Citation
Upwards and downwards, and other stories

Material Information

Title:
Upwards and downwards, and other stories
Creator:
A. L. O. E., 1821-1893 ( Author )
Borders, Fred ( Engraver )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson & Sons
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1876
Language:
English
Physical Description:
120 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1876 ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1876 ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1876
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Added title page and frontispiece printed in colors; some illustrations engraved by F. Borders.
Statement of Responsibility:
by A.L.O.E.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALH9440 ( notis )
61164853 ( oclc )
026997532 ( alephbibnum )

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UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

‘The soul of the sluggard desireth, and hath nothing; but the soul
of the diligent shall be made fat.”—PRrov. xiii. 4.





OOD-BYE, Ellie dear—bless you!”
i¥s \Jfg cried Willie Deane, with a chok-
ees ing voice, as he embraced his little
YQ blind sister again and again at the
gloomy door of the poor-house.

“Come, no more of this!” said the parish-

officer, laying his hand on the shoulder of the




sobbing girl, who clung closer and closer to
her brother, the only tie now left to her in
the wide world. They had that afternoon
followed the remains of their father to a
pauper’s nameless grave; and though the



8 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

only mourning worn by the bare-footed,
ragged children was a little bit of old crape,
lent by a pitying neighbour, in the hearts
of both there was deep, deep mourning, and
all the greater since they were now to be
separated. Willie, as a boy “quite able to
work,” though his wan face told of hardship
and hunger, was left to make his own way
in the world; while Ellie, whose blindness
made her perfectly helpless, was removed
to the shelter of the poor-house.

“Oh, we shall never, never meet again,
and you are all that is left me now! My
heart will break!” cried the little girl be-
tween her sobs.

“No, no; trust in God, darling; we shall
meet again! I will work early and late,
but I will find some means to support you !
We shall yet gain our bread by honest in-
dustry—we shall, Ellie dear; only trust in
God!”

And so they parted ; and the orphan boy,
needing only too much for himself the com-



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. , 9

fort which he had been trying to give to
another, stood for some minutes gazing at
the door which had been closed behind his
fair-haired sister with a feeling of utter
desolation. He wished, then tried to re-
press the wish, lest it should be sinful in
the sight of his Maker, that he could lay
his weary head where his father slept, and
forget all his sorrows in the quiet grave!
“ But no,” he thought, “I must live—I
must labour for her. God may yet have a
work for even me to do; life’s long day of
toil is before me, and then, oh, how sweet
will be rest!”

Willie carried back the crape to Mrs.
Clark, who had been the friend of his father
in better times. A very poor woman she
was now, but with a kind, compassionate
heart. “Sure, I’m sorry for you, poor
fellow!” she said, brushing the moisture
from her eyes with the back of her hand ;
“but I have scarcely bread to put into my
own mouth, and sorry a bit to give away.



“10 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

Had they allowed her but a shilling or two
for out-door relief, I’d have let that dear
little girl share my crust and my bed; but
what's little for one is starvation for two.
I don’t see how I can help you now, unless
—there’s an old broom in the corner there ;
if it’s any use to you, you're welcome to it ;
may be it will bring you a few pence.”

_ The present was accepted with thanks,
and the homeless boy, as he left her little
cellar, blessed the voice’ of kindness which
had been like a cordial to his desolate heart.
The night was now closing in; whither
should the orphan go? He crept under
the shadow of an archway, which sheltered
him from the rain which was beginning’ to
fall; and from that strange place of refuge
rose the humble, trusting prayer of a
troubled spirit—but a brave spirit, that was
preparing to battle with poverty, to look
want in the face, and, by God’s blessing,
thrust it back, and struggle on to indepen-
‘dence. Willie would not beg, but he



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 11

would earn his bread, though his sole
means of doing so was the half-worn-out
broom which had been given by one almost
as poor as himself.

The sun was scarcely up earlier than
Willie. He gazed on the brightening sky,
dappled with rosy clouds, and breathed
forth his morning prayer. With his broom
in his hand, and a hope in his heart that
the Almighty would bless his labours, he
passed along the quiet streets, and at last
began to work at a crossing by the side of
a square, which, from its almost impassable
state, seemed to have been neglected for
many a day, The labour was new to hin,
and soon tired his arms; but with resolu-
tion he brushed on till a clean causeway
was made across the narrow road. Pleased
at his own success, he had just paused to
rest, when a boy about his own size, also
ragged and bare-footed, ran up with a
broom in his hand, and in an angry voice
accused Willie of having deprived him of



12 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

his crossing, and tried to take the bread out
of his mouth.

‘“‘T did not know that it belonged to any
one,” said Willie, casting a glance of disap-
pointment at the crossing at which he had
been working so hard.

“Tt’s been mine this month and more,
and it was my mother’s afore me,” replied
Sam Higgins, in no very courteous tone.

“Well,” said Willie, shouldering his
broom with a sigh, “I must go somewhere.
else, I suppose. Does any one make a long
crossing yonder, so as to cut off the corner
of the square ?”

“Oh, youre welcome to that, if it takes
your fancy,” laughed Sam; “as if any one
would wade over that sea of brown mud!”

“They shall not have to wade,” replied
Willie, setting himself at once to his new
task with that resolute spirit which, whether
possessed by a king or a street-sweeper,
usually secures success. As he plied at his
crossing, Willie thought of the lines :—



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 18

“Tf I were a cobbler, I’d make it my pride
The best of all cobblers to be;
If I were a tinker, no tinker beside
Should mend an old kettle like me!”

And he determined that whatever he did
should be done well.

Sam, leaning on his broom, watched
Willie with a mocking sneer. He was
himself quite a stranger to that energy
which rises to meet difficulties—that perse-
verance which resolutely overcomes them.
He thought it enough to stand by his cross-
ing, sweep for a moment when he saw a
passenger approaching, and run after him
with loud importunate entreaties to beg
the pence which he was too lazy to earn.
Willie never begged; he left his work to
speak for him; and as the conduct of the
sweepers was different, so likewise, as might
be expected, was their success. The long
clean crossing was constantly preferred ;
the boy who remained steady at his post .
raised the kindly feelings of the passer-by,
and became known to the residents round.



14 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

For every penny which Sam extorted by
begging, his silent companion received
three. Willie found that he could maintain
himself in honest independence. This was
his first upward. step.

Willie heard that a Ragged School was
open every evening, not far from the poor
lodging which he now managed to procure
for himself. Anxious for knowledge—
anxious, above all, to be instructed in the
things of God—he never failed in his daily
attendance, and was the most diligent, the
most persevering of all the scholars.

“Tittle good larning will do to such as
you,” cried Sam sneeringly, as he saw
Willie one day with a multiplication table
in his hand, trying as hard to master its
difficulties as he had done to earn his bread.

Willie only replied with a smile; he felt
that the useful knowledge which he was ac-
quiring was another step in an upward path
—that he should one day find the benefit of
it; and he thought with fond hope of the ,



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 15-

time when he might impart to his darling’
little sister some of the information so
freely given to himself.

He learned also at the school the value
of cleanliness; he was instructed how to:
mend his own clothes. A kind teacher,
pleased by the industry and docility of her
pupil, gave him an old cap of her son’s, and
a cast-off pair of boots; so while Sam’s
elbows still looked through the rents in his
sleeves, and his dirty clothes hung in rags
upon him, and his face looked as though
it had never been washed,—gradually his
companion gained an appearance so respect-
able and clean that it could scarcely have
been believed that both had started from
the same point of poverty; but then the
one was pursuing an upward, the other a
downward path.

The object which Willie ever set before
himself was to be the support of his sister’
Ellie. He almost denied himself necessary
food to save up his little earnings for her ;.



16 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

and earnestly he prayed to his heavenly
Father to fulfil this desire of his heart. As
Willie became known in the neighbourhood,
he was often sent on little errands, em-
ployed to fetch water, or to sweep before
doors; and many a meal, and many a
penny—-yes, and silver pieces too—he was
enabled to earn in this manner. But still,
in the dry, clear autumn days, when his
crossing scarcely needed a touch of the
broom, Willie felt that his time was not
fully employed—he might do more—he
night gain more for his sister.
_ Here, again, the Ragged School offered
its valuable instruction. Willie was taught
how to make little baskets ; and though his
profits at first were very small indeed, the
little purse which he had made for himself,
and which contained all his savings for
Ellie, gradually grew heavier and heavier,
and every now and then he exchanged a
handful of coppers for a bright silver shil-

ling or half-crown.
(407)



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 17

Willie was a truly religious boy—his
hope and. trust were placed in his Saviour ;
but he well knew that religion gives no
encouragement to idleness,—that we are re-
commended to be not slothful in business,
fervent in spirit, serving the Lord. The
more earnestly he prayed, the harder he
worked ; his piety gave new impulse to his
industry. .

Sam, in the meantime, was sinking lower
and lower in idleness, poverty, and dirt.
His crossing afforded an emblem of his own
mind, all neglected and uncared for as were
both. Buta new era was now to open before
him ; he was to be given an opportunity of
rising at last from his miserable and degraded
state. Willie was surprised one day to see
his companion appear in the square respect-
ably dressed, his face looking ten shades
fairer from a recent washing, and his whole
manner expressing pleasure and hope.

“Ah, Tve done with you for ever!”

exclaimed Sam, flinging away his broom,
(407)



18 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

“and done with this wretched, starving life !
Plod on there, Will the sweeper,—scrape
up your farthings; I’ve something better
before me, I warrant you. My uncle’s come
to London, on his way to the Indies, and he
says that it’s a shame—and so it is—that a
boy like me should work at a crossing, like
a slave; so he’s given me a suit of clothes,
d’ye see, and something to rattle in the
pockets, and he’s got me a situation in the
city. Tm agoing now to rise in the world ;
maybe I’ll be a rich man some of these days !”

“JT wish you joy,” said Willie, good-
naturedly ; “what a blessing to have such
an uncle !”

Sam was placed in a situation, and a good
one ; but to get it was one thing, to keep
it another. Sam’s master was a tolerably
patient man, but there are bounds to the
patience of most people. What is to be
done with a servant who is always in bed
when the fires should be lighted in the
morning; who loiters when sent on a



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 19

message, idles when there is work to be
finished ; who is never willing, never busy,
never clean? What is to be done? Why,
after proper trial has been given, there is
but one thing to be done, and Sam’s master
did it ; he turned off the boy who was too
lazy to work, and Sam found himself again
in the streets!

Meantime another opening was made for
Wille to rise to a more comfortable position
in life. Mr. Baynes, a fruiterer, who lived
near the square, and had occasionally em-
ployed him on little errands, and always
found him diligent and steady, was suddenly
- obliged to dismiss his own errand-boy at am
hour’s notice for coming home in a state of
intoxication.

“This is exceedingly inconvenient ; what:
am I to do till I can supply his place ?”
said the old fruiterer to his wife as she stood
piling the rosy apples in the window.

“T should say, my dear,” she replied,
without pausing in her occupation, “ that



20 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

we might have in the little sweeper Willie,
just for a few days till we get another boy
to suit us. He looks so clean and neat that
we need not be ashamed of him; and I
believe that we might trust him with the
fruit.”

“Tl trust him,” said her husband ;
“honesty’s written on his face; and my
friend at the Ragged School, who sees him
every evening, says that he does not know
a more promising boy.”

So Willie, to his great joy, was engaged
for a week at a shilling a day, and his
dinner provided. This seemed riches to the
poor sweeper boy; and never was an
apple missed from a basket, never was the
messenger too late or too long. The shop,
to clean which was a part of his work, had
never looked so beautifully neat. At the
end of that week Willie was able to change
his silver for a piece of gold, the first which
he ever had touched in his life.

“T’ve not found any boy to suit me yet,”



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 21

said the fruiterer to his wife, as they sat at
the breakfast-table together ; “I believe that
we must hire Willie Deane for another
week.”

“Well, my dear,” she replied, as she
poured out the tea, “I don’t see why we
should not keep him altogether ; he’s honest,
sober, industrious, and clean, and the most
willing boy that ever I met with. Let’s
take him into the house, and give him
wages ; we ought to know when we’re well
served, my dear.”

Willie’s heart bounded for joy when the
old fruiterer gave him the offer of the
situation. It was not the thought of
exchanging the hardships and privations
of his present life, his miserable garret
shared with others, his wretched food,
barely sufficient to maintain him in health,
for the comforts of a respectable home, but
the hope that, as he would now have some-
thing certain for his work, he might support
his blind sister himself! He hastened to



22 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

Mrs. Clark, and telling her of the prospect
opening before him, asked her whether, if
he placed the whole of his wages in her
hands, a small sum for washing only ex-
cepted, she would agree to take charge of
his little sister.

Mrs. Clark hesitated, while Willie looked
anxiously into her face for a reply. ‘We
must at least wait,” she replied, “till your
quarter’s wages become due. I’m in debt
at this moment eighteen shillings for coals
and for rent, and—”

“But I can pay something now!” cried
Willie eagerly, laying a bright gold sovereign
upon the table, the fruit of months of self-
denial and toil.

She agreed instantly to receive poor Ellie,
and to take care of her as if she were her
own daughter ; and at once prepared to ac-
company Willie to the poor-house to claim
and bring back his beloved little sister.

As Willie approached with rapid steps
the gloomy portal, at which, some months



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDs. 23

before, he had stood so desolate and sad,
he overtook one whom he instantly recog-
nized as his old fellow-sweeper, Sam Hig-
gins. The good clothes of the latter had
been pawned for bread; his bare head and
feet, his hollow sunken eyes, the air of
misery, the appearance of dirt which he
wore, told at once the tale of the sluggard.

“Are you going to the house too?”
drawled the unhappy boy in a husky tone.
“T can’t stand another winter out o’ doors,
so I’m going in, just for a while. But you
don’t look as though you had come to that,”
he added, eyeing Willie Deane from head _
to foot. ‘“ What brings you to the poor-
house door ?”

“T come to take out my sister,” replied
Willie, suppressing his own joy that it
might not add to the pain of one who was
now driven to ask for relief from the parish.
Truly the words of heavenly wisdom had
been verified in the two boys, “ Zhe soul
of the sluggard desireth, and hath nothing ;



24 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

but the soul of the diligent shall be made
jou

“Oh, Willie, if you only knew how
happy I am!” was the exclamation of the
little blind orphan, as again she was pressed
to her brother’s heart, again was restored
to the outer world from the cheerless gloom
of the pauper’s abode. Those words repaid
Willie for all his toil, all his privations ;
and the language of his thankful heart was,
“ Bless the Lord, O my soul! and all that
ts within me bless his holy name !”

When Willie had been for three years in
the service of Mr. Baynes, he observed with
sorrow that the health of his kind old master
was much impaired. The early visits to
Covent Garden market were too much for his
strength ; he needed more rest and repose.
Feeling himself qualified to undertake this
part of the business, Willie offered, though
with some hesitation, his services. Mr.
Baynes smiled kindly, but evidently enter-
tained his doubts that the youth’s abilities



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 25

were equal to his good-will. It was not
probable that a sweeper, taken from the
streets, should know how to conduct the busi-
ness of a shop. An opportunity was, how-
ever, soon afforded to Willie to prove how
useful he could make himself in’a higher
‘ position, and that his head could work as
well as his hands.

It so happened that one morning a lady
entered the shop to buy when neither the
fruiterer nor his wife were in it, the former
having been taken suddenly unwell. Willie
would not disturb them by calling them
down ; he slipped behind the counter him-
self, served the lady with such intelligence,
drew up the bill so correctly, and performed
his new part so well, that from that day his
employers regarded him in another light,
and felt convinced that he could give valu-
able assistance to his master. In a very
short time Willie had quite changed his
position, another boy was hired to supply
his former place, and all the chief business,



26 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

whether of buying or selling, was com-
mitted to the charge of young Deane. The
aged fruiterer with confidence left every-
thing in his hands, and, as with the pious
Joseph, God made all that he did to prosper.
Custom increased, the business extended,
and Mr. Baynes was generous and honest
enough to give due credit to his active,
intelligent assistant. The salary of Willie
was first increased, then doubled, till at
length the fruiterer, feeling his own powers
decaying, and having no one to succeed him
in the business, took the once friendless
sweeper boy into partnership, and placed
- him in a position of respectability and
comfort beyond any to which his hopes had
dared to aspire.

And. now that Willie was in the way to
grow rich, dearly he loved to retrace every
step in the difficult but upward path by
which he, through God’s blessing on his
industry, had risen. With especial grati-
tude he remembered the Ragged School, at



UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 27

which he had gained knowledge more
precious than gold. He aided it from his
purse, and, though his time was by far too
much occupied to enable him to visit it during
the week, every Sunday evening he devoted
to repaying his debt as far as he could by
teaching where he had once been taught.

One night as Willie was returning from
the school, on turning a corner, he heard a
confused sound of scuffling, and voices
raised in excitement or anger; and quicken-
ing his steps, he found a small crowd as-
sembled round a man who had just been
caught in the act of picking a pocket. A
policeman’s hand was on the collar of the
thief—escape was impossible—he was about
to be dragged off to a felon’s jail! .

“This isn’t the first time ; you'll not get
off so easy now,” said the policeman.

“He's a reg’lar jail-bird; he'll come to
the gallows at last,” cried the woman who
had been robbed; “that’s the end of the
course of such as he !”



28 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

At that moment the crowd divided a little;
Willie caught a moment’s glimpse of the
prisoner’s haggard face as the moon shone
full upon it. It was several years since he
had seen it last, yet he recognized it still,—
it was the face of the sluggard who would
not work, whom idleness had driven to want,
and whom want had driven to crime,—it was
the face of the wretched Sam Higgins !

Dear young reader, the choice is before
you now, which will you decide upon taking,
—the upward course of the diligent, or the

_downward path of the sluggard ?

But oh! remember, above all things, that
however great the reward of industry may
be here, there is one thing needful, compared
with which all the goods of this life are as
dross. Be diligent first in the work of the
soul, seek first the kingdom of God and his
righteousness ; while not slothful in business,
let your chief desire be always to be serving
the Lord.





Mrs. Hayley has engaged Mark
Pat once on my recommendation,
x and I hope that the boy will do
credit to us!” exclaimed Giles
Fielding, the portly baker, with an air of
benevolent triumph, as he laid his broad
hand on the shoulder of a slight pale youth
who stood in the shop at his side.

“ T’m so glad, so heartily glad of it !” cried
Mrs. Fielding, pausing in her occupation of
scraping a French roll. “You could not
have got the poor fellow into a better place,



30 A WHITE LIE.

or one where he’s more likely to do well.
But,” added she, lowering her voice, and
glancing towards the shop door, “did you
tell the lady all, Giles?”

“No, I was not such an ass!” said the
baker. ‘When one wants to do a good turn
to a poor boy, and start him fairly in life,
do you think that one begins by telling that
he has a father in jail? No, no, I knew
better than that ; when Mrs. Hayley asked
me if he had parents, I said that they both
were dead.”

Mark coloured up to his temples; Mrs.
Fielding looked very grave.

“J wish that you had not said that, my
dear.”

“Tut!” laughed the good-humoured baker,
“it was only a white lie; it could do no
harm to any one. I doubt whether any
lady would knowingly take into her service
the son of a thief. To have told the whole
truth would have been to have set a brand
upon the poor boy; Mrs. Hayley would never



A WHITE LIE. 31

have thought her spoons safe!” And again
Giles Fielding laughed, but neither his wife
nor Mark Robson joined at all in his mirth.
Mrs. Fielding had read in her Bible that

lying lips are an abomination to the Lord.
She had read of the glorious Jerusalem above,
there shall in no wise enter into it anything
that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh abom-
ination or maketh a le. And in that Bible
she had been taught no distinction between
a white lie and any other: all sin is black
before God ; all sin puts the soul in danger ;
all sin shuts out from heaven unless repented
of—forsaken—and forgiven. Mrs. Fielding
was too dutiful a wife to say out all that
she thought to her husband in the presence
of Mark; she did so when they were alone
together, but the only answer which she
received was, “ A white lie can do no harm ;
the boy is as honest a boy as can be, and it
was not for me to go blazing abroad that he
is the son ofa thief. Don’t trouble your con-
science at all about the matter, my dear.”



82 A WHITE LIE,

So Mark Robson went to his place, and
very grateful did he feel to the friends whose
kindness had secured it for him. Mrs. Field-
ing had mended and cut down some of her
husband’s shirts to give the lad an outfit,
put a half-crown into his purse, and a Bible
into his hand.

“God bless you, my boy !” said she, as he
was about to start for his new home; “be
honest, faithful, and steady, and always keep
to the truth.”

Mark thanked her with glistening eyes,
and his heart was very full as he turned
from her hospitable door. Mrs. Fielding
had done more for the boy than rescue him
from poverty and shame, give him an op-
portunity of earning his bread by honest
exertions, and interest.in his behalf her
kind-hearted husband. As a Sunday-school
teacher she had earnestly sought, and not
in vain, to impress on the heart of the poor
boy the blessed truths of religion. She had
taught Mark that the poor on earth may be



A WHITE LIK, 33

rich in grace; that the friendless on earth
have a Friend in heaven; that they who
sow in tears may at last reap in joy ; and
that blessed are those who trust in the Lord,
and humbly walk in his ways. Mrs. Field-
ing little thought, when she bade her young
charge good-bye, how much had been done
by her husband’s few thoughtless words to
mar her labour of love, and confuse the
ideas of right and wrong in the mind of the
boy whom they both wished to serve.

. Mark Robson went to his situation in
the house of Mrs. Hayley with many good
resolutions and cheerful expectations. There
was but one uncomfortable feeling which
would sometimes arise, like a speck of dark
cloud upon a bright sky ; this was the re-
collection that he had gained his place by
deceit. But then the deceit was not his own.
He had merely remained silent when a false-
hood had been spoken, glad, if the truth
must be owned, that another was found to

say for him what he would have scrupled
(407) 3



34 A WHITE LIE.

to say for himself. But as one little seed,
blown by the wind, may become the parent
of many; as the small cloud may grow
larger and larger, till darkness overspread
the blue sky; so one sin—one falsehood——has
in itself a tendency to spread and increase.
Almost the first question which Mrs. Hay-
ley asked of Mark Robson was, “ When
did your poor father die?” Swift as light-
ning passed a crowd of thoughts through
the mind of the boy. “I can’t contradict
what the baker said ; I can’t expose my kind
friend; I will not disgrace myself ’Tis
impossible to speak the truth. What’s the
harm in a white ke?” So Mark answered,
“Two years ago,” scarcely knowing what he
said, but speaking out as boldly as he could
the first sentence which rose to his tongue.

The lady asked no more questions on that
subject, which was a great relief to Mark,
and he hoped that the falsehood which he
had uttered would be the last of which he
should be guilty.



A WHITE LIE. 35

But was “no harm” done by the lie?
Alas for the effect upon the soul of the
lad! When we give ourselves to the Lord,
we must give ourselves fully and freely ;
there must be no reserve, no keeping back,
no secretly saying in the heart, “T will obey
God in all things but one; I will give up
every sin but that which doth most easily
beset me!” One leak unstopped, sinks a
ship ;—one spark unquenched, may burn a
city! Poor Mark tried hard to persuade
himself that his kind friend, the baker, had
been right, and that there had been no real
harm in going a little from the truth. The
Evil One is but too ready to help us to
silence conscience, and every time that
conscience is wilfully silenced its power is
- weakened within us. Mark Robson now felt
little pleasure in reading the Holy Bible,
because its warnings against sin made him
feel uneasy in his mind. He wished that
God’s law were not so strict. When he
came to the awful history of Ananias and



36 A WHITE LIE.

Sapphira, struck dead with falsehood on
their lips, as related in the Book of Acts,
Mark closed the Bible with a sigh, and had
no wish to open it again. All his comfort
in prayer was gone! Giles Fielding, a well-
meaning man, who attended God’s worship,
honoured God’s day, and believed that he
was helping God’s poor, would have been
startled indeed could he have known what
a stumbling-block he had put in a young
lad’s path, how by what he had called a
white lie he had been doing the work of the
devil ! ;

Mark had been for some months in his
situation when, one day, as he was walking
along a street, a hand was suddenly laid on
his arm; and, turning round, he was startled
to behold his own father !

“Glad to see thee, my lad ; right glad to
see thee once more!” cried Robson, wring-
ing the hand of his son, in whose heart
feelings of affection, shame, pleasure, and
fear strangely mingled together. “And



A WHITE LIE. 37

where hast thou been, my boy, and how
hast weathered the winter? I guess from
the look of thee,” continued Robson, sur-
veying his son from head to foot, “that thee
has found some un to take thee by the hand.
Pll walk a bit with thee, and we'll crack
together as we go.”

Mark told his parent of everything but
the deceit which had been used by Giles
Fielding in order to get him a place,—he
shrank from saying a word about that. He
gave otherwise a full account of all that had
been done for him by the kindly baker and
his wife, and the heart of Robson warmed
towards the friends of his son.

“Blessings on ’em both for caring for a
lad as was worse than an orphan!” he
exclaimed, “and blessings on ’em for larning
thee the right honest way to go in! Td
never ha’ been where I’se come from, had
there been any one when I was young to
care for my soul, or give me a chance in
the world! Maybe I’ve larned summat in



38 A WHITE LIE.

jail, maybe T’ll ha’ a try to begin a new
sort of life ; but it’s hard for a fellow as has
a bad name to swim right against the tide.”
Robson passed his rough hand across his
brow. ‘But T’se never be a weight round
your neck, my lad; if I can’t float, Pll not
drag thee down. I'll not come hanging about
the house arter ye, as maybe the missus
mightn’t half like it; but thou’lt come and
see me,—come often, my lad,—I’ll need a
bit cheering from thee !”

Mark promised eagerly that he would
visit his father in the miserable lodging of
which Robson gave him the address, It
was the greatest relief to the boy to find
that the good feeling of his unhappy parent
would save him from a thousand difficulties
which visits to Mrs. Hayley’s house might
have caused. Had Robson been a more
hardened sinner, he would have forced his
son more bitterly to rue the white le so
lightly uttered by the baker.

But though Mark’s troubles might have



A WHITE LIE. 39

been greater, they were sufficiently perplex-
ing to keep him in a state of constant
anxiety and fear. He had a secret which
might be found out, and it became to him a
burden which grew more oppressive day by
day. Mark went to see his father, he was
in duty bound to do so, but he could not
ask leave to go in a frank and open manner.
Once beside poor Robson, it was hard to get
away. The late prisoner’s health was fail-
ing, he could hardly procure any work ;
but for the kindness of the Fieldings, the
poor man might almost have starved.
Mark saved what he could from his wages,
and gave what he could of his time; but
how could that time be spared—was it not
paid for by his mistress? Having entered
on a course of deceit, Mark felt himself
forced—against his will—to go on in it.
Untruths came more readily to his tongue.
He asked for leave now to go to a wedding,
then to buy himself shoes. When sent on
an errand and blamed for returning an hour



40 A WHITE LIE.

too late, he was ever ready with a false
excuse. ‘It is for my father,” he would
say to himself; “’tis but a white le after
all!” Oh, how much happier for him had
he spoken the truth from the first, and so
never have been tempted to plunge deeper
and deeper in the miry ways of falsehood !
Once, during Mark’s lengthened absence
from home, a thief took the opportunity to
steal down the area-steps, and carry off some
forks which had been carelessly left near the
window. Great were the surprise and distress
of Mark on discovering the loss! What
was to be done? Conscience and common
sense urged him alike to go at once and
confess the truth to his mistress. But the
unhappy lad had now no courage to speak
the truth. He had become accustomed to
deceit. He instinctively felt, alas! that he
had not a right to be believed. Mark con-
cealed the matter, and by doing so, brought
not only his truth but his honesty under sus-
picion when the loss was discovered at last!



A WHITE LIE. 41

Trembling and pale, the miserable lad
stood one evening before his indignant



UNDER SUSPICION.

mistress, who had just been having an
interview with a policeman. One suspicious



42 A WHITE LIE.

circumstance after another had recurred to
her mind; by making inquiries in the
‘neighbourhood the lady had found that
Mark had deceived her on several occasions.
All her confidence in him was gone, and
she naturally thought him guilty of stealing
the silver.

“JT find, unhappy boy,” said Mrs. Hayley,
fixing her eyes sternly upon Mark, who, in
the misery of his soul, almost wished that
the earth would open and hide him—“TI
find that you have repeatedly been seen in
company with a man, who—as the police-
man asserts
ago from jail. Such fellowship speaks for
itself. I am unwilling, from pity for your
youth, to send you before a magistrate,
but not a doubt exists on my mind that
either you, or your wicked companion, has
stolen my silver forks !”

How could Mark defend himself,—how
could he defend his father from a charge of
which he knew him to be guiltless! All



was released but a few months



A WHITE LIE. 43

the truth was now confessed, with deep
sorrow and shame; but the truth was not
now believed! Mark was dismissed from
his place in disgrace, and under suspicion of
theft! “A boy who could weave such a
web of falsehood,” observed Mrs. Hayley
to a friend, “ would be capable of any crime.
He who is false in his words, is likely to be
dishonest in his deeds.”

Miserable was the life which the poor
disgraced boy had for a long time to lead,
_ before any one would trust him again! If,
after a painful struggle through years of
hardship and toil, Mark did at last regain
the character which he had lost, it was only
‘through such trials as almost crushed his
young spirit. One lesson, however, he
thoroughly learned,—and this was worth
all that he suffered,—a dread of the begin-
ning’s of sins, a horror for a white le!

SS Ny .





papers round in the morning to his cus-
tomers, and get a peep at the news as I go;
and to take library books to the houses, and
run on an errand now and then! And what
a deal of time I’ll have for reading, and what
a glorious lot of books to read—for they say
Mr. Marsden is good-nature itself, and lends
- willingly enough to young chaps! Why,
Tll get as clever—as clever as a Lord
Chancellor or a Lord Mayor!” cried the



“DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 45

boy, almost wild with joy at the thought of
leaving the shop of his father the cobbler,
to enter on his first situation.

‘Don’t be too sure, Will,” said old Blane,
as he quietly fitted on the heel to a shoe.
“You've no reason to be certain that even
Mr. Marsden will take you at all.”

“Oh, there’s not a doubt of it!” exclaimed
Will. “Didn’t he tap me on the shoulder,
and say I was as ’cute a lad as ever he had
seen ?”

Blane only smiled and shook his grizzled
head, like one who has his doubts on some
matter.

“Father, don’t you want me to get clever
and great ?” asked Will, rather mortified at

the smile.
_ “TT want you, my boy, to do your duty in
the station, whatever it may be, to which it
shall please God to call you, and not to set
your heart on, or make sure of, any mere
eatthly success. When I see folk, as the
saying goes, counting their chickens before



46 “ DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

they are hatched, it brings into my mind
what I read lately about the famous
Napoleon Buonaparte.”

“TLet’s hear about him, father; you can
talk quite well at your work, and I like to
hear what you get out of those learned books
. that the clerk lends you to read of an even-
ing.”

“This was taken out of a grand long
work, written by an earl, the ‘ Life of the
great William Pitt,” said the cobbler, “and
it’s all true, I haven’t a doubt of it. When
Buonaparte—he was ruling over France,
he’d a mind to rule over old England too ;
and so, making sure of conquest, he fixed on
the very time when he’d come over and
invade us. He got a lot of his soldiers to-
gether, and had ships to carry ’em across ;
and he looked over the blue waves of the
Channel, and thinks he, ‘I’ll soon land in
England, march up to London, and take it.’”

“‘He made too sure,” laughed Will.

“He made so sure,” said the cobbler,



“ DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 49

“that—would you believe it, my boy ?—he
had actually a medal made to celebrate his
invasion of England !”

“ But he never invaded it!” interrupted
Will.

“And on the medal was stamped in
French, ‘ Struck at London,” continued old
Blane.

“ But he never entered London!” cried
Will.

“ He made so sure of success,” said the
cobbler, “that he prepared a medal in honour
of the conquest of a city that he was never
so much as to set his foot in!”

“Well, that .was counting his chickens
before they were hatched—making too
sure!” exclaimed the boy. “ How ashamed
Buonaparte must afterwards have felt when-
ever he thought of that medal! Have you
any more stories for me, father ?”

“Yes, another comes into my head, which
I read in another clever book,” replied
Blane. “It’s about a very different man



48 “DON’T BE TOO SURE,”

from him who struck the medal ; it’s about
the Duke of Wellington—”

“Who beat Napoleon Buonaparte himself
at the battle of Waterloo!” cried Will. “I
hope that Ae hadn’t his medal ready before-
hand ?”

“You know, or perhaps you don’t know,
my lad, that ‘Wellington was sent over to
Portugal to help the poor folk there who
were fighting against the French. God
gave wisdom to our great general, and suc-
cess to a good cause, so the enemy’s soldiers
were driven out, and Portugal ;was free.”

“How glad the Portuguese must have
been,” cried Will, “and how they must have
honoured our duke. That was the time for
striking a medal—when the battle had been
fought and won.”

“JT don’t know whether a medal was
struck,” said Blane; “but Vl tell you what
the Portuguese did; they had a print made
of the general, and under it were these
words in Latin, ‘ Invincible Wellington, from



“DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 49

grateful Portugal.’ So the clerk made out
their meaning ; he’s more of a scholar than
I be.”

“What does ‘invincible’ mean, father ?”

“Tt means, one who cannot be conquered,”
replied Blane.

“Oh, that was making too sure! The
duke might have won a hundred victories,
but as long as he lived no one could teli
that he might not be beaten at last.”

“ Just hear the end of my story, my boy,
and you'll see that the duke was just: of
your mind in that matter. A. friend asked
him to send him the print, so Wellington
got a copy and sent it: but he wouldn’t put
up with that boasting word at the bottom of
‘his likeness, as if he thought himself sure of
victory ; he scored out ‘invincible’ with a
dash of his pen, and underneath it he wrote,
‘Don’t halloo till you’re out of the wood.’”

Will Blane burst out laughing. “That
showed the duke’s good sense,” said he.

“Ay, and good feeling, too, my boy. It
(407) 4



50 “DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

showed that he was not a man of a boastful
spirit, but knew that the highest may have
a fall) When you are tempted, Will, to
make too sure of the morrow, just mind you
of Buonaparte and his medal—of Wellington
and his print. But now”—the cobbler
raised his eyes to the little Swiss clock
which was fixed on the wall before him, “it
is nearly time for you to be off to call upon
Mr. Marsden, as he told you to do this
evening, that all may be settled and fixed.”

‘“‘Tt is not six yet, father, and he bade me
be there at seven. But,” added Will with
animation, “I should like to call at Jem’s
and Wilson’s on the way, to tell them of
my good luck; so it is not too soon to
start.”

“ Perhaps,” said the cobbler with his quiet
smile, “you had better call upon them on
your way back—don’t be too sure of the
place.”

Long before Will Blane cd home,
his father’s day’s work was over ; but the



“ DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 51

cobbler delayed his evening meal until his
boy could share it. Everything he placed
ready—the neat white cloth on the little
table, the loaf, the piece of yellow cheese ;
and as twilight darkened around, Blane lit
his caudle and sat down to read. The
volume which he now opened was not one
of those which the clerk had lent him; the
fact was that Blane himself was anxious
about his son’s getting the place, and felt as
if he could not fix his attention on common
reading. He, therefore, had taken down
the Bible, which is worth all other books
put together, and was searching the pages
of the sacred volume for that wisdom which
cometh from above. Blane had his finger
on the verse, Casting all your care upon him,
for he careth for you, when he heard a step,
then the opening of a door, and turned round
to welcome his son.

The step was not so quick and firm as
that with which Will had left his home.
The door was opened slowly, as if by a weary



52 “DON'T BE TOO SURE.”

hand; and when Blane glanced up at his
boy, he read disappointment in his face
before Will had uttered a word.

“Tt's no use. I’ve had my trouble for
my pains!”
himself down on a chair. “Mr. Marsden
has behaved shamefully to me!” Will
pulled off his cap, rubbed his heated brow,
and looked both weary and angry.

“Mr. Marsden has not, then, settled with
you after all?”

“No,” replied Will, in a mortified tone.
“He has found out that he has a young

exclaimed the lad, throwing

cousin in Suffolk, who will suit him exactly.
He might as well have thought of that this
morning, and not have sent me on a fool’s
errand across half London, only to get dis-
appointment in the end!” And there was
a husky sound in the boy’s voice, while,
though he tried hard to keep it down, the
moisture would rise to his eyes.

“Well, my lad,” said Blane, after breathing
a little sigh—for he was disappointed as well



“DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 53

as his son—‘ there are two things that we
may be sure of.”

“T thought that you said, a little while
ago, that we should never be sure of any-
thing,” cried Will, in rather a testy tone.

“Two things that we may be sure of,” re-
peated his father ; “and these are, that God
knows what is best for us, and that he mak-
eth all things work together for good to them
that love him.”

“You are always bringing in religion,”
said the boy.

“ And haven’t I reason for it, Will?”
replied Blane. “In a world like this, where
all is changing and moving like the clouds
in the sky, or the waves of the sea; where
we're like the ships on the ocean—now up
in hope, now down in disappointment ;
where there’s nothing of which we can say,
‘This will be to-morrow as it is to-day ;’—
is it not a comfort to have something which
can never, never be moved ; something like
a rock, to which we can cling amidst all the



54 “DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

changes and tossings of life? Man’s word
may fail us, but God’s word issure.” Here
Blane laid his hand on the Bible. ‘Man
may break his promises ; God’s promise is
sure. Here is just one on which we can
rest.” He turned over to the place where
it is written, “ The Lord will give grace and
glory; no good thing will he withhold from
them that walk uprightly.”

“ But are not the promises only for God’s
people?” asked Will.

“For the redeemed of the Lord,” replied
his father.

“ And how can we be sure that we are so ?
We are all called Christians, I know; but
does that make us all Christians indeed ? ”

“That's a sensible question, my son.
May God help me to give a right answer,
for it is a matter in which it wouid be a
terrible thing to make a mistake. ‘There
are many as seem to take it as a matter of
course that they are right on the way to

heaven, “cause they were baptized when
&



“DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 55

young; and maybe they go to church or
chapel, and bear a good name in the world ;
-—-and so they make sure of heaven—too
sure, as they'll find at the last. They strike
their medal of success, as it were, before
they’ve crossed the sea of temptation, or hit
_ one good stroke against sin.

“ But how can we tell that we are of God’s
people?” again asked Will.

“There are two marks which can’t well
be mistaken,” said his father ; “let’s search
and see if we have them. Real Christians
love God above all, and hate sin above all:
these are two simple tests. They love God
above all; and why? Because they believe
that he gave his only Son to die for their
sins, and to save their poor lost souls;
because they believe that he will care for
them in this world, and will give them, in
the world to come, life and glory everlast-
ing! And they hate sin above all. Why?
Because sin is hateful to God; because sin
would keep them from God. They struggle



56 “DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

with it, they give it no quarter, they fight
against it, till God makes them more than
conquerors in the end!”

“Tf real Christians love God above all,
and hate sin above all, I’m afraid I’m not
one of them,” said Will Blane.

“Do you wish to be one?” asked his
father.

«1 should wish to go to heaven when |
die.”
“Then ask God for his blessed Spirit, to
make you live holily, die happily, and rise —
gloriously at the last. Make sure, my boy,
—oh! make sure that you give your heart
to God. He is the kindest of masters, he
is the best of friends. Sorrow, labour, and
disappointment may be our lot in this life ;
but remember that peace, and rest, and joy

are what God prepares for his people.”

Tt was about a week after the day on
which Will was disappointed of his place
with Mr. Marsden, when, on his return from
going on a little errand, he found his father



‘DON'T BE TOO SURE.” 57

with a letter in his hand and a look of
pleasure beaming on his face.



| !





TIE LETTER.

“Here’s a bit of good news for you, Will,”
he said, holding out the letter to his son.



58 “DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

Will took the paper from his father, and
eagerly began to read it; but before he had
gone half through it, he burst out with an
exclamation of joy,—-

“What! that good gentleman, Sir John
Bate, going to travel abroad, and offering
to take me with him; and you willing—TI see
that you are—quite willing to let me go! ©
Oh, how glad I am, how very glad, that I
was disappointed last week! This place
will be better in every way—so far better
than the other! There’s nothing on earth I
should like so much as to go abroad with
Sir John!”

“Did I not say truly, my son, that God
knows what is best for us?” observed Blane,
laying his hand on the shoulder of his boy.
“Tet us once be sure, quite sure, that we
have taken the Lord for our Saviour and
Guide, and we may be sure, quite sure, that,
happen what may, he will never fail or for-
sake us.”





from his knees, after joing, or
seeming to join, in the prayer that
his parent had been offering aloud. It was
the custom of Matthew Blane to pray morn-
ing and evening with his son. The first
prayer, he would say, gave him heart for the
_ labours of the day, and the second prepared
him for the rest of the night. Matthew
would as soon have forgotten his daily bread



as his daily prayer to his God.



60 QUITE IN EARNEST.

‘You seem to be in mighty haste to ask
me,” observed Blane drily; he could not
but notice how little of his son’s attention
had been given to the prayer.

“Well, you see, father, as I’m going.
abroad, I was thinking how useful I should
find one of those leather cases, with knife,
and pen, and pencil complete, and a place
for the paper and the stamps. Jem showed
me where I could get one very cheap; and
I thought, father, as a parting present, that
you would not mind buying one for me.”

Matthew Blane gave a little dry cough.

“Youre quite in earnest in wishing for
the case ?” asked he.

“Of course I am,” replied Will, a little
surprised at the question.

“A good deal more in earnest, perhaps,”
observed his father, “than you were a few
minutes ago, when you asked for safety,
health, and forgiveness, and food for both
body and soul.”

“Well, to own the truth, father,” said



QUITE IN EARNEST. 61

Will, “my thoughts will wander a bit while
I am saying my prayers.”

“Saying my prayers,” repeated Blane,
half to himself; “ay, that is the word for
the thing. Saying your prayers is not pray-
ing. You ask God for certain blessings as
a matter of course, as a duty ; but you don’t
expect to get aught by your asking. You
don’t look to receive an answer, as you did
when you told me you wanted the case.”

“O father, it’s so different !” cried Will.

“Ay, its different; I grant ye that,”
said Blane, slowly stirring the fire as he
spoke. “It isa different thing to ask for all
that you can need from One who alone has
power to give or to take away all, than to tell
a father that you’ve a fancy for a trifle that
you could very well do without.”

“JT did not mean that,” said Will, colour-
ing ; “but it does not seem as if the great
God in heaven would attend to the prayers
of such poor creatures as we are.”

“That’s it; “tis unbelief that makes so



62 QUITE IN EARNEST.

many cold in prayer,” observed Blane, look-
ing thoughtfully into the fire. “We do
not take God’s word as we would that of a
fellow-creature whom we respected. Does
he not say again and again in the Bible
what ought to encourage us to pray—Ask,
and it shall be given unto you. If ye then,
being evil, know how to give good gifts unto
your children, how much more shall your
Fath-vr which is in heaven give good things
to them that ask him. There are many and
many promises like that, which we'd hold fast
and never let go if they were made by a friend
upon earth. And if promises are not enough
to content us, just look again into the Bible,
and see if it is not full of examples of an-
swers to prayer.”

“ But that was in the old times,” observed
Will.

“God never changes,” replied Blane.
“He is the same yesterday, to-day, and for
ever. The same Saviour who stopped to
listen to the cry of the poor, when he walked



QUITE IN EARNEST. 68

as a man upon earth, now listens with the
same love and pity, sitting as God in the
- heavens. But then, prayer, to be answered,
must come not merely from the lips—the
heart must be quite in earnest.”

“Tt is difficult to pray from the heart,”
said Will.

« Ay, the best of us need to say with the
first disciples, Lord, teach us to pray. The
wisest of us need to ask for the Spirit of
grace and supplications, to help us to pray
as we ought.”

“But, father,” said Will, with a little
hesitation, “I don’t see as how those who
pray hard get much more than those who
don’t pray at all. If I were to ask God
now to make me very rich, and pray with all
my heart and soul, do you believe that he
would send me a fortune 2?”

“Maybe not, my boy,” answered Mat-
thew Blane; “for God might see that a
fortune would do you harm, and not good,
as has happened to many afore. If you



64 QUITE IN EARNEST.

asked me for poisoned food, I’d not give
it, however hard you might beg. I’d not
harm ye even to please ye! But what I
say, and what I’ll stand by, is this: God
gives to his praying children all that they
ask for in faith, if it really is a blessing that
they ask for. He may keep them waiting
awhile, to try their faith and their patience ;
but he never forgets their prayer. They
have at the last exactly what they would
think best for themselves, if they could see
all things as God sees—if they could know
all things as God knows. And when, ina
happier world, they look back upon their
past lives, they will find them—I’m sure
that they all will—full of answers to
prayer.”

“ Even in little earthly matters, father ?”

“Even in matters that may seem to us
earthly and little. Jl give you an instance,
my lad. One fact will often go further
than many words in the way of con-
vincing. Tl tell you what happened not



QUITE IN EARNEST. 65

very long since to our Bible-woman, Lucy
May.” *

“ What was it, father?” asked Will.

“ Lucy had a ring that she dearly prized,
because it had belonged to a pious sister,
who was dead. I doubt if there was any-
thing that she had that she would not sooner
have lost than that ring. Lucy, as you
know, is employed, like many another in
London, in seeking out poor wandering
sinners, and trying to lead them co the
Saviour. There was one girl—her name
is Emily—who seemed minded to listen to
Lucy, and even agreed that she would go
one evening with the Bible-woman to a
meeting for prayer. It was on the very
day, if I remember right, on which the meet-
ing was to take place, as the two were to-
gether in Lucy’s little room, there came the
postman’s knock at the door. Off started
Lucy in haste, for she expected a letter.

* AL. 0. E. had the following facts from one thoroughly ac-
quainted with them, and on whose truthfulness she implicitly
relies. She has only changed the Bible-woman’s name.

(407) 5



66 QUITE IN EARNEST,

And sure enough there was one, bringing
her news of her mother, who was ill. No
wonder that while the poor Bible-woman
was anxiously spelling over her letter, she
forgot that in the room in which she had
left the girl Emily there was her ring, be-
sides a golden sovereign in her work-box—
a work-box that was not locked.”

“Ah!” exclaimed Will, “that was a for-
get indeed! Did the girl open the box
and take them ?” ;

“The temptation was too strong for her,”
replied Blane ; “ Emily took both sovereign
and ring, and slipped them into her stock-
ing.”

“Lucy might have expected as much,”
eried Will, “What could have made her
leave such a temptation as that in the way
of a stranger ?”

“T s’pose it must have been her anxiety
about her mother, and the worry of the
letter,” answered Blane. “Anyways, it
added not a little to her trouble when she



QUITE IN EARNEST. 67

found that the girl whom she had hoped to
have as a penitent turned out such a thief ;
and that, instead of going to the prayer-
meeting as was settled, she went away no
one knew where, with the stolen money and
the ring, which she denied knowing anything
about.”

“Didn't Jucy call the police?” asked
Will.

“No; she didn’t like to set the police upon
the track of the wretched girl; she would
rather put up with her loss. And a sore
loss it was to Lucy,” added Blane. “III
could a poor Bible-woman spare the sove-
reign that had been taken, but that loss
might be made up by hard work or by the
kindness of friends ; but who could restore
the ring, the precious ring of her dead sister ?
How could Lucy hope to find again that
which she had valued so much ?”

“ How, indeed!” exclaimed Will. “To
hunt out one little rng amidst the thousands
and thousands in the endless pawnbrokers



68 QUITE IN EARNEST.

and jewellers’ shops in this big town of
London would be indeed, as the saying is,
like searching for a needle in a haystack !
One would as soon expect to fish up a ring
after throwing it into the Thames! What
did poor Lucy do 2”

“She went to her knees, my boy; she
laid her trouble before God. She and a
friend of hers prayed hard ; they were quite
im earnest, mind ye; their words didn’t go
one way and their thoughts another, like
those of some one that I know of.”

“ But did Lucy ever get her ring back ?
that’s the question,” asked Will, who did
not like the turn the conversation was taking.

“ Be patient awhile, and you shall hear.
No policeman followed that miserable thief ;
justice did not trace out her haunts ; no one
knew but herself in what pawnbroker’s shop
she had pledged the stolen ring : but it was
as if she had been followed by Lucy’s prayer ;
that was like an arrow in her heart; go
where she might, she carried that with her.



QUITE IN EARNEST. 69

What was the surprise of the Bible-woman
when, about three weeks after the robbery,
the girl Emily came back of her own accord,
with a look of sorrow and shame! She told
Lucy that she could neither sleep nor eat,
her conscience was so troubled by her sin.
She had but three and sixpence left out of
the sovereign which she had stolen, but this
she was ready to give back ; and she offered
to take Lucy to the pawnbroker’s shop,
where she might recover her ring.”

“ And Lucy went with the girl?” asked
Will.

“She went with Emily to the place, and
long and weary was her walk before she
reached it at last; for so bent had Emily
been upon hiding her wicked theft, that she
had gone to a shop distant three miles from
the lodging whence she had stolen the ring.
Right glad was Lucy to recover her treasure,
and all the more glad because she felt that
she got it in answer to prayer. While she
was engaged in the pawnbrokeyr’s shop, the



QUITE IN EARNEST.

70

poor shame-faced thief took the opportunity





of slipping away unseen.”





FRORDERE



A TROUBLED CONSCIENCE,

“ Poor soul!” exclaimed Will, “there was

some good left in her, or she would not



QUITE IN EARNEST. 71

have come back at all. Did Lucy never
see her again 2”

“Not for about nine months, I think,”
said old Blane; ‘and then she chanced—no,
that’s not the right word—God willed that
they should meet in the streets. ‘Why do
you turn from me?’ said Lucy, more anxious,
I take it, to recover the poor wandering
soul than she ever had been to recover her
ring. Emily owned that she was ashamed
to see her after having treated her so ill.
She then told Lucy, and after - inquiries
showed that she told the truth, that she had
once gone with five shillings in her hand to
the lodging where she had stolen the money
and the ring, to give them to the Bible-
woman in part payment of what she had
taken. Lucy had, however, left her lodging,
and poor Emily frankly confessed that she
had been rather glad at not being able to
find her, being so much ashamed at the
thought of meeting the woman whom she had
so cruelly wronged. The poor creature had



72 QUITE IN EARNEST.

now only one shilling and fourpence in the
world. She offered Lucy the shilling ; the
fourpence she said she must keep, as it was
her only means of getting food for that night.”

“Well,” exclaimed Will, “if Lucy prayed
quite in earnest, that poor girl repented
quite in earnest, or she would not have tried
three times over to pay back as much as
she could of the money. Did Lucy take
her last shilling ?”

“No; she had not the heart to do that.
She showed the poor penitent girl the way
to her new home, and made her promise to
come and see her. I can’t say—I don’t
know,” added Blane, “whether Emily has
ever steadily begun a new life, and given
herself to her Saviour, but I know that she
has often been prayed for, and that the
Almighty heareth prayer. He who touched
her heart with shame and repentance can
touch it with faith and love. I don’t
despair—not I—of meeting both the Bible-
woman and the poor thief in heaven !”



QUITE IN EARNEST. 73

“ Father,” said Will gravely, “I never
before thought that prayer was so real a
thing ; I never looked for an answer.” -

“Mark those telegraph wires stretching
over the street,” observed Blane, who was
fond of illustrating his ideas by the common
objects around him; “we can’t see the
message that is darted along them quick as
lightning ; but we know that messages are
sent, we know that answers are returned,
though plain folk like you and me cannot
understand how. Now I often think, as I
look at those lines, prayer is like a golden
wire that stretches all the way up to heaven,
and faith sends her messages by it. But
there is one thing which we must always
remember, Will, whether we ask for earthly
blessings or better gifts for our souls, we
must ask all in the name of the Lord Jesus
Christ. It is only for his sake that the
Almighty stoops to listen to the prayers of
poor sinners such as we.”

‘Will sat for several minutes, turning over



74 QUITE IN EARNEST.

in his mind what he had just heard from his
father. Matthew Blane was the first to
speak.

“ And now, my lad,” said he, “you and
I will go together to buy the case which
you want. It may serve to remind you
sometimes of what we have been talking
over this morning. ’Tis well that every
one should form a habit of daily prayer ;
but mere lip-prayer without heart-prayer is
like a body without a soul, it has no more
power for good than a dead corpse has in its
coffin. To pray with power we must pray
with faith, we must pray in the name of the
blessed Saviour ; and whether our words be
many or few, our hearts must be quite in
earnest.”







The Pharisee and the Publican.

PART I.

“* And he spake a parable unto certain which trusted in themse] ves
that they were righteous, and despised others.”——LUKE xviii. 9.

her little girl what appeared like
two piéces of money.

“Oh, this bright shining sovereign, to be
sure ! the other looks dull and old, as if it
had been taken from the dust-hole.”

“ Now take them up in your hands ; you
know that gold is a heavy metal,—weigh





76 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

them, and then tell me which you think the
more precious.”

“ How very light this bright one is! I
do not think that it is a sovereign at all.”

“Tt is not a sovereign ; it is not made of
gold ; a little thin gilding alone gives it so
bright an appearance.”

“ And the other one, mamma ?”

“The other is an old coin, not now used
as money, but valuable notwithstanding, be-
cause it is really gold. Do you remember
anything of which these things remind you,
my Anna ?”

Anna thought for a moment ;—she was
a clever child, and her mother had accus-
tomed her to reflect.

“They remind me that some people ap-
pear good, and are not really so, while others ~
may be better than we think them.”

“Yes, even as we.read in the beautiful
Parable of the self-righteous Pharisee and
the Publican. The Pharisee doubtless de-

ceived others, he also deceived himself; he



THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 77

believed himself to be holy, and little thought
how he appeared in the pure eyes of his
Maker! Heaven preserve you, my child,
from self-righteousness and pride, and teach
you to know your own heart !”

Anna said nothing in reply; but, if the
truth must be told, she thought her mother’s
caution very unnecessary as far as regarded
herself.

That my readers may judge how far it
was so, I will give a short account of the
next Sunday passed by the little girl; and
as we are rather writing about what she
was than what she dil, I must let you into
the secret of her thoughts as well as of her
actions.

No one could look neater than Anna as
- she stood ready to accompany her mother to
divine service in one of the churches in
London. Her hair nicely brushed, her look
quiet and sedate, just what might best be-
come a child upon the Lord’s-day. No one
knew that she thought that she appeared



78 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.,

very nice, and that her mind was a little
running upon her new ribbons.

As she walked towards the church, she
passed near to a poor girl clothed in rags,
barefooted and dirty, who was standing
with a basket of oranges to sell.

“What a wicked little creature that
must be!” exclaimed Anna ; “ nothing could
ever make me break the Fourth Command-
ment in such a dreadful manner !”

“My Anna, let us pray that we be not
led into such temptation,” replied Mrs.
Fairley: then, as she passed by the fruit-
seller, she said softly to her, “ What shall
it profit a man if he gain the whole world,
and lose his own soul ?”

The girl looked sadly after the lady, and
her thin fingers grasped more tightly the
handle of her basket as she reflected on the
words just spoken to her.

“ To lose the soul! Oh, that is a terrible
thought! I remember that text, and where
it comes from. Oh, if the lady only knew



THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN, 79

-iny trials! I stayed at home and sold
nothing last Sunday, because I feared to do
wrong. I went hungry to bed, and my
little brother cried himself to sleep. What
can Ido? Oh! what can I do? God help
me, a miserable sinner !”

At present we will follow the steps of
Anna,

After entering the church and taking her
usual place, she appeared very devoutly en-
gaged in prayer, while all the time the
thought of her heart was, “ How could my
mother speak a word to that wicked girl!
I wonder why the police have not orders to
take such people to prison!” Anna had never
known what it was to want one meal! Her
sins were of a different kind. Riches and
poverty have each their peculiar temptations
(Prov. xxx. 8,9).

I promised that I would let you into the
secret of Anna’s thoughts, but I have’ not
space to tell you one quarter of what passed ©
through her mind during the two hours that



80 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

she remained in church. I should be
ashamed also to put such trifling down ; and
startled indeed would the little Pharisee
have been could she have seen a record of
them before her! There was certainly
very little that was at all like prayers,
though she seemed to repeat earnestly every
petition for pardon, for mercy, and for grace.
She had little idea that she required any of
these blessings,—such people as the orange-
girl might be miserable sinners,—but for
herself, her mind was quite at ease.

So Anna noticed the carving on the
pulpit, and the shape of the windows ; ob-
served the fashion of the bonnets in front
of her ; wondered why the clergyman read
so slowly ; wished that the service were not
so long ; and left church at last, feeling that
she had performed a great duty, and that who-
ever might wander from the straight path to
heaven, she at least was upon the direct road!

Dinner and an amusing Sunday-book
occupied Anna until it was time to prepare



THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 81

for the second service. She attended to
the prayers this time still less than the first,
for she was tired as well as indifferent.
Many a plan for the business and amuse-
ment of the week did Anna devise while
the good clergyman was earnestly trying to
lead sinners to the God whom they had
offended! And yet, could it be believed!
when walking home with a friend, Anna
presumed to find some faults in the preacher
and to express her sorrow that she had not
heard “dear Mr. Haynes, who always, she
felt, did her so much good!” She made
some observations, also, which she thought
clever and solemn, upon hearing of the
sudden death of a neighbour whom she
believed to have been worldly and gay ; she
drew a contrast in her mind between his
character and her own, very decidedly to
her own advantage ; and parted from her
companion with a comfortable. feeling that
she must certainly stand high in the-opinion
of her friend as a girl of singular piety.
(407) 6



82 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

Whose voice was so loud and full in the
evening hymns as Anna’s! She made sweet
melody upon earth, but not such melody
as is loved in heayen. The holy words
upon her lips were not what engaged her
attention,—she was admiring the sound of
her own fine voice, and feeling sure that
others must admire it also.

Anna retired to rest on that Sabbath
evening rather glad, in her heart, that the
solemn day was over, though she would not
for the world have said so. She was pleased
with herself for the way in which she had
observed it; she never. doubted that her
conduct had been acceptable to the Al-
mighty ; and she rather considered herself
as deserving of reward, than in any way
requiring forgiveness. Alas for the blindness
of sinners who thank God that they are
not as other men are!

Have I among my readers one thus blind,
one possessing the spirit of the Pharisee ?
Let him search his heart, his thoughts, and



THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 83

his motives, and honestly examine his life to
see if his religion is the gilding or the gold !

“PART II.

“And the publican, standing afar off, said, God be merciful to me
asinner, I tell you, this man went down to his house justified
rather than the other.” —LukE xviii. 18, 14,

“What shall it profit a man if he gain
the whole world, and lose his own soul ?”
These were the words which sounded in the
ears of Esther, the poor orange-girl, as she
stood, barefoot and ragged, near a church,
with her basket, tempted by hunger to sin,
but with her conscience awakened even by
this short sentence from a passer-by. As
she paused, irresolute and sad, a little bird
flew within a few feet of her, and carried
away acrumb from a spot where a beggar
had taken his early breakfast. This was a
very trifling occurrence, but the little winged
creature preached a sermon to the heart of
the poor girl. It brought back to her mind
a text heard long ago, during the time when



84 _ YHE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

she had attended a Sunday school: ‘“ Behold
the fowls of the air, for they sow not, neither |
do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your
heavenly Father feedeth them: are ye not
much better than they ?”

“ God will take care of me, if I only love
and trust him!” murmured poor Esther.
“Oh, how sinful I was ever to doubt it!
May the Lord forgive me for intending to
do what is so wrong, and have pity upon
me and upon my poor little brother! I
will go home at once and pray for pardon
for my sin.”

So Esther turned from the place with a
broken and contrite heart, and took her
way towards her wretched lodging. She
had to go through a narrow street, in which
there was a small chapel ; but the bells were
silent, because the service had begun, and
there was scarcely a passenger in sight.
Just as Esther was passing the door of the
chapel, a gentleman, walking rapidly, for
he knew that he was late, brushed past her



THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 85

and entered the place. He drew a hymn-
book from his pocket at the moment that he
entered the door. Esther fancied that she
heard a slight chinking sound, turned her
head, and saw a bright crimson purse lying
on the door-step of the chapel. Trembling
she laid her hand upon it, paused, and
glanced round: there was no earthly eye to
behold her. Here was temptation in another
form. The Evil One seemed to whisper,
“This is an answer to your prayer; the
Lord has sent you help; neither you nor
your brother shall starve,—and as for the
money, the rich man will not miss it!”
But poor Esther had not heard in vain the
words of the Lord, ‘ What shall it profit a
man if he gain the whole world, and lose
his own soul?” She resisted the tempta-
tion with the sword of the Spirit—the good
seed had been received into an honest, faith-
ful heart!

Esther, barefoot and miserably clad, dared
not venture into the chapel to restore the

t



86 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

purse. She determined to remain and
watch until its owner should come out, and
give it back without even looking at the
contents. Oh, how many times was she
tempted, during the long two hours, to go
away with her unlawful prize! Once a
policeman ordered her to move on in a stern
tone of command which made the poor girl
tremble. She took up her basket, passed
round the corner of the street, then watched
her opportunity, and returned to her place.
She heard a faint sound of singing from the
chapel ; she thought it very beautiful, and
listened with a mixture of pleasure and fear.
“Oh, while holy, happy beings are singing
in heaven,” murmured Esther, “shall I be
shut out, as [am here?” The tears filled
her eyes, but she looked up towards the
sky: “There is room there even for a poor
sinful creature like me !”

At length the door opened and the con-
gregation began to pour out. With what
scorn some looked, and others with what



THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 87

- pity, upon the miserable Sabbath-breaker,
as they thought her! Patiently Esther
watched till at length she perceived the old
gentleman to whom the purse belonged.
Timidly she approached him ; she could not
catch his eyes—he had no attention to give
to such an object. She ventured very gently
to touch his arm; he started, and looking
angrily at her basket, asked if she were not
ashamed of such godless traffic upon the
Lord’s-day. Silently Esther held up the
purse; it was her only reply, but it was
enough. Too much surprised to speak, the
gentleman took the purse, walked a few
paces and examined its contents ; then hast-
ily returned and asked the orange-girl her
name, and that of the place where she lived.
Esther modestly replied; the old gentleman
nodded his head, put his purse in his pocket,
and walked away. Without a word of
praise—without a farthing of reward—the
poor girl returned to her home ; and through
that long day she and her young brother



838 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

had nothing with which to satisfy their
hunger but a little of the fruit which con-
science forbade them to sell!

But this was the last day that Esther
was ever to know want; the God in whom
she trusted had not forsaken her. The
next morning the old gentleman called at
her lodging, inquired into her case, promised
to put her in the way of earning an honest
livelihood, and kept that promise faithfully.
Her rags were exchanged for good warm’
clothes—her wretched lodging for one re-
spectable and clean. The next Sunday,
when worshippers sought the house of
prayer, Esther no longer stood trembling
without, but joined, heart and soul, in the
song of praise—‘“ Bless the Lord, O my soul:
and all that is within me, bless his holy
name.”





























Clouds and Sunshine.

“The hope of the righteous shall be gladness,”—Prov. x. 28,



Lucy ; there will be no boating for us to-

”

day.

“Tt is not raining one drop,—the grass is
quite dry,” replied Lucy, running for the
twentieth time to the door.

“But the sea-weed that hangs there is
quite soft and damp, and that is a sure sign
ofrain. Only see these black, heavy clouds!”

“Only see that dear little bit of bright



90 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.

blue between them! I think, Priscilla, -
that you are always looking out for clouds.
I never notice them at all till the rain be-
gins to drop!”

“That is because you are a thoughtless,
foolish little thing!” observed her sister,
with a kind of scornful pity.

“Well, I’m glad that I’m not so wise as
you; I’d rather be merry than wise,” was
the laughing Lucy’s reply.

This time, however, it appeared that the
elder sister was the mistaken one. The
patch of blue in the sky, to Lucy’s delight,
became larger and larger; the sun shone
out cheerfully ; and, no longer afraid of the
weather, both girls set out on their walk
towards Ryde. They were there to meet
their uncle, a boatman, who had promised
them a row over the water to Portsmouth,
where he was to show them the docks and
feast them with cakes; and as the girls had
never been to England before, having been
both born and brought up in the Isle of



CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 91

Wight, they had both looked forward to
this expedition for a very long time, though
with different feelings, according to their
different dispositions. Lucy was all delight
at the thought of the pleasure ; Priscilla all
fear lest anything should occur to prevent
their being able to enjoy it.

They made their way over the fields,—
the one mirthful, the other grave. They
shortened part of the distance by passing
along a lane; and a lovely lane it was, all
adorned with wild flowers.

“JT like this path so much!” cried the
happy little Lucy. “Such beautiful plants
grow in the hedges, that were I not in a
very great hurry to get on, I should gather
a splendid nosegay on the way!”

“T do not like this path at all,” replied
her elder sister; “it is so narrow, one is
caught every minute by the thorns.”

“ Ah, Priscilla, you are always looking
out for thorns! I never think of them till
I find myself caught.”



92 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.

“That is because you are a silly, giddy
child!” was Priscilla’s contemptuous reply.

It will be easily seen, from this short
conversation, that however wise Priscilla
might be in the eyes of other people, or in
her own, she was not the most pleasant
companion in the world. She was con-
sidered a very sensible girl, one possessing
reflection beyond her years; and in some
respects she deserved the character. She
was wise in keeping’ clear of evil society ;
she was wise in performing her daily duties,
and in not expecting too much from the
world: but she was not wise in ever casting
a shade of gloom over what Providence in-
tended to be bright; she was not wise in
ever meeting misfortune half way—in al-
ways looking at the dark side of every
event,-and seeming as though she thought
it almost a sin to be happy! In truth, in
these matters, by taking the opposite ex-
treme, Priscilla was just as foolish as her
sister. The one, eager after pleasure, often



CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 93

met with disappointment: the other, fearing
disappointment, scarce knew pleasure at all.

There was the same difference between
them on the subject of religion, in which
both had been carefully instructed. Lucy
was too easily carried away by amusement:
with a warm heart, but a giddy and
thoughtless spirit, she too often, alas! ne-
lected the one thing needful for the pass-
ing diversion of the hour. Priscilla never
forgot her Bible-reading or her prayer ; but
both were too often a mere matter of form.
She would not for any temptation have
worked, bought or sold, on the Sabbath:
but she never considered it a delight.
Priscilla quite put aside the command in
the Bible, Rejoice evermore; and again I
say unto you, Rejoice; while her sister for-
got, in her heedless mirth, that it is also
written, Rejoice with trembling. The one
girl knew too little of the fear of the Lord;
the other was a stranger to his love.

At length the sisters reached the shore,



94 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE,

and saw before them the sparkling waves of
the sea. On the waters large men-of-war
were lying at anchor ;—little boats were
floating on the sunny tide, some moving on
steadily, as their line of oars rose and fell;
others speeding along with graceful motion,
like butterflies spreading their silver wings.
Amongst the many boats which were ply-
ing here and there, and those which were
fastened to the pier, Priscilla and Lucy
vainly searched for the Nautilus, which was
that which belonged to their uncle. As
with anxious looks they proceeded along
the shore, exclamations of impatience burst-
ing from their lips, they were approached
by an old friend of their uncle’s whom they
had seen several times before.

“On the look-out, eh?” said the old
sailor, as he came towards them. “ You'll
not hail the Nautilus to-day. Your uncle
was engaged this morning by a gentleman
to carry him round tw the Undercliff in his
boat; and I suspect that they'll have ugly



CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 95

weather,” he added, turning his weather-
beaten face towards the sea: ‘‘so he asked
me to wait for you here, and tell you why
he could not give you a row over the water;
and, as he thought as how you might be a
little disappointed, he sends you a shilling
a-piece to make all straight.”

Tears burst from the eyes of little Lucy:
she turned aside that the sailor might not
see them. Delighted as she ever was at
the prospect of pleasure, she never could
bear to lose it; and every little disappoint-
ment appeared to her as a real and serious
_ misfortune. Priscilla showed less vexation
at losing her excursion, though she took the
shilling with a discontented air; and her
first words, as she turned to walk back with
her sister, were as unjust as they were un-
grateful to that good Providence that gives
us so much even upon earth to enjoy.

“T knew that it would be so! it always
happens thus !—if one expects a little plea-
sure, disappointment is sure to come !”



26 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.

“ How strange and unkind in my uncle!”
said Lucy, still half crying; “and to think
that these stupid shillings could make up
for the loss of such a delightful treat!”

“We had better walk faster,’ observed
her prudent sister; “your blue bit of sky
is quite disappearing now.”

“And these thorns are very annoying,”
Lucy added fretfully, as, trying too hastily
to free herself from a bramble, she tore a
large hole in her dress.

“Tife seems all full of clouds and of
thorns,” observed Priscilla, in the tone of
one who is conscious of uttering a very wise
saying; “and to hope to find it anything
else is folly only fit for a very little child.
There !—was not that a drop of rain?
Yes! another, and another !—and so large!
That great cloud is going to burst just over
our heads; and, as always happens, there is
no place near where we could take shelter
from a storm.”

“Oh, you are wrong there for once!



CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 97

there is Bertha Fielding’s cottage; it is a
little, a very little out of our way, and I am
sure that the good woman will make us wel-
come.”

Thither ran the two little girls in the
rain, which was now falling thick and fast.
A sudden flash of lightning quickened their
steps, till, heated and breathless, they slack-
ened their pace as they approached the neat
little cot. There was the voice of a woman
singing within,—a feeble, trembling voice,
in which little melody was left; but its
tones sounded earnest, as if coming from
the heart, and from a heart that was cheer-
ful and happy :—

“ Content with this, I ask no more,
But to Thy care the rest resign ;

Sick or in health, or rich or poor,
All shall be well if Thou art mine!”

The girls’ hasty tap silenced the hymn,
and a kind voice bade them come in. The
inside of the cottage was clean and neat,

but its appearance bespoke great poverty.
(407) 7



Full Text
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DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20091128_AAAAIR' PACKAGE 'UF00028326_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-11-28T09:49:02-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:08:08-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300265; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-09T18:24:37-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '3' DFID 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfile0' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00006.txt '
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
'SHA-1' cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
EVENT '2012-05-02T15:02:33-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2012-05-02T14:57:55-04:00'
redup
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfile1' 'sip-files00132.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-05-02T15:00:51-04:00'
describe
'2012-05-02T14:57:56-04:00'
redup
'1039' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKXV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
76ec6342ef1143ca6f9a92c7732f792e
ee3aa4ebe40f174be9fbe5d555f50a2d0c78c544
'2012-05-02T15:00:01-04:00'
describe
'309534' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKXW' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
c930d450c18da087fc83ba82d7923970
90116f6b4a87d2b22b6607c9b5b412776616ccde
'2012-05-02T15:01:00-04:00'
describe
'240802' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKXX' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
f1929363b30fd8de1fa8bde481a9703f
9d33b877df67667904ff7c7f27fc169142e79db2
'2012-05-02T15:02:26-04:00'
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKXY' 'sip-files00001.pro'
5758d2bb20b63950f519bcfd5309c5ec
ae1e57818a914468207a6d2ca9bb05d218676cbb
'2012-05-02T14:59:08-04:00'
describe
'56913' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKXZ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
900cb5b9e5724535253f578786d9d286
77512ea4b280c20eef279fa364cec3d7dea67169
'2012-05-02T14:59:53-04:00'
describe
'7437196' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYA' 'sip-files00001.tif'
9bb85d0afbf32a3e1e783345e1b41acb
d5f826353881cf50fe0e41db1f4b1690e3cf128e
'2012-05-02T15:00:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYB' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2012-05-02T15:03:06-04:00'
describe
'20371' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYC' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
380aab17fd6ce2a0db2deb282e183f66
0fb4c7f8566d956af8d1dd165c4da5660b5d13f4
'2012-05-02T15:02:05-04:00'
describe
'304182' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYD' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
48c814b912f23db124f137b72e49a3e0
517a0491625af614939fbd66f3d9dd927ced8185
'2012-05-02T15:04:09-04:00'
describe
'202038' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYE' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
23147c37ca316b284b10430b7bd5c182
c27bd27ef7b3f9e74929a3dbaf724a99988449d7
'2012-05-02T14:58:37-04:00'
describe
'7067' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYF' 'sip-files00002.pro'
80b97520d78cd004473975340d45901a
b7b4023d76f7f2fccc703f6d345a9462e8c33d7a
'2012-05-02T15:01:09-04:00'
describe
'65745' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYG' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
0227b9386f06fa226fa38df435ad0ce9
80e41127d64ad032a96dd8a3940458001ade394c
'2012-05-02T15:04:20-04:00'
describe
'7311784' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYH' 'sip-files00002.tif'
d67ac991448aab7d84c45d581d2825b9
efd217217abf0eb5f2efecc9b0d26d4fdd95c271
'2012-05-02T14:59:54-04:00'
describe
'545' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYI' 'sip-files00002.txt'
4a9c6c36bd075e4eee7e640d38d52e7a
21fb4beeb633ebe61b8ca08e756c49a6289f5653
'2012-05-02T14:59:11-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'25627' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYJ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
e53cd67dbea386477b541fc14e37e761
86fdde34c055c7bdd533f9c8953cd18689bac9aa
'2012-05-02T15:00:25-04:00'
describe
'245897' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYK' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
1766ba4dd141be8f227915dfe074e055
6ce80cc4b067a19059006dc494bfb508ce1c2336
'2012-05-02T14:59:17-04:00'
describe
'91293' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYL' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
c15e743bfbd2bca8134fd6233fba42da
f9efe9299a18ca4341663db8ad1ddfd73920b7ba
'2012-05-02T14:59:40-04:00'
describe
'28474' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYM' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
a7b9259391443c8954aa7b0ebf92c6b0
9574f12be489148a78f103221cedbc6b0dd26da8
'2012-05-02T15:00:37-04:00'
describe
'1976264' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYN' 'sip-files00005.tif'
342fc6e96ed55d829afe9c4e199df7f0
425ec9560217ac146eae6f91d08b63eb5131d818
'2012-05-02T15:03:19-04:00'
describe
'136' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYO' 'sip-files00005.txt'
e7023abd61a7af9ea9b0696d1164808c
a09be221e9f7d0b6f339b42ea6d524afe29e55d4
describe
Invalid character
'14442' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYP' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
6912253db1e482be4652b0f56e6f002a
153dcf64d02b54634c50ee8723d6508fcbb9c394
'2012-05-02T15:00:18-04:00'
describe
'243456' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYQ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
b276c333007b1bed9224f5918e193f33
5b841e462a9aa0c8d823c1553414cecd905cc623
'2012-05-02T15:00:00-04:00'
describe
'77313' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYR' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
d9adc3be869e1f330e887d7b3cf3c5b7
b4c56f807a676ba12eb797aed6626bde92499771
'2012-05-02T15:02:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYS' 'sip-files00006.pro'
55f3745a452f656274bb0734ec8f6347
791a5815059873681710e9d1b2706682cf40ba9f
'2012-05-02T14:59:48-04:00'
describe
'22018' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYT' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
356f75c16d392b5031b1813cf55e3a4d
9f0cfc6ca05114a5160c84d903fa905f3b9d47da
'2012-05-02T15:02:30-04:00'
describe
'1956072' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYU' 'sip-files00006.tif'
91035b6386cb4ff7f65febb1b89b2c7a
9d7713ea1b9fdc1e8189fe40312a4fc963e646b7
'2012-05-02T14:59:56-04:00'
describe
'11674' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYV' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
8cccb4525d60d85c0c3d1ec3a240a695
9618997529a430d3001464874babe1e62dff96a5
'2012-05-02T15:00:35-04:00'
describe
'254563' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYW' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
37e763f5e9f9aa2d8273dca038c7c724
f2f658b6522d5cdcc31f3e65992b124a7e0fce44
describe
'231371' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYX' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
6aa66e5e22d19247592685b385c5a9c3
8d8d0c3c0ef97791674b70c75b71005941815b69
'2012-05-02T14:59:01-04:00'
describe
'2203' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
a0c5496057dbf690739d11535d7ad4d6
3be4eae519869c6039ac82c83b34f71e2955bc18
describe
'64526' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKYZ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
eeaa9df6c2d5cd64b7a9585097db6649
ec950c41a2f9972d1d35dd1fab15cfa7ddc39297
'2012-05-02T15:02:04-04:00'
describe
'6122088' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZA' 'sip-files00008.tif'
577ba8986549a6358d809134b55270db
fb1a20d7b02e9830e64eb6585bd4790dce8a9410
'2012-05-02T15:00:56-04:00'
describe
'24287' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZB' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
6c799cb8dede376eb1a811caeb8b5334
5b3fdd6be4b9111162982ea75c2b52d6fb2b4142
'2012-05-02T15:03:17-04:00'
describe
'252709' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZC' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
286bb0711d5a1e3baa3405fb661aa1f0
b59e6d8fd1328bf0bf2fd57be0a53978b1816faa
'2012-05-02T15:00:04-04:00'
describe
'149030' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZD' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
adec3c9aaf9393a50ecafd559f9f095d
3ddf9ead228c576a2f9b5321561fe49faccf7125
'2012-05-02T14:58:58-04:00'
describe
'720' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZE' 'sip-files00009.pro'
d57126946bb4fc22b077eb5a9a3533e5
a738188027f3694f3d2c6e14ae160559d1de00d0
describe
'47484' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZF' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
40cfdd4ad3c374fdb3250011b60ef1f9
eee8c81c71290f86f7188b8b72c47137a995c4b9
'2012-05-02T14:58:52-04:00'
describe
'6076192' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZG' 'sip-files00009.tif'
657c8e900e268a1dd990c4d5622773c2
6e697096b89109dcc62709341e2302afb407396f
'2012-05-02T15:01:18-04:00'
describe
'76' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZH' 'sip-files00009.txt'
8f78b09c79a452d0a4e92b3f6dfb4d3f
794e37b38d7dd16e45a447fb314c34ef05bafe98
'2012-05-02T14:58:59-04:00'
describe
'20792' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZI' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c859125e7f406ed59187d3fc3b387c77
83331cb503f967a692c543b2f9e6340e3adbae1c
'2012-05-02T15:00:03-04:00'
describe
'252799' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f1c175921e8d23b4c8c8551177c921dc
e65cbed33471393ca3ce84b4088ea0ab6f391b2e
'2012-05-02T15:03:05-04:00'
describe
'152718' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZK' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
b36b5e0fec67da1e57b9758d94ba35ab
e7de0e22cdfd8906768c06b3ff56c19e18249b58
'2012-05-02T15:04:26-04:00'
describe
'6279' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZL' 'sip-files00011.pro'
95ce2724e808f5745a366aa2b4433375
30189f81d8c50bb54c00f980c0f3a0190103e9de
'2012-05-02T14:58:24-04:00'
describe
'48953' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
9729c12c1ac806aa8cfbb133806990c9
c3e451dcfe66e6fa05427813a125aec80939db72
'2012-05-02T15:01:14-04:00'
describe
'2034028' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZN' 'sip-files00011.tif'
452470ed312df5d84e1f8ff7e669c3e3
5b4ea8eedc38bec0f77694c92ebeeea6e56f7a93
'2012-05-02T15:01:19-04:00'
describe
'474' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZO' 'sip-files00011.txt'
25d5fd025595aa80d41f086f82e07341
559f7da34f33ba3b10fa4504235d6e0dcb041ebb
'2012-05-02T14:58:27-04:00'
describe
'21365' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZP' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
e14901433bafe939110bb4049b20e52e
6e31ee120b9da6949e1667638fd5e4a8a7c2fa6c
describe
'103260' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZQ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
03b2d90d6044be7376d3272d1224f320
f1c52bfcffcc4eb50779852bedbe920d1fe0d0f5
'2012-05-02T15:02:59-04:00'
describe
'10169' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZR' 'sip-files00013.pro'
fc1f6a67c73373af7bc22903a6d1a1f6
211d33066def645b0f0cfc8ea86ee14580aa1c12
'2012-05-02T14:59:16-04:00'
describe
'33288' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZS' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
f64fe5bba8919a49382d79db02acb008
2bc5f80681f7a7f44687e197a12590efd74aa64c
describe
'2054980' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZT' 'sip-files00013.tif'
57193e330ae45921f481757825dd52b8
c746175e43c2f25d1c1c2cf9feed514eee0aced1
'2012-05-02T14:58:16-04:00'
describe
'497' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZU' 'sip-files00013.txt'
76191009268543cefb83d2e25ee2a2cb
07e4e9dc603392363a1549185ee4afcd307819fa
describe
'15648' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
920072a0a12ee0e6287ff6fc434fdb44
c2bedf66f8c3262b9fe1092f3de5c53d6b9e286c
'2012-05-02T14:58:18-04:00'
describe
'163489' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZW' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a55b7e8e5f40c5532d7329016e42fc88
a0d4507cf886fe5d70ea65a649e44b4a0e60d20d
'2012-05-02T14:59:44-04:00'
describe
'27486' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZX' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
8c30d0ebaf0365f7f4513d862b3c9217
c480689bccaa7b8527fdb338850e7b07c7189841
'2012-05-02T15:03:18-04:00'
describe
'305' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZY' 'sip-files00014.pro'
38aad4a7a010d21aac1bc3da2b04ae7f
a9558ede4f93af00c6ddb8f1e607f854c0971d2d
'2012-05-02T15:00:21-04:00'
describe
'19878' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABKZZ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
08e521c3687fb22c1f2ac4e3119091d8
9cba52ffe20426e2a2643b7b957d6d237667119a
'2012-05-02T15:03:31-04:00'
describe
'1973104' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1606e94f48968c1e74141990366b5343
505e45e3a214a741a4295af11dd7b2077ca93970
'2012-05-02T14:59:06-04:00'
describe
'107' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
e4d945e4255cb23d12bf23b0b9f9a2df
124c42e88c50ee5f2f4301e386e7cd5decefa8fa
'2012-05-02T14:59:47-04:00'
describe
'18272' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAC' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
50d3680c426ac788b4a3a91a7b73bfb8
94af033777477261890489f7f6c830edcd91b77f
'2012-05-02T15:00:49-04:00'
describe
'256020' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d4d05bda87accdcb7c473393aee20113
5f92e4e85cb6f25bd3b407fa5e56f7dcdec2dcdc
'2012-05-02T15:01:05-04:00'
describe
'167171' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c7e9bfc4116b0e162a57e69f7bd35972
8a7a75b97e5ad7caab2b5256b5a3d92cf35f5a8e
'2012-05-02T15:03:16-04:00'
describe
'18131' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
b981b8032b41102ea5d02d8afde83262
e43982403c093b738a49c8372e7e56fec8c6cd7e
'2012-05-02T14:58:01-04:00'
describe
'2070740' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAG' 'sip-files00015.tif'
bdd534a066b84365b3d4d852655cd5d3
486f20311afee26aab305abe350d00c95473776b
'2012-05-02T14:59:07-04:00'
describe
'790' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAH' 'sip-files00015.txt'
353be0f9d16958dde334421666342975
012883a926c5a75da25813f7e1a3d347e7472955
'2012-05-02T15:02:22-04:00'
describe
'33235' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAI' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
0682c55979199f836ab6e56be68b9769
405334a004633d32625db10544200a139baab26a
'2012-05-02T14:59:32-04:00'
describe
'257133' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAJ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
d382e5405aad008e98df18a173bcb6a2
b166bf925d5a3d89e42f7e22daa91bd82ef5f640
'2012-05-02T15:03:50-04:00'
describe
'215282' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAK' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
ef0f3f60d3649ab592e57caf7e344193
c17dad4728ffae8bd20db95c2791909005328ddc
'2012-05-02T15:04:37-04:00'
describe
'24224' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAL' 'sip-files00016.pro'
1157b9bd99691b8c740a8f7eba8c4cf8
06e871b61215448ccd098ca67af2b2839e0a8a10
'2012-05-02T15:00:45-04:00'
describe
'78173' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAM' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
b4377cd54add35c819c89162a8d9cb77
5295970a9df8164f891c44bef2a1a76bf980e20f
'2012-05-02T15:01:13-04:00'
describe
'2070304' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAN' 'sip-files00016.tif'
76b73ae6b7a2e506f215021f66cd0cf9
5dc07f492429797160acdaea4c76293e26d062af
'2012-05-02T15:03:52-04:00'
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAO' 'sip-files00016.txt'
c701a64abf94cadb278b833d474f2f30
aaecf58550f8c43ccd1878680323a272208c683b
'2012-05-02T15:00:27-04:00'
describe
'29669' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAP' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
c2553635bdf8e798f48a951c7d4ac8cd
4b2fd803cfd4b46d1519149a151c524830bac30e
'2012-05-02T15:01:23-04:00'
describe
'253810' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAQ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
ca43d235730364831f62bd6e83191ffa
f0b101f0671cb5675b062dbb469e6ea82735703b
'2012-05-02T14:58:14-04:00'
describe
'218240' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAR' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
3a339062cdae11085b361b2458f60f35
6da8137911abe50d9bebe1596cd14cb2995c7803
'2012-05-02T15:02:39-04:00'
describe
'24951' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAS' 'sip-files00017.pro'
186ca01707b9362b8d964a46e5db067a
82ac666e4be97e344efb92992b4d6cbd4e0f46e5
'2012-05-02T14:59:03-04:00'
describe
'81566' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAT' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
2de6e7edb2e2e9a100c9528beaa904f7
e611524bd9bd9642f9f6463b8ac00300803d9b2b
'2012-05-02T14:58:07-04:00'
describe
'2043880' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAU' 'sip-files00017.tif'
10016458c66e7ee02cb08925cead76e6
3dc39f55ec918c89c391dccbf684c0dc21acc4a8
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAV' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a4dd59540e0dc42eae42910a406ddf7d
0a569ffe000c3430a32f2bf0e4bb8c59c78be674
'2012-05-02T15:00:59-04:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAW' 'sip-files00005.pro'
d6d12d6d3945ef076b237026f6d1015b
327fcbdf227037f112d6e9facc1810eb31308a64
'2012-05-02T14:58:08-04:00'
describe
'175' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAX' 'sip-files00008.txt'
c906225bfa0f354ddf8dbecda3794fb9
0dae90acf78a3fd13415cbff0ab683f7726f5444
'2012-05-02T15:03:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'255566' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAY' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
88f1646edd0d0c47f6d0e78207abf5c5
c7683a700f17a786cf3e1a8c29e4d98c373ce924
'2012-05-02T14:59:52-04:00'
describe
'66136' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLAZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f05cb0b3e408f706024cbde818a94492
647517c4f64570af0e96faf3374bb2e481be701b
'2012-05-02T14:59:31-04:00'
describe
'217793' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBA' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
5de0ccfd735a872b984626e6279880ae
c6e6b331fbc9944fd19f9916ee0c027eba9c6e36
'2012-05-02T14:59:41-04:00'
describe
'2054992' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
02292515e5811f0db9477fd07e9fa538
3f3f2ee7c8f750b49a17667c42b83b9b4019d202
describe
'30209' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBC' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
0b30ffac8e42c25a1f345e1caa55059d
dd9560b220a1586f23586a71d87e15febf2b450f
'2012-05-02T15:02:34-04:00'
describe
'24662' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBD' 'sip-files00027.pro'
1ad81ed018bf47052e58890dbb13a115
c60842dbb809e9f2954b46dc961af1878e806eca
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBE' 'sip-files00029.txt'
34ea2dbcc7c1df5be1de0ed419468ff6
3e37d1ddee733c5dbde8ec405f10ec004d07dfb9
describe
'246517' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBF' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
ed86e80aeba376b66ac9121e686c7dfe
68e6a18840394147e1fdb0f7458b056da7f0b7ce
'2012-05-02T14:59:20-04:00'
describe
'79129' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
53789f92c82c853873ae7cca41fadc85
2e40e2d383327a96a4376ab238edab74a28330e7
'2012-05-02T15:00:13-04:00'
describe
'189922' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
dba0657e780c851aa8807b5fc30a2c8b
aa7961c95fad9f80b4b1de88e00271f6ee552160
describe
'2059972' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBI' 'sip-files00041.tif'
16f482e9add86d030d29c889bdc676fc
6487228fcb81246241cd64c8c6ae2952f59217c7
'2012-05-02T14:58:25-04:00'
describe
'36001' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBJ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
3a845f80dd18905a88b72c711df0a47b
fe81dd89895dce8749a463c91ff8233c73ea4e72
'2012-05-02T14:59:51-04:00'
describe
'25108' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
19a40103371864ba22af5f3b24f68d8d
af8f9e3f71af44dfe6e1eaf4160d945f614a8ce3
'2012-05-02T14:59:04-04:00'
describe
'30301' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBL' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
fb33d7a7d5942eea77dc64674a896cb8
2a2c29c9720a58c16208c1068c7195132d432b1d
'2012-05-02T14:59:24-04:00'
describe
'258096' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBM' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
eaa49e8c2bb1fa39f242b88e1d936f46
618f4a577bbf5ef595d8234666cb5638cedd41b0
'2012-05-02T14:58:22-04:00'
describe
'223877' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
0e21a227b3dcf6861a9e596a37623097
d10eea76ca5f0938da0c8438ca18a0a003a84014
'2012-05-02T14:58:30-04:00'
describe
'26189' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBO' 'sip-files00018.pro'
19e9e39461cc7d49299dd1e022449d7f
27c9fc26401d704f8a179e7e786a4158b2ea4949
describe
'79658' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
6bdc25733c50216c234bc570f82cf467
ef98fe173656c15554fb235eb0115f0ae0d00d32
'2012-05-02T15:00:06-04:00'
describe
'2077984' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBQ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
2114907fa5d67a6465d8d4efe9d2a666
b45e5068ebfc7ae80896cc6b11db2c3f2be20731
'2012-05-02T14:58:00-04:00'
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBR' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ce9d1c55564c13c8d8a45cf82fe3b0cc
16c20bce2e4770d6b977623f5454eeefd2af69be
describe
'30057' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBS' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
45ca8995cfb109244afaf255d84a38e4
904d911d587ebb9f5349cac05955abf71ba330b0
'2012-05-02T14:59:58-04:00'
describe
'254811' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBT' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f3499dd286d6c4382f4f861ca08b81ef
b67320930022d542aacb4e751ef316429f07dd61
'2012-05-02T15:00:32-04:00'
describe
'220240' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
18ab3e34a2fc95712476c234f1151c1d
ee80a733f00bc84eed2effdf300bc12bac1a2b5e
describe
'24746' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBV' 'sip-files00019.pro'
758023346e6fca33b3f84bd6b7b9be7c
130d41159a510ea0881568a7619ac8e3dac6f43f
'2012-05-02T14:58:40-04:00'
describe
'79152' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
75440c323796621a779bdafe38a24fc9
2f378290ae2d8bb2240152bd0fe1185331eb7bf6
'2012-05-02T14:59:21-04:00'
describe
'2051648' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
14e108961a6c99aca055f5b986a0d209
009bb9a62e7a3e1395ba81db93f071dc78c51899
'2012-05-02T15:00:16-04:00'
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
35bbec35d8318e93ec48d7668a669166
cbdfa304e66bae69f98bf084efea4dc79cefa20e
'2012-05-02T14:58:50-04:00'
describe
'29629' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLBZ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
13c38a6b14ec494bcfc366f8053602ba
38b216bb6c5d8f3faa9c3d173af318f0afe683bb
describe
'253505' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
65da55a8f56e67eefb8585aa15117a62
8a3805b4f7fb1ecdb4f5329413d0a956a067f5f9
describe
'24074' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCB' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b9cec147f85f7130722b6e90b85f0ef6
e43bcea5c80e6e5a0b656f945b28d734dc0ccac0
'2012-05-02T15:03:24-04:00'
describe
'78501' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCC' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
481cd82fd126b3ddefe2b5c92f8af9d4
a59d8a41ed1e3eb65283dd5915285377cfac0cea
'2012-05-02T15:02:09-04:00'
describe
'2041252' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCD' 'sip-files00020.tif'
49633b605b63b4d5c5bcf0e142f01dea
40e4882d145dc11aa5dbaf1b40a8202ed48c6a45
'2012-05-02T15:00:15-04:00'
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCE' 'sip-files00020.txt'
ae6c5bec3300758f41b7878cc66c8a88
feb9af913b2a6f4d31f3b9b0078fcfd217275edd
'2012-05-02T14:59:14-04:00'
describe
'29273' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCF' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
f25fd0b0881c51e6d699bfaf7c2d179c
4774560d702a6de83cc9c5c64cfde69fd7ad05b2
'2012-05-02T14:58:36-04:00'
describe
'255254' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
df4fac133a87d2fdcd864fecfe170420
e245b6da0944204cbb6503d5bd596fc1f9133fe9
describe
'221716' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
a5236a8f398ca03a40b31a3a638bf659
8abcfbf54255e58d52a02cd9101b84866fc69bec
'2012-05-02T14:59:34-04:00'
describe
'25440' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCI' 'sip-files00021.pro'
b26a634dfdb2c290ab1262070f3ecdad
4ffb692eab3c4c2962aa69dd0b9c3386397f5857
'2012-05-02T14:58:23-04:00'
describe
'78947' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCJ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
464b7103bbd85dfe629d0ce483bc1a7e
10b5f648b0e8eb22440c405dab0fae16b0832633
describe
'2055412' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
fec5fecd53a4cbeaf36aaf012ef24596
e3fd49958c0ac4528d8d408349a5a288b99ed72f
'2012-05-02T14:58:47-04:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCL' 'sip-files00021.txt'
608992257a07702af8fb90cc407d55ec
3a5111cb04b9ea39a707ea617fdd9843073d90e3
'2012-05-02T14:59:15-04:00'
describe
'29276' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCM' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
27333c1e6f6176a0c8e2945ad72edc58
a3ee90c780bd41fd6ff1986a009cdc00ace9fc61
describe
'255197' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCN' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
2616ceb84cfdcca5a4a966fe71b3551c
f3c64b4f398af82fe7f76b3c04dd5db880891f75
'2012-05-02T14:58:15-04:00'
describe
'233671' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCO' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
18f8aa6863807662f998ef7e54adf231
2058fe07a64bbef9647add3f7e2ae36564b2f2d3
'2012-05-02T14:58:34-04:00'
describe
'25205' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCP' 'sip-files00022.pro'
6ad06aa31a9018dc8281154fdb0c6004
62024a2572dda0580af01664b71307640c7d43ed
'2012-05-02T15:00:46-04:00'
describe
'81880' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCQ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
fa217dc298f5f18d3f4cd66474085e86
4015232725339fc5b9ea53f5aebbb477859ada6a
'2012-05-02T14:59:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCR' 'sip-files00022.txt'
72bdcdb2ea3ba3fd7d03ac5a1c2094db
56645ee87edd678931b4ec78bffbf5d774de1292
'2012-05-02T15:01:16-04:00'
describe
'29812' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCS' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
a9061c36bb42dd3a449feb021b6bd85c
41ac7ad7ec8411311751824e7b4b39c2f32d61af
'2012-05-02T15:04:12-04:00'
describe
'259815' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCT' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
bcebb4704398addacb0731d66bf9f9ba
2ec2f2b978c2b06428580f25f1f158a272852ee3
'2012-05-02T15:04:19-04:00'
describe
'220653' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCU' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
f7a4636c5cea0a7c110b774dd8a57dcf
1621cfdbc2a3e7df58abeb0ef6c9ccf42aa747fb
describe
'24841' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCV' 'sip-files00023.pro'
62b0a30ee87fa9227eaa5797321aaad3
4544e37db3b03fd867f6d3584d83c57d88e10623
describe
'78767' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
e73c027aa1a87cbdf5283ba2d9faf72b
cf856e48f78667de0f7fdc89b52fc68e12e43010
'2012-05-02T15:03:56-04:00'
describe
'2091476' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCX' 'sip-files00023.tif'
d031787c8240346e44fa5dc66293bca1
30c1b3de6fd625b6ee3d79821119968ac7db503a
'2012-05-02T15:02:42-04:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
1fdc9cbcc5ce1ca50c984cd4c3d11231
34591f55c9a62dcb49d0249cc627d683a69684af
'2012-05-02T14:58:33-04:00'
describe
'29406' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLCZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
2c889384eb38d026501a7582c8fe27dd
3325f7f9f9ce23e27654a10b414e1e7f4f964f50
'2012-05-02T15:01:06-04:00'
describe
'258041' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e2aab869a6c229c9de2972777525a56b
b1cdcd2f2369bdf5cb0482e11c8169d85a77c5a7
describe
'220828' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d711d074ae031b202e5e24d55992fd86
0d7f7414fbd1363e7c865f320019e908ea75a463
'2012-05-02T15:03:42-04:00'
describe
'24925' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDC' 'sip-files00024.pro'
a2f48cc759d448984f6f9163aa3d3bf7
fdc0b22e3bbde112dc661006ce1e6a18e3e947dd
'2012-05-02T14:59:23-04:00'
describe
'80804' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDD' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
eff3b53f884294d12bbbe152d8663d98
9a79b1de62de45ce5aa6c062830c22dfbd88549f
'2012-05-02T15:00:42-04:00'
describe
'2078264' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDE' 'sip-files00024.tif'
880a0d88428ce73235aba9dcb3ca0bc4
fba403ac3da436e05e95ea2da8ffff274a69b06d
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
362fb837ac35d0691d5b1ec8485c9217
764d4d92b687e287583f0b847e0b28a186755e43
'2012-05-02T14:59:13-04:00'
describe
'256563' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
e79e38234c66195990079e450e8331f7
c360be586e7d7914e7564de65309b310a0b7e941
'2012-05-02T15:00:22-04:00'
describe
'226554' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
40bda811ba64894b370df116f420c341
601322722131b2e35144983dd8b94c6ce84a957d
'2012-05-02T14:59:02-04:00'
describe
'25250' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
f0b57838c60f6a27c452fd2217900cfb
8f890084446626cca49c06eade4aa79777c47c5d
describe
'82821' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
cdf3cd5f4c1583be659be69488f847e4
e1cb896fc3982edaa3d1d2e5e9a5f9d526a0fad4
'2012-05-02T15:00:14-04:00'
describe
'2066152' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
dcfa49a68480b441e51b8e7f8ffaec75
8b31a6b3e869d077fb44b5c8adb86607e7b5ba65
'2012-05-02T15:04:04-04:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDL' 'sip-files00025.txt'
b428ea276e9fbb9b8ac6994ab96c3b08
df42a4ac17c6cd6d4493a163c2bafb9508864520
'2012-05-02T15:01:27-04:00'
describe
'30703' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDM' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
44dc8596389b46ad1a81487ef0497d9f
3a0f6120640766d63cffb6a6003ac2baa1be296f
'2012-05-02T15:04:32-04:00'
describe
'246379' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
4a0df3b19f0edc6e65abba40b1ccf876
49d326506cf4ff0f1f1dd3f8a4e02f370c7bbae7
'2012-05-02T14:59:36-04:00'
describe
'220768' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
6153353ea42592ac1888307bab175609
76365ec55aff3bb3f3744ce6784afc58498abcd1
'2012-05-02T15:03:12-04:00'
describe
'25132' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDP' 'sip-files00026.pro'
a48ca34b8d970ced35aa44dbf11effe3
676b08838a0d8e65a249f72e0c23bdb4e04f8084
'2012-05-02T15:00:31-04:00'
describe
'80217' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
6c9c0208d83fc1094423f2527603dd33
121fb1abd660c9083e26d5803d357e527c19e175
'2012-05-02T14:59:43-04:00'
describe
'1984880' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDR' 'sip-files00026.tif'
2d24bc003233618f7da6231826a8b623
ab575b574230730cd2d17a7e0182066d9ba7c7f0
'2012-05-02T14:58:39-04:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDS' 'sip-files00026.txt'
70945acb3a0679c8bbf2b66f5791b56c
0b0548eda19b3d868b501e533bc63f9de0ef1cfd
'2012-05-02T15:02:24-04:00'
describe
'31412' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDT' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
d90f133ca00462cb4466eacae263c338
5585724fc96852c528c4db453a584f64d270f61d
'2012-05-02T14:59:39-04:00'
describe
'252459' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDU' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
857b4f89bfd15baa0bd31f8527cfdb74
0cb565f880ac67b81f7316a8afd6e2d82e306d20
'2012-05-02T15:02:12-04:00'
describe
'218385' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6e5b3603816840dc33a8f1ebe07d5e99
ef475245f2a1cd51b80cb490f78482f18c685190
describe
'79421' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDW' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
307e352cddaa6024170a2aa94522219b
172f92cf1b402bd5abf912081683d3716e3a4f03
describe
'2033224' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDX' 'sip-files00027.tif'
b6b91004e5309be919532ac8520815e6
450e83b7027bb767ae22d4b248676417734c86a1
'2012-05-02T14:59:18-04:00'
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDY' 'sip-files00027.txt'
dfa065d0013842c82f8cfaa235857410
129460dcf833f88e08eee178452f6ea6283b4958
'2012-05-02T14:58:26-04:00'
describe
'30232' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLDZ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
6f062204ae4f38012f85af908c5ff67e
4ff8945f9f8926288a4fdfc34f5d01a8ba284edd
describe
'248175' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEA' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
f2297eda5f7232bb5480abff861b57fd
9d0453298b03f59cde62e3d6d990ba0b876e9d2c
'2012-05-02T15:01:20-04:00'
describe
'222571' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEB' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
df19bd1df3a7ded8b0366f8511170670
93bd057b143d353a030cfa84717df252bf79dbe0
'2012-05-02T15:00:33-04:00'
describe
'24108' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEC' 'sip-files00028.pro'
c576d6d175770dc1a692bfc84457cc59
79512fee3fc66350fe9f48c232afd435c91be3d6
describe
'81259' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLED' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
be902a473082bb20e514499d71c234d2
30fb83f78a79213ff2df517505bf6372ef193c5c
describe
'1999084' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEE' 'sip-files00028.tif'
31880df9306c6d2da715d13a4a0e7f9e
61c23cb5445bf0abb9713f01bbd7c25d6300b865
'2012-05-02T15:04:11-04:00'
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEF' 'sip-files00028.txt'
747ed84eb6147aa0fb03bb64a563b3bf
ff17c0ff0ee8c7b14fe800593c834e4486e9550a
'2012-05-02T15:02:47-04:00'
describe
'30990' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEG' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
2d4288c5471db19ffffca213b557ae1c
02a31cef79342330c3a7327caaa8cd931e8a70e4
'2012-05-02T15:00:41-04:00'
describe
'253816' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEH' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
04893f760e5ed06556205956f5e094cf
b852528baac97a3ecdd1866a8c1bcba70010c3a4
describe
'210745' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEI' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
a04907382fc50e27f963d4831e0d5de7
c936bc4f453c61d752779f357c68a9790a22bb94
describe
'24366' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEJ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
75280c1b40e21748ef0d1e9ab5e1fdf7
783fb8fdcd157457d14227103cff569789f8ab70
'2012-05-02T15:04:33-04:00'
describe
'77960' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEK' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
673f59bd793013a152a00fcf7fb7479b
16f11d8ffb6956265949a314508469d0a9d6c341
describe
'2043900' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEL' 'sip-files00029.tif'
4b441861d4d73db76085288d214e3388
c13bfd14b04759e291edb125b5249105140d8eb6
describe
'29969' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEM' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
ef503c2d65dbceca87f680b3d437ca45
19160d3d7a7d6c6a6d374732f1f9eb2820ebd751
describe
'251765' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEN' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
8dd406f4535482bb0be438d3cb699388
5fe5c02904ff563196c2319c16f7ba0eb5892d5a
'2012-05-02T15:04:18-04:00'
describe
'219722' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEO' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
3a4fbe3b672cc43232778b7305a9cb67
9461a32f64b07688bc4355782ab783a7abe58a8b
'2012-05-02T14:58:57-04:00'
describe
'24318' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEP' 'sip-files00030.pro'
9321f2d4117d3ae09edb38c4b0968864
c83d4969a4bb3f0d92d9b9b352a919e538cdf942
describe
'79006' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEQ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
484f43ccdeac67aed1a5387aa9545d66
2e1bdd45b5fac0c6595165a0905b8833f8e94dd2
'2012-05-02T14:58:20-04:00'
describe
'2027296' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLER' 'sip-files00030.tif'
aa6d9af37007fa3fb0dba1627ba75884
0a177b35a7cbcac43aa3eca1ad37e01b159383de
'2012-05-02T15:04:34-04:00'
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLES' 'sip-files00030.txt'
aefb36be3c8d0c6680db9e1dce01e4aa
13007bf13d6c701f3c1a3dacbb13bc6b21e9f30f
'2012-05-02T14:58:05-04:00'
describe
'29643' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLET' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
be9e980dbd1592c3b09de40ca38b26cb
e6e98554201d93ed3505da57ef6f4c086fd27cd2
'2012-05-02T15:00:11-04:00'
describe
'250058' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEU' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
ce2b819d6ce7a6f3df39396a3a016364
4e9a5ade186accb7265d86f28f1b832ea0379b3c
describe
'219193' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEV' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
21e8a1d8eca6a6d49e0d69d39d224439
15cb4565ea7079cdff8f949d2095bed8dd258e90
'2012-05-02T15:02:14-04:00'
describe
'24911' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEW' 'sip-files00031.pro'
0cb1ddb1fc5dbbf71b626f2d0d471a51
ede54e526bddd8a63e9d073b975a0108412a5042
describe
'80230' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEX' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
8fe5cacaba80f94684f1df07ba350cfa
ab4d4737aa0d5353964ffc4193ce144c8ce15334
'2012-05-02T14:58:17-04:00'
describe
'2013620' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEY' 'sip-files00031.tif'
32eca60df5251b65f4163012e2e680f9
3aba6e62380a3fa9e8a0cb150cdd423dc1acfc7c
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLEZ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
242e3872beaaa0163a2f593903117900
283f6caa7244d28154e2cd601062a196a8e63d68
'2012-05-02T15:01:10-04:00'
describe
'30037' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFA' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
5b63ab02aea0e1b209a030915201a1ab
97225a4b2be2e5d5c5abcdcc367ae47a42cb9070
'2012-05-02T14:59:42-04:00'
describe
'230930' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFB' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
264601ea6066ca9bb6e55eb609bc76df
3f3add1a96b3799f62690a8aacda9d2c0805635d
'2012-05-02T15:00:05-04:00'
describe
'25187' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFC' 'sip-files00032.pro'
609848f90efea8410d832310d06f1ecf
c23f8fb3e454a8756c88a6be07d8e062443d2aa4
'2012-05-02T15:02:07-04:00'
describe
'81739' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFD' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
ab14e95bc4705fdb5aa252bfb8575f6f
05877f4cd7f2cd285d46aa895652d2be1cc0ff3b
'2012-05-02T14:58:28-04:00'
describe
'1986340' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFE' 'sip-files00032.tif'
9d507c10ce010d4206695c5dbcbe01f3
ac6feeda1622929a69ce5062a31a91c54393c023
'2012-05-02T15:00:52-04:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFF' 'sip-files00032.txt'
6ba49c5d58fff173078c5cfbf6a4931b
c2c6fec00e05dc118c8c4b842301810cea07e13e
'2012-05-02T14:58:45-04:00'
describe
'30545' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFG' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
266081f53f43ec4f941a5874176241ee
6df991db1cc908f2479d636cf8f12e7f7cacb524
'2012-05-02T14:58:09-04:00'
describe
'253889' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFH' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
e4a135ca595d9bbfff22e10a0c5d7c62
48f5e77ab54d75d6c5f421e2ada809445ce9db39
describe
'221413' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFI' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
d4cecfccc4f23e7b182de5b1da2ec218
cb983b2b4b91f3ad570f4930f81696f71a3e7882
'2012-05-02T14:59:22-04:00'
describe
'25488' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFJ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
118ae00b1386f1488c9996bb5804bc5d
26bc5f80208c651a13035a009cbcffe9330f8e66
'2012-05-02T15:03:40-04:00'
describe
'80985' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFK' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
377826d71d70b64d84a51b59abed8985
547ddbba0f2f73c4d339480441001028a6cbf8e4
'2012-05-02T14:59:59-04:00'
describe
'2044672' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFL' 'sip-files00033.tif'
765be06248e6b27e13ce604cb8f288dc
341415670aa398361af1945f8f14f5da894dea72
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFM' 'sip-files00033.txt'
20480759ab83790bcd1f7a9374b039a9
c4e83f63555cabe7d61ac560159c3e18c2e547c9
'2012-05-02T15:03:25-04:00'
describe
'30084' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFN' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
fed37083138de4a9bddeb70289441a18
0e917b4e3e573ae2ccfffe0522af86d872d7adea
describe
'256112' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0552b7ccbedf88a088f21e73d5d4f063
9c3318ec091601c44cb6ce19a827275653007df6
describe
'216308' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFP' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
d539da0d0a6dfa2930284d3a8a3405dd
65d4052f069c254760416c0035395399835fd3b4
'2012-05-02T15:03:14-04:00'
describe
'25199' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFQ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
b77987ad3452406d1e1127cf11b8143c
427dbfc560c03029c3b2ec6ab96bc1a592ba7104
describe
'2062252' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFR' 'sip-files00034.tif'
5b555ae8ba1dd8e7637984656813aa19
6a84e9a83e9b6dcabb38853506df79e85af67c5b
'2012-05-02T15:01:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFS' 'sip-files00034.txt'
0d867c2b3ea4e18824958da8f02e5297
e042123bbc5a4745d0694ebd9f6fecbd0dc65100
'2012-05-02T14:59:27-04:00'
describe
'29239' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFT' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
d579707d18cc0222fbc3395f31804d95
d2cfea59a691df94ff70bd8c60a23af7c3ab92a9
describe
'251978' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFU' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
2e61fbfa945b1bd3648761fe5109c42e
e7a41b37dfc1684996f6cbec2e6e8f459e757cb5
'2012-05-02T15:02:35-04:00'
describe
'212334' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
5adb28d30d5efc87682b6f40a387ef9d
df23e1c92008fdf98f76e5aa89b1b9192f06157f
describe
'24997' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
f897957611a47f25c4d78dece25dcd9e
4efbaf7e8480a69fa382fec0ad8817c62de8f7ba
describe
'78975' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFX' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
ed50715a6265588d98c92db3de384973
52e83e6517560b318e88f8d6f2caec4adf072663
'2012-05-02T15:02:20-04:00'
describe
'2029640' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
c1b03ccf2759c84a16571f069ccacc0e
4af7fbdd787fe9d90dafc3bf8c9d21daccb1de6b
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLFZ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
ecf6387c7d95cad2756e9201e43c1b9e
7f5e6c72b4318a987c0a3283406b703cf09a068a
'2012-05-02T14:58:41-04:00'
describe
'29775' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGA' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
eecc0f493ceb3c8d3c3cbe97c0239c83
901d6da949eba0c10016108f2b28f176bdef5061
describe
'251367' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGB' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
0c6ab17ca4fc63d30079b20f1a6bff89
448304f7d99ca3dcb1ba45c0ff3d50419843b7df
'2012-05-02T15:03:20-04:00'
describe
'217141' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGC' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
1051c8e4c6e75d072cb50798698a66f0
20041de81189cab20df1867ebf23f55bbb01fc18
'2012-05-02T14:58:13-04:00'
describe
'24469' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGD' 'sip-files00036.pro'
063b26897bd44b4d4f45c8094034870c
d8b48943ba46128c1a020d8a20908f657bfa768e
describe
'78010' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGE' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
70adcbbb347d05db21cb8cbee96279bf
eb1729a1f390afd2ee89e6f1d77bab5d996cae42
'2012-05-02T14:59:25-04:00'
describe
'2024368' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGF' 'sip-files00036.tif'
7673d8df2da445b1f6971671c700188d
18e353316f6b78ef66ac79cecccf32ca87d444e5
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGG' 'sip-files00036.txt'
2d1c8547e237e5fe2b774dd2e51b9ba1
38a29a8debee85db68d70e3146a9a73a108a297c
'2012-05-02T14:59:28-04:00'
describe
'28839' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGH' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
235906530a0e4a3375a86895234f4284
b757f5792275c8fe200f398995770bb2bcefa09e
'2012-05-02T14:59:12-04:00'
describe
'256035' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGI' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
313af9c4ebf5a7d6d8c9265fe054253d
786ca86d0db5b0257cc67881f0573f460e565ade
describe
'149518' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGJ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
b902b71e58be13bc093a7777d4576684
0da7b03996360e4033d5575c7fca09d4aa0db96c
describe
'13794' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGK' 'sip-files00037.pro'
0d73642f1fac7277db08571aa6bd1d46
cd1d16c92530cca86dc5b54ba1500975e6ea4742
'2012-05-02T15:03:04-04:00'
describe
'61197' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGL' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
3cfed6a1a8bde92fb316a25a2c6190c9
8539aa39b8a5f6d10444473a309c653e5abf0807
describe
'2069752' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGM' 'sip-files00037.tif'
8101e3410ffafa84af5916e6591a09a2
cc21f58bc7b9b03848ce539f1f52d010d838cf94
'2012-05-02T14:59:29-04:00'
describe
'657' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGN' 'sip-files00037.txt'
e6189f86a11f033e839d396b456873dd
fcb6b1ec1d632845348cd6fa783eb158fac0e837
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGO' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
d54374388835186652ad73865f33c068
9f80c9e7d099e989a6cf49df2423f7c90cc8733f
describe
'253903' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGP' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
e9c9d173bc4282cd4f841775ac45fe96
f658405eee15349a6204bcbef78b1bfb210fd28b
describe
'174351' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGQ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
b49cfd687d289353911f14a1cf9fe4c3
c5cbb7066e1627c5483ae7d86477a89c62f52dd5
describe
'23127' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGR' 'sip-files00038.pro'
10f14e05000168cd906695867a34e1f9
a47182087e8762f263ee9aae986bbbb308a3a0ea
describe
'73982' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGS' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
d84cc802c4cea367cfb1d1b7783e130e
a4f9712c8941c6634c0a9b3652d0ad8408271def
'2012-05-02T15:04:30-04:00'
describe
'2054120' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGT' 'sip-files00038.tif'
c6dd0b4626b46e21e0e448f734a088eb
9c7a32a403639b70273450540f3d9e362c55d68c
'2012-05-02T14:58:55-04:00'
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGU' 'sip-files00038.txt'
f48bad03ccf11a2dea72f3439d00c698
df5ef8f00c081406d8ee72de1a4ecfd97d77abab
'2012-05-02T15:01:31-04:00'
describe
'35874' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGV' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
899f47efa03c4e8f128dd3c09e0de5bc
bfdbad04d722904941f50e684f1ed28be9eb76b7
'2012-05-02T14:58:32-04:00'
describe
'253120' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGW' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
31bfee7828343737bcf92bbd0191effc
1375035956010049d585259b779aa2c93ce8d7ea
'2012-05-02T15:03:43-04:00'
describe
'26710' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGX' 'sip-files00039.pro'
45238f9bc06e4f0e9af84caed0a6c380
234b2886e688736cff2b551a277b3715dde0aeaa
describe
'78691' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGY' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
baa0296e784da24fbdfbf3b1aa612ea1
dd484d022395230d5ec0d3baee6083134d23c6f2
'2012-05-02T14:58:56-04:00'
describe
'2048404' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLGZ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
180486348a41ed5136c29c37aa2ea1fd
407922d6f8850c9d2ee1be433a1c16df511ab4cf
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHA' 'sip-files00039.txt'
a7f77947d57614349ee52dfd8f8ff493
8cf9b5c6dd684df343386d5c7fff8c870478e8df
describe
'36349' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHB' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
dcfe9f9d369b7510397c8fddc1a76e4b
3ddbf1536198b83741afda8060978b6fb0734123
describe
'242748' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHC' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
92d96d62e26684486d6a4cf8b793a486
a9deffcb3910e5240e9e1462ac3d2b258f2a7aad
describe
'183526' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHD' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
8d5ccc5346e404ce7178e24fe277e2a7
74025c2ff8a156ccc5963021921495f948c8b161
'2012-05-02T15:00:55-04:00'
describe
'24691' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHE' 'sip-files00040.pro'
20858a4de35f56428036f7e721b5e9c9
1098557535e0d2faca5ee66681715986fe471cf8
describe
'77910' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHF' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
ca06087b9c322e33a42f52752c6148d2
39446f5d63590d43526208a84a23bfa8836c95b5
describe
'1965664' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHG' 'sip-files00040.tif'
56e21bf2348e0fb0334240f944c963c9
ffc4161fbae3231e647c5fe6ded5bac04aeb9af8
'2012-05-02T15:00:17-04:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHH' 'sip-files00040.txt'
9e46ac97039befcc9fc033611ca109a1
e7c14e3c6923ce6210c080451c1ed839c898803a
'2012-05-02T14:59:49-04:00'
describe
'36727' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHI' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
d51cc28c8bc25b3952820f1013782fa0
f8d92e657031d6cd45e5de0d7888763b60cbd863
'2012-05-02T14:57:59-04:00'
describe
'254696' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHJ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
d23ea46af56c03db1c01d47f5917e2f1
bd97753f8a5865232b62fa78017085ee402456f7
'2012-05-02T15:03:41-04:00'
describe
'183252' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHK' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
70f10b2711c13e034b8331598ef1bdd5
e2caec8c9129e519fdef648e674b7f028b0b0b45
describe
'25947' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHL' 'sip-files00041.pro'
0cdb85dcd3a8f79c83fa2e87b010339d
4e2da988c13a2310f1cf20c7742567169a1eb21e
'2012-05-02T14:58:48-04:00'
describe
'75039' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
5097520b3c083e0ed296e12420c729a0
ee608947dbd6224a7efb358f854167cf1c4b5666
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHN' 'sip-files00041.txt'
20761f139020972b1a81242e0bce754e
d28bf9bee8cf2de433103dda6094d4e5fc8751c1
'2012-05-02T15:02:08-04:00'
describe
'35981' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
965d7d63983e98ac55b22e49b4d955ca
9712f2044c2122e5863a232bc3a1e09cbdda8c6e
describe
'251156' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
e73fe8e1f6c1b1d9b82b5d4f5dbf07d9
51adc20a15d7972436bf41e9800a4b280c9c184f
describe
'184374' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
ef03ad208014501ddd70fa02f3fc6e92
a2170b46061b7db33b1c100a5a649109d3c1ec6c
describe
'25194' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHR' 'sip-files00042.pro'
538adcde482684e096adc776e3cbb13e
feea124e2860a1d760f1196eaaa975b9feaaffd4
describe
'76425' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHS' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e3afc87f1066ec15fa5613fc8af62185
d9036b72b9cc45c8bed110ea293986037a97eaf2
describe
'2031976' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
4f5b721e0b1d8ffaa5844019a410c47c
ba748c65a6a9939b3a546526b22d44cc3fd99c34
'2012-05-02T14:58:54-04:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHU' 'sip-files00042.txt'
2a324ee73b90cff21e42018bdd340a7b
bec5a8cb9b2474dd180c1b9084587908509296c7
describe
'36079' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHV' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
6001ea98cecdd865d8ff8662a039bb03
b8fd66ee66b976035bc88c7d3f1c6d57bff9da2f
describe
'255617' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHW' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
d984f6bac503f8fb4a6364bfcd68bdf1
332dfdc98b79a8ab503ef9439da4a213320dfa25
describe
'180492' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHX' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
8d289b71295f87d906ff647a7a59d2a9
e11444f5f97eb72692b72e622f7d1989cb1f12a0
describe
'25418' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHY' 'sip-files00043.pro'
7000d248166fb3ae0ec548caa2b9e9b7
4063dfd2873f41548f0257b51eaea525b8d1c95d
describe
'76375' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLHZ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
8eca98433dbce1526baeb81cdcd3d3b0
cc2d3dbc8512e930e858e6036346f69558715cae
'2012-05-02T15:00:23-04:00'
describe
'2067736' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIA' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c7c102896e00faa9c4bf10a0bb82590e
9353cce3dc685f0a008b2d88ee107a0f8dd8cbe2
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIB' 'sip-files00043.txt'
3b76dfe078c333dc094b0ce15da9edca
0b334bf9ceffc05da5ae2f64ee2709922a213c94
'2012-05-02T14:58:35-04:00'
describe
'254835' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIC' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
b1c03a887374ad6bbce4dc77b1a07a96
dc556e1a1887a5da3e6c36ec4eb6901a0cdd746b
'2012-05-02T15:00:24-04:00'
describe
'178099' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLID' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
40100816b0099f3dbd02bfa821b07f61
f81dd0148d2bdf7d946fb3c1280c44dbe1ca12d4
'2012-05-02T14:58:43-04:00'
describe
'24436' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIE' 'sip-files00044.pro'
6e689dd3f03988aa2959ca4931e34198
3b40b6a3f38f64d5d7e25f7d097287fcb6ff14a3
'2012-05-02T14:58:44-04:00'
describe
'73381' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIF' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
77527f662cef8ed27834e52a53eb9523
014a35111bb4bf779795b4fefd069233af6a8e5d
'2012-05-02T14:58:49-04:00'
describe
'2061028' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIG' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9de6a14780c3dcfaaa4f03c457501ac5
601e1ec64a80d0e5845c191c93a3b78bf5a43a88
'2012-05-02T15:01:07-04:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIH' 'sip-files00044.txt'
00a790bc5d39976291b45ee4d403a02d
e526a88cd9d3eb76cd03ea93fd8490159a73d495
describe
'35636' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLII' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
8cdcaaebc24122e284212fe9b2f3cae5
60e439509cc6487d71be0495b5d9b263aac0cc8d
describe
'252658' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIJ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
f981ac4d29a0d07e20276b23788ff947
2a7ea2daefa301b67e7a7f922c709c7cbc100965
describe
'174723' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIK' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
99a4b3581d04a4a998705f19f74e0703
5c3ee6d5c4a2348d4a92533463210dd996693751
describe
'24537' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIL' 'sip-files00045.pro'
bc4294c51d393017ee1fad825cc0bb6b
19bdd41461d9fbbee45bd7405f3619821f8249a9
'2012-05-02T15:02:37-04:00'
describe
'73329' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIM' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
eef2a3e7cc4aea4d84b8e141ed8e29d9
1182519fc4a4c9ab583e306c401b3b1d94eda6a8
describe
'2043588' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIN' 'sip-files00045.tif'
4c72baac4fce3ec579b169184113b065
e4253d699a3cfa300d0d6951118d7ef995b0982a
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIO' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d9f0c652740278edd958c104bc3467ed
4d71ecbfd755b5c03a2ecf9bc52c3a835823df14
'2012-05-02T15:01:26-04:00'
describe
'35630' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIP' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
6e07c85cacfcc700095534d33d9a7c27
eec776b8c1cfbdc6753e3671b3c621088072ffcc
'2012-05-02T14:58:03-04:00'
describe
'250517' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIQ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
7f7aa73634046b90215ffbb37afc1c3b
60a7e3a158d478e5a884fcbd078d22b75de9e913
describe
'183136' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIR' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
a0f8c7a58ba461bbd2a186a042dc4234
a1c76ea921d31d7a6571510c6d24dd64ddd43850
'2012-05-02T15:01:11-04:00'
describe
'75795' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
3e4ef2b7f08140225c39469233f6d93b
142e22a93276376d6c69667c0acfe7ced7b6c0f1
describe
'2027392' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIT' 'sip-files00046.tif'
13fc337918b3b91fac617990c5944a87
658c8c12e15345f03c4fd1274a2b02c9ffa4ae53
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
14373ff7a70245699fab5a3dd5cffc02
7f1ef34074e737c0a76aadb32b54cc15f0546968
describe
'36256' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIV' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
f057278131ae0b7c62edd0a2e591cd51
10b0b0c6f5ca3a111f6ceb288fd94703a7e021c5
'2012-05-02T14:58:06-04:00'
describe
'255207' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIW' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
32a36a886698efaa002857c70f19647b
741c59fb2492f0d08771c3c37425809127281ae9
describe
'174859' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
29306f08d66ef437108c199adea8b037
9f36f2bf3d2b0b1cea1d29f0c5e98f172ab39ef2
'2012-05-02T15:00:48-04:00'
describe
'25486' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIY' 'sip-files00047.pro'
47e64acf86bf361a0162e5fa4c8f3588
d12849b0a7980f79e00a143e2543669db0485fc2
'2012-05-02T15:04:28-04:00'
describe
'66089' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLIZ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
d444b26849188bb395033a4e512b6cd1
3b0501157954960eb4cf2ef13cdcdca1653798da
'2012-05-02T15:00:29-04:00'
describe
'2054508' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c1c76209a448accc61ee3b8863725ad6
5b588a53e88e32979779e80b3cd101d374e6c9e1
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJB' 'sip-files00047.txt'
88e31a860dd98e44447dda4174864bbc
2c1b2e866669bddb6a712dfc08d2c9f2fdecd345
describe
'25949' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
47be67d94b318c0f8eca930ca94eb60d
8e0d12dcfdc5b2dea272326a9d9ea49ac4a24a71
describe
'259175' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJD' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
c7f7683f37a7c3ee8a82026a1cad51d7
036187f1aff7c535caa7d5acc2d26e4e5e315cdc
describe
'181632' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJE' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
128fd031ce458d94b51bbc6e4735ab40
0504d573ed9beac1bd3df34896601c5e4d1f8063
describe
'26053' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJF' 'sip-files00048.pro'
89576b2e0710d9f6668cd54510270f56
92681beda314d1bc0e198fa8be434798b3e328ec
'2012-05-02T14:58:04-04:00'
describe
'74950' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
ecdcb3e9047867291ace81177b5f7ea5
47289049e3912a5363f9eaf91252d25d3949ccae
describe
'2096180' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJH' 'sip-files00048.tif'
d7dafd50ead2fc84aeceaae72f94e2cc
a57ae1b4ab6778106d6f5087da0494419392d029
'2012-05-02T14:58:38-04:00'
describe
'35241' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJI' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
4b4379f5c34b74d6537b61e04b6d3b58
41fc06250ec522352aec98bf00a1b83477690f07
'2012-05-02T15:01:29-04:00'
describe
'263651' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJJ' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
1d25e22b113bd55269f78412b78120f3
c4c87386877a8357028716c8fdfc4ca51996af78
'2012-05-02T15:01:25-04:00'
describe
'214451' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJK' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ddc27b0a62f49f07511265150bf9c1e4
aa1810400314668394fad76dcb0a66d952004d27
'2012-05-02T15:02:55-04:00'
describe
'5651' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJL' 'sip-files00049.pro'
820892620c7314f523c5618aeb2aa44f
a498740da58e6abcd626d656352e81aeadea48e1
describe
'66735' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJM' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
a60b5ff011a92216a0a3cdf05d6ebacc
1635013d9d12d100862dd5f3ded5b8500cf8cba8
'2012-05-02T14:58:11-04:00'
describe
'2122792' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJN' 'sip-files00049.tif'
955286013daf4201b1d22d0359d9ecc9
49d02c371e71e4ca35e57ca7b787630d7fb4ae53
'2012-05-02T14:58:21-04:00'
describe
'326' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJO' 'sip-files00049.txt'
fdcea909035fdfea47dbcb3c7ab4ab0d
7973642a92108ed8b27c7eabbf349af8de70097a
'2012-05-02T15:01:24-04:00'
describe
'26733' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJP' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
0d71bbdb51345a7bd4263b36ed1d8211
7e9ae57b04f2b0819939c2b5d4e2beaa6c658148
'2012-05-02T15:02:58-04:00'
describe
'254324' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJQ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
4c9d815b1c64140013434c3025d6fa8b
997dd62cc133d98916a046d3cdd01af3fe98ba63
'2012-05-02T15:00:28-04:00'
describe
'220419' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJR' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
1d922f9f67bd79af19aec27bf29beeb7
dbee0f31a83a29d2ba6d30873f5481141d276938
'2012-05-02T15:00:58-04:00'
describe
'24112' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJS' 'sip-files00050.pro'
01fb75397b7e2f3cbb5dc19d7bb46bd0
b248501b86f55e843fdee9d2cb2447147a5fc536
describe
'79476' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJT' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e11f1e325eb199a6f3da040848778f62
db192414f168455700224b01336aec0007915082
'2012-05-02T15:00:39-04:00'
describe
'2047692' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJU' 'sip-files00050.tif'
b8cb35162c6c425d13d3aae6350219fe
59e6277a4e8eb3db8f0b1fb1c56e671e26216517
'2012-05-02T15:04:36-04:00'
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJV' 'sip-files00050.txt'
8ef87f6bfd5e65f5683c9e13fa3b18c5
b1e35ea5575eb976c4841fe5e192227b8ea6668a
describe
'29609' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJW' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
bc6950c23422530b0b1110d6c3d6db7d
9a34561d28f7808a6a77b572504eab1e5cd26ff2
describe
'207343' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJX' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
c00a03d051ddac51d7a96768b50f6888
507f3c035951fc69b86e445e6919c9b611995f6b
'2012-05-02T14:58:46-04:00'
describe
'21943' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJY' 'sip-files00051.pro'
a76a977803b3d596f6dedf0d57c6e086
bc47ef5762c6fb4f3a9ab487c3df6b458b27f573
describe
'75081' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLJZ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
3c698a40cf6ee613c18ddd40b00fdd88
350e79fa718351574d0f08e098ed578975c843a8
'2012-05-02T14:59:09-04:00'
describe
'2099644' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKA' 'sip-files00051.tif'
40a25a1c34ee1b3d709cf77765377228
f2e151ab69f88be61be9884fc55e68cd8ea10156
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKB' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8c1e72a4f0d5aab702a61202311e584b
2638817d7929cc1669db51d986d148cfc9adacfb
'2012-05-02T14:59:30-04:00'
describe
'28286' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKC' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
baa6e223409e48d24e9e119585006296
e72d1691e131d0e9065e3184a61199d2fc6126c8
describe
'254108' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKD' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
5e6ab1fb7d6141dfa94d51324b01b494
5cc10a3dbf51fb93c5df0665cdbf3acd0788bbc6
'2012-05-02T15:04:24-04:00'
describe
'220824' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKE' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
e6159af57aaa68dae079972c7e78467e
e175993d67a084f8d0b1fb323a45cc41ae364bb1
describe
'15456' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKF' 'sip-files00052.pro'
57021ad283f9b55d6642b1a5e4b138c4
c6d71e64be296abd53a0e57734300d6af5f0c127
describe
'74016' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKG' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
981a6b6a30556e923c47d9927a619d0d
def9e245bba5187f5917794dea0745e6d6d8fba4
'2012-05-02T15:00:10-04:00'
describe
'2046844' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKH' 'sip-files00052.tif'
d6e27fccf0b2eee89210e3e037d78912
ee280ca702d9d26b9204d95b179ac3feff644d65
describe
'666' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKI' 'sip-files00052.txt'
d6d558e27afb292c1d4bf68329cb2a3e
a08516d01459f79b91846d4a47a285b9cd0e6c01
'2012-05-02T15:04:21-04:00'
describe
'28270' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKJ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
ea0f45a5f688ee00741ba66d84ce8236
105e1a4fbf180a6ea1e286331ab32f77e93258be
describe
'261379' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKK' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e36849dc5b1e4f46bd4ced41f6aac977
fc8297862e7c0c0f06dd7eb2d97b833e913abde7
'2012-05-02T14:59:50-04:00'
describe
'202067' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKL' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
6dfea1bc80358e531b1b74f852b5d754
7892c0fb3638356914db89d1a15530af2f141b1a
'2012-05-02T15:03:39-04:00'
describe
'23440' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKM' 'sip-files00053.pro'
9a9b43009649b7a7835b2cfafca236fa
f77384841bb59056f911f531c142d7a4bbf559d7
describe
'2104040' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKN' 'sip-files00053.tif'
bc8f6167322ef9585d6cc5fb4497f4b9
c4589a546b95dd0fe5bd42aecfee75011fb83f4e
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKO' 'sip-files00053.txt'
ea7655a5e929465f1ea93459e77a7f73
e4fad686af5c7137273dc2c5425f4ba304f5a79e
'2012-05-02T15:03:58-04:00'
describe
'27195' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKP' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
096dd4757b8a7859a23a5084bd90d229
3f0494b48d3527b5f1bc907b0656c85af3be21cf
describe
'255400' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKQ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
98780bb40a7d82dff49c67c7f39fad87
2daeec92736a3bdf3b6460189da830060c7fb01e
describe
'219494' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKR' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
b64e1670796494898136a8ca6d6cf5b0
a1701089b94d945ba33aa0fcb568c0c8c9119219
'2012-05-02T15:01:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKS' 'sip-files00054.pro'
af076de1104493baf1efa25efd11720c
b7dcc87ebe3d1cdb2c8c264647de6ff16174c6dc
describe
'78762' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKT' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
55cdc0c4513aba5dc8840ad69655f39a
c120298c2de5dc91ccb75d1578a2b089e7bfe9b2
describe
'2056644' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKU' 'sip-files00054.tif'
1ce1fe064393ee60802f5957dda2930d
c00f0bc8971e0f4c0f64b324c816151e4fa4fa65
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKV' 'sip-files00054.txt'
4194bbb1a6f919d6f28becb03c88bd98
432e4502588c5a00835134da1f73cd4c60cb4131
describe
'29422' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKW' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
6b7c03f89465f0939edb695e62feaf30
6aba68a3d465026de5128d30f06cefa20f5f9501
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKX' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
4fce9ef3a73ac75cdabdf8039c9d8d5f
8cc89bc766fcf485ff59d4b1ca9ba4ff4ff7f871
describe
'204047' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKY' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
426367b531750bedd18574c6fc2d7c00
0093cbd1069bb2bbe4a845cfd704d088045cf4eb
describe
'21539' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLKZ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
611ca45f2757921afd763c03c038d739
81d653597d3fe07589b2c56b2a0a165ae2a54c0d
describe
'73458' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLA' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
ba303b610e283d0186bf582da0c50228
ce10ad08a845e05c1fd3691f5bcc3d88c3fcccb0
'2012-05-02T15:02:38-04:00'
describe
'2057872' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLB' 'sip-files00055.tif'
fd2c0453ec800d79196b8ef1071f7f2a
b217e8c82c8d900b38a2abd63d86738a3b7d49ae
'2012-05-02T15:00:50-04:00'
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLC' 'sip-files00055.txt'
9287e6ce49c37642f7fbf5c0d6d5f238
59efa599c2cae07bb07827b07fb69c954a2aa4be
'2012-05-02T15:00:44-04:00'
describe
'28067' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLD' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
9de7e7addbe8ee72ce06df785038af91
0dcb82bcd82ec5d46c43d0352fd859f525c70930
describe
'255837' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLE' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
fc867352bd520a8f8dc5814aec4fa6a4
86c31a770d312eab29e22c73c74a519e31d8dce2
describe
'215199' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLF' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
6e158665ed761f050c6145eb7dd9ff17
d42d9a4a17bd50d719c1e3f6c550d1eb9bd51e81
describe
'23767' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLG' 'sip-files00056.pro'
fb79155f173518055252468a51bf36e5
3fc2efa61b992c17b7fa61afe14f26db6cd3f5a0
describe
'77543' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLH' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b7dfdac9341798409ff78b63e1516910
b4c4c63f8ed6040f5a50544240d59806cd94f2f6
describe
'2060220' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLI' 'sip-files00056.tif'
086357bc8567d2ded23ee5e339b308ef
4796df11e20dd1561205d39cd2a2d4728f4fea34
'2012-05-02T15:00:26-04:00'
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLJ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
46e9cab966091de81c5304c8df436cc5
620141f7861eb1549adb334d8e8dd1f26905f9d6
'2012-05-02T14:58:12-04:00'
describe
'29429' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLK' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
2fc62b7f1a2548c3d6605afd22f05ec7
707cac68fb23e9647378dabe211f03d0fe5d953e
'2012-05-02T15:02:52-04:00'
describe
'253152' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLL' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c6a9bc5c73f53a51b69d4d9c9a2331c3
60fc7d9cc697ed8b0449acb0bb999043564f8a3b
describe
'210336' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLM' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
5cd0b603eb2b2b3314fe2ca7d44196df
07c1de4ec1ff50f63a6b8c50a84a65e3df64de77
describe
'24541' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLN' 'sip-files00057.pro'
dca70d80bb9c085793bece9712aa0c94
42c5fdaf86891d9f060b484ff5da43775b97c2d4
describe
'76299' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLO' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
4cd1fb73a47c08253dd67e3b2c13cedd
803f45b0436b1bff693f06017c3ba5a88189fff0
describe
'2038804' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLP' 'sip-files00057.tif'
1845bdc38b265158798253609fcf18c1
863ecf80506a848205f2c7e0e599f8e539f22a6f
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLQ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
3b95c7f6a5ee08cbfcc08ac8172e6d05
6a6b163fa646f3454fe2302ce08df61d00e2e16f
'2012-05-02T14:59:35-04:00'
describe
'29104' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLR' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
a2ef438d0d5981e3afb2e098ff2a57e7
8d4482cd82102f791f99af2ce95102bff02295d5
describe
'247958' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLS' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
b779d56b0c8813b10e2177f89cd2b897
277aee36697aaef509cac6058d2d5c62108a2089
describe
'24097' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLT' 'sip-files00058.pro'
f0ddefc69a1a3c2d56df45b6cd389136
8d8bd62bc2e2c325aacbbf9aa7a26108ab54669a
'2012-05-02T15:04:03-04:00'
describe
'78089' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLU' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
87c71647ecc3425231d3044a9b3f3ab3
1c5664257b9311cdadfd0e1368ac487476e4eff0
describe
'1996820' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLV' 'sip-files00058.tif'
80a2472a26ee487133f205507af70346
36a989612fb09d36f25d01b0cfffff45fc3f669b
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLW' 'sip-files00058.txt'
242a480fe4211df938a586f5d2a77415
33dffaee9b0098306a00ee9ec3a3ad95e1305798
describe
'29632' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLX' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
4ebb9dbd346fadcf15812c25c8b11aef
99e899c8a1bb67c5c100b54360e7f5ee4d3e6691
'2012-05-02T15:02:23-04:00'
describe
'255612' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLY' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
8b31ddbaeb3c6c79a727fa163ce9d10e
7bdee769f274e4fdce24c67a69340b5d785eccb5
'2012-05-02T15:02:45-04:00'
describe
'219386' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLLZ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
07018b4cad86c42ea531a795322973f0
9b7654cc02a8e91c674f4a421a9cd9fa50185435
describe
'25669' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMA' 'sip-files00059.pro'
88f98b7c6a11bc1b3e966c263ef2133b
50898453992d27a81fc8b6fd62bbaa9a9835e278
describe
'78536' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMB' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
633d229b73f0e27ce38596f4364b530c
d460ff03c3dbf5bd5d66119f4e5280ee45b265be
describe
'2058504' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMC' 'sip-files00059.tif'
9f5c19a63da4aa4d36701c9a478af0c4
64fe463d53366ae852ff2910ceb7745b2399a4d4
'2012-05-02T15:00:20-04:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMD' 'sip-files00059.txt'
dbf64c65153fe1b76bcc6c64be3541d9
faf98266921ec8e4b6e25243315cf40be69fccc5
describe
'28790' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLME' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
dd3b4635ec89e6712ece014171127d0d
5dc899cf07554a896dd9cee9e095a71672180fcd
describe
'254672' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMF' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
67f255cd68749a40f4e38350ce26370d
3a878ee5feda806aaea78ea8756513b009dee3b8
describe
'206462' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMG' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
56883ac270b3834330a4007c8b633d01
7ead04582be0e5e51f04379fdfec791cef15177a
describe
'24350' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMH' 'sip-files00060.pro'
81b2111c9201bb8d42cf4a553c21ad22
81ad8bc21ec503f427a2b03f2e6791f1d38bfad2
'2012-05-02T15:04:25-04:00'
describe
'74356' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMI' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
70c4dbc98d3da316ca0d0080c8465144
2d0e4744f69a1dd9672614ecace1803b7ef96a95
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMJ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
bacff7cae29553888fe0422f64e287d0
ef3a54db146f73147c72f239f1f73fc221a1965c
describe
'29836' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMK' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
f9b18cc54cca451ad86b95cf0dce0add
5596ca7364295151f3ba7bebeb3647a0a6f1d8ac
describe
'255711' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLML' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
0a3fb82be1d98b66b075e8d5ca3e38fe
93873451f16d649a37c8e8c3d93dd50dfdec5a86
'2012-05-02T15:03:01-04:00'
describe
'206788' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMM' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
438195c5e0f4e88f4fd19f50f53e2909
265fc00ebdede12ceca68f3ede534fb8f45739b6
'2012-05-02T14:59:10-04:00'
describe
'24215' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMN' 'sip-files00061.pro'
9b353fe1651fe382773949fbf996b787
f671efa0dd84d009d9fa9ee99cb7ad01f03221a8
describe
'75635' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMO' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
b0d014d85c52fa3f29136e5bb2564c35
c39ffcaa182d146fe9ddb758606c4b57cd008c62
describe
'2058700' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMP' 'sip-files00061.tif'
2ef984479a9ebff3a387d6ef49826dd2
c0d9ccaf2406d806e7c8eeacc41230be2e0b6fc4
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMQ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
8fc3a37c3fe7e64e35a437aaef41febb
175f5a4a80677b32caa4df691a916abed2037eb5
'2012-05-02T15:02:06-04:00'
describe
'28615' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMR' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
92b681160398fb9f45459f53763e877f
40c867775d108eb095a43b5dc6d0d02618b7bc95
describe
'257384' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMS' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
07898373bb6e564dac3be4db060c1be4
8410014fb001fe270b54acedb0533fdfee5197a5
describe
'218592' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMT' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6002d16ab113fe7bfbd82cb97168df6d
a9d6c85f1e5e854f6ea2aab9972854ea0f7a0ecd
'2012-05-02T14:59:46-04:00'
describe
'23959' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMU' 'sip-files00062.pro'
debc4d9e98613955fb653f3b35571449
a526bc75aaf1566c2cba3e356e4b31b4ebd6c3c5
describe
'76738' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMV' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a3f454a678ad5a4064208af7a0549136
bbdc21aa11a7f6e77315b6cd80e8f2b53c4c1423
'2012-05-02T14:58:51-04:00'
describe
'2072364' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMW' 'sip-files00062.tif'
754b26915ab6934de78bcf18dda5929c
1d394d37e5b56e9fb8c298d46cb3b7cbd04f6460
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMX' 'sip-files00062.txt'
0c24e33d5615b5b0fedce0cabd25bf36
3be67640ae304584d3ba80b024969872b2a24534
describe
'259059' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMY' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
496e4238b1e7b558bd4ba5cee3bf1c08
4c3f2e65c1910083f2b15312614fcfddd913d9a0
describe
'223473' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLMZ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
6f7a8995e3bdce63d4ae79a1ab57f53b
2dc549b80bcd8bead7ecfcfcf50fbb20704bfeba
describe
'25351' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNA' 'sip-files00063.pro'
be878f812f88066dca46635c0ce466fe
5a83978faadf41c94c8ba2cfbd82d1d634c0b8c8
describe
'79274' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNB' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
5c0b7e902c878b7c5bd5a31ebd3bb93b
0dcfb6434cb64f9d65e3b8c0fcdd213d81396fba
'2012-05-02T15:01:21-04:00'
describe
'2085848' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNC' 'sip-files00063.tif'
86f96a33e58a76695b24e14b446bb4fe
f1b43485cbf9b6dea17ea3f51d96d4e225ac99d7
'2012-05-02T14:58:31-04:00'
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLND' 'sip-files00063.txt'
1889b5d611a6c7ebbe78081bb582c42d
79bfff0dd164645dd37c6e7519ad339a03edd64d
'2012-05-02T15:02:03-04:00'
describe
'29543' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNE' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
a68e879b513d4e6078674c3cd65b82d2
329accf5cd6dda4cd1d85d11f146d0a789ed6ede
'2012-05-02T15:01:22-04:00'
describe
'252042' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNF' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
6c0f49d97c21cd0f78b54a811eabefc8
274e7e7e0dd447c5c91e89cb43d737ec21ce646b
describe
'211638' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNG' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
3dca33d395a6c99a9141258217b48c5c
f6ba92a851d3627b84740f0e8e0c85e2d0bea3b9
'2012-05-02T14:58:29-04:00'
describe
'23228' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNH' 'sip-files00064.pro'
7b95763fb7f40d5c85d6d34aa66a3984
951be5b1b4faa475c66902491bead9b33f6e6399
'2012-05-02T15:04:05-04:00'
describe
'75855' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNI' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
51778872b0cb985bf759d1bd7a9693a3
7903569592d89cae8d67f359c60a3e217563159a
describe
'2029500' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNJ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
52b1141230eb346b9d9db708f0374fe8
cf1a4de752237dcca6510ee731b3786dd78f9736
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNK' 'sip-files00064.txt'
210594142896c0248243451f2adb0604
1443cd42f1ea3d0802e2cf4141a73e4d0f279b79
describe
'28767' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNL' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
e27614ab68540242c85960a6f5b1605f
1ad52bdcbeeaed5b7ac41ae60b45ef0b70da994f
describe
'250767' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNM' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
e5ec1893f67f703d8fd033404d5aeff6
a484c02272aae2426a1a5ee5e8b17407af438963
'2012-05-02T14:59:38-04:00'
describe
'212622' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNN' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
7257e8912c05526f2c46159e86c15565
a1596217d9ec60766ff5b9dbe72fdcb34cc04b6d
describe
'66687' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNO' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
9fc4eff0b071caa5d75fc9be0e0f6d83
59961810b744ffdd80506e67a3521cf5ed87409c
'2012-05-02T15:00:43-04:00'
describe
'2018664' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
f146b8d2a0684520da585b3587f7e4c5
7c37a8cf502540fb67aaa44b358e1daadbfc1d2c
'2012-05-02T15:04:17-04:00'
describe
'453' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNQ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
5081d42882a369058081a6b8c138acf2
3ea0eca2cc0bf51adfdd41e5b1353e74783e2a76
'2012-05-02T15:02:21-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'26599' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNR' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
cda0b63255dca06ed385d18192d1fe29
b83fe31ba7d9b16683beeffeef48380e2a7e4d2a
describe
'251215' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNS' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
2e3878d86953c38def6ae6d520009e33
8e01640aaccd7e3066acfae1756ffb8d1d522ca2
'2012-05-02T14:58:02-04:00'
describe
'214251' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNT' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
b5cd81e664b1baca9784be3a4440b540
b51c6a812d909248323337abc10c03238ad39b9d
describe
'22701' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNU' 'sip-files00066.pro'
488e1c7dcd8949a3770fb7df3571789e
0a8b6dce1ed9f5b16e9dc2f797ea7b6544913ac1
describe
'75983' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNV' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
bcd9cddd852dea0e210ec76b888d1e7d
bf4c76b0a4bfa72c119f9fb2e35128858b553dc5
'2012-05-02T15:02:13-04:00'
describe
'2023276' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNW' 'sip-files00066.tif'
d9673ba44fd3014d1615aac0f05921b1
af67e86a1c6c898821689d27a975d032b5aa3482
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNX' 'sip-files00066.txt'
70c6efade88004b5acf993eec194af12
06e682f7ad28674dd436c7f38941487dd18f64ca
describe
'28551' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNY' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
724bc709c61caafd0e15073e517b9edb
8d97edbb88ab0c816d7fdaedfc135b1a0b47f361
describe
'252198' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLNZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
021659e0f3fcaa482e0d73780eca92dc
1a151519c635486073c72e9160b2e5c8de8d2447
describe
'206851' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOA' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a03cf794ad9fcd03aa88bf37e39e96f2
21d358d240d635b27045852ca9cbcb54552b7a58
'2012-05-02T14:59:55-04:00'
describe
'14676' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOB' 'sip-files00067.pro'
b6d342fbca6f5f2ff465437a61536fca
bad8cde873c0e5aae089bdfad9eca5d4512ca3ca
describe
'67876' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOC' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d1fc8d7f40779c966b9ee8da60736e57
9ead658860ab30bcccf21dd2aa9b3f63281cc039
'2012-05-02T14:58:19-04:00'
describe
'2030360' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOD' 'sip-files00067.tif'
aa94af2f231b72156e115b2210dc89d5
a9499c41bd4154b07d5b49014a37533309896fcd
describe
'25596' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOE' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
5844e5b8d0f0976ec41a03302fe51185
79fdde8b37fefb236fa88d239ca52bf308a1e07a
describe
'253288' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOF' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
e9df79b1f0cccba48db52dff9366fb9d
be0938611c4fa55bd60dc0fd28e803d6279330b0
describe
'208436' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOG' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
dc4bbe33d51b13ea2acc48f0ad45df2f
f805b3e953ab7f9078889969f0007d5a13464a95
'2012-05-02T15:02:44-04:00'
describe
'23684' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOH' 'sip-files00068.pro'
93cc581d3e092de37bbfd63282f6d387
a99607ee33f886ebc369888cb81c755fd1049612
describe
'76142' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOI' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
096a4022196642431a700553d765b3e4
76fe8ad64c670159f3ab5c21ec9867bca62071fa
'2012-05-02T14:59:00-04:00'
describe
'2039424' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
bf5a364b72ac4383c943b2466929609e
e273491ff51772716eeec4622869b0f8b779d8ae
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOK' 'sip-files00068.txt'
8bf6b8853f6e924d7a077fdc6a5dc991
1c177f76326bd448231a1764730444d2d682f177
'2012-05-02T14:58:53-04:00'
describe
'29002' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOL' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
c23775f09a1d2edf8f4796323fe84a48
5fc71b9b08152006738a60ee260b73c234a57d9b
describe
'255130' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOM' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ca83c14564c3f991f126c3d8fba807be
54179323f017b538ebf5fd2158d32882dc0a710b
describe
'212676' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLON' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
618db07582934b0c8660d611323122a6
8cca2613de6b7ade715cfea11df601ed46527e5d
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOO' 'sip-files00069.pro'
12b067db8b0169c8e25e2fec17c49a6f
45575f4e6e65cd67283a65b03b2d57ad51405cd2
describe
'78118' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
5de2c357db4ccdaa1e7e5545356cee60
da7ee8a1368248d0998b609a83f993be31346e3f
describe
'2054388' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOQ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
d04b6c78bba3dca3cd7309d68ec7123f
0f98c43dd75a9941da9fd31151dff895a845ad0c
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOR' 'sip-files00069.txt'
1611a6eb85d9d6f04e823ac07a66d898
056e79bb147599abf96c7dc9131bb8858bf3618e
describe
'29101' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOS' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
94fda7524aef99ef6b6cbdb59eac1cbf
d68a1b40bf2217b57a62128e2330d50bee67223f
'2012-05-02T15:01:17-04:00'
describe
'215592' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOT' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
127a263e7ba425c976db8e657a3d368b
97a968399b81f53c37290f5cd4e194365efa6a98
describe
'24680' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOU' 'sip-files00070.pro'
f3267eafd872dfe3e228a54102267c3f
9cd1aba7f8e7703e430246fe4938cb1307bf2294
describe
'76950' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOV' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
3021eb928700c0900ad7af2965f74c67
3f99f573c2a818164010c4345d3dfd490c0e3982
describe
'2040660' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOW' 'sip-files00070.tif'
dad16aa3a771899d55b70460f40a252b
d3564ad0430200399769b5eceeb6d3948d36d1b3
'2012-05-02T15:02:43-04:00'
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOX' 'sip-files00070.txt'
f1098033f7b5239e3ebcc8bff5578400
7cacb54916cec650919de807dd39abf7846c699c
describe
'28963' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOY' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
3d80153befc591fc6690aa4ab6b4ca2b
2993cff2c0e52baf4008738402ec9f0d5f528f2d
describe
'257568' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLOZ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
e66ecbe4ce70a4443344becb0ee14674
d162e0b4272298bb7084ee801f9fea7f648aa360
describe
'200414' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPA' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
14920792ed14b00483fb6e388f3062aa
31db4752664c5a23f09c141fd1623a405fdb3bf5
describe
'23314' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPB' 'sip-files00071.pro'
d2b1d9b64b2da82c29b29bd2ae4ae58d
1a7bc9eae42b5ce8c7e89ed05369e0afbdb51fec
describe
'72422' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPC' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
45fa7531daa242a5133e814450f5a172
a59e7cc88785929246f1a2591563f557589d2aac
describe
'2073732' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPD' 'sip-files00071.tif'
110bc9110bba81ef343f89c12119d8b2
1f15804f2deb5d0219d38e3cdc4b625f9ced6ca8
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPE' 'sip-files00071.txt'
350afdee95fbc356abb92fd47a26cb76
4141e6f2dbb9bdba4d2f29ed529860f2b4ec70e9
describe
'28147' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPF' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
0a423afd103d3351f0f26c613d9a5034
fc486e455fd2f9c5868f557acc5e15f48b72a7cc
describe
'254725' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPG' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
56b243906d6bfe7738b432546128c40d
07ffe29fd41c9452434c8654e649c5fc040d7032
describe
'189427' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPH' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
5e3604ac9bd66302dd6e38db1ffb0e52
c7d13b262e45dc04bb7cfa03788ba7a1f9e04fb6
'2012-05-02T14:58:10-04:00'
describe
'24905' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPI' 'sip-files00072.pro'
087be4eebe369b6a5511a2d64687118e
904e07033df4901a9f89a412331770221843d521
'2012-05-02T14:59:45-04:00'
describe
'2050960' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
6f3105791d2420d87f2bdcd4cbc430dc
1b5be0e9a674cbeecb66d16f3e92a39c80157e31
'2012-05-02T15:01:04-04:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPK' 'sip-files00072.txt'
faa8514d6df853983097e5d59b6a234c
f81bd2bdd45cdb8a040483bb30523c0c444b1aba
describe
'29267' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPL' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
7cec333b56b34e9208212f366a26e11a
20fcf24151618e15cb693caa0ac150ac1f239915
'2012-05-02T15:04:14-04:00'
describe
'255210' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPM' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
4d4a68d0415bf2800fc81eca828ceac9
d140538a6b9c1c5f8ccc7388de5a318cd821378d
describe
'190889' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPN' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
1b56d3680ebd7a24e94bd4cfcb694cb5
69a771caf5e83fff9731aea690bf4ccf738cacad
'2012-05-02T14:59:57-04:00'
describe
'26983' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPO' 'sip-files00073.pro'
910a56045cdd2e47f02d79be2ac68b43
2893d32419cf05de0957d65ec452b40d1c86b52d
describe
'74480' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPP' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
922a81edf12a2a802aba687317ce4e96
78003099ebeb921a56db369d563d2a825ffc6c75
'2012-05-02T15:01:02-04:00'
describe
'2055068' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPQ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
a81efc018da810aa855a65b089949179
2d993e168731c13ee0cf76b54391eb0fb9e19a7c
'2012-05-02T15:02:36-04:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPR' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5084c5253fa1f4dc2a9960faad4644fd
7b14d990825adb8a47f9f6835a2e22a5e46c42be
'2012-05-02T15:02:10-04:00'
describe
'28233' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPS' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
86f51199203ec0b455e7b2f7bd9a0845
9efb4218deae56c2ccb6a2cfd029fd5bb0d11cca
describe
'256340' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPT' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
5b8cba26ff4d4f17a692c731fa26dd04
8bbd148a4f8fe2cea7e00b0ee73254e8faf31cd9
'2012-05-02T15:04:15-04:00'
describe
'183924' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPU' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
0a5417908ec926694386fc41d9b9fefc
d5799b7c7d29e5eddacbaba6709308c4c1256129
describe
'22838' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPV' 'sip-files00074.pro'
d4f2bfecb4244022b8f0027e2e73c88b
bc6ee7de3ea8ec88a1f5be2bc23f704fa3cd3bdd
describe
'73061' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPW' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
a792a772a7c4bdd7c6764676d65cb2bb
afed6c8d0392dd36f1a520f8ca0537f5e3247e0a
'2012-05-02T15:00:08-04:00'
describe
'2063860' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPX' 'sip-files00074.tif'
9b913fae51e73b7dea18df3911a1110c
a3808d56473cb500d7bc0c1123208b4d295902a5
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPY' 'sip-files00074.txt'
0ea12b71d60e5e6436da9fc50e71828c
02df0f5c4d45e7923e048ffb59472e5649a1c936
describe
'27743' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLPZ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
48bcd46e5ec6add986922ed5fdf5ca94
e13089f6be3bc65665db02122a7dcac5d5c3ab16
'2012-05-02T15:00:36-04:00'
describe
'253837' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQA' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
f537cef8403bf678de80f05148d6e812
544501bb91ed6937adf7411001ffa8fae647a700
describe
'190455' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQB' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
80068e01a77232fd1de35f929cfa1ff9
2c01eeb7659e280f90f2707ead435903cc13270d
describe
'23658' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQC' 'sip-files00075.pro'
3c7baad3c9a29a607564fb55b625f31f
943957d5ca64eb77c60563f42bc9d6f055a2d2d5
'2012-05-02T15:00:34-04:00'
describe
'74992' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQD' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8f1c879ab4388b7d950dd5efe514b728
697f6fbae8a4ce7b79b4b551b031ccb7d4f86bac
describe
'2044088' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQE' 'sip-files00075.tif'
4852bf779674ebb89991c1d1b0298454
9f931654d6c81b15465b776c9b9990f8157610d7
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQF' 'sip-files00075.txt'
d72abf58ea609410cc716b82ba551e82
74bcfeb3304e87b1b9fc313cdf584a94c141a2b9
describe
'29141' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQG' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
1962057dee9c8cef17751883f8030ac7
5007f77347f51e38c70f49edba442d1af5874c3d
describe
'259712' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQH' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
a41d1dc5d710cd50d78e9ce75d582cc8
b455d3aee2e46215f9d3e1577dd8fc5e40614299
'2012-05-02T15:04:35-04:00'
describe
'192006' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQI' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
2f9e84ef134db52ef0eb7b415101f882
2ec78489acacf40226784b78d2c6d20796719801
describe
'25427' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQJ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
6aba6c5421fde7b2dba14ddcf9309eeb
cc6c7ee2cd205f3d23749d949e9937b0dc0a2f3e
describe
'76055' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQK' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
3a8255c408a5256b81dca2fb45fca540
d31b54110b7d24bd1b9999d8d5a1b16752602a3e
describe
'2090628' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQL' 'sip-files00076.tif'
514339ba05a291b78dd0bdc68f97a0cf
0850c0ad28d7443ed5c27c5b85e151457f770dff
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQM' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b8a321176404853bcf2561ada56b00e9
b3ae1efc454a4e2c98b5d7f21c6890cbb0e11a7f
describe
'29255' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQN' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
31442b612b0a04500ab15c54a569ae57
5713ceedb50b9ddff56185bf1ed8ddd61673a72b
'2012-05-02T15:03:32-04:00'
describe
'254001' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQO' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
c57291328218059922021819d2d659e3
2dc2969ac61dee0c51bcd71ff05cf45e8715b96e
describe
'25016' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQP' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6ee2d73a183b84b3a3166d17a9279f38
624822033b7387c0949d87ea044ff3d4c74ed3fe
describe
'76941' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQQ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
6cb8f7ead43a201d71268cdbc868e80e
74f78a54dd05d58eb07deb8d537f7bc957fdd75a
'2012-05-02T14:59:05-04:00'
describe
'2045324' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQR' 'sip-files00077.tif'
872a4c6c9c8ec62c9775ba3e2c117521
0156a439eb17d60e5c91998de6007f7462ebcc64
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQS' 'sip-files00077.txt'
3db0a2f1ac3078d76c8aaa18e673caa6
99c8e209ffbd40d992730267ced71945ea54f18a
describe
'28988' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQT' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
e817a7c3723129b3c6fb56e7856b1dce
c912612f6c4c7b34fa33cdce385be5f97e1ed453
describe
'261224' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQU' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
12abf088f36504907a0274f346097d83
efaac596c9c6eeeca174e0b16a31dc88dfa082e3
describe
'194519' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQV' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3b098fcd8d837a349cecaf166b08568f
cfa7c9e3e2b8c6e98d3bc434a118db4a2b194956
describe
'6023' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQW' 'sip-files00078.pro'
7bd9147624f5686644808b5d16083cd1
8fccc435f63311593b9e566cc343cf9ef752e889
'2012-05-02T15:01:08-04:00'
describe
'61157' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQX' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
01ed3b2acd678e4086c18b0fb6a5cf63
dbee0e9835c4a35a3acd1c2a26f914861ae45cd9
describe
'2103816' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQY' 'sip-files00078.tif'
24c42bc8f8f86cba7e4684072e886e60
ff161b7b231d7db44121368baa101efa1a88d135
describe
'317' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLQZ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
3da244c2a57209c28cfdfaff6ade5258
8e1266d4043db5067789e829d72aab728807fc53
'2012-05-02T15:02:18-04:00'
describe
'24852' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRA' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
12e64cef7eb8165c26207d61f80ea635
ceed44c5d20814979b2db6831d7cdaeaff29b146
describe
'258789' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRB' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
89476f892e236f327174e1eb6e0cdb20
ddcae67a428af24774bca12059b6b8621cad82ad
describe
'194645' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRC' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
ab00ef48ee7f2b4104af9b5fd7763441
d8d5b8451cf1e67069f4f1d942b33f027d99f1fa
describe
'25139' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRD' 'sip-files00079.pro'
b9309896dc7ec498c4b25338af658954
fbb774d8050d04fcc54a3514f7862aa2411d665a
'2012-05-02T15:03:09-04:00'
describe
'76351' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRE' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
bb9dacdf8f33b32d6cddd08244330c9c
e20acc785af7fe2e9c52f1a71f8c7d596c32a03e
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRF' 'sip-files00079.txt'
c17dabfdacc7eb515fcc6ba270d756f2
c1f1af84fcecbe2fb2b632bde44cfa7367a75083
describe
'29816' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRG' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c297801d572259ec91f110abb552f19a
68cf4c723d4aa84820cd62873188561f56bb178f
'2012-05-02T15:03:51-04:00'
describe
'256284' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRH' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
76d9ded3f223e25200de9a04329aa9ff
e3a3c9bbb8dd27263e94acbd3ec225b1d760263e
describe
'180974' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRI' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
95c5c18825b2cc0da97e5c75de88e912
b17370047e99370ae84813a4d99609e5ba397b25
'2012-05-02T15:03:37-04:00'
describe
'25020' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
5597032225e1b79d3a8d669f1afc9de2
0cf1da573db006f438b39f62a68aee21be0386a4
describe
'71738' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f79bb1fc7ae4e509dbae6e19fe3011c7
bbeec80ad79883198cade6d3d1b2f689980ebe7f
describe
'2063676' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRL' 'sip-files00080.tif'
65e4e4dd3a2ddc291e514bacda6c04d6
ef7ba38c3772c2a37bd63feb4ca8b58fe19b3cfb
'2012-05-02T14:59:33-04:00'
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
8d19325f7966decf246f6ec1a17fe323
520832a21367011be05f6b69d997b841a9ed9ec8
describe
'27791' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRN' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
66fe2e50b4c4c37176dc7ab17fd8a394
5a65ec602b6331f3c24ba8c8755b2545df3124e6
describe
'258972' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRO' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
d54e0450123e63fb8ccbb2506ccd71eb
0afc7e3d1068c2ea6de176d4a7f64c0cf231cde2
'2012-05-02T15:02:51-04:00'
describe
'184220' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRP' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
29f7b7f501d6c5c8e532172ab1294ed2
50775d151e06775849f633865e069ae96b441b75
describe
'25365' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
c1594a5ba4bcbe32b3723a5fd168dd74
9099a8d3c40644c628a5a61ef4a64c1b2b98ebc8
'2012-05-02T14:58:42-04:00'
describe
'73156' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRR' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
6e234960410aa767d40da832390471c0
c1b5b6a6792f4d1c000d921121a4b5c97216bd12
describe
'2085524' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRS' 'sip-files00081.tif'
7205f2eeaf66af9cd907a6018e34b211
c44ec7d9fbe715c018a797fbe4b119ac56394ede
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRT' 'sip-files00081.txt'
fffd4aff5f7c5045a32fa1308452f150
7190d3f10e954b72e2625b507badfb8edfddbeac
describe
'253413' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRU' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
f1bea18a206c113c008dca0fe3a5975b
1e7689f01418ac2232892fde6fd81d60ad46734c
describe
'152131' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRV' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
20bd032ba252b95e40ac68fe6742adde
228ac55716dc79e468687d28d0bf930915267e4e
describe
'17723' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
73d17adfebfb0ce9bd2e855d79b6eef8
1ce0f69d16c9c2ada152e2bffb9d98aa5889ba62
describe
'60678' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
504e94445350d04f0bc5fe5c74755d63
77f11aa7f1e932c74ec09ef4319e15135cdfce63
describe
'2039240' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
e414f7287a36b18b2633aa1d8db30729
8448c329d71cd637a19fc62f26c073cc97f612de
describe
'733' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLRZ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
d473806c5eaa9b31a33697606203b3b2
e7df8db037bc4e950e092992bacc9f169d3cd8bf
describe
'24151' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSA' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
6d4e85630ac5960ffba1d593ea2e19f9
a33f9087ef1a954a76fb80539ef2ab9a82c26f8f
describe
'252277' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
21ff2d8e51a51fa8730e5e06a0efeed5
e47b0459c86c19776b399ab4e40439954e7b75a4
describe
'164800' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSC' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
ed97918e25b9d152e9a73350094a3a26
1f5338df20a66c26541c91d709fc89c9d5943939
'2012-05-02T15:00:19-04:00'
describe
'18060' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSD' 'sip-files00083.pro'
7c41b8ff2ebb0b0d1a0858d3ace1ace2
37086010078be7fca50e18c8de27bc16b29f979a
describe
'60223' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSE' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
af088efddb1f232b2e36937fb201f507
c97e439137a4e4630b331f43f547a0dc44435a86
describe
'2030480' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
be56898fc11ce2b48fdfeac0ef7b6cb6
04b61b45934500e4e469660ffae77cb82aec7ca9
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
4542a36be4d3c03e98efea72abcca35d
4313af2de736bb76c32fb6f8e3bc7d6b1f86851d
describe
Invalid character
'24740' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSH' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
0a6925a8ebf26dd2041fd6ec3f2045a7
11aae3f1d44e4026088cfeb07e660ffafe8ac75c
describe
'251762' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
02a995d891c5d8dcf20f0fb0b5368ab1
86ed2ef270e120b679f7fea72a65832a498a3605
describe
'175183' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
70eb363a4498fd789f87c20a230ea4e1
b3d07d6ff26b1b9bfccfa560c926467205f02109
describe
'70679' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSK' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
98a888e1ae1284f015f8b48a9746469e
b8244c3239a87ab0543995d8d0d27fd2ed9a13bb
describe
'2027580' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSL' 'sip-files00084.tif'
796206b902adc27cac5e7ce131eb01f0
37f72d2334b15443ced0f686479d798cb39470d8
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSM' 'sip-files00084.txt'
d19005ceb92d599488115aa2fb21658e
504d295050f0a0bb9ac0728ed5c729995ffb41c0
describe
'28337' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSN' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
da8c74e0a44f1250600a5431c86c38e1
cebc79b029b966f22ec8de2f6e72cea151131cd1
describe
'250334' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSO' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
71b27bc15259387968a459db19ea02fb
31487b6a189bca81e8cc7f277952d32a7090ea4c
describe
'188632' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
608a26565b4e25f45c2ca2aacb26a91b
4210ae097a059fb425f6e9ff55de4364181bd4d8
'2012-05-02T15:03:13-04:00'
describe
'24023' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSQ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
dfcda378fa479471c5c3996a13bf4582
da0f623ba2746a6578a471543a63b4ac4a02d298
describe
'74531' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSR' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
dd5c0317718e39577a0094c571c0bbd4
e7951f7681af63c3b8d63e52fe1e3313767e844b
'2012-05-02T15:00:07-04:00'
describe
'2016264' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
5d4b78c8e24ed02807e02405bc46a0ca
becb46d65a614548be8c1729d9d5b0ef1d606f3c
'2012-05-02T15:02:48-04:00'
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLST' 'sip-files00085.txt'
6415bbfba7946a438d6c5d8dae574bb6
fe2928bc173fff486c88298a7eeb3d32cd92f6c4
describe
'29116' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSU' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
52c1d19e47c300f3714222e62d326083
24b253edf0979ba13d59a900c3926c9446b868d8
describe
'255143' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSV' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
d9f234c39068740d5d2bcb00efa7f030
e25dc56a2a75f5e867a9f40c9a0d8e11976e3215
describe
'184038' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ad03a635d994a5d63b70ea354386d33c
971dfbec5938258f6a6444ed6f4fdc471c059c8c
describe
'24384' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSX' 'sip-files00086.pro'
1c4e56e94a493300ef4764760dfa8aae
dcbde955c2d87a2288e297d1bd53d5c525c26bc8
describe
'73834' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSY' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
60e8c4e45bd8633369a2b9e54fb32b69
0e55fc0a8e8a7510aa234adfcba4fc70cc6f71a1
describe
'2054888' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLSZ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
95cc0dc7e09c47afb49e62c88aa6f4a5
d37b727b70cd814b1e8f1bf31a4f10b2169f0a45
describe
'28317' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTA' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
87ca1a6f3d4d04e5dcc54ff526869669
99ba11be5c88e4d5af7d1e47f9c533f05e4448c9
describe
'252544' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
29262a9ae8aec2cb52e0235040be69fd
7989592ff1b685ee5defbefc8d159c450370dd25
describe
'196914' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTC' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
bab8d87a14aa0ece77faa4a6e9d9afde
36a53a3af31f3254db51e7f211a8007d0679002e
describe
'23934' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTD' 'sip-files00087.pro'
27d84d6b8e46e7c96842b907f9bedb2c
9503783dd7cb6d8b166fba981dcfdd90aed4d1e9
describe
'75696' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTE' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
6613c5ccb96db2c07ceeb3728481bb14
c108769b49e2a9e522299d9ddd3efcb75ee9b14b
'2012-05-02T15:00:53-04:00'
describe
'2033940' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTF' 'sip-files00087.tif'
18337eceda8361b12c9337cd5384233f
67ce60a12a57b63af94bda5a3d8923bf99ce65dc
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTG' 'sip-files00087.txt'
dc0bd8c265d762917a8224e0b1a61eb5
55b56a90fd2a06077fa4e27f450cc5e9f2bc253c
describe
'29371' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTH' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
7ce816f9ec45241072073c7ec60e3d10
3b3f785911916a4b90f30da4fe0cdaeda05c3801
describe
'262977' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTI' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
a54f3e622d3422e982ae5c1d95ed9c7d
3a2b2e5c99a98538f955903b17311cc03e22cfad
'2012-05-02T15:04:02-04:00'
describe
'196561' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTJ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
d97df00d43d3646bd6ab3a260aac57a3
1962a97e995de4a3e3fc6e5fbca17fbcb6558986
describe
'26364' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTK' 'sip-files00088.pro'
7f218276ad2d9047633e2c841964ab67
a0bec3adcc0868338b5fab1ac271c6b1f039129c
describe
'76038' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTL' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
d206c9768e7ebdeeedc362b04d9fa8e1
3c6d5b3a2e3282d9ebb790c633a7f9e2130271e0
describe
'2117156' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTM' 'sip-files00088.tif'
7cc7465614fcaa13cbf09e008977f3d7
853e69a25a9bf200b775cb89f3af5e342eef76eb
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTN' 'sip-files00088.txt'
cc42a00e4dce64721d75013326a7f161
aea999242d1d8e610d292cd0f30f1cc5c44f5791
describe
'28900' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTO' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
dd0224d5e69d20e188e199d84b8c1347
d24013da48ea0f15ecfbdaf780b4090c60272b88
describe
'205847' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTP' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
29adcec5135edf0a225480a69692754a
9af849a68273d18f2a527937bf2d08dd705735c6
describe
'26136' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTQ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
fc0cea1bf9f0eb9fb3e60baafdb14661
aa05a7393d7a15333a8a24e780f27726a15eb2c5
describe
'80374' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTR' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
bc2234361700654f825b7952c60e59d3
9987cc4ce0f81b6ca483af9e28d55d6113e79eb5
'2012-05-02T15:01:32-04:00'
describe
'2051280' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTS' 'sip-files00089.tif'
e72f61d2c04d00371fa702a0501bc5f0
5987a5909a26220712b50dba71ee56d63a9d89ab
'2012-05-02T15:03:36-04:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTT' 'sip-files00089.txt'
6f6f8cd38536f8c11eb2fed205b84e68
ab3f1c1b7a23d7c4b1c9629fc2e93db4e179515b
describe
'30456' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTU' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
1ff1f60522a0bdb6f012646583e21017
9c4334ac304bf8c56d9322140a246bda0695697f
describe
'249593' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTV' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
e08e5a1011a7d7297aeb568d18278ffd
74496978822d0015f81c8a2bd66088082009832b
describe
'193748' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTW' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
b83c8176a09b076976eb9ecafbfe1c29
cbc034ff059940ac4927de2ab87a8458fe52c6f5
describe
'24804' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTX' 'sip-files00090.pro'
3ec365c7ff9fd8111752a2c9a36e21b6
0550bad86538654810fd4ed28f5fba4cb1612958
describe
'77847' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTY' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
c484d5ff900686b559ec5606890c4ee9
a2e13a597d4d6d6f3d44fbf9894453f69bf9e8ef
'2012-05-02T15:03:03-04:00'
describe
'2010224' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLTZ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
8cd2281cb7c474bbfbff629af0276a98
28db102140ab7535776488d091dda15e800496ac
'2012-05-02T15:03:38-04:00'
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUA' 'sip-files00090.txt'
f5cdab2017c74cabfaa2586e632626a1
5d1624c56430860f30b86ebb4aa05ed39b9f652d
describe
'29155' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUB' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
d0b2e8d0495a558f2ed01e4882ec0e6a
5b764989153aa7032a56e8384ce71270dc4a5a44
describe
'252301' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUC' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
87bab886d1ae94beb693e2fe9c3fe19c
9699f6b389236f13a1e380291ee3f95412494808
describe
'185538' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUD' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
a4ad4505116e6e2c57aa2605669bdd61
817288e4d85d50f203e21dcaa4cda8787b1ad09b
describe
'25799' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUE' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c7a6aa70a7fc98ff69143165f26be416
94a12aa787e21940b0bf9dcd935891af085d3f2f
'2012-05-02T15:02:11-04:00'
describe
'260846' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUF' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
b426c9d5ca947ccd5f706bbd5478241f
662efdb663514c930caa0e382075699112bb2b9f
describe
'72294' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUG' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
a5cbd3ab62f545c3fbe03f4ce68cee7b
b3ebe96a31a1af0bb6cea96f9934bcb8a68e19db
'2012-05-02T15:03:11-04:00'
describe
'221636' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9dd37b07c013a1d14b2569594e04aad6
a5cd812d36ce8e55b733874baeb15c22c59d6aa5
describe
'2050548' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUI' 'sip-files00060.tif'
e593d7d1f915344a1a8b0eb618746304
6f438d97add14cfb23c8bedea72ecf0f108c03a7
describe
'28844' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
9aeb9ea3a51afb3bcc30f2e3bf4033c3
ed6a79f07dfb7fccac1c11aa8314245b8ecbbc17
describe
'7625' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
328652d09034033841c8aedc85cf6360
8567a3a62355bae9670c32ffa24e1b27fd88b77f
describe
'635' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUL' 'sip-files00067.txt'
cbfb8c2477ae48735897880a10266bc5
7f2e89554f87a3a7d81fbab9f0f2d219c004d389
describe
'253411' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUM' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
93c4916d168968d27e81d3bd01371f0b
72537d3322f3aa2de60be2adc25b87c8e9780695
describe
'77371' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUN' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
8ec2a2a4abab103e54c7ad983179878c
293b77424e041b1de8a54254fa31c1d9ace29940
describe
'200089' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUO' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
b1a11735dc83a4501c20cba34b962163
f6f78edbffaa85109c8d3ce06864ba8f3701d6db
describe
'2083676' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUP' 'sip-files00079.tif'
6f62b422f1a171d28af9527813f08004
b6aec416b30c39f54a6b4167f5a3881582df9df0
'2012-05-02T15:00:30-04:00'
describe
'28142' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUQ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
83f694daf50ea4f52142bf3cd7b92b4b
595804485ed4d3027a322c83e8e95599a908c4c0
describe
'23207' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUR' 'sip-files00084.pro'
0b7cb80a0df7504ce53e96c26e033615
5a6624bd48182c42b3247d8987525ba2ebad8feb
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUS' 'sip-files00086.txt'
7b3450b16c955666ced616c2bece9474
fef45b20a65245e3afd835ec3efa8a0b59d1797f
describe
'254642' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUT' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
2d348c9494ce505b7bd60aaa7420434d
24724ebf7fe9c90bf391b6da1676b712bc859e70
describe
'73444' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUU' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
e63c8829fd0dd0935c2972e70838d3f2
31b5597fe7a6a1d852440a3da66c11230e50144a
'2012-05-02T15:01:33-04:00'
describe
'170063' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUV' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
fdff412c10d08a9f241d6fb7e47c68fc
b02877b93922ba8296a65855848fcff766d6d35f
describe
'2056868' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
dd0ef2b5c5d9aff21064e5152b8812e3
608a3e3633d4228a0975e2710197b99fb336d8b7
describe
'29743' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUX' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
8fbd1e6327596c0f54c771a0b47f5558
18260a6d77d25966156b97b83921224fc14e3364
describe
'25942' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
18cd003fc3f0c0901c25f9ceec3047d3
0adedb030d264c2829af790e87db3b3db1794116
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLUZ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
b518201e119df25b9e088416f6b3d927
cfeef8bfc989e9cc5f02e7bcb1fccfa411d55ad0
describe
'260770' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
67ee803b58dc7f5612ae501305a4ded0
da1e4f957cb57bb6e45c4b6c7be726567f1a57a3
'2012-05-02T15:03:53-04:00'
describe
'73629' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVB' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
e911d96a4eb11eed1faf1ef5d1b54855
5f6c97fd038e1492037a2a298b5502c5d5577ef3
'2012-05-02T15:01:03-04:00'
describe
'198423' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVC' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
7181c4ddacf8efd1fd2e8d29573f8ab1
ab8db6b11dcb9dcf4c634ec1e6422cdf3d148d9f
describe
'2058152' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVD' 'sip-files00117.tif'
12ddc9f7309da0aa382829710e94f735
3a29c2bbdaacba87659a22d13850f0b9100be5c3
describe
'29297' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVE' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
05ddf79059fff5c8e7947c22586021af
58fbb9f1eadc280443c0992c0337c268d47527d8
describe
'23493' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
7d77459ad17d8d35907f384ef255977c
8ca77b6f14a45bb8c20e96851e29492994551a86
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
583e4f13d4b3653171459d1da7b71803
4c1384fe5d8f47de29c9d868e321bab910079c88
'2012-05-02T14:59:37-04:00'
describe
'251050' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVH' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
382c97e2d14afea8fbab599d0e5c93c2
c7fa7551108e4e601ebf16e38ec72ac405d5fbde
describe
'37918' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVI' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
81f59302fff85c31b9c681d4c2ec7b21
f0e076d9c5b136035d00aab27609ede0bb5910e0
describe
'2030984' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
7bc37efbc4a866feebf285a4bf52e4c2
45f6838b73f72bd4c691497dc22b0fe3081d4b30
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
1dddd8385a29dfab2459d772e00dc06c
44311a60b84fdffebb2db9c729ee6a6cd0c78a24
describe
'28241' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
db17ee2ad6a5864167a66a21e982d616
5c60acdec17986b7cb32e9dd68592f419adb9597
describe
'256409' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
09627a72a60bc9f9fa76980df27ae3e1
330f26533831fa26e79e5731ebdc1431e58db7da
'2012-05-02T15:00:54-04:00'
describe
'193363' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVN' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
003f8f7bdf5557e2d94d2dce611620be
33a7c01188afaba8df9debf4089a2ae0350a18a1
describe
'24912' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
6a16008cdbaab31034e20fa4f7b23ce1
4574d326957339159bbf9e0ce163adfdc8da73d4
describe
'77703' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
25befd13b0c436d16739bc1d154955b4
1bd29b1c285f13a67ffbb011a008d284b95a74aa
describe
'2064848' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
11594399fe6523361abc6658bea519e0
52bd5c34ae21967268b906d47d76318deca33131
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
1eef571a10aecb4d68ff81c0d1ad477e
4b28565ee9691ce87a9b56a49da21ddb64e72a00
describe
'29399' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVS' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
147a0b65688c4146fd767f514ea93ee2
3bb76740b4189a6f51e4c71db68b9e684c4c2024
describe
'256852' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
2e06f50ba1dd2a1a92a4713b4e8492fa
5137d9baa66389bb4c126f38523ba8a36253d265
describe
'198434' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
72917452d7026e66aa67a5ccf7b78cde
9f53f7f4dba18e045a65b7a58c040c32cb2f13c6
describe
'25084' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVV' 'sip-files00093.pro'
2f26ba9a95ee896be0d6f9d9c5585373
dd0a09703bcddde35a8e68cecb663ea6722217a4
describe
'77574' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
8099aca7b20f5d7cb36a92171e7a8a4c
23358cbb7cb1ccc258a82d9ec0688acc60ee6e25
describe
'2068724' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d3edfd7f79e03da7ae708fb9351e5628
952752b7da5173344bb754aefbc0eb369ac5cb91
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVY' 'sip-files00093.txt'
e6120f17bee64f48187b39a1700f7c0c
3dcf96390fd6a886c6e369ef42c9d4189fc3e88b
describe
'29526' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLVZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b3ec203367cbd6e73abcd4e69f9027bd
8fb2e25cbd06d7e45a6e5db983b57acb8eb8f442
'2012-05-02T15:04:07-04:00'
describe
'249638' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
c735bad9ecb61d2d09d3086ff60ae159
dd7b46b250c6885464acb4d485d626bef45a6592
describe
'170365' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWB' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
09388b285f00e7b44fe15981447110f4
548c8e24d12ff85e65f682bf43244123ad65ae1a
describe
'25447' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
98ebc1c6eb128e2cf26c2891f8bfdc19
5eaffc669ac92e3aaf72242def4358272a26bd41
describe
'74969' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWD' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
08e8098117358d60cf9946857e071d5a
21284798f4e47209ad9cdbe2d8570e3c4bbb20ed
describe
'2019384' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
46fd2ffa6715db540eec7cca4c3a5c9e
11c180e17a079169a32cd40cfc20eb3e7adf5e7d
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWF' 'sip-files00094.txt'
d5b348c84b7868e82b56fa6ccfb50096
44cc7fbb724d41b905d96570a265112eada7fd03
describe
'35459' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
252c00a0fb38eb9f740ee5030c09ea8c
0526fb80b948de9fa5fdc5b2e6b98f77a7b2ac6c
describe
'250655' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
96681b17a88f598906332b85f1ee4db3
11f5f5cd88f52e63f1af41ea1953d91180a480ad
describe
'202062' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c2f80c0ab7dfc2fbffeb606fa42cf789
f16e5fa429a7fb2ca11a43b8ceabdc8f46f158d8
describe
'25975' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
94d8e7f8f3ab66f0601683ac1fb74870
8ea520cec7d518ba21d2812611dad90e9b0f4fe1
describe
'78615' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d66f99d5f8ccd4e56389ff682af4346b
f6cc8d57c04ea08bd43b59d38edabc21163c335f
describe
'2018476' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
e74d5c411cdece8ac52abf33aa1268eb
157d763b599992be2a3033621eee4fff93c3c7ab
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
929a0706dfde2c6d32f05c0411581b9a
867e1c9077c51724c720b240c645281eaa3fd33a
describe
'30707' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
fb86c51ab0713f13cc59e10dfd5e4194
ad57f2292eca266d7f48d6e7870a53479c1150fc
describe
'252704' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
8125abc5ceb7b57c2c2e36de79e43155
dfd43d0d7c616ebca7839f30ecf334296c0744b1
'2012-05-02T15:01:01-04:00'
describe
'20238' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWP' 'sip-files00096.pro'
82ca39a6f81f72576ff5daf91507158d
fa887ecf7de45fb6d203596926b1b8cd645e23e4
describe
'66614' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWQ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
54b861b6a8173f560a2b5a9594c3b2d3
3257bde4bd67e0de340bc322a8ab57d8683a8176
describe
'2034292' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWR' 'sip-files00096.tif'
9179d717f212d3d6084f89a1a1aa592c
ac317162ffcdb9895791d10cf8594ebb85d0e42f
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWS' 'sip-files00096.txt'
5782b4995175cb3cebe855c25979a6d9
c9da4a3cf372285525233aa446dff2025da33df1
describe
'26225' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWT' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
b43defc4c8cda26935238573b6803db4
27edb7d4aa7aa778b5d3e57e8d0e6b8905c83004
describe
'254072' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWU' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
6fd6c7b830bb18df89451fde7736b75e
d7de51f17c72236d36dfa1dfa63f805d7b366435
describe
'174197' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWV' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
33997acab876b55107f285ec227f2a5a
71c41ca6454739d2bf428dd437ca795437f59307
describe
'19243' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWW' 'sip-files00097.pro'
fc384f3b0a62e6f211512a4ecc678c9d
27d58ac2f377aa44a1fd0d7104b62d1be6d846ed
describe
'64639' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWX' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
eb676110143656ea2ed286e43c84f8c3
5d832803511698b5f2b6a0610735d61883b12419
describe
'2045708' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWY' 'sip-files00097.tif'
24b863d3f4fab0c90a3884e70034febf
40e42f5035941b7577a82cb9a2bc9f01b23766ca
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLWZ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
86d13750d287aab01defc54325342901
3e5da58afe47fe30214d23c3ca2b65aa3e6fbb13
describe
'26228' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXA' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
e3f8be4430adf40eba90be1cce9b8bf6
99dc9f0cc0aed758553fcc85c7c119939e9b4d7d
describe
'255401' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXB' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
29cfc58f29ef302c199ee095a4982e3b
2de148722813069e57f87f522ea5c1511e743974
describe
'187905' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXC' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
024c5ebe6a8ade1cd0dc93f2df7c10a7
9e7ee367925a5f231cce24f52feb89b781f637b6
describe
'24503' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXD' 'sip-files00098.pro'
b65bef9bc0e4bea40e028f1be3d6c82e
a3904426b4c20482f5f0ddedd8339d5016a2ea2b
describe
'75134' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
3e9216fcbdaf6d7e96445c16f02da901
10af01166c58bb4979dc82ed25d966ff634be49e
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXF' 'sip-files00098.txt'
f7735d5e0fdfa0acda91973701b0552c
e67be22f7e5075df1c800f31b29e158e3daa6226
describe
'29100' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXG' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
9d7c67dd04b687a000a7e038477c19b1
674a028884cedff49dd9e4844bbb1816dcd8ef8c
describe
'253484' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXH' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
2a39dcd955de58e49ff88df3e5f80b79
46bb7aa95a45bfb61459deeb0e7903bbd642ea94
describe
'188083' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXI' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
e50e3c96407f8c90699c1c9b38356431
215d655597564a1a9389821bf2af50eb5b8fb61c
describe
'24498' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXJ' 'sip-files00099.pro'
1f834f4e3b4585c906a07edf3efe9996
40f8929bc2afd13b3a98c9daca13daf4070b2c08
describe
'75124' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXK' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
c54480cd495afc05d0be602090b4a41a
28f4c199163cf9812893b625bb6b30b86a49b284
describe
'2040776' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXL' 'sip-files00099.tif'
e4d623d2d756f1d717ee59a3e211ac8b
e3e491c9ab67b3bd38d4c96d746ef1d9320dab0f
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXM' 'sip-files00099.txt'
d4992c1a536f2e577b5fe958f88727c6
21d8f0b68a360b556df6fcc662b05a99ad9836bb
describe
'28789' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXN' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
bd2cfe165fc47090826423f6b3aad0e5
a99a4c316a83e7b9e4dbef739804bad410726a94
describe
'252863' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXO' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
70ab269486d0582cf4db30727b8d7eb9
5b78dd4c409ec8d0d8866449c7cf4206cb3dba50
'2012-05-02T15:04:27-04:00'
describe
'199503' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXP' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b4b9f4c868157f847d40fcb7869833df
25447be69cd8d892faf95b39b13195b387ada627
describe
'25926' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXQ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
ea0c7abfee593f11c320b01b200c25be
4c987c27a93d16868254cb2ce804617613e27608
describe
'78366' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXR' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
6c2fb5b0dc96ea5380624cb4cd481b5b
3a7fe3362c9d3a93ba107f35ab0ebdb1129673b1
'2012-05-02T15:00:09-04:00'
describe
'2036256' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXS' 'sip-files00100.tif'
94ad33244765835e3a30f0a7e78149fc
d5aa241bb69dacb82c88df616dfebf6602a92115
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXT' 'sip-files00100.txt'
6581c857d10cd35d05f6e4edcfab6dda
2d992230b62dad38ddb20fb50da48ae4961cbd1e
describe
'258322' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXU' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
84af723edb3e02d32a8263868a581638
fcac57ed67cf7af82726397eaa350b801225f8d0
describe
'196519' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXV' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
8956a77bbdf0970063b8748ae97bc79e
c6782ee5af398f861588b19cff8c8093341aad5d
describe
'25827' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXW' 'sip-files00101.pro'
e8275cbc3df5e0aac2adc4071c081213
3cfda4f9b845ee52acefe393d204338ee004c2a1
describe
'77043' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXX' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
73377c6252cae73b71ec11c1e78f9adc
2a65665dc5e8333c66390b7966f447d766c9279c
describe
'2080424' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXY' 'sip-files00101.tif'
1485dc9679649df16cf6cd4a76314f6e
78ef83ca196e820ef3b7c61c3cfa56c1b37b567c
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLXZ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
bbe46b898b97e998c8a9dd876d92ba79
4f0128e8ca9dc8cc150580a05affe0639b3179b0
describe
'30000' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYA' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
6d56ad34ff1e4e6324056b581ad5bc53
1b4db8c71985182d8b4ca9253e1fd9e1cc1ddf46
describe
'258545' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYB' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
e2b8f459df0c3adff0bbe5992f974f63
b4639e91b28d6e49f60d8eaef0c1829c86917868
describe
'196222' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYC' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
68e5feb31ba2c052b74b76e087917056
97db9b484b7dd35449516bb05fe3a8b3945f93a0
describe
'25740' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYD' 'sip-files00102.pro'
6c09fc9c0351a0a684bdb854cc290f8f
527a76b25fba10f1bdc4b1ea89598bfe1c34eb6e
describe
'76947' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYE' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
2639a93bdb746461e1875e5e6b84033f
e6540840536f3537186ef9bb5a1a82c2de16116b
describe
'2081312' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYF' 'sip-files00102.tif'
2220696371c588302476426e9b8f66fc
6f3d63bdfd4b9abe36d8073960598d952db294c2
'2012-05-02T15:02:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYG' 'sip-files00102.txt'
cf0442e887da2eda064d636a342b7ff8
17a4a580958778074319f658d2686c13ecba67cb
describe
'29110' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYH' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
39c959024b8eaa65b14cf799e7dad149
6beb2fd07ff58be45e6eba87dcb47195a4584b4e
describe
'255936' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYI' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
a54679621a428a3213ebc46ab4b8288a
6efb0be42fb90c84135b5b7e1b60c56abfe78a4f
'2012-05-02T15:04:06-04:00'
describe
'195340' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYJ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
36b13c7e671046239db39a1dbfc1868a
56d4a0d65fc51c496fd0d06786be77d4c9b7dc7d
describe
'75838' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYK' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
5faebb464e78aed9d415f45592f5664c
c873ae93d3f49775bc3b8c57290e24d1b934714f
describe
'2060280' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYL' 'sip-files00103.tif'
77f37793e443e6f1e2e75fcba7ad2d63
b324b7485b4e548e1d572fd267b667450cc1b1eb
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYM' 'sip-files00103.txt'
dbfee2cbe5597c08e84993c61dec9919
a41bc3d3cdde52d25ea1dfdc8c05169140170ab8
describe
'28641' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYN' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
292ee5a35000144a344ecd06479a6759
acc23c60f7ae3933305338d501fd29e7b3302835
describe
'255269' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYO' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
e2c875c49d9b89c45a19870914a31c85
bfe532b248f5ec43f98ad88c27c6d27368c5373f
describe
'187498' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYP' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
85e7543a111f678522447cb959917f4e
0c97bd651ea2895f70ae0fc6e351814644e32c6a
describe
'24485' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYQ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
8ac71f19ca4645735be1b76f4bb1fc4c
99ff1cce44eb67a1d67698286f532101c9a740bf
describe
'73710' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYR' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
0a9b92c220b2a2d63004b0612b99a184
6d46c8043f732ef4141636dbeb335e91b2000ddc
describe
'2055708' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYS' 'sip-files00104.tif'
99f4520d6f7e02916285299aefdea348
6ec4f417f4f137843fe5849bacddbb11de1de6dc
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYT' 'sip-files00104.txt'
b7d03b7ffb872b5f7f2c45d428331b23
d81035b74d386b4ff5a405360fcbe3bbe36b475c
describe
'28816' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYU' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
5493b7fed2fdbf4f91767d73e3889e26
9800802ebf2cdc590e1a01e1e1f27d559c0a9fea
describe
'256836' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYV' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
b2136fe110145eebbdb36ce84a4e1648
28a574ba8d9e8fd4c234b3b99d936ec4f7be22a5
describe
'170640' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYW' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
622271130ba2cb603115fb8c2508986f
d6c197cc5f7de931592d526fbe3dc6f4104a3a4d
describe
'24400' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYX' 'sip-files00105.pro'
b1a7c028414a5b6b78d0656bade9b751
0979934e8f43382681adb0a059203872d68622e1
describe
'68533' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYY' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
8bdbb286dbada82ac85610873a0ad91d
31b1d6a49cfc1cec5266c631b8f88a000abbd759
describe
'2067704' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLYZ' 'sip-files00105.tif'
b9adde1217072dc09b38ccad3d41f075
393ec900c94bac4aaf0946428572a88e00e86ddc
describe
'26979' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZA' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
778ee5ee10adb7b999fb77be3a0c955c
d310614bc1954ec3131f09535a49dadf10ad144f
describe
'252926' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZB' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
4672ed79469dd4173071253eee742869
ce5262b2b762be0129d82ee8468b5c8b2e7103ab
describe
'190678' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZC' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
53532ed7f899738ac39d0365b4d5be8b
be7324329ff1877eb0e26eda578ab1ebbe0951a6
describe
'24654' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZD' 'sip-files00106.pro'
a8412d9968e74c01e6dbf2064425883b
4828833d18efb351ae8a085965f576c9bbc7bcc3
describe
'76754' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZE' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d3d3dcefbbec54ab56e66a4e52cc3959
d5ef73072b7f58c0ec10d5c2d149664df22506be
describe
'2037028' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZF' 'sip-files00106.tif'
82e8b31f946639713247be8fe42b7025
0404517b30cd9b2aea1ce7f78a9a7a1ea9fe57d2
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZG' 'sip-files00106.txt'
9efbc4d17d7856867be462642932ce4b
e5dcc877800b04775fd828f07a76e9a2818c6a2f
describe
'29410' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZH' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
c296336541a6a88da61c7681d859534e
6038e9d4892efb110659b2fe68d63d6ceb078b4c
describe
'252476' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZI' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
b54cf23c8b7d360037762dae011d2635
38bd55dd2d393779a952bc1f64da6048cf8dfa9c
describe
'171323' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZJ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
e1376f2fbacf6a7da22d55650f0187d9
b5a9cad013721e719f4383da6c9132e9a5584325
describe
'21115' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZK' 'sip-files00107.pro'
b7e3d2e0292883c635e917c3434beb8b
617679c6a085258ad6e932e37d2a552030b70fd8
describe
'68490' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZL' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
334d5a328836dd8fe56f638c47e72dfe
b421996d8084988efad55d67b2a0169c9fe86eb4
describe
'2033452' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZM' 'sip-files00107.tif'
d77ce2f469206fe116f58123f58124fd
a9064c3c736ed5c1f33276190298d2998cbbab84
'2012-05-02T15:00:40-04:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZN' 'sip-files00107.txt'
145732e029e66bc2c540e043001fda52
1c987bab0fc5cdde6fecde0c38d6b122778e26d7
'2012-05-02T15:00:12-04:00'
describe
'28237' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZO' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
3e95a426dae2ae0afe676b59c2e573d0
87cca99193ec00dbf7b0a3682748c7a98b55a38a
describe
'176987' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZP' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
51797008a9b148c2374324377bd54379
a11c8b4d7ab58c9c0d11bbbc57c180099b3533c2
describe
'22779' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZQ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
29d98f829245a0abd5136917f9eb8b8e
4fecb8880ea94bc5c8718e76744cfcbd8932b451
describe
'70200' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZR' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
d6094b43df3d17e2ce2e012b2677fa39
ac159bc746f47a23e3a869d588a671c73ac73aa7
describe
'2099428' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZS' 'sip-files00108.tif'
46c480fa6a30b1d0c292a37de1a8b8df
f6206b0bf372c77bc9f8313485001f84316769be
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZT' 'sip-files00108.txt'
f5bbceb841c7442fadd6bcb2035b9288
f8105a1e34afb249f5111aca05a000fd846df1e6
describe
'27625' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZU' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
3f9eba1d75a7b0ccbc5b22a409df6ea3
b876aed22dc5517415c1c4101ba33a478ff0c3ae
describe
'256045' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZV' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
6503bcbbae2759a64bf472526e8e1217
b3bdc47b17fa2bdba339eb56b5f41ec74b72e795
describe
'191008' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZW' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
89c8b27d77a12dab66348eb7a9eb0bf9
674bb5499bd1e009ed28cefc694d13a53e5a0db2
describe
'25471' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZX' 'sip-files00109.pro'
35c862eb3d78f20127fa0c0c8e8d42af
8f6392558579ddefd52dc147ded9999b7895d427
describe
'78545' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZY' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
8c55faf934a2477c0ac4e5551d700643
27b3b9207c6bd2f69a02184c8976a0aeb276bac2
describe
'2062076' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABLZZ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
b28fc5906b447183ad7f5e11cde77033
7b06c8eddad5811baa1c62a879b42b09a0b4466b
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAA' 'sip-files00109.txt'
e2f303ceee1a215359b67755086d3e88
eecf35258e73bdf899526831b6ee382e3e00451c
describe
'30120' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAB' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
74069a72c1dc4e7bac5f22e383e7d947
200e89828aba44900f66d66358b7ea1020a8fa02
describe
'251788' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAC' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
888d7e9d65979494e0a1d45dfc281773
8ffd5713fbfc8cd2c606f91db4b24d3284d1c661
describe
'180836' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAD' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
3d3e1d2f96b4bb8e757ade0a7ffcc4e4
fc63bd9e6362bf81b43ffb312c2c384d9bbd530c
describe
'23107' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAE' 'sip-files00110.pro'
08dc71c0589ba54473fbda6276730f58
3dfcf3b06cea8e7be388960b56c61610c77801bf
describe
'2028228' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAF' 'sip-files00110.tif'
b8b20f70d409254e9bdb7a057a0ccf0d
222a8a7bde860479e508c7604634257d59d99c7b
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
cbd90a53979c629c1b9f7d4eec5295e9
799b69a9b92f18f2b02addf7eb18da642f7d8da7
describe
'29390' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAH' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
639cd97e21b014254e4850b1285a3c44
5e23a5e43833c420f1b590fb27d18513ae51805a
describe
'254473' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAI' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
3824800e7458005272815ba1f5f1fdb0
892f7b336fd08e28c6f6258db2cd3ef406752fb6
describe
'187133' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAJ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
bb091e21fb47276f3f3e7bfc51a6d674
bd523c8de53de016b467e575288b687bb623aee1
describe
'24143' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAK' 'sip-files00111.pro'
619ef9d9e58a5dda021fb0aff7ff343e
0228faa608e92d9c0ceaa30fb2e681e34008aaad
describe
'74746' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAL' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
7afb3455a2bdca6807718f5d2a7bdfb1
003306a9c3c8f26671dfd1a627d3c649f4cca399
describe
'2049064' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAM' 'sip-files00111.tif'
6896aa55a4da56d31fdca0a1a16ac4aa
673c881726d06ada860061d989e9b6f9add209d2
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAN' 'sip-files00111.txt'
dab58c8f8a52efb0a9af51556708ed48
d689ee4225aafa3c85e9cc466146f6cceda51be7
describe
'29151' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAO' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
6db3117250f8ffd4720f5f5fa3c22f02
c29fc31ef19fb72933399f58d3cc8e1d7a38d441
describe
'246109' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAP' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
6edbf137177d52f5748c96a9ddef8f68
e6330155d8c36ec8e7f1d7c320cd344bc4266e51
describe
'149268' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAQ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
2f6a8384fc3ebbe91a9a46ba56928b80
c77b780fe7be0ca855b181f192d7849174cd126c
describe
'17239' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAR' 'sip-files00112.pro'
0f20e20fb832b3eb3b87b5cb3712a7c2
8824beb47888da8c1e79151596794d9f8651efe2
describe
'60312' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAS' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
a814ea19539a81f7d2a933df4ba386ba
bca909cc17928bd59e69e9e3656ded256b5eae82
'2012-05-02T15:03:21-04:00'
describe
'1981384' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAT' 'sip-files00112.tif'
95e79e316eae4f411b79fecff2affaf5
a09b470fb75929fd74be3e2076da852b4a0ed52c
describe
'723' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAU' 'sip-files00112.txt'
517723ad687e7e38e796acc98e777be0
708f1426a37785f0ad0df00d3225dcbcfdf94970
describe
'24757' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAV' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
fb253d0eaf4a4b6939a4d07c6249cc3f
e2aec24a306f3c3f3fb38e8f0d0ade13f0e04ae2
describe
'252133' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAW' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
910772e1df4f2a8eabef0343992a130f
5a192c0802873b9371fd666b667a70f367040ebf
describe
'166963' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAX' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
86dc5912145c65e128caa8e8f3d79362
07dcb38be881c094d57eb2264730da6e46fc6e5e
describe
'15305' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAY' 'sip-files00113.pro'
80b032c697c879426432b71e1d40ca87
a9ed8922d833adb05e2efea0abd860f3888e9afb
describe
'63747' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMAZ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
f5d530c6c0da3bde6de1a0c5453f8fae
3e84b565c19882d419b83ad0daa7496e8a32512d
describe
'2029916' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBA' 'sip-files00113.tif'
9f856958f070da740c2040b185e23446
ec69da9bbe4195d54eaa149f60b34b27d6277ad2
'2012-05-02T14:59:19-04:00'
describe
'669' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBB' 'sip-files00113.txt'
7c4e15122dcaf54b150d95910b5bb609
60397b938a5760e664b067fb2c58c66d673a3623
'2012-05-02T15:04:01-04:00'
describe
'26160' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBC' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
1246a5b06c1795a1338fcf1cab3a6a77
a1e214dc82fbaa22d1b9006d6ccf1e8faa10c99f
describe
'258554' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBD' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
260e2dce5e83003c80fd03457a8f23a4
8fcd87c295b0f14c4e2c53deab277ff7be80cf1a
describe
'186510' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
b67dea7641f2b7d7a3826047afc9d472
10b5ce6b49e38e2a6566f0fbbf6c709f603119e4
describe
'24535' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBF' 'sip-files00114.pro'
8119fd1598e6a86ab4e82ecd94a5c1f8
68bdcd6aaa293c400f18cb12c25b3d161c784f75
describe
'76076' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBG' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
4de561ec7bab160ac34f2756d40fa6e4
dc7d5d5fb39ac0fba9857d52efbbf0155e3ace28
describe
'2081864' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBH' 'sip-files00114.tif'
f3026a4495f7c4a23f75be4ea1cd918c
6630cde0ea8575ace1c02210a73eb0e7c14118c9
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBI' 'sip-files00114.txt'
2ae618f68787f4c3228861ea89b29260
1d0271e89d8d3761850d36e3f30a191be3ddec74
describe
'29351' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBJ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
84112aff3cf1a261056ff7135b8f74f0
a4078597712b7fde34faa8f85071f0167160339c
describe
'249858' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBK' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d97c1870d4727da4cf43bdef2fc1333b
815981b2d1806f6eaaafd8391a05a21689bd369f
describe
'25344' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBL' 'sip-files00115.pro'
47bb87d320d4362692c79933a7ed23e5
f0f97c4971c462f5a2a555b90e3d3758935d29b3
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBM' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
f295ef955af1968712bc49d412a9a252
d35900ed2fa799bc95fa275b64ee55c6e82a18fe
describe
'2013168' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBN' 'sip-files00115.tif'
9f625895acbe35881f1c14430bc63c5e
45261ce873a9fd388fee3841328a37e1301bdab2
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBO' 'sip-files00115.txt'
9b538b64601afc12d255a2adc6d5eb6a
74cd9dd8cd7823b0ac63fbeb0776b9a4f71230a1
describe
'29726' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBP' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
c1ebcb9bb111691274f5cf01eacbc994
59267ba36ad65fed3145f45a67e9aa3300f90229
'2012-05-02T15:03:27-04:00'
describe
'262582' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBQ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
f1fdc7d63b288e27efcadfb03cbf44cb
72158516f691b6c172fdc5d1b0d1236a34a3c42b
'2012-05-02T15:03:28-04:00'
describe
'179217' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBR' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
9d08f4c9029160861dd3b4b3123a4103
5478ad7ffcd37140e67b7ed8ac85e790769a21ac
describe
'23571' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBS' 'sip-files00116.pro'
3fee04b4f0442dc1ad4ad9766c09d9dd
868c683eaedf561608eac4af357bc1db1bbe0d6a
describe
'70655' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBT' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
8215ff31c6211d1dc420bfa68cb0cc88
2a2ebfd78e2dccf737ceaecaaf97081503b77171
describe
'2113736' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBU' 'sip-files00116.tif'
5f73ef294bf9699f2b60687a7377dd31
7a87bbb3040ad59d54db1da9769dbb37294e9f38
'2012-05-02T15:03:59-04:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBV' 'sip-files00116.txt'
c11130e22502bbbf2dae5580acd1d721
349b56a8ed54dba0e226288f88332076ab245e4a
describe
'27219' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBW' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
12ab97bf55a65c5a591aaed746ce303e
165bf4ed75197fde27c52b09271f2a65e0f7beed
describe
'255635' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBX' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
b93cd99210f17bb05b64a7fceb11116c
f141332a3e8e8e09dc7ed2b38e7a4870ceca4767
describe
'182100' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBY' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
b7809ad49d22ca38aa8e3d15926ccdd6
a21ad08d1c1c062552a586a47aa51816e623ab9f
describe
'23117' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMBZ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
f5cb0c6ecb208dc94ab89de5b1eb8e99
f2a173d88d1e55725b05f2d94ce163aeff8fe395
describe
'72260' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCA' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
630e35223fdbf3181dd4b3002b37dc6b
8e84b5fd058761e7ba75059e79c3404f2702d8bf
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCB' 'sip-files00117.txt'
a27a3d923d45ae8b958c8b6943207433
29b2d805eac02db2ee0de1cb9088e1d19f8c577a
'2012-05-02T15:04:29-04:00'
describe
'28355' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCC' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
2e387be5f82b54376f367f9445fb6dd5
9fd056b8f61f998ff3f163beed11af8c2b505e67
'2012-05-02T15:01:30-04:00'
describe
'254223' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCD' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
1e0acb3d20818e3ae0516a99bf497938
0ce5097b7729b251376d57b0a5ce9981b96c7076
describe
'201835' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCE' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b65044e883fd3fac6f198f2582acd83e
202cb78b708c54459bdc44d5ce15711ea790421c
describe
'5806' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCF' 'sip-files00118.pro'
02f8e18e746a308c060d66418686b3eb
d1a49bcc0d46186636570d23308afe0031269fc4
'2012-05-02T15:03:45-04:00'
describe
'66278' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCG' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
d030496fe44b6df7a657892036b8a3f8
8d33c97884bbcbbfc18a2ad2c4d24aa89c42cbe9
describe
'2046652' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCH' 'sip-files00118.tif'
1e94f4b84bf51c5b66d9eff72606700a
63af5a29ddc51224036f46a8198c0f6cbbc2c447
describe
'403' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCI' 'sip-files00118.txt'
5ca6ddf07c57d180f1930d4d5e94372f
0bdac143cda44e68a9481aaf49b04a20938aeebf
describe
'26373' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCJ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
7fb592338f06dc0434a2cf2f0315ce4d
58428b99e2433afc7e15e28ca724bd650b48af97
describe
'254892' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCK' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
47dffc810a74399574a74e8fb93d88a4
dc599743a6d79f1fc8b1dcd23f88a1d8a7735f15
'2012-05-02T15:02:56-04:00'
describe
'196903' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCL' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
5ecdd9568ec7889ec9d41d9dc8ebceb7
29adfce899e8ac30ed4e8935f17d4cd940abc8ce
describe
'25093' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCM' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a36d32a5bdf73e74e88aa70ade428fc4
ea67b04c5fa08f272cf7af25b146f58f94834b6c
describe
'79089' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCN' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
2b8e818b35b3dfb7c62cb7ed37d6e5c2
ec26177166f7a8d2ec1f7c5cc8d4c75ac4ad6b83
describe
'2052468' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCO' 'sip-files00119.tif'
639522e1e8912360ca31f6ef73c41d3e
d0a2bdf39f1759e9d4793e691ee0a15323d9764e
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCP' 'sip-files00119.txt'
bfa120f18563dba5a51f01cd020b0dc3
58312292a9ecf62bf53c5beb5f23801b6e44f030
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCQ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
b2a46ce12da3d5c914966bf5c03e74af
a6c872a1d23efbfa10f660408a43a95ab59780ef
describe
'203340' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCR' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
755dad6bf093f8f07a8736590873d9c3
7523c18ac0868b452cd929fb7a85a897ffcf4a2e
describe
'25843' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCS' 'sip-files00120.pro'
0c0c18f22e829bcf21f6737d2102362e
7657bf329c21ff2f5cf90840bbefd455043771d2
describe
'80357' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCT' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
3c0ec07b01a62c1c6d543f597d5f242e
95955ce9ad366122fe1969871ae7de2c9bc3a260
describe
'2036292' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCU' 'sip-files00120.tif'
0670b258ed19a995b7ed7c4249b3f495
250cc4ef78aba6c0ba76b89c483d41058d352e33
describe
'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCV' 'sip-files00120.txt'
90bb707808de74582d30795d546024a9
5f02581efd520b4975a9923a517308f2b1954f17
describe
'29879' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCW' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
3f0d02b12201cde45fcb3837e0c8ae87
113d0b77c4559909ef563721cc235320936f5b63
describe
'254897' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCX' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
1badca7545869be69805765508d73be2
076489b062f433673b368bd6b8b09f5d5c912cf9
describe
'196296' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
f7988a8195edbbae27294e04493cdefb
c22430767421bfdd971cc22646df27945a324337
describe
'25192' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMCZ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
56a936011dbec6ab03bd57bb010a7a8b
8b20a81b0b974618cd878238acafd4d7e59b0e5c
describe
'75823' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDA' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
3c548f100163bb4fba992845a7236fcc
5fada13f66a5747c3e0444dfe3088a9f0150139c
describe
'2052240' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDB' 'sip-files00121.tif'
fde8e2919f2674f24dd88784fa835c02
ec3a521ed8d1736f63ba4dc85cebb6721a73ffd1
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDC' 'sip-files00121.txt'
44196559f6b8e921208c99aff2796d07
e20cfd74772bc77e500c0b7a85d856d354ef5c40
describe
'28886' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDD' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
829e834150866dd48330c45553f3fc31
0667ec53fe79c5d5ce9b0a0fda024f877308547b
describe
'255293' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDE' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
14b06307edaf3a73a8d8b53c6a311fc8
88637bdf7b79b58a5d510f33a79c9a190648ee03
describe
'183302' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDF' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
03e7b3c5be6ac29728e6aa5c76991edc
ad2cac41a4d23647e346938bf9ee5dce1ea38254
'2012-05-02T15:03:10-04:00'
describe
'73965' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDG' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
0398613fba834ef99df24f5bc30100fe
3907ef5c0775869ea7110bebd84d26864b57047f
describe
'2055980' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDH' 'sip-files00122.tif'
576662ab64aae85513e801ef0e8202a4
225c7cc77277a4f134cfcc3e896ce1a2cb0f1b8d
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDI' 'sip-files00122.txt'
b5f48a0bb5320dc4dc6e18d27fc3e193
562e349d666e710eec0dace42bf23c6177844bce
describe
'28492' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDJ' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
31396048fe1ac9b6fe81fade2f035251
be078aafba948111e315283bf376362068ccd3f9
describe
'256299' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDK' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
028856344ee74b9b9086f29b8d1d2d99
685948490e22ddcc9d9977660f6440c7dfcf3011
'2012-05-02T15:02:57-04:00'
describe
'194999' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDL' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
6fa2a5c9912a49d5fb82432c936b77df
831776c77e05d0b851c1d191c2c55ca9c2443198
describe
'24550' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDM' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e1a98830e3747722c258d0dd5be41aad
a0b096f49548bfba3f84d1b33164fa29c170f0ce
describe
'75052' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDN' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
585a516bd122543a37cf7bfce5416f64
1e3f3f605a6d0c7a78ce3ff77f136c8f2789d943
describe
'2064112' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
2b2e440d6c2c3890994fa076eea5df09
612d1be608b9a91f93b1dbe38dcaa923ea8588dd
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMDP' 'sip-files00123.txt'
86892fc4c047bc52fc51cbec2f18d79d
4e1f2f68148875c6d0f20f164b4c2622aab471f1
describe
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describe
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Invalid character
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'2013-12-09T18:19:49-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'194134' 'info:fdaE20091128_AAAAIRfileF20091128_AABMFV' 'sip-filesUF00028326_00001.xml'
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describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-09T18:19:47-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.


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UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS,

@ither Storics.







THE ORANGE GIRL


N AND SONS



LONDON, EDINBURGH AND NEW YORK €








UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS,

AND

@tither Stories,

BY

Hea 0. ai

AUTHOR OF “THE SILVER CASKET,” ‘CROWN OF SUCCISS,”
: ETC., ETO.



LONDON:

T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.

1870.




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UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS, Ss
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CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE, ... aoe

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UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

‘The soul of the sluggard desireth, and hath nothing; but the soul
of the diligent shall be made fat.”—PRrov. xiii. 4.





OOD-BYE, Ellie dear—bless you!”
i¥s \Jfg cried Willie Deane, with a chok-
ees ing voice, as he embraced his little
YQ blind sister again and again at the
gloomy door of the poor-house.

“Come, no more of this!” said the parish-

officer, laying his hand on the shoulder of the




sobbing girl, who clung closer and closer to
her brother, the only tie now left to her in
the wide world. They had that afternoon
followed the remains of their father to a
pauper’s nameless grave; and though the
8 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

only mourning worn by the bare-footed,
ragged children was a little bit of old crape,
lent by a pitying neighbour, in the hearts
of both there was deep, deep mourning, and
all the greater since they were now to be
separated. Willie, as a boy “quite able to
work,” though his wan face told of hardship
and hunger, was left to make his own way
in the world; while Ellie, whose blindness
made her perfectly helpless, was removed
to the shelter of the poor-house.

“Oh, we shall never, never meet again,
and you are all that is left me now! My
heart will break!” cried the little girl be-
tween her sobs.

“No, no; trust in God, darling; we shall
meet again! I will work early and late,
but I will find some means to support you !
We shall yet gain our bread by honest in-
dustry—we shall, Ellie dear; only trust in
God!”

And so they parted ; and the orphan boy,
needing only too much for himself the com-
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. , 9

fort which he had been trying to give to
another, stood for some minutes gazing at
the door which had been closed behind his
fair-haired sister with a feeling of utter
desolation. He wished, then tried to re-
press the wish, lest it should be sinful in
the sight of his Maker, that he could lay
his weary head where his father slept, and
forget all his sorrows in the quiet grave!
“ But no,” he thought, “I must live—I
must labour for her. God may yet have a
work for even me to do; life’s long day of
toil is before me, and then, oh, how sweet
will be rest!”

Willie carried back the crape to Mrs.
Clark, who had been the friend of his father
in better times. A very poor woman she
was now, but with a kind, compassionate
heart. “Sure, I’m sorry for you, poor
fellow!” she said, brushing the moisture
from her eyes with the back of her hand ;
“but I have scarcely bread to put into my
own mouth, and sorry a bit to give away.
“10 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

Had they allowed her but a shilling or two
for out-door relief, I’d have let that dear
little girl share my crust and my bed; but
what's little for one is starvation for two.
I don’t see how I can help you now, unless
—there’s an old broom in the corner there ;
if it’s any use to you, you're welcome to it ;
may be it will bring you a few pence.”

_ The present was accepted with thanks,
and the homeless boy, as he left her little
cellar, blessed the voice’ of kindness which
had been like a cordial to his desolate heart.
The night was now closing in; whither
should the orphan go? He crept under
the shadow of an archway, which sheltered
him from the rain which was beginning’ to
fall; and from that strange place of refuge
rose the humble, trusting prayer of a
troubled spirit—but a brave spirit, that was
preparing to battle with poverty, to look
want in the face, and, by God’s blessing,
thrust it back, and struggle on to indepen-
‘dence. Willie would not beg, but he
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 11

would earn his bread, though his sole
means of doing so was the half-worn-out
broom which had been given by one almost
as poor as himself.

The sun was scarcely up earlier than
Willie. He gazed on the brightening sky,
dappled with rosy clouds, and breathed
forth his morning prayer. With his broom
in his hand, and a hope in his heart that
the Almighty would bless his labours, he
passed along the quiet streets, and at last
began to work at a crossing by the side of
a square, which, from its almost impassable
state, seemed to have been neglected for
many a day, The labour was new to hin,
and soon tired his arms; but with resolu-
tion he brushed on till a clean causeway
was made across the narrow road. Pleased
at his own success, he had just paused to
rest, when a boy about his own size, also
ragged and bare-footed, ran up with a
broom in his hand, and in an angry voice
accused Willie of having deprived him of
12 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

his crossing, and tried to take the bread out
of his mouth.

‘“‘T did not know that it belonged to any
one,” said Willie, casting a glance of disap-
pointment at the crossing at which he had
been working so hard.

“Tt’s been mine this month and more,
and it was my mother’s afore me,” replied
Sam Higgins, in no very courteous tone.

“Well,” said Willie, shouldering his
broom with a sigh, “I must go somewhere.
else, I suppose. Does any one make a long
crossing yonder, so as to cut off the corner
of the square ?”

“Oh, youre welcome to that, if it takes
your fancy,” laughed Sam; “as if any one
would wade over that sea of brown mud!”

“They shall not have to wade,” replied
Willie, setting himself at once to his new
task with that resolute spirit which, whether
possessed by a king or a street-sweeper,
usually secures success. As he plied at his
crossing, Willie thought of the lines :—
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 18

“Tf I were a cobbler, I’d make it my pride
The best of all cobblers to be;
If I were a tinker, no tinker beside
Should mend an old kettle like me!”

And he determined that whatever he did
should be done well.

Sam, leaning on his broom, watched
Willie with a mocking sneer. He was
himself quite a stranger to that energy
which rises to meet difficulties—that perse-
verance which resolutely overcomes them.
He thought it enough to stand by his cross-
ing, sweep for a moment when he saw a
passenger approaching, and run after him
with loud importunate entreaties to beg
the pence which he was too lazy to earn.
Willie never begged; he left his work to
speak for him; and as the conduct of the
sweepers was different, so likewise, as might
be expected, was their success. The long
clean crossing was constantly preferred ;
the boy who remained steady at his post .
raised the kindly feelings of the passer-by,
and became known to the residents round.
14 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

For every penny which Sam extorted by
begging, his silent companion received
three. Willie found that he could maintain
himself in honest independence. This was
his first upward. step.

Willie heard that a Ragged School was
open every evening, not far from the poor
lodging which he now managed to procure
for himself. Anxious for knowledge—
anxious, above all, to be instructed in the
things of God—he never failed in his daily
attendance, and was the most diligent, the
most persevering of all the scholars.

“Tittle good larning will do to such as
you,” cried Sam sneeringly, as he saw
Willie one day with a multiplication table
in his hand, trying as hard to master its
difficulties as he had done to earn his bread.

Willie only replied with a smile; he felt
that the useful knowledge which he was ac-
quiring was another step in an upward path
—that he should one day find the benefit of
it; and he thought with fond hope of the ,
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 15-

time when he might impart to his darling’
little sister some of the information so
freely given to himself.

He learned also at the school the value
of cleanliness; he was instructed how to:
mend his own clothes. A kind teacher,
pleased by the industry and docility of her
pupil, gave him an old cap of her son’s, and
a cast-off pair of boots; so while Sam’s
elbows still looked through the rents in his
sleeves, and his dirty clothes hung in rags
upon him, and his face looked as though
it had never been washed,—gradually his
companion gained an appearance so respect-
able and clean that it could scarcely have
been believed that both had started from
the same point of poverty; but then the
one was pursuing an upward, the other a
downward path.

The object which Willie ever set before
himself was to be the support of his sister’
Ellie. He almost denied himself necessary
food to save up his little earnings for her ;.
16 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

and earnestly he prayed to his heavenly
Father to fulfil this desire of his heart. As
Willie became known in the neighbourhood,
he was often sent on little errands, em-
ployed to fetch water, or to sweep before
doors; and many a meal, and many a
penny—-yes, and silver pieces too—he was
enabled to earn in this manner. But still,
in the dry, clear autumn days, when his
crossing scarcely needed a touch of the
broom, Willie felt that his time was not
fully employed—he might do more—he
night gain more for his sister.
_ Here, again, the Ragged School offered
its valuable instruction. Willie was taught
how to make little baskets ; and though his
profits at first were very small indeed, the
little purse which he had made for himself,
and which contained all his savings for
Ellie, gradually grew heavier and heavier,
and every now and then he exchanged a
handful of coppers for a bright silver shil-

ling or half-crown.
(407)
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 17

Willie was a truly religious boy—his
hope and. trust were placed in his Saviour ;
but he well knew that religion gives no
encouragement to idleness,—that we are re-
commended to be not slothful in business,
fervent in spirit, serving the Lord. The
more earnestly he prayed, the harder he
worked ; his piety gave new impulse to his
industry. .

Sam, in the meantime, was sinking lower
and lower in idleness, poverty, and dirt.
His crossing afforded an emblem of his own
mind, all neglected and uncared for as were
both. Buta new era was now to open before
him ; he was to be given an opportunity of
rising at last from his miserable and degraded
state. Willie was surprised one day to see
his companion appear in the square respect-
ably dressed, his face looking ten shades
fairer from a recent washing, and his whole
manner expressing pleasure and hope.

“Ah, Tve done with you for ever!”

exclaimed Sam, flinging away his broom,
(407)
18 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

“and done with this wretched, starving life !
Plod on there, Will the sweeper,—scrape
up your farthings; I’ve something better
before me, I warrant you. My uncle’s come
to London, on his way to the Indies, and he
says that it’s a shame—and so it is—that a
boy like me should work at a crossing, like
a slave; so he’s given me a suit of clothes,
d’ye see, and something to rattle in the
pockets, and he’s got me a situation in the
city. Tm agoing now to rise in the world ;
maybe I’ll be a rich man some of these days !”

“JT wish you joy,” said Willie, good-
naturedly ; “what a blessing to have such
an uncle !”

Sam was placed in a situation, and a good
one ; but to get it was one thing, to keep
it another. Sam’s master was a tolerably
patient man, but there are bounds to the
patience of most people. What is to be
done with a servant who is always in bed
when the fires should be lighted in the
morning; who loiters when sent on a
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 19

message, idles when there is work to be
finished ; who is never willing, never busy,
never clean? What is to be done? Why,
after proper trial has been given, there is
but one thing to be done, and Sam’s master
did it ; he turned off the boy who was too
lazy to work, and Sam found himself again
in the streets!

Meantime another opening was made for
Wille to rise to a more comfortable position
in life. Mr. Baynes, a fruiterer, who lived
near the square, and had occasionally em-
ployed him on little errands, and always
found him diligent and steady, was suddenly
- obliged to dismiss his own errand-boy at am
hour’s notice for coming home in a state of
intoxication.

“This is exceedingly inconvenient ; what:
am I to do till I can supply his place ?”
said the old fruiterer to his wife as she stood
piling the rosy apples in the window.

“T should say, my dear,” she replied,
without pausing in her occupation, “ that
20 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

we might have in the little sweeper Willie,
just for a few days till we get another boy
to suit us. He looks so clean and neat that
we need not be ashamed of him; and I
believe that we might trust him with the
fruit.”

“Tl trust him,” said her husband ;
“honesty’s written on his face; and my
friend at the Ragged School, who sees him
every evening, says that he does not know
a more promising boy.”

So Willie, to his great joy, was engaged
for a week at a shilling a day, and his
dinner provided. This seemed riches to the
poor sweeper boy; and never was an
apple missed from a basket, never was the
messenger too late or too long. The shop,
to clean which was a part of his work, had
never looked so beautifully neat. At the
end of that week Willie was able to change
his silver for a piece of gold, the first which
he ever had touched in his life.

“T’ve not found any boy to suit me yet,”
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 21

said the fruiterer to his wife, as they sat at
the breakfast-table together ; “I believe that
we must hire Willie Deane for another
week.”

“Well, my dear,” she replied, as she
poured out the tea, “I don’t see why we
should not keep him altogether ; he’s honest,
sober, industrious, and clean, and the most
willing boy that ever I met with. Let’s
take him into the house, and give him
wages ; we ought to know when we’re well
served, my dear.”

Willie’s heart bounded for joy when the
old fruiterer gave him the offer of the
situation. It was not the thought of
exchanging the hardships and privations
of his present life, his miserable garret
shared with others, his wretched food,
barely sufficient to maintain him in health,
for the comforts of a respectable home, but
the hope that, as he would now have some-
thing certain for his work, he might support
his blind sister himself! He hastened to
22 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

Mrs. Clark, and telling her of the prospect
opening before him, asked her whether, if
he placed the whole of his wages in her
hands, a small sum for washing only ex-
cepted, she would agree to take charge of
his little sister.

Mrs. Clark hesitated, while Willie looked
anxiously into her face for a reply. ‘We
must at least wait,” she replied, “till your
quarter’s wages become due. I’m in debt
at this moment eighteen shillings for coals
and for rent, and—”

“But I can pay something now!” cried
Willie eagerly, laying a bright gold sovereign
upon the table, the fruit of months of self-
denial and toil.

She agreed instantly to receive poor Ellie,
and to take care of her as if she were her
own daughter ; and at once prepared to ac-
company Willie to the poor-house to claim
and bring back his beloved little sister.

As Willie approached with rapid steps
the gloomy portal, at which, some months
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDs. 23

before, he had stood so desolate and sad,
he overtook one whom he instantly recog-
nized as his old fellow-sweeper, Sam Hig-
gins. The good clothes of the latter had
been pawned for bread; his bare head and
feet, his hollow sunken eyes, the air of
misery, the appearance of dirt which he
wore, told at once the tale of the sluggard.

“Are you going to the house too?”
drawled the unhappy boy in a husky tone.
“T can’t stand another winter out o’ doors,
so I’m going in, just for a while. But you
don’t look as though you had come to that,”
he added, eyeing Willie Deane from head _
to foot. ‘“ What brings you to the poor-
house door ?”

“T come to take out my sister,” replied
Willie, suppressing his own joy that it
might not add to the pain of one who was
now driven to ask for relief from the parish.
Truly the words of heavenly wisdom had
been verified in the two boys, “ Zhe soul
of the sluggard desireth, and hath nothing ;
24 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

but the soul of the diligent shall be made
jou

“Oh, Willie, if you only knew how
happy I am!” was the exclamation of the
little blind orphan, as again she was pressed
to her brother’s heart, again was restored
to the outer world from the cheerless gloom
of the pauper’s abode. Those words repaid
Willie for all his toil, all his privations ;
and the language of his thankful heart was,
“ Bless the Lord, O my soul! and all that
ts within me bless his holy name !”

When Willie had been for three years in
the service of Mr. Baynes, he observed with
sorrow that the health of his kind old master
was much impaired. The early visits to
Covent Garden market were too much for his
strength ; he needed more rest and repose.
Feeling himself qualified to undertake this
part of the business, Willie offered, though
with some hesitation, his services. Mr.
Baynes smiled kindly, but evidently enter-
tained his doubts that the youth’s abilities
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 25

were equal to his good-will. It was not
probable that a sweeper, taken from the
streets, should know how to conduct the busi-
ness of a shop. An opportunity was, how-
ever, soon afforded to Willie to prove how
useful he could make himself in’a higher
‘ position, and that his head could work as
well as his hands.

It so happened that one morning a lady
entered the shop to buy when neither the
fruiterer nor his wife were in it, the former
having been taken suddenly unwell. Willie
would not disturb them by calling them
down ; he slipped behind the counter him-
self, served the lady with such intelligence,
drew up the bill so correctly, and performed
his new part so well, that from that day his
employers regarded him in another light,
and felt convinced that he could give valu-
able assistance to his master. In a very
short time Willie had quite changed his
position, another boy was hired to supply
his former place, and all the chief business,
26 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

whether of buying or selling, was com-
mitted to the charge of young Deane. The
aged fruiterer with confidence left every-
thing in his hands, and, as with the pious
Joseph, God made all that he did to prosper.
Custom increased, the business extended,
and Mr. Baynes was generous and honest
enough to give due credit to his active,
intelligent assistant. The salary of Willie
was first increased, then doubled, till at
length the fruiterer, feeling his own powers
decaying, and having no one to succeed him
in the business, took the once friendless
sweeper boy into partnership, and placed
- him in a position of respectability and
comfort beyond any to which his hopes had
dared to aspire.

And. now that Willie was in the way to
grow rich, dearly he loved to retrace every
step in the difficult but upward path by
which he, through God’s blessing on his
industry, had risen. With especial grati-
tude he remembered the Ragged School, at
UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS. 27

which he had gained knowledge more
precious than gold. He aided it from his
purse, and, though his time was by far too
much occupied to enable him to visit it during
the week, every Sunday evening he devoted
to repaying his debt as far as he could by
teaching where he had once been taught.

One night as Willie was returning from
the school, on turning a corner, he heard a
confused sound of scuffling, and voices
raised in excitement or anger; and quicken-
ing his steps, he found a small crowd as-
sembled round a man who had just been
caught in the act of picking a pocket. A
policeman’s hand was on the collar of the
thief—escape was impossible—he was about
to be dragged off to a felon’s jail! .

“This isn’t the first time ; you'll not get
off so easy now,” said the policeman.

“He's a reg’lar jail-bird; he'll come to
the gallows at last,” cried the woman who
had been robbed; “that’s the end of the
course of such as he !”
28 UPWARDS AND DOWNWARDS.

At that moment the crowd divided a little;
Willie caught a moment’s glimpse of the
prisoner’s haggard face as the moon shone
full upon it. It was several years since he
had seen it last, yet he recognized it still,—
it was the face of the sluggard who would
not work, whom idleness had driven to want,
and whom want had driven to crime,—it was
the face of the wretched Sam Higgins !

Dear young reader, the choice is before
you now, which will you decide upon taking,
—the upward course of the diligent, or the

_downward path of the sluggard ?

But oh! remember, above all things, that
however great the reward of industry may
be here, there is one thing needful, compared
with which all the goods of this life are as
dross. Be diligent first in the work of the
soul, seek first the kingdom of God and his
righteousness ; while not slothful in business,
let your chief desire be always to be serving
the Lord.


Mrs. Hayley has engaged Mark
Pat once on my recommendation,
x and I hope that the boy will do
credit to us!” exclaimed Giles
Fielding, the portly baker, with an air of
benevolent triumph, as he laid his broad
hand on the shoulder of a slight pale youth
who stood in the shop at his side.

“ T’m so glad, so heartily glad of it !” cried
Mrs. Fielding, pausing in her occupation of
scraping a French roll. “You could not
have got the poor fellow into a better place,
30 A WHITE LIE.

or one where he’s more likely to do well.
But,” added she, lowering her voice, and
glancing towards the shop door, “did you
tell the lady all, Giles?”

“No, I was not such an ass!” said the
baker. ‘When one wants to do a good turn
to a poor boy, and start him fairly in life,
do you think that one begins by telling that
he has a father in jail? No, no, I knew
better than that ; when Mrs. Hayley asked
me if he had parents, I said that they both
were dead.”

Mark coloured up to his temples; Mrs.
Fielding looked very grave.

“J wish that you had not said that, my
dear.”

“Tut!” laughed the good-humoured baker,
“it was only a white lie; it could do no
harm to any one. I doubt whether any
lady would knowingly take into her service
the son of a thief. To have told the whole
truth would have been to have set a brand
upon the poor boy; Mrs. Hayley would never
A WHITE LIE. 31

have thought her spoons safe!” And again
Giles Fielding laughed, but neither his wife
nor Mark Robson joined at all in his mirth.
Mrs. Fielding had read in her Bible that

lying lips are an abomination to the Lord.
She had read of the glorious Jerusalem above,
there shall in no wise enter into it anything
that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh abom-
ination or maketh a le. And in that Bible
she had been taught no distinction between
a white lie and any other: all sin is black
before God ; all sin puts the soul in danger ;
all sin shuts out from heaven unless repented
of—forsaken—and forgiven. Mrs. Fielding
was too dutiful a wife to say out all that
she thought to her husband in the presence
of Mark; she did so when they were alone
together, but the only answer which she
received was, “ A white lie can do no harm ;
the boy is as honest a boy as can be, and it
was not for me to go blazing abroad that he
is the son ofa thief. Don’t trouble your con-
science at all about the matter, my dear.”
82 A WHITE LIE,

So Mark Robson went to his place, and
very grateful did he feel to the friends whose
kindness had secured it for him. Mrs. Field-
ing had mended and cut down some of her
husband’s shirts to give the lad an outfit,
put a half-crown into his purse, and a Bible
into his hand.

“God bless you, my boy !” said she, as he
was about to start for his new home; “be
honest, faithful, and steady, and always keep
to the truth.”

Mark thanked her with glistening eyes,
and his heart was very full as he turned
from her hospitable door. Mrs. Fielding
had done more for the boy than rescue him
from poverty and shame, give him an op-
portunity of earning his bread by honest
exertions, and interest.in his behalf her
kind-hearted husband. As a Sunday-school
teacher she had earnestly sought, and not
in vain, to impress on the heart of the poor
boy the blessed truths of religion. She had
taught Mark that the poor on earth may be
A WHITE LIK, 33

rich in grace; that the friendless on earth
have a Friend in heaven; that they who
sow in tears may at last reap in joy ; and
that blessed are those who trust in the Lord,
and humbly walk in his ways. Mrs. Field-
ing little thought, when she bade her young
charge good-bye, how much had been done
by her husband’s few thoughtless words to
mar her labour of love, and confuse the
ideas of right and wrong in the mind of the
boy whom they both wished to serve.

. Mark Robson went to his situation in
the house of Mrs. Hayley with many good
resolutions and cheerful expectations. There
was but one uncomfortable feeling which
would sometimes arise, like a speck of dark
cloud upon a bright sky ; this was the re-
collection that he had gained his place by
deceit. But then the deceit was not his own.
He had merely remained silent when a false-
hood had been spoken, glad, if the truth
must be owned, that another was found to

say for him what he would have scrupled
(407) 3
34 A WHITE LIE.

to say for himself. But as one little seed,
blown by the wind, may become the parent
of many; as the small cloud may grow
larger and larger, till darkness overspread
the blue sky; so one sin—one falsehood——has
in itself a tendency to spread and increase.
Almost the first question which Mrs. Hay-
ley asked of Mark Robson was, “ When
did your poor father die?” Swift as light-
ning passed a crowd of thoughts through
the mind of the boy. “I can’t contradict
what the baker said ; I can’t expose my kind
friend; I will not disgrace myself ’Tis
impossible to speak the truth. What’s the
harm in a white ke?” So Mark answered,
“Two years ago,” scarcely knowing what he
said, but speaking out as boldly as he could
the first sentence which rose to his tongue.

The lady asked no more questions on that
subject, which was a great relief to Mark,
and he hoped that the falsehood which he
had uttered would be the last of which he
should be guilty.
A WHITE LIE. 35

But was “no harm” done by the lie?
Alas for the effect upon the soul of the
lad! When we give ourselves to the Lord,
we must give ourselves fully and freely ;
there must be no reserve, no keeping back,
no secretly saying in the heart, “T will obey
God in all things but one; I will give up
every sin but that which doth most easily
beset me!” One leak unstopped, sinks a
ship ;—one spark unquenched, may burn a
city! Poor Mark tried hard to persuade
himself that his kind friend, the baker, had
been right, and that there had been no real
harm in going a little from the truth. The
Evil One is but too ready to help us to
silence conscience, and every time that
conscience is wilfully silenced its power is
- weakened within us. Mark Robson now felt
little pleasure in reading the Holy Bible,
because its warnings against sin made him
feel uneasy in his mind. He wished that
God’s law were not so strict. When he
came to the awful history of Ananias and
36 A WHITE LIE.

Sapphira, struck dead with falsehood on
their lips, as related in the Book of Acts,
Mark closed the Bible with a sigh, and had
no wish to open it again. All his comfort
in prayer was gone! Giles Fielding, a well-
meaning man, who attended God’s worship,
honoured God’s day, and believed that he
was helping God’s poor, would have been
startled indeed could he have known what
a stumbling-block he had put in a young
lad’s path, how by what he had called a
white lie he had been doing the work of the
devil ! ;

Mark had been for some months in his
situation when, one day, as he was walking
along a street, a hand was suddenly laid on
his arm; and, turning round, he was startled
to behold his own father !

“Glad to see thee, my lad ; right glad to
see thee once more!” cried Robson, wring-
ing the hand of his son, in whose heart
feelings of affection, shame, pleasure, and
fear strangely mingled together. “And
A WHITE LIE. 37

where hast thou been, my boy, and how
hast weathered the winter? I guess from
the look of thee,” continued Robson, sur-
veying his son from head to foot, “that thee
has found some un to take thee by the hand.
Pll walk a bit with thee, and we'll crack
together as we go.”

Mark told his parent of everything but
the deceit which had been used by Giles
Fielding in order to get him a place,—he
shrank from saying a word about that. He
gave otherwise a full account of all that had
been done for him by the kindly baker and
his wife, and the heart of Robson warmed
towards the friends of his son.

“Blessings on ’em both for caring for a
lad as was worse than an orphan!” he
exclaimed, “and blessings on ’em for larning
thee the right honest way to go in! Td
never ha’ been where I’se come from, had
there been any one when I was young to
care for my soul, or give me a chance in
the world! Maybe I’ve larned summat in
38 A WHITE LIE.

jail, maybe T’ll ha’ a try to begin a new
sort of life ; but it’s hard for a fellow as has
a bad name to swim right against the tide.”
Robson passed his rough hand across his
brow. ‘But T’se never be a weight round
your neck, my lad; if I can’t float, Pll not
drag thee down. I'll not come hanging about
the house arter ye, as maybe the missus
mightn’t half like it; but thou’lt come and
see me,—come often, my lad,—I’ll need a
bit cheering from thee !”

Mark promised eagerly that he would
visit his father in the miserable lodging of
which Robson gave him the address, It
was the greatest relief to the boy to find
that the good feeling of his unhappy parent
would save him from a thousand difficulties
which visits to Mrs. Hayley’s house might
have caused. Had Robson been a more
hardened sinner, he would have forced his
son more bitterly to rue the white le so
lightly uttered by the baker.

But though Mark’s troubles might have
A WHITE LIE. 39

been greater, they were sufficiently perplex-
ing to keep him in a state of constant
anxiety and fear. He had a secret which
might be found out, and it became to him a
burden which grew more oppressive day by
day. Mark went to see his father, he was
in duty bound to do so, but he could not
ask leave to go in a frank and open manner.
Once beside poor Robson, it was hard to get
away. The late prisoner’s health was fail-
ing, he could hardly procure any work ;
but for the kindness of the Fieldings, the
poor man might almost have starved.
Mark saved what he could from his wages,
and gave what he could of his time; but
how could that time be spared—was it not
paid for by his mistress? Having entered
on a course of deceit, Mark felt himself
forced—against his will—to go on in it.
Untruths came more readily to his tongue.
He asked for leave now to go to a wedding,
then to buy himself shoes. When sent on
an errand and blamed for returning an hour
40 A WHITE LIE.

too late, he was ever ready with a false
excuse. ‘It is for my father,” he would
say to himself; “’tis but a white le after
all!” Oh, how much happier for him had
he spoken the truth from the first, and so
never have been tempted to plunge deeper
and deeper in the miry ways of falsehood !
Once, during Mark’s lengthened absence
from home, a thief took the opportunity to
steal down the area-steps, and carry off some
forks which had been carelessly left near the
window. Great were the surprise and distress
of Mark on discovering the loss! What
was to be done? Conscience and common
sense urged him alike to go at once and
confess the truth to his mistress. But the
unhappy lad had now no courage to speak
the truth. He had become accustomed to
deceit. He instinctively felt, alas! that he
had not a right to be believed. Mark con-
cealed the matter, and by doing so, brought
not only his truth but his honesty under sus-
picion when the loss was discovered at last!
A WHITE LIE. 41

Trembling and pale, the miserable lad
stood one evening before his indignant



UNDER SUSPICION.

mistress, who had just been having an
interview with a policeman. One suspicious
42 A WHITE LIE.

circumstance after another had recurred to
her mind; by making inquiries in the
‘neighbourhood the lady had found that
Mark had deceived her on several occasions.
All her confidence in him was gone, and
she naturally thought him guilty of stealing
the silver.

“JT find, unhappy boy,” said Mrs. Hayley,
fixing her eyes sternly upon Mark, who, in
the misery of his soul, almost wished that
the earth would open and hide him—“TI
find that you have repeatedly been seen in
company with a man, who—as the police-
man asserts
ago from jail. Such fellowship speaks for
itself. I am unwilling, from pity for your
youth, to send you before a magistrate,
but not a doubt exists on my mind that
either you, or your wicked companion, has
stolen my silver forks !”

How could Mark defend himself,—how
could he defend his father from a charge of
which he knew him to be guiltless! All



was released but a few months
A WHITE LIE. 43

the truth was now confessed, with deep
sorrow and shame; but the truth was not
now believed! Mark was dismissed from
his place in disgrace, and under suspicion of
theft! “A boy who could weave such a
web of falsehood,” observed Mrs. Hayley
to a friend, “ would be capable of any crime.
He who is false in his words, is likely to be
dishonest in his deeds.”

Miserable was the life which the poor
disgraced boy had for a long time to lead,
_ before any one would trust him again! If,
after a painful struggle through years of
hardship and toil, Mark did at last regain
the character which he had lost, it was only
‘through such trials as almost crushed his
young spirit. One lesson, however, he
thoroughly learned,—and this was worth
all that he suffered,—a dread of the begin-
ning’s of sins, a horror for a white le!

SS Ny .


papers round in the morning to his cus-
tomers, and get a peep at the news as I go;
and to take library books to the houses, and
run on an errand now and then! And what
a deal of time I’ll have for reading, and what
a glorious lot of books to read—for they say
Mr. Marsden is good-nature itself, and lends
- willingly enough to young chaps! Why,
Tll get as clever—as clever as a Lord
Chancellor or a Lord Mayor!” cried the
“DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 45

boy, almost wild with joy at the thought of
leaving the shop of his father the cobbler,
to enter on his first situation.

‘Don’t be too sure, Will,” said old Blane,
as he quietly fitted on the heel to a shoe.
“You've no reason to be certain that even
Mr. Marsden will take you at all.”

“Oh, there’s not a doubt of it!” exclaimed
Will. “Didn’t he tap me on the shoulder,
and say I was as ’cute a lad as ever he had
seen ?”

Blane only smiled and shook his grizzled
head, like one who has his doubts on some
matter.

“Father, don’t you want me to get clever
and great ?” asked Will, rather mortified at

the smile.
_ “TT want you, my boy, to do your duty in
the station, whatever it may be, to which it
shall please God to call you, and not to set
your heart on, or make sure of, any mere
eatthly success. When I see folk, as the
saying goes, counting their chickens before
46 “ DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

they are hatched, it brings into my mind
what I read lately about the famous
Napoleon Buonaparte.”

“TLet’s hear about him, father; you can
talk quite well at your work, and I like to
hear what you get out of those learned books
. that the clerk lends you to read of an even-
ing.”

“This was taken out of a grand long
work, written by an earl, the ‘ Life of the
great William Pitt,” said the cobbler, “and
it’s all true, I haven’t a doubt of it. When
Buonaparte—he was ruling over France,
he’d a mind to rule over old England too ;
and so, making sure of conquest, he fixed on
the very time when he’d come over and
invade us. He got a lot of his soldiers to-
gether, and had ships to carry ’em across ;
and he looked over the blue waves of the
Channel, and thinks he, ‘I’ll soon land in
England, march up to London, and take it.’”

“‘He made too sure,” laughed Will.

“He made so sure,” said the cobbler,
“ DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 49

“that—would you believe it, my boy ?—he
had actually a medal made to celebrate his
invasion of England !”

“ But he never invaded it!” interrupted
Will.

“And on the medal was stamped in
French, ‘ Struck at London,” continued old
Blane.

“ But he never entered London!” cried
Will.

“ He made so sure of success,” said the
cobbler, “that he prepared a medal in honour
of the conquest of a city that he was never
so much as to set his foot in!”

“Well, that .was counting his chickens
before they were hatched—making too
sure!” exclaimed the boy. “ How ashamed
Buonaparte must afterwards have felt when-
ever he thought of that medal! Have you
any more stories for me, father ?”

“Yes, another comes into my head, which
I read in another clever book,” replied
Blane. “It’s about a very different man
48 “DON’T BE TOO SURE,”

from him who struck the medal ; it’s about
the Duke of Wellington—”

“Who beat Napoleon Buonaparte himself
at the battle of Waterloo!” cried Will. “I
hope that Ae hadn’t his medal ready before-
hand ?”

“You know, or perhaps you don’t know,
my lad, that ‘Wellington was sent over to
Portugal to help the poor folk there who
were fighting against the French. God
gave wisdom to our great general, and suc-
cess to a good cause, so the enemy’s soldiers
were driven out, and Portugal ;was free.”

“How glad the Portuguese must have
been,” cried Will, “and how they must have
honoured our duke. That was the time for
striking a medal—when the battle had been
fought and won.”

“JT don’t know whether a medal was
struck,” said Blane; “but Vl tell you what
the Portuguese did; they had a print made
of the general, and under it were these
words in Latin, ‘ Invincible Wellington, from
“DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 49

grateful Portugal.’ So the clerk made out
their meaning ; he’s more of a scholar than
I be.”

“What does ‘invincible’ mean, father ?”

“Tt means, one who cannot be conquered,”
replied Blane.

“Oh, that was making too sure! The
duke might have won a hundred victories,
but as long as he lived no one could teli
that he might not be beaten at last.”

“ Just hear the end of my story, my boy,
and you'll see that the duke was just: of
your mind in that matter. A. friend asked
him to send him the print, so Wellington
got a copy and sent it: but he wouldn’t put
up with that boasting word at the bottom of
‘his likeness, as if he thought himself sure of
victory ; he scored out ‘invincible’ with a
dash of his pen, and underneath it he wrote,
‘Don’t halloo till you’re out of the wood.’”

Will Blane burst out laughing. “That
showed the duke’s good sense,” said he.

“Ay, and good feeling, too, my boy. It
(407) 4
50 “DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

showed that he was not a man of a boastful
spirit, but knew that the highest may have
a fall) When you are tempted, Will, to
make too sure of the morrow, just mind you
of Buonaparte and his medal—of Wellington
and his print. But now”—the cobbler
raised his eyes to the little Swiss clock
which was fixed on the wall before him, “it
is nearly time for you to be off to call upon
Mr. Marsden, as he told you to do this
evening, that all may be settled and fixed.”

‘“‘Tt is not six yet, father, and he bade me
be there at seven. But,” added Will with
animation, “I should like to call at Jem’s
and Wilson’s on the way, to tell them of
my good luck; so it is not too soon to
start.”

“ Perhaps,” said the cobbler with his quiet
smile, “you had better call upon them on
your way back—don’t be too sure of the
place.”

Long before Will Blane cd home,
his father’s day’s work was over ; but the
“ DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 51

cobbler delayed his evening meal until his
boy could share it. Everything he placed
ready—the neat white cloth on the little
table, the loaf, the piece of yellow cheese ;
and as twilight darkened around, Blane lit
his caudle and sat down to read. The
volume which he now opened was not one
of those which the clerk had lent him; the
fact was that Blane himself was anxious
about his son’s getting the place, and felt as
if he could not fix his attention on common
reading. He, therefore, had taken down
the Bible, which is worth all other books
put together, and was searching the pages
of the sacred volume for that wisdom which
cometh from above. Blane had his finger
on the verse, Casting all your care upon him,
for he careth for you, when he heard a step,
then the opening of a door, and turned round
to welcome his son.

The step was not so quick and firm as
that with which Will had left his home.
The door was opened slowly, as if by a weary
52 “DON'T BE TOO SURE.”

hand; and when Blane glanced up at his
boy, he read disappointment in his face
before Will had uttered a word.

“Tt's no use. I’ve had my trouble for
my pains!”
himself down on a chair. “Mr. Marsden
has behaved shamefully to me!” Will
pulled off his cap, rubbed his heated brow,
and looked both weary and angry.

“Mr. Marsden has not, then, settled with
you after all?”

“No,” replied Will, in a mortified tone.
“He has found out that he has a young

exclaimed the lad, throwing

cousin in Suffolk, who will suit him exactly.
He might as well have thought of that this
morning, and not have sent me on a fool’s
errand across half London, only to get dis-
appointment in the end!” And there was
a husky sound in the boy’s voice, while,
though he tried hard to keep it down, the
moisture would rise to his eyes.

“Well, my lad,” said Blane, after breathing
a little sigh—for he was disappointed as well
“DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 53

as his son—‘ there are two things that we
may be sure of.”

“T thought that you said, a little while
ago, that we should never be sure of any-
thing,” cried Will, in rather a testy tone.

“Two things that we may be sure of,” re-
peated his father ; “and these are, that God
knows what is best for us, and that he mak-
eth all things work together for good to them
that love him.”

“You are always bringing in religion,”
said the boy.

“ And haven’t I reason for it, Will?”
replied Blane. “In a world like this, where
all is changing and moving like the clouds
in the sky, or the waves of the sea; where
we're like the ships on the ocean—now up
in hope, now down in disappointment ;
where there’s nothing of which we can say,
‘This will be to-morrow as it is to-day ;’—
is it not a comfort to have something which
can never, never be moved ; something like
a rock, to which we can cling amidst all the
54 “DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

changes and tossings of life? Man’s word
may fail us, but God’s word issure.” Here
Blane laid his hand on the Bible. ‘Man
may break his promises ; God’s promise is
sure. Here is just one on which we can
rest.” He turned over to the place where
it is written, “ The Lord will give grace and
glory; no good thing will he withhold from
them that walk uprightly.”

“ But are not the promises only for God’s
people?” asked Will.

“For the redeemed of the Lord,” replied
his father.

“ And how can we be sure that we are so ?
We are all called Christians, I know; but
does that make us all Christians indeed ? ”

“That's a sensible question, my son.
May God help me to give a right answer,
for it is a matter in which it wouid be a
terrible thing to make a mistake. ‘There
are many as seem to take it as a matter of
course that they are right on the way to

heaven, “cause they were baptized when
&
“DON’T BE TOO SURE.” 55

young; and maybe they go to church or
chapel, and bear a good name in the world ;
-—-and so they make sure of heaven—too
sure, as they'll find at the last. They strike
their medal of success, as it were, before
they’ve crossed the sea of temptation, or hit
_ one good stroke against sin.

“ But how can we tell that we are of God’s
people?” again asked Will.

“There are two marks which can’t well
be mistaken,” said his father ; “let’s search
and see if we have them. Real Christians
love God above all, and hate sin above all:
these are two simple tests. They love God
above all; and why? Because they believe
that he gave his only Son to die for their
sins, and to save their poor lost souls;
because they believe that he will care for
them in this world, and will give them, in
the world to come, life and glory everlast-
ing! And they hate sin above all. Why?
Because sin is hateful to God; because sin
would keep them from God. They struggle
56 “DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

with it, they give it no quarter, they fight
against it, till God makes them more than
conquerors in the end!”

“Tf real Christians love God above all,
and hate sin above all, I’m afraid I’m not
one of them,” said Will Blane.

“Do you wish to be one?” asked his
father.

«1 should wish to go to heaven when |
die.”
“Then ask God for his blessed Spirit, to
make you live holily, die happily, and rise —
gloriously at the last. Make sure, my boy,
—oh! make sure that you give your heart
to God. He is the kindest of masters, he
is the best of friends. Sorrow, labour, and
disappointment may be our lot in this life ;
but remember that peace, and rest, and joy

are what God prepares for his people.”

Tt was about a week after the day on
which Will was disappointed of his place
with Mr. Marsden, when, on his return from
going on a little errand, he found his father
‘DON'T BE TOO SURE.” 57

with a letter in his hand and a look of
pleasure beaming on his face.



| !





TIE LETTER.

“Here’s a bit of good news for you, Will,”
he said, holding out the letter to his son.
58 “DON’T BE TOO SURE.”

Will took the paper from his father, and
eagerly began to read it; but before he had
gone half through it, he burst out with an
exclamation of joy,—-

“What! that good gentleman, Sir John
Bate, going to travel abroad, and offering
to take me with him; and you willing—TI see
that you are—quite willing to let me go! ©
Oh, how glad I am, how very glad, that I
was disappointed last week! This place
will be better in every way—so far better
than the other! There’s nothing on earth I
should like so much as to go abroad with
Sir John!”

“Did I not say truly, my son, that God
knows what is best for us?” observed Blane,
laying his hand on the shoulder of his boy.
“Tet us once be sure, quite sure, that we
have taken the Lord for our Saviour and
Guide, and we may be sure, quite sure, that,
happen what may, he will never fail or for-
sake us.”


from his knees, after joing, or
seeming to join, in the prayer that
his parent had been offering aloud. It was
the custom of Matthew Blane to pray morn-
ing and evening with his son. The first
prayer, he would say, gave him heart for the
_ labours of the day, and the second prepared
him for the rest of the night. Matthew
would as soon have forgotten his daily bread



as his daily prayer to his God.
60 QUITE IN EARNEST.

‘You seem to be in mighty haste to ask
me,” observed Blane drily; he could not
but notice how little of his son’s attention
had been given to the prayer.

“Well, you see, father, as I’m going.
abroad, I was thinking how useful I should
find one of those leather cases, with knife,
and pen, and pencil complete, and a place
for the paper and the stamps. Jem showed
me where I could get one very cheap; and
I thought, father, as a parting present, that
you would not mind buying one for me.”

Matthew Blane gave a little dry cough.

“Youre quite in earnest in wishing for
the case ?” asked he.

“Of course I am,” replied Will, a little
surprised at the question.

“A good deal more in earnest, perhaps,”
observed his father, “than you were a few
minutes ago, when you asked for safety,
health, and forgiveness, and food for both
body and soul.”

“Well, to own the truth, father,” said
QUITE IN EARNEST. 61

Will, “my thoughts will wander a bit while
I am saying my prayers.”

“Saying my prayers,” repeated Blane,
half to himself; “ay, that is the word for
the thing. Saying your prayers is not pray-
ing. You ask God for certain blessings as
a matter of course, as a duty ; but you don’t
expect to get aught by your asking. You
don’t look to receive an answer, as you did
when you told me you wanted the case.”

“O father, it’s so different !” cried Will.

“Ay, its different; I grant ye that,”
said Blane, slowly stirring the fire as he
spoke. “It isa different thing to ask for all
that you can need from One who alone has
power to give or to take away all, than to tell
a father that you’ve a fancy for a trifle that
you could very well do without.”

“JT did not mean that,” said Will, colour-
ing ; “but it does not seem as if the great
God in heaven would attend to the prayers
of such poor creatures as we are.”

“That’s it; “tis unbelief that makes so
62 QUITE IN EARNEST.

many cold in prayer,” observed Blane, look-
ing thoughtfully into the fire. “We do
not take God’s word as we would that of a
fellow-creature whom we respected. Does
he not say again and again in the Bible
what ought to encourage us to pray—Ask,
and it shall be given unto you. If ye then,
being evil, know how to give good gifts unto
your children, how much more shall your
Fath-vr which is in heaven give good things
to them that ask him. There are many and
many promises like that, which we'd hold fast
and never let go if they were made by a friend
upon earth. And if promises are not enough
to content us, just look again into the Bible,
and see if it is not full of examples of an-
swers to prayer.”

“ But that was in the old times,” observed
Will.

“God never changes,” replied Blane.
“He is the same yesterday, to-day, and for
ever. The same Saviour who stopped to
listen to the cry of the poor, when he walked
QUITE IN EARNEST. 68

as a man upon earth, now listens with the
same love and pity, sitting as God in the
- heavens. But then, prayer, to be answered,
must come not merely from the lips—the
heart must be quite in earnest.”

“Tt is difficult to pray from the heart,”
said Will.

« Ay, the best of us need to say with the
first disciples, Lord, teach us to pray. The
wisest of us need to ask for the Spirit of
grace and supplications, to help us to pray
as we ought.”

“But, father,” said Will, with a little
hesitation, “I don’t see as how those who
pray hard get much more than those who
don’t pray at all. If I were to ask God
now to make me very rich, and pray with all
my heart and soul, do you believe that he
would send me a fortune 2?”

“Maybe not, my boy,” answered Mat-
thew Blane; “for God might see that a
fortune would do you harm, and not good,
as has happened to many afore. If you
64 QUITE IN EARNEST.

asked me for poisoned food, I’d not give
it, however hard you might beg. I’d not
harm ye even to please ye! But what I
say, and what I’ll stand by, is this: God
gives to his praying children all that they
ask for in faith, if it really is a blessing that
they ask for. He may keep them waiting
awhile, to try their faith and their patience ;
but he never forgets their prayer. They
have at the last exactly what they would
think best for themselves, if they could see
all things as God sees—if they could know
all things as God knows. And when, ina
happier world, they look back upon their
past lives, they will find them—I’m sure
that they all will—full of answers to
prayer.”

“ Even in little earthly matters, father ?”

“Even in matters that may seem to us
earthly and little. Jl give you an instance,
my lad. One fact will often go further
than many words in the way of con-
vincing. Tl tell you what happened not
QUITE IN EARNEST. 65

very long since to our Bible-woman, Lucy
May.” *

“ What was it, father?” asked Will.

“ Lucy had a ring that she dearly prized,
because it had belonged to a pious sister,
who was dead. I doubt if there was any-
thing that she had that she would not sooner
have lost than that ring. Lucy, as you
know, is employed, like many another in
London, in seeking out poor wandering
sinners, and trying to lead them co the
Saviour. There was one girl—her name
is Emily—who seemed minded to listen to
Lucy, and even agreed that she would go
one evening with the Bible-woman to a
meeting for prayer. It was on the very
day, if I remember right, on which the meet-
ing was to take place, as the two were to-
gether in Lucy’s little room, there came the
postman’s knock at the door. Off started
Lucy in haste, for she expected a letter.

* AL. 0. E. had the following facts from one thoroughly ac-
quainted with them, and on whose truthfulness she implicitly
relies. She has only changed the Bible-woman’s name.

(407) 5
66 QUITE IN EARNEST,

And sure enough there was one, bringing
her news of her mother, who was ill. No
wonder that while the poor Bible-woman
was anxiously spelling over her letter, she
forgot that in the room in which she had
left the girl Emily there was her ring, be-
sides a golden sovereign in her work-box—
a work-box that was not locked.”

“Ah!” exclaimed Will, “that was a for-
get indeed! Did the girl open the box
and take them ?” ;

“The temptation was too strong for her,”
replied Blane ; “ Emily took both sovereign
and ring, and slipped them into her stock-
ing.”

“Lucy might have expected as much,”
eried Will, “What could have made her
leave such a temptation as that in the way
of a stranger ?”

“T s’pose it must have been her anxiety
about her mother, and the worry of the
letter,” answered Blane. “Anyways, it
added not a little to her trouble when she
QUITE IN EARNEST. 67

found that the girl whom she had hoped to
have as a penitent turned out such a thief ;
and that, instead of going to the prayer-
meeting as was settled, she went away no
one knew where, with the stolen money and
the ring, which she denied knowing anything
about.”

“Didn't Jucy call the police?” asked
Will.

“No; she didn’t like to set the police upon
the track of the wretched girl; she would
rather put up with her loss. And a sore
loss it was to Lucy,” added Blane. “III
could a poor Bible-woman spare the sove-
reign that had been taken, but that loss
might be made up by hard work or by the
kindness of friends ; but who could restore
the ring, the precious ring of her dead sister ?
How could Lucy hope to find again that
which she had valued so much ?”

“ How, indeed!” exclaimed Will. “To
hunt out one little rng amidst the thousands
and thousands in the endless pawnbrokers
68 QUITE IN EARNEST.

and jewellers’ shops in this big town of
London would be indeed, as the saying is,
like searching for a needle in a haystack !
One would as soon expect to fish up a ring
after throwing it into the Thames! What
did poor Lucy do 2”

“She went to her knees, my boy; she
laid her trouble before God. She and a
friend of hers prayed hard ; they were quite
im earnest, mind ye; their words didn’t go
one way and their thoughts another, like
those of some one that I know of.”

“ But did Lucy ever get her ring back ?
that’s the question,” asked Will, who did
not like the turn the conversation was taking.

“ Be patient awhile, and you shall hear.
No policeman followed that miserable thief ;
justice did not trace out her haunts ; no one
knew but herself in what pawnbroker’s shop
she had pledged the stolen ring : but it was
as if she had been followed by Lucy’s prayer ;
that was like an arrow in her heart; go
where she might, she carried that with her.
QUITE IN EARNEST. 69

What was the surprise of the Bible-woman
when, about three weeks after the robbery,
the girl Emily came back of her own accord,
with a look of sorrow and shame! She told
Lucy that she could neither sleep nor eat,
her conscience was so troubled by her sin.
She had but three and sixpence left out of
the sovereign which she had stolen, but this
she was ready to give back ; and she offered
to take Lucy to the pawnbroker’s shop,
where she might recover her ring.”

“ And Lucy went with the girl?” asked
Will.

“She went with Emily to the place, and
long and weary was her walk before she
reached it at last; for so bent had Emily
been upon hiding her wicked theft, that she
had gone to a shop distant three miles from
the lodging whence she had stolen the ring.
Right glad was Lucy to recover her treasure,
and all the more glad because she felt that
she got it in answer to prayer. While she
was engaged in the pawnbrokeyr’s shop, the
QUITE IN EARNEST.

70

poor shame-faced thief took the opportunity





of slipping away unseen.”





FRORDERE



A TROUBLED CONSCIENCE,

“ Poor soul!” exclaimed Will, “there was

some good left in her, or she would not
QUITE IN EARNEST. 71

have come back at all. Did Lucy never
see her again 2”

“Not for about nine months, I think,”
said old Blane; ‘and then she chanced—no,
that’s not the right word—God willed that
they should meet in the streets. ‘Why do
you turn from me?’ said Lucy, more anxious,
I take it, to recover the poor wandering
soul than she ever had been to recover her
ring. Emily owned that she was ashamed
to see her after having treated her so ill.
She then told Lucy, and after - inquiries
showed that she told the truth, that she had
once gone with five shillings in her hand to
the lodging where she had stolen the money
and the ring, to give them to the Bible-
woman in part payment of what she had
taken. Lucy had, however, left her lodging,
and poor Emily frankly confessed that she
had been rather glad at not being able to
find her, being so much ashamed at the
thought of meeting the woman whom she had
so cruelly wronged. The poor creature had
72 QUITE IN EARNEST.

now only one shilling and fourpence in the
world. She offered Lucy the shilling ; the
fourpence she said she must keep, as it was
her only means of getting food for that night.”

“Well,” exclaimed Will, “if Lucy prayed
quite in earnest, that poor girl repented
quite in earnest, or she would not have tried
three times over to pay back as much as
she could of the money. Did Lucy take
her last shilling ?”

“No; she had not the heart to do that.
She showed the poor penitent girl the way
to her new home, and made her promise to
come and see her. I can’t say—I don’t
know,” added Blane, “whether Emily has
ever steadily begun a new life, and given
herself to her Saviour, but I know that she
has often been prayed for, and that the
Almighty heareth prayer. He who touched
her heart with shame and repentance can
touch it with faith and love. I don’t
despair—not I—of meeting both the Bible-
woman and the poor thief in heaven !”
QUITE IN EARNEST. 73

“ Father,” said Will gravely, “I never
before thought that prayer was so real a
thing ; I never looked for an answer.” -

“Mark those telegraph wires stretching
over the street,” observed Blane, who was
fond of illustrating his ideas by the common
objects around him; “we can’t see the
message that is darted along them quick as
lightning ; but we know that messages are
sent, we know that answers are returned,
though plain folk like you and me cannot
understand how. Now I often think, as I
look at those lines, prayer is like a golden
wire that stretches all the way up to heaven,
and faith sends her messages by it. But
there is one thing which we must always
remember, Will, whether we ask for earthly
blessings or better gifts for our souls, we
must ask all in the name of the Lord Jesus
Christ. It is only for his sake that the
Almighty stoops to listen to the prayers of
poor sinners such as we.”

‘Will sat for several minutes, turning over
74 QUITE IN EARNEST.

in his mind what he had just heard from his
father. Matthew Blane was the first to
speak.

“ And now, my lad,” said he, “you and
I will go together to buy the case which
you want. It may serve to remind you
sometimes of what we have been talking
over this morning. ’Tis well that every
one should form a habit of daily prayer ;
but mere lip-prayer without heart-prayer is
like a body without a soul, it has no more
power for good than a dead corpse has in its
coffin. To pray with power we must pray
with faith, we must pray in the name of the
blessed Saviour ; and whether our words be
many or few, our hearts must be quite in
earnest.”




The Pharisee and the Publican.

PART I.

“* And he spake a parable unto certain which trusted in themse] ves
that they were righteous, and despised others.”——LUKE xviii. 9.

her little girl what appeared like
two piéces of money.

“Oh, this bright shining sovereign, to be
sure ! the other looks dull and old, as if it
had been taken from the dust-hole.”

“ Now take them up in your hands ; you
know that gold is a heavy metal,—weigh


76 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

them, and then tell me which you think the
more precious.”

“ How very light this bright one is! I
do not think that it is a sovereign at all.”

“Tt is not a sovereign ; it is not made of
gold ; a little thin gilding alone gives it so
bright an appearance.”

“ And the other one, mamma ?”

“The other is an old coin, not now used
as money, but valuable notwithstanding, be-
cause it is really gold. Do you remember
anything of which these things remind you,
my Anna ?”

Anna thought for a moment ;—she was
a clever child, and her mother had accus-
tomed her to reflect.

“They remind me that some people ap-
pear good, and are not really so, while others ~
may be better than we think them.”

“Yes, even as we.read in the beautiful
Parable of the self-righteous Pharisee and
the Publican. The Pharisee doubtless de-

ceived others, he also deceived himself; he
THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 77

believed himself to be holy, and little thought
how he appeared in the pure eyes of his
Maker! Heaven preserve you, my child,
from self-righteousness and pride, and teach
you to know your own heart !”

Anna said nothing in reply; but, if the
truth must be told, she thought her mother’s
caution very unnecessary as far as regarded
herself.

That my readers may judge how far it
was so, I will give a short account of the
next Sunday passed by the little girl; and
as we are rather writing about what she
was than what she dil, I must let you into
the secret of her thoughts as well as of her
actions.

No one could look neater than Anna as
- she stood ready to accompany her mother to
divine service in one of the churches in
London. Her hair nicely brushed, her look
quiet and sedate, just what might best be-
come a child upon the Lord’s-day. No one
knew that she thought that she appeared
78 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.,

very nice, and that her mind was a little
running upon her new ribbons.

As she walked towards the church, she
passed near to a poor girl clothed in rags,
barefooted and dirty, who was standing
with a basket of oranges to sell.

“What a wicked little creature that
must be!” exclaimed Anna ; “ nothing could
ever make me break the Fourth Command-
ment in such a dreadful manner !”

“My Anna, let us pray that we be not
led into such temptation,” replied Mrs.
Fairley: then, as she passed by the fruit-
seller, she said softly to her, “ What shall
it profit a man if he gain the whole world,
and lose his own soul ?”

The girl looked sadly after the lady, and
her thin fingers grasped more tightly the
handle of her basket as she reflected on the
words just spoken to her.

“ To lose the soul! Oh, that is a terrible
thought! I remember that text, and where
it comes from. Oh, if the lady only knew
THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN, 79

-iny trials! I stayed at home and sold
nothing last Sunday, because I feared to do
wrong. I went hungry to bed, and my
little brother cried himself to sleep. What
can Ido? Oh! what can I do? God help
me, a miserable sinner !”

At present we will follow the steps of
Anna,

After entering the church and taking her
usual place, she appeared very devoutly en-
gaged in prayer, while all the time the
thought of her heart was, “ How could my
mother speak a word to that wicked girl!
I wonder why the police have not orders to
take such people to prison!” Anna had never
known what it was to want one meal! Her
sins were of a different kind. Riches and
poverty have each their peculiar temptations
(Prov. xxx. 8,9).

I promised that I would let you into the
secret of Anna’s thoughts, but I have’ not
space to tell you one quarter of what passed ©
through her mind during the two hours that
80 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

she remained in church. I should be
ashamed also to put such trifling down ; and
startled indeed would the little Pharisee
have been could she have seen a record of
them before her! There was certainly
very little that was at all like prayers,
though she seemed to repeat earnestly every
petition for pardon, for mercy, and for grace.
She had little idea that she required any of
these blessings,—such people as the orange-
girl might be miserable sinners,—but for
herself, her mind was quite at ease.

So Anna noticed the carving on the
pulpit, and the shape of the windows ; ob-
served the fashion of the bonnets in front
of her ; wondered why the clergyman read
so slowly ; wished that the service were not
so long ; and left church at last, feeling that
she had performed a great duty, and that who-
ever might wander from the straight path to
heaven, she at least was upon the direct road!

Dinner and an amusing Sunday-book
occupied Anna until it was time to prepare
THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 81

for the second service. She attended to
the prayers this time still less than the first,
for she was tired as well as indifferent.
Many a plan for the business and amuse-
ment of the week did Anna devise while
the good clergyman was earnestly trying to
lead sinners to the God whom they had
offended! And yet, could it be believed!
when walking home with a friend, Anna
presumed to find some faults in the preacher
and to express her sorrow that she had not
heard “dear Mr. Haynes, who always, she
felt, did her so much good!” She made
some observations, also, which she thought
clever and solemn, upon hearing of the
sudden death of a neighbour whom she
believed to have been worldly and gay ; she
drew a contrast in her mind between his
character and her own, very decidedly to
her own advantage ; and parted from her
companion with a comfortable. feeling that
she must certainly stand high in the-opinion
of her friend as a girl of singular piety.
(407) 6
82 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

Whose voice was so loud and full in the
evening hymns as Anna’s! She made sweet
melody upon earth, but not such melody
as is loved in heayen. The holy words
upon her lips were not what engaged her
attention,—she was admiring the sound of
her own fine voice, and feeling sure that
others must admire it also.

Anna retired to rest on that Sabbath
evening rather glad, in her heart, that the
solemn day was over, though she would not
for the world have said so. She was pleased
with herself for the way in which she had
observed it; she never. doubted that her
conduct had been acceptable to the Al-
mighty ; and she rather considered herself
as deserving of reward, than in any way
requiring forgiveness. Alas for the blindness
of sinners who thank God that they are
not as other men are!

Have I among my readers one thus blind,
one possessing the spirit of the Pharisee ?
Let him search his heart, his thoughts, and
THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 83

his motives, and honestly examine his life to
see if his religion is the gilding or the gold !

“PART II.

“And the publican, standing afar off, said, God be merciful to me
asinner, I tell you, this man went down to his house justified
rather than the other.” —LukE xviii. 18, 14,

“What shall it profit a man if he gain
the whole world, and lose his own soul ?”
These were the words which sounded in the
ears of Esther, the poor orange-girl, as she
stood, barefoot and ragged, near a church,
with her basket, tempted by hunger to sin,
but with her conscience awakened even by
this short sentence from a passer-by. As
she paused, irresolute and sad, a little bird
flew within a few feet of her, and carried
away acrumb from a spot where a beggar
had taken his early breakfast. This was a
very trifling occurrence, but the little winged
creature preached a sermon to the heart of
the poor girl. It brought back to her mind
a text heard long ago, during the time when
84 _ YHE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

she had attended a Sunday school: ‘“ Behold
the fowls of the air, for they sow not, neither |
do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your
heavenly Father feedeth them: are ye not
much better than they ?”

“ God will take care of me, if I only love
and trust him!” murmured poor Esther.
“Oh, how sinful I was ever to doubt it!
May the Lord forgive me for intending to
do what is so wrong, and have pity upon
me and upon my poor little brother! I
will go home at once and pray for pardon
for my sin.”

So Esther turned from the place with a
broken and contrite heart, and took her
way towards her wretched lodging. She
had to go through a narrow street, in which
there was a small chapel ; but the bells were
silent, because the service had begun, and
there was scarcely a passenger in sight.
Just as Esther was passing the door of the
chapel, a gentleman, walking rapidly, for
he knew that he was late, brushed past her
THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 85

and entered the place. He drew a hymn-
book from his pocket at the moment that he
entered the door. Esther fancied that she
heard a slight chinking sound, turned her
head, and saw a bright crimson purse lying
on the door-step of the chapel. Trembling
she laid her hand upon it, paused, and
glanced round: there was no earthly eye to
behold her. Here was temptation in another
form. The Evil One seemed to whisper,
“This is an answer to your prayer; the
Lord has sent you help; neither you nor
your brother shall starve,—and as for the
money, the rich man will not miss it!”
But poor Esther had not heard in vain the
words of the Lord, ‘ What shall it profit a
man if he gain the whole world, and lose
his own soul?” She resisted the tempta-
tion with the sword of the Spirit—the good
seed had been received into an honest, faith-
ful heart!

Esther, barefoot and miserably clad, dared
not venture into the chapel to restore the

t
86 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

purse. She determined to remain and
watch until its owner should come out, and
give it back without even looking at the
contents. Oh, how many times was she
tempted, during the long two hours, to go
away with her unlawful prize! Once a
policeman ordered her to move on in a stern
tone of command which made the poor girl
tremble. She took up her basket, passed
round the corner of the street, then watched
her opportunity, and returned to her place.
She heard a faint sound of singing from the
chapel ; she thought it very beautiful, and
listened with a mixture of pleasure and fear.
“Oh, while holy, happy beings are singing
in heaven,” murmured Esther, “shall I be
shut out, as [am here?” The tears filled
her eyes, but she looked up towards the
sky: “There is room there even for a poor
sinful creature like me !”

At length the door opened and the con-
gregation began to pour out. With what
scorn some looked, and others with what
THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN. 87

- pity, upon the miserable Sabbath-breaker,
as they thought her! Patiently Esther
watched till at length she perceived the old
gentleman to whom the purse belonged.
Timidly she approached him ; she could not
catch his eyes—he had no attention to give
to such an object. She ventured very gently
to touch his arm; he started, and looking
angrily at her basket, asked if she were not
ashamed of such godless traffic upon the
Lord’s-day. Silently Esther held up the
purse; it was her only reply, but it was
enough. Too much surprised to speak, the
gentleman took the purse, walked a few
paces and examined its contents ; then hast-
ily returned and asked the orange-girl her
name, and that of the place where she lived.
Esther modestly replied; the old gentleman
nodded his head, put his purse in his pocket,
and walked away. Without a word of
praise—without a farthing of reward—the
poor girl returned to her home ; and through
that long day she and her young brother
838 THE PHARISEE AND THE PUBLICAN.

had nothing with which to satisfy their
hunger but a little of the fruit which con-
science forbade them to sell!

But this was the last day that Esther
was ever to know want; the God in whom
she trusted had not forsaken her. The
next morning the old gentleman called at
her lodging, inquired into her case, promised
to put her in the way of earning an honest
livelihood, and kept that promise faithfully.
Her rags were exchanged for good warm’
clothes—her wretched lodging for one re-
spectable and clean. The next Sunday,
when worshippers sought the house of
prayer, Esther no longer stood trembling
without, but joined, heart and soul, in the
song of praise—‘“ Bless the Lord, O my soul:
and all that is within me, bless his holy
name.”


























Clouds and Sunshine.

“The hope of the righteous shall be gladness,”—Prov. x. 28,



Lucy ; there will be no boating for us to-

”

day.

“Tt is not raining one drop,—the grass is
quite dry,” replied Lucy, running for the
twentieth time to the door.

“But the sea-weed that hangs there is
quite soft and damp, and that is a sure sign
ofrain. Only see these black, heavy clouds!”

“Only see that dear little bit of bright
90 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.

blue between them! I think, Priscilla, -
that you are always looking out for clouds.
I never notice them at all till the rain be-
gins to drop!”

“That is because you are a thoughtless,
foolish little thing!” observed her sister,
with a kind of scornful pity.

“Well, I’m glad that I’m not so wise as
you; I’d rather be merry than wise,” was
the laughing Lucy’s reply.

This time, however, it appeared that the
elder sister was the mistaken one. The
patch of blue in the sky, to Lucy’s delight,
became larger and larger; the sun shone
out cheerfully ; and, no longer afraid of the
weather, both girls set out on their walk
towards Ryde. They were there to meet
their uncle, a boatman, who had promised
them a row over the water to Portsmouth,
where he was to show them the docks and
feast them with cakes; and as the girls had
never been to England before, having been
both born and brought up in the Isle of
CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 91

Wight, they had both looked forward to
this expedition for a very long time, though
with different feelings, according to their
different dispositions. Lucy was all delight
at the thought of the pleasure ; Priscilla all
fear lest anything should occur to prevent
their being able to enjoy it.

They made their way over the fields,—
the one mirthful, the other grave. They
shortened part of the distance by passing
along a lane; and a lovely lane it was, all
adorned with wild flowers.

“JT like this path so much!” cried the
happy little Lucy. “Such beautiful plants
grow in the hedges, that were I not in a
very great hurry to get on, I should gather
a splendid nosegay on the way!”

“T do not like this path at all,” replied
her elder sister; “it is so narrow, one is
caught every minute by the thorns.”

“ Ah, Priscilla, you are always looking
out for thorns! I never think of them till
I find myself caught.”
92 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.

“That is because you are a silly, giddy
child!” was Priscilla’s contemptuous reply.

It will be easily seen, from this short
conversation, that however wise Priscilla
might be in the eyes of other people, or in
her own, she was not the most pleasant
companion in the world. She was con-
sidered a very sensible girl, one possessing
reflection beyond her years; and in some
respects she deserved the character. She
was wise in keeping’ clear of evil society ;
she was wise in performing her daily duties,
and in not expecting too much from the
world: but she was not wise in ever casting
a shade of gloom over what Providence in-
tended to be bright; she was not wise in
ever meeting misfortune half way—in al-
ways looking at the dark side of every
event,-and seeming as though she thought
it almost a sin to be happy! In truth, in
these matters, by taking the opposite ex-
treme, Priscilla was just as foolish as her
sister. The one, eager after pleasure, often
CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 93

met with disappointment: the other, fearing
disappointment, scarce knew pleasure at all.

There was the same difference between
them on the subject of religion, in which
both had been carefully instructed. Lucy
was too easily carried away by amusement:
with a warm heart, but a giddy and
thoughtless spirit, she too often, alas! ne-
lected the one thing needful for the pass-
ing diversion of the hour. Priscilla never
forgot her Bible-reading or her prayer ; but
both were too often a mere matter of form.
She would not for any temptation have
worked, bought or sold, on the Sabbath:
but she never considered it a delight.
Priscilla quite put aside the command in
the Bible, Rejoice evermore; and again I
say unto you, Rejoice; while her sister for-
got, in her heedless mirth, that it is also
written, Rejoice with trembling. The one
girl knew too little of the fear of the Lord;
the other was a stranger to his love.

At length the sisters reached the shore,
94 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE,

and saw before them the sparkling waves of
the sea. On the waters large men-of-war
were lying at anchor ;—little boats were
floating on the sunny tide, some moving on
steadily, as their line of oars rose and fell;
others speeding along with graceful motion,
like butterflies spreading their silver wings.
Amongst the many boats which were ply-
ing here and there, and those which were
fastened to the pier, Priscilla and Lucy
vainly searched for the Nautilus, which was
that which belonged to their uncle. As
with anxious looks they proceeded along
the shore, exclamations of impatience burst-
ing from their lips, they were approached
by an old friend of their uncle’s whom they
had seen several times before.

“On the look-out, eh?” said the old
sailor, as he came towards them. “ You'll
not hail the Nautilus to-day. Your uncle
was engaged this morning by a gentleman
to carry him round tw the Undercliff in his
boat; and I suspect that they'll have ugly
CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 95

weather,” he added, turning his weather-
beaten face towards the sea: ‘‘so he asked
me to wait for you here, and tell you why
he could not give you a row over the water;
and, as he thought as how you might be a
little disappointed, he sends you a shilling
a-piece to make all straight.”

Tears burst from the eyes of little Lucy:
she turned aside that the sailor might not
see them. Delighted as she ever was at
the prospect of pleasure, she never could
bear to lose it; and every little disappoint-
ment appeared to her as a real and serious
_ misfortune. Priscilla showed less vexation
at losing her excursion, though she took the
shilling with a discontented air; and her
first words, as she turned to walk back with
her sister, were as unjust as they were un-
grateful to that good Providence that gives
us so much even upon earth to enjoy.

“T knew that it would be so! it always
happens thus !—if one expects a little plea-
sure, disappointment is sure to come !”
26 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.

“ How strange and unkind in my uncle!”
said Lucy, still half crying; “and to think
that these stupid shillings could make up
for the loss of such a delightful treat!”

“We had better walk faster,’ observed
her prudent sister; “your blue bit of sky
is quite disappearing now.”

“And these thorns are very annoying,”
Lucy added fretfully, as, trying too hastily
to free herself from a bramble, she tore a
large hole in her dress.

“Tife seems all full of clouds and of
thorns,” observed Priscilla, in the tone of
one who is conscious of uttering a very wise
saying; “and to hope to find it anything
else is folly only fit for a very little child.
There !—was not that a drop of rain?
Yes! another, and another !—and so large!
That great cloud is going to burst just over
our heads; and, as always happens, there is
no place near where we could take shelter
from a storm.”

“Oh, you are wrong there for once!
CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 97

there is Bertha Fielding’s cottage; it is a
little, a very little out of our way, and I am
sure that the good woman will make us wel-
come.”

Thither ran the two little girls in the
rain, which was now falling thick and fast.
A sudden flash of lightning quickened their
steps, till, heated and breathless, they slack-
ened their pace as they approached the neat
little cot. There was the voice of a woman
singing within,—a feeble, trembling voice,
in which little melody was left; but its
tones sounded earnest, as if coming from
the heart, and from a heart that was cheer-
ful and happy :—

“ Content with this, I ask no more,
But to Thy care the rest resign ;

Sick or in health, or rich or poor,
All shall be well if Thou art mine!”

The girls’ hasty tap silenced the hymn,
and a kind voice bade them come in. The
inside of the cottage was clean and neat,

but its appearance bespoke great poverty.
(407) 7
98 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.

The clock, which had once merrily ticked
on the white-washed wall, was gone from
its place; there was no arm-chair by the
side of the fire; and many a treasured
family piece of old china had disappeared
from the wooden shelf. A pale, sickly-
looking woman lay upon the bed, which
was now almost the sole furniture of the
little abode. Her countenance appeared
worn with pain and with want; yet it still
bore a peaceful, hopeful expression.

“May we wait here a little, till the
shower is over?” said Priscilla, as she en-
tered the cottage. .

“ Most heartily welcome,” replied Bertha.
“T was rather inclined just now to feel
sorry at the rain falling, as I suffer a good
deal from the damp; but I was wrong, for
it has brought me two visitors to-day, and
that ig a real pleasure in this lonely place.

“T am afraid that you are very poorly ?”
said Lucy, approaching her kindly.

“T an quite laid up at present with
CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 99

rheumatism, my dear, and have been so
for the last six weeks. I can scarcely rise
from my bed.”

“What a misery to have to lie so long
on your bed!” cried Priscilla, who had
known something of illness.

“What a mercy to have a good bed to lie
on!” replied the sufferer, with a smile.

“But you will recover before long, and
be able to work again,” said Lucy, with
kind interest in her looks.

“T hope so, if it please God,” answered.
Bertha.

“Ah!” cried Priscilla, “I daresay that.
you have been hoping and hoping all the
time that you have been ill.”

“T always cherish hope, my dear.”

“Then you are disappointed every day
~ of your life.”

“Oh no!” cried the sick woman cheer-
fully ; “my hope is firm and sure, and can
never be disappointed !”

“That is impossible!” said Priscilla.
100 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.

{?

“Oh, tell me your secret!” cried Lucy,
with animation. “I always am hoping too,
but I so often find that I never can have
what I hope for!”

“My secret is a very simple one,” replied
Bertha. “I ask the Lord, for the sake-of
his blessed Son, to give me all that is good
for me; and I hope—I more than hope, I
feel certain—that the Lord hears and will
grant my prayer.”

“Yet you are sent poverty and pain,”
said Priscilla.

“T firmly believe that both poverty and
pain will work together for my good, and
that I shall suffer from neither of them one
moment longer than the all-wise Father
knows to be best for his child.”

“Yet you must be very miserable now ?”
said Priscilla, glancing round on the com-
fortless abode, and then at its suffering in-
mate. ;

“Miserable! oh no; that is no word for
a Christian! When I think of my deserts,
CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE, 101

and then of all that is left me, I should
think it a sin to be miserable! I have
never yet gone one day quite without food ;
God has till now provided me with daily
bread. Ihave a roof over my head, and
some kind friends, and one friend ”—-here
she laid her hand on a Bible—“ that casts
sunshine over the darkest trial. My hear-
ing and my eyesight are spared to me,—
how great a blessing is this! Then I have
sweet thoughts to cheer me as I lie here in
‘pain. I trust that, through my Saviour,
my sins have been forgiven,—is that no
cause for happiness? I trust that every
hour brings me nearer to a home where
there shall be no more sorrow, or crying, or
pain,—is that no cause for happiness? I
believe that God is with me even here, to
support my courage and keep me from fall-
ing,—is that no cause for happiness? Oh,
well may I count up my mercies! well may
I thank him who bestowed them all !—the
Rock of my strength and my salvation!”
102 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE.

Tears filled her eyes as she spoke, but not
tears of sorrow: The hope of the righteous
_ shall be gladness.

Priscilla sighed. When she contrasted
her lot with that of this poor woman,—her
peevish discontent, her cold, heartless ser- .
vice, with Bertha’s loving, grateful, happy
spirit,—she felt abashed and humbled in
her own eyes.

“The rain is over,” she said, turning to
the door. “I am sure that we are much
obliged to you, Bertha; and I shall often
think over what you have said.”

Lucy glided to her sister and whispered
a few words to her, at the same time
pressing something into her hand. “You
speak for me,” was all that could be over-

“ heard. Priscilla’s smile was brighter than

usual,

“We happen to have been given a little
money,” she said, going up to Bertha with
Lucy ; “we have no real wants ourselves,

and we should be glad, very glad, if you
CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE. 103

would spend it in getting any little comfort
for yourself.”

“May the Almighty bless you for your
kindness, dear children!” cried Bertha, fer-
vently clasping her hands. “It is he who
has sent you here to-day. He knew that I
had not a crust left in my cottage, that I
had no earthly means of procuring one.
He has answered my prayer. I hoped in
him, and he has not disappointed my hope.
But I cannot deprive you of both shillings,”
she added ; “it is too much-——”

“Oh no!” exclaimed Priscilla; “we will
never touch that money again !”

“ Prissy,” said Lucy gaily to her sister,
as they hastened along the wet path, not
complaining when their shoes were fixed in
the mire, and showers of moisture dropped
on them from the trees, “I am almost glad
that we were disappointed of our treat; I
think it was a good thing after all.”

“Yes; and I am glad that the shower
came, though we dreaded it so much.”
104 CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE,

“J daresay that if we looked at things as
poor Bertha looks, we should find a great
deal to make us glad.”

“Glad, and thankful besides,” said Priscilla.

“ Ah, you are thinking less of the thorns
and the clouds!”

“T see that earthly joys and earthly sor-
rows are mixed, like the lovely wild flowers
with the brambles; so that we should not
care too much for the one, nor fret: too
much at the other. And as, when dark
clouds roll over the sky, we yet know that
the blue heaven is always beyond, we may
look through all troubles with a sure glad
hope.” :

“And the hope of the righteous shall be
gladness!” said Lucy.




Paving Dear for It.

ae Seo ee)





@jAKE it down to my room, Jessie, 1
say, and don’t let’s have any of your
Ps nx nonsense. There’s prime soup in

C} that jug, I'll be bound ; it’s in such
a stiff jelly that one might cut it with a
knife. I like a drop of good soup of all
things.”

“But it was not sent for us, aunt,” said
the child, who was holding in her hands a
white jug full of soup which had been left
by a gentleman’s servant ; ‘it’s for the poor
sick lady up-stairs ; the man said that it was
for Miss Delmar.”

“And Miss Delmar will have it, ot
106 PAYING DEAR FOR IT.

course,” said the aunt, Sarah Kingsley, a
tall red-faced woman, who, in bonnet and
shawl, was just about to go out for some
shopping; “but she'll never miss a few
spoonfuls ; so take out six—six good uns—
d’ye hear? and then set the jug on the hob,
and heat it down nicely again. I guess
there will be still a deal more than she'll

want ; it’s little enough she can take.” .

“Oh, but, aunt,” began Jessie, looking up.
at the woman with a timid glance of anxiety
and doubt.

“None of your impudence for me!” cried
Sarah fiercely ; “take the jug down and do
as I bid you, or [ll break every bone in
your body!” And with this ungentle threat
upon her lips, Sarah pushed past her niece
and left the house, banging the door as she
went out. |

“Oh, dear, dear, what shall I do? I’m
sure that it’s dreadful wicked,” sighed poor
little Jessie as she slowly went down the
kitchen steps to the room which she shared
PAYING DEAR FOR IT. 107

with her aunt. “Everything that comes
for Miss Delmar aunt will have a bit of,
and in such a sly, cunning way. And Miss
Delmar she’s so ill, and so good; she tells
me so much about God, and she makes me sit
by her bed, and gives me so many of the nice
things which kind ladies send here for her.”

Jessie reached the kitchen, and with a
heavy sigh had just taken with a spoon a
portion of the cold soup, and put it into a
jelly-pot belonging to her aunt, when she
heard the tingle of a bell rung by the sick
lodger above. With a sad heart Jessie
answered the ring, entering Miss Delmar’s
darkened room with a feeling of shame that
made her glad that the green blind was
down, that the bed-ridden lady might not
see the blush that burned on her face.

“Can I do anything for you, ma’am ?”
said Jessie, walking up to the bedside, and
speaking in a respectful tone; for though
Miss Delmar was very poor, Jessie knew
her to be in every way a lady.
108 PAYING DEAR FOR IT.

The pale, wasted face of the sufferer was
bright with a kindly smile. “TI wanted to
speak with you, Jessie,” said she.

“JT hope that she has heard nothing about
the soup,” was the first thought of the
conscience-stricken child.

“T know,” continued the lady, “how fond
you are of looking at some of the hymns in
my book. Would you not like a hymn-book
of your own ?”

Kind and gentle was the tone of that
feeble voice, but it seemed to frighten
Jessie, for she could not answer a word.

“You are such a good, attentive little
girl,” said Miss Delmar, “that it pleases me
to give youany pleasure. This is for you!”
and the thin trembling fingers drew forth
from beneath some papers a beautiful little
hymn-book, with gilt edges and purple
cover.

Miss Delmar had denied herself some
comforts to buy the present for the child,
and she expected it to be received with joy;
PAYING DEAR FOR IT. 109

such as she felt in giving ; but to her great
surprise, Jessie turned away and burst into
tears.

“T can’t bear it! I can’t bear it!” she
sobbed: “I can’t take anything more; I’ve
had a deal too much already!” and she
cried as if her heart would break.

“What is the matter, my child?” asked
Miss Delmar, raising her languid head from
the pillow.

“T mustn’t speak, but I can’t help speak-
ing; I can’t go on robbing you this way,
and you so good and so kind! I can’t bea
hiding the truth any more, if aunt beat me
ever so badly !”

And silence once being broken, very few
questions sufficed to make Jessie unburden
herself of all the secrets that had been
weighing like lead on her young, tender
heart. She could not now stop if she
would; it was such a relief to let Miss.
Delmar know all. Jessie thought that even.
if she must continue to rob the poor lady,
110 PAYING DEAR FOR IT.

she at least would never deceive her any

more

=









be / My i POSS. id

A TENDER CONSCIENCE.



“You did not get half of your biscuits
yesterday ; we always keep back part of
PAYING DEAR FOR IT. 111

your butter ; and when you send down your
teapot for hot water, aunt takes out some of
the tea. Such beautiful soup came to-day |!
I’ve been taking out spoonfuls from it; I
knew that was wicked, oh, so wicked! but
I’m forced to do what aunt bids me. Do
not tell her,” cried Jessie, clasping her hands,
“pray don’t tell her. that I’ve let out her
secrets; she would beat me, and turn me out
into the streets.”

“You need not fear my exposing you to
your aunt’s anger, my poor child,” said the
gentle, pitying sufferer.

“‘ And you forgive me all I have done ?”

“Fully and freely,” said the lady. ‘Go
to your own room, Jessie, and ask God for
the sake of his blessed Son to forgive you
also. Nay, take the hymn-book,” she added,
seeing that the child seemed afraid to touch
the gift which she had not deserved; “you
will learn in the sweet verses there both
where to seek forgiveness for the past, and

where to find grace for the future. Go, and
112 PAYING DEAR FOR IT.

God bless you, my child, and guide you in
the only path which leads to peace here
and happiness hereafter.”

Miss Delmar listened to the steps of Jessie, :
as she slowly went down the staircase, and
then turned over in her mind all that the
little girl had just told her. The sick lady
had often suspected that Sarah Kingsley
had robbed her of little comforts, and now
she felt certain of the fact.

“ How shall I act?” thought the invalid.
‘“‘ Here is a woman, pretending to be pious,
venturing to kneel in God’s house, to read
God’s word, to speak the language of God’s
people, and yet living in the habitual practice
of wilful sin. She deceives others, may it
not be possible that she is deceiving herself 4
May she not hope that her petty pilfering is
beneath the notice of Him who hath said,
Thou shalt not steal; that, like one who
takes slow poison, she is hardly aware of the
deadly nature of her sin? I cannot speak
‘to her openly of it, lest I should draw down
PAYING DEAR FOR IT. 113”

her anger on poor little Jessie: O God,
guide me to utter such words as may awake
her sleeping conscience. Open the eyes of
this wretched sinner, that she may see her
danger ere too late; that she may shrink
from the wages of sin, seeing that these wages
are death in the end!”

Though almost too feeble to lift her Bible,
Miss Delmar opened it, and sought in its
holy pages for some suitable portion which
she might ask Sarah to read aloud to her,
as she was in the habit of doing. Miss Del-
mar was still thus engaged, when she heard
the woman’s heavy step on the stairs, and
Sarah, after knocking at the door, entered
in, with some tea and sugar which she had
been-commissioned to buy.

After the woman had set down the two
little packets on the table, stirred the fire,
beaten up the invalid’s pillow, and. asked if
her head felt more easy, Miss Delmar re-
quested her to sit down beside her, take up

the Bible, and read.
(4u7) 8
114 PAYING DEAR FOR IT.

“Let me hear the story of Achan,” she
said ; “you will find it in the seventh chap-
ter of the Book of Joshua.”

“T do not remember who Achan was,”
observed Sarah, as with a little difficulty
she found out the place.

“He was one of the Israelites,” replied
Miss Delmar, “one of the favoured people
of the Lord. Achan had been at the tak-
ing of the city of Jericho, a great and
glorious triumph. God had strictly com-
manded that none of the spoil of that city
should be kept, that all was to be destroyed.
But ‘Achan, moved by covetousness, had
hidden a goodly garment, a wedge of gold,
and a quantity of silver.”

“Well,” observed Sarah Kingsley, “when
silver and gold were lying about in the
streets, and doing good to no one, it can’t
be wondered at much if he did take a little
and hide it.”

“ Achan hid it from men,” said Miss
Delmar, “but he could not hide it from
PAYING DEAR FOR IT. 115

God. None of Achan’s companions seem
to have suspected him, but the Eye which
pierceth through darkness, and readeth even
the thoughts of the heart, had watched the
sinner while he was. hiding his ill-gotten
spoil in the tent. Achan committed the
evil deed secretly ; God showed his anger
openly. Begin at the thirteenth verse of
that chapter, please, and read the message
of God to Joshua, the apes and ruler of
the people.”

Up, sanctify the people, and say, “Sanctify
yourselves against to-morrow: for thus saath
the Lord God of Israel, There is an accursed
thing in the midst of thee, O Israel: thou
canst not stand before thine enemies, until ye
take away the accursed thing from among
you.

In the morning therefore ye shall be
brought according to your tribes: and tt
shall be, that the tribe which the Lord taketh
shall come according to the families thereof:
and the family which the Lord shall take
116 PAYING DEAR FOR IT.

shall come by households; and the household
which the Lord shall take shall come man by
man. And tt shall be, that he that is taken
with the accursed thing shall be burnt with
fire.

' Sarah paused in her reading. “I don’t
understand the meaning of all this; how
were they to be taken?” said she.

“They were taken by lot,” replied the
lady ; “the Lord himself so guiding the lot
that it should certainly fall on the guilty.
What must have been the feelings of Achan
when first the lot fell on his tribe, then on
the family to which he belonged? How
his hand must have trembled and his heart
throbbed, when man by man his household
was brought, and he felt that for him there
was no escape, that mountains could not
cover his guilt, nor hide him from the ter-
rible fate which it drew on him!”

“He had to pay dear for his wedge of
gold and his heap of silver,” observed Sarah,
who tried to look as though there was
PAYING DEAR FOR IT. 117

nothing in the awful story to make her
uneasy.

“He had to pay dear indeed!” echoed
the lady. ‘Read to the close of the chap-
ter, and see what a fearful price had to be-
paid by the wretched Achan for the spoil
so carefully concealed.”

Sarah, little as she liked doing so, read
to the end of the chapter, and then hurriedly
closed the Bible. “It’s a comfort,” she
could not help saying, “that nowadays no
one is stoned and then burned to ashes for
such a small matter as that.”

“The whole account shows us,” observed
Miss Delmar, “that in the sight of Al-
mighty God the sin of Achan was not small.
And though man no longer is commanded
to inflict such terrible punishment upon his
fellow-man, remember that the God who
judges us is the same, unchangeable and
holy, as he who passed judgment on Achan.
He still regards unlawful gain, whether ac-
quired by theft, falsehood, or Sabbath-
118 PAYING DEAR FOR IT.

breaking, as an accursed thing: sin is as
hateful to the Almighty now, as it was in
the days of old.”

“T thought that the gospel brought
mercy to all,” said Sarah. Her voice
quivered a little as she spoke, and she
turned away her head so that the light,
little as there was of light, could not fall
upon her face.

“The gospel has brought mercy indeed,”
replied the lady, “but it is mercy to the
penitent soul; the blood of the Saviour
cleanseth from all sin, when sin is repented
of and forsaken. But if any man have not
the Spirit of Christ he is none of his. _Let
those who continue in wilful sin remember
the awful words which fell from the lips of
the gentle Saviour: What shall it. profit a
man tf he gain the whole world and lose hig
own soul? or what shall he give in exchange
for his soul? The soul then may be lost,
the soul may be bartered away! Achan
sold his for a rich garment, and a heap of
PAYING DEAR FOR IT. 119

silver and gold! For what wretched trifles
are miserable sinners now selling theirs
every day! They call it gain, they think
themselves richer for the accursed thing
which they take ; but an account is kept of
all, even to the uttermost farthing! All
must be paid for, and dearly paid for in the
last terrible day. Oh that transgressors
would flee in time from the wrath to come,
that they would remember that God seeth
and that God will judge, and so cast from
them, as a deadly serpent, the accursed thing
which endangers their souls!”

Little Jessie sat in the kitchen with her
beautiful new hymn-book on her knee, and
her eyes fixed upon the first page. But she
could not think of what was before her, her
mind was so full of what had passed in her
last interview with Miss Delmar. And
how would the matter end? As Jessie was
turning over these painful thoughts in her
mind, she heard her aunt’s hand on the
latch, and Sarah Kingsley entered the room.
120 PAYING DEAR FOR IT.

“Where did you put thersoup?” she
asked abruptly, without looking at Jessie as
she spoke.

“There, aunt, in the jelly-pot,” answered
Jessie. Sarah Kingsley walked up to the
table, and with an unsteady hand emptied
back. the stolen soup into the jug from

. which it had been taken.

“God help me!” she muttered to her-
self; “never again shall I touch the ac-
cursed thing!” and she added, what Jessie
could not hear, “I dare not pay the price it

{72

would cost