Citation
Strangers from the South and other stories

Material Information

Title:
Strangers from the South and other stories
Series Title:
Little boy blue series
Creator:
Farman, Ella, 1843-1907 ( Author, Primary )
Pratt-Chadwick, Mara L. ( Mara Louise ) ( Author, Secondary )
Kilburn, Samuel Smith ( Engraver )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston (Franklin St. Corner of Hawley)
Publisher:
D. Lothrop and Company
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1877
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[54] p., [7] leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
African Americans -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1877 ( rbgenr )
School stories -- 1877 ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1877
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes two illustrations engraved by Kilburn.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Ella Farman and Laurie Loring.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AHJ1820 ( NOTIS )
22965441 ( OCLC )
022791191 ( AlephBibNum )

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STRANGERS
FROM THE SOUTH,

AND OTHER STORIES.

BY ELLA FARMAN AND LAURIE LORING.





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BOSTON:
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY.

FRANKLIN ST., CORNER OF HAWLEY.



Copyright, D. Loturop & Co., 1877.





THE

STRANGERS FROM THE SOUTH.

NLESS 1 take a long half mile circle, my daily

walk to the post-office leads me down through
an unsavory, wooden-built portion of town. I am
obliged to pass several cheap grocerics, which smell
horribly of sauer-kraut and Limburg cheese, a res-
taurant steamy with Frenchy soups, a livery stable,
besides two or three barns, and some gloomy, window-
less, shut-up buildings, of whose use I haven’t the
slightest idea.

Of course, when I go out in grand toilet, I take
the half mile circle. But, being a business woman,
and generally in a hurry, I usually go this short way
in my short walking-dress and big parasol ; and, prob-

_ably, there is an indescribable expression to my nose,
just as Mrs. Jack Graham says.



The Strangers from the South.

Well, one morning I was going down town in the
greatest hurry. I was trying to walk so fast that I
needn’t breathe once going by the Dutch groceries;
and I was almost to the open space which looks away
off to the sparkling river, and the distant park, and the
forenoon sun,—TI always take a good, long, sweet
breath there, coming and going, — when my eye was
caught by a remarkable group across the street.

Yes, during the night, evidently, while the town
was asleep, there had been an arrival —strangers
direct from the Sunny South.

And there the remarkable-looking strangers sat, in
a row, along the narrow step of one of the mysterious
buildings I have alluded to. They were sunning
themselves with all the delightful carelessness of the
experienced traveler. Though, evidently, they had
been presented with the liberty of the city, it was just
as evident that they didn’t care a fig for sightseeing —
not a fig, either, for the inhabitants. All they asked
of our town was its sunshine. They had selected the
spot where they could get the most of it. Through
the open space opposite the sun streamed broadly ;
and the side of a weather-colored building is se
warm ! i

What a picture of dole far niente, of “sweet-do-
nothing,” it was! I stopped, hung my parasol over













































































































The Strangers from the South,

my shoulder, — there was a little too much sunshine
for me, — and gazed at it.

“O, how you do love it! You bask like animals!
That fullness of enjoyment is denied to us white-skins.
What a visible absorption of luster and heat! You
are the true lotus-eaters ! ”

The umber-colored creatures-——I suppose they are
as much warmer for being brown, as any brown sur-
face is warmer than a white one. I never did see
sunshine drank, and absorbed, and enjoyed as that
was. It was a bit of Egypt and the Nile life. I could
not bear to go on.

Finally, I crossed the street to them. Not one of
them stirred. The eldest brother was standing, lean-
ing against the building. He turned one eye on me,
and kept it there. At his feet lay a bulging, ragged
satchel. Evidently he was the protector.

The elder sister, with hands tucked snugly under
her folded arms, winked and blinked at me dozily.
The little boy with the Nubian lips was sound asleep,
—a baby Osiris, — his chubby hands hiding together
between his knees for greater warmth. The youngest
sister, wrapped in an old woolen shawl, was the only
uncomfortable one of the lot. There was no doze
nor dream in her eyes yet— poor thing, she was
cold !



The Strangers from the South,

I didn’t believe they had had where to lay their
heads during the night. Liberty of a city, to one
kind of new arrivals, means just that, you know.
Sundry crumbs indicated an absence of the conven-
tional breakfast table. Poor little darkies !

“ Children,” I said, like a benevolently-disposed
city marshal, ‘you mustn’t sit here in the street.”

“We’s gwine on soon, mistis,” said the protector,
meekly.

_ “T’low we ain’t, Jim!” The big sister said this
without any diminution of the utter happiness of her
look. :

“Tt’s powerful cold comin’ up fru the norf, mistis
I mus’ let em warm up once a day,” said Jim.

“Up through the north! Pray, where are you
going?”

Jim twisted about. He looked down at the toe of
his boot, reflectively.

“T ex-pect, I ex-pect —”

“You spec, Jim! You allers spectin’! Mistis,
we’s free—we kin go anywhars!”

I suspect there had been a great deal of long-
suffering on the part of Jim. He burst out like flame
from a smoldering fire, —. ....

“ Anywhars / That’s what ails niggas | Freedom

means anywhars to ’em, and so they’re nuffin’ nor

nd



The Strangers from the South,

nobody. You vagabon’, Rose Moncton, you in’t go
anywhars much longer —not ’long 0’ me!”

“OQ, you white folksy Jim! I ‘low this trompin’
was yer own plan. When you finds a town whar it’s
any show of warm, I'll hang up my things and stay,
and not afore—ye hyar that! I ’low I won’t see
Peyty and Kit a-freezin’!”

She scowled at me, she actually did, as if I froze
her with my pale face and cool leaf-green dress, and
kept the sun off her, talking with that “white folksy
Jim.”

I fancied Jim was hoping I would say something
more to them. I fancied he, at least, was in great
need of a friend’s advice.

“ Where did you come from?” I asked him. But
the other head of the family answered, —

“Come from nuff sight warmer place than we’s
goin’ anywhars.”

“Rose is allers techy when she’s cold, mistis,”
Jim apologized. “Ole Maum Phillis used fer to say
as Rose’s temper goose-pimpled when the cold air
struck it. We kim from Charleston, mistis. We’s
speckin’ to work out some land for ourselves, and
hev a home. We kim up norf to git wages, so as we
kin all help at it. I’d like to stop hyar, mistis.”

“Hyar! I ‘low we’s goin’ soufard when we gits



Ihe Strangers from the South.

from dis yer, you Jim,” sniffed “ Rose Moncton,” her
face up to the sunshine.

Poor Jim looked care-worn. I dare say my face
was tolerably sympathetic. It felt so, at least.

“ Mistis,” the fellow said, ‘she’s kep us tackin’ souf
an’ norf, souf an’ norf, all dis yer week, or we’d been
somewhars. She don’t like de looks of no town yet.
We’s slep’ roun’ in sheds six weeks now. -I gits
sawin’ an’ choppin’, an’ sich, to do once a day, while
dey warms up in de sun, an’ eats a bite. Den up we
gits, an’ tromps on. We’s got on so fur, but Rose
ain’t clar at all yit whar we'll stop. Mistis, whar is

‘de warmest place you knows on?”

I thought better and better of myself as the heavy-
faced fellow thus appealed to me. I felt flattered by
his confidence in me. I always feel flattered when a
strange kitty follows me, or the birdies hop near for
my crumbs. But I will confess that no human vaga-
bond had ever before so skillfully touched the soft
place in my heart. Poor, dusky wanderer! he looked
so hungry, he looked so worn-out, too, as a head of a
family will when the other head pulls the other way.

“Well, Jim, the warmest place I know of is in my
‘kitchen. I left a rousing fire there ten minutes ago.
You all stay here until I come back, which will be in

about seven minutes; then you shall go home with

‘



The Strangers from the South.

me, and I will give you a good hot dinner. You may
stay all night, if you like, and perhaps I can advise
you. You will be rested, at the least, for a fresh
start.”

Rose Moncton lifted her listless head, and looked
in my face. “Laws!” said she. “ Laws!” said
she again.

Jim pulled his forelock to me, vailed the flash in his
warm umbery eyes with a timely wink of the heavy
lids. He composed himself at once into a waiting
attitude. ;

I heard another “Laws!” as I hastened away.
“That young mistis is done crazy. She’ll nebber
kim back hyar, ’pend on dat!” Such was Rose’s
opinion of me.

I opened my ears for Jim’s. But Jim made no
reply.

Father and mother had gone out of town for two
days. Our hired girl had left. I really was “ mistis”
of the premises. If I chose to gather in a circle of
shivering little “niggas” around my kitchen stove,
and heat that stove red-hot, there was nobody to say
I better not.

I was back in five minutes, instead of seven. Jim
stood straight up on his feet the moment he dis-

covered me coming. Rose showed some faint signs



The Strangers from the South,

of life and interest. “’Clar, now, mistis! Kim
along, den, Jim, and see ye look to that there verlise.
Hyar, you Kit!” She managed to rouse her sister
with her foot, still keeping her hands warmly hidden,.
and her face to the sun.

But the other head took the little ones actively in
charge. ‘Come, Peyty, boy! come, Kit! we’s gwine
now!”

Peyty opened his eyes — how starry they were !

*“O, we goin’, mo’? Jim, I don’t want to go no mo’!”

““Ain’t gwine clar thar no, Peyty, boy ; come, Kit —

» only to a house to warm the Peyty boy — come,
Kit!”

Kit was coming fast enough. But Peyty had to
be taken by the arm and pulled up. Then he stepped
slowly, the tears coming. The movement revealed
great swollen welts, where his stiff, tattered, leathern
shoes had chafed and worn into the fat, black little
legs. “Is dat ar Mistis Nelly?” he asked, opening
his eyes, wonderingly, at the white lady.

Rose had got up now. A sudden quiver ran over
her face. ‘No, Peyty. Mist’ Nelly’s dead, you
know. Wish we’s back to Mas’r Moncton’s, and
Mist’ Nelly libbin’, an’ Linkum sojers dead afore
dey cum!”

There was a long sigh from everybody, even from:



The Strangers from the South,

Jim. But he drew in his lips tightly the next moment.
“Some niggas nebber was worf freein’. Come along,
Peyty, boy —ready, mistis.”

I walked slowly along at the head of the strangers
from the south. Little feet were so sore, Peyty
couldn’t walk fast. Kit’s big woman’s size shoes
were so stiff she could only shuffle along. Jim’s toes
were protruding, and I fancied he and Rose were as
foot-sore as the little ones. I dare say people looked
and wondered ; but I am not ashamed to be seen with
any kind of children.

I took them around to the back door, into the
kitchen, which I had found unendurable while baking
my bread and pies. The heated air rushed out against
my face as I opened the door. It was a delicious
May-day ; but the procession behind me, entering,
proceeded direct to the stove, and surrounded it in
winter fashion, holding their hands out to the heat.
Even from Jim I heard a soft sigh of satisfaction.

Poor, shivering children of the tropics! I drew up
the shades. There were no outer blinds, and the
sun streamed in freely.

“There, now. Warm yourselves, and take your
own time for it. Put in wood, Jim, and keep as much
fire as you like. Iam going to my room to rest for an
hour. Be sure that you don’t go off, for I wish, you



The Strangers from the South,

to stay here until you are thoroughly rested. I have
plenty of wood for you to saw, Jim.”

I brought out a pan of cookies. I set them on the
table. ‘Here, Rose, see that Peyty and Kit have
all they want.- When I come down, I’ll get you some
dinner.”

The poor children in stories, and in real life, too,
for that matter, always get only bread and butter —
dear me, poor dears! When I undertake a romance
for these waifs in real life, or story, I always give them
cookies — cookies, sweet, golden, and crusty, with
sifted sugar.

I left them all, even to Jim, looking over into the
pan. My! rich, sugary jumbles, and plummy queen’s
cakes? When I saw their eyes dance—no sleep in
those eyes now—TI was glad. it wasn’t simply whole-
some sandwiches and plain fried cakes, as somebody
at my elbow says now it ought to have been. I
would have set out a picnic table, with ice-cream and
candies, for those wretched little “niggas,” if I could!
I nodded to them, and went away. It is so nice, after
you have made a child happy, to add some unmistaka-
ble sign that it is quite welcome to the happiness !

I knew there was nothing which they could steal.
I expected they would explore the pantry. I judged
them by some of my little white friends. But the silver



The Strangers from the South.

was locked up. China and glass would hardly be
available. If, after they had stuffed themselves with
those cookies, they could want cold meat, and bread
and butter, I surely shouldn’t begrudge it. Then I
thought of my own especial lemon tart, which stood
cooling on the shelf before the window ; but I was
not going back to insult that manly Jim Moncton by
removing it.

Just as I was slipping on my dressing-gown up in
my own cool, quiet chamber, I caught a faint sound
of the outside door of the kitchen. Something like a
shriek, or a scream, followed. Then there was an
unmistakable and mighty overturning of chairs. I
rushed down. At the very least I expected to see my
romantic “ Rose Moncton” with her hands clenched
in brother Jim’s kinky hair. With loosened tresses,
without belt or collar, I appeared on the scene.

What did I see? Why, I saw Phillis, Mrs. Jack
Graham’s black cook, with every one of my little
“niggas” in her arms—heads of the family and all!
There they were, sobbing and laughing together, the
portly Phillis the loudest of the whole. One of Mrs.
Jack’s favorite china bowls lay in fragments on the
floor.

Phillis called out hysterically as she saw me. Jim
discovered me the same moment. He detached him-



The Strangers from the South.

self, went up to the window, and bowed his head down
upon the sash. I saw the tears roll down his cheek
and drop.

“Laws, Miss Carry! dese my ole mas’r’s niggers !
dey’s Mas’r Moncton’s little nigs, ebery one! dey’s
runned roun’ under my feet in Mas’r Moncton’s
kitchen many a day down in ole Carline—bress em
souls!” She hugged them again, and sobbed afresh,
The children clung to the old cook’s neck, and waist,
and arms like so many helpless, frightened black
kittens.

Phillis at last recovered her dignity. She pointed
them to their chairs. She picked up the pieces of
china in her apron. “Done gone, anyhow — dese
pickaninnies gib ole Phillis sich a turn! It mose like
seein’ Mas’r, Moncton an’ Miss Nelly demselves.
Whar you git ’em, Miss Carry?”

I told her.

“Bress your heart, Miss Carry! Len’ me a cup,
and git me some yeast, and I’ll bring Mistis Graham
ober, an’ I’ll be boun’, when she sees dat ar lubly
little Peyty, she’ll hire him to—to—to—lor! she’ll
hire him to look into his diamint eyes.”

I know she herself kissed tears out of more than
one pair of “diamint eyes” while I was getting the
yeast. I heard her.



The Strangers from the South.

“QO, Maum Phillis!” I heard Jim say. “Vou think
we'll hire out roun’ hyar?”

“Could we, Maum Phillis?” pleaded Rose, her
voice soft and warm now. “We’s done tired out.
I’m clean ready to drop down in my tracks long this
yer blessed stove, and nebber stir anywhars !”

“ Bress you, chilluns ! You Aev tromped like sojers,
clar from ole Carline! Spec it seems like home,
findin’ one of de old place hands— Phillis knows.
Dar, dar! don’t take on so. Miss Carry, she’ll bunk
you down somewhar it’s warm, and thar you stay an’
rest dem feet. I'll send my mistis ober, and dey
two’ll pervide fer ye on dis yer street ; dis yer one ob
de Lord’s own streets.”

Well, do you think Mistis Graham and Mistis Carry
‘dishonored Maum Phillis’s faith in them?

No, indeed! The family found homes on “de
Lord’s own street.” Jim is coachman at Squire
Lee’s. Peyty is at the same place, taken in at first
for his sweet disposition, and “diamint eyes,” I sus-
pect. He is now a favorite table-waiter.

Kit is Maum Phillis’s right-hand woman. Rose is
our own hired girl. She is somewhat given to sleep-
iness, and to idling in sunny windows, and to scorch-
ing her shoes and aprons against the stove of a
winter’s evening. But, on the whole, she is a good



The Strangers from the South.

servant ; and we have built her a bedroom out of
the kitchen.

I have never regretted crossing the street to speak
to the strangers from the south.







THE

BLACK AND THE GRAY PRINCE.

I.

iL ALLOO, Blackie! Why didn’t you get up
time enough to wash this morning?”

The mulatto sprang up the Academy steps without
a word ; yet there was an ominous light in the large
black eyes.

“ Better let the Black Prince alone, Grayson. He
won’t stand your impudence forever.”

“ Let him go where he belongs, then.”

“Vou make a tremendous fuss about nothing.
Suppose he did beat in the race last night, there’s
no need of being so spiteful. Let him be Number
One. Who cares?”

“You are too lazy to breathe, Nat.”



The Black and the Gray Prince.

“Thank you. The Gray Prince is complimentary,
this morning.”

The Gray Prince scowled. “To think #zs name
should be Prince, too!”

“Tt becomes him well,” answered Nat Stedman,
stretching himself upon the grass, while his eyes
twinkled mischievously, as he watched his friend,
Prince Grayson, impatiently tossing the pebbles at
his feet into the pond not far away. At last, seizing
a large stone, he threw it into the water, exclaiming,
spitefully, —

“Jd like to pitch Prince Blackwell into the pond
—like that!”

* You'd better try it.”

“ Perhaps you think I couldn’t do it?”

“ Just so.”

“You think he’s smart, I do believe, just because
he’s a nigger,” sneered Grayson.

“ Nigger or not, he’s smart as a steel-trap.”

“ New brooms always sweep clean.”

“That’s a fact. The old Academy never looked
half so well as since our Black Prince has had the
care of it.”

“Well, I wouldn’t leave old friends quite so
suddenly.”

“ Don’t intend to leave old or new, as long as they
behave themselves.”



The Black and the Gray Prince.

“Well, what have I done? You've been as cold
as an iceberg all the week.”

“Vou called me lazy, but I’d rather be lazy than
mean, any time.”

“Have I been mean? Haven't I treated you well
enough ?”

“ T don’t complain; but just tell a fellow why you
pick upon Blackwell the whole time.”

“J wish to take him down a peg.”

“Why?”

“ He feels too big altogether.”

“ He fits his clothes well,” said Nat, with provoking
coolness.

“ Come — I’m in earnest.”

“So am I.”

“Nat Stedman, I’ve a great mind to thrash you.”

“Tm willing.”

“TI wish you’d get downright mad once, and be
done with this everlasting coolness and indifference.”

Nat laughed heartily, as he answered, —

“You, Grayson, are such a fire-cracker, some of us
need to cultivate this coolness to preserve the peace
of society.

“Peace or no peace, I’m bound to put down that
little upstart.”

“ How?”



The Black and the Gray Prince.

“ He thinks more of that black suit of clothes than
anything, and if I could just give him a good sous-
ing, wouldn’t it be splendid?”

“Splendid? It would be the perfection of mean-
ness. Grayson, he has no father ; and do you know
how poor his mother is? She does our washing now ;
and mother said she was very anxious for Prince to
get a good education ; so she works hard to keep him
in the school here. I shouldn’t wonder if that was
the only decent suit of clothes he had, and that’s why
he’s so careful of them.”

Nat half rose in his earnestness, but sunk back
again as he read the expression of his friend’s face.

“Better and better! His mother’s a washerwo-
man, and he only one suit of clothes! Hurrah!”

“What on earth do you find amusing in that?”
asked Nat, eyeing his friend a little anxiously.

“JT supposed he was as poor as a church mouse, .
but didn’t know that his mother took in washing. I
shall tell the boys what an aristocratic fellow we have
among us; and if I should accidentally give him a
ducking to-morrow morning, perhaps you don’t see he
can’t be present at declamation? Then he’ll get a
demerit instead of merit mark. J, at least, remember
that last Saturday Mr. Frost gave him two merit
marks, while I received but one.”



The Black and the Gray Prince.

Nat sprang to his feet. He answered, earnestly,
“T’ll never speak to you again as long as I live, if
you are mean enough to take such an advantage of
the information I gave you.” :

“O, yes you will; for you never stay mad more
than a minute.”

Nat turned and walked away. Grayson called to
him, but his calls were unheeded. Just then a num-
ber of boys rushed down the Academy steps with
shouts and cries, such as schoolboys only can utter.

Amid the Babel of tongues Nat could distinguish
clearly only these :—

“Three cheers for the Black Prince! Hurrah!
Aunt Milly’s wood-pile! The Black Prince forever !
Three cheers for the saw-horse !”

As they came nearer, Nat put both hands over his
ears, and ran in mock alarm. With redoubled noise
they sprang after him, and just as Gus Bickford, the
foremost boy, was about to lay hold of him, he
dropped to the ground, and both rolled-over on the
grass, convulsed with laughter.

“ Come, Gus, don’t pull a fellow’s hands off.”

“ Sit up, then, and listen to Prince.”

“Which Prince? We have two, you know.”

“The Black one, of course. The Gray ‘Prince
wouldn’t soil his hands with what we intend ‘to do
to-morrow afternoon,” was the impatient answer.



The Black and the Gray Prince.

“Blackwell, are you spokesman? If so, out with
it. I’d like to know what started such an awful
racket.”

“O, I only proposed using a little of our surplus
strength in behalf of old Aunt Milly. Some one sent
her a nice load of wood, and we are going to cut and
saw it for her. We’ve asked all in our class but you
and Grayson. Will you go?”

“Certainly. I’d do anything for the good old soul.
She took care of me last winter when I had the mea-
sles, and she’d fix up splendid messes for a fellow to
eat. I always have meant to pay her some way.”

“Now, where’s Grayson? We must ask him,” .
said Blackwell, in a tone of relief. He had had his
doubts about Nat; for he had been in the school
part of a term only, and seeing him with Grayson so
much, he had been led to suppose they were alike.

Nat pointed to some one standing under a tree
near the pond, and Gus Bickford shouted, — ;

“Grayson, come here! we want you.”

’ But the solitary figure remained motionless.

“ Tf the Prince won’t come to us, we must go to the
Prince. Let’s descend upon him in a body,” said the
lively Gus, as he led the noisy boys toward the pond.

Seeing Grayson’s clouded face, Nat took upon him-
self the task of bringing him to terms.



The Black and the Gray Prince.

“T tell you, Grayson, the boys have got a splendid
idea to carry out to-morrow.”

“Indeed! Whose idea is it?”

“ Blackwell’s,” answered Gus, innocently. Gus
didn’t understand the Gray Prince as well as Nat.

“It must be splendid, then,” was the sneering
remark.

Nat saw Blackwell’s clinched hands and compressd
lips, and hastened to say, —

“It will be jolly fun. We are all going over to cut
and saw wood for Aunt Milly. We ought to do it, for

she always takes care of us when we are sick.”

_ “T never yet have worked for niggers,” was the
haughty answer.

‘ Gus laughed outright, as much at his manner as
his words. This provoked Grayson to add, —

“7 say, let niggers work for each other ;” and he
turned square round, and looked meaningly at Prince
Blackwell.

The latter turned pale; his eyes flashed dan-
gerously.

Nat once more attempted to make peace by saying,
pleasantly, yet in his own droll way, —

“ Come, two fire-crackers are one too many just at
this present time. I want you, Prince;” and taking
the arm of the mulatto, he led him away.



The Black and the Gray Prince.

After they were at a safe distance he dropped his
playful manner. Ina tone of real regret, he attempted
to apologize for his friend. He made rather bad work
of it; for Nat was honest, and he was growing to de-
spise Grayson himself. He was cut short with the
words, —

“ Don’t try to smooth it over. I know he hates me,
and just why. It is because I am the best scholar in
the class. He thinks I shall take the Latin prize ;
and I presume I shall; for I cannot fail when I know
my lesson perfectly. And it is such a real pleasure
to study hard, that I don’t think I shall give it up for
Prince Grayson.”

Nat couldn’t help showing the admiration he felt
for the ambitious student; and he expressed it in
true schoolboy style.

“You're a brick, that’s a fact;” and he laid his
hand familiarly on the other’s shoulder. ‘ Don’t mind
what Grayson says. I begin to think he isn’t worth
minding. ‘I like you first-rate, and so do the other
fellows. Still, you better let me try my luck with such
a tinder-box alone.”

Grayson looked far from pleasant as Nat ap-
proached ; yet this did not silence the latter.

“ You'll go with us —won’t you?”

“No. I’m going out on the pond; and, Nat, you
promised to go with me.”



The Black and the Gray Prince.

“So I will, But there’ll be time enough after cut-
ting the wood.”

“Who wants to get all tired out before we begin
to row?”

“We might as well get tired doing something use-
ful once in our lives.”

“Tsn’t rowing useful ?”

“What good does it do us?”

“ Doesn’t it develop the muscles ?”

“ Any more than cutting or sawing wood ?”

“Well, everybody says rowing is good exercise.”

“ Rowing is well enough. I like it tip-top. But,
after all, just think how many poor old bodies we
might help by spending a part of our time cutting and
sawing wood. We shouldn’t work as hard as we do
racing, and there’d be no danger of half killing our-
selves, as Everts did last year.”

“ Better pull down the gymnasiums, then ; and let
fellows at school put an ax or saw over their shoulders,
and call on every old woman who has a stick of
wood,” was the sarcastic reply.

“Not a bad idea. Guess J’ll draw up a paper for
that purpose.”

“You'd better. It’s just like some of your odd
notions.”

“Thank you.. That’s a compliment, if you did bui



The Black and the Gray Prince.

know it. Now say, won’t you go with us?” urged
Nat, after a pause.

“No, I won’t.”

“Hope you'll enjoy rowing by yourself, then. Z
shan’t hurry to join such an accommodating fellow ;”
and Nat followed the other boys, who were now some
distance away.

II.

SaTuRDAY morning, at the Academy, was always
devoted to essays, declamations, and select readings.
And during the present term Mr. Frost, the principal,
had given two merit marks to all who were well pre-
pared for such exercises, as there was a strong inclina-
tion on the part of many to absent themselves on this
particular morning, or else to plead some excuse for
miserable failures. ;

Nat, although not a brilliant speaker, was good in
his way. He must choose his own subjects, then they
always suited his style of delivery to perfection. -

Not feeling perfectly prepared, he took his book
the next morning to a favorite seat near the pond
for a half hour’s quiet study. Another motive, also,
was inclining his steps that way.

He was a trifle anxious to be near the pond when
Prince Blackwell passed on his way to the Academy



The Black and the Gray Prince,

He very soon, however, became absorbed in his
declamation, and was just closing his book with a
satisfied “ Now I’m sure of it,” when the sound of a
quick step caught his ear.

“That’s Blackwell!” he exclaimed, half aloud, as
he stepped back into the cluster of bushes which com-
pletely hid him from view, while, at the same time, he
could see distinctly all who passed.

He was about to draw a long breath of relief as he
thought to himself, —

“The Black Prince is safe for this morning,” when
a voice he well knew shouted, — :

“ Good. morning, Mr. Blackwell. Id like to see
you a moment.”

The mulatto turned instantly, and faced his tor-
mentor.

“What do you wish?” he coolly asked.

“Wish? I wish to wash a little of that dirt, tan,
or whatever it is, off your face. It really annoys me
to see it, if you will excuse my saying so.”

Nat could see the other’s clinched hands and
straightened form, and wondered that Grayson did
not take warning. He did seem a little surprised at
the other’s silence ; but he must have been deter-
mined to provoke him, for he continued, —

“‘ Didn’t your mother have soapsuds enough left in
her washtub to scrub you cleaner?”



The Black and the Gray Prince.

Nat drew a quick breath as he noted the effect
of these cruel words. With blazing eyes Blackwell
sprang at his enemy.

“Insult me, but breathe a word against my mother
at your peril! You coward! You coward, I say!”

Now, Grayson had intentionally chosen a certain
spot on the bank, near which to meet the mulatto.
It was very steep, and a slight push would send one
into quite deep water. Yet now he entirely forgot
this, forgot even that he was near the pond ; and, as
the other’s wrathful face came near, he involuntarily
stepped backward, lost his balance, and the next
instant the Gray, instead of the Black Prince, was
struggling in the water.

For a few moments that wrathful face glared upon
him from the bank above; then there was a sudden
change. The face was still pale, but the eyes had
lost their fierce glow. Bending low, as he grasped
firmly a branch near, he said, —

“ Here, Grayson, take my hand.”

It was an exceedingly difficult undertaking to climb
up the steep bank alone; yet the Gray Prince was
half inclined to try, rather than touch Blackwell’s
hand, But he was always a little nervous when in
the water, and he was fearful that the bushes, by
which he was. holding himself up, would give way.

























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NK
fh

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vi rs <
\ ‘i SSW
ANY wit Mage
i PANG oa































































































































The Black and the Gray Prince.

He looked around. He could see no one, and he
reluctantly grasped the quietly-extended brown hand.

As he was, with apparent ease, almost lifted up the
bank, the thought flashed through his mind that the
mulatto was remarkably strong,

“Guess I better not attempt to push him in this
week,” was his mental comment, as he stood dripping
on the bank.

“Get those wet clothes off, and you'll be all right.
Good morning.” And Blackwell turned away. The
other, without a word of thanks, hurried home.

When both were out of sight, Nat left his hiding-
place ; and, taking a shorter path, by running swiftly
he reached the Academy before Blackwell.

The bell was ringing as he took his seat. He tried
to look cool and unconcerned while the roll was called.
There was but one name before Blackwell’s, when a
quick step was heard on the stairs.

“ Blackwell ?” :

Blackwell walked in with firm step and glowing
face, and took his seat. ‘“ Present!”

A few more names ; then, —

“ Grayson?”

Nat had usually answered for him ; but now he was
obstinately silent, and Gus almost shouted, —

“ Absent !”



The Black and the Gray Prince.

“T think I saw him not half an hour ago,” said Mr.
Frost, in an inquiring tone.

Nat glanced at Blackwell, then quietly answered, —

“7 saw Blackwell pulling him out of the pond a
little while ago. Guess he’s gone home to change
his clothes, for he was pretty wet.”

An almost audible “Good!” from Gus, nearly up-
set the gravity of the school. And but for the quick
veto which the looks of their teacher expressed, the
boys would, then and there, have given three cheers
for the plucky Black Prince.

Blackwell had chosen for his declamation the
“Speech of Rienzi to the Romans.” He was the
best speaker in the school. Beforé he came, Gray-
son had considered himself the first.

This morning the mulatto was speaking with even
more than his usual animation. And Nat thought
he understood the cause of the deep meaning which
he put into the words, —

“Slaves to a horde
Of petty tyrants, feudal despots ;”

as he came to the words, —
“T have known deeper wrongs,”

Grayson walked in, dressed in faultless taste ; and
teacher as well as pupils noticed the flash of the



The Black and the Gray Prince.

speaker’s eyes, and the deeper color which tinged
the brown cheeks.

When Grayson was fairly in his seat, Blackwell’s
words caught his attention ;- and after one look of
surprise and annoyance, he whispered to Nat, —

“Tf that goose isn’t speaking the same piece which
J learned.”

“He doesn’t take to the water any more readily
than you do, if he is a goose,” was the cool answer.

Grayson looked at him keenly, but not a muscle
moved ; and he could only conjecture as to the cause
of Nat’s remark.

But he resolved not to speak that piece now, for he
was quite sure he could not do as well as Blackwell.
Neither did he wish to say, “ Not prepared,” when
called upon. Before he had well decided, he heard
his name, — ,

“ Grayson.”

He quickly left his seat, as though to perform his
part; but he stopped by the side of his teacher, and
there were a few words. Mr. Frost apparently assent-
ed to whatever he wished, for he returned to his
seat with a satisfied look. It vanished, somewhat,
as he saw that Mr. Frost was regarding him rather
searchingly. It wholly disappeared as the report was
read.





The Black and the Gray Prince.

“ Blackwell, two — Bickford, one. I wish you would
endeavor to learn your next declamation perfectly,
Bickford. Don’t you think you could, if you gave.
your mind to it as thoroughly as you do to some
things?” asked the teacher, kindly ; for, in spite of
his faults, the fun-loving, yet generous-hearted Gus,
was a favorite with all.

“Don’t know, sir. I never could remember any-
thing,” was the half-laughing answer.

“Who do you suppose can sing the greatest num-
ber of comic songs here?”

“Gus Bickford,” Gus himself answered. Even
Mr. Frost joined in the laugh which followed ; then
added, —

“JT have no doubt Gus Bickford could learn any-
thing he was interested in equally well.”

As the report was continued the Gray Prince felt
his cheeks tingle as he caught once more that keen ~
look from his teacher’s eyes.

“Grayson, one. I may, however, give you two,
after I have made a few inquiries. I wish to see you,
Stedman, after the others leave.”

Although Nat received two marks also, it did not
atone for the unpleasant task which he well knew was
before him. He must tell the whole truth if ques-
tioned ; and he plainly saw that it would result in the
loss of one if not both of Grayson’s marks.



Ihe Black and the Gray Prince.

“What's up?”

“What did Frost wish to see you about my marks
for?”

These questions were asked simultaneously by Gus
and Grayson the moment Nat appeared after his in-
terview with Mr. Frost.

“Strictly private— can’t tell,’ was Nat’s evasive
answer,

Both knew it was perfectly useless to tease him
after he had once made up his mind not to tell.

But Grayson could not help asking, with anxiety as
well as anger in his tone, —

“Will he give me two marks or one, Nat Stedman?”

“Not any,” was the reluctant answer.

“You lie! He said he’d give me one.”

“Go and ask yourself why he’s changed his mind.”

“T will;” and Grayson, thoroughly angry now,
rushed into the Academy.

“ Let’s wait, and see if the Frost doesn’t cool our
fiery Prince a little,” said Gus.

“No; he’ll be mad asa hornet. We'd better keep
out of his way.”

“Let him sting, if he wants to; he can’t kill this
child.”

“ Stings are troublesome things.”

“Well, tell a fellow about that water scrape, then.”



The Black and the Gray Prince,

“Can’t do it. We must give our whole attention
to Aunt Milly’s wood-pile now.”

“Before dinner? I’m a little too hungry for that,
I tell you.” 2

“T didn’t mean go to work now; but we must plan
a little, for a part should carry axes and a part saws.”

“That’s so. Let’s run and catch the other boys,
and see about it.”

Plans were soon formed, and the hungry boys
dispersed.

The work which the boys had undertaken that
afternoon would have been formidable to one, but it
was comparatively easy for eight or nine. And after
the wood was nicely packed in the tiny wood-shed,
they filed out of the yard, each with his ax, saw,
or saw-horse over his shoulder; and we should be
obliged to look far for a happier or noisier set of
boys.

As they passed the pond on their homeward way,
Nat stopped and looked for his friend Grayson. He
soon spied him far away, almost beyond hailing dis-
tance. He mounted the fence near, and shouted his
name.

“Let me try it,” said Gus, as they saw that he took
no notice of Nat.

Gus sprang upon the fence, and soon a cry was



ae

ai





The Black and the Gray Prince.

sent over the water, such as could come only from the
throat of Gus Bickford. This was followed by a
regular locomotive whistle.

These sounds reached the ears of the Gray Prince.
He looked around. Nat waved his hat. But the boat
did not turn.

Then Gus cried, “Gin you the slip, Nat. Let's
entertain him. with three rousing cheers for Aunt
Milly.”

They were given with a will.

The Gray Prince tried to row out of hearing.

But Gus cried, —

“ Now, three cheers for the Black Prince!”

Grayson must have heard even these ; for he urged
his boat away as rapidly as possible.

“ Now let’s leave him alone in his glory,” said Nat.

And the Gray Prince was left alone for many
a day. ce







THE




MmOU can sail for days and days in a
yacht and have nothing happen —
in fact, you take up your bed and
4 board in a yacht mostly to get out
Bare the way of things eee: If it

and are so ane as not to ae
landings, you can sail and sail, and be
sure that to-morrow will be like to-day and yesterday
—all days of Sweet Do Nothing. No callers, no
newspapers, no letters nor telegrams to bring you to
sudden joy or to sudden grief. You are safe from
Fate until the wind rises, or you land to get the mails.

We were a merry party of old friends, and all lov-
ing the water like old salts. We had a good cook;



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

and we had all the new books. The sunshiny days
and the moony nights followed upon each other in
the true dolce-far-niente succession.

But one night something did happen. We were
skirting along shore, at a goodly distance, however.
We were dreaming and lounging on deck when, all at
once, Norma called out, “O, Lorlei, do just look at
the sea, and at the sides of our boat!”

I did. Everything was all a-flash. The sea was
lit up everywhere. Such an illumination!

“ Probably some mermaid married to-night!” Tom
had removed his cigar, and honored the spectacle
with an appreciative stare.

I had read about the phosphorescence of the sea,
had seen a little of its wondrous spectacular effect,
but never upon such a scale as this. It outdid all
the Fourth-of-July illuminations I ever saw. You can
light up a few city squares quite respectably if you
are willing to pour out money like water to buy rock-
ets, and Roman candles, and wheels, and fire-balls,
and what not; but you would have to attach a fairy
rainbow candle to every blade of grass, and carpet
the pavements with iris phosphor, before you could
begin to approach the sea as it was in its beauty and
glory that night.

When I first looked up, at Norma’s cry, far as the



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

eye could reach the sea seemed covered with snow —
snow, or else intense sparkling white light, as if every
living atom in the ocean had come to the surface in
countless crowds bearing torches. But nearer, wher-
ever our boat disturbed the waves, what a flashing of
rainbows there was! Every wavelet was crested with
a dazzling prism, which flashed, broke, and came again
dazzlingly. At one end a web of gold seemed pouring
against the side of the boat, sliding down into the sea,
yard upon yard, from some elfin loom measured off
by viewless hands —how I hated Rufus for smiling
at our exclamations of delight!

“Nothing but a shoal of jelly-fish, girls! nothing
in the world but Medusz.”

“JT don’t care —it is wonderful, wondrously beauti-
ful, even if you dare to tell me half the light comes
from dead zoophites.” I splashed my hand in a ris-
ing wave, my fingers dripped pearls and diamonds —
if I could only have kept enough to set a ring!

“ Ctenophorer,” said Rufus, laconically, as he looked
backward at the track of fire in our wake ; and point-
ing to a lovely blue-edged wave, ‘ Dysmorphosa, too.”

I didn’t care whether it was Jelly-fishes, or Crusta-
cea, Medusz, or shrimps, though Rufus’ explanations
were pretty enough. He put just a drop or two of the
sea into a pitcher of water, and it lit up the pitcher like



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid,

acandle. He put another drop or two in milk, and the
milk shone so we could actually see to read by it. A
bowl of the sea water, after standing a while, ceased
to shine — “went out,” Norma said. Then Rufus
dropped a drop of acid in, and the bowl was filled
with flashing stars. I hoped the little Medusz were
not wriggling in torture ; J was afraid they were ; but,
perhaps, after lying in salt so long they didn’t mind
vinegar.

And O, how cunning the little living lamps were
under Rufus’ microscope! Some of them were trans-
parent, and filled with starry points that would emit
flashes as fast as you could wink.

We floated slowly along through the lovely illumina-
tion, watching a weird, faint aurora borealis in the
northern sky. Suddenly Norma cried out, “ Rufus,
what zs that? isn’t that a lady’s belt on the top of
that wave? Look quick —that wave yonder!” .

We all bent over the side. It was a lady’s belt —
such a lovely one—a shining, silvery ribbon two yards
_ long, fringed on the edges with a dainty “pearling”
in all manner of lovely colors.

“O,O!” said Norma. “O,O!” said Helen. “O,
O!” said I. “How came it here? What has hap
pened?”

“That zs a sash,” said Rufus. “In fact, it is the



I



Mh

Uy

]
Vy
fe

fe Yj
Me








The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

‘Girdle of Venus.’ But all the same, it is a living
thing, a big Medusa, a Jelly-fish, That bright fringe
is its oars, its cla, you know, by which it paddles
itself along.”

I didn’t believe it, not at first. But brother Tom
confirmed him. “Yes, girls; and if we could get it
for you, it would be simply a long, sticky streak of
gelatine in less than no time, if you didn’t keep it in
water, dull as could be, and finally dry up and dis-
appear.”

Wasn’t Tom horrid? And to think that what he
said should be true!

Norma was hanging over the side, silent. “ Lorlei,
come here,” she said, softly. Helen and I both
came, followed lazily by Rufus and Tom. “ Lorlei,”
she said, ‘do look and see if you can see what I do
—such a lot of things that look as if a lady’s trunk
had been spilled into the sea. I believe that was a
lady’s belt!”

I looked off upon the shining waves. I did see
something — several queer-looking objects.

Rufus laughed grimly. “ Perhaps the mermaid has
lost some of her luggage.”

The nearest thing looked exactly like a stiff, dense
blue feather, just such a one as we ladies call an
“aigrette,” and put on our hats. How each little ©



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

plumule of the long feather did shine at its tip! We
three girls watched it float out of sight. ‘“ Boys, that
was certainly a feather from some lady’s hat,” said
Norma. :
Rufus smiled. Tom did, too, but was good enough



Her Prune.

to add that the things did look like “women’s fix-
ings.” “Guess the little sea-bride did lose one of her
trunks off hereabouts — fell off, broke open, and spilt
her things.”

I ventured a wish that the plume might be secured.
“If we had a net, I could,” Rufus said. “If we



any





The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

were over the other side, on the Irish coast, say,
almost any fisherman could furnish you such a feather
from his nets, I’ve often seen them. It is called
the ‘sea-pen.’ Those little fronds up and down the
‘quill’ are alive —in fact, each of them is a cell
inhabited by a polyp. The ‘feather’ lives with its
stem stuck in the sea mud. It is only detached by
accident.”

So it wasn’t a lady’s plume. “ Rufus,” Helen said,
“if we see anything nice again, please don’t tell us
its history. In the water the feather is as pretty as
anything that ever came from Paris. And to think it
would be a dull, sticky mass if we could get it! My
goodness, Norma,” she cried, “the little sea-bride has
spilt her trunk here, I do believe! See, girls, if there
isn’t her sun-hat! I dare say she provided it to pre-
serve her complexion when she comes up to bask on
the beach.”

Sure enough! I could plainly make out a floating
hat. So could Tom. “Trimmed with both fringe
and lace, extravagant creature!”

“Ves,” said Norma. “Sure as you live, Lorlei,
she’s got a heavy fall of handsome lace on her sun-
hat!”

With their help, I could see something like a cas-
cade of-deep valenciennes floating at the back of the



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

hat. “Well,” I said, “probably there’s plenty on the
floor of the ocean after all the rich cargoes that have
gone down.”

“Mr. ‘Agassiz’ Pendleton,” said Norma, after she
was satisfied that Rufus wasn’t going to speak, “do
you dare affirm that that is a nasty, sticky Medusa,
too?”

“T shall be forced to, my dear Miss Luttrell. I’ve
seen them thrown on shore many 4 time. ‘There they
look like a mere mass of blubber, and melt away
rapidly in the sun; in fact, its substance all drains
out, and leaves a little quantity of transparent stuff
resembling cobwebs, full of empty cells. That ‘lace’
is its stomach. Put back in water it will soon fill up
and resume —”

“Hello, girls,” interrupted Tom; “here’s her
brooch — bet a dollar her jewel-box has gone to the
bottom !”

We could see two or three of them after a min-
ute’s steady look— brooches, and what pretty pat-
terns for our jewelers! little octagonal breast-pins
shining with pearly green and pink reflections, set at
each of their eight points with a star-like cluster of
lights.

“How bad, were I Mademoiselle Mermaid, I should
feel to have lost them!” said Norma. “TI shall bid



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

you dive after them for me, Mr. Rufus, unless you
speedily manage to disenchant me—tell me, quick,











that they are some
more of your sticky
Jelly-fishes.”

“Your wish is my fags
law. They are Jecl- i
ly-fishes, and our
most common ones§
—the Lucernaria.§
If they don’t get
out of sight too

soon, you may see

Her Broocu.

them contract at
the edgés, reveal their stems, and take the form of
vases — only they aren’t hollow. They are all stom-
ach and egg-pouches ; and those ‘stars’ at the points
are tentacles and auricles to eat with and to ‘hang
hold’ by. They are usually found among eel-grass
‘long shore ; how they drifted so far from their moor-
ings I can’t conceive. See there, Miss Luttrell —
there, to the right — there, there, floating on the sur-
face, is your sea-bride’s chignon; and her hair’s red-
dish brown, and she’s a milk-white blonde by that
token.”

We saw, indeed, a long mass of tresses, “reddish



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

brown,” changeable with pale yellow shimmers, and
with a pearly fleck here and there — mystic hair, but
just what I should suppose a mermaid would have.
At the top there shone something like a dark pearl-
edged. comb. I supposed at once that that was the
body of the creature. By this time, you see, I knew
that the mermaid’s “ things” were afve.

“Unfortunate young lady!” said Tom. ‘“Let’s
hope this fine floating ‘back hair’ was only a ‘re-
serve’ for evening parties, and that she has plenty
~ of good solid braids on her head for every-day wear.”

“ Discourse now, O, wise Rufus!” said Norma.

“ Jelly-fish again. A Discophore. Cyanea, Like
the rest, nothing but sea-blubber on land. Hair com-
monly forty feet in length. But Agassiz once‘encoun-
tered one, and measuring by his oar, backing his boat
the whole length of the hair, he found this monster
chignon to be one hundred and twelve feet long ;
the body was seven feet in diameter. But that hair,
ladies — those tentacles —a fellow don’t care to get
entangled in them when he’s out bathing; for they
sting like nettles. Up and down these tentacles are
cells, each containing a fine whip snugly coiled up;
at will the fish can spring them out — it’s worse than
any galvanic battery I ever tried. The mother of
this giant is a little thing called a Hydroid ; and she



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

is never, even when full grown, over half an inch in
height.”

_ But I, near-sighted Lorlei, was the one to discover
the prettiest article — the poor sea-bride’s comb. Un-
fortunate mermaid ! what dd she do when she got there,
without her comb? Such a handy comb, too — just

such a one as a fairy creature would be likely to select,

so long and fine, the teeth glittering like a prism.

\



Her Come.
Tennyson has seen it, and seen her —

“Combing her hair
- Under the sea,
Ina golden curl,
With a comb of pearl.”



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

But I haven’t told you the especial handiness of
it in the luggage of a traveling mermaid. The mo-
ment she gets her hair combed with it, she can stick
it in her tresses, and it will all knot up into a jew-
eled hair-pin, or it will float in a long, graceful, ex-
quisite, rainbowy feather over her head and down her
neck.

I had already seen enough of the infinite variety of
Jelly-fish to know what the Solomonic Rufus would
say ; and when he began, “Class, Ctenophoree, or
Comb-bearers, Individual, Pleurobrachia,” I put my
‘fingers in my ears. I didn’t want the disenchanter’s
rod waved over that exquisite and marvelous comb.
I didn’t want to hear that the prismatic teeth of the
pretty ornament were the creature’s “tentacles” and
“oars.”

Happily for my rainbow comb, Tom interrupted him
as eagerly as one of us girls. ‘“ Here’s.some more
spoil from the smashed trunk!” He was looking -
_through his eye-glass. “Jupiter! won’t she weep and
wail, though, when she finds it is that particular
‘chist’ that is gone. Rufe, see; there’s the smoking-
cap she’s embroidered for her lord and master float-
ing at the stern there!”

So it was—a nice one, too. Tll wager they keep
Christmas down there, for that was no first attempt —



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid,

at a smoking-cap. It was of pink velvet, I should
say, worked in dainty running pattern, finished with
fringes up and down the Grecian lines —red, yellow,
orange, green, and purple—and a sweet rosette at
the top.

I just dreaded to hear Rufus
take the romance out of this dain-
ty gift which the young bride had,
doubtless, fashioned sitting in her
cool, green sea-grotto, dreaming of

her handsome merman lover.



“Ctenophore. Genus Idyia. All
Stomach,” heisaids briefly,’ Mish) | 277 MEIN car:
swim right into the great open stomach, mouth of
smoking-cap contracts, and there the fish is. Handy
—isn’t it?”

Of course, after seeing all these things, and know-
ing we were on the trail of the smashed-up trunk, we
continued to look about us. We saw nothing more
for along time. At last Tom fixed his eye-glass on
a distant rock of the coast we were slowly skirting.
“Ves, ma’am, there’s her bouquet-holder strandéd high
and dry, flowers all in it neat as can be—hope the
dear creature hasn’t been shipwrecked herself. This
looks like it, though.”

Norma and I took turns with the eye-glasses. We



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

could plainly make it out. It seemed, at that dis-
tance, of a deep glowing color. It shone so I could
scarcely distinguish the “flowers.” I fancied there
was a pair of great tiger lilies, a mass of heliotropes,
and some honeysuckles, all fringed with ribbon-grass.
The bouquet-holder itself was of a very graceful form.
Who could want to hear

anything so pretty “

ex-
plained”?

Norma and Helen did,
to my disgust. ‘This, at
least, isn’t a Jelly-fish, Mr.
Pendleton?” they said.

“Well, it is the mother

of some of your Jelly-fishes,



at least. Tom’s bouquet:

Her Bouquet-HoLpeEr.

holder is a Hobocodon
Hydroid. The flowers are simply ten or twelve young
bud-Medusee. They are budded upon the Hydroid,
and grow there until they are strong enough to de
tach themselves and go sailing off upon the sea.”

* And so the bouquet-holder and the bouquet are
both alive?” said I. “ How dreadful!”

“* How wonderful!” said Norma, the scientific New
England Norma. New York boarding-schools had
tried four long years to make simply a pretty young



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

belle of Norma. J thought they had succeeded. But
one hour over this mermaid’s luggage had trans-
formed her into herself.

“There floats her breast-knot,” said Rufus, quickly,
as a brilliant object swept by. It did look like a
bunch of looped ribbons and filmy lace.

Rufus caught Norma’s glance
of inquiry. “A floating Hy-
droid: a Hydra with Meduse-
bells. There’ll ever so many
Jelly-fish get off from that Hy-
droid by and by.”

We were hugging close to the
rocky shore now. Numerous

pools and streams stretched



inland. In one of them Rufus

Her BREAST-KNOT.

himself pointed out a queer
little object lying high and dry. “One of young
madame’s ‘tidies’ has drifted in here.” It certainly
seemed like a crocheted anti-macassar with a pattern
delicately traced with violet.
Somehow / wanted to hear an explanation of that.
“Tis a sea-urchin,” he said. ‘The close center,
the portion you ladies would call ‘sc’ work, is his
body. The open work, the ‘dc’ and ‘chain,’ are
his tentacles. There is something extremely curious



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

about these ‘ tentacles,’ could we get close enough to
see. Upon four of them are set little forks. Any
tejected food is passed from an opening on the sum-
a : ee mit of his body,
down a tentacle,
received upon
one of these little
forks; this fork
closes upon it like

a forceps, passes

: HER ‘Lipy.



it down to an-
other fork, and so on until it is dropped off into the
water.”

“QO, look there, look there!” cried Norma, inter-
rupting him. She pointed to a ledge of rock lining
the entrance of a little bay. I saw it distinctly.
* Such a beautiful work of art—the luckless mermaid’s
work-basket.

“O, how dreadfully she will feel when she knows
she has lost that!’ Helen said.

“°Tis a work-basket, that’s a fact,” quoth Tom.

“Work-basket!” laughed Rufus. “It’s a greedy
net-fish. That fish will stand up and look like a
snug latticed house on a minute’s notice. . Then little

‘innocent shrimps and fishes will run into it for shel-



ter, and of course —say, girls,” he interrupted him-







The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid,

self, “there’s her clothes-brush, as I live!. By the by,
that greedy, lazy net-fish has 81,920 limbs. Governor
Winthrop said so in 1680, when he sent a specimen to



Her CLorizs-BrusH.

the Royal Society in England. No luckless shrimp
can escape aé/ those limbs, be sure. If he escapes
70,000, there are still 10,920 to catch him. As for
that clothes-brush, it is a Crinoid. Some polar wave
must have washed that ashore, for it lives off the coast
of Greenland.”



The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

We looked farther for an hour or two, but saw
nothing more, only some brooches.

It must have been her trunk of little personal treas-
ures that was lost, we all concluded. We did not
believe that the wedding bark itself was wrecked ;
for we should have found more of her outfit, we think ;
there would have been dainty snowy garments, silk-
en robes, and. wonderful shawls, floating somewhere
in the sea: don’t you think so? Norma and I did.












OE ee





Full Text



The Baldwin Library


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STRANGERS
FROM THE SOUTH,

AND OTHER STORIES.

BY ELLA FARMAN AND LAURIE LORING.





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BOSTON:
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY.

FRANKLIN ST., CORNER OF HAWLEY.
Copyright, D. Loturop & Co., 1877.


THE

STRANGERS FROM THE SOUTH.

NLESS 1 take a long half mile circle, my daily

walk to the post-office leads me down through
an unsavory, wooden-built portion of town. I am
obliged to pass several cheap grocerics, which smell
horribly of sauer-kraut and Limburg cheese, a res-
taurant steamy with Frenchy soups, a livery stable,
besides two or three barns, and some gloomy, window-
less, shut-up buildings, of whose use I haven’t the
slightest idea.

Of course, when I go out in grand toilet, I take
the half mile circle. But, being a business woman,
and generally in a hurry, I usually go this short way
in my short walking-dress and big parasol ; and, prob-

_ably, there is an indescribable expression to my nose,
just as Mrs. Jack Graham says.
The Strangers from the South.

Well, one morning I was going down town in the
greatest hurry. I was trying to walk so fast that I
needn’t breathe once going by the Dutch groceries;
and I was almost to the open space which looks away
off to the sparkling river, and the distant park, and the
forenoon sun,—TI always take a good, long, sweet
breath there, coming and going, — when my eye was
caught by a remarkable group across the street.

Yes, during the night, evidently, while the town
was asleep, there had been an arrival —strangers
direct from the Sunny South.

And there the remarkable-looking strangers sat, in
a row, along the narrow step of one of the mysterious
buildings I have alluded to. They were sunning
themselves with all the delightful carelessness of the
experienced traveler. Though, evidently, they had
been presented with the liberty of the city, it was just
as evident that they didn’t care a fig for sightseeing —
not a fig, either, for the inhabitants. All they asked
of our town was its sunshine. They had selected the
spot where they could get the most of it. Through
the open space opposite the sun streamed broadly ;
and the side of a weather-colored building is se
warm ! i

What a picture of dole far niente, of “sweet-do-
nothing,” it was! I stopped, hung my parasol over







































































































The Strangers from the South,

my shoulder, — there was a little too much sunshine
for me, — and gazed at it.

“O, how you do love it! You bask like animals!
That fullness of enjoyment is denied to us white-skins.
What a visible absorption of luster and heat! You
are the true lotus-eaters ! ”

The umber-colored creatures-——I suppose they are
as much warmer for being brown, as any brown sur-
face is warmer than a white one. I never did see
sunshine drank, and absorbed, and enjoyed as that
was. It was a bit of Egypt and the Nile life. I could
not bear to go on.

Finally, I crossed the street to them. Not one of
them stirred. The eldest brother was standing, lean-
ing against the building. He turned one eye on me,
and kept it there. At his feet lay a bulging, ragged
satchel. Evidently he was the protector.

The elder sister, with hands tucked snugly under
her folded arms, winked and blinked at me dozily.
The little boy with the Nubian lips was sound asleep,
—a baby Osiris, — his chubby hands hiding together
between his knees for greater warmth. The youngest
sister, wrapped in an old woolen shawl, was the only
uncomfortable one of the lot. There was no doze
nor dream in her eyes yet— poor thing, she was
cold !
The Strangers from the South,

I didn’t believe they had had where to lay their
heads during the night. Liberty of a city, to one
kind of new arrivals, means just that, you know.
Sundry crumbs indicated an absence of the conven-
tional breakfast table. Poor little darkies !

“ Children,” I said, like a benevolently-disposed
city marshal, ‘you mustn’t sit here in the street.”

“We’s gwine on soon, mistis,” said the protector,
meekly.

_ “T’low we ain’t, Jim!” The big sister said this
without any diminution of the utter happiness of her
look. :

“Tt’s powerful cold comin’ up fru the norf, mistis
I mus’ let em warm up once a day,” said Jim.

“Up through the north! Pray, where are you
going?”

Jim twisted about. He looked down at the toe of
his boot, reflectively.

“T ex-pect, I ex-pect —”

“You spec, Jim! You allers spectin’! Mistis,
we’s free—we kin go anywhars!”

I suspect there had been a great deal of long-
suffering on the part of Jim. He burst out like flame
from a smoldering fire, —. ....

“ Anywhars / That’s what ails niggas | Freedom

means anywhars to ’em, and so they’re nuffin’ nor

nd
The Strangers from the South,

nobody. You vagabon’, Rose Moncton, you in’t go
anywhars much longer —not ’long 0’ me!”

“OQ, you white folksy Jim! I ‘low this trompin’
was yer own plan. When you finds a town whar it’s
any show of warm, I'll hang up my things and stay,
and not afore—ye hyar that! I ’low I won’t see
Peyty and Kit a-freezin’!”

She scowled at me, she actually did, as if I froze
her with my pale face and cool leaf-green dress, and
kept the sun off her, talking with that “white folksy
Jim.”

I fancied Jim was hoping I would say something
more to them. I fancied he, at least, was in great
need of a friend’s advice.

“ Where did you come from?” I asked him. But
the other head of the family answered, —

“Come from nuff sight warmer place than we’s
goin’ anywhars.”

“Rose is allers techy when she’s cold, mistis,”
Jim apologized. “Ole Maum Phillis used fer to say
as Rose’s temper goose-pimpled when the cold air
struck it. We kim from Charleston, mistis. We’s
speckin’ to work out some land for ourselves, and
hev a home. We kim up norf to git wages, so as we
kin all help at it. I’d like to stop hyar, mistis.”

“Hyar! I ‘low we’s goin’ soufard when we gits
Ihe Strangers from the South.

from dis yer, you Jim,” sniffed “ Rose Moncton,” her
face up to the sunshine.

Poor Jim looked care-worn. I dare say my face
was tolerably sympathetic. It felt so, at least.

“ Mistis,” the fellow said, ‘she’s kep us tackin’ souf
an’ norf, souf an’ norf, all dis yer week, or we’d been
somewhars. She don’t like de looks of no town yet.
We’s slep’ roun’ in sheds six weeks now. -I gits
sawin’ an’ choppin’, an’ sich, to do once a day, while
dey warms up in de sun, an’ eats a bite. Den up we
gits, an’ tromps on. We’s got on so fur, but Rose
ain’t clar at all yit whar we'll stop. Mistis, whar is

‘de warmest place you knows on?”

I thought better and better of myself as the heavy-
faced fellow thus appealed to me. I felt flattered by
his confidence in me. I always feel flattered when a
strange kitty follows me, or the birdies hop near for
my crumbs. But I will confess that no human vaga-
bond had ever before so skillfully touched the soft
place in my heart. Poor, dusky wanderer! he looked
so hungry, he looked so worn-out, too, as a head of a
family will when the other head pulls the other way.

“Well, Jim, the warmest place I know of is in my
‘kitchen. I left a rousing fire there ten minutes ago.
You all stay here until I come back, which will be in

about seven minutes; then you shall go home with

‘
The Strangers from the South.

me, and I will give you a good hot dinner. You may
stay all night, if you like, and perhaps I can advise
you. You will be rested, at the least, for a fresh
start.”

Rose Moncton lifted her listless head, and looked
in my face. “Laws!” said she. “ Laws!” said
she again.

Jim pulled his forelock to me, vailed the flash in his
warm umbery eyes with a timely wink of the heavy
lids. He composed himself at once into a waiting
attitude. ;

I heard another “Laws!” as I hastened away.
“That young mistis is done crazy. She’ll nebber
kim back hyar, ’pend on dat!” Such was Rose’s
opinion of me.

I opened my ears for Jim’s. But Jim made no
reply.

Father and mother had gone out of town for two
days. Our hired girl had left. I really was “ mistis”
of the premises. If I chose to gather in a circle of
shivering little “niggas” around my kitchen stove,
and heat that stove red-hot, there was nobody to say
I better not.

I was back in five minutes, instead of seven. Jim
stood straight up on his feet the moment he dis-

covered me coming. Rose showed some faint signs
The Strangers from the South,

of life and interest. “’Clar, now, mistis! Kim
along, den, Jim, and see ye look to that there verlise.
Hyar, you Kit!” She managed to rouse her sister
with her foot, still keeping her hands warmly hidden,.
and her face to the sun.

But the other head took the little ones actively in
charge. ‘Come, Peyty, boy! come, Kit! we’s gwine
now!”

Peyty opened his eyes — how starry they were !

*“O, we goin’, mo’? Jim, I don’t want to go no mo’!”

““Ain’t gwine clar thar no, Peyty, boy ; come, Kit —

» only to a house to warm the Peyty boy — come,
Kit!”

Kit was coming fast enough. But Peyty had to
be taken by the arm and pulled up. Then he stepped
slowly, the tears coming. The movement revealed
great swollen welts, where his stiff, tattered, leathern
shoes had chafed and worn into the fat, black little
legs. “Is dat ar Mistis Nelly?” he asked, opening
his eyes, wonderingly, at the white lady.

Rose had got up now. A sudden quiver ran over
her face. ‘No, Peyty. Mist’ Nelly’s dead, you
know. Wish we’s back to Mas’r Moncton’s, and
Mist’ Nelly libbin’, an’ Linkum sojers dead afore
dey cum!”

There was a long sigh from everybody, even from:
The Strangers from the South,

Jim. But he drew in his lips tightly the next moment.
“Some niggas nebber was worf freein’. Come along,
Peyty, boy —ready, mistis.”

I walked slowly along at the head of the strangers
from the south. Little feet were so sore, Peyty
couldn’t walk fast. Kit’s big woman’s size shoes
were so stiff she could only shuffle along. Jim’s toes
were protruding, and I fancied he and Rose were as
foot-sore as the little ones. I dare say people looked
and wondered ; but I am not ashamed to be seen with
any kind of children.

I took them around to the back door, into the
kitchen, which I had found unendurable while baking
my bread and pies. The heated air rushed out against
my face as I opened the door. It was a delicious
May-day ; but the procession behind me, entering,
proceeded direct to the stove, and surrounded it in
winter fashion, holding their hands out to the heat.
Even from Jim I heard a soft sigh of satisfaction.

Poor, shivering children of the tropics! I drew up
the shades. There were no outer blinds, and the
sun streamed in freely.

“There, now. Warm yourselves, and take your
own time for it. Put in wood, Jim, and keep as much
fire as you like. Iam going to my room to rest for an
hour. Be sure that you don’t go off, for I wish, you
The Strangers from the South,

to stay here until you are thoroughly rested. I have
plenty of wood for you to saw, Jim.”

I brought out a pan of cookies. I set them on the
table. ‘Here, Rose, see that Peyty and Kit have
all they want.- When I come down, I’ll get you some
dinner.”

The poor children in stories, and in real life, too,
for that matter, always get only bread and butter —
dear me, poor dears! When I undertake a romance
for these waifs in real life, or story, I always give them
cookies — cookies, sweet, golden, and crusty, with
sifted sugar.

I left them all, even to Jim, looking over into the
pan. My! rich, sugary jumbles, and plummy queen’s
cakes? When I saw their eyes dance—no sleep in
those eyes now—TI was glad. it wasn’t simply whole-
some sandwiches and plain fried cakes, as somebody
at my elbow says now it ought to have been. I
would have set out a picnic table, with ice-cream and
candies, for those wretched little “niggas,” if I could!
I nodded to them, and went away. It is so nice, after
you have made a child happy, to add some unmistaka-
ble sign that it is quite welcome to the happiness !

I knew there was nothing which they could steal.
I expected they would explore the pantry. I judged
them by some of my little white friends. But the silver
The Strangers from the South.

was locked up. China and glass would hardly be
available. If, after they had stuffed themselves with
those cookies, they could want cold meat, and bread
and butter, I surely shouldn’t begrudge it. Then I
thought of my own especial lemon tart, which stood
cooling on the shelf before the window ; but I was
not going back to insult that manly Jim Moncton by
removing it.

Just as I was slipping on my dressing-gown up in
my own cool, quiet chamber, I caught a faint sound
of the outside door of the kitchen. Something like a
shriek, or a scream, followed. Then there was an
unmistakable and mighty overturning of chairs. I
rushed down. At the very least I expected to see my
romantic “ Rose Moncton” with her hands clenched
in brother Jim’s kinky hair. With loosened tresses,
without belt or collar, I appeared on the scene.

What did I see? Why, I saw Phillis, Mrs. Jack
Graham’s black cook, with every one of my little
“niggas” in her arms—heads of the family and all!
There they were, sobbing and laughing together, the
portly Phillis the loudest of the whole. One of Mrs.
Jack’s favorite china bowls lay in fragments on the
floor.

Phillis called out hysterically as she saw me. Jim
discovered me the same moment. He detached him-
The Strangers from the South.

self, went up to the window, and bowed his head down
upon the sash. I saw the tears roll down his cheek
and drop.

“Laws, Miss Carry! dese my ole mas’r’s niggers !
dey’s Mas’r Moncton’s little nigs, ebery one! dey’s
runned roun’ under my feet in Mas’r Moncton’s
kitchen many a day down in ole Carline—bress em
souls!” She hugged them again, and sobbed afresh,
The children clung to the old cook’s neck, and waist,
and arms like so many helpless, frightened black
kittens.

Phillis at last recovered her dignity. She pointed
them to their chairs. She picked up the pieces of
china in her apron. “Done gone, anyhow — dese
pickaninnies gib ole Phillis sich a turn! It mose like
seein’ Mas’r, Moncton an’ Miss Nelly demselves.
Whar you git ’em, Miss Carry?”

I told her.

“Bress your heart, Miss Carry! Len’ me a cup,
and git me some yeast, and I’ll bring Mistis Graham
ober, an’ I’ll be boun’, when she sees dat ar lubly
little Peyty, she’ll hire him to—to—to—lor! she’ll
hire him to look into his diamint eyes.”

I know she herself kissed tears out of more than
one pair of “diamint eyes” while I was getting the
yeast. I heard her.
The Strangers from the South.

“QO, Maum Phillis!” I heard Jim say. “Vou think
we'll hire out roun’ hyar?”

“Could we, Maum Phillis?” pleaded Rose, her
voice soft and warm now. “We’s done tired out.
I’m clean ready to drop down in my tracks long this
yer blessed stove, and nebber stir anywhars !”

“ Bress you, chilluns ! You Aev tromped like sojers,
clar from ole Carline! Spec it seems like home,
findin’ one of de old place hands— Phillis knows.
Dar, dar! don’t take on so. Miss Carry, she’ll bunk
you down somewhar it’s warm, and thar you stay an’
rest dem feet. I'll send my mistis ober, and dey
two’ll pervide fer ye on dis yer street ; dis yer one ob
de Lord’s own streets.”

Well, do you think Mistis Graham and Mistis Carry
‘dishonored Maum Phillis’s faith in them?

No, indeed! The family found homes on “de
Lord’s own street.” Jim is coachman at Squire
Lee’s. Peyty is at the same place, taken in at first
for his sweet disposition, and “diamint eyes,” I sus-
pect. He is now a favorite table-waiter.

Kit is Maum Phillis’s right-hand woman. Rose is
our own hired girl. She is somewhat given to sleep-
iness, and to idling in sunny windows, and to scorch-
ing her shoes and aprons against the stove of a
winter’s evening. But, on the whole, she is a good
The Strangers from the South.

servant ; and we have built her a bedroom out of
the kitchen.

I have never regretted crossing the street to speak
to the strangers from the south.




THE

BLACK AND THE GRAY PRINCE.

I.

iL ALLOO, Blackie! Why didn’t you get up
time enough to wash this morning?”

The mulatto sprang up the Academy steps without
a word ; yet there was an ominous light in the large
black eyes.

“ Better let the Black Prince alone, Grayson. He
won’t stand your impudence forever.”

“ Let him go where he belongs, then.”

“Vou make a tremendous fuss about nothing.
Suppose he did beat in the race last night, there’s
no need of being so spiteful. Let him be Number
One. Who cares?”

“You are too lazy to breathe, Nat.”
The Black and the Gray Prince.

“Thank you. The Gray Prince is complimentary,
this morning.”

The Gray Prince scowled. “To think #zs name
should be Prince, too!”

“Tt becomes him well,” answered Nat Stedman,
stretching himself upon the grass, while his eyes
twinkled mischievously, as he watched his friend,
Prince Grayson, impatiently tossing the pebbles at
his feet into the pond not far away. At last, seizing
a large stone, he threw it into the water, exclaiming,
spitefully, —

“Jd like to pitch Prince Blackwell into the pond
—like that!”

* You'd better try it.”

“ Perhaps you think I couldn’t do it?”

“ Just so.”

“You think he’s smart, I do believe, just because
he’s a nigger,” sneered Grayson.

“ Nigger or not, he’s smart as a steel-trap.”

“ New brooms always sweep clean.”

“That’s a fact. The old Academy never looked
half so well as since our Black Prince has had the
care of it.”

“Well, I wouldn’t leave old friends quite so
suddenly.”

“ Don’t intend to leave old or new, as long as they
behave themselves.”
The Black and the Gray Prince.

“Well, what have I done? You've been as cold
as an iceberg all the week.”

“Vou called me lazy, but I’d rather be lazy than
mean, any time.”

“Have I been mean? Haven't I treated you well
enough ?”

“ T don’t complain; but just tell a fellow why you
pick upon Blackwell the whole time.”

“J wish to take him down a peg.”

“Why?”

“ He feels too big altogether.”

“ He fits his clothes well,” said Nat, with provoking
coolness.

“ Come — I’m in earnest.”

“So am I.”

“Nat Stedman, I’ve a great mind to thrash you.”

“Tm willing.”

“TI wish you’d get downright mad once, and be
done with this everlasting coolness and indifference.”

Nat laughed heartily, as he answered, —

“You, Grayson, are such a fire-cracker, some of us
need to cultivate this coolness to preserve the peace
of society.

“Peace or no peace, I’m bound to put down that
little upstart.”

“ How?”
The Black and the Gray Prince.

“ He thinks more of that black suit of clothes than
anything, and if I could just give him a good sous-
ing, wouldn’t it be splendid?”

“Splendid? It would be the perfection of mean-
ness. Grayson, he has no father ; and do you know
how poor his mother is? She does our washing now ;
and mother said she was very anxious for Prince to
get a good education ; so she works hard to keep him
in the school here. I shouldn’t wonder if that was
the only decent suit of clothes he had, and that’s why
he’s so careful of them.”

Nat half rose in his earnestness, but sunk back
again as he read the expression of his friend’s face.

“Better and better! His mother’s a washerwo-
man, and he only one suit of clothes! Hurrah!”

“What on earth do you find amusing in that?”
asked Nat, eyeing his friend a little anxiously.

“JT supposed he was as poor as a church mouse, .
but didn’t know that his mother took in washing. I
shall tell the boys what an aristocratic fellow we have
among us; and if I should accidentally give him a
ducking to-morrow morning, perhaps you don’t see he
can’t be present at declamation? Then he’ll get a
demerit instead of merit mark. J, at least, remember
that last Saturday Mr. Frost gave him two merit
marks, while I received but one.”
The Black and the Gray Prince.

Nat sprang to his feet. He answered, earnestly,
“T’ll never speak to you again as long as I live, if
you are mean enough to take such an advantage of
the information I gave you.” :

“O, yes you will; for you never stay mad more
than a minute.”

Nat turned and walked away. Grayson called to
him, but his calls were unheeded. Just then a num-
ber of boys rushed down the Academy steps with
shouts and cries, such as schoolboys only can utter.

Amid the Babel of tongues Nat could distinguish
clearly only these :—

“Three cheers for the Black Prince! Hurrah!
Aunt Milly’s wood-pile! The Black Prince forever !
Three cheers for the saw-horse !”

As they came nearer, Nat put both hands over his
ears, and ran in mock alarm. With redoubled noise
they sprang after him, and just as Gus Bickford, the
foremost boy, was about to lay hold of him, he
dropped to the ground, and both rolled-over on the
grass, convulsed with laughter.

“ Come, Gus, don’t pull a fellow’s hands off.”

“ Sit up, then, and listen to Prince.”

“Which Prince? We have two, you know.”

“The Black one, of course. The Gray ‘Prince
wouldn’t soil his hands with what we intend ‘to do
to-morrow afternoon,” was the impatient answer.
The Black and the Gray Prince.

“Blackwell, are you spokesman? If so, out with
it. I’d like to know what started such an awful
racket.”

“O, I only proposed using a little of our surplus
strength in behalf of old Aunt Milly. Some one sent
her a nice load of wood, and we are going to cut and
saw it for her. We’ve asked all in our class but you
and Grayson. Will you go?”

“Certainly. I’d do anything for the good old soul.
She took care of me last winter when I had the mea-
sles, and she’d fix up splendid messes for a fellow to
eat. I always have meant to pay her some way.”

“Now, where’s Grayson? We must ask him,” .
said Blackwell, in a tone of relief. He had had his
doubts about Nat; for he had been in the school
part of a term only, and seeing him with Grayson so
much, he had been led to suppose they were alike.

Nat pointed to some one standing under a tree
near the pond, and Gus Bickford shouted, — ;

“Grayson, come here! we want you.”

’ But the solitary figure remained motionless.

“ Tf the Prince won’t come to us, we must go to the
Prince. Let’s descend upon him in a body,” said the
lively Gus, as he led the noisy boys toward the pond.

Seeing Grayson’s clouded face, Nat took upon him-
self the task of bringing him to terms.
The Black and the Gray Prince.

“T tell you, Grayson, the boys have got a splendid
idea to carry out to-morrow.”

“Indeed! Whose idea is it?”

“ Blackwell’s,” answered Gus, innocently. Gus
didn’t understand the Gray Prince as well as Nat.

“It must be splendid, then,” was the sneering
remark.

Nat saw Blackwell’s clinched hands and compressd
lips, and hastened to say, —

“It will be jolly fun. We are all going over to cut
and saw wood for Aunt Milly. We ought to do it, for

she always takes care of us when we are sick.”

_ “T never yet have worked for niggers,” was the
haughty answer.

‘ Gus laughed outright, as much at his manner as
his words. This provoked Grayson to add, —

“7 say, let niggers work for each other ;” and he
turned square round, and looked meaningly at Prince
Blackwell.

The latter turned pale; his eyes flashed dan-
gerously.

Nat once more attempted to make peace by saying,
pleasantly, yet in his own droll way, —

“ Come, two fire-crackers are one too many just at
this present time. I want you, Prince;” and taking
the arm of the mulatto, he led him away.
The Black and the Gray Prince.

After they were at a safe distance he dropped his
playful manner. Ina tone of real regret, he attempted
to apologize for his friend. He made rather bad work
of it; for Nat was honest, and he was growing to de-
spise Grayson himself. He was cut short with the
words, —

“ Don’t try to smooth it over. I know he hates me,
and just why. It is because I am the best scholar in
the class. He thinks I shall take the Latin prize ;
and I presume I shall; for I cannot fail when I know
my lesson perfectly. And it is such a real pleasure
to study hard, that I don’t think I shall give it up for
Prince Grayson.”

Nat couldn’t help showing the admiration he felt
for the ambitious student; and he expressed it in
true schoolboy style.

“You're a brick, that’s a fact;” and he laid his
hand familiarly on the other’s shoulder. ‘ Don’t mind
what Grayson says. I begin to think he isn’t worth
minding. ‘I like you first-rate, and so do the other
fellows. Still, you better let me try my luck with such
a tinder-box alone.”

Grayson looked far from pleasant as Nat ap-
proached ; yet this did not silence the latter.

“ You'll go with us —won’t you?”

“No. I’m going out on the pond; and, Nat, you
promised to go with me.”
The Black and the Gray Prince.

“So I will, But there’ll be time enough after cut-
ting the wood.”

“Who wants to get all tired out before we begin
to row?”

“We might as well get tired doing something use-
ful once in our lives.”

“Tsn’t rowing useful ?”

“What good does it do us?”

“ Doesn’t it develop the muscles ?”

“ Any more than cutting or sawing wood ?”

“Well, everybody says rowing is good exercise.”

“ Rowing is well enough. I like it tip-top. But,
after all, just think how many poor old bodies we
might help by spending a part of our time cutting and
sawing wood. We shouldn’t work as hard as we do
racing, and there’d be no danger of half killing our-
selves, as Everts did last year.”

“ Better pull down the gymnasiums, then ; and let
fellows at school put an ax or saw over their shoulders,
and call on every old woman who has a stick of
wood,” was the sarcastic reply.

“Not a bad idea. Guess J’ll draw up a paper for
that purpose.”

“You'd better. It’s just like some of your odd
notions.”

“Thank you.. That’s a compliment, if you did bui
The Black and the Gray Prince.

know it. Now say, won’t you go with us?” urged
Nat, after a pause.

“No, I won’t.”

“Hope you'll enjoy rowing by yourself, then. Z
shan’t hurry to join such an accommodating fellow ;”
and Nat followed the other boys, who were now some
distance away.

II.

SaTuRDAY morning, at the Academy, was always
devoted to essays, declamations, and select readings.
And during the present term Mr. Frost, the principal,
had given two merit marks to all who were well pre-
pared for such exercises, as there was a strong inclina-
tion on the part of many to absent themselves on this
particular morning, or else to plead some excuse for
miserable failures. ;

Nat, although not a brilliant speaker, was good in
his way. He must choose his own subjects, then they
always suited his style of delivery to perfection. -

Not feeling perfectly prepared, he took his book
the next morning to a favorite seat near the pond
for a half hour’s quiet study. Another motive, also,
was inclining his steps that way.

He was a trifle anxious to be near the pond when
Prince Blackwell passed on his way to the Academy
The Black and the Gray Prince,

He very soon, however, became absorbed in his
declamation, and was just closing his book with a
satisfied “ Now I’m sure of it,” when the sound of a
quick step caught his ear.

“That’s Blackwell!” he exclaimed, half aloud, as
he stepped back into the cluster of bushes which com-
pletely hid him from view, while, at the same time, he
could see distinctly all who passed.

He was about to draw a long breath of relief as he
thought to himself, —

“The Black Prince is safe for this morning,” when
a voice he well knew shouted, — :

“ Good. morning, Mr. Blackwell. Id like to see
you a moment.”

The mulatto turned instantly, and faced his tor-
mentor.

“What do you wish?” he coolly asked.

“Wish? I wish to wash a little of that dirt, tan,
or whatever it is, off your face. It really annoys me
to see it, if you will excuse my saying so.”

Nat could see the other’s clinched hands and
straightened form, and wondered that Grayson did
not take warning. He did seem a little surprised at
the other’s silence ; but he must have been deter-
mined to provoke him, for he continued, —

“‘ Didn’t your mother have soapsuds enough left in
her washtub to scrub you cleaner?”
The Black and the Gray Prince.

Nat drew a quick breath as he noted the effect
of these cruel words. With blazing eyes Blackwell
sprang at his enemy.

“Insult me, but breathe a word against my mother
at your peril! You coward! You coward, I say!”

Now, Grayson had intentionally chosen a certain
spot on the bank, near which to meet the mulatto.
It was very steep, and a slight push would send one
into quite deep water. Yet now he entirely forgot
this, forgot even that he was near the pond ; and, as
the other’s wrathful face came near, he involuntarily
stepped backward, lost his balance, and the next
instant the Gray, instead of the Black Prince, was
struggling in the water.

For a few moments that wrathful face glared upon
him from the bank above; then there was a sudden
change. The face was still pale, but the eyes had
lost their fierce glow. Bending low, as he grasped
firmly a branch near, he said, —

“ Here, Grayson, take my hand.”

It was an exceedingly difficult undertaking to climb
up the steep bank alone; yet the Gray Prince was
half inclined to try, rather than touch Blackwell’s
hand, But he was always a little nervous when in
the water, and he was fearful that the bushes, by
which he was. holding himself up, would give way.






















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The Black and the Gray Prince.

He looked around. He could see no one, and he
reluctantly grasped the quietly-extended brown hand.

As he was, with apparent ease, almost lifted up the
bank, the thought flashed through his mind that the
mulatto was remarkably strong,

“Guess I better not attempt to push him in this
week,” was his mental comment, as he stood dripping
on the bank.

“Get those wet clothes off, and you'll be all right.
Good morning.” And Blackwell turned away. The
other, without a word of thanks, hurried home.

When both were out of sight, Nat left his hiding-
place ; and, taking a shorter path, by running swiftly
he reached the Academy before Blackwell.

The bell was ringing as he took his seat. He tried
to look cool and unconcerned while the roll was called.
There was but one name before Blackwell’s, when a
quick step was heard on the stairs.

“ Blackwell ?” :

Blackwell walked in with firm step and glowing
face, and took his seat. ‘“ Present!”

A few more names ; then, —

“ Grayson?”

Nat had usually answered for him ; but now he was
obstinately silent, and Gus almost shouted, —

“ Absent !”
The Black and the Gray Prince.

“T think I saw him not half an hour ago,” said Mr.
Frost, in an inquiring tone.

Nat glanced at Blackwell, then quietly answered, —

“7 saw Blackwell pulling him out of the pond a
little while ago. Guess he’s gone home to change
his clothes, for he was pretty wet.”

An almost audible “Good!” from Gus, nearly up-
set the gravity of the school. And but for the quick
veto which the looks of their teacher expressed, the
boys would, then and there, have given three cheers
for the plucky Black Prince.

Blackwell had chosen for his declamation the
“Speech of Rienzi to the Romans.” He was the
best speaker in the school. Beforé he came, Gray-
son had considered himself the first.

This morning the mulatto was speaking with even
more than his usual animation. And Nat thought
he understood the cause of the deep meaning which
he put into the words, —

“Slaves to a horde
Of petty tyrants, feudal despots ;”

as he came to the words, —
“T have known deeper wrongs,”

Grayson walked in, dressed in faultless taste ; and
teacher as well as pupils noticed the flash of the
The Black and the Gray Prince.

speaker’s eyes, and the deeper color which tinged
the brown cheeks.

When Grayson was fairly in his seat, Blackwell’s
words caught his attention ;- and after one look of
surprise and annoyance, he whispered to Nat, —

“Tf that goose isn’t speaking the same piece which
J learned.”

“He doesn’t take to the water any more readily
than you do, if he is a goose,” was the cool answer.

Grayson looked at him keenly, but not a muscle
moved ; and he could only conjecture as to the cause
of Nat’s remark.

But he resolved not to speak that piece now, for he
was quite sure he could not do as well as Blackwell.
Neither did he wish to say, “ Not prepared,” when
called upon. Before he had well decided, he heard
his name, — ,

“ Grayson.”

He quickly left his seat, as though to perform his
part; but he stopped by the side of his teacher, and
there were a few words. Mr. Frost apparently assent-
ed to whatever he wished, for he returned to his
seat with a satisfied look. It vanished, somewhat,
as he saw that Mr. Frost was regarding him rather
searchingly. It wholly disappeared as the report was
read.


The Black and the Gray Prince.

“ Blackwell, two — Bickford, one. I wish you would
endeavor to learn your next declamation perfectly,
Bickford. Don’t you think you could, if you gave.
your mind to it as thoroughly as you do to some
things?” asked the teacher, kindly ; for, in spite of
his faults, the fun-loving, yet generous-hearted Gus,
was a favorite with all.

“Don’t know, sir. I never could remember any-
thing,” was the half-laughing answer.

“Who do you suppose can sing the greatest num-
ber of comic songs here?”

“Gus Bickford,” Gus himself answered. Even
Mr. Frost joined in the laugh which followed ; then
added, —

“JT have no doubt Gus Bickford could learn any-
thing he was interested in equally well.”

As the report was continued the Gray Prince felt
his cheeks tingle as he caught once more that keen ~
look from his teacher’s eyes.

“Grayson, one. I may, however, give you two,
after I have made a few inquiries. I wish to see you,
Stedman, after the others leave.”

Although Nat received two marks also, it did not
atone for the unpleasant task which he well knew was
before him. He must tell the whole truth if ques-
tioned ; and he plainly saw that it would result in the
loss of one if not both of Grayson’s marks.
Ihe Black and the Gray Prince.

“What's up?”

“What did Frost wish to see you about my marks
for?”

These questions were asked simultaneously by Gus
and Grayson the moment Nat appeared after his in-
terview with Mr. Frost.

“Strictly private— can’t tell,’ was Nat’s evasive
answer,

Both knew it was perfectly useless to tease him
after he had once made up his mind not to tell.

But Grayson could not help asking, with anxiety as
well as anger in his tone, —

“Will he give me two marks or one, Nat Stedman?”

“Not any,” was the reluctant answer.

“You lie! He said he’d give me one.”

“Go and ask yourself why he’s changed his mind.”

“T will;” and Grayson, thoroughly angry now,
rushed into the Academy.

“ Let’s wait, and see if the Frost doesn’t cool our
fiery Prince a little,” said Gus.

“No; he’ll be mad asa hornet. We'd better keep
out of his way.”

“Let him sting, if he wants to; he can’t kill this
child.”

“ Stings are troublesome things.”

“Well, tell a fellow about that water scrape, then.”
The Black and the Gray Prince,

“Can’t do it. We must give our whole attention
to Aunt Milly’s wood-pile now.”

“Before dinner? I’m a little too hungry for that,
I tell you.” 2

“T didn’t mean go to work now; but we must plan
a little, for a part should carry axes and a part saws.”

“That’s so. Let’s run and catch the other boys,
and see about it.”

Plans were soon formed, and the hungry boys
dispersed.

The work which the boys had undertaken that
afternoon would have been formidable to one, but it
was comparatively easy for eight or nine. And after
the wood was nicely packed in the tiny wood-shed,
they filed out of the yard, each with his ax, saw,
or saw-horse over his shoulder; and we should be
obliged to look far for a happier or noisier set of
boys.

As they passed the pond on their homeward way,
Nat stopped and looked for his friend Grayson. He
soon spied him far away, almost beyond hailing dis-
tance. He mounted the fence near, and shouted his
name.

“Let me try it,” said Gus, as they saw that he took
no notice of Nat.

Gus sprang upon the fence, and soon a cry was
ae

ai


The Black and the Gray Prince.

sent over the water, such as could come only from the
throat of Gus Bickford. This was followed by a
regular locomotive whistle.

These sounds reached the ears of the Gray Prince.
He looked around. Nat waved his hat. But the boat
did not turn.

Then Gus cried, “Gin you the slip, Nat. Let's
entertain him. with three rousing cheers for Aunt
Milly.”

They were given with a will.

The Gray Prince tried to row out of hearing.

But Gus cried, —

“ Now, three cheers for the Black Prince!”

Grayson must have heard even these ; for he urged
his boat away as rapidly as possible.

“ Now let’s leave him alone in his glory,” said Nat.

And the Gray Prince was left alone for many
a day. ce




THE




MmOU can sail for days and days in a
yacht and have nothing happen —
in fact, you take up your bed and
4 board in a yacht mostly to get out
Bare the way of things eee: If it

and are so ane as not to ae
landings, you can sail and sail, and be
sure that to-morrow will be like to-day and yesterday
—all days of Sweet Do Nothing. No callers, no
newspapers, no letters nor telegrams to bring you to
sudden joy or to sudden grief. You are safe from
Fate until the wind rises, or you land to get the mails.

We were a merry party of old friends, and all lov-
ing the water like old salts. We had a good cook;
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

and we had all the new books. The sunshiny days
and the moony nights followed upon each other in
the true dolce-far-niente succession.

But one night something did happen. We were
skirting along shore, at a goodly distance, however.
We were dreaming and lounging on deck when, all at
once, Norma called out, “O, Lorlei, do just look at
the sea, and at the sides of our boat!”

I did. Everything was all a-flash. The sea was
lit up everywhere. Such an illumination!

“ Probably some mermaid married to-night!” Tom
had removed his cigar, and honored the spectacle
with an appreciative stare.

I had read about the phosphorescence of the sea,
had seen a little of its wondrous spectacular effect,
but never upon such a scale as this. It outdid all
the Fourth-of-July illuminations I ever saw. You can
light up a few city squares quite respectably if you
are willing to pour out money like water to buy rock-
ets, and Roman candles, and wheels, and fire-balls,
and what not; but you would have to attach a fairy
rainbow candle to every blade of grass, and carpet
the pavements with iris phosphor, before you could
begin to approach the sea as it was in its beauty and
glory that night.

When I first looked up, at Norma’s cry, far as the
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

eye could reach the sea seemed covered with snow —
snow, or else intense sparkling white light, as if every
living atom in the ocean had come to the surface in
countless crowds bearing torches. But nearer, wher-
ever our boat disturbed the waves, what a flashing of
rainbows there was! Every wavelet was crested with
a dazzling prism, which flashed, broke, and came again
dazzlingly. At one end a web of gold seemed pouring
against the side of the boat, sliding down into the sea,
yard upon yard, from some elfin loom measured off
by viewless hands —how I hated Rufus for smiling
at our exclamations of delight!

“Nothing but a shoal of jelly-fish, girls! nothing
in the world but Medusz.”

“JT don’t care —it is wonderful, wondrously beauti-
ful, even if you dare to tell me half the light comes
from dead zoophites.” I splashed my hand in a ris-
ing wave, my fingers dripped pearls and diamonds —
if I could only have kept enough to set a ring!

“ Ctenophorer,” said Rufus, laconically, as he looked
backward at the track of fire in our wake ; and point-
ing to a lovely blue-edged wave, ‘ Dysmorphosa, too.”

I didn’t care whether it was Jelly-fishes, or Crusta-
cea, Medusz, or shrimps, though Rufus’ explanations
were pretty enough. He put just a drop or two of the
sea into a pitcher of water, and it lit up the pitcher like
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid,

acandle. He put another drop or two in milk, and the
milk shone so we could actually see to read by it. A
bowl of the sea water, after standing a while, ceased
to shine — “went out,” Norma said. Then Rufus
dropped a drop of acid in, and the bowl was filled
with flashing stars. I hoped the little Medusz were
not wriggling in torture ; J was afraid they were ; but,
perhaps, after lying in salt so long they didn’t mind
vinegar.

And O, how cunning the little living lamps were
under Rufus’ microscope! Some of them were trans-
parent, and filled with starry points that would emit
flashes as fast as you could wink.

We floated slowly along through the lovely illumina-
tion, watching a weird, faint aurora borealis in the
northern sky. Suddenly Norma cried out, “ Rufus,
what zs that? isn’t that a lady’s belt on the top of
that wave? Look quick —that wave yonder!” .

We all bent over the side. It was a lady’s belt —
such a lovely one—a shining, silvery ribbon two yards
_ long, fringed on the edges with a dainty “pearling”
in all manner of lovely colors.

“O,O!” said Norma. “O,O!” said Helen. “O,
O!” said I. “How came it here? What has hap
pened?”

“That zs a sash,” said Rufus. “In fact, it is the
I



Mh

Uy

]
Vy
fe

fe Yj
Me





The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

‘Girdle of Venus.’ But all the same, it is a living
thing, a big Medusa, a Jelly-fish, That bright fringe
is its oars, its cla, you know, by which it paddles
itself along.”

I didn’t believe it, not at first. But brother Tom
confirmed him. “Yes, girls; and if we could get it
for you, it would be simply a long, sticky streak of
gelatine in less than no time, if you didn’t keep it in
water, dull as could be, and finally dry up and dis-
appear.”

Wasn’t Tom horrid? And to think that what he
said should be true!

Norma was hanging over the side, silent. “ Lorlei,
come here,” she said, softly. Helen and I both
came, followed lazily by Rufus and Tom. “ Lorlei,”
she said, ‘do look and see if you can see what I do
—such a lot of things that look as if a lady’s trunk
had been spilled into the sea. I believe that was a
lady’s belt!”

I looked off upon the shining waves. I did see
something — several queer-looking objects.

Rufus laughed grimly. “ Perhaps the mermaid has
lost some of her luggage.”

The nearest thing looked exactly like a stiff, dense
blue feather, just such a one as we ladies call an
“aigrette,” and put on our hats. How each little ©
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

plumule of the long feather did shine at its tip! We
three girls watched it float out of sight. ‘“ Boys, that
was certainly a feather from some lady’s hat,” said
Norma. :
Rufus smiled. Tom did, too, but was good enough



Her Prune.

to add that the things did look like “women’s fix-
ings.” “Guess the little sea-bride did lose one of her
trunks off hereabouts — fell off, broke open, and spilt
her things.”

I ventured a wish that the plume might be secured.
“If we had a net, I could,” Rufus said. “If we
any


The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

were over the other side, on the Irish coast, say,
almost any fisherman could furnish you such a feather
from his nets, I’ve often seen them. It is called
the ‘sea-pen.’ Those little fronds up and down the
‘quill’ are alive —in fact, each of them is a cell
inhabited by a polyp. The ‘feather’ lives with its
stem stuck in the sea mud. It is only detached by
accident.”

So it wasn’t a lady’s plume. “ Rufus,” Helen said,
“if we see anything nice again, please don’t tell us
its history. In the water the feather is as pretty as
anything that ever came from Paris. And to think it
would be a dull, sticky mass if we could get it! My
goodness, Norma,” she cried, “the little sea-bride has
spilt her trunk here, I do believe! See, girls, if there
isn’t her sun-hat! I dare say she provided it to pre-
serve her complexion when she comes up to bask on
the beach.”

Sure enough! I could plainly make out a floating
hat. So could Tom. “Trimmed with both fringe
and lace, extravagant creature!”

“Ves,” said Norma. “Sure as you live, Lorlei,
she’s got a heavy fall of handsome lace on her sun-
hat!”

With their help, I could see something like a cas-
cade of-deep valenciennes floating at the back of the
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

hat. “Well,” I said, “probably there’s plenty on the
floor of the ocean after all the rich cargoes that have
gone down.”

“Mr. ‘Agassiz’ Pendleton,” said Norma, after she
was satisfied that Rufus wasn’t going to speak, “do
you dare affirm that that is a nasty, sticky Medusa,
too?”

“T shall be forced to, my dear Miss Luttrell. I’ve
seen them thrown on shore many 4 time. ‘There they
look like a mere mass of blubber, and melt away
rapidly in the sun; in fact, its substance all drains
out, and leaves a little quantity of transparent stuff
resembling cobwebs, full of empty cells. That ‘lace’
is its stomach. Put back in water it will soon fill up
and resume —”

“Hello, girls,” interrupted Tom; “here’s her
brooch — bet a dollar her jewel-box has gone to the
bottom !”

We could see two or three of them after a min-
ute’s steady look— brooches, and what pretty pat-
terns for our jewelers! little octagonal breast-pins
shining with pearly green and pink reflections, set at
each of their eight points with a star-like cluster of
lights.

“How bad, were I Mademoiselle Mermaid, I should
feel to have lost them!” said Norma. “TI shall bid
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

you dive after them for me, Mr. Rufus, unless you
speedily manage to disenchant me—tell me, quick,











that they are some
more of your sticky
Jelly-fishes.”

“Your wish is my fags
law. They are Jecl- i
ly-fishes, and our
most common ones§
—the Lucernaria.§
If they don’t get
out of sight too

soon, you may see

Her Broocu.

them contract at
the edgés, reveal their stems, and take the form of
vases — only they aren’t hollow. They are all stom-
ach and egg-pouches ; and those ‘stars’ at the points
are tentacles and auricles to eat with and to ‘hang
hold’ by. They are usually found among eel-grass
‘long shore ; how they drifted so far from their moor-
ings I can’t conceive. See there, Miss Luttrell —
there, to the right — there, there, floating on the sur-
face, is your sea-bride’s chignon; and her hair’s red-
dish brown, and she’s a milk-white blonde by that
token.”

We saw, indeed, a long mass of tresses, “reddish
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

brown,” changeable with pale yellow shimmers, and
with a pearly fleck here and there — mystic hair, but
just what I should suppose a mermaid would have.
At the top there shone something like a dark pearl-
edged. comb. I supposed at once that that was the
body of the creature. By this time, you see, I knew
that the mermaid’s “ things” were afve.

“Unfortunate young lady!” said Tom. ‘“Let’s
hope this fine floating ‘back hair’ was only a ‘re-
serve’ for evening parties, and that she has plenty
~ of good solid braids on her head for every-day wear.”

“ Discourse now, O, wise Rufus!” said Norma.

“ Jelly-fish again. A Discophore. Cyanea, Like
the rest, nothing but sea-blubber on land. Hair com-
monly forty feet in length. But Agassiz once‘encoun-
tered one, and measuring by his oar, backing his boat
the whole length of the hair, he found this monster
chignon to be one hundred and twelve feet long ;
the body was seven feet in diameter. But that hair,
ladies — those tentacles —a fellow don’t care to get
entangled in them when he’s out bathing; for they
sting like nettles. Up and down these tentacles are
cells, each containing a fine whip snugly coiled up;
at will the fish can spring them out — it’s worse than
any galvanic battery I ever tried. The mother of
this giant is a little thing called a Hydroid ; and she
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

is never, even when full grown, over half an inch in
height.”

_ But I, near-sighted Lorlei, was the one to discover
the prettiest article — the poor sea-bride’s comb. Un-
fortunate mermaid ! what dd she do when she got there,
without her comb? Such a handy comb, too — just

such a one as a fairy creature would be likely to select,

so long and fine, the teeth glittering like a prism.

\



Her Come.
Tennyson has seen it, and seen her —

“Combing her hair
- Under the sea,
Ina golden curl,
With a comb of pearl.”
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

But I haven’t told you the especial handiness of
it in the luggage of a traveling mermaid. The mo-
ment she gets her hair combed with it, she can stick
it in her tresses, and it will all knot up into a jew-
eled hair-pin, or it will float in a long, graceful, ex-
quisite, rainbowy feather over her head and down her
neck.

I had already seen enough of the infinite variety of
Jelly-fish to know what the Solomonic Rufus would
say ; and when he began, “Class, Ctenophoree, or
Comb-bearers, Individual, Pleurobrachia,” I put my
‘fingers in my ears. I didn’t want the disenchanter’s
rod waved over that exquisite and marvelous comb.
I didn’t want to hear that the prismatic teeth of the
pretty ornament were the creature’s “tentacles” and
“oars.”

Happily for my rainbow comb, Tom interrupted him
as eagerly as one of us girls. ‘“ Here’s.some more
spoil from the smashed trunk!” He was looking -
_through his eye-glass. “Jupiter! won’t she weep and
wail, though, when she finds it is that particular
‘chist’ that is gone. Rufe, see; there’s the smoking-
cap she’s embroidered for her lord and master float-
ing at the stern there!”

So it was—a nice one, too. Tll wager they keep
Christmas down there, for that was no first attempt —
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid,

at a smoking-cap. It was of pink velvet, I should
say, worked in dainty running pattern, finished with
fringes up and down the Grecian lines —red, yellow,
orange, green, and purple—and a sweet rosette at
the top.

I just dreaded to hear Rufus
take the romance out of this dain-
ty gift which the young bride had,
doubtless, fashioned sitting in her
cool, green sea-grotto, dreaming of

her handsome merman lover.



“Ctenophore. Genus Idyia. All
Stomach,” heisaids briefly,’ Mish) | 277 MEIN car:
swim right into the great open stomach, mouth of
smoking-cap contracts, and there the fish is. Handy
—isn’t it?”

Of course, after seeing all these things, and know-
ing we were on the trail of the smashed-up trunk, we
continued to look about us. We saw nothing more
for along time. At last Tom fixed his eye-glass on
a distant rock of the coast we were slowly skirting.
“Ves, ma’am, there’s her bouquet-holder strandéd high
and dry, flowers all in it neat as can be—hope the
dear creature hasn’t been shipwrecked herself. This
looks like it, though.”

Norma and I took turns with the eye-glasses. We
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

could plainly make it out. It seemed, at that dis-
tance, of a deep glowing color. It shone so I could
scarcely distinguish the “flowers.” I fancied there
was a pair of great tiger lilies, a mass of heliotropes,
and some honeysuckles, all fringed with ribbon-grass.
The bouquet-holder itself was of a very graceful form.
Who could want to hear

anything so pretty “

ex-
plained”?

Norma and Helen did,
to my disgust. ‘This, at
least, isn’t a Jelly-fish, Mr.
Pendleton?” they said.

“Well, it is the mother

of some of your Jelly-fishes,



at least. Tom’s bouquet:

Her Bouquet-HoLpeEr.

holder is a Hobocodon
Hydroid. The flowers are simply ten or twelve young
bud-Medusee. They are budded upon the Hydroid,
and grow there until they are strong enough to de
tach themselves and go sailing off upon the sea.”

* And so the bouquet-holder and the bouquet are
both alive?” said I. “ How dreadful!”

“* How wonderful!” said Norma, the scientific New
England Norma. New York boarding-schools had
tried four long years to make simply a pretty young
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

belle of Norma. J thought they had succeeded. But
one hour over this mermaid’s luggage had trans-
formed her into herself.

“There floats her breast-knot,” said Rufus, quickly,
as a brilliant object swept by. It did look like a
bunch of looped ribbons and filmy lace.

Rufus caught Norma’s glance
of inquiry. “A floating Hy-
droid: a Hydra with Meduse-
bells. There’ll ever so many
Jelly-fish get off from that Hy-
droid by and by.”

We were hugging close to the
rocky shore now. Numerous

pools and streams stretched



inland. In one of them Rufus

Her BREAST-KNOT.

himself pointed out a queer
little object lying high and dry. “One of young
madame’s ‘tidies’ has drifted in here.” It certainly
seemed like a crocheted anti-macassar with a pattern
delicately traced with violet.
Somehow / wanted to hear an explanation of that.
“Tis a sea-urchin,” he said. ‘The close center,
the portion you ladies would call ‘sc’ work, is his
body. The open work, the ‘dc’ and ‘chain,’ are
his tentacles. There is something extremely curious
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

about these ‘ tentacles,’ could we get close enough to
see. Upon four of them are set little forks. Any
tejected food is passed from an opening on the sum-
a : ee mit of his body,
down a tentacle,
received upon
one of these little
forks; this fork
closes upon it like

a forceps, passes

: HER ‘Lipy.



it down to an-
other fork, and so on until it is dropped off into the
water.”

“QO, look there, look there!” cried Norma, inter-
rupting him. She pointed to a ledge of rock lining
the entrance of a little bay. I saw it distinctly.
* Such a beautiful work of art—the luckless mermaid’s
work-basket.

“O, how dreadfully she will feel when she knows
she has lost that!’ Helen said.

“°Tis a work-basket, that’s a fact,” quoth Tom.

“Work-basket!” laughed Rufus. “It’s a greedy
net-fish. That fish will stand up and look like a
snug latticed house on a minute’s notice. . Then little

‘innocent shrimps and fishes will run into it for shel-



ter, and of course —say, girls,” he interrupted him-

The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid,

self, “there’s her clothes-brush, as I live!. By the by,
that greedy, lazy net-fish has 81,920 limbs. Governor
Winthrop said so in 1680, when he sent a specimen to



Her CLorizs-BrusH.

the Royal Society in England. No luckless shrimp
can escape aé/ those limbs, be sure. If he escapes
70,000, there are still 10,920 to catch him. As for
that clothes-brush, it is a Crinoid. Some polar wave
must have washed that ashore, for it lives off the coast
of Greenland.”
The Lost Luggage of a Mermaid.

We looked farther for an hour or two, but saw
nothing more, only some brooches.

It must have been her trunk of little personal treas-
ures that was lost, we all concluded. We did not
believe that the wedding bark itself was wrecked ;
for we should have found more of her outfit, we think ;
there would have been dainty snowy garments, silk-
en robes, and. wonderful shawls, floating somewhere
in the sea: don’t you think so? Norma and I did.



OE ee





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'2012-05-30T18:51:14-04:00'
describe
'440241' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
36a83ac45d20e7a2e5ba6db7cbedff03
7e38e4799e6f94ac5c3acbe8e0b668aac8625de8
'2012-05-30T18:51:28-04:00'
describe
'2510248' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHQ' 'sip-files00008.tif'
0221e6d9e7ca5c4c7e020888907dc34e
2638d4b96ac7a705ac7edd672152ce8f2b6d16e4
'2012-05-30T18:47:53-04:00'
describe
'203424' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHR' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
0ca8fcbb8df9ed05b56523dde0960086
7c7916c3c0a02fd24b1051d4602f3601df6e1493
'2012-05-30T18:50:41-04:00'
describe
'27929' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHS' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
fdbb199d44d1b24c5c816be02f1411b3
99dbe889be3d7e8bbe4179bb7e37da239bd397cb
'2012-05-30T18:49:45-04:00'
describe
'2666416' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
b0fb128444dbee8792a2a491a48c44c5
88049fe64579e9d1d2cc29884c9867a4ed2a1bb8
'2012-05-30T18:47:55-04:00'
describe
'428156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHU' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
c7f26123615bcf16910514ca9b08b7d9
c92e4883b1aad9fa7c2fe772881609d85a4084d7
'2012-05-30T18:48:12-04:00'
describe
'191636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHV' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
4523a33d823f447f18a20a5cc0f0f07f
df3398ccd9d5ce3176d6082df7e4d9b82961da52
'2012-05-30T18:50:24-04:00'
describe
'335920' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHW' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
2d7351b174c81f62f43058d77a0e4bd7
59bdf5d5b7e62a322a66f7b8d931ee8cfd5a4033
'2012-05-30T18:49:43-04:00'
describe
'2611036' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHX' 'sip-files00018.tif'
40db2e3e01fb111547e5d52b245be0ed
b98e7ef587fe6bae65817f83fea6cd65c0e0c35f
'2012-05-30T18:50:53-04:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
bad1c13802948940533f1f8d9a6ed647
5f35787dc775e393d89e7402e1c7918e544dbb57
'2012-05-30T18:51:20-04:00'
describe
'146722' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWHZ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f170552c02e1b9ef94d6f6f9b018e0ea
3c4d9c860ba6a777b491fac9d1efef826fc9d906
'2012-05-30T18:51:36-04:00'
describe
'46872' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIA' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
1aea42795380431452f609807861abf4
34bbed0dccfc84302153af074422899267af15c3
describe
'46414' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
59bc59001a88bf85efdaba026762c466
2349be8566ed5ef7e1cd84da1f2df6bb684e345c
'2012-05-30T18:51:13-04:00'
describe
'325362' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIC' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
ba381446eda20cd5baca22c19d99318e
4eb639f54ca216b3385a64867a1cdaed8172a8d4
'2012-05-30T18:48:13-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWID' 'sip-files00055.txt'
36f0ffbe703dc19dae13fbd2aa006808
cc8a8b3193c72f5fc98d38eb13f59b918d61b315
'2012-05-30T18:49:28-04:00'
describe
'422876' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
9b717cc0ee490f28c5db06ff38627b4f
192b6ef85efe4230ff1ce63da2ecc75f9e8d4ab4
'2012-05-30T18:48:20-04:00'
describe
'436486' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIF' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
93587bd8546d784a13c9f38180024a9e
12072e20557517268346db41684085a611f03237
'2012-05-30T18:49:20-04:00'
describe
'32607' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIG' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
b99b8d8181c3fb947427e9dc975110d6
2e067b32581e5bc738ad87cf2dcee6e76caded04
'2012-05-30T18:49:51-04:00'
describe
'327380' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIH' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
2106becff1e95baf0390d06d60339063
f735f23a2a6b8c0621980cc1d02149f32cccfa4a
'2012-05-30T18:48:54-04:00'
describe
'22482' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWII' 'sip-files00027.pro'
3ce698984e58f5cec44f17ee0e187e8d
5eb9f67e73bbb1ceec06ce6263e2f02ff8092462
describe
'331769' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIJ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
c0aa1ea88f7d2f061a1b162428cfe996
26aef775b53c2f1d9ad8eb1184516664970f8734
'2012-05-30T18:50:04-04:00'
describe
'318008' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIK' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
47743351f170ba0d55abc143153bc310
cc0d96663caf6b119e7b85f79bf4a9cc86022574
'2012-05-30T18:47:56-04:00'
describe
'2644112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIL' 'sip-files00038.tif'
ad9ad89d635b18286a2b09c2f18f0a5d
adede160e8daa6dfc73a029c6dba76454bc9bd4c
describe
'390742' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIM' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
0ca4900339e251d6462a0a9240909b75
1e81004208ebded58ded44df5579a6c8d575e802
'2012-05-30T18:51:23-04:00'
describe
'408831' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIN' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
7dad6d427732ef28f0a466211e954740
24977ebef05990ffff57f94e822c0ba1088ad984
'2012-05-30T18:48:34-04:00'
describe
'30000' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIO' 'sip-files00015.pro'
96db0ca388cbe24a7eb74712be585e31
8a4c549c2c201ff8fc2331389c8d2aa3730380d2
'2012-05-30T18:51:09-04:00'
describe
'35133' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIP' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
fa4fe9d87b55d9b723e5241e175e8c06
743469cc270081e782b8c32391c3eee4fdcba8f3
'2012-05-30T18:51:40-04:00'
describe
'148262' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
e675043f180741b2459185fba9a1d648
34a674976fb2cd19a76bc1abde038d5c323806e5
'2012-05-30T18:51:05-04:00'
describe
'140195' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIR' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
e229218610e64e3b1c55a6b000c38355
3217aa9af54a0cef47321d9e42260616f88df633
'2012-05-30T18:49:05-04:00'
describe
'150821' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIS' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
c6c8981b1a545a692ec0c018051ae843
c4ea03dc0f92ba717d6b80e59b646a40c46ff4a5
describe
'141165' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIT' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
b86d020900ef5b35168ff43adb1da4d7
0883303bc010bf6d42d94ccf51fd5d8458d3e85b
'2012-05-30T18:48:27-04:00'
describe
'45730' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIU' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
fab0ce3cb9f682636d6d7401117c6921
7ae6f15c4e018ca3d6923344f26bb6f4cb848419
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIV' 'sip-files00062.txt'
1c21793e26152e2dd7a9e10fb2c4fa66
566b1cf6a78c6815e27da6efad4934e1c18945b4
'2012-05-30T18:50:57-04:00'
describe
'2632884' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIW' 'sip-files00031.tif'
f0ca638636aa27186911be3f4081cb6a
3e4e2495a066dfa55ff05b9773c3956f953c7c73
describe
'338940' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIX' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
bf940ef76e94ccf66d56d6b9f528519d
4d5e69de224a1d425bfe1ccc04f69f278a8aebee
'2012-05-30T18:48:53-04:00'
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIY' 'sip-files00053.pro'
eee49e0037e8b2e21f850ac7fa6dc4e0
1bc807859638a427385ae931637e39cc10d7a94a
describe
'2550360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWIZ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
9646f968bf73a138fe3b3a0bd9dd988e
53b028f03b65cdf87631cb0a8108d32d6c91c6b5
describe
'333981' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJA' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a4c4e688520850075c49d48c6f2770ba
c457f79e726b2e2df823152599b84ef8be1696c4
describe
'45465' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJB' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
8f9da67bdf7e20524818ebb588768545
57e3a49068c6760a98eb77a3a2262fb563679a03
describe
'2732548' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
bd38153525900e9c94d318fae57da9bb
dc283e84c69dba33871ba9085da3432421da15d1
'2012-05-30T18:49:16-04:00'
describe
'45287' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJD' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
b2c2c308313ca947079abbf63aa3ece7
489b8b4eb4eaa3b24070a4b004c48a6da5c312d5
'2012-05-30T18:50:16-04:00'
describe
'191085' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJE' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
dbd073eb608a50c81c56dcf2f43ecbf3
f25321eefdf79fa5de3830dda1d8b9cf96a69abe
'2012-05-30T18:49:41-04:00'
describe
'285' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
83843bd6ef48aff5bf61822bae11f22b
aab571710ca5bf2741f130f464ea0690fb04408b
describe
'2777112' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJG' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f5b47043307a975e5153c259b4606f17
d6ab5294dfaa0322a9cfdd59f82b674379a3300b
describe
'2683936' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJH' 'sip-files00063.tif'
1339a652d334995c096f802214e92de8
1558aafa1f77161b5804bf856014af3b4c4ade63
'2012-05-30T18:49:06-04:00'
describe
'2709084' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJI' 'sip-files00014.tif'
f20eac95849856f9a34f977162139792
cc405cefda06f4e2df78284bbf7b8ae44ef6a878
'2012-05-30T18:50:35-04:00'
describe
'46390' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJJ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
2de4dd448206cb28f3a619182fa724ce
726168575b3f36d53bfceef8181bbc014e107dae
'2012-05-30T18:49:30-04:00'
describe
'328538' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJK' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
7f76285a5840b6e6ae5b0f2023287ae1
4d36cd033f68c10dca3476b5c00ffb1f195da51b
'2012-05-30T18:48:57-04:00'
describe
'27926' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJL' 'sip-files00062.pro'
80c8fda4459d4c4682c2cc59176d2ed8
b1ce30fee785288808ff98f20383a4c244d4238d
'2012-05-30T18:48:38-04:00'
describe
'31503' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJM' 'sip-files00030.pro'
059431e7a3e9ffd49b67ebcbd20e587d
b7400847bce237879cdd945d129024f181d459c4
describe
'513787' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJN' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
16ec038d465e1b4dc90a0165b62a4443
5e2241d7baa70ed5daa2143af6e910dc8195acd2
describe
'33643' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
802a2ffdd7c8d0a7d33f2ce013f7556e
89510441c0cb1a2604882abe80b23c6ddb77998b
'2012-05-30T18:49:11-04:00'
describe
'2734844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJP' 'sip-files00040.tif'
ee83011d51be3f54f404a4096c4f9506
18535d6117d62f1c9d9c7263df349699215ca914
describe
'21' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJQ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
8d7ebfb5eb0375d3d5088532027c0a1a
0d5e4f6462228b963ac7d2d1c212035fe5984de2
'2012-05-30T18:48:22-04:00'
describe
'337952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJR' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
0a00045945f735241a34a7e9775db72b
2f1814bb59f102d2c93417ba18750a76f6667c09
describe
'27403' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
0c7798f58667f1d3978c46401db6de9f
b28ea3abe3a36c4720c457905c38d8c3343c03ae
'2012-05-30T18:48:39-04:00'
describe
'322397' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJT' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
65412942feb702da085ea9aeccdd8bee
98f34e9dbdd788f48f79c63da6ef6fb0008d39c5
'2012-05-30T18:49:40-04:00'
describe
'325871' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJU' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
57caac30ea123c62d8c9178054a88370
8cd24d8213e951f98f56b2cc85cf8ccc6814a0ee
'2012-05-30T18:50:37-04:00'
describe
'48715' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJV' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
efbe365defb1ceed19988a0ab7a45bf5
4b6dedf7c50c866fa4a4c9f871321af9201ccf47
describe
'20444' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJW' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
f5fdad9048dace138c10301d29ca38ca
9a1a7741dde40ab07c773fe2a6345683c4140a26
'2012-05-30T18:51:38-04:00'
describe
'129908' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJX' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
ae673949f0aa75380ffe931222c532bd
9a5fbaa511e2a8d75b86b5a85c752ddc1b4fbe74
'2012-05-30T18:48:21-04:00'
describe
'330437' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
8d58975a6363d02eead9991be0d5f15c
6ba492b538535d46add29a8365cc08310a537b85
'2012-05-30T18:50:01-04:00'
describe
'31928' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWJZ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
0dbcd1cb7fb2d571dbf07ce2931be9c2
d3e592782612b404f523e25f8f4fb22415282bdb
describe
'12009' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKA' 'sip-files00066.pro'
75d7e6127c0d102f185a7f64df73f734
4a8683ff401db3da7d7f8eade3abbb9feabfcec1
'2012-05-30T18:48:03-04:00'
describe
'320704' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
77313b7c2d957d5cf44c4fa0ebc56271
e16b46b355e87e02d8672688c3a15591ab1edf70
describe
'684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKC' 'sip-files00064.pro'
8d14db6d4f30781cd163918f4ac7ff1f
a2ee6a2f0c83d735988e8766971556ed708cf4ca
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKD' 'sip-files00017.txt'
aa84977ad19da941701a7c53fdb42aa9
1f386ac9aeb575c3d833a292bf0ef27318a00d6d
'2012-05-30T18:47:58-04:00'
describe
'45967' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKE' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1cb3354dbf3baefd556dc561035e9357
8472c1cb20dcd55e4703d2d07e4196de538e6486
'2012-05-30T18:48:35-04:00'
describe
'2729952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
1b0f1ee853cc5fe9c607f3d6b8b55c93
1a871eb97df7614ef00d6cb0bc048671ffe50771
'2012-05-30T18:50:39-04:00'
describe
'2615924' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKG' 'sip-files00010.tif'
30a2234ae048759f80e08a5367344cc3
c6bec92b7f65f66f7f2f9f9b4222f651a5e70e6d
'2012-05-30T18:49:46-04:00'
describe
'327746' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKH' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
8c1d9b972f0418bdc5fd2f007ce291ec
f11dd9afb78e1362f9fb3821efc9b9a74f9623a9
'2012-05-30T18:48:29-04:00'
describe
'444981' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKI' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
56e4067d3ae207734ee68c36ebe8c896
4de74c884b94fc1a13ca97c627f612f933c271f7
'2012-05-30T18:50:22-04:00'
describe
'168' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
31d1692192353237b3ccacb5c63acc0d
1c88f1b947296cc27bd3bedfa17fe30139460d2c
describe
'14192' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKK' 'sip-files00025.pro'
912ba1af4111d998c326af991e289c45
fffd347faad196c87184c5c15c7f4e106ccc5821
describe
'37339' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKL' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
42bf0ada4a4654ccfa98a013e08d0763
4cb28aac9e60a5390e953f3fed19b2ae7b06659a
describe
'709877' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKM' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
372b41d482e477144e335fd563c44131
0ab4fd72ee38ae2f4856edeacf7a2e6568b5b6f5
'2012-05-30T18:48:33-04:00'
describe
'123216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKN' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
8de4e8fca1c5eea97e44ba6af25d93b6
3235b9533b4b01fdae9204883e3b823af74736d8
'2012-05-30T18:48:11-04:00'
describe
'326710' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKO' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
39d957c161a4b10391dadc7993650a45
38d6ef1e704e08f79383c24883bf1d71c77bae0e
'2012-05-30T18:48:08-04:00'
describe
'149341' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKP' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
00996422b6b71758455687f90fca377f
fc7d70edde0af655ebf9c7fef0ea8edd8663017b
describe
'2578088' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKQ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
8ff12c3bc646ddeaa056b4bc5ed28c9b
34954e251084e44d4e9a0bb95b61e3b7ce1a1834
'2012-05-30T18:49:58-04:00'
describe
'87278' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKR' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
79d436e40b7525290b80a48049290abb
dc60af1f67d6a05119dea48fdf27f42689dd6ff1
describe
'31451' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKS' 'sip-files00032.pro'
458cbe1d293794d762aec64ea28908a3
5d80f6f23c2606273bada727b5854803057a9c73
'2012-05-30T18:49:37-04:00'
describe
'2671496' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
e44ed15730ef356df47f1961ffd276ae
dcfdca31f7be6fddad964a5d4fde3f80acd87ddf
'2012-05-30T18:48:14-04:00'
describe
'408050' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
5e755f6dc5324ffbd237303804d07338
177d713429e012177487d8aa8ac29fc0e21d1002
'2012-05-30T18:49:56-04:00'
describe
'317755' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKV' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
be2a46f3d1267610e12790e12e27dcf2
54e0760c64e08e1cb2fc7e37731704a375743cdd
'2012-05-30T18:50:15-04:00'
describe
'323597' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKW' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
307706101e91714d3964edf841e6c0ba
65ba9b5360ffc298060a0486719ff8131d67b4cf
describe
'149404' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKX' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7b1a2e4dbedbfa8807758633acb54b76
f69f7362dcb05b59ffadcb5200bc352d68830aa4
describe
'4686' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
6a216c15289f9064acd7f398232a08a6
cd4a4049c4c2827db380f6c84b3e85ffcc67d8ce
describe
'405886' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWKZ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
cbe26937134de5ce9fb1566d9f3f0938
831a8a0a44b96c1b77cce9902edf81a00cad0a58
describe
'310277' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLA' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
51745394b7e06f4febf3e72cf21aff23
394abb7c9ac0c0783175a46e5a483291b69a052f
'2012-05-30T18:48:24-04:00'
describe
'149798' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLB' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
97a7ad7e16a7f33e59e8da6d43e98bf5
93837cedb1b313b3ac536a9a4b057f215e3263d2
'2012-05-30T18:48:46-04:00'
describe
'441209' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLC' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
5ab0bd0f7e41fb1b7e58032481d6a536
9e9243ce31ae86c952810a957b55a9c041b7e191
'2012-05-30T18:51:26-04:00'
describe
'145708' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLD' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
f73084d520174fd0e880b10fe407e959
ba81ae47a4089daaa8f21d3a257728e1396769fa
'2012-05-30T18:48:23-04:00'
describe
'11' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLE' 'sip-files00069.txt'
14a388db7b43c8340c5fd9e6c40f7563
7b29f44fb47eb9e2ed50de07d2a3cf2248ff141a
describe
'433701' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
7820796a31dfc46dbba8112c85df8716
22a504ad9cc2d29cff2636f94da337b0ea9a1bf4
describe
'422176' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
96c284d5c922116a59ae63dbbac1c7d5
fca980c4291855fcf45a2ac725bf26a479530801
'2012-05-30T18:51:18-04:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLH' 'sip-files00043.txt'
eec1ac27c210031f5c04029168042b56
5192dd8826261127ab668cb1432eb60e4cc1718b
describe
'32523' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLI' 'sip-files00020.pro'
ef64a2e12c04fe3db0ad53f1f79effae
20bfca16b80f152dcdc9b657d4b4eaad697d9558
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLJ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
7215ee9c7d9dc229d2921a40e899ec5f
b858cb282617fb0956d960215c8e84d1ccf909c6
describe
'140405' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
566ad39e32a1338064c0e42645f04828
2e23b4cfb1f4e798580ef2aae97e34dc0ec2330b
'2012-05-30T18:48:50-04:00'
describe
'30976' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLL' 'sip-files00029.pro'
79e431fb64550d42eadea656a38f0f75
8d36241c3c9d95f329c1371d324171185efef1d1
'2012-05-30T18:48:09-04:00'
describe
'361102' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLM' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
c71bbb7cfa171222713ce0ac0830da98
5a80e6fedbd6e8272382d1144d408bcfac26a454
'2012-05-30T18:51:21-04:00'
describe
'432160' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLN' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
505a8131f2c26384bbaf005222f44d78
7127c9f4d7e53c940b4355c97c39f9dbb4cfff8a
'2012-05-30T18:51:07-04:00'
describe
'73504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLO' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
090a21a796c9f06303cca6063946a663
6cbb07de53b97af84e794444abee2d5a72b5aefd
'2012-05-30T18:48:17-04:00'
describe
'2736828' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLP' 'sip-files00037.tif'
e5528dfbab59fca88630b3deb0a9a60d
ddea5a9e6feae55c4304ab12727b95067db0c723
describe
'336058' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLQ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
0b148beb8cd2738e95ea89922acd4068
2b6481d1cd61885d700d1539879e613a196fdf04
'2012-05-30T18:50:58-04:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLR' 'sip-files00032.txt'
96822be214608d1106af9a7a3764fa6b
67db83540e46643ae509a1970ce6cb84c4bf040f
'2012-05-30T18:50:59-04:00'
describe
'8675528' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLS' 'sip-files00068.tif'
cd6952795494e2c70377fadcb16783b6
eb7d52267c21d11a4f35dd143671f2031ffc55fa
describe
'441449' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLT' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
d202372d084b0ad8c62996905ef43784
285b00fc5c25c0dd4009cdd5766121aa1f196854
'2012-05-30T18:49:09-04:00'
describe
'69711' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
8d398d0ee0bcd561648ccebf7328c983
fb0afb66c64ccffc81555d1ee90da80c6c0d4ccf
'2012-05-30T18:50:05-04:00'
describe
'305' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLV' 'sip-files00005.pro'
93b145699b5eeb0503ceac072a2e39c7
54ff2a75c166b8bbb2ac90326727ca6e925aedf1
'2012-05-30T18:50:32-04:00'
describe
'42436' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLW' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
6483732511220c8ac74ee82165e872ce
d4ec427ca26b5d4c6f5b015aaf21f8cf1be284a7
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLX' 'sip-files00020.txt'
cec4d4be2105ffc6b96cb625539ef56c
ac7b7d532b8b790dcb14eb22a6be87abdf841651
describe
'336193' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
9cf9373660c1512f41791ac49064f8b8
8ae3c8cb1f38bf473f8db3906724d512fa14484c
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWLZ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
a7180b52fd91c08f5f91892435a2cfce
f46d845a026afdfdfee07bac004802a25fe800b7
'2012-05-30T18:49:17-04:00'
describe
'197042' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMA' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
6a5c321a6b088416049f5456d73c4762
69464c8fec4968d64915363bb256a8fca501523d
describe
'2699572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMB' 'sip-files00054.tif'
89319edecd6985e154598e3bd7736420
c4196eae0d2b22baaf1772faa2fa0152e85dc2bd
'2012-05-30T18:48:47-04:00'
describe
'30310' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
f9312619269e91d2b01b74e278a5a6c6
ac42e4fafd5a081505c0fe261127bc7fe5a1732a
'2012-05-30T18:49:48-04:00'
describe
'44002' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMD' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
971b8235e5bbdc091558d014e926d68a
3f696d45a833600b6d6e029877267fdf17fc519a
'2012-05-30T18:47:57-04:00'
describe
'67985' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWME' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
77b8fdf76bc9033f2a8ef5b0cba6fef0
e4ffd89dffbaacf2b4781fe335c5c6fa983ac279
'2012-05-30T18:50:06-04:00'
describe
'44986' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMF' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
e3f6b7c333264aa35c269d8b5202ea7b
dfa8aab6ca7d19ba461295efc3c944379ebebc2b
'2012-05-30T18:51:19-04:00'
describe
'135527' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
ae14eecb98598d3322583a4dfcaf9e6a
b955e4133cdcd34be5d10ac3b2159ac70f0378f6
describe
'323951' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMH' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
a2691e045af5ce48ec29a5a76ace4714
c139322314865b495f4204c1647b7d8f43758eb9
'2012-05-30T18:49:55-04:00'
describe
'288' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMI' 'sip-files00069.pro'
39e92b4c43a3983bec7aab1b22c3204d
7d0b00b246b9369bba95ac6bf3cfe9d335210659
describe
'142384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMJ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
82ac8f08d885e66547f97557d53481c2
659efe1f4505bae46f6996898e9708b9f6175fa1
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMK' 'sip-files00009.txt'
7984c4061869d2d63652cc8ff0ddc005
52b90bf9252f89245e65aa76d7576f6079e4745e
describe
'12731' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWML' 'sip-files00065.pro'
eea8847ffe8fcb2412cb3ea74eb61455
356138beb578e336c633621d1cbd836030a7aa0c
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMM' 'sip-files00030.txt'
f0a9a627fa455777386fa5888ddff873
1e7d67d06ca8d8a055e27a67a7f20a8f74d011db
describe
'335103' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
686fb6d60d0f636af3794885dae8b55f
2af19a2ebd8870e5c77223c31458f6c2143d744e
describe
'504280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMO' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
3e3124be9944550363c5244679cc65a0
dc5329c59dd1e2d37671b569e049ef72ffa8adb3
'2012-05-30T18:49:12-04:00'
describe
'458590' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMP' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
7c9c08d3daa08dd53c4335cf6cce422f
3e31d47fe8d76ccff21110d7d407b88daa2231f2
'2012-05-30T18:49:25-04:00'
describe
'44913' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMQ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
388d6f862f8c6816c9ff3abf08852b56
038afc26bb3d6e78b4642e3e25a1e6a41ab8b4e5
'2012-05-30T18:48:28-04:00'
describe
'2714644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMR' 'sip-files00027.tif'
159e278944e7c95f0fc317dbdc0e87d1
cc08dc1ea21d80f02a198dc70b13f48ccfee710f
describe
'4672' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMS' 'sip-files00024.pro'
07d6f025c28fc97e727a6992472e7e41
fef7eacdf40d1c44f1b98e1d2a6366fa7d40bd5d
describe
'34078' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMT' 'sip-files00016.pro'
0955689159a6ed3c27d0398f2466d896
7190215327f7b3daaf5a3967290518502f176176
'2012-05-30T18:48:31-04:00'
describe
'702' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMU' 'sip-files00052.txt'
2c9eca4252c4fe78d7b90ad8759344fa
239cb2c9e1c8fb86e27352aee9e7ad3a8804fcd3
'2012-05-30T18:51:08-04:00'
describe
'41896' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMV' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
1053adf3746ff89616a1a56d8a635e78
1d0743c2effcf836230669436754802fd804dfc1
describe
'217117' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMW' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
52afa73b6b8b1c76b0c29a3c10772d4c
e984c390867b5ece200a4e9155d090a70eb3ecf2
describe
'25684' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMX' 'sip-files00063.pro'
08693c812ec186970b6aff0dc9f09536
51c6444010f9dd6d0b5d435e880f1008247611c5
describe
'31173' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9b428b001d6fcb6ac394f9fd39ffdec0
b8d1167a7bf0dc0afa676976f094cd7d93c0f87d
'2012-05-30T18:50:34-04:00'
describe
'45720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWMZ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
f0ed347f0b156ed9de46d44d97728d02
db4e710a6e9c1abcc241d7675b4a0a1508422c00
'2012-05-30T18:51:33-04:00'
describe
'2650276' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNA' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e26875b39d67ba8338f97badce1f67cf
a90b0b0522406d2b11092da8c3289036664d19f7
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNB' 'sip-files00061.txt'
6294c28cfc1509fe1bf9c4f863e8a756
bdfa5991784d6ec91f1dc03ba1f83c91c1f06366
'2012-05-30T18:48:48-04:00'
describe
'134336' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNC' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
a3b09a778d995153462fabb2b7a5bfca
c7b4c3940bd160e26f78ac44223fb0c6085f721e
describe
'419313' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWND' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
fdd4f6fe432c51f1c07f77b9360ff1b6
ee7a081c57138af24972674553fd969098052a99
describe
'46758' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
c6f5bb92b3d6769689889d22b16fd40c
e1ff95c202609ee809950f71ecab193d458530b9
describe
'184' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNF' 'sip-files00012.txt'
a31b656e48a300895f8d0f063244b6f2
2e6c5ade196f7217e5ae812b0b99163c459a6728
'2012-05-30T18:51:31-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'1337' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNG' 'sip-files00063.txt'
3b9e0424d0787cefbe2a86895d565f50
8822df3a5b5c2e3e3d38024a0465e1f15b3b266d
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNH' 'sip-files00065.txt'
bed301e04262a8a9085d85495090af6b
d7ae9b12307636d62d386cde436bd43f9568544f
describe
'47425' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNI' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
01e2016ce7dfa9ea099ecca13031d478
9c3afd6d08f74765348cccf09232b50550e93ffe
describe
'449800' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNJ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
330bde66131a5f21b52c679890088c95
60cecdbbf12c021328a57014d9b86cc9d6163cef
describe
'17755' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
97a7f2f6a3dc354ff926651711bf5d45
3eedce509f7fc74f89804fc1f1aab5f6587b5f5e
'2012-05-30T18:49:03-04:00'
describe
'340243' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNL' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
1c77d779387f68fe5b2f76af4e23562a
214ff3678703fd6d56418b2c502609821271b298
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNM' 'sip-files00028.txt'
b4cad5b51ef1b1c240e92b6a1eda93b1
8d9bef765dae1dca80935d4a95599189d0a84c2c
'2012-05-30T18:48:25-04:00'
describe
'332643' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNN' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
99c53963021f256c9926b421f8d3a88f
50ad6829ec1cf7ebef729ae1b64124d0d812e4a7
'2012-05-30T18:48:07-04:00'
describe
'333173' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNO' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
4af25ce763bde41b107f39003b1c3d20
171fdab2e9d276a498f7275a92737cbf9496014e
'2012-05-30T18:48:52-04:00'
describe
'76882' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNP' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
28b06290d709d63d245401f9d7d1a5e7
f08f7a49fa4888ce6fd513d1d369ff1784fbebf5
describe
'337082' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNQ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
fcaf72252f9286114d75e1883100963b
52f44b9209a24e83fc2c693b8c04e9439d03c119
describe
'114022' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNR' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
89cdfae269bd101cfdcb15b164cd53a3
c6b29571325ed5b9d7f06da2227bfdfc4d86a24e
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNS' 'sip-files00067.pro'
b2d3033e997310ebb0529a50137beca7
75bcf4f1ae0ef5ad253893cc95859c56fec546b1
describe
'2588936' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
404f82b4812b013044b42c1ae9ffa738
48fef11277f000c63c3d598040bf6205a3d897cd
describe
'46401' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNU' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
f62f4d590179191e46a65309326ad1f1
a331b4574ec9ef5cddf289942d39704b2653f465
describe
'425970' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNV' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
bfbb001edb2e06d9f4a81203e6f7afe0
75d7d71d711f7372780334330d19447616642571
describe
'73398' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNW' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
0e026fccfd43faefaf9aad629b6aa1be
2f78757a0e7ace851d2e55d5bdf6e37e47b2ab7f
describe
'8684644' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNX' 'sip-files00001.tif'
cc849ce2df1436e0cdd707f80dc580f0
d3679e158395f72561511e4acc5b366a0f048a0f
describe
'414838' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNY' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
a5c49c838fdb22ab5710ced832d755fc
7a04872541b7658d4374983718d82258808bf8ce
'2012-05-30T18:48:16-04:00'
describe
'37573' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWNZ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8f049a12136afd2a41b173670383339e
15f51a87f0cbc014b5e5be3e77da9f6c353b7db7
describe
'334386' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
83b41d5897563b031a486891ab692c24
69a5043348fd0d1c3225af9aca6aff73eb7a0d87
'2012-05-30T18:51:34-04:00'
describe
'2738968' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOB' 'sip-files00013.tif'
bcc1fa955858633faf72a865a8423ed7
5435aec320dca4d1088125eb485e224dbf148f10
'2012-05-30T18:48:10-04:00'
describe
'4013' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOC' 'sip-files00006.pro'
b276ee61c7e8ef809af6dba0d42d8d61
0a070a20b4e8781d9ebdaefc709492a3d2ec05b3
describe
'329634' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOD' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
b18184dd90d91fca2fb07c64ebb6856b
4f86728c76aae26491e98e9339a6fdc9d5b1e8e2
'2012-05-30T18:49:04-04:00'
describe
'2649252' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOE' 'sip-files00006.tif'
7aa8f67e72ce5b690e530855cb164d03
5a351542d22d0af45fbca02700d12b4edaac224e
describe
'142284' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOF' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
19b728505eb5c45a689ee99ed18abc2a
41bfb4b438d26b864461f029ffa72ab4f1b09d09
describe
'25928' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOG' 'sip-files00026.pro'
5649bc55624f45b632082e415b1df615
b8005586ee29620abeef18ef71d3959769d79876
describe
'4152' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOH' 'sip-files00044.pro'
58ca3c3ef6d3b9bfdec7e9079488e6ac
2eec7c7848bda38e45924758333038c560acf5bd
describe
'146531' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOI' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
8bda83d3e94d4fa7f08799c553b50bb6
e712e61a092b8b541847e14342ce16856d34b025
describe
'441643' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
c6e6e1fe64080e1317d7cb271571f3d5
031bae67df852fba1a539ec7fd10341779f57d37
'2012-05-30T18:51:02-04:00'
describe
'332415' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOK' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
bc9d84364cebf0d9bf1b340cdfe72e0b
6169df92ad1ebba7ccd3ff0a3d222ba0cd3512a6
describe
'32880' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOL' 'sip-files00010.pro'
0e529d38bbb235060e99e565fc15524a
34b2d6893d9d89f743c27e07a1859f170c0ec517
describe
'339720' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOM' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
16be58f9bc2a6ae6ca944713c72dde83
a7980e3d67751e82a7fc745552be154e0b08dbc1
'2012-05-30T18:51:16-04:00'
describe
'122615' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWON' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
398644883fd1e3e17e1c1bf20728edd4
052800685c755d299d199de1ae96a96759bd6d3f
describe
'28657' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOO' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
45e81e2ad79764b04009f8f01bf69927
5e7bca66a687161b182e386107d76c34e8ea33f2
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
e9caf6dfc2962d0e9d3c1833ef0d92de
447f157e1bf5eb49542de5c01d23d37df006ac0f
describe
'2609556' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOQ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
60d450fa3b470af9ca409ae17abae0ed
01b080536a12b9fa163eacdef3dc812c1ff94ce8
describe
'46447' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOR' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
fbb5cb2c3c9826991ff4ea57d86791b1
359324c68dcc73ac1b6153dad17869155e0b437c
'2012-05-30T18:50:51-04:00'
describe
'26799' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOS' 'sip-files00033.pro'
c356a5df9620cdb65613f2e3f5a70f64
627b949d80e4fd4d33c558d9aeadf0a0d02984c7
'2012-05-30T18:48:51-04:00'
describe
'142504' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOT' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
66b09f4fcc023ce56de1669eb8413b8f
1d9941f8024c86c18453c5de3fd56c5406cccd9b
describe
'453216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOU' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
89036c9dbf54e895c3acd2a34237a186
92093ae0387e41e1785ce46dcc608fb7b12bab70
describe
'2631356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOV' 'sip-files00035.tif'
640bb2664e9ea2f7296ab998f14f775e
daee8fbb2757de516e6dfe61e35873805b341bc5
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOW' 'sip-files00026.txt'
091e713304ed738293477f5d8afbcc0c
2dd6ac9f3a0124993ec33a4ed090002101c01f0b
describe
'39755' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOX' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
d81af71a6d39232b98cbea8cafc0ea53
29976aa722d35d523b00d0f2c1f9e52877e874c9
'2012-05-30T18:49:36-04:00'
describe
'47175' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
23a0eaa3979be32666c1e8355d9bf410
05f569c50214d3cd00d725cd4cbc2b35ac922eab
describe
'99156' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWOZ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
0d9dfeb893753b3e7b16d521a989b773
0ba545fe0b368fec5a2340404894c38b77f3279a
describe
'70866' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPA' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
8a2eb4e637e66c9ae730707325f70d8c
071e0b596e31123872a59a247f655c7289fb945a
describe
'316481' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPB' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
0a4889fbafba996c46c9044a53c654cb
ac003180ed458c5e93362110cffe3bfd17b4e5ca
describe
'134748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPC' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e04806087b75d2da97e599b8aff120b0
3b539871dbfae19a49a9771a29b7cd6eced9b991
describe
'48138' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPD' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
b9a13bee8d56134e472dfc0b71a43136
ae49a6e7ae05dc751128d78120206c734208c504
describe
'145843' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPE' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
9e8523aafc9d326c9f3eb4a45dc394f6
7134b78b07fe5dcc7b84f35e059bd601037ca519
describe
'2655900' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPF' 'sip-files00015.tif'
e097e3273f30c5415b3dd5da7e8f9b71
f2c285633af3a56aa13500215e9e1b360f674c3a
describe
'42846' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPG' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
bf6d3d41dcc5460948b5d0d2f679b0ae
9b7f1e1bf4d3cf8541af29cde1d4708f53fa6649
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPH' 'sip-files00050.pro'
61cdfb6794c6a6fd425c8f8aeb299c0c
ad2f05e413042d3e773161d15a881ef2173a4616
'2012-05-30T18:50:42-04:00'
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
b8456b9d665e963ec5148dadb81b2e02
8da5788606c22379ba486d535764fcefdd33aae8
describe
'439036' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPJ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e3ef83515819cef67ca2cb68951790fa
34fd7551cdffaa1994bd0fa2e5ab01d2447feb7c
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPK' 'sip-files00022.txt'
d4142afafac50fafddc6a1c29883b5bf
a437f54a4236aa38a69fd13d9939c321cdc4a024
'2012-05-30T18:49:15-04:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPL' 'sip-files00036.txt'
8bc0e8ee15237ecb1a61c29f55ab0093
e9bbceea63d893fcedf86d2b20bdce662e1df6b8
'2012-05-30T18:48:30-04:00'
describe
'44134' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPM' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
f121cdebbfcf456ef6abfee52a970cd7
9daa9b7b3bb263c58016a8c50c8e4ce4a3aefaaf
describe
'140256' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPN' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
cb2466b56d1a2551bf7734df2bad8262
1f909b3f9977139a6cc81eae9445104385569bb9
describe
'44846' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPO' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
76f8cbca3372030c4fc8d0a66417bc8c
8799a9b9eac1d288a216b85890e8893cc379aadc
describe
'426330' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPP' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
60510bdc13267ab50f48ddcf517d2f51
c14a136d349f354a4b256eb6cd72f4ebb8773759
'2012-05-30T18:50:26-04:00'
describe
'32196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPQ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
547edd2254242043294a18fc587f6e23
30b45b4ef907b7440b9afd7c3c2f98f1e0f66b19
describe
'72121' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPR' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
72c7dbcbe06374964523c27f9cb43946
5f85bef33a5a7a4c711e067ec0e08af81cb319f8
'2012-05-30T18:49:00-04:00'
describe
'144959' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
4983b7c0b61489c48d2eb174a354578a
ef2709baf1093e6584cc94514f146a475dce24d4
describe
'178' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
121d46f6c993bf02660e2c534371124f
4addb5dfe1f808041b4935b48d7f696a538bba69
'2012-05-30T18:49:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'33257' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPU' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
b7fa6cf7554281c78428d96bff6ead9e
7cdb01012c7dd9120f58a7c99e430d2e13ee97a4
describe
'840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPV' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d2845f02ef5b4fda8228123cbf64c7c0
5220fc33bbead36fad7ab96ce3459f673a10d6a2
'2012-05-30T18:48:45-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'126043' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPW' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
abacac953c43e82e91bb1b2a841c6695
f312d3eb5079e3278a4c28c77e700012f7994bd2
'2012-05-30T18:50:14-04:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPX' 'sip-files00027.txt'
e198e54e5d8ba327b46c8f0c194f7bed
d125e584864454bc64220c11e6f1bc5f78269b4b
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
4cd14f6b4b8f699fa7859f68c554439d
fa791f79b60239b1d1f1e3825acca89596f64736
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWPZ' 'sip-files00002.pro'
29b921a47d492ed25de6561d1d0050fb
89f26731dbcb2a7170ace6e103092ecb086e9e1d
'2012-05-30T18:48:42-04:00'
describe
'127108' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
0b6889b63d2e6348fdda625e75c9e814
1f39c01d0c24caeb634b626f33d9756ead420c2f
'2012-05-30T18:48:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQB' 'sip-files00004.pro'
a27604f18311cd1b5f7b1912e84a3be9
4f3e2b3679221331fc73ac1c6d4b43dd6674eb75
'2012-05-30T18:49:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQC' 'sip-files00010.txt'
e1ec0dc9dcf7354a54e093605e6dfce3
b602902c876b0cd4a17587217fc2bdd3de5ca1dd
'2012-05-30T18:50:08-04:00'
describe
'48981' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQD' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
afc312bc64dff4a546d3ce30d3498f33
689f27b7a747cd143cc2be9e3898bcbd7e12da77
'2012-05-30T18:50:30-04:00'
describe
'34363' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQE' 'sip-files00048.pro'
a1f600d056ba79cec9165b469aabb711
83af5222783f6138f4827f79b43a356888648ac6
describe
'424120' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQF' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
2f81dae3a2ec4e4f8b0d8f1385bb608b
b17e53a8d2eaf49acfcb2c0e190fcc95ff1366ce
describe
'129743' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQG' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
a8191b24e8c84e3d6f09c245e5d039d4
d65febc96d2971d65529cc359a6b1ddb7d671bf5
describe
'2675244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
20213eaaad8ffc20dc0daae1268f29fa
b578014af3663224ad68d16f74707fd113a4d3b7
describe
'316003' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQI' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
b6be9db4019a7abdfb455dc78d9083ca
0c8aa789680849f337780bfc4de2d709ee6a4207
describe
'2700780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQJ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a4a7f5b790afa7d8a3e375f4281c21ce
e47232de0e5d9b54952113f0d582845763c251d6
describe
'332934' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0d0cf459bc0e934c769194ae805c36a7
d5a30e2c4b737014cee7efd36ba0d0953ed270c7
describe
'350633' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQL' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
f858c3d126a76c0b01cd83db6f3c091e
0d43ae3e562f855ab2d5e07c07ecd0c3b5e02fd5
describe
'150740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQM' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
94479305e793e7848489606d4df54a0e
5abe261aaba209acf4143303643dc24e8326da61
describe
'27841' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQN' 'sip-files00017.pro'
147f4b1e03910b3284f25f28f41093d8
be1cd6b8166630a63ff4575f2dc72bfb7f43c485
'2012-05-30T18:50:27-04:00'
describe
'2671304' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
dd808d908ad7df04af50e2c46d7f1361
3f5672e57bd5954fc8cf10465220f0f7a3d91a4e
describe
'449222' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQP' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
035f6c038a988a69f53f5ca05089f09c
b70f9048038344f3b998ce9441bd7a6ffba44cbe
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQQ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
af56ad2ed26ef514a8ad03f41cf3dfde
c0d2a92900bd2cae2b7f46b031fcda0e18bb8a28
describe
'23906' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQR' 'sip-files00056.pro'
e320381a871e24b703a655b53d7dc463
e9fa4511c73c52e3ef2f5205a9a9ff785091c02f
describe
'25622' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQS' 'sip-files00042.pro'
2424081983042128c2a4ceea8f57e97c
373ee3b763c0b6edf1dd9dc847e82dd816d1b966
'2012-05-30T18:51:35-04:00'
describe
'4322' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQT' 'sip-files00007.pro'
38a87268013fec27a925dae7b8f2717c
78c9b1816fc1efb7cbf6cda167caa531ef8f4032
'2012-05-30T18:50:54-04:00'
describe
'2646780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQU' 'sip-files00012.tif'
3664f7d431bb1828bc545fd470ed8a29
01f78a75af3db4e2fe5ab183d2eabca694d70992
describe
'2657840' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQV' 'sip-files00050.tif'
ec20c6871d060407234672e915414631
da0aabd81515667993eae6b0c878dec6809bd2de
'2012-05-30T18:49:14-04:00'
describe
'323454' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQW' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
2e7d61f4a92eebfbaacf37d5451d2dea
a02008b23358346ca01c36694ef256ef06f49051
describe
'149526' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQX' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
9877f5113b86f27434707b5713caf2d0
fb921debbc3334089dc4482cbcf6b43cccfa28da
'2012-05-30T18:50:31-04:00'
describe
'142533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
54d2a1a6070f25dd8221363e936a7362
a093b5b60e93fba3b9524047a181300f39a0b8ce
describe
'714' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWQZ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c8420aeea9e4e970ed4c768164fdd0fb
6ceb570697fa471820e2ccfa5f75be5cdc74657f
describe
'338863' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRA' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b2b5c30f7344c267e91834df2c70e4aa
bc67b01487d6cf9fd27119a68fd83c231553e858
describe
'331003' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRB' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
cf1d0cac788c39690795290cfaf55e2e
6d05cce461a2fb96ac6e5bc2343e4f0f77144bb2
'2012-05-30T18:49:27-04:00'
describe
'312287' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRC' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
c8c2195a158ed11a1b46c0542c9ff9fa
07f9bfffcd4c1fbd761c8f3f23e411d026046264
describe
'332320' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRD' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
8ec10db79378f70104273181b9a5d1f1
4df4082361574c9f85ca4d5d3ae4ccbab1bf1ae2
'2012-05-30T18:51:00-04:00'
describe
'430952' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRE' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
150bfb5e6c635870248edec0db64ecd1
c751ace478b5253ac7aaab2062827716c279a409
describe
'440256' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
0746cd907d21956cd7aa5d4244a41e08
52a1e79ea15a07e482328d1cb3d75f4d52d1780d
describe
'331047' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRG' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
a068d3ba17d9a12f02e64383c3e489f2
48b707a21ec7ef3f143038d93a96f2da42c8d826
'2012-05-30T18:50:52-04:00'
describe
'234297' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRH' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
493a1d6512f6d8d7faf414d34fb28c81
2d7799169952e0a27aed8a9dded738e0b3d7e6df
'2012-05-30T18:49:42-04:00'
describe
'29685' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRI' 'sip-files00022.pro'
98356e0a07471a9e7fd9fffe5b1e9d88
c6d31fcea8b15de5bc425df1124392ba49ae538c
'2012-05-30T18:50:09-04:00'
describe
'323829' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
055157f1a24969ff76aeb36e64815e12
165d3a11133e7e610b43b23c8521a800892631f4
describe
'140077' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRK' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
ff18b3baa20ea808baf14f0b71f57849
db46487556cf806103fd80723f533f30a07158e8
'2012-05-30T18:51:06-04:00'
describe
'2707492' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRL' 'sip-files00033.tif'
4df8c0620bf720984bf7b0fe5ae7cd7b
09f6c2c91e6a3f15d981c2a9fe6ab4512352571e
describe
'369062' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRM' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
03c09f3ec7b302ac3f3b508ff9f7a9ce
0ba6623e4597349df1f898c28111fd74f1e9750c
describe
'63801' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRN' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
90db52dd967ffed8793fc9f6a7281d83
2074aec0aa1b916c23431076b92a40c00ba48710
describe
'2687740' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRO' 'sip-files00041.tif'
3b056ef4fe467bd0cad63eb2f5cee1b9
7bcdc1e0f105811070c14ba60d3d1120ff649447
describe
'140733' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRP' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
e74fbf04cab26d8daa6d7dcc71dbd453
f916bdcbdcf9ba88388ff2a998c7bb9d8d3fe8be
describe
'28631' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRQ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
563490b44d8605550ed1c2a142cf56ab
2623316bdebc6cef65e08f4635951f910590a5f9
describe
'46655' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRR' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
9e3fdfec813876254feba5eb41743ab4
abff5787cccb4fda51253261583518dc56ea8b81
'2012-05-30T18:49:38-04:00'
describe
'2603100' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
32bea0001a3baf3fd9d2e85913f4038a
1c909be27b83948d60d81c55b764a3e6e199b240
describe
'144268' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRT' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
be1775e0b77fdc201d864bc690d0c705
f9a91717957404875f77bd9a57f9268c2c39fe01
'2012-05-30T18:49:07-04:00'
describe
'46244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRU' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
4576b44259943d26c5da4d844d9aaf8d
27d772be364a629a66a39c6ad604fb2aca49d728
describe
'29704' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRV' 'sip-files00060.pro'
4d5af7af207471bb652f232f27732200
23a033de56faef3f4526aa650570e9ae63d8f20e
describe
'32882' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRW' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
e4951c6ff01c6ef4502f0b30310448de
06a07d7a4b0754d94ae265c2938a58923b5c084c
describe
'294' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRX' 'sip-files00068.pro'
c7b51f5a99d41a8cc6ac9b979c3b5d21
da5d5b1bbb5ddb17af12ba5e2ad3b838a4ddee0f
describe
'2702216' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRY' 'sip-files00044.tif'
2815f340698a5528775c5f04caab069c
1c1bc9c65cac860ce3fb55b5a66582d859595752
describe
'328533' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWRZ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
c137696cf57fea0cf82a762bae69f201
9ea25b10b1038d106334c67b5d482fa0ca239b62
describe
'2696560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSA' 'sip-files00017.tif'
136ee4f36246ce778cc4568b0e691685
4febc122021f84ef1c312c9608a5af4c7c360b85
'2012-05-30T18:49:01-04:00'
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSB' 'sip-files00046.txt'
de8befaba26927196493bbe961fec4ba
7544c6e5757745b0476e5fb42aad77d18705b908
describe
'2671748' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSC' 'sip-files00016.tif'
5b7bac0d8f4f5e14e63f91cccad94729
8dec2e10823395cc4cf061854585b99ab39320f8
describe
'150869' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSD' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
517c4e33562f510a921dc33afdc64ada
e0d520f3f34db4cec5dc5d1da80b5cfd2b657416
describe
'30039' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSE' 'sip-files00051.pro'
69fe75e9f59fa69e6c2f92987f79722e
17d5a3b6f109986e6384afaa62800640091bceee
describe
'455912' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSF' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
eca7995f51bbc73ff75df34e7a280a05
c77ee9fad9b7fec11cd5625b1205c6bf7670a3fd
'2012-05-30T18:50:20-04:00'
describe
'1323' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSG' 'sip-files00047.txt'
1e60edd825fb29890b44498e24b9e42c
2e33a72585cdbc745d4c9991e36e71fa189cfce9
describe
'328153' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSH' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
fc465443b17963dbaba1dfd8b9608a31
e130a6888d4fc87ce5e80bcdccf56fa6bb7dfe2e
'2012-05-30T18:50:02-04:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
de8ae901b7a51c8f867f213f88300a69
44746d334b7970e37fef7d7ac8d69f182d708ec5
describe
'38428' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSJ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
01c0cdb30781876ef2e5f97c5845029b
9193cef21685de0f11f80cf9eec300b8971d3de5
describe
'455806' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSK' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
d824764406d94948bd49de472f649e46
fa8a7214cd7b7f380c6b24a0930e7273e920ef57
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSL' 'sip-files00048.txt'
56fdb4e8c10d3f793976e14c752d90bb
12b16ac49fedd67c5ef429c95ea2ee4fac5803b6
describe
'2631844' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSM' 'sip-files00062.tif'
c06e2326c619ff2df8ffead4c086b164
a861490524e8ae95c8c8b59ec429cbe6698bd0f2
describe
'2670688' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSN' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b2729c00dbc3a77f8b1fe6d072f78ec0
10785ecbdb4cfe89855640ccbcb074327546110c
describe
'34267' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSO' 'sip-files00057.pro'
c678219e49b3e150e02516c44f8a89e4
e659375345aad24acf950d8860564125a355c6ab
'2012-05-30T18:51:10-04:00'
describe
'353' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSP' 'sip-files00037.txt'
35b9571dabe9b14c50f711c7a1823e8c
49147f43ac0bca7be31701328692a6b96d39193a
describe
'31612' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSQ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
af1cb0a141600d03421ba2aeca4b126d
233ae162574ffff13aa770af811b3844cf684aa6
'2012-05-30T18:51:15-04:00'
describe
'2' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSR' 'sip-files00067.txt'
81051bcc2cf1bedf378224b0a93e2877
ba8ab5a0280b953aa97435ff8946cbcbb2755a27
describe
No printable characters
No printable characters
No printable characters
No printable characters
'141149' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSS' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
8e97ac704fc7945859af7b34a444ae61
46a57f91e5fc688e5ddccda795f0e72796c50b95
'2012-05-30T18:49:33-04:00'
describe
'144949' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWST' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1f3b523363e7875823b3bc85b6f07d6c
2a92df03465776952b251553949120edebcc774d
describe
'381569' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSU' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
86bffa2acbb912f25eb4e585ea06780a
63f7c9923c44df4e333cb9ce964c392ebfaedd09
describe
'431560' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSV' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f3bed6f5f93b1d9ebc3dd365a596bb90
92e7d41947e7ce185ec42a1c932bb195efa64cec
'2012-05-30T18:50:29-04:00'
describe
'2619508' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
b03ddb977993876090d3e83fedcb3695
47b166736772e7182265c98a3b9153381097dd9a
describe
'40049' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSX' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
a550d0458b18e4a77a97290835ed739b
f129bdfb58e144d382c84a4832512e6396d29e06
describe
'332356' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSY' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
8302f92aa5e6d79aeaafbcf16d866e8f
a18d1a5c3287d01cbc1776e6e184b406a77916d5
describe
'47114' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWSZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
d76d8469a21bf77689357396ae87d78a
d71ce5dad6847f5e924ec1ada1eddce456b0eebf
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
19c326ffc579c5121f8a38e3a53af9bc
174c793206a71de489a713e534aaa3af846a29f2
describe
'2636280' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTB' 'sip-files00021.tif'
df4a343e4873053a9514f2b31b366805
cbe469d65460cb16a9166450ff762cb7eebc279a
describe
'45250' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTC' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
5a3430557200d959e940bdd4597f6982
1fa3794b02425ef7aa092ab71dac7b202530c7c4
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTD' 'sip-files00060.txt'
73c8f7c4976a5e85eede47a77878ac31
55d7a484af90c3627ec190115fb85a4c1b29d188
describe
Invalid character
'159' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
34c729f1a020989e0d0f6476d72ce698
096b49f83e43ea5d80586acd3d7471167845a9b0
describe
'206705' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTF' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
73adae08fb060341e822a84d5936f5fb
9fd2bbd51ef9680431c3805baa557c4d8e400f73
describe
'336951' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTG' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
9d71cae2d20ac3e8cfcbcd815b9c1a9d
f4d0a732b7c695d05d759a5813d87f243782530b
describe
'327582' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTH' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
0f519374671d4a460afb065e31a09713
748b824775d505fdaef3cf04a757e7041d559791
describe
'26532' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTI' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
b8202b943adca5cc07bbf23d89acd17c
116a9acc441270d64bc8a8a2c06463446e1fad42
describe
'52217' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTJ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
f31e08003ed1b5dcad205041129ca706
665e1616ad30c611a1ff82f64bb1ad13ef93a6fc
describe
'40606' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
62b46f080fe7d8d88cdcd7b35c2682ba
d279e7dd7e09b63177c51afcfec521a8d83b0a83
describe
'334438' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTL' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
efe1db00a03765221fd895d2c859549b
9e9b9ead81c7d20169a817ed07b8c0e66bde224b
'2012-05-30T18:48:26-04:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTM' 'sip-files00029.txt'
fb0106e6f8e25ab59f81f288bb650b65
d1975d97b01c1665594a50e8eaf8c74670026d2b
describe
'329905' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTN' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c5970ba486c1b27061bef6ea01bdee14
691fee7e4c32bb5f7966944dc3a39205e4c7f779
describe
'42831' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTO' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
d4dfdf135f72174bcfae55c7dade41ae
ccc72e3eb172fb60f5291ce672efc9d9b6485b81
'2012-05-30T18:49:08-04:00'
describe
'47360' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTP' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1a314156e1d96c31eebfc1fb2cc0a838
cb8d4e9112251ceb4d5f440a6fcba5eba53b4e1a
describe
'2636088' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
a7752f032a0cbf79ee0e2d6fd7afdfcc
81d4b83eadf688760db1af40907a800fc0e78f24
describe
'44999' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTR' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
a150d722093ab2dd34f95b1ca7912c75
4bcc2f0357bd6c7e07febab9240a972f8bfff651
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTS' 'sip-files00019.txt'
94b770762965b57c9e2c68bb6b66b89b
0383ff28cfcb27a6dde12762a02e29b984294217
describe
'47637' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTT' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
d1e2f4f26ddada7c5569f3a24ac3a398
6348abb74799a9cb2f9bd6cceaeee40478d1b1c9
describe
'324812' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTU' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
1965aa635eb4efbb371e99623288af02
17e971af7219d957d9901efa4ef042f43c09f7a7
describe
'31853' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTV' 'sip-files00047.pro'
6bbe5082f9fc9123bb29993f1d0b9893
51bef00ecac216ebaa22b53ee89c909ac476900c
describe
'2711040' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTW' 'sip-files00048.tif'
59ffaa559dee013fe4a48d56c5792d36
c06d5909d5449aab414ca37534bb5a80563d2d1d
describe
'31767' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTX' 'sip-files00059.pro'
fe7389397ee84f1b3f5de5126e49f88b
64802e38845d0a8735c9130c20e82b1b869b907a
describe
'77130' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTY' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
1b001e280e07abd055a545a213b893cf
c795b076b2e68923e4853ae0a90dad553d05d42b
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWTZ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
eafabff31ad5d8fd9d39c90b15e84539
c8c3e5a00dd44f7ad8a3105f185e4e27f95626e0
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUA' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a834b818b197d1839e424d3f2dfa8329
10ce15143b2dec3256029189f6bce037577001f2
describe
'149632' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
e2382e04777ddc25123b03556627e1cb
98a6ded0be94c40aaa7a598aed17ec4808cfb689
describe
'2676736' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUC' 'sip-files00025.tif'
11a5e6dfa14335b7a048e8345ed135b1
5f8d25187304e5b7c857a0c0bc1e2e122fab2ac4
describe
'47461' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUD' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
dbc22d964d3a9b16bc0120e52a9bf798
bf3053cac9fa212f95d13ca1945b14d6c951c43c
describe
'28055' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUE' 'sip-files00038.pro'
4381b7f3669b778e77ca4986b03eba92
68ca9e80206891c1bde13f5c363be9cee328bcac
'2012-05-30T18:49:57-04:00'
describe
'8550804' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUF' 'sip-files00069.tif'
e2ebb64e86d39e456a4bb5c881841e6b
84351c47020b9148f0775ad09485725cb4dd711d
describe
'139930' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUG' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
d5697fe7c750ffc454d1d4b6d701b68f
7014c639db506f6b0df4745e2f52a97c6484f234
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUH' 'sip-files00068.txt'
adc3e9ad47da87330dda88c01f6103ef
c31c3f2d26bada888365e71957fca25b12da1f25
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
1827e6487f9a46558c51e0d2b08dbf0c
4398778a6b976337585f0603fc96fd78240523dd
describe
'365801' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUJ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
3ad4fbe3895bf644a21b3b3e99af7068
9bb5c2794ceebe89e1a90b07509fbfd61ce072e7
describe
'434887' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUK' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
5718ac493c27dc71967cbee21a401079
195f46889b9f944fecb20fce1d19c90d6c284c01
describe
'182291' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUL' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
e700b379ea546816d7b612f1b74d883b
041e03294d5992e91b1832f519f4310f69f3c17c
'2012-05-30T18:51:24-04:00'
describe
'419606' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
4c24bf0c3582b5f7546d0e9538c8bb10
118a122da8e21f744c5e74459a5c285f9c174de8
describe
'428731' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUN' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
04737b17f0e2671c1c2576782729bb97
ef53ccbc0478ed6ff76215a33ef2de482176804a
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f3d615ef756d8f6eaf4172cca455ddb9
1b136faff74925bc6a0a9f8171839ce542aab290
describe
Invalid character
'1201' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUP' 'sip-files00034.txt'
80c5010c89e1f2109c529cc5ca2a8f1c
81e914316869e001ed54624929695ad2c56e9bb7
describe
'107572' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUQ' 'sip-filesUF00028366_00001.xml'
ef30ca94326193d29d1a2428d4eafcf8
7f826b8cd6de718ca7f08d239a3a0db0b626e863
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T13:11:53-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'755475' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUT' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
59bc6a8c046ee7429b2459a0c13cf034
a7713a6a5f82bd6b4e3f847b98509322bb0ab218
describe
'449264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUU' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
13e93185263fef36ec85466acdc6a2ac
a9466d3a17cce4356407d08b8639d75e95689431
describe
'176534' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUV' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
f76fa79032bce67fd21298669a0cd4d3
634c6eed7bcccc588de2192bd0d832804baed188
describe
'449979' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
ad1913315a0012fd2803c1b3315d550a
8d5f4343c43bfb688f76194d32f2bc30d6425d08
describe
'342430' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUX' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
750da7ad21ad95e7393c3858d322af3e
70b1480983cd90c3432bf7d4dfe3e6d2bc68d3b7
'2012-05-30T18:48:44-04:00'
describe
'454836' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUY' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
1ba484f981e3b6a4fa92604e5d95da6f
0c6fe8b2f62096b644e92d75395258e07d36df96
describe
'424785' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWUZ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
4486bf67dd583a704ba8cbd004c44de4
85c74ce0a6a0e92136c82d0183f64b95d596e607
describe
'307966' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
c09613b7133856307464fa404459789b
5c7652894831764c217df58f9405391994c2d03c
describe
'328878' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVB' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
633d72c75de55f21a8f7d69cbc30fee6
645e8f1826ac2d13d56fd2b5220e4e25f600286c
describe
'329210' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVC' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
6204423385a63ed9128e3cdd45ba0df0
5f023ef7f41efa436f511f870757a1a0b620c22c
describe
'332370' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVD' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
deb4aef1febdf49f97a1df9c64b75abf
c5a5194ce1dcf1f3bc1df4da8059bacce4552deb
describe
'337762' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
9b5f32b7325af275442b2325ce1ccd18
9443d9026b90fb620b8bb2bac2d202d4161c4589
describe
'327619' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVF' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
2f933d344841cabe8b3e4630d28c1f4a
9d40ae56b02b8004f9ec8bb973f5a12f0c310a27
describe
'340194' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
9d45a22494603f6f318423489e5ac30c
fc8ad155107908f7f290e065c5996e749a833ac8
describe
'337344' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVH' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
217137f6d36c00333892d259e70f8c88
71aa45d78fbef594350d30fa10df7e544991b659
describe
'339242' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVI' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
fe1f360d3e43ecca3e44a3c17702d4da
486897d296bee6efd03dea2e9fcc018a8712befb
describe
'345629' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVJ' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
ec4bf72bb03909582cb6bb991c61d51b
548770575d51321061b6f08f062f2d516e3cfab3
describe
'355774' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
bdead0a40d7f7e66a214b1438c64ea0c
78b01c8c8000fcf5d706a832701cc527ceb9132c
describe
'2641932' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVL' 'sip-files00007.tif'
5799ac8af4ebe0e170359979f73862e9
497e79122bbe1eef6b93a0946821201289b6bcfc
'2012-05-30T18:49:39-04:00'
describe
'2693640' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVM' 'sip-files00022.tif'
00e30764d112f76da3e8ad99664f2f79
248542dca42602bd06c041ac4541cde06de16ecd
'2012-05-30T18:51:04-04:00'
describe
'2715648' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVN' 'sip-files00032.tif'
0a3c26f2ba0cbbc4617c21bc57e884ad
443c6dc5c6f5f42bd15dc4792ec5a66962ff42cc
describe
'2709196' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
f2d9aa6f32eacded8bc5287a196fd7f6
c018d2842a1969417262de17e9a94082650790be
describe
'2699464' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVP' 'sip-files00045.tif'
a6394a1c89b6a3181699c02618cfd6ad
8a72dfcf3d8a057c2f928939b8a2afc97736899d
describe
'2601300' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
adc969b66f2f10b7ccf140093cb4ba1d
877ec3b244b80cbd5cea72fd4cd96902a8c57c1b
'2012-05-30T18:51:22-04:00'
describe
'2556220' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVR' 'sip-files00049.tif'
a9f482f60c9468d11d9c5e3b4cbb6c77
e1825d28c1086ab830906962a62e76610ff45885
'2012-05-30T18:50:12-04:00'
describe
'2727352' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVS' 'sip-files00052.tif'
657ef5449c80c01aaf30b30737fa7891
9217707dbfb64e8a842f49d832521bd6e29f403d
describe
'2723384' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVT' 'sip-files00057.tif'
6f45cf29601a1c89ffb5e5a0fd6935ec
047c4c363406e0ff7a6b32f50788d12bfc919167
describe
'2723584' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVU' 'sip-files00058.tif'
2bb13c81b8955642c21db57dd3e4c011
0d058e81a5abf051ecbcdd22ac6bc4f223aa06d9
'2012-05-30T18:48:56-04:00'
describe
'2673140' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVV' 'sip-files00060.tif'
ee3269fc463e04a934529df42e57d4dc
6f35c825ec5213d425017437e154b5bb53640347
describe
'31051' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVW' 'sip-files00013.pro'
22cd90bc3b0cdb4421e78c39ce0d827f
8bbe1255859528d7d36a7413d6ae6c5bd60451e5
describe
'28014' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVX' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a7141bedb6aba578293627f69f863af8
3f2f02c2752048a6bb2cf8966f07aa56b59f3670
describe
'29771' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVY' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c0bcf1d851ff99f7a60a2eeb05c2b122
e8dd4fc35385f07f7f9bb12a55fbb7d975c51bb2
describe
'32596' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWVZ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
752e1da998f7d6474867c00b616e868c
e7f2d714c4b067cb1a3d364cb2b51ecc84a2c4d5
describe
'27780' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
87eaa0a5c03e0a756257094ef91a2972
3e25f2f91499c03a61196db37eaa7d10793ab7bf
describe
'27450' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWB' 'sip-files00043.pro'
a28c61f145e638f8bc558266c7614926
3b117e3133f911274f2a70c6875b4e5bcfe1968b
'2012-05-30T18:49:50-04:00'
describe
'18559' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWC' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e2ce3295cafa9d1c0c89aeec45fa3fe1
227234a28d50c751aa692e6f91ae0a6b4b3de73b
describe
'31227' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWD' 'sip-files00049.pro'
9674490ebe37b011c62adcb7202124a1
a18ec5cffb987dd9c9ec557452ccbc9c3d90ac2d
describe
'14252' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWE' 'sip-files00052.pro'
83d09229747c8b8e1e666e1036aca8e7
a0364c03e6eca7eb0ccd3c01e23d7c3f9af5f681
describe
'31133' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWF' 'sip-files00054.pro'
17aa46bc18dbddfb0b7ff75c5ef7263b
0eecad513b207b1e887619816962890b71a89bdb
describe
'29664' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWG' 'sip-files00055.pro'
f5b13ef817c82683d2ab3868e75864ec
35dbda6080835402fcd90921c7e45496d6837d18
describe
'27268' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWH' 'sip-files00061.pro'
06465a579ad91a9b8a92ad4a966918d4
8797d811ca52a01e405f996bc8d75293c1c8ee6f
describe
'257' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWI' 'sip-files00007.txt'
393fcea039340a0e2140338cfcd61caf
7b17e738e4d0f5e64aba080898b9bc4d50293eda
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWJ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
1b394e8c1b1ecb3db8d91bbf9580480f
57a88fd4caf78a6b14bd604157b77fab2209cbeb
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
28b6de1ca124140fb3ca9757e80376fe
de03308d715e0862872674d82b326db3ea668241
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWL' 'sip-files00015.txt'
b4b1a991a59ac92d4372cc993c93fcf2
19ff9de2a31e31b44aef4534269c0b2e3ecb2be1
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWM' 'sip-files00031.txt'
0d26f599aa37f959eefeaf66924eafab
f151871298d468a711a966283d225a58cac2e9bd
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
db9797d0aa63ba922dc2ea8f1c837585
58807e7b08ef108a66ef05e8b4ccc589a237f974
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWO' 'sip-files00049.txt'
2934b9cc5ee18d8aecd0be3ee5ee2bae
e80d871283d62ea1046b18d6620b4ed964f20468
describe
'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWP' 'sip-files00054.txt'
0f08e7f82459cd3572210d187ad1de26
eecb2f6ac68d6dc1746189f41d4572259f225320
'2012-05-30T18:50:40-04:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWQ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
8fcdb8b2893cb80353d8169e18be2c81
bf276a777664dbdea7aae78f79a4764dbdf0e1e9
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWR' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ce77c45e76e6c6bd60215616c9b11416
bcf049b1d86b20c078499a32e7da07a2c8687658
describe
'147244' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWS' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
85895364ce1e1e06bd0d157b9af765a5
6b41aecd6efad3b1f9acc416082ee53ddca16c3c
describe
'101195' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWT' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
a63da0204e38edbaf75335e5402052d7
0396dffde1f7f033475fa29cf5a056f2fe333d39
describe
'34704' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWU' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
e234247f047d24223d97433d0fad104e
4bd59ad634a0fa29afd63b4381922ca505f57ea9
describe
'32852' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWV' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
4417682c3cad1e3a8db3cc39f0ac6cab
ed7921f8f76a6f528a3d446823b9f8c4c55973c0
describe
'34898' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
f0d6115d5272ccaa2c6055c9e2c7390b
c156527c02f15dab9d807c57bb7683fc66d1dc2f
describe
'34969' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWX' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
19c1ea37d0fa4498613129d639e95850
caa17cff7691c5ed6313c0709d4348a84fe9fa7a
describe
'47255' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
29c2e49891339444651013039fcad645
9ec20e995ae1bd7186d7463f85a7dff420b057b6
describe
'99618' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWWZ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
ab225d8ccecc12b6f6fea9889525e421
6efaa37a42978cc6dcf1cdfbeea9532071993a6b
describe
'45518' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXA' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
e7ac010b6840c23f6ef1e45d7a5c38ce
5dd202a8cbf5a19d7e4197eba530ee5071fd45b7
'2012-05-30T18:50:00-04:00'
describe
'135567' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXB' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7c72e51d44c557f706b88afe58240c44
75a192c78522e9598abfc0ea63a2189aa821be03
describe
'95683' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXC' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
624e173acb5be62bd8163720717ffc98
77f422eeedd44db1da6cc9720d0c836c481997ce
describe
'142351' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXD' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
66a1934215acb13b13b1685d462b1ccd
f1aa86c16fac1de14ee0874fbccce5242bfeb5e0
describe
'146321' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXE' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
5bc25fe5b8f1e1f06c1004564f0be8fa
ad8a0f4337f086e1eec128f02f039e2ab91f7b5d
describe
'47264' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXF' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
9284f6220f593ce40b3b0cb14e6a10de
e4d67eee0c2c02a74bb02c362783466a906cc8c1
describe
'140885' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a3227a8cb95532576863d9e45657eaf8
37680d7fd2cb0ecdbb8bcee1212548425df43101
describe
'45227' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
27c2eac4e22f30caffb34f1ed32372c9
4b75e1e794b8f92449387bc2f64572307093744a
describe
'48361' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
b2f565577b9a6b08bd68f6002f967999
9d0d30084bcc8c2aa7bea59c634eba2b65675d24
describe
'46636' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXJ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
0d62c74bc5c63776cf72d3140a9d3fe0
7db69567b8325b5d39a78d5f22ee7a8dff4e52ee
describe
'115579' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXK' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
fc0168f666618508d514844a3b81230a
58e57a41b7019899774e6e8c204c1d2f9a16435f
describe
'133806' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXL' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
74b484b5a36a70218aecca7e57b8e20c
be690ae9e030af1f4409f85c739d98efed33bde5
describe
'47662' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXM' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
d6e34d9454c9443f88fd70f02f37c2d3
c635fb09d677afc36d6befa13cf90c02df0d8a87
describe
'147033' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXN' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
d5cf9833a2f117c43de8983d2c0d3520
25ddabddc54fa8118ee8dea250dd72b55de6efde
describe
'46162' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXO' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
8c25bbdd221e7dcd5bb8090bbdaeddeb
e8cfefe740d206fbeb990d1ad734b827b9c5f96e
describe
'143328' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXP' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
99de210207a98cfbb1bc5c9cd2ac6925
71fcadef4143be8d3698d3df74020a64d8848bca
describe
'69418' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXQ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
9afc17b77ea69584a82df4cd64db1f4d
c1a861d842539dfd2ca645d22133d223680cd28a
describe
'27789' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXR' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
69ffd8c2bf0a375c572f41c3809a30a5
a574a5587d0d3f799aeea69aef1ac543e7c2b56d
describe
'124043' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXS' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
eb719a29d91aca63bc4e82b5e82daa1a
2e36727fdd1a374295456873ff1bc73f42ed352a
describe
'84993' 'info:fdaE20100203_AAAAEGfileF20100203_AABWXT' 'sip-filesUF00028366_00001.mets'
040f3f175a98e5a5c446977b4737c54b
7d5021ee3c66f535db139cb8d6b802fe3bdf0011
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T13:11:52-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.