Citation
History of 149th Field Artillery Battalion from Camp Pickett, Virginia to Morotai, Nei

Material Information

Title:
History of 149th Field Artillery Battalion from Camp Pickett, Virginia to Morotai, Nei
Series Title:
Special archives publication
Added title page title:
History of One hundred and forty-ninth Field Artillery Battalion
Added title page title:
One hundred and forty-ninth Field Artillery Battalion
Added title page title:
Unit war report 149th Field Artillery Battalion
Creator:
Myrick, Julian P
Florida -- Dept. of Military Affairs
Place of Publication:
St. Augustine, Fla.
Publisher:
State Arsenal
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
42, [5] leaves : ill., facsim. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
World War, 1939-1945 -- Regimental histories -- United States ( lcsh )
World War, 1939-1945 -- Florida ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title: Unit war report, 149th Field Artillery Battalion (2nd Battalion, 116th Field Artillery) 1940-1944.
General Note:
"Florida Department of Military Affairs."--Cover.
Funding:
The Florida National Guard's Special Archives Publications was digitized, in part by volunteers, in honor of Floridians serving both Floridians in disaster response and recovery here at home and the nation oversees.
Statement of Responsibility:
Julian P. Myrick.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Florida National Guard
Holding Location:
Florida National Guard, St. Augustine Barracks
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the Florida National Guard. Digitized with permission.
Resource Identifier:
000938537 ( ALEPH )
15352879 ( OCLC )
AEP9781 ( NOTIS )

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Florida

Department of

Military Affairs









Special ArGlives
PubHication NumnbGr
7

UNIT WAR REPORT
149TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
(2ND BATTALION, 116TH FIELD ARTILLERY)
1940-1944


State ArsGenal
St. Fralncis
Barrachs
St. Augustiris,
Florida












STATE OFFLORIDA..
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS
OFFICE QF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL
J,


POST OFFICE BOX 1008
STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE
32085-1008





The Special Archives Publication Series of the Historical
Services Division are produced as a service to Florida
communities, historians, and to any historical or geneological
societies which find the information contained therein of use or
value.

Information about the series is available from the
Historical Services Division, St. Arsenal, St. Augustine,
Florida.

At present, copies of all Special Archives Publications are
available at no charge.




Robert Hawk
Director





















HISTORY

O F


149TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION

FR OM


CAMP PICKETT, VIRGIN3A

TO


YMOROTAI, NEI






JUiLIAN P MYRICi.
CAPTAIN F. A.








PROLOGUE

As an introduction to the History of the 149th Field Ar-
tillery Battalion, the following background data is furnished

to make the History more complete.


The Battalion was formerly the 2nd Battalion of thp 116tWh

Field Artillery Regiment. Upon induction the Regiment was part

of the Florida National Guard and one of-the three regiments of

the 56th Field Artillery Brigade, the other two being the ll4th

F. A, and the 117th F. A. The Brigade was the artillery of the

31st Infantry "Dixie Division" of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi,
and Louisiana. The Division was commanded by Major General Johni

C. Persons of Birzmingham, Alabama; the 56th Field Artillery Bri-.

gade by Brigadier General Sumpter L Lovry of Jacksonville; the

Regimentby Colonel Homer W Hesterly of Tampa; and the 2nd Ba-

ttalion by Lieutenant Colonel Emory Baya of Tampa. The Ba-

ttalion was composed of Hq Battery of Bartow, "'D" Battery of
Lakeland; "E" Battery of Plant City; "P" Battery of Vinter Eaven

and the Regimental Service Battery, which supplied the battalion,

was from Arcadia.

In the late summer of 1940, the world situation beginning
-to look critical, the Congress authorized the mobilization of

certain troops, among which was the 31st Division. The con-

struction of Camp Blanding, near Starke, Florida, and only a
short distance from Jacksonville was ba=un, Lend the DivisioZ











wan mobilized at home stations on November 25, 1940, and sworn
into Federal status. Of course much ground work and recruiting

was done prior to the actual date of induction.

The time between induction and the movement to unfinished

Camp Blanding, about the 20th of December, will long be remem-

bered by one and all. In those days, food prices were low and
the extremely liberal allowance of $1.25 per man per day for

food alone was enough to feed the troops like kings, three meals
a day and still find it impossible to spend the money allowed.

The .arrival at rainy, damp Camp Blanding just a few days

before Christmas, was rather a rude jolt for it opened a period
of seven days a week hard work of leveling, draining, filling,
and generally making of a camp from a morass. A large percent-
age of the men were allowed to return home for Christmas, and.
another large group for New Year's Day.

Basic training was soon begun but equipment was painfully
lacking, especially in view of the abundance of today. Work was
not too hard as the novelty was still there, and Wednesday and
Saturday afternoons were free, and home not too far away for more
than'just a few.

The.first week in March, the first inductees reached the

Battalion to bring it up to strength and immediate steps were

taken to whip the Battalion into shape for the Louisiana maneuvers

of twelve weeks duration. Maneuvers came and passed but were
closely followed by others in the Carolinas for four weeks









duration. These of course were followed by the Jap sneak

attack on Pearl Harbor, after onl a few days from the date of

return from Carolina. A rather dramatic sequence took place at

this time. On Monday morning, December 8, the 55th F. A. Brigade

Left for Tampa, Florida, in accordance with prior plans for a

: ceremony to dedicate the Tampa Armon;y, which was to be named

Fort Homer Eesterly. The Jap attack of the day before, alerted
one and all to the fact that we knew not what the next few days

would hold for the Division, which was a well trained outfit.
The Brigade arrived in Tampa, in the morning and the scheduled

parade was held early in the afternoon. It was quite a soniber
crowd that watched the long column wind its way through the

Tampa streets, in a misting rain just as the EXTRA papers hit

the streets telling of the U.S. Declaration of War on Japan. It

is believed that this was the first War Time parade of World War

II, to be held in the United States. That night, four Batteries

of the Regiment were alerted as parts of Battalion Combat Teams

for costal defense. ID" Battery went to Wilmington, N. C., and
"E" Battery to Charleston, S. C. Little happened of consequcnce;-

until the Division was moved to Camp Bowie, Texas, in early

February 1942, Upon arrival there, orders were received to

Trianglize the Division. Accordingly, the 2nd Battalion, l3.th

P.A. was redesignated 149th Field Artillery Battalion, under

command of Lieutenant Colonel W EUGENE JONES. The coNplemlent

of officers was very small at this time, getting as low asa Qei:h,,

at one period. Most of these eight were destined to remain vi-:h

the battalion for several years to come.










..In the second week of March 1942, the battalion left for
one month at Fort Sill, to act as school troops. This one
month proved to be one of the best periods of Artillery train-
ing the battalion everreceived. Annual AGF Test were-held dur-
ing the last week before return to Bowie. From Bowie it was
Louiana Maneuvers again that summer and thence to Camp Shslby,
Miss~asippi. From Camp Shelby, six of the Captains left for BOC
at F~Bt Sill, which they had been unable to attend prior to this
time The battalion was left with the three field officers and
a '1age group of brand new Lieutenants. The regular battery.
commn&Aers returned to take over their batteries in March, and
'AGF Teat were shortly participated in again. The regular Lou-
isiana f'aneuvers rolled around again, this time following the
"D" Series in Mississippi. At this time Lt.Col. Jones, and
Major .ill Wsre alerted for oversea transfer but it proved that
they w4fe not to go, and they returned to the Battalion after :a
leave a~ home. From Louisiana the Division went to Camp Pickett
for final preparation for overseas movement. From Camp Pickett,
trips were made to very enjoyable and very cold maneuver in
West Virginia, as well as to Camp Bradford for Amphibious Train-.
ing which included a landing in the Solomon Islands, in Maryland.
Thanksgiving week was spent at Camp AP Hill, Va, training for
AGF Test for which the battalion moved to Camp Butner, the first
week of December, On 29 January 1944 the battalion left Camp
Pickett for overseas. This story will follow in the next pages ,










HISTORICAL RECORD '
149TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION


The 149th Field Artillery Battalion departed Camp Pickett,
Virginia by train 0630, 29 January 1944, for Camp Patrick Henry,
Virginia for staging for overseas movement. The 114th Field

Artillery Battalion was also aboard this train. The train arriv-

ed in Camp Patrick Henry, at 1355, where it was met by various
officials of the camp, as well as the camp band. The battalion
vwas marched to its assigned area and given preliminary instruct-
ions7 for i'ta stay. Beginning 50 Januaryand continuing through

8 February 1944, a schedule of athletics, hikes, instructions in
censorship, and amphibious training was carried'out, while final
innoculations, inspects of equipment, :aand ckeoking of administrat-
ive records was completed. Physically unfit men were transferred
and replacements received to bring the battalion up to full
strength.

On 9 February the 149th Field Artillery commanded by Lt.Col.
W EUGENE JONES, the 114th Field ArtIillery .commanded by Lt. Col.

ALBERT LAKE, and Companies "B" and "C" of the 106th Engineers,
*-ommanded by.Capt. KILLEEN, departed by train for Hampton Roads
Port of Embarkation. The morning of departure was a very fitt-

ing send-off for the Southwest Pacific as the ground was heavily
covered with snow, sluoh and mud and a cold rain was intermitt-
ently falling. At Norfolk, the troops debarked from the train
and transferred to the Mohawk Ferry for the crossing of Norfolk








6

fBay. As each man boarded the SS Cape Henlopen, he removed and
turned in his overcoat.

The Henlopen sailed the morning of 10 February at 0900,

with Lt.Col. ALBERT LAKE as Commander of Troops, Lt. Col.

SW EUGENE JONES, as Executive Officer, Major JOSEPH.J HILL, as

Provost Marshal, and Capts. JOHN W BASKIN and JULIAN P MYRICK,

as joint S-3's. The 149th had I complete complement 6f officers

with the exception of the S-3, Major NILTON E HULL, who sailed

with an advance group of S-3's, Capt WILLIAM H FREELAKD, who

sailed Tn January as advance representative of the battalion,

SCapt.GEORGE H CRILL, and Lts. JOHN H KEMP and FRANK N ZIRBLIS,
:who sailed on another ship due .to shortage of necessary number

of officers to fill that ships accommodations, and Lt. HARI1dAN
A ALLEN, who sailed from San Francisco, as Division Ammunition
Representative. .

The trip was without event for the first week. Organization

of ship duties, mess, police and sanitation was established, and

a training program was put into operation.

The. Henlopen arrived at Panama, Canal Zone, on 16 February

and tied up to the docks for flushing of water tanks and repair

of ventilation fan motors. The troops were debarked upon the

pier for exercise and the two Colonels made arrangements for ice

cream to be delivered to the pier. This was to prove to be tho
the last ice cream for many, many months.

The passage through the Canal was begun early on the ori:'r










of 17 February and was naturally enjoyed veray much by all abo rQ.i.

The Henlopen anchored on the south end of the canal where it re-

mained until 1600 of 18 February, at which timb we sailed for

the Pacific part of the voyage. During the entire voyage, until

Milne Bay, New Guinea, was reached no land was sighted at any

time. The trip was almost without event though there was a

possibility of a definite submarine contact one night. ,Torpedo

alarm sounded but no torpedo was actually seen. During the voy-

ageone case of acute appendicitis occurred, which necessitated

an emergency operation at sea. Capt. JOHN L VIITAKER, Battalion

Surgeon, performed the operation while the ship was under way,

and the patient was well nigh completely recovered when New

Guinea was reached.

During the voyage a continuous training schedule of ath-

letics, Pidgin English, visual signaling, current events and

specialized section training was engaged in by all concerned.

One of the features of the voyage was the evening entertainC z.

ment program. A very diversified program was arranged with

competition for attendance between the Colonels' who hold a Binlo

gSme on the forward part of tho ship, and the S-3 Section's Box-

ing matches on the aft hatch. Frozen Coco-colas were among tht

prizes and were the most valued of all.

The Henloren reached M-lno Bay, at 1745, E15 .hrch 1944 whe,..

she anchored awaiting orders. Anchor vms weighed at 1400 on 13

March and was next dropped in COo Day at 0740 of 17 narch. T

unloading of troops and cargo w~as bTsln i:::::iat&ly., Thbo li....

F. A. Battalion waa tho first bbat'; lon of the 31Jt DL iisi~"r









land on New Guinea. Camp was established at Dobodura, and an

extensive and intensive program of construction and camp imp-

rovement begun at once. Acclimation to the tropics was begun

and many hours of instruction given in living in the jungle,
malaria control, jungle diseases, and relations with the natives.

Trips were made to the Battlefield and Cemetery at Buna, and at

Gona. Upon completion of the construction of the battalion area
it then becamenecessary to construct the area of the 116th Field

Artillery prior to their arrival.

During the first week of May, intensive training was begun

in preparation for future combat missions. Principal emphasis

was placed on Operation of the Artillery in Jungle Warfare, with
intensive study and construction of defense perimeters, followed
by night attack and defense problems. Demolition schools were

held.

During the week of May 15-22, the firing batteries engaged
in BCT Problems with the appropriate Infantry Battalions. Cri-

tiques were held and special emphasis placed on the correction
of deficiencies. Firing of all small arms for all members of

the battalion was held during the month of May. Forward Observa-
tion schools were scheduled for both the officers of the Battalin

and designated forward observers of the supported infantry. From

22 May until 5 June, intensive practice of Battery Proficiency

Tests was carried out along with continuous preparation for the

Annual Inspector General's Inspection. These inspections were

given thebattalion during the week of June 5 to 10. Preparation

was continued for Battery and Battalion Tests.









: A feature of the training of the battalion at Dobodura, was
:. the construction and operation of a kinature Artillery Range.
.A tower was erected for the installation of a 50 Caliber M. G.
whichh was to fire incendiary ammunition on a miniature Forward
Observation Range. Various forward observation posts were dug

.to give varied OT Ranges and variation in Angle T. -Impact area
was carefully constructed to include gas tanks filled with gaso-
lineto burn, power plants, observation post, fields, mountains,
water tanks and various other terrain objects. Continuous im-
provement of the range and practice of ne-v ideas was carried

out until it was possible to operate the entire battalion in
"every phase of occupation and firing except actual expenditure
.of Artillery ammunition. The Battalion Fire Direction Center was

'in operation and Battery Executives were used to give conmands to

the guns. In addition to the excellent training given officers
firing, all other sections received training of a highly interest-
'ing and instructive nature. Untold benefit was derived by
communication personnel All procedures were normal and it was
only at the machine gun that conversion of 105 Howitzer data was
made to accommodate the'M. G. The range was conceived by Lt. Col.
Jones, and built under his personal supervision.

During the period of training and equipping in Oto Bay.a
large portion of the: battalion was engaged in truck construction
During parts of May and June* A. Provisional Truck Assembly
SBattalion was formed composed of two batteries from 114th F. A.
and two batteries from the 149th F. A. Bn, with attached mechan-

Iics from the Reconnaisance Troop and Ordance Company, and the

124th Infantry Regiment. This group and the assembly line was











under command of Major MILT1O E HULL, S-3 of the 149th F. A.

This personnel was quartered at the old SOUFAC HOTEL with the

assigned duties of assembling'500 trucks. Three shifts wore

established as follows: 0700-1600; 1700-2400; 0001-0600. A day

and night mess were set up. The night shift having to feed five

meals in 12 hours.

Base Ordance was operating the assembly line at the time it

was taken over by this Provisional Outfit, which we called the

1149th Prov. Truck Assembly Battalion. After about two weeks, the
114th F. A. personnel were relieved by additional men from the

149th F.A. Bn, in order that the training program of both Ba-

ttalions would not be disrupted. During the four weeks period, a

total of 506 trucks were assembled, consisting of Dump, 2- ton,

1- ton; 3/4 ton;Weapon Carriers and 1/4 ton Command and Reconnai-
sance cars. This total would have been greater, but the assembly

line was rearranged three times, and production could not go on

while the rearrangement was being done. The battalion was
contended for its outstanding record.

During the period 18 June to 24 June the firing batteries

Engaged individually in Battalion Landing Team exercises with

the 124th Infantry. Actual full-scale loading and landing op-

orations were made and much training was derived.

On Thursday, 22; June, the Artillery Army Ground Force Teat-.

ing Team of the XI Corps gave the battalion the Battalion AGF

Te2ts #1 & #2. The battalion was unable to participate in'the

Test #3, due to Alert for Combat movement.








:: ':From 23 June to 28 June preparations wore made for emb-,rk- .

actionn for move to Aitape Combat Area. Major JOSEPH J HILL,
Battalion Executive acted as TQM and did an outstanding job.

SApproximately 50 1 of the battalion personnel and all combat car-

go sailed from Gro Bay on 29 June, aboard the SS Goodhue, and
'SS Barnes. These were Liberty ships and were greatly overcrow.d-
ed due to the belated arriARA sof scheduled LCIs. Approximately
1200 men were.aboard each 9Ip and sleeping, feeding, and san-
itary facilities were a :g 'ei'oblem.

O: n the night of 4 July, the Libertys anchored at Aitape and
Task Force Headquarters representatives came aboard for General
HUTCHINSON, Task Force Commander, and Colonel STARR, Commander

of the 124th Regimental Combat Team. C-i the morning of 5 July,
commanders of all units and organizations, and their staff rep-
resentatives went ashore for a conference and orientation at
:X Corps Headquarters. !Orders were issued for the unloading of
Infantry troops with individual equipment to reinforce and improve
the perimeter, but the artillery troops and all cargo was left
aboard the ships. Other than the construction work to be perform-

ed by the infantryand scheduled preparation of positions by the
artillery, the Combat Team was in the .nature of a "Floating
Reserve."

The remainder of the battalion, under Major MILTON E HULL,
Battalion S-3, boarded.LCIs at Cape Sudest on 3 July and sailed
that night to join the battalion. The LCIs arrived at Fin-
schhafen on the morning of 4 July and were beached for the troops

to debark for exercise and swimming. Troops were reembarked in.
.the afternoon and sailed for Aitape to arrive at 1630 on 0 July .









12

The 149th Field Artillery Battalion was under Corp Control

'and. Liaison was established with XI Corp Artillery, At this

'time the Infantbry went under the control of the 32nd Division.

Prior 'to !the arrival of ithe MLCIs, arrangements were made for

bitvouaoing the battalion In the :rear positions of the 120th F.A.,

antireconnaisance for positions areas and perimeter of defense

Wa'doe by Bn CO and Asst S-3.

Troops debarking from LCIs were marched along the beach to

'the 120th positions ~where kitchens'owere set up and B rations fed.

Minimum essential equipment was unloaded:from the ships and sur-

evey begun immediately. On 9 July the remainder of the troops wore

debarked from the Liberty ships and unloading of equipment and

cargo begun.

From captured documeintsand statements of prisoners, it

was anticipated'thattthe.Japs would attack the defense perimeter

-between'1:July and lO.trJly, probably at the Covering Force line
':on'the Driniumor River. :.A plan was.putinto effect on 8 July

'that sent two Battalions East across the Driniumor. .One Ba-

'ttalion was to:proceed along:ther coast and the other-inland.
Each'of these battalions was supported by a battalionoff Field

.Artillery. The 124th Regimental Combat Team wiph naval and air

support was to embarkeon 12,'July, and make an amphibious attack
.on' the morning 13 Julynat :Nyaparake, New Guinea, to seize a
l'bachhead and expand' it South and West.-to make contact with the

R'bannaisance in Force. :All equipment and supplies along with

the:troops were assembledtin :the Tadji Plantation area and final









preparations made to begin loading the LCTs and LOCIs at noon

12 July. On the night of 10 July, the Japs attacked the center

of the Driniumor line which was hold by the 128th Infantry of 'the

32nd Division. The attack was made in considerable force betwoon

the two Battalions who had crossed the Driniun:or on the Rocon-

naisance in Force mission. Tremendous artillery support wa9

given the river defense line, but the Japs succeeded in penetrat-

ing the center of the line, causing the Battallon in the c3ntera

of the line to withdraw. The two battalions on the left and

right of this battalion had crossed the river on thQ Reconnaisancj

in Force mission. The two battalions which had crossed the river

were in a very precarious situation as were the troops holding

the Driniumor line on the inland flank. This inland flank was

called the BALDY FCOCE and consisted of the 112th Cavalry and

certain battalions of the 127th Infantry of the 32nd Division.

The force from the beach inland to the Bialdy Force was called

the ALEX FORCE. The boundary between these forces as the AFUA-
SANAMO TRACK. The break-through by the Japs and the withdrawal

of the center Battalion, necessitated a hasty witldrawl by tho

BALDY FORCE, to prevent being cut off. The situation was rather

obscure on July 11-12 but it was known that large numbers of Japs

were on the West of the Driniumor.


In view of the situation, on the night of 11 July, the; plan

for the amphibious landing by the 124th Corbat Team was tcrpo R~'r-

ily suspended with the CT remaining on the alert for any ia:.y i-

ed mission. It shortly became obvious that thoe Lrit-uor Coveorin

Force line must be reestablished a and accordingly tihe -1~tlth CG::,?







14
Team, less 2nd Bn..124th Infantry (in Corp Reserve) and Co "A"

of the 106th Engineers, was ordered forward to assembly areas

just short of Anamo, to attack the morning of 13 July. Upon re-

ceipt of the order to occupy positions to support the attack,

the Battalion was loaded and movement forward begun under the Bn.

Executive, Major JOSEPH J HILL, leaving Tadji Plantation at 1255.

The NIGIA RIVER was not fordable and the light pontoon bridge

would not accommodate more than a 3/4 ton vehicle. Col. Jones,

after conference with General KAISER, the. Task Force Artillery

Officer, joined the advance parties who had preceded by light

vehicles to the forward area. Necessary orders were issued and

parties returned to the column. Prior and during this time,
Liaison and Forward Observation parties rejoined their respective

Infantry battalions. The advance parties rejoined the battalion

just as it reached the Beachmaster, where it became necessary to
shuttle the firing battery prime movers, guns, and all heavy ve-

hicles forward across the NIGIA by LOTs. The remainder of the
battalion, in light vehicles proceeded forward to the position

area. The battalion began to arrive in the position area on a

narrow sand spit, just West of the mouth of AKANAI CREEK at 1G45.

This was a very narrow spit with the ocean on the North and
AKANAI CREEK curvingback from its mouth just in front of "C"

Battery to form the south side of the battalion. The spit was

about 100 yards wide at the widest point and the battalion area

from front to rear was less than 400 yards. Large bodies of

Japs were known to be just south of our position with no infantry

in between. With only about three hours remaining to fully pre-

pare, occupy, and fortify before dark, feverish haste was made.








'Ib was well after dark before the last battery, "A" Battery

arrived in the position area. A perimeter was organized under

the direction of Major Hill, using the water on three sides for

fields of fire.

During the afternoon, the Asst S-3 and the Horizontal Con-

trol Operator had made an exact copy of the Metro Stripped Fir-

ing Chart of the 129th Field Artillery, which would have to be

used through necessity, with only an early morning registration

to correct it for our guns.

By 2000 overlays were completed for the forward observation

and liaison parties for the attack the next morning.

At 0155 on the morning of 13 July the Field Order No. 1 of

the Persecution Covering Force was received. It stated, in part,

that Jap forces have broken through our lines along the Driniumor

River south of ANAMO and in the vicinity of AFUA. His patrols had

penetrated west for 2000-3000 yards. The Persecutibn Covering

Force was ordered to attack early 13 July with the ALEX FORCE

making its main effort in a southeasterly direction from Anamo,

to restore original line along the DRINIUMOR RIVER. The BALDY

FORCE was ordered to attack Jap forces on the right (south) fls~in

drive west, and reestablish line along DRINIUMOR RIVER.

TERSECUTION ARTILLERY was ordered to support the attack by a

twenty minute preparation just preceding H Hour. Harrasaing fire

were fired during the night by other battalions.

At 0500 a barge load of 800 rounds of ammunition arrived at

the battalion. All ammunition was delivered direct to the







16

battalions by barges and unloadedc by both humann chains" and by

tractor. At 0807 the Battalion had registered and preceded to

fire preparation in front of the attacking troops.


At 0850, Capt. MCCAIN, Ln with Rogt., reported capture of

Jap plan of attack issued at 1630 on 12 July. One Jap battalion

was to proceed down ANANAI CREEK towards the ocean. At about

this same time an unconfirmed report.from another Field Artilllry

Battalion stated that two Japs Battalions were moving from the

south towards our area. The perimeter was notified of the poss-

ible attack, while support of infantry advance was continued.

Our Infantry attack continued according to plan with intermitt-nb

calls for artillery support. During the early part of the coan-

paign, great difficulty was experienced with Jap patrol and raid-

ing parties, cutting wire lines. At 1630 on 13 July a wire pert

of the battalion was fired on by mortars, between the front lines

and the battalion position. Pvt JAMES F LISA, 32500995, Hq. Btry

was lightly wounded by shrapnel, in lower back region, becoriLng

the first recipient of the Purple Heart, of which there were to

be a considerable number. Buffalos were used to lay underwater

lines weightedwith sandbags, and effective communication was

maintained in this manner for about a week. The work of Captain

FLOYD E COLEY, Battalion Como and the communication men of thVa

battalion was'outstanding throughout the campaign.


The first round of Artillery fired in actual combat by any

unit of the 31st Division, was fired by this battalion at 0752

on 13 July, by 2nd Section of "B" Battery. The lanyard was

pulled by Sgt DAVID BALLARD, 20423101, the oldest enlisted man,







17
from point of service, within "B" Battery. Tho m:isaon was an

Air Registration on Base Point.

Prior to the jtump-off, of the infantry in the attack, the

.battalion fired a preparation of approximately 500 rounds and

continuous support was furnished throughout the remainder of tho

day. Approximately 1300 rounds of artillery ammunition was ex-

pended on that day, which is undoubtedly the heaviest day of

fire that has yet been delivered by any battalion of the 81st
Division. The continuous support in front of the advancing

infantry was highly instrumental in their rapid and almost un-

interrupted advance.

The attacking infantry of ALEX FORCE reached the initial

objective in late afternoon of 13 July and preparations were ra`.s.

for night defense, which included the firing in of protective

barrage, which was to become a standard nightly procedure for telw

next four weeks. Throughout the night the battalion fired harrass-
ing and interdictory fires East along the coast beyond the
DRINIUMOR RIVER.

About noon of 14 July the DRINIUM1OR RIVER line was reestab-

lished and by night our supported battalions had made contact

with units ontheir flanks and preparations were made for the

night and protective barrages shot in by the battalion.

The attack to reestablish the DRINIUMOR line was highly

successful despite enemy opposition. Most resistance wa: in .Ltb

nature of sniper fire, but one road block was encountered, on

13 July. The Japs launched one counfter-attack which c ,a br-k:~n.







by 18 :
up by innteose artillery concentrations anrd' the attack preceded.
The Japs used automatic weapons, mortars and 75mm guns. A
document that was taken from a'dead Jap, who was apparently the
CO of the 237th Infantry, gave the complete plan of Jap attack.

: On Friday, 14 July, the battalion received a "Citation for
the Operation of: the 13th July 1944." .It was from the Command-
ing General of the PERSECUTION COVERING FORCE, and is quoted
here: "Congratulate your entire force upon their success of 13
July. The enemy still requires complete liquidation. Your dem-
fionatrated resolute spirit and determination give me greatest
: confidence in your ability The Commanding General of the
forcee Artillery also added the following: "By your accuracy,
!skill, and courage you have proved your metal, andI am proud to
have the privilege.of conveying to your officers and men the
Force Commander's message."

SFire of the 149th .A. A. killed a counted total of 25 Japs
n one concentration in front of BELL's (lst Bn, 124th Inf) pos-
''ition during the afternoon. The battalion sent out patrols to
i;:the south of its position. The front was rather quiet with con-
i.:.'tinued organization in progress by all units.

For the'next period extending from 15 July to 50 July days
were very similar. Many moments of excitement were experienced
and many hundreds of Japs killed. Continuous improvement was
Made in lines along the DRINIUMOR, until large bunkers were fin-
'ally constructed. The battalion displaced about 500 yards to
Ithe rear when hightides threatened to wash the sartdSpit away.
1- ,- ,











.' The displacement was made possible by the area to our immediate

:;; rear being cleared by movement of the 129th Field Artllery. Our
;.-initial area had been improved but this displacement allowed the
construction of an excellent position. Careful layout of the
battalion defense, under the supervision of the Bn Exec., Major
'iHill,' based on lessons learned in the first position provided
,for the best defensive perimeter. This period was characterized
:.,by continuous and aggressive patrolling by all elements. Frequent
icallsl came in for artillery support both day and night. Infil-
';' traction into the infantry' positions was the rule rather than the
exception. On one occasion the Japs attacked the Driniumor
'River line in a column of fours, but wore halted with consider-
able loss by timelyfire from this battalion. any remunerative
:.targets were freed on by all forward observers and liaison offic-
:ers. Lt. Michelson, "C Forward Observer, on one occasion locat-

ed a group of dug-in. Japs to his rear and adjusted and fired a
.'heavy concentration on them which resulted in the neutralization
and subsequent capture of a Jap 70mm gun. Artillery Obseer s
!f this battalion were particularly active in patrolling with
;;the Infantry. At the entrance of the Battalion into combat the
Total Jap casualties to date were 1366 Killed in Action and 41
:Prisoners of War. "Colonel EDWARD STARR, CO of 124th Infantry
took command on 14 July of the forces formerly known as the
: ALEX FORCE. Thid Force now came to be known as the TED FORCE.

,Both the TED FORCE and the BALDY FORCE were the recipients of
:.::frequent attacks by the Japs both in the nature of harassment
Sand full scale attack. The South flank (BALDY) was particularly

::exposed and subject to constant and heavy attacks.. Artillery








20
positions were constantly in danger of infiltration and several
Japs were killed in the vicinity yf the artillery positions,
bearing.demolition charges. At the end of thi' period, 31 July
Jap Casualties including prisoners, totaled 4756 of which a
large percentage fell to the TED FORCES supported by this ba-
ttalion :

Following the".first day of the 'attack, when approximately
1300 rounds -were fireddi,: ntermiittent .firing was the rule of the
day for this period fro14 Jul$ to:30 July. A great number of
night issins Aswerefired both as .harrasement and on targets of
opportunity. A brief summary of the' fire during this period
follow's:

om 160, of ;on day .to .600: .the following da. was: consider-
ed the dyyo6f orerd purposes.. For thd period ending
SJuly thb battalion tired twei-e V asitds, on enemy infantry,
with telling effect' to V tbtal -of approximately 600 rounds. Dur-
: .ingthenex..; period o&i ligh. tire on enemy tr-oop waa deliver-

, t er I. ,. ,
edbut 'a orientatid' n a ;d otr th6 Iiantrywee fired and
Spr-atct ,'barage sh ot' ib l; '.' E. RINIUAR iV R.V For th,
r4t '4h e !
period ending it Siy tarts *we ot iaeria biut heavy fire
'fo effe ct wa uaedi'or at tota te bf, bout 00 Ub utds, which in-
cluded '~dmiiet: 'nheutralization of machine gu.i fire, a body of
enemy troOps and erea iortar. fir ring ontined rather
i'ght fo the nex-t several days which. was a period iof intensive
and extensive infantry patrolligrit the period ending 20 July
Sas 'one O.great. firinS-;activity. Hieaxvy harrassing and interdic-
tWtoy;, :f.ies 1r ai down on. areas in which enemy troop were known







21
t e as sembling' P1On' 22 July .Lt..Michelson, located the dug-in

Jap'infantry'o his rear. Th ou had a .Jap mountain gu'.
which they used .to drop. short rounds behind ou' lines, when
friendly artillery : was. frirlgg, i.on several occasions:. His :'-;i:.
Successful adjustment resultedi;n the killing of a number of Japs
and.thesubsequent capture :of. ths gu, Enemy mortars were fired
ono three times, machine guns once, snipers on three occasions,
enem troops: across the river on three more occasions: during this
'same day of iitensi fied Jap ativity-, Heavy harassing :ire s
e cu e h -- '.- :.. ., .:. ".' .
were continued 'each night -n: an effort to destroy: the combat eff-":
cie'ncsyof a aspect ed impending attack. Early on the morning
of,27. July, as a.p attempting top cross the river were on the receiv-
i'ng .end.- of heavy ar tillery fire from this battalion and ..the attack
,as successful repulsed". 450 rounds 'total was also expended in
y. harassing ssions on this same :night. The following day:
and nights throuIgh. the night : of 30 July were' characterized by in-'
Senve patrol and. very little Japctivity inour sector.
Ph.incipal fires were thoie of harassmentnt:

';JOn 0 uly .the battalion received an Oral Fieid Order from
the ommandng General Persecution Covering Force Artillery, to: ';
the effect that elements of Jap 237th'and 239th Infantry Regiments
:Iwere believed to be .Iin the: areeast .ofthe: DRINIUMOR RIVER In the
... : ... ". ,ara,,. i ...v:. .; o ...h. 'in .
",vicinity of : NIU1- : CREEK:. Th. .TED F ., less .st Bn 128th Infan-
ry (which had o been a part of the ED FRCE up to this time),
'reinforced by2 2nd Battalion 124th i infantry, was ordered to attack
at 0800 31 July and push forward t the east; t ree battalions
in line one in reserve initial odbjective: NIMEN CREEK. The







22
Driniumor.line was to be immediately occupied by other troops
upon the jump-off of the TED FOCWE. .For the attack the TED'FORCE
-. i .' -
was composed of all three battalions 'of the 124th Infantry plus

*2nd battalion of the 169th Infantry of the 43rd Division. This

battalion wqs commanded by Major Lewis and was hereafter to be

known as the LVEIS FORCE. 1st Battalion 124th Infantry was
called the BUTCH FORCE, 2nd Battalion the FOVWLER FORCE, and the

3rd battalion the PAPPY FORCE, after'their commander who was

known as "POOP-DECK PAPPY". This was Lt. Col. Williams, who

will long be remembered as one of the most colorful figures of
the Atape campaign. His battalion was featured in the YA1IK mag-
azine with the story "PAPFY'S BOYS AT TADJI." The 149th Field

Artillery Battalion, reinforced by one Liaison Section from the

129th Field Artillery, was placed in direct support of the TED
FORCES from its position at AKANAI CREEK and ordered to prepare
to displace forward east of CHAKILA when directed.

Capt. WILLIAM B SWEARINGEN and party were to accompany the
TED FORCE headquarters .s liaison; Capt WILLIAM H FRESLAID with
BUTCH; Capt :GEORGE H CRILL with PAPFY; Capt FRANCIS S McCAIN with

LEWIS. The FOWLER liaison was furnished by the attached section.

Each of these liaison officers and sections did an outstandingly

fine job and contributed in a large measure to the ultimate
* success of the attack. Each liaison officer was ably assisted

by a forward observer party. With BUTCH was Lt. RICHARD L WAGIER;
with PAPPY was Lt. WILLIAM H IICHELSON; with LEWIS initially was
LT SAMUEL J NIELD. Lt Nield was relieved about the middle -of the

attack to report immediately for Shore Fire Control, and was
replaced by Lt. RAYMOND J MARLOWE, the Asat. ComO who was forward






, ./ .* ", ": *: i < *: .... ,5

on a communication mission, and immediately stepped in to fill
-this vacancy. Before the end of the attack these liaison officers
;and forward obs ever parties had become intergfated into closely
S:.knit teams in every respect. -Two other liaison officers who per-
-.ilformed their missions in exceptionally meritorious manner, were
Lt. FRANK J ZIRBLIS and Lt. JOHN J KEMP. These two officers as
liaison pilots, flew many hours daily, from dawn to after dusk
and performed innumerable missions; among them which were con-
stant fire missions, dropping bf urgently.needed small items
:-such as radio batteries, location of units and cooperation in
:preparations for dropping supplies and' food by :-47 Transports,
and the dropping on two occasions of critically needed blood
p-lasma in less than thirty minutes after the request was received.
SOn one day one pilot flew over ten hours. Landings were made af-
*ter, dark and flights; were constantly over the enemy lines--on
one occasion one of the planes received machine gun hits in both
wing and fuselage: o sum it .up in brief: It is safe to say.
that without the Sup ort of these planes. the infantry would have
been without food for better than 75% of the time, completely
:without communication s except a scheduled flight of the division
'.courier, without artillery fire support and without the ability
::.of locating. itself id the dense jungle. In the words of hundreds
of the doughboys: "The Cub plane and the C-47 are the best damn
*; planes in the United StatesArmy". Lts Kemp and Zirblis were both
1: recommended for the hir Medal.It would be very hard to single out
any individual for special mention from those that accompanied
:the infantry in this attack. The performance of every man was
above reproach and the infantry,had only the highest praise for.:








these men. L t. RICHARD L WAGNER, due to his location.with the
leading battalion, probably had more opportunity to fire miss-

. .;:;ions, and his work was the object of the highest praise of his
I.'nfantry battalion commander. He almost constantly placed him-
- ,: self with the point of the leading elements event hough these

,, elements were rotated.,. The team work in artillery support be-
S:tween Lt Wagner, with the point and Capt. Freeland with the Bn.
0,I: COwas very instrumental in the advance of this battalion with-
.out casaulty from enemy action after the first day of the attack.

Later in the day by day description of this attack, which
: was described by General MacARTHUR as "a feat unparalleled in
.the history of jungle warfare", more will be said of the work of
these various sections and officers, and especially that of Capt.
.Freeland and his sectiwo


;Z July 1944
TED FORCES crossed the DRINIUMOR RIVER at 0800, and pro-
ceeded towards NIUMEI CSREEK. The advance was made with three
battalions abreast, i.th the 2nd battalion on the beach (left), ..
1st battalion in the center and 3rd battalion on the inland (right)
side. 2nd battalion of 169th,(LEWIS) crossed the river at 0945,
and followed the rig t flani. of PAPPY as a reserve battalion and
to refuse the right lank of TED FORCE. Liaison and forward ob-
servation parties wera with all battalions as set out in detail
:in preceding paragraphs. The advance continued with practically
nil resistance. The ;one exception to this was an ambush hit by
BUTCH. "A" Company was advancing on the right of the battalion.

SThe jungle was very.dense and intermittent rain was falling.









,Three shots were heard from the point and the column halted; but
,-shortly resumed its advance, passing three dead Japs,' who were
'the results .of the three shots. Shortly thereaf ter firing again
.was..heard from the point--this time both BAR and rifle fire. As

the march was resumed, twelve more Japs (thoroughly dead) were
passed in their former bivouac area. The rain became heavy at
this time. A short while later.the battalion bit a Japdefense
position, to which the jungle hidden' Japs allowed the point to

advance, within five yards. Jap snipers -had allowed our advance

elementss to pass by them.. At his time the Japs opened fire
:with machine guns. An effort WLs made to flank the Japs right,
.;but it also met machine gun and sniper fire. First Aid men did
;:an .outstanding effort to evacuate these point casualties but
'. every first aid man was either Iilled or wounded. At this time
-Lt Wagner, the forward observer, began his adjustment which was
made under very pre various circumstances due to the remainder

,;of .the battalion ad dancing on.the left and the PAPPY FORCE on
the right. With' the expenditure of only 36 rounds the Jap pos-
ition was neutralize d-completely, which allowed .the BUTCHF ORCE
to t withdraw and est blish a perimeter in the short time that

'remained before dar :, and it was found the next day that the Jap
positionin had 'een completely neutralized by the fire of the pre-
ius day. Other t an the BUTCH FORCE, all battalions reached
.ithe objectives that ay, -with only a few Japs encountered and killed.

i, The 149th F..A Bn. was directed to remain in position at
bu'i t' o. b"6 n .e.p .a
AKANAI CREEK for the day, but to begin preparation' for di nlso-

ment forward to the vicinity of.CHAKILA on 1 August. One battery
o6f the 181st .F.A. (155im How) was to be attached and would co-







2 0
let.a position to the direct rear of our battalion. This
would be a dispacement of about three miles, putting the

Battalion within about 1000 yards of the mouth of the DURINIUI.MR.

iFull reconnaissance was made.and preparations begun for the dis-

placement by -the Bn CO and Battery Commanders and parties. The
\battalion was also ordered t' -'4iy survey forward with LEWIS.
'This survey was Jungle survey '-i'e worst sort, but neverthe-

less reported by Lt. Nield to .;be within 600 yards of being con

plete, when the section had to: stop to dig in for the night.

This survey was performed by L .i Nield and his forward ob erva-
tion party as it advanced.


S1 August 1944
Early in the morning, orders were received to displace for-
ward by battery, furnishingcontinuous fire support to the irnfan-

try, during displacement. "'B" Battery displaced first, and was
in position ready to fire at 0950; "A" Battery at 1300; and "C"

Battery at 1400. "CI" opened at 1330 at new position. This new
position- was in the :icinity of the village of CHAKILA., and wva

'muchllarger in size than the former positions. A creek flowed

on the south.flank ,ot the forward battery which was- "" Battery,

turning south and th n west again, \and then north and then we3t

again just at the junction of Hq and "Al Battery. A. sketch of
:the area. is attached as an annex but the position may best be

described here by sa ing that the batteries in order from front;
to:rear were "C", "B' "A", HQ, and Med Det, with elements of

Service battery. The north was bounded by the sea And the south
.by a stream forming a large horseshoe with the flatten tips at
SC"and Hq Batteries. The distance from the center of the









27
battalion to the stream at the deepest point of the horseshoe

was a little over 100 yards and the ground was very rough,

gullied and rolling. The far side of the creek was dense junglo.

The interior of the horseshoe was cleared for artillery fields

of fire by dark of this date.


Infantry activity during the day was minor and no calls

were received for fire support. "B" Battery of 181st field

Artillery Bn. was attached to us and occupied position to our

direct rear. Night protective concentrations were s hot in, and

the above attached battery checked in on our selected Base Point,

and Check Points. No other activity this date.

2 AUGUST 1944

All quiet during the night from the infantry standpoint.

The 149th F.A, fired heavy counter battery fire beginning short-

ly after midnight on a Division Artillery located target. At
about 1100 the battalion fired heavy concentrations on enemy

positions for one hour and a half. This fire also was in the

nature of a "softening-uplnfor the attack south and southeast the

next day. A. total of 651 rounds were fired with air observation

with excellent coverage of the target area. The survey section

under Lt. HOWARD N MOSELEY, continued survey to tie our positions

into Corp Survey. At this time it would be well to mention the

outstanding work done by Lt. Moseley and his section. All survey

in this operation was 'of me'ecessity under most difficult con-

ditions. The Task Force artillery called upon this section for

much extra survey, all off which was carried out with dispatch

and accuracy.







2.
At 1110, Lt. Col Jones returned from TED FORCE with plans

for the infantry to attack south and then southwest to envelop

the enemy, cutting off his supply lines and to'close him in a

.pincer move between the BALDY FORGE and the TED FORCE, withthe
apex of the forces being approximately at APUA. This was to pro-,-.

in the week-':that follows to be one of the most difficult attacks

in the history of-jungle warfare. Such an attack meant cutting

off from all supplies other than by air, no communication other
than by.relay through artillery radio nets, no evacuation for

days, plus the usual hardships 'f sleepless nights, cold wet cloth-

Sing and resistance of the jungle; all of this not to mention the

.:constant resistance of the Jap, who apparently is in his natural
habitat in the jungle.

S The attached battery of 155mm How, -was registered on a long

range.;check point inj the afternoon, by the liaison plane of this
battalion. Work was continued throughout the day by every avail-

able man, to clear fields of fire and lower the mask range to the

south. This was, v ry difficult task due to the previously ment-

ioned thickness of toe jungle on our i kedliate south flank.


3 AUGUST 1944
This day proved to be one of the most eventful in the history

of the battalion's mission at AITAPE. At 0100 a small force of

Japs, approximately or 8, penetrated our perimeter. They man-

aged to cross the st eam in the deepest point of the horseshoe
under cover of intermittent rain and the noise of firing by th.

battalion As before mentioned, the rising slope from the storert
to the batteries was very gullied and ridged. The Janps apr'- n:it







29
divided-into :,about four groups of two or three.each headed to-
"wards one of the four batteries. The oup that went for :"A"

Battery, managed to get into h battery perimeter and set off.
Stwo :demolition charges i.n between the rows of ammunition in the
-battery dump. i: A number of men '.lere sleeping in the ammunition

.dump vicinity and. within it. -Tw. of .ouur men; pfc AIBERT FERRERA,
:-16148691 'and Pvt GEORGE J RU OLO, 515333193 .were killed instantly.
}Several men :were injured and-, heir names are listed with the .:
Purple Heart ; yards in he anex.

::{After placing the ,demolitlons, which were large blocks of
:explosives approximately ten ihes square and 6 to 8 inches ;
thick, detonated by both a fuZe and a grenade in the center, the
*i"i'. .. *, '. *: **' .. '* ,' "** ^ : % l* .... *" : -
Japs ran back toward the soIth flank, tossing a grenade under
t]ha cot of 2nd Lt.ROBET I; PoWERS, 0-1182684, wounded him with
inultiple shrapnel wnds in three places; Lungs kidney and liver.

SVery fortunately, the demolitions did not detonate the
ammunition although some of it was blown many yards. $The fuze of,
Sone i smoke shell was blown off, but the' shell did iot rupture '

Considerable, on fusion existed in the dark night, but
SLt. CLINTON V mSEROL, Asst Exe. of "A" Batter diately
o:r,:. ..:. .t ry .' imm. diate
Sleft f or .the Battal on Aid Station 'to summon aid. .t L.Meserole
.made this trip even though Japs. were known to be in the area and
:,also %in face of."the greater danger of.being shot by his own men..;:
.At the aid .station, Capt. JOHN L WHITAKER, Battalion Surgeon, -and-
two volunteers: Tee 3 RALPH E BAKERINK and Tec 5 STEWART McWILLIAMS,
left immediately:.to give aid to Lt Powers and unknown others that -
might be injured. After treating Lt. Powers and dther injured,









_ ,:thesemen of the Medical Dotachment searched the area for cthers

:.that might be hurt; during.this entire time Japs were known to

;:be in the area and the order hadi,been given to take cover" For

Their meritorious service, without regard to personal ...safety,::
Capt WHITAKE,1, Tec BAKERINK, .andTec 5 McWILLIAMS, were awarded

: the Bronze Star Medal....

.This group of Japs appar tly escaped from the area but':
": b. -e... :-At bou ...0.300 ,th6,
several were thought to be wounded. : t about 0300 another attempt
was made to enter the ar a and: one Jap wao killed within just a
few yards of a howitzer i Df "Ba Battery, which he was endeavoring
to reach to set-off another demolition charge. :Another Jap was ,

thought to be woundedas '.lood 'and se veral demolition charges were

found nearby the next morning*. At about 0500 another :Jap was seen
escaping from the -ara.1 A mall .patrol was sent.out south of the

creek the next morni g, for about 500 yards, This patrol saw.'i :

two Japs, killed one i of them and the other escaped.. Two packs
Were found which contained rice and personal equipment, and :ne "
"I '-. i
of which contained; demolition charges. Blood and .evidence of.
-wounded was also fouad. At 1600 that afternoon an infantry patrol

killed another Jap a d located other equipment. i : ,." '

.TE FORCES nove out according ,to plan.at 096. The first

reportrep received was *hat WILLIAIS was opposed by two companies

of Japs, LEWIS by one; '.Resistance was overcome and the advance
continued. .The only form of communications was through the

Artillery. Cub plane and it was kept busy constantly. At 1700':
the air observer, Lt. MARK F EVERETT, located a Jap mountain gu:1.
but the plane was called out of the area 'due to a bombing strike
'.. : .' : '. i .: '. ,.








'.before'fire could be adjusted on the gun. When the plitao wa.

;. able to return to the areait wds too dark to see the gun and tho
I Nips had moved it by the next Aorning.

io;'..:-'Wrk during the day was largely devoted to tightenitig the ;
perimeter, clearing fields of fire and leveling with bulldozers
. the gullies as much as pbssible.Heavy log dugouts were built
e.aid barbed wire. and chicken wi e was. strung. Arrangements wero
made -fora 60mm Miortar t fire' lares on call as well as HE in
the event of a mass: attak. C oservative estimate of enemy ca-ual-
,oi -. i: :
,ties for thi~ date: ..;200. .

... ,,. : 4 AUGUST 1944. .
It was discovered on thls:'date that the forces opposing TEK
iwere probably Imperi.. pa ee Marines, averaging about. six feet
and inexcellent .on. i6io. Identification was extremely hard a.s
.wer probablysI.Were dragging of ng
the Japs were dra go most of their dead in accordance with
,,, *.
teir1 eom pd s pping identification from thse they were
tno. ale to'move i '

:' The plane we tip again in an.effort to relocate the mountain n
.gun.that a.scu ob re by: darkness the preceding evening. It had
Seen: moved by .the Ja s during the night and the plane was unable
:to find it.': The ap, 'were .extremely persistent and! labored out

,..;-of reason to obtain very small amount of ineffective artilleryv
support.L .,They would hand pack over long distances he 70m m:

Mountain gun ammunit onwith individual men carrying one round each.
They fired on us at no time with more than one gun and ama.'
'of nine rounds at one time. Their mortars were effective, however,
,,; ..! .:! .: ,.. .. :, : ; .. .. .. : .








32

and they are proficient in the use of their very light machine

gun.

Between 0820 and 0830 the battalion fired the heaviest ten

minute preparation in its history. 593 rounds were fired in

front of thezone of advance of the TED FORCES with telling re-

sults. At 1130 two missions were fired on enemy infantry and

two more at 1345 on a large enemy assembly area. Infantry con-

tinued to advanceduring the day and there were no further requests

for fires until defensive fires were marked at'the end of the day.

At the end of this period TED FORCES had captured and des-

troyed four radios and generators; 20 LMGa and 15 knee mortars.

At the end ofthe period, definite identification of four units

with which we were in contact had been identified, two of which

were regiments, and another 18th Army Hq Troops.

A concentration was fired on a Jap Bivouac at 1800. At 2100

sentinals on the perimeter reported seeing three or more Japs
approaching the perimeter rom the Jungle to the south. They were
fired on,and flares were put up but they got away. The perimeter
continued firespasmodically throughout the night on Japs that

could be heard in the edge of the woods.

5 AUGUST 1944

During the night harrassing fires were laid down on enemy

positions. At 0830 a patrol of our battalion accidentally tripped

a booby trap on the pouth perimeter of-the battalion. Those in-

jured were Cpl RAY H WEST, 37115461, whoreceived severe head and

brain InjTur.y which re-sulted in his death; Also injured was








' Pvt :AMELCA CiPMAN, 534070970', as later .evacuated to a
'' general hospitall.:. ;;1:, '. :,

.t 0950 the Battalion was notified .to furnish name;,~ank, ;
and serial number of .Officer and enlisted party for Shore Fire
'Control Group. "Lt. SA. EEL J NIELD of "B" Battery was ordered to
Report to ;the CP as soon as physically possible. :He started out.
t noon with one litter patient annd .a patrol of 16 men. Lt. RAY1MOiN
J. IARLOWE formed a forw rd observer party from available men and.
Sent forward from Regim nt to 'ake the place of Lt:.'.Nield. : ,
123 J. aG -.11ch was
i At 20 .WILLIAMS reueste6 .fire on a dug in Jap MG which was
.*opposing their advance.' The gun was neutralized and .theiadvance ,
proceeded. At 1745 another concentration was fired on enemy
ainfantry .oin wa frontfred ene
antyin front fBUTCH.1 Practically the entire afternoon was
spent in arranging Itltough our plane for the. dropping of rations.'
whichh were urgently eeaed. details were completed:and rations
odr pp d.. .: "

Standing Orders for our Local Defense were disseminated by
the B.attalion Common ier to standardize previous methods and in-
:'ure the bestrossibl cpoperation between batteries when attacks
o.,ccur.

LLIAI MU met sm~t ff' opposition all day. TED PORCES killed

an estate dl'104.Jap this date; The entire advance had been
.:-through Jap bivouac areas estimated to be more than two battalions.
;.WILLIAMS was opposed byan estimated two companies when he stopped
for the night..' The .terrain was very difficult; jungle was dense.
',:,. and paths had to be hacked out by machetes, no trails existed at






34
all, and the opposition. was described as "sticky" by TED.'


6 AUGUST1944
S Plane made early contact with, each of the forces in regard
to supply messages and arrangements were made for drops of need-

ed food and equipment. Supplies had become an urgent problem by

this day of advice. Very little could be carried while advanc-

ing through the heavy juggle,. d recovery of supplies dropped in
in only slightly clearedjidropping spots were extremely difficult,
often impossible. Evacuation 'f, casualties was already a problem

.and on this date it was ,o become 'a much more severe one*

.'At :0930, Lt. Michelson, with WILLIAMS FORCE, called.for fire

on an enemy infantry, which had come up on.their perimeter dur-
ing the night. By the neutralization, effect of a well placed

artillery fire, the battalion was able to continue its advance.

At1345 a safety linp was'agreed upon and ordered materalized on
thd me.p, by Lt.Col. TAYLOR, Divarty S-3. This line was to control
artillery fire betwe n ;the forces of TED.and BALDY as they came

together. Nothing wvs to be fired East of this line without

clearance from the 1 9th or adjustment by its observer.

At 1130 urgent request for heavily guarded native train was
received from Col.St.rr, GO of TED FORCES. The work of these

native trains in the AITArE operation especially in evacuation

of casualties can nob be praised to highly. This request was
.forwardedto higher headquarters. At 1100 fire wasagain delivered
for BUTCH on enemy estimated to number 75. The Japs. were.driven

off to the SW< after suffering casualties.









At 1750 the Forward Observer of BUTCH'. called for fire on
;-an enemy supply route and by-pass which he had located with a:i
Point Patrol.' This was .Lt. Wagner, who has been mentioned be-
fore. A concentration was fired ,on this area and request made .
,ho Division Artillery for authority to interdict it during the
niiight. -^;.:,J

: Two .protective :brrges were shot in before dar The
liaison plne a were particular y'acive thil date in the handling.:
.Tod rlay of messages.

Authorit. for rierdictio'was obtained and concentrations
ere fired vbwie b6or'e midni ht and once after .

: 7 I' AtO ST 1944. .
".ap uppy wa~is nthedi ted as mentioned on day before- At
.?6o6 the 6rward Observer with WILltAMS requested fire on enemy.
Sbivoua th 313 rb6uis weore fired. This timely and effective i

arttiiy r71 did i clh:i'to allow this battalion to 'continue the
attack th .a wiat hight have beeh bserioti situation, .
."The Nipe had m.ed uA on the WILtIAMB 'perimeter during the night
and the itu iitn a ritia t daybrk concentration
again placed 6n enem :uppiy- by-pasms roue. A.dlt 0810 another 152
rounds 'were fired n this samie t6 get which was on the route of
adv nce bf BUTCH. A. UTC1 proceeded it .was discovered that at
least 25 to 50 Tas ad been killed ad, two mountain guns knock-
id Out. The trail hid been thoroughly pshot up and:ihe counted-
ead ee ni on the ral, as no : :ort :wA:: mde to :.
' search the entire .aea. covered by 'he .fire : ::. .::.
. .. . '-l'' i : : i








36

At 1150 LEWIS requested fire on enemy,machine guns which

were immediately neutralized. At 1250 a concentration was fired

on enemy infantry.

The only form of communications continued to be through the

SCub'.plane and the planes'maintained a constant patrol over the

TED FORCES. Essential small items were dropped during the day.

LEWIS had rough going all day, long, both due to terrain and

enemy action. 'This battalion killed at least 120 Japs on this
date, 'plus an unestimated numbed destroyed by artillery fire.

BUTCH killed at least 25 in one!: mall area during his advance

of this date.

In the early afternoon LEWIS had a premature burst of an

81mm Mortar and casualties and killed were heavy. This force

was still far from AFUAA and'the situation was critical. In

addition to the walking wounded, there were 18 litter cases--
three very serious. At 1745 an urgent request for -10 units of

blood plasma was received. by.the plane, which was .over the force

at that time. The plane immediately radioed the battalion and

plasma was wrapped for dropping and sent forward to the Cub strip.

The plane received the plasma and completed the drop in 35
minutes from the time of the first call, undoubtedly assisting

in the saving of a number of lives.

TED FORCES were ordered to remain on the East of the

DRINIUMOR RIVER until LEWIS could close with it. Patrols were

sent to contact LEWIS and additional litter bearers were also

dispatched. It was impossible, however to evacuate any of these








#37
casualties on this date.

From the 149th Field Artillery, the following were wounded
on this day:

Capt. FRANCIS S McCAIN 0-462865 L.W.A.
Pfc AUSTELL E REID .3 4402130 S.W.A.
Pfc CHARLES E SPIVEY 6534775 S-W.A.
Pfc JAIMES F McDONALD'. .36538811 L.W.A.
Pvt, EDWARD J OUIMETTE' j 20423555 S.W.A.
Pvt. Ouimette late died as result of his wounds'and all

others were evacuated ad los to the battalion.

8 AUGUST 1944
All battalions of TED FORCES continued march West and South-

west towards AFUA. to complete the closure on the Japs. During the

entire sweeping envelopment of the TED, the BALDY FORCE had also
been taking a heavy toll of thie Japs that were being pinched in

Between the two forces.i The general picture seemed to be that
the 'Nips were fall ng back in front of TED and at the same time
vigorously attack g BALDY in an effort to break out of the trap.
Undoubtedly -ome Japs fled into the very rugged and unexplored
Smountains.on the South lank. Disease was reported to be taking
a heavy toll by this time, by a prisoner taken by TED and BALDY.
Many prisoners expressed awe at the amount and accuracy of the
artillery fire that they constantly received, and one officer
was said to have as ed to see the automatic artillery.

During the morning our patrol combed an area 75 yards south
of our position, Several Jap gas masks were found--one of which
was apparently booby-trapped.

At 1230 one concentration was fired for LEWIS which killed








.. 38
a total of 10 Japs counted dead on the trail. An undetermined

number were killed and wounded off the trail and evidence exist-

ed of a number having been wounded on the trail. By night-fall
all of the battalions except LEWIS had begun to close in on the
RDRINIUiOR RIVER. LEWIS was still itn vicinity of NIEUMAN CREEK.

S; At about 0145 thismorning at least two rounds of artillery,

:fire of BALDY FORCE ARTILLERY vell! very close to BUTCH. Division

Artillery was notified and assurance was given that no more fire
would be placed in this area. .i.owever, at 0730 BALDY FORCE
ARTILLERY fired a concentration of battery five volleys on this

same area, resulting in death for six of BUTCH'S men and 15 to

:20 unded.- Full report of the occurrence was made to higher
headquarters at onoe by all concerned. This fire was placed to
the east of the safety line over protest of the 149th F.A., and

was the same concentr tion that had fallen dangerously near

BUTCH..,the preceding i lght .

:: When this artill ry ~ire began to fall, all of the men were
out of their sleeping trenches and thickly scattered through the
battalion area. At it ie burst of the first round, TEC 4 DELANO G
NEAL, 20423309 and CA ?T. TWILLIAM H FREELA.D, 0-326945, both ran
for the Liaison radio. .Tec 4 Neal reached the radio first, and
immediately began the call to cease firing. Capt. Freeland reach-
ed the radio and took up the continuation of:the call. Both of

these men went to the radio with complete disregard for their own
personal safety, when everyone else was diving for a'hole or
protection of some kind. Capt. Freeland was wounded severely in

the heel, and.has been awarded the Purple Heart. Both Capt Freeland










and Tec'4 Neal have been awarded the.Silver Star Medal for

Gallantry.

Of the 149th F.A. the following were woundedthis date:
CAPT WILLIAM H FREEl.N : 0-326945 .L.W.A.
Pfc ARiION L HUYCK 16148575 S.W.A.
Pvt WILLIE T IH, TT 34530052 L.W.A.,

Pfc Huyck later diC, Ca as result'of the wounds received.

9 AUGUST 1944
All battalions of the TED FORCES except LEWIS crossed to the

westb ank of the DRINIUiOR RIVER. and consolidated and patrolled

to await the arrival of IL1IS. 'V.SIS began the extremely
difficult march out early in the morning but was still about
1000 yards east of.the river at 1600. The progress was very slow

due to many walking.wbunded and the 19 litter cases;. It was im-

possible for LEWIS JI6 reach1the DRINIUMOR that night, but when
word was received that a portable hospital was there, a volunteer
patrol of approximately 40 men brought out the three most serious-

ly wounded during the! night, one of who was Pvt Ouimette of the
149th F. A.

No fire was deleted during the day. Cub planes were in
constant patrol over LEWIS to transmit messages and another drop

of ten units of plasna was made in the afternoon.*: ::

Plans were made to displace to TADJI PLANTATION the next day
beginning at 0830. Tractors were to be sent forward to AFUA to
bring out the heavy equipment of the infantry..'' *








40
10 AUGUST 1944

The 152nd Field Artillery Battalion arrived early to relieve

the 149th F.A. Bn. and displacement to the bivouac area at TADJI

was completed beforonoon. Camp was established and normal camp

duties begun.


Many men had skin infection that required constr-.
ment and those that had made the attack of week long c.

were in most cases almost unable to walk on. their feet.

Sbl] RY
At the close of the: 124th Combat Teams part of the AITAPE

campaign, 7606 Japs had been killed or found dead, and Prisoners

of Wartotaled 95. Official credit for 2,067 Nips is given to the
Combat Team plus countless others-killed and wounded by artillery

and mortar fire and others that.the Japs drug off after they

were killed 'or wounded. Copies of the comendations of General

MacARTHUR, 'General -KIEGER, "General HALL and others are attached.

The"highest praise tsat the 149th Field Artillery Battalion re-
ceived and-.the one 'that the battalion appreciated the most, were
the -statements of. th doughboys and infantry officers, who said

that .we had h given th3m every possible measure of support and that

the battion was thI. "finest artillery in the t U.S.Army." Men of

the. battalion could hot help but feel a great pride when sick, and
wounded men-in the hospital would 'call you over.to their cot and

ask if you were a member of .the 149th F.A. When told that you

were, they would ay, "I just want. toshake your hand." Every

member of the 124th Combat Team was proud of a job well done.

From 10 August until embarkation: folr JOKOTAI operation on









9 oopteiboer, tiio as sent in fixing up an area,rest, so;iriiinj,

repair and replac.cment of equipment and making of plans for the

future operation. General PzlSO.S visited the Combat Team and

paid us compliments and delivered congratulatory remarks of

others.


During thi rest period an intensive prograrn of shell nock-

lace and bracelet making was begun by a large percentage of the

battalion.


The battalion lost two more Captains during this period:

Capt. VJILLIAi B SEaARINGGEN, 0-404157, and Capt GEORGE H CGhlLL,

0-336396. Capt Swvaringen was evacuated for high blood pressure

and sinus infection, and Capt. Crill fcr a bad knee.


Orders were received arid preparations begun for the IO3RDTAI.

operation. Major JOSEPH J HILL, Bn. Executive Officer was

appointed Transport Q:uartermastaer for the Corbat Team, and short-

ly after became T'QM for the entire XI Corp Headquarters and all

attached troops at AITAE when the job was turned over to the

Combat Teen by Corp. i Major Hill was ably assisted by Sgt. JOHli

A SMITE, 37016062., a for their outstanding work in this oper-

ation they were awarded the Bronze Star Medal.


For his leaders p of the battalion in the AITAPE mission

and the superb showing made by this organization, Lt. Col. W.

-JGENE JO1ES was aw-arded the Bronze Star Modal.


In preparation for the MOROTAI operation, Capts. HAYES,

FOVIKES, WELLES, and Lt. MOSELEEY made maps of the general area

of the operation as well as maps of specific areas on the island.








42
Terrain study was made and a talkgl.ven to the officers by Capt.

Welles, Bn. S-2. For his meritorious achievement, Capt Welles,
was awarded the Bronze Star Mledal'.

The batteries of the battalion'were transported to MOROTAI,

by LSTs.less the detached personnel which travelled-with the
infantry. Prior to embarkation fo' the actual mission a full
scale dry-runvas held at IAITAPE-










HEADQUARTERS US'FORCES
APO 705


11 August 1944

MEMORANDUMU:



1. I take great pleasure :in transmitting this message from
the Commanding General, Sixth.Army;

"2HE FOLLOWING MESSAGEE HAS JUST BEEN RECEIVED FROM
GEN.RAL la.CARTHURi QUOTE PLEASE EXrKESS TO THE OFFICERS AND 1&ti
OF THE TASK FUiiCSE AD1iRWLATION. FOR THE SrLENDID CONDUCT OF THE
CANMAIGN EAST OF AITAPE PD THE OfERATIONS VWhERE PLANNED VIITH GhtlAT
SKILL CA VERE EX.BUTED 'wITHi GREAT DEUTEfRINATION AND COURAGE AND
VERE CROWUi'4ED WITH GREAT SUCCESS END QUOTE IT GIVES ME GREAT
PLEASURE TO TRANSNI.T THIS IIESSAGE AND I WISH TO ADD ~i OWNI
CONGW-ATiTATIONS FOR A DIFFICULT JOB VWELL DONE iD SIGNED KRUGER"

2. I assure all officers and men that their expected fine
performance, willingness to accept a difficult job and determin-
ation to see it through, have been appreciated by me.

3. This fight i3s preliminary to bigger and harder ones to
come. We must all beo prepared in future operations to accept
.greater losses and privations. The attack rmust continue and only
by pushing it to the u:tmost' can we attain maximum success.
4. This memnoranidn will be communicated to all officers
and enlisted men of the command at the first opportunity.




/s/ C. P. Hall
C.P. HALL
eMajor General, U. S. Army
Commanding





ANNEX #1











A.V'ARDS


AIR 1.iEDAL

.1ST LT. JOHN J KEMP 0-1170447
1ST LT. FiiRNK J ZIRBLIS .'.: 0-1177706


SILVER STAR 11EDAL

CAPT. VJLLIAI H FREELAIA.I|D i 0-326745
TEG 4 DELANO G NEAL 20423309


BRONZE STAR 'lIEDAL

LT. COL. W EUGEINE JONES 0-242926
IMAJ. JOSEPH J HILL 0-176243,
CAPT. BENJAMIN; F WELLES JR 0-356677
CAPT. JOHN L VIITAKE3 0-118773
TECS 3 RALPH E 3BAKDIN ; 37652022.
SGT. JOHN A SklITi 37106062
TEC 4 CLA(RK A :CONGDON 32492234
TEC 5 STEWVART !J Mc'WILLIAMS 36404352.
PVT CHARLES IL NIXON 20423553


PURPLE HEART

CAPT. WILLIA H i REELA. D 0-326745
CAPT. FRANCIS S IMcCAIN 0-462e65
2D LT. ROBr T IH POY'; RST 0-1182684
S/SGT GEk-G SEL2TOH: 20423443
SGT RICHARW D 1W KEIYCON 31047896
TEC 4 JACK D HUIPF .. 38087305
CPL JAiMES F LISA 32500995
TEC 5 R. J. 0 MOC 34021634
TEC 5 EUGENE ROBINSON 20423557
SPFC ILLIE T HEfWTT 34530052
PFC AUSTELL E REID 34402130.
PFC CHARLES E SPIVEY 36534775
PVT PHILIP J BAI'JSS 14202242
PVT SAM~IUEL F DARBY 38511710





ANNEX -2.











32d DIVISION ARTILLEKR


KBSM/pod
APO 32
17 Au'g 44

SUBJECT Conmehdation.
TO Commanding Officer, 149th Field Artillery Battalion,
APO 705. .

1a Commendations and congratulatory messages to the
Persecution Covering Force:have been received from Generals
MacArthur, Krueger and Hall .for its performance in action
throughout the campaign jusf'closed. To these, General Gill,
in Memorandum No. 28 dated 12 August 1944, adds his commen-
dations. ?
2-. wish especially to express to you my pride and
commendation for ydur;part and the part which your officers
and men played in this action.
3. The skill_ accuracy and meticulous attention to duty
shown by the offi!opts,and men of your battalion was outstanding
and a credit to our Arm. The efficiency, volume and timeliness
of the Artillery frres, by breaking up the enemy's attack
formations and causing him severe casualties, greatly contributed
to.the speedy and successful conclusion of the campaign.



/s/ Robert B Me Bride Jr
ROBERT B NM BRIDE JR
,Brigadier General USA
Commanding.





ANNMX # 3







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Full Text

PAGE 1

Digitized with the permission of the FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY AFFAIRS FLORIDA NATIONAL GUARD SOURCE DOCUMENT ADVISORY Digital images were created from printed source documents that , in many cases , were photocopies of original materials held elsewhere . The quality of these copies was often poor . Digital images reflect the poor quality of the source documents. Where possible images have been manipulated to make them as readable as possible . In many cases such manipulation was not possible . Where available, the originals photocopied for publication have been digitized and have been added, separately , to this collection. Searchable text generated from the digital images, subsequently, is also poor . The researcher is advised not to rely solely upon text-search in this collection. RIGHTS & RESTRICTIONS Items collected here were originally published by the Florida National Guard, many as part of its SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series. Contact the Florida National Guard for additional information . The Florida National Guard reserves all rights to content originating with the Guard. DIGITIZATION Titles from the SPECIAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION series were digitized by the University of Florida in recognition of those serving in Florida's National Guard, many of whom have given their lives in defense of the State and the Nation.

PAGE 2

Florida Department of Military Affairs SpsGial ArGhi~ss PubliGation Num.bsr 7 UNIT WAR REPORT 149TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION (2ND BATTALION, 116TH FIELD ARTILLERY) 1940-1944 Stats Arse'flal St. Franc;is BarraGh.s St. Augusthte, Florida \

PAGE 3

-~-" POST Off ICE BOX 1008 STATE ARSENAL, ST. AUGUSTINE 32085 The Special Archives Publication Series of the Historical Services Division are produced as a service to Florida corrmunities, historians, and to any historical or geneological societies which find the information contained therein of use or value. Information about the series is available from the Historical Services Division, St. Arsenal, St. Augustine, Florida. At present, copies of al I Special Archives Publications are avai I able at no charge. Robert Hawk Director

PAGE 4

, . ..... . . . HISTORY. 149TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALIOU E!i.QM -: CAMP PICKETT, V!RGINJ:A . . . . T .Q MOROTAI, NEI JULIA.H P MYRIC.l\. Cii.P'l'AIU . F. A.

PAGE 5

I PROLOGUE As an introduction to the History of the 149th Field ru.~ tillery Battalion, the following background data is furni3hed to make the History more complete. The Battalion wa.s formerly the. 2nd Battalion of tl~ 116~11 Field Artillery Regiment . Upon induction . ~he Regiment v,as pu.i• t of the Florida National . Guard and one of thi; three regimenta oi' the 56th Field Artillery Brigade, the other two being the 114th F. A. and the 117th F A. T~e Brigad~i waa the artille1~y of th a .. 31st Infantry "Dixie Division'' of Florida, Alabama, Missioaippi, and Louisiana. The Division was command~d by .Major General Joh:::i . . C. Persons . of Birt'lingham., Alabama; the 56th Field Artillery Bri A ga.de by Brigadier General Sumpter L Lowry of Jacksonville; the Regimentby Colonel Homer W Heaterl.;r of Tan1pa; and the 2nd Battalion by Lieutenant Colonel Emory Eaya of Tampa. The Ba ttalion was composed of Hq Battery of Bartow., "D" Battery of Lakeland; HE" B~ttery 0 .Plant City; 11 F 11 Battery of Winter Ifo . v ;c .m and the Regimental Service Battery, which supplied the ba.tts . lion, was from Arca.die.. In the late summer of 1940, the world a:ttua.tion beginnirtg . to look crit:tcal, the Congress authorized the mobilization o!' certain troops, smong which naa the 31st D!vislon. The con struction of Camp Blanding .. neur Sti1.rke, Floi•id.a, cutd only a short diatl'.ince .from .Jacksonville wo.s ba5u..r1, o ~ nd tho Dtvisic, n j I I

PAGE 6

/ 2 . . . . . . wan mobilized at home stations ori November 25, 1940, and sworn :'. into Federal status. 01'" course much ground work e.nd recruiting was done prior to the actua.l date of induction •. The time be t,,een 1nduc)"t1on and the movement to unfinished : Camp Blanding , about the 20th of December, will long be remem. .. bered b,one and all. In those days, rood prices . were low and the extren1ely liberal allowance of $1.25 per man per day for food alone was eno~gh to feed the t;oops like . kings, _three meals a day and still 1'1nd it impcn.1&ible to spend the money allowed. The .arrival at rainy, damp Camp Blanding just a few do.ya . . before Christmas, was rather a rude jolt for it opened a period o:r seven days a week hard work ot leveling, draining, filling, . and generall.y making of a cam~ from a morass~ A le.rge percent. age of the men were allowed.to return home_ for Christmas, and . . . . another large group fc-r New Year's Day. . . . . . Basic training was soon begun but equipment was painfully -lacking, especially in view of the abundance of' today. Work was . " . . . : . . . . . not too ha.rd as th~ novelty was still. : there, : ~d . wea.n:esd~y and Sa~urday af'ternoons wer~ tree,:_ and home not too talr:.: away for more > . . than juat a few. ThE..first week in ~ch, the 'first inductees reached the Battalion to .bring t : :UP to ~trength and immediate steps were . . . . . . : _ . . . . . . . . . . . ' taken to whip the Battalion into . shape for . the .. Louisiana llianeuver.s of . twelve weeks duration. Maneuvers came and passed but were closelyfollowed by others in the Carolinas for four weeks

PAGE 7

,. . ' /' ! 3 These of course we1'e f'e>ilo illed by: the Jap sn,:Htk !lttack on Pe~l Harbor, after onl:1 . a few days from the date or : . ::• /; , return from Carolina. A. ratbt1r ~~a.tic sequehce took place at ... . . this time. On _ Uonday morning., December 8, the 5Sth F. A. Brie;ade . . : : lef't for T8lllpa, Florida, in accordan~e with prior _ plans for . . .. ceremony to dedicate the Tampa '1..rmo:ry, which waa to be nwuad ; :-;; Fort Homer Hesterly. The Jap a.tta.ck of the day before, _alerted . . . J one and s.ll to . tho .fact that we knew not what the ne:ct fev, days would hold for the Division, . which was a wail trained out.fit. . : . . . . . . ._ _ . . . . . < The Brigade arrived in Tampa, in the morning and _the scheduled . . > pare.de was held early in the afternoon. It was quite a sotnber . . . . . . . . .. crowd that watched the long colunm wind 1 ts we.y through the , ' . . . . . .. Tampa streets, in a misting rain just E\S the EXTRA papera hit ~I ' the streets telling of the u.s. Decla.rittion or War on Japan. It is believed that this was the first War Time _ parade of World Wm: II, to be held in the United States. That night, four Battericc of the Regiment were alerted as parts of Battal.ion Ool.llbe..t Tea.ms for costal defense. 11 D" Battery went to Wilmington, N. C~, and 11 E 11 Battery to Chm•leaton, s. c. Lit~le happened of conaequnn(,..::, until the DiQ'ision wa.a moved to Camp Bo,-,ie; Texa.a, _ in eux•ly February 1942. Upon arrival there., orders were received to Trianglize the Division. . Accordingly, the 2rid Battalion, llt:!1 F.A. was redesigna.ted 149th Field Artille1•y Batte.lien, uru.i.cr command of Lieutenant Colonel W EUGENE JONES. 'I'h1, complement. of of:fioers was very small at this time, getting as low ,a~ eic:ht at one period. Most or theae eight were destined f;;o :,:•arJ1..~i2:. wl ;:-1 . 1. the battalion for several years _ to ci.:.1me ..

PAGE 8

. ---: . .i . . . . : ' ' : the ' ' seco na. week of March 1942, the batta.lio;_ left for on~ ' monthat ' Fort Sill, to act as school troops: This ono . , I ...... ' . •.. \ month proved _ to be one of the be . at periods of 'Artillery tra1~.:. ini" th.$ be.tta.lion everreceived. ' Annual AGF Teat were held d~;: , ing the last week before return to Bowie. Fro:rii Bowie 1 t was .. . . . :. Lou:tiilana Ma.i:1euvers again that swnmer and thonce to Crunp shelby . . . Missf~sippi. From Camp Sh~lby, six of _ the Captains 1e:rt .1 foi-BOC ~t i F6i
PAGE 9

( . . HISTORICAL RECOfil) . . 149TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALIOi . ; . . . . . . , . . . . . l . . , .. The 149th . :B 1 ield Artillery Battalion departeu Camp Picket~, Virginia by train 0630, 29 January 1~44;, !or Camp Patrick Henry, : , Virginia for staging for overseas movement. The 114th Field ' ' Artillery Battalion was also aboard this train~ The train arr1v..; ti ed in Camp Patrick Henry, at 1335, where it ~as met by various otficials or the ea.mp, as well as ' the camp band. The battalion wa : s marched to its assigned area and given prei1m1ne.ry instruct-. ' t , :_. _ _ . _ . __ . :'7 -. . ,, :-: . :. :.' . '. : . : . ~_,' __ _ . . . _ .. . __ -: . . ,.. . -~ . . _ . ,.. . '._.: ..... .. _ . . _ : . _ .. . -. . . ' i'oris for its s~ay~ _. Beginning 30 January-and contir:iuing ~hrough . \ 8 February' 1944 , a: schedule of athletics; hikes, instructions 1n ,. ' . . ' ', censorship, ' arid amphibious training was carried' out, while final , . . : . 1nnoculations, 1nip~cts ' ot equipment~ ; a..."ld ckecld.ng o~ administrat. Ive records '• was cotiplete d . Physically ~it men . ;ere trtuisferred ' '. . _: ' ~ .. a.."ld . . repla ' cements received . to bring ~he ba.tta.11on up to full . ' . strength~ . On 9 February the 'lf,1:9th Field Artiliery comm~ded byLt.Col. '. . . . . . . ' . . . ~ . W EUGENE JONES, the 114th Field Artl1lery , coDlI:landed by Lt. Col~ AIBERT LAKE, and Companies 11 BII and i "c" of the . 106th '. Engineers, . . . . .. . . . . . ' . . -. , commanded by'. Capt. KILLEEM, departed by train for Hampton Roads ' ' Port of Embarkation •. The morning ot departure was a very f1tt' ,L ,, . _ ing send-off' for the Southwest _ .Pae1f1c as the groundwaa heavi1y _ . ,, . . covered with snow, sluoh and mud and a cold rain waa intermitt. ently falling. At Norfolk, the troops debarked froin the train . ' ' ,•;, , and tran~f'erred to the Mohawk Ferry .for the c:i:-oasin13 of 'Nor.folk

PAGE 10

6 . #111! . As each man boarded the SS Cape Henlopen, he ren:oved and : :: . ( ~ned . in his ~vercoa t. . . The Henlopen sailed the morning of 10 Februar:, at 0900 ~ : with Lt~Coi. AD3ERT LAKE as Comniander of Troops, Lt. Col . _ W EUGENE JONES, ' as Executive Officer~ lf.ajor JOSE.i:1H.J ~ILL, as :;. . -. ~ Provost ' Marshal., and Oapts. JOHI-1 w BASKIN. and JULIAN p MYRICK, ; e_~joint S-3 1 s , : _The 149th. ~d f~ c ~mplete complement 6f offic01'u .. . : with tfu) : exc~pt1on of : the . S-3., Major MILTON E HULL, who sailed . w1 th an ad vazice group or S-3' s, Capt WILLIAf5 H FREELAND., who \ . aaile~ 1n Janu~;vas a~vance representative or the ~attali~n., '.'; Capt~GEORGE _ H CRILL., and Lts .. JOHN H ltEMP and FRANK N ZIRBLIS, . ' ' , . . . . : : : who sailed on another ship due .to shortage of necessary number of ~ff1cers to r1i1 that ships accommodations., and Lt~ HARl.!AU : A ALLEN, _ who sailed from San Francisco, as Division Ammunition _, . -'. iepresentat1ve .. . The trip was without event for the first week. Organization oi' ship duties, meas, . police o.nd . sanitation vras est&blishod, o.nd ' . . I ' . ' . . . ' . a training progrs.m was put into operation. The;:Henlopen _ arrived at Panrur1a, Canal Zone., on 16 li\::1:)rue.ry e.nd tied up to the docks i'or flushing of water tanks e.nd repE1/ i. r . . . . of ventilation fan motors. The troops . were debtll"'lce,i upon tho pier for exercise and the two Colcnels made arrangements for ic , :, cree.m to be delivered to the pier. Thia was to prove to be the the last ice cream for many, many months. The passage through the Canal was begun early cai the mN."rdr: . ;:: :

PAGE 11

of 17 February and v:o.s naturally enjoyed ..,__.,y.;.-.y much by e.11 c.b ..:,,: , . r .L The Henlopen anchored 011 the south end o:f the canal where it . mained until l600or' 18 February, at which tim~ we sailed for i the Pacific part of the voyage. '.. Durine; the entire voyage, until Milne Bay, New Guinea., was reached no land wa3 sighted at an"J . . . . time. Tho trip was almost without event though there was a possibility of a de.t'ini te aubmari_ne ~ontaet one night. 1 Torpedo .. alarm sounded but no torpedo was actuo.lly s~en. During the voy age me case of acute appendicitis occurred:, which necessitated an emergency operation at sea. Capt. 'JOH...l./ . L WHITAKER; Battalion Surgeon, performed the operation while the ship was und~1 way, and the pa. _ tient was well nigh _ completely recovered when New Guinea was reached. During the voyage a continuous training schedule of ath. le tics, . Pidgin English, visual signaling, current events and specialized section training was engaged in by all concerned. One of tho .features of the voyage we.s tile evening entertain; ' ment probrram. f. .... very . divers:Lfi~d program vm.s arranged with competition tor attendance between the Colonels' who hold a Binge. ga."?le 011 the tor\1ard part of the ship, a...-rid the S-3 Section's Bo::::: inB matches on tha aft hi.1tch. Frozon Cooo-cola:J w•Jre among t;h.~; prizes and ware the mo:Jt valued or all.

PAGE 12

land on New Guinea. CDJnp was established at Dohodura, and an extens '. 1ve and intensive program of construction and camp imp_ rovement begun at once. Acclimation to the tr~pics was begun and_ma.ny hours of in3truct1on given in living in the _ jungle, malaria control, jungle diseases~ and relations with the natives. ! . . I , Trips were made to the Battlefield and Cemetery at Buna, and at Goxui.. Upon completion of the construction of the battalion area . . . I 1t then becamemcessary to construct.the area. of the 116th Field Artillery prior to their arrival. During the :f'ir st week of May, _ 1ntens1 ve training was be gun .. in preps.ration fol;. .future combat missions. ~rincipal emphasis was placed on Ope;ation o.f the Artille1:-y in Jungle Warf~e, with . . . . ' intensive study andcon.struction of de.t'ense perimeters, followed by night attack and def~nse problems. _ Demolition schools were held. During the week of \ May 15-22~ the firing batteries engaged . ' i . : . . . . . ~ j :. . : ' in BOT Problems with the appropriate Inf'antry Battalions. Cri.. j . . .. .. . . _. i . . . . . : '. . . . tiques were held arid special emphasis placed on the correction . . . . . . ... ot def'icienoies . Firing af all small arms for all members or the battalion was held during the month of May. Forward Obaerva' c . tion schools were scheduled for both . the o:f".ficers of the Battalio.:1 _ and designated forward . observers of the supported infantry. FrOL1 22 May until 5 June, intensive practice of Battery Proficiency Tests was carried out along with continuous preparation for the Annual Inspector General's Inspection. These inspections were given the'be.ttalion during the week of June 5 to 10~ reparation was continued or Battery and Battalion Teets.

PAGE 13

9. : A f'eaturo : of the training of _the battalion at Dobodura, was . , , ' ... . . . . . . . . . i :r: :; .. the. construction and operatio~ ot a Mina.ture Artillery Ro.nge , :. : < , .. . . . :, . . , , . . . . . _ . . l ; . . . . __ .. . . <::" A _ tower was erected for the . installation of a '50 Calibor M.. G . . , . which was to f'ire . incendiary ammunition on a mina ture Forward •C: Ab~~~v~tio1:1 Rang~ . Various f'~rllard !)bservetion posts were dug ;a• . I I , I ' to . give varie~ OT Range s and variation in Angle ~. Impact area ~; ~s carefully construotedto inolude gastanks .t"illed w~th gaso._.,. : •. .. . ,ff L '. li;eto burn} power ple.nts, ob~ervation post, ;fields, mountains, ';, w~ter tanks aiidv-~ious other ;;: terrain obj~~ts . Continuous im~ . pro~eiuent of the_ range and pr~ctice of ne-x idea.a . was carried . . .->:: < :: . ......... : . . '."-. .. _ : .. . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . ' .. ', . . out ._. until it . was possible to operate the entire battalion in , I .. .:-. , ... . -;.. , . _ _ . '.:: every phaae or occupation and tiring except actual expenditure : . . . . ~ . ; of _ Artiliery SJ?mIUn1tiori.. The Battalion Fire Direction Center was .)/ in ' ~p~rafion 'and B~tter ' y ' Executives were uaed . to give coimnands to ~ ,,i; t;he 1 guns~ ' In ' addition ~() . the excellent training given officers . ;: . : ,/ : ,. : . . . '. . ' . ' _. :_ . : ' : . . . . . -._ tiring; _ all other sections received training ot a highly inter~st~ :_ . .. ? :;> .', .. : . ,: . . . : . ... . . '.. : .' . . . : . _. , . . . _; . . . . } : . : •'. Jng and ina . tructive nat~e . Untold benefit was derived by I ri~ {V . _ :i _ '._~: .. .::-... ~: _ : : : ... _ ..'. ; .: . ~ -i : communication personnel. All procedures w.ere normal and it was . < _: : . _ . . - •... : -: _ •_ •. _ . _ . . . , I . . . . . . . .. . _. -•--_ . . onlyat the machine gun;that _ conversion of .105 Howitzer data was . . / ~~de to ' a.ecommod~te : the 1 it. , G . The .range was conceived by ' Lt. Col . . _ ' . . : , . _,. . . . ,• . ' . ; _'. , . . . :.. •. :: ~_; ' . I . . . .. ': ;. ; . ' , . ; Jones., arid built. _ under , his personal supervision~ . _ ,. ._ . . . .. . ... . . . . _ ;; , . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . , , :,. -~ . . . , . ' . During . '' the . pe;iod . of trit1n1ng . and equipping in Oi?o Ba1. a. . . .. '. . , . . . .. . large portion of .the :'. battaiiori ~as engaged in i truck construction ' . . ' ' :; : . . . . . ,:during.parts of May . and . June. __ A_Provisional Truck Aaoemblf .. i;:. /..... . . . •.. .; ., . .. . . . . . . . . ]: Battalion was . form~d comp ' o . sed of two b~tter1es from 114th F. A. '.•' 1 -and two b~tte~~es .t"rom the 149~h F. A. Bn, with attached meche.n-. . . .~ . ........ : . . . . . E\ 1e s f'rom the Reconna1eimce _Troop--and . Ordance Company, and the . . ' . . . . 12:~th Infent~y Regiment! : This group and the assembl:'I line was

PAGE 14

. •. under comma.nd. : < of Major MILTOH E HULL, S-3 of the 1-10.th F .;-; .• . This personnel was quro-tered at the old SOUrAC HO'fEL with the assigned dutie.s o:f assembling '500, trucks. Three ahif'ta .wore established as follows: 0700-1600; 1700-2400; 0001~0600. A day and night mess were set up. ~he night shi:ft havin8 to feed ;five .: meals in 1.2 hours. ,, Baae Ordance was operating the ~ssembly line at the time it was taken over by this Provisional Out:fit, which we called the : . . . . . )149th Prov. Truck Assembly Battalion. Af'ter about two weeks, the .:. 114th F. A. personnel were relieved by additional men .from the 149th F.A. Bn, in order that the trair.,ing program or~ Ba ttalions would not be disrupted. During the .four weelcs period, a . ' . total of . 506 trucks were assembled, consisting of Dw.nP, 2 ton, .. 11 to:n; 3/4 ton;WGapon Carriers and l/4 ton Command and Reconnai sance cars. This total would have been greater, but the aaseml;>ly line waa rearranged three times, and produ~tion could not go on while the rearrangement: was being done. The battalion v,as . commer.ided for its out~tanding record. During the period ia June to 24 June the firing batteries . ' . engaged individually in Battalion Landing Team exercises with the 124th InfB.ntry. Actual full-scale loading and landing op erations were . me.de and much training was derived. On Thursday, 22 : June, the Artillery Army Ground Force Teat. ing Terun of the XI Corps gave the battalion the Battalion AGF Teats #1 &: #2~ The battalion was unable to :partieipa.te in 'the Test -#3, duo to Alert -r Combat movement.

PAGE 15

.. : ,• : . ' : / . 23 June to 28 June pl~epEUia.tions . wore mnd~ . " ion for mo _ ve to Ai tape Comba~ Area. Major JOSEl:'H J HILL / . . Battalion Executive acted as TQ.ti and did an outstanding job. _ ;: Approximately 50% of the battalion personnel and all combat car, . . go _ sailed from Oro Bay on 29 Jime, . aboard the SS Goodhue, and .. ! \ SS Barnes. Theae were Liberty ships and were greatly overcrowd. ed due . to the belated arr!'ff~A ~f acheduled LCis. Approximately . ' :. . . . . . . . . 1 . 1200 men were . aboard eael:'.i. ~p and sleeping, feeding, and sanitary ' facilities were : ~oblem. ." l / : : ' . ' On the night of' . 4 ?ul:,, the L1bertys _ anchored a~ Aitape . and . ' . . ' , TMk Force Headquarters rep:resent~tiveu came aboard for General . : :' HUTCHINSOI{, Task Force Commander, and Colonel STARR:, Commander . ,: : -~ . ~ •.; . . . .. ;i o.f the 124th Regimental _ Combat Team. c , if tho morning o.t' 5 July, ; ~ommanders of all units _ and organiza.tion.;1 1 and their staff rep., . . resentat1ves went ashore for a conference e.nd orientation at . XI Corps Headquarters. ' Orders were issued for the Wlload1ng ')t . : . . Infantr1 troops w1 th 1nd1 v1dual equipment to reinforce and improve the . perimeter, but the artillery troops _ and all cargo was left . ,. ~boa.rd the . ships. Other ' than the construction work _ to be perf'orm ed by the int'a.ntryand ac : heduled preparation of positions by the artillery., the Combat Team was in the .nature ot a 11 Floating Reserve." The remainder of the battalion, under Majo~ MILTON E HULL, : -' . ! _ Battalion S-3., boarded. LCis. a; Cape . Sudest on 3 July and sailed !: . , : that night to join the . battalion. The LCis arrived at Fin. . . : schhe.f en on t he morning or 4 July and were beached for the troop a . . . . . : . to debark for exercise and swimming. Troops were reembarked in . . the afternoon and . sailed !'or Ai tape to arrive at 1630 on e July.

PAGE 16

12 ' The 149th Field Art10..lerr Battalion was under Corp Control and :L'i:aison was established with XI Corp Artillery, At this •t~ lthe Ini'aritry went under the control of the ~2nd Division. '. Pr:fol' 1 to 'the arrival or :the LCis, arrangements were JI]ade : :for :~\vouao'ing the battalion !itn the :rear positions of the :120th F.A ., ' ami:treconnaisance for poff:1!:tiona areas and perimeter or defense ittalie :by Bn co and Asst s-~. : . Troops debarking .rrom LCis were marched along the beach to 'the 120th positi1-ona 1 wher,e ; kitchens ( :were set up and B rations . fed. Minimum esseritlial equipment was unloaded:from the ships and sur ~vey begun immediately. On 9 July the remainder of the troops wore debarked :from the Liberty ships and unloading of equipment and cargo begun. From captured documen:bs n and statements of prisoners, it was anticipated thnt 1 . the ,:r Japs would attack the defense perimeter Lbetween ' 1 ?July and 10.rJuly, i probably at the Covering Force 11~e on Lt he Driniumor River. ,. A . plan was.putiinto effect on 8 July . 1 that sent two Battalions East across the Driniumor. , One Ba1 tte.lion we.a to : proceed , a.long : the, coast and the otl:j.,r : : illllanq. . . . Each o.f \ . these battalions was supported by a b~t;t~l:ion c oi' field . ~t1llery. The 124th1Regimental Combat Team withnaval. and air . . support was to embark , on1 l2/July, and make an , amphibious attack (n! the morning 13 Julynat ; :_Nyaparake, Uew : Guine~, to seize a h~achhead and expand: 1~, Southand West.-to .. make contact with the R~18~:nna.1sanoe in Force. \ l\.11eQ).ipment and supplies along with the : "troops were aasembledtiin : : the Tadji Plantation area dnd final

PAGE 17

J.3 preps . rations mude to begin lee.ding the LCTs and LGI.is o.t noon 12 July. On the night of 10 July, the Jc1.ps attnclrnd tho center of . the Drinim11or line which wus held by the lf.'8th. Infe . ntry of tlw 32nd Division. The a.tta.clc was !:lade in cons:i.der-~ole foI"co betw~on the two Batta.lions wno had crossed tho Drll"l.i1.::o:or on th'3 Hocon. . na.isa.nca ln Force mission. Tremendous artillery supporJ.; wg,:1 given the river defense line, but the Japa succeeded in~pen.etrnt ing the center of the line, ca.using ti:le Battallon in the conter• .of the line to withdraw. The two battalions on th~ left and right of this battalion had crosst}d the rivar on thQ .fleco11n8.is: . u1cd in Force mission. The two battalions which had crossed tho riv,?.r .. were in a very precarious s1tua.t:!.on as we:-c the troops holdin,s the Driniumor line on the inland fla:nk. This inltLrid flanlt rms called the BALDY FOHCE and consisted of the 112th Cavsl~y and certain battalions of the 12?th Infantry of the 32nd Division. The force from the boa.ch inland to the Baldy Force was called the ALEX FOHCE. The boundary between these fc1"ce5 a~ the AFUA . . . ANAMo TP~~CK. The break-through by the Js.pn and the t'/'1.thdrt~~wal I of the center Battalion, : neces31 . ta.ted s. hasty wi thdre.\'11 by t~-io BALDY FORCE, to prevent being cut off. The siliuo.tion was rathor obscure on July 11-12 but 1 t was known that la.rge mmibers of .Jap.:r were on the West of the Driniumor. In view of the situation, on the nieht of 11 ,July, th e p1.:1.n for the oo:nphibioua landing by the 12:t.h Co:i:1bat 'Ies.m V :!D .G t1..;;-;grH't-ff ily suspended with the CT remaining 0 the a.le:..•t fer' ~'lny ~i~l 31. :r.:::.ed mission. It shortly became obvious th.s.t tho Lrin-t.1 . u:nor Cmr-:: ~ .ng

PAGE 18

14 Team; less 2nc.1. Bn •. 124th Infantry { in Corp Reserve) and Co "A 11 •: 1 . . . _ of the 106th Engineer a, was or:dered forward to assembly areas : . just short of Ana.mo, to attack the morning of 1.3 July. Upon 1, ceipt of the order to oocupy positions to support the u.ttack, . . the Battalion was loaded. and movemen:t forward begun under the Bn; Executive, Major JOSE,1JH J HILL, leaving Tadji Plantntion at 1255. The NIGIA RIVER was not fordable and the lig..lit poatoon bridge . . ! would.not 1 '.accomodate more than a. 3/4. ton vehicle. Col. Jonos, after_ conference with Genera~ KAISER, the. Task Force Artillery Officer., joined the advance parties who had pre~eded by light vehicles to the forward are~~ Neoesse.ry orders were issued and parties returned to the column. Prior and during this time, Liaison and For 1 nard Observation parties rejoined their respectivi:. Infantry battalions. The advance parties rejoined the battalion just as it reached the Beacbznaater, whEire lt became nece:rnary to .. shuttle the f'iri_ng battery prime movers, guns, and all heavy ve-hioles forward across the NI GIA by I..CTs.. 'l'he remaimler of the battalion, in lig.,.~t ve~oles proceeded forward-to the position ! area. The battalion began to arrive in the position area on a narrow sand spit, just West of the mouth of AKANAI CREgK at; 16. . . This was a very narrow spit with the ooea.n on tho North e.nd A.KANAI CREEK curving_ back .from its mouth just in froDt of ncn Battery to form the south side of the battalion. The ap1t Yfft.s about 100 yards wide at the widest point and the battalion areo . .:f'rom front to rea~ was less than 400 yards. Large bodies of Japs were known to be just soutl1 of our position with no infantry in between. With only about three hours remaining to fully p,:-e pare, occupy, and fortify before dark, feverish baste was made.

PAGE 19

.It; was well atter dark before , the . last battery, 11 1\. 11 Battery . , irri v0d in tho po8it~on area. : A perimeter vms organized under '' the direction of lfujor Hill, _ using the water on threo sidos for fields of fire,. _ Durine the afternoon, the Asst S-3 and the Horizontal Con trol Operato1"' had made an exact copy of the net1 Stripped Fir' ,,: ing Chart of the 129th Field Artille~y, which would have to be us0d through necessity, vrlth only an early :morning registration to correct it for our guns. By 2000 . overla.ys were completed for the forward observation and liaison partiea for the attack the next morning. At 0155 on the morning of 13 July the Field Order No .. l of , the J:lersecution Covering Force vraa recoived.. It stated, in purt, that Je.p foroes have broken through ou1• lines along the Drin:'lu:r.p.o:i~ River south 01".l!NAMO and in the vicinity of AFUA. His patrol::i h f td . penetrated west :roi2000-3000 yards. The Persecution Covering .. Force was ordered to attack early 13 July with the ALEX FORCE making its main effort in a southeasterl7 direction from Anruno, to restore original line along the DRIUIUMOR RIVER. The BALDY FORCE vras ordered to attack Jap f'orces on the _ right ( south) fl~u.1 1 , -:: , drive . west, and reestablish line along DRINilI'MOR RIVER. PERSECUTION ARTILLERY was ordered to support the attack b7 a , , twenty minute preparation just preceding H Hour. Harras:Jing f.1.:t eni were fired d~ring the night by othe/batta.lions. At 0500 a barge load of 800 rounds of ammunition arrived a t . the battalion. All a."lllD.Unition was delivered direct to the

PAGE 20

16 bo.tte..lions by bargea nnd. unlo~di::d by bot 1 1 11 humun cha.i n::: " und by . tractors. At 0807 the Batta.lion had registered and prec e ded to fire preparation in front of the attacking troops. I At 0850 1 Capt. MCCAIN, Ln with Regt., reported capture of Jap plan or attack issued at 1630 on 12 July. One Jap battalion was . to proceed down A.KANAI CREEK towards the ocean .. At about ., this same time an unconfirmed report.from another Field ArtlllGl'J Battalion stated that two Japs Battalions _ware moving from the south towards our area. The perimeter was notified of the poss ible attack, while support of' in.t'a.ntryadvance was continued. Our Infantry attack continued according to plan w1 th intermi ttcnt; calls f'or artillery support. During the early part of the cmn paign, great d1f'f'1culty was experienced with Jap patrol and rn:l.d.1ng parties, cutting wire lines. At 1650 on 13 July a wire prart ;:r of the battalion was fired on bymortars, bet,veen tho front lln e s and the battalion position.Pvt JAMES F L!.SA, 32500995, liq. Bt:r ~ r waa lightly wounded by ~hrapnel, 1n lo\ver back rec;ion., becoraLng ' the f'irs t recipient of the Purple Heert., of which there were to be a considerable number. Buffalos were used to lay underwater lines weigh.tedwlth sandbags., and effective oonrmunication \ms maintained in this manner for about a week. The work of Capta:Lr, FLOYD E COLEY, Battalion Como and the com.."'lUiliaation men of th. 1 ? battalion was outstanding throughout the campaign. The first round of Artillery f'ired in actual combat by any . unit of the 31st Division, was fired by this battalion at 07:i~~ on 13 July, by 2nd Section of "B" Battery. The lanyard wa.a pulled by Sgt DAVID BALLARD, 20423101, the oldest enlisted m:111 1

PAGE 21

17 from point of service, within IIB'' Batte;ry. Tho clsalon waa o.n ' . .Air Regiatra tlon on Baae Point •. ,, Prior to the jTu""Up--of.f, of the infantry in the a.tt,1ck., the ~-battalion fired a preparation of approximately 500 rounds and continuous support wa3 .furnished throughout the remaind.er of tho day. Approximately 1300 rounds of e.rtillery e.ramuni tion wn3 ,I pend~d on that day, which is und.oubt_edly the heaviest day of .fire that has,y~t been delivered by any battalion of the 51st Division. The continuous support in .t'ront o.r the advo.ncing infantry was highly 1nstrv.mental in their rapid and almo3t un interrupted advance. The attacking infantry of ALEX FO;iCE reached the initial objective in .late afternoon of 13 July and preparations were 1rnd•: .tor night dai'enae, which included the firing in 0 protective ba.r1"ages. which ,va..s to become a stande.rd nightly procedure fot• thl'.l ne:-ct four weeks. Throughout the night the battalion fired h:;1.rrass.. ing and .interdic t;ory fi~es East a.long tho coast beyond the DRINIUMOR. RIVER •. About noon cf 14 July the DRINIUMOR RIVER 11nu was ree:st8.b liahed and by night our supported battalions had lt'Ade contaot with units ontheir flanks and preparations were mo.de for tht? night and protacti~e-ba.rrages shot in by the battalion. The att;acli: to reestablish the DRINIUI\IIOR line was hlgl1 .. 1y successful despite enemy opposition. 1':io:Jt :resistance WiH:1 in tbr:. nature of sniper fire., but one road block t1m.s encountered. on. 13 July.. The .Taps la.unche<.l one counte:::--a.ttack ~1hlch ;"lf\3 br•:iJ;:.-:,n

PAGE 22

; : .~.-.-.-::.. .. ,,: -_ . . . .. --~-<.: ....... _. r _, . . . . . . up by -intense ot;/~~e 13th. july'.i944. 11 It was fr~ the. Command. . -_ . . :. .. . r . .. . •. ---_;_-_. . . __ -:_:._ .. ,_ ',.:, : :.._:.,_ ' -'._-.. ,_ ,. _! . _. ..... ' . -. .. .. , 1rig General flf th~ PERSECUTION; COVERING FORCE; and :is quoted . . -. , . ... : _ _ -• .. :>:.-~:-.:. . ~:. .-, .'_. l . -_._ ... -•. -_ . . . . _;. : .. . , . here: -"Congrat-ul.ateyour_ entire force upon their. success ,: . . ; _::/;:< ' .< . ' . . . . . . ' . . ii . . . 1 : .•.. ' . 'ti/onstrated resolute::(C-/<--... ' --i~-. :.;_ ._.. ~-:-. . .... ' .. ., .... ; __ ,• . -\-. ' . .. :h . ': 0 :c9nfide.nce in j-our abilfty-. n The Commanding General ~:;_; .. .:_-_:._; •" :---~--::> ~:•-; .:.>::•-\f.->;"'. : .. . . . _. '... . . . . . . ': .. .... ~Force 'Artillery 'also added the following: 11 Byyour ace-uracy-, ;.;.:~ . ' .. ;., : . _,~-~~\-.}l. . t; -:. ... /~-~-'' . . . : \ . '.' sk1ll, and courage you have proved your metal, and I am proud to .. ,,,'/_ii.'.;::,::,.',:_:....• ~!•'_••:•..,:'.._:::~---~\./:• ... _\:•..: .. •.,'. .... ,,~}:•_..•.• ... ,_•i . .• ' . .: . . . I .:r::iJ:i.ave the privilege {of c6nvey1ng to your officers and men the : ::{_.:_/;'~\ •. ~:-:-.:~.::'.~:o::. ::_.<-::-: \:};;i .. _. ... :'./\::_~-. ':,. __ :_ .. : ':'.!~:\:\ {-~>\ -...-:_: ;:i. f ; . -_.. . _ . ' . . ..... ,. ! ::;,:.Force .commander' a message-. II . . . '~•: J' ' , <<:•: .. /,t,\ :•>;:.:, ,: •, •. •,, V . ), , ~i~'t~tn:t::iJ::::Jb~:t::l;~,::::dB::t~:i::• ::;a::._ ?lti\;\i'.?c: ?: : : :-::; . . : , •:. Jt. "'.I . . . .. . .. . .. _ _ . . . -. . \'.Jition during the atterrio'.on.. The battalion aent. out patrols to .. )_.+:.:'.{:y<_~>:_2;<:•'._ :,:;.. '--: :':_: : ::,;i,\:}.•:'-. -~_;::.-:,'./}; .. (.\-_;~-.-.::.:'.; -'-i-:., ._,_ •. .-.:-.-:: .• : " ": . .. :, •, ., ::. -~ . _,: . ', ' . >\ ; -. . (S:i\the south of :1ts_'.poait1on~ The front was ratner qu1et with con;'O>;::._::--r:,_. ... ;? : ',::;::::• 1 : :-: .. ::: : . i : '. :., :;.:: ::>, tinued organization in progress by;all uni ts. , •t '.f}!\}f/t'.LJ. .i. .• : :: ;_: :.\i{):{:{+):,>if' . .. ... . .•. .. . . . ; . . ,:;r:J: './'.f_:, ; For :,the:he.xt period extending from 15 July _to 30 July day-a =\.:~\),::>.i ...•.•. : .. , / f :: _;).'' :. .,/ : .: ' .. : : .. . . . : . . . .. t:i./wer~ .. ver1>s1m1liar. :; Many.moments of, exei tement ._were experienced 'Ii}~ man)">P~~~~ ~flaps .Jd118d. Continuous . ~r+ment ~as in:lines ~long the DRINIUMOR, until large bunkers were fin, . ': . ' . ; ,_> . :: . . . . . : . . . . . : ,. ' 1 .. ally constructed. The battalion displaced about 500 yards : to ::;,th~:re~ ... whl,h-~gh-ti~e~ threatened to. wash th~ .88.TL~Spit rway. . .: :,.;I' .. ,

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.: ' : .. , : :it ;.:{ ;/:: : \ . .,'.~ :.'i > : . . ,, . . . . .. . -, . . . . :> 19 . . _ , _ :~t /{ ;'. 'l'he. displaceme . nt was made posaible by the area to our : immediate •. . .. :.-:< 1 :-, , . , : . I -. . , ' . _ . . ',}J: . }eW:. " being cleared by movement! of the 129th Field 'Artille~y . Oiir r ~~: ~:/<-' :-, ... . . . . : . . . . . I .• I _ ; . •. . , _ . . . . . . . .. .. . -. !.;/{ {' initial area had been improved;btit this displacement allowed . the i t t/; .; . \: \ ::i~. . . _,-' '._ .. . .: . . ::::: : ' . . . . , _. : -'-~. ' .: . .. . ~ . . .. : : . : : . _ . : \ . __ .. : : .::.Jit/ conatruotion of an excellent po , sition.. Careful . lay'out of the ~ -" .... . ,.; . ' ,• '.. . . . . . . . . . . :. . . . . . .. . . . ; _\ :'!;}: bi~ta.li~n ~efen~e, under the sup:ervi _ sion of the Bil Exec~, Major //{:> / .. : ; . . . .-.. . _ : __ .. : '. . _ -. : .. _ ) '~ => ... _ : . .. .. . \ ' . . _: _ _ . ; . .... , ... :;1.:\ Hill:, baaed on lessons learned. ~n the _i'irst position provided . :/ ' -: _ _ ; . . ' . . . : . ){_ .f'o~_ i the . best defensive perimete1:~ . Thia period was char~cterized \.~ { ' . : .~ : _.,: ; > .. .. ; .. ~ . . . ' .. , . . . .• .I .-. . . \ .' ' };i}( ~y ; ~onti~uou:s and. agre~a1ve patrolling by all elements. Frequent '. )~-' .~ : ':\: , : . : .., ... ; : ~ . .. . . ' 1 ' . ' , . . . . k ?Y ca.lls came' in ' for artillery support both . day and night. Inr11~ ;;:\~t i ./ _ -:;_ <-:< ... . . _, <; ."_ ,/ :_ .. : .:... _ .'.-' . . :: , i: _ ~ ~-: _ .. : . . . . / _ ... .. , : . . ': . . . . ' :. .. ::--;~ ' ... . . Ht;'. tration 1~to , the . ~nfantr;r positions . w9:s th~ rule rather than the >~\:,:f.:.-; : :'. ' ' .'; _ . :: , ' _: : ,; :.; . :. _ ~: . .. .: _ :! -; , . :.: . __ . ' _ .. . , : -~ . .. .. . .. . :: : . . : '. : . ' ';,_ . . ,}: f 1 exoeption~ . . bn ' o _ ne : occasion. t ~e . Japs : : attacked the Driniumor .. J~t ~ivef . . 11i1e. A ~~l,~mn of f ~ur a, but . -ore haited with cons id~r :s:/. , ), able . loss by timely fire from this battE.lion. Many remuneratiV'e !/l/t ";\ , , , .. .. . . : •. . : :: . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . // /;;::; targets were fired on by all forward observers and liaison off'ic_: ~}\ f(.: _ ;/. / . .: < : ,: : . , , ': . . ;i .. . : . . . ~ . . . ' :: ... ' . : . . . . . .. '._ . ' _ . . - •. _. : . . _: . . . . -. , . : _ . i ; j }:{ .' ers/ . Lt~ : Michelson, . ttc 1 ! Forward Observer, on one occasion locat) /;\:;;:.:_/ . . ' .. ' , ' ,' . : . \ ' ' ' . ' ' ' . . : :Xf{. ed ,a sroup of dug-in, Je.P.S ' to his rear _and adj;sted , and tired a' :: } J \ ~ ){/ . ~~-~:. : : .. ,. . . . . . . I . ,. _ : , . : . . . I hea.VJ" concentration on them.which resulted in the neutralization ,/' .( }<_ :,: . ' . , ,, .. ' :• ' , _, : ', . 'i ' ' ,' . . . . ' , : . ' ' ' ' ' '\(/ and subsequent capture of' a Jap 70mm gun. Artillery Observers jf: '.' ,':,;: :: : : ' , : . -i ' ' . ' > : .. ': ' j ' . , ,,' '' ' ' , ' ' ' , ' . : . jt of' ' this -battalion jvere particularly active ln patrolling with ::,:f::;:J:: . . .. :_ . . ,: .. --: .\ v . ... :; -: L: --.: , : . = : . . . _ ._ : . . . tJ \' the . Infantry. ~t .t~ entrance or the _ Battalion in~o combat the , \ /';' '/ . . ,. ; ;} , :;' . : . . . .>. , . : . ,. ' : . }f totail Jap : casulties_ to date were 1366 Killed in Action and 41 :'Ht Prt s : on~;s : of' w~.: :' . Col;rielEDWARD :_ sT~,00 of 124th ' Irrl'antry J~[:. \;g 6~ c~~ai-id ; on i4 Juli: / of : the roroe ; s r6~erly kno~ as the : _.-; ;.,i , \ .,.. . .. ' .• •, _. .. .• ,. . . . . .• . ~-. J]i( ALEX FORCE. Thi4 FOl'co now ~8.Dlo j;~ be known S.:, .tho TED . FORCE . ; / Both the . TED FORCE and the BALDY FORCE were . the rec'epients of ~ : :(.' .; , :-_/ . . . . . :. . ' . ... . . . . . 1 11 1 ~:::E::::;:::c:~~:::::::~::~~~=:k::;::::::;ly

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20 po~1t16ria _ . w~r~ ;: ao:r;istari.tly ; : i~ or 1rif'1ltrat1on : and several .Japa k~l.i~a>i~ -. th~:~{ci~~t; : :~r ~h~ ~tillery. .. p~ ~1tions, . , :-: ,: _ . . ,; ,.. ,\ .. . .. : , .. ';_. : :: . l _ r: : . . . . . . . . . ,. bearing demolition charges. At the end of thi~ period, 31 July . . : , :. .. : : ._ . . ; _-:,_ : : _ _ :: . : ) /~ ,_ . : _ f .. _ _ _ -: : : ' . . : . : : :/ :; . ; _ . _ .. ' : . . : , . . . . . ... . . Jap Casualties incll.lding pr.isonersi . totaled or which a . . .:, .. ; . . -:.; -:<:~;, : :: _~ .~ ; ~;: ,\ . ) --_, t : . ... . .. ; .. ~-. ) t~ : _ -. : . _.. _ _ .. . -. . ' ... : .. . . -,._ .. . . _ . . large percentage fell to . .. the _ TEitFOR9ES supported bythis ba. . . .- •. , , , ; . . r . . ... ttaiion .. ' .. :-. ; ... .. '"'. ,; . ., . . .. . . :". , , , .. , Folib~~~,5 i ;; f, ~~1 . ~ltt i l ~f , \ 1i;tc~,. "he~ . approxfmately 1300 rounds : _ were ) fired, 1nterinltt ent ; firing was the rule . or the . ;;)~ 5 t; tS tti ~~ ~~; ~ f!'. ~t , f j; f { ) ~ f; ~f (Jiyt . j' . gi>eQt number of ~ _ ight inissi6ris were /: fi _ red _ p~th , as ,. harra~~ment and on targets of :: _ .. '. .. .. . __ / r_-,-?:\ r ; t-/ -/ J /-}/: ~ . { J. ; . \~<~ ; ~~:/~:-: . : _ :, :/. < _ J .. >:. ~.r <>.: ~\ . , -: ~ _.;_.;<-.c . _ ,. _ _ _ : . .. : _ _ _ .. _. _ : opportunit#~ . '.: ;' A .. bi':l.~ 'sumriiary. \ of -the ;t'1ro _ , during this period : ;,: ;o , ii.; ~ m };t!~iii }f ;: t~ J ~f ; ~eLllomng' . ~ . . wi . consider} _ e\ ~ _ _ / ! ~~t ~<\~ /) _: : :)-:? _ ::\ :\ ::: r ~--_; '.~\ -:\j(~-: , _ '. .:_; ~ : ~:_./ _-_ . ~: \ . __ : _ _ .. -~~/ ---.\ ... : :::" .~<::_ \ . . . _ .. :;: .. :. ~ .. . . _ : : ; ,--. ~ .._ . . : ... -; . . . _ . i:5 cru1y :;.\ thi3 ~: pat~ali<>~ fix-E,a twel'v'i3 iniss1ons . on enemt i~antri, \r.; . :-r;: ~:::;~-:~: f L . : ~ ).\ ~? / ~ '. ,:~:?) J ; . f'.! :' : <: .. _ ,;(:~~ ~ -;~ ~~f ( i:. \ _ : ~ -: ~ : ~ :: t ; l \ : .: . ::.~: / '. :~•.: , .. ' -'. _ :~ ~ . . ... . ~ .:-. ; '" \ : :~ ' ~'. . ; . : --: , .:. :-:--~~~f-: \; •. . . .. . . _ ' . . ~ " \ . _._: '. _ ; . .. '. . .. :. . /'. _. . ,: _ . . . .t,. : ' wfth: ; teJ.lin~ :; e t:r~o:t; ;: J~o ., ; 1~1;~l. : of. ippro:ilmatEJly 6CJO rounds. Dur• ' < -J::? r-tf .. : f ;\ : : . : ,( . .' i ): _ '. :.-::\ , ~ : '. : ~ .. ~ ; .-:~:i\ _ --;(, '. : : _ ( .. \ :_ .-{ . ~ ~: ~~, :< ~ > . .. -'.: -> ~ t :~ . ; .._. _ _ . < _ _ ; j " ~ -'._. :: . , _ _ : _ . , : _ _ : !hg :/ tffs : :: nei1 f ; per~~a ;: hn1y > llgnt tire . br( : enemy . _. trt;o1>s was _ de 11 ver. _:: ,;; ;., / f .. .. >:c .. ;.!i : ,.•::\ . ,'<\ :' <'.':, >-' \ : l :f' ' . a .. ... _ . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . .. ... .. . ; ec1; ( , hu:t /} 1rt~y \ 6ri~htati'o~; { )h,und~ . : :o~ . :the . _ lnfantri wete fired and ' '.i : r J , _ : ::';:\ '.': ! J,:.:; ;:r . .:J,':' it= / , t ; : .,;.; :J:~:;, . -\ ; // t:':: 5-: > ';: .: t ... .. . . , _ : . >> ' \ . : ._ , . prdtecti;ve , : batrages sno~ : !n along the DRIN!UMOR RIVER . ~or th~ __ . ; . . f -~: _-: > ; : ~_: . ~ : .. '-: -: :~ _ ,. _ _ : .. : .. : . _ . ,.-_.t \-!::L~ / . ~ ': i ,: .~'..> (;~~.<: ) -~ .. . -.::_ : : . .:_ ;/r : _ : .~/._ :: : t ._ : . . ; : > ... . -. : ! _ \ ' . , Lt-/ ':.: : . period endtb.g i1' :_: Juif, ' . . lartfjtS : wei . ~ nct nfunerotts bt hea:vr r1r6 i~r . e . .fteet ~~ ' , .. f t i ~ ;~ : } ~ '..-/ . .-"'. .. . . , . . __ . . _r_. .~i~ --: : : :-_ : _ ~-: \ _ ___ . : . .i:_.: :~: . . -~:-, .~ : . i. _ _ , .. : . . : . . _ . and _ . extensive J~antr~ : patrollirig•• ihe pe?:'iod. ' ending 20 Jul~ . : -. . ~ --' .i .. . ,. , , :. , ,-,'.;' ,. ' < ( , . : . i : :: .) : ,. : . <' ; _. < ' . . . . . : i . . . , , 1je,s < one _oz' : gre,t3;1? :i ti~irtg \ ac,:tivlty-_~ : HGaVj' . harrassirtg and interdie. \f;r , ti_~~~ ". -/i~~~iaidil~~n ;;;e,lie 1n: _ ,rlrl;ch ene~ , troop Were imown

PAGE 25

-!. ,,: : .• : }t:~{{~ ( }'.{\:IttY::r ':} W\. '{: :: :_ : ( . ;_ , . ., ... ._ . . ... . ; .\ . . ::>::. . . ' .. -, ... . ; : f .. ' .'.'2. ~ ,:_: :): ,. '. .; \ \ ~ s . hort . x-ou.nds behind our . lines, when . . .:::\t ,;;; / : _ _ \;.;, << :::, :\ \ 0 l/,;~ :: :,: : :•,,: .::i i , , .. ... . . _ ,-,-> \ :; . t,: fri,f3ndly ;, : artill~ry . -was . : : .firing:, ( on : several occasions. : : Hi a ,-:: ; i\:-.':',; •. :::~: ::". . ..,:. . ' : .. '. .. ,. ~-:t, : . : , < ... _' \t . .. , . ....... .. .'. , : ' :: "\ . ' . _~(:} succ.essful -' .adju ~tm~nt resulted, in t~ killing of a numbexo!' : J'aps . . ~ 1..\ / '. :/i-'c\' . \\ .}-' , ' ,/ :. :\ <.: :: ;'5< . '?\ (','' , < <: . ,: > :f .. . ;, . ,: .. > 1:-}.: , , : . , . . . . . •. ... . .. . . . .. . ; \ t\.: and .' i the \ subsequen.t / ca.p ' ture or '.tltla gun~ , . Enemy mortars were ' tired .. ;?$ti{ i .~ t1 i t ~\ f j{;; t; J' ~s _, ~ ;~~:': f t cin _ tbre~ ~;,~;~10~• . '. . . . . . ( .~ , enemy . troops acr()sa the _ river .: on three more oc.casions . during this ~).\:/, : . r ;,• .c' ./~ . -. /' /;: ::_:' ~:. ( )/ . . ',; .:,. \i,:•, ., . . .! )\ -: ': _ \:: ., .:: _ ;, \ .. :: :.-'-. . ; : <_: , .. :it \;: / : i. ~~ )\ same. , ' day : Pf , , intens~ , i"ied Jap a,ctivity ~ {: < Heavy . barras sing r1re a .. ( .. _;: .. .. \t:t .... ~~ ; }-_ :: .<: ; . : .. : > / . :_ ~ ' < / . . -: : i' .. •: , . ~. . . . :; :.. . . . : ~, : : ; r .• w h.: :Wereoontiriued 'i each ri1ght in : an ef.fort . to destroy the combat eft: :r r if ?f t.:::i:5 [ ~ ,; ~~ ~ ;;;t; ~ r~ ~ d~ ~i i t a, f t fi 11 ~~ . ti~ . m~nfiis 1 ;\J of '.: 2 . 7 .: Julf; \ : _ J)ips > ~ttempti,rig to ~ . cross ' the river were on . the . recei V'"'. '.!.~1\Y\}.,f . _ ,) ::._;J .. :/ /.~ ~ \ :_. :. ,. ::: : ~\ :_ , \ :; , . /t: _._ -. :\{ > ~; ~ /_. _. :_ : t \~: < .: _\. . ;. '. : _. :. : ; _.. ~:~ . : ) > . . i . -: t , ~ . . ' < . ..... , . ~ .: ~ . : _ / \ -: ; .. _ . . . . i : . . : ;.: <. : :> ; . . : \ ing , end i_ e>t h~avy _: ar , t.1lle.ry . f.1re . from , this battalion and _ the '. attack :; ,\.J•<'~:) ; ,•. ~# i, : ' 1 ('. '.~ ~-.\>• . . \._. /:: : :,,:--. :,. . ~:~.•: ._:} f _ _ : .. : •J~: ). '. \ , , .:~ :.• _ ! : ;( . . r .• --: , .. : :: .•:\ : •' ;; r ,{ wa::i _'. aiiccessfully '' repulsed ' ~ . 450 rounds . total ' was also expended in i( ' \V: ) (y;.•:;-;< :":! . (: _ ' t ,, , ':;?, .>'/.':.>;_;, . . ' . ' . ' . ,: . , . . . . . . ' . , , : . . . .. . ; t h~~yy ~~aas1:ng : mias1on;s , on this seme ~ght. . . The fo'J.lewing day : _ )/j; . -F : J< . \~ . } ){ ~ ,. ~'. :).>: ;):--_ _ . . _ .. . . . ; . > . : . ~:." ~'. ~~ ; . , __ i ., _. >" . < . ,: . .. > . ;_:: . . . . . -. . .. : .: -: .: _ . '. ' .~ .:_ ;: _ -_. , , .. ' ( a.nd ' ,'i\ighta :: througti: \ the night : of' 30 July \ were characterized by < iri~ . t t .. : : .)\ \ :// .: -:r.r; ::: _ ~ .. _ .. ~:-: _;::.: .\> / : :li ::; •?~ ~ .. (< : '. _ : ~ ... . ) . . .. : . . .. .. : _ . :_.: .. .-:. ~? .. : .. . _. .. .. _.(. ._ :. :: ; .,.::? .. . ::.:". .: . _ ... . f:/ tE1ns1v~ . :'i,atro1 arid . irery little _ ;Tap activity in our ,sector. , . I;-::, : . . _ J t: _ >r ,. : : / :::: < ,>{ . : / : -.1 -:-:---:--:-::; :': > : . ., /} . ' ' : . . . . r. Pniricipal . i'ires ; were : : tho~e of . harrassment ~ . . . . .. / :\ : ; .'/::'t'.f .:../< r.:. /-/; ,.. -:_ \ :, ~ ~---, ~-~ .. : .. > .. . ; ) _ _. .. :, . .. ;. : : _ -_: . . . . . : : .J_ . . . : . . , , . ) the ' , Comman.4ing ; CterieraL Persecution , ~overing Force Arti1lery; . to . j \ , / ;-, : : . .. . ~\:. . : i: /'f :;' ,:" ' , , _ . . . : . . <: . . \; .. . >' . ,:\ > , .. . . . '. : , , /';\ ; the effect :: t~t : elenient~ : . of . _ Jap . : 2~7th / and : 239th Iri:t'antry Regimerifar ': :\ :t f. ~ ~ _,:: . . -~ . / ~ ' , : t~' \< .. . :_/~ : .. _ ;: .. _ ~ '. _ : i:\ . : ;_;:. : . :"< .=: \ : Y ~ /<: : ( ' : < . . , ~r :-/_? ::.~ ~._\\ = ~./~ i:" ~: \ ~ ... : :: : .. : .;-_) .: :_ . ":_:-: . __ :.:_: -. _ <" : -.-; _ >. .. . . _ s' .. -\ ,,y v,ere belived i' to . be . 1n the :, aree. :, east or.,the DRINIUMOR , RIVER . in the '''! '~l ~cif,: ~ ~ ~.~ ht: ,' ~~ ~ t c~ , # ~; ? .~%fi,f ~ '.i! ~?-~ ~ i~~~ c f ;I . ~n l28t~ 1~~ 2 . M>>'. try ':'' ( ,,hich hs.d :> be ' en .. par~ : '.or ~ the : :. fED > ~ORCE, , up '. to this . time), '/' '.{ {, ; { ' , . :_ , ,:;; : .. . / .;~ .:): , ; :: _ : :i," --' . .. . :.,< ,; _ .,<-: :•:..'. : '._,;, ,: ;_. ' : :. : :' f' . ;J\' i~e1nfofce4 by 2114. . B~t:ta).ion . 124tll '. Iantry, was ordered . to attack :: > '. < />.'. ,: _' >": :_ ~ ?. \ \ '. :\ . : .::,.\( .: ,:: , . .. : ::\ ~ '/ ; ; , ; ,'< , . ?> '. .. . . : ;\ _ _ ': " j ' . ' . .. i :j\ It.~~ 0800 : _ 31 luly. ,}~ !lJ:ld pus~ :: :rorwarcf ~o : :, the : east; . •. tbree ' / ba.ttalions : < \ _. : . . ~:~,: ~_.:. :}:;{ : _ : ~:f ~~ .. .. :~\/;~ ; ) i-. , . ~ :~:( ~ . .. : . . : ~/: \ ' t{{ / _. . : . ~. :. /:. ~ :: . ~:~ : .. ~;' : _ ~ \ ... . ' . : _ . ... i : . . . . i\: in , line / \ one : 1n ''_ :r~ ser . ye ., \'.• initi1al. , .obj e eti ve: NIUMEN . CREEK~ /)(~:/f:i//:'.+•.:}:jf/ ? :Y{}:?-: '\'.: \: . :; ) .:: /::f /\:} . ' . < :, .. _ ,. : . .. . '. /: '. \ ... :J , ... , : : . .

PAGE 26

, .. ' ... : . ', 2 ') I:., . Dririitunor line . was to be im.111edie.tely occupied by othor troopo . i -:: : upon the jum.p~o ' ff of th~ TED FokdE. , :. For the at ta.ck tho TED' PORCE . : . J ' i ' '...... .. : . : was composed of ' all three battalions ' of the 121th Infantry plus . . , . . . . . . . , : I . . :_ 2nd battalion . of the l69th : Infantry of the 43rd Division. ' Thi::1 : .: . . . ' ' . . . . "' . . ' . . . _ , . ' . . _ battalion W(!S commanded by Major :: Le't!~S e.nd was hereafter to ' be ! known as the LEWIS FORCE . . 1st: Batta.lion 124th In!'antry was . . ' . called the BUTCH FORCE, 2nd Battalion the FOWLER FORCE., and the . 3rd battalion the PAPPY FORCE,afterthe1r commander who was :.: : ' ' lm~wn as "POOP-DECK PAPFY 11 T~a was Lt . Col. VUllis.ms, who ;; ,; I . ' will iorig be remembered as one or the most; colorful figures of . .:. ' I ... ,: .: ,, . I . .. . the J1tape campaign. His battalion was featured in the YANK mag. , '. . iz1ne with the story "PAPl'Y 1 s ' :soys AT rADJI. 11 The 149th Field Artillery Battalion, . reinforced by one Liaison Section from the l29th Field Artillery, was placed in direct support of the TED : FORCES from its position ' at AKAUAI CREEK and ordered to prepare . ; : . . , . . . . . . \ . . . . . to displace .forward east of CHAKILA. when directed. . . . ; Capt. WILLIAM B s.~.RINGEN and party were to accompany the . ! TED FORCE headquarters ~s liaison; Capt WILLIAM H FRE'ELAND with ... .. , , , . . . . . ' ' ; BUTCH; Capt , (GEORGE H . CRIL'L with PA~l'Y; Capt FRANCIS S :McCAIN with , LEWIS. The FOVffiER liaison ,1a.s furnished by the attached section . : Each of these liaison officers and sections did . an outste.ndingly: fine job and contributed in a large measure to the ultimate > success of the :attack . Ea.ch liaison off'icer was ably assisted. .. ' l:)y a forward observer party. With BUTCH was Lt. RICHARD L WAGNER; i . with PAPJ.>Y was Lt. WILLIAM H MICHELSON; with LEV{.[S 1n1tally wa:,; I LT SA1fUEL J NIBLD. Lt Nield was relieved about the middle of tbo attack to report immediately i'or Sho1"e Fire Control, and was reple.ced by Lt. RAY1/IOND J MAH.LOWE., the As::it. ComO who vms forw~\rd

PAGE 27

-:'. > ~. ,. : .. . J i ~!tt: ::t:rt;l~:~:~n:n~/::d:::::: :::::e:i::~:: ::::Cera : /\ ;: '.:'._ : / ... :. __ ,• '-:; . . . ,:/ -. ' . . .. :; . . .. J. ; .: . . . _ ... . . . : I :/ end f'orv1ard observer parties bad become intergtated into closely , ._} f ; l ... ::;•? Lt . FRANK : i ZIRBLIS ' and . tt . .:fOHN j KEMP. . . These \iwo. of fie er s . as .'. •: \ . ' ~,; ~. ' : '._ , I ,j , , : . : ., ; : . . ,:; ~ n : _: _ •: ; . .. \' t . '. _:• . ,: . .\ : . liaison pilots, :f'lew many hour . ~ ' daily. f~om dawn to after dusk : _ .. . _ .. . . , . . " . .. :; and performed _ inl'lumerable mi~afons; among them which were con,. _._ _ ,. __ , : _ : a•.-,. , 11 . : . -. ' ' . ' , ' ; .' .•: > . . : . . . . _ . . ; . :;< stant fire :misaiona, dropping ; of : urgently.needed small ltems ;,;:,_> .. ), . . . , __ ;- •. _: . , ' .. •i . _; . t i j' ' . : . . . . . . . :_ ,: . / such as radio: batteries, : location of' units end cooperation in . ; \ _.: _:-/. 1 __ .> _, . ,. _ :I _ ; _ : _ :-,.; : : .:: ~-/i \~ = .. .. .. : '.:{ :_. : _; : . ... _ __ . . . . .: . . -< : . . .: : .:... : i L -; ~-_. _ : -~ : : . . . . < .. _ ... . : . . :.. . , ;' .... _ ... ~ -. : ;:, preparations . forclropping supplies and' food by :. C-47 Transports, ., ,. . . . . .. . ' I . : :): ~cl .the : dr~pplng on . -~w~ occasl~~s . o:r critically. ne~~~d blood ' . '. :r ;~ l e.'sm~ :: i'J : :ies~ ' t~fu(.thi;ty ' m1~ tes aft13I' the request was received. . .. on on~ d~y -~ 'b~e p 1i~;t : .flew . ove/ ten " hotirs. Landi;r1gs 'were made af: _ :;,.' .; : : . , . : . _ : . '. :-;.,, ;. ~:\ . . ~ :\_ : _ : : ~. . ~: .= : . ... : . : . : ' ' .. . . . . . ... . .. /: ter ," : a.ark ' and lights; wei'e constantly over the enemy . lines--on : ,. ,'~ ;; ;_. /_. , ;: : :, ;'. :> _ . : : . . . '. _: :. . . , •.: ;_ . . ,; {" ,.~ 1 . I .. . , _ _ : " . , . f .' . ," .. _. . . ~!f W 0 t:et::l ~:el:~:•u: 8 ::1:::e:;c::n:. :t:: . ~:ttt . ... ) ~hat / wit~~~t the, ~u+ i,1' o;~:,., se plan~ s the intarit?'l' would hav" .. <, been ' without : f'ood. for b~tter _ than 75% Qf the tim!3,-_ completely . ~-' . ( i. :: : .. '.J -. .. :_. '. : : _-/:-: / ... _; .. "\ : ' :. ,:. / : . ,' ; . ' ; __ . , ,: : ... _ _. _., : ~'. . . ; . :: without communicatio s except a scheduled flight of' the division : •-. . . . . I . _ _ . .,... . /: '.' . . , . i' '.-: . .. '. ' ' . . . i. \_.: courier., without;art llery , fire, support and withou~ the ability . . -. : : '.:" <:: . _ ; : --':: r~ :: .-. . :,_, i_ Of loca.ting _ . 1tself 1 : _j/ ~1 ;_: th~ ,._ dot~~y~r . :. ~~. :} ti!\lle s _ iri the Unite .' " . ".. .' . . . .. '. . ; .-_ _ .; r . e ' Qub plane and the C. 47 are the best damn s ' t~t~~ / A~~:n~ : . Lts ' Kemp and Zirblis were both .• '1 . . .. . -. , _ . : : r~oo~ende~ ~ _ or_ ~he 1 1~ . ~edal _ .It ~~uld __ be _very . har4 to s 1nglc out , i:r;,.dividua:1 for special mention from those that 1accompanied '.. ' : . : . . .. . . ' . > ' . 1 :. < ' _; :' . . . > :: . _: the infantry in this' attack. The performance .of' every _man was , . : -_. . . . . , . ::; : e.bo _ ve . reproe.oh 8.Ild . the . lnf'antry ' . had only the highest praise f~r .: . ;;~ . ~ , [. :•/ . ', : '-, :: .,N~ . , , . . , , I, '.

PAGE 28

. t; ;t\ : ~ ~ E;l\\ ., :;: : }: ;\ : ,_ , _ . . . ~ . _ ;< ... . . _ 24 '. with. the . point ' and Capi; Freeland wi th ,r the Bn. : ' 0 , .;: O ' 0 q , . ... : : t .• ; O O , h :-, O : : ;:_\ co'; : ,';as : very instrumental in the advance of this battalion \Vith. _: ; . . > . . _ .' . '. . . '. . i. .:-r . ; . . . : .. . . . . _ . : : -. ,: . . _ .. .. ;> -~~~ -: ca.aa.ul ty i'~~m . enel?zy' ~ctio1 j~tter : the . first day of . t~e attack. , . /.':'..\O'.: ; ' .: :_:., . ' , . : / 0 : .. : _. ::~ . ) \: \ .. , . . . ~ . : : , ' . . : . _ . , ... '• v . : ,;'; :c. Later in the : day by day descripti _ Oil of this attack~ which . ~. . .. . _ . , . . . . . . . I . . /:C ,:•' < >" : . ::,. .... . . ,, . .. : : .'. : _;_ . .. . .,_ . . : , . .. : . :., .:. , : ; . •' , . . . . . _ ' . . \ . . was ' described by ' General l!e.c~THUR a.s . _ "a feat unparallel'ed in . .. ... . . . . . . •, . j . •i ' . . . . th~ hiat~ry~' ju~gle ~~fare n . more ~11i be said of the work of . . . . . . : .. ~: I , . . , . . : . ). these various . sectio~s and officers, : ~id especially)that of _ Cap~~ : < .: .: . . :' . ' ' / Freeland e.nd his sect110ii~ ' o Jl July _ 1944 . . .. TED FORCES cross~a. : the DRINIUMOR RIVER a.t 0800, and pro• . : :. /: ! . , l . : ~ . -, .. . . . . .. . . . . . ' . " ceeded towards NIUMEij CTI . EEK. ' . The advaricc . TlaS made _ with three . .. ' : . . ; , : .. . , . , .: _\ . > . .. . \ . , . , : . . . , . . . . . . battalions abreast;, ,tlth the 2nd battalion on the _bee.ch ; (left), . , . . .' , _, . . -/. . : -.. . . . . .) . . , : ' . . . 1 . . . . . . '1st be.~~a _ l:1.on in the jcenter and 3rd battaiion on t1te inland {~igbt) , ~id~ . . 2nd battal16??,JO:f l6~th, (LEWIS} crossed the ;iy~r at 0945, : \.nd followed_ the , rigiit _ fls.~ '. of PAPri as a. reserve battalion and .. -:~i t~ i'e:ruse the . right ~lElllk: o; i TED FORCE . Lie.is~n an~ forward ob servation parties we~,~ . with a.11 battalions as set Ollt in detail ' : in preceding paragraphs. The advance continued witl?, practically . ' ' ' . . . : nil resistance . The ;one exception to this was an ambush hit by ! , ." I .,_ . _. BUTCH . "All Company was advancing on the right of the battalion. _< The jungle we.a very dense and intermittent re.in was : falling.

PAGE 29

tUt f i ff ;!II : ' i} . . . . .• .. . . . . . . . •.. . . . .... . . .. . . . . . ... . . . . . c :\ 1 is ' { Three sho ts were heard from the rioint and ' the column halte ' d., . but . _:\.:~.\ }:;_ : : : l -: . . .. '. . ~ .. . ..... : . . . t: ;hortly 'resum~d lts advance.,. p ' assin~ three ' dead ' Jnps/ v,ho were , Jl[~ ;es~~ts of ~ he thr~e 'ahotaj. l :: Sho~tly . thereafter ri;:tns ' a.gain {::~< : _ . . ' , . . . . ' . . L . I , ' \ , O'was . heard from . the . point-_-thi s _' ~ime both BAR and rifle fire .• As : \he ~~ch ~ ~a.s resumed, ' t~elve m~~e JflpS (thorou~hly : dead) ,~~re ;: : /' ~::\ . _. . :. ;.. . _ : . : . ' _ -.• . ; . . : ' ... -. :. :i.! : : ; . . .' _ . . . . __ . . . : . ._ : , ... _ . _. : .:. ,' passed . in their former bi vouac area. ,The rain became heavy at _. \ }_'. .. ::_ . _ :'".:: :' . :-:. . .. .... . .:"' _ ~ :_ .. _ . .-_ . :. . i ;'.-'. . . ~ . . . . .= . . . .. . _' . . -_: . , _ . , _ this time. A . short while . ls.ter _ , the battalion hit a Jap.,defense ' \ ; 6;1tio;/\o' v,hi:ch the jungle;:~i dde~' Japs allowed. the p~i;t : t~ : > '>. '. 1. : : . ' ' ' '. , ' . ' . . \. :i: . ' ' ' '. . . , '. ' . f a.dvanoe ' ; within ' ' five yards~ , )Tap snipers -had allowed our advance :f/ ~'i_~~~-~ts ' ib :: ;ts~ ; ~ : / : them. : ' At } \iua ~ime tlie Jape op~nect : f~ro : ' ,:. j . . . ' . ; ' . . ' ' . . . . ' >i : ! . ' . . ... .. ' . ' .. ' . . . . . ' ~ ? with machine , guns ' . •; An ' err or t :'. \va~ niade: ~o !'lank the ~ap~ right; \/~tr: .. _:\-/_ :~•.:'. ; / _: . ,;._~ , __ . . : ... : . = .. : ._ :' ' : . \: : 1 _ . :' .• ."i .• . t : 1 .: : ; _ , .f . . . , :{ but . it also met ma.chine gun anp. sniper fire. .: First Aid men did )f . . . x :\•: :. : . . . . '. . , ! . : : . . . .. ;} .. . . . . . , . . . , < '.f:ar1.outstariding effor.t to evac-ate these point casualties but :_r ~ f/i ._ : .3: :: -:" : i , , . _ ~, .. ..... . ~ ... : _ . .--:. :_; ;, . .:.; . : . . . _-:_ ~!' .' _ _ _ ... , . ,: . : . ;. . . , .:-_-: . . •, . ' (fJvery .fir~t aid man ,was either ~illed or wounded. At thil f1m e . .. f;.: ..-::: -, >r: : : : <. . _ . 1 ~ : _; : -~ \ -t Lt . Wagner; the 1'orwe;rd ' observer, began his adjustment which was l id : :Jt::t::::nprj::~:: ::r::s:::e:;u:h:o P::~~:::d:: I/ /:1,-; i;h;,;.-:: . . . ' .. : j . .. , , ' . ' . ' 1 ,} , the 'right~ . With . th expenditure of only 36 . rounds. the Ja.p pos.. ~~: : ,'. / /::{ ; : :f ~ ::\r = ::~ ~-:\ . ~ :i :--•>.:_ \ _:/ i :.:. > .. __ i _ : I _.__ . . . ..: . _ ,:: . . : . . "' . ~: . -. .. : .. _ . : =' 1 tion ' ' wai( neutraliz d completely, . which allowed :the BUTCH F ORCE r:.::: ~:/: :: :) ~ _~ , _,._ __ .. :. , . \.~. : _ :.: _:_ ->:::< ::'..:: ->~ > .. _ -/_:;}( : : _-.: ~ : '. ___ ; ,. _ _ : . _ ... . \ . HX: :to '\ iithdraw :i and , es't bliSh a perneter 1n the a hort time th!it . }:~,\ { -t:J.\: . ~ .: t>~ t <. ::" . .. (' 1 .' , : ( : \/_ i. :; __ ~: . .:<~-~-,: _: ./ , :-. :' ,_, . _.! . ::_ : •: ; .. , . :.:, , ," .::: •. : ;. .. . '.. . . . :.. : \ . .. . : W re:i:nained before ; 9-ar , a:rtd ' it . was ' found the next da:y that the Jqp (}? •::) / ;'~)!, . : r: . ><,:/ _) \: _ .:_. _. i/ { \= .. . :' ; :: _: ( .' , .\ . ': : : : ..: : : , _ . . :_-' . . , ; . :. _ ... ~, . , . . . . : , . ' . ,'. ._ .. ' . , . ;:d' position ; had t,~ezi . o: mplet _ ely . rieut;r~l1zed by the fire of the pre. ~:i, \)~ ~1; / ~ : : .. t : : :(~ j)/~; ~:>•>: _ : : : . ~ =>.:) : < \ / / '. . < .. :_: : ~ ~: ' : _ ._. ~ < ... _r '. : ~ -~ >. > : . . ' . . : . t'.y~ous :-_ day; <: L Other t _ anthe B'CJTCE,Ir~.CE, all ba _ ttalions .reached ir ;}t 1~ /-//t7~\ ~ . .~.:~ _ _ _ :. ~ , : _ _../ :i: ~: ' ). ~ .. : _ :\ r-tt ~ : :_/ \ : : ~ . --; _ . -~.,i ;= ~ --. : . . : _ _ . . ~:( the objec~ive "' ' that ay, : ?fith ._ ~nl;r. :: ~. r~ . w : Japs encountered a.nd killed. ):?/ft-T , , . :/:_: i> : i: .::7:_ , ; ; _ _ : / ?, . ~ ::.c: : ... , : . .. .:_. _s :; : i.-: . : •:_ . : _. . . . . . . . 149th . F. . A Bri. " was directed to remain in position at . . ,._-:-_, / ... . '. :' .. . . -: . .. / . . :: . . '.~ . .. ~ ,,, . . : .: ; . _ '~/: •;: ~ . , _ / ." . . _ . .. . , , . . . ! : : AKANA! CREEK : tor th , day-, _bu:t: to . begin preps.rations for dlspl~~~; : . :;. ' ,. . . .-: ._ -.,. , y > . . : . . . . .
PAGE 30

.• _ Sa positio~ ,_ ~6 the diI1ect rear of our b o. ttal:lon. '.l'hi~ . i. : would be a dispacement of about t;iree miles, putt ins the . . . . . . . . . . i . , . / 1:>~ttaliori\vi thin ' about 1000 y~dt of the mouth9 ~f . the DRI:nuuon . . ". ,, ' . , , I .. :-: , '. I . . ~ . ::-:; :~ ~: : ' , Full. : reconnaisa.nce was made . end pr~parations begun for _ the dis, . . : . -'.:. , . :;' placement by the _ Bn co and Batte~ : t _ conuuanders and parties. The < \. _ : .. :\/ ..:.:_ .. ' 1. -_.:_. ._. : :r ._. -~; __ _ ._i:1. ~ _.1_ , _ . \ battalion was , alao ordered to ~-xvcy ::Jurvey forvmrJ. wi t;:i LEtvIS. . . _ \ : , : : ~.-; : .::: :.:. .. : _. -_ : . _.., .. . < t > . .. .. . -, . . : . . 1 ,.~ ;-:; , >: : .. .:., ~ : .This survey v1a.3 jungle survey : @t ' ~a worst sort~ but neverthe. ' . ,. . . . 1 : ... , ... . : :i. _1 -: . ~ .f , ie ss reported by Lt. Nield to > _ -=. _ . . -. .... , .. _ _ ' .. .. . . . . .. . . i _. : . e.gs.iri ju.st at.the : _ j , ction of liq and ' u . An Battery . sketch . of = .:. ... .' ,, . . , . :. ; _ ; ;. :_ . . .. . _: _ ' •. \_ . _ \ i'" : : _ :_ . . :: ; -. . . .. -~ .. ~. . . ' .~ ' . 1 ... ' . . :/ the . area is attached a.s e.n : annex but the position may best be )'. i a. : es6 . i1~ed hez:a ~ y . sa i~g ' t~ t th~ b ' att~~ie a in orde~ i'rom front ~ , ,.. . . .• . . . . . . . . . . I ( to : rear were ncn'. ~'Br HQ., and Med. ~~t, . ~11th e~ements of : : Service battery. : The .north was bounded by tho sea and the south . < ... ; . . ! . ' :' . . _: : by' a strerun forming a . large horseshoe with the flatten tips at , .. ; . ' Hq Batteries. The distance from the cente r . of the

PAGE 31

battalion to the stream at_the deepest point of the horseshoe was~ little over 100 yards and the ground was very rough, 27 gullied and ~lling. The far aide of the creek \"las dense jungle. ,,, The interior of the horseshoe was cleared for artillery fields of fire by dark of this date. Infantry activity during the day was minor and no calls were received for fire support. "Bit_ Battery of 181st field ArtilleryBn. was attached to us and occupied position to our direct rear. Night protective concentrations were shot in, and the above a~tached battery checked in on our selected Base Point, and Check Points. No other activity this date. 2. AUGUST 1944 All quiet during the. night from the infantry standpoint .. The 149th F.A, fired heavy counter battery fire beginning short ly after midnight on a Division Artillery located target. At ah-out 1100 the battalion fired heavy concentrations on enemy positions for one hour and a ha.1:r. This fire also ,vas in the nature of a 11 softening-up 11 for the attack south and southeast the next day~ A. total of 651 round,s were fired. with air observation wi.th e,::cellent coverage o:r the target area. The survey section under Lt. HOWARD N MOSELEY., :C'Cl>ntinued survey to tie our positions into Corp Survey. At this time it would be well to mention the outstanding work done by lI.'t,. iMo.aeley and his section •. A.11 survey in this operation was ,o!f ~ee-e.e-ssi ty uooer most diff'icul t con ditions. The Task Foree .Artll.llery eal.Ied upon this section for much o..x~pa _survey, aln. ;w.ld.ieh :was earried out with dispatch and aecura.e;1.

PAGE 32

: . . . 28 . . . ,. 1110, Col Jones returned from TED FORCE wl th plans . j ' .. . .. , . 1 in.fa.ntry to attack south and then southwest to envelop . j the enemy; cuttin& off his ~up~l~ lines a.na. to cloaa him , in a . . .. •. . . . . . . I . . . . . \ . , : , pincer move between -the BALDY FORCE and the TED FORCE, with the , . . . .. ,• . 1, .. . a.~e.x: of the_ forces be~ng approxim.ate~y a.t AFUA. __ This was to pro,,, \ ' in . the .veek: :,: that follows to b~ one of the most difficult a tta.clrn int he history of jungle warfe.rci. Such an attack meant cuttinr; i . . . . . ) . . . / . . . oft :from all supplies other t~ by air, . no communication other . . . . . t~ -. by-: ~el~y ;'' tlir.ough ~t-ille~l : 1•adio net.a/ no evacuation for ,,. , _ _ _ -. . _ . , ' . ' . . , . _ . :'. . . . . . . . . ,. I .. _ . _ . . . days,plus . the usual hardships :' 9t sle.epless nights, cold wet cloth, . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ _' i I '. . .': ing and resistance of the jurtgl~; all of this not to mention the ._; : ~ .. _.. . . . . . . •. . . . . . . . . . . , : .! '. !: . . . ' •._. . . :': constant resistance of . the Ja:f, vrho ap:;:,arently is in his m1.tural /:: , : ho.bi tat 1~ the jungle. :_ . . ' . ' '. ' ' . The . attached ba.~tery of 155mm How, ,,ras registered on e. long . ._. . ; . . . ,• . . ; . ' . ' . . . . . . ran~e , check point in th~ ~.fternoon, by . the llaieon plane of this . battalion. Work waa continued throughout the day by every av~11. : / . . . I . , . a:ble man; to clear :r,-elds of fire and lower the roe.sk range to tho :, s~ut~ . Thi~ wa~ :'a vlry \difficult task due to . ti1e prevlously munt( ione~ : . thfckn~ss Jr the jungle on our immediate . south flank. . . .• . . ' : ' . . . 3 AUGUST 1944 i . Tliis ' day proved t o be one of the most eventful in tho hllltory .' of th~ batt~lion' s m asion at AITAPE. A.t 0100 a small force of. or 8, penetrated our perimeter. They mun: _.aged. to cross the st as.m in the deepest point of the horse shoo . _ I under cover of inte~ ttent rain and the noise of firing b:7 the . battalion..: As before m~3ntioned, the risin8 slope fro-:.1 the ntrt'MJ . . to the batteries was very gullied and ridged. The Je-p~ up:-:i:tJ' ;'. ~:1 ~ j1.J

PAGE 33

.. , .. . . . . :.'; . . . . . , -.. , c. . : 29 .' _ :,!f~2'.?f~:;(( f X:i.::. :? j:>.:t . . . . _ : , < . . : . . . . . : _ . . '? c:., .. :. _ . , __ < . \; :-.dividedinto . i about four groups . or two or three .. each headed to. \. . . . ~, ... ~ . . . . ' . . ; it ;~ds one _. _ . 6f : th~ i'o~-be.;~-~ ;jJ~.The. -~oup t~~ : we~t for "A" '. __ :~~~:~ery, ~~ ~J~a. to get~ 1n to i~~ ~att~r; peri~~~r ~a. set off' .: .': .,:\ ~:~}~/ /r\ : :-_-;:;::;:. < _~; -_. _: \ :: :\>?•: ? ~< ... ~~-~ 1{ .> ~/ __ ~_ :"..:": : .• (~ .... _ : : . _ _ .<: j .'.<_ \f' f. :l -:_ . -, _ _ . .. .:: :_: ~ -,; \-;, . two :demolition . ~ chal'ges : 1ri : between :_; the rows . of aJllllunltion: iri .:' tb.e \ :f<:,::r\/.c/ : . ;:-: i ::-\~ : , . . . ::{1 .:_ . ; _. >•: _ \ : : ;:'. ,. --: ":. : .. : . . ,_ >' \: <> : : \ batterydump ~ : > ~ A number ; of men _ je:r _ e sle , ~iping in _ the ammunition . <>> .;: >:-: ... :. :_ ~J: . . ;. 1 . 1 . : , . . . ::''. .: .. : :_ . ~um~~c-~ni . ty , : a.~ within;1 , t. _ .. ;~6. . or o~ men; pfc A!B~T FERRERA, t \.:, : ... : ._::-::;: ::_ :: -'':.f.: r'. ,_:. .. . ' I . .. . I \:: . ?/' :\ ::. -: . . . . . . , . . . . l614869land . PvtGE0RGE'i J RUOTOLO, . 31333193 .were . killed.instantly. : , •. -~ > :;" , .' . ., _ , ., . _, •' : './;_ , ::\ / ~ \ . . Ir : ::\ ,(: .. -.::.; ;_: .'.:l l L. . . . . . . .. : : . -::' \ :! ;(:\ 4~~; . pj~~1~~ \~~ :'., ~~o:i.il~ona/ which-~ere l~g~ b1ooks >. ot : :} 0 :t] f iii 1 i:Ltrl:tt'&{f ~eiJif z:Iq:f d 1: t~~ ct::: .,~J} .if i'. t~;~JQll ~~i~ '' f o~~i'.s ~{e •~Y~~g~, tossing (sr~n;e ~~J J N f} t~ < :g~t : ol ' 2nd ; Lt~ ; :abBJT _ J ibWERs / o~iJ.8268 . 4., wo~d~d hlm : :_ ~ifat ;: : : ;:;::;f :;c:. :_/•:i/ >;;: , < .. ;._,_ : I i.!' .. : 1 L i . ' . . . : . -: . . ,, . . . . : . < .. ~,.-.' f :inultiple > shrapne1 : : w nds: 1n three . places; Lurigs, kidney . and liver.. ::vt : \/ / <:,, _ ;:: . :: ) <::"( k 1 . / .. _: : : ;: : i _> :":_ .: }:<:?:\ : << > -, _ _ ~:: . .< :,:::;: :_,: _ . ::'.'i)}: ./ . ~ery rortti~a~e r,. l~~~~:!~~~+;t1ona:.d1~_-n,~t : de~~~,a . ~~ _ . the :/: . '.>-:; . . . . . . . . . , . : I ' . I l . . . . ... . . .. .. . . . .. .. . ' . \ . , ' , .... ,, ...... ';.. : .... . ,.:,,.;_ . , , .: ammunition_. al thoi:igh :so~e _of it .was blo~ many yards. ~.The f'uze . ~~ . ,. t> / . . "::-: i _. .._,,: .. ,\-> I 1 !: 1 >< -: . , -\. < :,:., / .; :. r;:_. _ ,:i one I smoke shell was blown off, but the. shell did hot rupture . . .. :;:11:~'.: tf :1~~:~1j:;~, , ~f $ : f] ief't f'or the. Batt'al ori Aid : Station to :swmnon a1cl.:fat~Meserole .. . : := ._. ' ' ... '.:, . . ,><: '\ ,; .'..:,. \ .. :;,;:.._,:_ , :\ •j_:-'.-. :'.'':.'..•'. :: ;:: , _\ (.;} .. , ... . \\ 'made '•this :trip :even though : Japs . were kriown . to be \ 1h the area atici . ;\ 1 _.',.: ... •.=: .~/Y \. /~-. .. .:: . <_ : : . .: r(~ /L~ --;_<,. _ .,~,. , < ~-:\_ _: :.::,>:j.'. /: ~ -:-_ ~ ::r :.:if , . . ~.. ;\ : _ _ . _. ~\ :: } ~: ::---_~-,:; ... _ >... . :: : _ :.. .:_ ./~.~: '.-' ' . ._ -.:. ~--~l !'?'/>; \'. : .-:. _ : J '.).?f \. \t . ~ :: also ; in i'aoeof , : the greater danger of . being sho . t by : h1s ownmeri . . •,. ,, . .. . . . . :. ,\'-;•;/ ? : . ::• :<. (.,., .:.:,:: : '(. ; .: . : : : :/ :: , :. ' :. At . : the aid:, : sta~ion., Capt.~ t JOHN . L . WHITAKER; . Bat~alionS~g~ori; i and . . ' ; : , -: :-. . . >. i., , ; , : . :>-:/,: : . . . . ... ' : '. ;. : :two volunteers ' : ' Teo . 3 RALPH E BAKERINK and. Tee 5 : STEWART McViILLIAMS., ,_ ., < :.-_ .-; : /' .::-' ::: . :.;,.-:: , : . . ,, . .. _.-. . . :, •/:-: .. < , ,L . ... :> . ;.,, : :-. , , left ,innne ' diately . , to i give a:td to Lt Powers and unknown others that .: < : _ -;. ,<> . .:.._ ..... _., , ._..; :, . . . . .. .. _.::.";tr.~;~ <~:-.':;_ : i\: , ; .-.,;' .. : .... ;: ;,'.:' ':>: .. ' :: . . .. :,... -.-: -,_ , . . . .. ; ')night be injured. :, ~fte~ ,trea.:ting Lt.::.Powers and pther injured~ , ' ; . . . . . . ' :. . . . ' f\j ' ' . ; .. < . ' ,. . . . . ': ,

PAGE 34

of the Medical Detachihent searched the araa for other;1 . . j . .that might _be hurt; durine.thl.~ ~ri.tire time. Japs were known to . . . . . . . . . . J :?'., : . . .• . :, :be in the area e.nd the ordei• 1:is.d,:been given to take cover\ For :.•-_i:• ' •'..•. 0 '• .- •_..-,~ •.' : . O K,:: 0 0 . :.+.•>"{•,••::.\ ... '.' O •-~ 0 ::•-.: .... ',:., 0 :: "\/:./.•,•::::•\:/,:• their meritorious. service,wi~hout regard. to personal,safety,;:.-' . Capt WHI'rAKER, .:~ec BAKEkINK, .~tJtTec 5.McWILLIAMS, .we~lawa~d~d. i . . -~ : . ; j,. . . , ._.. # ,_: ~-r': :' .: ....... .... ... .' s.tar .. M' :e a .. l •. .,.11::,;I:. .. .. •.. .. .. ... ..... '._:, .. :.:,•.:.: .. : .•. .•..:.:.:. '. .'. ..• . . .. . _,.___, .... _,_;;a,\/::i.\::/r)0:i.,' . . / :''/::J)'._}::;1fr;>;tJ ... ,:-, > .. Tltla group of. Jap.s.rappa.i-~W.~.iy. e:Scipe.d from the .area~-but'. \:~-. : .. . ' , f I .. '. , .•it..,_.. :,::rt':/, ... ' . . .. •./'. '<<.,,:,' 'several were thought to [be wou~dod. ~t. E!.bout 0300 another, _.attempt,: . ; , ; . , '.l :<';!]-L ... >'? . .. . . ' ... . ., .. .; ,: vma made to enter the ar,ea and',ic>ne Jap waa. killed w1thin•jus~ a )r: . .. . ' f~~v yards of a ho~~~~er\~f.: 11 Bt~-[~~~ter;~ which h; .. '.-~hd&;!o;.1.~l :, to reach.' to -:~etl6!trelno;,~er_:-~1~4Jttibn. charge .-Ano'th;~ ,::-;:t'.-:.~as ... . thought'' to be ;;c,~J.idafJ;;t1oodiibd .sei~ral de~oiitiori/66~~~~--were . . ., ;-: .-1 1:, ' ' . ' .. ..... .. :(, '.< '. . .... . fou_nd nearb;r,._t~e n.~fft m~fnifgr:• A~ about 0500 ~other' :f~~,;w~s .seei::i:. escaping .from the arlfo .• : i A J3lllali' j>a,trol was sent .out. south .of: the .. ~re~k 1 t6e neit mo;A1ilg; !~o/ ahout 500 ;~d~ .: . Th{; ~at;of ~aw)it: .. .. :::~)::~:t:: .. :l:1l::e:1::\: 8 p::::a:•:::t:~t 0 J: 0 ::.e{..• \ .. : ! ;.,_,•,\')!.I I: H -... ::• . .':?r'.•.'\,;:,:\:?.--.":;r;\ >of --v~hioh oontained:.demolition charges~, B.lood and •;evidence o.r.'. t/i '/. '' . .. ; '.'>\ :.: ,; i•. ' :. /.> :.-.:: :': . ':<\ :_: . f'.V:.JJ.J'J-., :}>< .'. :.'~ ': :,,.ftJ.:J>+ ::,;-;. , .TED FO..tWES moiie out acoording ;to' plan :e.t 0930~:/,;Th~. first _ -.. ..':.\_.__,.--_:. •;:_.. .' ._,_ >:._,:>)-'_>: :\:.: :-.:(; ... __ ,=..._~---{ -~,r _ >_::i_ ..-;.--'.\:. _ .. ___ _ .. .. : .::_;:._~_::.t->:'-{>;:... -~-~---._,._::: .. :;\-'.<>-~-,:.:; report rece1yed.,was hat WILL::CAMS ;was opposed by two companies . . . . --,_: _:,.~: ' . ~ -\>_ '..~ .. --~_: __ ._ .... , .. , : '\:,:. . ... . ,. _ -~';' ~:!'-_(-_.___ . ' ' ;; o~ ~ap,s., LEWIS by 01 ~: ,:R.e_~i.st~.~e was ov.ercome an~ .the a~va.n_a~,, -continued.: -.The onlyj/Orin of dommunications was through the ''-<~-,-.:: . Artillery. Cub 'pia:n~ bd ft k~pt b~sy const~t~J 'At _.1700\:.' ... , . .': .... --~_ .... ._ .. : { .~.-; .. _.~' ,,_ .,~ . _:. . ; ... . ,• .'._:.:_:_/ .. /.:.::•_i,_:i:,;'": .the air .ob3erver,. Lt •. MARK F EVERETT, located a Jap mountain: gun. . , . . -. :-•... . 1 , . ::,,_., :., ... . . \ . but the plane was called out. of'
PAGE 35

,,,, ... . ( r 31 !~( ~!if ;)ftI:~;J~~ ::.a:1;:::q: J :t =~ ' t::;e t::oP:: 0 a; 0 thn . : Tips had moved it by the ; next n!or : ning •. \)J}jL)\{ r iJ . . i : : , :'c . _ i .. :J .: f~:\ ._:: . .'.: : 1 . . i• c iJ L 1 : . . -; \ \ t ( . . f :. : ~ :f\ Vr?rlt . . cl~ipg '. the day: i . \'TE!.S :!.~r&eli . devoted to tightenilig th~ . ~{)_/ _. . .. ?::-\ \\: ~ .::-:.~-\ , : : . _ ; __ . /'.--_. ,_ / :~ : :,: : ~ .. : ~ ) .: . .' i _ :1 : '. -:: } _ , :\: _ :: . . _: ... __ . . . . , .: . :.. . _ .. ' -:' __ _ .. . < ~ :. f ~~~~m~.~~t,,, cl;e~Jilg ~ieJ-.~s . of {ir~ : ~nd leveling \v:t th ~ull.qo~e3:s .;:. : ( : _ ,:.. :(/.'. ,> ::: _ :, . :; : :. /: , ; ,.: i :':: It . < . :, . :: _ . . _ >., . . :.the . gullies _ as ~ much as pbssible . . ' : Heavy log dugouts were _ built _ : ; .: t '., ;~ _\ /J~< . . r: . ~ _ '. : :_r -: , :?_~--: ; :~ : -_ :: . : ~ .-: \ .. __ ,._ ----~: ._ : : ~t . _ .:.:~n _. _ ;:. ~.: _ _ . . .;_ __ ,_ , :_ ., .,.. -.. ~-~ -/ : ~ : .. ~ . ,.~• : . . . , ;, } ~ t".1:'.b . 8,~ , f:f : 8Jl~ chief en w~,e : , !as . strung . , . Arr~geinerit o v,&~o }0~!:?Ff 1 ~ s~ f 't~r1'.ax; t~ , :u;~t:~• . . on <>1111 8." ~e;~ ? HE . 1n . :; the > event Ofa = mass : : a.tta.pk. 1 , Cqnser,vative e _ stimate . of enem;r _. canua1, '}' : FI '.\ t:;,: ' \ .:, : >t / .. :: : / ,t.-? : = -ql .':: : t:r:L :. -, _ . , , : , . ,. t . ties: for : .thi_s dr;i.t~• :.2.Q0~. 1 ;:;: .ir ij :i < -'/ . ;: ,wi1\:fl {{ JitJ([\i;_f :\lI: 1 :} Vt \~ ~u~s~ , : 944 . . . . .. " ... . ... . . <, ,, i\L::' . :'{i;It ".' :was discover~ on thi':f:date that the f'orces . opposing T.1-::0 >:~ . i~ .. );:~?_.:f~ -i~:~ -:: . :_r:~.:__ '. :: -:._ \.-.: -' . .: .-_ :_ :_ (l _ . . f1 . . . . ., . . ft~i:~jt{~\;bi1 Impei:t~ 411e~~ ~ines, averaging about. aiX ieet . -r. ~ . : . r . cl . _ , .. .' _ : . ::, . -.i_ '. . n ': :,,, .~ . .. . . ~ . i l8;,_ t . -. ~ 6~4j I ioh. . rdent1fio~t1on Was extremE>li hard ~ ; fJ ti\ 1 ,~~t# I ~ere '~~siif k' o~f m~~t of thoir .delld ik ;o~o;dan~i ii.th \ ; ~~;{;}cJ{f~~ !~d ' . ~~'? bp~~g identification from th~ .. ae t~ey ;. ~ere .. -~ . ;•; '' r:: 1 ' ' , ! .\ ~ ... ' ; ,' , ..... : ! 11 I .-: '> , 1 ' 'Ot -. , ( , I , •{ . . , , o' ;}1Tif ,!(~~t~ / tLr. 0 v~-.\ ~ : _'. !: . I . . . .\ _ ) _ . . . •.: __ _ _ : . .. . .. . . ~' ~ , ... .. , {1 :,'"'j :J(i._ 41 ,-. -'• !"';'i I'I.:; ', }' ; ' f jl I . . . ~6}-:;\!"-,i;t_f't f': \ , ; .' :. t .. >: ~• t .. /. \ : 1. F: , . . _ ., . ... . :• .. , : '{l::: 01 ,::• . r. The . plane went p age.in in an . ef'f'ort . to relocate the ' /\:It' t/;.: ;, ,r.-• :,, ( ..:j . !'->._; . : ' . . :-:..:~ I .. .-, ; .,. , .. . . . . : . . :. . " \ . : . : . -. , . . \J ~~t~ ' t _:, ;~s : ' ob:J C~~. i by :: dsrktiess . the preceding evening: It _ had . . .. ih/}}:'i} J;l~?>/ \C'.:.'' ,iii:> , :. : \i: ; t / ! . . . :. . < _ :. : .. _ . ,, \ . . . . : . . :(j: ;J~ . een moved _ l;>y _. the , J~' s during the . nl.ght and : the plane _ was unable ; ;t 1 f~it/tt:)\r?lt"\ : :.: , \, .. . _ .. .. : _ .. :> <)~ _ :'._\ . ( ... /\ . t /. _ (.) ~ : / / . :. .. _ :<. ~ . ;.: < . .: > _.' .. .. ., , . . . . : .. . . : . ':": _ ~ : . _ = -. _ :) . '. ! ;.... . . \ > l -_: \ :: _ : . ) .. _ : ~ .. !ftf tc( '. ' find . lt~: ?? The \ Jap \ wer~i ~xtremely: pepsi,stent ruid1 labored. ;' out ) : . /}#};ll}t,'::/i" \(L;,':/ >:'.•('\ , ( , : -:: > .; . :_ :\_:, ,'-: :' ' . ... . . ... \\ .. > ;: : ' .\ ,, ., . . . . . . . . J)j/ of , rea:son ; to obtain very . small amount .of i~effeotive artill~i•y !li~f i~ [t'; > Tf ;,+ld: f ;~ck ove~ long d1stall6:l . f F \ r?m,in .:/iif !,' , ,> ; -> mountain gun ammunit onwith individual men carrying i one rcui1d i each. ,;:i \ ; -_::/ /:::;;,_-, :. : \,. :) . . : : ... : . . : /:. : . . .(: i l . \ .• .; ::-::,,.;: ;}' ... ;,;;; :-, Thetr1re . d on
PAGE 36

32 and they a.re profioient in the use of their very light ma.chine Between 0820 and 0830 the battalion ired the hea;viest ten minute preparation in its history. 593 rounds were fired in front of themne of advance of the TED FORCES with telling re sults. At 1130 two missions were ti~ed on enemy infantry and two more at 1345 on a large enemy assembly area. Infantry con tinued to advtinceduring the day and thero were no further requests for fires until defensive fires were n1arked at' the end of the day. At the end of this period TED FORCES had captured and des troyed four radios and generators; 20 LliIGlJ and 15 knee mortars. At the end oft.he period, definite identification of four units with which we were in contact had been identified, two of which were rcgiments, and another 18th Army Hq Troops. A concentration was fired on a Jap Bivouac a; 1800. At 2100 sentinals on the perimeter reported seeing three or more Japs approaching the per:tmeter from the jwigle to the south. They were fired on, and flares were put up but they got away. The perimeter continued fire spa . smodically throughout the night on Japs that could be heard in the edge or the woods. 5 AUGUST 1944 During the night harrassing fires were laid down on enemy ; positiom11. At 0830 a patrol of our ba:~~a11on accidentally tripped a booby trap on the ~outh perimeter of . the battalion. Those in jured were Ci,l RAY R vvEST, 37115461, wlx>received s el7ere head and brain .'injury which re , sulted in his death~ Also injured was

PAGE 37

_ ).f '.;: 1 arid.; : aerial number : ~ or ._0t.t1cer and : : enlisted pe.rty for Shore '. Fire : > . \11~: gz*~m :. ~~-~J: ; . 1 ; f t: ' . SAMtr:L < J !!I~~f : •s ~ . s~tt~"? ~:;Nrd:~~d ,; ;o ., :/ _ report : to _ the CP as soon: as physieally possible, .,_ He started out , _ ')~t ' ;6~~ . wt t11 ~n . e litter !).la t1e~ Jd ~ pa troi ot . 16 nie~ 1 i.t; RAnio1m :. J_ , liitffiLOWE .fo~e-d a forw~~d ob : slr~~~r. party. 1'::-om ~~a1i~bi~ -rii~n -~ ~nd '. :: J~~t fo~w~r~ --f ; ;o~ Rogim~~t to -~;i ~ke the 'pl~-0~ of Lt ..: Niel~~ (jt~~it f t !~ l;3f ~u.JM r~~u~stf t:jf1f e ~n a . . d:~ \ n . . Ja~. ~. ~~ic~ . f ~. . . ;;' b,PPOS~ng their : o.dvanqe. ' J The g~ was neutralized and .thei advance , ,: \:{ :_ .. ,,-i : _:_, .::'. ,:J . . : . .\ I -. _: :-. .:, . . -~ . ;• : ., _ .. , ,;;proceed~d~ . At 1745\ Jnother cocentrat:t.on was . fired 'on _enemy , :-.': : : C j!f i~~f ' \ ' f ~ont Ar1 bUTpa ;j '~aottcaily th~ . thtir~; af terno;,(w~~ : d &i,~ ' n't'\ri arranging '~ tii.ro~ : gh bur plane for . the . dropping . of }atfon.a m ;~i.t~l~~;.;~geiitl1 ~ad:' b.t~ils w~re com;leted an~ ;fooni . : I: .~fF1~~ ; 1 J~:!Ft : ; (r 1 .JI . . .. . . ;~;t'.f\'.i/~J:'/~fe.~~1~~ ' b~~~Js rd; -~ur Local Def~nse wer~ . d{~ , s~min~t~d b~_. ''!'~J-'.lr._:;.ft :. -'--t~:: .:. ,."! . . ~ -•, . : .. i _ . \ -:; _.-!:. ' '. . . ' -.~ . . :. ) . .--_):_:.: ,;_ / .. _ .. ii, { th~; ~a it~ ' 1i~~ _ Conunab . e~:!to ~to.nde.rdize pr+3v1otts metthods. and . 111.. '_;: '.){'.+ _ .;_:\\ _ r.':' :;,i ":. _ . .. ~.: . .. -: 1 _ .. : . . >: 1 :-, ; _. _ _ ': \ ; ;_ . _. _ . , •. , . s~~ ; the ~'i~ esttossibl cpoperation ~>etween batteries when attacks i {iiiti? lft.K::I11:1r tJ/// 1 \J( < . , >; < .. > . .. . .. ... . .;;. /r . . . .. ;; L:c'.\:;;?i , Vf.rLLIAMS / met st ff :opposition a.11 day-. TED : rq~CES killed ' ~';•:/'.:/.\i~}.:•;'.'::,';.;: :.i. : . : _,, _ ~_ ,. : , ':. : .) ... __ :'.ii\_'>,.-~_ , _-,.. . . . : : > . ... 1 .> .. , . , ." , .. : :'.\ru.i.~st1ni1:1l : ed,-l04.Jap ~his date. ' The entire -ad,:van~e . had been :: f; _ ~:;.: i: 1: : ,:;, . J. . : : .. f . . ; _:~ .. ,,_ 'J _; .. . ''. L : ,}; } througl:(Jap -_ biyoue..c . ~as estimated to be more i tha.n! two battalions .. •t.:.; __ . . , : -' ,::;-: h:,: .. ! .. . . . . , //; !~~fLIAM~ !'~~ --: ~ppos~di : , ll:( : ~~ . es~imated tv:,o c~mp _~ ies _. jw~e~ _ he night . ~ '. _ The _. terrain . was very d1f'ticult f jungle was dense , . _ . , ~~~hri : ~~ : _ to be . ~eked out by machetea , no tr~ii~ existed . t\t , : . . -., .

PAGE 38

': :'<( ~11, . and. the opposition. V/l\S described as "sticky'' ' by TED~ : : j r . ! 6 AUGUST ; 1944 . . .. ; . l . 34 . Plane made e , arly contact vii ~hi each of the forces in ~ega . rd to supply mes~ages . an~ arrangemei~ ts ' Y(er~ made ior drops of . ed food a.nd equipment . ' ~upplies :_ had become an ~gerit prob~em by . i ... . . . . . . . , ... . : .. ,, : : ::: ; _... . ... . ' .. . ' :. ~his _ clayof e.dv~.rl.ce. Yefy 11 ttie' hould be. carried while : ~dv ' anc. : ' . . . . _ .' ' ' , . I ' l : ' :~ ~ ' . .• , f ng through the heav~ j1gle : , _:_ f1~ ~e_covery of supplies_ dropped _ in : in only slightly clearedjidropptng spots Vier~ extremely difficult, . I . Ji. . '',( l : . . : ' ; . . . ' . ' . . . . . . . often impossible .. . Evacuation oi' , : casualties was already a problem . ,• . . _. . . '. . . . .. . .. ' : ' i .'• , ... . . . . , . ' . _.. . ._ . ' . e.hd ~ri . this dat~ 1t was : ~o . bec'8Je , :~ much m~re severe . oi1e / . . ' :j . ' ,• : 1 ; ' . . . ' t .. , , . . ., . -, _ . ._ . . . t . i _; _ r .: . . At :0930~ :Lt. l,1ichefaon, with WILLIA1iS FORCE, ca.11ed for fire . .. . . . : : . i . .. : ; .. . . . ' . on _ an ' ~nem~ 1r1fa.ntry, i which come up . on . their. psri111eter . dllr. . -~ : .. r . ; . : ; . : . . . . . ing the night. By _ nfutia!fzation, e~f'ect _ of e. well placed . _ e.r_t . iller,r . fire _ , the battalion ' waa able to continue its ad_ . vs.nee. . . ' . V . : 1'' l . . : . ~t.~4~ aaf'ety lini ;wa~ agreed upon ~nd ordered materalized on ' the me.p, byLt.Col. 1 ':J.'AY~OR, Diverty S-3. This line was to control . . . . . . . .. . 1: _ . .. 1 '. ' . . . . . . ; . . , -. : ' : artillery fire betw~ n ; the forces of TED.and BALDY as they _ crune I, i . . . : . . . . _ •' ' . ;; : . . . . :'• . t?ge~her.. Nothing yr . s ; ~o be fired Ea.st oi' this line without . . . . . <. , . ' ' . .. clearanc~ from the 1 9th or e . c.l.justment by its . obser~1er .' : ,: At 1150 urgent eqU:est for heavily . guarc\ed native train was . , . ' :received f'rom Col.St .. rr, CO of TED FORCES. The work of these . -: of casualties can no! . be praised _ to highly _ . This was . . . for1mrdedto higher h~adquartera. At 1100 fire wasagain delivered . I . . . , for BUTCH on enemy e '. stimated to number 75 .. The Je.ps . ?iere . . driven off to the SW after suffering casualties.

PAGE 39

.. . . : : . :. :) -:'; ..... :.,_ .. \~. .... .... :;:~:/::,. :.•_-: _ _.. . -_-. ... --: -. !: ;>. :: . •. _:--' .: .. __ :_._ . At 1730 the Forward Observer of BUTCH/oalied for . . . . . : ;, ... : .. I \< .: ... _ .. : : ",.. . .. enemy aup_plyrout~ arid by-pa,.ss .which he had looatedwith .... > . :: :.-.::.;,,, ;.. .. / ... .! T> .. . ... :; '> .. .: . .. .'.•:.,'., .Point Patrol~. Thia was .Lt. Wagner, who has be•en mentioned be~:;•. : . . . ,.<" .. ,.-.'. : . > . > i': , :, .. ; . ' . \ . .\,' ; •: ':'i i'ore .: A. eonoen:tration was i'ireciT;on. th:ta .e.rea and request _ma.de : > : 0 0 0 0 ,•' •. 0 0 h •. 0 •'; 0 , 0 •: ', 0, .0 , 0 0: ;•: 0 0 •. 0 0 0 0 '.• 0 ._. to Division Arti~lery. for authority. ;to interdict it :during the. \ higlit:o protect,ive b~rts }l:iLoHrt before dark. ;The j_iniSO~ ~i~etr~e p1UJou1~(/~ot~ V8 t~~. dah in tho ~~l.}Il~ .. and r~lay of n1easages. .:; :,. --iJ:. . . . :. . . : . -._ . I ~;! ' ;• '1• I ! } . . . . ... ' ' . " .. ; .]:i . •!. 'i < > ,,. .. : . -~u~htii1i ~-,: ~ .~~eri1otl~;1{ _:~atl. obteJ.n~d and. coric,;htrations \ " .• . . .. . •, ... : .. i! : . I':, i:, . . .. , .. ... :were 'tired bviioo be:N,~e ;:liltinigh~: and. onoif itter~ . . . . . . : ! I . . . . ' . , j ( i';_i' ' i:{ . . . . , . . / . . . ' '..; ,J, AUGUST 194:4 . . ' . . . : ' .. ;i ' . , . .. . . .. :: _:inf, supf,iy. ;wal int~1di~tti.a a .lnehbioned on_ day before-,A~ ,.:8ijoo.:th~ -~o~,,itra'•t,b'.blkvJ:~. wlth:vu:ttti1~~ :reqliest~~:tifie)oh eite~y. b1vui:~trb~~(~-~-,,~d~:'.'tci .,, search 'the enit~e ~~~':;::~'ve_l'ed ''by\A-,;~: .fir~--: .. .,',,, . . y,: .. , , .... , . .... "1 . ' \ ;_::_ { ......

PAGE 40

36 At 1150 LBWIS requested fire on enemy , machine , guns which wore i:mr.iedia.tely neutralized. on enemy infantry. At 1250 a concentration was fired . . . :. \' -. The only form of communications continued t _ o be through the ;.: Cub'.'.plane ~nd the ple.nes : maintairi.ed a constant patrol ovor the . •, i: . ; _> ! : . . . . . TED li 1 0RCES. Essential small items: were dropped ~urlng the day. 1 l 1 . r . . I LEWIS had rough goins all ; day, long., both due to terrain and . I ' I ' . . . . . . j; . J. : . . . .. . . enemy action. ; This battalion killed a.t least 120 Ja.ps on thia . . . . , ; I•; . . .. : . :-:; l ; _ . . . date, plus an unes.timated number : destroyed py artillery fire . . ... . . . ' . .: . !. i ':1 ! .. :' ' . ' . . . ; BUTCH killed a~ ; least I 25 ;; in on~ : : rmall _ e._rea ~uring hi~ adv~ce . . . . . !. ;l !;: , . . , . . . . o:f thia date. . , ! .. . . . _ . . . In the . early a.ftern.oon LEVIIS had. a premature burst of an . . .. . . . . : ; ' . : i :_ . . . . . . . 81mm Mortar.and casuaiti~s dnd killed we~e hee.vy. This force . . t ;_ ' ' . , . , 1 I 1 ! ' ' ,. , . _ .. . . . , was still far from AFOA ' and 'the situation was critical . In . I . ; Ii! j •. addition to the waltl::Lng ~o~nded., there were 18 litter cases-. I . . . l 1: : three . very ser~ous _ .. : 1tt?745 an urgent request :ror 1.0 ,unit~ 0 .. blood pl-e.sme. was reccliv~d. by. the plane, which was .over the . force . . 'at tfu\t time •. The . : ~J!~n~ ; immediately radio~d the battalion . and . I . i . . , plamna was wrapped dropping and sent forv,ard . to . the Cub strip . !, . . .. . . . . . The plane recei v~d t e P,lasma and c , ?mpleted ~he drop _ in 3~ minutes from the ti~ of the . first call, undoubtedly : a~sisting 1 , •, ' . , I ; ' ', ,, . . ' , in ~h:E:a ::::E:! w:r:jo::r:: :: v::~ain on the East dt the ' : _ I DRIUIUMOR RI~R unti LEWIS could ' close with it . P~trols were } i . sent to contact LEVlIS and additional litter bearers ! were also , dispatched. It was impossible., _ however to evacuate' any of' these

PAGE 41

#37 ..... r casualties on .this date,• I ; . From the on 'this day: . I " 149th Field Artillery, . . : the follo~i.ng were-wounded i ' ... Capt~ FRANCIS S McCAIN)'. : . 0 65 Pfc . AUSTELL E REID '" , .. 34402130 Pfc CHARLES E SPIVEY. •:55534775 Pfc JAMES F McDONALD/!. . 36538811 . Pvt• EDWARD J \ OUIMET'l'E.. 20423555 . f . L. W .A. s.w.A .. s.w .A. . L.W.A s .. w .. A. : . . I ... : . . Pvt• Ouimette late, died 'las result of his wounds'{ and all others were e~a,oull ted 81[1 lasJ:~o : th~ bat ta,11 on. :!:," .). ' ., .' . ): . . :;8 AUGUST 1944 , :: '. : . ... . .. . . '!' ' ' ' ,=: . .Vi ''. [ :i :-'_. . . . . . __ .. _. . All ba tta.lions bf TED . FORC~S. 'continued march We st and South . .. . . .... .. i .JI •': i:i ' . . . . west towards AFUA._ t;o ;complete the closure on the Japs. During the . . . .. e~t1re :sw~eping envel,opiiient of the TED, the BALDY FORCE had also i I : been taking. heavy: ~~01i, or; t~e Japa that were being pinched in ' . . . . . . ' . :! d .. I I , . .betwe~n the two i'or,c,~s.: The general picture seemed to be that the '~S. w!>re !'au{J~ b~Ck in !'ront ()!', TED and at th& same tim8 vigorously a.tta.cki~J:BALDY in an ~ffort to break out. of the trap. Undo~b\;i,iJ.11 sofu~ J~f hed. into the ve;•y rugged and unexplored . mountaina .on the Solljth: ~lank. Disease w9:s reported to be talt1ng a heavy ~oll by thiJ ti.me, by a prisoner taken by _TED and BALDY. I . ! Many prisoners expreeae;d. a.we at tl;le amount ~nd accuracy of the . . ! i . .. artillery f'ire that hey constantly~eoe1ved,.-andone officer ' ', . . said bo have a:.s ad to aee the automatic artillery. ' During the mor ing our patrol combed an area 75 yards south of our position. Several Jap ga.a masks were found--one of' which I I was apparently booby-trapped. ! . ' ' I At 12S0 one concentration was fired for LE~IS,which killed

PAGE 42

38 _ Japs counted dead on the ti .. a.11 •. Ah unde.termined .. . I ~ •. _ .. :: , . : ; number were killed a.nd wounded ; off the trail and evidence . exist, ~ . . , . ! . ; . .. .. . 'ed of a number havj.ng been wounded on the trail. By nigh~-fall . . . . . . . , . . I all of . the bat _ talions except LEY(.[S had begun to close . in on the . . . . : . . " ._ ' . ,. ; ' . : ' , 20m::>unded. Full report of the r occurrence was made to higher ~ i.• . / -. \ --_ : ~ . l -~.:-_ _ -:_ /!,' _ . ; _ ' _ _ . hE1adquarters a.t once -by all ~o ' ncerried . This fire was placed . to . . . : H /f : : -: . . . : . . . . . . the ea.at of the sa..t'et;r 11 ne r.)ver protest of . the 149th F.A ., and .. . , ; '( .. . ,.' ' , •. .: , ~ , . { ~ i .. _ . . ; '. :~: = _ .'!• , _: •_ .. , . was the same . concentr a.tion that had falJ.en d , a.ngerously near . . , 1 r i , BUTCH:. ; the preceding : ntt.ght. . _ i r .• .: ;; : . . . . ;: When this artill ' ry' \ .fire began to .ta11., a.11' of the men were OU~ of the1J? . aleepi~g : t;i~tches and thiclcly_ sca~tered through the battalion area. At :t e ( bui•st of the .first round., TEC 4 DELANO G ' ! I , \ i. ! : . . NEAL, 2042~ 309 and CA T~ :: WILLIAM Hli'REELAlID, 0-326945, both ran . . . ( ", . . . ' ' . . for the Liaison radio :-: Tee = 4 Neal reached the radio first, and . . . . " \ . . ' . . inunediately began the ~ _ all . to cease :f'iririg . Capt.;. . Freeland reach. f1 , ' . ed the. radio and . took up the continuation of : the call. Both of . . . . . . . . . . . . these men went t~ the . radio with complete disregard tor their own . per . sonal safety, when! 'e;eryone . else i w~s diving for hole oi . . . . . . . . l . . . . . . . i . . . . protection of . s _ ome kiiid. : Capt. Freeland was wounded seJT~rely in the heel., . and . has been awarded the Purple Heart. Both Capt Free.land . .

PAGE 43

. and Tee 4 , Neal have .been a.warded the . Silver Star Medal : ror Gallantry. ' . i Of the 149th F.A. the follow:Lng were wounded this dat~: I ' , , CAPT v/ILLIAM . H FREE! A.N D ':;, . . Pfc. 1TARIOU L HUYCK :Pvt WILLIE T Hl~VJIT1 1 . , , ' ; '' . ; : 0-326945 . 16148575 34530052 . L.W.A. s.w.A . -B~W .A. 39 .. . '. " . 1 . I Pfc Huyck later dit 1 c":. t\a ti•result or the wounds received. . . . , . . ':> i . . . . b AlJGUl; : i944 .. :ii . . . . > h, . , All battalions of Uie TED :r FORCES exqept LEWIS crossed to the. . . . . ... .. ~ ;!' ~. ::-~; 1 . : .: .. .. . : ~~ . . . , west bank of the _DRINIU1~9R RIVER,! arid consclidated and : pat1•olled . :: __ ' :l ~ :".:, :' . : > : : ;Ii , -: : . . . . . . , ly : wounded during th : night, one of who vras Pvt Ouimette . of the , . ' I ,, I . . . . " . .! i . 149th F. A. . ; ) . No fire was del. ver~d during the day. Cub planes were in •' •, .. ,: : . . . i ' . . ccnstarit patrol oirer , LEWIS to tre.n . Sll11 t messages and . another d.rop . . , .. . .. . . " of ten uni ts of plasn a was mad~ in th~ afternoon._ ... :: Plans were n1ade to displace to TADJI PLANTATIOU the next day begirm.ing bring out . .. . at 0830. Tractors were ' to be sent f'or;mrd .. . . I . . . . the heavy equipment of the infantry . f'. :. : ; : , :.; ! . i I to AFUA to

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40 10 AUGUST . . . . The 152nd Field ArtilleryBattalion arrived early to relieve the 149th. F.A. Bn .. . and displacement to the bivouac area at 'l'ADJI I was con1pleted _ be.forcmon. duties begun. .Camp was established and no1•ma.i camp . . . . ; . . i : . 1 : ' ille.ny men had skin infection . that reqpircd const 1 •, . . . : . . ,' ': ! ntent and those the.t had lmade the attack of week long \~. I . , r . . _; . : . . vmre in most cases almo~t unable to wulk on . their feet. . :, . '; f . ,, .. ,, j . . ; , . i:! ' . . . . At; the close of .th~ : 124th : Combat Teams part of the AITAPE crunpaig~,.7606 Japshad ' been ' lcilled or found dead; ~ild Prisoners of War . totaled 95.. Official credit for 2,067 Nips is given ~o the Combat Tet1111 plus coutitless otherskilleds.nd wounded by artillery . . . . . i : I ', . . and mortar .fire ~d d.thers .th~t•_ . tho Jo.ps drug off after they . ' . . . . ' , . . . . / ; _ ; . ' ' . . . . . . . : . . . v:ere kil.led <>r wou~o.edt ' Gopie~ of t~e comendatio~s of General . . . . . . . . . ... .. . : !: .: . . . . . . . . . . . '. . ' . . . . . . !facARTiiUR, ' General KROEG:Ell, "Geineral HALL and others are attached. I '• I _:; 0 ' ; ' Thehighes't ., l?:t>ais~ that : the 149th F:t~ld Artillery Battalion re. : . _:, _ .. ... . _ . _\:,-. _ . _ _ ,.~ ;. --i .: ; . : } .: .. . . . . . . . ~ . _. . .. .. . . ceived and,-the one that : the _batta11 on appfeciated the most, were . '. , '": I ! . '. . , . . . . . . ' . . . , , . . . . the_ -s : t _ ~~e,~e~t _ 3: _~f.t~r ._ a.~~-~hb ~y . s_ ~n~ i~fantry office.rs, who se.id that . ~e . . . ~i ~~~: . _ _ e: . ?r~. p~s ~i~_~e :mea~n1~e __ _ o~.s_u~-~0I•~ and that the batte..lion was th. "fi-nest , o.rtillery in the U.S.Army." Men of the batt~lion: .cp~ii . -o~ help. b,.it ;e~~ great ;~lcie wh~n sic~ and . . . . . . .. . .. I •.. . . . . . . . wounded men 'in the . hospital would call y-ou over . to their cot and . . . . I , ; .. . . . . . . : ask if you _were a member of . the 149th F.A. -When told that you . '... . .. . . . . . ; . . ' ' . . . were~ , they would 3ay, "I . just wa . nt. to sq.3.ltc your hand. 11 Eve~y member of' the l24tb. Combat . Tea.-n na a . proud o.f a job well done .. From 10 August until embarkation fol'• 1'.iORO'rAI operation on

PAGE 45

repai_r and r0plc.c2?nent of equipment and r.10. l dng of plfans .for ti:10 future operation . GcnerEl Pz:.~::302 iS vis.lted thea Co1:1bat fJ?ca.m und puiu us cor:ipli::::wnts and deli verea. coI~3ratulatorJ ro i na.rlrn of .. '.During tb.:e rect period an intensive prog::'fll'rl of shell nock . , ! 18.ce and bracelet making ! was be 6 -u11; by s. ls . rGe percente.g6 o.f' the ' i: ; ,1 The battt~lion lost two more Captains cmring this poriod: 0-336396. Capt Sv;carineen vras cvacuatEid for high blood pro o :::ur,;1 a:nd sinus infection, and Gn.pt. Ci--111 fer a bad knee. 0rde1 .. s were rece~ved arid ; proparatioi1s begun for tho r . :o;rnT .:. I ! . . . . operation. Major JO::EPH J HILL, .Bn4 Bxecuti•.-e Officer vm.s ' . ! ; appointed Tran:::pol"t j Q,ua.rtermaster for the Cor , 1b~t Team, o.nd sh0rtly af'ter became T ,: ::~M ~or the entire XI Corp Headquarters and all. ..l . . attached troops at A.1.TAF:R when the job v:a.s turned over to tho •. Corriba : t To~ by Corp. I Major Hill was abl:r o.asisted by Sgt. JOH H . I . . A Sl,!ITE, .3701606a, •td ' , ttor their outstanding work in thio operation they vrere a'.i'ffl?'rd the Bronze Star l.iedal. For his leadersJip of the battalion in the AITAPE mi:rnion al!d the superb showiJg made by th.ts organization, Lt. Col. W. I EUGEHE JONES was D.\'TS.rded the Bronze . Star Medal. In preparation for the M0R0TAI operation, Capt~. HAYES, FOVJ1CES, WELLES, and Lt. Ifi08ELEY made . map9 of the general area. of the operation s.s well as maps of specific areas on the 1Dls.nd.

PAGE 46

42 Terrain study was :made and a tallq;t ven to the officers by Capt. , . i Welles, Bn. s-2. F~r. his merit6r.ious achievement., Capt Welles, ! . was ruvarded the Bronze Star Medal\ : 1 \' The batteries of the battalibnwere transported to M0R0TAI; bt LSTa.less the dotachedporsonnel Vlhi~h-travelied•wlth.the . . . . . ; .. :\, . .-:: : _._ ... . . . infantry_Prio~ embruli{a_tion•:r~~ the actual mission a .full : sea.le dry-runr.as held ~t jAITAPE{' : , , . 1 . . . ! .

PAGE 47

. . HEADGiUAR'l'EllS . US . FOttCES A\PO ;705 11 August 1944 . . I ,' . . . ,, l. I to1ce great plba.sure :in transmitting this message frou1 the Commanding General, $ixth•Army: . ; : ' ' "THE FOLLO ' UING f ; ;ESSA.GE . HAS JWT BEEN RECEIVED FROM GEH .r ~AL 15ACA.RTHvR QuorE .1:'Ll1~ASE EXt'.H.ESS TO rmi: OFFIC'ERS AND liiliN OF' '1 1 HE TASK FUH.GE 1/2 ADMii{A'l'ION FOR TH.E Sl"LENDID CONDUCT Qii' THE CA:iti.PAIGH EAST OF ArrAPE PD 1 rHE Ot'ERATIOUS WEH.E l'LANNED VJITH GHEAT ' SKILL m,1A 'WEHE EX ~ ~u;rED 'WITtI ' Gl'G!:A.T DETE:RMINATIOilf AND ' COURAGE AND \~ER~ CR01HNED WI'I1H GRE1'\.'1 1 SUCCESS END Q,UOTE rr GIVES 1,1:E GREJtT PL8J:..S1JRE TO TRANSi , lIT THIS IIIBSSAGE AND I WISH TO ADD trY OWN CONGHATUI.J'i.'rioNS FOH A. DI~,PICUL'r JOB WELL DONE 17.q SIGNED K..ltUGERlf 2~ I assure nll : office:rsa.nd men that their expected fine perfo~me.nc,3}~ vrillingn$ss : to accept o. difficult job and determin ation to see it through, ha.v;e been appreciated by me .. ., This fight , fs preli.'llim1ry to btgger and harder ones to come.. Vie must all oe . prepa1--ed in future ope rations . to accept . grea;tei; losses and pr•'ivntion3. The at t~clu1u . st continue and c..,nly }:>vpush:1:_:qp: it to~~-'Y--E.2J3t~ can we o.tta.tn maximum success. ' 4. This memo1:-un.d:um : will be co.mmunlcatcd to all of'ficers a."'l.d enlisted men o:f the command at the fil"st opportunity. , . . Me.jor ANNEX //1 /s/ c. P. Hall C.P. HALL General, U. S. Army Com.msnding ,

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AWARDS AIR HEDAL . lST Lr. JOHN J KEhiP . 1sr LT.. Ffu\lrK J ZirIBLIS I 0-1170447 0-1177706 , SI LVkR S 1 r1~r ! 1 IEriAL : I , ; ; ! CAPT.. \'JILLI.8.11'! li FRrrkrit\.lfT.J . : . . .' 0-526 7 45 TC i.J: DELANO G NEll.L i : 20423309 BRONZE STA .. 1 MEDAL LT .. OOL. W EUGENE JONES MAJ. JOSEPH J : HILL CAPT. BENJ1\MIN ; F WELLES JR CAPT. JOHN L Vf.HITAir1~R ' . 'f:C:C 3 RALPH E Bli. .. EHirUC : SG'r. JOHN SJ:;IITH •rgc 4 CLARK A CONGDON TEO 5 S'rEWAHT ' J IrTc'NILLIAMS PVT CHARLE$ i L .IUXON i' 0-242926 0-1762.43. 0-396677 0-118773 37652.022. 3710606232492234 36404352: .. 204:a3553 ' 1 . i . P'ORl:iLE HEART I ! CAPT .. . WILLIAM. H i PKEELAND CAPT . FRANCIS S \ He CAIN 2ND LT~ R0BZfd 1 H PO"ill1."iS s/SGT GEORGE S . G::-t rmr SGT RIGH.ATm v1 IKE1:JYON :l.)JW 4 JACK D HUirF . . CPL JAMi:S F L:tSA TEO 5 R. J. MOCI~ TEC 5 EUG:2NE ROBIN-SON PFC . 'WILLIE 1 r I-im ,fr~TT PFC AUSTELL E !REID . P::?C CHARLES E ! SPIVEY EVT PliILIP J BAlffi:S PVT SArifUt~L P DARBY 0-32Gr/45 0-462865 0-1182.684 204:?..3443 31047896 . . . 38087305 . . 32500995 34021634 20423557 34530052; . 34402130 . 36534775 14202242: 38511710 ; ' ' . !

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HE.\Dt~UAHTBt ; W 32d DIVI~IOl~ A.HTILLEKt : I , ' soBJECT; Com.nte:hdntiori.. . lIDM/pod APO 32 . 17 Au'f; 44 TO ! . . . 1: : . . : Cohlma.nding ~ffice~~ l49thF1eld Artillery Battalion; Apo 705 . :: :. )l . !i \ J ' : 1 . . : , 1 . . : . ' '! , ; . : . . . . . : . . . . . 1. Commendations : and corigratula.tory mes:Jages to the . Pei~secution Covering E'orce . hav:e been rccei ved from . Generals . . MacArthur# Krueger and , Hall :: fdr its performance in aotion . . throughout the campaign ju.at : closed~ To these, General Gill, in Memorand.um No.: 28 dated 12 August 1944, adds _ his commen dations. ' ; ... ; ; ; _. . . ,. . 2 •. I wish esP,eci~lly to express to you my pride and commendation or your. part and the par~ which your . officers . and man played in this a.c~ion. . . . . . . : 1 1 . . . ; 3. The . ~ki1ti} ~d~uracy and meticulo~s attention to duty , shown by the offikl13rs , and men or your battalion was outstanding . and a credlt _ to or Ar::n. The efficiency, volume and timeliness of the Artillery f~res, by breaking up the enemy~s attack f'or:matiol'la and _ co.u~ing him severe caoualties, greatly contributed to th~ a:pee . dy an~ ~uo~esai'ul conclusion of the campaign. . ANNEX# 3 . /s/ Robert B Mc Bride Jr ROBERT B MC BRIDE JR > Brigadier General USA c . ommand1ng . I . i i , .

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