Citation
Suwannee Democrat

Material Information

Title:
Suwannee Democrat
Creator:
Suwannee Democrat
Place of Publication:
Live Oak, Fla.
Live Oak, Fla
Publisher:
J. E. Pound
J.E. Pound
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Semiweekly[<1990-1994>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1897-1928>]
semiweekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Live Oak (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Suwannee County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Suwannee -- Live Oak

Notes

Abstract:
The Live Oak Suwannee Democrat is one of the oldest continuously published weeklies in the State of Florida. It began in 1884 in Live Oak, which at the turn of the century was the fifth largest city in Florida, preceded only by Jacksonville, Pensacola, Tampa, and Key West. The Suwannee Democrat enjoyed a corresponding reputation as a journalistic leader in the state. As its name suggests, the newspaper in its early days was affiliated with the Democratic Party. Its first editor hid under an assumed name when he was suspected of murder. A deathbed confession by the actual perpetrator allowed him to resume his true identity: F.R. McCormack, about whom, however, little else is known. From 1906 through 1907, the Suwannee Democrat was supplemented by the Live Oak Daily Democrat, edited by Charles W. Irwin. The rural character of early 20th-century Suwannee County, well known for its grist and lumber mills and poultry farms, is visible in the pages of the Suwannee Democrat. Indeed, over the years the newspaper has won numerous awards from the Florida Press Association for the quality of its agricultural reporting. Fires have taken their toll on the Suwannee Democrat. In 1906, a disgruntled printer left Live Oak by railroad on the night that the newspaper’s offices were burned to the ground. In October 1995, a fire destroyed a historic block of Live Oak’s downtown, and the newspaper’s office was one of the casualties. Lost in the fire were the last known issues of the Suwannee Democrat dating from 1897 through 1900.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Electronic reproduction of copy from George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida also available.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began Aug. 12, 1897.
General Note:
Editor: F.R. McCormack, <1910>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 12 (Nov. 20, 1897).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Suwannee Democrat, J.E. Pound publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ACE4563 ( NOTIS )
33273856 ( OCLC )
000398954 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95026787 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Related Item:
Live Oak daily Democrat
Preceded by:
Banner (Live Oak, Fla.)
Preceded by:
Suwannee leader
Preceded by:
Suwannee citizen

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




On the

CAMPAIGN

trail
Steve Southerland
pays a visit
PAGE 10A


Cry Out,

America
". 9/11 observations set for here,
throughout the region. Page 3A.


125th YEAR, NO. 94 13 SECTIONS, 30 PAGES Wednesday Edition - September 8, 2010 50 CENTS


Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Dowling Park, Branford, McAlpin and O'Brien


Student tasered in


bus incident at SHS


20-minute
standoff
ends in use
of force


By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.com
A student was tasered during
an altercation on a school bus
at Suwannee High School Fri-


day afternoon, according to
Principal Ted Roush.
The incident began around
3:05 p.m. as officials were
called to the Route 23 bus to
address a 17-year-old Suwan-


nee Opportunity School stu-
dent who was reportedly curs-
ing and causing a disruption
while on the bus in the com-
SEE STUDENT, PAGE 10A


SPORTS I PAGE 1B


- = == = -


Suwannee tailback Derek Smith eludes a Hamilton County defender during Friday night's Battle of the Bridge, a 21-6 win over
Hamilton. -Photo: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com)


Woman leads police
on 7-hour chase
along banks of
the Suwannee
�wrSee story
below



O'Brien


shooting


claims life


of man, 20

Hamilton CI guard on
administrative leave
pending investigation
By Jeff Waters
A 20-year-old Columbia County man lay
dead in an O'Brien home Thursday follow-
ing an argument over a woman, according to
Suwannee County Sheriff Tony Cameron.
Dead is Zachary Pritchard, 385 SW Mar-
cis Terrace, Lake City.
According to Cameron, Pritchard was en-
gaged in an argument with Trenton Lance
Lacy, 24, of 112 SW Golden Glen, Lake
City, at 4 a.m. when one of the two produced
a firearm. The men fought over the gun, at
which point another man intervened to
break up the fight. It was then that the
firearm discharged.
Pritchard died "within a matter of minutes
from a gunshot wound over his eye,"
Cameron said.
The exact circumstances of the shooting
aren't clear. However, Lacy, a corrections
officer at Hamilton Correctional Institution,
was placed on paid administrative leave af-
ter the shooting per standard procedure, said
Department of Corrections officials.
"There are things about this that I'm un-
sure of to call it an accident," Cameron said.
"I don't feel like one person should decide.
I'm going to request that the state attorney
put this before a grand jury."


Suspect named in March
shooting death of LO man


By Jeff Waters
Live Oak police have iden-
tified a suspect in the March
shooting death of 35-year-old
Marvin Louis O'Hara.
John Charles Ware, 56,
was arrested Friday morning
and charged with three
felonies involving the dispos-


al of the gun police say was
used to shoot O'Hara to
death in the rooming house
they shared. Ware was
charged with tampering with
evidence, possession of a
firearm by a convicted felon
SEE SUSPECT, PAGE 11A


John Charles
Ware


Woman leads police on seven-hour

chase along banks of the Suwannee


By Jeff Waters
jeff.waters@gaflnews.com


A Live Oak woman led po-
lice on a seven-hour chase af-
ter she bolted in anticipation
of a routine traffic stop Thurs-
day, sheriff's reports indicate.
Sheriff's Deputy Wayne
Kelly attempted to make a




I 97113 0752. 1


traffic stop on Dori Lisa Pope,
47, of 21981 B 160th Street,
Live Oak, for driving on an
expired tag.
"Upon attempting to con-
duct a traffic stop on (Pope)
SEE WOMAN, PAGE 10A


The Old
Dog says,
"Do it right or
don't bother."


r


Plea deal rejected

in Wellborn arson


By Carnell
Hawthorne Jr.
carnell.hawthorne@
gaflnews.com
One of three men
charged for his part in


A November 2009 fire de-
stroyed a Wellborn man's
live-in workshop.
- Photo: Staff

Cooper-Olin, right, in court
Friday with his attorney,
John Hendrick.
- Photo: Carnell Hawthorne Jr.


the burglary and subse-
quent fire that ravaged a
live-in furniture work-
shop in Wellborn back in
November 2009 ap-
SEE PLEA, PAGE 10A


www.suwanneedemocrat.com




NFL A 0908_001-Final NFL A 0908_001-Final 9/7/10 3:40 PM Page 2


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


ON THE FLIPSIDE


HOW TO REH US


Switchboard, 386-362-1734
Fax, 386-364-5578
Email, nf.editorial@gaflnews.com
Mail, P.O. Box 370
Live Oak, FL 32064
Office, 211 Howard Street East
* Publisher,
Myra Regan, ext. 122


CONTACT US WITH
YOUR COMMENTS
If you have any questions or
concerns, call us at 386-362-1734
or visit our Web site at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com



NEWSROOM
* Editor,
Robert Bridges, ext. 131
* Reporter,
Carnell Hawthorne Jr., ext. 134
* Reporter,
Jeff Waters, ext. 133
* Reporter,
Stephenie Livingston, ext. 130
* Sports Reporter,
Corey Davis, ext. 132



ADVERTISING
* Advertising Manager,
Monja Slater, ext. 105
* Sr. Advertising Representative,
Bill Regan, ext. 160
E Advertising Representative,
Tami Stevenson, ext. 109
E Advertising Representative,
Rhonda Cheney, ext. 141
* Telesales Ad Representative,
Nancy Goodwin, ext. 103
* Classified/Legal,
Janice Ganote, ext. 102


CIRCULATION
| Circulation Manager,
Angie Sparks, ext. 152
| Circulation
Service Hours, M-F 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Subscription Rates,
In-county, $33 Out-of-county, $48




#uwainnee

Nemorrat


. ., . - .
,-,& , . .- . . .-
Serving Suwannee County Since 1884


The Suwannee Democrat, published
Wednesday and Friday.
Periodicals postage paid at
Live Oak, FL 32064. Business located
at 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak,
FL. Publication number 530180.

"POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to Suwannee
Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL
32064." Annual subscription rate is
$33 in county, $48 out of county and
$48 out of state. Subscribe online at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com.

OFFICE HOURS
Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Letters, comments and opinions on
the Viewpoint & Opinions page are
not necessarily those of the
management/ownership of the
Suwannee Democrat.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Letters may be mailed, faxed or
e-mailed to our office. All letters are
read. Not all letters are published.
Letters may be edited to fit available
space. The editor should not alter the
writer's point of view. Well written
letters require less editing. Keep it to
the point, an ideal range is 150 to
200 words. Please include your
name, address and day and evening
phone numbers for verification.
Letters MUST be signed. Letters to
the editor can be limited to one
letter per quarter per individual.


RANT & RAVE HOTLINE
Here's your chance to tell everyone what you
think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a
message to express their thoughts, good or
bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not
about private individuals or businesses. If you
prefer, you may e-mail your comments to
robert.bridges@gaflnews.com.Your name is
not necessary, but please, ,---_
take 30 seconds or less for
your message.
.. .. art of
S' Florida" \


Editor's note: The
Suwannee Democrat
prints the entire arrest
record each week. If
your name appears here
and you are later found
not :...r, i h\ or the . Ih,,,... ..
are dropped, we will be
happy to make note of
this in the newspaper
when judicial proof is
presented to us by you
or the authorities.
The following abbre-
viations are used below:
SCSO-Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
LOPD-Live Oak Po-
lice Department
FDLE-Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment
FHP-Florida Highway
Patrol
FWC-Florida Wildlife
Commission
DOT-Department of
Transportation
OALE-Office of Agri-
cultural Law Enforce-
ment
P & P-Probation and
Parole
USMS-US Marshals
Service
ATF-Department of
Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms
DOC-Department of
Corrections

September 2, Fredrick
Cooks, 34, 12910 HW 90
West Lot #10 Live Oak,
Fl, vop (simple battery)
P&P-R. Raymond
September 2, Kellie
Lanier, 28, 12946 88th
Terr Live Oak, Fl, vop o/c
sell/del cont sub SCSO-K.
Osborn
September 2, Brad Alan
Patterson, 35, 207 SW
Owens Avenue Branford,
Fl, dwls/r SCSO-J.Brooks
September 2, John Jef-
fery Miller Jr., 26, 239
Lee Road Jacksonville, Fl,
vop o/c fraud use of credit
card & credit card theft,
vocc o/c intro contraband
SCSO-A. Loston
September 2, Bonnie
Kay Slaughter, 51, 9388
48th St Live Oak, Fl,sale
of darvocet, poss darvocet
w/int sell SCSODTF-R.
Sammons
September 2, Dori Lisa
Pope, 47, 21981 B 160th
St Live Oak, Fl, flee/elude
leo, dwls 2nd off, resis
w/o viol, vop o/c manuf
cannabis SCSO-W. Kelly


September 2, Joseph
Bernard Combs, 33, 314
S. Houston Ave., Live
Oak, Fl, battery (dom vio-
lence) LOPD-D. Slaughter
September 3, John
Howard Sterling, 35,
12803 225 Rd Live Oak,
Fl, burglary, grand theft
September 3, William
Charles Ledogar, 51,
13078 CR 137 Wellborn,
Fl, dwls/r 3rd offense
FDOT-T. Smipes
September 3, Steven C.
McCarthy, 24, 9477 US
Hwy 41 Jasper, Fl, ftc o/c
battery, $273.00 cash only
SCSO-G Edwards
September 3, Herbert
Lee White, 59, 7731 86th
St Live Oak, Fl,vop-poss
of cocaine P&P-S. O'Hara
September 3, Tracey
Miller, 47, 14393 68th
Street Live Oak, Fl, vop
att traff cont sub, no bond
per judge fina SCSO-
Fipps
September 3, John
Charles Ware, 56, 813
Hillman Ave. Live Oak,
Fl, poss/f/a by conv felon,
tamp w/evidence, poss f/a
by comm felony LOPD-J.
Bates
September 3, Dylan
Russell Camahan, 19,
9922 132nd Street Live
Oak, Fl, vop (sale contl
subs/poss, cntl subs w/i
sell/sale, oxy/poss oxy w/i
sell) LOPD - J. Roundtree
September 4, Fred Var-
go, 50, 7021 119th Road
Live Oak, Fl, dui, attach
not assigned, dwls/r, 1st
app pd appt per wrs FHP J
Clark
September 4, Stephany
Lynn Baisden, 25, 285
NW Saturn Lane Lake
City, Fl, columbia cty wrt
vop o/c, poss control sub-
stance, 1st app n/pd appt
per wrs SCSO A Robin-
son
September 4, Wesley
Breck Weingart, 29, 8450
Gate Parkway West
Jacksonville, Fl, bui FWC
D Sharpe
September 4, Johnny
Steven Musgrove, 38, 221
Wiregrass Street Home-
rville, Ga, bui FWC B
Humphries
September 4, Carlos
Rodriguez, 27, 245 Eva
Ave Live Oak, Fl,disor-
derly into, 1st app pd
appt per wrs LOPD Kin-
sey
September 4, Bumetta




CU-fMT


-------- COUPON -------
Buy 2 Pizzas &
2 Crazy Bread
Receive
FI Hot-N-ReadyI
I R E Pizza
Expires 9/22/10

Check next Wednesday's Democrat for the next coupon

364-5100
Located in the South Oaks Square Publix Shopping Center, Live Oak
607932-F







You %ant the most in-lelptli coverage.
the latest neuis anid stories thal louch home.
We want to give it to you.
1 Year In County
Subscription

J1 Year
L34 Out of County

Mail or bring payment to:

umanna hemniocrat
P.O. Box 370 * 211 Howard St. East
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-1734 * 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152
570802-F


Leigh Ansley, 38, 1009
NW 2nd St Live Oak, Fl,
battery domestic violence,
1st app pd appt per wrs
LOPD-B. Kastor
September 4, Tarrence
L. Ailep, 35, 1408 8th St
Live Oak, Fl, vop o/c tres-
pass, $300.00 cash only,
1st app pd appt per wrs
SCSO-K. Osborn
September 4, Jonathan
Hutchinson, 34, 23557 CR
250 Dowling Pk, battery
(dom viol) SCSO T
Roberts
September 4, Travis
Ginn, 20, 23352 124 St
Live Oak, Fl, dwls/r, 1st
app pd appt per wrs SCSO
C Home
September 5, William
Lee Burkett, 29, 18966
136 St Live Oak, Fl, bat-
tery
September 5, Lois
Juanita Johnson, 46, 1121
Davis St Live Oak, Fl,
vop-poss drug para, cash
bond only, 1st app pd appt
per wrs LOPD-Fipps
September 5, Marie An-
nette Baker, 29, 1415 Col-
iseum Ave Live Oak, Fl,
dui 2nd offense, 1st app
n/pd appt wrs, child ne-
glect-3 cts, new obts
6101022115 SCSO-C.
Tompkins
September 5, Deaker J.
Sterling, 25, 7720 US 90
Live Oak, Fl, poss of con-
trol substance w/o pre-
scription, dwls/r, dui,
refuse to submit to urine
test, columbia cty wrt fta
o/c, tag expired +6
months, 1st app pd appt
per wrs SCSO C McIntyre
September 5, Jose Her-
nandez-Gomez, 24, 369
Cirlce Mayo, Fl, no dri-
vers license, expired tag
+6 months SCSO M Lee
September 6, John Hen-
ry Wesson, 37, 9640 SR
51 Live Oak, Fl, battery
(dom. violence) SCSO-L.
Willis
September 6, Robert
Grant Lau Jr., 19, 12610
US HWY 129 Live Oak,
Fl, battery (dom viol) 2
cts SCSO - C. McTyre
September 6, Eddie
Collier, 32, 9077 169th
Road Live Oak, Fl, battery
dom violence SCSO J
Zimmerman
September 6, Paula
Jeanette Collier, 26, 9077
169th Road Live Oak, Fl,
battery domestic violence,
citrus cnty wmt, uttering
forged check SCSO J
Zimmerman




CASH 3 PLAY 4
Day Day
9/6/10..3,0,7 9/6/10.. .6,0,8,2
Night Night
9/6/10. .3,5,9 9/6/10 . . .6,4,7,9
FANTASY 5
9/6/10. ............ 4,7,25,31,34
MEGA MONEY..... 2,6,39,40,18
LOTTO ......... 2,7,9,22,29,42,5


Arrest Record


Temporarily closing for a


WHOLE NEW LOOK

October 15 through 24,

the office of Dr. Romero

will be closed for remodeling
Please call the office to make any necessary arrangements.
We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

386-364-1211
Hours: Mon. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.; Fri. 8 a.m. -1 p.m.
1304 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL 617184


PAGE 2A


BRIEFLY

Carroll Family Reunion
The Carroll Family reunion will be held Sept. 18, at
Philadelphia Baptist Church Recreation hall, from 5 p.m.
until. Come and bring a covered dish and your favorite
dessert. Paper goods and drinks will be provided.
Come early and let's catch up on the family news. Call
386-776-1325 or 386-294-1168.

01' Time Tent Revival
Under The Oaks
Surrey Place Care Center, 110 S.E. Lee Avenue, Live
Oak, Florida
Sept. 27, 28, 29th 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
SPEAKERS Mon. - Pastor John Whittington,
Lighthouse Christian Tues. - Pastor Craig Williams, Live
Oak Church of Christ
Wed. - Pastor Willie Warren, Mt. Sinai Baptist Church
Praise & Worship Music each night! Refreshments
offered!
BRING YOUR OWN LAWN CHAIR & Worship with
US!
For more information contact Chaplain Lester Curry
364-5961.

Lafayette County Historical
Society meeting
The Lafayette County Historical Society Meetings are
held the 4th Thursday of every month at 7 pm at the
Library in Mayo. Please feel free to join us and bring
your historic pictures, documents and stories. If you have
any questions please email lafayettechs@gmail.com.
You can also find us on Facebook!

Clases de Ingles
Gratis
Clases empiesan el 9 de Septiembre, 2010
cada lunes yjueves, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Maestra Felicia Doty
y el equipo
Todas las classes van estar en la Iglesia Episcopal, San
Lukas, 1391 SW llth St. (Se encuentra la Iglesia en
frente del hospital en Live Oak.) Call Phyllis Doty @
386-249-0096 for more information.

The Melody Wildcat Baseball
Team is having fund raiser
(car wash)
September 11, 2010 9:00 am - 2:00 pm First Federal
Savings Bank
US 129 (Across from Walt's) Minimum $5.00 COME
OUT AND SUPPORT THE MELODY WILDCATS!!!

School Advisory Council
meeting
The next meeting of the School Advisory Council for
Suwannee High School will be Thursday, September 9,
2010, at 6 p.m. It will be held in the Student Activities
Room at the high school. All interested students, parents,
teachers and community members that would like to
participate and become involved in Suwannee High
School are invited to attend.

Annual Trash
and Treasure Sale
Woman's Club of Live Oak: sponsor
Event: Annual Trash and Treasure Sale - and - Bake
Sale
When: September 23 and 24 from 9:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Location: Club House near the Coliseum, 1308 11th
Street SW, Live Oak
The Woman's Club of Live Oak meets: 1st Friday of
each month. Please call Susan Baan: 776-2264.

Archeological Discovery
at Camp Weed
A program about an archeological discovery at Camp
Weed near Live Oak will be presented on September 11,
at 10am at Camp Weed. First contact in Suwannee
County between Europeans and indigenous people
occurred on September 12, 1539. A great program for all
ages, home schoolers welcome. Program fee includes
lunch. To register go to www.diocesefl.org or call 386
364 5250.


lIAm










WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 3A


Colgate Country nen


Showdown



set for Friday at the Spirit


I


It's time for the WQHL
98.1/The Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park-
sponsored Colgate Country
Showdown contest at the
SOSMP's Music Hall in
Live Oak. The winner
could go on to become
America's Best New Act in
Country Music and win
$100,000.
Two years ago Orlando
native Johnny Bulford won
the state title at the
SOSMP and went on to
win the $100,000 when he
beat out four other national
contestant winners at the
Ryman Auditorium in
Nashville to take the na-
tional title.
This one and only North
Florida contest begins Fri-
day at 7 p.m. in the Music
Hall with 23 contestants
hoping to win and move on
to the state finals in the
fall. Contestants are Ashley
Briggs, Ft. Lauderdale;
Jamie O'Steen, Palatka;
Aaron Simmons, Pensaco-
la; Sue Ann Karam, Or-
ange Park; Buddy Brown,
Ocoee; Ivy Barrett, Cele-
bration; Dow Young,
Mayo; Amber Lee Abbott,
Madison; Keith Clark,
Palm Bay; Chloe Channell,
Pace; Savanna Ward,
O'Brien; Natalie Nicole
Green, Gainesville; Craig
Colby, Jenifer Ford, both
of Lake City; Laura
Hodges, Bryan Wain-
wright, Lauren Wain-
wright, Felisha Williams,
Gabrielle Buchanan and
the Noyes Boys (Jared &
Von), all of Live Oak; Ariel
Ratliff, Sierra Jade
Williamson, both of Jasper;
and Amber Gilliard,
Nicholls, Ga; Contestant
registration for this event is
closed.
Local radio DJ and radio
personality Kevin Thomas
will be the emcee for this
huge event expected to fill
the Music Hall with eager
contestants, family, friends
and well wishers.




Free yoga

classes in

September
September is National
Yoga month and Suwannee
Health & Fitness is offer-
ing free yoga classes all
month long at the gym on
Tuesday and Thursday
nights at 6:30.


Area singer, song-
writer/musician Perrie
Kitching and also the Com-
mon Ground Band will
perform during breaks in
the contest.
The Showdown is open
to vocal and/or instrumen-
tal performers, individuals
or groups of up to seven
members who have not
performed on a record list-
ed in the national record
charts of Billboard, radio
and records or The Gavin.
A uniform judging system
on all levels of competition
ensures fairness. State fi-
nals will be held at Silver
Springs Resort Oct. 16
with the winner receiving
$1,000 in cash and the
right to advance to the
Southern Regionals. Five
regional winners from
across the US will get an
expense paid trip to
Nashville in January 2011
to compete for the national
title.
Despite its humble be-
ginning, the Colgate Coun-
try Showdown has become


Perrie Kitching.


Kickin' Kevin Thomas of WQHL 98.1.


a reliable source of rising
country music stars over
its 28-year history. Country
stars such as Garth Brooks,
Sara Evans and Brad Pais-
ley have competed in the


Colgate Country Show-
down.
Doors open at 5 p.m.
with the contest beginning
at 7 p.m. Come early for
best seating. Admission is


Awakening America sponsors

Cry Out, America

Observations set locally
and nationwide for Sept. 11
There will be prayer for America and for our local com-
munities, including our firefighters, from area pastors and
Ciu, and county officials. There will also be special mu-
Sic.
S For Suwannee and Hamilton residents, the event
is set for noon on Saturday, Sept. 11 at Millennium
Park, one block north of the Courthouse, in Live
Oak.
Bring small folding chairs and come early.
For Lafayette and Dixie counties, the event will
take place at Mayo Town Park on US 27.
In Columbia County, the meeting is at Olustee
Park by Courthouse. In Taylor County, folks will
gather at Forest Capital State Museum in Perry at
204 Forest Park Cr. off Hwy. 19-South/Alt.27 at 9:30 a.m.
For more information call Carol Hudgins, North Central
Coordinator, at 386-935-2997.


The Bayway Group, LLC VOTED LAKE CITY
B WA BEST OF THE BEST CARPET
BAIY W A Y CLEANER 2008
SERVICES
S Meeting The Needs Of Home And Industry Members of the IICRC
3 ROOMS & HALL 5 ROOMS & HALL
$7900 $11800
TILE CLEANING VISA
0 CHECKOUT OURWEBSITE FOR MORE SPECIAL
7 F OFFERS WWW.BAYWAYSERVICES.B IZ ICOmB
Fire & Water Restoration, Tile Cleaning, Scotchgard Protection, Cleaning Services,
Emergency Water Extraction & Drying
Tel:386-362-2244 / 386-755-6142
Al room 3ssq maxper room LRDR �cobo cowxt as 2 rooms, Notvhid with ar other offer Residenti . on. Offer expires 9/30/10
617194-F


$10 per person.
For more information
about overnight reserva-
tions, the Colgate Country
Showdown or any of the
exciting upcoming events
at the SOSMP such as
Jambando In The Park,
Fall Suwannee River Ju-
bilee, Mike Mullis and his
band, Herold White Band,
Stephen Combs and his
band, Malt Shoppe Memo-


ries Band, Magnolia Fest,
Big Engine Band, Suwan-
nee Spirit Kids Music
Camp, Bear Creek Music
and Art Festival, Raid on
the Suwannee Civil War
Re-enactment, Old Tyme
Farm Days and much
more, call the SOSMP at
386-364-1683, email spir-
it@musicliveshere.com or
go to the website at
www.musicliveshere.com.


WHEN: Tuesdays & Thursdays
WHAT TIME:
4-7 yrs 'Lil Stars 3:15 - 4:00
8-12 yrs Big Stars 4:00 - 4:45
WHERE: Suwannee Health &
Fitness -

HOW MUCH: Just $30/month
WITH WHOM: Jennifer
Barrington
WHY: Because we want you
ROCKING' and HEALTHY!


craze everyone's talking
about! Shake, Move, Rock,
and Slam to Latin and
International beats like
reggaeton, hip-hop, calypso,
cumbia, meringue, samba,
and more! You won't stop 'til
you drop
S----- r 2 .ks -------------


Present this coupon to your
instructor and get ready to
ROCK
28-F Expires 9/77/10


TABE TESTING


For Surgical


Technician


nd LPN



SUaWANNIEE-lt
I-IAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER i-
415 S.W. Pinewood Dr.
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-647-4200


THANK YOU,

SUWANNEE COUNTY!
I would like to thank all of the people that
voted for me in the primary election for
Suwannee County Judge. I was amazed at
the number of people that held signs, passed
out literature, and worked so hard. Some of
you I have known for years and others I had
just met. I also want to thank those that
allowed me to speak to them and were kind
enough to listen to my message. I am
grateful to my wife and family for their
support and understanding over the past
several months.

I congratulate all three of my opponents:
Gary Brown, and his campaign manager,
Dean Papapetrou; Lin Williams and his
campaign manager, Stan Posey; and, Todd
Kennon. I wish them all the best!

I am trying to get all of my signs removed as
quickly as possible. Many thanks to all of you
who have helped me. If you find any that I
have missed, please feel free to remove
them and dispose of them, or you can call
me and I will gladly pick them up. (Cell #
590-1172)

Suwannee County is blessed with thousands
of good citizens that love God and are
dealing with life's problems to the best of
their ability. I have met so many nice people.
May God bless you and this County!

Sincerely,
Alex Prins
Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Alex Prins, Candidate
for Suwannee County Judge619266-F
____________________________' ~ __________ 619266-F


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 3A


* weep oil iOCuIZI *C









WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


suwannee living


WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS


Ross - Flowers


z


F


-
Traci Celeste Long and Matthew Wayne Leschber.


Long, Leschber

to be married
Wayne and Donna Long are proud to announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Traci Celeste Long, to
Matthew Wayne Leschber (Matt), son of Ivan and Barbara
Leschber, of Taylor, Texas. Traci's maternal grandparents
are the late Billy and Beth Chastain, of Jacksonville. Her
paternal grandparents are Ovie Long and the late Kenneth
Long, of Live Oak. Matt is the grandson of Christina
Menning and the late Lee Roy W. Menning of Yoakum
and the late Ewald and Mamie Leschber of Taylor, Texas.
Traci is a graduate of Suwannee High School. She
earned a BS degree from the University of Florida and an-
other BS degree from Nova Southeastern University in a
Physician Assistant program. She is employed by Ed-
wards LifeSciences as a Project Manager of Procedural
Development, Transcatheter Heart Valve. She works in
cardiac surgery throughout the US and in foreign coun-
tries.
Matt graduated from SW Texas State University with a
BA in Mass Communication and Speech Communication.
He is a Real Estate Broker and is the sole owner of 1836
Realty of Austin, Texas.
Traci and Matt will be married in the White Room in St.
Augustine, Florida, on October 17, 2010, at 4:30 p.m.
Their wedding will be a small, intimate ceremony with
family and close friends. They will make their home in
Austin, Texas.
II I�


4,51-/ey


P 's Salon


PI's Solon


102 & 10-4 )Dmvling Ave., Live Oaik
386-330-2908 .


Clay and Debra Ross of Live Oak, Fla., announce the
upcoming marriage of their daughter, Cortney Leanne
Ross and Clenton Alex Flowers, son of Alex Flowers and
Michele Bell of Live Oak, Fla.
The wedding will be Saturday, October 2, 2010 at 2 p.m.
at Lake Louise, Live Oak, Fla. Officiating clergy will be
Rev. Tommy Brett. Reception to follow. All friends and
family welcome.


Cortney Leanne Ross and Clenton Alex Flowers


T
Rut
her
- fi
Chi


�I \

num i "i /;I - ": '

, \-



Kerri LeAnn Varner and Christopher Ryan Ratliff.
- Courtesy photo


Varner-Ratliff to

marry Sept. 18


Harvey and Faye Parsons
of Live Oak, Florida would
like to remind you of the
approaching marriage of
their daughter, Kerri
LeAnn Varner, to Christo-
pher Ryan Ratliff, son of
Barbara and Russell Little
of Lake City, Florida and
Randy Ratliff of Live Oak,
Florida.
The wedding is planned
for the 18th of September,
2010 at 6 p.m. at the PSC


Happy 90th V


birthday ?

Ruth Laura Meyer Ware
'he children, grandchildren and great grandchildren of
h Laura Meyer Ware, invited you to celebrate with us
ninetieth birthday on Sunday, September 12, 2010, two
ive o'clock in the afternoon at Pinemount Baptist
urch, US 129, McAlpin, Florida.


No gifts, please.



Classes de Ingles

Gratis


Clases empiesan el
9 de Septiembre, 2010
cada lunes y jueves
7-9 p.m.
Maestra Felicia Doty y el equipo

Todas las classes van estar en la
Iglesia Episcopal
San Lukas, 1391 SW 11th St.
(Se encuentra la Iglesia en frente del
hospital en Live Oak)

Call Phyllis Doty @ 386-249-0096
for more information

This program is sponsored by the
Suwannee Hamilton Technical Center
617456-F


Conference Center, White
Springs, Florida. Local in-
vitations were not sent. All
family and friends are invit-
ed.


Thomas

awarded a

Master of

Science in

Psychology


� A w " .....


Ruth Laura Meyer Ware

ASK DR. MANTOOTH

Q: What is leukoplakia?
A: Whitish in color, leukoplakia is a thick
patch that can develop on the inside of
the cheeks or on the gum or tongue. It is
not easily scraped off. The patch is the
result of excessive cell growth triggered
by irritation from, say, an ill-fitting denture
or from a habit of biting the inside of a
cheek. Tobacco, whether smoked or
chewed, is also a main culprit in
development of leukoplakia. The danger
with leukoplakia is that it can progress to
cancer.
If you have the condition, your dentist
may want to take a biopsy - a sample of
tissue - for analysis. You can reduce your
changes of developing leukoplakia by
avoiding alcohol and tobacco and by
visiting your dentist regularly. As with any
type of cancer, early detection is critical
to avoiding a major problem.
Be on the lookout for any changes in your
mouth, including, but not limited to, any
rough spot, small eroded area, lump or a
sore that doesn't heal. Look also for
changes in color, like lesions that turn red
or white and be aware of any pain or
numbness in the mouth or lips, or trouble
swallowing, chewing or speaking. Talk
with your dentist for more information
about leukoplakia.
Presented as a service to the community by
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A.
Live Oak, FL
362-6556
(800) 829-6506


Priscilla Smart
Thomas


Priscilla Smart
Thomas, a graduate of
Suwannee High
School and Florida
State University, has
recently been awarded
a Master of Science in
Psychology with a
specialization in Edu-
cational Psychology
from Capella Univer-
sity.
Priscilla is currently
employed with Merid-
ian Behavioral ser-
vices as a counselor.
Pricilla is the
daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Smart, Jr.
and the granddaughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Leon
Ansley, Sr.


FURNITURE SHOWPLACE
1Tli /,h..,lir Sleep Distributors

US 90 West (Next To 84 Lumber) Lake City, 386-752-9303M


Q Why do I need to use
* primer before I paint?

P Iucl i .M r I J iuii|I, lI r o .,llhic.ii .crll .IcC
0 l1,61 1). 11111 1,1 011c'l 'C. 1 1 1 �ol'o r
plaster. They also cover marks, stains and repair work,
providing a clean, uniform surface for paint
application. Latex primers are ideal for most surfaces,
but in cases of extreme bleeding stains and smoke
damage, an oil-based primer may be required. Special
primers for interiors are formulated to provide
excellent holdout (sheen uniformity), while others are
formulated to prepare wood surfaces for painting
without raising the grain of the wood. A clean surface,
free of imperfections, provides the ideal foundation for
a beautiful paint job. Taking some time to prepare the
surface pays off in the end. For more information come
see the paint professionals at Live Oak Paint &
Flooring.

1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066
617192-F


WEDDING REMINDER


to marry uct.


" 'S " South Oaks Square Location: 1520 S. Ohio (386) 362-2591
S Medical Equipment Div: (386) 362-4404
Hours: 8:30 am-6:30 PM Mon-Fri.,
8:30 am-3:00 pm Sat.
by Kathy Fletcher, PharmD Drive-up window

How to Prevent Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis is a condition of weakened bones. Low levels of certain
minerals in the body, such as calcium and phosphorous, can lead to
the condition. This condition typically appears later in life. Persons
over 40 years of age are at an increased risk. Although women are
more commonly diagnosed with osteoporosis, both women and men
may be affected. Tobacco or alcohol use also may increase the risk of
developing osteoporosis.
Bisphosphonates used for the treatment of osteoporosis include
alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate - .. .. i I i h.. Li ii (Actonel),
and zoledronic acid (Zometa). Bisphosphonates reduce bone
resorption and increase bone mineral density and strength. These
medications work to reduce the risk of fractures. Raloxifene (Evista)
is another medication that may be prescribed for women with
osteoporosis who are unable to take bisphosphonates. Raloxifene is a
selective estrogen receptor modulator that works to prevent bone loss
by mimicking some actions of estrogen. Adults should obtain 1,000
to 1,500 mg calcium each day, along with vitamin D, as a preventive
measure against the development of osteoporosis. A healthy diet and
regular physical activity are also recommended for the prevention of
osteoporosis and promotion of bone health. 617197-F
617197-F


PAGE 4A


S(e 1/


f


I
�I;











WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 5A


Jeanette Roberts
August 6, 1922 -
September 1, 2010


Wellborn, Fla.
passed away on
Wednesday, Sep-
tember 1, 2010 after a long
illness.
The Ocilla, Ga. native
moved to Wellborn in 1958
from Ocilla. She was a
member of Crawford Lake
Primitive Baptist Church in
McAlpin, Fla.
Mrs. Roberts is survived
by her daughter Alicia and
Tony Hillhouse, Live Oak,
Fla.; two sons, Dennis and
Mickey Roberts, Wellborn,
Fla. and Daryl and Melanie
Roberts, Live Oak, Fla.;
one brother, Oswald Harp-
er, Tennessee; eight grand-
children; six great-grand-
children and one great-
great-grandchild.
Services will be held at 1
a.m. Saturday, September
4, 2010 at Crawford Lake
Primitive Baptist Church
with Elder Wendell Horton
and Elder Herman Griffin
officiating. Interment will
follow in Crawford Lake
Cemetery.
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc., Live
Oak & Branford, Fla. in
charge of all arrangements.


David Ring
March 31, 1975 -
September 3, 2010


avid Ring, 35, of
Live Oak, Fla.
passed away
suddenly on Friday, Sep-
tember 3, 2010. David
resided in Live Oak for the
past 25 years coming from
Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
David was an avid Miami
Dolphins and Gator fan.
David is survived by his
father and mother, Alan
and Sandy Ring, Live Oak,
Florida; twin sons Jake and
Jared Carter-Ring, Fort


Lauderdale, Florida; broth-
er Jeremy Ring, Live Oak,
Florida; sister Mandy Ring,
Live Oak, Florida; paternal
grandmother Ruby Ring,
Live Oak, Florida; a very
special friend, Sarah; won-
derful aunt and uncle, Fran
and Dave McCartney, Can-
ton, Ga.; a great uncle,
Bill Laird, Live Oak, Fla.;
another great uncle, Bob
Abernathy, Fort Laud-
erdale, Florida; a very, very
special niece and nephew,
Savannah and Tanner, Live
Oak, Fla.; very special
cousin, Cody McCartney,
Savannah, Ga.; aunt Kay
Gambill, Fayetteville,
N.C.; aunt and uncle Karen
and Marti Martin, Enter-
prise, Ala.; plus many
cousins and friends. Visi-
tation with the family was
Tuesday evening, Septem-
ber 7, 2010 from 5 p.m. to
7 p.m. at Daniels Funeral
Home, Live Oak, Florida;
Graveside services will be
held on Wednesday, Sep-
tember 8, 2010 at 10 a.m.
at Pinegrove Methodist
Church, Live Oak, Florida.
In lieu of flowers a memor-
ial fund will be set up at
Mercantile Bank, 535 S
Ohio Ave, Live Oak, Flori-
da, for David's son's Jake
and Jared Carter-Ring.
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc., Live
Oak & Branford, Fla.

Elsie O'steen Courson
September 23, 1928 -
September 5, 2010

SIsie O'Steen Cour-
son, 81, Live Oak,
O Fla. passed away
on Sunday, September 5,
2010 in the Suwannee Val-
ley Care Center after a
long illness. The Mayo,
Florida native moved to
Live Oak one year ago
from Providence, Fla. Mrs.
Courson was a member of
the Old Providence Baptist
Church, Providence, Fla.
She is survived by two
daughters, Valerie Dun-
can(Ricky) and Katherine
Copland both of Live Oak,
Fla.; four sons, Claude
Zukowski(Joanne), South
Carolina, Larry Zukowski,
Providence, Fla., Lanny
Courson, Atlanta, Ga. and
Wayne Courson (Alice)
Orlando, Fla.; one sister,
Dovie Jackson, Palm Har-


Moses Car Wash
Under New Management

t~~$ t


bor, Fla.; two brothers: Al-
bert O'Steen, Live Oak,
Fla. and George O'Steen,
Moultrie, Ga.; thirteen
grandchildren, twenty-five
great-grandchildren and
numerous nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be
held 2 p.m. Wednesday,
September 8, 2010 in the
Midway Baptist Church,
Branford, Fla. with Rev.
Lynwood Walters officiat-
ing. Interment will follow
in the church cemetery.
Daniels Funeral Homes
& Crematory, Inc., Live
Oak & Branford, Fla. in
charge of all arrangements.

Betty J. Wolf
September 3, 2010

S i rs. Betty J.
Wolf, 88, went
home to be
with her Lord and Savior
on Friday, September 3,
2010 after an extended ill-
ness. Mrs. Wolf had lived
in Suwannee County for
the past 36 years having
moved here from Jack-
sonville, Fla. She was the
daughter of the late Elisha
and Hazel Nolan. She was
a loving mother and grand-
mother who in her spare
time enjoyed gardening,
walking and backpacking,
but mostly she devoted her
life to the care of her fami-
ly. She was a member of
the Full Gospel Melody
Christian Life Center.
She is preceded in death
by her husband of 58
years, Kingston Grant
Wolf.
She is survived by her
daughters, Mary Anne
(Richard) Coates, Pamela
Jean (Thomas) Marshall &
Peggy Lynn (Edward)
Amaya all of Wellborn,
Fla.; brother, Dr. Robert
Nolan of Plantation, Fla.;
sister, Joanne Raye Nolan
of Wellborn, Fla.; grand-
children Todd (Patti) Byrd


of Tampa, Fla., Kevin (Ch-
asity) Byrd of N.C., Mi-
randa Amaya of Wellborn,
Fla. and Tommy (Nikki)
Vedilago of Okla.; great
grandchildren Natalie Byrd
of Tampa, Fla., Amanda
Byrd of Mulberry, Fla. and
Mikael Byrd of N.C.
Visitation with the fami-
ly will be Saturday, Sep-
tember 11, 2010 at the Full
Gospel Melody Christian
Life Center from 1 p.m.
until 3 p.m. In lieu of
flowers the family asks
that donations be made in
her honor specifically to
the Suwannee Valley Care
Center Facility (Haven
Hospice) at 6037 U.S.
Hwy 90 West Lake City,
FL 32055. Gateway-Forest
Lawn Funeral Home 3596
U.S. Hwy 441 S. Lake
City, FL 32025 386-752-
1954.

Lawanna Case
Burlingame
April 17, 1953 -
September 5, 2010

J rs. Lawanna Case
Burlingame, born
April 17, 1953,
died on Septem-
ber 5, 2010 in the Suwan-
nee Valley Care Center af-
ter a brief illness. She was
the daughter of the late
Dewey and Callie Fennell
of McAlpin, Fla.
She is survived by her
husband, Mark
Burlingame; sisters,
Shirley (Jim) Giebeig
and Faye Ridge, both of
Lake City, Fla., Barbara
(Dave) Parks of McAlpin,
Fla., and Marilyn (Bob)
Kasno of Salem, S.C.;
brothers, James (Bonnie)
Fennell of McAlpin, Fla.
and Lee (Joyce) Fennell of
Bowling Green, Fla.; sev-
eral nieces and nephews
also survive.
Memorial services will
be held at 11 a.m., on Fri-
day, September 10, 2010 at


the Suwannee Valley Care
Center (Haven Hospice)
Chapel. In lieu of flowers
the family asks that dona-
tions in her memory be
made specifically to the
Suwannee Valley Care
Center 6037 U.S. Hwy 90
West Lake City, FL 32055
Gateway-Forest Lawn Fu-
neral Home 3596 U.S.
Hwy 441 S. Lake City, FL
32025, 386-752-1954.

Helen Eloise Lewis
September 6, 2010

}( elen Eloise
Lewis passed
SH away September
6 at N. FL Special Care
Center.
Eloise was a Past Wor-
thy Matron of the Eastern


Star, a member of the
Gainesville Women's Club,
DAR, UDC, Society of
Southern Dames, Court of
Honor, Gainesville Garden
Club.
Survivors include her
husband, Ralph H. Lewis,
grandson, Brett Harrison
of San Francisco, and fam-
ily and friends.
Visitation at Milam Fu-
neral Home, Wed., Sept. 8,
5-7 pm. Funeral services at
Milam Funeral Home,
Thurs., Sept. 9 at 10 am.
Burial at Florida Nat'l
Cemetery in Bushnell.
Arrangements are under
the care of Milam Funeral
and Cremation Services,
311 S. Main St,
Gainesville, FL, 352-376-
5361.


Tax Collector representative

in Dowling Park

The Suwannee County Tax Collector's Office is in
Dowling Park the 1st Thursday of each month from 9
a.m. - 5 p.m. and can process vehicle and vessel registra-
tions, title work and real estate taxes. Come to the Vil-
lage Square in the Professional Offices.


Learn to

Square Dance!

It's Fun.... meet new friends, get great exercise!
Beginner lessons starting Thursday evening, Sept. 16,
2010 at 7 p.m. with the Vagabond Squares.Dancing at the
Hale Community Center, 215 NE Duval (across from the
fire station) in Live Oak, Florida. Caller: Ralph Beekman.
For information call 752-2544 or 638-0144.
The first night is FREE, so come check it out.



WITH GOD ALL THINGS

ARE POSSIBLE!!!!









IA







My family and I would like to express our heartfelt
gratitude & appreciation for your vote and support on
our election for county commissioner. We would like
to thank the many people for their encouragement
and positive reinforcement throughout the campaign.
I promise to be available and interested in
everyone's concerns and needs for the next four
years. I want to continue the theme of
"Your family, My family, one Family!"
Paid Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved By Clyde Fleming


ROBBIE'S


CAFE


Specials Daily


386-330-2825
Tuesday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Sunday 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
803 Pinewood Dr., Live Oak
(In old Winn Dixie Plaza) 619020-F


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5A











PAGE 6A U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


Viewpoints/Opinions


MYRA C. REGAN ROBERT BRIDGES
Publisher Editor
Members of the Suwannee Democrat
editorial board are Myra C. Regan, publisher,
and Robert Bridges, editor. Our View, which
appears in Friday editions of the
Democrat, is formed by that board.


THE SUWANNEE SCRIBBLER


The strange


odyssey of


Gus Potsdamer

By Jim Holmes
I think it is fair to say that Gus Potsdamer was
not a likely man to serve as the sheriff of Suwannee
County, or for that matter any small southern com-
munity in the late 1800s. After all, he was a Jew
at a time when strong anti-Semitic views were the
norm among America's Christian majority.
Oh, and then there was that other little thing in
his background. Gus was also a convicted murder-
er.
Back in 1880, Gus Potsdamer was a respected
resident of neighboring Columbia County ... so
much so that Lake City residents hired him as town
marshal. Now back in Florida's pioneering days,
the position of town marshal was frequently
ridiculed by the elected sheriff, who considered the
person doing the job little more than a night watch-
man. After all, the marshal's primary responsibil-
ities -- other than locking up the occasional drunk -
- consisted of lighting and extinguishing his town's
street lights and making sure that smudge pots --
used to keep mosquitoes somewhat at bay -- didn't
accidentally ignite a destructive fire in communi-
ties, which back then were primarily built of wood.
The distain Florida's sheriffs often demonstrated
toward the state's numerous town marshals fre-
quently meant the existence of "bad blood" be-
tween the people who held the two offices.
According to the book, Florida Sheriffs; A Histo-
ry: 1821-1945, such bad blood turned deadly in
Lake City on January 27, 1880. We don't know
many details, but we do know that on that date, Gus
and Sheriff John C. Henry got into an argument,
which escalated into a fistfight, resulting in the
sheriff reportedly pulling his revolver and beating
Gus with it. Gus then pulled his weapon and fired.
In the ensuing trial, Gus Potsdamer was convict-
ed of first degree murder, but was sentenced to life
imprisonment rather than hanging. That was be-
cause the jury -- considering the circumstances --
had recommended the defendant be shown "mer-
cy."
Potsdamer was then transported to Live Oak,
where he was to spend the rest of his life at hard la-
bor in the now infamous prison camp commonly
known as Sing-Sing, situated about four miles
south of town. He did not make the journey to Live
Oak alone, but was accompanied by a small legion
of friends, who were concerned that angry allies of
the deceased sheriff might yet figure out a way to
execute Gus. After all, prisoners had been known
to "try and escape."
Gus's incarceration at Sing-Sing was relatively
brief ... only about a month long. An appeal was
filed on his behalf and he was released until the
Florida Supreme Court could hear his case. When
it did, however, it ruled against him and Potsdamer
was ordered back to the prison camp.
Undaunted, Gus's many friends then launched a
vigorous campaign to get Governor Edward A. Per-
ry to pardon their friend and it wasn't long before
they accomplished their mission. After reviewing
the case, Perry ruled that the deadly fight was "a
mutual conflict" and thus Gus should be set free.
While he initially returned to Columbia County,
Gus ended up moving to Live Oak, where he even-
tually became as respected as he previously had
been in Lake City. In fact, his popularity was such
that he was elected Suwannee County Sheriff in
1889. In all, Gus would eventually serve in that ca-
pacity for three different terms...his last ending in
1914.
Jim Holmes lives in Live Oak.


BIBLE VERSE
"We proclaim him, admonishing and
teaching everyone with all wisdom,
so that we may present everyone
perfect in Christ."
- Colossians 1:28

Please address letters to: Letters To
The Editor, Suwannee Democrat,
PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.
Please include your full name, address and daytime


phone number. We ask this so we can verify your letter
and discuss any questions about it with you.


FROM OUR READERS


ouwannrr


hrmnorat


To the Editor:

Re: your editorial of September 3, 2010 on improving
education
Many, many teachers put a great deal of effort in the
classroom, and some are very successful in having the
students learn! However, no matter how much effort is
applied, some students don't learn. My hats off to these
teachers! I commend them for their knowledge, skills
and abilities!
Many of the challenges in the classroom are a result
from the student's environment outside of the classroom.
Eliminating, or at least reducing, the adverse influences
from the outside is one heck of a challenge to those in the
public education program.
When talking about improving public education, I see
very little discussion about augmenting these efforts in
the classroom with like efforts within the students' homes
and with direct efforts by their parents. I suggest that
whenever grades, not averages, go below a "B," the
teacher, the school or the school system should initiate a
dialog with the parents. Continued poor performance
could generate a 'individual educational plan' (IEP) for
the school, the student and the parents. Whenever possi-
ble, involve both parents, not just the 'custodial' parent.
Of course, classroom efforts in middle-school math
classes, et al., might improve if some of the math teach-
ers were to stop giving A's solely for effort. Awarding
100's for Adequate-Daily-Progress (ADP) undermines
the educational process as well as possibly raising the stu-
dent's grade-point-average by one or two letters. When
the ADP is weighted at 10%, there could be a one-letter-
grade rise. When the ADP is weighted at 20%, there
could be a two-letter-grade rise. So, a student's "C" in
math could actually have been an "F," if it were not for
this un-eared award. Parents, don't look at the grade-
point average. Instead, look at the individual grades for
tests and quizzes.
Also, I'd like to know how a student's education is en-
hanced by receiving 'extra credit' for bringing/donating
copy paper, hand sanitizer, etc. to a class. The students
are basically told they can buy a higher grade than they
deserve. Isn't that nice!?
Parents, ask your children how his/her teachers present
the daily lessons. Does the teacher merely sit at his/her
desk reading the lesson plan while the students are sup-
posed to read the lesson from the only-one television lo-


GUEST COMMENTARY


Hey fellow, my feelings aren't hurt


By Dwain Walden .
The other day someone wrote to
the Rants and Raves section of our
newspaper and declared that I was
not intellectual enough to write
columns about politics. For the ,
record, my feelings are not hurt.
You know, whoever said that
may be absolutely right. But let me
state right up front that I've never
claimed to be an intellectual. Back
in philosophy class at Georgia State University, I could-
n't keep my pipe lit. And I burned holes in my ties and
shirts. So I gave up the pipe. I just thought that deep
thinkers smoked pipes. Maybe that was the first sign that
I wasn't intellectual. Maybe I was learning to read the
smoke signals.
One day our philosophy professor asked the famous
question, "Who am I and what am I doing here?"
My response was, "Hello, I'm Dwain Walden. I want a
degree in something so that I don't have to climb up in to-
bacco barns at four o'clock in the morning and have sand
pour down the back of my shirt. And if at all possible, I
would like to stay away from Vietnam."
The professor just stared at me for a moment. I thought
at the time I was talking over his head. He said he didn't
know anything about tobacco barns, but he felt my com-
ment about Vietnam was valid. And since I got my name
right, I said to myself, "Hey, two out of three ain't bad."
When I graduated from high school, I thought I was
pretty smart. And in college I held the same high opinion
of myself just short of genius. I felt I had many answers
to many questions. But now, after all these years, not only
do I not claim to have all the answers, on many days I'm
not even sure what the questions are.


So let me sum up this little commentary with some
observations I have made in the venue of politics -
some of them I have stated before in my scribbling
which may not qualify me as a political pundit but per-
haps it's hand grenade close. And I'm not pretending to
be intellectual in stating them. It's just stuff I've no-
ticed. They include:
* The difference between "pork barrel" and "godsend"
is the county line. If they got it, it's obviously pork bar-
rel. If we got it, it was justified, sanctified and glorified.
* We're all liberal and we're all conservative. It all de-
pends on whether it's our ox in the ditch and the price of
oxen on that day.
* Term limits means i iIi after I get mine."
* "Kick the bums out" means all the bums except ours.
* Political forum means "submit your questions in ad-
vance, and we'll answer what we damn well please."
* "Thinking outside the box" means that what we're
doing now ain't working.
* "Strategy session" generally means "shoot in the
creek long enough and you're bound to hit a fish."
Maybe I don't write about politics much because I've
learned to tune politicians out. I have to be careful with
that skill, however. It can get too broad based. My wife
tells me I don't listen to a thing she says. At least I think
that's what she said.
So if someone has decided that I'm not intellectual, I
can live with that.
Maybe I've found a happy medium ... somewhere be-
tween a tobacco barn and Plato.
By the way, did Plato and Socrates have real jobs? I'm
pretty sure they didn't smoke pipes. Can you imagine
bur holes in one of those togas?
(Dwain Walden is editor/publisher of The Moultrie Ob-
server 985-4545. Email: i11,, 1i n,,1.i. i, 1* .',,ii,,. II .... 1,r)


cated at the front of the room? Does the teacher give the
students a pre-test ... which is the actual test with the
questions in a different order? Does the teacher allow the
students to sleep in class? Are the tests multiple-guess,
fill-in the blank, open-ended or discussion/essay type?
Each type requires a different depth of knowledge of the
subject matter, as well as a different level of time and ef-
fort in grading. Visit your student's classes during the
day once per month.
I'd like to see each school have video-taping capability
in each and every classroom, and randomly tape each
class at least once per week. Put the videos on YouTube
for public viewing! Boy, I bet there would be lots of
changes in the classroom by some teachers and students!
Is the new grading system, FOCUS, available to the
parents yet? I have not seen any information on how to
access it. It should be an automatic opt-in for both the
parents and students, with the ability for them to opt-out.

Sincerely,
Tom Burnett
Live Oak

The editorial to which this letter responds is available
online. Go to suwanneedemocrat.com and search for
"Gcrrin,g down to business."
- Editor


No Williams today

A

MINORITY
VIEW



� 2010 Creators Syndicate
BY WALTER WILLIAMS
Due to the Labor Day holiday, A Minority View
by Walter Williams arrived too late for the
Wednesday edition. Williams' column will appear
in Friday's paper instead.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


PAGE 6A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK










WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 7A


Branford rolls / Certain gets it done


Branford News

Serving southern Suwannee County, including Branford, O'Brien and McAlpin


O'BRIEN AND OUR
NEIGHBORS

'Bits & Pieces' from

south Suwannee Co.


By Ana Smith
With the way the economy
has been, and with just about
everyone I know having to
tighten their financial belts
even tighter, I had a fun week-
end at the flea market at the Co-
lumbia County fairgrounds last
weekend. I know the old cliche
is "one man's junk is another
man's treasure," but I had for-
gotten not only what great
"finds" are to be seen, but
also what fun and good, old
fashioned neighborliness can
be experienced at such a
venue. On this particular
weekend my friend Gail and I,
and another of her friends,
pooled our own items and had a
booth. A big part of the week-
end was talking with so many
interesting people who
were out for a fun morning, en-
joying finding those little sur-
prises and meeting new peo-
ple. If you are among the folks
who visit this particular flea
market on the weekends, I re-
mind you that there is plenty to
see inside the main building, as
well as all the open-air booths.
Part of that fun was running
into folks I haven't seen in a
while. A couple of my neigh-
bors stopped at our booth to say
hello, but for the life of me, I
cannot remember their names.
Next time I'll remember to
write them down! I did take
time to "wheel" around a cou-
ple of times, and at one booth I
found O'Brien resident Audrey
Howell, and we shared a few
minutes with the promise that
she would come and visit me
when she had some time in her
very busy life. Part of her very
active life is helping at the flea
market booth to benefit the
many community activities of
her church. Another who
stopped at our booth to say hel-
lo was Dr. Fritz Fountain, di-
rector of the Southern Baptist
Association in Live Oak and
his wife, Marie. Still another
was Roger Burnside, helping at
a booth that uses all the money
they make from donated items
to fund the free dinners they
provide the last Sunday of each
month at the community center
in Live Oak. He told me the
last dinner they served more
than 250 people, (actually I
think it was more than 300) --
quite an accomplishment.
They have a booth here the 1st
or 2nd Sunday of the month
with items that have been do-
nated ... which is an ongoing
need ... to make the money to
buy the food to have those din-
ners. So if you have items you
want to donate, or if you would
like to make a money donation
to help, all would be greatly ap-
preciated. And Roger, sorry I
didn't get to go by your booth
to meet Pat and Joann Lynch,
the couple who initiated the
free dinners in Live Oak. I
hope to meet them sometime
soon.
Roger and I also talked about
the upcoming need for dona-
tions for "Toys For Kids," a
group that provides toys as well
as much needed clothing items
for needy children in the Bran-
ford area of Suwannee County
at Christmas, and food baskets
for those families that would
not be able to provide that spe-
cial Thanksgiving or Christmas
dinner that most of us get to en-
joy. It is not too early, folks, to


start planning to make organi-
zations like "Toys For Kids"
your charitable contribution for
the upcoming holidays. I'll
keep reminding you in this col-
umn in the weeks to come.
Roger's number is 386-935-
3343 for more information of
pickup/drop off of donated
items for either charitable
cause.
And isn't it nice, finally, to
have days with temperatures
"down" in the mid-80s and a
break from all the afternoon
thunderstorms? I hope I'll be
able to open all my windows
soon and let in that fresh air
without also letting in that hu-
mid heat! In talking with Mary
Goldsmith, former O'Brien res-
ident now living up in Ken-
tucky, she reminded me that it
has been months of extreme
heat up in her area and no rain
so that her grass ceased to grow
and has huge brown patches,
despite a sprinkler system. So
it's a case of be thankful for
what we have, right?
I promised Roger that I
would mention a family that is
in need of donations to help
pay medical bills for emer-
gency surgery on their 5-year-
old son who was badly mauled
by a dog while attending a
child's birthday party about two
weeks ago. The child is Dakota
Allen, son of Michael and Ash-
ley Allen of Branford. His face
was severely damaged, and ex-
tensive 4-hour surgery was per-
formed on Saturday, Aug. 28,
to repair as much of the dam-
age as possible. An account
has been set up in the family's
name at the Capitol City Bank
in Branford to help defray the
cost of this surgery because the
family has no insurance to cov-
er it. Dakota will turn 6 years
old this month, and he is doing
as well as can be expected, but
has a long recovery ahead of
him. There is the possibility of
more cosmetic surgery in the
future to repair the damage
done to his face. At this writing
I forgot to ask Roger if Dakota
was still in the hospital or at
home. We pray this little boy
will have a full recovery and
that all traces of surgery will be
greatly diminished quickly.
More quotes from Readers
Digest "Quotable Quotes":
"Acting is just a way of mak-
ing a living; the family is life."
-- Denzel Washington
"There's never enough time
to do all the nothing you
want." -- Calvin Hobbes
"A girl phoned me the other
day and said 'Come on over,
nobody's home.' I went over;
nobody was home!" -- Rodney
Dangerfield
"All men are not homeless,
but some men are home less
than others." -- Henny Young-
man
"Homes really are no more
than the people who live in
them." -- Nancy Reagan
"I still close my eyes and go
home ... I can always draw
from that!" -- Dolly Parton
"At every party there are two
kinds of people -- those who
want to go home and those who
don't. The trouble is, they are
usually married to each oth-
er." -- Ann Landers
Life is still wonderful, de-
spite what's going on all around
us! Make the most of yours!
God bless!


'Rally Day' at McAlpin




Advent Christian Church


McAlpin Advent Christian Church is located at
call the pastor at 386-658-1048.
- Courtesy photo

The McAlpin Advent Christian Church will
resume Sunday School by hosting a Rally Day
at 9:30 a.m., Sunday, Sept. 12. All classes will
meet in the sanctuary, under the direction of
Mrs. Barbara Bertolino, for a song fest of fa-
vorite Vacation Bible School choruses and
pledges to the American and Christian flags.
Following the rally opening, all students and
teachers will enjoy a snack breakfast in Fellow-
ship Hall. Teachers and students will have a
"get acquainted" time following the breakfast.
"We have classes for children of all ages and
two adult classes," noted Pastor Paul Bertolino.
A women's class will meet with Mrs. Donna
Bassett and a coed class will be team taught by
Pastor Mike Bassett and Rev. Ron Wong. The
older youth will meet with this class for the
opening bible lesson and then move to their





21st Brai


Century in Mini
The Bi
Church
Branford have a yu
day, Sept
The 21st CCLC Afterschool until noc
Program began on Monday in Catholic
Branford. 304 SE I
It goes from 3:15 to 6:15 ford. All
Monday through Thursday each the the B
week unless there is no regular Church N
day school for students. We will Branfc
also have several Saturdays Church N
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Unfortu- the secoi
nately, we will not provide month at
transportation this year due to restaurant
budget cuts. Any student inter- es are in
ested in a mentoring, tutoring, represent
and an enriched educational ex- BAICM
perience is invited to attend. For benevole
more information contact Karen commun
Koon at Branford High School vides fel
935-5615. municati


17214 89th


Road. For more information please


break out group.
"We're very fortunate to have such a gifted
teaching staff," Pastor Bertolino continued. "As
we continue to grow, ministry to our greater
McAlpin community is our priority."
The worship service will start at 10:45 a.m.
The evening fellowship time is 4:30 p.m. Both
youth groups, Junior and Senior, will meet at
that time and child care is provided.
There will be two adult studies. Dr. David
Dean and Rev. Ron Wong will team teach an
"Introduction to Christianity and the Advent
Christian Church," which will serve as a bap-
tism and membership class for those interested.
Pastor Bertolino will continue his evening class
on, "Lives Changed by the Gospel of Jesus
Christ; What Happens When God's People
Pray?"


nford Area Inter Church


istries plans yard sale


ranford Area Inter
Ministries will
ard sale on Satur-
t. 18 from 7 a.m.
in at the San Juan
Mission located at
'lant Ave. in Bran-
i proceeds will go
Iranford Area Inter
Ministries.
)rd Area Inter-
Ministries meets
nd Thursday of the
The Gathering
it. All area church-
vited to have a
tative present. The
ministers to the
:nt needs in the
ity as well as pro-
lowship and com-
on between the lo-


cal churches in our com-
munity.
Our annual activities in-
clude Christmas parade,
Easter sunrise service,
Thanksgiving community
service, and other events.
For more information con-
tact one of the participating
churches, or visit
www.baicm.org.


Pancake

Breakfast

Fundraiser
Ranchettes Vol. Fire
Department
O'Brien Station

When: Saturday, Sep-
tember 11, from 7 a.m. -
10 a.m.
Where: O'Brien Station
42 at 10121 N. CR 349,
O'Brien, Fla.

2 pancakes, 2 sausage,
orange juice or tea or hot
cocoa, $3 per plate.
Funds will be used to
purchase equipment and
maintenance.


The McAlpin Community
Club will kick off the Fall season
with an indoor "cookout" on
Monday, Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. Hot-
dogs and buns will be furnished;
members please bring
sides. (Home-made ice cream


will be welcomed.)
We hope all our members have
had a good summer and will re-
turn for the first meeting of the
season.
For info call Shirley Jones at
963-5357.


INDEX


Arrests ..............2A
Legal Notices .........3B
Obituaries ............ 5A


Sports .........
Suwannee Living
Viewpoint ......


. . . . . . B
..... 4A
..... 6A


HI 93 LO 73 Follow us on

PAGE 2B FACEBOOK


McAlpin Community

Club to meet


I PRS


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 7A












GARDENING TIPS FROM THE LIVE OAK GARDENING CLUB
The Live Oak Garden Club will be offering outstanding daffodil bulbs well suited for our growing area
during its fall plant sale Saturday morning, October 23, at their clubhouse located on CR 136 West
next to Shands Hospital. Can't come to the sale? Call 362-5995 to order.




Bulbs to plant in the fall


By Lucille Heinrich
There are many differ-
ent bulb plants that do
well in North Florida.
Most bulb plants are
perennials, which means
they will come up year af-
ter year to a gardener's
delight. This article will
concentrate on bulbs to
look for now because they
need to be planted in late
October or in November
(before first frost) to en-
sure lovely spring flowers.
Daffodils
In our growing area,
daffodils will be the first
to flower in the spring, in
fact, some as early as Feb-
ruary. There are many
different varieties of daf-
fodils that can be pur-
chased: some in different
hues of yellow, some pure
white and others filled
with orange-red or pink
cups. Some varieties are
large cupped, some are
early bloomers, some are
fragrant, some have petals
twisted like a pinwheel,
and others will bloom in
clusters. Be sure that
whatever type you select
are for Southern gardens.
Plant bulbs pointy-end up
in well-drained, enriched
soil at least six inches be-
low the ground. Once the
plants have bloomed, do
not cut off the foliage as
they are feeding the bulb
for the next growing sea-
son. After the daffodils
have bloomed, you can
over plant with annuals
such as zinnias to ensure
that you have color in this


area all during the grow-
ing season.
Alliums
Here is another exciting
plant that performs best
when planted in the fall!
These bulb plants are in
the onion family, and their
colorful clustered florets
in a globe-shape flower
are held high on a thick
stem. They bloom in a
wide range of colors in-
cluding shades of yellow,
white, pink, and purple,
and their sizes range from
inch-wide heads to volley-
ball-sized bloom clusters.
They like sun or partial
sun and bloom in late
spring. They are excellent
in dried arrangements.
They range in height from
short for rock gardens up
to giant four-foot plants!
They are drought tolerant,
attract butterflies, deer re-
sistant, and easy to grow.
To plant, make the hole
three inches deep and
twice the width of the
bulb (or the width of the
spade) to loosen the soil.
The planting location
should be sunny and well-
drained. Drop the bulb
into the hole with the fi-
brous portion of the bulb
facing down. The stem of
the plant will emerge from
the pointed top of the
bulb.
Lilies
Fall is a great time for
planting lilies. Lily
"bulbs" are actually tubers
composed of fleshy scales
and lack a protective cov-
ering. Unlike true bulb


flowers, they never go
completely dormant and
should be handled careful-
ly since they can dry out
quickly. It is a good idea
to place them with other
low plants which can pro-
vide shade for the bulb
and root system. Lilies


prefer to have their three times before first
blooms in the sun and frost. Always allow the
their roots in the shade, leaves on the stalk to turn
Prepare the soil with large yellow and fall off as part
amounts of organic matter of the lily's natural
or compost. Space them growth process. This en-
about a foot apart as they sures that the bulbous un-
will spread. After planti- derground part of the
ng, water well two or plant has gotten enough


nourishment and will
mean greater growth next
year. There are thousands
of lily varieties and hy-
brids on the market today.
Some of the most popular
varieties include Tiger
Lilies, Oriental Lilies, and
Trumpet Lilies.


Fall bazaar set for Tangles


Tired of the heat and can't wait for fall's cool breezes,
sights, smells and sounds? Then join the Tangles team Sat-
urday, Oct. 16, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. for their premier Fall
Bazaar. Ministry leaders Angie Lott and Vickie Bass, have
announced they've scheduled their first Fall Bazaar as a
fundraising event for Tangles, a Community Outreach for
Women.
"We are excited to announce a great opportunity for our
community to join us at Tangles for this first-time event.
Not only will we be introducing the Tangles Gals' line of
shabby chic furnishings and gifts, Shabby T, but we are
looking for vendors who have hand-crafted or quality
food items to sell," said Bass.
Added Lott, "If you have handmade items such as jew-
elry, quilts, hand-sewn dill Iill-i. Christmas or other holi-
day decor, artwork or any other original, unique creations,


we'd love to talk to you about participating."
They are also seeking vendors who sell heritage food
items such as homemade cakes and pies, jams, preserves,
kettle corn and traditional fall festival food. Vending ap-
plications can be obtained by e-mailing vlb55@msn.com.
If you are looking for a family atmosphere where you
can enjoy fall festivities and shopping among true hand-
crafted creations, you won't want to miss this day at Tan-
gles. Also scheduled is an auction of unique, custom items
(details to be announced in the near future). If you have
items to donate (such as furniture, accessories, gift items -
no clothing please) contact Vickie Bass (contact informa-
tion below).
Tangles launched its fall schedule last week with a
mini-concert by Kayla Thomas, of Nashville, Tennessee
and Rachel Butler, from Live Oak. Upcoming events in


addition to the Fall Bazaar include an evening of focus on
women's health, participation in Operation Christmas
Child, a Wonder Full World retreat, Christmas Open
House, and more to be announced.
Tangles is a community outreach open to women of all
denominations, races, ages, nationalities and back-
grounds. There is never a charge for any of the events or
programs at Tangles. The goals of Tangles include that
God will be glorified, that Christian women will have a
place to encourage each other in their walk with God and
that unsaved women will come to know Jesus.
All proceeds from this event benefit Tangles, a non-
profit organization. Tangles is located at 12986 Hwy. 90
West, ? mile past Wayne Frier Mobile Homes on the left.
For additional information call 386-590-1543 or e-mail
lottfam4@windstream.net or vlb55@msn.com


IW


Um


Byrd's Power Equipment
Sales & Service
All Makes & Models

HUSQVARNA.
Open Saturday 7 a.m. - 12 Noon

11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 44
7 a.m.-5 p.m.(386) 935-1544
Saturday 7 a.m. - Noon 570896-F


To advertise

your business
here, call

Rhonda at

386-362-1734
for more
information


GILCHRIST
BUILDING SUPPLY INC.


Serving the community
since 1979
Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.;
Sat. 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
\ www.gilchrist.doitbest.com


Ir&^ Hwy. 129 Bell, FL 617655-Fl


Good Fast Service From Our Deli
Pizza * Subs * Broaster Chicken'

(lt TIME

SAVER

PETRO
Western Union * Alltel Phone Bills
* Pay Electric Bill * Windstream Phone
Bills * Money Orders * Check Cashing
* Lottery * Fax Service * Color Copies


i NORTH FLORIDA Mo".-Fri.
8:30 am-6:00 pm
PHARMACY, ' ,
OF BRANFORD Sunday-Closed
Now accepting
Blue Cross Blue Shield
Health Options
Everything For Your Home Recovery
From Prescriptions to Medical Supplies

Cherry Lumbert 101 S.W. US Highway 27
Cherry umbert Branford, Florida 32008
Pharmacist 892-F (386) 935-6905







24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
SAutomatic Fuel Delivery Prompt Installation & Repair
SSafety Trained Professionals Easy Payment Plans
Our Business is
Customer Satisfaction 502 SUWANNEE AVE. SW * BRANFORD
,isml 386-935.1728
570891 -F


Mini-Storage
Large and Small Units
Reasonable
386-935-2122 386-935-0298
617658-F

CLASS "A" COLLISION INC.
"The Wrecksperts"
SSpecializing In Heavy Collisions
' Quality Guaranteed
. Insurance Preferred Shop
SUnibody & Frame Straightening
Major Credit Cards Accepted.



FREE ESTIMATES Shop 386-935-9334
TED or TERESA LAWRENCE Fa 386-935-0464
301 Suwannee Ave., P.O. Box 519 -
Branford, FL. 32008-0519 617666-F


570661-F


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


PAGE 8A


.~ '�













'Life in the Suwannee River Valley'


Science grant will ive local students a
chance to study local ecology



I... .jE,


In the classroom.


Science students in
Suwannee County will
have the distinct opportu-
nity to study the ecological
life along the Suwannee
River this school year.
With funds that have been
received through the En-
hancing Education
Through Technology
(EETT) Life in the Suwan-
nee River Valley (LISVR)
grant, science students will
participate in field labs de-
veloped by the Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion Agency (DEP).
Trained teachers will en-
sure that lesson plans meet
the standards for Gold Seal
Lesson Plans. As technol-
ogy is immersed in science
education, this year, stu-
dents will create: web
pages, newsletters,
brochures, public service
announcements, and re-
ports-both oral and writ-
ten. They will document
field labs through digital
journals, and they will also
create power point presen-
tations, and podcasts for
iTunes U to showcase their
work.
In July, over 30 teachers
from Suwannee County
teachers attended Florida's
Digital Educators Teaching
& Learning Institute. This
workshop prepared them
for the specific instruction-
al practice that is needed
to support the LISVR
grant. This training provid-
ed insight and instruction
on: copyright issues,
Google presentations,
iTunes, power points,
Word 2007, Microsoft
Word, Audacity, iMovie,
iPhoto, Windows Movie
Maker, Photoshop, Picasa,
Excel 2007, as well as data
entry & analysis through
various spreadsheet appli-
cations. Participating edu-
cators uploaded examples

1l3 h aice



REGISTER
NOW
Mon.-Thurs. 3 p.m.-7 p.m.

Call Beka
386-590-6261
614854-F


of their work to the Digital
Educator Program for
evaluation and feedback.
In order to implement
the field labs that focused
on water quality and water
conservation efforts a
group of science teachers
from Branford High
School, Suwannee Middle
School, and Suwannee
High School attended a
four day workshop pre-
sented by the DEP at the
Suwannee River State Park
in Live Oak and Ivey Park
in Branford. This informa-
tive training reviewed the
key principals of the
DEP's LIFE program,
which includes: Project
WET, The Water's Jour-
ney, and Investigative
LIFE Field Labs. These
labs focus on engaging the
students with questions,
and/or demonstrations,
while students explore en-
vironmental conditions and
explain what they observe.
These interactive ex-
changes allow students to
extend their knowledge as
they evaluate and discuss
their data. The teachers
who attended DEP's LIFE
training will take back
what they have learned to
their respective school
sites and facilitate teacher
training for their col-
leagues. Suwannee County
is the 17th county in the
state of Florida to join the
DEP's LIFE program.
If your community orga-


nization would like to host
an EETT presentation,
please contact one of the
following:
Katrina Raulerson,
Grant Coordinator, 647-
4045, kraulerson@suwan-
neeschools.org
Tammy Boggus, SHS
Lead Teacher, 647-4000,
tboggus@suwan-
neeschools.org
Danelle Bradow, BHS
Lead Teacher, 935-1231,
dbradow@suwan-
neeschools.org
Melissa Brinson, SMS
Lead Teacher, 647-4500,
mbrinson @ suwan-
neeschools.org

The EETT LISRV staff
extends a special thanks
to their supportive part-
ners, which include: De-
partment of Environmental
Protection, Suwannee
County Soil and Water
Conservation District,
Suwannee River State
Park, Suwannee River Wa-
ter Management, Farmers
Cooperative, Florida Insti-
tute of Technology, Scien-
tific Environmental Appli-
cations, Florida and the Is-
lands Regional Compre-
hensive Center, The
Suwannee Democrat,
Suwannee Resource Con-
servation and Develop-
ment Council, IFAS Uni-
versity of Florida, Shade
Tree Nursery and Suwan-
nee Farms.


SUWANNEE RIVER READINGS
Branford 2010


S . _. . .......J I . .



The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge
in Branford in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In
the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level.


9.57
9.56
9.51


Sept. 7,2010 9.51
Sponsored By:


SCAFF'SSupermarket
Branford 386-935-1527
617662-F


Sept. 1, 2010
Sept. 2, 2010
Sept. 3, 2010


9.63
9.62
9.59


Sept. 4, 2010
Sept. 5, 2010
Sept. 6, 2010


Preparing for an experiment.


On the banks of the Suwannee.
- Courtesy photos


The Woman's Club of Live Oak

will host


Trask, Treasure

Homewaace Boke So.e

Sept. 23 & 24 * 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Antique furniture, solid mahogany dining room table & chairs, cherry chest of drawers with
mirror, full set of golf clubs, tools, christening doll, vacuum cleaner, luggage, Christmas wreaths
& decorations, stuffed toys, end tables, cocktail table, clothes, bedding, tons of knickknacks
and statues, Limoges dinner plates (sell for $10-$45 on Ebay), jackets, plus lots more!
For more information call 776-2264 (No calls after 7 p.m.)|




Three Rivers Medical

Now Accepting Medicare, Medicaid and
Private Insurance Patients!


Chelation Therapy now

available.
Toxic heavy metals contribute to many chronic illnesses.
Detoxification (removal of the metals) has benefited
many of your neighbors and others in our community.
We have tested over 400 patients for metals and have
only found 4 with normal levels!
Come in for your free consultation today.

Three Rivers Medical

in Branford, FL at 208 NW Suwannee Ave.,
across from Capital City Bank.
Call 935-1607 for more information and appointment! I
zo


13


off


CITY vs. COUNTY CHILI COOK OFF

OCTOBER 23, 2010
It's time for the City vs. County Chili Cookoff sposnored by the Woman's Club
of Live Oak. This year's event will be held on Saturday, October 23, 2010.
The Cook Off will be held at Veterans Park during the Fall Festival. The event
will begin at 11 a.m. with judging at 11:30 a.m.
The public will be able to sample chili from 11:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. for a
nominal donation of $5 per person. Awards will be presented at 2 p.m.
Challenge Registration is $25 per team. This is a "People's Choice"
competition. There will also be a judges' award for each chili category,
as well as a showmanship award. Entrants are encouraged to use this as an
informational opportunity to promote their departments. Business cards,
brochures and other free materials may be distributed from your booth.
For more information call 776-2264, no calls after 7 p.m. 618752-F


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 9A











PAGE 1OA U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


On the



CAMPAIGN TRAIL


Steve Southerland, the Republican candi-
date for the District 2 congressional
seat currently held by Democrat Allen
Bovd, stopped in for a brief visit Friday
at our offices. Southerland wants to
rein in government spending, and
cialeie small business "the fastest, sure-
tire way to kickstart the economy."
Southerland defended himself against
attack ads by his opponent -- "Allen
Boyd is lying when he says Steve
Southerland is against Social Security
and Medicare" -- and called the federal
healthcare plan now in place un-
constitutional, though he
said it wasn't realistic to
expect its immediate
post-election repeal.
- Photo: Staff


Student tasered in


bus incident at SHS


Continued From Page 1A

pound, Roush said.
"She was asked to get off
the bus so that she could
cool down and someone
could talk to her from the
school," he said. "But, she
refused."
Malcolm Hines, dean of
students at SHS, was then
called to the scene.
Hines went to the very
last seat where the young
lady was sitting and asked
her to come off the bus but
again she refused, Roush
said.
"I came up, got on the
bus and tried to talk to her.
I repeatedly asked her to
exit the bus so that I could
talk with her, but she still
refused," the principal reit-
erated.
At that point, School Re-
source Officer Gary Ed-
wards, who assists with af-
ter-school traffic, came
over and proceeded to the
back of the bus and spoke
with the student, repeated-
ly asking her to get off the
bus, said Roush, who fol-
lowed Edwards back on
board.
"Again, she refused,"
Roush said.
Edwards then opened the
rear door of the bus and
students in the rear were
directed to the front.


"Officer David Crutch-
field, (SHS) resource offi-
cer, arrived and stood out-
side the rear of the bus,"
Roush said. "We tried to
give the student an oppor-
tunity to exit through the
back of the bus to save face
from the embarrassment of
having to exit up front be-
tween her peers. She still
refused, became repeatedly
agitated, and began using
profanity at Officer Ed-
wards," Roush said.
As the student became
increasingly upset, Ed-
wards asked her to "turn
around and put her hands
behind her back, and she
still refused," Roush said.
Edwards then reached
for her arm and she became
physically aggressive as he
moved her out the rear of
the bus down toward
Crutchfield, Roush said.
"As her feet hit the
ground, she began a physi-
cal confrontation with Ed-
wards, Crutchfield and
Dean Alan Bond, who were
all trying to subdue her.
She struck Crutchfield in
the temple, at which point,
he chose to utilize his
taser."
Scott Pfender, director of
transportation for Suwan-
nee County schools, who
was at the scene, witnessed
the incident. He said,


Photos galore
Click on photo gallery at
www.suwanneedemocrat.com and
it will lead you to photos taken by
Democrat photographers. Local
events and local people are
generally featured. You may even
be there. Check it out! The photos
are available for purchase too.
571105-F


"somewhere among all
that, I heard the taser go
off, and she just stood
there."
The student was then es-
corted into a patrol vehicle
after nearly 20 minutes of
conflict, said Roush, who
was disturbed about the sit-
uation as he spoke Monday
morning.
"These situations are
very unfortunate but obvi-
ously when a student or an
adult in school or in regular
society become aggressive
and attempt to batter a per-
son or a law enforcement
officer -- there is no other
choice," he said.
To students who had to
witness the situation and
parents who showed con-
cern, Roush said, "While
unfortunate that any stu-
dent must witness another
in distress, this can be
seen as a learning experi-
ence to anyone for what
can happen when you
don't obey a legal and
lawful order by a law en-
forcement officer."
Neither Crutchfield nor
Edwards was available for
comment, and Hines de-
clined comment. The
school did not release the
name of the student in-
volved, a minor, nor con-
tact information for her
guardian.


All Students Can







An educational program by ACHIEVE of Suwannee, Inc.
12168 148th Terrace, Live Oak, FL 32060 (386) 362-6134
Email: achievesuwannee@yahoo.com




FREE TUTORING

Achieve is offering 33 hours of free

after school tutoring. We have certified

teachers and Achieve has served

Suwannee County for 6 years.

386-362-6134
*Your child may qualify for free tutoring if your child is eligible for free or reduced lunchAND attends an eligible Title I school If parental
. i ... ...... ,,.hool District will serve the students with the greatest need 4
S ".1. ....or endorse any particular supplemental services (SES) provider


Plea deal rejected



in Wellborn arson


:I
L.SF


Continued From Page 1A

peared before a judge for a
second time Thursday to
be sentenced but was sent
back to jail once again to
await his fate.
Shayne Cooper-Olin,
19, charged with burglary
of a dwelling, grand theft
III, and arson, had a plea
deal struck down Thurs-
day by Third Circuit Judge
Julian E. Collins, who
called the ramifications of
the requested agreement
"unlawful."
Collins would not allow
Cooper-Olin to be given a
six-year maximum prison
sentence for arson charged
as a youthful offender, and
15 years probation for
burglary and grand-theft
charged as an adult. In ad-
dition to the charges of
burglary, theft and arson,
Cooper-Olin also faces
two other cases both in-
volving a count each of
burglary of a dwelling and
grand theft III all being
tried together,
"I'll tell you right up
front, I have a problem
with this 6-year D.O.C.
sentence on an arson
charge," said Collins to
State Attorney Kyle
McLeod and Assistant
Public Defender John
Hendrick. "This was a res-
idence, and though no one
was in the building at the
time of the fire, I'll tell
you I'm not inclined to ac-
cept this plea. So he may
withdraw at this time."
Cooper-Olin withdrew
his plea and was sent back
to the Suwannee County
Jail to await another day
in court.
"We could not get a
youthful offender plea in
this case because he owes
so much money," McLeod


later said outside the
courtroom. "He applied
for youthful offender be-
cause of his age."
Cooper-Olin, who was
18 at the time of his arrest,
faces paying upward of
$11,600 in restitution in
the latter two cases plus
the cost of the destroyed
building in the first.
Cooper-Olin's mother,
Diane Cooper, was in
court Thursday and
walked away upset at the
judge's refusal to accept
the plea.
"I don't think it's fair in
the first place that they of-
fered him two deals -- one
for youthful offender and
one as an adult, and now
that the judge has taken
that off the table, there's
no telling what he might
get," she said. "They gave
one of the other boys a
similar deal -- prison as a
youthful offender and pro-
bation as an adult, so why
not my son? Shayne came
here from Michigan in
June, and by November he
was in jail. He's a follow-
er and has never been a
leader. He's always been a
good kid -- a Christian --
and now because he got in
with some of the wrong
kids he's in this situation."
Hank Whisnant, the vic-
tim and state's witness,
whose decades of belong-
ings were both stolen and
burned, and whose work-
shop and home were de-
stroyed, arrived in court
ready to give a statement
Thursday, but his moment
never came.
"I'm a retired Army
veteran and a senior citi-
zen," said Whisnant out-
side the courtroom. "He
burned up all my medi-
cine, my clothes, many of
my tools, all the pictures


Woman leads police on seven-hour


chase along banks of the Suwannee


Continued From Page 1A

for an expired tag (Pope)
fled in vehicle from this of-
ficer," Kelly wrote in a re-
port.
Kelly chased Pope for
about five or six miles near
152nd Street and 221st
Road in Luraville before
Pope stopped on a dead end
road.
"She then bailed out on
foot and ran into the
woods," Kelly wrote.
Around 10:40 a.m. K9
tracking units from Suwan-
nee and Hamilton Correc-
tional Institutions respond-
ed to the scene to search for
Pope.


After a seven-hour hunt
through woods, the banks
of the Suwannee River and
several homes, Pope was
found and detained by the
canine teams.
The officers of the K9
tracking units included Sgt.
John Morris, Sgt. Richard
Gamble and Correctional
Officer Jeremiah Carter ac-
companied by K9 officers
Witty and Pistol of Suwan-
nee CI.
Sgt. William Billingsley,
Correctional Officer Steve
Folsom and Correctional
Officer Allen Tolle, along
with K9 Officer Copper, all
of Hamilton CI, also partic-
ipated.


"Our Department of Cor-
rections canine officers
train hard and on many oc-
casions offer assistance at
the request of our local law
enforcement community,"
Suwannee CI Warden Mark
Redd said in a statement.
"We work closely together
to maintain public safety."
Pope was charged with
fleeing and eluding a law
enforcement officer, dri-
ving while license suspend-
ed second offense, resisting
without violence and viola-
tion of probation on the
original charge of manufac-
turing cannabis.
She was booked into the
Suwannee County Jail.


Surrey Place


Care Center


AS 6UO4t W HealthCARE Community


Qa"&# eaCcire aw "
we44&Wtwt*c u * t"e at (ume

110 SE Lee Ave., Live Oak, FL

386-364-5961
570633-F


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


PAGE 10A


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


of my wife who passed
away 40 years ago. Just
about all I had. I'm 69,
and they burned me out."
At a court date earlier
this year, Cooper-Olin
promised he would tell
Whisnant where some of
his missing belongings
had gone, hoping for le-
niency.
"When Hank went to
the Wellborn pawnshop
like (Cooper-Olin) said,
the owners said that none
of the items he mentioned
had been pawned there,"
said Wendell Snowden,
president of the Wellborn
Community Association --
the organization that
owned the burned build-
ing where Whisnant
resided.
"Furthermore, we com-
plained to McLeod that we
did not want to see a plea
agreement or a lighter sen-
tence, but both those op-
tions have been brought to
the table against our wish-
es," said Snowden, who is
not listed as a victim in the
case according to
McLeod.
McLeod said because
Cooper-Olin's arson case
is being tried together
with his other two cases
"in which the victims in
those cases mainly want to
see restitution, it's not as
cut an dried as Mr. Snow-
den makes it out to be, but
our office plans to contact
and have a meeting with
Mr. Whisnant and Mr.
Snowden on Tuesday
(Sept. 7)."
In the meantime, Coop-
er-Olin's attorney Hen-
drick plans to go back to
the drawing board con-
cerning the plea agree-
ment. A follow-up court
date for Cooper-Olin has
not been set.













SHCC honors local heroes


r

;1:
5
g
�:~
I

1


-' ~ ~ l;�;; � I *-


z -



k.


a -~ 9i

.3


-- ..


Suwannee Health Care Center paid tribute Tuesday morning to local heroes in the wake of Labor Day and on the cusp of Patriot Day (Sept. 11). The center recognized local leaders:
Mayor Sonny Nobles; Live Oak Police Chief Buddy Williams; Suwannee County Sheriff Tony Cameron (not present); Fire Chief Chad Croft, Live Oak Fire Department; members of the
269th Engineer Detachment; and SHCC honorary staff and residents. - Photo: Carnell Hawthorne Jr.




Suspect named in March shooting death of LO man


Continued From Page 1A

and use of a firearm during the commis-
sion of a felony.
Police found O'Hara in his room at 813
Hillman Avenue with a single gunshot
wound at on March 26 at about 11 p.m.
He died the next day at Shands UF
"On the first night working the case, we
were told he (Ware) was seen walking out


with a gun, but we could never verify it,"
said Shaw.
According to Shaw, other witnesses,
with no connection to either party, later
came forward to say Ware told them he
disposed of the gun.
The weapon, a 9MM Hi Point semiau-
tomatic pistol, was found in a local reten-
tion pond in June.
The Florida Department of Law En-


forcement lab in Tallahassee determined
the gun "matched evidence recovered
from the crime scene," according to a
press release from LOPD Det. Sgt. Ron
Shaw.
Ware, who has an extensive criminal
history, was booked into the Suwannee
County Jail.
Ware was sentenced to 15 years in
prison for 2nd degree murder in 1972,


three years for burglary and grand theft
auto in 1988, five years for burglary in
1992, two years for petty theft in 2000
and two years on drug charges in 2003.
Anyone having information concerning
this crime is asked to contact Live Oak
Police Department at 386-362-7463 ext.
232, or Suwannee County Crime Stop-
pers at 386-208-8477. Police say you can
remain anonymous.


IJp FU*14 "" h. e.) I.



Hey Kids! My name is Splash. My friends and I are called The Sandtastics, and we sure hope you'll join
us in VyStar's new Kids Club. It's all about making saving fun and easy. Whether you're saving for a new
bike or video game, a special pair of shoes or outfit, college or a car - you'll see that your dollars add up
quickly when you deposit them into your account. For ages 12 and under, look what you get when you join:


* An interest-bearing savings account * A passbook to keep track of
* A cnnrl . he & shar h.ank your savings


* Your very own membership card


* Free use of in-branch coin
counting machines


TheVyStar


ASK MOM OR DAD TO STOP BYYOUR LOCAL BRANCH AND SIGN YOU UP TODAY!*


FEATURING THE SANDTASTICSo


SCredit Union

We never forget that it's your money.

www.vystarcu.org


JACKSONVILLE AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES 904-777-6000
OUTSIDE OF JACKSONVILLE 1-800-445-6289
GAINESVILLE 352-372-1645 * LAKE CITY 386-719-6767
* PALM COAST 386-445-7079 * STARKE 904-368-9955


VyStar MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN TO ALL PEOPLE WHO LIVE OR WORK IN THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES:
Ala: hu * ~ker * BradIord * CIl', * Cluurnbhi * Du,. al Flagler * Gilchrist * Hamilton * Levy * Putnam * Marion * Nassau * St. Johns * Suwannee * Union *Vousia
'Important Note. To open an account, ,yu w ilt need a Child s birth certificate or certified copy AND social security card or state identification card. 2010VyStar Credit Union


LNbDER , NCUA


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 11A


k~



�~.;~r;
~�'

~tf



~sn,. ''"


==..


i"i~l


t":E.lll, - -
i""~
'^St 'it''"
.mm-'1-"""
1*, � , .


-AL







* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


1529 SE

SOhio Ave.

JH T LIVE OAK



THE BEST MEATS IN TOWN


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


Heavy Western Beef
T-BONE
STEAK OR
BONELESS
RIBEYE A


USDA Inspected Quick Frozen


CHICKEN
WINGS

$891
Ea.


5 LB. BAG


USDA Inspected Pork
SIRLOIN
ROAST (


$


0 Lb.


29


Fairgrounds Hillshire
HAM, SMOKEDTURKEY, SAUSAGE
OVEN ROAST TURKEY REG. POLISH
OR HONEY HAM OR BEEF


FUEL YOUR FAMILY FOR0LESS!


COUNTRY
CROCK
I mSnmi t SPREAD

^NT$W(i $969
S45 OZ.

PETER PAN
- PEANUT
BUTTER


KURTZ
WHOLE
KOSHER DILL
PICKLES


'-r**� * I - ' - V V

.. ifti
WYLWOOD I
HASH BROWN
PATTIES 40 OZ.

CHASE &
SANBORN
COFFEE


23
3 oz.

= cas GRANNY ELLA'S
. CINNAMON OR
HONEY
GRAHAMS

$|59
14.4

J. HIGGS
MINI TWISTS
TinOR STICK
PRETZELS

I12
oz


FREiSH;aROMOURPRODUiCEDEARTMENaTM


Honeydew Melons



Each


Sundia Fruit
Asst'd Varieties
(-7)(�)


Cups


8
oz.


Fresh Express
Salad Mix ,


It
12 oz.
Pkg.


OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8 A.M.
Quantity Right Reserved.


- 8 P.M.


We acce t USDA Food Stami s, Personal Checks, Debit/Credit Cards and WIC
IL -'E.THE ODFASHIONE A IYI,17188-F
e~g. - S S S * .6
I Io# I id'll=[o~u! A 3_ . ~]l~B A'/_


PAGE 12A


Heavy Western Boneless Beef


CHUCK
ROAST


N~ 3-C


. ASST. COBURN
FARMS BLOCK
- CHEESE

89Z
- ... 8 OZ.
..- ...f


* - L


_ WESTCOTT
' 'VEGETABLE
OIL

29
48
2 OZ.


O GINGER
EVANS
C!ic afd BISCUIT AND
,ak fd r BAKING MIX
�s $99
40
Hcrlurll] �h )~ HO Z.


I


kS i


% . 9 . m-


m m - .. H E. . A m 0 SA ... .AW&


6-1 ml









uuannere Bemoctrat What's happening
Section B at Corinth
Wednesday, September 8, 2010


Scoreboard
for Sept. 3


Suwannee
Hamilton


Branford 42
St. Francis 22


Madison
Fort White


Buchholz
Eastside


Trenton
Bronson


Dixie 35 Leon 26 Trinity 16 Hawthorne 26
Lafayette 21 Godby 7 Gainesville 9 Chiefland 21


Columbia
Brooks


Williston
PK Yonge


Union County
Ocala Forest


Newberry
Santa Fe


-*~ ~-;r
*.Av.


'4


Sloppy win


By Corey Davis
corey.davis@gaflnews.com

LIVE OAK-It wasn't pretty but Suwannee will
take it, after a near disastrous season opening
21-6 win over Hamilton County at Paul Langford
Stadium Friday.
Suwannee committed several penalties and
turnovers yet somehow escaped with another win
in the Battle of the Bridge rivalry.
Things looked promising early on for the Bull-
dogs after Greg Swinson returned the opening
kickoff 50 yards to the 39-yard line. However,
three plays later, a high snap sailed over quarter-
back Jackson Brown's head before Brown recov-
ered it 19 yards back at the fifty.
This was one of the many mistakes Suwannee
would make on the night as the 'Dogs racked up
18 penalties for 108 yards, accumulated four
turnovers and missed a chip shot field goal.
The good news: the defense bailed them out
several times and posted a shut out, the lone
points coming off an offense turnover.
Hamilton defensive back Gerald Bristol out
jumped wide receiver Andre Zanders to pick off
a Jackson Brown pass on their second posses-
sion.
One play later, Dontavius Hampton back from
an injury picked off a Deonte Simmons pass to
stall the Trojans drive.
Suwannee took advantage of the turnover and
turned it into points as Brown hit a wide open
Zanders across the middle for a 27-yard touch-
down pass giving the Bulldogs a 7-0 lead with
9:36 left in the second quarter.
Hamilton answered two possessions later as
Bristol scooped up a Swinson fumble and re-
turned it 25-yards for a score. However the PAT
was no good, cutting the lead to 7-6 with 1:57 re-
maining till halftime.
Suwannee took a one-point lead into half and
answered on its first possession of the second
half as Swinson walked in from 8-yards giving
the Bulldogs a 14-6 lead early in the third.
Following another Suwannee turnover, this
time a Derek Smith fumble, Swinson picked off
Simmons and returned it 25-yards for a score in-


creasing the lead to 21-6 with 4:34 left in the
third quarter.
Brown had a chance to put it away late in the
game but missed a 32-yard field goal with a low
liner kick.
Hamilton put together its only decent drive of
the night late in the game with under four min-
utes left in the game but a fourth down pass from
Simmons to Will Hill was dropped in the end-
zone.
Suwannee was able to run out the clock and
get the win despite the sloppy play.


Branford rolls


Cole Lamb


Kyle Stebbins


Kyle Stebbins


Kyle Certain and Kyle Stebbins combined for four touchdowns to
lead Branford (1-0) to a 42-22 win over St. Francis in their Big Ten
Conference opener.
Certain rushed for 161 yards on 24 carries and scored on runs of
3 and 8 yards, while Stebbins rushed 12 times for 74 yards, includ-
ing a scoring run of 21 yards.
Cole Lamb led the defense making two interceptions, returning
one for 38 yards and a score.
With the win, the Bucs improve to 4-0 all-time against the
Wolves and host Trenton this week in a non-conference and non-
district game.


Certain gets it done


By Corey Davis
corey.davis@gaflnews.com

Player of the Week
Branford senior athlete Kyle
Certain ran for 164 yards and 2
touchdowns on 24 carries to lead
the Bucs to a season opening win
over St. Francis.

Nominees
Jackson Brown-Suwannee se-
nior quarterback completed 15 of
29 passes for 139 yards and 1 TD


in the Bulldogs 21-6 win over
Hamilton.
Greg Swinson-Suwannee senior
tailback ran for 119 yards on 25
carries and also had a 25-yard in-
terception return for touchdown.
Andre Zanders-Suwannee se-
nior wide receiver stepped up big
for the offense with 8 catches for
89 yards and 1 touchdown.
Cole Lamb-Branford athlete
picked off two passes, returning
one for a touchdown, while scor-
ing another on offense.


Kyle Certain


\r^l














SPORTS


Prep




Roundup


Volleyball

Fort White def. Branford
Fort White (1-0) swept Branford
(0-10 in three straight sets 25-19,
25-18, 25-13 to win its season
opener Aug. 30 in Branford.
Leading the Indians was Kaycee
Baker with nine kills, Sarah
Stringfellow with 15 service points
and Allison Wrench with 22 assists.

Newberry def. Hamilton County
Newberry (1-0) swept Hamilton
County (0-1) in three straight sets
25-18, 25-22, 25-13 to win its
season opener Aug. 31 in Jasper.
Leading the Panthers was Taylor
Whitely with 18 service points and
Kailey Butler 17 service points and
seven assists.

St. Francis def. Branford
St. Francis (2-0) swept Branford
(0-2) in three straight sets 25-3, 25-
6, 25-10 in Branford. Leading the
Wolves are Megan Lee with 23
service points and 13 aces, Carson
Maris with 10 points, Sarah Rajaee
16 points and 17 assists and Jenny
Dugan with 10 kills.

Swimming
Suwannee traveled to Gainesville
recently to face PK. Yonge.
Despite being heavily
outnumbered, the men's team came
away with a 101-81 victory. The
girls put up a valiant effort as well,
but were defeated.

Golf
Suwannee boy's golf team took to
the links recently taking on
Branford and Union County. While
not playing their best they still
played hard and the long hours of
practice paid off. In the end, Alfer
Segura anchored a hard fought
effort, as Suwannee compiled a
four score total of 197 to sweep
both Branford (228) and Union
County (225).


Clearwater
Crestview
Daytona Beach
Fort Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Hollywood
Jacksonville
Key West
Lady Lake


t-storm
pt sunny
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm


National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver


pt sunny
t-storm
sunny
rain
t-storm


Lake City
Madison
Melbourne
Miami
N Smyrna Beach
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Plant City


Houston
Los Angeles
Miami
Minneapolis
New York


Sports





Calendar



KW *' -


Sept. 9
Volleyball
I.:ilayette at Hamilton County, 6
I icnton at Branford, 6:30
Ncwberry at Suwannee, 6:30
I oys Golf
Keystone Heights at Suwannee, 4
Girls Golf
Suwannee at Keystone Heights, 4

Sept. 10
Football
Trenton at Branford, 7:30
Oak Hall at Lafayette, 7:30
Madison County at Suwannee, 7:30
I liion County at Hamilton County, 7:30

Sept. 13
\' lleyball
I t irt White at Hamilton County, 6
I.:ilayette at Bell, 6
Si.anford at Dixie County, 6:30

Sept. 14
\' lleyball
.Ic Iferson County at Lafayette, 6
\niwannee at Santa Fe, 6:30

Sept. 15
\q lleyball
ian.mford at St. Francis, 6:30

Sept. 16
\q lleyball
N, rth Florida Christian at Hamilton
(', unty, 6
1.illahassee Maclay at Lafayette, 6
('i lumbia at Suwannee, 6:30
I )i\ie County at Branford,

Sept. 17
I ,otball
li.inford at Bishop Snyder, 7:30
St. Francis at Lafayette, 7:30
Suwannee at Fort White, 7:30
Hamilton County at University Christian,
7:30

Sept. 20
Volleyball
Hamilton County at Union County, 6
Lafayette at Madison County, 6
Suwannee at Branford, 6:30

Sept. 21
Volleyball
Hamilton County at Suwannee, 6:30
Lafayette at North Florida Christian, 6
Branford at Bronson, 6:30
Boys Golf
Suwannee at Keystone Heights, 4
Girls Golf
Keystone Heights at Suwannee, 4

Sept. 23
Volleyball
Madison County at Hamilton County, 6
Branford at Lafayette, 6
Suwannee at Williston, 6:30

Sept. 24
Football
Branford at Tallahassee Maclay, 7:30


Lafayette at Aucilla Christian, 7:30
Suwannee at Santa Fe, 7:30

Sept. 27
Volleyball
Suwannee at Lafayette, 6
Hawthorne at Branford, 6:30

Sept. 28
Volleyball
Hamilton County at Lafayette, 6
Suwannee at Newberry, 6:30

Sept. 30
Volleyball
Tallahassee Maclay at Hamilton County, 6
Fort White at Suwannee, 6
Branford at PK Yonge, 5

Oct. 1
Football
Branford at Paxon, 7:30
St. Stephens at Lafayette, 7:30
Taylor County at Suwannee, 7:30
Hamilton County at Hilliard, 7:30

Oct. 4
Volleyball
Hamilton County at Jefferson County, 6
Trenton at Lafayette, 6
Suwannee at Columbia, 6:30
Bronson at Branford, 6:30

Oct. 5
Volleyball
Suwannee at Hamilton County, 6
Bell at Branford, 6:30

Oct. 7
Football
Florida Deaf at Branford, 7:30
Volleyball
Brooks County, Ga at Hamilton County,
3:15
Lafayette at Jefferson County, 6
Santa Fe at Suwannee, 6:30
Branford at Trenton, 6:30

Oct. 8
Football
Lafayette at Mandarin Christian, 7:30
Hamilton County at Dixie County, 7:30
Suwannee at Raines, 7:30

Oct. 11
Volleyball
Lafayette at Trenton, 6
Branford at Bell, 6:30

Oct. 12
Volleyball
Hamilton County at Madison County, 6:30
North Florida Christian at Lafayette, 6
Branford at Chiefland, 7

Oct. 14
Volleyball
Hamilton County at North Florida
Christian, 6
Williston at Suwannee, 6:30
PK Yonge at Branford, 4:30


SEE SPORTS, PAGE 3B


SUWANNEE vs MADISON BRANFORD vs. OAK HALL
I II I
NAME IINAME I
I II I
ADDRESS II ADDRESS I
I II I
I II I
PHONE _________________ PO I
PHONE I PHONE I
L----------------- JL-------I-
CONTEST RULES: Sik
* Circle the team you think will win game for that week
* One entry form per week, per person
* Entry form with correct team will be entered into weekly drawing for $25
* All correct entry forms will be entered into drawing at end of season for
Grand Prize of $250.
* Entry forms must be received by 5 p.m. Game Day
* Drop off or mail entry forms to Suwannee Democrat/Football Contest,
P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 *Prize is in check form


72 t-storm
73 t-storm
75 t-storm
79 t-storm
75 t-storm
73 t-storm
75 t-storm
75 ptsunny
74 ptsunny
75 t-storm


86 75 rain
67 56 pt sunny
88 79 t-storm
69 52 sunny
86 62 mst sunny


Pompano Beach 89 78
Port Charlotte 91 74
Saint Augustine 88 74
Saint Petersburg 89 80
Sarasota 90 74
Tallahassee 92 73
Tampa 91 76
Titusville 90 74
Venice 90 75
W Palm Beach 89 78


Phoenix 95 71
San Francisco 60 51
Seattle 64 54
St. Louis 82 63
Washington, DC 91 65


�2010 American Profile Hometown Content Service


t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
ptsunny
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm


sunny
pt sunny
rain
sunny
mst sunny
570605-F


Today's Weather
L 3.a y Foecas
Wed Thu Fri
9/8 9/9 9/10




93/73 94/74 93/74
Partly cloudy in the morning fol- Partly cloudy, chance of a thunder- Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 90s
lowed by scattered thunderstorms in storm, and lows in the mid 70s.
the aft.

Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset Sunrise Sunset
7:13 AM 7:46 PM 7:13AM 7:45 PM 7:14AM 7:44 PM




Florida At A Glance


t-. Tallahassee
s ( 9 n2/73 ' J 2 Jacksonville
Pensacola LiveOak 89/76
92Pens- - k


Moon Phases

6 ' Orlando -
91/75 .
Last New
Sep Sep 8
S .', %Tampa , .
91,76
First Full
Sep 15 Sep 23

UV Index

Wea 98 9Very High Miami
Tnu 99 10 Very High 8879
Fri 910 10 Very High
Tr-. i r i rrn . j , a j 1 1
inj*.r.un . Ir~~i :i~Ai r ,i Iur-i�a r 'i a
.-.-


Area Cities


ICiyHL Corndm n


I CityHi Lo Cond. 1


PAGE 2B


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK











WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 3B


Suwannee Legals
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
CLEANING CONTRACT
Accepting bids for cleaning and
preparation of The Housing Authority of
the City of Live Oak's vacated (1-4)
bedroom apartments for move in.
Contractor's bidding this work shall have
an occupational license to do business in
the State of Florida. Liability Insurance in
the sum of $100,000 or more required, a
copy of the license is to be submitted
with the Bid. Contractors must adhere to
the Davis Bacon wage rate
determination. This is a one year contract
starting from 1 October 2010.
For more information you may contact
the Housing Authority Office at (386)
362-2123 or stop by the office at 406
Webb Drive N.E., Live Oak, FL, 32064,
and receive the scope of work. Bids will
be accepted until 12:00 A.M., 20
September 2010. Live oak Housing
Authority reserves the right to waive
minor informalities in the bidding if said
waiver is in the Housing Authority's best
interest. The Housing Authority of the
City of Live Oak is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Housing Authority of the City of Live Oak
(LOHA)
Contact: Scott Stephens,
Executive Director
Phone: (386) 362-2123
9/8, 10, 15, 17

STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT
TO ISSUE PERMIT
The Department of Environmental
Protection gives notice of its intent to
issue an Environmental
Resource/mitigation bank permit
(#0288852-001) to the Bayfleld
Mitigation, LLC to establish the Bayfleld
Mitigation Bank (SMB) on a +1994.64
acre parcel. The project includes the
preservation of the site and the
restoration or enhancement of a mosaic
of upland and wetland communities
described as longleaf pine/xeric oak,
mesic pine flatwoods, hydric pine
flatwoods, ecotone, cypress dominated
or mixed wetland forest depressions, and
mixed slough and stream swamp.
Credits generated may be used as
mitigation for future unavoidable
wetlands impacts to these natural or
disturbed communities within the service
area. Restoration and enhancement will
be accomplished by installing ditch
blocks and low water crossings,
removing -1/2 ac. of fill road and
associated ditches, thinning and removal
of planted pine, reducing woody shrub
density, decreasing bedding impacts,
planting longleaf pine and perennial
groundcover species, supplemental
planting of cypress, hardwood and mixed
wetland forest vegetation in appropriate
habitats, and implementing a long-term
management program including frequent
prescribed burns. The mitigation was
assessed by the Uniform Mitigation
Assessment Method (UMAM; Chapter
62-345, FA.C.) as having a potential of
280.77 freshwater credits (108.10 Hydric
Flatwoods/Wet Prairie Credits (38.50%)
and 172.67 Forested Wetland Credits
(61.50%)).
BMB is located in Columbia County,
north of Lake City, and east of White
Springs just east of Hwy 441. BMB site
is specifically located in Sections 28-30,
32, and 33, Township 01N, Range 17E.
It lies within the Upper Suwannee River
Basin Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) with a
small portion draining west directly to
Suwannee River but most of the site
draining south and east to Little Creek (a
tributary of the Suwannee), Class III
waters. It has a mitigation service area
incorporating portions of Baker,
Columbia, Suwannee, and Hamilton
Counties.
The application and draft permit is
available for public inspection during
normal business hours at the
Department's Office of Submerged
Lands and Environmental Resources,
Bob Martinez Building, 2600 Blair Stone
Road, MS 2500, Tallahassee, FL, 32399-
2400.
A person whose substantial interests are
affected by the Department's proposed
permitting decision may petition for an
administrative proceeding (hearing) in
accordance with Sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes. The petition
must contain the information set forth
below and must be filed (received) in the
Office of General Counsel of the
Department at 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida
323993000, within 21 days of publication
of this notice. Petitioner shall mail a copy
of the petition to the applicant at the
address indicated above at the time of
filing. Failure to file a petition within this
time period shall constitute a waiver of
any right such person may have to
request an administrative determination
(hearing) under Sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes.
The Petition shall contain the following
information: (a) The name, address, and
telephone number of each petitioner, the
applicant's name and address, the
Department Permit File Number and the
county in which the project is located; (b)
A statement of how and when each
petitioner received notice of the
Department's action; (c) A statement of
how each petitioner's substantial
interests are affected by the
Department's action (changes to the
conditions placed on this permit); (d) A
statement of the material facts disputed
by Petitioner, if any; (e) A statement of
facts which petitioner contends warrant
reversal or modification of the
Department's action (changes to the
conditions placed on this permit); (f) A
statement of which rules or statutes
petitioner contends require reversal or
modification of the Department's action
(changes to the conditions placed on this
permit); and (g) A statement of the relief
sought by petitioner, stating precisely the
action petitioner wants the Department to
take with respect to the Department's
action.
Persons whose substantial interests will
be affected by the permit have the right
to petition to become a party to the
proceeding. The petition must conform to
the requirements specified above and be
filed (received) within 21 days of
publication of this notice in the Office of
General Counsel at the above address of
the Department. Failure to petition within
the allowed time frame constitutes a
waiver of any right such person has to
request a hearing under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, FS., and to
participate as a party to this proceeding.
Any subsequent Intervention will only be
at the approval of the presiding officer
upon motion filed pursuant to Rule
285.207, F.A.C.


Mediation is not available.
9/8




Check out the

Suwannee

Democrat's

page on

Facebook


SPORTS


Sloppy






win

Suwannee wide receiver Andre Zanders (13) and
Hamilton County cornerback Anthony Ingram
(5) battle over the ball during the game.
- Photo: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com)







District




standings


District 2-2A
Baker County
Baldwin
Ribault
Raines
Suwannee
Santa Fe

District 5-1A
Chiefland
Dixie
Hamilton
Hilliard
Trenton
Villages
Wildwood

District 2-1B
Hawthorne
Lafayette
Mandarin Christian
Aucilla Christian
Oak Hall
St. Francis
St. Johns

Big Ten Conference
West
Branford
Bell
Bronson
Bishop Snyder
St. Joseph

East
Mandarin Christian
St. Johns
Oak Hall
St. Francis


District
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0

District
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0

District
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0


Overall
1-0
1-0
0-0
1-0
1-0
0-1

Overall
0-1
1-0
0-1
0-1
1-0
1-0
1-0

Overall
1-0
0-1
0-1
1-0
1-0
0-1
0-1


Conference Overall


Scores
Bishop Snyder 34, St. Joseph 7
Trenton 59, Bronson 0
Columbia 39, Brook's County 13
Baker County 40, Crescent City 0
Baldwin 33, Eagle's View 26
Suwannee 21, Hamilton County 6
Hawthorne 26, Chiefland 21
Fernandina Beach 27, Hilliard 6
Dixie County 35, Lafayette 21
Atlantic Coast 31, Mandarin Christian 20
Newberry 21, Santa Fe 14
Oak Hall 29, Bell 22
Raines 21, Jackson 14
Branford 42, St. Francis 22
Villages 31, Lake Weir 21
Warner Christian 46, St. Johns Country Day 6
Wildwood 21, Citrus 11
Aucilla Christian 20, Rocky Bayou 12





Sports




Calendar

Continued From Page 2B


Oct. 15
Football
Chiefland at Hamilton County, 7:30

Oct. 18
Volleyball
Hamilton County at Fort White, 6
Bell at Lafayette, 6

Oct. 19
Volleyball
Hamilton County at Newberry, 6:30
Lafayette at Branford, 6

Oct. 21
Volleyball
Lafayette at Suwannee, 6


-ti


Now THAT'S

Something

To Smile

About!


"My First Fish"

Evan J.

McMillan,

age 4


ancThake e a F E sr
rtbm illig Ifhis



L3. Switch at any time - 111111prefer to go back to p another way after













Syig EZUp orE? Pay today

























2.to bill my receive another renewal notice - no mor the applichecks to write oblr
am ot ot t tt o ot


trying EZ Payy Just call us!


Choose From eIvo Convenient Payment Options

Credit Card Payment
Ht t take advantage of EZ Pay, and I authoize you
1. Monthly bill my cedit/ATM/debisn't tic up large amounts of money in advance.he applicable







amount each month until I instruct you otherwise.


5 M IJ


C


Direct Debit from Checking Savings Account
I want to take advantage of EZ Pay, and I authorize you to process a
payment for the applicable amount on my checking/savings account
each month until I instruct you otherwise.


$2.75 each month
in county


$4.00 each month
out of county


Come by


Iuwannuu hrmncrat

211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL 32064

or call 386-362-1734 * 1-800-525-4182
Promotion ends September 22, 2010 at 5 p.m.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


PAGE 3B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK













RELIGION


What's happening




at Corinth


Asking for God's


Submitted toothpas
On Saturday August 28, Team washclol
Acts from Corinth Baptist went on a one of th
"Podge run" to seek out the home- are not r
less. Before beginning our journey ly, we st
we prayed and asked our Lord to use Jesus lov
us for His glory. We began our jour- we prayer
ney at 1-75 & SR6, where we found We th
our first ministry opportunity, whose state sto]
name is Mr. Jimmy. We took the for some
time to talk with Mr. Jimmy and exits the
learned he had been living on the a total ol
streets for over 24 years due to sev- and Gaii
eral different circumstances and couple o
gave him a "Podge bag". This bag is their refu
named after one of the church mem- prayer. I
bers who wanted to help those in member
need standing along the side of the they are
road. The bag we have put together Lord and
is just for this purpose and in the We st(
bag contains a Bible, toothbrush, picnic lu



Hatch Bend Baptist
Church Homecoming
Hatch Bend Baptist Church will host their annu-
al Homecoming services on Sunday, Sept. 12,
2010. Sunday School 9:45-10:30, worship to begin
at 10:45 with singing. Guest singer with be Gail
Moore and speaker will be Rev. Bruce Sullivan.
There will also be singing from several church
members. Lunch will follow in the fellowship hall.
Bring a covered dish and join us in worship, food
and fellowship. No evening service. For more in-
formation call Bro. Paul Coleman at the church,
935-0943 or email at hbbc@windstream.net.


Look for our Special Savings Coupon
for these items.
"See Store Personnel for Details"
Save $1 on any 1 Kellogg's Cereal when
you purchase one gallon of
Gustafson's Dairy Milk


te, candy, snacks, soap,
th, and comb. This is just
ie bag examples as all bags
nade alike. Most important-
lared with Mr. Jimmy that
ves him no matter what and
ed with him.
en went south on the inter-
pping at every exit looking
eone to minister to, but most
re was nobody. We gave out
f six bags between Jasper
nesville. There were also a
if homeless people who ei-
sed a bag or a bag and
n those cases we have to re-
they are not rejecting us,
rejecting Jesus Christ our
d Savior.
popped along the way to eat a
inch and there we were able


The Bible says, "For I
was hungry and you
gave Me something to
eat; I was thirsty and
you gave Me
something to drink; I
was a stranger and
you took Me in;
naked and clothed
Me; I was sick and
you visited Me; I was
in prison and you
came to Me."
Matthew 25:36-37.

to minister to a couple whose truck
was broke down. No matter where
we are God will use us if we are
willing to be His vessel! We ended
our day by stopping in Lake City at
Ole Times Country Buffet and en-
joying a meal together and talking
about our day. And we know that
most of the people we came in con-
tact with on this day we may never
see again and some of them will not
change the way they live their lives,
but we have done as our Lord and
Savior has told us to. We can only
hope and pray that a seed has been
planted when sharing a bag and Je-
sus with those we come in contact
with.
And we must always remember: It
is not about me, but ALL about
HIM!!!!


Homecoming at Swift Creek

Historic Church


Swift Creek Historic Church
will be having their annual
Homecoming on September
26, 2010. Location is at Swift
Creek Historic Church and
Cemetery in White Springs,
Florida. If any more informa-
tion is needed, please feel free
to call Cathy Erixton at 386-
397-2791. Services will start at


10:45 A.M. Our guest speaker
will be Rev. Brain Keen. As
always we will be having old-
fashioned music and following
the church services, everyone
will be bringing a covered
dish. If you want to get a feel
of an old fashion church ser-
vice and a taste of history
please come join us.


Live Oak area
Jiffy 304 -- Ohio Ave. North
Walmart - Hwy 129 North
S & S 22 --Hwy 129
Exxon -- Next to Wendy's on
Hwy 129
S & S 45 -- CR 49 & Hwy. 90
Donut Time -- Howard Street
Suwannee River Food Store - Hwy
129 N
Jiffy 311 - Hwy 90 west
Howlands- 11th street
Howlands Express - 11th street
Jiffy 305 -- Irvin Ave. at roundabout
Winn Dixie -- Pinewood and Hwy
51
One Stop # 7 -- Hwy 90 east
Stop and Shop -- Ohio Ave. east
Jiffy 318 -- Duval Street east
J & K -- Hwy 129 N and
Winderweedle Ave
Ready Freddy -- Houston Ave
S & M -- Corner of Hwy 90 and
Walker St
Harrys -Walker Ave
Dollar General -- Hwy 129 next to
Publix
Dollar General - Howard Street
S & P - Helvenston street
Downtown Cafe - Howard Street
west
Publix- Hwy 129 south
Luraville Store - Hwy 51 south
Jims Produce - Ohio ave south
Landens Grocery- Hamilton ave
Taylor Store -- Hwy 51 south
Dollar Tree -- Hwy 129 N next to
Walmart
S & S 46 --10019 Hwy 129
Walgreens - Hwy 129 s across
from Publix
M & M Discount - Hwy 129 south
Fast Mart -- Ohio ave across from
Hardees
O'Brien
S& S 19-- Hwy 129 S
McAlpin
S & S 25 -17022 Hwy 129
Branford area
Cuzins Cafe (moving to new
location)
Timesaver -- Hwy 27
Scaffs -- Suwanee Ave
C - Square Hwy 27
Dollar General - Hwy 27 east
M & M discount -- Suwannee Ave
Byrds Hwy 27 west of Branford
S & S 39 - Hwy27 & Hwy 129
S & S 47 -- Hwy 49 & Hwy 27
Jiffy 321 - Hwy 49 & Hwy 252


Mayo area
Jiffy 324 Hwy 27 west
L & R -- Hwy 51 north
S & S 53-- 11089 State Road 51
Jiffy 302 --203 E Main Street
Fast Track 264 -- Hwy 27
Jasper area
S & S 49 -
Fast Track 404
Fast Track 103
Wellborn area
S & S 35 -- Hwy 136
B&B -- HWY 90
Wellborn General -- CR 252
Lake City
S & S 9 -- Hwy90
S & S 42 -- Hwy 90
S & S 20 -- Hwy 90 at county line
Food Lion -- Hwy 90 west

Coin Rack
Locations
Live Oak Area
Suwannee Democrat - Howard
Street east
Dixie Grill - Howard Street east
Post Office - Ohio ave South
Sheryls
Kays Restaurant -- Howard St.
West
Jays Restaurant -- Hwy 90 west
Pepe's - Hwy 90 west
Suwannee Hospital -- 11th Street
Save a lot - Hwy 129 S across from
Publix
Dairy Queen - Ohio ave south
Hardees - Ohio Ave south
Island Food Store --Walmart Plaza
Subway -- Walmart plaza
Huddle House -- Hwy 129 N & I -
10
Penn Oil- Hwy 129 N & 1-10
Falmouth Crossing - Hwy 90 west
Wellborn
Post Office - CR 137
Branford Area
Post office -- Suwannee Ave
Nells -- Suwannee Ave
The Gathering - CR 252
Dowling Park
Riverview Apartments
Village Grocery
Jiffy 310 -- CR 250 at bridge
Food Mart -- CR 250
Good Samaritan Center
607289-F


Do you know



where your



Bible is?


David H Matier
Doctor of Pastoral C .,... 1',,.
dmatier@windstream.net


You say, "That's a dumb ques- 4
tion - everybody knows where
their Bible is!" You think so.
One time while visiting house to - -
house I came across a man who
thought he knew where his Bible was. When I
go out visiting I take my New Testament, but I
like to use the Bible of the person I'm visiting
because I don't want them to think, when I pre-
sent the plan of salvation, that it is something I
got out of my little book. I asked the fellow if
he had a Bible. He said, "Sure," and he went to
look for it. Well after 15 minutes or more, he
still had not found his Bible. I hope your Bible
is where you can put your hand on it faster then
that!
Not only individuals lose their Bibles but
many churches have lost the Bible too. It is hard
to find a church where the pastor has the free-
dom to preach the Word as it should be preached,
convincingly and without fear. So many people
want to tell the preacher when to preach, where
to preach and how to preach - and many preach-
ers let them do it! In these churches, the Bible
has been lost.
In II Chronicles 34:14, it is said that when the
money was brought out of the house of the Lord
they found "the book of the law." That seems
quite significant. Is not that where the Bible has
been lost, under "the money?" In a recent poll,
money, among other things, came in above faith
as the most important things in life. THINGS
have buried the Bible!
"...the love of money is the root of all evil:
which while some coveted after, they have erred
from the faith, and pierced themselves through
with many sorrows," (I Timothy 6:10). It is not
money but the "I must have it attitude" toward
money that people have that causes the problem!
If you move your "money," (your things) you
might find where you misplaced the Word of
God. If the church sets the money issue aside, it
might be able to locate God's Word once again.
We have buried the Word under our bake sales,
dinner parties, camping trips and other special
events that have become so popular in our
churches. Free us of THINGS so that we can
find the Word of God once again!
When the "Book of the Law" was found,
changes were made (II Chronicles 34:30-33).
Lives were changed; the people were brought
back to God. It even made a big difference in
the way the king pursued his subjects. When
God's Word is found, things will change.
Church members will want more; they won't be
satisfied with their ears being tickled but will
want "sound doctrine" and will do away with
"teachers, having itching ears" (II Timothy 4:3).
It is time to discover the Word of God. Read it
daily. Read it through at least once each year
(you can read it through in one year if you read
three chapters a day). Many have never read the
Bible through and we wonder where the Bible
went! We truly are in a time of famine, "not a
famine of bread, nor a thirst for water, but of
hearing the words of the Lord" (Amos 8:11).
When church members start carrying their Bibles
to church (not leaving them in the pew from one
Sunday until the next), reading it throughout the
week and giving their pastors the freedom to
preach the Word, they will rediscover the Word.
The Word will be found in the House of the
Lord!


NIGHTLY DRINK





KERS Try our new Red Bull Shots
WELcOM Sat. 6 p.m.; Weekdays On Demand
386-832-7079 .
www.myspace.com/countylinelounge
Package Store Open Mon.-Sat. 2-10 p.m.



3 UWANNEE

INSURANCE
[ AGENCY, INC.

386-364-1000
CALL US FOR YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS
AUTO - HOME - MOBILE HOME - BOAT - RV - BUSINESS LIABILITY
- PROPERTY ~ LIFE ~ HEALTH ~ MEDICARE SUPPLEMENTS
1720 OHIO AVENUE N. Fax (386) 362-6118
LIVE OAK, FL 3064-4800 57,36oF www.suwanneeinsurance.com


Suwannee Democrat

sold at these locations


PAGE 4B


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK











WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK PAGE 5B


MAKING


MATTER


Better-for-you snacks

kids will love


FAMILY FEATURES


Send some healthy
lunch munchies to
school - watermelon


Sids love to snack. But left to their chunks are an easy
Sown devices, most kids don't always way to brighten up a
make the healthiest snack choices, sack lunch and give
*K A new study of long-term eating kids a tasty nutri-
patterns in children, from researchers at the tional boost in the
University of North Carolina, shows that kids middle of the day.
today are getting nearly one-third of their daily
calories from unhealthy snacks such as chips,
crackers and candy.
Nutritious and delicious snacks are as close as your produce aisle. ii\ ..,-
S melon is practically a multivitamin unto itself- and its natural sweetness
is something kids love.
Did You Know?
* A 2-cup serving of watermelon is an excellent source of Vitamins A, B6 and C.
I Vitamin A found in watermelon is important for optimal eye health.
I Vitamin B6 found in watermelon is used by the body to manufacture brain
chemicals n......1111 ..iirt..i. such as serotonin, melatonin and dopamine,
which preliminary research shows may help the body cope with anxiety
and panic.
* Vitamin C in watermelons can help to bolster your immune system's defenses
against infections and viruses, and is known to stimulate the immune system
and protect against free radical damage.
* A 2-cup serving of watermelon is also a source of potassium, a mineral
necessary for water balance and found inside of every cell. People with low
potassium levels can experience muscle cramps. A 2-cup serving has less
than 10 percent of the daily reference value for potassium.
Try these fun recipes as after-school and post-activity snacks. For more kid-
friendly recipes and healthy eating tips, visit www.watermelon.org.


Watermelon Ktl)al),
1-inch cuht, I n tdktl
waterml In
Smoked tiirkL\ hrt.i,
Cheddar ti ht
Coffee stirrt ri r
beverage tr.ll.
Cut watermelo: hii .. , ,, 1 ,........
in cubes and stl.. . .i .r...,..1 i
straws.

Watermelon \dI'llIIl
Serves 6 to 8
12 to 16 1/2-inth rlhit
watermelon triangles
with 3-inch sides
2 cups Greek vanilla yogurt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
A few drops almond
extract
1 cup Craisins
1 cup white chocolate chips
1/2 cup toasted sliced almonds
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Arrange the watermelon triangles on
a serving platter or glass cake stand.
Mix yogurt with extracts and spoon
yogurt over the watermelon in the
fashion of nacho cheese sauce.
Sprinkle craisins, white chocolate
chips, and almonds over the yogurt
and dust with cinnamon.

Watermelon Dippers
8 ounces sour cream
4 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Watermelon sticks or
small wedges
Blend together the sour cream, sugar
and vanilla in a small serving bowl.
Use as a dip for the watermelon.


\\altrIniIini C'ul Oul
tiittdl , .lltr tr l iin1.
I I inlllr I 2- t 1










4 l. . ll ,m dlll l. ld , .



mineral water
L .i nll - 11 I I.. l ln . I ,nn,,I ,





Place waterelon in a single layer




in shallow pan; freeze until firm.
Remove from freezer and let stand
5 minutes. Drop watermelon through
food chute of a food processor or




blender with the motor running.
Add frozen raspberries alternately
1 12-ouncelbottle sparkling







with mineral water, processing until
smooth.
Place watermelon in a single layerogs





Makes 6 servings
in shallow pan; freeze unti finch
Remove from freezer and let stand




5 minutes. Drop watermelon rectangles
food chute of a food processor or
blender with the motor running.




Add frozen raspbs all fruit or low
with mineral water, preservesing until




6 ginger, molasses or peanut
smoobutter cookies
Using a melon baJeller, cut 3 divots
Makes 6 servings
6 3-inch x 2-inch x 5-inch


into a long side of each watermelonrectangles



rectangle. Fill each divot with a dif-
3 flavorserent all-fruit or low-sugar press
suge each rectangle with a cookie.
6 ginger, molasses or peanut
butter cookies
Using a melon baller, cut 3 divots
into a long side of each watermelon
rectangle. Fill each divot with a dif-
ferent all-fruit or low-sugar preserve.
Serve each rectangle with a cookie.


Health) Eating Tips






watermelon, cantaloupe and honey-. 11 1111 1 111
dew to create a festive, nutrition 111















ing the fridge filled' ll 1tl "i ril,
,chIl .es, carrot I and wat e I Io
li. l . I .. I I. u n. . , , in I ,, [, ,I



I 'l.i..p , J. 111. 11,1easie, r 1 your
."1~ rIIII 1II, �, 11. " I, , I,.. , l,, I I.- .i , I






llfrom full fat milk to non-fat milk'. ,
II d.r . . ,,u101.1I . I I I ,, Ir I .,,


I I I.1, 11 [ -. I... I 111. I I hI . ,I i

watermelon, cantaloupe and honey-
dew to create a festive, nutritious
and visually appealing dessert.
t Make healthy snacks available at
all times for your children by keep-
ing the fridge filled . ,, 1 i, .1 rtil
nutrient-rich treats such as grapes,
cherries, carrots and watermelon
cubes.
I \I,,,pl., < 1h,,,.. 11.: easier for your
child to get used to. Try switching
from full fat milk to non-fat milk,
serving sherbet, sorbet, ice milk or
fruit juice bars, or adding fresh fruit
to his or her cereal in the morning.
s Serve your children colorful, deeply
pigmented plant food. These foods
tend -., ,, ,.. 11..111.1 . ., , , 11 111 1l , ,
value. For example, red peppers,
carrots, broccoli, oranges and water-
melon are all packed with minerals,
vitamins and antioxidants.
s Start each day with breakfast, prefer-
ably fruit with low-fat yogurt or
granola. Make a fruit smoothie by
blending watermelon cubes and a
banana with crushed ice.


Watermelon Nachos


Watermelon Cut Outs


Watermelon Berry Slush


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


PAGE 5B


Watermelon Dippers


Watermelon Jelly Logs










PAGE 6B U SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010


.. ... , , .


mumC-


Ii


- I


Making This Right

Beaches


Claims

Cleanup

Economic Investment

Environmental
Restoration

Health and Safety

Wildlife


I was born in New Orleans. My family still lives here. We have
to restore the Gulf communities for the shrimpers, fishermen,
hotel and restaurant owners who live and work here.
- Iris Cross, BP Community Outreach


No oil has flowed into the Gulf for weeks. But we know this is just the
beginning of our work. BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup
in the Gulf and that includes keeping you informed.

Restoring Gulf Communities
We can't undo this tragedy. But we can help people get back on their feet.
We have been working with impacted communities since day one.

Partnering with local governments and community organizations, my job is
to listen to people's needs and frustrations and find ways to help. We have
19 community centers and teams in four states, listening and helping.

Restoring The Economy
BP is here in Gulf communities with shrimpers, fishermen, hotel and
restaurant owners, helping to make them whole.

More than 120,000 claim payments totaling over $375 million have
already gone to people affected by the spill. We have committed a
$20 billion independent fund to pay all legitimate claims, including lost
incomes until people impacted can go back to work. And none of this
will be paid by taxpayers.

BP has also given grants of $87 million to the states to help tourism
recover and bring people back to the Gulf beaches.

Restoring The Environment
We're going to keep looking for oil and cleaning it up if we find it. Teams
will remain in place for as long as it takes to restore the Gulf Coast.

And we've dedicated $500 million to work with local and national scientific
experts on the impact of the spill and to restore environmental damage.

Thousands of BP employees have their roots in the Gulf. We support
over 10,000 jobs in the region and people here are our neighbors. We
know we haven't always been perfect, but we will be here until the oil
is gone and the people and businesses are back to normal. We will do
everything we can to make this right.


For general information visit: bp.com
For help or information: (866) 448-5816

restorethegulf.gov
Facebook: BP America
Twitter: @BP_America
YouTube: BP

For claims information visit: bp.com/claims
floridagulfresponse.com


� 2010 BP, E&P


bp



^*^


618173gav


PAGE 6B


* SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT/LIVE OAK


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010










Page2 2. . NFCC NOrth8
,.. r-, r students r
o F Florioda
" . enjoy

Lemonade -
Son the 0


0 0i
Atp, . Lawn G)

News * Entertainment l Classifieds




North Florida Focus

Sepemer8 &9,200 ww . f on i e co m Sevig Hmito, Lfaete ad uwnne Cunie


UF researchers seek to




understand and protect




Florida's springs


Jim Stevenson


By Joseph Kays
Renowned University of
Florida naturalist Archie Carr
called them "little ecologic
jewels" and "the singular
blessing of the Florida land-
scape."
Environmentalist Marjorie
Stoneman Douglas called them
"bowls of liquid light," and
18th-century explorer William
Bartram called them "enchanti-
ng and amazing crystal foun-
tains."
Geologically, Florida's 700
springs are windows into the
Floridan Aquifer - 100,000
square miles of permeable
limestone saturated with water


like a giant sponge that under-
lies all of Florida and parts of
Georgia, South Carolina and
Alabama.
For eons, rainwater has
trickled from the surface down
to the aquifer, only to reappear
days, months or years later
from the springs, to form
rivers like the Ichetucknee and
the Silver, evaporate and fall
again as rain in a never-ending
cycle.
For much of history, human
impact on the springs and the
aquifer has been minimal. Al-
though archaeological evi-
dence indicates humans have
lived around the springs and


along the rivers they feed for
thousands of years, it is only in
the last century, as Florida's
population has mushroomed,
that humans have begun to
negatively impact the state's
fresh water supply.
Beginning in the 1880s,
Jacksonville, Fla. and
Brunswick, Ga. became the
first municipalities to punch
wells into the Floridan Aquifer
to provide drinking water for
their growing populations. To-
day, Floridians use more than 7
billion gallons of water a day,
more than 60 percent of it
groundwater.
At the same time that more


BEAUTIFUL
PLANTS
MAKE GREAT
GIFTS!
What better way to brighten up
someone's day than to give a gift with
the freshness and energy of a living
plant! At Nobles we have plants for
every occasion. Whether you want to
give birthday plants, sympathy plants *
housewarming plants, we have plants
for every occasion. No matter the
occasion, if you are in the mood to gif
a plant any of our flowering plants,
houseplants, trees or shrubs can be gift
wrapped and delivered. No time to stop
by? Just give us a call and we'll help
you make the perfect choice!


water is being withdrawn from
the aquifer, nitrates and other
pollutants from septic tanks,
treatment plants and stormwa-
ter and agricultural runoff are
contaminating the surface wa-
ter that replaces it.
The springs are suffering
"death by a thousands
wounds," says Jim Stevenson
of the state's Springs Task
Force and the Ichetucknee
Springs Basin Working Group.
civcl cvi 1950 and 1990,
Florida's human population
more than quadrupled, and our
population continues to in-
crease," a November 2000 re-
port from the task force said.


For Qualified
Home Inspections
Call
Paul Dial
C.R.P.I.
386-364-4434 or
386-590-6534
Certified 570742-F


, i* ,


-,,-;'.;; *',';*/ I


FALL BLOOMING MUMS HAVE BEGUN TO ARRIVE!
Loaded with buds our mums in 4.5" pots are only $2.99!
9248 129th Road * Live Oak
(386) 362-2333
Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Closed Sunday )EMEEES
"For over 30 Years"
WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM


Since the 1970s, scientists
ave documented a decline in
ater quality in most Florida
springs, particularly in regard
I nutrients such as nitrate."
Over the past 30 years, typi-
al nitrate levels in Florida
springs have risen from 0.02
illigrams per liter to 1.0 mil-
grams per liter, according to
he report.
During a recent day-long
our of the Ichetucknee Springs
asin, Stevenson illustrated the
any ways development is im-
acting, and being impacted
y, the springs.
He starts in Lake City at Al-
gator Lake, which regularly
bushes its water into a sink-
)le that ultimately leads 12
iles south to Ichetucknee
springs. Lake City used to
ump its treated sewage into
e lake. Now, the city sprays
e effluent over some 350
:res of hay field just a stone's
row from the Ichetucknee
race, the historic path of the
hetucknee River, now mostly
iderground.
As the tour follows the cur-
nt and historic path of the
ver south, Stevenson points
ut gas stations almost on top
f sinkholes feeding the
rings, and mobile homes be-
g swallowed by sinkholes in
a area that was once the
verbed. Canoeing down the
hetucknee River from the
headwaters, Stevenson then
)ints out the ecological impli-
cations of the pollution.
Mats of algae float past the
canoes, algae covers the
eelgrass that grows along
the river bottom and water
lettuce threatens to clog
some of the seven springs
that feed the river.
For Richard Hamann, an
environmental law expert
in the UF College of Law's
Center for Governmental
Responsibility (CGR), it
was a tour like this that
opened his eyes to the ex-
tent of the springs pollu-
tion problem.
"It wasn't until I saw the
sprayfields and the sink-
holes that I realized how
comprehensive any springs
protection legislation
would have to be," says
Hamann. "I was most im-
pressed by how far from
the headwaters you could
have pollution impacting
the springs."
Last year, Hamann ad-
vised a team of students
from CGR's Conservation
Clinic in the development
of springs protection legis-
lation and tools to help lo-
cal governments imple-
ment it.
The model springs pro-
tection legislation that law
students Matthew Brewer,
Matt Clark and Christine
Francescani, and interdisci-

SEE UF, PAGE 3


127 Howard Street E.,
Live Oak, FL
Phone: 386-362-4539
Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478
Se Habla Espanol
(EMAIL: info@poolerealty.com)


GREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING
RENTALS - STARTING AT $300 PER MONTH
FOR SINGLEWIDES AND $450 PER MONTH
FOR DOUBLEWIDES. WATER, SEWER,
AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS.
386-330-2567 569597F












PAGE 2, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Lemonade on the Lawn event at NFCC on Aug. 25.




NFCC students enjoy





Lemonade on the Lawn


MADISON - The Stu-
dent Services department
at North Florida Commu-
nity College and Saint
Leo University's Madison
Office teamed up to offer
NFCC students a refresh-
ing break - Lemonade on
the Lawn - to celebrate
the beginning fall term.
Students were greeted by
NFCC administrators in-
cluding NFCC President
John Grosskopf, various
faculty and staff mem-
bers, as well as represen-
tative from NFCC's Stu-
dent Government Associ-
ation (SGA) and Saint
Leo University's Madison
Office. The two-day event
was held Aug. 25 and
Aug. 26 from 10 a.m.-1
p.m. In addition to offer-
ing students a cool and
free glass of lemonade,
the event gave students
the opportunity to meet
new people and to social-
ize and chat with college
leaders and instructors.


529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL
Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131
S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389,
Evening 362-2990


(1) Horse Farm: 55 acres with a 5
bedroom, 3 bath CH&AC home
with fireplace cont. approx. 5000
sq. feet under roof with an 18 stall
horse barn with office and bath
cont. approx. 5000 sq. ft. under
roof. The property has 4 fenced
paddocks with room for
expansion. Approx. 3 miles from
1-75. Call for more information.
Just listed $599,999.
(2) Off CR 49 5 acres in grass with
scattered trees, fenced on 3 sides
with survey. Only $4,900 per acre.
(3) Off US 129 North: 5 acre
wooded on 89th Rd. Will work for
land home package. $37,000.
(4) CR 51 & Pinewood St.: 2.29
Acres, city water and sewer, zoned
office. Good location REDUCED
TO $159,900.
(5) Off CR 349: 10 acre wooded
tract with a two bedroom CH/AC
log home in excellent condition
cont. approx. 1200 sq. ft. under
roof, 30'x40' pole barn.
REDUCED TO $145,900.
(6) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre
corner tract good exposure.
Reduced to $34,500.
(7) 40 acres with 835 ft. on paved
road in 13 year old planted pines.
Priced to sell at REDUCED TO
$149,900.
(8) CR 143: 9 acres on paved road
with a 3/2 CH/AC home const. in
2002 with a 2 car garage, 30'x50'
bar, 8x8 storage, nice fish pond.
Good buy @ $175,000.
(9) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on
CR751 and the river approx. 1300
ft. on the water and approx. 1300
ft. on paved road. Priced to sell at
REDUCED TO $64,000.
(10) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4
acres in grass/cropland with
scattered trees. $32,500.
(11) Near City: Off US 90 East 5
acres wooded near golf course.
Good buy @ $44,900.
(12) 190th St.: 10 acres in planted
pines approx. 15 years old, with a
3/1 CH/AC SWMH, 2 car carport/
shop. Priced to sell @ $49,000.
(13) 169th Rd.: 5 ac. in grass with


a 3/2 CH/AC DWMH cont.
approx. 1,850 sq. ft. under roof in
excellent cond. 2 car detached
garage. Good area. REDUCED
TO $99,000.
(14) 193rd Rd.: 6.59 acres wooded
on paved road. Good area. Good
buy @ $37,500.
(15) Hamilton County: 40 acre
wooded on county road. Good
hunting area that adjoins
SRWMD. REDUCED TO
$129,500.
(16) New 3 bedroom, 2 bath CH/
AC home. City sewer & water,
privacy fence. Good Buy @
$95,000.
(17) Off CR 249: 3 wooded lots,
will work for mobile homes, on
county road. Good buy @ $12,600
for all three.
(18) Near City on paved road: 6
acres in grass with scattered trees,
36'x36' horse barn with tack/feed
room & I.I i 21111r. 2" well, fenced
& divided into paddocks with
horse type fence. Priced to sell @
$99,900 Terms.
(19) Off CR 250: 1.45 acres with a
3/2 CH/AC brick home with
fireplace, kitchen furnished, cont.
2700+ sq. ft. of living area, 2 car
detached garage, 12'x16' metal
storage building. Priced to sell @
$139,500.
(20) Suwannee River Charles
Springs area: 1.88 ac. wooded with
137 ft. on the water elevation
survey. Will support regular
inground septic tank. Good buy @
$39,900.
(21) 104th St.: 7 3/4 acres with a 3/
2 CH/AC 2006 Fleetwood DWMH,
kitchen furnished, fireplace 4"
well, 2 septic. Priced to sell @
$99,900.
(22) CR 136 West: 5 acres in grass
with a 3/2 CH/AC DWMH in
excellent condition cont. approx.
2,100 sq. ft. of living area, kitchen
furnished, 30'x42' carport and
storage. Priced to sell @ $93,000.
(23) Off US 90 West: Two 5 acre
wooded tracts, good area. $29,900
per tract.
617098-F


.:V,.. n:i w. m : -...
NFCC students Katelyn Scarboro, Brooke Turner, Kasmon English and
event at NFCC.


The event kicked off a
term packed full of en-
gaging events. NFCC Stu-
dent Activities department
is planning a Club Expo
for Sept. 8-9 to share in-
formation with students
about the variety of clubs
and organizations avail-
able on campus and ways
to get involved. A series
of "Coffee and Careers"
sessions are planned
throughout the term
where students can ex-
plore various careers and
chat with area profession-
als about their specific ca-
reers and experiences. In
October students will
have the opportunity to
volunteer and participate
in Make-a-Difference
Week and National Make-
a-Difference Day. There
is also a "Leadership Se-


ries", health fair, and
more planned this fall for
NFCC students.
NFCC encourages stu-
dents to get involved on
campus and promotes stu-
dent development and
leadership by providing
quality programs and ac-
tivities outside the class-
room. For more informa-
tion, contact NFCC Stu-
dent Services at (850)
973-1623 or email
halfhillk@nfcc.edu.




NFCC President
John Grosskopf and
SGA President Jim-
my Smith Jr. greet
students at
NFCC's Lemonade
on the Lawn event
on Aug. 25.


Quentin Griffin enjoy the Lemonade on the Lawn


P-


IN


I . , ---, I


PAGE 2, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


II**'

r:i,,


r~. ]F~:r�


, iv.I











U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 3


Continued From Page 1

plinary ecology doctoral student
Jason Evans drafted at the behest
of the Silver Springs Basin
Working Group required the state
Department of Environmental
Protection (DEP) in cooperation
with the Florida Geological Sur-
vey to delineate springsheds and
primary and secondary protection
zones for all first- and second-
magnitude springs. Flow from
first-magnitude springs, the
largest, exceeds 64 million gal-
lons a day.
Once this was completed, the
law required local governments
to review their comprehensive
plans to ensure that they ad-
dressed any springs in their juris-
diction. The law also required
DEP to establish total maximum
daily loads of nutrients for all im-
paired first- and second-magni-
tude springs and adopt new crite-
ria for determining impairment.
The model legislation ultimate-
ly evolved into the "Florida
Springs Protection Act" intro-
duced during the 2005 legislative
session by then state Sen. Nancy
Argenziano of Dunnellon and
former state Rep. Dwight Stansel
of Wellborn. The act was stripped
of most of its requirements and
then stalled as the session ex-
pired, but Hamann says its intro-
duction was an important first
step.
"We weren't looking to pro-
pose something that was politi-
cally possible; we were looking
to do something that was need-
ed," Hamann says of the legisla-


tion. "This kind of legislation
doesn't happen overnight, but the
fact that we set in motion serious
consideration of the problem and
potential solutions is an achieve-
ment."
"Getting sponsors and getting
it introduced was a big first
step," adds Fay Baird, coordina-
tor of the Silver Springs Basin
Working Group. "I was very im-
pressed with the quality of the
legislation we received from
Richard Hamann and the stu-
dents."
Margaret Carr, a UF landscape
architecture associate professor,
says "this legislation is part of
the building momentum to tie
land use to groundwater protec-
tion. What initially seems like a
radical idea eventually becomes
possible."
Four years ago, Carr led a
group of 17 urban and regional
planning and architecture stu-
dents who developed a land-use
plan to protect the water quality,
water quantity and native habitats
of the Ichetucknee springshed.
The final plan the team pre-
sented to Columbia County elect-
ed officials and administrators
sought to balance population
growth around Lake City, with
the desire to preserve the area's
agrarian heritage and protect the
Ichetucknee springshed.
One of the keys to effective
legislation and land-use planning
to protect springs is understand-
ing exactly how water moves
through the karst system. That's
what UF geological sciences As-
sociate Professor Jon Martin is


studying at one of the most
unique areas in Florida's springs
system.
Unlike the karst geology of the
central continent that has pro-
duced places like Mammoth
Cave in Kentucky and Carlsbad
Caverns in New Mexico, most of
Florida's caves are under water.
So Martin is focusing his re-
search on a stretch of the Santa
Fe River that goes underground
for more than six miles through
O'Leno State Park in High
Springs.
"O'Leno is a great natural lab-
oratory because it has been ex-
tensively mapped by cave
divers," says Martin, who is a
member of the Springs Task
Force. "We can track water as it
enters the system and as it comes
out."
Martin and his colleagues, in-
cluding geological sciences doc-
toral student P J. Moore, are us-
ing a variety of mechanical and
chemical techniques to track wa-
ter in the Santa Fe River from
when it disappears beneath the
surface at a point called the river
"sink" until it reemerges six
miles later at the river "rise."
"We monitor the chemical
composition of the water along
the flow path," Martin say. "We
also monitor the temperature and
measure the chemistry to see how
it changes. We're basically devel-
oping a natural chemical finger-
print for the water."
Specifically, Martin's team is
trying to understand how water
moves between large conduits
like sinkholes and springs and the


saturated limestone "matrix" that
surrounds them.
"Water flows rapidly through
the big conduits, but much more
slowly through the matrix," Mar-
tin says. "We're trying to under-
stand how these two types of
flows interact."
Interaction between the matrix
and the conduits has important
implications for human and eco-
logical health, Martin says.
"The water we drink comes
from the matrix porosity. If a
contaminant gets in the matrix, it
could reside there for a very long
time and cleanup would be very
difficult," he says. "It will also
slowly seep into the conduits and
get out into the springs, changing
the ecology."
In addition to monitoring the
water going through the conduits,
Martin's team has drilled eight
100-foot-deep wells to get sam-
ples of the matrix water near the
conduit.
I iMlll all of these techniques,
we can plot what portion of the
water is from the matrix and
what portion is from the con-
duit," Martin says. "A lot of at-
tention has been focused on sink-
holes and other large pathways
for contaminants to enter
aquifers. What is less commonly
appreciated is that the porous ma-
trix provides an additional, sig-
nificant route for contaminants
from the ground surface. Conse-
quently, results from this work
could provide the basis for a
more realistic conceptual model
of water flow in the Floridan
Aquifer."


UF researchers seek to understand



and protect Florida's springs


Down Syndrome Facts


/


Ophthalmology

GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D.
522 South Ohio Avenue
, -, 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937
- ,
Physical Therapy

y +aL lzIO'L, 1a,.
"^Mflincj C-iio ciiL~R ai i .VIHs"
* Physical Therapy * Occupational Therapy* Speech Therapy
* Specializing In Arthritis * Fibromyalgia * Geriatrics * Spinal &
Joint Pain * Sports Injuries * Work Injuries * Pediatrics
* Manual Therapy * Lymphedema
Locally Owned & Operated
Live Oak 208-1414 Medicare, Protegrity
Lake City 755-8680 Blue Cross, Av Med
Jasper 792-2426 Medicaid-pediatrics
Branford 935-1449 oWorkers Comp
Mayo 294-1407 Most Other Insurance Plans

A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency
Email: info@healthcorerehab.com o
Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore t


Family Dentistry
HERBERT C.
MANTOOTH,
D.D.S, P.A. \
602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL
(386) 362-6556
1-800-829-6506
(Out of Suwannee County) 570639-F

Physical Therapy


Heartland!
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Sandy Laxton, PTA
Mandy McCray, PTA
Carolyn McCook, Office Manager,
Patient Care Coordinator
AQUATIC THERAPY
Workers Compensation, Industrial
Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation, Job/
Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports
Medicine, Pediatrics Providers
Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers
405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060
(386) 364-5051 570640-F


Down syndrome is a genetic condition
that affects roughly 1 in every 800
babies. Although DS is common,
parents who welcome a baby with the
condition into their lives may have
many questions.
DS can happen to anyone. It is not the
result of anything that is drank or
eaten, nor is DS a product of any
medications taken during pregnancy.
Rather, it is a chromosomal change
that takes place during conception.
Only 3 to 5 percent of DS cases are
inherited.
DS is also known as trisomy 21
because of the chromosome on which
the mutation occurs. Normally a baby
inherits 23 chromosomes from a
mother and father, for a total of 46.
However, in children with DS, an
extra chromosome #21 is inherited,
for a total of 47. It is this extra
chromosome that can cause the
physical features, health problems,
and developmental delay in
individuals with DS.
It is possible to detect DS before a
child is born. Genetic testing can
predict the likelihood of the baby
having DS, as can blood tests.
However, the only definitive way to
know is through extracting fluid from
the amniotic sac, the balloon that
encompasses the fetus. This is called
amniocentesis, and has its own risks.
Women over the age of 35 have an
increased likelihood of giving birth to a
child with DS, and often opt to have


40


COPELAND

MEDICAL

CENTER
ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE
AT DOWLING PARK





Clinic: Family Practice, Urgent Care,
Geriatric Consultations, Women's Health, School Physicals
Rehab: Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy
10820 Marvin Jones Blvd., Dowling Park, FL
386-658-5300
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Nasseer Masoodi, M.D.
Rich Corley, PA-C
Accepting Medicare and Most Insurance,
Sliding Scale Also Available 617023-F


the amniocentesis.
There are some physical signs that
may also be present in fetuses with
DS. The baby tends to grow at a
slower rate than other fetuses.
Physical markers, may be detected
during routine sonograms, but cannot
concretely prove either way whether
the baby will be born with DS.
Children who have DS generally
develop at a slower pace than other
children. Yet, they can develop and
learn. There are various severities
associated with DS. Some people are
highly functional with minimal health
defects. Others may have more mental
trouble and be plagued with other
physical problems. Almost half of all
children born with DS have a
congenital heart defect. Half also
experience vision and hearing
problems.
Because adults with DS vary in their
abilities and overall health, it is
impossible to pinpoint an age
expectancy for individuals with DS.
On average, however, individuals with
good self-help skills, including
mobility and the ability to handle self-
feeding as well as other daily tasks,
could live into their 50s. Others with
poorer skills may live until their 40s.
Those with DS can live long, happy
lives. Understanding the factors that
go into caring for an individual with
DS can make parents more capable of
coping and make informed choices for
their child.
�"Tlie Village I'harinc.nc al .Adleul
Chri-liii Village-lletr-% lull
prescription services to the
community."


To place an ad on this page, please call Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103


Hatch Bend
Baptist
Church
Homecoming
Hatch Bend Baptist Church
will host their annual
Homecoming services on
Sunday, Sept. 12, 2010.
Sunday School 9:45-10:30,
worship to begin at 10:45
with singing. Guest singer
with be Gail Moore and
speaker will be Rev. Bruce
Sullivan. There will also be
singing from several
church members. Lunch
will follow in the
fellowship hall. Bring a
covered dish and join us in
worship, food and
fellowship. No evening
service. For more
information call Bro. Paul
Coleman at the church,
935-0943 or email at
hbbc @windstream.net.

Carroll Family
Reunion
The Carroll Family reunion
will be held Sept. 18, at
Philadelphia Baptist
Church Recreation hall,
from 5 p.m. until. Come
and bring a covered dish
and your favorite dessert.
Paper goods and drinks will
be provided.
Come early and let's catch
up on the family news. Call
386-776-1325 or 386-294-
1168.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6


1'0
.r...








LET'S TALK

ABOUT YOUR HEALTH


At the W.B. Copeland Medical Center at Advent
Christian Village, modern facilities provide a
comfortable setting for our experienced staff to
deliver quality, full-service medical care.
Following your medical appointment, have your
prescription filled on the spot and purchase over
the counter medications at Village Pharmacy. Our
experienced Pharmacist gives professional
consultations and personalized service. Village
Pharmacy also offers free prescription delivery
service within Dowling Park, as an additional
convenience. Most forms of insurance accepted.

ADVENT CHRISTIANVILAGE
---- AT DOWLING PARK --
PO Box 4345 * Dowling Park, FL 32064
386-658-5860 * 1-800-955-8771 TTY
1-800-647-3353
www.acvillage.net 617026-F


SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 3


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA










PAGE 4, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010 U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


". " .. , ".
. 7- -7 - .. -
" . . e ,,.- : - " - .....,: 9q � * .. " " ., .'-h


..-:-' rrk:4

.. - .... -.."."" : " .
-" * - ...... . i! * ,I "i
-r,



.*"~C .----__-


9


TIi.' Ot Ilu liu ei. 'l'ii i a .i. iiii l pi i o
$21 .620. 1 .ee . 'rlo i'iJ i L 'i.cia. lliiian il.s
i l in-llol ei- ienl'lll i : oiril'p l'leuo ..i II . .. I'en

,..iii,1 Oi iie O lr i l CI.i '..lin I ...e.f 'i Cie.'.i.]lnin.Cl
o rw i - ila 'e iih , , -a.


M 1l..ll)l..l ll C. ..prLIIAkv OLII-
I1ian I.Ci oI' ..'. ." Ii ia .. a iold
hio .lienlId 'a'll' ii a clalin'il 1i1
iltllki. lltlll If l l .1 i lul. l:. 1 ill
like. Tlii.' . C . n]li oii , I) 1 -0
Il n- iI 'J. N ill11 n 1i. 11c.. [l1i.' O nI[-
I ia I .o l "..l^ i i O1.1I il i fi i On a r l l -
.ci Il' i k i.[. � I-, .ll : . i.-h,,h


Outlander stands out, and




not just because of its looks


By Derek Price
CNHI News Service

The great thing about competition is that it forces peo-
ple to improve what they're doing.
If the New Orleans Saints spent all season playing dinky
high-school teams, would they have been able to win the
Super Bowl? Probably not.
If the New York Yankees only faced Little League pitch-
ers, would they be any good in the postseason? No way.
That's why it's so fun to watch what's happening to mid-
size crossover vehicles. A decade ago, crossovers barely
registered a blip on the automakers' radar screen, but to-
day they've become the de facto family car for a whole
generation of Americans.
Our grandparents had their sedans. Our parents had
their station wagons and minivans. Now we have our
crossovers, and they're getting better all the time.
Crossover vehicles have become so popular, in fact, that
virtually every auto company makes one. Some compa-
nies have an entire lineup of crossovers to pick from, so
they're available in every flavor imaginable -- sporty
Porsches and BMWs, luxurious Lexuses and Cadillacs,
zippy Mazdas and hefty GMCs.
If a crossover wants to stand out in this market, it has to


do an amazing job.
That's why it's encouraging to see what Mitsubishi has
done with its latest Outlander. In a market flooded with
cars all trying to do the same thing, the Outlander exhibits
a certain spunk that sets it apart from the pack.
For starters, there's its look. Its front end is almost
spaceship-like with rounded, smoothed-off covers and a
gaping air intake that looks like it wants to eat you.
Will everybody like the styling? No. It's polarizing, but
that's part of what makes it so appealing. It's bold and
doesn't look like a car designed by focus groups to give it
a PG-13 rating. It flaunts its full-frontal nose.
That also means it's not even remotely truck-like. While
some
crossovers enjoy dressing up like G.I. Joe, the Out-
lander embraces its softer, car-based roots.
The ride is whipped-cream soft, all airy and light. That
doesn't mean it's bouncy -- which can be a problem on
some crossovers, especially bigger ones -- but more of a
suspension that ice skates over the pavement with preci-
sion and snap. It's a wonderfully crisp feeling car.
The feeling that makes it fun to drive is surprising con-
sidering the Outlander is available with a third-row seat.
Most crossovers this fun don't come with a third row. And
most crossovers with a third row aren't nearly this zippy.
That back-row seat isn't really a full-time, full-size seat,
though. It's a small, lightweight, foldaway seat that's best
for those rare occasions when you need the capacity for


carrying extra bottoms.
If you carry more than five people on a regular basis,
you'd be better off getting something with more room for
passengers and cargo.
The middle row is spacious enough for adults to ride in
reasonable comfort, and the front seats are generously
spaced. Inside, the Outlander feels bigger than it is.
It also feels nicer than you'd expect from something in
this price class. The base is just $21,620, and you can get
a loaded V6 model for just over $30,000.
With the right options, such as navigation, leather and a
sound-pumping Rockford Fosgate stereo upgrade, the
Outlander feels as sumptuous as an entry-level luxury car.
It seems to have Acura DNA, which is a serious compli-
ment.
That luxury ambiance is helped by good interior quali-
ty and soft materials. The interior styling is spunky, just
like the car's personality, but not so much that it draws too
much attention to itself. It's good, clean, contemporary de-
sign.
Assuming you like the nose, the Outlander could be a
good pick. It's carved out a micro-niche for people who
like their crossovers fun to drive, interesting to look at,
and just a tiny bit outlandish.

Derek Price is editor of The Herald-Banner in
Greenville, Texas. CNHI News Service distributes his col-
umn.


COUPON LIVE OAK - COUPON LIVE OAK


Outgrow Your


Outgrow Your
Wheels?


rzri^


Time to Upgrade.


If youe sarhingfor that pfect set of wheels.
loo n furmter than www.nflaonline.com


k ~'W


I


PAGE 4, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


571 �10F s tI


S ' ......


'"A


I~~~C�~'
**.* . *I''�
�;�sr'"
�L .rr
�-*Y-rI:


8











* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 5


Announcements FirstDay
OFFICE MANAGER
ATTNT ONWanted experienced office man-
ADVT ISR S ager for rural family medical prac-
tice. Pay commensurate with ex-
perience. Great crew to work with
R F IREand good benefits. Send resume
to T to Three Rivers Medical 208
-; thefirstdyfpblcaio North West Suwannee Ave.,
Branford, FL 32008 or fax to 386-
respnsecredt willaly 935-1667.


SEARCHING FOR MY ROOTS:
Looking for items related to the
family of Norman Bevan 1894 to
1950 or Wife Elma Holcomb Be-
van 1907-2001. Old Photos, Civil
War Items. PIs call 904-217-0113


Jobs Wanted
CERTIFIED CNA WILL SIT
WITH ELDERLY: Cook, Clean,
Wash what ever you need. 386-
364-5737

DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME
CLEANED or Pressure Washed,
or your yard cleaned up? Done at
a very reasonable rate. Call
Christine or Gary 386-792-1655

HOUSECLEANING Available
any time. References call 386-
792-2616 or 386-792-0923

Help Wanted
CUSTODIAL WORKER
Duties to include, but not limited
to sweeping, and mopping floors,
dusting, vacuuming and cleaning
offices, conference room and li-
brary, cleans and sanitize all
bathroom facilities, disposes of
trash and waste materials. Mon-
day - Friday (10) hours flexible,
$8 hour. There are no benefits for
this position. A criminal back-
ground check is required. To ap-
ply go to North Florida REC -
Suwannee Valley, 7580 County
Road 136, Live Oak, FL 32060,
386-362-1725.
FL FISH & WILDLIFE
Commission seeks
Nuisance Alligator
Trappers for Lafayette,
Dixie & Suwannee counties
Apply online at
www.myfwc.com/gators
Call 863-462-5195

FirstDay




MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE INC.
Gainesville & Lake City, FL
and surrounding ares in FL
Staff Psychiatrist
Board Cert, Adult & Child
Outpatient Clinics:
Jasper, Live Oak, Lake City
Counselor IV I Sr Clinician
Outpatient Services
Adult & Child opportunities in
Mayo, Jasper, Live Oak,
Lake City Fl.
Masters Required,
Licensed Desired.
Adult/Child Case Manager
Lake City, FL
lyr Exp w/ SPMI population
Counselor III in Rehab Svcs
Bachelors in Lake City
To see our current openings
in Mental Health and to ap-
ply online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP

FirstDay
NOW HIRING MANAGER'S,
ASSISTANT MANAGERS
AND CUSTOMER SERVICE
ASSOCIATES
for fast paced convenient store.
Must have dependable trans-
portation and be available to
work any shift. Interviews guar-
anteed. Apply in person at 408 E.
Base Street, Madison, FL. No
phone calls please.


FirstDay
SERVICE AIDE
Part-time Service Aide positions,
Required high school diploma or
GED, 2 years minimum experi-
ence in education, child care,
medical, psychiatric, nursing
fields or working with people with
developmental disabilities. Apply
in person at Comprehensive
Community Services, 511 Gold-
kist Boulevard SW, Live Oak,
ADA, EOE Drugfree Workplace.

Special Notices

















Education
BE A CNA: FEES COVER
STATE TEST, & BACKGROUND
SCREENING. State test given on
site. HS Deploma or GED not re-
quired if age 18 or over. QUEST
TRAINING 352-493-7330
Want to be a CNA?
Don't want to wait?
Express Training is now
offering our quality Exam Prep
Classes in Lake City, FI.
Class sizes limited.
Call for details on the next
class!!! 386-755-4401
expresstrainingservices.co
m


Furniture
FirstDay
QUEEN SIZE Hide A Bed, Glider
Rocker, Rocker Recliner, Oak
Swivle Desk Chair. 386-362-6414


Garage/Yard Sales

FALL
COMMUNITY
YARD SALE
Saturday, Oct. 2nd
7 am - 12 pm

Lowndes Co.
Civic Center
(Fairgrounds, Hwy. 84 E.)
Earn some holiday cash!
Clean out your closets!
Empty your cabinets!
Reclaim your garage!
Join us for a great day
of yard sale fun!
BOOTH SPACES
AVAILABLE!
Inside spaces - $35 ea.
Outside spaces - $25 ea.
Spaces are limited,
so act quickly!
Call the
Classified Marketplace
229-244-1880
229-244-3400
1-800-600-4838
or come by
THE
mTDALMDOSTA
AVDAILY
TIMES
201 N. Troup St.
Valdosta, GA


BUSINESSES


Village Oaks I Apartments
1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom units.
Hurry in for an application.
Rental assistance available to
qualified applicants.
Call 386-364-7936,
TDD/TTY 711.
705 NW Drive, Live Oak
"This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer"


Garage/Yard Sales
INSIDE MOVING SALE 9/10 &
11 8-3: CR 136 2 miles past fair
grounds on right.


Guns/Accesories
GUN SHOW
SEPTEMBER 11TH & 12TH
COLUMBIA CO FAIR-
GROUNDS
HWY 247 LAKE CITY
SAT 9-4 SUN 9-3
CWP CLASSES @ 10:30 &
1:00
INFO 386-325-6114


Wanted to Buy
CASH FOR YOUR COINS! Pri-
vate collector seeking U.S. coins
and currency. Older varieties, all
denominations. I travel to you ! I
pay more than dealers and pawn!
Questions? Call 352-949-1450.


Apartments for Rent
FOR RENT: 3Bd/1Ba Apart-
ment $525 + Deposit. 2Bd/1Ba
Apartment $425 + Deposit. Near
Advent Christian Village in Dowl-
ing Park. 386-249-2647




PUBLISHER'S
NOTICE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Fair
Housing Act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference, limi-
tation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, disabili-
ty, familial status or national ori-
gin, or an intention, to make any
such preference, limitation and
discrimination." Familial status in-
cludes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under 18.
This newspaper will not know-
ingly accept any advertising for
real estate which is in violation of
the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777.
The toll-free number for the hear-
ing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


Houses for Rent

2-4 BEDROOM HOMES, $450 &
$750 per month. Call Jacob
Grantham Broker, Rankin-
Grantham & Assoc 386-362-
7080 or 386-208-3012

FirstDay
3BD/2BA 2000 sf, All new Appli-
ances, Hardwood/Tile, In Town,
Cable included, Large Rooms,
Screen Porch. $700 mo, $350
Security 386-208-8545

Mobile Homes for Rent

FirstDay
2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes
For Rent in Live Oak from $350 a
month, Deposit required. NO
PETS 386-364-7660

FirstDay
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba Enclosed large
porch, Dowling Park area. $700
mo, 1st, Last, Security. Section 8
accepted. Available Oct 1st. 386-
466-4653


Mobile Homes for Rent

FirstDay
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba in Butterfield
Acres Subdivision very near the
Advent Christian Village in Dowl-
ing Park. First time ever being
used as a rental. Nicely Fur-
nished, excellent condition. Has
2-Screened Porches, a carport,
and is situated on shaded lot.
$800 mo. Please call for details.
352-303-4484 or 352-793-6439.


LAKE WOOD
APARTMENTS IN
LIVE OAK
Quiet country living
2 bedroom duplex.
Call 362-3110.
570121-F


Acreage/Land/Lots for
Sale
5 ACRES FOR SALE: $20k
nothing down. 4" Well, Septic can
be added to the payment extra.
Off Hwy 349 Suwannee Co. near
Royal Springs. 352-498-3881

FIVE ACRES DOWLING PARK,
Well, Septic, Power, Paved Rd
frontage. Owner Financing, NO
DOWN $64,900 $570/mo 352-
215-1018

SUWANNEE CO 20 ACRES W/
DWMH 3Bd/2Ba. 10 Acres of it
Timber Land. $145K 386-776-
1164






You can Reach

Over 4 Million

Potential Buyers

for your product

through our Internet

and Newspaper

Network in Florida

and throughout

the Nation.

Call Nancy at

386-362-1734
1 569568-F


SERVICES


Village Oaks II
Apartments
1, 2, & 3 bedroom units.
HUD vouchers accepted.
Hurry in for an application.
Call 386-364-7936,
TDD/TTY 711.
705 NW Drive, Live Oak
"This institution is an equal
opportunity provider, and
employer."


FOUR ACRES
O'BRIEN/MCALPIN AREA
Beautiful Secluded Country Set-
ting. High & Dry. Owner Financ-
ing NO DOWN $34,900 $359/mo
352-215-1018

Trucks for Sale
FORD RANGER 1991 TRUCK:
V-6, 5-speed, Runs good. $1500
Call Virgil 386-362-4247

Sport Utility


1i





JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIM-
ITED 1995, V-8, 4-Wheel Drive,
All Factory Opts, Ice Cold Air,
w/Original Window Sticker.
Everything Works $4500 386-
658-2380




V, A' M_


JEEP WRANGLER SAHARA,
2007 model, 4X4, automatic. Low
miles. Black/gray. Priced at
$5,750. Details and pictures,
email nny65fd@msn.com. 561-
244-9447.


FirstDay
SWMH 2Bd/2Ba No Pets, $400
mo, Depostit $400. Near Dowling
Park. Available Sept 1st. 386-
294-2416 or 386-854-0093.

Homes for Sale

FirstDay
1993 24X40 PEACHTREE MO-
BILE HOME 3Bd/2Ba, CHA, May
be seen at 3318 CR 53 S, Madi-
son. $6,000 850-973-2353

Mobile Homes for Sale
DOUBLE WIDE FOR SALE
CHEAP Call Steve 386-365-
8549

HANDYMAN SPECIAL 5
ACRES 24X56 DWMH, gor-
geous oak shaded home sight.
Just off CR 49, needs interior re-
model. Owner Financing NO
DOWN PAYMENT. $69,900
$719/mo 352-215-1018

I HAVE A BEAUTIFUL 32X80
2001 HOME ON 1 ACRE: Fully
fenced nice neighborhood, close
to town & school. Would love to
show it to you! 386-365-4774
LAND HOME PACKAGES: Co-
lumbia & Suwannee County. pos-
sible owner Finance. Some avail-
ble with Sweat Equity Loans.
386-344-5024 or lugermom@ya-
hoo.com

NEW HOME 32X36 CASH
PRICE $29,900. Called Little Gi-
ant, a must see at this price call
Mike at 386-623-4218
OWN YOUR LAND? Use it as
down payment on a new home.
Call Nathan Welsh 386-623-7495
or email me t
nathan.a.welsh @gmail.com


~ (c~ TOYOTA
/r ^^^SSEV^SdC SCSHJf
^~ ^^^ ^^G~;g^-~ |


J-




t " * _. ,"2 * , ^ ' r


, '' '5
r ' 1 B - "


Each Kit includes:
* 3 Bright 11" x 14" All-weather Signs
* Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels
* Successful Tips for a "No Hassle" Sale
* Pre-Sale Checklist
* Sales Record Form


TOLL . ..
FREE:


LAKE CITY, FL 32055


DOWN PAYMENT REQUIRED. WITH APPROVED CREDIT SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. PHOTOS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. RMTO.P.0033


Run your Yard Sale in the

Wednesday North Florida Focus &

Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds

and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.
Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00 a.m.
569561-F/


I


I


And Make Your Event a Success! ^ S L














POAG , FATENON


Continued From Page 3


Homecoming at Swift Creek
Historic Church
Swift Creek Historic Church will be having their annual
Homecoming on September 26, 2010. Location is at
Swift Creek Historic Church and Cemetery in White
Springs, Florida. If any more information is needed,
please feel free to call Cathy Erixton at 386- 397-2791.
Services will start at 10:45 A.M. Our guest speaker will
be Rev. Brain Keen. As always we will be having old-
fashioned music and following the church services,
everyone will be bringing a covered dish. If you want to
get a feel of an old fashion church service and a taste of
history please come join us.


Philadelphia Baptist Church
Homecoming
The speaker will be Rev. James Roberts, DOM for
Beulah Baptist Association. The music will be Bro.
Couny Curl in in concert. We will begin at 10:30 a.m. on
September 26, 2010. There will be no Sunday School. We
will have a covered dish luncheon in the fellowship hall
following services. The church is located at 15824 169th
Road, in McAlpin, Fla. For more information call 386-
776-1541. Everyone is welcome.


Clases de Ingles
Gratis
Clases empiesan el 9 de Septiembre, 2010
cada lunes yjueves, 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Maestra Felicia Doty
y el equipo
Todas las classes van estar en la Iglesia Episcopal, San
Lukas, 1391 SW llth St. (Se encuentra la Iglesia en
frente del hospital en Live Oak.) Call Phyllis Doty @
386-249-0096 for more information.

The Melody Wildcat Baseball
Team is having fund raiser
(car wash)
September 11, 2010 9:00 am - 2:00 pm Cheek and Scott
Drugs (by Publix Store) Minimum $5.00 COME OUT
AND SUPPORT THE MELODY WILDCATS!!!

Cub Scout Pack 408 Round-
Up (sign up) for the 2010-2011
Cub Scout Pack 408 Round-Up (sign up) for the 2010-
2011 academic year will be held as follows: Tuesday,
August 31, 6:30 p.m. Suwannee Elementary School,
Thursday, September 9, 6 p.m. Suwannee Intermediate
School.
Our first meeting will be held on Thursday, September
16, at the Live Oak Church of the Nazarene, at 6:30 p.m.
Cub Scouts is for boys in first through fifth grades.


During the school year, boys earn their rank (Tiger-first
graders; Wolf - second graders; Bear-third graders;
Webelos 1 - fourth graders; Webelos 2 - fifth graders) as
well as badges, belt loops and pins, based on successful
completion of knowledge- and skill-based activities. Pack
408 camps out, either as a pack or with other Scouts in
district or regional camp-outs. Early camping
opportunities include the Wild Adventures Scout
Campout Septmember 25-26 and the Cuboree Oct. 15-16.
Other activities include zoofari Scout Day at the
Jacksonville Zoo and building a float and riding in the
Christmas Parade. For general information about Cub
Scouting, see
http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts/Cub%20
Scouts.aspx and
http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts/Parents.a
spx.

School Advisory Council
meeting
The next meeting of the School Advisory Council for
Suwannee High School will be Thursday, September 9,
2010, at 6 p.m. It will be held in the Student Activities
Room at the high school. All interested students, parents,
teachers and community members that would like to
participate and become involved in Suwannee High
School are invited to attend.

Annual Trash and Treasure
Sale
Woman's Club of Live Oak: sponsor
Event: Annual Trash and Treasure Sale - and - Bake Sale
When: September 23 and 24 from 9:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Location: Club House near the Coliseum, 1308 llth
Street SW, Live Oak
The Woman's Club of Live Oak meets: 1st Friday of
each month. Please call Susan Baan : 776-2264

Archeological Discovery
at Camp Weed
A program about an archeological discovery at Camp
Weed near Live Oak will be presented on September 11,
at 10am at Camp Weed. First contact in Suwannee
County between Europeans and indigenous people
occurred on September 12, 1539. A great program for all
ages, home schoolers welcome. Program fee includes
lunch. To register go to www.diocesefl.org or call 386 364
5250.

Did you earn your pin?
Reconnect with your shipmates and help
preserve the memories
With more than 13,000 members and over 150 chapters
throughout the United States, your rank or rate and status
are active, retired or honorably discharged are secondary
to the purposes of the organization. We are all brothers of
"The Pin." We band together to honor the memories of
the over 4,000 men who EARNED THE RIGHT to
wear"Dolphins" to maintain the bonds of friendship and
camaraderie.You are invited to contact us through the
address below for more information: National Contact:
United States Submarine Veterans, PO Box 3870
Silverdale, WA 98383 or 1-877-542-DIVE r
www.ussvi.org. Local contact:W. Ray Rausch, 386-209-
1473, uss483@windstream.net, 10035 105th Drive, Live
Oak, Fl 32060.

Brewer Lake Baptist Church
to host The Living Proof
Live Simulcast
BREWER LAKE BAPTIST CHURCH in Day, Florida
will be hosting THE LIVING PROOF LIVE
SIMULCAST on Saturday, September 18, 2010. The
simulcast features beloved Bible teacher, Beth Moore and
worship leader, Travis Cottrell.
The doors will open at 10:00 a.m. The event begins at
10:30 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m. The cost for this event
is $20.00 and will include lunch.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 7




l.LILLd ULL- CL1t.ll


HiDDLI IllHI DIunfHUL
All New Units
S5X15 * 5X20 * 10X15 * 10X20 * 15X20
Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd.
Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak


364-5300


IfyoeksMno ItlMpd ww laonline.com
IN* m tertan m www.nflaonline.com


Il53tC t o 7


PAGE 6, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA











U CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 7


Dear Classified Guys,
I went to an estate sale and found a
2000 Camaro in mint condition with
only 5,000 miles on it. The owner told
me that his grandmother, of all peo-
ple, bought the sports car new and
drove it for only two years before she
passed away. Most of the family did-
n't even know she had it in the
garage. It's been sitting there until
the family got around to cleaning out
the house. The price is unbelievable
for it's condition, but I'm
concerned since the car
hasn't been driven for the - -_
past three years. What '-
problems should I be looking
for? Am I getting a deal or a
headache?
Cash: Sounds like good ol' grandma
had a wild side. I guess if you're only
going to drive a car to church on
Sunday, you might as well be noticed
when you pull in the parking lot!
Carry: If everything is in good
working order, you probably found a
great car. These are the kind of deals
we love to find, where the item was
stored away and now the owner just
wants to find it a new home.
Cash: It looks like the most impor-
tant question is already answered:


TIE








Duane "Cast
& Todd



"Where was the car stored?" A car kept
in a dry place out of the sun is always
best and will have the least age-related
problems.
Carry: If you have the chance, check
out the garage where it was stored to
see if it's dry or damp. A damp garage
can cause rust on the undercarriage,
wheel wells and even in the trunk.
Cash: With only 5000 miles, we'd
expect all the parts to be original. So
your next step is to just make sure
everything is in good working order.
Since it hasn't been driven in awhile,
start it up, check the brakes, and take it
for a 20 to 30 minute test drive. The
car may run rough at first, but if it's in


SIED





i" Holze
'Carry" Holze


W 09/05/10
@2010 The Classified Guys.


good shape it should run smoother as
your ride progresses.
Carry: Plan on replacing the battery
and all of the fluids: oil, transmission,
radiator, etc. Fill up the gas tank right
away and add a fuel injector cleaner or
octane booster as well. Gas that sits for
a long time looses its octane and can
gum up the fuel injectors. Mixing in
these additives can help prevent any
problems.
Cash: The tires may need replacing
as well, but that's a small price to pay
for a car that's in pristine condition.
Carry: And who knows, maybe
you'll have an urge to drive it to church
next Sunday.


N


Road Worthy
Commuting has become a way of
life for many people and can rack up
thousands of miles on your car.
Include the trips to the grocery store,
movies and vacations, and we spend a
lot of hours behind the wheel. It's esti-
mated that the average American two-
driver family makes over 4000 trips in
their car each year. That adds up to
traveling more than 22,600 miles,
equivalent to driving from New York to
California seven times. Now that's a
long commute!
Lights Out
If you put your car in storage, don't
expect the battery to last. Car batteries
are designed to be discharged quickly
and then recharged using your car's
electrical system. When a car battery
remains unused for long periods of
time, the battery continues to sulfate,
diminishing its life by forming crystals
on the lead plates of the battery. Even
recharged, a battery that has been com-
pletely drained just a few times can
send you back to the auto store for a
replacement.
Do you have a question or funny story about the
classified? Want to just give us your opinion?
We want to hear all about it! Email us at:
comments@classifiedguys.com.


I wwCasiie usco0


(ooA � @(ToeN


Continued From Page 6

Please RSVP by September 12th to Jane Brock @ 386-
294-1211 (w) 386-294-2812 (h) or Becky Swain @ 386-
294-3537 (h) 386-209-1389 (m).

Learn to Square Dance!
It's Fun.... meet new friends, get great exercise!
Beginner lessons starting Thursday evening, Sept. 16,
2010 at 7 p.m. with the Vagabond Squares.Dancing at the
Hale Community Center, 215 NE Duval (across from the
fire station) in Live Oak, Florida. Caller: Ralph Beekman.
For information call 752-2544 or 638-0144.
The first night is FREE, so come check it out.

Greater New Bethel AME
Church celebrates
Pastor's retirement
The Rev. Charles Burke, Pastor of Greater New Bethel
African Methodist Episcopal Church, Live Oak, will
retire from pastoral duties in October, 2010 after 42 years
in the ministry. A Love Banquet will be held on Saturday,
September 25, 2010 at 6 p.m. in Greater New Bethel
Annex #2. Worship services will follow on Sunday,
September 26, at 3 p.m. The speaker will be the Rev. E.
Burke, brother of the honoree. Everyone is cordially
invited to share in the celebration of service for this man
of God. Banquet tickets may be obtained from any
member of the church. For further information, please
contact Eva Polite, (386) 362-6707 or Louise Brown
(386) 363-5417.

Combined Class reunion for
Suwannee High Classes of
1963, 1964, 1965 and 1966
Information has been mailed regarding this event. If you
were ever a part of any of these SHS graduating classes
and have not received your information, please email
your address to classofl964@comcast.net or call Elaine
Vann Garbett (Class of 64) at 386-362-6828.

Roberson - Taylor Reunion
Plan to join us Saturday September 18, 2010 for the
Roberson-Taylor family's 48th reunion in Live Oak.
When coming from Jasper on hwy 129, once in Live Oak,
Turn right at the 4th red light (you will see First Federal
Bank). Proceed west for 1 mile on the Newborn Road (at
the circle/around intersection, stay right heading west).
We will meet at the Coliseum which is on the left side of
the Garden's Club House. For the children we will have
an air bouncing fun unit. Pictures will be made of
family's and placed in reunion history book. Door will
open at 1 p.m. we will eat at 2 p.m. Please come and
bring a picnic lunch (including tea) for a good ole fashion
family get together! Eating utensils, places, ice, cups, and
napkins will be furnished.For more information contact
Doyle Roberson, 3111 Old Dobbin Rd, Montgomery, Al
at 334-202-0744.

New National Grove
Missionary Baptist Church
New National Grove Missionary Baptist Church, located
8283 105th Road, Live Oak will be hosting their Annual



SSuwannee

graphics

PRINTING * COPY SERVICE
Color Copies * Blueprints
621 Ohio Ave. North * Live Oak, FL 32064
(386) 362-1848 Fax (386) 364-4661* 1-800-457-6082

1996 ChryslerI

Town a Country '
Loac i .- . h .dl
Only ,,- 1.l,,-
Cash Price




G R A D Y 'S 500 West Howard St.(US 90),
Live Oak
AlaS S 5386.362.4012


Family and Friends Day on September 19, 2010 at 3 p.m.
Pastor: Tommie L. Jefferson, Messenger: Minister
Ditranna Walker, 1st Lady of Sweet Hope Missionary
Baptist Church, Live Oak.
Come share the celebration with us and be inspired by the
Word of God.

Annual Prayer Breakfast
The pastor and members of Jackson/Mackey Missionary
Society New Bethlehem A.M.E. Church, 11193 150th St.,
McAlpin, Fla. invites you and your Missionary Society to
our Annual Prayer Breakfast Service, Sunday, August 29,
2010, 8:30 a.m.
Come one! Come All! Join us in this special worship
experience RSVP: Sis. Vinnie S. King: 362-2740.
Rev. Johnnie Merrick, Pastor
Sis. Vinnie S. King, Program Coordinator
Sis. Mae DeVoe Fields, President

First Baptist Church of Live
Oak to hold weekly grief
recovery support group
First Baptist Church of Live Oak, FL will begin holding a
weekly grief recovery support group. GriefShare is a
non-denominational Biblically based 13 week program
for people who are struggling with losing a loved one in


Adoption

P[ IIn. ' Considering adoption?A
childless, successful, woman seeks to
adopt & needs your help! Financially
secure. Expenses paid. Call Margie.
(ask for michelle/adam). (800)790-
5260. FL Bar# 0150789

Announcements

NOTICE: Calling this number will
subject you to HUGE savingson
statewide advertising in over 100
newspapers. Advertising Networks of
Florida, Put us to work for You!
(866)742-1373 www.florida-
classifieds.com.

Equipment For Sale

NEW Norwood SAWMILLS-
LumberMate-Prohandles logs 34"
diameter, mills boards 28" wide.
Automated quick-cycle-sawing
increases efficiency up to 40%!
www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N
(800)661-7746 Ext 300N

Financial

CASH NOW!Get cash for your
structured settlement or annuity
payments. High payouts. Call J.G.
Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT
(1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the
Better Business Bureau.

Buried in Debt? Want to Save
Thousands& Eliminate Your Debt up
to 60%? We Can HELP! Call NOW
for a FREE Consultation! (888)496-
3167 Rated "A" with the BBB!

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH
NOW!!! $$$As seen on TV.$$$
Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need
$500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call
Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com

Are you behind on your Mortgage
payment?Do you have an adjustable
rate mortgage? FREE Evaluation and
Advice. Call Express Audits today!
(877)270-4415

For Sale

CHERRY BEDROOM SET.Solid
Wood, never used, brand new in
factory boxes. English Dovetail.
Original cost $4500. Sell for $895.
Can deliver. Call Tom (813)600-3653
Help Wanted

DRIVERS--ASAP!New Pay
Increase! 37-43 cpm Fuel Bonus -up


death. People can enter at any point in the 13 weeks. It
will be held at 6 pm on Wednesdays. First Baptist
Church is located at 401 W. Howard in Live Oak. For
more information, people may call 386-362-1583 or find
us on the web at www.fbcliveoak.org.

Happy Days are here again
The Suwannee County Animal Control Shelter has
received a $20,000 grant from Florida Animal Friend to
help spay or neuter the pets of low income families in
Suwannee County. This grant is funded through sales of
the official Florida Animal Friend Spay and Neuter
License Plate.
Applications can be picked up at participating local
veterinarian offices and at the shelter, 11150 144th Street,
McAlpin, Fl. There is a co-pay and that will be
determined according to your income. For further
information please call the shelter at 386-208-0072.

SHS Class of 1970
40 year reunion planned
The SHS Class of 1970 is planning their 40 year reunion
on Oct 23, 2010. If you were a member ,had a child,
sibling or relative in this graduating class, please email


CONTINUED ON PAGE 8


NORTH ALABAMA FARM: 33
ACRES, 2 Barns, fenced, Large
Kennel, 3500 sq.ft. Home, sell for
Appraisal Price $329,000. Debbie
Mathis Realty (256)599-5910

NORTH ALABAMA LAND: 480
Acres. Joins the Tennessee River!
Pasture, Bluff, Road Frontage, Trees.
$2500.00 /Acre. Close to
Chattanooga, TN & GA. Debbie
Mathis Realty (256)599-5910

Unbelievable Coastal Bargain! Only
$34,900 with FREE Boat Slip.
Adjoining lot sold for $99,900!
Beautifully wooded building lot in
premier gated waterfront community.
Enjoy direct access to Atlantic! All
amenities complete! Paved roads,
underground utilities, club house,
pool. Excellent financing. Call Now
(877)888-1415, x 2627

BUY MOUNTAIN LAND
NOW!Lowest prices ever! N.C.
Bryson City 2.5acres, spectacular
views, paved road. High altitude.
Easily accessible, secluded. $45,000.
Owner financing: (800)810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com

VIRGINIA MOUNTAIN LAND-20
acres!-Galax area, 2hrs from
Charlotte, views, gentle sloping for
great layout, springs, creeks, private,
reduced $199,500! Call owner,
(866)789-8535

Real Estate Auctions

FORECLOSED HOME
AUCTION1400+ FL Homes |
Auction: 9/18 Open House: Sept 4, 11
& 12 REDC I View Full Listings
www.Auction.com RE Brkr
CQ1031187


to 4cpm! Need CDL-A & 3 mos
recent OTR (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

Colonial Life seeks entrepreneurial
professional with sales experienceto
become a District Manager. Life/
Health license is required. Substantial
earnings potential. Please contact
meredith.brewer@coloniallife.com or
call (904)424-5697

Drivers- Flatbed CDL/A $2,000 Sign
On bonus. NEW TRUCKS
ARRIVING! Lease Purchase
Available. 6 months Experience
Required. No felonies. Hornady
Transportation (800)441-4271 x FL-
100

Heat & Air JOBS - Ready to work?3
week accelerated program. Hands on
environment. Nationwide
certifications and Local Job
Placement Assistance! (877)994-9904

Drivers - FOOD TANKER DRIVERS
NEEDEDOTR positions available
NOW! CDL-A w/ Tanker REQ'D.
Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a
recruiter TODAY! (877)484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com

Homes For Sale

FORECLOSED HOME
AUCTION1400+ FL Homes
Auction: 9/18 Open House: Sept 4, 11
& 12 REDC I View Full Listings
www.Auction.com RE Brkr
CQ1031187

Misc. Items for Sale

Si N I i 1LI S REBATE $$$$Sept/Aug
Electric Bill Paid $3,000.00 tax
Credit-2011 Get your free home gold
star certified. 1st 25 people to call,
$35.00 gift card Offer Expires 11/1/
2011: (877)791-6142


Miscellaneous


Ai R L I N 1 S ARE HIRING- Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.

Out of Area Real Estate

WATERFRONT, 152'
WATERFRONT, North Alabama,
Scottsboro. 1.8 Acres, 3000 sq.ft.
Home, enclosed inground pool,
boathouse, pier, electric lifts for boat /
jet ski. Debbie Mathis Realty
(256)599-5910


ANF
ADVEPrTIlINGr' rIETOPK ort iI ORIDA

Classified I D3 plr I Metro [D 'y


Week of Sept. 6, 2010
569559-F �


-


SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 7


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


Parental Guidance
The other day I ran into an old
friend I hadn't seen in awhile. As we
caught up on recent events, I told him
how I had to sell my Mom's car
because she was no longer able to
drive safely. Surprisingly, he shared
that he had the same problem with
his mother a few months back.
"Although, she refused to give up
her driver's license," he explained.
As he went on with his saga, I asked
him how he finally got her to give up
driving. "Well, she agreed to give up
her license after she ran into the cow."
"A cow!" I gasped. "How could
she hit a cow?"
"Well," he laughed, "that's what
happens when you drive into a barn.
(Thanks to Grant M.)


Apparently grandma never
drove too fast.



-^ \ -----~*^r^ ~'
GRANDMA SPECIAL 1
s, For Sale:1986Condition,
e Sabre, Great Condition,
Le S $, 200060O














POAG , FATENON


Continued From Page 7
your name (maiden & married), address, phone number
& email address to suwanneehighl970@gmail.com
.Please join our Facebook page, Suwannee High Class of
1970 40 Year Class Reunion to see information and
updates.

Suwannee High Class of 1990
The Suwannee High Class of 1990 20th reunion will be
held on October 22, 2010 and Oct. 23, 2010. The cost
will be $35/graduate and $10/spouse or additional guests.
If you were a member of the graduating class and are
planning to attend or would like more information, please
email your name, address, phone number to Melissa
(Kennedy) McKire at mckire4@windstream.net or Amy
Tucker Bauldree at(352)231-2683/(386)776-1904.
You can also visit our class website at shsl990.webs.com.
We will be having a class meeting on Saturday, August
21, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. at Florida Wholesale Homes on
90. We look forward to seeing you there or hearing from
you.

Lookingfor classmates
of Class of 1959
Would like to contact any classmates from the Class of
1959 (in the event of upcoming reunions, etc.) Contact
Joyce Parker at 407-886-0601 or write to: Joyce Parker,
4039 Visa Lane, Apopka, Fl 32703.

Haven Hospice hosts Helping
Hands Volunteer Orientation
When: Every Tuesday morning at 10 a.m.
Where: Haven Hospice Suwannee Valley Care Center,
6037 W. U.S. Hwy 90, Lake City, Fl,
Carolyn Long at 386-752-9191 for more information.

New Commander Post #107
New Commander Post #107 American Legion is Richard
(Dick) Lees Sr. For more information contact Hilde
Schmid 776-2123.

TOPS weigh-loss support
available locally
(It's now your time)
TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) is an effective weight-
loss solution that yields real results. With the average
waistline of North Americans growing at the same time
prices continue to rise, people are looking for cost effect
weight-loss support that works. That annual TOPS
membership fee is only $26 making TOPS one of the
most affordable options available. Monthly dues are $5.
Visitors are welcome to attend their first TOPS meeting
free of charge. TOPS FL 798 meets at Live Oak
Community Church of God 10639 US 129 South every
Wednesday morning with weigh in beginning at 7:45
a.m., meeting begins at 9 a.m. through 10 a.m. For more
information call Barbara at (386) 362-5933. It's never too
late to start losing those unwanted pounds.


Anna Miller Circle Seventh
Annual Fishing Tournament
The Anna Miller Circle of Live Oak Elks Lodge 1165
will sponsor its Seventh Annual Fishing Tournament in
Steinhatchee, Saturday, September 18, at River Haven
Marina. Entry Fee is $30 per person. Weigh-in from 1-4
p.m. Prizes total $1,500, plus free drawings and give-a-
ways. New children's category added: $10 entry fee (10
& under) with a special prize. Boat rental and lodging
available at local marinas. Info/entry forms: Terri
Johnson 386-776-2508, or River Haven Marina & Motel,
352-498-0709.
Thank you for your assistance in promoting this
tournament so the Anna Miller Circle can continue to
supports the special need children and the elderly in our
local nursing homes.

Donate your old cars
Now that spring has arrived, people may be thinking of
donating their old cars as part of a clean up. The Boys
and Girls Clubs would be happy to take their old cars.
People donating to the Clubs will not only get rid of the
unwanted car but will be contributing to the clubs. Boys
and Girls Clubs really work with kids in most
communities and offer a safe place for them. If you wish
to donate a car, call 800-246-0493. Not only will donators
be helping the kids, the will be able to take sale price as a
contribution for income tax purposes.

Talent Search
Do you sing or play and instrument? Do you act or
dance? Do you like to read or spend time with a friend in
wonderful conversation? WE WANT YOU! Suwannee
Health Care & Rehab Center is looking for your talent for
our residents. Dinner for two - $45; One night at the
Beach - $125; One hour volunteering to make memories
that last forever - PRICELESS! Call: Lynn Brannon,
Activities Director 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.

Customers needed!
Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host Dairy Queen Benefit
Night the second Tuesday of every month from 6-8 p.m.
to help buy books for Suwannee Middle School.

Donations needed!
Suwannee County Environmental Watchdogs, a non-
profit organization, seeks donations for yard sale
merchandise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.

CJBAT tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): CJBAT
(Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC Testing
Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required for
acceptance into Corrections & Law Enforcement
programs. Photo ID required. Pre-registration &
scheduling time and date are required. To register please
call 850-973-9451.

College Placement Tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): College
Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16),


Time to Upgrade.


If you searching for that pfct set f wheels,
lk no further than www.nflaonline.com


5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Services 24
hours before test. For information please call 850-973-
9451.

TABE tests
Monday - Thursday
Monday - Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): TABE
(Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center
(Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance
into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required.
Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required.
To register please call 850-973-9451.

Greater Visions Support Group
Addiction Support Group: Greater Visions faith-based
addictions support group meets at the Grace Manor
Restaurant. Meetings are held on Thursday mornings at
9:30 a.m. This group provides spiritual and emotional
support in a non-judgmental setting. Come experience the
freedom from addictions that is found in Christ. Greater
Visions is an outreach of Christ Central-Live Oak. For
more information contact 208-1345.

Suwannee County Republican
Executive Committee to meet
The Suwannee County Republican Executive Committee
meets in the council chambers of Live Oak City Hall at 7
p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. If the first
Thursday is the first day of the month, the meeting will be
held on the following Thursday. Each meeting has a guest
speaker or current issues will be discussed. All are
welcome to attend. For more information call Chairman
Carl Meece at 386-776-1444.

Branford TOPS meeting
changes locations
We now meet every Tuesday at L & M Scrapbooking
located at 105 SW Suwannee Ave. in Branford. Weigh-in
begins at 4:30 p.m. Meeting starts at 5. For more
information please contact Donna Hardin at 386-590-
2333. "Take Off Pounds Sensibly."

SREC seeking location in
Branford
Suwannee River Economic Council, Inc., a non-profit
organization is seeking a location in the Branford area
that could be used to serve meals to persons 60 years of
age or older. Any business, organization or church that
has space available and would be interested in assisting in
this much needed service to the elderly population of
Branford, should contact Bruce Evans, Senior Center
Director, at 362-1164 or Janis Owen, Director of Client
Services, at 362-4115, ext. 240.

Love a mystery?
Try locating your ancestors by working on your family
tree. The Suwannee Valley Gciic.il-h Society invites
you to join and learn how to find your ancestors.
Membership is $30 for a single member or $35 for a
family. Corporate membership is also available for
donations of $100 or more (tax deductible). Meetings are
held on the first Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM at
the Gclc.,i .-' Center at 215 Wilbur Street SW in Live
Oak. The library is open on Tuesday and Thursday from
9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and the talented folks there will be
glad to help. For more information call Jinnie or Alice at
386-330-0110.

Take Off Pounds Sensibly
(TOPS)
TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, is a non-profit weight
loss support group. We meet every Thursday morning at
First Advent Christian Church at 699 Pinewood Drive in
Live Oak, located next to the Vo-Tech. We all know how
difficult is to lose weight. As a group we support each
other through thick and thin. We welcome men as well as
ladies.
Weigh-in is from 8 - 8:50 with the meeting from 9 - 10
a.m. You are welcome to visit us and see if this is what
you are looking for.
For more information, please call Pat (386) 935-3720 or
Sherry (386) 776-2735.


Classifieds As Individual AsYoK

�nl I-F---



1 ENC- "0.0
�e be- f


It's fast, easy, convenient, and always available!

To create your customized classified ad visit

www.nflaonline.com

And click on "Buy a Classified"


, Good
nefits,
inities.
sn. Call
1-1314
ilder@
iii





,S.F.
1'


Re
pa.
press
clean
shelv
the
submi
salary
Attn: I
nber
or,


B SBE'
'C ASSOCIATE As
* r -..-


CLASSIFIED


571322-F


PAGE 8, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


1 1731 os o oi.Ar n h Cre


Your Ad


d











j -O J BackpackWord Find THIS DAY IN...
Just in time for Backpack Safety Month, see how
many related words you can find and circle in the puzzle.


ACHES
BACKPACK
BOOKS
CLASSROOM
C Z W


HEALTH
HURTS
PAINS
SAFETY


SCHOOL
SPINE
STRAPS
WEIGHT


S KO O B U Y N T


PL T H R S C L L F H S
PAAYT E FA SGMP
E P I S R L T D I X Q I
MG R N S E AE SBKN
ACHE S RW EXANE


H T


D V N U C P VOOK S R
BB R H V A U X M P Q I
ATOFVRL PBAXS
SOP PRT QMGC B M
LHH TF S SJ BK DV


School Match
Match the tools with the people who use them.


1. Grading Book

2. Backpack

3. Mop

4. Ladle


A. Janitor

B. Teacher

C. Lunch lady

D. Student

DP Vg aZ 3[ :stjaMsuv


Businesses from A to Z


UTO & TRUCK
SPECIALIST

B&B
920 E. Main, Mayo
Sammy Buchanan
Mon-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
386-294-2761
609688-F


all

Today!
Pick Your

$5.00 Space


immigration
Green Card; Spouse/
Family K Visa; Student F
Visa; Worker HB Visa;
Investor E Visa; Change
of Status
386-362-2030
www.fjslawcenter.com
609681 -F


H!!

SAVE BIG
WITH THIS AD!
CALL TODAY!
$5.00 PER
WEEK


Printing Copying
lueprints
lqSuwannee
- graphics
621 Ohio Ave. North
Live Oak
386-362-1848
609678-F


UNK

CARS
We Buy Junk
Cars & Trucks
Must Have Title
& Picture ID
FREE REMOVAL
386-658-1030


Live Oak
Plumbing, Inc.
Repairs/Remodel
New Construction
State Lic. #CFC1427438
386-362-1767
609684-F


CHOOSE YOUR LETTER!

PUBLISHES EVERY WEDNESDAY!

$5.00 PER WEEK

CALL JANICE GANOTE 386-362-1734


FREE
GROCERIES
Never Spend Your Money
For Food, Gas or
Prescriptions Again.
Find Out How!
386-590-1633 o

andclearing

BILL'S BACKHOE
44 SERVICE 4
Bushogging, Stump
Removal, Discing, Fencing
12150 196th Terrace
O'Brien, FL 32071
386-364-1418 or
386-249-1999


SMarks
The Spot!

Place Your
Ad Here!!


Lawn Service
* Full Lawn Service
* Brush Hogging
* Pressure Washing
* Leaf Vaccuming
386-776-2342
______________________R 9699-F


S SATELLITE

D I R ECT-V
200 Channels for 129.99
FREE Professional Installation
FREE 1-4 Receivers/Equipment
CASH Purchase Plans Available!
DirectvSat.com
Local Dealer 386-269-0984 S

OU CAN
SUCCEED
WITH THIS AD!
CALL TODAY!
$5.00 PER
WEEK


OME
TOUCH-UPS
BY: LEE
* Pressure Washing
(Commercial Grade
Pressure Washer)
* Lawn Maintenance
* Clean Roofs & Gutters
386-205-9543
LEE'S Home & Yard
Touch-Ups 614206


IIRED OF HIGH
PRICE COMCAST
OR WINDSTREAM
BUNDLES?
Get M . Plus Internet
starting at -j o !
plus UnlimitedPhone
for $14.95
DirectvSat.com
Local Dealer,
386-269-0984


ZOWIE
LOOK!
ONLY
$5.00 PER
WEEK
609603-F


SO I X H S OWH


HISTORY
* 1939: SOUTH AFRICA
DECLARES WAR ON
GERMANY.
* 1995: CAL RIPKEN, JR.
BREAKS LOU GEHRIG'S
MAJOR LEAGUE RECORD
FOR CONSECUTIVE
GAMES PLAYED.
* 1997: MORE THAN
TWO BILLION PEOPLE
WATCH PRINCESS DIANA
BE LAID TO REST ON
TELEVISION.


TRUE OR FALSE:
WEARING A BACKPACK INCORRECTLY
CAN CAUSE POOR POSTURE.



Ar-l. :� M NV


ergonomic

intended to provide
comfort and reduce
injury


ENGLISH: Pain

SPANISH: Dolor

ITALIAN: Dolore

FRENCH: Douler

GERMAN: Shmertz


STUDENTS CAN REDUCE THE
AMOUNT OF WEIGHT IN
THEIR BACKPACKS BY
ONLY BRINGING THE
BOOKS NEEDED
FOR PARTICULAR CLASSES.


G E T THE

PICTUREE.








Can you guess what
the bigger picture is?
)I3Vd)IV9 :IW3MGNV


SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 9


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA














Bill Cosby, Randy Newman among performers


TALLAHASSEE -
The 13th season of The
Florida State University's
annual festival of the fine
and performing arts has
been announced - and
prepare to be dazzled.
Running from Feb. 11
to Feb. 21, Seven Days of
Opening Nights will offer
a unique combination of
performances and exhibits
ranging from beloved en-
tertainer Bill Cosby to ac-
claimed singer-songwriter
Randy Newman, and
from tap-dancing virtuoso
Savion Glover to celebri-
ty chef and bestselling
author Anthony Bourdain.
Even before the Febru-
ary festival begins, the
Seven Days spirit starts to
build with several major
performances scheduled
in venues around Talla-
hassee. On Oct. 2, blues
legend B.B. King will
give the first show in
Florida State's newly ren-
ovated Ruby Diamond
Auditorium. And on Feb.
3, classical pianist Si-
mone Dinnerstein and
singer-songwriter Tift
Merritt will merge their
contrasting musical styles
in a concert at Tallahassee
Community College.
Two final performances
will also be offered after
Seven Days' main run
concludes. On March 14,
The Acting Company -
"the major touring classi-
cal theatre in the United
States," in the words of
The New York Times -
will perform Shake-
speare's "A Comedy of
Errors," one of the Bard's
earliest, most farcical


works. And on April 10,
hilarious essayist and mo-
nologist David Sedaris
makes a Seven Days re-
turn engagement - his
2009 performance was an
instant sell-out - when
he visits Ruby Diamond
Auditorium.
The annual festival
spotlights The Florida
State University's com-
mitment to the arts -
music, theater, dance, vi-
sual art, film and litera-
ture.
"There are very few
universities in the country
that stage an annual festi-
val of this caliber, and the
educational opportunities
that many of these artists
and performers provide
for our students while
they're here just make it
that much more special,"
Florida State President
Eric J. Barron said.
"From B.B. King all the
way through to David
Sedaris, I'm personally
looking forward to seeing
some of the greatest
artists of our time."
Education is integral to
the festival, and the ma-
jority of the artists who
perform at Seven Days of
Opening Nights also
spend time with Florida
State students in master
classes, giving invaluable
insights into craft, process
and art. Students and fac-
ulty are frequently invited
to perform onstage with
the artists as well.
"I think we hit a lot of
bases this season," said
Seven Days director
Steve MacQueen. "The
festival runs the gamut


from longtime legends to
up-and-coming stars,
from the deeply serious to
the deeply silly - some
very familiar stuff and
some brand-new things."
The full Seven Days of
Opening Nights schedule
is as follows:

Oct. 2 - B.B. King:
The reigning King of the
Blues brings his beloved
guitar, Lucille, to Ruby
Diamond Auditorium for
the very first performance
in that venue since it un-
derwent a $35 million
renovation.
Feb. 3 - Tift Merritt
& Simone Dinnerstein:
Roots rock meets classi-
cal piano as the two gift-
ed artists present NighIi,"
a fascinating meeting of
musical worlds. It will
take place at Tallahassee
Community College's
Turner Auditorium.
Feb. 11 - Jim Roche,
"Retrospective": Roche,
a multimedia artist and
retired Florida State Uni-
versity art professor, gets
the full retrospective
treatment at the universi-
ty's Museum of Fine Arts.
On display will be maps,
motorcycle drawings, rep-
resentations of myths,
conceptual works, pho-
tographs, abstracts and
much more.
Feb. 11 - Mark Mor-
ris Dance Group: The
acclaimed modern dance
troupe, which travels with
its own musical group,
will give a performance
that ranges in genres from
baroque to contemporary
by way of country swing.


It's happening at Ruby
Diamond Auditorium.
Feb. 12 - Randy
Newman: One of the
great American songwrit-
ers of the past 50 years,
Newman's work has been
interpreted by a who's
who of singers, from Peg-
gy Lee to Nina Simone,
Joe Cocker and Barbra
Streisand. He'll perform a
set of his darkly satirical
tunes at Ruby Diamond
Auditorium.
Feb. 13 - Bill Cosby:
Over the course of nearly
five decades, Cosby has
earned a spot as one of
the world's best-loved en-
tertainers. In a show at
Ruby Diamond Auditori-
um, he'll use his influen-
tial stand-up act as a way
to communicate directly
with his audience, impart
his philosophy and share
a few laughs.
Feb. 13-14 - Gabriela
Montero: One of the
brightest stars in classical
music, the Venezuelan pi-
anist will split her pro-
grams between Latin
compositions and her own
improvisations. She'll
perform at Pebble Hill
Plantation on Feb. 13,
then at TCC's Turner Au-
ditorium the next
evening.
Feb. 15 - PRISM:
The gloriously noisy cele-
bration of all things
"band" and all things
Florida State returns to
Seven Days of Opening
Nights with a concert at
Ruby Diamond Auditori-
um.
Feb. 16 - Anthony
Bourdain: You've proba-


Sell Your Car for "Top Dollar" 1


L


SALE


PRE.SALE CHECKLIST


' -


SUCCESSFUL TIPS

- 1 u




-


Each Kit Includes:


* 2 All-Weather Fluorescent "For Sale" Signs

* Successful Tips
"Get Top Dollar for Your Used Car"

* Pre-Sale Checklist

* Vehicle Options Window Display

* E-Z Closing Forms
including Deposit Form & Bill of Sale


Run your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday

North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat


569562-F J


bly seen his continent-
hopping culinary series
"Anthony Bourdain: No
Reservations." The
celebrity chef, bestselling
author and world traveler
will speak on a variety of
colorful topics at Ruby
Diamond Auditorium
(and also visit with cre-
ative-writing and hospi-
tality students during his
visit to campus).
Feb. 17 - Luciana
Souza: The Brazilian
singer, composer and
Grammy winner is one of
today's greatest singers.
Hailing from Sao Paulo,
Souza's Brazilian roots
are instantly evident, but
so is her absolute mastery
of jazz, world music,
classical and pop. At Sev-
en Days, Souza will be
joined by the equally as-
tonishing Brazilian gui-
tarist Romero Lubambo.
They'll perform together
at TCC's Turner Auditori-
um.
Feb. 18 - Kronos
Quartet & Wu Man: The
artists will collaborate on
"A Chinese Home," a ma-
jor work co-commis-
sioned by Seven Days of
Opening Nights. This
highly theatrical perfor-
mance piece tracks the
20th century in China
through music as well as
film: "A Chinese Home"
has a feature-length film
accompaniment by
award-winning director
Cheng Shi-Zheng. Add
costume changes, props,
lighting cues, and hun-
dreds of marching metal-
lic toys, and it will be
like nothing Tallahassee
has seen before. It's all
happening at Ruby Dia-
mond Auditorium.
Feb. 18, Feb. 20 -
"Silents! New Scores for
Old Films, Performed
Live": Three students in
the composition program
of Florida State's College
of Music were commis-
sioned to write new
scores for a trio of silent
shorts from the early days
of film. The results -
about an hour's worth of
silent-film fun - will be
presented and performed
live on two nights at
FSU's Student Life Cine-
ma.
Feb. 19 - Saturday
Matinee of the Arts: The
Tallahassee Museum
opens its doors free of
charge to celebrate the re-
gion's love of performing
arts and visual arts, from
folk dancing, drum lines
and fiddle-playing to
glassblowing, oil painting
and fancy needlework.
This year's lineup will in-
clude the Chinese Associ-
ation of Tallahassee's
dancing dragons and
tigers, as well as thrilling
African drum perfor-
mances.
Feb. 19 - Geoffrey
Gilmore and a Movie
We Haven't Seen: For
the fourth consecutive
year, Gilmore, chief cre-
ative officer of Tribeca


scheduled for 'Seven Days Of Opening


2 save.com


*i


ADVERTISING CIRCULARS * COUPONS * DEALS * TRAVEL SPECIALS * ONLINE ANYTIME!

Contact Monja Slater at the Siiwannee Democrat to I

advertise on zip2save.com 386-362-1734 * 1-800-525-4182


Nights'

Enterprises and previous
director of the Sundance
Film Festival, will pluck
a favorite movie from the
festival circuit and bring
it to Seven Days long be-
fore the general public
gets its chance. It will be
screened at FSU's Student
Life Cinema.
Feb. 19 - Ira Glass:
The host and producer of
the public radio program
"This American Life" has
won the highest honors
for broadcasting and jour-
nalistic excellence. He'll
share stories from his
program during a special
evening at Ruby Diamond
Auditorium.
Feb. 20 - FSU Sym-
phony Orchestra & Jazz
Band: For the first time
ever, the FSU Symphony
Orchestra and FSU Jazz
Program join forces for
an evening of top-flight
jazz and classical music,
capped by an
orchestral/jazz re-envi-
sioning of Gershwin's im-
mortal "Rhapsody in
Blue" with soloist Marcus
Roberts. It's at Ruby Dia-
mond Auditorium.
Feb. 21 - Savion
Glover: The undisputed
king of modern tap danc-
ing, Glover will come to
Florida A&M Universi-
ty's Lee Hall to perform
his latest production,
"SoLo iN TiME," in
which he explores tap and
its connection to flamen-
co, with a live flamenco
band and flamenco
dancers.
March 14 - The Act-
ing Company: The
renowned acting troupe
promotes theater and lit-
eracy by bringing a tour-
ing repertory of classical
productions, talented
young actors and teaching
artists into communities
across America. For Sev-
en Days, they'll perform
Shakespeare's "A Come-
dy of Errors" at Ruby Di-
amond Auditorium (and
also give a master class
with FSU theater stu-
dents).
April 10 - David
Sedaris: With sardonic
wit and incisive social
critiques, Sedaris has be-
come one of America's
pre-eminent humor writ-
ers. The great skill with
which he slices through
cultural euphemisms and
political correctness
proves that Sedaris is a
master of satire and one
of the most observant
writers addressing the hu-
man condition today.
He'll read from some of
his works during an
evening at Ruby Diamond
Auditorium.
Ticket sales for Seven
Days members begin Sept.
14 and run through Oct. 4.
(See www.sevendaysfesti-
val.org for details.) Tickets
for the general public go
on sale Oct. 5.
For more information,
visit www.sevendaysfesti-
val.org or call 850-644-
7670.


Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.*

Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.

*Not valid with the $18.95 special


i.'
~z~u~c~rt
kr


PAGE 10, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


-I


L


FOR SALE




- -











UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PERFORMING ARTS


Calendar


of Events


All events are in the Phillips Center for the
Performing Arts, unless otherwise noted.

Riders in the Sky
Friday, September 10, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $20-35
Sponsored by 93.7 K-COUNTRY

Craig Martin's Classic Albums Live: The
Songs of Woodstock
Friday, September 17, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $25-40
Sponsored by the Dharma Endowment Foun-
dation, WYMG-TV Myll and 92.5/98.5/107.4
WIND-FM THE CLASSIC ROCK STATION

Tania P6rez-Salas Compaiia de Danza
Tuesday, September 21, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $25-40
Sponsored by Fresco Neighborhood Italian
and Gainesville Today
*Please note: This performance
contains nudity.
U.S. Premiere


PANDEMONIUM -
Lost and Found Orchestra
Friday, October 1, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $30-40

Jupiter String Quartet
With Kevin Orr, Piano
Sunday, October 3, 2 p.m.
University Auditorium
Reserved Seating: $25-35

MOMIX - Botanica
Wednesday, October 6, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, October 7, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $25-40
Sponsored by Falcon Financial Management,
Inc., Jeff Davis CFP, Gainesville Magazine
and 92.5/98.5/107.4 WIND-FM THE CLAS-
SIC ROCK STATION

Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys
Friday, October 8, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $25


October 17, 2 p.m.
University Auditorium
Reserved Seating: $25-35

Francesca Gagnon - The Voice of AlegriaTM -
sings the music of Cirque du Soleil� with the
UF Symphony Orchestra
Friday, October 22, 7:30 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $30-40
Sponsored by Shands HealthCare

Young Concert Artist: Ran Dank, Piano
Monday, October 25, 7:30 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre*
Reserved Seating: $30
Sponsored by Fairfield Inn by Marriott,
Lowry Financial Advisors, Inc. and Shands
HealthCare.

*The Squitieri Studio
Theatre is located just off the Main
Lobby of the Phillips Center
for the Performing Arts.


Metales M5 - Mexican Brass
Sunday, October 10, 2 p.m.
Reserved Seating: $20-30
Borealis String Quartet


THE


QUEEN)


Jill Cataldo saves hundreds on groceries by making the most

of the common coupon. You can, too. Here's how.

Couponers: A Threat to the U.S. Economy?


, By
Jill Cataldo







Most of my reader mail is positive, but I also receive
comments from readers who aren't completely on
board with the whole idea of coupon shopping.
Occasionally, the questions that show up in my inbox
surprise me. Here's one.
Q: "Jill, don't you ever think about what you are
doing on a larger scale? In encouraging people to not
pay high prices, wait until products go on sale and use
coupons to get them at extremely low prices, people
are going to get used to paying less for everything. If
everyone did this, people are never going to want to
pay full price for anything again. Not just groceries
but clothes, travel, cars and more. I just can't help but
think you could be responsible for an economic
collapse."
A: I suppose I should be flattered by the idea that I,
merely by encouraging people to save money on
groceries with coupons, could bring down an entire

r-------- --------------il
I A a u ' f!I

Quality Plus


Carpet Cleaning
carpetcleaninglakecity.com
100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
I 386-965-7188
2 ROOMS Tile & Grout
S 50 *Add..,on.lchr.g. . for hev...yoi..l.o .50/sf
i Deluxe Package Ii Deluxe Package Ii Deluxe Package I
I 3Room*S 60 4o00m*170 L oom* S9O
Carpet Steam Cleaned Includes Chemical Pr-Spray, Chemical Injected Steam Extraction
| Deodorizer *Over 250sf considered 2 rooms i I c |


economy. Coupon use is nothing new. It originated
back in the late 1800s. Coca-Cola and Grape-Nuts
were among the first products to offer coupons in
magazines and via the mail to encourage shoppers to
buy their products.
While couponing has seen highs and lows in
popularity, it's never truly gone away. Certainly,
since the recession began in 2008 coupon use has
enjoyed resurgence. CNN reported that coupon use
increased 27 percent in 2009, noting that this was the
first time in 17 years that shoppers had used more
coupons than they'd used the previous year. So,
there's no doubt that many more people are using
coupons.
But, here are a few truths about couponing it's
important to keep in mind:
* Manufacturers would not offer coupons for their
products if they hadn't already budgeted for the cost
of redeeming them. Whether it's to raise recognition
of a new product or to boost sales on an existing one,
coupons are here to stay. If a manufacturer provides a
$1 coupon for a $1.99 product you like and use, why
wouldn't you want to save half the price on it?
* Legitimate coupon use does not hurt stores.
Excluding coupon fraud in all its forms, stores
receive the dollar value of the coupons they accept
from the manufacturer. So if a shopper buys a $1.99
product with a $1 coupon, the store still receives
$1.99, the price it charges for the product.
You mentioned that if people become accustomed to
saving significantly on their groceries that they will
likely want to pay less for everything - and this is
true. But again, most people already do this on many
levels. Do you decide to buy a new car and look for
the worst possible deal on it? Do you plan a vacation



I- : - "


NEW LIFE BIBLE $5 off
BOOKSTORE any
purchase of I
1102 Ohio Ave. South (Next to Advance Auto) e25 or more
386-362-4851 I
Better Parking, Better Hours, More Inventory I
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 1
L ------.LL


and choose the flights with the highest prices? Given
a choice, most people want to save money and
gravitate toward better prices instinctively, especially
if cost comparison is easy.
Not everyone who uses coupons on groceries will
become a Super-Couponer, either. It does take some
time, effort and desire to want to achieve lower
grocery bills. Effective coupon shoppers also use
stockpiling techniques, buying enough of an item to
last until the next time it goes on sale. Not all
shoppers care to do this. The "average" coupon
shopper looks at the coupon inserts in the newspaper
on the day they arrive, cuts the ones they'll use this
week and tosses the rest in the recycle bin. Super-
Couponers know these people are throwing away
money.
I don't think the economy is in danger because
people are coupon shopping, and I don't think it will
it get worse due to coupon shoppers' thriftiness. On
the contrary, I think people are waking up to
overspending in general. But for every person who
cuts their weekly grocery bill by 50 percent or more,
there are plenty who don't plan shopping trips based
on getting the best prices at the store that week.
Next week, we'll discuss the demographics of a
coupon shopper. Who's using coupons and who isn't
may surprise you.
(c) CTWFeatures


Jill Cataldo, a coupon workshop instructor writer
and mother of three, never passes up a good deal.
Learn more about couponing at her website,
www.supercouponing.com. E-mail your own
couponing victories and questions to
jill@ctwfeatures. com.




Ime


rIgo ---
IXooA A
IMa~
I0


any cake
S817 S. Ohio, Live Oak
I I362-7009
I 362-7009 61179
L, 7J-


--I


wI


SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 11


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA










PAGE 12, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010


* CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE - WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM - SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA


wrf lI Is Stok to Chews Freli





S771 oNL I OK MILES
2008 CHRYSLER CROSSFIRE LIMITED 2010 FORD MUSTANG 2003 FORD MUSTANG GT 2007 DODGE CHARGER
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, AUTOMATIC, ALLOY LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, POWER LOCKS LOCAL T RADE XTRA XTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, CHROME WHEELS, S POILER LOCAL TRADE, XTRAC LEAN, 20" CHROME WHEELS,
WHEELS, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, POWER DRIVERS SEAT & WINDOWS, ALLOY WHEELS AUTOMATIC, SPOILER, MACH S TEREOS YSTEMI4.6LV8 ENGINE THIS ONE IS IMMACULATE, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS & DRIVER' S SEAT!
THE ULTIMATE SPORTS CAR...LIKE BRAND NEW!!! LIKE BRAND NEW.SAVE THOUSANDS!!! THE NICEST ONE YOU WILL EVER FIND!!! YOU CAN DRIVE THIS ONE LIKE YOU STOLE IT!!!






N s99 5 FULLY LOADED
2006 CHEVY IMPALA LT 2006 GMC YUKON XL DENALI 2008 HUMMER H3 2005 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER GT CONVERTIBLE
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, POWER LOCAL TRADE, XTR EXTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, NAVIGATION, DVD LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, SUNROOF, L AT RADE XTRA XTRA C LEAN ONE 0 WNER WE SOLD IT NEW,
DRIVER S SEAT, DUAL CLIMATE CONTROLS, WOODGRAIN INTERIOR SUNROOF, DUAL CLIMATE CONTROLS, HEATED MEMORY SEATS, B RAND NEW BFG ALL TERRAIN TIRES, CHROME WHEELS, LEATHER, CHROME WHEELS, CD & C ASSETTE TILT & C RUISE
TRIM, YOU WILL NOT FIND A NICER SEDAN!!! THIS ONE HAS ALL THE OPTIONS!!! DUAL P OWEWfHEATED SEATS, FULLY LOADED ONE-OF-A-KIND!!! TURBO ENGINE THIS ONE IS FULLY LOADED!!!





ONLY 3K MILE SNL 17K MIL 0 -K MILES
2006 PONTIAC SOLSTICE CONVERTIBLE 2006 CHEVY Z-71 4x4 2008 BMW 3281 SEDAN 2006 PT CRUISER CONVERTIBLE
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, L WEATHER AUTOMATIC, CHROME LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA C LEAN,L WEATHER, CHROME WHEELS, FAB TECH LIFT KIT, LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA, LEATHER, SUNROOF, LocAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, A LLOYWHEELS,
WHEELS, STEERNGWHEEL CONTROLS, ALL POWER EQUIPMENT, CHROMEWHEELS, DUAL CLIMATE CONTROLS, JBL AUDIO SYSTEM, POWER DRIVER'S ALLOY WHEELS, NAVIGATION, ALL THE POWER OPTIONS, TILT & C RUIS AUTOMATIC, $AVE BIG ON THIS ULTRA
BRAND NEW TIRES, JUST IN TIME FOR SUMMER,
LET THE TOP DOWN & GO CRUISING TODAY!!! SEAT, THIS ISAN AWESOME TRUCK W/ALLTHEACCESSORIES!!! THIS LUXURIOUS ULTRA LOW MILEAGE BMW IS IMMACULATE!!! LOW MILEAGE CONVERTIBLE!!! GO CRUISING TODAY!!!





LY 8KLE1A- - ONLYs6985
2005 CHEVY AVALANCHE 2001 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 2009 BMW 135 I COUPE 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo
LOCAL TRADE, XTRAX TRA CLEAN, POWER WINDOWS&L OCKS, ALLOY WHEELS, BRAND L OCALT RADE XTRA XTRA C LEAN A UTOMATI HARD TOP, ICE LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, ALLOY WHEELS, L OCALTRADE, XTRA CLEAN, A LLOYW HEELS
NEW RWL TIRES, TOW PKG., PLENTY OF ROOM FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY, PLENTY OF COLD A/C A LLOYW HEELS 4OL 6 CYL E NGINEATHER, SPOILER, SUNROOF, ALL POWER EQUIPMENT! POWER W WINDOWS& LOCKS, CD/CASS., TILT & CRUISE,
ROOM HUGE CREW CAB & REAR STORAGE! THIS ONE ISA RARE FIND!!! THIS ONE IS LIKE BRAND NEW!!! PRICED TO SELL.J.TWON' T LAST LONG, HURRY!!!




; -~~U-- ------ --- --_CI -- ~ o 5 MILES

2007 CHEVY COBALT LS 2006 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER 2000 BMW 3231 SEDAN 2008 JEEP WRANGLER SAHARA 4x4
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, Spoiler, CD, Automatic LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, SUNROOF, L OCALTRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, L WEATHER SUNROOF, A LLOY LOCAL T RADE WE SOLD IT NEW! A UTOMATIq POWER W WINDOWS
ULTRA LOW MILEAGE, FUEL EFFICIENT SEDAN!!! A LLOYW HEELS V-6 ENGINE, P OWERD RIVER S SEAT, 6 DISC WHEELS, DUAL POWER SEATS , RWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, & LOCKS, C HROMEP KG, L IFTK ITW/C HROMEW HEELS& BFG TIRES,
CD C CHANGE D IGITALC LIMATEC CONTROLS& H EATEDS EAT! D DIGITAL C LIMATEC ONTROI,W OODGRAININTERIOR TRIM, THIS OVER $15,000 IN ACCESSORIES ON THIS 0 NO $AVE BIG
THIS LOW MILEAGE SEDAN IS LOADED!! BMW IS EXTREMELY NICE & IN EXCELLENT CONDITION!!! ON THIS LIKE NEW GORGEOUS WRANGLER!!!







2006 CHEVROLET TAHOE LS 2007 LINCOLN MKZ 2007 KIA SORENTO LX 2002 DODGE DAKOTA SXT
LOCAL TRADE TRAXTRAC LEAN, BRAND NEW RWL TIRES, LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA C LEAN LEATHER, C HROMEWHEELS, SUNROOF, DUAL LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, LEATHER, ALLOY WHEELS, LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, ALLOY WHEELS, CD,
3RD ROW SEAT, REAR AIR, DUAL CLIMATE CONTROLS, ALLOYWHEELS, P OWERSEATS, H EATEY'COOLED S EAT DIGITAL CLIMATE CONTROL, WOODGRAIN P OWERW WINDOWS& LOCKS, ILT & CRUISE. THIS MID-SIZE AUTOMATIC, ICE COLD A/C, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, THESE SMALL
STEERING WHEEL CONTROLS, POWER DRIVER' S SEAT. INTERIOR TRIM, TOO MANY OPTIONS TO LIST ON THIS LUXURY SEDAN!!! SUV IS SUPER NICE W/PLENTY OF INTERIOR SPACE!!! TRUCKS ARE HARD TO FIND. IT WON' T LAST LONG!!!
THIS NICE TAHOE WON' T LAST LONG!!!





NLY 37K MILE
2003 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER EXT LT 2007 EXPLORER SPORT TRAC XLT 4x4 2006 NISSAN MAXIMA 3.5 SE 2007 RAM 1500
L OCALT RADE X TRAXTRA CLEAN, POWER W WINDOWS& LOCKS, LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, ALLOY WHEELS, POWER WINDOWS LOCAL TRADE, XTRA CLEAN, SUNROOF, ALLOY WHEELS, POWER LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, WE SOLD IT NEW, TILT &
3 R3 Row SEAT, REAR AIR, P OWERDRIVER' S SEAT, DUAL & LOCKS, SUNROOF, FACTORY TAILGATE EXTENDER & NERF BARS, TOW DRIVER' S SEAT, STEERING WHEEL CONTROLS, DUAL DIGITAL CRUISE, AUTOMATIC, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, BRAND NEW MICHELIN
C LIMATEC CONTROL CDICASS., Tow PKG., A LLOYW HEELS PKG. IMMACULATE CONDITION, YOU WON' T FIND A NICER CLIMATE CONTROL, CD/CASSETTE. THIS SEDAN IS LOADED & TIRES! $AVE BIG ON THIS ULTRA LOW MILEAGE TRUCK!!!
PLENTY OF ROOM FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY!!! ONE!!! SPORTY!!!


FULLY LOADED! _CUMMINS



ouH29K MILES 01-1.WIW I. oNLY 7K MIL
2007 F EDME SEL 2006 FORD F-150 CREW LARIAT 2007 MERCEDES C230 SPORt 2009 RAM LARAMIE MEGA CAB 4x4
L0ocaTRADE. X1 L XAX M qCLBM(LEum,Ofm EWEELSu, DaN. LOCAL TRADE, XTRA X TRA C LEAN L WEATHER SUNROOF, 20" A LLOY LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, L WEATHER DUAL POWER SEATS, SUN- L OCALT RAD� XTRA X TRACLEAN, WE SOLD IT NEW! L EATHE1
S&m Sl K a DULfPQoWml ISaS POWER Foum IGRAMRSuT, 6 DISC W HEELq BRAND NEW RWL TIRES, H EATEDS EATS 6 D IscCD ROOF, D UALC LIMATECONTROLS, A LLOYW HEELS SPOILER, STEERING POWER STEPS, NAVIGATION, INFINITY AUDIO SYSTEM, BFG 315
S CQANf TIMS MID-SIZESUVIS LOADED& SUPERNICEl CHANGER, TOW PKG., THE NICEST ONE YOU WILL EVER SEE! WHEEL CONTROLS, THIS IS A GREAT LOOKING SPORTY CAR!!! ALL TERRAIN TIRES D ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM DUALPOWER SEATS,






2008 CHEVY COLORADO CREW LT 2009 FORD F-150 CREW XLT 2007 MINI COOPER S 2007 RAM 1500 SLT 4x4
LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, ALLOY WHEELS, POWER LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, ALLOY WHEELS, POWER DRIVERS SEAT, L OCALT RADE X TRAX TRAC LEAN L EATHER D UALS UNROOFS D IGITAL LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, POWER WINDOWS &
WINDOWS & LOCKS, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER, Z-71 PACKAGE, FACTORY ERFBARS, NEWTOOLBO!(POWERP EDALSTOWPKG, SPRA�.IN CLIMATE CONTROLS, ALLOY WHEELS & POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS. LOCKS, Alloy Wheels, TILT & CRUISE, SPRAY-IN BEDLINER,
CREW CAB TRUCK WITH PLENTY OF ROOM!!! BEDLINER, RWL M ICHELINTIRES, THIS ONE IS JUST LIKE BRAND NEW!!! IMMACULATE CONDITION PLUS IT HAS A TURBO ENGINE!!! TOW PKG., THESE 4x4 TRUCKS ARE TOUGH TO FIND!!!






2008 CHEVY CREW CAB 4X4 2006 TOYOTA CAMRY SOLARA 2008 HONDA ACCORD LX 2008 RAM QUAD CAB LARAMIE 4x4
LOCAL TORWI; XTRAC LEAN POWER INDOWS&WLC RTND LOCALTRADEXTRAXTRACLEAN LEATHER P OWERDRIVER'S SEAT, LOCALTRADE, XTRA XTRA CLEAN, POWERWINDOWS & LOCKS LOCALT RADE XTRAXTRA C LEAN L WEATHER HEMI E ENGINE C HROME2O"
SRUIS TOW PKG., SPR LINER CD, A LLOYW HEELSWBRN LOCAL RADE X TRAX TRA LEAN L EITHER OWERRIVER S SEAT, WHEELS, I NFINITYAUDIO S SYSTEM W OODGRAINI NTERIORTRIM, DUAL
NEW RWL BRIDGESTONE DUELLERTIRES, W WINDOWS & LOCKS, ALLOY WHEELS, BRAND NEWTIRES, STEERING WHEEL A UTOMA LT &CRUSE THIS ONE IS LIKE BRAND CLIMATE CONTROLS POWER DRIVER' S SEAT, TOW P KG,
THESE 4x4 CHEVY'S ARE SELLING FAST!! C ONTROLS,THIS LOW MILEAGE CAR IS SUPER NICE!!! NEW BUT WITHOUT THE BRAND NEW PRICE!!! THIS ONE IS LOADED!!!





HO 2L K M$9LL
2008 TOVOTA COROLLA S 2008 FORD F-250 CREW LARIAT 4X4 2001 HONDA ACCORD EX 2005 RAM QUAD CAB SLT


LOCAL TRADE TRA XTRA CLEAN, AUTOMATIC, SUNROOF, POWER WINDOWS LOCAL TRADE, XTRA XTRA C LEAN L WEATHER 20" F ACTORYALLOY WHEELS, L OCALTRADE, XTRA XTRA C LEAN POWER W WINDOWS& LOCKS, LOCAL T RADE XTRA XTRA CLEAN, POWER WINDOWS &
& LOCKS, ALLOY WHEELS, TILT & CRUISE, GREAT FUEL MILEAGE ON NAVIGATION, HEATED SEATS, STEERING W HEELCONTROLS & D UALPOWER A LLOYW HEELq 6 D ISCCD/CASS., SUNROOF, A UTOMATIC THIS IS LOCKS, TILT & CRUISE, S PRAY-IN B EDLINEi TOW P KG, THIS
THIS LOADED LOW MILEAGE COROLLA!!! Seats! THIS ONE IS IMMACULATE & ONE OF THE NICEST EVER TRADED THE NICEST ONE WE HAVE EVER HAD, MUST SEE TO BELIEVE!!! SUPER NICE QUAD CAB HAS LOW LOW MILES TOO!!!
FORM!




SA CASS BURCH



SHOP IN YOUR PAJAMAS 24 HOURS A DAY!

QUITMAN DRIVE IT LIKE YOU STOLE IT.COM VALDOSTA
SA PRICES REFLECT ALL REBATES INCLUDING ALLY BANK. CUSTOMER MUST QUALIFY FOR ALLY
5 iS .-"S U .4-.I IIJ77 BANK APPROVAL TO RECEIVE ALLY BANK REBATES. PRICES GOOD THRU 9/7/10. MUST PRESENT m29-242-1
AD TO OBTAIN SPECIALS.P RICES ARE PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE & WARRANTY RIGHTS FEE. m




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EPTSHOTYJ_8GAMSK INGEST_TIME 2011-05-31T22:37:19Z PACKAGE UF00028422_00727
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Wednesday Edition Ñ September 8, 201050 CENTSSuwannee Democrat 125th YEAR, NO. 94 3 SECTIONS, 30 PAGES Serving Suwannee County since 1884, including Live Oak, Wellborn, Dowling Park, Branford, McAlpin and O'Brien Visit us on the web at www.weshaneychevrolet.com WES HANEY Just East Of Downtown Live Oak, FL 362-2976 Family Owned & Operated Since 1967 617621-F 2011 Chevrolet 3/4 Ton Diesel Crew Cab 295 HP More Torque Greater Towing Newly Redesigned Diesel Engine... Better Fuel Economy! In Stock Immediate Delivery! On the CAMPAIGN trailPAGE 10ASteve Southerland pays a visit Cry Out, America 9/11 observations set for here, throughout the region. Page 3A. By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.carnell.hawthorne@gaflnews.comAstudent was tasered during an altercation on a school bus at Suwannee High School Friday afternoon, according to Principal Ted Roush. The incident began around 3:05 p.m. as officials were called to the Route 23 bus to address a 17-year-old Suwannee Opportunity School student who was reportedly cursing and causing a disruption while on the bus in the com-Student tasered in bus incident at SHS20-minute standoff ends in use of force SPORTS PAGE 1B ÔDogs win ugly in openerBy Jeff Watersjeff.waters@gaflnews.comALive Oak woman led police on a seven-hour chase after she bolted in anticipation of a routine traffic stop Thursday, sheriff's reports indicate. Sheriff's Deputy Wayne Kelly attempted to make a traffic stop on Dori Lisa Pope, 47, of 21981 B 160th Street, Live Oak, for driving on an expired tag. "Upon attempting to conduct a traffic stop on (Pope) Woman leads police on seven-hour chase along banks of the SuwanneeWoman leads police on 7-hour chase along banks of the Suwannee See story below By Carnell Hawthorne Jr.carnell.hawthorne@ gaflnews.comOne of three men charged for his part in the burglary and subsequent fire that ravaged a live-in furniture workshop in Wellborn back in November 2009 ap-Plea deal rejected in Wellborn arson A November 2009 fire destroyed a Wellborn man's live-in workshop.Photo: StaffSuwannee tailback Derek Smith eludes a Hamilton County defender during Friday night's Battle of the Bridge, a 21-6 win over Hamilton. -Photo: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com) By Jeff Waters A20-year-old Columbia County man lay dead in an O'Brien home Thursday following an argument over a woman, according to Suwannee County Sheriff Tony Cameron. Dead is Zachary Pritchard, 385 SWMarcis Terrace, Lake City. According to Cameron, Pritchard was engaged in an argument with Trenton Lance Lacy, 24, of 112 SWGolden Glen, Lake City, at 4 a.m. when one of the two produced a firearm. The men fought over the gun, at which point another man intervened to break up the fight. It was then that the firearm discharged. Pritchard died "within a matter of minutes from a gunshot wound over his eye," Cameron said. The exact circumstances of the shooting aren't clear. However, Lacy, a corrections officer at Hamilton Correctional Institution, was placed on paid administrative leave after the shooting per standard procedure, said Department of Corrections officials. "There are things about this that I'm unsure of to call it an accident," Cameron said. "I don't feel like one person should decide. I'm going to request that the state attorney put this before a grand jury."O'Brien shooting claims life of man,20Hamilton CI guard on administrative leave pending investigationBy Jeff Waters Live Oak police have identified a suspect in the March shooting death of 35-year-old Marvin Louis O'Hara. John Charles Ware, 56, was arrested Friday morning and charged with three felonies involving the dispos-Suspect named in March shooting death of LO man John Charles Ware al of the gun police say was used to shoot O'Hara to death in the rooming house they shared. Ware was charged with tampering with evidence, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon SEESTUDENT, PAGE10A SEEPLEA, PAGE 10A SEESUSPECT, PAGE 11A Cooper-Olin, right, in court Friday with his attorney, John Hendrick.Photo: Carnell Hawthorne Jr. www.suwanneedemocrat.com The Old Dog says , "Do it right or don't bother."Dori Lisa Pope SEEWOMAN, PAGE10A

PAGE 2

# $ ! b n f r b t " b b t nAdvertising Manager, Monja Slater , ext.105nSr.Advertising Representative, B ill Regan , ext.160nAdvertising Representative, Tami Stevenson , ext.109nA dvertising Representative, Rhonda Chene y , e xt.141nTelesales Ad Representative, Nancy Goodwin , ext.103nClassified/Legal, Janice Ganote , ext.102The Suwannee Democrat, published Wednesday and Friday. Periodicals postage paid at Liv e Oak, FL 32064.Business located a t 211 Howard Street East, Live Oak, F L.Publication number 530180.“POSTMASTER:Send address changes to Suw a nnee Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064.Annual subscription rate is $33 in county, $48 out of county and $48 out of state.Subscribe online at www.suwanneedemocrat.com.OFFICE HOURSOpen Monday Friday 8 a.m.to 5 p.m. Letters, comments and opinions on the Viewpoint & Opinions page are not necessarily those of the management/ownership of the Suwannee Democrat.LETTERS TO THE EDITORLetters may be mailed, faxed or e-mailed to our office.All letters are read. Not all letters are published. Letters may be edited to fit available space.The editor should not alter the wr iters point of view.Well written letters require less editing.Keep it to the point, an ideal r ange is 150 to 200 words.Please include your name, address and day and evening phone numbers for verification. Letters MUSTbe signed.Letters to the editor can be limited to one letter per quarter per individual.RANT & RAVE HOTLINEHere's y our chance to tell everyone what you think! Callers may dial 208-8314 and leave a message to express their thoughts, good or bad, 24/7 about issues and politics, but not about private individuals or businesses.If youpref er , y ou ma y e-mail your comments to robert.bridges@gaflnews.com.Your name is not necessary, but please,tak e 30 seconds or less for your message.Suwannee Democrat HOW TO REACH USSwitchboard , 386-362-1734 Fax , 386-364-5578 Email , nf.editorial@gaflnews.com Mail , P.O.Box 370 Live Oak, FL 32064Office , 211 Howard Street EastnPublisher, Myra Regan , ext.122 CONTACT US WITH YOUR COMMENTSIf you have any questions or concerns, call us at 386-362-1734 or visit our Web site at www.suwanneedemocrat.com NEWSROOMnE ditor, R obert Bridges , ext.131nReporter, Carnell Hawthorne Jr. , ext.134nReporter, Jeff Waters , ext.133nReporter, Stephenie Livingston , ext.130nS ports Reporter, Corey Davis , ext.132ADVERTISINGS er v ing Suw a nnee County Since 1884 CIRCULATIONnC irculation Manager , Angie Sparks , ext.152nCirculation Ser vice Hour s, M-F 8 a.m. 5 p .m. Subscription Rates, In-county, $33 Out-of-county, $48 H Suw anneeCounty Part of The Original Florida 1 Year In County Subscription$33$481 Year Out of CountySuwannee DemocratP.O. Box 370 211 Howard St. East Live Oak, FL 32064 386-362-1734 1-800-525-4182 ext. 152Mail or bring payment to:You want the most in-depth coverage, the latest news and stories that touch home. We want to give it to you.570802-F 3 6 4 5 1 0 0b t n r F R E E n f r t f f & ! " n b t b C h e c k n e x t W e d n e s d a y s D e m o c r a t f o r t h e n e x t c o u p o n # # $ # " $ ! $ & # ! % t f f f r % b t n r 3 8 6 3 6 4 1 2 1 1 t f r n r t " f " r f P l e a s e c a l l t h e o f f i c e t o m a k e a n y n e c e s s a r y a r r a n g e m e n t s . W e a p o l o g i z e f o r a n y i n c o n v e n i e n c e t h i s m a y c a u s e . T e m p o r a r i l y c l o s i n g f o r a W H O L E N E W L O O K r b ! n # b t t n f n t r n r n t r n r n n f r n n b r f r n b t b b r f n r b f n r r r r b t r t b n f n n f r n f n n n n r n n r f n n r r n n n r f n r n + 8 5 6 ? < < ? G 9 > 7 1 2 2 B 5 n F 9 1 D 9 ? > C 1 B 5 E C 5 4 2 5 < ? G * * ' n * E G 1 > > 5 5 ? E > D I * 8 5 B 9 6 6 C ' 6 6 9 3 5 $ ' ( n $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; ( ? n < 9 3 5 5 @ 1 B D = 5 > D $ n < ? B 9 4 1 5 @ 1 B D n = 5 > D ? 6 $ 1 G > 6 ? B 3 5 n = 5 > D ( n < ? B 9 4 1 9 7 8 G 1 I ( 1 D B ? < . n < ? B 9 4 1 . 9 < 4 < 9 6 5 ? = = 9 C C 9 ? > ' + n 5 @ 1 B D = 5 > D ? 6 + B 1 > C @ ? B D 1 D 9 ? > ' $ n ' 6 6 9 3 5 ? 6 7 B 9 n 3 E < D E B 1 < $ 1 G > 6 ? B 3 5 n = 5 > D ( ( n ( B ? 2 1 D 9 ? > 1 > 4 ( 1 B ? < 5 , * % * n , * % 1 B C 8 1 < C * 5 B F 9 3 5 + n 5 @ 1 B D = 5 > D ? 6 < 3 ? 8 ? < t + ? 2 1 3 3 ? 1 > 4 9 B 5 1 B = C ' n 5 @ 1 B D = 5 > D ? 6 ? B B 5 3 D 9 ? > C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t B 5 4 B 9 3 ; ? ? ; C t t r . r . 5 C D $ ? D r $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t F ? @ C 9 = @ < 5 2 1 D D 5 B I ( ( n ) ) 1 I = ? > 4 * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t # 5 < < 9 5 $ 1 > 9 5 B t t D 8 + 5 B B $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t F ? @ ? f 3 C 5 < < f 4 5 < 3 ? > D C E 2 * * ' n # ' C 2 ? B > * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t B 1 4 < 1 > ( 1 D D 5 B C ? > t t r * . ' G 5 > C F 5 > E 5 B 1 > 6 ? B 4 t < t 4 G < C f B * * ' n " B ? ? ; C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t " ? 8 > " 5 6 n 6 5 B I % 9 < < 5 B " B t t $ 5 5 ) ? 1 4 " 1 3 ; C ? > F 9 < < 5 t < t F ? @ ? f 3 6 B 1 E 4 E C 5 ? 6 3 B 5 4 9 D 3 1 B 4 3 B 5 4 9 D 3 1 B 4 D 8 5 6 D t F ? 3 3 ? f 3 9 > D B ? 3 ? > D B 1 2 1 > 4 * * ' n $ ? C D ? > * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t ? > > 9 5 # 1 I * < 1 E 7 8 D 5 B t t D 8 * D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t C 1 < 5 ? 6 4 1 B F ? 3 5 D t @ ? C C 4 1 B F ? 3 5 D G f 9 > D C 5 < < * * ' + n ) * 1 = = ? > C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t ? B 9 $ 9 C 1 ( ? @ 5 t t r D 8 * D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 6 < 5 5 f 5 < E 4 5 < 5 ? t 4 G < C > 4 ? 6 6 t B 5 C 9 C G f ? F 9 ? < t F ? @ ? f 3 = 1 > E 6 3 1 > > 1 2 9 C * * ' n . # 5 < < I * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t " ? C 5 @ 8 5 B > 1 B 4 ? = 2 C t t * ? E C D ? > F 5 t $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 2 1 D D 5 B I 4 ? = F 9 ? n < 5 > 3 5 $ ' ( n * < 1 E 7 8 D 5 B * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t " ? 8 > ? G 1 B 4 * D 5 B < 9 > 7 t t r ) 4 $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 2 E B 7 < 1 B I t 7 B 1 > 4 D 8 5 6 D * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t . 9 < < 9 1 = 8 1 B < 5 C $ 5 4 ? 7 1 B t t r ) . 5 < < 2 ? B > t < t 4 G < C f B B 4 ? 6 6 5 > C 5 ' + n + * = 9 @ 5 C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t * D 5 F 5 > % 3 1 B D 8 I t t , * G I " 1 C @ 5 B t < t 6 D 3 ? f 3 2 1 D D 5 B I t r r 3 1 C 8 ? > < I * * ' n 4 G 1 B 4 C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t 5 B 2 5 B D $ 5 5 . 8 9 D 5 t t D 8 * D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t F ? @ n @ ? C C ? 6 3 ? 3 1 9 > 5 ( ( n * ' 1 B 1 * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t + B 1 3 5 I % 9 < < 5 B t t D 8 * D B 5 5 D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t F ? @ 1 D D D B 1 6 6 3 ? > D C E 2 t > ? 2 ? > 4 @ 5 B : E 4 7 5 6 9 > 1 * * ' n 9 @ @ C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t " ? 8 > 8 1 B < 5 C . 1 B 5 t t 9 < < = 1 > F 5 $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t @ ? C C f 6 f 1 2 I 3 ? > F 6 5 < ? > t D 1 = @ G f 5 F 9 4 5 > 3 5 t @ ? C C 6 f 1 2 I 3 ? = = 6 5 < ? > I $ ' ( n " 1 D 5 C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t I < 1 > ) E C C 5 < < 1 B > 1 8 1 > t t > 4 * D B 5 5 D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t F ? @ C 1 < 5 3 ? > D < C E 2 C f @ ? C C t 3 > D < C E 2 C G f 9 C 5 < < f C 1 < 5 t ? H I f @ ? C C ? H I G f 9 C 5 < < $ ' ( n " ) ? E > 4 D B 5 5 * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t B 5 4 1 B n 7 ? t r t r D 8 ) ? 1 4 $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 4 E 9 t 1 D D 1 3 8 > ? D 1 C C 9 7 > 5 4 t 4 G < C f B t C D 1 @ @ @ 4 1 @ @ D @ 5 B G B C ( " < 1 B ; * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t * D 5 @ 8 1 > I $ I > > 1 9 C 4 5 > t t & . * 1 D E B > $ 1 > 5 $ 1 ; 5 9 D I t < t 3 ? < E = 2 9 1 3 D I G B D F ? @ ? f 3 t @ ? C C 3 ? > D B ? < C E 2 n C D 1 > 3 5 t C D 1 @ @ > f @ 4 1 @ @ D @ 5 B G B C * * ' ) ? 2 9 > n C ? > * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t . 5 C < 5 I B 5 3 ; . 5 9 > 7 1 B D t t r 1 D 5 ( 1 B ; G 1 I . 5 C D " 1 3 ; C ? > F 9 < < 5 t < t 2 E 9 . * 8 1 B @ 5 * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t " ? 8 > > I * D 5 F 5 > % E C 7 B ? F 5 t t . 9 B 5 7 B 1 C C * D B 5 5 D ? = 5 n B F 9 < < 5 t 1 t 2 E 9 . E = @ 8 B 9 5 C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t 1 B < ? C ) ? 4 B 9 7 E 5 J t t F 1 F 5 $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 4 9 C ? B n 4 5 B < I 9 > D ? H t C D 1 @ @ @ 4 1 @ @ D @ 5 B G B C $ ' ( # 9 > n C 5 I * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t E B > 5 D D 1 $ 5 9 7 8 > C < 5 I t t r r & . > 4 * D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 2 1 D D 5 B I 4 ? = 5 C D 9 3 F 9 ? < 5 > 3 5 t C D 1 @ @ @ 4 1 @ @ D @ 5 B G B C $ ' ( n # 1 C D ? B * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t + 1 B B 5 > 3 5 $ 9 < 5 @ t t r D 8 * D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t F ? @ ? f 3 D B 5 C n @ 1 C C t r r r r 3 1 C 8 ? > < I t C D 1 @ @ @ 4 1 @ @ D @ 5 B G B C * * ' n # ' C 2 ? B > * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t " ? > 1 D 8 1 > E D 3 8 9 > C ? > t t ) r ? G < 9 > 7 ( ; t 2 1 D D 5 B I 4 ? = F 9 ? < * * ' + ) ? 2 5 B D C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t + B 1 F 9 C 9 > > t r t * D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 4 G < C f B t C D 1 @ @ @ 4 1 @ @ D @ 5 B G B C * * ' ? B > 5 * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t . 9 < < 9 1 = $ 5 5 E B ; 5 D D t t * D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 2 1 D n D 5 B I * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t $ ? 9 C " E 1 > 9 D 1 " ? 8 > C ? > t t 1 F 9 C * D $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t F ? @ n @ ? C C 4 B E 7 @ 1 B 1 t 3 1 C 8 2 ? > 4 ? > < I t C D 1 @ @ @ 4 1 @ @ D @ 5 B G B C $ ' ( n 9 @ @ C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t % 1 B 9 5 > n > 5 D D 5 1 ; 5 B t t ? < n 9 C 5 E = F 5 $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 4 E 9 > 4 ? 6 6 5 > C 5 t C D 1 @ @ > f @ 4 1 @ @ D G B C t 3 8 9 < 4 > 5 n 7 < 5 3 D n 3 D C t > 5 G ? 2 D C r r * * ' n + ? = @ ; 9 > C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t 5 1 ; 5 B " * D 5 B < 9 > 7 t t r , * r $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t @ ? C C ? 6 3 ? > n D B ? < C E 2 C D 1 > 3 5 G f ? @ B 5 n C 3 B 9 @ D 9 ? > t 4 G < C f B t 4 E 9 t B 5 6 E C 5 D ? C E 2 = 9 D D ? E B 9 > 5 D 5 C D t 3 ? < E = 2 9 1 3 D I G B D 6 D 1 ? f 3 t D 1 7 5 H @ 9 B 5 4 b = ? > D 8 C t C D 1 @ @ @ 4 1 @ @ D @ 5 B G B C * * ' % 3 ! > D I B 5 * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t " ? C 5 5 B n > 1 > 4 5 J n ? = 5 J t t 9 B < 3 5 % 1 I ? t < t > ? 4 B 9 n F 5 B C < 9 3 5 > C 5 t 5 H @ 9 B 5 4 D 1 7 b = ? > D 8 C * * ' % $ 5 5 * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t " ? 8 > 5 > n B I . 5 C C ? > t t r * ) $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 2 1 D D 5 B I 4 ? = F 9 ? < 5 > 3 5 * * ' n $ . 9 < < 9 C * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t ) ? 2 5 B D B 1 > D $ 1 E " B t t r , * . / $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 2 1 D D 5 B I 4 ? = F 9 ? < 3 D C * * ' n % 3 + I B 5 * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t 4 4 9 5 ? < < 9 5 B t t r D 8 ) ? 1 4 $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 2 1 D D 5 B I 4 ? = F 9 ? < 5 > 3 5 * * ' " 0 9 = = 5 B = 1 > * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t ( 1 E < 1 " 5 1 > 5 D D 5 ? < < 9 5 B t t r D 8 ) ? 1 4 $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < t 2 1 D D 5 B I 4 ? = 5 C D 9 3 F 9 ? < 5 > 3 5 t 3 9 D B E C 3 > D I G B > D t E D D 5 B 9 > 7 6 ? B 7 5 4 3 8 5 3 ; * * ' " 0 9 = = 5 B = 1 > " " b ( % + 8 5 1 B B ? < < 1 = 9 < I B 5 E > 9 ? > G 9 < < 2 5 8 5 < 4 * 5 @ D t 1 D ( 8 9 < 1 4 5 < @ 8 9 1 1 @ D 9 C D 8 E B 3 8 ) 5 3 B 5 1 D 9 ? > 8 1 < < t 6 B ? = @ = E > D 9 < ? = 5 1 > 4 2 B 9 > 7 1 3 ? F 5 B 5 4 4 9 C 8 1 > 4 I ? E B 6 1 F ? B 9 D 5 4 5 C C 5 B D ( 1 @ 5 B 7 ? ? 4 C 1 > 4 4 B 9 > ; C G 9 < < 2 5 @ B ? F 9 4 5 4 ? = 5 5 1 B < I 1 > 4 < 5 D C 3 1 D 3 8 E @ ? > D 8 5 6 1 = 9 < I > 5 G C 1 < < n n ? B n n r $ & & " r #* E B B 5 I ( < 1 3 5 1 B 5 5 > D 5 B t r * $ 5 5 F 5 > E 5 t $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t < ? B 9 4 1 * 5 @ D t t D 8 r L r @ = * ( # ) * % ? > L ( 1 C D ? B " ? 8 > . 8 9 D D 9 > 7 D ? > t $ 9 7 8 D 8 ? E C 5 8 B 9 C D 9 1 > + E 5 C L ( 1 C D ? B B 1 9 7 . 9 < < 9 1 = C t $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; 8 E B 3 8 ? 6 8 B 9 C D . 5 4 L ( 1 C D ? B . 9 < < 9 5 . 1 B B 5 > t % D * 9 > 1 9 1 @ D 9 C D 8 E B 3 8 ( B 1 9 C 5 . ? B C 8 9 @ % E C 9 3 5 1 3 8 > 9 7 8 D ) 5 6 B 5 C 8 = 5 > D C ? 6 6 5 B 5 4 ) ! & / ' , ) ' . & $ . & ! ) . ? B C 8 9 @ G 9 D 8 , * ? B = ? B 5 9 > 6 ? B = 1 D 9 ? > 3 ? > D 1 3 D 8 1 @ < 1 9 > $ 5 C D 5 B E B B I n ( $ $ % $ ( t # $ " $ ( $ + 8 5 $ 1 6 1 I 5 D D 5 ? E > D I 9 C D ? B 9 3 1 < * ? 3 9 5 D I % 5 5 D 9 > 7 C 1 B 5 8 5 < 4 D 8 5 D 8 + 8 E B C 4 1 I ? 6 5 F 5 B I = ? > D 8 1 D @ = 1 D D 8 5 $ 9 2 B 1 B I 9 > % 1 I ? ( < 5 1 C 5 6 5 5 < 6 B 5 5 D ? : ? 9 > E C 1 > 4 2 B 9 > 7 I ? E B 8 9 C D ? B 9 3 @ 9 3 D E B 5 C t 4 ? 3 E = 5 > D C 1 > 4 C D ? B 9 5 C ! 6 I ? E 8 1 F 5 1 > I A E 5 C D 9 ? > C @ < 5 1 C 5 5 = 1 9 < < 1 6 1 I 5 D D 5 3 8 C 7 = 1 9 < 3 ? = / ? E 3 1 > 1 < C ? 6 9 > 4 E C ? > 1 3 5 2 ? ? ; # # n # B 1 D 9 C < 1 C 5 C 5 = @ 9 5 C 1 > 5 < 4 5 * 5 @ D 9 5 = 2 B 5 t r r 3 1 4 1 < E > 5 C I : E 5 F 5 C t @ = n @ = % 1 5 C D B 1 5 < 9 3 9 1 ? D I I 5 < 5 A E 9 @ ? + ? 4 1 C < 1 C 3 < 1 C 5 C F 1 > 5 C D 1 B 5 > < 1 ! 7 < 5 C 9 1 @ 9 C 3 ? @ 1 < t * 1 > $ E ; 1 C t * . D 8 * D * 5 5 > 3 E 5 > D B 1 < 1 ! 7 < 5 C 9 1 5 > 6 B 5 > D 5 4 5 < 8 ? C @ 9 D 1 < 5 > $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; 1 < < ( 8 I < < 9 C ? D I n n r r 6 ? B = ? B 5 9 > 6 ? B = 1 D 9 ? > f ( $ # # & % " # " " ' # * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t r r r r 1 = n r r @ = 9 B C D 5 4 5 B 1 < * 1 F 9 > 7 C 1 > ; , * 3 B ? C C 6 B ? = . 1 < D K C % 9 > 9 = E = r r ' % ' , + & * , ( ( ' ) + + % $ ' / . ! $ + * & # " ( % $ + 8 5 > 5 H D = 5 5 D 9 > 7 ? 6 D 8 5 * 3 8 ? ? < 4 F 9 C ? B I ? E > 3 9 < 6 ? B * E G 1 > > 5 5 9 7 8 * 3 8 ? ? < G 9 < < 2 5 + 8 E B C 4 1 I t * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t r r t 1 D @ = ! D G 9 < < 2 5 8 5 < 4 9 > D 8 5 * D E 4 5 > D 3 D 9 F 9 D 9 5 C ) ? ? = 1 D D 8 5 8 9 7 8 C 3 8 ? ? < < < 9 > D 5 B 5 C D 5 4 C D E 4 5 > D C t @ 1 B 5 > D C t D 5 1 3 8 5 B C 1 > 4 3 ? = = E > 9 D I = 5 = 2 5 B C D 8 1 D G ? E < 4 < 9 ; 5 D ? @ 1 B D 9 3 9 @ 1 D 5 1 > 4 2 5 3 ? = 5 9 > F ? < F 5 4 9 > * E G 1 > > 5 5 9 7 8 * 3 8 ? ? < 1 B 5 9 > F 9 D 5 4 D ? 1 D D 5 > 4 % " # " # % " n f C @ ? > C ? B > > E 1 < + B 1 C 8 1 > 4 + B 5 1 C E B 5 * 1 < 5 n 1 > 4 n 1 ; 5 * 1 < 5 n * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B 1 > 4 6 B ? = r r 1 = n @ = r < E 2 ? E C 5 > 5 1 B D 8 5 ? < 9 C 5 E = t r D 8 * D B 5 5 D * . t $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; t n f C D B 9 4 1 I ? 6 5 1 3 8 = ? > D 8 r b n " # & " ( $ ! @ B ? 7 B 1 = 1 2 ? E D 1 > 1 B 3 8 5 ? < ? 7 9 3 1 < 4 9 C 3 ? F 5 B I 1 D 1 = @ . 5 5 4 > 5 1 B $ 9 F 5 ' 1 ; G 9 < < 2 5 @ B 5 C 5 > D 5 4 ? > * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t 1 D r 1 = 1 D 1 = @ . 5 5 4 9 B C D 3 ? > D 1 3 D 9 > * E G 1 > > 5 5 ? E > D I 2 5 D G 5 5 > E B ? @ 5 1 > C 1 > 4 9 > 4 9 7 5 > ? E C @ 5 ? @ < 5 ? 3 3 E B B 5 4 ? > * 5 @ D 5 = 2 5 B t 7 B 5 1 D @ B ? 7 B 1 = 6 ? B 1 < < 1 7 5 C t 8 ? = 5 C 3 8 ? ? < 5 B C G 5 < 3 ? = 5 ( B ? 7 B 1 = 6 5 5 9 > 3 < E 4 5 C < E > 3 8 + ? B 5 7 9 C D 5 B 7 ? D ? G G G 4 9 ? 3 5 C 5 6 < ? B 7 ? B 3 1 < < r

PAGE 3

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 3A 570128-F 611889-F For Surgical Technician and LPN 415 S.W. Pinewood Dr. Live Oak, FL 32064 386-647-4200 617194-F Offer expires 9/30/10 Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Alex Prins, Candidate for Suwannee County Judge THANK YOU, SUWANNEE COUNTY! I would like to thank all of the people that voted for me in the primary election for Suwannee County Judge. I was amazed at the number of people that held signs, passed out literature, and worked so hard. Some of you I have known for years and others I had just met. I also want to thank those that allowed me to speak to them and were kind enough to listen to my message. I am grateful to my wife and family for their support and understanding over the past several months. I congratulate all three of my opponents: Gary Brown, and his campaign manager, Dean Papapetrou; Lin Williams and his campaign manager, Stan Posey; and, Todd Kennon. I wish them all the best! I am trying to get all of my signs removed as quickly as possible. Many thanks to all of you who have helped me. If you find any that I have missed, please feel free to remove them and dispose of them, or you can call me and I will gladly pick them up. (Cell # 590-1172) Suwannee County is blessed with thousands of good citizens that love God and are dealing with lifeÂ’s problems to the best of their ability. I have met so many nice people. May God bless you and this County! Sincerely, Alex Prins 619266-F Free yoga classes in SeptemberSeptember is National Yoga month and Suwannee Health & Fitness is offering free yoga classes all month long at the gym on Tuesday and Thursday nights at 6:30. ItÂ’s time for the WQHL 98.1/The Spirit of the Suwannee Music Parksponsored Colgate Country Showdown contest at the SOSMPÂ’s Music Hall in Live Oak. The winner could go on to become AmericaÂ’s Best New Act in Country Music and win $100,000. Two years ago Orlando native Johnny Bulford won the state title at the SOSMP and went on to win the $100,000 when he beat out four other national contestant winners at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville to take the national title. This one and only North Florida contest begins Friday at 7 p.m. in the Music Hall with 23 contestants hoping to win and move on to the state finals in the fall. Contestants are Ashley Briggs, Ft. Lauderdale; Jamie OÂ’Steen, Palatka; Aaron Simmons, Pensacola; Sue Ann Karam, Orange Park; Buddy Brown, Ocoee; Ivy Barrett, Celebration; Dow Young, Mayo; Amber Lee Abbott, Madison; Keith Clark, Palm Bay; Chloe Channell, Pace; Savanna Ward, OÂ’Brien; Natalie Nicole Green, Gainesville; Craig Colby, Jenifer Ford, both of Lake City; Laura Hodges, Bryan Wainwright, Lauren Wainwright, Felisha Williams, Gabrielle Buchanan and the Noyes Boys (Jared & Von), all of Live Oak; Ariel Ratliff, Sierra Jade Williamson, both of Jasper; and Amber Gilliard, Nicholls, Ga; Contestant registration for this event is closed. Local radio DJ and radio personality Kevin Thomas will be the emcee for this huge event expected to fill the Music Hall with eager contestants, family, friends and well wishers.Colgate Country Showdownset for Friday at the SpiritObservations set locally and nationwide for Sept. 11There will be prayer for America and for our local communities, including our firefighters, from area pastors and city and county officials. There will also be special music. For Suwannee and Hamilton residents, the event is set for noon on Saturday, Sept. 11 at Millennium Park, one block north of the Courthouse, in Live Oak. Bring small folding chairs and come early. For Lafayette and Dixie counties, the event will take place at Mayo Town Park on US 27. In Columbia County, the meeting is at Olustee Park by Courthouse. In Taylor County, folks will gather at Forest Capital State Museum in Perry at 204 Forest Park Cr. off Hwy. 19-South/Alt.27 at 9:30 a.m. For more information call Carol Hudgins, North Central Coordinator, at 386-935-2997. Awakening America sponsorsCry Out, AmericaArea singer, songwriter/musician Perrie Kitching and also the Common Ground Band will perform during breaks in the contest. The Showdown is open to vocal and/or instrumental performers, individuals or groups of up to seven members who have not performed on a record listed in the national record charts of Billboard, radio and records or The Gavin. A uniform judging system on all levels of competition ensures fairness. State finals will be held at Silver Springs Resort Oct. 16 with the winner receiving $1,000 in cash and the right to advance to the Southern Regionals. Five regional winners from across the US will get an expense paid trip to Nashville in January 2011 to compete for the national title. Despite its humble beginning, the Colgate Country Showdown has become a reliable source of rising country music stars over its 28-year history. Country stars such as Garth Brooks, Sara Evans and Brad Paisley have competed in the Colgate Country Showdown. Doors open at 5 p.m. with the contest beginning at 7 p.m. Come early for best seating. Admission is $10 per person. For more information about overnight reservations, the Colgate Country Showdown or any of the exciting upcoming events at the SOSMP such as Jambando In The Park, Fall Suwannee River Jubilee, Mike Mullis and his band, Herold White Band, Stephen Combs and his band, Malt Shoppe Memories Band, Magnolia Fest, Big Engine Band, Suwannee Spirit Kids Music Camp, Bear Creek Music and Art Festival, Raid on the Suwannee Civil War Re-enactment, Old Tyme Farm Days and much more, call the SOSMP at 386-364-1683, email spirit@musicliveshere.com or go to the website at www.musicliveshere.com. KickinÂ’ Kevin Thomas of WQHL 98.1. Perrie Kitching.

PAGE 4

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 PAGE 4A suwannee living 617456-F Clases de Ingles Gratis Clases empiesan el 9 de Septiembre, 2010 cada lunes y jueves 7-9 p.m. Maestra Felicia Doty y el equipo Todas las clases van estar en la Iglesia Episcopal San Lukas, 1391 SW 11th St. (Se encuentra la Iglesia en frente del hospital en Live Oak) Call Phyllis Doty @ 386-249-0096 for more information This program is sponsored by the Suwannee Hamilton Technical Center Q: What is leukoplakia? A: Whitish in color, leukoplakia is a thick patch that can develop on the inside of the cheeks or on the gum or tongue. It is not easily scraped off. The patch is the result of excessive cell growth triggered by irritation from, say, an ill-fitting denture or from a habit of biting the inside of a cheek. Tobacco, whether smoked or chewed, is also a main culprit in development of leukoplakia. The danger with leukoplakia is that it can progress to cancer. If you have the condition, your dentist may want to take a biopsy a sample of tissue for analysis. You can reduce your changes of developing leukoplakia by avoiding alcohol and tobacco and by visiting your dentist regularly. As with any type of cancer, early detection is critical to avoiding a major problem. Be on the lookout for any changes in your mouth, including, but not limited to, any rough spot, small eroded area, lump or a sore that doesn't heal. Look also for changes in color, like lesions that turn red or white and be aware of any pain or numbness in the mouth or lips, or trouble swallowing, chewing or speaking. Talk with your dentist for more information about leukoplakia. Presented as a service to the community by 571101-F ASK DR. MANTOOTH 362-6556 (800) 829-6506 HERBERT C. MANTOOTH, D.D.S., P.A. 602 Railroad Ave. Live Oak, FL LEUKOPLAKIA 102 & 104 Dowling Ave., Live Oak 386-330-2908 Ashley Starling PJ's Salon is back at Open Monday Friday, Weekends By Apppointment We accept credit cards Mention this ad and receive $ 10 OFF any chemical or $ 5 OFF any service over $ 20 • Dimensional Coloring • Updos • Waxing • Color Specialist 616009-F 617192-F 1512 South Ohio Avenue, 362-7066 Live Oak BY: BRAD WATSON ASK THE EXPERT Q: A : Primers are designed to prepare surfaces for paint. Primers seal porous surfaces such as wood or new wallboard and plaster. They also cover marks, stains and repair work, providing a clean, uniform surface for paint application. Latex primers are ideal for most surfaces, but in cases of extreme bleeding stains and smoke damage, an oil-based primer may be required. Special primers for interiors are formulated to provide excellent holdout (sheen uniformity), while others are formulated to prepare wood surfaces for painting without raising the grain of the wood. A clean surface, free of imperfections, provides the ideal foundation for a beautiful paint job. Taking some time to prepare the surface pays off in the end. For more information come see the paint professionals at Live Oak Paint & Flooring. Why do I need to use primer before I paint? PAINT & FLOORING South Oaks Square Location: 1520 S. Ohio (386) 362-2591 Medical Equipment Div: (386) 362-4404 Hours: 8:30 am-6:30 PM Mon-Fri., 8:30 am-3:00 pm Sat. Pharmacy & Your Health 617197-F How to Prevent Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a condition of weakened bones. Low levels of certain minerals in the body, such as calcium and phosphorous, can lead to the condition. This condition typically appears later in life. Persons over 40 years of age are at an increased risk. Although women are more commonly diagnosed with osteoporosis, both women and men may be affected. Tobacco or alcohol use also may increase the risk of developing osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates used for the treatment of osteoporosis include alendronate ( Fosamax ), ibandronate ( Boniva ), risedronate ( Actonel ), and zoledronic acid ( Zometa ). Bisphosphonates reduce bone resorption and increase bone mineral density and strength. These medications work to reduce the risk of fractures. Raloxifene ( Evista ) is another medication that may be prescribed for women with osteoporosis who are unable to take bisphosphonates. Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that works to prevent bone loss by mimicking some actions of estrogen. Adults should obtain 1,000 to 1,500 mg calcium each day, along with vitamin D, as a preventive measure against the development of osteoporosis. A healthy diet and regular physical activity are also recommended for the prevention of osteoporosis and promotion of bone health. by Kathy Fletcher, PharmD Drive-up window Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 REG. SALE Twin 2 pc. set $000 $000 Full 2 pc. set $000 $000 King 3 pc. set $000 $000 Plus FREE delivery FREE set-up FREE removal6 Months Same As Cash! Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 REG. SALE Twin 2 pc. set $000 $000 Full 2 pc. set $000 $000 King 3 pc. set $000 $000 Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 REG. SALE Twin 2 pc. set $000 $000 Full 2 pc. set $000 $000 King 3 pc. set $000 $000 Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 REG. SALE Twin 2 pc. set $000 $000 Full 2 pc. set $000 $000 King 3 pc. set $000 $000 Model Name and Comfort Level Queen set$000 LIMITED TIME OFFER!Sale Ends Monday! All Mattress Sets!take 50%OFF US 90 West (Next To 84 Lumber) Lake City, 386-752-9303 C ATALOG S HOWROOM F OR C OMPLETE H OME F URNISHINGS FURNITURE SHOWPLACE Wholesale Sleep Distributors Plus FREE set-up FREE removal $ 489 Level Queen Set Twin Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 319 Full Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 437 Queen Set . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 489 King Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 589 POSTURE PREMIER Twin Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 399 Full Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 547 Queen Set . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 599 King Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 899 MERIDEN ULTRA PLUSH Twin Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 499 Full Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 649 Queen Set . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 699 King Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 999 Twin Set . . . . . . . . . . $ 1200 Full Set . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1399 Queen Set . . . . . . . $ 1699 King Set . . . . . . . . . . $ 1999 TAFFETA PILLOW TOP TRUE FORM 9 MEMORY FOAM 617626-F Long, Leschber to be marriedWayne and Donna Long are proud to announce the engagement of their daughter, Traci Celeste Long, to Matthew Wayne Leschber (Matt), son of Ivan and Barbara Leschber, of Taylor, Texas. Traci's maternal grandparents are the late Billy and Beth Chastain, of Jacksonville. Her paternal grandparents are Ovie Long and the late Kenneth Long, of Live Oak. Matt is the grandson of Christina Menning and the late Lee Roy W. Menning of Yoakum and the late Ewald and Mamie Leschber of Taylor, Texas. Traci is a graduate of Suwannee High School. She earned a BS degree from the University of Florida and another BS degree from Nova Southeastern University in a Physician Assistant program. She is employed by Edwards LifeSciences as a Project Manager of Procedural Development, Transcatheter Heart Valve. She works in cardiac surgery throughout the US and in foreign countries. Matt graduated from SWTexas State University with a BAin Mass Communication and Speech Communication. He is a Real Estate Broker and is the sole owner of 1836 Realty of Austin, Texas. Traci and Matt will be married in the White Room in St. Augustine, Florida, on October 17, 2010, at 4:30 p.m. Their wedding will be a small, intimate ceremony with family and close friends. They will make their home in Austin, Texas. Traci Celeste Long and Matthew Wayne Leschber.WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS Ross Flowers to marry Oct. 2Clay and Debra Ross of Live Oak, Fla., announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Cortney Leanne Ross and Clenton Alex Flowers, son of Alex Flowers and Michele Bell of Live Oak, Fla. The wedding will be Saturday, October 2, 2010 at 2 p.m. at Lake Louise, Live Oak, Fla. Officiating clergy will be Rev. Tommy Brett. Reception to follow. All friends and family welcome. Cortney Leanne Ross and Clenton Alex FlowersWEDDING REMINDER Harvey and Faye Parsons of Live Oak, Florida would like to remind you of the approaching marriage of their daughter, Kerri LeAnn Varner, to Christopher Ryan Ratliff, son of Barbara and Russell Little of Lake City, Florida and Randy Ratliff of Live Oak, Florida. The wedding is planned for the 18th of September, 2010 at 6 p.m. at the PSC Kerri LeAnn Varner and Christopher Ryan Ratliff.Courtesy photoVarner-Ratliff to marry Sept. 18 Priscilla Smart Thomas, a graduate of Suwannee High School and Florida State University, has recently been awarded a Master of Science in Psychology with a specialization in Educational Psychology from Capella University. Priscilla is currently employed with Meridian Behavioral services as a counselor. Pricilla is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Smart, Jr. and the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Ansley, Sr. Conference Center, White Springs, Florida. Local invitations were not sent. All family and friends are invited.Thomas awarded a Master of Science in Psychology Priscilla Smart Thomas Happy 90th birthdayRuth Laura Meyer WareThe children, grandchildren and great grandchildren of Ruth Laura Meyer Ware, invited you to celebrate with us her ninetieth birthday on Sunday, September 12, 2010, two five o'clock in the afternoon at Pinemount Baptist Church, US 129, McAlpin, Florida. No gifts, please. Ruth Laura Meyer Ware

PAGE 5

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 5A 618757-F Moses Car Wash Under New Management 415 N. Ohio Ave., Live Oak 386-855-4042 Free Pickup & Delivery Ladies Day Special Monday $ 5.00 OFF 617969-F Silver Shears Monday-Friday 9 a.m. 6 p.m. 386-362-6979 643 Helvenston St., Live Oak 619019-F Walk-ins Welcome, Sat. by appt. only New Stylist In Town! Charli Shirey • Precision Cutting • Highlighting • Low Lighting • Color • Up Do's • Waxing • Pedicures 619020-F ROBBIES CAFE 386-330-2825 Tuesday Saturday 10 a.m. 8 p.m. Sunday 10 a.m. 2 p.m. 803 Pinewood Dr., Live Oak (In old Winn Dixie Plaza) Specials Daily Paid Political Advertisement Paid For And Approved By Clyde Fleming WITH GOD ALL THINGS ARE POSSIBLE!!!! My family and I would like to express our heartfelt gratitude & appreciation for your vote and support on our election for county commissioner. We would like to thank the many people for their encouragement and positive reinforcement throughout the campaign. I promise to be available and interested in everyone’s concerns and needs for the next four years. I want to continue the theme of “Your family, My family, one Family!” 619105-F Obituaries The Suwannee County Tax Collector’s Office is in Dowling Park the 1st Thursday of each month from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and can process vehicle and vessel registrations, title work and real estate taxes. Come to the Village Square in the Professional Offices. Jeanette Roberts August 6, 1922 September 1, 2010 eanette Roberts, 88, Wellborn, Fla. passed away on Wednesday, September 1, 2010 after a long illness. The Ocilla, Ga. native moved to Wellborn in 1958 from Ocilla. She was a member of Crawford Lake Primitive Baptist Church in McAlpin, Fla. Mrs. Roberts is survived by her daughter Alicia and Tony Hillhouse, Live Oak, Fla.; two sons, Dennis and Mickey Roberts, Wellborn, Fla. and Daryl and Melanie Roberts, Live Oak, Fla.; one brother, Oswald Harper, Tennessee; eight grandchildren; six great-grandchildren and one greatgreat-grandchild. Services will be held at 1 a.m. Saturday, September 4, 2010 at Crawford Lake Primitive Baptist Church with Elder Wendell Horton and Elder Herman Griffin officiating. Interment will follow in Crawford Lake Cemetery. Daniels Funeral Homes & Crematory, Inc., Live Oak & Branford, Fla. in charge of all arrangements. David Ring March 31, 1975 September 3, 2010David Ring, 35, of Live Oak, Fla. passed away suddenly on Friday, September 3, 2010. David resided in Live Oak for the past 25 years coming from Fort Lauderdale, Florida. David was an avid Miami Dolphins and Gator fan. David is survived by his father and mother, Alan and Sandy Ring, Live Oak, Florida; twin sons Jake and Jared Carter-Ring, Fort Tax Collector representative in Dowling ParkLauderdale, Florida; brother Jeremy Ring, Live Oak, Florida; sister Mandy Ring, Live Oak, Florida; paternal grandmother Ruby Ring, Live Oak, Florida; a very special friend, Sarah; wonderful aunt and uncle, Fran and Dave McCartney, Canton, Ga.; a great uncle, Bill Laird, Live Oak, Fla.; another great uncle, Bob Abernathy, Fort Lauderdale, Florida; a very, very special niece and nephew, Savannah and Tanner, Live Oak, Fla.; very special cousin, Cody McCartney, Savannah, Ga.; aunt Kay Gambill, Fayetteville, N.C.; aunt and uncle Karen and Marti Martin, Enterprise, Ala.; plus many cousins and friends. Visitation with the family was Tuesday evening, September 7, 2010 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Daniels Funeral Home, Live Oak, Florida; Graveside services will be held on Wednesday, September 8, 2010 at 10 a.m. at Pinegrove Methodist Church, Live Oak, Florida. In lieu of flowers a memorial fund will be set up at Mercantile Bank, 535 S Ohio Ave, Live Oak, Florida, for David’s son’s Jake and Jared Carter-Ring. Daniels Funeral Homes & Crematory, Inc., Live Oak & Branford, Fla. Elsie O’steen Courson September 23, 1928 September 5, 2010Elsie O’Steen Courson, 81, Live Oak, Fla. passed away on Sunday, September 5, 2010 in the Suwannee Valley Care Center after a long illness. The Mayo, Florida native moved to Live Oak one year ago from Providence, Fla. Mrs. Courson was a member of the Old Providence Baptist Church, Providence, Fla. She is survived by two daughters, Valerie Duncan(Ricky) and Katherine Copland both of Live Oak, Fla.; four sons, Claude Zukowski(Joanne), South Carolina, Larry Zukowski, Providence, Fla., Lanny Courson, Atlanta, Ga. and Wayne Courson (Alice) Orlando, Fla.; one sister, Dovie Jackson, Palm Harbor, Fla.; two brothers: Albert O’Steen, Live Oak, Fla. and George O’Steen, Moultrie, Ga.; thirteen grandchildren, twenty-five great-grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held 2 p.m. Wednesday, September 8, 2010 in the Midway Baptist Church, Branford, Fla. with Rev. Lynwood Walters officiating. Interment will follow in the church cemetery. Daniels Funeral Homes & Crematory, Inc., Live Oak & Branford, Fla. in charge of all arrangements. Betty J. Wolf September 3, 2010Mrs. Betty J. Wolf, 88, went home to be with her Lord and Savior on Friday, September 3, 2010 after an extended illness. Mrs. Wolf had lived in Suwannee County for the past 36 years having moved here from Jacksonville, Fla. She was the daughter of the late Elisha and Hazel Nolan. She was a loving mother and grandmother who in her spare time enjoyed gardening, walking and backpacking, but mostly she devoted her life to the care of her family. She was a member of the Full Gospel Melody Christian Life Center. She is preceded in death by her husband of 58 years, Kingston Grant Wolf. She is survived by her daughters, Mary Anne (Richard) Coates, Pamela Jean (Thomas) Marshall & Peggy Lynn (Edward) Amaya all of Wellborn, Fla.; brother, Dr. Robert Nolan of Plantation, Fla.; sister, Joanne Raye Nolan of Wellborn, Fla.; grandchildren Todd (Patti) Byrd of Tampa, Fla., Kevin (Chasity) Byrd of N.C., Miranda Amaya of Wellborn, Fla. and Tommy (Nikki) Vedilago of Okla.; great grandchildren Natalie Byrd of Tampa, Fla., Amanda Byrd of Mulberry, Fla. and Mikael Byrd of N.C. Visitation with the family will be Saturday, September 11, 2010 at the Full Gospel Melody Christian Life Center from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers the family asks that donations be made in her honor specifically to the Suwannee Valley Care Center Facility (Haven Hospice) at 6037 U.S. Hwy 90 West Lake City, FL 32055. Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 3596 U.S. Hwy 441 S. Lake City, FL 32025 386-7521954. Lawanna Case Burlingame April 17, 1953 September 5, 2010 rs. Lawanna Case Burlingame, born April 17, 1953, died on September 5, 2010 in the Suwannee Valley Care Center after a brief illness. She was the daughter of the late Dewey and Callie Fennell of McAlpin, Fla. She is survived by her husband, Mark Burlingame; sisters, Shirley (Jim) Giebeig and Faye Ridge, both of Lake City, Fla., Barbara (Dave) Parks of McAlpin, Fla., and Marilyn (Bob) Kasno of Salem, S.C.; brothers, James (Bonnie) Fennell of McAlpin, Fla. and Lee (Joyce) Fennell of Bowling Green, Fla.; several nieces and nephews also survive. Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m., on Friday, September 10, 2010 at the Suwannee Valley Care Center (Haven Hospice) Chapel. In lieu of flowers the family asks that donations in her memory be made specifically to the Suwannee Valley Care Center 6037 U.S. Hwy 90 West Lake City, FL 32055 Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral Home 3596 U.S. Hwy 441 S. Lake City, FL 32025, 386-752-1954. Helen Eloise Lewis September 6, 2010Helen Eloise Lewis passed away September 6 at N. FL Special Care Center. Eloise was a Past Worthy Matron of the Eastern Star, a member of the Gainesville Women’s Club, DAR, UDC, Society of Southern Dames, Court of Honor, Gainesville Garden Club. Survivors include her husband, Ralph H. Lewis, grandson, Brett Harrison of San Francisco, and family and friends. Visitation at Milam Funeral Home, Wed., Sept. 8, 5-7 pm. Funeral services at Milam Funeral Home, Thurs., Sept. 9 at 10 am. Burial at Florida Nat’l Cemetery in Bushnell. Arrangements are under the care of Milam Funeral and Cremation Services, 311 S. Main St, Gainesville, FL, 352-3765361.J M It’s Fun.... meet new friends, get great exercise! Beginner lessons starting Thursday evening, Sept. 16, 2010 at 7 p.m. with the Vagabond Squares.Dancing at the Hale Community Center, 215 NE Duval (across from the fire station) in Live Oak, Florida. Caller: Ralph Beekman. For information call 752-2544 or 638-0144. The first night is FREE, so come check it out.Learn to Square Dance!

PAGE 6

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 6A By Jim Holmes I think it is fair to say that Gus Potsdamer was not a likely man to serve as the sheriff of Suwannee County, or for that matter any small southern community in the late 1800s. After all, he was a Jew at a time when strong anti-Semitic views were the norm among America's Christian majority. Oh, and then there was that other little thing in his background. Gus was also a convicted murderer. Back in 1880, Gus Potsdamer was a respected resident of neighboring Columbia County É so much so that Lake City residents hired him as town marshal. Now back in Florida's pioneering days, the position of town marshal was frequently ridiculed by the elected sheriff, who considered the person doing the job little more than a night watchman. After all, the marshal's primary responsibilities -other than locking up the occasional drunk consisted of lighting and extinguishing his town's street lights and making sure that smudge pots -used to keep mosquitoes somewhat at bay -didn't accidentally ignite a destructive fire in communities, which back then were primarily built of wood. The distain Florida's sheriffs often demonstrated toward the state's numerous town marshals frequently meant the existence of "bad blood" between the people who held the two offices. According to the book, Florida Sheriffs; AHistory: 1821-1945, such bad blood turned deadly in Lake City on January 27, 1880. We don't know many details, but we do know that on that date, Gus and Sheriff John C. Henry got into an argument, which escalated into a fistfight, resulting in the sheriff reportedly pulling his revolver and beating Gus with it. Gus then pulled his weapon and fired. In the ensuing trial, Gus Potsdamer was convicted of first degree murder, but was sentenced to life imprisonment rather than hanging. That was because the jury -considering the circumstances -had recommended the defendant be shown "mercy." Potsdamer was then transported to Live Oak, where he was to spend the rest of his life at hard labor in the now infamous prison camp commonly known as Sing-Sing, situated about four miles south of town. He did not make the journey to Live Oak alone, but was accompanied by a small legion of friends, who were concerned that angry allies of the deceased sheriff might yet figure out a way to execute Gus. After all, prisoners had been known to "try and escape." Gus's incarceration at Sing-Sing was relatively brief É only about a month long. An appeal was filed on his behalf and he was released until the Florida Supreme Court could hear his case. When it did, however, it ruled against him and Potsdamer was ordered back to the prison camp. Undaunted, Gus's many friends then launched a vigorous campaign to get Governor Edward A. Perry to pardon their friend and it wasn't long before they accomplished their mission. After reviewing the case, Perry ruled that the deadly fight was "a mutual conflict" and thus Gus should be set free. While he initially returned to Columbia County, Gus ended up moving to Live Oak, where he eventually became as respected as he previously had been in Lake City. In fact, his popularity was such that he was elected Suwannee County Sheriff in 1889. In all, Gus would eventually serve in that capacity for three different termsÉhis last ending in 1914. Jim Holmes lives in Live Oak.Please address letters to: Letters To The Editor, Suwannee Democrat, PO Box 370, Live Oak, FL32064.Please include your full name, address and daytime phone number. We ask this so we can verify your letter and discuss any questions about it with you. Members of the Suwannee Democrat editorial board are Myra C.Regan, publisher, and Robert Bridges, editor.Our View, which appears in Friday editions of the Democrat, is formed by that board.Suwannee DemocratMYRA C.REGAN Publisher ROBERT BRIDGES Editor THE SUWANNEE SCRIBBLERViewpoints/Opinions The strange odyssey of Gus PotsdamerBIBLE VERSE"We proclaim him, admonishing and teaching everyone with all wisdom, so that we may present everyone perfect in Christ." Colossians 1:28 By Dwain Walden The other day someone wrote to the Rants and Raves section of our newspaper and declared that I was not intellectual enough to write columns about politics. For the record, my feelings are not hurt. You know, whoever said that may be absolutely right. But let me state right up front that I've never claimed to be an intellectual. Back in philosophy class at Georgia State University, I couldn't keep my pipe lit. And I burned holes in my ties and shirts. So I gave up the pipe. I just thought that deep thinkers smoked pipes. Maybe that was the first sign that I wasn't intellectual. Maybe I was learning to read the smoke signals. One day our philosophy professor asked the famous question, "Who am I and what am I doing here?" My response was, "Hello, I'm Dwain Walden. I want a degree in something so that I don't have to climb up in tobacco barns at four o'clock in the morning and have sand pour down the back of my shirt. And if at all possible, I would like to stay away from Vietnam." The professor just stared at me for a moment. I thought at the time I was talking over his head. He said he didn't know anything about tobacco barns, but he felt my comment about Vietnam was valid. And since I got my name right, I said to myself, "Hey, two out of three ain't bad." When I graduated from high school, I thought I was pretty smart. And in college I held the same high opinion of myself just short of genius. I felt I had many answers to many questions. But now, after all these years, not only do I not claim to have all the answers, on many days I'm not even sure what the questions are. So let me sum up this little commentary with some observations I have made in the venue of politics Ñ some of them I have stated before in my scribblings which may not qualify me as a political pundit but perhaps it's hand grenade close. And I'm not pretending to be intellectual in stating them. It's just stuff I've noticed. They include: • The difference between "pork barrel" and "godsend" is the county line. If they got it, it's obviously pork barrel. If we got it, it was justified, sanctified and glorified. • We're all liberal and we're all conservative. It all depends on whether it's our ox in the ditch and the price of oxen on that day. • Term limits means "right after I get mine." • "Kick the bums out" means all the bums except ours. • Political forum means "submit your questions in advance, and we'll answer what we damn well please." • "Thinking outside the box" means that what we're doing now ain't working. • "Strategy session" generally means "shoot in the creek long enough and you're bound to hit a fish." Maybe I don't write about politics much because I've learned to tune politicians out. I have to be careful with that skill, however. It can get too broad based. My wife tells me I don't listen to a thing she says. At least I think that's what she said. So if someone has decided that I'm not intellectual, I can live with that. Maybe I've found a happy medium ... somewhere between a tobacco barn and Plato. By the way, did Plato and Socrates have real jobs? I'm pretty sure they didn't smoke pipes. Can you imagine burn holes in one of those togas? (Dwain Walden is editor/publisher of The Moultrie Observer,985-4545. Email:dwain.walden@gaflnews.com) Hey fellow, my feelings aren't hurt FROM OUR READERS GUEST COMMENTARYTo the Editor: Re:your editorial of September 3, 2010 on improving education Many, many teachers put a great deal of effort in the classroom, and some are very successful in having the students learn!However, no matter how much effort is applied, some students don't learn.My hats off to these teachers!I commend them for their knowledge, skills and abilities! Many of the challenges in the classroom are a result from the student's environment outside of the classroom. Eliminating, or at least reducing, the adverse influences from the outside is one heck of a challenge to those in the public education program. When talking about improving public education, I see very little discussion about augmenting these efforts in the classroom with like efforts within the students'homes and with direct efforts by their parents.I suggest that whenever grades, not averages, go below a "B," the teacher, the school or the school system should initiate a dialog with the parents.Continued poor performance could generate a Ôindividual educational plan'(IEP) for the school, the student and the parents.Whenever possible, involve both parents, not just the Ôcustodial'parent. Of course, classroom efforts in middle-school math classes, et al., might improve if some of the math teachers were to stop giving A's solely for effort.Awarding 100's for Adequate-Daily-Progress (ADP) undermines the educational process as well as possibly raising the student's grade-point-average by one or two letters.When the ADPis weighted at 10%, there could be a one-lettergrade rise.When the ADPis weighted at 20%, there could be a two-letter-grade rise.So, a student's "C" in math could actually have been an "F," if it were not for this un-earned award.Parents, don't look at the gradepoint average.Instead, look at the individual grades for tests and quizzes. Also, I'd like to know how a student's education is enhanced by receiving Ôextra credit'for bringing/donating copy paper, hand sanitizer, etc. to a class.The students are basically told they can buy a higher grade than they deserve.Isn't that nice!? Parents, ask your children how his/her teachers present the daily lessons.Does the teacher merely sit at his/her desk reading the lesson plan while the students are supposed to read the lesson from the only-one television located at the front of the room?Does the teacher give the students a pre-test É which is the actual test with the questions in a different order?Does the teacher allow the students to sleep in class?Are the tests multiple-guess, fill-in the blank, open-ended or discussion/essay type? Each type requires a different depth of knowledge of the subject matter, as well as a different level of time and effort in grading.Visit your student's classes during the day once per month. I'd like to see each school have video-taping capability in each and every classroom, and randomly tape each class at least once per week.Put the videos on YouTube for public viewing!Boy, I bet there would be lots of changes in the classroom by some teachers and students! Is the new grading system, FOCUS, available to the parents yet?I have not seen any information on how to access it.It should be an automatic opt-in for both the parents and students, with the ability for them to opt-out. Sincerely, Tom Burnett Live Oak The editorial to which this letter responds is available online. Go to suwanneedemocrat.com and search for "Getting down to business." Editor A MINORITY VIEWBY WALTER WILLIAMS© 2010 Creators Syndicate~~ Due to the Labor Day holiday, AMinority View by Walter Williams arrived too late for the Wednesday edition. Williams' column will appear in Friday's paper instead.No Williams today

PAGE 7

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 7A Branford NewsServing southern Suwannee County, including Branford, O’Brien and McAlpinINDEXArrests . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2A Legal Notices . . . . . . . . .3B Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . .5A Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B Suwannee Living . . . . . .4A Viewpoint . . . . . . . . . . . .6A HI 93LO 73PAGE 2B Follow us on FACEBOOK By Ana Smith With the way the economy has been, and with just about everyone I know having to tighten their financial belts even tighter, I had a fun weekend at the flea market at the Columbia County fairgrounds last weekend. I know the old cliche is "one man's junk is another man's treasure," but I had forgotten not only what great "finds" are to be seen, but also what fun and good, old fashioned neighborliness can be experienced at such a venue. On this particular weekend my friend Gail and I, and another of her friends, pooled our own items and had a booth. A big part of the weekend was talking with so many interesting people who were out for a fun morning, enjoying finding those little surprises and meeting new people. If you are among the folks who visit this particular flea market on the weekends, I remind you that there is plenty to see inside the main building, as well as all the open-air booths. Part of that fun was running into folks I haven't seen in a while. A couple of my neighbors stopped at our booth to say hello, but for the life of me, I cannot remember their names. Next time I'll remember to write them down! I did take time to "wheel" around a couple of times, and at one booth I found O'Brien resident Audrey Howell, and we shared a few minutes with the promise that she would come and visit me when she had some time in her very busy life. Part of her very active life is helping at the flea market booth to benefit the many community activities of her church. Another who stopped at our booth to say hello was Dr. Fritz Fountain, director of the Southern Baptist Association in Live Oak and his wife, Marie. Still another was Roger Burnside, helping at a booth that uses all the money they make from donated items to fund the free dinners they provide the last Sunday of each month at the community center in Live Oak. He told me the last dinner they served more than 250 people, (actually I think it was more than 300) -quite an accomplishment. They have a booth here the 1st or 2nd Sunday of the month with items that have been donated ... which is an ongoing need ... to make the money to buy the food to have those dinners. So if you have items you want to donate, or if you would like to make a money donation to help, all would be greatly appreciated. And Roger, sorry I didn't get to go by your booth to meet Pat and Joann Lynch, the couple who initiated the free dinners in Live Oak. I hope to meet them sometime soon. Roger and I also talked about the upcoming need for donations for "Toys For Kids," a group that provides toys as well as much needed clothing items for needy children in the Branford area of Suwannee County at Christmas, and food baskets for those families that would not be able to provide that special Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner that most of us get to enjoy. It is not too early, folks, to start planning to make organizations like "Toys For Kids" your charitable contribution for the upcoming holidays. I'll keep reminding you in this column in the weeks to come. Roger's number is 386-9353343 for more information of pickup/drop off of donated items for either charitable cause. And isn't it nice, finally, to have days with temperatures "down" in the mid-80s and a break from all the afternoon thunderstorms? I hope I'll be able to open all my windows soon and let in that fresh air without also letting in that humid heat! In talking with Mary Goldsmith, former O'Brien resident now living up in Kentucky, she reminded me that it has been months of extreme heat up in her area and no rain so that her grass ceased to grow and has huge brown patches, despite a sprinkler system. So it's a case of be thankful for what we have, right? I promised Roger that I would mention a family that is in need of donations to help pay medical bills for emergency surgery on their 5-yearold son who was badly mauled by a dog while attending a child's birthday party about two weeks ago. The child is Dakota Allen, son of Michael and Ashley Allen of Branford. His face was severely damaged, and extensive 4-hour surgery was performed on Saturday, Aug. 28, to repair as much of the damage as possible. An account has been set up in the family's name at the Capitol City Bank in Branford to help defray the cost of this surgery because the family has no insurance to cover it. Dakota will turn 6 years old this month, and he is doing as well as can be expected, but has a long recovery ahead of him. There is the possibility of more cosmetic surgery in the future to repair the damage done to his face. At this writing I forgot to ask Roger if Dakota was still in the hospital or at home. We pray this little boy will have a full recovery and that all traces of surgery will be greatly diminished quickly. More quotes from Readers Digest "Quotable Quotes": "Acting is just a way of making a living; the family is life." -Denzel Washington "There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want." -Calvin Hobbes "A girl phoned me the other day and said 'Come on over, nobody's home.' I went over; nobody was home!" -Rodney Dangerfield "All men are not homeless, but some men are home less than others." -Henny Youngman "Homes really are no more than the people who live in them." -Nancy Reagan "I still close my eyes and go home ... I can always draw from that!" -Dolly Parton "At every party there are two kinds of people -those who want to go home and those who don't. The trouble is, they are usually married to each other." -Ann Landers Life is still wonderful, despite what's going on all around us! Make the most of yours! God bless! The McAlpin Advent Christian Church will resume Sunday School by hosting a Rally Day at 9:30 a.m., Sunday, Sept. 12. All classes will meet in the sanctuary, under the direction of Mrs. Barbara Bertolino, for a song fest of favorite Vacation Bible School choruses and pledges to the American and Christian flags. Following the rally opening, all students and teachers will enjoy a snack breakfast in Fellowship Hall. Teachers and students will have a “get acquainted” time following the breakfast. "We have classes for children of all ages and two adult classes,” noted Pastor Paul Bertolino. A women's class will meet with Mrs. Donna Bassett and a coed class will be team taught by Pastor Mike Bassett and Rev. Ron Wong. The older youth will meet with this class for the opening bible lesson and then move to their break out group. "We're very fortunate to have such a gifted teaching staff," Pastor Bertolino continued. “As we continue to grow, ministry to our greater McAlpin community is our priority.” The worship service will start at 10:45 a.m. The evening fellowship time is 4:30 p.m. Both youth groups, Junior and Senior, will meet at that time and child care is provided. There will be two adult studies. Dr. David Dean and Rev. Ron Wong will team teach an "Introduction to Christianity and the Advent Christian Church," which will serve as a baptism and membership class for those interested. Pastor Bertolino will continue his evening class on, "Lives Changed by the Gospel of Jesus Christ; What Happens When God's People Pray?" The 21st CCLC Afterschool Program began on Monday in Branford. It goes from 3:15 to 6:15 Monday through Thursday each week unless there is no regular day school for students. We will also have several Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Unfortunately, we will not provide transportation this year due to budget cuts. Any student interested in a mentoring, tutoring, and an enriched educational experience is invited to attend. For more information contact Karen Koon at Branford High School 935-5615. The Branford Area Inter Church Ministries will have a yard sale on Saturday, Sept. 18 from 7 a.m. until noon at the San Juan Catholic Mission located at 304 SE Plant Ave. in Branford. All proceeds will go the the Branford Area Inter Church Ministries. Branford Area InterChurch Ministries meets the second Thursday of the month at The Gathering restaurant. All area churches are invited to have a representative present. The BAICM ministers to the benevolent needs in the community as well as provides fellowship and communication between the local churches in our community. Our annual activities include Christmas parade, Easter sunrise service, Thanksgiving community service, and other events. For more information contact one of the participating churches, or visit www.baicm.org. The McAlpin Community Club will kick off the Fall season with an indoor “cookout” on Monday, Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. Hotdogs and buns will be furnished; members please bring sides. (Home-made ice cream will be welcomed.) We hope all our members have had a good summer and will return for the first meeting of the season. For info call Shirley Jones at 963-5357. Ranchettes Vol. Fire Department O’Brien Station When: Saturday, September 11, from 7 a.m. 10 a.m. Where: O’Brien Station 42 at 10121 N. CR 349, O’Brien, Fla. 2 pancakes, 2 sausage, orange juice or tea or hot cocoa, $3 per plate. Funds will be used to purchase equipment and maintenance. O'BRIEN AND OUR NEIGHBORS ‘Bits & Pieces’ from south Suwannee Co.Rally Day at McAlpin Advent Christian Church McAlpin Advent Christian Church is located at 17214 89th Road. For more information please call the pastor at 386-658-1048.Courtesy photo21st Century in BranfordBranford Area Inter Church Ministries plans yard saleMcAlpin Community Club to meetPancake Breakfast Fundraiser Branford rolls / Certain gets it done SPORTS 1B

PAGE 8

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 8A 570661-F B RANFOR D Mini-Storage Large and Small Units Reasonable 386-935-2122 386-935-0298 617658-F CLASS "A" COLLISION INC. "The Wrecksperts" • Specializing In Heavy Collisions • Quality Guaranteed • Insurance Preferred Shop • Unibody & Frame Straightening • Major Credit Cards Accepted. Damage Free 24 Hour Emergency Towing Shop 386-935-9334 Fax 386-935-0464 FREE ESTIMATES TED or TERESA LAWRENCE 301 Suwannee Ave., P.O. Box 519 Branford, FL. 32008-0519 617666-F Cherry Lumbert Pharmacist 101 S.W. US Highway 27 Branford, Florida 32008 (386) 935-6905 Everything For Your Home Recovery From Prescriptions to Medical Supplies OF BRANFORD Mon.-Fri. 8:30 am-6:00 pm Saturday 9am-1pm Sunday-Closed Now accepting Blue Cross Blue Shield Health Options NORTH FLORIDA PHARMACY 570892-F 570891-F 386-935-1728 GILCHRIST BUILDING SUPPLY INC. Hwy. 129 Bell, FL 352-463-2738 1-800-543-6545 617655-F Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.5:30 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Serving the community since 1979 www.gilchrist.doitbest.com To advertise your business here, call Rhonda at 386-362-1734 for more information 570896-F Byrd's Power Equipment Sales & Service All Makes & Models 11860 E. U.S. 27, Branford, FL 32008 (386) 935-1544 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday 7 a.m. Noon Open Saturday 7 a.m. 12 Noon 617651-F Good Fast Service From Our Deli Pizza € Subs € Broaster Chicken ® Western Union € Alltel Phone Bills € Pay Electric Bill € Windstream Phone Bills € Money Orders € Check Cashing € Lottery € Fax Service € Color Copies TIME SAVER PETRO Discount Cigarettes & Cigars Tired of the heat and can't wait for fall's cool breezes, sights, smells and sounds? Then join the Tangles team Saturday, Oct. 16, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. for their premier Fall Bazaar. Ministry leaders Angie Lott and Vickie Bass, have announced they've scheduled their first Fall Bazaar as a fundraising event for Tangles, a Community Outreach for Women. "We are excited to announce a great opportunity for our community to join us at Tangles for this first-time event. Not only will we be introducing the Tangles Gals'line of shabby chic furnishings and gifts, Shabby T, but we are looking for vendors who have hand-crafted or quality food items to sell," said Bass. Added Lott, "If you have handmade items such as jewelry, quilts, hand-sewn clothing, Christmas or other holiday dŽcor, artwork or any other original, unique creations, we'd love to talk to you about participating." They are also seeking vendors who sell heritage food items such as homemade cakes and pies, jams, preserves, kettle corn and traditional fall festival food. Vending applications can be obtained by e-mailing vlb55@msn.com. If you are looking for a family atmosphere where you can enjoy fall festivities and shopping among true handcrafted creations, you won't want to miss this day at Tangles. Also scheduled is an auction of unique, custom items (details to be announced in the near future). If you have items to donate (such as furniture, accessories, gift items no clothing please) contact Vickie Bass (contact information below). Tangles launched its fall schedule last week with a mini-concert by Kayla Thomas, of Nashville, Tennessee and Rachel Butler, from Live Oak. Upcoming events in addition to the Fall Bazaar include an evening of focus on women's health, participation in Operation Christmas Child, a Wonder Full World retreat, Christmas Open House, and more to be announced. Tangles is a community outreach open to women of all denominations, races, ages, nationalities and backgrounds. There is never a charge for any of the events or programs at Tangles. The goals of Tangles include that God will be glorified, that Christian women will have a place to encourage each other in their walk with God and that unsaved women will come to know Jesus. All proceeds from this event benefit Tangles, a nonprofit organization. Tangles is located at 12986 Hwy. 90 West, ? mile past Wayne Frier Mobile Homes on the left. For additional information call 386-590-1543 or e-mail lottfam4@windstream.net or vlb55@msn.com Fall bazaar set for Tangles By Lucille Heinrich There are many different bulb plants that do well in North Florida. Most bulb plants are perennials, which means they will come up year after year to a gardener's delight. This article will concentrate on bulbs to look for now because they need to be planted in late October or in November (before first frost) to ensure lovely spring flowers. Daffodils In our growing area, daffodils will be the first to flower in the spring, in fact, some as early as February. There are many different varieties of daffodils that can be purchased: some in different hues of yellow, some pure white and others filled with orange-red or pink cups. Some varieties are large cupped, some are early bloomers, some are fragrant, some have petals twisted like a pinwheel, and others will bloom in clusters. Be sure that whatever type you select are for Southern gardens. Plant bulbs pointy-end up in well-drained, enriched soil at least six inches below the ground. Once the plants have bloomed, do not cut off the foliage as they are feeding the bulb for the next growing season. After the daffodils have bloomed, you can over plant with annuals such as zinnias to ensure that you have color in this area all during the growing season. Alliums Here is another exciting plant that performs best when planted in the fall! These bulb plants are in the onion family, and their colorful clustered florets in a globe-shape flower are held high on a thick stem. They bloom in a wide range of colors including shades of yellow, white, pink, and purple, and their sizes range from inch-wide heads to volleyball-sized bloom clusters. They like sun or partial sun and bloom in late spring. They are excellent in dried arrangements. They range in height from short for rock gardens up to giant four-foot plants! They are drought tolerant, attract butterflies, deer resistant, and easy to grow. To plant, make the hole three inches deep and twice the width of the bulb (or the width of the spade) to loosen the soil. The planting location should be sunny and welldrained. Drop the bulb into the hole with the fibrous portion of the bulb facing down. The stem of the plant will emerge from the pointed top of the bulb. Lilies Fall is a great time for planting lilies. Lily "bulbs" are actually tubers composed of fleshy scales and lack a protective covering. Unlike true bulbThe Live Oak Garden Club will be offering outstanding daffodil bulbs well suited for our growing area during its fall plant sale Saturday morning, October 23, at their clubhouse located on CR 136 West next to Shands Hospital. Can't come to the sale? Call 362-5995 to order.GARDENING TIPS FROM THE LIVE OAK GARDENING CLUB Bulbs to plant in the fall flowers, they never go completely dormant and should be handled carefully since they can dry out quickly. It is a good idea to place them with other low plants which can provide shade for the bulb and root system. Lilies prefer to have their blooms in the sun and their roots in the shade. Prepare the soil with large amounts of organic matter or compost. Space them about a foot apart as they will spread. After planting, water well two or three times before first frost. Always allow the leaves on the stalk to turn yellow and fall off as part of the lily's natural growth process. This ensures that the bulbous underground part of the plant has gotten enough nourishment and will mean greater growth next year. There are thousands of lily varieties and hybrids on the market today. Some of the most popular varieties include Tiger Lilies, Oriental Lilies, and Trumpet Lilies.

PAGE 9

Science students in Suwannee County will have the distinct opportunity to study the ecological life along the Suwannee River this school year. With funds that have been received through the Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) Life in the Suwannee River Valley (LISVR) grant, science students will participate in field labs developed by the Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP). Trained teachers will ensure that lesson plans meet the standards for Gold Seal Lesson Plans. As technology is immersed in science education, this year, students will create: web pages, newsletters, brochures, public service announcements, and reports-both oral and written. They will document field labs through digital journals, and they will also create power point presentations, and podcasts for iTunes U to showcase their work. In July, over 30 teachers from Suwannee County teachers attended Floridas Digital Educators Teaching & Learning Institute. This workshop prepared them for the specific instructional practice that is needed to support the LISVR grant. This training provided insight and instruction on: copyright issues, Google presentations, iTunes, power points, Word 2007, Microsoft Word, Audacity, iMovie, iPhoto, Windows Movie Maker, Photoshop, Picasa, Excel 2007, as well as data entry & analysis through various spreadsheet applications. Participating educators uploaded examples of their work to the Digital Educator Program for evaluation and feedback. In order to implement the field labs that focused on water quality and water conservation efforts a group of science teachers from Branford High School, Suwannee Middle School, and Suwannee High School attended a four day workshop presented by the DEP at the Suwannee River State Park in Live Oak and Ivey Park in Branford. This informative training reviewed the key principals of the DEPs LIFE program, which includes: Project WET, The Waters Journey, and Investigative LIFE Field Labs. These labs focus on engaging the students with questions, and/or demonstrations, while students explore environmental conditions and explain what they observe. These interactive exchanges allow students to extend their knowledge as they evaluate and discuss their data. The teachers who attended DEPs LIFE training will take back what they have learned to their respective school sites and facilitate teacher training for their colleagues. Suwannee County is the 17th county in the state of Florida to join the DEPs LIFE program. If your community organization would like to host an EETT presentation, please contact one of the following: Katrina Raulerson, Grant Coordinator, 6474045, kraulerson@suwanneeschools.org Tammy Boggus, SHS Lead Teacher, 647-4000, tboggus@suwanneeschools.org Danelle Bradow, BHS Lead Teacher, 935-1231, dbradow@suwanneeschools.org Melissa Brinson, SMS Lead Teacher, 647-4500, mbrinson@suwanneeschools.org The EETT LISRV staff extends a special thanks to their supportive partners, which include: Department of Environmental Protection, Suwannee County Soil and Water Conservation District, Suwannee River State Park, Suwannee River Water Management, Farmers Cooperative, Florida Institute of Technology, Scientific Environmental Applications, Florida and the Islands Regional Comprehensive Center, The Suwannee Democrat, Suwannee Resource Conservation and Development Council, IFAS University of Florida, Shade Tree Nursery and Suwannee Farms. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 9A Three Rivers Medical Now Accepting Medicare, Medicaid and Private Insurance Patients! Chelation Therapy now available. Toxic heavy metals contribute to many chronic illnesses. Detoxification (removal of the metals) has benefited many of your neighbors and others in our community. We have tested over 400 patients for metals and have only found 4 with normal levels! Come in for your free consultation today. Three Rivers Medical in Branford, FL at 208 NW Suwannee Ave., across from Capital City Bank. 613809-F Call 935-1607 for more information and appointment! 614854-F Call Beka 386-590-6261 Blush Dance Company Mon.-Thurs. 3 p.m.-7 p.m. REGISTER NOW S U W ANN EE RI V ER RE AD I N GS Branford 2010 Branford 386-935-1527 SCAFFS S upermarket Sponsored By: 617662-F S ept. 1, 2010 9.63 S ept. 2, 2010 9.62 S ept. 3, 2010 9.59 S ept. 4, 2010 9.57 S ept. 5, 2010 9.56 S ept. 6, 2010 9.51 S ept. 7, 2010 9.51 The water levels provided here refer to the height at the US Hwy. 27 bridge in Branford in feet above mean sea level (ft-msl) at the gauging station. In the past the levels were read as gauge height not mean sea level. CITY vs. COUNTY CHILI COOK OFF OCTOBER 23, 2010 It’s time for the City vs. County Chili Cookoff sposnored by the Woman’s Club of Live Oak. This year’s event will be held on Saturday, October 23, 2010. The Cook Off will be held at Veterans Park during the Fall Festival. The event will begin at 11 a.m. with judging at 11:30 a.m. The public will be able to sample chili from 11:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. for a nominal donation of $5 per person. Awards will be presented at 2 p.m. Challenge Registration is $25 per team. This is a “People’s Choice” competition. There will also be a judges’ award for each chili category, as well as a showmanship award. Entrants are encouraged to use this as an informational opportunity to promote their departments. Business cards, brochures and other free materials may be distributed from your booth. For more information call 776-2264, no calls after 7 p.m. 618752-F Life in the Suwannee River ValleyScience grant will give local students a chance to study local ecology On the banks of the Suwannee.Courtesy photos In the classroom. Preparing for an experiment. Celebrate holiday office parties, family Christmas celebrations at the place that caters to them all. Its not too early to reserve your date for the upcoming Holiday season. Call today. 386-364-5250 email: frontdesk@campweed.org CAMP WEED CERVENY CONFERENCE CENTER 613810-F Th e W oman s Cl u b of Liv e O ak will h o s t Trash, Treasure & Homemade Bake Sale Sept. 23 & 24 € 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 618398-F Antique furniture, solid mahogany dining room table & chairs, cherry chest of drawers with mirror, full set of golf clubs, tools, christening doll, vacuum cleaner, luggage, Christmas wreaths & decorations, stuffed toys, end tables, cocktail table, clothes, bedding, tons of knickknacks and statues, Limoges dinner plates (sell for $10-$45 on Ebay), jackets, plus lots more! F or more i nformat i on c a ll 776 2264 (N o c a lls after 7 p.m. )

PAGE 10

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 10A FOOD STORESIf the Colonels Chicken was ths good He'd been a General!Lunch Special $649+tax Includes 2 veggies & breadHomestyle Dinners CHICKEN DINNER$999+tax8 piece 9980 US Hwy 90 Live Oak, FL 32060 601783-F An educational program by ACHIEVE of Suwannee, Inc. 12168 148 th Terrace, Live Oak, FL 32060 (386) 362-6134 Email: achieve_suwannee@yahoo.com *Your child may qualify for free tutoring if your child is eligible for free or reduced lunch AND at tends an eligible Title I school. If parental requests for free tutoring exceed the amount of funding available, the School District will serve th e students with the great est need. Neither the Florida Department of Education nor the School District promote or endorse any particula r supplemental services ( SES) provider All Students Can F REE T UTORING Achieve is offering 33 hours of free after school tutoring. We have certified teachers and Achieve has served Suwannee County for 6 years. 386-362-6134 618882-F * Photos galore Click on photo gallery at www.suwanneedemocrat.com and it will lead you to photos taken by Democrat photographers. Local events and local people are generally featured. You may even be there. Check it out! The photos are available for purchase too. 571105-F Steve Southerland, the Republican candidate for the District 2 congressional seat currently held by Democrat Allen Boyd, stopped in for a brief visit Friday at our offices. Southerland wants to rein in government spending, and called small business "the fastest, surefire way to kickstart the economy." Southerland defended himself against attack ads by his opponent -"Allen Boyd is lying when he says Steve Southerland is against Social Security and Medicare" -and called the federal healthcare plan now in place unconstitutional, though he said it wasn't realistic to expect its immediate post-election repeal.Photo: Staffpound, Roush said. "She was asked to get off the bus so that she could cool down and someone could talk to her from the school," he said. "But, she refused." Malcolm Hines, dean of students at SHS, was then called to the scene. Hines went to the very last seat where the young lady was sitting and asked her to come off the bus but again she refused, Roush said. "I came up, got on the bus and tried to talk to her. I repeatedly asked her to exit the bus so that I could talk with her, but she still refused," the principal reiterated. At that point, School Resource Officer Gary Edwards, who assists with after-school traffic, came over and proceeded to the back of the bus and spoke with the student, repeatedly asking her to get off the bus, said Roush, who followed Edwards back on board. "Again, she refused," Roush said. Edwards then opened the rear door of the bus and students in the rear were directed to the front. "Officer David Crutchfield, (SHS) resource officer, arrived and stood outside the rear of the bus," Roush said. "We tried to give the student an opportunity to exit through the back of the bus to save face from the embarrassment of having to exit up front between her peers. She still refused, became repeatedly agitated, and began using profanity at Officer Edwards," Roush said. As the student became increasingly upset, Edwards asked her to "turn around and put her hands behind her back, and she still refused," Roush said. Edwards then reached for her arm and she became physically aggressive as he moved her out the rear of the bus down toward Crutchfield, Roush said. "As her feet hit the ground, she began a physical confrontation with Edwards, Crutchfield and Dean Alan Bond, who were all trying to subdue her. She struck Crutchfield in the temple, at which point, he chose to utilize his taser." Scott Pfender, director of transportation for Suwannee County schools, who was at the scene, witnessed the incident. He said, "somewhere among all that, I heard the taser go off, and she just stood there." The student was then escorted into a patrol vehicle after nearly 20 minutes of conflict, said Roush, who was disturbed about the situation as he spoke Monday morning. "These situations are very unfortunate but obviously when a student or an adult in school or in regular society become aggressive and attempt to batter a person or a law enforcement officer -there is no other choice," he said. To students who had to witness the situation and parents who showed concern, Roush said, "While unfortunate that any student must witness another in distress, this can be seen as a learning experience to anyone for what can happen when you don't obey a legal and lawful order by a law enforcement officer." Neither Crutchfield nor Edwards was available for comment, and Hines declined comment. The school did not release the name of the student involved, a minor, nor contact information for her guardian.Student tasered in bus incident at SHSContinued From Page 1A for an expired tag (Pope) fled in vehicle from this officer," Kelly wrote in a report. Kelly chased Pope for about five or six miles near 152nd Street and 221st Road in Luraville before Pope stopped on a dead end road. "She then bailed out on foot and ran into the woods," Kelly wrote. Around 10:40 a.m. K9 tracking units from Suwannee and Hamilton Correctional Institutions responded to the scene to search for Pope. After a seven-hour hunt through woods, the banks of the Suwannee River and several homes, Pope was found and detained by the canine teams. The officers of the K9 tracking units included Sgt. John Morris, Sgt. Richard Gamble and Correctional Officer Jeremiah Carter accompanied by K9 officers Witty and Pistol of Suwannee CI. Sgt. William Billingsley, Correctional Officer Steve Folsom and Correctional Officer Allen Tolle, along with K9 Officer Copper, all of Hamilton CI, also participated. "Our Department of Corrections canine officers train hard and on many occasions offer assistance at the request of our local law enforcement community," Suwannee CI Warden Mark Redd said in a statement. "We work closely together to maintain public safety." Pope was charged with fleeing and eluding a law enforcement officer, driving while license suspended second offense, resisting without violence and violation of probation on the original charge of manufacturing cannabis. She was booked into the Suwannee County Jail.Woman leads police on seven-hour chase along banks of the SuwanneeContinued From Page 1A peared before a judge for a second time Thursday to be sentenced but was sent back to jail once again to await his fate. Shayne Cooper-Olin, 19, charged with burglary of a dwelling, grand theft III, and arson, had a plea deal struck down Thursday by Third Circuit Judge Julian E. Collins, who called the ramifications of the requested agreement "unlawful." Collins would not allow Cooper-Olin to be given a six-year maximum prison sentence for arson charged as a youthful offender, and 15 years probation for burglary and grand-theft charged as an adult. In addition to the charges of burglary, theft and arson, Cooper-Olin also faces two other cases both involving a count each of burglary of a dwelling and grand theft III all being tried together, "I'll tell you right up front, I have a problem with this 6-year D.O.C. sentence on an arson charge," said Collins to State Attorney Kyle McLeod and Assistant Public Defender John Hendrick. "This was a residence, and though no one was in the building at the time of the fire, I'll tell you I'm not inclined to accept this plea. So he may withdraw at this time." Cooper-Olin withdrew his plea and was sent back to the Suwannee County Jail to await another day in court. "We could not get a youthful offender plea in this case because he owes so much money," McLeod later said outside the courtroom. "He applied for youthful offender because of his age." Cooper-Olin, who was 18 at the time of his arrest, faces paying upward of $11,600 in restitution in the latter two cases plus the cost of the destroyed building in the first. Cooper-Olin's mother, Diane Cooper, was in court Thursday and walked away upset at the judge's refusal to accept the plea. "I don't think it's fair in the first place that they offered him two deals -one for youthful offender and one as an adult, and now that the judge has taken that off the table, there's no telling what he might get," she said. "They gave one of the other boys a similar deal -prison as a youthful offender and probation as an adult, so why not my son? Shayne came here from Michigan in June, and by November he was in jail. He's a follower and has never been a leader. He's always been a good kid -a Christian -and now because he got in with some of the wrong kids he's in this situation." Hank Whisnant, the victim and state's witness, whose decades of belongings were both stolen and burned, and whose workshop and home were destroyed, arrived in court ready to give a statement Thursday, but his moment never came. "I'm a retired Army veteran and a senior citizen," said Whisnant outside the courtroom. "He burned up all my medicine, my clothes, many of my tools, all the pictures of my wife who passed away 40 years ago. Just about all I had. I'm 69, and they burned me out." At a court date earlier this year, Cooper-Olin promised he would tell Whisnant where some of his missing belongings had gone, hoping for leniency. "When Hank went to the Wellborn pawnshop like (Cooper-Olin) said, the owners said that none of the items he mentioned had been pawned there," said Wendell Snowden, president of the Wellborn Community Association -the organization that owned the burned building where Whisnant resided. "Furthermore, we complained to McLeod that we did not want to see a plea agreement or a lighter sentence, but both those options have been brought to the table against our wishes," said Snowden, who is not listed as a victim in the case according to McLeod. McLeod said because Cooper-Olin's arson case is being tried together with his other two cases "in which the victims in those cases mainly want to see restitution, it's not as cut an dried as Mr. Snowden makes it out to be, but our office plans to contact and have a meeting with Mr. Whisnant and Mr. Snowden on Tuesday (Sept. 7)." In the meantime, Cooper-Olin's attorney Hendrick plans to go back to the drawing board concerning the plea agreement. Afollow-up court date for Cooper-Olin has not been set.Plea deal rejected in Wellborn arsonContinued From Page 1AOn the CAMPAIGN TRAIL

PAGE 11

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 11A 618749-F and use of a firearm during the commission of a felony. Police found O'Hara in his room at 813 Hillman Avenue with a single gunshot wound at on March 26 at about 11 p.m. He died the next day at Shands UF. "On the first night working the case, we were told he (Ware) was seen walking out with a gun, but we could never verify it," said Shaw. According to Shaw, other witnesses, with no connection to either party, later came forward to say Ware told them he disposed of the gun. The weapon, a 9MM Hi Point semiautomatic pistol, was found in a local retention pond in June. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement lab in Tallahassee determined the gun "matched evidence recovered from the crime scene," according to a press release from LOPD Det. Sgt. Ron Shaw. Ware, who has an extensive criminal history, was booked into the Suwannee County Jail. Ware was sentenced to 15 years in prison for 2nd degree murder in 1972, three years for burglary and grand theft auto in 1988, five years for burglary in 1992, two years for petty theft in 2000 and two years on drug charges in 2003. Anyone having information concerning this crime is asked to contact Live Oak Police Department at 386-362-7463 ext. 232, or Suwannee County Crime Stoppers at 386-208-8477. Police say you can remain anonymous.Suspect named in March shooting death of LO manContinued From Page 1A SHCC honors local heroesSuwannee Health Care Center paid tribute Tuesday morning to local heroes in the wake of Labor Day and on the cusp of Patriot Da y (Sept. 11). The center recognized local leaders: Mayor Sonny Nobles; Live Oak Police Chief Buddy Williams; Suwannee County Sheriff Tony Cameron (not present); Fire Chief Chad C roft, Live Oak Fire Department; members of the 269th Engineer Detachment; and SHCC honorary staff and residents. Photo: Carnell Hawthorne Jr.

PAGE 12

Quantity Right Reserved. We accept USDA Food Stamps, Personal Checks, Debit/Credit Cards and WIC OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 8 A.M. 8 P.M. 1529 SE Ohio Ave. LIVE OAK Save a lot a lot ¨ Prices good 9/8/10 thru 9/14/10 WE CUT FRESH MEAT DAILY THE BEST MEATS IN TOWN No additives or solutions for minimal shrinkage DONE THE OLD FASHIONED WAY 617188-F FUEL YOUR FAMILY FOR LESS! $ 1 19 12 OZ. $ 2 29 $ 1 19 $ 7 99 HELLMAN’S MAYONNAISE CHASE & SANBORN COFFEE $ 3 49 WYLWOOD MIXED VEGETABLES 99 ¢ $ 2 69 45 OZ. NU SOUTH STRAWBERRY LEMONADE FRESH FROM OUR PRODUCE DEPARTMENT Honeydew Melons $ 2 29 Each Sundia Fruit Cups Asst’d Varieties 99 ¢ Heavy Western Boneless Beef FAMILY PACK USDA Inspected Pork Heavy Western Beef USDA Inspected Fresh Heavy Western Boneless Beef USDA Inspected Pork Bone-In GROUND CHUCK $ 2 59 16 OZ. PKG. 5 LB. BAG 16 OZ. BAG WYLWOOD HASH BROWN PATTIES 30 OZ. ASSORTED GATORADE $ 1 59 NES Lb. SIRLOIN CHOPS Lb. 14.4 OZ. 79 ¢ Fresh Express Salad Mix 12 oz. Pkg. USDA Inspected Smoked Pork $ 1 49 $ 1 89 Fairgrounds 8 OZ. $ 3 99 COUNTRY CROCK SPREAD ASST. COBURN FARMS BLOCK CHEESE STARKIST CHUNKLIGHT TUNA IN WATER $ 1 99 40 OZ. 99 ¢ 32 OZ. 2 LITERS 20 LB. 48 OZ. 14 OZ. PKG. Hillshire Farm $ 2 39 23 OZ. PETER PAN PEANUT BUTTER 8 oz. GULF PACIFIC LONG GRAIN RICE GRANNY ELLA’S CINNAMON OR HONEY GRAHAMS WESTCOTT VEGETABLE OIL KURTZ WHOLE KOSHER DILL PICKLES GINGER EVANS BISCUIT AND BAKING MIX J. HIGGS MINI TWISTS OR STICK PRETZELS $ 1 79 16.3 OZ. $ 4 99 128 OZ. T-BONE STEAK OR BONELESS RIBEYE NECK BONES $ 1 69 Lb. HAM, SMOKED TURKEY, OVEN ROAST TURKEY OR HONEY HAM $ 2 87 Ea. SAUSAGE REG., POLISH OR BEEF Ea. Ea. $ 3 19 40 OZ. 59 ¢ 5 OZ. $ 5 99 Lb. SIRLOIN ROAST $ 1 29 Lb. $ 2 49 CHUCK ROAST Lb. $ 2 99 Lb. CHUCK STEAK USDA Inspected Quick Frozen $ 8 99 CHICKEN WINGS CUBED WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 12A

PAGE 13

Section BWednesday, September 8, 2010Suwannee Democrat SPORTS SPORTS By Corey Daviscorey.davis@gaflnews.comLIVE OAK-It wasn’t pretty but Suwannee will take it, after a near disasterous season opening 21-6 win over Hamilton County at Paul Langford Stadium Friday. Suwannee committed several penalties and turnovers yet somehow escaped with another win in the Battle of the Bridge rivalry. Things looked promising early on for the Bulldogs after Greg Swinson returned the opening kickoff 50 yards to the 39-yard line. However, three plays later, a high snap sailed over quarterback Jackson Brown’s head before Brown recovered it 19 yards back at the fifty. This was one of the many mistakes Suwannee would make on the night as the ‘Dogs racked up 18 penalties for 108 yards, accumulated four turnovers and missed a chip shot field goal. The good news: the defense bailed them out several times and posted a shut out, the lone points coming off an offense turnover. Hamilton defensive back Gerald Bristol out jumped wide receiver Andre Zanders to pick off a Jackson Brown pass on their second possession. One play later, Dontavius Hampton back from an injury picked off a Deonte Simmons pass to stall the Trojans drive. Suwannee took advantage of the turnover and turned it into points as Brown hit a wide open Zanders across the middle for a 27-yard touchdown pass giving the Bulldogs a 7-0 lead with 9:36 left in the second quarter. Hamilton answered two possessions later as Bristol scooped up a Swinson fumble and returned it 25-yards for a score. However the PAT was no good, cutting the lead to 7-6 with 1:57 remaining till halftime. Suwannee took a one-point lead into half and answered on its first possession of the second half as Swinson walked in from 8-yards giving the Bulldogs a 14-6 lead early in the third. Following another Suwannee turnover, this time a Derek Smith fumble, Swinson picked off Simmons and returned it 25-yards for a score increasing the lead to 21-6 with 4:34 left in the third quarter. Brown had a chance to put it away late in the game but missed a 32-yard field goal with a low liner kick. Hamilton put together its only decent drive of the night late in the game with under four minutes left in the game but a fourth down pass from Simmons to Will Hill was dropped in the endzone. Suwannee was able to run out the clock and get the win despite the sloppy play. Kyle Certain and Kyle Stebbins combined for four touchdowns to lead Branford (1-0) to a 42-22 win over St. Francis in their Big Ten Conference opener. Certain rushed for 161 yards on 24 carries and scored on runs of 3 and 8 yards, while Stebbins rushed 12 times for 74 yards, including a scoring run of 21 yards. Cole Lamb led the defense making two interceptions, returning one for 38 yards and a score. With the win, the Bucs improve to 4-0 all-time against the Wolves and host Trenton this week in a non-conference and nondistrict game.Branford rolls Sloppy winScoreboard for Sept. 3Suwannee 21 Hamilton 6 Branford 42 St. Francis 22 Dixie 35 Lafayette 21 Columbia 38 Brooks 13 Madison 31 Fort White 0 Leon 26 Godby 7 Williston 33 PK Yonge 0 Buchholz 17 Eastside 13 Trinity 16 Gainesville 9 Union County 12 Ocala Forest 7 Trenton 59 Bronson 0 Hawthorne 26 Chiefland 21 Newberry 21 Santa Fe 14 Greg Swinson came up big for the Bulldogs Friday night, rushing for 119 yards on 25 carries. See additional photo, Page 3B.Photo: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com) Cole Lamb Kyle Stebbins By Corey Daviscorey.davis@gaflnews.comPlayer of the Week Branford senior athlete Kyle Certain ran for 164 yards and 2 touchdowns on 24 carries to lead the Bucs to a season opening win over St. Francis. Nominees Jackson Brown-Suwannee senior quarterback completed 15 of 29 passes for 139 yards and 1 TD in the Bulldogs 21-6 win over Hamilton. Greg Swinson-Suwannee senior tailback ran for 119 yards on 25 carries and also had a 25-yard interception return for touchdown. Andre Zanders-Suwannee senior wide receiver stepped up big for the offense with 8 catches for 89 yards and 1 touchdown. Cole Lamb-Branford athlete picked off two passes, returning one for a touchdown, while scoring another on offense.Certain gets it doneKyle Certain What’s happening at CorinthPage 4B

PAGE 14

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 2BSPORTS 616907-F CONTEST RULES:  Circle the team you think will win game for that week  One entry form per week, per person  Entry form with correct team will be entered into weekly drawing for $25  All correct entry forms will be entered into drawing at end of season for Grand Prize of $250.  Entry forms must be received by 5 p.m. Game Day  Drop off or mail entry forms to Suwannee Democrat/Football Contest, P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 SUWANNEE vs MADISON BRANFORD vs. OAK HALL GAME DAY FRIDAY, SEPT. 10, 2010 NAME ADDRESS PHONE NAME ADDRESS PHONE $ 250 GRAND PRIZE * *Prize is in check form $ 25 WEEKLY * $ 25 WEEKLY * 570605-F Volleyball Fort White def. Branford Fort White (1-0) swept Branford (0-10 in three straight sets 25-19, 25-18, 25-13 to win its season opener Aug. 30 in Branford. Leading the Indians was Kaycee Baker with nine kills, Sarah Stringfellow with 15 service points and Allison Wrench with 22 assists. Newberry def. Hamilton County Newberry (1-0) swept Hamilton County (0-1) in three straight sets 25-18, 25-22, 25-13 to win its season opener Aug. 31 in Jasper. Leading the Panthers was Taylor Whitely with 18 service points and Kailey Butler 17 service points and seven assists. St. Francis def. Branford St. Francis (2-0) swept Branford (0-2) in three straight sets 25-3, 256, 25-10 in Branford. Leading the Wolves are Megan Lee with 23 service points and 13 aces, Carson Maris with 10 points, Sarah Rajaee 16 points and 17 assists and Jenny Dugan with 10 kills. Swimming Suwannee traveled to Gainesville recently to face P.K. Yonge. Despite being heavily outnumbered, the men's team came away with a 101-81 victory. The girls put up a valiant effort as well, but were defeated. Golf Suwannee boy’s golf team took to the links recently taking on Branford and Union County. While not playing their best they still played hard and the long hours of practice paid off. In the end, Alfer Segura anchored a hard fought effort, as Suwannee compiled a four score total of 197 to sweep both Branford (228) and Union County (225). Sept. 9 Volleyball Lafayette at Hamilton County, 6 Trenton at Branford, 6:30 Newberry at Suwannee, 6:30 Boys Golf Keystone Heights at Suwannee, 4 Girls Golf Suwannee at Keystone Heights, 4 Sept. 10 Football Trenton at Branford, 7:30 Oak Hall at Lafayette, 7:30 Madison County at Suwannee, 7:30 Union County at Hamilton County, 7:30 Sept. 13 Volleyball Fort White at Hamilton County, 6 Lafayette at Bell, 6 Branford at Dixie County, 6:30 Sept. 14 Volleyball Jefferson County at Lafayette, 6 Suwannee at Santa Fe, 6:30 Sept. 15 Volleyball Branford at St. Francis, 6:30 Sept. 16 Volleyball North Florida Christian at Hamilton County, 6 Tallahassee Maclay at Lafayette, 6 Columbia at Suwannee, 6:30 Dixie County at Branford, Sept. 17 Football Branford at Bishop Snyder, 7:30 St. Francis at Lafayette, 7:30 Suwannee at Fort White, 7:30 Hamilton County at University Christian, 7:30 Sept. 20 Volleyball Hamilton County at Union County, 6 Lafayette at Madison County, 6 Suwannee at Branford, 6:30 Sept. 21 Volleyball Hamilton County at Suwannee, 6:30 Lafayette at North Florida Christian, 6 Branford at Bronson, 6:30 Boys Golf Suwannee at Keystone Heights, 4 Girls Golf Keystone Heights at Suwannee, 4 Sept. 23 Volleyball Madison County at Hamilton County, 6 Branford at Lafayette, 6 Suwannee at Williston, 6:30 Sept. 24 Football Branford at Tallahassee Maclay, 7:30 Lafayette at Aucilla Christian, 7:30 Suwannee at Santa Fe, 7:30 Sept. 27 Volleyball Suwannee at Lafayette, 6 Hawthorne at Branford, 6:30 Sept. 28 Volleyball Hamilton County at Lafayette, 6 Suwannee at Newberry, 6:30 Sept. 30 Volleyball Tallahassee Maclay at Hamilton County, 6 Fort White at Suwannee, 6 Branford at PK Yonge, 5 Oct. 1 Football Branford at Paxon, 7:30 St. Stephens at Lafayette, 7:30 Taylor County at Suwannee, 7:30 Hamilton County at Hilliard, 7:30 Oct. 4 Volleyball Hamilton County at Jefferson County, 6 Trenton at Lafayette, 6 Suwannee at Columbia, 6:30 Bronson at Branford, 6:30 Oct. 5 Volleyball Suwannee at Hamilton County, 6 Bell at Branford, 6:30 Oct. 7 Football Florida Deaf at Branford, 7:30 Volleyball Brooks County, Ga at Hamilton County, 3:15 Lafayette at Jefferson County, 6 Santa Fe at Suwannee, 6:30 Branford at Trenton, 6:30 Oct. 8 Football Lafayette at Mandarin Christian, 7:30 Hamilton County at Dixie County, 7:30 Suwannee at Raines, 7:30 Oct. 11 Volleyball Lafayette at Trenton, 6 Branford at Bell, 6:30 Oct. 12 Volleyball Hamilton County at Madison County, 6:30 North Florida Christian at Lafayette, 6 Branford at Chiefland, 7 Oct. 14 Volleyball Hamilton County at North Florida Christian, 6 Williston at Suwannee, 6:30 PK Yonge at Branford, 4:30 Sports CalendarPrep Roundup Photos: Metro SEE SPORTS, PAGE 3B

PAGE 15

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 3BSPORTS Now THAT'S Something To Smile About! 571307-F "My First Fish" Evan J. McMillan, age 4 Thank you for submitting this week's SMILE photograph! Submit your photo for publication to: Suwannee Democrat P.O. Box 370, Live Oak, FL 32064 Suwannee Democrat 211 Howard St. East, Live Oak, FL 32064 or call 386-362-1734 • 1-800-525-4182 Choose From Two Convenient Payment Options Direct Debit from Checking/Savings Account I want to take advantage of EZ Pay, and I authorize you to process a payment for the applicable amount on my checking/savings account each month until I instruct you otherwise. $2.75 each month $4.00 each month in county out of county Credit Card Payment I want to take advantage of EZ Pay, and I authorize you to bill my credit/ATM/debit card for the applicable amount each month until I instruct you otherwise. Sign Up for EZ Pay today and receive a FREE $ 5 00 gift card to Publix How EZ Pay Benefits You 1. Monthly billing doesn't tie up large amounts of money in advance. 2. Never receive another renewal notice no more checks to write or stamps to find. 3. Switch at any time prefer to go back to paying another way after trying EZ Pay? Just call us! Come by Promotion ends September 22, 2010 at 5 p.m. District 2-2ADistrict Overall Baker County 0-0 1-0 Baldwin 0-0 1-0 Ribault 0-0 0-0 Raines 0-0 1-0 Suwannee 0-0 1-0 Santa Fe 0-0 0-1 District 5-1A District Overall Chiefland 0-0 0-1 Dixie 0-0 1-0 Hamilton 0-0 0-1 Hilliard 0-0 0-1 Trenton 0-0 1-0 Villages 0-0 1-0 Wildwood 0-0 1-0 District 2-1B District Overall Hawthorne 0-0 1-0 Lafayette 0-0 0-1 Mandarin Christian 0-0 0-1 Aucilla Christian 0-0 1-0 Oak Hall 0-0 1-0 St. Francis 0-0 0-1 St. Johns 0-0 0-1 Big Ten Conference Conference Overall West Branford 1-0 1-0 Bell 0-1 0-1 Bronson 1-1 0-1 Bishop Snyder 1-0 1-0 St. Joseph 0-1 0-1 East Mandarin Christian 0-0 0-1 St. Johns 0-0 0-1 Oak Hall 2-0 1-0 St. Francis 0-1 0-1 Scores Bishop Snyder 34, St. Joseph 7 Trenton 59, Bronson 0 Columbia 39, Brook's County 13 Baker County 40, Crescent City 0 Baldwin 33, Eagle’s View 26 Suwannee 21, Hamilton County 6 Hawthorne 26, Chiefland 21 Fernandina Beach 27, Hilliard 6 Dixie County 35, Lafayette 21 Atlantic Coast 31, Mandarin Christian 20 Newberry 21, Santa Fe 14 Oak Hall 29, Bell 22 Raines 21, Jackson 14 Branford 42, St. Francis 22 Villages 31, Lake Weir 21 Warner Christian 46, St. Johns Country Day 6 Wildwood 21, Citrus 11 Aucilla Christian 20, Rocky Bayou 12 Suwannee Legals REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS CLEANING CONTRACT Accepting bids for cleaning and preparation of The Housing Authority of the City of Live Oak’s vacated (1-4) bedroom apartments for move in. Contractor’s bidding this work shall have an occupational license to do business in the State of Florida. Liability Insurance in the sum of $100,000 or more required, a copy of the license is to be submitted with the Bid. Contractors must adhere to the Davis Bacon wage rate determination. This is a one year contract starting from 1 October 2010. For more information you may contact the Housing Authority Office at (386) 362-2123 or stop by the office at 406 Webb Drive N.E., Live Oak, FL, 32064, and receive the scope of work. Bids will be accepted until 12:00 A.M., 20 September 2010. Live oak Housing Authority reserves the right to waive minor informalities in the bidding if said waiver is in the Housing Authority’s best interest. The Housing Authority of the City of Live Oak is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Housing Authority of the City of Live Oak (LOHA) Contact: Scott Stephens, Executive Director Phone: (386) 362-2123 9/8, 10, 15, 17 STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an Environmental Resource/mitigation bank permit (#0288852-001) to the Bayfield Mitigation, LLC to establish the Bayfield Mitigation Bank (SMB) on a + 1994.64 acre parcel. The project includes the preservation of the site and the restoration or enhancement of a mosaic of upland and wetland communities described as longleaf pine/xeric oak, mesic pine flatwoods, hydric pine flatwoods, ecotone, cypress dominated or mixed wetland forest depressions, and mixed slough and stream swamp. Credits generated may be used as mitigation for future unavoidable wetlands impacts to these natural or disturbed communities within the service area. Restoration and enhancement will be accomplished by installing ditch blocks and low water crossings, removing ~1/2 ac. of fill road and associated ditches, thinning and removal of planted pine, reducing woody shrub density, decreasing bedding impacts, planting longleaf pine and perennial groundcover species, supplemental planting of cypress, hardwood and mixed wetland forest vegetation in appropriate habitats, and implementing a long-term management program including frequent prescribed burns. The mitigation was assessed by the Uniform Mitigation Assessment Method (UMAM; Chapter 62-345, F.A.C.) as having a potential of 280.77 freshwater credits (108.10 Hydric Flatwoods/Wet Prairie Credits (38.50%) and 172.67 Forested Wetland Credits (61.50%)). BMB is located in Columbia County, north of Lake City, and east of White Springs just east of Hwy 441. BMB site is specifically located in Sections 28-30, 32, and 33, Township 01N, Range 17E. It lies within the Upper Suwannee River Basin Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC) with a small portion draining west directly to Suwannee River but most of the site draining south and east to Little Creek (a tributary of the Suwannee), Class III waters. It has a mitigation service area incorporating portions of Baker, Columbia, Suwannee, and Hamilton Counties. The application and draft permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours at the Department’s Office of Submerged Lands and Environmental Resources, Bob Martinez Building, 2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 2500, Tallahassee, FL, 323992400. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s proposed permitting decision may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) in accordance with Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000, within 21 days of publication of this notice. Petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. Failure to file a petition within this time period shall constitute a waiver of any right such person may have to request an administrative determination (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes. The Petition shall contain the following information: (a) The name, address, and telephone number of each petitioner, the applicant's name and address, the Department Permit File Number and the county in which the project is located; (b) A statement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Department's action; (c) A statement of how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the Department's action (changes to the conditions placed on this permit); (d) A statement of the material facts disputed by Petitioner, if any; (e) A statement of facts which petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the Department's action (changes to the conditions placed on this permit); (f) A statement of which rules or statutes petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the Department's action (changes to the conditions placed on this permit); and (g) A statement of the relief sought by petitioner, stating precisely the action petitioner wants the Department to take with respect to the Department's action. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the permit have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding. The petition must conform to the requirements specified above and be filed (received) within 21 days of publication of this notice in the Office of General Counsel at the above address of the Department. Failure to petition within the allowed time frame constitutes a waiver of any right such person has to request a hearing under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S., and to participate as a party to this proceeding. Any subsequent intervention will only be at the approval of the presiding officer upon motion filed pursuant to Rule 285.207, F.A.C. Mediation is not available. 9/8 District standings Sloppy winSuwannee wide receiver Andre Zanders (13) and Hamilton County cornerback Anthony Ingram (5) battle over the ball during the game. Photo: Paul Buchanan (SuwanneeSports.com) Check out the Suwannee Democrat ’s page on Facebook Oct. 15 Football Chiefland at Hamilton County, 7:30 Oct. 18 Volleyball Hamilton County at Fort White, 6 Bell at Lafayette, 6 Oct. 19 Volleyball Hamilton County at Newberry, 6:30 Lafayette at Branford, 6 Oct. 21 Volleyball Lafayette at Suwannee, 6 Continued From Page 2B Sports Calendar

PAGE 16

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 PAGE 4B SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK aving Sale prices in effect 9/1-9/30 Fall Into at 570915-F Live Oak area Jiffy 304 -Ohio Ave. North Walmart Ð Hwy 129 North S & S 22 -Hwy 129 Exxon -Next to Wendy's on Hwy 129 S & S 45 -CR 49 & Hwy. 90 Donut Time -Howard Street Suwannee River Food Store Hwy 129 N Jiffy 311 Ð Hwy 90 west Howlands Ð 11th street Howlands Express Ð 11 th street Jiffy 305 -Irvin Ave. at roundabout Winn Dixie -Pinewood and Hwy 51 One Stop # 7 -Hwy 90 east Stop and Shop -Ohio Ave. east Jiffy 318 -Duval Street east J & K -Hwy 129 N and Winderweedle Ave Ready Freddy -Houston Ave S & M -Corner of Hwy 90 and Walker St Harrys Ð Walker Ave Dollar General -Hwy 129 next to Publix Dollar General Ð Howard Street S & P Ð Helvenston street Downtown CafŽ Ð Howard Street west Publix Ð Hwy 129 south Luraville Store Ð Hwy 51 south Jims Produce Ð Ohio ave south Landens Grocery Ð Hamilton ave Taylor Store -Hwy 51 south Dollar Tree -Hwy 129 N next to Walmart S & S 46 -10019 Hwy 129 Walgreens Ð Hwy 129 s across from Publix M & M Discount Ð Hwy 129 south Fast Mart -Ohio ave across from Hardees O’Brien S & S 19 -Hwy 129 S McAlpin S & S 25 Ð 17022 Hwy 129 Branford area Cuzins CafŽ (moving to new location) Timesaver -Hwy 27 Scaffs -Suwanee Ave C Ð Square Hwy 27 Dollar General Ð Hwy 27 east M & M discount -Suwannee Ave Byrds Hwy 27 west of Branford S & S 39 Ð Hwy 27 & Hwy 129 S & S 47 -Hwy 49 & Hwy 27 Jiffy 321 Ð Hwy 49 & Hwy 252 Mayo area Jiffy 324 Hwy 27 west L & R -Hwy 51 north S & S 53 -11089 State Road 51 Jiffy 302 -203 E Main Street Fast Track 264 -Hwy 27 Jasper area S & S 49 Ð Fast Track 404 Fast Track 103 Wellborn area S & S 35 -Hwy 136 B & B -HWY 90 Wellborn General -CR 252 Lake City S & S 9 -Hwy 90 S & S 42 -Hwy 90 S & S 20 -Hwy 90 at county line Food Lion -Hwy 90 west Coin Rack Locations Live Oak Area Suwannee Democrat Howard Street east Dixie Grill -Howard Street east Post Office -Ohio ave South Sheryls Kays Restaurant -Howard St. West Jays Restaurant -Hwy 90 west Pepe's Ð Hwy 90 west Suwannee Hospital -11th Street Save a lot Ð Hwy 129 S across from Publix Dairy Queen Ð Ohio ave south Hardees Ð Ohio Ave south Island Food Store -Walmart Plaza Subway -Walmart plaza Huddle House -Hwy 129 N & I 10 Penn Oil Ð Hwy 129 N & I -10 Falmouth Crossing Ð Hwy 90 west Wellborn Post Office Ð CR 137 Branford Area Post office -Suwannee Ave Nells -Suwannee Ave The Gathering Ð CR 252 Dowling Park Riverview Apartments Village Grocery Jiffy 310 -CR 250 at bridge Food Mart -CR 250 Good Samaritan Center Suwannee Democrat sold at these locations 607289-F Doctrinal views expressed on our Religion pages are those of the individual authors and not of the Suwannee Democrat . RELIGION Submitted On Saturday August 28, Team Acts from Corinth Baptist went on a "Podge run" to seek out the homeless. Before beginning our journey we prayed and asked our Lord to use us for His glory. We began our journey at I-75 & SR6, where we found our first ministry opportunity, whose name is Mr. Jimmy. We took the time to talk with Mr. Jimmy and learned he had been living on the streets for over 24 years due to several different circumstances and gave him a "Podge bag". This bag is named after one of the church members who wanted to help those in need standing along the side of the road. The bag we have put together is just for this purpose and in the bag contains a Bible, toothbrush, toothpaste, candy, snacks, soap, washcloth, and comb. This is just one of the bag examples as all bags are not made alike. Most importantly, we shared with Mr. Jimmy that Jesus loves him no matter what and we prayed with him. We then went south on the interstate stopping at every exit looking for someone to minister to, but most exits there was nobody. We gave out a total of six bags between Jasper and Gainesville. There were also a couple of homeless people who either refused a bag or a bag and prayer. In those cases we have to remember they are not rejecting us, they are rejecting Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior. We stopped along the way to eat a picnic lunch and there we were able to minister to a couple whose truck was broke down. No matter where we are God will use us if we are willing to be His vessel! We ended our day by stopping in Lake City at Ole Times Country Buffet and enjoying a meal together and talking about our day. And we know that most of the people we came in contact with on this day we may never see again and some of them will not change the way they live their lives, but we have done as our Lord and Savior has told us to. We can only hope and pray that a seed has been planted when sharing a bag and Jesus with those we come in contact with. And we must always remember: It is not about me, but ALL about HIM!!!! David H Matier Doctor of Pastoral Counseling dmatier@windstream.net You say, “That’s a dumb question everybody knows where their Bible is!” You think so. One time while visiting house to house I came across a man who thought he knew where his Bible was. When I go out visiting I take my New Testament, but I like to use the Bible of the person I’m visiting because I don’t want them to think, when I present the plan of salvation, that it is something I got out of my little book. I asked the fellow if he had a Bible. He said, “Sure,” and he went to look for it. Well after 15 minutes or more, he still had not found his Bible. I hope your Bible is where you can put your hand on it faster then that! Not only individuals lose their Bibles but many churches have lost the Bible too. It is hard to find a church where the pastor has the freedom to preach the Word as it should be preached, convincingly and without fear. So many people want to tell the preacher when to preach, where to preach and how to preach and many preachers let them do it! In these churches, the Bible has been lost. In II Chronicles 34:14, it is said that when the money was brought out of the house of the Lord they found “the book of the law.” That seems quite significant. Is not that where the Bible has been lost, under “the money?” In a recent poll, money, among other things, came in above faith as the most important things in life. THINGS have buried the Bible! “...the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows,” (I Timothy 6:10). It is not money but the “I must have it attitude” toward money that people have that causes the problem! If you move your “money,” (your things) you might find where you misplaced the Word of God. If the church sets the money issue aside, it might be able to locate God’s Word once again. We have buried the Word under our bake sales, dinner parties, camping trips and other special events that have become so popular in our churches. Free us of THINGS so that we can find the Word of God once again! When the “Book of the Law” was found, changes were made (II Chronicles 34:30-33). Lives were changed; the people were brought back to God. It even made a big difference in the way the king pursued his subjects. When God’s Word is found, things will change. Church members will want more; they won’t be satisfied with their ears being tickled but will want “sound doctrine” and will do away with “teachers, having itching ears” (II Timothy 4:3). It is time to discover the Word of God. Read it daily. Read it through at least once each year (you can read it through in one year if you read three chapters a day). Many have never read the Bible through and we wonder where the Bible went! We truly are in a time of famine, “not a famine of bread, nor a thirst for water, but of hearing the words of the Lord” (Amos 8:11). When church members start carrying their Bibles to church (not leaving them in the pew from one Sunday until the next), reading it throughout the week and giving their pastors the freedom to preach the Word, they will rediscover the Word. The Word will be found in the House of the Lord! Do you know where your Bible is?The Bible says, "For I was hungry and you gave Me something to eat; I was thirsty and you gave Me something to drink; I was a stranger and you took Me in; naked and clothed Me; I was sick and you visited Me; I was in prison and you came to Me." Matthew 25:36-37 .What’s happening at CorinthAsking for God’s blessings and help. Courtesy photo Hatch Bend Baptist Church will host their annual Homecoming services on Sunday, Sept. 12, 2010. Sunday School 9:45-10:30, worship to begin at 10:45 with singing. Guest singer with be Gail Moore and speaker will be Rev. Bruce Sullivan. There will also be singing from several church members. Lunch will follow in the fellowship hall. Bring a covered dish and join us in worship, food and fellowship. No evening service. For more information call Bro. Paul Coleman at the church, 935-0943 or email at hbbc@windstream.net. Swift Creek Historic Church will be having their annual Homecoming on September 26, 2010. Location is at Swift Creek Historic Church and Cemetery in White Springs, Florida. If any more information is needed, please feel free to call Cathy Erixton at 386397-2791. Services will start at 10:45 A.M. Our guest speaker will be Rev. Brain Keen. As always we will be having oldfashioned music and following the church services, everyone will be bringing a covered dish. If you want to get a feel of an old fashion church service and a taste of history please come join us.Hatch Bend Baptist Church HomecomingHomecoming at Swift Creek Historic Church

PAGE 17

FAMILY FEATURES Kids love to snack. But left to their own devices, most kids dont always make the healthiest snack choices. A new study of long-term eating patterns in children, from researchers at the University of North Carolina, shows that kids today are getting nearly one-third of their daily calories from unhealthy snacks such as chips, crackers and candy. Nutritious and delicious snacks are as close as your produce aisle. Water melon is practically a multivitamin unto itself „ and its natural sweetness is something kids love.Did You Know?A 2-cup serving of watermelon is an excellent source of Vitamins A, B6 and C. Vitamin A found in watermelon is important for optimal eye health.Vitamin B6 found in watermelon is used by the body to manufacture brain chemicals (neurotransmitters), such as serotonin, melatonin and dopamine, which preliminary research shows may help the body cope with anxiety and panic. Vitamin C in watermelons can help to bolster your immune systems defenses against infections and viruses, and is known to stimulate the immune system and protect against free radical damage.A 2-cup serving of watermelon is also a source of potassium, a mineral necessary for water balance and found inside of every cell. People with low potassium levels can experience muscle cramps. A 2-cup serving has less than 10 percent of the daily reference value for potassium. Try these fun recipes as after-school and post-activity snacks. For more kidfriendly recipes and healthy eating tips, visit www.watermelon.org.Watermelon Kebabs1-inch cubes of seedless watermelon Smoked turkey breast Cheddar cheese Coffee stirrers or beverage straws Cut watermelon, turkey and cheese in cubes and skewer on stirrers or straws.Watermelon NachosServes 6 to 8 12 to 16 1/2-inch thick watermelon triangles with 3-inch sides 2 cups Greek vanilla yogurt 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract A few drops almond extract 1 cup Craisins 1 cup white chocolate chips 1/2 cup toasted sliced almonds 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon Arrange the watermelon triangles on a serving platter or glass cake stand. Mix yogurt with extracts and spoon yogurt over the watermelon in the fashion of nacho cheese sauce. Sprinkle craisins, white chocolate chips, and almonds over the yogurt and dust with cinnamon. Watermelon Dippers8 ounces sour cream 4 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Watermelon sticks or small wedges Blend together the sour cream, sugar and vanilla in a small serving bowl. Use as a dip for the watermelon.Watermelon Cut OutsSeedless watermelon, cut into 1/2to 3/4-inch-thick slices Yogurt Granola or similar cereal Using your favorite cookie cutters, cut shapes out of watermelon slices. Frost with vanilla or other flavored yogurt. Sprinkle with granola.Watermelon Berry SlushMakes 6 servings 4 cups cubed, seeded watermelon 1 10-ounce package frozen raspberries 1 12-ounce bottle sparkling mineral water Place watermelon in a single layer in shallow pan; freeze until firm. Remove from freezer and let stand 5 minutes. Drop watermelon through food chute of a food processor or blender with the motor running. Add frozen raspberries alternately with mineral water, processing until smooth. Watermelon Jelly LogsMakes 6 servings 6 3-inch x 2-inch x 5-inch watermelon rectangles 3 flavors all fruit or low sugar preserves 6 ginger, molasses or peanut butter cookies Using a melon baller, cut 3 divots into a long side of each watermelon rectangle. Fill each divot with a dif ferent all-fruit or low-sugar preserve. Serve each rectangle with a cookie. Send some healthy lunch munchies to school „water melon chunks are an easy way to brighten up a sack lunch and give kids a tasty nutri tional boost in the middle of the day. HealthyEatingTipsHealthy eating habits start at home. One of the best things you can do for your kids is to be a role model for smart food choices. Here are some simple things you can do to help your kids develop healthy lifelong habits.Shop for food together and take time to examine, discuss and select fruit and vegetables that catch your childs eye. Allow your child to help you to prepare these healthful foods. For example, let your child use a melonballer to create melon balls from watermelon, cantaloupe and honey dew to create a festive, nutri tious and visually appealing dessert. Make healthy snacks available at all times for your children by keep ing the fridge filled with flavorful, nutrient-rich treats such as grapes, cherries, carrots and watermelon cubes. Simple changes are easier for your child to get used to. Try switch ing from full fat milk to non-fat milk, serving sherbet, sorbet, ice milk or fruit juice bars, or adding fresh fruit to his or her cereal in the morning. Serve your children colorful, deeply pigmented plant food. These foods tend to offer tremendous nutritional value. For example, red peppers, carrots, broccoli, oranges and water melon are all packed with minerals, vitamins and antioxidants. Start each day with breakfast, prefer ably fruit with low-fat yogurt or granola. Make a fruit smoothie by blending watermelon cubes and a banana with crushed ice. Watermelon Jelly Logs Watermelon Kebabs Watermelon Nachos Watermelon Cut Outs Watermelon Dippers Watermelon Berry SlushBetter-for-yousnacks kidswilllove WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2010 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 5B

PAGE 18

618173gav WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 , 20 1 0 SUWANNEE DEMOCRAT /LIVE OAK PAGE 6B

PAGE 19

flushes its water into a sinkhole that ultimately leads 12 miles south to Ichetucknee Springs. Lake City used to pump its treated sewage into the lake. Now, the city sprays the effluent over some 350 acres of hay field just a stone’s throw from the Ichetucknee Trace, the historic path of the Ichetucknee River, now mostly underground. As the tour follows the current and historic path of the river south, Stevenson points out gas stations almost on top of sinkholes feeding the springs, and mobile homes being swallowed by sinkholes in an area that was once the riverbed. Canoeing down the Ichetucknee River from the headwaters, Stevenson then points out the ecological implications of the pollution. Mats of algae float past the canoes, algae covers the eelgrass that grows along the river bottom and water lettuce threatens to clog some of the seven springs that feed the river. For Richard Hamann, an environmental law expert in the UF College of Law’s Center for Governmental Responsibility (CGR), it was a tour like this that opened his eyes to the extent of the springs pollution problem. “It wasn’t until I saw the sprayfields and the sinkholes that I realized how comprehensive any springs protection legislation would have to be,” says Hamann. “I was most impressed by how far from the headwaters you could have pollution impacting the springs.” Last year, Hamann advised a team of students from CGR’s Conservation Clinic in the development of springs protection legislation and tools to help local governments implement it. The model springs protection legislation that law students Matthew Brewer, Matt Clark and Christine Francescani, and interdisci-North Florida Focus News  Entertainment  Classifieds September 8 & 9, 2010Serving Hamilton, Lafayette and Suwannee Counties www.nflonline.com WWW.NOBLESGREENHOUSE.COM 592666-F 9248 129th Road • Live Oak (386) 362-2333 Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Closed Sunday "For over 30 Years" Loaded with buds our mums in 4.5" pots are only $2.99! What better way to brighten up someone’s day thanto give agift with the freshness and energy of a living plant!AtNobles we have plants for every occasion. Whether you want to give birthday plants, sympathy plants or housewarming plants, we have plants for every occasion. No matter the occasion, if you are in the mood to gift a plant any of our flowering plants, houseplants, trees or shrubs can be gift wrapped and delivered. No time to stop by? Just give us a call and we’ll help you make the perfect choice! FALL BLOOMING MUMS HAVE BEGUN TO ARRIVE! BEAUTIFUL PLANTS MAKEGREAT GIFTS! 570742-F ATTENTION!For Qualified Home Inspections CallPaul DialCertified386-364-4434 or 386-590-6534C.R.P.I. GREAT RATES FOR NICE LOOKING RENTALS STARTING AT $300 PER MONTH FOR SINGLEWIDES AND $450 PER MONTH FOR DOUBLEWIDES. WATER, SEWER, AND GARBAGE INCLUDED. NO PETS. 386-330-2567-FOR RENT-569597-F 127 Howard Street E., Live Oak, FL Phone: 386-362-4539 Toll Free: 1-800-557-7478 Se Habla Espanol EMAIL: info@poolerealty.com Hours: Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m.; Saturday 9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.; Sunday by appointment www.poolerealty.com 569603-F HILLS OF SUWANNEE COUNTY290 acres in northern Suwannee County with 3,500 feet of paved Road frontage. Property needs some work, but has a lot of potential. $2,495 per acre. Call Ronnie Poole, 386-208-3175 MLS#73856 JUST LISTED: 4 acresprivate country location on private road. Natural woods. Near Peacock Springs & Suwannee River. Motivated Seller! $15,900. Call Glenda McCall, 386-208-5244. MLS#75976 BRING OFFERS4+ acres just 10 minutes from town, fenced & open property with a few scattered trees. Graded road frontage on 2 sides. $34,500. Call Enola or William Golightly, 842-2470 MLS#74355 NATURES CALLING YOUƒ from this lovely 3/2 home privately set among the trees, yet not far from town. Home offers nearly 2000 sq.ft. living space, walkin closets, spacious kitchen w/breakfast bar and screened back porch. If thats not enough room you can store all your goodies in the 20x30 shop plus have room to work and park your vehicles. $239,000. Call Kellie Shirah, 386-208-3847 MLS#75844 BANK OWNED36 acres with a 3/2, 2,000+ sq.ft. farm house which needs TLC. Property is fenced with great road frontage. Asking $165,000. 386-362-4539 MLS#74779 BEAUTIFUL Brick 3/2 home located within the city limits. This home has a split floor plan with plenty of public space, a 2 car garage, and ceramic tiled sun porch. Hardwood floors, FP, large eat-in kitchen with lots of cabinets. $174,900. Call Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 MLS#75340 BRICK HOME and 20x40 building. Beautiful 3/2 w/bright, open floor plan, spacious kitchen w/breakfast nook, living room w/ FP, shop is large enough to park motorhome and still have room to work. Located on almost 2 acres. Near Dowling Park. $198,500. Call Kellie Shirah, 386-208-3847 MLS#73222 J UST A LITTLE TLC is needed to make this charmer a keeper. 3/1 with real pine paneling all warm and cozy in the dining and living room, screened in side porch, carport, shed/workshop on two city lots is priced right to sell. Perfect starter home, can be SHIP or FHA. Call Nelda Hatcher, 386-688-8067 for more information. MLS#76002 JUST LISTED: 20 acres with 1,848 sq.ft. 3/2 DWMH, multiple storage buildings and lots of room. This is a must see kinda place. $99,900. Call Ric Donovan, 386590-1298 MLS#76011 80 ACRESfenced, 10Ž irrigation well 1/2 mile road frontage. $220,000. Call Ronnie Poole, 386-208-3175 MLS#75096 DREAM HOMEOwner has access to private boat ramp at Lake Louise and clubhouse. Large kitchen with solid oak cabinets with lots of storage. Split floor plan with huge master bedroom. 2nd and 3rd bedroom has a jack and jill bathroom. Harwood floors. Vaulted ceilings. Many added features. IT IS A MUST SEE. $299,900. Cheryl Sellers 386-590-4085 MLS#72480 80 ACRESLand has been cleared, destumped and grassed. Lots of road frontage on CR25A & also has frontage on I-75, lots of possibilities for this gorgeous land. $3,700 per acre. Call Enola or William Golighlty, 842-2470 MLS#72791 BANK OWNED5 acres with a 1368 sq.ft. 3/1 DWMH come complete with a 40x36 shelter. Home needs some repair. Priced at just $45,000. MLS#75174 160 ACRES1/2 mile of paved road frontage, 10Ž irrigation well. Priced at $2,495 per acre. Call Ronnie Poole, 386-208-3175. MLS#71567 BANK OWNED 2,700 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath home located near Mayo. Asking $152,900. Call today for your showing. 386-362-4539 MLS#73375 READY for you & your horses. 3/2, 1860 sq. ft. home on 5 acres w/a 3 stall horse barn, 25x31 metal workshop, chainlink fenced backyard, approx. 3 acres fenced pasture for horses. Carport was screened-in for great outdoor living. $164,900. Call Anita Handy, 386-208-5877 MLS#70650. 9436 169th Road REDUCED By Joseph Kays Renowned University of Florida naturalist Archie Carr called them “little ecologic jewels” and “the singular blessing of the Florida landscape.” Environmentalist Marjorie Stoneman Douglas called them “bowls of liquid light,” and 18th-century explorer William Bartram called them “enchanting and amazing crystal fountains.” Geologically, Florida’s 700 springs are windows into the Floridan Aquifer — 100,000 square miles of permeable limestone saturated with water like a giant sponge that underlies all of Florida and parts of Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama. For eons, rainwater has trickled from the surface down to the aquifer, only to reappear days, months or years later from the springs, to form rivers like the Ichetucknee and the Silver, evaporate and fall again as rain in a never-ending cycle. For much of history, human impact on the springs and the aquifer has been minimal. Although archaeological evidence indicates humans have lived around the springs and along the rivers they feed for thousands of years, it is only in the last century, as Florida’s population has mushroomed, that humans have begun to negatively impact the state’s fresh water supply. Beginning in the 1880s, Jacksonville, Fla. and Brunswick, Ga. became the first municipalities to punch wells into the Floridan Aquifer to provide drinking water for their growing populations. Today, Floridians use more than 7 billion gallons of water a day, more than 60 percent of it groundwater. At the same time that more water is being withdrawn from the aquifer, nitrates and other pollutants from septic tanks, treatment plants and stormwater and agricultural runoff are contaminating the surface water that replaces it. The springs are suffering “death by a thousands wounds,” says Jim Stevenson of the state’s Springs Task Force and the Ichetucknee Springs Basin Working Group. “Between 1950 and 1990, Florida’s human population more than quadrupled, and our population continues to increase,” a November 2000 report from the task force said. “Since the 1970s, scientists have documented a decline in water quality in most Florida springs, particularly in regard to nutrients such as nitrate.” Over the past 30 years, typical nitrate levels in Florida springs have risen from 0.02 milligrams per liter to 1.0 milligrams per liter, according to the report. During a recent day-long tour of the Ichetucknee Springs basin, Stevenson illustrated the many ways development is impacting, and being impacted by, the springs. He starts in Lake City at Alligator Lake, which regularly UF researchers seek to understand and protect Florida's springsJim Stevenson Page 2NFCC students enjoy Lemonade on the Lawn SEE UF, PAGE 3

PAGE 20

PAGE 2, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA 1109 North Ohio Ave. US Hwy. 129, Live Oak 1-800-814-0609 Visit our website at: waltsliveoakford.com 601118-F Walts Live Oak Ford-Mercury 1998 Dodge Ram Supercab Laramie $ 7,995 $ 7,995 2001 F-150 XLT Crew Cab $ 9,450 $ 9,450 Leather, 70K Miles 616986-F S.C. Sullivan Agency 529 S. Ohio Ave., Live Oak, FL Bus. 386-362-1389 Fax: (386) 362-6131 S.C. Sullivan (386) 362-1389, Evening 362-2990 617098-F (1) Horse Farm: 55 acres with a 5 bedroom, 3 bath CH&AC home with fireplace cont. approx. 5000 sq. feet under roof with an 18 stall horse barn with office and bath cont. approx. 5000 sq. ft. under roof. The property has 4 fenced paddocks with room for expansion. Approx. 3 miles from I-75. Call for more information. Just listed $599,999. (2) Off CR 49 5 acres in grass with scattered trees, fenced on 3 sides with survey. Only $4,900 per acre. (3) Off US 129 North: 5 acre wooded on 89th Rd. Will work for land home package. $37,000. (4) CR 51 & Pinewood St.: 2.29 Acres, city water and sewer, zoned office. Good location REDUCED TO $159,90 0 . (5) Off CR 349: 10 acre wooded tract with a two bedroom CH/AC log home in excellent condition cont. approx. 1200 sq. ft. under roof, 30'x40' pole barn. REDUCED TO $145,90 0 . (6) Industrial Park: 1.13 acre corner tract good exposure. Reduced to $34,500. (7) 40 acres with 835 ft. on paved road in 13 year old planted pines. Priced to sell at REDUCED TO $149,90 0 . (8) CR 143: 9 acres on paved road with a 3/2 CH/AC home const. in 2002 with a 2 car garage, 30'x50' bar, 8x8 storage, nice fish pond. Good buy @ $175,000. (9) Hamilton Co.: 10 acres on CR751 and the river approx. 1300 ft. on the water and approx. 1300 ft. on paved road. Priced to sell at REDUCED TO $64,00 0 . (10) Farms of 10 Mill Hollow: 4 acres in grass/cropland with scattered trees. $32,500. (11) Near City: Off US 90 East 5 acres wooded near golf course. Good buy @ $44,900. (12) 190th St.: 10 acres in planted pines approx. 15 years old, with a 3/1 CH/AC SWMH, 2 car carport/ shop. Priced to sell @ $49,000. (13) 169th Rd.: 5 ac. in grass with a 3/2 CH/AC DWMH cont. approx. 1,850 sq. ft. under roof in excellent cond. 2 car detached garage. Good area. REDUCED TO $99,00 0 . (14) 193rd Rd.: 6.59 acres wooded on paved road. Good area. Good buy @ $37,500. (15) Hamilton County: 40 acre wooded on county road. Good hunting area that adjoins SRWMD. REDUCED TO $129,500 . (16) New 3 bedroom, 2 bath CH/ AC home. City sewer & water, privacy fence. Good Buy @ $95,000. (17) Off CR 249: 3 wooded lots, will work for mobile homes, on county road. Good buy @ $12,600 for all three. (18) Near City on paved road: 6 acres in grass with scattered trees, 36'x36' horse barn with tack/feed room & loft (2009), 2" well, fenced & divided into paddocks with horse type fence. Priced to sell @ $99,900 Terms. (19) Off CR 250: 1.45 acres with a 3/2 CH/AC brick home with fireplace, kitchen furnished, cont. 2700+ sq. ft. of living area, 2 car detached garage, 12'x16' metal storage building. Priced to sell @ $139,500. (20) Suwannee River Charles Springs area: 1.88 ac. wooded with 137 ft. on the water elevation survey. Will support regular inground septic tank. Good buy @ $39,900. (21) 104th St.: 7 3/4 acres with a 3/ 2 CH/AC 2006 Fleetwood DWMH, kitchen furnished, fireplace 4" well, 2 septic. Priced to sell @ $99,900. (22) CR 136 West: 5 acres in grass with a 3/2 CH/AC DWMH in excellent condition cont. approx. 2,100 sq. ft. of living area, kitchen furnished, 30'x42' carport and storage. Priced to sell @ $93,000. (23) Off US 90 West: Two 5 acre wooded tracts, good area. $29,900 per tract. Lemonade on the Lawn event at NFCC on Aug. 25. NFCC students enjoy Lemonade on the LawnNFCC students Katelyn Scarboro, Brooke Turner, Kasmon English and Quentin Griffin enjoy the Lemonade on the Lawn event at NFCC. MADISON – The Student Services department at North Florida Community College and Saint Leo University’s Madison Office teamed up to offer NFCC students a refreshing break – Lemonade on the Lawn to celebrate the beginning fall term. Students were greeted by NFCC administrators including NFCC President John Grosskopf, various faculty and staff members, as well as representative from NFCC’s Student Government Association (SGA) and Saint Leo University’s Madison Office. The two-day event was held Aug. 25 and Aug. 26 from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. In addition to offering students a cool and free glass of lemonade, the event gave students the opportunity to meet new people and to socialize and chat with college leaders and instructors. The event kicked off a term packed full of engaging events. NFCC Student Activities department is planning a Club Expo for Sept. 8-9 to share information with students about the variety of clubs and organizations available on campus and ways to get involved. A series of “Coffee and Careers” sessions are planned throughout the term where students can explore various careers and chat with area professionals about their specific careers and experiences. In October students will have the opportunity to volunteer and participate in Make-a-Difference Week and National Makea-Difference Day. There is also a “Leadership Series”, health fair, and more planned this fall for NFCC students. NFCC encourages students to get involved on campus and promotes student development and leadership by providing quality programs and activities outside the classroom. For more information, contact NFCC Student Services at (850) 973-1623 or email halfhillk@nfcc.edu. NFCC President John Grosskopf and SGA President Jimmy Smith Jr. greet students at NFCC’s Lemonade on the Lawn event on Aug. 25.

PAGE 21

SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 3CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA Locally Owned & Operated Live Oak 208-1414 Lake City 755-8680 Jasper 792-2426 Branford 935-1449 Mayo 294-1407 • Medicare, Protegrity • Blue Cross, Av Med • Medicaid-pediatrics • Workers Comp • Most Other Insurance Plans Email: info@healthcorerehab.com Website: www.isgroup.net/healthcore H C Healthcore, Inc. "Meeting All Your Rehabilitative Needs" H C Healthcore, Inc. Physical Therapy A Medicare Certified Rehabilitation Agency 570644-F • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy • Speech Therapy • Specializing In Arthritis • Fibromyalgia • Geriatrics • Spinal & Joint Pain • Sports Injuries • Work Injuries • Pediatrics • Manual Therapy •Lymphedema HERBERT C. MANTOOTH, D.D.S, P.A. Family Dentistry 602 Railroad Ave., Live Oak, FL (386) 362-6556 1-800-829-6506 (Out of Suwannee County) 570639-F Ophthalmology GREGORY D. SNODGRASS, M.D. 522 South Ohio Avenue (386) 330-6260 or 1-800-435-3937 570646-F 617026-F "The Village Pharmacy at Advent Christian Village offers full prescription services to the community." At the W.B. Copeland Medical Center at Advent Christian Village, modern facilities provide a comfortable setting for our experienced staff to deliver quality, full-service medical care. Following your medical appointment, have your prescription filled on the spot and purchase over the counter medications at Village Pharmacy. Our experienced Pharmacist gives professional consultations and personalized service. Village Pharmacy also offers free prescription delivery service within Dowling Park, as an additional convenience. Most forms of insurance accepted. PO Box 4345 • Dowling Park, FL 32064 386-658-5860 • 1-800-955-8771 TTY 1-800-647-3353 www.acvillage.net COPELAND MEDICAL CENTER ADVENT CHRISTIAN VILLAGE AT DOWLING PARK 10820 Marvin Jones Blvd., Dowling Park, FL 386-658-5300 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Nasseer Masoodi, M.D. Rich Corley, PA-C Accepting Medicare and Most Insurance, Sliding Scale Also Available Clinic: Family Practice, Urgent Care, Geriatric Consultations, Womens Health, School Physicals Rehab: Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy Pharmacy OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 617023-F REHABILITATION SERVICES Physical Therapy AQUATIC THERAPY Workers Compensation, Industrial Rehabilitation, Ergonomic Consultation, Job/ Workers Site Analysis Orthopedic/Sports Medicine, Pediatrics Providers Medicare, Medicaid, AvMed & BCBS Providers 405 11th St., Live Oak, FL 32060 (386) 364-5051 Sandy Laxton, PTA Mandy McCray, PTA Carolyn McCook, Office Manager, Patient Care Coordinator 570640-F To place an ad on this page, please call Nancy at 386-362-1734 Ext. 103 Down syndrome is a genetic condition that affects roughly 1 in every 800 babies. Although DS is common, parents who welcome a baby with the condition into their lives may have many questions. DS can happen to anyone. It is not the result of anything that is drank or eaten, nor is DS a product of any medications taken during pregnancy. Rather, it is a chromosomal change that takes place during conception. Only 3 to 5 percent of DS cases are inherited. DS is also known as trisomy 21 because of the chromosome on which the mutation occurs. Normally a baby inherits 23 chromosomes from a mother and father, for a total of 46. However, in children with DS, an extra chromosome #21 is inherited, for a total of 47. It is this extra chromosome that can cause the physical features, health problems, and developmental delay in individuals with DS. It is possible to detect DS before a child is born. Genetic testing can predict the liklihood of the baby having DS, as can blood tests. However, the only definitive way to know is through extracting fluid from the amniotic sac, the balloon that encompasses the fetus. This is called amniocentesis, and has its own risks. Women over the age of 35 have an increased liklihood of giving birth to a child with DS, and often opt to have the amniocentesis. There are some physical signs that may also be present in fetuses with DS. The baby tends to grow at a slower rate than other fetuses. Physical markers, may be detected during routine sonograms, but cannot concretely prove either way whether the baby will be born with DS. Children who have DS generally develop at a slower pace than other children. Yet, they can develop and learn. There are various severities associated with DS. Some people are highly functional with minimal health defects. Others may have more mental trouble and be plagued with other physical problems. Almost half of all children born with DS have a congenital heart defect. Half also experience vision and hearing problems. Because adults with DS vary in their abilities and overall health , it is impossible to pinpoint an age expectancy for individuals with DS. On average, however, individuals with good self-help skills, including mobility and the ability to handle selffeeding as well as other daily tasks, could live into their 50s. Others with poorer skills may live until their 40s. Those with DS can live long, happy lives. Understanding the factors that go into caring for an individual with DS can make parents more capable of coping and make informed choices for their child. Down Syndrome Facts UF researchers seek to understand and protect Florida's springsplinary ecology doctoral student Jason Evans drafted at the behest of the Silver Springs Basin Working Group required the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey to delineate springsheds and primary and secondary protection zones for all firstand secondmagnitude springs. Flow from first-magnitude springs, the largest, exceeds 64 million gallons a day. Once this was completed, the law required local governments to review their comprehensive plans to ensure that they addressed any springs in their jurisdiction. The law also required DEP to establish total maximum daily loads of nutrients for all impaired firstand second-magnitude springs and adopt new criteria for determining impairment. The model legislation ultimately evolved into the "Florida Springs Protection Act" introduced during the 2005 legislative session by then state Sen. Nancy Argenziano of Dunnellon and former state Rep. Dwight Stansel of Wellborn. The act was stripped of most of its requirements and then stalled as the session expired, but Hamann says its introduction was an important first step. "We weren't looking to propose something that was politically possible; we were looking to do something that was needed," Hamann says of the legislation. "This kind of legislation doesn't happen overnight, but the fact that we set in motion serious consideration of the problem and potential solutions is an achievement." "Getting sponsors and getting it introduced was a big first step," adds Fay Baird, coordinator of the Silver Springs Basin Working Group. "I was very impressed with the quality of the legislation we received from Richard Hamann and the students." Margaret Carr, a UF landscape architecture associate professor, says "this legislation is part of the building momentum to tie land use to groundwater protection. What initially seems like a radical idea eventually becomes possible." Four years ago, Carr led a group of 17 urban and regional planning and architecture students who developed a land-use plan to protect the water quality, water quantity and native habitats of the Ichetucknee springshed. The final plan the team presented to Columbia County elected officials and administrators sought to balance population growth around Lake City, with the desire to preserve the area's agrarian heritage and protect the Ichetucknee springshed. One of the keys to effective legislation and land-use planning to protect springs is understanding exactly how water moves through the karst system. That's what UF geological sciences Associate Professor Jon Martin is studying at one of the most unique areas in Florida's springs system. Unlike the karst geology of the central continent that has produced places like Mammoth Cave in Kentucky and Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico, most of Florida's caves are under water. So Martin is focusing his research on a stretch of the Santa Fe River that goes underground for more than six miles through O'Leno State Park in High Springs. "O'Leno is a great natural laboratory because it has been extensively mapped by cave divers," says Martin, who is a member of the Springs Task Force. "We can track water as it enters the system and as it comes out." Martin and his colleagues, including geological sciences doctoral student P. J. Moore, are using a variety of mechanical and chemical techniques to track water in the Santa Fe River from when it disappears beneath the surface at a point called the river "sink" until it reemerges six miles later at the river "rise." "We monitor the chemical composition of the water along the flow path," Martin say. "We also monitor the temperature and measure the chemistry to see how it changes. We're basically developing a natural chemical fingerprint for the water." Specifically, Martin's team is trying to understand how water moves between large conduits like sinkholes and springs and the saturated limestone "matrix" that surrounds them. "Water flows rapidly through the big conduits, but much more slowly through the matrix," Martin says. "We're trying to understand how these two types of flows interact." Interaction between the matrix and the conduits has important implications for human and ecological health, Martin says. "The water we drink comes from the matrix porosity. If a contaminant gets in the matrix, it could reside there for a very long time and cleanup would be very difficult," he says. "It will also slowly seep into the conduits and get out into the springs, changing the ecology." In addition to monitoring the water going through the conduits, Martin's team has drilled eight 100-foot-deep wells to get samples of the matrix water near the conduit. "Using all of these techniques, we can plot what portion of the water is from the matrix and what portion is from the conduit," Martin says. "A lot of attention has been focused on sinkholes and other large pathways for contaminants to enter aquifers. What is less commonly appreciated is that the porous matrix provides an additional, significant route for contaminants from the ground surface. Consequently, results from this work could provide the basis for a more realistic conceptual model of water flow in the Floridan Aquifer." Continued From Page 1 C C a a l l e e n n d d a a r r o o f f E E v v e e n n t t s s Hatch Bend Baptist Church HomecomingHatch Bend Baptist Church will host their annual Homecoming services on Sunday, Sept. 12, 2010. Sunday School 9:45-10:30, worship to begin at 10:45 with singing. Guest singer with be Gail Moore and speaker will be Rev. Bruce Sullivan. There will also be singing from several church members. Lunch will follow in the fellowship hall. Bring a covered dish and join us in worship, food and fellowship. No evening service. For more information call Bro. Paul Coleman at the church, 935-0943 or email at hbbc@windstream.net.Carroll Family ReunionThe Carroll Family reunion will be held Sept. 18, at Philadelphia Baptist Church Recreation hall, from 5 p.m. until. Come and bring a covered dish and your favorite dessert. Paper goods and drinks will be provided. Come early and let's catch up on the family news. Call 386-776-1325 or 386-2941168. CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

PAGE 22

PAGE 4, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA 571106-Fwww.nflaonline.com COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK OIL CHANGE in LIVE OAK $ 19.95 www.sunbeltchryslerjeepdodgeofliveoak.com CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE Hours: Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 1307 W. Howard Street (US Hwy. 90) Live Oak, FL 32064 386-362-1042 Fully certified mechanics, Up to 5 qts. FREE 16 pt. Inspection COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK COUPON LIVE OAK 10W30 Bulk Oil, No specialty oil plus taxes & disposal fee Expires 9/30/10 591089-F By Derek Price CNHI News Service The great thing about competition is that it forces people to improve what they're doing. If the New Orleans Saints spent all season playing dinky high-school teams, would they have been able to win the Super Bowl? Probably not. If the New York Yankees only faced Little League pitchers, would they be any good in the postseason? No way. That's why it's so fun to watch what's happening to midsize crossover vehicles. A decade ago, crossovers barely registered a blip on the automakers' radar screen, but today they've become the de facto family car for a whole generation of Americans. Our grandparents had their sedans. Our parents had their station wagons and minivans. Now we have our crossovers, and they're getting better all the time. Crossover vehicles have become so popular, in fact, that virtually every auto company makes one. Some companies have an entire lineup of crossovers to pick from, so they're available in every flavor imaginable -sporty Porsches and BMWs, luxurious Lexuses and Cadillacs, zippy Mazdas and hefty GMCs. If a crossover wants to stand out in this market, it has to The Outlander, with a starting price of $21,620, feels more upscale than its bargain-basement competitors. It's even available with a third-row seat, albeit a small one that doesn't seem designed for full-time use. Courtesy photoMitsubishi's spunky Outlander crossover has a bold front end with a gaping air intake that not everyone will like. The design may be polarizing, but it helps the Outlander stand out in a crowded market. Courtesy photo Outlander stands out, and not just because of its looksdo an amazing job. That's why it's encouraging to see what Mitsubishi has done with its latest Outlander. In a market flooded with cars all trying to do the same thing, the Outlander exhibits a certain spunk that sets it apart from the pack. For starters, there's its look. Its front end is almost spaceship-like with rounded, smoothed-off corners and a gaping air intake that looks like it wants to eat you. Will everybody like the styling? No. It's polarizing, but that's part of what makes it so appealing. It's bold and doesn't look like a car designed by focus groups to give it a PG-13 rating. It flaunts its full-frontal nose. That also means it's not even remotely truck-like. While some crossovers enjoy dressing up like G.I. Joe, the Outlander embraces its softer, car-based roots. The ride is whipped-cream soft, all airy and light. That doesn't mean it's bouncy -which can be a problem on some crossovers, especially bigger ones -but more of a suspension that ice skates over the pavement with precision and snap. It's a wonderfully crisp feeling car. The feeling that makes it fun to drive is surprising considering the Outlander is available with a third-row seat. Most crossovers this fun don't come with a third row. And most crossovers with a third row aren't nearly this zippy. That back-row seat isn't really a full-time, full-size seat, though. It's a small, lightweight, foldaway seat that's best for those rare occasions when you need the capacity for carrying extra bottoms. If you carry more than five people on a regular basis, you'd be better off getting something with more room for passengers and cargo. The middle row is spacious enough for adults to ride in reasonable comfort, and the front seats are generously spaced. Inside, the Outlander feels bigger than it is. It also feels nicer than you'd expect from something in this price class. The base is just $21,620, and you can get a loaded V6 model for just over $30,000. With the right options, such as navigation, leather and a sound-pumping Rockford Fosgate stereo upgrade, the Outlander feels as sumptuous as an entry-level luxury car. It seems to have Acura DNA, which is a serious compliment. That luxury ambiance is helped by good interior quality and soft materials. The interior styling is spunky, just like the car's personality, but not so much that it draws too much attention to itself. It's good, clean, contemporary design. Assuming you like the nose, the Outlander could be a good pick. It's carved out a micro-niche for people who like their crossovers fun to drive, interesting to look at, and just a tiny bit outlandish. Derek Price is editor of The Herald-Banner in Greenville, Texas. CNHI News Service distributes his column.

PAGE 23

SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 5CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA ClassifiedsNorth FloridaPlace a classified: Call 386-362-1734 or toll free 1-800-525-4182 or fax 386-364-5578 Hours are M-F 8 am 5 pm • closed Sat. & Sun.Reaching 14,100 households each week You can Reach Over 4 Million Potential Buyers for your product through our Internet and Newspaper Network in Florida and throughout the Nation. Call Nancy at REAL ESTATE386-362-1734Vehicles, Farm Equipment, Etc.569568-F Announcements ATTENTION ADVERTISERS*PROOF READ YOUR ADAny error must be reported the first day of publication. Should the error inhibit response, credit will apply only to the first run date. The South Georgia Media Group is not liable for any loss or expense that results from publication or omission. SEARCHING FOR MY ROOTS: Looking for items related to the family of Norman Bevan 1894 to 1950 or Wife Elma Holcomb Bevan 1907-2001. Old Photos, Civil War Items. Pls call 904-217-0113 Jobs Wanted CERTIFIED CNA WILL SIT WITH ELDERLY: Cook, Clean, Wash what ever you need. 386364-5737 DO YOU NEED YOUR HOME CLEANED or Pressure Washed, or your yard cleaned up? Done at a very reasonable rate. Call Christine or Gary 386-792-1655 HOUSECLEANING Available any time. References call 386792-2616 or 386-792-0923 Help Wanted CUSTODIAL WORKERDuties to include, but not limited to sweeping, and mopping floors, dusting, vacuuming and cleaning offices, conference room and library, cleans and sanitize all bathroom facilities, disposes of trash and waste materials. Monday Friday (10) hours flexible, $8 hour. There are no benefits for this position. A criminal background check is required. To apply go to North Florida REC Suwannee Valley, 7580 County Road 136, Live Oak, FL 32060, 386-362-1725. FL FISH & WILDLIFE Commission seeks Nuisance Alligator Trappers for Lafayette, Dixie & Suwannee counties Apply online at www.myfwc.com/gators Call 863-462-5195 FirstDay MERIDIAN BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE INC.Gainesville & Lake City, FL and surrounding ares in FL Staff Psychiatrist Board Cert, Adult & Child Outpatient Clinics: Jasper, Live Oak, Lake City Counselor IV / Sr Clinician Outpatient Services Adult & Child opportunities in Mayo, Jasper, Live Oak, Lake City Fl. Masters Required, Licensed Desired. Adult/Child Case Manager Lake City, FL 1yr Exp w/ SPMI population Counselor III in Rehab Svcs Bachelors in Lake City To see our current openings in Mental Health and to apply online, please go to:www.mbhci.org EOE, DFWP FirstDay NOW HIRING MANAGER’S, ASSISTANT MANAGERS AND CUSTOMER SERVICE ASSOCIATES for fast paced convenient store. Must have dependable transportation and be available to work any shift. Interviews guaranteed. Apply in person at 408 E. Base Street, Madison, FL. No phone calls please. FirstDay OFFICE MANAGERWanted experienced office manager for rural family medical practice. Pay commensurate with experience. Great crew to work with and good benefits. Send resume to Three Rivers Medical 208 North West Suwannee Ave., Branford, FL 32008 or fax to 386935-1667. FirstDay SERVICE AIDEPart-time Service Aide positions, Required high school diploma or GED, 2 years minimum experience in education, child care, medical, psychiatric, nursing fields or working with people with developmental disabilities. Apply in person at Comprehensive Community Services, 511 Goldkist Boulevard SW, Live Oak, ADA, EOE Drugfree Workplace. Special Notices ATTENTION READERSYou should be cautious of calls from interested buyers of your advertised merchandise. If the caller is offering you MOREmoney than what you are asking or suggest sending you a check for more than the amount and requesting you to cash it and just send them back the remaining amount DON’T! THIS IS A SCAM! BE CAUTIOUS, IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS. Education BE A CNA: FEES COVER STATE TEST, & BACKGROUND SCREENING . State test given on site. HS Deploma or GED not required if age 18 or over. QUEST TRAINING 352-493-7330 Want to be a CNA? Don’t want to wait? Express Training is now offering our quality Exam Prep Classes in Lake City, Fl. Class sizes limited. Call for details on the next class!!! 386-755-4401 expresstrainingservices.co m FurnitureFirstDay QUEEN SIZE Hide A Bed, Glider Rocker, Rocker Recliner, Oak Swivle Desk Chair. 386-362-6414 Wanted to Buy CASH FOR YOUR COINS! Private collector seeking U.S. coins and currency. Older varieties, all denominations. I travel to you ! I pay more than dealers and pawn! Questions? Call 352-949-1450. Garage/Yard Sales INSIDE MOVING SALE 9/10 & 11 8-3: CR 136 2 miles past fair grounds on right. FALL COMMUNITY YARD SALESaturday, Oct. 2nd 7 am 12 pmLowndes Co. Civic Center(Fairgrounds, Hwy. 84 E.) Earn some holiday cash! Clean out your closets! Empty your cabinets! Reclaim your garage! Join us for a great day of yard sale fun!BOOTH SPACES AVAILABLE!Inside spaces $35 ea. Outside spaces $25 ea. Spaces are limited, so act quickly! Call the Classified Marketplace 229-244-1880 229-244-3400 1-800-600-4838 or come by 201 N. Troup St. Valdosta, GA Guns/Accesories GUN SHOW SEPTEMBER 11TH & 12TH COLUMBIA CO FAIRGROUNDS HWY 247 LAKE CITY SAT 9-4 SUN 9-3 CWP CLASSES @ 10:30 & 1:00 INFO 386-325-6114 Garage/Yard Sales Apartments for Rent FOR RENT: 3Bd/1Ba Apartment $525 + Deposit. 2Bd/1Ba Apartment $425 + Deposit. Near Advent Christian Village in Dowling Park. 386-249-2647 PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation and discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Houses for Rent 2-4 BEDROOM HOMES, $450 & $750 per month. Call Jacob Grantham Broker, RankinGrantham & Assoc 386-3627080 or 386-208-3012 FirstDay 3BD/2BA 2000 sf, All new Appliances, Hardwood/Tile, In Town, Cable included, Large Rooms, Screen Porch. $700 mo, $350 Security 386-208-8545 Mobile Homes for RentFirstDay 2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes For Rent in Live Oak from $350 a month, Deposit required. NO PETS 386-364-7660 FirstDay DWMH 3Bd/2Ba Enclosed large porch, Dowling Park area. $700 mo, 1st, Last, Security. Section 8 accepted. Available Oct 1st. 386466-4653 Mobile Homes for RentFirstDay DWMH 3Bd/2Ba in Butterfield Acres Subdivision very near the Advent Christian Village in Dowling Park. First time ever being used as a rental. Nicely Furnished, excellent condition. Has 2-Screened Porches, a carport, and is situated on shaded lot. $800 mo. Please call for details. 352-303-4484 or 352-793-6439. FirstDay SWMH 2Bd/2Ba No Pets, $400 mo, Depostit $400. Near Dowling Park. Available Sept 1st. 386294-2416 or 386-854-0093. Homes for SaleFirstDay 1993 24X40 PEACHTREE MOBILE HOME 3Bd/2Ba, CHA, May be seen at 3318 CR 53 S, Madison. $6,000 850-973-2353 Mobile Homes for Sale DOUBLE WIDE FOR SALE CHEAP Call Steve 386-3658549 HANDYMAN SPECIAL 5 ACRES 24X56 DWMH , gorgeous oak shaded home sight. Just off CR 49, needs interior remodel. Owner Financing NO DOWN PAYMENT. $69,900 $719/mo 352-215-1018 I HAVE A BEAUTIFUL 32X80 2001 HOME ON 1 ACRE: Fully fenced nice neighborhood, close to town & school. Would love to show it to you! 386-365-4774 LAND HOME PACKAGES: Columbia & Suwannee County. possible owner Finance. Some availble with Sweat Equity Loans. 386-344-5024 or lugermom@yahoo.com NEW HOME 32X36 CASH PRICE $29,900. Called Little Giant, a must see at this price call Mike at 386-623-4218 OWN YOUR LAND? Use it as down payment on a new home. Call Nathan Welsh 386-623-7495 or email me t nathan.a.welsh@gmail.com Acreage/Land/Lots for Sale 5 ACRES FOR SALE: $20k nothing down. 4" Well, Septic can be added to the payment extra. Off Hwy 349 Suwannee Co. near Royal Springs. 352-498-3881 FIVE ACRES DOWLING PARK, Well, Septic, Power, Paved Rd frontage. Owner Financing, NO DOWN $64,900 $570/mo 352215-1018 FOUR ACRES O’BRIEN/MCALPIN AREA Beautiful Secluded Country Setting. High & Dry. Owner Financing NO DOWN $34,900 $359/mo 352-215-1018 SUWANNEE CO 20 ACRES W/ DWMH 3Bd/2Ba. 10 Acres of it Timber Land. $145K 386-7761164 Trucks for Sale FORD RANGER 1991 TRUCK: V-6, 5-speed, Runs good. $1500 Call Virgil 386-362-4247 Sport Utility JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED 1995, V-8, 4-Wheel Drive, All Factory Opts, Ice Cold Air, w/Original Window Sticker. Everything Works $4500 386658-2380 JEEP WRANGLER SAHARA, 2007 model, 4X4, automatic. Low miles. Black/gray. Priced at $5,750. Details and pictures, email nny65fd@msn.com. 561244-9447. Each Kit includes:€ 3 Bright 11Žx 14ŽAll-weather Signs € Over 275 Pre-Priced Labels € Successful Tips for a No HassleŽSale € Pre-Sale Checklist € Sales Record FormGet Your Yard Sale KitAnd Make Your Event a Success! ! F reeRun your Yard Sale in the Wednesday North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds and get the Yard Sale Kit for FREE.Deadline for placing your yard sale is Friday at 11:00 a.m.569561-F 570096-FVillage Oaks I Apartments1, 2, 3 & 4 bedroom units. Hurry in for an application. Rental assistance available to qualified applicants. Call 386-364-7936, TDD/TTY 711. 705 NW Drive, Live Oak "This insitution is an equal oportunity provider, and employer." LAKE WOOD APARTMENTS IN LIVE OAK Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex. Call 362-3110.570121-F 569608-FVillage Oaks II Apartments1, 2, & 3 bedroom units. HUD vouchers accepted. Hurry in for an application. Call 386-364-7936, TDD/TTY 711. 705 NW Drive, Live Oak "This insitution is an equal oportunity provider, and employer." BUSINESSES SERVICES &

PAGE 24

PAGE 6, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 386-362-1734 DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT 2:00 P.M. LAKEWOOD APARTMENTS IN LIVE OAK 569601-F Quiet country living 2 bedroom duplex Call 362-3110 617090-F CALL TOLL FREE 1-888-393-0335 Gulf Coast Supply & Mfg. Inc. Cut to your desired lengths! €Delivery Service Available€ Quality Metal Roofing & Accessories At Discount Prices!! Metal Roofing $ $ $ $ $ SAVE $ $ $ $ $ 3' wide galvalume 3' wide painted 2' wide 5-v Ask about steel buildings North Florida North Florida North Florida 571380-F Business Business Business Bulletin Board Bulletin Board Bulletin Board 617094-F LIVE OAK MINI STORAGE Units located on Gold Kist Road Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-6626 • 5x15 • 5x20 • 10x15 • 10x20 CLIMATE CONTROLLED STORAGE 5x5  5x10  10x10  10x20 E-LIMB-INATORS, INC. 569573-F Owners: Keith & Glenda Hudson 9351 220th Street O'Brien, FL. 32071 Phone 386-935-1993 Fax 386-935-3321 Complete Tree Service Licensed & Insured 617364-F ABBEY MINI STORAGE All New Units  5X15  5X20  10X15  10X20  15X20 Units located at 607 Goldkist Blvd. Rental Office: 121 Van Buren St., Live Oak 364-5300 617097-F Affordable Seamless Gutters Residential & Commercial • Licensed & Insured FREE ESTIMATES • FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED Specializing In: • Seamless Gutters • Soffit & Fasia • Gutter Guard • Screen Enclosures and Repair • Vinyl Siding • Vinyl Skirting Carl Kirk 386-776-1835 Cell 386-209-2740 "Satisfaction Guaranteed" 570794-F Jim Sellers 386-776-2522 Cell 386-647-5978 Stump Grinding 571389-Fwww.nflaonline.com C C a a l l e e n n d d a a r r o o f f E E v v e e n n t t s s Homecoming at Swift Creek Historic ChurchSwift Creek Historic Church will be having their annual Homecoming on September 26, 2010. Location is at Swift Creek Historic Church and Cemetery in White Springs, Florida. If any more information is needed, please feel free to call Cathy Erixton at 386397-2791. Services will start at 10:45 A.M. Our guest speaker will be Rev. Brain Keen. As always we will be having oldfashioned music and following the church services, everyone will be bringing a covered dish. If you want to get a feel of an old fashion church service and a taste of history please come join us. Philadelphia Baptist Church HomecomingThe speaker will be Rev. James Roberts, DOM for Beulah Baptist Association. The music will be Bro. Couny Curl in in concert. We will begin at 10:30 a.m. on September 26, 2010. There will be no Sunday School. We will have a covered dish luncheon in the fellowship hall following services. The church is located at 15824 169th Road, in McAlpin, Fla. For more information call 386776-1541. Everyone is welcome.Clases de InglesGratis Clases empiesan el 9 de Septiembre, 2010 cada lunes y jueves, 7 p.m. 9 p.m. Maestra Felicia Doty y el equipo Todas las clases van estar en la Iglesia Episcopal, San Lukas, 1391 SW 11th St. (Se encuentra la Iglesia en frente del hospital en Live Oak.) Call Phyllis Doty @ 386-249-0096 for more information.The Melody Wildcat Baseball Team is having fund raiser (car wash)September 11, 2010 9:00 am 2:00 pm Cheek and Scott Drugs (by Publix Store) Minimum $5.00 COME OUT AND SUPPORT THE MELODY WILDCATS!!! Cub Scout Pack 408 RoundUp (sign up) for the 2010-2011Cub Scout Pack 408 Round-Up (sign up) for the 20102011 academic year will be held as follows: Tuesday, August 31, 6:30 p.m. Suwannee Elementary School, Thursday, September 9, 6 p.m. Suwannee Intermediate School. Our first meeting will be held on Thursday, September 16, at the Live Oak Church of the Nazarene, at 6:30 p.m. Cub Scouts is for boys in first through fifth grades. During the school year, boys earn their rank (Tiger-first graders; Wolf second graders; Bear-third graders; Webelos 1 fourth graders; Webelos 2 fifth graders) as well as badges, belt loops and pins, based on successful completion of knowledgeand skill-based activities. Pack 408 camps out, either as a pack or with other Scouts in district or regional camp-outs. Early camping opportunities include the Wild Adventures Scout Campout Septmember 25-26 and the Cuboree Oct. 15-16. Other activities include zoofari Scout Day at the Jacksonville Zoo and building a float and riding in the Christmas Parade. For general information about Cub Scouting, see http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts/Cub%20 Scouts.aspx and http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts/Parents.a spx.School Advisory Council meetingThe next meeting of the School Advisory Council for Suwannee High School will be Thursday, September 9, 2010, at 6 p.m. It will be held in the Student Activities Room at the high school. All interested students, parents, teachers and community members that would like to participate and become involved in Suwannee High School are invited to attend.Annual Trash and Treasure SaleWoman's Club of Live Oak: sponsor Event: Annual Trash and Treasure Sale and Bake Sale When: September 23 and 24 from 9:00 a.m. 4 p.m. Location: Club House near the Coliseum, 1308 11th Street SW, Live Oak The Woman's Club of Live Oak meets: 1st Friday of each month. Please call Susan Baan : 776-2264Archeological Discovery at Camp WeedA program about an archeological discovery at Camp Weed near Live Oak will be presented on September 11, at 10am at Camp Weed. First contact in Suwannee County between Europeans and indigenous people occurred on September 12, 1539. A great program for all ages, home schoolers welcome. Program fee includes lunch. To register go to www.diocesefl.org or call 386 364 5250.Did you earn your pin?Reconnect with your shipmates and help preserve the memoriesWith more than 13,000 members and over 150 chapters throughout the United States, your rank or rate and status are active, retired or honorably discharged are secondary to the purposes of the organization. We are all brothers of “The Pin.” We band together to honor the memories of the over 4,000 men who EARNED THE RIGHT to wear”Dolphins” to maintain the bonds of friendship and camaraderie.You are invited to contact us through the address below for more information: National Contact: United States Submarine Veterans, PO Box 3870 Silverdale, WA 98383 or 1-877-542-DIVE r www.ussvi.org. Local contact:W. Ray Rausch, 386-2091473, uss483@windstream.net, 10035 105th Drive, Live Oak, Fl 32060.Brewer Lake Baptist Church to host The Living Proof Live SimulcastBREWER LAKE BAPTIST CHURCH in Day, Florida will be hosting THE LIVING PROOF LIVE SIMULCAST on Saturday, September 18, 2010. The simulcast features beloved Bible teacher, Beth Moore and worship leader, Travis Cottrell. The doors will open at 10:00 a.m. The event begins at 10:30 a.m. and ends at 5:00 p.m. The cost for this event is $20.00 and will include lunch. Continued From Page 3 CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

PAGE 25

SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 7CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Announcements _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _GET COVERED.... Run your ad STATEWIDE! You can run your classified ad in over 100 Florida newspapers for $475. Call this newspaper or (866)742-1373 for more details or visit: www.florida-classifieds.com._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Apartment for Rent _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$199/Mo! 6BR/3BA HUD Home! (5% down 20 years @ 8% apr) More Homes Available from $199/Mo! For listings call (800)366-9783 Ext 5669._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Building Supplies _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _METAL ROOFING. SAVE $$$ buy direct from manufacturer. 20 colors in stock with all accessories. Quick turn around. Delivery Available.. (352)498-0778 Toll free (888)393-0335 code 24. www.GulfCoastSupply.com._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Business Opportunities _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800/ day? 30 Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995. (888)629-9968 BO2000033. CALL US: We will not be undersold!_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Hottest! Fastest Growing! Home-based Business Opportunity of the Decade! Personal Training Provided. 6-7 Figure Income Potential. Not MLM. Call Now (888)874-9344._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Employment Services _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Notice: Post Office Positions Now Available. Avg. Pay $20/hour or $57K annually including Federal Benefits and OT. Get your exam guide materials now. (866)713-4492 USWA. Fee Req._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Help Wanted _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Colonial Life seeks an entrepreneurial professional with sales management experience to become a District Manager. A Life/Health license is required. This opportunity brings with it substantial earning potential. Please contact: meredith.brewer@coloniallife.com or call (904)7374165, x105._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Part-time, home-based Internet business. Earn $941 per month or much more. Flexible hours. Training provided. No selling required. FREE details. www.K348.com._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Driver: DON'T JUST START YOUR CAREER , START IT RIGHT! Company Sponsored CDL training in 3 weeks. Must be 21. Have CDL? Tuition reimbursement! CRST. (866)917-2778._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Our top driver made $54,780 in 2006 running our Florida region. Home weekly and during the week! 401k! Blue Cross/Blue Shield! 1 Year OTR experience required. HEARTLAND EXPRESS (800)441-4953 www.heartlandexpress.com._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _CALL TODAY! Guaranteed Home Christmas Day Sign-On Bonus & Benefits 36-43 cpm/$1.20pm $0 Lease / Teams Needed Class A and 3 mos recent OTR required Call toll free: (877)258-8782._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Owner Operators Wanted for Long Haul Work. Pull our 53' Refrigerated Trailer or Yours. 2 Years OTR Experience and Good Driving Record Required. 100% Fuel Surcharge and Fuel Discounts passed on to you. Paul Magana (800)274-9076._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Homes For Rent _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $26,300! Only $209/Mo! 5% down 20 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 6/BR $199/Mo! For listings (800)366-9783 Ext 5798._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _HUD HOMES! 3BR/2BA $209/mo! 6/BR Foreclosure! $199/mo! Stop Renting! 5% dw, 20 yrs @ 8% apr For Listings (800)366-9783 Ext 5853._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Homes For Sale _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $26,300! Only $209/Mo! 5% down 20 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 6/BR $199/Mo! For listings (800)366-9783 Ext 5760._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Miscellaneous _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888)349-5387._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. Medical, business, paralegal, computers, criminal justice. Job placement assistance. Financial aid and computer provided if qualified. Call (866)8582121, www.OnlineTidewaterTech.com._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _NOW AVAILABLE! 2007 POST OFFICE JOBS. $18-$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE. PAID TRAINING. FED BENEFITS. VACATIONS. CALL (800)910-9941 TODAY! REF #FL07._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Real Estate _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _NEW HOMES GREENVILLE, SC Owner Financing. 4.75% int./ 5% Down/From $120k-250k. Immediate Occupancy. Call (888)862-3572 or www.towerhomes.com._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _NC Mountains 2 acres with great view, very private, big trees, waterfalls & large public lake nearby, $69,500. Call now (866)789-8535._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _3-35 Acre Tracts near Moultrie, GA. Wooded acreage with lots of paved road frontage. $8,000 per acre. Call Norris Bishop Realty @ (229)890-1186._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _5000sqft custom built home on 10 acres. Includes stocked pond, dock, pond house, located 10 minutes south of Tifton, GA. Great location! Call Norris Bishop Realty @ (229)890-1186._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Beautiful NC Mountains Boone, Blowing Rock, Banner Elk. Let the local experts at MAP Realty find that perfect property for you. (828)262-5655 or www.maprealtyboone.com. Week of December 10, 2007 Adoption Pregnant? Considering adoption?A childless, successful, woman seeks to adopt & needs your help! Financially secure. Expenses paid. Call Margie. (ask for michelle/adam). (800)7905260. FL Bar# 0150789 Announcements NOTICE: Calling this number will subject you to HUGE savingson statewide advertising in over 100 newspapers. Advertising Networks of Florida, Put us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.floridaclassifieds.com. Equipment For Sale NEW Norwood SAWMILLSLumberMate-Prohandles logs 34Ž diameter, mills boards 28Ž wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N (800)661-7746 Ext 300N Financial CASH NOW!Get cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. Buried in Debt? Want to Save Thousands& Eliminate Your Debt up to 60%? We Can HELP! Call NOW for a FREE Consultation! (888)4963167 Rated AŽ with the BBB! $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com Are you behind on your Mortgage payment?Do you have an adjustable rate mortgage? FREE Evaluation and Advice. Call Express Audits today! (877)270-4415 For Sale CHERRY BEDROOM SET.Solid Wood, never used, brand new in factory boxes. English Dovetail. Original cost $4500. Sell for $895. Can deliver. Call Tom (813)600-3653 Help Wanted DRIVERS--ASAP!New Pay Increase! 37-43 cpm Fuel Bonus -up to 4cpm! Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Colonial Life seeks entrepreneurial professional with sales experienceto become a District Manager. Life/ Health license is required. Substantial earnings potential. Please contact meredith.brewer@coloniallife.com or call (904)424-5697 DriversFlatbed CDL/A $2,000 Sign On bonus. NEW TRUCKS ARRIVING! Lease Purchase Available. 6 months Experience Required. No felonies. Hornady Transportation (800)441-4271 x FL100 Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work?3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)994-9904 Drivers FOOD TANKER DRIVERS NEEDEDOTR positions available NOW! CDL-A w/ Tanker REQD. Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter TODAY! (877)484-3042 www.oakleytransport.com Homes For Sale FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION1400+ FL Homes | Auction: 9/18 Open House: Sept 4, 11 & 12 REDC | View Full Listings www.Auction.com RE Brkr CQ1031187 Misc. Items for Sale STIMULUS REBATE $$$$Sept/Aug Electric Bill Paid $3,000.00 tax Credit-2011 Get your free home gold star certified. 1st 25 people to call, $35.00 gift card Offer Expires 11/1/ 2011: (877)791-6142 Miscellaneous AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769. Out of Area Real Estate WATERFRONT, 152 WATERFRONT, North Alabama, Scottsboro. 1.8 Acres, 3000 sq.ft. Home, enclosed inground pool, boathouse, pier, electric lifts for boat / jet ski. Debbie Mathis Realty (256)599-5910 NORTH ALABAMA FARM: 33 ACRES, 2 Barns, fenced, Large Kennel, 3500 sq.ft. Home, sell for Appraisal Price $329,000. Debbie Mathis Realty (256)599-5910 NORTH ALABAMA LAND: 480 Acres. Joins the Tennessee River! Pasture, Bluff, Road Frontage, Trees. $2500.00 /Acre. Close to Chattanooga, TN & GA. Debbie Mathis Realty (256)599-5910 Unbelievable Coastal Bargain! Only $34,900 with FREE Boat Slip. Adjoining lot sold for $99,900! Beautifully wooded building lot in premier gated waterfront community. Enjoy direct access to Atlantic! All amenities complete! Paved roads, underground utilities, club house, pool. Excellent financing. Call Now (877)888-1415, x 2627 BUY MOUNTAIN LAND NOW!Lowest prices ever! N.C. Bryson City 2.5acres, spectacular views, paved road. High altitude. Easily accessible, secluded. $45,000. Owner financing: (800)810-1590 www.wildcatknob.com VIRGINIA MOUNTAIN LAND-20 acres!-Galax area, 2hrs from Charlotte, views, gentle sloping for great layout, springs, creeks, private, reduced $199,500! Call owner, (866)789-8535 Real Estate Auctions FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION1400+ FL Homes | Auction: 9/18 Open House: Sept 4, 11 & 12 REDC | View Full Listings www.Auction.com RE Brkr CQ1031187 Week of Sept. 6, 2010 569559-F Parental GuidanceThe other day I ran into an old friend I hadn't seen in awhile. As we caught up on recent events, I told him how I had to sell my Mom's car because she was no longer able to drive safely. Surprisingly, he shared that he had the same problem with his mother a few months back. "Although, she refused to give up her driver's license," he explained. As he went on with his saga, I asked him how he finally got her to give up driving. "Well, she agreed to give up her license after she ran into the cow." "Acow!" I gasped. "How could she hit a cow?" "Well," he laughed, "that's what happens when you drive into a barn." (Thanks to Grant M.) Reader Humor Laughs For Sale Duane CashŽ Holze & Todd CarryŽ Holze www.ClassifiedGuys.com Road WorthyCommuting has become a way of life for many people and can rack up thousands of miles on your car. Include the trips to the grocery store, movies and vacations, and we spend a lot of hours behind the wheel. It's estimated that the average American twodriver family makes over 4000 trips in their car each year. That adds up to traveling more than 22,600 miles, equivalent to driving from New York to California seven times. Now thats a long commute!Lights OutIf you put your car in storage, don't expect the battery to last. Car batteries are designed to be discharged quickly and then recharged using your car's electrical system. When a car battery remains unused for long periods of time, the battery continues to sulfate, diminishing its life by forming crystals on the lead plates of the battery. Even recharged, a battery that has been completely drained just a few times can send you back to the auto store for a replacement. Fast FactsDear Classified Guys, I went to an estate sale and found a 2000 Camaro in mint condition with only 5,000 miles on it.The owner told me that his grandmother,of all people,bought the sports car new and drove it for only two years before she passed away.Most of the family didn't even know she had it in the garage.It's been sitting there until the family got around to cleaning out the house.The price is unbelievable for it's condition,but I'm concerned since the car hasn't been driven for the past three years.What problems should I be looking for? Am I getting a deal or a headache?€€€Cash:Sounds like good ol' grandma had a wild side. I guess if you're only going to drive a car to church on Sunday, you might as well be noticed when you pull in the parking lot!Carry:If everything is in good working order, you probably found a great car. These are the kind of deals we love to find, where the item was stored away and now the owner just wants to find it a new home. Cash:It looks like the most important question is already answered: "Where was the car stored?" Acar kept in a dry place out of the sun is always best and will have the least age-related problems.Carry:If you have the chance, check out the garage where it was stored to see if it's dry or damp. Adamp garage can cause rust on the undercarriage, wheel wells and even in the trunk.Cash:With only 5000 miles, we'd expect all the parts to be original. So your next step is to just make sure everything is in good working order. Since it hasn't been driven in awhile, start it up, check the brakes, and take it for a 20 to 30 minute test drive. The car may run rough at first, but if it's in good shape it should run smoother as your ride progresses.Carry:Plan on replacing the battery and all of the fluids: oil, transmission, radiator, etc. Fill up the gas tank right away and add a fuel injector cleaner or octane booster as well. Gas that sits for a long time looses its octane and can gum up the fuel injectors. Mixing in these additives can help prevent any problems.Cash:The tires may need replacing as well, but that's a small price to pay for a car that's in pristine condition. Carry:And who knows, maybe you'll have an urge to drive it to church next Sunday. Ask the Guys Apparently grandma never drove too fast.©2010 The Classified Guys®09/05/10€Do you have a question or funny story about the classifieds? Want to just give us your opinion? We want to hear all about it! Email us at: comments@classifiedguys.com.GRANDMA SPECIAL For Sale:1986 Buick Le Sabre, Great Condition, Slo w Miles.$1,200 OBO 621 Ohio Ave. North • Live Oak, FL 32064 (386) 362-1848 • Fax (386) 364-4661 • 1-800-457-6082 Suwannee graphicsPRINTING • COPY SERVICE Color Copies • Blueprints570686-F 386-362-4012 570730-F AUTOMOTIVE GRADY  S 500 West Howard St. (US 90), Live Oak 1996 Chrysler Town & Country Plus Tax, Tag & Title Cash Price Loaded with options, Only 90K Miles $ 4,650 $ 4,650 $ 4,650 Please RSVP by September 12th to Jane Brock @ 386294-1211 (w) 386-294-2812 (h) or Becky Swain @ 386294-3537 (h) 386-209-1389 (m).Learn to Square Dance!It’s Fun.... meet new friends, get great exercise! Beginner lessons starting Thursday evening, Sept. 16, 2010 at 7 p.m. with the Vagabond Squares.Dancing at the Hale Community Center, 215 NE Duval (across from the fire station) in Live Oak, Florida. Caller: Ralph Beekman. For information call 752-2544 or 638-0144. The first night is FREE, so come check it out.Greater New Bethel AME Church celebrates Pastor’s retirementThe Rev. Charles Burke, Pastor of Greater New Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, Live Oak, will retire from pastoral duties in October, 2010 after 42 years in the ministry. A Love Banquet will be held on Saturday, September 25, 2010 at 6 p.m. in Greater New Bethel Annex #2. Worship services will follow on Sunday, September 26, at 3 p.m. The speaker will be the Rev. E. Burke, brother of the honoree. Everyone is cordially invited to share in the celebration of service for this man of God. Banquet tickets may be obtained from any member of the church. For further information, please contact Eva Polite, (386) 362-6707 or Louise Brown (386) 363-5417.Combined Class reunion for Suwannee High Classes of 1963, 1964, 1965 and 1966Information has been mailed regarding this event. If you were ever a part of any of these SHS graduating classes and have not received your information, please email your address to classof1964@comcast.net or call Elaine Vann Garbett (Class of 64) at 386-362-6828.Roberson Taylor ReunionPlan to join us Saturday September 18, 2010 for the Roberson-Taylor family’s 48th reunion in Live Oak. When coming from Jasper on hwy 129, once in Live Oak, Turn right at the 4th red light (you will see First Federal Bank). Proceed west for 1 mile on the Newborn Road (at the circle/around intersection, stay right heading west). We will meet at the Coliseum which is on the left side of the Garden’s Club House. For the children we will have an air bouncing fun unit. Pictures will be made of family’s and placed in reunion history book. Door will open at 1 p.m. we will eat at 2 p.m. Please come and bring a picnic lunch (including tea) for a good ole fashion family get together! Eating utensils, places, ice, cups, and napkins will be furnished.For more information contact Doyle Roberson, 3111 Old Dobbin Rd, Montgomery, Al at 334-202-0744.New National Grove Missionary Baptist ChurchNew National Grove Missionary Baptist Church, located 8283 105th Road, Live Oak will be hosting their Annual Family and Friends Day on September 19, 2010 at 3 p.m. Pastor: Tommie L. Jefferson, Messenger: Minister Ditranna Walker, 1st Lady of Sweet Hope Missionary Baptist Church, Live Oak. Come share the celebration with us and be inspired by the Word of God.Annual Prayer BreakfastThe pastor and members of Jackson/Mackey Missionary Society New Bethlehem A.M.E. Church, 11193 150th St., McAlpin, Fla. invites you and your Missionary Society to our Annual Prayer Breakfast Service, Sunday, August 29, 2010, 8:30 a.m. Come one! Come All! Join us in this special worship experience RSVP: Sis. Vinnie S. King: 362-2740. Rev. Johnnie Merrick, Pastor Sis. Vinnie S. King, Program Coordinator Sis. Mae DeVoe Fields, PresidentFirst Baptist Church of Live Oak to hold weekly grief recovery support groupFirst Baptist Church of Live Oak, FL will begin holding a weekly grief recovery support group. GriefShare is a non-denominational Biblically based 13 week program for people who are struggling with losing a loved one in death. People can enter at any point in the 13 weeks. It will be held at 6 pm on Wednesdays. First Baptist Church is located at 401 W. Howard in Live Oak. For more information, people may call 386-362-1583 or find us on the web at www.fbcliveoak.org.Happy Days are here againThe Suwannee County Animal Control Shelter has received a $20,000 grant from Florida Animal Friend to help spay or neuter the pets of low income families in Suwannee County. This grant is funded through sales of the official Florida Animal Friend Spay and Neuter License Plate. Applications can be picked up at participating local veterinarian offices and at the shelter, 11150 144th Street, McAlpin, Fl. There is a co-pay and that will be determined according to your income. For further information please call the shelter at 386-208-0072.SHS Class of 1970 40 year reunion plannedThe SHS Class of 1970 is planning their 40 year reunion on Oct 23, 2010. If you were a member ,had a child , sibling or relative in this graduating class, please email C C a a l l e e n n d d a a r r o o f f E E v v e e n n t t s s Continued From Page 6 CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

PAGE 26

PAGE 8, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA 571306-Fwww.nflaonline.com 571322-F C C a a l l e e n n d d a a r r o o f f E E v v e e n n t t s syour name ( maiden & married), address, phone number & email address to suwanneehigh1970@gmail.com .Please join our Facebook page, Suwannee High Class of 1970 40 Year Class Reunion to see information and updates.Suwannee High Class of 1990The Suwannee High Class of 1990 20th reunion will be held on October 22, 2010 and Oct. 23, 2010. The cost will be $35/graduate and $10/spouse or additional guests. If you were a member of the graduating class and are planning to attend or would like more information, please email your name, address, phone number to Melissa (Kennedy) McKire at mckire4@windstream.net or Amy Tucker Bauldree at(352)231-2683/(386)776-1904. You can also visit our class website at shs1990.webs.com. We will be having a class meeting on Saturday, August 21, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. at Florida Wholesale Homes on 90. We look forward to seeing you there or hearing from you.Looking for classmates of Class of 1959Would like to contact any classmates from the Class of 1959 (in the event of upcoming reunions, etc.) Contact Joyce Parker at 407-886-0601 or write to: Joyce Parker, 4039 Visa Lane, Apopka, Fl 32703.Haven Hospice hosts Helping Hands Volunteer OrientationWhen: Every Tuesday morning at 10 a.m. Where: Haven Hospice Suwannee Valley Care Center, 6037 W. U.S. Hwy 90, Lake City, Fl, Carolyn Long at 386-752-9191 for more information.New Commander Post #107New Commander Post #107 American Legion is Richard (Dick) Lees Sr. For more information contact Hilde Schmid 776-2123.TOPS weigh-loss support available locally(It's now your time)TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) is an effective weightloss solution that yields real results. With the average waistline of North Americans growing at the same time prices continue to rise, people are looking for cost effect weight-loss support that works. That annual TOPS membership fee is only $26 making TOPS one of the most affordable options available. Monthly dues are $5. Visitors are welcome to attend their first TOPS meeting free of charge. TOPS FL 798 meets at Live Oak Community Church of God 10639 US 129 South every Wednesday morning with weigh in beginning at 7:45 a.m., meeting begins at 9 a.m. through 10 a.m. For more information call Barbara at (386) 362-5933. It's never too late to start losing those unwanted pounds.Anna Miller Circle Seventh Annual Fishing TournamentThe Anna Miller Circle of Live Oak Elks Lodge 1165 will sponsor its Seventh Annual Fishing Tournament in Steinhatchee, Saturday, September 18, at River Haven Marina. Entry Fee is $30 per person. Weigh-in from 1-4 p.m. Prizes total $1,500, plus free drawings and give-aways. New children's category added: $10 entry fee (10 & under) with a special prize. Boat rental and lodging available at local marinas. Info/entry forms: Terri Johnson 386-776-2508, or River Haven Marina & Motel, 352-498-0709. Thank you for your assistance in promoting this tournament so the Anna Miller Circle can continue to supports the special need children and the elderly in our local nursing homes.Donate your old carsNow that spring has arrived, people may be thinking of donating their old cars as part of a clean up. The Boys and Girls Clubs would be happy to take their old cars. People donating to the Clubs will not only get rid of the unwanted car but will be contributing to the clubs. Boys and Girls Clubs really work with kids in most communities and offer a safe place for them. If you wish to donate a car, call 800-246-0493. Not only will donators be helping the kids, the will be able to take sale price as a contribution for income tax purposes.Talent SearchDo you sing or play and instrument? Do you act or dance? Do you like to read or spend time with a friend in wonderful conversation? WE WANT YOU! Suwannee Health Care & Rehab Center is looking for your talent for our residents. Dinner for two $45; One night at the Beach $125; One hour volunteering to make memories that last forever PRICELESS! Call: Lynn Brannon, Activities Director 386-362-7860 or 386-590-2961.Customers needed!Dairy Queen of Live Oak will host Dairy Queen Benefit Night the second Tuesday of every month from 6-8 p.m. to help buy books for Suwannee Middle School.Donations needed!Suwannee County Environmental Watchdogs, a nonprofit organization, seeks donations for yard sale merchandise. Info: Sandy, 386-364-8020.CJBAT testsMonday Thursday Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): CJBAT (Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test) at NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. CJBAT is required for acceptance into Corrections & Law Enforcement programs. Photo ID required. Pre-registration & scheduling time and date are required. To register please call 850-973-9451.College Placement TestsMonday Thursday Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): College Placement Test (CPT), NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16), 5 p.m., Madison. Register in NFCC Student Services 24 hours before test. For information please call 850-9739451.TABE testsMonday Thursday Monday Thursday at 5 p.m. (by appointment): TABE (Test of Adult Basic Education) at NFCC Testing Center (Bldg. #16), Madison. TABE is required for acceptance into vocational/technical programs. Photo ID required. Pre-registration & scheduling time & date are required. To register please call 850-973-9451.Greater Visions Support GroupAddiction Support Group: Greater Visions faith-based addictions support group meets at the Grace Manor Restaurant. Meetings are held on Thursday mornings at 9:30 a.m. This group provides spiritual and emotional support in a non-judgmental setting. Come experience the freedom from addictions that is found in Christ. Greater Visions is an outreach of Christ Central-Live Oak. For more information contact 208-1345.Suwannee County Republican Executive Committee to meetThe Suwannee County Republican Executive Committee meets in the council chambers of Live Oak City Hall at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month. If the first Thursday is the first day of the month, the meeting will be held on the following Thursday. Each meeting has a guest speaker or current issues will be discussed. All are welcome to attend. For more information call Chairman Carl Meece at 386-776-1444.Branford TOPS meeting changes locationsWe now meet every Tuesday at L & M Scrapbooking located at 105 SW Suwannee Ave. in Branford. Weigh-in begins at 4:30 p.m. Meeting starts at 5. For more information please contact Donna Hardin at 386-5902333. "Take Off Pounds Sensibly."SREC seeking location in BranfordSuwannee River Economic Council, Inc., a non-profit organization is seeking a location in the Branford area that could be used to serve meals to persons 60 years of age or older. Any business, organization or church that has space available and would be interested in assisting in this much needed service to the elderly population of Branford, should contact Bruce Evans, Senior Center Director, at 362-1164 or Janis Owen, Director of Client Services, at 362-4115, ext. 240.Love a mystery?Try locating your ancestors by working on your family tree. The Suwannee Valley Genealogy Society invites you to join and learn how to find your ancestors. Membership is $30 for a single member or $35 for a family. Corporate membership is also available for donations of $100 or more (tax deductible). Meetings are held on the first Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM at the Genealogy Center at 215 Wilbur Street SW in Live Oak. The library is open on Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. and the talented folks there will be glad to help. For more information call Jinnie or Alice at 386-330-0110.Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS)TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, is a non-profit weight loss support group. We meet every Thursday morning at First Advent Christian Church at 699 Pinewood Drive in Live Oak, located next to the Vo-Tech. We all know how difficult is to lose weight. As a group we support each other through thick and thin. We welcome men as well as ladies. Weigh-in is from 8 8:50 with the meeting from 9 10 a.m. You are welcome to visit us and see if this is what you are looking for. For more information, please call Pat (386) 935-3720 or Sherry (386) 776-2735. Continued From Page 7

PAGE 27

SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 9CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA Get Plus Internet starting at $ 59.98 Mo! plus Unlimited Phone for $14.95 DirectvSat.com Local Dealer, 386-269-0984 Businesses from A to Z CHOOSE YOUR LETTER! PUBLISHES EVERY WEDNESDAY! $5.00 PER WEEK CALL JANICE GANOTE 386-362-1734 A B I K L N O P Q U X 609678-F APA Auto Parts 209 Duval St. NW 386-362-2329 609679-F Place Your Ad Here!! Marks The Spot! uick 30 Years Exp. Call 386-776-1593 een Deal $ 5.00 a week andclearing mmigration Live Oak Plumbing, Inc. D lueprints Printing Copying Suwannee graphics 621 Ohio Ave. North Live Oak 386-362-1848 386-294-2761 609688-F V ERY GOOD PRICE $5.00 PER WEEK 609681-F www.fjslawcenter.com LUMBER Repairs/Remodel New Construction State Lic. #CFC1427438 386-362-1767 609684-F Green Card; Spouse/ Family K Visa; Student F Visa; Worker HB Visa; Investor E Visa; Change of Status 386-362-2030 UTO & TRUCK B&B 920 E. Main, Mayo Sammy Buchanan Mon-Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. SPECIALIST 609690-F addy's Gun Shop Buy Sell Trade Come To Daddy's, We'll Take Care of You! 386-294-1532 H OME TOUCH-UPS Y OU CAN SUCCEED WITH THIS AD! CALL TODAY! $5.00 PER WEEK 609603-F 609693-F BILL'S BACKHOE SERVICE 12150 196th Terrace O’Brien, FL 32071 386-364-1418 or 386-249-1999 Bushogging, Stump Removal, Discing, Fencing $ 5.00 per week SE THIS SPACE H!!! SAVE BIG WITH THIS AD! CALL TODAY! $5.00 PER WEEK G 386-776-2342 609692-F ilbert's Lawn Service  Full Lawn Service  Brush Hogging  Pressure Washing  Leaf Vaccuming S ATELLITE 609695-F 200 Channels for $ 29.99 FREE Professional Installation FREE 1-4 Receivers/Equipment CASH Purchase Plans Available! DirectvSat.com Local Dealer 386-269-0984 T IRED OF HIGH PRICE COMCAST OR WINDSTREAM BUNDLES? 609697-F Z OWIE LOOK! ONLY $5.00 PER WEEK 614206-F M ake it Happen $ 5.00 a week J UNK CARS We Buy Junk Cars & Trucks Must Have Title & Picture ID FREE REMOVAL 386-658-1030 609698-F W OW WHAT A DEAL! $5.00 PER WEEK R EAL DEAL Pick Your Letter! F REE E ffective Advertising $5.00 per week C all Today! Pick Your $5.00 Space BY: LEE  Pressure Washing (Commercial Grade Pressure Washer)  Lawn Maintenance  Clean Roofs & Gutters 386-205-9543 LEE'S Home & Yard Touch-Ups GROCERIES 614206-F Never Spend Your Money For Food, Gas or Prescriptions Again. Find Out How! 386-590-1633 on Your Fiberglass Boats Repair 618391-F

PAGE 28

PAGE 10, SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA TALLAHASSEE — The 13th season of The Florida State University’s annual festival of the fine and performing arts has been announced — and prepare to be dazzled. Running from Feb. 11 to Feb. 21, Seven Days of Opening Nights will offer a unique combination of performances and exhibits ranging from beloved entertainer Bill Cosby to acclaimed singer-songwriter Randy Newman, and from tap-dancing virtuoso Savion Glover to celebrity chef and bestselling author Anthony Bourdain. Even before the February festival begins, the Seven Days spirit starts to build with several major performances scheduled in venues around Tallahassee. On Oct. 2, blues legend B.B. King will give the first show in Florida State’s newly renovated Ruby Diamond Auditorium. And on Feb. 3, classical pianist Simone Dinnerstein and singer-songwriter Tift Merritt will merge their contrasting musical styles in a concert at Tallahassee Community College. Two final performances will also be offered after Seven Days’ main run concludes. On March 14, The Acting Company — “the major touring classical theatre in the United States,” in the words of The New York Times — will perform Shakespeare’s “A Comedy of Errors,” one of the Bard’s earliest, most farcical works. And on April 10, hilarious essayist and monologist David Sedaris makes a Seven Days return engagement — his 2009 performance was an instant sell-out — when he visits Ruby Diamond Auditorium. The annual festival spotlights The Florida State University’s commitment to the arts — music, theater, dance, visual art, film and literature. “There are very few universities in the country that stage an annual festival of this caliber, and the educational opportunities that many of these artists and performers provide for our students while they’re here just make it that much more special,” Florida State President Eric J. Barron said. “From B.B. King all the way through to David Sedaris, I’m personally looking forward to seeing some of the greatest artists of our time.” Education is integral to the festival, and the majority of the artists who perform at Seven Days of Opening Nights also spend time with Florida State students in master classes, giving invaluable insights into craft, process and art. Students and faculty are frequently invited to perform onstage with the artists as well. “I think we hit a lot of bases this season,” said Seven Days director Steve MacQueen. “The festival runs the gamut from longtime legends to up-and-coming stars, from the deeply serious to the deeply silly — some very familiar stuff and some brand-new things.” The full Seven Days of Opening Nights schedule is as follows: Oct. 2 — B.B. King: The reigning King of the Blues brings his beloved guitar, Lucille, to Ruby Diamond Auditorium for the very first performance in that venue since it underwent a $35 million renovation. Feb. 3 — Tift Merritt & Simone Dinnerstein: Roots rock meets classical piano as the two gifted artists present “Night,” a fascinating meeting of musical worlds. It will take place at Tallahassee Community College’s Turner Auditorium. Feb. 11 — Jim Roche, “Retrospective”: Roche, a multimedia artist and retired Florida State University art professor, gets the full retrospective treatment at the university’s Museum of Fine Arts. On display will be maps, motorcycle drawings, representations of myths, conceptual works, photographs, abstracts and much more. Feb. 11 — Mark Morris Dance Group: The acclaimed modern dance troupe, which travels with its own musical group, will give a performance that ranges in genres from baroque to contemporary by way of country swing. It’s happening at Ruby Diamond Auditorium. Feb. 12 — Randy Newman: One of the great American songwriters of the past 50 years, Newman’s work has been interpreted by a who’s who of singers, from Peggy Lee to Nina Simone, Joe Cocker and Barbra Streisand. He’ll perform a set of his darkly satirical tunes at Ruby Diamond Auditorium. Feb. 13 — Bill Cosby: Over the course of nearly five decades, Cosby has earned a spot as one of the world’s best-loved entertainers. In a show at Ruby Diamond Auditorium, he’ll use his influential stand-up act as a way to communicate directly with his audience, impart his philosophy and share a few laughs. Feb. 13-14 — Gabriela Montero: One of the brightest stars in classical music, the Venezuelan pianist will split her programs between Latin compositions and her own improvisations. She’ll perform at Pebble Hill Plantation on Feb. 13, then at TCC’s Turner Auditorium the next evening. Feb. 15 — PRISM: The gloriously noisy celebration of all things “band” and all things Florida State returns to Seven Days of Opening Nights with a concert at Ruby Diamond Auditorium. Feb. 16 — Anthony Bourdain: You’ve probably seen his continenthopping culinary series “Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations.” The celebrity chef, bestselling author and world traveler will speak on a variety of colorful topics at Ruby Diamond Auditorium (and also visit with creative-writing and hospitality students during his visit to campus). Feb. 17 — Luciana Souza: The Brazilian singer, composer and Grammy winner is one of today’s greatest singers. Hailing from São Paulo, Souza’s Brazilian roots are instantly evident, but so is her absolute mastery of jazz, world music, classical and pop. At Seven Days, Souza will be joined by the equally astonishing Brazilian guitarist Romero Lubambo. They’ll perform together at TCC’s Turner Auditorium. Feb. 18 — Kronos Quartet & Wu Man: The artists will collaborate on “A Chinese Home,” a major work co-commissioned by Seven Days of Opening Nights. This highly theatrical performance piece tracks the 20th century in China through music as well as film: “A Chinese Home” has a feature-length film accompaniment by award-winning director Cheng Shi-Zheng. Add costume changes, props, lighting cues, and hundreds of marching metallic toys, and it will be like nothing Tallahassee has seen before. It’s all happening at Ruby Diamond Auditorium. Feb. 18, Feb. 20 — “Silents! New Scores for Old Films, Performed Live”: Three students in the composition program of Florida State’s College of Music were commissioned to write new scores for a trio of silent shorts from the early days of film. The results — about an hour’s worth of silent-film fun — will be presented and performed live on two nights at FSU’s Student Life Cinema. Feb. 19 — Saturday Matinee of the Arts: The Tallahassee Museum opens its doors free of charge to celebrate the region’s love of performing arts and visual arts, from folk dancing, drum lines and fiddle-playing to glassblowing, oil painting and fancy needlework. This year’s lineup will include the Chinese Association of Tallahassee’s dancing dragons and tigers, as well as thrilling African drum performances. Feb. 19 — Geoffrey Gilmore and a Movie We Haven’t Seen: For the fourth consecutive year, Gilmore, chief creative officer of Tribeca Enterprises and previous director of the Sundance Film Festival, will pluck a favorite movie from the festival circuit and bring it to Seven Days long before the general public gets its chance. It will be screened at FSU’s Student Life Cinema. Feb. 19 — Ira Glass: The host and producer of the public radio program “This American Life” has won the highest honors for broadcasting and journalistic excellence. He’ll share stories from his program during a special evening at Ruby Diamond Auditorium. Feb. 20 — FSU Symphony Orchestra & Jazz Band: For the first time ever, the FSU Symphony Orchestra and FSU Jazz Program join forces for an evening of top-flight jazz and classical music, capped by an orchestral/jazz re-envisioning of Gershwin’s immortal “Rhapsody in Blue” with soloist Marcus Roberts. It’s at Ruby Diamond Auditorium. Feb. 21 — Savion Glover: The undisputed king of modern tap dancing, Glover will come to Florida A&M University’s Lee Hall to perform his latest production, “SoLo iN TiME,” in which he explores tap and its connection to flamenco, with a live flamenco band and flamenco dancers. March 14 — The Acting Company: The renowned acting troupe promotes theater and literacy by bringing a touring repertory of classical productions, talented young actors and teaching artists into communities across America. For Seven Days, they’ll perform Shakespeare’s “A Comedy of Errors” at Ruby Diamond Auditorium (and also give a master class with FSU theater students). April 10 — David Sedaris: With sardonic wit and incisive social critiques, Sedaris has become one of America’s pre-eminent humor writers. The great skill with which he slices through cultural euphemisms and political correctness proves that Sedaris is a master of satire and one of the most observant writers addressing the human condition today. He’ll read from some of his works during an evening at Ruby Diamond Auditorium. Ticket sales for Seven Days members begin Sept. 14 and run through Oct. 4. (See www.sevendaysfestival.org for details.) Tickets for the general public go on sale Oct. 5. For more information, visit www.sevendaysfestival.org or call 850-6447670.Bill Cosby, Randy Newman among performers scheduled for ‘Seven Days Of Opening Nights’ Each Kit Includes: € 2 All-Weather Fluorescent For SaleŽ Signs € Successful Tips Get Top Dollar for Your Used CarŽ € Pre-Sale Checklist € Vehicle Options Window Display € E-Z Closing Forms including Deposit Form & Bill of SaleSell Your Car for Top DollarŽ FreeRun your Car For Sale classified in the Wednesday North Florida Focus & Friday Suwannee Democrat Classifieds and get the Car Kit for FREE.Deadline for placing your ad is Friday at 11:00 a.m.*Not valid with the $18.95 specialGet your Car For Sale Kit*569562-F

PAGE 29

SEPTEMBER 8 & 9, 2010, PAGE 11CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE WWW.NFLAONLINE.COM SERVING NORTH FLORIDA AND SOUTH GEORGIA THE Most of my reader mail is positive, but I also receive comments from readers who arent completely on board with the whole idea of coupon shopping. Occasionally, the questions that show up in my inbox surprise me. Heres one. Q: Jill, dont you ever think about what you are doing on a larger scale? In encouraging people to not pay high prices, wait until products go on sale and use coupons to get them at extremely low prices, people are going to get used to paying less for everything. If everyone did this, people are never going to want to pay full price for anything again. Not just groceries but clothes, travel, cars and more. I just cant help but think you could be responsible for an economic collapse.Ž A: I suppose I should be flattered by the idea that I, merely by encouraging people to save money on groceries with coupons, could bring down an entire economy. Coupon use is nothing new. It originated back in the late 1800s. Coca-Cola and Grape-Nuts were among the first products to offer coupons in magazines and via the mail to encourage shoppers to buy their products. While couponing has seen highs and lows in popularity, its never truly gone away. Certainly, since the recession began in 2008 coupon use has enjoyed resurgence. CNN reported that coupon use increased 27 percent in 2009, noting that this was the first time in 17 years that shoppers had used more coupons than theyd used the previous year. So, theres no doubt that many more people are using coupons. But, here are a few truths about couponing its important to keep in mind: € Manufacturers would not offer coupons for their products if they hadnt already budgeted for the cost of redeeming them. Whether its to raise recognition of a new product or to boost sales on an existing one, coupons are here to stay. If a manufacturer provides a $1 coupon for a $1.99 product you like and use, why wouldnt you want to save half the price on it? € Legitimate coupon use does not hurt stores. Excluding coupon fraud in all its forms, stores receive the dollar value of the coupons they accept from the manufacturer. So if a shopper buys a $1.99 product with a $1 coupon, the store still receives $1.99, the price it charges for the product. You mentioned that if people become accustomed to saving significantly on their groceries that they will likely want to pay less for everything and this is true. But again, most people already do this on many levels. Do you decide to buy a new car and look for the worst possible deal on it? Do you plan a vacation and choose the flights with the highest prices? Given a choice, most people want to save money and gravitate toward better prices instinctively, especially if cost comparison is easy. Not everyone who uses coupons on groceries will become a Super-Couponer, either. It does take some time, effort and desire to want to achieve lower grocery bills. Effective coupon shoppers also use stockpiling techniques, buying enough of an item to last until the next time it goes on sale. Not all shoppers care to do this. The averageŽ coupon shopper looks at the coupon inserts in the newspaper on the day they arrive, cuts the ones theyll use this week and tosses the rest in the recycle bin. SuperCouponers know these people are throwing away money. I dont think the economy is in danger because people are coupon shopping, and I dont think it will it get worse due to coupon shoppers thriftiness. On the contrary, I think people are waking up to overspending in general. But for every person who cuts their weekly grocery bill by 50 percent or more, there are plenty who dont plan shopping trips based on getting the best prices at the store that week. Next week, well discuss the demographics of a coupon shopper. Whos using coupons and who isnt may surprise you. (c) CTW Features Jill Cataldo, a coupon workshop instructor, writer and mother of three, never passes up a good deal. Learn more about couponing at her website, www.supercouponing.com. E-mail your own couponing victories and questions to jill@ctwfeatures.com. Jill Cataldo saves hundreds on groceries by making the most of the common coupon. You can, too. Here's how. Couponers: A Threat to the U.S. Economy? By Jill Cataldo $ 3 00 off any cake 817 S. Ohio, Live Oak 362-7009 611797-F Carpet Cleaning Quality Plus A Deal You Can't Refuse! 386-965-7188 carpetcleaninglakecity.com 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 2 ROOMS $ 50 Tile & Grout .50 ¢ /sf Carpet Steam Cleaned Includes: Chemical Pre-Spray, Chemical Injected Steam Extraction Deodorizer *Over 250sf considered 2 rooms Deluxe Package 3 Room* $ 60 Deluxe Package 4 Room* $ 70 Deluxe Package 6 Room* $ 90 *Additional charge for heavy soil removal 611798-F Better Parking, Better Hours, More Inventory 1102 Ohio Ave. South (Next to Advance Auto) 386-362-4851 NEW LIFE BIBLE BOOKSTORE 611796-F Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $ 5 off any purchase of $ 25 or more All events are in the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, unless otherwise noted. Riders in the Sky Friday, September 10, 7:30 p.m. Reserved Seating: $20-35 Sponsored by 93.7 K-COUNTRY Craig Martin’s Classic Albums Live: The Songs of Woodstock Friday, September 17, 7:30 p.m. Reserved Seating: $25-40 Sponsored by the Dharma Endowment Foundation, WYMG-TV My11 and 92.5/98.5/107.4 WIND-FM THE CLASSIC ROCK STATION Tania Pérez-Salas Compañia de Danza Tuesday, September 21, 7:30 p.m. Reserved Seating: $25-40 Sponsored by Fresco Neighborhood Italian and Gainesville Today *Please note: This performance contains nudity. U.S. Premiere PANDEMONIUM – Lost and Found Orchestra Friday, October 1, 7:30 p.m. Reserved Seating: $30-40 Jupiter String Quartet With Kevin Orr, Piano Sunday, October 3, 2 p.m. University Auditorium Reserved Seating: $25-35 MOMIX Botanica Wednesday, October 6, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, October 7, 7:30 p.m. Reserved Seating: $25-40 Sponsored by Falcon Financial Management, Inc., Jeff Davis CFP, Gainesville Magazine and 92.5/98.5/107.4 WIND-FM THE CLASSIC ROCK STATION Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys Friday, October 8, 7:30 p.m. Reserved Seating: $25 Metales M5 – Mexican Brass Sunday, October 10, 2 p.m. Reserved Seating: $20-30 Borealis String Quartet October 17, 2 p.m. University Auditorium Reserved Seating: $25-35 Francesca Gagnon – The Voice of Alegria™ sings the music of Cirque du Soleil® with the UF Symphony Orchestra Friday, October 22, 7:30 p.m. Reserved Seating: $30-40 Sponsored by Shands HealthCare Young Concert Artist: Ran Dank, Piano Monday, October 25, 7:30 p.m. Squitieri Studio Theatre* Reserved Seating: $30 Sponsored by Fairfield Inn by Marriott, Lowry Financial Advisors, Inc. and Shands HealthCare. *The Squitieri Studio Theatre is located just off the Main Lobby of the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts.UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PERFORMING ARTSCalendar of Events September – October 2010

PAGE 30

r b n n r n f t n f n n r f f f n r n b t f n t b b n 888-304-2277 QUITMAN 229-242-1540 VALDOSTA CASS BURCH P RICES REFLECT ALL REBATES INCLUDING A LLY B ANK . C USTOMER MUST QUALIFY FOR A LLY B ANK APPROVAL TO RECEIVE A LLY B ANK REBATES . P RICES G OOD T HRU 9/7/10. M UST PRESENT AD TO OBTAIN SPECIALS . P RICES ARE PLUS TAX , TAG , TITLE & WARRANTY RIGHTS FEE . S HOP IN YOUR P AJAMAS 24 HOURS A DAY ! D RIVE I T L IKE Y OU S TOLE I T . COM ONLY 17 K MILES 2008 BMW 328i S EDAN L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA , L EATHER , S UNROOF , A LLOY W HEELS , NAVIGATION, A LL T HE P OWER O PTIONS , THIS LUXURIOUS ULTRA LOW MILEAGE BMW IS IMMACULATE!!! ONLY 33 K MILES 2006 P ONTIAC S OLSTICE C ONVERTIBLE L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , A UTOMATIC , C HROME W HEELS , S TEERING W HEEL C ONTROLS , A LL P OWER E QUIPMENT , BRAND NEW TIRES, JUST IN TIME FOR SUMMER, LET THE TOP DOWN & GO CRUISING TODAY!!! ONLY 19 K MILES 2006 PT C RUISER C ONVERTIBLE L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , A LLOY W HEELS , T ILT & C RUISE , A UTOMATIC , $AVE BIG ON THIS ULTRA LOW MILEAGE CONVERTIBLE!!! GO CRUISING TODAY!!! 2006 C HEVY Z-71 4 X 4 L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , C HROME W HEELS , F AB T ECH L IFT K IT , C HROME W HEELS , D UAL C LIMATE C ONTROLS , JBL A UDIO S YSTEM , P OWER D RIVER S S EAT , THIS IS AN AWESOME TRUCK W /ALL THE ACCESSORIES!!! ONLY 5 K MILES 2008 J EEP W RANGLER S AHARA 4 X 4 L OCAL T RADE , WE SOLD IT NEW! A UTOMATIC , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , C HROME P KG ., L IFT K IT W /C HROME W HEELS & BFG T IRES , OVER $15,000 IN ACCESSORIES ON T HIS O NE ! $AVE BIG ON THIS LIKE NEW GORGEOUS WRANGLER!!! 2006 M ERCURY M ILAN P REMIER L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , S UNROOF , A LLOY W HEELS , V-6 E NGINE , P OWER D RIVER S S EAT , 6 D ISC CD C HANGER , D IGITAL C LIMATE C ONTROLS & H EATED S EATS ! THIS LOW MILEAGE SEDAN IS LOADED !!! 2000 BMW 323I S EDAN L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , S UNROOF , A LLOY W HEELS , D UAL P OWER S EATS , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , D IGITAL C LIMATE C ONTROL , W OODGRAIN I NTERIOR T RIM , THIS BMW IS EXTREMELY NICE & IN EXCELLENT CONDITION!!! ONLY 20 K MILES 2007 C HEVY C OBALT LS L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , Spoiler, CD, Automatic ULTRA LOW MILEAGE, FUEL EFFICIENT SEDAN!!! 2007 F ORD E DGE SEL 2007 F ORD E DGE SEL L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , C HROME W HEELS , D UAL L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , C HROME W HEELS , D UAL S UNROOFS , D UAL P OWER S EATS , P OWER F OLDING R EAR S EAT , 6 D ISC S UNROOFS , D UAL P OWER S EATS , P OWER F OLDING R EAR S EAT , 6 D ISC CD C HANGER THIS MID-SIZE SUV IS LOADED & SUPER NICE!!! CD C HANGER THIS MID-SIZE SUV IS LOADED & SUPER NICE!!! ONLY 29 K MILES 2006 F ORD F-150 C REW L ARIAT L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , S UNROOF , 20” A LLOY W HEELS , B RAND N EW RWL T IRES , H EATED S EATS , 6 D ISC CD C HANGER , T OW P KG ., THE NICEST ONE YOU WILL EVER SEE! F ULLY L OADED ! 2007 M ERCEDES C230 S POR t L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , D UAL P OWER S EATS , S UN ROOF , D UAL C LIMATE C ONTROLS , A LLOY W HEELS , S POILER , S TEERING W HEEL C ONTROLS , THIS IS A GREAT LOOKING SPORTY CAR!!! ONLY 17 K MILES 2009 R AM L ARAMIE M EGA C AB 4 X 4 L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , WE SOLD IT NEW! L EATHER , P OWER S TEPS , NAVIGATION, I NFINITY A UDIO S YSTEM , BFG 315” A LL T ERRAIN T IRES , DVD E NTERTAINMENT S YSTEM D UAL P OWER S EATS , TOO MANY OPTIONS TO LIST, THIS ONE HAS IT ALL!!! C UMMINS T URBO D IESEL 2007 K IA S ORENTO LX L OCAL T RADE , X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , A LLOY W HEELS , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , T ILT & C RUISE . THIS MID-SIZE SUV IS SUPER NICE w/PLENTY OF INTERIOR SPACE!!! 2007 L INCOLN MKZ L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , C HROME W HEELS , S UNROOF , D UAL P OWER S EATS , H EATED /C OOLED S EATS , D IGITAL C LIMATE C ONTROL , W OODGRAIN I NTERIOR T RIM , TOO MANY OPTIONS TO LIST ON THIS LUXURY SEDAN!!! 2006 C HEVROLET T AHOE LS L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , B RAND N EW RWL T IRES , 3 RD R OW S EAT , R EAR A IR , D UAL C LIMATE C ONTROLS , A LLOY W HEELS , S TEERING W HEEL C ONTROLS , P OWER D RIVER S S EAT . THIS NICE TAHOE WON’T LAST LONG!!! 2002 D ODGE D AKOTA SXT L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , A LLOY W HEELS , CD, A UTOMATIC , I CE C OLD A/C, S PRAY -I N B EDLINER , THESE SMALL TRUCKS ARE HARD TO FIND. IT WON’T LAST LONG!!! ONLY 37 K MILES 2007 R AM 1500 L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , WE SOLD IT NEW, T ILT & C RUISE , A UTOMATIC , S PRAY -I N B EDLINER , B RAND N EW M ICHELIN T IRES ! $AVE BIG ON THIS ULTRA LOW MILEAGE TRUCK!!! 2003 C HEVY T RAILBLAZER EXT LT L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , 3 RD R OW S EAT , R EAR A IR , P OWER D RIVER S S EAT , D UAL C LIMATE C ONTROL , CD/C ASS . , T OW P KG . , A LLOY W HEELS . PLENTY OF ROOM FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY!!! 2007 E XPLORER S PORT T RAC XLT 4 X 4 L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , A LLOY W HEELS , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , S UNROOF , F ACTORY T AILGATE E XTENDER & N ERF B ARS , T OW P KG . IMMACULATE CONDITION, YOU WON’T FIND A NICER ONE!!! 2006 N I SSAN M AXIMA 3.5 SE L OCAL T RADE , X TRA C LEAN , S UNROOF , A LLOY W HEELS , P OWER D RIVER S S EAT , S TEERING W HEEL C ONTROLS , D UAL D IGITAL C LIMATE C ONTROL , CD/C ASSETTE . THIS SEDAN IS LOADED & SPORTY!!! P OWERSTROKE D IESEL ONLY 27 K MILES 2008 T OYOTA C OROLLA S L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , A UTOMATIC , S UNROOF , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , A LLOY W HEELS , T ILT & C RUISE , GREAT FUEL MILEAGE ON THIS LOADED LOW MILEAGE COROLLA!!! 2008 F ORD F-250 C REW L ARIAT 4 X 4 L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , 20” F ACTORY A LLOY W HEELS , NAVIGATION, H EATED S EATS , S TEERING W HEEL C ONTROLS & D UAL P OWER Seats! THIS ONE IS IMMACULATE & ONE OF THE NICEST EVER TRADED FOR.!!! 2001 H ONDA A CCORD EX L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , A LLOY W HEELS , 6 D ISC CD/C ASS ., S UNROOF , A UTOMATIC , THIS IS THE NICEST ONE WE HAVE EVER HAD, MUST SEE TO BELIEVE!!! ONLY $ 7995 2005 R AM Q UAD C AB SLT L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , T ILT & C RUISE , S PRAY -I N B EDLINER , T OW P KG ., THIS SUPER NICE QUAD CAB HAS LOW LOW MILES TOO!!! ONLY 23 K MILES 2008 C HEVY C OLORADO C REW LT L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , A LLOY W HEELS , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , S PRAY IN B EDLINER , Z-71 P ACKAGE , CREW CAB TRUCK WITH PLENTY OF ROOM!!! 2009 F ORD F-150 C REW XLT L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , A LLOY W HEELS , P OWER D RIVERS S EAT , F ACTORY N ERF B ARS , N EW T OOLBOX , P OWER P EDALS , T OW P KG ., S PRAY IN B EDLINER , RWL M ICHELIN T IRES , THIS ONE IS JUST LIKE BRAND NEW!!! ONLY 2 K MILES ONLY 27 K MILES 2007 M I NI C OOPER S L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , D UAL S UNROOFS , D IGITAL C LIMATE C ONTROLS , A LLOY W HEELS & P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS . IMMACULATE CONDITION PLUS IT HAS A TURBO ENGINE!!! 2007 R AM 1500 SLT 4x4 L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , Alloy Wheels, T ILT & C RUISE , S PRAY -I N B EDLINER , T OW P KG . , THESE 4x4 TRUCKS ARE TOUGH TO FIND!!! ONLY 37 K MILES 2008 C HEVY C REW C AB 4 X 4 L OCAL T RADE , X TRA C LEAN , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , T ILT & C RUISE , T OW P KG ., S PRAY -I N B EDLINER , CD, A LLOY W HEELS W /B RAND N EW RWL B RIDGESTONE D UELLER T IRES , THESE 4x4 CHEVY’S ARE SELLING FAST!! 2008 R AM Q UAD C AB L ARAMIE 4 X 4 L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , HEMI E NGINE , C HROME 20 W HEELS , I NFINITY A UDIO S YSTEM , W OODGRAIN I NTERIOR T RIM , D UAL C LIMATE C ONTROLS , P OWER D RIVER S S EAT , T OW P KG .,. THIS ONE IS LOADED!!! ONLY 11 K MILES 2008 H ONDA A CCORD LX L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS A UTOMATIC , T ILT & C RUISE THIS ONE IS LIKE BRAND NEW BUT WITHOUT THE BRAND NEW PRICE!!! 2006 T OYOTA C AMRY S OLARA L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , P OWER D RIVER S S EAT , W INDOWS & L OCKS , A LLOY W HEELS , B RAND N EW T IRES , S TEERING W HEEL C ONTROLS , THIS LOW MILEAGE CAR IS SUPER NICE!!! 2001 J EEP W RANGLER S PORT L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , A UTOMATIC , H ARD T OP , I CE C OLD A/C, A LLOY W HEELS , 4.0L 6 C YL E NGINE , THIS ONE IS A RARE FIND!!! ONLY 8 K MILES 2009 BMW 135 I C OUPE L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , A LLOY W HEELS , L EATHER , S POILER , S UNROOF , A LL P OWER E QUIPMENT ! THIS ONE IS LIKE BRAND NEW!!! 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo L OCAL T RADE , X TRA C LEAN , A LLOY W HEELS , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , CD/C ASS . , T ILT & C RUISE , PRICED TO SELL IT WON’T LAST LONG, HURRY!!! 2005 C HEVY A VALANCHE L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , A LLOY W HEELS , B RAND N EW RWL T IRES , T OW P KG ., P LENTY OF R OOM F OR THE W HOLE F AMILY , PLENTY OF ROOM HUGE CREW CAB & REAR STORAGE!!! ONLY $ 6985 2003 F ORD M USTANG G T L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , C HROME W HEELS , S POILER , M ACH S TEREO S YSTEM , 4.6L V8 E NGINE THIS ONE IS IMMACULATE, THE NICEST ONE YOU WILL EVER FIND!!! 2007 D ODGE C HARGER L OCAL T RADE , X TRA C LEAN , 20” C HROME W HEELS , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS & D RIVER S S EAT ! YOU CAN DRIVE THIS ONE LIKE YOU STOLE IT!!! 2008 C HRYSLER C ROSSFIRE L IMITED L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , A UTOMATIC , A LLOY W HEELS , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , P OWER D RIVERS S EAT THE ULTIMATE SPORTS CAR...LIKE BRAND NEW!!! ONLY 10 K MILES 2010 F ORD M USTANG L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , P OWER L OCKS & W INDOWS , A LLOY W HEELS , A UTOMATIC , S POILER , LIKE BRAND NEW $AVE THOUSANDS!!! 2005 C HRYSLER PT C RUISER GT C ONVERTIBLE L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , O NE O WNER , WE SOLD IT NEW, L EATHER , C HROME W HEELS , CD & C ASSETTE , T ILT & C RUISE , T URBO E NGINE THIS ONE IS FULLY LOADED!!! 2008 H UMMER H3 L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , S UNROOF , B RAND N EW BFG ALL TERRAIN TIRES, C HROME W HEELS , D UAL P OWER /H EATED S EATS , FULLY LOADED ONE-OF-A-KIND!!! ONLY $ 9995 2006 C HEVY I MPALA LT L OCAL T RADE , X TRA C LEAN , P OWER W INDOWS & L OCKS , P OWER D RIVER S S EAT , D UAL C LIMATE C ONTROLS , W OODGRAIN I NTERIOR T RIM , YOU WILL NOT FIND A NICER SEDAN!!! 2006 GMC Y UKON XL D ENALI L OCAL T RADE , X TRA X TRA C LEAN , L EATHER , N AVIGATION , DVD E NTERTAINMENT S YSTEM , R EAR A IR , B OSE S TEREO S YSTEM , S UNROOF , D UAL C LIMATE C ONTROLS , H EATED M EMORY S EATS , THIS ONE HAS ALL THE OPTIONS!!! ONLY 771 MILES FULLY LOADED