Citation
The Madison enterprise-recorder

Material Information

Title:
The Madison enterprise-recorder
Alternate title:
Madison enterprise recorder
Alternate Title:
Enterprise-recorder
Creator:
Madison enterprise-recorder
Place of Publication:
Madison, Fla.
Madison, Fla
Publisher:
T.C. Merchant
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Weekly
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Madison (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Madison County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Madison -- Madison

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 32, no. 43 (June 23, 1933)-
General Note:
Issued a "Woman's Club edition" on Mar. 31, 1979.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Greene Publishing, Inc., Emerald Greene - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
33284795 ( OCLC )
sn 95047180 ( LCCN )

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Preceded by:
Enterprise-recorder

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Full Text
1:Layout 1 10/14/10 11:12 AM Page 1


www.greenepublishing.com
b ,ww.greanepublishing.com
I ,I absi01on , 1 �,1865


nterpnse ecorper


Our 146th Year, Number 7


Friday, October 15, 2010


Madison, Florida


46f- +-F4f- Tax=5O40







www greenepublishing.com


ADay In Lee


Page 10


Halloween

Contest
Winners


Page 18

Mayhem
Drive
At NFCC


Page 5

Dry

Conditions

May Spark

Wildfires
At the Madison Forestry Sta-
tion, Elijah Terrill is the Forest
Area Supervisor charged with
watching over conditions that may
spark wildfires. The station is locat-
ed at 2229 S. State Road 53 in Madi-
son.
"We're in a transition," said
Terrill, whose family hails from
Madison and Jefferson Counties.
"It's not bad yet, but it's getting
there if we continue to go another
month or two without rain." He said
that heavy rains the week of Sept.
27 helped, although the area is dry-
ing out again.
On Oct. 11, the National Ocean-
ic and Atmospheric Administra-
tion's National Weather Service
listed Madison with a red flag warn-
ing, which means that critical fire
weather conditions are either oc-
curring now, or will shortly. A com-
bination of strong winds, low
Please see Wildfires, Page 3


Danny

Plain

Continues

To

Recover

From

Burn

Wounds
By Jacob
Bembry
Greene
Publishing,
Inc.
Danny
Plain con-
tinues to re-
cover from
burns re-
ceived
w h i 1 e Danny Plain
burning
stumps and wood during a con-
trolled burn on Monday morn-
ing, Oct. 11.
Family members said that
Plain had undergone skin
grafts on his arms and shoul-
der on Wednesday. The doctors
were able to graft pigskin on
Please see Danny Plain,
Page 3


The City of Madi-
son Fire Department
will soon reach new
heights thanks to a
$387,000 USDA Rural
Development Econom-
ic Impact Initiative
Grant.
Today, during a
ceremony that coin-
cides with National
Fire Prevention Week
Oct. 3-9, USDA Rural
Development officials
presented Madison city
leaders with a check to
help purchase a 75-foot
aerial ladder truck to
provide fire protection
for the city's 350 multi-
storied buildings, resi-


ureene rulmisning, inc. nPio oy iristIn r-inney, ucitoer I, 2uiu
Skip James, left, and Fire Chief Alfred Martin, right, show off
the USDA check for the new fire truck.


dential homes, local
schools, and community college.
Other funds leveraged toward the
ladder truck's $568,493 purchase
price include $67,500, Madison
County Board of Commissioners;
$67,500, Madison City Commission-
ers; $27,500, District Board of
Trustees of North Florida Commu-
nity College; and $18,993, City of
Please see USDA Grant, Page 3


Fall Fest Carnival

And Midway

In Madison

This Weekend


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Marianne Graves, October 14, 2010


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
A Fall Fest, featuring mod-
ern midways and a complete car-
nival, will be taking place in
Madison, through Sunday. The
attractions will be at Lanier
Field.
The carnival begins Thurs-
day from 6-10 p.m. Friday's fun


will last from 6-10 p.m. Satur-
day's fun will last from 2-11 p.m.
and Sunday's carnival will last
from 2-10 p.m.
A special four-day unlimited
ride ticket is available for $45
and 14 ticket ride coupons are
available for $15 a pack.
The event is sponsored by
Please see Fall Fest, Page 3


Hickory Grove
Founder s Pay
get For Saturday


Hickory Grove
Founder's Day set for
this Saturday at
Hickory Grove Unit-
ed Methodist


Church. The event
begins early Satur-
day morning and
lasts through Satur-
day afternoon.


Madison Man

Arrested For

Drug And Firearm

Possession
A Madison man was arrest-
ed for drug possession and pos-
session of a firearm during the
commission of a felony last -
Saturday. ,.
According to a Madison Po-
lice Department report, on Oc-
tober 9 at 8:10 p.m., Ptl. Eric i
Gilbert conducted a traffic stop
on a blue Jeep for a traffic vio-
lation. Joshua M. Reams
Upon making contact with the driver, Joshua
M. Reams, Gilbert observed that Reams was sweat-
ing, shaking profusely and his pupils were con-
stricted.
Gilbert asked Reams for his driver's license
and step out of the car. When Reams exited the ve-
hicle, he threw a small plastic bag into the vehicle.
At this time, Gilbert called for assistance from an-
other officer.
Upon the arrival of Ptl. Anthony Land, Gilbert
Please see Man Arrested, Page 3


Presents For Pets Charity

Auction Slated For Saturday


By Kristin Finney
Greene Publishing, Inc.
On Saturday, Oct. 16, all are invited to attend the inau-
gural Presents for Pets Charity Auction at Hickory Hill Auc-
tions. This event is being held by The Country Store and
Hickory Hill Auctions and will benefit the Suwannee Val-
ley Human Society and Goliath and BeBe's World.
Suwannee Valley Human Society qnd Go.
liath and BeBe's World are both lo:.-il
no-kill pet shelters.
The Presents for Pets Charity
Auction will begin at 10 a.m.
with a preview beginning at 9
a.m. There will be a breakfast of
biscuits and gravy supplied by
Mark Mickle. There will also be
Johnson's Donuts from Perry and
the 4-H will be serving popcorn.
Baked goods will also be available
at the auction.
In charge of the event are, Jen-
nifer and Barbara Funk, Shanna
Mugge and Dolly Fuls. There will be se.


eral door prizes and raffles.
There will also be drawings for the following packages.
Three-Day Getaway Package for Four:
This includes a three day, two night stay at Holiday Inn,
St. Augustine Beach, Old Town Trolley Tour for four, Fami-
ly pass for four to St. Augustine's Alligator Farm
and Zoological Park, Gift certificate for four on
St. Augustine's Scenic Cruise Boat, and four
tickets to The Oldest House Museum. A
- $527.00 value
SSt. Augustine's Historic Museum
ST:ulr Package for Four:
This includes tickets for four to the
Briaind New Pirate and Treasure Muse-
um, tickets for four to The Oldest
House Museum and a gift certifi-
- cate for four to Villa Zorayda Mu-
seum. A $120.00 value
Christmas Tour & More
f jPackage for Four:
This includes four Holly Jolly
Trolley Tour tickets, four combo tickets
Please see Pet Auction, Page 3


IInde Loal eater'


1 Section. 18 Pages
Around Madison 4-9 Halloween Contest 18
Legals 17 Forest Festival 8-9
Classifieds 18 Day In Lee 10
Viewpoints & Opinions 2-3 Turn Back Time 14


Wed 88/60 Thu Fri 80/50 Sat 82/50
1/14 87/50 - 1 0/15 - 10 /16 82/50
Sun and a few passing clouds. nny h n tho and
High 88F. Winds W at 5 to 10 Mostly sunny. Highs in the upper Sunny. Highs in the low 80s and Mainly sunny. Highs in the low 80s
mph. 80s and lows in the low 50s. lows in the low 50s. and lows in the low 50s.


USDA Grant To Enhance

Fire Protection For

City Of Madison
Rural Development Official Presents Check to City
During National Fire Prevention Week


I




2:Layout 1 10/14/10 11:37 AM Page 1


2 Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



OiCtopoints & Opinions


Friday, October 15, 2010


Jacob's
Ladder
Jacob Bembry
Collunnist
r ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ _


Making


The Beggs


BoVs Crv
Brendan Behan, an Irish author and playwright,
is credited with saying, "There's no such thing as
bad publicity except your own obituary" While that
may emit a little chuckle from most of us, I really
don't want my obituary to be bad publicity
I believe that one should live his or her life that
when they die, that even the boys over at Beggs Fu-
neral Home will shed tears. I want to live my life like
that, but I know that there are times when I mess up
and make mistakes and, sometimes, the mistakes
are not even mistakes. When that happens, it is
called sin. Vernelle Allen, who teaches Bible study
at the church I attend, and to inmates in the Suwan-
nee and Madison County Jails often says, the letters
S-I-N are an acronym for "standing in need."
Over my life, I have received my share of pub-
licity I have been lauded by others and given acco-
lades. I have also been booed and hissed. No matter
the cheers or jeers that I receive on this earth, they
will vanish away like the morning fog when I go to
Heaven.
The Bible tells us that a good name is be chosen
above precious jewels and I want to live my life so
that my name will be respected. You cannot please
everyone, however, and, sometimes, people will even
lie about you. Jesus was lied about, He was reviled,
yet the Bible tells us, that He did not revile His ene-
mies.
When you get knocked to the ground, get up and
shake the dirt off you, and go back to trying to make
the Beggs boys cry when you die.


Florida Press Assoc

2010
Award Winning Newspaper

the fMlaison
Enterprise-Recortlervt
P.O. Box 772 * Madison, FL 32341 4^o-
1695 South SR 53 * Madison, FL 32340
(850) 973-4141 * Fax: (850) 973-4121
greenepub@greenepublishing.com
www.greenepublishing.com


Publisher
Emerald Greene
Editor
Jacob Bembry
Production Manager
Heather Bowen
Staff Writers
Kristin Finney and
Marianne Graves
Graphic Designers
Stephen Bochnia
and Dee Hall
Advertising Sales
Representatives
Mary Ellen Greene,
Dorothy McKinney
Jeanette Dunn and
Kimberly McLeod


Classified and
Legal Ads
Laura Little
Deadline for classified
is Monday at 3 p.m.
Deadline for
legal advertisements is
Wednesday at 5 p.m.
There will be a $3 charge
for affidavits.

Circulation
Department
Sheree Miller

Subscription Rates:
In-County $35
Out-of-County $45
(State & local
taxes included)


-Since 1865-
"Telling it like it is with honesty and integrity."
Zbe fflaison Entertptise-Recot ter
Madison Recorder established 1865
New Enterprise established 1901
Consolidated June 25, 1908
Published weekly by Greene Publishing Inc., 1695 S SR 53,
Madison, FL 32340. Periodicals postage PAID at Madison Post Office
32340. Publication No. 177.400.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Madison Enter-
prise-Recorder, P.O. Drawer 772, Madison, FL 32341-0772.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement,
news matter or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management,
will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to Greene Publishing Inc. for publication in
this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from the
date they are dropped off. Greene Publishing Inc. will not be respon-
sible for photos beyond said deadline.


October Brings


Each season always
brings a change of food to
the table and October
brings pumpkins. During
the month of October, 80%
of the pumpkin supply is
harvested in the United
States. You see them every-
where this time of year,
they are in the grocery


IMadison Count
Extension Servi
Diann Douglas
Guest Columnist


stores, at road side stands
and many organizations have a pumpkin patch for a
fund raising project. We carve faces on them or dis-
play them for fall decorations. Pumpkins are a mem-
ber of the squash family; when these boldly colored
vegetables start showing up we know Halloween and
Thanksgiving are just around the corner.
The one thing many people overlook about pump-
kins is the food value of the pulp. That's the inside of
the pumpkin you throw away when you carve a face on
the front. The bright orange color is an indication that
pumpkin is loaded with beta-carotene, an important
antioxidant, it is converted to vitamin A in the body
that has many functions for health. It's nutritional
contributions include smooth skin and healthy eye
sight.
We often associate pumpkins with pies, but there
are many other uses for pumpkin. They can be used
in any recipe for winter squash such as acorn or but-
ternut. Try combining pumpkin with potatoes in your
favorite casserole. Add pumpkin puree to your pan-
cake mix or use in muffins and sweet breads. You can
even make pumpkin soup and the seeds can be roast-
ed and eaten for a snack.
Extension Specialists suggest when selecting a
pumpkin, look for one with a 1 to 2 inch stem. It
should feel heavy and be free of blemishes and soft
spots. Smaller pumpkins are better for eating, they are
more flavorful and don't have a stingy texture. A lop-
sided pumpkin is not necessarily a bad choice, so don't


I rl �i;- --.


DECISION




*2010


Before


You Vote


The Races for Governor and U.S. Senate
Florida voters have key decisions to make in the races for Governor and U.S. Senate. Read
continuing coverage in this newspaper and tune-in to the statewide debates to learn more
about the candidates and where they stand on the issues that matter the most to you. For more
information and to submit questions to the candidates visit www.beforeyouvote.org.
* General Election Debates *



Tues., October 19, 2010 I 7:00 - 8:00 pm ET
Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University


Charlie Crist
Confirmed


Kendrick Meek
Confirmed


Marco Rubio
Confirmed


Wed., October 20, 2010 | 7:00 - 8:00 pm ET
Broadcast live from Nova Southeastern University


Rick Scott
Confirmed


---
Alex Sink
Confirmed


The debates are produced by WFOR-TV/Ch. 4, the Miami-Dade/Broward region's CBS affiliate.
Watch the UVE debates on these stations on Oct. 19 and 20: Miami-Dade/Broward - WFOR-TV *
Orlando - WKMG-TV/Ch. 6 (CBS) * Jacksonville - WJXT-TV/Ch. 4 * West Palm Beach - WPTV-TV/Ch. 5 (NBC) *
Tampa/St. Pete WFTS-TV/Ch. 28 (ABC) * Tallahassee - WCTV-TV/Ch. 6 (CBS) * Panama City - WJHG-TV/Ch. 7
(NBC) * Ft. Myers - WINK-TV/Ch. 11 (CBS) * Gainesville - WCJB-TV/Ch. 20 (ABC) * Pensacola - WEAR-TV/Ch.
3 (ABC) * Sarasota - WWSB-TV/Ch. 7 (ABC). (Visit www.beforeyouvote.org for additional details.)


Debate Partners


I I , 1)l ! I I I P
FL ORI DA


Brought to you by

N TOVA SOUTHEASTERN
iNOV -UNIVERSITY


/\\\ Florida
- Philanthropic
OF M AYORS, INC. , f f.tml rc if� , ,, . fi, ,,e, r i


Yo'u neowan
Independefit Insurance agent.'

WAMP-RtP)


I


the Pumpkins
pass them up. Since pump-
"kin is highly perishable, it
[. I must be cooked the same
I day it is cut open. The or-
ce "ange flesh has a tendency
to develop a black mold.
S .. Pumpkin pulp can be
) cooked on the stovetop, in
- ^the oven or microwave.
Each method takes a differ-
ent time, but all produce a
cooked product. For use in a variety of recipes, puree
will freeze well. To make puree, once your pumpkin is
cooked, cool it enough to handle and remove the peel
using a small sharp knife then put the peeled pumpkin
in a food processor. One pound of raw, untrimmed
pumpkin will make one cup of finished pumpkin
puree. To freeze, measure cooled puree into one cup
portions and place in freezer containers, leaving 12
inch headspace. Label, date and freeze, it will keep up
to one year. Use the puree in any recipe that calls for
solid pack canned pumpkin.
Pumpkin can be processed in canning jars, but
you must cut the flesh into 1 inch cubes. It is recom-
mended that you not process mashed or pureed pump-
kin in a canner. Pumpkin must be processed in a
pressure canner. If you are interested in receiving
safe canning or freezing instructions, call the Exten-
sion office and we will be glad to send you the infor-
mation.
The University of Florida/IFAS Extension - Madi-
son County is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affir-
mative Action Employer authorized to provide research,
educational information p
and other services only to
individuals and institu-
tions that function with-
out regard to race, color,
sex, age, handicap or na-
tional origin. W


2�4�




3:Layout 1 10/14/10 11:37 AM Page 1 I


Friday, October 15, 2010


www.greenepublishing.com




From pagc One


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 3


Pet Auction

cont from Page 1
to the Imax and World Golf Hall of Fame and a $50
gift certificate to Salt Water Cowboys Restaurant. A
$158.00 value
Ghost Tour & More Package for Four:
This includes Ghost & Graveyards fright-seeing
trolley tour for four, tickets for four to St. Augus-
tine's Lighthouse & Museum and a $50 gift certifi-
cate to Aunt Kate's Restaurant on the river. A $190.00
value
Four 14-day tickets from Seaworld. Worth $468.
St. Augustine Vacation Package. Valued at
$1,000.
Various gift baskets, including FSU, John Deere
Tractor, Chick-Fil-A, O'Toole's Herb Farm.
Gift certificates, including Carrabbas, Tea Time
Cafe and Restaurant, Madison Lunchbox, Fiddler's
Rest, Divine Events.
Other auction items include a wild game cam-
era, vintage dishes and glass ware, a vintage ice box,
jewelry, antiques, a piano, flower arrangements,
tools and Christmas items.
Several items to be auctioned off and all pro-
ceeds will go to these two humane societies. There
will also be celebrity guests including Leonard Be-
mbry and Rob Nucatola.
Anyone interested in participating in the auc-
tion should come to the Hickory Hill Auctions build-
ing on Range Avenue. If you have any questions call
Jennifer at (850) 973-2476.


Fall Fest

cont from Page 1


the Greater Madison County
merce.


Chamber of Com-


Wildfires

cont from Page 1

relative humidity and warm temperatures will
create explosive fire growth potential, according
to the NOAA Web site.
Terrill, who has worked for 24 years in
forestry, said, "The fact that we have some mois-
ture in the grass counteracts the other factors."
He definitely advises not to burn on windy days.
Terrill said most people make mistakes with
burning after a killing frost when the ground
turns brown. Without enough moisture, it's a
recipe for disaster.
Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson said recently
that
dry conditions in at least some parts of the
state, with a long-range forecast calling for a
strong drying cycle, threaten a potentially severe
wildfire season. The culprits are a lack of any
major tropical storm activity so far this season
and the existence of La Nina conditions, which
are expected to continue until at least early next
year.
"They pretty much think we'll go into a dry
winter," said Terrill. "If we go into spring after a
dry winter, it'll probably be pretty bad by
spring."
Meteorologists define La Nina conditions as
abnormally cold sea surface temperatures in the
Pacific Ocean, which generally trigger severe
wildfire activity in Florida. In fact, five of Flori-
da's most active wildfire years have occurred
during or immediately after a period when the
Pacific Ocean had unusually cold sea tempera-
tures.
"This weather cycle calls for a warmer and
drier winter here in Florida, and when you com-
bine that with the lack of any real rainfall asso-
ciated with tropical systems so far this season,
we have to expect a tough wildfire season ahead,"
Bronson said.
Citizens can do their part to protect them-
selves and their property.
"Most times, if people stay with the fire, they
don't have problems," Terrill said. "It's usually
when they turn their backs the fire gets away.
Follow-up with water to make sure it's dead out."
The three most important tips to protect
homes from wildfires are: Clean roofs and gutters
to eliminate debris, including leaves, twigs, pine
needles and palm fronds; Keep the area directly
next to the home free of anything that can easily
catch fire, including flammable plants. They can
be replaced with less flammable varieties and
maintain and keep the landscape within 30 foot of
a home sufficiently watered to deter flames from
approaching the home if a fire occurs.
Floridians can remain aware of the current
wildfire danger in their areas by regularly check-
ing the Fire Danger Index at http://fdi.fl-dof.com.
The index is easy to understand as it uses a sim-
ple rating system that classifies regions of the
state as having low, moderate, high, very high or
extreme conditions.
Residents can also visit the Florida Division
of Forestry website at http://www.FL-DOF.com
or call the Madison Forestry Station at (850) 973-
5100.
Kids need to understand the importance of
fire safety and prevention, too. Check out the U.S.
Forest Service's Smokey Bear website at
http://www.smokeybear.com/, which includes in-
teractive games and how to prevent fires. The
U.S. Fire Administration's Kids website at
http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/kids/flash.shtm offers
fire prevention coloring pages and more informa-
tion.


Man Arrested

cont from Page 1

retrieved the plastic bag from the vehicle, which
contained a white powdery substance. Gilbert filed-
tested the substance, which was positive for
methamphetamines.
Upon further search of the vehicle, Gilbert dis-
covered a firearm and drug paraphernalia and six
small pills which were later determined to be oxy-
codone.
Reams was placed under arrest and charged
with possession of a controlled substance, posses-
sion of a firearm during the commission of a felony,
possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of
a controlled substance (Meth).


Danny Plain

cont from Page 1
him and not have to get skin from another part of
his body.
The doctors will wait and see how the healing
process will go before they attempt to do a skin
graft on Plain's face.
According to Richard Cone, he and Plain were
doing a controlled burn when the fire flashed back
at him.
He was working with Cone and burning trees
and stumps on land that Cone owns so that Cone
could put up a new hay barn. The two men had ob-
tained a burn permit from the Division of
Forestry.
The fuel that was used for the burn was a mix-
ture of diesel and gasoline used to keep things like
a flash from occurring when fires are set.
"It was something that we had done hundreds
of times before," Cone said.
Cone said that he and Plain were standing
shoulder to shoulder and had just lit the fire when
the fuel flashed back at him.
Cone said that the fire burned Plain, without
even singing him. He said that he looked at Plain
and told him that they needed to get to the hospi-
tal immediately.
Not really feeling anything at the time, Plain
told Cone that he would be okay. Cone insisted that
they go to the hospital. He knew that he could get
him there faster than an ambulance could so he
put Plain in Plain's truck and took off for the hos-
pital.
At the hospital, the staff prepared Plain who
was flown to Gainesville and admitted to the burn
unit.
Family members said that 11 percent of
Plain's body had been burnt. The fact that he was
wearing sunshades and a hat protected his head
and eyes from injury
Cone said that he could not explain how the
flash occurred.
"I guess the vapors all concentrated in one
area," he said.


Madison.
"The city leaders of Madison are to be
commended for their efforts to secure this
USDA Community Facilities grant and the
other funding required to purchase the
equipment needed to enhance fire protec-
tion for the city's buildings and citizens,"
said USDA Rural Development State Direc-
tor Richard A. Machek.
The USDA Rural Development Eco-
nomic Impact Initiative Grant is used to
develop essential community facilities in
rural communities with extreme unem-
ployment and severe economic depression.
The City of Madison meets these criteria
due to its designation by the State of Flori-
da as a Rural Area of Critical Concern and
a Not Employed Rate of 25.1 percent.
USDA Rural Development is commit-
ted to the future of rural communities and
provides financing and technical assis-
tance to foster growth in homeownership,


10/6
Keith Phillips -
Open container
Dexter Richardson
- Open container
Alexander Toler,
Jr. - Forgery out of
Cobb County, Ga.
William Keith Kir-
by - Criminal registra-
tion
Alphadakki Bx -
Criminal mischief
Steven Michael
Forton - VOP (circuit)
10/7
Michael Scott Ship-
ley - VOP (DUI, driving
while license suspend-
ed (habitual offender))
Darrlyn McKeith
Joseph - Shoplifting
Courtney LaPadre
Copeland - VOP (cir-
cuit)
Jorge Alberto
Lezama-Cardenas - No
valid drivers license,
resisting arrest with-
out violence
10/8
Virginia Jo Kenda
- Resisting arrest with-
out violence
Richard Lee Kenda
- Battery on a law en-
forcement officer, re-
sisting arrest with
violence, resisting ar-
rest with violence, dis-
orderly conduct
Jarrod Lamar
Robinson - Criminal
registration
10/9
Rickey Lee Stubbs
- VOP (circuit)
Joshua McKinnon
Reams - Possession of
a controlled substance
without a prescription,
possession of a firearm
during the commission
of a felony, possession
of a firearm by a con-
victed felon, posses-
sion of a controlled


substance, possession
of drug paraphernalia
Lawrence David
Stanford - Drugs
10/10
Michael Clifford
Mears - VOP (county),
out of county warrant
Darrlyn McKeith
Joseph - Dealing in
stolen property, theft to
a building
10/11
Gordon Demond
Lewis - Carrying a
concealed firearm,
grand theft of a
firearm
James Luke Gask-
ins - Attaching a tag
not assigned, posses-
sion of less than 20
grams of marijuana
Keith Alan Tumlin
- DUI
Clayton Robert
Coker - Possession of a
controlled substance
David Bivens - Bat-
tery (aggravated do-
mestic)
Essie Mae Johnson
- Battery (domestic vi-
olence), battery on a
person 65 or older
Phillip Lamont
Nelson - Criminal reg-
istration
Elton Ruebin Mar-
shall - Criminal regis-
tration
10/12
Keron Devonshay
Pride - Disorderly con-
duct
Dustin Lee Sherrill
- Aggravated battery
Victor John
Hendry - Criminal reg-
istration
George Johnson -
Criminal registration
Michael Antone
Cooper - Criminal reg-
istration
Leonard Lamont
Dix - Failure to appear


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Kristin Finney, October 7, 2010
North Florida Community College John Grosskopf, far
left, along with Mayor, Judy Townsend, far right, hold the
check for $387,000, while State Director of the USDA,
Richard Machek signs it.
technology infrastructure. More information
busi- about USDA Rural Development can be found at


ness development, and critical community and www.rurdev.usda.gov/fl.


USDA Grant

cont from Page 1


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Kristin Finney, October 7, 2010
The commissioners of Madison hold the check from the USDA. From left to right are, Roy Ellis, Renetta
Parrish, Judy Townsend, Alfred Martin and Wayne Vickers.


I


on County










www.greenepublishing.com


4 Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Axouno i abi o Countp


Friday, October 15, 2010


E0NV ITI


October 14-17
Fallfest Carnival and
Midway. Hosted by the
Greater Madison County
Chamber of Commerce.
Over 40 Midway rides
and games and exhibits
galore. For more infor-
mation, call (850) 973-
2788.
October 16
Hickory Grove
Founder's Day, at Hicko-
ry Grove United
Methodist Church, off
Highway 255. All day.
October 16
All are invited to at-
tend the inaugural Pre-
sents for Pets Charity
Auction at Hickory Hill
Auctions. This event is
being held by The Coun-
try Story and Hickory
Hill Auctions and will
benefit the Suwannee
Valley Human Society
and Goliath and BeBe's
World. Preview begins at
9 a.m. Auction begins at
10 a.m.
October 16
Skeet shoot, spon-
sored by the Lee Commu-


nity Volunteer Fire De-
partment. High noon.
Ben Blair Park Soccer
Field. 12 skeet, anyway,
$20. 12 skeet, your way,
$25. Kids/youth, 14 and
under, $1 birds. Kids
must have an adult pre-
sent to shoot. 50/50 draw-
ing. $10 raffle for 870
pump shotgun. Drinks
and hot dogs at park.
October 17
Lee United
Methodist Church home-
coming. Steve McHargue
will speak at the 9 a.m.
and 11 a.m. services. Spe-
cial memories will be
shared at 10 a.m. There
will be dinner on the
church grounds follow-
ing the 11 a.m. service.
October 17
Rye family reunion,
Beulah Baptist Church,
east of Lee, 12:30 p.m.
October 24
Pine Grove Baptist
Church homecoming.
Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.
Morning worship, 11
a.m. Dinner on grounds
after service. Praise and


IALfN0AI


singing, 2-3 p.m. Speaker:
Pastor Josh Wynn.
October 30
Fifth Saturday
Farmers and Friends
Day, downtown Madison.
Begins 8 a.m.
November 20
Skeet shoot, spon-
sored by the Lee Commu-
nity Volunteer Fire
Department. High noon.
Ben Blair Park Soccer
Field. 12 skeet, anyway,
$20. 12 skeet, your way,
$25. Kids/youth, 14 and
under, $1 birds. Kids
must have an adult pre-
sent to shoot. 50/50 draw-
ing. $10 raffle for 870
pump shotgun. Drinks
and hot dogs at park.
December 11
Skeet shoot, spon-
sored by the Lee Com-
munity Volunteer Fire
Department. High noon.
Ben Blair Park Soccer
Field. 12 skeet, anyway,
$20. 12 skeet, your way,
$25. Kids/youth, 14 and
under, $1 birds. Kids
must have an adult pre-
sent to shoot. 50/50
drawing. $10 raffle for
870 pump shotgun.
Drinks and hot dogs at
park.
First and Third
Saturday of
the Month
Girl Scout Troop 150
meets at Greenville Unit-
ed Methodist Church
every first and Third Sat-
urday of the month from
10 a.m. until noon.
Please call Janice or
Sean Carson at 850/948-
6901 or the Girl Scout
Council Office at 850/386-
2131 for more informa-
tion.


First Friday of
Each Month
Everyone is invited
to gospel (open mic)
sings at Lee Worship
Center the first Friday
night of each month, be-
ginning at 7 p.m. The
church is located at 397
Magnolia Dr. in Lee.
Everyone is asked to
bring a dish for the
potluck supper. There
will be great musicians,
so those who can play an
instrument are welcome
to come and join in.
Bring a friend with you.
For more information,
call Allen McCormick at
(850) 673-948
Every First And
Third Monday
Consolidated Christ-
ian Ministries, located
at 799-C SW Pinckney
Street in Madison has
changed their food dis-
tribution give-out days.
Food will now be given
out on the first and third
Monday of each month
from 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. to
those who have signed
up and qualified in ac-
cordance with USDA
guidelines. Anyone can
come in and see if they
qualify and sign up on
the following days: Tues-
day, Wednesday or
Thursday from 9 a.m.-
11:45 a.m.
Each Weekday
Except Tuesday
The Senior Citizens
Center offers computer
classes to seniors 60 and
older each weekday ex-
cept Tuesday. For more
information or to sign
up, please call (850) 973-
4241.


Every
Tuesday-Saturday
The Diamonds in the
Ruff Adoption Program
at the Suwannee Valley
Humane Society is open
every Tuesday through
Saturday from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. It is located on 1156
SE Bisbee Loop, Madi-
son, FL 32340. For more
information, or direc-
tions, call (866) 236-7812
or (850) 971-9904.
Third Tuesday
of Each Month
The Greater
Greenville Area Diabetes
Support Group is a free ed-
ucational service and sup-
port for diabetes and those
wanting to prevent dia-
betes. The group meets the
third Tuesday of each
month at the Greenville
Public Library Conference
Room at 312 SW Church
St., Greenville, 11-11:30
a.m. Everyone is welcome!
Every Wednesday
and Friday
The Senior Citizens
Center's sewing club for se-
niors 60 and older meets
every Wednesday and Fri-
day For more information
or to sign up, please call
(850) 973-4241.
Fourth Wednesday
of Each Month
An informational
meeting for those injured
and needing help return-
ing to work will be held the
fourth Wednesday of each
month from 12-3 p.m. at
the Madison County Ex-
tension Office located at
184 College Loop, Madison.
The meeting is free and
open to the public. For
more information, please
call (850) 245-3489.


Joe D.

Hart, Jr.
Joe D. Hart, Jr., age
71, passed away on Octo-
ber 10, 2010 in Madison,
Florida.
Funeral services
will be Wednesday, Octo-
ber 13, 2010 at 11:00 AM
at Beggs Funeral Home
Madison Chapel with
burial at Oak Ridge
Cemetery
Visitation will be
Wednesday, October 13,
2010 at Beggs Funeral
Home from 6-8 p.m.
In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be
made to the Faith Bap-
tist Church Building
Fund, Madison, Florida
32340 or the Florida Bap-
tist Children's Home.
He was born in
Madison on May 4, 1939
and served in the US
Army from 1959 to 1962
and retired from
Progress Energy after 33
years of service. He was
a member of Faith Bap-
tist Church.
He is survived by
his wife of 48 years, He-
len Driggers Hart;
daughter: Lynn Paschal
(Joey) and granddaugh-
ter Brooke of Silverhill,
AL; two sisters, Frances
Gottuso of Mandarin
and Betty Jo Haynes of
Ohio; and one brother,
James Hart of Missouri.
He was preceded in
death by a daughter: Be-
linda Susan Hart and his
parents Joe and Vicey
Hart and 2 brothers
Enoch Newborn and
Jack Hart.


Avoid These Sayings Like The Plague


[-Conservative

Corner

By Nelson A Pryor. Vice President,
Madison Republican Club



This Land Is

Your Land.

Take It Back!
Our tough ancestors, in the twilight of English
freedom, wrung the right of petition from King
John at Runnymede, and established it in Magna
Charta, so that we wouldn't have to confront despo-
tism in our own time. But, as Thomas Jefferson
noted on 12/26/1825, about the "representation" we
get from our Representatives in Congress: "Reason
and argument? You might as well reason and argue
with the marble columns encircling them".
Comes the need for a Tea Party
Veteran pollsters, Scott Rasmussen and Doug
Schoen, have just released: "Mad as Hell, How the
Tea Party Movement Is Fundamentally Remaking
Our Two-Party System." This is a scholarly analy-
sis of the mess we are in, completely buttressed
with "proprietary" polling data.
The Tea Party is described as "the most potent
force in American politics, with the potential to
fundamentally change America", 'America's most
vibrant political force" and one that "may even be
powerful enough to elect the next president of
these United States". It's presently a force to be
reckoned with. It's already changed the politics in
many states! So much so that the movement is be-
ing credited with taking majority status away from
the Democratic Party in Congress and that election
won't even take place until Nov. 2. There also is
much speculation about flipping the U.S. Senate to
the conservatives as well.
People aren't taking it anymore! A combina-
tion of economic dislocation, frustration with
Washington, declining living standards and loss of
Faith in the American dream has produced an an-
gry, fearful electorate. A once in a lifetime realign-
ment is occurring and the proof will be all over the
news once the votes are counted.
The Tea Party is conjoining three separate
strands of conservatism: economic conservatism,
small-government conservatism and social conser-
vatism. A successful merger of these strands, and
the Tea Party will be unstoppable!
See you at the Polls on Nov. 2.

Mr. & Ms. Taxpayer,
This week alone, the
Federal Government added
$30 billion to its "Credit Card" balance.

YOUR SHARE of this is $211.
Your total balance is $121,972.

US National Debt: $13,580,284,000,000
Source: www.usdebtclock.org 10/12/10

REPUBLICAN VICTORY OFFICE IS OPEN
Come visit the
Madison Republican Victory Office
987 W. Base St. (200 yards west of Pizza Hut)
Get signs, bumper stickers, and information
on our great slate of candidates.
Volunteer to help! Call 850-464-1805
Hours: Mon - Fri 11:00am - to 1:00pm
Saturday 10:00am - 12:00 noon

Paid for and approved by the Madison County
Republican Executive Committee
MadisonRepublican@embarqmail. corn


and eat and drink and wait to see if they would
wake up. This is where the custom of holding a
"wake" originates.
When local folks in England started running
out of places to bury people, they would dig up
coffins and take the bones to a bone-house, then
reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, ap-
proximately one out of 25 coffins were found to have
scratch marks on the inside, meaning that they had
been burying people alive. So they would tie a string
on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin
and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Some-
one would sit out in the graveyard all night (work-
ing the "graveyard shift") to listen for the bell. As a
result, someone could be "saved by the bell" or con-
sidered to be "a dead ringer."
At the beginning of this story, I told you to de-
cide for yourself which of these stories are true,
and which ones are just urban myths. You still
might not know the answers, but at least you've had
an entertaining ride back through history



Breast ribbon for
Cancer o ly
Awareness
VMonth

Peadline is 5 p.m. Tuesday Sample Ad:
Oct. 19 publication will be
Friday, Oct. 22 e




- Sponsored Py






or send your check or money order to
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By Paul Niemann
I've always been intrigued by cliches ... what
they mean, how they originated, and whether or not
they are true. Below are several that you've proba-
bly heard before, but are they true?
They must be true, because they were on the in-
ternet, right?
Not necessarily, but the explanations that fol-
low make most of them sound pretty credible. I say
"most of them" because the story about raining
cats and dogs is just a little too much of a stretch.
Some of these stories go all the way back to Europe
in the 1500's, so their accuracy and their origins are
nearly impossible to verify.
Which of the following stories are true, and
which ones are just urban myths? You decide.
Centuries ago, before indoor plumbing was
common, most people got married in June because
they took their annual bath in May Since they were
starting to smell by the time June came around,
brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body
odor. That is where we get the custom of a bride car-
rying a wedding bouquet.
When a family would take its annual bath, the
man of the house went first, followed by the women,
and then the children. The babies went last, which
means that the water they bathed in was pretty
dirty Sometimes it was so dirty that you could ac-
tually lose someone in it. Hence the saying, "Don't
throw the baby out with the bath water."
It gets better. Houses had thatched roofs with
thick straw piled high, and there was no wood un-
derneath. The roof was the only place for animals
to get warm and to stay warm, so the cats and other
small animals lived in the roof. The rain made the
roof slippery, and the animals would sometimes
slip out and fall from the roof. This is supposedly
where the saying "It's raining cats and dogs" comes
from.
(I know it's hard to believe, but the saying had
to come from somewhere.)
Unless you were wealthy, you probably had a
dirt floor. This is where the saying, "dirt poor"
comes from. On the other hand, the floors of the
wealthy were made of slate. The wet slate would get
slippery in the winter, so they spread straw - known
as thresh - on the floor to keep from slipping. As the
winter wore on, they added more thresh. When you
opened the door, it would spill outside, so a piece of
wood was placed in the entryway This was known
as the "thresh hold."
(I know these are hard to believe, but at least
there are no more "raining cats and dogs" stories.)
Lead cups were used to drink ale or whiskey
The combination would occasionally knock a drunk
out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the
road would take them for dead and prepare them for
burial. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a
couple of days and the family would gather around


I










Friday, October 15, 2010


www.greenepublishing.com



touno maoison Count


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 5


Mayhem


Drive


Brings


Life To


NFCC


Students*


Dreams


Trent Frier
By Kristin Finney
Greene Publishing, Inc.
North Florida Community College is the educa-
tional home to many upcoming artists and musi-
cians. It is also the home of a few members of
Mayhem Drive.
Mayhem Drive is a pop-rock band based out of
Lake City It is made up of three people: Stephen
Hayden from Mayo, Nick Furst from Live Oak,
Austin Henderson from Mayo, and Trent Frier from
Mayo, Florida. Austin, Stephen and Trent have been
playing for several years. They began getting seri-
ous during Stephen and Trent's tenth grade year in
high school at Lafayette High School. They first be-
gan playing small shows like band banquets and pep
rallys.
When Trent and Stephen graduated high school
in 2009 the "full" band was put on hold. During this
time Trent and Stephen performed acoustically at
several malls around Florida. They played mostly in
the Hot Topic stores for Hot Topic's local band out-
reach "Local Static." After performing their third
acoustic show they began becoming more popular
and building a name for themselves. People began
showing up as regulars to their acoustic shows and
they realized some people had even memorized their
songs.
It was about this time that they recorded, "The
Long Hall," this was their first EP. They had the as-
sistance of Trent's ex-guitar teacher, Rick Johnson.
"The Long Hall" had seven original songs. Trent and
Stephen gave them out or sold them at their mall
shows. In 2010, around the time Austin Henderson
graduated, they decided they wanted to start the
"full" band again. With the addition of a new bassist
from Live Oak, they were ready to write new songs
and start performing as Mayhem Drive.
They soon got a chance to play at Marion Street
Cafe' with a band from Lake City named
"LoveLoud." This also turned out to be where they
played their first headliner show and eventually
called their "home venue." Trent told this reporter,
"Sadly Marion Street Cafe' just shut down."
As for their most memorable show, "So far that
was in Tallahassee at the biggest venue in town,
Floyd's Music Store. Alongside us were local Talla-
hassee bands, so we had drawn a great crowd. It was
one of the biggest shows we have ever played. There
were around 300 people there all jumping and
screaming, 'Mayhem Drive."
After that particular show the next day Mayhem
Drive had 900 plays on their MySpace page. There
were the most plays on their biggest hit, "Dating
Tuesday." It was all of this that told the world we
were serious about music and making their name
known. Trent stated, "Ever since Stephen and I
started this band, I have always given it my all. May-
hem Drive is a huge part of my life. It gives me some-
thing to look forward to on a bad day Even though I
am always busy doing something for the band: writ-
ing, practicing, booking shows, etc. I love the fact
that it is stress free unlike someone's job, or school-
ing. Having a band and playing big shows is a once
in a lifetime opportunity that everyone dreams to
have and I'll recommend it to anyone who plays an
instrument. I love it, the lights, the stage, the crowd
screaming your name."
People can expect to see big things from May-
hem Drive. Their first show out of state is coming up
as well as new merchandise and new recordings.
The members of Mayhem Drive appreciate any sup-
port the community is willing to give. Anyone inter-
ested in hearing some of their songs can visit,
www.myspace.com/mayhemdrive, wwwfacebook.co-
m/mayhemdrive, www.twitter.com/mayhemdrive or
www.reverbnation.com/mayhem


Positive Behi


Plans MCCS
The "Fall Carnival" at
MCCS will take place Friday,
October 22nd, from 5:00 PM until 4
7:00 PM. The school has not had r
an event like this in eight years;
therefore, everyone is busy gathering
materials, organizing games, collect- ,f
ing donations, and selling tickets to ,
get ready for one of the biggest fund-rais-
ers the school initiates throughout the school
year.
There will be over 30 game and food booths
available, some of which will include a dunking
booth, football throw, hoop toss, go-fish, dart-
throw, ring-toss, treasure-dig, and many, many
more. Also, for the enjoyment of kids of all ages,
there will be a bounce-house and a ping-pong
toss where students will have a chance to win a
gold fish to take home. Food booths will include
hot dogs, pizza, cotton candy, popcorn, na- 1

Bembry t.

To Be

Recognized

By Florida

Library

Association
State Representative Leonard Bembry will be
recognized by the Florida Library Association for
his special effort in restoring State Aid to Public Li-
braries during the 2010, Florida Legislative session.
At one point all funding for public libraries had
been zeroed out of the State budget and Rep. Bembry
and others fought successfully to restore funding
for public libraries. Rep. Bembry will receive the
award at a special presentation at the Madison Pub-
lic Library, on Wednesday, October 20th, 2010 at 3
PM by officials of the Florida Library Association.
The public is invited. For more information contact
the Madison Public Library at 850 973 6153.


"It would waste the public's money, penalize de-
velopers who weren't trying to game the system
and pour sand into Florida's business engine."
- Palm Beach Post
"Voters could easily end up unknowingly voting
against their own best interests. That's no way
to run a little city, and it's certainly no way to run
a state."
- Tampa Tribune

"I have a warm spot in our hearts for our home-
town, and democracy - how could that be bad?
The answer is it can be bad on several levels, not
the least of which is that it will fail to do what its
proponents promise."
- Ponte Vedra Recorder

"Amendment 4 will serve to throttle an eco-
nomic recovery and compound unemployment."
- Bradenton Herald
"Hometown Democracy is a splendid name for a
bad idea."
- Fort Myers News Press


ivior


Support


Fall Carnival
chos, snow cones, and drinks of all kinds.
There will be some-
thing for everyone
to enjoy!
The event has
been organized by
---the school's "Positive Behav-
* ior Support Team", a new
. state initiative that has been
implemented this year to en-
courage active participation
by everyone to always behave
P in a positive manner in all situations.
* "Positive Behavior Support" is defined
as a progressive, multi-tiered, problem-
solving approach that includes evi-
/ dence-based instruction and
intervention accompanied with increas-
I L ing levels of intensity where decisions are
based on data that continues all the
way through to progress monitoring.
We are working very hard to get this
program off the ground, and look
forward to the results it will bring to
our students, parents, and staff.
Everyone at MCCS and in the community is
looking forward to the upcoming "Fall Carnival"
to be a fun and exciting time to enjoy with family
and friends. Tickets can be purchased from the
school from now until the day of the carnival.
The cost is 5 tickets for $1.00, in advance, and 4
tickets for $1.00, at the carnival gates.
Hope to see you there!!



SPinetta Fire

i Department o

To Host

. Aucti on .
The Pinetta Fire Department will host
an auction to help restore the Pinetta Com-
munitv Center on Nov 6
) One-h nilel pe-rii ent ,If the m: inney-
Lrai-se.i \w11 ,L\ o ,' ll e to rl1:tor ' t lm ark
" The AuI.Kon -;'art{9 at 11a n IY
0 //////1111IIIIII\\\\\\\\\
00g
00, inE


"... don't make the solution worse than the
problem."
- Florida Times-Union
"The cost... would soar in the millions."
- Orlando Sentinel
"It's a simplistic, ham-handed overreaction."
- Charlotte Herald
"It's perfectly legitimate to vote 'no' to some-
thing that on the surface once sounded OK..."
- Tallahassee Democrat
"Those pushing the passage of Amendment 4
are simply looking for another opportunity to
prevail after a thorough airing of issues has re-
sulted in a vote by duly elected officials that is
contrary to their wishes. Exert a little 'hometown
democracy' of your own by voting 'No' on 4."
- FloridAgriculture Magazine
"Now is the time for Farm Bureau members to
engage in the 'No on 4' campaign. The issue will
affect our members directly and we will work to-
ward a victory for common sense and economic
sustainability."
- FFB President John Hoblick


www.Florida2Ol10.org
Paid political advertisement paid for in kind and sponsored by Madison Enterprise-Recorder.








6 Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, October 15, 2010











Friday, October 15, 2010


www.greenepublishing.com



Sch ool & education


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 7


The

School


SHOOL Bell
By Beth Moore, Principal,
Pinetta Elementary School


Greetings

From Pinetta

Elementary

School!
I can hardly believe that the first seven weeks of
school have come and gone. Pinetta Elementary
School has been hard at work, both students and
teachers. So we need a little fun in our life! The fun
started on September 14, 2010 with an invitation to
our students' grandparents for lunch. Over 80
grandparents came and enjoyed a delicious meal of
chicken tetrazini with their grandchildren. This
has become a yearly event, and a special time for
both the students and the grandparents.
November 11th is a day set aside to honor those
brave men and women who have served in our coun-
try's armed forces. At 9:00 on Nov.11, 2010, PES will
be saluting our Veterans with a program planned
just for them. If you are a veteran please come and
enjoy the fun.
Fall would not be complete without the annual
FALL FESTIVAL! This year's festival is scheduled
for November 19, 2010 from 6:00-8:00 p.m. Come and
enjoy some great games, awesome food, and fun fel-
lowship.
We are always looking for volunteers to help out
at the school. If you are interested please give the
school a call so we can get you started!

Your Local Paper Has Lots 1o Offer:
* Community Events * Sports
* Local News * Classifieds
Call 973-4141 to start your subscription today!


NFCC Artist Series Presents


Dracula October 23
Dance Alive National Ballet performs classic tale at Van H. Priest Auditorium


The seductive Count
Dracula of fictional lore
serves up a Halloween sto-
ry for the brave of heart as
Dance Alive National Bal-
let, one of the most distin-
guished and creative ballet
companies in the South-
east, performs the classic
tale of good versus evil -
Dracula - on Saturday, Oct.
23 at North Florida Com-
munity College's Van H.
Priest Auditorium. Doors
open at 6:30 p.m. Show be-
gins at 7 p.m.
As the curtain goes up
we are transfixed by a dra-
matic Transylvanian cas-
tle with vile green
gargoyles perched atop of
arched windows, and a
creaking gate that rises to
reveal our menacing
Count Dracula. We are
next invited into a Victori-
an England with elongat-
ed and exagge-rated sets -
giving us a sense of fore-
boding and unreality A
most unusual and fright-
ening set of ruby red lips,
replete with large white
menacing teeth, appear in
the second act, with Drac-
ula bounding through
them in a hideous mask of
evil.
The story is conveyed
through dance, and sup-
ported by a speaking role
of the scientist, Abraham
van Helsing. All in all, it's
a most unusual and cre-
ative production, sure to
fill you with excitement,
fear, and a strange sense of
satisfaction. Returning in
the title role of Count
Dracula is the darkly


handsome principal
dancer, Andre Valladon.
His first victim, Lucy, is
danced by principal
dancer Michele Incollingo,
in a mesmerizing role.
Other principals include
Rostislav Dzabraev, as the
heroic lawyer Jonathan
Harker, and Reka Gyulai as
his winsome bride, Mina.
Against the marvelous
backdrop by Gainesville
artist, Margaret Ross Tol-
bert, this production of
Dracula is gothic, svelte,
and contemporary all at
the same time.
Based in Gaines-ville,
Dance Alive National Bal-
let is led by Artistic Direc-
tor Kim Tuttle and


Choreographer in Resi-
dence Judy Skinner. The
exceptional dancers of
Dance Alive have a non-
stop energy and love for
dance that is at the source
of the company's undeni-
able success; they are dra-
matic, stunning, classic
and exuberant.
Don't miss Dracula at
NFCC's Van H. Priest Au-
ditorium on Saturday, Oct.
23. The performance is
sponsored in part by the
State of Florida, Depart-
ment of State, Division of
Cultural Affairs, the Flori-
da Council on Arts and
Culture, and the National
Endowment for the Arts.
Tickets are on sale


now - $12 general, $6 chil-
dren ages 12 and under -
and available at the NFCC
College Advancement Of-
fice (Bldg. 32, NFCC cam-
pus) or by calling (850)
973-1653. More informa-
tion is also available at
http://www.nfcc.edu/com
munity-programs/artist-
series- or email Artist-
Series@nfcc.edu.





















Sat., Oct. 23
7:00 p.m.
Van H. Priest Auditorium
Madison, Florida
Tickets on Sale Now!
$12 adults/S6 Child
WWW.NFCC.EDU
Tikt on Sae Now


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Each year, Florida's governor declares the fourth week in
October "Florida Forestry Week," to coincide with the Flori-
da Forest Festival in Taylor County
Forestry is Florida's number one agricultural crop, above
even citrus and among Florida's 67 counties, Taylor County
is number one in forestry, according to the University of
Florida.
Once again more than 20,000 people from around the re-
gion are expected to join in the annual celebration as the fes-
tival marks its 55th year on Saturday, Oct. 24, at Forest
Capital State Park in Perry.
The festival includes a month-long series of events which
began Saturday, Oct. 2, with the Jr. Miss Program. She was
joined by the festival's "wee royalty" Saturday, Oct. 9 with the
crowning of the Little King and Queen. Together, they will
reign over Florida's biggest forestry celebration in the state.
The festivities kick off in earnest Thursday, Oct. 21, when
the carnival opens on Industrial Drive (off U.S. 19 in Perry)
along with the "fabulous" fireworks display at Perry-Foley
Airport (also on Industrial Drive) at 8 p.m.
Friday night (Oct. 22) will see festivities move to historic
downtown Perry for the Scary Stories at the Taylor County
Public Library at 5 p.m., the annual Kids' Parade, a proces-
sion of children dressed in their best forestry-related cos-
tumes around the courthouse square at 6 p.m., the inaugural
Strut Your Mutt Dog Parade at 7 p.m., the Gaslight Antique
Car Parade at 7:30 p.m., and a 50s/60s Sock Hop to close the
evening.
Concessions, kids' games and more fill out the evening's
festivities.
Saturday morning of "festival day" (Oct. 23) will see the
annual King Tree Parade pass through downtown Perry be-
ginning at 10 a.m.
Then, everyone will travel to Forest Capital State Park (on
U.S. 19) for the rest of the festival.
More than 75 arts and crafts vendors open at 9 a.m. along
with dozens special concessions and food booths.
Forestry-related events include professional lumberjack

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The 55th Annual


shows (at 12, 2:30 and 4
p.m.), a kid's lumberjack
camp (beginning at 2:30
p.m.), chainsaw competi-
tion, loader competition
and cross cut saw competi-
tion.
The World's Largest
Free Fish Fry starts off at 12 noon as an estimated 7,000
people will receive a free lunch of fried catfish, baked
beans and coleslaw.
The mainstage entertainment begins at 12:30 p.m. and
will include performances from the Boggy Creek Band,
Casey Weston and Alibi.
Throughout the day, visitors will be able to view displays
from the Florida Division of Forestry and the Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission, walk through demon-
strations of historic Florida Cracker lifestyle, visit the an-
tique car show, listen to storytellers under the pines and
enjoy the rides at the carnival.
Admission for the event (excluding the carnival) is free.
"For the past 55 years, Taylor County and the surrounding
area have celebrated the important impact forestry has had
on our region, and the role it will play in our future," said fes-
tival representative Mark Viola.
In 1955, the citizens of Taylor County decided to stage a
county-wide "Pine Tree Festival" as an educational tool to
reduce forest fires that were crippling the county's econom-
ic base--the timber industry Over the years, the festival
grew and accomplished its aim so well that by 1965, Taylor
County could boast the lowest fire record in the nation,
prompting then Florida Governor Hayden Burns and the
Florida Cabinet to proclaim Taylor County the "Tree Capi-
tal of the South," a distinction it still holds. U.S. Congress-
man Don Fuqua made the same proclamation on the floor of
the Congress. At the urging of Governor Burns, the Pine
Tree Festival then became known as the Florida Forest Fes-
tival.
The goal of the Florida Forest Festival became, and re-
mains that of promoting the benefits of "Forestry Forever."
For information about any of the festival's events, or to
get directions, call the festival office at 850-584-TREE (8733)
or visit online at www.floridaforestfestival.com.


the South

THURSDAY, OCT.21
Fireworks
(Perry-Foley Airport) 8:00 p.m.
Carnival Opens
(On Industrial Drive through Oct. 23)
FRIDAY, OCT.22 (DOWNTOWN PERRY)
"Scary Stories" at the library 5:00 p.m.
Kid's Parade 6:00 p.m.
Strut Your Mutt 7:00 p.m.
Gaslight Antique Car Parade 7:30 p.m.
Sock Hop (Downtown Cafe afterparade)


retialDa -3 ray -Otobem2-


Cub Scout Breakfast ......... 7:00 a.m.
King Tree Parade (Downtown) .... 10:00 a.m.

LUMBERJACK SHOWS
12 noon, 2:30 & 4 p.m.
Kid's Lumberjack Camp ...... 2:30 p.m.


MAIN STAGE ENTERTAINMENT
National Anthem & Color Guard . . 12:00 p.m.


Boggy Creek Band ..... 12:30
Casey Weston .......... 1:30
A libi.................. 2:30
Karaoke Contest ............


& 3:30 p.m.
& 4:30 p.m.
& 5:30 p.m.
. 7:00 p.m.


ALL DAY
Arts and Crafts Show * Heavy Equipment Exhibition * Loader Competitions
Cross Cut Saw Competitions * Heritage Events * Food Vendors & Exhibits * Antique Car Show

A I A A AS 6^^^J ^^B^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^


For more information, call 584-TREE


8Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Friday, October 15, 2010


Visit www.floridaforestfestival.com







www.greenepublishing.com


(6)


'7~tt&
It,, *4'


1,
1#

]







$


$,i /


Friday Night Only
Prime Rib el"
Special Ieniti


Locatedl "Under The Clock" At The Historic Perry Station
500 S Jefferson St. * 850-223-2727
" PERRY, FL 3235-1


?6


'I


ii


You and your family are invited to enjoy all the activities
at the FLORIDA FOREST FESTIVAL in Perry
including spectacular:

FIREWORKS
Thursday, October 21, 8:00 PM at the Perry-Foley Airport,

THE KING TREE PARADE
Saturday, October 23, 10:00 AM, Downtown Perry
And
The World's Largest Free Fish Fry
Saturday, October 23, Noon at Forest Capital Park.
Your neighbors in Taylor County look
forward to being with you.


BUC


EVE


AZ5 S10101 A



- UNER UR EX-
AT HFSIAL


Sales Hours
Mon-Fri
8:00AM-7:00PM
Saturday
7:30 AM - 5:00 PM


Parts/Service Hours
Mon-Fri
7:30 AM-5:30 PM
Saturday
7:30 AM - 3:00 PM


(850) 584-6178 * (800) 763-4589
2441 South Byron Butler Parkway
PERRY, FLORIDA
www.timberlandford.com


I


NORTH AMERICA
MADISON BOTTLING PLANT |



Proud supporter of
The 55th annual
Florida Forest Festival


Southern Property Pest Control
Serving Madison & Taylor Counties


Toll Free I 877-838-4959
Local I 850-838-4959
12562 Spring Warrior Rd.
P.O. Box 25 * Perry, Florida 32348





1312 Riverside Drive * Steinhatchee, FL
Next to Fiddler's Restaurant
352-498-2942


ComM
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ON THE NATURE COAST |
WE CARRY FINE CIGARS
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FRIDAY NIGHTS:
6:00 P: I - 9:00 PMI
AFTERNOON TEA
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f ''-i I ourt Noi.-e )


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i


Friday, October 15, 2010


Madison Enterprise-Recorder


t;

q
I


*a


Gift Certificates
Available




10:Layout 1 10/14/10 8:08 AM Page 1 I


1 0 Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



A Dap in Jce


Friday, October 15, 2010


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Kristin Finney, October 8, 2010
Addie Crawford goes over some home work online at the Lee Public Library.
I^I-
I aflURiRA IESi
ONFICTION


uruene ruullsning, Inc. rniuou uy ruistiiinney, uctuuer o0, uIu
Shannon Keel, the owner of The Hair Parlor in Lee, talks with client Beth
Ward before cutting her hair.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Kristin Finney, October 8, 2010
Mark Bennett works on his computer at the Lee Public Library. Mark, his wife
and his mother are missionaries in Mexico. They live in Lee but spend long peri-
ods of time working in Mexico.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Kristin Finney, October 8, 2010
Nathan Wooten, sitting, is a municipal worker for the town of Lee. Leonard
Miller, standing, is the Public Works Director for Lee.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Kristin Finney, October 8, 2010
Lee Bishop, left, and Joe Branch Jr., right, chat at Cherry Farms in Lee. Bish-
op and Branch have been friends for nearly 42 years.


Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Kristin Finney, October 8, 2010
Town Manager, Sarah Anderson, left, and Janice Miller, Deputy Clerk, right,
pause from a busy day at Lee Town Hall to take a picture.


I








www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, October 15, 2010


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 1 1


MADISON COUNTY
CENTRAL SCHOOL
Faculty & Staff
Truly Appreciates
Our Principal,

Sam
Stalnaker


Im


Roberta Agner,
You make
Lake Park of Madison
Nursing Center Rock!
Thank you for

FR everything you do!
TAKS FOR


SEING
A GREAT 80SS!
THE FACULTY 6 STAFF
AT PINETTA ELEMENTARY
Beth 9Voore SCHOOL APPRECIATES YOU!


from.
The Faculty & Staff
at Madison County
Excel Alternative School








QMADISON NURSING CENTER
HEALTH AND REHABILITATION
Would Like To Wish
JoAnn Gnewuch,
Administrator

You are an expert in the health field.
You are full of energy and warmth.
We truly appreciate that you
are always here supporting us.
The Staff And Residents
of Madison Nursing & Rehab


Happy Boss'

Day
There are numerous reasons which life has giv-
en us to celebrate, one of them being Boss Day. Na-
tional Boss Day falls on 16th of October every year.
It is a day dedicated to all the bosses of the world and
provides a prospect of improving the liaison be-
tween the boss and his/her employees. Boss Day is
celebrated with the notion of honoring the hard
work and the dedication of your supervisor, who has
helped you in being a better worker. If, by chance, it
happens to fall on a weekend, then it is celebrated on
the working day closet to it.
Employees all over the world celebrate Boss Day,
so as to make their supervisor feel his worth in the
life of his employees. However, whether they cele-
brate it with their heart or just for the heck of it is
something that is totally dependent on their boss
and his behavior towards his juniors. In fact, being
a boss, who is worth of the boss day celebration, de-
pends largely on the individual. A boss should be
compassionate towards his employees. He must be a
considerate person who tries to understand the
problems of his juniors.
A boss should act according to situations, being
a taskmaster at one time and a happy gleeful senior
at the other time. It the impression that one leaves
on employees which goes ahead to make him count
as one of the great bosses. Boss Day is the time to
show your respect and gratitude to your boss, espe-
cially if he has all the qualities mentioned above. So,
on the occasion of this Boss Day, try to make him
feel special as well as appreciated for the efforts that
he has put in for making his juniors responsible
workers.


All of us at
SBECGGS FUNERAL HOME
L"f'. A Wish
E Ashley Beggs
A Happy Boss' Day
- * I *
*,i' .1�'�' Y.' A '** .i 9**' r ^- .


Brad Meister

We Appreciate You!
Thanks For Being A Great Boss
All The Farmers Furniture Staff


Happy Boss's Day
to the one that
expects, encourages,
appreciates, and
inspires all of us at
Greenville
Elementary
You're The Best!


C. Davis Barclay
- - awas1 �&-I ~I


Happy Boss' Day,

Beni,

From,
MCHS Staff & Faculty


...............................................................












12 Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com



Ual o sta potlight


Friday, October 15, 2010


(229) 775-3200


Highway 133 (12 miles West of Valdosta Mall) Morven, GA
(Next to Dollar General & Lawson Peaches)



Bishop Clean Care
3115 N. Oak Street Ext. * Valdosta, GA 31602
(229) 244-2470 * (800) 426-6324
At Bishop, quality has always
been a family tradition.
* Carpet * Upholstery
* Area Rugs * Hard Floors
* Fire & Water Damage Restoration
24/7 Fire & Water Damage Service |


LOSE WEIGHT. i
NEVER FIND IT AGAIN.
229.242.9785

fthe center for medical weight 1os5
S207 Northside Drive, Valdosta, GA 31602


THE HONEYBAKED HAM co.
C- _CAFE'
Any Sandwich,
Chips and Drink

et im.must present coupon at time of purchase to
i recleve offer. Good at the Valdosta, GA location
only Limit one per customer, per visil
229-244-6833
1601 Baytree Rd (behind Sears)
Mon - Sat loam - 6pm el1877v


GLASS


I"SINCE 1972"
By Kristin Finney can expect from a company that has been leading
Greene Publishing, Inc. the industry for over 30 years.
Since 1972 GlassPro by American Glass has "We offer friendly dependable service to all
been serving South Georgia and North Florida's our customers. Our goal is to be the best glass
glass needs. They offer an array of services, dealer in our area. We thrive on putting our cus-
everything from automotive glass to custom mir- tomers first and doing the best job possible, as this
rors. is what has made our business what it is today!
GlassPro also offers tabletop glass, shower "Whether you are a residential, commercial or
doors, commercial storefront windows, screen a new construction client, GlassPro by American
rooms and sunrooms. They also offer repairs in- Glass is your number one choice."
cluding: Storefront repair, window and door re- The team at GlassPro offers service to all of
pair and screen repair. They specialize in mirrors, the following areas: Valdosta, Thomasville,
shower doors, sunrooms and closet shelving. Tifton, Moultrie, Madison, Nashville, Albany,
GlassPro by American Glass's website ex- Adel and Lakeland.
plains, "We provide glass and mirror services If you have any questions or would like a free
with the professionalism and experience that you estimate please call (229) 244-8484.


MERICAN


Glass and Mirror Co.


Mike Cunningham l

LIei rimttfest s
. 3268 B Inner Perimeter Rd.
Valdosta, GA 31602


' ~(229) 571-9255
'/ ^ J- Store Hours: Memory Foam
8 Queen Sets at Mon., Tues., Thur., Fri.,: attresses Starting At
$399 W eSa. Sr
ea. or less! 11am-6pm 7--r


r-PEDIC.


Now offering
Trophies, Plaqu


& Awards!

^L^Screenprinti
2003 W. Gordon St.
Valdosta, GA
Phone:(229) 247-0111
Fax:(229) 247-9661
arrowart@earthlink.net
www.arrowscreenprinting.corr


Tee Shirts
Polos
HHats
roipSBagsa]
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Much More!0tsss
W9 HAV9
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MEN * WOMEN * CHILDREN |
1737 Gornto Rd. Valdosta, GA 4
229-242-1430


wnat is a narvester 'n is
term is used in the glass industry
to identify unknown companies
that use smooth-talking and of-
ten high-pressure salesmen and
hustlers with questionable sales
tactics and no credentials to con-
vince unsuspecting drivers that
their windshield may need to be
replaced, sometimes even if it is
not damaged, or offer to fix a chip
or crack at the driver's home or
office. They have also been
known to tell drivers that they
have already called in a claim to
the driver's insurance company
without the driver's approval.
These "harvesters" usually
solicit door-to-door in residential
neighborhoods, or places like
suburban shopping malls, retail
parking lots and car washes.
They provide little if any infor-


nation aoout me companies iney
represent, where they are located
or the auto glass industry safety
standards they follow. They usu-
ally refuse to provide even a busi-
ness card.
Needless to say, insurance
companies frown on these "har-
vesters" and do not condone
them, even if they are not illegal
in some states.
Following are some ques-
tions to ask if you are unsure of
any company that solicits a wind-
shield repair or replacement
from you:
* Ask them for their business
card
* Do they use original equip-
ment glass or its equivalent?
* Does the glass and the ad-
hesive being used meet or exceed
federal and "ANSI Z 26.1" stan-


aaras:
* Is there any warranty on
the glass or the workmanship?
* What type of adhesive is
used, is there proof that it has
not expired and how soon can
your car be driven safely after in-
stallation?
* Is the new windshield prop-
erly installed, flush to the frame
and centered perfectly?
* Does the molding sit flat
around the windshield's circum-
ference?
* Does the company adhere to
AGRSS Auto Glass Replacement
Safety Standards?
* Does the company employ
trained and certified techni-
cians?
For trustworthy, reliable ser-
vice, be sure to call GlassPro at
(229) 244-8484.


by Am


i / COOK
PORTABLE WAREHOUSES
SLifetime Warranty * No Credit Check*
* Rent To Own *
Tommy Sheppard
229-241-0050


BENNETT
TRUST ESTATE
ELDER LAW
Wills * Trusts * Probate
Elder Law * Medicaid * Estate Planning
John R. Bennett | Walter D. Moody
Counselors at Law
2502 North Oak Street * Valdosta, Georgia 31602
(229) 333-0860 * www.BennettTrust.com
Protecting Families * Preserving Legacies


Matt 5:16









www.greenepublishing.com



Church


Friday, October 15, 2010


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 13


Jtappeninq0


At

Madison

First Baptist

Church

By Nell Dobbs


j


Pine Grove Baptist Church

To Hold Homecoming
Everyone is cordially invited to the morning worship service. This
oin Pine Grove Baptist Church on will be followed by an afternoon of


Sunday, Oct. 24, for their 154th an-
niversary homecoming service. It will
also be "Old-Fashioned Day" for any-
one who wants to participate.
Josh Wynn, pastor of the church,
will be the morning speaker. There
will also be special music by the Pine
Grove Choir, the Three Seals, Cheri
Plackzkowski and Karen Brown.
Dinner on the grounds will follow


praise and singing.
Sunday school will begin at 9:45
a.m. and morning worship at 11 a.m.
The tentative time for the afternoon
sing is from 2-3 p.m.
Curtis Smith is the chairman of
the homecoming committee. Other
members include Thomas Kelley,
Lorena Kelley, Stacey Herring, Debo-
rah Kelley and Nola Sindt.


As we are studying Ephesians,
Paul prayed that God would grant
them, according to the riches of His
glory, to be strengthened with power
through His spirit in the inner man.
We know the blackness at night when
the power goes off. Another favorite
song, "There is Power in the Blood:"
Verse 4
"Would you do service for Jesus
your King?
There's pow'r in the blood, pow'r
in the blood;
Would you live daily His praises to
sing?
There's wonderful pow'r in the
blood."
Wonder-working power in the pre-
cious blood of the Lamb! Amen.
As believers, we face situations
every day that demand spiritual
strength for the spiritual welfare of
our church, the church's harmony, the
church's growth, the church's holi-
ness, the church's spirituality and for
our own lives. Amen!
There are so many activities in
this month. Madison High School
Class of 1977 held their 33rd reunion
over the weekend beginning with the
Cowboys football game. Then Satur-
day night, the wonderful meal at Terry
and Paula Tuten's Lunch Box, the
grateful blessing by Joyce McGhee
Taylor. Each member talked of his life
these years and teacher/
coach/principal James Ray brought
back many memories and reminded
us that there are many happenings -
good and bad - and there are times we
have to "Let it go!" which became a
chant. Mrs. Ray touched us singing
"The Way We Were." Fellowship was
great. Robin Peavy gave the benedic-
tion.
Sunday, at 8:30 a.m., Robin
preached at Fellowship at 11 at our
church (which he loves and the whole
town); and at 12:30, Terry Johnson and
he preached at Mount Nebo and
church was blessed as the three
daughters of Terry dedicated a song to
the reunion members: "I Just Can't
Give Up Now" - perfect! A suggestion
for the next one - name tags, so no one
would have to ask "Who dat?" Those
still in town gathered back at the
Lunch Box Sunday for delicious chick-
en.
At our morning service, Hunter
Robinson (a friend of classmate Larry
Smith) blessed us by singing, as did
Robin in his message and he asked
earnest prayers for his new ministry
in Huntsville, Ala. - a construction
company called "A Carpenter for
Christ Ministries," helping many of


the helpless, needy widows and or-
phans and desiring our prayers!
Amen!
Sadness has come among us and
we pray for comfort for Joe Hart's He-
len and family as they cared for him
and did all they could. Helen is Buck
Driggers' sister. We pray for Joe Sher-
rard and his family as his niece, Wan-
da, in Kentucky, died of the dreaded
disease. Her mother had died not so
long ago. We pray also for Camille and
Keith Quick in the death of her broth-
er.
Again, there are many ill among
us. Sadie Barfield's parents, the Yo-
ders; Lois Wainright and Mildred
Bruner, now both better; Mr. Red Ca-
son; Preacher Redditt's mother, Mrs.
Zelma Redditt, now living with them;
Glen Schmidt covering surgery; Sue
Downing, covering knee surgery;
Mikey Wilson; Mike Woods; Mrs. Ina
Littleton Moore; Jackie Grable's son,
Jeff Vanderlip in Atlanta Medical
Center; Sandra Shannon's Tom; all the
many homebound; all the many in
nursing homes; all the little ones; all
the military people; and all the whole
world! He's got the whole world in His
hands and He protected Danny Plain
on Monday from what could have been
more devastating burns. Again,
Shands is such a wonderful place and I
give thanks for it and all hospitals.
Amen!
Preacher Ronnie Combass
preached Sunday night and the closing
prayer was "I Have Decided to Follow
Jesus." May that be so for all people.
On Wednesday night at Madison
County High School, the youth met to
give testimonies, live testimonies,
challenge each other to read the Bible
and share.
On Oct. 24, in evening service, the
deacons and personnel committee in-
vite all to covered dish fellowship and
recognition for our church staff.
On Oct. 26, Ladies Night Out.
On Oct. 31, Fall Festival, 4-7 p.m.,
remembering, "many hands make
light the work."
Time now to prepare Christmas
shoeboxes.
Many opportunities to share and
show God's love! Amen!
Prayers of thanksgiving for recov-
ery of miners and for the white but-
terfly which saved two miners by
causing them to stop to watch it and
thereby missing the rocks, which fell
just ahead of them. God does provide,
does protect. And we give thanks for
the miner who dropped to his knees in
giving thanks to God for recovery and
sustaining them in the mine.


Middle Florida Baptist Association

To Hold Annual Meeting
The Annual Meeting Lee First Baptist on Tuesday. Preachers
of the Middle Florida Church and will feature will be Rev.'s Murrell
Baptist Association will Rev. Delbert Redditt giv- Bennett and Gene
be held next Monday and ing the Doctrinal Ser- Stokes. Special music
Tuesday, Oct. 18 and 19. mon and Rev. Jeff Bailey will be presented by
The meetings will begin giving the inspirational folks from Elizabeth.
at 4 p.m. each day for the message. Special music Everyone is wel-
afternoon sessions and will be given by Lee come to come
the evening sessions be- First. and experience the fel-
gin at 6:30 p.m. Elizabeth Baptist lowship and blessings of
Monday's meet- Church near Monticello the music and preached
ing will convene at the will be the host Church Word.


A-lipa aTd the Omega
ginning and the End

First and"the Last
.. � w , . d 4


I












14 Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com




Zurn Back ZimC


Friday, October 15, 2010


From Friday, October 11, 1974 From Friday, September 27, 1974

Madison Enterprise-Recorder Madison Enterprise-Recorder


- aI- . -, .M AV- . ,w
Gaston Family Reunion - Soloman speaks of "Women more Precious than
pearls". I nominate these as falling into that category, Retha Gaston, Irene
Knight, Nora Bass, Annie Mae Jackson, Carrie Carter, Mae Gaston, Gladys Stir-
ling, and Forence Keeling.

From Friday, October 11, 1974
Madison Enterprise-Recorder


Tri-County - A fine group of Tri-County officials, M.C. Burnett, Manager,
stands with the trustees, C. A. Fulford, Benton Sale, Dalton Mercer, President of
Trustees; Norman Newman, T. S. Studstill, Ralph Williams, W H. Russell, and
W G. Clements.
Today In History * October 15, 1917

Mata Hari Executed

History. com
Mata Hari, the archetype of the se- ranking military officers of various na-
ductive female spy, is executed for espi- tionalities. In February 1917, French au-
onage by a French firing squad at thorities arrested her for espionage and
Vincennes outside of Paris. imprisoned her at St. Lazare Prison in
She first came to Paris in 1905 and Paris. In a military trial conducted in
found fame as a performer of exotic July, she was accused of revealing details
Asian-inspired dances. She soon began of the Allies' new weapon, the tank, re-
touring all over Europe, telling the story sulting in the deaths of thousands of sol-
of how she was born in a sacred Indian diers. She was convicted and sentenced
temple and taught ancient dances by a to death, and on October 15 she refused a
priestess who gave her the name Mata blindfold and was shot to death by a fir-
Hari, meaning "eye of the day" in Malay. ing squad at Vincennes.
In reality, Mata Hari was born in a small There is some evidence that Mata
town in northern Holland in 1876, and Hari acted as a German spy, and for a
her real name was Margaretha Geertrui- time as a double agent for the French,
da Zelle. She acquired her superficial but the Germans had written her off as
knowledge of Indian and Japanese an ineffective agent whose pillow talk
dances when she lived for several years had produced little intelligence of value.
in Malaysia with her former husband, Her military trial was riddled with bias
who was a Scot in the Dutch colonial and circumstantial evidence, and it is
army. Regardless of her authenticity, she probable that French authorities
packed dance halls and opera houses trumped her up as "the greatest woman
from Russia to France, mostly because spy of the century" as a distraction for
her show consisted of her slowly strip- the huge losses the French army was suf-
ping nude. fering on the western front. Her only real
She became a famous courtesan, and crimes may have been an elaborate stage
with the outbreak of World War I her cat- fallacy and a weakness for men in uni-
alog of lovers began to include high- form.


Four members of Boy Scout Troop 606 were elected into the Order of the Ar-
row. The lodge held its Fall Order the weekend of September 27, 28, and 29 at
Wallwood Boy Scout Reservation. Tap out ceremonies for the Semialachee
Lodge were held this past summer at camp. Assistant Scout Master Howell Ed-
wards, William Edwards, Don Fenneman, and Daniel Fenneman were among
forty-one Scouters honored within northwest Florida. Left to right in picture
Howell Edwards, Asst. Scout Master, William Edwards, Daniel Fenneman, and
Don Fenneman.


/ FALLFE

CARNIVAL &
Featuring Modern Midways - The Co
NOW THRU SUN
LANIER FIELD, M
Friday, Oct. 15 .. .6PM
Saturday, Oct. 16 .. .2PM
Sunday, Oct. 17 .. .2PM


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L GREATER MADISON COUNTY CH
248 SW Range
850-9;
Partial Proceeds to Benefit




pAEW
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red by the
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Avenue, J
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the Madison Y


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complete Carnival
DAY!!!
ADISON
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COMMERCE & TOURISM
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8
south Initiative




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Iwj


October 18, 1940
Mr. and Mr. G. W Rea
entertained Sunday at
noon in honor of their
son, Grady Rea, Jr., a
freshman at the Univer-
sity of Florida. Those
enjoying the dinner be-
sides the honoree were:
Miss Willamine Rea,
Miss Eddie Ragans, Miss
Margaret Hawkins and
Mr. Wesley Catledge,
also a student of the Uni-
versity of Florida.
Rev. and Mrs. J. L.
Odom attended church
at Macedonia Sunday
and Sunday night and
were dinner guests of
Mr. and Mrs. Byth Webb.
Bro. Nicholas preached
two interesting sermons.
Miss Helen Glenn
Merryday entertained at
a delightful three table
bridge party Saturday
afternoon honoring
Miss Jean Stoy, whose
marriage to Dr. C. W De-
Long of Live Oak, will be
an event of October 26,
in the First Methodist
Church.
Mr. and Mrs. H. K.
Jones announce the
marriage of their
daughter, Mary Eleise, to
Mr. Jack Saxon, son of
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Saxon.
The marriage was an
event of June 2nd in
Jasper, Fla.


MONDAYS 7 .I S 741 Wee4eRe WEDNESDAY WI/ Faaeq. .
2pc. Dark 2pc. Meal (Mixed) 9pc. (Mixed) Chicken Only $1199
1 - Side Dish 2- Side Dish ( i Ie
I 1 - Biscuit 1 - Biscuit 9pc. (Mixed) Meal
21g - Potatoes -n- Gravy
$401 SI6 1lg- Cole Slaw or llg Green Beans
ONLY All White Meat 4- Biscuits S1699
I W -Extra Charge
L ------------ --------------------------------J


October 13, 1950
Ashley Beggs had an
x-ray examination and
cast applied to a fracture
of his left leg, October 6.
He received the injury
playing football.
Jake Vickers gave a
very interesting talk on
his trip to the World Se-
ries in Philadelphia at
the Rotary Club meeting
Wednesday. He said he
was greatly impressed
with the "Phillies," but
couldn't understand
why they lost. Visitors
were L M Bevis, Madi-
son, R Y Hunter, Cres-
cent City, and Pete
Gibson, of Perry.
Mr. and Mrs. D H
Mays, Jr., announce the
birth of a son, D H Mays
III, October 10, in a Live
Oak hospital. The baby
was born on the second
wedding anniversary of
Mr. and Mrs. Mays.
Miss Myrtle Lou
Floyd celebrated her 15th
birthday Sept. 28 with a
birthday party given at
the home of her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. L T Floyd of
New Home. About 25 of
the honoree's friends at-
tended the affair, and she
received many lovely
gifts. The hostess served
birthday cake and punch
at the close of the
evening.

October 14, 1960
Mrs. Hallie Oxford
was unanimously elect-
ed Chairman of the
Madison County Health
and Hospital Board,
Monday, October 10, at
the regular monthly
meeting of the Board.
The Board also re-elect-
ed Frank E Cantey Sec-
retary and C. S. Blalock
Treasure, for the coming
fiscal year.
Mrs. Rosa Hay enter-
tained the Hadden-Mor-
row Circle Monday
afternoon with eleven
members. Mrs. L C Glass


read the Upper Room de-
votional and Mrs. Fred
Mickler gave a spiritual
life thought on Evening-
Morning-Noon Prayer.
Dr. Marshall Hamil-
ton was guest speaker on
the Layman's Day pro-
gram, Sunday morning
at the First Methodist
church. Each year lay-
men of the church pre-
sent a program, usually
in October, Church loyal-
ty month.
Mrs. T C McNally has
returned from a three
weeks' visit with friends
and relatives in Lakeland,
Sarasota and Tampa. She
has as her guest at her
home now, her aunt, Mrs.
Dora Connoley

October 16, 1970
Miss Norma Bailey,
daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Kelly Bailey, of
Madison was among stu-
dents that has been
awarded a graduate fel-
lowship in English, at
the University of West
Florida in Pensacola.
Miss Bailey was one of
four receiving the grant
of $200.
Mrs. Dannitte Hill
Mays III, a recent bride,
was honoree Tuesday
evening at a lovely mis-
cellaneous shower in the
social hall of Hanson
Methodist Church. Mrs.
Phillip Smith and Mrs.
Eugene Newsome were
hostesses when twenty-
five guests were enter-
tained.
Mrs. Flossie Mae
McDaniel gave her
brother, Mr. Charlie
Lee Brown, a surprise
birthday party at her
home on Saturday
night, October 10, 1970,
at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. M. D. Minter is
leaving soon to make her
home in Mobile, Ala.,
with her son and daugh-
ter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Tumble Minter.


ql***,







www.greenepublishing.corn


Friday, October 15, 2010


Outoors


Madison Enterprise-Recorder 15


Did You Know White-Tailed

Deer Like to Go Fishing?
And Other Unusual Deer Facts


Learning as much as possible about white-tailed
deer will enable you to hunt better and smarter. My
book, the "Deer Hunter's Pocket Reference," avail-
able at
www.protoolindustries.net/fears/index.html, is full
of information about deer. Here are some little-
known facts about whitetails.
* How Deer Go Fishing - A deer will kill and
eat fish by using its paws to disable fish such as
trout. Next it will take the fish in its mouth, chew it
and swallow it. Whitetails commonly eat fish up to
14-inches long.
* How a Deer Spots the Hunter - Deer can spot
movement so well, because they have the ability to
focus on both nearby and distant objects at the same
time. For instance, a deer can concentrate on what
it's eating, yet keep its eye out for predators at the
same time. The deer's eyes sit high and wide on its
head, which allows a deer to see almost completely
around itself.
* How Bucks Fight Back - When bucks fight,
they most often lock antlers, push and shove. But in
almost all other situations, the buck uses his sharp,
slashing hoofs as his number-one defense to strike
and cut other deer, kill snakes and ward-off preda-
tors.
* What You Can Learn about a Buck Deer -
Although you can't determine a buck's age by his
antlers, you can follow some general rules to ap-
proximate his age. Small and narrow racks general-
ly indicate a young deer, while wider and taller
racks usually imply an older deer. The number of
points a deer has on his rack may not represent the
length of time the deer has lived. A 1-1/2-year-old
buck raised on good soil may have 8 points and pos-
sibly a 6- to 10-inch inside spread of the main beam.
A 2-1/2- to a 4-year-old buck often will have 8 points
and measure 16 to 18 inches between the main
beams. A 5-1/2- to 6-1/2-year-old buck may have an
18- to 20-inch inside spread of the main beam and
sport 8 points or more. However, after 6-1/2-years,
the size of the bucks' antlers generally decreases.
From studies done at Auburn University in Auburn,
Alabama, scientists have learned that generally the
availability of highly-nutritious food plays a larger
role in antler development than any other factor.
* How Deer Eat - Deer browse, and when feed-
ing, a mature deer breaks off twigs and branches
and chops its food with its 24-grinding teeth. A deer
chews its food only briefly before passing the food to
its rumen, a storage compartment. Once the rumen
fills-up, the deer will move to heavy cover for protec-
tion to complete the process of chewing and digest-


414


I.
*.1


. .'


., Si


1~~

I ~


\ . 'i"'-.'< " "-,". " "


ing its food. Next it regurgitates the partially-digest-
ed material from the rumen, chews it briefly and
swallows the food for a second time. Then the food
passes through the deer's 65-foot-long intestine
where it's digested. Within 1-1/2-days after the deer
chews the food, this waste will have passed from the
deer's body
* How and Why Deer Lures Work - A wide va-
riety of scents, smells and sounds can attract deer,
which are highly-curious animals that will come to
investigate any new odor in their environment. But
not all odors will attract deer at all times. Also, deer
may not always come to investigate a new odor or
lure in an area during daylight hours.
* Which Deer Use Rubs - When hunters see a
deer rub in the woods, they often assume this rub
has been made by and used by a buck. Although
bucks most often make rubs, rubs can function as
signposts or communication devices between the
sexes. Does sometimes sniff, lick or even mark a
buck's rub with their foreheads.
* Which Deer Make Scrapes - Although most
hunters believe only dominant bucks make scrapes,
wildlife biologists have found indications that does
also make scrapes sometimes, and this behavior is-
n't limited to breeding season. The more scientists
study the scraping behavior of deer, the more they
realize how little they understand the social behav-
ior of whitetails.


The Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC)
has teamed up once
again with the "Wound-
ed Warrior Project" to
recognize the service of
our nation's injured war
veterans. The Wounded
Warrior Project (WWP)
is taking U.S. war veter-
ans on fishing trips on
Lake Okeechobee Mon-


day and Tuesday
FWC Chairman Rod-
ney Barreto presented
two war veterans with
three-day fishing licens-
es donated by FWC staff
and promotional pack-
ages containing items
donated by the freshwa-
ter fishing industry.
"The FWC wishes to
thank our service men
and women for the con-


Industrial and Commercial Handlers



.,................



M- 8 .- 5.-p
Sa- 5c5s. z 55 . . .


tributions they have
made to our freedom,"
Barreto said. "By part-
nering with the WWP,
we are helping these vets
experience some of the
best bass fishing in the
world."
The FWC's Division
of Freshwater Fisheries
Management (DFFM)
provided the promotion-
al packages, which in-
clude tackle samples,
fishing publications and
discount coupons. Addi-
tionally, the veterans re-
ceived a free "Get
Outdoors Florida!" t-
shirt. "Get Outdoors
Florida!" is an ongoing
campaign highlighting
the health and social
benefits of fishing and
other types of nature-
based recreation.
Not only are the fish-
ing trips fun, they're
also successful. In June,
a pair of Iraqi war veter-
ans, guided by a profes-
sional bass angler,


caught more than 60
bass during their fishing
expedition on Lake
Okeechobee.
The trips are spon-
sored by SMI Cold Ther-
apy of Butler, Pa., a
manufacturer of cold-
therapy products and
services for post-opera-
tive patient care in hos-
pitals and surgery
centers, and Basson-
line.com, Florida's
largest freshwater guide
service and outfitter for
bass fishing on Florida
lakes, canals and rivers.


Name: Cecilia
Age: 3 years 7 months
Breed: Diluted Calico
Sex: Female
Size: Medium
Spayed/Neutered: Yes

Cecilia is a laid back and beautiful diluted cal-
ico cat. She is older and past the kitten stage,
so she will not climb up the curtains. She is
friendly and loves being petted. Her previous
owner was unable to care for her and gave her
to the Suwannee Valley Humane Society.



Stone TCrab Season


Opens Oct. 15

The commercial and recreational harvest sea-
son for stone crab claws in Florida opens on Oct. 15.
The season will remain open through May 15.
Stone crab claws must be at least 2 3/4 inches in
length to be harvested legally, and claws may not be
taken from egg-bearing female stone crabs. Recre-
ational harvesters are allowed to use up to five stone
crab traps, and there is a daily bag limit of one gal-
lon of claws per person or two gallons per vessel,
whichever is less.
More information regarding the recreational
harvest of stone crab claws, as well as commercial
stone crab regulations and licensing information, is
available online at MyFWC.com/Rules (click on
"Fishing - Saltwater").
FWC Seeks Information
On Listed Species


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) is conducting
biological reviews on all
species on the state's list of
threatened species and species
of special concern. The FWC
seeks specific information on
these species from the public.
After new rules were
adopted in September for con-
serving and managing threat-
ened species in Florida, the
work began for compiling in-
formation on the 61 listed
species that have never had re-
views completed, or the re-
views were done so long ago
that the information is no
longer current. The list of
species is available at
MyFWC. com/ImperiledSpecies
(follow the link under "Latest
Updates").
FWC staff needs informa-
tion on population size and
trends, distribution and range,
and threats to the species.
"We want to make sure
we have the best available sci-
entific and commercial data as
we conduct these reviews,"
said Dr. Elsa Haubold, leader of
the FWC's Species Conserva-
tion Planning Section. "That is
why we are requesting infor-
mation about these species
from the public. We also will re-
search published studies and
contact known experts for in-
formation.
"Specific aspects of the
species' life history that may
influence the range and status


of the species in Florida will
help us make well-informed de-
cisions on whether to continue
listing each species."
After gathering informa-
tion from the public and com-
pleting the research, biological
review groups, appointed by
the Commission, will evaluate
the information this fall, using
the newly approved listing
process. Based on these re-
views, staff will then make rec-
ommendations to the
Commission on whether the
species should be on Florida's
threatened list. Before a
change in status is made, no
matter if the species is listed or
not, all reviewed species will
have a management plan devel-
oped that will outline the con-
servation goal and objectives
needed to improve or maintain
the species. The management
plans will be developed with
extensive public and stake-
holder input.
Information and data on
any of the 61 species should be
sent to: Biological Status Re-
views, Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission, 620 South Meridian
St., Mail Station 2A, Tallahas-
see, FL 32399-1600 or e-mailed
to Imperiled@My FWC.com.
Responses will be accepted un-
til 5 p.m., Nov. 1.
If providing information
on more than one species, send
a separate, clearly identifiable
section of the response devoted
to each species.


Ammodump
International, LLC



formerly B& GP Enterprises

Custom built AR-15's Have it your way
Revolvers, Pistols, Always in Stock
Re-Loading Components In Stock
Winchester Primers In Stock
Hodgdon, IMR, Alliant Powder, In Stock

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10 am to 4 pm Tues, Wed, Thur.
Call for weekend Gun Shows


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16 Madison Enterprise-Recorder


www.greenepublishing.com


Friday, October 15, 2010


Licensed Junk Dealer
I Buy Junk vehicles and
heavy metal, free removal.

Other Services Available
Mowing, bush hogging,
clean up, etc
Call Kevin @
850-210-3137
6/23, rmtn, n/c


I CAN DO
Artificial Insemination and
Embryo Transfer. Certified in
AI through ABS and ET
through Texas A&M
850-661-6868

6/23, rtn, n/c

I build Sheds, Decks &
Well Houses & I sell Steel
Buildings. Call Bob
850-242-9342
6/30, rtn, c

DUNN'S
Lawn Mower Repair
WELDING
New & Used Parts
Senior Citizen Discounts
Other Services Available
Mowing, Pressure Cleaning
& Clean-up
850-973-4723
2089 NE State Road 6
Madison, FL 32340
ANYTHING LEFT OVER 7 DAYS
WILL BE SOLD
rti, n/c

Wanted: Your Children
to babysit in my home, any
age and after school kids
welcome, Call Rebecca any-
time at 850-464-7040

9/29 - 10/20, pd


Housecleaning Services
Commercial and residential
850-464-2524
10/6 - 10/20, pd


Call 973-4141
to Place Your Ad!





Wanted: Chickens, turkeys,
guineas and peafowl.
850-661-6868
rtn, n/c

Wanted: BAND SAWMILL
CALL 850-973-4004. IF NO
ANSWER, PLEASE LEAVE
NAME, TELEPHONE NUMBER
AND INFO ABOUT THE MILL

rtni, n/c





Children's Dresses...

Size 3 - white long dress,
worn as flower girl dress, se-
quin/beadwork all on bodice,
sequin/beadwork/appliques
on bottom, built in crinoline.
-$50

Size 4 - off white dress,
worn as flower girl dress,
lace work around
bodice, pretty lace work at
bottom, cap sleeves - $25

Size 7-8 - off white dress,
worn as a flower girl dress,
overlay of lace
over entire dress, probably
knee to calf length - $25

Size 8 - white, long dress,
lace around neck with deco-
rative bodice - $25

Size 16 - white long pageant
gown, cap sleeves, white se-
quin work across entire
bodice and sleeves, buttons
around neck with circular
cut-out on back, beautiful
gown - $100

Teen dresses..

Size 7-8 - Kelli green gown,
lace overlay - $40

Size 8 - red gown, se-
quin/bead work around
bodice - $50

Size 14 (child's size 14 but
dress is for a teen division
approximately 13-15)-
GORGEOUS lime green


dress, strapless but with
spaghetti straps that cress
cross across the back, se-
quins spotted across the en-
tire gown, built in crinoline -
absolutely gorgeous. - $300
(paid over $500 for it)

Call 850-973-3497
and leave message.
3/3, irt, n/c


Diamond Plate Alum. Pick- Brand New
up truck tool boxes. 3/2 doublewide, set-up &
Various sizes. $50 each. Call delivery for only $33,597,
973-4172 -8am-5pm M-F call eric @ 386-752-8196 or
5/6-rtn, n/c jetdec @windstream.net
| | 9/29 - 10/27, c


BUSINESS CLOSING
SALE: phones $20, ship-
ping scale $30, embroidery
software $50, wireless
router $35, if interested call
850-673-1589 - Doug or
850-673-1776 - Sherry
9/3, ri, n/c


Mattress and boxsprings
for sale $300, call 929-4002
10/15,ppd

Buy, Sell or Trade
Call 973-4141
To Place Your Ad!





Apartment For Rent
2 bedroom 1 bath, dish
available, furnished or un-
furnished located near
NFCC & downtown Madi-
son, reasonable rent. Call
850-524-2093

10/13, 10/20, pd

2 bedroom 1 bath house
on 5 acres, 8 miles outside of
town, $550 per month and
$300 security deposit
869-0916
9/29, rtn, c

1 bedroom, 1 bath house,
large living room/dining
room, screened porch, stor-
age shed, double carport,
private, no pets, near Blue
Springs off Hwy 6. 1 year
lease with references.
$550 per month, $550 se-
curity deposit, 423-845-
0590
9/22, rtn, c

For Rent: 2 bedroom mobile
home, remodeled
Call 869-0916


9/10, rtn, c


Madison Heights
Apartments
1,2,3 & 4 bedroom apts.
Section 8 Housing designed
for low income families
150 SW Burngardner Dr.
Madison, FL
Phone 850-973-4290
TDD 711
Equal Housing
Opportunity
8/11, rtn, c


Southem lilas of

Cadison O apartments


Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. 1, 2, & 3 BR
HC & non-HC accessible
apts. Call 850-973-8582,
TDD/TTY 711. 315 SW
Lawson Circle,
Madison, FL 32340.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c


Greenville Pointe

Apartments

$199 Move-In Special!!
1, 2 & 3 BR HC & non-
HC accessible apts.
Rental assistance may be
available. HUD vouchers
accepted. Call 850-948-
3056. TDD/TTY 711.
192 NW Greenville
Pointe Trail, Greenville,
FL 32331.
Equal Housing
Opportunity
rtn, c


Cambridge Manor
Apartments designed for
Senior's and Disabled.
1 & 2BR
HUD vouchers accept-
ed Call 850-973-3786 -
TTY Acs 711.
404 SW Sumatra Rd,
Madison
This institution is an
Equal Opportunity
Provider and Employer



EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
rtn,cc


No Money Down
$0 down if you own your
own land! Interest rates as
low as 5% and payments of
$399.00 a month! Call Eric
@ 386-752-1454 or
jetdec @windstream.net
9/29 - 10/27, c


"Free Free Free"
For the month of October
only, purchase a new home
and get free septic & power
package, call Eric @
386-752-1454 or
jetdec @windstream.net


Commercial/Industrial
Property
with state highway frontage.
Corner lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Dr.
& Highway 53 South.
Enterprise Zone
Natural gas line, 8 inch wa-
ter main, access to city utili-
ties, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14.
Will build to suit tenant or
short or long term lease.
Call Tommy Greene 850-
973-4141

rtn, n/c


9/29 - 10/27,
Spaghetti House
mes Buy, ready to be rented, leased or
ised. All sold, call Diane at
arting 860-459-4269
delivery. 10/6, pd
5024 days


m10/13,
10/13,rtn,


Manufactured Ho
sell, trade. New, u
price ranges. St
$3500.00 including
Pat Riley 386-344-
9 am to 6 p


Drive a Little, Save
New 2011 32 wide
room starting at $29,9
mean Business! Cal
386-352-5355



Land Home Pack


starting at $39,900 with as
little as 10k down, bad credit
ok. Call Nathan
386-623-7495
10/13, ritn, c

5 bedroom 3 bath Home
New never lived in, close out
sale just 55k and it's yours.
Call 386-623-4218


10/13, rtn, c


a Lot! Piano lessons are now being
3 bed- offered for individuals who
900. We are beginners or veteran
[1 now players who wish to build or
polish their skills. Lessons
are one-on-one and reason-
o ably priced! For more infor-
mation, please call (850)
ages 464-0114 or (850) 973-4622.


10/13, pd

Granny's Indoor Yard
Sale Fri. & Sat 8:00 am -
until! Items brought in &
sold by the public, call in
advance to rent a table
($10.00 per day/per table)
Sell your unwanted items.
Call Granny @ 850-973-
3500, Thurs., Fri., & Sat.
Granny's Auction House
201 SW Rutledge St.,
Madison, Fl
10/13- 11/10,c


Got news
Straight from the
horse's mouth?


WeDo.

The
Madison County Carrier

& Madison
Enterprise Recorder


I FOR SALE I


Nursing Instructoi
for North Florida C
ty College in Perry
See www.nfcc.edu



Mystery Shop
earn up to $150 pe
der cover shoppers
judge retail and din
lishments. No ex
required. C
888-731-11


6/18, rtn, n/c


r Position Experienced Mechanic
ommuni- Needed for general farm
Florida. equipment. Ideal applicant is
for details dependable and trustworthy.
Welding and mechanical ex-
10/13, 10/20,c perience needed. Compensa-
tion equivalent to experience.
Excellent opportunity with a
)pers drug-free workplace. Please
.r day un- fax resume to 850-971-0006


needue to
ing estab-
perience
,�n


/21, rtn, n/c


80 I Call 973-4141
10/6 -10/27, pd to Place Your Ad!


Minature daschunds for
sale. 9 weeks old, call for
more info, 850-973-6678,
leave message
9/29, rtn, n/c


EMEM^


Need a GreenHome Energy
Star, call us, great rates on
insurance 758-9538


Energy Star I
New ready to deli
rates on insure
758-9538



New Homr
$79,900, Palm Har
Call 888-313-



32 x 80 Palm I
$79,900 4 bedroo
758-9538



32 x 60 Palm I
$63,900, C
758-9538


Buy, Sell or
Trade In The
Classifieds
Call 973-4141
To Place
Your Ad Today


County Camp Road, 1.8
acres, city water, cleared.
Owner Financing with
$2,500 down, $229/ month.
Call Chip Beggs
850-973-4116.

8/18, rtn,

1/2 acre buildable rural lot
for sale. Well, Pole, canopy
road frontage, 535 SW Bryan
Earnhardt Rd., Madison
$13,000. 850-584-6880

10/13 - 11/3, pd





For Sale:
House & Lot
In the Town of Suwannee
was $135,000, Now $99,000.
2 BR/1 BA. Fully Furnished,
New Metal Roof, and New
Paint. Utility Building with
Washer and Dryer. Nice Fruit
Trees. 386-719-0421


rtn, n/c


d it in to:


nc.
FL 32341
payment
Inc. in the
unty rate


County


-----------
---------


Fill o




P.O. [
S Wit
made
amou


1 $35


I Name:_.

/ Address:


m City:-
State:-
Phone:_


ut the form below and sen


Greene Publishing, Ii
)rawer 772 * Madison,
th money order or check p
out to Greene Publishing,
nt for the In or Out-of-Co


5In County $45 Out-of-


Zip:


L -------------------J


AUCTION SATURDAY
10/13- 11/5, n/c OCTOBER 16 AT 6:30
PM. 1693 SW MOSELEY
HALL RD (CR360) MADI-
omver. Great SON. LIQUIDATING
MERCHANDISE FROM
ance LARGE RETAILERS. WE
WILL BE SELLING
10/13-11/5, n/c ITEMS AS NAME BRAND
TOOLS, AIR CONDI-
TIONERS, AUTOSHEL-
ies TER, COOKWARE,
bor loaded SEAL-N-SAVE, INVERT-
2899 ER, AIR BEDS. JIG SAW,
DRILLS, SHOP VACS.,
10/13- 11/5,n/c FOOD PROCESSOR.
WEED EATERS, DVD
PLAYERS, GPS AND
harbor MANY MORE ITEMS.
m, 2 bath AIR CONDITIONED,
8 COMFY SEATS AND
LOTS OF FUN. 10% BUY-
10/13-11/5, n/c ERS PREMIUM. MC,
VISA, DISCOVER, DEBIT
harbor CARDS, CHECKS AND
all CASH ACCEPTED. AU691
8 RON COX. AB2490. 850
973 2959
10/13- 11/5, n/c


Deadline For Classifieds

(850) 973-4141
CLASSIFI DS 3:00 p.m. Every Monday


OBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
mi


Temporary Position

Someone that can speak, spell & type the King's language
correctly, no exceptions. Research & typesetting of books to
be published. Job could last approximately 60-90 days or
more. Call Tommy Greene @ 973-4141 Monday - Friday,
8 am - 5 pm
9/24, r , n/c

Inside Account Management- Looking for an enthusiastic
individual with an outgoing personality to manage our For-
tune 1000 accounts. Must be a self-starter, professional, orga-
nized, articulate, be a team player, and have a minimum of 2
years in Marketing or Customer Service related field. Some
travel required.

Benefits, competitive wage & Opportunity for growth. Please
mail resume to following: Corporate Graphics -240 SW
Commerce Drive, PO Box 650 Madison, FL 32341, fax to:
(850)973-1377 Attn: Human Resources or email to cf-
bass@cgintl.com. Please no phone calls.

10/8,10/13,c

The Third Judicial Circuit currently has the following posi-
tions available:
Administrative Assistant III, Live Oak
User Support Analyst, Lake City
Administrative Services Manager, Live Oak
For more information go to: www.jud3.flcouns.org
10/15


PIANO
LESSONS I







MAGENTA


#ii h #new (i-)neIw# #i (i


BLACK


Friday, October 15, 2010


www.greenepublishing.com


Madison Enterprise-Recorder * 17


LEG~ALI


CASE NO:. 2010-85-CC
CIVIL DIVISION


Defendant
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER ES. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that under a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the West door of the MADISON County Courthouse, MADISON,
Florida at 11:00 a.m. on OCTOBER 21, 2010 the following described prop-
erty:
Parcel number: 00-00-00-4366-002-000
LOT 20, BLOCK D, PLANT ADDITION TO CITY OF MADISON, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS OF THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT OF MADISON
COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 507 MOORE STREET, MADISON, FLORIDA
32340.
IF ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THIS SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE SALE.


Dated: Octoberl, 2010
Cary A. Hardee, II
Post Office Drawer 450
Madison, Florida 32341
Tel:(850)973-4007
Fax:(850)973-8495
Attorney for Plaintiff


TIM SANDERS, Clerk of the Court
By: April Herring, Deputy Clerk


10/8, 10/15

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION NO. 2010-342-CA
MADISON COUNTY COMMUNITY BANK
Post Office Box 834
Madison, Florida 32341
Plaintiff,
vs. FORECLOSURE AND
OTHER RELIEF
LOURDES M. FAUSTIN
6934 Finamore Circle
Lake Worth, Florida 33467: unknown tenants; and other unknown parties in
possession, including the unknown spouse of any person in possession of the
property, and if a named Defendant is deceased, the surviving spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming by, through, un-
der or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural
or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of
the named or described Defendants,
Defendant.

NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Sum-
mary Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 12, 2010, in the above
styled action I, Tim Sanders, Clerk of the Court, will sell at public sale the
following described real property:
Lot No. 13 Norton Creek , a subdivision as per the plat thereof filed at Plat
Book 2, Page 31-33 of the Public Records of Madison County, Florida. Sub-
ject to Restrictions and Protective Covenants as recorded in the official
records of Madison County, Book 750, Page 257-258.
The sale will be held on November 3, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. (or as
soon thereafter as possible, provided that said sale must be commenced prior
to 2:00 p.m.) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the West door of the
courthouse in Madison County, in Madison, Florida, in accordance with Sec-
tion 45.031, Florida Statutes.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the owner of the above described property as of the date of
the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Sondra Williams,
court administrator, Post Office Box 1569, Lake City, Florida 32056, tele-
phone:(386)758-2163, within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated: October 12, 2010.
Tim Sanders,
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ Karen Holman
As Deputy Clerk

10/15, 10/22



HAPPY BIRTHDAY ADS

SNOW Just

$25!




Wish someone a Happy Birthday in
The Madison Carrier or

The Enterprise-Recorder.
Call Mary Ellen, Jeanette or Dorothy

973-4141




L Onthe end,

it's all about the baby.






' ' ' .. .W.... :
Probe sovd


Aw DF0 pW0RE


S


L l80-6,dpt aopford.g*,0 * :1


IN THE COUNTY COURT THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
VIVIAN W. SEARCY
d/b/a SEARCH REAL ESTATE
Plaintiff
vs
KENYA TOOKES


Any person clai f


any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file
a claim within 60 days after the sale
Dated this 29 day of September, 2010.

Tim Sanders
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Ramona Dickinson
Deputy Clerk

N ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT,
persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the MADISON County Courthouse at 850-
973-1500, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Ser-
vice.
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J. STERN, P.A.
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND ROAD SUITE 400, PLANTATION, FL 33324-
3920
(954) 233-8000 Fax (954) 233-8705

10/8, 10/15


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS OF THE
NORTH FLORIDA BROADBAND AUTHORITY
OPERATIONS COMMITTEE
The North Florida Broadband Authority ("NFBA") announces a meeting of
the NFBA Operations Committee that all interested persons are invited to
attend. The NFBA is a legal entity and public body created pursuant to the
provisions of Section 163.01, Florida Statutes, and an Interlocal Agreement
among Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jefferson,
Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Putnam, Suwannee, Taylor, Union and Wakulla
Counties and municipalities of Cedar Key, Cross City, Lake City, Live Oak,
Monticello, Perry, White Springs and Worthington Springs, Florida. The
NFBA's Operations Committee meetings will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Thurs-
day, November 4, 2010, Thursday, December 2, 2010 and Thursday, January
6, 2011; at Courtyard by Marriott, 3700 SW 42nd Street, Gainesville, Flori-
da 32608. The NFBA's Operational Committee meeting will be to conduct
general business of the committee. If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the NFBA with respect to any matter considered at the meeting,
such person will need a record of the proceedings and may need to ensure
that a verbatim record is made, including the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be made. In accordance with the Americans with Dis-
abilities Act, persons needing special accommodation or an interpreter to
participate in this proceeding or have any questions please contact Faith
Doyle, Clerk to the NFBA Board at (877) 552-3482 or (407) 629-6900 at least
one (1) business day prior to the date of the meeting.

10/15


Your Local Paper Has Lots To Offer:

* Community Events

" Sports

* Local News

* Classifieds



Call 973-4141 to start your subscription today!









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Man Goes "TOAD-AL" at High School Reunion

BEXAR COUNTY- After using Thera-Gesic` on aching joints,
Tom W. attended last Friday's reunion where, according to 5 amused and
concerned classmates, he went TOAD-AL. He squatted, extended both
arms to the ground, arched his back and did his best to hop numerous times
while croaking.
When asked to explain his behavior, he painlessly replied,
"None of your dang business!"

SAVE, LIVE,
BUY THERA-GESIC.








:*. Offered in - .Tracts * High Qualiti Timber .o. "-
* 1300 Ac oflincome Producing Irrigated Cropland -
*'8 milese' u[ rit.er Irunidge on Ihe FlinI Ri' er -
-,.000 bq. FI RilerIroni Main Lodge. 1.Brokr.
* -E'nsnielt Managed Ior Deer I&Qu"ai"1. P r I epi
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I . I S TATE IDE



A A lIl *fy i Am
CLSIID RGA


Adoption

Pregnant? Considering
adoption? A childless,
successful, woman
seeks to adopt & needs
your help! Financially
secure. Expenses paid.
Call Margie. (ask for
michelle/adam).
(800)790-5260. FL Bar#
0150789
Business Opportunities

THINK CHRISTMAS -
START NOW! OWN A
RED HOT! DOLLAR,
DOLLAR PLUS, MAIL-
BOX OR DISCOUNT
PARTY STORE FROM
$51,900 WORLDWIDE!
100 % TURNKEY CALL
NOW (800)518-3064
WWWDRSS4.COM

Equipment For Sale

NEW Norwood
SAWMILLS-Lumber-
Mate-Pro handles logs
34" diameter, mills
boards 28" wide. Auto-
mated quick-cycle-saw-
ing increases efficiency
up to 40%!
www.NorwoodSawmills.
com/300N (800)661-7746
Ext 300N

Financial

IT'S YOUR MONEY!
Lump sums paid for
structured settlement or
fixed annuity payments.
Rapid, high payouts.
Call J.G. Wentworth.
(866)294-8772. A+ Better
Business Bureau rating.

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!!! $$$ As
seen on TV$$$ Injury
Lawsuit Dragging? Need
$500-$500,000++within
48/hrs? Low rates AP-
PLY NOW BY PHONE!
Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321
www.lawcapital.com

Help Wanted

Colonial Life seeks en-
trepreneurial profes-
sional with sales
experience to become a
District Manager.
Life/Health license is
required. Substantial
earnings potential.
Please contact mered-
ith.brewer@coloniallife.
com or call (904)424-5697

13 DRIVERS NEEDED!
Top 5 % Pay! Excellent


Benefits Latest Technol-
ogy Need CDL-A & 3
mos recent OTR.
(877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

Drivers-CDL/A $2,000
SIGN-ON BONUS! Start
up to .42 CPM. Good
Home Time and Bene-
fits. OTR Experience Re-
quired. No Felonies.
Lease Purchase Avail-
able. (800)441-4271 x FL-
100

THR & Associates, the
world's largest traveling
road show, is seeking
Buyers, Assistant Man-
agers, Managers and
District Managers. Ex-
perience with antiques,
collectibles, coins, pre-
cious metals and sales
are highly desired. Must
be willing to travel and
potentially relocate.
Earn 35K-125K. To apply
go to
www.thrassociates.com/
careers

Drivers - FOOD
TANKER DRIVERS
NEEDED OTR positions
available NOW! CDL-A
w/ Tanker REQ'D. Out-
standing pay & Benefits!
Call a recruiter TODAY!
(877)484-3042
www.oakleytransport.co
m

WANTED: LIFE
AGENTS. Earn $500 a
Day, Great Agent Bene-
fits. Commissions Paid
Daily, Liberal Under-
writing. Leads, Leads,
Leads. LIFE INSUR-
ANCE, LICENSE RE-
QUIRED. Call
(888)713-6020

Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIR-
ING - Train for high
paying Aviation Mainte-
nance Career. FAA ap-
proved program.
Financial aid if quali-
fied - Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute
of Maintenance
(866)314-3769.

Out of Area Real Estate

NC Mountain Land
Mountain top tract, 2.6
acres, private, large pub-
lic lake 5 min away, own-
er must sell, only
$25,500, call (866)275-0442


I~II~IBUMOU #BLACK


MAG1?NI\TA


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 3RD JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 2008-646-CA
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE BNC MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-1
PLAINTIFF
VS.
CARL EUGENE MCKISSICK; MARY ANN
MCKISSICK; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION
DEFENDANTS)
RE- NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting
the Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated Sesptember 28, 2010 en-
tered in Civil Case No. 2008-646-CA of the Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial
Circuit in and for MADISON County, Madison, Florida, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Courthouse of the
MADISON County Courthouse, 125 SW Range Avenue, Madison, Florida,
at 11:00 a.m. on the 20 day of October, 2010 the following described proper-
ty as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit:
A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH;
RANGE 11 EAST, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID
SECTION 18, AND SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 00�26' 46"
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 666.72 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF SE
CANDLESTICK TRAIL; THENCE NORTH 89� 41' 49" WEST ALONG
SAID CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE OF 875.98 FEET TO INTERSECTION
OF SAID CENTERLINE AND THE CENTERLINE OF SE CAMELOT
WAY; THENCE ALONG SAID CENTERLINE THE FOLLOWING
COURSES; NORTH 18� 30' 27" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 203.42 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 15� 54' 32" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 216.63 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 02� 20' 09" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 256.86 FEET;
THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 89� 43' 47" EAST,
A DISTANCE OF 986.44 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.


i. fh� .,


A


h- th� ..I� if






www.greenepublishing.com
18Madison Enterprise-Recorder alleen Contest W winners


Friday, October 15, 2010


First Place
John Beggs - 3 yrs.


First Place
Faizah Young - 6 yrs.


First Place
Kylie Andrews - 10 yrs.


~ Honorable Mentions ~


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