Citation
Mary Elton, or, Self-control

Material Information

Title:
Mary Elton, or, Self-control
Added title page title:
Self-control
Added title page title:
Mary Elton
Creator:
Paull, H. B. ( Author, Primary )
Billing, J. ( Printer )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Frederick Warne and Co.
Manufacturer:
Billing
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1876
Language:
English
Physical Description:
123, [4] p., [2] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Discipline -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1876 ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1876 ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1876 ( rbprov )
Baldwin -- 1876
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Surrey -- Guildford
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note:
Title page and frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. H.B. Paull.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALH0863 ( NOTIS )
61250030 ( OCLC )
026787677 ( AlephBibNum )

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Front. Mary Elton,



Sen Se eens

S=E=L_E- CO N= ReO=







LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO,,
BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.



MARY ELTON:

OR,

SELF-CONTROL,

BY

MRS. iH. 5B. PAUL.



LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CoO,,

BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN,



MARY ELTON,



CHAPTER I.
ONE fine afternoon, many years ago, a stage-
coach, with its four foaming horses, stopped
at the corner of one of the principal streets
in London,

“There ’tis, there ’tis!” exclaimed a little
rosy, flaxen-haired girl of about three years
old, whom the guard had just lifted from the
coach and placed on the pavement. “ There
tis!” and she immediately started off at a
rapid pace, to the great alarm of the passen-
gers. A gentleman was assisting a lady to
alight: he turned quickly, and said, “ Follow
her, my love; I will attend to the luggage.”
The lady smiled, and pointed to her little girl,
now standing on the steps of a door at some
distance. In the parlour of that house sat a
lady at work, but not diligently : she seemed
to be in anxious expectation, and every now
and then would look up and listen. The



4 Aiary Elton ; or,

child, who had been endeavouring to reach
the knocker, no sooner saw her parents ap-
proaching, than she again exclaimed, “ Here
*tis, mamma! here ’tis!” There was no mis-
taking that silvery voice. Grandmamma
started up, and by the time Mr. and Mrs.
Elton reached the house, little Mary had
been folded in the arms of her fond grand-
mamma, whose house she so well remem-
bered. That was, indeed, a happy evening;
so much to tell of their journey, and the
pleasant hours they had spent many miles
away with Mr. Elton’s parents. Mary’s little
tongue went so fast that, at length tired out,
she was carried to bed. Her parents, also
fatigued with the journey, followed soon after,
but before entering their own room, they did
as many.kind parents, especially mothers,
often do—they went to look at their little
girl, The mother of the poet Cowper must
have done this, for on receiving her picture
he writes—
‘ Thy nightly visits to my chamber made,
To see if I was safe and warmly laid.”

Little Mary was calmly sleeping, her flaxen
curls falling around her pillow, and her rosy
cheeks flushed with sleep and excitement ;



Self-Control. 5

she looked, indeed, the picture of happy
repose, and as her young mamma kissed
her, she sighed and thought how quickly the
pleasant hours of infancy and youth would
pass away.

Mary Elton was naturally clever and in-
telligent, and being the only child in the
family, every one was ready to teach her. To
her mother’s young sisters she became at
once a plaything and a pupil; her father
encouraged her to learn by his notice and
help, so that before Mary had reached the
age of four years, she could read any book,
and had acquired as much general knowledge
as many children double her age.

It was well for Mary that her mother was
a woman of superior and cultivated mind, one
who knew well how much more important is
the education of the moral qualities of the
mind by early discipline and training, than
the mere acquirement of knowledge. She
saw that her little girl would have no diffi-
culty in learning with so many teachers; she
therefore took upon herself the task of teach-
ing her patience, moral courage, truthfulness,
and, above all, self-control, without which,
like a rudderless ship, many a fine character



6 Mary Elton ; or,

has been lost amidst the storms and tempests
of life.

Mary was a child of great energy, extreme
sensitiveness, and warm, impetuous feelings :
still there was a timid amiability about her,
which made her shrink from offending and
dread the anger of those she loved. This
would have made her untruthful, but for her
mother’s careful training ; yet the disposition
that gave Mrs. Elton the greatest anxiety,
was an earnest clinging to anything she loved
or wished for, which made her almost broken-
hearted at a disappointment, and caused her
to shed agonies of tears at the death of a pet
bird, or the destruction of a favourite toy. In
some respects, this earnest clinging to what
she loved or delighted in was an advantage.
Once make her love a study, and it ceased to
be a difficulty ; she would throw her whole
soul into whatever she undertook, whether a
sum in arithmetic or a good game of play,
when once fairly interested in it.

Mary, however, had her favourite employ-
ments ; and while even very young, reading
was the chief. Lessons, work, walking, and
even play would be forgotten in the delight
of a new book; while needlework, requiring



Self-Control, 7

quiet attention and less excitement, was hate-
ful to her. Added to this—for we must tell
all the truth—Mary’s eager impatience made
her careless and untidy in her habits, so that,
when required to work, a work-box, in which
sometimes neither thimble, needle, nor cotton
could be found, caused the loss of more time
than the work itself would have occupied.
Mrs. Elton’s determination that a certain
quantity of needlework should be gone through
daily, was Mary’s severest discipline— she
knew it must be done; and besides this, it
was made to contribute to her pleasures: her
mother, knowing her love for books, had
promised that every week’s successful con-
quest of untidy habits should add to her
pocket-money for the purpose of increasing
her library. Mary wasa very little girl when
this rule was made, and our readers will not
suppose that she gained the promised reward
every week; yet, by the time she was six
years old, very few children of that age could
boast of a larger library. And although
juvenile books were not then so numerous
as they are now, Mary had a well-chosen
collection, many of which she had read so
often as almost to know them by heart. It



8 Afary Elton ; or,

was unlikely, however, that a little girl not six
years old could understand all she read ; her
mother therefore encouraged her to ask ques-
tions, and often explained to her ina very
simple manner what had before seemed diffi-
cult and puzzling. One book, which was a
great favourite, Mary had read several times
without talking about it to her mother. She
would have saved herself a great deal of foolish
fear had she not forgotten to do so.



CHAPTER II.

“Miss MARY, it is time for you to learn your
lessons,” said a neat, pleasant-looking woman,
as she entered the nursery one evening : “you
know your mamma told you not to read too
long, before she went out.”

Mary was seated on the window-seat, with
her feet raised, so that her knees formed a
reading-desk for her book. She looked up—
“Oh Nurse, just one little piece more, to
finish the chapter; I won’t be long; please
let me?”

Nurse was very fond of her little charge ;
she could not resist the pleading look, so she
quietly walked round the room, picking up



Self-Control, 9

Mary’s thimble from the floor, and folding up
the work which she had thrown on a chair.
She next took out Mary’s lesson-books, and
placed them on the table: five minutes
passed,— Miss Mary,” said nurse, “ when
your mamma was a little girl I never had to
tell her twice to do anything.”

Mary started from herseat. “Dear Nurse,
I am very sorry, but you know I shall never
be as good as mamma was; do you know, I
quite forgot my lessons, and had begun
another chapter?” then, seeing her books, she
said, “Oh, thank you, Nurse. Howkind! I
shall soon learn them.” She reseated herself at
the window, but daylight was fast disappearing;
and Mary soon found she could not long see
to read, and was obliged to wait for candles.
It had been a rough October day ; the leaves
blown by the wind from the trees of an adjoin-
ing square were now whirling in circles through
the street. Mary pressed her face against the
window-pane, and looked out. Presently the
lamplighter turned the corner, his torch
flaring in the wind as he ran rapidly from one
lamp to the other. London streets were not
then all lighted with gas, and the flaming red
torch was a very amusing sight to children.



Io Mary Elton ; or,

Little boys and girls now would fancy Lon-
don a dull, dismal-looking place, if they could
see it as it appeared then, with no greater
light in the streets and shops than dim oil-
lamps. Mary’s thoughts, as she watched the
lamplighter, were not, however, about him, but
about the wind, which seemed every moment
as if it would blow out his torch; and she was
glad when Nurse entered with candles, that
she might finish her lessons.

“May I sit up a little longer to-night,
Nurse?” asked Mary, when the clock struck
eight.

Nurse looked surprised. “ Why, my dear?”
she asked.

“Oh,” said Mary, “because it will make me
tired, and then I shall go to sleep directly I
get into bed, and not hear that dreadful
wind.”

“But the wind cannot hurt you, my dar-
ling, in your nice warm bed, with the curtains
drawn round,”

“No, I know that: Iam not afraid of the
wind making me cold; but don’t talk about
it, Nurse, please, it frightens me.”

Nurse was surprised. .Mary was by no
means a fearful child, and what could make



Self-Control. 11

her so afraid of the wind was a mystery, yet
she allowed her to remain half an hour later,
and then went with her to her room. It
certainly was a very rough night. Mr. Elton’s
house being at the corner of two streets, and
Mary’s bedroom at the top, the roaring of the
wind through the roof, and down the chimney,
sounded rather alarming. Mary trembled so
much while being undressed, that Nurse
could not resist throwing her arms round her,
and asking—“My darling, what is it makes
you so afraid?”

“Oh, Nurse,” said Mary, clinging closely
to her, “the wind, the wind ; oh, listen ; it will
blow the house down, I am sure it will.”

“Nonsense, my dear, if that is all you are
afraid of, it is very silly ; your papa’s house is
too strongly built to be blown down easily:
besides, you forget that God takes care of
people while they sleep, if they pray to Him.”

“I know He does, Nurse; but even then I
know the wind does blow houses down some-
times.”

Nurse hardly knew what to reply, but she
encouraged the little trembling girl to repeat
her prayers, and then reminded her of the
words she had uttered ;--



12 Mary Elton ; cr,

“J lay my body down to sleep,
Let angels guard my head,
And through the hours of darkness keep
Their watch around my bed.”
After covering her up warmly and drawing
the curtains, Nurse sat down by the bedside,
and tried to soothe the little girl to sleep by
telling her how unlikely it would be for such
a thing to happen as that large, strong houses
in London should be blown down; but it was
no use, Mary knew such things had happened,
she said, and would not be convinced. After
this she lay so quiet for some time that Nurse
thought she was asleep, and rose to go.

“Stop, Nurse, please,” said Mary, who had
been thinking deeply, “can I not say a prayer
to God about the wind, and ask Him not to
let it hurt the house?”

Nurse sat down again by the bed; the tears
came into her eyes, and she did not speak fora
minute or two. Mary pulled back the curtain
and looked ather; she had always seemed like
a picture to Mary, with her neat mob-cap, dark
stuff dress, and snow-white kerchief pinned
across her bosom. She was not old, although
sorrow had silvered the dark hair that was
so smoothly braided in white bands under her



Self-Control, 13

cap. Like all servants who have lived long in
one family, she was deeply attached to Mrs,
Elton, whom she had nursed in her infancy,
and dearly fond of the little girl who now
turned to her for instruction.

“Miss Mary,” she said, “your dear mamma
is the best person to teach you these things.”

“Qh, but she is not here now,” said Mary;
“do tell me one little prayer to say!”

“My dear, you can read the prayers at
church ; do you know which is the Litany ?”

“Oh yes,” said Mary, “it has a short prayer
for everything. I know: is there one about
the wind in that?”

“Yes, my dear, there is.”

“Do teach it me, then, Nurse,” said the
little girl, getting out of bed ; and, kneeling
down, she repeated after her nurse the beauti-
ful words,—“From lightning and tempest,
from plague, pestilence, and famine, from
battle and murder, and from sudden death,
good Lord, deliver us.”

The simple faith of the little child clung at
once to what she had been told, that God is
the hearer and answerer of prayer, and she
laid her head on the pillow, saying, “Oh,
Nurse, I feel quite safe now: tempest means



14 Afary Elton ; or,

high wind, and it would be sudden death if I
were to be killed by the house falling upon
me. Will you stay and repeat those words
until I have learnt them ?”

Nurse did as the little girl requested, and
stayed by her side till she fell asleep with
almost the words on her lips,



CHAPTER III.
THE next day, as soon as Mrs. Elton sat
down to work, Mary brought her little chair,
and seating herself at her mother’s side, in-
quired,—“ Mamma, what is a hurricane ?”

“A hurricane, Mary! What has put that
into your head ?”

“The wind last night, mamma.”

“But there was no hurricane last night,
Mary.”

“No, mamma; or else it would have blown
the house down.”

Mrs. Elton smiled. “There is not much
fear of your papa’s house being blown down
by the wind, Mary; but who has been telling
you this?”

“No one, mamma; only: ?

“Well,—speak out, my love,” said Mrs,

>





Self-Control. 13

Elton, as Mary held down her head, and
looked half ashamed.

“Why, mamma,’ she said, at last, “you know
my book called, ‘The History of a Bible, writ-
ten by Itself?”

Mrs. Elton remembered the book.

“Well, mamma, there is a story in it of
some very good people, who were at family
prayer one morning, and suddenly a great
wind arose, called a hurricane, and they had
only just time to escape out of the house,
when it was blown down by the wind: ever
since I read it, I have always felt afraid when
_ the wind blew hard.”

“Why did you not tell me before, Mary ?”
said her mother.

“T meant to, mamma; but very often, after
the wind had been blowing in the night, the
sky would look so bright and clear in the
morning, that I forgot all about it.”

“And what has made you come to me
now ?”

“Why, last night, mamma, I was more
afraid than ever ; and dear Nurse taught me a
little prayer, and told me I should ask you;
although I did not tell her what I had read in
my book about the hurricane. But, mamma,



16 Mary Elton ; or,

what is a hurricane? Is it not a very strong
wind?”

“It is, Mary; but the highest wind that
ever blew in England is nothing to a hurricane
abroad. Did not the people you read of live
in the West Indies ?”

“Ves, mamma. Oh, I never thought of
that |”

“Hurricanes in those countries are, in-
deed, very dreadful,’ continued Mrs. Elton.
“ Houses, trees, and even whole villages, are
sometimes destroyed by their violence, and
when they happen at sea, the Waves rise moun-
tains high ;—ships are cast upon rocks, or sink
into the boil!n¢ ocean, while all on board perish.
Weare highly favoured in England, where such
wind is never known; although sometimes:
even here it will tear up trees by the roots, or
blow down stacks of chimneys ; but my little
Mary should remember who it is that ‘holdeth
the winds in His fist, and the waters in the
hollow of His hand;’ and then, whether she
sleeps in England or in India, she will lie
down in safety.”

After her mother had ceased speaking,
Mary sat for some time silent and thought-
ful: at length she said, “Mamma, why does



Self-Control, 17

God allow such high winds to arise ?—what
use can they be ?”

“Ah, Mary!” said Mrs. Elton. “God does
many things for which we cannot give a reason.
We know they must be right, because ‘He
doeth all things well.’ Grown people, as well
as little children, often find fault with what
they cannot understand ; yet, Mary, I can give
you a reason for high winds. Without them,
the air we breathe would become impure, and
we should haye sickness, fevers, and death;
whereas, the violent agitation of the air—
which is called wind—purifies it, and prevents
many serious consequences.”

“Oh, mamma!” said Mary, “how silly 1
was not to talk to you about it before. I
think J shall almost like to hear the wind blow
after what you have told me. But, mamma,
did you ever hear of houses being blown down
in England ?”

“Yes, I have, Mary; some very old houses,
that were going to be pulled down.”

“Oh, mamma!” said Mary, “do tell me all
about it. When did it happen?”

“When I was a little girl, Mary; but I
cannot allow you to sit idle any longer,” said
Mrs. Elton, smiling at the wide open eyes and

B



18 Mary Elton ; Or,

excited looks of her little girl, “You can
finish that hem you began yesterday, while I
tell you.”

Mary held down her head, and said, slowly
“T do not know where my thimble is.”

“Safe in your work-box, this time, Mary;
and I have cotton and a needle for you.”

Mary threaded her needle, and gave the
work to her mother to begin: as she took it
again from her, she said, in a low tone, as if
half ashamed of the excuse, “Can I listen
and work too, mamma ?” f

“Try, Mary; it is not such a very difficult
thing, after all.” Mary began to work, and
Mrs. Elton commenced her story.

“When I was a little girl about nine years
old, several new streets were made near to
your grandpapa’s house; old streets destroyed;
many houses pulled down; and others re-
paired and beautified. Three very old build-
ings stood nearly opposite to us: two, near
the corner, were first removed ; but the third,
_the most unsafe of them all, remained, only
supported on one side by the wall of the
next house. So dangerous and tottering did
it appear, that the neighbours applied to the
owners to have it taken down, or supported by



Self-Control, 19

large beams, called props, which I think you
must have seen sometimes, Mary, planted ina
sloping position against houses, while those
adjoining are under repair. But nothing was
done; and it seemed very strange to me, as
a little girl, that, while the fear of the house
falling upon them would cause the neighbours
to avoid that side of the street, yet there were
people living in the house!”

“People living in it, mamma!” said Mary,
almost breathless.

“Yes, my dear: they were very poor, and
they could live there without paying any rent,
which appeared a great inducement, for they
would stay, although several times warned of
their danger. One morning, after a rather
rough night, and just before breakfast, I went
into my bed-room for a book I had left on the
dressing-table, which stood before the window.
T had just placed my hand upon it, when a
noise like thunder startled me; and, in a mo-
ment, the window became darkened, as with a
cloud of smoke. Much terrified, I dropped
the book, and flew out of the room, scarcely
knowing what I was about. On the stairs, I
met a servant, who exclaimed, ‘ The house !—
the house! it is down: and all those poor peo-



20 Mary Elton ; or,

ple in it!’ I hardly knew where I went next;
but I remember my mother taking me by the
hand and. leading me into a room, while she
gently and quickly calmed my fears for my
own safety, and told me that everything was
being done to discover if the family were
buried in the ruins.”

“And, mamma,—oh, mamma! were they?”
said Mary.

“My dear,” said Mrs. Elton, “this is the
most wonderful part of my story. The whole
family were in the house when it fell, yet
not one was hurt! Don’t excite yourself
so, my love,” ‘said Mrs. Elton, as Mary with
flushed cheeks threw her work on the floor,
clasped her hands tightly together, and said,
almost in a whisper—

“Mamma; how did they escape?”

“T will tell you how it happened. The
family were in the kitchen, underground : they
had heard strange noises during the night; but
just as they were going to begin breakfast, a
dreadful cracking sound caused them all to
rush upstairs into the passage leading to the
street-door. Before they could open it, the
building gave way, and fell around them
with the noise of thunder; yet, strange



Self-Control. 21

to tell, the ceiling and walls of the pas-
sage in which they stood remained perfect,
although surrounded by bricks and broken
timber, so that the street-door could not be
opened !” *

“Oh, mamma,” said Mary; “how wonder-
ful!”

“Tt was wonderful. And although we must
acknowledge the great providence of God in
thus saving these poor people,—yet it could
be accounted for ina singular manner. You
remember I told you that the next house
had been rebuilt, and the new wall adjoining
the passage of the old house supported it.

The house also fell forwards towards the street, -

and gave way first on the unprotected side,
so that the weight of bricks, or beams, which
fell on the ceiling, was not sufficient to force
it in. The difficulty now was, to get the
door open; and nearly an hour passed be-
fore the bricks and rubbish could be cleared
away sufficiently for this to be done. All
this time, those within were in total dark-
ness; and thankful indeed they must have felt
to escape from a place that might have been a
grave, but had proved a harbour of safety, and
* A fact.

4



22 Mary Elion ; or,

once more to behold the beautiful sunlight,
and to breathe the fresh air.”

“Oh, dear mamma,” said Mary, “ whata
wonderful story. Is it all true?”

“ Quite true, my dear Mary; and next time
we go to see grandmamma, I will show you
the beautiful house that now stands on the
spot where the house fell.”

Mary sat for some time after her mother
had finished, silently working ; and having
completed the hem, she gave it to her mamma
with her thimble, and quietly left the room.
In a few moments she was seated by Nurse,
her blue eyes opened to their widest width, re-
lating, in her own childish way, the story she
had heard. Nurse sat listening very atten-
tively; all at once Mary exclaimed, “Why,
nurse, you must have been there, too !—do you
remember it?

“To be sure I do, my darling; and I re-
member, when I took your mamma to look at
the ruins, she said, in her quiet, childish way,
‘Don’t you think, Nurse, those poor people
prayed to God to take care of them last
night ?”

“Oh!” said Mary, “ mamma was right,
I am sure they did. I do not think I shall



Self-Control, 23

ever feel afraid of hearing the wind again. I
will try to remember how wonderfully God
can take care of people, and I will ask Him
to take care of me.”



CHAPTER IV.

Mary’s sixth birthday arrived, and her grand-
mamma invited a few little people to meet her
and celebrate the day. Mary, who had been
complaining for some days of painsin her limbs,
and looked flushed and heavy-eyed, had been
treated by her mamma as fora slight cold. She
seemed so much better on the morning of her
birthday, that, after being carefully wrapped
up, she was taken to her grandmamma’s, with
the understanding that she was to remain all
night. Seldom had Mary looked better than
she did on this evening: excitement had
flushed her cheek and brightened her eyes,
making the contrast with her flaxen ringlets
and fair complexion more striking; she was in
excellent spirits, the life of every game, and the
delight of her kind friends. It was not until the
little party had dispersed to their homes, that
Mrs. Elton noticed, as the excitement passed
away, that she looked dull, and sat without



24 Mary Elton ; or,

speaking a word. Her mamma hurried her to
bed, thinking it might be fatigue. In the
morning she appeared better, and sat reading
in a corner of the sofa with her usual intent-
ness, Mrs. Elton entered the room about
eleven o’clock: “Come, Mary, my love, you
will make your head ache if you sit reading so
long. Grandmamma wants you to take a
little walk with her.”

“T will come, mamma,” said Mary, closing
her book.

Mrs. Elton had walked to the window to
observe the weather—she was startled by the
* sound of some one falling, and a scream, She
turned—Mary was on the floor.

“Mamma, I cannot walk,” she said, pite-
ously; “when I moved from the sofa I
thought my legs were asleep, and the mo-
ment I tried to stand, they would bend under
me, and it was such dreadful pain.”

Much alarmed, Mrs. Elton attempted to
raise her little girl from the ground, but at
each movement she screamed so painfully, and
with such a struggle to suppress it, that her
mother was terrified. Grandmamma, from the
next room, had heard the screams; she came
hurrying in, and saw ina moment what was



Self-Control. 25

the matter. Nurse, fortunately, was in the
house, and she gently lifted the child with her
strong arms, and placed her on the sofa, sooth-
ing her fondly as she moaned with pain, while
Mrs. Elton, in eager, low tones, inquired of
her mother what could be the matter with
her.

“TI fear,” she replied, “that the child has
rheumatic fever. I would offer to keep her
here, my dear, but I know you would rather
have her at home.”

“Oh, yes,” said Mrs, Elton, “thank you,
dear mother, but I should wish her to be with
me. Poor child! it will be dreadful to see her
suffer,” she continued, while the tears ran
down her cheeks,

“Tf you please, ma’am,” said Nurse, coming
forward, “ifshe goes home, it must be zow—
by-and-bye it will be too late to move her.”

It was, indeed, a painful task to wrap the
little girl in blankets, and see how bravely she
tried to act up to her mother’s teachings about
patience and moral courage to endure pain,
and her kind friends were scarcely less relieved
than herself when they had laid her com-
fortably in her own little bed, and saw her sink
to sleep with exhaustion, From that sick-bed



26 Mary Elton ; or,

Mary Elton did not rise for weeks; at one
time she was not expected to live; and even
at last, when hopes were raised that she
might recover, the doctor feared that she
would be acripple for life. Mrs. Elton was,
however, spared this severe trial. After some
months she recovered so far as to be able
to walk without assistance — but oh! how
changed: her round rosy face had become
pale and thin, her flaxen hair cut close to her
forehead, and no one would have recognized,
in the slight, delicate child, moving quietly
about the house, or reading in a corner by her-
self, the rosy, animated little girl we first in-
troduced to our readers. Mrs. Elton was only
too thankful to have her restored to life, as it
were from the dead, and to find her fears that
Mary might bea cripple groundless. She had
already lost two children, and the idea of part-
ing with Mary had been a great trial indeed.
During the spring that followed this severe
illness, Mary continued so delicate that the
medical man advised change of air as the only
means of saving her life Mr. Elton now
thought of his parents, who resided in the West
of England, and felt, that with them and his
kind sister, his little girl would he safe. It was



Self-Control. 27

a painful trial for Mrs. Elton to part with her
little girl; but she subdued her feelings, and
allowed her husband to write and ask them if
they would accept sucha charge. How quickly
they wrote back, promising to do all in their
power to restore her to health, and offering to ~
receive her immediately! The bustle of pre-
paration did Mary good: she watched the
progress of her new frocks and bonnets, fol-
lowed Nurse from room to room, giving her
strict injunctions what books to pack up, and
where she was to put her great doll. The de-
light with which she looked forward to the
journey pained poor Nurse as much as it
pleased her : she felt happy to see her darling
so cheerful, yet sorry to part with her. The
day came at last: Mrs. Elton clung to her
little girl as if she could not spare her even
then. Indeed, to no one else but her husband’s
sister would she have trusted her child. Mary,
too, forgot all her anticipations of pleasure
when she came to part from her mother and
brother ; and, dreading the effects of excite-
ment on her delicate little girl, the mother
checked her own feelings, for Mary’s flushed
face and glistening eyes,as she threw her arms
round Nurse’s neck, kissed over and over again



28 Mary Elion ; or,

her little brother, and clung convulsively to
her mother, told,too plainly that the old nature
was still there, though kept down by weakness.
After a long and fatiguing journey, during
which Mr. Elton had more than once trembled
for his child’s life, he reached Byford, and was
received with open arms by his parents and
sister,—but oh, how shocked were these kind
friends to perceive, that, but for the round blue
eyes, they would have found it difficult to dis-
cover any resemblance to the rosy little girl
who had visited them three years before.

The town of Byford, in which Mr. Elton’s
father lived, is curiously built on the banks of
a beautiful river, from which the ground rises
with a steep ascent, the houses situated one
above another to the very brow of the hill,
and those at the top commanding a most
beautiful view of the town, the river, and the
surrounding country. A long, handsome
bridge connects one part of the town with
the other, and vessels of all sizes going out
and coming in, make the quay at which they
discharge their cargoes a very lively, bustling
place. Now and then a ship is launched by
shipbuilders in the town; so that, although
Mary Elton was so far away from noisy



Self-Control. 29

London, there were many things in Byford to
amuse and interest her. Besides this, the sea
is not three miles distant, and many pleasant
excursions and picnics are made, both by
water and by land, to the beach, during the
summer months. We are describing the place
as it is now, for thirty years have made but
little change, excepting that the streets and
shops are lighted with gas, and very lately a
railroad has been opened, by which persons
can travel from London to Byford in eight or
nine hours, instead of twenty-five or twenty-
six, as was the case when Mr. Elton travelled
with his sick little daughter. These, no doubt,
are great advantages, but the pretty little
town, with its bright river and pleasant walks,
was enough for Mary without them, and very
few weeks passed before her appetite and
spirits began to improve; not till then would
her father leave her. This was another
trial, but she bore it bravely, although the tears
would come when she saw the coach start, and
watched him kissing his hand to her until it
was out of sight. Mary hada kind friend in
her dear Aunt Elton, and the close pressure
of her hand as she returned home told Miss
Elton that now she felt herself deprived of all



30 Mary Elton ; or,

other earthly friends, the little trusting nature
was clinging to ker, and her heart opened to-
wards her brother’s child with loving sym-
pathy.

For some months after Mary’s arrival at
Byford, nothing was thought of but her health;
books and work were laid aside for daily walks
or healthful play, yet her mind was not neg-
lected. Miss Elton had a very pleasant me-
thod of imparting instruction by conversation,
which the little girl quickly found out, and
the moment she saw her aunt seated at work,
she would fetch her little chair, seat herself at
her aunt's knee, as she had so often done with
her dear mother, and looking up in her face,
would say,—

“ Dear aunt, please tell me some pretty story
—a true story, I mean—I don’t like made-up
stories.”

The knowledge Mary acquired in this way
was astonishing. Miss Elton had a fund of
information, and Mary learnt more of Grecian,
Roman, and English history in six months,
than many young people acquire in years of
study. Bible stories, too, were her delight,
and she would listen with streaming eyes
to the history of Joseph, or with eager



Self-Control, 31

enthusiasm to the story of David and
Goliath.

During all this time, by careful exercise,
regular diet, and sea-bathing, Mary was re-
gaining her strength wonderfully. Letters
home contained accounts of her improving
health, but Miss Elton did not think her suffi-
ciently recovered to return. Mr. Elton, who
felt the value of his sister’s instruction, had
no wish to send for his little girl yet, especially
as her mother was at present so delicate ; Mrs.
Elton also appreciated too highly the valué of
her aunt’s instructions to deprive her of them
merely for the pleasure of having her at home
again. One thing, however, she much re-
gretted ; she had never intended to send Mary
to school, but Mr. Elton’s parents were aged
people, to whom the constant presence of a
lively child, as Mary soon became, was weari-
some; and to keep her from intercourse with
other children would have been injurious. Be-
sides, schools in a country town are very diffe-
rent from those in London, and were more so
thirty years agothan now. All objection, there-
fore, was set aside, and arrangements made
for Mary to go for a few hours daily to a pre-
paratory school at a short distance from her



32 Mary Elton ; or,

grandfather’s house, merely to learn the most
simple English studies, with writing, arithme-
tic, and needle-worls.



CHAPTER V.

Mr. ELTon’s house was situated about the
middle of the town, and Mary’s school at the
end nearest the bridge. To this school there
were two ways: one through a narrow street,
and the other along the quay ; the latter being
by far the more lively and pleasant. Mary
went to school alone: in a quiet country town
there seemed no danger in this, excepting from
the river, and she had already proved herself
so truthful and obedient that it was considered
sufficient to desire her on no account to go to
school along the quay. Mary’s dear mamma
had trained her too well to make it likely she
would openly disobey ; and yet one morning
she transgressed the command almost without
knowing what she was about.

Within a few doors of Mary’s school stood
a large grammar-school for boys. The school-
room windows overlooked those of Mary’s,
and many were the symptoms of fear and



Self-Control. a

trembling among the little girls when they
heard the sounds of pain and distress uttered
by: some unfortunate culprit undergoing a
flogging. These boys were accustomed to at-
tend school from seven to eight o’clock, before
breakfast, and, sad to tell, some of them not
having prepared their lessons properly, were
kept to learn and repeat them after the rest
had left; consequently, Mary would some-
times meet a party of these boys returning
when she was going to school at a little be-
fore nine.

Dunces are generally idle, and idle persons
ate seldom out of mischief; it was not long,
_therefore, before the quiet, timid-looking little
girl was marked out as an object of fun. One
morning, therefore, when Mary reached the
narrowest part of the street, she found her way
obstructed by five or six great boys, who had
joined their hands, and stretched themselves
across the whole way. At first she looked
confused, and then her mother’s lessons on
moral courage gave her strength.

“Let me pass, if you please,” she said, fear-
lessly.

_“Oh, of course, Miss Prim,” replied one of
the boys; “would you like to creep under our
Cc



34 Mary Elton ; or,

arms, or jump over our heads? either way will
do, whichever is most agreeable.”

Mary took no notice of this speech, but
walked down the line, making the same re-
quest to the other boys, and looking eagerly
in their faces to see if she could discover one
with a kinder look than the rest. But no;
she then attempted to push her way through
their arms, but that was indeed useless, the
weak against the strong, and so many. Again
she pleaded, “ Pray do let me pass, I shall be
late for school.”

The boys laughed. “To be sure, that is
what we want you to be. Do they put you
on the fool’s-cap for being late?”

Mary now became indignant. “You have
no right to stop me,” she said; “how dare
you try to make me late at school!” and
again she made a violent effort to break
through the obstruction. This was fine fun
for the boys; they laughed, and jeered, and
mocked her, till the tears, which pride had
kept down, almost started from her eyes. At
length she turned round proudly, saying, “I
shall go home and see if my grandfather will
not force you to let me pass.”

The boys, however, were satisfied for this



Self-Control. 35

time. Not exactly knowing who her grand-
father might be, they called her back, and
opening a way for her, bowed with mock
politeness and ran off.

Poor Mary! this was but the beginning of
trouble. She did not meet them every morn-
ing, partly because by being a little earlier she
reached school before they had left, and also
because the same boys were not always kept
in. Still, the annoyance occurred three or
four times, until the poor child became quite
nervous, and surprised her aunt by her anxiety
to be at school before nine. One morning,
however, after several days had passed with-
out meeting her enemies, who no doubt thought —
themselves very superior to the little girl they
delighted in teasing, she was running gaily to
school, forgetful of everything but her anxiety
to be there in time, when she saw a number
of them coming towards her. Between them
and herself was a narrow lane, connecting the
street with the quay. No thought entered her
mind but how she should avoid her tormentors.
In a moment she darted down the lane, and
along the quay, nor did she stop till breathless
with running she reached her school, and then
she remembered her act of disobedience,



36 Mary Elton ; or,

Many children, no doubt, will think, “Oh, but
then Mary had such a good excuse.” She did
not think so. He mother had taught her that
obedience was to stop at no difficulty. The
straightforward path is the only right path,
and whatever excuse might be offered, an act
of disobedience was disobedience still, She
never forgot that day at school; for until she
had told her aunt, and asked her forgiveness,
she could not feel comfortable. Miss Elton
readily forgave the little girl, although she
smiled at her description of the terror she felt
when she saw the boys approaching. She told
her, however, if it continued, that she would
write to Dr, Hatton, the head-master, and ask
him to interfere. But Mary did not wait for
her aunt to do this: she took the law into her
own hands. It was a bold thing for a little
girl to do, and it happened in this way. One
morning, about a week after telling her aunt,
she was much alarmed by seeing a larger
number than usual of the pupils approaching ;
and while considering what she should do to
avoid them, she saw that they were accom-
panied by two of the masters, one of them
Dr. Hatton himself. With some of her old
impetuosity and energy of character, she in-



Self-Control. 37

stantly determined to speak to him. It was
a dangerous experiment, and scarcely wise for
Mary to risk making herself an object of in-
sult as well as fun among the pupils of the
Grammar-school; few little girls of seven
years, however, reflect upon the consequences
of what they are going to do. She passed
the boys rather proudly, feeling secure of
their behaviour in such presence, and ap-
proaching Dr. Hatton, said, in her gentle,
silvery voice, “May I speak to you, sir, if you
please?”

Dr. Hatton stopped instantly, and looked
earnestly at her. “Are you not Mr. Elton’s
grandchild, my dear?” said the Doctor,
kindly.

“Yes, sir.”

“Well, what do you wish to say to me?”

Mary timidly, but as quickly as possible,
described the annoyance she had received,
and, with perfect confidence that his word
would be law, begged him to prevent it in
future.

“But, my dear,” said the clergyman, “my
pupils generally leave at eight o'clock; at
what time do you go to school?”

_ “At nine, sir.”



38 Mary Elton ; or,

“Ah, then,” he replied, rather sternly, “it
must be the idlers and the dunces who annoy
you: they shall not do it again.”

The severe tone startled Mary. Ina mo-
ment there flashed across her memory the re-
collection of the floggings she had heard from
the school-room windows, and the idea that
her complaining might produce such dreadful.
consequences filled her with terror. She laid
her little hand on the clergyman’s arm, and
exclaimed, “Oh, sir, you won't flog them, will
you? Oh, it is not bad enough for that;
pray, pray, do not let them be punished at all;
only tell them not to do it again. Iam sure
they will obey you. Promise me, sir, please,”
she continued, her eyes filled with tears of
regret for having said a word about it.

Dr. Hatton smiled, and promised all she
wished ; but as he turned from the little girl
who thanked him so warmly, he said to him-
self, “The woman’s nature all over: patient
endurance and earnest forgiveness.”

The grammar-school at Byford consisted of
the sons of men of influence and position in
the neighbourhood. The numbers were large,
and not one amongst them would have en-
dured quietly to be told he was not a gentle-



Self Controt, 39

man, because he was the son of a gentleman,
and born to wealth and position. This is a
great mistake, and so Dr. Hatton made them
understand. On the afternoon of the dav on
which Mary had complained, and just before
the hour for dismissing the school, Dr. Hatton
requested each young gentleman to seat him-
self at his desk, while he asked a few questions,
The order was obeyed in silence and dis-
may. When all were seated, Dr, Hatton said,
“Let every boy who has been kept in at
morning school during the last month stand
up.”

Slowly the culprits arose, some with looks
of shame, others with indifference. There was
no escape for them: the under-master had
opened a book in which their names were re-
corded.

“Now,” said Dr. Hatton, “I am not going
to inquire which of you have been cowardly
and rude enough to annoy a quiet, ladylike
little girl, in the open streets : 1t is sufficient to
know that some of you have done so—the
child appealed to me to-day for protection.
Shame upon you, no doubt calling yourselves
gentlemen, to make an object of fun of one so
much weaker and younger than either of you.



40 Mary Elton ; or,

You may think all this a grand display of
courage and superior strength; but men and
boys of really noble spirit shrink from such
conduct, and will rather take part with the
oppressed, even though it may be a poor half-
starved cat or a trembling unfledged bird.
You will understand,” he continued, “that she
has proved herself superior to you all, by en- .
treating me not to punish you in any way,
only begging me to protect her for the future.
Nothing but my promise to her has saved you;
and be sure, if I hear of such conduct again,
either to this child or any other, the severest
punishment shall follow.”

We cannot tell how far the Doctor’s address
did good to these cowardly boys: one thing
is certain—Mary never again met with the
slightest annoyance from the pupils of Byford
grammar-school.

More than twelve months passed away, and
Mary continued to improve in health and
spirits. A little of her former colour and vi-
vacity returned; but her friends, fearing to
presumetoo much upon this increased strength,
continued to send her to the preparatory school
as at first. With no young companions at
home, her love of reading increased so much



Self-Control, 4I

that Miss Elton was obliged to allow her only
a certain number of hours to read daily. Her
grandmother had taught her to knit, and this
was an amusement she soon became fond of;
and greatly did it surprise her mamma to re-
ceive two pairs of socks for her little brother,
knitted by Mary’s own hands.

One morning, while Mary was at school
two boxes arrived from London. Miss Elton
opened them both, and finding that one con-
tained nothing but books, she put it aside, and
sent for Mary to unpack the other herself.
Mary’s delight at being sent for from school
was only equalled by her joy at the contents
of the box: a large doll, with clothes of every
description, a transparent slate, a humming-
top, a skipping-rope, a box of dominoes, a
dissected map of Europe, and multiplication
table cards, such as many little boys and girls
would like to have now, but there are none
published. Very pretty pictures of animals
and birds of every description were painted
on cards, which were cut in half; the half
containing the head of the animal had printed
underneath it the question, and on the other
half, containing the tail, the answer would be
found. Mary soon learnt how to use them,



42 Mary Elton ; or,

It was very simple. For instance, having
found the head and half the body of a horse,
under which was. written “9 times 8,” it could
be quickly matched with the other half, con-
taining the answer “are 72.” ‘This cer-
tainly was a delightful way of learning the
multiplication table. Mary’s box also con-
tained several books, which were eagerly seized -
upon—she knew nothing of the number in
store for her.

Several weeks slipped by before the ex-
citement occasioned by the box and its con-
tents had passed away. Her aunt only
allowed her to have one amusement at one
time, and thus the pleasure they caused was
never quite lost. When she had read over and
over again the small stock of books which were
such a treasure to her when discovered at the
bottom of the box, Miss Elton, to her surprise,
brought out one from the hidden store,

“Why, aunt,” said the little girl, opening
her eyes with delight at a newly published
tale, handsomely bound, “where did you get
this?”

“Never mind,” said Miss Elton; “read it,
and do not ask any questions; but am I to
have no thanks ?”



Self-Control. 43

“Oh yes! dear aunt,” she exclaimed, jump-
ing up and clinging to her neck; “but it seems
almost too good to be true.”

If Mary was astonished this time, it is im-
possible to describe her feelings when, having
read and studied this delightful book, at the
end of a few weeks Miss Elton produced from
its hiding-place a copy of “Bunyan’s Pil-
grim’s Progress,” with many engravings, old-
fashioned certainly, but suited to the fashion
of the time in which he wrote. The pleasure
excited by this book, and the conversations
she had with her aunt about it, seemed to be
inexhaustible ; and Miss Elton was obliged to
produce another to divert her mind from
dwelling too much on the same subject.

The appearance of the third book gave
Mary some idea of the truth, and she ex-
claimed, “ Now, aunt, I have found you out:
mamma sent me all these books, and you have
hidden them, for fear I should read them too
quickly. Am I not right ?” Miss Elton smiled.
“ Oh, aunt,” she said, earnestly, “are there any
more? Oh,dotell me! I will not hurry over
this one—only just tell me that.”

“When you have read that one carefully,
Mary,” said her aunt, “you shall have another ;



44 Mary Elton ; or,

but I shall not tell you anything more, so do
not ask me.”

Mary knew that her aunt’s word could not
be shaken; she therefore walked away with
her new treasure, quite satisfied to think that
there was still another when she had read it,

She now made it a rule, when her aunt gave
her out a new book, to say with trembling -
earnestness, “Is there one more yet, aunt?”
When, after receiving six or seven books, the
answer was still, “ Yes, there is another,” Mary
could scarcely contain herself.

“Why, aunt,” she said, jumping about the
room with great glee, “you are like a fairy:
it seems as if you touched something with your
wand, and it turned to a book.”

It was indeed a clever arrangement, for the
pleasure was now spread over many months ;
and had Mary taken possession of the books
all at once, they would have been hurried over
without creating half the gratification they
now caused,



CHAPTER VI.
STORY-BOOKS very often represent little girls
as almost always good; but although Mary had



Self-Control, 45

receivedsuch carefulinstruction,and her friends
hoped she would grow up an obedient child,
yet she was not perfect ; and as we are writing
a true history, we must tell the whole truth.
One disadvantage attended Mary’scontinuance
at the preparatory school; she was in danger
of becoming vain at finding how much more
she knew than many girls older than herself.
Several of them were the daughters of respect-
able farmers in the neighbourhood, who con-
sidered the instruction they would receive in
such a school quite sufficient. Mary, by this
time, was advanced enough in her studies to
join the pupils at the establishment of Miss
Ferrars, who did not take any under eight
years old, and received very high terms fora
town like Byford. Mr. Elton, however, when
written to on the subject, was unwilling to
consent, from a fear for Mary’s health ; indeed,
all her friends knew that her love for study,
if excited by emulation, would render her so en-
thusiastic in her endeavours to be the head of
a class, or to win a prize, that her health might
suffer; therefore she was allowed to remain
amongst girls, very few of whom could excel
her in anything. Miss Elton, by constantly
pointing out to Mary her superior advantages,



46 Mary Elton; or,

kept her, to a certain degree, humble; but
there were other dangers amongst girls of in-
different education, who had not been taught
the importance of implicit obedience: two in
particular, the daughters of a wealthy farmer,
Miss Elton knew were not fit companions for
her little niece. Mary, therefore, had strict
injunctions not to make acquaintance with
them after school, but always to come straight
home; and as these girls lived in quite a con-
trary direction, there seemed no danger of
any temptation to disobey. The temptation
came at last.

It was a bright afternoon in June, the clock
had struck four, and Mary was standing on
the steps at her school-door, watching her
schoolfellows, Ellen and Mary White, trying
to persuade one of their father’s farm-sevants
to allow them to ride home on the back of a
hay-cart ; when they had gained their point,
and were comfortably seated, one of them
espied Mary.

“Mary Elton!” she exclaimed, “oh, come
and have a ride ; it is so delightful here; such
fun. Stay one moment, Thomas,” she ex-
claimed to the man; “come, Mary, make
haste.”



Self-Control, 47

“No, thank you,” said Mary; “I must
go home;’ but she still lingered on the step. _

“Why must you go home? I’m sure your
aunt wouldn’t mind you having a ride for a
little way—such a beautiful day too.”

The sun was indeed shining brightly ; the
river sparkling and dancing in its light; the
tide was up, and one or two vessels, with their
sails swelling to a gentle breeze, were leaving
the quay. Mary hesitated.

“Come, little miss,’ said the man: “if ee
be gwine, I beant going to ztay ’ere all day.”

Mary could not resist. She allowed herself
to be lifted up, and placed between the two
girls whom her aunt had desired her to avoid.
Away they went, over the brid+e, through the
outskirts of the town, and along the green
shady lanes, every moment carrying Mary
farther away from home. For more than a
mile the noisy mirth of her companions, and
the novelty of her position, prevented all re-
flection in Mary’s mind of what she was about;
presently they passed a milestone, and upon
it she read, “ Two miles to Byford.” In great
alarm, she now entreated her companions to
stop the driver, and allow her to get down,
but they enjoyed her fears, and laughingly



48 Mary Elton ; or,

told her they intended to take her home with
them, and keep her all night. Mary’s cries at
this became so distressing that the man heard
them, and stopping his horses, came round to
the back of the cart, and inquired what was
the matter.

“Oh, lift me down, please do,” said Mary ;
“Tam all this long way from Byford. How
shall I get home ?”

“ Beant’ee goin hoame, my dear?” said the
man, as he lifted her down.

“Qh no, no,” she replied ; “TI live in Byford.”

“For sheame on ye, then, to bring the cheeld
all this way,” said the man to his master’s
daughters, who were laughing heartily at
Mary’s terror. “Ne’er ye mind, my dear,” he
continued, kindly, “keep the straight road
till ’ee coom to the toon; and ye'll soon get
hoame.,”

Mary thanked him, and taking the direction
the man pointed out, began to walk very
quickly. Then came reflection. She had dis-
obeyed, and no doubt alarmed, her kind
friends, and she dreaded the displeasure she so
well deserved. Again, she thought of her
dear mamma’s surprise, at seeing her little
gentle Mary riding like a rude boy through



Self-Control. 49

a town behind a hay-cart, even had she known
nothing of the disobedience; and above all,
Mary remembered she had offended God, and
she could only walk very fast towards home,
weeping with sorrow and regret for what she
had done.

In the meantime, the old clock, in the kit-
chen of Grandfather Elton’s house, struck five.
The old gentleman listened to the sound with
surprise; then rising, he took his hat and
stick, and walked out in search of his little
grandchild. In spite of their confidence in
Mary’s obedience, there was always a fear in
the minds of her friends that she might be
tempted near the river and fall in; it was to
the quay, therefore, he first directed his steps,
dreading that every one he met might have
bad news to tell. He then called at the
school, and found she had left at four o’clock;
after inquiring at the houses of some neigh-
bours without hearing any news of her, he
returned home, expecting to find the little girl
had arrived. Miss Elton met him at the door.

“Have you seen her ?” she inquired... -

“No; has she not come home?” » ng

Miss Elen shook her head. Much alarmed,
but too fatigued to continue his search, the old”

Db



50 Mary Elton ; or,

gentleman threw himself into his arm-chair,
and Miss Elton was leaving the room to pre-
pare herself to go out, when the garden-gate
opened, and the little feet were heard timidly
approaching,

“Oh, thank God, she is safe!” exclaimed
the old gentleman ; “don’t scold her, Fanny.
T am only too happy to have her return alive.”

Ah, young people, how seldom do you re-
flect on the sorrow and anxiety your disobe-
dience causes those friends whose every wish
and command is for your own welfare and
happiness. Mary had not courage to face the
kind friends she had so grieved and alarmed ;
she therefore crept away to her bed-room,
whither she was soon followed by her aunt, to
whom, with many tears of shame and sorrow,
she confessed her disobedience ; very gently,
and with anxious love, did her kind aunt point
out the sin and folly of which she had been
guilty, and then she knelt and prayed with her
for forgiveness, and for power to res'st tempta-
tion. Perhaps Mary understood a ittle of the
grief she had caused her kind grandfather and
grandmother when she received the kiss of
forgiveness, and heard their thankful expres-
sions of gratitude for her safety.



Self-Control. BI

Not many weeks after this occurrence, Mary
was surprised and delighted by a visit from
her father ; how rejoiced was he to find her so
much improved in health and appearance, and
how gladly would he have taken her home with
him, for her dear mother’s heart yearned for
her little Mary: yet he hesitated ; she was grow-
ing very fast, and had still a delicacy of com-
plexion that did not indicate confirmed health:
His parents and sister, who felt unwilling to
part with the little girl until she was quite
strong, urged all these facts as reasons for her
stay, with great earnestness, Mr. Elton there-
fore agreed to leave her for another twelve
months ; he could not bear to deprive his little
daughter of the benefit likely to follow this
extended visit, in addition to the advantage
of his sister’s kind and judicious training.
Mary, although longing to see her dear mo-
ther and brothers, one of whom, a baby,
she had never seen, submitted pleasantly
to the arrangement; she loved her grand-
father, grandmother, and aunt too well to
grieve them by showing any over-anxiety to
go away.

During the winter that followed Mr. Elton’s
visit, Mary, to her regret, finished the last of



52 Mary Elton ; or,

her aunt’s hidden store of books. In March,
she was to commence her studies with Miss
Ferrars, and to continue with her for six
months. The long stay at the preparatory
school had not been lost ; it now gave her the
advantage of being able to read the most
difficult lesson with ease and quickness, and
to write exercises neatly and readily. She
soon gained a high position in her class, and,
but for a caution given to Miss Ferrars, she
might have been tempted to try how much
the wonderfully retentive memory could bear.
Mary was delighted with her school, and al-
ways ready to learn her lessons, which, al-
though much more numerous and difficult
than any she had been used to, were, seem-
ingly, quite easy to her. Therefore, as the
summer approached, Miss Elton was surprised
to see her little niece sometimes quite sleepy
and inclined for bed before seven o'clock.
Half-past six was her usual hour for rising,
and, for more than a year, she had been
allowed to sit up till half-past eight ; and yet
two or three nights in the week she would fall
asleep in her chair, after learning her lessons,
This continued for nearly ‘a month. Miss
Elton was beginning to fear that her studies



Self-Control, 53

were beyond her strength, when Mary herself
. betrayed her own secret.

“Aunt,” she exclaimed, suddenly, one
evening, “are there really such things as
genii?”

The words were no sooner uttered, than
she recollected what she had done; face, neck,
and even arms were crimsoned with conscious
shame, Oh, what a tell-tale conscience is!
but for that blush, Miss Elton would have ex-
plained and answered her question, without
inquiring why she asked it. Now she looked
at her earnestly.

“Where did you read about genii, Mary ?”
she asked.

The little girl was silent, and her aunt
deeply pained; what could cause so much
shame as to render her speechless, Miss El-
ton could now only trust to the truthfulness of
her little niece: she saw the struggle, as the
tears trickled down her cheeks, and she waited
with hope and fear for the answer. Mary had
turned to the window to hide her tears, when
suddenly, with a violent effort, she flew into her
aunt’s lap, threw her arms round her neck, and
sobbed as if her heart would break.

“Oh! aunt, aunt,” at length burst forth in



BA Mary Elion ; or,

choking accents, “I have been so wicked; you
will never forgive me. Oh! I shall never,
never, be so good as mamma !”

“My dear,” said Miss Elton, “do not say
I shall never forgive you; try me, dear Mary,
if you have done wrong. I am sure you are
ashamed and sorry by your tears; tell me all
about it; you will be miserable now till you
have done so.”

Mary hid her face on her aunt’s shoulder,
and said in a low voice, “ Aunt, I have been
reading the ‘Tales of the Genii,’ one of the
books in the corner cupboard, over my bed,
that you told me not to open.”

Miss Elton was very sorry—this direct act
of disobedience pained her. Yet she blamed
herself, knowing, as she did, Mary’s love of
reading ; she should have locked the cup-
board, to prevent her from being tempted be-
yond her strength to resist. This curious
corner cupboard, its dark ebony doors, inlaid
with Chinese figures in gold, had been one of
the first things to attract Mary’s attention, and
when she found it contained books, excited a
longing curiosity she could never overcome.
Miss Elton, knowing that among these books
were some not exactly suitable for a child to



Self-Control. 55

read, had forbidden her to touch them. The
box from London had arrived in time to divert
her mind from the forbidden place, but when
that was exhausted, the temptation had re-
turned with full force.

-“ Have you read any other of the books?”
inquired Miss Elton, at length.

“Yes, aunt; ‘Gil Blas,” ‘Don Quixote,’
‘Telemachus, and now I am reading the
‘Arabian Nights !’”

Miss Elton was amazed, “My dear child,
how did you find time to read all these
books ?”

“Aunt, I used to wake in the morning as
soon as it was light; and read till it was time
to get up. Not every morning ; sometimes I
did not wake, but when I was in the middle
of a story I was sure to, because I thought
about it so much.

“ And,” said Miss Elton, much astonished,
“could you understand what you read?”

“A great deal I did, aunt,’ said Mary;
“but there were lots and lots of words I never
heard in my life, and I longed to ask you, but
T did not dare; till to-night it slipped out, I
can’t tell how. Dear aunt,” she: continued,
looking up through her tears at her aunt’s



56 Mary Elton ; ov,

face, “you afte not quite so angry as I ex.
pected.”

“My dear,” said Miss Elton, “your dis-
obedience grieves me, but it was partly my
fault. I thought you more perfect than a
little girl ever could be; I hoped, when my
little Mary was told not to touch the corner
cupboard, she would have feared to disobey
and offend God.”
~ “Oh! dear, kind Aunt Fanny,” said the
little girl; “what shall I say, to tell you how
sotry I am, but it was such a dreadful temp-
tation —all those books staring at me every
day.”

“TI know it, my darling; but God sends
temptations to His people to try them; and
don’t you know what He has promised, that
He will, with the temptation, send a way of
escape? Ah! Mary, 1am afraid you did not
pray to God to help you to conquer this
temptation. .

“No, indeed, aunt,” said ree “that I did
not; but I will, Oh! I will to-night. And,
dear aunt, don’t lock the cupboard ; you shall
see I will never touch the books again.”

Mary kept her word, and when she left
Byford, her aunt chose from the forbidden



Self-Control. 57

store several which she thought Mary would
like to read when she grew older ; saying, as
she did so, “Mary these books will remind
you how necessary it is to pray, ‘Lead us
not into temptation.”
Cee tee
CHAPTER VII.

THE affair of the corner cupboard was, very
shortly after, driven from Mary’s mind by a
circumstance which brought to light the dis-
position her mother so much dreaded—that
earnest clinging to anything she loved or de-
lighted in. Miss Elton had hitherto had no op-
portunity of noticing this: the child’s delicate
health had made her more tranquil; a very
trifling event showed her aunt how enthusiastic
her little niece could be.

‘To encourage her to take exercise in the
open air, Mr. Elton had given her, during her
first spring in Byford, a small plot of ground,
to cultivate according to her own taste. It
was by this time a very pretty spot, enclosed
by a border of single and double daisies ; one
part, in which stood a beautiful standard rose-
tree, was kept for flowers, and in the other she
sowed radishes and mustard-and-cress. Mary’s



58 Mary Elion ; or,

garden proved a great pleasure andamusement
to her, Old Mr. Elton might well be very
proud of Azs garden ; it was well kept and
attended, so that fruit, flowers, and vegetables,
according to the different seasons of the year,
were always in plentiful supply. Not far from
Mary’s little garden stood a very rare cherry-
tree, which, notwithstanding all the care and
attention it had received, had never yet borne
any fruit. During the spring of Mary’s last
year at Byford, it was covered with blossoms,
and many hopes were entertained that at last
there must be some cherries. As May ap-
proached, however, the blossoms dropped off,
and their white petals covered Mary’s little
garden, leaving the tree as usual, with ap-
parently nothing but leaves. The energy of
Mary’s character did not allowher to be easily
discouraged. She watched the tree daily, lifting
leaf after leaf within her reach, searching for
fruit, as the anxious mother often seeks in vain
for the good effects of earnest instruction to a
darling child. ;

One half-holiday, as Mr. Elton was dozing
in his arm-chair after dinner, Mary ran into
the house from the garden, exclaiming,
“ Grandfather! grandfather! oh! come, quick, I



Self-Control, 50

T have such a wonder to show you!” At the
same time she commenced pulling the bewil-
dered old gentleman from his chair. Mr.
Elton felt rather inclined to chide the little
girl for her merciless interruption of his nap,
but it was impossible to resist the earnest,
smiling face, looking up at him soimploringly;
he therefore roused himself, and putting on a
look of wondering expectation, allowed her to
lead him up the steps into the garden. On
reaching the top, Mary darted forward, and in
a moment stood before the cherry-tree, her
eyes sparkling with pleasure, and her flaxen
ringlets waving in the wind.

“ Grandfather!” she exclaimed, as he slowly
approached, “look here!” and lifting some
leaves, she exhibited two cherries already in
an advanced state of formation, and promising
to be very large.

“Why, my little girl,” said the old gentle-
man, fairly interested, “this is, indeed, a won-
der; I cannot scold you now for disturbing
my nap.”

“Oh, I knew that, dear grandfather,” said
Mary, capering about with excitement and de-
light ; “I was quite sure you would be pleased
to see cherries on the wonderful tree; after all,

”



60 Mary Elton ; or,

grandfather, it may be a good tree and bring
you plenty of fruit next year.”

“Perhaps it may, my dear,” said Mr. Elton,
looking with pleasure on the hitherto worth-
less, though promising tree ; “and as for these
cherries, if they ripen and do not fall off, they
shall be yours on your birthday, as you dis-
covered them.”

“Oh, thank you! dear grandfather! how
kind ! you can’t think how I have searched and
searched every day, so carefully. I thought,
with all those beautiful blossoms, there must
be some fruit.”

“ Ah! my child,” said her grandfather, with
a sigh, “ many are the beautiful blossoms of
earth that produce nothing but disappoint-
ment, as well as those of a cherry-tree,” Then
after a pause, he continued, “ Well, my dear
watch your cherries; they are your own now,
and much more promising fruit than this now
appears has been blighted before it could reach
perfection.” So saying, he returned to the
house and his arm-chair, reflecting on the
vanity of all earthly hopes,—bright, beautiful
blossoms, blighted by the cold blast of earth’s
dread realities.

It was now that the intense earnestness of



Self-Control. 61

Mary’s character showed itself to her aunt,
by the enthusiasm with which she watched the
growth of her cherries, and the dread she felt
lest they should never ripen. The first thing
in the morning, the last at night, before going
to school, and instantly on returning, without
taking off her bonnet, was to run into the gar-
den to look at her cherries ; she could think
of nothing else; ifthe truth must be told, les-
sons were neglected, work misplaced, even
books set aside; and sad to tell, on one or two
occasions, her morning prayer forgotten. Miss
Elton was surprised; she had never seen her
little niece like this, and she determined to
leave her to herself, only reminding her, now
and then, of neglected duties. She hoped to
make the cherries a medium for a lesson to
Mary, never to be forgotten.

Miss Elton had a Bible-class at the Sunday-
school ; many of the girls who formed it were
almost young women, yet Mary, who generally
went with her aunt, would listen with eager in-
telligence to her kind instructions, and prepare
answers for the same questions with them,
Miss Elton keeping her humble by constantly
pointing out her great advantages. On the
Sunday before Mary’s birthday, Miss Elton



62 Mary Elton ; or,

had chosen for her subject, “The vanity of all
earthly hopes,” and required from her scholars
texts of scripture as proofs, and also others in
which we are taught to look for higher and
more lasting happiness. Mary had chosen for
one of the latter, the third chapter of St. Paul’s
Epistle to the Colossians, in which are the
words, “Set your affection on things above,
not on things on the earth.” From this subject,
Miss Elton explained to her attentive class
the necessity of early discipline of the heart.
She told them of those who, not having
learned to bear disappointments in youth,
often, when the sorrows of life fell upon them,
became the victims of broken hearts, soured
tempers, or reckless despair; and worse still,
of otheis, whose characters had never been con-
trolled in childhood, and who, resting all their
fondest hopes on the things of this life, and
failing to realize the happiness they had ex-
pected, had sunk into insanity, or, unable to
bear the bitter disappointment, had been
tempted to take their own lives, and rush, un-
called, into the presence of their Maker. Mary,
who listened to all, and understood much of
what her aunt said, was still quite unaware
that any of it could apply to a little girl like



Self-Control, 63

herself; and at present, Miss Elton did not
address her in. particular—she waited.

The long looked for birthday arrived; it
wanted but a few days to the midsummer
vacation; Mary, who was too busy at
school to get home until just in time for
dinner, could not go into the garden. No
sooner, however, had the cloth been removed
than she asked permission to fetch her cherries
—it was granted; away she bounded out of
the house, up the garden steps, and stood
breathless before the tree. The cherries were
gone! In vain she lifted leaf after leaf; no, she
had not mistaken the bough—they were really
gone. It took some moments, however, to
make Mary believe this ; we are slow to realize
the disappointment of our hopes. She burst
into an agony of tears, and turned towards the
house with a rapid step. Those cherries she
had tended so. carefully, so beautiful they had
looked in the morning, large, full, and ripe.
Our readers must not mistake : our little Mary
was by no means greedy; she had not the
slightest intention of eating the rare fruit her-
self; but to think that after all they should
be stolen. Oh, it was too much, and again
her sobs almost choked her. Suddenly there



64 Mary Elton ; or,

flashed across the little girl’s mind her aunt's
teaching on the previous Sunday. The violent
grief was hushed ina moment. “ Why,” she
said to herself, “aunt meant me, when she
talked about people fixing their expectations
too strongly on anything. I feel more sorry
about these cherries than if all the fruit in the
garden had been stolen,—I suppose it is be-
cause I did set my mind upon them so much.”

Slowly and quietly, with the tears, which
would come, following one another down her
cheeks, she entered the parlour. “Grand-
father,” she said mournfully, “the beautiful
cherries are gone! who could have taken
them? they must have been stolen,”

“Are you quite sure, Mary?” said Miss
Elton, in a pleasant voice. Mary looked up
through her tears, andlo! on the table were
two or three dishes of fruit, one of them con-
taining cherries, on the top of which, innocently
reposing in a fresh vine-leaf, were laid Mary’s
rare and long-watched favourites. Her look of
astonishment was quickly followed by a smile
glistening through her tears, like sunshine
through an April shower. Throwing herself
on her aunt’s neck, she exclaimed, “Aunt,
dear aunt! you did this to show me the mean-



Self-Control. 65

ing of what you said on Sunday. Oh, I
know it all now.”

There was no occasion for Miss Elton to
explain; the quick, sensitive feeling of her
little niece sufficiently understood and appre-
ciated what she had done, She merely kissed
away the tears, exclaiming, “God grant, my
darling, that your future disappointments and
sorrows may be as comparatively slight, and
as patiently endured, as this!”

The next three months seemed to pass
away very quickly, and Mary was almost as
much surprised as delighted when her father
arrived to take her home. It was with feelings
of deep gratitude to God, and thankfulness to
his kind parents and sisters, that Mr. William
Elton again clasped his little daughter in his
arms, and compared her now blooming, heal-
thy appearance, with the delicate child he had
placed under their care three years before,
The delight Mary felt at going home, and the
prospect of seeing her dear mother and little
brothers, was very natural, still she could not
bear to think of leaving her kind friends at
Byford; her grandfather and grandmother were
both growing old, and the thought would come,
“Perhaps I may never see them again.”

i E



66 Mary Elion ; or,

When the day at length arrived, the same
thought seemed to impress them all, and the
deep and heartfelt blessings poured upon her
head by these aged friends, as they bade her
farewell, made her feel as if she could not leave
them. She clung to her aunt’s neck, and
whispered, “Dear, dear aunt Fanny, thank you
for teaching me so much. Oh, indeed, I will
try never to forget it.”

At length Mr. Elton hurried her away, and
as she looked qut of the coach-window to say
“Good-bye” once more to her aunt, who stood
to see them off, she checked her sobs, and said,
“Aunt, I can write you letters now, and when
I grow a woman, I shall come and see you
again ; and—” she was going to add, “dear
grandfather and grandmother,” but she stop-
ped, and again her tears burst forth. Miss
Elton was almost glad when the coachman
mounted the box ; the ostlers whisked away
the covering from the horses, and the four
noble animals started forward with their bur-
den, prancing and curvetting as they went.
She felt almost a mother’s love for the warm-
hearted child, whose deep feelings were so
clinging to earthly objects, and so excitable,
so sensitive for those she loved, and she knew



Self-Control. 67

how much she would have to contend with in
a world where all is cold, harsh, and unsatis-
fying.

How different did this long, tedious journey
appear now to the travellers ; they were going
home, and Mr. Elton could think of nothing
but the delight her mother would feel at see-
ing the improvement in a child she had once
mourned for as sick unto death. He told his
little girl of her new brother, a baby about a
month old; described her second brother,
Willie, whom she had also never seen; and
told her that Aunt Kate, her mother’s young-
est sister, would meet them at the coach-
office.

It was a lovely September afternoon, as the
coach stopped at the White Horse Cellar; a
lady, who recognized her brother-in-law, ad-
vanced to meet him ; she looked at Mary with
a doubtful countenance. “Is it possible ?” she
said at last, seeing Mr. Elton smile; “Oh,
will not Maria be delighted?” In the hack-
ney coach that conveyed them home, Aunt
Kate took off Mary’s bonnet, wiped the dust
from her face, combed out the long flaxen
ringlets, and arranged her dress, that she
might look her best to her mother. “Thank



68 Mary Elton ; or,

you, dear aunt Kate,” said Mary, “but I did
not remember you at first ; I think I do now;
only it seems such a long while ago.” Aunt
Kate kissed her fondly. “My dear Mary, I
should know you by your voice, that is just
the same, but you are a great girl now, and I
could scarcely believe it was our little Mary.”

A family party had assembled in Mr. Elton’s
drawing-room. Mrs. Elton’s mother, and two
sisters, her brother, and his wife, and an old
uncle, Colonel Herbert. She herself sat on the
sofa, looking pale, but calm, with her infant
on her lap. By her side sat a noble boy of
five, his large black eyes anxiously turned
upon his mother. At length he inquired,
“How long will it be now, mamma, before
Mary comes ?”

“Very soon, Harry,” said his mother; “go
to the window and watch for the coach.” The
child eagerly obeyed. Another little fairy
child sat on the ground at her feet, playing
with some bricks ; he looked up, shaking his
fair curls from his brow, and said, “ Me see
coach too, ma.”

She was going to reply, when the sound of —
wheels made her rise from the sofa.

“Here they are, mamma!” exclaimed Harry,



Self-Control. 69

statting from the window. Mrs. Elton gave
the baby to her mother and turned to the door,
which Harry had opened. She could not move
astep farther ; she heard the steps of the coach
let down, and then a light foot ascended the
stairs. A tall, blooming girl stood before her,
her long fair hair curling to the waist, and
without a bonnet. Mary flew into her arms;
she instinctively felt who it was, and Mrs. EI-
ton, although the difference in the child she
now clasped to her bosom to the one she had
parted with was so great, could well under-
stand the change.

“Mamma, dear mamma!

“My own darling Mary!” was the mother’s
fervent reply.

Wewill leave the hited family to the plea-
sure and joy of that happy evening, still more
happy even than the one with which our story
began. When we continue Mary’s history,
she will no longer be a little child, but a kind
elder sister.

hed



CHAPTER VIII.

WE took leave of Mary Elton on her return
to her father’s house, after an absence of three



70 Mary Elton ; or,

years. She is now filling the responsible posi-
tion of elder sister, and in all its affectionate
duties her character is shown to great advan-
tage. She had been delighted, on her return
to Byford, to find her little brother Henry,
whom she had left a toddling child of two
years, now a fine noble boy of five. Little,
delicate, fair-haired Willie soon learnt to look
up to the gentle sister, who treated him as if
he were in reality one of the fairies of which
she had read. The baby was a new and lovely
plaything, or, as she called it, a real living doll.
Had she room in her heart for so many objects
of love? Oh yes; they all quickly became
dear to her; but it was to her brother Henry
that her young feelings seemed to turn with
the fondest affection ; he was at once a play-
mate and a pupil. Mary’s perfect acquaint-
ance with the simple, yet fundamental parts
of education, rendered her of great assistance
_to her mother in teaching Henry until he
reached the age of eight years. Mary had not
now to learn to read, write, spell, or work the
first four important rules in arithmetic, and she
had a very good general knowledge of ancient
and modern history, geography, and grammar.
Mrs. Elton, therefore, was able to commence .



Self-Control. 71

at once with the accomplishments; and her
father, finding she had a taste for arithmetic,
carried her forward in that science as well as
in other more abstruse studies, She was to
learn French and Italian, and he also made ~
her study the Latin grammar, well knowing it
to be the only foundation for the acquisition
of languages. Mary’s time was soon, therefore,
completely occupied. Her mother’s superior
education enabled her to direct her studies,
and, indeed, to be her only governess ; for, al-
though she had masters after awhile, her pa-
rents would never send her to school. Mr.
Elton was a merchant in prosperous circum-
stances, but not rich enough to place his
daughter where she could have the advantage
of such instructions as he required for her; and
Mrs. Elton feared the effects of evil example
from other girls, so she remained at home
under her mother’s watchful eye.

From Mary’s new position, asan elder sister,
arose many difficulties, which required great
patience and control of temper to contend
with. Unaccustomed to young children, es-
pecially boys, her natural quickness was some-
times sorely tried ; while their rough, boisterous
play startled and surprised the quiet little girl.



72 Mary Elton ; or,

Her mother’s gentle teachings, and her own
warm heart, soon taught her the necessary les-
son of self-conquest and self-denial with those
so much younger than herself; and Mrs. Elton
discovered, to her great satisfaction, how much
this discipline improved and strenghtened her
little daughter’s character. The careful train-
ing Mary had received, both from her mother
and aunt, Mrs. Elton had adopted with her
eldest boy, knowing well, that in a family
where the elder children are obedient and
orderly in their conduct, half the mother’s
trouble in her family is spared, by the effects
of good example upon the younger branches.
Mary being so much older, her influence was
more powerful, and her gentle manners had a
softening effect upon her brothers. At the
same time, there was none of that fearful
timidity about her which boys so contemptu-
ously ridicule. Mrs. Elton considered moral
courage, presence of mind, and endurance,
some of the highest qualities a woman can
possess. She taught her daughter the folly of
shrinking at the sight of blood, or screaming
when a beetle or a spider came near her, and
she was very soon called upon to prove the
good effects of her mother’s instructions.



Self-Control, 73

One evening, about two years after her re-
turn from Byford, she was seated in the rock-
ing-chair by the nursery fire, holding her
youngest brother in her lap, while the nurse
went into the next room for some article which
she supposed to be in one of the drawers.
Not finding it, the woman placed the candle
on the table, and left the room without re-
marking that Willie had followed her in. The
door to this room from the nursery opened
opposite to the fire-place ; Mary therefore, as
she sat singing to her little brother in a low
tone, and rocking herself backwards and for-
wards, had her back to it. The nursery was
dark, excepting the glimmering from a low fire
in the grate. Presently. Mary was startled by
the reflection of a strong light on the wall be-
fore her: at the same moment she heard Wil-
lie’s voice crying out, “Oh, Mary, here’s a bon-
fire!” She started up, and saw with terror
an open drawer at the bottom of the chest, full
of flames. This drawer, which had been left
partly open by the nurse, contained some
paper shavings which, during the summer, had
been used to ornament the empty grates.
Quickly placing her little brother on the floor,
she flew into the room, exclaiming, as she



74. Stary Elton ; ov,

snatched Willie from his dangerous position,
“Oh! you naughty boy, what have you done?”
Then snatching a blanket from the bed, she
pressed it down with her hands over the burn-
ing mass, and succeeded in extinguishing the
flames. The cries of the two children brought
Mrs. Elton and the nurse up-stairs at the same
time. Mary, overcome by the effort she had
made, had seated herself on the floor, and,
pale as death, was resting her head against a
chair in a state of faintness, Willie stood sob-
bing as if his heart would break, conscious he
had done wrong, and Freddy, on the floor in
the nursery, screamed with terror.

“What zs the matter?” said Mrs. Elton, as
she lifted her fainting daughter and placed her
on the bed.

“Oh, mamma!” said the sobbing Willie,
“T did it—lI set fire to the shavings to make
a bonfire, and Mary said I was a naughty boy,
and she put it out with a blanket.”

It was all explained now, and oh, how ten-
derly did Mrs. Elton bathe the temples of her
courageous little girl, and soothe her when she
recovered, with the warmest expressions of
love and approbation. But she did not forget
the trembling Willie; calling him to her, she



Self-Control. 75

took him on her lap, and explained to him
how dangerous it was for little boys to play
with fire. “Why, my dear Willie,” said his
mother, “if Mary had not so quickly put out
the fire, very likely your papa’s house would
have been burnt down.”

“But, mamma,” said the child, “little boys
do play with fire. I sawthem when they burnt
Guy Faux, and they made a large bonfire too, ~
mamma.”

Mrs. Elton could scarcely help smiling. The
children had been invited to spend the evening
of the Fifth of November at the house of a
friend living in the country, and from the win-
dows they had seen the burning of Guy Faux,
and a display of fireworks in the playground
of an adjoining school. “Perhaps you did,”
said his mother; “but those little boys had
masters and big boys to take care of them ;
besides, it was not in a house, but out of doors,
where there could be very little danger. My
Willie must never play with fire again, Sup-
pose your pinafore had taken fire—you would
have been burnt up like Guy Faux, and mam-
ma would have lost her little Willie,” she con-
tinued, pressing him to her bosom at the
thought. “If ever Willie touches the candle,



76 Mary Elion ; ov,

or plays with fire again, mamma will be very
sorry, but she must punish him very much.”
The little boy hid his face at this, to him, un-
usual threat, and without looking up, said, in a
choking voice, “Mamma, I never, never will
play with fire again.”

This incident occurred not long after Mrs.
Elton had been obliged to engage a stranger
to supply the place of dear old Nurse. She
had fondly and faithfully fulfilled her duties in
the nursery, till age and infirmities had obliged
her to give them up. She remained in Mrs. El-
ton’s house till her death, and the children,
especially Mary, mourned for her almost as a
mother. Mary’s presence of mind in the affair
of Willie’s bonfire relieved her mother of great
anxiety, and from that day she encouraged her
to make herself useful in the nursery, as, by
helping the nurse, she could gain her kind
feeling and confidence, and be a loving protec-
tion to her little brothers. Mrs. Elton was for-
tunate enough, a few months after, to secure
the services of a very superior woman, under
whose guidance Mary still continued to spend
what time she could spare in the nursery. Mrs.
Elton felt that there could be nothing deroga-
tory or degrading in anything she might do



Self-Control, 27

for her little brothers. Many a young mother,
mourning over the death of one infant, or the
deformity that threatened another from the
carelessness of a servant, has bitterly lamented
her ignorance of nursery duties. The constant
demand upon Mary’s time left her ao room for
idleness; certain hours for each study were
strictly enforced by both parents; a sufficient,
but not undue, length of time for music and
drawing was also allowed; and when these
and her nursery duties were accomplished, her
time was her own, for reading and other recre-
ations. By learning from her mother strict
economy of time, and never wasting a mo-
ment, it was wonderful how much she could
perform in one day. She accompanied the
children in their walks, learned to mend and
make their clothes, and, in short, promised
fair to be that treasure to a mother—an affec-
tionate, accomplished, useful, elder daughter.
Nearly four years passed away, during which
time Mary improved so rapidly under the
teaching she received from both parents, that
they felt no regret at having kept her at home.
Yet Mrs. Elton had discovered, in the earnest
intensity of her daughter’s feelings, that the
nature she so much feared existed still, and



78 Mary Elton; or,

seemed to gain strength with advancing age,
notwithstanding every effort to control it.
Whatever Mr. Elton might think about edu-
cating his daughter at home, he did not intend
to do the same with his boys. Both parents
felt the discipline of school useful for a boy
who had to fight his way through the world. A
school is, in general, a little world of itself;
and although much of evil may be, and often
is, acquired there, from the effect of bad exam-
ple, yet the influence of early teachings at
home and a mother’s gentle warnings and
prayers are never wholly lost. They will cling
to the boy—aye, and the man too, in the hour
of the sharpest temptations—whether in the
school-room, the counting-house, or the busy
haunts of men. It is the sweet influence of a
well-ordered home, and the judicious training
of a tender mother, that can alone form the
characters of England’s men and women.
When Henry Elton reached the age of
eight years, arrangements were made to send
him to school. Parting from her brother was
Mary’s first real sorrow. The boy had en-
twined himself around every fibre of her affec-
tionate heart. Nor was his love for her less
earnest. She was, in his estimation, the dearest,



Self-Control. 79

the most patient, the cleverest sister in the
world ; he could tell her all his joys, all his
sorrows; she would enter into his amusements,
however trivial, make tails for his kites, sew
the sails of his boats, feed his white mice, and
take care of his rabbits. There was no onelike
Mary. On the morning of his departure for
school, the boy’s manly spirit kept down the
tears, lest his dear mother should grieve. Mary
scarcely dared to wish him good-bye; she,
however, struggled with her over-wrought feel-
ings until he was gone, and then sobbed upon
her mother’s neck as if her heart would break.
This was the first time Mrs. Elton had recog-
nized, in its full force,.the old intense feeling.
Mary was older now, and childish disappoint-
ments had ceased to arouse it. The mother’s
quiet, calm remark covered her with shame:
“My dear Mary, your brother has more self-
command than you: he subdued his deepest
feelings for my sake.”

Oh! how bitterly the unselfish heart of
the child regretted her burst of sorrow, when
she saw tears, which she had caused, on
her mother’s usually placid face. She left
the room, but returned in a few minutes,
smiling through her tears: “ Mother, I have



80 Mary Elton; or,

conquered ; I will not grieve you by giving
way.”

Mrs. Elton kissed her fondly. “My dear
child,” she said, “you must, indeed, learn to
control yourself: you cannot always expect
me to be with you, to remind you as I have
done to-day, or to help you to self-control.
Mary, you must learn to look to a higher
Power than myself for help.” It was, how-
ever, some days before she could quite recon-
cile herself to her brother’s absence. She
missed him in-the school-room, at meals, in
the nursery, during their daily walks—in-
deed, every moment something occurred to
remind her of him. Henry Elton was a boy
whom any sister might love—noble, high-
spirited, and truthful, intelligent far beyond
his years, so much so as to form a companion
even for his clever sister. She was proud of
him in every way—proud of his handsome
face and manly bearing.’ Henry was a great
contrast to his sister ; his black, piercing eyes
were shaded by long lashes that rested on his
clear brown cheek; and around his smooth,
high forehead clustered curls of a dark, rich
colour. The contrast between the brother and
sister was, indeed, remarkable; and when, in



Self-Control, 81

earnest conversation respecting some lesson or
kind office in which she was assisting him,
Mary would lean over her brother, mixing her
bright auburn ringlets with his dark hair and
complexion, the effect was very singular.
Henry Elton was not perfect—no truly de-
scribed character can ever be so; he possessed
a passionate temper, and once, in a fit of rage,
he struck his sister. Oh! how the gentle spirit
shrunk from the blow; not on her arm did
Mary feel the pain, it fell on her heart; and
although, with bitter tears of sorrow and
fondest caresses, he regained her instant for-
giveness and love, yet Mary would have given
worlds to recall the act, not for her own sake,
but his: she wished him to be perfect, and she
wanted to think him so. Ah! Mary, Mary,
why did you twine that brother around your
heart so fondly ?—had you forgotten the cher-
ries? Ah, yes! and the earnest, ardent spirit
was enthusiastic still.



CHAPTER IX.
Henry ELTON’s first holidays occurred at
midsummer, and great was his dear mother’s
anxiety lest any evil example at school should
F



82 Mary Elton ; or,

have injured her boy. He had been at home
but one day, when the principles she had so
earnestly instilled into his mind were put to
the test. It was a lovely June morning. Mary
and her brother, prepared for walking, were
seated in the library, waiting for Nurse and
the two younger children. Nearly twenty
minutes passed, and as Nurse did not come,
Henry grew impatient. “Shall we go on?” he
said to his sister, “ Nurse will soon overtake us.”

“No,” she replied; “we must not go out
“alone. Have you forgotten that, dear Henry?”

“T had almost. Oh, it is so tiresome wait-
ing. I shall go down, and stand at the door.
She cannot be long now.”

“If I were you, I would stay here,” said
Mary ; but he was gone, and did not hear her.
She then took up a book, wondering what
could keep the nurse, and feeling a little im-
patient herself.

In the meantime, Henry sauntered into the
street. Everything looked gayand bright. The
merry spring cries, as the vendors of different
articles passed by; thedistanthumof carriages;
the voices of happy children already on their
way to the parks; the musical cry of the flower-
women, with their sweet-smelling dcaupots of



Self-Control. 83

flowers—all these were sights and sounds de-
lightful to Henry; but they increased his impa-
tience. Suddenly there struck upon his ear the
sound of military music. Henry started, and
listened ; in a moment he remembered it was
the 18thof June, the anniversary of the battle of
Waterloo. He knew also that the detachment
of soldiers who went daily to relieve the guard
at Whitehall, were on that day accompanied
by a splendid military band, and that they
would go through an adjoining street. “I
must just see it pass,” thought Henry; “I
shall be back again before Mary and Nurse
come down.” In a few moments, the gilded
dresses, glittering in the sun, and the flashing
of brass instruments, passed before his eyes ;
while the sound of the martial music and the
spirit-stirring drum filled the music-loving
child with ecstasy. Did he merely stop and
look as it passed by? No: Henry had made
the first false step in disobedience. All the
rest of the way was downhill. On he went,
mixing with a crowd of rude men and boys,
unconscious of where he was going, or to what
distance, till at the gate of a large building the
music suddenly ceased, One by one the gaily
dressed musicians, the splendid black horses



84. Mary Elton ; or,

and their warlike riders, disappeared from his
eyes. He was left standing ina strange place,
nearly two miles away from home, and alone!
He now reflected upon what he had done—
disobeyed, grieved, and no doubt alarmed his
dear mamma, deceived and forgotten his dar-
ling sister. How bitterly did he regret, and
how eagerly ask his way home! To reach it,
however, was not so easy. He walked very
fast, became heated and tired, and having two
or three times mistaken the directions given
him, found himself, after more than an hour
had passed away, apparently as far from home
as ever. He was slowly walking on, longing,
yet dreading, to see his dear mother, when he
saw coming towards him a schoolfellow much
older than himself, but, alas! possessing neither
moral courage nor principle. Henry could not ¢
have met with a more dangerous companion.
Arthur Ross, from his spirit and cleverness at
school, was looked up to by the younger boys.
Henry, therefore, was in danger of taking his
advice, whatever it might be. “ Why, Harry,
my boy! all this way from home, and alone ?”
said Arthur.

“Yes,” replied Henry, looking very sad;
*T followed the Horse Guards’ band, and I



Self-Controt. 85

was so much taken up with the music that I
did not know which road we took. I seem to
have been walking for hours, without getting
nearer home.”

“Oh, I will show you the way. But did you
go by yourself?” -

“Ves, and mamma will be very angry. She
does not allow us to go out alone.”

“Oh, nonsense! she cannot be angry for
such a trifle as this ; especially when she hears
it was the military band you followed.”

“My mamma does not call disobedience a
trifle, I can tell you, Arthur,” said Henry ;
“and as to the music, that makes it worse;
for the rude men and boys in the crowd
said wicked words to me, and called me
names.”

Arthur walked by the side of Henry, silently
considering what could be done. He was fond
of him, and anxious to save him, if possible,
from the severe punishment, or even flogging,
which he supposed was the cause of his dread,
Arthur did not know that to Henry a look of
sorrowful anger from his dear, gentle mamma
was worse, far worse, than the severest punish-
ment she could inflict upon him. At last he
spoke: “ Henry, you need not tell your mam-

*.
~



86 Mary Elton ; or,

ma where you have been, or, if you do, you
need not repeat what the men and boys said
to you; besides, you can tell her I have been
with you, which will be true, you know; and
then you can lay the blame on me.”

For one moment there rested on Henry’s
mind a wish to escape his mother’s anger by
this untruthful excuse. It was but a moment,
and that moment brought him within sight of
a street he knew to be near his home. “ No,”
said the little boy, “no, Arthur. Thank you
for trying to save me; but I could not tell a lie
for the world. I know where I am now, so
good-bye. I shall tell mamma all the truth.”
So saying, he started off, and was out of sight
in a moment.

Arthur stood looking the way he had gone
for some time; then, turning on his heel, he
said to himself, “T wish I had such courage ;
but what’s the use? They never believe me,
even when I do speak the truth.” Ah, Arthur!
whose fault was that ?

We will now zeturn to Mary. Not many
minutes after Henry.had left the room, Nurse
came down stairs; Mary joined her, but on
reaching the street-door they found it open
and Henry nowhere to be seen,



Self-Control. 87

“Where is Master Henry?” inquired the
nurse.

“T am sure I don’t know,” said Mary, look-
ing anxiously up and down the street; “he
promised to wait for us here.” They went to
each corner, looked earnestly in every direc-
tion, and at last returned to the house to in-
quire if he were still there. After looking in
every room, Mary opened the drawing-room
door, and asked, “ Mamma, is Henry here?”

“No, my love,” said Mrs. Elton, looking up
from her work; but as she did so she was
startled by Mary’s extreme paleness. “What
is the matter, my dear?” she inquired.

“Oh! mamma, mamma—Henry—he is
lost, we cannot find him anywhere,” and she
threw herself on the sofa in an agony of tears,

“Lost!” said Mrs. Elton, “what do you
mean?” and for a moment even her own
calmness gave way. Nurse entered the room
and explained. “Leave the children with me,”
said Mrs. Elton, “and send the man in one
direction, while you go another yourself; he
certainly cannot be gone far.” Nurse left the
room. Mrs, Elton sat down, took off her
youngest boy’s hat and pelisse, and telling
Willie to amuse him, she went to the sofa and



88 Mary Elton; er,

seated herself by her weeping daughter. She
felt almost inclined to chide her for such vio-
lent grief on so trifling an occasion, but she
could not bear to add to her pain. She, there-
fore inquired, “ Mary, what is the matter?”
“Qh! mamma, if anything should happen
to Henry—if he should be knocked down by
a carriage, or meet with any accident—(you
know he has never been out in London before
by himself)—or if he should have gone to the
Park alone and go near the river. Oh, mam-
ma!” she exclaimed, shuddering, and covering
her eyes, as if to shut out the picture her fancy
had formed, “ Oh, I cannot bear to think of it.”
“But why should you think of it, Mary?
your brother is still under the care of an Al-
mighty power ; he is intelligent, and not likely
to lose himself for want of inquiring the way
home. fam not fearing for his safety; the
act of disobedience causes me the greatest
pain; but my dear girl,” said her mother,
“what will become of you when you grow a
woman, unless you check these feelings?
Everything you love, every pleasure you en-
joy, will cause you constant pain from fear of
losing it. Mary, indeed, indeed you must not
make such an idol of your brother—God may



Self-Control, 89

think fit to take him from you.” Mrs, Elton
said this with quivering lips.

Mary looked up, and in that look her mo-
ther saw how fearful such a discipline would
be. “Is there danger now, do you think,
mamma?”

“No, my dear, certainly not. Come, Mary,
conquer yourself once more ; supposing I were
like you—and Henry is equally dear to me—
what would become of you? My dear child,”
she continued, “God may think proper to try
you very severely if you fix your heart on
earthly objects, and forget to love Him.” The
solemn manner of her mother awed Mary, she
struggled to be calm—she dried her tears, and,
to divert her thoughts, began to amuse her
little brothers.

The servants returned without finding
Henry; and Mrs. Elton, with all her confi-
dence in the manly intelligence of her boy,
began to feel anxious, especially when one
o’clock arrived and he had not returned. In
addition to her fear of the possibility of an ac-
cident, arose a dread, that having been tempted
to disobey, he might be induced to tell her an
untruth; that her noble, truthful Henry should
have learnt evil habits atschool. The thought



90 Mary Elton ; or,

was agony. Nurse came to take the boys to
dinner. As Willie left the room, he said,
“ Mamma, I think Henry went to hear the sol-
diers’ band; I heard them while Nurse was
putting on her bonnet. I did not like to say
so before, mamma,” said Willie, shaking his
curls from his fair brow and blushing, “ for
fear you should be angry with him, and I
thought he would soon be back. The sol-
diers would not take him away, would they,
mamma ?”

“No, my boy,” said his mother, relieved
beyond measure at being able to account for
the boy’s absence ; “but never mind, go and
have your dinner, Willie.”

“Mamma, I never thought of the band—I
did not hear it,” said Mary.

“No, my dear, nor did I, but the nursery
is at the back of the house, and you were in
the library, reading, I suppose.”

“Yes, mamma; and you mean I could hear
nothing then.”

Another half-hour passed. Mrs. Elton was
pleased to see how Mary struggled with her
fears, yet she had almost lost her self-control;
and Mrs. Elton herself felt anxious—when the
door opened, and the lost one entered! Mary



Self-Control. gt

started from her sofa—a look from her mother
checked her. The mother’s own impulse was
to clasp him in her arms with delight at
finding him safe. But she remained still,
and looking sadly at him, she said, “ Henry,
my Henry, where have you been?” Oh!
how she trembled as she spoke, lest the
answer should be untrue, or even partially
so. There he stood before her, his eyes rest-
ing on the carpet, dreading his greatest pun-
ishment—that dear mothers anger. She
need not to fear; in a moment, without a
single word to excuse himself, the answer
came,

“Mamma,” and the little heart beat so as
almost to choke his utterance, “ I will tell you
the truth. I went out by myself, and I fol-
lowed the Horse Guards’ band all the way to
the barracks.”

Mrs. Elton looked at her boy ; he had never
told her a lie; and she felt what it had cost
him to risk her anger. She opened her arms,
and the next moment Henry was sobbing on
his mother’s bosom, telling her how he had
been tempted not only to disobey, but to de-
ceive her.

“Ah! Henry,” said his mother; “this













02 Mary Elton, or,

will teach you, I hope, how one false step
leads to another. Had you been patient and
remained with your sister, you would not have
heard the music; having once heard it, you
wished to see it, and then resistance was over.
Again, if you had been walking with your
sister and Nurse, Arthur Ross would have had
no opportunity to tempt you to do wrong,
even if you had met him.”

Henry’s conscience told him how true was
every word his mother uttered ; and when he
saw how sorry poor Mary had been, and how
he had grieved his mother, his repentance was
so deep and sincere, that he was soon made
happy by his mother’s forgiveness, and by his
sister’s kiss of happiness that he had returned
in safety.

Willie Elton was a very different boy to his
brother. He had never been strong ; and per-
haps on that account, as well as natural dispo-
sition, he had very little energy of character.
Sometimes, too, he would be fretful and impa-
tient over his lessons, which was a great trial to
Mary’s quickness and impetuosity; she did not
love poor Willie as she did her noble and high-
spirited Henry. But Mrs. Elton encouraged
her in every way to subdue herself for his sake;



Self-Control, 93

and the little fellow, who loved his sister dearly,
won his way to her heart by trying to supply
Harry’s place. The boy had many gentle, en-
dearing ways, which she had overlooked, and
now her heart bitterly accused itself for her
neglect. Freddy, too, the youngest, who more
resembled his eldest brother, one day laid his
arms across her lap, and, looking up in her
face, said, “ Mary, make a kite for me, like you
did for Henry once, will you?” Yes ; indeed,
she would, or anything else they liked. Con-
science was awakened; and she one day told
her mother, she could understand now why
God sometimes took away from us the objects
we loved too much, that we might learn to
value those that were left behind. Henry,
however, was still her idol, and she looked
forward to his return at Christmas with the
most intense anxiety.

Mr. Elton had placed his boy at a school
kept by a clergyman, whose kind teachings
and pleasing management had a great influ-
ence over his pupils. All the arrangements
tended to soften and refine the manners, with-
out destroying that manly spirit and noble
bearing which every English boy should pos-
sess. Their amusements were chosen with



04 Mary Elton ; or,

the same intent; and, to Henry’s delight, music
was one of them. He had great natural ta-
lent; and although so young, soon became, for
his age, a very good performer on the flute.
On his return at Christmas, he was in every
way so much improved, that his parents and
sister looked upon him with delight. He had
become gentle and patient to his brothers;
respectfully polite, yet fondly affectionate to
his dear mother, and to his father an intel-
ligent companion ; while to Mary he seemed
the deau zdeal of all that was noble and clever.

These happy Christmas holidays were, to
the brother and sister, too short for all the de-
lightful plans they had laid out together.
Duets to practise in the morning, walks in the
afternoon,andsome pleasant book or Christmas
party in the evening. Henry had also a new
object to love, in a little sister. On hearing
of the birth of this baby, he had declared it
impossible he could ever love another sister as
he did dear Mary, but he very soon found his
mistake. One he looked up to and loved asa
guide and friend: for the other he felt all the
love of an elder brother. “Mamma,” he said,
one morning, as he sat with the baby in his
lap, trying to hold her as gently and nurse-



Self-Control, 95

like as possible; “Mamma, when I grow a
man, baby will be but a little girl; oh, how
proud I shall be to take care of her and protect
her. You are not jealous, are you, dear Mary,
because I love baby ?”

“Jealous, Harry, oh no!” said Mary, who
was looking on partly with pleasure and partly
with fear, lest he should let the baby fall.

“And I shall be a man too,” said Willie,
with a sudden show of spirit; “may I not
take care of baby too?”

“Of course,” said Mrs, Elton; “ grown-up
brothers should always be proud of taking
care of their young sisters; but, Willie, baby
will be nearly as old as Mary is now, when
you are twenty.”

“And I shall be twenty-two, mamma, quite
aman then. Do you think baby will be like
Mary ?”

“No, my boy,” said his mother; “she is
more like yourself, she has dark eyes.” The
children pressed round their sister, who had
taken the infant from Henry, and tried to dis-
cover the exact colour of those large eyes,
which had already begun to notice and follow
them about the room.

Mrs. Elton looked at her children as only a



96 Mary Elton; or,

mother can; her feelings were as earnest and
enthusiastic as Mary’s, but she had experi-
enced enough of earth’s sorrows to learn the
Christian’s lesson of the vanity of all earthly
hopes, She had already lost her first-born
son and an infant daughter; therefore her love
for her beautiful, her noble Henry, trembled
with its own intenseness. A cold, shuddering
sensation would pass over her as the question
arose in her mind—“Can it be possible that I
may lose him!’ The thought would be dis-
missed as the effect of nervousness ; yet with
a heart disciplined by religion and sorrow,
she was enabled to wear these dearest of
earthly ties as loosely as a fond mother ever
can hope to do.



CHAPTER X.

ANOTHER six months passed away, and again
the dearly loved son and brother, improved in
mind and person, returned to delight the
family circle. Mr. Elton, anxious to make
the summer vacation a season of real enjoy-
ment, took his family to the sea-side. There
on the sea-beach would the kind elder sister,
after wandering about gathering shells and



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c87eb3788dfcfec322d7ada91a234bd9
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'2012-04-24T19:25:37-04:00'
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTJT' 'sip-files00001.pro'
a26e3c5dcf9edde57499b99571e5d721
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'2012-04-24T19:27:38-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:27:37-04:00'
describe
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101b1a3a3ca01b7b48c6ef223c7c6bcc
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'2012-04-24T19:23:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTJW' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-04-24T19:23:45-04:00'
describe
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fa5917981c9f689bb58f4f127167ca7a
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:43-04:00'
describe
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c04271496cd946414a09a42e3a96532c
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'2012-04-24T19:25:16-04:00'
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTKA' 'sip-files00002.pro'
de42b35c9604ede382c7c0a814cdd3fb
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describe
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f0f8e6b27b4b67aac02ecf74f1181132
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'2012-04-24T19:22:53-04:00'
describe
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b139af9f8a62068491aae596d0fc1f2d
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'2012-04-24T19:21:49-04:00'
describe
'31' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTKD' 'sip-files00002.txt'
9c0c3c9ad4cdcf5f62255a69531dd9f8
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'2012-04-24T19:26:34-04:00'
describe
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280d3fdefc5e2d3e791aefc0685f4625
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'2012-04-24T19:25:05-04:00'
describe
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e7dbfabb6df8dddd365961e016ba99b0
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'2012-04-24T19:27:34-04:00'
describe
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895eed1a72b4bd18212037510ab925ac
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'2012-04-24T19:21:57-04:00'
describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTKH' 'sip-files00003.pro'
745781ff4b274b35154c5a5406cf8846
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describe
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060db03ee25dccd845ce4802daa7aa55
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'2012-04-24T19:27:03-04:00'
describe
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878f0bce62e729980a1f1897417cb4b8
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'2012-04-24T19:22:50-04:00'
describe
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a6be9c13a682ecacc3b1a9bee5437925
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'2012-04-24T19:27:01-04:00'
describe
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c927e4262b715375baa2f1ff516c5bba
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'2012-04-24T19:22:38-04:00'
describe
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fe16c9f3fb8710bdca63612dbdc97e22
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'2012-04-24T19:27:39-04:00'
describe
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e19db2c9269a117f4b97e14464712651
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describe
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ae7e0a447689730a06d866937608f0d2
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'2012-04-24T19:26:00-04:00'
describe
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343251ed58c06d511baf9cb101a577a7
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'2012-04-24T19:27:42-04:00'
describe
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0020c613ab96bac2fca1a6c658750ad6
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'2012-04-24T19:22:15-04:00'
describe
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f67ed6d1a5b6d6b1c3f5f74bf7cfe8ec
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'2012-04-24T19:22:03-04:00'
describe
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1283d970d18fa89de50a27ab6c23f6ab
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'2012-04-24T19:27:12-04:00'
describe
'3062' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTKT' 'sip-files00005.pro'
8972e3f61b2369d8350fcaa800124ffa
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'2012-04-24T19:27:29-04:00'
describe
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bbd0654c9471b0d40080db3a4ba88172
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'2012-04-24T19:23:24-04:00'
describe
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2805143334a63006c40dbebc4fec94be
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'2012-04-24T19:24:53-04:00'
describe
'52' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTKW' 'sip-files00005.txt'
cd8d7b5ccaad971232ffdb17996935b0
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'2012-04-24T19:22:11-04:00'
describe
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0dff16dc48249adc88c24f1bc7e0f410
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'2012-04-24T19:23:27-04:00'
describe
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a1158b74fe5a9e0443e11a4947cb1f69
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'2012-04-24T19:27:09-04:00'
describe
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68edfad3eedf8813d1a1b1411ba2093e
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'2012-04-24T19:23:44-04:00'
describe
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3fca581f7eba0a8493f11b5120d2e099
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'2012-04-24T19:22:37-04:00'
describe
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0ce02cd0733bb91a44f6f1081d5dc3bb
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'2012-04-24T19:23:07-04:00'
describe
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b20a946ec895655f8a37d0bbc6e88d4d
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'2012-04-24T19:22:13-04:00'
describe
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f55c7e7e0ef061709247fcd9eccadac4
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'2012-04-24T19:26:30-04:00'
describe
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e8fd64baf0c87dfed4c9b9217b6703d8
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'2012-04-24T19:27:30-04:00'
describe
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4383f488e5792645f2ef2422533abc6b
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'2012-04-24T19:22:57-04:00'
describe
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fbe035fc0ef2f10f92446f9b3f1bb296
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'2012-04-24T19:25:04-04:00'
describe
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7418cd5907e3b0d1fc0c7321be897158
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'2012-04-24T19:26:18-04:00'
describe
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70a57c670494eb2fcb6f87e8571d97d5
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'2012-04-24T19:22:32-04:00'
describe
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1ca23a639a4223ad9de90e2dc4901836
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'2012-04-24T19:23:41-04:00'
describe
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cd179f39c0395474a52be461dcdaa3ba
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'2012-04-24T19:25:52-04:00'
describe
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f56ce48d3021bb5fefbc9b4389ecb99b
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'2012-04-24T19:25:38-04:00'
describe
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7ee4ed8f69d784479c2e142db74edcf8
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'2012-04-24T19:21:54-04:00'
describe
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61f8632213a5f1c1488592bd80b5191f
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'2012-04-24T19:26:13-04:00'
describe
'30123' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTLO' 'sip-files00008.pro'
b9f1c3e84d50cf169c4b0f4ab68a81bd
3bdeea9c64994871dcbf98fd3a7f52baa8c8971a
describe
'167418' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTLP' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
1b130474a96e1e33e722b841e7939001
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'2012-04-24T19:22:42-04:00'
describe
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d9523e80e17bd9652e74ab414a2a174d
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'2012-04-24T19:25:24-04:00'
describe
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66d5050bf430b866568350494937f185
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'2012-04-24T19:23:00-04:00'
describe
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947ca940dd686f96c2465e991dad4b53
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describe
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c096b35311f13eaa3c1df74e88ebfc6a
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'2012-04-24T19:23:13-04:00'
describe
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5445ec4e64ff9589fbb50bcdfba37447
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'2012-04-24T19:23:15-04:00'
describe
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00d52ed843cb885cc06e61c6b05e3a02
1ae1dd5d1c949b8875171cdd86b50c92fbf6f32c
describe
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b76d86212d2d27877fe883a80b1c43f5
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'2012-04-24T19:27:02-04:00'
describe
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83caa4a09be36d1fb7d717c5d54993cd
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'2012-04-24T19:24:22-04:00'
describe
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750221fddcc0442d8350f762c7ea4e6e
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'2012-04-24T19:26:33-04:00'
describe
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6db2264de2fb581bffa33dfcfaf61cdc
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'2012-04-24T19:23:30-04:00'
describe
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ea9ee37bee17c356800266f48ff67c99
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'2012-04-24T19:23:40-04:00'
describe
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b64e61a2ac253fdc02942aebd8d905d8
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'2012-04-24T19:23:34-04:00'
describe
'30656' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMC' 'sip-files00010.pro'
322ac798b116cbb4110236e968407bf6
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'2012-04-24T19:24:59-04:00'
describe
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157ebf21c4af0b4cc2c6290cc4141743
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'2012-04-24T19:22:44-04:00'
describe
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60e2f4341275dc3ee49891d7ae496cde
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'2012-04-24T19:25:20-04:00'
describe
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cadcab1d1df113a84ade2f4257dc61b7
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'2012-04-24T19:27:31-04:00'
describe
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a51f8b043f1813cbacb453f377bec46e
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'2012-04-24T19:23:51-04:00'
describe
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94ab5c2c65fe3840d189ee153a145e76
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'2012-04-24T19:23:12-04:00'
describe
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d4e2d02556968e588d9b6f12c0727dde
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'2012-04-24T19:26:52-04:00'
describe
'31284' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMJ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
50d64dce31a550dfe0fb87059891ab21
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'2012-04-24T19:23:48-04:00'
describe
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484eb07d5d7be3ebaa62f0b552beb724
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'2012-04-24T19:25:07-04:00'
describe
'1944232' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTML' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b5fd6dfb485be011a56d7fbc35408fe7
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'2012-04-24T19:27:14-04:00'
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMM' 'sip-files00011.txt'
1bbf63faf8572bfb4a7f51cbd5b44a61
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describe
'53633' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
d45520455a732c21b26e7a71d6e273bf
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'2012-04-24T19:27:00-04:00'
describe
'245960' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
527d1f065e389f939311da33f7212936
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'2012-04-24T19:23:56-04:00'
describe
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fec311478bc255f102688b1bca7df092
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'2012-04-24T19:26:11-04:00'
describe
'27302' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMQ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
530edb63365e176d4dd9ec99bf7ae543
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'2012-04-24T19:25:39-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:27:19-04:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMT' 'sip-files00012.txt'
8b4dbadff1f35138b85e9841c8dbe41b
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'2012-04-24T19:22:35-04:00'
describe
'50178' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMU' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:25:18-04:00'
describe
'234958' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMV' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
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'2012-04-24T19:27:25-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:25:11-04:00'
describe
'31158' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMX' 'sip-files00013.pro'
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describe
'169714' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTMY' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTNA' 'sip-files00013.txt'
0f19151a8ed98b39787f47eddc4f0164
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'2012-04-24T19:26:21-04:00'
describe
'53863' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTNB' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:22:46-04:00'
describe
'238262' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTNC' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'27401' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTNE' 'sip-files00014.pro'
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'2012-04-24T19:21:50-04:00'
describe
'156327' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTNF' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:21:59-04:00'
describe
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describe
'242978' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTNJ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:25:17-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:17-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:21:52-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:25:50-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:23:11-04:00'
describe
'30310' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTNS' 'sip-files00016.pro'
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'2012-04-24T19:27:48-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:24:46-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:25:13-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:26:17-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:27:50-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:26:29-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:21:58-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:24:49-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:23:20-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:29-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:22-04:00'
describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:21:56-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:25:31-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:40-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:10-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:26:49-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:24:35-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:27:41-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:52-04:00'
describe
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'2012-04-24T19:27:24-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:24:57-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:25:35-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:27:47-04:00'
describe
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describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTPS' 'sip-files00023.txt'
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'2012-04-24T19:22:12-04:00'
describe
'53770' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTPT' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
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describe
'242352' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTPU' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e9962d2dd783563811c4ccae38416b11
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'2012-04-24T19:25:23-04:00'
describe
'464963' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTPV' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
5e1482be5c7c5f6cbaf6db3db57d804d
40249fab241da4be69fe1a2decf04a2b7514aee5
'2012-04-24T19:22:25-04:00'
describe
'28952' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTPW' 'sip-files00024.pro'
9fea81c6459f58a6bf1476d12af5e326
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'2012-04-24T19:26:50-04:00'
describe
'165568' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTPX' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
041a2e7bedd78f18731d4cb29928b4bc
d7df272a5b519d61cd0e308519b57c49fc3bf912
'2012-04-24T19:25:15-04:00'
describe
'1951460' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTPY' 'sip-files00024.tif'
ac058f226b1ba103d588c00b65b5046e
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'2012-04-24T19:27:49-04:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTPZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
2e528640d6e229567019ba98685fd4a7
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describe
'52071' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQA' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
9501cf8e05d6c0be7e7bf502a4f3910e
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describe
'238289' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
871b34d013dc9fd97df63a2b443e711f
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'2012-04-24T19:22:01-04:00'
describe
'454588' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQC' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
3b2e9e4ad64002a687bc4d71b69bbf7a
cbaa4c372b3208cf2fd99214aeabde8ef63a342b
describe
'28678' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQD' 'sip-files00025.pro'
6cf9024f3579078950fd0320468e39e2
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'2012-04-24T19:23:42-04:00'
describe
'161466' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQE' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
5950ca130f32d51c9b468bb99b7d25d0
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describe
'1919608' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQF' 'sip-files00025.tif'
aea183a41ae8922cdaf96b1d520252e4
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describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
ddf655184ef1b0cf46bdeb8bb62fbd87
ce23473955a6e262ba57f6ea5e797238f6a86f26
describe
'53677' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQH' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
bea6a124bbe9dcfed6f6129dfd56642e
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'2012-04-24T19:22:39-04:00'
describe
'243041' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQI' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
103e88ec52e0f37a154cf3d7e8c4ddbd
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'2012-04-24T19:26:37-04:00'
describe
'456145' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQJ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
b45b55685dcc13897e07e44bfa17c4a2
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'2012-04-24T19:25:59-04:00'
describe
'28537' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQK' 'sip-files00026.pro'
7ef56184923bf819a5a4ac7f916015cb
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'2012-04-24T19:22:36-04:00'
describe
'158285' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQL' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
1fef321ca3c7bfe17f9145e5dc8d2bee
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describe
'1956996' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQM' 'sip-files00026.tif'
784e4724a30007aaab11b3d2c2c61d33
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'2012-04-24T19:24:25-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQN' 'sip-files00026.txt'
601cca93aab7e95fcc35e5f3237afd13
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'2012-04-24T19:27:05-04:00'
describe
'51222' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQO' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
e33a166aed3bca502d37200630ddec66
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describe
'243330' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQP' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
5d0822a5c6ac0c759713a8a26eb725bc
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describe
'464213' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQQ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
a7be858be8ec912628b409e5e1f7911e
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'2012-04-24T19:24:28-04:00'
describe
'28521' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQR' 'sip-files00027.pro'
157705351372c1a65a8a81490940aa6a
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'2012-04-24T19:22:31-04:00'
describe
'161728' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
38e12d8c6c9186906009e12e50507a60
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'2012-04-24T19:22:05-04:00'
describe
'1960272' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQT' 'sip-files00027.tif'
0aaf477da57bb49feb033e6ddd2be0b6
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'2012-04-24T19:23:23-04:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQU' 'sip-files00027.txt'
ea6d46bc3cd4f0d7a006cbfe99e0a099
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'2012-04-24T19:27:28-04:00'
describe
'51433' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQV' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
5847ee835b59a315e1c24c9566ef0e1f
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describe
'243151' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQW' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
427e05bbd400945ba562c88bf0fcb9c5
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'2012-04-24T19:25:03-04:00'
describe
'467642' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ed4c3b65e217cf3560468bd91083d8ac
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describe
'28901' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQY' 'sip-files00028.pro'
31697cc1fbeabacdd8fb52c09b8729c7
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describe
'167941' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTQZ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
532b14a7745073ffe6386f45d4d5febc
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'2012-04-24T19:23:26-04:00'
describe
'1958600' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRA' 'sip-files00028.tif'
b821ad60d04fe7e4d6bf44bf741ea4d0
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'2012-04-24T19:27:26-04:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRB' 'sip-files00028.txt'
a9c442d8c023dbf44ee4d69d269345b3
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'2012-04-24T19:23:32-04:00'
describe
'53185' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRC' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
a895d52f044e7266dd49961d25b725ce
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'2012-04-24T19:24:24-04:00'
describe
'263043' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRD' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
ff87f3d9ec2ae059e602e918bf800579
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'2012-04-24T19:26:38-04:00'
describe
'451310' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRE' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
7945a6c6b8b2ae7d95016764ff3e53f0
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describe
'29921' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRF' 'sip-files00029.pro'
22d739854533d3b8aa2bc16df2e42e3c
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'2012-04-24T19:23:22-04:00'
describe
'157133' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRG' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
fb71a255d3e84923797683dd94ffb92d
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'2012-04-24T19:26:02-04:00'
describe
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b5051e1e4296a93f961efc9583c8a000
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'2012-04-24T19:24:56-04:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
0aca4639edaef24bb8f3d916ca84c8a9
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describe
'50162' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRJ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
702c5b7c2a0837ea9a6b139daaa38c55
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'2012-04-24T19:26:25-04:00'
describe
'241230' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
c8f11b676639c4c045ba16bf60c50cbf
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'2012-04-24T19:27:07-04:00'
describe
'499916' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRL' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
481755b618064730353a367415fab9c2
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'2012-04-24T19:23:38-04:00'
describe
'32535' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRM' 'sip-files00030.pro'
bb5ab7bdc79039606da57cdf5f156c05
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describe
'173270' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRN' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0d2cd6244e07da2437d146f803911532
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describe
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d9c5ac3e8cac10ba3b254630a42d134c
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'2012-04-24T19:26:07-04:00'
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRP' 'sip-files00030.txt'
ee82cfe0d0ff55110b9f7a11f583f4df
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'2012-04-24T19:24:31-04:00'
describe
'54052' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRQ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
e4ffc08ad79d357d91561430437051e7
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'2012-04-24T19:22:20-04:00'
describe
'263059' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRR' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
3ecacacde1a54278c6e65be3ec8280c4
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describe
'470852' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRS' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
0f9f8b26abc6229827b013c48be2f93a
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'2012-04-24T19:27:06-04:00'
describe
'32528' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRT' 'sip-files00031.pro'
c62dc42bdd3050de5d7b20d407e1ace5
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describe
'161881' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRU' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
63acc578bdf56c884673420e61acba75
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'2012-04-24T19:21:51-04:00'
describe
'2117108' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
1654cde4e6c7e1c39126178c2ddd6e69
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describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRW' 'sip-files00031.txt'
5b60151729a6e6d91b750376560b21ec
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describe
'49342' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRX' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
0ca1b234cb0e0e9cf338c4383f8ddd89
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'2012-04-24T19:22:09-04:00'
describe
'235318' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRY' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
b3544f2aac439eb7b9238f37618668d0
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'2012-04-24T19:25:42-04:00'
describe
'488221' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTRZ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
4ac6735d2561317745c060a9899cee59
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'2012-04-24T19:23:54-04:00'
describe
'32156' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSA' 'sip-files00032.pro'
761d1e9a7a7f2f159e7fcea2de831c4f
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describe
'172788' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSB' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
fb9881bdd24b0ae3f37be7afe77bf089
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describe
'1895804' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSC' 'sip-files00032.tif'
d9d805a9b1697b1a4b475e4172359d02
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describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSD' 'sip-files00032.txt'
fb1f88a3d82c3f3c17bbfeaf507c7781
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'2012-04-24T19:23:49-04:00'
describe
'55028' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSE' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
c505c28abd21152bc16fa06c9206258b
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'2012-04-24T19:25:34-04:00'
describe
'262987' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSF' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
6eb6debdd696aa001bf8e8265aced21c
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'2012-04-24T19:25:28-04:00'
describe
'466454' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSG' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
4b9e061b685d51c5184c6433a7a699f3
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'2012-04-24T19:23:25-04:00'
describe
'32318' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSH' 'sip-files00033.pro'
1fceeb41f2fc29372d18fc6a387386f5
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describe
'161834' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSI' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
ff4015fddfd1844520cd225d8b574a65
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describe
'2117400' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSJ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
63ecd3f276ad8791ea83a87f4eefba54
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describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSK' 'sip-files00033.txt'
08e47f3a781267ef0d39bcc0dee47a4d
27b59dc5facbb7f5d5ec4d6356a8e5813a15bbcc
'2012-04-24T19:22:16-04:00'
describe
'50581' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSL' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
500d335fc1c0be4a299e70e354291050
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describe
'247473' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSM' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
c5877e83eb1f0cd258cf4ee050d9c675
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describe
'477267' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSN' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
024115a93016670a273161dddc3626c3
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'2012-04-24T19:22:49-04:00'
describe
'29416' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSO' 'sip-files00034.pro'
6fbfe1562c5d5a334af769decbd5e630
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describe
'162849' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSP' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
d1a881dfa610301f80e36b19afff83a3
e42dae01a2f8a84ddb80f83b2b71cae594dd8c2e
'2012-04-24T19:25:56-04:00'
describe
'1993044' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSQ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
e0bced894239f7bd0c43d42a9cbfc592
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describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSR' 'sip-files00034.txt'
ace25da1b3d526a60f7e3787d342c70a
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'2012-04-24T19:27:22-04:00'
describe
'52974' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSS' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
8dcb81ce1c7c628b2b1b9dbe310eab8e
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'2012-04-24T19:24:29-04:00'
describe
'242061' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTST' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
077cf0dac811da5b194d2d37df45ad38
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describe
'483889' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSU' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
340e77bd6752cc2b2887b21cd0a3f0c6
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'2012-04-24T19:27:32-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSY' 'sip-files00035.txt'
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describe
'52729' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTSZ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'25855' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTTC' 'sip-files00036.pro'
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describe
'157032' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTTD' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'50153' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTTG' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
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describe
'246806' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTTH' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:26:20-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:25:10-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:23:17-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:41-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'164075' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTWC' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:27-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'26737' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTWI' 'sip-files00048.pro'
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describe
'145981' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTWJ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'244960' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTWN' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTWZ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTXE' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTYJ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTYP' 'sip-files00056.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'27914' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZH' 'sip-files00059.pro'
455493d7cf9eeea934d8ed8c6a40e2b3
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'2012-04-24T19:25:19-04:00'
describe
'163977' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZI' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1885696' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZJ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
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describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZK' 'sip-files00059.txt'
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describe
'53761' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZL' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
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describe
'243914' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZM' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
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'2012-04-24T19:22:24-04:00'
describe
'444574' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZN' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
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describe
'27314' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZO' 'sip-files00060.pro'
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describe
'159822' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZP' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1964368' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZQ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
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describe
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describe
'50365' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZS' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
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describe
'245046' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZT' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
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describe
'456952' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZU' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
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describe
'28204' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZV' 'sip-files00061.pro'
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describe
'158992' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZW' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1973848' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZX' 'sip-files00061.tif'
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:04-04:00'
describe
'50134' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABTZZ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
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describe
'244777' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAA' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:27:13-04:00'
describe
'31939' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAC' 'sip-files00062.pro'
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describe
'170408' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAD' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'54048' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAG' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
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describe
'241382' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAH' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAJ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
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describe
'169833' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAK' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:25:27-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
'53525' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAN' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
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describe
'247441' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAO' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'51725' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAU' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'171787' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUAY' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'53835' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUBB' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
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describe
'249351' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUBC' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'52688' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUBI' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'31492' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUBL' 'sip-files00067.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'54189' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUBP' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
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describe
'256762' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUBQ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'159122' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUBT' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'2037072' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCB' 'sip-files00069.tif'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'157765' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCO' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCQ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
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describe
'51615' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCR' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
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describe
'249867' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCS' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
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'2012-04-24T19:26:55-04:00'
describe
'462958' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCT' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
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describe
'30020' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCU' 'sip-files00072.pro'
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describe
'159811' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCV' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2012240' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCW' 'sip-files00072.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCX' 'sip-files00072.txt'
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describe
'51492' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCY' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:23:35-04:00'
describe
'254123' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUCZ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
592989689af1f46e37fb6e2aa6fdebc3
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describe
'434577' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDA' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
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describe
'26615' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDB' 'sip-files00073.pro'
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'2012-04-24T19:26:39-04:00'
describe
'150518' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDC' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:27:20-04:00'
describe
'2045052' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDD' 'sip-files00073.tif'
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describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDE' 'sip-files00073.txt'
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describe
'47749' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDF' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:26:01-04:00'
describe
'257362' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDG' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
8b3e5737890e5a089e66af7b0dfd3716
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describe
'467538' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDH' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
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describe
'33103' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDI' 'sip-files00074.pro'
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describe
'162232' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDJ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
d42af64f5658b559a0c51ab6f3bb2218
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'2012-04-24T19:21:53-04:00'
describe
'2071320' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDK' 'sip-files00074.tif'
ab53f8812383cee40c93e23f56887551
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'2012-04-24T19:25:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDL' 'sip-files00074.txt'
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describe
'49784' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDM' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
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describe
'250169' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDN' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
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'2012-04-24T19:26:24-04:00'
describe
'470804' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDO' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
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describe
'32254' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDP' 'sip-files00075.pro'
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describe
'164576' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDQ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:22:59-04:00'
describe
'2014588' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDR' 'sip-files00075.tif'
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describe
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describe
'52457' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDT' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
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describe
'256938' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDU' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
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describe
'462531' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDV' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
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describe
'32256' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDW' 'sip-files00076.pro'
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describe
'158256' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDX' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:25:53-04:00'
describe
'2068124' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDY' 'sip-files00076.tif'
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describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUDZ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
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describe
'48545' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEA' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
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describe
'237587' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEB' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
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describe
'498256' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEC' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
a6662c50c3259e5d23fb35ad7fa7a4a8
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'2012-04-24T19:26:42-04:00'
describe
'32324' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUED' 'sip-files00077.pro'
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describe
'172381' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEE' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:25:41-04:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEG' 'sip-files00077.txt'
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describe
'53729' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEH' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
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describe
'275394' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEI' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
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describe
'446443' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEJ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
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describe
'31491' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEK' 'sip-files00078.pro'
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describe
'152939' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEL' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:24:23-04:00'
describe
'2216060' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEM' 'sip-files00078.tif'
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'2012-04-24T19:24:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEN' 'sip-files00078.txt'
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describe
'47859' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEO' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:22:28-04:00'
describe
'247569' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEP' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
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describe
'468042' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEQ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
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describe
'30751' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUER' 'sip-files00079.pro'
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describe
'163868' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUES' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
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describe
'52198' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEV' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:25:48-04:00'
describe
'246392' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEW' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
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describe
'489485' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEX' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
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describe
'32616' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEY' 'sip-files00080.pro'
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'2012-04-24T19:24:13-04:00'
describe
'169479' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUEZ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1984220' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFA' 'sip-files00080.tif'
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'2012-04-24T19:25:43-04:00'
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFB' 'sip-files00080.txt'
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'2012-04-24T19:26:35-04:00'
describe
'52268' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFC' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
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describe
'243357' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFD' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
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describe
'489690' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFE' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
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describe
'32293' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFF' 'sip-files00081.pro'
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describe
'171304' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFG' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:24:36-04:00'
describe
'1959732' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFH' 'sip-files00081.tif'
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'2012-04-24T19:25:00-04:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
1f18dd7f4c1aa7a1a33ead943df79956
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'2012-04-24T19:25:09-04:00'
describe
'52837' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFJ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
d2f14eea404e01da1104ea26da4ab5c4
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describe
'248635' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFK' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
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describe
'479503' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFL' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
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describe
'32246' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFM' 'sip-files00082.pro'
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'2012-04-24T19:23:19-04:00'
describe
'166172' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFN' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:24:58-04:00'
describe
'2001808' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFO' 'sip-files00082.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFP' 'sip-files00082.txt'
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describe
'52860' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFQ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:24:38-04:00'
describe
'242001' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFR' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
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describe
'484156' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFS' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
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describe
'31733' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFT' 'sip-files00083.pro'
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describe
'170183' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1949300' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFV' 'sip-files00083.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFW' 'sip-files00083.txt'
67293f16ef920c70fd2a216e34cb45b6
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'2012-04-24T19:26:57-04:00'
describe
'53426' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFX' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'465698' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUFZ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
63c3c6435c7b59ef4a82f4a33f3813ec
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describe
'30617' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGA' 'sip-files00084.pro'
f843aaed46a454e946d911b33f139e1d
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describe
'162876' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGB' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:22:07-04:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGD' 'sip-files00084.txt'
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describe
'49950' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGE' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ece25e97b67bc4cfc35fc8edca79fbcc
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'2012-04-24T19:24:11-04:00'
describe
'242827' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGF' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
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describe
'470456' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGG' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
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describe
'28673' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGH' 'sip-files00085.pro'
8a2dd90023118b185c30f95437a7914a
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describe
'164564' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGI' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:22:33-04:00'
describe
'1955272' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGJ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
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describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGK' 'sip-files00085.txt'
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describe
'51944' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGL' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
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describe
'233956' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGM' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
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describe
'475574' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
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describe
'31119' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGO' 'sip-files00086.pro'
021f09ce5510429a3b4b4d2c128c684f
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'2012-04-24T19:23:52-04:00'
describe
'165351' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGP' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
78e8858ef77d45d76071cae2601280df
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describe
'1885352' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGQ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGR' 'sip-files00086.txt'
1b61b70751984c2298f315b6d7fd845e
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describe
'53326' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGS' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
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describe
'244765' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGT' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'32161' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGV' 'sip-files00087.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'52833' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUGZ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'485222' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHB' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
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describe
'31425' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHC' 'sip-files00088.pro'
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describe
'168452' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHD' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1938508' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHE' 'sip-files00088.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHF' 'sip-files00088.txt'
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'2012-04-24T19:24:09-04:00'
describe
'52184' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHG' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
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describe
'247163' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
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'2012-04-24T19:24:14-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'51033' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHN' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'460485' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHP' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHQ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
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describe
'161376' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHR' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:26:23-04:00'
describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHT' 'sip-files00090.txt'
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describe
'51230' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHU' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
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describe
'244017' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHV' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
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describe
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:27:35-04:00'
describe
'162703' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUHY' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUIA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
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describe
'52280' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUIB' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
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describe
'246949' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUIC' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
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describe
'485150' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUID' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:24:44-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUIH' 'sip-files00092.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUIO' 'sip-files00093.txt'
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describe
'47723' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUIP' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'439825' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUIY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'474574' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJM' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
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describe
'31198' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJN' 'sip-files00097.pro'
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describe
'166253' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJO' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2002128' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJP' 'sip-files00097.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJQ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
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describe
'50600' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJR' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
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'2012-04-24T19:23:08-04:00'
describe
'241572' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJS' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
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describe
'473358' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJT' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
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describe
'32725' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJU' 'sip-files00098.pro'
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describe
'166267' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJV' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1946060' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
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describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJX' 'sip-files00098.txt'
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describe
'52399' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJY' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
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describe
'246868' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUJZ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
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describe
'440570' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKA' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
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describe
'28336' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKB' 'sip-files00099.pro'
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describe
'154682' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKC' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1988096' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKD' 'sip-files00099.tif'
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describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKE' 'sip-files00099.txt'
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'2012-04-24T19:26:53-04:00'
describe
'49959' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKF' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
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describe
'240961' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKG' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
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describe
'460749' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKH' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
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describe
'28220' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKI' 'sip-files00100.pro'
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describe
'159404' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKJ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'49668' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKM' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
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describe
'248772' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKN' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'31637' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'52595' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKT' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'170105' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKX' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUKZ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
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describe
'53493' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULA' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'161668' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULE' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULG' 'sip-files00103.txt'
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describe
'51117' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULH' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
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describe
'235146' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULI' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
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describe
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describe
'31294' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULK' 'sip-files00104.pro'
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describe
'175563' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'159481' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2040872' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULT' 'sip-files00105.tif'
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describe
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'2012-04-24T19:23:09-04:00'
describe
'51876' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULV' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
'468679' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULX' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
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describe
'30540' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABULY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMB' 'sip-files00106.txt'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'30573' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMF' 'sip-files00107.pro'
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describe
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describe
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describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
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describe
'51771' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMJ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'29265' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMT' 'sip-files00109.pro'
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describe
'158835' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMU' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
db170d243aa12932da7f914d89ae9ac4
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describe
'2007512' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMV' 'sip-files00109.tif'
2c57326ab4f6995ae2b8da0a1405187e
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMW' 'sip-files00109.txt'
d66ceccfc04ecb2d68b74f5562d6407c
64889fa33d9462862b8165f187bcc3826d90afa8
describe
'50386' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMX' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
5623027a3260d4e28f966bb878b75fa4
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describe
'245625' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMY' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
07033ca9ff5e370a31f4e2f6796e55f2
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describe
'467481' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUMZ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
4f854c0a4cdd5a5337cf4c5acafc2ae0
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'2012-04-24T19:26:44-04:00'
describe
'31727' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNA' 'sip-files00110.pro'
34bf78a69d17ec54ced8b3a2d4484644
3a7c5e5bb42137bd8227ce635a1e275cdae53746
'2012-04-24T19:26:14-04:00'
describe
'164552' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNB' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
0662270b4aeddcd859e7563e29cf3764
2fa597699099c697d2e239cd35168333506810f6
'2012-04-24T19:23:50-04:00'
describe
'1978504' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNC' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c4a7c00f86cf39bc8c4ccf1f6ecef208
3879723d50479519dad434c35cf0ba212617c062
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUND' 'sip-files00110.txt'
ba341370227aa487f8a2581f69b14917
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describe
'52740' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNE' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
89edf1704af2b7b13885e180e1c3c95e
e3c6777706321e157e39377884621eb4eaca46f3
describe
'248845' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNF' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
2f2c55cf4f8922216bc8348d54e7b141
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describe
'456843' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNG' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
3782203d9ad7690ac5566de7bb5a1d27
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describe
'30804' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNH' 'sip-files00111.pro'
179187835f07b84eefe5d31623f853e9
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describe
'162090' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNI' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2004608' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNJ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
9eea2b3ae06894ba9a1db41e8a776640
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNK' 'sip-files00111.txt'
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describe
'52327' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNL' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
310f499c781dbbb5f2027c17514b1455
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describe
'244012' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNM' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
8f55c54b5bc51d6c49c4fb523d4c9a0c
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describe
'457377' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNN' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
839db2faf78833229a90292544410228
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describe
'29117' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNO' 'sip-files00112.pro'
abb8a27da6e8be25e5322c5ae64ec283
30bd43ce74ef1afa0d67f95b17832ffdeaaceaef
'2012-04-24T19:27:16-04:00'
describe
'163439' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNP' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
640c09990d9daf526d4e238d8ed657f3
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describe
'1964784' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNQ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
cdf82a3437d054d559ee97b8c73f47fd
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describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNR' 'sip-files00112.txt'
699722d555e9b19c31cc3279ff3224dc
ce6b5bf921f0d3540c24ab83755a1f4f92fbceeb
'2012-04-24T19:26:05-04:00'
describe
'51371' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNS' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
10840d6be257b0d7e8ef8fc752e21d94
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describe
'246519' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNT' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
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describe
'461054' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNU' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
af2570072f2f4efec6097bcb23f2c3c4
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describe
'30183' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNV' 'sip-files00113.pro'
f80590d05c45eea72e89312f40e79f3a
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describe
'162591' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNW' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1985528' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNX' 'sip-files00113.tif'
40d5d4a8d349b6f976f0fc33da6349c6
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describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNY' 'sip-files00113.txt'
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describe
'52982' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUNZ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
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describe
'242633' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOA' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
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describe
'476075' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOB' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
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describe
'31916' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOC' 'sip-files00114.pro'
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describe
'170698' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOD' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1954132' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOE' 'sip-files00114.tif'
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describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOF' 'sip-files00114.txt'
b136469a399841ecfa71967ad669cf59
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describe
'53247' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOG' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
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describe
'254513' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOH' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
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describe
'426212' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOI' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
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describe
'25814' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOJ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
cbc7fbad0c5d5b9cc189a9bd98ae8480
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describe
'146519' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOK' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
4d066f76d9e9adcb3c0017a989f836e6
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'2012-04-24T19:27:33-04:00'
describe
'2048664' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOL' 'sip-files00115.tif'
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describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOM' 'sip-files00115.txt'
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describe
'48994' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUON' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
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describe
'247359' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
68c7b1ab93d08cb5e38a30c1eebc4c8b
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'2012-04-24T19:24:41-04:00'
describe
'486489' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
d8c968acc96b35451b742f2057500465
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'2012-04-24T19:26:04-04:00'
describe
'32013' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOQ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
200eb187bb9d057bb3597534afd96a93
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describe
'171182' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOR' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1991960' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOS' 'sip-files00116.tif'
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describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOT' 'sip-files00116.txt'
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describe
'53013' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOU' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
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describe
'254679' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOV' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
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describe
'457547' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOW' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
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describe
'31707' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOX' 'sip-files00117.pro'
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describe
'159004' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOY' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2050512' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUOZ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
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describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPA' 'sip-files00117.txt'
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describe
'51128' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPB' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
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describe
'236627' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPC' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
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describe
'486626' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPD' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
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describe
'30784' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPE' 'sip-files00118.pro'
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describe
'172213' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPF' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1905840' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPG' 'sip-files00118.tif'
6f80199137c72c4c0be3f829dd9a1cb2
cb9be77783d5b1bd330ca2c9296e83eec5c8fbe6
'2012-04-24T19:25:57-04:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPH' 'sip-files00118.txt'
30ec395be543fbe66b4de82ddc08cd8e
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describe
'53037' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPI' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
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describe
'249793' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPJ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
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'2012-04-24T19:27:45-04:00'
describe
'460679' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPK' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
f056715657fc36fb80882ecfee25d474
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describe
'30339' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPL' 'sip-files00119.pro'
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describe
'160870' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPM' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
7f724f9beac54ba60c96fa4a68f58e5b
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describe
'2012108' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPN' 'sip-files00119.tif'
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describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPO' 'sip-files00119.txt'
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describe
'51268' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPP' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
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describe
'245050' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPQ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
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describe
'460271' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPR' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
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describe
'29438' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPS' 'sip-files00120.pro'
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describe
'160774' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPT' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
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describe
'1973596' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPU' 'sip-files00120.tif'
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describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPV' 'sip-files00120.txt'
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'2012-04-24T19:23:33-04:00'
describe
'51593' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPW' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
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describe
'253281' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPX' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
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describe
'465746' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
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describe
'31609' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUPZ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
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describe
'163867' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQA' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2039392' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQB' 'sip-files00121.tif'
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describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQC' 'sip-files00121.txt'
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describe
'51749' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQD' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
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describe
'243870' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQE' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
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ae9573be42eb2f416e262a032b263245ecff9dcd
describe
'474868' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQF' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
365ab9cd825f314845a2ddb86f056b61
0bd5aef0b27e5c41217cc7ec33be5684fa30cff3
describe
'30419' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQG' 'sip-files00122.pro'
b922a02ab4723f12e17adb59c44056dc
535db00d7f4ac328d8e57269c8dde7683d09adf0
describe
'170496' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQH' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
0b3b364efcf4311eeaa031edbc23641f
1a8cc698cfc5387c1d88452211a5e63c80ca66d2
describe
'1963980' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQI' 'sip-files00122.tif'
9c4d9424c17ba1e0a300c91a9ecb7566
44ed15a851a1caf9b4cb8d9a9ce65e9f2c1c95d1
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQJ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
e4a341d8c2730953abe0abad2d95b6a3
824c9e36b8f8e08de607cd89593efeb142730999
describe
'53240' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQK' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
3e1aaa579a290d549397a508391fc8d6
eade8ad57649243d19556f2a545996bb7b05405a
describe
'249624' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQL' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
0fe7f4e17cec2f768f10402ad61d74f0
83526a88bcd0ae63fccbb7542557c2fa34ac983c
describe
'467489' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQM' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
9cfcd9291b50875eebed53ecccb5a667
d6515bd2e9de46466c8b8aabc26893145a269fb3
describe
'31050' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQN' 'sip-files00123.pro'
94ffb3deab0011a863f7828f7c960b56
2792a81d8cc43da08a267d74a89546e988db95fe
describe
'164506' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQO' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
6b60b71be5b310e8507dfac8ba9109f0
5605c45ef22efbc8f8ab9e0c860204f5ea970173
describe
'2010968' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQP' 'sip-files00123.tif'
f33fb861179bfdec38fd304137328b36
3b1fe62f5dec1685323dc04c0e36bdf928830b53
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQQ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
706c942caff1fea6dde6083ade63ab0d
80eb4bffe447f412cdd589c22c9a4e238d56285e
describe
'51238' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQR' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
e2ef330b07739169bd916521645b1d00
9e779ee75815a47f087b97356c27e3cea0df99ef
describe
'254955' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQS' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
0261844dc2e42296ff983a2f0320c02b
45e211cb7531bc9b535ee9959bf30dd74ff76934
describe
'459071' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQT' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
22a3a0df69598504fb923ebdf544e286
33fc42005b5e17bf091f084c10cd6189724652c7
describe
'31572' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQU' 'sip-files00124.pro'
7297c43650f9a54b2ac9d94476a0c2f7
bf5d8cbfe5a2760984f37ca40fa6fde938311f4b
describe
'159028' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQV' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
96546610bc6b5f372b7f71fc635c58cf
fe1ac8c073ab2cacdf45da10d03a93275691a726
describe
'2053164' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQW' 'sip-files00124.tif'
3023e78ebaf31ad104f1f661a4a98d9e
4bb0e564281d024d55a275558f1a48013c938bfd
'2012-04-24T19:26:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQX' 'sip-files00124.txt'
3970c10f7d9874a2a45fd79e7285db36
779aef3a37d0dc7b00c5b445721c7ec6bf34274b
'2012-04-24T19:25:36-04:00'
describe
'49731' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQY' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
bd3da0ad98b27c1c74835dd3ce5a1a50
5992cf5c91ec019d4f2f4fd2e1e20432a94bd706
describe
'271129' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUQZ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
538f573640bc8af915129feb04075d2d
2ebfc7688c379992bedabfda9a35246f3fdeb8f1
describe
'438735' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURA' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
21e59c1ae2e716d02bcdd20c2e16eb19
b59ce49605a552fd26a8209405155adf545adba3
describe
'31017' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURB' 'sip-files00125.pro'
b623ec44cad33ab05dd2f16b0410dbeb
e39c2144ac1f9923d3d9312b719c68b73470adfe
describe
'150990' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURC' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
ca83b546f1939c4da624632bd27a4076
9653aa181eba3f6938a1807eb537633cc1adfa70
describe
'2182252' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURD' 'sip-files00125.tif'
d430374d977baf1cd9f39757dbc07b78
445ee95c5994ddca4f460f4a1d68ac98998d613d
describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURE' 'sip-files00125.txt'
4ed483a568076c849f072a55cfd517a4
cd0b41c86d614a63ea0b41b9850ecb49572a8d0a
describe
'49181' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURF' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
8fda9985e1bf0b9b1f65b86c83f1c7ee
9910487aaaf30f8ec627828d656ff88a5f0c3dbf
describe
'244988' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURG' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
50ce07c5f2cf7625ce222d4bc32ee4de
a56ec6b6d981cec645a29637829006a680d91c59
describe
'473830' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURH' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
5049502658e6e50e03ced2be118c340a
8ef360f0b394f8ac073d46506c60d91060c51386
describe
'30976' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURI' 'sip-files00126.pro'
1be7e5d61a0e5f5bb899ae1569ce744d
1a72d578bc3b34152e26ff278d5c8b750f5fe15a
describe
'167235' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURJ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
c0f3a8000f306d4cc36ef3ba783f9eb1
8366d734862ed06b0121f39c6c072000a9d5e515
describe
'1973396' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURK' 'sip-files00126.tif'
34bbbe79dd5ddf8e171843722178c9c4
4bb0c178a74e334527d823f954424401ff61c79d
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURL' 'sip-files00126.txt'
c9e2ff2fdaa728112fe2e88eefa40a27
578aa93a22b345ab392fbfa8b2417d0459c4a851
describe
'53236' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURM' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
2e9bca64617711d49468642184ea72f7
c97ed7f8c7623414541bbfe153e942c1a7adf37d
describe
'247368' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURN' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
f6daf8b84bcf6d44c5e522e7422e3722
ba93c025ac82f888743d524fd38cb74e49625f37
describe
'354418' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURO' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
76e05c79ad558a75fa6693293f55e152
b41159e0dca7611af3249fc5dc0335c0d8d4710a
describe
'17389' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURP' 'sip-files00127.pro'
8180be8ba838c80cd4fd90029e2b9711
89b0fd6dc891e313cd063ac82ada9628021e7c2b
describe
'120127' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURQ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
a9183cae4a8d76b64dbaaec841055139
52a57b33c92df9061e8642749816717dac0656d4
describe
'1990304' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURR' 'sip-files00127.tif'
c71edb1a3d322063abaed3e9534bb361
dd4f1461a86fd898e203de02f6086c0d8ee709e7
'2012-04-24T19:27:08-04:00'
describe
'767' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURS' 'sip-files00127.txt'
7c951015ed6f006ab86307f3eabbbb65
1f08b9f5229eb887e22236839f00671721326cc7
describe
'40190' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURT' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
bc6c99f06351096da224ef29412031e2
fc5350f4da51eabf43518d18263f6adbcff72a64
'2012-04-24T19:24:20-04:00'
describe
'271147' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURU' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
66b8c5afb02d64371b27780e77e10703
47f303430e97918eeaf383e2a181503196e718ec
describe
'458321' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURV' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
ce5b780ccb49d001eef37ba5ffb9ae00
fb880417196a78dc6d05944a9f89f20907ca83d2
describe
'30235' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURW' 'sip-files00128.pro'
f8db2571a008843cd480ad368235e24c
ad10a705495855aefe1c254b43d936e4665c27bc
describe
'160672' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURX' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
0e3faee8a1948579bc518f3e3639a44a
2622f732d520ccdb244ba54d92dcfd0985979420
describe
'2182904' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURY' 'sip-files00128.tif'
b28d21f80f1a799720261e394503f0a7
e813b015657ab86def57ce6ca5758b3ec57aae1f
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABURZ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
d734c83acd8ddb495d4d142ffe7c3952
a2b9dcfd71a407c072c42e11b557fccb8a032fd1
describe
'53433' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSA' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
26477c2a22dfa334e78a51785d49a352
46f38cc292b315f6f10fdb18b203aab30c107613
describe
'249804' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
b8d6273162e4e62cdb0a88b18cd9be92
e8c4e2066d23e00cb103a722f49ad8fd99837b06
describe
'566557' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSC' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
90e3f115ba8b9cd38ece9d7f47a74087
b4a2a2a3de67d6489f511781b5c051f04759b715
describe
'48793' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSD' 'sip-files00129.pro'
d221bfa93deafe16a693951e8dd6401f
356887e24a2ee020c181ffe457ae24d05fbb5576
describe
'192047' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSE' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
30511a2fbfee2e77f5795a03e67fc855
7fee3fd31f4a3c2258c0b022f5d1cff33981a64f
describe
'2014084' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSF' 'sip-files00129.tif'
83de1d67598f6efea39bbc16197a8de5
81a6fc66b508ff82551ee78fc45d1fe7a73f3241
describe
'2166' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSG' 'sip-files00129.txt'
0ff3b663b5445607553c2d3dedd96b5c
ab0d86269197e53d5d34895c8f51296eabc50d2f
describe
'63138' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSH' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
12a4851533481ca1af5e19d4901c7286
74e114256671e3ea4933387dd3cf8f4d39b26ac2
describe
'252201' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSI' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
4a460d78ac1c4c7f26a51cc93ae424a4
2dbc0fe5dfe3ec23524cc0d45f076588ce729d6b
describe
'494743' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSJ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4ba74931cee00555917659e419f1bce9
ba64909cfec5a27283c49bf1036bda6d9090f32a
describe
'43777' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSK' 'sip-files00130.pro'
8720e21ad2dff1d06e935d965c3a6751
f3943e0ce1bf3a3cf93c204c16a9193d8435f785
describe
'165392' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSL' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
9266b1f47aaca5e1de59184c9d2d5b9f
3cfd9f01d4612694ad8024791f42b64bd8118c2b
describe
'2031144' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSM' 'sip-files00130.tif'
f171e5d0796fa043d349e2d9bb17419d
7e0508948d8f8b5c6ef816e1b544358fcbcd4eec
describe
'1906' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSN' 'sip-files00130.txt'
232842c63529c4fea7f8bf49369e8bfd
2121e77f04db58b21d84fba3f4c47a448ca3a77a
describe
'52223' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSO' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
7a787ae9b5f83d0b0c1dce6afa18a6a7
705863578c52a1294c3440cfdb3b6584ed6172b6
describe
'279694' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSP' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
d43d829888815cd02d41138b7ebefbfb
9e414c78bb062ce9cc6bb4800daf0151322ab21d
describe
'482576' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSQ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
29c3f5fade2e1a45644193e33f27402b
00d8fd9569a1c8960c1d837a810a89be7610bab5
describe
'51532' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSR' 'sip-files00131.pro'
7e13b4c24b1cdb0b0c30de0e9a6780f7
d63ab9c1fa3bc2218099fef95aa899707d37db5a
describe
'160159' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSS' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
a0be9d0aca00f09e1087fefca1f32b42
dd925101730de3f6ad1d3097d692c06e563c8194
describe
'2251288' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUST' 'sip-files00131.tif'
4535e030c22d6a8094bcd217458dd18d
99ea8d2c278b62ce6f76647d77d8cd98a559d533
describe
'2353' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSU' 'sip-files00131.txt'
8280655700aef93a821125df5f5b9382
d60587e6eafcc9fa671a952b422d99045ff9281f
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'53549' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSV' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
c15dc0040f73333b654562131aaa1f2b
0a1524b3e134b6fd97db6eb54b093ec2776acab7
describe
'297500' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSW' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
c15cc776a7df14af8294618286572115
00b8bc99fab3a82c5a839420a9fe0b56dc62e390
describe
'347966' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSX' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
5b4c85b7ef554d02f23bb5a88292e88f
6b1213ea6fa39d077939eb9c26113b37e5a44b4e
describe
'306' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSY' 'sip-files00133.pro'
e5dccd2623a178030d899583560da0ac
8da0ad0237e09e7e44c9411c8f75fac1d7488379
describe
'102829' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUSZ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
2aab6ddf9f181e11ba8253d45f5dcc60
c3d10edadcb19ca357b26e5533732266f46d636f
describe
'7147604' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTA' 'sip-files00133.tif'
fd6d4db6fe48090616031dd111670b9f
bf6085fcf503fabf481ea95988e6e8b56ed83fc6
describe
'10' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTB' 'sip-files00133.txt'
7a983609f12748c87ccd7de0340c9b22
b48b430b82e4db57b32963a94b71eef1cabe62f4
describe
'33955' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTC' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
6b9c51864e9841e002e669875504bd77
a60461a80e24bead28739b994b22448187428bcf
describe
'304974' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTD' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
fb5c42bff70afcb0cc4598d1f4082641
3c87a55890bd3ad2f3117e618803727b28152281
describe
'734300' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTE' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
3a26304bd8048b06ce858d8ee8b1a2b4
86a70fa16c3655970eb7d5bc44165a429925a754
describe
'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTF' 'sip-files00134.pro'
8b4443b4e9843437f2450e114d7b5cb0
13a60f664768500ee5971ce30f84371fe70f310c
describe
'202179' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTG' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
06077909a8f5c64e3401c08c77094213
7b0be441f5be03b723a63cae30898e0a333d9d71
describe
'7331628' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTH' 'sip-files00134.tif'
1700e09bc12afb6b986b00cb570c62d8
246c755398b77d6eb4e365fb20c8b1cc4ff3d9bc
describe
'2' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTI' 'sip-files00134.txt'
81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877
ba8ab5a0280b953aa97435ff8946cbcbb2755a27
describe
No printable characters
No printable characters
No printable characters
'58912' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTJ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
2b28074ebaa8e66626ecca02e887013b
89eb1ae283b0d902ee721b71deba8253a09a3c69
describe
'32' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTK' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
4a5a0b620a7617a8d9c3406235a9009e
ef7f4fd0089b13dbd3cf4b02f7f426d010244c81
describe
'160688' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTL' 'sip-filesUF00028394_00001.mets'
da00f89c721c151e2c4a44b7838f1084
d8dfaa4281b7ba9d604e944b4cc78d23caaee54e
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T06:35:18-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'205148' 'info:fdaE20091101_AAAAMRfileF20091101_AABUTO' 'sip-filesUF00028394_00001.xml'
a889a944f7a6151e910ec5f6d1935fd0
c73940b7197e584532c81fbaedffb03b3ca27c5b
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T06:35:16-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
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Front. Mary Elton,
Sen Se eens

S=E=L_E- CO N= ReO=







LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO,,
BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN.
MARY ELTON:

OR,

SELF-CONTROL,

BY

MRS. iH. 5B. PAUL.



LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CoO,,

BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN,
MARY ELTON,



CHAPTER I.
ONE fine afternoon, many years ago, a stage-
coach, with its four foaming horses, stopped
at the corner of one of the principal streets
in London,

“There ’tis, there ’tis!” exclaimed a little
rosy, flaxen-haired girl of about three years
old, whom the guard had just lifted from the
coach and placed on the pavement. “ There
tis!” and she immediately started off at a
rapid pace, to the great alarm of the passen-
gers. A gentleman was assisting a lady to
alight: he turned quickly, and said, “ Follow
her, my love; I will attend to the luggage.”
The lady smiled, and pointed to her little girl,
now standing on the steps of a door at some
distance. In the parlour of that house sat a
lady at work, but not diligently : she seemed
to be in anxious expectation, and every now
and then would look up and listen. The
4 Aiary Elton ; or,

child, who had been endeavouring to reach
the knocker, no sooner saw her parents ap-
proaching, than she again exclaimed, “ Here
*tis, mamma! here ’tis!” There was no mis-
taking that silvery voice. Grandmamma
started up, and by the time Mr. and Mrs.
Elton reached the house, little Mary had
been folded in the arms of her fond grand-
mamma, whose house she so well remem-
bered. That was, indeed, a happy evening;
so much to tell of their journey, and the
pleasant hours they had spent many miles
away with Mr. Elton’s parents. Mary’s little
tongue went so fast that, at length tired out,
she was carried to bed. Her parents, also
fatigued with the journey, followed soon after,
but before entering their own room, they did
as many.kind parents, especially mothers,
often do—they went to look at their little
girl, The mother of the poet Cowper must
have done this, for on receiving her picture
he writes—
‘ Thy nightly visits to my chamber made,
To see if I was safe and warmly laid.”

Little Mary was calmly sleeping, her flaxen
curls falling around her pillow, and her rosy
cheeks flushed with sleep and excitement ;
Self-Control. 5

she looked, indeed, the picture of happy
repose, and as her young mamma kissed
her, she sighed and thought how quickly the
pleasant hours of infancy and youth would
pass away.

Mary Elton was naturally clever and in-
telligent, and being the only child in the
family, every one was ready to teach her. To
her mother’s young sisters she became at
once a plaything and a pupil; her father
encouraged her to learn by his notice and
help, so that before Mary had reached the
age of four years, she could read any book,
and had acquired as much general knowledge
as many children double her age.

It was well for Mary that her mother was
a woman of superior and cultivated mind, one
who knew well how much more important is
the education of the moral qualities of the
mind by early discipline and training, than
the mere acquirement of knowledge. She
saw that her little girl would have no diffi-
culty in learning with so many teachers; she
therefore took upon herself the task of teach-
ing her patience, moral courage, truthfulness,
and, above all, self-control, without which,
like a rudderless ship, many a fine character
6 Mary Elton ; or,

has been lost amidst the storms and tempests
of life.

Mary was a child of great energy, extreme
sensitiveness, and warm, impetuous feelings :
still there was a timid amiability about her,
which made her shrink from offending and
dread the anger of those she loved. This
would have made her untruthful, but for her
mother’s careful training ; yet the disposition
that gave Mrs. Elton the greatest anxiety,
was an earnest clinging to anything she loved
or wished for, which made her almost broken-
hearted at a disappointment, and caused her
to shed agonies of tears at the death of a pet
bird, or the destruction of a favourite toy. In
some respects, this earnest clinging to what
she loved or delighted in was an advantage.
Once make her love a study, and it ceased to
be a difficulty ; she would throw her whole
soul into whatever she undertook, whether a
sum in arithmetic or a good game of play,
when once fairly interested in it.

Mary, however, had her favourite employ-
ments ; and while even very young, reading
was the chief. Lessons, work, walking, and
even play would be forgotten in the delight
of a new book; while needlework, requiring
Self-Control, 7

quiet attention and less excitement, was hate-
ful to her. Added to this—for we must tell
all the truth—Mary’s eager impatience made
her careless and untidy in her habits, so that,
when required to work, a work-box, in which
sometimes neither thimble, needle, nor cotton
could be found, caused the loss of more time
than the work itself would have occupied.
Mrs. Elton’s determination that a certain
quantity of needlework should be gone through
daily, was Mary’s severest discipline— she
knew it must be done; and besides this, it
was made to contribute to her pleasures: her
mother, knowing her love for books, had
promised that every week’s successful con-
quest of untidy habits should add to her
pocket-money for the purpose of increasing
her library. Mary wasa very little girl when
this rule was made, and our readers will not
suppose that she gained the promised reward
every week; yet, by the time she was six
years old, very few children of that age could
boast of a larger library. And although
juvenile books were not then so numerous
as they are now, Mary had a well-chosen
collection, many of which she had read so
often as almost to know them by heart. It
8 Afary Elton ; or,

was unlikely, however, that a little girl not six
years old could understand all she read ; her
mother therefore encouraged her to ask ques-
tions, and often explained to her ina very
simple manner what had before seemed diffi-
cult and puzzling. One book, which was a
great favourite, Mary had read several times
without talking about it to her mother. She
would have saved herself a great deal of foolish
fear had she not forgotten to do so.



CHAPTER II.

“Miss MARY, it is time for you to learn your
lessons,” said a neat, pleasant-looking woman,
as she entered the nursery one evening : “you
know your mamma told you not to read too
long, before she went out.”

Mary was seated on the window-seat, with
her feet raised, so that her knees formed a
reading-desk for her book. She looked up—
“Oh Nurse, just one little piece more, to
finish the chapter; I won’t be long; please
let me?”

Nurse was very fond of her little charge ;
she could not resist the pleading look, so she
quietly walked round the room, picking up
Self-Control, 9

Mary’s thimble from the floor, and folding up
the work which she had thrown on a chair.
She next took out Mary’s lesson-books, and
placed them on the table: five minutes
passed,— Miss Mary,” said nurse, “ when
your mamma was a little girl I never had to
tell her twice to do anything.”

Mary started from herseat. “Dear Nurse,
I am very sorry, but you know I shall never
be as good as mamma was; do you know, I
quite forgot my lessons, and had begun
another chapter?” then, seeing her books, she
said, “Oh, thank you, Nurse. Howkind! I
shall soon learn them.” She reseated herself at
the window, but daylight was fast disappearing;
and Mary soon found she could not long see
to read, and was obliged to wait for candles.
It had been a rough October day ; the leaves
blown by the wind from the trees of an adjoin-
ing square were now whirling in circles through
the street. Mary pressed her face against the
window-pane, and looked out. Presently the
lamplighter turned the corner, his torch
flaring in the wind as he ran rapidly from one
lamp to the other. London streets were not
then all lighted with gas, and the flaming red
torch was a very amusing sight to children.
Io Mary Elton ; or,

Little boys and girls now would fancy Lon-
don a dull, dismal-looking place, if they could
see it as it appeared then, with no greater
light in the streets and shops than dim oil-
lamps. Mary’s thoughts, as she watched the
lamplighter, were not, however, about him, but
about the wind, which seemed every moment
as if it would blow out his torch; and she was
glad when Nurse entered with candles, that
she might finish her lessons.

“May I sit up a little longer to-night,
Nurse?” asked Mary, when the clock struck
eight.

Nurse looked surprised. “ Why, my dear?”
she asked.

“Oh,” said Mary, “because it will make me
tired, and then I shall go to sleep directly I
get into bed, and not hear that dreadful
wind.”

“But the wind cannot hurt you, my dar-
ling, in your nice warm bed, with the curtains
drawn round,”

“No, I know that: Iam not afraid of the
wind making me cold; but don’t talk about
it, Nurse, please, it frightens me.”

Nurse was surprised. .Mary was by no
means a fearful child, and what could make
Self-Control. 11

her so afraid of the wind was a mystery, yet
she allowed her to remain half an hour later,
and then went with her to her room. It
certainly was a very rough night. Mr. Elton’s
house being at the corner of two streets, and
Mary’s bedroom at the top, the roaring of the
wind through the roof, and down the chimney,
sounded rather alarming. Mary trembled so
much while being undressed, that Nurse
could not resist throwing her arms round her,
and asking—“My darling, what is it makes
you so afraid?”

“Oh, Nurse,” said Mary, clinging closely
to her, “the wind, the wind ; oh, listen ; it will
blow the house down, I am sure it will.”

“Nonsense, my dear, if that is all you are
afraid of, it is very silly ; your papa’s house is
too strongly built to be blown down easily:
besides, you forget that God takes care of
people while they sleep, if they pray to Him.”

“I know He does, Nurse; but even then I
know the wind does blow houses down some-
times.”

Nurse hardly knew what to reply, but she
encouraged the little trembling girl to repeat
her prayers, and then reminded her of the
words she had uttered ;--
12 Mary Elton ; cr,

“J lay my body down to sleep,
Let angels guard my head,
And through the hours of darkness keep
Their watch around my bed.”
After covering her up warmly and drawing
the curtains, Nurse sat down by the bedside,
and tried to soothe the little girl to sleep by
telling her how unlikely it would be for such
a thing to happen as that large, strong houses
in London should be blown down; but it was
no use, Mary knew such things had happened,
she said, and would not be convinced. After
this she lay so quiet for some time that Nurse
thought she was asleep, and rose to go.

“Stop, Nurse, please,” said Mary, who had
been thinking deeply, “can I not say a prayer
to God about the wind, and ask Him not to
let it hurt the house?”

Nurse sat down again by the bed; the tears
came into her eyes, and she did not speak fora
minute or two. Mary pulled back the curtain
and looked ather; she had always seemed like
a picture to Mary, with her neat mob-cap, dark
stuff dress, and snow-white kerchief pinned
across her bosom. She was not old, although
sorrow had silvered the dark hair that was
so smoothly braided in white bands under her
Self-Control, 13

cap. Like all servants who have lived long in
one family, she was deeply attached to Mrs,
Elton, whom she had nursed in her infancy,
and dearly fond of the little girl who now
turned to her for instruction.

“Miss Mary,” she said, “your dear mamma
is the best person to teach you these things.”

“Qh, but she is not here now,” said Mary;
“do tell me one little prayer to say!”

“My dear, you can read the prayers at
church ; do you know which is the Litany ?”

“Oh yes,” said Mary, “it has a short prayer
for everything. I know: is there one about
the wind in that?”

“Yes, my dear, there is.”

“Do teach it me, then, Nurse,” said the
little girl, getting out of bed ; and, kneeling
down, she repeated after her nurse the beauti-
ful words,—“From lightning and tempest,
from plague, pestilence, and famine, from
battle and murder, and from sudden death,
good Lord, deliver us.”

The simple faith of the little child clung at
once to what she had been told, that God is
the hearer and answerer of prayer, and she
laid her head on the pillow, saying, “Oh,
Nurse, I feel quite safe now: tempest means
14 Afary Elton ; or,

high wind, and it would be sudden death if I
were to be killed by the house falling upon
me. Will you stay and repeat those words
until I have learnt them ?”

Nurse did as the little girl requested, and
stayed by her side till she fell asleep with
almost the words on her lips,



CHAPTER III.
THE next day, as soon as Mrs. Elton sat
down to work, Mary brought her little chair,
and seating herself at her mother’s side, in-
quired,—“ Mamma, what is a hurricane ?”

“A hurricane, Mary! What has put that
into your head ?”

“The wind last night, mamma.”

“But there was no hurricane last night,
Mary.”

“No, mamma; or else it would have blown
the house down.”

Mrs. Elton smiled. “There is not much
fear of your papa’s house being blown down
by the wind, Mary; but who has been telling
you this?”

“No one, mamma; only: ?

“Well,—speak out, my love,” said Mrs,

>


Self-Control. 13

Elton, as Mary held down her head, and
looked half ashamed.

“Why, mamma,’ she said, at last, “you know
my book called, ‘The History of a Bible, writ-
ten by Itself?”

Mrs. Elton remembered the book.

“Well, mamma, there is a story in it of
some very good people, who were at family
prayer one morning, and suddenly a great
wind arose, called a hurricane, and they had
only just time to escape out of the house,
when it was blown down by the wind: ever
since I read it, I have always felt afraid when
_ the wind blew hard.”

“Why did you not tell me before, Mary ?”
said her mother.

“T meant to, mamma; but very often, after
the wind had been blowing in the night, the
sky would look so bright and clear in the
morning, that I forgot all about it.”

“And what has made you come to me
now ?”

“Why, last night, mamma, I was more
afraid than ever ; and dear Nurse taught me a
little prayer, and told me I should ask you;
although I did not tell her what I had read in
my book about the hurricane. But, mamma,
16 Mary Elton ; or,

what is a hurricane? Is it not a very strong
wind?”

“It is, Mary; but the highest wind that
ever blew in England is nothing to a hurricane
abroad. Did not the people you read of live
in the West Indies ?”

“Ves, mamma. Oh, I never thought of
that |”

“Hurricanes in those countries are, in-
deed, very dreadful,’ continued Mrs. Elton.
“ Houses, trees, and even whole villages, are
sometimes destroyed by their violence, and
when they happen at sea, the Waves rise moun-
tains high ;—ships are cast upon rocks, or sink
into the boil!n¢ ocean, while all on board perish.
Weare highly favoured in England, where such
wind is never known; although sometimes:
even here it will tear up trees by the roots, or
blow down stacks of chimneys ; but my little
Mary should remember who it is that ‘holdeth
the winds in His fist, and the waters in the
hollow of His hand;’ and then, whether she
sleeps in England or in India, she will lie
down in safety.”

After her mother had ceased speaking,
Mary sat for some time silent and thought-
ful: at length she said, “Mamma, why does
Self-Control, 17

God allow such high winds to arise ?—what
use can they be ?”

“Ah, Mary!” said Mrs. Elton. “God does
many things for which we cannot give a reason.
We know they must be right, because ‘He
doeth all things well.’ Grown people, as well
as little children, often find fault with what
they cannot understand ; yet, Mary, I can give
you a reason for high winds. Without them,
the air we breathe would become impure, and
we should haye sickness, fevers, and death;
whereas, the violent agitation of the air—
which is called wind—purifies it, and prevents
many serious consequences.”

“Oh, mamma!” said Mary, “how silly 1
was not to talk to you about it before. I
think J shall almost like to hear the wind blow
after what you have told me. But, mamma,
did you ever hear of houses being blown down
in England ?”

“Yes, I have, Mary; some very old houses,
that were going to be pulled down.”

“Oh, mamma!” said Mary, “do tell me all
about it. When did it happen?”

“When I was a little girl, Mary; but I
cannot allow you to sit idle any longer,” said
Mrs. Elton, smiling at the wide open eyes and

B
18 Mary Elton ; Or,

excited looks of her little girl, “You can
finish that hem you began yesterday, while I
tell you.”

Mary held down her head, and said, slowly
“T do not know where my thimble is.”

“Safe in your work-box, this time, Mary;
and I have cotton and a needle for you.”

Mary threaded her needle, and gave the
work to her mother to begin: as she took it
again from her, she said, in a low tone, as if
half ashamed of the excuse, “Can I listen
and work too, mamma ?” f

“Try, Mary; it is not such a very difficult
thing, after all.” Mary began to work, and
Mrs. Elton commenced her story.

“When I was a little girl about nine years
old, several new streets were made near to
your grandpapa’s house; old streets destroyed;
many houses pulled down; and others re-
paired and beautified. Three very old build-
ings stood nearly opposite to us: two, near
the corner, were first removed ; but the third,
_the most unsafe of them all, remained, only
supported on one side by the wall of the
next house. So dangerous and tottering did
it appear, that the neighbours applied to the
owners to have it taken down, or supported by
Self-Control, 19

large beams, called props, which I think you
must have seen sometimes, Mary, planted ina
sloping position against houses, while those
adjoining are under repair. But nothing was
done; and it seemed very strange to me, as
a little girl, that, while the fear of the house
falling upon them would cause the neighbours
to avoid that side of the street, yet there were
people living in the house!”

“People living in it, mamma!” said Mary,
almost breathless.

“Yes, my dear: they were very poor, and
they could live there without paying any rent,
which appeared a great inducement, for they
would stay, although several times warned of
their danger. One morning, after a rather
rough night, and just before breakfast, I went
into my bed-room for a book I had left on the
dressing-table, which stood before the window.
T had just placed my hand upon it, when a
noise like thunder startled me; and, in a mo-
ment, the window became darkened, as with a
cloud of smoke. Much terrified, I dropped
the book, and flew out of the room, scarcely
knowing what I was about. On the stairs, I
met a servant, who exclaimed, ‘ The house !—
the house! it is down: and all those poor peo-
20 Mary Elton ; or,

ple in it!’ I hardly knew where I went next;
but I remember my mother taking me by the
hand and. leading me into a room, while she
gently and quickly calmed my fears for my
own safety, and told me that everything was
being done to discover if the family were
buried in the ruins.”

“And, mamma,—oh, mamma! were they?”
said Mary.

“My dear,” said Mrs. Elton, “this is the
most wonderful part of my story. The whole
family were in the house when it fell, yet
not one was hurt! Don’t excite yourself
so, my love,” ‘said Mrs. Elton, as Mary with
flushed cheeks threw her work on the floor,
clasped her hands tightly together, and said,
almost in a whisper—

“Mamma; how did they escape?”

“T will tell you how it happened. The
family were in the kitchen, underground : they
had heard strange noises during the night; but
just as they were going to begin breakfast, a
dreadful cracking sound caused them all to
rush upstairs into the passage leading to the
street-door. Before they could open it, the
building gave way, and fell around them
with the noise of thunder; yet, strange
Self-Control. 21

to tell, the ceiling and walls of the pas-
sage in which they stood remained perfect,
although surrounded by bricks and broken
timber, so that the street-door could not be
opened !” *

“Oh, mamma,” said Mary; “how wonder-
ful!”

“Tt was wonderful. And although we must
acknowledge the great providence of God in
thus saving these poor people,—yet it could
be accounted for ina singular manner. You
remember I told you that the next house
had been rebuilt, and the new wall adjoining
the passage of the old house supported it.

The house also fell forwards towards the street, -

and gave way first on the unprotected side,
so that the weight of bricks, or beams, which
fell on the ceiling, was not sufficient to force
it in. The difficulty now was, to get the
door open; and nearly an hour passed be-
fore the bricks and rubbish could be cleared
away sufficiently for this to be done. All
this time, those within were in total dark-
ness; and thankful indeed they must have felt
to escape from a place that might have been a
grave, but had proved a harbour of safety, and
* A fact.

4
22 Mary Elion ; or,

once more to behold the beautiful sunlight,
and to breathe the fresh air.”

“Oh, dear mamma,” said Mary, “ whata
wonderful story. Is it all true?”

“ Quite true, my dear Mary; and next time
we go to see grandmamma, I will show you
the beautiful house that now stands on the
spot where the house fell.”

Mary sat for some time after her mother
had finished, silently working ; and having
completed the hem, she gave it to her mamma
with her thimble, and quietly left the room.
In a few moments she was seated by Nurse,
her blue eyes opened to their widest width, re-
lating, in her own childish way, the story she
had heard. Nurse sat listening very atten-
tively; all at once Mary exclaimed, “Why,
nurse, you must have been there, too !—do you
remember it?

“To be sure I do, my darling; and I re-
member, when I took your mamma to look at
the ruins, she said, in her quiet, childish way,
‘Don’t you think, Nurse, those poor people
prayed to God to take care of them last
night ?”

“Oh!” said Mary, “ mamma was right,
I am sure they did. I do not think I shall
Self-Control, 23

ever feel afraid of hearing the wind again. I
will try to remember how wonderfully God
can take care of people, and I will ask Him
to take care of me.”



CHAPTER IV.

Mary’s sixth birthday arrived, and her grand-
mamma invited a few little people to meet her
and celebrate the day. Mary, who had been
complaining for some days of painsin her limbs,
and looked flushed and heavy-eyed, had been
treated by her mamma as fora slight cold. She
seemed so much better on the morning of her
birthday, that, after being carefully wrapped
up, she was taken to her grandmamma’s, with
the understanding that she was to remain all
night. Seldom had Mary looked better than
she did on this evening: excitement had
flushed her cheek and brightened her eyes,
making the contrast with her flaxen ringlets
and fair complexion more striking; she was in
excellent spirits, the life of every game, and the
delight of her kind friends. It was not until the
little party had dispersed to their homes, that
Mrs. Elton noticed, as the excitement passed
away, that she looked dull, and sat without
24 Mary Elton ; or,

speaking a word. Her mamma hurried her to
bed, thinking it might be fatigue. In the
morning she appeared better, and sat reading
in a corner of the sofa with her usual intent-
ness, Mrs. Elton entered the room about
eleven o’clock: “Come, Mary, my love, you
will make your head ache if you sit reading so
long. Grandmamma wants you to take a
little walk with her.”

“T will come, mamma,” said Mary, closing
her book.

Mrs. Elton had walked to the window to
observe the weather—she was startled by the
* sound of some one falling, and a scream, She
turned—Mary was on the floor.

“Mamma, I cannot walk,” she said, pite-
ously; “when I moved from the sofa I
thought my legs were asleep, and the mo-
ment I tried to stand, they would bend under
me, and it was such dreadful pain.”

Much alarmed, Mrs. Elton attempted to
raise her little girl from the ground, but at
each movement she screamed so painfully, and
with such a struggle to suppress it, that her
mother was terrified. Grandmamma, from the
next room, had heard the screams; she came
hurrying in, and saw ina moment what was
Self-Control. 25

the matter. Nurse, fortunately, was in the
house, and she gently lifted the child with her
strong arms, and placed her on the sofa, sooth-
ing her fondly as she moaned with pain, while
Mrs. Elton, in eager, low tones, inquired of
her mother what could be the matter with
her.

“TI fear,” she replied, “that the child has
rheumatic fever. I would offer to keep her
here, my dear, but I know you would rather
have her at home.”

“Oh, yes,” said Mrs, Elton, “thank you,
dear mother, but I should wish her to be with
me. Poor child! it will be dreadful to see her
suffer,” she continued, while the tears ran
down her cheeks,

“Tf you please, ma’am,” said Nurse, coming
forward, “ifshe goes home, it must be zow—
by-and-bye it will be too late to move her.”

It was, indeed, a painful task to wrap the
little girl in blankets, and see how bravely she
tried to act up to her mother’s teachings about
patience and moral courage to endure pain,
and her kind friends were scarcely less relieved
than herself when they had laid her com-
fortably in her own little bed, and saw her sink
to sleep with exhaustion, From that sick-bed
26 Mary Elton ; or,

Mary Elton did not rise for weeks; at one
time she was not expected to live; and even
at last, when hopes were raised that she
might recover, the doctor feared that she
would be acripple for life. Mrs. Elton was,
however, spared this severe trial. After some
months she recovered so far as to be able
to walk without assistance — but oh! how
changed: her round rosy face had become
pale and thin, her flaxen hair cut close to her
forehead, and no one would have recognized,
in the slight, delicate child, moving quietly
about the house, or reading in a corner by her-
self, the rosy, animated little girl we first in-
troduced to our readers. Mrs. Elton was only
too thankful to have her restored to life, as it
were from the dead, and to find her fears that
Mary might bea cripple groundless. She had
already lost two children, and the idea of part-
ing with Mary had been a great trial indeed.
During the spring that followed this severe
illness, Mary continued so delicate that the
medical man advised change of air as the only
means of saving her life Mr. Elton now
thought of his parents, who resided in the West
of England, and felt, that with them and his
kind sister, his little girl would he safe. It was
Self-Control. 27

a painful trial for Mrs. Elton to part with her
little girl; but she subdued her feelings, and
allowed her husband to write and ask them if
they would accept sucha charge. How quickly
they wrote back, promising to do all in their
power to restore her to health, and offering to ~
receive her immediately! The bustle of pre-
paration did Mary good: she watched the
progress of her new frocks and bonnets, fol-
lowed Nurse from room to room, giving her
strict injunctions what books to pack up, and
where she was to put her great doll. The de-
light with which she looked forward to the
journey pained poor Nurse as much as it
pleased her : she felt happy to see her darling
so cheerful, yet sorry to part with her. The
day came at last: Mrs. Elton clung to her
little girl as if she could not spare her even
then. Indeed, to no one else but her husband’s
sister would she have trusted her child. Mary,
too, forgot all her anticipations of pleasure
when she came to part from her mother and
brother ; and, dreading the effects of excite-
ment on her delicate little girl, the mother
checked her own feelings, for Mary’s flushed
face and glistening eyes,as she threw her arms
round Nurse’s neck, kissed over and over again
28 Mary Elion ; or,

her little brother, and clung convulsively to
her mother, told,too plainly that the old nature
was still there, though kept down by weakness.
After a long and fatiguing journey, during
which Mr. Elton had more than once trembled
for his child’s life, he reached Byford, and was
received with open arms by his parents and
sister,—but oh, how shocked were these kind
friends to perceive, that, but for the round blue
eyes, they would have found it difficult to dis-
cover any resemblance to the rosy little girl
who had visited them three years before.

The town of Byford, in which Mr. Elton’s
father lived, is curiously built on the banks of
a beautiful river, from which the ground rises
with a steep ascent, the houses situated one
above another to the very brow of the hill,
and those at the top commanding a most
beautiful view of the town, the river, and the
surrounding country. A long, handsome
bridge connects one part of the town with
the other, and vessels of all sizes going out
and coming in, make the quay at which they
discharge their cargoes a very lively, bustling
place. Now and then a ship is launched by
shipbuilders in the town; so that, although
Mary Elton was so far away from noisy
Self-Control. 29

London, there were many things in Byford to
amuse and interest her. Besides this, the sea
is not three miles distant, and many pleasant
excursions and picnics are made, both by
water and by land, to the beach, during the
summer months. We are describing the place
as it is now, for thirty years have made but
little change, excepting that the streets and
shops are lighted with gas, and very lately a
railroad has been opened, by which persons
can travel from London to Byford in eight or
nine hours, instead of twenty-five or twenty-
six, as was the case when Mr. Elton travelled
with his sick little daughter. These, no doubt,
are great advantages, but the pretty little
town, with its bright river and pleasant walks,
was enough for Mary without them, and very
few weeks passed before her appetite and
spirits began to improve; not till then would
her father leave her. This was another
trial, but she bore it bravely, although the tears
would come when she saw the coach start, and
watched him kissing his hand to her until it
was out of sight. Mary hada kind friend in
her dear Aunt Elton, and the close pressure
of her hand as she returned home told Miss
Elton that now she felt herself deprived of all
30 Mary Elton ; or,

other earthly friends, the little trusting nature
was clinging to ker, and her heart opened to-
wards her brother’s child with loving sym-
pathy.

For some months after Mary’s arrival at
Byford, nothing was thought of but her health;
books and work were laid aside for daily walks
or healthful play, yet her mind was not neg-
lected. Miss Elton had a very pleasant me-
thod of imparting instruction by conversation,
which the little girl quickly found out, and
the moment she saw her aunt seated at work,
she would fetch her little chair, seat herself at
her aunt's knee, as she had so often done with
her dear mother, and looking up in her face,
would say,—

“ Dear aunt, please tell me some pretty story
—a true story, I mean—I don’t like made-up
stories.”

The knowledge Mary acquired in this way
was astonishing. Miss Elton had a fund of
information, and Mary learnt more of Grecian,
Roman, and English history in six months,
than many young people acquire in years of
study. Bible stories, too, were her delight,
and she would listen with streaming eyes
to the history of Joseph, or with eager
Self-Control, 31

enthusiasm to the story of David and
Goliath.

During all this time, by careful exercise,
regular diet, and sea-bathing, Mary was re-
gaining her strength wonderfully. Letters
home contained accounts of her improving
health, but Miss Elton did not think her suffi-
ciently recovered to return. Mr. Elton, who
felt the value of his sister’s instruction, had
no wish to send for his little girl yet, especially
as her mother was at present so delicate ; Mrs.
Elton also appreciated too highly the valué of
her aunt’s instructions to deprive her of them
merely for the pleasure of having her at home
again. One thing, however, she much re-
gretted ; she had never intended to send Mary
to school, but Mr. Elton’s parents were aged
people, to whom the constant presence of a
lively child, as Mary soon became, was weari-
some; and to keep her from intercourse with
other children would have been injurious. Be-
sides, schools in a country town are very diffe-
rent from those in London, and were more so
thirty years agothan now. All objection, there-
fore, was set aside, and arrangements made
for Mary to go for a few hours daily to a pre-
paratory school at a short distance from her
32 Mary Elton ; or,

grandfather’s house, merely to learn the most
simple English studies, with writing, arithme-
tic, and needle-worls.



CHAPTER V.

Mr. ELTon’s house was situated about the
middle of the town, and Mary’s school at the
end nearest the bridge. To this school there
were two ways: one through a narrow street,
and the other along the quay ; the latter being
by far the more lively and pleasant. Mary
went to school alone: in a quiet country town
there seemed no danger in this, excepting from
the river, and she had already proved herself
so truthful and obedient that it was considered
sufficient to desire her on no account to go to
school along the quay. Mary’s dear mamma
had trained her too well to make it likely she
would openly disobey ; and yet one morning
she transgressed the command almost without
knowing what she was about.

Within a few doors of Mary’s school stood
a large grammar-school for boys. The school-
room windows overlooked those of Mary’s,
and many were the symptoms of fear and
Self-Control. a

trembling among the little girls when they
heard the sounds of pain and distress uttered
by: some unfortunate culprit undergoing a
flogging. These boys were accustomed to at-
tend school from seven to eight o’clock, before
breakfast, and, sad to tell, some of them not
having prepared their lessons properly, were
kept to learn and repeat them after the rest
had left; consequently, Mary would some-
times meet a party of these boys returning
when she was going to school at a little be-
fore nine.

Dunces are generally idle, and idle persons
ate seldom out of mischief; it was not long,
_therefore, before the quiet, timid-looking little
girl was marked out as an object of fun. One
morning, therefore, when Mary reached the
narrowest part of the street, she found her way
obstructed by five or six great boys, who had
joined their hands, and stretched themselves
across the whole way. At first she looked
confused, and then her mother’s lessons on
moral courage gave her strength.

“Let me pass, if you please,” she said, fear-
lessly.

_“Oh, of course, Miss Prim,” replied one of
the boys; “would you like to creep under our
Cc
34 Mary Elton ; or,

arms, or jump over our heads? either way will
do, whichever is most agreeable.”

Mary took no notice of this speech, but
walked down the line, making the same re-
quest to the other boys, and looking eagerly
in their faces to see if she could discover one
with a kinder look than the rest. But no;
she then attempted to push her way through
their arms, but that was indeed useless, the
weak against the strong, and so many. Again
she pleaded, “ Pray do let me pass, I shall be
late for school.”

The boys laughed. “To be sure, that is
what we want you to be. Do they put you
on the fool’s-cap for being late?”

Mary now became indignant. “You have
no right to stop me,” she said; “how dare
you try to make me late at school!” and
again she made a violent effort to break
through the obstruction. This was fine fun
for the boys; they laughed, and jeered, and
mocked her, till the tears, which pride had
kept down, almost started from her eyes. At
length she turned round proudly, saying, “I
shall go home and see if my grandfather will
not force you to let me pass.”

The boys, however, were satisfied for this
Self-Control. 35

time. Not exactly knowing who her grand-
father might be, they called her back, and
opening a way for her, bowed with mock
politeness and ran off.

Poor Mary! this was but the beginning of
trouble. She did not meet them every morn-
ing, partly because by being a little earlier she
reached school before they had left, and also
because the same boys were not always kept
in. Still, the annoyance occurred three or
four times, until the poor child became quite
nervous, and surprised her aunt by her anxiety
to be at school before nine. One morning,
however, after several days had passed with-
out meeting her enemies, who no doubt thought —
themselves very superior to the little girl they
delighted in teasing, she was running gaily to
school, forgetful of everything but her anxiety
to be there in time, when she saw a number
of them coming towards her. Between them
and herself was a narrow lane, connecting the
street with the quay. No thought entered her
mind but how she should avoid her tormentors.
In a moment she darted down the lane, and
along the quay, nor did she stop till breathless
with running she reached her school, and then
she remembered her act of disobedience,
36 Mary Elton ; or,

Many children, no doubt, will think, “Oh, but
then Mary had such a good excuse.” She did
not think so. He mother had taught her that
obedience was to stop at no difficulty. The
straightforward path is the only right path,
and whatever excuse might be offered, an act
of disobedience was disobedience still, She
never forgot that day at school; for until she
had told her aunt, and asked her forgiveness,
she could not feel comfortable. Miss Elton
readily forgave the little girl, although she
smiled at her description of the terror she felt
when she saw the boys approaching. She told
her, however, if it continued, that she would
write to Dr, Hatton, the head-master, and ask
him to interfere. But Mary did not wait for
her aunt to do this: she took the law into her
own hands. It was a bold thing for a little
girl to do, and it happened in this way. One
morning, about a week after telling her aunt,
she was much alarmed by seeing a larger
number than usual of the pupils approaching ;
and while considering what she should do to
avoid them, she saw that they were accom-
panied by two of the masters, one of them
Dr. Hatton himself. With some of her old
impetuosity and energy of character, she in-
Self-Control. 37

stantly determined to speak to him. It was
a dangerous experiment, and scarcely wise for
Mary to risk making herself an object of in-
sult as well as fun among the pupils of the
Grammar-school; few little girls of seven
years, however, reflect upon the consequences
of what they are going to do. She passed
the boys rather proudly, feeling secure of
their behaviour in such presence, and ap-
proaching Dr. Hatton, said, in her gentle,
silvery voice, “May I speak to you, sir, if you
please?”

Dr. Hatton stopped instantly, and looked
earnestly at her. “Are you not Mr. Elton’s
grandchild, my dear?” said the Doctor,
kindly.

“Yes, sir.”

“Well, what do you wish to say to me?”

Mary timidly, but as quickly as possible,
described the annoyance she had received,
and, with perfect confidence that his word
would be law, begged him to prevent it in
future.

“But, my dear,” said the clergyman, “my
pupils generally leave at eight o'clock; at
what time do you go to school?”

_ “At nine, sir.”
38 Mary Elton ; or,

“Ah, then,” he replied, rather sternly, “it
must be the idlers and the dunces who annoy
you: they shall not do it again.”

The severe tone startled Mary. Ina mo-
ment there flashed across her memory the re-
collection of the floggings she had heard from
the school-room windows, and the idea that
her complaining might produce such dreadful.
consequences filled her with terror. She laid
her little hand on the clergyman’s arm, and
exclaimed, “Oh, sir, you won't flog them, will
you? Oh, it is not bad enough for that;
pray, pray, do not let them be punished at all;
only tell them not to do it again. Iam sure
they will obey you. Promise me, sir, please,”
she continued, her eyes filled with tears of
regret for having said a word about it.

Dr. Hatton smiled, and promised all she
wished ; but as he turned from the little girl
who thanked him so warmly, he said to him-
self, “The woman’s nature all over: patient
endurance and earnest forgiveness.”

The grammar-school at Byford consisted of
the sons of men of influence and position in
the neighbourhood. The numbers were large,
and not one amongst them would have en-
dured quietly to be told he was not a gentle-
Self Controt, 39

man, because he was the son of a gentleman,
and born to wealth and position. This is a
great mistake, and so Dr. Hatton made them
understand. On the afternoon of the dav on
which Mary had complained, and just before
the hour for dismissing the school, Dr. Hatton
requested each young gentleman to seat him-
self at his desk, while he asked a few questions,
The order was obeyed in silence and dis-
may. When all were seated, Dr, Hatton said,
“Let every boy who has been kept in at
morning school during the last month stand
up.”

Slowly the culprits arose, some with looks
of shame, others with indifference. There was
no escape for them: the under-master had
opened a book in which their names were re-
corded.

“Now,” said Dr. Hatton, “I am not going
to inquire which of you have been cowardly
and rude enough to annoy a quiet, ladylike
little girl, in the open streets : 1t is sufficient to
know that some of you have done so—the
child appealed to me to-day for protection.
Shame upon you, no doubt calling yourselves
gentlemen, to make an object of fun of one so
much weaker and younger than either of you.
40 Mary Elton ; or,

You may think all this a grand display of
courage and superior strength; but men and
boys of really noble spirit shrink from such
conduct, and will rather take part with the
oppressed, even though it may be a poor half-
starved cat or a trembling unfledged bird.
You will understand,” he continued, “that she
has proved herself superior to you all, by en- .
treating me not to punish you in any way,
only begging me to protect her for the future.
Nothing but my promise to her has saved you;
and be sure, if I hear of such conduct again,
either to this child or any other, the severest
punishment shall follow.”

We cannot tell how far the Doctor’s address
did good to these cowardly boys: one thing
is certain—Mary never again met with the
slightest annoyance from the pupils of Byford
grammar-school.

More than twelve months passed away, and
Mary continued to improve in health and
spirits. A little of her former colour and vi-
vacity returned; but her friends, fearing to
presumetoo much upon this increased strength,
continued to send her to the preparatory school
as at first. With no young companions at
home, her love of reading increased so much
Self-Control, 4I

that Miss Elton was obliged to allow her only
a certain number of hours to read daily. Her
grandmother had taught her to knit, and this
was an amusement she soon became fond of;
and greatly did it surprise her mamma to re-
ceive two pairs of socks for her little brother,
knitted by Mary’s own hands.

One morning, while Mary was at school
two boxes arrived from London. Miss Elton
opened them both, and finding that one con-
tained nothing but books, she put it aside, and
sent for Mary to unpack the other herself.
Mary’s delight at being sent for from school
was only equalled by her joy at the contents
of the box: a large doll, with clothes of every
description, a transparent slate, a humming-
top, a skipping-rope, a box of dominoes, a
dissected map of Europe, and multiplication
table cards, such as many little boys and girls
would like to have now, but there are none
published. Very pretty pictures of animals
and birds of every description were painted
on cards, which were cut in half; the half
containing the head of the animal had printed
underneath it the question, and on the other
half, containing the tail, the answer would be
found. Mary soon learnt how to use them,
42 Mary Elton ; or,

It was very simple. For instance, having
found the head and half the body of a horse,
under which was. written “9 times 8,” it could
be quickly matched with the other half, con-
taining the answer “are 72.” ‘This cer-
tainly was a delightful way of learning the
multiplication table. Mary’s box also con-
tained several books, which were eagerly seized -
upon—she knew nothing of the number in
store for her.

Several weeks slipped by before the ex-
citement occasioned by the box and its con-
tents had passed away. Her aunt only
allowed her to have one amusement at one
time, and thus the pleasure they caused was
never quite lost. When she had read over and
over again the small stock of books which were
such a treasure to her when discovered at the
bottom of the box, Miss Elton, to her surprise,
brought out one from the hidden store,

“Why, aunt,” said the little girl, opening
her eyes with delight at a newly published
tale, handsomely bound, “where did you get
this?”

“Never mind,” said Miss Elton; “read it,
and do not ask any questions; but am I to
have no thanks ?”
Self-Control. 43

“Oh yes! dear aunt,” she exclaimed, jump-
ing up and clinging to her neck; “but it seems
almost too good to be true.”

If Mary was astonished this time, it is im-
possible to describe her feelings when, having
read and studied this delightful book, at the
end of a few weeks Miss Elton produced from
its hiding-place a copy of “Bunyan’s Pil-
grim’s Progress,” with many engravings, old-
fashioned certainly, but suited to the fashion
of the time in which he wrote. The pleasure
excited by this book, and the conversations
she had with her aunt about it, seemed to be
inexhaustible ; and Miss Elton was obliged to
produce another to divert her mind from
dwelling too much on the same subject.

The appearance of the third book gave
Mary some idea of the truth, and she ex-
claimed, “ Now, aunt, I have found you out:
mamma sent me all these books, and you have
hidden them, for fear I should read them too
quickly. Am I not right ?” Miss Elton smiled.
“ Oh, aunt,” she said, earnestly, “are there any
more? Oh,dotell me! I will not hurry over
this one—only just tell me that.”

“When you have read that one carefully,
Mary,” said her aunt, “you shall have another ;
44 Mary Elton ; or,

but I shall not tell you anything more, so do
not ask me.”

Mary knew that her aunt’s word could not
be shaken; she therefore walked away with
her new treasure, quite satisfied to think that
there was still another when she had read it,

She now made it a rule, when her aunt gave
her out a new book, to say with trembling -
earnestness, “Is there one more yet, aunt?”
When, after receiving six or seven books, the
answer was still, “ Yes, there is another,” Mary
could scarcely contain herself.

“Why, aunt,” she said, jumping about the
room with great glee, “you are like a fairy:
it seems as if you touched something with your
wand, and it turned to a book.”

It was indeed a clever arrangement, for the
pleasure was now spread over many months ;
and had Mary taken possession of the books
all at once, they would have been hurried over
without creating half the gratification they
now caused,



CHAPTER VI.
STORY-BOOKS very often represent little girls
as almost always good; but although Mary had
Self-Control, 45

receivedsuch carefulinstruction,and her friends
hoped she would grow up an obedient child,
yet she was not perfect ; and as we are writing
a true history, we must tell the whole truth.
One disadvantage attended Mary’scontinuance
at the preparatory school; she was in danger
of becoming vain at finding how much more
she knew than many girls older than herself.
Several of them were the daughters of respect-
able farmers in the neighbourhood, who con-
sidered the instruction they would receive in
such a school quite sufficient. Mary, by this
time, was advanced enough in her studies to
join the pupils at the establishment of Miss
Ferrars, who did not take any under eight
years old, and received very high terms fora
town like Byford. Mr. Elton, however, when
written to on the subject, was unwilling to
consent, from a fear for Mary’s health ; indeed,
all her friends knew that her love for study,
if excited by emulation, would render her so en-
thusiastic in her endeavours to be the head of
a class, or to win a prize, that her health might
suffer; therefore she was allowed to remain
amongst girls, very few of whom could excel
her in anything. Miss Elton, by constantly
pointing out to Mary her superior advantages,
46 Mary Elton; or,

kept her, to a certain degree, humble; but
there were other dangers amongst girls of in-
different education, who had not been taught
the importance of implicit obedience: two in
particular, the daughters of a wealthy farmer,
Miss Elton knew were not fit companions for
her little niece. Mary, therefore, had strict
injunctions not to make acquaintance with
them after school, but always to come straight
home; and as these girls lived in quite a con-
trary direction, there seemed no danger of
any temptation to disobey. The temptation
came at last.

It was a bright afternoon in June, the clock
had struck four, and Mary was standing on
the steps at her school-door, watching her
schoolfellows, Ellen and Mary White, trying
to persuade one of their father’s farm-sevants
to allow them to ride home on the back of a
hay-cart ; when they had gained their point,
and were comfortably seated, one of them
espied Mary.

“Mary Elton!” she exclaimed, “oh, come
and have a ride ; it is so delightful here; such
fun. Stay one moment, Thomas,” she ex-
claimed to the man; “come, Mary, make
haste.”
Self-Control, 47

“No, thank you,” said Mary; “I must
go home;’ but she still lingered on the step. _

“Why must you go home? I’m sure your
aunt wouldn’t mind you having a ride for a
little way—such a beautiful day too.”

The sun was indeed shining brightly ; the
river sparkling and dancing in its light; the
tide was up, and one or two vessels, with their
sails swelling to a gentle breeze, were leaving
the quay. Mary hesitated.

“Come, little miss,’ said the man: “if ee
be gwine, I beant going to ztay ’ere all day.”

Mary could not resist. She allowed herself
to be lifted up, and placed between the two
girls whom her aunt had desired her to avoid.
Away they went, over the brid+e, through the
outskirts of the town, and along the green
shady lanes, every moment carrying Mary
farther away from home. For more than a
mile the noisy mirth of her companions, and
the novelty of her position, prevented all re-
flection in Mary’s mind of what she was about;
presently they passed a milestone, and upon
it she read, “ Two miles to Byford.” In great
alarm, she now entreated her companions to
stop the driver, and allow her to get down,
but they enjoyed her fears, and laughingly
48 Mary Elton ; or,

told her they intended to take her home with
them, and keep her all night. Mary’s cries at
this became so distressing that the man heard
them, and stopping his horses, came round to
the back of the cart, and inquired what was
the matter.

“Oh, lift me down, please do,” said Mary ;
“Tam all this long way from Byford. How
shall I get home ?”

“ Beant’ee goin hoame, my dear?” said the
man, as he lifted her down.

“Qh no, no,” she replied ; “TI live in Byford.”

“For sheame on ye, then, to bring the cheeld
all this way,” said the man to his master’s
daughters, who were laughing heartily at
Mary’s terror. “Ne’er ye mind, my dear,” he
continued, kindly, “keep the straight road
till ’ee coom to the toon; and ye'll soon get
hoame.,”

Mary thanked him, and taking the direction
the man pointed out, began to walk very
quickly. Then came reflection. She had dis-
obeyed, and no doubt alarmed, her kind
friends, and she dreaded the displeasure she so
well deserved. Again, she thought of her
dear mamma’s surprise, at seeing her little
gentle Mary riding like a rude boy through
Self-Control. 49

a town behind a hay-cart, even had she known
nothing of the disobedience; and above all,
Mary remembered she had offended God, and
she could only walk very fast towards home,
weeping with sorrow and regret for what she
had done.

In the meantime, the old clock, in the kit-
chen of Grandfather Elton’s house, struck five.
The old gentleman listened to the sound with
surprise; then rising, he took his hat and
stick, and walked out in search of his little
grandchild. In spite of their confidence in
Mary’s obedience, there was always a fear in
the minds of her friends that she might be
tempted near the river and fall in; it was to
the quay, therefore, he first directed his steps,
dreading that every one he met might have
bad news to tell. He then called at the
school, and found she had left at four o’clock;
after inquiring at the houses of some neigh-
bours without hearing any news of her, he
returned home, expecting to find the little girl
had arrived. Miss Elton met him at the door.

“Have you seen her ?” she inquired... -

“No; has she not come home?” » ng

Miss Elen shook her head. Much alarmed,
but too fatigued to continue his search, the old”

Db
50 Mary Elton ; or,

gentleman threw himself into his arm-chair,
and Miss Elton was leaving the room to pre-
pare herself to go out, when the garden-gate
opened, and the little feet were heard timidly
approaching,

“Oh, thank God, she is safe!” exclaimed
the old gentleman ; “don’t scold her, Fanny.
T am only too happy to have her return alive.”

Ah, young people, how seldom do you re-
flect on the sorrow and anxiety your disobe-
dience causes those friends whose every wish
and command is for your own welfare and
happiness. Mary had not courage to face the
kind friends she had so grieved and alarmed ;
she therefore crept away to her bed-room,
whither she was soon followed by her aunt, to
whom, with many tears of shame and sorrow,
she confessed her disobedience ; very gently,
and with anxious love, did her kind aunt point
out the sin and folly of which she had been
guilty, and then she knelt and prayed with her
for forgiveness, and for power to res'st tempta-
tion. Perhaps Mary understood a ittle of the
grief she had caused her kind grandfather and
grandmother when she received the kiss of
forgiveness, and heard their thankful expres-
sions of gratitude for her safety.
Self-Control. BI

Not many weeks after this occurrence, Mary
was surprised and delighted by a visit from
her father ; how rejoiced was he to find her so
much improved in health and appearance, and
how gladly would he have taken her home with
him, for her dear mother’s heart yearned for
her little Mary: yet he hesitated ; she was grow-
ing very fast, and had still a delicacy of com-
plexion that did not indicate confirmed health:
His parents and sister, who felt unwilling to
part with the little girl until she was quite
strong, urged all these facts as reasons for her
stay, with great earnestness, Mr. Elton there-
fore agreed to leave her for another twelve
months ; he could not bear to deprive his little
daughter of the benefit likely to follow this
extended visit, in addition to the advantage
of his sister’s kind and judicious training.
Mary, although longing to see her dear mo-
ther and brothers, one of whom, a baby,
she had never seen, submitted pleasantly
to the arrangement; she loved her grand-
father, grandmother, and aunt too well to
grieve them by showing any over-anxiety to
go away.

During the winter that followed Mr. Elton’s
visit, Mary, to her regret, finished the last of
52 Mary Elton ; or,

her aunt’s hidden store of books. In March,
she was to commence her studies with Miss
Ferrars, and to continue with her for six
months. The long stay at the preparatory
school had not been lost ; it now gave her the
advantage of being able to read the most
difficult lesson with ease and quickness, and
to write exercises neatly and readily. She
soon gained a high position in her class, and,
but for a caution given to Miss Ferrars, she
might have been tempted to try how much
the wonderfully retentive memory could bear.
Mary was delighted with her school, and al-
ways ready to learn her lessons, which, al-
though much more numerous and difficult
than any she had been used to, were, seem-
ingly, quite easy to her. Therefore, as the
summer approached, Miss Elton was surprised
to see her little niece sometimes quite sleepy
and inclined for bed before seven o'clock.
Half-past six was her usual hour for rising,
and, for more than a year, she had been
allowed to sit up till half-past eight ; and yet
two or three nights in the week she would fall
asleep in her chair, after learning her lessons,
This continued for nearly ‘a month. Miss
Elton was beginning to fear that her studies
Self-Control, 53

were beyond her strength, when Mary herself
. betrayed her own secret.

“Aunt,” she exclaimed, suddenly, one
evening, “are there really such things as
genii?”

The words were no sooner uttered, than
she recollected what she had done; face, neck,
and even arms were crimsoned with conscious
shame, Oh, what a tell-tale conscience is!
but for that blush, Miss Elton would have ex-
plained and answered her question, without
inquiring why she asked it. Now she looked
at her earnestly.

“Where did you read about genii, Mary ?”
she asked.

The little girl was silent, and her aunt
deeply pained; what could cause so much
shame as to render her speechless, Miss El-
ton could now only trust to the truthfulness of
her little niece: she saw the struggle, as the
tears trickled down her cheeks, and she waited
with hope and fear for the answer. Mary had
turned to the window to hide her tears, when
suddenly, with a violent effort, she flew into her
aunt’s lap, threw her arms round her neck, and
sobbed as if her heart would break.

“Oh! aunt, aunt,” at length burst forth in
BA Mary Elion ; or,

choking accents, “I have been so wicked; you
will never forgive me. Oh! I shall never,
never, be so good as mamma !”

“My dear,” said Miss Elton, “do not say
I shall never forgive you; try me, dear Mary,
if you have done wrong. I am sure you are
ashamed and sorry by your tears; tell me all
about it; you will be miserable now till you
have done so.”

Mary hid her face on her aunt’s shoulder,
and said in a low voice, “ Aunt, I have been
reading the ‘Tales of the Genii,’ one of the
books in the corner cupboard, over my bed,
that you told me not to open.”

Miss Elton was very sorry—this direct act
of disobedience pained her. Yet she blamed
herself, knowing, as she did, Mary’s love of
reading ; she should have locked the cup-
board, to prevent her from being tempted be-
yond her strength to resist. This curious
corner cupboard, its dark ebony doors, inlaid
with Chinese figures in gold, had been one of
the first things to attract Mary’s attention, and
when she found it contained books, excited a
longing curiosity she could never overcome.
Miss Elton, knowing that among these books
were some not exactly suitable for a child to
Self-Control. 55

read, had forbidden her to touch them. The
box from London had arrived in time to divert
her mind from the forbidden place, but when
that was exhausted, the temptation had re-
turned with full force.

-“ Have you read any other of the books?”
inquired Miss Elton, at length.

“Yes, aunt; ‘Gil Blas,” ‘Don Quixote,’
‘Telemachus, and now I am reading the
‘Arabian Nights !’”

Miss Elton was amazed, “My dear child,
how did you find time to read all these
books ?”

“Aunt, I used to wake in the morning as
soon as it was light; and read till it was time
to get up. Not every morning ; sometimes I
did not wake, but when I was in the middle
of a story I was sure to, because I thought
about it so much.

“ And,” said Miss Elton, much astonished,
“could you understand what you read?”

“A great deal I did, aunt,’ said Mary;
“but there were lots and lots of words I never
heard in my life, and I longed to ask you, but
T did not dare; till to-night it slipped out, I
can’t tell how. Dear aunt,” she: continued,
looking up through her tears at her aunt’s
56 Mary Elton ; ov,

face, “you afte not quite so angry as I ex.
pected.”

“My dear,” said Miss Elton, “your dis-
obedience grieves me, but it was partly my
fault. I thought you more perfect than a
little girl ever could be; I hoped, when my
little Mary was told not to touch the corner
cupboard, she would have feared to disobey
and offend God.”
~ “Oh! dear, kind Aunt Fanny,” said the
little girl; “what shall I say, to tell you how
sotry I am, but it was such a dreadful temp-
tation —all those books staring at me every
day.”

“TI know it, my darling; but God sends
temptations to His people to try them; and
don’t you know what He has promised, that
He will, with the temptation, send a way of
escape? Ah! Mary, 1am afraid you did not
pray to God to help you to conquer this
temptation. .

“No, indeed, aunt,” said ree “that I did
not; but I will, Oh! I will to-night. And,
dear aunt, don’t lock the cupboard ; you shall
see I will never touch the books again.”

Mary kept her word, and when she left
Byford, her aunt chose from the forbidden
Self-Control. 57

store several which she thought Mary would
like to read when she grew older ; saying, as
she did so, “Mary these books will remind
you how necessary it is to pray, ‘Lead us
not into temptation.”
Cee tee
CHAPTER VII.

THE affair of the corner cupboard was, very
shortly after, driven from Mary’s mind by a
circumstance which brought to light the dis-
position her mother so much dreaded—that
earnest clinging to anything she loved or de-
lighted in. Miss Elton had hitherto had no op-
portunity of noticing this: the child’s delicate
health had made her more tranquil; a very
trifling event showed her aunt how enthusiastic
her little niece could be.

‘To encourage her to take exercise in the
open air, Mr. Elton had given her, during her
first spring in Byford, a small plot of ground,
to cultivate according to her own taste. It
was by this time a very pretty spot, enclosed
by a border of single and double daisies ; one
part, in which stood a beautiful standard rose-
tree, was kept for flowers, and in the other she
sowed radishes and mustard-and-cress. Mary’s
58 Mary Elion ; or,

garden proved a great pleasure andamusement
to her, Old Mr. Elton might well be very
proud of Azs garden ; it was well kept and
attended, so that fruit, flowers, and vegetables,
according to the different seasons of the year,
were always in plentiful supply. Not far from
Mary’s little garden stood a very rare cherry-
tree, which, notwithstanding all the care and
attention it had received, had never yet borne
any fruit. During the spring of Mary’s last
year at Byford, it was covered with blossoms,
and many hopes were entertained that at last
there must be some cherries. As May ap-
proached, however, the blossoms dropped off,
and their white petals covered Mary’s little
garden, leaving the tree as usual, with ap-
parently nothing but leaves. The energy of
Mary’s character did not allowher to be easily
discouraged. She watched the tree daily, lifting
leaf after leaf within her reach, searching for
fruit, as the anxious mother often seeks in vain
for the good effects of earnest instruction to a
darling child. ;

One half-holiday, as Mr. Elton was dozing
in his arm-chair after dinner, Mary ran into
the house from the garden, exclaiming,
“ Grandfather! grandfather! oh! come, quick, I
Self-Control, 50

T have such a wonder to show you!” At the
same time she commenced pulling the bewil-
dered old gentleman from his chair. Mr.
Elton felt rather inclined to chide the little
girl for her merciless interruption of his nap,
but it was impossible to resist the earnest,
smiling face, looking up at him soimploringly;
he therefore roused himself, and putting on a
look of wondering expectation, allowed her to
lead him up the steps into the garden. On
reaching the top, Mary darted forward, and in
a moment stood before the cherry-tree, her
eyes sparkling with pleasure, and her flaxen
ringlets waving in the wind.

“ Grandfather!” she exclaimed, as he slowly
approached, “look here!” and lifting some
leaves, she exhibited two cherries already in
an advanced state of formation, and promising
to be very large.

“Why, my little girl,” said the old gentle-
man, fairly interested, “this is, indeed, a won-
der; I cannot scold you now for disturbing
my nap.”

“Oh, I knew that, dear grandfather,” said
Mary, capering about with excitement and de-
light ; “I was quite sure you would be pleased
to see cherries on the wonderful tree; after all,

”
60 Mary Elton ; or,

grandfather, it may be a good tree and bring
you plenty of fruit next year.”

“Perhaps it may, my dear,” said Mr. Elton,
looking with pleasure on the hitherto worth-
less, though promising tree ; “and as for these
cherries, if they ripen and do not fall off, they
shall be yours on your birthday, as you dis-
covered them.”

“Oh, thank you! dear grandfather! how
kind ! you can’t think how I have searched and
searched every day, so carefully. I thought,
with all those beautiful blossoms, there must
be some fruit.”

“ Ah! my child,” said her grandfather, with
a sigh, “ many are the beautiful blossoms of
earth that produce nothing but disappoint-
ment, as well as those of a cherry-tree,” Then
after a pause, he continued, “ Well, my dear
watch your cherries; they are your own now,
and much more promising fruit than this now
appears has been blighted before it could reach
perfection.” So saying, he returned to the
house and his arm-chair, reflecting on the
vanity of all earthly hopes,—bright, beautiful
blossoms, blighted by the cold blast of earth’s
dread realities.

It was now that the intense earnestness of
Self-Control. 61

Mary’s character showed itself to her aunt,
by the enthusiasm with which she watched the
growth of her cherries, and the dread she felt
lest they should never ripen. The first thing
in the morning, the last at night, before going
to school, and instantly on returning, without
taking off her bonnet, was to run into the gar-
den to look at her cherries ; she could think
of nothing else; ifthe truth must be told, les-
sons were neglected, work misplaced, even
books set aside; and sad to tell, on one or two
occasions, her morning prayer forgotten. Miss
Elton was surprised; she had never seen her
little niece like this, and she determined to
leave her to herself, only reminding her, now
and then, of neglected duties. She hoped to
make the cherries a medium for a lesson to
Mary, never to be forgotten.

Miss Elton had a Bible-class at the Sunday-
school ; many of the girls who formed it were
almost young women, yet Mary, who generally
went with her aunt, would listen with eager in-
telligence to her kind instructions, and prepare
answers for the same questions with them,
Miss Elton keeping her humble by constantly
pointing out her great advantages. On the
Sunday before Mary’s birthday, Miss Elton
62 Mary Elton ; or,

had chosen for her subject, “The vanity of all
earthly hopes,” and required from her scholars
texts of scripture as proofs, and also others in
which we are taught to look for higher and
more lasting happiness. Mary had chosen for
one of the latter, the third chapter of St. Paul’s
Epistle to the Colossians, in which are the
words, “Set your affection on things above,
not on things on the earth.” From this subject,
Miss Elton explained to her attentive class
the necessity of early discipline of the heart.
She told them of those who, not having
learned to bear disappointments in youth,
often, when the sorrows of life fell upon them,
became the victims of broken hearts, soured
tempers, or reckless despair; and worse still,
of otheis, whose characters had never been con-
trolled in childhood, and who, resting all their
fondest hopes on the things of this life, and
failing to realize the happiness they had ex-
pected, had sunk into insanity, or, unable to
bear the bitter disappointment, had been
tempted to take their own lives, and rush, un-
called, into the presence of their Maker. Mary,
who listened to all, and understood much of
what her aunt said, was still quite unaware
that any of it could apply to a little girl like
Self-Control, 63

herself; and at present, Miss Elton did not
address her in. particular—she waited.

The long looked for birthday arrived; it
wanted but a few days to the midsummer
vacation; Mary, who was too busy at
school to get home until just in time for
dinner, could not go into the garden. No
sooner, however, had the cloth been removed
than she asked permission to fetch her cherries
—it was granted; away she bounded out of
the house, up the garden steps, and stood
breathless before the tree. The cherries were
gone! In vain she lifted leaf after leaf; no, she
had not mistaken the bough—they were really
gone. It took some moments, however, to
make Mary believe this ; we are slow to realize
the disappointment of our hopes. She burst
into an agony of tears, and turned towards the
house with a rapid step. Those cherries she
had tended so. carefully, so beautiful they had
looked in the morning, large, full, and ripe.
Our readers must not mistake : our little Mary
was by no means greedy; she had not the
slightest intention of eating the rare fruit her-
self; but to think that after all they should
be stolen. Oh, it was too much, and again
her sobs almost choked her. Suddenly there
64 Mary Elton ; or,

flashed across the little girl’s mind her aunt's
teaching on the previous Sunday. The violent
grief was hushed ina moment. “ Why,” she
said to herself, “aunt meant me, when she
talked about people fixing their expectations
too strongly on anything. I feel more sorry
about these cherries than if all the fruit in the
garden had been stolen,—I suppose it is be-
cause I did set my mind upon them so much.”

Slowly and quietly, with the tears, which
would come, following one another down her
cheeks, she entered the parlour. “Grand-
father,” she said mournfully, “the beautiful
cherries are gone! who could have taken
them? they must have been stolen,”

“Are you quite sure, Mary?” said Miss
Elton, in a pleasant voice. Mary looked up
through her tears, andlo! on the table were
two or three dishes of fruit, one of them con-
taining cherries, on the top of which, innocently
reposing in a fresh vine-leaf, were laid Mary’s
rare and long-watched favourites. Her look of
astonishment was quickly followed by a smile
glistening through her tears, like sunshine
through an April shower. Throwing herself
on her aunt’s neck, she exclaimed, “Aunt,
dear aunt! you did this to show me the mean-
Self-Control. 65

ing of what you said on Sunday. Oh, I
know it all now.”

There was no occasion for Miss Elton to
explain; the quick, sensitive feeling of her
little niece sufficiently understood and appre-
ciated what she had done, She merely kissed
away the tears, exclaiming, “God grant, my
darling, that your future disappointments and
sorrows may be as comparatively slight, and
as patiently endured, as this!”

The next three months seemed to pass
away very quickly, and Mary was almost as
much surprised as delighted when her father
arrived to take her home. It was with feelings
of deep gratitude to God, and thankfulness to
his kind parents and sisters, that Mr. William
Elton again clasped his little daughter in his
arms, and compared her now blooming, heal-
thy appearance, with the delicate child he had
placed under their care three years before,
The delight Mary felt at going home, and the
prospect of seeing her dear mother and little
brothers, was very natural, still she could not
bear to think of leaving her kind friends at
Byford; her grandfather and grandmother were
both growing old, and the thought would come,
“Perhaps I may never see them again.”

i E
66 Mary Elion ; or,

When the day at length arrived, the same
thought seemed to impress them all, and the
deep and heartfelt blessings poured upon her
head by these aged friends, as they bade her
farewell, made her feel as if she could not leave
them. She clung to her aunt’s neck, and
whispered, “Dear, dear aunt Fanny, thank you
for teaching me so much. Oh, indeed, I will
try never to forget it.”

At length Mr. Elton hurried her away, and
as she looked qut of the coach-window to say
“Good-bye” once more to her aunt, who stood
to see them off, she checked her sobs, and said,
“Aunt, I can write you letters now, and when
I grow a woman, I shall come and see you
again ; and—” she was going to add, “dear
grandfather and grandmother,” but she stop-
ped, and again her tears burst forth. Miss
Elton was almost glad when the coachman
mounted the box ; the ostlers whisked away
the covering from the horses, and the four
noble animals started forward with their bur-
den, prancing and curvetting as they went.
She felt almost a mother’s love for the warm-
hearted child, whose deep feelings were so
clinging to earthly objects, and so excitable,
so sensitive for those she loved, and she knew
Self-Control. 67

how much she would have to contend with in
a world where all is cold, harsh, and unsatis-
fying.

How different did this long, tedious journey
appear now to the travellers ; they were going
home, and Mr. Elton could think of nothing
but the delight her mother would feel at see-
ing the improvement in a child she had once
mourned for as sick unto death. He told his
little girl of her new brother, a baby about a
month old; described her second brother,
Willie, whom she had also never seen; and
told her that Aunt Kate, her mother’s young-
est sister, would meet them at the coach-
office.

It was a lovely September afternoon, as the
coach stopped at the White Horse Cellar; a
lady, who recognized her brother-in-law, ad-
vanced to meet him ; she looked at Mary with
a doubtful countenance. “Is it possible ?” she
said at last, seeing Mr. Elton smile; “Oh,
will not Maria be delighted?” In the hack-
ney coach that conveyed them home, Aunt
Kate took off Mary’s bonnet, wiped the dust
from her face, combed out the long flaxen
ringlets, and arranged her dress, that she
might look her best to her mother. “Thank
68 Mary Elton ; or,

you, dear aunt Kate,” said Mary, “but I did
not remember you at first ; I think I do now;
only it seems such a long while ago.” Aunt
Kate kissed her fondly. “My dear Mary, I
should know you by your voice, that is just
the same, but you are a great girl now, and I
could scarcely believe it was our little Mary.”

A family party had assembled in Mr. Elton’s
drawing-room. Mrs. Elton’s mother, and two
sisters, her brother, and his wife, and an old
uncle, Colonel Herbert. She herself sat on the
sofa, looking pale, but calm, with her infant
on her lap. By her side sat a noble boy of
five, his large black eyes anxiously turned
upon his mother. At length he inquired,
“How long will it be now, mamma, before
Mary comes ?”

“Very soon, Harry,” said his mother; “go
to the window and watch for the coach.” The
child eagerly obeyed. Another little fairy
child sat on the ground at her feet, playing
with some bricks ; he looked up, shaking his
fair curls from his brow, and said, “ Me see
coach too, ma.”

She was going to reply, when the sound of —
wheels made her rise from the sofa.

“Here they are, mamma!” exclaimed Harry,
Self-Control. 69

statting from the window. Mrs. Elton gave
the baby to her mother and turned to the door,
which Harry had opened. She could not move
astep farther ; she heard the steps of the coach
let down, and then a light foot ascended the
stairs. A tall, blooming girl stood before her,
her long fair hair curling to the waist, and
without a bonnet. Mary flew into her arms;
she instinctively felt who it was, and Mrs. EI-
ton, although the difference in the child she
now clasped to her bosom to the one she had
parted with was so great, could well under-
stand the change.

“Mamma, dear mamma!

“My own darling Mary!” was the mother’s
fervent reply.

Wewill leave the hited family to the plea-
sure and joy of that happy evening, still more
happy even than the one with which our story
began. When we continue Mary’s history,
she will no longer be a little child, but a kind
elder sister.

hed



CHAPTER VIII.

WE took leave of Mary Elton on her return
to her father’s house, after an absence of three
70 Mary Elton ; or,

years. She is now filling the responsible posi-
tion of elder sister, and in all its affectionate
duties her character is shown to great advan-
tage. She had been delighted, on her return
to Byford, to find her little brother Henry,
whom she had left a toddling child of two
years, now a fine noble boy of five. Little,
delicate, fair-haired Willie soon learnt to look
up to the gentle sister, who treated him as if
he were in reality one of the fairies of which
she had read. The baby was a new and lovely
plaything, or, as she called it, a real living doll.
Had she room in her heart for so many objects
of love? Oh yes; they all quickly became
dear to her; but it was to her brother Henry
that her young feelings seemed to turn with
the fondest affection ; he was at once a play-
mate and a pupil. Mary’s perfect acquaint-
ance with the simple, yet fundamental parts
of education, rendered her of great assistance
_to her mother in teaching Henry until he
reached the age of eight years. Mary had not
now to learn to read, write, spell, or work the
first four important rules in arithmetic, and she
had a very good general knowledge of ancient
and modern history, geography, and grammar.
Mrs. Elton, therefore, was able to commence .
Self-Control. 71

at once with the accomplishments; and her
father, finding she had a taste for arithmetic,
carried her forward in that science as well as
in other more abstruse studies, She was to
learn French and Italian, and he also made ~
her study the Latin grammar, well knowing it
to be the only foundation for the acquisition
of languages. Mary’s time was soon, therefore,
completely occupied. Her mother’s superior
education enabled her to direct her studies,
and, indeed, to be her only governess ; for, al-
though she had masters after awhile, her pa-
rents would never send her to school. Mr.
Elton was a merchant in prosperous circum-
stances, but not rich enough to place his
daughter where she could have the advantage
of such instructions as he required for her; and
Mrs. Elton feared the effects of evil example
from other girls, so she remained at home
under her mother’s watchful eye.

From Mary’s new position, asan elder sister,
arose many difficulties, which required great
patience and control of temper to contend
with. Unaccustomed to young children, es-
pecially boys, her natural quickness was some-
times sorely tried ; while their rough, boisterous
play startled and surprised the quiet little girl.
72 Mary Elton ; or,

Her mother’s gentle teachings, and her own
warm heart, soon taught her the necessary les-
son of self-conquest and self-denial with those
so much younger than herself; and Mrs. Elton
discovered, to her great satisfaction, how much
this discipline improved and strenghtened her
little daughter’s character. The careful train-
ing Mary had received, both from her mother
and aunt, Mrs. Elton had adopted with her
eldest boy, knowing well, that in a family
where the elder children are obedient and
orderly in their conduct, half the mother’s
trouble in her family is spared, by the effects
of good example upon the younger branches.
Mary being so much older, her influence was
more powerful, and her gentle manners had a
softening effect upon her brothers. At the
same time, there was none of that fearful
timidity about her which boys so contemptu-
ously ridicule. Mrs. Elton considered moral
courage, presence of mind, and endurance,
some of the highest qualities a woman can
possess. She taught her daughter the folly of
shrinking at the sight of blood, or screaming
when a beetle or a spider came near her, and
she was very soon called upon to prove the
good effects of her mother’s instructions.
Self-Control, 73

One evening, about two years after her re-
turn from Byford, she was seated in the rock-
ing-chair by the nursery fire, holding her
youngest brother in her lap, while the nurse
went into the next room for some article which
she supposed to be in one of the drawers.
Not finding it, the woman placed the candle
on the table, and left the room without re-
marking that Willie had followed her in. The
door to this room from the nursery opened
opposite to the fire-place ; Mary therefore, as
she sat singing to her little brother in a low
tone, and rocking herself backwards and for-
wards, had her back to it. The nursery was
dark, excepting the glimmering from a low fire
in the grate. Presently. Mary was startled by
the reflection of a strong light on the wall be-
fore her: at the same moment she heard Wil-
lie’s voice crying out, “Oh, Mary, here’s a bon-
fire!” She started up, and saw with terror
an open drawer at the bottom of the chest, full
of flames. This drawer, which had been left
partly open by the nurse, contained some
paper shavings which, during the summer, had
been used to ornament the empty grates.
Quickly placing her little brother on the floor,
she flew into the room, exclaiming, as she
74. Stary Elton ; ov,

snatched Willie from his dangerous position,
“Oh! you naughty boy, what have you done?”
Then snatching a blanket from the bed, she
pressed it down with her hands over the burn-
ing mass, and succeeded in extinguishing the
flames. The cries of the two children brought
Mrs. Elton and the nurse up-stairs at the same
time. Mary, overcome by the effort she had
made, had seated herself on the floor, and,
pale as death, was resting her head against a
chair in a state of faintness, Willie stood sob-
bing as if his heart would break, conscious he
had done wrong, and Freddy, on the floor in
the nursery, screamed with terror.

“What zs the matter?” said Mrs. Elton, as
she lifted her fainting daughter and placed her
on the bed.

“Oh, mamma!” said the sobbing Willie,
“T did it—lI set fire to the shavings to make
a bonfire, and Mary said I was a naughty boy,
and she put it out with a blanket.”

It was all explained now, and oh, how ten-
derly did Mrs. Elton bathe the temples of her
courageous little girl, and soothe her when she
recovered, with the warmest expressions of
love and approbation. But she did not forget
the trembling Willie; calling him to her, she
Self-Control. 75

took him on her lap, and explained to him
how dangerous it was for little boys to play
with fire. “Why, my dear Willie,” said his
mother, “if Mary had not so quickly put out
the fire, very likely your papa’s house would
have been burnt down.”

“But, mamma,” said the child, “little boys
do play with fire. I sawthem when they burnt
Guy Faux, and they made a large bonfire too, ~
mamma.”

Mrs. Elton could scarcely help smiling. The
children had been invited to spend the evening
of the Fifth of November at the house of a
friend living in the country, and from the win-
dows they had seen the burning of Guy Faux,
and a display of fireworks in the playground
of an adjoining school. “Perhaps you did,”
said his mother; “but those little boys had
masters and big boys to take care of them ;
besides, it was not in a house, but out of doors,
where there could be very little danger. My
Willie must never play with fire again, Sup-
pose your pinafore had taken fire—you would
have been burnt up like Guy Faux, and mam-
ma would have lost her little Willie,” she con-
tinued, pressing him to her bosom at the
thought. “If ever Willie touches the candle,
76 Mary Elion ; ov,

or plays with fire again, mamma will be very
sorry, but she must punish him very much.”
The little boy hid his face at this, to him, un-
usual threat, and without looking up, said, in a
choking voice, “Mamma, I never, never will
play with fire again.”

This incident occurred not long after Mrs.
Elton had been obliged to engage a stranger
to supply the place of dear old Nurse. She
had fondly and faithfully fulfilled her duties in
the nursery, till age and infirmities had obliged
her to give them up. She remained in Mrs. El-
ton’s house till her death, and the children,
especially Mary, mourned for her almost as a
mother. Mary’s presence of mind in the affair
of Willie’s bonfire relieved her mother of great
anxiety, and from that day she encouraged her
to make herself useful in the nursery, as, by
helping the nurse, she could gain her kind
feeling and confidence, and be a loving protec-
tion to her little brothers. Mrs. Elton was for-
tunate enough, a few months after, to secure
the services of a very superior woman, under
whose guidance Mary still continued to spend
what time she could spare in the nursery. Mrs.
Elton felt that there could be nothing deroga-
tory or degrading in anything she might do
Self-Control, 27

for her little brothers. Many a young mother,
mourning over the death of one infant, or the
deformity that threatened another from the
carelessness of a servant, has bitterly lamented
her ignorance of nursery duties. The constant
demand upon Mary’s time left her ao room for
idleness; certain hours for each study were
strictly enforced by both parents; a sufficient,
but not undue, length of time for music and
drawing was also allowed; and when these
and her nursery duties were accomplished, her
time was her own, for reading and other recre-
ations. By learning from her mother strict
economy of time, and never wasting a mo-
ment, it was wonderful how much she could
perform in one day. She accompanied the
children in their walks, learned to mend and
make their clothes, and, in short, promised
fair to be that treasure to a mother—an affec-
tionate, accomplished, useful, elder daughter.
Nearly four years passed away, during which
time Mary improved so rapidly under the
teaching she received from both parents, that
they felt no regret at having kept her at home.
Yet Mrs. Elton had discovered, in the earnest
intensity of her daughter’s feelings, that the
nature she so much feared existed still, and
78 Mary Elton; or,

seemed to gain strength with advancing age,
notwithstanding every effort to control it.
Whatever Mr. Elton might think about edu-
cating his daughter at home, he did not intend
to do the same with his boys. Both parents
felt the discipline of school useful for a boy
who had to fight his way through the world. A
school is, in general, a little world of itself;
and although much of evil may be, and often
is, acquired there, from the effect of bad exam-
ple, yet the influence of early teachings at
home and a mother’s gentle warnings and
prayers are never wholly lost. They will cling
to the boy—aye, and the man too, in the hour
of the sharpest temptations—whether in the
school-room, the counting-house, or the busy
haunts of men. It is the sweet influence of a
well-ordered home, and the judicious training
of a tender mother, that can alone form the
characters of England’s men and women.
When Henry Elton reached the age of
eight years, arrangements were made to send
him to school. Parting from her brother was
Mary’s first real sorrow. The boy had en-
twined himself around every fibre of her affec-
tionate heart. Nor was his love for her less
earnest. She was, in his estimation, the dearest,
Self-Control. 79

the most patient, the cleverest sister in the
world ; he could tell her all his joys, all his
sorrows; she would enter into his amusements,
however trivial, make tails for his kites, sew
the sails of his boats, feed his white mice, and
take care of his rabbits. There was no onelike
Mary. On the morning of his departure for
school, the boy’s manly spirit kept down the
tears, lest his dear mother should grieve. Mary
scarcely dared to wish him good-bye; she,
however, struggled with her over-wrought feel-
ings until he was gone, and then sobbed upon
her mother’s neck as if her heart would break.
This was the first time Mrs. Elton had recog-
nized, in its full force,.the old intense feeling.
Mary was older now, and childish disappoint-
ments had ceased to arouse it. The mother’s
quiet, calm remark covered her with shame:
“My dear Mary, your brother has more self-
command than you: he subdued his deepest
feelings for my sake.”

Oh! how bitterly the unselfish heart of
the child regretted her burst of sorrow, when
she saw tears, which she had caused, on
her mother’s usually placid face. She left
the room, but returned in a few minutes,
smiling through her tears: “ Mother, I have
80 Mary Elton; or,

conquered ; I will not grieve you by giving
way.”

Mrs. Elton kissed her fondly. “My dear
child,” she said, “you must, indeed, learn to
control yourself: you cannot always expect
me to be with you, to remind you as I have
done to-day, or to help you to self-control.
Mary, you must learn to look to a higher
Power than myself for help.” It was, how-
ever, some days before she could quite recon-
cile herself to her brother’s absence. She
missed him in-the school-room, at meals, in
the nursery, during their daily walks—in-
deed, every moment something occurred to
remind her of him. Henry Elton was a boy
whom any sister might love—noble, high-
spirited, and truthful, intelligent far beyond
his years, so much so as to form a companion
even for his clever sister. She was proud of
him in every way—proud of his handsome
face and manly bearing.’ Henry was a great
contrast to his sister ; his black, piercing eyes
were shaded by long lashes that rested on his
clear brown cheek; and around his smooth,
high forehead clustered curls of a dark, rich
colour. The contrast between the brother and
sister was, indeed, remarkable; and when, in
Self-Control, 81

earnest conversation respecting some lesson or
kind office in which she was assisting him,
Mary would lean over her brother, mixing her
bright auburn ringlets with his dark hair and
complexion, the effect was very singular.
Henry Elton was not perfect—no truly de-
scribed character can ever be so; he possessed
a passionate temper, and once, in a fit of rage,
he struck his sister. Oh! how the gentle spirit
shrunk from the blow; not on her arm did
Mary feel the pain, it fell on her heart; and
although, with bitter tears of sorrow and
fondest caresses, he regained her instant for-
giveness and love, yet Mary would have given
worlds to recall the act, not for her own sake,
but his: she wished him to be perfect, and she
wanted to think him so. Ah! Mary, Mary,
why did you twine that brother around your
heart so fondly ?—had you forgotten the cher-
ries? Ah, yes! and the earnest, ardent spirit
was enthusiastic still.



CHAPTER IX.
Henry ELTON’s first holidays occurred at
midsummer, and great was his dear mother’s
anxiety lest any evil example at school should
F
82 Mary Elton ; or,

have injured her boy. He had been at home
but one day, when the principles she had so
earnestly instilled into his mind were put to
the test. It was a lovely June morning. Mary
and her brother, prepared for walking, were
seated in the library, waiting for Nurse and
the two younger children. Nearly twenty
minutes passed, and as Nurse did not come,
Henry grew impatient. “Shall we go on?” he
said to his sister, “ Nurse will soon overtake us.”

“No,” she replied; “we must not go out
“alone. Have you forgotten that, dear Henry?”

“T had almost. Oh, it is so tiresome wait-
ing. I shall go down, and stand at the door.
She cannot be long now.”

“If I were you, I would stay here,” said
Mary ; but he was gone, and did not hear her.
She then took up a book, wondering what
could keep the nurse, and feeling a little im-
patient herself.

In the meantime, Henry sauntered into the
street. Everything looked gayand bright. The
merry spring cries, as the vendors of different
articles passed by; thedistanthumof carriages;
the voices of happy children already on their
way to the parks; the musical cry of the flower-
women, with their sweet-smelling dcaupots of
Self-Control. 83

flowers—all these were sights and sounds de-
lightful to Henry; but they increased his impa-
tience. Suddenly there struck upon his ear the
sound of military music. Henry started, and
listened ; in a moment he remembered it was
the 18thof June, the anniversary of the battle of
Waterloo. He knew also that the detachment
of soldiers who went daily to relieve the guard
at Whitehall, were on that day accompanied
by a splendid military band, and that they
would go through an adjoining street. “I
must just see it pass,” thought Henry; “I
shall be back again before Mary and Nurse
come down.” In a few moments, the gilded
dresses, glittering in the sun, and the flashing
of brass instruments, passed before his eyes ;
while the sound of the martial music and the
spirit-stirring drum filled the music-loving
child with ecstasy. Did he merely stop and
look as it passed by? No: Henry had made
the first false step in disobedience. All the
rest of the way was downhill. On he went,
mixing with a crowd of rude men and boys,
unconscious of where he was going, or to what
distance, till at the gate of a large building the
music suddenly ceased, One by one the gaily
dressed musicians, the splendid black horses
84. Mary Elton ; or,

and their warlike riders, disappeared from his
eyes. He was left standing ina strange place,
nearly two miles away from home, and alone!
He now reflected upon what he had done—
disobeyed, grieved, and no doubt alarmed his
dear mamma, deceived and forgotten his dar-
ling sister. How bitterly did he regret, and
how eagerly ask his way home! To reach it,
however, was not so easy. He walked very
fast, became heated and tired, and having two
or three times mistaken the directions given
him, found himself, after more than an hour
had passed away, apparently as far from home
as ever. He was slowly walking on, longing,
yet dreading, to see his dear mother, when he
saw coming towards him a schoolfellow much
older than himself, but, alas! possessing neither
moral courage nor principle. Henry could not ¢
have met with a more dangerous companion.
Arthur Ross, from his spirit and cleverness at
school, was looked up to by the younger boys.
Henry, therefore, was in danger of taking his
advice, whatever it might be. “ Why, Harry,
my boy! all this way from home, and alone ?”
said Arthur.

“Yes,” replied Henry, looking very sad;
*T followed the Horse Guards’ band, and I
Self-Controt. 85

was so much taken up with the music that I
did not know which road we took. I seem to
have been walking for hours, without getting
nearer home.”

“Oh, I will show you the way. But did you
go by yourself?” -

“Ves, and mamma will be very angry. She
does not allow us to go out alone.”

“Oh, nonsense! she cannot be angry for
such a trifle as this ; especially when she hears
it was the military band you followed.”

“My mamma does not call disobedience a
trifle, I can tell you, Arthur,” said Henry ;
“and as to the music, that makes it worse;
for the rude men and boys in the crowd
said wicked words to me, and called me
names.”

Arthur walked by the side of Henry, silently
considering what could be done. He was fond
of him, and anxious to save him, if possible,
from the severe punishment, or even flogging,
which he supposed was the cause of his dread,
Arthur did not know that to Henry a look of
sorrowful anger from his dear, gentle mamma
was worse, far worse, than the severest punish-
ment she could inflict upon him. At last he
spoke: “ Henry, you need not tell your mam-

*.
~
86 Mary Elton ; or,

ma where you have been, or, if you do, you
need not repeat what the men and boys said
to you; besides, you can tell her I have been
with you, which will be true, you know; and
then you can lay the blame on me.”

For one moment there rested on Henry’s
mind a wish to escape his mother’s anger by
this untruthful excuse. It was but a moment,
and that moment brought him within sight of
a street he knew to be near his home. “ No,”
said the little boy, “no, Arthur. Thank you
for trying to save me; but I could not tell a lie
for the world. I know where I am now, so
good-bye. I shall tell mamma all the truth.”
So saying, he started off, and was out of sight
in a moment.

Arthur stood looking the way he had gone
for some time; then, turning on his heel, he
said to himself, “T wish I had such courage ;
but what’s the use? They never believe me,
even when I do speak the truth.” Ah, Arthur!
whose fault was that ?

We will now zeturn to Mary. Not many
minutes after Henry.had left the room, Nurse
came down stairs; Mary joined her, but on
reaching the street-door they found it open
and Henry nowhere to be seen,
Self-Control. 87

“Where is Master Henry?” inquired the
nurse.

“T am sure I don’t know,” said Mary, look-
ing anxiously up and down the street; “he
promised to wait for us here.” They went to
each corner, looked earnestly in every direc-
tion, and at last returned to the house to in-
quire if he were still there. After looking in
every room, Mary opened the drawing-room
door, and asked, “ Mamma, is Henry here?”

“No, my love,” said Mrs. Elton, looking up
from her work; but as she did so she was
startled by Mary’s extreme paleness. “What
is the matter, my dear?” she inquired.

“Oh! mamma, mamma—Henry—he is
lost, we cannot find him anywhere,” and she
threw herself on the sofa in an agony of tears,

“Lost!” said Mrs. Elton, “what do you
mean?” and for a moment even her own
calmness gave way. Nurse entered the room
and explained. “Leave the children with me,”
said Mrs. Elton, “and send the man in one
direction, while you go another yourself; he
certainly cannot be gone far.” Nurse left the
room. Mrs, Elton sat down, took off her
youngest boy’s hat and pelisse, and telling
Willie to amuse him, she went to the sofa and
88 Mary Elton; er,

seated herself by her weeping daughter. She
felt almost inclined to chide her for such vio-
lent grief on so trifling an occasion, but she
could not bear to add to her pain. She, there-
fore inquired, “ Mary, what is the matter?”
“Qh! mamma, if anything should happen
to Henry—if he should be knocked down by
a carriage, or meet with any accident—(you
know he has never been out in London before
by himself)—or if he should have gone to the
Park alone and go near the river. Oh, mam-
ma!” she exclaimed, shuddering, and covering
her eyes, as if to shut out the picture her fancy
had formed, “ Oh, I cannot bear to think of it.”
“But why should you think of it, Mary?
your brother is still under the care of an Al-
mighty power ; he is intelligent, and not likely
to lose himself for want of inquiring the way
home. fam not fearing for his safety; the
act of disobedience causes me the greatest
pain; but my dear girl,” said her mother,
“what will become of you when you grow a
woman, unless you check these feelings?
Everything you love, every pleasure you en-
joy, will cause you constant pain from fear of
losing it. Mary, indeed, indeed you must not
make such an idol of your brother—God may
Self-Control, 89

think fit to take him from you.” Mrs, Elton
said this with quivering lips.

Mary looked up, and in that look her mo-
ther saw how fearful such a discipline would
be. “Is there danger now, do you think,
mamma?”

“No, my dear, certainly not. Come, Mary,
conquer yourself once more ; supposing I were
like you—and Henry is equally dear to me—
what would become of you? My dear child,”
she continued, “God may think proper to try
you very severely if you fix your heart on
earthly objects, and forget to love Him.” The
solemn manner of her mother awed Mary, she
struggled to be calm—she dried her tears, and,
to divert her thoughts, began to amuse her
little brothers.

The servants returned without finding
Henry; and Mrs. Elton, with all her confi-
dence in the manly intelligence of her boy,
began to feel anxious, especially when one
o’clock arrived and he had not returned. In
addition to her fear of the possibility of an ac-
cident, arose a dread, that having been tempted
to disobey, he might be induced to tell her an
untruth; that her noble, truthful Henry should
have learnt evil habits atschool. The thought
90 Mary Elton ; or,

was agony. Nurse came to take the boys to
dinner. As Willie left the room, he said,
“ Mamma, I think Henry went to hear the sol-
diers’ band; I heard them while Nurse was
putting on her bonnet. I did not like to say
so before, mamma,” said Willie, shaking his
curls from his fair brow and blushing, “ for
fear you should be angry with him, and I
thought he would soon be back. The sol-
diers would not take him away, would they,
mamma ?”

“No, my boy,” said his mother, relieved
beyond measure at being able to account for
the boy’s absence ; “but never mind, go and
have your dinner, Willie.”

“Mamma, I never thought of the band—I
did not hear it,” said Mary.

“No, my dear, nor did I, but the nursery
is at the back of the house, and you were in
the library, reading, I suppose.”

“Yes, mamma; and you mean I could hear
nothing then.”

Another half-hour passed. Mrs. Elton was
pleased to see how Mary struggled with her
fears, yet she had almost lost her self-control;
and Mrs. Elton herself felt anxious—when the
door opened, and the lost one entered! Mary
Self-Control. gt

started from her sofa—a look from her mother
checked her. The mother’s own impulse was
to clasp him in her arms with delight at
finding him safe. But she remained still,
and looking sadly at him, she said, “ Henry,
my Henry, where have you been?” Oh!
how she trembled as she spoke, lest the
answer should be untrue, or even partially
so. There he stood before her, his eyes rest-
ing on the carpet, dreading his greatest pun-
ishment—that dear mothers anger. She
need not to fear; in a moment, without a
single word to excuse himself, the answer
came,

“Mamma,” and the little heart beat so as
almost to choke his utterance, “ I will tell you
the truth. I went out by myself, and I fol-
lowed the Horse Guards’ band all the way to
the barracks.”

Mrs. Elton looked at her boy ; he had never
told her a lie; and she felt what it had cost
him to risk her anger. She opened her arms,
and the next moment Henry was sobbing on
his mother’s bosom, telling her how he had
been tempted not only to disobey, but to de-
ceive her.

“Ah! Henry,” said his mother; “this










02 Mary Elton, or,

will teach you, I hope, how one false step
leads to another. Had you been patient and
remained with your sister, you would not have
heard the music; having once heard it, you
wished to see it, and then resistance was over.
Again, if you had been walking with your
sister and Nurse, Arthur Ross would have had
no opportunity to tempt you to do wrong,
even if you had met him.”

Henry’s conscience told him how true was
every word his mother uttered ; and when he
saw how sorry poor Mary had been, and how
he had grieved his mother, his repentance was
so deep and sincere, that he was soon made
happy by his mother’s forgiveness, and by his
sister’s kiss of happiness that he had returned
in safety.

Willie Elton was a very different boy to his
brother. He had never been strong ; and per-
haps on that account, as well as natural dispo-
sition, he had very little energy of character.
Sometimes, too, he would be fretful and impa-
tient over his lessons, which was a great trial to
Mary’s quickness and impetuosity; she did not
love poor Willie as she did her noble and high-
spirited Henry. But Mrs. Elton encouraged
her in every way to subdue herself for his sake;
Self-Control, 93

and the little fellow, who loved his sister dearly,
won his way to her heart by trying to supply
Harry’s place. The boy had many gentle, en-
dearing ways, which she had overlooked, and
now her heart bitterly accused itself for her
neglect. Freddy, too, the youngest, who more
resembled his eldest brother, one day laid his
arms across her lap, and, looking up in her
face, said, “ Mary, make a kite for me, like you
did for Henry once, will you?” Yes ; indeed,
she would, or anything else they liked. Con-
science was awakened; and she one day told
her mother, she could understand now why
God sometimes took away from us the objects
we loved too much, that we might learn to
value those that were left behind. Henry,
however, was still her idol, and she looked
forward to his return at Christmas with the
most intense anxiety.

Mr. Elton had placed his boy at a school
kept by a clergyman, whose kind teachings
and pleasing management had a great influ-
ence over his pupils. All the arrangements
tended to soften and refine the manners, with-
out destroying that manly spirit and noble
bearing which every English boy should pos-
sess. Their amusements were chosen with
04 Mary Elton ; or,

the same intent; and, to Henry’s delight, music
was one of them. He had great natural ta-
lent; and although so young, soon became, for
his age, a very good performer on the flute.
On his return at Christmas, he was in every
way so much improved, that his parents and
sister looked upon him with delight. He had
become gentle and patient to his brothers;
respectfully polite, yet fondly affectionate to
his dear mother, and to his father an intel-
ligent companion ; while to Mary he seemed
the deau zdeal of all that was noble and clever.

These happy Christmas holidays were, to
the brother and sister, too short for all the de-
lightful plans they had laid out together.
Duets to practise in the morning, walks in the
afternoon,andsome pleasant book or Christmas
party in the evening. Henry had also a new
object to love, in a little sister. On hearing
of the birth of this baby, he had declared it
impossible he could ever love another sister as
he did dear Mary, but he very soon found his
mistake. One he looked up to and loved asa
guide and friend: for the other he felt all the
love of an elder brother. “Mamma,” he said,
one morning, as he sat with the baby in his
lap, trying to hold her as gently and nurse-
Self-Control, 95

like as possible; “Mamma, when I grow a
man, baby will be but a little girl; oh, how
proud I shall be to take care of her and protect
her. You are not jealous, are you, dear Mary,
because I love baby ?”

“Jealous, Harry, oh no!” said Mary, who
was looking on partly with pleasure and partly
with fear, lest he should let the baby fall.

“And I shall be a man too,” said Willie,
with a sudden show of spirit; “may I not
take care of baby too?”

“Of course,” said Mrs, Elton; “ grown-up
brothers should always be proud of taking
care of their young sisters; but, Willie, baby
will be nearly as old as Mary is now, when
you are twenty.”

“And I shall be twenty-two, mamma, quite
aman then. Do you think baby will be like
Mary ?”

“No, my boy,” said his mother; “she is
more like yourself, she has dark eyes.” The
children pressed round their sister, who had
taken the infant from Henry, and tried to dis-
cover the exact colour of those large eyes,
which had already begun to notice and follow
them about the room.

Mrs. Elton looked at her children as only a
96 Mary Elton; or,

mother can; her feelings were as earnest and
enthusiastic as Mary’s, but she had experi-
enced enough of earth’s sorrows to learn the
Christian’s lesson of the vanity of all earthly
hopes, She had already lost her first-born
son and an infant daughter; therefore her love
for her beautiful, her noble Henry, trembled
with its own intenseness. A cold, shuddering
sensation would pass over her as the question
arose in her mind—“Can it be possible that I
may lose him!’ The thought would be dis-
missed as the effect of nervousness ; yet with
a heart disciplined by religion and sorrow,
she was enabled to wear these dearest of
earthly ties as loosely as a fond mother ever
can hope to do.



CHAPTER X.

ANOTHER six months passed away, and again
the dearly loved son and brother, improved in
mind and person, returned to delight the
family circle. Mr. Elton, anxious to make
the summer vacation a season of real enjoy-
ment, took his family to the sea-side. There
on the sea-beach would the kind elder sister,
after wandering about gathering shells and
Self-Control, 97

sea-weeds with her three brothers, seat herself
on the strand, and, pointing to the white sails
here and there dotting the blue ocean, tell
them a story of some poor little sailor-boy
away from his fond mother, obliged to climb
the mast when the wind was roaring, and the
waves tolling like mountains over the trem-
bling ship. Then there were long country
walks, Mary and Henry alone; while as they
went on, from some elevated spot or break
between the trees, the wide expanse of the
blue ocean could be seen. Those were indeed
days of delight; life and its future appeared
like the sky above them, without a cloud.
After this vacation, Henry returned to
school in great spirits; he was trying for the
prize, and, dearly as he loved home, he knew
that to stay beyond the appointed time was
not the way to ensurea reward. His brother
Willie now accompanied him, and Henry felt
it an honour indeed when his mother said'to
him, “ Remember, Henry, your brother Willie
is a delicate, timid boy. I entrust him to
your care, to screen him from harm, to help
him with his lessons, and to protect him from
the effects of evil example.” Mary had now
but two in the nursery, and her dear little
G
98 Mary Elton ; or,

sister very soon became an object for her
tenderest care. Freddy was growing a great
boy ; he resembled his eldest brother, and
had much of his intelligence, and bold, manly
spirit. But it was of her absent brother
Henry that Mary constantly thought; she
always began to count the weeks to the time
of his return. Nine weeks to Michaelmas—
he would then be at home for a few days, and
after that the time would slip away quickly,
bringing the happy Christmas holidays.
Mrs. Elton saw with pain this ardent attach-
ment to her eldest brother; he was every-
thing to her.

Her thoughts were, however, diverted from
him by the dangerous illness of Freddy and
his little sister; both children were ill before
Mrs, Elton discovered the disorder to be the
measles. Neither Henry nor Willie had yet
had this complaint ; it was, therefore, arranged
for them to stay at school during the Christ-
mas vacation, with a promise that, in the
spring, Mr. Elton would take apartments
near them, for the invalids, and they could all
meet. Henry was now nearly eleven years
old, and he bore the disappointment with a
manly spirit Mary, on the contrary, was
Self-Control. 99

almost inconsolable at the arrangement ; her
brother was her idol, and having made up her
mind to his coming home at Christmas, she
could not easily submit. But when fears
arose that Freddy would die, her affection
for the dear little suffering boy and pity for
her gentle mother, who she knew would feel
as deeply at parting with one as with another,
brought out her best feelings, and she became
at once the kindest nurse and the gentlest
consoler. Freddy, however, recovered, as if
from the grave; and the kind-hearted, affec-
tionate sister was never tired of guiding,
leading, and tending him, through his long
weakness and slow recovery.

Mary Elton was now approaching her fif-
teenth year. Careful training, advantages of
no common order in education, and religious
instruction from her mother, were forming a
character to all appearance lovely and of good
report. Her love for her brother Henry, and
the affection between the two—for his love
was equal to hers, though less enthusiastic—
was still a beautiful sight. This earnest at-
tachment on the part of Mary was quite
excusable; she had lost a brother and a
sister between herself and Henry; he was,
100 Mary Elton y on,

therefore, the only one of her brothers fit for
a companion ; yet her mother trembled—she
knew not why.

During the Midsummer vacation, in which
Mary’s fifteenth birthday occurred, she was
again called upon to exercise her presence of
mind, in a moment of even greater peril than
before. Nurse had been ironing on the nursery
table, and, to get the last of the daylight, she
had pushed it close to the open window;
darkness, however, obliged her to light a can-
dle and pull down the blind. Having finished
her ironing, she was about to remove the
table, when the sound of little Annie’s voice
from the next room took her to the child’s
bedside. The little girl had been dreaming
uneasily, and could not be satisfied unless
Nurse took her in her arms for a few moments,
She carried her into the nursery, and sat down
in the rocking-chair, soothing and caressing
her. Mary, who had heard her sister’s voice,
came to the door, to inquire what was the
matter. She was followed by a servant car-
rying a tray with Nurse’s supper. As the
girl entered the room, she lifted her foot and
kicked the door, to shut it after her. The
strong draught occasioned by its rapid closing
Self-Control, > 101

blew the blind against the candle, and, in a
moment, it caught fire; and, while the flame
ran rapidly upwards, the woman set down the
tray, and screamed. Mary, without a mo-
ment’s hesitation, jumped on the table, and,
gathering the blind up in her hands, pressed
one part against the other quickly and firmly,
and, by so doing, with some difficulty extin-
guished the flames. This time she did not
faint : but, pale, trembling, and breathless, she
jumped from the table, and wondered at her
own courage.

“Oh, Miss Mary,” said the housemaid, who
had covered her eyes with her hands the mo-
ment Mary sprang to the blind, “ what should
we have done if you had not been here ?”

“Tt’s all very fine for you to talk,” said
Nurse, who sat clasping the little girl to her
bosom, almost paralysed with terror. “If
you had shut the door properly, instead- of in’
that vulgar way, with your foot, it would ‘not
have happened.”

“Oh, pray,” said Mary, “don’t quarrel about
it, It is over now, thank God; and perhaps
you can find me something to do my hands
good; they are terribly burnt.”

“Miss Mary, I beg your pardon,” said
102 Mary Elton ; or,

Nurse, jumping up, and seating the child in
a chair; “let me see what you have done.”

“Put Annie into bed first, please,” said
Mary, as the little girl opened her large eyes,
and looked ready to cry at being so uncere-
moniously treated.

“Me don’t want to go to bed: me fright-
ened,” said the child.

“ Mary will come and sit with you, darling,”
said her sister; and following Nurse as she
carried the child to her room, she seated her-
self by her bed, and, though suffering agony
from her burnt hands, she talked and soothed
her to sleep. Poor Mary! it was more than
she could do herself all night, In the morn-
ing, however, her hands were covered with
blisters, and the pain had subsided. Mrs.
Elton heard nothing of the matter until Mary
appeared at the breakfast-table, the next
morning, both hands carefully and loosely
wrapped in linen. She did not praise her
daughter for this effort of presence of mind;
but Mary saw how pleased she felt, and Henry,
who thought his sister by this act as brave as
a soldier, waited upon her in every way, and
did his utmost to make amends for the loss of
her hands. Mary was careful not to use
Self-Control, 103

them: she knew that so long as the blisters
remained unbroken there was no danger of a
sore or wound. Nature raises blisters over a
burn, and fills them with water, to protect her
work while she heals the part underneath, and
covers it with a new skin. When this is ac-
complished, the water disperses, the blister
becomes dry, breaks and peels off; it is no
longer wanted. Some persons have a very
false idea that these blisters should be broken,
to let out the water. Many have suffered for
months, and been scarred for life, in conse-
quence of such treatment.

Henry Elton had passed his eleventh year
when he returned to school after this vaca-
tion; he was in the bloom of health, and had
delighted all the dear friends at home, by
carrying off two or three prizes at school ; it
was impossible to help loving a boy of such
noble, generous character.

Willie, too, was much improved; he was
stronger in health, more manly, and making
great progress, Mary and her mother stood
at the door watching them, as they entered
their father’s open chaise; Henry, with his
permission, being allowed to drive.

“Oh, mamma,” said Mary, “they are both
104 Mary Elton ; on,

dear boys; but is not Harry a noblé fellow?
I will never get married, mamma,” she con-
tinued, “ Henry. says I shall keep his house
for him when he is a man; and if he marries,
I am certain I shall love his wife; he is sure
to make a good choice, don’t you think so?”

“Mary, my love,” said her mother, with a
sigh, “do not make up your mind to any-
thing ; we know not what a day may bring
forth.”

“Oh, mamma, I feel so happy!” she con-
tinued, not noticing her mother’s remark.
“Every year makes Harry more of a com-
panion for me; he is a noble, clever fellow.”
So saying, she flew upstairs, singing like a
bird, and looking forward to September, as
usual, for the Michaelmas vacation.

One Saturday evening, early in that Sep-
tember for which Mary had been longing, she
was busy in the nursery, as usual; Mrs, Elton,
seated by the fire, had her youngest girl in her
lap. The child had been complaining during
the day, and mamma’s hand was the most
persuasive to administer medicine; she had
taken it bravely, and was now being soothed
on her mother’s bosom before placing her in
bed. Mary had been for some minutes in
Self-Control. 108

Freddy’s room, and had just wished him
good night, when she heard the Nurse’s voice
exclaiming hastily, “Miss Mary, yourmamma
is ill.”

Mary flew to her mother. “Mamma, dear
mamma, what is it?” Mrs. Elton, pale as
death, pointed to an open letter which had
fallen from her hands on the floor, as Nurse
had taken the little girl from her lap. Mary
did not pick up the letter; she could not
touch it; what could it contain to affect her
usually calm mother so seriously? Faint as
she was, Mrs. Elton struggled to regain com-
posure; and then she said, gently, “ Mary,
dearest, perhaps I am foolish to be so much
alarmed ; it may be nothing after all, That

_ letter is from C ; your dear brother Henry
is ill.”

Like one in a dream, Mary now took up the
letter, and read it.. The words seemed to
burn themselves into her brain—they stunned
her, yet she spoke words of comfort and hope
to her mother. Mrs. Elton, who had
struggled to hide her own fears for Mary’s
sake, was deceived by this apparent calmness,
and greatly relieved. They had still to wait
for Mr. Elton’s return; he had gone into the


106 Mary Elion ; or,

country on business, and did not reach home
till nearly ten o'clock, Late as it was, Mr.
Elton felt sure something in the letter im-
plied that immediate attention was necessary,
but he did not alarm his wife and daughter.
His horse was too tired, after his long journey,
for more work. He therefore ordered a post-
chaise, and started at once, with Mrs. Elton,
determining to bring the dear boy home, be-
fore it might be too late to move him.

Mary, to whom suspense was agony, still
felt relieved when she found they were going.
Mrs. Elton kissed her as she got into the
chaise, and whispered, “Go to bed directly,
my love, and try to sleep; remember, your
brother is in the hands of God.” Mary
obeyed; and such is the effect of violent grief
that she slept heavily till the morning. The
awakening brought a recollection of some un-
defined sorrow. She dressed quickly, and
breakfasted in the nursery with the children—
Nurse cheering and encouraging her to eat.
Mary could not understand her own feelings.
She had not shed a tear; and there seemed a
kind of deadness on her mind which made her
feel like one ina dream. However, she took
Nurse’s advice, and went with Freddy to
Self-Control. 107

church. “It will do you good, Miss Mary,”
said the kind creature, who did not like to see
the dull look on her generally animated face.

“Perhaps it will, nurse,” said Mary, ab-
stractedly.

The afternoon passed away slowly and
sadly: towards the close of it, as she sat in
the drawing-room, leaning back in the arm-
chair, and trying to realize the possibility that
her brother could be so very ill, a carriage
stopped at the door; she flew into the hall,
and met her father carrying in his arms his
darling boy. But oh! howchanged. Pale, and
faint with the journey, and disfigured by the
marks of leeches on his forehead, from which
the clustering curls had been cut to make way
for them. Mechanically she followed her
father, and stood by him as he laid the faint-
ing boy on the sofa; she could not believe in
her own powers of vision. Could this be
Henry, her noble, handsome brother? He
opened his eyes, and said, “Mary!” She
knelt and kissed the pale face; she could not
speak, her heart seemed turned to stone. The
doctor arrived; Mary moved to let him ap-
proach her brother, she stood and looked on
and listened, yet her mind seemed unable to
108 Mary Elton; or,

comprehend what was passing. After the
usual routine of feeling the pulse, and looking
at the tongue, the doctor inquired, ““My boy,
have you had a fall lately ?”

“No, sir,” said Henry, rousing himself.

“Try to remember, have you at any time
had a blow on your head at school ?”

Henry closed his-eyes and seemed to con-
sider. “I was struck with the cricket-ball,”
said Henry, “the last time I played.”

“Where did it strike you?”

se At the back of my head ; I did not feel

it much, and I was so sick in the evening, I
forgot all about it.”
_ The doctor looked grave; he drew Mr.
Elton away to a window, where they con-
versed in a low tone. Mrs. Elton watched
her husband’s countenance with the deepest
anxiety: something seemed to whisper there
was no hope, and the mother’s loving yet dis-
ciplined heart could not yet say, “ Thy will
be done.” Mary also watched the doctor's
face, as if she could there seek some explana-
tion of the scene before her.

Presently Henry spoke again. “Mary!”
She instantly knelt at his side and clasped
his hand; his mother sat at the foot of the
Self-Control. 109

sofa. He looked at her and said, “Don’t go
away, dear mamma; I like you both to stay
near me.”

“We will not leave you, darling,” said Mrs.
Elton. As she spoke there came again over
the dear boy’s face that pallid tinge which had
so startled his sister ; at the same moment the
doctor moved towards them.

“Get him to bed as soon as you can,” he
said, cheerfully; “the journey has fatigued
him. You must not judge of his symptoms
now; a night's rest may do wonders. I will
be here very early in the morning.”

There was something cheering in this, and
and the mother and sister were not long in
obeying the doctor’s orders.- It was not till
Mary had seen him sink into a deep sleep
that she could be induced to leave the room.
Mrs. Elton trembled as she observed the ex-
pression of Mary’s face; and, much as she
suffered herself, she determined to probe the
wound to the very quick, if by so doing she
could produce tears. Mary, led by her mother,
entered the drawing-room, where the untasted
tea stood on the table. Her father went up
stairs to look at his boy; his heart trembled for
his noble, generous Henry: the doctor had pre-

a
Ito Mary Elton ; or,_

pared him for the worst, and he could not bear
the inquiring looks of his wife and daughter.
When they were alone, Mrs. Elton seated her-
self on the sofa, and drawing her daughter
towards her, she said, “Mary, if God should
think fit to take your dear brother to heaven,
can you say, ‘Thy will be done’?” The gen-
tle tone, the look of subdued sorrow, went to
Mary’s heart; she burst into an agony of tears,

“T cannot, mamma; oh, indeed, I cannot!
Oh, he must not die, I cannot part with him !”
and again she sobbed convulsively.

Mrs. Elton did not check this outburst of
sorrow; she knew how it would relieve her ;
silently the sad tears were flowing from her
own eyes. She did not speak for some
minutes; then drawing her sobbing daughter
towards her, and resting her head on her bo-
som, she said, “ My dear Mary, it may please
Almighty God to restore your dear brother
to health; while there is life there is hope, but,
my love, you must try to prepare for the
worst. God often takes away those we love
most dearly to make us seek our happiness in
Him. At the same time, it is right to use all
means for his recovery, and pray that, if pos-
sible, this great sorrow may be removed.”
Self-Control. Itt

As Mrs. Elton finished speaking, her voice
faltered, Mary looked up—that loving, gentle
mother was in tears.

“Oh, dearest mother, how selfish I am,
always forgetting you! Oh, if I could be
calm and govern myself like you do! But
mamma,” and she clasped her hands, “he
will not die? Oh, he cannot ; how can I lose
him!” and again the tears burst forth.

Mr, Elton entered the room. “ Mary,” he
said, quietly, “ your mother and I are tired;
will you not make us some tea?” Again she
was reminded of her selfish sorrow; she started
up, and with a violent effort checked her tears
and prepared to obey.



CHAPTER XI.

SLOWLY and sadly passed the days of that
mournful week, each one bearing away with
it the trembling hopes of dear Henry’s re-
covery. Sunday morning arrived; every one
save Mary felt that he must die; she could
not, and would not, believe it, although he had
been speechless for some days, and at times
insensible. On this morning Mary was stand-
112 Mary Elion ; ov,

ing with her mother at his bedside ; he looked
up, and something like intelligence gleamed
in his dark eyes, whose dilated pupils gave
them an unusual brightness. ‘‘Do you know
me, darling ?” his mother asked, bending over
him. He could not reply, but, lifting his hand,
he passed it softly over her face. She stooped
and kissed his flushed cheeks; then turned
from him to hide her tears. A-slight, almost
imperceptible turn of the head, as if looking
for Mary, brought her to his side; as she knelt
by him, he again lifted up his hand, and laid
it on her head; even ag it rested there, the
beautiful eyes became fixed, and Mary beheld
with terror the first convulsive struggle with
death. Hours passed away, and still that
youthful form, struck down in the very bloom
of health, struggled with the grim foe. The
Sabbath passed away, the morning dawned.
and yet he lived on. At last, Mary’s hopes
were gone. The same deadened feeling op-
pressed her; nothing, not even her mother’s
sorrow, could move her to tears; she even
stood with her father, watching her brother’s
painful death-bed. Her father had taken
her there in the hope of breaking up the
fountains of grief, but without effect. She
Self-Control. 113

had ascertained from the doctor that her
brother was insensible to pain, and she could
not realize, in the distorted, agonized body
before her, the brother she loved ; she could
only now long that the weary, convulsed limbs
might soon be at rest. Towards evening the
struggles gradually subsided, and there passed
over the distorted features that change so su-
blime, yet terrible. Mary clung to her father’s
arm. “Go down to your mother,” he whis-
pered. Mr. Elton feared the effect which might
be produced upon his daughter by seeing her
brother actually die. She obeyed his command
in silent dread, but ere she closed the door,
she heard the last sigh that carried the happy
spirit to heaven.

Death! ah, what is it that in a moment in-
vests the chamber where lie the remains of a
loved one with terror? Yet so it is. Mary
kept the key of the linen-press, and Nurse,
who with streaming eyes was performing the
last offices for the dead, thought to arouse her
from that terrible look of stupefied grief. She
therefore asked her to give out what was re-
quired. Mary did as she was desired, and
brought the articles to the door of the room,
but nothing could induce her to enter. Mrs,

; i
1I4 Mary Elton ; or,

Elton sent for her; she came, and seating her-
self by her weeping mother, drew her head
gently down, wiped the tears as they fell, but
neither spoke nor wept. “You had better go
to bed, my dear Mary,” said her mother, for
once too much absorbed in grief to notice
Mary’s unnatural calmness.

Mary obeyed ; she ascended the stairs as if
she walked on air, entered her room, locked
the door, and throwing herself on her knees,
she exclaimed, in choking accents, “Great
God, give me patience to bear this dreadful
trial; oli, it is too much! Why is he taken away
from me? Oh, I cannot pray,” she exclaimed,
rising from her knees, and throwing herself on
the bed, dressed as she was. “I feel like
Jonah—I feel angry with God ; oh, what will
become of me?” She pressed back her hair
from her forehead, and covered her eyes, as if to
shut out the scenes she had witnessed. Thena
kind of stupor came over her, and at length,
worn out with exhaustion, she sank into a
death-like sleep,

Before Mrs. Elton retired to her room, she
inquired for her daughter. “Miss Mary has
been in bed some time, ma’am,” said the
housemaid, who thought Mary’s quietness a
Self-Control, 115

favourable sign. “I think she must be asleep,
for I knocked at her door just now, and she
did not answer.” Thankful to hear this, and
exhausted with grief and watching, Mrs. Elton
hastened to follow, as she thought, her daugh-
ter’sexample. S/e also knelt, and, with bitter
tears, prayed for a submissive spirit, and strug-
gled hard to say, “Thy will be done;” until
there fell upon her the calm He only can give
who has said, “ He shall deliver thee in six
troubles; yea, in seven there shall no evil
touch thee.”

In the morning, her first thought was for
Mary. She dressed quickly, and hastened to
her room; but, on attempting to enter, was
startled to find the door locked. She knocked
anxiously and loudly; it was opened almost
immediately by Mary herself, quite dressed—
her hair and clothes in disorder, her face flushed
and eyes unnaturally bright. “Why, Mary, my
dear girl,” said her mother, “ have you not been
to bed 2”

“No,mamma,I could not; I felt so wretched.
I think I have been to sleep, though,” she con-
tinued, pressing her hand to her forehead, and
looking bewildered.

Mrs. Elton looked at her with terror. What
116 Mary Elton ; or,

could she do to break the spell? Must she
lose her Mary also? The prayer of the Syro-
Pheenician. woman arose from her heart—
“Lord, help me.” In a moment, as if in an-
swer to the prayer, a thought suggested itself.
“ Come, my dear girl,” she said, kindly, “ bathe
your face in cold water ; it will refresh you—
and let me brush your hair.”

Mary obeyed, and stood patiently while her
mother combed out the long ringlets, which
were Mary’s principal claimto personal beauty.
She then took her hand, and led her from her
room towards the chamber of death. “I can-
not go in there, mamma,” she exclaimed, as
they approached the door, at the same time
attempting to withdraw her hand; but her
mother held it firmly.

“Why do you not wish to go in, Mary; are
you afraid ?”

“No, mamma, there is nothing, I know,
to be afraid of; but I cannot bear to think
it is my beautiful brother Henry looking so
frightful.”

“Tf that is all, Mary, believe your mother's
words: I have been there this morning already;
there is nothing frightful in the remains of your
poor brother. The calm, placid face of death,
Self-Control. 117

my dear Mary, is often very beautiful. Poets
have even written in its praise. But come,”
she continued, “putting her arm round her,
and forcing her gently forward, “will you not
trust your own mother ?”

Tremblingly, Mary entered the room, and
looked on as her mother uncovered the face
of her once beautiful boy. Not till then did
she know how lovely that face had become—
how changed since last she saw it, flushed with
agony, distorted with pain, and convulsed in
the struggles of death! Now it was calm and
placid; a smile seemed to play about the lips;
and she stood and gazed upon that face till,
with a sudden effort, she threw herself upon
her knees, exclaiming, “Oh! Henry, my dar-
ling brother!” while a torrent of long-sup-
pressed tears gushed forth. Mrs. Elton’s own
tears flowed; but she let her daughter weep
on, even almost convulsively, without inter-
rupting her. At length, as she became calmer,
she heard her mother’s voice gently repeating,
“But I would not have you be ignorant, bre-
thren, concerning them which are asleep, that
ye sorrow not even as others which have no
hope. For if we believe that Jesus died and
rose again, even so them also which sleep in
a
118 Mary Elton or,

Jesus will God bring with Him.” The words
of that Book, in whose pages may be found a
balm for every earthly sorrow, fell upon her
mind with a soothing influence, and she looked
up for the first time through the gloom of that
shrouded room, from the sleeping clay to the
glorified spirit in heaven.

During the week preceding the funeral,
Mary remained calm, and seemingly submis-
sive; yet she startled her mother by her fre-
quent visits to her brother’s room, There was
a morbid sensitiveness about her, which made
her feel that while her brother was still lying
there, so calm and placid, as if asleep, she
had not really lost him ; and she would linger,
as if spell-bound, by the open coffin, till her
mother called her away.

The plan now adopted by her judicious
mother to divert her mind, was painful, yet
it succeeded ; she expressed her fears that
little Annie’s black frock would not be fin-
ished, unless Mary would make it. A burst
of tears followed the request, yet she set her-
self diligently to work to the task. The
evening before the funeral she had entered
her bedroom, accompanied by the housemaid,
who brought in her black dress for the morn-
Self-Control, 119

ing, ‘Put it out of my sight, Sarah!” she
exclaimed, covering her eyes. Then suddenly
she started up: “To-morrow—yes, to-mor-
row, they will take him away, and I have not
got a lock of that beautiful hair. Oh, how
could I forget it?” With nervous, trembling
fingers, she took up the candle, and turned
towards the door.

“Oh pray, Miss Mary, don’t go into that
room to-night, I cannot go with you.”

“Then I will go by myself,” said Mary, “for
I must have it.’ She looked so excited and
flushed, that the young woman, conquering
her own dread, followed her in dismay. When
they approached the coffin, Mary removed the
lid, and took off the cap. Her dear brother’s
curls had all been cut off, except a few at the
back ; just as she was about to lift the head
for the purpose of obtaining what she wished,
she suddenly remembered she had no scis-
sors. “Sarah,” she exclaimed, “will you fetch
my scissors? they are down stairs, on the nur-
sery table.” The woman, who had been hold-
ing the candle, and looking on with awe, at
the calm, loving manner in which Mary touched
the lifeless remains of her once noble brother,
without a thought, still carrying the candle in
120 Mary Elton ; or,

her hand, left the room and her young mis-
tress by the open coffin in the dark! Mary’s
first impulse was to follow her ; she could not
repress a shudder at her position—alone, with
the dead, in the dark! It was but a moment.
The calm reflection that. the sleeping clay
before her could do her no harm, removed all
fear. Again the words of the holy Book fell
like balm upon her wounded spirit, “ It is sown
a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body; it
is sown in corruption, it is raised in incorrup-
tion ; it is sown in weakness, it is raised in
power ; it is sown in dishonour, it is raised in
glory.” Mary could realize the idea that her
brother should rise again, but she could not
yet separate herself from him in the body; she
could not look upwards and think of him as
clothed in awhite robe before the throne of God.

She was still standing with her hand on the
open coffin, when, breathless with haste and
alarm, Sarah returned.

“Oh, Miss Mary,” she exclaimed, “how
thankful I am to see you safe! I never
thought of having left you in the dark till I
got down stairs; I quite expected to find you
had fainted away or fallen down ina fit, But
you don’t appear afraid.”

*
Self-Control, 121

“What should I be afraid of ?” said Mary;
“this cold, marble image could not hurt me.”

The poor girl, who was pale with her own
fears at having left Mary in the dark, silently
held the candle, while, with gentle hands, she
cut one dark curl from the back of her brother’s
head ; then quietly replacing the coffin lid, she
left the room, thankful that no foolish fear had
deprived her of courage to obtain the wished-
for treasure.

A funeral, with its hearse and nodding
plumes !—then, and then only, do we realize
that the loved one is gone. Death itself isa
shock—a change that passes over the beloved
object. The stern grave is a reality; thus does
human nature cling to earth. So also are we
taught how far inferior is the most lovely of
earth’s fairest forms to the immortal spirit it
embodies. When once the spirit has fled,
the body sinks to decay, and would soon be-
come loathsome to our sight, and by this the
Christian is taught to forget the form so loved
on earth, and to think of one more bright
and beautiful in heaven.

Much as Mary had dreaded the day that
was to consign her brother to the grave, she
had not expected to feel it so deeply. The
122 Mary Elton ; or,

last link was broken—the last tie that bound
her to the decaying form of her dearly-loved
brother was gone. She could not look up
—down into the cold grave her heart would
rest. The same tearless agony displayed itself
from the moment the coffin was screwed down,
shutting him for ever from her sight. She
heard it carried down stairs; watched the
procession as it slowly passed the shrouded
windows, with flushed cheeks and dilated
eyes.

This last stroke was too much, and before
morning she was prostrate with fever and de-
lirium. The distress of the bereaved and
suffering mother, called upon to bear this ad-
ditional trial, can be well understood, For
many days it was expected that the fondly
attached brother and sister would be laid side
by side in one grave ; but the youthful consti-
tution rallied. She arose from that sick-bed,
calm and submissive. This, her first deep afflic-
tion, had disciplined her heart. Her mother’s
gentle teachings and prayers were at length
successful : she could kneel, though with tears
streaming down her cheeks, and say, “ Thy
will, O God, be done!” Yet it was months
before she could bear the sight of any article
Self-Control. 123

of his clothes, a book, or an air that he
loved, without recalling her sorrow, and pro-
ducing torrents of tears; still she had been
taught in the school of affliction, and felt the
frailty of all earthly blessings,

Years have passed since Mary Elton lost her
dearly-loved brother. Many dear friends have
been laid in the cold grave. She has been
called upon to endure the loss of home, friends,
and property. She has had to battle with
the world, and endure coldness and neglect ;
but amidst all, she has been enabled to say,
even with a heart bursting with sorrow, “Thy
will, O God, be done!”

THE END.

.

BILLING, PRINSER, GUILDFORD, SURREY.




frederick Warne & Co., Publishers,



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