Citation
Lily's screen

Material Information

Title:
Lily's screen
Creator:
Barker, Sale, Mrs., 1841- ( Author, Primary )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Dalziel, Edward, 1817-1905 ( Engraver )
Dalziel, George, 1815-1902 ( Engraver )
J. Ogden and Co ( Printer )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publisher:
G. Routledge
Manufacturer:
J. Ogden and Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
128 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Picture books for children -- 1877 ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1877 ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1877 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1877 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1877
Genre:
Picture books for children ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes illustrations by Harrison Weir and the Dalziel Brothers.
General Note:
Includes publisher's catalog.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Sale Barker.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
024162219 ( ALEPH )
04534136 ( OCLC )
AHN4135 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text




The Baldwin Library

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nl a ieee al 5
ats an ate sina



LILY S36 2 EN







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LY SS © Rie ban

BY

MRS. SALE.BARKER

AUTHOR oF “LirrLe Wipeawake”

ETC. ETC.



WITH ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY PICTURES

LONDON AND NEW YORK
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS
1877



CONTENTS.



Lily’s Screen . . . ‘ .
Youth and Age

Mother Hubbard .
Evening Prayer

Guardian Angels .

A Curious Housemaid
Dancing a Minuet

A Morning Visitor

An Awkward Position ..
Missed

The Trapper T rapped 5
The Magic Looking-Glass.
Old Times :
Little Piggie

His Welcome Home
Naughty Piggie

His Impudence
Punishment 3

A Hapless oe :

Rosa

Rosa’s Brother

A Nice Family.

Our House .

A Gentleman of dicot ance
Little Mammas

A Good Gallop

Lightfoot

Topaz

Topaz being Washed

PAGE

10
II
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
30
37



Contents.

Portraits of Cats .
Bijou ‘i :
Bijou’s Death

Charity m
Windy Weather
Going to a Fancy Ball
Long, Long Ago .
Feasting . c
Captain Carbuncle
The Waterspout

A Ship on Fire

The Wreck

Clinging for Life .

A Peaceful Scene
Discord

The Carrier

The Gardener

The Lark’s Nest
Heaith and Sickuess
The Hares and Frogs
The Good Girl
Waiting upon Mamma
A Chimney Sweep
The Sweep Again
Stalking Buffaloes
The Hunter Hunted.
Mamma and Boy .

A Careless Nurse

A Hairbreadth Escape .
The Young Sportsman
A Puzzle

Run Away with

A Pet Mouse

The Prisoner

The Old Fiddler .

A Long Swim.



Contents.

John Gilpin

A Little Owl

Blue Titmouse .

A Funny Couple .
An Old Friend
Dolly’s Doctor
Cavalry

Little Clitbhens
Bright Intellect

A Handsome Profile
Jenny Wren
Ruby-Headed Hiumaitie: Bird
Beggars : :
Fairy Stories

Deer 3
Running a Race
Friendly Toads.
Showing the Way
A Dunce .

Follow my Leader
In Trouble

Reapers at Dinner
Ida and ‘her Crow
Feeding the Dickies
Boating

Angling

Hair Dressing -
‘Out inthe Snow .
A Thief
Rat-Catching
Charity

Cruelty

Poor Pulcinello
Impudence .

Mr. Froggie

A False Alarm

100
1Ot
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109



Contents,

PAGE

Stopping a Duel . : : 3 : ‘ : 110
Sweet Music : : : : : ‘ ; ; IIt
Teasing Tommy . . 3 : 5 : : 112
Tommy’s Turn . : ‘ ; : : : 3 113
An Upset : : . . ‘ a ° i 114
Mother and Child ‘ . : . . 3 . 115
A Cheerful Picture . : ‘ a : : 116
A Sad Picture. i ‘ : 5 ‘ rf 7 117
A Lion and Stag. : : : e ; : 118
A Head without Brains : 5 : ; . . 1i9
Borrowed Plumes . : A . 120
Dignity . ; iE 121
A Volcano. : 3 : : : ‘ : 122
Shipwreck . : : ci : ; : 123
Capital Fun. 3 , : Z 5 ; : 124
A Summer Morning . : : : p : : 125
A Poor Musician . ‘ ; : : A . 126
The Artist . 3 : : : : ; 5 127
: ; a s 128

English Scenery











Now, my children, here’s something for, you
to do; something that will amuse you, too, I
think. I am going to give you this old drawing-
room screen to put into the nursery ; and here’s
a basket full of pictures and engravings to paste
upon it. Some. are very pretty ; some very
funny. There are figures, landscapes, animals.
We must cover the screen entirely—all over
with pictures. It was a very grand one in its
day, I can tell you, when it was fresh and new ;
but was never half so amusing to look at as it is
going to be now. Nurse, go and tell Cook to
make some paste, and then we'll set to work.
You shall, each in turn, my darlings, take out a
picture from the basket, and then I'll tell you
what it means while you paste it on.
B



IO Youth and Age.

Now, is the paste ready ? Let us set to work,
then. What’s this that my Lily has taken out
of the basket ? A picture of an old man anda



\
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f \/ oe

dear Me little girl: Re and grandchild,
I should think. This picture will do nicely to
begin with. I know nothing prettier than to see

the very old and the very young kind and loving
to each other.



Mother Hubbard. . II

Who is this, I wonder? You have found a
funny one, Cissy. Did you ever see such a high-
crowned hat? She must be some old witch from



a fairy tale; though she looks too good-natured.
I can scarcely fancy her riding upon a broom-
stick. I shouldn’t wonder if she were old Mother
Hubbard, who was so fond of her doggie.



12 Evening Prayer.

Here, now, is a very pretty little picture: a
child at her mother’s knee, saying her prayers.
Dear, good little child! Sweet baby-lips breath-
ing the purest of all earthly sounds—a little
child’s first prayer! I wonder, now, if you can
guess whom this picture reminds me of? Ah,



I see the dimples coming in your cheeks, my
Cissy and Lily; and you smile as you think—
Mamma means us. Yes, dears, it reminds me
of all my children, for does not my little Johnny
also say his prayers at his mother’s knee ?

But let us try now if we can find pictures that
will come well next to each other, so that we
may make a little story sometimes out of two



Guardian Angels. 1

or three together. And here’s the very thing.
A child asleep, with angels watching over her.
This must follow the little girl praying. Paste
them side by side upon the screen. We will
suppose that this is the same little girl who is
saying her prayers. Now, you see, after having
finished her prayer, she goes to bed: the little



head, with its curls, rests upon the pillow; the
pretty eyes are shut, and the long lashes droop
upon the soft round cheek. She sleeps, and
angels come to guard her. The picture is very
nicely done. We can see how peacefully she
rests ; and we may be sure the angels keep bad
dreams away, and bring her healthy and refresh-
ing sleep. May good angels so guard you all,
my children !



14 A Curious Housemaid.

Well, this is a contrast to the last, certainly.
She looks like a housemaid ; but what a funny ©
one! How would you like her to take the
place of Mary? I think, Cissy, you would not



want to play with her when she was at work, or
help her to sweep, as you want to help Mary
sometimes. She might do her work without
being disturbed, I fancy. And what a cap!
Can it be her night-cap ?



Dancing a Minuet. 15

These ladies and gentlemen are dancing a
minuet. It is a slow, graceful dance, which was
fashionable nearly a hundred years ago, when
people dressed as you see them in the picture.
In those days fine ladies and gentlemen used to
wear powder on their hair, as you sometimes
see footmen do, even now. Indeed, the gentle-
men generally wore powdered wigs: and both



little round patches of black sticking-plaster
here and there upon their faces to make their
complexions appear fairer. Was it not a curious
way of trying to look more beautiful ?

What, Johnny, you say you've got four
pictures of bears! Let me see. Don’t crumple
them up in your little chubby hand, dear. This
must come first. Here is a family of settlers
in the backwoods of North America. They



16 A Morning Visitor.

have built themselves a log-hut ; and one morn-
ing, when the master of the hut opens the door,



he finds a bear outside, anxious to pay them a
morning visit. I suppose the bear walked off on



An Awkward Position. 17

this occasion, for, in the next picture, we find
him climbing up a tree after one of the children,
who has climbed up it to escape, not knowing



i AN VAS SS
that the bear could climb too. But there come
the papa and brother with their rifles, and
they'll soon bring the bear down.



18 Missed.

This is another bear altogether. You seea
hunter has just fired at him, but only wounded



him and made him furious. The poor man, in
running away, falls into a pit-trap; that is, a



The Trapper Trapped. 19

hole which has been dug, and covered over with
branches and earth, in the hope that the bear



—

might tumble in instead. How frightened he

looks! But see! the other hunters are coming.
I trust they will shoot the bear in time.



20 The Magi Looking-Glass.

Well, Cissy, this certainly is a curious picture
you have given me. How should we like such
a magic looking-glass as this, which makes
people look so much uglier than they really
are? How disgusted that young couple appear



at seeing themselves such frights! Generally,
people think themselves better-looking and
better than they are; but they cannot be set
right by being made to think too ill of them-
selves. See how those mischievous little goblins
behind the glass are chuckling at the dismay of
the young couple. -



Old Times. 21

This represents a country parson, as country
parsons were in former days. Should we not be





surprised now to see a clergyman riding about
his parish with his good lady on a pillion behind
him ?



22 Little Pigere.

Now my Lily gives me two pictures—one in
each little hand : both pictures of little dressed-
up pigs. Yes, darling, they will do nicely to go
together. They are pictures of a good, useful,
obedient, little piggie, who was a great comfort



to his mother. You see he has been to market
to buy things for the house, while mamma pig
stays at home to look after the children, for he is
the oldest of a very large family. He is now
returning home, dragging his cart behind him.
He brings a fine supply of fresh fruit and vege-
tables ; and he is enjoying his pipe, too, on his
way home.



His Welcome Home. 23

The next picture shows how delighted
mamma pig is with her good, clever, industrious
son. See how the old lady clasps him to her
heart! I have no doubt she is grunting loving



words in pig language. She thinks to herself
what credit he does to her bringing-up,’ and
what a comfort he is to her old age. She has
but one anxiety about him. So fascinating and
accomplished as he is, she fears lest he should
be induced to marry; and then his poor old
mother would no longer be the first object of
his affection.



24 Naughty Piggie.

Here are Johnny’s little hands held up now.
What, Johnny, have you found three more pic-
tures of little pigs ? Oh, these will do famously.
These are pictures of a younger brother of the
last piggie, and one who was as naughty and
mischievous as the first was good and useful,



One day he was at home while his mamma and
brothers and sisters were out, and how do you
think he amused himself? Why, he smashed
all the toys in the nursery—dolls, kite, drum,
every toy that was there. Presently he heard
his mother come home, and after a little while
he stole quietly down stairs, and found her



flis Impudence. 25

asleep in her chair, for she had come home tired.
Then this impudent little pig tied his old mother
into her chair while she slept. Afterthishelooked
about for more mischief to do, and saw the red-



hot poker in the fire. This naughty little piggie

took out the poker, and began burning a hole in

the floor with it. Now the smell of the burning

wood woke up Mrs. Pig; but at first she could ~

not catch her naughty child, because she ran
Cc



26 Punishment.

after him with the chair upon her back. Mrs.
Pig, however, was not a mother to be trifled
with. She soon unfastened the chair, and then
took a birch-rod from out the closet. In vain



Prise



little Master Piggie tried to escape; in vain he
squeaked for mercy. I can tell you he smarted
well for the mischief he had done that day.



A Hapless Queen. 27

Oh, dear, dear, what a savage dog! Heisa
bulldog, which is the most savage kind there is.
How lucky that he has not got hold of a child
there instead of a doll. These dolls are marion-
nettes, and we may fancy that the dog belongs
to one of the spectators who has just been see-
ing them perform. The dog might well think



they were live creatures, for they are made to
move, dance, or act in a very clever way, by
having thin threads attached to them, the ends
of which pass to the top of the show, where they
are held and moved about by the man who ex-
hibits. The show-box rather resembles that of
Punch. See! The poor doll whose bones are
being crunched has a crown of gold upon her
head. Sad destiny for a queen !



28 LRosa.

Let us call this little girl Rosa. She is pick-
ing the dead leaves off the rose-tree, but does







|

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sare ’*
PRE Mirrorred
x =

2 “a8 Oy =
A SY ania
w=

not cut the flowers to put in water. She loves
them too well, she says, for that; and thinks
they are happier blooming on the tree.



Rosa's Brother. 29

I think this must be Rosa’s brother, for you
see he is fond of flowers, too. He is taking up
some sweet wild violets by the roots, that grow
upon that bank, and intends to carry them home
to his sister to be planted in her garden. He is

a A P me

)



on his return from school, and has to carry his
books and slate, but he will manage to take care
of the violet roots for all that. Brother and
sister love each other dearly; and he thinks
what a bright look will come upon little Rosa’s
face when she sees the violets.



30 A Nice Family.

Well, this zs droll! Ha! ha! ha! That old
gentleman you see keeps a number of pet ani-

_ mi
















mals, and spoils them just as some people spoil
children. See the consequence !



Our FTouse. 31

Here are some children who have made them-
selves a little house in the garden. They have
trained the jessamine and other creepers over-

SS







MAY ws



no A

head so as to make quite a thick roof; thick
enough to keep out the heat of the sun, and
even rain. They have placed a wooden seat in
the house to sit down upon ; and that there may



32 A Gentleman of Importance.

be no mistake about its being a house, they
have written up “Our House” upon a piece of
pasteboard overhead. Many a happy, merry
hour did the three children and their pussy pass
together there in the summer months. There
they used to tell stories to each other; and



sometimes they would bring out cake, or bread
and butter, to eat in their own little house ; and
it was always much nicer there than when eaten
anywhere else.

Frank, who was the eldest of the three chil-
dren, was the first to leave off taking delight in
the house in the garden. He began to wear
jackets and little trousers with pockets in them,



Little Mammas. 93

as you see him in the picture; and this change
in his dress gave him such an idea of his own
importance and manliness, that he hardly con-
descends any longer to play with. his sisters at
all. He struts about all day with his hands in
his pockets.



xo : = =





The picture above shows us the twos sisters
playing with their dolls, after their brother no
longer joined intheir games. They are playing,
you see, at being two mammas. Each has her
child, and each is telling the other of the won-
derful beauty and talent of her own child, as
they have heard fond real mothers often do.



34 A Good Gallop.

This is Miss Mary Masterly having a gallop
upon Lightfoot over the soft turf. It is a pic-
ture after my Cissy’s own heart, I know. How



delightful to go so fast through the air, to feel
the wind blowing on your cheeks, and see the
dear doggie running by your side !



Lightfoot. 35

But here, Cissy dear, look on this picture after
that ; you would not find this so delightful. I
fear our friend, Miss Mary Masterly, has been
trying to be too masterful with poor Lightfoot,



and he resents it. He deserves his name, for
certainly his heels seem too light to be com-
fortable for his rider. You would not like to be
in her place now, I think.



36 Topaz.

Yes, my Lily, this is very pretty ; Mrs. Puss
is carrying little kitty in her mouth. Good,
kind mother! You may be sure she is very
careful not to hurt her kitten. Try, dear, to

RN fee



see if we can make a story. Let us suppose
that pussy is a great pet of her mistress, whom
we will call Lady Lovepet, and who has given
pussy the name of Topaz, because of her large
yellow eyes, which shine like precious gems.
Lady Lovepet treats Topaz very much as if she
were a baby, and makes her have a bath occa-~



Topaz beng Washed. 37

sionally. This picture will do to represent Topaz
being washed by the housekeeper and footman ;
only we must suppose it all happened about a
century ago, when footmen sometimes wore
cocked hats. The footman has to help, you
see, because Mrs. Topaz does not like being











washed, and scratches if she is not held tight.
After her bath, she makes a rule, as soon as she
is let loose, of getting into the coal-scuttle, thus
undoing the effect of the washing, and changing
herself into a black cat. After that she gene-
rally takes a run upstairs, jumps upon her mis-
tress’s bed, and rubs herself upon the counter-
pane till she recovers her natural colour again.



38. Portraits of Cats.

Lady Lovepet has portraits, drawn in her
scrap-book, of all the cats she ever had among
her pets ; and she and her old housekeeper are
never tired of looking at them. Let us admire
them too!

But, however fond Lady Lovepet might be of



Topaz, she once had another pet, whom she
loved quite as well, but who came to an untimely
end. This was her parrot, Bijou. He was a
wonderful bird, there is no doubt about it. He
could talk and sing in two or three different
languages, and was so tame, that instead of
being kept shut up in his cage all day, he used
to be let out in a conservatory among the plants,



Byou. 39

as you see him in the picture. He was fond of
asking, “ Who’s the King of England?” Then
would answer himself in another voice, “ King
George, of course.” He often screamed out,
“Three cheers for the king ; hip, hip, hurrah!”



and kept up his “hurrah” till the most loyal
subjects rejoiced when he left off. When he
was covered up for the night you would hear a
soft, sweet voice wishing you “good-night ”
from beneath the green baize covering which
was put over the cage. Unfortunately; Bijou



40 Byou's Death.

had one bad habit, which eventually cost him
his life. He was fond of teasing Topaz. If
ever he saw the poor cat settling comfortably
to sleep, he always screamed out “ Puss, puss!”
And Topaz started up, thinking her mistress
called. The parrot did this once when he was







alone in the conservatory with Topaz. Pussy
sprang at the unlucky bird and brought him to
the ground. When Lady Lovepet returned to
the room where she had left her two pets, one
had scampered off, knowing she had done wrong,
the other lay upon the ground, a blood-stained
and lifeless heap of feathers.



Charity. AI

Here we see a nice, good little lad leading a
poor tired old traveller into a cottage, that he
may rest. The little lad’s mother is out, but he



knows she would be glad to let the poor old man
sit down, and perhaps, when she comes in, will
give him a meal besides.

D



42 Windy Weather.

Oh, I am sure this man will tumble on his
nose. Poor fellow! I am sorry for him, yet
we cannot help laughing. What a rare dance
he is having after hishat! Perhaps he has been
running after it a long time, now and then almost
touching it, when a sudden gust has come, and:
off it has gone, whirling away again. I daresay



it is all happening at the sea-side, for there you
get wind enough to blow hats about, and to do
a deal more mischief than that. Let us hope
some kind person will meet the hat and stop it,
for it looks rather battered now, and in a little
time it will scarcely be worth picking up, I
think. As for the poor man, J am sure before.
he takes many steps more he will come down.
with his face in the mud.



Going toa Fancy Ball. 43

These are curious people. They. must ‘be
going to a fancy ball where everybody is to





it UC!

AW \



































































































































represent some vegetable. One has a melon on
his head, the other has onions all about him. 1

hope they are not real onions.



44 Long, Long Ago.

Yes, dears, this will do nicely to fit in here,
though it is rather a sad picture. Poor old
woman! She sits there all alone, watching the













little flower on her window-sill. She is thinking
of past times, when perhaps she had children
about her to brighten her life.



Feasting. 45

Now you have taken a very pretty one from
the basket ; a fine goat standing on a wall, and
helping himself to some grapes—or, more likely,
to the tendrils and young leaves of the vine!
Is he not a handsome goat? You say you



would like to be in his place, my Lily? I dare-
say you would, but it’s very lucky you are not ;
for you would certainly eat too many grapes,
and make yourself ill; and, what is worse, you
might fall off the wall, and perhaps break one
of those little arms or legs.



46 Captain Carbuncle.

“Why are you laughing, little ones? Well, I
am not surprised. Johnny always picks out
funny pictures. What a fat, ferocious-looking

ny
H
1
N
N
\N



man, with his shaggy hair and beard, and great
nose! He is evidently an old sailor; and his
name shall be Captain Carbuncle. He is as-



The Waterspout. 47

tonishing those two lads with some marvellous

stories of his adventures. He tells them that

once, when he was a young middy, a mere boy
*



like them, his ship was. sailing along,” one
moonlight night, when suddenly they found
themselves running into a terrific waterspout.
Cloud and sea rushed together, meeting in a



48 A Ship on Fore.

giant mass of water. They had just time to
change their course, and barely escaped being
sunk. Then Captain Carbuncle goes on to tell



them how, on another voyage, his ship took
fire, and, although the sea was calm, they had
to take to the boats and leave her. He relates



The Wreck. 49

how half the crew died of starvation and cold
before they reached the land. Another time,







the ship he sailed in struck on ‘canbe rocks,
during a dreadful tempest, and was lost. He
was captain then, and would not leave the vessel



50 Clinging for Life.

till the last. He saw the crew take to the boats,
and leave him. When the vessel was at
length broken in pieces by the fury of the
waves, he clung to a spar, and so kept himself
afloat in the surging water. At first he had
some hope that one of the boats might yet be



near enough to see him, and might return on
purpose to take him in; but, as hour after hour
went by, this hope departed. Still, although he
despaired of saving his life, he clung to the
spar from an instinct of self-preservation. For
a day and night he floated there, when, by great
good luck, a French merchant vessel passed and
‘picked him up.



A Peaceful Scene. 51

Well, my darling Cissy, what is this picture ?
Certainly a very pretty and peaceful scene, and,
indeed, pleasant to look at, after our friend
Captain Carbuncle’s stormy adventures and
perilous escapes. I think you are quite right,



ah
Lily, in saying that it is nice to fancy that
gentleman, walking under the trees, to be
Captain Carbuncle himself, after his return in
safety to his native land. What a delight it
must be to him to find himself in such a lovely
peaceful spot, with the soft grass under his feet !



Discord.

Johnny now hands me a picture of what ought
to be a quiet, peaceful scene too: an English













farm-yard. but, I am sorry to say, it seems to
be nothing of the kind. Turkey, chickens,
ducks, and cat seem all at discord.



The Carrier. 53

What have we here? A funny little couple
playing at being grown-up people. This carrier
is only a little boy, as you see. His name is
Freddy, and that is his little sister Lucy, who
has borrowed the housemaid’s cap for the occa-
sion. She comes out on to the door-step to



eee FEO pag SEN

receive the box which they pretend has just
arrived by the carrier. The box, in fact, is only
an empty one, which Master Fred took out of
the nursery a few minutes ago. The cart stand-
ing at the door, though, is the real carrier’s cart,
and has brought a real parcel for the children’s
mamma. The real carrier, too, is in the house,
having a glass of beer.



54. The Gardener.

This is a gardener. He has his hammer in
his hand, nailing the creepers against the wall,
to make it look tidy. We will call him Mr.
Tidyman ; and, do you know, that was really:











the name of.a gardener we had when I was a
little girl. But what is he looking at, I won-'
der? Why, he spies a nice, soft, warm little bird’s
nest in that ivy on the wall. He would not dis-
turb it for the world ; and leaves off hammering,
that he may not frighten the tiny nestlings.



The Lark’s Nest. 55

No, Johnny dear, this is not the nest that
Tidyman found in the ivy; but it will do very
well.to paste upon the screen, for all that. This
is a lark’s nest, and is built upon the ground
amid the young green corn. Larks’ nests are
often found in cornfields; and, when you see a



lark mounting up into the air, higher and higher,
and singing away so merrily and sweetly, I
daresay he often has his little eye upon the
cornfield down below, watching to see if any
one goes near his nest. I hope these little birds
will be old enough to fly away before the
reapers come.



56 fTealth and Sickness.

This is a sad picture, and yet a pleasant one.
It is sad to see the poor, sick, deformed child,
sitting in her little chair, wrapped up, even in







summer, to keep her warm. It is pleasant to
see the strong, healthy sister trying to amuse her,
and bringing sweet flowers to give her pleasure.



The Hares and Frogs. ay

This picture of hares and frogs must be in-
tended to illustrate one of AZsop’s fables. Hares
are considered remarkably timid creatures ; and
the fable tells us that some hares once, being
weary of their lives, on account of the constant
state of alarm they lived in, determined to go



together to the river and drown themselves. On
the bank of the river sat a number of frogs, who,
being frightened at the approach of the hares,
and the sight of their long ears, leaped into the
water and swam away. Then the hares took
comfort, seeing there were creatures in the world
afraid also of them.
E



58 The Good Girl.

Here we have a nice little girl, playing and
singing to her brother and sister. She is sing-
ing some nursery song set to music. Look how





AL ; oe ‘ a oe 3
WAS

quiet they are, and how attentively they listen !
I wish certain little people I know, who are
sometimes inclined to be too uproarious, could
always be charmed into quietness like that with
a little music, .





Waiting upon Mamma. 59

Dear me, how delightful it is to have pictures
of such very good children! Here is a nice,
useful, handy little girl. I think she must be
the same as we had in the last. There she was

LEI



amusing her brother and ‘sister: here, she is
taking a cup of tea to her poor sick mamma,
who isin bed. How carefully she carries it! and
how it must gladden mamma’s heart to see her
child’s little smiling face coming into the room!



60 A Chimney Sweep.

This picture is not only pretty, but it teaches
a good lesson too. You see those nice little clean
children are not afraid of the poor black sweep-
boy, and are willing to shake hands with him.
Nowadays, sweeps are men who clean the chim-



— fF 7 =e

neys by poking long jointed brooms into them ;
but I daresay you have heard that chimneys
used to be swept by little boys, who climbed up
them, sweeping as they climbed; and almost
every village had its sweep-boy. This boy in
the picture was known to be a kind and merry
little fellow, and was liked by all the other



The Sweep Again. 61

village children before he became a sweep; and
now they do not shun him, because he earns his
living honestly in that way. In the second
picture he looks a comical figure, does he not ?
Standing with bare feet on the snowy roof, and










er Sl ijtr
se

fi
MY

oe

looking down a chimney, while a couple of birds
are staring at him in return without being afraid
of him in the least. The children, the dogs, and
even, you see, the birds of the village appear to
know what a good-natured fellow he is; and
none of them fear him, in spite of his blackness,



62 Stalking Buffaloes.

Paste these two pictures of buffalo-hunting in
North America side by side. In this one they















are stalking the buffaloes; and one hunter has
covered himself with a bear-skin, to crawl up
close to a fine buffalo before he fires. But no!



The Hunter Hunted. 63

that clever trick is quite a failure. In the second
picture we see the buffalo hunting the hunter,



Se OE Sse

who has cast off his disguise to run away. The
other hunter there, with his rifle levelled, had
better fire quickly.



64 Mamma and Boy.

This is quite a change of subject: a mamma
with her little boy! What, my little Johnny,
do you think there is any likeness between you
and the little man standing. on a chair to kiss
his mother? What is he holding, I wonder,
behind his back? A sword, I do believe; and
he is asking mamma to guess what he has there.
The sword has just been given him by papa,







and he thinks to show it to his mother as a
great surprise; but the fact is, she knows all
about it, and has prepared a present for him
too. Ina cupboard, close by, she has hidden a
fine cocked hat, with coloured paper plume ; so
she has her secret too. As soon as her little
boy brings out his sword from behind him,
mamma will take out the cocked hat. With
cocked hat and sword he zw7// bea brave soldier
indeed,



A Careless Nurse. 65

This is a pretty picture for our screen, and
shows us a pretty little girl, and a pretty baby
leg and foot sticking up out of the cot. Still, I
must say, I should not like my little child to be
rocked as carelessly as that little girl is rocking
her baby brother. Why, she turns her back to
him, and goes on rock, rock, rocking away, with



her foot on the rockers, without looking at him
at all. She might rock the baby out of the cot
without being any the wiser. Generaily, I think,
little girls take great care of their baby brothers
and sisters. I have seen poor little girls in the
street staggering along under the weight of a
baby almost as big as themselves ; and all the
time as careful of it as the mother could be.



66 A Hairbreadth Escape.

Dear! dear! What exciting pictures Johnny
brings out of the basket! Another hunting
scene! but no longer in North America. This

co SAN
to drink a
out of the jungle. What a moment of agony
and terror! He thinks his death certain, when
—ping!—he hears his friend’s rifle, and down
drops the leopard.





Lhe Young Sportsman.

Here’s some shooting of a tamer kind.
gallant young sportsman has just shot his first

This





import-

and only see with what an air of
ance he comes into the room, to show his prize

to his father, brother, and sisters.

d

hare ;



68 A Puzzle.

This is a curious picture, I must say. Can
anything be funnier than three people sitting in
bed under umbrellas? Let us think what can
be the reason of this behaviour. I fear their
roof cannot be water-tight: This is a kind little
girl, who knows that these people are very poor,
and she has come to see them; perhaps to
bring them something to eat from her mother,
who lives near. Just fancy her surprise, when

2 na pte ott



she finds the whole family sitting in bed under
umbrellas. They were obliged to go to bed, I
should tell you, because they had been out in
the rain, and got their clothes wet. You ask me,
Cissy dear, how it happens, if they are so poor,
that they have three good umbrellas. I confess
that puzzles me. I am afraid my story will not
suit, after all. I cannot guess at the meaning of
the picture ; so let us leave it to the imagina-
tion of each person who sees it.



Run Away With. 69

Another hairbreadth escape! but not from wild
animals this time. Flora Munro is driving her
mamma in the pony carriage, when, in holding

———— = BED 7 a Be Wn



rein suddenly snaps. Flora bravely jumps out,
and in a moment catches the pony just as it
breaks into a gallop.



70 A Pet Mouse.
What's this that Johnny has in hishand? A

little girl watching a pet mouse. Poor little
prisoner! how he turns round and round in his

i



|

|
Hi)



cage, trying to get out. The child has no in-
tention of being cruel, but she does not consider
how much the whole enjoyment of life, to a little
wild creature like that, must depend upon its



The Prisoner. 71

liberty. The little mouse longs for freedom
almost as much as this poor human prisoner
whom we see in the other picture. What a sad
picture it is! Poor fellow! How the chained
hands, so tightly clasped together, and the
whole attitude of the man, tell of the despair he









feels. I hardly know whether he is most to be
pitied, if he be innocent, or if he be guilty. In
either case, it must be terrible to be shut up
between narrow walls, almost, or quite com-
panionless. How happy he must think the
poorest or most wretched creature that has but
the power of going about as he pleases!



v2 The Old Fiddler.

This is an old fiddler: one whose occupation
and delight it is chiefly, I should say, to amuse
children with his music. He receives many a

I

ee

SSC
NOMI”



penny at cottage doors; sometimes a meal be-
sides; and, I can tell you, he plays away with
a will, for his heart is in it.



A Long Swim. 73

This poor Donkey was thrown overboard from
a sinking ship, on the chance of its being able

















































to swim to shore. You will be glad to hear
that it managed to do so, swimming eight or
nine miles in a tempestuous sea.

F



74 F ohn Gilpin.

Why, here is our old friend, John Gilpin, I
declare! Paste him on by all means; he is
always amusing. Poor fellow! How he clings
to his horse’s neck, and what a fright he is in!
The picture represents him as he dashes past



the hotel at Edmonton, where his wife and chil-
dren are standing in the balcony watching for
him.

1»

“Stop, stop, John Gilpin, here’s the house
They all aloud did cry ;

“The dinner waits, and we are tired,”
Said Gilpin, “ So am I.”



A Little Owl. 75

You have found some pictures of birds, you
say, Cissy? Let me look at them, and I'll try
if I can tell you what they are. Here we have
an Owl. It is acurious and very handsome kind
of little Owl, sometimes found in England, but



more common in North America. The head,
back, and wings are of a rich chocolate-brown,
dotted with white spots, and the under parts of
the body are a greyish white. Like most Owls,
it remains quietly at home during the daylight ;
but in the stillness of night, and in quiet country
places, its melancholy cry is often heard.



76 Blue Titmouse.

_ This is a picture of a little blue Titmouse,
“one of gur most familiar birds. It is a voracious
little creature, and of great service to all gar-
deners/by destroying the insects which get upon
their fiuit trees. In the course of one day two
Titmice have been observed to visit their nest,



between them, about four hundred times, each
time bringing in their beaks a caterpillar or
insect. Fancy how many they must destroy !
Next to the Titmouse you must place this
picture of two odd-looking little birds with black
crests; for they are Titmice also, but of a kind
found chiefly in Asia. They are called yellow-



A Funny Couple. a

cheeked Titmice. The cheeks and under part
of the body are yellow; the back and wings a



greyish green, while the parts you see dark in
the picture are jet black.



78 An Old Friend.

This is a picture of a very well-known bird—
the House-Martin. In habits, size, and shape it
resembles the common swallow, but may be dis-
tinguished by the white patch upon the lower
part of the back. In the dusk of evening, martins
may often be seen flying about at so late an















PDP a Ll

hour that they are only visible, as they dart past
you, by the white patches on their backs. They
are called house-martins because their nests,
which are of clay, are generally built in some
sheltered nook about the outside of a house;
often under the eaves cf the roof, and sometimes
—so trustful and fearless are they of human
beings—in the corner of a window



Dolly's Doctor. 79

This is a picture that will amuse Johnny.
That little urchin with papa’s hat upon his head
is playing at being the doctor, and has come to
prescribe for sister’s dolly, who is supposed to



“Some cake? Just let me taste. Oh, this is
most unwholesome!” he exclaims. Then he eats
all the cake himself, and says he will send a
draught, blue pill, some salts, a powder, and a
few more things for baby ; whose mamma also,
he thinks, would be better for a little physic.



80 Cavalry.

Make way for the cavalry, if you please. See
how bravely they come dashing along, and how
the horses prance and rear! Freddy, and
Frank, and Arthur are having a gallop on their
hobby-horses. They are making a rare noise,



and a fine dust ; yet their mamma appears to be
dozing in the corner there in spite of all. I am
sure that is more than I could do with such a
noise. Ishould sound the retreat for the cavalry
if they were.my boys, I think; and bid them
enjoy themselves as riotously as they please
in the garden or the nursery.



Little Chickens. 81

Well, this is a contrast to the last. Our pic-
tures change from childhood to old age. This
old woman seems to have the care of the poultry
at some large farm, or perhaps at a gentleman’s
country house, for there are some ladies looking



in at the door. But doesn’t she seem fond of
her chickens, and geese, and ducklings! How
they gather about her! — And she has some little
ducklings too in her lap. She sits in the midst
as if they were her family ; and I think you will
like her, children, because she seems fond of the
little creatures she has charge of.



82 Bright [ntellect.

This is a sketch I made from recollection
of a countryman I once met, when I was stay-
ing in the west of England, in a rather out-
of-the-way part of the world. It was a long
time ago, children ; before I married, in fact. I
was walking out alone, and contrived to lose



myself in a little wood, which was quite near to
the house I was staying at. There were so
many paths in the wood that, once in, I could
not find my way out again. Meeting this
countryman, I asked him the way. He scratched
his head for five minutes, then replied: “One
way be as gude as t’other;” and walked off.



A FLandsome Profile. 83

- Well, I wandered on, and soon met another
labourer; and there ought to be a sketch of
him also there. Oh, here it is! Well, I asked
this handsome person the same question, when
he appeared astonished beyond expression, and
opened his mouth, just as you see. At last, he



SIE SS
pointed with his stick the way I was already
going. I took this for my answer; and, indeed,
the path proved to be right. On relating my
adventure to my friends whom I was staying
with, I made these sketches to help my descrip-
tion, and they declared they recognised two
men living in the village close by.



84 Fenny Wren.

My Johnny brings me two more pictures of
birds. Why, here is little Jenny Wren, who
hops about so merrily in the hedges, wagging
her saucy little tail. She sings a merry soug,

'
6,
)



too; and, even in winter, there needs but a,
gleam of sunshine to set her twittering.

But the other picture represents a much
smaller bird —the tiny, beautiful humming-bird.
It is only found in certain hot countries, and
feeds upon the honey from flowers. Its nest is
attached, you see, to a large leaf, and you can



Ruby-headed Humming-Bird. 86

judge of its size by comparison with the butterfly
in the picture. This is called the ruby-headed



humming-bird. It has a crimson head, yellow
throat, purple wings; the back is a velvety
brown, and the tail dark red, edged with black.



86 Beggars.

Well, Cissy, you have discovered a funny old
man, certainly. Ha, ha, ha! I don’t know
which is the ugliest, the old man or his dog.
How the master wants shaving, and how the
poor dog wants feeding! I suspect they area
pair of beggars, and try to appear worse off
than they really are. No doubt, they are both
very thin; that cannot be sham; but they may



keep themselves so on purpose, for I observe a
certain air of jollity about them, and a merry
twinkle in their eyes. They have retired to a
quiet nook to eat a good dinner. Look! the
man has a quantity of food in a jar on his knees,
and some in a wallet at his back. However, let
them get their living as they may, it is pleasant
to see how fond the old man evidently is of
his dog, and how the dog seems to return his
affection.



fairy Stories. 84

What a good, kind elder sister this is! She
takes the little girl on her knee, and tells her
some pretty story before she goes to bed. I



fancy it is about Golden Hair and the Three
’ Bears, or perhaps the story of Cinderella. How
interested the child seems! I think she will
dream she has a Fairy Godmother.



88 Deer.

This is a picture of some deer. See, how
graceful and noble-looking the stag is! This
herd of deer is in a forest, and, I think, must be
intended for red deer, which are larger and
stronger, though not more graceful, than fallow-
deer. Those we see in parks in England are
generally of the latter kind; and you know how



pretty they are, and how tame sometimes. Red
deer are notcommon in England now, but in
the Highlands of Scotland they still lead a
natural and wild existence. There, deer-stalk-
ing is considered excellent sport. The red deer
distrusts man; and great care and skill are
needed—either by crawling on the ground, or
hiding behind projecting stones—to approach
near enough for a shot.



Running a Race. 89

But, besides deer-stalking,the Highlanders are
fond of all kinds of manly sports and exercises,
‘as you may see by this picture. I am not sur-
prised, little ones, that it makes you laugh. You
-have seen Highlanders before now, I daresay,

=H AS



and you know that, instead of trousers, they

wear a short petticoat, called a kilt. That lady
.and gentleman are English tourists, who have
come to Scotland to see the beautiful scenery.

Fancy their astonishment, in some quiet place
among the mountains, to meet half a dezen
. bony, half-naked giants amusing themselves by
running a race.

G



90 friendly Toads.

This picture must belong to some pretty fairy
story. There is a dear tiny little girl talking
to a couple of great toads. I think she has
lost herself, as I did that day in the wood, and
she is asking her way of the toads. They seem
amiable, although so ugly; indeed, I think that
one nearest to us, with his head all on one side,





is looking quite kindly at her out of his bright
staring eyes. But here’s another picture of a
toad, that has a little elf, or fairy, riding on his
back. Let us take the two pictures together,
and suppose that this is the same toad ; let us
suppose, too, that this little elf has just hopped
‘out from among the flowers and grass, and,
jumping on the toad’s back, has said: “ Pretty



Showing the Way. gt

lady, follow me: I will show you the way.”
And there he rides like a fine gentleman, trying
to be very graceful, smiling with all his might,
and pointing with his riding-whip—which is a
blade of grass—in the direction the little girl
should go. Then, as she walks along, she

f
an



observes that what she thought was a wood of
trees is nothing but grass and flowers ; and she
wonders how it happens that she should have
become so small; actually, not so tall as the
grass, not bigger than the elf, and not so big as
the toad. And she wonders, and wonders, till
at last she wonders so hard that she wakes her-
self up, and finds it was all a dream.



92 A Duncee.

Why, here’s a naughty boy! He is made to
stand against the wall with the dunce’s cap on









aT

i
_——

Wh $=



i

































his head. I hope, when my Johnny goes to
school, he’ll never have to do that. This boy
does not look like a dunce either, does he ?





follow my Leader. 93

Here are some schoolboys amusing them-
selves out in the fields. They are playing at
leaping over the railing, to see which can clear it
best; or perhaps they are having a game at
“Follow my Leader,” when whatever the leader



he jumps, or climbs, or runs, or wherever he
goes, all the rest must follow, and do the same.
One boy you see in the picture has come to
grief; another clears the railing in style. Happy
boys !_enjoying themselves in the fresh spring
weather !



94 In Trouble.

This is a sad picture. What can we make ot
it? I fear the poor woman who is crying must



have lost her purse in tne market; and there is
a dear good little girl saying all she can think
of to comfort and console.



Reapers at Dinner. 95

This is a quiet, peaceful scene, in autumn,
when the harvest is going on. It is midday, and
the reapers are resting while they have their
dinners, A few sheaves of corn, piled up, afford
ey







f MA ie

Z = Wy Y
a little shade and a rest for the back besides.
The wives or children of the poor reapers bring
out their dinners to them ; and how they must
enjoy their short rest, and their bread and bacon,
and above all, their draught of beer, after their
hard work!



96 Ida and her Crow.

- Cissy has found a picture of a little girl, who
was so fond of birds that she made a pet of a
crow. Ida—that was the little girl’s name—-had
the crow given to her when it was hardly fledged,
and she fed it, and took care of it, until it was









quite big and strong. Then she did not shut it
up ina cage, but let it fly where it liked. Soon
it went away to live up in the tall trees, but
whenever Ida calls, “Tommy, Tommy!” if the
crow is within hearing, it answers with a croak,
and flies down to its little mistress.



feeding the Dickies. 97

* This is another picture of the same little girl.
Here you see Ida and her brother standing at
the dining-room window after breakfast, throw-
ing out crumbs to the dear little dickies. Ida’s
brother is as fond of them as she is; and the

\







birds seem to know this, for they come quite
close to the window. Perhaps they say to one
another, in bird language: ‘We have nothing to
fear, for these are good, kind children, that love
little birds.’ And they hop, and chirp, and
peck about, and make a gocd breakfast.



Full Text

The Baldwin Library

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LY SS © Rie ban

BY

MRS. SALE.BARKER

AUTHOR oF “LirrLe Wipeawake”

ETC. ETC.



WITH ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY PICTURES

LONDON AND NEW YORK
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS
1877
CONTENTS.



Lily’s Screen . . . ‘ .
Youth and Age

Mother Hubbard .
Evening Prayer

Guardian Angels .

A Curious Housemaid
Dancing a Minuet

A Morning Visitor

An Awkward Position ..
Missed

The Trapper T rapped 5
The Magic Looking-Glass.
Old Times :
Little Piggie

His Welcome Home
Naughty Piggie

His Impudence
Punishment 3

A Hapless oe :

Rosa

Rosa’s Brother

A Nice Family.

Our House .

A Gentleman of dicot ance
Little Mammas

A Good Gallop

Lightfoot

Topaz

Topaz being Washed

PAGE

10
II
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
30
37
Contents.

Portraits of Cats .
Bijou ‘i :
Bijou’s Death

Charity m
Windy Weather
Going to a Fancy Ball
Long, Long Ago .
Feasting . c
Captain Carbuncle
The Waterspout

A Ship on Fire

The Wreck

Clinging for Life .

A Peaceful Scene
Discord

The Carrier

The Gardener

The Lark’s Nest
Heaith and Sickuess
The Hares and Frogs
The Good Girl
Waiting upon Mamma
A Chimney Sweep
The Sweep Again
Stalking Buffaloes
The Hunter Hunted.
Mamma and Boy .

A Careless Nurse

A Hairbreadth Escape .
The Young Sportsman
A Puzzle

Run Away with

A Pet Mouse

The Prisoner

The Old Fiddler .

A Long Swim.
Contents.

John Gilpin

A Little Owl

Blue Titmouse .

A Funny Couple .
An Old Friend
Dolly’s Doctor
Cavalry

Little Clitbhens
Bright Intellect

A Handsome Profile
Jenny Wren
Ruby-Headed Hiumaitie: Bird
Beggars : :
Fairy Stories

Deer 3
Running a Race
Friendly Toads.
Showing the Way
A Dunce .

Follow my Leader
In Trouble

Reapers at Dinner
Ida and ‘her Crow
Feeding the Dickies
Boating

Angling

Hair Dressing -
‘Out inthe Snow .
A Thief
Rat-Catching
Charity

Cruelty

Poor Pulcinello
Impudence .

Mr. Froggie

A False Alarm

100
1Ot
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
Contents,

PAGE

Stopping a Duel . : : 3 : ‘ : 110
Sweet Music : : : : : ‘ ; ; IIt
Teasing Tommy . . 3 : 5 : : 112
Tommy’s Turn . : ‘ ; : : : 3 113
An Upset : : . . ‘ a ° i 114
Mother and Child ‘ . : . . 3 . 115
A Cheerful Picture . : ‘ a : : 116
A Sad Picture. i ‘ : 5 ‘ rf 7 117
A Lion and Stag. : : : e ; : 118
A Head without Brains : 5 : ; . . 1i9
Borrowed Plumes . : A . 120
Dignity . ; iE 121
A Volcano. : 3 : : : ‘ : 122
Shipwreck . : : ci : ; : 123
Capital Fun. 3 , : Z 5 ; : 124
A Summer Morning . : : : p : : 125
A Poor Musician . ‘ ; : : A . 126
The Artist . 3 : : : : ; 5 127
: ; a s 128

English Scenery








Now, my children, here’s something for, you
to do; something that will amuse you, too, I
think. I am going to give you this old drawing-
room screen to put into the nursery ; and here’s
a basket full of pictures and engravings to paste
upon it. Some. are very pretty ; some very
funny. There are figures, landscapes, animals.
We must cover the screen entirely—all over
with pictures. It was a very grand one in its
day, I can tell you, when it was fresh and new ;
but was never half so amusing to look at as it is
going to be now. Nurse, go and tell Cook to
make some paste, and then we'll set to work.
You shall, each in turn, my darlings, take out a
picture from the basket, and then I'll tell you
what it means while you paste it on.
B
IO Youth and Age.

Now, is the paste ready ? Let us set to work,
then. What’s this that my Lily has taken out
of the basket ? A picture of an old man anda



\
Ae
f \/ oe

dear Me little girl: Re and grandchild,
I should think. This picture will do nicely to
begin with. I know nothing prettier than to see

the very old and the very young kind and loving
to each other.
Mother Hubbard. . II

Who is this, I wonder? You have found a
funny one, Cissy. Did you ever see such a high-
crowned hat? She must be some old witch from



a fairy tale; though she looks too good-natured.
I can scarcely fancy her riding upon a broom-
stick. I shouldn’t wonder if she were old Mother
Hubbard, who was so fond of her doggie.
12 Evening Prayer.

Here, now, is a very pretty little picture: a
child at her mother’s knee, saying her prayers.
Dear, good little child! Sweet baby-lips breath-
ing the purest of all earthly sounds—a little
child’s first prayer! I wonder, now, if you can
guess whom this picture reminds me of? Ah,



I see the dimples coming in your cheeks, my
Cissy and Lily; and you smile as you think—
Mamma means us. Yes, dears, it reminds me
of all my children, for does not my little Johnny
also say his prayers at his mother’s knee ?

But let us try now if we can find pictures that
will come well next to each other, so that we
may make a little story sometimes out of two
Guardian Angels. 1

or three together. And here’s the very thing.
A child asleep, with angels watching over her.
This must follow the little girl praying. Paste
them side by side upon the screen. We will
suppose that this is the same little girl who is
saying her prayers. Now, you see, after having
finished her prayer, she goes to bed: the little



head, with its curls, rests upon the pillow; the
pretty eyes are shut, and the long lashes droop
upon the soft round cheek. She sleeps, and
angels come to guard her. The picture is very
nicely done. We can see how peacefully she
rests ; and we may be sure the angels keep bad
dreams away, and bring her healthy and refresh-
ing sleep. May good angels so guard you all,
my children !
14 A Curious Housemaid.

Well, this is a contrast to the last, certainly.
She looks like a housemaid ; but what a funny ©
one! How would you like her to take the
place of Mary? I think, Cissy, you would not



want to play with her when she was at work, or
help her to sweep, as you want to help Mary
sometimes. She might do her work without
being disturbed, I fancy. And what a cap!
Can it be her night-cap ?
Dancing a Minuet. 15

These ladies and gentlemen are dancing a
minuet. It is a slow, graceful dance, which was
fashionable nearly a hundred years ago, when
people dressed as you see them in the picture.
In those days fine ladies and gentlemen used to
wear powder on their hair, as you sometimes
see footmen do, even now. Indeed, the gentle-
men generally wore powdered wigs: and both



little round patches of black sticking-plaster
here and there upon their faces to make their
complexions appear fairer. Was it not a curious
way of trying to look more beautiful ?

What, Johnny, you say you've got four
pictures of bears! Let me see. Don’t crumple
them up in your little chubby hand, dear. This
must come first. Here is a family of settlers
in the backwoods of North America. They
16 A Morning Visitor.

have built themselves a log-hut ; and one morn-
ing, when the master of the hut opens the door,



he finds a bear outside, anxious to pay them a
morning visit. I suppose the bear walked off on
An Awkward Position. 17

this occasion, for, in the next picture, we find
him climbing up a tree after one of the children,
who has climbed up it to escape, not knowing



i AN VAS SS
that the bear could climb too. But there come
the papa and brother with their rifles, and
they'll soon bring the bear down.
18 Missed.

This is another bear altogether. You seea
hunter has just fired at him, but only wounded



him and made him furious. The poor man, in
running away, falls into a pit-trap; that is, a
The Trapper Trapped. 19

hole which has been dug, and covered over with
branches and earth, in the hope that the bear



—

might tumble in instead. How frightened he

looks! But see! the other hunters are coming.
I trust they will shoot the bear in time.
20 The Magi Looking-Glass.

Well, Cissy, this certainly is a curious picture
you have given me. How should we like such
a magic looking-glass as this, which makes
people look so much uglier than they really
are? How disgusted that young couple appear



at seeing themselves such frights! Generally,
people think themselves better-looking and
better than they are; but they cannot be set
right by being made to think too ill of them-
selves. See how those mischievous little goblins
behind the glass are chuckling at the dismay of
the young couple. -
Old Times. 21

This represents a country parson, as country
parsons were in former days. Should we not be





surprised now to see a clergyman riding about
his parish with his good lady on a pillion behind
him ?
22 Little Pigere.

Now my Lily gives me two pictures—one in
each little hand : both pictures of little dressed-
up pigs. Yes, darling, they will do nicely to go
together. They are pictures of a good, useful,
obedient, little piggie, who was a great comfort



to his mother. You see he has been to market
to buy things for the house, while mamma pig
stays at home to look after the children, for he is
the oldest of a very large family. He is now
returning home, dragging his cart behind him.
He brings a fine supply of fresh fruit and vege-
tables ; and he is enjoying his pipe, too, on his
way home.
His Welcome Home. 23

The next picture shows how delighted
mamma pig is with her good, clever, industrious
son. See how the old lady clasps him to her
heart! I have no doubt she is grunting loving



words in pig language. She thinks to herself
what credit he does to her bringing-up,’ and
what a comfort he is to her old age. She has
but one anxiety about him. So fascinating and
accomplished as he is, she fears lest he should
be induced to marry; and then his poor old
mother would no longer be the first object of
his affection.
24 Naughty Piggie.

Here are Johnny’s little hands held up now.
What, Johnny, have you found three more pic-
tures of little pigs ? Oh, these will do famously.
These are pictures of a younger brother of the
last piggie, and one who was as naughty and
mischievous as the first was good and useful,



One day he was at home while his mamma and
brothers and sisters were out, and how do you
think he amused himself? Why, he smashed
all the toys in the nursery—dolls, kite, drum,
every toy that was there. Presently he heard
his mother come home, and after a little while
he stole quietly down stairs, and found her
flis Impudence. 25

asleep in her chair, for she had come home tired.
Then this impudent little pig tied his old mother
into her chair while she slept. Afterthishelooked
about for more mischief to do, and saw the red-



hot poker in the fire. This naughty little piggie

took out the poker, and began burning a hole in

the floor with it. Now the smell of the burning

wood woke up Mrs. Pig; but at first she could ~

not catch her naughty child, because she ran
Cc
26 Punishment.

after him with the chair upon her back. Mrs.
Pig, however, was not a mother to be trifled
with. She soon unfastened the chair, and then
took a birch-rod from out the closet. In vain



Prise



little Master Piggie tried to escape; in vain he
squeaked for mercy. I can tell you he smarted
well for the mischief he had done that day.
A Hapless Queen. 27

Oh, dear, dear, what a savage dog! Heisa
bulldog, which is the most savage kind there is.
How lucky that he has not got hold of a child
there instead of a doll. These dolls are marion-
nettes, and we may fancy that the dog belongs
to one of the spectators who has just been see-
ing them perform. The dog might well think



they were live creatures, for they are made to
move, dance, or act in a very clever way, by
having thin threads attached to them, the ends
of which pass to the top of the show, where they
are held and moved about by the man who ex-
hibits. The show-box rather resembles that of
Punch. See! The poor doll whose bones are
being crunched has a crown of gold upon her
head. Sad destiny for a queen !
28 LRosa.

Let us call this little girl Rosa. She is pick-
ing the dead leaves off the rose-tree, but does







|

ITN Zi IPR 4
=< Se Z
sare ’*
PRE Mirrorred
x =

2 “a8 Oy =
A SY ania
w=

not cut the flowers to put in water. She loves
them too well, she says, for that; and thinks
they are happier blooming on the tree.
Rosa's Brother. 29

I think this must be Rosa’s brother, for you
see he is fond of flowers, too. He is taking up
some sweet wild violets by the roots, that grow
upon that bank, and intends to carry them home
to his sister to be planted in her garden. He is

a A P me

)



on his return from school, and has to carry his
books and slate, but he will manage to take care
of the violet roots for all that. Brother and
sister love each other dearly; and he thinks
what a bright look will come upon little Rosa’s
face when she sees the violets.
30 A Nice Family.

Well, this zs droll! Ha! ha! ha! That old
gentleman you see keeps a number of pet ani-

_ mi
















mals, and spoils them just as some people spoil
children. See the consequence !
Our FTouse. 31

Here are some children who have made them-
selves a little house in the garden. They have
trained the jessamine and other creepers over-

SS







MAY ws



no A

head so as to make quite a thick roof; thick
enough to keep out the heat of the sun, and
even rain. They have placed a wooden seat in
the house to sit down upon ; and that there may
32 A Gentleman of Importance.

be no mistake about its being a house, they
have written up “Our House” upon a piece of
pasteboard overhead. Many a happy, merry
hour did the three children and their pussy pass
together there in the summer months. There
they used to tell stories to each other; and



sometimes they would bring out cake, or bread
and butter, to eat in their own little house ; and
it was always much nicer there than when eaten
anywhere else.

Frank, who was the eldest of the three chil-
dren, was the first to leave off taking delight in
the house in the garden. He began to wear
jackets and little trousers with pockets in them,
Little Mammas. 93

as you see him in the picture; and this change
in his dress gave him such an idea of his own
importance and manliness, that he hardly con-
descends any longer to play with. his sisters at
all. He struts about all day with his hands in
his pockets.



xo : = =





The picture above shows us the twos sisters
playing with their dolls, after their brother no
longer joined intheir games. They are playing,
you see, at being two mammas. Each has her
child, and each is telling the other of the won-
derful beauty and talent of her own child, as
they have heard fond real mothers often do.
34 A Good Gallop.

This is Miss Mary Masterly having a gallop
upon Lightfoot over the soft turf. It is a pic-
ture after my Cissy’s own heart, I know. How



delightful to go so fast through the air, to feel
the wind blowing on your cheeks, and see the
dear doggie running by your side !
Lightfoot. 35

But here, Cissy dear, look on this picture after
that ; you would not find this so delightful. I
fear our friend, Miss Mary Masterly, has been
trying to be too masterful with poor Lightfoot,



and he resents it. He deserves his name, for
certainly his heels seem too light to be com-
fortable for his rider. You would not like to be
in her place now, I think.
36 Topaz.

Yes, my Lily, this is very pretty ; Mrs. Puss
is carrying little kitty in her mouth. Good,
kind mother! You may be sure she is very
careful not to hurt her kitten. Try, dear, to

RN fee



see if we can make a story. Let us suppose
that pussy is a great pet of her mistress, whom
we will call Lady Lovepet, and who has given
pussy the name of Topaz, because of her large
yellow eyes, which shine like precious gems.
Lady Lovepet treats Topaz very much as if she
were a baby, and makes her have a bath occa-~
Topaz beng Washed. 37

sionally. This picture will do to represent Topaz
being washed by the housekeeper and footman ;
only we must suppose it all happened about a
century ago, when footmen sometimes wore
cocked hats. The footman has to help, you
see, because Mrs. Topaz does not like being











washed, and scratches if she is not held tight.
After her bath, she makes a rule, as soon as she
is let loose, of getting into the coal-scuttle, thus
undoing the effect of the washing, and changing
herself into a black cat. After that she gene-
rally takes a run upstairs, jumps upon her mis-
tress’s bed, and rubs herself upon the counter-
pane till she recovers her natural colour again.
38. Portraits of Cats.

Lady Lovepet has portraits, drawn in her
scrap-book, of all the cats she ever had among
her pets ; and she and her old housekeeper are
never tired of looking at them. Let us admire
them too!

But, however fond Lady Lovepet might be of



Topaz, she once had another pet, whom she
loved quite as well, but who came to an untimely
end. This was her parrot, Bijou. He was a
wonderful bird, there is no doubt about it. He
could talk and sing in two or three different
languages, and was so tame, that instead of
being kept shut up in his cage all day, he used
to be let out in a conservatory among the plants,
Byou. 39

as you see him in the picture. He was fond of
asking, “ Who’s the King of England?” Then
would answer himself in another voice, “ King
George, of course.” He often screamed out,
“Three cheers for the king ; hip, hip, hurrah!”



and kept up his “hurrah” till the most loyal
subjects rejoiced when he left off. When he
was covered up for the night you would hear a
soft, sweet voice wishing you “good-night ”
from beneath the green baize covering which
was put over the cage. Unfortunately; Bijou
40 Byou's Death.

had one bad habit, which eventually cost him
his life. He was fond of teasing Topaz. If
ever he saw the poor cat settling comfortably
to sleep, he always screamed out “ Puss, puss!”
And Topaz started up, thinking her mistress
called. The parrot did this once when he was







alone in the conservatory with Topaz. Pussy
sprang at the unlucky bird and brought him to
the ground. When Lady Lovepet returned to
the room where she had left her two pets, one
had scampered off, knowing she had done wrong,
the other lay upon the ground, a blood-stained
and lifeless heap of feathers.
Charity. AI

Here we see a nice, good little lad leading a
poor tired old traveller into a cottage, that he
may rest. The little lad’s mother is out, but he



knows she would be glad to let the poor old man
sit down, and perhaps, when she comes in, will
give him a meal besides.

D
42 Windy Weather.

Oh, I am sure this man will tumble on his
nose. Poor fellow! I am sorry for him, yet
we cannot help laughing. What a rare dance
he is having after hishat! Perhaps he has been
running after it a long time, now and then almost
touching it, when a sudden gust has come, and:
off it has gone, whirling away again. I daresay



it is all happening at the sea-side, for there you
get wind enough to blow hats about, and to do
a deal more mischief than that. Let us hope
some kind person will meet the hat and stop it,
for it looks rather battered now, and in a little
time it will scarcely be worth picking up, I
think. As for the poor man, J am sure before.
he takes many steps more he will come down.
with his face in the mud.
Going toa Fancy Ball. 43

These are curious people. They. must ‘be
going to a fancy ball where everybody is to





it UC!

AW \



































































































































represent some vegetable. One has a melon on
his head, the other has onions all about him. 1

hope they are not real onions.
44 Long, Long Ago.

Yes, dears, this will do nicely to fit in here,
though it is rather a sad picture. Poor old
woman! She sits there all alone, watching the













little flower on her window-sill. She is thinking
of past times, when perhaps she had children
about her to brighten her life.
Feasting. 45

Now you have taken a very pretty one from
the basket ; a fine goat standing on a wall, and
helping himself to some grapes—or, more likely,
to the tendrils and young leaves of the vine!
Is he not a handsome goat? You say you



would like to be in his place, my Lily? I dare-
say you would, but it’s very lucky you are not ;
for you would certainly eat too many grapes,
and make yourself ill; and, what is worse, you
might fall off the wall, and perhaps break one
of those little arms or legs.
46 Captain Carbuncle.

“Why are you laughing, little ones? Well, I
am not surprised. Johnny always picks out
funny pictures. What a fat, ferocious-looking

ny
H
1
N
N
\N



man, with his shaggy hair and beard, and great
nose! He is evidently an old sailor; and his
name shall be Captain Carbuncle. He is as-
The Waterspout. 47

tonishing those two lads with some marvellous

stories of his adventures. He tells them that

once, when he was a young middy, a mere boy
*



like them, his ship was. sailing along,” one
moonlight night, when suddenly they found
themselves running into a terrific waterspout.
Cloud and sea rushed together, meeting in a
48 A Ship on Fore.

giant mass of water. They had just time to
change their course, and barely escaped being
sunk. Then Captain Carbuncle goes on to tell



them how, on another voyage, his ship took
fire, and, although the sea was calm, they had
to take to the boats and leave her. He relates
The Wreck. 49

how half the crew died of starvation and cold
before they reached the land. Another time,







the ship he sailed in struck on ‘canbe rocks,
during a dreadful tempest, and was lost. He
was captain then, and would not leave the vessel
50 Clinging for Life.

till the last. He saw the crew take to the boats,
and leave him. When the vessel was at
length broken in pieces by the fury of the
waves, he clung to a spar, and so kept himself
afloat in the surging water. At first he had
some hope that one of the boats might yet be



near enough to see him, and might return on
purpose to take him in; but, as hour after hour
went by, this hope departed. Still, although he
despaired of saving his life, he clung to the
spar from an instinct of self-preservation. For
a day and night he floated there, when, by great
good luck, a French merchant vessel passed and
‘picked him up.
A Peaceful Scene. 51

Well, my darling Cissy, what is this picture ?
Certainly a very pretty and peaceful scene, and,
indeed, pleasant to look at, after our friend
Captain Carbuncle’s stormy adventures and
perilous escapes. I think you are quite right,



ah
Lily, in saying that it is nice to fancy that
gentleman, walking under the trees, to be
Captain Carbuncle himself, after his return in
safety to his native land. What a delight it
must be to him to find himself in such a lovely
peaceful spot, with the soft grass under his feet !
Discord.

Johnny now hands me a picture of what ought
to be a quiet, peaceful scene too: an English













farm-yard. but, I am sorry to say, it seems to
be nothing of the kind. Turkey, chickens,
ducks, and cat seem all at discord.
The Carrier. 53

What have we here? A funny little couple
playing at being grown-up people. This carrier
is only a little boy, as you see. His name is
Freddy, and that is his little sister Lucy, who
has borrowed the housemaid’s cap for the occa-
sion. She comes out on to the door-step to



eee FEO pag SEN

receive the box which they pretend has just
arrived by the carrier. The box, in fact, is only
an empty one, which Master Fred took out of
the nursery a few minutes ago. The cart stand-
ing at the door, though, is the real carrier’s cart,
and has brought a real parcel for the children’s
mamma. The real carrier, too, is in the house,
having a glass of beer.
54. The Gardener.

This is a gardener. He has his hammer in
his hand, nailing the creepers against the wall,
to make it look tidy. We will call him Mr.
Tidyman ; and, do you know, that was really:











the name of.a gardener we had when I was a
little girl. But what is he looking at, I won-'
der? Why, he spies a nice, soft, warm little bird’s
nest in that ivy on the wall. He would not dis-
turb it for the world ; and leaves off hammering,
that he may not frighten the tiny nestlings.
The Lark’s Nest. 55

No, Johnny dear, this is not the nest that
Tidyman found in the ivy; but it will do very
well.to paste upon the screen, for all that. This
is a lark’s nest, and is built upon the ground
amid the young green corn. Larks’ nests are
often found in cornfields; and, when you see a



lark mounting up into the air, higher and higher,
and singing away so merrily and sweetly, I
daresay he often has his little eye upon the
cornfield down below, watching to see if any
one goes near his nest. I hope these little birds
will be old enough to fly away before the
reapers come.
56 fTealth and Sickness.

This is a sad picture, and yet a pleasant one.
It is sad to see the poor, sick, deformed child,
sitting in her little chair, wrapped up, even in







summer, to keep her warm. It is pleasant to
see the strong, healthy sister trying to amuse her,
and bringing sweet flowers to give her pleasure.
The Hares and Frogs. ay

This picture of hares and frogs must be in-
tended to illustrate one of AZsop’s fables. Hares
are considered remarkably timid creatures ; and
the fable tells us that some hares once, being
weary of their lives, on account of the constant
state of alarm they lived in, determined to go



together to the river and drown themselves. On
the bank of the river sat a number of frogs, who,
being frightened at the approach of the hares,
and the sight of their long ears, leaped into the
water and swam away. Then the hares took
comfort, seeing there were creatures in the world
afraid also of them.
E
58 The Good Girl.

Here we have a nice little girl, playing and
singing to her brother and sister. She is sing-
ing some nursery song set to music. Look how





AL ; oe ‘ a oe 3
WAS

quiet they are, and how attentively they listen !
I wish certain little people I know, who are
sometimes inclined to be too uproarious, could
always be charmed into quietness like that with
a little music, .


Waiting upon Mamma. 59

Dear me, how delightful it is to have pictures
of such very good children! Here is a nice,
useful, handy little girl. I think she must be
the same as we had in the last. There she was

LEI



amusing her brother and ‘sister: here, she is
taking a cup of tea to her poor sick mamma,
who isin bed. How carefully she carries it! and
how it must gladden mamma’s heart to see her
child’s little smiling face coming into the room!
60 A Chimney Sweep.

This picture is not only pretty, but it teaches
a good lesson too. You see those nice little clean
children are not afraid of the poor black sweep-
boy, and are willing to shake hands with him.
Nowadays, sweeps are men who clean the chim-



— fF 7 =e

neys by poking long jointed brooms into them ;
but I daresay you have heard that chimneys
used to be swept by little boys, who climbed up
them, sweeping as they climbed; and almost
every village had its sweep-boy. This boy in
the picture was known to be a kind and merry
little fellow, and was liked by all the other
The Sweep Again. 61

village children before he became a sweep; and
now they do not shun him, because he earns his
living honestly in that way. In the second
picture he looks a comical figure, does he not ?
Standing with bare feet on the snowy roof, and










er Sl ijtr
se

fi
MY

oe

looking down a chimney, while a couple of birds
are staring at him in return without being afraid
of him in the least. The children, the dogs, and
even, you see, the birds of the village appear to
know what a good-natured fellow he is; and
none of them fear him, in spite of his blackness,
62 Stalking Buffaloes.

Paste these two pictures of buffalo-hunting in
North America side by side. In this one they















are stalking the buffaloes; and one hunter has
covered himself with a bear-skin, to crawl up
close to a fine buffalo before he fires. But no!
The Hunter Hunted. 63

that clever trick is quite a failure. In the second
picture we see the buffalo hunting the hunter,



Se OE Sse

who has cast off his disguise to run away. The
other hunter there, with his rifle levelled, had
better fire quickly.
64 Mamma and Boy.

This is quite a change of subject: a mamma
with her little boy! What, my little Johnny,
do you think there is any likeness between you
and the little man standing. on a chair to kiss
his mother? What is he holding, I wonder,
behind his back? A sword, I do believe; and
he is asking mamma to guess what he has there.
The sword has just been given him by papa,







and he thinks to show it to his mother as a
great surprise; but the fact is, she knows all
about it, and has prepared a present for him
too. Ina cupboard, close by, she has hidden a
fine cocked hat, with coloured paper plume ; so
she has her secret too. As soon as her little
boy brings out his sword from behind him,
mamma will take out the cocked hat. With
cocked hat and sword he zw7// bea brave soldier
indeed,
A Careless Nurse. 65

This is a pretty picture for our screen, and
shows us a pretty little girl, and a pretty baby
leg and foot sticking up out of the cot. Still, I
must say, I should not like my little child to be
rocked as carelessly as that little girl is rocking
her baby brother. Why, she turns her back to
him, and goes on rock, rock, rocking away, with



her foot on the rockers, without looking at him
at all. She might rock the baby out of the cot
without being any the wiser. Generaily, I think,
little girls take great care of their baby brothers
and sisters. I have seen poor little girls in the
street staggering along under the weight of a
baby almost as big as themselves ; and all the
time as careful of it as the mother could be.
66 A Hairbreadth Escape.

Dear! dear! What exciting pictures Johnny
brings out of the basket! Another hunting
scene! but no longer in North America. This

co SAN
to drink a
out of the jungle. What a moment of agony
and terror! He thinks his death certain, when
—ping!—he hears his friend’s rifle, and down
drops the leopard.


Lhe Young Sportsman.

Here’s some shooting of a tamer kind.
gallant young sportsman has just shot his first

This





import-

and only see with what an air of
ance he comes into the room, to show his prize

to his father, brother, and sisters.

d

hare ;
68 A Puzzle.

This is a curious picture, I must say. Can
anything be funnier than three people sitting in
bed under umbrellas? Let us think what can
be the reason of this behaviour. I fear their
roof cannot be water-tight: This is a kind little
girl, who knows that these people are very poor,
and she has come to see them; perhaps to
bring them something to eat from her mother,
who lives near. Just fancy her surprise, when

2 na pte ott



she finds the whole family sitting in bed under
umbrellas. They were obliged to go to bed, I
should tell you, because they had been out in
the rain, and got their clothes wet. You ask me,
Cissy dear, how it happens, if they are so poor,
that they have three good umbrellas. I confess
that puzzles me. I am afraid my story will not
suit, after all. I cannot guess at the meaning of
the picture ; so let us leave it to the imagina-
tion of each person who sees it.
Run Away With. 69

Another hairbreadth escape! but not from wild
animals this time. Flora Munro is driving her
mamma in the pony carriage, when, in holding

———— = BED 7 a Be Wn



rein suddenly snaps. Flora bravely jumps out,
and in a moment catches the pony just as it
breaks into a gallop.
70 A Pet Mouse.
What's this that Johnny has in hishand? A

little girl watching a pet mouse. Poor little
prisoner! how he turns round and round in his

i



|

|
Hi)



cage, trying to get out. The child has no in-
tention of being cruel, but she does not consider
how much the whole enjoyment of life, to a little
wild creature like that, must depend upon its
The Prisoner. 71

liberty. The little mouse longs for freedom
almost as much as this poor human prisoner
whom we see in the other picture. What a sad
picture it is! Poor fellow! How the chained
hands, so tightly clasped together, and the
whole attitude of the man, tell of the despair he









feels. I hardly know whether he is most to be
pitied, if he be innocent, or if he be guilty. In
either case, it must be terrible to be shut up
between narrow walls, almost, or quite com-
panionless. How happy he must think the
poorest or most wretched creature that has but
the power of going about as he pleases!
v2 The Old Fiddler.

This is an old fiddler: one whose occupation
and delight it is chiefly, I should say, to amuse
children with his music. He receives many a

I

ee

SSC
NOMI”



penny at cottage doors; sometimes a meal be-
sides; and, I can tell you, he plays away with
a will, for his heart is in it.
A Long Swim. 73

This poor Donkey was thrown overboard from
a sinking ship, on the chance of its being able

















































to swim to shore. You will be glad to hear
that it managed to do so, swimming eight or
nine miles in a tempestuous sea.

F
74 F ohn Gilpin.

Why, here is our old friend, John Gilpin, I
declare! Paste him on by all means; he is
always amusing. Poor fellow! How he clings
to his horse’s neck, and what a fright he is in!
The picture represents him as he dashes past



the hotel at Edmonton, where his wife and chil-
dren are standing in the balcony watching for
him.

1»

“Stop, stop, John Gilpin, here’s the house
They all aloud did cry ;

“The dinner waits, and we are tired,”
Said Gilpin, “ So am I.”
A Little Owl. 75

You have found some pictures of birds, you
say, Cissy? Let me look at them, and I'll try
if I can tell you what they are. Here we have
an Owl. It is acurious and very handsome kind
of little Owl, sometimes found in England, but



more common in North America. The head,
back, and wings are of a rich chocolate-brown,
dotted with white spots, and the under parts of
the body are a greyish white. Like most Owls,
it remains quietly at home during the daylight ;
but in the stillness of night, and in quiet country
places, its melancholy cry is often heard.
76 Blue Titmouse.

_ This is a picture of a little blue Titmouse,
“one of gur most familiar birds. It is a voracious
little creature, and of great service to all gar-
deners/by destroying the insects which get upon
their fiuit trees. In the course of one day two
Titmice have been observed to visit their nest,



between them, about four hundred times, each
time bringing in their beaks a caterpillar or
insect. Fancy how many they must destroy !
Next to the Titmouse you must place this
picture of two odd-looking little birds with black
crests; for they are Titmice also, but of a kind
found chiefly in Asia. They are called yellow-
A Funny Couple. a

cheeked Titmice. The cheeks and under part
of the body are yellow; the back and wings a



greyish green, while the parts you see dark in
the picture are jet black.
78 An Old Friend.

This is a picture of a very well-known bird—
the House-Martin. In habits, size, and shape it
resembles the common swallow, but may be dis-
tinguished by the white patch upon the lower
part of the back. In the dusk of evening, martins
may often be seen flying about at so late an















PDP a Ll

hour that they are only visible, as they dart past
you, by the white patches on their backs. They
are called house-martins because their nests,
which are of clay, are generally built in some
sheltered nook about the outside of a house;
often under the eaves cf the roof, and sometimes
—so trustful and fearless are they of human
beings—in the corner of a window
Dolly's Doctor. 79

This is a picture that will amuse Johnny.
That little urchin with papa’s hat upon his head
is playing at being the doctor, and has come to
prescribe for sister’s dolly, who is supposed to



“Some cake? Just let me taste. Oh, this is
most unwholesome!” he exclaims. Then he eats
all the cake himself, and says he will send a
draught, blue pill, some salts, a powder, and a
few more things for baby ; whose mamma also,
he thinks, would be better for a little physic.
80 Cavalry.

Make way for the cavalry, if you please. See
how bravely they come dashing along, and how
the horses prance and rear! Freddy, and
Frank, and Arthur are having a gallop on their
hobby-horses. They are making a rare noise,



and a fine dust ; yet their mamma appears to be
dozing in the corner there in spite of all. I am
sure that is more than I could do with such a
noise. Ishould sound the retreat for the cavalry
if they were.my boys, I think; and bid them
enjoy themselves as riotously as they please
in the garden or the nursery.
Little Chickens. 81

Well, this is a contrast to the last. Our pic-
tures change from childhood to old age. This
old woman seems to have the care of the poultry
at some large farm, or perhaps at a gentleman’s
country house, for there are some ladies looking



in at the door. But doesn’t she seem fond of
her chickens, and geese, and ducklings! How
they gather about her! — And she has some little
ducklings too in her lap. She sits in the midst
as if they were her family ; and I think you will
like her, children, because she seems fond of the
little creatures she has charge of.
82 Bright [ntellect.

This is a sketch I made from recollection
of a countryman I once met, when I was stay-
ing in the west of England, in a rather out-
of-the-way part of the world. It was a long
time ago, children ; before I married, in fact. I
was walking out alone, and contrived to lose



myself in a little wood, which was quite near to
the house I was staying at. There were so
many paths in the wood that, once in, I could
not find my way out again. Meeting this
countryman, I asked him the way. He scratched
his head for five minutes, then replied: “One
way be as gude as t’other;” and walked off.
A FLandsome Profile. 83

- Well, I wandered on, and soon met another
labourer; and there ought to be a sketch of
him also there. Oh, here it is! Well, I asked
this handsome person the same question, when
he appeared astonished beyond expression, and
opened his mouth, just as you see. At last, he



SIE SS
pointed with his stick the way I was already
going. I took this for my answer; and, indeed,
the path proved to be right. On relating my
adventure to my friends whom I was staying
with, I made these sketches to help my descrip-
tion, and they declared they recognised two
men living in the village close by.
84 Fenny Wren.

My Johnny brings me two more pictures of
birds. Why, here is little Jenny Wren, who
hops about so merrily in the hedges, wagging
her saucy little tail. She sings a merry soug,

'
6,
)



too; and, even in winter, there needs but a,
gleam of sunshine to set her twittering.

But the other picture represents a much
smaller bird —the tiny, beautiful humming-bird.
It is only found in certain hot countries, and
feeds upon the honey from flowers. Its nest is
attached, you see, to a large leaf, and you can
Ruby-headed Humming-Bird. 86

judge of its size by comparison with the butterfly
in the picture. This is called the ruby-headed



humming-bird. It has a crimson head, yellow
throat, purple wings; the back is a velvety
brown, and the tail dark red, edged with black.
86 Beggars.

Well, Cissy, you have discovered a funny old
man, certainly. Ha, ha, ha! I don’t know
which is the ugliest, the old man or his dog.
How the master wants shaving, and how the
poor dog wants feeding! I suspect they area
pair of beggars, and try to appear worse off
than they really are. No doubt, they are both
very thin; that cannot be sham; but they may



keep themselves so on purpose, for I observe a
certain air of jollity about them, and a merry
twinkle in their eyes. They have retired to a
quiet nook to eat a good dinner. Look! the
man has a quantity of food in a jar on his knees,
and some in a wallet at his back. However, let
them get their living as they may, it is pleasant
to see how fond the old man evidently is of
his dog, and how the dog seems to return his
affection.
fairy Stories. 84

What a good, kind elder sister this is! She
takes the little girl on her knee, and tells her
some pretty story before she goes to bed. I



fancy it is about Golden Hair and the Three
’ Bears, or perhaps the story of Cinderella. How
interested the child seems! I think she will
dream she has a Fairy Godmother.
88 Deer.

This is a picture of some deer. See, how
graceful and noble-looking the stag is! This
herd of deer is in a forest, and, I think, must be
intended for red deer, which are larger and
stronger, though not more graceful, than fallow-
deer. Those we see in parks in England are
generally of the latter kind; and you know how



pretty they are, and how tame sometimes. Red
deer are notcommon in England now, but in
the Highlands of Scotland they still lead a
natural and wild existence. There, deer-stalk-
ing is considered excellent sport. The red deer
distrusts man; and great care and skill are
needed—either by crawling on the ground, or
hiding behind projecting stones—to approach
near enough for a shot.
Running a Race. 89

But, besides deer-stalking,the Highlanders are
fond of all kinds of manly sports and exercises,
‘as you may see by this picture. I am not sur-
prised, little ones, that it makes you laugh. You
-have seen Highlanders before now, I daresay,

=H AS



and you know that, instead of trousers, they

wear a short petticoat, called a kilt. That lady
.and gentleman are English tourists, who have
come to Scotland to see the beautiful scenery.

Fancy their astonishment, in some quiet place
among the mountains, to meet half a dezen
. bony, half-naked giants amusing themselves by
running a race.

G
90 friendly Toads.

This picture must belong to some pretty fairy
story. There is a dear tiny little girl talking
to a couple of great toads. I think she has
lost herself, as I did that day in the wood, and
she is asking her way of the toads. They seem
amiable, although so ugly; indeed, I think that
one nearest to us, with his head all on one side,





is looking quite kindly at her out of his bright
staring eyes. But here’s another picture of a
toad, that has a little elf, or fairy, riding on his
back. Let us take the two pictures together,
and suppose that this is the same toad ; let us
suppose, too, that this little elf has just hopped
‘out from among the flowers and grass, and,
jumping on the toad’s back, has said: “ Pretty
Showing the Way. gt

lady, follow me: I will show you the way.”
And there he rides like a fine gentleman, trying
to be very graceful, smiling with all his might,
and pointing with his riding-whip—which is a
blade of grass—in the direction the little girl
should go. Then, as she walks along, she

f
an



observes that what she thought was a wood of
trees is nothing but grass and flowers ; and she
wonders how it happens that she should have
become so small; actually, not so tall as the
grass, not bigger than the elf, and not so big as
the toad. And she wonders, and wonders, till
at last she wonders so hard that she wakes her-
self up, and finds it was all a dream.
92 A Duncee.

Why, here’s a naughty boy! He is made to
stand against the wall with the dunce’s cap on









aT

i
_——

Wh $=



i

































his head. I hope, when my Johnny goes to
school, he’ll never have to do that. This boy
does not look like a dunce either, does he ?


follow my Leader. 93

Here are some schoolboys amusing them-
selves out in the fields. They are playing at
leaping over the railing, to see which can clear it
best; or perhaps they are having a game at
“Follow my Leader,” when whatever the leader



he jumps, or climbs, or runs, or wherever he
goes, all the rest must follow, and do the same.
One boy you see in the picture has come to
grief; another clears the railing in style. Happy
boys !_enjoying themselves in the fresh spring
weather !
94 In Trouble.

This is a sad picture. What can we make ot
it? I fear the poor woman who is crying must



have lost her purse in tne market; and there is
a dear good little girl saying all she can think
of to comfort and console.
Reapers at Dinner. 95

This is a quiet, peaceful scene, in autumn,
when the harvest is going on. It is midday, and
the reapers are resting while they have their
dinners, A few sheaves of corn, piled up, afford
ey







f MA ie

Z = Wy Y
a little shade and a rest for the back besides.
The wives or children of the poor reapers bring
out their dinners to them ; and how they must
enjoy their short rest, and their bread and bacon,
and above all, their draught of beer, after their
hard work!
96 Ida and her Crow.

- Cissy has found a picture of a little girl, who
was so fond of birds that she made a pet of a
crow. Ida—that was the little girl’s name—-had
the crow given to her when it was hardly fledged,
and she fed it, and took care of it, until it was









quite big and strong. Then she did not shut it
up ina cage, but let it fly where it liked. Soon
it went away to live up in the tall trees, but
whenever Ida calls, “Tommy, Tommy!” if the
crow is within hearing, it answers with a croak,
and flies down to its little mistress.
feeding the Dickies. 97

* This is another picture of the same little girl.
Here you see Ida and her brother standing at
the dining-room window after breakfast, throw-
ing out crumbs to the dear little dickies. Ida’s
brother is as fond of them as she is; and the

\







birds seem to know this, for they come quite
close to the window. Perhaps they say to one
another, in bird language: ‘We have nothing to
fear, for these are good, kind children, that love
little birds.’ And they hop, and chirp, and
peck about, and make a gocd breakfast.
98 Boating.

What a pleasant amusement this must be,
and a fine healthy exercise, too! I wish we









were all with them in their nice boat, on the
beautiful river, this glorious summer evening.
I am afraid, though, they would say: “ Thank
you ; you are too heavy!”
Angling. 99

Here is another picture of boys amusing
themselves in the beautiful summer weather.
These boys are angling. I cannot say I admire
them as I do those who take to the fine, manly













exercise of sautuds Still, it must be pleasant to
sit on the bank of a quiet pretty stream, on a
warm day, and listen to the humming of in-
sects, the chirping of birds, and the ripple ot
the water. Only I do not see the fun of catch-
ing the little fish,
100 Flair Dressing.

Would you believe that, less than a hundred
years ago, fashionable ladies dressed their hair
like this ? It is covered with white powder, and



piled up in such a rickety way, that a case is
being put on to keep it in position till the
moment of starting for the ball.
Out in the Snow. IOI

Here we have another style of dress: a very
modern littie girl, rather like my Cissy, running

== = Ay

out in the snow with Tip, her pet doggie.
Happy little girl, enjoying the cold bracing air.


102 A Thief.

A monkey, by way of a change! Well, I
never saw anything more ridiculous. An ugly
old monkey has stolen that little girl’s hat, and
evidently thinks it becomes him immensely.
The girl must belong to a family of colonists in



Australia or New Zealand. And see! the
brother comes out with his rifle, while the little
girl herself pleads for her hat, and hopes to
recover it by peaceable means. I am afraid
the poor monkey’s merriment is likely to be
stopped by a rifle ball.
Rat-Catching. 103

These two dogs are rat-catching, or at least,
are watching a rat hole, probably in the loft of
a stable. They remind me of two dogs that
belonged to our coachman when I was a little



girl, called Pincher aiid Eife Pinchet was cele-
brated far and near for rat-catching; and taught
Elfie, who was brought to him as a companion
when quite a puppy, his own accomplishment.
But afterwards he became jealous, and never
would hunt in company with Elfie.
104 Charity.

I think I have heard the story of these three
schoolboys. Their names are Tommy, George,
and John. Each of them has had his weekly
pocket-money just given him, and they walk
out together, thinking how they shall spend
it. First they come to a pastry-cook’s; and
here Tommy spends all his money. Then



they all walk on to the toy-shop. Here

George soon invests his little fortune in a toy ;

but John is still looking about to choose one,

when an old beggar-man appears at the door,

John thinks how tired and hungry he looks,

and, remembering that there is a baker’s shop ,
next door, he runs there and buys a large loaf

of bread for the poor man. Which ot the boys,

think you, spent his money the best ?
Cruelty. 105

Here are three more boys, znd I am afraid
they are all three bad. They have harnessed a
poor dog into a little cart, and have laden it
with stones till it istoo heavy for him to draw
it. One kicks him, and another is going to beat
him, because he cannot go on, Dogs, like horses,
are willing servants to man, and should always



be treated kindly. How grateful and proud a
dog is if you let him carry your stick or um-
brella in his mouth. Those boys deserve a
good beating ; and there is a gentleman coming
with a stick in his hand. I hope he will ob-
serve how cruelly they are behaving, and give
them a good lecture at least, if he does nothing

more,
H
106 Poor Fulcinello.

_ This isa man who acts Pulcinello on the Italian
stage. His wife is lately dead ; and at night,

~ AN la —
SS \ CAMS
S : $ = = nN q }i
WS YAuillif





after making people laugh at. the theatre, he
goes to sit in the churchyard and weep for her.
Liipudence. 107

Some bears are very clever at climbing trees.
Here is one who has climbed up a high tree into
the nest of an eagle or vulture. After feasting



upon the eaglets, he has made himself comfort-
able in the nest. The parent birds are return-
ing ; how astonished and enraged that one is!
108 Mr. Froggie.

So, Lily, you have collected four pictures of
frogs, and birds, and mice, all dressed up like
little people. Well, paste them in a row, and
we will find out some meaning for them. ee
certainly is a froggie who “ would a-wooing go,”
but I do not think he can be the real original



old froggie of the nursery song. You see this
Mr. Froggie plays the guitar; and, bless me,
how he turns up his eyes and opens his mouth
while he sings! He must be quite irresistible.
No doubt Mrs. Lark thinks him so, and the baby
larks seem delighted too. How they open their
little beaks! and one turns to its mother to ask
her if she does not think ¢#a¢ beautiful music.
A False Alarm. 109

But see here, what a flurry and fluster they
are all in! Something must have happened to
frighten them. Froggie has been playing away,
and the lark family have been listening, till day-
light has passed, and the moon isrising. I think



































































































2\\ VA
AN Nii



now they must hear a human footstep, or perhaps
the approach of some prowling creature who
might devour the baby larks. A nest in corn or
grass is not safe like a nest in a tree. Froggie
is the only one of the party who retains his
presence of mind; he is telling them to be
quiet, and says—-“ Hush!”
110 Stopping a Duel.

Luckily it proves a false alarm; and when
Mrs. Lark and family have recovered from their
fright, froggie gracefully takes his leave. Wan-
dering along by moonlight, humming a tune, he
suddenly hears a noise like loud and angry
squeaking. Coming to a small open space, he



beholds two field-mice engaged in mortal com-
bat, while several ugly beetles are looking on,
thinking that if either mouse is killed, they
may have a merry feast. Froggie resolves to
be a peacemaker; and with that object, be-
labours both the combatants with his guitar till
they run away in opposite directions.
Sweet Music. III

Here we see froggie again after he has re-
turned to his native pond and his own chosen
friends, who welcome him with a concert. They
have solos, duets, choruses. See how atten-
tively, and with what a critical air, his friends
are listening to him now. Perhaps he is re-



lating to them in song the story of his late
adventures. To human beings passing near
the pond that night, the music might appear
like croaking ; but when we look at the picture,
and consider the graceful attitudes and the ex-
pressive faces, we must feel satisfied that it is
music of a high order. Now we must say
good-bye to froggie, and wish him well.
112 Teasing Tummy.

This picture warns you, my children, that it
is not always safe or kind to play practical
jokes upon people. This boy’s name is Tom,
and he is generally called Teasing Tommy.
One day he got a hideous mask, and after he

i Tin aT]
‘I ‘ip | HK











Lae



had tried to frighten his little brothers, who did
not much mind it, he crept up softly behind the
housemaid and gave a dreadful bellow. Turn-
ing round suddenly, she was so startled at this
hideous face that she screamed and fainted, and
was ill for a long time afterwards.
Tommy's Turn. ET

But one day, when Tommy was teasing some
pigs, he had the worst of it. The family was
staying in the country, where there was a farm-
yard and a large pigsty.. Tommy got in among
the Pigs and amused himself fae pulling their



tails till he made them so wild, that one, s, running
behind him, knocked him over in all the mud and
slush. He was welllaughed at ; and afterwards,
if his little brothers wanted to tease him in re-
turn, they would grunt like pigs. Tommy
always knew what they meant.
114 | An Upset.

Washerwomen in France wash their linen in
some running stream. This one is returning from



















a horse, who is turned out in the field, playfully
upsets the poor woman, her basket, and all.
Mother and Child. 115

See, here is a picture of some deer; a doe
and a fawn. How pretty they are; how in-
telligent they look; and how plainly you can
see that they are talking together! I have
often wondered how it is that animals, without



language, make themselves understood by each
other. Yet somehow they certainly do make
each other understand. I suppose the sound of
the voice expresses a good deal without words.
I can almost fancy that that nice pretty doe is
giving advice to her little child, as I might to
you, my darlings.
116 A Cheerful Picture.

My Lily brings me a picture of a nice little
girl with a nosegay of flowers in her hand. She’
is just going off to school, I think, and no



doubt the flowers are for her school-mistress,
whose little garden does not grow such good
. ones. It is a pretty child, and a nice cheerful,
picture.
A Sad Picture. 117

Here is another, though, which is far from
cheerful: a poor little boy out in the snow with
only a shawl over his head! He does not seem



















a beggar, but looks very sad. Perhaps some-
body is ill at home, and he has run to fetch the
doctor.
118 A Lion and Stag.

What's this? A lion attacking a poor stag,
who is caught by his antlers in the branches of
atree. This would do to illustrate a well-known
fable, which tells us that a stag once, looking
at his own reflection in a pool of water, was
delighted with the beauty of his antlers, their
graceful curves, and the dignity they gave to



his appearance ; while he found fault with his
legs for being too long and straight. But when
the stag was hunted, and had to run for his life,
the despised legs would have carried him far
away from his enemies, had not the beautiful
outspreading antlers caught in a tree, and so
caused his death. This fable teaches that things
should not be prized only for their beauty, but
for their usefulness and goodness.
A Flead without Brains. 119

This illustrates a fable of A‘sop. The fable
is called the “ Fox and the Mask,” and is meant,
like the other, to teach that good looks do not
go for everything. Among the ancient Greeks,
when A¢sop lived, actors were accustomed always
to wear masks, which were made handsome or
ugly, serious or merry-looking, to suit each
Wi

‘



character. One day a fox found his way into
the house of an actor, and saw, lying on the
ground, a handsome mask intended to represent
a hero. The fox admired it very much, but
happening to look behind observed it was hollow.
“Oh,” said he, “a handsome head! What a
pity it has no brains!” When A‘sop made his
beasts and birds talk, he always put the sharpest
sayings into the mouths of foxes.
120 Borrowed Plumes.

I see there in the basket a picture of a jackdaw
with peacock’s feathers in its tail. That must
refer to another of Atsop’s fables. Give it to
me, Lily dear, and I will tell you about it. The
birds once wished to have a king among them-
selves to rule over them ; and a day was fixed
for them to assemble and elect one. The jack-









5
= ee Poe a

daw, wishing to be chosen, went about the wooas
collecting all the handsomest feathers, that had
fallen from the wings and tails of other birds,
and stuck them on to himself. He looked so
splendid that at first the birds were going to
elect him ; but presently some of them recog-
nised their own feathers, and soon plucked off
his stolen finery.
Dignity. 121

Here is something funny. This lady walks
out with her groom behind her, to give her more

Sa
ANN ‘

pda RSID
; seu .

a
oe

pee Se

a —



importance and an air of dignity. She little
thinks how he is amusing himself behind her

back.
rE
122 A Volcano.

I daresay you have already heard or read
about volcanoes, Cissy. They are burning
mountains, which send forth smoke, and fire,
and showers of red-hot cinders high into the
air. There is one near Naples, in Italy, called



Mount Vesuvius. At the foot of this mountain
there exist now the remains of two small towns,
built in the time of the ancient Romans, which
were so completely covered up by cinders during
an irruption of the mountain, that they were
lost sight of and forgotten for centuries.
Shipwreck. 123

But if fire out of the earth causes destruction
sometimes, water and air bring worse, or at
least more frequent, dangers. What a dreadful
storm this is! The poor sailors on board that
ship have but small chance, I fear, for their lives.



Looking at that water, raging and furious as it
is now, you can scarcely believe it to be the same
sea that on a calm summer evening will look so
peaceable and gentle. There are rocks, too,
peeping above the water to make the danger
worse, and the ship is running right upon them.
it will be dashed to pieces in a minute.
124 Capital Fun.

Here’s fun! Danger, too, I should say, but
not the less fun on that account, perhaps—at
least to schoolboys. A race in tubs upon the







river, with mops for oars! Some men follow in
a punt to pick up those who come to grief ; and
I should think they find plenty to do.
A Summer Morning. 125

This picture is intended to represent a fresh
early morning in summer; every creature is
waking up, you see, and preparing for the work
of the day. The labourers are going off to their
work in the fields ; while that pretty bird, there
in the foreground of the picture, has just come
out of his nest, and is saying good-bye to his



ap wae) GB eee!

little wife, who remains to sit upon the eggs. He
is telling her that he shall soon be home again,
and that he hopes to bring back a nice fat worm
this dewy morning. There is a lark, too, who
is rising up into the sky to sing his merry song,
and welcome the morning sun. The steeple of
the village church in the distance stamps the
scene as one of English country life.
126 A Poor Musician.

I should hardly call these people beggars, but
that the handsome little boy is holding out his
hat. Judging by the head-dresses of the women,
and their wooden shoes, the scene must be in-
tended for the north of France. It is evidently



some fair or market-day, and this poor fiddler is
trying to gain a little money from the peasants,
or farmers and their families, by delighting them
with his music. Well, I daresay they are easily
pleased, and perhaps quite as charitable as those
who are richer. If we were there we would give
that little boy something, I know.
The Artist. 127

This, I can fancy, is an English artist, who
has been away from his own country for years.





On his return, he wonders at the beauty of the
English scenery, which he thought so little of
128 English Scenery.

when more familiar with it. He makes this
sketch of what he sees: it is a fair landscape,
green and fresh, with wood and water, bathed
in the summer sunshine.

But, dear me, children! Here is nurse to tell



us that the tea is ready. Put the other pictures
back into the basket; mind you don’t tear
them, Johnny, dear. The screen looks quite
handsome already ; really we have worked hard.
And so good-bye to the Nursery Screen for to-
day.

J. OGDEN AND CO., PRINTERS, 172, ST. JOHN STREET, E.C.


GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’ |

CATALOCUL’ OF

A THOUSAND

JUVENILE BOOKS

Reward and Gift Books

AND

CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOKS.



‘*No firm surpasses Messrs. Routledge in Sixpenny and Shilling
Picture Story-Books. Could not be better drawn, printed, or coloured,
if they cost twenty shillings, instead of twelve pence.”—Standard,

December 23, 1870.



LONDON: THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE.
NEw YorK: 416, BRooMâ„¢ STREET.



August, 1875



?


CONTENTS:





Books, 125. 62., 10s. 6d., 85. 6¢., Be 6d. 3
6s. . 4
BRITISH Ports, ‘3s. 5 '
| JUVENILE Books, 5s. 6
PicTURE BOOKS, 5s. Bae 8
JUVENILE Books, 45. 6d., 45. : 9 |
REWARD BOOKs, CoLoURED PLATES, 38. 6a Io |
| Mayne Retp’s JUVENILE Books, 3s. 6d. 10
| ANNE BowMan’s Do., 3s. 6d. 10
| JUVENILE Books, 3s. 6d. II |
GOLDEN RULE LIBRARY FOR Youne LADIES, Bigs 6a: 12
| pre LA Morte Fougut’s Lisrary, 35. 6d. 12
| RouTLEDGE’s ALBUM SERIES, 35. 6d. 13
Various 3s. 6d. Books 14
| RourLEDGE’s COLOURED PICTURE “Books, 35. 6d. 14
BritisH PoETs, 3s. 6d. 15
STANDARD LIBRARY, 35. 6d. ... 15
JUVENILE BooKs, 3s. ... * 16
ONE-SYLLABLE BOOKS, 2s. 6d. 17
JUVENILE Books, 2s. 6d. : 17
WIDE-WORLD SERIES, 2s. 6d. “i a 18
ILLUSTRATED Books FoR YOUNG READERS, Csr 19
JUVENILE Books, 2s. at me oe ae 19
ay AL SOds ie ae ie s+. 20, 21
ONE- SYLLABLE BOOKS' Is... ne be a 22
Various BOOKS, Is. ... ae me tee ae 22
| MASTER JACK SERIES, Is. .,. R65 eae are 22
JUVENILE Books, Is. ... a re an 4 23
CHRISTMAS Books, Is. 5 ae at 24
THE Hans ANDERSEN LIBRARY, I Is. a ois 25
| JUVENILE Books, 92. ... a ae Ps RS 25
MINIATURE LIBRARY, 6a... ang ses 1a 25
Story Books, 6d. a as a ee 26
JUVENILE Books, 3¢., Mie bz ie in my 8 ay,
LitTLeE LADDERS TO LEARNING ... oN a8 27
ROUTLEDGE’S NURSERY LITERATURE—
PENIIY AND TWorpENNY Toy Books oe 28
THREEPENNY AND SIXPENNY ,, a ot 29



SHILLING AND Two-SHILLING ,, ae se 30








GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS
REWARD & PRESENTATION BOOKS.

100

. In gto, price was. 6d. sa.
Naomi; or, The Last Days of Jerusalem. By Mrs. 12 6
Wess. With Steel Plates.

The Prince of the House of David. With 60

Illustrations.

In 8vo, price ros #6d.

Discoveries and Inventions of the Nineteenth 10 6
Century. By Rosert Routiences, B:Sc., F.C.S., Assistant
Examiner in Chemistry and Natural Philosophy to the University
of London, and J. H. Perver, late of the Polytechnic. With
numerous Illustrations.

The Young Lady’s Book. By the Author of “A
Trap to Catch a Sunbeam.” An entirely New Book of Occupa-
tions, Games, and Amusements for Young Ladies. With 300
Tlustrations and Coloured Plates.

The Adventures of Captain Hatteras. By JULES
Verné. 1x. LHE EnGiisH aT THE NortH Poise, 2. THE
Fietp or Ick. 220 Illustrations by Riou.

The Sunlight of Song. With Original Music by
Barney, ARTHUR SULLIVAN, and other eminent living Com-

posers. Original Illustrations by the most eminent Artists,
engraved by DaxziEv Brothers.

In small 4to, cloth gilt, price 8s. 6d.; gilt edges, 9s. 6d.
Every Boy’s Book. A New Edition. Edited by

Epmunp Routtepce. A Complete Cyclopedia of Sport and
Recreation. With roo Illustrations and 9 Coloured Plates.

In 4to, and royal 8vo, cloth gilt and gilt edges, price 7s. 6d. each.
Illustrated by the best Artists,

Grimm’s Household Stories. With 220 Plates. 7 6

Homes and Haunts of the British Poets. By
Wiciram Howitt. With many Illustrations.

Little Barefoot. A Domestic Tale. By BERTHOLD
AveRBACH. With many Illustrations.

A New Book by Auerbach. With 300 Illustrations.

Household Tales and Fairy Stories. With 380
Illustrations by J. D. Watson, Harrison WeEtr, and others,

Christmas Carols. Set to Music. ‘With Original
Illustrations by the Brothers Dauzian, 7

oo
oO.

nnn




4

GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’



SEVEN-AND-SIXPENNY, Books, continued.

Seas
7 6 Bonnechose’s France. A New Edition. 1872.

60

The Language of Flowers. By the Rev. RoBERT
Tyas. With 12 pages of Coloured Plates by KRONHEIM.

Longfellow’s Poetical Works. With Plates by
Joun Gitpert. Author’s Complete Edition. Lemy 8vo, cloth,
gilt edges.

Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress. With 100 Plates by
J. D. Watson.

Popular Natural History. By the Rev. J. G. Woop,
M.A. With Hundreds of Illustrations.

National Nursery Rhymes. Set to Music by J. W.

Exuiott. With Original Illustrations, engraved by DaLziEL
Brothers,

Naomi; or, The Last Days of Jerusalem. By Mrs.
Wess. With Steel Plates. Post 8vo, cloth, gilt edges.

Dante’s Divine Comedy. Translated by H. ‘W.
LonGFELLow. 1 vol., crown 8vo, cloth.

Hogg onthe Microscope. With g00 Illustrations
and 8 Coloured Plates.

Andersen’s Stories for the Household. 8vo,
cloth, gilt edges, with 220 Illustrations.

Robinson Crusoe. With 110 Plates by J. D. WaT-

SON.
Sheridan Knowles’ Dramatic Works.

In cloth, gilt edges, 6s. each.
Routledge’s Every Boy’s Annual for 1876. Edited

by Epmunp Rout.Lepce. With many Illustrations, and beauti-
ful Coloured Plates.

Shipwrecks and Disasters at Sea. By W. H. G.
Kineston. With more than 100 Illustrations,

The Adventures of Robinson Playfellow, a Young
French Marine. With 24 Plates, and many Woodcuts,

Bab Ballads. By W. S. GILBERT. With Illustra-
tions by the Author.

Travelling About. By Lady BARKER. With Six
Plates and 5 Maps.

Pepper’s Boy’s Play-book of Science. 400 Plates.
D’Aulnoy’s Fairy Tales. Translated by PLANCHE, |
Perrault’s Fairy Tales. Translated by PLANCHE, &c.

Pepper’s Play-book of Mines, Minerals, and
Metals. With 300 Illustrations. Post svo, gilt. :

ent nt et a ie See




JUVENILE BOOKS.





S1x-SHILLING BooKs, continued.

Motley’s Rise of the Dutch Republic. Crown 8vo, 6 0

cloth, gilt.

An Illustrated Natural History. By the Rev. J. G.
Woop, M.A. 500 Illustrations,

The Playfellow. By HarRIET MaRTINEAU. With
Coloured Plates,

The English at the North Pole. By JuLEs VERNE.

129 Illustrations by Riou.
The Field of Ice. By JuLEs VERNE. 129 LIllustra-

tions by Riou.
The Adventures of Johnny Ironsides. 115 Plates.

ROUTLEDGE’S BRITISH POETS.
EDITED BY REv. R. A. WILLMOTT.
Illustrated by Birket Foster, Sir Joun Givpert, &c.

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. [Illustrated by 5 0

CorBouLp.

Kirke White. Illustrated by BIRKET FosTeEr.

Southey’s Joan of Arc, and Minor Poems.

Herbert. With Life and Notes by the Rev. R. A.
WILLMOTT.

Longfellow’s Complete Poetical Works. With
Illustrations. Fcap. 8vo.

Burns’ Poetical Works. Illustrated by JoHN
GILBERT.

Fairfax’s Tasso’s Jerusalem Delivered. Illus-
trated by CorBouLp.

Crabbe. Illustrated by BrRKET FOSTER.
Moore’s Poems. Illustrated by CorBOULD, &c.
Byron’s Poems. Illustrated by GILBERT, WOLF,

Foster, &c.
Campbell’s Poetical Works. Illustrated by W.
Harvey.

Lover’s Poetical Works. With a Portrait.
Rogers’ Poetical Works. With a Portrait.
Dryden’s Poeticak Works. With a Portrait, &e.
Mrs. Hemans’ Poems.

Lord Lytton’s Poetical Works.

Lord Lytton’s Dramatic Works.








6

GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’



s. a,
5 © Children of

ROUTLEDGE’S FIVE-SHILLING JUVENILE BOOKS.

In fcap. 8vo and post 8vo, gilt, Illustrated by GILBERT,
Harvey, Foster, and ZwEckER.

the
Forest. By Marryat.

LittleSavage. By Marryat.

History of British India.

Lilian’s Golden Hours. By
Silverpen.

Boy’s Treasury of Sports
and Pastimes.

The Queens of Society.

The Wits and Beaux of
Society.

Entertaining Knowledge.

Pleasant Tales.

Extraordinary Men and
Women,

Doraand her Papa. Author
of “ Lilian’s Golden Hours.”

oe Battles of the British

The > Prince of the House
of David.

The Pillar of Fire.

The Throne of David.

The Story of the Reforma-
tion. By D’ Aubigné.

Popular Astronomy and
Orbs of Heaven.

Once upon a Time. By
Charles Knight.

White sHistoryof England.

The Winborough Boys.
By Rev. H. C. Adams.

The Prairie Bird. By Hox.
C. Murray.

The ree, Sieges of His-
tory. With Coloured Plates.
Cooper's
Tales.

New

Leatherstocking

|
|

Great Battles of the British
Navy. WithColoured Plates.
Memoirs of Great Com-

manders. With Coloured
Plates.

The Family Arabian
Nights. Coloured Plates.

The Adventures of Robin
Hood. With ColouredPlates,
Holiday Stories. By Lady

Barker.

Half Hours with the Best
Cae

Letter Writers.
Knight.

Characteristics of Women.
By Mrs. fameson.

Memoirs of Celebrated
Female Sovereigns, By Mrs.
Fameson.

What Menhave said about
Woman.

British Heroes in Foreign
Wars. By Yames Grant.
With Coloured Plates.

Don Quixote for Boys.
With Coloured Plates by
Kronheim.

wee: College. By Rev.

HC. Adams.

Boys. By Lady Barker.

Sunday Evenings at Home
By Rev.H.C. Adams, M.A.
First Series.

—— Second Series.

Memoirs of Celebrated
Women. By G.P.R. fames.

Nine Little Goslings.
By Susan Coolidge. With
Illustrations,

By








JUVENILE BOOKS. 9





ny,

ROUTLEDGE’S FIVE-SHILLING BOOKS

Ss.

Little Wide-Awake for I876. By Mrs. SALE 5
Barker. With 400 Iilustrations and Coloured Frontispiece.

Grimm’s Fairy Tales. With Coloured Plates.
Crown 8vo, gilt.

Hans Andersen’s Stories and Tales. 8o Illustra-
tions, and Coloured Plates.

Walter Crane’s Picture Book. With 64 pages of
Coloured Plates. Cloth, gilt edges.

Country Life. Illustrated by Poetry, and 40 Pictures
by Brrxet Foster.

What the Moon Saw, and other Tales. By HansC.
ANDERSEN. With 8o Illustrations,and Coloured Plates,

Chimes and Rhymes for Youthful Times. With
Coloured Plates. (Uniform with “ Schnick-Schnack.”)

Buds and Flowers. A Coloured Book for Children.
(Uniform with “ Schnick-Schnack.”) Small gto, cloth.

Schnick-Schnack. Trifles forthe LittleOnes. With
Coloured Piates. Smal! 4to, cloth.

Buttercups and Daisies. A new Coloured Book for
Children. (Uniform with “ schnick-Schnack.”) Small 4to, cloth,

Watts’ Divine and Moral Songs. With 108 Wood-
cuts, engraved by Cooper.

Original Poems for Infant Minds. By JANE and
A. Yaytor. With Original Illustrations by the Best Artists, en-
graved by J. D. Cooper.

Little Lays for Little Folk. Selected by J. G.
Warts. With Original lilustrations by the best living Artists,
engraved by J. D. Cooper. 4to, cloth, gilt edges.

The Picture Book of Reptiles, Fishes, and In-
sects. By the Rev J. G. Woop, M.A. With 250 Illustrations,

4to, cloth.

Birds. By the Rev. J. G.
Woop, M.A. With 242 Illustrations. 4to, cloth.
—_—- Mammalia. By the Rev. J.

a.
°







G. Woop, M.A. With 250 Illustrations. 4to, cloth.

Happy Day Stories for the Young. By Dr.
DutcKEN. With full-page Plates by A. B. HoucuTon,






GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’

i —

ROUTLEDGE’S FIVE-SHILLING BOOKS.

In super-royal 8vo, cloth gilt, price 5s.

Ss. a.
3 0 Walter Crane’s Picture Book. Containing 64

ages of Pictures, designed by WALTER CRANE, viz. :—“ Luckie-
oy’s Party,” “The Old Courtier,” ‘‘How Jessie was Lost,”
“The Fairy Ship,” “ Chattering,” ‘‘ Annie and Jack in
London,” “Grammar in Rhyme, ” ‘‘The Multiplication Table
in Verse.”

Walter Crane’s New Toy Book. Containing 64
pages of Pictures, designea by Water CRrANng, viz. :—‘*-Cin-
derella,” ‘“‘ My Mother,” ‘‘The Forty Thieves,” ‘The Three
Bears,’’ “‘ One, Two, Buckle my Shoe,” ‘‘ Puffy,” ‘This Little
Pig,” “‘ Noah’s Ark A BC.”

Goody Two-Shoes Picture Book. Containing
“Goody Two-Shoes,” ‘* Beauty and the Beast,’ “ABC of
Old Friends,” and ‘‘The Frog Prince.” With 24 pages of
Coloured Plates from designs by WALTER CRANE.

The Henny-Penny Picture Book. Containing
“Henny-Penny,” ‘‘ Sleeping Beauty, ” “‘ Baby” and ‘‘ The Pea-
cock at Home.’ With 24 pages of Coloured Plates.

The Poll Parrot Picture Book. Containing

“*Tittums and Fido,” ‘‘ Reynard the Fox,’ ‘‘ Anne and her
Mamma,” and ‘‘ The Cats’ Tea Party.”

Rouiledge’s Coloured ABC Book. Containing
““The Alphabet of Fairy Tales,” ‘‘The Farm Yard Alphabet,”
* Alphabet of Flowers,” and ‘‘ Tom Thumb’s Alphabet.”

My Mother’s Picture Book. Containing ‘My
Mother,” “The Dogs’ Dinner Party,” ‘‘ Little Dog Trusty,”
and “‘ The White Cat.” Large 4to, cloth.

The Red Riding-Hood Picture Book. Containing
“Red Riding Hood,” “‘ Three Bears,” ‘*Three Kittens,” and
“* Dash and the Ducklings.” Large 4tof cloth.

Our Nurse’s Picture Book. Containing ‘‘Tom
Thumb,” ‘‘ Babes in the Wood,” ‘‘ Jack and the Beanstalk,” and
“Puss in Boots.” Large quarto, cloth.

The Child s Picture Book of Domestic Animals.
12 Large Plates, printed in Colours by Kronnzm. Large
oblong, cloth.

The Child’s Picture Book of Wild Animals.
iS Taree Plates, printed in Colours by Kronur. Large oblong,
cloth.

Pictures from Engiish History. 63 Coloured

Plates by Krosueim. Demy 4to, cloth.






4to, cloth,

Routledge’s Picture
s Nursery Songs,” “Alphabet
and ‘This Little Pig.”

The Pet Lamb Picture
Toy Primer,” “The Pet Lamb,
Locks,”

and ‘* Asop’s Fables.”

Illustrations.

Every Little Boy’s Book.
With many Illustrations.



Ace a cee deters oe acy ease

JUVENILE BOOKS.

ET

Gift Book.

9

FIVE-SHILLING Books, continued.

s.d.

Routledge’s Scripture Gift Book. Containing ‘The 5 0
Old Testament Alphabet,” ‘‘'The New Testament Alphabet,”
“The History of Moses,” and ‘‘ The History of Joseph.” Demy

Containing
of Trades,” ‘‘ Nursery ‘Vales,”

Book. Ccentainirg ‘* The
» “The Fair One with Golden

and *€ Jack the Giant Killer.”

The Robinson Crusoe Picture Book. Containing
“Robinson Crusoe,” “Cock Sparrow,” ‘‘ Queer Characters,”



ROUTLEDCE’S FOUR-AND-SIXPENNY JUVENILES.
A New Series of Fuvenile Works.

All well Illustrated, and bound in an entirely New Binding,
expressly designed for them.

List OF THE SERIES.

Life of Richelieu. By 1” | The Boy’s Own Country 4 6
Robson, Book. By A7iller.
Monarchs of the Main. | The Forest Ranger. By
By Walter Thornbury. Major Campbell.
Roget Kyffyn’s Ward. By | Pleasures of Old Age.
H. G. Kingston. Tales upon Texts. By the
The Man o’ War’s Bell. Rev. H. C. Adams.
By Lieut. C. R. Low. Pictures from Nature. By
The Orville College Boys. Mary Howitt.
By Mrs, Henry Wood. Stephen Scudamore the
Wonderful Inventions. By Younger. By A. Locker.
Fohn Timbs, F Hunting Grounds of the
fsop’s eS. With Old World.
Plates by #. Watch the End. By
The Illustrated iGinl’s Own Thomas Miller.
Treasury.
In feap. 8vo, cloth, gilt edges, price 4s. each,
Every Girl’s Book. By Miss LAwrorp, With many 4 0'

By EDMUND ROUTLEDGE.








ao

GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’



ROUTLEDGE’S THREE-AND-SIXPENNY REWARD BOOKS.

With Coloured Illustrations, gilt sides.

36

36

183, ae
3 6 Robinson Crusoe.

Sandford and Merton
Evenings at Home.
Swiss Family Robinson.







Edgeworth’s Popular
Tales.

———— Moral Tales.

- Parent’s As-
sistant.

———Early Lessons.



The Old Helmet. By the
Author of “The Wide, Wide
World.”

The Wide, Wide World.
Edgar Clifton.



|
|
|
|





! The Lamplighter.
Melbourne House.

\ Queechy.

| Ellen Montgomery’s Book-

shelf,
The Two Schoolgirls.
The Pilgrim’s Progress.
Gulliver’s Travels.
Andersen’s Fairy Tales.
The Arabian Nights.
The Adventures of Robin
Hood.
Don Quixote for Boys.
Captain Cook’s Voyages.

All the above have Coloured Plates.

MAYNE REID'S JUVENILE BOOKS.

In feap. 8vo, cloth gilt, with Illustrations.

Bruin.

The Boy Tar.

The Desert Home.
Odd People.

Ran away to Sea.
The Forest Exiles.
The Young Yagers.

|

The Young Voyageurs.
The Plant Hunters.
The Quadroon.

The War Trail.

The Bush Boys.

The Boy Hunters.

ANNE BOWMAN'S. JUVENILE BOOKS.

With Plates, fcap. 8vo, cloth gilt.

The Boy Voyagers.

The Castaways.

The Young Nile Voyagers.
The Boy Pilgrims.

‘The Boy Foresters,

Tom and the Crocodiles.
Esperanza,

The Young Exiles.

The Bear Hunters.

The Kangaroo Hunters.
Young Yachtsmen.
Among the Tartar Tents.
Clarissa.

Howtomake the Best of It.




JUVENILE BOOKS.



ROUTLEDGE’S

THREE-AND-SIXPENHY JUVENILE BOOKS.

With Engravings, cloth gilt.

Sketches and Anecdotes
of Animal Life. By ev.
Â¥. G. Wood.

Grimm’s Home Stories.

Animal Traits and Charac-
teristics. By Rev. F. G.
Wood.

My Feathered Friends.
By Rev. ¥. G. Wood.

Schoolboy Honour. By
Rev. H. C. Adanis.

Red Eric. By 2. J. Bal-
lantyne.

Louis’ School-Days.

Wild Man of the West.
By Ballantyne.

ve Priory. By Z.

Â¥. Ma

Peale on the Fells. By
R. M. Ballantyne.

Lamb’s Tales from Shak-
speare.

Balderscourt ; or, Holiday
Tales By Rev. H.C. Adauis.

Rob Roy. By James Grané.

Johnny Jordan. By Mrs.
Eiloart.

Ernie wltOh, at Home and
at School.

Lost Among the Wild Men.

Percy’s Tales of the Kings
of England.

Boys of Beechwood. By
Mrs. Evloart.

Papa’s Wise Dogs.

Digby Heathcote. By
Kingston.

Hawthore’s Wonder
Book. e

Will Adams. By Dalton.

Little Ladders to Learning.
1st serics.
D-:to. and series.

\
|

White's Selborne.

Cuts.

; Boyhood of Great Men.



|

Footprints of Famous
Men. By ¥. G. Edgar.
kev. $. G. Wood’s Boy’s

Own Natural History Book.
Tales of Charlton School,
By the Rev. H. C. Adams.

Our Domestic Pets. By
Rev. F. G. Wood.
History for Boys. By

F. G. Edgar.
Saxelford. By 2. ¥. May.
Old Tales for the Young.
Harry Hope's Holiday.

Boy Life Among the
Indians.
Old Saws new Set. By

the Author of “A Trap to
Catch a Sunbeam.”
Hollowden Grange.
Mayhew’s Wonders
Science.

of



Peasant - Boy

Philosopher.

Barford Bridge. By the
av. H.C. Adams.

The White Brunswickers.
By Rev. H.C. Adams.

A Boy’s Adventures in the
Wilds of Australia. By W.

Howitt.

Tales of Walter’s School
Daysie§ By -Kev.. A C.
Adams.

The Path She Chose, By

FL M.S.

The Gates Ajar.

A Country Life.
LFTowitt.

Stories for Sundays.
Rev. H. C. Adams,

By W.

It



s. a.
200 3 6

By






)12





GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’





THREE-AND-SIXPENNY JUVENILE Books, continued.

(s. a
3 6 The Child’s Country Book.

By 7. Miller. Coloured
Plates

The Child’s Story Book.
By 7. Miller. Coloured
Plates.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Tom Dunstone’s Troubles.
By Mrs. Ev/oart.

The Young Marooners.

Influence. By the Author
of “A Trap to Catch a Sun-
beam.”

Jack of the Mill. By
Howi't.

Dick Rodney. By Fames
Grant, (

Jack Manly. By Fame
Grant,

Sybil’s Friend. By
Florence Marryat.

Life in the Red Brigade.
By &. M. Ballantyne.

Edgar Clifton.

Stepping Heavenward,
and Aunt Jane’s Hero.

Valentin. By Henry
Kingsley.

With a Stout Heart. By
Mrs. Sale Barker.

Opening a Chestnut Burr.
By the Rev. C. P. Roe.

What Might Have been
Expected.

Tales of Nethercourt. By
Rev. H. C. Adams.





THE GOLDEN RULE LIBRARY FOR YOUNG LADIES.

In cloth gilt, post 8vo, with full-page Illustrations,
price 3s. 6d. each.

3 6 The Four Sisters.

The Golden Rule.
Lillieslea.

The Village Idol.

The Doctor’s Ward.
Through Life and for Life.
Tell Mamma.

Little Women.

Heroines of History.

Heroines of Domestic
Life.

What Can She Do?

Barriers Burned Away.

The Girls’ Birthday Book.

Blanche and Beryl.

Miss Roberts’ Fortune.

In post 8vo, cloth, 3s. 6d. each.

THE FOUQUE FAIRY LIBRARY.

A Collection of De La Motre Fougut's most Popular Fairy Tales

Illustrated by TENNIEL, SELous, and others.
3, 6 The Four Seasons,

Romantic Fiction,

| The Magic Ring.
Other Vols. to follow.










JUVENILE BOOKS.





ROUTLEDGE’S ALBUM SERIES,

In cloth gilt, price 3s. 6d., beautifully printed on toned paper.

Otto Speckter’s Fables. With roo Coloured Plates,
A New Edition. 4to, cloth, gilt edges.

Routledge’s Sunday Album for Children. With
80 Plates by J. D. WaTsoN, Sir Joun Gitbert, and others.

The Boys’ and Girls’ Illustrated Gift-Book. With
many Illustrations by McConwett, Weir, and others.

The Child’s Picture Fable Book. With 60 Plates
by Harrison WEIR.

The Coloured Album for Children. With 72 Pages
of Coloured Plates.

The Picture Book of the Sagacity of Animals.
With 60 Plates by Harrison WEIR.

For a Good Child. Containing ‘‘ The Alphabet of
Trades,’’ ‘‘ The Cats’ Tea-Party,” and ‘‘ Cinderella.” With 18
Pages of Coloured Plates.

Routledge’s Picture Book. Containing ‘‘ The Farm
Yard Alphabet,” ‘‘ The Alphabet of Flowers,’’ and “‘ The Pretty
Name Alphabet.” With 18 Pages of Coloured Plates.

A Present for My Darling. Containing ‘‘ This
Little Pig went to Market,” ‘Nursery Tales,” and ‘‘Tom
Thumb’s Alphabet.”? With 18 Pages of Coloured Plates.

The Good Child’s Album. Contaiuing ‘* Red
Riding Hood,” “ Mother Hubbard and Cock Robin,” and ‘‘ The
Three Kittens.” With 18 Pages of Coloured Plates.

Nursery Rhymes. With Plates by H. S. Marks.
Nursery Songs. With Plates by H. S. Marks.
The Child’s Coloured Gift-Book. With 72

Coloured Plates.

The Child’s Coloured Scripture Book. With 72
Coloured Plates.

The Nursery Album. 72 Pages of Coloured Plates.
The Golden Harp Album. With 400 Illustrations.
Happy Child Life. With 24 Pages of Coloured Plates.
Album for Children. With 180 page Plates by

Mitrais, Sir Joun Gi-Bert, and others. Imp. 16mo, cloth.

Popular Nursery Tales. With 18o Illustrations by
J. D. Watson and others. Imp. 16mo, cloth.

Child’s Picture Story Book. With 180 Plates,
Imp. 16mo, cloth.

A Picture Story Book. Containing ‘‘King Nut-

cracker,” and other Tales. 300 Illustrations. Imp. 16mo, cloth,



Saas
36



The Book of Trades. By THomas ARCHER. |


Se eee

14



GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’



s. d.
3 6 Mixing in Society. A Complete Manual of Manners.

The Children’s Bible Book. With 100 Illustrations,

engraved by DaLztEL.

A Handy Histcry of England for the Young.

With 120 Illustrations, engraved by DauzIEL.

Griset’s Grotesques. With Rhymes by Tom Hoop.
Fancy boards.

The Children’s Poetry Book. With 16 Coloured
Plates. Square, cloth.

Out of the Heart: Spoken to the Little Ones. By

Hans ANDERSEN. With 16 Coloured Plates. Cloth.
The Nursery Picture Book. With 630 Illustrations.

Folio, boards.

ROUTLEDGE’S COLOURED PICTURE BOOKS.

In super-royal 8vo, cloth gilt, price 3s. 6d. each, or mounted
on linen, 5S. each.

THIRD SERIES, containing
Happy Days of Childhood. | Hop o’ My Thumb.

Sing a Song of Sixpence. Gaping, Wide-Mouthed,
This is not kept on Linen. Waddling Frog.

ANIMALS AND BIRDS, containing
Wild Animals. British Animals.
Parrots. Singing Birds.

BOOK OF ALPHABETS, containing
The Railroad Alphabet. The Sea-Side Alphabet.

The Good Boys’ and Girls’ | The Farm-Yard Alphabet.
Alphabet.

KinG LUCKIEBOY’S PICTURE BOOK, containing

King Luckieboy’s Party. The Old Courtier.
This Little Pig went to Picture Book of Horses.







Market.
Our PETS’ PICTURE BOOK, containing

The History of Our Pets. | Aladdin.

Nursery Rhymes. Noah’s Ark A BC.

THE MARQUIS OF CARABAS’ PICTURE BOOK, with Designs
by WALTER CRANE, containing

Puss in Boots. O!d Mother Hubbard.

The Absurd A BC, Valentine and Orson.






nen at =

JUVENILE BOOKS.

ROUTLEDGE’S BRITISH POETS.

(38. 6d. Editions.)

Elegantly printed on tinted paper, crown 8vo, gilt edges,
with Illustrations,

Those marked * can be had elegantly bound in Ivortne, price 7s. 6d.

Longfellow.

Cowper.

Milton.

Wordsworth.

Southey.

Goldsmith.

* Kirke White.

Burns,

Moore.

Byron.

* Pope.

* James Montgomery.

Scott.

Herbert.

Campbell.

Bloomfield.

Shakspere.

* Chaucer.

Sacred Poems.

Choice Poems.

Shakspeare Gems,

Wit and Humour.

Wise Sayings.

Longfellow’s Dante—
Paradiso. ?

Purgatorio.
————Inferno.

(Complete. )

|
|
i
1



* Lover’s Poems.

Book of Familiar Quota-
tions.

Bret Harte.

* Leigh Hunt.

* Dryden.

Ainsworth.

* Spenser.

® Rogers.

Mrs. Hemans.

Shelley.

Keats.

Coleridge.

ee hcl ,

* Percy’s Reliques.

* Dodd’s Beauties of Shake-
speare.

The Christian Year.

Keble.

E. Allan Poe.

| Longfellow’s Tales of a

Wayside Inn.

edition.)

(Complete

Prose Works.
The Mind of Shakespeare,
as Exhibited in his Works.
The Comic Poets of the

Nineteenth Century.





ROUTLEDGE’S STANDARD LIBRARY.

In post 8vo, toned paper, cloth, gs. 6d. each.

The Arabian Nights.
Don Quixote
Gil Blas.

Curiosities of Literature.

By Isaac D’ Israeli.



Bes

1,001 Gems of British
Poetry.
The Blackfriars Shak-

spere. Charles Knight.
Cruden’s Concordance,



15

Seas
36

36



ALTO


16

Sins
36



GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’



STANDARD LIBRARY, continued.

Boswell’s Life of Johnson.

The Works of Oliver Gold-
smith,

Routledge’s
Dictionary.

The Family Doctor.

Ten Thousand Wonderful
Things.

Sterne’s Works.

Extraordinary Popular De-
lusions.

Bartlett’s Familiar Quota-
tions.

The Spectator.

Routledge’s | Modern
Speaker.

1,001 Gems of Prose.

Pronouncing |

| Pope’s Homer’s Iliad and
Odyssey.

| Book er Modern Anec-
dotes. English, Irish, Scotch.

Josephus.

Book of Proverbs, Phrases,
Quotations, and Mottoes.
The Book of Modern
Anecdotes— Theatrical, Le-

gal, and American.

|
| The Book of Table Talk.
|
|
I



By W.C. Russell.
Junius, (Woodfall’s edi-
tion.)
Froissart’s Chronicles.
Charles Lamb’s Works.

(Centenary edition.)

ROUTLEDGE'S THREE-SHILLING JUVENILES.

Under the rbowe title Messrs. G. ROUTLEDGE & SONS offer 7

New

Series of fuvenile Books, all well Illustrated, and well bound ina

New and Elegant Binding.

List OF THE SERIES.

Dogs and their Ways. By
Williams.

The Holiday Camp. By
St. ohn Corbet.

Helen Mordaunt. By the

Author of “ Naomi.”
Romance of Adventure.
Play Hours and Half

Holidays. By Rev. #. C.
Atkinson.
Walks and Talks of Two
Schoolboys.
The Isiand Home.
Hildred the Daughter.
Hardy and Hunter. «
Fred and the Gorillas. By
T. Miller.
Frank Wildman’s Adven-

tures.

The Little Wide-Awake for 1876.

Wild kone in the iar
Wes

Guizor s Moral Tales.

Voyage and Venture.

The Young Whaler. Hy
Gerstaecker.

Great Cities of the Middle
Ages.

Dawnings of Genius.

Celebrated Childwen.

Seven Wonders of the
World.

Faery Gold.
Chorley.

The Travels of Rolando.

Great Cities of the Ancient
World.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin for
Children,

By Henry



By Mrs, SALE

Barker, with 400 Illustrations, fancy boards, 3s,

th eae








JUVENILE BOOKS.

ROUTLEDGE’S ONE-SYLLABLE SERIES.

By Mary Gopo.puin.

In r6mo, cloth gilt, with Coloured Plates, price 2s. 6d. each.

Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Pro-
gress.
Evenings at Home.

17

Ss. a.
Swiss Family Robinson. 2 6

Child’s First Lesson Book.

ROUTLEDGE’S HALF-CROWN JUVENILES.

Feap. 8vo, Illustrated by the Best Artists, gilt, 2s. 6d. each.

Eda Morton and_ her
Cousins. By MZ. M, Bell.

Gilbert the Adventurer.

The Lucky Penny, and
other Tales. By AZ7s. S.C.
Hall.

Minna Raymond. Illus-
trated by B. Foster.

Helena Bertram.
Author of ‘The
Sisters.”

Heroes of the Workshop,
&e. By £. L. Brightwell.

Sunshine and Cloud. By
Miss Bowman.

The Maze of Life. By
the Author of *‘ The Four
Sisters”?

The Wide, Wide World.

The Lamplighter. By

Cummins.

four

The Rector’s Daughter. |

By Miss Bowman.
The. Old Helmet.
Miss Wetherelt.
The Secret of a Life.
ey By Miss Wethe-

Ste aed Ashton. By
Lady C. Long.

Sir Wilfred’s Seven
Flights. By Madame de
Chatelain,

By

By the |





Pilgrim’s
Offor.
Friend or Foe: A Tale of

Sedgmoor. By the Rev. H.
C. Adams.
Tales of Naval Adventure.
Matilda Lonsdale.
The Life of Wellington.
The Glen Luna Family.
Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
Mabel Vaughan.
The Boy’s Book about
Indians.
Christian Melville.
The Letter of Marque.
The Swiss Family Robin-
son.
Evenings at Horne.
Sandford and Merton.
Stepping Heavenward.
Kaloolah. ByW. S. Mayo.
Patience Strong. By the

Progress.

Author of “The Gay-
worthys.”?

Gulliver’s Travels. With
Coloured Plates.

The Life of Nelson. By

Allen.

The Young Gold Digger.
By Gerstaecker.

Robinson Crusoe,

By 2 6



}



rete iterate PE


26

GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’



HALÂ¥F-CROWN JUVENILES, continued.

EllenMontgomery’s Book-
shelf. With Coloured Illus-
trations.

The Two School Girls.
With Coloured Illustrations.

Melbourne House. By
Miss Wetherell.

The Medwins of Wyke-
ham. By the Author of

“ Marian.”
The Young Artists.
The Boy Cavalier.
the Rev. H. C. Adams.
Lamb’s Tales.
Stories of Old Daniel.
Extraordinary Men,
Life of Napoleon
Popular Astronomy.
The Orbs of Heaven.

By

|
|
|
|
|
|

|

The Gayworthys. By the
Author of “ Faith Gartng.”
Andersen’s Fairy Tales.
The Arabian Nights.
Grimm’s Home Stories.
The Arctic Regions.
P. L. Simmonds.
Stepping Heavenward, and
Aunt Jane’s Hero.
Footprints on Life’s Path-

By

way.
Sceptres and Crowns, and
the Flag of Truce. _
Captain Cook’s Voyages.
Coloured Plates.
Don Quixote for Boys.
Coloured Plates.
Adventures of Robin Hood.
Coloured Plates,

ROUTLEDGE’S HALF-CROWN WIDE-WORLD SERIES.

In small post, 8vo, cloth gilt, well Illustrated.

The Wide, Wide World.

The Lamplighter.

The Old Helmet.

Queechy.

EllenMontgomery’s Book-
shelf,

The Two School Girls.
Melbourne House.

Glen Luna; or, Speculation.
Mabel Vaughan.

Padience Strong.

Most of the above are by Miss Wetherell.

penne tre en


sit BOOKS.

19





ROUTLEDGE’S BOOKS FOR young READERS.

Illustrated by ABsoton, GitBERT, Harrison WEIR, &c.,
square royal, gilt, 2s. each.

Amusing Tales for Young
People. By Mrs. ALyrtle.
The Broken Pitcher, and

other Stories.

The Little Lychetts. By
the Author of “ Olive,” &c.

Historical Tales.

The Great Wonders of the
World.

My First Picture Book, 36
pages of Coloured Plates.
16m, cloth.

A Visit to the Zoological
Gardens.

Aunt Bessie’s _ Picture
Book. With 96 Pages of
Plates.

Little Lily’s Picture Book.
With 96 Pages of Plates.



The Story of a Nutcracker
With 224 Pictures.

Old Mother Hubbard’s
Picture Book. 36 pages of
Coloured Plates.

Cock Robin’s Picture
Book, with 36 pages of
Coloured Plates.

Aunt Mary’s Sunday Pic-
ture Book.

Sunday Reading for Good
Children.

The Punch and Judy Pic-
ture Book, with 36 pages
of Coloured Plates,

Pussy’s Picture Book, 36
pages of ditto.

Birdie’s Picture Book,
with 36 pages of Coloured
Plates.

TWO-SHILLING GIFT-BOOKS.

With Illustrations, strongly bound in cloth.

Juvenile Tales for all Sea-

sons.

Evenings at Donaldson
Manor.
Grace and Isabel. By
M‘Intosh.

Gertrude and Eulalie.
Robert and Harold.
Robinson the Younger.
Amy Carlton.
Robinson Crusoe.
Laura Temple.

Harry and his Homes.
Our Native Land.

The Solitary Hunter.
Bundle of Sticks.
Hester and I; or, Beware

of Worldliness;s By Mrs.
Manners.



The Cherry Stones. By
Rev. H.C. Adams.
The First of June. By

Rev. H. C. Adams.
Rosa: A Story for Girls.

May Dundas; or, The
Force of Example. By Jérs.
Geldart.

Glimpses of Our Island
Home. By Mrs. Geldart.
The Indian Boy. By Zev.

H.C. Adams.
Ernie Elton at Home.
The Standard Poetry
Book for Schools.
Try and Trust. By Author
of “ Arthur Morland.”
Swiss Family Robinson.
Evenings at Home.



Sivde:
20

20

— pooner ——————————
| 20 GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’
2
| 3 Two-SHILLING GIFT-BooKs, continued.
s&s,
| 2 0 Ernie Elton at School. Adventures among the In-

1 John Hartley.

Jack of all Trades.
Miller.

The Wonder Book.

Tanglewood Tales.

Archie Blake.

Inez and Emmeline.

The Orphan of Waterloo.

Maum Guinea.

Todd’s Lectures to Chil-

dren.
Marooner’s Island.

dians.
Cousin Aleck.
The Doctor’s Birthday. By
the Rev. H. C. Adams.
Walter’s Friend. By the
Rev. H.C. Adanis.
By the

By

Sweet Violets.
Author of “A Trap to Catch
a Sunbeam.”

Ragged Robin, and other
Tales. By the Author of “A
Trap to Catch a Sunbeam.”

The School Friends. By

The Mayflower. B W. H. G. Kingston.

Mrs. ie te Sunday Evenings at Home.
Anecdotes of Dogs. By the Rev. H. C. Adanis.
Mr. Rutherford’s Chil- Bsbaciics:



——_—_——— 2nd series.
Wild Rose. By the Author



dren.

The Play-Day Book. By
Funny Fern. Coloured
Plates.

Emma. By Fane Austen.

Mansfield Park. By Zane
Austen.

Northanger Abbey. By
Fane Austen,

Village Sketches. By the
Rev. C.T. Whitehead.

Spider Spinnings.

Stories for Sundays. By

the Rev. H. C. Adams.
ist Series.





and Series.



of “A Trap to Catch a Sun-
beam,”

Snowdrop. By the Author
of “A Trap to Catcha Sun-

eam,
The Ocean Child. By Afrs.
Myrtle.

Gulliver’s Travels, with
Coloured Plates.
The Lost Rifle. By the

Rev. H.C. Adams.

Watts’ Divine and Moral
Songs. 60 Cuts.

Captain Cook’s Voyages.
With Coloured Frontispiece,

ROUTLEDGE’S EIGHTEENPENNY JUVENILES.

In square 16mo, cloth, with Illustrations by GirperT, ABSOLON, &c.

1 6 Peasant and Prince. By
Harriet Martineau,
Crofton Boys. By ditto.

Feats on the Fiord. By do.
Settlersat Home. By ditto.

Holiday Rambles ; or, The

Emilie the Peacemaker.
By Mrs. Geldart.

Truth is Everything. By
Mrs. Geldart,

Rainbows in Springtide.

Christmas Holidays. By
Miss Fane Strickland.

School Vacation.


JUVENILE BOOKS,

EIGHTEENPENNY JUVENILES, continaed.

Little Drummer: A Tale
of the Russian War.

Frank. By Maria Ldge-

worth.

Rosamond. By Maria
Edgeworth.

Harry and Lucy, Little
Dog Trusty, The Cherry

Orchard, &c.

A Hero ; or, Philip’s Book.
By «the Author of “* Fohn
Holifax.”

By

Story of an Apyple.
Lady Campbell.
The Cabin by tae Wayside.
Memoirs of a Doll. By
Mrs. Bisset.
Black Princess.
Laura and Ellen ; or, Time
Works Wonders.
By

Emigrant’s Lost Son.
G. H. Hall.

Runaways (The) and the

Gipsies.

Daddy Dacre’s School. By
Mrs. Hall.

British Wolf Hunters. By
Thomas Miller,

Bow of Faith (The); or,

Old Testament Lessons. By
Maria Wright.

Anchor of Hope ; or, New

Testament Lessons. By
Maria Wright.

Mrs. Loudon’s Young
Naturalist.

Think Before you Act.
Stories for Heedless Children.

Annie Maitland ; or, The
Lesson of Life. By D. Rich-
mond.

Lucy Elton ; or, Home and
School. By the Author of
“The Twins.”

Daily Thoughts for Chil-
dren, By Mrs. Geldart.

Holidays at Limewood,



rt en SERS SE SERN

2I

s. d

Rose and Kate; or, The 1 6

Little Howards.

Aunt Emma. By the Az-
thor of “‘ Roseand Katie.”
The Island of the Rain-
bow. By Afr. Newton Cross-

land,

Max Frere; or, Return
Good for Evil.

The Child’s First Book of
Natural History. By 4. Z.
Bond.

Florence the Orphan.

The Castle and Cottage.
By Perring.

Fabulous Histories. By
Mrs. Trimmer.

Mrs. Barbauld’s Lessons.

Traditions of Palestine,
By Martineau,

On the Sea. By AZiss
Campbell.

Games and Sports.

The Young Angler.

Athletic Sports.

Games of Skill.

Scientific Amusements.

Miriam and Rosette.

| The Picture Book of Ani-

mals and Birds.
Boy Life on the Water.
Original Poenis. Com-
plete. By A. and ¥. Taylor.

.Homeand Foreign Birds.

150 Plates.

Wild and Domestic Ani-
mals. 150 Plates.

How Paul Arnold Made
His Fortune.

The Billow and the Rock.

By Miss Martineau.

A Year at School. By
Tom Brown,
ZEsop’s Fables. With 50

Plates.
Honour and Glory.






22

Sh ds
Kio

GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’



THE SHILLING ONE-SYLLABLE SERIES.

Square 16:no, cloth.

The Book of OneSyllable. | The Sunday Book of
Coloured Plates. One Syllable.

The New Book of One | Susy’s Teachers. By the
Syllable. Coloured Plates. Author of “ Stepping Heaven-

Little Helps for Little | ward.” ;
Readers. Coloured Plates. | Susy’s Servants. By ditto.

Price 1s. each.

Youens’ Ball-Room Guide. With Rules and Music.
Cloth, gilt edges.

The Nursery Library. 12 Books in a Packet.

Routledge’s British Reading-Book. Plate on every
page, demy 8vo, cloth.

Routledge’s British Spelling-Book. Demy 8vo,
cloth. 300 Plates.

Routledge’s Comic Reciter. Fcap. 8vo, boards.

Popular Reciter. Fcap. 8vo, boards.

Temperance Reciter.

Ready-Made Speeches. Fcap. 8vo, boards.

The Illustrated Language of Flowers. By Mrs.

BuRKE.





THE MASTER JACK SERIES.

In small 4to, cloth, each with 48 pages of Plates, rs. each.

Master Jack. | Nursery Rhymes.
Mamma’s Return. The Tiger Lily.
Nellie and Bertha. | The Lent Jewels.
The Cousins. Bible Stories.
Dame [Mitchell and her | My Best Frock.
Cat. Prince Hempseed.

With Coloured Plates, fancy boards.

My A B C Book. | The Farmyard A BC.

Nursery Rhymes and | TheChild’s Book of Trades.
Songs. Animals and Birds.

Old Testament A BC. The Three Envious Men.

Little Stories for Good | The Two Neighbours.

Children. | For Want of a Nail.
The History of Moses. The Canary Bird.

Joseph.











steamer eenpenneeeih




JUVENILE BOOKS.

ROUTLEDGE’S ONE-SHILLING JUVENILES.

18mo, price 1s., well printed, with Tlustrations.

Grace Greenwood’s Stories

for her Nephews and Nieces. |

. Helen’s Fault. By the
Author of “ Adelaide Lind-
say.”

The Cousins,
M ‘Intosh.
Ben Howard ; or, Truth

and Honesty. By C. Adams.
Bessie and Tom : A Book
for Boys and Girls.
Beechnut : A Franconian
Story. By ¥acob Abbott.
Wallace: A Franconian
Story. By Yacob Abbott.
Madeline. By Yacod Abbott.

Mary Erskine. By acod
Abbott.
oy Bell. By Yacod Aéb-

visit ‘to my Birth-place. By
Miss Bunbury.

Carl Krinken ; or, The
Christmas Stocking. By JZiss
Wetherell.

Mr. Rutherford’s Children.
By Miss Wetherell.

Mr. Rutherford’s Children.
endseries. By Miss Wetherell.

Emily Herbert. By dfiss
M ‘Intosh.

Rose and Lillie Stanhope.
By Miss M‘Intosh.

Casper. By Miss Wetherell.

The Brave Boy ; or, Chris-
tian Heroism.

Magdalene and Raphael.

The Story ofa Mouse. By

Mrs. Perring.

Our Charla; By Ms.
Stowe.
Uncle Frank’s Home

Stories,

By Miss *



Village School-feast.
Mrs. Perring.

Nelly, the Gipsy Girl.

The Birthday Visit. By
Miss Wetherell

Stories for Week Days and
Sundays.

Maggie and Emma. By
Miss M‘Intosh.

Charlie and Georgie ; or,
‘The Children at Gibraltar.
Story ofaPenny. By A/rs.

Perring.

Aunt Maddy? s Diamonds.
By Harriet Myrtle.
Two School Girls. By

Miss Wetherell.

The Widow and_ her
Daughter. By Miss Wethe-
rete.

Gertrude and her Bible. By
Miss Wetherelt.

The Rose in the Desert.
By Miss Wetherell.

The Little Black Hen. By
Miss Wethereli.

Martha and Rachael.
By Miss Wetherell.

The Carpenter’s Daughter.
By Miss Wetherell.

The Story of a Cat.

- By Mrs. Perring.

Easy Poetry for Children,
Witha Coloured Frontispiece
and Vignette.

The Basket of Flowers.
With a Coloured Frontispiece
and Vignette.

The Story of a Dog.
By Mrs. Perring.

Ashgrove Farm. By J@s.
Myrtle,

Aunt Margaret’s Visit.

s. @
By 10




24



GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’

ONE-SHILLING JUVENILES, continued.
. a

o The Angel of the Iceberg.
By the Rev. Fohn Todd.
Todd’s Lectures for Chil.
dren. ist series.
and series.
Little Poems for Little
Readers.
Minnie’s Legacy.
Kitty’s Victory.
Elise and her Rabbits.
Happy Charlie.
Annie Price.
The Little Oxleys. By
Mrs. W. Denzey Burton.
Uncle Tom’s Cabin, for
Children.

Keeper’s Travelsin Search
of His Master.

Richmond’s Annals of the
Poor.

Child’s Illustrated Poetry
Book.

Blanche and Agnes.

The Lost ChamoisHunter.

The Gates Ajar.

Mrs. Sedgwick’s Pleasant
Tales,









Our Poor Neighbours.

Tales in Short Words.

Watts’ Songs. \

Z&sop’s Fables.

Language and Poetry of
Flowers.

Stuyvesant.

Susan Gray.

Rhymes for the Nursery.
By Anne and Yane Taylor.

The Babes in the Basket.

| The Three Sisters. By
Mrs. Perring.
Marian Ellis. By Ms.

Windle.
A Kiss for a Blow.

| Robert Dawson.

The Sacred Harp: A
Book of Sunday Poetry.

Original Poems. (Complete
Edition.)

Lily’s Home. By Ms. Sale
Barker. 120 Illustrations.
Ellen and Frank. By

Mrs. Perring.
Aunt Effie’s Rhymes. With

many new Poems,

CHRISTMAS BOOKS.

Feap. 8vo, boards, 1s. each, with fancy covers.

0 Riddles and Jokes.

The Dream Book and

Fortune Teller.

Acting Proverbs for the

Drawing Room.
Fly Notes on Conjuring.
A Shilling’s-worth of Fun.
Sensational Dramas.
W.R. Snow,
Family Theatricals.

By



|
|

Acting Charades. By
Anne Bowman.

Pippins and Pies. By
Stirling Coyne.

Shilling Manual of Modern

Etiquette.

Plays for Children. By
Miss Walker.
Christmas Hamper. By

Mark Lemon,






pos Petree
JUVENILE BOOKS. 25
| THE HANS ANDERSEN LIBRARY.
j Feap. 8vo, gilt, rs. each. i
Se
| The Red Shoes. Under the Willow Tree. 10
| The Silver Shilling. The Old Church Bell.
The Little Match-Girl. The Ice Maiden.
The Darning Needle. The Will o’ the Wisp.
The Tinder Box. Poultry Meg’s Family.
The Goloshes of Fortune. | Put off is Not Done with.
The Marsh King’s The Snow Man.
Daughter. In Sweden.
The Wild Swans, The Snow Queen.
Place.



Each Volume contains a variety of Tales, a Frontispiece in
colours, and an average of 16 other Pictures, engraved by the
Brothers Datziet.

ROUTLEDGE’S NINEPENNY JUVENILES.

|

i

\

|

Everything in its Right | Hardy Tin Soldier. !

With Coloured Plates, x8mo, cloth, gilt. |

Ally and her Schcolfellow.

Loyal Charlie Bentham.

Simple Stories for Children A Winter’s Wreath.
A Child’s First Book. Twelve Links.

Story of Henrietta. SE Easy Talks.

Barbauld’ s Hymnsin Prose. 0 9
Prince Arthur.



Stories from English Susan and the Doll.
History.

Juvenile Tales.
Life of Robinson Crusoe.

|
|
|
Six Short Stories. |
The Captive Skylark. |

Little Paul and the Moss
Wreaths. {Songs.
Watts’ Divine and Moral Ae Stee Poems.

Cobwebs to Catch Flies,



2nd Series.

ROUTLEDGE'S. MINIATURE. MINIATURE LIBRARY.

In 64mo, 6d. each, cloth gilt, with Ccloured Frontispiece.

Language of Flowers. Ball Room Manual. ° 6

Etiquette for Gentlemen. Handbook of Carving,

Etiquette of Courtship and { Toasts and Sentiments.
Matrimony. How to Dress weil.

Etiquette for Ladies, :






|
26 GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’ - |

ROUTLEDGE’S SIXPENNY STORY BOOKS.

Royal 32mo, with Ilustrations. |
These are also kept in Paper Covers, price 4d. each.

| Egerton Roscoe.

s. d,
o 6 History of My Pets.

Hubert Lee.

Ellen Leslie.

Jessie Graham.

Florence Arnott.

Blind Alice.

Grace and Clara. [hood.

Recollections of MyChild-

Lazy Lawrence, and the

. White Pigeon.

The Barring Out.

The Orphans and Old Poz.

The Mimic.

The Purple Jar,
other Tales.

The Birthday Present,
and the Basket Woman.

Simple Susan.

The Little Merchants.

Tale of the Universe.

Kate Campbell.

Basket of Flowers

Babes in the Basket.

The Jewish Twins.

Children on the Plains.

Little Henry and_ his
Bearer.

Learning better
Houses and Lands,

Maud’s First Visit to her
Aunt.

Easy Poems. Plain edges.

and

than

The Boy Captive. By |

Peter Parley.
Stories of Child Life.
The Dairyman’s Daughter
Arthur’s Tales for the
Young.
Hawthorne’s Gentle Boy.
Pleasant and Profitable.
Parley’s Poetry and Prose.
Book about Boys. [Boys.
Axthur’s Stories for Little



Flora Mortimer.
Charles Hamilton.

| Story of a Drop of Water.

The False Key.

The Bracelets.

Waste Not, Want Not.

Tarlton ; or, Forgive and
Forget.

The Young Cottager.

Parley’s Thomas Titmouse.

Arthur’s Christmas Story.

The Lost Lamb. :

Arthur’s Organ Boy.

Margaret Jones.

The Two School Girls.

Widow and her Daughter.

The Rose in the Desert.

The Little Black Hen.

Martha and Rachel.

The Carpenter’s Daughter,

The Prince in Disguise.

Gertrude and her Bible.

The Contrast. By Miss
Edgeworth.

The Grateful Negro. By
Miss Edgeworth.

Jane Hudson. *

Lina and her Cousins.
Bright-Eyed Bessie.

The Last Penny.

A Kiss for a Blow.

The Gates Ajar. Plain edges
Sunday School Reader.
Robert Dawson.

Hearty Staves. (Wealth.
Contentment better than
Robinson Crusoe.

Patient Working no Loss.
No such Word as Fail.
Edward Howard. [Girls.

Arthur’s Stories for Little



gs
a a ree atte


JUVENILE BOOKS.



27



ROUTLEDGE’S THREEPENNY JUVENILES.

Fcap. 8vo, with Coloured Plates, 3d.; or bound in cloth, 6d.

Sweet Violets,
White Daisy.

Only a Primrose.
Forget Me Not.
The School Friends.
The Brothers.
Alone on an Island.
The Ivory Traders.
Columbine.

Old Speedwell.

The Deadly Nightshade.
The Iris.

May.

An Artist’s Holiday,
Treasure Trove.
Poor Pearl.

Nelly.

Naomi.

The White Rosebud.
Turn of the Tide.
Jolly Miller.

Raynham’s Curse.

Bye and Bye.

Thorns and Roses.
Wild Rose and Poppies.
Tulip and Holly.
Orange Blossoms and

{
{
\
i
i

Eglantine.

Heart’sease and Lily of
the Valley.

Snowdrop, and other
‘Tales.

Broom, and other Tales.

| Blue Bell, and other
| Tales.
Traveller’s Joy, and

other Tales.
Sunday Evenings at

Home. ist Evening.
and Evening.
3rd Evening.
4th Evening.
5th Evening.
6th Evening.
——-— 7th Evening.
——— 8th Evening.
oth Evening.
— xoth Evening.





I







ROUTLEDGE’S FOURPENNY JUVENILES.

For List, see Sixpenny Juveniles, on page 26.

LITTLE LADDERS TO LEARNING.

Each Illustrated with 125 Woodcuts by Joun GitBERT, HARRISON
Crown 8vo, sewed, in fancy covers, 6a. each.

i
i
Ragged Robin.
Jessie and Hessie.
|

WER, and others.

Things In-doors..

What we Eat and Drink.

Animals and their Uses.

Birds and Birds Nests.

Fishes, Butterflies, and
Frogs.

Trees, Shrubs, and
Flowers,

City Scenes.

Rural Scenes.

Country Employments.
How Things are made.
Soldiers and Sailors.
Science and Art,
Geography and Costume.

o3



06



AN RR SE SS ESE RS


28 GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’

Routledge’s Murserp Literature,

ROUTLEDGE’S PENNY TOY BOOKS.

Each with Eight Coloured Plates by KronueEmm, in Packets only,
containing the 12 sorts, 1s.

s. a,
ro A, Apple Pie. Jack the Giant Killer.
| The Three Bears. The Cats’ Tea Party.
| Nursery Songs. *| The Dogs’ Dinner
i My Mother. Party.
| This Little Pig. Nursery Rhymes.
| Farmyard A BC. Robin Redbreast.

Red Riding Hood. ;

The following vols. are formed from the above :—

| 10 A, Apple Pie, and other Nursery Tales. With 48

Pictures, boards.







16 Cloth.
1 o The Robin Redbreast Picture Book. Boards.

1 6 Cloth.

2 0 Jack the Giant Killer Picture Book. With 96 Pic-

tures, boards,

|
|
|
| 26 Cloth.
|
|
|

TWOPENNY TOY BOOKS.

With Coloured Pictures by LzeicuTon Brothers, in covers, per doz. 2s.

' 02 My Mother. Jack the Giant Killer.

| Nursery Rhymes. Railway A BC.

Our Pets. Punch and Judy.
Baby. Red Riding Hood.

| Mother Hubbard.

\ Also, in One Vol.

' 16 The Punch and Judy Picture Book. With 36
(

Coloured Plates, cloth boards, 2s.


JUVENILE BOOKS. 29

a a

ROUTLEDGE’S THREEPENNY TOY-BOOKS.

In fancy covers, with Pictures printed in Colours ;
or printed on Linen, 6d.

S. Ge
Cinderella, The Dogs’ Dinner Party. 0 3
My First Alphabet. My Mother.
Old Mother Goose. The Cats’ Tea Party.

Babes in the Wood. More Nursery Rhymes.
This Little Pig went to | Robin Redbreast.
Market. A, Apple Pie.
2 Old ot who | Railroad A BC.
lived an:a! Shoe: Nursery Songs.
nie EoD Nursery Ditties.

Nursery Rhymes.
Farmyard Alphabet. ae nae Judy.

Jack and the Beanstalk
John Gilpin.
Old Mother Hubbard.
Three Bears.

; Puss in Boots.
Little Red Riding Heod.
| Wild Animals.

The House that Jack Built. ae oe



ROUTLEDCE’S SIXPENNY TOY-BOOKS.

i
|
!
| Beautifully printed in Colours by Messrs. Leicuron Brothers,
| Vincent Brooks, Datzist Brothers, and EDMUND

Evans. In super-royal 8vo, Fancy Wrappers.

Bible Alphabet. | The Enraged Miller. 06
Nursery Alphabet. The Hunchback.

Little Totty. How Jessie was Lost.

Puck and Pea-Blossom. Grammar in Rhyme.

Old Woman and her Pig. | * Baby’s Birthday.
A, Apple Pie. * Pictures from the Streets. ‘
Tom Thumb’s Alphabet. | * Lost on the Sea-Shore.
Picture Alphabet. * Animals and Birds.
Arthur’s Alphabet. A Child’s Fancy Dress \
Railroad Alphabet. Ball. r
Alphabet for Good Boys | A Child’s Evening Party.

and Girls. Annie and Jack in London.
The Seaside Alphabet. One, Two, Bucklemy Shoe. |






30



GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS’



SIXPENNY Toy-BooKs—continued.

sid.



ae

* Greedy Jem and his Little
Brothers.
The Farm Yard Alpha-
bet.
Hop o’ my Thumb.
Beauty and the Beast.
Mother Hubbard.
* Happy Daysof Childhood.
Little Dog Trusty.
The Cats’ Tea Party.
Wild Animals.
British Animals.
*The Frog who would a-
Wooing Go.
* The Faithless Parrot.
*The Farm Yard.
Horses.
Old Dame Trot.
Sing a Song of Sixpence.
The Waddling Frog.
The Old Courtier.
Multiplication Table.
Chattering Jack.
King Cole.
Prince Long Nose.



* Mary’s New Doll.

* When the Cat’s Away.

* Naughty Puppy.

* Children’s Favourites.

Little Minnie’s Child Life.

King Nutcracker.

King Grisly Beard.

Rumpelstiltskin.

The Fairy Ship.

Adventures of Puffy.

This Little Pig went to
Market. ,

King Luckieboy’s Party.

Aladdin.

Noah’s Ark Alphabet.

Domestic Pets.

Nursery Rhymes.

My Mother.

The Forty Thieves.

The Three Bears.

Cinderella,

Valentine and Orson.

Puss in Boots.

Old Mother Hubbard.

The Absurd A BC.

All the above can be had Mounted on Linen, price 1s., except

those marked *.

ROUTLEDCE’S NEW SERIES OF SHILLING TOY-BOOKS.

With large Original Illustrations by H. S. Marxs, J. D. Watson,
Harrison WEIR, and Keyt, beautifully printed in Colours.
Demy 4to, in stiff wrapper ; or Mounted on Linen, 2s.

o Nursery Rhymes.
Alphabet of Trades.
* Cinderella.
Old Testament Alphabet.
The Three Little Kittens.
The History of Five Little

Pigs.
Tom Thumb’s Alphabet,
Nursery Songs. _

The Cats’ Tea Party.

Baby.

Henny-Penny.

Peacock at Home,

Sleeping Beauty.

The Toy Primer.

The Pet Lamb.

The Fair One with the
Golden Locks,






JUVENILE BOOKS.



SHILLING Toy-BooKs—continued.

New Testament Alphabet.
Our Farm Yard Alphabet.
The History of Moses.
The History of Joseph.
The Alphabet of Flowers.
The Life of Our Lord.
The Three Bears.

Little Red Riding Hood.
* New Tale of a Tub.
Nursery Tales.

Old Mother Hubbard.
Pictures from English His-

tory. st Period.
Ditto. 2nd Period.
Ditto. 3rd Period.
Ditto. 4th Period.
Puss in Boots.
Tom Thumb.

Babes in the Wood.
Jack and the Beanstalk.
The Laughable A BC.
My Mother.

The Dogs’ Dinner Party.
Little Dog Trusty.

The White Cat.

Dash and the Ducklings.
Reynard the Fox.
Alphabet of Fairy Tales.
Tittums and Fido.

Anne and her Mamma.



Ss.
Jack the Giant Killer. I

Robinson Crusoe.

Cock Sparrow.

Queer Characters.
fsop’s Fables.

The Robin’s Christmas

Song.
The Lion’s Reception.
The Frog Prince.
Goody Two Shoes.
Beauty and the Beast.
The A B C of Old Friends.
Ginger-bread.
Old Nursery Rhymes with

Tunes.

The Yellow Dwarf.
Aladdin.

WILD ANIMALS,
* Lion, Elephant, Tiger.
* Leopard, Bison, Wolf.
* Bear, Hyzena, Zebra.
* Hippopotamus, Rhino-

ceros, Giraffe.

TAME ANIMALS.

* Horse, Cow, Sheep.
* Donkey, Pet Dog, Goat.
*Rabbit, Guinea Pig,

hs Dog.
Pig, Pony, Cat.

All the above can be had Mounted on Linen, 2s., except those marked*,



| enero trainee cane gn ARTO ES HREENet Sanmen as meme te eeepc IT


THE BEST MAGAZINE FOR BOYS.

EVERY BOY'S MAGAZINE,

Edited by EDMUND ROUTLEDGE.
MONTHLY, 6d.; POSTAGE, 1d.

The Parts contain 56 royal 8vo pages, from Eight te
Twelve Illustrations, and either a Coloured Plate or a Full-
page Illustration on plate paper. Each month several Pr7zes
are offered for the Solution of Puzzles ; Zen Guinea and Ten
Half-Guinea Prizes for Essays, Stories, Poems, Maps,
Models, Paintings, &c. &c. All the Stories are Completed
in the Volume in which they commence. Articles on
subjects interesting co Boys, written by the most popular
living Authors, appear each month.

on receipt of which sum the Parts for Twelve Months will be
sent, post free, as they appear.

Prospectuses will be sent post free, on application at the
Publishing Office, Broadway, Ludgate Hill, E.C., where also
all Subscriptions must be sent.

LITTLE WIDE-AWAKE

Edited by Mrs. SALE BARKER:
8d. Monthly; Postage, 1d.
An Illustrated Magazine for Little Childven.

Each Number consists of Thirty-two pages, printed in

large clear type, and is Illustrated with about Thirty Pictures
by the First Artists.



_ The Annual Subscription is 4s. (P.O.0. on Chief
Office), on receipt of which sum the Parts for 12 Months
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London: GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS, Broadway, Ludgate.

J. OGDEN AND CO., PRINTERS, 172, ST. JOHN STREET, E.C,

The Annual Subscription is 7s. (P.O.O. on Chief Office),

tn




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