Citation
The Madison enterprise-recorder

Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Place of Publication:
Madison, FL
Publisher:
Greene Publishing, Inc., Emerald Greene - Publisher
Creation Date:
May 31, 2013
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison
Coordinates:
30.466389 x -83.415278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Greene Publishing, Inc., Emerald Greene - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
33284795 ( OCLC )
sn 95047180 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Enterprise-recorder

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

f n t n b n n Sun3/22 80/62 Showersandthunderstormslate. Mon3/23 67/50 Afewthunderstormspossible. Sat3/21 85/62 Partlycloudy.Highsinthemid80s andlowsinthelow60s.S Fri3/20 83/61 Intervalsofcloudsandsunshine. High83F.WindsWNWat5to10 mph. " ! !( 4 0 A ; : 4 9 > = : 8 8 ? 9 4 > B ! 0 A = r % . 3 : : 7 $ 0 7 , > 0 / 8 ; 7 : B 0 0 % . 3 : : 7 7 , = = 4 E 0 / = b 0 2 , 7 = 0 , 7 > 3 ? 4 / 0 % 0 . t t f r n b n b r b f n t n f f n t b t f b r n r b r r f t t t r f f n b r f r t r f r t r n n f t r t t t r f f n b b r r f t t t r f f n b # , 2 0 f r ! " " " " ! t % " # , 2 0 # , 2 0 $ ! ! " f n " % ! " # " ! " $ " " ! " r " ! t % b # " f r t r n n n r b ! # n f n $ 2 ' $ 0 0 ( $ * 1 $ , 5 1 2 0 4 $ * ( , & 5 $ 1 2 , 5 6 f 5 ' ( * $ 0 & ( $ 2 0 3 & ' 2 $ 0 ! * $ 6 5 1 2 2 $ + . 2 ( , & 2 2 0 4 $ * , 0 2 ' , 1 ' ( , & 2 , 4 $ , 3 $ , # 2 ' $ 2 5 4 $ ' ( " * $ 1 " * * ( # $ # , 0 " ' t 2 r n f . + ! # n f n 0 & ( $ 2 0 3 & ' 2 $ 0 ! * $ 6 5 1 2 2 $ + . 2 ( , & 2 2 0 4 $ * , 0 2 ' , 1 ' ( , & 2 , 4 $ , 3 $ 5 ' $ , 1 ' $ " * * ( # $ # 5 ( 2 ' $ 2 ' $ 0 0 ( $ * 1 $ , 5 ' 5 1 2 0 4 $ * ( , & 5 $ 1 2 , 5 6 f , 0 " ' t 2 r n f . + & A : A 0 < 0 > < , 9 = ; : < > 0 / > : > 3 0 3 : = ; 4 > , 7 , 1 > 0 < , / < 4 @ 0 < 1 , 4 7 0 / > : 9 : > 4 . 0 , @ 0 3 4 . 7 0 . : 8 4 9 2 > 3 < : ? 2 3 > 3 0 4 9 > 0 < = 0 . > 4 : 9 : 1 ) , = 3 4 9 2 > : 9 @ 0 9 ? 0 , 9 / ' % A B t 4 9 , / 4 = : 9 , 9 / . : 7 7 4 / 0 / : 9 % , > ? < / , B , < . 3 n r , > b n t f r b n n t f ! r f # t n " n n b n r n f r $ , ' 3 0 1 # 6 0 " ' 0 ! 0 , 1 $ 6 5 1 $ * $ " 2 $ # 1 0 $ $ , 4 ( * * $ 1 , $ 5 + 6 0 * $ 1 2 0 ( 2 " ' $ 2 2 5 1 $ * $ " 2 $ # 4 ( " $ + 6 0 ( " 2 3 0 $ # % 0 + * $ % 2 2 0 ( & ' 2 0 $ r 6 0 0 ! 0 , 1 $ 6 , # ( " $ 6 0 * $ 1 2 0 ( 2 " ' $ 2 2 ! r f # t n " n n b n r n f r $ 5 , * $ 0 ) ( + $ + 1 % 0 0 ( & ' 2 1 5 $ 0 1 ( , " 3 , " ( * + $ + ! $ 0 1 * 4 ( , * , $ * $ % 2 , # 0 ! 0 , 1 $ 6 " $ , 2 $ 0 t f " 9 & 3 ? < = / , B , < . 3 n < 0 0 9 @ 4 7 7 0 & : A 9 : ? 9 . 4 7 8 0 > > : = A 0 , < 4 9 . : ? 9 . 4 7 8 0 8 0 < = , 9 / 0 7 0 . > , 9 0 A 8 , B : < , 9 / @ 4 . 0 8 , B : < % 4 9 . 0 1 : < 8 0 < 8 , B : < : @ , . 3 0 < 4 . 6 < 9 : 7 / D = > 0 < 8 3 , / 0 9 / 0 / & : A 9 7 0 < 6 4 8 $ 0 , 8 = . : 9 / ? . > 0 / > 3 0 = ; 0 . 4 , 7 8 0 0 > 4 9 2 $ 0 , 8 = = A : < 0 4 9 . : ? 9 . 4 7 8 0 8 0 < = , < , < , , 9 = 0 B , 9 / , 7 @ 4 9 , 7 : 9 0 1 : < , 9 : > 3 0 < > 0 < 8 > 3 0 9 9 : 8 4 9 , > 4 : 9 = A 0 < 0 8 , / 0 1 : < 8 , B : < : ? 9 . 4 7 8 0 8 0 < 7 0 = > , # < 4 > . 3 0 > > n b n t t t r n f b n n t 9 9 4 0 $ # , ? 7 : 1 < 0 0 9 @ 4 7 7 0 A 0 9 > 8 4 = = 4 9 2 : 9 % ? 9 / , B 0 , 9 / 3 , = 9 : > 0 0 9 = 0 0 9 = 4 9 . 0 # , ? 7 A , = : < 9 : 9 " . > r n r , 9 / = 3 0 4 = F , 9 / A 0 4 2 3 = n r t ; : ? 9 / = % 3 0 A , = A 0 , < 4 9 2 7 ? 0 5 0 , 9 = , A 3 4 > 0 7 : 9 2 = 7 0 0 @ 0 = 3 4 < > , 9 / 7 , . 6 = 7 4 ; ; 0 < = A 4 > 3 ; 4 9 6 : 9 > 3 0 8 7 , = > > 4 8 0 = 3 0 A , = = 0 0 9 # , ? 7 : < 4 2 4 9 , 7 7 B 1 < : 8 , / = / 0 9 : ? 9 > B 7 A , = , < 0 = 4 / 0 9 > : 1 $ : = , = , < 4 9 2 0 , < > , = = 4 = > 0 / 7 4 @ 4 9 2 1 , . 4 7 4 > B 7 : . , > 0 / , > f ! ) A B n 4 9 < 0 0 9 @ 4 7 7 0 % 3 0 = ? 1 1 0 < = 1 < : 8 / 0 8 0 9 > 4 , , 9 / 8 , B 0 / 4 = : < 4 0 9 > 0 / , 9 / 4 9 9 0 0 / : 1 8 0 / 4 . , 7 , = = 4 = > , 9 . 0 & 3 0 , / 4 = : 9 : ? 9 > B % 3 0 < 4 1 1 = " 1 E . 0 . : 9 > 4 9 ? 0 = > : ? > 4 7 4 C 0 . : 8 4 9 0 / < 0 = : ? < . 0 = : 1 8 ? 7 > 4 ; 7 0 , 2 0 9 . 4 0 = 4 9 , 9 , > > 0 8 ; > > : 7 : . , > 0 # , ? 7 & 3 0 % 3 0 < 4 1 1 = " 1 E . 0 3 , = < 0 . 0 4 @ 0 / 9 ? 8 0 < : ? = ; : = = 4 7 0 7 0 , / = , 7 7 A 3 4 . 3 3 , @ 0 1 , 4 7 0 / > : 7 0 , / > : > 3 0 / 4 = . : @ 0 < B : 1 # , ? 7 & 3 0 , / 4 = : 9 : ? 9 > B % 3 0 < 4 1 1 = " 1 E . 0 4 = : 1 1 0 < 4 9 2 , t t < 0 A , < / 1 : < 4 9 1 : < 8 , > 4 : 9 7 0 , / 4 9 2 > : > 3 0 A 3 0 < 0 , : ? > = : < < 0 . : @ 0 < B : 1 9 9 4 0 $ # , ? 7 & 3 4 = < 0 A , < / 4 = 4 9 , / / 4 > 4 : 9 > : , 9 ? 9 / 4 = . 7 : = 0 / < 0 A , < / : 1 1 0 < 0 / B 9 9 4 0 $ # , ? 7 = 1 , 8 4 7 B 9 B : 9 0 A 4 > 3 4 9 1 : < 8 , > 4 : 9 4 = , = 6 0 / > : ; 7 0 , = 0 . : 9 > , . > > 3 0 , / 4 = : 9 : ? 9 > B % 3 0 < 4 1 1 = " 1 E . 0 , > t f r t t n b r r f t t t r f f n b n b b f b b t n b b r r r b ! r f # t n " n n b n r n f r $ , 0 " ' b # ( 1 , 3 , 2 6 " ' * ( 1 2 0 ( " 2 . $ 0 1 , , $ * 2 ' $ 3 . $ 0 ( , 2 $ , # $ , 2 % " ' * 1 . 0 ( , " ( . * 1 % " 3 * 2 6 , # % 0 ( $ , # 1 " + $ 2 & $ 2 ' $ 0 2 ' , 0 2 ' $ " ' * $ * 2 $ # + . * 6 $ $ 1 % 2 ' $ $ 0 , $ % " 3 * 2 6 + $ + ! $ 0 % 0 + $ " ' 1 " ' * 2 ' $ # ( 1 2 0 ( " 2 % 7 " $ , # 2 ' $ 2 0 , 1 . 0 2 2 ( , # $ . 0 2 + $ , 2 5 1 ' , 0 $ # 1 $ + . * 6 $ $ % 2 ' $ 6 $ 0 2 2 ' $ ( 0 ( , # ( 4 ( # 3 * * " 2 ( , 2 2 ' $ ! , / 3 $ 2 , $ % 2 ' $ 5 0 # 0 $ " ( . ( $ , 2 1 5 3 * # ! $ , + $ # 4 $ 0 * * " ' * $ * 2 $ # + . * 6 $ $ % 2 ' $ $ 0 ' 2 ' , 0 5 1 ! $ 1 2 5 $ # 3 . , 0 1 4 $ * 6 , ' , " 6 * , & 2 ( + $ 1 $ " 0 $ 2 0 6 % 0 2 ' $ # ( 1 , 3 , 2 6 ( & ' " ' * . 0 ( , " ( . * t t t n n b r r n f t t r f f b b t r n $ 0 7 , B 1 : < 4 1 0 4 = 3 : = > 4 9 2 > 3 0 4 < % ? < @ 4 @ : < 4 9 9 0 < : 9 , < . 3 f n 1 < : 8 f t ; 8 , > > 3 0 0 7 7 : A = 3 4 ; , ; > 4 = > 3 ? < . 3 4 9 , / 4 = : 9 7 7 . , 9 . 0 < = ? < @ 4 @ : < = , < 0 4 9 @ 4 > 0 / > : , > > 0 9 / ? > 8 ? = > $ % ( # > : % > 0 ; 3 , 9 4 0 & 3 4 2 ; 0 9 f t t f : < 0 8 , 4 7B 0 : 8 , 9 = + = > 0 ; 3 , 9 4 0 B , 3 : : . : 8> : 0 9 = ? < 0 > 3 0 B = , @ 0 , = ; : > 1 : < B : ? & 3 0 / 4 9 9 0 < 4 = ; 7 , 9 9 0 / 1 : < t 2 ? 0 = > = & 3 0 < 0 , < 0 n r n b f b r r r b b t n , / 4 = : 9 , B : < b : 8 8 4 = = 4 : 9 0 < 9 , & 3 : 8 ; = : 9 A 4 7 7 3 : 7 / , . : 8 8 ? 9 4 > B 8 0 0 > 4 9 2 0 2 4 9 9 4 9 2 , > f t ; 8 & 3 ? < = / , B , < . 3 , > , / 4 = : 9 4 > B , 7 7 7 : . , > 0 / , > f n % : ? > 3 A 0 = > $ ? > 7 0 / 2 0 % > < 0 0 > & 3 : 8 ; = : 9 < 0 ; < 0 = 0 9 > = 4 = > < 4 . > & 3 0 / 4 = > < 4 . > = > < 0 > . 3 0 = 1 < : 8 ! ) 9 3 4 9 2 , , 9 0 4 9 > 3 0 9 : < > 3 > : t f t f r t f f t f n r f f b f f & 3 0 0 1 1 0 . > = : 1 = 0 @ 0 < 0 A 0 , > 3 0 < , < 0 1 0 7 > 0 @ 0 < B B 0 , < B 8 , 9 B 8 0 < 4 . , 9 = & : : > , 4 9 . < 4 > 4 . , 7 A 0 , > 3 0 < 4 9 1 : < 8 , > 4 : 9 ! " D = ! , > 4 : 9 , 7 ) 0 , > 3 0 < % 0 < @ 4 . 0 ! ) % ; , < > : 1 > 3 0 ' % 0 ; , < > 8 0 9 > : 1 : 8 8 0 < . 0 0 = > , 7 4 = 3 0 / % * ) $ ! G A 4 > 3 ; , < > 9 0 < : < 2 , 9 4 C , > 4 : 9 = % * ) $ ! G 4 = , @ : 7 ? 9 > 0 0 < ; < : 2 < , 8 A 4 > 3 9 0 , < 7 B t t t t > < , 4 9 0 / = 0 @ 0 < 0 A 0 , > 3 0 < = ; : > > 0 < = & 3 0 = 0 @ : 7 ? 9 > 0 0 < = 3 0 7 ;

PAGE 2

Dear Editor, Our Madison Garden Club “rmly supports our Florida Federation of Garden Clubs' strong commitment to a ban on the practice of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in Florida. This process contaminates vast amounts of fresh water with chemicals, many of which are carcinogenic. There is no safe way to dispose of fracking's toxic waste water. Joining with Garden Club members and others all across our state, our aim is to see Florida's endangered waters and aquifer restored, protected and preserved for our next generation! We are truly blessed by our Creator to live in Madison County where citizens and local government are willing to stand strong together to protect our aquifer, historic rivers, springs, lakes, streams, wetlands, ponds and water recharge areas, our farmlands and, very importantly, our health. The preservation of Florida's clean water supply is a natural right guaranteed by the Florida Constitution. This is a non-partisan issue about preserving and protecting our natural resources. We hope you will join Garden Club, as we work to preserve and protect this beautiful county we love! If you are interested in reading the Florida Federation of Garden Club's position statement regarding hydraulic fracturing, go to http://www.ffgc.org/about_us/positions_policies_resolutions/index.html , and click on ban hydraulic fracturing.Ž Laura Coleman, President of the Madison Garden Club A Tallahassee case, unravels after surveillance is revealed. The Washington Post , of Feb. 23, 2015, ran the above story headline, on page 1, on a highly secret device that simulates a cell tower. Two defendants, in a robbery case, gamed the system because their legal defense discovered that the investigators used a secret surveillance tool, a tool that raises signi“cant privacy concerns. In an unprecedented move, a state judge ordered the police to show the device-a cell-tower simulator sometimes called a Sting-Ray, to the attorneys. Rather than show the equipment, the state offered a plea bargain. The case is described as being, emblematic of the growing, but hidden, use by local law enforcement of a sophisticated surveillance technology borrowed from the national security world. It shows how a gag order imposed by the FB -on grounds that discussing the devices operation would compromise its effectiveness has left judges, the public and criminal defendants in the dark on its daily utilization as well as how the tool works.Ž Top Secret Box That secrecy, in turn, has hindered debate over whether the String-Rays use respects Americans civil liberties. The FBIs secrecy order on the spy device is on a box about the size of a small suitcase theres also a handheld version that simulates a cell phone tower. It elicits signals from all mobile phones in its vicinity. That means it collects information not just about a criminal suspects communications but also about the communications of potentially hundreds of law-abiding citizens. Cell Phones the Gateway The Tallahassee police used the Sting-Ray or a similar device in more than 250 investigations over a six-year period, from mid 2007 through early 2014, according to a list of cases compiled by the Tallahassee Police Department and provided to the American Civil Liberties Union. Thats 40 or so instances a year in a city of 186,000, a surprisingly high rate given that the Sting-Rays manufacturer, Harris Corp, has told the Federal Communications Commission that the device is used only in emergencies. At least 48 state and local law enforcement agencies in 20 states and Washington City have bought the devices, according to the ACLU. BACKLASH! The secrecy surrounding the devices use has begun to prompt a backlash in cities across the fruited plains. In Baltimore, a judge is pushing back against the refusal of police of“cers to answer questions while testifying. In Charlotte, following a newspaper investigation, the states attorney is reviewing whether prosecutors illegally withheld information about the devices use from defendants. In Tacoma. Wash., after a separate newspaper investigation found that judges in almost 200 cases had no idea they were issuing orders for the Sting-Ray, the courts set new rules requiring police to disclose the tools use. The State Legislature is weighing a bill to regulate the uses of the equipment. Both the FBI and the Tallahassee police say that the device is used only with an appropriate court order and that they do not collect the content of calls or text messages. The FBI also said it retains only location data that is relevant to an investigation and immediately discards all other data. So far, there is virtually no case law on how the Fourth Amendment, which prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures, should apply to this technology. The Light of Day A public defender, Carrie McMullen, for Leon County, in September, drew up a motion to suppress the evidence obtained in the Tallahassee case, prior to the defendants arrest, alleging that his Fourth Amendment rights were violated by the use of the Sting-Ray. She argued that the police had not obtained a warrant based on probable cause to use the device. By scooping up all manner of information from a target cell-phone, as well as nearly all cell-phones in the general area, a Sting-Ray device was utilized in exploratory rummaging. Last November, Florida Circuit Court Judge Frank Shef“eld held a hearing on obtaining a look see at the device in court. The states attorney Courtney Frazier, argued that details of the equipments operations were protected from disclosure under a law enforcement exception to the state open-records law. Judge Shef“eld remarked: What right does law enforcement have to hide behind the rules and to listen in and take peoples information like the NSA?Ž On Dec. 2, 2014, the judge signed the subpoena forcing Tallahassee police to show the device they used. The police caved, and the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution stands, as does the Magna Charta of 1215. VIEWPOINTS & OPINION2A » Friday, March 20, 2015 » madison enterprise-recorderConservative Corner Fire is everyone's “ghtPolice secretly spy on phonesMadison County Extension ServiceReduce your intake of fats and sugarsLetter to the EditorGarden Club against frackingOutside burning safetySince March is National Nutrition Education Month, lets continue our focus on making positive food choices. The USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans has a full chapter on foods Americans need to work on reducing in their daily consumption; solid fats and sugars are two that take top billing. SoFAS is the new acronym USDA has coined to describe this trend in the American meal patterns; the SoFŽ stands for solid fat and the ASŽ represents added sugars. While the intention is a catchy phrase, it might leave some people scratching their heads. Lets break this down and look at SoFŽ (solid fats) “rst. Fats are categorized into three groups know as fatty acids; they can be saturated, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated. All fats contain a combination of fatty acids, but they are in different amounts. Saturated fats are solid at room temperature and that is where we get SoFŽ, the exception of palm and coconut oils. These fats tend to raise cholesterol levels in the human body, which over time can cause a plaque build-up in blood vessels leading to coronary heart disease. Fats that are liquid at room temperature will be higher in poly or monounsaturated fats and do not contribute to cholesterol levels. These liquid fats are the better choice, but use all fats sparingly. Trans fats are also a fat that can lead to increased cholesterol levels, these are formed in food processing. When hydrogen is added to a fat to make it more solid, trans fats are formed making the fat more saturated. Synthetic trans fatty acids are found in margarines, snack foods and prepared desserts. Small amounts of trans fats are naturally found in meat and milk foods. How does all of this information translate into the food choices you make every day? Eat lean cuts of meat and choose low-fat and fat free dairy foods to reduce solid fats and naturally occurring trans fats. Consume less prepared desserts and snacks to reduce trans fats and saturated fats that are added to foods as an ingredient. Consumers always have questions about margarine, there are so many on the market. Read the ingredient list and start with a spread that has a monounsaturated fat as the major ingredient. High monounsaturated fats are canola, olive, soy, sun”ower and peanut. Then, read the nutrition label and “nd the smallest amount of saturated and trans fats with a higher number of poly or monounsaturated fats. In food preparation, both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are much better alternatives to solid fats. While they still have the same amount of calories, they have a more positive affect in your body. Oils that are high in monounsaturated fats are canola, saf”ower, olive and peanut oils. Examples of polyunsaturated fats are corn, cotton seed and soy bean oil. Now, for the ASŽ or added sugars in SoFAS. By itself, it is not a bad ingredient and it adds sweetness to our foods and serves as a browning agent in many foods and most have few nutrients, and are high in calories. According to the new Dietary Guidelines, added sugar contributes an average of 16 percent of the total calories in the American diet. This translates into added calories and excess calories can only mean extra pounds. Sugar also contributes to tooth decay, another good reason the consume less. Sugars come in many forms. Read the nutrition labels, added sugars may be high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, malt syrup, maple syrup, fructose, dextrose molasses or honey. Can you guess the food source highest consumption of added sugar? Sugary drinks like soda, energy drinks and sports drink account for 36 percent of extra sugar in our diet Sugar sweetened fruit drinks account for about 10 percent of the extra calories in the American diet. Sweet tea, a southern stable, is loaded with sugar and falls into this category, so sweeten lightly. The message is to cut back on food high in sugar and eat them less often. Solid fats and added sugar can contribute a substantial portion of calories to the American diet. It is estimated that on average solid fats and added sugar contribute up to 800 calories per day to an adults diet. Remember too, most foods that are high in these ingredients are also low in other nutrients and it is well documented these foods contribute to weight gain. The recommendation from USDA is to eat these foods less often. Instead, focus on nutrient-dense forms of foods from all food groups. For more information on eating for health or a free copy of MyPlate, contact the Madison County Extension Service at 973-4138. The University of Florida Extension/IFAS Extension … Madison County is an Equal Opportunity Institution.As the weather changes, it turns warmer and many people start doing more outdoor burning to include yard debris, leaf piles or even bon “res at night. There are legal and safety guidelines for outdoor burning activities regardless of where your property is located. The City of Madison has an ordinance that affects city residents when it comes to outdoor burning. Because most houses and properties in the city are close together, the ordinance prohibits burning of yard debris, leaves, trash, etc. in the city limits. City crews will pick up bagged leaves and yard debris if left at the curb. The Florida Forest Service has regulations that govern outdoor burning; any burning pile should be less than eight feet in diameter or in a noncombustible container, must be more than 50 feet from a road, more than 25 feet from your house and 25 feet from any brush, wildland or combustible structure and at least 150 feet from any other occupied building. It is also illegal to burn household garbage including paper products, treated lumber, plastics, rubber materials, tires, pesticide, paint and aerosol containers. The Florida Forest Service can issue citations for illegal burning, which can include “nes for said burning. Any outdoor burning must be conducted after 8 a.m., and be extinguished one hour prior to sunset. Use wire mesh to cover the container and clear an area around the container or around your burn pile to bare dirt to prevent sparks from causing any other “res. Never leave any “re unattended and keep a close eye on young children while burning. Keep a garden hose close by while youre burning in order to extinguish any escaping “re or sparks. Use care when starting any “re and do not use gasoline or other ”ammable liquids to start your “re. Flammable liquids such as gasoline produce vapor that can ignite easily and sometimes with explosive results. Many people are injured by the ”ash “re that is caused by igniting gasoline or other ”ammable liquids. It is safer to use a match or lighter to ignite another fuel such as pine cones, dry pine straw or grass, etc. and add the larger yard debris after the “re gets started, building the “re slowly. Monitor the weather while burning and extinguish your “re if the wind conditions increase or if you must leave your “re for any reason. Unattended and escaped “res can cause damage to your property as well any others it travels to. You are responsible for any “re that you start and that includes any damages caused by a “re that travels onto another persons property. Call 911 if you lose control of your “re, uncontrolled “re can travel quickly depending on the fuel that is available. If you regain control of your “re you can always call back and notify 911. More information can be found at www.freshfrom”orida.com. Please feel free to call (850) 9735075 with any questions you may have about smoke alarms or to request assistance with any existing smoke alarms that you have in your home. Any group(s) that would like to have someone come out and speak about smoke alarms or any other “re safety topics, please contact Chief Bruce Jordan (850 )253-5117 or email: bruce.jordan@cityofmadison”.com. NELSONA. PRYORGuest Columnist DIANNDOUGLAS BRUCEJORDAN

PAGE 3

$ / : < / = / 8 > + > 3 @ / A / 8 < + 2 + 7 + 8 8 9 ? 8 / . 2 / < 9 0 0 3 / A 3 6 6 2 9 6 . < / 1 ? 6 + < 7 9 , 3 6 / 9 0 0 3 / 2 9 ? < = 3 8 > 2 / n < ? < + 6 + 8 . = 7 + 6 6 9 ? 8 > 3 / = 3 8 > 2 / % / 9 8 . 9 8 1 < / = = 3 9 8 + 6 3 = > < 3 > & 2 / 7 9 , 3 6 / 9 0 0 3 / = + < / 3 8 + . . 3 > 3 9 8 > 9 > A 9 : / < 7 + 8 / 8 > 9 0 0 3 / = 3 8 # + 8 + 7 + 3 > C + 8 . & + 6 6 + 2 + = = / / + 8 . , / 1 + 8 9 8 & ? / = . + C + < 2 n t F 7 : < 9 ? . > 9 + 8 8 9 ? 8 / < / 1 ? 6 + < 9 0 0 3 / 2 9 ? < = 3 8 + 6 6 n r 9 ? 8 > 3 / = J $ / : < + 2 + 7 = + 3 . F & 2 / n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r : 7 + 8 . : < 3 6 0 < 9 7 r : 7 0 C 9 ? A 9 ? 6 . 6 3 5 / > 9 @ 9 3 / C 9 ? < 9 8 / < 8 = : 6 / + = / 7 + 5 / = ? < / C 9 ? 7 + < 5 C 9 ? < + 6 / 8 . + < & 2 / + . 3 = 9 8 3 < / $ / = ? / < / / 3 @ / . + + 6 6 + , 9 ? > + = > < ? > ? < / 0 3 < / + < 9 ? 8 . n : 7 9 8 & ? / = . + C + < 2 n t & 2 / 0 3 < / A + = 6 9 + > / . + > f r t % > + > / $ 9 + . n r 3 8 + . 3 = 9 8 & 2 / < / A + = 9 8 / : / < = 9 8 3 8 = 3 . / + > > 2 / > 3 7 / 9 0 > 2 / 0 3 < / $ ? 8 / > > 2 / 8 > A 2 9 = ? 0 0 / < / . 0 < 9 7 = 7 9 5 / 3 8 2 + 6 + > 3 9 8 & 2 / + ? = / 9 0 > 2 / 0 3 < / A + = + 8 ? 8 + > > / 8 . / . 2 9 > : 6 + > / 9 < . 3 8 1 > 9 > 2 / < / : 9 < > 2 / 8 > 0 / 6 6 + = 6 / / : A 2 3 6 / 9 9 5 3 8 1 & 2 / . + 7 + 1 / A + = 7 3 8 3 7 + 6 > 9 > 2 / 2 9 > : 6 + > / + 8 . > 2 / 9 ? 8 > / < > 9 : > 2 / 2 9 > : 6 + > / A + = 9 8 + . 3 = 9 8 3 < / $ / = ? / 3 8 = > + 6 6 / . + 8 / A 0 3 < / + 6 + < 7 + = 2 / 8 > = / B 3 = > 3 8 1 + 6 + < 7 A + = 8 9 > A 9 < 5 3 8 1 + . 3 = 9 8 3 < / $ / = ? / + 8 . + . 3 = 9 8 9 ? 8 > C % < / = : 9 8 . / . > 9 > 2 / 0 3 < / t b r t f n r r b n n t b r b b r b f n r t r t 9 8 > < 9 7 # + 1 / n f b n n 9 8 > < 9 7 # + 1 / n b f f 9 8 > < 9 7 # + 1 / n r r f 9 8 > < 9 7 # + 1 / n r 9 8 > < 9 7 # + 1 / n nrn n -&62 (1&&-&/4#+*2)*-($., 1"6&1 "%+fn "%*2.#+*2)&1 $%"!% .4)"5&"04&23*.-.$.-$&1$"++"3 n .1*2*3.41*3&"3)))% !&15*412 % .4-377&"1 /&1&"1 &/.13&1 r &/.13&1 !! %%5&13*2*-(!/&$*"+*23 &&\b'!! "22*'*&%b&("+ "/)*$&2*(-b"7.43 ! 2*(-&1 $ n ;**01=3*;75&5*6$" t fbb)*7.,3*)+468-**<56*776*&).3, 51*&796*4+8-*5*451*4+.87(.6(91 8.43&6*'*8-*=5&7856*7*3846+9 896**7.)*387 '1.7-*);**01'= rf t 498r *6.4).(&175478&,*5&.)&88-*478 +>( *3)&))6*77(-&3,*78 6&;*6n !-.73*;75&5*6*7*6:*78-*6.,-884 6*/*(8&3&):*68.7*2*383*;72&88*6 4679'7(6.58.4378-&8.38-*45.3.434+ 8-*2&3&,*2*38;.11348'*+468-* '*78.38*6*784+8-*(4938&8-* 4;3*6748-.3*;75&5*6&8. :*78.,&8&3=&):*68.7*2*3879'2.88*) 15-484,.:*8 ttrfn +4659'1.(&8.43.38-.73*;75&5*6 2978'*5.(0*)95341&8*68-&3 2438-7+648-*)&8*8-*=&6)6455*) 4++ ;.11348 '*6*75437.'1*+46-4847'*=43)&.) )*&)1.3*tt t*&)1.3*+46(1&77.>*)7 .7)&=&82 *&)1.3*7+46 1*,&1&):*68.7*2*3876* 3)&#*)3*7)&=&82 !-*6*;.11'*&(-&6,* +46&++.)&:.87 n b t nf : 7 9 < . 3 8 1 > 9 > 2 / + . 3 = 9 8 # 9 6 3 / / : + < > 7 / 8 > < / : 9 < > / + > 2 / < + < 3 / " 6 = 9 8 f 9 0 < / / 8 @ 3 6 6 / A + = > < + @ / 6 3 8 1 A / = > 9 8 ' % A C t 3 8 2 / < n 9 . 1 / $ + 7 + < 1 3 / % > < + ? 1 2 > / < 9 , 6 / C 9 0 + . 3 = 9 8 A + = + > > / 7 : > 3 8 1 > 9 > < + @ / 6 8 9 < > 2 9 8 ) + = 2 3 8 1 > 9 8 @ / 8 ? / 3 8 2 / < t t r & 9 C 9 > + + < 9 , 6 / C . 3 . 8 9 > = / / " 6 = / 8 + = = 2 / : < 9 / / . / . > 2 < 9 ? 1 2 ' % A C t > 9 ) + = 2 3 8 1 > 9 8 @ / 8 ? / + 8 . > 2 / > A 9 @ / 2 3 6 / = 7 + . / 9 8 > + > " 6 = / 8 = > < ? 5 + = : / / . 6 3 7 3 > = 3 1 8 9 , 6 / C A + = > < + 8 = : 9 < > / . > 9 + . 3 = 9 8 9 ? 8 > C / 7 9 < 3 + 6 9 = : 3 > + 6 A 3 > 2 3 8 + : + 3 > + > 3 8 1 3 8 4 ? < 3 / = " 6 = / 8 2 + . > A 9 : + = = / 8 1 / < = 3 8 2 / < @ / 2 3 6 / < 3 + 8 + = + . . + 8 r 9 0 < / / 8 @ 3 6 6 / + 8 . ( + < 3 + 8 & / < < C f t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b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n t t t t = / @ / < / > 2 ? 8 . / < = > 9 < 7 = t t t H 9 9 . = + 8 . 7 9 < / > 2 + 8 n t t t > 9 < 8 + . 9 / = 9 ? < + < 9 = = > 2 / ' 8 3 > / . % > + > / = & 2 / = / / @ / 8 > = > 2 < / + > / 8 / . 6 3 @ / = + 8 . : < 9 : / < > C % 3 8 / > 2 / : < 9 1 < + 7 = > + < > / . 3 8 > 2 / n t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n t f % ) + < @ / C < / / 8 / < 3 @ / 3 8 + . 3 = 9 8 & 2 / + = 3 % : 9 > > / < 9 ? < = / 3 = < / 9 7 7 / 8 . / . 0 9 < + 8 C G < = > < / = : 9 8 . / < / 7 / < 1 / 8 C 7 + 8 + 1 / < 9 < 1 / 8 / < + 6 A / + > 2 / < / 8 > 2 ? = 3 + = > & 2 / > < + 3 8 3 8 1 7 + > / < 3 + 6 3 = + : : < 9 : < 3 + > / 0 9 < + 1 / = n t + 8 . ? : & 2 3 = 9 ? < = / 6 + = > = + , 9 ? > t 7 3 8 ? > / = & 2 / . @ + 8 / . % : 9 > > / < 9 ? < = / 3 = . / = 3 1 8 / . 0 9 < 3 8 . 3 @ 3 . ? + 6 = A 2 9 A + 8 > > 9 6 / + < 8 3 8 . / : > 2 + , 9 ? > = / @ / < / = > 9 < 7 . C 8 + 7 3 = + = A / 6 6 + = , + = 3 < + . + < 3 8 > / < : < / > + > 3 9 8 & 2 3 = 9 ? < = / 7 + C 9 8 6 C , / + : : < 9 : < 3 + > / 0 9 < > 2 9 = / A 2 9 2 + @ / + = 3 1 8 3 G + 8 > 3 8 > / < / = > 3 8 > 2 / A / + > 2 / < & 2 3 = 9 ? < = / + 6 = 9 6 + = > = + , 9 ? > t 7 3 8 ? > / = + = 3 % : 9 > > / < 9 ? < = / 3 = = / > 0 9 < & 2 ? < = . + C + < 2 + > : 7 + 8 . > 2 / . @ + 8 / . % : 9 > > / < 9 ? < = / 3 = = / > 0 9 < & ? / = . + C : < 3 6 + > : 7 9 < 7 9 < / 3 8 0 9 < 7 + > 3 9 8 9 8 > + > > 2 / + . 3 = 9 8 9 ? 8 > C 7 / < 1 / 8 C " : / < + > 3 9 8 = / 8 > / < + > t f f b b n t n b r f f r t n r b t b t n f f b t f f b t t f f n r r r r f f t t f r f b n n " b n ! f t " t "'&&.-)-25<192300>-25<1C252200>-25<1A>1<1E2A222B00>-25<0100>-25<1B22>1((! ""(")-25<1A>1(.&,%&($)-25<16282006>]TJ1.49108 -1.08333 TD-0.129 Tc[<1A06>-129<19>-128<06>-129<00>-154<13>-130(+0"+rrt &/"

PAGE 4

We are indeed grateful for the loving acts of kindness you expressed during the passing of our beloved Richard. Your calls, cards, food, floral arrangements and prayers, especially your prayers, have all served as sources of strength for us. May Gods abundant blessings always be yours. The Miller Family COMMUNITY NEWS4A » Friday, March 20, 2015 » madison enterprise-recorderObituariesDorothy Jean Hamilton Pritchett Collier, 56, of Perry, passed unexpectedly on Sunday, March 8, in Perry. Funeral services are at 2 p.m. on Saturday, March 21 at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church, Greenville. Viewing-visitation will be from 3-7 p.m. on Friday, March 20 at Tillman of Monticello (850) 997-5553. She was born in Monticello; she has lived in Perry for several years where she was lovingly known as Ms. Dot.Ž Survivors include her husband, Johnny Collier; sons: Eddie Hamilton, Tyrone and Bryant Pritchett; mother, Carrie Mae Blackshear Hamilton; sisters, Lavonne (Ronnie) Spearman and Lender Hamilton; brother, Edward (Joyce) Hamilton; 11 grandchildren; numerous other relatives and friends. She was predeceased by her son, Gerard Pritchett; father, Willie Hamilton, Sr., and brother, Willie Hamilton, Jr. Reverend Howard Lewis, Jr., 48, of Powder Springs, Ga. passed unexpectedly in Atlanta, Ga. on Tuesday, March 10. Funeral services are 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 21 at Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church, Madison. Interment will follow in the Church Cemetery. Viewingvisitation is 3-7 p.m. Friday, March 20 at Tillman of Monticello (850) 997-5553. A native of Madison, Reverend Howard was a 1984 graduate of Madison County High School. He was also a graduate of Tampa College and had been a retail manager for Radio Shack, CopUSA and FedEx Copies. For the past year, he had been the pastor of Sardis Missionary Baptist Church, Kennesaw, Ga. He is survived by his loving wife, Gwendolyn Siplin Lewis; children: Megan and Justin Lewis; mother, Betty Brown Lewis; brothers: Harold and Keith (Maria) Lewis; father-and-motherin-law, George and Alberta Lamar Siplin; brother-inlaw, Darrin Alexander, Sr.; and a host of other loving relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his father, Reverend Howard Lewis, Sr., and his sister, Angela Lewis Alexander.Jail Report : March 7-16Dorothy Jean CollierRichard Miller, Jr.May 2, 1943-February 26, 2015Rev. Howard Lewis, Jr. Paul Kinsley of Cherry Lake and Emerald Greene Parsons of Madison, proudly announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter Cheltsie Elizabeth Kinsley to Marcus Walter Holbrook, son of Michelle Hall, of Waynesboro, Ga. Maternal grandparents of the bride are Mary Ellen Greene and the late Thomas Harvey TommyŽ Greene, Jr., of Madison. Paternal grandparents of the bride are Sue Ellen Kinsley and the late Maurice MoreyŽ Kinsley of Cherry Lake. Maternal grandparents of the groom are the late Clarence Walter and Norma Ruth Hall of Percy, Illinois. Paternal grandparents of the groom are the late John D. and Loraine Mae Holbrook of Greenville. The bride to be is a 2011 graduate of Aucilla Christian Academy and a 2013 graduate of North Florida Community College where she received her A.A. degree. She is now currently enrolled at Saint Leo University where she will be receiving her Bachelors degree in Business Administration in May of 2015. Cheltsie is currently employed at Greene Publishing, Inc ., where she is preparing to take over the publisher position from her mother. The groom to be is a 2008 graduate of Madison County High School and a 2009 graduate from the Police Public Safety Academy. He is currently employed with the Madison Police Department. Friends and family are welcome to attend the ceremony at the Madison Country Club on Saturday, March 21, 2015 starting at 4:30 p.m. A small, private invitation only reception will follow. Wedding Announcement Kinsley Holbrook To Unite In MarriageMarcus Holbrook and Cheltsie Kinsley NEXT CONSIGNMENT/SWAP MEET SALEWhen: Saturday, April 4th10a.m. … 3 p.m. Where: Rt 255 & I-10, Exit 262, LEE, FL Get your vehicles and stuff ready to sell ƒ cost to sell is only $5 ... crafts, arts, garage items, cars, trucks, boats. Bring them all down and sell for only $5 . 8 10 Consignment Setup & Arrival 10 3 SALE TIME!The CourierXpress Company, Inc.( www.leetrader.com ) Call 850-997-4343 J.V. Cheerleader Spotlight Kelsey OdomGrade: 10thGrade Years Cheering: Three Years Favorite Stunt: Basket Toss Favorite Cheer: All In Favorite Dance: Anything we did at camp.Ž Kelsey OdomFavorite Part Of Being a Cheerleader: My favorite part of cheering is being in front of my cowboys cheering them on because it brightens any bad day I have!Ž Biggest Struggle With Cheering: My biggest struggle with cheerleading was stunting yet it was the most fun. It was hard combining everyones strengths and weaknesses but when we did, we perfected it.Ž Plans After High School: After I get out of high school, I plan on going into the military and after that becoming a physiologist.Ž What Does It Mean To You To Be A Cheerleader? To me, to be a cheerleader means time and effort but also smiles and a good attitude.Ž What Is Your Favorite Class In School? My favorite subject is history of our country because I love learning about the way our country was formed.Ž We would like to sincerely thank our neighbors, coworkers, friends and family for the many acts of kindness shown us at the time of Marvins death. Special thank you to Joe Robinson of Harmon-Watson Funeral Home and Pastor Joel Stroud. Thank you also to Beggs Funeral Home, Madison, Fl.; Lee Methodist Church and Pastor Brian Sanderson, of Lee, Fl. and the J.C. Riders Motorcycle Club CMA #1231 of Valdosta, Ga. FROM THE FAMILY OF Marvin Doud March 7 Evil Adonias VelazquezPerez … D.U.I. and no valid drivers license. Cedric Eugene Williams … Shoplifting, resisting retail merchant, simple battery and disorderly intoxication. Jessica Lynn Bar“eld … Criminal mischief $1,000 or greater. John Christopher Bar“eld … D.U.I. and criminal mischief $1,000 or greater. Abner Mensuy … Driving while license suspended (habitual offender). March 8 Robert Michael Harbick … Disorderly intoxication. March 9 Gregory Allen … Out of county warrant. Kendrick Bernard Brown, Jr. … Violation of parole (county). Harrison Webb Hewlett … Possession of marijuana less than 20 grams and possession drug equipment. March 11 Deion Edrick Mackey … Three charges of possession with intent to sell controlled substance, three charges of sale of controlled substance, two charges of possession of “rearm during the commission of a felony. Kalvin Grant Olson … Possession of a controlled substance under 20 grams and possession of drug paraphernalia. Lewis Christian King, Jr. … Violation of parole (county). March 12 Marquis Sherrod Pollocks … Out of county warrant. March 13 Jabar Renard Miller … Criminal registration. Troy Derek Mendheim, Jr. … Criminal registration. Arthur Lee Humphrey … Possession of cocaine with intent to sell and possession of marijuana less than 20 grams. Keilah Monique Fullerton … Simple battery (domestic). Sirjamez Antonio Stevens … Violation of parole. Sandra Denise Gee … Disorderly intoxication and resisting without violence. March 14 Kenneth Alonzo Glee … Possession of cocaine with intent to sell. Otilio Flores … Spouse abuse/battery and criminal mischief. March 15 Nicholas Montague Owens … Possession of marijuana with intent to sell and two charges of possession of drug equipment. Israel Chaddock … Trespass of occupied structure or conveyance and arrest warrant. Jarrod Daniel Burns … Battery domestic and theft. Jay Anthony Johnson … Assault, disorderly intoxication and resisting of“cer without violence. Shonntay Laron Weatherspoon … Leaving the scene of an accident. Casey Ryan Dixon … D.U.I. and possession of alcohol by person under 21. March 16 Melissa Nicole Conway … Grand theft auto. Emmanuel Landle Ratliff … Violation of parole (county), burglary to structure of conveyance and battery/spouse abuse. Jayston Darnell Fails … Driving with suspended or revokes drivers license (habitual). Herbert Lee Bell … Violation of parole (county).

PAGE 5

COMMUNITY NEWSmadison enterprise-recorder « Friday, March 20, 2015 «5A B u s i n e s s C a r d D i r e c t o r y Lake Park of Madison Spotlight:A St. Patrick's Day Celebration Photo SubmittedLake Park of Madison celebrated St. Patrick's Day in style. Everyone was decked out in green and had a blast bringing Ireland t o the residents for the day. Pictured in the back row is Doug Cruce. In the middle row, pictured from left to right, are: Courtney Pape, Ronda Garner, Michelle Lewis, Christina Brooks, Tonya Reddick, Kellie Guthrie, Deena Hames, Sharon Gamble and Beverley Fletcher.. In the front row, pictured from left to right, are: Ca ndice Webb, Jonna Pate, Ashley Sevor, Melanie Seago, Kim Browning, Connie Walker, Bridgette Bonner and Regina Yulee.On Tuesday, March 17, staff members and residents at Lake Park of Madison came together to celebrate St. Patrick's Day, fellowship and have some light-hearted fun. A party, complete with St. Paddy's decorations, punch and “nger foods, began at 2 p.m. Staff members dressed up in St. Patrick's Day garb and residents voted for best costume. Regina Yulee won the contest by receiving the most applause. However, all of the staff members were dressed fabulously festive. Perhaps the best part of the day, was the laughter, smiles and shared memories between residents and staff members-a group of workers who love their job, who are passionate about their work and are truly dedicated to making their residents feel safe, cared for and, above all, loved.SAVANNAHREAMSGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo SubmittedDoug Cruce: part time Executive Director, part-time leprechaun.Photo SubmittedResidents were all smiles during the St. Patrick's Day celebration. In the back row, pictured from left to right, are: Connie Walker, Ronda Garner and Candice Webb. Resident, John Davis, sits in the front center. Madison Senior Citizens Center is “lled with musicGreene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Savannah Reams, March 13, 2015The philosopher Plato once said, Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, ”ight to the imagination and charm and gaiety to life and to everything.Ž On Friday, March 13, Billy Haynie, seated, and Dean Gallagher, standing, came to the Senior Citizens Center in Madison to play music for the seniors. Sometimes it's the little things-a nod, a smile, the sound of guitar strings vibrating to the melody of a familiar song-that makes life just a little bit sweeter. Thanks to Billy and Dean, the folks at the Senior Citizens Center had a pep in their step and a smile in their hearts. Junior Auxiliary to host Father Daughter DanceGet your dancing shoes ready. It is time for the Junior Auxiliary of Madison's 7thAnnual Father-Daughter Dance, Land of Enchantment.Ž The dance will be Saturday, March 28, from 68 p.m., at the Womans Club. The tickets are $10 and include entry for one father with up to three daughters and a 5x7 photo taken at the event. Tickets are available at Odiorne Insurance and Madison County Community Bank. For more information, contact Jamie Andrews at (850) 673-8177 or “nd Junior Auxiliary of Madison County Florida on Facebook.JESSIER. BOXGreene Publishing, Inc.

PAGE 6

There's an edible favor “t for every couple. From the oenophile to the coffee lover, get inspired by these 10 favor ideas. Family-friendly Package a collection of family recipes in a small box with your names and wedding date printed on the back. Candy Bar Give out Chinese takeout boxes, stamped with your new monogram and let guests “ll up their own with sugary sweets of their choice -from old-fashioned button candy to colorful gumdrops to gourmet jelly beans -from a penny candy cart. For the Oenophiles Send guests home with mini wine bottles of the same vintage served with dinner and adorned with a personalized label. Spend a little extra and top off each bottle with a silver or crystal wine stopper. Hometown Pride Hometown goods such as locally baked cookies, maple syrup, candies or anything sweet that originated in the city where you'll wed always make memorable favors. Seaside Inspired Saltwater taffy is not only “tting for a summer wedding by the water, it will also make a colorful statement at your reception. Pack taffy into cellophane bags and add a monogram sticker and ribbon for a nicely packaged takeaway. Italian Family Favorites Have your waiters pass around chocolate-chip cannolis on sleek silver trays at the end of the night. Also offer take-home boxes for guests who want their's for the road. 6A » Friday, March 20, 2015 » madison Enterprise-recorder Fine Linens Home Accessories Gifts Bridal Registry229.469.6231 € Valdosta 134 N. Patterson St. Edible wedding favorsMusical guests perform for 55 Plus ClubMike Humphrey and Debbie Shef“eld, two members of the musical group Everlasting Arms, performed for the 55 Plus Club on Wednesday, March 11. Shef“eld was vocals while Humphrey was vocals and guitar. They performed many of Humphreys original songs as well as Amazing Grace,Ž which they performed as their last song. When Humphrey introduced his original song, Ladder of Life,Ž he commented that every day people are getting a little closer to meeting Jesus. Lyrics from the song said, life is like a ladder, each step a memoryŽ and each step I take is a day I lived.Ž Humphrey commented that sin is like a big wave chasing you all the time, when he introduced his original song, Waves of Sin.Ž Lyrics from the song said, when temptations come that will tear your world in two, dont let the waves of sin come over you.Ž The 55 Plus Club is open to all Madison County residents who are 55 years old and older. All faiths and races are welcome, and no reservations are necessary. There are no fees of any kind. The 55 Plus Club meets the second Wednesday every month, from September through May, at the United Methodist Center located on Highway 145 about “ve miles North of Madison. For more information about the 55 Plus Club or any outreach ministry of the United Methodist Cooperative Ministries please contact coordinator Deborah Brown at (850) 253-2133.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, March 11, 2015Debbie Shef“eld (left) and Mike Humphrey of the group Everlasting Arms performed for the 55 Plus Club on Wednesday, March 11. Sheriff Stewart to host Mothers Day BanquetSheriff Ben Stewart invites you to a Mothers Day Banquet on Saturday, May 9, featuring dinner, a silent auction and entertainment by the Madison County Sheriffs Of“ce. The banquet will be in the Madison County Central Schools gym. The doors open at 6 p.m. and dinner begins at 7 p.m. Tickets for adults and children 12 and over are $25 and tickets for children ages 6-11 are $12.50. Children age “ve and under are free. There are two dinner options: All you can eat seafood buffet with devil crab, two varieties of “sh, fried shrimp, fried oysters, fried scallops, boiled shrimp, cole slaw, potato salad, cheese grits, hush puppies, French fries, tea, coffee and dessert or a single serving of steak, potato salad, bread, tea, coffee and dessert. Proceeds of the evening will bene“t the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches and Madison County Sheriffs Of“ce charities. The evening requires semi-formal dress and there will be a photo opportunity. For tickets and more information, contact Tammy Webb at (850) 973-4151. JESSIER. BOXGreene Publishing, Inc. JESSIER. BOXGreene Publishing, Inc. March activities at the senior centerSenior Citizens Council of Madison County, Inc. hosts numerous activities for the residents of Madison to enjoy. The fitness room and the computer lab are open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday. Arts and crafts open at 10 a.m. Senior dining begins everyday at 11:45 a.m. On Monday, March 23, there will be Tai Chi with Bob Downey at 10:30 a.m. On Tuesday, March 24, there will be World History at 10:30 a.m. and Computer Class with Gianni at 12:30 p.m. On Thursday, March 26, there will be World History at 10:30 a.m. and Caregiver Support Group at 1:30 p.m. On Monday, March 30, there will be Tai Chi with Bob Downey at 10:30 a.m. On Tuesday, March 31, there will be World History at 10:30 a.m., Senior Birthday Luncheon at 11 a.m. and Computer Class with Gianni at 12:30 p.m. The Senior Center is located at 1162 SW Harvey Greene Drive, Madison, Fl. 32340 and is open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Transportation is provided MondayFriday for recreational activities at the Senior Center. For reservations for transportation, call beginning at 8 a.m. daily at (850) 973-4241. JESSIER. BOXGreene Publishing, Inc.COMMUNITY NEWS

PAGE 7

On Friday, March 13, at Shelby's restaurant, a banquet was hosted by the Madison County School District to honor the 2015-2016 School Related Employees of the Year and to announce the district-wide School Related Employee of the year. Superintendent Doug Brown welcomed all employees, principals and guests, then Sam Stalnaker gave the invocation. A delicious meal complete with salad a hefty entrée and dessert, was prepared by Shelby's and attendees dined in style. Next, each School Related Employee of the year was recognized by their administrator or principal and presented a special plaque by Superintendent Doug Brown. Teresa Jennings received the award for Greenville Elementary School, Leroy James received the award for Lee Elementary, Darlene Bland was honored for her work at Madison County Central School and Shaynika Glee won for Madison County Excel School. Madison County High School's award recipient was Evelyn Chancy, Laura Singletary received the award for Pinetta Elementary School, Latayna Denson won for the District Ofce and Barbara Epkins was honored for the Transportation Department. While each employee deserved the award, only one could be chosen to receive the title of School Related Employee of the Year for the district. That honor was bestowed upon Mrs. Evelyn Chancy, long-time secretary for the Madison County High School principal. Prior to her 21 year term as secretary, she was the bookkeeper for Madison County High School for 25 years. In total, she has been employed by the Madison County School District for 46 years. She attended and graduated from Madison County High School and also attended North Florida Community College. Evelyn is married to Marion Chancy and they have two children: Jim Chancy and wife Sherri of Mayo, Fl. and Cathy Chancy of Madison. They have seven grandchildren. Her favorite quote is “We can't help everyone, but everyone can help someone.” It is evident that Mrs. Chancy lives this out on a regular basis as she has proved to be a vital asset to Madison County High School, its principal, students and the Madison community. The 2015-2016 School Related Employee of the Year banquet was a success. Principals, employees, friends and family enjoyed the event and came together to honor the best of the best. Congratulations to all School Related Employee of the Year recipients! madison enterprise-recorder « Friday, MARCH 20, 2015 «7A SAVANNAHREAMSGreene Publishing, Inc. Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Savannah Reams, March 13, 2015Evelyn Chancy received the School Related Employee of the Year award for Madison County High School. She was also named the School Related Employee of the Year for the entire district. Pictured, from left to right, are: Superintendent Doug Brown, Evelyn Chancy and Madison County High School Principal Ben Killingsworth.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Savannah Reams, March 13, 2015Teresa Jennings received the School Related Employee of the Year award for Greenville Elementary School. Pictured, from left to right, are: Greenville Elementary Principal Barbara Pettiford, Superintendent Doug Brown and Teresa Jennings.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Savannah Reams, March 13, 2015Shaynika Glee received the School Related Employee of the Year award for Madison County Excel School. Pictured, from left to right, are: Madison County Excel Principal Jada Williams, Superintendent Doug Brown and Shaynika Glee.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Savannah Reams, March 13, 2015Latayna Denson received the School Related Employee of the Year award for the District Of“ce. Pictured, from left to right, are: Superintendent Doug Brown, Latayna Denson and Chief Academic Of“cer, James Mills.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Savannah Reams, March 13, 2015Darlene Bland received the School Related Employee of the Year award for Madison County Central School. Pictured, from left to right, are: Yolanda Haynes (on behalf of Principal Willie Miles), Superintendent Doug Brown and Darlene Bland.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Savannah Reams, March 13, 2015Laura Singletary received the School Related Employee of the Year award for Pinetta Elementary School. Pictured, from left to right, are: Superintendent Doug Brown, Laura Singletary and Pinetta Elementary Principal Beth Moore.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Savannah Reams, March 13, 2015Barbara Epkins received the School Related Employee of the Year award for the Transportation Department. Pictured, from left to right, are: Superintendent Doug Brown, Barbara Epkins and Supervisor of Transportation, Ivan Johnson.Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Savannah Reams, March 13, 2015Leroy James received the School Related Employee of the Year award for Lee Elementary School. Pictured, from left to right, are: Superintendent Doug Brown, Leroy James and Lee Elementary Principal Robin Hill.Banquet honors 2015-2016 School Related Employees of the Year

PAGE 8

Thirteen members of the Madison County High School FCCLA chapter attended the annual state conference in Orlando, on March 6…8. The students attended the conference to participate in leadership activities and vote on incoming state officers and amendments, as well as to compete in both state and national competitive events. These events allow students to take the skills they are learning in Family and Consumer Science classes beyond the classroom. The twelve members competing at the state level did very well with their competitive events, bringing home six gold and seven silver medals. Five of the students were selected to represent Florida at the national conference this summer. The students were: Florida Events Dylan King, Decorative Food Centerpiece, occupational division … silver medal Ashlyn Blount, FCCLA Writes: Poetry, occupational division … gold medal Victoria Todd, Chapter in Action Scrapbook, occupational division … gold medal Lizzie Frakes, Storytelling, senior division … gold medal (perfect score) National STAR events Bianca Serrano, Applied Math for Culinary Management, occupational division … gold medal (first place), Floridas representative to nationals Amelia Blanton, Career Investigation, occupational division … gold medal (first place), Floridas representative to nationals Tyler Burnett, Career Investigation, senior division … silver medal (second place), Floridas representative to nationals Jacob Moore, Illustrated Talk, senior division … gold medal (first place), Floridas representative to nationals Sarah Baltzell, Job Interview, occupational division … gold medal (first place), Floridas representative to nationals Magan Jennings, Life Event Planning, senior division … silver medal (third place) Maddie Gurley and Mackenzie Miller, Life Event Planning, junior division … silver medal In addition to the awards the students received, two young ladies from the chapter received scholarships to further their education. For her high score in the Applied Math competition, Bianca Serrano received a $1,000 scholarship to Johnson & Wales University. Amelia Blanton, Chapter President, received the Francis Champion Scholarship, a $1,500 scholarship to further her education in a Family and Consumer Science related career. Chapter Advisor Robin Smith is very thankful to the parents and community members, who are a consistent and constant source of support. She is also very proud of the students accomplishments and hopes that next year the group will grow and expand.SCHOOL 8A » Friday, March 20, 2015 » madison enterprise-recorder The Bush Wealth Advantage Our column, The Bush Wealth AdvantageŽ is our way of giving back to the community with all sorts of insights, relevant news, and practical wealth planning strategies. 913318 Options When Your CD Matures Investors who are looking for a short-term cash alternative often find certificates of deposit to their liking. But when a CD matures „ when it stops earning interest „ investors are faced with a choice of what to do with the proceeds. This can be a difficult decision, especially if an investor purchased a CD when interest rates were higher and then must consider whether to purchase a new CD when interest rates are low. CDs are short or medium-term debt investments offered by banks and savings and loans. CDs also can be purchased through most brokerage firms. Theyre insured for up to $250,000 per depositor, per institution in interest and principal by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC). CD holders agreed to keep their money in the account for a specified amount of time anywhere from one month to five years. If money is withdrawn from a bank-purchased CD before the specified period expires, the CD holder may face penalties. Brokerage-purchased CDs trade in a secondary market, which may provide the holder the option to sell the CD for prevailing market prices (prevailing prices may be more or less than the original amount invested). Brokeragepurchased CDs are more complex and may not be suitable for all investors. Investors are encouraged to read the terms and conditions before purchasing a CD through a brokerage. Three Choices Generally, investors have three options when a CD matures: Option 1: They can roll the proceeds into another CD. Option 2: Invest the proceeds into another cash alternative. Option 3: Invest the proceeds in another type of investment. Some banks will automatically roll the CD proceeds into another certificate of deposit unless instructed otherwise. That makes it critical to keep track of when CDs mature. When rolling over a CD, it is important to be aware of the interest rates being offered. CD rates rise and fall, and the interest rates offered may be more or less than those earned on the maturing CD. Another Cash Alternative Investors also may elect to invest the proceeds in another cash alternative. One alternative is short-term U.S. Treasury bills which are backed by the full faith and credit of the federal government for the timely payment of principal and interest. These are debtbased investments; investors lend money to the U.S. government and are paid a specified rate of return. Another Investment Investors may elect to invest the proceeds in another type of investment. However, other investments that offer a higher yield generally carry more risk. So investors should consider the role CDs are playing in their portfolios and attempt to determine if adding additional risk would be appropriate, given their situation. When one of your CDs matures, you face a number of choices. Knowing your options can help you make a sound investment decision. Stacy Bush has practiced independent financial advising in the Valdosta area for 14 years. Growing up on a farm in Donalsonville, Georgia, he is keen to the financial needs of South Georgia and North Florida families. Stacy and his wife, Carla, live in Valdosta with their four children. You can submit questions about this article to askstacybush@lpl.com Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, member FINRA/SIPC. The opinion voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. Stacy Bush, President Bush Wealth Management Madison County High School FCCLA attends State ConferencePhoto SubmittedThe Madison County High School FCCLA chapter attended the annual state conference in Orlando on March 6-8. In the front row, pi ctured from left to right, are: Ashlyn Blount, MacKenzie Miller, Bianca Serrano, Tyler Burnett, Magan Jennings, Lizzie Frakes, Maddie Gurley and Shera Ber man. In the back row, pictured from left to right, are: Dylan King, Jacob Moore, Sarah Baltzell, Amelia Blanton and Victoria Todd. STORYSUBMITTED Kiwanis reads to Lee Elementary students Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo By Jessie R. Box, March 6, 2015Kiwanis member and Chamber of Commerce Executive Director, Lisa Frieman, reads a Dr. Seuss book to the 1stgrade students in Sarah Evans' and Susan Maultsby's classes at Lee Elementary School on Friday, March 6.

PAGE 9

$199 Move-In Special!! 1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-HC accessible apts. Rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-948-3056. TDD/TTY 711. 192 NW Greenville Pointe Trail, Greenville, FL 32331. Equal Housing Opportunityrtn, c ESTATE SALE HELP WANTED FOR SALE FOR SALE YARD SALE FOR RENT HELP WANTED Classifieds Work Classifieds Work$15 $15(for 20 words or less) Wednesday & Friday & on the website Wednesday & Friday & on the websiteCall 973-4141 Call 973-4141 LEGALS FLORIDA PRESS SERVICES, INC. STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED PROGRAMSTATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR 03/16/2015 THROUGH 03/22/2015 Pageant and Prom Dresses For Sale:Size 3 children's white long dress, worn as ßower girl dress, sequin/beadwork all on bodice, sequin/beadwork/ appliques on bottom, built-in crinoline. $50. Size 4 children's off white dress, worn as ßower girl dress, lace work around bodice, pretty lace work at bottom, cap sleeves $25. Size 7-8 children's off white dress, worn as a ßower girl dress, overlay of lace over entire dress, probably knee to calf length $25. Size 8 children's white, long dress, lace around neck with decorative bodice $25. Size 8 Teen Dress A fuchsia strapless gorgeous dress. The dress has gathers up the bodice and a sequined design down the left side and laces up half the back. There is also a train on this dress and a split up one leg. $200.Size 16 pre-teen size white long pageant gown, cap sleeves, white sequin work across entire bodice and sleeves $100. Size 10 Teen Dress A beautiful, elegant, ßowing emerald green dress. Has eye-catching beaded straps that criss cross in the back along with a beaded design in the front of the dress. Beautiful ßowing train. $200. Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is for a teen division approximately 13-15) GORGEOUS lime green dress, strapless but with spaghetti straps that criss cross across the back, sequins spotted across the entire gown, built-in crinoline absolutely gorgeous. $250.Call Emerald Parsons (850) 973-3497 Leave a message.1/9 rtn, n/c Madison Heights Apartments 1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts. Section 8 Housing designed for low income families 150 SW Bumgardner Dr. Madison, FL Phone 850-973-4290 TDD 711 Equal Housing Opportunity6/22, rtn, cBecome A CertiÞed Nursing Assistant Quest Training offers a nurse taught, 40 hour, CNA prep class. No GED required if age 18. Professional training site, high pass rates. 386-362-10653/4 4/29, pdNewspaper Bundles For Sale $1 each Greene Publishing, Inc. 1695 S. SR 53 in Madison (850) 973-4141.12/10 rtn, n/cFort Madison Self-Storage on 53 South has 5'x10', 10'x10' and 10'x20' units available. Call (850) 973-4004.12/24 rtn, n/c12'x18' building with 6' porch located on State Road 53 South. Ideal for a small or start-up business. Come see for yourself how it could work for you. (850) 973-4141.12/24 rtn, n/c Asphalt Milling, 18 tons, $350 load. Call Paul Kinsley at (850) 464-1230.12/10 rtn, n/c 1/4 Inch Coat Galvanized Steel Cable For Sale .15 cent a foot. We have as much as you need. (850) 464-3041.12/10 rtn, n/c CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALSSenior Citizen Center of Madison County Indoor Yard Sale Friday April 10th12 p.m. 5 p.m. and Saturday April 11th8 a.m. 4 p.m. Items include: Houseware, Clothing, designer purses, crafts, hotdogs/chips/drinks, bake goods, etc. Live musical entertainment. Booth rental prices are 1 day $12.50, both days $25. To reserve your table please call the Senior Center @ (850) 973-4241. All proceeds of the booth rental go to the Senior Citizens Center3/18-4/3, cPinetta Vol. Fire Dept. Annual Spring Community Yard Sale and Fried Chicken Dinner Saturday March 28 from 8 a.m.-3p.m.. At the Pinetta Community Center, 401 NE Empress Tree Ave. Pinetta, FL. We offer 2 (free) tables per vendor. To reserve your spot contact Sharon at (850)251-0999. Inside and outside spaces available!3/20, 3/25, 3/27, n/cNew Life Learning Centerfull time and part time positions. Must have 40 hours of DCF classes. Apply in person at 227 SW Allandale Trail, Madison. 973-1336 or 973-7336.3/11 4/3, pdOpenings at North Florida Community College, Madison FL: English Faculty Position , Math Faculty Position, Test Center Manager See www.nfcc.edufor details.3/11, 3/13, 3/18, 3/20, 3/25, 3/27, cNOW HIRING FIELD TECHNICIANS (Tallahassee, Perry and Madison) $1,000 hiring incentive First year Techs average $3545k your Þrst year! WE PROVIDE: • Fully stocked van • Handheld android tablet • Cell phone • Applicable tools necessary to perform quality work. You can begin your work route from home three days a week! APPLY TODAY AT:WWW.DRSCAREERS.COM3/11, 3/13, 3/18, 3/20, pdAdvent Christian Village Current JOBS Line Advertisement call 658-5627 or visit www.acvillage.net 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week Be your BEST, Among the BEST Speech Therapist … LTC & Outpatient PT opportunity for licensed speech / language pathologist to work in 161-bed skilled nursing facility and state of the art outpatient therapy center. Valid & unrestricted Florida license required. Prior experience preferred. Must be committed to personalized and compassionate care, and support and participate in multi-disciplinary approach to patient care. Onsite daycare and Þtness facilities available. Apply in person at Personnel OfÞce Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., or fax resume/credentials to (386) 658-5160. EOE / Drug-Free Workplace / Criminal background checks required.3/11, 3/13, 3/18, 3/20, c Huge Yard Sale Friday, Saturday, March 20, 21 from 8 a.m. until. 391 NE Cherry Lake Circle (850)-929-6965 Wrought Iron Benches, Porchswings, tools, small appliances, computer monitors, household/ofÞce items, jewelry, much more.3/18, 3/20, pd ESTATE SALE Friday March 20th9 a.m. Ð 6 p.m. Saturday March 21st9 a.m. Ð 3 p.m. 1218 NE Cherry Lake Circle Cherry Lake, Florida Bedroom sets, dining tables, china cabinet, Alabama Roll Tide collectibles, kitchen utensils, patio furniture, entertainment center, living room furniture, artwork, and much more. Visitwww.hickoryhillauctions.comfor pictures or call 850-228-5228 for more information.3/18, 3/20 pd. MIG Welders Needed Must have High School diploma or equivalent, the ability to read and understand CAD sketches, also able to read a tape measure to the 1/16th, and you will be required to pass an onsite weld test. You must have a minimum of two years welding experience or a graduate of a certiÞed welding program, must pass Weld CertiÞcation Test on-site. Previous employees may apply if longer than 3 years since employment with Big Top Mfg". There are only three (3) positions available. Applications accepted Monday thru Friday between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Please apply in person at Big Top Mfg. 3255 North Hwy 19. EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled3/18-3/27, cLead Field Technician Needed This position requires extensive travel including weekends, some holidays and at times overseas. We do require you to have a valid driver's license, pass a back ground check and drug screen, knowledge of tools & equipment, ability to lift 50lbs, interact with customers, two (2) years crew lead experience, basic computer skills, and have professional communication skills. We prefer you have a passport and construction knowledge. We have two (2) positions available. Applications accepted Monday thru Friday between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Please apply in person at Big Top Mfg starting on Wednesday 03/18/15 EEO/AA/m/f/vets/disabled3/18-3/27, c PUBLIC AUCTION Fred McGilvray, Inc. 3 Auctions scheduled! 03/25 11am & 04/07 10:30am at 8690 NW 58 St, Doral, Fl 33166 04/14 10am at 1421 Oglethorpe Rd, Palm Beach, Fl 33480 Lg. Qty. of Vehicles, trailers, plumbing supplies, Þre & sprinkler equipment/supplies, engineering/construction equipment, Lg. Qty. of power tools/hand tools, press breaks, welding equipment, torch equipment, forklifts, 20' & 44' containers, warehouse items, scrap metal/brass/copper, acetylene tanks & much more! 15%-18%BP Live/Online Assignment Case #2015004902-CAwww.moeckerauctions.com/ (800) 840-BIDS AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin Live Simulcast Bankruptcy Auction Case 13-10157, Hayes Iron & Metal, Inc. OfÞce Bldg., Metal Frame Bldgs, Workshop, Shop Equip., Tools, OfÞce Furnishings & Equip., Providence, NC. 3/26/15 at 10am. Auction at The Institute Conference Center Barkhouser Auditorium, Danville, VA. 800-9972248, NCAL3936/V AAL580. www .ironhorseauction.comBusiness Opportunities HIGH CASH PRODUCING Vending Machines .75 Vend = .65 ProÞt All on Location in Florida Selling due to illness Call 1-866-668-6629 for Details Employment DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for CONWAY TRUCKLOAD NO Experience Needed. Local CDL Training Apply Today! 1-800-7097364 Health & Medical Attention Viagra Users! VIAGRA 100mg, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. No Prescription Needed! Discreet Shipping. Call Now 1-800-224-0305 Help Wanted Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to QualiÞed drivers. Good home time. Call: 843-2663731 / www.bulldoghiway.com.EOE Are you ready to kick-start your new career? Now Interviewing Accredited Truck Driving School Graduates (With CDL-A) for our Entry Level Apprentice Program. Must have Good MVR, Work history and Criminal Background history. Call Chris Blackwell at 843-266-3731 to discuss pay and beneÞts. www.bulldoghiway.com EOE Miscellaneous AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, Boeing, Delta and othersstart here with hands on training for FAA certiÞcation. Financial aid if qualiÞed. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-5838 WELDING CAREERS Hands on training for career opportunities in aviation, automotive, manufacturing and more. Financial aid for qualiÞed students. Job placement assistance. CALL AIM 877206-4006 Connect instantly with sexy local singles! No paid operators, just real people like you. Try it FREE. 18+ Only. Call now: 1-800-9316473 Satellite TV DISH TV Packages for $19.99/mo & $14.95/mo for Internet + $25 Visa Gift Card (with activation). Call NOW and Save: 844-560-2654. Conditions apply. Advertise in 100+ top newspapers statewide. Add other sta tes to your buy without making another call. CONTACT Kevin Austin 321-283-5276 kaustin@reach”orida.com Reach Florida with a single phone call! REAC H FL O RIDAHello Get the coop Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!Žor Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE madison enterprise-recorder « Friday, MARCH 20, 2015 «9A Sparks Tractor Company is looking for an experienced diesel mechanic. Full-time position. Valid driver's license a must. Call, stop by, or email: (850) 973-3355; 1085 US Hwy 90, Madison Fl.;sparkstractor@gmail.com.3/20, c The City of Madison, FL seeks bids for the repair or replacement of a bar screen unit located in the headworks of the city's Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTF). To schedule an appointment to discuss and visit the WWTF, phone Assistant City Manager Juan Williams at (850) 973-5081. Bids are due March 27, 2015. Submit bids to the City of Madison, Attn: Wastewater Headworks, 321 SW Rutledge Street, Madison, FL 32340.3/20

PAGE 10

12A » Friday, March 20, 2015 » madison enterprise-recorder ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TITLE & LEMON LAW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES. 2014 RAM TRUCK SALES FIGURES PER FIAT CHRYSLER AUTOMOBILES YEAR END INFORMATION. MUST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADVERTISED PRICE. VEHICLES MAY BE LOCATED AT EITHER OF OUR QUITMAN OR VALDOSTA DEALERSHIPS. ALL PRICES GOOD THROUGH MARCH 21, 2015 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. MPG PER FACTORY WINDOW STICKER. VOTED BEST NEW TRUCK DEALER BY VALDOSTA DAILY TIMES READERS CONTESTŽ Everybody Knows Chevys Cost Less In Quitman! 39 MPG $7,000OFF 31 MPG 28 MPG 34 MPG 36 MPG 26 MPG 2015 SILVERADO 1500 CREW LT 4X4 Z71 C150087C150106 C150057 C140288 C150049 2015 CHEVY SONIC 2015 CHEVY CRUZE 2014 CHEVY CAMARO 2LT 2015 CHEVY EQUINOX 2014 CHEVY SPARKC140152 2015 SILVERADO 2500 CREW DURAMAX DIESEL 4X4 2015 CHEVY COLORADO 2015 SILVERADO 1500 4DR C1500832015 SILVERADO 1500 LT 4 DR 888-463-68314164 N. VALDOSTA RD. VALDOSTA, GA888-304-2277801 E. SCREVEN ST QUITMAN, GA 0% Example: Q140444 MSRP $20,135 -Disc. $1,743 -$2,000 Down = $16,392/72 @ $227/Month 2014 RAM 1500 2014 RAM 1500 4 DOOR BUSINESS OWNERS SAVE $500 MORE Q140481 2014 RAM BIG HORN 1500 4DR SLT V140544V140137 V140665 2014 RAM 2500 4 DOOR 4X4 HEAVY DUTY CUMMINS DIESEL Q140457FASTEST GROWING TRUCK IN AMERICA! 2015 DODGE JOURNEY 2014 JEEP CHEROKEE 2014 JEEP COMPASS Q150138 V150247V1500102015 DODGE DART 2015 JEEP PATRIOT ALL PRICES PLUS TAX, TITLE & LEMON LAW FEE OF $3 AND REFLECT ALL APPLICABLE FACTORY REBATES. 2015 COLORADO, MOTOR TREND TRUCK OF THE YEAR PER MOTOR TREND MAGAZINE. VEHICLES ARE LOCATED AT OUR QUITMAN DEALERSHIP. ALL PRICES GOOD THROUGH MARCH 21, 2015 OR UNTIL VEHICLE IS SOLD, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. MUST PRESENT AD AT TIME OF PURCHASE TO RECEIVE ANY OR ALL ADVERTISED PRICE. MPG PER FACTORY WINDOW STICKER. VOTED BEST NEW TRUCK DEALER BY VALDOSTA DAILY TIMES READERS CONTESTŽ229-263-7561 8640 HWY 84W CHEVROLET 2015 CHEVY IMPALA 2LTC150116 2015 SILVERADO 1500 CREW LTZ 4X4 Z71C150162 All New 2015 CHALLENGER HELLCAT Drive It LikeƒYou Stole It! BUSINESS OWNERS SAVE $500 MORE LOADED • Heated & Cooled Leather Seats, NAV, Spray-in Bedliner LED Lighted Cargo Box 20" Chrome Wheels All Terrain TiresC150021MSRP: $41,690 Disc. $8,702 LUXURY GROUP 5.7Liter Hemi, 20" Chrome Wheels Backup CameraALL STAR EDITION NAV, 18" All Terrain Tires, LED Lighting & Cargo Box2014 RAM 2500 PROMASTER CARGO VAN $1,000 Equipment Upfit AllowancePLUS 159" Wheelbase, 76" Hi Roof, 3 Litre Turbo Diesel, Loaded w/All Power Equipment including Backup Camera 2014 DODGE CHALLENGERQ140342 Q140187 2014 DODGE CHARGER SXT 2015 CHRYSLER 200 LTDV140677V150030V140314 28 MPG BUSINESS OWNERS SAVE $500 MORE BESTOF SOUTHGEORGIA2015 BEST NEW TRUCK DEALER 6TIMES BESTOF SOUTHGEORGIA2015 BEST NEW TRUCK DEALER 6TIMES BUSINESS OWNERS $200 UPFIT ALLOWANCE BUSINESS OWNERS $500 UPFIT ALLOWANCE MSRP: $44,995 Disc. $7,000 ALL NEW 2015 CHEVY TRAXAmerica's Trendiest Turbo-charged Small SUV Now In Stock, Come See!!! 34 MPG 35 MPG 39 MPG $5,000DISCOUNTMSRP: $34,850 Disc. $5,001 LOADED Sunroof, NAV • 20" Polished Aluminum Wheels, Hi B Headlights & Rear Spoiler 0% Example: C140282 MSRP $19,545 -Disc. $563 -$999 Down = $17,982/72 @ $249/Mth Financed for 84 mths. @ 3.24% w/$999 down. With Lender approval. Financed for 84 mths. @ 3.24% w/$999 down. With Lender approval. SUPPLIER PRICING ON ALL 2015 LT SILVERADO...SAVE THOUSANDS!909287C150152

PAGE 11

March 20, 2015Section B HEALTH WELLNESS AND GUIDE THEMADISONENTERPRISE-RECORDERS March is National Nutrition MonthSee Pages 7 & 8B

PAGE 12

www.ValdostaVeins.netValdosta, GeorgiaGreg Martin, MD, FACS In-Office Procedures Latest Laser Technology Insurance Accepted for Most ProceduresSouth Georgia Vein Center(229) 259-9666Its time to get ready for Spring...and prettier, more healthy legs. Lets face it...you deserve it! Like you! Our revolutionary varicose and spider vein removal technology is the healthy choice for active adults. We can help your legs look younger and prettier and feel better now...just in time for Spring! Plus, you can resume your active lifestyle right away...theres no hospitalization. Dont wait call now to learn how safe, affordableand pain-free pretty legs can be. Theres no better time than right now! Oh...I just love being pampered! 2B Madison Enterprise-Recorder | March 20, 2015

PAGE 13

Great Strides is the Cystic Fibrosis Foundations largest national fundraising event. More than 125,000 people participate in hundreds of walks across the country to raise funds for cystic “brosis (CF) research and drug development each year. On April 11, there will be a Great Strides 5K in Tallahassee at Maclay Gardens State Park. Check-in will begin at 8 a.m. and the walk will begin at 9 a.m. Walk day is a fun, family-oriented event with a healthy 5k walk, childrens activities, food and festivities. Registration for the event is free. Everyone is encouraged to fundraise and each walker who raises $100 will get a T-shirt on walk day. All funds raised will go to the CF Foundations research efforts to develop new CF drugs and therapies. CF is a life-threatening genetic disease that primarily affects the lungs and digestive system. An estimated 30,000 children and adults in the United States (70,000 worldwide) have CF. A defective gene and its protein product cause the body to produce unusually thick, sticky mucus that clogs the lungs and leads to life-threatening lung infections. CF also obstructs the pancreas and stops natural enzymes from helping the body break down food and absorb vital nutrients. Come out on April 11 and walk in Great Strides to help add tomorrows to the lives of those living with cystic “brosis. To join, form a group or for more information, visit cff.org.JESSIER. BOXGreene Publishing, Inc. Health & Wellness Guide 3B Walk in Great Strides for more tomorrows MCMH Auxiliary seeks volunteers The Madison County Memorial Hospital Auxiliary is seeking more volunteers. The Auxiliary, or as they are often referred to as The Pink Ladies,Ž for the pink jackets they wear, volunteer their time to the hospital and help out at the lobby desk and the outpatient lobby. While at the desk, they help direct people to the area in the hospital they need or what room a patient is in. According to Auxiliary President Frances Mercer, the volunteers are mostly volunteering from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. but different hours are available to better suit your schedule. To volunteer you must be at least 18 years of age and pay $10 dues to the Madison County Memorial Hospital Auxiliary. If you would like to become a volunteer, you may call Mercer at (850) 971-5480 or attend their monthly meeting on the fourth Wednesday of the month at 10 a.m. at Madison County Memorial Hospital. The next meeting is Wednesday, March 25.JESSIER. BOXGreene Publishing, Inc.

PAGE 14

4B Madison Enterprise-Recorder | March 20, 2015 Health And Fitness Calendar If you have an event or class you would like to include in the monthly Health And Fitness Calendar, call Jessie at (850) 973-4141 or email jessie@greenepublishing.com. Mondays The Madison County Senior Center offers Tai Chi classes, every Monday, starting at 10:30 a.m. Tai Chi is a low impact exercise that improves strength, reduces pain and stiffness, and can help reduce falls by building better balance. The center is located at 1162 SW Harvey Greene Drive, in Madison. For more information, call (850) 973-4241. Monday, March 23 Madison County E.M.S. and SSTRIDE has teamed up to offer free Hands-OnlyŽ CPR training to community members. The class will be Monday, March 23 from 3:45-6 p.m., at the Madison County High School library. This is open to 9thgraders to adults. Those who are interested in attending one of the nine available classes must register. For more information or register for Hands-OnlyŽ CPR training, please contact Selena Phillips at (850) 464-2667, texts welcomed, or madisonsstride@hotmail.com . Thursday, March 26 Madison County E.M.S. and SSTRIDE has teamed up to offer free Hands-OnlyŽ CPR training to community members. The class will be Thursday, March 26 from 5:30-8 p.m., at North Florida Community College. This is open to 6thgraders to adults. Those who are interested in attending one of the nine available classes must register. For more information or register for Hands-OnlyŽ CPR training, please contact Selena Phillips at (850) 464-2667, texts welcomed, or madisonsstride@hotmail.com. Tuesday, April 7 Madison County E.M.S. and SSTRIDE has teamed up to offer free Hands-OnlyŽ CPR training to community members. The class will be Tuesday, April 7 from 5:30-8 p.m., at North Florida Community College. This is open to 6thgraders to adults. Those who are interested in attending one of the nine available classes must register. For more information or register for Hands-OnlyŽ CPR training, please contact Selena Phillips at (850) 464-2667, texts welcomed, or madisonsstride@hotmail.com. Saturday, April 11 Great Strides 5K will begin at 8 a.m., in Tallahassee at Maclay Gardens State Park. This 5K is a fundraiser for Cystic Fibrosis research. Check-in begins at 8 a.m.; the walk begins at 9 a.m. In addition to the 5K, there will be childrens activities, food and festivities. To go solo, form a group or for more information, visit cff.org . Monday, April 20 Madison County E.M.S. and SSTRIDE has teamed up to offer free Hands-OnlyŽ CPR training to community members. The class will be on Monday, April 20 from 3:45-6 p.m., at James Madison Preparatory High School Auditorium. This is open to 6thgraders to adults. Those who are interested in attending one of the nine available classes must register. For more information or register for Hands-OnlyŽ CPR training, please contact Selena Phillips at (850) 464-2667, texts welcomed, or madisonsstride@hotmail.com . Wednesday, April 29 Madison County E.M.S. and SSTRIDE has teamed up to offer free Hands-OnlyŽ CPR training to community members. The class will be Wednesday April 29 from 1-4:30 p.m., at Madison County Central School gym. This is open to students 6th-12thgrade. Those who are interested in attending one of the nine available classes must register. For more information or register for "Hands-Only" CPR training, please contact Selena Phillips at (850) 464-2667, texts welcomed, or madisonsstride@hotmail.com.

PAGE 15

Health & Wellness Guide 5B More than 50 years after the creation of the modern hospice movement by Dame Cicely Saunders, hospice care continues to be a mystery to most Americans. The word hospice is often whispered over the bedside of the terminally ill, or discussed out of ear shot by concerned and stressed family members. The question is why? Once family members experience hospice care, the most frequent comment and feedback received by hospice organizations is, I wish we knew about hospice sooner.Ž Hospice care does not have to be a mystery anymore; in fact according to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) an estimated 1.6 million patients receive service from hospice each year. So what exactly is hospice care? Considered the model for quality compassionate care for people facing a life-limiting illness, hospice provides expert medical care, pain management, and emotional and spiritual support expressly tailored to the patients needs and wishes. Support is provided to the patients loved ones as well. Hospice focuses on caring, not curing. In most cases, care is provided in the patients home but may also be provided in freestanding hospice centers, hospitals, nursing homes and other long-term care facilities. Hospice services are available to patients with any terminal illness or of any age, religion or race. Top Seven Bene“ts of Hospice Care 1. Hospice care is a Medicare bene“t … Most hospice services are covered by Medicare, Medicaid and many insurance companies. Families may even choose to pay privately. However, most hospice providers will never turn away patients based on an inability to pay. 2. 24/7 availability … Hospice care provides families access to an on-call nurse, which can provide peace of mind and reduce stress. 3. Medical equipment … All medical equipment and supplies related to the hospice diagnosis are covered by hospice and will even be delivered. 4. Prescriptions … Under hospice care, all medications related to the hospice diagnosis are covered under the Medicare Bene“t. 5. Hospice Aide … Patients receive this valuable service, which includes assisting with personal care, such as bathing and dressing. 6. Volunteers … A hospice volunteer can provide respite care to family caregivers, which allows them to focus on other important issues, like becoming a loved one again. 7. Emotional support … The hospice team can provide emotional support and education, which is often one of the greatest bene“ts of hospice care. Caring for a loved one can be stressful, interfere with work and personal relationships, and can even take its toll on the physical health and well-being of the caregiver. If you feel like youre struggling to care for a loved one, hospice care may very well be the answer. Still confused? Call Covenant Hospice of Tallahassee today at (850) 575-4998 and a dedicated healthcare professional will guide you through your options. Hospice care does not need to remain a mystery … you owe it to yourself to uncover the many bene“ts. Why is Hospice still a mystery?STORYSUBMITTEDBYBlythe Newsome

PAGE 16

Story Taken From https://ufhealth.org/news A common booster vaccine could improve the effect of a vaccine aimed at treating a type of brain tumor, leading to improvement in patient survival, according to research published on March 11 in the journal Nature. Vaccine therapies have been increasingly used to treat different types of cancer, including glioblastoma. In glioblastoma „ the most common and most lethal form of brain tumor „ the team, which included researchers from Duke Cancer Institute and University of Florida Health, targeted a common virus called cytomegalovirus. The virus is present in glioblastoma tumors, but not in surrounding brain tissue. To target the tumors, the team pulled immune cells called dendritic cells from patients with glioblastoma, loaded them with a protein produced by the virus that would trigger the immune system to combat the virus, and injected them back into the patients. Dendritic cells are the master activatorsŽ of the immune system, said Duane A. Mitchell, M.D., Ph.D., co-lead author of the paper and member of the UF Health Cancer Center. Dendritic cells alert T cells and other immune cells to the presence of a pathogen or tumor cell. But getting these dendritic cells to migrate to the lymph nodes where they can activate the immune system was proving difficult. To increase the number of dendritic cells that reach the lymph nodes and spread throughout the body, the researchers primed the immune system with the common tetanus/diphtheria toxoid booster vaccine. We saw a twoto threefold increase in dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes in the group that received a booster shot,Ž said Mitchell, also director of the UF brain tumor immunotherapy program. The survival in patients who received the vaccine and booster also was significantly longer than those receiving the vaccine alone.Ž The trial included 12 patients, half who were randomly assigned to receive the tetanus/diphtheria toxoid booster vaccine and half who received a different vaccine preparation. The researchers did not know which treatment patients received. Three of the six patients who received the tetanus booster with their dendritic cell vaccine were alive at the time of analysis, with survival times from their diagnoses ranging between 57 and 106 months „ including one patient whose tumor shows no sign of progression and who is still living eight years after treatment. Patients with glioblastoma usually survive for little more than one year. However, in patients who got the immunotherapy with tetanus, three of the six patients lived nearly five years or longer, so the findings are promising and significant,Ž said senior author John Sampson, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the division of neurosurgery at Duke University Medical Center. This one-two punch vaccine technique may also be applicable to other types of cancer as well as immunotherapies for other types of diseases, Mitchell said. This is an approach that should be applicable to other cancer vaccines and potentially even vaccines targeted at chronic infectious diseases,Ž Mitchell said. Using the immune system to attack cancers has always had an appeal because the immune system is very specific and can target tumor cells without targeting normal tissues. Traditionally, it has also been well-tolerated by patients with very little side effects.Ž The researchers think that activating the immune systems recall response „ or its ability to recognize and respond to something it has encountered before, such as tetanus „ helped it also recognize the new tumor vaccine. Weve known for some time that when we inject these cells, typically less than one to five percent of dendritic cells actually make it to their target,Ž said Mitchell, also the endowed cancer research chair at the Evelyn F. and William L. McKnight Brain Institute of the University of Florida. In this trial, we were able to enhance the ability of these cells to make it to the lymph nodes.Ž After the small trial, the researchers went back to the laboratory to analyze their results in animal models. In the animal studies, they confirmed the ability to increase the number of dendritic cells that reached the lymph nodes as well as to dramatically increase suppression of tumor growth. The researchers discovered a new role for an immune signaling protein called CCL3, which had not yet been associated with ushering dendritic cells to the lymph nodes. The protein also was found to work systemically, not just at the injection site, according to Duke researchers. While dendritic cell vaccines have shown some promise in the treatment of patients with advanced cancers, including glioblastoma, the dynamics of this process have not been well-understood,Ž Sampson said. Our work identifies an immunologic interaction whereby recall responses to one antigen „ tetanus „ can influence the migratory capacity of dendritic cells loaded with different antigens „ cytomegalovirus.Ž Now, the researchers are working to confirm their results in a larger clinical trial. Funding support for the study includes grants P50CA108786, P50-NS20023 and R01-NS067037 from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, or NINDS, and grants R01-CA134844, R01-CA177476-01, R01-CA134844 and P01CA154291-01A1 from the National Cancer Institute. NINDS and the National Cancer Institute are units of the National Institutes of Health. Additional support came from the American Brain Tumor Association, the Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation, the National Brain Tumor Society, the Kinetics Foundation and Accelerate Brain Cancer Cure. 6B Madison Enterprise-Recorder | March 20, 2015 A one-two vaccine punch could leave brain tumors vulnerable to the immune system

PAGE 17

Story Taken From http://www.eatrightpro.org/ Make physical activity a part of your daily routine as you "Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle" during National Nutrition Month®. Each March and throughout the year, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages everyone to return to the basics of healthy eating by adopting a healthy lifestyle focused on consuming fewer calories, making informed food choices and getting daily exercise. The goal is to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, reduce the risk of chronic disease and promote overall health. "Daily physical activity is a crucial part of everyone's healthy lifestyle, but unfortunately most of us dont include enough movement in our daily routines," says registered dietitian nutritionist and Academy Spokesperson Jennifer McDaniel. "Regular physical activity strengthens bones and muscles, reduces the risk of chronic illness and fosters overall well-being." Regular Physical Activity is a Must Most health benefits come from at least 150 minutes a week of moderately intense physical activity, with added advantages from increased exercise and intensity. Endurance and muscle-strengthening activities like lifting weights, working with a resistance band or doing pushups are also beneficial. "A physically active lifestyle offers you many rewards, from a slimmer body to a healthy heart," says McDaniel, who is also a board certified sports dietitian. "And these physical benefits are only the beginning. Additional advantages include stress relief, better sleep and even a more positive mental outlook." Everyday Ways to get Moving Physical activity is important for everyone at every age. "The key is to find activities that are both sustainable and enjoyable. For some, this may mean a light yoga class, while for others it may mean training for a marathon. Bottom line: Find manageable ways to move more," McDaniel says. McDaniel offers ways to get moving: Use the buddy system: Join a walking group or attend fitness classes. Participate in social and competitive sports like soccer or flag football. Plan a hiking or canoeing trip instead of a beach vacation. Sign up for a 5k run/walk with friends or family. Sneak in exercise at your desk like leg lifts and calf raises … or even buy a desk that allows you to stand while working. Take a 15-minute walk on your lunch break (or walk up and down the stairs when weathers bad). Find an activity monitor to assess movement through the day … gadgets are very motivating for some! Food is Vital for Energy To maintain a physically active and healthy lifestyle, stay nourished before, during and after exercise. "Before exercise, look for foods high in carbohydrates, adequate in protein and moderate in fat and fiber, like oatmeal with bananas, almonds and fat-free milk," McDaniel says. Health & Wellness Guide 7B 'Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle' during National Nutrition Month® by including physical activity in your daily routine

PAGE 18

8B Madison Enterprise-Recorder | March 20, 2015 Madison Life Spring Clinic New Hours: 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday Friday 9 a.m. 12 p.m. Walk-ins accepted.Accepting New Patients We Do DOT Physicals (850) 973-9980Quality Healthcare Where Patients Come First Dr. Filemon PatacxilHarvey Greene PA-C National Nutrition Month healthy recipe: Jamaican barbecued pork tenderloinIngredients2 teaspoons “rmly € packed brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground all€ spice 1 teaspoon ground cin€ namon 1/2 teaspoon ground € ginger 1/2 teaspoon onion € powder 1/2 teaspoon garlic € powder 1/4 teaspoon cayenne € pepper 1/8 teaspoon ground € cloves 3/4 teaspoon salt € 1/2 teaspoon freshly € ground black pepper 1 pork tenderloin, about € 1 pound, trimmed of visible fat 2 teaspoons white vine€ gar 1 1/2 teaspoons dark € honey 1 teaspoon tomato paste €DirectionsIn a small bowl, combine the brown sugar, allspice, cinnamon, ginger, onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne pepper, cloves, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and the black pepper. Rub the spice mixture over the pork and let stand for 15 minutes. In another small bowl, combine the vinegar, honey, tomato paste and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt. Whisk to blend. Set aside. Prepare a hot “re in a charcoal grill or heat a gas grill or broiler (grill) to medium-high or 400 F. Away from the heat source, lightly coat the grill rack or broiler pan with cooking spray. Position the cooking rack 4 to 6 inches from the heat source. Place the pork on the grill rack or broiler pan. Grill or broil at medium-high heat, turning several times, until browned on all sides, 3 to 4 minutes total. Remove to a cooler part of the grill or reduce the heat and continue cooking for 14 to 16 minutes. Baste with the vinegar-honey glaze and continue cooking until the pork is slightly pink inside and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part reads 160 F, 3 to 4 minutes longer. Transfer to a cutting board and let cool for 5 minutes before slicing. To serve, slice the pork tenderloin crosswise into 16 pieces and arrange on a warmed serving platter, or divide the slices among individual plates. (Serves 4)

PAGE 19

Health & Wellness Guide 9B Story Taken From https://ufhealth.org/news The mechanism that causes high-performance athletes to feel the burnŽ turns out to be the culprit in what makes people with chronic fatigue syndrome feel exhausted by the most common daily activities, new University of Florida Health research shows. Published in the February issue of the journal Pain, the study shows that the neural pathways that transmit feelings of fatigue to the brain might be to blame. In those with chronic fatigue syndrome, the pathways do their job too well. The “ndings also provide evidence for the “rst time that peripheral tissues such as muscles contribute to feelings of fatigue. Determining the origins of fatigue could help researchers develop therapies or identify targets for those therapies. Researchers focused on the role of muscle metabolites, including lactic acid and adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, in the disease. The study has demonstrated for the “rst time that these substances, released when a person exercises his or her muscles, seem to activate these neural pathways. Also, UF Health researchers have shown that these pathways seem to be much more sensitive in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome than in patients without the disease, something that hasnt been studied before. Chronic fatigue syndrome, which the Institute of Medicine recently renamed systemic exertion intolerance disease, or SEID, is characterized by extreme chronic fatigue. Because its chief symptom „ fatigue „ is often associated with many other diseases, it can be dif“cult to diagnose SEID for the more than 1 million people who actually have the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disease has no root medical cause, and researchers dont know what triggers it. But they are studying aspects of the disease to “gure out ways to treat it. What we have shown now, that has never been shown before in humans, is that muscle metabolites can induce fatigue in healthy people as well as patients who already have fatigue,Ž said Roland Staud, M.D., a professor of rheumatology and clinical immunology in the UF College of Medicine and the papers lead author. During exercise, muscles produce metabolites, which are sensed by metaboreceptors that transmit information via fatigue pathways to the brain, according to the researchers. But in patients with SEID, these fatigue pathways have become highly sensitive to metabolites and can trigger excessive feelings of fatigue. For most of us, at the end of strenuous exertion we feel exhausted and need to stop „ but we will recover rapidly,Ž Staud said. However, these individuals tire much more rapidly and sometimes just after moving across a room, they are fully exhausted. This takes a toll on their lives.Ž Staud and co-author Michael E. Robinson, Ph.D., a professor in the department of clinical and health psychology in the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions, recruited a group of 39 patients with SEID and 29 participants without the disease. The researchers asked the participants to don a blood pressure cuff just above their elbows on their dominant side, pick up a springloaded device and squeeze it to 100 percent of their maximum capacity, which was measured by a dial. With research assistants encouraging them, the study participants then squeezed the device so that the dial showed they were gripping at 50 percent of their maximum capacity for as long as they could. At the end of the handgrip exercise, the blood pressure cuff on the participants arm was in”ated, almost instantly trapping the metabolites generated by the exercise within the forearm muscles. This allowed the metabolites to collect in the forearm tissue without being cleared by the circulatory system. There, the metabolites continued to activate fatigue pathways, sending messages of fatigue to the brain and allowing researchers to measure how much fatigue and pain may occur because of the trapped metabolites. With the blood pressure cuff still in”ated, the participants rated fatigue and then pain in their forearms every 30 seconds. Both patients with SEID and patients without the disease reported increasing fatigue, but patients with the disease recorded much higher levels of fatigue and pain. We found that the fatigued individuals reported more fatigue than the non-fatigued individuals during the exercise, and also found that they had more pain compared to the nonfatigued individuals,Ž Staud said. On the Fatigue Visual Analog Scale used to measure participants fatigue, patients with SEID rated their fatigue at approximately 5.5 on a scale of 0 to 10 after the hand-grip exercise while wearing the inflated blood pressure cuff, whereas participants without the disease rated their fatigue at approximately 1.5. After 30 minutes, the participants repeated the exercise, but with the opposite arm and without the cinching blood pressure cuff so the metabolites could be cleared from the arm. Both sets of participants experienced fatigue, but the feeling of fatigue in those with the disease was much lower than when the metabolites were trapped with the blood pressure cuff. This suggests that hypersensitive fatigue pathways play an important role for the often pronounced exerciserelated fatigue of patients with the disease,Ž Staud said. Next, Staud plans to explore treatment interventions and to conduct brain-imaging studies of patients with SEID. The take-home message here is, like many of the pain studies we have conducted, there are both peripheral and central nervous system factors at play in these complex syndromes,Ž said Robinson, who is also the director of the UF Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Health. Our study seems to highlight the important role of these peripheral tissues.Ž UF Health researchers establish why exercise can worsen exhaustion of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

PAGE 20

According to the 2013-2014 Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Annual Report released by EFORCSE, the ElectronicFlorida Online Reporting of Controlled Substances Evaluation, there has been a decline in prescription drug abuse in Florida. The report largely contributes the decrease to the increase in utilization and registration of the EFORCSE Prescription Drug Monitoring System. According to the Florida Health Department, EFORCSE was created by the 2009 Florida Legislature in an initiative to encourage safer prescribing of controlled substances and to reduce drug abuse and diversion within the state of Florida.Ž Section 893.055 of the Florida Statutes, requires health care practitioners to report to the PDMP each time a controlled substance is dispensed to an individual. This, in turn, reduces what is commonly referred to as doctor shopping,Ž otherwise known as multiple provider episodes (MPE). According to the report, a multiple provider episode is defined as the use of five or more prescribers with five or more pharmacies within three months. According to the 2013-2014 report, there has been a 53 percent decrease in the number of individuals who participate in doctor shopping. The more health care providers and pharmacies utilize the drug monitoring system, the easier it is to identify doctor shopping and put an end to prescription drug abuse. While the monitoring system is efficient in identifying these multiple provider episodes, it also provides valuable statistics. The 2013-2014 annual report released by EFORCSE shows a numerical decline in prescription drug rates. For instance, there has been a 20.1 percent reduction in morphine milligram equivalents per patient (MMEs) prescribed between October 2011 and December 2013. The EFORCSE annual report asserts: Morphine is widely regarded as the gold standard for the 10B Madison Enterprise-Recorder | March 20, 2015 Florida sees decline in prescription drug abuse; Madison among lowest prescription rates See Drug Abuse On Page 11BSAVANNAHREAMSGreene Publishing, Inc.

PAGE 21

treatment and management of moderate to severe pain and, therefore, is used as the reference point for other opioids. Studies have shown that opioid usage for more than three months can lead to tolerance and dependence resulting in higher dosages being prescribed to the patient.Ž Commonly prescribed opioids include Vicodin, Percocet, Oxycontin, Dilaudid and Hydromet. The report goes on to say, As dosage increases, the likelihood of an adverse reaction increases. Evidence suggests that a patient receiving more than 100 mg of MMEs is nine times more likely to overdose, with 12 percent resulting in death.Ž Moreover, the recent decline in opioid prescriptions has likely made an impact on the decrease in overdose-related deaths. The EFORCSE report refers to the drugs identified in deceased persons by the Florida Medical Examiners 2013 Annual Report, which reveals an 8.3 percent decrease in the number of deaths where one or more controlled substance prescriptions was identified as the predominant cause of death, while oxycodone deaths fell by 27.3 percent and overall drug deaths diminished by 7.3 percent when compared with 2012. The recent decline in prescription drug abuse has certainly made a positive impact on the state of Florida and, thus, in Madison County. According to Figure 6, a chart measuring the prescription rate per 1,000 Florida county residents for sedatives, stimulants, tranquilizers and pain relievers in the current reporting period, Madison County is in the lowest percentile in all drug categories. The Florida Health Department asserts, the 2013-2014 PDMP Annual Report was prepared in collaboration with the University of Florida, College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine and the Department of Health Outcomes and Policy. The PDMP has contracted with UF through its 2013 Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Data-Driven Multi-Disciplinary Approaches to Reducing Rx Abuse Grant award 2013-PM-BX-0010. Through this collaboration, the PDMP has focused on measures that best demonstrate the impact of the PDMP on the prescription drug abuse epidemic in Florida. Today, there are over 125 million controlled substance prescription dispensing records maintained in the database. In the first three years of operation, physicians and dispensers made more than 10.6 million requests to view their specific patients controlled substance dispensing history. Law enforcement has requested and received more than 43,000 investigative reports from program staff to assist in active criminal investigations involving controlled substances.Ž Health & Wellness Guide 11B Drug AbuseContinued from page 10B PrintTabletSmartphoneComputer +++ Subscribe Now! (850) 973-4141

PAGE 22

12B Madison Enterprise-Recorder | March 20, 2015


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EUZTFV320_HZN41T INGEST_TIME 2015-04-20T20:56:19Z PACKAGE UF00028405_00678
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES