated at Plant Rort Wilbur. William C. Dem ey, secon
Robert M. Wilbur. William C. Dempsey, second

oldest man in point of service in the battery, is First

PLANT CITY, FLORIDA Sergeant.

[63 1











r































SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
FIRST Row: B. E. Wasmund, S. L. Richardville, D. H. Sher- Captain . . . GEORGE R. HARDY
man, R. L. MacCalla, Jr., W. R. Boland, C. R. Abel, C. M. First Lieutenant . . HENRY M. FULTON
Johnson. Second Lieutenant . ROBERT C. HOLTZCLAW, JR.
Johison. Second Lieutenant . . EUGENE A. LAURENT
SECOND Row: C. J. Anderson, G. A. Pottinger, W. Harrison,
C. T. Fowler, 0. B. Howard, H. R. Wells, R. E. Patton, A. E. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS
Knighton. First Sergeant . . RAYMOND L. MACCALLA, JR.
THIRD ROW: H. P. Sanders, V. Madden, J. T. Sutherland,
A. B. Tanner, J. C. Smith, H. Hammac, E. N. Griner, D. J. SERGEANTS
Griner, R. R. Tanner. BOLAND, WILLARD R. JOINSON, CLYDE M.
DOUGLAS, BENJAMIN T. RICHARDVILLE, S. L
GARNER, Gus SHERMAN, DANIEL H.


CORPORALS
ABEL, CHARLES R. FREEMAN, A. H., JR.
CHELETTE, WAYLON W. FREEMAN, MARTIN A.
DAVIS, JOHN B. STANLEY, FREMONT B.
HWASMUND, HOWARD 0.

PRIVATES FIRST CLASS
ANDERSON, RUSSELL E. KNIGHTON, ALLEN E.
GRINER, DANIEL J. O'QUIN, PATRICK C.
GRINER, ETIIRIDGE N. POTTINGER, GEORGE A.
JACKSON, STEADMAN H. WOODHAM, EDWARD K.

PRIVATES
ANDERSON, CHARLIE J. DAVIS, HORACE C.
BEAUCHAMP, WILLARD A. DUKES, GLENN W.
BISSETT, JOHN F. EUBANKS, ISMA L.
CAMPBELL, RICHARD D. FOWLER, CHARLES T.
CLEMONS, MYRON H. FRAISER, EDWARD R.
COMERFORD, JOE R. FREEMAN, JAMES W.
COOPER, LATIMER C. HALE, OSWALD D.
c)AvIsd EARL W. ITAMMAC, CALVIN N.



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

[64]










5-




























JouNsoN, GEORGE L. SAYE, THOMAS G. SECOND Row: H. L. M S. H. Jackson. J. D. Paulk, M.
MADEN, VINsoN SMIT, JoN C H. emons, T. G. Saye, A. L. Roberts, J. W. Freeman, E. W.










POONE, ILLIAM E. WELLS, HARRIS R. SCD, R. H l l S
WHEELER, IIE








PRFAC TUAL HISTORY Regular Army.IN PHOTOGRAPH
The Service, Battery, 116th Field Artill ROBER, ALBthe originT L. FIRST Row:eld Artillery, Apr., H. a1937, under comm. T. and ofug-
National, Guard organization ANER, HOWaven, Fl. asorida, W. ChCaptain Georgette, R. Halerdys, ieutenanlets, Hen. C.ry Wheeler.


HOWARreceived Federal recognition August 29AE, JOH1923, under co- Albert B. Connor, Jr., and Joseph J. Scherer asW.
mnd fORROW, WILLIAM E. SUTHERLPaul HaymanND,, who was succeeded battery officComerford.
MULLANEY, HARRELL L. SZEGLOWSi, ALFONS






by CaptainLK, JAMES Donald MacCalla on September 19, 1924,Saye, G. W. Dukes, I.anded field training in JulyC. Cooper, E. K.1937, de-
WHEELER, WILLIE C. ham, R. D. Campbell



holds the rank of First Lieutenant of Infantry in the
FACTUAL HISTORY Regular Army.

The Service Battery was redesignated as Battery "F,"
The Service Battery, s follow6th Field Artillery, the original 11commiss6th Field Artillery, April 1, 1937, under command of
National Guard organization at Winter Haven, Florida, Captain George R. Hardy, with Lieutenants Henry W.
received Federal recognition August 29, 1923, undeuver. coLieutenant House Jr., and Joseph J. Scherer as
mand of Captain W. Paul Hayman, who was succeeded battery officers.
by Captain J. Donald MacCalla on September 19, 1924, Battery "F" attended field training in uly, 1937, de-January
with Lieutenants Thomas L. Starnes and Frank J. Poitras livering all types of fire in a creditable manner. Lieuten-
as battery officers. This Battery participated in activent 39 being replace as executive by First Lieutenant
state service as follows: Florida hurricane, 1926, and at commissioned in June, 1938, and assigned to Battery "F."
Tampa, 1927. It was noted for pistol marksmanship and The Battery participated in Third Army Maneuvers in

high morale. The band, in charge of Warrant Officer Mississippi in 1938, functioning satisfactorily throughout
Frank A. Oren, was disbanded in 1937. the maneuver. Lieutenant House assumed command of
Charles E. Frederic who began his military career Battery "D," 116th Field Artillery, at Lakeland, January
in this battery, won the National Guard appointment 1, 1939, being replaced as executive by First Lieutenant
to the United States Military Academy in 1926 and now Henry M. Fulton.
A modern armory, which will provide every facility for
the proper functioning of this outstanding battery, is now
WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA under construction.

I 651




Full Text

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Digitized with the permission of the FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD SOURCE DOCUMENT ADVISORY Digital images were created from printed source documents that , in many cases , were photocopies of original materials held elsewhere . The quality of these copies was often poor . Digital images reflect the poor quality of the source documents. Where possible images have been manipulated to make them as readable as possible . In many cases such manipulation was not possible . Where available, the originals photocopied for publication have been digitized and have been added, separately , to this collection. Searchable text generated from the digital images, subsequently, is also poor . The researcher is advised not to rely solely upon text-search in this collection. RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS Items collected here were originally published by the Florida National Guard, many as part of its SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series. Contact the Florida National Guard for additional information . The Florida National Guard reserves all rights to content originating with the Guard. DIGITIZATION Titles from the SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series were digitized by the University of Florida in recognition of those serving in Florida's National Guard, many of whom have given their lives in defense of the State and the Nation.

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Florida Department of Military Affairs SpsGial ArGhi\?ss PubliGatiott Nutrtbsr 66 FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD YEARBOOK 1939 (REPRINT) State Arse1\al St. FrartGis BarraGhs t. Augusth'ie, Florida

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\ ' ;, , ;;. . , ~ ,., : ~ \ \ fJ } A ~;,, .. > ,, :. ;;: ti i :{ 1f _ , _ , ~,~ ~ ~ ~ ::a.:;._; -;::.::;.;; t ..:.. ~ -'" ~f .. I~ f f l I l I Wl BY SERGEANT FRANK H. CROWE Service Company, I 24th Infantry The Florida National Guard was not known by this name during the first 344 years of its history. Begin ning with the Timucuan allies of the first French and Spanish explorers, through the Florida Rangers of the British Period, and later to the period of the State Mili tia or Florida State Troops, its organization has per sisted to the present day. Its battalions have fought under the Sacred Stag of Timucua, the Lion and Castle of Spain, the Fleur de Lis of France, the Lion and the Unicorn of England, the Stars and Bars of the Con federacy, and, lastly, i:he Stars and Stripes of a united nation. As a component part of the United States Army in the program for National Defense, and through the successful administration of its staff officers, the Florida National Guard today stands second to none in physical equipment and training program. But not only in material possessions and in manpower is the Florida National Guard rich. It is wealthy in the resources of historical tradition-a military heritage dat[XVJ ing back to the age of j romance in the middle of the six teenth century. This was the age when Columbus had pierced the cloud of jnystery and gloom shutting out the west, and all Eur4pe was ringing with tales of the wondrous new-found r ' ealms beyond the sunset. I THE EARLY PERIOD With the discovery l of Florida in 1513 by Ponce De Leon, Spain arrogated to herself entire dominion of the vast unknown Co11tine ) 1t of America. Other Spanish ex plorers came in rapid / succession; Mireulo, who entered Pensacola Bay in 15 lr; Cordova, who fought the first battle between white !Jlen and natives; Pineda, who in 1519 sailed along the l Gulf Coast as far as Mexico; de Ayllon, who in 1526 hied to make a settlement in the Carolinas; Narvaez , ~ho in 1528 landed near Tampa and explored the northwest portion of Florida. In 1539, DeSoto made the fifth attempt to conquer and colonize Florida, bui: his cam p f ign ended in his death and burial in the Mississippi River, which he had discovered. Expedition after exbedition, made up of the flower of Spanish chivalry, ha~ landed on the shores of Florida,

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and set out with buoyant step upon a triumphal march to win the fabled treasures of. the interior, and the for ests had closed behind them. But the dream of glory in Florida was not dispelled, and still there remained brave men to accomplish its colonization. In 1564, the Huguenots, under Laudonniere and Jean Ribaut, explored the east coast of Florida and founded a small fort on the St. John's River which they named Fort Caroline. The French were welcomed by the Timu cuans, who inhabited the coast, and were given every assistance in their attempt at colonization. Great was the surprise of the French to learn that these Indians had a highly organized army. Outina, a Timucuan chief of this period, seems to have been one of the first Indian officers to have a knowledge of mili tary formations. When going into battle, his ranks were drawn up in the shape of a half-moon, the chief in the center and the youngest and swiftest men in the wings. These were the scouts who preceded the army on the march and tracked the enemy, returning when contact was made. As the forces approached to join battle, her alds transmitted their officers' commands by various high-pitched cries, each pitch of voice having a different meaning. When the command was given, the warriors on both sides flung themselves into battle at a headlong pace, for whichever side first slew an enemy, no matter how insig nificant, that side claimed the victory, even if they even tually lost more men, or were soundly trounced by the enemy. FRENCH, SPANISH FIGHT But soon the French and their Indian militia were doomed to destruction. Spain had no desire to have a foreign settlement upon her lands, so in 1565, Menen dez, foremost admiral of Spain, was sent to destroy the French fort and drive out the Huguenots. These objec tives were soon accomplished, and again the New World was in sole possession of Spain. Menendez was the greatest historical figure ever asso ciated with Florida. He founded St. Augustine and made it the headquarters for a chain of forts and mis sion towns which extended from Virginia to Florida and far into the interior. Succeeding years of Spanish occupation brought only defeat and enslavement for the Indian warriors. Indian slaves erected the huge coquina fort of Castillo de San Marcos, Indian slaves built the great military road now called the Old Spanish Trail, and Indian slaves worked the mission gardens and tended the mission 'flocks. Their military glory was over and their numberless legions had been subdued by the flame of a few hundred harque buses. CHARLESTON After 1670, the Spaniards drove their captive workers with more than ordinary zeal, for northward a new men ace reared its head. Charleston, called by the Spanish San Jorge, took root in abandoned Spanish fields and waxed strong by its trade with the Indians. Soon there was a continuous friction between the English and their Spanish neighbors, which the Spanish met by sending . their Indian allies to burn and destroy the Carolina set tlements. By 1708, the Timucuans were a lost race. The English could not brook such conduct long, and retaliated by sending expeditions under Moore in 1702, and Oglethorpe in 1740, to destroy St. Augustine and break the Spanish rule. Both expeditions were doomed to failure. By 1744, the savage Yemassees had turned against their English allies and had fled to Florida. Now the Spanish were stronger than ever, being augmented by a new militia of well-trained Indian warriors. So the fruitless warfare went on for 20 years longer, and might have continued to this day, had not the action of the mother countries put an end to the contentions of the colonies. By the treaty of 1763, England, having previously by force of arms gained possession of Cuba, restored that island to Spain, and Spain in return made over to England her possessions in Florida. From the country that they had defended for 200 years, the Spaniards departed in a body. Even the In dian mission towns were deserted, for many of the cop pe~-hued people dei,arted for Cuba with their Spanish masters. ' By this exchang~, Florida's first capital, San Augus tine of the Spaniards, became the Saint Augustine of the English; and over the ramparts of the huge San Marcos, which had so long and so bravely held out against the shock of British cannon balls, floated the Cross of St. George. BRITISH OCCUPATION t ; When Ertgland first came into possession of Florida, the new province was so vast that it was decided to divide it into East and West Florida for the purposes !<. -~ I , "17!n,"~''' , ' ;, 5:. ., = , 1{ffl!/41 / d diJ: c. r,t•-.~•, /;,;;_~d ...-f ~-. rf -c.. ' _ ~?~• ~< •. ::~ ~;-:~~~~-:.e. t~... _ _.. r,n;,~. ~-,. = .. t,;,._ c~ ;,,,,///, . ,...:-;.:::~:-_. t{_f..~~,. --~fi:?: ..... ,~,:.:::..::~---,,_ .. ~-:
PAGE 5

of administration, and for a short time the government of both provinces was under the Military. There were only three towns of any size in the new territory and these had been practically destroyed by the 1 disgruntled Spanish. Pensacola consisted of only 40 thatched huts; St. Augustine ~as little better off, as its fine gardens and many of its stone houses had been torn, destroyed or injured by the vindictive Spaniards. Mo bile was in better condition, with numbers of brick build ings and well-kept public structures. Major Ogilvie commanded in East Florida until Oc tober, 1763, when James Grant, the first Governor, ar rived, but it was not until 1764 that the military rule of Col. William Taylor was displaced by the coming of George Johnstone, first Governor of West Florida. Both Governors issued proclamations extolling the advantages of the provinces and inviting settlers. GREAT PLANTATIONS The English soon flocked in and great plantations arose near the population centers. Soldiers in the late wars were offered special inducements to immigrate. A field officer was granted 5,000 acres; a captain, 3,000; a subaltern, 2,000; every non com, 200; and every private, 50 acres of ground. Most interesting of all settlements was that attempted at New Smyrna by Dr. Turnbull and his associates. These partners received a grant of 60,000 acres and employed 1,403 persons from Greece, Italy, and Minorca to cuhivate the !!ind. These colonists gave valuable aid to the English in the formation of the provincial mili tia, "The Florida Rangers." Meanwhile the military forces had not been idle. The . unrest of the American colonies was becoming serious, and in spite of numerous conflicts between military and civil authority, the southern outpost of England began to prepare for war. PREPARE FOR WAR Castillo de San Marcos ( called Fort St. Marks by the English) w,as repaired and equipped with the finest armament of the day. Addition joists were put across the casemates, making "double-deckers" . for the accom modation of the coming concentration of troops. The St. Francis Friary was rebuilt and occupied "because of its good water," and great wooden barracks were erected "sufficient to house five regiments." Soon the treasury kept the King's accounts; laborers worked on the King's fort, wrought in the King's forge, manned the King's pilot boats, bought their "bisket" at the King ' s bakery and their meat at the King's market. Pensacola and Mobile were likewise reconstructed, with the Military building good roads, draining swamps, and constructing forts. REVOLUTIONARY WAR In 1775 came the American Revolution. Of the 14 colonies of England, Florida alone remained loyal, even burning in effigy the two arch-rebels, John Hancock and Samuel Adams. The State was a haven of refuge for the King's serv ants and Tories, who fled from the revolted coknies. Of th• 14 colonle~, Florida alone remained loyal to England during tho American Revolution. It served as a haven of refuge for the K i ng's servants and Tories, who later banded together In the troops of the Florida Rangers, who Joined with the Hessians from . New York In the siege of Savannah and the reduction of Charleston.

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Soon an oddly assorted throng came flocking in. F~om Georgia appeared the Tory Colonel Thomas Browne the tar and feathers given him by the Liberty Boys still sticking t~ his skin, and not long after followed Daniel McGirth, once as stout-hearted a Liberty Boy as any in the South, then victim of official wrong, and now de serter to the King's cause. Still another accession was the valorous Scot, Rory MacIntosh, captain in his Maj esty's Highlanders, who, attended always by his pipers, paraded the narrow streets, breathing out oaths of . slaughter against the rebels. INDIAN AND MILITIA ACT With such an element Florida was not long content with passive loyalty. When the "Indian and Militia Act" was passed in 1778 and Governor Tonyn called for volunteers to aid in suppressing the rebellion, citi zens, Tory refugees, Scopholites, Minorcans, and In dians banded together in the troops of the Florida Rangers. In command was Colonel Thomas Browne, e~ger to revenge himself upon the Georgians. McGirth, also thirsting for retaliation, mustered a desperate band of cut-throats mounted on stolen horses, and carried fire and sword through the southern provinces. It was the old story of warfare between Florida and Georgia; but more bitter than the conflicts between English and Spaniard were the contentions of Liberty Boy and Florida Ranger. The Florida Rangers were active, aggressive, and suc cessful in their campaigns. In cooperation with the Hessians from New York, they joined in the siege of Savannah, and afterwards took part in the reduction of Charleston. When Charleston fell, many notable American pa triots were brought to Florida as prisoners; these in cluded General Gadsden, Governor of South Carolina, and three signers of the Declaration of Independence, Middleton, Rutledge, and Hayward. In 1779, Spain declared war against the English and captured the province of West Florida. With the suc cess of the 13 colonies, the British decided that East Florida was untenable and withdrew in 1783 . To Eng land, Spain yielded Jamaica, and to Spain, England, in exchange, gave Florida. The 20 years' occupation of Florida by the British, however, left an indelible impression upon its shores. This period -was so productive and constructive that hardly a section of the Florida coast today does not contain some relic of this great period of colonization. SECOND SPANISH OCCUPATION With the return of the Spaniard a change came over Florida. There was no more planting and harvesting; the Indian stalked through the deserted indigo fields and camped in abandoned sugar mills; industry was at 1 . an end; the crowding _sails of merchant ships no longer brightened the peninsular coast. Murderous outlaw, cruel pirate, savage Yemassee _ and Seminole, and thiev ing runaway slave inhabited the interior or the coast of Florida. Spain kept up a half-hearted attempt at jurisdiction over these rough citizens, but could not make much headway. The towns of St. Augustine and Pensacola were jammed full with troops, but these seldom ven tured farther than the city gates. Their time was en tirely taken up with such duties as guarding powder houses, noting the marking of high noon on the ~un dial in order to ring the various bells; guarding the poor devils of convicts slaving on fortifications, and partici pating in military balls and fiestas. To keep the savages in 'the interior from molesting the Spanish towns, the authorities fomented and encour aged, with great success, guerilla attacks upon the bor der American towns. For many years the Georgia colonists suffered this state of affairs to continue, but finally began to make counter raids into Spanish territory. The United States Government also regarded with apprehension the pres ence of a foreign power on its southern boundary and decided that the indolent Don must no longer stand in the way of the new nation's development. OUR UNDECLARED WAR WITH SPAIN Within the years 1811-1813 occurred an episode wherein a group of adventurers, with the tacit assistance of part of the United States Army, took it upon them selves to make a private war for the annexation of Flor ida. This was a thoroughly American piece of insouci ance which would be repeated in other places with better success for many years to come. Spain itself was under the thumb of Napoleon and most of her American colonies in revolt, so that she had little strength in Florida. France, England, and the United States regarded Florida as the key to the Gulf of .l,VIexico and watched each other to check any move for control there. The Spanish Governor of Florida begged in vain for reinforcements from Spain and finally in disgust wrote Robert Smith, United States Secretary of State, that if help did not come before the first of the year (1811), he would give both the Floridas to the United States. WAR CLOUDS Madison was quick .to act and on January 15, 1811, Congress passed an act enabling the President to take possession of any part of Florida which might be under the hungry eye of England, before that nation could occupy some convenient inlet as a war base. This was when the clouds of war with England were gathering and the United States feared that Spain, ever mindful of American yearning for her golden isles and luxuriant [ XVIII l

PAGE 7

Th• full cost of the War w i th th• Semlnolu, which lasted seven years, 1835 lo 1842 , Is estimated al more than $40,000 , 000 . Nearly 1.s00 regular 1old i ers were killed or d i ed of disease, besides heavy losses among the volunteer forces. mainlands, might permit that nation to seize a base of operations against the unruly western republic. President Madison appointed secret commissioners to negotiate with the Spanish, with general directions "to conceal from general observation the trust," but nego tiations failed. Whereupon American initiative took matters into its own hands, and, while Andrew Jackson invaded West Florida, the militia or "patriots" from Georgia did the same thing in the eastern part of th ~ province. George Matthews, an ex-member of Congress from Georgia, a general of that state's militia, and one of the disappointed commissioners of President Madison, promptly proceeded to create his own "local authori ties" in East Florida and to carry out his official duties in a quite unofficial way. For his purposes, he had at hand numerous Georgia and Florida frontiersmen who were more than willing to go into Spanish territory to recapture their slaves (prptected by the Spanish) and to administer a deserved drubbing to the Indians who had been harrying the border settlem~nts. EAST FLORIDA PATRIOTS Matthews, himself a hot-tempered, rough son of the new world, lost little time in leading a band of from 50 to 100 self-styled "East Florida Patriots" over the St. Marys. Many of the settlers of the invaded territory were of English birth, so General Matthews soon had his little force augmented by many new converts. Ludovick Ashley, a wealthy lumberman, agreed to furnish funds to the invading army, whi!e another lumberman, John McIntosh, consented to become "Direc tor" of the projected "Republic of Florida." Under the leadership of these men a paper republic was formed under which the self-appointed authorities were to trans fer their property to the United States. General Matthews next demanded regular troops from the United States, but Major Laval, officer in charge of the southern post, refused, saying that his orders did not mean that he should invade foreign soil. In spite of the blandishments of General Matthews, Major Laval's command also stood firm, so he was forced to appeal to the Navy. The Navy, or at least Commodore Campbell, gave Matthews a hearty response. He soon had the guns of his squadron trained on Fernandina, and when he was required by the Spanish Commandant to give reason for such action, he replied that "it was to prevent an effu sion of blood and to protect American citizens." There upon, Commandant Lopez decided to march to St. Au gustine "for orders," and the town was left in the hands of the Patriots. During the surrender, Captain Lopez, in accordance with the custom of war, handed his sword to Colonel Ashley. The latter gentleman, ignoring the further re quirement of those customs, failed to return the weapon and, "putting it on, wore it ever after." In spite of the complaints of Spain and the hot let ters between the ambassadors of the two countries, United States militia occupied Spanish Florida until May 6, 1813. In 1817, they returned again to chase out the French pirate, Luis Aury, and incidentally estab[XIX]

PAGE 8

lished a United States garrison at Fernandina until the whole territory was ceded in 1819. In this robust fashion, worthy of some of the modern dictators, was the road paved for the purchase of Flor ida. The curious mixture of patriotism, interest, de fense, and frontier democracy, which the Patriots repre sented, thus worked itself out as they wished. England did not get her Florida sea base and another star was added to the flag. FIRST YEARS OF AMERICAN RULE Immediately after final ratification of the Florida treaty was accomplished in 1821, Congress passed a bill placing the newly-acquired territory directly under the President, and Andrew Jackson was commissioned Gov ernor of Florida. For many years the territory was in the most wild and lawless condition imaginable. Pirates and smugglers infested the coast towns, savage Seminole and runaway slave made the interior uninhabitable to colonizers. The years 1817-1818 had seen one severe uprising of the Seminole, which had been put down by General Jackson and his militiamen, but Indians remained a seri ous problem. Little bands of militia were forced to wage unceasing warfare against the tribes in order to protect their small log houses scattered throughout the state. In spite of all these difficulties, however, the first 10 years of Florida under American rule saw the influx of great numbers of settlers from the Southern States. The development of the territory continued a few years longer, but was soon destined to receive a serious set back. WARS WITH THE SEMINOLES The Florida War, which may be said to have begun with the Dade Massacre, December 28, 1835, had many underlying causes. The United States desired to reunite the runaway Creeks {Seminoles) with the main bodies of the Creek nation, or at least force the Seminole to confine himself within smaller territorial limits. Either plan was unacceptable to the Seminole and hostility soon kindled between Indian and white. The slaughter of Dade's command and the ambush ing of General Thompson and Lieutenant Smith, both occurring in 1835, aroused the War Department to the need of a sufficient military force in Florida. In 1836, General Winfield Scott was placed in command of the forces engaged to fight the Seminoles. Soon after Gen eral Scott's appointment, General Edmond P. Gaines, without orders from the War Department, made a brief but not very successful campaign in the ~egion of the lower Withlacoochee. The records show that in the-Seminole Wars of 183543 the force employed is reported as 10,169 regulars and 29,953 volunteers. Perhaps it will be amusing, in the light of today, to consider the appearance of the Florida militia or volunteer of this period. Many of the militiamen were called "mounted volun1 teers," but as each individual had been his own quar termaster, no two were either armed or mounted alike. Nearly all carried rifles, though ther~ were quite a few who shouldered the old Revolutionary musket, and some were simply armed with single or double-barreled shot guns. These, however, loaded with "buck for bear," were no contemptible weapons in a skirmish with the Indians. There were pistols of many sorts-from the huge brass-butted horse pistols to small single and double barreled "hide-out guns." Every volunteer carried his knife, some dagger-shaped with ornamental hafts, while the greater number were long, keen blades, similar to those in use among butchers. In the beks of many were stuck small hatchets, an imitation of the Indian toma hawk. These were to se~ve the double purpose of cut ting a way through the tangled woods, or breaking in the skull of a savage, as opportunity might olfer. The accoutrements consisted of powder-horns, bullet pouches, and shot belts; in short, the ordinary sporting gear of the hunter and frontiersman. The "mount" of the troop was as varied as the arms and equipment; horses from 13 hands to 17; the tall raw-boned steed, the plump cob-shaped roadster, the tight, wiry native of the soil. Many of the horses were of the Andalusian race, descendants of the horses first brought to the New World by the Spanish. The lean, wornout "critter" carried on his back the half-ragged squatter, side by side with the splendid Ara bian charger of a dashing young planter. Not a few of the militia were mounted on mules, both of American and Spanish origin, a~d these, when well trained to the saddle, were quite equal to the horse in a campaign against the Indian. The uniforms of the men were as motley as their mounts. There were uniforms or half-uniforms, worn by some of the officers, but among the men no two were dressed alike. Blanket-coats of red, blue and green; lin sey-woolseys of coarse texture, gray or copper-colored; red flannel shirts, jackets of brown linen or white, some of sky-blue cottonade; hunting shirts of dressed deer skin, with moccasins and leggings of the same, boots of horse or alligator hide; in short, every variety of cos tume known throughout the States. FANTASTIC HEADGEAR The headgear was equally varied and fantastic. No stilf shakos were to be seen there, but caps of skin and hats of-wool, straw, and palmetto leaf, broad-brimmed, scuffed, and slouching. A few had forage caps of blue cloth that gave somewhat of a military character to the wearers. The Florida militia was indeed in a bad state of af fairs at the beginning of the Indian wars, but the terri torial Legislature of 1836 soon moved to insure better organization and equipment.

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A corps of m\litary exempts was formed at St. Augus tine and the counties of Franklin, Columbia, Washing ton, Wal ton, and Leon were all ordered to form addi tional militia units. The Governor issued a proclamation calling for vol unteers, and by virtue of his authority given by the Legislature, was empowered, "in time of imminent dan ger," to draft troops from each county, said troops to serve for four months. Another act of this year per tained to the election of Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel, and Major. Inasmuch as the militia had failed to elect these officers, the Governor was authorized to appoint officers considered necessary to -an efficient organization. Twenty thousand dollars was appropriated to pay the militia, and a law was passed making it a crime to attach property of militiamen on active duty, or serve upon them any summons ~n civil suit . In addition a morato rium was declared on all liens against militiamen on active duty. The following year the sum for defense was increased to $30,000 and a bounty of $16.50 a month was given to a soldier enlisting for one year's service on the frontier. WAR WITH THE SEMINOLE Meanwhile the war with the Seminole had been pro ceeding in a desultory fashion, with the Indian more than holding his own against the Regulars. Scott's cam paign did not prove a success, and he was called away to fight the Creeks in Western Georgia . General Thom as S. Jesup was named to succeed Scott, but General R. K. Call was in charge of military operations during the latter part of 1836. His troops did some fighting in the Big Wahoo Swamp and along the Withlacoochee, but these battles led to no permanent results. While the savages retreated, they were unconquered. During the period when General Jesup was com mander, December, 1836, to May, 1838, there were 2,400 Indians either killed or captured. Among these Al tho lime of the War with , Mexico, Florida was so scantily populated and so engrossed with fighting th• Indians that only two companies of Florida volunteer. went to Mexico .

PAGE 10

~ ~k< 4'~~t~ ,.:~-~:::;'{,~-.. , --Jtfr~~ '~, ,:5,
PAGE 11

. ~.-. . ~ rif ~ yt ,' . . . , \ , . .. ~, -. ,-i~ r~ t . ,; The history of the Florida soldiers during the War Between the States is that of the great Confederate armies whtch surged northward to the. very gates of Washington before being stopped by super(or numbers and lack of equipment and arms. By provisions of this act: "In the equipment of a private, a musket, rifle, or shotgun shall be indispensa ble"; "No company of cavalry shall be received or rec ognized as a company unless it consists of one cap tain, two lieutenants, one cornet, four sergeants, four corporals, and 32 privates in full uniform, and each member fully equipped with saddle, bridle, halter, mar tingales, and spurs, and mounted upon a serviceable and efficient horse"; "There shall not be more than one vol unteer artillery company to each regiment of infantry." The act provided that "the uniform of the company officers shall consist of a blue coat and sword," but it is presumed that an officer was allowed to wear some sort of trousers also. In 1846, the Militia Act was amended to govern the election of officers, and another act was passed that all persons subject to militia , duty should be subject to do and perform all patrol duty which was required by the commanding officer. This patrol duty consisted of taking up all slaves found without the limits of their owner's plantation and "to correct such slaves by a moderate whipping with a switch or cowhide, not exceeding 20 lashes, unless said slave shall have a ticket to show c~use of absence." In 1846, the Legislature asked Congress for the St. Francis Barracks at St. Augustine, "to be . used as an arsenal," but it was not until 61 years later that the re quest was granted. THE MEXICAN WAR Chiefly, if not solely, owing to the annexation of Texas to the United States, war broke out between this country and Mexico in 1846. Mexico claimed Texas, and Santa Anna, then at the head of the Mexican Gov ernment, insisted on a military force to back these claims. General Taylor in turn introduced counter mili tary movements, and in a short time collision and open war followed. Florida at this time was so scantily populated and so engrossed with fighting the Indians that only two com panies of Florida volunteers went to Mexi . co. Due to the absence of data concerning these troops, the number of men engaged and their casualties cannot be estimated. That there were losses is certain, as witnessed by the resolution of the Legislature in 1848, asking Congress "to make provision for the relief of the widows and orphans of those gallant defenders of our country who have lost their lives in conflicts in Mexico." INDIAN UPRISINGS In 1853-57, another series of Indian upnsmgs oc curred in the southern part of Florida. In the war that followed, both Federal and State troops were used and the small regular force was increased to 800 men. Flor ida men who fought were mainly from Hernando, Hills borough, and Manatee Counties, but there were many from other sections. A few minor engagements and skirmishes were fought, but the principal work of the soldiers was hunting the Indian through the swamps of Lake Okeechobee. As the result of this war, which tXXlllJ

PAGE 12

closed before the end of 1857, Chief Billy Bowlegs and about 160 Indians were sent west. There still . remained about 300 in the Everglades, artd their descendants live there today. Their nation has nevei: signed a peace treaty with the United States, and technically are still at war with the invader. WAR BETWEEN THE ST A TES The history of the Florida soldiers in the War Be tween the States is that of the great Confederate armies which surged northward to the very gates of Washing ton before being stopped by superior numbers and lack of equipment and arms. From its secession on January 3, 1861, Florida re mained the storehouse of the Confederacy. The great battles of the war were fought in other states, leaving Florida unmolested to raise crops as usual. It was well for the Confederacy that this was so, for soon long lines . of oxen dragged Florida beef and Flor ida corn to the soldiers fighting desperately in Virginia and Tennessee. The coastal sky was soon bright at night with the flames of the salt-makers, preparing that pre servative and necessary mineral. In fact, Florida salt was so important that at one time the Union Navy had one-half of their gunboats engaged in operations against the salt-makers of the peninsula. The military operations in Florida prior to 1864 had been comparatively unimportant. At the beginning of the war the mili;ia had seized the Florida forts and pow der storehouses of the United States, with the exception of Fort Pickens, Key West, and Fort Jefferson. But soon the Union Navy took possession of the Florida coast and began a blockade. By 1863 the Federal troops were in possession of Jack sonville and St. Johns River and were making extensive expeditions into the interior. During this time the Con federates bombarded Jacksonville with a 32-pound rifled gun mounted on a railroad flat car, perhaps the first instance of a "steam gun" being used. In 1864, the Union troops decided to invade the State and destroy the commissary of the Confederacy. In Feb ruary they marched to Olustee, where they were de feated in a ard-fought battle. While the Federals were havin)! / rd time in the east, West Florida was beir rom Pensacola. The invaders reached ... -o :s::. "'~ '7 tion . .;;~ the U niie... '7 France had ust, to turn back. United States Navy landed troops hed on the capital at Tallahas ere met at Natural J,3ridge by men, mostly militia, under er a sharp engagement of orced to withdraw. ikewise the granaries e saved to the Con ible effect on the a close. RECONSTRUCTION Aft~r the war, the lot of Florida was the same un happy one as that of the other Confederate States. The soldier returned home to find his slaves freed, his fields laid waste, his buildings burned, his money of no value, and his property taxed beyond possibility of payment. Worse than all, he found that his right of franchise had been taken away from him, and that his servants were now his masters. The "carpet-baggers" now ran the government, and he had no voice in his government. So with heavy heart, but with the indomitable spirit that he had displayed on so many battlefields, he set to work to rebuild his fortunes. With the fall of the Confederacy and the advent of Reconstruction under Federal military rule, there began a long period of inactivity for the regular State Militia. But after eight and a half years of carpet-bag rule, Flor ida returned to her own. By 1893, according to the reports of Adjutant General Patrick Houstoun, the Florida State Troops consisted of 20 companies of infantry and two batteries of light artillery, with very little increase until 1898. THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR The war with Spain will cause the year 1898 to be always memorable in the _ history of the Florida State Troops. Owing to the large numbers of Cuban cigar makers in Tampa and Key West, the citizens of Florida were cognizant of the cruelties of the Spanish long be fore the. rest of the nation was aroused. Indeed, for many months before the entrance of the United States into the war, secret juntas had been formed to help the insurgents, and night after night filibsters slipped out of Florida ports. Loaded with guns and ammunition, the American sympathizers did much to stiffen the re sistance of the Cubans, while Federal authorities looked the other way. As the war clouds began to darken, the Governor is sued an order on April 4, "directing Company Com manders to use all diligence in recruiting their com panies to the complement authorized by law," and by April 19, Congress had authorized and passed resolu tions of intervention. Following the declaration of war, April 23, President McKinley issued a call for 125,000 volunteers, and, in keeping with their traditions, the Florida militia units were among the first to respond. On April 24, the Secretary of War notified the Gov ernor that the State was expected to furnish one regi ment of infantry and . that the State Militia should be used. As all the Florida companies had volunteered their services and only 12 could be accepted, it was the decision of the State to select the companies in the order in which their services were tendered. However, it was found impossible for any of the companies to recruit up to full strength, so eventually the entire 20 C(),,<1.panies [XXIV]

PAGE 13

were ordered to Tampa. By May 12, all the Militia were camped in the "Cigar City," and on May 23 the ceremonies were completed for the "muster-in," and the First Regiment of Florida Volunteers, numbering 1,001, was accepted into the service of the United States. FEAR SPANISH ATTACK . During the mobilization, citizens on the coasts of Florida, fearing that on account of their nearness to Cuba, an attack might be made by Spanish gunboats, appealed to the Governor for ordnance and ammunition for their protection. They also asked to be allowed to organize coast guard companies. Both of these requests were granted, and 17 companies for coast defense were formed. At the same time the naval militia was put at the service of the Coast Signal organization and Auxil iary Naval Force vessels. In addition to furnishing these units, Florida contributed cash as well, lending the sum of $7,000 to the United States for the purpose of equipping and subsisting the volunteer forces of the State in national service. During the stay in Tampa rumors of all kinds were heard concerning the departure to Cuba, something that all the troops ardently desired. The possibility of see ing service in Cuba was finally completely dissipated by the destruction of the Spanish fleet and the battle of Santiago. One outfit of Florida men, however, did see some actual fighting, although they were not members of the regularly enlisted militia. These were a group of wag oners suddenly beset by the Spanish upon a beach in Cuba. According to the press of that day: "The wag oners pulled out spokes from the wheels and with them and , wagon tongues did cover themselves with glory and the enemy with gore!" The Florida Volunteers did some little extempora neous fighting in camp also, when they came to the aid of a Georgia regiment. The Georgia unit had arrived in camp wearing the Confederate gray and were billeted next to the New York ti-oops, who were uniformed in blue. It was not long before an argument started and soon the camp assumed the appearance of a riot. Flo~ ida troops could not long resist the opportunity of such a cause and waded in to help their southern neighbors. After the war with Spain, the militia of the State was reorganized and an era of improvement began. The call to arms had brought together the militia of the several states, organized and officered each upon a plan unto itself, equipped with obsolete arms of various patterns, and garbed to suit their respective tastes. The troops of Florida alone displayed not less than 20 varieties of "uniforms"-if such a term may be so applied. Not wanting patriotism were these soldiers, nor in intelli gence, nor courage, but woefully lacking in the strictly necessary military information. JACKSONVILLE FIRE The attempt to inaugurate a better training plan in the militia had hardly started when they were again called into active service. In 1901, while the great Jack sonville fire was raging, a call went out for troops. Com panies from Live Oak, Lake City, Palatka, and St. Au gustine were rushed to the scene to preserve order. By this time the flames had assumed such gigantic propor tions that additional companies from Starke, Gaines ville, Orla.ndo, and Jasper were ordered out . It was de cided to put the stricken city under martial law imme diately, and the militia soon had the gutted city under firm control. The companies acted so swiftly and effi ciently that a report made to the Governor stated: "Mil itary control city entirely without friction. Presence of military has preserved order and prevented possible trou ble. No excitement." Service during the Jacksonville fire had a far-reaching effect upon the growth and training plans of the State Troops. Although the men, as a rule, had acquitted themselves in a soldierly manner, much was left to be desired in "esprit de corps." Petty jealousies among companies caused much unpleasantness. It was realized that an annual encampment should be held at which all companies should participate in order to accustom them to act as a single unit. It was also decided that officers should be required to pass regular examinations to prove their ability to command. These recommendations were approved by the Legislature of that year. The following years brought a great improvement along all lines. Florida, in 1903, became the first State in the Union to conform to the new national law by prescribing for its militia the same organization, arma ment, and discipline prescribed for co-relative branches of the Regular or Volunteer Armies of the United States. The obsolete .45 calibre Springfields were re placed by the "Krags," a magazine rifle, calibre .30, 1898 model, and, as could be exp~cted, a general revival of interest in musketry arose . For the first time in seven years the Florida State Troops were ordered into camp for field instruction. During this encampment the Hon orable James P. Taliaferro gave a handsome and ,alu able silver loving cup, called "The Taliaferro Trophy," to be competed for annually by the teams from the vari ous organizations composing the Florida State Troops. To this day, the Taliaferro Trophy tournament is a great event in the Florida National Guard. During 1903 another forward impetus to the State military service was given by the formation of the Na tional Guard Association. FIRST MACHINE GUN COMPANIES For the next five years the militia went about their routine duties with little change. The first machine gun companies of the infantry regiment were organized and issued .45 calibre Gatlings taken from the inactive artilCXXVJ

PAGE 14

Iery. New olive-drab uniforms replaced the blues, and in 1908 the old Krags were replaced by United States Army rifle, calibre .30, model 1903. As an interesting example of the new spirit of friend liness manifested by the North and South, since the uni fication of the Spanish-American War, Secretary of War Taft, in 1905, returned to the State seven Confed erate battle flags of the Florida State Militia. In 1907, two very important acquisitions were made by the State. Black Point was formally approved as a permanent camp, and the St. Francis Barracks were turned over to the State under a lease. The new State Arsenal was thoroughly needed. There had never ex isted any facilities for the care of public military prop erty in Florida, and such limited supply of this property as was kept on hand was stored in the cellar and lower halls of the State Capitol. For the first time the State had a well-equipped building suitable for storage of a complete supply of clothing and equipment, a safe place to provide for the care and keeping of unused military property, and repair shops for ordnance and ordnance stores. Shortly after the occupation of the new State Arsenal the Legislature adopted an amended military code which further adapted the State Militia to the requirements of the Federal militia law. During the year 1909, the name of the Florida State Troops was changed to the "Flor ida National Guard," as the most fitting term to be applied to an organized militia, in that it expressed the chief purpose for which that force was provided by the Constitution. MEXICAN BORDER It was on the Mexican Border in 1916 that many of the present-day high-ranking officers of the Florida Na tional Guard received their first taste of warfare. On June 18, 1916, the National Guard of Florida was mo bilized into the national service, Florida having been called upon to furnish one regiment of infantry. Owing to the general excellence of the Second Regi ment, it was selected by the War Department, recruited to full strength, and sent to the Texas-Mexico border. It was during the mobilization that the new camp facilities at Black Point showed their true value. Flor ida troops encamped without any confusion, or without one cent of outlay or expense to the Federal Govern ment or State . This was not true of all the states, for many of them, much larger than Florida, had made no provision for billeting such a large number of troops. The Second Regiment of Infantry and Field Hospital Company remained on the border until they were re turned to their home state, April, 1917, for the purpose of demobilization and muster out of the Federal service. The Second was not inactive for long , however, for in August of the same year they were again called to the colors. THE WORLD WAR On April 13, 1917, the First Separate Battalion of Infantry and detachment of Sanitary Troops were mobilized and mustered into Federal service. The several companies of this battalion were distributed throughout the State at various points where their service was con sidered most necessary for the guarding of bridges, rail road crossings, and public utilities. Upon the call into Federal service, this battalion was combined with other new companies that had been recently organized, and all were consolidated, forming the First Regiment In fantry. The First Infantry was, just prior to its muster into national service, practically reorganized and recruited at state expense by the Adjutant General's office. Eleven new organizations were formed, including headquarters company, supply company, and machine gun company. These organizations were consolidated into regimental formation, and with the addition of the First Separate Battalion completed the regiment, thus allowing the State to furnish two complete regiments of infantry. The entire force of the National Guard was taken into the Federal service on August 5, 1917. The Coast Artillery, after being federalized, was mobilized at Fort Dade. The First and Second Regiments of Infantry, with Sanitary Troops attached, and the First Field Hos pital Company, were mobilized at Camp Wheeler for further preparation. In the absence of the National Guard units from the State, the counties were authorized to raise and main tain units. of Home Guards, and a reliable and efficient force was actually organized in most of these counties. The history of the Florida National Guard from April 5, 1917, until November 11, 1918, is the glorious history of_ the United States in the World War. The Second Florida became the 124th Infantry, while the First Flodda was split and distributed through the units of the 31st or "Dixie Division." As the main line of defense behind the skeleton-sized regular Army, these National Guard soldiers were sent to France and served on foreign soil from October 4 to November 26, 1918. Officers and privates were scattered through every branch of the Army in active service. It would be impractical to attempt to detail here the activi ties of the Florida men. It will suffice to say that total enlistments, commissions, and inductions of Floridians numbered 42,030 men, 1,287 of whom were killed or died in the service. The valor of the Florida troops brought immortal credit to the State, 221 of the men being either cited or decorated. Following their trium phant return, they were accorded the most enthusiastic home-coming welcome ever given to returning soldiers from war. Many of the present high-ranking officers of the Na tional Guard saw service in France and rzturned to 1 direct reorganization of the State unit after _ the war. [XXVI]

PAGE 15

THE POST-WAR PERIOD On January 1, 1919, this State had no active Fed erally-recognized National Guard. Under the provisions of the National Defense Act, the troops serving in the World War, upon discharge from the Army, automat ically became private citizens, thus leaving the various states without guard units. Up to this time, the Militia Bureau of the War De partment had had but little opportunity to formulate plans for the recognition of the National Guard within the several states. During 1919, however, the provisions of the Defense Act of 1916 were put into active play and new regulations were published as a guide for re organization. Under the above authority, the State or ganized and presented for inspection three companies of infantry, of which two obtained Federal recognition. Despite the reluctance shown by ex-service men and others to enlist, and other circumstances militating against active organization, the Florida National Guard began to revive, although as late as 1920 it numbered ohly 836 officers and enlisted men. It was a very effi cient organization, at that, for the majority o~ officers and non-coms were men who had seen service not only in the World War but in previous activities, and in con sequence the companies were better trained than ever before. By 1921, the Guard had an aggregate of 1,550 men, showing an increase over the previous year of 41 officers and 673 men. The Guard now consisted of the pre scribed Staff Corps and Department, one complete regi ment of infantry with 16 units, one Motor Transport Company, one Motorcycle Company, and three Field Artillery Batteries, making a total of 22 organizations, as compared with the 12 companies at the end of the previous year. EX-SERVICE MEN'S BUREAU During 1921, the Florida Ex-Service Men's Bureau began to function and an increasing interest in military affairs was shown by the public. Ove~l,200 inquiries regarding the CMTC poured into the Adjutant Gen eral's office during July. The reservation, which was originally provided as campgrounds and rifle range for the Guard, but which was used by the Federal Authority during the World War and designated "Camp Johnson," was returned to the custody of the State in 1921. The original plan of the camp had been changed, and many of the perma nent structures had either been destroyed or were ir reparable. Effort was begun to obtain funds to make the camp again available. The St. Francis Barracks were also in bad condition, having been injured by the fire of 1915, and the Legislature of this year voted ,40,000 for its repair, at the same time requesting a transfer of the property from the War Department to the State. Senator Trammell introduced a bill in Con gress for this purpose. It was passed March 1, 1922. In 1923, the reconstruction of the main office building of the State Arsenal . was completed. From a report made by Major John C. Fairfax upon the annual Fed eral inspection of the National Guard posts, the follow ing statement is quoted: "The State Arsenal is in the Old St. Francis Barracks. It is the best military plant ever seen by the writer." The mustering in of the 116th Field Artillery in 1923 brought into the State an investment of half a million dollars of Federal funds and gave added impetus to tht steadily growing demands for modern and adequate armories. Many of the counties met this need by liberal donations and grants of land. The providing of suitable armories was one of the most difficult problems with which the State Military Department had to contend. Finally, it was decided at the meeting of the State Armory Board held August 24 1923 that in the formation of additional Guard ' ' units it would be considered a prerequisite that the com• munities where such units were to be located should agree to provide appropriate and necessary housing. In spite of the many difficulties and annoyances con• nected with lack of funds, the unit as a whole had a phenomenal growth during these trying years. HURRICANE RELIEF It was well that the Guard was ready for action by 1926, because on the morning of September 19 of that year a relayed radiogram was received from the sherifl of Dade County briefly advising of the devastation cre• ated by the hurricane that visited South Florida on the day previous. The sheriff requested that troops be sent immediately to protect property and maintain the public peace. Preparatory orders were issued to the nearest available units at once, and communication with the Governor was obtained by long distance telephone. All organizations in the storm area were immediately placed on duty and directed to report to Major Robert N. Ward, 124th Infantry, at Miami. When the call for troops came, Adjutant General Foster was en route to Washington. Upon the receipt of telegraphic news of the disaster, he returned immedi ately and en route to Miami met Henry Baker, Na tional Director of the Red Cross. General Foster laid his plans on the train and arranged to take Mr. Baker by motor all over the storm area. Meanwhile, the Guard was functioning smoothly. Colonel Vivian B. Collins, with his field and staff offi cers, and practically all of the 124th Infantry, had been sent to Miami. All troops at Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and Holly wood were placed under the command of Colonel Col lins, who also acted as co-ordinator of the other organi zations and agencies in the stricken area. TRAGEDY AT MOORE HAVEN On September 21, report was received from the mili tary commander at Moore Hav~n, calling attention to the [XXVII]

PAGE 16

CONT IN U A T-10 N very serious conditions at that point and urging that additional troops be sent there. Orders were issued di recting Colonel Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., with his staff and the Headquarters and Service Batteries of the 116th Field Artillery, to proceed to Moore Haven. Colonel Lowry was assigned supervision over the military opera tions in the storm area west of Lake Okeechobee. It is impossible within a limited scope to single out instances of particularly noteworthy service performed by individuals or the various organizations that partici pated in this particularly trying tour of duty. It is suf ficient to say that the officers and enlisted men as a whole acquitted themselves with credit and rendered valuable assistance not only in aiding civil authority to preserve the peace and police the devastated area, but by cooperating in every practical and effective way in extending immediate relief wherever required. During 1928 occurred the death of that distinguished citizen and able soldier, Brigadier General J. Clifford R. Foster, Adjutant General of the State of Florida during the years 1901-1916 and 1923-1928. The follow ing year Camp Johnson was redesignated "Camp Fos ter" in honor of the memory of the General. General Foster was succeeded by Brigadier General Vivian Collins, who, by direction of the Governor, took over the duties of the Adjutant General and has occu pied that position to the date of this writing (1939). MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY In 1929, there arose an unusual ~mergency in Flor ida. The Mediterranean fruit fly was found in an orange grove in the central portion of the State. This discovery caused great consternation to the owners of millions of dollars invested in citrus groves. The United States Department of Agriculture and the State Plant ,Board likewise took a grave view of the situation. To prevent the spread of this pest over the entire country it was necessary that immediate quarantine of the in fested area be instituted, and no organized force was available to enforce this quarantine except the Florida National Guard. It was recognized that this was not a military duty, but the emergency was such that the Governor felt jus tified in using the Guard to enforce the quarantine and save the United States from the possible permanent infestation of this pest. , Soon the National Guard had established two lines across the State, and the men on patrol duty from June 1, 1929, to June 30, 1930, inspected 4,578,572 vehicles. There were guards stationed at 42 towns within the area, and the train riders traveled a distance of 5,100 miles daily over the railroads. Guards on baggage in spection checked 5,079,136 pieces of baggage and found 19,863 hosts of the "Med ~ly." This made a consoliOF HISTORIES dated total for road patrol and baggage inspection of 9,657,708 pieces. This incident offers an example which is believed more or less unique, of a state military force performing non military duty and meeting an emergency for which there appeared no other possible solution. The manner of performance of this duty was highly commended by the Federal authorities appointed to investigate the problem. THE PRESENT PERIOD With the appointment of Adjutant General Collins, June 29, 1928, the Florida National Guard embarked upon its present and greatest program of training and expansion. On December 31, 1938, the strength of the Florida National Guard was 2,552 officers and enlisted men, a gain of 1,716 since 1920. In addition to those on active status)the Florida National Guard had a reserve of 634 on inactive status. Through the medium of Service Schools, Army Extension Course studies, and United States Army instruc tors, the standard of military education has been consid erably raised, and training schedules and programs re flect the more serious study and consideration of all commanding officers. Field and armory inspection reports of the War De partment inspectors indicate that all branches of the Florida Guard measure up to War Department stand ards, and the recent concentration and maneuver of the Third Army demonstrated to all military authorities that the Florida contingent was well prepared to per form any reasonable war mission to which it might be assigned. All divisional units of the Florida National Guard, which include Infantry, Field Artillery, Engineers, Med ical and Quartermaster branches, participated in the maneuvers of the Third Army, DeSoto National For e5t, Mississippi, July 31 to August 14, 1938. The re port of the field umpires indicates a well-founded knowl edge of interior administration and military tactics, a high state of troop morale and discipline, anq probably outstanding ability of the Florida Infantry and Field Artillery in maintaining efficient wire and radio com munications. In this maneuver, 140 Reserve Officers of the several branches were assigned to organizations of the Florida National Guard and rendered valuable and cooperative service. CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM The armory construction program is rapidly ap proaching completion, and within another year it is ex pected that all units of the National Guard will occupy modern quarters. During the years 1937-1938, local ( Continu,d on pag, 114) [XXVIII]

PAGE 17

111 "T l he Militia is certainly an object of primary importance, whether viewed in reference to the national security, to the satisfaction of the com munity or to the preserva tion of order. n -GEORGE WASHINGTON.

PAGE 18

CORPS AND DEPARTMENT VIVIAN COLLINS Brigadier General 1 The Adiutant General State Staffs and State Detachments are author ized by the Secretary of War under an Act of Congress, May 12, 1917. The purpose of the State Administrative Staff Corps is to constitute a nucleus of personnel for the administration, sup ply, mobilization and recruiting of the National Guard in both State and Federal service. Under present tables of organization, Florida is allotted nine officers and 26 enlisted men. The Adjutant General's Department, Inspector Gen eral's Department, Judge Advocate General's De partment, Quartermaster Corps, ordnance DeTHOMAS B. SPARKMAN Major, Inspector General I HEBER E. COUCHMAN Major, Judge Advocate [2] partment, and Finance Department constitute the branches represented on this date. All officers are assigned definite duties in their departments. The officers of the State Staff have been as signed the duty of completing all plans within the State for the rapid and successful mobilization of the National Guard in case of emergency. In addition to this, they have enrolled in the required courses assigned by the Joint Army and Navy Selective Service Committee and have submitted plans for recruiting prior to M-day. Coordina tion of effort in all branches of the service in Florida is the desire of the Adjutant General, and through the State Staff such an effort can be realized. RUPERT SMITH Major, Ordnance Officer *

PAGE 19

ROBERT G. WHITE Lloulenanl Colonel Assistant Adjutant General and Stale Q. M. GEORGE E. GRACE Lieutenant Colonel Finance Officer, U. S. P. & D . 0. LIEUTENANT COLONEL WHITE Entered military service during World War, enlisting in S. A. T. C., University of Florida, Gainesville, October r, 1918. Discharged December 12, 1918. Enlisted in Third Separate Company at Live Oak on February 11, 1920. Served as private, sergeant, and first sergeant. Commissioned First Lieutenant, November 14 , 1921. On Februar y 26, 1923 , was appointed Cap tain, as s igned to Company E, 154th Infantry, Live Oak. Federal recogniti o n in this grade from June 4, 1923 . Appointed Major of Infantry, assigned as C. 0 . , Second Battalion, 124th Infantry, May 25, 1934. Assigned as Assistant to the Adjutant General , in addition to other duties, June 9, 1937. Transferred to State Staff, a ss igned to Adjutant General's Department on August ro, 1937 . App o inted Lieutenant Colonel , A . G. D . , assigned as As sistant Adjutant General, State of Florida, May 2, 1938. Grad uate of Company Officers Course (Rifle), Fort Benning, Georgia, May 29, 1925. Attended National Rifle Matches as firing memb e r of ,Florida National Guard Team in 1927 and as Team Captain in 1938. CHARLES R. TULLY Captain Assistant lo Adjutant General * [3] LIEUTENANT COLONEL GRACE Enlisted in United Stat e s Army, November 2, 1914. Served in Fourth C a valry, 301st Cavalry, and 46th Field Artillery, a s private, c o rporal, sergeant a nd regimental sergeant major. Ap pointed Se c ond Lieutenant, Cavalry, United States Army, Sep tember 16, 1918. Honorably discharged, December 28, 1918. Reenli s ted June 6, 1919, and served in grad e s of private fir s t class, corporal, sergeant, technical se rgeant, and master sergeant, D. E. M. L . and Field Artillery. Honorably discharged, October 20, 1935 . Enlisted in u6th F ield Artillery, Florida National Guard, and appointed Mast e r Sergeant, Regimental Sergeant Major, Oct o ber 27, 1925. Commissioned Captain, Field Artillery, and assigned as Adjutant, 116th Field Artillery, March r, 1926 . Promoted to Major , Field Artiller y, June 9 , 1937. Tran s ferred to Finan c e Department, March 4, 1938, and appointed United States Property and Disbur s in g Officer. Appointed Lieutenant Colonel, Finance Department, December q., 1938. HAROLD C. WALL First Lieutenant Assistant to Adjutant General J, RUSSELL INGRAM Captain Anhlonl lo Stale Q. M.

PAGE 20

Left, Top: Stale Detachment in Office of tho Adjutant General , Loft, Bottom: Two members of Enlisted Detachment, State Staff, with Mstr . Sgt . Ralph C , Crawford, Headquarters Company , 12 4 th Infantry, seated al desk. Righi, left to Right, First Row : Tech . Sgt. C . L. Mickler, Staff Sgt. H . C. Pittman, Mslr. Sgt. W. L. Wiler, Sgt. G. W, Green, Pvt. First Class H ; D. Bilger, Sgt. A. J. Coffman. Second Row: Tech. Sgt. R. B. Murphy, Cpl. B. L . Hildebrand, Staff Sgt . S . B. Smith, Sgt . W. P . Wade . s T A T E D E T A C H M E N T ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA The State Detachment of the Florida National Guard was Federally recognized March 10, 1933, with Captain J. B. Rousseau in command . On November 1, 1937, the strength of the unit was increased to 15 enlisted men. The duties of the members are varied, the 10 men in St. Augustine being divided into two radio operators, two assigned to administrative duties, one to finance, and the remaining five to the sup ply section. The four men in Jacksonville are attached to the Headquarters Company, 124th Infantry, and the member in Haines City is as signed to Headquarters Second Battalion, 106th Engineers. Under the command of Captain John Heilich, , 106th Quartermaster Regiment, this unit rendered efficient and valuable service during the Third Army Maneuvers held in the DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi, July 31 to August 14, 1938. Left to Right: Radio Sect i on. Physical Examination. Corporal Waller E. Spencer ond Corporal Edward E . Wolker. Staff Sergeant Richard G. Pittman and Sergeant John T. Heston.

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* * MAJOR GENERAL Commanding Thirty-first Division Born in Lyon,, Iowa, November 9, 1876. Moved to Florida with parents in December, 1878. Graduate, East Florida Seminary ( State Military Academy). number one in 1894 class, with rank of . cadet first lieutenant and battalion adjutant. Enlisted in Gaines ville Guards, F. S. T., in 1895, serving as enlisted man until unit's disbandment {prior to Spanish-American War). Commissioned Captain in National Guard of Florida, September 23, 1899, and assigned as Regimental Adjutant, Second Infantry. Commissioned Major, 1906; Lieutenant Colonel, 1908; Colonel, 1909. Commanded Second Florida Infantry in Mexican Border service, June, 1916, to March, 1917. Mustered into Federal service for the World War, August 5, 1917. Appointed Brigadier General by the President, August 30, 1917, and assigned fo command the Fifty-sixth Depot Brigade, Thirty-first Division. Upon the breaking up of this Brigade in Oc tober, 1917, he was attached to command the Fifty-sixth Artillery Brigade of the same division, Was assigned lo command the 185th Infantry Brigade, Ninety-third Provisional Division, in December, 1917, and went overseas with this Brigade in April, 1918. Sent lo the front three days after arrival in France and attached to the Sixteenth ( French Infantry Division l for observation and instruction, serving with them approximately ten days. Was then attached lo the Second American Division {late in Aprill and served with it until June 15, 1918, when ordered at tached to Sixty-third Brigade, Thirty-second American Division, serving with it in defensive operations in the Rouge Mont sector in Alsace until a bout July I 0, 1918, at which time he was ordered to the Fifth American Division in the St. Die sector in Lorraine, where he commanded the north sub-sector of the line held by that Division and manned by the Sixtieth U. S. Infantry, the 137th French Infantry, and one battalion of the First Alpine Chasseurs. On the withdrawal of the Fifth Division from the line of that sector, he was ordered to the Twenty-seventh American Division to com mand the Fifty-third Brigade, ta king over on the night of August 30 with the Brigade in the line in Dedaboush Lake sector between Ypres and Mt. Kemme!, Belgium. Commanded the troops of this Division which were used in the taking of Vierstraate Ridge and in the assault on Wycheate Ridge, August 31 to September 2, From there with the Twenty-seventh Division to the Somme Area. Commanded the troops used in the preliminary attack on the Hindenburg Line September 27, 1918, and the Fifty-third Brigade in the main aiiack on September 29, 1918, and on the afternoon of that day was placed in command of all the infantry of the Division. Commanded his brigade in the advance after the breaking of the Hindenburg Line to the vicinity of Le Caleau, including the Baille of the Celle River, October 17-22, 1918. On the final withdrawal of the Twenty-seventh Division from the line, was ordered to com mand the 184th Brigade of the Ninety-second Division. Joined ii November 2, 1918, near Pont A Mousson opposite Metx, being in the line there at the declaration of the Armistice. Relinquished command of this Brigade in Brest, France, in February, 1919, and returned to the United States as troop commander on U, S. S. President Grant, with part of the Forty-first Division and casuals. Was discharged March I, 1919. Awarded the D. S. M., one divisional citation from Headquarters, Twenty-seventh Division, and one citation from G. H. Q., A. E. F. Appointed Major General of the line and assigned to command the Thirty-first Division on October 15, 1924. Command continuous to date. Awarded Active Service Medal, April 8, 1929. Awarded Florida Cross, July 21, 1932, for meritorious service in the organiza tion and development of the Florida National Guard, with more than thirty-two years service with Florida tr . oops, Is present Chief of the National Guard Bureau,

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* LOPER B. LOWRY Lieutenant Colonel, Inf. (G-3) JEROME A. WATERMAN Captain, F. A., Aldo * INSIGNIA A Shoulder Sleeve Insignia, approved bl the A.G., A. E. F., March 7, 1919, consists : Within a red circle 2 inches in diameter and 3 / I b inch in width on a while disk, the red letters DD back to back in the form of an Octagon; elements of letters I /8 inch in width. A distinctive insignia has been adopted as a badge: Between the extremities of a blue bastioned fort, the cre,t of the Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana National Guard proper. (Florido Allotment) On July 18, 1917, the War Department designated Na tional Guard troops of Alabama, Florida and Georgia to form the Thirty-first Division. Camp Wheeler, Macon, Georgia, was selected for the training camp. The Division was drafted into Federal service on August 5, 1917, under the command of Major General Francis J. Kernan. The Division, officered largely from the _ Organized Reserve Corps and National Army, totaled 24,100. The Division moved from Camp Green, Camp Jackson, and Camp Wheeler, via Camp Mills to the ports of em barkation of Brooklyn, Hoboken and New York. As a unit, the Thirty-first Division was in France .in the latter part of September, 1918. Once in France, 'the Division was broken up to be used as replacements. Although the Division was not privileged to act as a unit, its personnel, assigned to various organizations of the A. E. F., served well, and in many cases heroically, through the last few weeks of the war. This Division was known as the Dixie Division, with the motto: "It Shall Be Done." The return of the Division to the United States was effected during the perio4 from November 27, 1918, to January 14, 1919, and Camp Gordon, Georgia, was selected as the camp for demobilization. After the World War, the Thirty-first Division was re• organized as a National Guard Division and includes troops from Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Florida. Head quarters of the Thirty first Division, located at Bartow, Florida, received Federal recognition as of October 15, 1924, and Major General A. H. Blanding, Florida. Na tional Guard, the present Chief of the National Guard Bureau, assumed command of the Division on that date. Besides Major General Francis J. Kernan, the Division Commanders during the World War period included Brigadier General John L. Hayden, Brigadier General Walter A. Harris, Major General Francis H, French, and Major General LeRoy S. Lyon. The Thirty-first Division assignments to Florida include the Division Commander, Major General A. H. Blanding, Chief of the National Guard Bureau; G-3, Assistant Chief : of Staff, Lieutenant Colonel Loper B. Lowry, and Aide, Captain Jerome A. Waterman, Field Artillery. I b) ! i I I I .I

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* * Commanding One Hundred and Sixth Quartermaster Regiment Enlisted Troop C, Third Cavalry, April 30, 1900. Honorably discharged, April 29, 1903. Served in Philippine Insurrection, July 14, 1900, to June 22, 1902. Re-enlisted in Troop A, Second Cavalry, July 7, 1903. Discharged July 6, 1906; Served in Philippine Islands February 18 , 1904, to January 5, 1906. Appointed Squadron Ser• geant Major, First Squadron, Second Cavalry, December 23, 1906, Discharged and re-enlisted July 7, 1909, in the Second Cavalry. Served in the Ute Indian disturbance, South Dakotd, 1907. Ap pointed Post Quartermaster Sergeant, November, 1911. Discharged and re-enlisted, July 7 , 1912. Served in the Philipp i ne Islands from January 3, 1910, to May 15, 1915. Participated in skirmishes with hostile Moros in Jolo in 1911. Discharged and re-enlisted, July 7, 1915 . Appointed Senior Grade Quartermaster Sergeant, Quartermaster Corps, March 23, 1917. Instructor in Quartermaster Corps School, Philadelphia, Pa., 1917. Appointed Captain, Quartermaster Corps, August 6, 1917 . Des ignated as an Executive Officer, Camp Johnston, Florida, October, 1917. Relieved, 1918. Administrative Division, Office of the Quar termaster General , 1918. Promoted lo Major in Quartermaster Corps, July 6, 1918. Served with A E. F. in England , France, BelI 8 l gium, Italy, and Germany, 1918-1919. Assistant to Military At tachee, Rome, Italy, 1919. Received citation for meritorious serv ices Commander in Chief, A. E . F., 1919. Duty with National Museum, Washington, D. C . , 1920. Honorably discharged as Major, Quartermaster Corps, October 20, 1920. Re-enlisted Senior Grade Quartermaster Sergeant, October 30, 1920. Retired from active service, May 15, 1921, Promoted to Major, Retired List Regular Army, by act of Congress, May 7, 1932, Appointed Captain of . Infantry, Florida National Guard, September 14, 1921 . Designated U, S. P, & D. 0., October 6, 192 f, Appo i nted State Quarter master, Florida, September 14, 1921, Promoted to Major, Quartermaster Corps, Florida National Guard , October 3 f , 1921, Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Quar termaster Corps, Florida Nationel Guard; June 13, 1924. Appointed Division Quartermaster, Thirty-first Division (Dixie Division), June 5, 1924. Relieved U . S. P. & D. 0., February 12, 1938. Relieved State Quartermaster, November I, 1938. Awarded Purple Heart I for meritorious services with A. E. F. Diploma Command and Gen eral Staff, Extension Course, 1938. Certificate of Proficiency, Fourth Corps Area Command Staff School, 1939 :

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ST AF F MARK W, LANCE Major, Commanding Second Battalion -AND U N l'T JOHN HEILICH Captain, Adjutant 0 FF ICE R . . _ S ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH QUARTERMASTER REGIMENT (Florida Allotment) (Contin,ud from p~gt 7) I, 1936. Company "F," organized as the 106th Motor cycle Company, June Ii, 1926, was redesignated as Com pany "F," 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Alabama Na tional Guard, May I, 1936. Due to the dispersion of its units, the 106th Quarter master Regiment was never assembled until it participated in the Third Army Maneuvers in DeSoto National Park, Mississippi, July 31 to August 14, 1938. During these maneuvers, the Regiment performed the normal functions of Supply and Transportation for the Thirty-first Division. For these services, it received the commendation of the Division Commander, Brigadier General L. F. Guerre. JULIAN F. PFAFF * JOHN W. SNYDER Captain, Company C First lieutenant, Adjutant, Second Battalion, Headquarters Staff [9) JOSEPH M . INGRAM Second Lieutenant, Company C *

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: C. F. Riggle, G . L. Reier, J. F. Armstrong, L. II. Williams, H. C. Bu c kland, R. P. McRae, E. C. Cook, M. J. Kin nebrew, R. II. Mizelle, V. W. Rawls. SECOND Row: B. R. Witherington, B. H. Harri s, J. L. Niven, D. E . Burner, A. W. Monk, R. A. Wells, W. P. Phillip s , A. J. Luten, E. C. Mann, E. M. Pierce, H. F. Rowe, T. E. McClamma. Sec
PAGE 26

The following coot of arms for the I0bth Quartermaster Regiment, . Lou• isiona, Miuiosippi, Alabama, end Florido Notional Guard, was approved under the provloiono of Par. 5, AR 260-10: SHIELD: Per bend sanguine and buff, to chief a prickly pear cactus, to base a fleur de-lis all argent. CRESTS: Those for the regiments of the Louisiana, Mississippi , Alabama, and Florida Notional Guard, in the following order: LOUISIANA: On a wreath of the colors (argent and s~nguine) a pelican in her piety offronte with three young in nest, argent armed and vulned proper. MISSISSIPPI: On a wreath of the colors (argent and sanguine) a ,lip of magnolia full flower with leaves proper behind a trident sable. ALABAMA: On a wreath of the colors (argent and sanguine) a slip of cotton plant with full bursting boll proper. FLORIDA: On a wreath of the colors (argent and sanguine) on alligator statant proper. MOTTO: Prat d'accomplir (Ready to accomplish). The 106th Quartermaster Regim~nt was organized in January, 1924, as the Thirty-first Division Quartermaster Train, in the National Guard of Florida, Alabama, Mis sissippi and Louisiana, and was redesignated as the 106th Quartermaster Regiment, May 1, 1936. It is entitled to a streamer in the colors of the Victory ribbon, without in scription, to commemorate the services of Companies "A" and "D" ( one-third of the lettered companies of the Regi ment) during the World War, Headquarters was organized June 13, 1924, as Quarter master Section, Headquarters, Thirty-first Division, and redesignated as Headquarters, 106th Quartermaster Regi ment, Florida National Guard, May 19, 1936. Headquar• ters Company and the Medical Detachment were organized and recognized in the Mississippi National Guard on June 1, 1936, while Headquarters, First Battalion, was organized and recognized in the Louisiana National Guard, May 12, 1936. Company "A," orgaii.ized in July, 1917, as Troop "E," Second Separate Squadron Cavalry, Mississippi National Guard, was mustered into Federal service on August 9, 1917, and redesignated as Company "F," 114th Supply Train, serving in France with the Thirty-ninth Division. After the Armistice, the personnel was transferred to other units, the records returned to the United States by cadre, and the unit demobilized on January 23, 1919. It was re organized April 21, 1922, as the 154th Motor Transport Company, redesignated as the 122nd Motor Transport Company, January 29, 1924, and as Company "A," 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Mississippi Nation~! Guard, May 13, 1936. [ 7 J Company "B," organized as the 123rd Motor Tra:upor~ Company, December 3, 1924, was redesignated as Com pany "B," 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Louisiana Na tional Guard, on May 12, 1936. Headquarters, Second Battalion, was organized and recognized in the Florida National Guard, May 21, 1936. Company "C," organized as the 220th Motor Transport Company, April 27, 1921, was redesignated the 124th Motor Transport Company, January 1, 1928, and as Company "C," 106th Quarter master Regiment, Florida National Guard, May 19, 1936. Company "D," organized in June, 1916, as the First Ambulance Company, Alabama National Guard, was mus tered into Federal service on July 2, 1916, for the Mexican Border duty and mustered out February 2, 1917. It was again mustered into Federal service on April 2, 1917, for the World War, expanded into the 121st, 122nd, 123rd, and 124th Ambulance Companies, 106th Sanitary Train, in September, 1917. It served overseas with the Thirty-first Division, returned to the United States and was demobilized June 2, 1919. It was reorganized as the 140th Ambulance Company, April 1, 1922, redesignated as the 116th Ambu lance Company, January 16, 1924, converted into the Eleventh Wagon Company, March 24, 1934, converted into the 121st Motor Transport Company, September 1, 1934, and redesignated as Company "D," 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Alabama National Guard, May 1, 1936. Headquarters, Third Battalion, was organized and recog• nized in the Alabama National Guard, June 4, 1936. Company "E," organized as the Eleventh Motor Repair Section, June 19, 1924, was redesignated as Company "E," 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Alabama National Guard, May (ContinMtd on ptJgt 9)

PAGE 27

STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL POST OFFICE BOX 1008 STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE 32085~1008 The special Archives Publication Series of the Historical Services Division are produced as a service to Florida corrmunities, historians, and to any other individuals, historical or geneological societies, and national or regional governmental agencies which find the information contained herein of use or value. At present, only a very I imited number of copies of these publications are produced and are pr6vided to certain state and national historical record repositories at no charge. Any remaining copies are provided to interested parties on a first come, first served basis. It is hoped these publications wi I I soon be reproduced and made available to a wider public through the efforts of the Florida National Guard Historical Foundation Inc. Information about the series is available from the Historical Services Division, Department of Military Affairs, State Arsenal, St. Augustine, Florida. Robert Hawk Director

PAGE 28

FLORIDA STATE DEPOSITORIES State documents are distributed to the following depository libraries and are available to Florida citizens for use either in the libraries or on interlibrary loan, subject to each library's regulations. An asterisk(*) indicates libraries that are obligated to give interlibrary loan service. Requests should be directed to the nearest, epository. Bay County Public Library (1968) 25 West Government Street Panama City, Florida 32402 Bay Vista Campus Library (1982) Documents Department Florida International University North Miami, Florida 33181 Broward County Division of Libraries (1968) 100 South Andrews Avenue Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301 Cocoa Public Library (1968) 430 Delannoy Avenue Cocoa, Florida 32922 *Florida Atlantic University (1968) Library P.O. Box 3092 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 *Florida International University (1971) Documents Section Tamiami Campus Library Tamiami Trail Miami, Florida 33199 *Florida State University Library (1968) Documents Maps Division Tallahassee, Florida 32306 *Jacksonville Public Library (1968) 122 North Ocean Street Jacksonville, Florida 32202 *Miami-Dade Public Library (1968) 101 West Flagler Street Miami, Florida 33130-1504 *Ocala Public Library (1972) 15 Southeast Osceola Avenue Ocala, Florida 32671 Orange County Library District (1968) 101 East Central Boulevard Orlando, Florida 32801 St. Petersburg Public Library (1968) 3745 Ninth Avenue, North St. Petersburg, Florida 33713 Rev. 1-7-89 *State Library of Florida (1968) Documents Section R. A. Gray Building Tallahassee, Florida 323 9-0250 Stetson University (1968) Dupont-Ball Library Deland, Florida 32720-3769 Jacksonville University (1968) Carl S. Swisher Library University Blvd., North Jacksonville, Florida 32211 *Tampa-Hillsborough County Public (1968 Library System 900 North Ashley Street Tampa, Florida 33602 *University of Central Florida (1968) Library Post Office Box 25000 Orlando, Florida 32816-0666 *University of Florida Library (1968) Documents Department Gainesville, Florida 32611 *University of Miami Library (1968) Gov't Publications P. o. Box 248214 Coral Gables, Florida 33124 *University of North Florida Library ( Documents Division Post Office Box 17605. Jacksonville, Florida 32216 *University of South Florida (1968) Library Special Collections 4204 Fowler Avenue Tampa, Florida 33620 University of West Florida (1968) Documents John Pace Library Pensacola, Florida 32514-5750 West Palm Beach Public Library (1968: 100 Clematis West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

PAGE 29

' . THIS COPY OF THE NATIONAL GUARD HISTORICAL ANNUAL STATE OF FLORIDA IS PRESENTED , To ______ _ By ______ _ 1959

PAGE 31

.. J' THIS CERTIFIES THAT AS OF THIS DATE JANUARY 1, 1959 IS A MEMBER OF Commanding Officer

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I I I ' HISTORICAL ANNUAL NATIONAL GUARD i of the ! i i i I ! STA TE OF FLORIDA I I I I I . ! . I 1939

PAGE 33

, i CA M P F O ST E R, F L O R I D A ~~ . ~ ' }1 ~ f} /7 > f" r . , . * Old Gun on th e Camp G rounds. Camp Foster Entrance. Officer's Club. Camp Foster Hospital. Administration Building. Range Administration Bu i ld i ng. ' . ) / , ., : ; t" . . . ~•''i ,~~\!l / ; l 'j \ ' .. I -:~ f : ~. : ~ l4', "'/B n,., :~11!1~~ cc:, I :: ~•',!! ;,/ ,.b~;;;;:;!i. e iii1; r:~~ .... ., it r~i -""'-'==-"""==~""""~ ""';z'.. 7~ fk:-~ . _7 ; ~5 . ~~:~ ~ :< 7 fif_. ~:; ! ~~:• . , . _ , . ,,. . ~, ':~ ,; ~ , : ~ j~ ;l~ . . . ; ~ ..... ~ -•. ;; ; _ ,t-t:~ jo . . :::~ _.; . . . , , ., ,:..,;;;,,-~ , '.[J' ~ . ~' '. ' ' ':"'

PAGE 34

Historic Landmark. Changing the Guard. Arch. Chapel. Watch Tower. ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA * l

PAGE 35

, . 41 ' . . ,: .; ' :itl'i t : i '' i" ' : ' : * I Panama City PLANT CITY ARMORY ',; ' i Gun and Motor Garage Caretaker ' s Lodge Main Building

PAGE 36

I Bradenton Lakeland t Tallahassee I l Haines City Palmetto B , *

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~11' Lake City Jacksonville Sanford Avon Park Administrative Offices and Garage at Haines City *

PAGE 38

. . ~ -~ ::: , -,: .. ~ , ~ . f '-!-~ ., ' . : ~ -- •. ... ,~: i:t :.• ., , * Orlando Miami Bartow Tampa Key West *

PAGE 39

* Lieutenant Colonel R Assistant Adjutant c;;ert G. White, ecutive Off' eneral and Ex ,cer. Lieutenant Colo I G Finance Offic;re U eSorge E. Grace, P. & D. O. Captain John H T State Detachm e; icAh, . Commanding & D. 0. en , ssistant U. S. P. First Lieutenant 0 Infantry Sec twen W. Griffin, I 24th G re ary to th Ad' eneral. e 1utant ,. . ; ,._-_,. ' ' _,_ .... ~ ,, "'2 1 , ' ' -, \.'i '

PAGE 40

F 11 _ E D C O N E COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF, FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD [ III l

PAGE 41

To t . he Office~s and Enlisted Men of the Florida National Guard: It is hoped that this historical annual ~ill not only be a source . of pride to all members of the Florida National Guard, but a valuable medium through which the people of Florida may become better acquainted with the service and value of the State's military forces. The State looks to you for the maintenance of those high and patriotic ideals which are indispensable attributes of a dependable protective force, and which have always been characteristics of the Florida soldier. I con gratulate you upon your outstanding military accomplishments. As Commander-in-Chief of the State's armed forces, I send official greetings and best wishes to each officer and enlisted man. Governor and Commander-in-Chief. C II J

PAGE 42

* * * As we scan the pages of this pictorial annual of the Florida National Guard we feel a sense of growing,pride. Included here are the likenesses of many officers and enlisted men who have served with us in times of danger and who, under most trying circumstances, have conducted themselves according to the best traditions of the service. That the Florida National Guard is recognized by military authorities as an efficient and dependable force, is due to the willing and intelligent coopera tion of this group of Florida's finest men, who patriotically assume military service as an obligation of citizenship. We know that this book will be a long-cherished possession to those of us who still "follow the flag." We feel also that such citizens of the state as may on occasion review its contents, will possess a heartening sense of se. curity in the knowledge that this highly-trained group of men stands always ready to answer any call in the alleviation of suffering, if disaster should overtake us, or in defending and upholding the principles of law and order from within or without as necessity demands. Brigadier General , Florida National Guard, THE ADJUTANT GENERAL.

PAGE 43

Entered Florida State Troop s !l!'I Second Li e utenant, Coast Artillery, July 21, 1908. Promoted ro Captain, Fehr11a,y 17, 1909, and command e d First Company, Coast Artillery Corps, Resigned, September 11, 1912. Commis s i one d Fint Licutcn:mt, St , :o nd flmida Infantry, Au~ust 19, 1913, assign~ to Company "F." Promoted to Captain of Infantry, Decemb e r 26, 1913, as.sign e d to command Company "F," ~cond florida Infantry. Promoted to Major and assigned ro command Second Battalion, Second Florida Infantry, November 29, 1914. Inducted into Federal servict (Mexican Border service), June ,, 1916 1 until April 17 1 1917. Inducted into Federal service (World War), August ,, 1917. Commanded Second Battalion. 124th Infantry, Thirty-first Division, at Camp Wheeler, Georgia. Detached and attended special Field Officers' School at Langres, France, September 9, 1918. Transferred to command First 8ftralion, 1,4th Infantry, Thirty-$eventh Division, January 1, 1919. Mustered out of Federal service, April 30, 1919. Aided in reor~anizing the Ftorid;i National Guard after the World War. Appointed Lieutcn:mt Colond and Executive Officq, 124th Infantry, May 9, 1921. Promoted to Colonel, commandin~ the Regiment, September 30 1 19 2 ,. Appoint ed Adjutant G en eral and promoted to Brigadier Gen eral, June 25, 192R. &l'vir e continuous to d;ttc. More than twenty -fi 1d1t years service With flnritla troOf):., Grnduate, lnf:mny Sd1ool o{ Ann:.. St"rvcd ;1s Divisional lm"tructor in Mushtry during Camp Wheeler concentration in 1918. Graduate, Field Officers School, Langres, France. Awarded Aorid.1. Cross for me1icorious service in comm;,nd of National {iuard troops at Miami , Florida, incident to the hurricane disaster of 1926. VIVIAN COLLINS BRIGADIER GENERAL FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD. THE

PAGE 44

~f 1 St. A~e, d}./oluda b * Military Department Building. Brigadier General Vivian Collins, the Adjutant General. The Adjutant General's Office Person nel. Major James B. Rousseau, Assistant to the Adjutant General. \ ; " -S \ . ~~~ l i( ~ ,, . \ .

PAGE 45

CAMP J. HI S T ORY OF CLIFFORD R. FOSTER LOCATION AND AREA The site of the Florida camp grounds and r i fle range was selected by a commission appointed by act of the Florida Legislature of 1905. This commission visited various sections of the State and inspected a large number ofsites that were proposed, finally deciding upon the location near Yukon, Duval County, Florida, , as being most suitable because of its healthfulness, general physical characteristics and central location with relation to means of transportation. The original tract acquired by the State consisted of 300 acres. As additional land was at that time available, and as it was deemed desirable that there should be a well equipped and suitable rifle range immediatly adjacent to the camp grounds, the approval of the War De p a rtment was secured of a plan by which additional land should be acquired by purchase from Federal funds allotted for the equipment and support of the organized militia of this State, and set aside for the promotion of rifle practice. In pursuance of this policy, purchases were made for the Federal Government as follows: August 10, 1907, tract of 400 acres; Septem ber 11, 1908, two tracts, one of 85 and the other of 108 1 3 acres, and November 18 , 1913, 100 acres. The total area of both Federal and of State owned land is 993 1-3 acres. It is located eight miles from the City of Jacksonville by (well-paved) road and seven and a half miles by water. GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS In its original state this was a beautiful tract of land, heavily wooded and a natural park, extending, in peninsular form, from the west shore of the St . Johns River. It is ornamented with a magnificent growth of magnolia and oak trees, and even without artificial beautification could just be described as oqe of the most attractive natural parks in the South. High bluffs overlook the St. Johns River on three . sides and its favorable location in this respect adds much to the comfort of the camp during the summer season when field exercises are usually held . The land is high, with sandy soil and good natural drainage. [XIV] WATER Water is supplied from a 10-inch artesian well, driven to a depth of 720 feet. This well has an esti mated flow of 2,500,000 gallons per day. The water is reasonably soft, palatable and healthful. THE RIFLE RANGE The plan of constructing a large rifle range adjacent to the camp grounds was adopted in pursuance of a resolution adopted by the National Board for the Pro motion of Rifle Practice, which advocated the estab lishment of a large range in each State, of sufficie;t size and capacity to provide for the training of the entire National Guard of such States, and civilians as well. The Florida range at the time of its con struction was second only in size to tha range at Camp Perry, Ohio; being equipped with 150 targets, in groups of 50 in echelon and with firing points at 200, 300, 600 and 1,000 yards; pistol and machine gun targets hav e subsequently been added with "temporary appointments." The firing direction on the Florida range is a few degrees east of north, and firing condi tions and all range equipment and accessories are ideal. The Army Divisional Matches were held on this range in 1914, and the National Matches in 1915 and 1916. WORLD WAR USE During the World War this camp site was con verted into one of the Nation's largest cantonments and occupied as a Quartermaster Corps Training Camp, with a large remount station. It was then designated Camp Joseph E. Johnston. FACILITIES Modern kitchens and latrines have been constructed for the accommodation of a brigade of Infantry. At tractive administration building, officers club, ware houses, caretaker quarters, swimming pool, post ex change building, and dance pavilion are also part of the camp.

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PRIVATES LUTEN, HENRY A. MANN, EVERE'IT C. MERRILL, CHESTER E., JR. MtTCIIELL, JOSEPH D. MULLINS, JIM L., JR. Nonus, RICHARD C. PIERCE, ELDREDGE M. POPE, ROY II., JR. PRIVETT, PARK D. RANEY, THOMAS L. RUDD, PAUL H. SABISTON, THOMAS J. SWEAT, PAUL II. TOUCHTON, REMER Y. WELLS, ROBERT A. FACTUAL HISTORY Company "C" was Federally recognized on April 27, 1921, as the 121st Motor Transport Company, 31st Di vision Train. The organization was later redesignated as the 220th Motor Transport Company, and again redesig nated the early part of 1938 as the 124th Motor Trans port Company, stationed at Jacksonville, Florida. Upon formation of the 106th Quartermaster Regiment, this company was designated Company "C" on May 12, 1936. This organization attended annual field training en campments with the 124th Infantry, FNG, from 1921 through 1935. The assigned motor equipment during these years consisted of 14 !-,iberty trucks. In 1915, new 13/2ton Chevrolet trucks were received by the State and the company has operated these trucks since that date. In 1936, the company left the state for encampment for the first time, serving at Fort McClellan, Alabama; SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FtRsT Row: A. G. Hawarah, II. E. Kivi, G. A. Arsenault, W. D. Corners, P. W. Rockwood, \V. \V. Lamar, \V. J. Gaines, T. L. Raney, F. L Gatlin, R. H. Pope, Jr . , P. D. Privett. SECOND Row: W. H. Hester, T. J. Sabiston, A. T. George, P. C. Marsh, A. W. Burner, J . D. Mitchell, P. H. Sweat, W. F. Harvey, J. Mullins, C. E. Merrill, Jr., J. Cameron, R. C. Nobles. with the 106th Engineers. Again in 1937, the company attended field training at Fort McClellan, being attached to the 62nd Infantry Brigade. At this camp the com pany for the first time served with another unit of the 106th Quartermaster Regiment, Company ''D" of Ramer, Alabama, the other company of the Second Battalion. Major Mark Lance, Battalion Commander, was in com mand. With the other units of the regiment, the com pany took part in the Third Army Maneuvers at DeSoto National Forest, near Biloxi, Mississippi, from July 31 to August 14, 1938, gaining great benefit in training, with resultant hopes of participating in another such movement in the near future. The 1939 encampment will find this organization again training at Camp J. Clifford Foster~ for the first time since 1935. This org~nization is proud of the fact that practically every Sergeant on the roll at the present time has seven or mote years service to his credit, proving the interest and good fellowship prevailing in the company. R E G I M E NT, J AC K S O N V I LL E, FLORIDA [II J

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C 0 t 06TH '\ ~"" ~ . ' 1 :: , t~, 4 .. , ' ' /'< M PAN Y C SECOND BATTALION QUARTERMASTER REGIMENT JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA I I) Captain and Company Trophies. {2) Club Room. (3) Orderly Room. (4) Non-Commis,ioned Officers . (5) Supply Room. (6),Head quarters Section. (7) At Camp Foster.

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rn~rn Mm ~rn Mrnl Sta/J and 'Unit (jl/lc,elb.t (FLORIDA ALLOTMENT) The 106th Medical Regiment is composed of troops from Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, with regimental headquarters at New Orleans, Louisi ana. The Florida allotment consists of two regimental officers and Company "F," which is located at Fort Myers, with Captain Baker Whisnant in. command and First Lieutenant Arthur D. McLean assisting him. Corren P. Youmans, Lieutenant Colonel, stationed at Miami, and Shuler H. Etheredge, Major, stationed at Tampa, are the two regimental officers assigned to Florida. The history of the Regiment, through the various units that went into its organization, can be traced back many years. The headquarters of the Regiment, though, was organized and Federally recognized July CORREN P. YOUMANS Lieutenant Colonel, Regimental Staff 28, 1936, with the appointment of Captain Anees Mogabgab to the grade of Colonel in command. On January 1, 1937, the companies in the Regiment were redesignated, including the Florida unit. The 118th Ambulance Company, 106th Medical Regiment, St. Petersburg, was redesignated as Company "F," 106th Medical Regiment, but it was transferred to the Field Artillery, and on January 13, 1937, Headquar ters Battery, 116th Field Artillery, Fort Myers, was converted to Company "F," 106th Medical Regiment. The entire Regiment attended the encampment in 1937 at Camp J. Clifford R. Foster,. Jacksonville, Florida. In 1938, it took part in the Third Army Maneuvers at DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi. SHULER H. ETHEREDGE Major, Regimental Staff BAKER WHISNANT Captain, Company F ARTHUR D. McLEAN First Lieutenant, M. A. C., Company F * * [13]

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RsT Row: V. N. Kant z, A. B. Sumner, H. E. Gibbs, H . C. Raulerson, C. \V. Johnson, M . H. Infinger, A. L. Hord, II. A. Ford, F. Skinner. SECOND Row: G. R. H e rington, J. W. Roan, C. E. Hall, D. F. Lessey, F. C. Campbell, G. F. Futral, C. R. Forbes, G. McGee, \V. B. Cowart, J. T. Roberts. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . . BAKER WHISNANT First Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . ARTHUR D. McLEAN NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant SERGEANTS GILBE:tT, SAMUEL S. MATHIS, NOLAN S. CORPORALS BENNETT, WALTER E. RICHARD B, BOWDEN POWERS, CHARLES J. SANTINI, JOSEPH G. HISLER, CHARLES C. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS CAIN, LESTER J. COWART, WILLIAM B, HALL, CHARLES E. HENDERSON, JAMES J. HOGAN, SIMON P. PRIVATES BARTLESON, MARK F, BROUGH, THOMAS G. CAMPBELL, FRED C. CHANDLER, ANDREW L. FORBES, CLAUDE R. FORD, HENRY A. FUTRAL, GEORGE F. FUTRAL, RAY W. GIBBS, HARRY E. GRISSETTE, GUY R. McGEE, WESLEY E. PENNINGTON, HARRY W. RAULERSON, HERMAN C. SPARKS, HENRY E . SUMNER, ALBERT B. HALL, ToM J. HANCHEY, HOMER L. HERINGTON, GILBERT R. HORD, ALFRED L. INFINGER, MARK H. JOHNSON, CHARI.RS W, KANTZ, VOLNEY N. KERSEY, ALLEN G. LESSEY, DANIEL F. MAKER, EDWARD F. ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH MEDICAL REGIMENT .j I I

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PRIVATES McGEE, GORDON ROAN, JOHN W. MURPHY, FRANCIS L. ROBERTS, JOIIN T. NAYLOR, WALLACE E. RUSSELL, JERRY C. NYE, ALFRED SAPP, CHARLES H. POPE, EDGAR 0, SKINNER, FRED WHITAKER, Rov J. FACTUAL HISTORY First organized as 118th Ambulance Company, 106th Medical Regiment, at St. Petersburg, Florida, on April 15, 1936, this unit was redesignated as Company "F," 106th Medical Regiment, on January 1, 1937, and con verted to Headquarters Battery, 116th Field Artillery, on January 13, 1937. At the same time, Headquarters Bat tery, 116th Field Artillery, with station at Fort Myers, was converted to Company "F," 106th Medical Regiment. Headquarters Battery, 116th Field Artillery, (Animal Drawn), was first organized at Fort Myers, Florida, on October 24, 1923, by Captain Horace M. Sherwood and a group of ex-wartime soldiers. It was mustered into th . e service by General Vivian Collins, who at that time was a Lieutenant Colonel. FORT MYERS, FLORIDA SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: W . E . McGee, W. E. Bennett, J. G. Santini , R. B. Bowden, S. S. Gilbert, C . J. Powers, H. E. Sparks, JI. W. Pennington . SECOND Row: E. F. Maker, A. G. Kersey, A. Nye, J. C. Rus sell, G. R. Gr,issette, E. 0, Pope, A. L. Chandler, T. G. Brough, S. P. Hogan, T. J. Hall, H. L. Hanchey. Besides Captain Sherwood, other commanders ~f the unit have been Captain Elmer M. Jenkins, Lieutenant George H. Craven (later Captain), Lieutenant William G. Gibson (later Captain, retired as Major), and Captain Baker Whisnant. The organization was in State service after the 1926 and 1928 storms, which hit the Lake Okechobee region, and during the trial of a Negro for rape in Hendry County, Florida, in 1935. During the 1926 relief duty, the Battery was the first organization to arrive and render aid. It reestablished communication with the outside world. Wires and poles were gone, but in 12 hours messages were being sent and received without interruption. The Battery performed this and other duties for 14 days, then the commercial companies had their services in operation again. The unit took part in the Third Army Maneuvers, DeSoto National Forest, in 1938.

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7 ~ , < ., _ rC , ': , . COMPANY F ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH MEDICAL REGIMENT FORT MYERS, FLORIDA * (I) Loading Ambulance. (2) Litter Squad Loading . Litters. (3) Non-Commissioned Officers. ( 4) Artificial Respiration. ( 5) Litter Squad at Attention . (6) Ambulance Drivers . (7) Ambulances.

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(Florida Allotment) COAT Of ARMS: Approved April 12, 1927; amended July 25, 1931. SHIELD: Per fess Indented argent and gules, In chief a fleur-de-lis azure. CRESTS: Those for regiments of Mississippi and Florida National Guard. MOTTO: Virtuto Et Armis (By valor and arms). DESCRIPTION : The shield is white and red. the CE colors, and the partition line is indented (a saw-tooth line} to indicate the regi ment is .a combat unit; the fleur-de lis represents service in France. DISTINCTIVE INSIGNIA: Approved April 12, 1927. Shield and motto of coat of arms. STREAMERS AUTHORIZED: World War-Mouse-Argonne. The 106th Engineers had its beginning during the World War.when it was organized as the 114th Engineers, 39th Division, from Company "A," Engineers, on Sep tember 27, 1917, and new units then or subsequently or ganized. This organization participated in the Meuse Argonne operation in France and was mustered out May 21, 1919. The 106th Engineers, 31st Division, was organized from Company "A," Georgia Engineers, in 1917, and new units organized largely from the personnel of the First Florida National Guard. It served in France, but not in actual combat, then was mustered out on July 12, 1919. Reorganized as 114th Engineers in 1921-1922, it was re designated the 106th Engineers on January 29, 1924. The World War 106th Engineers organization was reconstituted and a consolidation effected on October 9, 1926. The Second Battalion ' of the 106th Engineers is in Florida, with the rest located in Mississippi. Headquarters of the Second Battalion, Company "D," Company "E," Company "F," and the Medical Detachment have home stations in Florida. Lieutenant Colonel James P. Coombs, . Apalachicola, Florida, is a member of the Regimental Staff. Priding itself on its "esprit de corps" and morale, this organization has never held a summary court. No charges have ever been preferred against either officer or enlisted man, and no one has been confined in the guard house or in quarters for seven years. The Regiment also prides itself upon having always carried out its field training program in its entirety. JAMES P. COOMBS Ueutenant Colonel, 106th Engineers, Executive Officer Entered Florida National Guard and served as private and sergeant in Company "L." First Florida Infantry, October 11, 1910. Pro• moted to First Lieutenant, Infantry, January 25, 1912. Promoted to Captain, Commanding Co.;,pany "L," April 19, 1912. Promoted to Major, January 8, 1915. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, July 15, 1916. Resigned upon disbandment of regiment, June 5, 1917. Appointed Major of Infantry, reorganized regiment, June 5, 1917. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, July 24, 1917. Inducted into Fed eral Service (World War) August 5, 1917, and transferred to 106th Engineers, 31st Division at Camp Wheeler, Ga. Attended Field Officers Service School at Lang res, France. Commanded I 06th Engineers al Brest, France. Honorably discharged September 15, 1919. Entered reorganized Florida National Guard as Captain, commanding Company "E." I0bth 0 Engineers, Febru . ary 3, 1927. Promoted to Major, May 11, 1928. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and Executive Officer of Regiment, March I, 1934. * The 106th Engineers has received nine commendations in the last four years, one from the Chief of Engineers, one from the Chief of the Map Reproduction Plant, and several each from the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, Corps Area Commander, and the Adjutants General of Florida and Mississippi. During the 1938 Third Army Maneuvers, the Regiment gave assistance wherever needed, maintaining roads and supplying water under great difficulties. The men's zeal and attention to duty and eagerness to work on through the rest periods were very commendable. Their objective is to do the job thoroughly and efficiently regardless of any obstacles. [ 17]

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LIONEL E. ROBINSON Major 1 Commanding HIRAM W. SPERRY Captain, Company 0 JESSE V. SMITH Second Lieutenant, Adjutant JAMES A. FORT, JR. Captain 1 Company F ALEXANDER H. MILLER Second Lieutenant, Company 0 (j~ ~f ~~ll~l BERNARD E. FULGHUM First Lieutenant, Company 0 ' JAMES M. HENRY Second Lieutenant. Company E HERBERT 0. MARSHALL First Lieutenant, Company E JOSEPH S. BURROWS Second Lieutenant 1 Company F * HARRY T. MOREHEAD Second Lieutenant, Company F

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COMPANY D SECOND BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH ENGINEERS PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA (I) Gas Mask Instruction. (2) Anti-Aircraft Defense. (3) Non Commissioned Officers. (4) Physical Training. (5) Con• struclion . (6) Supply Room . (7) Informal Gathering Around Fireplace, 5 , : ' \ . ~ J. I \; 6 71![•;• . 't' . . : .. 1 . ' ,. . . . ' . , --.,...------. ,,.. ~ ........ ., . -. .i:' . ',!•."• (' 1 1"!? . ,./ >~r \i ; ;f )! -~,

PAGE 55

SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RsT Row: S. \V. Blackburn, R. L. McCall, II. T. Sorenson, L E. Stevens, M. S. Kennedy, A. F. Titus, F. Vickers. SECOND Row: C. C. Hubbard, D. L. Emanual, Jr., J. llutchin &on, T. L. Wilkes, N. G. Goss, C. F. Brown, W. 0. Wilson, 0. L. Duncan, A. L. Lee. TmRn Row: P. \V. Gore, G. J. Gainer, II. B. Hayes, F. P. Peach, E. R. Gray, II. E. Maloy, J. A. Sorenson, W. II. Masker, G. M. Adams. g~ B~ 0 NE HUNDRED AND [ 20) COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ... First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . HIRAM W. SPERRY . . . . . . BERNARD E. FUl,GIIUM . . ' . ALEXANDER H. MILi.ER NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant Staff Sergeant SERGEANTS BLACKBURN, SAMUEL W. KENNEDY, MARTIN S. McCALL, RUSSELL L. VICKERS, FRED CORPORALS BRYANT, FRED C. CHAMPION, JAMES L. HAGAN, LoNNIE W. GROVER C. AUCHMOODY . . JIUBERT T. MALOY SORENSON, HENRY T. STEPHENS, LED E. TITUS, ARTHUR F. JENNINGS, WILLIAM H. JOYNER, CHARLES L. SCHIVER, COLON L. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ARD, WALTER L. BROWN, CHARLES F. CAMPBELL, LAYMON C. EMANUAL, DALLAS R. HOOTEN, JOHN M. HUBBARD, CARY C. J Aeons, LLOYD D. PRIVATES ADAMS, GEORGE M. ADAMS, J0IIN B. BROWN, CHARLES E. BRYANT, L. E. CLANTON, JAMES E. CLANTON, TOM Cox, CoY J. MoLOY, BASWELL D. MAYO, JAMES F. MOZLEY, HUGH A. PEACH, FRED P. SMITH, HORACE C. SORENSON, JOHN A. WEEKS, DANIEL R. Cox, SAM s., JR. DUNCAN, OLEN L. EMANUAL, D. L., JR. GAINER, Guy J. GORE, PHILIP W. GRAY, ELMER R. Goss, NEIL G. SIXTH ENGINEERS

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, /-t ~ . , . ~ ~-: 'i \ ~ ~ . , : ' t_,, ,r , . . . ? . PRIVATES GWALTNEY, RANDALL R. IIAYES, HENRY Il, HOLBROOK, FRANK M . , JR. HOLMAN, RUFUS HUTCHISON, JUSTUS JERNIGAN, MAXWELL JOHNSON, ROBERT L. JOYNER, RAYMOND D. LEE, AMMIE L. MASKER, WILLIAM H. MALOY; HOMER E. Moom, DAVID :jl. MOSELEY, JOE E. O'DONNELL, EDWIN J. PRESLEY, JOHN T, RIGELL, JOSEPH S. ROLLINS, JAMES A. SKIPPER, HARRY E. SULLIVAN, DANIEL M. THOMPSON, JAMES T. WILKES, TIMOTHY L. WILSON, WILLIAM 0. FACTUAL HISTORY Company "0," 106th Engineers, Panama City, Florida, was organized and Federally recognized on December 5, 1922, with Captain M. B. Hawkins as the first commanding officer. Following Captain Hawkins were Captains R. J. Bennett, A. S. Brake, and Lieutenant Coy C. Rushing, Captain Brake hav ing served the longest period, from 1928 to 1935. Lieutenant Rushing served until March 18, 1937, at which time the present commanding officer assumed command . . Lieutenants serving during the period 1922 to 1927 include J. R. Asbell, M. J. Daffin and H .0. PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA [ 21) , ,,_: 1 SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: G . C. Auchmoody, II . T. Maloy, M. Jernigan, J. L. Champion, W. H. Jenn.ings, C, L . Schiver, F. C . Bryant, C. L. Joyner, H. C. Smith. SECOND Row: F. M. Holbrook, Jr., J. T. Presley, T. Clanton, H. E. Skipper, J. Il. Adams, D. R. Emanual, W. L. Ard, L .E. Bryant, J. S. Rigel!. TmRo Row: E. J. O'Donnell, D . M. Sullivan, L. C. Campbell, J. F. Mayo, D. R. Weeks , J. T. Thompson, B. D, Moloy, J . M. Hooten, R. L. Johnson. Freeman, Jr. Captain Hiram W. Sperry, having com manded Company "E," 106th Engineers, at Apalachi cola, Florida, for the period November 20, 1932, to March 17, 1937, was transferred to command Com pany "D," 106th Engineers, Panama City. He is assisted by Lieutenant B. E. Fulghum and Lieutenant A. H. Miller. The organization has been maintained continuously since first organized at Panama City, has attended every field training camp, . and was called on State duty on October 27, 1934, to aid in quelling a riot at Marianna, Florida. A new armory was completed recently, with a flood lighted drill field adjacent to it. The organization maintains a high state of proficiency. l'J

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a SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: J. D. Glass, C. F. Jenkins, F. G. Lovett, D . P. Totman, R. F. Duggar, N. E. Marshall, J. R. Buzzett, J. 0. Mahoo. SECOND Row: \V. T. Hend.erson, A. M. Pace, J. F. Zingarelli, C. R. Russell, R. P. Coombs, R. G. Power, G . P. Patronis, II . n. Roberts, \V. M. Bass. Tl!IRll Row: R. L. Dunne, L. C. Buzzell, A. C. ~lass, G. M. Counts, Jr . , H. C. Brown, F. L. Wages, L .. A. Scott, A. L. Harrison, R. E. Littles. \_. . ~ geco.,,,,J B~ 0 NE HUNDRED AND ( 22 J COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Lieutenant HERBERT 0. MARSHALL Second Lie11/e11a11t . . . . . . . . . . JAMES M. HENRY NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant BENJAMIN F. BLOODWORTH Staff Sergeant FRANCIS G. LovETI ' SERGEANTS ---..,.,__BUZZETI, JULIAN R. MAHON 1 JAMES 0. GEORGE, COSTA D. MARSHALL, NEUMAN E. JENKINS, CHARLES F. RICHARDS, FRED W, SMITH, ROY V., JR. CORPORALS DUGGAR 1 RUDOLPH F. GLAss, JOHN D. KEITH, GEORGE A. Lovrrr, JOHN C. MARSHALi,, EARL R. TOTMAN, DONALD P. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BARBER, GEORGE E. BASS, WILLIAM M. COOMBS, ROGER P, CROTTS, O0RTHAL R. GUNN, OLLIE L. HENDERSON, WILLIAM T. LITTLES, JEFFERSON E. MOREN, LUKE V, PACE, CHARLES A. PACE, REGINALD C. PATRENOS, FRANCIS P. POWER, RICHARD G. HENDLES, GEORGE W. REEVES, LESLIE L. HOLLAND, KARL E. ROBERTS, HARLEY B. WAGES, FRED L, ADKISSON, ALBERT 1-1. BARBER, JOHN E. PRIVATES Br.OODWORTII 1 MINOR K. BOHANNON, WOODROW B. / . SIXTH ENGINEERS

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PRIVATES BROOKES, JOIIN F. LoVE'IT, CLARENCE J. JIROWN, HENRY C. LITTLES, ROBERT E. BuzzETT, LAWRENCE C. MONTGOMERY; LoYD 0. COUNTS, GEORGE M., JR. PACE, AUGUST M. CRUM, EARL M. PATRENOS, GEORGE DUGGAR, MELL PmLIPS, ALBERT E. DUNNE, ROBERT L. PROCTOR, CLARENCE W. GANDER, JAMES V. RUSSELL, CHARLES R. GLASS, ALBERT C. RUSSELL, WILLIAM C. GLASS, BEN R. ScoTI, JOHN P. GOODSON, JAMES P. ScoTT, LAWRENCE A. HAMMETT, JESSE R. STANSBERRY, ROBERT F. HARRISON, ALFRED L. WILSON, JOE, JR. ZINGARELLI, JOSEPH F. FACTUAL HISTORY The Franklin Guards, a company of Infantry, was or ganized in Apalachicola in 1884 by J. H. Coombs and Fred Butterfield. Exii;ting as an independent company at first because no vacancy existed in the number of companies provided for by the State, the unit was finally accepted as part of the Florida State Troops in 1890, when it was designated as Company "C," Third Battalion, there being no regimental unit at that time. In 1898, the Florida State Troops were formed into regiments, and this company was designated as Company "L," First Regiment of Infantry, and retained this desig nation until its merger in the World War in 1917 at Camp Wheeler, Georgia. APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA '2J J SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: J. V. Gander, R. C. Pace, J. C. Lovett, C. D. George, G. A. Keith, R. V. Smith, Jr., E . R. Marshall, B. F. Bloodworth, F. W. Richards. SECOND Row: C. W. Proctor, J. R. Hammett, R. F. Stansberry, B. R. Glass, C. A. Pace, J. C. Lovett, M. Duggar, J. P. Scott, A. H. Adkisson. THIRD Row: J. P. Goodson, M. K. Bloodworth, J. E. Barber, K. E. Holland, J.E. Littles, J. Wilson, Jr., L V. Moren, G. W. Hendles, F. P. Patronis, L 0. Montgomery. In 1898, this Company was ordered to Tampa, Florida, where troops were being mobilized for the Spanish-Amer ican War. A portion of this Company enlisted with companies that had been selected to serve in the war, and the remainder of the Company was ordered home. It was called out in October, 1907, to protect a prisoner during a street car strike. Again in 1912, it served dur ing a street car strike. On February 3, 1927, Company "E," 106th Engineers, was organized and Federally recognized. In 1929,. it saw active duty in the Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine. The Company has had the following commanders: Captains J. H. Coombs, Robert Knickmeyer, Patrick S. Hickey, A. S. Mohr, John P. Lovett, Doll\onick Brown (later Major, later Lieutenant Colonel), T. J. Moore, Joseph P. Hickey (later Major, later Colonel, First Florida Infantry), J. Farley Warren, R. R. Rice, J. P. Coombs (later Major, later Lieutenant Colonel), W. J. Glasgow, John Marshall, George A. Dodd, Hiram W. Sperry, and Lieutenant Herbert 0. Marshall, present commander.

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COMPAN Y E SECOND BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH ENGINEERS APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA (I) Dig In. (2) Company Street. (3) Recreation Room. (4) Anti-Aircraft Defense. (5) Non-Commissioned Officers. (6) Squad Wedge. (7) Supply Room.

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COMPANY F SECOND BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH ENGINEERS HAINES CITY, FLORIDA (I) Gas Mask Drill. {2) Demolition School. {3) Recreation Hall Interior. (4) Non-Commi s sioned Officers, (5) Sketching Class . {6) Second Battalion Command i ng Officer and Staff. (7) Barbed Wire Entanglement.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: J. C. Newton, E. L. Loop, II. T. Passmo~e, A. Chaffin, L. E. Davis, J, A. Gore. SECOND Row: E. E. Brinkworth, H. L. Prestwood, F. S. Baker, V. B. Br.idges, J. J. Kierce, T. L. Bowen, H. D. Youngblood. TmRo Row: A. M. Strickland, V. E, McAlum, W. J. Brown ing, J. ,v. Richard, C. W. Fortson, I. L. Padgett, J. T. Han cock. Sec
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I : ! I PRIVATES Cor.r.INSWORTH, WALTER L. CROMER, RAYE. CROMER, ROBERT L. DEATON, CHARLES H. DOUGLAS, LENORE D. FORTSON, CHARLES W. GILL, ERNEST S, GILL, HOMER E. HANCOCK, JAMES T. HENDRIX, ALVIN M . . KEEN, JAMES W. KIERCE, JAMES J. KIMBALL, KENNETH B. Loor, RonERT E. McALUM, VIVIEN MASSEY, MORRIS L. NonLE, KERMIT A. O'DONNELL, JAMES PADGETT, ISHMAEL L. PETTUS, JOHN F. SASSER, LEWIS C. SAYRE, MORRIS E. SMITH, OLIVER H. YOUNGBLOOD, HOLLIS D. YoEMANs, CHARLES T. GRINER, HILTON FACTUAL HISTORY Company "F," Second Battalion, 106th Engi neers, was organi;ed in Haines City, Florida, by W. H. Morton, who was appointed Captain when the organization received Federal recogni tion on April 27, 1927. Lionel E. Robinson was appointed Captain on February 29, 1928, and served until promoted to HAINES CITY, FLORIDA [ 27] SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: T. M. Jowers, B. E. \Vaters, H. N. Jaeger, C. II. Heath, A. K. Chestnut, S. Owens, P. C. Koerner, \V. G. Smith, J. N. Cannon. SECOND Row: W. G. Cannon, D. C. Collinsworth, J. A. Noble, E. H. Bruce, W. L. Collinsworth, H. E. Gill, 0. H. Smith, J. L. Bridges, M. L. Massey. TmRD Row: A. M. Hendrix, W. D. Chumney, K. A. Noble, C. II. Deaton, M. E. Sayre, R. E. Cromer, L. D. Douglas, J. O'Donell, P. D. Walker, 0. J. Bosse. Battalion Commander on June 12, 1935. Under his guidance, the organization reached a high state of efficiency, being awarded the Regimental Cup for attaining highest standards for three successive years. The unit has served its community on several occasions and is an important factor in all civic development. It has an excellent drill field, which has been beautified and is well lighted. A new armory was completed in 1932 and a mod ern recreation building was erected in 1935. The latter has space for seven motor vehicles. E

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EMMETT E. MARTIN Captain, Commanding Medical D1tachm1nl HAINES CI TY, FLORIDA 0 NE HUNDRED AND [ 28 J SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH LEFI' TO RIGHT: Pvt. 0. B. Douglas, Pvt, R. A. Roclrell, Pvt. First Class N. N . . Morehead, Pvt. J. E. Jowers, Pvt. J. \V. Braxton, Pvt. W. 0. Batchelor, Pvt. First Class A. C. Douglass. LETT, Tor: Battalion Aid Station. LETT, BoTl'OM: Applying Head Bandage. COMMISSIONED OFFICER Captain .. . . . . . . EMMETTE. MARTIN PRIVATES FIRST CLASS DOUGLAS; AMON C. BRAXTON 1 JESS BATCHELOR, WILLIS DOUGLASS, OREN PRIVATES MOREHEAD, NEAi , JOWERS, JEFF MCCURRY, ANDREW ROCIIEI.L, ROBERT FACTUAL HISTORY The Medical Department Detachment, Second Bat talion, 106th Engineers, was organized m Haines City, Florida, on June 24, 1930, by Dr. J. R. Sample, who was later appointed Captain. Captain Sample developed a first class organization and served faithfully until May 21, 1938, at which time Cap tain Emmett Edward Martin was given command of the unit. Under the command of Captain Martin, the personnel and equipment have been rapidly improved and the unit is today able to properly fill its mission in the Ba,ttalion's program of National Defense. SIXTH ENGINEERS

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J I ,, * * Commanding Fifty-sixth Field Artillery Brigade Organized Company H, Second Florida Infantry (National Guard) and appointed Captain in command. September 14, 1. Mustered into Federal service with organization, June 20, 1916, and served for 90 days at State Camp. Served in Laredo District, Mexican Border, with inten• slve outpost and patrol duties extending from Laredo to San Ygnacio on the Rio Grande River during the winter of l916-l'll7. Relieved from t=ederal service and assumed National Guard status, March 17, 1917. inducted into Federal service August 5, 1917, with Second Florida Infantry, (redesignated 124th Infantry), and served with 31st Division at Camp Wheeler, Georgia, until September 18, 1918 , During this period, attended Infantry School of Arms, Fort Sill, O\lahoma, graduated as a bayonet instructor and appointed Divlsional Boyonet ln5tructor upon return to 31st Division. The organization and operation of this important task was an outstanding example of ability and efficiency. Served in France with A. E . F. until January 27 , 1919 . Honorably di,charged from Federal service, February 4 1 1919, and return•d to civ,I status . Organiied First Battalion, 116th Field Artillery, at Tampa, Florida , and appointed Major of Field Artillery, November 14, 1921. Promoted to Lteutenant Colonel, September 22, 1922. Compl•ted the or9aniiation of the regiment and C 29 J promoted to Colonel, January 15, 1924 . (Federal recognition to date from January 20, 1924.) Saw active State military duty as follows: 1917, commanded provisional battalion of Infantry in defending county jail at Tampa, Florida, during setious riot and attack on jail; commanded Co"!pany H 1 S~cond Florida Infantry, in hazardous riot duty at Bradenton, Flortda. Service commended. 1926, in command .of the I 16th Field Artillery in the Moore Haven sector of Lake Okeechobee exceptional ability was displayed by this officer in the patrol guard and relief activities incident to the hurricane and flood disa;ter. As a reward for outstanding and meritorious work in this disaster, General Lowry was awarded the Florida Cross by the Governor of Florida and his per formance was cited _ in General Of'ders . 1927, commanded all armed forces at p . ost of Tampa in defense of the Hillsborough County jail against a determined attack of 1,000 armed and excited men . With cool and outstanding Judgment and strategy, this n,ob was repulsed with a minimum of casualties. Commended by Governor. Ins commanded the 116th Field Artillery on rescue and relief duty on the• North and West sectors of the Lake Okeac:hobee flood disaster. Commended by fhe Governor .

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* * ROBERT H. GIVENS, JR. Captain, Adjutant PERRY M . TEEPLE First Lieut., Intelligence Officer Fl FTY-SIXTH FIELD ARTILLERY Sla/J BRIGADE The 56th Field Artillery Brigade was established as a unit in September, 1917, when the 116th, 117th and 118th Field Artillery Regiments were mobilized as part of the 31st Division. The Brigade began intensi v e training at Camp Wheeler, Georgia. As a unit of the 31st Division, the Brigade was in France in the latter part of September, 1918. In France, the Division was broken up to be used as replacements . The Brigade did not act as a unit. Its personnel as signed to various organizations of the A . E . F. served well, and in many cases, heroically, through the latter part of the war. . The 56th Field Artillery Brigade was reorganized as a unit during 1924-1925, with the 116th and 117th Field Artillery Regiments, under the command of Brigadier General Allison Owen . The 114th Field Artillery was organized during 1933. Brigadier General Owen retired during 1934 and Colonel Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., 116th Field Artillery, was promoted to the grade of Brigadier General and assigned to com mand the Brigade. Stations of the regiments composing the Brigade are as follows: 114th Field Artillery, Mississippi; 116th Field Artillery, Florida, and 117th Field Artillery, Alabama. OFFICERS, HEADQUARTERS .BATTERY * CHESTER R . YATES Captain [3()1 RICHARD D . REDDICK Second Lieutena n t *

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COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . . . . . . . CHESTER R. y ATES Second Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . RICHARD D. REDDICK NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Master Sergeant First Sergeant Staff Sergeant Staff Sergeant SERGEANTS Hou.AND STEBBINS RAYMOND A. GERRARD PAULE . ALLYN . . , EULIE V. RICE CLARK, ELMER C. ' DEMOREST, ALBERT A. SADLER, WOODSON A. BRIDGES, JAMES 0. Es,, ALBIN J. CORPORALS PARNELLE, MILTON H. REYNOLDS, JOHNNIE 0. WELLS, GARVICE G. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS DERKMAN, OREN T. LANDR E SS, MERLE A. HARDEN, ISAAC W. MATHIS, JOJIN E. WOODARD, WILLIAM F. ALLYN, CHARLES L. BATES, ARTHUR A. GREENAMYRE, G. , w. HILL, HARVEY L . MOORE, DAVID E. POPE, ALVA L. ROGERS, MELVIN L. PRIVATES ROGERS, RALPH T. RYALL, KEITH M. ROBINSON, LoNNIE B. ROBINSON, SAMUEL P. WILD, HENRY W. W1Lt . IAMS, CLIFTON D. WILLIS, MILTON L. FACTUAL HISTORY Headquarters Battery, 56th Field Artillery Brigade, was organized and Federally recognized January 25, 1927, with Captain Mark W. Lance, Second Lieutenant Good < Continutd on p a gt 1 H) FIFTY-SIXTH FIELD .. ,. : ; .. ',jt ~ . . ~\ ~-"' ' SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: R. A. Gerrard, A. A. D e more s t, R. T. Roger s, M. L. Roger s , M. L. Willis, C. D. Williams, L. B. Robinson, G . W. Greenamyre, H. L. Hill. SECOND Row: I. \V. Harden, W. F. Woodard, M. A . Lan dress, 0 . T. Derkman, E. V. Rice, J. 0. Reynolds, \V. A. Sadl e r, C. L . Allyn , S . P. Robinson, P. E. Allyn . THIRD Row: E. C. Clark, G. G . Well s , J. 0. Bridges, H. \V. Wild, A. J. Ebi, H. Stebbins, A. A. Bate s , K. M. Ryall, J. E. Mathis, D. E. Moore, A. L. Pope. AVON PARK, FLORIDA AR TILLE . RY BRIGADE [ 31 J

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,,1) ? : . , ~ :sJ' Jl :-: :_• -~ ~i;i~~ 56TH FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE AVON PARK, FLORIDA I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2. Radio Section . 3. Motor Section. 4. Message Center. 5. Mess Detail. 6. Switchboard.

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ONE HUNDRED "The 116th Field Artillery has had a singular history in the period covered since the date of its organization in Florida. Perhaps no regiment of the National Guard within the United States has had such dramatic calls upon its services. Woven into the pattern of everyday life, the work of the peace time soldier calls forth little notice from the general public. However, when disaster threatens t~e structure of the commonwealth, either man made, or by the hand of Providence, the National Guard steps promptly into the breach, and, with a steady hand firmly applied, brings aid and comfort to the stricken and punishment to the law breaker." (From the official regi mental history, compiled by Lieutenant Colonel George E. Grace, FNG.) This Regiment was originally organized at Camp Wheeler, Georgia, during the World War as part of the 31st (Dixie Division), was transported overseas, but saw no combat action and was mustered from Federal service on January 16, 1919. On December 5, 1921, Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., of Tampa, Florida, upon commisison issued by the Adjutant General, State of Florida, presented for Federal recognition three batteries to constitute units of a regiment to be known as the 116th Field Artillery. Thus, on December 5, 1921; there firing batteries, "A," "B" and "C," formed the basis of the First Battalion, 116th Field Artillery, Major Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., command ing. The battalion was inspected and mustered into serv ice by then Lieutenant Colonel Vivian Collins, present Adjutant General of Florida. Completion of the First Battalion was effected February 15, 1922, with the establishment of Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, First Battalion. In 1922, the City of Tampa and Hillsborough County furnished land and funds for the construction of stables, gunsheds and armory buildings. An expansive movement was made for the establish ment of a full regiment by the founding of the Second Battalion. Firing batteries "D," "E" and "F" were lo cated at Lakeland, Plant City and Arcadia, with Head quarters Battery and Combat Train, Second Battalion, AND SIXTEENTH [ H l in Bartow. The Second Battalion participated in sum mer encampment in 1923, and on August 23, 1923, was Federally recognized as a unit with Major Fred Hampton commanding. The regiment , received official recognition , ) at Tampa on January 20, 1924. The Service Battery with band section was placed at Winter Haven and later at Arcadia. Battery "F" was trans erred to Winter Haven. The regiment was the first to abandon the band section in line with the National Guard Bureau's wishes. The Medical Detachment was first organized in Tampa, October 6, 1922. Regimental Headquarters Battery was placed in Ft. Myers but in 1937 was moved to St. Peters burg. On the date of Federal recognition, Major Lowry was promoted to Colonel and regimental commander. Cap tain Hesterly became regimental executive officer and a Lieutenant Colonel. Effective July 16, 1933, a radical change in the trans port equipment of the theretofore horsedrawn regiment was made. The horses, picturesque part of the transport, were trans erred, and one and one-half ton trucks issued in their places. Since that time, the 116th Field Artillery has been a completely motor-transported unit. On October 4, 1934, the Regiment was signally honored by the promotion of Colonel Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., to Brigadier General and commanding general, 56th Field Artillery Brigade, of which the 116th Field Artillery is a part. Lieutenant Colonel Homer W. Hesterly was ad vanced to Colonel in command of the regiment on Octo ber 23, 1934. Major Byron E. Bushnell was transferred from C. 0., Second Battalion, to regimental executive, as a Lieutenant Colonel. The Regiment has held annual field training exercises at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, and Camp Jackson, South Carolina. At. Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, in 1937, through the suggestion of Colonel A. L. P. Sands, the Field Ar tillery Board selected the regiment to test by firing the theretofore untried fire control data sheets calculated for the reservation area. During the Third Army Maneuvers held in DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi, in August, 1938, the regiment participated as• a unit of the 56th (Continutd on pag, 35)

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* * Commanding One Hundred and Sixteenth Field Artillery Was Cadet student at Georgia Tech, 1906-1910. Enli5ted in Company G, Second Florida Infantry, June I, 1916. Resigned, August lb, 1916. Appointed First Lieutenant, Engineers Reserve, May 13, 1917. Inducted into Federal service (World War), September 2, 1917. Served with Company C, . Sixth U. S. Engineers overseas until July 4, 1918. Promoted to Captain, attended service schools, August 28, 1918. Honorably discharged, July 21, 1919. Entered reorgani1ed Florida National Guard as Captain, commanding Battery B, I 16th Field Artillery, at Tampa, Florida, on December 5, 1921. Promoted to 0 Major, Oct~ber I, 1922. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, February 5, 1924. Promoted to Colonel, commanding I 16th Field Artillery, October 23, 1934. Member of State Armory Board. Graduate of Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, 1938. Rendered valuable service in civil disorders a~d hurricane disasters. I '

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(Continiud from p
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a SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1 R ST Row : J. E . Boggs, H. F . Pheenix , H. D. Embree, F. J . Bulman, G. J . Gibs o n, A. H. Garver, A. J. Rollman. SECOND Row: F. C . Dorman, H. E. Colman, G . S. Her s hmer, K . V. Rett s utt, D. G . Williams, A. M. Archib a ld, W. Hogau, B . A. Dahler. T HI RD R o w : J. T. R a nkin, J. A. Dietrich, E . A. Whittier, L. T. D k ks, W . 0. Pounds, C. E . Paulsen, H. J. Dietrich, F. G. Brink e r, H. M . Clayton . CYRIL S. LLOYD Captain GEORGE H. CRILL Second Lieutenant COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . CYRIL S. LLOYD Second Lieutmant . . . . . . . . . . GEORGE H. CRILL NON COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Master Sergeant . . . . . . . . . . . ROBERT R. HICKS First S e rgeant . . . . . . . . . . . FRANCIS L. CLAUSS Staff Sergeant . PHIi.iP H. CONNER Staff Ser9ea11t . NORBERT I.. FULLER Staff Sergeaflt . . . . L E SLIE W. Mon SERGEANTS ARCHIBALD, ALEX M. HERSHMER, GENE S. BREEDI N G, AVERY I.. R E TI'STATI', KARL V. WILLIAMS, DONALD G. CORPORALS BOGART, WALTER J . BREAKER, W1LL1AM B. HILL, HENRY E. L A NG , DONALD R. . MEEK, NOAL N. PHIFFER, ROBERT A. RU S IIING, Wll . BUR 0. VA N DERVORT, JOHN R. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BOGGS, JACK E . GARVER, ALVIN H. BRITI'IAN, FRANK A. HERMAN, MAYNARD DAHLER, BERNARD A. PHEENIX, HARRISON F. DICKS, LESLIE T. POWER, GEORGE B., JR. EMBREE, HOWARD D. TUBBS , WARREN G, WHJTI'IER, Ev AN A. PRIVATES AI.LEN, LEE A. BRINKER, FRANKLIN G. BULMAN, FREDERICK J. CAIN, JULIUS C. CHENEY, ARTHUR A. C1 . A YTON, HAROLD M. ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY [ 361

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.. . , ; -~:~ ~ .. , f. ;,.... : PRIVATES COLMAN, HUBERT E, JORDA, LOUIS DIETRICH, }ACK B. MENSER, THORN W. DIETRICH, JAMES A. PAULSEN, CARL E. DIETRICH, HARRY J. PEDEN, ROBERT M, DODGE, HAROLD R. POUNDS, WILBUR DORMAN, FRANK C, POWER, ALBERT M . GIBSON, GORDON, JR. ROLLMAN, ALLEN ]. GLOVER, GEORGE R. RANKIN, ] ACK T. GRIFFITH, JOHN R. SPENCER, MYRON C. HOGAN, WALTER STAGG, }OHN E. WALKER, WILLIAM FACTUAL HISTORY First organized on April 15, 1936, as the 118th Am bulance Company, 106th Medical Regiment, this unit was mustered into the service at the Florida Military Academy, Sr. Petersburg, Florida, by Brigadier General Vivian Col lins, the Adjutant General, and Colonel A. L. P. Sands, Field Artillery Instructor of the 116th Field Artillery. Its first tour of duty was at Camp Clifford J. R. Foster, Jacksonville, Florida, from July 23 to August 8, 1936. On January 1, 1937, it was redesignated Company "F," 106th Medical Regiment, and on January 13, 1937, was converted to Headquarters Battery, 116th Field Artillery. On July 3, 1937, the unit moved from its home station to Columbia, South Carolina, by motor to its first tour of ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA. C J7 I SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: J. R. Griffith, M. Herman, L. A. Allen, R. E. Claeson, H. R. Dodg e , J . B . Dietrich, W. 0 . Rushing. SECOND Row: T. W. Menser, H. E. Hill, D. R . Lang, A. L. Breeding , P. H. Conner, F. L. Clauss, L. ,v. Mott, R. A. Pfeif fer, N. N. Meek . THIRD Row: G. R. Power, Jr . , _A. M. Power, W. G. Tubbs, W. J. Bogart, R. R. Hicks, N. L. Fuller, G. R. Glover , W. B. Breaker, M. C. Spencer. duty as a Field Artillery unit. A very successful camp was enjoyed by the personnel in this new branch of serv ice. During this time, the Battery participated in a three day field maneuver at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. In 1938, the unit took part in the Third Army Maneuvers, DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi. In October, 1938, First Lieutenant Edward J. Heney, Executive Officer since the Battery was organized, trans ferred to the inactive list due to business reasons. He was succeeded by Second Lieutenant George H. Crill, who was transferred from Battery "C," 116th Field Artillery. Captain N. W. Gable, who had comm it nded the organi zation since its formation, was transferred to the Medical Department and promoted to Major . Captain C. S. Lloyd was transferred from Headquarters, Second Bat talion, 116th Field Artillery, to fill this vacancy. Quartered in the American Legion Armory, St. Peters burg, the unit hopes to move into its new _ armory now under construction at an 1;arly date. a

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HEADQUARTERS BATTERY I I 6 TH FI ELD ARTILLERY ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA * (I} Motor Section. (2) Radio Section . I l) Scout Section , ( 4) Headquarters Section. (5) Instrument Section. {b) Message Center. {7} Non-Commissioned Officers.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row : F . K. Core, L. G. Gamage, H. Rauler so n, A . J . Turner, J. I.. Hollingsw o rth, Jr., V. B. Bishop, W. Kerce, P. Craft, B . Carlton, H . Cravey. SECOND Row: J. Sullivan, B. Sullivan , R. Summerall, J. C. Barrs, G. T. Fountain, J. Rogers, H. Hollingsworth, V. Cochran, B . Stribling, J. T. Hall, W. H . Blackmon , P. J . Sloan. THIRD Row: C. I. Chancey, J. Bretton, G. Smith, W. L. Myers, S . Stribling, J. B. Belflower, P. Cochran, R . L. Cleve land, D. Bragdon, W. H. Saxon, R. Bradley, F. H. Carroll. STANHOPE C. SMITH Captain THOMAS R. BROWN First Lieutenant SERVICE BATTERY ARC AD A1 FLORIDA COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Cap1ai11 . . . . STANHOPE C. SMITH First Lieutenant . . THOMAS R. BROWN S ec ond Lieutenant . MAURICE B, CARLTON Second Lieutenant . . . JAMES A. Sco nNON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Master Sergeant Master Sergeant First Sergeant . Staff Sergeant . SERGEANTS . . . FRED K. CORE WILLIAM H. HA N COCK LELAND G. GAMMAGE . BERNARD RAULERSON BISHOP, VIRGIL B. HOLLINGSWORTH, JESSE L., JR. TURNER, ALBERT J. CORPORALS CARLTON, BRUCE \V . CRAVEY, HARRY C . CRATT, J. A . , JR. KERCE, WOODROW PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BR E TTON, ERVIN J. MYERS, WILLIAM L. Roc;ERS, JAMES V. PRIVATES llARRS, JOHN C. BRADLEY, ROBERT F. llRAGDON, DAVID R. BRA@ON , J. G. BEi .F LOWER, JESSE H. 111.ACKMON, WILLIAM K . CARROLL, FRANK H. CnANCP.Y, CEDF.RIC I. Cl.EVELAND, RODERT L. COCHRAN, PERCY D. COCHRAN, VERNON J. SAXON, WILLIAM H. STRIBI.ING, SAMUEL L SUMMERALL, R. L., JR. FOUNTAIN, GEORGE T. IIALL, JAMES T. HARRELL, PAULL. HOLLINGSWORTH, HAROLD SLOAN, PAUL L. SMITH, GLEN D. STRIBLING, WILLIAM J. SULLIVAN, BIRK C. SULLIVAN, BUDDY W. Sul.l.lVAN, JOHNNIE B. WHITTLE, BUFORD F., JR. FACTUAL HISTORY Battery "F," 116th Field Artillery, was organized September 3, 1923, and Federal recognition was ex(Conri,uud on pagt Jj-f) ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY l

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MAURICE B. CARLTON Second Lieutenant JAMES A. SCOTT Second lieutenant SERVICE BATTERY I I 6 TH FIELD ARTILLERY ARCADIA, FLORIDA * ( 1 j Personnel Section . I 2 l Non-Commissioned Officers. (3 l Motor Instruction. (41 Map Section. (5) Drivers and Truck,. ( b) Anti-Aircraft.

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~ 'f X: i .. : J ; ik~ !~ ~ : ~~ c : ~ _ ~ , ~ ;~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ :.• _ . --~ ~, ~--~ GEORGE N. SAGIN Major, Commanding (!J~ fl~~l I 16TH FIELD ARTILLERY MARCUS N. OWEN First Lieutenant, P. & T. O. WILLIAM A. HEMPHILL Second Lieutenant. Headquarters Battery and Combat Train EDMOND J. SWANN First Lieutenant, Headquarters Battery and Combat Train OSCAR D. HOWELL, JR. Second lieutenant, Battery A FRANK C. PAUL Captain, Adjutant GEORGE E. BAVA Captain, Battery B ROBERT F. NUNEZ, JR. First lieutenant, Battery A MARSDEN G , KELLY Second lieutenant, Battery A HAROLD M. CLARVOE Captain, Headquarten Battery and Combat Train RAY V. S. RUDD Captain 1 Battery C HARRY P. BAVA First Lieutenant, Battery B THOMAS P. KELLY, JR. Second Lieutenant, Battery B ,;,, . / ::-...... ~ ; . "' . . . . . . , . , . .. _~;= ,-, RALPH J. KING Captain, Battery A EARL E . WHITEHEAD Fint Lieutenant, L. 0. EDMUND J. McMULLEN First Lf411ufenant, Battery C MARTIN CARABALLO, JR . Second Lieutenant, Battery C

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: C. H. Brown, O. L Maro, J. W. Thaxton, Jr., 0. G. Dodson, 0. C. Whitehea~_dl. \V. Tice. SF.COND Row : E. E. Leavine, J. A. Gibson, H. D. "'hidden, J. W. Mulholland, G. W. Abrames, J. F. Greene, J. Smith. T111RD Row: G. G. Frissell, J. E. Hackney, I. L. Scott, \V. Byrd , P. San Martin, \V. L. Holden, E. F. Greene, E. L. Pierce. FIRST BATTALION COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ........ . First Liwtenant . . . . . Second Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . HAROLD M. CLARVOE EDMOND J. SWANN . . . Wn . l.lAM A. HEMPHILL NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant Staff Sergeant Stt1/f Sergeant BENNETT, N. J. DODSON, o. G. GUNTER, E. BYRD, WILLIE BROWN, CHARLIE COWART, L. J. SERGEANTS CORPORALS E. E. l.EAVINE J. GIBSON . JOSP.PII SMITH PIERCE, E. SIIAW, B. SCOTT, I. FRISSELL, D. E. FRISSELL, G. G. GREENE, E. F. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ALEXANDER, C. H. BYRD, E. HALL, 0. I. HARPER, W. R. ABRAMES, G. W. ANNESS, A. C. BROWN , K. D., JR. PRIVATES HOLDEN, W. L. OLSEN, B. P. STONE, F. B. TICE, B. W. DAVIDSON, T. E. FILOGAMO, L. M. COi.DEN, L. L. ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

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GREENn, J. JIACKNEY, J. E. HACKNEY, W. L. HOI.WWAY, C. KF.ATIILEY, M. N. MAYO, 0. L . MAYO, R. E. MILLS, J. MULHOLLAND, J, W. PRIVATES RIGGIO, J. SAN MARTIN, P. SMITH, J. TERRY, M. THAXTON, J. W., JR, WALKER, E. H. WHIDDEN, H . D. WHITF.IIEAD, o. C. \Vn.soN, F. L., JR. FACTUAL HISTORY Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, First Battalion, 116th Field Artillery, was accepted by the Federal Government under command of Cap tain Jack Hedrick on February 15, 1922. Cap tain Henry H. Cole was appointed commander of the organization upon resignation of Captain Hedrick on December 12, 1922, and the comTAM PA, FLORIDA ( 4J) SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RsT Row: E. C . Gunter, D. E. Frissell, 0 . I. Hall, C. 11. Alexander, W. R. Harper, L. L. Golden, R. T. Shaw . SECOND Row: E. H. Walker, N. J. Bennett, J . R. Mills, L. M. Filogamo, A. C. Anness, F. L. Wilson, Jr., W. L. Hackney. THIRD Row : M. Terry , E. Byrd, R. E. Mayo, C. F. Holloway, L. J . Cowart, T. E. Davidson, K. 0. Bro,~n, Jr .• M. N. Keathley. mand then passed to First Lieutenant Henry Woodward who was promoted to Captain De cember 22, 1924. Captain Woodward was re lieved on April 1, 19 3 6, by First Lieutenant Har old M. Clarvoe, who was promoted to Captain July 2, 1936. This organization has been called upon a number of times to assist local civil authorities. The most notable ones being the riot at the county jail in Tampa May 31-June 2, 1927, and Sep tember 2-3, 1935, which was election day in Tampa and mob spirit was rampant. l'J

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==== I. Wire Laying Detail . 2. Surveying Section . 3. Non-Commissioned Officers. FIRST BATTALION TAMPA, FLORIDA Headquarters Battery and Combat Train , First Battalion, I 16th Field Artillery, in the Third Army Maneuvers. ,-, ... . " !f "" ' . . r ,, ,_ . , , -.,,._.~ _,, .L .. , ------, _. _ .. ~~ 7::: . ~ : . :.~ , , ., -~ . . ~ , '

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FIRST BATTALION TAMPA, FLORIDA I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2. Instrument Section. 3. Swearing in a Recruit. 4. Gun in Action. 5. Trucks. 6. Wire Section.

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, / ~ ' '; ,. ;,... ;_:-.. . ~ , ' ~ ,. . . . , : _ :; ~ . ,:_,. : , . . ; ( ~ -1 . / , ', , SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: 0. F. L a mbers o n, A. P. Barfield, A. R. Boykin, J. L. Slattery, J. J. Hill, F. Palmer, D. W. Embry, ,v. Shaw . SECOND Row: R. J. Gatliff , W. M. French, 0. L. Bower, W. L. Waller, J. H. Bunkley , T. A. Kersey, L. L. Priest, J. R. Cof fey, W. C. Mills, M. D. Kirb y , L. P. Crandon. T111Rn Row: C. W. McClintock, E . W. Sampson, R. M. Brant le y , R. L. Tucker, C . A. Joyner, C. R. Flynt, A. II. Ekker, J. A. C a mpbell, R. J. Barnw e ll, M. H. Rob a rts, P . C . Ainsworth. o/.Vtdi B~ COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ... First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . RAI.PH J. KING ROBERT F. NUNEZ, }R. OSCAR D. 1-IOWEl.1., JR. MARSDEN G. KELLY NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant JACK J . HILi , SERGEANTS BARFIELD, ALVA P. LAMBERSON, OWEN F. BOYKIN, AUDREY B. PALMER, FRANKE. EMBRY, DURWARD W. SHAW, WILLIAM B. SLATTERY, JOSEPH L. CORPORALS DONNELLY, }AMES W. FENDER, BURTON C. GLASS, GEORGE L. GROUT, WILLIARD E. KANEY, THOMAS E. STUMP, GEORGE L. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ADAMS, CLARENCE T. JOYNER, CHARLES A. AINSWORTH, PHILLIP C . MILLER, JOHN J. AVRIE1T , ROBERT J. ROBARTS, MERRILL H. BARNWELi . , RANDALL }. SAMPSON, EuTH E MIUS W. BUNKLEY, JAMES H. TUCKER, RonERT L. C. w Al.I.ER, WII . UAM L. PRIVATES BARKER, LARRY N. BowER, ORIS BRANTLEY, ROBERT M. BURNETT, ROBERT L. CAMPBELL, . JULIUS A. COFFEY, } AM E S R. COMPTON, HARMON W. COOPER, ROl,UNS COUNE, FRANCIS L. CRANDON, LEO P. CROMARTIE, DAVID J. CROSBY, RAY DIEZ, RAT.PH EK K ER, ALFRED II. ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

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PRIVATES Fr., N-r, C11i\Rr.1cs R. N1 c uo1.s, GuF. F . l'Rl-:NCIJ, ,v i\1 . 1.i\CE M. NOIITIIIJI', EllWi\Rll 11.. (;/\NT, Ei\RL JI. NoRTIIUP, Gi\RlllNF.R L. GATI.IFF, RENE J. NAVA, LOUIS A. GouI.DING, FRANK R. PARRA, Roy P. HATCHETT, PAUL E. PRIEST, L! , OYD L KERSEY, CALVIN H. PURDOM, LEMUEL A. KERSEY, THEODORE A . REED . ROBERT E. KIRBY, MURR D. SEARJEANT, H. M . , JR. LoVELL, LONNIE S . VAN SICKEL, MARCUS E. MCCLINTOCK, CHAS. W. WEBER, WALTER L. MILLS, WILBUR C. WILLIAMS, WINTON H. WHITE, HOWARD C. FACTUAL HISTORY Battery "A," 116th Field Artillery, was organized De cember 5, 1921, under the command of the late Captain Claiborne Phipps, who was made a Major on February 5, 1924, and was succeeded by Captain Loper Lowry as Battery Commander. Captain Davis Walker succeeded Captain Lowry, who resigned, on June 18, 1925. On November 28, 1925, Captain Laird succeeded Cap tain Walker. The Battery saw its first active service from May 30 to June 2, 1927, when it assisted Hillsbor ough County authorities to protect a prisoner held by the sheriff. Brushes betwee:i the mob and troops on May TAM PA, FLORIDA .~ ~ if SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIR ST Row: \V. E. Crout, C. J,. Glass, Jr., .J. \\'. D1111111lly , c;, L. Stump, B. Fcndl'r , T . E. Kane y, II . \\'. Co111pto11, I.. A. Nava, Jr., G. L. Northup. SECOND Row: \V. L. \Veber, E. A. N orth up, Jr., R. Di ez, R. J . Avriett, R. Cooper, Jr . , P. E. Hatchett, M . E. VanSickle, L. A. Purdom, R. E. Reed, L . S . Lovell , C. T. Adams. THIRD Row: R. Crosby, J. J. Miller, F. L. Coune, E. IL Gant, R. L. Burnett, W. H. Williams, L. N. Bark e r, II. M. Scarj ca nt, F. R. Goulding, G. F. Nichols. [i7] 31 resulted in six deaths and 19 wounded. No Battery member was killed or severely hurt. Captain Laird was tr~nsferred to the National Guard Reserve on August 22, 1928, and Captain J. W. McNeer was in command until June 25, 1931, at which time he resigned and was succeeded by Captain Daniel Van Dus e n. Under Captain Van Dusen, the Battery saw active service on July 5 and 6 , 1933 , when 20 men were sent to Road Prison Camp No. 33 to assist in quelling a riot . Captain Ralph J. King, present commander, took over the Battery on December 8, 1934, to fill the vacancy caused by Captain Van Dusen's transfer to the National Guard Reserve. The last active duty of the Battery, with the exception of the annual two weeks summer encamp ment, occurred September 2-4, 1935, when it assisted county officials in maintaining order during a city election.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: E. J. Brend, S. C. Wright, W. C. Hubbard, P. M. Grahn, Jr . , C . G. Brockington, J. B. Gremer, F. H. Collins, E. O'Mara, A. B. Cherry. S.:co?-.o Row: F. G. McAlister, E. L. Barber, E. J. Bell, B. F. Shaw, G. N. McClintock, L. L. Hardin, 0. J. Giles, H. •A. Per rette, T. E. Taaffe, E. B. Lussier. T111RD Row: R. A. Tullis, L. A. Shinlever, B. F. Braxton, J. D. Cline, E. L. Gardner, G. L. Castor, C. L. Tullis, C. H. Stew art , Jr . , C. E. Loggins, F. H. Plageman, J. J. Dangelo. t . ' . ~ -:-, . ,; COMMISSIONED OFFIC~RS Captain . . . . . . . . . . . GEORGE E. BAYA First Lieutenant . . . . . HARRY P. BAYA Second Lieutenant . . . W11.LIAM F. HUNTER, JR. Second Lieutenant . . . . . . . . THOMAS P. KEI.T.Y, JR. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant SERGEANTS BIGGS, EARL A. BROCKINTON, CECIL G. COLLINS, FRED JI. GREMER, JOHN B. CORPORALS PETER M. GRAHN, JR. JANDREAU, RAYMOND J. MILIAN, ALWIN S. MOORE, AUBREY A. MORGAN, MARION C. CLINE, JAMES D. MCALISTER, FOREST G. CORDELL, B. C., JR. MILLS, EDGAR L. HOPE, WILLIAM II. SHEPPARD, HARLO J., JR. T AAFFI!, THOMAS E. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BOSTICK, CHARLES E. BRAXTON, BEN F. BREND, ELMORE J. BRITT, JIMMY C. GILES, OCKLY J. GRANTHAM, VERNON C. GUTKIN, MAX L. HARDIN, LEONARD L. HARDER, ELDERT L. BELL, EARL J. BENNETT, ELWOOD E. BUNCII, ROBERT E. CAMALO, AI.BERT J. PRIVATES MANER, JOSEPH M. MATHENEY, HOWARD R. McGAHEE, MARTIN F. M1t.I.ER, EMMETT JI. PLAGEMAN, FRED H. SABA, CHARLES N. SmNLEVER, LEE A. STARLING, LEE R. CASTOR, GEORGE L. CHERRY, ALVIN B. DANGEW, JAMES J. D1MAIO, FREDERICK B. GARONER, EDWIN L. ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY I 48 J

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PRIVATES HAMPTON, HOOD C., JR. MILLER, SAMMIE HENRIQUEZ, GEO. E. O'MARA, EDWIN HILLER, FRANK W. PERRETTE, HARRY A. HUBBARD, WILLIS C. PETTIGREW, ARTHUR D. KELLEY, BARNEY L. PUCKETT, LOUIS L. KELTNER, C. M., JR, REID, WILLIAM T. KICKLITER, JOSEPH F. SANCHEZ, ALBERT B. KIEFFER, RICHARD 0. SHAW, BEN F. LoGGINS, CHARLIE E. STEWART, C. H., JR. LUSSIER, EDWARD B. THOMAS, CHARLES R. MANGAN, GEORGE F. TULLIS, CARL L. MCCLINTOCK, GEO. N. TULLIS, RALPH A. WRIGHT, SEYMOUR C, FACTUAL HISTORY After the close of the World War and pursuant to the provisions of the then newly enacted National Defense Act providing for a Federally organized and recognized National Guard, there was organized at Tampa, Florida, three batteries of Field Artillery and on December 5, 1921, these three units were ' given Federal recognition and desig nated Batteries "A," "B," and "C," 116th Field Artillery. Battery "B" was therefore one of the original units around which the regiment was built, and it has since re mained one of the regiment's most dependable and effi cient firing batteries. Organized at Tampa, it has ever since been stationed in this city. A French 75 mm. Gun Battery, it was originally equipped TAM PA, FLORIDA [ I -~l~,. _ , .;,t t: : . . _ . ..... _ ; , : , ~ . .. ~ ' SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RsT Row: G. F. Mangan, A. J. Camalo, M. C. Morgan, E. A. Biggs, A. A. Moore, R. J. Jandreau, F. \V. Hiller, B. L. Kelley. SECOND Row: H. J. Sheppard, Jr., R. E. Bunch, G. E. Hen riquez, A. B. Sanchez, C. R. Thomas, C. M. Keltner, Jr., C. N. Saba, M. L. Gutkin, B. C. Cordell,'Jr., R. 0. Kieffer. TmRD Row: J. M. Maner, E. H. Miller, C. E. Bostick, \V.11. Hope, W. T. Reid, E. E. Bennett, A. D. Pettigrew, F. H. Di Maio, V. C. Grantham, L. R. Starling, H. R. Matheney . as a horse-drawn unit, but after many years with the horses it was, in 1933, converted to the truck-drawn unit that it now is. The Battery has seen active State service on two occasions. In 1927 it aided civil authorities in defending the Hillsborough County Jail, and in 1935, it was called out to preserve order during municipal election day riots in the City of Tampa. On both occasions it performed its duties creditably and honorably. Its first Battery Commander was Captain William E. Hamner. Succeeding Battery Commanders were as fol lows: Captian John A. Smith, December 12, 1922, to September 27, 1925; Captain Samuel G. Harrison, Sep tember 27, 1925 to October 28, 1925; Captain Arlie C. Luther, October 28, 1925, to January 17, 1928; Captain Ray V. S. Rudd, January 27, 1928, to September 30, 1936, and Captain George E. Baya, present Battery Com mander, who was placed in command on September 30, 1936, and has served_ since that date.

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FIRST BATTALION TAMPA, FLORIDA I. Instrument Section. 2. Gun Crew in Action. 3. Battery Column of Platoons. 4. Motor Section. s. Signal Section. b. Non-Commissioned Officers.

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I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2. On the ' March. 3. Telephone Section. 4. Instrument Detail. 5. Laying W i re by Hand. 6. Section Coupling. 7. Battery in Action. 8. Gun in Recoil. 9. Laying Wire. TAMPA, FLORIDA ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH Fl.ELD ARTILLERY

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: C. F. Hall, N. W. Benjamin, H. F. Sheppard, J. T. Specht, J. B. Richardson, M . N . Jones, W. P. Gillstrap, Jr., 0. P. Hall, E. R. Hill. SECOND Row: G. M. Bryant, F. Fairchild, R. W. Milam, R. L. Stephens, R. B. Gouch, L. E. Curtis, H. L. Nelson, A. G. Sims, E. V. Gerow, C. W. Hend , erson. THIRD Row: C.R. Banks, E. P. Barnwell, J. C. Heard, D. A. Riley, C. M. Tittsworrh, C. P. Hand, H. H. Wester, R. Rodri guez, F. 0. Calohan, Jr., F. T. Sanz. dJ.vid B~ COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . . . . . . . . . RAY V. S. Ruoo First Lieutenant . EDMUND J. McMULLEN Second Lieutenant . . . . . . . . MARTIN CARABALLO, JR. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant SERGEANTS GILLSTRAP, WILLIAM P. HILL, ELLIS R. JONES, MANSFIELD N. . . JAMES T. SPECHT LOPEZ, ANTONIO J. MANSON, HERMAN W. RAMIREZ, ERNEST L. SttEPPARD, HUBERT F. CORPORALS BARNWELL, EMANUEL P. BRYANT, GEORGE M. HALL, OSCAR P. HEARD, JOJ!N C. OLSON, PHILLIP W. PRATER, OWEN J. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BEARD, MALCOLM BENJAMIN, NATHAN W. CAl , OIIAN, FRANK Q. CAMl'O, JosEPII COOKE, LUTHER A. CRAWFORD, HERBERT E. GARCIA, RALPH JONES, ELBERT E. BANKS, CLIVE R. BOYDE, GEORGE E. CARTER, ROBERT B, CROFT, BILLIE D. PRIVATES McRAE, DONALD C. NICHOLAS, HERBERT S. RILEY, . DAVID A. RODRIGlJi!z, RENE ROJO, ALBERT R. SCHUMACHER, CHAS. L. SIMS, ALBERT G. TrrrsWORTII, C. M. CURTIS, LORAN E. FAIRCHILD, FRANK GEROW, EDWARD v. Goumr, RonERT B. ONE HUND.RED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY

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PRIVATES HALI., CHARLES F, PADGETT, CECIL F. HAND, Al.BERT E. PEERMAN, ROY w., JR, HAND, CHARI . ES P. RrCIIARDSON, JAMES B. HAND, Wn.1. M. RrLEY, W11.L1AM E. HANNON, WILLIAM A. Ross, ERNEST w. lIENDP.RSON, CHAS, W. SANZ, FRANK T. Howe, VICTOR E. SESSIONS, Ons M . lluc:Jlf,S, AVERY E, SHURTLEFF, ROBERT E, JACKSON, RAYMOND D. SPENCER, }OIIN ll. LYNN, VELNA V. STEPHENS, RICHARD L. MIT.AM, RICHARD W. WAKELEY, RAYMOND R, NELSON, HARRY L. WALKER, DONALD P. NEWCITY, EDWARD S. WESTER, HERBERT II. WILLIAMS, HERBERT P. FACTUAL HISTORY Battery "C" was mustered into service on December 5, 1921, with Captain Homer W. Hesterly commanding. Fifty men were present of whom three are still in the organization. On October 1, 1922, Captain T. Byrd Sparkman took command and continued until October 1, 1925, when Captain Thomas H. Dunn took over. During this period the l3attery was building up an excellent rec ord for efficiency and attendance, a notable point being that at the first summer camp in 1922, the Battery had present 96 per cent of its strength. On May 31, 1927, Battery "C" was called out on active State duty to aid the sheriff of Hillsborough TAM PA, FLORIDA C,JJ SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: E. L. Ramirez, M. E. Beard, C. L. Schumacher, L. A. Cooke, E. S. Newcity, J. H. Spencer, H. S. Nichola ~ , A. J. Lopez, H. W. Manson. SECOND Row: D . C. McRae, A . R. Bojo, C. F. Padgett, 0. J. Prater, R. R . Wakely, E. E. Jones, E. W. Ross, B. D. Croft, R. Garcia, P. W. Olson . THIRD Row: R. W. Peerman, Jr., J, Campo,~ W. E. Riley, A. E. Jlughes, D . P. Walker, R. E. Shurtleff, V. E. Howe, R. B. Carter, G. E. Boyd. County during the jail riots, and fortunately completed its tour without casualty. On May 13, 1930, Captain Herbert E. Harley took command, to be succeeded on July 1, 1930, by Captain Byron E. Bushnell. At camp in 1930, the Battery won the Tampa Board of Trade trophy for the best firing battery in the regiment for the third time, and thus permanent possession. On Septem ber 17, 1931, Captain George N. Sagin was assigned to command. In June, 1933, the organization bid farewell to the horses and welcomed the new motor equipment furnished by the Government. On September 3, 1935, the Battery was again called out on active State service to maintain order at the elec tion polls. Although the situation was very tense at times, particularly after nightfall, the mission was ac complished without serious incident, and the organization was relieved early the next morning at the height of a tropical hurricane. On November 1, 1935, command passed to Captain Daniel Van Dusen, who was succeeded on October 1, 1937, ~y Captain Ray V. S. Rudd. l'J

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FRANK J . POITRAS Captain, Adjutant ROBERT l. HUGHES Capta i n, Headquarters Battery and Combat Train OFFICERS, SECOND BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY MILTON E . HULL Capta i n, Batt e ry E WILLIAM S . MYRICK , JR . First Lieutenant , Battery D BALDWIN WYLIE Second Lieutenant, Battery D GEORGE R . HARDY Captain, Battery F JOHN E. MARTIN First li utenant, Battery E ROBERT M. WILBUR Second Lieutenant, Battery E I MAURICE J . WILSON First Lieutenant, P . & T. 0 . HENRY I.A. FULTON First lieutenant, Battery F HENRY R. HARPER Second Lieutenant, Battery E ALBERT W. CONNOR, JR. First Lieutenant , L, 0. JOEL C . GARRARD se cond Lieutenant, Headquartus Battery and Combat Tra i n ROBERT C. HOLTZCLAW, JR. Second lieutenant, Battery f HENRY W . HOUSE, JR. Captain ; Battery D DONALD R , PIERCE Second Li e utenant, Battery D EUGENE A. LAURENT Second lieutenant, Battery F

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HEADQUARTERS AND COMBAT BATTERY TRAIN SECOND BATTALION I I 6 TH FIELD ARTILLERY BARTOW, FLORIDA (I) Non-Commissioned Officers , (2) Trucks and Dri v ers . (3) Switchboard Operators . (4) Instrument Detail. (5) M essa ge C e n ter . (6) Radio Detail {161). (7) Lin e sm e n.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FrnsT Row: C . T. Burgess, T. \V . Holland, C. C, Wilson, H. S. Speice, J. J. Barush, F. W. Reynolds, R. G. Paterson, J. S. Huggart, D . Fletcher, H. C. Mercer. SECOND Row : H. C. Floyd, J. P . S c huck, C. W. Mercer, B. B. Brock, R. E . Stenger, R. J. Stenger, \V. H. Terry, F . W. Schuck, \V. D. Cameron, F. Z. Lawrence. SECOND BATTALION COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain Second Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . . ROBERT L. HUGHES . }OEL C. GARRARD NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Serg e ant Staff Sergeant Staff Sergeant SAPP, KENNETH N. SERGEANTS . ROBERT P. HUGHES WATSON S. GARRARD SYLVESTER 0. HARRISON STEWART, RALPH W. WHIDDEN, JAMES F. CORPORALS BASS, NELSON E. BURGESS, CASSELL T, BROOKS, ROBERT N. CHATHAM , GEORGE T. MERCER, HARRI' C, PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BARUSH, JOHN ], BLACK, MARVIN D. CAMERON, \\ 1 1LLIAM D . HAWKINS, RICHARD C. PRIVATES BROCK, BENJAMIN JJ. BURNETT, THURMAN D. CONNER, \\ 7 11.LIAM JI. HOLLAND, THOMAS W. REYNOLDS, FLOYD W. SPEICE, HOWARD S. WILSON, CLARENCE C. FI.ElCIIF.R, DOZIHR FLOYD, HENRY C. GmsoN, }AMES c. ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY C 561

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PRIVATES llu r. GART, JAMES C. LAWRENCE, FRANCIS Z. MERCER, CHARLTON W. PATERSON, ROBERT G. Pm1 . urs, RonP.RT E. REYNOLDS, BUSTER L. SCIIUCK, FREll \V. SCHUCK, JOE P. STENGER, RAYMOND J. STENGER , RALPH E. TERRY, WARREN H. VOIGT, EDWARD C. RYALS, CARI.OS M . WILBANKS, HENRY L. WoJTF.CZKO, ADOLPH L. FACTUAL HISTORY Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, Second Bat talion, 116th Field Artillery, was organized during the summer of 1923 by Major Roger B. Lyle. The Battery was extended Federal recognition on August 21, 1923. The first officers of the Battery were Captain Roger B. Lyle, First Lieutenant Charles D. Appling and Second Lieutenant C. C. Harper. Following Captain Lyle, in the order named, Captains A. T. Hackl, W. E. Jones, C. S. Lloyd and George R. Hardy commanded the Bat tery. During its existence, the Battery has responded to orders for active State duty on five different occasions, the first BARTOW, FLORIDA C,7) . ~ ~~:, _ ;<.; : ( ?:v . , .,, ...... . .. .. ,. r ..-,s ,. ;.._ . ~ . . { . . i : : SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIKST Row : R. P. llu~hes, S. O . Harrison, R. \V. Stewart, J . F . Whidden, . G. T. Chatham, E. C. Voigt, R. N. Brooks, N. E. Bass, K. N. Sapp. SECOND Row: R. E . Phillips, T. Burnett, B. Reynolds , H . L. Wilbanks, R. C. Hawkins, M. D. Black, C. M. Ryals, A. L. Wojteczko, J. C. Gibson, W. H. Conner. of which occurred in September, 1926, following the hur ricane of that year, when the Battery did patrol work at Moore Haven, Florida. Again, in May, 1927, the Battery was ordered to Tampa to aid the civil authorities in subduing a riot there. Then, immediately following the hurricane in September, 1928, the Battery performed relief work for more than two weeks at Okeechobee. In 1929, in connection with the campaign for the eradi cation of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Florida, the unit served two months on patrol work in the Tampa area. On March 27, 1932, the Battery was sent to Lakeland to aid the civil authorities there in protecting a prisoner from mob violence. The year 1939 will be commemorative of the completion of a modern brick armory, replacing the outmoded 15year-old wooden building which has housed the unit since its beginning.

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a SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: L. E. Smith, J. H. Miller, H. D. W a fford, J. E. Albritton, C. L . Howell, L. L. Lawrence, H. W. Fussell, W. D. Helm, D. B. McCorkle. SECOND Row: L . A . We s tb e rry, D. W. McCormick, A. G. Simmons, R. T. \\'ill.iams, R. ll. Palmer, J. R. Davenport, C. G. I.overing, P. R. Bennett, R. Lang. T111Rn Row: I. F. Johnson, C. S. Johnson, E. G. Thompson, H. L. Brandon, H . E. Halden, B. B. Safar, W. J . Rentz, A. H. En g lish, \\'. E. Bradley, J. K. Carter. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ... First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant Second Lieutenant HENRY 'W. HOUSE, JR. WILLIAM S . MYRICK, JR. . DONALD R. PIERCE BALDWIN WYLIE NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant . . CIIARI. F. S R . PINSON SERGEANTS BOOKER, VANCE W. HUCKABAY, GEORGE S. CARTER, JOHN K. PHILLIPS, HERBERT J. GRIFFIN , JAMES A. PUTNAM, JOE F. Wooo, HAROLD o. CORPORALS BRANDON, BYRON L. PUTNAM, RALPH D. COLLIER, J. B. SMITH, JOUN J., JR. HALLER 1 ROBERT P. WILBANKS, JAMES L . HELM 1 \V1LL1AM D. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS DOHANY, ANDREW J., JR. DOOLEY, MAX L . EDWARDS, ISAAC A. ENGLISH, ALEXANDER H. HOWE! , !., CHESTER L. PALMER, RALPH B. REGISTER , Cr.YD E 0. SAFAR, BENJ A MIN B. SIMMONS , JOHN \l\1. SMITH, LEWIS E . LEFFERS, R1cuARD TmGPEN, DAvm C. LOVERING, CURTIS G. THOMPSON, E . G. WESTBERRY, LEONARD A. PRIVATES ALBRITTON, JAMES E. BALLARD, CHARLES H. BENNETT, PAUi , R. BRADLEY, WAYNE E. ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY C 58 l

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PRIVATES Cr.oun, T. E. f>AVENPORT, JANSF.N R. ENGLISH, WARREN G, FERGUSON, R. T., JR, FRASER, LAWRENCE A . FUSSELL, HERMAN W, GARRISON, WILLIAM H. I-IA!.IJP.N, HARRY E., III. IIA!. L , CHARLES G. HAL L ER, RUSSELL A, HANCOCK, F. HARDIN, GRANT M. HARPER, FRANK HARPER, 0. T. HOW E I . L, JULIAN W. HOWELL, R. E. }OIINSON , CHARl , ES S. JmrnsoN, INMAN F. KEEN, II. M. KENNEDY, WILLIAM L, KEARSE, Rosco F. LANG, R. LAWRENCE, LUCION L. MATH E WS, ARTHUR, JR. McCoRKEI , , DoN B. McCORMICK, D. MCCULLEN, JOSEPH W. MILLER, JOE H. RENTZ, WILLIAM J. SIMMONS, A. G. w AFFORD, H. D. WILLIAMS, R. T. FACTUAL HISTORY This unit was organized by Captain Jesse Gil liam, Federally recognized and furnished with horses and equipment on October 10, 1923. Offi cer personnel also included First Lieutenant Wat son and Second Lieutenant Hicks. The following officers have served with the Battery: Captains Frank Merrin, Frank J. Poitras, Robert L. LAKELAND, FLORIDA 159 J SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: C. R. Pinson, J. A. Griffin, V. \V. Booker , G. S . lluckahay, II . 0. Wood, J. F. Pntnam, A:..,~ MathDY:', Jr . , R. D. Putnam, D. C. Thigpen." 0 S E CONll R o w : J . L. Wilbanks, L . A. Fraser, II. M . Keen, J. W. McCullen, W. H. Garrison, C. G. Hall, T . E. Cloud, R. E. Howell, F. Harper, 0. T. Harper, A. J . Dohany, Jr. T111R1> Row: G. M . Hardi n , J . W . Howell, R . F. K e ar s e, J. W . Simmon s , C. 0. Register, J. J. Smith, Jr., W. L. K e nnedy, F. Hancock, I. A. Edwards, W. G. English, C. 1-1. Ballard. Hughes, William Mcllwain, Jr,, William S. My rick, Jr., and Second Lieutenants Robert Y. Pope, Donald R. Pierce, and Baldwin Wylie. This unit was mobilized for riot duty in Tampa '/ in 1926 and again on Easter Sunday, 1932, in Lakeland. Trucks replaced the horses m 1933, when the unit was motorized. l In 1937, a new $32,000 armory was dedicated. When President Roosevelt visited Florida in 1936, this organization had the honor of firing the Presidential salute at Winter Park. l'J

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B A T T E R y D SECOND BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY LAKELAND, FLORIDA (I) N o n-Commissioned Officers. (2) C l assroom Instruction. (3) R ea d y! (4) T e lephone Group . (5) Instrum e nt Section. (b) Dis m o unt and Push. (7 . ) Maint e n a nce D e tail. ::.'.<1 . ; -'t ~t E . . ~ -' -' r ~}if t;; fNPiff,:iYP ,:_ : :~:~~ \~~~~ ~~~~i~~~ , ~ ~ t;.,~t'""'-"~ _ _

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SECOND BATTALION 116TH FIELD ARTILLERY PLANT CITY, FLORIDA (I) Non-Commissioned Officers. ( 2) Bat• tery Front. (3) Non-Commissioned Officers' Room. (4) Guns in Aclion. (5) Regimental Sergeant-Major, (6) Pushing Truck, (7) First Sergeant, ( 8) Wire Section Climber.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FtRS'l' Row: \V. C . Dempsey, C. E. Connor, W. D. Pearson, H. llur:gins, E. G. Snowden, U. S. Anderson, C. A. Christen b e rry, J. W. Chambers, N. H. Rentz. SF.CONll Row: L. M. Hunter, L. T. Bridges, L. H. Cooper, J. \V. Booth, A. L. Dyal, J. T. Blanton, J. C. Young, J. A. Ker sey, E. L Hutto, W. H. Edgemon, R. A. Paschall. TmRo Row: 0. S. Tershansey, A. E. Ham, 0. Adams, W. H. Lovelace, S. I.. Thomas, W. A. Wilkes, L. S. Parnell, C. A. O.c:,lrn, J.. E. DeMontmoll.in, R. II. Ca!'nn, Jr., \V. 0. Hodges, Jr. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . First Lieutenant Second Lieu/man/ Second Lieutenant MILTON E. HULL . JOHN E. MARTIN . HENRY R. HARPER ROBERT M. WILBUR NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant . . . , . WILLIAM C. DEMPSEY SERGEANTS ANDERSON, Uus s. CHAMBERS, Jo1n1 w. CHRISTENBERRY, c. A. CONNOR, CHARLES E. CORPORALS IIUGGINS, HROWARIJ Pr.ARSON, W11.1.1AM D. RENTZ, NORMAN II. SNOWDEN, EDWARD G. BOLANDER, PAUL H. KucsMA, ERNEST E. HAGAN, VINCENT T. MOORE, GEORGE M. HOLBROOK, JAMES R. PARNELL, WM. C., JR. RAY, ROBERT A. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ADAMS, OLIVER LOVELACE, WILLIAM H. CASON, ROBT. H., JR. OGDON, CLAUDE A. CONNOR, NATHAN H. PARNELL, LINDSEY S. CROSBY, HENRY C. PASCHALL, RAYMOND A. DEMONTMOLLIN, L. E. SMITH, CHARLIE N . DRISKELL, EUGENE E . SURRENCY, G. W., JR. HAM, ARTHUR E. TERSIIANSP.Y, OLIVER S. HODGES, WILLIAM o., JR. THOMAS, SAM L. WILKES, WILLIAM A. PRIVATES BLANTON, JOHN T. BLANTON, WILBURN L. BOOTH, JAMES \V, Boon1, JOSEPH H . . BRIDGES, LEWIS T. BUCHMAN, MANUEL CONNELL, GEORGE V. COOPER, LUTIIER JI. CROSBY, JULIAN T. DYAi,, ALVIN L. ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY [ 62)

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PRIVATES DIXSON, }OIIN JI. EnGISMON, W11.1.1AM IL FUTCH, MILLARD E. HAGAN, FLOYD L. HOOKER, LoRANZO T. HUNTER, LEONARD M. HUTTO, ELDRIDGE KERSEY, JAMES A. KITE, MARKEY KNIGHT, HOMER H. McDANrnu, RoBERT E. PEACOCK, JIMMIE H. PF.ARSON, MONROE 11. PONDER, RALPH E., JR. RAY, PEARL G. RAY, CHARLES F. SCARBOROUGH, WM. J. SIMMONS, WILLIAM J. TUCKER, Loms o .. JR. WALDRON, CECIL C. WEEKS, CALVIN J. WEST, DOUGLAS B. Wooo, HENRY M. YOUNG, JAMES C. FACTUAL HISTORY Battery "E," th Field Artillery, on August 15, 1923, succeeded Company "E," 124th Infantry, which served during the War with Mexico and the World War. Battery "E" has enjoyed more than 15 years of steady progress and ' today is quartered in one of the finest armory buildings in the State. The truck and gun sheds and caretaker's home were completed last year at an approximate cost of $40,000. On No vember 14, 1938, the armory, truck and gun sheds and caretaker's home, all built of stone taken from the nearby Hillsborough River, were dedicated at Plant PLANT CITY, FLORIDA C 63 J SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RST Row: I'. II. Bolander, G. W. Moore, E. E . Kucsma, J. R. Holbrook, V. T. IIa~an, N. II. Connor, E. E. Driskell, P . G. Ray, H. C. Crosby, G. W. Surrency, Jr. SECOND Row: L. T. Hooker, H. M. Wood, N. W. Fleming, J. H. Booth, M. E. Futch, J. B. Dixson, C. J. \Veeks, J. H. Pea cock, C. C. Waldron, C. N. Smith. TmRD Row: M. H. Pearson, C. F. Ray, L. 0. Tucker, Jr., R. E. McDaniels, M. Kite, R. E. Ponder, Jr., D. B. West, W. J. Scarborough, J. T. Crosby, H. B. Knight, M. Buchman. City with General Vivian Collins and other prominent National Guard and Army officers present. Captain Nat Clemons, World War veteran, was the first commanding officer of Battery "E," with First Lieutenant Frank G. Merrin, Second Lieutenants Lewis G. Carlton and Calvin G. Moore (deceased), Carlton succeeded Clemons as Captain in June, 1926. He was succeeded in June, 1933, by Captain Irving S. Tillotson, who served until May, 1938, when Cap tain Milton E. Hull took command. Other present commissioned officers are First Lieutenant John E. Martin, Second Lieutenants Robert H. Harper and Robert M. Wilbur. William C. Dempsey, second oldest man in point of service in the battery, is First Sergeant.

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Cl SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RST Row : B. E. Wasmund, S. L. Richardville, D. H. Sher man, R. L. MacCalla, Jr., \V. R. Boland, C. R. Abel, C. M . John so n. SECOND Row: C . J. Ander s on, G. A. Pottinger, \V . Harrison, C. T. Fowler, 0. B. Howard, H. R. Wells, R. E. Patton, A. E. Knighton. T111Ru Row: H. P. Sander s , V. Madden, J . T. Sutherland, A . JI. Tanner, J. C. Smith, H. Hammac, E . N. Griner, D. J. Grin e r, R. R. Tanner. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . .. First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . Second Lieutenant . . GEORGE R. HARDY HENRY M. FULTON ROBERT C. HOLTZCLAW, JR . EUGENE A. LAURE N T NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First S e rr,eant . RAYMOND L. MACCAI.LA, JR. SERGEANTS BOLAND, WILLARD R. DOUGLAS, BENJAMIN T, GARNER, Gus HALES, RUSSELL N . CORPORALS ABEL, CHARI.ES R. CHELETTE, \VAYLON W. DAVIS, JOHN B. JOHNSON, CLYDE M. R1CIIARDVILLE, s. L SIIERMAN, DANIEi. H. WASMU N D, BENJAMIN E. FREEMAN, A. H., JR, FREEMAN, MARTIN A. STA N LEY, FREM O NT B. WASMUND, HOWARD 0. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ANDERSON, RUSSELL E. GRINER, DANIEL J. GRINER, ETHRIDGE N. JACKSON, STEADMAN H. PRIVATES ANDERSON, CHARI.IE J, BEAUCHAMP, WILLARD A. BISSETT, JOUN F. CAMPBELL, RICHARD D . CLEMO N S, MYRON H. COMERFORD, JOE R. COOPER, LATIMER C. DAVIS', EARi. W. KNI G HTON, ALLEN E. O'QUIN, PATRICK C. PO T TINGER, G E ORGE A. WOODHAM, EDWARD K. DAVIS, IIORACF. C. DUKES, GLENN W. EUBANKS, lsMA L. FOWLER, CHARLES T . FRAISER, EDWARD R. FREEMAN, JAMES W, HALE, OSWALD D. IJAMMAC, CA I. VIN N. ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY [64]

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,, .,, \. ::, ;! ; .. , .. ~~ '"1 .t,'., !/" _' . . . ' ,_ ti _ } , . _'!:. ; PRIVATES IIAMMAC, HrLREY RonF.RTS, ALBERT L. IIARRJSON, WOODROW SANDERS, llOWi\Rt> P. HOWARD, OLON B. SAYE, JOHN W. JOHNSON, GEORGE L. SAYE , THOMAS G. MADDEN, VINSON SMITII, JOHN C. MORROW, WILLIAM E. SUTHERLAND, JOHN T. MULLANEY , HARRELL L. SZEGLOWSKI, ALFONS PATTON, RAYMOND E. TANNER, ARCHIE B, PAULK, JAMES D. TAN NER, ROGER R. Pool.E, WILJ.IAM E. WELLS, HARRIS R. WHEELER, WILLIE C. FACTUAL HISTORY The Service Battery, 116th Field Artillery, the original National Guard organization at Winter Haven, Florida, received Federal recognition August 29, 1923, under com• mand of Captain W. Paul Hayman, who was succeeded by Captain J. Donald MacCalla on September 19, 1924; with Lieutenants Thomas L. Starnes and Frank J. Poitras as battery officers. This Battery participated in active state service as follows: Florid;t hurricane, 1926, and at Tampa, 1927. It was noted for pistol markmanship and high morale. The band, in charge of Warrant Officer Frank A. Oren, was disbanded in 1937. Charles E. Frederick, who began his military career in-this battery, won the National Guard appointment to the United States Military Academy in 1926 and now WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: A.H . Freeman, Jr., H . 0. \Vasmund, B . T. Dou las, W. W. Chelette , R. N. Hales, F. B. Stanley, \V. C. Wheeler. SECOND Row: H . L. Mull a neY, S. H . Jackson . J . D. P a ulk , M. H. Clemon s , T. G. Saye, A. L. Roberts, J. W. Freeman, E. W. D av is, J. R. Comerford. TmRD Row: \V. E. Poole, 0. D. Hale, E. R. Fraiser, J. W. Saye, G. W. Duke s , I. L. Eubanks, L. C. Coop e r, E. K. \Vood ham, R. D. Campbell. holds the rank of First Lieutenant of Infantry in the Regular Army. The Service Battery was redesignated as Battery "F," 116th Field Artillery, April 1, 1937, under command of Captain George R. Hardy, with Lieutenants Henry W. House, Albert B. Connor, Jr., and Joseph J. Scherer as battery officers. C 6, l Battery "F" attended field training in July, 1937, de livering all types of fire in a creditable manner. Lieuten ants Robert C. Holtzclaw and Eugene A. Laurent were commissioned in June, 1938, and assigned to Battery "F." The Battery participated in Third Army Maneuvers in Mississippi in 1938, functioning satisfactorily throughout the maneuver. Lieutenant House assumed command of Battery "D," 116th Field Artillery, at Lakeland, January 1, 1939, being replaced as executive by First Lieutenant Henry M. Fulton. A modern armory, which will provide every facility for the proper functioning of this outstanding battery, is now under construction. IE

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BATTERY F SECOND BA TT ALION 116TH FIELD ARTILLERY WINTER HAVEN, FLORIDA (I) T ruch . ( 2) Non-Commissioned Officers. (3) 0. P. (4) Communication,. (5) Heave. (6) Caught in Recoil. (7) Ready to Hit the Road . (8) Truck Inspection.

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NONIE W, GABLE Mafor, M, C. JAMES HOLDSTOCK Captain, D. C. Commanding Medical Detachment JOSEPH M, BOSWORTH, JR. Captain, M. C. CLACK D. HOPKINS Captain 1 M. C. TAMPA, FLORIDA I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 3. Bandages. 2. Application of Thomas Leg Splint. 4. Artificial Resp i ration.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RST Row: W. D. Eisinger, C. L. Robinson, W. E. Curnick, A. R . Robin, D. D. Weber, A. J. Sheffield, L. E. Folgueras, W. II . Howington, J. D. Hungate, B. Weintraub. SECOSD Row: K . E. Eagan, J. F. Dowell, Jr., H. A. Stokes, G . W. Brend, P. L. Eagan, M. J. Foley, H. B. Knabe!, I. Blanco, Jr . , R. L. Clinton, Jr : , F. 0. Bender. T A M P A, F L O R D A Major Captain Captain . Captain . Staff Sergeant COMMISSIONED OFFICERS . . NONIE W. GABLE (M.C.) , . . JAMES HOLDSTOCK (O.C.) JOSEPH M. BOSWORTH, JR. (M.C.) CLACK D. HOPKINS (M.C.) NON COMMISSIONED OFFICERS . WILLIAM 0. EISINGER SERGEANTS BREND, GEORGE W. EAGAN, PATRICK L. WEINTRAUB, BERNARD CORPORAL WEBER, O0NLYNN 0. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BLANCO, lslDORE, JR, FOLEY, MORGAN J. FOLGUERAS, LUIS E. PRIVATES HowINGTON, W1LI.1AM II. KNABEL, HENRY B. STOKES, HOMER A. BENDER, FRED 0. EAGAN, KENNETH E. CAUDLE, RICHARDS. HUNGATE, JACK 0, CLINTON, ROBT. L., JR, ROBIN, ALVIN R. CURNICK, WILLIAM E. ROBINSON, CHARLES L. DOWELL, JOE F., JR. SHEFFIELD, ARIEL J. WILLS, RICHARD B. FACTUAL HISTORY The Medical Department Detachment, 116th Field Ar tillery, was Federally recognized October 6, 1922, under the command of Captain John Halliday, M. C. Since its inception, this Detachment has been called upon a (Continued on p11g~ I 14) ONE HUNDRE . D AND SIXTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY C 68 J

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TAMPA, FLORIDA The 116th Field Artillery Drum and Bugle Corps was organized in the fall of 1937. Member ship in the organization is entirely voluntary and comes from the enlisted personnel of the First Bat talion in Tampa. It is equipped with the latest type instruments, and rehearsals are held weekly. Major T. E. Jacobson, a member of the All-American Drum and Bugle Corps, is director. The Corps is organized so that it is a complete working unit within its own membership, which includes: Major Jacobson, director; Staff Sergeant J. Smith, executive; P. W. Olsen, Sr., assistant director; E. A. Northrup, Jr., assistant director; H. F. Sheppard, drill master; L. S. Lovell, drums; C 69 l ~ ,, ~. ' I ~ -: ~ : , ~: ; ,. ~ 1 ;1d . : , , j},L__ .. "' J ,. T. E. JACOBSON Major, Director, Drum and Bugle Corps L. A. Cooke, soprano bugles; H. R. Matheney, tenor and baritone bugles; H. W. Swilley, soloist; T. E. Kaney, Color Sergeant; B. Weintraub, Medical Sergeant; J. S. Gibson, Mess Sergeant; A. R. Rojo, Supply Sergeant; E. R. Miller, Service Section; Drum Major C. L. Schumacher, Twirling Drum Major G. E. Boyd, Sergeants Tice, Mills, Cordell and Thaxton; Corporals Averitt, Coffey, Cooper, Gardner, Shaw, Beard, Benjamin, Calo han, Campo, and Privates Abrames, Hackney, Sam Martin, Wilson, Crandon, Goulding, Kersey, McClintock, Mills, Northrup, Priest, Purdom, Reed, Van Sickle, Hand, Shurtliff, Spencer, Walker, Dowell, Barker, Serjeant, Parra and Nava.

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~~hU I 16TH FIELD ARTILLERY TAMPA, FLORIDA * I. Trumpet, Tenor and Baritone Section . 3. Drum Section, * l 1 "' : _ _. , . ~ . '-, _ ,_ i..,~ . l':'• •. , __ :_-_._•~ ~. !. ' i:/~):;_ HOMER W. HESTERLY Colonel, Commanding 116th Field Artillery * * 2. Drum and Bugle Corps Group. 4. Trumpet, Soprano Section . L h > . ~ / J~ I;;: . :~ , , . ~~ ~' : : : j ,: 1. > 7 . : : \ , , ,' : : . ~ 1,,....w~ I ,-} . .. : _ ' ~' : 1i .. , ~ ~lti ~ ~ ; .;, ' ~-~ . f; , . . .(, :
PAGE 106

The 62nd Infantry Brigade composed of the First Alabama and Second Florida Regiments of Infantry, which were later designated as the 123rd Infantry and 124th Infantry, respectively, and the 118th Machine Gun Battalion, formed a part of the 31st Division when the division was organized in October, 1917, at Camp Wheeler, Georgia. Units of the Brigade sailed overseas in September and October, 1918, and upon arrival was desig nated as a replacement Brigade. The personnel of most of the units was withdrawn and sent to other organizations, leaving the Brigade skelton ized. The Brigade was originally commanded by Brigadier General Robert E. Steiner, of Mont gomery, Alabama, who served throughout the World War or until November 14, 1918. Upon the return of the Brigade from overseas, GEORGE W. McRORY Major, 62nd Infantry Brigade Staff it was demobilized. It was reorganized and recog nized as the 77th Infantry Brigade June 17, 1922, and was commanded by Brigadier General William P. Screws, with Headquarters in Montgomery, Alabama; redesignated 61st Infantry Brigade, July 1, 1923; redesignated 62nd Infantry Brigade, May 12, 1924. Brigadier General Walter E. Bare assumed command of the brigade August 24, 1926, and served until August 27, 1930, when he was succeeded by Brigadier General John C. Persons, and the headquarters was changed to Birmingham, Alabama. During the Third Army Maneuvers, under the command of General Persons, the Brigade func tioned excellently. The Florida allotment for this Brigade consists of the Executive Officer, Major George W. McRory, and the 124th Infantry.

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ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH Through historical data obtained from a wide range of sources, it is evident that the 124th Infantry is en titled to claim its descent fror_n the first garrisons in America established in the 16th century. Through the centuries its Infantry units have formed the largest com ponent parts of "The Florida Militia," "Florida Rangers," "Florida State Troops," and the "Florida Volunteers." It is not the purpose of this history to lessen in any degree the splendid record of the other arms and serv ices of the State, yet it must be admitted that through out the changing flags of Florida, her Infantry has played a predominant part. The motto "Florida and Country," adopted by the 124th Infantry and approved by the Secretary of War for use on the regimental coat of arms, was first used as the battle cry of the Florida Infantrymen at the outbreak of the War Between the States. At this time,. there were many Infantry units throughout the State which went into active service immediately. Perhaps the best organized of these at the outbreak of the war was "The Jacksonville Light Infantry," established in 1857. Owing to its unbroken record to the present time, it is considered by many, to be the parent organization of the 124th. The "Light Infantry" was mustered into the Confed erate service as Company "A," Third Florida Infantry, August 10, 1861. Its first battle was at Perryville, Ken tucky, in 1862, but its losses were so heavy. that it was consolidated with the "First Florida Infantry" and this organization remained with Bragg's Army until the end of the war. They fought at Murfreesboro, siege of Jackson, Chickamauga, and Missionary Ridge, and ac quitted themselves in such a man ner that every member of the National Guard of Florida has reason to look with pride upon their achievements. At the end of the [ 70) war, there was a disintegration of the military units of the State troops, but in memory of their victories, the regimental insignia bears a "satire gules" or a red cross, which signifies their loyalty to the Florida State flag of the Confederacy. After the Civil War, the State Militia was very in efficiently organized. Numerous independent military or ganizations are mentioned during the years immediately following the war. By 1898, however, there were 20 companies of Florida State Troops ready for the field. At the outbreak of the War with Spain, Florida was requested by the Secretary of War to furnish one regi ment of infantry. All 20 companies volunteered imme diately, and 12 were mustered into the Volunteer Army of the United States. By May 23 the muster-in was complete, and the "First Regiment of Florida Volunteers," numbering 1,001 men, was accepted into the service of the United States. The sheathed sword, from the Span ish War service medal, is placed on the regimental shield to commemorate this service. After its reorganization following the Spanish-Amer ican War, the Florida Infantry consisted of th'e First and Second Florida. These remained in State service, with only minor changes, until the disturbances on the Mexican Border in 1916-17 caused the mobilization of the Second Florida into Federal service. Companies "M," "L," and "C," of the Second Infantry served on the border until March, 1917. The cactus on the regi mental shield of the 124th Infantry represents this duty in Mexico. Close upon the heels of the border troubles came the World War. The First Florida Infantry was inducted into the Federal service, August 5, 1917, upon the call of the President, and upon the same date, the Second Florida was also called to the colors. The First Florida was disbanded at Camp Wheeler, (Conti,uuJ on page 72)

PAGE 108

* * Commanding One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Infantry Enlided in Company "L", Second Regiment, Florida State Troops, May 20, 1900, Resigned and enlisted in Company "E," Twenty-first United States Infantry, September 22, 1902. Served in Philip pine Insurrection. Participated in engagements with Pulajanes on Island of Samar. Honorably discharged, September 25, 1905. Enlisted in Company "G," Second Regiment, Florida State Troops, January 17, 1906 . Promoted to Second Lieutenant, Company "C," April 12, 1906. Resigned and accepted commission as First Lieutenant, June 27, 1916. Inducted into Federal service (Mexican Border service), June 27, 1916. Promoted to Captain, commanding Company "C," March 28, 1917. Returned from Federal service April 17, 1917. Inducted into Federal service (World War), August 5, 1917, with Second Florida Infantry, converted into 124th Infantry, Thirty-first Division, at Camp Wheeler, Georgia. Served overseas, Returned and honorably discharged, May 25, 1919. Entered reorganized Florida National Guard as Captain of Company "K," 124th Infantry, March 25, 1921. Promoted to Major, June 29, 1925. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, July 10, 1929. Promoted to Colonel, commanding 124th Infantry, July 14, 1934. Rendered valuable service in the 1926 and 1928 hurricane disasters on the lower East Coast. C 71 l

PAGE 109

JOSEPH C. HUTCHISON Lieutenant Colonel ALBERT E . BARRS Major, P. & T. 0. (C o ntinutd fr o m p d gt 70) Georgia, and the personnel was transferred to units of the Thirty-first or "Dixie" Division. The Second Florida was redesignated the 124th Infantry, Septe~ber, 1917, and sailed from Camp Mills to France in October, 1918. This World War service is symbolized upon the regi men ta! shield by the addition of the fluer-de lis or lily of France. On January 1, 1919, Florida had no active Federally recognized National Guard. During the year, however, the provisions of the National Defense Act of June, 3, 1916, were put into active play and the National Guard Regulations were published as a guide for organizing new units. The 124th Regiment Infantry, Florida National Guard, was recognized as the First Infantry, Florida National Guard, in June, 1921, redesignated the 154th Infantry JOHN T. JENNER Major , Chaplain ROBERT N. HILL Captain, Adjutant in December, 1921, and again redesignated the 124th Infantry, Florida National Guard, in May, 1924. C 72 J The 124th Infantry has had as Commanding Officers: Colonel Raymond C. Turck, Colonel Vivian B. Collins, Colonel Chester H. Wilson. On July 13, 1934, Colonel Preston Ayers was placed in command of the 124th In fantry and has held that position until the present time (1939). Various units of the 124th Infantry have rendered . splendid service at various times in aid of Civil Author ity, but the Regiment has not been ca'1led out as a whole since the World War. During the July-August, 1938, Third Army Maneuvers, held in the DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi, the regiment received many com mendations for the general efficiency and excellence of its personnel. HARRY J. LEWIS Captain, Asst. P. & T. 0., G. 0. WALDO WILLIS Captain, Supply Officer

PAGE 110

I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2. Radio Section. 3. Intelligence Section. 4. Wire Section. INSERT: Regiment.!' Communication Officer and His Assistant Technic~I Sergeant. 5. Message Center. 6. Company Headquarters. HEADQUARTERS. COMPANY ONE HUNDRED A N D T W E N T Y -F O U R T H I N F A N T R Y JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

PAGE 111

ROY 8. WHITAKER Captain * SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: G. E . Barr, C. E. A s try, A . W. Bales, Jr., C . I. Bumgardner, C. W. Russell, J . T. McAlpin, P. S. Pattlilo, J. H. Thompson. SECOND Row: H. M. Gooding, W. L. Norvell, E. S. Stewart, H. E. Curts, J. Parker, W. Nolti n g, Jr., R. Pederson, C. F. Eth eredge, P. M. Smith. THIRD Row: R. C. Bailey, B. W. Griffith, J. 0. Richardson, C . J. Brady, T. E. Boyette, L. M . Shepard, W. E. Noedell, H . B. Bragg, C. A. Lanca s ter, F. M. Hulbert, H. R. Teuton. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roy B, Wm rAKP.R S e cond Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . R1c11ARD D. Su-1T0N NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Master Sergeant . RALPH C. CRAWFORD First Sergeant . . ASHFORD T. JORDAN Technical Sergeant WooDROW W. BRIDGES SERGEANTS ASPINALL, OLIVER H. LEVAN, ALVIN E. ASTRY, CLAUDE E, NICHOLSON, MIESSE W. BARR, GEORGE E. ROBINSON, SILAS A. SMITH, FR E D L. CORPORALS BALES, ARTHUR W., JR. PATTILLO, PATS . BUMGARDNER, CURTIS I. RUSSELL, CHARLES W. LANCASTER, CLYDE A. SMITH, PERCY M. MCALPIN, JOHN T. TEUTON, H. R. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BAILEY, RICHARD C. BRADY, CREIGHTON J. CALDWELL, JOHN W. CROSBY, ABRAHAM B. CURTS, HORACE E. DRANE, MELVIN, JR. GRIFFITH, BENNIE W. BASTINGS, MARCEL S. BomNE, Jmm A. BOYETTE, THOMAS F,. PRIVATES McDANIEL, THOMAS T, McDOWELL, JUI.IAN P. MERRILL, EnGAR E. MORRIS, TROY M. l'l'lTMAN, ROBERT J. PEllERSON, RALPH w. WILLIAMSON, WILLIAM 0. BRAGG, 1-IAROALD B. DF.NTON, MAX DICKSO N , JAMES JI . ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH IN FAN TRY C 74 J

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PRIVATES DRANE, CLIFTON NoEDELL, WILLIAM T . DUNBAR, THOMAS P. Nor . TING, \VM, E., JR. ETIIERP.DGE, CLIFORD F. NORVELi., WILLIAM L. GoomNG, HAROLD M. OSTEEN, FRITZ, JR. GREEK, LLOYD E. PARKER, JACK E. HERNDON, ALTON E. PLAIT, MARVIN L. HULBERT, FRANK M. RICHARDSON, JACK 0. HULBERT, GEO. H., JR. RICHARDSON, JACK,C. JARRELL, BENJAMIN F. ROCHER, JOHNNIE R. JONJOCK, MATHEW E. RoMEDY 1 ROBERT C. KEEN, NILES A. SHEPARD, LEWIS M. McCULLOUGH, JAMES L . STEWART, ERIC S. McKENDREE, A. J. TEUTON, CHARLES WILMOT, ALFRED C. FACTUAL HISTORY The Regimental Headquarters Company, 124th Infan try, was first organized following the World War, in St. Petersburg, Florida, on June 14, 1920, but was soon disbanded in that city on January 17, 1922. On May I, 1922, First Lieutenant Fred A. Safay, of Company "F," 154th Infantry, was requested by Colonel R. C. Turck of the 154th Infantry, to organize the Headquar ters Company in Jacksonville, Florida. Pursuant to this request, the Headquarters was organ ized and received Federal recognition on June 7, 1922. Fred A. Safay was promoted to the rank of Captain and placed in the command of this Company with Roy B. Whitaker as Second Lieutenant. Ac this time, Frank M, Whiddon received the rank of First Sergeant with William J. Thomas as Technical Sergeant. It is interJACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA [75 J , . . . '.4{~ ; : '\ t(}' -i~ ) ' ' , ii \ SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: R. C. Crawford, A. T. Jordon, \V, \V. ilridg,s, R. G. Pittman, A . E. LeYan, M. W. Nicholson, F. L. Smith, J. T. Heston, J. W. Caldwell. SECOND Row: O. II. Aspinwall, T . T. McDaniel, T. M. Mor ris, A. E. Herndon, C. Drane, H. F. Jarrell, M . E. Drane, Jr., F. G. Osteen, Jr., S. A. Robinson. TmRo Row: E. E. Merrill, T. P. Dunbar, J. C. Richardson, L. E. Greek, J. A. Bodine, W. 0. Williamson, R. J. Pittman, J. H. Dickson, J. R. Rocher, H. R. Teuton, A. B. Crosby. esting to observe that all four of the above soldiers of this original organization are still active in the Florida National Guard at the present time. On April 1, 1931, Roy B. Whitaker was promoted to the rank of Captain and placed in command of the * RICHARD D. SUTTON Second Lieutenant . ( Contin&ud on p<1gt I J 4) * r': 1, ~ , . , .J . : ~ : :r : ' i fa ' l

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a GEORGE F. KENDRICK Captain ROBERT T. McDANIEL First Lloutenont SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: T. \\', Parker, P. J. Menten, S. E. Tenney, F . H. Crowe, G. P. Appleby, M. L. Johnson, A. W. Usina. SECOND Row: A. D. Hay, J. D. Ammons, H. L. Mobley, I. Thomas, J . L. Rowe, L. E. M c Quaig, D. Lopez, R. E. Campbell. THIRD Row: \\'. H . Lane, P. T. T y re, \'i'. L. Carter, E. E. M c Quaig, J. D. Edward, Jr., \\'. Suddeth, E. Swindell, R. E. Hall, J. W . May, Jr. Captain ... Firs/ lieulenanl . Firs/ Lirnteuant . Second Lieutenant COMMISSIONED OFFICERS . (;EOR(;~ ; F . K1 N1>RJCK OWF.N W. GRIFFIN RonF.RT T. McDAN1F.1. . W Al.I.ACE A. McDANIEL NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Master Sergeant . . . . . . . . . . JAMES C. BURDETTE Master Sergeant . . . . . . . . . , THOMAS W. PARKER Master Sergeant . . . . . . . . . . . JOHN T. SCOVILLE First Sergeant . . . . , . . . . . , PETER J. MENTEN Staff Sergeant . . . SAM L. FLOYD Staff Sergeant . . . . . GEO. W. SCOVILLE, JR. Staff Sergeant . . . . . STANLEY E. TENNEY SERGEANTS APPLEBY, GEORGE P, JOHNSON, MARION L. BENNETT, CURTIS H. MASTERS, BUFORD C. CROWE, FRANK H. McCLELLAN, NOAH J. TAYLOR, SIDNEY J. CORPORALS CHAPMAN, HERSCHEL S . JIAY, ADRIAN D. USINA, ARTHUR W. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BLEDSOE, JACK MAY, JOHN W ., JR, BROWN, JAMES C. MCQUAIG, ELMER E. LANE, WILBUR JI. SUDDETH, WILLIAM F. LoPEZ, DAVIll E. SWINDELL, EDWARD L. TRUETT, EARi. L . ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH IN FANT RY [ 76] ., _ , )t . .... .. . . , .. . -

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PRIVATES AMMONS, JAMF.S D. BJ.AI.OCK, CHARUS c. CAMPBELL, RUBEN E . CARTER, WILLIAM L. EDWARD, JESSE D., JR. GOVREAU, LEO H. HAl.l . , RUSSELL E. HUNTER, ROGER D . Hurro, CLARENCE E. MARKS, Wn.LIAM K. MASON,]AMES C. McKENZIE, ERNEST M . McLEOD, JOHN MCQUAIG, LAWRENCE E. MOBLEY, HAROLD L. Roc1rn, BILLY B. ROWE, JAMES L. SPIRES, LAWTON V. ,,.-STRICKLAND, SELBY L. TEDDER, GARCIA W. TESTON, ARTHUR C., JR, THOMAS, IRA THOMPSON, JOHN L. TVRE, PARK T. FACTUAL HISTORY Although the date of the organization of the Service Company seems somewhat recent, it is in reality a de scendant of the earliest military garrison in America. From its beginning in 1565, through the uninterrupted years of colonization, St. Augustine has been the mili tary outpost of Nations. Spanish Pikeman and Arque busier , have stalked the ramparts of its ancient fort. Black-robed Friars have muttered prayers in the St. Francis vaults, where now repose gleaming stands of arms. British Grenadiers have watered their horses on Service Company's parade ground, and American Rifleman, In dian fighter, Civil and Spanish-American War soldier, all have been part of its military heritage. Perhaps the first officially enrolled American militia to be stationed in St. Augustine was the Corps of St. Augustine Veterans, organized in 1836 to protect the town from the rampant Seminole and run away slave. During ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA [ 77 J SHOWN IN rHOTOGRAPH FtRST Row: J. T . Scoville, J. C. Burdette, S. I.. Floyd, G. W. Scoville, Jr., C. II. B e nnett, S . J. Tayl o r, N. J. McClellan. SECONn Row: B. C. Master s , H. S. Chapman, J . L. Thomp son, A. Teston, W. K. Marks, C. E. Hutto, E. McKenzie, S . L. Strickland. TmRD Row: J. C. Brown, J. McLeod, J. C. Mason, R. D . Hunter, G . W. Tedder , C. C. Blalock, J . Bledsoe , E. L. Truett, B. R. Roche. the Civil War, Confederate militia and Union Regular occupied the town in turn, and at the close of the hos tilities the local militia was broken and scattered with the hopes of the Confederacy. By 1891, however, the St. Augustine Rifles formed and from that date until the present, the company record is continuous. OWEN W. GRIFFL~ Fint lieutenant (C o nt i n1ud o n p1tge 155) WALLAC~ A. McDANIEL Second Lteutenant

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SERVICE COMPANY ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA ( I ) Transportat i on Platoon . (2) Non-Commiss i oned Offi c ers. (3) Company Front ; (4) Ten Year Men . (5) Staff Section and Com pany Headquarters. (6) Transportation Platoon. (7) Supply Section.

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. ~ - •: H : .; ll I ., , \ "~ '1 il , 1 1 , I HOWITZER COMPANY ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA (I) Non-Commissioned Officers with Cup and Banners. (2) Three inch Trench Marlar in Action. (3) Sergeant Dowling and Corporal Bostick at Sand Table Made by First Sergeant Emmerling. (4) Second Trench Mortar Squad. (5) 37 mm. in Action. (6) Ammunition Squad. ( 7) Riot Squad .

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EARLE M. SHINE Captain SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: E . J . Morris, J. M. Sara, E . P. Stake, P. T. Brinn, C. B. B o stick, G. JI. Boggs, B. M. Meyer. SECOND Row: B. Smith, C . E. Brinn, A. L. Behrnes, L. M . Barber, T. J. Davis, G . E . Ferrell, W. 0. Pringle, E. J. Smith. THIRD Row: B . E. Anders o n, C. W. Lamb, J. JI. C o llins, S. B. Brown, R. II. McMillan, P. R. Jlolsrmbrck, I.. B. l'cclcr, A. T. Branton. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . : . . . . . . . . . . . EARLE M. SHINE First Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . . ALPHONSE JI. FRITOT Second Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . CONRAD MANGELS, JR. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First S e rgeant . FRANK EMMERLING SERGEANTS O0\VLING, JIMMY A. N1c1101.s0N, JACK M. SARA, JOHN M. MORRIS, ERNEST J. CORPORALS BARRErr, FJ.OYll E. Nt:1.so11, RAJ.PH G. BosncK, CHARLES B. SMElll,EY, Esn : 1. R. BRINN, PAUL T. SMITH, TED J. STAKE, ELLWOOD P. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BoGGS, GEORGE JI. IIo G AN, HENRY R. BRINN, CECIL E. IIOI.Sf:NDACK, P. R. COLLINS, Ju1.1us JI. LVl'F.N, C!.AUllE J. CooMns, STEDDARD F. McM11.r.AN, RorrnRT H. GWALTNEY, JOHN C. NUNN, JAMES W. SAUNlll!RS, JIAROLll R. ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY ( 80]

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PRIVATES ANDERSON, BERNARD E. MEYER, BILLY llARDER, LECKY M . MEAD, PAULL. BARRY, AUBREY M. PATI ' ISON, ROY W. llEIIRNES, ALLEN L. PEELER, LEON B. llELL 1 ADNER W. PRINGLE, WILLIAM 0. llLITCHINGTON, DOYLE H. RAY, RICHARD R. BLOECKER, WALTER R. REED, ROBERT L. Rm . AND, RAYMOND n. RHODEN, ALGIE w. BROWN, SANTFORD B. SANDERS, JAMES L'. COLE, DOUGLAS E. SANDERS, THOMAS C. CoLE, WILLIAM B. SKINNER, WESLEY P. DAVIS, THOMAS J. SMITH, UEARLEY EPHREM, VICTOR L , SMITH, EDWARD J. FERRELL, GEORGE E . SMITH, JOSEPH H. FORDHAM, HOWARD J. THOMAS, HARRY G. GILBERT, WILLIAM R. TINSLEY, JAMES M. HARDY, WILLIAM H. TROEGER, GEORGE LAMB, CLIFFORD W. WHATLEY, WILLIAM J. LmDEI . L, BLAIR WooDs, GEORGE H. MEEKS, HAROLD L. . YOUNGBLOOD, JIMMY B. Woo _ Ds, W1LLIAM W. FACTUAL HISTORY The Howitzer Company, 124th Infantry, was Federally recognized on April 27, 1921, at Jack sonville, Florida, with a strength of three officers and 72 men. The first Captain of the organization was Cap tain Alvin Register, 1921-22. He was followed in order by Captain Robert A. Towers, 1922-24; Captain Levin H. Arnett, 1924-27; Captain FredJACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA [ 81 J !'..., ~ : , .• ). .. u .. . i . < \ ~r '. , .:_. w ; ~ . . i , ; ,,,..,.:~ J ' ~ r ..:...'\ ' f ' J 1 1 .. ) ,. : j j ' ' . ' ' f l / : SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: E. R. Smedley, J. M. Nicholson, R. G. Nels o n, J. A. Dowling, F. Emmerling, R. B. Boland, V. L. Ephrem. SECOND Row : J.-.M. Tinsley, c; J. Luten, H. L. Meeks, G. Troeger, J. C . Gwaltney, D. E. Cole, W. H. Hardy, G. H. Woods. THIRD Row: J. H. Smith, R. L. Reed, R. R. Ray, H. J. Ford ham , H. R. Hogan, J . W. Nunn, S. F. Coomb s , \V. R. Gilbert, J; L. Sanders. erick A. Carlson, 1927-29; Captain Frank Peek, 1929-31; Captain Harry J. Lewis, Jr., 1931-38, and Captain Earle M. Shine, 1938 to date. ALPHONSE H. FRITOT First Ueutenant (Contin,uJ on p ag t 1,1) CONRAD MANGELS, JR. Second Lieutenant I

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GEORGE A . OeCOTTES Major, ComrTlanding {j/Jic,e1u, FIRST JOHN G. MACFARLAN Captain, Company A BENJAMIN B. ACREE Captain, Company 8 * VICTOR H. KUSCHEL Captain, Company C HAROLD C. WASHBURN Captain, Comp.:rny D BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY WILBUR D. HOFMANN First Lieut., HHdquarters Company CHARLES B. SCHIRARD Seeond Lieut., Headquarters Company JOHN J. KLEIN Fint Lieutenant, Company A WALTER G, SMITH Second Lieutenant, Company A RAYMOND ST. J. SPRAGUE First Lieutenant, Company B ROBERT B. TURNER, JR. Second Lieutenant, Company B -----CURTIS D. CLEMENT First Lieutenant, Company C OLIVER W. HARTWELL Second Lieutenant, Company C WILLIAM F. RUNGE First Lieutenant, Company D KARL E. NORDGREN Second Lieutenant, Company D

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~-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Lieutenant . . . . . . . . WILBUR D. HOFMANN Second Lieutenant . . . . . . CHARLES B. ScmRARD NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Staff Sergeant BUTNER, CYRIL L. CARTER, BONNER L. COLLINS, HUGH L. HYATT, CLINTON L. SERGEANTS CORPORALS ELLSWORTH C. HARPER HOOLEHAN, JAMES R. SENKARIK, JOHN M. HYATT, MENDALL J, LOWRY, NORMAN D. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS JOHNSON, ELMER H. WALTHAL, RANDALL P. PRIVATES BURNS, MARCELLUS EARLE, DAVID M. COLBERT, HAL A, HUMPHREYS, COLLIER E. CooK, JAMES w. MANDON, MILTON E. CLELLAND, ULMER F. SPIVEY, JAMES W, STEINMEYER, HARRY A. FACTUAL HISTORY With two World War veterans as officers, Headquar ters Company, First Battalion, 124th Infantry, was or ganized in Sanford, Florida, May 15, 1929. First Lieu tenant George A. DeCottes, previous commander of Company "D," 124th Infantry, was in command, with Second Lieutenant W. D. Hofmann as communication officer. They had both seen active overseas duty. (Continu,d on P"B• 1'1) SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: N. D. Lowry, R. P. Walthal, J. W. Cook, H. L. Collins, J. W. Spivey, M. Burns, H. A. Colbert, U. F. Clelland, J. R. Hoolehan. SECOND Row: C. L. Butner, D. M. Earle, B. L. Carter, C. E. Humphreys, E. C. Harper, M. E. Mandon, H. A. Steinmeyer, J. M. Senkarik, E. H. Johnson. FIRST BATTALION ,\,._ S A N F O R D, FLORIDA ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY [ 83 J

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FIRST BATTALION 2 4 T H INFANTRY SANFORD, FLORIDA I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2 . Message Center. 3. Telephone Section. 4. Radio Section, 5. Intelligence Section. 6. Supply Room.

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FIRST BATTALION 2 4 T H N F A N T R Y MIAMI, FLORIDA I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2. Riot Duty. 3. Column of Squads. 4. Shelter Half Inspection. 5. Supply Room.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FrnsT Row : C. R. Gibbs, E. H . Gaulding, P. B. Peabody, F. T. S c harr e r, W. D. Mayer, H . A . Lane, W. P. Stewart, G. S. Jamieson, C. D. Dickson, W. F. Felts. SECOND Row: H. A. McCormick, L. F. Murphy, T. J. Kitch ens, G. C. Brooks, P. G. Sweeting, T. T. Scott, J. P. Cape, T. J. Clark, B. F. Collins, C. J. _ Toler, H. J. Reed, R. W. Boone, Jr. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ]OIIN G. MACFARLAN First Lieutenant JOHN J. KLEIN Second lieutenant . . . . . . . . WALTER G. SMITH NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant . JOSEPH J. SPENCE SERGEANTS DICKSON, CHARLES D. LANE, HALE A. FELTS, WILLIAM F. MAYER, WILl,l('M D. KELLER, JOHN J. ~ MALOOF, ROGER W. PEABODY, ' PRENTICE B. COR?ORALS GAULDING, EMMl'IT H. MclNNIS, JOHN A. Grnes, CLARENCE R. SCHARRER, FRED T. JAMIESON, GEORGE S. SCHEINBERG, JOI! S. MARSHALL, ARTHUR R. SCOTT, TOM T. STEWART, WALTER P. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BENNETT, LESTER w. BOONE, ROBERT W., JR. CAPE, JOUN P. COLLINS, ROBERT A. FAY, ETHAN D. GROOVER, ROAN J. AGEE, CLINTON B. B1ou1N , ADRIAN D. BOOHER, FRANK L BROOKS, GEORGE C. PRIVATES HENSON, JESSE 0. MARSHALL, JOHN E. McCORMICK, HENRY A. McFEETERs, Bou B. SCHULTZ, PAUL H, WILSON, HARLAN D. BRYANT, JAMES W. C1CIRELLI, FRANK $ . CLARK, HOWARD R,, JR. CLARK, THOMAS J. ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH IN FANT RY [86]

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PRIVATES COLLINS, BENJAMIN F. DAYE, GUSSIE E., JR. , ""FUIIRKN, JACK ., . . FUIIRKN, ROBERT W. HOLLIDAY, FR A NK A. JOHNSON, JOHN R. KELLY, JACK D. KITCHENS, THOMAS J. LANE, FRANK L. MATHEWES, JOHN F. McCLAIN, ALLEN F. MILLER, ALBERT W., JR. MURPHY, LEVERETTE F. PAMPLIN, DELLIS N. PEELER, OSCAR C. REED, HENRY J. SCHARRER, WILLIAM F. SCOTT, Joirn w. SHEFFIELD, JOHN A. SMITH, ALLEN SWEETING, PHIL0MEN G. TAYLOR, RAYMOND C. TOLER, CARROLL J. WooD, BURTON M. FACTUAL HISTORY Company ''A" was organized at H~llywood, Florida, and Federal recognition extended on June 10, 1926. On May 8, 1929, this unit was dis banded and transferred to Miami, Florida. The Headquarters Company First Battalion, 124th Infantry, being redesignated as Company "A." The officers of Company uA" at Miami, Flor• ida, at the time the transfer became effective on May 14, 1929, were Captain Alva F. Carden, MIAMI, FLORIDA SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: C. R. Agee, R. W. Maloof, J. A. Mcinni s , J. R. Johnson, B. M. Wood, F. S. Cicirclli, J. J. Keller, J. J. Spence, B. B. Mcfeeter s , A. Smith, H. D. Wilson, A. D. Blouin. SECOND Row: E. D. Fay, F. L. Booher, A. F . McClain, L. W. Bennett, J. W. Bryant, F. A. Holliday, A. R. Marshall, W. F. Scharrer, J. F. Mathewes, R. A . Collins, J. A. Sheffield, M. F . Heery, D. N. Pamplin, 0. C. Peeler, G. E. Daye, Jr. First Lieutenant Edgar A. Higgs, and Second Lieutenant George F. Klein. Captain William H. Peeples commanded the organization from April, 1931, until February, 1934, when he resigned. First Lieutenant John G. Macfarlan was trans• ferred from the 265th Coast Artillery and placed in command of Company ''A," being promoted to Captain in July, 1934. The present officers of the unit are Captain John G. Macfarlan, First Lieutenant John J. Klein and Second Lieutenant I . Walter G. Smith. I 87) Company "A" served on active 1 St~te duty dur ing the Mediterranean fruit fly epidemic, 19291930, and the South Florida hurricanes, 1928 and 1935.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RST Row: J. H. Moser, S. T. Nelson, E. P. O'Hara, F. J. Cooper, K. 0. Sandborn, E. E. Sanderson, A. J. Cumbaa, J. I. Renaldi. SECOND Row: J. C. Carter, J. W. Rothwell, S. F. BoriDg, S. C. Pyfrom, A. E. Chapman, R. A. Moser, W. H. Barnes, J. S. Roan, Jr., W. F. Bamberg. THIRD Row: N. J. Beatty, C. Cochran, V. H. Barnes, L. B. McDonald, F. B. Rolfes, L. W, Ayers, G. D. Rogers, J. E. Ellis, W. A. Kessler, B. L. Knott. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ... First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant , , . BENJAMIN B. ACREE RAYMOND ST, JOHN SPRAGUE , ROBERT B. TURNER, JR, NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant SERGEANTS CHEATHAM, ROBERT H. EDDY, ROY N. ~; MOSER, JAMES H. CORPORALS ANDERSON, CLARENCE A. CUMBAA, ARTHUR J, Dix, SHIRLEY H. METCALF, JACK WILLIAM H. BOYD SANDERSON, EUGENE E. SAPP, MITCHELL A. SIMMONITE, THOMAS F. NELSON, STEVE T., JR, O'HARA, EDWARD P. TAYLOR, MARION J, WESTMAN, JOHN P. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS AYERS, LLOYD W. BARNES, WILLIAM H. COOPER, FRED J. DIXON, BENJAMIN D. EVANS, LEWIS C. HARPER, FRANKLIN W, KNOTT, BERNARD L. ALLEN, RAYMOND F, ANDREWS, JAMES C. BAILEY, WILLIAM L. BAMBERG, WILEY F. BARNES, VAN H. BEATTY, DAVID J. BEATTY, NORMAN J. BORING, SAMUEL F. BRIGHT, JESS T. PRIVATES MILLER, FRANCIS H. MOSER, ROBERT A. PEARMAN, R. W., III, RENALDI, JAMES I. ROAN, JOHN S., JR. SANDBORN, KENNETH 0. SUGGS, EUGENE N. BURRUS, CHARLES C. CARTER, JOHN C. CATES, CECIL H., JR, CHAPMAN, ARTHUR E. COCHRAN, CHARI.ES CRANE, ROBERT I. DAVIS, RALPH E. EISENWINTER, CHAS. E. ELLIS, JOHN E. ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY [ 88)

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PRIVATES FREAR, JIARRY J. : : GUNN, WOODROW W, KELLERMAN, NORMAN H. KESSLER, WILLIAM A. LARRIMORE, SAMUEL W. McDONALD, LEO B. PYFROM, STANLEY C. RAFFERTY, FRANK J. R1GSBY, RoY E. ROGERS, GEORGE D. ROLFES, FRANCIS B, ROLLINS, LEVIN H. ROTHWELL, JOHN W, SOUTHERN, SAM C., JR. SUHRDIER, LEO K. WILSON, GILBERT C, FACTUAL HISTORY In 1917, shortly after Company "M,'' First Florida Infantry, was called into Federal service, Captain Wil liam Pruden Smith, then Mayor of Miami, attended the officers' training school. After graduating, he was placed on the officers' reserve list. He immediately returned to Miami, called together some 500 Dade County citizens, and organized four rifle companies and a band, by au thority of the late Governor Sidney J. Catts. Captain Saunders was placed in command of Company "B," des ignated as the Dad~ County Guard. Five units were organized, equipped and drilled weekly, with a huge mili tary parade each Sunday, usually on the East Coast Golf Club grounds. The rifles were about six feet long, and the uniforms were not of the latest design. This gave the county military protection and furnished a military spectacle during those hectic days while the National Guard units were in training camps and overseas. Immediately after the armistice was signed, ending the MI AM I FLORIDA SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RsT Row: T. F. Simmonite, R. N. Eddy, J. Metcalf, J. P. \\Testman, W. H. lloyd, R. H. Cheatham, S. H. Dix, C. A. An derson, M. A. Sapp. SECOND Row: M. J. Taylor, R. F. Allen, J. C. Andrews, G. C. Wilson, J. T. Bright, R. I. Crane, F. J. Rafferty, E. N. Suggs, D. J. Beatty. ( 89) THIRD Row: R. W. Pearman, III, R. E. Rigsby, W. W •. Gunn, L. H. Rollins, L. K. Suhrbier, S. W. Larrimore, C. C . Burrus, R. E. Davis, C. E . Eisenwinter, H. J. Frear. World War, Captain Walter D. Payne called all will ing, able-bodied, partially trained guardsmen together and organized the present company "B." This company con tinued to hold weekly drills, using the obsolete arms and uniforms until Federal recognition was extended on October 17, 1919. New equipment was issued including the latest type rifles and uniforms. The shoes were the hobnail type-vety soft and comfortable. Captain Payne resigned and Captain Robert N. Ward was placed in command July 30, 1919. The first detail was a four-day school for two officers and 16 non-commissioned officers at Camp Jackson, South Carolina. The present company commander, Captain Benjamin B. Acree, was a member and held the grade of Corporal at the time. In August, 1920, the first annual encamp ment was held at Camp Joseph E. Johnsto7:1, near Jack sonville, the name of the camp was later changed to Camp J. Clifford R. Foster, in honor of our late Adjutant General Foster. The organization has attended 19 annual encampments, winning the trophy for the best drilled company in close order drill three times. E

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CO M P ANY B FIRST BATTALION 2 4 T H NFANTRY MIAMI, FLORIDA I. Non-Commissioned Officers' School. 2. Port Arms. 3. Squad Wedge. 4. Pistol Drill, 5. Automatic Rifle Schooling. 6. Squad Rifle Marksmanship. 7. Non-Commissioned Officers ..

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C 0 M p A N y C i FIRST BATTALION ! I 2 4 T H N F A N T R y l WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA I. Company "C" in Third Army Maneuvers. 2. Company Headq~arlers. 3 . Squad Wedge. 4 . Non-Commissioned Officers. 5. Supply Room. 6. Third Army Maneuvers.

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I 11 --SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: D. C , Peters, C. M . Halstead, R. M. Thompson, B. \V. Miller, V. T. Port, J . C. Callahan, G. N. Page. SECOND Row: \V. Meyer, P. J. Jordan, H. L Nicholas, W. E. Griffith, J. A. Garvey, G. W. McElhenney, R. J. Thistlewaite, R. E. Whetstone. TmRo Row: J. R. Bennett, H. C. Morgan, C. W. Moore, J. M. Kelly, L. T. Rabun, B. F. Benton, L. B. \Vise, J. K. Mahon, C. T. Hartman. d/.vui B~ COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ... First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . VICTOR H. KUSCHEL . CURTIS D. CLEMENT OLIVER W. HARTWELL NON-COMMISS'IONED OFFICERS First Sergeant . EUGEN!! J. MCCANN SERGEANTS BAYNE, EDWARD S, KELLY, JOHN M. HARTMAN, CHARLES T, ; LoY, EDGAR c. JACKSON, CHESTER F. WHETSTONE, RUSSELL E. WILMER, HARRY M. CORPORALS BALDWIN, LEONARD A., JR. FUQUAY, CECIL 0. BROWN, EUGENE G. MILi.ER, BEN W. BUTTE, JOIIN H. MEYER, 'WILSON C. POST, TRACY A. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS CALLAHAN, JACK C. GARVEY, JACK A. HALSTEAD, JOSEPH 0. HUTClllNS, NEAi , C. MAHON, JACK K. McELHENNEY, GEO, \V. MORGAN, HERBERT C. PRIVATES BENNETT, JULIAN R. BENTON, BENNY F. BRANNAM, HARRY M. BRANNAM, JOIIN W, BURBRIDGE, JOHN D. BURRUS, JACK M. MORRIS, CHARLES M. OSBORNE, RUPERT S. PAGE, GARLAND N. RABUN, LYNELLE T. REDDICK, GEORGI! R. THOMPSON, RONALD M. W1sE, LAWRENCE B. CREECH, Wu.LIAM L. DONAHUE, JOHN W, GRIFFITH, WILLIAM E, GRAF, WALTER F, HALSTEAD, CHARLES M. JOHNSON, FRANK E. B. ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY [92)

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j I I. l PRIVATES JORDAN, PAUL SHANKLIN, FRANKE. LICK, ORIN L. STEVENS, MAX LICK, WILLIAM M. THISTLEWAITE, R. J. NICHOLAS, HERBERT L. TOLLAY, JACK T. PETERS, DARWIN C. TDLLAY, THURMAN T . PIERCE, ARTHUR F. VAUCHN, JAMES R. PORT, VERNE T. WEATHERFORD, C. B. Ross, DONALD J. WEST, LESLIE H. WILLS, THEODORE T. FACTUAL HISTORY This unit was originally mustered into service at West Palm Beach, Florida, on May 11, 1914, as Company "L," Second Florida Infantry, with William Saas as Captain, Harold E. Ferguson as First Lieutenant, and Gordon R. Broome as . Second Lieutenant. It was in Federal service on the Mexican Border from June, 1916, to March, 1917, and entered Federal service for the World War on August 5, 1917, when the desig nation of the regiment was changed to the 124th In fantry. The organization sailed for France from Camp Mills, New York, on October 16, 1918, and was broken lip and used as replacements upon arrival in France. On March 21, 1921, Company "C," 154th Infantry, WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. [ 93 J SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: H. M. Wilmer, J. 1-1. Butte, E. G. Brown, J. M. Burrus, T. T. Tolley, R. S. Osborne, C. 0 . Fuquay. SECOND Row: J. W. Br:innam, 0. L. Lick, H. M. Brannam, M. D. Stevens, J. V. Donahue, W. L. Creech, G . R. Reddick, N. C. Hutchins. THIRD Row: J. 0. Hals1ead, J. R. Vaughn, T. A. Post, E . C. Loy, C. F. Jackson, C. M. Morris, L. H. \Vest, W. M. Lick, L. A. Baldwin, Jr., E. S. Bayne. was reorganized at West Palm Beach, Florida, and was Federally recognized from that date. On May 12, 1924, the regiment designation was changed to 124th Infantry. Company "C" was on duty immediately following the South Florida hurricane of 1926 at Miami, Florida, for 11 days. It served for 14 days following the hurricane at West Palm Beach in 1928. During the Mediterran• ean fruit fly quarantine, it saw duty at Brooksville, Day tona Beach, and from Melbourne to Jacksonville, for 18 months. It also served on active State duty following the Labor Day hurricane of the Florida Keys in 1935. Officers serving in Company "C" since its reorganiza tion have been Captains Charles Holtslaw, William H. vonBehren, Victor H. Kuschel; First Lieutenants Cliff Ewing, R. D. Hill, James A. McIntosh, Curtis D. Clem ent, and Second Lieutenants Victor R. Rousseau, George Rowley, and Oliver W. Hartwell. lL l'J

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: P. M. Vickery, H. L. Howell, C. L. Tanner, T. V. Brown, F. S. Ray, G. C. Maready, 0. P. Forguson, F. R. Ganas. SECOND Row: C. L Wisenbacker, W. B. Stovall, R. D. Mer• chant, E. E. Knight, A. J. Williams, L. G. Bryan, W. 0. Cun• ningham, W. T. Wright, J. E. King. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ..• First Lieutenant . Second Lieutenant HAROLD C. WASHBURN WILLIAM F. RUNGB . . KARL E. NORDGREN NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant PHILLIP M. VICKERY SERGEANTS BRowN, TERRENCE v."--, MAREADY, GEORGE c. CAMERON, ROBT. A., JR. RAY, FRANK S. HOWELL, HERMAN L. TANNER, CLYDE L. THOMPSON, IRA S. CORPORALS BADGER, OTIS C. FORGUSON, OWEN P. GANAS, FRED R. JACKSON, WILMAN D. JONES, CLARENCE 0. PIATT, FRANK J. STANALAND, ROBERT H. WOODS, CARMON c. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BENTON, JACK M. KING, JOHN E. BROOKE, SAMUEL G. MONGER, RALPH P. BROKMEYER, HENRY C. QUATTLEBAUM, KYLE L. BRYAN, LEON G. RABUN, CARL M. FORGUSON, LESLIE D. SHANNON, WATSON KENDALL, WARD V. WENT, RALPH L. WILLIAMS, ARTHUR J. PRIVATES ANDERSON, WALTER BENTON, KENNETH E. BROWN, WILLIAM T. BUSH, JOHN CAMERON, BRUCE CUNNINGHAM, W. 0. ECHOLS, CHARLES L, EVANS, EDWARD F., JR. GOODLOE, ROBERT K. GOODSPEED, RALPH A., JR. ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH IN FANTR'f l 9-t l

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PRIVATES GRIFFIS, LOYD D. NETrLES, CHARLES W . HALL, EUGENE O'BARR, WILLIAM R. HILL, WILLIAM C, SAUCER, GEORGE J, HOLLOWAY, EASTER B. STARNES, JOHNNIE A. HOLLOWAY, LUTHER N. STOVALL, WALTER B. JACOBS, OLIVER M. THOMPSON, JOSEPH T. KING, HERBERT B. TURNER, JAMES A. KLICKER, WALTER T. TYSON, MILLARD C. KNIGHT, EARL E, VANNESS, DAVID W, MERCHANT, FRANK B. WELBORN, WEBBER D. MERCHANT, ROLAND D. WISENBACKER, C. L. MCINTYRE, CHARLES H, WHITWORTH, HUBERT $. WRIGHT, WILLIAM T, INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD RESERVE PRIVATE FIRST CLASS ALLBRITTON, WALLACE E. DP.AN, RALPH HENDERSON, JAMES HURT, CHARLES C, PRIVATES KASERMAN, ARNOLD J. MATTAIR, WILLIAM E. STOVALL, EUGENE K. FACTUAL HISTORY This company was given Federal recognition in the National Guard on April 5, 1921. The officers at time of organization were: George A. DeCottes, Cap tain; Joseph C. Hutchison, First Lieutenant, and Frank SANFORD, FLORIDA SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: R. A. Cameron, Jr., I. S. Thompson, C. 0. Jones, R. H, Stanaland, L. D. Forguson, W. V, Kendall, S. G. Brooke. SECOND Row: B. Cameron, E. B. Holloway, W. T. Brown, H. C. Brokmeyer, L. N. Holloway, C. L. Echols, R. A . Goodspeed, E. F. Evans, Jr., J. M. Benton. Lossing, Second Lieutenant. Service seen by this unit since its reorganization in the new National Guard has been as follows: It served in the Miami hurricane area during September, 1926, in the Miami, Hollywood, and Ft. Lauderdale areas, and was under the command of First Lieutenant William F. Runge. It served in the Palm Beach hurricane area in September, 1928, in West Palm Beach and surrounding territory, and was under the command of Captain Joseph C . Hutchison. It served in the Mediterranean fruit Hy quarantine, 1929-31, in the Sanford, Haines City, Tampa and Green Cove Springs areas, under the command of Captain Harold C. Washburn. It served in the threat• ened riotous disturbance in Daytona Beach on Janu ary 1, 1937, and was under command of Captain H. C. Washburn. [ 95]

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COMPANY D I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2. Instruction in Nomenclature of Machine Gun. FIRST BATTALION 3. Using Instruments in Determining Range and Targets. 4. Supply Room. 2 4 T . rf NFANTRY 5. Machine Gun and Crew Ready for Action. 6. Anti-Aircraft Alertness. SANFORD, FLORIDA

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THOMAS T. LONG First Lieut., Headquarters Company RICHARD G. KIDD, JR. Second Lieut., Headquarters Company FRANK M. GREENE, JR. First lieutenant, Company E LOUIE C. WADSWORTH Second Lieutenant, Company E MAHONE REES, JR. Captain 1 Company E FRANK M. WHIDDON Captain, Company F * MAXWELL C. SNYDER Captain, Company G EDMUND A. WRIGHT Captain, Company H FRED A. SAFAY Major, Commanding SECOND BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY GEORGE W. SEARS . Fir,t lieutenant, Company F NED A. PATTON S•cond lieutenant, Company F WILLIAM J. THOMAS ROBERT 6 HARKNESS First Lieutenant, Company G Fint Lieutenant, Company H WILLIAM E. BALL HUGH A. WILSON Second Lieutenant, Company G Second Lieutenant, Company H

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: R. C. Long, L. 0. Jones, R. C. Johns, M. G. Mc Millan, E. R. Struth, ,v. H . Graham, J. II. Dennis. SECOND Row: C. A. Jenkins, M . Edwards, 0. G. Lewis, R. C. Bradley, T. C. Hazen, Jr., W . C. Powell, A. K. Carlisle, L A . Shaw. S T A R K E, F L O R D A COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . . . THOMAS T. LONG Second Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . RICHARD G. Kmo, JR. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Staff Sergeant SAM ALVAREZ SERGEANTS GRAHAM, WILLIAM H. McMILLAN, MERRILL G. DENNIS, }AMES H. STRUTH, ELMO R, CORPORALS EDWARDS, MERRILL }DUNS, ROBERT C, }ONES, LEE 0. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS JENKINS, CHARLES A. PRIVATES ANDREWS, WILLIAM R. BRADLEY, REECE C, CARLISLE, AL. K, CROSBY, ALBERT L, GRIFFIS, JOHN D. POWELL, WILLIAM C. HAZEN, THOMAS C., JR . LoNC, WILLIAM N. LoNG, ROBERT C. LEWIS, 0vm G. SHAW, LOUIS A, FACTUAL HISTORY There has been a military organization in Starke, Florida, for many years. The oldest record on file with the present company is an "Annual Muster Roll," ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY [98 J

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date April 22, 1897, which stated that the company was then known as Company "B," Fourth Battalion, Florida State Troops. , After the World War, the National Guard of the State was reorganized and a company was organized in Starke on February 17, 1920, and received Federal recognition as the Fourth Separate Company on March 16, 1920. Before the end of the first year, the unit was redesignated as Company "F," First Infantry. It was redesignated Company "H," First Infantry, on January 5, 1921, and Company "G," 154th In fantry, on May 7, 1921. It was redesignated Company "G," 124th Infantry, in April, 1924, and Headquarters Company, Second Battalion, 124th Infantry, on August 24, 1927. I . Intelligence Section. 2. Wire Section, 3. Radio Section. 4. Message Center . 5. Non-Commissioned Officers,

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El SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH Frnsr Row: L. W. Lee, W. A. Anderson, L. F. Ray, J. M. Brown, T. D. Hart, P. D . Langford, M. F. Land, V. E . Mc• Keithen. SECOND Row: H. F. Hayes, P. L. Mixon, A. A. VanBuren, C. \V. Stewart, \V. M. Clayton, S. J. Hurst, J. L. Hingson, C. A. Hurst, E. Williams. A. Pearson, M . P. Brown, L. M. Cothron, J. Goff, L. J. Gill, C . S. Touchton. TmRo Row: J. P. Smith, H . G. Helton, Jr . , R. E. Tudor, J. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . . . . . . . . MAHONE REES, JR. Fir,t Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . FRANK M. GREENE, JR. Second Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . LOUIE C. w ADSWORTH NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant . . . . . . . . . . PAUL D. LANGFORD SERGEANTS ANDERSON, WILLIAM A;-; LEE, LAWRENCE W. BIRD, WILEY MCKEITHEN, VANN E. BRORSEN, NEILS JI. STEWART, CLYDE W. WHITE 1 SAMUEL J., JR. CORPORALS AUSTIN, ELBERT HOWELL, CLARENCE G. BROWN, JAMES M. LAND, MARVIN F. DURELL, ALBERT E. LoNG, KENNETH A. HART, THOMAS D. RAY, LEROY F. WEAVER, WILLIAM D. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BROWN, HARLEY M. CANNON, CLAUDE K. CHAPMAN, ROBERT V. HELTON, HENRY G., JR, HINES, ROLAND P. HINCSON, JOSEPH F, HOWARD, GREEN V.\; PRIVATES ALLEN, HENRY D. Bit.OWN, MARVIN P. ]ONES, ELZA LANIER, BARNEY, JR, LANIER, MALCOLM F. PALMER, CALVIN 0. PEAVY, WILLARD H. POWELL, LAWSON M. VAN BUREN, A. A. CHAPMAN, ALTON R. C1111.os, FESTUS R., JR. ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY I 100)

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PRIVATES CLAYTON, WILSON M. COTHRON, LESSEY M. CREWS, TALMADGE R. CURL, HENRY A. GAMBLE, EWELL F. GILL, LEON J. GOFF, JACK r-HACKNEY, C, J., JR, HAYES, HOMER F. HELTON, JOSHUA M. HINGSON, JAMES L. HUNTER, WILLIAM C, HURST, CARY A. HURST, SIDNEY J. HOWELL, JRA J, MOORE, LONNIE C. NOLAND, HOUSTON S. MCKEITHEN, HENRY T, NEWMAN, FRED L. PLYMEL, ERNEST L. PEARSON, JONNIE A. SMITH, FRED L. SMITH, JAMES V. SMITH, JOHN P. TAYLOR, HOWARD $, TEDDER, DANIEL W, TUDOR, ROBERT E. TURNA~E, HERMAN L. FACTUAL HISTORY Steeped in tradition of many years service with State and national militia, Live Oak's guard unit holds an enviable spot in the hearts of its citizenry. First organ• ized as the Suwannee Rifles, March 20, 1890, its per sonnel has included many of the county's prominent residents. In 1895, the Suwannee Rifles became Company "A," Fourth Battalion. It was mustered into Federal service for the Spanish-American War, May 23, 1898. The designation was changed to Company "L," First Florida Volunteers. Mustered out in Tallahassee, December 3, 1898, it immediately re-entered State service as Company "A," Fourth Battalion, Florida State Troops; became Company "E," First Florida Infantry between January LIVE OAK, FLORIDA [ IOI I SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: W. Bird, C. W. Stewart, E. Austin, C. G . How• ell, G. V. Howard, J. F. Hingson, N. H. Brorsen, K. A. Long . SECOND Row: H. S. Taylor, F. L. Smith, T. R. Crews, M . P. Brown, J. V. Smiih, D. W, Tedder, R. P. Hines C. K. Cannon B. Lanier , Jr. ' ' THIRD Row: H. A. Curl, F. L. Newman, H. L. Turnage, E. L. Plymel, E. F. Gamble, H. S. Noland, L. M. Powell, F. R. Childs, E. Jones, I. J. Howell. 16, 1899, and April 19, 1900, and remained in State service until disbanded just prior to the World War. In April, 1917, the unit was reorganized, entered Fed era~ service August 5, 1917, and was broken up upon arrival at Camp Wheeler to build up various units of the 31st Division. hs members were largely responsible for reorganization on February 11, 1920, of the Third Sep a_rate Company, Florida National Guard. This designa tion held for a year, the unit then became Company "E," 154th Infantry. On May 12, 1924, the regiment was changed to the 124th Infantry. Much of the Company's history since the World War can be traced to the untiring effort of Florida's Assistant Adjutant General, Lieutenant Colonel Robert G. White, , who rose from the ranks to command the unit for over 10. years. As commander of the battalion including the umt, he led the movement to secure the unit an adequate armory in Live Oak, now one of the State's finest. I _ t was the first company in the State to qualify its entire personnel with the rifle during a target season. This_ was done for two consecutive years, bringing the Remington Trophy to the unit, which it still retains. a

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COMPANY E SECOND BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY LIVE OAK, FLORIDA l 1021 I. Basketball Team. 2. Non-Commiuioned Officers. 3 . Squad . Wedge. 4. Recruit Instruction. 5. Platoon Attacking. 6. As Skirmish~rs.

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I, Non-Commissioned Officers. 2. Rille Team. 3. Recruit Drill, of Inspection Arms. 4. Riot Duty, 5. Bayonet Drill. 6. Anti-Aircraft Defense , [ 103] l•"' ,.,.;. ; , tc COMPANY F SECOND BA TT ALION ' ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: J. H. Jackson, T. J. Lafferty, R. H. Church, G. E. Summers, Jr., H. C. Meadows, P. D. Lampru, J. W. Osborne, F. M. Strayer, J. E. Foster. SECOND Row: E. L. Yarb~rough, S. W. Rivers, C. Attaw;iy, J. lj. Martin, C. P. Bridwell, Jr., E. A. Windham, E. M. Car roll, E. D. Riles, J. W. Brown, F. E. Rush. ~~Row: F. H. Beighley, B. Williams, L. E. Shiferdek, H. D. M. Hinson, G. M. Hurlbert, R. L. Trawick, G, C. Carter, Jr., C. G. Ryals, J. A. Harrington. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ... First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant FRANK M. WHIDDON GEORGE W. SEARS . . NED A. PATTON NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant SERGEANTS JOSEPH A. JOHNSON LAFFERTY, THOMAS J. MARTIN, FREDERIC R. MEADOWS, HENRY C, CHURCH, ROBERT H. FOSTER, WILSON J. JACKSON, JAMES H. .,__ SUMMERS, GEORGE E., JR. CORPORALS ALDERMAN, WILLIAM R. LAMPRU, PAUL D. FOSTER, JAMES E. MARTIN, GEORGE E, HILL, WALLACE LAM. OSBORNE, JAMES W. KERSEY, HERBERT W. SMITH, ROY H. STRAYER, FRED M. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ATTAWAY, CECIL FOSTER, CARL K. BEIGHLEY, FRANK H. HARRINGTON, JAMES A. BOUTWELL, THEODORE R, HURLBERT, ROY A. BRIDWELL, C. P., JR. JACKSON, FRANCIS R. CARTER, GEORGE C., JR. OXFORD, RALPH W,, JR, CHASE, RAYMOND W; RILES, EDGAR D. DOLLAR, ALDEAN L. ROBERTS, ROBERT W, SMITH, Jmrn s., JR. PRIVATES BARNES, ELWARD C. BERNREUTER, HERMAN C. BLUME, ARTHUR A. BRIDGES, WILLIAM H. BROWN, JOHN W, BUNK, MAX M. CARROLL, EDWARD M. DIGGETT, ERNEST A. DRAWDY, CLINTON E. FUTCH, EDGAR M. GIBBS, LESTER H. GRIMSl,EY, FREDERICK 0, ONE HUNDRED ANO TWENTY-FOURTH IN FANT RY I 104 J

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PRIVATES HINSON, DAVIS M. '--::-HIRES, WILLIAM E. JOHNSON, ANDREW L. MARTIN, JAMES H. MCCRANIE, MARTIN C. MCGAHEE, HUNTON OLIVER, WILLIAM J. OLSON, MERVIN J. RENTZ, CEILON H. RIVERS, SINCLAIR W. RUSH, FRANK E. RYALS, CECIL G. SIIIFERDEK, LYLE E. SMITH, WILLIAM H. STARLING, GEORGE G. TILLIS, REED L. TRAWICK, ROBERT L. W1LLIAM8, BRINKLEY WILLIAMS, DAVID C. WINDHAM, EUTHO~ A. Wooo, PERCY M. YARBOROUGH, EDWIN L. FACTUAL HISTORY The Metropolitan Light Infantry was organized on June 7, 1887, at Jacksonville, Florida, being the fast military organization allowed to form in this section after the Civil War. About 1893, the unit's name was changed to Metropolitan Light Infantry, Company "C," First Battalion, Florida State Troops. After its entrance into Federal service for the Spanish American War its designation was changed on May 20, 1898, to Company "F," First Florida Infantry. It changed from Federal to State service on January 27, 1899, and rendered valuable assistance in many ways during the disastrous Jacksonville fire of~ Mustered into Federal service on April 13, 1917, it was assigned duty guarding bridges, public utilities, etc., in Florida until the general call of National Guard orJACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: J. A. Johnson, R. H. Smith, W. L. Hill, G . E. Martin, W. R. Aldcman, H. W. Kersey, J. H. Hopkins, L. II. Gibbs, P. M. Wood, E. M. Futch. SECOND Row: C. H. Rentz, R. \V. Oxford, Jr., F. R. Jackson, C. K. Foster, F. 0. Grimsley, E. A. Diggett, A . L. Dollar, G. G. Starling, R. L. Tillis, E. C. Barnes. THIRD Row: H. C. Bernreuter, R. W. Chase, A. L. Johnson, M. C . McCranie, C. E. Drawdy, M. M. Bunk, W. J. Oliver, W. E. Hires, W. H. Smith, T. R. Boutwell, M. J. Olson. ganizations for the World War on August 5, 1917. Im mediately, the regiment was broken up and the personnel was used to make up various units of the 31st Division at Camp Wheeler, Georgia. The 124th Infantry (part of the 31st Division) went to France in July, 1918, and was placed in GHQ reserve, where a great many men were transferred to other organizations to replace cas ualties. In the Spring of 1919, the troops returned to the United States and were mustered out at Camp Wheeler, Georgia. Company "F," 154th Infantry, organized and Federally recognized at Jacksonville on September 22, 1920, was h C "F" designated as successor to t e pre-war ompany , First Florida Infantry. On May 12, 1924, the 154th Infantry was redesignated the 124th Infantry. Company "F" has an excellent armory drill attendance record and has won the Taliaferro Trophy, emblematic of State Military Rifle Championship, 10 out of the 30 times it has been offered for competition since its donation in 1903 by Senator Taliaferro. I 10~ J

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1 SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: E. C. Conn, G. Shearer, Jr., B. 0. Day, T. R. Overstraat, S. M. Pirkle, E. A. Swope, B. L. Tyler, W. J. Rhodes, J. P. Carroll. SECOND Row: H. C. Cato, A. H. Hemmingway, J. T, Morgan, E. M. Cook, A. J. Bennett, H. E. Fort, R. F. Wheeler, N. R. Ivey, E. P. Harris, W. R. Wright. TmRo Row: J. B. Graham, P. Knight, E. J. Allen, W. W. Braswell, W. M. Abernathy, B. J. Durkee, L. T. Hagin, B. C. Clanton, Jr., W. J. Thomas, Jr., 0. H. Byrd, C. B. Strange, Jr. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . MAXWELL C. SNYDER . WILLIAM J. THOMAS . . WILLIAM E. BALL NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant . . . . SERGEANTS NEFLER, LAWRENCE L. OVERSTREET, THOMAS ll. .... SAWYER, AUBREY D. ' CORPORALS . EMORY L. ANDERSON TOLBERT, SANTFORD C. TYLER, BRUCE L. WHEELER, EDWIN H. BELL, OSMOND R. HULL, HENRY H., JR. FORT, HERBERT E. PAGONIS, JAMES A. HALL, THEODORE E. RHODES, WILLIAM J. HOBBS, RICHARD P. THOMAS, WM. J., JR, WILD, JOHN K. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ABERNATHY, WILLIAM M. ALLEN, EARL J. BARNARD, HUGH D. BARNARD, WALLACE C. BOUTWELL, HOWARD C. CARROLL, JOHN P. CLANTON, B. C., JR, CLANTON, ROBERT H. PRIVATES BENNETT, ARYEY BROWN, ELMO J. BYRD, OWEN H. CANNON, CLARENCE J. CATO, HARPER C. COOK, EARL M. CLEMONS, Oms CONN, ELMER C. DAY, BENNETT 0. DURKEE, BREWSTER J. INNES, EDWIN J. KNIGHT, PAUL O'BRIEN, PATRICK D. SMITH, ERNEST M. CRAWFORD, ROSCOE N. GRAHAM, JACK B, HAGIN,_LEONARD T. HALL, CLARENCE L. HARRIS, EllWARD P. HEMMINGWAY, AUBRY ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH IN FANT RY [ 106]

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PRiVATES IVEY, NORMAN R. JonNS, THOMAS M. Jmrns, Jmrn P. MACDONALD, THOMAS R. McDONALD, ALBERT T. MORGAN, KENNETH ORR, WILLIAM H. PIRKLE, SCOTT M. Poou, HENRY H. SHAW, CLEO T. STRANGE, CLAUDE B., JR. SIIP.ARER, GEORGE TERRY, GEORGE D. TILLMAN, CHAS. F., JR. WHEELER, ROBERT F. WILLIAMS, RAY R., JR. WRIGHT, WILLIE R. YARBOROUGH, FRANCIS W. FACTUAL HISTORY This unit was originally organized in Starke, Florida, 1903, and mustered out August 23, 1905. It was again mustered in on April 23, 1906, and mustered out March 18, 1916: Mustered in again on June 19, 1916, it was recognized on July 4, 1916, and recognized on September 4 as the Fourth Separate Company, Infantry. The com pany was redesignated Company "H," First Infantry, January 5, 1921; Company "G," First Infantry, May '7, 1921; Company "G," 154th Infantry, December 7, 1921, and Company "G," 124th Infantry, May 12, 1924. On August 24, 1927, the organization was transferred to Jacksonville, Florida, replacing Second Battalion Headquarters Company, 124th Infantry, which was transferred to Starke. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA [ 107] SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FrnsT Row: E. II. Wheeler, A. D. Sawyer, S. C. Tolbert, E. L. Anderson, 0. R. Bell, L. L. Nefler, E. J. Brown. SF.COND Row: A. T. McDonald, E. J. Innes, H. H. Poole, C. L . Hall, T. E. Hall, R. A. Clinton, F. W. Yarborough, J. P. Johns, W. J. Bernard. THIRD Row: R. P. Hobbs, 0. Clemons, T . R. McDonald, C. F. Tillman, Jr., C. T. Shaw, E . M. Smith;~. A. Pagonis, H. H. Hull, Jr., H. D. Barnard. The only active duty that the organization has seen since the World War was participation in hurricane re lief duty in Miami in 1937 and patrol duty during the Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine. The unit is particularly proud of its activities in the Third Army Maneuvers in DeSoto National Park, near Biloxi, Mississippi, in August, 1938. The organization received commendations on its operations in contacting the enemy forces in two engagements, where the men showed they were wel!-disciplind, and through their ag gressiveness, captured many prisoners, arms, and material while gaining their objective. The present Company Commander, Captain Maxwell C. Snyder, took command on June 18, 1934. First Lieu tenant William J. Thomas, First Sergeant Emery L. An derson and Sergeant Francis A. Swope have been with the organization since that time.

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COMPANY G SECOND BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA 'I , .. f:~ ~\, : ~~ : .) ~ ~ --?, : . ~~it'.,i;~~~~;\h ~it.!~ ~ ~~~ i ~ ,-~ ~ '. . I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2. Company Headquarters. 3. Manual of Arms. 4. Bayonet Instruction. 5. Squad Wedge. 6. Supply Room.

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I, Non-Commissioned Officers. 2, Non-Commissioned Offieers' Sehool, 3, Gas Mask lnstruetion, 4. Anti-Aireraft Defense. 5. Free Ride. 6. Going into Aetion. COMPANY H SECOND BA TT ALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY LAKE CITY, FLORIDA

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Ro w : E. C. Morrell, C. W. Re g i s ter, C. J. Bedenbaugh, C. A. Crews, E. G . Bedenbaugh, C. E . Cason, S. H. Davant, M. M. Moore . SECOND Row: D. S. DesVergers, C. W. Fralick, R. L. Smith, N. E. Pear c e, R. L. Montague, N. R. Greene, P. Keene, A. F. Markham , H . C . Brooks. TmRD Row: A. A. Bryan, R. C. Blanton, S. J. Bryan, L. W. Ro s ier, D. P. Rogers, W. M. Bryan, F. H. Nalls, C. H. Tice, F. River s. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ... First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . EDMUND A. WRIGHT . ROBERT B. HARKNESS . HUGH A. WILSON NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergea,nt EDWARD C. MORRELL SERGEANTS BEDENBAUGH, CLAUDE J. -:.:.._ _ MOORE, MARION M. DAVANT, SHELLY H. ' REGISTER, CECIL W. MARKHAM, ALFRED G. STUART, JOHN B. W1TT, ALTON C. CORPORALS oWENBAUGH, EARL G. CALLAHAN, CARL J, CASON, CLAUDE E. CREWS, CARL A. HILL, O'NEALL J. HILLIARD , ]AMES M . PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BRYAN, ALONZO A. BRYAN, SIDNEY DAUGHTREY, RICHARD L FRALICK, CARLTON W. KEENE, PETI! MOSES, . PHILLIP REGISTER, ST E WART S. ROBERTSON, FLOYD T, ROSIER, LEANDOUS W. ROY, WILLIAM G. SMITH, RAYMOND L. TICE, CLARENCE 1-1. WALDRON, J, W. PRIVATES ATKINSON, VIRGIL L BLANTON, Roscoe c; BROOKS, HAROLD C. BRYAN, WILLIAM M. CARTER, ODELL H. CHASSEREAU, EDWIN p, CREWS, ROY A. CROIT, How ARD C. DESVERCP.RS, DUNHAM S. GRAY, ' RICHARD E . GREENE, ]O!IN F. GREENE, NORMAN R. HALE, WILLIAM C. HILLIARD, HAROLD F _ . ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY ( 110)

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PRIVATES HOGAN, HENRY F. MosEs, EDWARD J. HORNE, CORBETT PEARCE, NATHAN E. HUNTER, JAMES D. NALLS, FRANK H. JOHNSON, CASEL O'CAIN, WILLIAM R. JOHNSON, ERNEST C. RIVERS, FRANK KNOX, FRANK D. PURDY, WILBUR L. MARKHAM, AMION F, ROBERTS, DURWOOD D, MARKHAM, REESR R. ROBERTS, EARL C. MATHIS, JAMES L. ROBERTS, JAMES L. MILTON, JOHNNIR J, ROGERS, DONALD P. MONTAGUE, ROBERT L, ROGERS, PAUL W, SHEPPARD, JACOB L. FACTUAL HISTORY Company "H," First Infaritry, was organized and mus tered into service in Lake City, Florida, February 3, 1901. The organization was commanded by Captain Nelson Holt Cox, First Lieutenant Joshua Kinard, and a Second Lieutenant Humboldt Helvensson. One of the distin guished services rendered by the Company was the splendid work done at the Jacksonville fire in 1901. This Com pany was mustered out on April 10, 1909. Company "G," First Florida Infantry, was mustered in at Lake City on June 7, 1917, two months and two days before it was drafted into Federal service for the World War, with Captain William L. Carbine as com manding officer, First Lieutenant Alexander C. Blount, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA [ lll] SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: W. R. O'Cain, V. L. Atkinson, E. C. Roberts, J. D. Hunter, H. F. Hilliard, A. C. Witt, J. B. Stuart, J. M. Hil liard, A. G. Markham. SECOND Row: P. Moses, H. C. Croft, F. T. Robertson, J. L. Sheppard, J. W. Waldron, E. P. Chassereau, R. E. Gray, W. L. Purdy, C. Horne, H. F. Hogan. THIRD Row: S. S. Register, R. L. Daughtrey, F. D. Knox, E. C. Johnson, 0. H. Carter, C. Johnson, J. L. Roberts, R. A. Crews, E. J. Moses, D. D. Roberts. and Second Lieutenant Edward 0. Little. A Mr. Hurst seems to have been responsible for the organization of the company, but he was not made commanding officer. Com pany "G" was sent to Camp Wheeler at Macon, Georgia, where the whole First Regiment was transferred to vari ous units of the Thirty-first Division. The present organization was mustered in at Lake City, Florida, on April 16, 1920, with Captain Talmage C. Young commanding, as Company "G," 154th Infan try. It was redesignated Company "H," 154th Infantry, December 7, 1921, and again to Company "H," 124th Infantry, on May 12, 1924. Under the able command of Captain Wright, assisted by Lieutenant Robert B. Harkness, the Company was on Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine duty on Ochlocknee River from July, 1928, to February, 1929, and two squads were ordered to Raiford to guard Zangara, the man who fired at Franklin D. Roosevelt and killed Chicago's Mayor in March, 1932.

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CAIUS A. ROWLETT Major, Commanding FRED W. KUSHMER Captain, Company I ROBERT C. DAVIS Captain, Company K * FRANCIS N. THERIOT Captain, Company L HENRY W. McMILLAN, JR. Captain, Company M {!}/Jice,,u, THIRD BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY EDWARD T. WALKER First Lieut., Headquarters Company WILLIAM H. DIAL Second Ueut, 1 Headquarters Company BURNICE H. BELL Finl Lieutenant, Company I LeROY F. RICHARDS Second Lieutenant, Company WILBUR K. MILLER First Lieutenant, Company K LUTHER W. TILDEN Second Lieutenant, Company K JONES S. JOYNER First Lieutenant, Company L WILLIAM B. STINSON Second. Lieutenant, Company L JULIUS C. NEWTON First Lieutenant, Company M JAY L HALL Second Lieutenant, Company M

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COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Lieutenant ; . . . . . EDWARD T. WALKER S e cond Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . . WILLIAM H. DIAL NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Staff Sergeant . . . . . . . . . JAMES F. HALL SERGEANTS COLLIER, MILTON H. CRANFORD, WALLACE C. EDSEN, PAUL E. CORPORALS CRITTENDEN, EDWARD JAMES, WILLIAM P. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS HALLEUER, FRED W, METCALF, HOWARD L. SEGREST, THOMAS M . . PRIVATES ALLEN, PAUL H. CADENHEAD, WILLIAM R. CO L LIER, JAMES G. . CUNNINGHAM, BEN H. DEBRAY, THOMAS M . . KERNS, RUSSELL E. McGARITY, MARCUS H. MOYER, JOHN R. SEGREST, ROBERT L. STORRS, EDWIN M. FACTUAL HISTORY This company was first recognized as the Sixth Sepa rate Company of Infantry, April 12, 1920, at Tarpon Springs, Florida. It was redesignated Company "C," First Infantry, January 15, 1921; redesignated Company "I," 154th Infantry, December 7, 1921; redesignated Head quarters Company, Third Battalion, 154th Infantry, May (Continutd on pdgt 114) SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RsT Row: J. F. Hall, M. I-I. Collier, T. M. Segrest, P. E. Edsen, J. G. Collier, E. M. Storrs, W. C. Cranford. SE<:;oND Row: R. E. Kerns, H. L Metcalf, M. H. McGafrity, B . H. Cunningham, P. H. Allen, T. M; DeBray, R. L. Segrest, F. W. Halleuer.
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HEADQUARTERS COMPANY THIRD BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY ORLANDO, FLORIDA (Continued from p,1gc 11 J) 25, 1923; redesignated Headquarters Company, Third Battalion, 124th Infantry, May 12, 1924. It was dis banded at Tarpon Springs, Florida, June 4, 1925, and reorganized and recognized as Headquarters Company, Third Battalion, 124th Infantry, at Orlando, Florida, on July 10, 1925. This unit was mobilized for State duty in September, 1926, and was on duty to aid civil authorities in the Miami area during the "Miami hurricane" of 1926. It was again mobilized for State . duty about April, 1927, and moved to Tampa to aid civil authorities during the Tampa jail riot, This Company was ordered to duty in March, 1929, during the Mediterranean fruit Ry quaran tine and stay,ed on duty until June, 1930. I. Intelligence Section. 2. Wire Section. 3. Message Center. 4. Non-Commissioned Officers. 5. Radio Section.

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COMP.ANY I THIRD BATTALION 2 4 T H NFANTRY PALMETTO, FLORIDA * ( I) Basketball Team. (2) .Firing Squad. (3) Non-Commissioned Officers. (4) "Behind the Eight Ball." (5) Supply Room. (6) Colors. (7) Gun Room.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: M. N. Smith, A. P. Metcalf, A. D. Willis, J. E. Pierce, R. V. Link, N. T. Vanlandingham, J. B, Sutton, W. McBride, W. W. Tresca. SECOND Row: J. L. Winter, T. F. Alford, J. M. Pierce, E. S. Anderson, W. S. Smith, C. K. Reynolds, G. W. Rye, J. R. Young, J.M. Meade. THIRD Row: A, C. Morgan, M. J. Myrick, W. H, Wingert, W. C. Coker, R. R. Storr, M. Thomas, T. W. Jones, R. H. Tracy, \V. M. Hickox, S. 0. Calos, COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . FRED W. KuSHMER First Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . . BURNICE H. BELL Second Lieutenant , , . . . . . LEROY F. RICHARDS NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Technical Sergeant . . , , CHARLES M. NABORS SERGEANTS LINK, ROBERT V. SMITH, W. S. LUNDY, WILLIAM G. TRESCA, Wn,LIAM W, SKENE, LYLE W. ...___, WmTE, JAMES WINTER, EDWARD J. CORPORALS ANDERSON, JAMES E. ANDERSON, EDWARD S. BUGG, ELBERT P, METCALF, ARTHUR P. MCBRIDE, WALTER SMITH, MARION N. SNEEDEN, JOIIN R, WINTER, JOHN L. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS ASKEW, FRANK W. CARTER 1 PIE J. COKER, WILLIAM C. Fox, ROBERT H. HARDIN, EARL M. McCooK, O'NEAL W. RIVERS, RICHARD N, RYE, GORBY W, PRIVATES ALFORD, THOMAS F. BAKER, JOHNNIE C. BRAND, RANDOLPH U. . CALOS, SPERO 0. HICKOX, WILBUR M. JOHNSON, GARLAND C. JONES, THOMAS W. LANGFORD, JAMES L. LANGFORD, JOHN E. SMITH, CARL P. STORR, ROBERT R. THOMAS, McADOO THOMAS, ALVEY M. VANLANDINGHAM, NED T, WINGERT, WALTER H, WOOD, JAMES w. ZEIGLER, GLENN LACKEY, JIMMIE M. LOWRIMORE, JACKSON T, MATIIIS, CHARLES H. MYRICK, WmT C. MOORE, RUDOLPH M. MYRICK, MARION A. MYRICK, MILTON J, MORGAN, A. CANCELMO MEADE, Jmrn M. ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY I 116 J

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PRIVATES OXFORD, WADE L. SUTTON, BEN F. PIERCE, JACK E. SUTTON, JESSIE B. PIERCE, JAMES M. TRACY, ROBERT H. PIGOTT, JAMES H, THOMAS, JEFFERSON F. PURVIS, FLOYD W. WILLIS, AUBREY D. REYNOLDS, CLINTON K. WILLIS, EMORY SANDEFUR, BODINE R. WATSON, WILLIAM A. YOUNG, JOE R. FACTUAL HISTORY Company "I," 124th Infantry, was first mustered into State service on December 20, 1923, as Company "I," 154th Infantry. Captain P. Watts, in command of the unit at time of State acceptance, was refused a Federal commission due to the age limit. He resigned imme diately. Federal recognition was given Company "I," 154th Infantry, Florida National Guard, on January 15, 1924. When the 154th Infantry was later redesignated the 124th Infantry, the unit at Palmetto was designated Com pany "I," 124th Infantry, Florida National Guard. The unit's first call to active State service came in 1927, when the unit, with other companies of the 124th Infantry and 116th Field Artillery, was called to Tampa PALMETTO, FLORIDA SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: C. M . Nabors, L. \V. Skene, W. L. Oxford, \V. G. Lundy, E. J. Wfoter, E. Willis , A. M. Thomas , E. P . Bugg. SECOND Row: J. R. Sneeden, B. R. Sandefur, J. E. Langford, B. F. Sutton, G. Zeigler, F. W. Purvis, E. M . Hardin, J. T. Lowrimore, R. M . Moore. THIRD Row: G. C. Johnson, C. P. Smith, J. \V. Wood, J. H. ( 117 l Pigott, P. J. Carter, J. C. Baker, J. M. Lackey, W. A. Watson, R. N. Rivers, J. E. Anderson. to guard the ax murderer Levins. Its second call to active State service, in 1929, was for one of the most unusual and one of the most valuable services ever ren dered by National Guard units in peace time. It served for more than 10 months during the Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine. Company "I" has made a splendid record in many ways, gathering under its banner rriany honors. It has won the Remington Trophy, the Best Drill Cup, the Taliaferro Trophy (the best 5-man rifle team), and other awards. For more than 14 years, it has been an outstanding organization. Ever since its first days, the company home has been in the City Hall on Main Street. The upper floor was used as an armory up \lntil recently. All equipment was moved to the handsome, modern armory on November 1, 1938.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: W. 0. Ingham, R. S. Boyd, R. L. Davis, Jr., C. E. Hill, R. N. Johnson, W, S. Morgan, E. T. Wimbish, H. But ler, P. J. Pait, J. C. Flora. SECOND Row: B. Williams, J. E. Lamb, L. R. Newham, C. L. Coward, B. Hill, R. H . Lloyd, R. A. Trotter, M. I. Love, H. L. Rogers, G. C. Russell, H. F. Dietrich, Jr., H. M. Hancock.
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~RIVATES ~ ... PlllLLIPS, LENVEL B . TROTTER, RICHARD A. RUSSELL, GEORGE C. Tueo, HUSTON G. TEAL, JOHN S., JR, WARREN, FRANCIS C. TIGNER, MARVIN E. WILLIAMS, BRADFORD WITHEROW, HAROLD M. FACTUAL HISTORY In 1885, a group of public spirited men m Orlando banded themselves together and formed a State Militia Company, the "Orlando Rifles." A few years later, the name was changed to the "Shine Guards" in honor of Captain Shine, its Company Commander, who was very helpful in its formative stages. For over fifty continuous years Company "K," 124th Infantry, and its predecessors have played a prominent part in the affairs of the State of Florida and the United States Government. In 1898, it was called into Federal service and sent to Tampa, Florida, for the duration of the Spanish-American War. In 1916, the Company, then known as Company "C," First Florida National Guard, was mustered into Fed eral service and went to the Mexican Border for approxi mately nine months. In 1917, it was mustered out of Fed eral service, remained in Orlando a few months, and in August, 1917, it was mustered back into Federal service. 0 R LAND 0. FLORIDA [ 119) SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: A. W. Petti g rew, F. C. Warren, J. W. Hall, C . E. Cox, J. D. Yates, E. K . Guard, P. E. Freeman, J. S. Teal, Jr., J. M. Hyde, H. W. Davis. SECOND Row: G. C. Aldrich, J. P. Hart, M. L. Hair, G. C . Ru ss ell , J . A. Everett, T. E . Cole, J. G. Nicholson, L. G. Fisches ser, H. M . Da w son, H . M. \Vitherow, F. H . Harrell . In September, 1917, it was sent to Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga., where it became a part of the Thirty-first (Dixie) Division. In October, 1919, it arrived in France when the members of the Company first learned at LeMons, France, that it, as well as its division, had been ordered to be broken up and made into replacements. Although it never served as a Company at the front, its personnel served with other Companies and Regiments with distinction while under fire. In 1921, the Company was reorganized and finally be came Company "K," 124th Infantry, Thirty-first (Dixie) Division, with its war time Commander, Preston Ayers, in command. The Company saw service in the 1926 and 1928 hurricanes which did so much damage to South Florida. Orlando's unit of the State Militia and the National Guard has had the good fortune to furnish three Regi mental Commanders: Colonel Bradshaw, Colonel Schuler, and the present Regimental Commander, Col. Preston Ayers.

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COMPANY K THIRD BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY ORLANDO, FLORIDA I. Non-Commiss i oned Officers. 2. Bayonet Firing. 3. First Sergeant and Sergeant in Arch. 4. Section Wedge.

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COMPANY L THIRD BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY BRADENTON, FLORIDA (I) Left: Sgt. A. M. Dennis and Sgt. W. H. Cooper. Rigl,t: Registered Nurse, Mrs. C. W. Larrabee, who has been a friend to Company L members and has never refused a call af any time. ( 2) Non-Commissioned Officers. ( 3} Club Room. ( 4) Bayonet Drill. (5) Squad Wedge. (I>) Strong Arm Squad. (7) Automatic Rifle Instruction. *

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: T. W. Watts, A. M. Dennis, E. A. Clinger, E. C. Storr, C. U. Howell, E . C. Huff, J. D. Kemp, E. D. Ramsey. SECOND Row : \V, M. Odom, C. P. Wilson, J. H. Argo, E. D. Williams, C. E. Mayhugh, T. B. Douglas, B. A. Butler, S. H. Klemetsrud, D. R. Harrell. TmRo Row: J. G. Nosworthy, F. II. Jones, n. I. Brown, R. A. Mallard, L. L. Pittman, E. R. Clements, G. JI. Taylor, R. P Clack, E. P. Graham, H. N. Walden. B~ COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain ... First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . FRANCIS N. THERIOT JONES S. JOYNER WILLIAM Il. STINSON, JR. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant TEDDY w. WATTS SERGEANTS BARFIELD, JAMES W. . DELOACH, JOHN L. CLINGER, EARL A. ---.._. DENNIS, ALFRED M. COOPER, WILLIAM D. STORR, ELLIS C. WOODWORTH, WILLIS I-1. CORPORALS BOHANAN, LAWRENCE HUFF, ELMER C. HOWELL, CLAUDE U. KEMP, JOHN D. PATTERSON, PHIL C, RAMSEY, EDWARD TYLER, JAMES H. WALDRON, FRANK P. WILCOX, HOKE S. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS CANNON, ALVIN B .. ' .. Ci.ACK, ROBERT P. CLEMENTS, DAVID N. HOUSEMAN, THOMAS C. JACKSON, THOMAS E. JONES, FLOYD H. LoVESTEAD 1 CECIL R. LYDAY, CHARLES E. -:-, PRIVATES l_ ARCJO, ]ASPER H., ' BILLINGSLEY, JOHN W. MAYHUGH, CHARLES E NORTH, JAMES M. ODOM, WILLIE M. PtTI ' MAN, LESTER L. STOKES, JESSE L. WALDEN, HARRIS N. WATTS, EUNICE L. Wu.SON, CURRY P. BOONE, RUDOLPH R. BROWN, BETHEL I. ONE HUN.DRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY I 122 J

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1 _I PRIVATES BUTLER, BUFORD A. LIVINGSTON, JAMES D. CAMPBELL, \VILLIAM V. LoGUE, HENRY G. CHESHIRE, JACKSON S. MALLARD, RALEIGH A. CI.EMENTS, ELBERT R. McLAIN, CHARLES M . COTHERN, LAWTON C. MILLER, ROBERT C. DENNIS, THOMAS J. NORTH, MARCUS L. DOUGLAS, THOMAS B. NOSWORTHY, JAMES G. DRYDEN, EZEKIEL PATTERSON, GEORGE M. GAGNON, NORBERT R. PEACOCK, THOMAS J. GRAHAM, ELMER P. STINSON, ALEC E. HARRELL, DANIEL R. TAYLOR, CLIFFORD B . JOHNS, ALBERT C. TAYLOR, GLENN H. JONES, ALBERT C. TOMLINSON, HAROLD J. KLEMETSRUD, STANLEY H. WILLIAMS, EARL D. WILSON, CLAUDE H. FACTUAL HISTORY In early 1926, Second Lieutenant Francis N. Theriot, Company "I," 124th Infantry, Palmetto, Florida, con ceived the idea of forming a Company across the Manatee River in Bradenton. He was promoted to Captain and Company "L," 124th Infantry, was organized and received State and Federal recognition on May 18, 1926. Captain Theriot has been in command since that time. Company "L" served as protectors to the Hillsborough County jail against mob violence in June, 1927, and as inspectors during the Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine in 1929. The unit attended Camp Joseph E. Johnston, BRADENTON, FLORIDA SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: J. W. Barfield, W. H. Woodworth, J. L. De Loach, T. C. Houseman, P. C. Patterson, L. Bohanan, H. S. Wil cox, F. P. Waldron, J. H. Tyler. SECOND Row: M. L. North, L. C. Cothern, A. E. Stinson, A. C. Jones, J. M. North, E . Dryden, T. J. Dennis, T. E. Jackson, A. B. Cannon, H. J. Tomlinson. THIRD Row: G. M. Patterson, C. Lyday, C. B. Taylor, J. W. Billingsley, C. R. Lovestead, \V. V. Campbell, R. R. Boone, D . N. Clements, H. G. Logue, E. L. Watts. Jacksonville, for three years following organization. From 1929 to 1936, it attended Camp J. Clifford R. Fos ter, formerly Camp Johnston. It attended a brigade camp at Camp McClellan, Alabama, in 1937, and the Third Army Maneuvers, DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi, in 1938. During the 1937 encampment, it won the Oscar May nard Cup for the most efficient company in the 124th Infantry, the Regimental Best Company banner, and the Mary Turck Boyd Cup for the Best Drill Company in the 124th Infantry. For 12 years, home for Company "L" was an old f~ame building donated to it by the City of Bradenton when the unit was organized. In November, 1938, it moved into its new, modern home, a $25,000 brick veneer build ing, constructed under W. P. A. supervision and spon sored by the City of Bradenton. The new armory meets all requirements of the unit for military and social pur poses . I 123 J

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a SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RsT Row: \V. F. Fordham, T. C. Wesley, G. C. Brand, E. C . Strawn, C. F. Linzy, H. C. Kaufman, B. F. Riley. SECOND Row: \V. C. MacLean, 0. B . Clark, R. Tucker, Jr., J. R. Long, Jr., E. J. Hartsfield, J. W. Parker, W. E. Sellers, W. R. Barber. TmRD Row: A. C. Black, E. L. Marsh, J. E. Jackson, C. T. Yancey, H. E. Searcy , Jr., T. G. Clemons, G. G. Clemons, J, P. McKeown, L. W. Pippin.
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PRIVATES COP., THOMAS R. COUNCIi., MAURICE E. DUNHAM, JAMES N. DUNN, WILLIAM F. EDENFIELD, ROBERT A. FERRELL, JOHN S. FREEMAN, WILLIAM F. HARTSFIELD, EARL J. HERRING, CHARLES K. JACKSON, JOSEPH E. MARSH, EDMOUND L MIDDLETON, EARL B. MOORE, Lon H. MACLEAN, WILLIAM C . McCARTNEY, FRED F. NEWELL, HERMAN I. PARKER, JESSE W. PIPPIN, LLOYD W. REED, OSBORNE B. SAULS, PAUL V., JR. SEARCY, HENRY E., JR. SHEPPARD, DAVIS V. SKIPPER, LAURIE G. TUCKER, RUFUS, JR. WELLS, JOHN M. y ANCEY, CLICE T. FACTUAL HISTORY Company "M," 124th Infantry, was organized at Talla hassee and recognized under the National Defense Act on June 24, 1924, with Captain C. M. Hobbs as its commanding officer. Other commanding officers of the comp:111; have been Captain Fred H. Davis, Captain Hugh L. Mays, and its present commanding officer, Captain Henry W. McMillan, Jr. The company was on duty for approximately one year during the Mediterranean fruit fly quarantine in 19291930. The company has been called out in the aid of the TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA I 12, l SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RST Row: J. S. Brand, K. F. Searcy , W. D. Mercer, J. V. McCartney, L. C. Kelly, Jr., G. J. Barrow, N. J. Nahoom. SECOND Row: W. H. Anderson, H. Anderson, J. N. Dunham, F. F. McCartney, R. A. Edinfield, J. B. McLane, W. F. Dunn, 0. B. Reed. T111Ro Row: V. L Richardson, L G. Skipper, C. K . Herring, L. H . Moore, H. I. Newell, J. H. Booth, M. E . Fletcher, T. R. Coe, W. H. Mapoles, Jr. civil authorities in connection with lynching and race trouble in Marianna, Florida, in 1934, and at Tallahassee in connection with a civil trial in July, 1937. The com pany was highly commended by State and military au thorities for the manner of its performance of these duties. It moved into the new $78,000 Leon County Armory in July, 1935. Located at the State Capital, the com pany has been on duty on numerous State occasions, such as inauguration of Governors, parades, etc. One of the radio stations of the National Guard network is located in the Armory for the purpose of keeping the State Capital in connection or in contact with other parts of the State in case of hurricane or storm. Annual highlights "in the company's program are the banquet held the last drill in December of each year and the practice march held prior to camp each year.

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COMPANY M THIRD BATTALION ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY TALLAHASSEE. FLORIDA I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2. Pi.to( Inspection. 3. Rodio Room. 4. Supply Room. 5. Anti-Aircraft Defense. 6. Machine Guns in Line.

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* ARTHUR W. KNOX Mafor, M. C. FACTUAL HISTORY FRANK C. BOARDMAN Captain, 0. C. OSMAH E. HARRELL Captain, M. C. DOUGLAS G. SCOTT Captain, M. C. In the seventeen years since its organization, the Medical Detachment, 124th Infantry, has served four times on special state duty, assisting storm sufferers on two occasions and serving during the Mediterranean Fruit Fly Quaran tine and on special riot duty at Daytona Beach. It was organized and Federally recognized on May 2, 1922, at Sanford, Florida. The first. encampment was at Camp Johnson (later Camp Clifford J. Foster), Jacksonville. 2 4 T H NFANTRY The first call for active service was in 1926 when the unit was sent to Miami to assist other units of the 124th Infantry and civil authorities maintain order and proper sanitary conditionsJollowing a severe storm. Its second (Contin,.ud on pagt! 15') I. Dressing Station. 3. Thomas leg Splint. SANFORD, FLORIDA 2. Non-Commissioned Officers. 4. loading Stretcher.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RST Row: J . P. Holtsclaw, E. M. Smith, E. W. Allen, F. J. Richter, E. M. Speir, J. B. Phillips, L. E. Reel, E. W. Kaeser man. SECOND Row: J. D. Colbert, C . L. Hayes, R. M. Martin, J. T. Brown, T . J . Culberhouse, Jr., H. W. Shannon, Jr., C. D. Phil lips, G. D. Culberhouse, W. R. Foltz. THIRD Row: H. E. Robson, C . A. Leavitt, R. A. Howell, Jr., W. G. Brown, G. H. Allen, R. G. May, J. G. Govocak, J. L. Lee, T. J. Townsend, H. A. Thurston. S A N F O R D, FLORIDA Major .... Captain Captain . . Captain First Lieutenant COMMISSIONED OFFICERS . . . . . . . ARTIIUR W. KNOX (M.C.) . FRANK C. BOARDMAN (D.C.) OsMAH E. HARRELL (M.C.) DOUGLAS G. SCOTT (M.C.) . ROBERT D. HARRIS (M.C.) NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Staff Sergeant . JAMES P. HOLTSCLAW SERGEANTS PHILLIPS, JOHN B. REEL 1 LAWRENCE E. SPEIR 1 EMORY M. CORPORAL KAESERMAN 1 EMIL W. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BROWN, WILLIAM G. COLBERT, JAMES D. CULBERHOUSE, T. J., JR. GOVOCEK, JOSEPH G. PRIVATES HOWELL, ROBT. A., JR. LEAVITT, CHARLES A. ROBSON, HARRY E. TOWNSEND, TOM J. ALLEN, ESTON W. HAYES, CHARLES L. ALLEN, GRADY H. LEE 1 JOHNNY L BEST, THOMAS A. MARTIN, ROBERT M. BOYETTE, STANCEL L. MAY, ROBERT G. BROWN, JAMES T, PHILLIPS, CALLEY D. BROWN, MANUEL L, RICHTER, FRANCIS J. CULBERHOUSE 1 GEO. D. SHANNON, H. W., JR. FOLTZ, WILBUR R. SMITH, EDWARD M. THURSTON, HERBERT A. ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY [ 128)

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Warrant Officer , . . . . , ALBERT L. FOWLER NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Tee/mica/ Sergeant . . . . .. . . Jov S. Cisco Staff Sergeant . . MELVIN E. DRANE SERGEANTS ENGLAND, CLAUDE L. FOWLER, ALBERT L., JR, CORPORALS HORNBUSKLE, SHELDON L. ROCHE, BERNARD E. PmLLIPS, BENJAMIN J. Pons, JAMES F. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BONIFIELD, THOMAS A. Boss, HERBERT E. EGAN, DDN PRIVATES ALLEN, ELLSWORTH B. BounVELL, GENE A . BRIDGES, JAMES E. DAVIS, CHAR!ES B. JULIAN, FLOYD F. LEATHERMAN, PAUL G. LUCAS, FREDERICK H. JULIAN, ALBERT V. MAHONE, CHARLES F. WILKERSON, CLIFFORD T. MUNRO, RALPH W. POLK, HARLO C. ROBINSON, CARL 0 . SMITH, CHARLES M. VANDERPOOL, C, E. WILLIAMS, CLYDE H. WILLIAMS, NORMAN F, FACTUAL HISTORY The Band was first organized as part of Headquar~ers Company, First Florida Infantry, at St. Petersburg, Florida, June 14, 1920. Upon the disbanding of Company "L" (C o ntinutd on pagt IJ6) SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: A. L. Fowler, Jr., C. B. Davis, R W. Munro, J. F. Potts, F. H. Lucas, R. E. Lucas, C. F. Mahone, C. L. Eng land, J. S. Cisco. BAND ALBERT L. FOWLER Warrant Officer SECTION OF THE SERVICE COMPANY 24TH INFANTRY JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA (I) Band on Parade. INSERT: Drum Major. (2) Concert Formation .. . . . . , :~: E

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* * l W l l Commanding Two Hundred and Sixty-Fifth Coast Artillery Was Cadet, United States Military Academy, June 14, 1918, to September 10, 1920. Served as First Sergeant, Coast Artillery, Florida National Guard, May 25, 1921, to December 14, 1922. Appointed Second Lieutenant, Coast Artillery, December 13, 1922; Captain, Coast Artillery, Novemcer 14, 1923; Major, Coast Artillery, December 7, 1929; Lieutenant Colonel, Coast Artillery, June 17, 1937. Is Graduate of Coast Artillery School, National Guard Officers' Course, 1929. Commanding 265th Coast Artillery and Post of Jacksonville since March I, 1937. [ 130]

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, _ I ' I . ' The 265th Coast Artillery was formed on November 4, 1923, as the First Separate Battalion, comprising the 437th Company, C. A. C., at Jacksonville, and the 438th Company, C. A. C., at Key West, under the command of Major Mayre R. Woodward. On July 22, 1925, the designation of the battalion was changed to 265th Coast Artillery Battalion (Harbor Defense). A Headquarters Detachment was formed on October 31, 1923, and a Med ical Detachment on February 2, 1927, both at Jackson ville. On February 9, 1924, the 437th and 438th Com panies were redesignated Batteries "A" and "B," respec tively. The present regimental designation was authorized on November 20, 1929, with the formation of firing batteries at Miami, Daytona Beach and Jacksonville. The Miami battery was trahsferred to Pensacola on March 30, 1936. The formation of this regiment as presently designated is the culmination of years of work and effort on the part of its officers, and exemplifies the high standard of the Florida National Guard as a whole. While the origin of the regiment actually centers in Battery "A," Jacksonville, which was mustered in on May 25, 1921, as the First Company, C. A. C., Florida National Guard, the regimental history properly dates back to June of the year 1888, at which time the "Island City Guards" was organized as an infantry company at Key West, now reconstituted as Battery "E." War Department official records credit the regiment, through its individual units, with Mexican border service in 1916-17, and World War service in 1917 18. Down the years since its inception, the .regiment has been an important factor in almost every emergency necessitating the use of the National Guard in State service; princi pally, in more recent years, in the disastrous hurricanes of 1926 and 1928, the fruit fly quarantine of 1929, and [ 131) LEON E. WALDRON Captain, Regimental Staff the storm that devastated the Keys in 1935. It has also been of material aid to local civil authorities in maintain ing law and order. Many of its officers and enlisted men are outstanding in the civic activities of their communi ties. Two members of the regimental personnel, Captain William E. Thigpen and First Sergeant George W. Hen dricks, both of Battery "A," have been awarded the much coveted Florida Cross for exceptionally bravery above and beyond the line of duty, in removing helpless injured from a burning motor truck near Dania, Florida, on July 23, 1938. Since the beginning a high class of young men have been attracted to the ranks of the various regimental units, and the majority of its officers have served, step by step, through the various grades from private to their present designation. In point of armory and field train ing, the regiment has always held high rank with other National Guard outfits, and in 1928 led all National Guard Coast Artillery units in target practice. The ap pearance, discipline and morale of the enlisted personnel has been the subject of much favorable comment, as has also its high state of efficiency as a combat unit of the Nation's fighting forces. Regimental headquarters are at Jacksonville, the regi mental commander also being post commander. The regimental band, under the direction of Warrant Officer Caesar Lamonaca, famous band leader, is recog nized as one of the outstanding military bands of the United States. The regiment, officially designated as the 265th Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense), has variously trained on the mortars and 10-inch guns of Fort Monroe, Virginia; Fort Screven, Georgia; Fort Barrancas, Florida, and Fort Tay lor, Florida . Its present armament assignment are the 155 mm. guns at Fort Taylor (Key West), Fla.

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: \V. H. Duguicl, C. E. Rosenberg, E. F. Henry, E. Crenshaw, Jr., J . R. Lockridge, \V, II. Dean, Jr., A. B. Price, W. Henry. SECOND Row: H. E. DeFlorin, H. B . Parker, Jr., J. B. Hof mann, J. W. Hollister, Jr., \V, M. Pye, R. S. Sutton, D. S. Shine, III., E. B. Prince, F. L. Smith. T111Ro Row: L. E. Cameron, W. H. Price, G. M. Parker, V. F. Sikes, A. Warden, C. R. Burnham, B. L. Barker, J. H. Nicol son, Jr., A. P. Rahn, R. M. Phillips. STANLEY S. BARCHAN Captain RALPH W. COOPER, JR. F1rst Lieutenant COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain First Lieutenant . . . . . . . . STANLEY S. BARCIIAN . . . . . . . . RALPII W. COOPER, JR. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Master Sergeant . . . . . . . . . JOHN w. HOLLISTER, JR. First Sergeant . , . . . . . . WILLIAM H. Ducum Tecl,nicaJ Sergeant . WILLIAM R. HENRY Tecl,nicaJ Sergeant . MERRITT PARTRIDGE Staff Sergeant . CHARLES E. BOSENBERG Staff Sergeant . . CLYDE R. BURNHAM Staff Sergea11t . ELLIS CRENSHAW, JR. Staff Sergea11t . . .. , , EDWARD F. HENRY Staff Sergeant . FRANK L LAMAR Staff Sergeant . WILLIAM M. PYE SERGEANTS BARKER, BRUCE L DEFLORIN, HENRY E. CAMERON, LINDSAY E. SmNE, DUDLEY S., III. CARMICHAEL, EDDIE J. SIKES, VERNON F. CORPORALS ANSKE, LEANDER H . PRICE, ALFRED B. PIIILLIPS, ROBERT M. RAHN, AsA P. Su-noN, ROBERT s. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS NICOLSON, JEAN I-1., JR. PRICE, W1Ll . lAM J-I. PARKER, Hucu B . , JR. \VELDON, MITCHEL E. PRIVATES DEAN, WILSON H., JR. HOFMANN, JOJIN B. l.OCKRlllGE, JOSF.Nl R. PARKER, GEORGE M. PRINCE, ERNEST B. R1cHARDs, WM. McA. SMl'f'II, Ff.DYi> S. W ARDEN 1 ALEXANDER FACTUAL HISTORY On November 14, 1923, an organization was formed and designated as Headquarters Detachment, First Sep arate Battalion, C. A. C. In those days of construction TWO HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIFTH COAST ARTILLERY C 132]

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(I) Metrological Section. (2) Captain, Lieutenant, and Sergeant at Work. (3) Radio Section, (4) Telephone Section. (5) Non Commissioned Officers, ( 6) Artillery Engineers. leading to th~ present state of being of the National Guard, not a great deal of technical training was to be had. How ever, a foundation was built for the years to come of high type personnel. Working on the hypothesis that with the JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA right men anything could be accomplished, the organiza tion built what was to become in 1929 Headquarters Bat tery, 265th Coast Artillery. While esprit de corp in this unit was high, it was still sadly lacking in the technical training so necessary for a headquarters battery of coast artillery. The annual field training period was held at Fort Barrancas. It was an (C,nt;nutd on pagt 155) [ 133]

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PENNYWELL F. McCALL, JR. M•l•r, Commandln,;r WILLIAM E. THIGPEN Captain. Battery A EDWARD V. GARCIA Captain, Battery B WILMANS K. BALLOUGH Captain, Battery C OFFICERS. FIRST BATTALION JAMES 8 . CATO First Lieutenant, Battery A ERNEST E. LOUDERMILK Second lieut., Headquarters Staff ANDREW V . BOSWELL First Lieutenant, Battery B ALEXANDER H . LEUNIG Second lieutenant, Battery A FRANK V. COUCH First Lieutenant, Battery C JAMES L. BUTLER Second Lieutenant, Battery 8 NORMAN 0. ABEL Second Lieutenant, Battery C .' . ' ~fl~'~ .. .

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. i B A T T E R y A TWO FIRST BATTALION HUNDRED COAST AND SIXTY-FIFTH ARTILLERY JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA (I) Non-Commissioned Officers with Trophies. (2) Plotting Course of Enemy Fleet. (3) The Battery Commander-Detail, Carrying on the Fire. ( 4) Base En _ d Observing. ( 5) Gun Crew in Action. (6) Sergeant Hendricks Awarded Florida Cross for Valor. (7) The . Old Juke Flag t

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: G. W. Hendri~ks, G. J. Tipping, J. J. O'Rourke, II. J . Doe!, N. L. Reynolds, N. P . Grosser . SECONo Row: S. M. Burris, J. B. Oliveros, A. M. Burris, A. A. Meyer, W. P. Wares, D. C. Smith, J . M. Watkins, R. T. Smotherman. T111Rn Row: W. R. Warrick , D. H. Garrett, Jr., C. Carter, C. F. Rich, R. E. Bird s ong, T . Boswell, C. A. Hinson, H. Hindin . l COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain .. . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant WILLIAM 2. TIIICPEN . . . JAMES B . . CATO ALEXANDER H. LEUNIG NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Ser9eanl SERGEANTS DOEL, HAROLD J. -~ GROSSER, NORMAN P. O'ROURKE, JOJIN J. CORPORALS . GEORGE W. II E NDRICKS RAINEY, MORTON 1-1. REYNOLDS, NORRIS L. TIPPING, GEORGE J. CHESTER, JOHN C. MOORE, LUTHER S. HUBBARD, GROVER C. NIELSEN, LEO M. LORIMIER, Jos. M., JR. STEPIJENS, JAMES N. WRIGHT, ALBERT L. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BALANKY, JOIIN F. GARRETT, DILMUS II., JR. BOSWELL, TIBERIA HINSON, CLYDE A. BROWN, THOMAS A. IRWIN, LUTHER S, BUNN, LUTHER A, JOHNSON, FRANK H. BURRIS, SYDNEY M. LoCKRIDCE, GORDON W. GARCIA, WILLIAM S. PICKETT, WOODROW W. SCHENCK, HERMAN E . BALANKY, EDWARD L. BIRDSONG, RALPH E. BUNN, DUDLEY B. BURRIS, ALBERT M. PRIVATES CARTER, CARL CARVER, JESSE V. DAVIS, A. GIBSON, JR. GEARY, DUKE J . TWO HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIFTH COAST ARTILLERY I 136 i

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PRIVATES Cr,ovF.R, IVA L. GREEN, GEORGE F, }hNDON, HERMAN MALONE, JO!IN J-1. MCMILLEN, WILLIAM A. MEYER, ANDREW A. MORRIS, PAULE. OLIVEROS, JAMES B. O'QUINN, MILTON F. PARKERSON, JAMES D. RACIIEI.S 1 \VH.l.lAM F. R1c11, CHARLES F. RICH, WALTER C. SANDS, WILLIS F. SMITH, DUDLEY C. SMOTHERMAN, ROGER T. TILL, HARVEY F. WARES, WILLIAM P. WARRICK, WILLIAM R. \VATKINS, JOHN M. FACTUAL HISTORY As First Company, Coast Artillery Corps, this unit was mustered in as a unit of the Florida National Guard at Jacksonville on May 25, 1921. The majority of its members were World War veterans with overseas service in the Coast Artillery. The organization was accom plished through the efforts of Captain King Dorsey, Lieu tenant Colonel P. L. Wall, Major P. F. McCall, Captain J. C. Heidenreich, Captain S. S. Barchan, Captain W. E. Thigpen and Lieutenant Louis A. Smith. First officers were Captain Dorsey, First Lieutenant Heidenreich, and Second Lieutenant Barchan. The present regimental commander, Lieuten~nt Colonel P. L. Walls was First Sergeant. Captain W. E. Thigpen, present battery com mander, was Supply Sergeant. After two months, Captain JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA [ 137] SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: J. C. Chester, L. S. Moore, A. L. \Vright, J. N. Stephens, L. M. Neilsen, J. N. Lorimier, Jr. Sr.c0ND Row: G. C. Hubbard, F. H. Johnson, \V. W. Pickett, G. W. Lockridge, M. F. O'Quinn, E. L. Balanky, J. F. Balanky. TmRD Row: D. B. Bunn, I. L. Glover, G. F. Green, J. H. Malone, L. A. Bunn, A. G. Davis, Jr., H. E. Schenck, T. A. Brown . Dorsey resigned and was succeeded by Captain Mayre R. Woodward, late regimental commander. The unit was r~designated the 437th Coast Artillery Company on May 29; Battery "A," First Separate Bat talion, Coast Artillery Corps, on October 31, 1923; Bat tery "A," 265th Coast Artillery Battalion (HD), on July 22, 1925, and Battery "A," 265th Coast Artillery (HD) on November 20, 1929. The battery saw active duty in the hurricane disasters of 1926, 1928, 1935 and the Mediterranean fruit fly quar antine of 1929. It is the nucleus around which the 265th Coast Artillery has been built and has always been in the forefront in maintaining the high regimental standard of morale, discipline and efficiency. The following mem bers of the organization were with the battery when it was mustered in on May 25, 1921: Captain W. E. Thig pen, Second Lieutenant A. H. Leunig, First Sergeant George W. Hendricks, and Corporal Joseph M. Lorimier, Jr. Six regimental officers have served previously as offi cers and enlisted men of Battery "A."

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,;!_,. { ) ._,. ,. ' ,•s #' 1 / \ . "1 -;', J!~: !)~ SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FtR S T Row: J. ll. Robert s , J. W. Woodley, L. A . Yeoman s , F. H. Cole, W. P. Wilson; W. J. Wynn, T. W. Baine, J. P. S a bin, V. \V. Beau. SECOND Row: C. C. Garcia, M. 0. Ross, J. N. Baxter, W. L a whead, G. M . Young, M. L. Thurman, H. M. Hodg e s, J. E. Richard s on , 0. L. M c Mullen, W. H. Gore. COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . .. First Lieutenant S e cond Lieutenant , , EnWARll V . GARCIA ANDREW V. BOSWELL JAMES L. BUTLER NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First S e r9 e ant SERGEANTS BALLANTINE, CLYDE L. BALKE, WILLIAM C. ELAIN, RIC H ARD BOWEN, JOSEP H N. BUTLER, JOSEPH B. COLE, FRANK H. CORPORALS FRANK H . MACLAIN JOSEPH, TOM TOWSEND, WILLIAM V. WARD, RAMON B. HonGES, HARRIS M . POPE, JAMES E. SABIN, Jmrn P. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BLAKE, GEORGE C. PORTIER, LEWIS 0. EZELL, GEORGE w. Ross, MARVIN o . KORI, JOHN B . STANSELL, RALPH MCKELi.AR , JAMES L. THURMAN, Mt T CIIEI.L L. MEGGS, HAROLD WYNN, LYNN 0 . YEOMANS, LESTER A. PRIVATES ADDISON, Eow _ ARD A. ANDREWS, HAINES C. ARMISTEAD, THOMAS B. BAINE, THOMAS W . BAXTER, fOHN N . CLARK, JOH N W, Fox, JOHN c. GARCIA, CURTIS C. GORE, WtLEY H. GREEN, SHIRLEY E . . HALL, ROBERT J . , JR . HAMILTON, SIDNEY M. TWO HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIFTH COAST ARTILLERY [ IJ8 J

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i ( J ' j ; ,.. . .,., ,4 "",.~ ' '~, i~ \ii'f ~ 1 1' . \ / . , 1\ , ' , ., fl ~'. _,, , l .. . . , . ./ , i , PRIVATES KALEEL, SAM A. Kf.LLER, JENNINGS S. I.AM, CARL A. LAWHEAD, WALTER McMuu . EN, OscAR L. McNABB, EMORY C. McRAE, ALWIN C. MATHIS, JAMES A. PI , UMMER, HARRY B. RICHARDSON, JACK E. ROBERTS, CHARLES W. ROBERTS, JAMES H. SHAW, LEVY TAN7.LER, WARREN G , TOWNSEND, GEORGE H. TOWNSEND, SEEBA S. THOMPSON, RALEIGH W. TAYLOR, HIRAM WILSON, WILLIAM P . WOODLEY, JACK W. WYNN, \VALLACE J. YOUNG, GEORGE M. FACTUAL HISTORY h f B "B" T e parent organization o attery was a motorcycle company formed in Jacksonville, Flor ida, 1921. This unit received Federal recognition on September 28, 1921, and by December of the s~me year was designated Motorcycle Company No. 114 by the State Military Department. The Company was redesignated Motorcycle Company No. 106 in 1924 and assigned to the 31st Division Special Troops. By direction of the Secretary of War, the Company was relieved from JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA C 139 I SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: F. H. Maclain, L. 0 . Portier , S . M. Hamilton, J. B. Butler, T. Jo se ph, R. Elain, G. C. Blake, J. J.. McKeller, R. B. Ward. SECO N D Row: H. Taylor; J. S . Keller, S . A. Kaleel , J. E. Pope, J. C. Fox, J. N. Bowen, L. 0. Wynn, E. A. Addison, J. B. Kori, E. C. McNabb. assignment to the 31st Division in September, and its designation was changed to 146th Motorcycle Company, Fourth Corps, Q. M. Train. In 1929, it was decided to expand the Coast Artillery of the Florida National Guard, so the 1 d B "E" motorcyc e umt was reass1gne as attery , C. A. H. D., on November 20, 1929. On the same date the Coast Artillery organization was increased from a battalion to a regiment. Battery "E" was redesignated as Battery "B" on January 1, 1930. An examination of the records of Battery "B" indicates that the target practices fired by this or ganization are of very high order. In 19 3 3, the battery was classed "Excellent" by the Chief of . the National Guard Bureau.

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, ; . t'( .-"': . ;! B A T T E R y B FIRST BATTALION C OAST ARTILLERY 2 6 5 TH JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA I. Non-Commissioned Officers. 2 . Range Section. 3. Base End Section. 4 . Gun Section.

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B AT T E R y C FIRST BATTALION 2 6 5 TH COAST ARTILLERY DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA (I) Squad Wedge. (2) Director Crew. (3) Headquarters. (4) No. I Gun Crew. (SJ End Stations. (6) Non-Com,,;issioned Offi cers. (7) Rifle Team,

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: H. H. Gwinner, 0. S. Eastman, W. J. Caldwell, G. S. Bontempt, C. 0 . Westfall, J. J . Watson. SECOND Row: J. Leonard, E. E. Cueni, V. V. Harton, Jr., L E. Yelvington, R. L. Lewis, J. P. Dicker s on, R . H. Triantafellu. TtllRD Row: J. 0. Eubank, G. W. Lyons, C. Kendrick, T. A. Sam e s, J. T. Brannam, E. L. Tippins, L . T. Galphin . COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant . W1LMANS K. BALLOUGH FRANK V. B. COUCH . NORMAN D. ABEL NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Serueant SERGEANTS CALDWELL, WILLIAM J. COLBY , LAWRENCE R. EASTMAN, OSCAR S. CORPORALS CHARLES E. MESSING GWINNER, HAROLD H . PENT, WILLIAM S. WILLIAMS, CLYDE M. BONTEMPT, GEORGE S. NUSBAUM, CHARLES S. JONES, THOMAS M. RACE, HARRY A. NULL, WALTER L \VATSON, JOHNNY J. WESTFALL, CEaL 0. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BRANNAM, JOSEPH T. HART, MAX CUEN!, ERNEST E. HOLLINGSWORTH, NED DICKERSON, JAY P. LYONS, GRANT W. EUBANK, JAMES 0. SAMES, THEODORE A. EVERETT, PARLEY N. SAULS, LAMAR P. . FUSSELL, LESTER B. SITTON, ANDREW J. YELVINGTON, LARCOM E. BOLDON, ALLEN W. BONIFAY, ORMOND U. DICKERSON, MINOR L. PRIVATES FOLSOM, AUREN 0. FOSTER, JAMES W. FOSTER, ROBERT E. TWO HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIFTH COAST ARTILLERY [ 1'12 J

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PRIVATES GALPIIIN, LAWRENCE T, MEYER, ANDREW GuzEWICH, NILES F. MEYER, FRANK llAMMACIIER, RUSSELL L. MULLIS, ELTON C. HARTON, VIRGIL V., JR, SHARPTON ; FRANK HILL, WILLIAM T. SMITH, CARLTON M. lloGG, WILLIAM G. SoMERS, GEORGE A. HULL, WILLIAM E. TIPPINS, ERNEST L. KENDRICK, CARL TRIANTAFELLU, R. H , LANE , GRADY L. WALTERS, CHESTER L LEONARD, JACK WHITE, ROBERT J, LEWIS, Roy L. WHITING, JOHN F. YELVINGTON, DWIGHT E. FACTUAL HISTORY Through the efforts of Major Guy A. Klock, Medical Corps, and Captain Leon J. C. Harton, Infantry, this battery was allotted to Daytona Beach and organized in 1929. Officers were John 0. McNamara, Captain; Heber E. Couchman, First Lieutenant, and Wilmans K. Bal lough, Second Lieutenant. The Battery was Federally recognized July 1, 1929. About 30 days later the Battery went to Fort Bar• rancas, Florida, for its first annual field training. The assignment was 10-inch disappearing gun~. The following year Battery "C" again trained with the same armament at Fort Barrancas. At Key West, the Battery continued to fire 10-inch disappearing guns during 1931, 1932 and 1933. DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA I 143 l SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row : C. E. Messing, C. M. Williams, W. S. Pent, H. A. Race, C. S. Nusbaum, P. N. Everett. SECOND Row: R. E. Fo s ter, R. L . Hammacher, L. B . Fu ss ell, A . J, Sitton, J, F. Whiting, N. Holling s worth, M. L. Dickerson. THIRD Row: C. L Walters, C. M. Smith, A. Meyer, 0. U. Bonifay, W. E. Hull, J. W. Foster, M . Hart. Then the assignment was changed to three-inch anti aircraft guns, so Battery "C" was separated from the regiment for field training and sent to Fort Barrancas again in 1934, 1935, and 1936. Then in 1937, the Bat tery fired anti-aircraft guns at the _ regimental camp at Fort Taylor, Key West. Training facilities at Fort Taylor for anti-aircraft were not entirely satisfactory, though, so the 1938 field train ing was again held at Fort Barrancas. In 1933, John 0. McNamara became Assistant Adju tant General. Coud-iman took command of the Battery as Captain, Ballough became First Lieutenant, and Frank V. B. Couch, Second Lieutenant. In July, 1937, Couch man became a Major and Judge Advocate. Ballough took command as Captain, Couch became First Lieuten ant and Norman DeWitt Abel; Second Lieutenant. These are the present officers. Battery "C" was called to active State duty twice, once to protect the polls in December, 1933, during election trouble in Daytona Beach, and again locally on January 1, 1937, for a political disturbance.

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WILLIAM V. ALBURY Major, Commanding ARCHIBALD S. MILLS Captain. Battery D EDSON E. DAILEY First Lieutenant, Battery D WILLIAM C. HARRIS Captain, Battery E SAMUEL PASCO, JR. Second Lieutenant, Battery D [144] WILLIAM E. P. ROBERTS Second Lieutenant, Battery E HENRY H. TAYLOR, JR. S•cond Lieutenant, Battery E

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B A T T E R y D TWO SECOND BATTALION HUNDRED COAST AND SIXTY-FIFTH ARTILLERY PENSACOLA, FLORIDA (I) Non-Commission e cl Officers . (2) Riot Duty. (3) Bayonet Practice . (4) Instrument Detail. (5) Heaclquarters Section . (6) Range Section. (7) Kitchen Detail. ' . hr1 ' ' ; 1 -/ , . "

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. SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RST Row: H. Betts, C . W. Dean , J . S. Massey, L. B . Mc Elveen, J. E. Boyd, W. H. Herrington, D. G. Sheppard, J. A. Yelverton. SECOND Row: J.B. Marchetti, D. L. Pfeiffer, G. Dillard, J. J. McHugh, J. H. Little , R . D. Campbell, P. S. Daw, J. D . Mat tox, W. E. Br a mblett. THIRD Row: W.W. \Vilson, R. L. Purdy, V. R Eddins, L. S. Nim s , C. C. H a rdy, S. A . Bass, J. B. Peake, C . J. Kirkland, T. B . Williams. i '. ' l ... , ::, r L 1/ '. I _,/ ,1 COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain .• First Lieutenant Second Lieutenant ARCHIBALD S. MILLS . EDSON E, DAILEY SAMUEL PASCO, JR. NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant SERGEANTS DEAN, CECIL W, McCONNELL, CURTIS M. MCELVEEN, LEONARD ll. 'CORPORALS Bovo, JOHNNIE E. HERRINGTON, WILLIAM H. PARKER, FLOYD C. PFEIFFER, EDGAR W. HARRY BETTS M AN DEVIL L P., HARRY A. MA S SEY, JOHN S , STUMBAUGH, J. H. R. SHEPPARD, DUDLEY G. TARVER, JOHN B; TRAXLER, ROBERT L. YELVERTON, JOHN A, PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BASS, SIDNEY A. BORJA, ARTHUR DAW, PERCY S. DILLARD, GORDON KIRKLAND, CECIL J, LITI'LE, JAMES H. LITTLE, VICTOR C. PRIVATES AMMONS, GORDON L. ASHLEY, JACKSON L. BRAMBLETI', Woon E. BREWTON, MONROE CAMPBELL, ROBERT D. CHATTMAN, FREDERICK A. DELONEY, JAMES W. EDDINS, V ALFORD R. FALZONE, JEROME S. LOWERY, ORA L. McMANNAMAN, E. K. PARKER, GUY J. PFEIFFER, DUDLEY L. PURDY , ROBERT L. YOUNG, DALE E. ZELIUS, ALE X ANDER 0. GILMORE, ALVAN R. HANCOCK, THOMAS C, HARDY, CECIL C. HENDERSON, T. W., JR. HOYT, KENN E TH D . MCHUGH, JULIAN J. MARCHETTI , JO S EPH B. MATI'OX, JAM E S D. MILLER, CHARLES S. TWO HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIFTH COAST ARTILLERY [ 146)

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PRIVATES NEE, DANIEL A., JR ,. SIMPSON, GEO. F., JR . NIMS, LEWIS s. . WIIITE, ROLAND M. PATE, DUDLEY w. \V1L1,IAMS, THERON B. PEAKE, JAMES R. WILSON, CALVIN 0. ROPKE, ROBERT D. ".ILSON, JOHN T. WILSON, WILLIAM \V. INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD PRIVATES ABERCROMBIE, WILLIAM HERRING, CARY H. BP.AL , JOHN ti. HORNE, FRANK S., JR. CHAPMAN, JAMES H. JERNIGAN, ROBERT F, CHATTMAN, JOIIN W . JONES, EDD1I! CREIGHTON, CLYDE T. LOCKART, WALTER R. DUNHAM, WAYNE A. LOWE, THOMAS A. FARINAS, ADRIAN v., JR. MILLER, Rov T. GAGE, FRED H., JR. NEWMAN, CLAUDE P. GLASS, CARTER A. SNELL, SIDNEY 0. GUNTER, JOHN T. STANDLEY, BRYAN H. HERRIN, T. E., JR. STRINGFIELD, JOHN R. WATSON, ROBERT J. FACTUAL HISTORY Orders for the organization of Battery "D," 265th Coast Artillery, at Pensacola, Florida, were received March 1, 1936. By March 26, armory facilities had been secured and 58 applicants had been accepted. On March 30, the battery was mustered in, with Captain A. S. Mills, First Lieutenant E. E. Dailey, and Second Lieu tenant Sam Pasco, Jr. The Battery was designated as a harbor defense unit and was assigned to 12-inch mortars. PENSACOLA, FLORIDA SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row: H. A. Mandeville, J. B . Tarver, f. C. Park e r, R. M. White, G. L. Ammon s , f . A . Chattman, D. E. Young, J. W. Deloney. SECOND Row: C. 0. Wil s on, A. Gilmore, G. F. Simpson, Jr. , E. K. McMannamon, A. 0. Zelius, C. S. Miller, D. W. Pate, A. Berja, J. T, Wilson. THIRD Row: V. C. Little, D. A. Nee, Jr.,. T. C. Hancock, G. J. Parker, K. D. Hoyt, T. \V . Henderson, Jr., J. S. Falzone, M . Brewton, J . L . Ashley. C H7] With only three months available for training prior to summer encampment, a very intensive training schedule was adopted and carried out. Personnel and material of the Harbor Defenses of Pensacola were placed at the Battery's disposal by the commanding officer at Fort Bar rancas. Thanks to these and to the esprit de corps shown by the Battery personnel, the first encampment found the Battery prepared to function as a unit of the regi ment. This Battery has been on three encampments, all at Fort Taylor, Key West, Florida. Three kinds of transportation have been used; motor convoy, train and boat, all trips having been ~ade without loss or accident. No change has been made in officer personnel and only three losses have occurred in the N. C. O.'s. Sixty-five per cent of the present Battery personnel were on the original muster roll. A battery rifle team, small bore, has fired twice in competition with the U. S. Marine team, Naval Air Station, Pensacola, coming off in both cases with creditable scores. Social activities have not been neglected and the Battery has a fine annual dance. I

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SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH FIRST Row : J. Gand o lfo, G. E. Saunders, K. E. Albury, J . L. Cate s , B . II. \Vaile, 0. E . Ward, M. Zacal, M. A. Donenech, E. F. Pierce. SECO N D Row: J. M. Varela, C. Santana, F. Key, A. Navarro, G. P. Varel a , J. Aveal, L. G. Richardson, H. Roberts, C. W. Robert s , R. Boza, J. 0. Lucignani. T111Ro Row: B. E. Carey, A. C. Brye, J. N. Henriquez, C. T. Curry, G. \V . Spencer, C. Stickney, C. W. Wells, E. P. Wells, A. Ri v ero, C. E. Hjort, J. E. Sawyer, H . Hernandez . KEY WEST, FLORIDA COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . . . . . . . . . . WILLIAM C. HARRIS Second Lieutenant . . . . . . , \V1L1 . IAM E. P. ROBERTS Second Lietllenant . . . . . . . . HENRY H . TAYI . OR, JR . NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS First Sergeant . . . . . . . . . . . ROBERT J. SAUNDERS 'SERGEANTS CATES, JOSEPH L. VELASQUEZ, OLE PIERCE, EUGENE F. WAITE, BERNARD H. SAUNDERS, GEORGE E. WARD, OSCAR E . CORPORALS ALBURY, KIRK E. GARCIA, MARIO M. BRANDT, JOHN lIENRIQUF.Z, CLEVELAND DEL Prno, GEORGE J. SAUNDERS, WILLIAM F. DOMENECH, MANUEL A. , ZACAL, MATTHEW PRIVATES FIRS1CLASS BRAVO, HARRY McMAHON, Jos. c., JR. CERVANTES, MANUEL P. ROBERTS, GIFFORD M. BAICER, JOSEPII W, RIVERO, ARM,\NOO KEY, FRANK SAUNDERS, FRED HENRIQUEZ, JOSEPH N. SPENCER, GEORGE w. HJORT, CHARI.ES SWEETING, EDWIN E. LUCIGNANI, JULIAN o . \VoooY, THOMAS ANDREW ACOSTA, WALTER J. AVEAL, JULIO PRIVATES Boz,-., RUDOLPH BR,\NLEY, LOUIS W, BRYE, ARNOLD C. BARROSA, LUCIO H. CAREY, BF.LM0NT E. CURRY, CECIL T. GARONER , WILLIAM A . GANDOLFO, Jmrn J-IF.RNAN0F.Z, HOMF.R MONTOJ0 , MIGUF.L L. MOJICA, NEAL V. NAVARRO, ANDREW ROBERTS, CHESTER W. ROBERTS, HARRY RICHARDSON, LOUIS G . RODRIGUEZ, . MANUEL 1-1 . SANTANA, CECIi.iD SAWYER, JOUN E . STICKNEY, Cl.YOE VARELA, JosF.PH M. VAREi.A, GF.ORGE P. WEI.LS, CHARI.RS w. WF.1 . . 1.s, Eur.F.NE P. WELLS, WILLIAM J-1., JR. FACTUAL HISTORY During June, 1885, there was organized in the City of Key West a unit of the State Militia known as the (Conlinutd on pa g t I 16) TWO HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIFTH COAST ARTILLERY C lof8 J

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I. Rifle Inspection. 2. Plotting Room. INSERT: Oldest Service Man in Florida National Guard. 3. Riot Duty. 4 _ . Gun Crew, 155 mm. 5. Posting Relief, Interior Guard Duty, 6. Non-Commissioned Officers. B A T T E R y E TWO ( 119] . SECOND BATTALION HUNDRED COAST AND SIXTY-FIFTH ARTILLERY KEY WEST, FLORIDA

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WILLIAM C . BAYLESS Capta i n, Command i ng EUGENE D. SIMMONS First Utuftnanl MEDICAL DE TAC H M E N T I, Applying Thomas Leg Splint. 3, Inoculation. JACKSONVILLE , FLORIDA 2. Artificial Respiration. 4. Non-Commission~d Officers.

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COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Captain . . . . . . . . . . . . WILLIAM C. BAYLESS First Lieutenant . . . . . . . . . EUGENE D. SIMMONS NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Staff Sergeant . . . . . . . . . SAMUEL 0. ROUSSEAU, JR. SERGEANT \VADSWORTH, LEWIE L. CORPORAL \VILSON, ROYALL. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BRETT, DENNIS J. LoLL 1 LEON . WooD, MARVIN E. BEVILLE, LEONARD s. BRETT, JOIIN B. FENDER, BRITT A. FIRTH, LUTIIER H. GORDON, ALTON B. PRIVATES KELLY, CLARENCE M. REYNOLDS, THOMAS A. RHODEN, ULYSS S. STEWART, LELAND G. WADSWORTH, ALVY W. FACTUAL HISTORY The Medical Detachment, 265th Coast Artillery, was organized and extended Federal recognition on February 2, 1927, with Captain George W. Richardson command ing, who resigned and was succeeded on February 20, 1929, by Captain W . W. Rogers. The following enlisted men were called out on hurri cane duty in September, 1935, in the lower Florida Keys: Sergeant Leonard R. Butler, Coporal Royal L. Wilson, and Private Leland M. Garcia. Captain William B. Keating received Federal recogni (Contin.,td on pllgt 1,6) NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS FIRST Row: S. 0. Rousseau, Jr., L. L. Wadsworth, R. L. Wil son, M. E. Wood, A. B. Gordon, L. S. Beville, L. E. Loll. SECOND Row: D. J. " Brett, Jr., A. W. Wadsworth, J. B. Brett, L. G. Stewart, B. A. Fender, T. A. Reynolds, L. H . Firth, U. S. Rhoden, C. M. Kelly. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA TWO HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIFTH COAST ARTILLERY [ 1'I J I

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t , , : : . / . . . . -;, . ,.. ' .. . . . " i r , . : -J.1 t: 1 : . . / ! _ \ . . ;;4111 .. _ ' ~ . ~~ . . SHOWN IN PHOTOGRAPH F1RST Row: A. Drucker, R. Picciolo, P. Carpinelli, D. C. Nel son, C. W. Burket, F. J. Purnell, A. A. Nelson, S. Lorino, F. Velardi, A. Adler, T. F. Lee. SECOND Row: B . Law, C. P. Buehrer, F. 0 . Reiter, N. L. Hall, C. H. Wood, D. A. Lones, H. Noyer, E. D. Brasted, J. B. Olin ger, L. 0. Ganyard, D. A. Baker, G. Hickman. BAND SECTION OF ~ll[~~ 265TH COAST ARTILLERY MIAMI, FLORIDA Non-Commissioned Officers ., CAESAR LaMONACA Warrant Officer ~--.. i ,• ~ " i ~ ., . . { ,4-,. . ,. ' . "' , :r,, \ . .. , 1~ '/ 1 1 f: _ , . , , . ~ ..... -..:;~ ~ , ',;~ ' 1~. : ,:' ,.~ : ' ~,,,. :. " . .. , ~: ,,.. ~ ~ h '. . . . Warrant Officer . . . . . . . . . . CAESAR LA MONACA NON.COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Tec/J11ica/ Sergeant . . . . . . ROSARY PICCIOLO Staff Sergeant . . . . . . . . . . PASQUALE CARPINELLI SERGEANTS BURKET, CARL W. NELSON, DEWITT c . CORPORALS FUR.NELL, FRANK J , REITER, FRED 0. ADLER, ALFRED _ NELSON 1 ARTHUR A. PRIVATES FIRST CLASS BAKER, DONALD A. NOYER, HENRY LEE, THEODORE F. OLINGER 1 MAXINE 0. VELARDI, FRANK PRIVATES BUEHRER 1 CHARLES P. BR A STED, EDWIN D. CREAL, RAYMOND D. DRUCKE, ALEX HALL 1 NORMAN L. ' HARTSFIELD, BEN Jl, HICKMAN, GEOR G E HUMPHREYS, GEORGE F. JOHNSON, WOODROW L, LAW, BERTON LONES, DEVILL A . LORINO, SAM MARnN, CHARL E S E. OLINGER, }OHN B. WHARTON, HORACE B. Wooo, CHARLES H. FACTUAL HISTORY The 265th Coast Artillery Band was organized in Feb ruary, 1930, with Lieutenant Thomas J. Kelly in com mand and Caesar La Monaca as Warrant Officer and (Continutd on pagt 1,6) Band Members and Instruments

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l THURMAN A. HANCOCK Ttchnlcal Sergeant JOHN GLADIS Technical Sergeant * * MAXWELL 0. THROWER Sergeant HARRY B. CREA Colonel, Infantry Senior Instructor ROBERT S. LYTLE Lieutenant Colonel, Infantry FRANK L. HOSKINS Lieutenant Colonel, C. A. C. * PATRICK E. SHEA Malor, Field Artillery JOHN C. BUTNER, JR. Major, Field Artillery PAUL T. BAKER Major, Infantry CYRUS G, BARTER Sergeant HENRY BERGFELD Sergeant

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(j~,4~no!J dj./oJucia PURPOSE // rticlc J1: The purpo s e of the Association shall be to represent the National Guard in all matters directly affecting the National Gu a rd in its relationship to the National Defen s e Program of the State of Florida and the United States. MEMBERSHIP I Article Ill: The member s hip shall consist of active Federally recognize~ W. EUGENE JONES Major, I 16th Fltld Artillery President commissioned officers and ,varrant officers of the National Guard of the State of Florida and such other officers of the National Guard as associate members as shall be provided for . by the by-laws from time to time. In the history of the Florida National Guard and Militia, many references are found to the Florida Na tional Guard Association. The present organization, though, is not the hrst of its kind, for in 1903 an organ• ization was founded in the Florida National Guard with practically the same ideas and objectives. From various available records, it is found that this hrst organization took a very active part during its first few years in the passage of laws and regulations that now form the foun dation of our present National Defense System. Working for the betterment of the Guard and pas sage of laws dealing with military matters, this first Association held annual meetings through 1909. In this year it passed a resolution asking the National Guard Association of the United States to take some action to * RALPH W . COOPER, JR. First Lieut., 265th Coast Artllltry Secretary.Treasurer secure favorable action by Congress upon a bill to pro vide pay for the militia. No meeting was held in either 1910 or 1911, but after this two-year lapse a reorganization of the Association was commenced at the 1912 annual encampment of the Guard at St. Augustine in May. Meetings were held in 1913, 1914, and 1915. A general discussion of State military affairs was held, but no formal program was carried out. In 1916, the Florida National Guard \.vas mobilized for the Mexican Border, and the Association went out of existence as a result of this and the World War, which followed. Upon the reorganization of the Na tional Guard in 1920, no thought was given to the or ganization of an association. There was some discussion

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HOMER W. HESTERLY Colonol, I 16th Flo Id Artillory Vic;e-Prestdent JAMES P. COOMBS lieufendnt Colonel, 106th Engineers Vice-President MARK W. LANCE Major, IO&lh Quarlorma\ler Regiment < Yico-Prosldenl throughout the Guard at different times in regard to forming an association, but it was not until 1936 that any concerted effort was made in this dirtction. Early in 1936, Major W. Eugene Jones, 116th Field Artillery, on his own initiative, contacted the Adjutants of the various organizations of the Florida National Guard in regards to forming an association. On April 4, 1936, the Adjutants met with Major Jones in Bartow to discuss the feasibility of the plan. Present at this meeting were: Captain George E. Grace, 116th Field Artillery; Captain John P. Derham, Jr., 124th Infantry; Lieutenant Leon E. Waldron, 265th Coast Artillery; Lieutenant Jesse V. Smith, 106th Engineers, and Lieu tenant Robert L. Hughes, 116th Field Artillery, who acted as clerk. Following the distribution of a questionnaire, sug gested constitution and by-laws, arid a letter of explana tion of the purposes of the organization, the organiza tion meeting of the National Guard Officers Associa tion of Florida was held on June 14, 1936, at the May fair Hotel, Sanford, Florida. Colonel Joseph C. Hutchison, 124th Infantry, was ALBERT E. BARRS Major, 12~th Infantry Vico,Presldenl HAROLD C. WALL f-irst Lieutendnf, State Sfdft Vice-Pruldent EDWARD V. GARCIA Captain, 2&5th Coast Artillery Vict-Pr1S1dent elected temporary chairman of the meeting. Several of ficers spoke on the advisability of forming an associa tion. A constitution committee was appointed, later recommending the constitution that was adopted. Cap tain Robert C. Davis, 124th Infantry, was elected presi dent for the coming year. The second meeting of the newly organized associa tion was held in Jacksonville on April 4, 1937, at the Seminole Hotel. Many matters of importance to the Guard were discussed and several legislative resolutions passed. Major Percy L. Wall, 265th Coast Artillery, was elected president for the coming year. On April 10, 1938, the Association held its annual meeting in St. Augustine, with approximately 100 mem bers present. Among visitors to the convention were: Major General Albert H. Blanding, Chief of the Na tional Guard Bureau; Major General Van Horn Mose ley, Commanding General, Fourth Corps Area; and Colonel Alfred P. Sands, officer in charge of National Guard Affairs, Fourth Corps Area. Major W. Eugene Jones, 116th Field Artillery, was elected president for the coming year.

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CONTINUATI_ON H1sTORICAL SKETCH OF THE FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD (Continu,d /mm pag, XXVIII) committees have sponsored 17 new armories, under the construction operation of the Works Progress Admin istration:, at a total cost of over ~900,000. Upon the completion of this program the State Armory Board will have 27 armories under its jurisdiction. The Florida National Guard today occupies an en viable position in its standing in the National Guard of the United States, and that steady improvement which has so richly rewarded the efforts of its personnel for, years has never been more potent than during the last decade. The State may be assured that a dependable and efficient armed force stands ready to support civil authority in maintaining law, and in the preservation of public peace, furnishing at the same time a necessary component of national security. HEADQUARTERS BATTERY, 56TH FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE ( Continu,d from pag< JI) rich R. Copeland, and 22 enlisted men. Mustered in service by Colonel Sumter L. Lowry, Jr., 116th Field Artillery, it was inspected for Federal recognition by Cap tain C. D. Parmalee, Field Artillery (D. 0. L.). Lieutenant Copeland was succeeded by Second Lieu tenant Herbert F. R. Reck, who was commissioned January 20, 1931, and who became the Battery Commander when Captain Lance was transferred to the Quartermaster Sec tion, 31st Division, June 20, 1933. The Battery was commanded by Second Lieutenant Clifford L. Craft and First Lieutenant Thomas R . Brown in 1936, the latter being transferred tempora.rily from Battery ' "F," 116th Field Artillery. Captain Chester R. Yates has been com mander since September l, 1936. Second in command is Second Lieutenant Richard D. Reddick, commissioned February 9, 1938. The unit was motorized in June, 1933. After being housed for 10 years in a partially adequ;ite wooden ar mory, the organization moved February 1, 1937, into a splendid new brick armory, erected by the W. P. A. with the cooperation of the City of Avon Park and Highlands County. At present, First Sergeant R. A. Gerrard op erates from the Armory one of the key stations organized State Emergency Radio Net (call letters: WXKK) and is also active on Monday nights in cooperation with the Army-Amateur Radio System throug~ his own station, W-4AFZ. Field trainjng has been at Camp Jackson, South Caro lina; Fort McClelland, Alabama; Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia; Camp Beauregard, Louisiana, and in the Third Army Maneuvers, DeSoto National Forest, Mississippi. SERVICE BATTERY, 116TH FIELD ARTILLERY (Continrud f,om page 19) tended September 19, 1923, with Captain Rupert Smith commanding; Stanhope C. Smith, Cyril S. Lloyd and George T. Stonebraker, as Lieutenants. [ 1'4] OF HISTORIES Captain Rupert Smith was transferred to Staff, 56th Field Artillery Brigade, October 28, 1924. First Lieutenant Stanhope C. Smith assumed command and was promoted to Captain, serving as battery comman der since that time. Battery "F," 116th Field Artillery, was redesignated Service Battery, 116th Field Artillery, on April 1, 1937. The present junior officers of this organization came up through the ranks, serving one or more enlistments prior to appointment as Second Lieutenants. This Battery has served the following tours of "active State duty": riot duty at LaBelle, Florida, May 13 to 18, 1926, flood relief at Moore Haven, Florida, September 19 to 28, 1926, and flood relief at Okee chobee City, Florida, September 17 to 21, 1928. MEDICAL DETACHMENT, 116TH FIELD ARTILLERY (Conti,uud from PdRt 68) number of times to render help and assistance to the citizenry of the State. The most notable one was during the hurricane and flood disaster in the lower part of the State in 1926, when the Detachment was on active duty from September 20 to October 4, 1926, in the Miami and Moore Haven areas. The Detachment received the Major General I. Thord Gray trophy in June, 1938, for having the highest per centage of attendance during the past year. When Captain Halliday resigned on February 5, 1924, Dr. Earl H. McRae, commissioned a Major, succeeded him to the command. Captain Harry C. Evans, M. C., was placed in command on September 1, 1934, so Major Hardy could devote his full time as Regimental Surgeon. Captain James Holdstock, D. C., relieved Captain Evans. on August 9, 1935. The Detachment suffered a great loss in the death of Major Hardy on March 26, 1936. Captain Shuler H. Etheredge was promoted to Major, M. C., and assigned as Regimental Surgeon on July 14, 1938, and transferred to Headquarters, 106th Medical Regiment, on November 21, 1938. Captain Nonie W. Gable, who was in command of Headquarters Battery, 116th Field Artillery, was appointed a Major, M. C., and assigned as Regimental Surgeon on December 23, 1938. HEADQUARTERS COMPANY, 124TH INFANTRY (Continu~d from page 1,) Company and in such position he is still active. Upon Captain Whitaker's pro~otion George W. Sears became Second Lieutenant until March 1, 1937, at which time Richard D. Sutton, formerly an officer in the Howitzer Company became communication officer with the rank of Second Lieutenant. Lieutenant Sutton is still active in this capacity at the present time. The Headquarters Company has a long and enviable record of achievement, including the participation at the Third Army Maneuvers at DeSoto National Forest, Mis

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I . , CONTINUATION sissippi, during the summer of 1938, as well as attending and being a vital part of the brigade camp held in 1937, at Camp McClellan, Alabama. During 1929, this organ ization performed State service for several weeks during the Mediterranean fruit fly duty. SERVICE COMPANY, 124TH INFANTRY ( Conti,uud from pagt 77) In the years 1893-94, the Rifles were designated as Company "D," First Battalion, Florida State Troops, and remained as such until mustered into Federal service for the Spanish-American War. Designation was then changed to Company "G," First Florida Infantry. By 1916, the Company was again called Company "D" and that title was retained until the unit was broken up and personnel used as replacements in the 31st Division, August 5, 1917. At the close of the World War, a Supply Company was formed at Hastings, Florida, which was mustered into State service on February 27, 1920, but failed to receive Federal recognition. This unit was in tum con verted into Service Company, First Infantry, with head quarters at Hastings. During the same year, the Com pany was made a unit of the 154th Infantry and in 1922 was transferred to St. Augustine. It now occupies quarters in the oldest barracks in America, St. Francis Barracks, constructed in the 17th century. The 154th Infantry was redesignated as the 124th Infantry, F. N. G., in 1924, and Service Company became a unit of the latter organization. This company was used in aid of civil authority during the 1926 hurricane. Selected men have also assisted at various emergencies, such as the fruit fly quarantine and election disorders. HOWITZER COMPANY, 124TH INFANTRY (Conrin,ud fro . m p a gt 81) The organization has long been the outstanding unit in the regiment, winning the Athletic Cup for three consecu tive years, the Best-Dressed Unit Cup for two years, and the Military Efficiency Trophy for a total of nine years of the twelve years it has been competed for. The organiza tion is also the regimental pistol champions and brigade 37 mm. champions. I I" l OF HISTORIES HEADQUARTERS COMPANY, FIRST BATTALION, 124TH INFANTRY (Continutd from pag, 81) The unit was in active service during the entire Medi terranean fruit fly quarantine period. It has attended every annual encampment since its organization ~nd has always been outstanding in communication work. Most of the non-commissioned officers have more than five years service with the unit. On February 17, 1938, the command of the unit was taken over by Second Lieutenant Hofmann, who was promoted to 'First Lieutenant and Federally recognized on July 5, 1938. This vacancy had been created when First Lieutenant DeCottes was promoted to Major and given command of the First Battalion on February 17, 1938. Sergeant C. B. Schirard of Company "D," who had received his Federal recognition as Second Lieuten ant on April 15, 1938, was made communication officer. MEDICAL DETACHMENT, 124TH INFANTRY (Continu,d frorn 127) active service was in 1928 at West Palm Beach, following a destructive storm . The unit administered typhoid innocu lations extensively, an action made imperative because of sanitary conditions. The third call for active duty was in 1929-'30, when the unit served for nineteen months with other units of the 124th Infantry during the Mediterranean Fruit Fly cam paign. Members of the enlisted personnel were attached to every unit of the 124th Infantry which saw service dur ing this period. The fourth call was in 1937 when the unit assisted other units of the 124th Infantry, working in conjunction with civil authorities, in maintaining order in the vicinity of Daytona Beach. With the exception of 1937 and 1938, annual encamp ments have been at Camp Foster, where the unit operated the Regimental Hospital, besides its usual duties, and gave annual physical examinations to all officers of the 124th Infantry. In 1937, the unit attended the 62nd Brigade encampment at Fort McClelland, Alabama. In 1937, it attended the Third Army Maneuvers, DeSoto Nationa~ Forest, Mississippi. HEADQUARTERS BATTERY, 265TH CoAST ARTILLERY (Continu,d from pag, IJJ) unheard of event for National Guardsmen to replace the Regulars in such duties as running power plants, radio stations, meteorological stations, search light operation, tele phone management, installation and operation, and estab lishment and responsibilities incident to the orientation sys tem of a harbor defense. Those duties were an every-day occurrence with the soldiers of the garrison, and guardsmen whiled away the days as half-hearted observers, in "soldier ing," and other forms of amusement. But when the regiment was ordered to Fort Taylor at Key West for training and target practice, this unit's offi cers and men suddenly found themselves in a post garri soned only by a caretaker's establishment. Each detail in

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CONTINUATION volved in a coast artillery target practice was thrust upon our National Guard personnel. There ensued a period of intensive study, training and action, from which emerged a headquarters battery unique to the National Guard, a headquarters battery endowed with the initiative and ability to function as would a Regular Army unit in the execution of technical and other military duties. The quality of the personnel has remained consistently excellent, stress being placed upon basic education, ability and civic standing and reputation of the recruit. BATTERY E, SECOND BATTALION, 265TH COAST ARTILLERY Island City Guards. It was the inception of what is now known as the Key West unit of the Florida Na tional Guard, which is Ba"ttery "E," 265th Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense). For five years, the unit was known as the "Island City Guards." In 1893, it was redesig nated Company "A," Fifth Battalion, State Troops, and retained that designation until 1920, when it was again redesignated as. Company ''I," Second Infantry, and re mained as such for 15 years or until 1917. The Company was stationed on the Mexican Border at Laredo, Texas, June 21, 1916, under the command of Captain Arthur H. Sheppard, and mustered out March 17, 1917. On August 5, 1917, it was again mustered into the Federal service during the World War and was redesignated Company "I," 124th Infantry, sailing for France October 16, 1918, where it was used for replace ments. It was mustered out January 14, 1919. On June 29, 1923, it was reorganized and recognized as the 438th Coast Artillery Company, and assigned to the First Separate Battalion, Coast Artillery, on October 31, 1923. It was redesignated Battery "B," February 9, 1924; redesignated Battery "B," First Separate Battalion, Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense), April 4, 1924; redes ignated Battery "B," 26,th Coast Artillery (Harbor De fense), July 22, 1925, and redesignated Battery "E," 265th Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense), on January 1, 1930. The Battery has served on active State duty following the hurricane at Key West on September 28-29, 1929; aiding civil authorities, Islamorada, from February 28 to May 13, 1935, and following the Labor Day hurricane, September 3-11, 1935. MEDICAL DETACHMENT, 265TH CoAST ARTILLERY (Continued from p,g, 1'1) tion and was attached to this organization on August 7, 1929. He resigned and was transferred to the un assigned list on March 5, 1938. William C. Bayless assumed command of the unit on July 2, 1934, when he was appointed First Lieutenant. He was promoted to Captain on July 1, 1938. First Lieutenant Eugene D. Simmons was extended Federal recognition on July 1, 1938, and attached to this organization. ( 156] OF HISTORIES BAND SECTION OF HEADQUARTERS BATTERY, 265TH COAST ARTILLERY (Continutd /Tom P"8t 1,2) Band Leader. Its first encampment was at Fort Bar• rancas, Pensacola, Florida, in 1930. This unit and the 13th Coast Artillery Band of the Regular Army played several fine concerts in camp besides playing for dances. From 1931 to the present date, the Band and the Regiment have attended camp at Fort Taylor, Key West Florida. During the annual two weeks there, the band has given concerts almost every night for the officers and enlisted men of the Regiment. Thousands of Key West citizens, who crowd the Military Park adjoining the camp, also enjoy these concerts. This Band has been acclaimed one of the finest military bands of the nation. In 1932, Governor David Sholtz of Florida honored the Band by selecting it as his official band of the State of Florida during his four years regime. The Band led the inaugural parade at Tallahassee in 1932. It has made numerous trips through the State on different occasions. When Lieutenant Kelly resigned in 1936, Lieutenant H. H. Taylor was appointed in his place. Warrant Of. ficer Caesar La Monaca was placed in command of the Band. Several original members of the Band are still in the unit, including Technical Sergeant Rosary Picciolo, Staff Sergeant P. Carpinelli, Sergeant Carl Burkett, and a few others. BAND SECTION OF SERVICE COMPANY, 124TH INFANTRY (Continued from pag, 119) at Wauchula, the Headquarters Company personnel were transferred to form a new Company "L" which was sta tioned at St. Petersburg. The Band Section was transferred to Sanford, Florida, at this time and was made a part of Service Company (then at Hastings), on January 26, 1921. In March of the same year the Band received Federal recognition and was designated "Band Section, Service Company, 154th Infantry." On January 10, 1924, this unit was mustered out of the service. On January 17, 1924, an application signed by 24 Jack sonville musicians with Joseph Warren Berry, acting as Bandmaster, was submitted to the State Military Depart• ment with the request that a Band Section be formed in Jacksonville. This application was approved eight days later, and the present organization was mustered into State Service. Federal recognition was granted in March and by May of the same year the Band was redesignated "Band Section, Service Company, 124th Infantry." . During the Third Army maneuvers held in Mississippi, July-August, 1938, the bandsmen not only enlivened the regiment and contributed greatly to its morale, but also were active in work details and guard duty about the bivouac area. I 1 I