Citation
Frank R. Crumbie Scrapbooks

Material Information

Title:
Frank R. Crumbie Scrapbooks
Creator:
Crumbie, Frank R.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Crumbie, Frank R., -1960 ( lcnaf )
Baseball ( fast )
Béisbol ( bidex )
Cuba ( fast )
Genre:
scrapbooks ( aat )
Álbum de recortes ( qlsp )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Full Text


" .SEB LL CUL'
CTO _ER 6'I -1


































'1000,






-, BASE ALL BULL .
OCTOBER 6TH 1936

B ;EI..LL 3ULL.- GIANTS PITCHER FITZSI -'"S CATCHER "ACUSO
"Y A.i.EES PITCHER GC. EZ CAT.,HER DICKEY.
BASEBALL BULL.- YANKEES 1ST CROSETTI POPPED TO 'H ITEHEAD
ROLFE OUT IERRY U-'NASSISTED DI"'AGGIO FL lED
TO CENTER ;0 RU3 NO HITS '3I ER ICS.


C0 INTj 1S T 1 ,NG ,, SINGLE TO LEFT FIELD Bf, TELL WALKEDD
TERRY SACRIF ICE RU T 1 OuT TRU1"7 LEI
-ER WALKEDD OirD LOZDE OTT DOURLE1 TO i-IT
FIELD 2 IRU'D 1 ORI I i! < SECOND IJ iD Til IRD
L .LE uT TO "LFE .i K T LAZ E-


SBj : LL BULL.- ',.l .B:S 2ND I N'l G GEHRIG FLIED TO CTITLR
FILD DIEY FLiED TO CErTEI FIELD, SELKIRK
TO RIGHT CENTER FIELD P 'ELL H N LA-'-
-ERI SINGLE- T LEFT FIELD GOLZ OUT FIT- 31V
-.0 T T 1 Y ITS 2 RU., 0O ERRORS.
GIANTS 2ND ,- INNING JACKSONO SI LE TO ENTE. FIELD FITZSIH.
MONS FLIED TO RIGHT FIELLD -.RE FLIED TO LEFT
FIELD ,-TELL WALKED TERRY FLIED TO CE TER F'A
FIELD 1 HIT SYANKEES 3RD CRjUETTl SRilc'l O6TT ROLFE SlAIGLE TO LEFT
FIELD DILfGGIO 1S IGLE LEFT FIELD GEHR IG
T I1T FIELD 1 RU SC 1" DICKEY FLIED TO
T: LD 2 H TS 1 E
GIANTS 3RD.- LEIBER OUT FOULED TO DIREC'LEY OTT OUT C oSETTI
TO GEHRIG \'iCULD HIT 0' ERROR BY ROLFE WHITEHE
-AD FLIED TO RIGHT FIELD O1 HITS '" RU'NI. 1 ER-


4TH INN 'G CASTLE.A,; G 'i PITCHI'' FOR GIANiTS





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THL FLTI kVILLL CLUB

January 22, 1907



ivdr. Rex A. FixlEy, President
The Peti )iville Club
Port- au-Prin ce.


Sir:
Your Committee for investigating the possibility of constructing
a golf course at the Petionville Club has the honor of submitting below
a report covering the work it hes accomplished to date, together vith its
findings and recommendations:

The Committee has completed a topographical survey and map of the
property; it has made a scale model of the golf course which it has de-
signed; it hes obtained an option, good until August 8, 1938, to purchase
the necessary property for .500 (14 1/8 carreaux); it has obtained per-
mission to construct a golf course on the property and have free use of
it until such time, prior to uugust 8, 1938, as it is able to purchase
the land; it has constructed 400 yards of footpath; and it has carried
out the prelimnnary work on greens and fairways described below:


"Planted to
Bermuda Grass: Aough Cleared: o tal:
Acres .cres acres

Hole No. 1: Tee constructed 5/4 3 5 "/4
Green cleared 1/4 1/4

Hole No. 4: Green cleared 1/4 1/4

Hole lio. 8: Tee constructed 3/4 )/4
Green cleared 1/4 1/4

Hole No. 9: Two Tees constructed 3 2 5
Green cleared 1/4 1/4

Totals 3 3/ 6 3/4 10 1/2

The Corinittee has iiude careful investigation into the cost of
clearing lend anl preparing it for 9lantiif,. It has observed the results
obteinea through different methods of planting Bermuda grass, and of planting
gress in different soils; it has experimented in control' of erosion on new-
ly cleared land and the control of weeds;- it has observed climatic effects
on the growth of grass.

The Coimzittee has made a thorough study of the problem of fitting
the desired course to the terrain available. It hes drafted a large number
of alternative arrangements, el.d has chosen a final design which it believes
to be best adaptable to the terrain. In arriving at its decision, it be-
lieves tiht the final design, considering limitati ns as to terrain and to
finances, is thoroughly in keeping jwith the best practice in modern golf
course design.












a plan of the proposed course ,is attached. Details respecting the cost
of construction, a scheduled plan of construction, proposed methods of finen-
cing the work, observations regarding the proposed design of the course, and
the Coiamittee's recommendations, are given in the sections ;.ich follow:


I. LSTIiATED COST OF COiDTRUCTION1

Plan No. 1. (2000 yard course)

A. Contract Work
Hole Io.: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total
Fairways:
Clearing, stumping,
hoeing, grading 15 12 15 10 30 1 12 10 It 124

Greens:
Clearing, removal of topsoil,
grading screening topsoil,
replacement of topsoil,
rolling 15 12 12 15 'l1' 12 12 16 13 122 *

Total: 246


B ay Labor & Sup'rvisig.n

(Construction'of 'tees, 'paths, lanti ng
grass, weeding, rolling, general maintenance)

Nine months (April t De.aenber)
Five la.borers.at ,,0.20 per day 216
Supervi.sioh:. 15 per month 135 $ 351

C. Cultivating tools

Hoes, rakes, shovels, wheelbarrows, etc. 40
Turf rollers 30
Screens 5
Lawmvaowers 100 $ 175

D. Equipment

Hole cups, poles and flags 50
Hole cutter and rib setter 15
Sprinkling cart 25
Ceddie House (thatched roof) 10
Benches, sandboxes, etc. 30 130
To forward: 902



'his figure does not include work on greens performed by the regular aai..tenance
rew, for which the sum of 3551 is alloct ted above.








-5-


,: .... Forvarded ; 902

Unforeseen 98

Plus cost of land 500
Legal fees, survey, etc. 50 .55

S1.550
Less contributions from gener 1
revenues of Club ** 300

Net cost of Plan No. 1. 1.250

To be carried out later from revenues:

Construction of sand traps
Improvement s to rough and to fairways
Construction of shelters, tool houses,
S""";'" bridges over drainage ditch, etc.

Plan 1'o, 2 (3000 yard course)

This plan consists of Plan io. 1 :enlarged by acquisition of sufficient ad-
di tional land to permit slight rearranreorent of course at ends of valleys and ex-
tension of fairways for approximately a further 1000 yards..

Estimated cost:
Plan No. 1 J 1.250
Purchase of b carreaux of land at 35 each *. 210
Survey, legal' ees, fenciiig, etc. 150
Plus:
Construction of extension of fairways 100

Total cost of Plan No. 2 .. 1,710


II. SUGGSTJD TIL SCHIDULL FOR COINTRUCTIOLI

February, 1937: Rough-clearing, all fairways;
construction of greens (Contract) 4 45
Purchase tools, rollers, screens 75 120

March, 1937: Stumping, grading, rolling
fairways (Contract) 64
Construction o f greens (Contract) :42 106

April, 1937: Stumping, grading, rolling
fairways (Contract) 30
Construction of greens (Contract) 20
Planting, rolling greens 39 y 89

fay, 1937: Balance of contract work -45
Planting & rolling fairways, rolling greens 39 84

June, 1937: Planting fair!.'qys, ene ral main-
tenance of greens anr fainrays,
construction of tees' ... 39

July, 1937: Maintenance of greens and fairways,
weeding, construction of tees 39

august, 1937: Ditto- -' Dit.. 9

To fo nard. '516



Sbe cont' j.ced over period of 18 months in form of labor by boyr on
i gular cla.j payroll and by hire of additional labor -,hen club revenues
,s mit.



* is an alternative it might be found advisable and precticfble to rent or
lease the additional land needed.









-4-


Ni Forwarded 516
eptember, 1937: maintenance and improvement
fairways and rough i 39
Purchase of golf course equipment 65 104

octcber, 137:
Maintenance and improvement 39
Purchase of lawnmowers 100 139

ve ronber, .1937?:
Maigtenance and improvement 39
Purchase sprinking cart 25 64

December, 1937:
Maintenance and improvement 39 --
Construction of caddie house,
sand boxes, benches, etc. 40
Unforeseen expenses 98 177
Total cost of construction 1,00@

January, 1938: Play begins on basis which will permit
club to finance maintenance and gradual 'im-
provement on self-supporting basis

August, 1938: Purchase of laid 550
1,550


III. FINlACING CONSTIJCTIOI OF THL COURSE

Funds needed, as indicated in Section II above, would be approximately
as follows:
To April 30, 1937 315
To July 31, 1937 162
To October 31, 1937 282
To December 31, 1937 241
To August 31, 1938 550
L 1,550

Of the above, it is believed that about .400 could be expended safety from
the Club's available cash resources and operating profits during the period cf one
year and a half.

If the response of members to the present plan is favoirble, it is sug-
ested that: (1) the club begin work immediately, reserving O00O from its revenue
toward work on the project; and (2) that the balance of 1,250 be obtained
through one of the following plans:

a) By voluntary cash contributions obtained by securing
subscription ns from manbers.

The entire amount could be raised if each member contributed .,18,
with payments distributed over a period of eighteen months (approxima-
tely one dollar per member per month).

b) By an issue c f serial debentures, secured by the general
credit of the Club.


c) By restrictJit. ihe Club's activities for the period of one
year, and financing the project entirely from present dues
-from members.

Receipts from dues alone exceed 5,b00 annually at present. If, by agree-
mernt of manmbers, these receipts are applied only to maintenance of the club
property, to unavoidable fixed charges and, say, to the operation of Cott- Plag,








-5-



and the bar at the Clubhouse, sufficient funds would be released tt
finance the project. Present club activities could be resumed after
one year, with the added feature of the new golf course.

d) By mortgaging the Club's property.
It should be possible to obtain sufficient funds in this way, although
probably at a cost somewhat higher than iL (b) above.

e) By leasing the necessary land.

Funds needed for the outright purchase of land constitute approxima-
tely one-third of the sum required. An appropriate long-term lease
would eliminate this item (except for rental costs.) The balance needed
could be obtained in any one of the ways indicated above.

f) By s.le of common stock of the Club to members.

This plan would require an increase in the authorized capital
stock issue.


IV. OBS EVaTI'OS RPG\RDING TELh DESIGN OF THL COURSE.

Objections to certain features of the proposed course have been brought
to the attention of the Conmittee.. These objections, and the Committee's com-
ments upon the points raised, are given below:

A. The design requires too much climbing on the part of the players.

a) An authority in golf course architecture (G.C. Thomas Jr)
in a published work on the subject of golf course design, expresses
the opinion th&t in nine holes, not more than one hole should re-
quire a climb of 100 feet, and not more than tvo holes a climb of
50 feet.

The highest climb on the proposed course is 85 feet (Hole No.9).
Next highest is a rise of 35 feet on No. 4, followed by 30 feet on
No. 5. The amount of climbing required is therefore considered to
be well v.ithin reasonable limits.

b) The course is so designed as to eliminate climbing as much
as possible. Greens and tees are purposely located in step-fashion,
permitting the player to break the climb froma the bottom of the val-
ley. Tees are invariably loaited-close to iroci'ing, greens reducing
walking between holes. The steepest climbs are located not on fairways
but on rough between tees and the be6innihg of the fairways. Paths are
built on an angle to permit'easy ascent of these slopes.

The opinion of the Committee is, therefore, that the course would
not be unduly fatiguing because of the hilly nature of the terrain.

B. The course is too short for championship play.

a) A good course of one-shot holes is better than a feature-
less course with ree-ter yardage.. .The present plan (Plan No. 1)
calls for a good short course.

b) Plan No. 1 easily and cheaply can be extended to 3,000
yards, following the design given in Plan No. 2.

C. The course is so located as to giv the player little protec-
tion from the wind.

a) This is True; but allowing. for. ind velocity is part .of
the game
b) Ya:Ry f m ous courses-are loc tod on. the seashore, 'e
winds arc strong.

D. Two fairways (Nos. 1-& 8) cross at right angles.

a) This defect would be eliminated if Plan io. 1 were eventually
enlarged to Plan No. 2.
b) The crossing is located so that players on either fairway
are easily visible to players on the other.







-b-


c) The course is not likely to be so congested that cros-
sing fairways ; aold constitute a problem;

d) Famous courses abroad hive had crossing fairways
(St indrews, for example )

i. Course is too difficult for beginners.

a) The course is more difficult in appearance than in practice
(there are no long compulsory carries).

b) The design is such that the short player, by playing safe,
can always have reasonable assurance of a good lie and a
clear'path to the green and, as is quite proper, he is pen-
alized in strokes for his inability to play a long shot.

c) Beginners should easily be able to adapt their game to the
design of the course; in other words, they should (as is
proper) emphasize direction end placement of shots, rather
than distance alone.

F, Play cannot be seen from the Clubhouse.

This is true of most of the course, but

a) The IE. 9 green is immediLtely in front of the club veranda;

b) The Lo. 1 tee can be easily seen from tue club;

c) Play on greens 1 and 4 can be seen from the ver nda;

d) A spectators' shelter locE ted at i1o. 1 tee (130 yards in
front of club) would give spectators an exceptionally
good view of most of the play.

G. Plan does nt call for sand traps and other artificial hazards.

a) These can be added letter;

b) Use has been made of r tur.l hazards so as to make the play
interesting, and to give to the good player an incentive to
try his best stokes withoutt at the same time, penalizing
the short player unduly).

H. Fairways overlap or are too narrow.

a) It is not believed that congestion on course would be so great
that this defect would create a serious problem.

b) Except on short holes, fairways are regulation width (40 yards
iide at 100 yrrds from the Tee, increasing to j0 yards).

c) Narrov. (or overlapping) fainrays on short holes would be com-
pletely eliminated if Plan No. 1 were later expanded to Plan No.2.

I. Grass greens are expensive and difficult to maintain.

a) No data are available, but best opinion is tiat maintenance
costs in Haiti would d be in fevor of grass greens in preference
to sand greens.

b) Ori -inal outlay for construction is definitely less for
grass greens.

J. Soil is too rccKy to assure good fairways.

a) This is partly true, but only in the c se of h .1- Nios. 1 i 9
(on steep hillside).

b) Experiments demonatrtte that even on rocky slopes a satisfactory
growth of grass can be obtained.

o) lost of play would be on fairways built on soil relatively free
": from stones and easily :orked.









-v '^C O in PL ,N No. I
I 1Hole No.: Yards:

// VI I 325
/ 3\II 200
SIII c QO
J IV 160
L ir V 375
S \\ VI 200
"VI VII 150
VIII 175
SIX 225






IIV







II PLiJ No. 2

IV
K) Hole No.: Ya is:

I 250
II 575
III 175
IV 400
V 600
/ VI 350
VII 250
if VIII 175
i i- ...I I 225
Total 3000


V




Ij III
VII
c:\










50 o00 20

YARDS IL


CLUB





Full Text

PAGE 1

" .SEB LL CUL' .CTO _ER 6'I -1 '1000,



PAGE 1

1 I 'l~il< ;i: :K.]!'ILL.3LUBi •S ..... , -.. .,-,, ...·. .i , -.. 4,...". I. •. ..



PAGE 1

-5and the bar at the Clubhouse, sufficient funds would be released tt finance the project. Present club activities could be resumed after one year, with the added feature of the new golf course. d) By mortgaging the Club's property. It should be possible to obtain sufficient funds in this way, although probably at a cost somewhat higher than iL (b) above. e) By leasing the necessary land. Funds needed for the outright purchase of land constitute approximately one-third of the sum required. An appopriate long-term lease would eliminate this item (except for rental costs.) The balance needed could be obtained in any one of the ways iddicated above. f) By s.le of common stock of the Club to members. This plan would require an increase in the authorized capital stock issue. IV. OBS EVaTI'OS RPG\RDING TELh DBSIGN OF THL COURSE. Objections to certain features of the proposed course have been brought to the attention of the Conmittee.. These objections, and the Committee's comments upon the points raised, are given below: A. The design requires too much climbing on the part of the players. a) An authority in golf course architecture (G.C. Thomas Jr) in a published work on the subject of golf course design, expresses the opinion th&t in nine holes, not more than one hole should require a climb of 100 feet, and not more than tvo holes a climb of 50 feet. The highest climb on the proposed course is 85 feet (Hole No.9). Next highest is a rise of 35 feet on No. 4, followed by 30 feet on No. 5. The amount of climbing required is therefore considered to be well v.ithin reasonable limits. b) The course is so designed as to eliminate climbing as much as possible. Greens and tees are purposely located in step-fashion, permitting the player to break the climb froma the bottom of the valley. Tees are invariably loaited-close to iroci'ing, greens reducing walking between holes. The steepest climbs are located not on fairways but on rough between tees and the be6innihg of the fairways. Paths are built on an angle to permit'easy ascent of these slopes. The opinion of the Committee is, therefore, that the course would not be unduly fatiguing because of the hilly nature of the terrain. B. The course is too short for championship play. a) A good course of one-shot holes is better than a featureless course with ree-ter yardage.. .The present plan (Plan No. 1) calls for a good short course. b) Plan No. 1 easily and cheaply can be extended to 3,000 yards, following the design given in Plan No. 2. C. The course is so located as to giv the player little protection from the wind. a) This is True; but allowing. for. ind velocity is part .of the game b) Ya:Ry fmous courses-are loc tod on. the seashore, _ 'e winds arc trong. D. Two fairways (Nos. 1-& 8) cross at right angles. a) This defect would be eliminated if Plan io. 1 were eventually enlarged to Plan No. 2. b) The crossing is located so that players on either fairway are easily visible to players on the other.


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PAGE 1

a plan of the proposed course ,is attached. Details respecting the cost of construction, a scheduled plan of construction, proposed metnods of finencing the work, observations regarding the proposed design of the course, and the Coiamittee's recommendations, are given in the sections ;.ich follow: I. LSTIiATED COST OF COiDTRUCTION1 Plan No. 1. (2000 yard course) A. Contract Work Hole Io.: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total Fairways: Clearing, stumping, hoeing, grading 15 12 15 10 30 1 12 10 It 124 Greens: Clearing, removal of topsoil, grading screening topsoil, replaeement of topsoil, rolling 15 12 12 15 'l1' 12 12 16 13 , 122 * Total: ' 246 B ' ay Labor & Sup'rvisig.n (Construction'of 'tees, 'paths, lanti ng grass, weeding, rolling, general maintenance) Nine months (April t De.aenber) Five la.borers.at ,,0.20 per day 216 Supervi.sioh:. 15 per month 135 $ 351 C. Cultiveting tools Hoes, rakes, shovels, wheelbarrows, etc. 40 Turf rollers 30 Screens 5 Lawmvaowers 100 $ 175 D. Lquipment Hole cups, poles and flags 50 Hole cutter and rib setter 15 Sprinkling cart 25 Ceddie House (thatched roof) 10 Benches, sandboxes, etc. 30 130 To forward: 902 'his figure does not include work on greens perlormed by the regular aai..tenance rew, for which the sum of 3551 is alloct ted above.



PAGE 1

-bc) The course is not likely to be so congested that crossing fairways ;aold constitute a problem; d) Famous courses abroad hive had crossing fairways (St indrews, for example ) i. Course is too difficult for beginners. a) The course is more difficult in appearance than in practice (there are no long compulsory carries). b) The design is such that the short player, by playing safe, can always have reasonable assurance of a good lie and a clear'path to the green and, as is quite proper, he is penalized in strokes for his inability to play a long shot. c) Beginners should easily be able to adapt their game to the design of the course; in other words, they should (as is proper) emphasize direction end placement of shots, rather than distance alone. F, Play cannot be seen from the Clubhouse. This is true of most of the course, but a) The IE. 9 green is immediLtely in front of the club veranda; b) The Lo. 1 tee can be easily seen from tue club; c) Play on greens 1 and 4 can be seen from the ver nda; d) A spectators' shelter locE ted at i1o. 1 tee (130 yards in front of club) would give spectators an exceptionally good view of most of the play. G. Plan does nt call for sand traps and other artificial hazards. a) These can be added leter; b) Use has been made of rtur.l hazards so as to make the play interesting, and to give to the good player an incentive to try his best stokes (;ithout, at the same time, penalizing the short player unduly). H. Fairways overlap or are too narroi. a) It is not believed that congestion on course would be so great that this defect w;ould create a serious problem. b) Except on short holes, fairways are regulation width (40 yards iide at 100 yrrds from the Tee, increasing to j0 yards). c) Narrov. (or overlapping) fainrays on short holes would be completely eliminated if Plan No. 1 were later expanded to Plan No.2. I. Grass greens are expensive and difficult to maintain. a) No data are available, but best opinion is tiat maintenance costs in Haiti ,;ould be in fevor of grass greens in preference to sand greens. b) Ori-inal outlay for construction is definitely less for grass greens. J. Soil is too rccKy to assure good fairways. a) This is partly true, but only in the c se of h .1Nios. 1 i 9 (on steep hillside). b) Lxperiments demonatrtte that even on rocky slopes a satisfactory growth of grass can be obtained. o) l4ost of play would be on faixways built on soil relatively free ": from stones and easily :orked.



PAGE 1

-, BASEB ALL BULL . OGTOBER 6TH 1936 B ;EI..LL 3ULL.GIANTS PITCHER FITZSI .-'"S CATCHER "ACUSO "Y A.i.EES PITCHER GC. EZ CAT.,HER DICKEY. BASEBALL BULL.YANKEES 1ST CROSETTI POPPED TO 'H ITEHEAD ROLFE OUT IERRY U-'NASSISTED DI"'AGGIO FL lED TO CENTER ;0 RU3 NO HITS '3I ER ICS. C0 INTj 1S T 1 ,NG ,, SINGLE TO LEFT FIELD Bf, TELL 'ALKED TERRY SACRIF ICE RU T 1 OuT TRU1"7 * LEI -ER 'ALKED OirD LOZDE OTT DOURLE1 TO i-IT FIELD 2 IRU'D 1 ORI I i! " < SECOJD IJ iD Til IRD L .LE uT TO "LFE , .i K T LAZ ESBj : LL BULL.',.l .B:S 2ND I N'l G GEHRIG FLIED TO CTITLR FILD DIEY FLiED TO CErTEI FIELD, SELKIRK TO RIGHT CENTER FIELD P 'ELL H N LA-'-ERI SINGLET LEFT FIELD GOLZ OUT FIT31V -.0 T T 1 Y ITS 2 RU., 0O ERRORS. GIANTS 2ND ,INNING JACKSONO SI LE TO ENTE. FIELD FITZSIH. MONS FLIED TO RIGHT FIELLD -ý.RE FLIED TO LEFT FIELD ,-TELL iALKED TERRY FLIED TO CE TER F'A FIELD 1 HIT


PAGE 1

-4Ni Forwarded 516 eptember, 1937: iaintenance and improvement fairways and rough i 39 Purchase of golf course equiiment 65 .104 octcber, 137: Maintenance and improvement 39 Purchase of lawnmowers 100 139 ve ronber, .1937?: Maigtenance and improvement 39 Purchase sprinking cart 25 64 December, 1937: Maintenance and improvement ' ' ' 39 -Construction of caddie house, sand boxes, benches, etc. 40 Unforeseen expenses 98 177 Total cost of construction 1,00@ January, 1938: Play begins on basis which will permit club to finance maintenance and gradual 'improvement on self-supporting basis August, 1938: Purchase of laid 550 .1,550 III. FINlACING CONSTIJCTIOI OF THL CGOURSE Funds needed, as indicated in Section II above, would be approximately as follows: To April 30, 1937 315 To July 31, 1937 162 To October 31, 1937 282 To December 31, 1937 241 To August 31, 1938 550 L 1,550 Of the above, it is believed that about .400 could be expended safety from the Club's available cash resources and operating profits during the period cf one year and a half. If the response of members to the present plan is favoirble, it is sugested that: (1) the club begin work immediately, reserving O00O from its revenue toward work on the project; and (2) that the balance of 1,250 be obtained hrough one of the following plans: a) By voluntary cash contributions obtained by securing subscriptio ns from manbers. The entire amount could be raised if each member contributed .,18, with payments distributed over a period of eighteen months (approximately one dollar per member per month). b) By an issue c f serial debentures, secured by the general credit of the Club. c) By restrictJit. ihe Club's activities for the period of one year, and financing the project entirely from present dues -from members. Receipts from dues alone exceed 5,b00 annually at present. If, by agreemernt of manmbers, these receipts are applied only to maintenance of the club property, to unavoidable fixed charges and, say, to the operatton of CottPlag,



PAGE 1

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-5-· ,: .... Forvarded ; 902 Unforeseen 98 Plus cost of land 500 Legal fees, survey, etc. 50 .55 S1.550 Less contributions from gener 1 revenues of Club ** 300 Net cost of Plan No. 1. 1.250 To be carried out later from revenues: Construction of sand traps Improvement s to rough and to fairways Construction of shelters, tool houses, S""";'" bricges over drainage ditch, etc. Plan 1'o, 2 (3000 yard course) This plan consists of Plan io. 1 :enlarged by acquisition of sufficient addi tional land to permit slight rearranreorent of course at ends of valleys and extension of fairways for approximately a further 1000 yards.. Estimated cost: Plan No. 1 J 1.250 Purchase of b carreaux of land at ý35 each *. 210 Survey, legal' ees, fenciiig, etc. 150 Plus: Construction of extension of fairways 100 Total cos't of Plan No. 2 .. 1,710 II. SUGGýSTJD TIL SCHIDULL FOR COINTRUCTIOLI February, 1937: Rough-clearing, all fairways; construction of greens (Contract) 4 45 Purchase tools, rollers, screens 75 .120 March, 1937: Stumping, grading, rolling fairways (Contract) .64 Construction o f greens (Contract) :42 , 106 April, 1937: Stumping, grading, rolling fairways (Contract) 30 Construction of greens (Contract) 20 Planting, rolling greens 9 y 89 fay, 1937: Balance of contract work -45 Planting & rolling fairways, olling greens 39 -84 June, 1937: Planting fair!.'qys, ene ral maintenance of greens anr fainrays, construction of tees' ... .39 July, 1937: Maintenance of greens and fairways, weeding, construction of tees .. 39 august, 1937: Ditto-' Ditto...... 9 To fo nard. '516 Sbe contý' ).ced over period of 18 ronths in form of labor by boyr on i gular cl..j payroll and by hire of additional labor -,hen club revenues ,s mit. * is an alternative it might be found advisable and precticfble to rent or lease the additional land needed.



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-v --'^C O in PL ,N No. I v HHole No.: Yards: // -VI I 325 / 3\II 200 SIII c QO I/ ,,'IV 160 Sr V 375 S\\ VI 200 "VI VII 150 VIII 175 \ I 225 Total 2000 0 50 100 20& ' \ , .I ---1YALrS ^+** ******;**** *** **^**^»* Z ** r******4**<*^^*******^**>**i* II PIAJ No. 2 IV S) Hole No.: Yards: 7 I 250 II 575 III 175 IV 400 V 600 S/ VI 50 VII 250 Si VIII 175 i .III IX 225 SITotal 3000 V SVIII VI v:i 50 oI 200 YARDS IJL CLUB



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& I THL FLTI kVILLL CLUB January 22, 1907 ivdr. Rex A. FixlEy, President The Peti )iville Club Portau-Prin ce. Sir: Your Committee for investigating the possibility of constructing a golf course at the Petionville Club has the honor of subiitting below a report covering the work it hes accomplished to date, together vith its findings and recoraendations: The Committee has completed a topographical survey and map of the property; it has made a scale model of the golf course which it has designed; it hes obtined an option, good until August 8, 1938, to purchase the necessary property for .500 (14 1/8 carreaux); it has obtained permission to construct a golf course on the property and have free use of it until such time, prior to uugust 8, 1938, as it is able to purchase the land; it has constructed 400 yards of footpath; and it has carried out the prelimnnary w;ork on greens and fairways described below: "Planted to Bermuda Grass: Aough Cleared: o tal: Acres .cres acres Hole No. 1: Tee constructed 5/4 3 5 "/4 Green cleared 1/4 1/4 Hole No. 4: Green cleared 1/4 1/4 Hole lio. 8: Tee constructed 3/4 )/4 Green cleared 1/4 1/4 Hole No. 9: Two Tees constructed 3 2 5 Green cleared 1/4 1/4 Totals 3 3/ 6 3/4 10 1/2 The Corinittee has iiude careful investigation into the cost of clearing lend anl preparing it for 9lantiif,. It has observed the results obteinea through different methods of planting Bermuda grass, and of planting gress in different soils; it has experimented in control' of erosion on newly clecred land and the control of weeds;it has observed climatic effects on the growth of grass. The Coimzittee has made a thorough study of the problem of fitting the desired course to the terrain available. It hes drefted a large number of alternative arrangements, el.d has chosen a final design which it believes to be best adaptable to the terrain. In arriving at its decision, it believes tiht the final design, considering limitati ns as to terrain and to finances, is thoroughly in keeping jwith the best prectice in modern golf course design.