Citation
Final measure. Part II.

Material Information

Title:
Final measure. Part II.
Uniform Title:
Final measure
Creator:
Hawk, Robert,
Place of Publication:
St. Augustine, Fla.
Publisher:
State Arsenal,
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
National Guard -- Florida ( lcsh )
St. Francis Barracks (Fla.) -- History ( lcsh )
History -- Saint Augustine (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Temporal Coverage:
Common Era ( 1516 - 3000 )
Spatial Coverage:
Florida

Notes

Funding:
The Florida National Guard's Special Archives Publications was digitized, in part by volunteers, in honor of Floridians serving both Floridians in disaster response and recovery here at home and the nation oversees.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Florida National Guard
Holding Location:
Florida National Guard, St. Augustine Barracks
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the Florida National Guard. Digitized with permission.
Resource Identifier:
25214552 ( OCLC )

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UF00047696_00002_pdf.txt


Full Text



Digitized with the permission of the
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS

FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD





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RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS

Items collected here were originally published by the
Florida National Guard, many as part of its SPECIAL
ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series. Contact the Florida
National Guard for additional information.

The Florida National Guard reserves all rights to
content originating with the Guard.



DIGITIZATION

Titles from the SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series
were digitized by the University of Florida in
recognition of those serving in Florida's National
Guard, many of whom have given their lives in
defense of the State and the Nation.






FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF

MILITARY AFFAIRS















1$

A FLORIDA COUNTY'S WAR
PART II
FATAL CASUALTIES
ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA
1940-1945






STATE ARSENAL

ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA










,STATE OFFLORIDA
DEPARTMENT-OF MILITARY AFFAIRS
OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL




POST OFFICE BOX 1008
STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE
32085-1008







The Special Archives Publication Series of the Historical
Services Division are produced as a service to Florida
communities, historians, government agencies, and to any other
individuals, h-is-orical or geneological societies, and national
or regional governmental agencies which find the information
contained herein of use or value.

At present, copies of all Special Archives Publications are
provided to certain state and national historical repositories at
no charge. A nominal fee is charged all other individuals and
institutions to help defray production costs.

Information about the series is available from the
Historical Services Division, Department of Military Affairs,
State Arsenal, St. Augustine, Florida.


Robert Hawk
Director



















PREFACE



The material contained in this archives publication
represents the raw research data gathered on the individual fatal
casualties from Alachua County, Florida during the Second World
War. It is to be Part II of a book which will include many
photographs of individual casualties, their ships, plane types,
and unit crests. Part I will be a narrative survey of the county
and its people during the war with stories about the war services
some of its more famous sons and daughters in addition to
interesting tales from the "home front."

This material is provided solely for the research use of
historians, archivists and genealogists. All rights are retained
by the authors, Harlan Trofholz and Robert Hawk of Gainesville
and St. Augustine, Florida respectively.












INTRODUCTION



A government decision to "centralize" military personnel
records during the 1950's should have made research into the
lives and careers of Alachua County's war casualties a simple
task. Unfortunately, the resulting Military Personnel Records
Center in St. Louis is terribly understaffed and, more
importantly, a fire set by a misguided protester in 1973,
destroyed a vast amount of accumulated personnel records
associated with the Second World War.

Some information is available from other sources. The U.S.
Marine Historical Center in Washington keeps files on all
casualties. The Naval Historical Center has information on
former officers. Both can provide detailed unit histories. The
Army's Casualty (now Mortuary) Support Division in Alexandria can
obtain considerable information on individual casualties. The Air
Force Historical Center in Montgomery was able to provide
extremely interesting unit information. The National Archives
was able to help with copies of Missing Air Crew Reports on a
number of our individual casualties.

Much information, some less than absolutely reliable, was
obtained from articles in the Gainesville Sun, the principle
Alachua County newspaper. Bits and pieces of information was
elicited from the few relatives of casualties we contacted and
even a little from the old yearbooks of the University of
Florida.

Unfortunately, the scattered location and diversified nature
of the information meant some entries consist of little more than
the names while others are quite complete and detailed. Hopefully
more information will turn up in the future and a more complete
version of this list can be produced.

When we began this project two years ago, we had no idea how
long it would last and complicated it would become. It began as
a labor of honor and and general interest and became a labor of
love. The war happened a long time ago and most contemporary
Americans have no interest in, or understanding of, that time.
But these young men from our county who gave their lives in that
war should not be forgotten. Their story deserves to be told.
So far as we were able to discover, here it is.







FATAL CASUALTIES; ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA WORLD WAR II



HARMON PRICE ALDERMAN WILLIAM THOMAS HOGE
ALTA PAUL ASHURST, JR. ARTHUR M. HOLDER
JACK CLINTON BACHLOTTE SAMUEL DODD HOLMES, JR.
WILLIAM D. BALLOU LEROY S. HUNT
JAMES PAUL BANKS WALLACE JONES JR.
JAMES BECK FRANCIS D. JORDAN
ERNEST WILMER BELL LESTER PERRY KARR
WILLIAM F. BENNAFIELD IRA DELL KEENE
PLEMON BENNEFIELD BENJAMIN W. (JACK) KIMMEL
ROBERT TYRIE BENTON WILMER M. KNIGHT
T. HARPER BEVILLE CARL L. LATOUR
JAMES LYNN BILLINGTON ROBERT A. LAYNE
DALTON L. BLACKBURN T. ALEXANDER LIVINGSTON
ROBERT CHARLES BOWERS, JR. THOMAS LARRY MARKHAM
STEPHEN L. BOYLES DELL MARTIN
JOSEPH PLUMMER BROOKS HUGH WILLIAM MCCAIN
ROBERT E. BROWN GROVER WALTER MCCALL, JR.
SIDNEY A. BRUCE WILLIAM RANDALL MCCALL
GORDON DUWARD CADY ROBERT SYBOTEN MCCOOK
JOHN L. CAMERON WILLIE MCCRAY JR.
JULIAN C. CANNON RICHARD Z. MCDERMOTT
LOUIS T. CARR ROBERT G. MCDONNELL
CURTIS E. CATON JOHN F. MELLOR
JOSEPH NOWLIN CHAMBERLAIN REGINALD HYMAN (BUDDY) MILLER
JOHN S. CHAPMAN MEREDITH M. (SPARKY) MILLS, JR.
JOHN GORDON CHAPPELL JAMES CALEB MOTT
CLEMENT M. CLAPP VIRGINIUS C. MURPHREE
GEORGE BRUMLEY CLARKE ALBERT LEA NELSON
ROBERT H. COLGAN HARRY H. NICHOLS
WALTER E. COOTER JAMES WALTER PATTERSON
JACK CRAFT ROBERT J. PHILLIPS
JOHN W. CULLEN, JR. CHARLES W. PINHOLSTER
WILLIAM E. CULP, JR. VAN B. PORCHER
LEROY DE BOSE LEONARD R. RAINEY
JAMES W. DEGRAFF LEO D. RAMOS
JESSE W. DIXON ANDREW RICHARDSON
JAMES E. EASTMOOR JACKSON C. RICHARDSON
SAMUEL A. EGGERS WILSON BLOOM RIPPEY
SEALS WORTH FAGAN JAMES REXALL ROBINSON
CURTIS FOUNTAIN JOHN LEE SAUNDERS JR.
ALFONSO E. FRANKLIN RUDOLPH A. SCHUMAN
CHARLES HUGO GILBERT,, JR. EWART T. SCONIERS
LUCIAN B. GRAY JOHN S. SHARP II
LORIN A. GREEN JOHN W. SMALLBONES
GEORGE MCMILLAN GUY CHARLES WILLIAM SMITH
RAYMOND JEFFERSON HAGEN WILLIAM A. (BILLY) SMITH
GEORGE Q. HALBROOK ALBERT LEA SNOWDEN
WILBUR EUGENE HALL WILLIAM A. SNOWDEN
BERNARD H. HEIDENFELDER BYRON EDDY SPARKS
RALPH JAMES HENDERSON LOREN P. STEWART
GEORGE P. HENDRIX. JR. PAUL M. STULTS
HARRY F. HENDRY, JR. RICHARD LEE STULTS



























MOSBY G. TAYLOR, JR.
JOSEPH PINK THOMPSON
CHARLES GORDON TISON
LOUIS A. TOWSON
LEONARD W. VAUGHN
LEVIE EDWARD VAUSE
HARRISON B. WALTON
WILLIAM CECIL WEIL
RICHARD WALSH WELLS
HANS A.E. WENZEL
JAMES DARNELL WESTMORELAND JR.
JOSEPH R. WHALEY
WILMON PHILLIP WHEELER
JULIAN BRYANT WILKERSON
HOWARD THACKER WILLIAMS
WILBUR W. WILLIS
ORMAN RUDOLPH WIMMER
JOE GARRETT WINSTON
EMORY C. WOOTEN
WESLEY W. WORTHINGTON JR.
MARION M. ZETROUER
CHARLES A. ZINKIL JR.










In his History of Alachua County, Florida, Jesse Davis included a
list of more than eighty names of county casualties for World War
II. This list is identical with that provided by the American
Legion. Research has shown it is not complete.


ALDERMAN, Harmon Price
BACHLOTTE, Jack Clinton
BANKS, James Paul
BECK, James
BELL, Ernest W.
BENEFIELD, Plemon
BENNAFIELD, William
BENTON, Robert Tyrie
SEVILLE, Theo Harper
BILLINGTON, James Lynn
BOWERS, Robert Charles RAMOS, Leo Dionsion
BOYLES, Stephen RICHARDSON, Jackson Collins
BROWN, Robert E. ROBINSON, James Rexall
BRUCE, Sidney A. SAUNDERS, John Lee Jr.
CAMERON, John L. SMITH, William Arthur
CANNON, Julian SNOWDEN, Albert Leo
CARR, Louis SNOWDEN, William A.
CHAMBERLIN, Joseph Nowlin SPARKS, Byron Eddy
CHAPMAN, John S. STEWART, Loren Prescott
CHAPPELL, John G.? STULTS, Paul M.
CLAPP, Clement STULTS, Richard L.
COOTER, Walter E. TAYLOR,' Mosby Jr.
CULLEN, John W. THOMPSON, Joseph Pink
CULP, William E. -TISON, Charlie Gordon
DIXON, Jesse W. TONGE, Samuel Davis
EASTMOOR, James E. TOWSON, Louis Albert
EGGERS, Samuel VAUSE, Levie Edward
GUY, George McMillan WALTON, Har'rison B. Jr.
HAGAN, Raymond J. WEIL, William Cecil
HALBROOK, George Q. WELLS, Richard Walsh
HAWLEY (or Haley), Frank WENZEL, Hans A. E.
HEIDENFELDER, Bernard H. WESTMORELAND, James D.
HENDERSON, Ralph James WHEELER, Wilmon Phillips
HENDRY, Harry F. WILKERSON, Julian Bryant
HOGUE, William Thomas WILLIS, Wilbur
HOLDER, Arthur Maryland WILLIAMS, Howard T.
KARR, Lester Peter WIMMER, Ormond Rudolf
KEENE, Ira D. WINSTON, Joe Garrett
KIMMEL, B. W. "Jack" WOOTEN, Emory C.
KNIGHT, Wilmer
LAYNE, Robert A.
LEWIS, Milton
MARKHAM, Thomas Larry
McCAIN, Hugh Williams
McCALL, Grover Walter
McDERMOTT, Richard Ziemer
MILLER, Reginald "Buddy"
MOON, Solomon DeBeau
MOTT, James Caleb
PATTERSON, James Walter
RAINEY, Leonard Rhodes






















Shortly following the end of the war, the Army released an
un-official list of 59 men accredited to Alachua County, Florida.
Most have been identified and can be associated with the county
but the men listed below cannot be confirmed to have an Alachua
County connection. Nearly all of them appear accredited to other
Florida counties in the official War Department list of late
1946.






ANDREW, Richard
COMEAUX, Dallard L.
GREEN, Clyde L.
HARVEY, Basil
HOOD, Lonnie
JOHNSON, Thomas V.
MILLS, Archibald S. Jr.
OLIVER, Bradley C.
PREVATT, James P. Jr.
RAY, James N.
RILEY, Leonard J.
SMITH, James E.
STRAUM, Vernon K.
SWEAT, Ellis J.
WILLETT, Claire V.
WILLIAMS, Carl













HARMON PRICE ALDERMAN

Chief Radioman, U.S. Navy
U.S.S. Houston (CA 30)
Died, 28 November 1942, Zontsuji, Japan while a prisoner of war

Harmon Alderman was raised in Melrose, Florida, graduating from
Melrose High School in 1927. Immediately after graduation, he
joined the naval service. At the time of his death his next of
kin included;

Virginia widow and Robert B. Alderman, son, both of Long Beach,
California, H. Guy Alderman, father, Dolly Price, maternal
grandmother, George M. Alderman, brother, Frances Alderman,
sister, all of Melrose, Florida, two brothers, Eddie L. and Emory
R. in the Army and Wyman 0. Alderman, brother, Navy.

The heavy cruiser Houston was commissioned in 1930. Prior to the
outbreak of war with Japan, the ship had spent most of its
operational life in Far Eastern waters. On 7 December 1941, the
Houston was the flagship of the US Asiatic fleet based in the
Phillipine Islands. Immediately dispatched to Australia, she
soon joined other Allied ships to become part of the ABDA
(American-British-Dutch-Austral ian) fleet which would attempt to
prevent the Japanese conquest of the Dutch East Indies. During
January and February of 1942, the Houston helped convoy
transports and provided anti-aircraft protection to un-armed
ships. In the Battle of the Java Sea, 26-27 February, the
Houston was one of two surviving crusiers from the ABDA fleet.
The following day, the two ships attacked massive Japanese naval
forces in the Banten Str. of western Java. In a furious contest
lasting into the early hours before dawn the next day, the two
allied cruisers sank a minesweeper and severely damaged several
other Japanese ships but was mortally damaged by numerous torpedo
hits.

The survivors from the Houston were intered first in
Batavia, Java and Changi Camp, Singapore. Alderman's group was
sent to Japan where he subsequently died. Whether from injuries,
wounds, illness or Japanese maltreatment is not known.

It is not known if his remains were recovered after the war.

Harmon Alderman was eligible for the following medals and decor.

Purple Heart
Navy Good Conduct Medal
Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon
American Defense Service Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Service Medal
Phillipine Defense Ribbon
Victory Medal



















ALTA PAUL ASHURST, JR.

Private First Class, U.S. Army
34 547 141
Company F, 142nd Infantry Regiment
36th Infantry Division (Texas National Guard)
Died of Wounds 28 August 1944 near Crest, France

Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr. was born 13 September 1923 in Gainesville,
Florida. He grew up and attended schools in that city. On the
eve of the war, he and his parents moved to Cocoa, Florida. At
the time of his death, his next of kin were;

Alta Paul and Eva Ageneta Ashurst, 134 Olive St., Cocoa, Florida
George A. Barber of Gainesville, Florida, Maternal uncle.

Pfc. Ashurst served with the 36th Division in North Africa,
Sicily, and Italy including Salerno, Naples-Foggia (including
Cassino), Anzio, Rome-Arno campaigns. He landed with his
division in the south of France on the 15th of August, 1944. In
cooperation with other American and French units, the 36th
Division pushed up the Rhone River valley against retreating
German forces. A savage German counter-attack on the 25th of
August was contained by the 27th and the American and French
advance continued. It was during the battles associated with
the German counter-attack that Pfc. Ashurst received the wounds
from which he succumed on the 28th of the month.

Following his death, Alta Ashurst's remains were interred in the
U.S. Military Cemetery, Draguignan, France. After the war, he
was returned to the United States and re-interred in Pinecrest
Cemetery, Cocoa, Florida.

He is known to have been eligible for the following decorations,
medals, and awards:

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
European Theater Campaign Medal with two arrowheads and four
bronze stars
Victory Medal
Combat Infantryman Award





JACK CLINTON BACHLOTTE

Radioman 2nd Class, U.S. Navy
killed in action, sometime summer of 1943, Solomon Islands area,
Southwest Pacific


Jack Baclotte was from Alachua, County, Florida. He entered
naval service in May of 1941. He became a radioman-tunnel gunner
on a Grumman TBF torpedo plane, assigned to the famous Torpedo
Squadron 8 aboard the U.S.S. Saratoga following the Battle of
Midway. At the time of his death, his next of kin included;

Helen Bailey Bachlotte, mother, Campville, Florida.

After the near total personnel losses in the Battle of Midway,
Torpedo 8 was re-constituted and sent, with Jack Bachlotte, to
participate in the Solomon Islands campaign August to December
1942. Service in the squadron with Bachlotte was Corwin Morgan
of Gainesville, a TBF pilot and winner of the Navy Cross. The
squadron won its second Presidential Unit Citation for the
Solomons battle. The following year, as All ied forces advanced up
the Solomon Island chain, Jack Bachlotte was killed during a
mission, time, place and destination unknown.

During the Guadalcanal campaign, Torpedo 8 was assigned to the
First Marine Air Wing attached to the First Marine Division,
operating from Henderson Field, Guadalcanal Island. Their
citation reads;

"The officers and men of the First Marine Division,
Reinforced, (including Torpedo 8) on August 7 to 9, 1942,
demonstrated outstanding gallantry and determination in
successfully executing forced landing assaults against a number
of strongly defended Japanese positions on Tulagi, Gavutu,
Tanambogo, Florida and Guadalcanal, British Solomon Islands,
completely routing all enemy forces and seizing a most valuable
base and airfield within the enemy zone of operations in the
South Pacific Ocean. From the above period until December 9,
1942, this Reinforced Division not only held its important
strategic positions despite determined and repeated Japanese
naval, air and land attacks, but by a series of offensive
operations against strong enemy resistance drove the Japanese
from the proximity of the airfield and inflicted great losses on
them by land and air attacks. The courage and determination
displayed in these operations was of an inspiring order."

After the Guadalcanal Campaign, Torpedo 8 operated from the
Saratoga and from landing fields on the islands south of the
Solomons.

It is not know if Jack Bachlotte's remains were ever recovered
but it seems unlikely. He is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Presidential Unit Citation



















WILLIAM D. BALLOU

Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Corps
34 546 512
319th Bomb Squadron, 90th Bomb Group
Killed in Action 12 April 1944,-New Guinea


William Ballou was born 3 March 1924. At the time of his death,
his next of kin included;

Mrs. Thelma H. :Magee, Step-mother of Box 146, Marianna, Florida
Julia Boykin, Aunt, Chattahoochee, Florida
Elise Dickenson, Aunt, 602 South Sanchez St. Ocala, Florida.

Sergeant Ballou enlisted in Gainesville, Florida and was a
resident there for an unknown length of time prior to entering
military service.

The 90th Bomb Group was part of the Fifth Air Force and was
heavily engaged during March and April 1944 attacking Japanese
bases and installations in and around Hollandia, New Guinea
preparatory to American landings in the area. Sergeant Ballou
was killed during a major air strike against Hollandia on the
12th of April.

Sergeant Ball.ou's remains are interred in the Zachary Taylor
National Cemetery, Louisville, Kentucky.

Decorations and medals for which Sergeant Ballou was eligible
include;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal






'A



















JAMES PAUL BANKS

Captain, 0 789 132, U.S. Army Air Corps
345th Bomb Group (Medium)
Killed, aircraft accident, 27 July 1943, Port Moresby, New Guinea

James Banks was born 28 October 1918 in Alachua County, Florida.
He was raised in High Springs and graduated from High Springs
High School. He attended Stetson University for three years and
worked at the High Springs Bank prior to entering the military in
May 1941. He received training at Maxwell Field, Alabama, Avon
Park and Augusta, Georgia. He received his wings and commission
at Turner Field, Albany, Georgia 29 April 1942. For nearly one
year, he was a B-25 flying instructor in Columbia, South Carolina
and went overseas with the 345th Bomber Squadron in April of
1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Sidney and Sadie Banks, parents, Betty Banks, sister, Mr. and
Mrs. James Paul, grandparents, all of High Springs, Florida and
various near relations in Gainesville and St. Petersburg,
Florida.

The 345th entered combat in June of 1943, flying from their base
at Port Moresby, New Guinea. They attacked Japanese airfields,
fortified positions, and shipping on the northern coast of New
Guinea, the Bismark Archipelago, the Admiralties and the seas in
between. It was when returning from such a mission that Captain
Banks's aircraft hit a tree with one wing and was caused to
crash.

Janes Banks's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Armed
Forces Cemetery, Port Moresby, New Guinea and re-interred in the
City Cemetery, High Springs, Florida after the war.

Captain Banks is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal











JAMES BECK

Seaman 2nd Class, U.S. Navy
Killed in action, died of wounds, date place and unit unknown
(Reported in news 13 December 1942)
At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Eliga Beck, Grandfather, Route 1, box 8, Melrose, Florida








ERNEST WILMER BELL

Captain, U.S. Army
0 462 628
120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division
Killed in Action 25 July 1944 near St. Lo, France

Ernest Bell was born 10 May 1917. Originally from
Crawfordsville, Florida, he came to Gainesville to attend the
University of Florida. He received his AB degree and had
completed two years of Law School when he entered military
service 1 July 1942. He had made Gainesville his home and his
wife and young son lived in the city. Mrs. Culp worked for a
local law firm. At the time of Captain Bell's death, his next of
kin included;

Veda B.Bel widow, Ernest Wilmer Bell Jr., son, of Gainesville,
Florida and Mrs. E. C. Ferrell, mother, of Crawfordsville,
Florida.

The 30th Division had been deeply involved in the savage Battles
of the Hedgerows in Normandy, France following the Allied
invasion. After the capture of St. Lo, the American Armies
prepared to break through German defensive positions in Normandy.
This plan, Operation Cobra, was spear-headed by the 9th and 30th
Infantry Divisions. Captain Bell was killed on the first day of
the battle.

Captain Bell's remains are permanently interred in the Normandy
American Military Cemetery, St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France.

Ernest Bell is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge









WILLIAM F. BENNAFIELD

Sergeant, U.S. Army
34 058 562
Headquarters and Service Company,
853rd Aviation Battalion
Killed in Action, 27 November 1943

William Bennafield was born 28 February 1919. He was killed when
a passenger aboard the troopship SS Rohna, sunk by enemy action
of Djidjolli, Algeria, 27 November 1943.

At the time of his death, Sergeant Bennafield's next of kin were;

Thelma M. Bennafield (Wife), Henry William Bennafield (son) and
Lillian Bennafield (mother) of 891 West Masonic St. Gainesville,
Florida and a sister, Margaret Carter, 32 Gainesville Court,
Gainesville, Florida.

The 853rd Aviation Battalion was enroute from the United States
to India via the Suez Canal when its troopship was destroyed in
action off the North African coast.

William Bennafield's remains were not recovered. His name is
memorialized on the Wall of the Missing, North Africa American
Military Cemetery, Carthage, Tunisia.

Sergeant Bennafield is known to have been eligible for the
following decorations and medals:

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal













PLEMON BENNEFIELD

Seaman 2nd Class, U.S. Navy
Killed in action or died of wounds, date place and unit unknown
At the time of death his next of kin included;

Thomas Mitchell Bennefield, father, Newberry, Florida

















ROBERT TYRIE BENTON

1st Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps
Killed in action 24 March 1945, near Wesel, Germany

Robert Benton was raised in Gainesville, Florida where his father
was a professor, later college dean at the University of Florida.
(Benton Hall was named for him) Robert graduated from the
University Magna Cum Laude in 1935. Subsequently, he was
employed by the Mott-Smith Corporation of Houston, Texas and by
Socony Vacuum Oil Company in Venezuela. Benton entered military
service in October of 1942. He received flight, weather and
navigator training in Grand Rapids, Michigan. At the time of his
death his next of kin included;

Mrs. J.R. Benton, mother, 1436 West University Avenue,
Gainesville, Florida and Sergeant Charles R. Benton, brother, in
military service.

Lieutenant Benton was navigator on a C-47 transport aircraft
operating with American airborne infantry units. His aircraft
towed gliders, made supply drops, or parachute infantry for
several combat operations in Europe, 1944-1945. He was involved
in the invasion of France, the "Market Garden" campaign in
Belgium and Holland and in the assault over the Rhine River in
February 1945. On the 24th of March 1945, his aircraft received
a mortal hit from German defensive fire. The aircraft was seen
to be on fire and, although several parachutes were seen, the
plane was too low and there were no survivors. They were on a
glider mission and had successfully released their charge before
being hit.

It is not known where Robert Benton's remains are interred.

Lieutenant Benton received or is known to have been eligible for
the following g decorations and medals;

Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
























T. HARPER BEVILLE

Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps
Army Air Corps Ferry Command
Killed, plane crash 5 August 1942 near Detroit, Michigan

Harper Beville was born 19 May 1917 in Gainesville, Florida. He
was raised in that city and graduated from Gainesville High
School in 1935. At the time of his death his next of kin
included;

Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Beville, parents, Newberry Road, Gainesville,
Florida, Clarise Estelle Beville, wife, and Jack L. Beville of
Meridan, Mississippi.

Lieutenant Beville learned to fly as a civilian and was a
civilian flying instructor prior to his entry into military
service in March 1942. He was ki-lled when his fighter aircraft
went into a spin at 10,000 feet and his attempt to bail out at
500 feet was unsuccessful.

T. Harper Beville's remains were interred in Evergreen Cemetery,
Gainesville, Florida.

Lieutenant Beville is known to have been eligible for the
following medals;

American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal











4












JAMES LYNN BILLINGTON

2nd Lieutenant, 0 810 463, U.S. Army Air Corps
514th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 407th Fighter-Bomber Group
Killed in action 24 June 1944, Orval, Normandy, France

James Billington was born 12 January 1923 in Gainesville,
Florida. He was raised in that city and graduated from
Gainesville High School in 1940. He attended the University of
Florida for one year and left his studies to enter military
service 4 June 1942 at Orlando Air Base. He attended pre-flight
at Maxwell Army Base, Alabama and flight school with the 61st
Flying Training Detachment, Avon Park, Florida, receiving his
wings in 1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Billington, parents, Pamela Haire Billington,
widow, Pamelan Lynn Billington, daughter, all of Gainesville,
Florida and six sisters, most of whom also lived in Gainesville.

The 514th Fighter-Bomber Squadron flew P-47 fighter aircraft and
arrived in England in early 1944. The squadron was heavily
engaged in pre-invasion and invasion support missions over the
Normandy Peninsula in France. They supported U.S. and British
ground forces on D-Day, the 6th of June and during the bitter
beachead battles that followed. On the 17th of June, Lieutenant
Billington's aircraft was hit by enemy fire, he was slightly
wounded and forced to bail-out of his aircraft over the English
Channel. On the 24th, he volunteered for a special mission
against German positions and transportation in the vicinity of
St. Lo, France.

Two squadrons were involved; they first dive-bombed railway and
road bridges in the vicinity of Hyeaville, France. Moderate
enemy anti-aircraft fire was encountered, including considerable
fire from a wooded area southeast of La Laude. Lieutenant
Billington's aircraft was observed to take hits while at a low
altitude, go into a tight spin and crash with an attendant
explosion. The canopy of his aircraft remained closed and no
parachute was observed.

James Billington's remains were recovered and are interred in the
St. Augustine National Cemetery, St. Augustine, Florida.

Lieutenant Billington is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart with cluster
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medfal
Victory Medal

























DALTON L. BLACKBURN

2nd Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps
0 804 779
Station No. 6, South Atlantic Wing,
Air Transport Command
Died in an airplane crash at sea between Ascension
Island and Liberia, West Africa, 4 May 1944

At the time of his death, Lieutenant Blackburn's next of kin was;

Mrs. Georgia Edwards Blackburn, mother, of Hawthorn, Florida.

Lieutenant Blackburn's remains were not recovered. His name is
memorialized on the Wall of the Missing, North African American
Military Cemetery, Carthage, Tunisia.

Medals Dalton Blackburn is known to have been eligible for include;

European Campaign Medal
American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal















ROBERT CHARLES BOWERS, JR.

Technical Sergeant, 14 077 155, U.S. Army Air Corps
339th Bomb Squadron, 96th Bomb Group (Heavy)
Killed in action 25 August 1944 over Polnitz, Germany

Robert Bowers was born 15 November 1910 in Gainesville, Florida.
He graduated from Gainesville High School and attended the
University of Florida. In 1935, he married the former Miss Sonia
Eddins of Gainesville and worked as a salesman for Baird Hardware
Company. Bowers joined the Florida Defense Force 11 September
1941 and entered federal service 7 March 1942. He originally
trained as a glider pilot at Big Springs, Texas and Roswell, New
Mexico but was later trained as a radio operator at Souix Falls,
South Dakota and Yuma, Arizona. He received his final training
as a heavy bomber crew member at Drew Field, Tampa, Florida and
was sent overseas in July 1944. At the time of his death his
next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs Robert C. Bowers, Sr., Box 4640, Jacksonville,
Florida, parents, (formerly of Gainesville), Sonia Jeanette
Bowers, widow, 1011 East Boundry Street, Gainesville, Florida.

The 339th Bomber Squadron had been in Europe since mid-1943.
Sergeant Bowers and his fellow crewmen of the B-17 had flown
three previous combat missions prior to the mission to Polnitz;
Mulhouse and Paris, France, and Ludwiggshaven, Germany. The
mission of 25 August involved over 1,100 American heavy bombers
in strikes against German experimental sites, aircraft plants and
targets of opportunity. Sergeant Bowers's aircraft received a
direct hit from German Anti-aircraft fire and exploded violently.
One crewman, the ball turret gunner survived and became a
prisoner of war.

Robert Bowers's remains were recovered and temporarily interred
in the U.S. Military Cemetery, Neuv I le-en-Condroz, Belgium and
re-interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesville, Florida after the
war.

Sergeant Bowers is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal





















STEPHEN L. BOYLES

Private, U.S. Army
34 912 684
Company A, 318th Infantry Regiment,
80th Infantry Division
Killed in Action 10 Feburary 1945
Wallendorf, Germany

Stephen Boyles was born 20 December 1911. At the time of his
death, his next of kin were;

Martha G. Boyles, widow, Stephen L. and Nell E. Boyles, children.
All resided in Island Grove, Florida.

The 80th Infantry Division was part of the Third Army. Its first
major action was in assisting in'the defeat of the Germans in the
Falaise Gap. Subsequently, the division.took part in the battles
for Northern France and later, the Battle of the Bulge. Once the
Germans had been eliminated from the Bulge, the division
assaulted the West Wall, the elaborate defenses of Germany
itself. It was during the assault on the German border defenses
that Private Boyles was killed.

Private Boyles's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery in Hamm, Germany. After the war he was
re-interred in the Barrancas National Cemetery, Pensacola, Florida.

Decorations and medals Stephen Boyles is known to have been
eligible for include;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge



















JOSEPH PLUMMER BROOKS

Soundman 1st Class, U.S. Naval Reserve
U.S.S. COOPER (DD 695)
Killed in action, 3 December 1944, Ormoc Bay, Leyte, Phillipine
Islands

At the time of his death, the parents of Joseph Brooks, Mr. and
Mrs. R.L. Brooks, lived in Montbrook, Florida although it is
believed they, and he, lived for some years in Alachua County and
that Joseph attended school in the county.

It is fairly certain Plummer had served on other ships prior to
joining the COOPER in March 1944 upon the ship's commissioning.
The COOPER sailed from Boston to Hawaii and from there to UIithi
where she became truly operational during the early naval battles
in the waters around Leyte Island, the Phillipines following
American landings there.

On the 2nd of December, the COOPER, with two other
destroyers, was sent to attack Japanese shipping in Ormoc Bay,
Leyte. Entering action at almost exactly midnight, the three
American ships engaged a number of Japanese ships in a furious
gun duel. At least two Japanese ships, a destroyer loaded with
troops and a destroyer escort, were destroyed but not before the
COOPER was hit amidships by an enemy torpedo. The COOPER
exploded, broke in half, turned on its side and sank in less than
one minute. Due to the presence in enemy-controlled waters, it
was not until many hours later American Catalina "Black Cats"
rescue aircraft were able to pick up the COOPER'S survivors.
Plummer was not among those saved.

Plummer's remains were not recovered. He is known to have been
eligible for the following medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Phillipine Liberation Ribbon



A












ROBERT E. BROWN

Captain, 0421 626, U.S. Army Air Corps
74th Fighter Squadron, 23rd Fighter Group
Killed in action, 27 December 1944, near Canton, China

Robert Brown was 27 years old at the time of his death. He was
from Atlanta, Georgia and had attended Georgia Tech University.
He worked for the Westinghouse Corporation and married the former
Martha Golden of Gainesville, Florida. Brown joined the Army in
1940 and earned his wings and commission in class 41-E, Kelly
Field, Texas. After a tour of duty in the Panama Canal Zone, he
served in combat with the Fifth Air Force in New Guinea during
1943, returning to the U.S. and instructor duty at Tampa Florida.
Requesting a second term of overseas duty, he was sent to the
23rd Fighter Group in China in July of 1944. At the time of his
death his next of kin included;

Martha Brown, widow, Gainesville, Florida and Mr. and Mrs. S. E.
Brown parents, 811 Virginia Circle, Atlanta, Georgia.

The 23rd Fighter Group, of which the 74th Fighter Squadron was a
part, were formed in China based on the previously existing
"Flying Tigers" or pre-war American Volunteer Group commanded by
General Claire Chenault. In the fall of 1944, the Japanese had
launched a massive ground offensive against unoccupied areas of
south-central China, leaving an isolated allied-controlled area
to the east of their positions. The 74th Fighter Squadron and a
few other detachments operated offesively against Japanese troops
and positions from within the pocket, being re-supplied by air.
On the 27th of December, a major attack was directed at the
Japanese air fields in the Canton, China area. Some enemy air
craft attempted to resist and there was a moderate amount of
anti-aircraft fire. Captain Brown, leader of a flight, was not
seen to go down. Subsequently, a report was received from
Chinese guerrillas in the area of finding Brown's aircrafton the
ground, having received some damage but having crash-landed
saely. However, Captain Brown was apparently shot by the Japanes
while still in his cockpit. The Chinese buried his body and
marked it with stones. His remains were never recovered.

Robert Brown is known to have received or been eligible for the
following decorations and medals;

Distinguished Flying Cross
Air Medal with clusters
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Distinguished Unit Citation Ribbon
A























SIDNEY A. BRUCE

Private, U.S. Army
6 973 664
3712th Quartermaster Truck Company
Died 7 August 1945 Sossenheim, Germany

Sidney Bruce was born 20 March 1921. He was a resident of
Gainesville, Florida at the time he entered military service. At
the time of his death, his next of kin included Ira Hampton
Bruce, widow, and Sidney M. Bruce, son, both of 726 East Union
Street, Gainesville, Florida, Beatrice Aaron Bruce, mother, Box
232, Covington, Georgia and James D. Bruce, brother Route 1, Box
368, Atlanta, Georgia.

Private Bruce's remains were temporarily .interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Margraten, Holland and were re-interred in the
Covington Cemetery, Covington, Georgia after the war.

Private Bruce is known to have been eligible for the following r

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal













GORDON DUWARD CADY

Commander, U.S. Navy
Commanding Officer, Fighting Squadron Eleven
Killed, 30 August 1944, air crash, Pacific area, not involving
combat with the enemy

Gordon Cady was born 2 March 1913 in Port Huron, Michigan. He was
raised in that city and attended Port Huron Junior College.
Later he attended the University of Florida, graduating in 1935
with a degree in engineering. He entered naval service 10 August
1935 and in October, was appointed a naval aviation cadet. At
the time of his death his next of kin included;

Carolyn Virginia Cady, widow (formerly Sikes of Gainesville,
Florida), and Marcia Anne Cady, daughter, living in San Diego,
California, Mary Catherine Cady, mother, 1820 Military Street,
Port Huron Michigan, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Sikes, In-laws, 335 West
Orange Street, Gainesville, Florida.

He became a Naval Aviator 3 November 1936 and received an award
as the outstanding aviation cadet for fiscal year 1937.Assigned
to Fighting Squadron Three aboard the U.S.S. Saratoga in November
1936, he served with that ship until early 1941, except for a
stint of duty at the Naval Reserve Air Base, Grosse Isle,
Michigan in 1938. During 1941, Cady, now a Lieutenant (JG), saw
service under orders from the Chief of Naval Operations, with the
Asiatic Fleet, and as an observer with British forces at
Singapore, Straits Settlement. When the Japanese attacked Pearl
Harbor, he was serving as an observer in Wellington, New Zeeland.

Cady returned to duty with Fighting Squadron Eleven in September
1942. He served with the unit until July 1943 and was then
involved in fitting out Composite Squadron Sixty-nine in Seattle,
Washington. From September 1943 until August 1944, he commanded
the squadron. On the 1 of August, Cady was detached for further
duties with a carrier task force and was killed in a plane crash.

Commander Cady's remains were not recovered. Cady had received a
Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal and Presidential Unit
Citation "for heroism and extraordinary and meritorious
achievement in aerial flight."
Commander Cady was eligible for the following medals and decora-

Distinguished Flying Cross
Air Medal
Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal


















JOHN L. CAMERON

Private First Class, U.S. Army
34 794 416
359th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division
Killed in Action 8 Feburary 1945 Winterspelt, Germany

John Cameron was born 1 July 1914. He grew up in Alachua County
and attended Micanopy High School. At the time he entered
service, he had been working for Stringfellow Supply Company of
Gainesville. He received military training at Camp Selby,
Mississippi. At the time of his death, he had been in the Army
for 18 months and overseas for 9 months. His next of kin included;

James I. Cameron, father, 1732 West University Avenue and Patty
Cameron, 507 N. Pleasant Street, both in Gainesville, Florida.

The 90th Infantry Division was part of the Third Army and in
Feburary of 1945, was involved in the bitter fighting associated
with breaching the West Wall defenses on Germany's western
border. It was during the difficult struggle to eliminate German
pillbox fortifications near Habscheid, Germany that Private
Cameron was killed.

Private Cameron's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Foy, Belgium and were re-interred in the
Mackintosh Cemetery, Mackintosh, Florida after the war.

Private Cameron is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge








'a


















JULIAN C. CANNON

Corporal, U.S. Army
34 051 430

804th Tank Destroyer Battalion
Attached, 34th Infantry Division
Killed in Action, 30 June 1944 near Sienna, Italy

Julian Cannon was born 10'October 1908. He and his family were
Gainesville, Florida residents. Prior to his entry into military
service, Corporal Cannon was a guard at the state convict camp at
the farm colony near Gainesville.


At the time of his death, Corporal Cannon's next of kin included;

Annie Newell Cannon, mother, 208 South Roper Street, Gainesville,
Florida and Christine C. Bone, sister, General Delivery,
Williston, Florida.

Following the fall of Rome, the American Fifth Army advanced into
northern Italy against strong German opposition. The 34th
Infantry Division with attached units including the 804th Tank
Destroyer Battalion and the 442nd Infantry Regiment attacked
strong German positions in and around Sienna, Italy. It was
during the battle for that northern Italian city that Corporal
Cannon was killed.

Corporal Cannon's remains were not recovered and his name is
memorialized on the Wall of the Missing, Florence American
Military Cemetery, Florence, Italy.

Decorations and medals to which Corporal Cannon is known to have
been eligible for include;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Theater Medal
Victory Medal




















LOUIS T. CARR

Private First Class, U.S. Army
34 798 829
121st Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division
Killed in Action 14 August 1944-at Dinnard, France

Louis Carr was born 29 January 1919. He was a long time resident
of Gainesville, Florida and worked for the Gainesville Sun
newspaper prior to his entry into military service. At the time
of his death, his next of kin included;

Hazel A. Carr, widow, his son, both of 932 East Main Street,
and Wi lliam C. Carr, father, Route 3, Box 181, Gainesville,
Florida.

After the breakout from the hedgerow country of the Normandy
Beachead, the 8th Infantry Division was sent into the Brittany
Peninsula. On the 14th of August, the division joined in the
assault on the German fortress of St. Malo. It was during the
struggle for Dinnard, an strongly defended outpost of St. Malo
that Louis Carr was killed.

Louis Carr's remains are interred in the Britany American
Military Cemetery, St. James, France.

Decorations and medals to which Louis Carr is known to have been
eligible for include;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge









'A























CURTIS E. CATON

Captain, 0 325 838, U.S. Army Air Corps
13th Ferry Squadron
Killed in action 2 November 1942 near Pingi, China

Curtis Caton was born 31 December 1912. He graduated from
Gainesville High School and attended the University of Florida,
both in Gainesville, Florida. At the time of his death his next
of kin included Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Caton, parents, Montgomery,
Alabama (formerly of Gainesville, Florida), and Audrey Allen
Caton, widow, 404 Glen Grattan, Montgomery, Alabama.

Apparently, Captain Caton was attached to the China Air Task
Force when he was killed by enemy action in China.

Curtis Caton's remains were temporarily interred in the American
Military Cemetery, Kunming, China and re-interred in the National
Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii after the war.

Captain is known to have been eligible for the following medals
and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal














JOSEPH NOWLIN CHAMBERLAIN

Chief Water Tender, 268 26 22, U.S. Navy
U.S.S. LONG (DMS 12)
Died of wounds 20 January 1945 received 6 January when his
ship was sunk by Japanese suicide plane off Linguyan Gulf,
Phillipine Islands

Joseph Chamberlain was born 3 March 1918 in Micanopy, Florida. He
attended schools there and in Gainesville and was active in
sports, playing baseball with the American Legion Tung Nut team
(1932). He had been in the Naval service for ten years at the
time of his death and his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. G.S. Chamberlain, parents, Mrs. A.M. Howell, Mrs.
J.A. Owens, and:.Miss Diane Chamberlain, sisters and Mrs. J.D.
Nowl in, maternal grandmother, al from Micanopy, Florida.

The LONG was a Destroyer, originally launched in 1919 and
converted to a fast minesweeper during 1940-41. Chamberlain was
a member of the ships crew for the entire war until its loss in
1945. When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, the LONG was
delivering supplies to Johnston Island. Later, the ship
participated in the sea battles around Guadalcanal, the Aleutian
Islands, Kwajalein, Admiralty Islands, Palaus and New Guinea.
The LONG then helped sweep mines for the invasion and subsequent
battles for Leyte Island in the central Phil lipines. Attached to
the pre-invasion force preparing for the American landings at
Lingayen Gulf, northern Luzon, it was while sweeping for mines
that the LONG was hit and sunk by Japanese suicide planes.

At 0845 the morning of 6 January, the Long and accompanying ships
began to sweep for mines in the Gulf. Almost immediately,
Japanese aircraft initiated attacks against the American ships.
One dropped bombs at the LONG but these missed close aboard, at
1215, a lone enemy aircraft succeeded in penetraing the LONG'S
defenses and crashed with great violence into the port side,
almost amidships.

The order was given to abandon ship and the survivors were picked
up by the U.S.S. HOVEY (DMS 11). The derilict LONG was struck by
another'suicide plane and sunk later that day. The following
morning, the HOVEY too was hit and sunk by a Japanese Torpedo.
Its survivors, and those of the LONG were transferred to other
ships. Chamberlain was taken aboard the U.S.S. CALIFORNIA and
treated for severe burns. Later taken to Hollandia, New Guinea,
he died of his wounds.
'A
















Joseph Chamberlain was recommended for, and his next of kin
received, the Silver Star, by the Long's commander, Lieutenant S.
Caplan, U.S.N.R. It read as follows;


"On 6 January 1945, the U.S.S. LONG (DMS 12) during the
LINGAYEN GULF OPERATIONS was hit by a Japanese plane on the port
side below the bridge with a very severe flame flashing across
the well deck, over the galley deck house, and through the galley
deck house passageways, with topside ammunition on the well deck
and galley deck house exploding. CWT Joseph CHAMBERLAIN, USN,
was standing in the starboard"galley deck house passageway. When
the plane hit the ship, he protected three men from the flames by
using his own body as a shield. Although he was exposed to the
fire and was being severely burnt, CWT Joseph CHAMBERLAIN, USN,
maintained his position and continued to protect the men until
the passageway was cleared and the men were able to escape. CWT
CHAMBERLAIN, USN, sustained third degree burns on his hands,
arms, legs, chest and back. As badly hurt as he was he attempted
to fight the fire, running out fire hose. Seventeen hours later,
0500 7 January, CWT Joseph CHAMBERLAIN, USN, who was aboard the
U.S.S. HOVEY (DMS 11) when it was torpedoed and sunk. He was
unable to swim due to his injuries, but managed to get into the
water by himself and was assisted to a life raft by the
Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. HOVEY. As badly injured as he
was he refused to go aboard the life raft so that others could
use it, and assisted in maintaining morale and discipline among
the men on the life raft."

Chamberlain's remains were temporarily interred in the American
Cemetery at Hollandia, New Guinea and re-interred in the Micanopy
Cemetery, Micanopy, Florida after the war.

Joseph Chamberlain was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Silver Star
Purple Heart
Navy Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Phillipine Liberation Ribbon














JOHN S. CHAPMAN

1st Lieutenant, 0 728 255, U.S. Army Air Corps
407th Bomb Suadron, 92nd Bomb'Group
Killed in action 6 September 1943, Couchy-sur-Canche, France.

John Chapman was born 23 September 1919 in Newberry, Florida. He
was raised in that city and graduated from Newberry High School
in 1938. He attended the University of Florida but left his
studies to enter military service in July 1941. He received his
bombadier wings in early 1943. At the time of his death his next
of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Chapman, parents, Newberry, Florida and
Lieutenant Billy Chapman, U.S.N., Lt. Colonel A.K. Chapman,
brothers, both in military service.

The 407th Bomb Squadron had been in England since August of 1942
and in combat operations over Europe since May 1943. The
remainder of 1943 witnessed many missions for the squadron over
France and Germany, most of them without fighter escorts and many
of them costly in lost American aircraft and crews. The August
raids against Schweinfurt and Regensburg ball-bearing plants had
been especially costly. The raid of 6 September was the largest
American bomber raid of the war to that date with 407 heavy
bombers dispatched against strategic targets in Stuttgart,
Germany. German fighters and anti-aircraft fire was savage and
forty-five American bombers were lost. Lieutenant Chapman's
aircraft had received battle damage and, on the return flight to
England, was observed to be on fire amidships. At 16,500 feet
over northern France near Amiens, one wing broke off the B-17
aircraft. Five crewmen were seen to exit the aircraft; one
parachute failed to open and one was on fire. One crewman
survived to become a prisoner-of-war in Germany.

After the war, John Chapman's remains were recovered and interred
in Forest Lawn Cemetery, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Lieutenant Chapman is known to have received and/or been eligible
for the following medals and decorations;

Distinguished Flying Cross
Air Medal with 2 oak leaf clusters
Purple Heart with 1 oak leaf cluster
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal






















JOHN GORDON CHAPPELL

Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army
34 247 556

Coast Artillery
died, Cerrebral Hemorrhage, 30 March 1944
Key West, Florida

John Chappell was born 4 March 1916 in Alachua County, Florida
and lived there all his life prior to his entry into military
service. He graduated from High Springs High School. At the time
of his death his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Chappell, parents, High Springs, Florida
Lieutenant Donald B. Chappell, brother,Air Corps, Natal, Brazil
J.C. Chappell, brother, Lake Park, Florida
Mrs. Ruth C. Prince, sister, Tampa, Mrs. Maude Adams, sister,
Micanopy, and Mrs. Ethel Burke, Gainesville, Florida.

Sergeant Chappel I was in charge of Telephone communications at
the Key West, Florida Coastal Artillery base at the time of his
death. He had been in the Army approximately 18 months.

He was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesville, Florida.

Medals Sergeant Chappell was known to be eligible for include;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal

























CLEMENT M. CLAPP

First Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps
Killed, aircraft accident, 8 July 1945, Pueblo, Colorado

At the time of his death, Lieutenant Clapp's next of kin included;

Pauline Carter Clapp, wife and Mrs. Alice Clapp Brown, aunt, both
of Gainesville, Florida, Sergeant Edwin T. Clapp, brother,
enroute home from overseas.

Lieutenant Clapp was a veteran of 35 air missions over Germany in
a B-17 Heavy Bomber Squadron. He had been re-assigned to Maxwell
Field, Alabama and was in Colorado undergoing a special
navigator's course when killed.

Lieutenant Clapp was known to have been eligible for the
following decorations and medals;

Distinguished Flying Cross
Air Medal with three oak leaf clusters
American Campaign Medal
European Theater Campaign Medal
Victory Medal






















GEORGE BRUMLEY CLARKE

Captain, U.S. Army
0 393638
460th Parachute Field Artillery
Died, Misadventure, suicide, 2 Feburary 1946, Norwalk,
Connecticut

George Clarke was born 27 January 1919 in Gainesville, Florida.
He grew up in Gainesville and later graduated from the University
of Florida. He had entered military service in June of 1940,
attending service schools at Fort Sill, Oklahoma and Camp Polk,
Louisiana. He served overseas from 1943 to 1945, participating in
campaigns in Italy, the invasion of southern France and in
Belgium and Germany. At the time of his death, his next of kin
included;

Dorothy Spelman Clarke, widow, Fairfield, Conn., Harry H. Clarke,
brother, Gainesville, Florida, Lieutenant Edwin M. Clarke,
Jacksonville, Florida and Mrs. L.D. Mullins, West Palm Beach,
Florida.

George Clarke was interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesville,
Florida.

Captain Clarke is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Bronze Star with Combat V Device
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal























ROBERT H. COLGAN

Technical Sergeant, 34 782 382,-U.S. Army Air Corps
603rd Bomb Squadron, 398th Bomb Group
Killed in Action 3 February 1945 at Lehmke, Germany

Robert Colgan was born 4 September 1924. At the time of his
death his next of kin included Arthur H. and Elsea Colgan,
parents, Route:'1, Port Richey, Florida.

The late winter of 1945 saw a stepped-up bombing campaign against
strategic targets in Germany by the Combined Allied Air Forces.
On the 3rd of February, over 1,200 American Heavy bombers were
dispatched to bomb Berlin, and transportation synthetic oil
production plants near Magdeburg, Germany. It was during this
raid that Sergeant Colgan's plane was destroyed by enemy action.

After the war, Robert Colgan's remains were interred in Pine Hill
Cemetery, New Port Richey, Florida.

Sergeant Colgan is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

(Air Medal)
Purple Heart
Army Cood Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal






















WALTER E. COOTER

Private First Class, U.S. Army
33 215 381
501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Infantry
Division
Killed in Action 5 October 1944 near Elst, Holland

Walter Cooter was born 29 December 1921. At the time of his
death, his next of kin included Charlie D. and Lillie M. Cooter,
parents, Route 3, Box 144, Gainesville, Florida.

Following their use in the Market Garden operation in Belgium and
southern Holland, the 101st Airborne Division assumed active
defensive positions in Holland. It was during a patrol action
within ill-defined German defensive positions that Walter Cooter
was killed.

Walter Cooter's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Molenhoek, Holland and permanently interred in
the Netherlands American Military Cemetery, Margraten, Holland.

Walter Cooter is known to have been eligible for the following
decorations and medals;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge









JACK CRAFT

Ist Lieutenant, U.S. Army
Died, 27 July 1944 France
(Name appears on the ....list of casualties from Alachua County.
He is known to have attended Gainesville High School and the
University of Florida, both in Gainesville, Florida.)

At the time of his death his next of kin included Mr. and Mrs.
Fred Craft, parents, West, Mississippi, former residents of
Gainesville, Florida.











JOHN W. CULLEN, JR.

Staff Sergeant, 34 782 386, U.S. Army Air Corps
570th Bomb Squadron, 390th Bomb Group
Killed in action 14 February 1945 in Belgium.

John Cullen was born 29 May 1924 in Hague, Florida. At the time
of his death his next of kin included;

John W. Sr. and Mae Cullen, Route U2, Box 41, Alachua, Betty
Cullen, sister, and Dwight, Larry, and Jody Cullen, brothers, of
Hague, Florida.

The 570th Bomb Squadron operated B-17 heavy bomber aircraft with
the 8th Air Force. It had been in combat since August of 1943.
Sergeant Cullen had completed 27 combat missions at the time of
his death. On the 14th of February, over 1,300 American Bombers
attacked Dresden and various important transportation targets of
opportunity in Germany. Sergeant Cullen's aircraft was received
damage from enemy action causing it to crash in Belgium during
the flight back from the targets.

John Cullen's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Henri Chapelle t1, Belgium and re-interred in
the Hague Cemetery, Alachua, Florida after the war.

Sergeant Cullen is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal









WILLIAM E. CULP JR.

First Lieutenant, U.S. Army
0 1312837
Company A, 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division
Died 12 August 1944, of Wounds Received in Action, near Vire,
France

William Culp was born 10 April 1919. Originally from New
Kensington, Pennsylvania, when stationed at Camp Blanding,
Florida, he married a Gainesville woman and called Gainesville
home.e went overseas in May 1944. At the time of his death, his
next of kin included Ruth B. Culp, widow, 406 East University
Avenue, Gainesville, Florida and William E. Sr. and Bessie Culp,
parents, 1701 Leighman Avenue, Arnold, Pennsylvania.

In early August 1944, the 28th Division was committed to help
contain and eventually destroy the German forces in the Falaise
Pocket, south of the Normandy Peninsula. It was during the
heavily contested advance of the division south west of Vire,
France that Lieutenant Culp received the wounds that cost him his
life.

Lieutenant Gulp's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery Le Chene-Guerin, France and re-interred in the
Plum Creek, New Texas, Pennsylvania after the war.

Lieutenant Culp was known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge










LEROY DE BOSE

Private, U.S. Army
34 787 190
Died non-battle, date and place unknown
(Name appears on the official War Department list of casualties
from Alachua County)
'A






















JAMES W. DEGRAFF

Private, U.S. Army
34 408 936
81st Airborne Artillery Battalion
Killed in Action 6 June 1944, Carentan, Peninsula, (Normandy),
France

James Degraff was born 15 October 1921. At the time of his death
his next of kin included;

Lewis B. and Hattie Bell Degraff, parents, of High Springs,
Florida.

The 81st Airborne Artillery was part of the massive U.S. airborne
force dropped on the Normandy Peninsula of France in the early
hours of D-Day, the 6th of June 1944. It was in this operation
that Private Degraff was killed.

Private Degraff's remains are interred in the Normandy American
Military Cemetery, St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France.

Private Degraff is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medfal
Victory Medal





















JESSE W. DIXON

Private First Class, U.S. Army
34 792 092
Company A, 13th Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division
Killed in'Action 9 September 1944 at Brest, France

Jesse Dixon was born in Archer, Florida, 17 June 1923 and lived
in the county his entire life prior to his induction into military
service September 1943 at Camp Blanding, Florida. At the time of
his death his next of kin included;

Newsome C. and Mary L. Dixon, parents, Route 1, Box 27-A, Archer,
Florida and Mrs. C.T. Copeland, sister, Archer.

Following the American defeat of the Germans in Normandy, the
enemy forts and bases in the Brittany Peninsula were targeted for
destruction. In early September of 1944, the 8th Division joined
other divisions in the assault and eventual capture of the
heavily fortified and defended port of Brest. It was during a
period of the most savage fighting for that city and its
fortifications that Jesse Dixon was killed.

Private Dixon's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, St. James, France. After the war, he was
re-interred in the Laurel Hill Cemetery, Archer, Florida.

Private Dixon is known to have been eligible for the following
decorations and medals;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge

























JAMES E. EASTMOOR

Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps
Killed, air accident, on or about 15 September 1944, Foster
Field, Texas.

James Eastmoor :was born 10 August 1922 in Jacksonville, Florida.
He had lived in Alachua County since 1927. At the time of his
death his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. N.E. Eastmoor, parents, Gainesville, Florida and
Lieutenant Norman E. and Corporal Thomas E. Eastmoor, brothers,
both in military service.

James Eastmoor's remains are intered in Alachua County, cemetery
unknown.

Lieutenant Eastmoor is known to have been eligible for the
following medals;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal








SAMUEL A. EGGERS

2nd Lieutenant, 0 794 787, U..S. Army Air Corps
546th Bomb Squadron, 384th Bomb Group
Killed in aircraft accident in England 12 June 1943

Samuel Eggers was born 28 March 1918 in Rockwell City, Iowa.
Prior to his entry into military service he made his home in
Gainesville, Florida and had graduated from the University of
Florida. Subsequently, he worked for the State Road Department
and was active in the Gainesville Little Theater. He enlisted in
the Florida Defense Force 11 September 1941 and entered Federal
service 14 March 1942. He received his commission as a navigator.
At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Estelle P. Eggers, widow, 846 East Union Street, Gainesville, and
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Eggers, Sr., 3435 21st Avenue South, St.
Petersburg, both in Florida.

The 546th Bomb Squadron flew B-17 heavy bombers and had arrived
in England to begin combat operations only one week prior to the
accident which *cost Samuel Eggers his life.

Samuel Eggers remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Brookwood, England and re-interred in Westview
Cemetery, Atlanta, Georgia after the war.

Lieutenant Eggers is known to have been eligible for the
following medals;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal











SEALS WORTH FAGAN

Aviation Cadet, U.S. Navy
Killed, air accident, 14 May 1944, Pensacola, Florida
Son of Seals E. Fagan, former Gainesville, Florida resident


















CURTIS FOUNTAIN

Sergeant, U.S. Army
14 064 074
2nd Battalion, 5307th Composite Unit, Infantry
Killed in Action 3 April 1944 at Nhpum Ga, Burma

Curtis Fountain was born 26 June 1919. He was a long time
resident of Gainesville, Florida and was working at the
University of Florida at the time he entered military service. At
the time of his death, his next of kin included;

S.A. Harvey Fountain, brother, 814 SE Main Street, Gainesville,
Florida, Mary Fountain, sister and William Terrill, nephew, both
residing at Route 3, Jasper, Florida.

Sergeant Fountain was a member of the famous Merrill's Marauders,
a unit trained and organized to operate behind enemy lines in
Burma. As part of Galahad Force, the 5307th campaigned in
north-central Burma, Feburary to May 1944. During the campaign,
the 2nd battalion was cut off and besieged by the Japanese in
Nhpum Ga, Burma. It was during the bitter battles to hold off
the enemy that Sergeant Fountain was killed.

Sergeant Fountain's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Nhpum Ga, Burma and was re-interred in the
Gonner Cemetery, Starke, Florida following the war.

Sergeant Fountain is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations.

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge





















ALFONSO E. FRANKLIN

Corporal, U.S. Army
34 540 457
Company C, 371st Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division
Killed in Action 9 Feburary 1944, near Vallecchia, Italy

Alfonso Franklin was born 1 September 1923. He was the first
Negro from Alachua County killed in action during the war. At
the time of his. death, his next of kin included;

Nelsie Franklin, mother and Minerva Franklin, sister, both
resident at 947 W. Seminary, Gainesville, Florida.

During the winter of 1944, the 92nd Division was assigned
defensive positions in the mountains of Northern Italy. In the
second week of Feburary, the Germans launched a strong artillery
and infantry attack against the division's positions, inflicting
very heavy casualties, including Corporal Franklin.

Corporal Fountain's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Castelfiorentino, Italy and was re-interred in
the Pine Grove Cemetery, Gainesville, Florida after the war.

Corporal Franklin is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge









'a














CHARLES HUGO GILBERT, JR.

Electrician's Mate 1st Class, 244 53 04, U.S. Navy
Killed in action, 24 October 1944, aboard the U.S.S. Birmingham,
(CL-62), Leyte Gulf, Phillipine Islands.

Charles Gilbert was born and raised in Bartow, Florida and
graduated from the Summerlin Institute. He entered naval service
in November 1941. (His family had moved to Gainesville, Florida
in June). At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Mrs. Julia M. Gilbert, mother 1244 West Union Street,
Gainesville, Florida.

After training in Norfolk, Virginia and service aboard a Hospital
Ship, Gilbert joined the Birmingham at the time of its commission
in January 1943. With the ship, he participated in the invasion
of Sicily prior to the ship's transfer to the Pacific in
September 1943. In the months proceeding the action that cost
Charles Gilbert his life, he and the Birmingham participated in
raids on Tarawa and Wake Island, the Battle of Empress Augusta
Bay, the invasion of Siapan, Tinian, Guam, Battle of the
Phillipine Sea, raids on Luzon, Phillipine Islands and Formosa.
During the Battle of Leyte Gulf, The Carrier Princeton suffered
severe damage and the Birmingham pulled along side to render aid.
A magazine aboard the Princeton exploded and caused extensive
damage and severe casualties to the Birmingham. The Birmingham
suffered more than 50 % casualties over 200 dead and in excess
of 400 wounded.

Charles Gilbert suffered injuries described in the medical report
as multiple and extreme. He died of these wounds the same day
and was buried at sea.

Gilbert is known to have been eligible for the following medals
and decorations;

Purple Heart
Navy Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal












LUCIAN B. GRAY

2nd Lieutenant, 0 798 792, U.S. Army Air Corps
400th Bomb Squadron, 90th Bomb Group (Heavy)
Killed in action 12 October 1943, at sea between New Britain
Island and New Guinea.

Lucian Gray was born 13 January 1923. He was raised in
Gainesville, Florida and graduated from Gainesville High School
in 1940. He attended the University of Florida as an engineering
student and had received his private pilots license at Stengle
Field, Gainesville, while still- in high school. Gray entered
mil itary service in April 1942. He received his training as a
navigator at Selmon Field, Monroe, Louisana and Tuscon, Arizona.
He departed for overseas duty from Pocatello, Idaho.At the time
of his death his next of kin included;

Mrs. Florence E. Gray, mother, and Helen Gray Davis, sister, both
of 614 South Roper Avenue, Gainesville, Florida.

The 400th Bomb Squadron had been in the Southwest Pacific area
since 1942. When Gray joined the unit, it was operating B-24
heavy bombers out of Dobodura, New Guinea against Japanese
targets in northern and eastern New Guinea, New Britain and
against enemy shipping in the surrounding seas. On the 12th of
October, the Fifth Air Force began a major aerial offensive
against Japanes positions on New Britain, especially their base at
Rabaul. On the 13th, poor weather prevented effective bombing at
Rabaul but secondary targets on the island were hit. There was
heavy enemy fighter opposition, requiring many aircraft to take
high-speed evasion routes from the target area. Lieutenant
Gray's aircraft was later seen, approximately 50 feet off the
water with its mid-section heavily damaged by enemy action. It
was never seen again. As many of the aircraft returned to base
low on fuel, it is surmised Gray's aircraft crashed at sea after
running out of fuel or perhaps it succommed to battle damage.
There were no survivors.

Lucian Gray's remains were not recovered and his name is
memorialized on the Piers of the Hemicycles, Manila American
Cemetery, Manila, Phillipine Islands.

Lieutenant Gray is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal







LORIN A. GREEN

Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army
Died non-battle, date and place unknown
(Name appears on the official War Department list of casualties
for Alachua County)







GEORGE MC MILLAN GUY

2nd Lieutenant, 0 796 528, U.S. Army Air Corps
324th Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group
Died of wounds, 12 August 1943, Rotenburg, Germany

George Guy was born 17 December 1922 in Gainesville, Florida. He
lived in that city until his parents moved to Chattanooga,
Tennessee where he graduated from high school. Guy entered
military service 1 February 1942 and received navigator training
at Maxwell Field, Alabama and Monroe, Louisiana where he received
his wings. He received further training at Blythe, California
and Pyote, Texas before departing for overseas duty in May
29,1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Arthur T. and Georgia M. Guy, parents, 601 Ohio Avenue, Signal
Mountain, Tennessee, and by a sister and one aunt, also in
Tennessee.

The 91st Bomb Group had been engaged in combat operations since
September 1942. George Guy's first combat mission was 10 July
1943 against targets at Villa Coublay, France. He also
participated in missions to Amiens, France, Heroya, Norway, and
Hamburg, Germany prior to the mission on the 26th of July to
Hamburg when his plane was lost to enemy action when it took a
direct hit from German anit-aircraft fire. The pilot managed to
control the aircraft's descent near Bremen, Germany, allowing
some of the crew to parachute from the crippled aircraft.
Several crew men were never seen again. George Guy was reported
un-injuried when he left the aircraft and his parachute carried
him safely to ground. Post-war interrogations reveal Lieutenant
Guy was shot by either German soldiers or civilians after
reaching the ground. He died of those wounds in a German
hospital 12 August 1943.

George Guy's remains were recovered and interred in Liberty Hill
Cemetery, Acworth, Georgia after the war.

Lieutenant Guy is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal








RAYMOND JEFFERSON HAGEN

Fireman 1st Class, U.S. Navy
Killed in action, date place and unit unknown
At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Mrs. Nolan Cara Hagen, mother, RFD 1 box 133, Alachua, Florida





GEORGE Q. HALBROOK

Technical Sergeant 5th Grade, U.S. Army
34 024 044
Company B, 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division
Killed in Action 15 August 1944, Domfort, France

George Halbrook was born 19 April 1923 in Alachua, County,
Florida. He was a life-long resident of Gainesville and the son
of the late Mr. and Mrs. George W. Halbrook. Prior to his entry
into military service, he was employed by the Chemical Retort
Plant. He entered the service 25 Feburary 1941 at Camp Blanding,
Florida with subsequent service at Fort Benning, Georgia before
shipping overseas with the 30th Infantry Division in 1943.

At the time of his death, Sergeant Halbrook's next of kin included;

Dreyfus Halbrook, brother, Tampa, Florida, Leroy Halbrook,
brother, Augusta, Georgia, Perlie Mae Halbrook, sister, Alachua,
Florida, and Mrs. M.F. Brunson, sister, 861 Jefferson Street,
Gainesville, Florida.

The combat service of the 30th Infantry Division began on the
15th of June on the Vire-et-Taute Canal in the Normandy Peninsula
of France. The division was active in the costly hedgerow battles
of the Normandy Beachead and, with the 9th Division, spear-headed
the breakout at St. Lo, "Operation Cobra." Later assigned
defensive positions near Mortain, the 30th absorbed the brunt of
the German counter-attack on the 7th of August. Fighting the
Germans to a standstill by the 12th, the division then
participated in the actions to seal off the Falaise Pocket. It
was during this phase of the battle for France that Sergeant
Halbrook was killed.

George Halbrook's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery at Le Chene Guerin, France and re-interred in
Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesville, Florida after the war.

Sergeant Halbrook is known to have been eligible for the
following decorations and medals;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge








WILBUR EUGENE HALL

Seaman, U.S. Navy
Killed, 28 January 1945, auto-train accident, Sanford Florida

Wilbur Hall was born 26 July 1925 in Manatee, Florida. At the
time of his death his next of kin included;

Mrs. Ronnie Reed, mother, four sisters, Mrs. Lois Luke, Ida,
Birtie and Letta Reed, Gilbert Reed, brother, all of Gainesville,
Florida and two brothers, Earl Hall and Russell Reed on active
military service.

Wilbur Hall's remains are interred in Evergreen Cemetery,
Gainesville, Florida.






BERNARD H. HEIDENFELDER

Technical Sergeant 5th Grade, U.S. Army
37 413 100
Troop F, 112th Cavalry, attached to 1st Cavalry Division
Killed in Action 30 November 1944 at Bonbongon, near Limon,
Leyte, Phillipine Islands.

Bernard Heidenfelder was born 19 April 1923. He and his wife had
become permenant residents of Alachua County, Florida in 1942.
He entered military service in 1943. At the time of his death,
his next of kin included;

Lois Heidenfelder, widow and baby daughter of Orange Heights,
Florida, Paul and Catherine Heidenfelder, parents of 1501 Ekin,
New Albany, Indiana, six sisters, all in St. Louis, Missouri, and
three brothers, all in service overseas.

The 112th Cavalry had fought in the New Guinea and Bismark
Archipelago campaigns before the assault on Leyte, Phillipine
Islands. Fighting on Leyte was bitter and costly. On the 30th
of November, the regiment met strong opposition and local
Japanese counter-attacks in its drive on the city of Limon. It
was during this day's battle that Sergeant Heidenfelder was
killed.

Bernard Heidenfelder's remains are permanently interred in the
Manilia American Cemetery, Manila, Phillipine Islands.

Sergeant Heidenfelder is known to have been el igible for the
following medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Phillipine Liberation Ribbon
Phillipine Presidental Unit Citation Ribbon
Combat Infantry Badge







RALPH JAMES HENDERSON

Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class, U.S. Navy
Killed in Action, (1945) date:unknown, somewhere in the Pacific
area

Ralph Henderson was 20 years old when killed. He was a long-time
resident of Alachua, Florida having graduated from Alachua High
School. He entered naval service in March of 1943 and underwent
training in Jacksonville, Florida, Norfolk, Virginia, and San
Diego, California prior to being sent overseas in December 1944.
At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Mrs. Henderson, mother, Mrs. J.O. Compton, sister, Mr. and Mrs.
W. E. Hancock, grandparents, all of Alachua, Florida, Jack
Henderson, brother, in military service, W.B. Henderson, father,
Perry, Florida.

It is not known if Ralph Henderson's remains were recovered but
it is unlikely. He is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal






GEORGE P. HENDRIX, JR.

U.S. Army Air Corps
Killed, truck accident, 17 November 1942, Denver, Colorado

George Hendrix was born 14 October 1908 in Levon, Florida. He
was a graduate of Gainesville High School and attended the
University of Florida. Prior to entering military service,
Hendrix was a night operator with the City of Gainesville Utility
Department. He was attending aircraft armourers school and was
returning from target practice when the truck in which he was a
passenger over-turned, killing three of its occupants, including
George Hendrix. At the time of his death his next of kin
included;

George P. Hendrix, Sr., father, Mrs. L.S. Usry, sister, Mrs. H.E.
Bratley, sister, all of Gaineville, Mrs. H.K. Netles, sister,
Birmingham, Alabama, and Walter Hendrix, brother, in military
service.

George Hendrix's remains are interred in Alachua County, Florida;
cemetery unknown.

Hendrix is known to have been eligible for the following medals;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal












HARRY F. HENDRY JR.

Private, 14 084 327, U.S. Army
359th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division
Killed in action 13 January 1945, Isenborn, Luxembourg

Harry Hendry was born 2 October 1923.At the time of his death,
his next of kin included;

William W. and Alice L. Hendry, parents, 245 1/2 Hibiscus Street,
Daytona Beach, Florida.

The 359th Infantry Regiment landed in Normandy, D-Day, the 6th of
June 1944. It and the 90th Division were involved in the
Normandy battles and many severe contests with the Germans in
central and eastern Franceduring that summer and fall. In
January 1945, they were part of the attacking army which drove
the Germans out of the southern part of their "Bulge" and crossed
the German frontier. On the 13th of January, the 90th division
drove the Germans out of the key position at Bras and captured
hill 530 commanding the surrounding area. Private Hendry died in
this days battle.

Harry Hendry's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Hamm, Luxembourg and re-interred in Arlington
National Cemetery after the war.

Private Hendry is known to have been eligible for the follwoing
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campoaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge










WILLIAM THOMAS HOGE

Ensign, U.S. Navy
Next of kin Mrs. Martha Roberts, foster-mother, Melrose, Florida










ARTHUR M. HOLDER

Private First Class, U.S. Army
185th Field Artillery Battalion, 34th Infantry Division
Killed in Action 3 January 1944 Mount Sammucro, Italy

Arthur Holder was born in Gainesville, Florida 12 December 1923
and lived there all his life prior to his entry into military
service, 2 April 1943. Private Holder trained at Camp Blanding,
Florida and Fort Jackson, South Carolina before shipping overseas
in October 1943. At the time he entered military service, his
parents address was Route 3, Gainesville, Florida. At the time
of his death, his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. T. I. Holder, parents, Wilmington, North Carolina,
Harriet Dubose Holder, widow, Sumpter, South Carolina, Bobby,
Leonard, and Hampton Holder, brothers and Ruth Holder, sister,
all of Gainesville, Florida.

The 34th Infantry Division, as a part of the U.S. Fifth Army, was
involved in the costly battles against the German defensive
positions north of Naples centered on Monte Cassino. At the time
of Private Holder's death, his battalion was in direct support of
the division's positions on Mount Sammucro.

Following the war, Private Holder's remains were permanently
interred in Antioch Cemetery.

Private Holder is known to have been eligible for the following
decorations and medals;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal








SAMUEL DODD HOLMES, JR.

Motor Machinist Mate 2nd Class, U.S. Naval Reserve
Died, 28 April 1944, cause unknown, England

Samuel Holmes had been in the Naval Service for one year prior to
his death. At that time, his next of kin included;

Martha Sue Holmes, widow, 1034 West Margaret Street, Gainesville,
Florida, Mrs. S.D. Holmes, Sr., mother, Titusville, Florida.







LEROY S. HUNT

Private, U.S. Army
Killed, Misadventure, on or about 2 March 1945, Waldo, Florida

Leroy Hunt was born 1 August 1923 in Orange Heights, Florida. He
had just finished basic training at Camp Blanding, Florida and
was on furlough prior to oversears shipment when he was murdered
while visiting at the home of a friend. There was no apparent
reason for the killing. At the time of his death, his next of
kin included;

G. L. Hunt, father, G.L. Jr., George, and Jimmie Hunt, brothers
of Waldo, Ed C. Hunt, brother, overseas, Thomas Hunt, brother,
Auburndale, Donald and William Rountree, brothers, Dorothy Hunt
and Jeanette Rountree, sisters, all of Waldo, Florida.

Funeral and internment in Windsor, Florida.

Private Hunt is known to have been eligible for the following n

American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal






WALLACE JONES JR.

Private First Class, U.S. Army
34 793 232
Company F, 370th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division
Killed in Action 8 Feburary 1945 near Querceta, Italy.

Wallace Jones was born 5 March 1918. At the time of his death,
his next of kin included;

Allean Jones, widow, Geneva Jones, daughter, Louise Jones,
mother, all of Pompano Beach, Florida.

Elements of the 92nd Division launched a successful attack in the
coastal area of the division's generally mountainous front in
northern Italy against moderate German resistance on the 8th of
Feburary 1944. It was a heavily mined area and the division
suffered numerous casualties. All gains were lost the next day
to a strong German counter-attack.

Private Jones's remains are interred in the Florence American
Military Cemetery, Florence, Italy.

Private Jones is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge






























FRANCIS D. JORDAN

Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy
Killed, 27 October 1944, when unmarked Japanese prisoner of war
ship was sunk by U.S. forces.

Commander Jordan was a career naval officer, captured on
Corregidor in May of 1942 by the Japanese. Nothing is known of
his wife or the residence of his mother, brother and two of his
three sisters at the time of his death but one sister, Mrs. C.E.
Bell was resident at 234 University Terrace, Gainesville, Florida
at the time.











LESTER PERRY KARR

Boatswain 1st Class, U.S. Navy
U.S.S. LUCE (DD 522)
Killed in action 4 May 1945 off Okinawa

It is not known where Karr was born and raised but his only
family resided in Gainesville, Florida. At the time of
his death his next of kin included;

Flora Odessa Karr, widow, 1344 W. Michigan Avenue, and Mr. and
Mrs. J.L. Jones, 538 North Ropes Street, in-laws, both of
Gainesville, Florida.

The LUCE was commissioned in June 1943 and proceeded to the west
coast where it was attached to the northern Pacific fleet units
operating in the Aleutian Islands and against targets in the
Kurlie Islands north of Japan. After some months of successful
duty, the LUCE was sent southward to participate in the campaigns
in New Guinea, and at Leyte and Luzon, Phillipine Islands. During
March and April of 1945, the LUCE participated in the landings at
Okinawa and near-by islands. During the Okinawa operations prior
to 4 May, the LUCE was credited with shooting down two Japanese
aircraft.In May, she was assigned to radar picket duty off the
coast to help counter savage Japanese suicide attacks against
American shipping.

On the 4th of May, the LUCE was in her assigned patrol area when
attacked by several Japanese suicide aircraft. Anti-aircraft
fire from the ship turned one of the planes away but another
crashed close aboard, causing a complete power failure in the
ship. The another Japanes plane, low on the water came for the
port side. Unable to manually train guns on this plane, it
crashed directly into the aft port side of the LUCE, causing the
damage which would leed to the ships loss within five minutes.
206 members of the crew were lost, including many killed by an
underwater explosion following the ships sinking. As Lester Karr
was a member of the :3 5"38 gun mount just aft of the second
stack, it is likely he was killed when the suicide pland hit the
ship.

Karr's remains were not recovered.

Lester Karr is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Navy Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Phil lipine Liberation Ribbon






















IRA DELL KEENE

Naval Construction Battalion, U.S. Navy
Died, 14 January 1943, U.S. Naval Hospital, Mare Island,
California, reportedly of wounds received in action in the South
Pacific.

Ira Keene was 37 years old when he died having been born in 1905
in Newberry, Florida. He had been a resident of Jonesville and
Gainesville, Florida for some years prior his entry into naval
service. At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Mrs. Rosa Keene, widow, Mrs. Pastorie Keene, mother, Mrs. Samuel
Goswick, daughter, Doris, Henry, Alvin Ira Dell, Jr., Glenda,
children, all of Gainesville, Florida, J.N. Knight, brother on
actve military duty, and three sisters, Mrs. Quintus Bobo, Vero
Beach, Mrs. J.L. Sykes, Hawthorne, and Mrs. Paul E. O'Hara,
Tallahassee, Florida.

Ira Keene's remains are intered in the Jonesville Cemetery,
Jonesville, Florida.

Keene is known to have been eligible for the following medals;

(Purple Heart, if died of wounds)
American Campaig'n Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal




















BENJAMIN W. (JACK) KIMMEL

Staff Sergeant, 14 085 434, U.S. Army Air Corps
744th Bomb Squadron, 456th Bomb Group (Heavy)
Killed, 6 February 1944, aircraft accident, Foggia, Italy

Jack Kimmel was born 18 July 1916. He had been a Gainesville
City Construction Inspector for six years prior to his entry into
military service 7 November 1942 at Camp Blanding, Florida. He
attended service schools in Fort Myers, Florida, Greensboro,
North Carolina and received his wings as a flight engineer on
B-24's at Monroe, California 10 August 1943. At the time of his
death his next of kin included;

Lucy Kimmel, widow, 405 East University Ave., Gainesville,
Florida and Netta Kimmel, mother, 2907 West Adams Street,
Chicago, Illinois, D.B. Kimmel and Sergeant J.W. Kimmel,
brothers, Mrs. Clarence Jones, Sister, Brooksville, and Mrs.
Marcel Martini, sister, Sarasota, Florida.

The 744th Bomb Squadron went overseas in January 1944. It had
not entered combat operations when Sergeant Kimmel was killed in
an aircraft accident at the unit's base in Italy.

Jack Kimmel's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Bari, Italy and re-interred in the Sicily-Rome
American Military Cemetery, Nettuno, Italy after the war.

Sergeant Kimmel is known to have been eligible for the following
medals;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
















WILMER M. KNIGHT

1st Lieutenant, 0 801 705, U.S. Army Air Corps
68th Fighter Squadron, 347th Fighter Group
Killed in action, 24 March 1944, Solomon Islands, South-west
Pacific

Wilmer Knight was born 7 November 1917. He was raised in
Gainesville, Florida and graduated from Gainesville High School.
Prior to his entry into military service he had worked for the
U.S. Civil Service Commission and Zeb's Dry Cleaners in
Gainesville. Knight enlisted in the Army in February 1942. He
received his training at Shaw Field, South Carolina, Spence
Field, Moultrie, and Moody Field, Valdosta, Georgia receiving his
wings and commission in May 1943. At the time of his death his
next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Knight, parents, 622 South Virginia Avenue
and Jeraldine P. Knight, widow, 501 North Government Street, both
of Gainesvi lle, Florida.

The 68th Fighter Squadron had been in the south Pacific since
1942. At the time Lieutenant Knight joined the unit, it operated
from bases on Guadalcanal and later, Stirling Island, the
Treasury Group, in support of American landings in the northern
Solomon Islands, especially on Bouganville. The squadron made
frequent attacks on the Japanese base at Rabaul, New Britain
Island and other enemy bases throughout the Solomons. It was on
a mission to attack enemy positions in the Russell Islands that
Lieutenant Knight's aircraft failed to return. Death is presumed
to have been the result of enemy action.

Wilmer Knight's remains were not recovered. His name is
memorialized on the Piers of Hemicycles in the Manila Military
Cemetery, Manila, Phillipine Islands.

Lieutenant Knight is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal










'-.
F I 7 ,T .,, .. 4'

MILTON LEWIS

CORPORAL

SECOND BATTALION; FIFTH REGIMENT

FIRST DIVISION

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS



BORN:
KILLED IN ACTION: 7 AUGUST 1942




Buried: Tulagi 1942; Evergreen Cemetery 1948

MILTON LEWIS
MEDALS: Navy Cross, Purple Heart, American Defense,
American Campaign, Pacific Campaign, Victory





Milton Lewis was born and raised in Gaincsville. lie played football with the (Gin;usv.ile
High School "Hurricanes" and won awards for his swimming ability at Silver Springs. Leaving
school prior to graduation, he earned his diploma while in the Marine Corps. His local
family included his mother, Mrs. William F. Lewis, two sisters, Miss Agnes Lewis and Mrs.
Dorthy .Chamberlain and a brother, Albert V. Lewis, all of Gainesville.


In his honor, the city's softball field was named the Milton Lewis Memorial Field and the
Navy named a Destroyer Escort after him; the U.S.S. Milton Lewis (DE 772)




ABSTRACT OF SERVICE



Entered the Marine Corps in 1938; Basic Training, Parris Island, South Carolina. lie earned
many awards for marksmanship and tactical employment of rifle, pistol, and both light and
heavy machine guns. He swa service in the eastern U.S. Puerto Rico, and Guantamano Bay,
Cuba prior to America's entry into the War.





(Further details of service; promotions, training etc)














CARL L. LATOUR

Private, U.S. Army
14 013 675
Died non-battle, date and place unknown
(Name appears on the official War Department list for casualties
from Alachua County)











ROBERT A. LAYNE

Private First Class, U.S. Army
6 375 427
Battery A, 12th Field Artillery Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division
Killed in Action 11 June 1944, Omaha Beachead, Normandy Peninsula,
France

Robert Layne was born 30 January 1907. At the time of his death,
his next of kin included Robert L. Layne, father, Route 2, Box
28, Alachua, Florida and James E. Layne, 2937 Cedar Street, Baton
Rouge, Louisiana.

The 2nd Division was landed in the Omaha Beachead on the 7th of
June. It was committed to that portion of the beachead near Foret
de Cerisy. On the 11th of June, the division was ordered to
seize the German strongpoint at Haute-Littee crossroads which it
did following a savage struggle with the Germans in the hedgerows
surrounding the position. It was during the battle for the
crossroads that Private Layne was killed.

Robert Layne's remains are interred in the Normandy American
Cemetery, St. Laurent, France.


Private Layne is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal











WAR SERVICE: FIFTH MARINES


At the outbreak of the war in Europe, the Fifth Marines were stationed in Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba. After a few months of training and reorganization the the States, the Fifth, now
up to war strength, moved to Wellington, New Zealand for further training and to await
their use as the spear-head of America's counter-attack against the Japanese in the South-
West Pacific. The Fifth entered combat on the 7th of August 1942; the first day and the
first assault of that counter-attack. The location was Tulagi and Guadalcanal in the
Solomon Islands.









4' v (A ,


.. .. ... ..






TULAGI CAMPAIGN: AUGUST 1942


America's first offensive against the Japanese in the Southwest Pacific involved landings
by U.S. Marines on Guadalcanal and Tulagi Islands in the Solomons. Simultaneous landings
took place at both locations on the 7th of August 1942. Initially, the Marines met little
opposition on Guadalcanal. Not so at Tulagi and its neighboring islets of Tonambago and
Gavutu. These islands were defended by the Third Kure Special Landing Force (Imperial
Marines). Tulagi was assaulted by the First Marine Raider Battalion and the Second Battalion
Fifth Marine Regiment. Volcanic in origin and tropical in vegetation, heavily wooded and
hilly, laced with caves and other defendable features, Tulagi required three days of hard
fighting to secure. On the first day, the Raiders landed first and moved inland. They were
joined on theline later in the morning by the 2/5. as both began the struggle to conquer
the island's main defensive position; hills 208 and 281 and the ravine which separated them.
It was in the savage fighting in this area that Milton Lewis was killed.


CITATION FOR NAVY CROSS: TULAGI, 7 AUGUST 1942


"For extraordinary heroism as a member of
the First Marine Division in action against
enemy Japanese forces in the Solomon Islands
area on August 7th, 1942:
With courageous disregard for his own safety,
Corporal Lewis determinedly led his squad ag-
ainst a hostile machine oum position which
thiu-oatned to hall hlin tni ft tl\vic',. ,' ,pite
h Sli icmmil n nt re 1 Ih- tI c :I i'o : Iy cont, 1111t'd
his relentless fighting and, althoulIh tally
wounded, so inirpi red hi til' IIh;I t" hle'y SIlCC' detdc
in silencing tIhe enemy t11n, Ithmceel rnmovinc this
I perilous obstacle.
Corporal Lewis's unswerving devotion to duty in
the face of extreme personal da;nqer was in kc-'p inq
with the hig hest tradi innt o f *thli Ndva.l s;l.vice.
lie gallantly gave his life for his country."



(Photo Caption)

























T. ALEXANDER LIVINGSTON

Private, U.S. Army
Died 23 March 1945 of wounds received in action 23 August 1944 in
France

Alexander Livingston was born 28 November 1908 in Newberry,
Florida. At the time of his death, his next of kin included;

Donald Madison Livingston, father, Newberry, Florida,
Donald Madison Livingston Jr.brother, Fletcher, North Carolina,
Mrs. E.E. Field, sister, Newberry, Florida, Mrs. Charles Butler,
sister, Atlanta, Georgia.

Alexander Livingston's remains are interred in the Newberry
Cemetery, Newberry, Florida.

Private Livingston spent six months in a military hospital in
England before being returned to the U.S. 1 March 1945. He died
of his wounds in Oliver General Hospital, Augusta, Georgia.

Private Livingston is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge


















THOMAS LARRY MARKHAM

Private, U.S. Army
34 837 710
51st Armoured Infantry Battalion
Killed in Action 9 January 1945, at Lutremange, Belgium

Thomas Markham was born 7 January 1919. He entered military
service at Camp Blanding, Florida 26 June 1944 and reached
England 19 December 1944. He was sent as a replacement to the
51st Armoured Infantry Battalion. At the time of his death, his
next of kin included;

Larry T. Markham, father, General Delivery, Alachua, Florida,Nita
Y., widow, Robert T. and Larry W. Markham, sons, all of P.O. Box
261, McClenny, Florida, Mrs. Cleo M Trice, foster mother and two
foster sisters of Gainesville, Fl-orida, O.T. Markham, brother,
Jacksonville, Florida Mrs Vera Tillis, sister, Jacksonville,
Florida, Ann Pace, sister, Pensacola, Two foster brothers in
military service.


The 51st Armoured Infantry Battalion was, and had been, heavily
engaged in the Battle of the Bulge. It was during the
hard-fought battles to eliminate the German forces in the Bulge
that Private Markham was killed. He had been overseas only
twenty-two days.

Thomas Markham's remains are interred in the Luxembourg American
Military Cemetery, Luxembourg.

Private Markham is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge





.4








DELL MARTIN

Petty Officer 1st Class, U.S. Naval Reserve
Died, 9 May 1945, Naval Hospital somewhere in the Southwest
Pacific area. Cause unknown but probably of illness.

Dell Martin was born in Statesboro, Georgia. He had been a
resident of Gainesville, Florida since 1934 and in the several
years prior to his entry into naval service, had operated the
Piggy Park and V and W Grill in that city. Martin had been in the
Naval Reserve for 14 months. He was serving aboard an LCI
(Landing Craft, Infantry) at the time he was removed to a naval
hospital. At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Inez Martin, widow, Susan Martin, daughter, both of 400 F Street,
Gainesville, Florida, Mr. and Mrs. J. Martin, parents, and three
brothers 'and two sisters, all of -Statesboro, Georgia.

Dell Martin is known to have been eligible for the following
medals;

American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal






HUGH WILLIAM MCCAIN

Seaman 2nd Class, Radioman-striker, U.S. Navy
Miami Naval Air Training Station, Florida
Killed, on or about 29 August 1943, near Miami, Florida

William McCain was born 25 January 1926 in Lakeland, Florida. He
spent part of his childhood in Ruskin, Florida, moving to
Gainesville, Florida with his family in about 1939. He attended
Gainesville High School, leaving school to join the Navy in early
1943. He received basic training at Jacksonville Naval Air
Station prior to being assigned to the Training Station in Miami.
He was killed when the aircraft in which he was the radioman
crashed approximately two miles off-shore southeast of Miami,
Florida. At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Blanche Thompson McCain, mother, Anne and Jeanne McCain, sisters,
and Eugene McCain, brother, all of Gainesville, Florida, H.A.
McCain, brother, and Geraldine McCain, sister, both in naval
service.

Hugh McCain's remains were returned to Gainesville and it is
believed he is interred in Evergreen Cemetery in that city.

Seaman McCain is known to have been eligible for the following
medals;

American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
















GROVER WALTER MC CALL JR.

Private, U.S. Army Air Corps
14 099 426
Died non-battle, date unknown, place believed to have been McDi I
Air Base, Tampa, Florida. It is probable he was from High
Springs, Florida. (Name appears on the official War Department
list for casualties from Alachua County)














WILLIAM RANDALL MC CALL

Corporal, U.S. Army Air Corps"
Killed in action, 29 July 1945, Northern Burma

William Randall was raised in Alachua County, Florida and
graduated from Alachua High School in 1942. He entered military
service the same year and was an aerial gunner in the Air
Transport service. He had left Savannah, Georgia some six weeks
before his aircraft was reported missing due to enemy action over
Northern Burma in the last weeks of the war.

At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. M.M. McCall, parents, Yankeetown, Florida (formerly
of Alachua), and his widow, living with her parents in Buffalo,
New York.

Corporal Randall is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal


















ROBERT SYDBOTEN MC COOK

2nd Lieutenant, 0 811 417, U.S. Army Air Corps
Co-Pilot, 735th Bomb Squadron; 453rd Bomb Group (Heavy)
Killed in action 6 March 1944, off shore from Great Yarthmouth,
England (Drowned, ditching battle-damaged B-24 aircraft)

Robert McCook was born 6 April 1920. He is believed to have
married a Gainesville woman; he may have attended the University
of Florida and his remains were returned here after the war,
indicating a local connection of importance. At the time of his
death his next of kin included;

Doris S> McCook, widow, Cedar Lane, Fountain City and Leola S.
McCook, mother, 1003 Luttrell, Knoxville, both cities in
Tennessee.

The 453rd Bomb Group, operating B-24 aircraft entered combat from
bases in England in February 1944. They were involved in the
"Big Week" 8th Air Force attacks against German Aircraft
production plants at the end of February. On the 6th of March,
more than six hundred heavy American bombers attacked various
industrial targets in Germany, including Genshagen. Sixty-nine
American bombers were lost that day to extremely aggressive
German fighter opposition and anti-aircraft fire. Lieutenant
McCook's plane received considerable battle-damage and had to be
crash-landed off the English coast on its way home. There was one
survivor from the crew.

Robert McCook's remains were recovered and temporarily interred
in the U.S. Military Cemetery, Cambridge, England and re-interred
in the Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesville, Florida after the war.

McCook is known to have been eligible for the following medals
and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal








WILLIE MC CRAY JR.

Private, U.S. Army
34 796 902
195th Company, 47th Reinforced Battalion
Died 8 July 1945 Compiegne, France

Willie McCray was born 6 October 1918. At the time of his death
his next of kin included;

Willie McCray Sr. father, and Vastrow Zow, sister, 512 Mathews
Street, Deland, Florida.

Willie McCray's remains are interred in the Epinal American
Military Cemetery, Epinal, Vosges, France.

Private McCray is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal




RICHARD Z. MC DERMOTT

Private First Class, U.S. Army
14 077 363
Company G, 290th Infantry Regiment, 75th Infantry Division
Died 11 April 1945 at Recklinhausen, Germany of wounds received
in action.

Richard McDermott was born 28 September 1923. At the time of his
death his next of kin included;

Annette McDermott, widow, 341 Prospect Avenue and Florence I.
McDermott, 237 College Court, both in Gainesville, Florida.

During mid-April 1945, the 75th Division was psrt of the Force
advancing into German in the Ruhr industrial region, trapping a
very large portion of the German Army in the west. On the 10th
and 11th, the regiments of the 75th reached the Ruhr River and
successfully seized several bridges intact. It was during these
operations that Private McDermott received his fatal wounds.

Richard McDermott's remains are interred in the Netherlands
American Military Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands.

Private McDermott is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge



















ROBERT G. MC DONNELL

2nd Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps
354th Fighter Squadron, 355th-Fighter Group
Killed in action, 5 April 1945, Buren, Holland

Robert McDonnell was born 31 May 1923 in High Springs, Florida.
He was a graduate of High Springs High School in 1941 and
attended the University of Florida prior to his entry into
military service in February 1943. At the time of his death his
next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. McDonnell, parents, Rev. Harry McDonnell,
Warren McDonnell, brothers, Mary McDonnell, sister, all of High
Springs, Florida, Mrs. L.R. Bullen, sister, Miami, Florida, Rev.
Durward McDonnell, brother, Gainesville, Florida, Captain Roger
McDonnell, brother, in military service.

The 355th Fighter Group entered combat in Europe in September
1943 flying P-47 aircraft. When Lieutenant McDonnell joined the
group, they were operating P-51 aircraft and their primary
mission was as fighter-bombers in support of ground units of the
Allied armies. In April of 1945, the fighters of the group were
active in northern Germany and Holland in support of advancing
American and British forces, attacking enemy road and rail
communications and troop concentrations. It was during one such
raid that Lieutenant McDonnell's aircraft received the battle
damage which caused his death.

Robert McDonnell's remains were recovered and are interred in the
High Springs Cemetery, High Springs, Florida.

Lieutenant McDonnell is known to have received or been eligible
for the following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal



4

























JOHN F. MELLOR

Technical Sergeant 4th Grade, U.S. Army
517th Field Artillery Battalion
Died 6 July 1945, Luzon, Phillipine Islands

John Mellor was born 18 September 1923. At the time of his death
his next of kin included;

Fred H. and Fannie B. Mellor, 2011 Gasparilla, Fort Myers,
Florida.

John Mellor's remains are interred in the Manila American
Military Cemetery, Manila, Phillipine Islands.

Sergeant Mellor is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Phillipine Liberation Ribbon











REGINALD HYMAN "BUDDY" MILLER

Aviation Machinist Mate 1st Class, 268 54 39, U.S. Navy
Torpedo Squadron 4, U.S.S. RANGER (CV4)
Killed in action, 4 October 1943, Bodo, Norway

Buddy Miller was born 25 August 1922 in Gainesville, Florida.
Raised in that city, he was active in the Boy Scouts and attended
both P.K. Young and Gainesville High School, playing football
for the latter school during the 1938 season. Offered a football
scholarship, he next attended Georgia Military academy for one
year before entering naval service in 1940. At the time of his
death his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. Clayton G. Miller, Gainesville, Florida and two
brothers, C. G. and Jack Miller.

When the war began, the RANGER was at Norfolk, Virginia.
Considered ill-designed for operations in the Pacific, the ship
was attached to the Atlantic Fleet. During part of 1942, the
RANGER carried Army aircraft to various destinations and then
participated in the North African invasion of November 1942. Her
aircraft were used to attack enemy land targets in Morocco and
against enemy ships in and near Casablanca. For much of 1943,
the RANGER was involved in training and transport missions until
attached to the British Home Fleet to participate in Operation
Leader; an attack on German shipping in Bodo Harbor, Norway
during the first week in October.

Miller's squadron, VTS 4 flew TBF Grumman "Avenger" aircraft.
Ten planes of their squadron were sent to attack German shipping
in and near Bodo Harbor as part of a larger American attack
force. Several German ships were sunk or severely damaged. Five
American planes were lost to heavy German anti-aircraft fire,
including Miller's. His plane was seen to be on fire, close to
the water. The pilot parachuted safely and became a prisoner of
war. The other two crewmen of the TBF were reported to be either
wounded or dead when the pilot left the plane and are presumed to
have died in the crash as no further parachutes were seen.

During 1985, the Norwegian Government announced plans to recover
Miller's aircraft from the waters of the fijord. Whether this
has been done is not known.

Miller's remains were not recovered. He is known to have been
eligible for the following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Navy Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal














MEREDITH M. "SPARKY" MILLS JR.

Staff Sergeant, 14 084 813, U.S. Army Air Corps
Ball turret gunner, 365th Bomb Squadron, 305th Bomb Group (Heavy)
Killed in action, 21 July 1944 at Schollach-Neustadt, Baden
Germany.

Meredith Mills was born 21 April 1923. He was raised in St.
Augustine, Florida, completed high School and attended college in
Gainesville, Florida. His home was with his aunt, H.W. Wait of
that city when he entered military service in October 1942. He
went overseas in May 1944. At the time of his death his next of
kin included;

Meredith M. and Russie W. Mills Sr., parents, 76 Sargosa Street,
St. Augustine, Florida.

The 305th Bomb Group, flying B-17 aircraft, had been operational
from bases in England since late 1942. From May to July 1944,
they were involved in a wide variety of missions including
preparation for the Normandy landings and attacks against
industrial targets in Germany. On the 21st of July, nearly one
thousand American heavy bombers were dispatched to strike
important industrial targets in several locations throughout
Germany. The 305th bombed targets near Munich. Sergeant Mills's
aircraft was seen to receive a direct hit from an anti-aircraft
shell and fall out of control. After the war, it was determined
Mills and most of the crew safely parachuted to ground some six
miles from the Swiss border. Mi lls and four other crewmen were
captured by a force of German home guards and civilians and
murdered by them.

Meredith Mil s's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, St. Avoid, France and re-interred in the St.
Augustine National Cemetery, St. Augustine, Florida after the
war.

Sergeant Mills is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Air Medal with oak leaf cluster
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal


-a

























JAMES CALEB MOTT

U.S. Navy
killed, 19 April 1945, jeep accident, Finschafen, New Guinea

James Mott was raised in Alachua, Florida and attended Alachua
High School. He worked in and around Alachua prior to his entry
into naval service in 1941. He had been overseas approximately
one year at the time of the accident. At the time of his death
his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. B.W. Mott, parents, Nina Mae Harrison and Thelma
Barnes, sisters, all of Alachua, Florida.

James Mott's remains were originally interred in the American
Cemetery, Finschafen, New Guinea. It is not known if they were
returned to the United States after the war.

Mott is known to have been eligible for the following medals;

Navy Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal















'i


















VIRGINIUS C. MURPHREE

1st Lieutenant, 0 417 382, U.S. Army
Company I, 128th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division
Killed in action 23 December 1942, Buna Mission, New Guinea.

Virginius Murphree was born 24 December 1918. Prior to his entry
into mil itary service, he lived at 1120 West Union Stree in
Gainesville, Florida and had attended the University of Florida.
At the time of his death, his next of kin included;

Mrs. Jewel Smith, mother, P.O. Box 1146, Jacksonville, Florida.

The 32nd Division was one of the first American units to be
committed to fighting the Japanese in the Southwest Pacific. It
arrived in Australia in the spring of 1942 and was involved, with
the Austral ians, in stopping the Japanese drive on Port Morseby,
New Guinea and in the American counter-attack whcih drove the
enemy over the mountains. In the fall of 1942, regiments of the
division were engaged in expelling the Japanese from the
Buna-Sanananda area of eastern New Guinea. The fighting for Buna
was extremely bitter, the Japanese were well-fortified. It was
during the savage Battle of Buna Mission that Lieutenant Murphree
was killed.

Virginius Murphree's remains were temporarily interred in the
U.S. Armed Forces Cemetery, Soputa Z1 and re-interred in
Graveland Cemetery, Pine Bluff, Arkansas after the war.

Lieutenant Murphree is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge
























ALBERT LEA NELSON

Aviation Ordinanceman 1st Class, U.S. Navy
Killed in action, in October or early November 1944, most
probably during the battles associated with the invasion of
Leyte, Phillipine Islands.

Albert Nelson, originally from Michigan, married a Gainesville
woman and considered that city home when he enlisted in the naval
service in 1939. At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Helen Louise Nelson, widow, 520 South Garden Street, Gainesville,
Florida, Mr.and Mrs. L.H. Nelson, parents, Detroit, Michigan.

It is improbable his remains were recovered. Nelson is known to
have been eligible for the following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Navy Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal




















HARRY H. NICHOLS

Private, U.S. Army
34 980 273
Company K, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division
Killed in Action 19 December 1944, vicinity of Keyersburg,
France.
(Name appears on the official War Department list of casualties
from Alachua County)

Harry Nichols was born 6 March 1915. At the time of his death,
his next of kin included Lenore H. Nichols, widow, Randall L. and
James A. Nichols, sons, 800 W. Alapaha Street, Fitzgerald,
Georgia, James H. Nichols, father, Waverly, Alabama.

The 3rd Division had been in combat since the invasion of Sicily,
having been active in southern Italy, Anzio and the invasion of
southern France. After helping drive the Germans out of southern
France, the division was active in the campa-ign to clear north
eastern France of the enemy and reach the Rhine River near where
the Frence, German and Swiss frontiers meet. It was bitter
fighting and, with the German Offensive to the north, the
"Bulge", much of the division's activities became defensive as
troops were shifted to the north to counter the German offensive.

Harvey Nichols's remains are interred in the Epinal American
Military Cemetery, Epinal, Vosges, France.

Private Nichols is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge






-a







JAMES WALTER PATTERSON

Yeoman 1st Class, U.S. Naval Reserve
Killed in action, late October or in November 1944, location
unknown but probably in the battles associated with the invasion
of Leyte, Phillipine Islands.

Originally from Massachusetts, James Patterson made his home in
Gainesville and had worked for some years as a clerk at the
University of Florida prior to his entry into naval service in
February 1942. His home address of record was 200 South Pleasant
Street, Gainesville, Florida. He received naval training at
Little Creek and Norfolk, Virginia prior to his departure for the
war zone. Nelson was 32 years old when killed. At the time of
his death his next of kin included;

Mrs. Patterson, mother, Gloucester, and a sister in Andover, both
in Massachusetts.

It is not known if Nelson's remains were recovered but it is
unlikely. He is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal






ROBERT J. PHILLIPS

Corporal, U.S. Army
34 200 681
2889th Truck Company, Quartermaster Corps
Died 6 April 1945 Mainz, Germany

Robert Phillips was born 16 November 1917 in Santa Rosa County,
Florida. At the time of his death, his next of kin included;

Ruth Anna Phillips, widow, Reading Pensylvania, Mack and Laura
Phillips, parents, Mrs. A.W. Hall, sister, of Gainesville,
Florida, Mrs. Gilbert Bryant, Bell, Florida.

Robert Phillips's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, St. Avoid, France and re-interred in Evergreen
Cemetery, Gainesville, Florida after the war.

Corporal Phillips is known to have been eligible for the
following medals;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
















CHARLES W. PINHOLSTER

Corporal, U.S. Army
34 538 859
Died 7 September 1944 Camp Robinson, Arkansas

Prior to entering the service, Charles Pinholster lived and
worked in Gainesville, Florida. He was the manager of the
Birdsey Flour Store.















VAN B. PORCHER

Private, U.S. Army
34 785 779
448th Quartermaster Troop, TP Company
Died 2 September 1944 vicinity of Bricy, France

Van Porcher was born 27 January 1914. At the time of his death,
his next of kin included lola Mitchell, mother and Rosa Lee
Porcher, sister, Route 1, Box 3A, Ocala, Florida.

Van Porcher's remains are interred in the Epinal American
Military Cemetery, Epinal,Vosges, France.

Private Porcher is known to have been eligible for the following
medals;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal



'a





















LEONARD R. RAINEY

Sergeant, 34 764 893, U.S. Army
Company 1, 135th Infantry Regfment, 34th Infantry Division
Killed in action 16 November 1944, Mt. Belmonte, Italy

Leonard Rainey was born 9 December 1915. At the time of his
death, his next of kin included;

Ola C. Rainey, widow, General Delivery, Gainesville, Florida,
Marry E.R. Jarrard, mother, 677 Anton Street, NW, and Nellie R.
Baugham, 1105 Grove Street, NW, both of Atlanta, Georgia.

The 34th Division began its combat career in North Africa and
participated in all the major battles and offensives of the
Italian Campaign. During October of 1944, the Division
participated in attacking the German Gothic Line defenses and
seized Mt. Belmonte. During November, the held the position
against repeated German counter-attacks. It was during this
phase of the battle that Sergeant Rainey was killed.

Leonard Rainey's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery in Pietramala, Italy and re-interred in the
Marietta National Cemetery, Marietta, Georgia after the war.

Sergeant Rainey is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge



















LEO D. RAMOS

Flying Officer, (Navigator), 124 381, U.S. Army Air Corps
560th Bomb Squadron, 388th Bomb Group
Killed as a result of enemy action, 19 July 1944, aircraft
crashed following raid on Germany near Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk,
England.

Leo Ramos was born 8 May 1921. He was raised in Gainesville,
Florida and attended the University of Florida in the same city.
He had received his navigator's wings at Selman Field, Monroe,
Louisana and had been overseas since late 1943 when he died.
His next of kin included;

Frank and Mary Ramos, parents, 124 North 6th Street, Gainesville,
Florida, and Oveida A. Ramos, widow, Box 1359, De Land, Florida.

The 560th Bomb Squadron operated out of England flying B-17 heavy
bombers. on the 19th of July, more than 1,100 American heavy
bombers, in five groups, attached numerous strategic industrial
and transportation targets in central and southern Germany. Leo
Ramos's aircraft received sufficient battle damage to cause it to
crash upon its return to England.

Leo Ramos's remains are interred in the Cambridge Military
Cemetery, Cambridge, England.

Flying Officer Ramos is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Distinguished Unit Citation Ribbon






A

























ANDREW RICHARDSON

Private, U.S. Army
34 540 463
1520th Engineer Water Supply Company
Died 7 March 1945 at Paganque, Luzon, Phillipine Islands
(Name appears on the official War Department list of casualties
from Alachua County)

Private Richardson was born 5 September 1924. At the time of his
death his next of kin included;

Mrs. Hasse Jackson, mother 143 Tichnor Street, Newark, New
Jersey, Bouse Jackson, grandfather, Route 1, Pelham, Georgia.

Andrew Richardson's remains are interred in the South View
Cemetery, Atlanta Georgia.

Private is known tdo have been eligible for the following medals;

Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Phillipine Liberation Ribbon




















JACKSON C. RICHARDSON

Private, 44 185 309, U.S. Army
309th Infantry Regiment, 78th:lnfantry Division
Killed in action 22 March 1945, Diez, Germany

Jackson Richardson was born 6 June 1924. He attended the
University of Florida, was active in ROTC and was a pre-med
student prior to entering military service. At the time of his
death, his next of kin included;

James C. and Maggie B. Richardson, 1630 West Orange Street,
Gainsville, Florida and three brothers, Bland and John
Richardson, both in military service in California, and James
Richardson, retired from the military and a student at the
University of Florida.

The 78th Division entered active combat service in early December
1944. The division crossed the Roer River and fought its way to
the Rhine River and was passed over the river to participate in
the breakout from the Remagen Bridgehead in early March 1945. It
was during the battles to expand the Bridgehead on the east side
of the Rhine that Private Richardson was killed.

Jackson Richardson's remains were temporarily interred in the
U.S. Military Cemetery, Margraten, Holland and re-interred in the
Netherlands American Military Cemetery, Margraten, Holland after
the war.

Private Richardson is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge





4



















WILSON BLOOM RIPPEY

Lieutenant Junior Grade, U.S. Naval Reserve
Patrol Squadron Fifty-One
Killed, 8 June 1942, Missing on anti-submarine patrol, North
Atlantic

Wilson Rippey was born 10 December 1913 in Lawrenceburg,
Tennessee. He was partly raised in Gainesville, Florida
graduating fro Gainesville High School and later, the University
of Florida. He enlisted in the Naval Reserve as a seaman 15 May
1936 and became an Aviation Cadet 15 August 1936. He was
appointed Naval Aviator Number 5321 16 August 1937 and assigned
to duties with Patrol Squadron Twelve, Fleet Air Detachment,
Naval Air Station, San Diego, California. Patrol Squadron Twelve
became Patrol Suadron Fifty One in-July 1939 at which time Rippey
was promoted to Ensign.

In August 1940, Patrol Squadron Fifty One was transferred to
the east coast at the Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Miami,
Florida. In January 1941, Rippey was promoted to Lieutenant,
Junior Grade. It was on a long-range patrol mission over the
North Atlantic in June 1942 that Rippey and his aircraft went
missing, to be declared dead several months later.

At the time of his death, his next of kin included;

Mrs. Flora Rippey, mother,. Bradenten, Doris Rippey, widow, Haines
City, G.P. Rippey, brother 1617 Thomas Street, and Mrs. W.H.
Mixon, sister, both of Gainesville, all cities in Florida.

Wilson Rippey's remains were not recovered. He is known to have
been eligible for the following medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Navy Good Conduct
American Defense Service Medal
American Campaign Medal
Victory Medal



















JAMES REXALL ROBINSON

Corporal, 34 024 061, U.S. Army
119th Infantry Regiment, 30th'Infantry Division
Died of wounds 3 August 1944 received 31 July 1944 near St. Lo,
Normandy, France

James Robinson was born 5 April 1913 in Jessup, Georgia. He had
lived in Melrose, Florida most of his life. Prior to his entry
into military service, he worked for the Florida Market,
Gainesville, Florida. He entered military service in February
1941 and received training at Camp Blanding, Florida and Fort
Benning, Georgia. He was sent overseas in February 1944. At the
time of his death his next of kin included;

Ruby L. Robinson, mother, 404 Benson Street, Ms. H.H. Benson,
aunt, 346 Orange Street, both of Gainesville, Florida, Mary
Robinson, sister, Melrose, Florida, two additional sisters,
Dorothy and Maxine and three brothers, Harold, Wynel Elwyn.

The 30th Division entered combat in the Normandy Beachead on the
11th of June 1944. It was deeply engaged in the hedgerow battles
around the key town of St. Lo and was one of two assault
divisions in Operation Cobra, the battle to breakout of the
beachead. The division seized a strongly defended German position
Troisgots and defended it against a heavy German counter-attack
on the 31st of July, the battle in which Corporal Robinson lost
his life.

James Robinson's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, La Cambe, France and re-interred in the
Normandy American Military Cemetery, St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France
after the war.

Corporal Robinson is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge




























JOHN LEE SAUNDERS JR.

Aviation Machinist Mate 2nd Class, U.S. Navy
Killed, 18 December 1944, Aircraft crash, location and
circumstances unknown. Listed as combat-connected in Navy lists.

John Saunders was from Alachua County, Florida. He had left the
county to manage the A and P store in Jacksonville just prior to
enlisting in the naval service 14 September 1942. It is believed
he was on active service in the Pacific when killed in action.
His next of kin at the time of his death included;

Hattie Green Saunders, widow, John Lee Saunders III, son,
Jacksonville, Florida, Parents, a brother and two sisters, of
Waldo, Florida.

It is presumed his remains were not recovered. He is known to
have been eligible for the following medals;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal













a*




















RUDOLPH A. SCHUMAN

Private First Class, U.S. Army
34 200 704
Company D, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Killed in Action 23 December 1944, Elsenborn, Belgium

Rudolph Schuman was born 6 March 1911. At the time of his death,
his next of kin included;

Mrs. Edith E. Schuman, mother, Box 33, Santa Fe, Florida, and
Mrs. Eula M. Avinger, sister, High Springs, Florida.

The 1st Division had seen plenty of combat, beginning with North
Africa in 1942. They Landed on Omaha Beach, Normandy, on D-Day
and had been actively involved in all the campaigns clearing the
Germans from France and Belgium. The division held the northern
shoulder of the American positions resisting the German winter
counter-attack, the Battle of the Bulge. There was a series of
extremely bitter battles associated with the division's role in
the battle and it was during the division's counter-attack
against the Germans to secure positions at Butenbach, Belgium
that Private Schuman was killed.

Rudolph Schuman's remains are interred in the Henri-Chappell
American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chappell, Belgium.

Private Schuman is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge







'a


















EWART T. SCONIERS

1st Lieutenant, 0 724 720, U.S. Army Air Corps
414th Bomb Squadron, 97th Bomb Group (Heavy)
Died 24 January 1944 while a prisoner of war at Luben/Schleswig,
Germany.

Ewart Sconiers was born 29 November 1916. He had worked as a
barber in Pensacola, Tallahassee and Gainesville, Florida. He
had attended the University of Florida and made his home in
Gainesville prior to his entry into military service in 1941. He
was trained as a navigator. At the time of his death his next of
kin included;

Warren W. and Maude Sconiers, parents, 12th Street, DeFuniak
Springs, Florida.

The 97th Bomb Group was part of the first American heavy bomber
force to begin strategic bombing operations against targets in
France and the Low Countries during August 1942. That same
month, Lieutenant Sconiers received the Distinguished Flying
Cross for safely landing his battle-damaged B-17 after the pilot
had been killed. At some later date his aircraft was lost over
the continent and Sconiers became a prisoner of war. He died in
a German prison camp.

Ewart Sconiers's remains were not recovered and his name is
memorialized on the Piers of the Colonnade, Henri-Chapelle
American Military Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium.

Lieutenant Sconiers is known to have been eligible for the
following decorations and medals;

Distinguished Flying Cross
Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal





















JOHN S. SHARP II

Technical Sergeant 5th grade, U.S. Army
34 782 383
Infantry
Killed in Action 31 January 1945 at Steffenhausen, Belgium

John Sharp was born 22 January 1925. At the time of his death,
his next of kin included;

Lott W. and Jinnie Sharp, parents, 423 Williams Street, Waycross,
Georgia.

Sergeant Sharp waqs almost certainly killed in the battles
associated with driving the Germans out of the "Bulge and
crossing the German frontier in the Ardennes region of Belgium.

John Sharp's remains are interred in the Ardennes American
Military Cemetery, Neupre (Neuville-en-Condroz), Belgium.*

Sergeant Sharp is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Euroipean Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge



















JOHN W. SMALLBONES

Corporal, 34 854 980, U.S. Army Air Corps
777th Bomb Squadron, 464th Bomb Group
Killed in action 13 October 1944, Yugoslavia

John Smal'bones was born 24 August 1921. He graduated from
Gainesville High School, Gainesville, Florida in 1939. Corporal
Smallbones was a waist gunner in a B-24 heavy bomber and had been
overseas since approximately 11 months prior to his last mission.
At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Ellen W., mother, and Hary Smallbones, brother, of 215 Walnut
Street, Wilmington, North Carolina, (formerly of Gainesville,
Florida) Mrs. Clara Wald, aunt, Danny Wells, uncle, both of
Gainesville, Florida.

The 777th Bomb Squadron, operating from air fields in Italy, was
heavily involved in attacks against German war plants in Austria
and transportation targets in Hungary and Yugoslavia during
October 1944. On the 13th, over six hundred heavy bombers
attacked a variety of targets in southern Europe. Corporal
Smallbones's aircraft was destroyed near Belgrade, Yougoslavia
during the attack.

John Smallbone's remains are intered in the Sicily-Rome American
Military Cemetery, Nettuno, Italy.

Corporal Smallbones is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Distinguished Unit Citation Ribbon

























CHARLES WILLIAM SMITH

Aviation Radioman 3rd Class, U.S. Navy
Killed in action, 11 May 1945; aboard the U.S.S. Bunker Hill,
CV-17, by a Kamakazi airplane attack off Okinawa, Ryuku Islands

Charles Smith was raied in High Springs, Florida. He is known to
have ben a member of an air crew aboard the Bunker Hill, at least
from January 1945. Aircraft of this carrier during this period
took part in the Iwo Jima campaign, attacks against the Japanese
mainland and in the sinking of the Japanese super battleship
Yamato and escorting ships 7 April and in the Okinawa campaign.
Having just returned from a mission, Smith and other air crewmen
were in the ready-rooms when two Japanes suicide planes crashed
into the flight deck of the Bunker Hill, immediately above the
ready-rooms. Approximately 400 Americans died in the action,
including Smith.

At the time of his death, his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Smith, parents, Box 54, High Springs,
Florida

Smith is known to have been eligible for the following medals

(Air Medal)
Purple Heart
Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal




















WILLIAM A. (BILLY) SMITH

Private, U.S. Army
34 795 325
Company B, 362nd Infantry Regiment, 91st Infantry Division
Killed inaction 21 October 1944, vicinity of Canovetta, Italy

William Smith was born 23 November 1923. He attended Gainesville
High School, Gainesville, Florida. He received his military
training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi and departed for overseas
from Fort Meade., Maryland. At the time of his death, his next of
kin included;

Miss Bernice Smith, sister, 1405 La Salle Street, and Mrs. Violet
Smith, aunt, 824 E. Arlington Street, both of Gainesville,
Florida, and Herbert Smith Sr.,father, with the Seabees in the
Southwest Pacific.

The 91st Division was a part of the Fifth Army trying to force
the Germans from their defensive positions in the mountains north
of Rome during October 1944. The division has temporarily on the
defensive, engaged in aggressive patrol actions at the time
Private Smith was killed.

William Smith's remains are interred in the Marietta National
Cemetery, Marietta, Georgia.

Private Smith is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge







ai



























ALBERT LEA SNOWDEN

U.S. Navy
Died, 8 December 1945, of multiple injuries, cause unknown,
probably from an accident, Phillipine islands.

Albert Snowden was raised in Gainesville, Florida and graduated
from Gainesville High School in 1943. He worked at the Railway
Express office in Gainesville for a year prior to his entry into
naval service. At the time of his death his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Snowden, parents, Ruth, Grace, Margie,
sisters, George, brother, all of Route 2, Gainesville, Florida
and Robert E. Snowden, brother, in military service.

Although Snowden's remains were recovered, it is not known where
they were interred. He is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Phillipine Liberation Ribbon















'a











WILLIAM A. SNOWDEN

Technical Sergeant 5th Grade, 34 207 092, U.S. Army
Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 322nd Infantry Regiment,
81st Infantry Division
Killed in Action 29 September 1944, Angaur, Palau Islands, South
Pacific

Will iam Snowden was born in Gainesville, Florida 29 February
1912. He was raised in that city and attended local schools.
Immediately prior to entry into military service, he worked for
the Standard Oil Company. At the time of his death his next of
kin included;

Linnie G. Snowden, mother, Route 2, Box 161; Georgia E. Polk,
sister, General Delivery, L.R. Snowden, brother, all of
Gainesville, Florida; E.M. Snowden, brother, Windsor, Florida,
Ethel Snowden, sister, Miami, Florida, and many nieces and
nephews in Alachua County.

Sergeant Snowden enlisted in the Army at Camp Blanding, Florida
on the 12th of June, 1942 and went overseas in July 1944. His
division trained in the Hawaiian Islands prior to its commitment
to battle at Angaur.

The 81st Infantry Division, assigned to General MacArthur's
Southwest Pacific Command, was first employed to seize Angaur
Island in the Palau Island Group, part of the preparation for the
later invasion of the Phillipine Islands. After a relatively
brief campaign to capture the useable portions of the island, the
322nd Regiment was assigned the task of eliminating the main
Japanese defense force for the island who had withdrawn and
fortified positions in the Lake Salome area of the island. It
turned out to be a savage and difficult operation to destroy the
enemy positions in the area. The month-long battle involved the
use of saturation bombing and artillery fire and the need to dig
out the Japanese almost one at a time in difficult, rocy and
jungle-covered terrain. It was during the period in late
September characterized by the most severe fighting that Sergeant
Snowden was killed.

Wi I iam Snowden's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Armed Forces Cemetery, Angaur Island and re-interred in the
Orange Heights Cemetery, Orange Heights, Florida after the war.

Sergeant Snowden is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge

















BYRON EDDY SPARKS

Sergeant, U.S. Army
14 013 511
Company G, 319th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division
Died of Wounds 15 April 1945 Weimar, Germany.

Byron Sparks was born 6 April 1921 in Louise, Florida. He had
enlisted in the Army during August 1940 and was stationed at Fort
Shafter, Hawaii when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in
December of 1941. Subsequently, he served in the Fiji Islands
and the Bouganville campaign in the southwest Pacific, returning
to the United States in July 1944. He was re-assigned to the
European Theater and arrived there in January 1945.

At the time of his death, Sergeant Sparks's next of kin included;

Andrew and Mary Sparks, Box 63, Route 1, George W., Roger W.,
Luther and Albert Sparks, brothers, Juanita and Fidella, sisters,
all of Gainesville, Florida and Mrs. J.C. Bryant, sister,
Oklahoma City.

The 80th Division was part of the Third Army engaged in
eliminating all enemy forces in the southern part of Germany that
final spring of the war in Europe. The division had just reached
the River Saale, helping surround German positions in the
Erfurt-Weimar region. It was during this advance Sergeant Sparks
received the wounds from which he died at Weimar, Germany.

Bryon Sparks's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S.
Military Cemetery, Eisenach, Germany and were re-interred in the
Santa Fe Cemetery, Hampton, Florida after the war.

Sergeant Sparks is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Combat Infantry Badge






















LOREN P. STEWART

Colonel, 0 005 881, U.S. Army
51st Infantry, Phil lipine Scouts
Killed inaction 13 January 1942, Baatan, Phillipine Islands

Loren Stewart was born 27 June 1892. At the time of his death,
his next of kin included Frances V.M. Stewart, widow and
Josephine Stewart, daughter, 1255 Florida Avenue, Gainesville,
Florida.

The 51st held positions on the Abucay Line on the Baatan
Peninsula against repeated strong attacks by the Japanese. Enemy
breakthroughs on the 12th and 13th of January required the
commitment of reserves to restore the line. Although the
counter-attacks were successful, the line had to be abandoned.
Colonel Stewart was killed during these final battles for the
Abucay Line.

Loren Stewart's remains were not recovered and his name is
memorialized on the Piers of Hemicycles in the Manila American
Military Cemetery, Manila, Phillipine Islands.

Colonel Stewart is known to have been eligible for the following
medals and decorations;

Purple Heart
World War I Victory
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
World War II Victory Medal
Phillipine Defense Ribbon








'4
















PAUL M. STULTS

1st Lieutenant, 0 420 234, U.S. Army Air Corps 836th Bomb
Squadron, 487th Bomb Group (Heavy) Killed, 20 July 1944, aircraft
accident, near Lavenham, Suffolk; England

Paul Stults was born 4 September 1919. He and his family lived
in Gainesville, Florida and he attended the University of Florida
prior to his entry into military service at Fort Jackson, South
Carolina in October 1941. Stults received infantry training at
Columbia, South Carolina and transferred to the Air Corps in May
1942. He trained at Clovis and Almagordo, New Mexico and
received his pilot's wings at Albany, Georgia in January 1943.
Prior to his departure for overseas in April 1944, he was a B-25
flying instructor at Columbia, South Carolina and transferred to
B-24's at Clovis, New Mexico in December 1943. At the time of h
is death his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Stults, parents, 1052 West Boulevard, Rebekah
Stokes Stults, widow, and Patricia Wayne Stults, daughter, of
1009 North Myrtle St. all of Gainesville, Florida, Lois Stults,
sister, Richard Stults, USMC, Max Stults, USN, both in military
service. (Richard would be killed in action in February 1945 and
Max would die shortly after the end of the war.)

The 487th Bomb Group, equipped with B-24 heavy bombers commenced
combat operations in May 1944 during the pre-invasion bombing
campaign in western France and Belgium and the continuing
strategic operations against major targets in western Germany.
Lieutenant Stults was killed, most probably in a mid-air
collision during a Squadron aerial form-up for a major American
bombing raid directed against Leipzig, Germany.

Paul Stults's remains are interred in Arlington National
Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

Lieutenant Stults is known to have been eligible for the
following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Defense Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal

4<


















RICHARD LEE STULTS

1st Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve

VMF 218 (Marine Fighting Squadron), Marine Air Group 12, Marine
Air Wing, Pacific
Killed in action, 19 December 1944, Negros, Phillipine Islands

Richard Stults was born 18 January 1922 in Portland, Indiana. He
graduated from Castle Heights Military Academy in Lebanon,
Tennesee. He attended the University of Florida for three years,
being active in the Pershing Rifles and Demolay. His parents and
brothers all resided in Gainesville, Florida upon the outbreak of
the war. Stults entered naval service in May of 1942, completed
aviation cadet training at Dallas Naval Air Station and
transferred to Pensacola Naval Air Station to complete his
training. He received his commission and wings in June 1943. He
was assigned to VMF 218 and with that unit, departed for overseas
duty in November 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin
included;

Norma Tyson Stults, widow, Larry Eugene Stults, son, both of
Hawthorne, Mr. and Mrs. Morris E. Stults, Gainesville, both
cities in Florida. Of his two brothers, one, Paul M. had been
killed in England during July 1944 and the other, Max W., then in
naval service, was to die shortly after wars end.

Between 1 and 3 December 1944, the men and planes of VMF 218
staged through New Guinea to their new operational base at
Tacloban, Leyte Island, the Phil ines. They became combat
operational on the 5th of December. For the next three weeks, the
squadron was engaged in patrol, escort, anti-shipping strikes and
attacks on ground targets in territories controlled by the
Japanese. On numerous occasions they encountered enemy aircraft,
destroying several. Records indicate Richard Stults first combat
mission was to escort friendly aircraft over Ormoc, Leyte. On the
19th, Stults was part of a mission in support of Allied troops on
Negros Island. While straffing Silay airfield on Negros,
Lieutenant Stults's Corsair aircraft, apparently damaged, flying
at tree-top level.





Ai






















"Lt. Stults plane was seen smoki-ng and one large flash of
fire observed coming from underside of plane flying at tree-top
level. The plane appeared to be under control and smoke and
flame had disappeared. Lt. Wilson, who observed this plane,
looked away momentarily. When he glanced back to the position
where plane was last seen, he observed a long line of flame along
tree tops and saw the empenage of a Corsair sticking up through
trees with a large fire burning all around it."

It is not known what caused the damage to Stults plane, whether
ground fire over Silay Field or one of the three Japanese fighter
planes encountered in the area.

A check of all Prisoner of War camps failed to turn up and
information and after the war, Phillipine natives confirmed
Stults had died in the aircraft. His remains, originally
identified as unknown, were identified with aid of a ring, date
and location of crash. His remains are interred in Arlington
National Cemetery, Virginia.

Lieutenant Stults was eligible for the following medals and
decorations;

Purple Heart
American Campaign Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
Victory Medal













MOSBY G. TAYLOR, JR.

1st Lieutenant, 0 692 573, U.S. Army Air Corps
515th Bomb Squadron, 376th Bomb Group (Heavy)
Killed in action, 17 October 1944, near the island of Vis, off
the coast of Yugoslavia.

Mosby Taylor was born 18 August 1919. He was raised in
Gainesville, Florida and graduated from Gainesville High School.
He attended the University of Florida prior to his entry into
military service in October 1942. He received his pre-flight and
flight training in San Antonio and Brooks Field, Texas and was
commissioned in October 1943. He trained as a B-24 pilot in
Arizona. Taylor departed for overseas duty in June 1944. At the
time of his death his next of kin included;

Mr. and Mrs. Mosby G. Taylor, Sr., parents, 233 North Roper
Avenue, Mary Taylor, widow, Michael Wayne Taylor, son, Mary Kay
Taylor, daughter, 720 NW 9th Terrace, all of Gainesville, Florida
and Joe Taylor, brother, U.S. Army.

The 376th Bomb Group had been in combat in the Mediterranean area
since the earliest days of the North African invasion in 1942.
At the time when Taylor was assigned to the group, it operated
out of Italian bases against targets in Austria, northern Italy,
Hungary, Roumania, Bulgaria and Yugoslavia. On the 17th of
October 1944, in excess of three hundred heavy bombers from
Italian bases, including the 376th, were sent to bomb oil
refineries at Blechhammer, Austria and other targets of
opportunity in the other Balkan countries. On the return flight
from their successful raid, Taylor's aircraft was seen to have
one engine out and in distress off the coast of Yugoslavia.
Eight parachutes were seen to open but the clouds prevented
continuous sighting. The aircraft was later seen crashed into
the sea off the island of Vis and fighter aircraft had called for
vessels of the rescue service but no survivors were ever found.

Mosby Taylor's remains were not recovered and his name is
memorialized on the Wall of the Missing, Florence American
Military Cemetery, Florence, Italy.

Lieutenant Taylor is known to have received or been eligible for
the following medals and decorations;

Air Medal
Purple Heart
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal
European Campaign Medal
Victory Medal
Distinguished Unit Citation Ribbon




Full Text

PAGE 1

Digitized with the permission of the FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD SOURCE DOCUMENT ADVISORY Digital images were created from printed source documents that , in many cases , were photocopies of original materials held elsewhere . The quality of these copies was often poor . Digital images reflect the poor quality of the source documents. Where possible images have been manipulated to make them as readable as possible . In many cases such manipulation was not possible . Where available, the originals photocopied for publication have been digitized and have been added, separately , to this collection. Searchable text generated from the digital images, subsequently, is also poor . The researcher is advised not to rely solely upon text-search in this collection. RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS Items collected here were originally published by the Florida National Guard, many as part of its SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series. Contact the Florida National Guard for additional information . The Florida National Guard reserves all rights to content originating with the Guard. DIGITIZATION Titles from the SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series were digitized by the University of Florida in recognition of those serving in Florida's National Guard, many of whom have given their lives in defense of the State and the Nation.

PAGE 2

FLOR-IDA DEPARlM,ENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS p t
PAGE 3

POST OFFICE BOX 1008 STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE 32085-1008 The Special Archives Publication Series of the Historical Services Division are produced as a service to Florida corrmunities, historians, government agencies, and to any other individuals, h~s~oric~I or genealogical societies, and national or regional_ governmental agencies which find the information contained he~ein of use or value. At present, copies of al I Special Archives Pub! ications are provided to certain state and national historical repositories at no charge. A nominal fee is charged al I other individuals and institutions to help defray production costs. Information about the series is avai fable from the Historical Services Division, Department of Mi I itary Affairs, State Arsenal, St. Augustine, Florida. Robert Hawk Director

PAGE 4

PREFACE The mater i a I contained in this archives pub I i cation represents the raw research data gathered on the individual fatal casualties from Alachua County, Florida during the Second World War. It is to be Part 11 of a book which wi 11 include many photographs of individual casualties, their ships, plane types, and unit crests. Part I wi I I be a narative survey of the county and its people during the war with stories about the war services some of its more famous sons and daughters in addition to interesting tales from the "home front." This material is provided solely for the research use of historians, archivists and genealogists. Al I rights are retained by the authors, Harlan Trofholz and Robert Hawk of Gainesvi I le and St. Augustine, Florida respectively.

PAGE 5

INTRODUCTION A government decision to "centralize" mi I itary personnel records during the 1950's should have made research into the I ives and careers of Alachua County's war casualties a simple task. Unfortunately, the resulting Mi I itary Personnel Records Center in St. Louis is terribly understaffed and, more importantly, a fire set by a misguided protester in 1973, destroyed a vast amount of accumulated personnel records associated with the Second World War. Some information is avai !able from other sources. The U.S. Marine Historical Center in Washington keeps files on al I casualties. The Naval Historical Center has information on former officers. Both can provide detailed unit histories. The Army's Casualty (now Mortuary) Support Division in Alexandria can obtain considerable information on individual casualties. The Air Force Historical Center in Montgomery was able to provide extremely interesting unit information. The National Archives was able to help with copies of Missing Air Crew Reports on a number of our individual casualties. Much information, some less than absolutely reliable, was obtained from articles in the Gainesvi I le Sun, the principle Alachua County newspaper. Bits and pieces of information was elicited from the few relatives of casualties we contacted and even a I ittle from the old yearbooks of the University of Florida. Unfortunately, the scattered location and diversified nature of the information meant some entries consist of I ittle more than the names while others are quite complete and detailed. Hopefully more information wi I I turn up in the future and a more complete version of this I ist can be produced. When we began this project two years ago, we had no idea how long it would last and comp! icated it would become. It began as a I abor of honor and and genera I interest and became a I abor of love. The war happened a long time ago and most contemporary Americans have no interest in, or understanding of, that time. But these young men from our county who gave their I i ves in that war should not be forgotten. Their story deserves to be told. So far as we were able to discover, here it is.

PAGE 6

FATAL CASUALTIES; ALACHUA COUNTYL FLORIDA WORLD WAR I I HARMON PRICE ALDERMAN ALTA PAUL ASHURST, JR. JACK CLINTON BACHLOTTE WILLIAM D. BALLOU JAMES PAUL BANKS JAMES BECK ERNEST WILMER BELL WILLIAM F. BENNAFIELD PLEMON BENNEFIELD ROBERT TYRIE BENTON T. HARPER BEVILLE JAMES LYNN BILLINGTON DALTON L. BLACKBURN ROBERT CHARLES BOWERS, JR. STEPHEN L. BOYLES JOSEPH PLUMMER BROOKS ROBERT E. BROWN SIDNEY A. BRUCE GORDON DUWARD CADY JOHN L. CAMERON JULIAN C. CANNON LOUIS T. CARR CURTIS E. CATON JOSEPH NOWLIN CHAMBERLAIN JOHNS. CHAPMAN JOHN GORDON CHAPPELL CLEMENT M. CLAPP GEORGE BRUMLEY CLARKE ROBERT H. COLGAN WALTER E. COOTER JACK CRAFT JOHN W. CULLEN, JR. WILLIAM E. CULP, JR. LEROY DE BOSE JAMES W. DEGRAFF JESSE W. DIXON JAMES E. EASTMOOR SAMUEL A. EGGERS SEALS WORTH FAGAN CURTIS FOUNTAIN ALFONSO E. FRANKLIN CHARLES HUGO GILBER~, JR. LUCIAN 8. GRAY LORIN A. GREEN GEORGE MCMILLAN GUY RAYMOND JEFFERSON HAGEN GEORGE Q. HALBROOK WILBUR EUGENE HALL BERNARD H. HEIDENFELDER RALPH JAMES HENDERSON GEORGE P. HENDRIX, JR. HARRY F. HENDRY, JR. WILLIAM THOMAS HOGE ARTHUR M. HOLDER SAMUEL DODD HOLMES, JR. LEROY S. HUNT WALLACE JONES JR. FRANCIS D. JORDAN LESTER PERRY KARR IRA DELL KEENE BENJAMIN W. (JACK) KIMMEL WILMER M. KNIGHT CARLL. LATOUR ROBERT A. LAYNE T. ALEXANDER LIVINGSTON THOMAS LARRY MARKHAM DELL MARTIN HUGH WILLIAM MCCAIN GROVER WALTER MCCALL, JR. WILLIAM RANDALL MCCALL ROBERT SYBOTEN MCCOOK WILLIE MCCRAY JR. RICHARD Z. MCDERMOTT ROBERT G. MCDONNELL JOHN F. MELLOR REGINALD HYMAN (BUDDY) MILLER MEREDITH M. (SPARKY) MILLS, JR. JAMES CALEB MOTT VIRGINIUS C. MURPHREE ALBERT LEA NELSON HARRY H. NICHOLS JAMES WALTER PATTERSON ROBERT J. PHILLIPS CHARLES W. PINHOLSTER VAN 8. PORCHER LEONARD R. RAINEY LEO D. RAMOS ANDREW RICHARDSON JACKSON C. RICHARDSON WILSON BLOOM RIPPEY JAMES REXALL ROBINSON JOHN LEE SAUNDERS JR. RUDOLPH A. SCHUMAN EWART T. SCONIERS JOHNS. SHARP I I JOHN W. SMALLBONES CHARLES WILLIAM SMITH WILLIAM A. (BILLY) SMITH ALBERT LEA SNOWDEN WILLIAM A. SNOWDEN BYRON EDDY SPARKS LOREN P. STEWART PAUL M. STULTS RICHARD LEE STULTS

PAGE 7

MOSBY. G. TAYLOR, JR. JOSEPH PINK THOMPSON CHARLES GORDON TISON LOUIS A. TOWSON LEONARD W. VAUGHN LEVIE EDWARD VAUSE HARRISON B. WALTON WILLIAM CECIL WEIL RICHARD WALSH WELLS HANS A.E. WENZEL JAMES DARNELL WESTMORELAND JR. JOSEPH R. WHALEY WILMON PHILLIP WHEELER JULIAN BRYANT WILKERSON HOWARD THACKER WILLIAMS WILBUR W. WILLIS ORMAN RUDOLPH WIMMER JOE GARRETT WINSTON EMORY C. WOOTEN WESLEY W. WORTHINGTON JR. MARION M. ZETROUER CHARLES A. ZINKIL JR.

PAGE 8

In his History of Alachua Co~nty, Florida, Jesse Davis included a I ist of more than eighty names of county casualties for World War I I. This I ist is identical with that provided by the American Legion. Research has shown it is not complete. ALDERMAN, Harmon Price BACHLOTTE, Jack Clinton BANKS, James Paul BECK, James BELL, Ernest W. BENEFIELD, Plemon BENNAFIELD, Wi I I iam BENTON, Robert Tyrie BEVILLE, Theo Harper BILLINGTON, James Lynn BOWERS, Robert Charles BOYLES, Stephen BROWN, Robert E. BRUCE, Sidney A. CAMERON, John L. CANNON, Ju I i an CARR, Louis CHAMBERLIN, Joseph Nowlin CHAPMAN, John S. CHAPPELL, John G.? CLAPP, Clement COOTER, Walter E. CULLEN, John W. CU LP, W i I I i am E. DIXON, Jesse W. EASTMOOR, James E. EGGERS, Samuel GUY, George McMi I Ian HAGAN, Raymond J. HALBROOK, George Q. HAWLEY (or Haley), Frank HEIDENFELDER, Bernard H. HENDERSON, Ralph James HENDRY, Harry F. HOGUE, Wi I I iam Thomas HOLDER, Arthur Maryland KARR, Lester Peter KEENE, Ira D. KIMMEL, B. W. "Jack" KNIGHT, W i I mer LAYNE, Robert A. LEW I S , M i I ton MARKHAM, Thomas Larry McCAIN-, Hugh Wi I Iiams McCALL. Grover Walter McDERMOTT, Richard Ziemer MILLER, Reginald "Buddy" MOON, Solomon DeBeau MOTT, James Caleb PATTERSON, James Walter RAINEY, Leonard Rhodes RAMOS, Leo Dionsion RICHARDSON, Jackson Col I ins ROBINSON, James Rexal I SAUNDERS, John Lee Jr. SMITH, Wi I I iam Arthur SNOWDEN~ Albert Leo SNOWDEN, Wi I I ia~ A. SPARKS, Byron Eddy STEWART, Loren Prescott STULTS, Paul M .. STULTS, Richard L. TAYLOR,. Mosby Jr. THOMPSON, Joseph Pink .TI SON, Char I i e Gordon TONGE, Samuel Davis TOWSON, Louis Albert VAUSE, Levie Edward WALTON, Harrison B. Jr. WE IL, W i I I i am Cec i I WELLS, Richard Walsh WENZEL, Hans A. E. WESTMORELAND, James D. WHEELER, Wi lmon Phi I I ips WILKERSON, Julian Bryant W I LL I S , W i I bur WILLIAMS, Howard T. WIMMER, Ormond Rudolf WINSTON, Joe Garrett WOOTEN, Emory C.

PAGE 9

Shortly fol lowing the end of the war, the Army released an un-official I ist of 59 men accredited to Alachua County, Florida. Most have been identified and can be associated with the county but the men I isted below cannot be confirmed to have an Alachua County connection. Nearly al I of them appear accredited to other Florida counties in the official War Department I ist of late 1946. ANDREW, Richard COMEAUX, Dal lard L. GREEN, Clyde L. HARVEY, Bas i I HOOD, Lonnie JOHNSON, Thomas V. MILLS, Archibald S. Jr. OLIVER, Bradley C. PREVATT, James P. Jr. RAY, James N. RILEY, Leonard J. SMITH, James E. STRAUM, Vernon K. SWEAT , E I I i s J WILLETT, Claire V. WILLIAMS, Carl

PAGE 10

.. HARMON PRICE ALDERMAN Chief Radioman, U.S. Navy U.S.S. Houston (CA 30) Died, 28 November 1942, Zontsuj i, Japan while a prisoner of war Harmon Alderman was raised in Melrose, Florida, graduating from Melrose High School in 1927. Immediately after graduation, he joined the naval service. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Virginia , widow and Robert B. Alderman, son, both of Long Beach, California, H. Guy Alderman, father, Dolly Price, maternal grandmother, George M. Alderman, brother, Frances Alderman, sister, al I of Melrose, Florida, two brothers, Eddie L. and Emory R. in the Army and Wyman 0. Alderman, brother, Navy. The heavy cruiser Houston was commissioned in 1930. Prior to the outbreak of war with Japan, the ship had spent most of its operational I ife in Far Eastern waters. On 7 December 1941, the Houston was the flagship of the US Asiatic fleet based in the Phi 11 ipine Islands. lrrmediately dispatched to Australia, she soon joined other Al I ied ships to become part of the ABDA (American-British-Dutch-Australian) fleet which would attempt to prevent the Japanese conquest of the Dutch East Indies. During January and February of 1942, the Houston helped convoy transports and provided anti-aircraft protection to un-armed ships. In the Battle of the Java.Sea, 26-27 February, the Houston was one of two surviving crusiers from the ABDA fleet. The fol lowing day, the two ships attacked massive Japanese naval forces in the Banten Str. of western Java. In a furious contest lasting into the early hours before dawn the next day, the two al I ied cruisers sank a minesweeper and severly damaged several other Japanese ships but was mortally damaged by numerous torpedo hits. The survivors from the Houston were Batavia, Java and Changi Camp, Singapore. sent to Japan where he subsequently died. wounds, i I I ness or Japanese ma I treatment i ntered , first in Alderman's group was Whether from injuries, is not known. It is not known if his remains were recovered after the war. Harmon Alderman was eligible for the fol lowing medals and decor, Purple Heart Navy Good Conduct Medal Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon American Defense Service Medal Asiatic-Pacific Service Medal Phi I I i pine Defense Ribbon Victory Medal

PAGE 11

ALTA PAUL ASHURST, JR. Private First Class, U.S. Army 34 547 141 Company F, 142nd Infantry Regiment 36th Infantry Division (Texas National Guard) Died of Wounds 28 August 1944 near Crest, France Alta Paul Ashurst, Jr. was born 13 September 1923 in Gainesvi I le, Florida. He grew up and attended schools in that city. On the eve of the war, he and his parents moved to Cocoa, Florida. At the time of his death, his next of kin were; Alta Paul and Eva Ageneta Ashurst, 134 01 ive St., Cocoa, Florida George A. Barber of Gainesvi I le, Florida, Maternal uncle. Pfc. Ashurst served with the 36th Division in North Africa, Sicily, and Italy including Salerno, Naples-Foggia (including Cassino), Anzio, Rome-Arno campaigns. He landed with his division in the south of France on the 15th of August, 1944. In cooperation with other American and French units, the 36th Division pushed up the Rhone River valley against retreating German forces. A savage German counter-attack on the 25th of August was contained by the 27th and the American and French advance continued. It was during the battles associaterd with the German counter-attack that Pfc. Ashurst received the wounds from which he succumed on the 28th of the month. Fol lowing his death, Alta Ashurst's remains were interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Draguignan, France. After the war, he was returned to the United States and re-interred in Pinecrest Cemetery, Cocoa, Florida. He is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing decorations, medals, and awards: Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal European Theater Campaign Medal with two arrowheads and four bronze stars Victory.Medal Combat Infantryman Award ..

PAGE 12

JACK CLINTON BACHLOTTE Radioman 2nd Class, U.S. Navy ki I led in action, sometime summer of 1943, Solomon Islands area, Southwest Pacific Jack Baclotte was from Alachua, County, Florida. He entered naval service in May of 1941. He became a radioman-tunnel gunner on a Grumman TBF torpedo plane, assigned to the famous Torpedo Squadron 8 aboard the U.S.S. Saratoga fol lowing the Battle of Midway. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Helen Bailey Bachlotte, mother, Campvi I le, Florida. After the near total personnel losses in the Battle of Midway, Torpedo 8 was re-constituted and -sent, with Jack Bachlotte, to participate in the Solomon Islands campaign , August to December 1942. Service in the squadron with Bachlotte was Corwin Morgan of Gainesvi I le, a TBF pi lot and winner of the Navy Cross. The squadron won its second Presidential Unit Citation for the Solomons battle. The fol lowing year, as Al I ied forces advanced up the Solomon Island chain, Jack Bachlotte was ki I led during a mission, time, ,place and destination unknown. During the Guadalcanal campaign, Torpedo 8 was assigned to the First Marine Air Wing attached to the First Marine Division, operating from Henderson Field, Guadalcanal Island. Their citation reads; "The officers and men of the First Marine Division, Reinforced, (inc I ud i ng Torpedo 8) on August 7 to 9, 1942, demonstrated outstanding gallantry and determination in successfully executing forced landing assaults against a number of strongly defended Japanese positions on Tulagi, Gavutu, Tanambogo, Florida and Guadalcanal, British Solomon Islands, completely routing al I enemy forces and seizing a most valuable base and airfield within the enemy zone of operations in the South Pacific Ocean. From the above period unti I December 9, 1942, this Reinforced Division not only held its important strategic positions despite determined and repeated Japanese naval, air and land attacks, but by a series of offensive operations against strong enemy resistance drove the Japanese from the proximity of the airfield and inf I icted great losses on them by land and air attacks. The courage and determination displayed in these operations was of an inspiring order." After the Guadalcanal Campaign, Torpedo 8 operated from the Saratoga and from landing fields on the islands south of the Solomons. It is not know if Jack Bachlotte's remains were ever recovered but it seems uni ikely. He is known to have been el igibie for the fo I I ow _ i ng meda Is and decor at i ans; Air Meda I Purple Heart American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Presidential Unit Citation

PAGE 13

WILLIAM D. BALLOU Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Corps 34 546 512 319th Bomb Squadron, 90th Bomb Group Ki I led in Action 12 Apri I 1944,New Guinea Wi I I iam Ballou was born 3 March 1924. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Mrs. Thelma H. •Magee, Step-mother of Box 146, Marianna, Florida Julia Boykin, Aunt, Chattahoochee, Florida Elise Dickenson, Aunt, 602 South Sanchez St. Ocala, Florida. Sergeant Ba I I ou en I i sted in Ga i nesv i I I e, FI or i da and was a resident there for an unknown length of time prior to entering mi I itary service. The 90th Bomb Group was part of the Fifth Air Force and was heav i I y engaged during March and Apr i I 1944 attacking Japanese bases and installations in and around Hot landia, New Guinea preparatory to American landings in the area. Sergeant Ballou was ki I led during a major air strike against Hol landia on the 12th of Apri I. Sergeant Bal lou's remains are interred in the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisvi I le, Kentucky. Decorations and medals for which Sergeant Ballou was eligible include; Air Meda I Purple Heart American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 14

JAMES PAUL BANKS Captain, 0 789 132, U.S. Army Air Corps 345th Bomb Group (Medium) Ki I led, aircraft accident, 27 July 1943, Port Moresby, New Guinea James Banks was born 28 October 1918 in Alachua County, Florida. He was raised in High Springs and graduated from High Springs High School. He attended Stetson University for three years and worked at the High Springs Bank prior to entering the mi I itary in May 1941. He received training at Maxwel I Field, Alabama, Avon Park and Augusta, Georgia. He received his wings and commision at Turner Field, Albany, Georgia 29 Apri I 1942. For nearly one year, he was a B-25 flying instructor in Columbia, South Carolina and went overseas with the 345th Bomber Squadron in Apri I of 1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Sidney and Sadie Banks, parents, Betty Banks, sister, Mr. and Mrs. James Paul, grandparents, al I of High Springs, Florida and various near relations in Gainesvi I le and St. Petersburg, Florida. The 345th entered combat in June of 1943, flying from their base at Port Moresby, New Guinea. They attacked Japanese airfields, fortified positions, and shipping on the northern coast of New Guinea, the Bismark Archipelago, the Admiralties and the seas in between. It was when returning from such a mission that Captain Banks's aircraft hit a tree with one wing and was caused to crash. Janes Banks's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Armed Forces Cemetery, Port Moresby, New Guinea and re-interred in the City Cemetery, High Springs, Florida after the war. Captain Banks is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic~Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 15

JAMES BECK Seaman 2nd Class, U.S. Navy Ki I led in action, died of wounds, date place and unit unknown (Reported in news 13 December 1942) At the time of his death his next of kin included; Eliga Beck, Grandfather, Route 1, box 8, Melrose, Florida ERNEST WILMER BELL Captain, U.S. Army 0 462 628 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 25 July 1944 near St. Lo, France Ernest Bell was born 10 May 1917. Originally from Crawfordsvi I le, Florida, he came to Gainesvi I le to attend the University of Florida. He received his AB degree and had completed two years of Law School when he entered mi I itary service 1 July 1942. He had made Gainesvi I le his home and his wife and young son I i ved in the city. Mrs. Cu Ip worked for a local law firm. At the time of Captain Bel I's death, his next of kin included; Veda B.Bel I, widow, Ernest Wilmer Bel I Jr., son, of Gainesvi I le, Florida and Mrs. E. C. Ferrel I, mother, of Crawfordsv i I le, Florida. The 30th Division had been deeply involved in the savage Battles of the Hedgerows in Normandy, France fo I I owing the A I I i ed invasion. After the capture of St. Lo, the American Armies prepared to break through German defensive positions in Normandy. This plan, Operation Cobra, was spear-headed by the 9th and 30th Infantry Divisions. Captain Bel I was ki I led on the first day of the battle. Captain Bel I's remains are permanently interred in the Normandy American Mi I i tary Cemetery, St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France . Ernest Bel I is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 16

WILLIAM F. BENNAFIELD Sergeant, U.S. Army 34 058 562 Headquarters and Service Company, 853rd Aviation Battalion Ki I led in Action, 27 November 1943 Wi I I iam Bennafield was born 28 February 1919. He was ki I led when a passenger aboard the troopship SS Rohna, sunk by enemy action of Dj idjol Ii, Algeria, 27 November 1943. At the time of his death, Sergeant Bennafield's next of kin were; Thelma M. Bennafield (Wife), Henry Wi 11 iam Bennafield (son) and Li 11 ian Bennafield (mother) of 891 West Masonic St. Gainesvi I le, Florida and a sister, Margaret Carter, 32 Gainesvi I le Court, Gainesvi I le, Florida. The 853rd Aviation Batta! ion was enroute from the United States to India via th~ Suez Canal when its troopship was destroyed in action off the North African coast. Wi I I iam Bennafield's remains were not recovered. His name is memorialized on the Wal I of the Missing, North Africa American Mi I itary Cemetery, Carthage, Tunisia. Sergeant Bennaf i e Id is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing decorations and medals: Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal PLEMON BENNEFIELD Seaman 2nd Class, U.S. Navy Ki I led in action or died of wounds, date place and unit unknown At the time of death his next of kin included; Thomas Mitchel I Bennefield, father, Newberry, Florida~

PAGE 17

ROBERT TYRIE BENTON 1st Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps K i I led in action 24 March 1945, near Wesel, Germany Robert Benton was raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida where his father was a professor, later college dean at the University of Florida. (Benton Hal I was named for him) _ Robert graduated from the University Magna Cum Laude in 1935. Subsequently, he was employed by the Mott-Smith Corporation of Houston, Texas and by Socony Vacuum Oi I Company in Venezuela. Benton entered mi I itary service in October of 1942. He received flight, weather and navigator training in Grand Rapids, Michigan . At the time of his death his next , of kin i ncluded; Mrs. J.R. Benton, mother, 1436 West University Avenue, Ga i nesv i I I e, FI or i da and Sergeant' Char I es R. Benton, brother, in mi I itary service. Lieutenant Benton was navigator on a C-47 transport aircraft operating with American airborne infantry units. His aircraft towed g I i ders, made supp I y drops, or parachute infantry for several combat operations in Europe, 1944-1945. He was involved in the invasion of France, the "Market Garden" campaign i n Belgium and Holland and in the assault over the Rhine River in February 1945. On the 24th of March 1945, h i s aircraft received a mortal hit from German defensive fire. The aircraft was seen to be on fire and, although several parachutes were seen, the plane was too low and there were no survivors. They were on a glider mission and had successfully released their charge before being hit. It is not known where Robert Benton's remains are interred. L i eutenant Benton received or is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the following decorations and medals; Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal America~ Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal ..

PAGE 18

T. HARPER BEVILLE Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps Army Air Corps Ferry Command Ki I led, plane crash 5 August 1942 near Detroit, Michigan Harper Bevi I le was born 19 May 1917 in Gainesvi I le, Florida. He was raised in that city and graduated from Gainesvi I le High School in 1935. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Bevi I le, parents, Newberry Road, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Cl arise Estel le Bevi I le, wife, and Jack L. Bevi I le of Meridan, Mississippi. Lieutenant Bevi I le learned to fly as a c ivi I ian and was a civi I ian flying instructor prior to his entry into mi I itary service in March 1942. He was ki 1 led when his fighter aircraft went into a spin at 10,000 feet and his attempt to bai I out at 500 feet was unsuccessful. T. Harper Bevi I le's remains were interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida. Lieutenant Bevi I le is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals; American Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 19

JAMES LYNN BILLINGTON 2nd Lieutenant, 0 810 463, U.S. Army Air Corps 514th Fighter-Bomber Squadron; 407th Fighter-Bomber Group Ki I led in action 24 June 1944, Orval, Normandy, France James Bi I I ington was born 12 January 1923 in Gainesvi I le, Florida. He was raised in that city and graduated from Gainesvi I le High School in 1940. He attended the University of Florida for one year and left his studies to enter mi I itary service 4 June 1942 at Orlando Air Base. He attended pre-flight at Maxwel I Army Base, Alabama and flight school with the 61st Flying Training Detachment, Avon P~rk, Florida, receiving his wings in 1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Bi I I i ngton, parents, Pame I a Hai re Bi I I i ngton, widow, Pamelan Lynn Bi I I ington, daughter, al I of Gainesvi I le, Florida and six sisters, most of whom also I ived in Gainesvi I le. The 514th Fighter-Bomber Squadron flew P-47 fighter aircraft and arrived in England in early 1944. The squadron was heavily engaged in pre-invasion and invasion support missions over the Normandy Peninsula in France. They supported U.S. and British ground forces on D-Day, the 6th of June and during the bitter beachead battles that fol lowed. On the 17th of June, Lieutenant Bi 11 ington's aircraft was hit by enemy fire, he was slightly wounded and forced to bai I-out of his aircraft over the English Channel. On the 24th, he volunteered for a special mission against German positions and transportation in the vicinity of St. Lo, France. Two squadrons were involved; they first dive-bombed railway and road bridges in the vicinity of Hyeavi I le, France. Moderate enemy anti-aircraft fire was encountered, including considerable fire from a wooded area southeast of La Laude. Lieutenant Bi I I ington's aircraft was observed to take hits while at a low altitude, go into a tight spin and crash with an attendant explosion. The canopy of his aircraft remained closed and no parachute was observed. James 8 ! I I i ngton 's remains were recovered and are interred in the St. Augustine National Cemetery, St. Augustine, Florida. Lieutenant Bi I I i ngton is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart with cluster Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medfal Victory _Medal

PAGE 20

DALTON L. ~ BLACKBURN 2nd Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps 0 804 779 Station No. 6, South Atlantic Wing, Air Transport Corrmand Died in an airplane crash at sea between Ascension Island and Liberia, West Africa, 4 May 1944 At the time of his death, Lieutenant Blackburn's next of kin was; Mrs. Georgia Edwards Blackburn, mother, of Hawthorn, Florida. Lieutenant Blackburn's remains were not recovered. His name is memorialized on the Wal I of the Missing, North African American Mi I i tary Cemetery, Carthage, Tun i _ s i a. Medals Dalton Blackburn is known to have been eligible for include; European Campaign Medal American Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 21

ROBERT CHARLES BOWERS, JR. Technical Sergeant, 14 077 155, U.S. Army Air Corps 339th Bomb Squadron, 96th Bomb Group (Heavy) Ki I led in action 25 August 1944 over Polnitz, Germany Robert Bowers was born 15 November 1910 in Gainesville, Florida. He graduated from Gainesvi I le High School and attended the University of Florida. In 1935, he married the former Miss Sonia Eddins of Gainesvi I le and worked as a salesman for Baird Hardware Company. Bowers joined the Florida Defense Force 11 September 1941 and entered federal service 7 March 1942. He originally trained as a gl icier pi lot at Big Springs, Texas and Roswel I, New Mexico but was later trained as a radio operator at Sou ix Fat Is, South Dakota and Yuma, Arizona. He received his final training as a heavy bom~~r crew member at Drew Field, Tampa, Florida and was sent overseas in July 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs Robert C. Bowers, Sr., Box 4640, Jacksonvi I le, Florida, parents, (formerly of Gainesvi I le), Sonia Jeanette Bowers, widow, 1011 East Boundry Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida. The 339th Bomber Squadron had been in Europe since mid-1943. Sergeant Bowers and his fellow crewmen of the 8-17 had flown three previous combat missions pr ior to the mission to Polnitz; Mulhouse and Paris, France, and Ludwiggshaven, Germany. The mission of 25 August involved over 1,100 American heavy bombers in strikes against German experimental sites, aircraft plants and targets of opportunity. Sergeant Bowers's aircraft received a direct hit from German Anti-aircraft fire and exploded violently. One er ewman, the ba I I turret gunner survived and became a prisoner of war. Robert Bowers's remains were recovered and temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Neuvi I le-en-Condroz, Belgium and re-interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida after the war. Sergeant Sowers is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 22

STEPHEN L. BOYLES Private, U.S. Army 34 912 684 Company A, 318th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division Kil led in Action 10 Feburary 1945 Wal lendorf, Germany Stephen Boyles . ~as born 20 December 1911. At the time of his death, his next of kin were; Martha G. Boyles, widow, Stephen L. and Nel I E. Boyles, children. Al I resided in Island Grove, Florida. The 80th Infantry Division was part of the Third Army. Its first major action was in assisting in -the defeat of the Germans in the Falaise Gap. Subsequently, the division . took part in the battles for Northern France and later, the Battle of the Bulge. Once the Germans had been e I im i nated from the Bu I ge, the division assaulted the West Wal I, the ela~6rate defenses of Germany itself. It was during the assault on the German border defenses that Private Boyles was ki I led. Private Boyles's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery in Harrrn, Germany. After the war he was re-interred in the Barrancas National Cemetery, Pensacola, Florida. Decorations and medals Stephen Boyles is known to have been e I i g i b I e for inc I ude; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 23

JOSEPH PLUMMER BROOKS Soundman 1st Class, U.S. Naval Reserve U.S.S. COOPER (DD 695) Ki I I ed in action, 3 December 1944, Ormoc Bay, Leyte, Phi I I i pine Islands At the time of his death, the parents of Joseph Brooks, Mr. and Mrs. R.L. Brooks, I ived in Montbrook, Florida although it is be! ieved they, and he, I ived for some years in Alachua County and that Joseph attended schoo I in the county. It is fairly certain Plummer had served on other ships prior to joining the COOPER in March 1944 upon the ship's co~missioning. The COOPER sailed from Boston to Hawaii and from there to UI ithi where she became truly operation~! during the early naval battles in the waters around Leyte Island, the Phi 11 ipines fol lowing American landings there. On the 2nd of December, the COOPER, •with two other destroyers, was sent to attack Japanese shipping in Ormoc Bay, Leyte. Entering action at almost exactly midnight, the three American ships engaged a number of Japanese ships in a furious gun duel. At least two Japanese ships, a destroyer loaded with troops and a destroyer escort, were destroyed but not before the COOPER was hit amidships by an enemy torpedo. The COOPER exploded, broke in half, turned on its side and sank in less than one minute. Due to the presence in enemy-contra I I ed waters, it was not unti I many hours later American Cata I ina "Black Cats" rescue aircraft were able to pick up the COOPER'S survivors. Plummer was not among those saved. Plummer's remains were not recovered. He is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Phi 11 ipine Liberation Ribbon

PAGE 24

ROBERT E. BROWN Captain, 0421 626, U.S. Army Air Corps 74th Fighter Squadron, 23rd Fighter Group Ki I led in action, 27 December 1944, near Canton, China Robert Brown was 27 years old at the time of his death. He was from Atlanta, Georgia and had atteded Georgia Tech University. He worked for the Westinghouse Corporation and married the former Martha Golden of Gainesvi I le, Florida. Brown joined the Army in 1940 and earned his wings and commission in class 41-E, Kelly Field, Texas. After a tour of duty in the Panama Canal Zone, he served in combat with the Fifth Air Force in New Guinea during 1943, returning to the U.S. and instructor duty at Tampa Florida. Requesting a second term of overseas duty, he was sent to the 23rd Fighter Group in China in July of 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Martha Brown, widow, Gainesvi I le, Florida and Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Brown , parents, 811 Virginia Circle, Atlanta, Georgia. The 23rd Fighter Group, df which the 74th Fighter Squadron was a part, were formed in China based on the previously existing "Flying Tigers" or pre-war American Volunteer Group commanded by General Claire Chenault. In the fal I of 1944, the Japanese had launched a massive ground offensive against unoccupied areas of south-central China, leaving an isolated al I ied-control led area to the east_ of their positions. The 74th Fighter Squadron and a few other detachments operated offesively against Japanese troops and positions from within the pocket, being re-"-suppl ied by air. On the 27th of December, a major attack was directed at the Japanese air fields in the Canton, China area. Some enemy air craft attempted to resist and there was a moderate amount of anti-aircraft fire. Captain Brown, leader of a flight, was not seen to go down. Subsequently, a report was received from Chinese guerri I las in the area of finding Brown's aircrafton the ground, having received some damage but having crash-landed saely. However, Captain Brown was apparenly shot by the Japanes wh i I e st i I I in his cockpit. The Chinese buried his body and marked it with stones. His remains were never recovered. Robert Brown is known to have received or been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing decorations and medals; Distinguished Flying Cross Air Medal with clusters Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Distinguished Unit Citation Ribbon ..

PAGE 25

SIDNEY A. BRUCE Private, U.S. Army 6 973 664 . 3712th Quartermaster Truck Company Died 7 August 1945 Sossenheim, Germany Sidney Bruce wa~ born 20 March 1921. He was a resident of Gainesvi I le, Florida at the time he entered military service. At the time of his death, his next of kin included Ira Hampton Bruce, widow, and Sidney M. Bruce, son, both of 726 East Union Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Beatrice Aaron Bruce, mother, Box 232, Covington, Georgia and James D. Bruce, brother Route 1, Box 368, Atlanta, Georgia. Private Bruce's remains were temporarily.interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Margraten, Hofland and were re-interred in the Covington Cemetery, Covington, Georgia after the war. Private Bruce is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing r Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 26

GORDON DUWARD CADY Commander, U.S. Navy Corrmanding Officer, Fighting Squadron Eleven Ki I led, 30 August 1944, air crash, Pacific area, not involving combat with the enemy Gordon Cady was born 2 March 1913 in Port Huron, Michigan. He was raised in that city and attended Port Huron Junior College. Later he attended the University of Florida, graduating in 1935 with a degree in engineering. He entered naval service 10 August 1935 and in October, was appointed a naval aviation cadet. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Carolyn Virginia Cady, widow (formerly Sikes of Gainesville, FI or i da) , and Marci a Anne Cady, daughter, I iv i ng in San Di ego, California, Mary Catherine Cady, mother, 1820 Military Street, Port Huron Mic~igan, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Sikes, In-laws, 335 West Orange Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida. He became a Naval Aviator 3 November 1936 and received an award as the outstanding aviation cadet for fiscal year 1937.Assigned to Fighting Squadron Three aboard the U.S.S. Saratoga in November 1936, he served with that ship unti I early 1941, except for a stint of duty at the Naval Reserve Air Base, Grosse Isle, Michigan in 1938. During 1941, Cady, now a Lieutenant (JG), saw service under orders from the Chief of Naval Operations, with the Asiatic Fleet, and as an observer~ with British forces at Singapore, Straits Settlement. When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, he was serving as an observer in Wei I ington, New Zeeland. Cady returned to duty with Fighting Squadron Eleven in September 1942. He served with the unit unti I July 1943 and was then involved in fitting out Composite Squadron Sixty-nine in Seattle, Washington. From September 1943 unti I August 1944, he commanded the squadron. On the 1 of August, Cady was detached for further duties with a carrier task force and was ki I led in a plane crash. Commander Cady's remains were not recovered. Cady had received a Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal and Presidential Unit Citation "for heroism and extraordinary and meritorious achievement in aerial flight." Commander Cady was eligible for the fol lowing medals and decora : Distinguished Flying Cross Air Meda I Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 27

JOHN L. CAMERON Private First Class, U.S. Army 34 794 416 359th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 8 Feburary 1945 Winterspelt, Germany John Cameron was born 1 July 1914. He grew up in Alachua County and attended Micanopy High School. At the time he entered service, he had been working for Stringfellow Supply Company of Gainesvi I le. He received military training at Camp Selby, Mississippi. At the time of his death, he had been in the Army for 18 months and overseas for 9 months. His next of kin includtd; James I. Cameron, father, 1732 West University Avenue and Patty Cameron, 507 N. Pleasant Street, both in Gainesvi I le, Florida. The 90th Infantry Division was part of the Third Army and in Feburary of 1945, was involved in the bitter fighting associated with breaching the West Wal I defenses on Germany's western border. It was during the difficult struggle to eliminate German pi I I box fortifications near Habscheid, Germany that Private Cameron was ki I led. Private Cameron's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Foy, Belgium and were re-interred in the Mackintosh Cemetery, Mackintosh, Florida after the war. Private Cameron is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 28

JULIAN C. CANNON Corporal, U.S. Army 34 051 430 804th Tank Destroyer Batta I ion Attached, 34th Infantry Division Ki I I ed in Action, 30 June 1944 near Sienna, I ta I y Julian Cannon was born 1ooctober 1908. He and his family were Gainesvi I le, Florida residents. Prior to his entry into mi I itary service, Corporal Cannon was a guard at the state convict camp at t . he farm co I any near Ga i nesv i I I e. At the time of his death, Corporal Cannon's next of kin included; Annie Newel I Cannon, mother, 208 South Roper Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida and Christine C. Bone, sister, General Delivery, Williston, Florida. Fol lowing the fal I of Rome, the American Fifth Army advanced into northern Italy against strong German opposition. The 34th Infantry Division , with attached units including the 804th Tank Destroyer Batta! ion and the 442nd Infantry Regiment attacked strong German pas it ions in and around Sienna, I ta I y. It was during the battle for that northern Italian city that Corporal Cannon was ki I led. Corporal Cannon's remains were not recovered and his name is memo r i a I i zed on the Wa I I of the M i s s i n g , F I ore n c e Amer i can Mi I i tary Cemetery, FI orence, I ta I y. Decorations and medals to which Corporal Cannon is known to have been e I i g i b I e for inc I ude; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Theater Medal Victory _ Medal

PAGE 29

LOUIS T. CARR Private First Class, U.S. Army 34 798 829 121st Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 14 August 1944 , at Dinnard, France Louis Carr was born 29 January 1919. He was a long time resident of Gainesvi I le, Florida and worked for the Gainesvi I le Sun newspaper prior to his entry into military service. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Hazel A. Carr, widow, his son, both of 932 East Main Street, and W i I I i am C . Car r , f a the r , Ro u t e 3 , 8 ox 1 8 1 , Ga i n es v i I I e , Florida. After the breakout from the hedgerow country of the Normandy Beachead, the 8th Infantry Division was sent into the Brittany Peninsula. On the 14th of August, the division joined in the assault on the German fortress of St. Malo. It was during the struggle for Dinnard, an strongly defended outpost of St. Malo that Louis Carr was ki I led. Louis Carr's remains are interred in the Britany American Mi I itary Cemetery, St. James, France. Decorations and medals to which Louis Carr is known to have been elegible for include; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 30

CURTIS E. CATON Captain, 0 325 838, U.S. Army Air Corps 13th Ferry Squadron Ki I led in action 2 November 1942 near Pingi, China Curtis Caton was born 31 December 1912. He graduated from Gainesvi I le High School and attended the University of Florida, both in Gainesvi I le, Florida. At the time of his death his next of kin included Mr. and Mrs. E.L. Caton, parents, Montgomery, Alabama (formerly of Gainesvi I le, Florida), and Audrey Allen Caton, widow, 404 Glen Grattan, Montgomery, Alabama. Apparently, Captain Caton was attached to the China Air Task Force when he was ki I led by enemy action in China. Curtis Caton's remains were temporarily interred in the American Mi I itary Cemetery, Kunming, China and re-interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, Honolulu, Hawaii after the war. Captain is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal Purple Heart American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 31

JOSEPH NOWLIN CHAMBERLAIN Chief Water Tender, 268 26 22, U.S. Navy U.S.S. LONG (OMS 12) Died of wounds 20 January 1945 received 6 January when his ship was sunk by Japanese suicide plane off Linguyan Gulf, Phi I I i pine Is I ands Joseph Chamberlain was born 3 March 1918 in Micanopy, Florida. He attended schools there and in G~inesvi I le and was active in sports, playing basebal I with the American Legion Tung Nut team (1932). He had been in the Naval service for ten years at the time of his death and his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. G.S. Chamberlain, parents, Mrs. A.M. Howe I I, Mrs. J.A. Owens, and,.Miss Diane Chamberlain, sisters and Mrs. J.D. Nowlin, maternal grandmother, al~ from Micanopy, Florida. The LONG was a Destroyer, originally launched in 1919 and converted to a fast minesweeper during 1940-41. Chamberlain was a member of the ships crew for the entire war unti I its loss in 1945. When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, the LONG was delivering supplies to Johnston Island. Later, the ship participated in the sea battles around Gu•dalcanal, the Aleutian Islands, Kwajalein, Admiralty Islands, Palaus and New Guinea. The LONG then helped sweep mines for the invasion and subsequent battles for Leyte Island in the central Phi 11 ipines. Attached to the pre-invasion force preparing for the American landings at Lingayen Gulf, northern Luzon, it was while sweeping for mines that the LONG was hit and sunk by Japanese suicide planes. At 0845 the morning of 6 January, the Long and accompanying ships began to sweep for mines in the Gui f. Almost immediately, Japanese aircraft initiated attacks against the American ships. One dropped bombs at the LONG but these missed close aboard. at 1215, a lone enemy aircraft succeeded in penetraing the LONG'S defenses and crashed with great violence into the port side, almost amidships. The order was given to abandon ship and the survivors were picked up by the U.S. S. HOVEY (OMS 11). The der i I i ct LONG was struck by another s u i c i de p I an e and sunk I ate r that day . The f o I I ow i n g morning, the HOVEY too was hit and sunk by a Japanese Torpedo. Its survivors, and those of the _ LONG were transfered to other ships. Chamberlain was taken aboard the U.S.S. CALIFORNIA and treated _ for severe burns. Later taken to Hol landia, New Guinea, he died of his wounds.

PAGE 32

Joseph Chamberlain was recommended for, and his next of kin received, the Si Iver Star, by the Long's commander, Lieutenant S. Caplan, U.S.N.R. It read as follows; "On 6 January 1945, the U.S.S. LONG (DMS 12) during the LINGAYEN GULF OPERATIONS was hit by a Japanese plane on~the port side below the bridge with a very severe flame flashing across the wel I deck, over the galley deck house, and through the galley deck house passageways, with.topside ammunition on the wel I deck and galley deck house exploding. CWT Joseph CHAMBERLAIN, USN, was standing in the starboard.galley deck house passageway. When the plane hit the ship, he protected three men from the flames by using his own body as a shield. Although he was exposed to the fire and was being severely burnt, CWT Joseph CHAMBERLAIN, USN, maintained his position and continued to protect the men unti I the passageway was cleared and the men were able to escape. CWT CHAMBERLAIN, USN, sustained third degree burns on his hands, arms, I egs, chest and back. As bad I y hurt as he was he attempted to fight the fire, running out fire hose. Seventeen hours later, 0500 7 January, CWT Joseph CHAMBERLAIN, USN, who was aboard the U.S.S. HOVEY (DMS 11) when it was torpedoed and sunk. He was unable to swim due to his injuries, but managed to get into the water by himself and was assisted to a life raft by the Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. -HOVEY. As badly injuried as he was he refused to go aboard the I ife raft so that others could use it, and assisted in maintaining morale and discipline among the men on the Ii fe raft." Chamberlain's remains were temporarily interred in the American Cemetery at Hol landia, New Guinea and re-interred in the Micanopy Cemetery, Micanopy, Florida after the war. Joseph Chamberlain was eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Si Iver Star Purple Heart Navy Good Conduct Medal American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Phi 11 ipine Liberation Ribbon

PAGE 33

JOHNS. CHAPMAN 1st Lieutenant, 0 728 255, U.S. Army Air Corps 407th Bomb Suadron, 92nd ~omb ' Group Ki I led in action 6 September 1943, Couchy-sur-Canche, France. John Chapman was born 23 September 1919 in Newberry, Florida. He was raised in that city and graduated from Newberry High School in 1938. He attended the University of Florida but left his studies to enter mi I itary service in July 1941. He received his bombadier _ wings in early 1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Chapman, parents, Newberry, Florida and Lieutenant Bi I ly Chapman, U.S.N., Lt. Colonel A.K. Chapman, brothers, both , in mi I itary servic::e. The 407th Bomb Squadron had been in England since August of 1942 and in combat operations over Europe since May 1943. The remainder of 1943 witnessed many missions for the squadron over France and Germany, most of them without fighter escorts and many of them costly in lost American aircraft and crews. The August raids against Schweinfurt and Regensburg bal I-bearing plants had been especially costly. The raid of 6 September was the largest American bomber raid of the war to that date with 407 heavy bombers dispatched against strategic targets in Stuttgart, Germany. German fighters and anti-aircraft fire was savage and forty-five American bombers were lost. Lieutenant Chapman's aircraft had received battle damage and, on the return flight to England, was observed to be on fire amidships. At 16,500 feet over northern France near Amiens, one wing broke off the 8-17 aircraft. Five crewmen were seen to exit the aircraft; one parachute failed to open and one was on fire. One crewman survived to become a prisoner-of-war in Germany. After the war, John Chapman's remains were recovered and interred i n Forest Lawn Cemetery, Charlotte, North Carolina. Lieu tenant Chapman is known to have received and/or been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Distinguished Flying Cross Air Medal with 2 oak leaf clusters Purple Heart with 1 oak leaf cluster Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 34

JOHN GORDON CHAPPELL Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army 34 247 556 Coast Arti I lery died, Cerrebral Hemorrhage, 30 March 1944 Key West, Florida John Chappel I ~as born 4 March 1916 in Alachua County, Florida and I ived there al I his I ife prior to his entry into military service. He graduated from High Springs High School. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Chappel I, parents, High Springs, Florida Lieutenant Donald B. Chappel I, brother,Air Corps, Natal, Brazi I J.C. Chappel I, brother, Lake ParK, Florida Mrs. Ruth C. Prince, sister, Tampa, Mrs. Maude Adams, sister, Micanopy, and Mrs. Ethel Burke, Gainesvi I le, Florida. Sergeant Chappel I was in charge of Telephone communications at the Key West, Florida Coastal Arti I lery base at the time of his death. He had been in the Army approximately 18 months. He was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Medals Sergeant Chappel I was known to be eligible for include; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 35

CLEMENT M. CLAPP First Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps Ki I led, aircraft accident, 8 July 1945, Pueblo, Colorado At the time of his death, Lieutenant Clapp's next of kin included; Pauline Carter Clapp, wife and Mrs. Al ice Clapp Brown, aunt, both of Gainesvi I le, Florida, Sergeant Edwin T. Clapp, brother, enroute home from overseas. Lieutenant Clapp was a veteran of 35 air missions over Germany in a 8-17 Heavy Bomber Squadron. He had been re-assigned to Maxwel I Field, Alabama and was in Colorado undergoing a special navigator's course when ki I led. Lieutenant Clapp was known to have been eligible for the fol lowing decorations and medals; Distinguished Flying Cross Air Medal with three oak leaf clusters American Campaign Medal European Theater Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 36

GEORGE BRUMLEY CLARKE Captain, U.S. Army 0 393638 460th Parachute Field Arti I lery Died, Misadventure, suicide, 2 Feburary 1946, Norwalk, Connecticut George Clarke was born 27 January 1919 in Gainesvi I le, Florida. He grew up in Gainesvi I le and later graduated from the University of Florida. He had entered mi Ii tary service in June of 1940, attending service schools at Fort Sil I, Oklahoma and Camp Polk, Louisiana. He served overseas from 1943 to 1945, participating in campaigns in Italy, the invasion of southern France and in Belgium and Germany. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Dorothy Spelman Clarke, widow, Fairfield, Conn., Harry H. Clarke, brother, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Lieutenant Edwin M. Clarke, Jacksonvi I le, Florida and Mrs. L.D. Mui I ins, West Palm Beach, Florida. George Clarke was interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida. Captain Clarke is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Bronze Star with Combat V Device Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 37

ROBERT H, COLGAN Technical Sergeant, 34 782 382,U.S. Army Air Corps 603rd Bomb Squadron, 398th Bomb Group Kil led in Action 3 February 1945 at Lehmke, Germany Robert Colgan was born 4 September 1924. At the time of his death his next of kin included Arthur H. and Elsea Colgan, parents, Route i:1, Port Richey, Florida. The late winter of 1945 saw a stepped-up bombing campaign against strategic targets in Germany by the Combined Al I ied Air Forces. On the 3rd of February, over 1,200 American Heavy bombers were dispatched to bomb Ber I in, and transportation synthetic o i I production plants near Magdeburg, Germany. It was during this raid that Sergeant Colgan's plane was destroyed by enemy action. After the war, Robert Colgan's remains were interred in Pine Hi I Cemetery, New Port Richey, Florida. Sergeant Colgan is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; (Air Meda I) Purple Heart Army Coad Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 38

WALTER E. COOTER Private First Class, U.S. Army 33 215 381 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 5 October 1944 near Elst, Holland Walter Cooter was born 29 December 1921. At the time of his death, his next of kin included Chari ie D. and Li I I ie M. Cooter, parents, Route 3, Box 144, Gainesvi I le, Florida. Fol lowing their use in the Market Garden operation in Belgium and southern Hof land, the 101st Airborne Division assumed active defensive positions in Holland. It was during a patrol action within i I I-defined German defensive positions that Walter Cooter was ki I led. Walter Cooter's remains were temorari ly interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Molenhoek, Holland and permanently interred in the Netherlands American Mi I itary Cemetery, Margraten, Holland. Walter Cooter is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing decorations and medals; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 39

JACK CRAFT 1st Lieutenant, U.S. Army Died, 27 July 1944 France (Name appears on the .... I ist of casualties from Alachua County. He is known to have attended Gainesvi I le High School and the University of Florida, both in Gainesvi I le, Florida.) At the time of his death his next of kin included Mr. and Mrs. Fred Craft, parents, West, Mississippi, former residents of Gainesvi I le, Florida. JOHN W. CULLEN, JR. Staff Sergeant, 34 782 386, U.S. Army Air Corps 570th Bomb Squadron, 390th Bomb Group Ki I led in action 14 February 1945 in Belgium. John Cullen was born 29 May 1924 in Hague, Florida. At the time of his death his next of kin included; John W. Sr. and Mae Cullen, Route #2, Box 41, Alachua, Betty Cullen, sister, and Dwight, Larry, and Jody Cullen, brothers, of Hague, Florida. The 570th Bomb Squadron operated B-17 heavy bomber airc~aft with the 8th Air Force. It had been in combat since August of 1943. Sergeant Cullen had completed 27 _combat missions at the time of his death. On the 14th of February, over 1,300 American Bombers attacked Dresden and various important transportation targets of opportunity in Germany. Sergeant Cul I en's aircraft was received damage from enemy action causing it to crash in Belgium during the f I i ght back from the targets. John Cullen's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Henri Chapel le #1, Belgium and re-interred in the Hague Cemetery, Alachua, Florida after the war. Sergeant Cullen is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 40

WILLIAM E. CULP JR. First Lieutenant, U.S. Army 0 1312837 Company A, 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division Died 12 August 1944, of Wounds Received in Action, near Vire, France Wi 11 iam Culp was born 10 Apri I 1919. Originally from New Kensington, Pennsylvania, when stationed at Camp Blanding, Florida, he married a Gainesvi I le woman and cal led Gainesvi I le home.e went overseas in May 1944. At the time of his death, his next of kin included Ruth 8. Culp, widow, 406 East University Avenue, Gainesvi I le, Florida and Wi I I iam E. Sr. and Bessie Culp, 'parents, 1701 Leighman Avenue, Arnold, Pennsylvania. In early August 1944, the 28th Division was corrrnited to help contain and eventually destroy the German forces in the Falaise Pocket, south of the Normandy Peninsula. It was during the heavily contested advance of the division south west of Vire, France that Li~utenant Culp received the wounds that cost him his I i fe. Lieutenant Cul p's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery Le Chene-Guerin, France and re-interred in the Plum Creek, New Texas, Pennsylvania after the war. Lieutenant Culp was known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge LEROY DE BOSE Private, U.S. Army 34 787 190 Died non-battle, date and place unknown (Name appears on the official War Department I ist of casualties from Alachua County)

PAGE 41

JAMES W. DEGRAFF Private, U.S. Army 34 408 936 81st Airborne Arti I lery Batta! ion Ki I led in Action 6 June 1944, Carentan, Peninsula, (Normandy), France James Degraff was born 15 October 1921. At the time of his death his next of ki~ included; Lewis 8. and Hattie Bel I Degraff, parents, of High Springs, Florida. The 81st Airborne Arti I lery was part of the massive U.S. airborne force dropped on the Normandy Pe~insula of France in the early hours of D~Day, the 6th of June 1944. It was in this operation that Private Degraff was ki I led. Private Degraff's remains are interred in the Normandy American Mi I itary Cemetery, St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France. Private Degraff is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medfal Victory Medal

PAGE 42

JESSE W. DIXON Private First Class, U.S. Army 34 792 092 Company A, 13th Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division Ki I led in•Action 9 September 1944 at Brest, France Jesse Dixon was born in Archer, Florida, 17 June 1923 and I ived in the county his entire I ife prior to his induction into mi I itary service September 1943 at Camp Blanding, Florida. At the time of his death his ri~xt of kin included; Newsome C. and Mary L. Dixon, parents, Route 1, Box 27-A, Archer, Florida and Mrs. C.T. Copeland, sister, Archer. Fol lowing the American defeat of the Germans in Normandy, the enemy forts and bases in the Briftany Peninsula were targeted for destruction. In early September of 1944, the 8th Division joined other divisions in the assault and eventual capture of the heavily fortified and defended port of Brest. It was dduring a period of the most savage fighting for that city and its fortifications that Jesse Dixon was ki I led. Private Dixon's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, St. James, France. After the war, he was re-interred in the Laurel Hi I I Cemetery, Archer, Florida. Private Dixon is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing decorations and medals; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 43

JAMES E. EASTMOOR Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps Ki I led, air accident, on or about 15 September 1944, Foster Field, Texas. James Eastmoor ~as born 10 August 1922 in Jacksonvi I le, Florida. He had I ived in Alachua County since 1927. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. N.E. Eastmoor, parents, Gainesvi I le, Florida and Lieutenant Norman E. and Corporal Thomas E. Eastmoor, brothers, both in mi I itary service. James Eastmoor's remains are intered in Alachua County, cemetery unknown. Lieutenant Eastmoor is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 44

SAMUEL A. EGGERS 2nd Lieutenant, 0 794 787, U . . S. Army Air Corps 546th Bomb Squadron, 384th Bomb Group Ki I led in aircraft accident in England 12 June 1943 Samuel Eggers was born 28 March 1918 in Rockwel I City, Iowa. Prior to his entry into military service he made his home in Gainesvi I le, Florida and had graduated from the University of Florida. Subsequently, he worked for the State Road Department and was active in the Gainesvi I le Little Theater. He enlisted in the Florida Defense Force 11 September 1941 and entered Federal service 14 March 1942 . He received his commision as a navigator. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Estel le P. Eggers, widow, 846 East Union Street, Gainesvi I le, and Mr. and Mrs _ . Samuel A. Eggers, Sr., 3435 21st Avenue South, St. Petersburg, both in Florida . The 546th Bomb Squadron flew 8-17 heavy bombers and had arrived in England to begin combat operations only one week prior to the accident which cost Samuel Eggers his I ife. Samuel Eggers remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Brookwood, England and re-interred in Westview Cemetery, Atlanta, Georgia after the war. Lieutenant Eggers is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal SEALS WORTH FAGAN Aviation Cadet, U.S. Navy Ki I led, air accident, 14 May 1944, Pensacola, Florida Son of Seals E. Fagan, former Gainesvi I le, Florida resident

PAGE 45

CURTIS FOUNTAIN Sergeant, U.S. Army 14 064 074 2nd Batta! ion, 5307th Composite Unit, Infantry Kil led in Action 3 Apri I 1944 at Nhpum Ga, Burma Curtis Fountain was born 26 June 1919. He was a long time resident of Gainesvi I le, Florida and was working at the University of FI or i da at the time he entered mi I i tary service. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; S.A. Harvey Fountain, brother, 814 SE Main Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Mary Fountain, sister and Wi I I iam Terri I I, nephew, both residing at Route 3, Jasper, Florida. Sergeant Fountain was a member of the famous Merri I I's Marauders, a unit trained and organized to operate behind enemy I i nes in Burma. As part of Galahad Force, the 5307th campaigned in north-central Burma, Feburary to May 1944. Dur i ng the campaign, the 2nd ba tta I ion was cut off and besieged by the Japanese in Nhpum Ga, Burma. It was during the bitter battles to hold off the enemy that Sergeant Fountain was ki I led. Sergeant Fountain's remains were temporarily interred Mi I itary Cemetery, Nhpum Ga, Burma and was re-interred Ganner Cemetery, Starke, Florida fol lowing the war. in the U.S. in the Sergeant Fountain is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations. Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campa i gn Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medai Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 46

ALFONSO E. FRANKLIN Corporal, U.S. Army 34 540 457 Company C, 371st Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 9 Feburary 1944, near Val lecchia, Italy Alfonso Frankl in was born 1 September 1923. He was the first Negro from Alachua County ki I led in action during the war. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Nelsie Frankl in, mother and Minerva Frankl in, sister, both resident at 947 W. Seminary, Gainesvi I le, Florida. During the winter of 1944, the 92nd Division was assigned defensive positions in the mountains of Northern Italy. In the second week of Feburary, the Germans launched a strong arti I lery and infantry attack against the division's positions, inflicting very heavy casua It i es, inc I ud i ng Corpora I Frank I in. Corporal Fountain's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Military Cemetery, Castelfiorentino, Italy and was re-interred in the Pine Grove Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida after the war. Corpora I Frank I in is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 47

CHARLES HUGO GILBERT, JR. Electrician's Mate 1st Class, 244 53 04, U.S. Navy Ki I led in action, 24 October i944, aboard the U.S.S. Birmingham, (CL-62), Leyte Gui f, Phi 11 ipine Islands. Charles Gilbert was born and raised in Bartow, Florida and graduated from the Surrmer I in Institute. He entered nava I service in November 1941. (His family had moved to Gainesvi I le, Florida in June) At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mrs. Julia M. Gilbert, mother 1244 West Union Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida. After training in Norfolk, Virginia and service aboard a Hospital Ship, Gilbert j , oined the Birming~am at the time of its commission in January . 1943. With the ship, he participated in the invasion of Sicily prior to the ship's transfer to the Pacific in September 1943. In the months preceeding the action that cost Charles Gilbert his I ife, he and the Birmingham participated in raids on Tarawa and Wake Island, the Battle of Empress Augusta Bay, the invasion of Siapan, Tinian, Guam, Battle of the Phi I I i pine Sea, raids on Luzon, Phi I I i pine Is I ands and Formosa. During the Battle of Leyte Gulf, The Carrier Princeton suffered severe damage and the Birmingham pulled along side to render aid. A magazine aboard the Princeton exploded and caused extensive damage and severe casualties to the Birmingham. The Birmingham suffered more than 50 casualties , over 200 dead and in excess of 400 wounded. Charles Gilbert suffered as multiple and extreme. and was buried at sea. injuries described in the medical report He died of these wounds the same day G i I ber t is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing med a Is and decorations; Purple Heart Navy Good Conduct Medal American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal ..

PAGE 48

LUCIAN 8. GRAY 2nd Lieutenant, 0 798 792, U.S. Army Air Corps 400th Bomb Squadron, 90th Bomb Group (Heavy) Ki I led in action 12 October 1943, at sea between New Britain Island and New Guinea. Lucian Gray was born 13 January 1923. He was raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida and graduated from Gainesvi I le High School in 1940. He attended the University of Florida as an engineering student and had received his private pi lots I icense at Stengle Field, Gainesvi I le, while sti 11in high school. Gray entered mi I itary service in Apr i I 1942. He received his training as a navigator at Selmon Field, Monroe, Louisana and Tuscon, Arizona. He departed for overseas duty tram Pocatello, Idaho.At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mrs. Florence E. Gray, mother, and Helen Gray Davis, sister, both of 614 South Roper Avenue, Gainesvi I le, Florida. The 400th Bomb Squadron had been in the Southwest Pacific area since 1942. When Gray joined the unit, it was operating 8-24 heavy bombers out of Dobodura, New Guinea against Japanese targets in northern and eastern New Guinea, New Britain and against enemy shipping in the surrounding seas. On the 12th of October, the Fifth Air Force began a major aerial offensive agains Japanes positions on New Britain, especially their base at Rabaul. On the 13th, poor weather prevented effective bombing at Rabaul but secondary targets on the island were hit. There was heavy enemy fighter opposition, requiring many aircraft to take high-speed evasion routes from the target area. Lieutenant Gray's aircraft was later seen, approximately 50 feet off the water with its mid-section heavily damaged by enemy action. It was never seen again. As many of the aircraft returned to base low on fuel, it is surmised Gray's aircraft crashed at sea after running out of fuel or perhaps it succommed to battle damage. There were no survivors. Lucian Gray's remains were not recovered and his name is memorialized on the Piers of the _ Hemicycles, Mani la American Cemetery, Mani la, Phi I I ipine Islands. Lieutenant Gray is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 49

LORIN A. GREEN Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army Died non-battle, date and place unknown (Name appears on the official War Department I ist of casualties for Alachua County) GEORGE MC MILLAN GUY 2nd Lieutenant, 0 796 528, U.S. Army Air Corps 324th Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group Died of wounds, 12 August 1943, Rotenburg, Germany George Guy was born 17 December 1922 in Gainesvi I le, Florida. He I ived in that city unti I his parents moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee where he graduated from high school. Guy entered mi I itary service 1 February 1942 and received navigator training at Maxwel I Field, Alabama and Monroe, Louisiana where he received his wings. He received further training at Blythe, California and Pyote, Texas before departing for overseas duty in May 29,1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Arthur T. and Georgia M. Guy, parents, 601 Ohio Avenue, Signal Mountain, Tennessee, and by a sister and one aunt, also in Tennessee. The 91st Bomb Group had been engaged in combat operations since September 1942. George Guy's first combat mission was 10 July 1943 against targets at Vi I la Coublay, France. He also participated in missions to Amiens, France, Heroya, Norway, and Hamburg, Germany prior to the mission on the 26th of July to Hamburg when his plane was lost to enemy action when it took a direct hit from German anit-aircraft fire. The pi lot managed to control the aircraft's descent near Bremen, Germany, al lowing some cf the crew to parachute from the crippled aircraft. Several crew men were never seen again. George Guy was reported un-injuried when he left the aircraft and his parachute carried him safely to ground. Post-war interrogations reveal Lieutenant Guy was shot by either German soldiers or civilians after reaching the ground. He died of those wounds in a German hospital 12 August 1943. George Guy's remains were recovered and interred in Liberty Hi I I Cemetery, Acworth, Georgia after the war. Lieutenant Guy is known to have been eligible tor the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal ..

PAGE 50

RAYMOND JEFFERSON HAGEN Fireman 1st Class, U.S. Navy Ki I led in act i on, date place and unit unknown At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mrs. Nolan Cara Hagen, mother, RFD 1 box 133, Alachua, Florida GEORGE Q. HALBROOK Technical Sergeant 5th Grade, U.S. Army 34 024 044 Company B, 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 15 August 1944, Domfort, France George Halbrook was born 19 Apr i I 1923 in Alachua, County, Florida. He was a I ife-long resident of Gainesvi I le and the son of the late Mr . . and Mrs. George W. Halbrook. Prior to his entry into mi I itary service, he was employed by the Chemical Retort Plant. He entered the service 25 Feburary 1941 at Camp Blanding, Florida with subsequent service at Fort Benning, Georgia before shipping overseas with the 30th Infantry Division in 1943. At the time of his death, Sergea~t Halbrook's next of kin included; Dreyfus Halbrook, brother, Tampa, Florida, Leroy Halbrook, brother, Augusta, Georgia, Perl ie Mae Halbrook, sister, Alachua, Florida, and Mrs. M.F. Brunson, sister, 861 Jefferson Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida. The combat service of the 30th Infantry Division began on the 15th of June on the Vire-et-Taute Canal in the Normandy Peninsula of France. The division was active in the costly hedgerow battles of the Normandy Beachead and, with the 9th Division, spear-headed the breakout at St. Lo, "Operation Cobra ... Later assigned defensive positions near Martain, the 30th absorbed the brunt of the German counter-attack on the 7th of August. Fighting the Germans to a standsti I I by the 12th, the division then participated in the actions to seal off the Falaise Pocket. It was during this phase of the battle for France that Sergeant Halbrook was ki I led. George Halbrook's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I i tary Cemetery at Le Chene Guerin, France and re-interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida after the war. Sergeant Ha I brook is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing decorations and medals; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 51

WILBUR EUGENE HALL Seaman, U.S. Navy Ki I led, 28 January 1945, auto~train accident, Sanford Florida Wi I bur Hal I was born 26 July 1925 in Manatee, Florida. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mrs. Ronnie Reed, mother, four sisters, Mrs. Lois Luke, Ida, Birtie and Letta Reed, Gilbert Reed-, brother, al I of Gainesvi I le, Florida and two brothers, Earl Hal I and Russel I Reed on active mi I i tary service. Wilbur Hal I's remains are interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida. BERNARD H. HEIDENFELDER Technical Sergeant 5th Grade, U.S. Army 37 413 100 Troop F, 112th Cavalry, attached t~_ 1st Cavalry Division Kil led in Action 30 November 1944 at Bonbongon, near Limon, Leyte, Phi I I i pine Is I ands. Bernard Heidenfelder was born 19 Apri I 1923. He and his wife had become permenant residents of Alachua County, Florida in 1942. He entered mi I itary service in 1943. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Lois Heidenfelder, widow and baby daughter of Orange Heights, Florida, Paul and Catherine Heidenfelder, parents of 1501 Ekin, New Albany, Indiana, six sisters, al I in St. Louis, Missouri, and three brothers, a I I in service overseas. The 112th Cavalry had fought in the New Guinea and Bismark Arch i pe I ago campaigns be fore the ass au It on Leyte, Phi I I i pine Islands. Fighting on Leyte was bitter and costly. On the 30th of November, the regiment met strong opposition and local Japanese counter-attacks in its drive on the city of Limon. It was during this day's battle that Sergeant Heidenfelder was k i I I ed. Bernard Heidenfelder's remains are permanently interred in the Mani I ia American Cemetery, Mani la, Phi I I ipine Islands. Sergeant Heidenfelder is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Phi 11 ipine Liberation Ribbon Phi 11 ipine Presidental Unit Citation Ribbon Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 52

RALPH JAMES HENDERSON Aviation Ordnanceman 2nd Class, U.S. Navy Ki I led in Action, (1945) date'unknown, somewhere in the Pacific area Ralph Henderson was 20 years old when ki I led. He was a long-time resident of Alachua, Florida having graduated from Alachua High School. He entered naval service in March of 1943 and underwent training in Jacksonvi I le, Florida, Norfolk, Virginia, and San Diego, California prior to being sent overseas in December 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mrs. Henderson, mother, Mrs. J.O. Compton, sister, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hancock, grandparents, al I of Alachua, Florida, Jack Henderson, brother, in mi I itary service, W.B. Henderson, father, Perry, Florida. It is not known if Ralph Henderson's remains were recovered but it is un I i ke I y. He is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal GEORGE P. HENDRIX, JR. U.S. Army Air Corps Ki I led, truck accident, 17 November 1942, Denver, Colorado George Hendrix was born 14 October 1908 in Levon, Florida. He was a graduate of Gainesvi I le High School and attended the University of Florida. Prior to entering military service, Hendrix was a night operator with the City of Gainesvi I le Uti I ity Department. He was attending aircraft armourers school and was returning from target practice when the truck in which he was a passenger over-turned, ki I I ing three of its occupants, including George Hendrix. At the time of his death his next of kin included; George P. Hendrix, Sr., father, ~rs. L.S. Usry, sister, Mrs. H.E. Bratley, sister, al I of Gainevi I le, Mrs. H.K. Net I es, sister, Birmingham, Alabama, and Walter Hendrix, brother, in mi I itary service. George Hendrix's remains are interred cemetery unknown. in Alachua County, Florida; ... Hendrix is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing med a Is; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 53

HARRY F. HENDRY JR. Private, 14 084 327, U.S. Army 359th Infantry Regiment, 90th' Infantry Division Ki I led in action 13 January 1945, lsenborn, Luxembourg Harry Hendry was born 2 October 1923.At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Wi I I iam W. and Al ice L. Hendry, parents, 245 1/2 Hibiscus Street, Daytona Beach, Florida. The 359th Infantry Regiment landed in Normandy, D-Day, the 6th of June 1944. It and the 90th Division were involved in the Normandy battles and many severe contests with the Germans in centra I and eastern Francedur i ng that surrmer and fa I I. In January 1945, they were part of the attacking army which drove the Germans out of the southern part of their "Bulge" and crossed the German frontier. On the 13th of January, the 90th division drove the Germans out of the key position at Bras and captured hi I I 530 corrmanding the surrounding area. Private Hendry died in this days battle. Harry Hendry's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Hamm, Luxembourg and re-interred in Ari ington National Cemetery after the war. Private Hendry is known to have been eligible for the fol lwoing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campoaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge WILLIAM THOMAS HOGE Ensign, U.S. Navy Next of kin Mrs. Martha Roberts, foster-mother, Melrose, Florida

PAGE 54

ARTHUR M. HOLDER Private First Class, U.S. Army 185th Field Arti I lery Batta( ion, 34th Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 3 January 1944 Mount Sammucro, Italy Arthur Holder was born in Gainesvi I le, Florida 12 December 1923 and I ived there al I his I ife prior to his entry into mi I itary s er v i c e , 2 Apr i I 1 9 4 3 . Pr i v a t e Ho I de r tr a i n e d a t Camp B I and i n g , Florida and Fort Jackson, South Carolina before shipping overseas in October 1943. At the time he entered mi I itary service, his parents address was Route 3, Gainesvi I le, Florida. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. T. I. Holder, parents, Wilmington, North Carolina, Harriet Dubose Holder, widow, Sumpter, South Carolina, Bobby, Leonard, and Hampton Holder, brothers and Ruth Holder, sister, al I of Gairiesvi I le, Florida. The 34th lnfan~ry Division, as a part of the U.S. Fifth Army, was involved in the costly battles against the German defensive positions north of Naples centered on Monte Cassino. At the time of Private Holder's death, his battalion was in direct support of the division's positions on Mount Sarrmucro. Fol lowing the war, Private Holder's remains were permanently interred in Antioch Cemetery. Private Ho Ider is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing decorations and medals; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Victory Medal SAMUEL DODD HOLMES, JR. Motor Machinist Mate 2nd Class, U.S. Naval Reserve Died, 28 Apri I 1944, cause unknown, England Samuel Holmes had been in the Naval Service for one year prior to his death. At that time, his next of kin included; Martha Sue Holmes, widow, 1034 West Margaret Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Mrs. S.D. Holmes, Sr., mother, Titusvi I le, Florida.

PAGE 55

LEROY S. HUNT Private, U.S. Army Ki I led, Misadventure, on or about 2 March 1945, Waldo, Florida Lero~ Hunt_w~s born 1 August 1923 in Orange Heights, Florida. He had Just f1n1shed basic training at Camp Blanding Florida and wa~ on :u~l~ugh prior to oversears shipoment when 1 he was murdered wh, le v1s1t1ng at the home of a friend. There was no apparent r~as~n for the ki 11 ing. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; G. L. Hunt, father, G.L. Jr., George, and Jimmie Hunt, brothers of Waldo, Ed C. Hunt, brother, overseas, Thomas Hunt, brother, Auburndale, Donald and Wi I I iam Rountree, brothers, Dorothy Hunt and Jeanette Rountree, sisters, al I of Waldo, Florida. Funeral and internment in Windsor, Florida. Private Hunt is known to have been eligible f h f or t e o I I owing n _ _,, American Campafgn Medal Victory Medal WALLACE JONES JR. Private First Class, U.S. Army 34 793 232 Company F, 370th Infantry Regiment, 92nd Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 8 Feburary 1945 near Querceta, Italy. Wal lace Jones was born 5 March 1918. his next of kin included; At the time of his death, Al lean Jones, widow, Geneva Jones, daughter, Louise Jones, mother, al I of Pompano Beach, Florida. Elements of the 92nd Division launched a successful attack in the coastal area of the division's generally mountainous front in northern Italy against moderate ~erman resistance on the 8th of Feburary 1944. It was a heavi ly mined area and the division suffered numerous casualties. Al I gains were lost the next day to a strong German counter-attack. Private Jones's remains are Mi I itary Cemetery, Florence, interred Italy. in the Florence American Private Jones is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 56

FRANCIS D. JORDAN Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy Ki I led, 27 October 1944, when : unmarked Japanese prisoner of war ship was sunk by U.S . forces. Commander Jordan was a career naval off i cer, captured on Corregidor in May of 1942 by the Japanese. Nothing is known of his wife or the residence of his mother, brother and two of his three sisters at the t i me of h i s death but one sister, Mrs. C.E. Bel I was resident at 234 University Terrace, Ga i nesvi I le, Florida at the time.

PAGE 57

LESTER PERRY KARR Boatswain 1st Class, U.S. Nav1 U.S.S. LUCE (DD 522) Ki I led in action 4 May 1945 off Okinawa It is not known where Karr was born and raised but his only family resided in Gainesvi I le, Florida. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Flora Odessa Karr, widow, 1344 W. Michigan Avenue, and Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Jones, 538 North Ropes Street, in-laws, both of Gainesvi I le, Florida. The LUCE was commissioned in June 1943 and proceeded to the west coast where it was atached to th~ northern Pacific fleet units operating in the Aleutian Islands and against targets in the Kur I ie Islands north of Japan. After some months of successful duty, the LUCE = was sent southward to participate in the campaigns in New Guinea, and at Leyte and Luzon, Phi I I i pine Is I ands. During March and Apri I of i945, the LUCE participated in the landings at Okinawa and near-by islands. During the Okinawa operations prior to 4 May, the LUCE was credited with shooting down two Japanese aircraft. In May, she was assigned to radar picket duty off the coast to help counter savage Japanese suicide attacks against American shipping. On the 4th of May, the LUCE was in her assigned patrol area when attacked by several Japanese suicide aircraft. Anti-aircraft fire from the ship turned one of the planes away but another crashed close aboard, causing a complete power failure in the ship. The another Japanes plane, low on the water came for the port side. Unable to manually train guns on this plane, it crashed directly into the aft port side of the LUCE, causing the damage which would feed to the ships loss within five minutes. 206 members of the crew were I ost, inc I ud i ng many k i I I ed by an underwater explosion fol lowing the ships sinking. As Lester Karr was a member of the !t3 5"38 gun mount just aft of the second stack, it is I ikely he was killed when the suicide pl and hit the ship. Karr's remains were not recovered. Lester Karr is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Navy Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Phi 11 ipi_ne Liberation Ribbon ..

PAGE 58

IRA DELL KEENE Naval Construction Batta! ion, U.S. Navy Died, 14 January 1943, U.S. Naval Hospital, Mare Island, California, reportedly of wounds received in action in the South Pacific. Ira Keene was 37 years old when he died having been born in 1905 in Newberry, Florida. He had been a resident of Jonesvi I le and Gainesvi I le, Florida for some years prior his entry into naval service. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mrs. Rosa Keene, widow, Mrs. Pastorie Keene, mother, Mrs. Samuel Goswick, daughter, Doris, Henry, Alvin Ira Del I, Jr., Glenda, children, al I of Gainesvi I le, Florida, J.N. Knight, brother on actve military duty, and three sisters, Mrs. Quintus Bobo, Vero Beach, Mrs. J.L. Sykes, Hawthorne, and Mrs. Paul E. O'Hara, Tai lahassee, Florida. Ira Keene's remains are intered in the Jonesvi I le Cemetery, Jonesvi I le, Florida. Keene is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing med a Is; (Purple Heart, if died of wounds) American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 59

BENJAMIN W. (JACK) KIMMEL Staff Sergeant, 14 085 434, U.S. Army Air Corps 744th Bomb Squadron, 456th Bomb Group (Heavy} Ki I led, 6 February 1944, aircraft accident, Foggia, Italy Jack Kimmel was born 18 July 1916. He had been a Gainesvi I le City Construction Inspector for six years prior to his entry into mi I itary service 7 November 1942 at Camp Blanding, Florida. He attended service schools in Fort Myers, Florida, Greensboro, North Carolina and received his wings as a flight engineer on B-24's at Monroe, California 10 August 1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Lucy Kimmel, widow, 405 East University Ave., Gainesvi I le, Florida and Netta Kimmel, mother, 2907 West Adams Street, Chicago, 111 inois, D.S. Kimmel arid Sergeant J.W. Kimmel, brothers, Mrs. Clarence Jones, Sister, Brooksvi I le, and Mrs. Marcel Martini, sister, Sarasota, Florida. The 744th Bomb Squadron went overseas. in January 1944. It had not entered combat operations when Sergeant Kimmel was ki I led in an aircraft accident at the unit's base in Italy. Jack Kimmel 's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi Ii tary Cemetery, Bari, I ta I y and re-interred in the Sic i I y-Rome American Mi I itary Cemetery, Nettuno, Italy after the war. Sergeant Kimmel is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 60

WILMER M. KNIGHT 1st Lieutenant, 0 801 705, U.S. Army Air Corps 68th Fighter Squadron, 347th Fighter Group Ki I led in action, 24 March 1944, Solomon Islands, South-west Pacific Wilmer Knight was born 7 November 1917. He was raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida and graduated from Gainesvi I le High School Prior to his entry into mi I i tary service he had worked for the U.S. Civi I Service Comnission and Zeb's Dry Cleaners in Gainesvi I le. Knight enlisted in the Army in February 1942. He received his training at Shaw Field, South Carolina, Spence Field, Moultrie, and Moody Field, Valdosta, Georgia receiving his wings and commission in May 1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. John H. Knight, parents, 622 South Virginia Avenue and Jeraldine P. Knight, widow, 501 North Government Street, both of Gainesvi I le, Florida. The 68th Fighter Squadron had been in the south Pacific since 1942. At the time Lieutenant Knight joined the unit, it operated from bases on Guada I can a I and I a ter, Stir I i ng Is I and, the Treasury Group, in support of American landings in the northern Solomon Islands, especially on Bouganvi I le. The squadron made frequent attacks on the Japanese base at Rabaul, New Britain Island and other enemy bases throughout the Solomons. It was on a mission to attack enemy positions in the Russel I Islands that Lieutenant Knight's aircraft failed to return. Death is presumed to have been the result of enemy action. Wilmer Knight's remains were not recovered. His name is memorialized on the Piers of Hemicycles in the Mani la Mi I itary Cemetery, Mani la, Phil I ipine Islands . Lieutenant Knight is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 61

I MILTON LEWIS CORPORAL SECOND BATTALION; FIFTH REGIMENT FIRST DIVISION UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS BORN: KILLED IN ACTION: 7 AUGUST 1942 Buried: Tulagi 1942; Evergreen Cemetery 1948 MILTON LEWIS MEDALS: Navy Cross, Purple Heart, American Defense, American Campaign, Pacific Campaign, Victory Milton Lewis was born mid raised in Gainesville. lie plnycd footbull w.it.h the C,iilll!!;v.ill<' High School "Hurricanes" and won awards for his swimming ability at Silver Springs. Lenving school prior to graduation, he earned his diploma while in the Marine Corps. His local family included his mother, Mrs. William• F. Lewis, two sisters, Miss Agnes Lewis and Mrs. Dorthy .Chamberlain and a brother, Albert v. Lewis, all of Gainesville. In his honor, the city's softball field was named the Milton Lewis Memorial Field and the Navy named a Destroyer Escort after him; the u.s.s. Milton Lewis (DE 772) ABSTRACT OF SERVICE -------------------------------Entered the Marine Corps in 1938; Basic Training, Parris Island, South Curolina. lie many awards for marksmanship and tactical employment of rifle, pistol, and both light heavy machine guns. He swa service in the eastern U.S. , Puerto Rico, and Guantamano Cuba prior to America's entry into the War. (Further debails of service; promotions, training etc) --earned and Buy,

PAGE 62

CARLL. LATOUR Private, U.S. Army 14 013 675 Died non-battle, date and place unknown (Name appears on the official War Department I ist for casualties from Alachua County) ROBERT A. LAYNE Private First Class, U.S. Army 6 375 427 Battery A, 12th Field Arti I lery Batta I ion, 2nd Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 11 June 1944, Omaha Beachead, Normandy Peninsula, France Robert Layne was born 30 January 1907. At the time of his death, his next of kin included Robert L. Layne, father, Route 2, Box 28, Alachua, Florida and James E. Layne, 2937 Cedar Street, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The 2nd Division was landed in the Omaha Beachead on the 7th of June. It was commited to that portion of the beachead near Foret de Cerisy. On the 11th of June, the division was ordered to seize the German strongpcint at Haute-Littee crossroads which it did fol lowing a savage struggle with the Germans in the hedgerows surrounding the position. It was during the battle for the crossroads that Private Layne was ki I led. Robert Layne's remains are interred in the Normandy American Cemetery, St. Laurent, France. Private Layne is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing meda!s and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 63

WAR SERVICE: FIFTH MARINES At the outbreak of the war in Europe, the Fifth Marines were stati6n0d in Guantanamo Dny, Cuba. After a few months of training and reorganization the the States, the Fifth, now up to war strength, moved to Wellington, New Zealand for further training and to await their use as the spear-head of America's counter-attack against the Japanese in the South West Pacific. The Fifth entered combat on the 7th of August 1942: the first day and the first assault of that counter-attack. The location was Tulagi and Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands. I J 1' t ti rr .. . •;. •;.i:•:!,r.\ i!:l.i11!91m~ Ii,~, . -: ... '\, -~_:_:_,:__ ---__;= ---TULAGI CAMPAIGN: AUGUST 1942 America's first offensive against the Japanese in the Southwest Pacific involved landings by U.S. Marines on Guadalcanal and Tulagi Islands in the Solomons. Simultaneous landinqs took place at both locations on the 7th of A~gust 1942. Initially, the Marines met little opposition on quadalcanal. Not so at Tulagi and its neighboring islets of Tonambago and Gavutu. These islands were defended by the Third Kure Special Landing Force (Imperial Marines). Tulagi was assaulted by the First Marine Raider Battalion and the Second Battalion Fifth Marine Regiment. Volcanic in origin and tropical in vegetation, heavilly wooded and hilly, laced with caves and other defendable features, Tulagi required three days of hard fighting to secure. On the first day, the Raiders landed first and moved inland. They were joined on theline later in the morning by the 2/5. as both began the struggle to conquer the island's main defensive position: hills 208 and 281 and the ravine which separated them. It was in the savage fighting in this area that Milton Lewis was killed. CITATION FOR NAVY CROSS: TULAGI, 7 AUGUST 1942 "For extraordinary heroism as a member of the First Marine Division in action against enemy Japanese forces in the Solomon Islands area on August 7th, 1942: With courageous disregard for his own safety, C~rporal Lewis determinedly led his squad ag ninst a hostilemnchincCl\111 posit i<'n wldeh tht,,,1tr1_H'<.l t-o hnlt hln 1111ll'1,,1d\';11H•, 11,•:11•it,• h~r: !1111111111. I, It, t,:"i,,11::ly t'<'lll !1n1td ht!1 re-lent.less fiqltt.in,_1 .-ind, nll"110uqh J."ll,"llly ':'ounc}l'tl, ~o inr:p-i rt)d It i !' 1111 t 1,.-, I'. t hl'\' !::IIL'L'C'1.~,1'-'c1 lll ~l lenc111
PAGE 64

T. ALEXANDER LIVINGSTON Private, U.S. Army Died 23 March 1945 of wounds received in action 23 August 1944 in France Alexander Livingston was born 28 November 1908 in Newberry, Florida. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Donald Madison Livingston, father, Newberry, Florida, Donald Madison Livingston Jr.brother, Fletcher, North Carolina, Mrs. E.E. Field, sister, Newberry, Florida, Mrs. Charles Butler, sister, Atlanta, Georgia. Alexander Livingston's remains are interred in the Newberry Cemetery, Newberry, Florida. Pr i vat e L i v i n gs ton spent s i x months i n a m i I i tar y hosp i ta I i n England before being returned to the U.S. 1 March 1945. He died of his wounds in 01 iver General Hospital, Augusta, Georgia. Private Livingston is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 65

THOMAS LARRY MARKHAM Private, U.S. Army 34 837 710 51st Armoured Infantry Batta! ion Ki I led in Action 9 January 1945, at Lutremange, Belgium Thomas Markham was born 7 January 1919. He entered mi I i tary service at Camp Blanding, Florida 26 June 1944 and reached England 19 December 1944. He was sent as a replacement to the 51st Armoured Infantry Batta! ion. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Larry T. Ma~kham, father, General Delivery, Alachua, Florida,Nita Y., widow, Robert T. and Larry W. Markham, sons, al I of P.O. Box 261, McClenny, Florida, Mrs. Cleo M Trice, foster mother and two foster sisters of Gainesvi I le, Frorjda, O.T. Markham, brother, Jacksonvi I le, Florida , Mrs Vera Ti I I is, sister, Jacksonvi I le, Florida, Ann Pace, sister, Pensacola, Two foster brothers in mi I i tary service. The 51st Armoured Infantry Batta I ion engaged in the Battle of the Bulge. hard-fought batt I es to e I im i nate the that Private Markham was ki I led. He twenty-two days. was, and had been, heavily It was during the German forces in the Bulge had been overseas only Thomas Markham's remains are interred in the Luxembourg American Mi I itary Cemetery, Luxembourg. Private Markham is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

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DELL MARTIN Petty Officer 1st Class, U.S. Naval Reserve Died, 9 May 1945, Naval Hospital somewhere in the Southwest Pacific area. Cause unknown but probably of i I lness. Del I Martin was born in Statesboro, Georgia. He had been a resident of Gainesvi I le, Florida since 1934 and in the several years prior to his entry into naval service, had operated the Piggy Park and V and W Gri 11 in that city. Martin had been in the Naval Reserve for 14 months. He ~as servicng aboard an LCI (Landing Craft, Infantry) at the time he was removed to a naval hospital. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Inez Martin, widow, Susan Martin, daughter, both of 400 F Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Mr. and Mrs. J. Martin, parents, and three brothers and two sisters, al I of -statesboro, Georgia. Del I Martin is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals; American Campafgn Medal Asiatic-Paeifi~ Campaign Medal Victory Medal HUGH WILLIAM MCCAIN Seaman 2nd Class, Radioman-striker, U.S. Navy Miami Naval Air Training Stat1on, Florida Ki I led, on or about 29 August 1943, near Miami, Florida Wi I I iam McCain was born 25 January 1926 in Lakeland, Florida. He spent part of his childhood in Ruskin, Florida, moving to Gainesvi I le, Florida with his family in about 1939. He attended Ga i nesv i I I e High Schoo I , I eav i ng schoo I to join the Navy in ear I y 1943. He received basic training at Jacksonvi I le Naval Air Station prior to being assigned to the Training Station in Miami. He was ki I led when the aircraft in which he was the radioman crashed approximately two miles off-shore southeast of Miami, Florida. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Blanche Thompson McCain, mother, -Anne and Jeanne McCain, sisters, and Eugene McCain, brother, al I of Gainesvi I le, Florida, H.A. McCain, brother, and Geraldine McCain, sister, both in naval service. Hugh McCain's remains were returned to Gainesvi I le and it is believed he is interred in Evergreen Cemetery in that city. Seaman McCain is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals; American Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 67

GROVER WALTER MC CALL JR. Private, U.S. Army Air Corps 14 099 426 Died non-battle, date unknown, place believed to have been McDi I Air Base, Tampa, Florida. It is probable he was from High Springs, Florida. (Name appears on the official War Department I ist for casualties from Alachua County) WILLIAM RANDALL MC CALL Corporal, U.S. Army Air Corps' Ki I led in action, 29 July 1945, Northern Burma Wi I I iam Randal I was raised in Alachua County, Florida and graduated from Alachua High School in 1942. He entered mi I itary service the same year and was an aerial gunner in the Air Transport service. He had left Savannah, Georgia some six weeks before his aircraft was reported missing due to enemy action over Northern Burma in the last weeks of the war. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. M.M. McCal I, parents, Yankeetown, Florida (formerly of Alachua) and his widow, I ivi~g with her parents in Buffalo, New York. Corporal Randal is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 68

ROBERT SYDBOTEN MC COOK 2nd Lieutenant, 0 811 417, U.S. Army Air Corps Co-Pi lot, 735th Bomb Squadron; 453rd Bomb Group (Heavy) Ki I led in action , 6 March 1944, off shore from Great Yarthmouth, England (Drowned, ditching battle-damaged 8-24 aircraft) Robert McCook was born 6 Apr i I 1920. He is be I i eved to have married a Gainesvi I le woman; he may have attended the University of Florida and his remains were returned here after the war, indicating a local connection of importance. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Doris S> McCook, widow, Cedar Lane, Fountain City and Leola S. McCook, mother, 1003 Luttrel I, Knoxvi I le, both cities in Tennessee. The 453rd Bomb Group, operating B-24 aircraft entered combat from bases in England in February 1944. They were involved in the "Big Week" 8th Air Force attacks against German Aircraft production plants at the end of February. On the 6th of March, more than six hundred heavy American bombers attacked various industrial targets in Germany, including Genshagen. Sixty-nine American bombers were lost that day to extremely aggressive German fighter opposition and anti-aircraft fire. Lieutenant McCook's plane received considerable battle-damage and had to be crashI anded off the Eng I i sh coast on its way home. There was one survivor from the crew. Robert McCook's remains were recovered and temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Cambridge, England and re-interred in the Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida after the war. McCook is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing med a Is and decorations; Air Medal Purple Heart American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 69

WILLIE MC CRAY JR. Private, U.S. Army 34 796 902 195th Company, 47th Reinforced Batta! ion Died 8 July 1945 Compiegne, France Wi I I ie McCray was born 6 October 1918. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Wi I I ie McCray Sr. father, and Vastrow Zow, sister, 512 Mathews Street, Deland, Florida. Wi I I ie McCray's remains are interred in the Epinal American Mi I itary Cemetery, Epinal, Vosges, France. Private McCray is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and ~ecorations; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European CampaJgn Medal Victory Medal RICHARD Z. MC DERMOTT Private First Class, U.S. Army 14 077 363 Company G, 290th Infantry Regiment, 75th Infantry Division Died 11 Apr i I 1945 at Reck I i nhausen, Germany of wounds received in action. Richard McDermott was born 28 September 1923. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Annette McDermott, widow, 341 Prospect Avenue and Florence I. McDermott, 237 College Court, both in Gainesvi I le, Florida. During mid-Apri I 1945, the 75th Division was psrt of the Force advancing into German in the Ruhr industrial region, trapping a very large portion of the German -Army in the west. On the 10th and 11th, the regiments of the 75th reached the Ruhr River and successfully seized several bridges intact. It was during these operations that Private McDermott received his fatal wounds. Richard McDermott's remains are interred in the Netherlands American Mi I itary Cemetery, Margraten, Netherlands. Private McDermott is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fa I I ow i ng meda Is and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 70

ROBERT G. MC DONNELL 2nd Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps 354th Fighter Squadron, 355th Fighter Group Ki I led in action, 5 Apri I 1945, Buren, Holland Robert McDonnel I was born 31 May 1923 in High Springs, Florida. He was a graduate of High Springs High Schoo I in 1941 and attended the University of Florida prior to his entry into mi I itary service in February 1943. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. McDonnel I, parents, Rev. Harry McDonnel I, Warren McO6nnel I, brothers, Mary McDonnel I, sister, al I of High Springs, Florida, Mrs. L.R. Bui len, sister, Miami, Florida, Rev. Durward McDonnel I, brother, Gain~svi I le, Florida, Captain Roger McDonnel I, brother, in mi I itary service. The 355th Fighter Group entered combat in Europe in September 1943 flying P-47 aircraft. When Lieutenant McDonnel I joined the group, they were operating P-51 aircraft and their primary mission was as fighter-bombers in support of ground units of the A I 1 i e d arm i es . I n Apr i I of 1 9 4 5 , the f i g ht er s o f the group were active in northern Germany and Hot land in support of advancing American and British forces, attacking enemy road and rai I communications and troop concentrations. It was during one such raid that Lieutenant McDonnel I's aircraft received the battle damage which caused his death. Robert McDonnel I's remains were recovered and are interred in the High Springs Cemetery, High Springs, Florida. Lieutenant McDonnel I is known to have received or been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 71

JOHN F. MELLOR Technical Sergeant 4th Grade, U.S. Army 517th Field Arti I lery Batta! ion Died 6 Ju I y 1945, Luzon, Phi I I i pine Is I ands John Mellor was born 18 September 1923. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Fred H. and Fannie B. Mellor, 2011 Gaspari I la, Fort Myers, Florida. John Mel !or's remains are interred in the Mani la American Mi I itary Cemetery, Mani la, Phi I I ipine Islands. Sergeant Me I I or is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing medals and decorations; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Phi 11 ipine Liberation Ribbon

PAGE 72

REGINALD HYMAN "BUDDY" MILLER Aviation Machinist Mate 1st Class, 268 54 39, U.S. Navy Torpedo Squadron 4, U.S.S. RANGER (CV4) Ki I led in action, 4 October 1943, Bodo, Norway Buddy Mi Iler was born 25 August 1922 in Gainesvi I le, Florida. Raised in that city, he was active in the Boy Scouts and attended both P.K. Younge and Gainesvi I le_High School, playing footbal I for the latter school during the 1938 season. Offered a footbal I scho I arsh i p, he next attended Georgi a Mi I i tary academy for one year before entering naval service in 1940. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. Clayton G. Mi Iler, Gainesvi I le, Florida and two brothers, C. G. and Jack Mi Iler. When the war began, the RANGER was at Norfolk, Virginia. Considered i I I-designed for operations in the Pacific, the ship was attached to the Atlantic Fleet. During part of 1942, the RANGER carried Army aircraft to various destinations and then participated in the North African invasion of November 1942. Her aircraft were used to attack enemy land targets in Morocco and against enemy ships in and near Casablanca. For much of 1943, the RANGER was involved in training and transport missions unti attached to the British Home Fleet to participate in Operation Leader; an attack on German shipping in Bodo Harbor, Norway during the first week in October. Mi I ler's squadron, VTS 4 flew TBF Grumman "Avenger" aircraft. Ten planes of their squadron were sent to attack German shipping in and near Bodo Harbor as part of a larger American attack force. Several German ships were sunk or severely damaged. Five American planes were lost to heavy German anti-aircraft fire, including Mi I ler's. His plane was seen to be on fire, close to the water. The pi lot parachuted safely and became a prisoner of war. The other two crewmen of the TBF were reported to be either wounded or dead when the pi lot left the plane and are presumed to have died in the crash as no further parachutes were seen. During 1985, the Norwegian Government announced plans to recover Miller's aircraft from the waters of the fijord. Whether this has been done is not known. Mi I ler's remains were not recovered. He is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal Purple Heart Navy Good Conduct Medal American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 73

MEREDITH M. "SPARKY" MILLS JR. Staff Sergeant, 14 084 813, U.S. Army Air Corps Ball turret gunner, 365th Bomb Squadron, 305th Bomb Group (Heavy) Ki I led in action, 21 July 1944 at Schol lach-Neustadt, Baden Germany. Meredith Mi I ls was born 21 Apri I 1923. He was raised in St. Augustine, Florida, completed high School and attended college in Gainesville, Florida. His home was with his aunt, H.W. Wait of that city when he entered mi I i tary service in October 1942. He went overseas in May 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Meredith M. and Aussie W. Mi I Is Sr., parents, 76 Sargosa Street, St. Augustine, Florida. The 305th Bomb Group, flying 8-17 aircraft, had been operational from bases in England since late 1942. From May to July 1944, they were involved in a wide variety of missions including preparation for the Normandy lan~ings and attacks against industrial targets in Germany. On the 21st of July, nearly one thousand American heavy bombers were dispatched to strike important industrial targets in several locations throughout Germany. The 305th bombed targets near Munich. Sergeant Mi I ls's aircraft was seen to receive a direct hit from an anti-aircraft shel I and fal I out of control. After the war, it was determined Mi I ls and most of the crew safely parachuted to ground some six miles from the Swiss border. Mi I Is and four other crewmen were captured by a force of German home guards and c iv i I i ans and murdered by them. Meredith Mi I !s's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, St. Avoid, France and re-interred in the St. Augustine National Cemetery, St. Augustine, Florida after the war. Sergeant Mi I ls is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal with oak leaf cluster Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 74

JAMES CALEB MOTT U.S. Navy ki I led, 19 Apri I 1945, jeep accident, Finschafen, New Guinea James Mott was raised in Alachua, Florida and attended Alachua High School. ~e worked in and around Alachua prior to his entry into naval service in 1941. He had been overseas approximately one year at the time of the accident. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. B.W. Mott, parents, Nina Mae Harrison and Thelma Barnes, sisters, al I of Alachua, Florida. James Mott's remains were originally interred in the American Cemetery, Finschafen, New Guinea. It is not known if they were returned to the United States after the war. Mott is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals; Navy Good Conduct Medal American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 75

VIRGINIUS C. MURPHREE 1st Lieutenant, 0 417 382, U.S. Army Company I, 128th Infantry Regiment, 32nd Infantry Division Ki I led in action 23 December 1942, Buna Mission, New Guinea. Virginius Murphree was born 24 December 1918. Prior to his entry i n to m i I i .tar y s er v i c e , he I i v e d a t 1 1 2 0 Wes t Un i on S tr e e i n Gainesvi I le, Florida and had attended the University of Florida. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Mrs. Jewel Smith, mother, P.O. Box 1146, Jacksonvi I le, Florida. The 32nd Division was one of the first American units to be commited to fighting the Japanese in the Southwest Pacific. It arrived in Australia in the spring of 1942 and was involved, with the Australians, in stopping the -Japanese drive on Port Morseby, New Guinea ~nd in the American counter-attack whcih drove the enemy over the mountains. In the fal I of 1942, regiments of the division were engaged in expe I I i ng the Japanese from the Buna-Sanananda area of eastern New Guinea. The fighting for Buna was extreme I y bitter, the Japanese were we I I -fortified. It was during the savage Battle of Buna Mission that Lieutenant Murphree was k i I I ed. Virginius Murphree's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Armed Forces Cemetery, Soputa #1 and re-interred in Graveland Cemetery, Pine Bluff, Arkansas after the war. Lieutenant Murphree is known to have been el igfble for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 76

ALBERT LEA NELSON Aviation ~rdinanceman 1st Class, U.S. Navy Ki I I ed in action, in October or ear I y November 1944, most probably during the battles associated with the invasion of Leyte, Phi I I i pine Is I ands. Albert Nelson,original ly from Michigan, married a Gainesvi I le woman and considered that city home when he enlisted in the naval service in 1939. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Helen Louise Nelson, widow, 520 SoGth Garden Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Mr.and Mrs. L.H. Nelson, parents, Detroit, Michigan. It is improbable his remains were recovered. Nelson is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart Navy Good Conduct Medal American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 77

HARRY H. NICHOLS Private, U.S. Army 34 980 273 Compan K, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 19 December 1944, vicinity of Keyersburg, France. (Name appears on the official War Department list of casualties from Alachua County) Harry Nichols was born 6 March 1915. At the time of his death, his next of kin included Lenore H. Nichols, widow, Randal I L. and James A. Nichols, sons, 800 W. Alapaha Street, Fitzgerald, Georgia, James H. Nichols, father, Waverly, Alabama. The 3rd Division had been in combat since the invasion of Sicily, having been active in southern Italy, Anzio and the invasion of southern Fiance. After helping drive the Germans out of southern France, the division was active in the campa ign to clear north eastern France of the enemy and reach the Rhine River near where the Frence, German and Swiss frontiers meet. It was bitter fighting and, with the German Offensive to the north, the "Bulge", much of the division's activities became defensive as troops were shifted to the north to counter the German offensive. Harvey Nichols's remains are interred in the Epinal American Mi I i tary Cemetery, Ep i na I , Vosges, France. Private Ni cho Is is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fa I I owing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 78

JAMES WALTER PATTERSON Yeoman 1st Class, U.S. Naval Reserve Ki I led in action, late October or in November 1944, location unknown but probably in the battles associated with the invasion of Leyte, Phi 11 ipine Islands. Originally from Massachusetts, James Patterson made his home in Gainesvi I le and had worked for some years as a clerk at the University of Florida prior to his entry into naval service in February 1942. His home address _ of record was 200 South Pleasant Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida. H~ received naval training at Little Creek and Norfolk, Virginia prior to his departure for the war zone. Nelson was 32 years old when ki I led. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mrs. Patterson, mother, Gloucester, and a sister in Andover, both in Massachusetts. It is not known if Nelson's remains were recovered but it is uni ikely. He is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal ROBERT J. PHILLIPS Corporal, U.S. Army 34 200 681 2889th Truck Company, Quartermaster Corps Died 6 Apri I 1945 Mainz, Germany Robert Phi I I ips was born 16 November 19i7 in Santa Rosa County, Florida. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Ru~h ~nna Phi I I ips, widow, Reading Pensylvania, Mack and Laura Phr I I 1ps, parents, Mrs. A.W. Hal I, sister, of Gainesvi I le, Florida, Mrs. Gilbert Bryant, Be1 1, Florida. Ro_be_rt Phi 11 ips's remains were temporarily interred 1 n th us M I e ' 1tary Cemetery, St. Avoid, France and re-interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida after the war. Corpora I Phi I I i ps is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 79

CHARLES W. PINHOLSTER Corporal, U.S. Army 34 538 859 Died 7 September 1944 Camp Robinson, Arkansas Prior to entering the service, Charles Pinholster I ived and worked in Gainesvi I le, Florida. He was the manager of the Birdsey Flour Store. VAN B. PORCHER Private, U.S. Army 34 785 779 448th Quartermaster Troop, TP Company Died 2 September 1944 vicinity of Br icy, France Van Porcher was born 27 January 1914. At the time of his death, his next of kin included Iola Mitchel I, mother and Rosa Lee Porcher, sister, Route 1, Box 3A, Ocala, Florida. Van Porcher's remains are interred in the Epinal American Mi I itary Cemetery, Epinal ,Vosges, France. Private Porcher is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 80

LEONARD R. RAINEY Sergeant, 34 764 893, U.S. Army Company I, 135th Infantry Regiment, 34th Infantry Division Ki I led in action 16 November 1944, Mt. Belmonte, Italy Leonard Rainey was born 9 December 1915. death, his next of kin included; At the time of his Ola C. Rainey, widow, General Delivery, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Marry E.R. Jar~ard, mother, 677 Anton Street, NW, and Nel I ie R. Baugham, 1105 Grove Street, NW, both of Atlanta, Georgia. The 34th Division began its combat career in North Africa and participated in al I the major battf~s and offensives of the Italian Campaign. During October of 1944, the Division participated in attacking the German Gothic Line defenses and seized Mt. Belmonte. During November, the held the position against repeated German counter-attacks. : It was during this phase of the battle that Sergeant Rainey was ki I led. Leonard Rainey's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery in Pietramala, Italy and re-interred in the Marietta National Cemetery, Marietta, Georgia after the war. Sergeant Rainey is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 81

LEO D. RAMOS Flying Officer, (Navigator), 124 381, U.S. Army Air Corps 560th Bomb Squadron, 388th Bomb Group Ki I led as a result of enemy action, 19 July 1944, aircraft crashed fol lowing raid on Germany near Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, Eng I and. Leo Ramos was born 8 May 1921. He was raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida and attended the University of Florida in the same city. He had received his navigator's wings at Selman Field, Monroe, Louisana and had been overseas since late 1943 when he died. His next of kin included; Frank and Mary Ramos, parents, 124 North 6th Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida, and Oveida A. Ramos, wioow, Box 1359, De Land, Florida. The 560th Bomb Squadron operated out of England flying B-17 heavy bombers. on the 19th of July, more than 1,100 American heavy bombers, in five groups, attacted numerous strategic industrial and transportation targets in central and southern Germany. Leo Ramos's aircraft received sufficient battle damage to cause it to crash upon its return to England. Leo Ramos's remains are interred in the Cambridge Mi I itary Cemetery, Cambridge, England. Flying Officer Ramos is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Distinguished Unit Citation Ribbon

PAGE 82

ANDREW RICHARDSON Private, U.S. Army 34 540 463 1520th Engineer Water Supply Company Died 7 March 1945 at Paganque, Luzon, Phi I I ipine Islands (Name appea_rs on the official War Department I ist of casualties from Alachua County) Private Richardson was born 5 September 1924. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mrs. Hasse Jackson, mother 143 Tichnor Street, Newark, New Jersey, Bouse Jackson, grandfather, Route 1, Pelham, Georgia. Andrew Richardson's remains are interred in the South View Cemetery, Atlanta Georgia. Private is known tdo have been eligible for the fol lowing medals; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Phi I I i pine Liberati on Ribbon

PAGE 83

JACKSON C. RICHARDSON Private, 44 185 309, U.S. Army 309th Infantry Regiment, 78th' Infantry Division Ki I led in action 22 March 1945, _ Diez, Germany Jackson Richardson was born 6 June 1924. He attended the University of Florida, was active in ROTC and was a pre-med student pr i or to enter i n g m i I i tar y s er v i c e . At the t i me o f h i s death, his next of kin included; James C. and Maggie B. Richardson, 1630 West Orange Street, Gainsvi I le, Florida and three brothers, Bland and John Richardson, both in mi I i tary service in Ca I i torn i a, and James Richardson, retired from the mi I ita _ ry and a student at the University of Florida. The 78th Division entered active combat service in early December 1944. The division crossed the Roer River and fought its way to the Rhine River and was passed over the river to participate in the breakout from the Remagen Bridgehead in early March 1945. It was during the battles to expand the Bridgehead on the east side of the Rhine that Private Richardson was ki I led. Jackson Richardson's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Margraten, Ho I land and re-interred in the Netherlands American Mi I itary Cemetery, Margraten, Holland after the war. Private Richardson is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 84

WILSON BLOOM RIPPEY Lieutenant Junior Grade, U.S. Naval R~serve Patrol Squadron Fifty-One Ki I led, 8 June 1942, Missing on anti-submarine patrol, North Atlantic Wi Ison Rippey was born 10 December 1913 in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He was partly raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida graduating fro Gainesvi I le High School and later, the University of Florida. He enlisted in the Naval Reserve as a seaman 15 May 1936 and became an Aviation Cadet 15 August 1936. He was appointed Naval Aviator Number 5321 16 August 1937 and assigned to duties with Patrol Squadron Twelve, Fleet Air Detachment, Naval Air Station, San Diego, California. Patrol Squadron Twelve became Patrol Suadron Fifty One in~uly 1939 at which time Rippey was promoted to Ensign. In August 1940, Patrol Squadron Fifty One was transfered to the east coast at the Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Miami, Florida. In January 1941, Rippey was promoted to Lieutenant, Junior Grade. It was on a long-range patrol mission over the North Atlantic in June 1942 that Rippey and his aircraft went missing, to be declared dead several months later. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Mrs. Flora Rippey, mother, . Bradenten, Doris Rippey, widow, Haines City, G.P. Rippey, brother 1617 Thomas Street, and Mrs. W.H. Mixon, sister, both of Gainesvi I le, al I cities in Florida. Wi Ison Rippey's remains were not recovered. He is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Navy Good Conduct American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 85

JAMES REXALL ROBINSON Corporal, 34 024 061, U.S. Army 119th Infantry Regiment, 30th'lnfantry Division Died of wounds 3 August 1944 received 31 July 1944 near St. Lo, Normandy, France James Robinson was born 5 Apri I 1913 in Jessup, Georgia. He had I ived in Melrose, Florida most of his I ife. Prior to his entry into mi I i tary service, he worked for the FI or i da Market, Ga i nesv i I I e, FI or i da. He entered mi I i tary service in February 1941 and received training at Camp Blanding, Florida and Fort Benning, Georgia. He was sent overseas in February 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Ruby L. Robinson, mother, 404 Benson Street, Ms. H.H. Benson, aunt, 346 Orange Street, both of Gainesvi I le, Florida, Mary Robinson, sister, Melrose, Florida, two additional sisters, Dorothy and Maxine and three brothers, Harold, Wyne I I, Elwyn. The 30th Division entered combat in the Normandy Beachead on the 11th of June 1944. It was deeply engaged in the hedgerow battles around the key town of St. Lo and was one of two assault divisions in Operation Cobra, the battle to breakout of the beachead. The division seized a strongly defended German position Troisgots and defended it against a heavy German counter-attack on the 31st of July, the battle in which Corporal Robinson lost his I i fe. James Robinson's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, La Cambe, France and re-interred in the Normandy American Mi I i tary Cemetery, St. Laurent-sur-Mer, France after the war. Corporal Robinson is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Europea~ Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 86

JOHN LEE SAUNDERS JR. Aviation Machinist Mate 2nd Class, U.S. Navy Ki I led, 18 December 1944, Aircraft crash, location and circumstances unknown. Listed as combat-connected in Navy I ists. John Saunders was from Alachua County, Florida. He had left the county to manage the A and P store in Jacksonvi I le just prior to enlisting in the naval service 14 September 1942. It is believed he was on active service in the Pacific when ki I led in action. His next of kin at the time of his death included; Hattie Green Saunders, widow, John Lee Saunders I I I, son, Jacksonvi I le, Florida, Parents, a brother and two sisters, of Waldo, Florida. It is presumed his remains were not recovered. have been e I i g i b I e tor the to I I owing med a Is; Air Meda I Purple Heart American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal He is known to

PAGE 87

RUDOLPH A. SCHUMAN Private First Class, U.S. Army 34 200 704 Company D, 18th Infantry Regiment, Ki I led i~ Action 23 December 1944, 1st Infantry Division Elsenborn, Belgium Rudolph Schuman was born 6 March 1911. his next of kin included; At the time of his death, Mrs. Edith E. ?chuman, mother, Box 33, Santa Fe, Florida, and Mrs. Eula M. Avinger, sister, High Springs, Florida. The 1st Division had seen plenty of combat, beginning with North Africa in 1942. They Landed on Om?ha Beach, Normandy, on D-Day and had been actively involved in al I the campaigns clearing the Germans from France and Belgium. The division held the northern shoulder of the American positions resisting the German winter counter-attack, the Battle of the Bulge. There was a series of extremely bitter battles associated with the division's role in the battle and it was during the division's counter-attack against the Germans to secure positions at Butenbach, Belgium that Private Schuman was ki I led. Rudolph Schuman's remains are interred in the Henri-Chappel American Mi I i tary Cemetery, Henri -Chappe I I , Be I g i um. Private Schuman is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 88

EWART T. SCONIERS 1st Lieutenant, 0 724 720, U.S. Army Air Corps 414th Bomb Squadron, 97th Bomb Group (Heavy) Died 24 January 1944 while a prisoner of war at Luben/Schleswig, Germany. Ewart Sconiers was born 29 November 1916. He had worked as a barber in Pensacola, Tai lahassee and Gainesvi I le, Florida. He had attended the University of Florida and made his home in Gainesvi I le prior to his entry into mi I itary service in 1941. He was trained as a navigator. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Warren W. and Maude Sconiers, parents, 12th Street, DeFuniak Springs, Florida. The 97th Bomb Group was part of the first American heavy bomber force to begin strategic bombing operations against targets in France and the Low Countries during August 1942. That same month, Lieutenant Sconiers received the Distinguished Flying Cross for safely landing his battle-damaged B-17 after the pi lot had been ki I led. At some later date his aircraft was lost over the continent and Sconiers became a prisoner of war. He died in a German prison camp. Ewart Sconiers's remains were not recovered and his name is memorialized on the Piers of the Colonnade, Henri-Chapelle American Mi I itary Cemetery, Henri-Chapel le, Belgium. Lieutenant Sconiers is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing decorations and medals; Distinguished Flying Cross Air Meda I Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 89

JOHNS. SHARP I I Technical Sergeant 5th grade, U.S. Army 34 782 383 Infantry Ki I led in Action 31 January 1945 at Steffenhausen, Belgium John Sharp was born 22 January 1925. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Lott W. and Jinnie Sharp, parents, 423 Wil Iiams Street, Waycross, Georgia. Sergeant Sharp waqs almost certainty ki I led in the battles associated with driving the Germans out of the "Bulge and crossing the German frontier in the Ardennes region of Belgium. John Sharp's remains are interred in the Ardennes American Mi I itary Cemetery, Neupre (Neuvi I le-en-Condroz), Belgium.* Sergeant Sharp is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Euroipean Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 90

JOHN W. SMALLBONES Corporal, 34 854 980, U.S. Army Air Corps 777th Bomb Squadron, 464th Bomb Group Ki I led in action 13 October 1944, Yugoslavia John Sma1bones was born 24 August 1921. He graduated from Gainesvi I le High School, Gainesvi I le, Florida in 1939. Corporal Smal I bones was a waist gunner in a B-24 heavy bomber and had been overseas since approximately 11 months prior to his last mission. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Ellen W., mother, and Hary Smal I bones, brother, of 215 Walnut Street, Wilmington, North Carolina, (formerly of Gainesvi I le, Florida) Mrs. Clara Wald, aunt, Qanny Wei Is, uncle, both of Gainesvi I le, Florida. The 777th Bomb Squadron, operating from air fields in Italy, was heavily involved in attacks against German war plants in Austria and transportation targets in Hungary and Yugoslavia during October 1944. On the 13th, over six hundred heavy bombers attacked a variety of targets in southern Europe. Corporal Smal lbones's aircraft was destroyed near Belgrade, Yougoslavia during the attack. John Smal I bone's remains are intered in the Sicily-Rome American Mi I i tary Cemetery, Nettuno, I ta I y. Corpora I Sma I I bones is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Distinguished Unit Citation Ribbon ..

PAGE 91

CHARLES WILLIAM SMITH Aviation Radioman 3rd Class, U.S. Navy Ki I led in action, 11 May 1945; aboard the U.S.S. Bunker Hi 11, CV-17, by a Kamakazi airplane attack off Okinawa, Ryuku Islands Charles Smith was raied in High Springs, Florida. He is known to have ben a member of an air crew aboard the Bunker Hi I I, at least from January 1945. Aircraft of this carrier during this period took part in the lwo Jima campaign, attacks agaist the Japanese mainland and in the sinking of the~apanese super battleship Yamato and escorting ships , 7 Apri I and in the Okinawa campaign. Having just returned from a mission, Smith and other air crel/\/TTlen were in the ready-rooms when two Japanes suicide planes crashed i n to the f I i g ht deck o f the Bunker H i I I , i rrme d i ate I y above the ready-rooms. Approximately 400 Americans died in the action, including Smith. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Smith, parents, Box 54, High Springs, Florida Smith is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals (Air Medal) Purple Heart Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Meda!

PAGE 92

W I LL I AM A . { B I LL Y) SM I TH Private, U.S. Army 34 795 325 Company 8, 362nd Infantry Regim~nt, 91st Infantry Division Ki I led in . action 21 October 1944, vicinity of Canovetta, Italy Wi I I iam Smith was born 23 November 1923. He attended Gainesville High School, Gainesvi I le, Florida. He received his mi I itary training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi and departed for overseas from Fort Meade , , Maryland. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Miss Bernice Smith, sister, 1405 La Sal le Street, and Mrs. Violet Smith, aunt, 824 E. Ari ington Streei, both of Gainesvi I le, Florida, and Herbert Smith Sr. ,father, with the Seabees in the Southwest Pacific. The 91st Division was a part of the Fifth Army trying to force the Germans from their defensive positions in the mountains north of Rome during October 1944. The division has temporarily on the defensive, engaged in aggressive patrol actions at the time Private Smith was ki I led. Wi 11 iam Smith's remains are interred in the Marietta National Cemetery, Marietta, Georgia. Private Smith is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army ~ood Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 93

ALBERT LEA SNOWDEN U.S. Navy Died, 8 December 1945, of multiple injuries, cause unknown, probably from an accident, Phi I I ipine Islands. Albert Snowden was raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida and graduated from Ga i nesv i I I e High Schoo I in 1943. He worked at the Ra i I way Express office in Gainesville for_: a year prior to his entry into naval service. At the time of his ~eath his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Snowden, parents, Ruth, Grace, Margie, sisters, George, brother, al I of Route 2, Gainesvi I le, Florida and Rober t E . Snowden , brother , i n m i I i tar y s er v i c e . Although Snowden's remains were recovered, it is not known where they were interred. He is known to have been eligible for the tel lowing medals and decorations; American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Phi I I i pine Liberati on Ribbon

PAGE 94

WILLIAM A. SNOWDEN Technical Sergeant 5th Grade, 34 207 092, U.S. Army Headquarters Company, 2nd Batta! ion, 322nd Infantry Regiment, 81st Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 29 September 1944, Angaur, Palau Islands, South Pacific Wi 11 iam Snowden was born in Gainesvi I le, Florida 29 February 1912. He was raised in that city and attended local schools. Immediately prior to entry into milit.ary service, he worked for the Standard Oi I Company. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Linnie G. Snowden, mother, Route 2, Box 161; Georgia E. Polk, sister, General Delivery, L.R. Snowden, brother, al I of Ga i n es v i I I e , F I or i d a ; E . M . Snowden , brother , W i n d so r , F I or i d a , Ethel Snowd~n, sister, Miami, Florida, and many nieces and nephews in Alachua County. Sergeant Snowden enlisted in the Army at Camp Blanding, Florida on the 12th of June, 1942 and went overseas in July 1944. His dividion trained in the Hawaiian Islands prior to its corr.mitment to battle at Angaur. The 81st Infantry Division, assigned to General MacArthur's Southwest Pacific Command, was first employed to seize Angaur Island in the Palau Island Group, part of the preparation for the later invasion of the Phi 11 ipine Islands. After a relatively brief campaign to capture the useable portions of the island, the 322nd Regiment was assigned the task of eliminating the main Japanese defense force for the island who had withdrawn and fortified positions in the Lake Salome area of the island. It turned out to be a savage and difficult operation to destroy the enemy positions in the area. The month-long battle involved the use of saturation bombing and arti I iery fire and the need to dig out the Japanese almost one at a time in difficult, racy and jungle-covered terraine. It was during the paeriod in late September characterized by the most severe fighting that Sergeant Snowden was ki I led. Wi 11 iam Snowden's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Armed Forces Cemetery, Angaur Island and re-interred in the Orange Heights Cemetery, Orange Heights, Florida after the war. Sergeant Snowden is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic~Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge ...

PAGE 95

BYRON EDDY SPARKS Sergeant, U.S. Army 14 013 511 Company G, 319th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division Died of Wounds 15 Apri I 1945 Weimar, Germany. Byron Sparks was born 6 April 1921 in Louise, Florida. He had enlisted i . n the Army during August 1940 and was stationed at Fort Shafter, Hawaii when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in December of 1941. Subsequently, he served in the Fiji Islands and the Bouganvi I le campaign in the southwest Pacific, returning to the United States in July 1944. He was re-assigned to the European Theater and arrived there in January 1945. At the time of his death, Sergeant Sparks's next of kin included; Andrew and Mary Sparks, Box 63, Route 1, George W., Roger W., Luther and Albert Sparks, brothers,-Juanita and Fidel la, sisters, al I of Gainesvi I le, Florida and Mrs. J.C. Bryant, sister, Oklahoma City. The 80th Division was part of the Third Army engaged in eliminating al I enemy forces in the southern part of Germany that final spring of the war in Europe. The division had just reached the River Saale, helping surround German positions in the Erfurt-Weimar region. It was during this advance Sergeant Sparks received the wounds from which he died at Weimar, Germany. Bryon Sparks's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Eisenach, Germany and were re-interred in the Santa Fe Cemetery, Hampton, Florida after the war. Sergeant Sparks is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic:Pacific Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 96

LOREN P. STEWART Colonel, 0 005 881, U.S. Army 51st Infantry, Phi 11 ipine Scouts Ki I led in action 13 January 1942, Baatan, Phi 11 ipine Islands Loren Stewart was born 27 June 1892. At the time of his death, his next of kin included Frances V.M. Stewart, widow and Josephine Stewart, daughter, 1255 FI or i da Avenue, Ga i nesv i I I e, Florida. The 51st held positions on the Abucay Line on the Baatan Peninsula against repeated strong attacks by the Japanese. Enemy breakthroughs on the 12th and 13th bf January required the corrmi tment of reserves to restore the I ine. Al though the counter-attacks were success f u I , the I i ne had to be abandoned. Colonel Stewart was ki I led during these final battles tor the Abucay Line. Loren Stewart's remains were not recovered and his name is memorialized on the Piers of Hemicycles in the Mani la American Mi I itary Cemetery, Mani la, Phi I I ipine Islands. Co I one I Stewart is known to have been e I i g i b I e tor the fo I I owing medals and decorations; Purple Heart World War I Victory American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal World War I I Victory Medal Phi I I ipine Defense Ribbon

PAGE 97

PAUL M. STULTS 1st Lieutenant, 0 420 234, U.S. Army Air Corps 836th Bomb Squadron, 487th Bomb Group (Heavy) Ki I led, 20 July 1944, aircraft accident, near Lavenham, Suffolk; England Paul Stults was born 4 September 1919. He and his family I ived in Gainesvi I le, Florida and he attended the University of Florida prior to his entry into mi I itary service at Fort Jackson, South Carolina in October 1941. Stults received infantry training at Co I umb i a, South Caro I i na and transfered to the Air Corps in May 1942. He trained at Clovis and Almagordo, New Mexico and received his pi lot's wings at Albany, Georgia in January 1943. Prior to his departure for overseas in Apr i I 1944, he was a 8-25 flying instructor at Co:umbia, South Carolina and transfered to B-24's at Clovis, New Mexico in December 1943. At the time of h is death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. Morris Stults, parents, 1052 West Boulevard, Rebekah Stokes Stults, widow, and Patricia Wayne Stults, daughter, of 1009 North Myrtle St. al I of Gainesvi I le, Florida, Lois Stults, sister, Richard Stults, USMC, Max Stults, USN, both in military service. (Richard would be ki I led in action in February 1945 and Max would die shorly after the end of the war.) The 487th Bomb Group, equipped with 8-24 heavy bombers commenced combat operations in May 1944 during the pre-invasion bombing campaign in western France and Belgium and the continuing strategic operations against major targets in western Germany. Lieutenant Stults was ki I led, most probably in a mid-air co I I is ion during a Squadron aer i a I form-up for a major American bombing raid directed against Leipzig, Germany. Paul Stults's remains are interred in Arlington National C eme t er y , Ar I i n gt on , V i r g i n i a . Lieutenant Stults is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal Army Go~d Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 98

RICHARD LEE STULTS 1st Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve VMF 218 (Marine Fighting Squadron), Marine Air Group 12, Marine Air Wing, Pacific Ki I led in action, 19 December 1944, Negros, Phi 11 ipine Islands Richard Stults was born 18 January 1922 in Portland, Indiana. He graduated from Cast I e Heights Mi I i tary Academy in Lebanon, Tennesee. He attended the University of Florida for three years, being active in the Pershing Rifles and Demolay. His parents and brothers al I resided in Gainesvi I le, Florida upon the outbreak of the war. Stults entered naval service in May of 1942, completed aviation cadet training at Dallas Naval Air Station and transfered to Pensacola Naval Air Station to complete his training. He received his commission and wings in June 1943 . He was assigned to VMF 218 and with that unit, departed for overseas duty in November 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Norma Tyson Stults, w,cow, Larry Eugene Stults, son, both of Hawthorne, Mr. and Mrs. Morris E. Stults, Gainesvi I le, both cities in F l orida. Of his two brothers, one, Paul M. had been ki I led in England during July 1944 and the other, Max W., then in naval service, was to die shortly after wars end. Between 1 and 3 December 1944, the men and planes of VMF 218 staged through New Guinea to their new operational base at Tac I oban, Ley te Is I and, the Phi I I i nes. They became combat operational on the 5th of December. For the next three weeks, the squadron was engaged in patrol, escort, anti-shipping strikes and attacks on ground targets in territories controlled by the Japanese . On numerous occassions they encountered enemy aircraft, destroying several. Records indicate Richard Stults first combat mission was to escort friendly aircraft over Ormoc, Leyte. On the 19th, Stults was part of a mission in support of Al I ied troops on Negros Island. While straffing Si lay airfield on Negros, Lieutenant Stults's Corsair aircraft, apparently damaged, flying at tree-top level. ..

PAGE 99

"Lf. Stults plane was seen smoking and one large flash of fire observed coming from underside of plane flying at tree-top level. The plane appeared to be under control and smoke and flame had disappeared. Lt. Wi Ison, who observed this plane, looked away momentarily. When he glanced back to the position where plane was last seen, he observed a long I ine of flame along tree tops and saw the empenage of a Corsair sticking up through trees with a large fire burning all around it." It is not knowri what caused the damage to Stults plane, whether ground fire over Si I ay Fie Id or one of the three Japanese fighter planes encountered in the area. A check of al I Prisoner of Wa~ camps failed to turn up and information and after the war, Phi I I ipine natives confirmed Stults had died in the aircraft. His remains, originally identified as unknown, were identified with aid of a ring, date and location of crash. His remains are interred in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia. Lieutenant Stults was eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 100

MOSBY G. TAYLOR, JR. 1st Lieutenant, 0 692 573, U.S. Army Air Corps 515th Bomb Squadron, 376th Bomb Group (Heavy) Ki I led in action, 17 October 1944, near the island of Vis, off the coast of Yugoslavia. Mosby Taylor was born 18 August 1919. He was raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida and graduated from Gainesvi I le High School. He attended the University of Florida prior to his entry into mi I itary service in October 194_2. He received his pre-flight and f I i ght tr.a in i ng in San Antonio and Brooks Field, Texas and was commissioned in October 1943. He trained as a 8-24 pi lot in Arizona. Taylor departed for overseas duty in June 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. Mosby G. Taylor, Sr:, parents, 233 North Roper Avenue, Mary Taylor, widow, Michael Wayne Taylor, son, Mary Kay Taylor, daughter, 720 NW 9th Terrace, al I of Gainesvi I le, Florida and Joe Taylor, brother, U.S. Army. The 376th Bomb Group had been in combat in the Mediterranean area since the earliest days of the North African invasion in 1942. At the time when Tay I or was assigned to the group, it operated out of Italian bases against targets in Austria, northern Italy, Hungary, Roumania, Bulgaria and Yugoslavia. On the 17th of October 1944, in excess of three hundred heavy bombers from Italian bases, including the 376th, were sent to bomb oi I refineries at Blechhammer, Austria and other targets of opportunity in the other Balkan countries. On the return flight from their successful raid, Taylor's aircraft was seen to have one engine out and in distress off the coast of Yugoslavia. Eight parachutes were seen to open but the clouds prevented continuous sighting. The aircraft was later seen crashed into the sea off the island of Vis and fighter aircraft had cal led for vessels of the rescue service but no survivors were ever found. Mosby Taylor's remains were not recovered and his name is memorialized on the Wal I of the Missing, Florence American Mi I itary Cemetery, Florence, Italy. Lieutenant Tay I or is known to have received or been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Distinguished Unit Citation Ribbon ..

PAGE 101

JOSEPH PINK THOMPSON Sergeant, U.S. Army 34 052 688 (Probably the 1st Infantry Division) Ki I led in , .Action 8 January 1945 Belgium Joseph Thompson was born 7 October 1909 in Mikesvi I le, near High Springs, Florida. He graduated from High Springs High School and worked for the Sand S Cash Grocery in High Springs and Cross City and with the Gulf Life Insurance Company in Gainesvi I le and Jacksonvi I le, Florida prior to his enlistment in the Army in June of 1941. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Lil I ie Thompson, mother, Melvalee Thompson, sister, both of High Springs, Florida, Gertrude Thompson, widow, Sanford, Florida, A.W Thompson, brother, Mobile, Alaba~a. Mrs, G.H. Putnam, sister, Durham, North Carolina. Sergeant Thompson went overseas in September 1943 and took part in the D-Day invasion of Normandy, Fr a nee. It is be I i eved he served with the 1st Infantry Division as was ki I led in action during the closing phases of the Battle of the Bulge. It is not known where his remains were interred. Sergeant Thompson is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge ..

PAGE 102

CHARLES GORDON TISON Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps Ki I led, 25 December 1942, aircraft accident, Paine Field, Everett, Washington. Charles Tison was born 3 Apri I 1916 in Ocala, Florida. He was raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida and Graduated from Gainesvi I le High School in , 1934. He attended the University of Florida. Tison was an employee of Baird Hardware Company in Gainesvi I le at the time of his enlistment into mi I itary service 31 January 1942. He received his wings and corrmission 29 September 1942 at Luke Field, Arizona. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. J.M. Tison, parents, 835 East Magno I ia Street, J.M. Tison Jr., brother, Mrs. Richard Wi I Iiams, Dorothy, Martha tison, sisters, al I of Gainesvi I le. Charles Tison's remains are interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida. Lieutenant Tison is known to have been eligib l e for the fol low i ng medals; Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 103

LOUIS A. TOWSON 1st Lieutenant, 0 496 118, U.S. Army Air Corps 97th Fighter Squadron, 82nd Fighter Group Ki I led in action, 22 February 1943, near Kasserine Pass, Tunisia, North Africa Louis Towson was born 19 June 1920. He was raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida and graduated from Gainesvi I le High School in 1938. He attended the UniversLty of Florida for two years, majoring in engineering. He entered mi I i tary serv . i ce in 1940. Towson graduated from aircraft mechan~cs school at Chanute Field and was rated an instructor. He entered pre-flight school as a member of the first enlisted pi lots class, 1941C. After training at Brady and Kelly Fields, Texa~, he was promoted Staff Sergeant and pi I at ' 7 March 1942. Sent to Ca I i forn i a to train on P-38 fighter aircraft, he was commissfoned a Lieutenant, 15 September 1942 and left for overseas duty with his fighter group in October. At the time of.his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Towson, parents, 966 East Court Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida and Marjorie J. Towson, widow, 607 Baldwin Street, Detroit, Michigan. When it first arrived overseas, the 82nd Fighter Group was stationed in Northern Ireland and England. They moved to North Africa fol lowing the Al I ied Invasion of that continent and were assigned bomber escort and ground attack missions in support of the Al I i ed advace against German pas it i ans in A I ger i a and Tunisia. On the 23 of January 1943, Lieutenant Towson shot down an Italian Cant i007 aircraft. During the crisis associated with the German Attack at Kasserine Pass, Towson's squadron was assigned a ground attack mission against German forward positions. On the critical day of 22 February, the P-38's of the 97th provided part of the aerial cover and attacking force that permanently stopped the German attack. On that day, Towson's aircraft was destroyed and he was ki I led, most probably by German anit-aircraft fire. Louis Towson's remains were not recovered and his name is memorialized on the Wal I of the Missing, North African American M i I i tar y C eme t er y , Car th age , Tun i s i a . Lieutenant Towson is known to have received or been eligible for the fol lowing decorations and medals; Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal ,l

PAGE 104

LEONARD W. VAUGHN Private First Class, U.S. Army 34 205 230 580th Quartermaster Laundry Platoon Died 4 November 1945 Luzon, Phi I I ipine Islands Leonard Vaughn ' was born 4 Apri I 1918 High Springs, Florida. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Azzie L. and Annie L. Vaughn, Route A, Box 94A, High Springs, Florida. Leonard Vaughn's remains were temporarily interred in the American Mi I itary Cemetery, Mani la, Phi I I ipine Islands and later re-interred in Spring Hi I I Cemetery, Traxler, Florida. Private Vaughn is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medal Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medaal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Phi I ipine Liberation Ribbon

PAGE 105

LEVIE EDWARD VAUSE 1st Lieutenant, 0 393 694, U.S. Army Air Corps 512th Bomb Squadron, 376th Bo~b Group (Heavy) Kil led in action 19 December 1943, south of Augsburg, Germany. Levie Vause was born 3 March 1918. His father was editor of the W i I I i ston Sun. Vause attended the University of FI or i da Law School, was married and made his home in Gainesvi I le, Florida prior to _ his entry into mi I itary service in November 1940. He attended f I i ght and navigator's schoo I in Hondo, Texas, receiving his wings in October 1942. t the time of his death his next of kin included; Winifred Boyd Vause, widow, 1358 West Ari ington Street, Gainesvi I le _ , Fforida and Mr. and Mrs. L.E. Vause, Sr. of Wi I I iston, Florida. The 512th Bomb Squadron had entered active operations in November 1942. At the time Lieutenant Vause.served with the unit, it flew 8-24 heavy bombers against targets in central and eastern Europe and northern Italy. Vause was assigned as navigator to an aircraft, al I of whose crew except: Vause, were members of the Royal Yugoslavian Air Force on secondment to the 5i2th. On the 19th of December 1943, Lieutenant Vauses's aircraft was part of a major force dispatched to bomb the Messerschmitt aircraft manufacturing plants at Augsburg, Germany. When last seen, his aircraft had suffered extensive damage from enemy anti-aircraft fire and was spiraling downward, apparently out-of-control No parachutes were seen and their were no survivors. Levie Vauses's remains were not recovered and his name is memorialized on the Wal Is of the Court: of Honor, Epinal American Mi I i tary Cemetery, Ep i na I (Vosges), France. Lieutenant Vause is known to have been el i gible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 106

HARRISON 8. WALTON 1st Lieutenant, 0 800 677, U.S. Army Air Corps 45th Troop Carrier Squadron, 316th Troop Carrier Group Ki I I ed in action 24 March 1945, -near Ha I dern, Germany Harrison Walton was born 11 November 1920. He was raised in Gainesvi I le and Tampa, Florida. He had been overseas since 1942. At the time of h.is death his next of kin included; Morre I le Buchman Walton, widow, 140 South Pleasant Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida, Harrison B. Sr., and Sarah H. Walton, parents, 1000 Charter Street, and Mrs. R.S. Dennis, aunt, al I of Tampa Florida, Mrs. P.T. Walton, grandmother, Archer, Florida, and two brothers, Payton and Spencer Wa I ton, both in mi I i tary service. Lieutenant Walton was a navigator on a C-47 transport aircraft. He was lead group navigator on several missions in Europe. He and his unit had participated in si-x invasions and many additional re-supply missions in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Normandy, France, Belgium and the Rhine Crossing operation in which Walton lost his I ife. On the 24th of March 1945, after successfully discharging their load of parachute infantry, Walton's aircraft was seen to receive damage from German ground fire and to be burning along the entire length of the fuselage with flames reaching the wings and tai I sections. The plane went into a tight spin and crashed. There were no parachutes and no survivors from among the aircraft's crew. Harrison Walton's remains are interred American Mi I i tary Cemetery, Mar gr a ten, in the Netherlands Ho I I and. Lieutenant Walton is known to have received or been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Distinguished Flying Cross Air Medal with two or more oak leaf clusters Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Distinguished Unit Citation Ribbon Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon

PAGE 107

Citation for the Distinguished Flying Cross, awarded 13 Novembe~ 1944; For ext~aordinary ~chievement while participating in aerial flights on June 6-7, 1944, during the invasion of Normandy and September 17-18, 1944, in the vertical envelopment of ~en~my positions in Ho! land; HAs lead navigator on five paratroop, gl icier and air landing missions in these operations, Lieutenant Walton, by the exercise of unusual professional ski I I ' and calm judgement, brought the formations to their objectives with unerring precision at their appointed times despite difficult weather conditions and hostile ground fire. The courage, coolness and exceptional devotion to duty demonstrated by Lieutenant Walton on these occassions reflect the highest credit upon him and upon the United States Army Air Forces.H

PAGE 108

WILLIAM CECIL WEIL Private First Class, U.S. Army 34 241 841 305th Engineer Batta! ion, attached to 80th Infantry Division Ki I led in. Action 10 October 1944 at Lixieres, France. Wi I I iam Wei I was born 27 November 1915. At the time of his death, his next of kin included Mary C. Wei I, widow, RFD #1, Newberry, Florida, Willie N. Weil, father, RFD #1, Box 61, Williston, Flor:-ida, Jafious M. Weil, brother, 891 Masonic Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida. The 80th division, a part of the Third Army, had been fighting in France since the Normandy Breakout~ In early October, against increasingly stiff German opposition, the Third Army, includiong the 80th Division, were engaged rn establishing effective positions in eastern France from which to launch a major assault on the German frontier defenses. In cooperation with the 6th Armoured Division, the 80th advanced toward the Sei I le River and in the battles of consolidation for recently seized German positions, Private Wei I was ki I led. Wi 11 iam Wei I's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery# 1, Andi I ly, France and re-interred in Barrancas National Cemetery, Pensacola, Florida after the war. Private Wei I was known to have been e I i g i b I e for the fo I I owing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal ..

PAGE 109

RICHARD WALSH WELLS 1st Lieutenant, 0 689 288, U.S. Army Air Corps 6th Air Service Group Ki I led in action 27 January 1945 at Sansafor, Dutch New Guinea. Richard Wei Is was born 3 December 1920 in Gainesvi I le, Florida. He graduated from Ga i nesv i I I e High Schoo I in 1939 and attended the University of Florida for one year . Prior to his entry into mi I itary service he was the manager of the Wei Is Hatchery, Gainesvi I le, Florida. He enlisted in the Air Corps 12 May 1942. Lieutenant Wei 1 , s completed pre-flight training in San Antonio, Texas, Flying School in Enid, Oklahoma and received his wings in Victoria, Texas 30 August 1943. He was a test pi lot at Hunter Field, Savanah, Georgia prior to being sent to New Guinea in June 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Or ian P. and Ida L. Wei Is, parents, 1789 North 9th Street, and Orian P. Wei Is, brother, both of Gainesvi I le, Nimrod Wei Is, brother, Crescent Beach, and Mrs. C.M. Crutchfield, sister, Auburndale, al I Florida and Cora Lee Wei Is, sister, Atlanta, Georgia. Richar Wei !s's remains were temporarily interred in New Guinea and re-interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida after the war. Lieutenant Wei Is is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; (Air Medal) Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 110

HANS A.E. WENZEL Staff Sergeant, 14 076 777, U.S. Army Air Corps 96th Bomb Squadron, 2nd Bomb Group (Heavy) Ki I led in action 11 March 1944, Adriatic Sea, Northeast coast of Italy. Hans Wenzel was born 14 July 1919 in Palatka, Florida. He attended Gainesvi I le High School and graduated from P . K. Younge High School in 1937. Later, he _ attended the University of Florida. Wenzerl enlisted 13 March 1942 and entered mi I itary service 4 May 1942. He graduated from armament school at Lowry Field, Denver, Colorado and trained as a i r crew in Wal la Wal la, Washington, Montgomery Field, Alabama and Bainbridge, Georgia. He went overseas 5 January 1944. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mrs. Louis~ Wenzel, mother, Route :3, and Richard Wenzel, brother, and Gertrude, Marie, Louise, Norma Wenzel, sisters, al I of Ga i nesv i I I e. The 96th Bomb Squadron, flying B-17 heavy bombers, reached the European theater in May of 1943 and were stationed at fields in North Africa and Italy for the remainder of the war. The suadron received two Distinguished Unit Citations, one each on consecut i ve days, 24 and 25 February 1944, for their performance on raids to Steyr, Austria and Regensburg, Germany. It was during a 100 bomber raid on Padua in northern Italy that Sergeant Wenzel 's aircraft was shot down. Eight parachutes were seen to leave the plane but, there were no survivors. (The aircraft was over the Adriatic Sea at the time it was abandoned). Hans Wenzel 's remains were not recovered and his name is memoral ized on the Wal I of the Miss ing, Florence American M i I i tar y C eme t e r y , F I or e n c e , I ta I y . Sergeant Wenze I is known to have received or been e I i g i b I e for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Distinguished Unit Citation with oak leaf cluster

PAGE 111

JAMES DARNELL WESTMORELAND, JR. Aviation Machinist Mate 3rd Class, U.S. Naval Reserve Ki I led operationally, 26 November 1943, near Hval fjord, Iceland James Westmoreland was raised in High Springs, Florida. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. James Darnel I Westmoreland, Sr., parents, High Springs, Florida. Westmoreland served aboard the U.S.S. RANGER (CVA 4). He and the ship were ~ctive in the Atlantic during the early days of the war. The a . ircraft and aircrew, including James Westmoreland, participated in the invasion of North Africa, the planes engaged in attacking targets both on shore and at sea. In October of 1943, the RANGER was part of a B~itish force which attacked German installations and shipping in Bodo, Norway. (Where Alachua County's Buddy Mi Iler was ki I led) Fol lowing the assignment with the Brit i sh, the RANGER was dispatched to the U.S. via Iceland and was engaged in anti-submarine patrols on the way. James Westmoreland went overboard from the carrier's deck while the ship ' s aircraft were being spotted for operational use. The ship's log for 27 November reported his body had not been recovered. Due to the coldness of the sea during November in Iceland, it is presumed he did not survive. He is I isted in Navy records as lost during operations in a war zone. It is not known if his remains were recovered subsequent to 27 November. James Westmoreland was eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Medal Purple Heart American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 112

JOSEPH R. WHALEY Private First Class, U.S. Army 14 000 047 406th Infantry Regiment, 102nd Infantry Division Ki I led in Action 25 March 1945 Rheinhausen, Germany Joseph Whaley was born 1 Februa!""y 1919. He entered mi I itary service in July of 1940 and was stationed in Iceland 1942-43. He was transfered to England late in 1943. At the time of his death, Private Whaley's next of kin included; John 0. and Jessie M. Whaley, parents, P.O. Box 87, Hawthorne, Florida,and th~ee brothers and three sisters. The 104th Division was part of the Ninth Army from October 1944. The division was involved in the -assault over the Floer River and in the battles for control of the Qorthern Rhineland region of Germany. The division reached the Rhine River itself on the 2nd of March 1945, the same day Private Whaley earned a Bronze Star for gallantry. For the remainder of March, the division held defensive positions alone the Rhine, engaging in patrol actions, clearing out German positioOns west of the Rhine and subject to occassional artillery fire from the east bank. It was during this phase that Private Whaley was ki I led, reportedly during an assault on a German machine-gun position. Joseph Whaley's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery, Margraten, Ho I land and permanently interred in the Nether I ands American Mi I i tary Cemetery, Mar gr a ten, Ho I ! and. Private Whaley is known to have received or been ei igible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Bronze Star with combat V device Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Defense Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 113

WILMON PHILLIP . WHEELER Ensign, k i I I ed Japan U.S. Naval Reserve in action, 19 March 1945, 55 mi Jes off coast of Kyushu, Wi Iman Wheeler was born 1 August 1922 in Dade County, Georgia. He graduated from Hawthorne High School, Hawthorne, Florida in 1940. He en I i sted in the nava I service 1 0 December 1942. After attending pre-flight and flight school in Athens, Gorgia, Orlando and Pensacola, Florida, he was corrmissioned and received his wings 8 June 1944. Fol lowing a~vanced training at Miami, Florida and Glenv-iew, 111 inoiw, Wheeler reported to Fleet Air, West Coast, San Diego, California and was assigned to Torpedo Squadron Five, Alameda Naval Air Station, California. He departed for combat duty sometime in December 1944. He is known to have participated in the naval actions associated with the Luzon, Phillipine Islands invasion and American strikes against targets in the Japanese homeland where he was ki I led. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Barron Kylus Wheeler, father and Susie Bible Wheeler, mother, of Hawthorne, Florida. His remains were not recovered. He is known to have been e I i g i b I e for the f o I I ow i n g med a I s and decor a t i on s ; Purple Heart (Air Meda I) American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Phil I ipine Liberation Ribbon JULIAN BRYANT WILKERSON Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Corps Ki I led, air crash, 30 May 1943 Van Horn, Texas Sergeant Wilkerson was born in Bel I, Florida and was twenty years old when he died. He was a ere~ member of a B-17 heavy bomber that crashed during a training flight. His next of kin included Geor~ia P. Wilkerson, mother, 716 Arredondo, Gainesvi I le, Florida.

PAGE 114

HOWARD THACKER WILLIAMS Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps Died, 29 July 1944, reported. suicide, Kinston, North Carolina Howard Wi I Iiams was born 27 October 1924 and raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida and Attended Gainesvi I le High School which he left in his senior year to enlist in the naval service. At the time of his death his next of kin included; Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Wi I Iiams, parents, 414 Benson Street, Gainesvi I le, Florida. Corporal Wi I Iiams had seen service aboard the U.S.S. Wyoming during the North African invasion, November 1942. In early 1944, he was re-assigned to Camp Lejeune, North Carolina to undergo special weapons training; His course of training had Just beerr completed at the time of his death. Wi I I iam's remains are interred in Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesvi I le, Florida. Corporal Wi I Iiams was eligible for the fol lowing medals; American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal WILBUR W. WILLIS Private, 34 823 105, U.S. Army 548th Quartermasters Died O f i I I ness 28 Ju I y 1944 near St. Lo, France Wi I bur Wi I I is was born 29 December 1916 in Alachua, Florida. He served almost three years in the Florida National Guard, . 1 9 35-1939_ He was a citrus worker by trade and e~tered nat1~nal mi I itary service 16 June 1943. At the time of his death, hts next of kin included; Aline H. Wi 11 is, widow, Box 811: and Daisy J.B. Crawf~rd, General Delivery, both of Haines City, Florida and 011ver Wi I I is, Route 2, Alachua, Florida. mother, 8. Wi I bur Wi 11 is's remains were temorari ly in~erred in Mi I i tary ce metery, La Carnbe, France and re1 nterred Hope Cemetery, Alachua, Florida after the war. the U.S. in the New Private Willis medals; is known top have been eligible for the fol lowing .. Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal

PAGE 115

ORMAN RUDOLPH WIMMER Fireman 2nd Class, U.S. Nava~ Reserve Ki I led in Action, November 1942, presumably near Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands. At the time of his death Wimmer's next of kin included; James Everett Wimmer, father, High Springs, Florida. It is not known if his remains were recovered but it is highly uni ikely. Rudolph Wimmer is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; P1Jr p I e Heart American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal JOE GARRETT WINSTON Ensign, U.S. Naval Reserve Died, 1 October 1944, plane crash, Pacific area, not the result of enemy action. Joe Winston was born 25 November 1922 in Gainesvi I le, Florida. He graduated from Gainesvi I le High School in 1940 and attended Copiah Linclon Junior College and the University of Florida before enlisting in the naval service 10 November 1942. As an aviation cadet, he attended pre-f I i ght and f I i ght schoo Is in Athens, Georgia, Hutchison, Kansas and Corpus Cristi, Texas, receiving his wings 3 June 1944. Between Uune and August 1944, he attended special training schools in Texas, Miami, Florida nd Glenview, 111 inois. In September, he reported to Fleet Air, West Coast, San Diego, California. Winston was a torpedo plane pi lot. His assignment at the time his aircr~ft was lost at sea is not known. His next of kin at the time of h)s death included; Mrs. Bel I Garrett Winston, mother, 1216 West Ari ington Street, Mrs. John A.H. Murphree, sister, both of Gainesvi I le, Florida, Fred Winston, brother, in mi I i tary service, Mrs. John Porter Chase, sister, New York. Joe Wtnston's remains were not recovered. ben eligible for the fol lowing medals; American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal He is known to have

PAGE 116

EMORY C. WOOTEN Private First Class, 34 200 676, U.S. Army 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division Ki I led in action 11 June 1944, Normandy, France Emory Wooten was born 19 February 1914. He was raised in Gainesvi I le, Florida and graduated from Gainesvi I le High School Prior to entering mi I i tar y service, he worked for the post office. He went overseas in January 1944. At the time of his death, his next of kin included; Florence Wooten, widow, 315 Barton Street, Thomasvi I le, Georgia, Martha F. Wooten, mother, 210 East Lemon Street, Gainesvi I le, F I o r i d a and th r e e b r o the rs , a I I i n --s e r v i c e overseas . The 4th Division landed in Normandy on D-Day, the 6th of June. It was commit t ed to the bitter hedgerow bat t I es against fanatic German resistance to expand the beachead and cut across the Carentan Peninsula. On the 11th, the 12th Infantry seized its objectives on the Montgebourg-Ouinevi I le ridge but had to pul I back as the regiments on its flanks were not successful. Private Wooten was ki I led in the action. Emory Wooten's remains were temporarily interred in the U.S. Mi I itary Cemetery at St. Egl ise, France and re-interred in Evergreen Cemetery , Gainesvi I le, Florida after the war. Private Wooten is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Purple Heart Army Good Conduct Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Victory Medal Combat Infantry Badge

PAGE 117

WESLEY W. WORTHINGTON, JR. Engine mechanic 2nd Class, U.S. Navy U.S.S. Gudgeon (SS 211) Ki I led in action on or about 12 May 1944, area of Marianas Islands in the Pacific Wesley Worthington had been a resident of Gainesvi I le, Florida at the time he entered naval service in May 1941. He was a communicant of a local Catholic church and had last been there in 1943, just before joining the Gudgeon. At the time of his death his next of kin included; E.H. and J.O. Worthington, uncle and aunt, Gainesvi I le, Florida and Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Worthington, parents, Memphis, Tennessee . ... Worthington had seen service aboard the U.S.S. Texas during the invasion of North Africa in November 1942, transfering to the submarine service the fol lowing year. It is not known how many combat patrols he made with the Gudgeon. On the 4th of Apri I 1944, the Gudgeon departed Pearl Harbor on her twelth war patrol Assigned an area in the Marianas near Saipan. There were several other American submarines in the area, part of a pre-invasion offensive against Japanese shipping in the area. There were reported attacks by the Japanese on several occasions between 14 Apri I and 12 May. The presumption is that Gudgeon was sunk by Japanese aircraft and anti-submarine forces. Worthington's remains were not recovered. the fol lowing medals and decorations; Pi.J r p I e Hear t Navy Good Conduct Medal American Defense Service Medal American Campaign Medal European Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal Submariner's Badge He was e I i g i b I e for ..

PAGE 118

MARION M. ZETROUER Aviation Radioman 2nd Class, . U.S. Navy Patrol-Bombing Squadron 208 Ki I led, 28 July 1945, aircraft accident, Okinawa Marion Zetrouer was born 19 November 1923 in Cedar Key, Florida. He was raised and spent most of his I ife in Alachua County and en I i sted in the nava I service at Ga i nesv i I I e, FI or i da 25 July 1943. Fol lowing various _ training assignments, including duty in Norfolk; Virginia, he was sent overseas 5 September 1944. At the time of his death his next.of kin included; Albert Johns, father Hattie Ori I la Johns, mother, of Rural Route 1 , box 92 A, Mrs. Earl Hines, sister, al I of Hawthorne, Florida, Mrs. Brice Johns Boardman, and Mrs. Earl Sykes, sisters, Island Grove, Florida and Frank McGahagin, half-brother. Zetrouer received the Air Medal with the fol lowing citation; "For meritorious achievement in aerial flight as a radioman in Patrol Bombing Squadron 208 in action against enemy Japanese forces in the vicinity of Okinawa, Ryuku Islands, from 10 March to 23 June 1945. Participating in numerous combat search missions over enemy-control led territory, Zetrouer rendered valiant service to his pi lot throughout each vital assignment despite grave hazards and, by his ski I I and courage, contributed materially toward the securing of vital information protecting our forward bases and fleet from surprise attack and denying to the enemy freedom of movement. His resolute conduct and unwavering devotion to duty were in the highest traditions of the Nava I Service." Marion Zetrouer's remains were recovered and are interred in Providence Cemetery, Windsor, Florida. Zetrouer is known to have been eligible for the fol lowing medals and decorations; Air Meda I American Campaign Medal Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal CHARLES A. ZINKIL JR. Private, U.S. Army 44 007 952 Died non-battle, date and place unknown (Name appears on the official War Department list of casualties from Alachua County)