Citation
Suwannee Democrat

Material Information

Title:
Suwannee Democrat
Creator:
Suwannee Democrat
Place of Publication:
Live Oak, Fla.
Live Oak, Fla
Publisher:
J. E. Pound
J.E. Pound
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak

Notes

Abstract:
The Live Oak Suwannee Democrat is one of the oldest continuously published weeklies in the State of Florida. It began in 1884 in Live Oak, which at the turn of the century was the fifth largest city in Florida, preceded only by Jacksonville, Pensacola, Tampa, and Key West. The Suwannee Democrat enjoyed a corresponding reputation as a journalistic leader in the state. As its name suggests, the newspaper in its early days was affiliated with the Democratic Party. Its first editor hid under an assumed name when he was suspected of murder. A deathbed confession by the actual perpetrator allowed him to resume his true identity: F.R. McCormack, about whom, however, little else is known. From 1906 through 1907, the Suwannee Democrat was supplemented by the Live Oak Daily Democrat, edited by Charles W. Irwin. The rural character of early 20th-century Suwannee County, well known for its grist and lumber mills and poultry farms, is visible in the pages of the Suwannee Democrat. Indeed, over the years the newspaper has won numerous awards from the Florida Press Association for the quality of its agricultural reporting. Fires have taken their toll on the Suwannee Democrat. In 1906, a disgruntled printer left Live Oak by railroad on the night that the newspaper’s offices were burned to the ground. In October 1995, a fire destroyed a historic block of Live Oak’s downtown, and the newspaper’s office was one of the casualties. Lost in the fire were the last known issues of the Suwannee Democrat dating from 1897 through 1900.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Electronic reproduction of copy from George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida also available.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note:
Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Suwannee Democrat, J.E. Pound publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ACE4563 ( NOTIS )
33273856 ( OCLC )
000398954 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95026787 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Related Item:
Live Oak daily Democrat
Preceded by:
Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Suwannee leader
Preceded by:
Suwannee citizen

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month
A


> Fighting on f
A. i In a family plagued with cancer,
Mary Lou Roberson is the first survivor
'I've never told my story before because so many people had
* these type of things and I don't want other families to think
I'm boasting. I had nothing to do with surviving.'
See Page 15A for Mary Lou's story.


-I


Semi

downs

power

pole,
disrupts
traffic
Page 13A


^uwann~ lr~>imntrcat


125th YEAR, NO. 104 3 SECTIONS, 38 PAGES


Wednesday Edition - October 13, 2010


50 CENTS


Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Dowling Park, Branford, McAlpin and O'Brien


Murder trial will be



battle of the experts

Cause of toddler's death in dispute


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com
The trial of Ronald Ed-
ward Kramer in the death of
18-month-old Olivia Rescig-
no began Monday in a
Suwannee County court-
room. Rescigno's lifeless
body was discovered in her
crib at her Suwannee County
home on March 14, 2008.
She had bruises on her face
and legs and a bite wound on
her thigh. Kramer, later in-
dicted for felony murder and
child abuse, was reportedly
the only adult present when


the body was discovered.
Kramer, 28, is a registered
sex offender in New Jersey.
Prosecutor Craig Jacobsen
began his opening arguments
by telling the jury what con-
dition Rescigno was in when
paramedics arrived.
"They found Olivia beat-
en, battered, bruised, bitten
and dead," said Jacobsen.
Jacobsen said that on
March 14, Olivia's mother,
Rebecca Lee Rescigno, left
for work at Pilgrim's Pride
around 2:20 p.m. and there
SEE MURDER, PAGE 13A


Ronald Edward Kramer during opening arguments at his
murder trial Monday in the Suwannee County Courthouse.
- Photo: Jeff Waters


'Hunger Caravan' stops in Live Oak


Second Harvest North Florida stopped in Live Oak Thursday afternoon to distribute food to about 250 families. The Hunger Cara-
van concluded its 10-site, nine-county distribution at First Baptist Church of Live Oak at 2 p.m. - Photo: Jeff Waters


New Web

offerings from

SRWMD,

Shands, LO

Partnership
Residents, businesses,
surveyors and others now
have better access to flood
hazard information through
the Suwannee River Water
Management District's
website.
The District recently up-
dated its flood information
tool to improve access to
flood zone locations and
flood elevations. The new
webpage is available at
http://www.srwmdflood-
report.com.
SEE NEW, PAGE 13A





6 97113 07520 1


Two county
residents
were hurt
in the crash
of this
pickup
Sunday in
Live Oak.
- Photo:
Jeff Waters


2 hurt in truck rollover


Staff
Two Suwannee County
residents were injured
when a GMC Sierra pickup
left the roadway and over-


The Old Dog says
"Y'all buckle up and
stay safe out there."


turned on CR 49 around
5:30 p.m. Sunday, accord-
ing to family members.
The driver, 15-year-old
Hunter Waters, was north-
TODAY'S
WEATHER
SEE PAGE 2B FOR
FULL FORECAST
HIGHS





60 1Z


bound on CR 49, near CR
252, when the truck left the
roadway. Waters reportedly
SEE 2 HURT, PAGE 13A


.- te .
"--.------- -:-...--,.,Jl------ -


Paddle Florida
Canoeing event begins
Thursday at the Spirit
FOCUS | Inside


90-month


sentence


for W'born


arsonist
Staff
A local teen convicted f
for his part in the bur-
glary and subsequent fire
that destroyed a live-in
furniture workshop in
Wellborn in November
2009 will spend the next Shayne
90 months in prison. Cooper-Olin
Shayne Cooper-Olin,
19, had pleaded guilty to burglary of a
dwelling, grand theft III and arson after he
and two accomplices (one of whom has
not yet been tried and is presumed inno-
cent) set fire to the dwelling of Hank
Whisnant. His personal belongings, in-
SEE 90-MONTH, PAGE 13A

POLICE
Man chased with ax,
run down by truck
By Jeff Waters
A Lake City man was
arrested for reportedly us- 4. , " l,
ing his truck to run over '
the legs of a man he had .-*
earlier threatened to kill,
a Suwannee County sher-
iff's report shows. Jeffrey Keith
According to SCSO Wheeler
Deputy Chuck Tompkins,
Jeffrey Keith Wheeler, 41, of 2919 230th
Street, Lake City, called the resident at
SEE MAN, PAGE 13A

Woman uses crowbar
in attempt to get cash
By Jeff Waters
A Live Oak woman
was charged with at- ,
tempted burglary for try-
ing to pry open the night
deposit box at Suwannee . .. I
Valley Electric Sunday
night with a crowbar. Carly Victoria
Carly Victoria Dolly, Dolly
30, of 1619 Ruby Street
NE, was seen on surveillance by an SVEC


SEE WOMAN, PAGE 13A


www.suwanneedemocrat. com


]













ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REACH US


Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, nf.editorial@gaflnews.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH
YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, call us at 386-362-1734
or visit our Web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
* Editor,
Robert Bridges, ext. 131
* Reporter,
Carnell Hawthorne Jr., ext. 134
* Reporter,
Jeff Waters, ext. 133
* Reporter,
Stephenie Livingston, ext. 130
* Sports Reporter,
Corey Davis, ext. 132


ADVERTISING
E Advertising Manager,
Monja Slater, ext. 105
E Sr. Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 160
* Advertising Representative,
Tami Stevenson, ext. 109
* Advertising Representative,
Rhonda Cheney, ext. 141
E Teles Ad Representative,
Nancy Goodwin, ext. 103
E Classified/Legal,
Janice Ganote, ext. 102


CIRCULATION
* Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
* Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $33 Out-of-county, $48



#uwannuie

i mocrat

'" 'ftr t ... . -, 'i ' "
-- " -- ' ^

Serving Suwannee County Since 1884

The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064." Annual subscription rate is
$33 in county, $48 out of county and
$48 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


RANT & RAVE HOTLINE


Here's your chance to tell everyone what you
think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a
message to express their thoughts, good or
bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not
about private individuals or businesses. If you
prefer, you may e-mail your comments to
robert.bddges@gaflnews.com. Your name is
not necessary, but please,
take 30 seconds or less for \,'
your message.
, , Part of
Florida" '


2010-211111
( ainpain (Goal:
$685.011111

United Way of
Suwannee Valley

GIVE. ADVOCATE. VOLUNTEER.


LIVE UNITED


This Week's Partner Agency:

Catholic Charities Bureau, Lake City Regional Office
(386) 754-9180 Provides emergency assistance with utility,
rent/mortgage, food and gas vouchers for medical appointments or
new employment. A Hand Up Center provides homeless services
including food, clothing, showers, laundry, traveler's aid, case
management and referrals. Food Bank of Suwannee Valley, (386)
755-5683 provides agencies, group homes and church food pantries
with food to alleviate hunter.


* 386.752.5604 * 325 NE Hernando Avenue Lake City, Florida
32055-4015 * Email: uiinitedwayr@hellouiith.net






I \\S'\




Suwannee County Fire/Rescue calls
for service for Oct. 3 to Oct. 9


Total calls for
service: 106

Medical Calls: 88
Cardiac: 10
Trauma: 14
Motor vehicle
crash: 6
Miscellaneous medical
call: 16
Altered mental status: 7
Respiratory: 10
OD: 2


Diabetic: 1
Abdominal pain: 4
Weakness: 6
CVA: 1
Seizure: 4
Nausea/vomiting: 1
OB: 1
Cardiac arrest: 1
Standby @ Football
Game: 3
Standby @ Rodeo: 1

Fire Calls: 18


Structure fire: 1
Brush fire: 7
Vehicle fire: 2
Motor vehicle crash: 4
Fire alarm: 1
Med assist: 2
Person assist from tree: 1
Volunteer Fire
Responses: 25
Engine 1 Utilized as
Rescue 5: 5
Mutual aid from
Gilchrest County: 1


p


Arrest Record


Editor's note: The
Suwannee Democrat
prints the entire arrest
record each week. If your
name appears here and
you are later found not
".',it or the (. ,I.i .. . are
dropped, we will be hap-
py to make note of this in
the newspaper when judi-
cial proof is presented to
us by you or the authori-
ties.
The following abbrevi-
ations are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
LOPD-Live Oak Police
Department
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol
FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission
DOT-Department of
Transportation
OALE-Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P & P-Probation and
Parole
USMS-US Marshals
Service
ATF-Department of Al-
cohol, Tobacco and
Firearms
DOC-Department of
Corrections

October 8, Rayne Easton
Szwec, 18, 4282 85th Place
Live Oak, Fl, petit theft,
forgery, utter forged inst. 2
cts SCSO - M. Landis
October 8, Lindsay
Marie McLeod, 22, 173 SE
Byrd Ave E Madison, Fl,
retail theft SCSO-J. Greene
October 8, James M.
Gurliaccio Jr, 30, 3141 172
Street Wellborn, Fl, colum-
bia county warrant,
dui/dwls/r SCSO S. Gam-
bel
October 8, Alberta
Cooks Ross, 52, 4265 CR
249 Live Oak, Fl, vop o/c
grand theft x 2, columbia-
vop o/c wbc-4ct P&P-R.
Raymond
October 8, Francine Gail
Gilbert, 25, 10369 94th St
Live Oak, Fl, grand theft iii
reduced to petit theft per
judge fina, poss oxycodone
w/int sell, sale of oxy-
codone, unlawful use two
way comm device, 1st
app/pd appt SCSO-C.
Smith
October 9, James Ed-
ward Mills, 52, 11081 89th
Road Live Oak, Fl, corrup-
tion/threat to leo SCSO -
M. Landis
October 9, Jerome Louis
Carter, 24, 301 Parshley
Live Oak, Fl, battery (dom


viol) LOPD-S. Gamble
October 9, Stephen Funi-
celli, 24, 16400 185th Rd
McAlpin, Fl, vop o/c
sale/manuf/deliv cocaine x
4 SCSO-K. Osborn
October 9, Jason Ronald
McCullers, 34, 21535
160th Street Live Oak, Fl,
poss +20G cannabis
LOPD-D. Slaughter
October 10, Aurelio Am-
brocio Aguilar, 26, 302
NW Gerson St Lake City,
Fl, dui, no dl FHP - K.Put-
nel
October 10, Gregorio
Gonzalez, 49, 1405 Duval
Street Lot 54 Live Oak,
Fl, no valid dl LOPD - D.
Slaughter
October 10, William
Thomas McNeal, 53, P.O.
BOX 288 Jennings, Fl, sell
manufacture deliver co-
caine w/i 1000' church,
poss of cocaine LOPD - D.
Hohman
October 10, Carly Vic-
toria Dolly, 30, 1619 Rudy
St. NE Live Oak, Fl, at-
tempted burglary, poss bur-
glary tools, criminal mis-
chief, 1st app pd appt per
wrs SCSO - M. Landis
October 10, Melanie
Yates, 29, 12372 Bass Rd
Live Oak, Fl, dwls (habitu-
al), leave scn acc w/prop
dmg LOPD Fipps
October 11, Loren Oliver
Thomas, 57, 222 Walther
Trail Lee, Fl, battery, bat-
tery SCSO-A. Loston
October 11, William
Georg Hutcherson, 28,
6079 N W 12th Court Bell,
Fl, columbia co wrt, vop
o/c agg child abuse PP 7
October 11, Elvoy
Vasques Cruz, 29, 1711
Long Ave Live Oak, Fl,
vop, o/c dwls, vop o/c dwls
both cash, cash bond per
wrs SCSO-A. Loston
October 12, Reginald
Eugene Thomas, 29, 1113
SW 7 St Live Oak, Fl, batt
(dom viol) LOPD K Kirby
















10/11/104,6,8 10/11/10 .3,8,9,8
Night Night
10/11/108,9,3 10/11/10 .1,0,2,3
FANTASY 5
10/11/10 .. . . .. 3,5,19,27,34
MEGA MONEY.... 1,22,29,39,22
LOTTO...... 10,16,17,26,42,47,5


1755-1413


Temporarily closing for a


WHOLE NEW LOOK

October 15 through 26,

the office of Dr. Romero

will be closed for remodeling
Please call the office to make any necessary arrangements.
We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

386-364-1211
Hours: Mon. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.; Fri. 8 a.m. -1 p.m.
1304 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL 617184-F


You uant the nmost in-(lel)th coverage.
lthe latest neu s and( stories that louch Ihome.
We want to give it to you.
1 Year In County
Subscription

$ J 1Year
13 3 4 Out of County
Mail or bring payment to:

umannee remnocrat
P.O. Box 370 * 211 Howard St. East
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 * 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152
570802-F


PAGE 2A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010












E Scarecrow Festival could


become signature event for LO


Submitted
It's that time of year again,
time for Live Oak's annual
' "~ Fall Festival. In years past this
event has primarily been an
endeavor of the Live Oak
Garden Club, and has most re-
c ' ntly included the Live Oak
\ tists Guild. This year, the Live
i (k Partnership has joined forces
with these two groups to present
this annual event that will focus on
the whimsical Scarecrow.
Also known as The Live Oak Scarecrow Fes-
tival, this year's event will take place on Satur-
day, Oct. 23 at Millennium Park in downtown
Live Oak, and will encompass several activities
i and smaller events within the fall season.
A most popular facet of this annual event is the
Scarecrow contest. This year's contest will feature
a cash prize in multiple categories. The annual tra-
Sill ion of displaying homemade scarecrows is open to
c\ Cl 'yone for participation. Participating businesses are


encouraged to display scarecrows in front of their places of business.
Scarecrows will also be displayed on Ohio Avenue and Howard
Street, as well as in designated areas of Millennium and Veteran's
parks. In addition to the traditional scarecrow contest, the Live Oak
Partnership will also host a Live Scarecrow Contest in which contes-
tants can enter a 'costume contest' for the best dressed scarecrow.
Those wishing to enter into either of the Scarecrow competitions will
be required to register and pay a $10 entry fee which will help cover
event expenses and provide the cash prize for each category. Regis-
tration information is available at www.scarecrowfun.com and from
the offices of Magnetic Marketing at 124 E. Howard Street, Live
Oak.
As with most events, the Scarecrow Festival will also feature a se-
lection of vendors. The Live Oak Partnership will sponsor a 'scare-
crow market' featuring flea market and farmers market vendors, and
The Live Oak Artist Guild will host an array of artists and crafters of
the season. Vendor spaces are still available. Vending spaces are open
to all vendors except food vendors. Spaces are based on 12x12 feet in
size and are rated at $10.00 per space. There is no charge for infor-
mational booths. Nonprofit groups are also welcome to participate.
Full event information and registration forms can be found on two
local websites: The Live Oak Partnership at www.scarecrowfun.com
and through the Live Oak Artists Guild at www.loag.org.


Walker Reunion 2010


Club is located in the old Branford De-
pot.Please remember to bring your pic-
tures or any family memories you may
wish to share.We hope you will join us,
bring your family/friends and a basket
lunch for a day of fun, visiting, smiles
and celebration. For your family mem-
bers and friends who may not receive
this notice. PLEASE REMIND THEM


ABOUT OUR REUNION.The Club will
be open at 12:45 p.m. and we will serve
lunch at 1:15 p.m. Mark your calendars:
October 24, 2010! Remember location!
We are looking forward to your being
there. Katie Walker's Children. Contacts:
Mona Walker Hurst - 386-935-1184, Di-
ane Walker-Saunders - 386-935-101,7
Marcia Walker Hurst - 352-376-1930.


Cell: 386-249-2803 Email: votelinwilliams@gmail.com

WWW. VOTELINWILLIAMS. COM
Political advertisement paid for and approved by William "Lin" Williams Nonpartisan for Suwannee County Judge
625812-F







TABE TESTING


For Surgical


Technician


nd LPN





TECHNICAL CENTER
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-647-4200


Celebrate holiday office parties,
family ( Ii i, iI celebrations
at the place ;lhat caters to them all.
It's not too early to reserve your date
for the upcoming Holiday season.
Call today.
-386-364-5250
email: frontdesk@campweed.org
CAMP WEED CERVENY
CONFERENCE CENTER


Mt. Gilead Baptist Church
18305 56th St., Live Oak







Oct. 16, 2010 2-5 p.m.
Featuring... Face
The Gibbs painting,
Family' sand art,
(also on free games,
Sunday at free prizes,
11 a.m.) and bounce
Comedian houses,
Josh Taylor obstacle
courses,
1 maze,
,Free Food! hayrides
- Everything Is Free!!!
625505-F


Political Rally! Everyone Welcome!


OCTOBER 16, 2010


SPONSORED BY:
THE REPUBLICAN PARTY OF SUW I\ L\ LL COUNTY, FLORIDA
at the SUWi ..\LL HISTORICAL il1 SLi .1TRAINDEPOT
Downtown Live Oak
1:00 - 6:00 PM.
FOOD MUSIC LIVELY DISCUSSIONS
COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 4 -Philip Oxendine,
confirmed
DISTRICT 1 1 STATE REPRESENTATIVE Elizabeth Porter, confirmed
US SENATE -Mrco Rubio
US CONGRESS -Steve Southerland, confirmed
GOVERNOR -4ick Scott
ATTORNEY GENERAL -Pam Bondi
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER-Jeff Atwater
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE -Adam Putnam
Local Nobn-Partisan Candidates and current elected Republicans
SEATING AND RESTROOMS AVAILABLE
CONTACT.: BARBARA GILL - 386-364-7784 or drop by the Suwannee GOP Victory Headquarters
located across from the Methodist Church at 306 S. Ohio Ave., downtown Live Oak
www.suwanneegop.com


I m 0


off


CITY vs. COUNTY CHILI COOK OFF
OCTOBER 23, 2010
It's time for the City vs. County Chili Cookoff sposnored by the Woman's Club
of Live Oak. This year's event will be held on Saturday, October 23, 2010.
The Cook Off will be held at Veterans Park during the Fall Festival. The event
will begin at 11 a.m. with judging at 11:30 a.m.
The public will be able to sample chili from 11:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. for a
nominal donation of $5 per person. Awards will be presented at 2 p.m.
Challenge Registration is $25 per team. This is a "People's Choice"
competition. There will also be a judges' award for each chili category,
as well as a showmanship award. Entrants are encouraged to use this as an
informational opportunity to promote their departments. Business cards,
brochures and other free materials may be distributed from your booth.
For more information call 776-2264, no calls after 7 p.m. 618752-F


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 3A












suwannee living


Weddings/Births


birth announcement


John Harper


Henry


H0th
Happy 0J9 Birthday!



Elder Rosa Lee


Ford


John Harper Henry


Travis and Megan Henry are proud to announce the
birth of their son, John Harper Henry. John Harper was
bom on August 3, 2010 at 8:48 a.m. at North Florida
Women's Center in Gainesville. He weighed 8 pounds, 14
ounces and was 21 inches long.
Maternal grandparents are Walter "Musky" and Peggy
Musgrove of Live Oak. Paternal grandparents are Cecelia
Henry and the late John Henry of Williston.
Isaac and Aislinn are the proud siblings of John Harper.


Elder Rosa Lee Ford


From your children and grandchildren


wedding reminder


Parnell


& Walters

You work, you play and then, one day....
love just happens!
James & Debbie Parnell of Live Oak, Florida and
Mary Ann Walters of Fort White, Florida, invite you to
be a witness to one of life's loveliest surprises as Elisha
Parnell & William Walters are joined together in matri-
mony on Saturday, the sixteenth of October, at one thirty
in the afternoon at O'Leno State Park, High Springs,
Florida.



wedding reminder


Tanner


& Fillyaw

Lonnie and Annette Tanner of Mayo would like to re-
mind you of the upcoming marriage of their daughter,
Katrina Anastasia Tanner to Kevin Tyler Fillyaw, son of
Steve and DeAnna Fillyaw of Live Oak, Florida.
The wedding is planned for Saturday, October 16, 2010
at 6 p.m. at the home of Jim Montrym, 216 NE Tulip
Road, Mayo, Florida, on the Suwannee River. All family
and friends are invited to attend.


Why should we pray for
our country? Because we
know that prayer will
cause a positive change in
the United States of Amer-
ica.
Where can we pray to-
gether for our Country?
Each Friday at noon,
everyone from our com-
munity is invited to come
to Live Oak Christian


Church to spend some time
in prayer for America. The
format permits individuals
to come and go at will, de-
pending upon their sched-
ule. The first fifteen min-
utes os a time of private
prayer as individuals arrive
in the sanctuary. Please en-
ter quietly. The next thirty
minutes (12:15-12:45) is a
time of guided prayer.


1104 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak

386-364-1186


mERLE noRmRnf
DISCOVER YOUR BEAUTY
� 2010 Merle Norman Cosmetics, Inc.
Merle Norman Cosmetic Studios have been independently owned and operated since 1931.


Each week the service will
vary, although it will in-
clude music, videos and
public prayer.
Who can come to the
"Friday Pray for America"
service? Everyone is wel-
come to come and join
with us in prayer. If you
can only stay a few min-
utes or if you can stay for
the total service, we wel-
come you to come and join
us in prayer.
What changes should we
ask God to make in our
country? We ask God to
guide and protect the lead-
ers of our country - For
President Obama for all of
the members of Congress,
for Governor Crist, for our
State Legislature, for the
County Commissioners, for
Mayor Nobles, and the
City Council, and for our
law enforcement agencies.
As citizens, it is doubtful
that any of us would agree
with everything that all of
these people do or that we








REGISTER
NOW
Mon.-Thurs. 3 p.m.-7 p.m.

Call Beka
386-590-6261
623241-F


would disagree with every
action they have taken. Yet,
as Christians, we are told
that we should pray for our
leaders because they are
servants of the people and
God, placed in their posi-
tion of authority by God.
What the "Friday Pray
for America" is not? This
is not a political program
in any way. The goal is to
ask God to guide the lead-
ers of our country as they
make decisions for our
country, state, county, and
city. We believe that these
individuals need the bless-
ing of God and that our
prayers will help to lead
them to make the best pos-
sible decisions.
How long will the "Fri-
day Pray for America" pro-
gram continue? We are not
sure. The plan is to contin-
ue this weekly prayer ser-
vice until the middle of
November. At that point,
we will evaluate it and de-
termine the outcome. Much
of the decision depends
upon your response.
Where is the "Friday
Pray for America" pro-
gram? Live Oak Christian
Church, 1015 Ohio Ave.
North in Live Oak, be-
tween Walt's Ford and the
cemetery. Dr. W. Ray Kel-
ley, the pastor, will be hap-
py to answer any question
at 386-209-1615 or email:
www.liveoakchristian @ win
dstream.net.


Miss Autumn Apple


Charity Queen

Mikayla Senea was awarded the title of 2010-2011
Miss Autumn Apple Charity Queen at the Miss Au-
tumn Apple Beauty Pageant held on Saturday, Oct. 9,
2010 at the Madison Women's Club. All monies ex-
cluding entry fees collected by participants from busi-
ness sponsors and activities the day of the pageant go
to support the Florida Literacy Coalition.
Mikayla is a freshman at Suwannee High School.
She is the daughter of
Scott and Shari Senea of
Live Oak. Her grandpar-
ents are Howard and
Frances Underwood of b
McAlpin and Peggy and
Frank Conner of Sander-
son.
Mikayla would like to
thank her family and
friends for their love and
support and all of the
business sponsors that
helped her obtain this
honor.
Beltone Hearing Care
Centers - Shari Senea,
H.C.P.
Brenda Sorensen, E.A.
Tax and Accounting Ser-
vices in Monticello
McHales Cigar Shop -
Martin and Cathy
Senea Construction -
Amanda Senea
Innovative Truck
Products - Donnie and
Stacey Bullock
New Life Bible Book-
store - Randy and Mar-
sha Jordan
Java Jax - Hal and Ka-
trina Chaffee
A Total You Hair Sa-
lon-Becky Glass
Mikayla Senea


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623246-F


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ASK DR. MANTOOTH

Q: What is the value of braces?
A: While their cosmetic role is obvious,
straightening teeth into an orderly smile,
there are other reasons for braces.
Crooked teeth are harder to keep clean,
a problem that can lead to tooth decay,
gum disease and, down the road, tooth
loss. Misaligned teeth can also be an
impediment to talking and chewing, and
over time can cause abnormal wear on
tooth enamel.
Today's generation of braces, also known
as orthodontic appliances, can be as
visible or as inconspicuous as a patient
likes. For instance, some brackets, which
are affixed to the tooth to hold wires and
elastics, are clear or tooth-colored.
Advances in the equipment also make
braces more comfortable and more
efficient than they were in the past.
There are two basic categories of braces:
fixed, which are installed and removed by
the dentist, and removable, which the
patient can put in and take out according
to the dentist's instructions for duration of
wear. A person generally will wear braces
from one to three years, followed by a
shorter period of wearing a retainer to
hold teeth in place. Talk with your dentist
about whether you are a candidate for
braces.
Presented as a service to the community by
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A.
602 Railroad Ave.
Live Oak, FL ,
362-6556
(800) 829-6506


'Friday Pray for America'


PAGE 4A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010










WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 5A


Elizabeth Adair Henning
May 4, 1916 -
October 7, 2010

Slizabeth Adair
Henning, 94,
passed away
Thursday, October 7, 2010
in Shands of Live Oak
Hospital following a long
illness.
Mrs. Henning was born
in Birmingham, Ala., May
4, 1916 and lived most of
her life in the Branford
area.
She worked in the cen-
tral supply area of Shands
at UF .And was a member
of the First Baptist Church
of Branford, Fla.
Survivors include five
daughters, Betty Edwards
of Suwannee, Fla., Billie
Owens, Freddie Bailey,
JoAnn Hayes, all of Bran-
ford, Fla. and Linda Bailey
of Dade City, Fla., 11
grandchildren, 21 great
grandchildren and eight
great-great grandchildren
also survive.
Funeral services were
conducted Monday, Octo-
ber 11, 2010 at 11 a.m. in
the First Baptist Church of
Branford, with Rev. Gor-
don Keller officiating. In-
terment followed in Oak
Grove Cemetery. Visitation
was held one hour prior to
the services in the church.
Daniels Funeral Homes
and Crematory, Inc., Bran-
ford, Fla. in charge of
arrangements.

Bertie Mae Starling
Boyette
October 6, 2010

A i rs. Bertie Mae
Starling
Boyette, 88, of
rural Lake Butler, died Oc-
tober 6, 2010 at her resi-
dence after an extended ill-
ness. She was born in Live
Oak and lived in Home-
stead several years before
moving to Union County
15 years ago. She was a
homemaker. She was a
Baptist. She was the
daughter of the late
William and Blanche Car-
roll Starling. She was also
preceded in death by her
husband, Bernice Preston
Boyette; two daughters,
Levon Holton and Linda
Faye Boyette; two sons,
Wayne Curtis Boyette and
William Preston Boyette.


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Mrs. Boyette is survived
by one daughter, Patricia
(husband Steve) Murphy
of Land-O-Lakes; one son,
Derrill (wife Susan)
Boyette of Lake Butler;
one sister, Maude King of
Savannah, Ga.; three
brothers, William "Buddy"
Starling of Live Oak,
Robert Starling of Davie
and Gilford Callahan of
Tennessee; 19 grandchil-
dren, 24 great grandchil-
dren and eight great-great
grandchildren.
Graveside funeral ser-
vices were held Saturday,
Oct. 9, 2010 at 2 p.m. at
Beards Creek Cemetery of
Glennville, Ga. Burial fol-
lowed. Family received
friends at Archer Funeral
Home of Lake Butler on
Friday evening from 5:30-
7:30 p.m.
Archer Funeral Home of
Lake Butler was in charge
of local arrangements.

Becky Patton
October 18, 1952 -
October 10, 2010

Secky Patton age
57, of Live Oak,
Florida passed
away early Sunday morn-
ing October 10, 2010 in
the Suwannee Health Care
Center in Live Oak, Fla.
following complications
from Alzheimer's Disease.
The Citronelle, Ala. native
moved to Live Oak FL in
2007 from Lakeland, Ga.
Becky worked as a beauti-
cian and was a member of
the Westwood Baptist
Church.
Survivors include her
mother, Ida Kinser, Live
Oak, Fla.; one daughter,
Sarah Patton, Jacksonville,
Fla.; two brothers, Gary
Kinser, High Springs, Fla.
and Ralph Kinser, Decatur,
Ala.
Memorial services will
be held 2 p.m. Wednesday,
Oct. 13, 2010 in the West-
wood Baptist Church with
Dr. Jimmy Deas officiat-
ing.
In lieu of flowers, con-
tributions may be made to
Haven Hospice, 6037
Hwy. 90,
Lake City, FL 32055 or
your favorite charity.
Please sign the guest-
book at www.harrisfuner-
alhomeinc.net.
Harris Funeral Home &


Cremations, Inc., 932 N.
Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL,
386-364-5115, is in charge
of all arrangements.

Jerry Dean Ramsey
October 7, 2010

erry Dean Ramsey,
74, passed away
Thursday, October 7,
2010, at the VA Hos-
pital in Lake City, Florida
after a long struggle with
his health.
He fought in the Korean
and Vietnam Wars and re-
ceived numerous medals to
show for his heroism. He
retired as a Captain from
the Army, after serving in
the military for 21 years.
He is survived by his
only son, David Ramsey,
and his two grandsons of
Wellborn, Florida.
A memorial service will
be held at the Beachville
Advent Christian Church
in Beachville, Florida at 11
a.m. on October 14. There
will be food and fellow-
ship after the service at the
church, in the fellowship
hall. His final resting place
will be in the Arlington
National Cemetery in
Washington, D.C.
Address for Beachville
Advent Christian Church,
24815 CR 49, O'Brien, FL
32071.


William "Bill"
F. Chambers
November 23, 1933 -
October 6, 2010

1J illiam "Bill" F.
Chambers, 76,
Live Oak, Fla.
passed away on Wednes-
day, October 6, 2010 after
a long illness. The Uvalda,
Ga. native moved to Live
Oak in 1973 from Bell
Glade, Fla. He was a Vet-
eran of the Korean War


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while serving in the
Marines, a member of the
American Legion and was
of Baptist faith.
Mr. Chambers is sur-
vived by his wife, Eva
Chambers, Live Oak, Fla.;
two daughters, Carol
Smallwood, Alice, Texas,
Inga Chambers, Live Oak,
Fla.; one son, Christopher
Quillen, Live Oak, Fla.;
two sisters, Helen Hoyle,
Okeechobee, Fla., Carolyn
Kemp, Belle Glade, Fla.;
one brother, Leon Cham-
bers, Okeechobee, Fla.;
granddaughters Jenny
Smallwood, Tessa Small-
wood and grandson
Christopher Reid Quillen
II. He was preceded in


death by one son, Stanley
Chambers. A memorial
service will be set at a later
date.
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc., of Live
Oak and Branford, Fla. in
charge of arrangements




Calvin D. Jelks
July 6, 1973 -
Oct. 11, 2010

alvin D. Jelks,
born July 6, 1973,
died Oct. 11,
2010. He passed away in
Doctors Memorial Hospi-
tal, Perry, Fla.


M. Udell and Sons of D.
M. Udell Funeral Home in
charge of all arrangements.

Atha Muriel Thomas
October 11, 2010

A tha Muriel
Thomas, 88, Bell,
Florida, died Oc-
tober 11, 2010.
Daniels Funeral Homes
and Crematory, Inc., Bran-
ford, Fla.


Check out the
Suwannee
Democrat's page
on Facebook


SUWANNEE HIGH SCHOOL PRESENTS



2nd Annual

Bulldog Bash

Glory Days: Back to the 80's

SUWANNEE HIGH SCHOOL HOMECOMING
COMMUNITY PEP-RALLY 2010
WHERE: PAUL LANGFORD STADIUM
WHEN: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2009
TIME: 7:00 P.M.
COST: $3.00-TICKETS SOLD AT THE GATE

SEE PERFORMANCES BY VARSITY CHEERLEADERS, SHS BAND,
JV CHEERLEADERS, THE DANCING DOLLS
KEY CLUB, NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY, STUDENT GOVERNMENT, MEMBERS OF
THE 10TH, 11TH, AND 12TH GRADES, AND EVEN A FEW SURPRISES!
THE 2010-2011 HOMECOMING COURT WILL ALSO BE PRESENTED!
COME AND SUPPORT THE BULLDOGS AND HELP US CELEBRATE HOMECOMING!


When


you

a new



Photo for illustration
purposes only


From October
11-18 the Suwannee
Democrat will think
pink to raise
awareness about
breast cancer.

To win simply
purchase a one-year
subscription to the
Suwannee Democrat
and your name will be
entered into a
drawing. One lucky
winner will receive the
Netbook. For each
subscription ordered,
the Suwannee
Democrat will donate
$1 to the American
Cancer Society.


Call 386-362-1734 or come by our office at
211 Howard St. East for your chance to win.
625738-F


I


I


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5A


Iosputo IInIcI


Hi�UMmt










PAGE 6A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


Viewpoints/Opinions


MYRA C. REGAN ROBERT BRIDGES
Publisher Editor
Members of the Suwannee Democrat
editorial board are Myra C. Regan, publisher,
and Robert Bridges, editor. Our View, which
appears in Friday editions of the
Democrat, is formed by that board.


THE SUWANNEE SCRIBBLER


A Confederate



naval tale
By Jim Holmes
When we think of the U.S. Civil War today, it's
usually names like Antietam, Chancellorsville and
Gettysburg that spring to the forefront of our mem-
ories. After all, they pitted thousands of men
against each other in brutal combat.
On the other hand -- with the exception of the
1864 battle between the Monitor and the Merri-
mack -- I doubt few of us ever learned much in
school about civil war NAVAL actions. One of the
most interesting was a bloodless encounter that
took place that same year, in of all locations,
Brazil.
Although often overlooked today, the Confeder-
ate Navy was seen as vitally important to the
Southern secessionist leadership. Confederate
ships were to run Union blockades, bringing in vi-
tal supplies to the CSA, defend rebel ports from
Union invasion, harass Northern merchant ships
and last, but not least, seize Yankee vessels, which
then became a part of the Confederate fleet.
The CSS Florida -- a 191 foot steam and sail-
powered cruiser -- was among the most accom-
plished in such missions, particularly when it came
to running Union blockades and seizing Yankee
ships. For more than two years, the Florida --
which was also nicknamed The Prince of the Pri-
vateers -- was a constant thorn in the side of the
U.S. Navy. During its career, the Florida directly
seized 37 Yankee vessels and was indirectly in-
volved in confiscating 23 more. Only the CSS Al-
abama was more successful.
In October 1864, Union Navy Commander
Napoleon Collins of the USS Wachusett sailed into
the neutral Brazilian harbor of Bahia, only to find
his motorized sloop anchored just a half mile from
his long time enemy, the CSS Florida. To top it off,
nearly the entire Florida crew was on shore leave.
Apparently the temptation was just too much for
the veteran Yankee sailor, even though he must
have understood at the time that he would create a
diplomatic nightmare for Washington. At three o'-
clock in the morning on Oct. 7, Collins ordered his
crew to ram the Florida in the hope of sinking it.
When that failed, the USS Wachusett began to tow
the enemy cruiser out to sea.
Outraged that their neutrality had been ignored,
surprised Brazilian troops opened fire on the de-
parting Yankee ship and its captured prize, but to
no avail. Brazil quickly filed a formal diplomatic
protest with Washington. In response, Commander
Collins -- viewed by most Northerners as a hero --
was court-martialed, found guilty and ordered dis-
missed from the U.S. Navy.
Meanwhile, Washington made arrangements to
have the CSS Florida towed back to Brazilian wa-
ters, where the ship would then be returned to the
Confederacy. Many historians think this was just
too much for Admiral David Porter, the Union of-
ficer responsible for seeing that the rebel vessel got
back to Brazil. It is suspected he arranged for the
Florida to be "accidentally rammed" and sunk by a
U.S. Navy troop ship before it could leave for
South America.
As for the fate of the court-martialed Collins?
Well, Navy Secretary Gideon Welles proceeded
to set aside the Commander's conviction and or-
dered him back to duty. Two years later, Collins
was promoted to the rank of Captain. Then in 1874
he became a Rear Admiral. A year later -- at the
age of 61 -- Collins died in Lima, Peru, while com-
manding the U.S. South Pacific Squadron.
Jim Holmes lives in Live Oak.


BIBLE VERSE

"My soul finds rest in God

alone; my salvation comes

from him."- Psalm 62:1


Please address letters to: Letters To
The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your full name, address and daytime


phone number. We ask this so we can verify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


OPINION


Invisible victims


The National Transportation
Safety Board has again recom-
mended that airlines require a
separate seat for all children, re-
gardless of age, eliminating the
current practice of permitting
children under the age of 2 to fly
for free on the lap of a parent.
Will mandating child restraint �
systems make air travel safer?
The answer is probably yes but BY WALTI
that's the visible.
Having to purchase an extra airplane ticket, some fami-
lies will opt to drive to their destination instead. Thus,
mandated CRS will force some families to switch to a less
safe method of travel and some highway fatalities will rep-
resent the invisible victims of NTSB policy. By the way, if
parents wanted a greater measure of safety for their infant,
it's available to them right now. They can purchase a seat
and seat restraint for their infant.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is charged with
ensuring that drugs are safe and effective. Drugs must meet
FDA approval before they can be marketed. FDA officials
can make two kinds of errors. They can approve a drug that
has unanticipated, dangerous side effects that might cause
illness and death. Or, they can err by either not approving
or causing huge delays in the marketing of a safe and ef-
fective drug. Statistically, these are known as the Type I
and Type II errors.
FDA officials have a bias toward erring on the side of
over-caution. If FDA officials err on the side of under-cau-
tion, approving an unsafe drug, they are attacked by the
media, patient groups and investigated by Congress. Their
victims, sick and dead people, are highly visible. If FDA
officials err on the side of over caution, keeping a safe and
effective drug off the market, who's to know? The victims
are invisible.
If you conclude that FDA officials have a bias toward er-
rors that create invisible victims, who don't know whom to
blame for their illness or death, step to the head of the
class. Particularly egregious examples are: The FDA's 10-
year delay in approving alprenolol, a beta-blocker, sold for
three years in Europe, cost more than 10,000 lives per year.
The three-year delay in the approval of misoprostol, a drug


A

MINORITY

VIEW



O010 Creators Syndicate
ER WILLIAMS


for the treatment of gastric bleed-
ing that cost between 8,000 and
15,000 lives per year. The lag in
the approval of streptokinase for
the treatment of occluded coro-
nary arteries cost more than
10,000 lives per year.
FDA erring on the side of over-
caution makes the average cost of
bringing a drug to the market
close to $1 billion. When an FDA


official proudly announces the ap-
proval of a major new drug, someone should ask him: If
this drug is going to start saving lives tomorrow, how many
people died yesterday, last week, last month or last year
waiting for the drug to be approved? A drug company CEO
could give you the answer if he weren't fearful of FDA re-
taliation.
Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) represents
Congress' way to force manufacturers to produce more
fuel-efficient cars. Manufacturers meet CAFE standards by
producing lighter weight and hence less crash-worthy cars.
According to a Brookings Institution study, a 500-lb
weight reduction of the average car increased annual high-
way fatalities by 2,200-3,900 and serious injuries by
11,000 and 19,500 per year. A National Highway Trans-
portation and Safety Administration study demonstrated
that reducing a vehicle's weight by only 100 pounds in-
creased the fatality rate by as much as 5.63 percent for light
cars, 4.70 percent for heavier cars and 3.06 percent for
light trucks. These rates translated into additional traffic fa-
talities of 13,608 for light cars, 10,884 for heavier cars and
14,705 for light trucks between 1996 and 1999.
Congressmen have full knowledge of these life and
death statistics but doing the bidding of environmentalists
and other interest groups is more important than American
lives. There ought to be a way to make the invisible victims
of Congress visible.

Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at G, .. *.
Mason University. To find out more about Walter E.
Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web
page at www.creators.com.


FROM OUR READERS


To the Editor:

In Mr. Holmes' 'Shame on Us' article about how a signif-
icant portion of students entering Suwannee Schools are ill
prepared, he never once mentions PARENTS or PRIMA-
RY CAREGIVERS as part of the reason students are ill-
prepared. These adults spend the most time with these chil-
dren before school age. Before we dissect programs that
support some parents/primary caregivers, let's put the re-
sponsibility for school preparedness squarely on the shoul-
ders it should rest. If parents/primary caregivers did not
make the effort to prepare their children for the rigors of
school this year, maybe parents/primary caregivers should
either get training or place the child in an available pro-
gram to learn these skills, and the child should wait until
next school year.

Janet Messcher
Live Oak

Jim Holmes responds:
Ms. Messcher appears to have misunderstood the 8th
paragraph in my column, in which I stated in part, "tough
questions need to be asked of our daycares, our Head Start
Programs, our Pre-K Programs, our high school 1."o. ,iiiir .
classes and ourselves." Perhaps IJ, ,/. l., but I tried to make
it clear that as far as I am concerned, NO ONE gets a pass.
Thus, %Nii,u . on us!"


To the Editor:

Is it any wonder that the economic and employment pic-
ture is so bad here in Live Oak, when this paper carries,


without challenging the foolishness of the publicity release,
that the placement of an ATM machine, bolted to a concrete
slab in the middle of a parking lot, is portrayed as a new
business in our community?
Seems little surprise that our economy is stagnant, em-
ployment offers little opportunity, and our best leave the
area for hope of a future.
Is it fair that they have ignored the new ice dispensing
machine on South 129? A tidal wave of economic develop-
ment is afoot!

Steve Johnson
Live Oak


To the Editor:

An open letter to the Suwannee County Commission
From: SCFR personnel who have signed below
Re: Chief Conner

Dear Sirs,

In light of some recent events that have shown some neg-
ative light on our department, and more importantly upon
our chief, the personnel who have signed below would like
to voice our support for Chief Conner. In any business or
organization, there should be structure. It is not uncommon
that every employee will not agree with every decision
made by their boss, leader or superior. It is no different
within our fire service. However, in other organizations
where there is less to be lost, perhaps mishaps or mistakes


SEE FROM OUR READERS, PAGE 12A


umwannrr


remocrat


GA E, O AF ID fO
IT .oo LIKE 1TA9K AItNTW E NOW VOWUID
AT T.AT SIANTuPE. RAOTlCAL COMMENTS tA





6/ - 2


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


PAGE 6A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK















Suwannee County Health
Department can tell you
how to get started


By Mary Ward
Suwannee County
Health Dept.
See related story, Page HA. october is
All women are at risk for breast cancer. Not
counting skin cancer, breast cancer is the most
common cancer in women of all combined i
major racial and ethnic groups in the United
States. Men can also get breast cancer, but this
is rare. Among Hispanic women, it is the most
common cause of death from cancer, and it is
the second most common cause of death from cancer among white, black,
Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women.
Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die
from it.
Breast cancer prevention
Scientists are studying how best to prevent breast cancer. Ways to help
lower your risk of getting breast cancer include:
* Being physically active by getting regular exercise.
* Maintaining a healthy weight.
* Avoiding hormone replacement therapy (HRT) aw areness m onth
* Limiting the amount of alcohol that you drink and discontinuing the
use of tobacco
products. Be apart of
Early detection is key - ,
According to the American Cancer Society, women in their 20s and 30s , 1 T '. HN
should have a clinical breast exam (CBE) as part of a regular health exam . :
by a health professional, at least every 3 years. After age 40, women T I N
should have a breast exam by a health professional every year.
Breast self-exams (BSE) should be done by women starting in their 20s.
Women should report any breast changes to their health professional right N
away. Mammograms are a series of X-ray pictures of the breast that allow
doctors to look for early signs of breast cancer, sometimes up to three Let's work together to raise awareness
years before it can be felt. When breast cancer is found early, treatment is of breast cancer and the importance of
most effective, and many women go on to live long and healthy lives. A early detection.
Most women should have their first mammogram at age 50. Talk to your
health professional if you have any symptoms or changes in your breast,
or if breast cancer runs in your family. Your provider may recommend thatPu c a a ri bin mo r
you have mammograms before age 50 or more often than usual.
Please join the Suwannee County Health Department at the Tangles Fallso e n ora a su p t.1 0o
Bazaar on Saturday from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at 12986 US Hwy. 90 West.
The Health Department will feature Breast Cancer Awareness information i w llb do a d t A Cfr
along with BMI screenings. Suwannee River Area Health Education
Council will also be doing free bone density screenings.


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1100 SW 11th Street * Live Oak, Florida 32064 * www.ShandsLiveOak.com


Fulpge of ribbn i llrno
[Otoe 20 inath Su anne emca t.


^^^^^^^^^M


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 7A









PAGE 8A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


Branford runs over Dragons


Branford News
Serving southern Suwannee County, including Branford, O'Brien and McAlpin


3 local women attend GFWC Florida



Fall Board of Directors Meeting

Submitted
Kathy Stark, President of the GFWC
Branford Woman's Club, and members Cathi
Cintorino, Secretary, and Elaine Nemeth,
District 3 Home Life Chairperson, attended
the annual GFWC Florida Federation of
Women's Clubs Fall Board of Directors
meeting Sept. 17-19 in Orlando.
In addition to being the semi-annual busi-
ness meeting of the GFWC Florida Board of II,
Directors, Fall Board is a learning time and
many workshops and materials are presented "
to help clubs work more effectively in their
communities. This year marked the begin-
ning of a new administration, with new pro- .
grams and community service projects to be . ,
adopted. The members had an opportunity to ' .
attend several workshops, meet new pro-
gram coordinators and to receive new litera-
ture for fundraising ideas and programs, '
such as Conservation, Education, Arts and
Public Issues. .
This year the theme was Saluting OUR
Veterans and dressing in red, white, and blue.
It was a chance to reflect, to appreciate, and Cathi Cintorino, Kathy Stark, Elaine Nemeth.
to honor those who gave themselves for our
freedom. The special guest speaker for the
"Stars and Stripes Forever" banquet Satur-
day evening was George "Bud" Day, a re-
tired U.S. Air Force Colonel and Command
Pilot who served during the Vietnam War,
which included five years and seven months
as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam. He is Sr
often cited as being the most decorated U.S.
service member since General Douglas
MacArthur, having received some seventy
decorations, including the Medal of Honor.
Major Terry Jones, a United Methodist - .. - - :-
Minister and a United States Army Reserve
Chaplain, spoke to us on her time served in _ .
Iraq as a field Chaplain, and about women in
the military and their challenges. The
evening was entertaining and very emotional r
as we laughed, cried, and saluted the quest & .
speakers and all of our GFWC Florida club-
women veterans. "
The Branford Woman's Club has many -- -.


SEE GFWC, PAGE 9A


Elaine Nemeth, Major Terry Jones, Kathy Stark.


'Bits and Pieces' from south Suwannee Co.


By Ana Smith
Isn't the weather great?
Sunny, pleasantly warm days,
cool mornings, open win-
dows, fresh air, and yards and
porches decorated with
pumpkins and scarecrows ...
who says we don't experience
the changing of the seasons
down here in the South?
This week I finally have a
couple of photos of the folks
who give of their time to pro-
vide free dinners at the Live
Oak Community Center on
Duval Street the last Sunday
of each month. The volun-
teers vary from month to
month as their time allows,
but the folks in these photos
are the ones who are usually
on hand and who were pre-
sent last month. Please, if you
have items that can be donat-
ed to be sold at the flea mar-
ket to help raise money to pay
for the food and supplies at
these dinners, call Roger
Burnside at 386-935-3343 to
arrange for the drop off or the
pick up of your donations.
To everyone who was suf-
fering the last couple of
weeks with yet another bout
of colds, sniffles, general flu
symptoms, I hope you are all
feeling better by now. I slept



INDEX


Some of the volunteers who cook and serve dinners every month. Kneeling, from left: Darnell Watson,
Benji McLean, Andrew Show. Front row, standing, from left: JoAnn Lynch, Rayan Wiggan (holding son
Stephan Wiggan in front), son O'Neal Wiggan, Jakayla Edwards (next to O'Neal). Back row, from left:
Pat Lynch, Katia Cherisol, David Cherisol, Betty Cherry, Richard Tomic Jr., an unidentified volunteer,
Roger Burnside and Pastor Ryan Wiggan. - Courtesy photo


one night with my window open
and woke up with sniffles, stuffed
up head, aching body, all because I
didn't want to shut the window that
night and got a chill. Thankfully it
only lasted the one day, but be care-

A rrests................................2A
Legal Notices......................5B
Obituaries ....................... 5A


ful not to do the same thing. I had
to get out a blanket the next night
and lower my window ... the fresh
air feels so good I didn't want to
close any windows, even at night,
but I learned a simple precaution

Sports ................................1 B
Suwannee Living................4A
Viewpoint.......................... 6A


was all I needed to do.
My sincere condolences to the
family of Mr. Harry Wells of
O'Brien. I read about his passing in
SEE O'BRIEN, PAGE 9A


HI 89 LO 60


PAGE 2B


Southerland

to make

Branford

appearance
The Republican candi-
date for U.S. Congress,
District 2, Steve Souther-
land, will be at a chicken
BBQ in Branford at A Per-
fect Setting on Friday, Oct.
15, from 5 to 7 p.m. Every-
one is invited to attend this
fundraising event to meet
and speak with Mr.
Southerland. Steve will be
making a short speech dur-
ing the evening, but the fo-
cus of the event is to allow
people of the eastern part of
the district to meet their
candidate prior to the gen-

SEE SOUTHERLAND,
PAGE 9A


Branford

Camera

Club meets

Oct. 14
The Branford Camera
Club will meet at the Bran-
ford Public Library on
Thursday, Oct. 14, at 7
p.m. October's meeting
will be an open forum
where members discuss
photographic topics of in-
terest and share photos.
The homework subject for
this month is Rivers, and
several members will share
experiences and photos
from an overnight kayak
trip on the Suwannee River.
A projector will be avail-
able to share pictures digi-
tally, or you may bring
SEE BRANFORD, PAGE 9A


BHS and
BES Fall
Festival set
The annual Fall Festival
sponsored by BHS and
BES is set for Oct. 30
from 3:30-6 p.m.
Booths will be set up by
various classes with differ-
ent activities for the chil-
dren to participate in.
Come out and support the
students and teachers of
the Branford Schools.
Trick or Treating in
Branford will begin imme-
diately after the Fall Festi-
val Ends.
For additional informa-
tion, please contact Stacy
Young at young @ suwan-
nee.kl2.fl.us.


O'Brien 4-H

yard sale
The O'Brien 4-H Club
would like to invite you to
their yard sale and bake
sale on Saturday at the
O'Brien Feed Depot at 8
a.m. Please plan to attend
and support this brand new
4-H Club.


Follow us on

FACEBOOK


I SPORT


PAGE 8A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010












Branford News


Tina Roberts and Bo Hammock,
with their children, would like to re-
mind you of their upcoming marriage,
Saturday, the Sixteenth of October, two
thousand ten at two o'clock in the af-
ternoon.


The Beachville Advent Christian
Church, located at 24815 County Road 49,
at the intersection of State Road 247 and
County Road 49, will celebrate its 114th
Homecoming, on Sunday, Oct. 17. Morn-
ing worship service will be at 10:30 with
Rev. Robert Mann as the guest speaker,
and special music by the Funkhouser Fam-
ily. Dinner will follow the morning wor-
ship service and then at 2 p.m. there will be
a gospel sing featuring the Funkhouser
Family. Rev. Mann will also be speaking
on Monday through Wednesday evenings
at 7. Come and join us as we celebrate 114


Continued From Page 8A

projects and fundraising
events planned for 2010-
11. One of which is the
"Who let the dogs out"
quilt to raise money for Ca-
nine Companions for Inde-
pendence (CCI). There is a
$1 donation per ticket. If
you would like to make a
donation, or take a chance
to receive this adorable
quilt, please mail a check
for the number of tickets
you would like ($1 dona-


The ceremony will take place at
O'Brien Baptist Church, on Highway
349, O'Brien, Florida.
Reception to follow in the church
fellowship hall. All friends and family
are invited to attend.


years of God's goodness.
The Beachville Advent Christian Church
will holds its fourth annual Fall Festival on
Saturday, November 6 from 10 a.m. till 2
p.m.. All are invited for a day of fun,
food,(hamburgers, sausages, chili, cotton
candy, funnel cakes, nachos) music, just
plain fun! Bounce house, door prizes, mu-
sic by local talent. There will be a chili
cook off, a cake auction, (call 935-0723 to
register for the cook off). We desire to of-
fer this day to our community for no
charge, for anything! Come and enjoy a
day of fun for the whole family!


tion per ticket).
Make your check
payable to Branford
Woman's Club and mail to
P.O. Box 1084, Branford,
FL 32008. Be sure to indi-
cate that the funds are for
the CCI project, so we can
mail you your tickets.
Please visit www.cci.org
for more information about
the Canine Companion for
Independence organiza-
tion.
The Branford Woman's
Club located at 26811


Hwy. 247, is a member of
the General Federation of
Women's Clubs (GFWC)
and the GFWC Florida
Federation of Women's
Clubs. Members meet Sep-
tember through May, the
third Thursday of each
month. For more informa-
tion about the Branford
Woman's Club or joining
our volunteer community,
please call 386-935-3487
or 386-935 4645 or visit
our website at www.gfw-
cbwcfl.org.


Roberts - Hammock


wedding reminder


"What the Bible means?
Basic Information Before
Leaving Earth."
"There are two kinds of
people on this earth; those
who wake up and say,
'Good morning, Lord,' and
those who wake up and
say, 'Good Lord, it's morn-
ing!'"
"A preacher announced
to his congregation, 'I have
good news and I have bad
news. The good news is
we have plenty of money
for our building fund. The
bad news is it's still out
there in your pockets.'"
"Sign on the back of an
Amish carriage ... 'This ve-
hicle is energy efficient; it
runs on oats and grass.


Caution; do not step in ex-
haust.'"
"People want the front of
the bus, the back of the
church, and the center of
attention."
"A minister addressed
his church, asking that
those who would be will-
ing to donate $100 towards
their building fund to stand
up. A wise organist imme-
diately began to plan the
National Anthem; the
preacher got his pledges."
Get outside in this beau-
tiful weather and breathe in
this wonderful clean fall
air. Listen to the birds
singing; thank God for the
free entertainment. God
bless!


Continued From Page 8A

the newspaper a couple of
weeks ago, I think. I had
the pleasure of meeting Mr.
Wells several times, and
enjoyed having a couple of
interesting talks with him
on a couple of those occa-
sions. He will be very
much missed.
Next week our local Ex-
tension Office will have
another class in one of its
on-going gardening series,
"Growing Salvia in North
Florida" at the extension
office next to the Coliseum
building on Oct.14 from
6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.
These classes are free and
very informative. Call the
office at 386-362-2771 for
more information or to sign
up.
Don't forget the Food
Pantry at O'Brien Baptist
Church next Tuesday, Oct.
19, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
For more information call
the church office at 386-
935-1503.
From my "e-mail" files:



Southerland

to make

Branford

appearance
Continued From Page 8A

eral election on Nov. 2.
BBQ chicken, chicken and
rice, with sides, drinks and
dessert will be served,
courtesy of friends of
Steve in our area.
For more information
call Chris Summerlin at
386-935-0995.


Continued From Page 1A

printed photos to share
with the group. If you need
some help with your cam-
era, be sure to also bring
your user's manual. If you
have extra pieces of equip-
ment that need a home,
bring those along too. You
may have just the thing an-
other member is looking
for.
Branford Camera Club
has members of all levels
of expertise from absolute


novice to experienced pro-
fessional. Our meetings
are informal and open to
anyone with an interest in
photography.
For more information,
contact any of the follow-
ing members:
Carolyn Hogue, Program
Chair, 386-935-2044
Dick Bryant, Technical
Consultant, 386-935-1977
Dick Madden, Technical
Consultant, 386-935-0296
Skip Weigel, Technical
Consultant, 386-935-1382


Byrd's Power Equipment
1 Sales & Service
All Makes & Models

HUSQVARNA.
Open Saturday 7 a.m. - 12 Noon

11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008


Hours: Mon.-Fri.
7 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturday 7 a.m. - Noon


(386) 935-1544
570896-F


To advertise

your business
here, call

Rhonda at

386-362-1734
for more
information


GILCHRIST
BUILDING SUPPLY INC.

v Serving the community
since 1979
Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.;
Sat. 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
< www.gilchrist.doitbest.com
l ^ Hw;. 129 Bell, FL 624552-F


Good Fast Service From Our Deli
Pizza * Subs * Broaster Chicken'

M r, TIME
SAVER

PETRO
Western Union * Alltel Phone Bills
* Pay Electric Bill * Windstream Phone
Bills * Money Orders * Check Cashing
* Lottery * Fax Service * Color Copies


NORTH FLORIDA Mon.-Fri.
PHARMACY 8:30 am-6:00 pm
OF BRANFORD Sunday-Closed
Now accepting
Blue Cross Blue Shield
Health Options
Everything For Your Home Recovery
From Prescriptions to Medical Supplies
Cherry Lumbert 101 S.W. US Highway 27
Cherry Branford, Florida 32008
Pharmacist 570892-F (386) 935-6905







24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
SAutomatic Fuel Delivery Prompt Installation & Repair
* Safety Trained Professionals * Easy Payment Plans
Our Business is
Customer Satisfaction 502 SUWANNEE AVE. SW * BRANFORD
,jmm 386-935-17289
570891 -F


Mini-Storage
Large and Small Units
Reasonable
386-935-2122 386-935-0298
624556-F

CLASS "A" COLLISION INC.
"The Wrecksperts"
Specializing In Heavy Collisions
*Quality Guaranteed
Insurance Preferred Shop
Unibody & Frame Straightening
Major Credit Cards Accepted.



FREE ESTIMATES Shop 386-935-9334
TED or TERESA LAWRENCE Fax 386-935-0464
301 Suwannee Ave., P.O. Box 519 -935-0464
Branford, FL. 32008-0519 624558-F


570661-FI


Roger and Coralee take time to talk with one of the
guests. There's always time for a little chat, word of
welcome, sharing in fellowship. - Courtesy photo


Branford Camera

Club meets Oct. 14


114th Homecoming at

Beachville Advent Christian


I


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 9A













J, I.Live Oak man elected President of



I lil 339th Fighter Squadron Association


Robert Murphy when he served as the Communica-
tions Chief in the 339th Fighter Interceptor Squadron,
in 1951- 52. - Courtesy photo


Submitted
Robert Murphy of Live
Oak was elected President
of the 339th Fighter
Squadron Association dur-
ing the group's 29th re-


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10/19, 1:30 PM
Holiday Inn Express
US Hwy 129 N
Live Oak, FL 32060


10/21, 6:30 PM
Holiday Inn Express
US Hwy 129 N
Live Oak, FL 32060


Part I) prescription drug plans may be discussed.
Theodore (Thad) Glass
Licensed Insurance Agent
386-776-1671
thadins,."msn.com



An,--'r: Medicare Supplement
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AARPdoes n makehealth p n rccomme i n ndio for diiduals. . i.. .. i i i,,,
AS702 (2/09)


626462-F


union in Kingsport, Tenn.
recently. Murphy will
serve as president of this
national organization for
one year.
While on active duty
with the 339th at Johnson
Air Force Base, located in
Japan, during the Korean
Conflict, Murphy, a Staff
Sergeant, served as the
Communications Chief.
The 339th Fighter Inter-
ceptor Squadron served as
one of the main protectors
of Japan during the Korean
Conflict. The squadron


was credited with shooting
down the first YAK fighter
during the early part of
this war. Major James W.
Little and Lt. W.C. (Bill)
Hayhurst were involved in
and credited with this kill.
The 339th was orga-
nized during WWII in the
south Pacific as a fighter
squadron. The
P-38 Lightning was the
more notable fighter that
was used at that time. The
squadron later became an
All Weather Squadron and
then a Fighter Interceptor


Squadron and the aircraft
were equipped with radar
units. They flew mainly
during the hours of dark-
ness and inclement weath-
er. Aircraft used were P-61
Black Widow, F-82 Twin
Mustang and later Jet air-
craft F-94B and F-86C, all
fighters.
Many of the former
members of the 339th
Fighter Interceptor
Squadron attended the re-
union and enjoyed the fel-
lowship and re-telling of
old war stories.


Robert Murphy of Live Oak accepts the gavel to serve as new President of the 339th Fight-
er Squadron Association from outgoing President Richard Carney, Mayfield, Ky.
- Courtesy photo


North Florida Conservation

and Airboat Alliance meeting


The North Florida Conservation and
Airboat Alliance meets the first Tuesday
of every month (except December) at 7
p.m. at Cowboy's BBQ in Live Oak. We
are airboaters and sportsmen working to


keep public lands and waterways open for
everyone to use and enjoy. President
Randy Howard, 590-4884.
Secretary/Treasurer Patty Williams, patty-
williams@consultant.com or 961-5399.


,,.CcOr.J inM 1O tot .liet Ar iI'icdli Q icier ;ocIc'TrY. thd eIh.ilcc .If .i3 \\'1o r11
h n\'irl il\viive'e bre sr, c.incter -c e r ime [rirll du 1ir' hertz life i-s abo'urt 1 in ,.3




Breast Friends



Forever Luncheons



Thursday, October 21 st | 12 noon

Live Oak Church of God
9828 US Highway 129
Speaker: Dr. Cherylle Hayes



Thursday, October 28th i 12 noon

First Baptist Church of Jasper
207 2nd Street NE
Speaker: Dr. Mark Thompson



Be our guest for a FREE luncheon

and be sure to wear PINK!



Seating is limited. Please call

(800) 525-5248 to reserve your seat!


PRIMARY
CARE CENTER
I, ,rf.lI.., 1 o e ri_ . .4n- ,\ e,. _ , ,-.'


LAKE CITY
MEDICAL CENTER


III II II I r II
liii II


Join us for
o 1?DgeS FALL BAZAAR

and the

FLORIDA BREAST AND

CERVICAL CANCER

EARLY DETECTION PROGRAM
Presented by the Suwannee County Health Department

Saturday, October 16th,

8AM - 4PM

12986 US Hwy. 90 West
(1/4 mile past Wayne Frier Mobile Homes on the Left)

Health Screening including Bone Density Screening,
Information & Applications for
Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program
Vouchers for FREE MAMMOGRAMS for
Qualified Individuals,
Plenty of Giveaways and Resource Information!

Huge Rummage Sale of Furniture, Collectibles,
Antiques and More
Quality Vendors - Everything from Home Canned Goods
to Original Oil Paintings, Hand-Crafted Furniture,
Jewelry, Quilts, you name it!
Kids' Activities
Bake Sale
$hboby s - Unique, Upcycled Furniture, Gifts and Accessories
Food by J. Don Allen's "World Famous"
Beach Buns and Dawgs
(Call 386-590-1543 for Vending Information)
Sponsored by: Suwannee River Federal Credit Union I39
SHERBERT C. Repai
H I ..IlltlILl'Lt" ^-I tltmr 1rn lt MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A.
Let's Build Something Together' A&B Customs Auto Repair


Suwannee County Health Department


Color Perfect Painters


A Benefit Event for Tangles - A Community Outreach for Women
12986 US Hwy 90 W., Live Oak, FL 32060
Ministry Leaders Angie Lott 386-688-4977 * lottfam4@windstream.net
** Vickie Bass 386-590-1543 * vlb55@msn.com


624685-F


PAGE 10A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


IIIE-

























WE D NESDAYi OC3 1 11 .B SUW E M OiCLI V OK G , . E A


Staff
Here s what was happening in the world in 1935:
Babe Ruth hit his 714th and final home run; the
board game Monopoly was released; Will Rogers
and Wiley Post died in a plane crash in Alaska;
Social Security was enacted to alleviate the effects
of the Great Depression; and Live Oak s Buddy
Nott got his high school diploma
Of the 47 members of the Pasco High class of
1935, Nott and six others are all that survive Five
of them gathered recently in Dade City, where
they grew up
Getting together was a treat, Nott said, though
the group has "stayed in touch, more or less "
Two of the five still live in Dade City Nott. on the
other hand, made his way upstate, and spent 52
years as a banker.
He started out in St. Petersburg at $40 a month,
with the promise of $50 if he worked hard and did
well. By any measure, he did.
And what advice does Nott offer today's youth
as they enter the workplace?
"I taught my children to work hard," Nott said.
"That's always been my philosophy."
Well said, Mr. Nott.


Sponsors on board for Tangles' Fall

Bazaar, cancer detection program


Submitted
See related story,
Page 7A.
Two events combined
for one huge impact when
the Florida Breast and
Cervical Cancer Early De-
tection Program partnered
with the Tangles' Fall
Bazaar, a premier event
for the community out-
reach for women.
Tangles' ministry lead-
ers, Angie Lott and Vickie
Bass, were presented the
opportunity to partner
with the Florida Breast
and Cervical Cancer Early
Detection Program and
immediately seized the
opportunity to be part of
the awareness program.
The Fall Bazaar is Satur-
day, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Personal interest, though,
according to the two
women, was superseded
by the opportunity to
bring awareness to
women in the community.
Sponsors already se-
cured reacted positively to
the partnership of the two
events. Lowe's was al-
ready on board as a spon-
sor when the Florida pro-
gram became part of the
event. Nationally, Lowe's
initially partnered with
the Susan G. Komen
Foundation for the Cure
in 2001. They have con-
tinued to be a strong pro-
moter of the Foundation
and breast cancer aware-
ness and education since
then.
"We have been pleased
to sponsor and support
Tangles since this
women's outreach pro-
gram began a year ago,"


said Ryan Sedgley, man-
ager of the local Lowe's.
"When I was approached
about the Florida Breast
and Cervical Cancer Early
Detection Program part-
nering with the Fall
Bazaar, I thought it was a
natural fit."
Locally, Lowe's has nu-
merous signature pink
items throughout the store
that benefit breast cancer
awareness with each pur-
chase.
All other sponsors have
had positive response as
well to the two programs
merging their events.
Event sponsors in addition
to Lowe's are Farm Bu-
reau Insurance, Herbert C.
Mantooth, DDS, PA, the
Suwannee County Health
Department, Suwannee
River Federal Credit
Union, The Suwannee De-
mocrat, A&B Customs
Automotive Repair, Color
Perfect Painters and First
Federal Savings Bank.
First Federal Savings
Bank signed on as an ad-
vertising partner for pink
post-it notes which will
remind everyone of the
event on the front page of
this week's Suwannee De-
mocrat. First Federal is
well-recognized as a com-
munity partner and sup-
porter of local cancer
awareness events.
Saturday's event has
shaped up as an old-fash-
ioned community festival.
In addition to a huge rum-
mage sale, quality ven-
dors with hand-crafted
items will be on-site.
Everything from home
canned goods to jewelry,


Five members of the Class of '35 1935 2010
gathered recently in Dade City, where
they grew up. With 47 members, their
class was the largest freshman class to PABO 11M G CHOOL
enter Pasco High at that point. Live ad. Ci FL
Oak's Buddy Nott, second from the
right, got his start there, but he spent CUMO, f1935
much of his banking career right here Class -l935
in Live Oak. Nott even served as -. Reunim -


mayor of Live Oak. - Courtesy photo


Publix school supply



collection drive a success


original oil paintings,
quilts, afghans and baked
items will be sold. Addi-
tionally, a sneak peak at
Tangles' upcoming line of
unique "upcycled" fur-
nishings, gifts and acces-
sories (Shabby T) will be
available for sale. Draw-
ings will be held for raffle
items including: $100
merchandise item from
Lowe's; an antique
Boston Rocker donated by
Suwannee Antiques; two
hand-quilted quillows
made by local quilter, Pat
Roberts; a baby afghan;
and an original oil paint-
ing by Nancy Boatright
McCullers. For informa-
tion on purchasing raffle
tickets (only $1.00!) con-
tact Amber Avera at am-
beravera71 @yahoo.com.
Also slated are kids' ac-
tivities and J. Don Allen's
Beach Buns and Dawgs
food truck will be on hand
with his "world-famous"
food for sale!
This first-time event is
a fundraiser for Tangles -
A Community Outreach
for Women. A few vend-
ing spaces are still avail-
able. For information on
those spaces, to donate
items for the rummage
sale, or any other ques-
tions, call Vickie Bass at
386-590-1543. For infor-
mation about the Florida
Breast and Cervical Can-
cer Early Detection Pro-
gram, call Mary Ward,
Healthy Communities,
Health People Coordina-
tor, Suwannee County
Health Department, at
386-362-2708, Extension
269.


Publix Super Markets conducted a
community participation program to col-
lect school supplies for homeless chil-
dren in Suwannee County. The annual
program, "School Tools for Cool Kids,"
is conducted with the support of United
Way of Suwannee Valley which provides
the media communications for commu-
nity awareness and the distribution of
supplies collected to the school system
homeless liaison. Homeless children in
need of these supplies are assisted
through this community effort.
United Way of Suwannee Valley
serves as the lead agency for the Home-


less Services Network of Suwannee Val-
ley, which serves the counties of Colum-
bia, Suwannee, Lafayette, and Hamilton.
The network includes agencies and indi-
viduals interested in the services avail-
able to those who are homeless or threat-
ened with homelessness. United Way of
Suwannee Valley is a community impact
and fundraising organization which, uti-
lizing volunteers on all levels, identifies
unmet community needs and seeks to al-
leviate those needs through United Way
of Suwannee Valley initiatives and the
funding of 22 affiliated health and hu-
man service agencies.


- -E~'La.[ ~*]


,p 4

-'j L --- ,





Live Oak Publix employees presented United Way of Suwannee Valley Homeless Coor-
dinator Jennifer Lee, right; and Suwannee County School District Homeless Advocate
Debra Ross, left; with school supplies collected through the store's annual "School Tools
for Cool Kids" school supply collection drive. - Courtesy photo


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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 11A















Viewpoints/Opinions


FROM OUR READERS


Continued From Page 6A

can be dealt with a little
more compassionately.
This is a fire department,
and mistakes can cost the
lives of not only personnel,
but patients, victims and
bystanders. Mistakes can
not be easily tolerated, es-
pecially if they violate the
safety and well being of
employees and citizens.
Mr. Conner has brought to
this department something
that has been lacking,
structure. He has held em-
ployees accountable for
their actions, which is the
only way to ensure safety
and structure within a fire
department. Many of us
have worked at larger de-
partments, and have no-
ticed the vast improve-
ments that have been made
within our department
since Mr. Conner has been
the public safety director. It
is now being managed as a
fire service should.
Just a few examples of
some of the things that Mr.
Conner has brought to this
department in working
with you gentlemen are: the
purchasing of newer and
safer equipment, ensuring
that volunteers get the
training they need so that
they are in compliance with
state guidelines and that
scenes are safer, imple-
menting and enforcing that
proper safety equipment be
worn and utilized on
scenes, enforcing that train-
ing be performed on a reg-
ular basis, working to
strategically place the sta-
tions to ensure shorter re-
sponse times, working with
the Advent Christian Vil-
lage to put up a new station
so that the citizens of ACV
do not have to wait for such
long response times, bridg-
ing the gap between volun-
teer personnel and career
personnel as to ensure that
working relationships are
harmonious, and he has
worked diligently to bring
the stations, (both paid and
volunteer) up to the ISO re-
quirements which in turn
will help to lower citizens'
home owner premiums, as
well as provide better ser-
vice. These are just a few of
the many things that Chief
Conner has done to im-
prove Suwannee County
Fire Rescue.
He has treated his em-
ployees well, and while a
few feelings may occasion-
ally get stung, his purpose
for being 'to the point and
brisk' once in awhile is to
ensure the safety of his sub-


ordinates. Most of us knew
when we signed up to be
firefighters, that the service
is 'para-military,' and that
we will not have our hands
held and our backs patted
along the way.
We feel that Mr. Conner
has done a fine job as our
Chief, and he shows con-
tinued effort to grow and
learn to be an even better
leaders. Please note that
while a few employees,
(some of which may have
been disgruntled), may
have voiced problems with
him, those of us who have
signed below are in full
support of him. Thank you
for your time and attention
to this matter.

Respectfully,
Bill Underhill
Brad Merritt
Tara Thompson
Jerry Jordon
John Munsell Jr.
Wesley Schneider
Debbie Adams
Allen D.,,n-,n ,,i ..
David May
Steve Oaks
Lucas Hodge
John Cherry
Brian Cranford
James Riley
Robert Garbett
David Long
Jonathan Mieras
Shawn Hill., i.', .
Slade Mayhard
James Sommers
Eddie Hand
Robert Eyer
Dave Smith
Chris Rathbun
Matthew V i.1.-,. ,i,
Chris Perry
Paul McDavid
Nathan G. i"i..
Tammy Conner
Randy Hill
Grady Sims
Michael Conner
Guy Cooper
Tom Maynard
Penny Munsell
John Munsell Sr.
Johnny Howard
Tim White
Matt Hubbard


To the Editor:

Every week I read the
Rant & Rave about the mu-
sic on the school bus and
stop signs and about the
bus drivers. I have been a
bus driver for 20 years and
let me tell you, people have
no idea what bus drivers do
or some of the things par-
ents and students put us
through. I have had parents
going to sue me and the
schools for writing up their
kids. Kids calling me an


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SUWANNEE RIVER READINGS

Branford 2010








The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge
in Branford in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In
the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level.
Oct. 6, 2010 8.98 Oct. 9, 2010 8.89
Oct. 7, 2010 8.94 Oct. 10, 2010 8.86
Oct. 8, 2010 8.91 Oct. 11,2010 8.8
Oct. 12, 2010 8.76
Sponsored By:


SCAFF'SSupermarket
Branford 386-935-1527
624560-F


unsavory name or two,
telling me I can't do any-
thing about it. Parents call-
ing my house at all hours of
the day and night because
their kids don't want to sit
in the seats I put them in or
they traded toys and now
want me to get it back. Oh,
and how many times have I
been told "You will pay for
any toys that their kids
don't bring home." Some
of the fun stuff like talking
back, "you can't move me,
make me, what for, why?"
One of the best is "my par-
ents will have your job, I
hate you, I hate my parents,
and I hate school. Write me
up, I don't care, you can't
make me, I'll do what I
want. Call the cops, I don't
care." And then parents tell
us "I would not do what
you do for a million dol-
lars." That one is funny
since we couldn't raise a
family on our salary. Let's
not forget we have to drive
down the road with 65-80
kids, watch every seat, and
every toy, what's playing
on the radio, watch the road
and other drivers all the
while one kid is slapping
someone else, one is trying
to walk down the aisle, one
is screaming at you to
move the kid in the seat
with him because he hates
them, or he (she) looked at
me and one asking when
can they move.
Why is it so much of a
problem to play a radio?
Kristi Mullen said in the
letter to the Editor on Oct.
1. I quote, "I was told that
they think I am doing a
good thing and that it's
great that I stand up for
what I believe in and for
my children." That's great
she is a parent looking out
for her children, is this not
what we all strive for as
parents? We need more
parents to be like this. I'm
sorry to say that is not al-
ways the case. But if some
parents aren't against ra-
dios on school buses does
that make them bad? Why
should all the other chil-
dren have to do without? If
she is so against radios on
school buses why stop it in
Suwannee County why not
take on the other states and
let's ban all school buses
from having radios? I have
a bus with a radio and I do
play it some of the time and
it's on one of the stations
that have been allowed.
Most of my kids don't lis-
ten to the station.
And please someone tell
me what babysitting has to
do with riding a school bus.


I hope that I'm not looked
at as a babysitter. Does she
not realize that when the ra-
dios are on and the kids
have to keep the noise level
down that it's keeping them
from fighting, cursing at
each other, slapping,
throwing things and stay-
ing in their seats. That it
makes it easier on the kids
as well as the driver. I grant
you there may be some sta-
tions that should not be lis-
tened too. How many par-
ents gave their kids iPods
for birthdays and Christ-
mas? How many actually
listen to the music that has
been downloaded on the
iPods. Everyday I see kids
walking around and pass-
ing them on the school
grounds and on the buses
and I have had to try and
get the kids to turn them off
because of the language on
them. Kristi Mullen, don't
think for one minute that
your kids are not hearing
things and language that
you find inappropriate.
Possibly at school or on the
bus or even at friends'
houses and that one of your
children may one day or
have been handed an iPod
with inappropriate music
on it, watched a movie at
friends' houses or just been
in a store or sitting at a red
light and having to listen to
music from another car
close by.
Let's talk about seat belts
since there are issues with
them. How many times
have we, as bus drivers,
talked ourselves blue in the
face for our kids to buckle
up? Parents tell us all the
time they want us to make
their child buckle up. I'm
still trying to figure out
how to do that. I can't
physically put it on them
and I can't sit in each seat
with them to make sure
they keep them buckled
and I don' t have x-ray vi-
sion to see children are do-
ing as I expect. So, it's a
work in progress. Over and
over, everyday, how many
times I have had kids to tell
me "you can't make me."
Or I look up in the mirror
and one of the kids has the
belt slamming the kid be-
hind or in front of them.
What are we supposed to
do? We still have to drive.
The teachers do a great job
in school but remember
they have 20-30 kids in
classrooms and it's not
moving. They can look
them in the face and take
care of problems. Send the
kids to the office. I have 60
or more behind me and still


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DRIVE. It's a long walk
back to the office so that is
not an option.
Now let's talk stop signs.
We're taught to stop at the
stop sign two feet before
the stop sign, pull up until
we have a clear view,
watch for traffic and when
it is safe to do so, pull out
into the lane. The stop sign
and stop line are usually in
two different places. Today
when you're driving home,
look at some of the stop
signs an see how many are
at the stop line. We stop at
the signs not at the stop
line. That can give the illu-
sion we are not stopping
because the stop sign is not
visible to oncoming traffic.
I have been doing this job
for a long time and don't
get me wrong I love it. I get
to see and talk to all the
beautiful children in the
school system. I'm now
driving children of children
that I have drove over the
years. And I can't tell you
how many coats or lunch
money I have given out, the
items I have cleaned up a
little tiny cut a child got on
the playground, wiped
tears from eyes when feel-
ings got hurt. How many
times have I called to check
on one of my kids because
they were sick or hurt? Be-
fore you judge us, stop and
think about it.
I say to the Kristi Mul-
lens in the community, if
you have the time and the
will, take the bus driving
class and join us. You
would be surprised just
how much heart bus drivers
really have. To all the par-
ents that support us and the
job we do, God Bless You!

Cheryl Clark
Joan Fewox
Pat Bryant
Mildred Griswold
Doriec B ;l... % ,.,,,,
Sharna Blanco
Dan Olson
Robert S.. m,n.1*..:. I
Paula Frazier
Robin Whitt
David Blevins
Janice Thompson
Phyllis Postell
Waydine Hollaway
Wilbur Woods
Ted Fralick
Ami Fields
Sarah Chavis
Earnestine Riley
Sandra Neely
Monica Pitts
Inez Williams
Clayton Sneed


To the Editor:

Wake up Suwannee
County. We have a problem
of pandemic proportion.
It's a problem that not only
has touched every family in
Suwannee County, but is
on every doorstep across


America. Prescription drug
abuse, is not gender or race
specific. It has no preju-
dices. It is not even class
specific. What do we really
know about prescription
drug abuse? Nothing really.
We go about our daily
lives, reading a newspaper
that is filled weekly with
deaths, arrests, petty thefts
that are related somehow to
this problem. Yet we do
nothing about it. We all
quietly say to ourselves,
wow, there's another one.
Does that prompt us to take
a look around and really
open our eyes, and see
what is going on right un-
der our noses? I can answer
that.... no it does not.
EVERYONE knows some-
one that suffers from a
problem with this abuse.
It's time to get our heads
out of the dirt, take our
blinders off, stop making
excuses, cause we think
our loved one is not doing
anything illegal.
Addiction is a disease,
and needs to be treated as
such. What resources do
we have to counter this
problem? I can answer that
question also. None, that is
affordable. Our insurance
companies will cover ex-
penses to get you hooked,
but, will not cover the ex-
penses to get you off of it.
Our problem goes much
deeper than just what we
see on the surface. At a
time when our youth
should be spending time
working towards a brighter
future filled with educa-
tion, or working toward
gaining life and work expe-
rience, many times is spent
chasing that next pill. Of-
ten times this leads to lies,
and deception because of
the addiction. Families are
being altered and relation-
ships are being strained.
This is our future, folks.
These are our future lead-
ers. Our youth are being
robbed of their dreams.
Pain clinics are advertised
everywhere. It is a multi-
billion dollar industry. For
every one that is shut
down, six more open to
take their place. It will take
much needed legislation to
solve this problem. There is
strength in numbers. If you
know someone or suspect a
loved one with this prob-
lem, join us... gain some
knowledge, education.
Let's fight to take back our
youth, and help them to
free themselves from this
widespread epidemic. Our
first meeting will be the
first week of November in
the training room at the
Live Oak Police Depart-
ment. Exact date and time
to follow.

Trish Evans
Live Oak


by Jeffrey F. Scott, R.Ph DrHe-up
Treatment for Croup Infectionv: (386) 362-4404
Hours: 8:30 am-6:30 PM Mon-Fri.,





Croup is a condition that is most commonly caused by a virus, but also
may be caused by bacteria that affect the lungs. Respiratory synctial virus
(RSV) is one type of common virus that may cause croup. Parainfluenza
virus can also cause croup. However, a viral infection does not necessarily
mean croup will develop. The condition occurs most commonly in young
children between 6 months and 3 years of age, and typically affects boys
more frequently than girls. The infection causes airway inflammation
which leads to narrowing of the airway. Consequently, children with croup
may develop hoarseness and coughing, which is usually worst during the
nighttime. A fever is also a common symptom of this condition.
The fall and winter are the most common times of the year for croup to
occur. Viruses that can lead to croup are easily transmitted through
coughing and sneezing. The condition usually lasts less than a week. Use
of a humidifier or warm fluids can be used at hoe used at home to alleviate a mild
cough associated with croup. If the child has a fever, over the counter
medications such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
can be used. Dexamethasone is a glucocorticoid medication that may be
given by a doctor to decrease swelling and improve the ability to breathe.
623242-F


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


PAGE 12A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK










WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 13A


Semi downs power pole, disrupts traffic
: ,C E-- ',V.-: J .t- " ',
l b a{__ * " -', ",�." "


* Io


Lt. Gov. candidate p
Rod Smith, running mate of Democratic gu-
bernatorial candidate Alex Sink, chatted
with patrons of the Brown Lantern restau-
rant in Live Oak Friday afternoon. On recent
polls showing the race between Sink and Re-
publican Rick Scott tightening, Smith said, "
"This was always going to be a close race." \fl
However, Smith said he believes Sink "has been "
able to carve out a message that works" and wl Ii
prevail. As for his decision to accept the number
two spot on the ticket, Smith told of a
woman who had two sons. "One was lost
at sea, the other became Lieutenant .. . i ..
Governor," he laughed. - Photo: Staff /


r ,
I
/,
/
I


This tractor trailer snapped a power pole in the Penn Oil Company driveway on US 129
North Monday afternoon, killing power to nearby businesses and traffic lights to several in-
tersections on the north end of town for several hours. - Photo: Jeff Waters




Woman uses crowbar in attempt to get cash


Continued From Page 1A

dispatcher using a crowbar to try to open
the box around 8:54 p.m. A traffic stop
was later conducted and Dolly told a sher-
iff's corporal that she was trying to get
cash out of the box that her roommate
dropped in there around 4 p.m. in the
amount of $432. She stated that the room-
mate's friend needed the cash, so she "just
wanted to get the cash out of the deposit
box and bring back a money order in place
of the cash."


The roommate reportedly told deputies
that Dolly had no reason to get inside the
box and that Dolly "had a bad gambling
problem and she wanted the money to sup-
port her habit."
The report states that little damage was
done to the box and that a crowbar and a
pair of needle-nose pliers were found with
Dolly at time of arrest.
Dolly was arrested and transported to
the Suwannee County Jail and charged
with attempted burglary, possession of
burglary tools and criminal mischief.


New Web offerings from SRWMD,

Shands Live Oak, LO Partnership


Continued From Page 1A

"This is a more advanced
tool than what was previ-
ously available on the web
and it makes flood hazard
information more easily
accessible," said James
Link, the District's Federal
Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) coordina-
tor. "Visitors of the site can
view their property in rela-
tion to new flood zone des-
ignations and print custom
maps of their property or
any parcel of interest."
The tool also helps users
interpret the flood zones
affecting a property and


2 hurt


in truck


rollover
Continued From Page 1A

overcorrected, causing the
truck to flip several times,
coming to a rest on its top
in the grassy shoulder.
Waters received a head
laceration and several con-
tusions to the body. A pas-
senger in the truck, Lester
Ambrose, 54, suffered a
broken collarbone and had
to be pulled from the
wreckage by Waters. Both
were treated at Shands
Live Oak and released the
same night.
Both were reportedly
wearing seatbelts.
LO couple unhurt in
Columbia County mishap
A Live Oak couple es-
caped serious injury in a
Columbia County crash
Friday.
Paul Shaffer, 36, west-
bound on US 90 at Brown
Road, was stopped at a
traffic light when a 2005
Ford pickup driven by
Robert Mershon, 28, of
Lake City, struck the rear
of his 2004 Dodge pickup,
according to the Florida
Highway Patrol.
Shaffer and his passen-
ger, Amanda Shaffer, 36,
were treated for minor in-
juries at Lake City Medical
Center, reports show.
Mershon, who was un-
hurt, was charged with
careless driving, according
to FHP.
All three individuals
were wearing seat belts,
said FHP.


provides information con-
cerning which property
owners are required to pur-
chase flood insurance.
The District continues to
work with FEMA and
counties within its bound-
aries to evaluate flood
risks, update digital flood
maps, and establish flood
elevations through the Dig-
ital Flood Insurance Rate
Maps (DFIRMs) and Risk
MAP programs.

Shands Live Oak
launches new website

Shands community hos-
pitals -- Shands Lake
Shore, Shands Starke and
Shands Live Oak -- offi-
cially launched new dedi-
cated websites.
"We are thrilled to an-
nounce that each hospital
now has its own individual
website," said Rhonda
Sherrod, Market CEO.
"The benefits are numer-
ous; online payment op-
tions, a listing of hospital
services, and descriptions
of the various health and
wellness programs our lo-
cal hospitals offer specifi-
cally to their communi-
ties."
Shands community hos-
pitals recently entered into


a partnership with Health
Management, who led the
effort to create the web-
sites. The websites feature
details about each of the
hospitals' backgrounds,
services, job openings,
maps, volunteer opportuni-
ties and a whole host of de-
tailed information.
The URL for Shands
Live Oak is www.Shand-
sLiveOak.com

Live Oak Partnership
announces new website

The Live Oak Partner-
ship has announced a new
website for the Live Oak
community. This website
will feature local event de-
tails, downtown revitaliza-
tion progress and concerns.
Through this website, the
organization also hopes to
encourage visitors and resi-
dents to experience Live
Oak, by providing an av-
enue of event publicity and
information. Keeping with
the theme and realization
of the importance that his-
tory holds in the Live Oak
community, the website ad-
dress in www.histori-
cliveoak.com, and features
seasonal links based on
Partnership sponsored
events.


Murder trial will be


battle of the experts


Continued From Page 1A

were no signs of biting or bruising, ac-
cording to Jacobsen.
From then until 9:03 p.m., when the
911 call was made, Kramer was the only
adult in the home with Olivia.
"That was his job everyday, to take care
of Olivia," said Jacobsen. "At 9:12 EMS
arrived and found Olivia dead."
Jacobsen said that Olivia was prone to
terrible temper tantrums.
He said Kramer was responsible for
"keeping her happy, feeding her until
March 14 when he killed her and he did-
n't have to do that anymore, put up with
that anymore."
An autopsy revealed that Olivia had 25
"blunt force injuries" to the head, al-
though none was said to be fatal.
Jacobsen also said that Kramer "cannot
be excluded as the biter."
The defense countered that an expert
witness will produce DNA evidence
proving the bite mark was from a female,
not a male, ruling out Kramer.
Furthermore, according to defense at-
torney David Collins, Olivia had serious
medical problems and the cause of death
couldn't be precisely determined.
Olivia "was taken 41 times to a clinic


or emergency room in her short 18
months," said Collins.
He said she was also hospitalized four
times because she had stopped breathing
while asleep. Jacobsen acknowledged in
his opening that Olivia was eventually di-
agnosed with sleep apnea.
"There was something wrong with
Olivia," said Collins.
Collins explained that about a month
before her death, Olivia suffered from di-
arrhea, blockages in the ears and, as re-
ported by her mother, a tendency to
bruise easily.
"Was this some kind of conspiracy to
use later?" Collins asked the jury. Cer-
tainly not, he said.
About two weeks before Olivia's death,
Collins said she had a 102.5 temperature.
"That's the condition of the child be-
fore she passed away," he said.
Witness testimony from several experts
were heard Monday. The medical exam-
iner who performed Olivia's autopsy,
along with other experts were heard Tues-
day.
Rebecca Lee Rescigno pleaded guilty
in February 2009 to lesser charges and re-
ceived probation.
The murder trial is expected to last all
week.


90-month sentence for W'born arsonist


Continued From Page 1A

cluding items of sentimen-
tal value accumulated over
the decades, were either
stolen or burned.
"I'm a retired Army vet-
eran and a senior citizen,"
Whisnant said during an
earlier court proceeding.
"He burned up all my
medicine, my clothes,
many of my tools, all the


pictures of my wife who
passed away 40 years ago.
Just about all I had. I'm
69, and they burned me
out."
Cooper-Olin was sen-
tenced Thursday in a
Suwannee County court-
room by Judge Julian
Collins. He was given
time for two other burglar-
ies as well. Those sen-
tences will run concurrent-


ly with the 90-month term.
Cooper-Olin must also
pay $38,500 in restitution
and serve 15 years' proba-
tion on his release.
Collins had earlier re-
jected a plea deal for
Cooper-Olin under which
he would have received 6
years in prison.
Another defendant has
already been sentenced
and a third awaits trial.


Man chased with ax, run down by truck


Continued From Page 1A

13477 233rd Road, Live
Oak, and "stated that he
was on his way over there
to kill everyone in the
house," on Oct. 6 around
6:22 p.m.
Once at the home,
Wheeler allegedly chased
the man in the yard and


around the house with an
ax.
"The defendant then got
back in his truck and
chased the victim with his
truck, running over the vic-
tim's legs," wrote Tomp-
kins.
Wheeler then fled the
scene.
Wheeler was arrested


Oct. 7 and booked into the
Suwannee County Jail. He
was charged with aggravat-
ed battery with a motor ve-
hicle, aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon, Co-
lumbia County warrant for
violation of probation for
driving while license sus-
pended and a Bay County
warrant for child support.


04 6i^tAdAt f.


- ,




Fryer
Leg
Quarters


Full Service Meat Counter
* Smoked Bacon


- IV Lb.
10 lb. Bag, Limit 4


Hog Head Cheese
Oxtails

2 Pack Pork Boston
Butts

1 $ 39
- Lb.


* Sausage * Hams
* "Tro er" Amish Products
* DeTi Meats & Ckeeses
* Jams & Jellies
* Butter and Much More


Sirloin $039
=,. _ $


Ground Sizzlers Lb

Chuck Cut, Wrapped and Frozen to
_____--_ uJour specifications


$


(We also carry Jim's Produce)

6)6 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, Florida a)zo6+

Phone Number: (86) 550-O+0+0


Drawing will be held on
November 1,201626826
J 626826-F


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 13A


,) "


.4


I I.L









PAGE 14A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


Candidates Night in Wellborn


The Wellborn Neighborhood
Watch will sponsor a Candidates
Night on Oct. 19. Lake City radio
station Power Country 102.1 will
broadcast the event.
This time the meeting will be at
the Wellborn Community Associa-
tion Building starting exactly at 6
p.m. so please come early and get a
seat. Some of the candidates have
later commitments so we must start
on time. All local candidates were
invited. The following have com-


mitted to attend:
State House of Representatives,
Dist. 11
Debbie Boyd, Elizabeth Porter
Suwannee County Judge
Gary E. Brown,
William F. (Lin) Williams
County Commission, Dist. 4
Billy C. Maxwell,
Philip D. Oxendine


In addition, the five constitution-
al amendments on the ballot that
will be explained by guest speaker
Adam Prins, a member of the Live
Oak City Council.
The Wellborn Community Asso-
ciation is located on 8th Avenue in
Wellborn.
Refreshments will be served.
For more information call Jane
Campbell at 963-3196.


MAJOR APPLIANCES


Receive 10% off in-stock and Special Order major appliances priced $397 or more (before taxes). Not valid on
previous sales, installation and delivery fees, extended protection plans, water heaters, Electrolux or select
Fisher&Paykel� items. Discount taken at time of purchase. See store for details.


Let's Build Something Together"


[,ii::. juri 1. r , l lIm -
)r,:,iur 3rd ,l .:.r 3r
e c ;Tore? l,.r . jt il


HURRY IN - 6 DAYS ONLY! Prices valid 10/13/10 - 10/18/10 unless otherwise noted. See store for details.


Er-

JOHN DEERE
WALK-BEHIND MOWERS,
RIDING MOWERS AND
PRESSURE WASHERS

O JOHN DEERE
Discount taken at time of purchase. While supplies last.
Excludes returned and refurbished merchandise.
See store for details.
s,______________________


ALL SPECIAL ORDER
WINDOWS,
ENTRY DOORS AND
PATIO DOORS
INCLUDING PELLA


Applies to Special Order product only. Discount taken at
time of purchase. See store for details.
<^_, ,,,^^ ^^ _^ ^ ^^^^ ^


~j~L


now 4f
$118
was $129
Perfecta" Toilet Kit* OW
#130294 S49
P.u- ,o.. ' ,...,'t c
*** ..'. was $58 par3iel,.
24" White Shaker
*Toilet kit includes tank, bowl, seat, wax ring and Vanity Combo
mounting bolts. Supply lines not included; various *24"W x 18"D x 31 "H #6864
sizes available.


POLYSEAMSEAL
CAULK
applies to items #43460
and #221680
(a$4 value
when you

m, S-ee 1ore
,.o r ,'el.IsI


now
$2^98 was
$3881 .z
GREAT STUFF Gaps and
Cracks Insulating Foam
#13617


now
$69
was $997
9.6-Volt NiCd Compact
Cordless Drill/Driver
*3/8" keyless chuck -Comes with
2 batteries and case #238743


-i3 ^ ir *i*/. - mj
now
$8 was
$998 l5
Garden Mum
#50097


now
$6 was
$6 $1644 Only
6-Pack 65-Watt $ b
Flood Light Bulbs When bought
*Lasts 2,000 hours in a 6-pack.
per bulb #69008


Details on our policies and services: Prices may vary after 10/18/10 if there are market variations. "Was" prices in this advertisement were in effect on 10/8/10 and may vary based on Lowe's Everyday
Low Price policy. See store for details regarding product warranties. We reserve the right to limit quantities. While Lowe's strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. We reserve the right to
correct any error. Prices and promotions apply to US locations only, and are available while supplies last. XAsk for 10% Off your single-receipt in-store purchase charged to your Lowe's Consumer
Credit Card between 10/13/10 through 10/18/10. Offer must be requested at time of purchase, and cannot be used in conjunction with any other coupon, Lowe's military discounts or Lowe's employee
discounts. If you elect to receive 10% off your purchase, your purchase will not be eligible for special financing. This offer is good for a single receipt purchase of any in-stock or Special Order merchandise
only. Offer is not redeemable for cash. Not valid on sales via Lowes.com, previous sales, purchase of services or gift cards. Offer is subject to credit approval. Excludes Lowe's� Business Credit Accounts,
Lowe's� Project CardsM Accounts, all Lowe's� VISA* Accounts, and all Lowe's Canada Credit Accounts. *Ask for No Interest if Paid in Full within 12 Months. Offer applies to single-receipt purchases
of $299 or more on your Lowe's� Consumer Credit Card. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the promotional balance is not paid in full within 12 months.
Minimum monthly payments are required. Offer must be requested at time of purchase. Offer valic 10 13 10 ir rr.:.ugh 10/18/10. Applies to a single-receipt purchase of $299 or more made on a Lowe's
Consumer Credit Card account 10/13/10 through 10/18/10. Cannot be combined with other credit *eiaied prrotional offers. No interest will be assessed on this promotional purchase if you pay the
following ("promotional balance") in full within 12 months: (1) the promotional purchase amount, and (2) any related optional credit insurance/debt cancellation charges. If you do not, interest will be
assessed on the promotional purchase from the date of the purchase. Minimum monthly payments are required. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases and, after promotion ends,
to promotional purchases. Standard purchase APR is 22.99%. Penalty APR is 26.99%. Minimum interest charge is $1.00. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable
terms. Offer is subject to credit approval. Excludes Lowe's� Business Credit Accounts, Lowe's Project CardsM Accounts, Lowe's Visa� Accounts, and all Lowe's Canada Credit Accounts. +$39 offer
requires purchase of STAINMASTER� carpet and pad from Lowe's and only includes labor for installation. Offer is limited to single-family residential homes. Additional charges may apply, as offer does
not include any customization, installation on steps, or any other optional labor such as removal, haul-away, or moving of furniture. Multi-family and commercial properties will be priced by quote only.
Offer not valid on glue-down carpet, prior purchases, and may not be available in your area. See store for additional information and listing of all available carpet. $39 entire house carpet installation is a
limited time offer that applies only to STAINMASTER� carpet. � 2010 Lowe's Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Lowe's and the gable design are registered trademarks of LF, LLC. (6829)
001/6829/016,017,021,033
208 72nd Trace (South of the Intersection of 1-10 & Highway 129) Live Oak, FL 386-330-5760
Store Hours: Monday-Saturday 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. 626780-F


ASK FOR



10%OFFx
YOUR PURCHASE a

OR--N


12 MONTHS
SPECIAL FINANCING
ON PURCHASES OF $299 OR MORE
Offer valid 10/13/10 - 10/18/10. See store associate to request offer.
Offers cannot be combined. See below for details.


Check out the
Si.. " e :
D )-:- -.crat' s
page on
Facebook


Candlelight Vigil and
Memorial Walk
In Memory of Those Lost to Alcohol and Drug Abuse and
Those Suffering from the Disease of Addiction
Thursday, October 28, 2010
Suwannee Courthouse - 6:45 pm
Suwannee Courthouse
6:45 pm - Candle Lighting at Courthouse
7:00 pm - Memorial Walk to Millennium Park Beginning
at Suwannee Courthouse
7:15 pm - Reception at Millennium Park Unveiling of
Memorial Wall
To add your story and loved one's photo to the memorial
wall or to receive information about the Candlelight Vigil,
call 362-2272 or email suwanneecoalition@mac.com.


March


of Dimes


Signature


Chefs Auction
The March of Dimes and
Mercantile Bank are pre-
senting "Signature Chefs
Auction" Nov. 11 at 5:30
p.m. at the newly re-deco-
rated Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
There will be a Festival of
Trees and Wreaths, live
and silent auctions, and
live entertainment by "Har-
ry, Sally, and Billy." The
highlight will be a selec-
tion of specialty foods pre-
sented by area restaurants
and caterers, along with
complimentary wine tast-
ing. For more information
call Maureen Lloyd at 386-
752-4885.Tickets will be
sold at all Mercantile Bank
offices, Rountree Moore
Toyota, Ward's Jewelers,
First Street Music, Suwan-
nee Democrat, and Jasper
News.
Put this event on your
calendar and support
March of Dimes as we
work together to give every
baby a healthy start!



Lady of

the Lake

Quilting

Guild to meet
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild will hold its
monthly meeting on
Wednesday, Oct. 27, at
9:30 a.m. at the Teen Town
533 NW Desoto Street,
Lake City (2 blocks north
of Duval (US 90) on Lake
Jeffery Road.
The program will feature
the famous Chinese Auc-
tion, where members ex-
change a one-yard piece of
fabric, while playing a
game.
The Guild is an organi-
zation for anyone interest-
ed in quilts and the art of
quilting. The Guild makes
and distributes over 200
quilts a year to various
charities and non-profit or-
ganizations in the Suwan-
nee Valley Region.
The Guild is co-hosting
the 22nd Stephen Foster
Quilt Show and Sales at
Stephen Foster Folk Cul-
ture Center State Park in
White Springs on October
15-17, 2010. This is a
judged quilt show with
vendors, boutiques and
much more.
For more details, contact
President Ramona Dewees,
386-496-3876.


ALL SCOTTS
PRODUCTS




^^MD


Discount taken at time of purchase. While supplies last.
See store for details.


U


PAGE 14A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010










October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month


Fi
1k :^A


gon


In a family plagued with

cancer, Mary Lou Roberson

is the first survivor


/


/


BY JEFF WATERS


he's the first survivor in a family that's been plagued
with cancer. A three-time survivor herself, Mary Lou
Roberson said she's never asked for pity from anyone,
and never will.
"I've never told my story before because so many
people had these type of things and I don't want other
families to think I'm boasting," she said at her dining
room table in her home Monday. "I had nothing to do with surviving."
She said her sister-in-law knew the secret to her survival.
"Only the good die young, she always told me," said Roberson laughingly.
"I'll never forget that."
The 72-year-old lost six members of her immediate family to cancer at an
early age. In December 1975, Roberson went to a Jacksonville doctor. Tests
were performed and she had to wait.
"He said to go home and enjoy Christmas with the family and come back
the sixth day of January," she said. "We enjoyed Christmas, but of course I
worried about it."
She didn't tell her children or anyone else, just her husband. Later, with her
husband by her side, the doctor told them the lump in her left breast, which
had just been removed, was already in stage four, the highest stage of breast
cancer.
Her treatments consisted of cobalt injections, which affected her entire
body, not just the cancer-ravaged areas.
After her mastectomy, Roberson thought she could move on with life.
About a year later, however, Roberson was diagnosed with colon cancer.
Doctors told her they couldn't do much. She heard about treatments for can-
cer in Greece from a friend who was cured by the same treatments.
"The family got up money and I went to Greece for 22 days," she said.
"The doctor said (the cancer) is all over me 'I can only give you the treat-
ments and see what it does' he said. Around the 15th or 16th day, he said the
counts looked good, the 19th day blood work showed no signs of cancer and
by the 24th I was home and that's it."
Through it all, Roberson was still her strong, witty self.
"At lunch I'd come over here to her house and call them in Greece," said
daughter Lori Harper. "To get to them you always had to call a taxi cab to get


WALMART
SUPERCENTER
For all your shopping needs.
PHARMACY VISION CENTER
LAWN & GARDEN TIRE & LUBE EXPRESS
DELI MEAT DEPT.
1-HOUR PHOTO FRESH BAKERY
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Highway 129 North, Live Oak, FL
386-330-2488 622811 F



Badcock

HOME FURNITURE

&fmore

S Gary Olive, Dealer
. Lollie Olive, Manager
Jessica Olive, Sales Associate
. 1429 N. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak
386-362-1971
www.badcock.com
622810-F


through. Here we are, three daughters, all married, and she's trying to set us
up with a taxicab driver."
A few years later Roberson was showering when she discovered a lump in
her right breast. For a second time, she survived stage four breast cancer. To
this day, she said her fingernails and toenails fall off as a result of all the
treatments.
"I'm a survivor," she said. "And my family members all died very young."
But several others are sick even now.
Lori Harper has Hodgkin's lymphoma, diagnosed in 2007. And one of
Roberson's granddaughters was diagnosed with cancer in 2006. Her husband
is also a cancer survivor as well.
The toughest one to deal with may be the diagnosis of Roberson's 21-
month-old great-granddaughter, Bridget Mathis. She was diagnosed on Sept.
29 with acute lymphocytic B-cell leukemia.
"Whenever this happened to my great-granddaughter it just made me won-
der why such a little child who never did anything wrong to anyone had to go
through this," she said. "It rips my heart out seeing her in the hospital going
through this."
Roberson said she broke down a few times dealing with her own cancer
over the years. However, she found inspiration and hope in an older woman
and a young boy.
Doris Allen would send her cards at least once a week. Allen wasn't a close
friend, just an acquaintance, "but she always wrote something sweet that
would lift me up. I never did tell her that she was an inspiration to me."
A six or seven-year-old boy was receiving chemotherapy the same time
Roberson was.
"Every time I was there, he was there. He would just smile and light up the
whole room," she said. "That little old fellow would just lay there and grin
and he would always sing 'Jesus Loves Me.' All he wanted was for someone
to go near him and just touch him. Of course you weren't supposed to touch
the other patients, but I would always go up to him and just touch his little
hand. The last time I saw him he told me 'Jesus loves you,' and 'you're my
angel.'"
At her next treatment, he wasn't there.
"I always wondered about him," she said. "I figured he must have passed
away. It was sad, his little song was 'Jesus Loves Me' and he would just light
up."


PHONE e A
(386) 935-1442

ESTABLISHED 1904


Badcock
HOME&FURNITURE


P.O. BOX 518
OWNER 903 SUWANNEE AVE.
TIM VERDI BRANFORD, FL 32008
622809-F


Suwannee


j graphics
PRINTING * COPY SERVICE
Complete Printing Services from
Business Forms, Blueprints,
Tickets, Letterheads, Envelopes,
Program Books,
COLOR COPIES, etc...
621 North Ohio Avenue * Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 362-1848 * Fax (386) 364-4661* (800) 457-6082
622808-F


Family is why
WE DO IT ALL.
We all feel the same commitment to care for our families.
As your good neighbor agent, I can help you meet your
insurance needs. Call me today.

SRob Cathcart, Agent
, ' 115 Grand Street NE
Live Oak, FL 32064
Bus: 386-364-7900
rob.cathcart.j656@statefarm.com
LIKE A GOOD NEIGIIHBOR j-l STATE FARM IS THERE.
Proiding Insurance and Financial Services C


("


i


FLORIDA BREAST AND
CERVICAL CANCER EARLY
DETECTION PROGRAM
at the


FALL BAZAAR
Saturday, October 16th,
8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
12986 Hwy 90 West
(1/4 Mile Past Wayne Frier Mobile Homes)
Free Health Screening!
[ Huge Rummage Sale
* Quality Vendors of Hand-Crafted Items
Kids' Activities
* Food by J Don Allen's Beach Buns
and Dawgs
For more . ..386-590-1543


Jeff Tippens Insurance Agency
S1' Jeff Tippens, Agent r ,
4' 313 N. Ohio Avenue !
Live Oak, Fl 32064
Ph: 386-364-2886
Fax: 386-364-3592
AUTO * HOME * LIFE
CALL US TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE.
S ::FTIPPE'

INSURANCE
AGENCY
COMPETITIVE RATES AND EXCELLENT SERVICE


127 Howard Street E.,
Live Oak, FL
Phone: 386-362-4539
Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478
Se Habla Espanol


( ww .poolerea. m ]
Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.;
Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.; m
Sunday by appointment MIS


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 15A


/









P iSes good 11529 S 1
^^*WS� Ohio Ave.




"BEEF IT UP SALE!"
Heavy Western Boneless Beef Heavy Western Semi-Boneless Heavy Western Boneless
NY ETRIP H "Old Fashioned"
NYSTRIP MWM CHUCK - TFW(
STEAK ROAST STEW


Heavy Western "Lean & Meaty" Beef
SHORT .,
RIBS S.


Lb.


Heavy Western Semi-Boneless
CHUCK
STEAKS

$ 89
Lb.


IOCm m 15 1 ll P01
IWhileietl
HEAV WESERN ONELSS BEF W OLENY SRIP ........... 3.991 b
USAI NSPC TED FRESlaH GON EF Fml ak)... MMM1 6 b

USAINSPC TED FRESlHPOK I NGRSYERBS........H22 b
^E^^DAIRY ^^^^SJill_ FROZEN^


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WHIPPED
TOPPING




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12 DBL
ROLLS


FREiSH;aROMOURPRODUiCEDEARTMENaTM


BANANAS

fv '3


9g


YELLOW ONIONS


BIGGINS RUSSET
POTATOES. 10Lb


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8 A.M.


- 8 P.M.


Quantity Right Reserved.
We accept USDA Food Stamps, Personal Checks, Debit/Credit Cards and WIC
WECUTFRESH EATD AILY II
Noadditiv sorsolutnsls
DmONETI EOLD-FASHIONEDWAY 62324F _


ASST. COBURN
FARMS
YOGURT
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COBURN
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CHEESE
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1- AXIS ULTRA
BLEACH
REG. OR
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I GROCERY


PAGE 16A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010









uumannurr rnemorrat Playoff push
Section B for spikers
Wednesday, October 13, 2010


S-Ollow us on -aceDooK
Page 4B www.garvbrownforjudge.com-
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Gary Brown,
Candidate, for Suwannee County Judge


Scoreboard
for Oct. 8
Raines 49
Suwannee 14


Lafayette 33
Mandarin Chrst. 27


Ridgeview
Columbia


Bell
St. Joseph

Trinity
Hawthorne


Vanguard
Eastside


Trinity Catholic
Keystone


First Coast
Buchholz


Taylor
East Gadsden


Hamilton 18 Fort White 30 Bradford 25 Ribault 46 Madison 35
Dixie 9 Fla. High 27 Union 24 Santa Fe 22 Godby 17






Branford runs over Dragons


Branford's defense shut down Florida Deaf's double-wing offense, holding them to 53 yards rushing on 25 carries. - Photo: Corey Davis


By Corey Davis
corey.davis@ gaflnews.com
BRANFORD-After establishing a
quick 14-0 lead in the game against over
manned Florida Deaf team, Branford
coach Bill Wiles did everything he could
to try to keep the score down in a 60-12
win over the visiting Dragons Thursday
night.
Wiles substituted backups and wide
receivers in the backfield as the Bucs
rolled up 471 yards rushing, including


over 300 in the first half.
Kyle Certain, 150 yards on 11 carries,
picked up 25 yards on the Bucs opening
play of the game and followed it with a
45-yard touchdown run on the next play
to give the Bucs a 7-0 lead.
On the ensuing Dragons offensive
play, senior linebacker Danny Johnston
scooped up a loose fumble and returned
it 32 yards for another score increasing
the lead to 14-0 with 6:48 left in the first
quarter.
Holding the Dragons to another three


and out series, Branford scored again on
its next possession.
Kyle Stebbins, 151 yards on 10 carries
including 123 in the first half, picked up
33 yards on three of the first five plays
of the drive. Kendrick Prevatt, 35 yards
on 4 carries, rumbled 16 yards before
freshman Cole Lamb sprinted 10 yards
to the 3-yard line.
Certain appeared to score on a 3-yard
run but it was called back for holding.
Prevatt hit Josh Kirby for a 13-yard
touchdown pass on the next play increas-


ing the lead to 21-0 with less than two
minutes left in the first quarter.
Florida Deaf put together its best of
the night answering the Bucs score with
a score of their own as quarterback
Corey Koski found Zachary Reese for a
15-yard score cutting the lead to 21-6
with 8:57 left in the second quarter.
Branford answered back three plays
later as Stebbins rumbled 21 yards and
Lamb weaved 29 yards. Stebbins found
SEE BRANFORD, PAGE 5B


Vikings


roll


'Dogs


By Corey Davis
corey.davis@ gaflnews.com
JACKSONVILLE-Two plays was all it took for host
Raines to take control of a crucial District 2-2A game
against visiting Suwannee at Earl S. Kitchings Stadium
Friday.
Raines junior linebacker Kenny Bynum picked off a
Jackson Brown pass on the first play from scrimmage and
returned it 30 yards to give the Vikings an early 7-0 lead.
On the Vikings' first play from scrimmage, Raines se-
nior quarterback Sam Smiley hooked up with wide re-
SEE VIKINGS, PAGE 5B

RIGHT: A Raines and Suwannee player battle it out in the
trenches during the first half of their critical District 2-2A game
Friday night at the Graveyard in Jacksonville.
- Photo: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com)


S



-


I


~1~














SPORTS


District Standings


District 2-2A
Raines
Ribault
Baker County
Suwannee
Baldwin
Santa Fe

District 5-1A
Villages
Wildwood
Hamilton
Trenton


Dst.
(2-0)
(2-0)
(1-1)
(1-1)
(0-2)
(0-2)

Dst.
(3-0)
(2-0)
(2-0)
(1-1)


Ovr.
(5-0)
(3-2)
(5-1)
(2-4)
(2-4)
(0-6)

Ovr.
(5-0)
(5-1)
(2-3)
(4-1)


Dixie
Hilliard
Chiefland


District 2-1B
Hawthorne
Lafayette
Mandarin
St. Johns
St. Francis
Oak Hall
Aucilla


(1-2)
(0-3)
(0-3)

Dst.
(4-0)
(4-0)
(2-2)
(2-1)
(0-2)
(0-3)
(0-4)


Big Ten Conference
West
Bishop Snyder
Bell
Branford
St. Joseph
Bronson


(3-3)
(0-5)
(0-6)

Ovr.
(5-1)
(5-1)
(2-3)
(2-3)
(1-4)
(2-3)
(1-4)


East
Mandarin
St. Johns
Oak Hall
St. Francis


Statewide Scoreboard


Saturday
Alabama Deaf 40, Niceville Rocky Bayou 16
Lauderdale Lakes Boyd Anderson 19, Dillard 13
Miami Braddock 48, Ferguson 47
Miami Country Day 19, Archbishop Curley 18
North Miami 34, Goleman 3

Friday
Alonso (Tampa) 28, Chamberlain 21
Andrew Jackson (Jacksonville) 10, Terry Parker 0
Apopka 33, West Orange 6
Armwood (Seffner) 41, King 0
Astronaut (Titusville) 30, Rockledge 0
Atlantic Coast (Jacksonville) 57, Father Lopez Catholic 0
Atlantic Community (Delray) 20, Park Vista Community 14
Auburndale 35, Lake Nona 31
Aucilla Christian 41, Pope John Paul II 0
Avon Park 19, Mulberry 6
Baker County 46, Baldwin 25
Baker School 32, Bozeman School 0
Barrington Christian Academy (Homestead) 35, Sheridan Hills Christian 0
Barron Collier (Naples) 28, Cypress Lake 19
Bartram Trail (St. Johns) 16, Nease 8
Bell 29, St. Joseph Academy 21, OT
Berean Christian (W. Palm Beach) 42, Zion Christian 36
Berkeley Prep (Tampa) 42, Lakeland Christian 0
Bishop Kenny (Jacksonville) 38, Englewood 6
Bishop Moore (Orlando) 26, South Sumter 10
Blake (Tampa) 21, Seminole Osceola 14
Blanche Ely (Pompano) 27, Monarch 8
Blountstown 41, West Gadsden 0
Bolles School (Jacksonville) 38, University Christian 19
Booker (Sarasota) 28, Bayshore 27, OT


Today's Weather

Wed Thu Fri
10/13 10/14 10/15


89/60
Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper
80s and lows in the low 60s.

Sunrise Sunset
7:33 AM 7:03 PM


87/53
Sunshine. Highs in the upper 80s
and lows in the low 50s.

Sunrise Sunset
7:33 AM 7:02 PM


81/50
Sunny. Highs in the low 80s and
lows in the low 50s.


Sunrise Sunset
7:34 AM 7:01 PM


Florida At A Glance


--:, Tallahassee
' 87/59 --- Jacksonville
Pensacola --- *ive Oak 87/66
83/63 89/6


Moon Phases

* d'�, v Orlando -
0 I "87/64
New First
c 7 OcI 14
Tampa .
86/66 . .
Full Last
Oct 23 Oct 30

UV Index

Wed 10/13 l High Miami
Thu 10/14 High 82/71
Fri 10/15 HighI H

Th - ..- .


Area Cities


Clearwater
Crestview
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Hollywood
Jacksonville
Key West
Lady Lake


65 pt sunny
56 pt sunny
61 pt sunny
72 t-storm
67 t-storm
60 pt sunny
71 t-storm
66 pt sunny
75 t-storm
62 pt sunny


National Cities
Atlanta 81 56 pt sunny
Boston 58 42 sunny
Chicago 67 43 rain
Dallas 81 54 mst sunny
Denver 65 43 sunny


Lake City 87 59 pt sunny
Madison 88 60 pt sunny
Melbourne 85 66 pt sunny
Miami 82 71 t-storm
N Smyrna Beach 85 64 pt sunny
Ocala 89 60 pt sunny
Orlando 87 64 pt sunny
Panama City 84 62 pt sunny
Pensacola 83 63 pt sunny
Plant City 89 64 pt sunny


Houston
Los Angeles
Miami
Minneapolis
New York


84 60
85 63
82 71
66 43
62 50


mst sunny
pt sunny
t-storm
pt sunny
sunny


Pompano Beach 82 71
Port Charlotte 86 65
Saint Augustine 83 63
Saint Petersburg 83 73
Sarasota 85 65
Tallahassee 87 59
Tampa 86 66
Titusville 85 64
Venice 86 66
W Palm Beach 83 70


Phoenix 94 70
San Francisco 85 63
Seattle 66 48
St. Louis 73 48
Washington, DC 65 52


t-storm
t-storm
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
t-storm


sunny
sunny
mst sunny
t-storm
sunny
570605-F


Bradenton Christian 37, St. John Neumann 0
Bradford Co. (Starke) 26, Union County 24
Brandon 48, Wharton 20
Calvary Christian (Ft. Lauderdale) 28, Pope John Paul II 27
Cape Coral 49, Palmetto Ridge 21
Carrollwood Day (Tampa) 47, All Saints 14
Central Florida Christian 43, Orlando Christian 26
Chaminade-Madonna (Hollywood) 52, Somerset Academy 34
Charlotte (Punta Gorda) 46, Palmetto 13
Choctawhatchee (Fort Walton Beach) 49, Arnold 48, OT
Choice Learning (Miami) 19, Marathon 0
Christopher Columbus (Miami) 37, Coral Gables 0
Clay (Green Cove Springs) 51, Ponte Vedra 14
Clearwater Central Catholic 21, Indian Rocks 13
Clewiston 60, Gateway Charter 0
Cocoa Beach 28, Eau Gallie 26
Cocoa 35, Satellite 6
Colonial (Orlando) 28, Orlando University 21
Cooper City 27, Fort Lauderdale 0
Coral Glades 21, Coral Springs Charter 14
Coral Shores 14, Mourning 0
Countryside (Clearwater) 21, Clearwater 6
Creekside (Jacksonville) 42, Stanton College Prep 12
Crescent City 35, Holy Trinity Episcopal 24
Crestview 26, Ft. Walton Beach 20, 20T
Cypress Bay (Weston) 35, Charles Flanagan 21
Dade Christian (Miami) 42, Florida Christian 14
DeLand 44, Pine Ridge 0
Delray American Heritage 50, Pahokee 20
Douglas 31, Taravella 22
Dr. Phillips (Orlando) 45, Boone 0
Dunbar (Fort Myers) 34, LaBelle 3
Dunnellon 36, Citrus 7
Durant (Plant City) 49, Riverview 0
Dwyer (Palm Beach Lakes) 62, Palm Beach Lakes 6
East Lake (Tarpon Springs) 38, Palm Harbor University 28
East Lee County (Fort Myers) 34, Lely 31
East Ridge (Clermont) 42, Jupiter Christian 15
East River (Orlando) 27, St. Cloud 14
Ed White (Jacksonville) 56, R.E. Lee 0
Edgewater (Orlando) 55, Liberty 6
Episcopal (Jacksonville) 42, Fernandina Beach 14
Estero 46, DeSoto County 12
Evangelical Christian (Fort Myers) 28, Out-of-Door Academy 24
Everglades (Miramar) 56, West Broward 13
FAMU (Tallahassee) 62, Graceville 22
First Coast (Jacksonville) 19, Buchholz 7
Fleming Island 31, Seabreeze 10
Fletcher (Neptune Beach) 41, Middleburg 25
Fort Pierce Central 14, Sebastian River 9
Fort Pierce Westwood 21, Merritt Island 3
Fort White 30, Florida 27, 20T
Foundation Academy (Kissimmee) 37, Seffner Christian 7
Freeport 15, South Walton 0
Gainesville 55, Lecanto 0
George Steinbrenner (Tampa) 31, St. Petersburg Catholic 14
Glades Central (Belle Glade) 40, Boca Raton Community 7
Glades Day 41, Summit Christian 7
Gulf Breeze 38, Rutherford 20
Gulf Coast (Naples) 28, Ida S. Baker 7
Hallandale 8, Pines Charter 6
Hamilton County 18, Dixie County 9
Harmony (St. Cloud) 44, Poinciana 0
Hernando (Brooksville) 56, Tavares 0
Hialeah 23, Miami Beach 8
Highlands Christian (Pompano) 55, Miami Douglas MacArthur North 20
Hillsborough (Tampa) 35, East Bay 14
Immokalee 36, Hardee 34
Interlachen 39, Taylor 14
Island Coast (Cape Coral) 54, Lake Placid 0
Jefferson County (Monticello) 43, Cottondale 0
Jefferson (Tampa) 50, Lakewood 14
Jensen Beach 35, Titusville 19
Jesuit (Tampa) 42, Lennard 7
John I. Leonard (Greenacres) 35, Santaluces 18
Jones (Orlando) 35, Frostproof 0
Kathleen (Lakeland) 28, Haines City 17
King's Academy (W. Palm Beach) 24, Benjamin 7
Kissimmee Osceola 35, George Jenkins 28
Lafayette (Mayo) 33, Mandarin Christian 27
Lake Brantley (Altamonte Springs) 42, Lyman 6
Lake Gibson (Lakeland) 37, Bartow 7
Lake Highland (Orlando) 30, Cardinal Mooney 13
Lake Wales 37, Sebring 3
Lake Weir (Ocala) 17, Springstead 14
Lake Worth 42, Royal Palm Beach 13
Lakeland 59, Bayside 34
Lakewood Ranch (Bradenton) 42, Port Charlotte 21
Land O'Lakes 50, Anclote 0
Landmark Christian 47, Merritt Island Christian 0
Largo 55, Leto 0
LaSalle (Miami) 56, Doral Academy Charter 7


�2010 American Profile Hometown Content Service


Conf.
(3-0)
(2-0)
(0-1)
(0-2)
(0-2)

Conf.
(1-0)
(1-0)
(0-2)
(0-0)


Ovr.
(4-2)
(3-3)
(2-3)
(2-2)
(1-5)

Ovr.
(2-3)
(2-3)
(2-3)
(1-4)


PAGE 2B


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


I Ctyli Lo Cond.]i I


Ill IRleY'�Rlf.


SEE STATEWIDE, PAGE 3B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK












SPORTS


Statewide Scoreboard


Continued From Page 2B

Leesburg 56, Eustis 27
Lehigh 27, Golden Gate 12
Leon (Tallahassee) 42, Chiles 14
Liberty County (Bristol) 48, Wewahitchka 0
Madison County 35, Godby 17
Mainland (Daytona Beach) 21, Spruce Creek 0
Manatee (Bradenton) 45, Sarasota 10
Mariner (Cape Coral) 24, Bishop Verot 20
Martin County (Stuart) 14, South Fork 7
MAST Academy (Miami) 45, Lighthouse Christian 14
Melbourne 45, Port St. Lucie 21
Melbourne Central Catholic 48, University High School (Orange City) 21
Miami Belen Jesuit (Miami) 47, Mater Academy 7
Miami Central 25, Miami Northwestern 22
Miami Jackson 44, Edison 0
Miami Washington 42, Key West 13
Middleton (Tampa) 31, Strawberry Crest 14
Miramar 49, South Plantation 13
Mitchell (New Port Richey) 51, Zephyrhills 22
Monsignor Pace (Miami) 27, Archbishop Carroll 14
Moore Haven 76, St. Stephen's Episcopal 39
Mount Dora 62, Newberry 26
Munroe Day 44, Bronson 21
Navarre 49, Milton 20
Niceville 35, Mosley 14
North Florida Christian (Tallahassee) 57, Eagle's View 12
North Marion (Citra) 59, Belleview 0
North Miami Beach 28, Carol City 20
Northview (Bratt) 35, Holmes County 14
Oak Ridge (Orlando) 28, Cypress Creek 0
Oakland Park Northeast 7, Deerfield Beach 0
Ocala Forest 24, Mandarin 14
Ocala Trinity Catholic 59, Keystone Heights 7
Ocala Vanguard 45, Eastside 0
Olympia (Orlando) 27, Wekiva 13
Orange Park 38, Sandalwood 28
Orlando Freedom 49, Gateway 6
Ormond Beach Calvary Christian 52, Florida Air Academy 6
Oviedo 14, Evans 0
Pace 42, Escambia 0
Palatka 34, Matanzas 16
Palm Bay (Melbourne) 47, Viera 7
Pasco (Dade City) 45, Gulf 13
Pensacola Catholic 35, Marianna 19
Pensacola Washington 13, Bay 7
Pine Crest (Fort Lauderdale) 28, North Broward 23
Pine Forest (Pensacola) 29, Tate 8
Plant City 37, Bloomingdale 0
Plant (Tampa) 24, Gaither 16
Plantation American Heritage 44, Pompano Beach 7
Port St. Joe 39, Franklin County 26
Princeton Christian (N.ii.iiij.i 8, Palmer Trinity 0
Raines (Jacksonville) 49, Suwannee 14
Ribault (Jacksonville) 46, Santa Fe 22
Ridge Community (Davenport) 44, Lake Region 7
Ridgeview (Orange Park) 16, Columbia 9
River Ridge (New Port Richey) 26, Hudson 13
Riverdale (Fort Myers) 39, Fort Myers 20
Robinson (Tampa) 28, Newsome 14
Sanford Seminole 20, Lake Mary 14
Santa Fe Catholic (Lakeland) 39, Cambridge Christian 28
Sarasota Riverview 35, Dunedin 0
Seminole 10, St. Petersburg Northeast 7
Seminole Ridge (Loxahatchee) 21, Palm Beach Central 10
Seven Rivers Christian 57, Leesburg The First Academy 0
Sickles (Tampa) 17, Boca Ciega 16
South Broward (Hollywood) 52, McArthur 7
South Dade (Homestead) 21, Miami Palmetto 7
South Fort Myers 34, North Fort Myers 0
South Lake (Groveland) 56, Ocoee 7
Southeast (Bradenton) 31, Braden River 0
Spoto (Tampa) 54, Dixie Hollins 0
St. Augustine 56, Menendez 0
St. Edward's (Boca Raton) 51, South Florida HEAT 6
St. Francis 28, Orangewood Christian 21
St. John Lutheran (Ocala) 60, Hernando Christian 0
St. Petersburg Canterbury 40, Shorecrest Prep 14
St. Petersburg 49, Gibbs 20
St. Thomas Aquinas (Fort Lauderdale) 45, Nova 0
Stanching (fort Lauderdale) 40, Forest Hill 6
Suncoast (Riviera Beach)21, Boynton Beach 20
Sunlake 29, Wesley Chapel 0
Tampa Bay Tech 21, Tampa Freedom 14
Tarpon Springs 2, Ridgewood 0




Now THAT'S Something

To Smile About!


Submit your photo for publication to:
Thank you for submitting this & wrngU g eamncrrat
week's SMILE photograph! P ou7a7,iv 3m045rat
o P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 571307-F


Taylor County 57, East Gadsden 17
Tenoroc (Lakeland) 19, Celebration 0
The Villages 21, Chiefland 7
Treasure Coast (Port St. Lucie) 21, St. Lucie West Centennial High School 13
Trinity Catholic (Ocala) 59, Keystone Heights 7
Trinity Christian (Jacksonville) 42, Hawthorne 6
Trinity Prep 27, John Carroll Catholic 21
University School (Davie) 42, Cardinal Newman 14
Venice 49, North Port 20
Vernon 55, Jay 13
Vero Beach 31, Palm Beach Gardens 21
Victory Christian (Lakeland) 43, Calvary Christian (Clearwater) 14
Walton 28, Chipley 14
Warner Christian (S. Daytona) 35, Deltona Trinity Christian 0
Wellington 20, West Boca Raton Community 14
West Port (Ocala) 29, Brooksville Central 6
Western (Davie) 21, Plantation 20
Westland Hialeah 27, Hialeah Gardens 20
Westminster Christian (Miami) def. Upperroom Christian, forfeit
Wildwood 16, Hilliard 7
Williston 43, Umatilla 3
Windermere 27, Cedar Creek Christian 12
Winter Park 35, Timber Creek 10
Winter Springs 28, Hagerty 21
Wiregrass Ranch 49, Fivay 7
Yulee 17, West Nassau County 6

Thursday
Branford 60, Florida Deaf 12
Coconut Creek 17, Coral Springs 10
Hollywood Hills 28, Piper 16
Jacksonville Providence 48, Bishop Snyder 7
Miami Senior 26, South Miami 3
Miami Coral Park 48, Reagan 7
Miami Dr. Krop 14, American 6
Miami Southridge 13, Homestead 0
North Miami Beach Hillel 14, Ransom Everglades 7
Port Orange Atlantic 28, Space Coast 25
Southwest Miami 14, Sunset 7
Southwest Ranches Archbishop McCarthy 23, Olympic Heights 7
Tallahassee Lincolns 24, Wakulla 10
Vanguard School 38, Posnack 12

Wednesday
Hialeah Miami Lakes 27, Miami Springs 20
Miami Coral Reef 48, Killian 7



Sports briefs wanted

Are you hosting any kind of sports everyone free each week in the Sports
tournament, having rec league signups, Briefs. Send me your information, the
having a car wash event for a sporting time, the place, when, how much it
team or looking for baseball and cost, etc.. Send me our information at
softball players to fill out your travel corey.davis@gaflnews.com or call me
teams. Get your information out to at 362-1734, ext. 132.




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payment for the applicable amount on my checking/savings account
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$2.75 each month
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out of county


Come by


nuwannuu hrmncrat

211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL 32064
or call 386-362-1734 * 1-800-525-4182
Promotion ends September 22, 2010 at 5 p.m.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 3B











SPORTS


Playoff push for spi


Visit Our Booth

During The Fair!
Goody Bags * Register For Prizes!


Columbia County Fair -
Thursday, Novem
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ir Admission
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PUBLIC AUCTION
8.38 AC of Land
When: Saturday, Oct. 16th, 2010 * 10 a.m.
Location: 95th Dr., Live Oak, FL
Directions: From US 90 take CR 49 S to 102 St. turn L to 95th Dr
turn L and the property is almost to the end on the fight.

Live Oak Small Item Auction
When: Saturday, Oct. 16th, 2010 * 10:30 a.m.
Location: 1105 Howard St. W, Live Oak
Consignments taken in all day on Fri., Oct. 15th and
Sat., Oct. 16th from 7:30 A.M.-9:30 A.M.
Directions: Hwy 90 West next to Mott Buick


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[ers


By Corey Davis
corey.davis @ gaflnews.com

Si~1v .ilIIcc. Branford,
L.il..', ell .iiid Hamilton
C(' .iiIII, .ll ,-et ready to fin-
i4i Ilicii ic:-iilar seasons in
I lic ic\l Iv - weeks. The
It llh iui . i', .1 synopsis of
lii ' ec.'li Ic.im is doing in
Ilien icep\c live districts.
IDi.Iricl 5-3A
Siiu .imncc (3-11 overall,
I - ,hdilici i has struggled
Iiill,-li -iiiI Ithe season, re-
cenill, eiidii'-, a five-game
Ii-iiin- 'lic.ik The Bulldogs
v ill icied Ncwberry (1-6)
ill Ilic Nn 4 vs. No. 5
5..talic ni\i v eek Oct. 25 in
Ihc I D)IinCi S-3A touma-
nwiil. liwi,.h I, be deter-

S;ini.i 1 e 16-0) has
k% i-appId iup ihe top seed,
1'11i \\ lice i6-2) the sec-
i,.1dI ,ecd .I .ld Williston (3-
I Ilic Ilird seed.
d district 4-1A
Fallahassee
MNaclay (14-4,
7-0) has dom-
inated the
district for
the last two
years after
years of see-
i g rival North
I ith rida Christian
,,'i. . From 2004-
2007, NFC (2-3) con-
trolled the district but is
struggling this year.
Lafayette (5-2) has
locked up the second seed
and appears on its way to-
wards back-to-back playoff
appearances as the runner-
up spot.
Hamilton County (2-5)
appears likely to finish as
the fourth seed and will
host fifth seeded Jefferson
County (0-6) in the open-
ing game of the District 4-
1A game in two weeks in
Jasper.
District 5-1A
Like Suwannee, Bran-
ford (4-11, 2-10) has also
been struggling with a
roller coaster type of sea-
son. The Bucs finish the
season with three district
games in a row and need to
at least take 2 of the 3 to
stay out of the No. 8 vs.
No. 9 opening game in the
District 5-1A tournament at
St. Francis in two weeks.
PK Yonge (15-0) is the
clear favorite to win the
district as the top seed,
ahead of second seed
Gainesville St. Francis (12-
2).
Chiefland (11-4) is the
third seed, Bronson (9-6) is
the fourth seed, while
Trenton (7-7) is the fifth
seed.
Bell (4-9), Branford (2-
10) and Dixie County (2-
11) are battling for the final
three spots for sixth-eighth

ninth seed.

Sports news wanted
Attention area
coaches, want your
athletic team to get
more coverage send
me your results each
week or after each
game. Covering
Suwanee, Branford,
Lafayette and
Hamilton County High
sports programs, we
can't be everywhere
and need your help


with coverage. Send us
a few short
paragraphs, stats and
pictures on last nights
game to
corey.davis @ gaflnews.
com or call your
results in to 362-1734,
ext. 132.


I . - - I^^ ^^ ^ _ _^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ _ _ _


PAGE 4B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010












WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


Suwannee Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-81-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DANA CARL DOUGLAS, SR.,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of Dana
Carl Douglas, Sr., deceased, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Suwannee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 200 South Ohio (MLK Jr. Ave.)
Live Oak, FL 32064, file number 10-81-
CP The estate is intestate. The names
and addresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
Any interested person on whom a copy of
the notice of administration is served who
challenges the validity of the Will or Codi-
cils, qualification of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or the jurisdiction of the
court is required to file any objection with
the court in the manner provided in the
Florida Probate Rules WITHIN THE TIME
REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or be-
fore the date that is 3 months after the
date of service of a copy of the Notice of
Administration on that person, or those
objections are forever barred.
A petition for determination of exempt
property is required to be filed by or on
behalf of any person entitled to exempt
property under Section 732.402, WITHIN
THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is
on or before the later of the date that is 4
months after the date of service of a copy
of the Notice of Administration on such
person or the date that is 4- days after the
date of termination of any proceeding in-
volving the construction, admission to
probate, or validity of the will or involving
any other matter affecting any part of the
exempt property, or the right of such per-
son to exempt property is deemed
waived.
An election to take an elective share must
be filed by or on behalf of the surviving
spouse entitled to an elective share under
Section 732.201 - 732.2155 WITHIN THE
TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or
before the earlier of the date that is 6
months after the date of se vice of a copy
of the Notice of Administration on the sur-
viving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a
guardian of the property of the surviving
spouse, or the date that is 2 years after
the date of the decedent's death. The time
for filing an election to take an elective
share may be extended as provided in the
Florida Probate Rules.
Personal Representative:
Nikki T. Douglas
7570 300th Street
Branford, Florida 32008
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Ray E. Thomas, Jr.
FLB #0978205
PO. Box 39
Bell, FL 32619
Phone 352-463-0077
Fax: 352-463-0090
10/6, 13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR SUWANNEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 10-81-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DANA CARL DOUGLAS, SR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Dana
Carl Douglas, deceased, whose date of
death was May 25, 2010, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Suwannee County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 200 South Ohio (MLK Jr. Ave.)
Live Oak, Florida 32064. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tives and the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice
is October 6, 2010.
Personal Representative:
Nikki T. Douglas
7570 300th Street
Branford, Florida 32008
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Ray E. Thomas, Jr.
FLB #0978205
PO. Box 39
Bell, FL 32619
Phone: 352-463-0077
Fax: 352-463-0090
10/6, 13
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING:
The District Board of Trustees of North
Florida Community College will hold its
regular monthly meeting Tuesday, Octo-
ber 19, 2010 at 5:30 p.m. in the NFCC
Board Room, NFCC, 325 NW Turner
Davis Dr., Madison, FL. A copy of the
agenda may be obtained by writing:
NFCC, Office of the President, 325 NW
Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For
disability-related accommodations, con-
tact the NFCC Office of College Advance-
ment, 850-973-1653. NFCC is an equal
access/equal opportunity employer.
10/13


Find

us oni


I FaeokI


Suwannee Legals
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR SUWANNEE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 10-69-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANN M.WHITE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Ann M.
White, deceased, whose date of death
was May 13, 2010, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Suwannee County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is
200 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, Flori-
da 32064. The names and addresses of
the personal representatives and the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice
is October 6, 2010.
Personal Representative:
Jerry Gottheb
2475 Enterprise Road, Suite 100
Clearwater, Florida 33763
Attorney for Personal Representative:
Richard Gottlieb
Attorney for Jerry Gotthlieb
Florida Bar Number: 793670
GOTTLIEB & GOTTLIEB, PA.
2475 Enterprise Road, Suite 100
Clearwater, Florida 33763-1733
Telephone: (727) 791-1977
Fax: (727) 791-8090
E-Mail: Richard@Gottlaw.com
10/6, 13
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SUWANNEE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 09-139-DR
DIVISION: DOMESTIC RELATIONS
STEPHANIE NOBLES BLANKENSHIP
Petitioner
and
NORMAN DOUGLAS BLANKENSHIP
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO:
NORMAN DOUGLAS BLANKENSHIP
504 Marymac St SE
Live Oak, FL 32064
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
been filed against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any to it on STEPHANIE NO-
BLES BLANKENSHIP whose address is
504 Marymac St SE, Live Oak, FL 32064
on or before , October 21, 2010, and file
the original with the clerk of this Court at
Suwannee County Clerk of Court, 200
South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064,
before service on Petitioner or immedi-
ately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a de-
fault may be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available at
the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You
may review these documents upon re-
quest.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified of your current ad-
dress. You may file Notice of Current Ad-
dress, (Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers
in this lawsuit will be mailed to the ad-
dress on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and
information, failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking
of pleadings.


Dated: September 16, 2010
SEAL
CLERK OF THE CIRi


9/ 22, 29 10/6, 13


CUIT COURT
Sallie Pert
Deputy Clerk


Season

tickets

for sale
Suwannee High
football season tickets
are now on sale at $40
per seat in the Main
Office 8 a.m. till 3
p.m. daily. Each
season ticket
purchased enters you
into a drawing to win a
John Deere Gator
valued at $6,000.
Other giveaways to be
drawn at games
throughout the season.


SPORTS








Branford runs over Dragons


Continued From Page 1B

a hole and trotted 15-yards
untouched for another
score making it 28-6 with
eight minutes remaining till
half.
Two plays later, Johnston
recovered another fumble
at the 33-yard line, which
later led to another score.
Prevatt ran 13 yards on
the first play of the drive
and Certain finished it off
with runs of 7, 5 and 8
putting the Bucs ahead 34-
6 with 5:53 left till half.
About the only thing that
went wrong for the Bucs
on the night was their spe-
cial teams play. Certain
and Kell Prevatt missed
four point after attempts


and Reese returned a kick-
off 51 yards down to the
31 following Certain's
score.
Four plays later, Robert
Morris picked off Koski's
pass in the end zone before
officials ruled he was down
at the 4-yard line.
Branford drove 96 yards
before the half thanks to a
18-yard and 13-yard runs
by Certain, the latter which
made it 40-6 with 2:03 till
half.
With a big lead at the
half, Wiles brought in
some of his receivers and
part time players and rested
playmakers Certain and
Stebbins in the second half.
Lineman Matt Dickerson
was brought in at tailback


and rumbled 10 yards for a
score on the first drive of
the second half giving the
Bucs a 46-6 lead.
Josh Kirby picked off
Koski three plays later, re-
turning it 32-yards for a
score adding to the lead
making it 53-6.
Sophomore split end
Robert Morris and senior
wide receiver Kell Prevatt
were the work horse in the
second half teaming up for
a combined 106 yards, in-
cluding one score.
Kell Prevatt's 4-yard run
with 9:50 left in the game
closed the Bucs scoring
ahead 60-6.
Branford fans and cheer-
leaders cheered for the
Dragons when Colski


Vikings roll


Continued From Page 1B

ceiver Aubrey Grant for a
71-yard touchdown pass
as the Vikings stunned the
Bulldogs with two quick
scores and 14-0 lead just
minutes into the game.
By the end of the first
half, Smiley had thrown
for 242 yards and four
touchdown passes (71,
46, 80, 14) in a 49-14 win
over Suwannee.
Sophomore tailback
Keith Stallings led the
Vikings (5-0, 2-0) with 82
yards, including a 54-yard
touchdown run in the
third quarter.
Isaiah Stallings was on


the receiving end of a 46-
yard touchdown pass
from Smiley and Devin
Johnson brought down a
12-yard pass from Smiley
to give the Vikings a 27-0
lead after the first quarter.
Suwannee (2-4, 1-1)
was led by senior RB
Greg Swinson, who
rushed 16 times for 107
yards including a 14-yard
touchdown run in the sec-
ond quarter which cut the
lead to 27-6.
Elijah Maxey's 5-yard
run, Freeman Dozier's
80-yard reception from
Smiley, and George Max-
ey's 24-yard field goal in-
creased the lead to 42-6


at the half.
Sophomore quarterback
Jimmie Taylor added a 5-
yard touchdown run in
the third quarter cut the
lead to 42-14.
After establishing the
passing game early in the
game, Raines worked on
their running game and
ran for 197 yards on 26
carries in the second half
to control the clock.

Raines 49,
Suwannee 14

R - Kenny Bynum 30
interception return
(George Maxey kick)
R - Aubrey Grant 71


found John Dellatto from
28-yards out for another
score cutting the lead to
60-12 with 6:11 left in the
game.
The lone drive the Bucs
failed to score was the final
one as the Bucs scored on
their first seven posses-
sions. After Morris (89
yards on 8 carries) and
Kell Prevatt (28 yards on 3
carries) drove their team
inside the 5-yard line with
less than six minutes left,
Wiles directed his team to
take a knee and kill the
clock.
Branford (3-3) takes the
week off this week before
traveling to rival Bronson
Oct. 22 in a Big Ten Con-
ference game.


pass from Sam Smiley
(kick blocked)
R - Isaiah Stallings 46
pass from Smiley (Maxey
kick)
R - Devin Johnson 12
pass from Smiley (Maxey
kick)
S - Greg Swinson 14
run (kick blocked)
R - Elijah Maxey 5 run
(kick failed)
R - Freemon Dozier 80
pass from Smiley (kick
failed)
R - George Maxey 24
FG
R - Keith Stallings 50
run (Maxey kick)
S - Jimmie Taylor 5 run
(Smith pass from Taylor)


Thunder Alley Bowler of the Week


Submitted
Olivia Carter bowled 138 pins over her average mak-
ing her the Thunder Alley Bowler of the Week. Larry
Schattle led the King's and Queen's with a 590 series fol-
lowed by Carter with a 588 series and Al Music with a
558 series.
Carter is eligible to join the 500 club and we hope that
she does. Ray Goodman led the Monday Morning Blues
with a 534 series followed by Debbie Rice with a 521
and Suzie Graf with a 495. Dave Ward led the Sassy Se-
niors with a 603 followed by Larry Schattle with a 521
and Jerry Hakes with a 512.
9 Pin No Tap was led by George Williams with a 691
followed by Roger Rathbun with a 596 and Joey Forister
with a 589.
On the Men's league, Doug Mabey led the way with a
577 series followed by Pat Taylor with a 557 and Thure
Olson with a 545.
Last week's bowler of the week is Johnny Murrah,
Murrah bowled 145 pins over his average.
Al Music had a 618 series followed by Murrah with a
616 and Jason Cannon with a 583.
Debbie Rice led the Monday Morning Blues with a
480 series followed by Kim Carter with a 471 and Janette
Rushing with a 464. Looks like the women dominated
Monday morning.
Dave Ward led the Sassy Seniors with a 549 series fol-
lowed by Jerry Hakes with a 509 and Larry Schattle with
a 487.




Surrey Place


Care Center


A AS 9 a'ttY HealthCARE Community
<7


George Williams led the 9 Pin No Tap with a 686 fol-
lowed by Roger Rathbun with a 620 and Chancie Corbett
with a 605. On the King's and Queens, Larry Schattle had
a 634 series followed by Lorrie Geiger with a 617 and
Clay Corbett with a 598.
Don't forget the Snake Bite tournament this Saturday at
2 p.m. I hope that you are all working on your Halloween
Costumes. The Halloween Party is always a fun time
with lots of prizes and will take place Oct. 30 from 8-
midnight.
Call Thunder Alley for more details at 386-364-7778.




Suwannee Democrat


sold at these locations


Live Oak area
Jiffy 304 -- Ohio Ave. North
Walmart - Hwy 129 North
S&S22 --Hwy 129
Exxon -- Next to Wendy's on
Hwy 129
S&S45 -- CR49&Hwy.90
Donut Time -- Howard Street
Suwannee River Food Store - Hwy
129 N
Jiffy 311 - Hwy 90 west
Howlands - 11th street
Howlands Express -11th street
Jiffy 305 -- Irvin Ave. at roundabout
Winn Dixie -- Pinewood and Hwy
51
One Stop # 7 -- Hwy 90 east
Stop and Shop -- Ohio Ave. east
Jiffy 318 -- Duval Street east
J & K -- Hwy 129 N and
Winderweedle Ave
Ready Freddy -- Houston Ave
S & M -- Corner of Hwy 90 and
Walker St
Harrys -Walker Ave
Dollar General -- Hwy 129 next to
Publix
Dollar General - Howard Street
S & P - Helvenston street
Downtown Cafe - Howard Street
west
Publix - Hwy 129 south
Luraville Store - Hwy 51 south
Jims Produce - Ohio ave south
Landens Grocery - Hamilton ave
Taylor Store -- Hwy 51 south
Dollar Tree - Hwy 129 N next to
Walmart
S &S 46-- 10019 Hwy 129
Walgreens - Hwy 129 s across
from Publix
M & M Discount - Hwy 129 south
Fast Mart -- Ohio ave across from
Hardees

O'Brien
S&S 19-- Hwy 129 S
McAlpin
S & S 25- 17022 Hwy 129
Branford area
Cuzins Cafe (moving to new
location)
Timesaver --Hwy 27
Scaffs -- Suwanee Ave
C-Square Hwy 27
Dollar General - Hwy 27 east
M & M discount -- Suwannee Ave
Byrds Hwy 27 west of Branford
S & S 39- Hwy 27 & Hwy 129
S & S 47 -- Hwy 49 & Hwy 27
Jiffy 321 - Hwy 49 & Hwy 252


Mayo area
Jiffy 324 Hwy 27 west
L & R -- Hwy 51 north
S &S 53- 11089 State Road 51
Jiffy 302 -- 203 E Main Street
Fast Track 264 -- Hwy 27
Jasper area
S & S 49 -
Fast Track 404
Fast Track 103

Wellborn area
S&S 35 --Hwy 136
B & B -- HWY 90
Wellborn General -- CR 252
Lake City
S&S9-- Hwy90
S & S 42-- Hwy 90
S & S 20 -- Hwy 90 at county line
Food Lion -- Hwy 90 west

Coin Rack
Locations

Live Oak Area
Suwannee Democrat - Howard
Street east
Dixie Grill - Howard Street east
Post Office -- Ohio ave South
Sheryls
Kays Restaurant -- Howard St.
West
Jays Restaurant - Hwy 90 west
Pepe's - Hwy 90 west
Suwannee Hospital -- 11th Street
Save a lot - Hwy 129 S across from
Publix
Dairy Queen - Ohio ave south
Hardees - Ohio Ave south
Island Food Store --Walmart Plaza
Subway -- Walmart plaza
Huddle House -- Hwy 129 N & I -
10
Penn Oil - Hwy 129 N & 1-10
Falmouth Crossing - Hwy 90 west
Wellborn
Post Office- CR 137
Branford Area
Post office -- Suwannee Ave
Nells -- Suwannee Ave
The Gathering - CR 252
Dowling Park
Riverview Apartments
Village Grocery
Jiffy 310 -- CR 250 at bridge
Food Mart -- CR 250
Good Samaritan Center
607289-F


PAGE 5B


'Dogs


S UWANNEE


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386-364-5961 570633-F










SPORTS


Branford 60,



Florida Deaf 12,



Bra


nodceredr -. . ,g a is hi


nford cheerleaders hold up the sign that says 'Buccaneers slay the Dragons.'


--- i '
-wmmw__m�4-


Branford cheerleaders had plenty to cheer for as the Bucs whipped the Dragons.


Senior linebacker Danny Johnston had a heck of a night, recovering two fumbles, return-
ing one for a score. - Photos: Corey Davis


Branford's band had a lot to play as the Bucs kept scoring.


Vote


The Races for Governor and U.S. Senate
Florida voters have key decisions to make in the races for Governor and U.S. Senate. Read
continuing coverage in this newspaper and tune-in to the statewide debates to learn more
about the candidates and where they stand on the issues that matter the most to you. For more
information and to submit questions to the candidates visit www.beforeyouvote.org.
* General Election Debates *

Tues., October 19,2010 I 7:00 - 8:00 pm ET
Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University


Wed., October 20,2010 I 7:00 - 8:00 pm ET
Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University


Rick Scott Alex Sink
Confirmed Confirmed
The debates are produced by WFOR-TV/Ch. 4, the Miami-Dade/Broward region's CBS affiliate.
Watch the LIVE debates on these stations on Oct. 19 and 20: Miami-Dade/Broward - WFOR-TV *
Orlando -WKMG-TV/Ch. 6 (CBS) * Jacksonville - WJXT-TV/Ch. 4 * West Palm Beach -WPTV-TV/Ch. 5 (NBC) *
Tampa/St.PeteWFITS-TV/Ch. 28 (ABC) * Tallahassee -WCTV-TV/Ch. 6 (CBS) * Panama City -WJHG-TV/Ch. 7
(NBC) * Ft. Myers -WINK-TV/Ch. 11 (CBS) * Gainesville -WCJB-TV/Ch. 20 (ABC) * Pensacola -WEAR-TV/Ch.
3 (ABC) * Sarasota -WWSB-TV/Ch. 7 (ABC). (Visit www.beforeyouvote.org for additional details.)


Debate Partners


- 1 I AII KS 11 I
FLORIDA


k^K -"O-
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A SOUTHEASTERN
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Florida
P[iiLuidii rpii.
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Branford freshman cornerback Kyle Stebbins drops back in formation.


o -
L. d AV-s


DECISION


2010


Before


You


mIsfln ainuiranlf g "

-A5RP f>^


PAGE 6B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


I


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04









SPORTS


.aines 49, Suwannee


Andre Zanders pulls a pass down over a Raines defender.
- Photos: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com)


14


Suwannee coach Willie Spears has a word with the referee
during play.


Lineman Jacob Palmer and a Raines lineman go
lineman Jacob Palmer and a Raines lineman go


Suwannee students show
their support with 'Go Dogs'
painted on their chests.


\,i /


Jimmie Taylor breaks a long run through the Vikings defense.


Greg Swinson breaks through a hole for another Suwannee score.


Greg Swinson (2) and Tre Robinson (95) bring down a Vikings player.


Suwannee
at it.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 7B


Greg Swinson eludes four Raines defenders for a first down.





* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


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Farmer donates entire harvest to food pantry, Page 2 F


News * Entertainment * Classifieds




North Florida Focus


S - S

-- A
-. /E*1.
4 p.
*'I


Paddle Florida

Canoeing event begins at the Spirit on Thursday


Scene from a previous Paddle Florida event. - Courtesy photo


-~
a


A large number of canoe enthusi-
asts will begin the third annual Fall
Paddle Florida event Oct. 14 on a
123-mile trek down the Suwannee
River Wilderness Trail. The event
begins at the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park in Live Oak. Nestled
along the banks of the Suwannee
River, the SOSMP is Florida's pre-
mier music park and campground.
Paddlers will push off from the boat
ramp at the SOSMP in small groups
as they head south on the river to-
wards their destination of Manatee
Springs State Park. Paddlers will
travel through Suwannee, Lafayette,
Dixie, Gilchrist and Levy counties


for eight days during this adven-
ture.
The annual paddle event includes
the opportunity to hike, bird watch,
take in all that nature has to offer
along the banks of the famous
Suwannee River, camp, swim in
clear springs and also allows partic-
ipants an opportunity to get to
know the real North Florida and all
the wonderful places, people and
things it offers. That includes the
SOSMP where music reigns
supreme four nights each week,
during various large music festival
such as Magnolia Fest, Wanee and
Bear Creek Music and Art Festival


and where the South's largest coun-
try music festival, the Suwannee
River Jam, is held each April.
Many of the paddlers will spend
the night at the SOSMP before be-
ginning their leisurely trip along the
majestic river. During the trip pad-
dlers will spend each night camping
at designated sites. After a day on
the river with lunch on the banks
and supper under the trees each
evening, paddlers will be enter-
tained by some of Florida's finest -
from bluegrass and blues to Florida
history and humor woven into
songs by such notables as Lars An-
derson, Katherine Archer, Franklin


Baker, Big Cypress, Mike Devlin,
Garrison Doles, Willie Green
Bluesman, Magda Hiller, Patch-
work and others. Paddlers are en-
couraged to bring their harmonicas
and join in by the campfire each
night!
For more information about
primitive ,.,,',p*,... RV sites or cab-
in rental at the SOSMP, call the
SOSMP at 386-364-1683; email
spirit@musicliveshere.com or go to
the website at
www.musicliveshere.com. You may
also contact bill@paddleflorida.org
for more information about the
paddle.


127 Howard Street E.,
Live Oak, FL
b Phone: 386-362-4539
Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478
Se Habla Espanol
(EMAIL: info@poolerealty.com )


(OUNrRY,,HOWDOWN

AMERICA'S LARGEST COUNTRY MUSIC TALENT SEARCH



North Florida's Amber Lee Abbott seeks


Colgate Country Showdown state title


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WE'LL DRAW YOU A
LANDSCAPE PLAN!


North Florida sup-
porters will be present
and cheering this week-
end, Oct. 16, when Am-
ber Lee Abbott of White
Springs and Madison
competes in the Colgate
Country Showdown
state finals in her quest
to win $100,000 and the
national title of Ameri-
ca's Best New Act In
Country Music! Amber,
a beautiful, talented
singer who's been belt-
ing out songs since she
was a toddler, won The
Big 98 sponsored North


Save lots of money by installing the plants
yourself! Bring us pictures and
measurements of the area you want to
landscape and we'll draw you a plan for free!


9248 129th Road * Live Oak
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Closed Sunday
"For over 30 Years"
WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM


Florida regional compe-
tition Sept. 10 at the
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park (SOSMP) in
Live Oak, Fla.
Amber Lee Abbott,
who also has strong ties
to Suwannee County
and Live Oak, will com-
pete for the state title
against six other
statewide winners begin-
ning at 3 p.m. Oct. 16 at
Silver Springs Resort at
Silver Springs and Wild
Waters Water Park in
Ocala.
This week's Florida
winner will receive
$1,000 and compete in
the South East Region
contest at Christ-
masVille in Rock Hill,
South Carolina Dec. 4
against state winners
from Georgia, South
Carolina, North Caroli-
na, Alabama, Mississip-
pi, Louisiana, South
Arkansas, North
Arkansas and Tennessee.
One winner from each
of the five national re-
gional contests across

SEE NORTH, PAGE 11



For Qualified
Home Inspections
Call
Paul Dial
C.R.P.I.
386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Certified 570742-F


w w-


ss0 =s


r















Iconic television town of


'Mayberry'






marks 50th anniversary


-


ALBEMARLE, N.C. - "The Andy
Griffith Show," the TV program cele-
brating life in a small Southern town, is
such an enduring piece of American
culture that it has launched careers of
actors who never appeared on the show
itself but now portray its supporting
characters at fairs, festivals and commu-
nity events.
"The last 10 years that I have been
performing as Howard Sprague have
been fabulous," said Jeff Branch, of
Oakboro, N.C., one of the so-called
"tribute artists" whose character was
county clerk in the fictional town of
Mayberry, N.C.
Branch's work has taken him through-
out the country to festivals, conventions
and even an annual cruise with stars
from the show.
"I have met so many Mayberry fans,
and it is a joy to see their faces light up
when all the tributes are performing and
mingling with the fans," he said.
"The Andy Griffith Show," named for
its star, followed the lives of sheriff
Andy Taylor, his son, Opie, Aunt Bee
and Deputy Barney Fife. It first aired 50
years ago, in 1960, on small black-and-
white television sets.


The program ran for eight full sea-
sons and 249 episodes - 159 of which
were black and white and 90 color. It
launched the careers of Griffith, who
appeared in all 249 episodes, and Ron
Howard, who played his son in 209
episodes.
It also gave the world Don Knotts,
who played Barney the bungling deputy,
as well as other actors who went on to
lifetimes of work and stardom.
The program, one of the most
watched TV shows of all time, survives
on cable and DVD discs.
David Browning, of Virginia, a fellow
tribute artist and friend of Branch's,
says the show's characters and mythical
town of Mayberry endure in the imagi-
nations of fans.
Browning is in his 17th year of per-
forming as Barney. He opened for
Knotts for 11 years and has worked
with many of the show's stars.
"Mayberry gives fans a way to escape
the real world for a while," he said,
"and reflect back to their childhood
days."
Information for this story was provid-
ed by the Stanly News & Press in Albe-
marle, N.C.


Ernest T. Bass, portrayed by tribute artist Phil Fox, tries to woo
Sweet Romeena, played by actress Jackie Joseph.
- Photo: Stanly News & Press, Albemarle, N.C.


Tribute actors portraying Mayberry denizens Otis (Kenneth Junkin),
Goober (Tim Pettigrew) and Howard Sprague (Jeff Branch) flank Doug
Brewer, the real-life mayor of Graysville, Ala.
- Photo: Stanly News & Press, Albemarle, N.C.


* Farmer donates entire




harvest to food pantry


Lou Simmons, 83, was looking forward to retirement and then thought of a way to use his orchard to help his
community. - Photo: Kevin Spradlin/Times-News, Cumberland, Md.


(1) 3+ Acre Tract on paved road
with scattered trees. Driveway
in place. Good buy @ $19,500.
Terms.
(2) Off CR 49 5 acres in grass
with scattered trees, fenced on 3
sides with survey. Only $4,900
per acre.
(3) Off US 129 North: 5 acre
wooded on 89th Rd. Will work
for land home package. $37,000.
(4) CR 51 & Pinewood St.: 2.29
Acres, city water and sewer,
zoned office. Good location
REDUCED TO $159,900.
(5) Off CR 349: 10 acre
wooded tract with a two
bedroom CH/AC log home in
excellent condition cont.
approx. 1200 sq. ft. under roof,
30'x40' pole barn. REDUCED
TO $145,900.
(6) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre
corner tract good exposure.
Reduced to $34,500.
(7) 40 acres with 835 ft. on
paved road in 13 year old
planted pines. Priced to sell at
REDUCED TO $149,900.
(8) CR 143: 9 acres on paved
road with a 3/2 CH/AC home
const. in 2002 with a 2 car
garage, 30'x50' bar, 8x8 storage,
nice fish pond. Good buy @
$175,000.
(9) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on
CR751 and the river approx.
1300 ft. on the water and
approx. 1300 ft. on paved road.
Priced to sell at REDUCED
TO $64,000.
(10) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4
acres in grass/cropland with
scattered trees. $32,500.
(11) Near City: Off US 90 East 5
acres wooded near golf course.
Good buy @ $44,900.
(12) 190th St.: 10 acres in
planted pines approx. 15 years
old, with a 3/1 CH/AC SWMH,
2 car carport/shop. Priced to
sell @ $49,000.
(13) 169th Rd.: 5 ac. in grass
with a 3/2 CH/AC DWMH cont.
approx. 1,850 sq. ft. under roof


in excellent cond. 2 car detached
garage. Good area. REDUCED
TO $99,000.
(14) 193rd Rd.: 6.59 acres
wooded on paved road. Good
area. Good buy @ $37,500.
(15) Hamilton County: 40 acre
wooded on county road. Good
hunting area that adjoins
SRWMD. REDUCED TO
$129,500.
(16) New 3 bedroom, 2 bath CH/
AC home. City sewer & water,
privacy fence. REDUCED TO
$90,000.
(17) Off CR 249: 3 wooded lots,
will work for mobile homes, on
county road. Good buy @
$12,600 for all three.
(18) Near City on paved road: 6
acres in grass with scattered
trees, 36'x36' horse barn with
tack/feed room & loft (2009), 2"
well, fenced & divided into
paddocks with horse type fence.
REDUCED TO $90,000.
(19) Off CR 250: 1.45 acres with
a 3/2 CH/AC brick home with
fireplace, kitchen furnished,
cont. 2700+ sq. ft. of living area,
2 car detached garage, 12'x16'
metal storage building. Priced to
sell @ $139,500.
(20) Suwannee River Charles
Springs area: 1.88 ac. wooded
with 137 ft. on the water
elevation survey. Will support
regular inground septic tank.
Good buy @ $39,900.
(21) 104th St.: 7 3/4 acres with a
3/2 CH/AC 2006 Fleetwood
DWMH, kitchen furnished,
fireplace 4" well, 2 septic. Priced
to sell @ $99,900.
(22) CR 136 West: 5 acres in
grass with a 3/2 CH/AC DWMH
in excellent condition cont.
approx. 2,100 sq. ft. of living
area, kitchen furnished, 30'x42'
carport and storage. Priced to
sell @ $93,000.
(23) Off US 90 West: Two 5 acre
wooded tracts, good area.
$29,900 per tract.
A24526-F


CNHI News Service
CUMBERLAND, Md.
- Lou Simmons believes
he's figured out how to
solve the country's hunger
problem.
If every farmer were to
donate a small portion of
each harvest to the poor, no
one would go hungry, he
said.
Simmons then put his
idea into action. He is do-
nating every single apple,
pear, peach and cherry
from his modest orchard to
the Salvation Army.


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SI l ., purposes of AARP and its members.
i .. , i . . .. i . *..... HiI ,. I i *... NciheierAARPnoritsaffiliateistheinsurer AARPMedicare
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AS702 (2/09)


.1 I,
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625506-F


Salvation Army volun-
teers distribute more than
30,000 pounds of fruit
from the Simmons orchard
each year.
Kitty Willison, director
of social services at the
Salvation Army, said the
fresh fruit is a highly de-
sired commodity.
Young men from from
the local youth center re-
cently helped pick more
than 2,000 pounds of ap-
ples one morning.
Simmons, 83, got the
idea when he was thinking
about retirement. He
thought about cutting down
the trees, but was encour-
aged to save the orchard.
"It's a beautiful place,"
Judy Hodel, director of the
Green Ridge Youth Center,
said of the Simmons or-
chard, calling it a place of
serenity.
"He does a great ser-
vice," Hodel said. "He
feeds people with his ap-
ples. He donates every-
thing he has. I hate to see
that get lost."
Information for this story
was provided by The
Times-News in Cumber-
land, Md.




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A Traditon of Excellence






* 161-bed Medicare/Medicaid
skilled nursing facility
* Alzheimer's Unit - specialized
care by loving staff who provide
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short-term rehabilitation, well-
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529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990


PAGE 2, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA















Riding on air isn't as


far fetched as


By E. Kirsten Peters
CNHI News Service

Kids delight in blowing up a balloon
and letting it go. The air inside is under
mild pressure, and when a youngster lets
go of the neck of the balloon, air rushes
outward. The escaping air propels the bal-
loon forward like an erratic jet.
Remarkably enough, a car powered by
the same energy source - compressed air
- may be coming to a road near you.
At least one innovative auto company
is investing in a small "air car," as these
vehicles are known. Air cars have some
wonderful advantages compared to our
traditional internal combustion engine -
like the complete absence of air pollution
coming from a tailpipe.
The idea of an air car is not as far
fetched as it may sound. Your commuter
car, my 1987 pickup, and a farmer's
diesel tractor actually all run on a broadly
similar idea.
Work with me for a moment, and I'll
explain.
The internal combustion engines com-
mon around us look like they are powered
by heat from burning fuel. But all the
heat actually does is to increase the pres-
sure of gases in the engine's cylinders.
It's the high pressure that pushes on the
pistons. The pistons' motion powers the
vehicle.
The heat isn't crucial. The pressure in-
side the cylinder is the key.
Now imagine you could simply add
highly compressed air into a car's cylin-
der to drive the piston. You wouldn't need


u


heat, so there would be no need for gaso-
line or diesel fuel. And you could drive
all day with no stinky fumes coming out
your tailpipe.
For several decades, engineers have tin-
kered with using air under high pressure
to power the pistons of automobiles. The
system can be made to work, especially if
the air is under extreme pressure. (Those
who know trucks will note that com-
pressed air powers big-rig brakes and
starters. So large trucks have a bit of air
power in their designs already.)
The pressure useful in a piston is gen-
erally much higher than that of a car tire.
In scientific labs we often use high-pres-
sure tanks, as do welders and others in
particular industries. If you work near an
enormous tank of this variety, and if it
ruptures, your troubles are over. But I've
never known that to happen.
If you've ever moved a high-pressure
tank, you know they are heavy enough to
give you a hernia. Indeed, the steel "fuel
tank" of compressed air in old test vehi-
cles was so heavy it created real trouble
for the engineering goal of powering a car
on air alone.
But much lighter-weight materials
based on carbon fibers that can hold air at
high pressure are now on the market. So
visionaries are taking another look at the
"air car," and carmakers overseas are ex-
ploring options of bringing such cars to
market.
But, of course, there is the question of
where the compressed air will come from.
There's no such thing as a free lunch, and
the cost of running the air car is partly the


think


cost of energy to com-
press the air. As Popu-
lar Mechanics points
out, it's generally
electrical energy that's
used to compress air. So air vehicles are
essentially electric cars using the com-
pressed air as a way of storing energy.
On the positive side, pollution that's
created generating the electricity used to
compress air could be distant from our
cities. That's a real plus. (Although we
geologists are fond of the smell of spilled
gasoline and the choking fumes of ex-
haust on a hot day, normal human beings
prefer to avoid all that filth.)
A lot of innovation is on the table these
days in the car world, with major manu-
facturers investigating better electric cars,


hi id vehicles, and
ii. i iitral gas vehicles
.1l.i what T. Boone Pickens
advocates.
These are tough economic times, but
interesting, too, and some folks are going
to take advantage of entirely new ways of
doing things to help move us forward.
I'm for that.
E. Kirsten Peters, Ph.D., is a ... ..*/..i
trained at Princeton and Harvard and a
native of the rural Northwest. Questions
about science or energy for future
columns may be sent to epeters@wsu.edu.
Her column is a service of the College of
Agricultural, Human and Natural Re-
source Sciences at IWV,.,in.'i.i State Uni-
versity.


LET'S TALK

ABOUT YOUR HEAL"


CPR Can:
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, is a
life-saving method that has prevented the
deaths of scores of individuals throughout the
centuries. CPR is often used to keep a person
alive until more in-depth medical attention
can be provided. It's an essential skill to know
and can be a lifesaver for people of all ages.
The American Heart Association reports that
effective bystander CPR, provided
immediately after sudden cardiac arrest, can
double or triple a victim's chance of survival.
Despite these statistics, less than one-third of
out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest victims
receive bystander CPR. It could be because
many people still do not know how to perform
it.
CPR has been around since 1740, when the
Paris Academy of Sciences officially
recommended mouth-to-mouth resuscitation
for drowning victims. In 1891, Dr. Friedrich
Maass performed the first documented chest
compression in humans. Roughly 10 years
later, successful chest compressions were used
in human resuscitation.
In the 1950s, it was determined that exhaled air
r was enough to provide oxygenation of another
person. Peter Safar and James Elan, thusly,
invented mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. In
1960, the American Red Cross officially
adopted cardiopulmonary resuscitation and
began to teach the public the techniques.
The ability to do CPR is not based on age but
rather body strength. Studies have shown that
children as young as 9 years old can learn and
retain CPR skills. It's important to keep in
mind that while CPR can keep a person alive,
Automated External Defibrillators (AED)
'N devices are needed to restore a natural heart
rhythm to an individual who has suffered from
cardiac arrest. Unless resuscitation is provided
within minutes of collapse, an individual can
rarely be saved.
CPR training courses are provided for
individuals at many places, often free of
charge. Some hospitals even offer CPR training
. to new parents. Check with a hospital, medical
provider or police station on where CPR can be
learned.
Performing CPR
For those who want to know the basics of
CPR, follow these guidelines, courtesy of The
Mayo Clinic.
Think ABC -- airway, breathing and circulation
S - to remember the steps explained below.
Move quickly through airway and breathing to


Ophthalmology

GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
522 South Ohio Avenue
, -,330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937 |

Physical Therapy

7C TaIi os, nla.

* Physical Therapy * Occupational Therapy * Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis * Fibromyalgia * Geriatrics * Spinal &
Joint Pain * Sports Injuries * Work Injuries � Pediatrics
* Manual Therapy * Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
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Branford 935-1449 Workers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans
A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com o
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore W


Save Lives
begin chest compressions.
Airway: Clear the airway
1. Put the person on his or her back on a firm
surface.
2. Kneel next to the person's neck and
shoulders.
3. Open the person's airway using the head-
tilt, chin-lift maneuver. Put your palm on the
person's forehead and gently tilt the head
back. Then with the other hand, gently lift
the chin forward to open the airway.
4. Check for normal b ,Hi, I,l i ,* taking no
more than five or 10 seconds. Look for chest
motion, listen for normal breath sounds and
feel for the person's breath on your cheek
and ear. Gasping is not considered to be
normal breathing. If the person isn't
bi , i ,. iiii i. i i' i\,1 and you are trained in
CPR, begin mouth-to-mouth breathing. If
you believe the person is unconscious from a
heart attack and you haven't been trained in
emergency procedures, skip mouth-to-mouth
rescue breathing and proceed directly to
chest compressions.
Breathing: Breathe for the person
Rescue breathing can be mouth-to-mouth
breathing or mouth-to-nose breathing if the
mouth is seriously injured or can't be
opened.
1. With the airway open (using the head-tilt,
chin-lift maneuver), pinch the nostrils shut
for mouth-to-mouth breathing and cover the
person's mouth with yours, making a seal.
2. Prepare to give two rescue breaths. Give
the first rescue breath -- lasting one second --
and watch to see if the chest rises. If it does
rise, give the second breath. If the chest does
not rise, repeat the head-tilt, chin-lift
maneuver and then give the second breath.
3. Begin chest compressions to restore
circulation.
Circulation: Restore blood circulation with
chest compressions
1. Place the heel of one hand over the center
of the person's chest, between the nipples.
Place your other hand on top of the first
hand. Keep your elbows straight and position
your shoulders directly above your hands.
2. Use your upper body weight (not just your
arms) as you push straight down on
(compress) the chest 2 inches (approximately
5 centimeters). Push hard at a rate of 100
compressions a minute.
3. After 30 compressions, tilt the head back
and lift the chin up to open the airway.
Prepare to give two rescue breaths. Pinch the
nose shut and breathe into the mouth for one
second. If the chest rises, give a second
rescue breath. If the chest doesn't rise, repeat
the head-tilt, chin-lift maneuver and then
give the second rescue breath. That's one
cycle. If someone else is available, ask that
person to give two breaths after you do 30
compressions. If you're not trained in CPR
and feel comfortable performing only chest
compressions, skip rescue breathing and
continue chest compressions at a rate of 100
compressions a minute until medical
personnel arrive.
4. If the person has not begun moving after
five cycles (about two minutes) and an
automatic external J . t, Ii I, i r..i (AED) is
available, apply it and follow the prompts.
Administer one shock, then resume CPR --
starting with chest compressions -- for two
more minutes before administering a second
shock. If you're not trained to use an AED, a
911 operator may be able to guide you in its
use. Use pediatric pads, if available, for
children ages 1 to 8. Do not use an AED for
babies younger than age 1. If an AED isn't
available, go to step 5 below.
5. Continue CPR until there are signs of
movement or until emergency medical
personnel take over.


To place an ad on this page, please call Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


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Physical Therapy


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Sandy Laxton, PTA
Mandy McCray, PTA
Carolyn McCook, Office Manager,
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Workers Compensation, Industrial
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Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
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OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 3


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


L












PAE , COBE 3&1, 00CASSFE MAKEPLC W.FLANLE.M-SRVGNOT H LRD N OT ERI


Walker Reunion 2010
The Annual Walker Reunion will be held Sunday, October
24, 2010, at The Branford Shrine Club, Branford. (Old
Branford Depot).
Location of Shrine Club: From U.S. 27 in Branford turn
north on US 129, at the flashing light. Continue one long
block to first street on left (at Sister's Cafe') turn left,
cross railroad, the Shrine Club is located in the old
Branford Depot.Please remember to bring your pictures
or any family memories you may wish to share.We hope
you will join us, bring your family/friends and a basket
lunch for a day of fun, visiting, smiles and celebration.
For your family members and friends who may not
receive this notice. PLEASE REMIND THEM ABOUT
OUR REUNION.The Club will be open at 12:45 p.m. and
we will serve lunch at 1:15 p.m. Mark your calendars:
October 24, 2010! Remember location! We are looking
forward to your being there. Katie Walker's Children.
Contacts: Mona Walker Hurst - 386-935-1184, Diane
Walker-Saunders - 386-935-101,7 Marcia Walker Hurst -
352-376-1930.

Tangles' Fall Bazaar
and Florida Breast
and Cervical Calendar
Early Detection Program
Tangles' Fall Bazaar and Florida Breast and Cervical
Calendar Early Detection Program, Saturday, Oct. 16, 8
a.m. - 4 p.m., 12986 US Hwy 90 W, (1/4 mile past Wayne
Frier Mobile Homes on the left). Free information and
health screening, huge rummage sale, quality vendors
with hand-crafted items; bake sale; Shabby T - unique
"upcycled" furnishings, gifts and accessories; raffle with
great prizes; and food by J. Don Allen's Beach Buns and
Dawgs. For vending or other information, or to donate
items (no cl .ilhiii.. please) for the rummage sale, call
386-590-1543. A benefit for Tangles - a Community
Outreach for Women.

School Advisory Council
meeting
The next meeting of the School Advisory Council for
Suwannee County High School will be Thursday, Oct. 14,
2010, at 6 p.m. It will be held in the Student Activities
Room at the high school. All interested students, parents,
teachers and community members that would like to
participate and become involved in Suwannee High
School are invited to attend.

NAACP Annual Freedom
Fund Banquet
The Suwannee County Branch of the NAACP will hold
its Annual Freedom Fund Banquet on Friday, Nov. 5,
2010 at 7 p.m. at the Annex of African Baptist Church,
502 SE Walker Ave., Live Oak. The speaker will be the
Honorable Walter A. McNeil, Secretary, Florida
Department of Correction. Banquet tickets are $20,
contact any member of the NAACP or call 386-364-4754.

Barrs Family Reunion
Barrs Family Reunion---The Descendent's and family
friends of the James C. Barrs & Martha E. Land and their
son Issac N. Barrs & Mary Elizabeth Boyett will hold
their annual family reunion on Saturday Oct. 16, 2010 at
the Day Community Center; Day, Florida. Gathering
starts at 11:00 a.m. with lunch at 12:30 pm. Bring food
and drink for your family and others. Call and remind
family and Friends.

Masonic Lodge #166
Fund Raiser
Date: Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010
Location: Day Lodge, next to Brewer Lake Church, Time:
11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Luncheon Menu: Fried fish, hushpuppies, grits, slaw,
chili, peas, greens, smoked, pulled pork, tea, lemonade,
soft drinks.
1 child's platter - $2.50
1 adult platter - $7.50
Schwans food truck will be on site to support us. Place
your orders now before this date. Pick up your orders at



SSuwannee

9 graphics
PRINTING * COPY SERVICE
Color Copies * Blueprints
� 621 Ohio Ave. North * Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 362-1848 * Fax (386) 364-4661 * 1-800-457-6082


the event. We earn commissions on all orders from this
effort. Special Drawing 2:00 p.m. for Taurus Judge pistol.
It shoots a 410ga. shot or 45 cal. bullet. Touted by the
NRA as the most popular home defense weapon of the
year.
Buy 1 ticket $25 + 1 free platter
Buy 3 tickets-$50 +2 free platters
Buy 7 tickets - $100- + 3 free platters.
Winner does not have to be present.
Need tickets? Call 386-294-3415.

BHS Class of 1960 will hold
their 50th Year Class Reunion
Reunion will be Friday, Oct. 15, 2010. Meet at the
"Gathering" Restaurant in Branford at 5 p.m. Spread the
word.

March of Dimes Signature
Chefs Auction
The March of Dimes and Mercantile Bank are presenting
"Signature Chefs Auction" at 5:30 PM, November 11, at
the newly re-decorated Columbia County Fairgrounds
Banquet Hall. There will be a Festival of Trees and
Wreaths, live and silent auctions, and live entertainment
by "Harry, Sally, and Billy". The highlight will be a
selection of specialty foods presented by area restaurants
and caterers, along with complimentary wine tasting.
For more information call Maureen Lloyd 752-
4885.Tickets will be sold at all Mercantile Bank offices,
Rountree Moore Toyota, Ward's Jewelers, First Street
Music, Suwannee Democrat, and Jasper News. Put this
event on your calendar and support March of Dimes as
we work together to give every baby a healthy start!!

Family history book
I am putting together a family history book on the
descendants of Stephen, William & Sarah Ann Grant.
Surnames include Grant, Hewitt, Adams, Land, McCray,
McClamma & any other related. If you would like to
submit information or photos or are interested, please
contact Cher Newell at 386-209-1559 or 386-364-1608.

Come Early For The Best
Choices!
The Suwannee County Friends of the Library
will host The Great Book Sale commencing on Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, October 14-16, 2010. The sale will
be held during the regular library hours, 8:30 AM to 8:00
PM on Thursday, Friday 8:30 AM to 5:30 PM, and
Saturday 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM.

Please sign up to volunteer to help with the sale at the
library.
The Suwannee County Friends of the Library is a
volunteer booster organization for libraries of Suwannee
County. Through membership and fundraisers, such as
The Great Book Sale, thousands of dollars have been
donated to enhance and provide for library services.
Furniture, staff training, books, videos, special children's
programs and even major contributions to the
construction of the Live Oak and Branford Libraries have
been supported by the Suwannee County Friends of the
Library.
Betsy Bergman, President of the Suwannee County
Friends of the Library, 386/842-2953.

Social Sewing Club:
New Member Recruitment
If you are looking for an opportunity to socialize and help
the community grow, then join the Social Sewing Club.
To become a member bring a can of food or
nonperishable item for the Thanksgiving basket.
Meetings held every second Tuesday of the month at 6
p.m. at the club house. For more information contact Mrs.
Ella Cooper, president at 362-4062.

Stop, drop and Recycle
for Adults with Disabilities
Comprehensive Community Services Inc. Invites you to
participate in our recycling project campaign. CCS
Clients are recycling - Printer Ink Cartridges, Laser
Cartridges, Cell Phones -Any Kind, MP3 Players
Drop off at Lafayette Extension Office, Wes Haney
Chevrolet, Suwannee Tax Collectors, Live Oak City
Hall, or the CCS Office, larger quantities can be picked
up. For more information on how your business can join
the CCS recycling team call Janet Sampson, 386-362-
7143 ext 5.

Humane Society's 25th Annual
Pet Show October 16
Join us for Pet Contests and other fun activities on
Saturday, October 16th, in the Suwannee County
Coliseum at the Live Oak Fairgrounds. Registration
begins at 10:00am and contests begin at ll:00am.


Free Admission. There are many fun contests for dogs
and cats; just $1 each. Win ribbons and be eligible for
"Best in Show" trophies. Even if you don't have a pet to
bring, come and enjoy the show.There'll be refreshments,
delicious bake sale items reasonably priced, super raffles,
and more fun stuff. Need more info? Call 1-866-236-
7812 toll free or 850-971-9904 local. The shelter and
thrift stores are open 10 am to 2 pm, Tuesday through
Saturday.

Alzheimer's Support Group
2010
Meets the 3rd Thursday of each month except December
in the Good Samaritan Center Private Dining Room at
3:00 PM., Advent Christian Village
Good Samaritan Center (nursing home), 10676 Marvin
Jones Blvd, Dowling Park, FL 32064 Remainder of this
year: Oct. 21, Nov. 18, 2010.

LHS Band Boosters meeting
LHS Band Boosters meet the 1st Tuesday of every month
at 6 p.m. in the band room.

Miss & Little Miss Majestic
Pageant 2010
The Miss Majestic Pageant Association is seeking
contestants to compete for the title of Miss & Little Miss
Majestic. The event will take place November 13, 2010 at
the Suwannee High School Auditorium.
Little Miss: ages 4-6
Miss: ages 15-19
All contestants must be from the Suwannee Valley area
which consists of Columbia, Dixie, Hamilton, Lafayette,
Madison, Suwannee and Taylor County. Registration
deadline is October 16, 2010. Contestant packets and
additional information are available. Please contact
Calvin Sneed at (386) 590-6881 or any association
member. You may also request an application packet by
email at rozmerrick@msn.com. Look for Miss Majestic
updates on Face Book.

FREE SUNDAY LUNCH
For the past several months a group headed up by Pat and
JoAnn Lynch have been serving a free lunch at the
community center in Live Oak the last Sunday of the
month. This past month we fed around 300 children and
families. We support this project by selling donated items
at the Flea Market in Lake City. We have cleaned out all
of our closets, garages and are now in need of items to be
donated to this cause. We also need volunteers to help set
up and serve the meals. If you are interested in
volunteering or would like to donate garage sale items
you may contact Pat and Jo Ann Lynch at (386) 935-1076
or Roger Burnside at (386) 935-3343.

St. Luke's Busy Hands
for Babies
Saturday, October 16, St. Luke's Busy Hands for Babies
will hold a yard sale from 7a.m. -2 p.m. at St. Luke's
Episcopal Church, 1391 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak,
across from the Garden Club. The sale will be inside and
there will be many bargains on cl] ,diiii.-. books and lots
more. Come and see our handmade gift table for
Christmas. The proceeds buy material and yam to make
items for two children's hospitals in Gainesville and
Jacksonville.

Lafayette County Historical
Society meeting
The Lafayette County Historical Society Meetings are
held the 4th Thursday of every month at 7 pm at the
Library in Mayo. Please feel free to join us and bring
your historic pictures, documents and stories. If you have
any questions please email lafayettechs@gmail.com. You
can also find us on Facebook!

Did you earn your pin?
Reconnect with your shipmates and help preserve the
memories
With more than 13,000 members and over 150 chapters
throughout the United States, your rank or rate and status
are active, retired or honorably discharged are secondary
to the purposes of the organization. We are all brothers of
"The Pin." We band together to honor the memories of
the over 4,000 men who EARNED THE RIGHT to
wear"Dolphins" to maintain the bonds of friendship and
camaraderie.You are invited to contact us through the
address below for more information: National Contact:
United States Submarine Veterans, PO Box 3870
Silverdale, WA 98383 or 1-877-542-DIVE r
www.ussvi.org. Local contact:W. Ray Rausch, 386-209-
1473, uss483@windstream.net, 10035 105th Drive, Live
Oak, Fl 32060.


CONTINUED ON PAGE 7


COUPON LIVE OAK - COUPON LIVE OAK


Outgrow Your


Outgrow Your
Wheels?


rzri^


Time to Upgrade.


If youe searching fr that perfect set of wheels,
loo n further than www.nflaonline.com


I


PAGE 4, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


571 �106-F Co4st to Co.*jt Apou"d the cofnef











* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


North Florida








Classic


Reaching 14, 100 households each week









ieds


Place a classified: Call 386-362-1734 or toll free 1-800-525-4182

or fax 386-364-5578 Hours are M-F 8 am - 5 pm * closed Sat. & Sun.
View the Classifieds Online at: www.classifiedmarketplaceonline.com We accept I " , -







fi- i4',ft


Announcements














Jobs Wanted
DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME
CLEANED or Pressure Washed,






or your yard cleaned up? Done
at a very reasonable rate. Call
Christine or Gary 386 792 -1655i
WILL TAKE CARE OF THE
ELDER: Will cook, clean, etc.
Experience and Goodr
References.
386-792-1616
obselp Wanted


Experienced persons
preferred. Should be flexible in
hours available. PRNa
schedule. Positions will lead to
full time schedule if desired.
Smaller facility where it is
easier to get to know residents
and families. Contact Karen
Williams at Lafayette Health
Care Center, 512 W. Main St.,
Mayo, FL 386129463300.

FirstDay

OPPORTUNITY IN

TRANSPORTATION!
F/T Division Chair,
Transportation position in a
community college setting. Will
be responsible for the effective
mgt of the Transportation depot
as well as the effective
operation of the Aviation
Meastier's to get to know residents or








Trand families. Conrtatin Karelate
program, 10 yrs mLafayette exp
related to division programs:
Aviation Maintenance or Flight
Training. Hold either a Private
Pilot Certificate with both
Instrument & Commercial Pilot
Ratings or an Airframe &
Power Plant Certificate (with
Inspection Authorization
desired). Successful priorns:
ateaching or training exp in an
setting with exp in curriculum
classroom presentation. S/he
should have solid work exp at
the admin & supervisory level
to include budget mgt,
purchasing & procurement,
writing bid specs, personnel
eval & org planning. Visit our
website www.gtcc.edu for(
more information &r
application. Open until filled.
As an Equal Opportunityn
Employer, GTCC is strongly
committed to diversity &
welcomes applications from all



GUILFORD TECHNICAL
COMMUNITY COLLEGE
qualified candidates,
particularly persons of color
and faculty underrepresented
in higher education. EOE

Firsg plDay
NURSING INSTRUCTOR
wanted atu
North Florida
Community Collegep
Employerry, GTCC is stronglyda.
committSee www.nfcc.edu for details.ity &







See www.nfcc.edu for details.


Help Wanted

FirstDay
MAINTENANCE POSITION
AVAILABLE
40 hours with benefits.
Experience in plumbing,
electrical, carpentry, and
painting/ sheetrock required.
Drug free workplace, must
have valid drivers license and
transportation. Some travel
required. Applications may be
picked up at Lafayette
Apartments East 3rd Street &
Main (176 SE Land Avenue)
or call 386-294-2720 or 386-
364-7936. TDD/TTY 711. "This
institution is an equal
opportunity provider, and
employer."

FirstDay




MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE INC.
Lake City, Live Oak,
Jasper, Mayo, and
surrounding ares in FL
Staff Psychiatrist
Board Cert, Adult & Child
Outpatient Clinics:
Jasper, Live Oak, Lake City
Counselor IV/Sr Clinician
Outpatient Services
Adult & Child opportunities in
Mayo, Jasper, Live Oak,
Lake City Fl.
Masters Required,
Licensed Desired.
Adult/Child Case Manager
Lake City, FL
lyr Exp w/ SPMI population
Counselor III in Rehab Svcs
Bachelors in Lake City
Locations are
National Health
Service Corps
Student Loan
Forgiveness qualified
http://nhsc.bhpr.hrsa.gov/
To see our current openings
in Mental Health and to
apply online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP
REPORTER
General assignment reporter
wanted for weekly newspaper
in North Florida. Must have
excellent writing, reporting,
photography, word processing
and internet skills. Experience
much preferred. Candidate
should be comfortable
generating a high volume of
copy on a daily basis. Night
and weekend assignments
common.
The Suwannee Democrat is
fast becoming one of the
premier weekly newspapers in
Florida. If you take pride in
your work and are willing to
give everything you've got and
then some, please submit
resume, references and
clippings to:
robert. bridges @ gaflnews.com
Postal submissions
also welcome:
Robert Bridges, Editor
Suwannee Democrat
PO Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
We are a Drug Free
Workplace.
No phone inquiries.


BUSINESSES


Village Oaks I Apartments
1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom units.
Hurry in for an application.
Rental assistance available to
qualified applicants.
Call 386-364-7936,
TDD/TTY 711.
705 NW Drive, Live Oak
"This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer."


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
570121-F


Help Wanted

FirstDay
SHANDS LIVE OAK
REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER
has the following immediate
openings:
Registered Nurses-
Emergency Room (PRN)
C.N.A.- Emergency Room
(Full-time)
CTTech-Full Time
Switchboard Operator-Full
Time
Patient Financial Rep.-
Shands Medical Group
Accounts Payable Clerk
Respiratory Therapist- PRN
Laboratory Technologist -
PRN
Phlebotomist - PRN
Competitive salary and benefit
package. Resumes WITH
cover letter may be faxed to
386-292-8295 Or email to
angela.altman @ hma.com
EOE, M/FN/D, Drug Free
Workplace

FirstDay
The Third Judicial Circuit
currently has the following
positions available:
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT III, LIVE OAK
USER SUPPORT
ANALYST, LAKE CITY
ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES MANAGER,
LIVE OAK
For more information go to:
www.jud3.flcourts.org

Lost & Found
FOUND MUSICAL
INSTRUMENT in area of Bass
Rd. Please call to identify. 386-
362-3975
LOST BASSETT HOUND Tri-
Color, Female, Name Maggie.
Last seen on CR 250 & 167th
Rd. Call Pam 386-208-5044
LOST MY PURSE in the Live
Oak P.O. Parking Lot on Monday.
If anyone has seen my purse
please return it, I have a lot of
personal items in it. My name is
Judy Huffman my phone # is
362-4970. Please, just let me
know where it's at and I will pick
it up.

Special Notices

















Education

Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training is now
offering our quality Exam Prep
Classes in Lake City, Fl.
Class sizes limited.
Call for details on the next
class!!! 386-755-4401
expresstrainingservices.co
m


SERVICES


Village Oaks II
Apartments
1, 2, & 3 bedroom units.
HUD vouchers accepted.
Hurry in for an application.
Call 386-364-7936,
TDD/TTY 711.
705 NW Drive, Live Oak
"This institution is an equal
opportunity provider, and
employer."
I


Building Materials
METAL ROOFING & STEEL
BUILDINGS. Save $$$ buy
direct from manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with trim & access.
4 profiles in 26 ga. panels.
Carports, horse barns, shop
ports. Completely turn key jobs.
All Steel Buildings, Gibsonton,
Florida. 1-800-331-8341.
www.allsteel-buildings.com
METAL ROOFING. 40 yr
Warranty - Buy direct from
manufacturer. 30/colors in
stock, all accessories. Quick
turn around. Delivery available.
Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. 888-
393-0335
www.GulfCoastSupply.com
Educational
AIRLINE MECHANIC - Train for
high paying Aviation Career.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Job
placement assistance. Call
Aviation Institute of Maintenance
866-314-6283
AVIATION MAINTENANCE I
AVIONICSGraduate in 14
Months. FAA Approved;
financial aid if qualified. Job
placement assistance. Call
National Aviation Academy
Today! 1-800-659-2080 or
NAA.edu
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
FAST! Accredited! At Home! Or
Online!
www.worldhopeacademy.org
305-270-9830
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA!
Fast Affordable & Accredited
PACE Program Free Brochure.
Call Now! 1-800-532-6546 ext.
16
www.continentalacademy.com
NEED YOUR HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA? Finish from home
fast for $399! Nationally
accredited. EZ pay. Free
brochure.
www.diplomaathome.com Call
800-470-4723
BE A CNA! ENROLL TODAY
QUESTTRAINING NOW
IN LIVE OAK
GreatClass! - Great Future!
386-362-1065

Misc. Merchandise
CASH PAID FOR DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS! New, sealed &
unexpired. Most brands,
shipping prepaid. We pay the
most & fast! Call Linda 1-888-
973-3729 or
www.cash4diabeticsupplies.com
DISH - BEST OFFER EVER!
$24.99/mo (for 1 year.) 120+
Channels, FREE HD! FREE
DVR Upgrade! PLUS, Call NOW
& SAVE Over $380! CALL 1-
866-573-3640
EVERY BABY DESERVES a
healthy start. Join more than a
million people walking and
raising money to support the
March of Dimes. The walk starts
at marchforbabies.org.
FREE GPS! FREE PRINTER!
FREE MP3! With Purchase of
New computer. Payments
Starting at Only $29.99/week. No
Credit Check! Call GCF Today.
1-877-212-9978
SWIM SPA LOADED! 3
Pumps, LED lighting, OZ
Cover, Never used $8995. Hot
Tub, Seats 6 , 5HP, 220, 28
jets. $2695. Can deliver. 727-
851-3217
VONAGE Unlimited Calls
Around The World! Call the U.S.
AND 60+ Countries for ONLY
$24.99/Month 30-Day Money
Back Guarantee. Why Pay More?
1-877-872-0079


Misc. Merchandise

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTERS,
NEW KITCHEN & BATH
CABINETS, BOOKCASES,
HOPE CHEST, CUSTOM
CLOSET UNITS, & MORE!!
I can build it the way you want!
V & K Cabinets 229-242-
3295
If no answer please Iv. msg.
FirstDay
HOLIDAY TRAILER 1966
Perfect for Hunting Camp. $600
1992 MOZDA MPV Runs but
needs turn-up $400. WHEEL
CHAIR LIFT for auto. $200 386-
364-6949

Wanted to Buy
CASH FOR YOUR COINS!
Private collector seeking U.S.
coins and currency. Older
varieties, all denominations. I
travel to you ! I pay more than
dealers and pawn! Questions?
Call 352-949-1450.
Garage/Yard Sales
COMMUNITY YARD SALE: Sat
10/16 8-Till? 102nd St & 95th
Court. Hwy 90 E to CR 49, 1
mile S turn left on 102nd St.
Boats/Accessories
BOATS; 1000's of boats for sale
www.floridamariner.com
reaching 6 million homes weekly
throughout Florida. 800-388-
9307, tide charts, broker profiles,
fishing captains, dockside dining
and more.
Guns/Accesories
FirstDay
GUNS: 1-SKS, 1-12 Ga J.C.
Higons Shotgun. 386-938-5832
386-855-0531
Apartments for Rent
CHEAP APARTMENTS, From
$500 per month. Thousands of
apartments available at
discounted rates. Call 1-800-
524-9780 Now!




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, disabili-
ty, familial status or national ori-
gin, or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legaFcus-
todians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under 18.
This newspaper will not know-
ingly accept any advertising for
real estate which is in violation of
the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free number for the hear-
ing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Houses for Rent
FirstDay
NEAR BRANFORD: HOME 3/2
- SWMH 2/1 - DWMH 3/2 on 1.5
ac - DWMH 4/2 on 3.3 ac. Can
rent to OWN 590-0642 or 867-
1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Mobile Homes for Rent
SWMH 2Bd/2Ba Large Yard,
W/D Hook-up. $575mo 1st, Last,
Security. 386-688-3736


Mobile Homes for Rent
FirstDay
DOUBLE AND SINGLE WIDE
MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT
on their own lots in the Live Oak
Area. First & last months rent,
plus security deposit to move in.
No Pets. Call 386-362-2720
FirstDay
LARGE PRIVATE FENCED
PROPERTY in McAlpin, park like
setting, 2bd/2ba, large kitchen,
small bonus rm, fenced kennel
(No Pit Bulls), storage building.
10 min. to Live Oak, 20 min. to
Lake City, 50 min. to Gainesville,
$495/mo, 1st, last sec.dep. $300.
Call 401-369-2351
FirstDay
SWMH 2Bd/1.5Ba Country
Setting, $400mo, $400 Deposit.
386-854-1036
SWMH 2Bd/1Ba Large Bonus
Room. Porch, Car Port, W/D,
CHA. Dowling Pk Area. $500mo,
1st & Secutiry Avail 11/1. 727-
798-0537 727-365-6293

Homes for Sale
FirstDay
OPEN HOUSE/FOR SALE BY
OWNER
1001 Bynum Ave, Live Oak, FL
(corner of Bynum & Barclay)
Brick ext, 3Bd/1Ba, LR, DR, Kit,
Laundry Rm, Bonus Rm, CHA,
HW Floors, 2-Car Carport,
Single family owned/occupied
Remodeled-Repainted. Approx
1624 sq ft, Near Schools. Open
House: Sat. Oct. 16 - 10-4 or
call (904) 206-1235
Mobile Homes for Sale
FirstDay
BIG 4Bd/2.5Ba DWMH on 6
acres. Fenced, utility bldg, back
porch.Bring the animals to graze!
LR, Den w/Fireplace. 386-344-
5024 lugermom@yahoo.com
FirstDay
DWMH 2Bd/2Ba 1997 24X40
New Stove, New Microwave, Up
Grades. Must Be Moved. Asking
$8500. 386-208-0801
FirstDay
LAND HOME PACKAGES.
Columbia & Suwannee Co.
Possible owner finance. Some
Available with Sweat Equity
Loans. 386-344-5024
lugermom@yahoo.com
FirstDay
NEW 5Bd/3BA FLEETWOOD-
Lot Mode-Must Go this month
price. Reduced-10K Only 56K
Special. No Bad Credit,
Financing Avail. w/10K Down
386-623-7495
FirstDay
WE HAVE USED & NEW
HOMES Large Discounts
w/Cash Deals Only. Bank says
move Em Out. Take all offers call
Mike 386-623-4218


"If you can't live at home,
this is the next best place
to live! Everyone here
is so good to the residents."


When you or your loved one need
assistance with the tasks of daily
living, consider Dacier Manor
Assisted Living Facility (ALF
#7641). Our loving, qualified staff
is on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. And our secure, comforting
atmosphere allows our residents
to maintain the highest level of
self-care. Our residents enjoy
a variety of activities and a
supportive environment.
Call us today for more information
or to schedule a free tour.
(386) 658-5552


ADVENT CmRISTIANVMLIAGE
------ AT DOWLING PARK ------
PO Box 4551 * DOWLING PARK, FL 3zo64
(386) 658-5552 * 1-800-955-8771 TTY
1-800-647-3353 .
--- www.acvillage.net '
624956-F


S L! L! L! P
~
~ ~J- ..L~JA.i ~ - ,
Mt~IJW FElEE flW~R~ 1fJ W lii ~ ~ '~' T~


--E-ROLE - -WITI APPRVED CRED- SEE DEALER 1- DETAIHTOS 101 ILLUSTR-IN PU


OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 5


OPEN HOUSE / FOR SALE BY OWNER

1001 Bynum Ave., Live Oak, FL
(corner of Bynum & Barclay)
Brick ext., 3BR, 1 BA, LR, DR, Kit, Laundry Room,
Bonus Room, Central H &A, HW Floors,
2-car carport, Single family owned/occupied,
Remodeled, Fully repainted, Approx. 1624 sq. ft.,
Near schools
Open House: Sat., October 16; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
or call (904) 206-1235
626186-F


I











PAGE 6, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Acreage/Land/Lots for
Sale
GEORGIA - ESCAPE THE
STORMS & HEAT! Beautiful
weather, year round. Low Taxes.
Homesites/Mini-Farms:
1.25acres to 20acs. from
$3750/acre. Near Augusta &
Macon. Owner Financing from
$199/mo. 706-364-4200
Vacation
Property/Sales
GA MOUNTAINS N. Income
producing 3 log cabins on 4.5ac.
Creekside. Fully furnished,
Recently appraised. All for
$495,000 or will sell separately.
706-253-8000
www.npgbrokers.com
GEORGIA BLUE RIDGE
MOUNTAINS-10 ACRES
w/1000ft. on trout stream,
Cutcane Road paved frontage,
county water, building ready, rare
find, $109,000. Owner financing,
E-Z terms/low down. 706-364-
4200
GEORGIA - Crawford County, 85
ACRES - $1,125/AC. Where will
you hunt this season? Other
tractsavailable.
stregispaper.com 478-987-
9700 St. Regis Paper Co.
NC MOUNTAINS Log Cabin
Liquidation. New 1200+ sf
genuine log cabins w/ acreage
$79,900. Plenty of windows,
decks. Need finishing. 866-
738-5522
SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE
FOR CASH!!! Our Guaranteed
Services will Sell/Rent Your
Unused Timeshare for Cash!
Over $78 Million Dollars offered
in 2009!
www.sellatimeshare.com 877-
554-2430
SOUTH CAROLINA 2 acres in
the Santee Cooper Lake area.
Near 1-95. Beautiful building
tract $19,900. Ask about E-Z
financing, low payments. Call
owner: 803-473-7125
TENNESSEE MTNS 435ac
w/timber, creek, river, natural gas
well, springs, city water, utilities,
trails $1800/ac. 2 tracts possible.
Good hunting. No state income
tax. www. tnwithaview.com 1-
888-836-8439
TENNESSEE-OBEY RIVER.
By Owner, 5 Acres. River front,
deep swimming area. $19,900.
Owner financing. Call 931-839-
6141
VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS
GALAX AREA 6 acres on river,
great fishing, private, reduced!
$59,500. Call owner now! 1-
866-275-0442


Real Estate/Misc. Sales
FirstDay
$5500-GREAT GET-A-WAY
cottage or hunting cabin.
EZ to move, wired.
Call 386-590-6125 ASAP! (-8
Commercial/Business
For Sale
HARD TO FIND B4 ZONING
property for sale or lease on
Highway 484 in South Marion
County. 4,700 sq footbuilding on
1 acre. Great for church, clubs,
meetings, etc. For info contact
Realtor Anthony White, 352-547-
3137.
Trucks for Sale
FORD 1981 F-100 3-Speed on
Column Standard, Runs Great,
$1800 or best offer. 386-209-
0528


us at the

paper. i


Classified
Advertising
386-362-1734 ex, 102
fox: 386-364-5578
e-mail:
wwwsuwanneedemocratcom
Mon.-Fri,:
8 am.-5pm,

We'd love to hear from you.

Classified
Marketplace
P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064


Tuff Times Band




and Mike Mullis Variety Show



at The Spirit Oct. 15-16


I-W U T FIA illD


j a~


k L


Mike Mullis
- Courtesy photos


Fall is upon us with glo-
rious cool weather and the
urge to get out and enjoy
music and dinner this
weekend, Oct. 15-16, at
The Spirit of the Suwan-
nee Music Park with the
Tuff Times Band and Mike
Mullis and his band. Whoo


Whee!
Friday night kicks off
the weekend with North
Florida singer/musician
Mike Mullis and his band
Whoo Whee as they pump
out great country and rock
'n roll music. Don't forget
your dancing shoes for this


event.. .they will be shak-
ing the rafters and inviting
the audience to join in
some fun times with them
Friday, Oct. 15. Mike and
his band have become one
of the regulars on Friday
night where you never
know just what will hap-


'1

IsA


pen next during Mike
Mullis' shows!
Saturday, Oct. 16, it's the
Tuff Times Band. The Tuff
Times Band plays blues,
classic rock and a large va-
riety of music to delight
any audience. Seasoned by
years of experience, this
band was formed by musi-
cians who met at East
Coast blues events. Each
member comes from a dif-
ferent cultural and musical
background, which pro-
vides you with a huge vari-
ety of great dancing and
listening music. This easy
listening band will have
you on your feet dancing
the night away Saturday,
Oct. 16, in the Music Hall.
Bring your sweetie, enjoy
dinner, dancing and relax
after a hard week! But, be
ready to answer the urge to
get out on that dance floor
because it's going to hap-
pen!
Admission to the Music
Hall is just $5 per person
each night. Your $5 will be
applied to your evening tab
at the SOS Caf6 and
Restaurant where you'll
find delicious culinary pre-
sentations to delight you at
regular prices. The Music
Hall opens at 6 p.m. Friday
and Saturday evening, mu-
sic begins at 8 p.m.
For more information
about overnight reserva-
tions or any of the upcom-
ing events at the SOSMP
such as Magnolia Fest, Big
Engine Band and the big
Halloween party, Suwan-
nee Spirit Kids Music
Camp, Bear Creek Music
and Art Festival, Raid on
the Suwannee Civil War
Re-enactment, Thanksgiv-
ing dinner and Old Tyme
Farm Days and much
more, call the SOSMP at
386-364-1683, email spir-
it@musicliveshere.com or
go to the website at
www.musicliveshere.com.


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PAGE 6, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA













U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 7


[AskteGy


Dear Classified Guys,
I'm in shock. I was reading the clas-
sifieds the other day when I stum-
bled across an ad in the business
services section. A professional
taxidermist was offering to mount
your pet. Cats, dogs and birds were
his specialty. After I read the ad, I
began to think about it in more detail.
What kind of person would want to
stuff their pet? I personally couldn't
imagine having my Basset Hound,
Barney, stuffed and standing by my
sofa. Granted, he doesn't move that
much now, but I still think it would be
weird. After all, when your pet dies,
isn't it time to just let them rest in
peace? I think keeping them around
in this way is morbid. Why would
someone want to put their loving pet
through all that?
Cash: You have to love the classi-
fieds. You never know what you're
going to find, even in the business serv-
ices section.
Carry: First though, we need to cor-
rect you on something. In the world of
taxidermy, professionals prefer the
term "mounting", not "stuffing".
Considering the amount of work and
artistry involved, using the term "stuff-
ing" can be very insulting.


GUSm

r^~. eof


Duane "Cast
& Todd'
'i


Cash: Today, taxidermy is more than
just a mounted animal head hanging
above the fireplace. Those who get
involved in taxidermy, either as amateurs
or professionals, spend a lot of time re-
creating an animal to a lifelike state,
much like you would see in museums.
Carry: That's likely the draw to
some pet owners. Losing a beloved pet
can be a very traumatic event. And
while mounting your pet may seem like
an odd choice for you, others can find
great comfort in it.
Cash: In fact, some of the most
famous mountings are the animals of
Roy Rogers. He had his legendary
horse, Trigger, mounted along with his


i" Holze
'Carry" Holze


W210/10 10
�2010 The Classified Guys


German Shepherd, Bullet.
Carry: If you consider the alterna-
tives, taxidermy seems like a logical
choice for some. Many people don't live
near a pet cemetery and dislike methods
such as cremation. Others don't want to
bury their pet in the yard just in case the
family moves sometime in the future.
Cash: To those people, this idea may
make perfect sense. Taxidermists can
place a pet in almost any position so it
can be very comforting for an owner to
see their pet in a restful manner.
Carry: I imagine if you ever did
choose to mount your Basset Hound in
his natural state, he wouldn't be stand-
ing, but more likely sleeping by the fire.


Happy Trails
Roy Rogers rode his horse Trigger in
every motion picture he filmed. When
his beloved horse died in 1965 at the
age of 33, Roy had him mounted.
Trigger's hide was dried and stretched
over a plaster likeness that rears on his
hind legs. At a later date, Roy also had
his pet German Shepherd, Bullet, and
Dale Evan's horse, Buttermilk, mount-
ed as well. They were all on display at
the Roy Rogers/Dale Evans museum in
Branson, Missouri, until it closed in
2009.
Reel It In
Nearly any fisherman would love to
mount the "one that got away."
However, unlike mounting other ani-
mals, fish have a unique problem.
When their skin dries, it loses most of
its color, leaving only patterns and
scales. That's why taxidermists need
good artistry skills to repaint the entire
fish from tip to tail and give it a natural
look. So the next time you see a fish
mounted on the wall, keep in mind that
it is more a work of art than just a good
catch.
Do you have a question or funny story about the
classified? Want to just give us your opinion?
We want to hear all about it! Email us at:
comments@dclassifiedguys.com.


Fishing for Truth
After my girlfriend Jennifer and I
divorced our cheating husbands, we
would get together once a month to
catch up. At our most recent luncheon
she told me about her new boyfriend
and how he often takes weekend trips
to go fly-fishing.
I told her that she better be careful
since "fishing" was the excuse that
both our husbands used when they
went away and had affairs.
"I already thought of that," she
conceded. "But I know he's honest
because the last time he came home, he
thanked me for packing his pajamas."
"Pajamas?" I questioned. "How
does that prove anything?"
She laughed and replied, "Because
I packed them in his tackle box!"
(Thanks to Joy K.)


Is this a "taxidermist"
or an auto body specialist?
FOR HIRE ~
S ea~atologist over 10
�s, TaxDermat� u A
years experience, Call or
yrert esand species,
el1


I wwCasiie usco0


(-o, �(? T8NW


Continued From Page 4

Combined Class reunion for
Suwannee High Classes of
1963, 1964, 1965 and 1966
Information has been mailed regarding this event. If you
were ever a part of any of these SHS graduating classes
and have not received your information, please email
your address to classofl964@comcast.net or call Elaine
Vann Garbett (Class of 64) at 386-362-6828.

First Baptist Church of Live
Oak to hold weekly grief
recovery support group
First Baptist Church of Live Oak, FL will begin holding a
weekly grief recovery support group. GriefShare is a
non-denominational Biblically based 13 week program
for people who are struggling with losing a loved one in
death. People can enter at any point in the 13 weeks. It
will be held at 6 pm on Wednesdays. First Baptist Church
is located at 401 W. Howard in Live Oak. For more
information, people may call 386-362-1583 or find us on
the web at www.fbcliveoak.org.

Happy Days are here again
The Suwannee County Animal Control Shelter has
received a $20,000 grant from Florida Animal Friend to
help spay or neuter the pets of low income families in
Suwannee County. This grant is funded through sales of
the official Florida Animal Friend Spay and Neuter
License Plate.
Applications can be picked up at participating local
veterinarian offices and at the shelter, 11150 144th Street,
McAlpin, Fl. There is a co-pay and that will be
determined according to your income. For further
information please call the shelter at 386-208-0072.


60 Day Layaway - 00� INTEREST

ALL Scooters *

& ATVVs
Layaway now
S for Christmas

G R A 0 Y 500 West Howard St. (US 90), Live Oak
iWRl 5 386-.62-4012



. .LtUL. LLI.LILC C, L1--LL.


SHS Class of 1970
40 year reunion planned
The SHS Class of 1970 is planning their 40 year reunion
on Oct 23, 2010. If you were a member ,had a child,
sibling or relative in this graduating class, please email
your name ( maiden & married), address, phone number
& email address to suwanneehighl970@gmail.com.
Please join our Facebook page, Suwannee High Class of
1970 40 Year Class Reunion to see information and
updates.

Suwannee High Class of 1990
The Suwannee High Class of 1990 20th reunion will be
held on October 22, 2010 and Oct. 23, 2010. The cost
will be $35/graduate and $10/spouse or additional guests.
If you were a member of the graduating class and are
planning to attend or would like more information, please
email your name, address, phone number to Melissa
(Kennedy) McKire at mckire4@windstream.net or Amy
Tucker Bauldree at(352)231-2683/(386)776-1904.
You can also visit our class website at shsl990.webs.com.
We will be having a class meeting on Saturday, August
21, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. at Florida Wholesale Homes on
90. We look forward to seeing you there or hearing from
you.


Adoption

Pregnant? Considering
adoption?A childless,
successful, woman seeks to
adopt & needs your help!
Financially secure. Expenses
paid. Call Margie. (ask for
michelle/adam). (800)790-5260.
FL Bar# 0150789

Business Opportunities

THINK CHRISTMAS - START
NOW! OWN A RED HOT!
DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS,
MAILBOX OR DISCOUNT
PARTY STORE FROM
$51,900 WORLDWIDE! 100%
TURNKEY CALL NOW
(800)518-3064
WWW.DRSS4.COM

Equipment For Sale

NEW Norwood SAWMILLS-
LumberMate-Prohandles logs
34" diameter, mills boards 28"
wide. Automated quick-cycle-
sawing increases efficiency up
to 40%!
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/
300N (800)661-7746 Ext 300N

Financial

IT'S YOUR MONEY!Lump
sums paid for structured
settlement or fixed annuity
payments. Rapid, high payouts.
Call J.G. Wentworth. (866)294-
8772. A+ Better Business
Bureau rating.

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH
NOW!!! $$$As seen on TV.$$$
Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need
$500-$500,000++within 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY NOW BY


Looking for classmates
of Class of 1959
Would like to contact any classmates from the Class of
1959 (in the event of upcoming reunions, etc.) Contact
Joyce Parker at 407-886-0601 or write to: Joyce Parker,
4039 Visa Lane, Apopka, Fl 32703.

Haven Hospice hosts Helping
Hands Volunteer Orientation
When: Every Tuesday morning at 10 a.m.
Where: Haven Hospice Suwannee Valley Care Center,
6037 W. U.S. Hwy 90, Lake City, Fl. Call Carolyn Long
at 386-752-9191 for more information.

New Commander Post #107
New Commander Post #107 American Legion is Richard
(Dick) Lees Sr. For more information contact Hilde
Schmid 776-2123.

TOPS weigh-loss support
available locally
(It's now your time)


CONTINUED ON PAGE 8


(877)484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com

WANTED: LIFE AGENTS.Earn
$500 a Day, Great Agent
Benefits. Commissions Paid
Daily, Liberal Underwriting.
Leads, Leads, Leads. LIFE
INSURANCE, LICENSE
REQUIRED. Call (888)713-
6020

Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train
for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid
if qualified - Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.

Out of Area Real Estate

NC Mountain Land Mountain
top tract, 2.6 acres, private, large
public lake 5 min away, owner
must sell, only $25,500, call
(866)275-0442












ANF
ADVEPTI'ING' rJET% , i'O K Q - H ORIDA

Classified | ID p.i? Metro D[) Jy


[Week of Oct. 11,2010!
569559-F j


PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com

Help Wanted

Colonial Life seeks
entrepreneurial professionalwith
sales experienceto become a
District Manager. Life/Health
license is required. Substantial
earnings potential. Please
contact
meredith.brewer@coloniallife. c
om or call (904)424-5697

13 DRIVERS NEEDED! Top
5% Pay!Excellent Benefits
Latest Technology. Need CDL-
A & 3 mos recent OTR.
(877)258-8782
www.meltontruck. corn

Drivers-CDL/A $2,000 SIGN-
ON BONUS!Start up to .42
CPM. Good Home Time and
Benefits. OTR Experience
Required. No Felonies. Lease
Purchase Available. (800)441-
4271 x FL-100

THR & Associates, the world's
largest traveling road show, is
seeking Buyers, Assistant
Managers, Managers and
District Managers. Experience
with antiques, collectibles,
coins, precious metals and sales
are highly desired. Must be
willing to travel and potentially
relocate. Earn 35K-125K. To
apply go to
www.thrassociates.com/careers

Drivers - FOOD TANKER
DRIVERS NEEDED OTR
positions available NOW! CDL-
A w/ Tanker REQ'D.
Outstanding pay & Benefits!
Call a recruiter TODAY!


t i arthmUmn www.nflaonline.com


OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 7


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


5738-FC t I:Is A vm heCo e











PAE8OTOBE 3&1, 00UCASSFE MAKEPLC W.FLANLECO-SRVGNRT H LRD N OT ERI


Continued From Page 7
TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) is an effective weight-
loss solution that yields real results. With the average
waistline of North Americans growing at the same time
prices continue to rise, people are looking for cost effect
weight-loss support that works. That annual TOPS
membership fee is only $26 making TOPS one of the
most affordable options available. Monthly dues are $5.
Visitors are welcome to attend their first TOPS meeting
free of charge. TOPS FL 798 meets at Live Oak
Community Church of God 10639 US 129 South every
Wednesday morning with weigh in beginning at 7:45
a.m., meeting begins at 9 a.m. through 10 a.m. For more
information call Barbara at (386) 362-5933. It's never too
late to start losing those unwanted pounds.

Donate your old cars
Now that spring has arrived, people may be thinking of
donating their old cars as part of a clean up. The Boys
and Girls Clubs would be happy to take their old cars.
People donating to the Clubs will not only get rid of the
unwanted car but will be contributing to the clubs. Boys
and Girls Clubs really work with kids in most
communities and offer a safe place for them. If you wish
to donate a car, call 800-246-0493. Not only will
donators be helping the kids, the will be able to take sale
price as a contribution for income tax purposes.

Talent Search
Do you sing or play and instrument? Do you act or
dance? Do you like to read or spend time with a friend in
wonderful conversation? WE WANT YOU! Suwannee
Health Care & Rehab Center is looking for your talent for
our residents. Dinner for two - $45; One night at the
Beach - $125; One hour volunteering to make memories
that last forever - PRICELESS! Call: Lynn Brannon,
Activities Director 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.

Customers needed!
Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host Dairy Queen Benefit
Night the second Tuesday of every month from 6-8 p.m.
to help buy books for Suwannee Middle School.

Donations needed!
Suwannee County Environmental Watchdogs, a non-
profit organization, seeks donations for yard sale
merchandise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.
CJBAT tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): CJBAT
(Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC Testing
Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required for
acceptance into Corrections & Law Enforcement


1I


I


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91 *

~ ~.5


programs. Photo ID required. Pre-registration &
scheduling time and date are required. To register please
call 850-973-9451.

College Placement Tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): College
Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16),
5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Services 24
hours before test. For information please call 850-973-
9451.

TABE tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.

Greater Visions Support Group
Addiction Support Group: Greater Visions faith-based
addictions support group meets at the Grace Manor
Restaurant. Meetings are held on Thursday mornings at
9:30 a.m. This group provides spiritual and emotional
support in a non-judgmental setting. Come experience the
freedom from addictions that is found in Christ. Greater
Visions is an outreach of Christ Central-Live Oak. For
more information contact 208-1345.

Suwannee County Republican
Executive Committee to meet
The Suwannee County Republican Executive Committee
meets in the council chambers of Live Oak City Hall at 7
p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. If the first
Thursday is the first day of the month, the meeting will
be held on the following Thursday. Each meeting has a
guest speaker or current issues will be discussed. All are
welcome to attend. For more information call Chairman
Carl Meece at 386-776-1444.

SREC seeking location
in Branford
Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc., a non-profit
organization is seeking a location in the Branford area
that could be used to serve meals to persons 60 years of
age or older. Any business, organization or church that
has space available and would be interested in assisting in
this much needed service to the elderly population of
Branford, should contact Bruce Evans, Senior Center
Director, at 362-1164 or Janis Owen, Director of Client
Services, at 362-4115, ext. 240.


Each Kit includes:
* 3 Bright 11" x 14" All-weather Signs
* Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels
* Successful Tips for a "No Hassle" Sale
* Pre-Sale Checklist
* Sales Record Form


Run your Yard Sale in the
Wednesday North Florida Focus &
Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds
and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.
Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
569561-F/


FO


Love a mystery?
Try locating your ancestors by working on your family
tree. The Suwannee Valley Gciic.ii-., Society invites
you to join and learn how to find your ancestors.
Membership is $30 for a single member or $35 for a
family. Corporate membership is also available for
donations of $100 or more (tax deductible). Meetings are
held on the first Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM at
the GCc.,i -. Center at 215 Wilbur Street SW in Live
Oak. The library is open on Tuesday and Thursday from
9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and the talented folks there will be
glad to help. For more information call Jinnie or Alice at
386-330-0110.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly
(TOPS)
TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, is a non-profit weight
loss support group. We meet every Thursday morning at
First Advent Christian Church at 699 Pinewood Drive in
Live Oak, located next to the Vo-Tech. We all know how
difficult is to lose weight. As a group we support each
other through thick and thin. We welcome men as well as
ladies.
Weigh-in is from 8 - 8:50 with the meeting from 9 - 10
a.m. You are welcome to visit us and see if this is what
you are looking for.
For more information, please call Pat (386) 935-3720 or
Sherry (386) 776-2735.

Live Oak Partnership meeting
schedule changes
The Live Oak Partnership Revitalization Board will meet
on the first and third Tuesdays of each month at 3:30 p.m.
The meetings will be held at the Live Oak City Hall
complex. Unless otherwise noted, these meetings will be
held in the City Hall Annex building, east of the main
City Hall office.

MOAA meets fourth
Thursday
MOAA (Military Officers Association of America,
Suwannee River Valley Chapter) meets fourth Thursday,
6:30 p.m., Elks Club, Lake City for dinner and program.
Info: Steve Casto 386-497-2986.

Free English-speaking
and literacy classes
Provided by Columbia County School Districtis Career
and Adult Education Program. Where: Wellborn, Florida,
Unity of God Ministries, Inc., 12270 County Road 137


CONTINUED ON PAGE 9


Each Kit Includes:
* 2 All-Weather Fluorescent "For Sale" Signs
* Successful Tips
"Get Top Dollar for Your Used Car"
* Pre-Sale Checklist
* Vehicle Options Window Display
* E-Z Closing Forms
including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale


Run your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday
North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat
Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.*
Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
*Not valid with the $18.95 special 569562-F


Classifieds As Individual AsYoL



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It's fast, easy, convenient, and always available!

To create your customized classified ad visit

www.nflaonline.com

And click on "Buy a Classified"


And Make Your Event a Success! ^ S^^s A


Sell Your Car for "Top Dollar"


PAGE 8, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Your Ad


I


lIkIiYARD











U LSIIE AKTPAE-WWFLONLN.OM-SRIGNTHFODA AND SOT GOGA OTOE R 3&1,21,PG


Continued From Page 8
When: Every Thursday, 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Activities for
children will be provided. Please contact 386-755-8190
for additional information.
Suwannee High Class of 1980
The Suwannee High Class of 1980 is planning their 30
year class reunion. If you were a member, had a child,
sibling or relative as part of the graduating class, please
email your name (maiden and married), address, phone
number and email address to shsclassl980@yahoo.com.
Or call 386-362-6309 to leave a message. We look
forward to hearing from you and seeing you at the
reunion.
Class of 1971 reunion planned
The class of 1971 is preparing for our 40th class reunion.
We are searching for addresses and emails of all
classmates. If you are a parent, grandparent, or sibling of
a former classmate and can help us with this task you are
asked to please contact suwanneeclassreunion @
ymail.com or call 386-362-3895 and leave a message.
Anyone who would like to help on the planning
committee is more than welcome. We look forward to
hearing from all our classmates.
Senior Citizen Club
Madison Travel & Tours
Oct. 14-26


CNHI News Service
VALDOSTA - A student who wore a ri-
val school's sweatshirt to school was dis-
missed from class and placed on in-school
suspension.
Mark Love Day, a 15-year-old student at
Lowndes High School, got in trouble this
week for wearing a Valdosta High School
sweatshirt to class.
His first-period teacher deemed the other
school's shirt a disruption. When Day
would not turn it inside out, he was sent to
the principal's office, the student said.
Spirits are running high this week on the
eve of the "Winnersville Classic" - the an-
nual football game between the two
schools.
Between classes Principal Wes Taylor
saw Day in the hallway and also told him to


Las Vegas and the Grand Canyon - 13 days, 12 nights
Oct. 14-26, 2010. Total Cost $1220. Final payment due
by 8/8/2010. For more information contact Charlene and
Walter Howell (386) 842-2241.
Senior Citizen Club
Madison Travel & Tours
Dec. 6-10
Smoky Mountains "Show Trip" 5 days, 4 nights Dec. 6-
10, 2010. Total Cost $490. Final payment due by 9/30/10.
For more information contact
Charlene and Walter Howell (386)
842-2241. I A ...


Gospel Sing
at River Run
Campground
There will be a Gospel sing at River
Run Campground, located between
Branford and Ft. White, the last
Friday of each month, starting at 6
p.m. April through October. It will
be held in an open air pavilion. We
ask that you bring your own lawn
chair. There is a concession stand
that will be selling food. If you play
or sing, you are welcome to join in.
For more information call 386-935-
6553.


wan


remove the sweatshirt; again, Day refused.
A check of the school handbook showed the
student was not violating policy.
Keisha Moore, Day's mother, said her son
was given a week in ISS for insubordina-
tion. "He is not there for football. He is
there for an education," Moore said. "The
adults are the ones making a big ruckus out
of it. What they are doing is childish."
Lowndes County School Superintendent
Dr. Steve Smith agreed with Taylor stating
that if an article of clothing a student is
wearing causes a disruption in a class, it is
a violation of the dress code.
"The student refused to comply, refused
to follow directions, that's the issue," Tay-
lor said.
Information for this story was provided
by the Valdosta (Ga.) Daily Times.


Senior Citizens will NOT meet
in October
Senior Citizens will NOT meet in October. We will
resume our meetings the first Monday in November at
10:30 a.m. in the west annex of the Suwannee Co.
Coliseum.


it to Subscribe?


*


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Democrat,
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and The Mayo Free
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Student suspended for


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buubW-�l


OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 9


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I

















Going green with alpacas


p. 4


X.

.L . .










- -
' .


410
.4 - -
1 -,


LEFT: An alpaca costume contest.
ABOVE: Up close and personal with an alpaca.
- Courtesy photos


Iconic television town of

'Mayberry'

marks 50th anniversary
Page 2


With world focus now on going green and
making a soft imprint on the earth, the alpaca is
taking center stage on the agricultural scene.
Alpacas are fairly new to North America
with the first importation of this small camelid
into the U.S. in 1984. Alpacas are native to
South America, particularly Peru, Bolivia and
Chile and were coveted by the Incan royalty.
4-H, FFA and like clubs are increasingly in-
volved as youngsters enjoy interacting with the
gentle, humming alpaca which weigh between
100 and 200 lbs. at maturity. Baby alpacas,
crias, typically weigh about 17 lbs. at birth. As
five alpacas can be supported on just one acre
of good pasture, the aspect of raising alpacas
for the gentleman farmer is easily within reach.
City dwellers are included in the opportunity
with many larger alpaca farms offering board-
ing services. This eco-friendly animal needs to
be in a group of at least two to prosper, requires
only about two pounds of grass hay or grass
per day per 125 pounds of body weight, plus
some mineral supplementation. They tread gen-
tly on soft, padded feet, much like a dog's foot,
that do not tear up pasture as hooved animals
do. Alpacas have only four teeth on the bottom
and a hard gum called a dental pad on the top
of their mouths, allowing them to nibble off
only the tops of grass with less disturbance to
plant roots than other grazing livestock. They
also have molars at the back of their jaws for
chewing cud.
Articles in publications such as The Wall
Street Journal have spurred interest in the in-
vestment opportunities and tax benefits of own-
ership. The relative ease of raising this gentle,
fiber animal appeals increasingly to those head-
ing into retirement.
The number of alpaca farms is increasing in
Florida and across the U.S. Two types of al-
paca, differentiated by their fiber type, allows
for fleece preference. The Huacaya (wa-kai-a)
has dense, highly crimped, soft fleece that
grows perpendicular to the body. The Suri
(surrey), rarer of the two breeds, has a
straighter, very lustrous fiber that drapes down
the side of the body.
While raising alpacas offers one aspect of the
benefits to this livestock option, the fiber pro-
duced with a once a year shearing is the icing.
Recognized as the elite, natural fiber, there are
22 natural colors. White and fawn fleeces are
very easily dyed. Each alpaca can produce be-
tween 4 and 10 pounds of prime fleece each
year. The fiber is spun into yam and can then
be knitted, woven or felted. Alpaca fiber does
not contain lanolin, is hypoallergenic, and ap-
peals to those who cannot wear wool.
Alpacas are a natural for creating sustainable
agriculture. More details are readily obtained
from the Georgia Alpaca Association. This or-
ganization is presenting The Royal Alpaca
Challenge on November 6 & 7, 2010 at the site
of the Olympic equestrian events, the Georgia
International Horse Park, in Conyers, GA (28
miles east of Atlanta just off 1-20). This is an
opportunity to talk directly with the owners
who raise and show these unique, fiber ani-
mals. Children and adults will delight in this
free, family friendly event! www.RoyalAl-
pacaChallenge.com or RoyalAlpacaChal-
lenge@alpacamoon.com.


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PAGE 10, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


1 11,713-1 C*Ast to Coast. Ar"r, IM17=711-1 1













North Florida's


Amber


Lee Abbott


seeks Colgate Country Showdown state title


Continued From Page 1

America will receive an
all expense paid trip to
compete in January 2011
on the Ryman Auditorium
stage in Nashville, Ten-
nessee for a prize of
$100,000 and the title of
Best New Act in Country
Music at the 29th Annual
Colgate Country Show-
down.
The Florida finals will
be held at Silver Springs
Resort at 5656 East Silver
Springs Boulevard, on SR
40, Ocala. Take exit 352
east off 1-75 or exit 268
west off 1-95 to reach the
park. Call 352-236-2121
or email ssinfo@silver-
springs.com for more in-
formation.
Among the talent Am-
ber will compete against
at state will be 2009 North
Florida Colgate Country
Showdown winner Emily
Brook, who won The Big
98/Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park contest last
year when she was just
10. Emily also is among
the four winners of the
first ever Colgate Country
Showdown Songwriting
Contest. Each of the four
were pictured on the
Showdown website and
received an acoustic guitar
autographed by LeAnn
Rimes. The grand prize
winner will be announced
later this month and the
winner's name and song
title will be announced by
LeAnn Rimes during the
29th Annual Colgate
Country Showdown in


rw .win tsr
r~CI~Uu* W"q t

~ in


Amber Lee Abbott 2010 Colgate winner. -Courtesy photo


January 2011.
The 2009 Colgate Best
New Act In Country Mu-
sic winner Johnny Bul-
ford, now an up and com-
ing country singer and
prolific songwriter under
contract to a major


recording company in
Nashville, won the Florida
finals at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park and
then won the national con-
test.
During the wins by Bul-
ford, Abbott and Brooke,


Kickin' Kevin Thomas of the Big 98 in Live Oak. - Courtesy photo


the Big 98's DJ and radio
personality Kickin' Kevin
Thomas was the emcee.
The SOSMP has live
performances four nights
a week, is the home of the
largest country music fes-
tival in the South each


April, the Suwannee River
Jam, and hosts SpringFest,
Magnolia Fest, Wanee,
Bear Creek Music and Art
Festival plus many other
musical events each year
such as the North Florida
Colgate Country Show-


down in conjunction with
The Big 98.
For more information,
call the SOSMP at 386-
364-1683, email
spirit@musicliveshere. co
m or go to the website at
www. musicliveshere. corn.


Bombing mission story retold, 66 years later


LEFT:
John Szczur, 86, wears
a replica of the leather
flight jacket that he lost
while he was a prisoner
of war. He received the
jacket from Calvin Rap-
son, whose father was a
member of Szczur's
squad.
- Photo: John Rucosky/The Tri-
bune-Demorat, Johnstown, Pa.


Calvin -apson


By Arlene Johns
CNHI News Service
JOHNSTOWN, Pa. -- Calvin Rap-
son was not yet born when his father's
B-24 was shot out of the skies above
Romania during World War II.
Yet Rapson, who just retired as vice
president of the United Auto Workers
General Motors Department in De-
troit, searched for two years for the
last living member of his father's
squad.
His journey brought him to John-
stown to meet 86-year-old John
Szczur.
Szczur and nine other U.S. Army
Air Corpsmen, including Rapson's fa-
ther - also named Calvin Rapson -
were on a bombing mission to the
Ploesti oil refineries on May 31, 1944,
when they were hit by enemy fire.
Szczur and one other man were able
to deploy their parachutes, but Rapson
and the other seven men went down
with the plane.
Rapson said his family did not talk
much about the war.5
"But as I got older, I always won-
dered why he was shot down over Ro-
mania," he said. "I just wanted to


know what I could about him."
It was his association with veterans
in the UAW that piqued his interest in
finding a survivor of the plane.
After some research, they found the
name of the plane - Sleepytime Gal -
and the name of the one living sur-
vivor - Szczur.
After months of phone calls and
planning, the long-anticipated meeting
took place at a dinner party at John
and Angie Szczur's Geistown home.
"He told the whole story," Rapson
said.
Szczur, who was 19 at the time, re-
members much of the events of that
day.
"My buddy tapped me on the shoul-
der and he said 'Look over there.'
There was a hole in the wing about 3
inches in diameter."
Szczur grabbed his parachute.
"The plane blew up as soon as I
snapped it on," he said.
"When I bailed out, I saw one chute
above me and that was the bom-
bardier. He was pretty well burned up
on his face.
"As I left the plane, I looked back
and I saw (Rapson) and another


crewmember sitting on the floor. They
didn't have their chutes on."
Rapson said it was hard to hear of
his father's final minutes.
And it wasn't easy for Szczur to
tell.
"He said he'll never forget my dad
looking at him," Rapson said.
Although Szczur made it out of the
plane safely, his ordeal was not over.
"When I hit the ground there was a
cemetery right near there and I hid in
the cemetery in the bushes until they
captured me."
Szczur was kept with more than
1,000 other men in a prison in
Bucharest.
The prisoners could see the action
continue in the skies above them.
"We saw our planes going over and
hitting targets. We saw our planes tak-
ing fire."
Szczur said the prisoners were treat-
ed well.
"The Romanians liked us," he said.
"Even though they were on the side of
Germany."
After nearly three months, the men
were freed.
"The Russians came through and


liberated us."
Rapson said hearing the story was
very meaningful for him.
"I think it closed a loop for me -
and the kind of people (the Szczurs)
were made it mean more," Rapson
said.
"They just couldn't have been
nicer."
Rapson presented Szczur with an
exact replica of the leather flight jack-
et that he lost while he was a prisoner
of war.
Rapson was given a replica of the
B-24. And one of Szczur's daughters,
Connie Ramseth, a retired lieutenant
colonel with the U.S. Army, presented
him with a Purple Heart with his fa-
ther's name on it.
"That really meant something to
me," Rapson said. "My mother had
(the original) but I don't know what
happened to it."
Angie Szczur is very proud of her
husband of 60 years.
"You can't find too many like him,"
she said. "He's a great husband and a
great father."
Arlene Johns writes for The Tri-
bune-Democrat in Johnstown, Pa.


OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 11


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA














PAGE 12, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA
U U


Schools








without








walls


Education Professor Rick

Ferdig seeks to understand the

impact of virtual environments

on gaming and education


By Tim Lockette

GAINESVILLE - If you grew up
geeky in the 1980s, Rick Ferdig's
workplace may closely resemble
your idea of heaven.
Here in the Educational Technol-
ogy lab in the basement of Norman
Hall on the University of Florida
campus, you'll find rows of Macin-
tosh computers where, every sum-
mer, middle-school kids design
their own video games. A 4-foot-
tall stuffed Sonic the Hedgehog
lounges on a well-worn sofa near a
rack filled with Wired, GamePro
and other computer-oriented maga-
zines. In a side room, you'll find a
row of PlayStations, set up for a
Tecmo Bowl tournament. It's a
Gen-Xer's idea of an after-school
paradise.
Your grandmother might not ap-
prove, but there is a method to all
this computer madness. Ferdig, a
35-year-old associate professor in
UF's College of Education, is at
the vanguard of a new generation
of scholars who understand that
video games just might be good for
you. Rather than rotting kids'
brains, those "wasted" hours in
front of a glowing screen may actu-
ally have helped build better prob-
lem-solving skills, or so the new
theory goes. And Ferdig is literally
taking that idea to school, explor-
ing the ways video games - real,
fun video games - can help teach-
ers get their ideas across.
"Computers have been in the
classroom for a couple of decades,"
he says. "But we're just now be-
ginning to understand how to really
use them."
Ferdig is the editor of the Hand-
book of Research on Effective
Electronic Gaming in Education,
the first-ever comprehensive com-
pilation of research on what has be-
come a hot topic: the educational
benefits of video games. Drawing
on research from 150 authors in 15
countries, the 1,759-page, three-
volume collection goes far beyond
the old "skill-and-drill" approach
that characterized early efforts at
educational computing - efforts
like Oregon Trail and Reader Rab-
bit - and asks deeper questions
about the games people play. Why
do some kids struggle to learn their
ABCs but have no problem memo-
rizing the names of characters in
Pokemon? How can we make edu-
cational games with the appeal and
addictive power of Super Mario?
Better yet, how can we turn exist-
ing games into teaching tools?
"People are beginning to realize
that when kids disappear into an
online world, they're learning at an
amazing rate," he says. "But most
of us don't realize that they're also
developing self-confidence and
identity, and maybe even trying a
new job."
Ferdig has been conducting in-
depth research on the psychology
of video gaming for most of his
life, though for much of that time
he didn't know it was research. As
a kid in Holland, Mich., he whiled
away the snow days in front of a
video console. As a graduate stu-
dent at Michigan State University
and later as a visiting scholar at
WSP Teacher Training College in
Krakow, Poland, he would study
and teach educational psychology
by day, then spend his nights blast-
ing his colleagues to smithereens in
networked games of Doom and


Duke Nukem.
One of Ferdig's friends suggest-
ed his gaming might be, well, un-
healthy. It might have been meant
as a warning, but Ferdig and his
gaming buddies took the question
more philosophically.
"We started this in-depth conver-
sation about what we were accom-
plishing by doing this," Ferdig
says.
For Ferdig, that conversation
grew, and is still growing. Apply-
ing his background in educational
psychology to the evolving Inter-
net, Ferdig spent the next several
years exploring the implications the
new online world held for teachers
and students.
Pioneering though it is, gaming
is not Ferdig's only avenue of re-
search, or even his best known. As
the principal investigator on a
$600,000 grant from the AT&T
Foundation, Ferdig is heading the
first comprehensive assessment of
practices in the nation's growing
number of virtual K-12 schools.
More than a decade has passed
since states across the U.S. began
investing in "distance education"
programs for K-12 students - pro-
grams that would use the Internet
to allow students anywhere to take
courses from teachers qualified in
hard-to-find subjects such as Latin,
macroeconomics or Advanced
Placement physics. The boom in
online learning has opened new
academic doors to home-schooled
kids and students in rural areas, but
there is little data to show whether
the rising tide has lifted all boats.
"In most virtual schools, the final
grades are sent to the schools and
are stored and tracked by the
schools," Ferdig says. "Most states
haven't done a detailed analysis of
which courses are really effective
in producing learning gains, or
which techniques are working."
Ferdig isn't accusing the virtual
schools of selling "silicon snake
oil." There's already research to
show that, in general, online stu-
dents learn just as much or more
than students in traditional class-
rooms. What's lacking in virtual
high schools, however, is a detailed
look at who is learning, how much,
and why.
"Florida, for instance, may know
that its online students generally do
well on standardized tests," Ferdig
says. "But does virtual schooling
work as well for students in Miami
as it does for students in
Gainesville? And if it doesn't, why
not? That's what teachers really
want to know, and that's the kind
of data we're collecting."
The project reaches well beyond
Florida, however. In all, 22 states
are participating, offering Ferdig
data on millions of students. And
Ferdig is looking at more than just
grades and lesson plans. The most
important elements in online learn-
ers' success, he says, may not be
the things you see on the computer
screen.
"Learning online takes more than
a teacher, a student and a couple of
computers," Ferdig says. "We're
very interested in the support the
students receive. How much help
do they get from parents, and from
mentor teachers in their schools?
Do administrators understand the
role of virtual schooling, and how
does their understanding affect the
results their students have in online
courses?"


Alex Brown, a 17-year-old senior
at Santa Fe High School, has taken
two virtual classes and knows what
is necessary to succeed in them.
Brown took Personal Fitness and
Life Management Skills through
Florida Virtual School, a 90-course
virtual school that served 60,000
K-12 students in the '07-'08 school
year. She received an A in both
classes.
"My teacher was really nice and
helpful," Alex says. "It was really
easy to learn because I got to do it
at my own pace. I could work out
on my treadmill, under the fan,
with my music on."
Alex would study modules on-
line and converse with fellow
classmates in message boards. She
also would speak to her instructor
on the phone to discuss that week's
topic.
"I liked the setup a lot," she says.
"It was easy to express yourself
and work on your own schedule."
That's an aspect Alex's mother,
Chris Brown, liked as well.
"The teacher was available
throughout the day," Brown says.
"I could talk to her about how Alex
was doing whenever I needed to."
Alex had to exercise regularly
and record her activities in a work
log. Brown would then sign off that
the log was accurate.
It was never a problem making
sure Alex did the work, Chris
Brown says.
"I think the flexibility was key.
She would have had to drop anato-
my or art, which she really loved,"
if the classes hadn't been available
online.
Chris Brown acknowledged that
engaged parents are essential to
virtual schooling, though.
"A student without an involved
parent could make the work logs
up."
While many virtual school teach-
ers have successfully made the
transition from the classroom, as
the program grows Ferdig worries
that there won't be enough techni-
cally savvy instructors. That's why
Ferdig is working with colleagues
at UF and bucking tradition by pi-
loting the nation's first online
teaching internship.
"The old adage was that you
needed to have three to five years
of classroom experience in order to
excel in an online teaching envi-
ronment," Ferdig says. "But it's re-
ally kind of hard to see why that
face-to-face teaching requirement
is in place."
In the traditional classroom, Fer-
dig notes, an expert teacher is one
who can diagram sentences or do
long division while monitoring 15
to 30 kids in a single room. Any-
one who has tried that can tell you
that it takes a special talent, and
most teachers look unfavorably on
any teacher preparation program
that doesn't require its students to
get some experience in the class-
room.
Teaching online requires special
talents, too, but not necessarily the
ones you need in a face-to-face
classroom, Ferdig says.
"Online, I don't have to worry
about whether Johnny is throwing
paper at Sarah, or Sarah is sticking
gum under her chair," Ferdig says.
"But I do have to worry about a
number of other things - like cre-
ating community among students
who can't see each other and mod-
erating discussions online."


In cooperation with the Florida
Virtual School (the nation's largest
virtual K-12 school), Ferdig recent-
ly supervised a group of education
majors in an on-the-job training ex-
perience that had them looking
over the shoulders of the state's
best online teachers, all without
leaving Ferdig's lab in the base-
ment of historic Norman Hall.
The virtual internship may go
against the grain of the teaching
profession, but it's just one exam-
ple of Ferdig's outside-the-box ap-
proach to education and technolo-
gy. For another, just follow Ferdig
on one of his trips to Rwanda,
where he is helping school officials
come up with ways to bring 21st-
century educational technology to
schools that sometimes can't even
afford pencils and paper.
"Rwanda is probably the last
place most Americans would ex-
pect kids to be using computers in
schools," Ferdig says. "After all,
we're talking about a place where
students sometimes have to prac-
tice writing in the dirt because they
can't afford school supplies. But
they're ready."
Known to most of the world for
the brutal civil war it endured in
the 1990s, Rwanda is looking for
ways to start over, rebuild and at-
tract foreign investment. As in
many African countries, Rwanda's
educators have big dreams for pub-
lic education, but they lack the in-
frastructure to make those dreams a
reality.
But the Rwandans see their un-
der-resourced schools as clean
slates, ready to be converted into
21st-century wired classrooms.
Provided, of course, that someone
finds computers they can afford.
Ferdig, whose travel was funded
by UF's Center for African Studies,
has been looking for ways to use
handheld computers to meet those
needs. While people in the United
States use PDAs mostly as portable
address books, the tiny devices
have far more computing power
than the Apple IIe computers
American schools were using in
Ferdig's high school years. PDAs
are easily transported from school
to school, and unlike the famed
"$100 laptop," they're readily
available right now.
Ferdig is also looking for ways
to introduce software that meets the
Rwandans where they live. Too of-
ten, when educational books or
computer games make their way to
crowded African cities and remote
rural villages, they're hand-me-
downs from the West, depicting
suburban environments that are
alien to many Africans. Ferdig is
looking for ways to Africanize the
content of the educational software
the Rwandans use in the future.
While Rwanda may seem worlds
away from his lab in Gainesville,
Ferdig sees a common theme in all
of his work in educational technol-
ogy. Whether you're bringing
handheld computers to Africa or
setting up a virtual high school in
the U.S., he says, educational com-
puting is about more than devices
with bells and whistles. The com-
puter works as an educational tool
because it gives kids a chance to
use their knowledge to create new
things - and the power to show
those creations to the public.
"If kids aren't creating some-
thing," he says. "They aren't learn-
ing."


PAGE 12, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA











U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 13


The Fubul







Flavors of














FAMILY FEATURES
F all brings a whole new set
of flavors to the table, and
that's reason enough to
celebrate with friends.
Award-winning celebrity chef A I
and cookbook author Michael
Chiarello has created some deli- -
cious seasonal dishes that make
the most of autumn's bounty and
make it easy to entertain.
I[ ., l il I, .. I ..... I,, rill
food for your friends and family, Chef Michael
the most important thing you can Chiarello
do is start your recipes with the
best possible ingredients," says Chiarello. I 'ij.. *.. makes
it easy to fill your pantry with the very finest ingredients."
Using Progresso 100% natural broth and panko bread
crumbs, Chiarello has created dishes with exceptional
:11 1. ] .J p ,,....1 them with the award-winning wines of
the Cavit Collection.
Find more seasonal recipes at www.progressofoods.com
and www.cavitcollection.com.


Makes 8 servings
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Start to Finish: 30 minutes
8 portions boneless turkey breast (4 ounces each)
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 eggs, beaten
2 cups Progresso plain panko crispy bread crumbs


1 stick (8 tablespoons)
unsalted butter
1 package (18 ounces)
frozen squash ravioli
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh
sage or 2 teaspoons
dried sage
11/2 cups fresh cranberries
3 tablespoons dark
molasses
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1 cup Progresso chicken
broth or
reduced-sodium
chicken broth
Salt and pepper
Bring 4 quarts lightly salted water
to a boil in a large pot.
Between two sheets of plastic
wrap, pound turkey breast pieces
to an even 1/4-inch thickness with
a meat mallet. If you don't have a
meat mallet, the back of a frying
pan will work fine. You can do this
a day ahead and leave them stored
in the plastic wrap, folded over on
each other. You can also ask a
good butcher to cut and pound the
turkey for you.
Heat olive oil in a large saut6
pan over medium-high heat.
Lightly coat turkey pieces with
flour, cii. p ,,i ,rt excess; dip in
beaten eggs and then dredge in
bread crumbs. When oil is hot and
bubbling, add turkey pieces. Do
not crowd the pan. Let brown
about I minute, then turn to cook
the second side, another 30 seconds.
The turkey will cook very quickly
and will dry out if overcooked.
When done, remove to a baking
sheet or platter and keep warm.
Do not wash saut6 pan!
To make the sauce, add butter to
saut6 pan and place over medium-
high heat. At the same time, drop
ravioli into the boiling water.
When butter begins to turn light
brown, add fresh sage. Stir for a
few seconds; then add cranberries,
and saut6 until skins begin to
burst. Add molasses, balsamic
vinegar and broth, scraping bottom
of the pan to pick up all the flavor
of the turkey. ' ,iiiii..i i,,ii cran-
berries are soft and the sauce coats
the back of a spoon, about 2 min-
utes. Season to taste with salt and
pepper. Be sure to taste sauce for
seasoning before you pour it over
the turkey.
Test ravioli for doneness in
about 3 minutes - pinch edges of
dough; it should be tender. Drain.
Divide ravioli among hot plates
and layer a piece of turkey over
the ravioli. Spoon sauce over them.
Tip: The sauce must be put
together very quickly, so have all
the ingredients premeasured and
ready at the side of the stove.
ij,\ niih Cavit Riesling or
PinotNoir.


SParing Shellfish
W Chicken - Baked/Grilled


When it comes to Chicken -I
pairing wine and food, Turkey
there are some general Duck
guidelines that will Ham/Pork
result in great com-
binations. However, Steak
everyone's sense of Fruit
taste is different and Salad - Lea
what tastes good to one Salad - Doi
person may not taste Pasta - Wh1
good to another. If you Pasta-- Red
find a combination that
you like, but it doesn't
follow the guidelines, don't worry -just
enjoy! Part of the fun is experimenting
with different combinations to find the
ones you like best.


Marinated 9 9
00 0_

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S S

ify/Vegetable S S
minant Protein
ite Sauce 90
d Sauce S v


Ci a ~
g, ' 5" 5 "



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1 C


Roasted Butternut Squash Soup
Makes 4 servings
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Start to Finish: ., i.....
Roasted Winter Squash
2 tablespoons butter
2 cups diced (3/4-inch) raw winter
squash (butternut, hubbard,
acorn)
Salt and pepper
Soup
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup diced onion
1/4 cup diced celery
1/4 cup diced carrot
1 cinnamon stick
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1 carton (32 ounces) Progresso
chicken broth (4 cups)
1/2 teaspoon ground toasted
coriander, if desired
11/2 cups Roasted Winter Squash
(above)
1/2 cup half-and-half, if desired
2 tablespoons toasted pumpkin seeds
1/2 cup Progresso plain panko crispy
bread crumbs, toasted light brown
in saute pan over medium heat
To make roasted winter squash: Heat oven
to 375�F. Heat butter over medium-high
heat in an ovenproof saut6 pan; add diced
squash, salt and pepper. \\ i.. , .ii1 i,
begins to brown, place pan in oven. Roast
for 15 minutes or until medium-brown on
all sides. Remove from oven and let cool
slightly. Pure6 in food processor, or mash
with potato masher or ricer. Measure I 1/2
cups squash; reserve.
To make soup: Heat olive oil in large
saucepan over medium heat until hot. Add
onion, celery, carrot and cinnamon stick;
saut6 until soft but not brown, about 10 min-
utes. Season with salt and pepper. Add broth
and coriander; bring to a boil. Simmer for
several minutes. Stir in reserved squash until
smooth; simmer gently to 1.. tl i .I ....1i1,
about 10 minutes. Discard cinnamon stick.
Pure6 soup using an immersion blender or
in a blender until smooth. (The soup can be
made ahead to this point, cooled, covered,
and refrigerated for several days or frozen
for about I month. It will thicken as it cools
and may need thinning with broth or water
when reheating.)
Return soup to pan and reheat gently. Add
half-and-lb il 'i .i ... ;..i l ill. h and
pepper. Top each serving with pumpkin
seeds and toasted bread crumbs.
Tip: Depending on how rich you want it,
or how cold it is outside, you can use
cream, yogurt or mascarpone instead of
half-and-half.
Eni.i niiih Cavit (huIllna,.


Mama Chiarello's
Stuffed Eggplant
Makes 4 servings
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Start to Finish: I hour 20 minutes
1 large eggplant
3 tablespoons extra virgin
olive oil
1/2 teaspoon grey sea salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 pound ground beef
1 onion, diced small
(about 1 cup)
1 red bell pepper, diced small
(about 1 cup)
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil leaves
1 1/4 cups grated pecorino Romano
cheese
1/2 cup Progresso plain panko
crispy bread crumbs
1 whole egg
2 chopped tomatoes
Heat oven to 350�F.
Ci,, .. -prl.il II1 lilf and scoop out center,
leaving enough meat inside the skin so that
it holds its shape when baked. Chop egg-
plant that has been scooped out of the inside;
place in saucepan, cover with water and boil
until very soft, 10 to 12 minutes.
Meanwhile, in medium saute pan, heat
I tablespoon olive oil over medium heat.
Salt and pepper the beef. Add seasoned
ground beef to pan, and saute until all of
its liquid is evaporated and beef begins to
brown slightly. Let cool briefly, and chop
cooked beef so that there are no large
chunks of meat. In another medium saut6
pan over medium heat, add remaining 2
tablespoons olive oil, and saute the onion,
pepper and garlic together in oil.
In bowl, mix together cooked eggplant,
vegetables, beef, herbs, I cup cheese, 1/4
cup bread crumbs and egg. Fill scooped-out
., . ,l Ii 1 ,i .... ii, this mixture, dividing
it evenly between the two halves.
Top with chopped tomatoes, remaining
1/4 cup cheese, remaining 1/4 cup bread
crumbs, and season with salt and pepper.
Place on an oiled oven tray or baking dish,
and bake for 50 minutes. Let cool briefly;
slice widthwise and serve.
nt, j.' ,ith Cavit Pinot Noir, Merlot or
Cabernet Sauvignon.


OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 13


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PAGE 14, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


emver IN I gmg f* MI





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Full Text

PAGE 1

www.suwanneedemocrat.com SEE90-MONTH, PAGE13A Visit us on the web at www.weshaneychevrolet.com WES HANEY Just East Of Downtown Live Oak, FL 362-2976 Family Owned & Operated Since 1967 624397-F After Rebate 60 MO. Auto, AC, Cruise, CD Player $ 18,489 OR 0 % New 2011 Chevrolet Pickup Wednesday Edition Ñ October 13, 201050 CENTSSuwannee Democrat 125th YEAR, NO. 104 3 SECTIONS, 38 PAGES Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Dowling Park, Branford, McAlpin and O'Brien ÔI've never told my story before because so many people had these type of things and I don't want other families to think I'm boasting. I had nothing to do with surviving.' See Page 15A for Mary Lou's story.October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month Semi downs power pole,disrupts trafficPage 13A By Jeff Watersjeff.waters@gaflnews.comThe trial of Ronald Edward Kramer in the death of 18-month-old Olivia Rescigno began Monday in a Suwannee County courtroom. Rescigno's lifeless body was discovered in her crib at her Suwannee County home on March 14, 2008. She had bruises on her face and legs and a bite wound on her thigh. Kramer, later indicted for felony murder and child abuse, was reportedly the only adult present when the body was discovered. Kramer, 28, is a registered sex offender in New Jersey. Prosecutor Craig Jacobsen began his opening arguments by telling the jury what condition Rescigno was in when paramedics arrived. "They found Olivia beaten, battered, bruised, bitten and dead," said Jacobsen. Jacobsen said that on March 14, Olivia's mother, Rebecca Lee Rescigno, left for work at Pilgrim's Pride around 2:20 p.m. and thereMurder trial will be battle of the expertsCause of toddler's death in dispute Ronald Edward Kramer during opening arguments at his murder trial Monday in the Suwannee County Courthouse.Photo: Jeff Waters SEEMURDER, PAGE13A The Old Dog says ,"Y'all buckle up and stay safe out there."Staff Alocal teen convicted for his part in the burglary and subsequent fire that destroyed a live-in furniture workshop in Wellborn in November 2009 will spend the next 90 months in prison. Shayne Cooper-Olin, 19, had pleaded guilty to burglary of a dwelling, grand theft III and arson after he and two accomplices (one of whom has not yet been tried and is presumed innocent) set fire to the dwelling of Hank Whisnant. His personal belongings, inShayne Cooper-Olin90-month sentence for W'born arsonistSecond Harvest North Florida stopped in Live Oak Thursday afternoon to distribute food to about 250 families. The Hunger Caravan concluded its 10-site, nine-county distribution at First Baptist Church of Live Oak at 2 p.m. Photo: Jeff WatersÔHunger Caravan' stops in Live Oak POLICEBy Jeff Waters ALake City man was arrested for reportedly using his truck to run over the legs of a man he had earlier threatened to kill, a Suwannee County sheriff's report shows. According to SCSO Deputy Chuck Tompkins, Jeffrey Keith Wheeler, 41, of 2919 230th Street, Lake City, called the resident at Jeffrey Keith WheelerMan chased with ax, run down by truck SEEMAN, PAGE13ABy Jeff Waters ALive Oak woman was charged with attempted burglary for trying to pry open the night deposit box at Suwannee Valley Electric Sunday night with a crowbar. Carly Victoria Dolly, 30, of 1619 Ruby Street NE, was seen on surveillance by an SVEC Carly Victoria DollyWoman uses crowbar in attempt to get cash SEEWOMAN, PAGE13A Residents, businesses, surveyors and others now have better access to flood hazard information through the Suwannee River Water Management District's website. The District recently updated its flood information tool to improve access to flood zone locations and flood elevations. The new webpage is available at http://www.srwmdfloodreport.com.New Web offerings from SRWMD, Shands, LO Partnership SEENEW, PAGE13A Staff Two Suwannee County residents were injured when a GMC Sierra pickup left the roadway and overturned on CR 49 around 5:30 p.m. Sunday, according to family members. The driver, 15-year-old Hunter Waters, was northbound on CR 49, near CR 252, when the truck left the roadway. Waters reportedly Two county residents were hurt in the crash of this pickup Sunday in Live Oak.Photo: Jeff Waters2 hurt in truck rollover SEE2 HURT, PAGE13AHIGHS89LOWS60TODAY'S WEATHER SEE PAGE 2B FOR FULL FORECASTCanoeing event begins Thursday at the SpiritFOCUS InsidePaddle Florida In a family plagued with cancer, Mary Lou Roberson is the first survivorFighting on

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 2A ON THE SIDEFLIPArrest Record Advertising Manager, Monja Slater , ext.105Sr.Advertising Representative, Bill Regan , ext.160Advertising Representative, Tami Stevenson , ext.109Advertising Representative, Rhonda Cheney , ext.141Telesales Ad Representative, Nancy Goodwin , ext.103Classified/Legal, Janice Ganote , ext.102The Suwannee Democrat, published Wednesday and Friday. Periodicals postage paid at Live Oak, FL32064.Business located at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak, FL.Publication number 530180."POSTMASTER:Send address changes to Suwannee Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064."Annual subscription rate is $33 in county, $48 out of county and $48 out of state.Subscribe online at www.suwanneedemocrat.com.OFFICE HOURSOpen Monday Friday 8 a.m.to 5 p.m.Letters, comments and opinions on the Viewpoint & Opinions page are not necessarily those of the management/ownership of the Suwannee Democrat.LETTERS TO THE EDITORLetters may be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to our office.All letters are read.Not all letters are published. Letters may be edited to fit available space.The editor should not alter the writer's point of view.Well written letters require less editing.Keep it to the point, an ideal range is 150 to 200 words.Please include your name, address and day and evening phone numbers for verification. Letters MUSTbe signed.Letters to the editor can be limited to one letter per quarter per individual.RANT & RAVE HOTLINEHere's your chance to tell everyone what you think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a message to express their thoughts, good or bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not about private individuals or businesses.If you prefer, you may e-mail your comments to robert.bridges@gaflnews.com.Your name is not necessary, but please, take 30 seconds or less for your message.Suwannee Democrat HOW TO REACH USSwitchboard , 386-362-1734 Fax , 386-364-5578 Email , nf.editorial@gaflnews.com Mail , P.O.Box 370 Live Oak, FL 32064 Office , 211 Howard Street EastPublisher, Myra Regan , ext.122 CONTACT US WITH YOUR COMMENTSIf you have any questions or concerns, call us at 386-362-1734 or visit our Web site at www.suwanneedemocrat.com NEWSROOMEditor, Robert Bridges , ext.131Reporter, Carnell Hawthorne Jr. , ext.134Reporter, Jeff Waters , ext.133Reporter, Stephenie Livingston , ext.130Sports Reporter, Corey Davis , ext.132ADVERTISINGServing Suwannee County Since 1884 CIRCULATIONCirculation Manager, Angie Sparks , ext.152Circulation Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m.5 p.m. Subscription Rates, In-county, $33 Out-of-county, $48 SuwanneeCounty Part of "The Original Florida" 1 Year In County Subscription$33$481 Year Out of CountySuwannee DemocratP.O. Box 370 • 211 Howard St. East Live Oak, FL 32064 386-362-1734 • 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152Mail or bring payment to:You want the most in-depth coverage, the latest news and stories that touch home. We want to give it to you.570802-F 621410-F 617184-F 386-364-1211 Hours: Mon. Thurs. 7:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.; Fri. 8 a.m. -1 p.m. 1304 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL Please call the office to make any necessary arrangements. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. Temporarily closing for a WHOLE NEW LOOK October 15 through 26, the office of Dr. Romero will be closed for remodeling 626827-F at Suwannee Health & Fitness ATA KARATE 626719-F 755-1413 386LOTTERYRESULTS CASH 3 Day 10/11/104,6,8 Night 10/11/108,9,3 PLAY 4 Day 10/11/10 .3,8,9,8 Night 10/11/10 .1,0,2,3 FANTASY 5 10/11/10. . . . . . . . . . . 3,5,19,27,34 MEGA MONEY . . . . 1,22,29,39,22 LOTTO . . . . . . 10,16,17,26,42,47,5 Florida FloridaEditor’s note: The Suwannee Democrat prints the entire arrest record each week. If your name appears here and you are later found not guilty or the charges are dropped, we will be happy to make note of this in the newspaper when judicial proof is presented to us by you or the authorities. The following abbreviations are used below: SCSO-Suwannee County Sheriff’s Office LOPD-Live Oak Police Department FDLE-Florida Department of Law Enforcement FHP-Florida Highway Patrol FWC-Florida Wildlife Commission DOT-Department of Transportation OALE-Office of Agricultural Law Enforcement P & P-Probation and Parole USMS-US Marshals Service ATF-Department of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms DOC-Department of Corrections October 8, Rayne Easton Szwec, 18, 4282 85th Place Live Oak, Fl, petit theft, forgery, utter forged inst. 2 cts SCSO M. Landis October 8, Lindsay Marie McLeod, 22, 173 SE Byrd Ave E Madison, Fl, retail theft SCSO-J. Greene October 8, James M. Gurliaccio Jr, 30, 3141 172 Street Wellborn, Fl, columbia county warrant, dui/dwls/r SCSO S. Gambel October 8, Alberta Cooks Ross, 52, 4265 CR 249 Live Oak, Fl, vop o/c grand theft x 2, columbiavop o/c wbc-4ct P&P-R. Raymond October 8, Francine Gail Gilbert, 25, 10369 94th St Live Oak, Fl, grand theft iii reduced to petit theft per judge fina, poss oxycodone w/int sell, sale of oxycodone, unlawful use two way comm device, 1st app/pd appt SCSO-C. Smith October 9, James Edward Mills, 52, 11081 89th Road Live Oak, Fl, corruption/threat to leo SCSO M. Landis October 9, Jerome Louis Carter, 24, 301 Parshley Live Oak, Fl, battery (dom Total calls for service: 106 Medical Calls: 88 Cardiac: 10 Trauma: 14 Motor vehicle crash: 6 Miscellaneous medical call: 16 Altered mental status: 7 Respiratory: 10 OD: 2 Diabetic: 1 Abdominal pain: 4 Weakness: 6 CVA: 1 Seizure: 4 Nausea/vomiting: 1 OB: 1 Cardiac arrest: 1 Standby @ Football Game: 3 Standby @ Rodeo: 1 Fire Calls: 18 Structure fire: 1 Brush fire: 7 Vehicle fire: 2 Motor vehicle crash: 4 Fire alarm: 1 Med assist: 2 Person assist from tree: 1 Volunteer Fire Responses: 25 Engine 1 Utilized as Rescue 5: 5 Mutual aid from Gilchrest County: 1Suwannee County Fire/Rescue callsfor service for Oct. 3 to Oct. 9viol) LOPD-S. Gamble October 9, Stephen Funicelli, 24, 16400 185th Rd McAlpin, Fl, vop o/c sale/manuf/deliv cocaine x 4 SCSO-K. Osborn October 9, Jason Ronald McCullers, 34, 21535 160th Street Live Oak, Fl, poss +20G cannabis LOPD-D. Slaughter October 10, Aurelio Ambrocio Aguilar, 26, 302 NW Gerson St Lake City, Fl, dui, no dl FHP K.Putnel October 10, Gregorio Gonzalez, 49, 1405 Duval Street Lot 54 Live Oak, Fl, no valid dl LOPD D. Slaughter October 10, William Thomas McNeal, 53, P.O. BOX 288 Jennings, Fl, sell manufacture deliver cocaine w/i 1000’ church, poss of cocaine LOPD D. Hohman October 10, Carly Victoria Dolly, 30, 1619 Rudy St. NE Live Oak, Fl, attempted burglary, poss burglary tools, criminal mischief, 1st app pd appt per wrs SCSO M. Landis October 10, Melanie Yates, 29, 12372 Bass Rd Live Oak, Fl, dwls (habitual), leave scn acc w/prop dmg LOPD Fipps October 11, Loren Oliver Thomas, 57, 222 Walther Trail Lee, Fl, battery, battery SCSO-A. Loston October 11, William Georg Hutcherson, 28, 6079 N W 12th Court Bell, Fl, columbia co wrt, vop o/c agg child abuse PP 7 October 11, Elvoy Vasques Cruz, 29, 1711 Long Ave Live Oak, Fl, vop, o/c dwls, vop o/c dwls both cash, cash bond per wrs SCSO-A. Loston October 12, Reginald Eugene Thomas, 29, 1113 SW 7 St Live Oak, Fl, batt (dom viol) LOPD K Kirby Find us on Facebook

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Political Rally! Everyone Welcome! OCTOBER 16, 2010SPONSORED BY:THE REPUBLICAN PARTY OF SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA at the SUWANNEE HISTORICAL MUSEUM TRAIN DEPOT Downtown Live Oak1:00 … 6:00 P.M.FOOD MUSIC LIVELY DISCUSSIONS COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 4 „ Philip Oxendine, confirmedDISTRICT 11 STATE REPRESENTATIVE „ Elizabeth Porter, confirmedUS SENATE „ Marco RubioUS CONGRESS „ Steve Southerland, confirmedGOVERNOR „ Rick ScottATTORNEY GENERAL „ Pam BondiCHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER „ Jeff AtwaterCOMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE „ Adam Putnam Local Non-Partisan Candidates and current elected RepublicansSEATING AND RESTROOMS AVAILABLE CONTACT: BARBARA GILL … 386-364-7784 or drop by the Suwannee GOP Victory Headquarters located across from the Methodist Church at 306 S. Ohio Ave . , downtown Live Oak www.suwanneegop.com Submitted It’s that time of year again, time for Live Oak’s annual Fall Festival. In years past this event has primarily been an endeavor of the Live Oak Garden Club, and has most recently included the Live Oak Artists Guild. This year, the Live Oak Partnership has joined forces with these two groups to present this annual event that will focus on the whimsical Scarecrow. Also known as The Live Oak Scarecrow Festival, this year’s event will take place on Saturday, Oct. 23 at Millennium Park in downtown Live Oak, and will encompass several activities and smaller events within the fall season. A most popular facet of this annual event is the Scarecrow contest. This year’s contest will feature a cash prize in multiple categories. The annual tradition of displaying homemade scarecrows is open to everyone for participation. Participating businesses are encouraged to display scarecrows in front of their places of business. Scarecrows will also be displayed on Ohio Avenue and Howard Street, as well as in designated areas of Millennium and Veteran’s parks. In addition to the traditional scarecrow contest, the Live Oak Partnership will also host a Live Scarecrow Contest in which contestants can enter a ‘costume contest’ for the best dressed scarecrow. Those wishing to enter into either of the Scarecrow competitions will be required to register and pay a $10 entry fee which will help cover event expenses and provide the cash prize for each category. Registration information is available at www.scarecrowfun.com and from the offices of Magnetic Marketing at 124 E. Howard Street, Live Oak. As with most events, the Scarecrow Festival will also feature a selection of vendors. The Live Oak Partnership will sponsor a ‘scarecrow market’ featuring flea market and farmers market vendors, and The Live Oak Artist Guild will host an array of artists and crafters of the season. Vendor spaces are still available. Vending spaces are open to all vendors except food vendors. Spaces are based on 12x12 feet in size and are rated at $10.00 per space. There is no charge for informational booths. Nonprofit groups are also welcome to participate. Full event information and registration forms can be found on two local websites: The Live Oak Partnership at www.scarecrowfun.com and through the Live Oak Artists Guild at www.loag.org.Scarecrow Festival could become signature event for LO WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 3A 625812-F Political advertisement paid for and approved by William "Lin" Williams Nonpartisan for Suwannee Cou nty Judge www.votelinwilliams.com Cell: 386-249-2803 Email: votelinwilliams@gmail.com Celebrate holiday office parties, family Christmas celebrations at the place that caters to them all. Its not too early to reserve your date for the upcoming Holiday season. Call today. 386-364-5250 email: frontdesk@campweed.org CAMP WEED CERVENY CONFERENCE CENTER 613810-F CITY vs. COUNTY CHILI COOK OFF OCTOBER 23, 2010 It’s time for the City vs. County Chili Cookoff sposnored by the Woman’s Club of Live Oak. This year’s event will be held on Saturday, October 23, 2010. The Cook Off will be held at Veterans Park during the Fall Festival. The event will begin at 11 a.m. with judging at 11:30 a.m. The public will be able to sample chili from 11:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. for a nominal donation of $5 per person. Awards will be presented at 2 p.m. Challenge Registration is $25 per team. This is a “People’s Choice” competition. There will also be a judges’ award for each chili category, as well as a showmanship award. Entrants are encouraged to use this as an informational opportunity to promote their departments. Business cards, brochures and other free materials may be distributed from your booth. For more information call 776-2264, no calls after 7 p.m. 618752-F 624010-F For Surgical Technician and LPN 415 S.W. Pinewood Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 386-647-4200 Oct. 16, 2010 625505-F Mt. Gilead Baptist Church 18305 56th St., Live Oak Fall 2-5 p.m. Everything Is Free!!! Featuring... The Gibbs Family (also on Sunday at 11 a.m.) and Comedian Josh Taylor Face painting, sand art, free games, free prizes, bounce houses, obstacle courses, maze, slides, hay rides Free Food! The Annual Walker Reunion will be held Sunday, October 24, 2010, at The Branford Shrine Club, Branford. (Old Branford Depot). Location of Shrine Club: From U.S. 27 in Branford turn north on US 129, at the flashing light. Continue one long block to first street on left (at Sister’s Cafe’) turn left, cross railroad, the Shrine Club is located in the old Branford Depot.Please remember to bring your pictures or any family memories you may wish to share.We hope you will join us, bring your family/friends and a basket lunch for a day of fun, visiting, smiles and celebration. For your family members and friends who may not receive this notice. PLEASE REMIND THEM ABOUT OUR REUNION.The Club will be open at 12:45 p.m. and we will serve lunch at 1:15 p.m. Mark your calendars: October 24, 2010! Remember location! We are looking forward to your being there. Katie Walker’s Children. Contacts: Mona Walker Hurst 386-935-1184, Diane Walker-Saunders 386-935-101,7 Marcia Walker Hurst 352-376-1930.Walker Reunion 2010

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Mikayla Senea was awarded the title of 2010-2011 Miss Autumn Apple Charity Queen at the Miss Autumn Apple Beauty Pageant held on Saturday, Oct. 9, 2010 at the Madison Women’s Club. All monies excluding entry fees collected by participants from business sponsors and activities the day of the pageant go to support the Florida Literacy Coalition. Mikayla is a freshman at Suwannee High School. She is the daughter of Scott and Shari Senea of Live Oak. Her grandparents are Howard and Frances Underwood of McAlpin and Peggy and Frank Conner of Sanderson. Mikayla would like to thank her family and friends for their love and support and all of the business sponsors that helped her obtain this honor. Beltone Hearing Care Centers Shari Senea, H.C.P. Brenda Sorensen, E.A. Tax and Accounting Services in Monticello McHales Cigar Shop Martin and Cathy Senea Construction Amanda Senea Innovative Truck Products Donnie and Stacey Bullock New Life Bible Bookstore Randy and Marsha Jordan Java Jax Hal and Katrina Chaffee A Total You Hair Salon-Becky Glass WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 PAGE 4A suwannee living Weddings/Births Q: What is the value of braces? A: While their cosmetic role is obvious, straightening teeth into an orderly smile, there are other reasons for braces. Crooked teeth are harder to keep clean, a problem that can lead to tooth decay, gum disease and, down the road, tooth loss. Misaligned teeth can also be an impediment to talking and chewing, and over time can cause abnormal wear on tooth enamel. Today's generation of braces, also known as orthodontic appliances, can be as visible or as inconspicuous as a patient likes. For instance, some brackets, which are affixed to the tooth to hold wires and elastics, are clear or tooth-colored. Advances in the equipment also make braces more comfortable and more efficient than they were in the past. There are two basic categories of braces: fixed, which are installed and removed by the dentist, and removable, which the patient can put in and take out according to the dentist's instructions for duration of wear. A person generally will wear braces from one to three years, followed by a shorter period of wearing a retainer to hold teeth in place. Talk with your dentist about whether you are a candidate for braces. Presented as a service to the community by 571101-F ASK DR. MANTOOTH 362-6556 (800) 829-6506 HERBERT C. MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A. 602 Railroad Ave. Live Oak, FL PRIMER ON BRACES 623241-F Call Beka 386-590-6261 Blush Dance Company Mon.-Thurs. 3 p.m.-7 p.m. REGISTER NOW 623246-F 1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066 Live Oak BY: BRAD WATSON ASK THE EXPERT Q: A : Yes, DuPont ’ Sorona ® plays a major role in the worldwide objective of a renewable economy and represents a new frontier in sustainability . This carpet is environmentally smart because: € The production of Sorona ® polymer requires 30 percent less energy than the production of an equal amount of nylon. ª Greenhouse gas emissions from the production of Sorona ® are 63 percent lower than nylon manufacturing. € This energy reduction results in approximately one gallon of gasoline saved per every seven square yards of carpet. For more information contact John or Brett at Live Oak Paint & Flooring. I have heard SmartStrand carpet is environmentally smart, can you tell me more about it? PAINT & FLOORING Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 REG. SALE Twin 2 pc. set $000 $000 Full 2 pc. set $000 $000 King 3 pc. set $000 $000 Plus FREE delivery FREE set-up FREE removal6 Months Same As Cash! Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 REG. SALE Twin 2 pc. set $000 $000 Full 2 pc. set $000 $000 King 3 pc. set $000 $000 Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 REG. SALE Twin 2 pc. set $000 $000 Full 2 pc. set $000 $000 King 3 pc. set $000 $000 Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 REG. SALE Twin 2 pc. set $000 $000 Full 2 pc. set $000 $000 King 3 pc. set $000 $000 Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 LIMITED TIME OFFER!Sale Ends Monday! All Mattress Sets!take 50%OFF US 90 West (Next To 84 Lumber) Lake City, 386-752-9303 C ATALOG S HOWROOM F OR C OMPLETE H OME F URNISHINGS FURNITURE SHOWPLACE Wholesale Sleep Distributors Plus FREE set-up FREE removal $ 489 Level Queen Set Twin Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 319 Full Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 437 Queen Set . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 489 King Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 589 POSTURE PREMIER Twin Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 399 Full Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 547 Queen Set . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 599 King Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 899 MERIDEN ULTRA PLUSH Twin Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 499 Full Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 649 Queen Set . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 699 King Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 999 Twin Set . . . . . . . . . . $ 1200 Full Set . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1399 Queen Set . . . . . . . $ 1699 King Set . . . . . . . . . . $ 1999 TAFFETA PILLOW TOP TRUE FORM 9 MEMORY FOAM 624401-F 1104 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak 386-364-1186 626213-F SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAKFrom your children and grandchildrenTravis and Megan Henry are proud to announce the birth of their son, John Harper Henry. John Harper was born on August 3, 2010 at 8:48 a.m. at North Florida Women’s Center in Gainesville. He weighed 8 pounds, 14 ounces and was 21 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Walter “Musky” and Peggy Musgrove of Live Oak. Paternal grandparents are Cecelia Henry and the late John Henry of Williston. Isaac and Aislinn are the proud siblings of John Harper. Lonnie and Annette Tanner of Mayo would like to remind you of the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Katrina Anastasia Tanner to Kevin Tyler Fillyaw, son of Steve and DeAnna Fillyaw of Live Oak, Florida. The wedding is planned for Saturday, October 16, 2010 at 6 p.m. at the home of Jim Montrym, 216 NE Tulip Road, Mayo, Florida, on the Suwannee River. All family and friends are invited to attend. You work, you play and then, one day.... love just happens! James & Debbie Parnell of Live Oak, Florida and Mary Ann Walters of Fort White, Florida, invite you to be a witness to one of life’s loveliest surprises as Elisha Parnell & William Walters are joined together in matrimony on Saturday, the sixteenth of October, at one thirty in the afternoon at O’Leno State Park, High Springs, Florida. birth announcement John Harper Henry wedding reminder Tanner & FillyawMiss Autumn Apple Charity Queen‘Friday Pray for America’HappyElder Rosa Lee Ford wedding reminder Parnell & WaltersJohn Harper Henry Why should we pray for our country? Because we know that prayer will cause a positive change in the United States of America. Where can we pray together for our Country? Each Friday at noon, everyone from our community is invited to come to Live Oak Christian Church to spend some time in prayer for America. The format permits individuals to come and go at will, depending upon their schedule. The first fifteen minutes os a time of private prayer as individuals arrive in the sanctuary. Please enter quietly. The next thirty minutes (12:15-12:45) is a time of guided prayer. Elder Rosa Lee Ford Each week the service will vary, although it will include music, videos and public prayer. Who can come to the “Friday Pray for America” service? Everyone is welcome to come and join with us in prayer. If you can only stay a few minutes or if you can stay for the total service, we welcome you to come and join us in prayer. What changes should we ask God to make in our country? We ask God to guide and protect the leaders of our country For President Obama for all of the members of Congress, for Governor Crist, for our State Legislature, for the County Commissioners, for Mayor Nobles, and the City Council, and for our law enforcement agencies. As citizens, it is doubtful that any of us would agree with everything that all of these people do or that we would disagree with every action they have taken. Yet, as Christians, we are told that we should pray for our leaders because they are servants of the people and God, placed in their position of authority by God. What the “Friday Pray for America” is not? This is not a political program in any way. The goal is to ask God to guide the leaders of our country as they make decisions for our country, state, county, and city. We believe that these individuals need the blessing of God and that our prayers will help to lead them to make the best possible decisions. How long will the “Friday Pray for America” program continue? We are not sure. The plan is to continue this weekly prayer service until the middle of November. At that point, we will evaluate it and determine the outcome. Much of the decision depends upon your response. Where is the “Friday Pray for America” program? Live Oak Christian Church, 1015 Ohio Ave. North in Live Oak, between Walt’s Ford and the cemetery. Dr. W. Ray Kelley, the pastor, will be happy to answer any question at 386-209-1615 or email: www.liveoakchristian@win dstream.net. 90th Birthday! Mikayla Senea

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 5A 570128-F Now Available at Suwannee Health & Fitness Contact Lynn Brannon 386-362-4676 12 Week Program can deliver 25 pounds of weight loss 625738-F Hillhouse Construction Inc. 618395-F Licensed & Insured RR-0067552 386-362-7805 or 590-1805  New Homes  Remodeling  Additions  Screen Rooms  Siding & Soffits  Decks & Porches  Window Replacement  Door Replacements  Free Estimates Elizabeth Adair Henning May 4, 1916 October 7, 2010Elizabeth Adair Henning, 94 , passed away Thursday, October 7, 2010 in Shands of Live Oak Hospital following a long illness. Mrs. Henning was born in Birmingham, Ala., May 4, 1916 and lived most of her life in the Branford area. She worked in the central supply area of Shands at UF .And was a member of the First Baptist Church of Branford, Fla. Survivors include five daughters, Betty Edwards of Suwannee, Fla., Billie Owens, Freddie Bailey, JoAnn Hayes, all of Branford, Fla. and Linda Bailey of Dade City, Fla., 11 grandchildren, 21 great grandchildren and eight great-great grandchildren also survive. Funeral services were conducted Monday, October 11, 2010 at 11 a.m. in the First Baptist Church of Branford, with Rev. Gordon Keller officiating. Interment followed in Oak Grove Cemetery. Visitation was held one hour prior to the services in the church. Daniels Funeral Homes and Crematory, Inc., Branford, Fla. in charge of arrangements. Bertie Mae Starling Boyette October 6, 2010Mrs. Bertie Mae Starling Boyette, 88, of rural Lake Butler, died October 6, 2010 at her residence after an extended illness. She was born in Live Oak and lived in Homestead several years before moving to Union County 15 years ago. She was a homemaker. She was a Baptist. She was the daughter of the late William and Blanche Carroll Starling. She was also preceded in death by her husband, Bernice Preston Boyette; two daughters, Levon Holton and Linda Faye Boyette; two sons, Wayne Curtis Boyette and William Preston Boyette. Mrs. Boyette is survived by one daughter, Patricia (husband Steve) Murphy of Land-O-Lakes; one son, Derrill (wife Susan) Boyette of Lake Butler; one sister, Maude King of Savannah, Ga.; three brothers, William “Buddy” Starling of Live Oak, Robert Starling of Davie and Gilford Callahan of Tennessee; 19 grandchildren, 24 great grandchildren and eight great-great grandchildren. Graveside funeral services were held Saturday, Oct. 9, 2010 at 2 p.m. at Beards Creek Cemetery of Glennville, Ga. Burial followed. Family received friends at Archer Funeral Home of Lake Butler on Friday evening from 5:307:30 p.m. Archer Funeral Home of Lake Butler was in charge of local arrangements. Becky Patton October 18, 1952 October 10, 2010Becky Patton age 57, of Live Oak, Florida passed away early Sunday morning October 10, 2010 in the Suwannee Health Care Center in Live Oak, Fla. following complications from Alzheimer’s Disease. The Citronelle, Ala. native moved to Live Oak FL in 2007 from Lakeland, Ga. Becky worked as a beautician and was a member of the Westwood Baptist Church. Survivors include her mother, Ida Kinser, Live Oak, Fla.; one daughter, Sarah Patton, Jacksonville, Fla.; two brothers, Gary Kinser, High Springs, Fla. and Ralph Kinser, Decatur, Ala. Memorial services will be held 2 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010 in the Westwood Baptist Church with Dr. Jimmy Deas officiating. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Haven Hospice, 6037 Hwy. 90, Lake City, FL 32055 or your favorite charity. Please sign the guestbook at www.harrisfuneralhomeinc.net. Harris Funeral Home & Cremations, Inc., 932 N. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL, 386-364-5115, is in charge of all arrangements. Jerry Dean Ramsey October 7, 2010 erry Dean Ramsey, 74, passed away Thursday, October 7, 2010, at the VA Hospital in Lake City, Florida after a long struggle with his health. He fought in the Korean and Vietnam Wars and received numerous medals to show for his heroism. He retired as a Captain from the Army, after serving in the military for 21 years. He is survived by his only son, David Ramsey, and his two grandsons of Wellborn, Florida. A memorial service will be held at the Beachville Advent Christian Church in Beachville, Florida at 11 a.m. on October 14. There will be food and fellowship after the service at the church, in the fellowship hall. His final resting place will be in the Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Address for Beachville Advent Christian Church, 24815 CR 49, O’Brien, FL 32071. William “Bill” F. Chambers November 23, 1933 October 6, 2010William “Bill” F. Chambers, 76, Live Oak, Fla. passed away on Wednesday, October 6, 2010 after a long illness. The Uvalda, Ga. native moved to Live Oak in 1973 from Bell Glade, Fla. He was a Veteran of the Korean War Obituaries Suwannee High School PresentsSuwannee High School Homecoming Community pep-rally 2010 Where: Paul Langford stadium When: Thursday, October 21, 2009 Time: 7:00 p.m. Cost: $3.00-Tickets sold at the gate See performances by Varsity Cheerleaders, SHS Band, JV Cheerleaders, The Dancing Dolls Key Club, National Honor Society, Student Government, members of the 10th, 11th, and 12th grades, and even a few surprises! The 2010-2011 homecoming court will also be presented! Come and support the Bulldogs and help us celebrate Homecoming!2nd Annual Bulldog Bash Glory Days: Back to the 80's Su H e e n n a w wa Su ool h Sc h ig H s t n e s e r P ool s H e e n n a w wa Su om H ool h Sc h ig H g in om c e om e p e Se H e e n n a w wa Su m om C P : e r e h W u h T : n e h W 0 0 . 3 $ : t os C y b s e c n a m or f r om H ool h Sc h ig H y l ly l a r p e p y y it n u d or f g n a L l u a P Pa r obe t c O , y a ay d s r . m . p 0 0 : 7 : e im T Ti a d ol s s t e k ic T Ti -T 0 r e e h C y y it s r a V Va y y g in om c e om 0 1 0 2 y m iu d a t ta s 9 0 0 2 , 1 2 r e t a g e h t t a S B SH s r e d a e l r d n a S B e p e Se t a N b, u l C y e K 0 1 e h tth1 0 2 e h T p u s d n a e om C y b s e c n a m or f r a e l r e e h C JV V Soc or on H l a ion tth1 1 ,th2 1 d n a ,thom c e om h 1 1 0 2 0 l l u B e h t t or p p r e e h C y y it s r a V Va y y n a D e h T , s r e d a n e d u t S , y t ie Socth e d n a , s e d a r g w t r ou c g in om p l e h d n a s og d l S B SH , s r e d a e l r s l ol D g in c n t n e m n r e v o G t n p r u s w w e f a n e v e e r p o be s l a l il e t a br e l e c s u p , d n a S B of s r be m e m , t ! s e is r p ! d e t n e s g in om c e om H! while serving in the Marines, a member of the American Legion and was of Baptist faith. Mr. Chambers is survived by his wife, Eva Chambers, Live Oak, Fla.; two daughters, Carol Smallwood, Alice, Texas, Inga Chambers, Live Oak, Fla.; one son, Christopher Quillen, Live Oak, Fla.; two sisters, Helen Hoyle, Okeechobee, Fla., Carolyn Kemp, Belle Glade, Fla.; one brother, Leon Chambers, Okeechobee, Fla.; granddaughters Jenny Smallwood, Tessa Smallwood and grandson Christopher Reid Quillen II. He was preceded in death by one son, Stanley Chambers. A memorial service will be set at a later date. Daniels Funeral Homes & Crematory, Inc., of Live Oak and Branford, Fla. in charge of arrangements Death notices Calvin D. Jelks July 6, 1973 Oct. 11, 2010Calvin D. Jelks, born July 6, 1973, died Oct. 11, 2010. He passed away in Doctors Memorial Hospital, Perry, Fla. M. Udell and Sons of D. M. Udell Funeral Home in charge of all arrangements. Atha Muriel Thomas October 11, 2010Atha Muriel Thomas, 88, Bell, Florida, died October 11, 2010. Daniels Funeral Homes and Crematory, Inc., Branford, Fla.J Check out the Suwannee Democrat ’s page on Facebook

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 6A By Jim Holmes When we think of the U.S. Civil War today, it's usually names like Antietam, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg that spring to the forefront of our memories. After all, they pitted thousands of men against each other in brutal combat. On the other hand -with the exception of the 1864 battle between the Monitor and the Merrimack -I doubt few of us ever learned much in school about civil war NAVALactions. One of the most interesting was a bloodless encounter that took place that same year, in of all locations, Brazil. Although often overlooked today, the Confederate Navy was seen as vitally important to the Southern secessionist leadership. Confederate ships were to run Union blockades, bringing in vital supplies to the CSA, defend rebel ports from Union invasion, harass Northern merchant ships and last, but not least, seize Yankee vessels, which then became a part of the Confederate fleet. The CSS Florida -a 191 foot steam and sailpowered cruiser -was among the most accomplished in such missions, particularly when it came to running Union blockades and seizing Yankee ships. For more than two years, the Florida -which was also nicknamed The Prince of the Privateers -was a constant thorn in the side of the U.S. Navy. During its career, the Florida directly seized 37 Yankee vessels and was indirectly involved in confiscating 23 more. Only the CSS Alabama was more successful. In October 1864, Union Navy Commander Napoleon Collins of the USS Wachusett sailed into the neutral Brazilian harbor of Bahia, only to find his motorized sloop anchored just a half mile from his long time enemy, the CSS Florida. To top it off, nearly the entire Florida crew was on shore leave. Apparently the temptation was just too much for the veteran Yankee sailor, even though he must have understood at the time that he would create a diplomatic nightmare for Washington. At three o'clock in the morning on Oct. 7, Collins ordered his crew to ram the Florida in the hope of sinking it. When that failed, the USS Wachusett began to tow the enemy cruiser out to sea. Outraged that their neutrality had been ignored, surprised Brazilian troops opened fire on the departing Yankee ship and its captured prize, but to no avail. Brazil quickly filed a formal diplomatic protest with Washington. In response, Commander Collins -viewed by most Northerners as a hero -was court-martialed, found guilty and ordered dismissed from the U.S. Navy. Meanwhile, Washington made arrangements to have the CSS Florida towed back to Brazilian waters, where the ship would then be returned to the Confederacy. Many historians think this was just too much for Admiral David Porter, the Union officer responsible for seeing that the rebel vessel got back to Brazil. It is suspected he arranged for the Florida to be "accidentally rammed" and sunk by a U.S. Navy troop ship before it could leave for South America. As for the fate of the court-martialed Collins? Well, Navy Secretary Gideon Welles proceeded to set aside the Commander's conviction and ordered him back to duty. Two years later, Collins was promoted to the rank of Captain. Then in 1874 he became a Rear Admiral. Ayear later -at the age of 61 -Collins died in Lima, Peru, while commanding the U.S. South Pacific Squadron. Jim Holmes lives in Live Oak.Please address letters to: Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL32064.Please include your full name, address and daytime phone number. We ask this so we can verify your letter and discuss any questions about it with you. Members of the Suwannee Democrat editorial board are Myra C.Regan, publisher, and Robert Bridges, editor.Our View, which appears in Friday editions of the Democrat, is formed by that board.Suwannee DemocratMYRA C.REGAN Publisher ROBERT BRIDGES Editor THE SUWANNEE SCRIBBLERViewpoints/Opinions AConfederate naval taleBIBLE VERSE"My soul finds rest in God alone; my salvation comes from him." Psalm 62:1 The National Transportation Safety Board has again recommended that airlines require a separate seat for all children, regardless of age, eliminating the current practice of permitting children under the age of 2 to fly for free on the lap of a parent. Will mandating child restraint systems make air travel safer? The answer is probably yes but that's the visible. Having to purchase an extra airplane ticket, some families will opt to drive to their destination instead. Thus, mandated CRS will force some families to switch to a less safe method of travel and some highway fatalities will represent the invisible victims of NTSB policy. By the way, if parents wanted a greater measure of safety for their infant, it's available to them right now. They can purchase a seat and seat restraint for their infant. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is charged with ensuring that drugs are safe and effective. Drugs must meet FDAapproval before they can be marketed. FDAofficials can make two kinds of errors. They can approve a drug that has unanticipated, dangerous side effects that might cause illness and death. Or, they can err by either not approving or causing huge delays in the marketing of a safe and effective drug. Statistically, these are known as the Type I and Type II errors. FDAofficials have a bias toward erring on the side of over-caution. If FDAofficials err on the side of under-caution, approving an unsafe drug, they are attacked by the media, patient groups and investigated by Congress. Their victims, sick and dead people, are highly visible. If FDA officials err on the side of over caution, keeping a safe and effective drug off the market, who's to know? The victims are invisible. If you conclude that FDAofficials have a bias toward errors that create invisible victims, who don't know whom to blame for their illness or death, step to the head of the class. Particularly egregious examples are: The FDA's 10year delay in approving alprenolol, a beta-blocker, sold for three years in Europe, cost more than 10,000 lives per year. The three-year delay in the approval of misoprostol, a drug for the treatment of gastric bleeding that cost between 8,000 and 15,000 lives per year. The lag in the approval of streptokinase for the treatment of occluded coronary arteries cost more than 10,000 lives per year. FDAerring on the side of overcaution makes the average cost of bringing a drug to the market close to $1 billion. When an FDA official proudly announces the approval of a major new drug, someone should ask him: If this drug is going to start saving lives tomorrow, how many people died yesterday, last week, last month or last year waiting for the drug to be approved? Adrug company CEO could give you the answer if he weren't fearful of FDAretaliation. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) represents Congress' way to force manufacturers to produce more fuel-efficient cars. Manufacturers meet CAFE standards by producing lighter weight and hence less crash-worthy cars. According to a Brookings Institution study, a 500-lb weight reduction of the average car increased annual highway fatalities by 2,200-3,900 and serious injuries by 11,000 and 19,500 per year. ANational Highway Transportation and Safety Administration study demonstrated that reducing a vehicle's weight by only 100 pounds increased the fatality rate by as much as 5.63 percent for light cars, 4.70 percent for heavier cars and 3.06 percent for light trucks. These rates translated into additional traffic fatalities of 13,608 for light cars, 10,884 for heavier cars and 14,705 for light trucks between 1996 and 1999. Congressmen have full knowledge of these life and death statistics but doing the bidding of environmentalists and other interest groups is more important than American lives. There ought to be a way to make the invisible victims of Congress visible. Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. To find out more about Walter E. Williams and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists,visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.OPINION A MINORITY VIEWBY WALTER WILLIAMS© 2010 Creators Syndicate~~ Invisible victims FROM OUR READERS To the Editor: In Mr. Holmes' 'Shame on Us' article about how a significant portion of students entering Suwannee Schools are ill prepared, he never once mentionsPARENTS or PRIMARYCAREGIVERS as part of the reason students are illprepared. These adults spend the most time with these children before school age. Before we dissect programs that support some parents/primary caregivers, let's put the responsibility for school preparedness squarely on the shoulders it should rest. If parents/primary caregivers did not make the effort to prepare their children for the rigors of school this year, maybe parents/primary caregivers should either get training or place the child in an availableprogram to learn these skills, and the child should wait until next school year. Janet Messcher Live Oak Jim Holmes responds: Ms. Messcher appears to have misunderstood the 8th paragraph in my column,in which I stated in part,"tough questions need to be asked of our daycares,our Head Start Programs,our Pre-K Programs,our high school parenting classes and ourselves."Perhaps I failed,but I tried to make it clear that as far as I am concerned,NO ONE gets a pass. Thus,"Shame on us!" To the Editor: Is it any wonder that the economic and employment picture is so bad here in Live Oak, when this paper carries, without challenging the foolishness of the publicity release, that the placement of an ATM machine, bolted to a concrete slab in the middle of a parking lot, is portrayed as a new business in our community? Seems little surprise that our economy is stagnant, employment offers little opportunity, and our best leave the area for hope of a future. Is it fair that they have ignored the new ice dispensing machine on South 129? Atidal wave of economic development is afoot! Steve Johnson Live Oak To the Editor: An open letter to the Suwannee County Commission From: SCFR personnel who have signed below Re: Chief Conner Dear Sirs, In light of some recent events that have shown some negative light on our department, and more importantly upon our chief, the personnel who have signed below would like to voice our support for Chief Conner. In any business or organization, there should be structure. It is not uncommon that every employee will not agree with every decision made by their boss, leader or superior. It is no different within our fire service. However, in other organizations where there is less to be lost, perhaps mishaps or mistakes SEEFROM OUR READERS, PAGE12A

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By Mary Ward Suwannee County Health Dept. See related story, Page 11A. All women are at risk for breast cancer. Not counting skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women of all combined major racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Men can also get breast cancer, but this is rare. Among Hispanic women, it is the most common cause of death from cancer, and it is the second most common cause of death from cancer among white, black, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaska Native women. Although more white women get breast cancer, more black women die from it. Breast cancer prevention Scientists are studying how best to prevent breast cancer. Ways to help lower your risk of getting breast cancer include:  Being physically active by getting regular exercise.  Maintaining a healthy weight.  Avoiding hormone replacement therapy (HRT)  Limiting the amount of alcohol that you drink and discontinuing the use of tobacco products. Early detection is key According to the American Cancer Society, women in their 20s and 30s should have a clinical breast exam (CBE) as part of a regular health exam by a health professional, at least every 3 years. After age 40, women should have a breast exam by a health professional every year. Breast self-exams (BSE) should be done by women starting in their 20s. Women should report any breast changes to their health professional right away. Mammograms are a series of X-ray pictures of the breast that allow doctors to look for early signs of breast cancer, sometimes up to three years before it can be felt. When breast cancer is found early, treatment is most effective, and many women go on to live long and healthy lives. Most women should have their first mammogram at age 50. Talk to your health professional if you have any symptoms or changes in your breast, or if breast cancer runs in your family. Your provider may recommend that you have mammograms before age 50 or more often than usual. Please join the Suwannee County Health Department at the Tangles Fall Bazaar on Saturday from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at 12986 US Hwy. 90 West. The Health Department will feature Breast Cancer Awareness information along with BMI screenings. Suwannee River Area Health Education Council will also be doing free bone density screenings. Doing something about breast cancerWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 7A THINK PINK Lets work together to raise awareness of breast cancer and the importance of early detection. Be a part of 623199-F Stop by the Suwannee Democrat office at 211 Howard St. East or mail payment with information to P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 30264. All entries must be received by October 15 at 5 p.m. Purchase a ribbon in memory of someone or as a support. 100% of profit will be donated to ACS for breast cancer research. $ 5 Ribbons cost Each Full page of ribbons will run on October 20 in the Suwannee Democrat. Lets all work together to show how $5 can add up to make a difference. EXAMPLE 625518-F Doing something about breast cancer Suwannee County Health Department can tell you how to get started

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 8A Serving southern Suwannee County, including Branford, O’Brien and McAlpinINDEXArrests................................2A Legal Notices......................5B Obituaries..........................5A Sports................................1B Suwannee Living................4A Viewpoint............................6A HI 89LO 60PAGE 2B Follow us on FACEBOOKSubmitted Kathy Stark, President of the GFWC Branford Woman’s Club, and members Cathi Cintorino, Secretary, and Elaine Nemeth, District 3 Home Life Chairperson, attended the annual GFWC Florida Federation of Women’s Clubs Fall Board of Directors meeting Sept. 17-19 in Orlando. In addition to being the semi-annual business meeting of the GFWC Florida Board of Directors, Fall Board is a learning time and many workshops and materials are presented to help clubs work more effectively in their communities. This year marked the beginning of a new administration, with new programs and community service projects to be adopted. The members had an opportunity to attend several workshops, meet new program coordinators and to receive new literature for fundraising ideas and programs, such as Conservation, Education, Arts and Public Issues. This year the theme was Saluting OUR Veterans and dressing in red, white, and blue. It was a chance to reflect, to appreciate, and to honor those who gave themselves for our freedom. The special guest speaker for the “Stars and Stripes Forever” banquet Saturday evening was George "Bud" Day, a retired U.S. Air Force Colonel and Command Pilot who served during the Vietnam War, which included five years and seven months as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam. He is often cited as being the most decorated U.S. service member since General Douglas MacArthur, having received some seventy decorations, including the Medal of Honor. Major Terry Jones, a United Methodist Minister and a United States Army Reserve Chaplain, spoke to us on her time served in Iraq as a field Chaplain, and about women in the military and their challenges. The evening was entertaining and very emotional as we laughed, cried, and saluted the quest speakers and all of our GFWC Florida clubwomen veterans. The Branford Woman’s Club has many By Ana Smith Isn't the weather great? Sunny, pleasantly warm days, cool mornings, open windows, fresh air, and yards and porches decorated with pumpkins and scarecrows ... who says we don't experience the changing of the seasons down here in the South? This week I finally have a couple of photos of the folks who give of their time to provide free dinners at the Live Oak Community Center on Duval Street the last Sunday of each month. The volunteers vary from month to month as their time allows, but the folks in these photos are the ones who are usually on hand and who were present last month. Please, if you have items that can be donated to be sold at the flea market to help raise money to pay for the food and supplies at these dinners, call Roger Burnside at 386-935-3343 to arrange for the drop off or the pick up of your donations. To everyone who was suffering the last couple of weeks with yet another bout of colds, sniffles, general flu symptoms, I hope you are all feeling better by now. I slept The annual Fall Festival sponsored by BHS and BES is set for Oct. 30 from 3:30-6 p.m. Booths will be set up by various classes with different activities for the children to participate in. Come out and support the students and teachers of the Branford Schools. Trick or Treating in Branford will begin immediately after the Fall Festival Ends. For additional information, please contact Stacy Young at syoung@suwannee.k12.fl.us. The Republican candidate for U.S. Congress, District 2, Steve Southerland, will be at a chicken BBQ in Branford at A Perfect Setting on Friday, Oct. 15, from 5 to 7 p.m. Everyone is invited to attend this fundraising event to meet and speak with Mr. Southerland. Steve will be making a short speech during the evening, but the focus of the event is to allow people of the eastern part of the district to meet their candidate prior to the gen-Southerland to make Branford appearanceBHS and BES Fall Festival set GFWC Branford Womans Club well-represented in Orlando 3 local women attend GFWC Florida Fall Board of Directors MeetingElaine Nemeth, Major Terry Jones, Kathy Stark. Cathi Cintorino, Kathy Stark, Elaine Nemeth. SEE GFWC, PAGE 9A O'BRIEN AND OUR NEIGHBORS ‘Bits and Pieces’ from south Suwannee Co. SPORTS, 1B Branford NewsBranford runs over DragonsThe Branford Camera Club will meet at the Branford Public Library on Thursday, Oct. 14, at 7 p.m. October’s meeting will be an open forum where members discuss photographic topics of interest and share photos. The homework subject for this month is Rivers, and several members will share experiences and photos from an overnight kayak trip on the Suwannee River. A projector will be available to share pictures digitally, or you may bringBranford Camera Club meets Oct. 14The O’Brien 4-H Club would like to invite you to their yard sale and bake sale on Saturday at the O’Brien Feed Depot at 8 a.m. Please plan to attend and support this brand new 4-H Club.O’Brien 4-H yard sale SEE BRANFORD, PAGE 9A Some of the volunteers who cook and serve dinners every month. Kneeling, from left: Darnell Watson, Benji McLean, Andrew Show. Front row, standing, from left: JoAnn Lynch, Rayan Wiggan (holding son Stephan Wiggan in front), sonO'Neal Wiggan, Jakayla Edwards (next to O'Neal). Back row, from left: Pat Lynch, Katia Cherisol, David Cherisol, Betty Cherry, Richard Tomic Jr., an unidentified volunteer, Roger Burnside andPastor Ryan Wiggan.Courtesy photoone night with my window open and woke up with sniffles, stuffed up head, aching body, all because I didn't want to shut the window that night and got a chill. Thankfully it only lasted the one day, but be careful not to do the same thing. I had to get out a blanket the next night and lower my window ... the fresh air feels so good I didn't want to close any windows, even at night, but I learned a simple precaution was all I needed to do. My sincere condolences to the family of Mr. Harry Wells of O'Brien. I read about his passing in SEE O’BRIEN, PAGE 9A SEE SOUTHERLAND, PAGE 9A

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 9ABranford News BUCCANEERS Branford High Oops! We goofed, folks. The schedule printed on the 2010 Branford Buccaneers football poster wasn't the right one. Here's th e correct schedule, with our apologies. We suggest you clip it and paste it in place. Sept. 3 St. Francis Sept. 10 Trenton Sept. 17 at Bishop Snyder Sept. 24 at McClay Oct. 1 at Paxon Oct. 7 Florida D&B Oct. 22 at Bronson Oct. 29 St. Joseph Nov. 5 Bell Nov. 12 at Lafayette 2010 Varsity Football Schedule 621386-F 570661-F B RANFOR D Mini-Storage Large and Small Units Reasonable 386-935-2122 386-935-0298 624556-F CLASS "A" COLLISION INC. "The Wrecksperts" • Specializing In Heavy Collisions • Quality Guaranteed • Insurance Preferred Shop • Unibody & Frame Straightening • Major Credit Cards Accepted. Damage Free 24 Hour Emergency Towing Shop 386-935-9334 Fax 386-935-0464 FREE ESTIMATES TED or TERESA LAWRENCE 301 Suwannee Ave., P.O. Box 519 Branford, FL. 32008-0519 624558-F Cherry Lumbert Pharmacist 101 S.W. US Highway 27 Branford, Florida 32008 (386) 935-6905 Everything For Your Home Recovery From Prescriptions to Medical Supplies OF BRANFORD Mon.-Fri. 8:30 am-6:00 pm Saturday 9am-1pm Sunday-Closed Now accepting Blue Cross Blue Shield Health Options NORTH FLORIDA PHARMACY 570892-F 570891-F 386-935-1728 GILCHRIST BUILDING SUPPLY INC. Hwy. 129 Bell, FL 352-463-2738 1-800-543-6545 624552-F Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.5:30 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Serving the community since 1979 www.gilchrist.doitbest.com To advertise your business here, call Rhonda at 386-362-1734 for more information 570896-F Byrd's Power Equipment Sales & Service All Makes & Models 11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008 (386) 935-1544 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday 7 a.m. Noon Open Saturday 7 a.m. 12 Noon 624553-F Good Fast Service From Our Deli Pizza € Subs € Broaster Chicken ® Western Union € Alltel Phone Bills € Pay Electric Bill € Windstream Phone Bills € Money Orders € Check Cashing € Lottery € Fax Service € Color Copies TIME SAVER PETRO Discount Cigarettes & Cigars The Beachville Advent Christian Church, located at 24815 County Road 49, at the intersection of State Road 247 and County Road 49, will celebrate its 114th Homecoming, on Sunday, Oct. 17. Morning worship service will be at 10:30 with Rev. Robert Mann as the guest speaker, and special music by the Funkhouser Family. Dinner will follow the morning worship service and then at 2 p.m. there will be a gospel sing featuring the Funkhouser Family. Rev. Mann will also be speaking on Monday through Wednesday evenings at 7. Come and join us as we celebrate 114 years of God's goodness. The Beachville Advent Christian Church will holds its fourth annual Fall Festival on Saturday, November 6 from 10 a.m. till 2 p.m.. All are invited for a day of fun, food,(hamburgers, sausages, chili, cotton candy, funnel cakes, nachos) music, just plain fun! Bounce house, door prizes, music by local talent. There will be a chili cook off, a cake auction, (call 935-0723 to register for the cook off). We desire to offer this day to our community for no charge, for anything! Come and enjoy a day of fun for the whole family! Tina Roberts and Bo Hammock, with their children, would like to remind you of their upcoming marriage, Saturday, the Sixteenth of October, two thousand ten at two o’clock in the afternoon. The ceremony will take place at O’Brien Baptist Church, on Highway 349, O’Brien, Florida. Reception to follow in the church fellowship hall. All friends and family are invited to attend.Roberts Hammock wedding reminder114th Homecoming at Beachville Advent Christianprojects and fundraising events planned for 201011. One of which is the “Who let the dogs out” quilt to raise money for Canine Companions for Independence (CCI). There is a $1 donation per ticket. If you would like to make a donation, or take a chance to receive this adorable quilt, please mail a check for the number of tickets you would like ($1 donation per ticket). Make your check payable to Branford Woman’s Club and mail to P.O. Box 1084, Branford, FL 32008. Be sure to indicate that the funds are for the CCI project, so we can mail you your tickets. Please visit www.cci.org for more information about the Canine Companion for Independence organization. The Branford Woman’s Club located at 26811 Hwy. 247, is a member of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs (GFWC) and the GFWC Florida Federation of Women’s Clubs. Members meet September through May, the third Thursday of each month. For more information about the Branford Woman’s Club or joining our volunteer community, please call 386-935-3487 or 386-935 4645 or visit our website at www.gfwcbwcfl.org. GFWC Branford Womans Club Continued From Page 8A printed photos to share with the group. If you need some help with your camera, be sure to also bring your user’s manual. If you have extra pieces of equipment that need a home, bring those along too. You may have just the thing another member is looking for. Branford Camera Club has members of all levels of expertise from absolute novice to experienced professional. Our meetings are informal and open to anyone with an interest in photography. For more information, contact any of the following members: Carolyn Hogue, Program Chair, 386-935-2044 Dick Bryant, Technical Consultant, 386-935-1977 Dick Madden, Technical Consultant, 386-935-0296 Skip Weigel, Technical Consultant, 386-935-1382Branford Camera Club meets Oct. 14Continued From Page 1A eral election on Nov. 2. BBQ chicken, chicken and rice, with sides, drinks and dessert will be served, courtesy of friends of Steve in our area. For more information call Chris Summerlin at 386-935-0995.Southerland to make Branford appearanceContinued From Page 8A the newspaper a couple of weeks ago, I think. I had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Wells several times, and enjoyed having a couple of interesting talks with him on a couple of those occasions. He will be very much missed. Next week our local Extension Office will have another class in one of its on-going gardening series, "Growing Salvia in North Florida" at the extension office next to the Coliseum building on Oct.14 from 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. These classes are free and very informative. Call the office at 386-362-2771 for more information or to sign up. Don't forget the Food Pantry at O'Brien Baptist Church next Tuesday, Oct. 19, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information call the church office at 386935-1503. From my "e-mail" files: "What the Bible means? Basic Information Before Leaving Earth." "There are two kinds of people on this earth; those who wake up and say, ‘Good morning, Lord,’ and those who wake up and say, ‘Good Lord, it's morning!’" "A preacher announced to his congregation, 'I have good news and I have bad news. The good news is we have plenty of money for our building fund. The bad news is it's still out there in your pockets.'" "Sign on the back of an Amish carriage ... ‘This vehicle is energy efficient; it runs on oats and grass. Caution; do not step in exhaust.'" "People want the front of the bus, the back of the church, and the center of attention." "A minister addressed his church, asking that those who would be willing to donate $100 towards their building fund to stand up. A wise organist immediately began to plan the National Anthem; the preacher got his pledges." Get outside in this beautiful weather and breathe in this wonderful clean fall air. Listen to the birds singing; thank God for the free entertainment. God bless! O'BRIEN AND OUR NEIGHBORS Continued From Page 8A Roger and Coralee take time to talkwith one of the guests. Theres always time for a little chat, word of welcome, sharing in fellowship. Courtesy photo

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 10A Sponsored by: Health Screening including Bone Density Screening, Information & Applications for Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program Vouchers for FREE MAMMOGRAMS for Qualified Individuals, Plenty of Giveaways and Resource Information! Huge Rummage Sale of Furniture, Collectibles, Antiques and More Quality Vendors Everything from Home Canned Goods to Original Oil Paintings, Hand-Crafted Furniture, Jewelry, Quilts, you name it! Kids’ Activities Bake Sale Food by J. Don Allen’s “World Famous” Beach Buns and Dawgs (Call 386-590-1543 for Vending Information) A Benefit Event for Tangles A Community Outreach for Women 12986 US Hwy 90 W., Live Oak, FL 32060 Ministry Leaders Angie Lott 386-688-4977 * lottfam4@windstream.net ** Vickie Bass 386-590-1543 * vlb55@msn.com Join us for Saturday, October 16 th , 8AM 4PM 12986 US Hwy. 90 West (1/4 mile past Wayne Frier Mobile Homes on the Left) 624685-F Suwannee Democrat A&B Customs Auto Repair Color Perfect Painters Suwannee River Federal Credit Union Unique, Upcycled Furniture, Gifts and Accessories HERBERT C. MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A. FALL BAZAAR and the FLORIDA BREAST AND CERVICAL CANCER EARLY DETECTION PROGRAM Presented by the Suwannee County Health Department 626462-F 10/19, 1:30 PM 10/21, 6:30 PM 626467-F Submitted Robert Murphy of Live Oak was elected President of the 339th Fighter Squadron Association during the group’s 29th reLive Oak man elected President of 339th Fighter Squadron Associationunion in Kingsport, Tenn. recently. Murphy will serve as president of this national organization for one year. While on active duty with the 339th at Johnson Air Force Base, located in Japan, during the Korean Conflict, Murphy, a Staff Sergeant, served as the Communications Chief. The 339th Fighter Interceptor Squadron served as one of the main protectors of Japan during the Korean Conflict. The squadron was credited with shooting down the first YAK fighter during the early part of this war. Major James W. Little and Lt. W.C. (Bill) Hayhurst were involved in and credited with this kill. The 339th was organized during WWII in the south Pacific as a fighter squadron. The P-38 Lightning was the more notable fighter that was used at that time. The squadron later became an All Weather Squadron and then a Fighter Interceptor Squadron and the aircraft were equipped with radar units. They flew mainly during the hours of darkness and inclement weather. Aircraft used were P-61 Black Widow, F-82 Twin Mustang and later Jet aircraft F-94B and F-86C, all fighters. Many of the former members of the 339th Fighter Interceptor Squadron attended the reunion and enjoyed the fellowship and re-telling of old war stories. Robert Murphy when he served as the Communications Chief in the 339th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, in 195152. Courtesy photoRobert Murphy of Live Oak accepts the gavel to serve as new President of the 339th Fighter Squadron Association from outgoing President Richard Carney, Mayfield, Ky. Courtesy photoThe North Florida Conservation and Airboat Alliance meets the first Tuesday of every month (except December) at 7 p.m. at Cowboy's BBQ in Live Oak. We are airboaters and sportsmen working to keep public lands and waterways open for everyone to use and enjoy. President Randy Howard, 590-4884. Secretary/Treasurer Patty Williams, pattywilliams@consultant.com or 961-5399.North Florida Conservation and Airboat Alliance meeting

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 11A Would like to welcome Shereal Harris Professional Nail Technician 623240-F Book Your Appointment TODAY! 386-208-HAIR (4247) • 9049 101st Ct., Live Oak $ 5 00 OFF Full Set € Spirals € Stilettos € Nail Encasings € 3D Nail Art $ 20 Pedicures on Saturdays Manicure & Pedicure for only $ 40 OCTOBER SPECIALS 623243-F Offer expires 10/31/10 Submitted See related story, Page 7A. Two events combined for one huge impact when the Florida Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program partnered with the Tangles’ Fall Bazaar, a premier event for the community outreach for women. Tangles’ ministry leaders, Angie Lott and Vickie Bass, were presented the opportunity to partner with the Florida Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program and immediately seized the opportunity to be part of the awareness program. The Fall Bazaar is Saturday, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Personal interest, though, according to the two women, was superseded by the opportunity to bring awareness to women in the community. Sponsors already secured reacted positively to the partnership of the two events. Lowe’s was already on board as a sponsor when the Florida program became part of the event. Nationally, Lowe’s initially partnered with the Susan G. Komen Foundation for the Cure in 2001. They have continued to be a strong promoter of the Foundation and breast cancer awareness and education since then. “We have been pleased to sponsor and support Tangles since this women’s outreach program began a year ago,” said Ryan Sedgley, manager of the local Lowe’s. “When I was approached about the Florida Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program partnering with the Fall Bazaar, I thought it was a natural fit.” Locally, Lowe’s has numerous signature pink items throughout the store that benefit breast cancer awareness with each purchase. All other sponsors have had positive response as well to the two programs merging their events. Event sponsors in addition to Lowe’s are Farm Bureau Insurance, Herbert C. Mantooth, DDS, PA, the Suwannee County Health Department, Suwannee River Federal Credit Union, The Suwannee Democrat, A&B Customs Automotive Repair, Color Perfect Painters and First Federal Savings Bank. First Federal Savings Bank signed on as an advertising partner for pink post-it notes which will remind everyone of the event on the front page of this week’s Suwannee Democrat. First Federal is well-recognized as a community partner and supporter of local cancer awareness events. Saturday’s event has shaped up as an old-fashioned community festival. In addition to a huge rummage sale, quality vendors with hand-crafted items will be on-site. Everything from home canned goods to jewelry, original oil paintings, quilts, afghans and baked items will be sold. Additionally, a sneak peak at Tangles’ upcoming line of unique “upcycled” furnishings, gifts and accessories (Shabby T) will be available for sale. Drawings will be held for raffle items including: $100 merchandise item from Lowe’s; an antique Boston Rocker donated by Suwannee Antiques; two hand-quilted quillows made by local quilter, Pat Roberts; a baby afghan; and an original oil painting by Nancy Boatright McCullers. For information on purchasing raffle tickets (only $1.00!) contact Amber Avera at amberavera71@yahoo.com. Also slated are kids’ activities and J. Don Allen’s Beach Buns and Dawgs food truck will be on hand with his “world-famous” food for sale! This first-time event is a fundraiser for Tangles A Community Outreach for Women. A few vending spaces are still available. For information on those spaces, to donate items for the rummage sale, or any other questions, call Vickie Bass at 386-590-1543. For information about the Florida Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, call Mary Ward, Healthy Communities, Health People Coordinator, Suwannee County Health Department, at 386-362-2708, Extension 269. Publix Super Markets conducted a community participation program to collect school supplies for homeless children in Suwannee County. The annual program, “School Tools for Cool Kids,” is conducted with the support of United Way of Suwannee Valley which provides the media communications for community awareness and the distribution of supplies collected to the school system homeless liaison. Homeless children in need of these supplies are assisted through this community effort. United Way of Suwannee Valley serves as the lead agency for the Homeless Services Network of Suwannee Valley, which serves the counties of Columbia, Suwannee, Lafayette, and Hamilton. The network includes agencies and individuals interested in the services available to those who are homeless or threatened with homelessness. United Way of Suwannee Valley is a community impact and fundraising organization which, utilizing volunteers on all levels, identifies unmet community needs and seeks to alleviate those needs through United Way of Suwannee Valley initiatives and the funding of 22 affiliated health and human service agencies. Staff Heres what was happening in the world in 1935: Babe Ruth hit his 714th and final home run; the board game Monopoly was released; Will Rogers and Wiley Post died in a plane crash in Alaska; Social Security was enacted to alleviate the effects of the Great Depression; and Live Oaks Buddy Nott got his high school diploma. Of the 47 members of the Pasco High class of 1935, Nott and six others are all that survive. Five of them gathered recently in Dade City, where they grew up. Getting together was a treat, Nott said, though the group has stayed in touch, more or less.Ž Two of the five still live in Dade City. Nott, on the other hand, made his way upstate, and spent 52 years as a banker. He started out in St. Petersburg at $40 a month, with the promise of $50 if he worked hard and did well. By any measure, he did. And what advice does Nott offer todays youth as they enter the workplace? I taught my children to work hard,Ž Nott said. Thats always been my philosophy.Ž Well said, Mr. Nott. Five members of the Class of 35 gathered recently in Dade City, where they grew up. With 47 members, their class was the largest freshman class to enter Pasco High at that point. Live Oaks Buddy Nott, second from the right, got his start there, but he spent much of his banking career right here in Live Oak. Nott even served as mayor of Live Oak. Courtesy photo , y p y Sponsors on board for Tangles’ Fall Bazaar, cancer detection programPublix school supply collection drive a successLive Oak Publix employees presented United Way of Suwannee Valley Homeless Coordinator Jennifer Lee, right; and Suwannee County School District Homeless Advocate Debra Ross, left; with school supplies collected through the store’s annual “School Tools for Cool Kids” school supply collection drive.Courtesy photo

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 12A DISABILITY Social Security Social Security CALL TOLL FREE AT 1-800-782-0059 • Retired Social Security Executives • We do ALL negotiations and personally represent you during hearings. • NO FEE UNLESS WE COLLECT Even if you've been turned down before. • Full representation from start to finish on any Social Security claims WE KNOW HOW TO DO IT! 622573-F SUWANNEE RIVER READINGS Branford 2010 Branford 386-935-1527 SCAFF'S Supermarket Sponsored By: 624560-F Oct. 6, 2010 8.98 Oct. 7, 2010 8.94 Oct. 8, 2010 8.91 Oct. 9, 2010 8.89 Oct. 10, 2010 8.86 Oct. 11, 2010 8.8 Oct. 12, 2010 8.76 The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge in Branford in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level. 625913-F Moses Car Wash Under New Management 415 N. Ohio Ave., Live Oak 386-855-4042 Free Pickup & Delivery Ladies Day Special Monday $ 5.00 OFF 621572-F PALMS MEDICAL GROUP formerly BRANFORD HEALTH & WELLNESS Will be having a PAP SMEAR CLINIC, beginning at 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 13th, 2010 at our Branford location. NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY. THIS SERVICE WILL BE PROVIDED TO ALL WOMEN WITH A CHARGE OF ONLY $5.00. THIS $5.00 FEE INCLUDES THE OFFICE VISIT AND THE LABORATORY BILLING. IF YOU NEED MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT OUR OFFICE (386) 935-3090 108 US 27 SOUTH WEST, Branford, FL 32008 South Oaks Square Location: 1520 S. Ohio (386) 362-2591 Medical Equipment Div: (386) 362-4404 Hours: 8:30 am-6:30 PM Mon-Fri., 8:30 am-3:00 pm Sat. Pharmacy & Your Health 623242-F Treatment for Croup Infection Croup is a condition that is most commonly caused by a virus, but also may be caused by bacteria that affect the lungs. Respiratory synctial virus (RSV) is one type of common virus that may cause croup. Parainfluenza virus can also cause croup. However, a viral infection does not necessarily mean croup will develop. The condition occurs most commonly in young children between 6 months and 3 years of age, and typically affects boys more frequently than girls. The infection causes airway inflammation which leads to narrowing of the airway. Consequently, children with croup may develop hoarseness and coughing, which is usually worst during the nighttime. A fever is also a common symptom of this condition. The fall and winter are the most common times of the year for croup to occur. Viruses that can lead to croup are easily transmitted through coughing and sneezing. The condition usually lasts less than a week. Use of a humidifier or warm fluids can be used at home to alleviate a mild cough associated with croup. If the child has a fever, over the counter medications such as acetaminophen ( Tylenol) or ibuprofen ( Advil, Motrin ) can be used. Dexamethasone is a glucocorticoid medication that may be given by a doctor to decrease swelling and improve the ability to breathe. by Jeffrey F. Scott, R.Ph Drive-up window Viewpoints/Opinions FROM OUR READERScan be dealt with a little more compassionately. This is a fire department, and mistakes can cost the lives of not only personnel, but patients, victims and bystanders. Mistakes can not be easily tolerated, especially if they violate the safety and well being of employees and citizens. Mr. Conner has brought to this department something that has been lacking, structure. He has held employees accountable for their actions, which is the only way to ensure safety and structure within a fire department. Many of us have worked at larger departments, and have noticed the vast improvements that have been made within our department since Mr. Conner has been the public safety director. It is now being managed as a fire service should. Just a few examples of some of the things that Mr. Conner has brought to this department in working with you gentlemen are: the purchasing of newer and safer equipment, ensuring that volunteers get the training they need so that they are in compliance with state guidelines and that scenes are safer, implementing and enforcing that proper safety equipment be worn and utilized on scenes, enforcing that training be performed on a regular basis, working to strategically place the stations to ensure shorter response times, working with the Advent Christian Village to put up a new station so that the citizens of ACV do not have to wait for such long response times, bridging the gap between volunteer personnel and career personnel as to ensure that working relationships are harmonious, and he has worked diligently to bring the stations, (both paid and volunteer) up to the ISO requirements which in turn will help to lower citizens' home owner premiums, as well as provide better service. These are just a few of the many things that Chief Conner has done to improve Suwannee County Fire Rescue. He has treated his employees well, and while a few feelings may occasionally get stung, his purpose for being Ôto the point and brisk'once in awhile is to ensure the safety of his subordinates. Most of us knew when we signed up to be firefighters, that the service is Ôpara-military,'and that we will not have our hands held and our backs patted along the way. We feel that Mr. Conner has done a fine job as our Chief, and he shows continued effort to grow and learn to be an even better leaders. Please note that while a few employees, (some of which may have been disgruntled), may have voiced problems with him, those of us who have signed below are in full support of him. Thank you for your time and attention to this matter. Respectfully, Bill Underhill Brad Merritt Tara Thompson Jerry Jordon John Munsell Jr. Wesley Schneider Debbie Adams Allen Donburgh David May Steve Oaks Lucas Hodge John Cherry Brian Cranford James Riley Robert Garbett David Long Jonathan Mieras Shawn Hillengas Slade Mayhard James Sommers Eddie Hand Robert Eyer Dave Smith Chris Rathbun Matthew Verdgrem Chris Perry Paul McDavid Nathan Griffis Tammy Conner Randy Hill Grady Sims Michael Conner Guy Cooper Tom Maynard Penny Munsell John Munsell Sr. Johnny Howard Tim White Matt Hubbard To the Editor: Every week I read the Rant & Rave about the music on the school bus and stop signs and about the bus drivers. I have been a bus driver for 20 years and let me tell you, people have no idea what bus drivers do or some of the things parents and students put us through. I have had parents going to sue me and the schools for writing up their kids. Kids calling me an unsavory name or two, telling me I can't do anything about it. Parents calling my house at all hours of the day and night because their kids don't want to sit in the seats I put them in or they traded toys and now want me to get it back. Oh, and how many times have I been told "You will pay for any toys that their kids don't bring home." Some of the fun stuff like talking back, "you can't move me, make me, what for, why?" One of the best is "my parents will have your job, I hate you, I hate my parents, and I hate school. Write me up, I don't care, you can't make me, I'll do what I want. Call the cops, I don't care." And then parents tell us "I would not do what you do for a million dollars." That one is funny since we couldn't raise a family on our salary. Let's not forget we have to drive down the road with 65-80 kids, watch every seat, and every toy, what's playing on the radio, watch the road and other drivers all the while one kid is slapping someone else, one is trying to walk down the aisle, one is screaming at you to move the kid in the seat with him because he hates them, or he (she) looked at me and one asking when can they move. Why is it so much of a problem to play a radio? Kristi Mullen said in the letter to the Editor on Oct. 1. I quote, "I was told that they think I am doing a good thing and that it's great that I stand up for what I believe in and for my children." That's great she is a parent looking out for her children, is this not what we all strive for as parents? We need more parents to be like this. I'm sorry to say that is not always the case. But if some parents aren't against radios on school buses does that make them bad? Why should all the other children have to do without? If she is so against radios on school buses why stop it in Suwannee County why not take on the other states and let's ban all school buses from having radios? I have a bus with a radio and I do play it some of the time and it's on one of the stations that have been allowed. Most of my kids don't listen to the station. And please someone tell me what babysitting has to do with riding a school bus. I hope that I'm not looked at as a babysitter. Does she not realize that when the radios are on and the kids have to keep the noise level down that it's keeping them from fighting, cursing at each other, slapping, throwing things and staying in their seats. That it makes it easier on the kids as well as the driver. I grant you there may be some stations that should not be listened too. How many parents gave their kids iPods for birthdays and Christmas? How many actually listen to the music that has been downloaded on the iPods. Everyday I see kids walking around and passing them on the school grounds and on the buses and I have had to try and get the kids to turn them off because of the language on them. Kristi Mullen, don't think for one minute that your kids are not hearing things and language that you find inappropriate. Possibly at school or on the bus or even at friends' houses and that one of your children may one day or have been handed an iPod with inappropriate music on it, watched a movie at friends'houses or just been in a store or sitting at a red light and having to listen to music from another car close by. Let's talk about seat belts since there are issues with them. How many times have we, as bus drivers, talked ourselves blue in the face for our kids to buckle up? Parents tell us all the time they want us to make their child buckle up. I'm still trying to figure out how to do that. I can't physically put it on them and I can't sit in each seat with them to make sure they keep them buckled and I don't have x-ray vision to see children are doing as I expect. So, it's a work in progress. Over and over, everyday, how many times I have had kids to tell me "you can't make me." Or I look up in the mirror and one of the kids has the belt slamming the kid behind or in front of them. What are we supposed to do? We still have to drive. The teachers do a great job in school but remember they have 20-30 kids in classrooms and it's not moving. They can look them in the face and take care of problems. Send the kids to the office. I have 60 or more behind me and still Continued From Page 6A DRIVE. It's a long walk back to the office so that is not an option. Now let's talk stop signs. We're taught to stop at the stop sign two feet before the stop sign, pull up until we have a clear view, watch for traffic and when it is safe to do so, pull out into the lane. The stop sign and stop line are usually in two different places. Today when you're driving home, look at some of the stop signs an see how many are at the stop line. We stop at the signs not at the stop line. That can give the illusion we are not stopping because the stop sign is not visible to oncoming traffic. I have been doing this job for a long time and don't get me wrong I love it. I get to see and talk to all the beautiful children in the school system. I'm now driving children of children that I have drove over the years. And I can't tell you how many coats or lunch money I have given out, the items I have cleaned up a little tiny cut a child got on the playground, wiped tears from eyes when feelings got hurt. How many times have I called to check on one of my kids because they were sick or hurt? Before you judge us, stop and think about it. I say to the Kristi Mullens in the community, if you have the time and the will, take the bus driving class and join us. You would be surprised just how much heart bus drivers really have. To all the parents that support us and the job we do, God Bless You! Cheryl Clark Joan Fewox Pat Bryant Mildred Griswold Dorie Bingemann Sharna Blanco Dan Olson Robert Schnaudigel Paula Frazier Robin Whitt David Blevins Janice Thompson Phyllis Postell Waydine Hollaway Wilbur Woods Ted Fralick Ami Fields Sarah Chavis Earnestine Riley Sandra Neely Monica Pitts Inez Williams Clayton Sneed To the Editor: Wake up Suwannee County. We have a problem of pandemic proportion. It's a problem that not only has touched every family in Suwannee County, but is on every doorstep across America. Prescription drug abuse, is not gender or race specific. It has no prejudices. It is not even class specific. What do we really know about prescription drug abuse? Nothing really. We go about our daily lives, reading a newspaper that is filled weekly with deaths, arrests, petty thefts that are related somehow to this problem. Yet we do nothing about it. We all quietly say to ourselves, wow, there's another one. Does that prompt us to take a look around and really open our eyes, and see what is going on right under our noses? I can answer that.... no it does not. EVERYONE knows someone that suffers from a problem with this abuse. It's time to get our heads out of the dirt, take our blinders off, stop making excuses, cause we think our loved one is not doing anything illegal. Addiction is a disease, and needs to be treated as such. What resources do we have to counter this problem? I can answer that question also. None, that is affordable. Our insurance companies will cover expenses to get you hooked, but, will not cover the expenses to get you off of it. Our problem goes much deeper than just what we see on the surface. At a time when our youth should be spending time working towards a brighter future filled with education, or working toward gaining life and work experience, many times is spent chasing that next pill. Often times this leads to lies, and deception because of the addiction. Families are being altered and relationships are being strained. This is our future, folks. These are our future leaders. Our youth are being robbed of their dreams. Pain clinics are advertised everywhere. It is a multibillion dollar industry. For every one that is shut down, six more open to take their place. It will take much needed legislation to solve this problem. There is strength in numbers. If you know someone or suspect a loved one with this problem, join us... gain some knowledge, education. Let's fight to take back our youth, and help them to free themselves from this widespread epidemic. Our first meeting will be the first week of November in the training room at the Live Oak Police Department. Exact date and time to follow. Trish EvansLive Oak

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 13A $ 1 89 Ole Country Meat Market, Inc. 636 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064 Phone Number: (386) 330-0404 Drawing will be held on November 1, 2010 Full Service Meat Counter Register to Win a Half a Beef Register to Win a Half a Beef Cut, Wrapped and Frozen to your specifications 5 lbs. or more Sirloin Sizzlers $ 2 39 Lb. We also carry Jim’s Produce € Smoked Bacon € Sausage € Hams € TroyerŽ Amish Products € Deli Meats & Cheeses € Jams & Jellies € Butter and Much More Fryer Leg Quarters 49 ¢ Lb. Pork Boston Butts $ 1 39 Lb. 10 lb. Bag, Limit 4 2 Pack Hog Head Cheese Oxtails Ground Chuck Lb. 626826-F were no signs of biting or bruising, according to Jacobsen. From then until 9:03 p.m., when the 911 call was made, Kramer was the only adult in the home with Olivia. "That was his job everyday, to take care of Olivia," said Jacobsen. "At 9:12 EMS arrived and found Olivia dead." Jacobsen said that Olivia was prone to terrible temper tantrums. He said Kramer was responsible for "keeping her happy, feeding her until March 14 when he killed her and he didn't have to do that anymore, put up with that anymore." An autopsy revealed that Olivia had 25 "blunt force injuries" to the head, although none was said to be fatal. Jacobsen also said that Kramer "cannot be excluded as the biter." The defense countered that an expert witness will produce DNAevidence proving the bite mark was from a female, not a male, ruling out Kramer. Furthermore, according to defense attorney David Collins, Olivia had serious medical problems and the cause of death couldn't be precisely determined. Olivia "was taken 41 times to a clinic or emergency room in her short 18 months," said Collins. He said she was also hospitalized four times because she had stopped breathing while asleep. Jacobsen acknowledged in his opening that Olivia was eventually diagnosed with sleep apnea. "There was something wrong with Olivia," said Collins. Collins explained that about a month before her death, Olivia suffered from diarrhea, blockages in the ears and, as reported by her mother, a tendency to bruise easily. "Was this some kind of conspiracy to use later?" Collins asked the jury. Certainly not, he said. About two weeks before Olivia's death, Collins said she had a 102.5 temperature. "That's the condition of the child before she passed away," he said. Witness testimony from several experts were heard Monday. The medical examiner who performed Olivia's autopsy, along with other experts were heard Tuesday. Rebecca Lee Rescigno pleaded guilty in February 2009 to lesser charges and received probation. The murder trial is expected to last all week.Murder trial will be battle of the expertsContinued From Page 1A cluding items of sentimental value accumulated over the decades, were either stolen or burned. "I'm a retired Army veteran and a senior citizen," Whisnant said during an earlier court proceeding. "He burned up all my medicine, my clothes, many of my tools, all the pictures of my wife who passed away 40 years ago. Just about all I had. I'm 69, and they burned me out." Cooper-Olin was sentenced Thursday in a Suwannee County courtroom by Judge Julian Collins. He was given time for two other burglaries as well. Those sentences will run concurrently with the 90-month term. Cooper-Olin must also pay $38,500 in restitution and serve 15 years'probation on his release. Collins had earlier rejected a plea deal for Cooper-Olin under which he would have received 6 years in prison. Another defendant has already been sentenced and a third awaits trial.90-month sentence for W'born arsonistContinued From Page 1A 13477 233rd Road, Live Oak, and "stated that he was on his way over there to kill everyone in the house," on Oct. 6 around 6:22 p.m. Once at the home, Wheeler allegedly chased the man in the yard and around the house with an ax. "The defendant then got back in his truck and chased the victim with his truck, running over the victim's legs," wrote Tompkins. Wheeler then fled the scene. Wheeler was arrested Oct. 7 and booked into the Suwannee County Jail. He was charged with aggravated battery with a motor vehicle, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, Columbia County warrant for violation of probation for driving while license suspended and a Bay County warrant for child support.Man chased with ax, run down by truckContinued From Page 1A overcorrected, causing the truck to flip several times, coming to a rest on its top in the grassy shoulder. Waters received a head laceration and several contusions to the body. Apassenger in the truck, Lester Ambrose, 54, suffered a broken collarbone and had to be pulled from the wreckage by Waters. Both were treated at Shands Live Oak and released the same night. Both were reportedly wearing seatbelts. LO couple unhurt in Columbia County mishap ALive Oak couple escaped serious injury in a Columbia County crash Friday. Paul Shaffer, 36, westbound on US 90 at Brown Road, was stopped at a traffic light when a 2005 Ford pickup driven by Robert Mershon, 28, of Lake City, struck the rear of his 2004 Dodge pickup, according to the Florida Highway Patrol. Shaffer and his passenger, Amanda Shaffer, 36, were treated for minor injuries at Lake City Medical Center, reports show. Mershon, who was unhurt, was charged with careless driving, according to FHP. All three individuals were wearing seat belts, said FHP.2 hurt in truck rolloverContinued From Page 1A dispatcher using a crowbar to try to open the box around 8:54 p.m. Atraffic stop was later conducted and Dolly told a sheriff's corporal that she was trying to get cash out of the box that her roommate dropped in there around 4 p.m. in the amount of $432. She stated that the roommate's friend needed the cash, so she "just wanted to get the cash out of the deposit box and bring back a money order in place of the cash." The roommate reportedly told deputies that Dolly had no reason to get inside the box and that Dolly "had a bad gambling problem and she wanted the money to support her habit." The report states that little damage was done to the box and that a crowbar and a pair of needle-nose pliers were found with Dolly at time of arrest. Dolly was arrested and transported to the Suwannee County Jail and charged with attempted burglary, possession of burglary tools and criminal mischief.Woman uses crowbar in attempt to get cashContinued From Page 1A "This is a more advanced tool than what was previously available on the web and it makes flood hazard information more easily accessible," said James Link, the District's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) coordinator. "Visitors of the site can view their property in relation to new flood zone designations and print custom maps of their property or any parcel of interest." The tool also helps users interpret the flood zones affecting a property andNew Web offerings from SRWMD, Shands Live Oak, LO PartnershipContinued From Page 1A provides information concerning which property owners are required to purchase flood insurance. The District continues to work with FEMAand counties within its boundaries to evaluate flood risks, update digital flood maps, and establish flood elevations through the Digital Flood Insurance Rate Maps (DFIRMs) and Risk MAPprograms. Shands Live Oak launches new website Shands community hospitals -Shands Lake Shore, Shands Starke and Shands Live Oak -officially launched new dedicated websites. "We are thrilled to announce that each hospital now has its own individual website," said Rhonda Sherrod, Market CEO. "The benefits are numerous; online payment options, a listing of hospital services, and descriptions of the various health and wellness programs our local hospitals offer specifically to their communities." Shands community hospitals recently entered into a partnership with Health Management, who led the effort to create the websites. The websites feature details about each of the hospitals'backgrounds, services, job openings, maps, volunteer opportunities and a whole host of detailed information. The URLfor Shands Live Oak is www.ShandsLiveOak.com Live Oak Partnership announces new website The Live Oak Partnership has announced a new website for the Live Oak community. This website will feature local event details, downtown revitalization progress and concerns. Through this website, the organization also hopes to encourage visitors and residents to experience Live Oak, by providing an avenue of event publicity and information. Keeping with the theme and realization of the importance that history holds in the Live Oak community, the website address in www.historicliveoak.com, and features seasonal links based on Partnership sponsored events. Rod Smith, running mate of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Alex Sink, chatted with patrons of the Brown Lantern restaurant in Live Oak Friday afternoon. On recent polls showing the race between Sink and Republican Rick Scott tightening, Smith said, "This was always going to be a close race." However, Smith said he believes Sink "has been able to carve out a message that works" and will prevail. As for his decision to accept the number two spot on the ticket, Smith told of a woman who had two sons. "One was lost at sea, the other became Lieutenant Governor," he laughed. Photo: StaffThis tractor trailer snapped a power pole in the Penn Oil Company driveway on US 129 North Monday afternoon, killing power to nearby businesses and traffic lights to several intersections on the north end of town for several hours. Photo: Jeff Waters Semi downs power pole, disrupts trafficLt. Gov. candidate pays a visit

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 14A 208 72nd Trace (South of the Intersection of I-10 & Highway 129) Live Oak, FL 386-330-5760 Store Hours: Monday-Saturday 7 a.m. 9 p.m.; Sunday 8 a.m. 8 p.m. 626780-F The Lady of the Lake Quilting Guild will hold its monthly meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 27, at 9:30 a.m. at the Teen Town 533 NW Desoto Street, Lake City (2 blocks north of Duval (US 90) on Lake Jeffery Road. The program will feature the famous Chinese Auction, where members exchange a one-yard piece of fabric, while playing a game. The Guild is an organization for anyone interested in quilts and the art of quilting. The Guild makes and distributes over 200 quilts a year to various charities and non-profit organizations in the Suwannee Valley Region. The Guild is co-hosting the 22nd Stephen Foster Quilt Show and Sales at Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park in White Springs on October 15-17, 2010. This is a judged quilt show with vendors, boutiques and much more. For more details, contact President Ramona Dewees, 386-496-3876. The March of Dimes and Mercantile Bank are presenting “Signature Chefs Auction” Nov. 11 at 5:30 p.m. at the newly re-decorated Columbia County Fairgrounds Banquet Hall. There will be a Festival of Trees and Wreaths, live and silent auctions, and live entertainment by “Harry, Sally, and Billy.” The highlight will be a selection of specialty foods presented by area restaurants and caterers, along with complimentary wine tasting. For more information call Maureen Lloyd at 386752-4885.Tickets will be sold at all Mercantile Bank offices, Rountree Moore Toyota, Ward’s Jewelers, First Street Music, Suwannee Democrat, and Jasper News. Put this event on your calendar and support March of Dimes as we work together to give every baby a healthy start! In Memory of Those Lost to Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Those Suffering from the Disease of Addiction Thursday, October 28, 2010 Suwannee Courthouse 6:45 pm Suwannee Courthouse 6:45 pm Candle Lighting at Courthouse 7:00 pm Memorial Walk to Millennium Park Beginning at Suwannee Courthouse 7:15 pm Reception at Millennium Park Unveiling of Memorial Wall To add your story and loved one’s photo to the memorial wall or to receive information about the Candlelight Vigil, call 362-2272 or email suwanneecoalition@mac.com. The Wellborn Neighborhood Watch will sponsor a Candidates Night on Oct. 19. Lake City radio station Power Country 102.1 will broadcast the event. This time the meeting will be at the Wellborn Community Association Building starting exactly at 6 p.m. so please come early and get a seat. Some of the candidates have later commitments so we must start on time. All local candidates were invited. The following have committed to attend: State House of Representatives, Dist. 11 Debbie Boyd, Elizabeth Porter Suwannee County Judge Gary E. Brown, William F. (Lin) Williams County Commission, Dist. 4 Billy C. Maxwell, Philip D. Oxendine In addition, the five constitutional amendments on the ballot that will be explained by guest speaker Adam Prins, a member of the Live Oak City Council. The Wellborn Community Association is located on 8th Avenue in Wellborn. Refreshments will be served. For more information call Jane Campbell at 963-3196.Candlelight Vigil and Memorial WalkCandidates Night in WellbornLady of the Lake Quilting Guild to meetMarch of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction Check out the Suwannee Democrat ’s page on Facebook

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Family is why WE DO IT ALL. statefarm.com ® State Farm Insurance Companies  Home Offices: Bloomington, Illinois P02640 11/04 Providing Insurance and Financial Services LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR STATE FARM IS THERE. ¨ Rob Cathcart, Agent 115 Grand Street NE Live Oak, FL 32064 Bus: 386-364-7900 rob.cathcart.j656@statefarm.com We all feel the same commitment to care for our families. As your good neighbor agent, I can help you meet your insurance needs. Call me today. 622813-F 127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL Phone: 386-362-4539 Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478 Se Habla Espanol Hours: Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m.; Saturday 9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.; Sunday by appointment www.poolerealty.com 622812-F Gary Olive, Dealer Lollie Olive, Manager Jessica Olive, Sales Associate 1429 N. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak 386-362-1971 www.badcock.com 622810-F 621 North Ohio Avenue  Live Oak, Florida 32060 (386) 362-1848  Fax (386) 364-4661 (800) 457-6082 Suwannee graphics PRINTING  COPY SERVICE Complete Printing Services from Business Forms, Blueprints, Tickets, Letterheads, Envelopes, Program Books, COLOR COPIES, etc... 622808-F Branford Cabinets Robert Diett, Owner • Custom Cabinets • Counter Tops • Native Woods • Entertainment Units • Wall Units • Closet Systems 386-344-1822 27058 83rd Place, Branford 622807-F WALMART SUPERCENTER For all your shopping needs. PHARMACY VISION CENTER LAWN & GARDEN TIRE & LUBE EXPRESS DELI MEAT DEPT. 1-HOUR PHOTO FRESH BAKERY HAIR SALON PORTRAIT STUDIO Highway 129 North, Live Oak, FL 386-330-2488 622811-F OWNER TIM VERDI P.O. BOX 518 903 SUWANNEE AVE. BRANFORD, FL 32008 PHONE (386) 935-1442 ESTABLISHED 1904 622809-F BYJEFF WATERS he's the first survivor in a family that's been plagued with cancer. Athree-time survivor herself, Mary Lou Roberson said she's never asked for pity from anyone, and never will. "I've never told my story before because so many people had these type of things and I don't want other families to think I'm boasting," she said at her dining room table in her home Monday. "I had nothing to do with surviving." She said her sister-in-law knew the secret to her survival. "Only the good die young, she always told me," said Roberson laughingly. "I'll never forget that." The 72-year-old lost six members of her immediate family to cancer at an early age. In December 1975, Roberson went to a Jacksonville doctor. Tests were performed and she had to wait. "He said to go home and enjoy Christmas with the family and come back the sixth day of January," she said. "We enjoyed Christmas, but of course I worried about it." She didn't tell her children or anyone else, just her husband. Later, with her husband by her side, the doctor told them the lump in her left breast, which had just been removed, was already in stage four, the highest stage of breast cancer. Her treatments consisted of cobalt injections, which affected her entire body, not just the cancer-ravaged areas. After her mastectomy, Roberson thought she could move on with life. About a year later, however, Roberson was diagnosed with colon cancer. Doctors told her they couldn't do much. She heard about treatments for cancer in Greece from a friend who was cured by the same treatments. "The family got up money and I went to Greece for 22 days," she said. "The doctor said (the cancer) is all over me ÔI can only give you the treatments and see what it does'he said. Around the 15th or 16th day, he said the counts looked good, the 19th day blood work showed no signs of cancer and by the 24th I was home and that's it." Through it all, Roberson was still her strong, witty self. "At lunch I'd come over here to her house and call them in Greece," said daughter Lori Harper. "To get to them you always had to call a taxi cab to get through. Here we are, three daughters, all married, and she's trying to set us up with a taxicab driver." Afew years later Roberson was showering when she discovered a lump in her right breast. For a second time, she survived stage four breast cancer. To this day, she said her fingernails and toenails fall off as a result of all the treatments. "I'm a survivor," she said. "And my family members all died very young." But several others are sick even now. Lori Harper has Hodgkin's lymphoma, diagnosed in 2007. And one of Roberson's granddaughters was diagnosed with cancer in 2006. Her husband is also a cancer survivor as well. The toughest one to deal with may be the diagnosis of Roberson's 21month-old great-granddaughter, Bridget Mathis. She was diagnosed on Sept. 29 with acute lymphocytic B-cell leukemia. "Whenever this happened to my great-granddaughter it just made me wonder why such a little child who never did anything wrong to anyone had to go through this," she said. "It rips my heart out seeing her in the hospital going through this." Roberson said she broke down a few times dealing with her own cancer over the years. However, she found inspiration and hope in an older woman and a young boy. Doris Allen would send her cards at least once a week. Allen wasn't a close friend, just an acquaintance, "but she always wrote something sweet that would lift me up. I never did tell her that she was an inspiration to me." Asix or seven-year-old boy was receiving chemotherapy the same time Roberson was. "Every time I was there, he was there. He would just smile and light up the whole room," she said. "That little old fellow would just lay there and grin and he would always sing ÔJesus Loves Me.'All he wanted was for someone to go near him and just touch him. Of course you weren't supposed to touch the other patients, but I would always go up to him and just touch his little hand. The last time I saw him he told me ÔJesus loves you,'and Ôyou're my angel.'" At her next treatment, he wasn't there. "I always wondered about him," she said. "I figured he must have passed away. It was sad, his little song was ÔJesus Loves Me'and he would just light up."Fighting on CALL US TODAY FOR A FREE QUOTE. COMPETITIVE RATES AND EXCELLENT SERVICE Jeff Tippens Insurance Agency Jeff Tippens, Agent 313 N. Ohio Avenue Live Oak, Fl 32064 Ph: 386-364-2886 Fax: 386-364-3592 AUTO  HOME  LIFE 622806-F € Huge Rummage Sale € Quality Vendors of Hand-Crafted Items € Kids Activities € Food by J Don Allens Beach Buns and Dawgs For more information call 386-590-1543 FLORIDA BREAST AND CERVICAL CANCER EARLY DETECTION PROGRAM at the FALL BAZAAR Saturday, October 16th, 8 a.m. 4 p.m. 12986 Hwy 90 West (1/4 Mile Past Wayne Frier Mobile Homes) Free Health Screening! 625545-F SWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 15A ÔI've never told my story before because so many people had these type of things and I don't want other families to think I'm boasting. I had nothing to do with surviving.' In a family plagued with cancer, Mary Lou Roberson is the first survivor

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99 ¢ Quantity Right Reserved. We accept USDA Food Stamps, Personal Checks, Debit/Credit Cards and WIC OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8 A.M. 8 P.M. 1529 SE Ohio Ave. LIVE OAK Save a lot a lot ¨ Prices good 10/13/10 thru 10/19/10 WE CUT FRESH MEAT DAILY "BEEF IT UP SALE!" No additives or solutions for minimal shrinkage DONE THE OLD FASHIONED WAY 623249-F FRESH FROM OUR PRODUCE DEPARTMENT BANANAS YELLOW ONIONS $ 4 99 BIGGINS RUSSET POTATOES 39 ¢ $ 1 69 10 Lb. Bag 3 Lb. Bag 99 ¢ DAIRY 69 ¢ 2 LT. 79 ¢ $ 1 00 ASST. CHEF BOYARDEE COLORTEX BATH TISSUE $ 1 8 OZ. 14.50 -15 OZ. ASST. KOOLAID BURST DRINKS 49 ¢ 10.75 OZ. $ 3 99 ASST. COBURN FARMS YOGURT ASST. BETTY CROCKER MASHED POTATOES 99 ¢ 96 OZ. 99 ¢ 6 CT. PKG. 7.25 OZ. 16 OZ. 12 DBL. ROLLS O’DAYS MAC & CHEESE CASKEY’S TOMATO SOUP J. HIGGS SALTINE CRACKERS 99 ¢ 8 OZ. 4.8-6.6 OZ. FROZEN $ 1 99 GROCERY 8 OZ. 2 CT. PKG. PRINGLES REG. OR SOUR CREAM & ONION AXIS ULTRA BLEACH REG. OR LEMON ASSORTED SAVE-A-LOT BRAND SODA $ 1 17 GOLD LEAF DEEP DISH PIE SHELLS CREAMY WHIP WHIPPED TOPPING 4.9 OZ. 88 ¢ 99 ¢ 16 OZ. Lb. Heavy Western Boneless FAMILY PACK Heavy Western Semi-Boneless “Old Fashioned” USDA Inspected Fresh Lean Heavy Western Semi-Boneless Heavy Western “Lean & Meaty” Beef Lb. Lb. FAMILY PACK Lb. Lb. Lb. Heavy Western Boneless Beef GROUND CHUCK $ 2 99 $ 3 49 CHUCK ROAST BEEF STEW NY STRIP STEAK $ 4 99 Lb. $ 2 69 HEAVY WESTERN BONELESS BEEF WHOLE NY STRIP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3.99 lb. USDA INSPECTED FRESH GROUND BEEF (Family Pack) . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1.69 lb. USDA INSPECTED PORK SPARERIBS (3 Pack) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1.69 lb. USDA INSPECTED FRESH FRYER LEG QUARTERS (10 lb. Bag) $ 4.90 USDA INSPECTED FRESH PORK FINGER STYLE RIBS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2.29 lb. ONE DAY TRUCKLOAD SALE OCT. 15th, 2010 While Supplies Last 2/ 3/ COBURN FARMS CREAM CHEESE $ 1 49 RICE TOWN LONG GRAIN RICE 3 LB. BAG ALBANY BAKERY ICED OATMEAL OR CHOC. CHIP COOKIES CHUCK STEAKS $ 2 89 $ 3 49 SHORT RIBS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 16A

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Section BWednesday, October 13, 2010Suwannee Democrat SPORTS SPORTS Political advertisement paid for and approved by Gary Brown, Candidate, for Suwannee County Judge 626057-F BROWN Gary Elect FOR COUNTY JUDGE www.garybrownforjudge.com Follow us on Facebook Branford runs over DragonsRIGHT: A Raines and Suwannee player battle it out in the trenches during the first half of their critical District 2-2A game Friday night at the Graveyard in Jacksonville. Photo: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com)By Corey Daviscorey.davis@gaflnews.comBRANFORD-After establishing a quick 14-0 lead in the game against over manned Florida Deaf team, Branford coach Bill Wiles did everything he could to try to keep the score down in a 60-12 win over the visiting Dragons Thursday night. Wiles substituted backups and wide receivers in the backfield as the Bucs rolled up 471 yards rushing, including over 300 in the first half. Kyle Certain, 150 yards on 11 carries, picked up 25 yards on the Bucs opening play of the game and followed it with a 45-yard touchdown run on the next play to give the Bucs a 7-0 lead. On the ensuing Dragons offensive play, senior linebacker Danny Johnston scooped up a loose fumble and returned it 32 yards for another score increasing the lead to 14-0 with 6:48 left in the first quarter. Holding the Dragons to another three and out series, Branford scored again on its next possession. Kyle Stebbins, 151 yards on 10 carries including 123 in the first half, picked up 33 yards on three of the first five plays of the drive. Kendrick Prevatt, 35 yards on 4 carries, rumbled 16 yards before freshman Cole Lamb sprinted 10 yards to the 3-yard line. Certain appeared to score on a 3-yard run but it was called back for holding. Prevatt hit Josh Kirby for a 13-yard touchdown pass on the next play increasing the lead to 21-0 with less than two minutes left in the first quarter. Florida Deaf put together its best of the night answering the Bucs score with a score of their own as quarterback Corey Koski found Zachary Reese for a 15-yard score cutting the lead to 21-6 with 8:57 left in the second quarter. Branford answered back three plays later as Stebbins rumbled 21 yards and Lamb weaved 29 yards. Stebbins found By Corey Daviscorey.davis@gaflnews.comJACKSONVILLE-Two plays was all it took for host Raines to take control of a crucial District 2-2A game against visiting Suwannee at Earl S. Kitchings Stadium Friday. Raines junior linebacker Kenny Bynum picked off a Jackson Brown pass on the first play from scrimmage and returned it 30 yards to give the Vikings an early 7-0 lead. On the Vikings’ first play from scrimmage, Raines senior quarterback Sam Smiley hooked up with wide reScoreboardfor Oct. 8Raines 49 Suwannee 14 Hamilton 18 Dixie 9 Lafayette 33 Mandarin Chrst. 27 Ridgeview 16 Columbia 9 Fort White 30 Fla. High 27 Bell 29 St. Joseph 21 Trinity 42 Hawthorne 6 Bradford 25 Union 24 Vanguard 45 Eastside 0 Trinity Catholic 59 Keystone 7 Ribault 46 Santa Fe 22 First Coast 19 Buchholz 7 Taylor 57 East Gadsden 17 Madison 35 Godby 17 Vikings roll ‘DogsBranford’s defense shut down Florida Deaf’s double-wing offense, holding them to 53 yards rushing on 25 carries. Photo: Corey Davis SEE BRANFORD, PAGE 5B SEE VIKINGS, PAGE 5BPlayoff push for spikersPage 4B

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 2BSPORTS 570605-F Saturday Alabama Deaf 40, Niceville Rocky Bayou 16 Lauderdale Lakes Boyd Anderson 19, Dillard 13 Miami Braddock 48, Ferguson 47 Miami Country Day 19, Archbishop Curley 18 North Miami 34, Goleman 3 Friday Alonso (Tampa) 28, Chamberlain 21 Andrew Jackson (Jacksonville) 10, Terry Parker 0 Apopka 33, West Orange 6 Armwood (Seffner) 41, King 0 Astronaut (Titusville) 30, Rockledge 0 Atlantic Coast (Jacksonville) 57, Father Lopez Catholic 0 Atlantic Community (Delray) 20, Park Vista Community 14 Auburndale 35, Lake Nona 31 Aucilla Christian 41, Pope John Paul II 0 Avon Park 19, Mulberry 6 Baker County 46, Baldwin 25 Baker School 32, Bozeman School 0 Barrington Christian Academy (Homestead) 35, Sheridan Hills Christian 0 Barron Collier (Naples) 28, Cypress Lake 19 Bartram Trail (St. Johns) 16, Nease 8 Bell 29, St. Joseph Academy 21, OT Berean Christian (W. Palm Beach) 42, Zion Christian 36 Berkeley Prep (Tampa) 42, Lakeland Christian 0 Bishop Kenny (Jacksonville) 38, Englewood 6 Bishop Moore (Orlando) 26, South Sumter 10 Blake (Tampa) 21, Seminole Osceola 14 Blanche Ely (Pompano) 27, Monarch 8 Blountstown 41, West Gadsden 0 Bolles School (Jacksonville) 38, University Christian 19 Booker (Sarasota) 28, Bayshore 27, OTDistrict 2-2A Dst.Ovr. Raines(2-0)(5-0) Ribault(2-0)(3-2) Baker County(1-1)(5-1) Suwannee(1-1)(2-4) Baldwin(0-2)(2-4) Santa Fe(0-2)(0-6) District 5-1A Dst.Ovr. Villages(3-0)(5-0) Wildwood(2-0)(5-1) Hamilton(2-0)(2-3) Trenton(1-1)(4-1) Dixie (1-2)(3-3) Hilliard(0-3)(0-5) Chiefland(0-3)(0-6) District 2-1B Dst.Ovr. Hawthorne(4-0)(5-1) Lafayette(4-0)(5-1) Mandarin(2-2)(2-3) St. Johns (2-1)(2-3) St. Francis(0-2)(1-4) Oak Hall(0-3)(2-3) Aucilla (0-4)(1-4) Big Ten Conference West Conf.Ovr. Bishop Snyder(3-0)(4-2) Bell(2-0)(3-3) Branford(0-1)(2-3) St. Joseph(0-2)(2-2) Bronson(0-2)(1-5) East Conf.Ovr. Mandarin(1-0)(2-3) St. Johns(1-0)(2-3) Oak Hall(0-2)(2-3) St. Francis(0-0)(1-4)Statewide ScoreboardDistrict Standings Bradenton Christian 37, St. John Neumann 0 Bradford Co. (Starke) 26, Union County 24 Brandon 48, Wharton 20 Calvary Christian (Ft. Lauderdale) 28, Pope John Paul II 27 Cape Coral 49, Palmetto Ridge 21 Carrollwood Day (Tampa) 47, All Saints 14 Central Florida Christian 43, Orlando Christian 26 Chaminade-Madonna (Hollywood) 52, Somerset Academy 34 Charlotte (Punta Gorda) 46, Palmetto 13 Choctawhatchee (Fort Walton Beach) 49, Arnold 48, OT Choice Learning (Miami) 19, Marathon 0 Christopher Columbus (Miami) 37, Coral Gables 0 Clay (Green Cove Springs) 51, Ponte Vedra 14 Clearwater Central Catholic 21, Indian Rocks 13 Clewiston 60, Gateway Charter 0 Cocoa Beach 28, Eau Gallie 26 Cocoa 35, Satellite 6 Colonial (Orlando) 28, Orlando University 21 Cooper City 27, Fort Lauderdale 0 Coral Glades 21, Coral Springs Charter 14 Coral Shores 14, Mourning 0 Countryside (Clearwater) 21, Clearwater 6 Creekside (Jacksonville) 42, Stanton College Prep 12 Crescent City 35, Holy Trinity Episcopal 24 Crestview 26, Ft. Walton Beach 20, 2OT Cypress Bay (Weston) 35, Charles Flanagan 21 Dade Christian (Miami) 42, Florida Christian 14 DeLand 44, Pine Ridge 0 Delray American Heritage 50, Pahokee 20 Douglas 31, Taravella 22 Dr. Phillips (Orlando) 45, Boone 0 Dunbar (Fort Myers) 34, LaBelle 3 Dunnellon 36, Citrus 7 Durant (Plant City) 49, Riverview 0 Dwyer (Palm Beach Lakes) 62, Palm Beach Lakes 6 East Lake (Tarpon Springs) 38, Palm Harbor University 28 East Lee County (Fort Myers) 34, Lely 31 East Ridge (Clermont) 42, Jupiter Christian 15 East River (Orlando) 27, St. Cloud 14 Ed White (Jacksonville) 56, R.E. Lee 0 Edgewater (Orlando) 55, Liberty 6 Episcopal (Jacksonville) 42, Fernandina Beach 14 Estero 46, DeSoto County 12 Evangelical Christian (Fort Myers) 28, Out-of-Door Academy 24 Everglades (Miramar) 56, West Broward 13 FAMU (Tallahassee) 62, Graceville 22 First Coast (Jacksonville) 19, Buchholz 7 Fleming Island 31, Seabreeze 10 Fletcher (Neptune Beach) 41, Middleburg 25 Fort Pierce Central 14, Sebastian River 9 Fort Pierce Westwood 21, Merritt Island 3 Fort White 30, Florida 27, 2OT Foundation Academy (Kissimmee) 37, Seffner Christian 7 Freeport 15, South Walton 0 Gainesville 55, Lecanto 0 George Steinbrenner (Tampa) 31, St. Petersburg Catholic 14 Glades Central (Belle Glade) 40, Boca Raton Community 7 Glades Day 41, Summit Christian 7 Gulf Breeze 38, Rutherford 20 Gulf Coast (Naples) 28, Ida S. Baker 7 Hallandale 8, Pines Charter 6 Hamilton County 18, Dixie County 9 Harmony (St. Cloud) 44, Poinciana 0 Hernando (Brooksville) 56, Tavares 0 Hialeah 23, Miami Beach 8 Highlands Christian (Pompano) 55, Miami Douglas MacArthur North 20 Hillsborough (Tampa) 35, East Bay 14 Immokalee 36, Hardee 34 Interlachen 39, Taylor 14 Island Coast (Cape Coral) 54, Lake Placid 0 Jefferson County (Monticello) 43, Cottondale 0 Jefferson (Tampa) 50, Lakewood 14 Jensen Beach 35, Titusville 19 Jesuit (Tampa) 42, Lennard 7 John I. Leonard (Greenacres) 35, Santaluces 18 Jones (Orlando) 35, Frostproof 0 Kathleen (Lakeland) 28, Haines City 17 KingÂ’s Academy (W. Palm Beach) 24, Benjamin 7 Kissimmee Osceola 35, George Jenkins 28 Lafayette (Mayo) 33, Mandarin Christian 27 Lake Brantley (Altamonte Springs) 42, Lyman 6 Lake Gibson (Lakeland) 37, Bartow 7 Lake Highland (Orlando) 30, Cardinal Mooney 13 Lake Wales 37, Sebring 3 Lake Weir (Ocala) 17, Springstead 14 Lake Worth 42, Royal Palm Beach 13 Lakeland 59, Bayside 34 Lakewood Ranch (Bradenton) 42, Port Charlotte 21 Land OÂ’Lakes 50, Anclote 0 Landmark Christian 47, Merritt Island Christian 0 Largo 55, Leto 0 LaSalle (Miami) 56, Doral Academy Charter 7 SEE STATEWIDE, PAGE 3B

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 3BSPORTS 571307-F Now THAT'S Something To Smile About! Thank you for submitting this week's SMILE photograph! Suwannee Democrat Submit your photo for publication to: P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 I’m ready to go Trick or Treating, are you? Suwannee Democrat 211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL 32064 or call 386-362-1734 • 1-800-525-4182 Choose From Two Convenient Payment Options Direct Debit from Checking/Savings Account I want to take advantage of EZ Pay, and I authorize you to process a payment for the applicable amount on my checking/savings account each month until I instruct you otherwise. $2.75 each month $4.00 each month in county out of county Credit Card Payment I want to take advantage of EZ Pay, and I authorize you to bill my credit/ATM/debit card for the applicable amount each month until I instruct you otherwise. Sign Up for EZ Pay today and receive a FREE $ 5 00 gift card to Publix How EZ Pay Benefits You 1. Monthly billing doesn't tie up large amounts of money in advance. 2. Never receive another renewal notice no more checks to write or stamps to find. 3. Switch at any time prefer to go back to paying another way after trying EZ Pay? Just call us! Come by Promotion ends September 22, 2010 at 5 p.m. Leesburg 56, Eustis 27 Lehigh 27, Golden Gate 12 Leon (Tallahassee) 42, Chiles 14 Liberty County (Bristol) 48, Wewahitchka 0 Madison County 35, Godby 17 Mainland (Daytona Beach) 21, Spruce Creek 0 Manatee (Bradenton) 45, Sarasota 10 Mariner (Cape Coral) 24, Bishop Verot 20 Martin County (Stuart) 14, South Fork 7 MAST Academy (Miami) 45, Lighthouse Christian 14 Melbourne 45, Port St. Lucie 21 Melbourne Central Catholic 48, University High School (Orange City) 21 Miami Belen Jesuit (Miami) 47, Mater Academy 7 Miami Central 25, Miami Northwestern 22 Miami Jackson 44, Edison 0 Miami Washington 42, Key West 13 Middleton (Tampa) 31, Strawberry Crest 14 Miramar 49, South Plantation 13 Mitchell (New Port Richey) 51, Zephyrhills 22 Monsignor Pace (Miami) 27, Archbishop Carroll 14 Moore Haven 76, St. Stephen’s Episcopal 39 Mount Dora 62, Newberry 26 Munroe Day 44, Bronson 21 Navarre 49, Milton 20 Niceville 35, Mosley 14 North Florida Christian (Tallahassee) 57, Eagle’s View 12 North Marion (Citra) 59, Belleview 0 North Miami Beach 28, Carol City 20 Northview (Bratt) 35, Holmes County 14 Oak Ridge (Orlando) 28, Cypress Creek 0 Oakland Park Northeast 7, Deerfield Beach 0 Ocala Forest 24, Mandarin 14 Ocala Trinity Catholic 59, Keystone Heights 7 Ocala Vanguard 45, Eastside 0 Olympia (Orlando) 27, Wekiva 13 Orange Park 38, Sandalwood 28 Orlando Freedom 49, Gateway 6 Ormond Beach Calvary Christian 52, Florida Air Academy 6 Oviedo 14, Evans 0 Pace 42, Escambia 0 Palatka 34, Matanzas 16 Palm Bay (Melbourne) 47, Viera 7 Pasco (Dade City) 45, Gulf 13 Pensacola Catholic 35, Marianna 19 Pensacola Washington 13, Bay 7 Pine Crest (Fort Lauderdale) 28, North Broward 23 Pine Forest (Pensacola) 29, Tate 8 Plant City 37, Bloomingdale 0 Plant (Tampa) 24, Gaither 16 Plantation American Heritage 44, Pompano Beach 7 Port St. Joe 39, Franklin County 26 Princeton Christian (Naranja) 8, Palmer Trinity 0 Raines (Jacksonville) 49, Suwannee 14 Ribault (Jacksonville) 46, Santa Fe 22 Ridge Community (Davenport) 44, Lake Region 7 Ridgeview (Orange Park) 16, Columbia 9 River Ridge (New Port Richey) 26, Hudson 13 Riverdale (Fort Myers) 39, Fort Myers 20 Robinson (Tampa) 28, Newsome 14 Sanford Seminole 20, Lake Mary 14 Santa Fe Catholic (Lakeland) 39, Cambridge Christian 28 Sarasota Riverview 35, Dunedin 0 Seminole 10, St. Petersburg Northeast 7 Seminole Ridge (Loxahatchee) 21, Palm Beach Central 10 Seven Rivers Christian 57, Leesburg The First Academy 0 Sickles (Tampa) 17, Boca Ciega 16 South Broward (Hollywood) 52, McArthur 7 South Dade (Homestead) 21, Miami Palmetto 7 South Fort Myers 34, North Fort Myers 0 South Lake (Groveland) 56, Ocoee 7 Southeast (Bradenton) 31, Braden River 0 Spoto (Tampa) 54, Dixie Hollins 0 St. Augustine 56, Menendez 0 St. Edward’s (Boca Raton) 51, South Florida HEAT 6 St. Francis 28, Orangewood Christian 21 St. John Lutheran (Ocala) 60, Hernando Christian 0 St. Petersburg Canterbury 40, Shorecrest Prep 14 St. Petersburg 49, Gibbs 20 St. Thomas Aquinas (Fort Lauderdale) 45, Nova 0 Stanching (fort Lauderdale) 40, Forest Hill 6 Suncoast (Riviera Beach)21, Boynton Beach 20 Sunlake 29, Wesley Chapel 0 Tampa Bay Tech 21, Tampa Freedom 14 Tarpon Springs 2, Ridgewood 0 Continued From Page 2BStatewide ScoreboardTaylor County 57, East Gadsden 17 Tenoroc (Lakeland) 19, Celebration 0 The Villages 21, Chiefland 7 Treasure Coast (Port St. Lucie) 21, St. Lucie West Centennial High School 13 Trinity Catholic (Ocala) 59, Keystone Heights 7 Trinity Christian (Jacksonville) 42, Hawthorne 6 Trinity Prep 27, John Carroll Catholic 21 University School (Davie) 42, Cardinal Newman 14 Venice 49, North Port 20 Vernon 55, Jay 13 Vero Beach 31, Palm Beach Gardens 21 Victory Christian (Lakeland) 43, Calvary Christian (Clearwater) 14 Walton 28, Chipley 14 Warner Christian (S. Daytona) 35, Deltona Trinity Christian 0 Wellington 20, West Boca Raton Community 14 West Port (Ocala) 29, Brooksville Central 6 Western (Davie) 21, Plantation 20 Westland Hialeah 27, Hialeah Gardens 20 Westminster Christian (Miami) def. Upperroom Christian, forfeit Wildwood 16, Hilliard 7 Williston 43, Umatilla 3 Windermere 27, Cedar Creek Christian 12 Winter Park 35, Timber Creek 10 Winter Springs 28, Hagerty 21 Wiregrass Ranch 49, Fivay 7 Yulee 17, West Nassau County 6 Thursday Branford 60, Florida Deaf 12 Coconut Creek 17, Coral Springs 10 Hollywood Hills 28, Piper 16 Jacksonville Providence 48, Bishop Snyder 7 Miami Senior 26, South Miami 3 Miami Coral Park 48, Reagan 7 Miami Dr. Krop 14, American 6 Miami Southridge 13, Homestead 0 North Miami Beach Hillel 14, Ransom Everglades 7 Port Orange Atlantic 28, Space Coast 25 Southwest Miami 14, Sunset 7 Southwest Ranches Archbishop McCarthy 23, Olympic Heights 7 Tallahassee Lincolns 24, Wakulla 10 Vanguard School 38, Posnack 12 Wednesday Hialeah Miami Lakes 27, Miami Springs 20 Miami Coral Reef 48, Killian 7 Are you hosting any kind of sports tournament, having rec league signups, having a car wash event for a sporting team or looking for baseball and softball players to fill out your travel teams. Get your information out to everyone free each week in the Sports Briefs. Send me your information, the time, the place, when, how much it cost, etc.. Send me our information at corey.davis@gaflnews.com or call me at 362-1734, ext. 132.Sports briefs wanted

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 PAGE 4B SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK Available Oct. 1 Nov. 6 570915-F Columbia County Fair Oct. 29 Nov. 6 Thursday, November 4th is S&S Customer Appreciation Day S&S Customer Appreciation Day Receive a FREE Fair Admission * for Nov. 4th by Purchasing Our Sponsors Quantity Deals Powerade Reese's Tom's Monster Gustafson's Blue Bell Zephyrhills *While supplies last. $ 5 2 for FREE Fair Ticket w/Quantity Purchase $ 4 6 for Brand Candy Bars FREE Fair Ticket w/Quantity Purchase or .67¢ ea. Chocolate Milk Half Gallon Visit Our Booth During The Fair! Goody Bags  Register For Prizes! SPORTS (386) 362-3300 PUBLIC AUCTION 8.38 AC of Land When: Saturday, Oct. 16th, 2010 € 10 a.m. Location: 95th Dr., Live Oak, FL Directions: From US 90 take CR 49 S to 102 St. turn L to 95th Dr turn L and the property is almost to the end on the right. 10% buyers fee / 10% sellers fee Cash, checks, and all major credit cards accepted. 3% administration fee on credit cards Check out our website @ www.jwhillauctions.com AB 2083 AU 2047 AU 691 ALL SALES ARE FINAL; SOLD AS IS WHERE IS! Live Oak Small Item Auction When: Saturday, Oct. 16th, 2010 € 10:30 a.m. Location: 1105 Howard St. W, Live Oak Consignments taken in all day on Fri., Oct. 15th and Sat., Oct.16th from 7:30 A.M.-9:30 A.M. Directions: Hwy 90 West next to Mott Buick District Volleyball StandingsABOVE, BELOW: Suwannee and Branford have put themselves in bad positions seeding wise with losing streaks. Photos: Corey DavisDistrict 5-3A Dst. Santa Fe(6-0) Fort White(6-2) Williston(3-3) Suwannee(1-6) Newberry(1-6) District 4-1A Maclay(7-0) Lafayette(5-2) NFC(2-3) Hamilton(2-5) Jefferson(0-6) District 5-1A PK Yonge(15-0) St. Francis(12-2) Chiefland(11-4) Bronson(9-6) Trenton(7-7) Bell (4-9) Branford (2-10) Dixie (2-11) Hawthorne(0-13) By Corey Daviscorey.davis@gaflnews.comSuwannee, Branford, Lafayette and Hamilton County all get ready to finish their regular seasons in the next two weeks. The following is a synopsis of how each team is doing in their respective districts. District 5-3A Suwannee (3-11 overall, 1-6 district) has struggled through out the season, recently ending a five-game losing streak. The Bulldogs will meet Newberry (1-6) in the No. 4 vs. No. 5 game next week Oct. 25 in the District 5-3A tournament, held to be determined. Santa Fe (6-0) has wrapped up the top seed, Fort White (6-2) the second seed and Williston (33) the third seed. District 4-1A Tallahassee Maclay (14-4, 7-0) has dominated the district for the last two years after years of seeing rival North Florida Christian own it. From 20042007, NFC (2-3) controlled the district but is struggling this year. Lafayette (5-2) has locked up the second seed and appears on its way towards back-to-back playoff appearances as the runnerup spot. Hamilton County (2-5) appears likely to finish as the fourth seed and will host fifth seeded Jefferson County (0-6) in the opening game of the District 41A game in two weeks in Jasper. District 5-1A Like Suwannee, Branford (4-11, 2-10) has also been struggling with a roller coaster type of season. The Bucs finish the season with three district games in a row and need to at least take 2 of the 3 to stay out of the No. 8 vs. No. 9 opening game in the District 5-1A tournament at St. Francis in two weeks. PK Yonge (15-0) is the clear favorite to win the district as the top seed, ahead of second seed Gainesville St. Francis (122). Chiefland (11-4) is the third seed, Bronson (9-6) is the fourth seed, while Trenton (7-7) is the fifth seed. Bell (4-9), Branford (210) and Dixie County (211) are battling for the final three spots for sixth-eighth place seedings, while Hawthorne (0-13) is the ninth seed. Playoff push for spikers Check out the Suwannee Democrat ’s page on Facebook Sports news wanted Attention area coaches, want your athletic team to get more coverage send me your results each week or after each game. Covering Suwanee, Branford, Lafayette and Hamilton County High sports programs, we can't be everywhere and need your help with coverage. Send us a few short paragraphs, stats and pictures on last nights game to corey.davis@gaflnews. com or call your results in to 362-1734, ext. 132.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 5B Live Oak area Jiffy 304 -Ohio Ave. North Walmart Ð Hwy 129 North S & S 22 -Hwy 129 Exxon -Next to Wendy's on Hwy 129 S & S 45 -CR 49 & Hwy. 90 Donut Time -Howard Street Suwannee River Food Store Hwy 129 N Jiffy 311 Ð Hwy 90 west Howlands Ð 11th street Howlands Express Ð 11 th street Jiffy 305 -Irvin Ave. at roundabout Winn Dixie -Pinewood and Hwy 51 One Stop # 7 -Hwy 90 east Stop and Shop -Ohio Ave. east Jiffy 318 -Duval Street east J & K -Hwy 129 N and Winderweedle Ave Ready Freddy -Houston Ave S & M -Corner of Hwy 90 and Walker St Harrys Ð Walker Ave Dollar General -Hwy 129 next to Publix Dollar General Ð Howard Street S & P Ð Helvenston street Downtown CafŽ Ð Howard Street west Publix Ð Hwy 129 south Luraville Store Ð Hwy 51 south Jims Produce Ð Ohio ave south Landens Grocery Ð Hamilton ave Taylor Store -Hwy 51 south Dollar Tree -Hwy 129 N next to Walmart S & S 46 -10019 Hwy 129 Walgreens Ð Hwy 129 s across from Publix M & M Discount Ð Hwy 129 south Fast Mart -Ohio ave across from Hardees O’Brien S & S 19 -Hwy 129 S McAlpin S & S 25 Ð 17022 Hwy 129 Branford area Cuzins CafŽ (moving to new location) Timesaver -Hwy 27 Scaffs -Suwanee Ave C Ð Square Hwy 27 Dollar General Ð Hwy 27 east M & M discount -Suwannee Ave Byrds Hwy 27 west of Branford S & S 39 Ð Hwy 27 & Hwy 129 S & S 47 -Hwy 49 & Hwy 27 Jiffy 321 Ð Hwy 49 & Hwy 252 Mayo area Jiffy 324 Hwy 27 west L & R -Hwy 51 north S & S 53 -11089 State Road 51 Jiffy 302 -203 E Main Street Fast Track 264 -Hwy 27 Jasper area S & S 49 Ð Fast Track 404 Fast Track 103 Wellborn area S & S 35 -Hwy 136 B & B -HWY 90 Wellborn General -CR 252 Lake City S & S 9 -Hwy 90 S & S 42 -Hwy 90 S & S 20 -Hwy 90 at county line Food Lion -Hwy 90 west Coin Rack Locations Live Oak Area Suwannee Democrat Howard Street east Dixie Grill -Howard Street east Post Office -Ohio ave South Sheryls Kays Restaurant -Howard St. West Jays Restaurant -Hwy 90 west Pepe's Ð Hwy 90 west Suwannee Hospital -11th Street Save a lot Ð Hwy 129 S across from Publix Dairy Queen Ð Ohio ave south Hardees Ð Ohio Ave south Island Food Store -Walmart Plaza Subway -Walmart plaza Huddle House -Hwy 129 N & I 10 Penn Oil Ð Hwy 129 N & I -10 Falmouth Crossing Ð Hwy 90 west Wellborn Post Office Ð CR 137 Branford Area Post office -Suwannee Ave Nells -Suwannee Ave The Gathering Ð CR 252 Dowling Park Riverview Apartments Village Grocery Jiffy 310 -CR 250 at bridge Food Mart -CR 250 Good Samaritan Center Suwannee Democrat sold at these locations 607289-F Q uality healthcare and rehabilitation right here at home 110 SE Lee Ave., Live Oak, FL 386-364-5961 Surrey Place Care Center 570633-F SPORTS Suwannee Legals IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 10-81-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF DANA CARL DOUGLAS, SR., Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of Dana Carl Douglas, Sr., deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court for Suwannee County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 200 South Ohio (MLK Jr. Ave.) Live Oak, FL 32064, file number 10-81CP. The estate is intestate. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. Any interested person on whom a copy of the notice of administration is served who challenges the validity of the Will or Codicils, qualification of the personal representative, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court is required to file any objection with the court in the manner provided in the Florida Probate Rules WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on that person, or those objections are forever barred. A petition for determination of exempt property is required to be filed by or on behalf of any person entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402, WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on such person or the date that is 4days after the date of termination of any proceeding involving the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property, or the right of such person to exempt property is deemed waived. An election to take an elective share must be filed by or on behalf of the surviving spouse entitled to an elective share under Section 732.201 732.2155 WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of se vice of a copy of the Notice of Administration on the surviving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedent’s death. The time for filing an election to take an elective share may be extended as provided in the Florida Probate Rules. Personal Representative: Nikki T. Douglas 7570 300th Street Branford, Florida 32008 Attorney for Personal Representative: Ray E. Thomas, Jr. FLB #0978205 P.O. Box 39 Bell, FL 32619 Phone 352-463-0077 Fax: 352-463-0090 10/6, 13 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 10-81-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF DANA CARL DOUGLAS, SR. Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Dana Carl Douglas, deceased, whose date of death was May 25, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Suwannee County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 200 South Ohio (MLK Jr. Ave.) Live Oak, Florida 32064. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 6, 2010. Personal Representative: Nikki T. Douglas 7570 300th Street Branford, Florida 32008 Attorney for Personal Representative: Ray E. Thomas, Jr. FLB #0978205 P.O. Box 39 Bell, FL 32619 Phone: 352-463-0077 Fax: 352-463-0090 10/6, 13 NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The District Board of Trustees of North Florida Community College will hold its regular monthly meeting Tuesday, October 19, 2010 at 5:30 p.m. in the NFCC Board Room, NFCC, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL. A copy of the agenda may be obtained by writing: NFCC, Office of the President, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For disability-related accommodations, contact the NFCC Office of College Advancement, 850-973-1653. NFCC is an equal access/equal opportunity employer. 10/13 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 10-69-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ANN M. WHITE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Ann M. White, deceased, whose date of death was May 13, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Suwannee County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 200 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, Florida 32064. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 6, 2010. Personal Representative: Jerry Gottlieb 2475 Enterprise Road, Suite 100 Clearwater, Florida 33763 Attorney for Personal Representative: Richard Gottlieb Attorney for Jerry Gottlieb Florida Bar Number: 793670 GOTTLIEB & GOTTLIEB, P.A. 2475 Enterprise Road, Suite 100 Clearwater, Florida 33763-1733 Telephone: (727) 791-1977 Fax: (727) 791-8090 E-Mail: Richard@Gottlaw.com 10/6, 13 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 09-139-DR DIVISION: DOMESTIC RELATIONS STEPHANIE NOBLES BLANKENSHIP Petitioner and NORMAN DOUGLAS BLANKENSHIP Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE TO: NORMAN DOUGLAS BLANKENSHIP 504 Marymac St SE Live Oak, FL 32064 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on STEPHANIE NOBLES BLANKENSHIPwhose address is 504 Marymac St SE, Live Oak, FL 32064 on or before , October 21, 2010, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at Suwannee County Clerk of Court, 200 South Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, FL 32064, before service on Petitioneror immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office notified of your current address. You may file Notice of Current Address, (Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerk's office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information, failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: September 16, 2010 SEAL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Sallie Pert Deputy Clerk 9/ 22, 29 10/6, 13 Suwannee LegalsSubmitted Olivia Carter bowled 138 pins over her average making her the Thunder Alley Bowler of the Week. Larry Schattle led the King's and Queen's with a 590 series followed by Carter with a 588 series and Al Music with a 558 series. Carter is eligible to join the 500 club and we hope that she does. Ray Goodman led the Monday Morning Blues with a 534 series followed by Debbie Rice with a 521 and Suzie Graf with a 495. Dave Ward led the Sassy Seniors with a 603 followed by Larry Schattle with a 521 and Jerry Hakes with a 512. 9 Pin No Tap was led by George Williams with a 691 followed by Roger Rathbun with a 596 and Joey Forister with a 589. On the Men's league, Doug Mabey led the way with a 577 series followed by Pat Taylor with a 557 and Thure Olson with a 545. Last week’s bowler of the week is Johnny Murrah, Murrah bowled 145 pins over his average. Al Music had a 618 series followed by Murrah with a 616 and Jason Cannon with a 583. Debbie Rice led the Monday Morning Blues with a 480 series followed by Kim Carter with a 471 and Janette Rushing with a 464. Looks like the women dominated Monday morning. Dave Ward led the Sassy Seniors with a 549 series followed by Jerry Hakes with a 509 and Larry Schattle with a 487. Thunder Alley Bowler of the Weeka hole and trotted 15-yards untouched for another score making it 28-6 with eight minutes remaining till half. Two plays later, Johnston recovered another fumble at the 33-yard line, which later led to another score. Prevatt ran 13 yards on the first play of the drive and Certain finished it off with runs of 7, 5 and 8 putting the Bucs ahead 346 with 5:53 left till half. About the only thing that went wrong for the Bucs on the night was their special teams play. Certain and Kell Prevatt missed four point after attempts and Reese returned a kickoff 51 yards down to the 31 following Certain’s score. Four plays later, Robert Morris picked off Koski’s pass in the end zone before officials ruled he was down at the 4-yard line. Branford drove 96 yards before the half thanks to a 18-yard and 13-yard runs by Certain, the latter which made it 40-6 with 2:03 till half. With a big lead at the half, Wiles brought in some of his receivers and part time players and rested playmakers Certain and Stebbins in the second half. Lineman Matt Dickerson was brought in at tailback and rumbled 10 yards for a score on the first drive of the second half giving the Bucs a 46-6 lead. Josh Kirby picked off Koski three plays later, returning it 32-yards for a score adding to the lead making it 53-6. Sophomore split end Robert Morris and senior wide receiver Kell Prevatt were the work horse in the second half teaming up for a combined 106 yards, including one score. Kell Prevatt’s 4-yard run with 9:50 left in the game closed the Bucs scoring ahead 60-6. Branford fans and cheerleaders cheered for the Dragons when Colski found John Dellatto from 28-yards out for another score cutting the lead to 60-12 with 6:11 left in the game. The lone drive the Bucs failed to score was the final one as the Bucs scored on their first seven possessions. After Morris (89 yards on 8 carries) and Kell Prevatt (28 yards on 3 carries) drove their team inside the 5-yard line with less than six minutes left, Wiles directed his team to take a knee and kill the clock. Branford (3-3) takes the week off this week before traveling to rival Bronson Oct. 22 in a Big Ten Conference game. Continued From Page 1B ceiver Aubrey Grant for a 71-yard touchdown pass as the Vikings stunned the Bulldogs with two quick scores and 14-0 lead just minutes into the game. By the end of the first half, Smiley had thrown for 242 yards and four touchdown passes (71, 46, 80, 14) in a 49-14 win over Suwannee. Sophomore tailback Keith Stallings led the Vikings (5-0, 2-0) with 82 yards, including a 54-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. Isaiah Stallings was on the receiving end of a 46yard touchdown pass from Smiley and Devin Johnson brought down a 12-yard pass from Smiley to give the Vikings a 27-0 lead after the first quarter. Suwannee (2-4, 1-1) was led by senior RB Greg Swinson, who rushed 16 times for 107 yards including a 14-yard touchdown run in the second quarter which cut the lead to 27-6. Elijah Maxey’s 5-yard run, Freeman Dozier’s 80-yard reception from Smiley, and George Maxey’s 24-yard field goal increased the lead to 42-6 at the half. Sophomore quarterback Jimmie Taylor added a 5yard touchdown run in the third quarter cut the lead to 42-14. After establishing the passing game early in the game, Raines worked on their running game and ran for 197 yards on 26 carries in the second half to control the clock. Raines 49, Suwannee 14 R Kenny Bynum 30 interception return (George Maxey kick) R Aubrey Grant 71 pass from Sam Smiley (kick blocked) R Isaiah Stallings 46 pass from Smiley (Maxey kick) R Devin Johnson 12 pass from Smiley (Maxey kick) S Greg Swinson 14 run (kick blocked) R Elijah Maxey 5 run (kick failed) R Freemon Dozier 80 pass from Smiley (kick failed) R George Maxey 24 FG R Keith Stallings 50 run (Maxey kick) S Jimmie Taylor 5 run (Smith pass from Taylor) Continued From Page 1BBranford runs over DragonsVikings roll ‘DogsGeorge Williams led the 9 Pin No Tap with a 686 followed by Roger Rathbun with a 620 and Chancie Corbett with a 605. On the King's and Queens, Larry Schattle had a 634 series followed by Lorrie Geiger with a 617 and Clay Corbett with a 598. Don't forget the Snake Bite tournament this Saturday at 2 p.m. I hope that you are all working on your Halloween Costumes. The Halloween Party is always a fun time with lots of prizes and will take place Oct. 30 from 8midnight. Call Thunder Alley for more details at 386-364-7778. Season tickets for saleSuwannee High football season tickets are now on sale at $40 per seat in the Main Office 8 a.m. till 3 p.m. daily. Each season ticket purchased enters you into a drawing to win a John Deere Gator valued at $6,000. Other giveaways to be drawn at games throughout the season. Find us on Facebook

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 6B 626039akv Branford 60, Florida Deaf 12 SPORTS Branford cheerleaders hold up the sign that says ‘Buccaneers slay the Dragons.’ Here come the Buccaneers. Branford cheerleaders had plenty to cheer for as the Bucs whipped the Dragons. Branford freshman cornerback Kyle Stebbins drops back in formation. Branford’s band had a lot to play as the Bucs kept scoring. Senior linebacker Danny Johnston had a heck of a night, recovering two fumbles, returning one for a score. Photos: Corey Davis

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 7BSPORTS Raines 49, Suwannee 14 Andre Zanders pulls a pass down over a Raines defender. Photos: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com)Greg Swinson breaks through a hole for another Suwannee score. Suwannee students show their support with ‘Go Dogs‘ painted on their chests. Suwannee coach Willie Spears has a word with the referee during play. Greg Swinson (2) and Tre Robinson (95) bring down a Vikings player. Suwannee lineman Jacob Palmer and a Raines lineman go at it. Greg Swinson eludes four Raines defenders for a first down. Jimmie Taylor breaks a long run through the Vikings defense.

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*After rebates. Must qualify through Ally Bank for all APR special rates. Photos for illustration pu rposes only. CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE If the Sunbelt tag's not on your car you paid too much! 1307 W. Howard Street (US Hwy. 90) Live Oak, FL 32064 386-362-1042 www.sunbeltchryslerjeepdodgeofliveoak.com Hours: M-F 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 2010 DODGE 2500 & 3500 HDS APR 60 MOS. 1.9 % JEEP PATRIOT & COMPASS APR 60 MOS. 0 % 0 % 2010 JEEP WRANGLER APR 60 MOS. 3.9 % 2010 DODGE CARAVAN APR Plus $ 750 BONUS CASH 60 MOS. 0 % 0 % 626898-F 2010 RAM HALF TON CREW CABS 60 60 0 % 0 % APR APR MONTHS F O R BONUS CASH Plus Plus $ 1,500 $ 1,500 Join the 0% for 72 Months group 2010 Jeep 2010 Jeep 2010 Jeep Commander Commander Commander 2010 Jeep 2010 Jeep 2010 Jeep Grand Cherokee Grand Cherokee Grand Cherokee 2010 Chrysler 300 2010 Chrysler 300 2010 Chrysler 300 2010 Chrysler 2010 Chrysler 2010 Chrysler Sebring Sebring Sebring 2010 Dodge Avenger 2010 Dodge Avenger 2010 Dodge Avenger 2010 Dodge Charger 2010 Dodge Charger 2010 Dodge Charger SEE MORE OF OUR HUGE INVENTORY ON THE WEB! WWW.SUNBELTCHRYSLERJEEPDODGEOFLIVEOAK.COM UP TO OR *Must be Florida resident * #101D03 2010 DODGE CALIBER 0 % 60 MOS. APR 2010 DODGE JOURNEY 0 % 60 MOS. APR NOW AT SUNBELT IN LIVE OAK $ 6,000 DISCOUNT Completely Redesigned 2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Now In Stock $ 6,000 NEW 2011 SHIPMENTS ARE HERE! REMAINING 2010S MUST BE SOLD IMMEDIATELY! FOR A LIMITED TIME SAVE UP TO OFF MSRP New Redesigned Jeep Wrangler Now In Stock WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 8B

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North Florida Focus News  Entertainment  Classifieds October 13 & 14, 2010Serving Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee Counties www.nflonline.com WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM 592666-F 9248 129th Road • Live Oak (386) 362-2333 Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Closed Sunday "For over 30 Years" Save lots of money by installing the plants yourself! Bring us pictures and measurements of the area you want to landscape and we'll draw you a plan for free! WE'LL DRAW YOU A LANDSCAPE PLAN! PANSY THERAPY WILL MAKE YOU SMILE! Studies have shown that pansies are good for the heart and the soul! The colorful blooms of pansies can warm your spirits on the coldest winter day. Planted in pots or in your flower beds they will make you smile all winter long! 2 plants for only $1.29 570742-F ATTENTION!For Qualified Home Inspections CallPaul DialCertified386-364-4434 or 386-590-6534C.R.P.I. GREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING RENTALS STARTING AT $300 PER MONTH FOR SINGLEWIDES AND $450 PER MONTH FOR DOUBLEWIDES. WATER, SEWER, AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS. 386-330-2567-FOR RENT-569597-F 127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL Phone: 386-362-4539 Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478 Se Habla Espanol EMAIL: info@poolerealty.com Hours: Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m.; Saturday 9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.; Sunday by appointment www.poolerealty.com 569603-F 10 ACRESHeavily wooded square tract located in NW Suwannee County. Paved road frontage on River Road and graded frontage on 78th Trace. Nice corner tract. $45,000. Call William or Enola Golightly, 386-842-2470 MLS#76298 WOW! Reduced to $240,000! Beautiful fenced 39 plus acre horse farm between Lake City and Live Oak. Call Cathy Collins, 386-208-4150 MLS#74746 RIVER FRONT143 on the Suwannee River is gated community over 3 acres to build on. Right in the middle of a very large bend in river with great view in two directions. Owner motivated. $44,900. Call Ric Donovan, 386590-1298 MLS#75378 LOCATED IN WELLBORNVery nice 3/2, 1,200+ sq.ft. on located on 1 acre in the country. Bring all reasonable offers. Equipped with handicap ramp in back. $59,900. Call David Mincey, 386-590-0157 for more information. MLS#73259 BEAUTIFULLY REFURBISHED 2/2 manufactured home on 5 wooded acres. Home has Bellawood floors, screened in porch and a gabled roof, 2 car garage with loft. Can be yours for only $79,500. Call Nelda Hatcher, 386688-8067 MLS#73602 BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in the North end of the county close to the Music Park. All natural woods has been reduced from $37,000. Could be a great place for a land home package. Asking $29,900. Call Ric Donovan, 386-5901298 BRING YOUR HORSES12 fenced acres are waiting for them! Spacious 4/2 DWMH w/ large front and back porches. Very comfortable country setting. Asking $129,900. Call Nelda Hatcher, 386-688-8067 MLS#74086 LIKE NEW 2001 4/2 home on gorgeous 5 acre wooded lot. Private & secluded. Access to 1,242 acres of horse trails along the Suwannee. $169,000. Call David Mincey, 386-590-0157. MLS#68634 JUST LISTED! Get away from it all on the 64+ acre hay farm with hill top home set back off the paved road. Screened front porch, wood floors, fireplace and more. Call for appointment. Cathy Collins, 386-208-4150 or Vicki Prickitt, 386-590-1298 NO CONTESTWhat a give away on this spacious 4/3 in great location. Large eat in kitchenLR, den w/ fireplace. Large carport many outbuildings formally a plant nursery. All irrigation in placevirgin timber & hardwoods on 27.5 acres w/ 1/2 mile of Hwy frontage. $485,000. Call Carolyn Spilatore, 386-208-4828 or Rhonda Miller, 386-362-4169 MLS#76218 PARK LIKE SETTING in town. 1,600+ sq.ft., 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath home with Hardwood floors, 7ft privacy fence around back yard, located on 2 city lots, 18x22.5 detached wood frame building, Greenhouse, koi pond, 1.5 car carport. $134,500. Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 MLS#76313 Queen-Anne Victorian in Live Oak. 3/2, wood floors, beautiful kitchen. Listed on the historic registry. Large yard, 2 car garage. $189,000 Call Kellie Shirah 386-208-3847 MLS#75214 NEW LISTING Scene from a previous Paddle Florida event. Courtesy photoA large number of canoe enthusiasts will begin the third annual Fall Paddle Florida event Oct. 14 on a 123-mile trek down the Suwannee River Wilderness Trail. The event begins at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak. Nestled along the banks of the Suwannee River, the SOSMP is Florida's premier music park and campground. Paddlers will push off from the boat ramp at the SOSMP in small groups as they head south on the river towards their destination of Manatee Springs State Park. Paddlers will travel through Suwannee, Lafayette, Dixie, Gilchrist and Levy counties for eight days during this adventure. The annual paddle event includes the opportunity to hike, bird watch, take in all that nature has to offer along the banks of the famous Suwannee River, camp, swim in clear springs and also allows participants an opportunity to get to know the real North Florida and all the wonderful places, people and things it offers. That includes the SOSMP where music reigns supreme four nights each week, during various large music festival such as Magnolia Fest, Wanee and Bear Creek Music and Art Festival and where the SouthÔs largest country music festival, the Suwannee River Jam, is held each April. Many of the paddlers will spend the night at the SOSMP before beginning their leisurely trip along the majestic river. During the trip paddlers will spend each night camping at designated sites. After a day on the river with lunch on the banks and supper under the trees each evening, paddlers will be entertained by some of Florida's finest from bluegrass and blues to Florida history and humor woven into songs by such notables as Lars Anderson, Katherine Archer, Franklin Baker, Big Cypress, Mike Devlin, Garrison Doles, Willie Green Bluesman, Magda Hiller, Patchwork and others. Paddlers are encouraged to bring their harmonicas and join in by the campfire each night! For more information about primitive camping, RV sites or cabin rental at the SOSMP, call the SOSMP at 386-364-1683; email spirit@musicliveshere.com or go to the website at www.musicliveshere.com. You may also contact bill@paddleflorida.org for more information about the paddle.Canoeing event begins at the Spirit on ThursdayPaddle Florida North Florida supporters will be present and cheering this weekend, Oct. 16, when Amber Lee Abbott of White Springs and Madison competes in the Colgate Country Showdown state finals in her quest to win $100,000 and the national title of America's Best New Act In Country Music! Amber, a beautiful, talented singer who's been belting out songs since she was a toddler, won The Big 98 sponsored NorthNorth Florida’s Amber Lee Abbott seeks Colgate Country Showdown state title Florida regional competition Sept. 10 at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park (SOSMP) in Live Oak, Fla. Amber Lee Abbott, who also has strong ties to Suwannee County and Live Oak, will compete for the state title against six other statewide winners beginning at 3 p.m. Oct. 16 at Silver Springs Resort at Silver Springs and Wild Waters Water Park in Ocala. This week's Florida winner will receive $1,000 and compete in the South East Region contest at ChristmasVille in Rock Hill, South Carolina Dec. 4 against state winners from Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, South Arkansas, North Arkansas and Tennessee. One winner from each of the five national regional contests across SEE NORTH, PAGE 11Farmer donates entire harvest to food pantry, Page 2

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PAGE 2, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA 625506-F Good Samaritan Center A Tradition of Excellence • 161-bed Medicare/Medicaid skilled nursing facility • Alzheimer's Unit specialized care by loving staff who provide hands-on care • Individualized Care through stimulating physical and social environment, physical, occupational, and speech therapy, short-term rehabilitation, wellbalanced meals and family support and involvement • Physician services provided through our on-site Copeland Medical Center • Admission Standards resident must be 60 years of age and meet the State nursing home admission guidlines, as ordered by a physician. For more information call 386-658-5550 or 1-800-647-3353 TDD# 800-955-8771 624945-F S.C. Sullivan Agency 529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131 S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990 624526-F (1) 3+ Acre Tract on paved road with scattered trees. Driveway in place. Good buy @ $19,500. Terms. (2) Off CR 49 5 acres in grass with scattered trees, fenced on 3 sides with survey. Only $4,900 per acre. (3) Off US 129 North: 5 acre wooded on 89th Rd. Will work for land home package. $37,000. (4) CR 51 & Pinewood St.: 2.29 Acres, city water and sewer, zoned office. Good location REDUCED TO $159,90 0 . (5) Off CR 349: 10 acre wooded tract with a two bedroom CH/AC log home in excellent condition cont. approx. 1200 sq. ft. under roof, 30'x40' pole barn. REDUCED TO $145,90 0 . (6) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre corner tract good exposure. Reduced to $34,500. (7) 40 acres with 835 ft. on paved road in 13 year old planted pines. Priced to sell at REDUCED TO $149,90 0 . (8) CR 143: 9 acres on paved road with a 3/2 CH/AC home const. in 2002 with a 2 car garage, 30'x50' bar, 8x8 storage, nice fish pond. Good buy @ $175,000. (9) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on CR751 and the river approx. 1300 ft. on the water and approx. 1300 ft. on paved road. Priced to sell at REDUCED TO $64,00 0 . (10) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4 acres in grass/cropland with scattered trees. $32,500. (11) Near City: Off US 90 East 5 acres wooded near golf course. Good buy @ $44,900. (12) 190th St.: 10 acres in planted pines approx. 15 years old, with a 3/1 CH/AC SWMH, 2 car carport/shop. Priced to sell @ $49,000. (13) 169th Rd.: 5 ac. in grass with a 3/2 CH/AC DWMH cont. approx. 1,850 sq. ft. under roof in excellent cond. 2 car detached garage. Good area. REDUCED TO $99,00 0 . (14) 193rd Rd.: 6.59 acres wooded on paved road. Good area. Good buy @ $37,500. (15) Hamilton County: 40 acre wooded on county road. Good hunting area that adjoins SRWMD. REDUCED TO $129,500 . (16) New 3 bedroom, 2 bath CH/ AC home. City sewer & water, privacy fence. REDUCED TO $90,000 . (17) Off CR 249: 3 wooded lots, will work for mobile homes, on county road. Good buy @ $12,600 for all three. (18) Near City on paved road: 6 acres in grass with scattered trees, 36'x36' horse barn with tack/feed room & loft (2009), 2" well, fenced & divided into paddocks with horse type fence. REDUCED TO $90,000 . (19) Off CR 250: 1.45 acres with a 3/2 CH/AC brick home with fireplace, kitchen furnished, cont. 2700+ sq. ft. of living area, 2 car detached garage, 12'x16' metal storage building. Priced to sell @ $139,500. (20) Suwannee River Charles Springs area: 1.88 ac. wooded with 137 ft. on the water elevation survey. Will support regular inground septic tank. Good buy @ $39,900. (21) 104th St.: 7 3/4 acres with a 3/2 CH/AC 2006 Fleetwood DWMH, kitchen furnished, fireplace 4" well, 2 septic. Priced to sell @ $99,900. (22) CR 136 West: 5 acres in grass with a 3/2 CH/AC DWMH in excellent condition cont. approx. 2,100 sq. ft. of living area, kitchen furnished, 30'x42' carport and storage. Priced to sell @ $93,000. (23) Off US 90 West: Two 5 acre wooded tracts, good area. $29,900 per tract. ALBEMARLE, N.C. "The Andy Griffith Show," the TV program celebrating life in a small Southern town, is such an enduring piece of American culture that it has launched careers of actors who never appeared on the show itself but now portray its supporting characters at fairs, festivals and community events. "The last 10 years that I have been performing as Howard Sprague have been fabulous," said Jeff Branch, of Oakboro, N.C., one of the so-called "tribute artists" whose character was county clerk in the fictional town of Mayberry, N.C. Branch's work has taken him throughout the country to festivals, conventions and even an annual cruise with stars from the show. "I have met so many Mayberry fans, and it is a joy to see their faces light up when all the tributes are performing and mingling with the fans," he said. "The Andy Griffith Show," named for its star, followed the lives of sheriff Andy Taylor, his son, Opie, Aunt Bee and Deputy Barney Fife. It first aired 50 years ago, in 1960, on small black-andwhite television sets. The program ran for eight full seasons and 249 episodes Ñ 159 of which were black and white and 90 color. It launched the careers of Griffith, who appeared in all 249 episodes, and Ron Howard, who played his son in 209 episodes. It also gave the world Don Knotts, who played Barney the bungling deputy, as well as other actors who went on to lifetimes of work and stardom. The program, one of the most watched TV shows of all time, survives on cable and DVD discs. David Browning, of Virginia, a fellow tribute artist and friend of Branch's, says the show's characters and mythical town of Mayberry endure in the imaginations of fans. Browning is in his 17th year of performing as Barney. He opened for Knotts for 11 years and has worked with many of the show's stars. "Mayberry gives fans a way to escape the real world for a while," he said, "and reflect back to their childhood days." Information for this story was provided by the Stanly News & Press in Albemarle, N.C.Iconic television town of CNHI News Service CUMBERLAND, Md. Ñ Lou Simmons believes he's figured out how to solve the country's hunger problem. If every farmer were to donate a small portion of each harvest to the poor, no one would go hungry, he said. Simmons then put his idea into action. He is donating every single apple, pear, peach and cherry from his modest orchard to the Salvation Army.Farmer donates entire harvest to food pantry 'Mayberry' marks 50th anniversaryErnest T. Bass, portrayed by tribute artist Phil Fox, tries to woo Sweet Romeena, played by actress Jackie Joseph. Photo: Stanly News & Press, Albemarle, N.C.Tribute actors portraying Mayberry denizens Otis (Kenneth Junkin), Goober (Tim Pettigrew) and Howard Sprague (Jeff Branch) flank Doug Brewer, the real-life mayor of Graysville, Ala.Photo: Stanly News & Press, Albemarle, N.C. Salvation Army volunteers distribute more than 30,000 pounds of fruit from the Simmons orchard each year. Kitty Willison, director of social services at the Salvation Army, said the fresh fruit is a highly desired commodity. Young men from from the local youth center recently helped pick more than 2,000 pounds of apples one morning. Simmons, 83, got the idea when he was thinking about retirement. He thought about cutting down the trees, but was encouraged to save the orchard. "It's a beautiful place," Judy Hodel, director of the Green Ridge Youth Center, said of the Simmons orchard, calling it a place of serenity. "He does a great service," Hodel said. "He feeds people with his apples. He donates everything he has. I hate to see that get lost." Information for this story was provided by The Times-News in Cumberland, Md. Lou Simmons, 83, was looking forward to retirement and then thought of a way to use his orchard to help his community. Photo: Kevin Spradlin/Times-News, Cumberland, Md.

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By E. Kirsten Peters CNHI News Service Kids delight in blowing up a balloon and letting it go. The air inside is under mild pressure, and when a youngster lets go of the neck of the balloon, air rushes outward. The escaping air propels the balloon forward like an erratic jet. Remarkably enough, a car powered by the same energy source – compressed air – may be coming to a road near you. At least one innovative auto company is investing in a small "air car," as these vehicles are known. Air cars have some wonderful advantages compared to our traditional internal combustion engine – like the complete absence of air pollution coming from a tailpipe. The idea of an air car is not as far fetched as it may sound. Your commuter car, my 1987 pickup, and a farmer’s diesel tractor actually all run on a broadly similar idea. Work with me for a moment, and I’ll explain. The internal combustion engines common around us look like they are powered by heat from burning fuel. But all the heat actually does is to increase the pressure of gases in the engine’s cylinders. It’s the high pressure that pushes on the pistons. The pistons' motion powers the vehicle. The heat isn’t crucial. The pressure inside the cylinder is the key. Now imagine you could simply add highly compressed air into a car’s cylinder to drive the piston. You wouldn’t need heat, so there would be no need for gasoline or diesel fuel. And you could drive all day with no stinky fumes coming out your tailpipe. For several decades, engineers have tinkered with using air under high pressure to power the pistons of automobiles. The system can be made to work, especially if the air is under extreme pressure. (Those who know trucks will note that compressed air powers big-rig brakes and starters. So large trucks have a bit of air power in their designs already.) The pressure useful in a piston is generally much higher than that of a car tire. In scientific labs we often use high-pressure tanks, as do welders and others in particular industries. If you work near an enormous tank of this variety, and if it ruptures, your troubles are over. But I’ve never known that to happen. If you’ve ever moved a high-pressure tank, you know they are heavy enough to give you a hernia. Indeed, the steel “fuel tank” of compressed air in old test vehicles was so heavy it created real trouble for the engineering goal of powering a car on air alone. But much lighter-weight materials based on carbon fibers that can hold air at high pressure are now on the market. So visionaries are taking another look at the “air car,” and carmakers overseas are exploring options of bringing such cars to market. But, of course, there is the question of where the compressed air will come from. There’s no such thing as a free lunch, and the cost of running the air car is partly the cost of energy to compress the air. As Popular Mechanics points out, it’s generally electrical energy that’s used to compress air. So air vehicles are essentially electric cars using the compressed air as a way of storing energy. On the positive side, pollution that’s created generating the electricity used to compress air could be distant from our cities. That’s a real plus. (Although we geologists are fond of the smell of spilled gasoline and the choking fumes of exhaust on a hot day, normal human beings prefer to avoid all that filth.) A lot of innovation is on the table these days in the car world, with major manufacturers investigating better electric cars, hybrid vehicles, and natural gas vehicles ala what T. Boone Pickens advocates. These are tough economic times, but interesting, too, and some folks are going to take advantage of entirely new ways of doing things to help move us forward. I’m for that. E. Kirsten Peters, Ph.D., is a geologist trained at Princeton and Harvard and a native of the rural Northwest. Questions about science or energy for future columns may be sent to epeters@wsu.edu. Her column is a service of the College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences at Washington State University. OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 3CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA To place an ad on this page, please call Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103 Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, is a life-saving method that has prevented the deaths of scores of individuals throughout the centuries. CPR is often used to keep a person alive until more in-depth medical attention can be provided. Its an essential skill to know and can be a lifesaver for people of all ages. The American Heart Association reports that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest, can double or triple a victims chance of survival. Despite these statistics, less than one-third of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR. It could be because many people still do not know how to perform it. CPR has been around since 1740, when the Paris Academy of Sciences officially recommended mouth-to-mouth resuscitation for drowning victims. In 1891, Dr. Friedrich Maass performed the first documented chest compression in humans. Roughly 10 years later, successful chest compressions were used in human resuscitation. In the 1950s, it was determined that exhaled air was enough to provide oxygenation of another person. Peter Safar and James Elan, thusly, invented mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. In 1960, the American Red Cross officially adopted cardiopulmonary resuscitation and began to teach the public the techniques. The ability to do CPR is not based on age but rather body strength. Studies have shown that children as young as 9 years old can learn and retain CPR skills. Its important to keep in mind that while CPR can keep a person alive, Automated External Defibrillators (AED) devices are needed to restore a natural heart rhythm to an individual who has suffered from cardiac arrest. Unless resuscitation is provided within minutes of collapse, an individual can rarely be saved. CPR training courses are provided for individuals at many places, often free of charge. Some hospitals even offer CPR training to new parents. Check with a hospital, medical provider or police station on where CPR can be learned. Performing CPR For those who want to know the basics of CPR, follow these guidelines, courtesy of The Mayo Clinic. Think ABC -airway, breathing and circulation -to remember the steps explained below. Move quickly through airway and breathing to begin chest compressions. Airway: Clear the airway 1. Put the person on his or her back on a firm surface. 2. Kneel next to the persons neck and shoulders. 3. Open the persons airway using the headtilt, chin-lift maneuver. Put your palm on the persons forehead and gently tilt the head back. Then with the other hand, gently lift the chin forward to open the airway. 4. Check for normal breathing, taking no more than five or 10 seconds. Look for chest motion, listen for normal breath sounds and feel for the persons breath on your cheek and ear. Gasping is not considered to be normal breathing. If the person isnt breathing normally and you are trained in CPR, begin mouth-to-mouth breathing. If you believe the person is unconscious from a heart attack and you havent been trained in emergency procedures, skip mouth-to-mouth rescue breathing and proceed directly to chest compressions. Breathing: Breathe for the person Rescue breathing can be mouth-to-mouth breathing or mouth-to-nose breathing if the mouth is seriously injured or cant be opened. 1. With the airway open (using the head-tilt, chin-lift maneuver), pinch the nostrils shut for mouth-to-mouth breathing and cover the persons mouth with yours, making a seal. 2. Prepare to give two rescue breaths. Give the first rescue breath -lasting one second -and watch to see if the chest rises. If it does rise, give the second breath. If the chest does not rise, repeat the head-tilt, chin-lift maneuver and then give the second breath. 3. Begin chest compressions to restore circulation. Circulation: Restore blood circulation with chest compressions 1. Place the heel of one hand over the center of the persons chest, between the nipples. Place your other hand on top of the first hand. Keep your elbows straight and position your shoulders directly above your hands. 2. Use your upper body weight (not just your arms) as you push straight down on (compress) the chest 2 inches (approximately 5 centimeters). Push hard at a rate of 100 compressions a minute. 3. After 30 compressions, tilt the head back and lift the chin up to open the airway. Prepare to give two rescue breaths. Pinch the nose shut and breathe into the mouth for one second. If the chest rises, give a second rescue breath. If the chest doesnt rise, repeat the head-tilt, chin-lift maneuver and then give the second rescue breath. Thats one cycle. If someone else is available, ask that person to give two breaths after you do 30 compressions. If youre not trained in CPR and feel comfortable performing only chest compressions, skip rescue breathing and continue chest compressions at a rate of 100 compressions a minute until medical personnel arrive. 4. If the person has not begun moving after five cycles (about two minutes) and an automatic external defibrillator (AED) is available, apply it and follow the prompts. Administer one shock, then resume CPR -starting with chest compressions -for two more minutes before administering a second shock. If youre not trained to use an AED, a 911 operator may be able to guide you in its use. Use pediatric pads, if available, for children ages 1 to 8. Do not use an AED for babies younger than age 1. If an AED isnt available, go to step 5 below. 5. Continue CPR until there are signs of movement or until emergency medical personnel take over. CPR Can Save Lives Ophthalmology GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D. 522 South Ohio Avenue (386) 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937 570646-F Locally Owned & Operated Live Oak 208-1414 Lake City 755-8680 Jasper 792-2426 Branford 935-1449 Mayo 294-1407  Medicare, Protegrity  Blue Cross, Av Med  Medicaid-pediatrics  Workers Comp  Most Other Insurance Plans Email: info@healthcorerehab.com Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore H C Healthcore, Inc. "Meeting All Your Rehabilitative Needs" H C Healthcore, Inc. Physical Therapy A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency 570644-F • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy • Speech Therapy • Specializing In Arthritis • Fibromyalgia • Geriatrics • Spinal & Joint Pain • Sports Injuries • Work Injuries • Pediatrics • Manual Therapy •Lymphedema HERBERT C. MANTOOTH, D.D.S, P.A. Family Dentistry 602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL (386) 362-6556 1-800-829-6506 (Out of Suwannee County) 570639-F REHABILITATION SERVICES Physical Therapy AQUATIC THERAPY Workers Compensation, Industrial Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation, Job/ Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports Medicine, Pediatrics Providers Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers 405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060 (386) 364-5051 Sandy Laxton, PTA Mandy McCray, PTA Carolyn McCook, Office Manager, Patient Care Coordinator 570640-F "Everything For Your Home Recovery" • Medical Equipment • Oxygen Locally Owned & Operated 101 SW U.S. Hwy. 27, Branford, FL 32008 (386) 935-6905 229 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 32066 (386) 294-3777 570643-F North Florida Pharmacy Riding on air isn't as far fetched as you think Contact the Classifieds via fax to make an announcement, sell your stuff, post a job or subscribe today!386-364-5578FAX800 -525-4182CALLor

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PAGE 4, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA 571106-Fwww.nflaonline.com COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK OIL CHANGE in LIVE OAK $ 19.95 www.sunbeltchryslerjeepdodgeofliveoak.com CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE Hours: Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 1307 W. Howard Street (US Hwy. 90) Live Oak, FL 32064 386-362-1042 Fully certified mechanics, Up to 5 qts. FREE 16 pt. Inspection COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK 10W30 Bulk Oil, No specialty oil plus taxes & disposal fee Expires 10/31/10 591089-F 621 Ohio Ave. North • Live Oak, FL 32064 (386) 362-1848 • Fax (386) 364-4661 • 1-800-457-6082 Suwannee graphicsPRINTING • COPY SERVICE Color Copies • Blueprints570686-F Walker Reunion 2010The Annual Walker Reunion will be held Sunday, October 24, 2010, at The Branford Shrine Club, Branford. (Old Branford Depot). Location of Shrine Club: From U.S. 27 in Branford turn north on US 129, at the flashing light. Continue one long block to first street on left (at Sister’s Cafe’) turn left, cross railroad, the Shrine Club is located in the old Branford Depot.Please remember to bring your pictures or any family memories you may wish to share.We hope you will join us, bring your family/friends and a basket lunch for a day of fun, visiting, smiles and celebration. For your family members and friends who may not receive this notice. PLEASE REMIND THEM ABOUT OUR REUNION.The Club will be open at 12:45 p.m. and we will serve lunch at 1:15 p.m. Mark your calendars: October 24, 2010! Remember location! We are looking forward to your being there. Katie Walker’s Children. Contacts: Mona Walker Hurst 386-935-1184, Diane Walker-Saunders 386-935-101,7 Marcia Walker Hurst 352-376-1930.Tangles’ Fall Bazaar and Florida Breast and Cervical Calendar Early Detection ProgramTangles’ Fall Bazaar and Florida Breast and Cervical Calendar Early Detection Program, Saturday, Oct. 16, 8 a.m. 4 p.m., 12986 US Hwy 90 W, (1/4 mile past Wayne Frier Mobile Homes on the left). Free information and health screening, huge rummage sale, quality vendors with hand-crafted items; bake sale; Shabby T unique “upcycled” furnishings, gifts and accessories; raffle with great prizes; and food by J. Don Allen’s Beach Buns and Dawgs. For vending or other information, or to donate items (no clothing, please) for the rummage sale, call 386-590-1543. A benefit for Tangles a Community Outreach for Women.School Advisory Council meetingThe next meeting of the School Advisory Council for Suwannee County High School will be Thursday, Oct. 14, 2010, at 6 p.m. It will be held in the Student Activities Room at the high school. All interested students, parents, teachers and community members that would like to participate and become involved in Suwannee High School are invited to attend.NAACP Annual Freedom Fund BanquetThe Suwannee County Branch of the NAACP will hold its Annual Freedom Fund Banquet on Friday, Nov. 5, 2010 at 7 p.m. at the Annex of African Baptist Church, 502 SE Walker Ave., Live Oak. The speaker will be the Honorable Walter A. McNeil, Secretary, Florida Department of Correction. Banquet tickets are $20, contact any member of the NAACP or call 386-364-4754.Barrs Family ReunionBarrs Family Reunion---The Descendent's and family friends of the James C. Barrs & Martha E. Land and their son Issac N. Barrs & Mary Elizabeth Boyett will hold their annual family reunion on Saturday Oct. 16, 2010 at the Day Community Center; Day, Florida. Gathering starts at 11:00 a.m. with lunch at 12:30 pm. Bring food and drink for your family and others. Call and remind family and Friends.Masonic Lodge #166 Fund RaiserDate: Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010 Location: Day Lodge, next to Brewer Lake Church, Time: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Luncheon Menu: Fried fish, hushpuppies, grits, slaw, chili, peas, greens, smoked, pulled pork, tea, lemonade, soft drinks. 1 child’s platter $2.50 1 adult platter $7.50 Schwans food truck will be on site to support us. Place your orders now before this date. Pick up your orders at the event. We earn commissions on all orders from this effort. Special Drawing 2:00 p.m. for Taurus Judge pistol. It shoots a 410ga. shot or 45 cal. bullet. Touted by the NRA as the most popular home defense weapon of the year. Buy 1 ticket $25 + 1 free platter Buy 3 tickets-$50 +2 free platters Buy 7 tickets $100+ 3 free platters. Winner does not have to be present. Need tickets? Call 386-294-3415.BHS Class of 1960 will hold their 50th Year Class ReunionReunion will be Friday, Oct. 15, 2010. Meet at the "Gathering" Restaurant in Branford at 5 p.m. Spread the word.March of Dimes Signature Chefs AuctionThe March of Dimes and Mercantile Bank are presenting “Signature Chefs Auction” at 5:30 PM, November 11, at the newly re-decorated Columbia County Fairgrounds Banquet Hall. There will be a Festival of Trees and Wreaths, live and silent auctions, and live entertainment by “Harry, Sally, and Billy”. The highlight will be a selection of specialty foods presented by area restaurants and caterers, along with complimentary wine tasting. For more information call Maureen Lloyd 7524885.Tickets will be sold at all Mercantile Bank offices, Rountree Moore Toyota, Ward’s Jewelers, First Street Music, Suwannee Democrat, and Jasper News. Put this event on your calendar and support March of Dimes as we work together to give every baby a healthy start!!Family history bookI am putting together a family history book on the descendants of Stephen, William & Sarah Ann Grant. Surnames include Grant, Hewitt, Adams, Land, McCray, McClamma & any other related. If you would like to submit information or photos or are interested, please contact Cher Newell at 386-209-1559 or 386-364-1608.Come Early For The Best Choices!The Suwannee County Friends of the Library will host The Great Book Sale commencing on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, October 14-16, 2010. The sale will be held during the regular library hours, 8:30 AM to 8:00 PM on Thursday, Friday 8:30 AM to 5:30 PM, and Saturday 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM. Please sign up to volunteer to help with the sale at the library. The Suwannee County Friends of the Library is a volunteer booster organization for libraries of Suwannee County. Through membership and fundraisers, such as The Great Book Sale, thousands of dollars have been donated to enhance and provide for library services. Furniture, staff training, books, videos, special children’s programs and even major contributions to the construction of the Live Oak and Branford Libraries have been supported by the Suwannee County Friends of the Library. Betsy Bergman, President of the Suwannee County Friends of the Library, 386/842-2953. Social Sewing Club: New Member RecruitmentIf you are looking for an opportunity to socialize and help the community grow, then join the Social Sewing Club. To become a member bring a can of food or nonperishable item for the Thanksgiving basket. Meetings held every second Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m. at the club house. For more information contact Mrs. Ella Cooper, president at 362-4062.Stop, drop and Recycle for Adults with DisabilitiesComprehensive Community Services Inc. Invites you to participate in our recycling project campaign. CCS Clients are recycling Printer Ink Cartridges, Laser Cartridges, Cell Phones -Any Kind, MP3 Players Drop off at Lafayette Extension Office, Wes Haney Chevrolet, Suwannee Tax Collectors, Live Oak City Hall, or the CCS Office, larger quantities can be picked up. For more information on how your business can join the CCS recycling team call Janet Sampson, 386-3627143 ext 5.Humane Society's 25th Annual Pet Show October 16Join us for Pet Contests and other fun activities on Saturday, October 16th, in the Suwannee County Coliseum at the Live Oak Fairgrounds. Registration begins at 10:00am and contests begin at 11:00am. Free Admission. There are many fun contests for dogs and cats; just $1 each. Win ribbons and be eligible for "Best in Show" trophies. Even if you don't have a pet to bring, come and enjoy the show.There'll be refreshments, delicious bake sale items reasonably priced, super raffles, and more fun stuff. Need more info? Call 1-866-2367812 toll free or 850-971-9904 local. The shelter and thrift stores are open 10 am to 2 pm, Tuesday through Saturday.Alzheimer’s Support Group 2010Meets the 3rd Thursday of each month except December in the Good Samaritan Center Private Dining Room at 3:00 PM., Advent Christian Village Good Samaritan Center (nursing home), 10676 Marvin Jones Blvd, Dowling Park, FL 32064 Remainder of this year: Oct. 21, Nov. 18, 2010. LHS Band Boosters meetingLHS Band Boosters meet the 1st Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. in the band room.Miss & Little Miss Majestic Pageant 2010The Miss Majestic Pageant Association is seeking contestants to compete for the title of Miss & Little Miss Majestic. The event will take place November 13, 2010 at the Suwannee High School Auditorium. Little Miss: ages 4-6 Miss: ages 15-19 All contestants must be from the Suwannee Valley area which consists of Columbia, Dixie, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee and Taylor County. Registration deadline is October 16, 2010. Contestant packets and additional information are available. Please contact Calvin Sneed at (386) 590-6881 or any association member. You may also request an application packet by email at rozmerrick@msn.com. Look for Miss Majestic updates on Face Book.FREE SUNDAY LUNCHFor the past several months a group headed up by Pat and JoAnn Lynch have been serving a free lunch at the community center in Live Oak the last Sunday of the month. This past month we fed around 300 children and families. We support this project by selling donated items at the Flea Market in Lake City. We have cleaned out all of our closets, garages and are now in need of items to be donated to this cause. We also need volunteers to help set up and serve the meals. If you are interested in volunteering or would like to donate garage sale items you may contact Pat and Jo Ann Lynch at (386) 935-1076 or Roger Burnside at (386) 935-3343.St. Luke’s Busy Hands for BabiesSaturday, October 16, St. Luke’s Busy Hands for Babies will hold a yard sale from 7a.m. -2 p.m. at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 1391 SW Eleventh St., Live Oak, across from the Garden Club. The sale will be inside and there will be many bargains on clothing, books and lots more. Come and see our handmade gift table for Christmas. The proceeds buy material and yarn to make items for two children’s hospitals in Gainesville and Jacksonville.Lafayette County Historical Society meetingThe Lafayette County Historical Society Meetings are held the 4th Thursday of every month at 7 pm at the Library in Mayo. Please feel free to join us and bring your historic pictures, documents and stories. If you have any questions please email lafayettechs@gmail.com. You can also find us on Facebook!Did you earn your pin?Reconnect with your shipmates and help preserve the memories With more than 13,000 members and over 150 chapters throughout the United States, your rank or rate and status are active, retired or honorably discharged are secondary to the purposes of the organization. We are all brothers of “The Pin.” We band together to honor the memories of the over 4,000 men who EARNED THE RIGHT to wear”Dolphins” to maintain the bonds of friendship and camaraderie.You are invited to contact us through the address below for more information: National Contact: United States Submarine Veterans, PO Box 3870 Silverdale, WA 98383 or 1-877-542-DIVE r www.ussvi.org. Local contact:W. Ray Rausch, 386-2091473, uss483@windstream.net, 10035 105th Drive, Live Oak, Fl 32060. C C a a l l e e n n d d a a r r o o f f E E v v e e n n t t s s CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

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OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 5CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA ClassifiedsNorth FloridaPlace a classified: Call 386-362-1734 or toll free 1-800-525-4182 or fax 386-364-5578 Hours are M-F 8 am 5 pm • closed Sat. & Sun.Reaching 14,100 households each week 583239-F 624956-F "If you can't live at home, this is the next best place to live! Everyone here is so good to the residents." When you or your loved one need assistance with the tasks of daily living, consider Dacier Manor Assisted Living Facility (ALF #7641). Our loving, qualified staff is on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. And our secure, comforting atmosphere allows our residents to maintain the highest level of self-care. Our residents enjoy a variety of activities and a supportive environment. Call us today for more information or to schedule a free tour. (386) 658-5552 626186-F OPEN HOUSE / FOR SALE BY OWNER 1001 Bynum Ave., Live Oak, FL (corner of Bynum & Barclay) Brick ext., 3BR, 1BA, LR, DR, Kit, Laundry Room, Bonus Room, Central H & A, HW Floors, 2-car carport, Single family owned/occupied, Remodeled, Fully repainted, Approx. 1624 sq. ft., Near schools Open House: Sat., October 16; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. or call (904) 206-1235 570096-FVillage Oaks I Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom units. Hurry in for an application. Rental assistance available to qualified applicants. Call 386-364-7936, TDD/TTY 711. 705 NW Drive, Live Oak "This insitution is an equal oportunity provider, and employer." LAKE WOOD APARTMENTS IN LIVE OAK Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex. Call 362-3110.570121-F 569608-FVillage Oaks II Apartments1, 2, & 3 bedroom units. HUD vouchers accepted. Hurry in for an application. Call 386-364-7936, TDD/TTY 711. 705 NW Drive, Live Oak "This insitution is an equal oportunity provider, and employer." BUSINESSES SERVICES & Announcements ATTENTION ADVERTISERS*PROOF READ YOUR ADAny error must be reported the first day of publication. Should the error inhibit response, credit will apply only to the first run date. The South Georgia Media Group is not liable for any loss or expense that results from publication or omission. Jobs Wanted DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME CLEANED or Pressure Washed, or your yard cleaned up? Done at a very reasonable rate. Call Christine or Gary 386-792-1655 WILL TAKE CARE OF THE ELDER: Will cook, clean, etc. Experience and Good References. 386-792-1616 Help Wanted C.N.A.Experienced persons preferred. Should be flexible in hours available. PRN schedule. Positions will lead to full time schedule if desired. Smaller facility where it is easier to get to know residents and families. Contact Karen Williams at Lafayette Health Care Center, 512 W. Main St., Mayo, FL 386-294-3300. FirstDay EXCITING OPPORTUNITY IN AVIATIONTRANSPORTATION!F/T Division Chair, Transportation position in a community college setting. Will be responsible for the effective mgt of the Transportation dept as well as the effective operation of the Aviation Center. Qualifications: Master's in Aviation or Transportation related program, 10 yrs min exp related to division programs: Aviation Maintenance or Flight Training. Hold either a Private Pilot Certificate with both Instrument & Commercial Pilot Ratings or an Airframe & Power Plant Certificate (with Inspection Authorization desired).Successful prior teaching or training exp in an academic, industry or military settingwith exp in curriculum development,assessment & classroom presentation. S/he should have solid work exp at the admin & supervisory level to include budget mgt, purchasing & procurement, writing bid specs, personnel eval & org planning.Visit our website www.gtcc.edu for more information & application. Open until filled. As an Equal Opportunity Employer, GTCC is strongly committed to diversity & welcomes applications from all qualified candidates, particularly persons of color and faculty under-represented in higher education.EOE FirstDay NURSING INSTRUCTORwanted at North Florida Community College Perry Florida. See www.nfcc.edu for details. Help Wanted FirstDay MAINTENANCE POSITION AVAILABLE40 hours with benefits. Experience in plumbing, electrical, carpentry, and painting/ sheetrock required. Drug free workplace, must have valid drivers license and transportation. Some travel required. Applications may be picked up at Lafayette Apartments East 3rd Street & Main (176 SE Land Avenue) or call 386-294-2720 or 386364-7936. TDD/TTY 711. “This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer.” FirstDay MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE INC.Lake City, Live Oak, Jasper, Mayo, and surrounding ares in FL Staff Psychiatrist Board Cert, Adult & Child Outpatient Clinics: Jasper, Live Oak, Lake City Counselor IV / Sr Clinician Outpatient Services Adult & Child opportunities in Mayo, Jasper, Live Oak, Lake City Fl. Masters Required, Licensed Desired. Adult/Child Case Manager Lake City, FL 1yr Exp w/ SPMI population Counselor III in Rehab Svcs Bachelors in Lake City Locations are National Health Service Corps Student Loan Forgiveness qualified http://nhsc.bhpr.hrsa.gov/ To see our current openings in Mental Health and to apply online, please go to:www.mbhci.org EOE, DFWP REPORTERGeneral assignment reporter wanted for weekly newspaper in North Florida. Must have excellent writing, reporting, photography, word processing and internet skills. Experience much preferred. Candidate should be comfortable generating a high volume of copy on a daily basis. Night and weekend assignments common. The Suwannee Democrat is fast becoming one of the premier weekly newspapers in Florida. If you take pride in your work and are willing to give everything you’ve got and then some, please submit resume, references and clippings to: robert.bridges@gaflnews.com Postal submissions also welcome: Robert Bridges, Editor Suwannee Democrat PO Box 370 Live Oak, FL 32064 We are a Drug Free Workplace. No phone inquiries. Help Wanted FirstDay SHANDS LIVE OAK REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTERhas the following immediate openings: Registered Nurses Emergency Room (PRN) C.N.A. Emergency Room (Full-time) CT Tech -Full Time Switchboard Operator -Full Time Patient Financial Rep .Shands Medical Group Accounts Payable Clerk Respiratory Therapist PRN Laboratory Technologist PRN Phlebotomist PRN Competitive salary and benefit package. Resumes WITH cover letter may be faxed to 386-292-8295 Or email to angela.altman@hma.com EOE, M/F/V/D, Drug Free Workplace FirstDay The Third Judicial Circuit currently has the following positions available: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT III, LIVE OAK USER SUPPORT ANALYST, LAKE CITY ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES MANAGER, LIVE OAKFor more information go to: www.jud3.flcourts.org Lost & Found FOUND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT in area of Bass Rd. Please call to identify. 386362-3975 LOST BASSETT HOUND TriColor, Female, Name Maggie. Last seen on CR 250 & 167th Rd. Call Pam 386-208-5044 LOST MY PURSE in the Live Oak P.O. Parking Lot on Monday. If anyone has seen my purse please return it, I have a lot of personal items in it. My name is Judy Huffman my phone # is 362-4970. Please, just let me know where it’s at and I will pick it up. Special Notices ATTENTION READERSYou should be cautious of calls from interested buyers of your advertised merchandise. If the caller is offering you MOREmoney than what you are asking or suggest sending you a check for more than the amount and requesting you to cash it and just send them back the remaining amount DON’T! THIS IS A SCAM! BE CAUTIOUS, IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS. Education Want to be a CNA? Don’t want to wait? Express Training is now offering our quality Exam Prep Classes in Lake City, Fl. Class sizes limited. Call for details on the next class!!! 386-755-4401 expresstrainingservices.co m Building Materials METAL ROOFING & STEEL BUILDINGS . Save $$$ buy direct from manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with trim & acces. 4 profiles in 26 ga. panels. Carports, horse barns, shop ports. Completely turn key jobs. All Steel Buildings, Gibsonton, Florida. 1-800-331-8341. www.allsteel-buildings.com METAL ROOFING. 40 yr Warranty Buy direct from manufacturer. 30/colors in stock, all accessories. Quick turn around. Delivery available. Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. 888393-0335 www.GulfCoastSupply.com Educational AIRLINE MECHANIC Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-6283 AVIATION MAINTENANCE / AVIONICS Graduate in 14 Months. FAA Approved; financial aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. Call National Aviation Academy Today! 1-800-659-2080 or NAA.edu HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA FAST! Accredited! At Home! Or Online! www.worldhopeacademy.org 305-270-9830 HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Fast Affordable & Accredited PACE Program Free Brochure. Call Now! 1-800-532-6546 ext. 16 www.continentalacademy.com NEED YOUR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA? Finish from home fast for $399! Nationally accredited. EZ pay. Free brochure. www.diplomaathome.com Call 800-470-4723 BE A CNA! ENROLL TODAY QUEST TRAINING NOW IN LIVE OAK GreatClass! Great Future! 386-362-1065 Misc. Merchandise CASH PAID FOR DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! New, sealed & unexpired. Most brands, shipping prepaid. We pay the most & fast! Call Linda 1-888973-3729 or www.cash4diabeticsupplies.com DISH BEST OFFER EVER ! $24.99/mo (for 1 year.) 120+ Channels, FREE HD! FREE DVR Upgrade! PLUS, Call NOW & SAVE Over $380! CALL 1866-573-3640 EVERY BABY DESERVES a healthy start. Join more than a million people walking and raising money to support the March of Dimes. The walk starts at marchforbabies.org. FREE GPS! FREE PRINTER! FREE MP3! With Purchase of New computer. Payments Starting at Only $29.99/week. No Credit Check! Call GCF Today. 1-877-212-9978 SWIM SPA LOADED! 3 Pumps, LED lighting, OZ Cover, Never used $8995. Hot Tub, Seats 6 , 5HP, 220, 28 jets. $2695. Can deliver. 727851-3217 VONAGE Unlimited Calls Around The World! Call the U.S. AND 60+ Countries for ONLY $24.99/Month 30-Day Money Back Guarantee. Why Pay More? 1-877-872-0079 Misc. Merchandise ENTERTAINMENT CENTERS, NEW KITCHEN & BATH CABINETS, BOOKCASES, HOPE CHEST, CUSTOM CLOSET UNITS, & MORE!! I can build it the way you want! V & K Cabinets 229-2423295 If no answer please lv. msg. FirstDay HOLIDAY TRAILER 1966 Perfect for Hunting Camp. $600 1992 MOZDA MPV Runs but needs turn-up $400. WHEEL CHAIR LIFT for auto. $200 386364-6949 Wanted to Buy CASH FOR YOUR COINS! Private collector seeking U.S. coins and currency. Older varieties, all denominations. I travel to you ! I pay more than dealers and pawn! Questions? Call 352-949-1450. Garage/Yard Sales COMMUNITY YARD SALE: Sat 10/16 8-Till? 102nd St & 95th Court. Hwy 90 E to CR 49, 1 mile S turn left on 102nd St. Boats/Accessories BOATS; 1000’s of boats for sale www.floridamariner.com reaching 6 million homes weekly throughout Florida. 800-3889307, tide charts, broker profiles, fishing captains, dockside dining and more. Guns/AccesoriesFirstDay GUNS: 1-SKS, 1-12 Ga J.C. Higons Shotgun. 386-938-5832 386-855-0531 Apartments for Rent CHEAP APARTMENTS , From $500 per month. Thousands of apartments available at discounted rates. Call 1-800524-9780 Now! Houses for RentFirstDay NEAR BRANFORD: HOME 3/2 SWMH 2/1 DWMH 3/2on 1.5 ac DWMH 4/2on 3.3 ac. Can rent to OWN 590-0642 or 8671833 suwanneevalleyproperties.com Mobile Homes for Rent SWMH 2Bd/2Ba Large Yard, W/D Hook-up. $575mo 1st, Last, Security. 386-688-3736 Mobile Homes for RentFirstDay DOUBLE AND SINGLE WIDE MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT on their own lots in the Live Oak Area. First & last months rent, plus security deposit to move in. No Pets. Call 386-362-2720 FirstDay LARGE PRIVATE FENCED PROPERTY in McAlpin , park like setting,2bd/2ba, large kitchen, small bonus rm, fenced kennel (No Pit Bulls), storage building. 10 min. to Live Oak, 20 min. to Lake City, 50 min. to Gainesville, $495/mo, 1st, last sec.dep. $300. Call 401-369-2351 FirstDay SWMH 2Bd/1.5Ba Country Setting, $400mo, $400 Deposit. 386-854-1036 SWMH 2Bd/1Ba Large Bonus Room. Porch, Car Port, W/D, CHA. Dowling Pk Area. $500mo, 1st & Secutiry Avail 11/1. 727798-0537 727-365-6293 Homes for SaleFirstDay OPEN HOUSE/FOR SALE BY OWNER 1001 Bynum Ave, Live Oak, FL (corner of Bynum & Barclay) Brick ext, 3Bd/1Ba, LR, DR, Kit, Laundry Rm, Bonus Rm, CHA, HW Floors, 2-Car Carport, Single family owned/occupied Remodeled-Repainted. Approx 1624 sq ft, Near Schools. Open House: Sat. Oct. 16 10-4 or call (904) 206-1235 Mobile Homes for SaleFirstDay BIG 4Bd/2.5Ba DWMH on 6 acres. Fenced, utility bldg, back porch.Bring the animals to graze! LR, Den w/Fireplace. 386-3445024 lugermom@yahoo.com FirstDay DWMH 2Bd/2Ba 1997 24X40 New Stove, New Microwave, Up Grades. Must Be Moved. Asking $8500. 386-208-0801 FirstDay LAND HOME PACKAGES. Columbia & Suwannee Co. Possible owner finance. Some Available with Sweat Equity Loans. 386-344-5024 lugermom@yahoo.com FirstDay NEW 5Bd/3BA FLEETWOODLot Mode-Must Go this month price. Reduced-10K Only 56K Special. No Bad Credit, Financing Avail. w/10K Down 386-623-7495 FirstDay WE HAVE USED & NEW HOMES Large Discounts w/Cash Deals Only. Bank says move Em Out. Take all offers call Mike 386-623-4218

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PAGE 6, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA You can Reach Over 4 Million Potential Buyers for your product through our Internet and Newspaper Network in Florida and throughout the Nation. Call Nancy at REAL ESTATE386-362-1734Vehicles, Farm Equipment, Etc.569568-F Acreage/Land/Lots for Sale GEORGIA ESCAPE THE STORMS & HEAT! Beautiful weather, year round. Low Taxes. Homesites/Mini-Farms: 1.25acres to 20acs. from $3750/acre. Near Augusta & Macon. Owner Financing from $199/mo. 706-364-4200 Vacation Property/Sales GA MOUNTAINS N. Income producing 3 log cabins on 4.5ac. Creekside. Fully furnished, Recently appraised. All for $495,000 or will sell separately. 706-253-8000 www.npgbrokers.com GEORGIA BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS-10 ACRES w/1000ft. on trout stream, Cutcane Road paved frontage, county water, building ready, rare find, $109,000. Owner financing, E-Z terms/low down. 706-3644200 GEORGIA Crawford County, 85 ACRES $1,125/AC. Where will you hunt this season? Other tractsavailable. stregispaper.com 478-9879700 St. Regis Paper Co. NC MOUNTAINS Log Cabin Liquidation. New 1200+ sf genuine log cabins w/ acreage $79,900. Plenty of windows, decks. Need finishing. 866738-5522 SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE FOR CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/Rent Your Unused Timeshare for Cash! Over $78 Million Dollars offered in 2009! www.sellatimeshare.com 877554-2430 SOUTH CAROLINA 2 acres in the Santee Cooper Lake area. Near I-95. Beautiful building tract $19,900. Ask about E-Z financing, low payments. Call owner: 803-473-7125 TENNESSEE MTNS 435ac w/timber, creek, river, natural gas well, springs, city water, utilities, trails $1800/ac. 2 tracts possible. Good hunting. No state income tax. www. tnwithaview.com 1888-836-8439 TENNESSEE-OBEY RIVER . By Owner, 5 Acres. River front, deep swimming area. $19,900. Owner financing. Call 931-8396141 VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS GALAX AREA 6 acres on river, great fishing, private, reduced! $59,500. Call owner now! 1866-275-0442 Real Estate/Misc. SalesFirstDay $5500~GREAT GET-A-WAYcottage or hunting cabin. EZ to move, wired. Call 386-590-6125 ASAP! (-8 Commercial/Business For Sale HARD TO FIND B4 ZONING property for sale or lease on Highway 484 in South Marion County. 4,700 sq footbuilding on 1 acre. Great for church, clubs, meetings, etc. For info contact Realtor Anthony White, 352-5473137. Trucks for Sale FORD 1981 F-100 3-Speed on Column Standard, Runs Great, $1800 or best offer. 386-2090528 The Tuff Times Band Tuff Times Bandand Mike Mullis Variety Show TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734 DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M. LAKEWOOD APARTMENTS IN LIVE OAK 569601-F Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex Call 362-3110 626320-F Carpet Cleaning Quality Plus A Deal You Can't Refuse! 386-965-7188 Deluxe Package 3 Room* $ 60 Carpet Steam Cleaned Includes: Chemical Pre-Spray Chemical Injected Steam Extraction Deodorizer *Over 250sf considered 2 rooms Deluxe Package 4 Room* $ 70 Carpet Steam Cleaned Includes: Chemical Pre-Spray Chemical Injected Steam Extraction Deodorizer *Over 250sf considered 2 rooms Deluxe Package 6 Room* $ 90 Carpet Steam Cleaned Includes: Chemical Pre-Spray Chemical Injected Steam Extraction Deodorizer *Over 250sf considered 2 rooms carpetcleaninglakecity.com 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 2 ROOMS $ 50 Tile & Grout .50 ¢ /sf *Additional charge for heavy soil removal North Florida North Florida North Florida 571380-F Business Bulletin Board Business Bulletin Board Business Bulletin Board 324387-F ABBEY MINI STORAGE All New Units  5X15  5X20  10X15  10X20  15X20 Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd. Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-5300 624386-F Affordable Seamless Gutters Residential & Commercial • Licensed & Insured FREE ESTIMATES • FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED Specializing In: • Seamless Gutters • Soffit & Fasia • Gutter Guard • Screen Enclosures and Repair • Vinyl Siding • Vinyl Skirting Carl Kirk 386-776-1835 Cell 386-209-2740 "Satisfaction Guaranteed" 624372-F LIVE OAK MINI STORAGE Units located on Gold Kist Road Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626 • 5x15 • 5x20 • 10x15 • 10x20 CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE 5x5  5x10  10x10  10x20 624379-F WE ARE THE MANUFACTURER Phone: 38-294-1720 Fax: 386-294-1724 232 SE Industrial Park Cir. Mayo, FL STATE OF FLORIDA APPROVED Residential  Commercial  Agricultural METAL ROOFING AGRI-METAL SUPPLY, INC. 30 Years Paint Finish Limited Warranty Delivery Available 621611-F Easy Cash For Junk Cars, Trucks & Scrap Metal $100-$200 & Up (Title or Not) Free Removal 904-783-4114 624375-F CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335 Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc. Quality Metal Roofing & Accessories At Discount Prices!! Metal Roofing $ $ $ $ $ SAVE $ $ $ $ $ Cut to your desired lengths! €Delivery Service Available€ 3' wide galvalume 3' wide painted 2' wide 5-v Ask about steel buildings www.gulfcoastsupply.com Fall is upon us with glorious cool weather and the urge to get out and enjoy music and dinner this weekend, Oct. 15-16, at The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park with the Tuff Times Band and Mike Mullis and his band, Whoo Whee! Friday night kicks off the weekend with North Florida singer/musician Mike Mullis and his band Whoo Whee as they pump out great country and rock ‘n roll music. Don’t forget your dancing shoes for this event…they will be shaking the rafters and inviting the audience to join in some fun times with them Friday, Oct. 15. Mike and his band have become one of the regulars on Friday night where you never know just what will happen next during Mike Mullis‘ shows! Saturday, Oct. 16, it’s the Tuff Times Band. The Tuff Times Band plays blues, classic rock and a large variety of music to delight any audience. Seasoned by years of experience, this band was formed by musicians who met at East Coast blues events. Each member comes from a different cultural and musical background, which provides you with a huge variety of great dancing and listening music. This easy listening band will have you on your feet dancing the night away Saturday, Oct. 16, in the Music Hall. Bring your sweetie, enjoy dinner, dancing and relax after a hard week! But, be ready to answer the urge to get out on that dance floor because it’s going to happen! Admission to the Music Hall is just $5 per person each night. Your $5 will be applied to your evening tab at the SOS Café and Restaurant where you’ll find delicious culinary presentations to delight you at regular prices. The Music Hall opens at 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday evening, music begins at 8 p.m. For more information about overnight reservations or any of the upcoming events at the SOSMP such as Magnolia Fest, Big Engine Band and the big Halloween party, Suwannee Spirit Kids Music Camp, Bear Creek Music and Art Festival, Raid on the Suwannee Civil War Re-enactment, Thanksgiving dinner and Old Tyme Farm Days and much more, call the SOSMP at 386-364-1683, email spirit@musicliveshere.com or go to the website at www.musicliveshere.com. at The Spirit Oct. 15-16 Mike MullisCourtesy photos

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Please contact: meredith.brewer@coloniallife.com or call (904)7374165, x105._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Part-time, home-based Internet business. Earn $941 per month or much more. Flexible hours. Training provided. No selling required. FREE details. www.K348.com._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Driver: DON'T JUST START YOUR CAREER , START IT RIGHT! Company Sponsored CDL training in 3 weeks. Must be 21. Have CDL? Tuition reimbursement! CRST. 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I told her that she better be careful since "fishing" was the excuse that both our husbands used when they went away and had affairs. "I already thought of that," she conceded. "But I know he's honest because the last time he came home, he thanked me for packing his pajamas." "Pajamas?" I questioned. "How does that prove anything?" She laughed and replied, "Because I packed them in his tackle box!" (Thanks to Joy K.) Reader Humor Laughs For Sale Duane CashŽ Holze & Todd CarryŽ Holze www.ClassifiedGuys.com Happy TrailsRoy Rogers rode his horse Trigger in every motion picture he filmed. When his beloved horse died in 1965 at the age of 33, Roy had him mounted. Trigger's hide was dried and stretched over a plaster likeness that rears on his hind legs. At a later date, Roy also had his pet German Shepherd, Bullet, and Dale Evan's horse, Buttermilk, mounted as well. They were all on display at the Roy Rogers/Dale Evans museum in Branson, Missouri, until it closed in 2009.Reel It InNearly any fisherman would love to mount the "one that got away." However, unlike mounting other animals, fish have a unique problem. When their skin dries, it loses most of its color, leaving only patterns and scales. That's why taxidermists need good artistry skills to repaint the entire fish from tip to tail and give it a natural look. So the next time you see a fish mounted on the wall, keep in mind that it is more a work of art than just a good catch. Fast FactsDear Classified Guys, I'm in shock.I was reading the classifieds the other day when I stumbled across an ad in the business services section.A professional taxidermist was offering to mount your pet.Cats,dogs and birds were his specialty.After I read the ad,I began to think about it in more detail. What kind of person would want to stuff their pet? I personally couldn't imagine having my Basset Hound, Barney,stuffed and standing by my sofa.Granted,he doesn't move that much now,but I still think it would be weird.After all,when your pet dies, isn't it time to just let them rest in peace? I think keeping them around in this way is morbid.Why would someone want to put their loving pet through all that?€€€Cash: You have to love the classifieds. You never know what you're going to find, even in the business services section.Carry: First though, we need to correct you on something. In the world of taxidermy, professionals prefer the term "mounting", not "stuffing". Considering the amount of work and artistry involved, using the term "stuffing" can be very insulting.Cash: Today, taxidermy is more than just a mounted animal head hanging above the fireplace. Those who get involved in taxidermy, either as amateurs or professionals, spend a lot of time recreating an animal to a lifelike state, much like you would see in museums.Carry: That's likely the draw to some pet owners. Losing a beloved pet can be a very traumatic event. And while mounting your pet may seem like an odd choice for you, others can find great comfort in it.Cash: In fact, some of the most famous mountings are the animals of Roy Rogers. He had his legendary horse, Trigger, mounted along with his German Shepherd, Bullet. Carry: If you consider the alternatives, taxidermy seems like a logical choice for some. Many people don't live near a pet cemetery and dislike methods such as cremation. Others don't want to bury their pet in the yard just in case the family moves sometime in the future.Cash: To those people, this idea may make perfect sense. Taxidermists can place a pet in almost any position so it can be very comforting for an owner to see their pet in a restful manner. Carry: I imagine if you ever did choose to mount your Basset Hound in his natural state, he wouldn't be standing, but more likely sleeping by the fire. Ask the Guys Is this a "taxidermist" or an auto body specialist?©2010 The Classified Guys®10/10/10€Do you have a question or funny story about the classifieds? Want to just give us your opinion? We want to hear all about it! Email us at: comments@classifiedguys.com.FOR HIRE Taxi Dermatologist , over 10 years experience .Call for references and specialties . 571389-Fwww.nflaonline.com Layaway now for Christmas 386-362-4012 570730-F AUTOMOTIVE GRADY  S 500 West Howard St. (US 90), Live Oak ALL Scooters & ATVs 60 Day Layaway 0 % INTEREST C C a a l l e e n n d d a a r r o o f f E E v v e e n n t t s s Combined Class reunion for Suwannee High Classes of 1963, 1964, 1965 and 1966Information has been mailed regarding this event. If you were ever a part of any of these SHS graduating classes and have not received your information, please email your address to classof1964@comcast.net or call Elaine Vann Garbett (Class of 64) at 386-362-6828.First Baptist Church of Live Oak to hold weekly grief recovery support groupFirst Baptist Church of Live Oak, FL will begin holding a weekly grief recovery support group. GriefShare is a non-denominational Biblically based 13 week program for people who are struggling with losing a loved one in death. People can enter at any point in the 13 weeks. It will be held at 6 pm on Wednesdays. First Baptist Church is located at 401 W. Howard in Live Oak. For more information, people may call 386-362-1583 or find us on the web at www.fbcliveoak.org.Happy Days are here againThe Suwannee County Animal Control Shelter has received a $20,000 grant from Florida Animal Friend to help spay or neuter the pets of low income families in Suwannee County. This grant is funded through sales of the official Florida Animal Friend Spay and Neuter License Plate. Applications can be picked up at participating local veterinarian offices and at the shelter, 11150 144th Street, McAlpin, Fl. There is a co-pay and that will be determined according to your income. For further information please call the shelter at 386-208-0072.SHS Class of 1970 40 year reunion plannedThe SHS Class of 1970 is planning their 40 year reunion on Oct 23, 2010. If you were a member ,had a child , sibling or relative in this graduating class, please email your name ( maiden & married), address, phone number & email address to suwanneehigh1970@gmail.com. Please join our Facebook page, Suwannee High Class of 1970 40 Year Class Reunion to see information and updates.Suwannee High Class of 1990The Suwannee High Class of 1990 20th reunion will be held on October 22, 2010 and Oct. 23, 2010. The cost will be $35/graduate and $10/spouse or additional guests. If you were a member of the graduating class and are planning to attend or would like more information, please email your name, address, phone number to Melissa (Kennedy) McKire at mckire4@windstream.net or Amy Tucker Bauldree at(352)231-2683/(386)776-1904. You can also visit our class website at shs1990.webs.com. We will be having a class meeting on Saturday, August 21, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. at Florida Wholesale Homes on 90. We look forward to seeing you there or hearing from you.Looking for classmates of Class of 1959Would like to contact any classmates from the Class of 1959 (in the event of upcoming reunions, etc.) Contact Joyce Parker at 407-886-0601 or write to: Joyce Parker, 4039 Visa Lane, Apopka, Fl 32703.Haven Hospice hosts Helping Hands Volunteer OrientationWhen: Every Tuesday morning at 10 a.m. Where: Haven Hospice Suwannee Valley Care Center, 6037 W. U.S. Hwy 90, Lake City, Fl. Call Carolyn Long at 386-752-9191 for more information.New Commander Post #107New Commander Post #107 American Legion is Richard (Dick) Lees Sr. For more information contact Hilde Schmid 776-2123.TOPS weigh-loss support available locally(It's now your time) Continued From Page 4 CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

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PAGE 8, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA Each Kit includes:€ 3 Bright 11Žx 14ŽAll-weather Signs € Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels € Successful Tips for a No HassleŽSale € Pre-Sale Checklist € Sales Record FormGet Your Yard Sale KitAnd Make Your Event a Success! ! F reeRun your Yard Sale in the Wednesday North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00 a.m.569561-F Each Kit Includes: € 2 All-Weather Fluorescent For SaleŽ Signs € Successful Tips Get Top Dollar for Your Used CarŽ € Pre-Sale Checklist € Vehicle Options Window Display € E-Z Closing Forms including Deposit Form & Bill of SaleSell Your Car for Top DollarŽ F reeRun your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.*Not valid with the $18.95 specialGet your Car For Sale Kit*569562-F 571322-F C C a a l l e e n n d d a a r r o o f f E E v v e e n n t t s sTOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) is an effective weightloss solution that yields real results. With the average waistline of North Americans growing at the same time prices continue to rise, people are looking for cost effect weight-loss support that works. That annual TOPS membership fee is only $26 making TOPS one of the most affordable options available. Monthly dues are $5. Visitors are welcome to attend their first TOPS meeting free of charge. TOPS FL 798 meets at Live Oak Community Church of God 10639 US 129 South every Wednesday morning with weigh in beginning at 7:45 a.m., meeting begins at 9 a.m. through 10 a.m. For more information call Barbara at (386) 362-5933. It's never too late to start losing those unwanted pounds.Donate your old carsNow that spring has arrived, people may be thinking of donating their old cars as part of a clean up. The Boys and Girls Clubs would be happy to take their old cars. People donating to the Clubs will not only get rid of the unwanted car but will be contributing to the clubs. Boys and Girls Clubs really work with kids in most communities and offer a safe place for them. If you wish to donate a car, call 800-246-0493. Not only will donators be helping the kids, the will be able to take sale price as a contribution for income tax purposes.Talent SearchDo you sing or play and instrument? Do you act or dance? Do you like to read or spend time with a friend in wonderful conversation? WE WANT YOU! Suwannee Health Care & Rehab Center is looking for your talent for our residents. Dinner for two $45; One night at the Beach $125; One hour volunteering to make memories that last forever PRICELESS! Call: Lynn Brannon, Activities Director 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.Customers needed!Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host Dairy Queen Benefit Night the second Tuesday of every month from 6-8 p.m. to help buy books for Suwannee Middle School.Donations needed!Suwannee County Environmental Watchdogs, a nonprofit organization, seeks donations for yard sale merchandise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.CJBAT testsMonday Thursday Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): CJBAT (Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required for acceptance into Corrections & Law Enforcement programs. Photo ID required. Pre-registration & scheduling time and date are required. To register please call 850-973-9451.College Placement TestsMonday Thursday Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): College Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Services 24 hours before test. For information please call 850-9739451.TABE testsMonday Thursday Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): TABE (Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required. Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required. To register please call 850-973-9451.Greater Visions Support GroupAddiction Support Group: Greater Visions faith-based addictions support group meets at the Grace Manor Restaurant. Meetings are held on Thursday mornings at 9:30 a.m. This group provides spiritual and emotional support in a non-judgmental setting. Come experience the freedom from addictions that is found in Christ. Greater Visions is an outreach of Christ Central-Live Oak. For more information contact 208-1345.Suwannee County Republican Executive Committee to meetThe Suwannee County Republican Executive Committee meets in the council chambers of Live Oak City Hall at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. If the first Thursday is the first day of the month, the meeting will be held on the following Thursday. Each meeting has a guest speaker or current issues will be discussed. All are welcome to attend. For more information call Chairman Carl Meece at 386-776-1444.SREC seeking location in BranfordSuwannee River Economic Council, Inc., a non-profit organization is seeking a location in the Branford area that could be used to serve meals to persons 60 years of age or older. Any business, organization or church that has space available and would be interested in assisting in this much needed service to the elderly population of Branford, should contact Bruce Evans, Senior Center Director, at 362-1164 or Janis Owen, Director of Client Services, at 362-4115, ext. 240.Love a mystery?Try locating your ancestors by working on your family tree. The Suwannee Valley Genealogy Society invites you to join and learn how to find your ancestors. Membership is $30 for a single member or $35 for a family. Corporate membership is also available for donations of $100 or more (tax deductible). Meetings are held on the first Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM at the Genealogy Center at 215 Wilbur Street SW in Live Oak. The library is open on Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and the talented folks there will be glad to help. For more information call Jinnie or Alice at 386-330-0110.Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS)TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, is a non-profit weight loss support group. We meet every Thursday morning at First Advent Christian Church at 699 Pinewood Drive in Live Oak, located next to the Vo-Tech. We all know how difficult is to lose weight. As a group we support each other through thick and thin. We welcome men as well as ladies. Weigh-in is from 8 8:50 with the meeting from 9 10 a.m. You are welcome to visit us and see if this is what you are looking for. For more information, please call Pat (386) 935-3720 or Sherry (386) 776-2735.Live Oak Partnership meeting schedule changesThe Live Oak Partnership Revitalization Board will meet on the first and third Tuesdays of each month at 3:30 p.m. The meetings will be held at the Live Oak City Hall complex. Unless otherwise noted, these meetings will be held in the City Hall Annex building, east of the main City Hall office.MOAA meets fourth ThursdaysMOAA (Military Officers Association of America, Suwannee River Valley Chapter) meets fourth Thursday, 6:30 p.m., Elks Club, Lake City for dinner and program. Info: Steve Casto 386-497-2986.Free English-speaking and literacy classesProvided by Columbia County School DistrictÌs Career and Adult Education Program. Where: Wellborn, Florida, Unity of God Ministries, Inc., 12270 County Road 137 Continued From Page 7 CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

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OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 9CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA Get Plus Internet starting at $ 59.98 Mo! plus Unlimited Phone for $14.95 DirectvSat.com Local Dealer, 386-269-0984 Businesses from A to Z CHOOSE YOUR LETTER! PUBLISHES EVERY WEDNESDAY! $5.00 PER WEEK CALL JANICE GANOTE 386-362-1734 B I K L N O P U X 609678-F APA Auto Parts 209 Duval St. NW 386-362-2329 609679-F Place Your Ad Here!! Marks The Spot! een Deal $ 5.00 a week andclearing mmigration Live Oak Plumbing, Inc. D lueprints Printing Copying Suwannee graphics 621 Ohio Ave. North Live Oak 386-362-1848 V ERY GOOD PRICE $5.00 PER WEEK 609681-F www.fjslawcenter.com LUMBER Repairs/Remodel New Construction State Lic. #CFC1427438 386-362-1767 609684-F Green Card; Spouse/ Family K Visa; Student F Visa; Worker HB Visa; Investor E Visa; Change of Status 386-362-2030 609690-F addy's Gun Shop Buy Sell Trade Come To Daddy's, We'll Take Care of You! 386-294-1532 Y OU CAN SUCCEED WITH THIS AD! CALL TODAY! $5.00 PER WEEK 609603-F 609693-F BILL'S BACKHOE SERVICE 12150 196th Terrace O’Brien, FL 32071 386-364-1418 or 386-249-1999 Bushogging, Stump Removal, Discing, Fencing $ 5.00 per week SE THIS SPACE H!!! SAVE BIG WITH THIS AD! CALL TODAY! $5.00 PER WEEK G 386-776-2342 609692-F ilbert's Lawn Service  Full Lawn Service  Brush Hogging  Pressure Washing  Leaf Vaccuming S ATELLITE 609695-F 200 Channels for $ 29.99 FREE Professional Installation FREE 1-4 Receivers/Equipment CASH Purchase Plans Available! DirectvSat.com Local Dealer 386-269-0984 T IRED OF HIGH PRICE COMCAST OR WINDSTREAM BUNDLES? 609697-F Z OWIE LOOK! ONLY $5.00 PER WEEK M ake it Happen $ 5.00 a week J UNK CARS We Buy Junk Cars & Trucks Must Have Title & Picture ID FREE REMOVAL 386-658-1030 609698-F W OW WHAT A DEAL! $5.00 PER WEEK R EAL DEAL Pick Your Letter! F REE E asy Cash C GROCERIES 617275-F Never Spend Your Money For Food, Gas or Prescriptions Again. Find Out How! 386-590-1633 For Junk Cars, Trucks & Scrap Metal $100-$200 & Up (Title or Not) Free Removal 904-783-4114 621486-F ERAMIC TILE 621488-F Laminate Flooring Tractor Work: Bush Hogging/Site Prep Walter Hurst & Sons 386-209-3551 H AVE A BUSINESS? ADVERTISE IT HERE FOR ONLY $5.00 A WEEK. 386-362-1734 A DVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS OR SERVICE FOR ONLY $5 PER WEEK! CALL FOR DETAILS 362-1734 Q UICK $5.00 PER WEEK SAVINGS C C a a l l e e n n d d a a r r o o f f E E v v e e n n t t s s When: Every Thursday, 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Activities for children will be provided. Please contact 386-755-8190 for additional information.Suwannee High Class of 1980The Suwannee High Class of 1980 is planning their 30 year class reunion. If you were a member, had a child, sibling or relative as part of the graduating class, please email your name (maiden and married), address, phone number and email address to shsclass1980@yahoo.com. Or call 386-362-6309 to leave a message. We look forward to hearing from you and seeing you at the reunion.Class of 1971 reunion plannedThe class of 1971 is preparing for our 40th class reunion. We are searching for addresses and emails of all classmates. If you are a parent, grandparent, or sibling of a former classmate and can help us with this task you are asked to please contact suwanneeclassreunion@ ymail.com or call 386-362-3895 and leave a message. Anyone who would like to help on the planning committee is more than welcome. We look forward to hearing from all our classmates.Senior Citizen ClubMadison Travel & Tours Oct. 14-26 Las Vegas and the Grand Canyon 13 days, 12 nights Oct. 14-26, 2010. Total Cost $1220. Final payment due by 8/8/2010. For more information contact Charlene and Walter Howell (386) 842-2241.Senior Citizen ClubMadison Travel & Tours Dec. 6-10 Smoky Mountains "Show Trip" 5 days, 4 nights Dec. 610, 2010. Total Cost $490. Final payment due by 9/30/10. For more information contact Charlene and Walter Howell (386) 842-2241.Gospel Sing at River Run CampgroundThere will be a Gospel sing at River Run Campground, located between Branford and Ft. White, the last Friday of each month, starting at 6 p.m. April through October. It will be held in an open air pavilion. We ask that you bring your own lawn chair. There is a concession stand that will be selling food. If you play or sing, you are welcome to join in. For more information call 386-9356553.Senior Citizens will NOT meet in OctoberSenior Citizens will NOT meet in October. We will resume our meetings the first Monday in November at 10:30 a.m. in the west annex of the Suwannee Co. Coliseum. Continued From Page 8 CNHI News Service VALDOSTA — A student who wore a rival school’s sweatshirt to school was dismissed from class and placed on in-school suspension. Mark Love Day, a 15-year-old student at Lowndes High School, got in trouble this week for wearing a Valdosta High School sweatshirt to class. His first-period teacher deemed the other school’s shirt a disruption. When Day would not turn it inside out, he was sent to the principal’s office, the student said. Spirits are running high this week on the eve of the “Winnersville Classic” – the annual football game between the two schools. Between classes Principal Wes Taylor saw Day in the hallway and also told him to remove the sweatshirt; again, Day refused. A check of the school handbook showed the student was not violating policy. Keisha Moore, Day’s mother, said her son was given a week in ISS for insubordination. “He is not there for football. He is there for an education,” Moore said. “The adults are the ones making a big ruckus out of it. What they are doing is childish.” Lowndes County School Superintendent Dr. Steve Smith agreed with Taylor stating that if an article of clothing a student is wearing causes a disruption in a class, it is a violation of the dress code. “The student refused to comply, refused to follow directions, that’s the issue,” Taylor said. Information for this story was provided by the Valdosta (Ga.) Daily Times.Student suspended for wearing rival's shirt to school

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PAGE 10, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA 571306-Fwww.nflaonline.com 1109 North Ohio Ave. US Hwy. 129, Live Oak 1-800-814-0609 Visit our website at: waltsliveoakford.com 601118-F Walts Live Oak Ford-Mercury 2007 Chevy Malibu LT $ 7,995 $ 7,995 2001 Mazda Miata LS Gold $ 9,995 $ 9,995 With world focus now on going green and making a soft imprint on the earth, the alpaca is taking center stage on the agricultural scene. Alpacas are fairly new to North America with the first importation of this small camelid into the U.S. in 1984. Alpacas are native to South America, particularly Peru, Bolivia and Chile and were coveted by the Incan royalty. 4-H, FFA and like clubs are increasingly involved as youngsters enjoy interacting with the gentle, humming alpaca which weigh between 100 and 200 lbs. at maturity. Baby alpacas, crias, typically weigh about 17 lbs. at birth. As five alpacas can be supported on just one acre of good pasture, the aspect of raising alpacas for the gentleman farmer is easily within reach. City dwellers are included in the opportunity with many larger alpaca farms offering boarding services. This eco-friendly animal needs to be in a group of at least two to prosper, requires only about two pounds of grass hay or grass per day per 125 pounds of body weight, plus some mineral supplementation. They tread gently on soft, padded feet, much like a dog’s foot, that do not tear up pasture as hooved animals do. Alpacas have only four teeth on the bottom and a hard gum called a dental pad on the top of their mouths, allowing them to nibble off only the tops of grass with less disturbance to plant roots than other grazing livestock. They also have molars at the back of their jaws for chewing cud. Articles in publications such as The Wall Street Journal have spurred interest in the investment opportunities and tax benefits of ownership. The relative ease of raising this gentle, fiber animal appeals increasingly to those heading into retirement. The number of alpaca farms is increasing in Florida and across the U.S. Two types of alpaca, differentiated by their fiber type, allows for fleece preference. The Huacaya (wa-kai-a) has dense, highly crimped, soft fleece that grows perpendicular to the body. The Suri (surrey), rarer of the two breeds, has a straighter, very lustrous fiber that drapes down the side of the body. While raising alpacas offers one aspect of the benefits to this livestock option, the fiber produced with a once a year shearing is the icing. Recognized as the elite, natural fiber, there are 22 natural colors. White and fawn fleeces are very easily dyed. Each alpaca can produce between 4 and 10 pounds of prime fleece each year. The fiber is spun into yarn and can then be knitted, woven or felted. Alpaca fiber does not contain lanolin, is hypoallergenic, and appeals to those who cannot wear wool. Alpacas are a natural for creating sustainable agriculture. More details are readily obtained from the Georgia Alpaca Association. This organization is presenting The Royal Alpaca Challenge on November 6 & 7, 2010 at the site of the Olympic equestrian events, the Georgia International Horse Park, in Conyers, GA (28 miles east of Atlanta just off I-20). This is an opportunity to talk directly with the owners who raise and show these unique, fiber animals. Children and adults will delight in this free, family friendly event! www.RoyalAlpacaChallenge.com or RoyalAlpacaChallenge@alpacamoon.com. Going green with alpacasLEFT: An alpaca costume contest. ABOVE: Up close and personal with an alpaca.Courtesy photos Iconic television town of 'Mayberry' marks 50th anniversaryPage 2

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OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 11CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIAAmerica will receive an all expense paid trip to compete in January 2011 on the Ryman Auditorium stage in Nashville, Tennessee for a prize of $100,000 and the title of Best New Act in Country Music at the 29th Annual Colgate Country Showdown. The Florida finals will be held at Silver Springs Resort at 5656 East Silver Springs Boulevard, on SR 40, Ocala. Take exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95 to reach the park. Call 352-236-2121 or email ssinfo@silversprings.com for more information. Among the talent Amber will compete against at state will be 2009 North Florida Colgate Country Showdown winner Emily Brook, who won The Big 98/Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park contest last year when she was just 10. Emily also is among the four winners of the first ever Colgate Country Showdown Songwriting Contest. Each of the four were pictured on the Showdown website and received an acoustic guitar autographed by LeAnn Rimes. The grand prize winner will be announced later this month and the winner’s name and song title will be announced by LeAnn Rimes during the 29th Annual Colgate Country Showdown in Continued From Page 1North Florida’s Amber Lee Abbott seeks Colgate Country Showdown state titleKickin' Kevin Thomas of the Big 98 in Live Oak. Courtesy photoBy Arlene Johns CNHI News Service JOHNSTOWN, Pa. -Calvin Rapson was not yet born when his father’s B-24 was shot out of the skies above Romania during World War II. Yet Rapson, who just retired as vice president of the United Auto Workers General Motors Department in Detroit, searched for two years for the last living member of his father’s squad. His journey brought him to Johnstown to meet 86-year-old John Szczur. Szczur and nine other U.S. Army Air Corpsmen, including Rapson’s father – also named Calvin Rapson – were on a bombing mission to the Ploesti oil refineries on May 31, 1944, when they were hit by enemy fire. Szczur and one other man were able to deploy their parachutes, but Rapson and the other seven men went down with the plane. Rapson said his family did not talk much about the war.5 “But as I got older, I always wondered why he was shot down over Romania,” he said. “I just wanted to know what I could about him.” It was his association with veterans in the UAW that piqued his interest in finding a survivor of the plane. After some research, they found the name of the plane – Sleepytime Gal – and the name of the one living survivor – Szczur. After months of phone calls and planning, the long-anticipated meeting took place at a dinner party at John and Angie Szczur’s Geistown home. “He told the whole story,” Rapson said. Szczur, who was 19 at the time, remembers much of the events of that day. “My buddy tapped me on the shoulder and he said ‘Look over there.’ There was a hole in the wing about 3 inches in diameter.” Szczur grabbed his parachute. “The plane blew up as soon as I snapped it on,” he said. “When I bailed out, I saw one chute above me and that was the bombardier. He was pretty well burned up on his face. “As I left the plane, I looked back and I saw (Rapson) and another crewmember sitting on the floor. They didn’t have their chutes on.” Rapson said it was hard to hear of his father’s final minutes. And it wasn’t easy for Szczur to tell. “He said he’ll never forget my dad looking at him,” Rapson said. Although Szczur made it out of the plane safely, his ordeal was not over. “When I hit the ground there was a cemetery right near there and I hid in the cemetery in the bushes until they captured me.” Szczur was kept with more than 1,000 other men in a prison in Bucharest. The prisoners could see the action continue in the skies above them. “We saw our planes going over and hitting targets. We saw our planes taking fire.” Szczur said the prisoners were treated well. “The Romanians liked us,” he said. “Even though they were on the side of Germany.” After nearly three months, the men were freed. “The Russians came through and liberated us.” Rapson said hearing the story was very meaningful for him. “I think it closed a loop for me – and the kind of people (the Szczurs) were made it mean more,” Rapson said. “They just couldn’t have been nicer.” Rapson presented Szczur with an exact replica of the leather flight jacket that he lost while he was a prisoner of war. Rapson was given a replica of the B-24. And one of Szczur’s daughters, Connie Ramseth, a retired lieutenant colonel with the U.S. Army, presented him with a Purple Heart with his father’s name on it. “That really meant something to me,” Rapson said. “My mother had (the original) but I don’t know what happened to it." Angie Szczur is very proud of her husband of 60 years. “You can’t find too many like him,” she said. “He’s a great husband and a great father.” Arlene Johns writes for The Tribune-Democrat in Johnstown, Pa. Bombing mission story retold, 66 years later Amber Lee Abbott 2010 Colgate winner. Courtesy photoJanuary 2011. The 2009 Colgate Best New Act In Country Music winner Johnny Bulford, now an up and coming country singer and prolific songwriter under contract to a major recording company in Nashville, won the Florida finals at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park and then won the national contest. During the wins by Bulford, Abbott and Brooke, the Big 98's DJ and radio personality Kickin' Kevin Thomas was the emcee. The SOSMP has live performances four nights a week, is the home of the largest country music festival in the South each April, the Suwannee River Jam, and hosts SpringFest, Magnolia Fest, Wanee, Bear Creek Music and Art Festival plus many other musical events each year such as the North Florida Colgate Country Showdown in conjunction with The Big 98. For more information, call the SOSMP at 386364-1683, email spirit@musicliveshere.co m or go to the website at www.musicliveshere.com. Calvin Rapson LEFT: John Szczur, 86, wears a replica of the leather flight jacket that he lost while he was a prisoner of war. He received the jacket from Calvin Rapson, whose father was a member of Szczur’s squad.Photo: John Rucosky/The Tribune-Demorat, Johnstown, Pa.

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PAGE 12, OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIABy Tim Lockette GAINESVILLE If you grew up geeky in the 1980s, Rick Ferdig’s workplace may closely resemble your idea of heaven. Here in the Educational Technology lab in the basement of Norman Hall on the University of Florida campus, you’ll find rows of Macintosh computers where, every summer, middle-school kids design their own video games. A 4-foottall stuffed Sonic the Hedgehog lounges on a well-worn sofa near a rack filled with Wired, GamePro and other computer-oriented magazines. In a side room, you’ll find a row of PlayStations, set up for a Tecmo Bowl tournament. It’s a Gen-Xer’s idea of an after-school paradise. Your grandmother might not approve, but there is a method to all this computer madness. Ferdig, a 35-year-old associate professor in UF’s College of Education, is at the vanguard of a new generation of scholars who understand that video games just might be good for you. Rather than rotting kids’ brains, those “wasted” hours in front of a glowing screen may actually have helped build better problem-solving skills, or so the new theory goes. And Ferdig is literally taking that idea to school, exploring the ways video games — real, fun video games — can help teachers get their ideas across. “Computers have been in the classroom for a couple of decades,” he says. “But we’re just now beginning to understand how to really use them.” Ferdig is the editor of the Handbook of Research on Effective Electronic Gaming in Education, the first-ever comprehensive compilation of research on what has become a hot topic: the educational benefits of video games. Drawing on research from 150 authors in 15 countries, the 1,759-page, threevolume collection goes far beyond the old “skill-and-drill” approach that characterized early efforts at educational computing — efforts like Oregon Trail and Reader Rabbit — and asks deeper questions about the games people play. Why do some kids struggle to learn their ABCs but have no problem memorizing the names of characters in Pokemon? How can we make educational games with the appeal and addictive power of Super Mario? Better yet, how can we turn existing games into teaching tools? “People are beginning to realize that when kids disappear into an online world, they’re learning at an amazing rate,” he says. “But most of us don’t realize that they’re also developing self-confidence and identity, and maybe even trying a new job.” Ferdig has been conducting indepth research on the psychology of video gaming for most of his life, though for much of that time he didn’t know it was research. As a kid in Holland, Mich., he whiled away the snow days in front of a video console. As a graduate student at Michigan State University and later as a visiting scholar at WSP Teacher Training College in Krakow, Poland, he would study and teach educational psychology by day, then spend his nights blasting his colleagues to smithereens in networked games of Doom and Duke Nukem. One of Ferdig’s friends suggested his gaming might be, well, unhealthy. It might have been meant as a warning, but Ferdig and his gaming buddies took the question more philosophically. “We started this in-depth conversation about what we were accomplishing by doing this,” Ferdig says. For Ferdig, that conversation grew, and is still growing. Applying his background in educational psychology to the evolving Internet, Ferdig spent the next several years exploring the implications the new online world held for teachers and students. Pioneering though it is, gaming is not Ferdig’s only avenue of research, or even his best known. As the principal investigator on a $600,000 grant from the AT&T Foundation, Ferdig is heading the first comprehensive assessment of practices in the nation’s growing number of virtual K-12 schools. More than a decade has passed since states across the U.S. began investing in “distance education” programs for K-12 students — programs that would use the Internet to allow students anywhere to take courses from teachers qualified in hard-to-find subjects such as Latin, macroeconomics or Advanced Placement physics. The boom in online learning has opened new academic doors to home-schooled kids and students in rural areas, but there is little data to show whether the rising tide has lifted all boats. “In most virtual schools, the final grades are sent to the schools and are stored and tracked by the schools,” Ferdig says. “Most states haven’t done a detailed analysis of which courses are really effective in producing learning gains, or which techniques are working.” Ferdig isn’t accusing the virtual schools of selling “silicon snake oil.” There’s already research to show that, in general, online students learn just as much or more than students in traditional classrooms. What’s lacking in virtual high schools, however, is a detailed look at who is learning, how much, and why. “Florida, for instance, may know that its online students generally do well on standardized tests,” Ferdig says. “But does virtual schooling work as well for students in Miami as it does for students in Gainesville? And if it doesn’t, why not? That’s what teachers really want to know, and that’s the kind of data we’re collecting.” The project reaches well beyond Florida, however. In all, 22 states are participating, offering Ferdig data on millions of students. And Ferdig is looking at more than just grades and lesson plans. The most important elements in online learners’ success, he says, may not be the things you see on the computer screen. “Learning online takes more than a teacher, a student and a couple of computers,” Ferdig says. “We’re very interested in the support the students receive. How much help do they get from parents, and from mentor teachers in their schools? Do administrators understand the role of virtual schooling, and how does their understanding affect the results their students have in online courses?” Education Professor Rick Ferdig seeks to understand the impact of virtual environments on gaming and educationAlex Brown, a 17-year-old senior at Santa Fe High School, has taken two virtual classes and knows what is necessary to succeed in them. Brown took Personal Fitness and Life Management Skills through Florida Virtual School, a 90-course virtual school that served 60,000 K-12 students in the ‘07-’08 school year. She received an A in both classes. “My teacher was really nice and helpful,” Alex says. “It was really easy to learn because I got to do it at my own pace. I could work out on my treadmill, under the fan, with my music on.” Alex would study modules online and converse with fellow classmates in message boards. She also would speak to her instructor on the phone to discuss that week’s topic. “I liked the setup a lot,” she says. “It was easy to express yourself and work on your own schedule.” That’s an aspect Alex’s mother, Chris Brown, liked as well. “The teacher was available throughout the day,” Brown says. “I could talk to her about how Alex was doing whenever I needed to.” Alex had to exercise regularly and record her activities in a work log. Brown would then sign off that the log was accurate. It was never a problem making sure Alex did the work, Chris Brown says. “I think the flexibility was key. She would have had to drop anatomy or art, which she really loved,” if the classes hadn’t been available online. Chris Brown acknowledged that engaged parents are essential to virtual schooling, though. “A student without an involved parent could make the work logs up.” While many virtual school teachers have successfully made the transition from the classroom, as the program grows Ferdig worries that there won’t be enough technically savvy instructors. That’s why Ferdig is working with colleagues at UF and bucking tradition by piloting the nation’s first online teaching internship. “The old adage was that you needed to have three to five years of classroom experience in order to excel in an online teaching environment,” Ferdig says. “But it’s really kind of hard to see why that face-to-face teaching requirement is in place.” In the traditional classroom, Ferdig notes, an expert teacher is one who can diagram sentences or do long division while monitoring 15 to 30 kids in a single room. Anyone who has tried that can tell you that it takes a special talent, and most teachers look unfavorably on any teacher preparation program that doesn’t require its students to get some experience in the classroom. Teaching online requires special talents, too, but not necessarily the ones you need in a face-to-face classroom, Ferdig says. “Online, I don’t have to worry about whether Johnny is throwing paper at Sarah, or Sarah is sticking gum under her chair,” Ferdig says. “But I do have to worry about a number of other things — like creating community among students who can’t see each other and moderating discussions online.” In cooperation with the Florida Virtual School (the nation’s largest virtual K-12 school), Ferdig recently supervised a group of education majors in an on-the-job training experience that had them looking over the shoulders of the state's best online teachers, all without leaving Ferdig’s lab in the basement of historic Norman Hall. The virtual internship may go against the grain of the teaching profession, but it’s just one example of Ferdig’s outside-the-box approach to education and technology. For another, just follow Ferdig on one of his trips to Rwanda, where he is helping school officials come up with ways to bring 21stcentury educational technology to schools that sometimes can’t even afford pencils and paper. “Rwanda is probably the last place most Americans would expect kids to be using computers in schools,” Ferdig says. “After all, we’re talking about a place where students sometimes have to practice writing in the dirt because they can’t afford school supplies. But they’re ready.” Known to most of the world for the brutal civil war it endured in the 1990s, Rwanda is looking for ways to start over, rebuild and attract foreign investment. As in many African countries, Rwanda’s educators have big dreams for public education, but they lack the infrastructure to make those dreams a reality. But the Rwandans see their under-resourced schools as clean slates, ready to be converted into 21st-century wired classrooms. Provided, of course, that someone finds computers they can afford. Ferdig, whose travel was funded by UF's Center for African Studies, has been looking for ways to use handheld computers to meet those needs. While people in the United States use PDAs mostly as portable address books, the tiny devices have far more computing power than the Apple IIe computers American schools were using in Ferdig’s high school years. PDAs are easily transported from school to school, and unlike the famed “$100 laptop,” they’re readily available right now. Ferdig is also looking for ways to introduce software that meets the Rwandans where they live. Too often, when educational books or computer games make their way to crowded African cities and remote rural villages, they’re hand-medowns from the West, depicting suburban environments that are alien to many Africans. Ferdig is looking for ways to Africanize the content of the educational software the Rwandans use in the future. While Rwanda may seem worlds away from his lab in Gainesville, Ferdig sees a common theme in all of his work in educational technology. Whether you’re bringing handheld computers to Africa or setting up a virtual high school in the U.S., he says, educational computing is about more than devices with bells and whistles. The computer works as an educational tool because it gives kids a chance to use their knowledge to create new things — and the power to show those creations to the public. “If kids aren’t creating something,” he says. “They aren’t learning.” Schools without walls

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FAMILY FEATURES Fall brings a whole new set of flavors to the table, and thats reason enough to celebrate with friends. Award-winning celebrity chef and cookbook author Michael Chiarello has created some deli cious seasonal dishes that make the most of autumns bounty and make it easy to entertain. If you want to create beautiful food for your friends and family, the most important thing you can do is start your recipes with the best possible ingredients,ŽsaysChiarello.Progresso makes it easy to fill your pantry with the very finest ingredients.Ž Using Progresso 100% natural broth and panko bread crumbs, Chiarello has created dishes with exceptional flavor and paired them with the award-winning wines of the Cavit Collection. Find more seasonal recipes at www.progressofoods.com and www.cavitcollection.com.Turkey Scallopini and Squash Ravioli with Cranberry Brown Butter Makes 8 servings Prep Time: 10 minutes Start to Finish: 30 minutes 8 portions boneless turkey breast (4 ounces each) 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 2 eggs, beaten 2 cups Progresso plain panko crispy bread crumbs 1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter 1 package (18 ounces) frozen squash ravioli 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh sage or 2 teaspoons dried sage 1 1/2 cups fresh cranberries 3 tablespoons dark molasses 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 1 cup Progresso chicken broth or reduced-sodium chicken broth Salt and pepper Bring 4 quarts lightly salted water to a boil in a large pot. Between two sheets of plastic wrap, pound turkey breast pieces to an even 1/4-inch thickness with a meat mallet. If you dont have a meat mallet, the back of a frying pan will work fine. You can do this a day ahead and leave them stored in the plastic wrap, folded over on each other. You can also ask a good butcher to cut and pound the turkey for you. Heat olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Lightly coat turkey pieces with flour, and pat off excess; dip in beaten eggs and then dredge in bread crumbs. When oil is hot and bubbling, add turkey pieces. Do not crowd the pan. Let brown about 1 minute, then turn to cook thesecondside,another30seconds. The turkey will cook very quickly and will dry out if overcooked. When done, remove to a baking sheet or platter and keep warm. Do not wash sauté pan! To make the sauce, add butter to sauté pan and place over mediumhigh heat. At the same time, drop ravioli into the boiling water. When butter begins to turn light brown, add fresh sage. Stir for a few seconds; then add cran berries, and sauté until skins begin to burst. Add molasses, balsamic vinegar and broth, scraping bottom of the pan to pick up all the flavor of the turkey. Sim mer until cran berries are soft and the sauce coats the back of a spoon, about 2 min utes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Be sure to taste sauce for seasoning before you pour it over the turkey. Test ravioli for doneness in about 3 minutes „pinch edges of dough; it should be tender. Drain. Divide ravioli among hot plates and layer a piece of turkey over the ravioli. Spoon sauce over them. Tip: The sauce must be put together very quickly, so have all the ingredients premeasured and ready at the side of the stove. Enjoy with Cavit Riesling or Pinot Noir. Roasted Butternut Squash Soup Makes 4 servings Prep Time: 30 minutes Start to Finish: 60 minutes Roasted Winter Squash 2 tablespoons butter 2 cups diced (3/4-inch) raw winter squash (butternut, hubbard, acorn) Salt and pepper Soup 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1/2 cup diced onion 1/4 cup diced celery 1/4 cup diced carrot 1 cinnamon stick Sea salt and freshly ground pepper 1 carton (32 ounces) Progresso chicken broth (4 cups) 1/2 teaspoon ground toasted coriander, if desired 1 1/2 cups Roasted Winter Squash (above) 1/2 cup half-and-half, if desired 2 tablespoons toasted pumpkin seeds 1/2 cup Progresso plain panko crispy breadcrumbs,toastedlightbrown in sauté pan over medium heat To make roasted winter squash: Heat oven to 375°F. Heat butter over medium-high heat in an ovenproof sauté pan; add diced squash, salt and pepper. When squash begins to brown, place pan in oven. Roast for 15 minutes or until medium-brown on all sides. Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Pureé in food processor, or mash with potato masher or ricer. Measure 1 1/2 cups squash; reserve. To make soup: Heat olive oil in large sauce pan over medium heat until hot. Add onion, celery, carrot and cinnamon stick; sauté until soft but not brown, about 10 min utes. Season with salt and pepper. Add broth and coriander; bring to a boil . Simmer for several minutes. Stir in reserved squash until smooth; simmer gently to let flavors meld, about 10 minutes. Discard cinnamon stick. Pureé soup using an immersion blender or in a blender until smooth. (The soup can be made ahead to this point, cooled, covered, and refrig erated for several days or frozen for about 1 month. It will thicken as it cools and may need thinning with broth or water when reheating.) Return soup to pan and reheat gently. Add half-and-half. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Top each serving with pumpkin seeds and toasted bread crumbs. Tip: Depending on how rich you want it, or how cold it is outside, you can use cream, yogurt or mascarpone instead of half-and-half. Enjoy with Cavit Chardonnay.Mama Chiarellos Stuffed Eggplant Makes 4 servings Prep Time: 30 minutes Start to Finish: 1 hour 20 minutes 1 large eggplant 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon grey sea salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/2pound ground beef 1 onion, diced small (about 1 cup) 1 red bell pepper, diced small (about 1 cup) 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil leaves 1 1/4 cups grated pecorino Romano cheese 1/2 cup Progresso plain panko crispy bread crumbs 1 whole egg 2 chopped tomatoes Heat oven to 350°F. Cut eggplant in half and scoop out center, leaving enough meat inside the skin so that it holds its shape when baked. Chop egg plant that has been scooped out of the inside; place in saucepan, cover with water and boil until very soft, 10 to 12 minutes. Meanwhile, in medium sauté pan, heat 1 table spoon olive oil over medium heat. Salt and pepper the beef. Add seasoned ground beef to pan, and sauté until all of its liquid is evaporated and beef begins to brown slightly. Let cool briefly, and chop cooked beef so that there are no large chunks of meat. In another medium sauté pan over medium heat, add remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil, and sauté the onion, pepperand garlic together in oil. In bowl, mix together cooked eggplant, vege tables, beef, herbs, 1 cup cheese, 1/4 cup bread crumbs and egg. Fill scooped-out eggplant halves with this mixture, dividing it evenly between the two halves. Top with chopped tomatoes, remaining 1/4 cup cheese, remaining 1/4 cup bread crumbs, and season with salt and pepper. Place on an oiled oven tray or baking dish, and bake for 50 minutes. Let cool briefly; slice widthwise and serve. Enjoy with Cavit Pinot Noir, Merlot or Cabernet Sauvignon. Chef Michael Chiarello OCTOBER 13 & 14, 2010, PAGE 13CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA

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THIS ONE IS LOADED!!! 2005 R AM 2500 Q UADSLT L OCAL T RADE , X TRAX TRA C LEAN , O NEO WNER , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , A LLOYW HEELS , T OWP KG .,S PRAY _ INB EDLINER& B RANDN EWT IRES , LOW MILES ON THIS DIESEL TRUCK!!! 2000 J EEPG RANDC HEROKEEL AREDO L OCALT RADE , X TRA C LEAN , A LLOYW HEELS , P OWERW INDOWS & L OCKS , CD/C ASS ., T ILT & C RUISE , PRICED TO SELLƒIT WONT LAST LONG, HURRY!!! ONLY $ 6985 2008 C HRYSLERC ROSSFIREL IMITED L OCALT RADE , X TRAX TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , A UTOMATIC , A LLOY W HEELS , P OWERW INDOWS & L OCKS , P OWERD RIVERSS EAT THE ULTIMATE SPORTS CAR...LIKE BRAND NEW!!! ONLY 771 MILES FULLY LOADED2006 GMC Y UKON XL D ENALI L OCALT RADE , X TRA X TRAC LEAN , L EATHER , N AVIGATION , DVD E NTERTAINMENTS YSTEM , R EARA IR , B OSES TEREOS YSTEM , S UNROOF , D UALC LIMATEC ONTROLS , H EATEDM EMORYS EATS , THIS ONE HAS ALL THE OPTIONS!!! 2002 C HRYSLERS EBRINGLX i L OCALT RADE , X TRA C LEAN , S UNROOF , P OWERW INDOWS & L OCKS , A LLOYW HEELS , W OODGRAINI NTERIORT RIM& P OWERD RIVER  SS EAT . NICE FOUR DOOR SEDAN!!! 2006 C HEVY Z-71 4 X 4 L OCALT RADE , X TRA X TRAC LEAN , L EATHER , C HROMEW HEELS , F ABT ECHL IFT K IT , C HROMEW HEELS, D UALC LIMATEC ONTROLS, JBL A UDIOS YSTEM , P OWER D RIVER  SS EAT , THIS IS AN AWESOME TRUCK W/ALL THE ACCESSORIES!!! ONLY 27 K MILES 2007 M INIC OOPERS L OCALT RADE, X TRAX TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , D UALS UNROOFS , D IGITAL C LIMATEC ONTROLS , A LLOYW HEELS & P OWERW INDOWS & L OCKS . IMMACULATE CONDITION PLUS IT HAS A TURBO ENGINE!!! 2004 D ODGED URANGO SLT 4x4 L OCALT RADE , X TRAX TRAC LEAN , P OWER Drivers Seat, L EATHER , I NFINITYA UDOS YSTEM, 6 D ISC CD C HANGER , R EARA IR , A LLOYW HEELS , 3 RDR OWS EAT . THIS ONE IS LOADED w/LOTS OF ROOM!!! ONLY 1 K MILES 2010 T OYOTAT UNDRAD OUBLEC AB L OCALT RADE , X TRAX TRA C LEAN ,18Ž A LLOYW HEELS , S PRAY -I NB EDLINER , L EATHERS EATS , P OWERD RIVER  SS EAT , W INDOWS & L OCKS , T OWP KG ., 5.7L V8 E NGINE W /P LENTY OFP OWER , C HROMEN ERFB ARS, TRD P KG . LIKE BRAND NEW BUT YOULL SAVE THOUSANDS!!! ONLY 7 K MILES 2010 C HEVYM ALIBULT L OCALT RADE , X TRAX TRA C LEAN , T WOT ONEI NTERIOR , P OWER D RIVER  SS EAT , C HROMEW HEELS , A LLT HEP OWERO PTIONS ! LIKE BRAND NEW!!! ONLY $ 5985 2005 D ODGEC ARAVANSXT L OCALT RADE , X TRAX TRA C LEAN , A LLOYW HEELS , Q UADB UCKET S EATS , D UALC LIMATEC ONTROLS , T ILT & C RUISE , P OWERW INDOWS& L OCKS , LOADED & PLENTY OF ROOM FOR THE FAMILY!!! ONLY $ 6985 ONLY 21 K MILES 2007 F ORD F150 C REWK INGR ANCH4 X 4 L OCALT RADE , X TRAX TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , S UNROOF , S ADDLEB ROWN L EATHER , D UALP OWERS EATS, 6 D ISC CD C HANGER & H EATEDS EATS . THIS IS THE NICEST TRUCK YOU WILL EVER SEE!!! HEMI ONLY 21 K MILES 2007 J EEPW RANGLER X 4 X 4 L OCALT RADE , X TRA C LEAN, Automatic, Hard Top, Power Windows & Locks, A LLOYW HEELS , F OGL IGHTS , F ACTORYR UNNINGB OARDS . $AVE BIG ON THIS WRANGLER w/HARDLY ANY MILES!!! 5.9L C UMMINS T URBOD IESEL C UMMINS T URBOD IESEL ONLY 35 K MILES 2008 R AM 2500 Q UADC AB SLT 4 X 4 L OCALT RADE , X TRAX TRA C LEAN , BRAND N EW RWL 315Ž BFG ALL TERRAIN TIRES, P OWERD RIVER  SS EAT , W INDOWS& L OCKS , T OWP KG ., A LLOYW HEELS , S PRAY -I NB EDLINER , ULTRA LOW MILES ON THIS HARD TO FIND DIESEL TRUCK!!! 2007 T OYOTAT ACOMAR EG . C AB L OCALT RADE , X TRAC LEAN , BRAND NEW RWL TIRES , CD, GREAT LOOKING w/EVEN BETTER FUEL ECONOMY!!! 2008 F ORD F-150 C REWL ARIAT4 X 4 L OCALT RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , B ACK -U PC AMERA, 6 D ISC CD C HANGER , P OWERD RIVER  S & P ASSENGERS EATS , H EATEDS EATS , S PRAY -I NB EDLINER , LOADED w/ALL THE POWER EQUIPMENT!!! ONLY $ 12995 2007 C HRYSLERS EBRINGT OURING L OCALT RADE , X TRAX TRA C LEAN , P OWERW INDOWS & L OCKS , A LLOYW HEELS , T ILT & C RUISE . LOW MILES & EXCELLENT FUEL MILEAGE!!! FULLY LOADED! 2002 J EEPG RANDC HEROKEEL IMITED L OCALT RADE , X TRAX TRALeather, Woodgrain Interior Trim , Dual Digital Climate Controls, Sunroof, Big Bold Alloy Wheels, V8 Engine w/Plenty of Power, Dual Power Seats, Heated Seats, CD/ Cass., THIS ONE IS FULLY LOADED & SUPER NICE!!! 5.9L C UMMINS T URBOD IESEL 2005 R AM 2500 Q UAD SLT 4 X 4 L OCALT RADE , X TRA X TRAC LEAN , Leather, B RANDN EW315ŽBFG ALL TERRAIN TIRES , Power Drivers Seat, Windows & Locks, Tow Pkg., Spray-In Bedliner. THESE 5.9L CUMMINS DIESELS ARE VERY HARD TO FIND, IT WONT LAST LONG !! P R E M I U M M H A N D P I C K E D D T R A D E S ! P R E M I U M M H A N D P I C K E D D T R A D E S ! PREMIUM HANDPICKED TRADES! O v e r r 1 0 0 0 I n n S t o c k k t o o C h o o s e e F r o m ! O v e r r 1 0 0 0 I n n S t o c k k t o o C h o o s e e F r o m ! Over 100 In Stock to Choose From! QUITMAN 888-304-2277 € VALDOSTA 229-242-1540 SHOPINYOUR PAJAMAS 24 HOURSADAY! D RIVEI TL IKEY OUS TOLEI T . COM CASS BURCH


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