Citation
The Brothers, or, Tales of long ago

Material Information

Title:
The Brothers, or, Tales of long ago
Added title page title:
Tales of long ago
Creator:
Levien, F
Marcus Ward & Co ( Publisher )
Royal Ulster Works ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London (67 68 Chandos Street)
Publisher:
Marcus Ward
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
123, 4 p., [5] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Brothers -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1877 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1877 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1877
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Northern Ireland -- Belfast
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes publisher's catalog.
General Note:
Simultaneously published by Royal Ulster Works, Belfast.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by F. Levien.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
022415492 ( ALEPH )
22497449 ( OCLC )
AHH0462 ( NOTIS )

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TALES oF ONG COR











The Baldwin Library

University
RmB Florida





















— eMarcus Warp & Co, Lonvon,

& ROYAL ULSTER WORKS, BELFAST.







THE BROTHERS

OR

TALES OF LONG AGO

BY

F. LEVIEN

AuTuHoR oF ‘‘Maccir’s Picrures,” Etc.







Dondon:
MARCUS WARD & CO., 67, 68, CHANDOS STREET
AND ROYAL ULSTER WORKS, BELFAST
1877







CONTENTS.



CHAP. ; PAGE
I.—THE CONTRAST x fs : eh
II.—THE BEGINNING 5 a . . 2
III.—Joun’s TROUBLES . : Sa ete a Sy
IV.—THE STORY OF THE RAINBOW : : 49
V.—PERPLEXITIES . . F 7 SO)
VI.—ABRAHAM’'S SACRIFICE . F . . 75
VII.—IsAAc’s BLESSING . : f "I , 85
VIII.—JOSEPH AND EIS BRETHREN . . . 99
IX.—THE JOURNEY THROUGH THE WILDERNESS « 108

X.—A WONDERFUL DISCOVERY . 5 3 118







THE BROTHERS.



CHAP. I.—THE CONTRAST.

SOHN and Stephen Wright stood side
| by side, looking at each other.

GE Nobody would have taken them for
brothers ; Valentine and Orson in the fairy
tale were not more unlike, and perhaps that
is what these boys were thinking as they
stood looking into each other’s face. They
felt shy and strange, for they could not re-
member ever having met before; and they
were silent, not knowing how to begin speak-
ing. Their meeting had taken place at a
railway station—not exactly the place for
two people to stand still and think and look
at each other. And so the boys began to
find out, when two trucks, a porter, and half-





8 The Brothers.



a-dozen passengers had run up against them
in turns.

“Is that your box, Stephen?” John asked
at last, and Stephen nodded,

“Then we had better take it away,” said
the other. “ There’s the carrier outside ; he'll
take it down to aunt’s for you.”

John was nine years old and Stephen eight,
both tall strong boys for their age; and the
box was small enough; they found no diffi-
culty in carrying it through the station to
the cart, which was standing outside in the
little country road, under the trees.

“T’ve met my brother, Mr. Brown,” John
said to the carrier. “And here’s his box, if
you'll be kind enough to take it to aunt’s.”

The carrier —a stout countryman, with
big blue eyes—stared with all his might at
- Stephen.

“What! is he your brother?” he asked,
surprised ; for John’s rosy cheeks and blue
eyes and rings of yellow hair formed the
strangest contrast to his brother’s face, which
was dark as a gipsy’s. Still more unlike was
John’s neat look to Stephen’s neglected ap-
pearance and shabby dress; John’s springing
step to Stephen’s slouching tread; John’s
frank gaze to Stephen’s timid, furtive glances.



The Contrast. 9



. John crimsoned as the carrier spoke, and
took hold of Stephen’s hand.

“Yes,” he cried stoutly. “He is my brother,
and he is coming to live with aunt and me
now.”

Stephen stood hanging his head and taking
no notice.

“Well, to be sure!” said Mr. Brown, and
he drove off without any more words, looking
back, However, more than once at the boys, who
were walking soberly along the road, until a
turning was passed and he lost sight of them.

By-and-by he came to a pretty little farm-
house like a nest among the trees, just then
unfolding their new spring leaves. Here he
stopped and lifted out Stephen’s box, while a
woman in a widow’s dress, with a sweet, sad
face, came hastily down the little garden path
and opened the gate to him.

“Has my nephew come, Mr. Brown?” she
asked eagerly.

“That he has, Mrs, Baynes; and a fine
rough one he looks—not a bit like your
Johnnie.”

“Poor little fellow! he has been brought
up very differently,” she answered. “They
were left orphans when they were quite little
things. I took Johnnie, but poor Stephen



10 The Brothers.



went to some rough relations of his father
in a mining district, where I fear he has not
been kindly treated. Often enough I have
fretted to have both my dear sister’s children
with me, especially as I had none of my own,
but my dear husband was afraid of the charge.
Now that I am alone, it’s different.”

Her voice failed her a little, and she helped
Mr. Brown to carry in the box without more
words.

“The boys are not far behind me, Mrs.
Baynes,” said the carrier, as he drove away.
She smiled and nodded as she went back to
the gate and stood for some time watching,
her eyes shaded with her hand.

At length the two little figures were to be
seen coming quietly along under the trees.
As Johnnie caught sight of her, he took hold
of his brother’s hand and set off running ; but
Stephen pulled his hand away, and let him
run on alone.

“Here he is, auntie!” cried John triumph-
antly. “But I think he’s tired; he won't
speak.”

“Hush!” Mrs. Baynes said; and she came
out into the road and walked a few steps to
meet her nephew.

“Dear Stephen, I am so glad to see you,”



The Contrast. II



she said gently, and put her arm round him
and kissed him.

He only hung his head, making no reply;
and his aunt, holding his hand, led him into
the house.

“TI expect you have been a long time on
your journey, my dear,” she said.

“Yes.”

“And you must be very tired and hungry.
Johnnie shall take you to your bedroom to
wash your hands and face, and then we will
have some tea.”

“Come along, Stephen; you’ve to sleep
with me, you know; and we have a jolly
room, looking over the hay-field.”

Still no answer ; and John ran upstairs, and
waited at the top, while Stephen slowly fol-
lowed him.

A bullfinch was whistling in his cage; soft
spring air was coming in; and the sunshine,
that had got too low in the sky to look in at
the window, might still be seen sparkling
through the trees. The room was very neat
and pretty too, and John looked for some
sign of pleasure from his brother at finding
himself in such a pleasant place. But Stephen
said nothing, and neither smiled nor took any
notice.



12 The Brothers.



“Isn't he a beauty?” said Johnnie, pointing
to the bird. “I’ve had him these two years,
and he’s as tame asa dog. When I let him
out of the cage he'll follow me all round the
rcom.”

Then he waited in vain for an answer.

“Don’t you like birds, Stephen ?”

“J don’t know.”

The voice certainly sounded Saige but
Johnnie felt sure he was only tired, and has-
tened to pour him out some water, and to
suggest the preparations for tea. Stephen
silently obeyed, and never said another word
till he was seated in Mrs. Baynes’ comfortable
kitchen, with his tea before him. He seemed
very hungry, said “Yes, please,” to everything
his aunt and brother offered him, and ate it
up quickly.

Afterwards he seemed so sleepy that his
aunt sent him at once to bed, Johnnie going
too, “for company’s sake,” he said.

Stephen was asleep almost as soon as his
head touched the pillow ; but his poor brother
was awake a long time, thinking over a cir-
cumstance which distressed him very much.
Stephen had got into bed without saying any
prayers!

The bright sunshine woke Johnnie very



The Contrast. 13

early next morning ; they were always early
risers at the farm, having a good deal to
attend to before breakfast; but he would
not wake his brother, who was still sleeping
soundly, and presently ran downstairs and
out to his work, whistling like one of the
blackbirds that were about.

Mrs. Baynes was already up, and busy with
a woman who came in to help her with her
dairy-work ; and John had no opportunity,
even if he had the wish, to tell her of his
trouble last night. About seven o’clock he
ran up to waken Stephen, and tell him that
breakfast would be ready in half-an-hour.

“Yes,” said Stephen, and rose slowly and
sleepily.

“T wonder when he will seem happy and
talk,” thought Johnnie to himself, as he
handily set out the breakfast things and made
the room ready for their morning meal.

He repeated his wonder to his aunt, who
came in just then with a jug of new milk in
her hand.

“Poor Stephen! He has been unhappy
and frightened, I believe ; he will be all right
by-and-by, if you are good to him.”

“Will he come to school with me this
morning, aunt?”



14 The Brothers.





“Not just yet, while he seems so strange,
and has not anything very tidy to go in.
There’s your last year’s things, that you’ve
grown out of; I must have them done up for
him.”

So John went off to school by himself that
day ; and when Stephen was told he might
amuse himself as he pleased, he went out into
the garden, and stood leaning over the gate.
He looked so dull that by-and-by his aunt
called him and asked him to help her with
her flowers. She was a great gardener, and
she talked away pleasantly to the boy, ex-
plaining her work to him, and telling him
the names of the plants. Stephen seemed
pleased, though he hardly said anything ; and
the morning was passing pleasantly enough,
when poor Stephen managed to upset a fine
geranium ina pot. It was a beautiful flower,
and had only been set out for a little while to
enjoy the sunshine ; and now it was snapped
right in two, and the blossoms fell like a
heavy head upon the ground!

Mrs. Baynes was fond of her flowers, but
she was much more distressed at the effect of
the accident upon Stephen than upon the
geranium. For the poor child had shrank
back with such a look of terror, and put up



The Contrast. 15



his arms as if expecting a blow. The move-
ment, the expression of his face, told a sad
tale of what his childish experiences had
been.

“Never mind,” she said, putting her arm
round him tenderly; “it was only an acci-
dent. Let us pick up the blossoms, Stephen,
and put them in water; they'll last a long
time so, and make the room quite gay.”

He looked very much astonished, but fol-
lowed her into the house, and watched her
putting the flowers in water with the greatest
interest.

After that morning he followed his aunt
everywhere, watching all her work, and smil-
ing silently whenever she found some little
business for him to do.

She soon found that Stephen had a true
and earnest nature, and that he had at least
learned a horror of falsehood and dishonesty.
For the rest he was sadly untaught, though
-very anxious to learn. He seemed delighted
to repeat the easy prayers she taught him,
and listened eagerly when she spoke to him
about our Saviour, and how we ought to love
and serve Him. ;

So matters went on very quietly all the
week, till Sunday morning came, and Ste-



16 The Brothers.



phen, tidy and clean, looked far more like
Johnnie’s brother than when he first came.
However, he was very silent still, and only
coloured when Mrs. Baynes said at breakfast,
“Stephen will begin going to Sunday school
to-day.”

John had ceased to expect answers from
his brother, so he talked on describing the
school, and trying to cheer Stephen up and
make him laugh, but it was all in vain.

Mrs. Baynes walked with them to the gate
when school-time approached, and sighed as
she felt the tight clasp of Stephen on her
hand, as if he feared to let her go.

“Good-bye, my dear,” she said, kissing him
when they reached the end of the garden.
“Be a good boy.”

Then she was obliged to pull away her
hand, and John led his brother off; she
watched them for a while along the road, and
then went indoors and sat down to read.
How pleasant the stillness was, after her’
week’s work!

Outside, only the birds’ songs and the
‘wind among the trees moving ever so softly ;
within, the clock ticking, the purring of the
cat. This was all she heard. She opened
her Bible at some words she loved.



The Contrast. 17



“There remaineth therefore a rest unto the
people of God.”

That was indeed a verse for Sunday, she
thought, as she bent over her Bible. It was a
large, handsome book, with pictures in it, just
such beautiful pictures as you see here. Mrs.
Baynes had many loving recollections belong-
ing to that book. How often her husband
had read to her from it! How often she had
shown Johnnie the pictures on quiet Sunday
afternoons, and taught him Bible lessons from
them !

I think she had lost herself in some such
remembrances, when she was suddenly roused
by hasty footsteps; the door was pushed
open hurriedly, and Stephen ran in. He was
sobbing as if his heart would break ; and Mrs.
Baynes, in some alarm, took him on her lap
and begged him to tell her what was the
matter.

“TI won't go to school any more!” he
gasped. “I won't go! I won't go!”

“Why, Stephen? What has happened?”

Stephen only sobbed ; but presently he put
his arms round her neck and began to im-
plore her—

“Don’t send me there again! don’t send
me!”

B



18 The Brothers.



“But tell me why, dear child! Johnnie
always likes going.”

“Johnnie! Hecan read; Ican’t. He can
write; I can’t. He knows all about what
they ask at the school, and I don’t. And
they put me in among the little ones; and
they laughed at me. And I heard some of
the others whisper, “Fancy Johnnie Wright’s
brother being such a dunce! He’s not a
bit like Johnnie,” they said; “and then 73
And coming to the bitterest part of his story,
the child’s voice failed altogether.

Mrs. Baynes kissed him, and told him not
to mind.

“Ts that all?” she asked.

“Oh no! oh no!”

“What else did they say? I am afraid
they are very naughty boys.”

“They said that—that Johnnie was ashamed
of his brother.”

“Then you know they said what is not
true. Johnnie ashamed of his brother! If
he was ashamed of his brother, I am sure I
should be ashamed of him.”

And then she soothed and petted him as if
he had been a baby. Poor child! He re-
membered no such caresses in his earlier
years ; his memory could recall little but hard





The Contrast. 19



blows and harder words; and just now the
love seemed too much for him, and made it
all the harder to stop crying.

Indeed the church bells were ringing before
Stephen could be persuaded to hold up his
head, and he had only time to wash his face
and make himself presentable before his aunt
took him with her to church.

There all was strange; he could not re-
member ever going to church before, and the
service was quite incomprehensible to him.
But his morning’s trouble seemed to have
loosed his tongue ; he asked various questions
as he went home, and showed his aunt how
much she would have to teach him.

Then when Johnnie begged to know what
had made him run away from school, Stephen
found words to tell him all about it.

Johnnie crimsoned.

“What a shame!” he cried in great wrath.
“You show me to-morrow who said it, and
see if I won’t knock him down for his impu-
dence.”

“Johnnie!” cried his aunt so severely that
Stephen quite started.

“T beg your pardon, aunt ; but really he
deserves it.”

“Deserves! Oh, Johnnie, I hope we shall



20 The Brothers.



none of us get all we deserve. That would be
dreadful !”

Johnnie said no more, and they sat down
to dinner in silence.

“And you are not coming to school this
afternoon?” John asked of his brother, as
two o'clock approached.

Stephen looked beseechingly at his aunt.

“You had better make his excuses this
afternoon, Johnnie. He is coming to school
to me.”

The boys laughed.

“And remember, Johnnie, I shall be seri-
ously displeased if you make any quarrels out
of this matter.”

John’s face looked a little gloomy as he
walked away, but Mrs. Baynes took no notice;
and as soon as she had finished “washing up
the dinner things,” she took out her big Bible
again, and invited Stephen to come and look
at the pictures.







CHAP. Il.—THE BEGINNING.

“ saey are nice pictures,” said Stephen.
“ But I don’t know what they mean.”

“They are pictures belonging to the story
of the world, the true story, as we find it in
the Bible. And I want you to learn what
they mean very much. Will you listen and
try to remember, if I tell you?”

Stephen was quite ready to promise that
he would ; he turned back to the first picture,
and fixed his eyes upon it as his aunt began.

“You can tell me, Stephen, who is the
Maker of all things in heaven and earth?”

“You told me that God Almighty made us.”

“Yes. Our Father in heaven, the great and
merciful God, whom we cannot see, but who
always sees us, called us into being, as well as
the earth, the trees, the flowers, the sun and
stars, and all creatures that you see. We
read in the Bible that ‘in the beginning God
created the heaven and the earth. And at



22 The Brothers.



first the earth was dark and empty, with the
waves of the sea roaring all over it, until God
said, ‘Let there be light, and there was light.’
Then God caused the sea to gather together
in its place, and let the dry land appear; and
when there was dry land for the plants to
grow upon, God made them grow, and cover
the earth with grass and trees. And He
made the sun, the moon, and the stars.
Afterwards He caused live things to come
into the world—fishes in the sea and birds in
the air; then other animals. At last, when
all the earth was ready for a man to live in,
God made a man to live there. We read,
‘And the Lord God formed man of the dust
of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils
the breath of life; so man became a living
soul.’ ”
“Had the first man a home to live in?”
“We read that God placed him in a gar-
den—a beautiful place, full of lovely trees and
* fruits and flowers, and with a great bright
river flowing through it to water the garden ;
and all kinds of gentle and pretty animals
and birds were there ; it was a happy place.”
“And did the man have it for his own ?”
“Yes, it was all his own—the Lord God
gave it to him; all the trees and the animals







The Beginning. oe



were to be his. The first man, Adam, might
walk about the garden, and have everything
for himself.”

“He must have been very happy.”

“Yes; but he wanted something else. Can
you guess what it was? What would you
have wished for in his place, I wonder ?”

Stephen thought of the lovely garden, the
shining river, and the birds with their pleasant
song.

“T should not have wanted anything,” he
said, “except for you and Johnnie to come
and be in my garden with me.”

“And that is what Adam found; he was
very lonely in his beautiful garden—he wanted
a friend. Man is not meant to be happy all
alone ; we can only be really happy when we
have some one near us to share our happiness
with. It leaves off being real happiness as
soon as we get selfish, and want it all to our-
selves. So as Adam could not be happy all
by himself, the Lord God made a woman,
called Eve, who was to be Adam’s wife,
and live with him in the garden. Adam was
asleep when the Lord God made Eve; but
we can fancy how pleased he felt when he
woke up and saw her coming towards him
under the trees. And how pleased she must



24 The Brothers.



have been to find herself with Adam in that
lovely place.

“There were all manner of beautiful things
for her to see, as I told you; pleasant shady °
trees, sweet and gay flowers, roses and lilies
perhaps; all sorts of fruit trees, orange trees —
with their dark leaves and golden fruit, vines -
with their clusters of purple grapes. The
air was full of sweet sounds as the song--
birds sang to their mates; beautiful animals
bounded across the soft grass, or drank of
the clear water of the streams which flowed
murmuring through the garden.”

“She must have been pleased,” said Ste- ~
phen.

“Yes; altogether it was the most beautiful
place you can imagine. But you must not
think that Adam and Eve had nothing else
to do than to enjoy all those beautiful things.
In some respects they were like grown-up
people, but in other ways they were more like
children. They had a man’s and a woman’s
power of learning, but they had to learn like
children. Yes; God had put them into that
beautiful garden that they might fear. Per-
haps you will ask what sort of things they
had to learn.

“T fancy they were intended to learn all

\



The Beginning. 25



about the trees and flowers, the birds and
beasts that were about them.”

“ And how would they learn all that ?”

“Well, by observation—by using their eyes
and other senses.

“But I think God intended them to learn
much more important things than those.
They were not only God’s creatures, they
were God’s children ; so it was necessary for
them to learn about their Father in heaven.”

“ And how could they learn that?”

“Perhaps God sent some of His holy angels
to talk with them.”

“What were they?” Stephen asked.

“This man and woman were not the first
creatures the Lord God had made to love
and serve Him. He had some other servants
(who did not live in this world), called His
‘angels’ —that means ‘messengers.’ They
were something like men, the Bible says; but
they could fly, and do other things that men
cannot do, because men are meant to serve
God in one way and the angels in another.
Perhaps, as I said, some of these holy mes-
sengers were sent to talk to Adam and Eve.
But I rather think, from what the Bible says,
that they had a higher and better teacher
than even the angels.



26 The Brothers.



“Who could so well teach them about the
Father as the Son of God, whose good plea-
sure it has always been to reveal the Father
to us?

“But you cannot so well understand that
yet; we will go on to the great lesson which
Adam and Eve would have to learn about
that heavenly Father, and of the duty they
owed to Him. This was the great lesson we
all have to learn, the lesson which God has
placed us on this earth to learn, the great
lesson of obedience. You know what that
means ?”

“Doing what we are told to do,” Stephen
answered.

“Yes; and the remembrance of that great
lesson brings us to a very difficult and very
sad part of this story. I have told you that
Adam and Eve had to /earn—above all, that
they had to learn obedience. Now they
could only learn obedience by having some
rule to obey, and by being able to disobey
it if they wanted to do so. Of course the
Almighty God could have made of them
creatures who could not disobey if they had
tried, or who could never have felt a wish to
disobey Him. But such obedience as that—
forced obedience, that they could not help—

\



The Beginning. 27



would not have been pleasing to God. He
had given them all good things; and, best of
all, He gave them the power of pleasing Him
by obeying Him, if they liked. He left their
choice free; they could obey if they liked,
they could disobey if they liked. That is
the only way in which their obedience could
really show that they loved God and wanted
to serve Him; therefore it was the only way
in which their obedience could be pleasing to
Him. And so it is with us; God wishes us
to serve Him because we love Him and wish
to serve Him, not because we must. It is so
with ourselves, in a way. I should not care
for you to do things for me only because you
could not help it. If I thought you /ked to
do them, then I should be pleased.

“So you see there was no help for it. If
man had to learn to please God by his
obedience, he must run the risk of diso,
bedience. And there must be some trial to
show whether he would obey or not. It
mattered very little what the trial was, so
that it was a trial ; and God appointed one for
Adam and Eve that was suited to their way
of life and the place in which they lived.

“It was this. In the beautiful garden there
was a tree, which was called the Tree of



28 The Brothers.



Knowledge of good and evil. The fruit of
this tree God strictly forbade them to eat.
They might take the fruit of every tree but
this one, but of this the Lord God told them
that in the day they ate of it they should die.
Here was their trial. This would show what
was in their hearts, whether they would obey
God or no. But this was not the whole of
their trial. This was only the shell, as it
were, of their trial; the kernel of it was very
different, and far more serious. However
beautiful the tree might be, however tempting
was its fruit, its merely being there in the
midst of the garden was not a sufficiently
searching test of obedience. The tree could
not speak and ask them to take of its fruit,
and the very idea of doing so might never
strike them.

“Now in order that Adam and Eve should
reach their highest good—that is, pleasing
God by choosing to obey Him—it was needful
for some one to put the idea of taking the
forbidden fruit into their head, and that they
should refuse to disobey when they were free
to choose their own course. This test was at
hand.

“There was an enemy preparing to try and
lead them wrong; and perhaps, if you think



The Beginning. 29



over what I have said, you will see a little
why he was allowed by God to doit. There
is a wicked angel who has rebelled against
God, and who is always striving to displease
Him as much as the holy angels try to serve
Him; and this wicked angel made his way
into the beautiful garden to tempt Adam and
Eve to rebel against God, even as he had
done.

“In some way he contrived to speak to
Eve without frightening her too much, and
then he began to talk about the tree of know-
ledge, trying to make her believe that God
was not good to her in keeping back from
her this fruit, which the wicked angel said
was best of all. It would do more for her
than any other fruit, he told her, and that
was why God had told her not to eat it, and
that she should die if she did so. She would
not die because of eating it, he said. Eve
had never heard a lie before; but she knew
enough of God’s goodness and truth not to
believe the wicked angel’s words, if she had
thought properly about it all.

“But instead of turning away from the tree
and the voice of the tempter, to remember
the goodness and wisdom of God, and assure
herself that it must be right to obey Him, she



30 The Brothers.



let her eyes rest upon the tempting fruit, and
listened to the wicked words, till she began
to long to disobey. She saw that the fruit
was ‘pleasant to the eye’ and ‘good for food,’
and ‘a tree to be desired to make one wise;’
and at last she stretched out her hand and
picked the fruit and ate of it, and then she
gave some to her husband, and he ate of it
also.

“This beginning of sin in the world is what
we call ‘The Fall of Man, because Adam
and Eve fell from a state in which they knew
no harm, and became sinners, who must know
sorrow and die. Though they did not die at
once, though the Lord gave them time to
repent, yet they knew now death was coming.
This is partly what the words mean— Thou
shalt die ;’ and partly they refer to sin itself,
which is called in the Bible ‘death,’ because
it kills goodness in the soul; it is, to use a
hard word for it, ‘spiritual death.’

“This was the Fall; they had disobeyed,
and now they knew kow to be wicked, while
before they had only known goodness. Every-
thing was changed to them; they began to
feel unhappy and frightened for the first time.
The evening came, and then they heard the
voice of the Lord God calling to them, and



The Beginning. 31



they were afraid, and hid themselves among
the trees of the garden.

“But we cannot hide from God; He sees
us always, and knows all we do, all we think,
every moment of our lives. He saw them
among the trees, as He had seen them all
day long, and he called to Adam, ‘ Where art
thou?’ And Adam said, ‘I heard Thy voice
in the garden, and I was afraid.’ And the
Lord God asked him what he had done.

““Hast thou eaten of the tree whereof I
commanded thee that thou shouldst not eat?’

“Then Adam, like every one who does

- wrong, felt inclined to excuse himself and
throw the blame upon somebody else, and he
answered—

“ with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did
eat.’

“And the Lord God asked Eve—

“What is this that thou hast done?’

“And Eve had her excuse too; she said it
was the bad angel who had persuaded her to
take the fruit.

“But of what use were excuses? They
had done the wrong; they were no longer
sinless creatures; and therefore they could
no longer be allowed to stay in the garden of



32 The Brothers.



Eden. The Lord God banished them from
their beautiful home; they were driven forth
by an angel into the great wide world.”

“How unhappy they must have been,”
Stephen said.

“They must indeed, especially when they
came to know that their children, and all
mankind who came after them, would follow
their bad example, and be sinners too. But
the Lord God was merciful to them, and did
not leave them without hope. He promised
(though in words that they could not quite
understand then) that mankind should have a
Deliverer, who should some day help them
out of their sad state of sin, and make them
good and happy again. This Deliverer was
our Saviour, about whom I have been telling
you lately ; the Son of God, who became man
to help us.

‘There was no other good enough
To pay the price of sin ;
He oa could unlock the gate
Of heaven and let us in,’
You know I have told you how He died to
save us all; He died for all mankind—for
Adam and Eve, and all who lived before He
came into this world, as much as for us who
live after.



The Beginning. 33



“We must never read this sad story without
thinking of Him who is called in the Bible
the Second Adam, because He showed us in
His perfect life all that the first Adam should
have been, and was not. He fulfilled exactly
all that God meant man to be; He was per-
fect in obedience; He overcame the tempta-
tions of the bad angel.

‘He died that we might be forgiven ;
He died to make us good;
That we might go at last to heaven,
Saved by His precious blood.’

If we will but trust in Him, and do His will,
He will give us back more than all that Adam
lost. He will bring us to a better paradise,
and make us happy there for ever.”







CHAP. IIL—JOHN’S TROUBLES.

(\TEPHEN was sitting thinking over what
he had heard, and looking at the Bible
pictures, when the click of the garden gate
disturbed him, and he looked up to see his
brother appearing ; not, as usual, with a light
step and laughing face; indeed he looked so
gloomy that Stephen ran to him and asked
what was the matter.

It was an improvement that the younger
brother could look up at him frankly now, and
speak easily ; that day’s trouble and sympathy
seemed suddenly to have carried him over the
barriers of shyness and restraint. Yesterday,
Johnnie would have been full of delight at
his brother’s show of friendship ; but now his
brow did not clear—no smile came to his
lips. He only put his arm round Stephen,
and began to walk up and down the garden
with him.

“What is the matter, Johnnie?”

The other did not answer.



John’s Troubles. 35



“Ts anything the matter?”

“Yes; I’m in a scrape—such a scrape as I
never was in before at school ;” and Johnnie
looked still more put out.

“Tell me about it, do!”

“It’s no good telling. But I’ve been treated
unjustly ; and I don’t care what they say. If
they don’t treat me fairly, I won’t behave
myself, and so I tell them.”

John’s voice had a sound of rebellion in it,
and his eyes flashed; Stephen looked very
much awe-struck, but he made no answer, for
at the moment Mrs. Baynes had come up to
them, and was looking surprised and dis-
tressed at John’s loud voice and excited
face.

“My dear boy, you have not been getting
into trouble at school ?”

“Yes, I have,” he said, rather sullenly.

“But what was it? Iam sure you did not
wish to give your teacher trouble, Johnnie.”

“Mr. Moore said he should come and tell
you all about it,” said John bitterly.

Mr. Moore was the rector of the parish,
and the idea that he should come to com-
plain of her boy, whom she loved to think
one of the pattern boys at the school, quite
frightened Mrs. Baynes.



36 The Brothers.



“Oh, Johnnie! surely Mr. Moore is not
displeased with you?”

“He-said he was, aunt.”

“But do tell me what it is all about; you
do not know how anxious and unhappy you
are making me.”

“They were unjust to me,” said Johnnie
sturdily ; and then, catching sight of a figure
coming along the road, he exclaimed, “ There
now! there’s Mr. Moore. He'll tell you ;”
and, turning from then: *hastily, he ran into
the house. Stephen followed him, and Mrs.
Baynes turned to meet a kind-faced old gen-
tleman who entered the garden a moment
afterwards and shook hands with her in
friendly fashion.

“TI do hope, sir,” she began anxiously, “that
my Johnnie has not been giving you trouble.
He’s not like himself this afternoon.”

“Well, so I thought. I never remember
hearing a complaint of John before. But this
afternoon his teacher come to me quite dis-
turbed about him. ‘I told him to look over
the hymn-book with Ned Rice, he said. ‘And
some sort of a whisper passed between them,
and John got into such a rage he knocked
Ned off the form, threw down tke book, and
all I can say will not make him pick it up



John’s Troubles. $7



again, or go on with his lesson.’ So I had
to go and see what I could do, Mrs. Baynes.
I desired John myself to pick up the book
and go on with his lesson; but finding him
stubborn, I would not contend with him, but
put him at the bottom of the class, in dis-
grace. After school I spoke to him privately,
and tried to persuade him to beg his teacher’s
pardon; but he was as obstinate as possible.
You must mind you do not spoil him, Mrs.
Baynes; he has no father to correct him. If
I were you I would send him off to bed at
once, to show him you are displeased.”

“But perhaps, sir, Ned teased him. His
brother has been much neglected, and the
other boys mocked at him this morning, and
Johnnie could not bear that.”

“My dear Mrs. Baynes, could a silly speech
from a school-fellow justify all that display of
temper and disobedience to his teacher and
myself? Forgive me if I say, do not let your
kind heart blind your good sense, for I know
you have the best of good sense of your own.
Do not let it be misled into spoiling the boy.
He is a very nice boy, but all children may be
spoiled.”

“T will do my best, sir, indeed,” she an-
swered so humbly and earnestly that Mr.



38 The Brothers.



Moore’s wish to scold her passed away, and
he only talked a little while pleasantly about
her flowers, and then bade her good-bye.

Mrs. Baynes walked slowly into the house ;
called Stephen downstairs, and asked him to
get out the tea things; then went up to John,
who had taken refuge in his own room.

He was sitting on the edge of his bed
looking down gloomily, and he did not stir
as she came in, nor even when she sat
down beside him and put her hand on his
shoulder.

“My dear child, what is it all about? Did
Ned Rice say anything about Stephen ?”

“Hed made a picture of him, with a fool’s
cap on, in his hymn-book, and I wasn’t going
to look over it with him after that. I just
shoved him one way and the book the other.
And they never asked what I did it for,
but ordered me to pick it up and go on.
I wasn’t going to pick up Ned’s old book for
him, I know. They might have asked me my
reasons ; but if they like to be unfair, I’m not
going to behave myself.”

Mrs. Baynes sat silent for a few moments;
then she said suddenly—

“How long is it that you have been to
Sunday school, Johnnie?”



John’s Troubles. 39



“These four or five years—since I was ever
so small.”

“And Mr. Mason has been so kind to you
all the time before you got into his class.
How often he has played with you and noticed
you. I remember his letting you ride home
on his shoulder once, and then another time
his bringing you that big coloured ball you
used to be so proud of. And when you had
the fever a year ago, how he used to come
and see you. When you were getting better,
it was always, ‘When is Mr. Mason coming
again?’ and you had a drawer full of the
pictures he brought you. And you had the
Bible he gave you at Christmas with you this
afternoon. How soon all that kindness is for-
gotten, because one day he did not understand
how another boy had put you in a passion!”

John got very red, but said nothing.

“And Mr. Moore! I should have thought
there was no friend you could respect like
him, who was so good to us when your dear
uncle was dying, who has been so kind to
you all your life. Oh, Johnnie! is it possible
that you can have unkind, ungrateful feelings
to him ?”

“I don’t know,” returned Johnnie, in a
rather unsteady voice.



40 The Brothers.



“My dear child, think about it, try to
know. I cannot help hoping you do not feel
ungrateful ; but indeed what you did was un-
grateful—disrespectful too. If you think it
over, I am sure you will be ashamed of your-
self, and scold yourself, which will be far
more useful than my scolding you.”

Johnnie felt ashamed enough already, and
sorry enough too; it seemed “babyish” to
cry, he thought; but when he was left alone
he could help it no longer, the tears would
have their way. Yes, he had behaved very
badly. He could feel it now that the wave of
passion had retreated and left the truth bare.

He was very miserable for perhaps half-an-
hour ; that was a long time for Johnnie to be
unhappy ; his troubles generally cleared away
in half that time. He was only beginning to
recover himself when Stephen came in softly
and timidly. He had some vague idea that
his brother’s trouble was connected with him-
self; but he dared not ask, and the idea only
made him shy.

“Won't you have your tea, Johnnie?” he
said with an effort.

Johnnie jumped up and ran to wash his
face.

“I want to go out again,” he said, trying to



John’s Troubles. 4l



steady his voice. “It was too bad of me this
afternoon, and I'll just go and say so to Mr.
Mason, and to Mr. Moore too.”

Stephen’s heart sank. What dreadful thing
was this that his brother was going to do?
He trembled to think of it.

But Johnnie rushed downstairs as if his
spirits had returned to him, and darted into
the kitchen to his aunt.

“TI am very sorry,” he said eagerly. “I
want to go and tell them.”

Mrs, Baynes quite understood what he
meant, and smiled with pleasure as she an-
swered, “You are right, my boy;” but there
was a depth of satisfaction in her tone that
made Stephen glad of his brother’s deci-
sion, terrible as it appeared to him. Johnnie
was out of the house and speeding away on
his errand before any more could be said,
though as he came near the Rectory his pace
slackened a little, and a certain shyness made
his cheeks burn again. But he was fortunate
in the moment of his arrival, for the rector
was walking in his garden, and the very Mr.
Mason himself at his side.

They were talking very earnestly, and did
not notice the approaching footsteps till John
stood close beside them; then they turned



42 The Brothers.



and perceived the little fellow, looking up
with a flushed face and a very much ashamed
expression. :

“Well, Johnnie, have you come to your
senses?” asked Mr. Moore quite kindly.

“I’m very sorry, sir. If you'll try me again,
I shall behave better, I hope. I’m very sorry,
sir.” This second apology was addressed to
Mr. Mason.

“That is well,” said Mr. Moore. “You have
been a very good boy in general, Johnnie, and
I hope you mean to try for the future to keep
up that character. I’ve no doubt your teacher
will be quite willing to overlook what hap-
pened to-day.”

Mr. Mason signified his willingness, and
then, perhaps pitying his pupil’s confusion,
said they must not keep the rector any longer
now; it would soon be church-time, and so
went off with the boy. They were great
friends really, and Mr. Mason had heard the
whole story before they reached Mrs. Baynes’
gate. ;

“I don’t wonder that it tried your temper,
Johnnie,” he said kindly. “I wish I had seen
it at the time.”

They shook hands and parted better friends
than ever



John’s Troubles. 43



How could Johnnie look so bright after all
that trouble? Stephen wondered, as the three
went off very quietly to church together. He
felt unhappy for his brother and for himself;
he could not forget what he had suffered that
morning.

But people who cannot get over their
troubles quickly perhaps learn the more from
them ; so Stephen had some advantage over
his brother.

It was a lovely evening when they came
out of church; the sun had set, but had left
a great deal of light behind him in the sky—
a soft, low light that made everything look
beautiful.

It had not been a very happy day, Stephen
thought ; but the evening seemed so pleasant
and still, as if it would make up for all that
had gone wrong. He would have felt almost
happy again, as the three walked along to-
gether, but for the thought of to-morrow.

Had not his aunt said that he must begin
going to day-school to-morrow? And how
dreadful that would be, if the Sunday-school
had been so bad!

Stephen’s dreams that night were disturbed
with visions of troubles in school ; sometimes
the boys were teasing, sometimes the rector



44 The Brothers



was scolding him for being so great a dunce;
so that it was a relief to wake and find the
morning had come, and that Johnnie was
already up and whistling gaily.

Only, as he recollected in a moment, the
real troubles were coming now, and the
thought made him sink back on his pillow
with a deep sigh.

“What’s the matter?” said Johnnie, stop-
ping suddenly in the middle of “Rule, Bri-
tannia.”

“ Johnnie,” Stephen began, then he stopped
again, but brought out at last—“I’m afraid of
going to school.”

“Afraid! Why, our master, Mr. Willis, is
as kind as can be. You needn’t be afraid.”

“Tt’s—it’s—I wouldn’t mind the master
beating me. I’ve been beaten often enough.”

Johnnie stared,

“Mr. Willis won’t beat you, Stephen.”

“No; it’s the boys I’m afraid of.”

“Oh, they daren’t say a word in school
when Mr. Willis is there. It’s different on
Sundays; they take liberties then.”

“Are they so frightened for Mr. Willis,
then?” ;

“Frightened! No; but he makes them
afraid of doing anything wrong.”



John’s Troubles. 45



A little consoled by these assurances, Ste-
phen found spirit to rise and follow Johnnie
out of doors, to help in his various tasks.
But he was very silent and sober again, and
so he showed himself at breakfast, and during
their walk to school.

“Oh, Johnnie!” he said in a whisper as they
reached it, “how I wish I was not going in!”

Johnnie laughed, and told him not to mind.
The bell was ringing loudly; a number of
boys were running in; the brothers joined
them ; and what with the clatter of feet, the
buzz of voices, and the clanging of the bell,
Stephen felt quite bewildered, but his brother
pulled him by the sleeve, and led him up
the school. “There’s Mr. Willis,” whispered
Johnnie, and Stephen scarcely found courage
to look up at a gentleman who was standing
by a desk at the upper end of the room—a
gentleman with a bald head and a beard, a
kind, thoughtful face, with grave quick eyes
that seemed to see every part of the room at
once. This was Mr. Willis.

“This is my brother, sir,’ said Johnnie,
presenting him.

“Your brother,” the master returned, in a
low, clear voice. “A younger brother, I
suppose.”



46 The Brothers.



“Yes, sir; and he has not been to school
before, so he has to begin at the beginning.”

“Well, every one must do that some time
or other, I suppose. What is your name, my
boy ?”

“Stephen Wright, sir.”

“You have not learned to read yet, Ste-
phen?”

It was not nearly so difficult to say “No”
as Stephen had feared; somehow the master
did not seem at all as if he were going to be
shocked.

“No? Then you shall begin this morning.
Be very attentive. Come this way;” and
Stephen found himself placed at the bottom
of a form full of very little boys ; but nobody

seemed to notice him, or made any remark.

"The big bell stopped ringing at the moment
the master walked to his desk and touched a
little bell which stood there. It was the
signal that all noise should cease; at the
sound every voice was hushed, every boy sat
down quietly in his own place. The whole
school became still as a frozen river.

“Stand!” All the boys stood up as straight
as soldiers and sang a hymn ; afterwards came
some prayers; then all set to work.

Pupil teachers began to instruct the younger



John’s Troubles. AT



classes; but Mr. Willis’ eyes seemed on every
one at the slightest disturbance; his low“hush”
was enough to bring back perfect order.

Indeed it was soon easy for even Stephen
to see how difficult it would be to disobey the
gentle determination of the master’s manner,
or to elude his all-seeing observation.

But there was the young pupil teacher
pointing out the letters on the board, and
making the children repeat them after him.
Stephen set to work with all his might to
learn the looks of these strange black things,
which meant so much.

How hard it seemed at first! But there
were these little, tiny children learning them,
and he would—he would! :

Mr. Willis noticed the eager earnestness of
Stephen’s dark eyes, and said to Johnnie
when school was over—

“You might try and get your brother on at
home. Iam sure he wants to learn.”

“Yes, I will, sir, thank you, if he likes.”

And the boys went out with the stream.

“There now! You did not mind it much,
did you?” asked Johnnie, quite triumphantly,
as he met his brother’s smile.

“No, it was not half so bad as I thought ;
and Mr. Willis does seem kind.”



48 The Brothers.



“Ah! and he is kind too,” said Johnnie.
“But what is he like when he’s angry?”
said Stephen. “I suppose, if they will not
behave themselves, he is angry sometimes ?”
“Yes. Tm sure I hope, Stephen, he will
never be angry with us. Its enough to
frighten you; he’s so quiet, and yet his voice
is like thunder; and he looks but I hope
you'll not see it, Stephen; that’s all.”
Certainly Stephen hoped so too,









CHAP. IV.—THE STORY OF THE RAINBOW.

CEPHEN had made up his mind that he
would soon cease to be a dunce; when
afternoon school was over, Johnnie must find
a little time to teach him the letters. In the
evening, when his aunt was sitting at her
needlework, he begged her to let him have
the Bible with the pictures again, and to tell
him another story out of it.

“T was thinking yesterday I never should
learn anything,” he said. “But to-day seems
like beginning again; and I hope I shall learn
as much as Johnnie some day.”

“That beginning again every new day that
comes is a great blessing to us,” said his
aunt. “We go to bed at night tired, or dis-
appointed, or sorry because the day has gone
by and we seem not to have done all we
meant in it; then we have a good rest, and
we wake up and find everything new again—
a new day to work in and hope in—new

dD :



50 The Brothers.



strength and spirits to begin all over again,
just as if we were fresh labourers come to a
piece of work of which others had got tired
out. We ought to thank God for our new
beginnings every morning.”

“It was a big ‘new beginning’ my coming
here,” said Stephen gravely; and in his own
heart he said to himself, “I am sure I ought
to thank God for that.”

“It is about the great ‘new beginning’ of
the world that I was going to tell you to-
night, Stephen,” his aunt went on. “You
know you heard about the first beginning of
all yesterday.”

“Yes—and how soon people left off being

ood.”

“After those days they seem to have gone
on getting worse, instead of better; the more
men there were living together, the more
harm was done, till there was no peace in the
world because of their violence and of their
wickedness ; and at last they grew to be so
dreadfully bad that the Lord God saw that it
was better they should not live on the earth
any more, for the longer they lived the worse
they grew; it was better that their bodies
should return to the earth, and their souls
should be called to God.



The Story of the Rainbow. 51



“But in the midst of all those wicked
people there lived one good man, whose
name was Noah. The Lord God saw that,
in spite of all the dreadful things that were
going on around him, Noah lived a good,
quiet life, and did all he could to serve God,
and teach his sons to be good men. He had
three sons, whose names were Shem, Ham,
and Japhet. Now in those days people used
to live for a very great number of years,
and when Noah was more than four hundred
years old, it pleased the Lord God to speak
to him, and tell him that an end was coming
to all the terrible wickedness that was filling
the earth. Every one was going on boldly
with his bad deeds, just as if there was no one
to punish them ; but all the time the end was
coming nearer and nearer. And the Lord
God said to Noah that a great danger was
hanging over all the world, and that he was
to begin at once and build for himself a great
ship, called an ‘ark ;’ it was rather more like
a house than a ship perhaps, but it was all to
be made of wood, that it might float upon the
waters. It was to have a window and a door,
and to be three storiés high; and it was to
be very large. ‘And,’ the Lord God said,
‘behold I, even I, do bring a flood of waters



52 i The Brothers.



upon the earth to destroy all flesh wherein is
the breath of life from under heaven, and
everything that is in the earth shall die.’

“But Noah and his wife, and his sons and
their wives, were to go into the ark and be
safe ; and they were to take two of every kind
of animals into the ark too, to keep them
alive; and birds as well, two of every kind.”

“And that was why the ark had to be so
big ?” Stephen asked.

“That was the reason ; and when Noah had
heard the words of the Lord God, he set to
work and began to build the ark directly.”

“Did the people know that the flood was
coming ?”

“I believe that all the many years Noah
was building the ark he kept on telling them
why he was making it, and warning them
of the danger that was coming upon them.
But they would not heed him. Noah went
on working and working; year by year the
ark grew larger. Perhaps many came and
watched his work; perhaps they laughed at
him for taking so much trouble for nothing.
At any rate, they did not believe in the
dreadful flood that was coming, but went on
with their business and their pleasure and
their wickedness, until at last the ark was



The Story of the Rainbow. 63



finished, and Noah took into it all the crea-
tures that the Lord God had told him to
take, and then went in himself with his wife
and family.

“Very likely the wicked men mocked the
more at that, when they saw Noah and his
family enter into their ship on dry land; and
a week went by, and nothing happened. And
then, in the midst of the feasting and merri-
ment and wickedness, came the terrible end -
of it all; there came on a wonderful deluge
of rain, and the sea rolled in great waves
upon the land, farther and farther, till all the
cities and fields and mountains were covered
with water, and all living creatures that lived
upon the land perished in the waves.

“But over the flood the ark went floating,
quite safely, though it must have been terrible
for those inside to hear the rush of waters
above and the dashing of the sea below, and
to know that underneath those waves a whole
world lay buried.

“For forty days the rushing torrents of
rain went on, never stopping day and night ;
then that sound ceased, and all was still.
There was a great silence outside the ark, for
all voices were hushed in death, and every-
where spread a great endless sea. And fora



54 The Brothers.



hundred and fifty days the ark floated upon
the waters of the flood. Then the waters
began to: dry up again, and the tops of the
mountains appeared first of all, looking like
little islands in the great sea, And it was on
the top of one of these mountains that the
ark rested at last. Noah waited quietly for
forty days more; then he opened the window
of the ark and looked out. No doubt he saw
nothing but the mountain tops and the great
sea; but he thought he would try if there
was any dry land near him, so he let out two
of the birds he had brought with him into the
ark—a raven and a dove. The birds flew
about, and found no place to rest upon. The
raven did not mind; it kept flying about till
the waters went down; but the dove soon got
tired, and went back to the ark, and Noah put
out his hand and pulled her in again.

“Then he waited for another week, and
after that let out the dove again; and she
flew about all day, and came back to him in
the evening with an olive leaf in her beak.
So then Noah knew that the waters must
have gone down a great deal; but he waited
patiently another week, and then he sent out
the dove again, and it never came back to
him any more.’







The Story of the Rainbow. BE



“Tt must have been very lonely, out by
itself in the world,” said Stephen.

“Noah and his family and the other crea-
tures soon came out afterwards. For when
Noah saw that his bird did not come back,
he lifted the covering from off the ark and
looked out, and there was the land again, all
fresh and green, and the great waves of water
had rolled back to the sea. And the Lord
God spoke to Noah again, and said to him,
“Go forth of the ark, thou and thy wife, and
thy sons’ wives with thee. Bring forth with
thee every living thing that is with thee of all
flesh, both of fowl and of cattle, and of every
creeping thing that creepeth on the earth.’

“So Noah did as he was told, and he came
out of the ark with his family and all his
creatures, and so the world had a new be-
ginning. Then the Lord God promised that
there should never be another great flood
to kill all living things. ‘While the earth
remaineth, the Lord said, ‘seed-time and
harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and
winter shall not cease.’ And the Lord blessed
Noah and his sons, and said that all the world
and all the creatures in it should be given
them. They might kill the animals they
needed for their food; but if any man shed



56 The Brothers.



man’s blood, by man should his blood be
shed.

“And then the Lord God was so merciful
that He’ gave Noah and his sons a sign that
there should be no more floods to destroy the
earth. This sign was the beautiful rainbow
that we see in the clouds. When rain had
fallen, and they began to be afraid, the sun
would shine upon the clouds, and they should
see the lovely coloured arch, and remember
God’s promise, and all His mercy and love.”

“How glad they must have been to see it!
And oh! how pleased they must have been
to get out upon the land again after all that
time in the ark!”

“Yes, indeed! And the sight of the rain-
bow might remind us often of Noah’s long,
patient waiting, till in God’s good time he
was allowed to begin his life again. The
rainbow might preach us a little sermon
every time it comes, and say, ‘Be patient, and
trust in God. He will keep you safely in the
midst of troubles. You will not get good all
at once, or wise all at once; you will have to
wait as Noah waited till the waters went
down, but in God’s good time your patience
shall have its reward. Begin again. Begin
again.’ ”



The Story of the Rainbow. 7



“That is a nice easy sermon,” said Stephen ;
“and short too.”

“You know the rainbow does not stay very
long at a time,” said his aunt, smiling. “ But
the shorter the sermon the easier it ought to
be remembered, so I hope you will remember
the rainbow’s.”

“T will try,” said Stephen in a low voice;
and presently he asked, “Did Noah and his
sons ever feel afraid of another flood after
they had seen the rainbow?”

“T should think not; but not very long
after their days the message of the rainbow
was forgotten. There were a great many
people living in the world by that time, and
as they were all descended from Noah’s
family, they all talked one language—not as
we do now-a-days, each nation speaking its
own kind of speech. Now these people
began to be afraid that something dreadful
would happen to them, in spite of the Lord’s
promise, and that they should be scattered
all over the earth. So they agreed to build a
city and a great tower, so high that the top
of it should reach up to heaven.

“But no doubt it was wrong of the people
to determine thus to show they did not trust
in God, or remember what He had promised.



58 The Brothers.



And when they had set to work to make ©
their tower, and to build and to carry out their
plan, the Lord God showed it to be His will
that their buildings should never be com-
pleted.

“Instead of letting them go on speaking
the same language, God caused them to begin
to speak with different tongues, so that they
might not understand each other; and this
caused such a confusion that they gave up
their plan altogether.

“They separated, and went some one way,
some another; I suppose they divided them-
selves into parties speaking the same tongue.
And in this way they came to be scattered
all over the earth, as they had determined
not to be.

“See, Stephen, their story only teaches
some more of the same lesson we have had
before—‘ Do not be in too great a hurry to
arrange things for yourselves, and to get your
own way. Have patience, and see what is
God’s will for you. Begin again. Begin
again.’

“Once more the message of the rainbow.”



TEEPE

CHAP. V.—PERPLEXITIES.

GeEHEN learned his letters quickly enough
to surprise himself as well as his teacher ;
he had soon risen from the lowest place in
the school. His eyes grew brighter and his
tongue more ready; indeed he felt those
days to be sunshiny outside and in. But an
interruption was coming only too soon, and
one morning, as they sat at breakfast, Johnnie
exclaimed—

“Why, there’s the postman!”

This was quite an event, so few letters
came to Mrs. Baynes’ house, and both boys
rushed out to see what had come.

It was a letter for their aunt, and Johnnie
darted back with it to her.

“A letter from Uncle John!” she said,
examining the postmark.

The boys stood, looking up at her, sur-
prised; they had never heard of “ Uncle
John” before.



60 The Brothers.



“No, it’s not from himself,” went on Mrs.
Baynes, as she read. “He got some one to
write for him. He was too ill to write him-
self.”

She finished the letter in silence, and then
sat holding it in her lap, thinking and looking
troubled. The boys gazed with a dozen ques-
tions in their eyes, till at last John could wait
no longer.

“What is it, aunt? Who's ill? What's
the matter?”

“My uncle, dear — your grandmother’s
brother—is very ill, and wants me to come
and see him. He lives twenty miles off, and
I was thinking how I could manage, and who
could take care of you and the house and all
if I went away for a few days.”

“Must you go, aunt?” asked Stephen in
rather an alarmed voice.

“TI think so, my dear. Besides, I wish to
go. Uncle John was always very kind to me,
and I should like to go to him if he wants
me. But you must be off to school now. We
can talk about it more when you come back.”

They went rather reluctantly, talking over
what they should do with their aunt away. -

“T know what she'll do,” said Johnnie, with
an air of superior wisdom. “She'll do as she



Perplexities. 61



did once before when she had to go away;
she had old Mrs. Hardy to come and sleep in
the house and see to everything. Don’t you
know that nice old lady that lives with her
daughter at the shop?”

There being only one shop in the village,
Stephen had the less difficulty in bringing
Mrs. Hardy to his mind.

Certainly she was a pleasant-faced old lady,
but it would be very sad to see her in his
aunt’s place. If Mrs. Hardy could only go to
Uncle John instead !

It is to be feared that Stephen was not
quite so attentive as usual at school that
morning. Certainly John was not, and he
drew upon himself one of Mr. Willis’ stern,
quiet questions, “What are you thinking of,
Wright?” which alarmed him very much.
And no wonder; Mr. Willis had a way of
asking those questions that was enough to
frighten any one.

You may be sure that Johnnie was much
more attentive for the rest of the morning;
but he was still glad when the clock struck
twelve, and all were free to run out of doors
again.

“T wonder what aunt will do?” said Ste-
phen as soon as he joined his brother.



62 The Brothers.



“And that’s what I’ve been wondering
about all the morning,” said Johnnie, laugh-
ing; “and Mr. Willis saw it. I do believe he
sees one’s thoughts.”

Stephen said he hoped not, and then they
had a race home—a race which Johnnie won
of course, but as he was kind enough to wait
for his brother at the garden gate, that did
not much matter.

Mrs. Baynes, who was putting dinner on
the table, looked up smiling as they ran in.

“Have you settled what you are going to
do, aunt?” cried Johnnie, while Stephen only
looked the question.

“Yes, my dear; I think I ought to go as
soon as possible. So I shall try and get off
to-morrow morning as soon as I have finished
churning; and Mrs. Hardy has kindly pro-
mised to come here and look after you and
the rest of my goods.”

“T thought you would,” said Johnnie rather
sorrowfully.

“Well, I hope it will not be for long, and
you must try how good you can be, and how
much you can help Mrs. Hardy. But now
come and have your dinner.”

Stephen looked more disconsolate titan
Johnnie even, and all the afternoon and



Perplexities. 63



evening he went about with quite a long
face.

“What shall we do to-morrow?” was the
last thing he said to his brother as they lay
down in bed.

“Do!” Johnnie laughed a little. “Do our
best, and leave the rest; aunt always says
that’s a good motto to have.”

And Stephen sighed, but said no more.

They had to say good-bye to their aunt
‘next morning before they went to school, for
her train started at eleven o’clock.

“Won't the house seem strange when we
come back?” said Johnnie; but his brother
made no answer.

His teacher found Stephen rather inatten-
tive again that morning, and when the clock
struck eleven it was all the boy could do to
avoid bursting into tears.

As to Johnnie, he seemed to have some-
thing else on his mind besides Mrs. Baynes’
departure. He told Stephen to “go on”
when they came out of school, and darted back
himself to have a talk with a school-fellow.
Stephen looked round, and saw it was with
Ned Rice he was talking, the boy with whom
he had quarrelled on Sunday. But Johnnie
soon forgot quarrels, and was friends again.



64 The Brothers.



“What can he want to say?” thought Ste-
phen, who did not forget so easily. He
walked on slowly, for he did not care about
getting home now; but he reached the gate
and went in before John came in sight.

“Good morning, Mrs. Hardy,” he said to
the neat, quick old lady who was getting
dinner ready. “Is aunt gone?”

“Yes, my dear, that she is; I saw her off
myself. And she was sorry to go and leave
you, and the chickens and the cows were very
much on her mind. But I promised her to
do my best for you all. I’ve had a large
farm, and family too, of my own in my day.
Where’s Johnnie ?”

“He’s coming,” said Stephen, as he went
upstairs. “ Begin again,” he thought to him-
self, remembering his aunt’s words. “ This is
another beginning with Mrs. Hardy. We
must try and begin well.”

His thoughts were interrupted by Johnnie,
who rushed upstairs laughing and rosy.

“Well, Stephen, so you got home first !”

“What did you want to say to Ned Rice?”

“Gunpowder treason and plot,” returned
the other, laughing. “Ah, Stephen! wouldn’t
you like to know?”

It was evident he was not going to be



Perplexities, 65



told, and he felt a little vexed at the idea of
his brother having a secret with Ned Rice,
away from him. So he wisely said no more
about it.

The afternoon and evening went by quietly,
and much as usual, though it seemed strange
to see Mrs. Hardy working in their aunt’s
place, and Stephen had not spirits to take
down the Picture Bible, now that Mrs. Baynes
was not there to explain it to him.

‘How I wish aunt would come back!” he
said next morning, and Johnnie said—

“ All in good time.”

But this morning it was easier to attend
to the lessons; and when he had read his
“a-b, ab; e-b, eb,” &c., with infinite pains,
he found that Mr. Willis was behind him
listening too.

“Very good, Wright,” said the master,
patting his head. “You have made a very
great progress in three weeks.”

Was it possible those words were said to
him, the dunce of the school ?

Stephen’s cheeks glowed, his eyes sparkled;
he had never been so proud and pleased in his
life.

Now he would really take courage to attend
the Sunday school again, as his aunt wished.

E



66 The Brothers.



“Boys,” said Mr, Willis that morning, just
before he dismissed the school, “I have lost a
new knife that was given me by a friend the
other day. I fancy I dropped it when walking
on Saturday from here to Maverly Woods.
It was in a green case, with my initials upon
it in gold letters, ‘H.W? If any one can find
it, or hear of it, I shall be very much obliged
by his letting me know.”

There was a chorus of “Yes, sirs;” but
Johnnie got very red, and, as soon as they
were out of school, ran up to Ned again and
seemed to be questioning him eagerly. What
could it be? Stephen thought. The knife?
No; if Johnnie had known anything about
that, he would have told the master at once,
Stephen was sure.

Then what could it be? He wished Johnnie
would not have secrets with Ned Rice; he
did not like it. And with a little cloud of
sullenness settling over him, he turned and
plodded slowly homewards. Yet when his
brother overtook him, merry and full of kind-
ness, the sulky words soon changed to pleasant
ones, and they were friends again. Stephen
felt happy, and forgot all about Ned Rice.

But that night—Stephen never forgot the
misery of it, not even when he was a grown



Perpleaities, 67



man—that night he was to be reminded of
the secret, indeed.

Stephen had been in bed a few minutes;
Johnnie was still moving about in the room,
but rather as if he were lingering idly than
doing anything in particular. By-and-by he
looked round at his brother, who was just
going off to sleep; but thinking Johnnie was
going to speak to him, he roused himself and
opened his eyes.

Johnnie, however, did not speak; he thought
his brother was sleeping already. Softly
he opened a little drawer, and drew out a
knife.

A large handsome knife, with a great white
handle. He opened one blade after another,
looked at them, flashed them backwards and
forwards in the candle-light, then shut them,
and put the knife softly back into the drawer.

Why had he hidden it there? What had
the master said to-day? What was Johnnie’s
secret with Ned Rice?

No; it was impossible. His brother—his
brave, kind, good, clever brother—a Ste-
phen could not end the sentence in his
own mind even. It was too terrible; it was
impossible. And yet what—what did it all
mean?





68 The Brothers.



Long, long hours after Johnnie was in bed
and asleep, the younger brother lay, cold with
horror and fright, thinking and thinking.

The blind was up, and the soft white moon-
light was falling in great streaks across the
room. Stephen raised himself on his elbow,
and looked at his brother.

Sleeping, so softly, with his head upon his
hand, the curls falling over his forehead, a
smile upon his lips. Johnnie—dear Johnnie—
you could not be a thief!

Stephen almost cried aloud with the terror
and misery of his thoughts: hour after hour
he could hear sounding from the church clock,
and still he had thought of no relief—no ex-
planation.

At last, when the dawn was coming pink
and bright over the sky, he fell asleep and
dreamed that he was happy—a dream that
made his awaking all the more sad.

John could not think what was the matter
with him, Distress had brought back all his
half-sullen shyness, and he was as silent as
when he first came to the farm. He could
not ask his brother for an explanation; he
knew he cou/d not, and yet he longed so to tell
him all.

“You can’t be well. You eat no breakfast,



Perplexities. 69



my dear,” said Mrs. Hardy; but she could get

no reply.

“What’s the matter?” said Johnnie, as they
walked off to school. “Is it aunt’s being
away that puts you out, Stephen?”

SEN?

The tone was so very unpromising, that
John shrugged his shoulders and took to
whistling.

Oh! how could he be so jolly if Stephen
trembled at the idea. The lessons were all
hard that day; the teacher scolded him, and
he did try to do better, but his head was full
of nothing but his dread.

At last a thought came to him ; perhaps it
was Ned’s doing. He had only asked Johnnie
to take care of the knife and not tell, and
Johnnie did not know whose it was. Or
perhaps it was another knife after all.

He went straight up to Ned when they
came out of school, and said in a low,
determined way—

“Ned, do you know anything about Mr.
Willis’ knife?”

Ned started at first, and turned very red;
then, recovering himself, he said rudely—

“What are you prying about now ?”

Stephen repeated his question.





70 The Brothers.



“T expect I know as much as you know,”
returned Ned. “Perhaps Johnnie knows the
most about it of any one.”

“Johnnie! Then—he”
faltered.

“Ah! you know all about it, I see,” sneered
Ned. “You'd better take care what you say
to me, or I'll just let Mr. Willis know what
you know.”

He turned and ran off, leaving Stephen
white and speechless with distress.

Mrs. Hardy and his brother thought him
very rude and sulky all that day, and his
teacher made him stand out of the class in
disgrace for his inattention in the afternoon.
It was the first time such a misfortune had
come to him, but he did not seem to mind,
not even when Mr. Willis looked down upon
him, saying—

s Why, Wright, I expected better things of

ou.’

That would have seemed very terrible
indeed yesterday, but now nothing mattered
—nothing could matter any more if Johnnie
was guilty.

“I think you must be ill, Stephen,” his
brother said next morning.

They had had a letter from Mrs. Baynes,



Stephen’s voice



Perplexities. 71



telling them her uncle was better, and she
hoped they would see her back on Saturday.
Would they pick the strawberries to-morrow
(Friday), and send them in to the market by
Mrs. Brown?

Stephen did not seem to care about the
letter at all, and hence his brother’s remark.
But it brought no answer, and things went on
as badly that day as the day before.

Very early on Friday morning Stephen got
up. His distress would not let him sleep, and
his brother drowsily told him to go and
gather the strawberries.

He took the basket and went to the beds,
where the red berries were making a fine show
the previous night. But what was his indig-
nation to find Ned Rice there already, eating
as fast as he could, trampling over the plants,
all the fruit devoured and destroyed.

“Ned!” he exclaimed angrily.

“Ay, it’s Ned,” retorted the other, grin-
ning, with his mouth full, and his face stained
with juice. “I’m enjoying myself, I am.”

“You thief, you!” cried Stephen, pas-
sionately.

“Oh! Pmathief,amI? Look out if there
isn’t a thief nearer home. You just look here,
Stephen Wright ; you go and say one word of



72 The Brothers



your catching me here, and I’ll tell the master
who’s got his knife. There’s plain speaking
for you; do you understand?” and Ned, who
was two years older than Stephen, took hold
of him fiercely. “You haven't said a word to
Johnnie about the knife?”

“No.”

“You hold your tongue then, and don’t say
a word about me to him, or about being here
to-day, or I'll just tell the master what the
good boy’s got of his; you may trust to
that ;” and, releasing his hold, Ned dashed off
across the beds, jumped the garden fence, and
vanished.

Stephen stood looking at the beds, spoilt—
all spoilt ; not a strawberry to send, and what
was he to say? How was he to join in this
deceit? How could he answer all the ques-
tions they would put to him? Oh!-how
miserable he was! What should he do? He
was sitting on the door-step, moodily enough,
when Johnnie came singing downstairs.

“Well, Stephen, have you gathered my
strawberries ?”

“No.”

“Hullo! you have been lazy. Here, give
me the basket ; I'll go and get them.”

“ There are none.”



Perpleaities. 7



“None! why, whatever do you mean? There
were plenty last night—there must be some ;”
and off he ran, but returned in a moment full
of consternation.

“Why, Stephen, somebody’s been in and
taken almost all, and trampled down the seed.
What a shame! There must be thieves
about.”

“There must be,” repeated the other in a
low tone.

“T wonder who ever it could have been. I
wish I'd been a little earlier to catch him, the
rascal! I never knew a thief to come into the
garden before.”

Stephen, with his elbows on his knees and
his face buried in his hands, neither answered
nor moved.

“ Did you see any one about, Stephen ?”

No answer.

“Tsay, did you see any one? Do just say
you know.”

Still no answer, and Johnnie’s patience gave
way.
“T do declare it’s a shame to be so sulky,”
he exclaimed. “One might as well have no
brother at all, as one that won’t speak to you ;”
and he rushed into the house.

Poor Stephen! they thought him very sulky



74 The Brothers.



at school too; his teacher kept him back as
the others went out, and when they were gone
took him up to Mr. Willis.

“JT am sorry to complain, sir, but nearly all
the week Stephen Wright has been very sulky
and idle, there is no doing anything with him,
and he was getting on so well before.”
Whereupon the teacher retreated, and left
Stephen alone with the master.

“How is this, Stephen? Why don’t you
behave yourself better ?”

“T can’t,” muttered the boy, huskily.

“But you were doing so well till the last
few days. Begin again, Stephen; try to get
on. There’s no worse motto than ‘I can’t’ for
any one. Say I can, and make it true. Don’t
let me hear these complaints again; you
mean to be a good boy, I’m sure. There! be
off with you, and come in a better temper this
afternoon.”

Stephen went away, choking down the sob
that was rising in his throat, and found
Johnnie waiting for him.

“Never mind,” he said kindly ; “you'll be
all right when aunt comes back ;” then they
walked home in silence.





CHAP. VI.—ABRAHAM’S SACRIFICE.

HEN Mrs. Baynes came home on Saturday,
she was a good deal surprised at the
change in Stephen, and took an opportunity
of asking Johnnie what was the matter; but
she could hear nothing, and the boy himself
seemed resolved not to speak.

He quietly went back to the Sunday school
when Sunday morning came, and when there -
was time in the afternoon he seemed glad to
hear some more about the Bible pictures, but
he was strangely silent all the time.

“There was once,” said Mrs. Baynes, “a
good man, whose name was Abraham, and
the Lord God called him to leave the country
in which he was living, and where all his
friends were, and go into another land which
was quite strange tohim. Abraham was very
full of faith—that is, he knew so well that
God knew best, and would love him and take
care of him, that he trusted in God altogether,



76 The Brothers



and was not afraid of leaving everything to
the mercy and holy will of his Father in
heaven. . In this we ought all to try and
follow Abraham’s example; we should re-
member that our Father is so wise He knows
exactly what is best for us, and so good and
merciful He wills exactly what is best for us,
so that whatever happens to us is just the
very best thing for us. If we can remember
this, and leave ourselves altogether to God’s
will, we have faith, as Abraham had faith.
There is a hymn that says—

“All is right that seems most wrong,
If it be Thy good will ;’

and it would be well for us to remember that
whenever we are troubled.

“It seemed hard to Abraham, I dare say, to
leave his country and all his relations to go
into the strange land. But he did it at once,
and the Lord promised him that some day all
that land should belong to his family, and
that he should be the father of a great nation,
as many as the starsin the sky. This seemed
very strange, as Abraham and his wife Sarah
had no children; but he knew that the Lord
was almighty, and left it all to him. At last
Sarah had a child, a little boy, and they



Abraham’s Sacrifice. 77



called his name Isaac, which in their language
meant ‘Laughter, because they were so
pleased to have him; and they loved him very
dearly, and only thought of bringing him up
well, thinking often, no doubt, of the great
people that should descend from him and
possess the land in which they were living as
strangers. And now, when Isaac had grown
_ to be a big boy, it pleased the Lord to give
Abraham a great opportunity of showing his
faith, and leaving a good example to all who
know his story.

“One night, when Abraham had laid down
to rest, he heard the voice of the Lord God
calling to him, and saying, ‘ Abraham!’

“And Abraham answered—

“* Behold, here I am,’

“ And then the Lord spoke again, and said—

“*Take now thy son, thine only son Isaac,
whom thou lovest, and get thee into the land
of Moriah, and offer him there for a burnt-
offering upon one of the mountains that I
will tell thee of.’

“What terrible words for Abraham to hear,
as he listened for God’s voice in the darkness !
His son, his dear child that he loved so, and
from whom he hoped so much—to be com-
manded to kill him!



78 The Brothers.



“Surely no one ever heard such a terrible
command as this, and we might expect to
hear it answered with a prayer to the Lord
to take anything but this—any sacrifice but
this.

“But Abraham made no answer; he knew
the Lord knew best; he would leave it all—
just a—to Him.

“And he did not wait; the Lord had
spoken, His servant should obey at once, and
when the morning light returned he rose up
very early and prepared for his journey. The
land of Moriah was many miles from the part
where Abraham lived, and he saddled his ass,
called two of his servants and his son Isaac to
go with him, and cut up some wood and took
it with him to be ready for the burnt-offering.

“Then he started on his strange, dreadful
journey, travelled for nearly three days, till on
the third day Abraham looked up and saw the
mountain of which the Lord had told him
lying before him.

“ All this time Abraham had said nothing to
his child of the object of his journey ; perhaps
he felt as if he could not tell him—perhaps he
thought to spare Isaac the terror of such news.

“ At any rate nothing was said, and when
the mountain was in sight, Abraham told his



Abraham’s Sacrifice. 79



servants to stay below with the ass, while he
and his son went up the mountain to make
their offering ; and he took the wood he had
prepared, and gave it to Isaac to carry, and
he himself took fire in something like a lamp,
and a knife.

“Tsaac understood quite well that there
were preparations for offering a sacrifice, but
he could not think what his father was going
to offer, and as they went away together he
said to Abraham—

“<«My father !’

“And Abraham answered—

“« Flere am I, my son.’

“And Isaac went on—

“*« Behold the fire and the wood, but where
is the lamb for a burnt-offering ?’

“Still Abraham would not tell him the
dreadful thing that was to be done, and he
only said—

“« My son, God will provide Himself a lamb
for a burnt-offering.’

“ And so they went on and on till they had
climbed all up the mountain, and then they
made an altar, and put the wood in its place
upon it; and then there was no help for it—
Abraham was obliged to tell Isaac all. We
are not told what Isaac said—whether he had



80 The Brothers.



learned from his father to be quite sure that
all must be right that was God’s will; we
only hear what Abraham did—that he bound
Isaac his son, and laid him on the altar upon
the wood, and then he stretched out his hand
and took the knife to slay his son.

The trial was over, Abraham had showed
his faith to the last, and now the help was
coming. Through the great stillness of the
mountain-top came a strange sound—a voice
that called from heaven—

“« Abraham! Abraham!’

“Tt was the angel of the Lord who was
calling, and who brought this message from
God—

“*Lay not thy hand upon the lad, neither
do thou anything unto him, for now I know
thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not with-
held thy son, thine only son, from me.’

“And as Abraham looked round, he saw
that the words he had spoken in his trouble
had come true in his joy; the Lord had pro-
vided a sacrifice, for behind him was a ram
caught in the thicket by his horns, sent by
God’s mercy to take the place of Isaac.

“Then Abraham released his son, and went
and took the ram, and offered it up for a
burnt-offering in the stead of his child.



Abraham's Sacrifice. 81



“ And again the angel of the Lord called to
Abraham out of heaven, and said to him—

“* Because thou hast done this thing, and
hast not withheld thy son, thine only son: that
in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying
I will multiply thy seed as the stars of heaven,
and as the sand that is upon the sea shore;
and thy seed shall possess the gate of his
enemies ; and in thy seed shall all the nations
of the earth be blessed; because thou hast
obeyed my voice.’

“This meant that from Abraham’s family
should come a great nation, stronger than
their enemies, and that when our Saviour
came into the world it should be as one of the
descendants of Abraham.

“ After hearing this message, so full of joyful
promise, Abraham and his son went down the
mountain again, back to the place where they
had left the servants. We can fancy what a
happy journey that must have been home
again—how every stone and tree they passed
must have reminded Abraham of the time
when he passed them in so much distress, to
return in such great joy.

“Now that is a beautiful story of faithful
Abraham, and, like all the Bible stories, it has
many lessons to teach us.

F



82 The Brothers.



“ One thing we see in it is, that it seems to
show beforehand what the mercy of God was
to do for man some day. As Abraham pre-
pared to offer up his son, so it pleased God
after many, many years to give up His son,
our Saviour Jesus Christ, to die for the sin of
the world. Abraham showed his love to God
by what he prepared to do, and the Lord God
showed His love to man by what He did.
Isaac carried the wood for the offering up the
mountain, not knowing why he did it ; but our
Saviour went forth, bearing His Cross to the
mountain where he was to suffer, well know-
ing what He did, desiring to die, that so He
might save us. Of Abraham we read— Thou
hast not withheld thy son, thine only son.’
Of the Lord God Himself it is said, ‘So God
loved the world that He gave His only begot-
ten Son, to the end that all that believe in Him
should not perish, but have everlasting life.’

“ And there is another lesson in this story
that concerns ourselves, our own conduct
especially. Dearly as Abraham loved his
son, he loved his God better; he was ready
rather to slay Isaac than to disobey the Lord.
This is a very important lesson for us. Dearly
as we love our friends, we must never let our
love lead us to do wrong for their sakes.”



Abraham's Sacrifice. 83



Stephen, who had been sitting very quietly
with his eyes on the book, suddenly reddened
at these words, and asked eagerly—

“ How could we do wrong for their sakes ?”

“If we did what we knew we ought not to
do to please them, or left off doing right
because our friends did not like it; or if we
allowed ourselves to be deceitful, to say what
was not true in order to hide the faults of
those who were dear to us, should we not be
doing wrong for their sakes ?”

Mrs. Baynes had no suspicion that Stephen
was in any particular need of this warning ;
she spoke only in general; but it seemed to
the boy as if the words were addressed to the
troubled thoughts of his heart.

That very morning there had been some
discussion about the strawberry business, and
Johnnie had been declaring in the innocence
of his heart that never had anything been so
mysterious.

“Stephen went down in the morning to
look, and then they had all vanished. He saw
nobody about.”

“Really, Stephen, that was very odd,” said
Mrs. Baynes, unsuspectingly. “How early did
you go down, my dear ?”

“T don’t know.”



84 The Brothers.



“And you did not hear any one run away,
or see any sign of the thieves?”

Stephen hesitated, he did not say a word
very distinctly, but yet he felt somehow that
he had consented to a lie.

It had been heavy on his heart all day; he
had never lied before, not even in his dark and
terrified days, and now that he knew better!

But he dared not speak for fear of betraying
Johnnie; and now what was this that he
heard ?—what warning about preferring the
friend to the right? Could this have been the
sacrifice that was asked of him, and had he
refused it? But then how could he sacrifice
Johnnie?

The idea troubled him so much that his
aunt could not help noticing the agitation of
his face.

“My dear, what is it?” she asked gently.
“Tell me what makes you look so unhappy?”

“No; I’ve nothing to tell,” said he, almost
crossly ; and then, to his great relief, his aunt
saw a neighbour coming down the garden,
and went away. Afterwards Johnnie came
in singing and smiling; Stephen watched him
sadly, and wondered more and more.





CHAP. VII.—ISAAC’S BLESSING.

ile quiet Sunday passed away, but it
seemed to bring none of its peace to
Stephen ; the thoughts that had troubled him
were with him all day. Sometimes he thought
of telling all to his aunt ; sometimes of speak-
ing to Johnnie himself, and imploring him to
give back the knife.

But he could not betray his brother, he told
himself; and then how angry John would be—
how horrified at Stephen’s discovering him!
No, he could not; and while he felt he dared
not do what he knew to be right, conscience
left him no peace in doing wrong.

So much the better for him, and yet it
made him very miserable.

At last bed-time came, and he went slowly
and sorrowfully upstairs, sat down at the side
of the bed, and thought.

Johnnie looked at him for a while, walking



86 The Brothers.



about the room, whistling the evening hymn
to himself. At last he began to sing it.

“Teach me to live, that I may dread
The grave as little as my bed.”

His brother’s dark eyes were raised and
fixed upon him.

“Being wicked,” said Stephen suddenly,
“would make you dread them both, I sup-

ose ?”

Stephen had been so silent lately, that John
was quite delighted to hear him speak of his
own accord ; but as he had not been thinking
much of the words he sang, he did not under-
stand the observation.

“ Dread what, Stephen ?”

Stephen repeated the lines slowly.

“T suppose you would be afraid of going to
bed, because you would have no peace there;
and afraid of dying, because you would have
to be judged then, and get no peace.”

“Well, I suppose so,” returned the other,
who was more given to singing hymns than
to considering what they meant.

“Tt would be dreadful to lie down in bed in
the dark, and remember some very bad thing
youhaddone. I should think it would go over
and over in your head and let you get no rest.”



Lsaac’s Blessing. 87



“T’m sure I hope we are not going to try,”
said John, in his offhand way. “We don't
mean to be thieves and murderers, do we,
Stephen?”

And then he stared with all his might, for
his brother pressed his hands together, and
cried out, “ Oh, Johnnie!” as if something had
hurt him.

John was by his side in a moment, putting
his arm round him, and begging to know what
was the matter.

“T’ve seen you weren’t all right the last day
or two,” he said, in his most loving voice.
“Do tell me, Stephen! If anything was on
my mind, I’m sure I'd tell you. If you are in
any scrape, do tell me; you know that must be
right.”

Oh, how Stephen longed to bring out the
truth! But no, the words seemed to choke
him, he could not speak.

“What is it, Stephen, dear?”

But the poor boy was too miserable to
answer gently.

“Let me alone!” that was all he could
utter, in a rough, sullen tone; and his brother,
who could not guess at all the love and sorrow
that were keeping him silent, grew vexed and
disappointed.



88 The Brothers.



“ As you like,” he said, and went off again
whistling.

“T will try and forget it all,” said Stephen
to himself next day, and he tried to talk and
laugh, to work hard at school, and wait on
his aunt at home, and be too busy to remember;
but he was remembering all the time.

In the evening, as his aunt was at work, he
begged her to go on explaining the pictures
to him; for he dreaded nothing so much as
sitting still to think. Mrs. Baynes could see
through all his busy ways that he was not
happy, and she was glad to give him some-
thing good to think about. So she complied
at once, and went on with the Bible story.

“When Isaac grew up, his mother died, and
Abraham, having no one left to care for but
his son, grew very anxious to see him com-
fortably married before he himself died.

“The women in the country to which God
had called Abraham were not very good
people, and Abraham wished Isaac to marry
one of his own relations, who lived in those
parts where Abraham was born. So one day
he called a faithful old servant that he had to
him, and told him that Isaac must not go back
to the old home, for the Lord had called him
from it. ‘But,’ he said, ‘thou shalt go unto



Isaac’s Blessing. 89



my country, and to my kindred, and take a
wife unto my son Isaac.’

“So the servant promised to do as his master
wished, and took ten camels to carry presents
for Abraham’s friends, and the other things
required, and started on his journey. And he
travelled on and on till he came to the city
where Abraham’s relations lived. It was one
evening that he reached it, and he rested a
little while just outside the city, by a well
that was there. Now the wells in those parts
were places where many women would meet
at this time in the day, for it was the custom
to drive all the flocks down to the well about
sunset, and give them water there, and draw
water besides for themselves. So Abraham’s
servant thought he would wait here and see if
he could find some woman amongst them who
might become Isaac’s wife. And while he
waited, he prayed to God and said, ‘O Lord
God of my master Abraham, I pray thee, send
me good speed this day, and show kindness
unto my master Abraham. Behold, I stand
here by the well of water; and the daughters
of the men of the city come out to draw water :
and let it come to pass, that the damsel to
whom I shall say, Let down thy pitcher, I pray
thee, that I may drink; and she shall say,



90 The Brothers.



Drink,and I will give thy camels drink also: let
the same be she that thou hast appointed for thy
servant Isaac; and thereby shall I know that
thou hast shewed kindness unto my master.’

“ The servant had not finished his prayer,
before he saw a young girl coming towards
him out of the city, with her pitcher on her
shoulder, to draw water from the well. As
she came nearer, he saw that she was beautiful,
and he watched her go down to the well and
fill her pitcher and come up again. Then he
came forward and asked her for water, as he
had said he would do in his prayer, and she
answered, just as he had prayed that the right
wife for Isaac might answer, ‘Drink, my
lord, and she gave him some water out of her
pitcher, and went on, ‘and I will draw water
for thy camels also, until they have done
drinking’

“ And the servant did not answer, but stood
wondering whether this was indeed the answer
to his prayer.

“But when she had given the camels all the
water they wanted, in a trough that was put
for cattle by the well, he took out some of
the presents he had brought with him—a
golden earring and bracelets—and gave them
to her, saying—



Isaacs Blessing. QI



“«Whose daughter art thou?’

“And she told him her father’s name, and
then the servant knew that she was one of
Abraham’s own relations. She begged him
also to come with her, for they had straw and
food enough for the camels, she said, and
room to put them in. And the man bowed
down his head, and thanked God for having
so far prospered his journey, while the girl
ran home to show her presents, and tell all
about the stranger she had met by the
well.

“ Hearing this, her brother, whose name was
Laban, now came out, and found the servant
standing by his camels, and Laban said to
him—

“Come in, thou blessed of the Lord;
wherefore standest thou without? for I have
prepared the house, and room for the camels.’

“Then the’ man followed Laban home,
taking with him the camels and the other
men that were with him, and they were all
most kindly received, and the animals were
attended to, and a meal prepared for the men
at once. But before Abraham’s messenger
tasted anything, he said—

« errand.’



92 The Brothers.



“ And then he told them all his story, and
what he had come for, and who his master
was, and how Laban’s sister Rebekah had
seemed to come to the well in answer to his
prayer. This made them think it was God’s
will that Rebekah should become the wife of
Isaac, so she consented to go back with the
servant to the land where Abraham lived.

“ One evening, Isaac, who was very unhappy
at having lost his mother not long before,
went out into the fields to walk about and
think, when, happening to look up, he saw a
party of camels coming towards him. They
were his father’s camels travelling with
Rebekah. She, too, caught sight of him as
she came nearer, and asked the servant who
he was. And the servant told her.

“Then she got off her camel, and walked
forward to meet him, and Isaac took her into
his mother Sarah’s tent, and she became his
wife; and he loved her, and was comforted
after his mother’s death.

“Isaac and Rebekah had two sons, called
Esau and Jacob. Esau, the eldest, was a
rough sort of youth, fond of hunting and
going out with his father ; Jacob was quieter,
and more content to stop at home with his
mother. So it happened that Isaac thought



Isaac’s Blessing. 93



the most of Esau, and Rebekah’s favourite
was Jacob.

“One day, when they were grown up to be
men, Esau had been out hunting, and coming
home very hungry, he saw that Jacob had
just got some dinner ready. So the elder
brother said—

“« Feed me, I pray thee, for I am faint.’

“And Jacob said he would, if Esau would
give up to him his rights as eldest son. Esau
was very careless and impatient, so he said in
a moment that he would give up all his rights
to Jacob. Then the younger brother gave
him the food he wanted, and Esau ate and
drank, and went out again, forgetting all
about this promise. But it was a very serious
thing, as he ought to have remembered, for
the eldest son, in those days, received a special
blessing from his father, when the time of the
fathers death drew near; and in Esau’s
family this blessing would have included the
promise that the Redeemer of the world should
be one of his descendants. But this rough,
impatient man did not think about it at all;
the Bible says, ‘He despised his birthright.’
This is what made him wrong. Jacob was
also wrong, but in another way; he valued
the birthright so much, that he was selfish for



94 The Brothers.



its sake. So time went on; Esau married
two wives (for people were allowed in those
days to take more than one wife), and his
wives were not good people, and caused his
father and mother great grief. At last Isaac
had become quite an old man, and his eyes
were dim so that he could not see, and he
thought the time had come for him to give
his eldest son the precious blessing before his
death.

“These blessings were not like ours, only
prayers for our children’s happiness; but
whatever the fathers foretold in those bless-
ings, the Lord gave to their sons.

“Tsaac did not seem to know anything
about the bargain Esau and .Jacob had made
together; he only called Esau, and said,
‘Behold now, I am old, I know not the day of
my death: now therefore take, I pray thee, thy
weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to
the field, and take me some venison ; and make
me savoury meat, such as I love, and bring it
to me, that I may eat ; that my soul may bless
thee before I die.’

“So Esau went out to hunt the deer for his
father, while Rebekah, who had overheard
them, called her son Jacob, and told him what
they were going to do.







Isaac’s Blessing. 95



“*Go now, she said, ‘to the flock, and
fetch me from thence two good kids of the
goats; and I will make them savoury meat
for thy father, such as he loveth: and thou
shalt bring it to thy father, that he may eat,
and that he may bless thee before his death.’

“Then she dressed Jacob in Esau’s clothes,
and put the skins of the kids upon his hands,
that his poor blind father might not feel the
difference between Esau’s rough hands and
Jacob’s smooth ones; and she got the meat
ready, and Jacob went in to deceive his father,
and pretend he was Esau come back from
hunting.

“Isaac was surprised at first at his coming
so quickly, and he called him near and felt
him, saying, ‘The voice is Jacob’s voice, but
the hands are the hands of Esau.’

“So poor old Isaac was deceived; he ate
the meat that Jacob brought, and blessed him,
saying—

“God give thee of the dew of heaven, and
the fatness of the earth, and plenty of corn
and wine: let people serve thee, and nations
bow down to thee: be lord over thy brethren,
and let thy mother’s sons bow down to thee:
cursed be every one that curseth thee, and
blessed be he that blesseth thee.’



096 The Brothers.



“Then Jacob went away, and had barely
got out before Esau came in from hunting,
and hurried to his father, saying that he had
brought the venison, and begged for the
blessing.

“Then Isaac trembled very much, and said,
‘Who art thou? Where is he that hath
taken venison, and brought it me, and I have
eaten of ‘all before thou camest, and have
blessed him? yea, and he shall be blessed ?’

“And Esau cried with a loud bitter cry,
‘Bless me, even me also, O my father.’
And he complained of his brother, and said,
‘ He hath taken away my birthright, and now
he hath taken away my blessing ;’ and he went
on imploring his father, and saying—

“* Hast thou but one blessing, my father?
‘Bless me, even me also, O my father” And
at last Isaac blessed him too, and said—

“* Behold, thy dwelling shall be the fatness
of the earth, and of the dew of heaven from
above; and by thy sword shalt thou live, and
shalt serve thy brother; and it shall come to
pass when thou shalt have the dominion,
that thou shalt break his yoke from off thy
neck.’

“Esau could get no better promise. Jacob
seemed to have prospered in his deceit, but



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393f2d4b47f08f8f66c74d354cf00dce4a69bcf3
'2011-09-20T01:10:13-04:00'
describe
'26414' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUTS' 'sip-files00012.pro'
40c54eb296f37ed47ef15a62f806af6e
fe03ead074c61b97ba1e0cc8afed8e6530df23f7
'2011-09-20T01:12:59-04:00'
describe
'1732516' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUTT' 'sip-files00012.tif'
fc25fe75676eeab8c134c4f54a74a044
261036c607c70a8b66e37ebb35e0c38e246929ab
'2011-09-20T01:13:03-04:00'
describe
'28547' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUTU' 'sip-files00013.pro'
516360ae32abebea0a9f9b793a6e0db5
0158c47586d2e46c8ee3790f77081358d37ec53d
'2011-09-20T01:11:44-04:00'
describe
'1745600' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUTV' 'sip-files00013.tif'
26ae1f37c6cbe8d7b8cb1d0853992cbb
d9c52bac1543ac289605bd13cc310564ddfdab39
'2011-09-20T01:10:45-04:00'
describe
'28154' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUTW' 'sip-files00014.pro'
ad0e475cebff20709890dd755d799790
0d940fd430b9b37860e3150c859bd08949b3ca02
'2011-09-20T01:10:30-04:00'
describe
'1731612' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUTX' 'sip-files00014.tif'
d5589d81cda82335c4ac19177d275993
f08e37e79baa5bff8ebc501f684e1b860805d8b0
'2011-09-20T01:10:39-04:00'
describe
'30861' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUTY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
e358d23a9f95b19e551409ded7fea0a0
21ecda2bb141b19a793dd98a678cafba68ff3b1c
'2011-09-20T01:11:02-04:00'
describe
'1726524' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUTZ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
8970fc99ebc26a7093a5221d525686de
28d9b70eb10ccdfd1ff596a2ba4206eb385294c5
describe
'28802' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUA' 'sip-files00016.pro'
c127f95a9be9e6fadf720db4f0a72348
877851350195fe5276fb3ec0d03dcee3c720ce84
describe
'1714004' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUB' 'sip-files00016.tif'
d9cb1c61bb1f9ca99c92969a53fb704d
fb95b89d8e7431dd7f4927a00ade8be435548967
'2011-09-20T01:11:55-04:00'
describe
'28974' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUC' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d8c5854acc8eedb906671b3b2316ad51
43bddd57dd4c5492bccbc97169c384cda4e89250
'2011-09-20T01:10:47-04:00'
describe
'1689156' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUD' 'sip-files00017.tif'
cec29717e1db31692fe390a243b38f2a
e84d19eaf2462bcd35f74c1c72fd3fec50745062
'2011-09-20T01:10:25-04:00'
describe
'26923' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUE' 'sip-files00018.pro'
0acba67d09edfa415604a66afc5216d5
c1ac4a15fa99bf793621560a5d9c389254274fbc
describe
'1702528' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUF' 'sip-files00018.tif'
1f9ef29f44247c8de8090e054ec2556f
a0bc810e692e38a5e683edd80f8f961bb115322f
'2011-09-20T01:12:37-04:00'
describe
'26985' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUG' 'sip-files00019.pro'
a425e27db87779cddd275d70afaa5ea7
7e21a9c3ded1e5a8a73c5132aa184756efd69150
'2011-09-20T01:12:07-04:00'
describe
'1721348' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUH' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c168198104e137dcbbfc86091e908dec
159f4031b021cb332481f05951963374a8e455dd
'2011-09-20T01:12:48-04:00'
describe
'27634' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUI' 'sip-files00020.pro'
4d10be99d0ef7f912654f331f6e472c6
de7aad7929a9e5ebc2df820abd1ac0511712abbf
'2011-09-20T01:12:45-04:00'
describe
'1702336' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
f8ce3b6ada4a2f9c2f14a05edfc362f2
d808b2d41d0d0e8258f605109eb8cad82330b364
'2011-09-20T01:13:01-04:00'
describe
'19407' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUK' 'sip-files00021.pro'
037e7d5d5b96eed074b7df64998eb3dc
6d2311df94841f58fdfcc4b390c5a99c0d00517e
'2011-09-20T01:11:30-04:00'
describe
'1790176' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
a2eb184532ad339d902b8e22a1635c9e
458d0cada063f8b86b8866da8388fd5e254f5618
'2011-09-20T01:12:12-04:00'
describe
'22090' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUM' 'sip-files00022.pro'
05d0613918233ba40f22f20fa47ecadb
5cc7658b69515e568a9ca2c5d69a351f04613cca
'2011-09-20T01:12:02-04:00'
describe
'1756612' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUN' 'sip-files00022.tif'
4f4d9274670d9d82dafc636f42387573
8ba5c6c5790a4c1cb5f61fe8370bd48b9493fe13
'2011-09-20T01:12:49-04:00'
describe
'31251' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUO' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5591007de31de7a7705038f247c13f4a
97f088a74e2595c0e09aa27cb678239fe6a2c24b
'2011-09-20T01:12:21-04:00'
describe
'1768364' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUP' 'sip-files00023.tif'
94bfc29f02cd90d4dcee2f56c300245e
cb8dac052177ac6c1367d375940758fc22df0216
'2011-09-20T01:12:23-04:00'
describe
'2418' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUQ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
68ba6b9972c6acfb9a25400b8bdcf0d3
2d3c1d64b91a2ccd9579842b25d7909c040dfcd0
'2011-09-20T01:11:35-04:00'
describe
'5714096' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUR' 'sip-files00024.tif'
bc898ff52cabdaa636d8f5b3e3112105
8024de7b5859f2e13fa853c91e174ebfb8902ffd
'2011-09-20T01:12:54-04:00'
describe
'29240' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUS' 'sip-files00025.pro'
d9cd776977fcb77dc25ccf4f97c94689
825ebcb56c33b3c85a200510e617010680d2e55d
'2011-09-20T01:10:48-04:00'
describe
'1912444' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUT' 'sip-files00025.tif'
1ab11fe20f5a3f83de38dc4d02c5c1d5
a5336835a3be2248585c7e6100c25f77a606f93a
'2011-09-20T01:12:16-04:00'
describe
'29783' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
8d88e981184514ded956ef6185cd2023
8412c34364d35516f6ea50a66830a4d6f7597d52
'2011-09-20T01:12:29-04:00'
describe
'1745232' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUV' 'sip-files00026.tif'
ac928f2d973e1bbe34b4ec4ef816dff2
55ff806f61368cb7a44452bc97abc3dcef6ee9a6
'2011-09-20T01:10:37-04:00'
describe
'28970' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUW' 'sip-files00027.pro'
fabe04b1b54485b6bd5a77052e18f086
2269779f947cdadd1a0a1f31d0ea73d1fc1983cc
'2011-09-20T01:10:34-04:00'
describe
'1777852' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUX' 'sip-files00027.tif'
f72bee5c603a860549b6f6ac54bafdb9
ceee26ff53465fdb9b0532f2ed1e4f0fd4a1c227
'2011-09-20T01:10:40-04:00'
describe
'28887' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUY' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b45e50e3f14d6de011d8718b2043a3cb
e13a39a13197dd754eb2328d38b27ce1915d0e1d
describe
'1843296' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUUZ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
47e3cc2f1b12f13cafd5b566bfe0b34f
9fdb1c823cfe2c0ab439ac35198d7a037aafa4bb
'2011-09-20T01:12:46-04:00'
describe
'31838' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
5cacc4812e427a467cc8a007d2481546
f77186ea9386568c3c8bf639f5545752630dc899
describe
'1788964' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVB' 'sip-files00029.tif'
0d727d1b34813a2c69a46ee110e38d93
538547f6f361d6656c5b37149ac32dc78c98887a
'2011-09-20T01:10:23-04:00'
describe
'29851' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVC' 'sip-files00030.pro'
fa56fe7972d10f9180e423f562db2df0
ef591cb4aa32c24243a978dab2b648c6c51d6a71
'2011-09-20T01:12:00-04:00'
describe
'1776384' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVD' 'sip-files00030.tif'
42673ecc142c9794efb6e63bcd665893
67a4b81e08ab8f45d8b0f65228652f840fbff15c
describe
'29665' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVE' 'sip-files00031.pro'
32bea64e566691adae2b2581a6567f1b
1bcc2af393530942fbfb6e5cc85faf7dba97f303
'2011-09-20T01:10:49-04:00'
describe
'1832068' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVF' 'sip-files00031.tif'
2ff47ab896f8fca3064f8c0dd54c49a2
ad896743130940d35ca998802628ec87e67806eb
'2011-09-20T01:11:19-04:00'
describe
'30723' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVG' 'sip-files00032.pro'
999741f7059d5cee790a17073a975421
9171325511b7e68fdad55dfef7ffe9e2f2d91a64
'2011-09-20T01:12:42-04:00'
describe
'1822320' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
af267dd3de9bc35bc6fd9510f913f1a0
f0b5a1a4a01f0b2276472a1f384501d06f0fb205
'2011-09-20T01:12:18-04:00'
describe
'27533' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVI' 'sip-files00033.pro'
24d9c1a0f4d6dc99a5c01e5af347c9f7
fe563d8509b364daf6bdb70bd51f3846d41a4301
describe
'1751952' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVJ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
d0fb5e8c2e210cbf9359fec6828eafd9
c5debdcb3b7e4b33e0b41965901e6c9c8d73525f
'2011-09-20T01:11:40-04:00'
describe
'27470' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVK' 'sip-files00034.pro'
2d694f68c5c1ca699365b69c9627375a
1dee61c572efc20252efcf95fe61ef82004cc8ac
'2011-09-20T01:10:19-04:00'
describe
'1831316' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVL' 'sip-files00034.tif'
1f04dac48339adf51f3b80a9c730a8bf
2fd4df82d04038578b399d296022ad543b05fb85
describe
'17620' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
7d41c27fce962637124d43580b13565c
a69a27af8ce3cfe065842e5833e5379b5b7ec832
describe
'1754992' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVN' 'sip-files00035.tif'
731d3baf1b6a2f37f70113d139e3832b
fa97c32be235606e51827014c8c41df1e0710bf4
describe
'22372' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVO' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1c916c9be894b0bf75e2fd32c3b16216
81ed52d625b7f1193a2fd1fd454f2cfcbd367598
'2011-09-20T01:12:11-04:00'
describe
'1831280' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
502e517e29c946ff564c51875543cfbf
3e3ac4600cf58ed49ea5a147818f714a739d43f7
'2011-09-20T01:10:41-04:00'
describe
'27983' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVQ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
51c9913fc7e1650270609ceebcca1220
8e5b437c474a0dc01a2a5ec73902d605ac0e3ba4
'2011-09-20T01:11:28-04:00'
describe
'1739044' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
59857b2bf992fee409a7b743af5d3c5d
a15d4e9ee245bf7d5d928d464c58bdbcda552961
'2011-09-20T01:10:54-04:00'
describe
'29515' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVS' 'sip-files00038.pro'
502793b7d685d94590cdbb1e441dbaa4
be7dc9b3a4ff07a3180524c424e67ce42500b197
'2011-09-20T01:12:43-04:00'
describe
'1831820' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVT' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7a107bd93d99cc007b0c102ad391905a
b42a04fc40ee685e921de775de2de8b39a3ef1f7
'2011-09-20T01:12:27-04:00'
describe
'30247' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVU' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1e0b33f5cf6796f170d8e203de2c8aa5
02c16ebf59cc269b322becd096e68b554998a2be
'2011-09-20T01:11:13-04:00'
describe
'1770096' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVV' 'sip-files00039.tif'
5bbdbe3c0749688d0c09009295ae2be3
6f249d4fd406dc8e29188e0098bd3d8cd077c1d8
describe
'29349' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVW' 'sip-files00040.pro'
c32f41b509985264fdc22eb031ed974e
3b6f60dbac31e0274707894e1b2263e72c635e1f
describe
'1831892' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVX' 'sip-files00040.tif'
4fddfe5dfb481efd04d7dd326a1703eb
dd8600c6012adb623340d1958916e49f57f50dd1
'2011-09-20T01:11:33-04:00'
describe
'29698' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
e2ce1738c339aa2efec0b85eff857ff1
4ae00aa3144b61a0a9596b6407055f1ea484522c
'2011-09-20T01:10:50-04:00'
describe
'1898260' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUVZ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
20fe9b74393f3f2ef8125abb95c0b000
b1d829cb16f77b391ac571c1191b95b0686ae0e3
'2011-09-20T01:11:36-04:00'
describe
'29740' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWA' 'sip-files00042.pro'
00b50ff5503afdd29dab731f2ea32919
73594ddbf553e032ee12cdb3e7695f9ec4f494f2
describe
'1707864' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWB' 'sip-files00042.tif'
211da4da9aeaa6d914424813b5c9b2a4
71e51c411a5032878630046d004a4efabc73f8c0
describe
'30255' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWC' 'sip-files00043.pro'
23c669a813830cd52fd059c707c75ff2
59c44b387ad24d8980080bc32a538acc8935e1a0
'2011-09-20T01:10:44-04:00'
describe
'1898380' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWD' 'sip-files00043.tif'
d674ca3793bf1a214cc7a6dddf4fb4f6
4b84510fc110c9e1b004de6749844e4f7ae0d6bc
describe
'27649' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWE' 'sip-files00044.pro'
c1235bbf68c1a0777d17623da7c0cc3e
a2deff6ec97470c5ce9b9d78a417f2bebd23ef6a
'2011-09-20T01:12:36-04:00'
describe
'1831808' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWF' 'sip-files00044.tif'
ff55d851ae3b059328c8e78c50c8548d
578a08b8cbfa061e344d208f61f5be6605eb8ff8
'2011-09-20T01:11:27-04:00'
describe
'29204' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWG' 'sip-files00045.pro'
9f91de34f070d76c3955b70d5c59e02b
24127a41511131617c74708dc2b44425bb24190d
'2011-09-20T01:11:39-04:00'
describe
'1898312' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWH' 'sip-files00045.tif'
e4950ac3fda7d6bd0acb17107f77106c
8d65b20ad137c753ba36fa28cf894dd876a5b45a
'2011-09-20T01:11:48-04:00'
describe
'26443' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWI' 'sip-files00046.pro'
5da9e599e2ab5faa47db5dadf4cd5dfa
df585d38200cb7461594e4ef44b31241b881e2a5
describe
'1706588' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
222eeb6361a6b153c05d5d62466c17d2
ee94c896ae19e51715b28f1f5f478f24e68cc031
'2011-09-20T01:11:11-04:00'
describe
'29795' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWK' 'sip-files00047.pro'
4dac9e8a77b67888670c187345df7afb
3dd41da606a1bd8061d8210c433461fdf0ddb4b1
'2011-09-20T01:11:23-04:00'
describe
'1724448' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
6f1c489759dd8b4eabc082effad8a1f5
ae0f0545e6567c50dd4154c98d61b33e8469badf
'2011-09-20T01:11:57-04:00'
describe
'28403' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWM' 'sip-files00048.pro'
07738130f959ce3c1cc592604d1ed86d
c9d0b3b3bc7e4c548d876c01dbcaf1d5f64ad167
describe
'1708384' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWN' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7b5642e59355e57890b7f92384a4ae2a
989fc7212704c0e7b09d87bd5ab880bf5a862a56
describe
'29498' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWO' 'sip-files00049.pro'
0d0cff4e1012f3afd7389d456726e059
d3370649ad65487f795d5b1803e138e7dc3988cb
describe
'1751024' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWP' 'sip-files00049.tif'
bead4421569bd5e366764200c7b42130
cf82f4fe9efcc580b3e15054fd37dc6b2bd7708c
'2011-09-20T01:10:24-04:00'
describe
'11594' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWQ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
ba6297f8896b8de300dfcb82edc99969
758af70b246633e7311a6e701cf40beb3a2688e2
'2011-09-20T01:10:55-04:00'
describe
'1701052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWR' 'sip-files00050.tif'
29aea7735d2335e020ec489a3b87c475
725cc4d571096d6d1ba1cf88478bfdf27fe04e9c
'2011-09-20T01:12:41-04:00'
describe
'24125' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWS' 'sip-files00051.pro'
fd4385bfb622636f436efe39dca957bf
c53b253b3465d864fae8757c949821544b216d79
describe
'1782112' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWT' 'sip-files00051.tif'
21b112072f85de031787818ed49c041b
443a05d7e127be6f2961158e5e30c808623ae611
describe
'29322' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWU' 'sip-files00052.pro'
e59ea4ab91dd3314cd3ad9f9a654f5dd
dd371b687db128aa59ef94226979ce5d2129f9ee
'2011-09-20T01:11:07-04:00'
describe
'1689384' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWV' 'sip-files00052.tif'
78046571a13a23771f67535f991fd2e1
450c797d4e68ebc6c51272ebbfa369e14009ea80
'2011-09-20T01:12:33-04:00'
describe
'32341' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWW' 'sip-files00053.pro'
78b1f840cfe203044e45c1977a896178
1ebc22d278c9a57342da1d380c0a42afc51ac983
describe
'1771668' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWX' 'sip-files00053.tif'
5dd39cc0274f02bfb1f3a4515936231d
443b649aa475902169e32d7558d1f22770904553
'2011-09-20T01:12:55-04:00'
describe
'30232' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWY' 'sip-files00054.pro'
2b15a4c32ad9cec599269d35533c0ce0
15a77999e95f6dcb316c9a31172c6cff0705436d
'2011-09-20T01:12:39-04:00'
describe
'1672204' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUWZ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
8dd51575bddc925fe1d757015985c62f
157bc800656e2b329c825f2f3693016de121b613
'2011-09-20T01:11:05-04:00'
describe
'31164' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXA' 'sip-files00055.pro'
c9901cabf4005d10309750a48ef44a9a
10c5af27fcd81b0d81608ad61dbf0e56de901cdc
'2011-09-20T01:11:34-04:00'
describe
'1750492' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXB' 'sip-files00055.tif'
23aede801dd541fb2610778b1cb62266
bcae3a05f1ba6628e2aaa8f803bb1a359958ac8d
'2011-09-20T01:11:24-04:00'
describe
'31344' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXC' 'sip-files00056.pro'
0606fd587af60d7e9a715e6df88ee2bb
33265c1f1964babee968a7e3e9913e289ce47f71
'2011-09-20T01:11:53-04:00'
describe
'1682596' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXD' 'sip-files00056.tif'
37e4a11dd6481659a5c672e06dc4f4a4
9ea5c3941c2e626dcceb40b4a15cb240cddd5907
'2011-09-20T01:10:36-04:00'
describe
'2106' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
6b85a29348885426fbba9de12f861776
bdc04c1b3239b0e3d3f163d5ecbdd61e7cc54f07
'2011-09-20T01:11:47-04:00'
describe
'5864848' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXF' 'sip-files00057.tif'
b6e691322755220ca4890c113171e1b5
d359e6e6f03c003ba25f2c6745b608996f2b1c6b
'2011-09-20T01:10:29-04:00'
describe
'32293' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXG' 'sip-files00058.pro'
e9262cba56f660d7fe702b4a9809858c
7e8b6f80be4333729642e2b4d29a109595e6c766
describe
'1800608' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXH' 'sip-files00058.tif'
de1628b053edff5a6eebd6741bb0067d
b1d29ad328fc79a8bc8f034d2262c61803babc53
describe
'29631' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXI' 'sip-files00059.pro'
2c06b168058aa1055502771e3793bd39
1b29a64f2c36c0647dce3249097d94338de31f6f
describe
'1697836' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXJ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
e0d05429dbcdb6a5a93866a1e99d593d
f7544a16d9d44a39f729d1209064199d70ab5f96
'2011-09-20T01:11:16-04:00'
describe
'30272' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXK' 'sip-files00060.pro'
16ad560631620c155efbd65021d559e9
e4e10b360e246e5fbfeae642c618a568d152d7f5
describe
'1783960' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXL' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a5766c0f0dde70e4beb01bbf88fa86d8
8e485713b5a0a58a41e0f744788881eca62a5bba
'2011-09-20T01:10:56-04:00'
describe
'25031' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXM' 'sip-files00061.pro'
3c7ab3fe49477de376e97644a6a5fcae
4f37aabf9c87cfd06b32eabd5ec73e7cd9096b39
'2011-09-20T01:11:49-04:00'
describe
'1706356' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXN' 'sip-files00061.tif'
fa2f51956c3ed6c9c36bb2e29f9b618c
3f265a81bf18e6f0573354d7f023c8550bee0652
'2011-09-20T01:10:22-04:00'
describe
'19021' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXO' 'sip-files00062.pro'
938d05b2dede441d36c6617619ee895c
21a13610bfd56b1fadc84bba38edd08d8293cf74
describe
'1799776' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
42921b93c067c874775a6d59e09096aa
c15c5625576875e93527048f209d34922f37c812
'2011-09-20T01:11:52-04:00'
describe
'28651' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXQ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
d1a8ef2e98c1413ab10a512c67e24670
8a992b709c4c828171ccd48e1a0ee62dcca62861
'2011-09-20T01:12:40-04:00'
describe
'1690156' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXR' 'sip-files00063.tif'
046f1a9dc7db5aa0b8a40c789f903a51
12e66171d73f8de3bc43d9b1f5e549445e7e356c
'2011-09-20T01:12:15-04:00'
describe
'28333' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXS' 'sip-files00064.pro'
bdb61507bbe501179cabb48f137cf196
81e69d2ebe0eaa10a400797cb1e7e4be4eac2ade
'2011-09-20T01:11:51-04:00'
describe
'1738508' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXT' 'sip-files00064.tif'
539b143c649e0c0f711593c0242774fd
84ef7d240722e7be414b01c99d3b36802f826d28
'2011-09-20T01:11:10-04:00'
describe
'28123' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
8208f6f4b14dd19448eb5190e27939ab
8a4c787dfa54b2f1ff6c25e871186d354c1b7681
describe
'1696024' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXV' 'sip-files00065.tif'
c0abd1c4008ed81800c9f3affe4d76dc
98f47c21dfc99dcddb617597572a315cee2fc867
describe
'27915' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXW' 'sip-files00066.pro'
d1c678955de5cc4e7ea2de9359b47c7e
f95b90d56f69d19489019f739a106b3177770b7f
describe
'1787324' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXX' 'sip-files00066.tif'
2e3f79bbe4b44440b834f8f35121d538
37009b0f86fdadc46417c0f83ec3f5fe7eed21ff
describe
'28800' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
8804a99731b7b5462531fef0fb5c7054
508a139dad2555364784226417819c09ae8e0b00
describe
'1832008' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUXZ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
7ad253d2257bdd05a30d7e1fc105044a
d38eb70187015eb7f283c7f493a45063fa7dd369
'2011-09-20T01:10:57-04:00'
describe
'27766' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYA' 'sip-files00068.pro'
19bf2defdf39210ee3d21baebfd777a2
cd81bf8f63b3126b325764a00aaac3a146b54396
describe
'1739540' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYB' 'sip-files00068.tif'
22a53204caf8e8e99b2559df799e37e8
3f9b592396b85db87169072ba932fd3afcb66b44
describe
'30026' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
d40c06a35145e0094d9ab4d77c5c0588
3dae7e8b77be6a0a112460d0fe2e8cafaeaf88d3
describe
'1687160' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYD' 'sip-files00069.tif'
85f196b19a044acc5ff1132ebc506a78
3c6e1789080e28a2bf3c31f25db31f258376786c
'2011-09-20T01:10:17-04:00'
describe
'27186' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYE' 'sip-files00070.pro'
b4cbbc5963889dc84dc0d7042a4b5304
2764151df849bdf03a5101cc921b527de368f10e
'2011-09-20T01:11:37-04:00'
describe
'1825004' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYF' 'sip-files00070.tif'
4a3cc7ebe1dc3bd427ab139d40bdc3ea
f0a5cf8d8b5c65f732faf1e7f6d9b701aff54320
describe
'29398' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYG' 'sip-files00071.pro'
2e60a1ade03f2b0631c23c0f8e93b499
5a9e766d77b2069ac43ef69ea75a8a82a02428c4
describe
'1699828' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYH' 'sip-files00071.tif'
c314bd91f953c03025f0c5a8102d9b14
d0555eef37773094a94862b9b290ae432e2dfbb2
describe
'26033' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYI' 'sip-files00072.pro'
e9febd1ef93026974bf9a6eafd555fb1
2ba3fec96442cc168c0a5e6e6fe6ce349e9a4c0b
'2011-09-20T01:12:57-04:00'
describe
'1783348' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
13afd056a920a148fc214252fd3c16aa
fb4a7de81e3a768f1be1c7be316d88b3bad9c4fb
'2011-09-20T01:12:03-04:00'
describe
'26193' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYK' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a5c3cea0378fdc3998483473ccebcd54
f2484b1c9cb774b39fe10d7ab9f9577ce90f542f
'2011-09-20T01:12:09-04:00'
describe
'1711328' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYL' 'sip-files00073.tif'
3baf5b43e8cb4d1dd129660730dbb03b
a8d352f4c1b1dfa83e53b175cd0cdd16c0fbe56e
'2011-09-20T01:12:13-04:00'
describe
'29503' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYM' 'sip-files00074.pro'
5431c014eae1cca6e396f77c613bf571
0ef597ee10c44e8bb8c2f7ad9d9dd70c6c207ecc
'2011-09-20T01:12:06-04:00'
describe
'1797104' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYN' 'sip-files00074.tif'
e589caf3380d73b620c0915e3314adfd
cbfc1e7acc25ad1d86e60f9879338fc480d970a3
describe
'27078' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYO' 'sip-files00075.pro'
0cafedcd990ee13e19c2a963bc979537
60ed4fecadf5e64441e5796f63c2e4415d758856
'2011-09-20T01:10:10-04:00'
describe
'1665040' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYP' 'sip-files00075.tif'
5bba88bc6c02794f41f024b8bbb9303f
6d90540acdf2d50bb4572201d8e1eef27d0fe334
'2011-09-20T01:12:34-04:00'
describe
'25213' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYQ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
a661ef23b315812d14e1e4626d6557a0
22fe1c55ecf6458806e41b2369eedd9223bee6fb
describe
'1841052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYR' 'sip-files00076.tif'
7f14fc0760a11b3d25253638047adbb5
ae47ba754e573ac9085296be9340c59e6778677a
'2011-09-20T01:12:08-04:00'
describe
'26456' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYS' 'sip-files00077.pro'
f382ffcd4c774553be6d08fcf5c6e7e6
2b5d595196fe73b793bdf2e340e97ad934fd2fce
'2011-09-20T01:12:04-04:00'
describe
'1692948' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYT' 'sip-files00077.tif'
b9150b17b02c75143c8d8a91bb21ff22
67b6de411e3d8258fd46738176be127d1e78d266
describe
'22631' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYU' 'sip-files00078.pro'
90dad828bf02237c0a1ec28cd74d79fa
28d6479b618d890ae470f40cf9d23b3fd5db8a18
describe
'1804128' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYV' 'sip-files00078.tif'
10d67884bbfd1805e24d4c0344d3bd9c
efaf2ddb85b65fdc7cfc58ab9a1473146694acbc
describe
'29850' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYW' 'sip-files00079.pro'
441447fcad7e924937d1fd2f86908632
23f4acb23ceb7401479d1a6eec2d275b8061d27a
describe
'1685080' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYX' 'sip-files00079.tif'
1a823fc46a8d68a8a70740fd2cbffc70
5dc99183d47b58f0b14f03850927747184674cf0
describe
'29320' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYY' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9f52cbccc75f4e48809f45bce3eb2369
8f9c1c20ccb2420a4c645d5bc81d6127f4e8ef3e
describe
'1786572' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUYZ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
310185062e2f2092310e634094973467
93873e0320f92da7c00b60b0be29ec4ae74451a7
describe
'30304' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZA' 'sip-files00081.pro'
f8c4d18c6d174f9a2ae68c5442055e46
017efed9355be516ae44f743f9255bfeaec588b8
'2011-09-20T01:12:19-04:00'
describe
'1725612' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZB' 'sip-files00081.tif'
dde58c0889d122578fdc644f8bf97c43
cba7d2b59f70d813a046378730b0ce478d467352
describe
'26211' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZC' 'sip-files00082.pro'
15c72cf06281bda8159a600a95c34e64
c982ee67307ee9c9c9cd0345a7fff071deccdafb
describe
'1837840' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZD' 'sip-files00082.tif'
e7fe2fab1c953c0600fbc302adb0a202
5fea9cf7a9a5d7beb3bd5b6fd79ce8cd866a98a5
describe
'29473' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZE' 'sip-files00083.pro'
327601d26325711b1df91093d286bf84
dea2f5eb764b10a7cd8299c08db695bbf755917e
describe
'1669076' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
05d7dc315364b0282555fb0dc792cbbf
95649f1626aab0f33d92dc104c75151211a6e0e1
'2011-09-20T01:12:14-04:00'
describe
'30820' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZG' 'sip-files00084.pro'
7e4065e6e75131d405c92222cd07292e
ea02196d5aed213918096b7c9bc05d119f84eb97
describe
'1787724' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZH' 'sip-files00084.tif'
cd7d75f7bc1910639f30ba6bda91dcff
c23d6c1745a79e353a20fa613b988b0245c92e09
'2011-09-20T01:10:12-04:00'
describe
'32839' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZI' 'sip-files00085.pro'
5421c0426a3f82eca14a74d6295dd4e6
8efd9df39b347e1661af228598c4238e7c9e696c
describe
'1681332' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZJ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
2c665f5e7880a8757cafc0bbbec9f470
af9cd437bfcba3939648f9b29fb1f52b707f9cf0
describe
'28965' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZK' 'sip-files00086.pro'
a056ea02ea885fc696d2051f5e3c0036
02ef500c58d1f83a85bf4a98991e7824ca2aed31
describe
'1855008' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZL' 'sip-files00086.tif'
a068e4661c8784a078424b06b409709e
cfc7d187cc49502185ec2f963478455b2bfdf1a7
describe
'27259' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZM' 'sip-files00087.pro'
7c0a6e9e0223258d7ad19076f5c0c1b1
2e779a5a51f958cc3a150f93c9e357bcc7d46704
'2011-09-20T01:11:41-04:00'
describe
'1713884' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZN' 'sip-files00087.tif'
4e62d5cb01bf3bf6757514406a2d12d5
b1195439213550ace3f6d4ead519e7b03bfc3b3a
'2011-09-20T01:11:21-04:00'
describe
'20577' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZO' 'sip-files00088.pro'
ec94af128574d3a896fa7add44cb558a
bb725d816e2200c18b412061b547dd4094380ee6
describe
'1798440' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
babd6b8f6348d5c715b887d9b67f0c66
8216d3c5663f8fb5436f5923929526fda9b083c4
describe
'27160' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZQ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
f7f1015bb5f3eb5c6a539b5007855edb
8efea5cea356315951fc435c6ba4c30839c8af1e
'2011-09-20T01:11:45-04:00'
describe
'1655912' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
57a3a2f1196da3ede08b6b5ee6278fa7
d8d84190e714e672b656de8e8d61d2c294991d33
describe
'26704' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZS' 'sip-files00090.pro'
6dd3e2fd8ba81517d240e8e14c6863db
a729b09333b7d344124b52cc3f8a24aeab727607
describe
'1782708' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZT' 'sip-files00090.tif'
fcc8560275ff4c873f604f778c5aeb58
94639eb5129c611fb1392ea2498622c58f3cc9e6
'2011-09-20T01:11:01-04:00'
describe
'31152' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZU' 'sip-files00091.pro'
e8ffcca30334ae09a4194dee9087295a
75de7f1219104e43a302a95459edecee84c3d47d
describe
'1685924' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZV' 'sip-files00091.tif'
92bc8a3d9afa29bda61780f6c6708211
576c8fa79db5886e5ec813e787fef44f1105c9b4
describe
'32311' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZW' 'sip-files00092.pro'
a2090bc90228aeac0bdafa3cbec72db7
ef86b0a48a7b666eb624cb7e935780387a73737d
describe
'1831432' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZX' 'sip-files00092.tif'
212811cc7a68d9b9d2a543008a6e9b05
50acd767615dfb5e62cdd4de2f565c12958e8e4e
'2011-09-20T01:12:56-04:00'
describe
'29718' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZY' 'sip-files00093.pro'
c5289fe8012f09dd0ce3b83f7e27ab2b
5cb3fcce88b6c17f5f3564f3cce04d1eb70fec46
describe
'1683888' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACUZZ' 'sip-files00093.tif'
f762adc66b1345409d2691b039daa222
2cff4d6af599c725aa4989b599f8c202e70d420b
describe
'27912' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAA' 'sip-files00094.pro'
d0fce04f8e487528230c55f39127e9c0
e8ce20e3f2ce47155478938967c86b308afbf0ec
describe
'1829472' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAB' 'sip-files00094.tif'
83f74d35c2365de58a300c939ceaddc8
cf747325dd3f3cc426b0a0c7caff2d58b1665005
'2011-09-20T01:10:33-04:00'
describe
'30800' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAC' 'sip-files00095.pro'
93571d7c9331eabab9adf734cf335b68
1f9dfc5d3422af83cef68cc8b739ddbbb485404a
describe
'1669868' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAD' 'sip-files00095.tif'
51507d757e8643653d8ae38ad0e74bed
930bee66f23217d29a2491cf729450bc41cff9c0
describe
'30837' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAE' 'sip-files00096.pro'
0360a0d0d43f5d5530e6b722d558c632
f0e0253833159fc89fb3da1309c6a7f26830b816
describe
'1811640' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAF' 'sip-files00096.tif'
5e78a7ababfd1db6a53e476ea0682920
e20d9819df020ff08c684b30fb127e0f626caf2a
describe
'30173' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAG' 'sip-files00097.pro'
380b6b0c244cb575d4feb560bf696db2
a0256dc772e57f97e3a83a19dc05db2414088ae5
describe
'1718532' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAH' 'sip-files00097.tif'
98a7e0050bc00309287f74326e284953
88161af93efccc7a3d5a415c6798724c7b6160bc
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAI' 'sip-files00098.pro'
6690b9732ecff196b4b17bc6b456447e
1fc7ad6c2cbd80d44d2b751ef76968041a9a9930
describe
'5646172' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAJ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
953a9701103f6f4aa7c0839c839e9df4
e054813a4c9230bcf1f42794891621d48dd9dcbe
'2011-09-20T01:11:54-04:00'
describe
'30296' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAK' 'sip-files00099.pro'
2cc9116297b27210d157178e8723d0a8
c86a2e2b3f4f1f7045c65b4ef2272189a76ca6ad
'2011-09-20T01:12:47-04:00'
describe
'1766728' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAL' 'sip-files00099.tif'
a39e0545be6554c610272cf12da4293b
9562d67980781cabdf4f4113ebf74198644cca42
describe
'29917' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAM' 'sip-files00100.pro'
594220a67ee42eb85ab0d996d39a05bc
4fd44a1226305fd6a4b50545e26d5a2047e76cb3
describe
'1719784' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAN' 'sip-files00100.tif'
7b863878bbb21c68a071c57068cbf0ca
b9cfa60aedea43f6d68e73e841916ce821672264
describe
'32020' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAO' 'sip-files00101.pro'
62ce3d2386adf20cb06c7692c7e18291
4e1419b5093856e3e31b75e9009a7a60d3a8db43
describe
'1807056' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAP' 'sip-files00101.tif'
a4241cde59e8e99b2ae34e3e27c5a733
d314492b884546eb1ca6d483d223688f7b1f832e
describe
'26178' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAQ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
c5d989ce0b39ada7a1ae04c5adae2206
cac7e7ac44748b09c3ba71af17af5dde34dbd6ba
describe
'1726036' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAR' 'sip-files00102.tif'
9074f792fea112ef9577b1b94e0d4f51
f8b877083e68533319294c494a7c419287cc3148
describe
'22042' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAS' 'sip-files00103.pro'
9bb46a0477042b247d68b5ec0540b962
ead51995f3b62841af775a8f4ccfc880be3bf586
describe
'1850064' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAT' 'sip-files00103.tif'
dc375d28d3f24a6c30a8c069f2985828
a7a4980c312ed44dd8348c9423c96b95410bc08f
describe
'31702' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
9b58d9934836a5c43bc2df620e3f19c7
124fb125b52386030d9922fc8f96858b00598e94
describe
'1716620' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAV' 'sip-files00104.tif'
1d61b7e7cab9ad7fe71aec16e6bc40fd
361ff57c24d85cc6defe3ff4c450ab349f171c71
describe
'30319' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAW' 'sip-files00105.pro'
613783945160b7b44fabd18b11ca3e8f
f90712d4598a2b7920de918b765cd3f39567610b
describe
'1828836' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAX' 'sip-files00105.tif'
b4468b294c208becd7ef8d17441a84df
cd5667eba481a03e5ad8b44a6e6ecbd40a009880
describe
'27950' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
8d369070b3e0a162dd302c6ba493d955
bd4aed2c1802dca3155b1ee0877adb6ca91d7880
'2011-09-20T01:12:30-04:00'
describe
'1721028' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVAZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
ef7ae63800b4dd9f3eec12f4915bf495
58915c31a35e8620147c5cc754d349322347e827
'2011-09-20T01:11:15-04:00'
describe
'30287' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
eab5afb840df02d4c24e587ac9233f51
e34d02b801f2276714ef515f3ce75aa69f199db4
'2011-09-20T01:10:38-04:00'
describe
'1809960' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBB' 'sip-files00107.tif'
e5abf606b595b95f433b2cead8ce2d85
c186a9d5810ba1ac9ebb454d52a4ff9953d602d1
describe
'29770' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
997bfd2f0fb40bd631070f2c2a340e42
e6967b63c7c672d9616d902209ba5f9aa439c9e4
describe
'1697168' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBD' 'sip-files00108.tif'
03f9338e86ce47ef878c4c3e732cb64d
533587d47a2c6afb3bcc6f56236b5decd973bff0
'2011-09-20T01:11:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBE' 'sip-files00109.pro'
6c19d0576bba28bbfa04552677fadbce
3d98e8cb02e60a22e65e43b003e8d26b3d22fda2
describe
'1785396' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
4024860c05b7cae952b415a0ee0241ad
33efd772a69aece48a90ba415672d13bc32d4749
'2011-09-20T01:11:12-04:00'
describe
'30786' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBG' 'sip-files00110.pro'
258c765132338d342f23c2bda1e5e2e7
db4bec7a37880136c0585df580336da66ef34a6e
'2011-09-20T01:11:38-04:00'
describe
'1727200' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBH' 'sip-files00110.tif'
056dacfe43bb6e051466802dc1b90920
91aa92f3618a7b64d6585c4ef0b5352ef5758ac8
'2011-09-20T01:10:16-04:00'
describe
'13632' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBI' 'sip-files00111.pro'
37d180459c8c35058f1de0577c2dba66
f4b4bb324a0f2a5ccfc5bba57358f96633092d2b
describe
'1778136' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBJ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
ee606099937a67d58243f5d5a24bfe0f
480c7193a31563a115d6f2086791110a02fad509
describe
'19903' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBK' 'sip-files00112.pro'
6cbaa1f28eb17674b5fb831c9ca7dbd4
2348e9b080434bc765c9c0d4e07202ca7d691d76
describe
'1692132' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
6d7b19e2d6b3213091d945b15851ce10
a50cf1cc3ddef7591e24611145f4fe4acb12ceb8
'2011-09-20T01:13:02-04:00'
describe
'27092' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBM' 'sip-files00113.pro'
8646b57016e2b134e19bada1a3298d69
1225d23e01f6bdb33bf24b4b1fbb93b9e83c2962
'2011-09-20T01:11:32-04:00'
describe
'1764604' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBN' 'sip-files00113.tif'
d8082712669d72f8c47ddea9f083cf5a
792e5ab9f8855a6fccfdec90ed8cab75e44ded78
describe
'28896' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBO' 'sip-files00114.pro'
e4300651ec0efa5b0566eba3a59ebfed
b7dd467519f64c4dafb899aeaefedb23856013a2
describe
'1708088' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBP' 'sip-files00114.tif'
10d924538d40bff3b9aa03cc3781e104
06af743a17d19ccaa927347da8546f1917dfef14
describe
'32113' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBQ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
45d4041879880d8c685c517cc676eb56
8b8d498b3b601b1bb8e556d5d3fc2e273b9846bc
'2011-09-20T01:11:59-04:00'
describe
'1831832' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBR' 'sip-files00115.tif'
96e939e9df4332f078a9b7784d2f20ef
e48d29b4c2ff8091f504c4b71a8381f23818facf
'2011-09-20T01:10:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBS' 'sip-files00116.pro'
8b96032b6d77b25e61e63dfab962469f
7efa0ae608ae6a4f392aee7c103e6051d0f23ff7
describe
'1847080' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBT' 'sip-files00116.tif'
99b7e42702bf42337f38c4f4719b4c14
9478efed6529da775c87ca42c79a64e19a11ca94
describe
'31049' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBU' 'sip-files00117.pro'
4c91d33e84f81d21e13a3b50c08690e5
0d02ba7a5fd7ae4acca5f35485138939705fcebd
describe
'1822048' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBV' 'sip-files00117.tif'
83b92a39a5cdd9c2de642c628e0500c4
a0f2a9cc454b4761914dad281de8e27c3996f4db
describe
'29814' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBW' 'sip-files00118.pro'
fc168d22f65488e7a0f3fad36f63842c
bc092d648cfdd832b2a837923517fc28730e8c8a
describe
'1707492' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBX' 'sip-files00118.tif'
4ef0e011455fa763a1e94d8ab28a4ca3
65c1264d39b13ec2d66b6ef1b2f3f97d7af1459f
describe
'29416' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBY' 'sip-files00119.pro'
7887f6117ffd9b8241ae10a111ec21ca
f6f8696a016331ca9779273b52fbb58b8d55a324
'2011-09-20T01:11:17-04:00'
describe
'1808204' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVBZ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
5c256b0471638529d2b14e121c998586
f8bb65e3d56f8dc10a9c61065e6028727b53dd1e
describe
'30908' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCA' 'sip-files00120.pro'
f97a13d3bc26f0df69f734a4ddde0390
b823aa82a2a7c067fc200d5e93c8244a09d2053a
describe
'1739268' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCB' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ed2cc91753a6ff285cb2a315ae3e9bcc
aa3b65f3f3235d1ffe9547f5464410c45baa7102
describe
'1791' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCC' 'sip-files00121.pro'
1b381cd2ea69b2645b928407ff7617ae
33c726ffe4d64c323f63dc20c5c66645443b178b
describe
'5678888' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCD' 'sip-files00121.tif'
aaee2df2faf1605d905b2a659dc2ef59
c49a481599149afe30803fd512ae214c52800f65
describe
'29252' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCE' 'sip-files00122.pro'
9fea2ff9ad07e20425ec01f91eea5ab4
21ddc850efb5cd680f34aca7e45c0b51d4cb64eb
describe
'1782540' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCF' 'sip-files00122.tif'
2baf057c948d4d41bb21d9053976af8c
ce4959125e3e2d464c5a84333e100473d16432c2
describe
'18617' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCG' 'sip-files00123.pro'
ea8bd7488b9cde26cb4943d5b59b12eb
327cda422f57941274f3f0b13a3f2ca4672c8c9e
describe
'1726172' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCH' 'sip-files00123.tif'
99489fce07302cf8f76cc5f812d89f6b
1f8b175a312ccebca71bfc7163e0c4910ed3243b
'2011-09-20T01:10:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCI' 'sip-files00124.pro'
7f0a0af8576a80284ecffdead765f511
b263c1e49fcd356039fe0568a61c8d6cf1fb027b
describe
'1782032' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCJ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
b03cc4ca0ae1a236faaf1065a7298f69
6cc4be92d4f071247cb56aea601659924ad8acb1
describe
'29467' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCK' 'sip-files00125.pro'
3d89937a40f87de7f8239ec0f6e6fd41
af645767795c7047e0de191977761da380a163b1
describe
'1731364' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCL' 'sip-files00125.tif'
e19ba229cb78aa5eeba4d067ab6d5239
ff27714abd009a997dd66e4afa2a93d0c03c5769
describe
'29899' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCM' 'sip-files00126.pro'
459330d3d06f8f7634e957c05301e2fb
6018e19dbfcdb271315d8b6d1418c4d86ec1c667
describe
'1782816' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCN' 'sip-files00126.tif'
5689fe24b9bec2ac837927e16e81d623
223ad0419d37674bdea44d984b6765821dee5fb9
'2011-09-20T01:12:01-04:00'
describe
'29836' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCO' 'sip-files00127.pro'
ef452311c7f92c2087b86e6a99f05d09
1c7c28e3ec6d3149acba1c309d07f09098011138
describe
'1711612' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCP' 'sip-files00127.tif'
43bd485644bfd7510e25bc2c962fd62b
f691789bebc98e2ea37211f47a5b7207b611dbdd
'2011-09-20T01:10:11-04:00'
describe
'13407' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCQ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
868fa8ff934c45c3101c2549406e7054
164de65029b48be9effc6f8cf0b43dd2e6c54b28
describe
'1778680' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCR' 'sip-files00128.tif'
7ddf416687871b72ea36a44e2c6ee2c7
19e7b453a6183e35457fa3711782d814765da6bd
'2011-09-20T01:12:51-04:00'
describe
'23523' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCS' 'sip-files00130.pro'
5c2eb796e75521d679e396f0228bf36c
c5fd72c9c3ddcec7561d4bde3874bf8eb172c2c7
describe
'1799676' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCT' 'sip-files00130.tif'
6fb336608739a75d9e13b7fbe847a417
5fa9e2ebf3e690bb1adf854a4b8342141d7d927f
describe
'29488' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCU' 'sip-files00131.pro'
4ec461e4a6a06041e9383570d6054cfd
43a064e7c8d9880b996f24a2ed0934441b24ad3c
describe
'1767296' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCV' 'sip-files00131.tif'
e14ad1c2f363e891e3776f232f9cf223
3a54bcf5a611ef6b8d985f02bd32fbacfc16b6c0
describe
'27132' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCW' 'sip-files00132.pro'
992b4e103a8ba61c9baf6084571420c4
53f653cdb00fe4b3832a55bc6e67b6b1e79991ad
describe
'1762772' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCX' 'sip-files00132.tif'
63b522c96b5583befa88563d4d1f2ba5
b80974a84321514f40e28223a05767814e687c51
describe
'23926' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCY' 'sip-files00133.pro'
f5417cc71fad3dcc8253e77156a45713
105f0e19d2fae2f5bc75a2ae84bcf8b7dee16ece
describe
'1891544' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVCZ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
38b5cf110c03b906bc319a947b410c63
779fa3e3ea468a53fcef1f1f0429c64e3195bb71
describe
'275' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDA' 'sip-files00136.pro'
e7bba27b79dd9b226373d05d674a2369
9c5b591a26fde1ed5c26295bc34cb333c42757f6
'2011-09-20T01:10:28-04:00'
describe
'6226316' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDB' 'sip-files00136.tif'
0329e50891239b9b185e3ed4d37fc1df
d9a4263121e85c9eabb2ccbdee902513b5a65b09
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDC' 'sip-files00137.pro'
681f8a57c786e7688a8ea5af7922d7f0
b050c204eca14169beae5194dda5aa8b776ec1ea
'2011-09-20T01:12:26-04:00'
describe
'6136032' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDD' 'sip-files00137.tif'
07b897513bc482e0b68694d539f0b7b8
25371006039017c980c6d2652c9d6170cf42c754
'2011-09-20T01:11:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDE' 'sip-files00138.pro'
791a5d842dad4681c1513e0d70d40ff9
fdeef04500617fb9aae113efe146c8d63b27dd53
describe
'1488100' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDF' 'sip-files00138.tif'
58772be027f768aa3b2465951642e3dd
6c10dd9b38f0e6e2c23289b2a5c62e97eee09e3a
describe
'48185' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDG' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
6d8dbd4fede99097155c6fb403fb5857
5e2d081c6d988056dcbb2325282846331b445ee9
describe
'681339' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDH' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
40f9a6351cf82a56b47a8bac8a230b59
9d38d0abfb4ada1ed6245989e8ebf5a94bd5513c
describe
'173694' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDI' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
76a77b537320ed2ebbed706b6b60e9d4
b309833d4dec710dccc2ccee869456dc537e71b4
describe
'262277' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDJ' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
d5b032be52f2b3aabd3805c5ed36cf0c
2df4240dbc5f6753e7bad068fce1a388c8299162
'2011-09-20T01:12:24-04:00'
describe
'307756' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDK' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
b9da93d7ad72af1489b12db3c6abe9c5
3d681f73b569ba8925893eafd3bf784f8c8fdb6c
describe
'84268' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDL' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
23991ab09608bf48aeab8b2d5b151003
c242e1847f2198d4d3878947f7b01b08840ee1eb
'2011-09-20T01:11:04-04:00'
describe
'261028' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDM' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
c99c9bd68d94f62abaa0d9eb09d95529
bc9bd77e87c68d003ec760de87b64284f39307fc
describe
'297690' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDN' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
da5d0f10e33e4463b65192490cd6c5cb
ac9d9a027764dd6ed9b2d5fc23062e34667ccff1
describe
'83816' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDO' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
b5f5ec64d3317c6cee7174b030549bcf
301cf20cbd54a81b318882e011ee1a453ac64ef2
describe
'238641' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDP' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
5fcf75c04edefe4d19f4c442e05fee65
2d01d1e6d0d9998f7f997cc38edb326b26e5efcf
describe
'268268' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDQ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
6c1bf1ede7f9da4d56a4279ae4af61ce
b3d8d3cd64f1020d16def44c2cf1115358d42196
describe
'71887' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDR' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
72b7a8c8e508887c2847ace2c441c07e
0a37024747354322b87428dda8e18ed538480ec6
describe
'244887' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDS' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
c588d27ed1904be06185b3ffaaece81e
1bf5f0a87fc8b38cabae7df295421d5e40ebe1bf
describe
'565193' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDT' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
880a957c94e051247c4c381c887e6a5e
7ef0c7bdda83f7d884999eb13c6a06ce5bfca9bc
describe
'155081' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDU' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
305607abf05dfa8d5b8511d0e693c061
1bdc64fc3995b95baec02211df99f4a734476090
describe
'231906' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDV' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
3135adda2de5756ac864b4e4b6611678
e43b4c90ec7fa42f3b85f43bd75b430b0e2d0a2b
describe
'274713' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDW' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
aff9ebe360bc275d6f63f8fbcdafee60
c88887aed0c0cd0aafb6418054a98de8c2851a1e
describe
'72917' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDX' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
30881c364dc21ef14614361960a891df
c912fd8776fe14accd2654d8250ad644dfe67c82
describe
'223048' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDY' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
d9cad0557e7ffdd0fabc5e6896a1af30
cf8daa5c0c26bafb92ac5bcc8e5c491c9a724b3b
'2011-09-20T01:11:18-04:00'
describe
'280469' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVDZ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
cfbcae9650a1ae72c85800b4f04a05c6
105c4ce4bc4494582206d806674fc97fec31f11d
describe
'73313' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEA' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
7b9d5bce4d459b755d2eb66d8b56d632
12971464d2aa7af9abe4833af1f2b334be00a691
describe
'218500' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEB' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
5ad169ddf1491ea2e02d1ae1f9493979
790935bc351b5ed5adbee8911494f6f27d146b6a
'2011-09-20T01:12:28-04:00'
describe
'373533' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEC' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
3da0082beef2de2cd9eb3fe08464eadc
a149cbe4eb922c863b9bc41d02d526a71598cc8d
describe
'108651' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVED' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
44a5616bfae72b0d79207f58b59f4e0d
4742e4a65fa77fca58b692d21cd725db557bee20
'2011-09-20T01:10:14-04:00'
describe
'214862' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEE' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
8d5e7079131eb56918e98cfaa7dd9467
ae44ebbb743b3ec4a192fecb3cf0eeb4ab6be8bb
describe
'430990' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEF' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
f5197249a75c35e3d787ee6202f77d92
ac0dc22571e9e5dfc2615f4968d3801dc8a15b5a
'2011-09-20T01:10:20-04:00'
describe
'128254' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEG' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
7fbd10db6b884b2a86a2d414d889575f
14b76240b00f7e62ce5ca476731c1f01b8407cf2
'2011-09-20T01:11:09-04:00'
describe
'211259' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEH' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
f4910a40e5e17dc6b110d6095225c15d
61ebe5eb0ac7754d92fa96eafb8ad601d366628b
describe
'401359' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEI' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
043d650e87f3b8cef07aab7b955d962f
dd4fc3748b7384bd76284c04d25fe2ad2d7510d9
'2011-09-20T01:10:26-04:00'
describe
'120137' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
c0f4997171610a7a853adc2266efff7f
d14720f07aaad993f213d45d7e6ce8bba07dc1c0
describe
'216378' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEK' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
5c049f65d78d4aa7593977d37c75eb23
32500ec5b547913bb41e78d1f4c6de21fa7e250e
describe
'416131' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEL' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
33a310d3d00ca5eb92e0e2a0c9487be0
d877ae2b1ded98880e39e896afbb5d2a65cbc900
describe
'123327' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEM' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
68be2633239745e29dbeb0596dacdd2b
46a61a6311ce7cc116ea31d908eb4660a8aa5153
describe
'214371' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEN' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
a5f824d2a4e9b5fe0a1adb9c58c93044
ee1eb41bf8fc70befea93751f45e785a8408447b
describe
'394609' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
c80205e6b005d14371d1560a629f6507
b9076021118e1321c3d6073466009c9438f72c5f
describe
'118132' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEP' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
b2547bd114bdea5ed079e5e4a46bcd4b
eac4e4df8d03906d498bde43bc3635c351b5e3bc
'2011-09-20T01:10:43-04:00'
describe
'214772' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEQ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
f619fc6c9b1097120591c683b9c3a214
5b74b479c095b44b680df0e25c1c24d80ef37791
describe
'414699' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVER' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
e74d1cb2b4b5ec0b4d7d388acff1e0f2
1cb710d0f2c776e2a33526e67bf813851953c637
describe
'121229' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVES' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
6363060230a5152b3327f6f4fd8c1a8d
6f48f54835ee67bd3ce05f5099a3a1c7b6f89c7f
describe
'216533' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVET' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
35e4a9147592a197fcc660c113092cc9
8b7c797d48205fa7f3afccd173a6a12800166920
describe
'410758' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEU' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
e2bae66c56d64ac8f84a99372cc28b31
298319fc146feb9d3e8f922bb1c4c5bfa0f224d5
describe
'120791' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEV' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
fc322b01bbb64332eb42db56a2b377ad
a9b43946d4531b6163a014ca417a05deac51fb10
'2011-09-20T01:12:10-04:00'
describe
'214740' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEW' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
50a04394873f0ec3b7436c6213d6ebe3
d3fa4e3409c3aac3111f5e3cfedc42fc2becbe2a
describe
'441229' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
1053b1aaf84a018b727c301553ad7b16
f8e1c24985b2f5f033cec5ab40d8616f82884860
describe
'131477' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEY' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
ae7c8056ea6fd90d39ef1e5688ffffb4
789fb33240f2747f74e777c5cd42135579690c9b
describe
'214116' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVEZ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
0caa8fed2cdf7da01362dd6275f8f435
1d528abfa4fa4df3b61a1f4e738a166f09c6df5a
describe
'423995' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFA' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
44676f5cf04fb98de8bed3f1dd622217
1e268aaf447190ab15f51973f3b586c98d26c160
describe
'124815' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFB' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
f1470a9f3dc6012cd6d6855c40b30ce3
167fc6c53faecf1622aa28258c74e5070cc21e46
describe
'212529' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFC' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
265d60c788691374d77113d6e99b7444
db989c80989192374e6e25b77697ef71d40241e4
describe
'427370' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFD' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
06b554419d4e4c9bc8edd3e884e94f78
941cebf25323d395b842e359f0b9df7c3f1f58bd
'2011-09-20T01:10:35-04:00'
describe
'126509' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFE' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
675674519b7a81c830b07a47d9a1400f
723c1350e4fdf7666bd3a03cea823f6fd15a5227
describe
'209450' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
1cc8c74b8e72f325f2995ec7373d9fa8
58e8b54ceefee17ec40be40404746dad96c3c599
describe
'413458' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFG' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
4880537dcf1f39626944ec8da44f13f6
f6a2b293063c2fa03fb8328bef3177e187e2229a
describe
'122418' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFH' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
f1e43c766a609261588b5ee374fc4da5
1bab02957cef39b1dadd140755bc125c8838a7ee
describe
'211146' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFI' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
48e0ac56ef7b9049c2f893f301affa6a
015eb29d15dfb7af0ff352a5fd6b231c4c98a234
describe
'401783' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFJ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
c4957c094ed031eb8fcf5c3a982943d0
7c293738be7508465ae75b65feca5abe5eaec89e
describe
'119938' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFK' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
1b9bd193d52eb5a3c0b34626543805bf
eea748dfce3eed53452327a601f0e151424d4250
describe
'213568' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFL' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
73cb5e078978e1d1d50fd4bab0dce58e
65bf37400551260c9b5a58c07dd1dde744425667
describe
'411805' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFM' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
e9c9e926d0ba83d62bdc399a3ee98307
11811de4776e1cb5ca63dc5f988591acc2daaebb
describe
'122294' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFN' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
722fbf19503fb5c1464576ea82faeff2
3c354ea798581ba8c56dcb30a4501964251aff88
describe
'211031' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFO' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
fe5d7263005503b8db9d332e536a6700
8873088e2211f9faddf02203b05f6ec9b54ca54f
describe
'363533' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFP' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
5628e4ba4500b537c3a064763a4e7075
288dc11dc8692df3276e2e17e42a085052a1bb7e
describe
'103717' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFQ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
e541a6ac9f80b77e5bdab9d4e682720f
4b630a902135437db3a361fb02fb9b5ee0662963
describe
'222265' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFR' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
dda512d1166b37c2e8111ed02c280add
c824fe77040a7e3d40fd88cb0ef39e0bc9bd8304
describe
'406227' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFS' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
71a99bdfd0559bdbb8b19ad5a5708ffc
ce69b0fd6467e0c16ff46c309386bb4cbc181202
describe
'116635' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFT' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
508ee16b8ece1204bcb42dc420fb91df
274f761cf1e26746bbd8c06850683c87cb83c8d7
'2011-09-20T01:10:15-04:00'
describe
'217942' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFU' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
04ee1c56dcfe59990a5c70b057d45db7
faa5e28b04c892d376b89ea80558743d8b28fb44
describe
'435353' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFV' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
3326d8a0cb404c4bd6e71cc148614876
6203521dade618cb8a06f4189dc29560d930fc27
'2011-09-20T01:13:00-04:00'
describe
'129500' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
bfa98e4d0ce60be0958cb2627a60696a
f72c38f0da5f7730349a594f5b254c422a8ba3bc
describe
'219380' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFX' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7a2663eddf73f752730ae61c52cb47e1
0f8872d3f599ebc9f8abc5fc7f9ef83211752833
describe
'312839' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFY' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
6cd2570fa2e3f10a6812d77af7d2889e
8eca358f872d0d568570a40fc9598655744c4000
describe
'83782' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVFZ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
ecc6d699970fcafd29f4560a6f1d85fb
88100aa120831b8e83c16f17100cc322cd72d102
describe
'237533' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
21459047a4e4e25253354005840f427d
0420418e9afdc06347f74da04857223816398c6c
describe
'376268' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
c2e1e4bb501a0f0c1b21dc56dd7c647d
cf1cef70b5974c356d0a3b501159d7fcd02ff4a3
describe
'107635' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGC' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
b9f7ec240c400bba1f7c86b0eb3eeb7b
67c5c64ba22406cf48881ebdaada475f2edf90c7
describe
'237454' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGD' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
c6f176a895cb0581ef0c9c569ab8120d
1df49c72c85e941d1b35dd884487c3057ed362b1
describe
'425037' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
edf365b6a3e8acf21738dd3ffd8c9724
5744de3b7b1f61e2a70b1f77b4976f5662c1bdb5
describe
'125020' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGF' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d93fe969a68a7cb9667b79487f7f4b80
4464c95817289119c7dd45d0e9ccc7d9c1a87ccb
describe
'216518' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d1e3c646bc0624c84421d64a3a318ac0
3ca01c123c7320bb1d30d839fe3cf01e10d9e3f7
describe
'406122' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGH' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
04288d7a534b1b5d8c50e3bf50e8dbc7
acd29dd9c609c86286eaa59265e287ad6f052d7c
describe
'118237' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGI' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
4156c7cde55b9b0e2af7f7c3f19e6ddb
24e63efc44037fe7adaf4ab85498c6f052be7953
describe
'220562' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
378865452b28667cded12934222ce5bb
900ee7224116f4055917b99c9f34fe3a027f11db
'2011-09-20T01:10:31-04:00'
describe
'387696' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGK' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
f402db6da582c8fe13a4f8a9350e0543
0ac564ca40fc972691bf78aeda3bc049217d4190
describe
'113409' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGL' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
dae9969b23dd8ffd1cee24ef87b6275c
6afefeffc221cf1407161e0d7ce9d5daac2453c3
'2011-09-20T01:11:20-04:00'
describe
'228785' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGM' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
3d89128406d51cf90859b5b12f9a6f59
e1a5d877e9ba7053c06a829fcc2185a81ebfd955
describe
'412642' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGN' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
7aa1127b3e0837f8be0674a854c449bd
8087a604587d74198f531c9b34b19665104e3de1
'2011-09-20T01:12:50-04:00'
describe
'120933' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
78a6e04d8cec43b8143078b9139a6925
a842d93d5f3ef260b27be988cd33964f901df9f3
'2011-09-20T01:11:58-04:00'
describe
'221969' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGP' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
4aa4976688a63fdcabe80095848168b6
fff70460dd8b9b40fc14f6b4db0089a7f777d3e5
'2011-09-20T01:11:42-04:00'
describe
'408842' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
491ce64d377020844e593dac23e89319
29b5f365e93afd38487239c1f38d7d04d42118b0
describe
'119633' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGR' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0e0de94d2be35024862ed2ea6fd10a46
377df22023d4c43f008ee6871b2882ecead7fe8b
describe
'220336' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGS' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
2a2a7608a43d390bb2ca05213c48cfc2
aeacc860b7c5080f1489e039214414b88649c960
describe
'405657' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGT' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
8c1c51189c21806cdcd3e78111703bf8
25b5f06073dd2d271499efdd4b7c03c10843beb6
describe
'117956' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGU' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
d6c4459754e198eacd5ff03ce2e1f477
681fea84988edafa6d81c7edbc48073702de6295
describe
'227336' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGV' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e3c82e179476c94a16fddd8611de1b11
664285056f42d91e81918821ec60cf38f2937a49
'2011-09-20T01:10:59-04:00'
describe
'404355' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGW' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
95bb3e780374f6932900b985211bb1f1
c9c6a3831d92326aeee87fa9a3d7e83a1a0aff8b
describe
'119175' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e9e028b1d7d2b49dfad3ee7263d30885
c394e0862b2ad000c46e8bc1a96f8032677968cd
describe
'226115' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGY' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
823c0c99c20484a6a4d82803200bf50a
d7d664a62e765575e3fc9997aa868929ca1510d7
describe
'401458' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVGZ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
117212478a7f2b82a034606f4520e989
a9fd6d3b903f997bb4f9f3674b6fceefeae0de58
describe
'119014' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHA' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
884c8c5d664a8bdb240dc0ac7f4a03d1
6e179dccf5ed773cc4e1a1e89694d6728240cfa6
describe
'217246' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHB' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
aa9302f9de67f9e4877f20f2987d28d7
d52cc99434b6010b8a6ab04c4799d4bc615db7ea
describe
'405720' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
e42b162abbb7060051dc020739ec54db
25c0c76047238d6660670341e8fb411b50012d1d
describe
'116072' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHD' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
f98bcf2a298c6526c3b0562f86b9eeaf
157967eab0a4f4af9c7024726572bb4fbc865619
describe
'227283' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHE' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0b1ce4eef23bd437c1776891c2b46f0f
b6f937ad836f0ccf3e7625cb3cdef97158561c40
describe
'330043' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
9740d82c3fb85b2dbff939d6a4bf3a46
f033433db4383d4d27811c6f991ef8264ce9187d
describe
'91121' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
82080f80b8c9204de764925b285dd53a
46a4f4b279ab4a4aba2528e411a1a810ddfceb1d
'2011-09-20T01:11:22-04:00'
describe
'217878' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHH' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
eb6059110446b6f2cf73c1aa2b05eecd
9f201a102a536dee10b641a212fd429391255501
describe
'395424' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHI' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
46b66694f1070d3d1cc6f8900965fc3a
5742797d48a42a13d3bb228f41716c2a083586a8
describe
'111262' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
7b0af8d9cde83af6703e94f29619f3d2
e599132d5dfe0de7fa07467d9b2199bed9b2a172
'2011-09-20T01:11:26-04:00'
describe
'227284' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHK' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
656e47a5587746f6fb47b2c364e67fd8
cb20a10ce7d3a17d6d1a41444549277b50bc4263
describe
'416173' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHL' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
e28b78655fe00faabf94ee9efe734b91
a33a4d81574c26cfed44014abf0b55f5e5c2f723
describe
'120978' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHM' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
c4fe3724896b78314f13fb4926eab5a6
382e424c25f90d79fa80627c687cf195c0195b15
describe
'215743' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
47076d8507fb0ad16a39a565196fe0f3
057b8f5753959b9dc0e42d88992a94f93101f970
describe
'409555' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
e2f7b717c2aadd8f1dcbee0428243cae
3daaae59137fa61b20dbf7a55f5cbbea8d4e2135
describe
'118846' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHP' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
3b00297956524ccb434a47c26e52da62
3cddd27a8210f3a049538951c5735ba7097599a9
describe
'227380' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHQ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
d23c92dbba1c0985081ee8605d12fe94
0cb9b58bf471e54a5ce47140798f0968fdb3dbb2
describe
'418500' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHR' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f82b7febff02088669e482248ffd2b21
f396652cc1097288fd71de434bf4506dba4ccc03
'2011-09-20T01:12:25-04:00'
describe
'124155' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHS' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
6896e33ff0d99761b581dd386f16ee86
d30e2fc5b7e0a129721c4795c52e7f9b1ce2d11f
describe
'219585' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHT' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
b1d78b0d0dd2ffddd4c053cc9ef70c1e
085e42f51540ff630b27d7ad69fbec16ded70b2e
describe
'415139' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHU' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
0a6eca7754b88e70714c146636244242
16692ad8d34b2e57f6da5f85ec9b9d72265c1cd8
describe
'119559' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHV' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
0df33a613ceb0662a465d83de1dfc69c
46f13b3802b4d10bad061814e95b4075d06db5d6
describe
'227291' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHW' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
2707338200d399d48aacdac7dad21f90
64692efc28485d6499fb1e288baba9d9b1544aa7
describe
'381751' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
d435bb2e233eff6511d2b265e281ec5d
8c0665b8aadbb6f0c38ffbf7894796810a6e0ef2
describe
'113298' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHY' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
30189387a3961dcd5c82236038b852b9
2c7f58786ce94ba4ebe2ff99de2152036d32450c
describe
'235601' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVHZ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
2dd184514d139ca204d1b6f58f28d128
807fe27ef336febc897442faf8081478b5c27fe6
describe
'428780' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIA' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
5577397936d324d579ff1f201a5e8ce6
2c6d878484f133b72fbc1c7f5a3933952f1f1a29
describe
'127558' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIB' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
5708c4ae00a7a919c777c32882c5ac84
7f5be8b2bec86849974d3e9947b8459b7f138658
describe
'211852' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIC' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
dff19c97a6287061c33e62cf61015941
a43fc466d1a04b16bece122be93de1204f5777bc
describe
'394056' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVID' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
656898920acefd35540c582f55c5aa13
ce13d7d8fe53f4e1f6064c81c8e0c2c7aa33ced7
describe
'111997' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIE' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
de503b0e2e4335b956d12def93d98739
95bbb571c88dab7f64dd687a478f6167cb5c0098
describe
'235604' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIF' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
f0b5200b16f0bfffbdddf3f2736117cc
a9cfbf4092446448d3fc87ff60915bced21cf3f4
describe
'399166' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIG' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
60c3ab612c572cbd7877de0de8ca933a
a6cee82c29b6da28c81c3e6eccba1e42be03ecd8
describe
'117080' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIH' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
c1c65ce9a6b6d302dbc3e5dbd99210b5
16ee8928dd60a30b9f25e1f29d3d6f5cabda0c9f
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVII' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
550a7b922bc37beecde9441848ff7b49
3370af92396ec1c111f0514e5425c9cece66ebf4
describe
'403100' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIJ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
2788323cd62b9721c10dcc1af3a567eb
46ac1fa909e66fed00468acc862e2f68f8b741a0
'2011-09-20T01:10:51-04:00'
describe
'112389' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIK' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
15071d0aea1f0c9323e0de87949de4bf
556fa815501a66a1530677727b827acd66ad076f
describe
'235538' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIL' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
56c8fbd31014b0358082c5723c486e48
36975e173b9d7314d4979595620d10c91add361d
describe
'407395' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIM' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
6a2a2f71ff31b33629bf7a1cb68db418
047d92e8e8f457b5292ad1b817b0f31ab8195537
describe
'121936' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIN' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
a384e0c6e7aeb88f39187d59423ef994
81e8dae420df3f70e4a72d685e66a1922d834664
describe
'211667' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIO' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
9efc31ff7c9c4ae6c9e6403075a66352
254afd4099e990c9f645ad7860b611a20a53a8b9
describe
'406378' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIP' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
9b5498335dcb7776f14eff062b87b3a0
9f9939f8115202726d756aff4145f35403d48d6b
describe
'119702' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIQ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
2b02e80f39d28ac4cceaf8e5e2ae031c
1b157a939c9eb4a75492e28406a15c427771cd3d
describe
'213792' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIR' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
dbf1741ea4f67bef5d9f55c817742fa4
56fdcd8845409b2c41b49b9f9307c40182ca9c86
describe
'421896' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIS' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
295881a2d70e81b7b626c101accfc7e3
2c2c42e2620358606101e1cca6feac37ecacc1b6
describe
'124465' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIT' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
fd024c7a0f352261166f5d70a5909536
a83ecf81e065eef64e4e17dd9e82211c8bad1559
describe
'211897' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIU' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9abfa0ce5e2e96aa767eb6b871ca5f54
684b4162703780463105b84fdb929ff8de20cb14
describe
'403858' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIV' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
5ec0caebba1ddbaa3343facf6297edcb
d5ed60b8e4f665161046c81bbea45e7e6876ee4e
describe
'118059' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIW' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
8e970110e0d87182aac34f29764570bc
08c445e8b314b80048ea1e207e8755601459a8da
describe
'217208' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
db44405c6068f345fb2b13a4ac294d00
05cac7cae763106bc1b0f88f5a6ba4db4ec8f094
describe
'320822' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
5735c3c80404f6c5013b79cf3aadcd4b
0784afebab61a9da66dd5960793ef33ec9ee5653
describe
'87928' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVIZ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
6774439a0543913da9b471fe1c3abcee
da9a94be9aa316a5de2d97e4c88243d73caa3ef8
'2011-09-20T01:12:17-04:00'
describe
'211268' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
82a1979f9851a3172e1a501f29be7428
c70434deff1a3f55315ce346cc6654234396babb
describe
'379604' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJB' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
a89b3036b180e96c7aa8f8be2aef75fb
321199a113b32584c58c5da6a8bde822a1af8a6b
describe
'107492' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJC' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
13669d91ece4efd213cd4de7e7438072
47494532ec2b7419a4e1c25f4309f44dbe810501
describe
'221158' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJD' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
bcb54ca70da0112f491ed80519d1836e
f58cb58175987e67bec98357a5bb6bbf8b67b456
describe
'425515' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJE' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
8e345de8ed0c95895712359637ca932a
f7cff6bdbe33343cf9d28930c55dd5910d4400c5
describe
'125573' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJF' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
d8b377a8fc3c0efcafb42a05ebace4ab
c89aaaf625d41f7613c64be0776b387f1eaa800b
describe
'209469' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJG' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
9a60a17ae3f37a2b35af17f389d9d43a
d175955dbae29e4707e80599645a39619ea16cd6
describe
'420623' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJH' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
13a2c79c8a2a6b9e31638cabeb817d26
99eecad913712533c37f58c3d99df818d5c5227a
describe
'124703' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJI' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
9fc172d974ed8dee1174702d597ab541
1307bdb8d07b9d6e19787671b07339300d59a244
describe
'219751' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJJ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
cd128ce68fbc177bb2d495f192b4eb4d
fc3b35eb5943647b7c8b14c544c517129e52ff96
describe
'434704' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
67b007ad6f86802d5a71fc5ea860ba3c
47546492775d4fa602e13ca16f772e97437df507
describe
'129319' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJL' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
00ad4965dd4d0d6bfb55d8e7a097aac5
1f794aa678ba54ebfe5a461f8610fad8dcf3db29
describe
'207395' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJM' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
68a04812187985439d5cd50678e1661f
d1b428a37a662a6c7f6d396aaa7fbfa4ab6eb48b
describe
'425577' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJN' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
ccf432a96c0ff25950d3cf4386c0798a
eb16298df641d7d37291501dccb36a2aca9f72f8
describe
'124296' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJO' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7213aa7c02c6c60cc33526598d15a246
0bd7b459c578bae44b628b3538d62eb7e618af3c
describe
'217100' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJP' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
714aab2bc35a0561f34ac1a6dc65b978
22a548c8e9e855a0e8ac7863788dadf30fff2e5d
describe
'456589' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJQ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
bf04ce059bf9d6c9d8d900e92ce10d82
72a2db59863dd4888d54f32be94487e8856c361b
describe
'135512' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJR' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
69b4408ac1a867caf70535f544f4b1a9
b0392807710c92ed2180b1c255775feb8cdd6101
describe
'208613' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJS' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
dab31261773fecd4d81c120838ca924b
d08101419d2832381284144e84bd6b90fc28afeb
describe
'301542' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJT' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
9ebaffcd52ac1fcab2218cc510d3774d
b599ac3e2c7d1a0b34abe3491592a52a42480289
describe
'78576' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJU' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
c8ccb758670b6e5182bf05091e55b30e
e8cf065e15845e55bb1807f1fc56ef7fbedcc540
describe
'243883' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJV' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c87d08caaa1986eb7ff2e700d635348d
05fa3d34bd2c4ce5a98c2e8ebe38ceb5b78fe8be
describe
'410051' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJW' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
1797211b28d0692587a6f2e86e3ea327
4f58cb1be9835ef4fada4119ef8c2262e87dcd85
describe
'118289' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJX' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
0ea56128c242896bf34d4775843631c5
9ce668e3c0bdb03c5f996093007824e1a96feab9
describe
'223345' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJY' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
479448223a154c8b6e013fe0cb732f8d
9fd1262ae7b62a55f76d15808352d6860bfead47
describe
'426138' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVJZ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
ab60a9c963175c498c8e34abbe224bb4
bf720a01e90d25aaa6469cbae0bf74a89ab40259
describe
'126915' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKA' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
be84f93fd916ce310c18a516b66f86a7
32d3bacce14833f7f9fb4bee9e8383650b8b4053
describe
'210585' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKB' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
3a5ce9a1a444a6c8eeb8451750a9d6db
7351eede8a10b5b2ee1a9e885a3417b0a4e1d5fe
describe
'410116' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKC' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
8dc7cfa5dd07f0e2e5200aaaa5c970d8
136df97e0749f00b20561efbbd40d62b4ccdb418
describe
'117620' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKD' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
a47cbc3f710688d774fa09f632b8fb3d
c914910e404fee7e87f1715f2624ce78946f062c
describe
'221332' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKE' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
f11f5022a139f7989b03148ea3c958d8
898dc3b15df6b18e58b5497840abdf4fd4eb6152
describe
'397424' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
c9097e69ab73ab62809d14f7670749b5
ccca5e0d14bb3e27b43544455c9f85afd768ca33
describe
'118410' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKG' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
934acd1a9ebfb68bc4c179b60d9e5aea
ef22ed6a8cfe054bc08b1a3d53bda1d9551a3b0a
'2011-09-20T01:12:35-04:00'
describe
'211674' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKH' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
51b5e78941053e614212fd9855eb3a1a
e076ccd404a3f24077f8f1c412650886cbb5b061
'2011-09-20T01:11:14-04:00'
describe
'356782' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKI' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
56bebd21c978e304ba3ac028b051d831
f948f9155ae5e5539da2bfc1dfe245c565af2d9f
describe
'100516' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
9994d58b02398ef22a37dc7f6e8a4fe1
117f14fcc98086b52d40d804c48606f38b9e182c
describe
'223465' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKK' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
770bf998b449dcecefbbdc125519667a
8fab9cd9cca3df9f4165b1469c08df826241cd93
describe
'424720' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
1121e8df3b659123e36e0a5897010577
4c6c166e2ee4d73ac4ac17e2e607c343f54c4826
describe
'125555' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
592076fdb8d1712148775f350c5e3540
3ff167a5ee7f2b3ec0ab8e64aa283b415e8e9c5f
describe
'209653' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKN' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
5808c887d046caa4684e06da6bbc337c
2e610cae87e1d2151246e3075186ca5431ca8d0c
describe
'403073' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKO' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
1b99baa635e21afb323eb3208f4ff4f3
f00f55c1b26f23bb1e97df6d4d46879bbde3f307
describe
'117030' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKP' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ff09074cd2190d2bfe566152637ba463
fa383cae90e29005242cdf28a1bd365cc7e92359
describe
'215725' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
70e76afbd1452b4564fde8bcd71120e7
55a70e3f20e07c82dcb8ec6f5fb8ef3d2b52f4e2
describe
'422284' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKR' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
91abd5e1e7e4c2c6b5566aa71dfe5091
775d7db65d2e3679cd9ee789487fa186dd693b9e
describe
'125996' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKS' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
b22a0b7395e8d96bab3011b2049b73e2
70c244791d62fb6bc18af44ce97b411075ad469b
describe
'210366' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKT' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
dafe2122d3cdd966399b88314cf9c902
5b03f11addb3bb26aa677bd7e397088c8a672ee9
describe
'391783' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKU' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
ceebba3cc765acc52fa1310d08852246
cc0d83b638b81533f010066a36a761ed808faab9
describe
'112770' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKV' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
24f0e608f485df4ddb06f787227f540c
c9cdd184b35277ee613761fdbc34f089b85b076c
describe
'221795' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKW' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
6835b98c666d3afa2c71ddc5a7fb453e
31a872d8e77fbf64fcd88baf54e949ae22fef02c
describe
'417177' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b0ac9f00fd7420b48930106541583b20
006e3f46054b3fecb35b74e6f7369b48675714cf
describe
'120771' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKY' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
9ffb708d7175c7fbf1430dcb343c48da
4ba76062fcbf8671c360b8da87384e552f1f3543
describe
'227335' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVKZ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
d07974655775b0d372cfbf7698b0d5de
3a9597c4c538ed84dd2a7c385a145375b28461f8
describe
'404941' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLA' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
7126e171e54a466ab0a15840935a82b9
6baabd61323e99cf03c29988ec550ecdd4ac7007
describe
'118263' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLB' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
34e6b63adbb2713ee5028275c4ecb150
7bc33adcefc9088b07c8e575af82db85a1dc6c77
describe
'215737' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLC' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
4811b41e72795b412b304b42fb4f3c7d
37e7a5c997c79bd8412386770bc153d86877a47c
describe
'437272' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLD' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
049f67b7f88ec11840cb7ccebe96293c
ed5b0bf385b9c394b1e0d6ded5f0f29b4c5bdedd
describe
'129706' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLE' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
22fb41fc988b051ce2baff5df503ea5c
a508a3a106e5e0b238b8be5176cdc0aa14527a2c
describe
'209238' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLF' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
1e48b8e774224090f58ff14986526b37
1a5e275bea965bd6ec648d00a649fbc795e724d9
describe
'384650' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLG' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
ae345c2769e6f25e3a36abd7493a7092
3714c61fdbd40f8b3fd8acaa9d71bdee920390c3
describe
'110515' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLH' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
305cd5c1766bf9032ff2c381f2e4d562
14720073d409de0838c69a289b6ed205e48120c7
describe
'226425' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLI' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
9a9aa82ca84699b612fee507c51c9ace
50e7a3a7c57ecac56c3913292177cc82796a1586
'2011-09-20T01:10:58-04:00'
describe
'429519' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLJ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
6dfb09732787c871e9ec63795bcf979a
94c79ceeacde936b915c5e1d79a8cce8fdb70258
describe
'126120' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLK' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
be35b174cd2a0eab63a0be163c226a79
a77a7746e597e9284e9d850379a9a3158766fc3a
describe
'210846' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLL' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
ac5161b6d7bddd6e43edf80512b7dda1
fe6ea3bd3c8df36e6470b424e8e59bcd07bbea91
describe
'379394' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLM' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
71683b449401b17aa9106ada543951ac
0f6fcddfd60430bf881d727a4c0b15c359582264
describe
'109740' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLN' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
efc2d44d9f25dbd6f26a8e83b635f4d6
4ef1a13f8dab29781bbb637989803f806946612f
describe
'221350' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLO' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
ac4e7f411ea1b2c2247782f79054b49b
93ec64e7cde8ffb1c59a72334b03061e80c0d913
describe
'403670' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLP' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
5c68c5c167ae2e179d8361146e20886f
504abb235e36745bcd0b06be0f65184583ff127c
describe
'120632' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLQ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
05cd22689c5bdccb194b5173db50a245
7ccbd9a335869b066ce5ffab6c45fd1168ec619e
describe
'212218' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLR' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
f44656d1d070fe56c9d183c92ab89f7e
2bb71046d3c982e8c7f4069580069f6e9d03185d
describe
'401019' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
f049b51a85ff04d25079479f51808a04
1062769da563d10e1ad680a386dd3f0d1d6e7f2a
describe
'114973' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
ddb728b8d6485b7c97df11c2222122a1
8dcf6912448d7326979e537284dfffbe6b6df664
describe
'223081' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLU' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
904c83539f14a53c98876b645604d6fc
a64bf4c4f6731983595d05f4e838ec27c93fb08b
describe
'419407' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLV' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
6079b8a0eb769662a1de6ec9d375f6af
4184b16c2b1e1d83036ed3c129d468272a12b170
describe
'123584' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLW' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
95a48890a0fb6abe5fe408f46c4ac70a
d762776a04252d07342109136f360c5cb08a0c63
describe
'206491' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLX' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
4a77c35ac2361feae0a73ea027c2a33c
55b80c10759b1bf09f758465c8520c563c47d4e2
describe
'361938' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
993aa0a41b6bd91fe1f4630dc8bfcec0
b472ff1d561c1f6075901f88c0876d84eda5241c
describe
'102895' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVLZ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
697c4580b43e86ec5a60341bf4b7cbf1
88e618da14b1fbfd49d3f1ceacd13027d05497be
describe
'228496' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMA' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
7458d477fc8c8ffbd8609c74d52824db
b26f9407440ee9efd49daecff477ce91a721cd03
describe
'403832' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMB' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
e8e41a23ae0601eecb050688e4465784
19f3a644b26548a92ed8a7b8407ff4877daae26d
describe
'120946' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMC' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
ec04ddfaa7193428cc0910387ae1005b
9b3a674b61f1aacff05e7c3a64611cd8d8165570
describe
'209939' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMD' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
11031f88eb070397c5d7ef8fd219cce9
b17a4c9fc5eb6ad9aac1ebf8d0540eabff00459d
describe
'368897' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVME' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
83afcbbd0078d8d60e2bb39fcbb9ddab
dc6f6ba92435f923268b6230edee71fb99c3f672
describe
'104541' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMF' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
6975be0401bf670ebdd5da341b894637
3fe7b8e558a826256d0bc0a270968fc8f5a5c22c
describe
'224017' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMG' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6533ce21050bd5ba4c98682e66a6ab80
0cc7cd8863e63217814d07389305f5c237c14be1
describe
'420688' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMH' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
8dc1427cb608937ca13593eda668763b
e188c8a6a6aba798ad1ba81edd6fab681dcecac9
describe
'127008' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMI' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
63a7ac1f2b798f17f6d3e3373a42588d
222ac67997df56cb98809c8dcff2da43d43f6e79
describe
'209032' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMJ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
eb5e0008f3e5df637d439c9c969cda9e
4a82b68fa646df87065eeb60d341b90dd5e2ba94
describe
'398853' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
ecbaf24a7abc75e3e35103ef8f0a0d95
f6292b9bf170ff7ea677e04e99b4fef7a0cf2add
describe
'114548' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVML' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
b169b33f7be98a015cad160f15af21fe
58a298acc98e7016082c426b6c840cc694e5af4a
describe
'221663' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMM' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
1fb72d146e7877af851173ab0e321e07
3cd5cd8715ff4d0467aeba7d12b4645910d3e091
describe
'413494' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMN' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
4b46ab9cf120670745c5cc2c58839505
80649b6b94ea822a03cf64f47d0d187dd3fd6ff7
describe
'121909' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMO' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
a79dac039463f36837ecf60186a4588a
27332d774c10c01d23f13c9db9cf64a95743fc56
describe
'213855' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMP' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
be289a761740ee8cfa19da5f35f3dbdc
2394a6fd61ab8ec4daf8d2a28df8329d80bd57d3
describe
'368861' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMQ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
e5b04613d81ac96f11bc6d7b2e0e044d
ba113de8c577465cae121391b9d5b75158cd82c4
describe
'107505' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMR' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
5fbb509a6955adb0d8b71f9ae59565ed
3110b41f274acbfcee9e2a1c3dc340e9fe633b10
describe
'228193' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMS' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
854ffe28d038a5fa038cd3c8349258e6
3f6c11f18cd4f3d0d2af0057f0eec1aa509a56fc
describe
'429210' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMT' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
289cfacb2ec2fd52233c130de76926b6
011b236d951a09d2cf87cdd5a9a578f5a6a6adb5
describe
'127842' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
4e68f9e347395ec468aa856098cc44a9
e94ba603d504c39be77be28a68f4c1e6d46fe311
describe
'207008' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMV' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
07bebfd8f1a77c83ea599ef6c11cacf8
22e27673f627ce4e670cbbe171dd8b368068d354
describe
'411567' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMW' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
04fafa0b4bc9414adde5115f285b94da
d422d99faa3b459e17a077e6bf125b68907e3d1c
describe
'118052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMX' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
b0a180296a6e8033c344b55f878beaba
80716a590808a85dfba20f83b5845b7f825451b9
describe
'221832' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMY' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
b3e9f717a204115e80acb5fbd7cf1fd3
1755188ef5b26f7e753d59a9995b88fbf94104e9
describe
'435612' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVMZ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ca83deee0bf3e2d8df9de91baa232d5f
8c839782115379c967713e6adf20381192ab702a
describe
'130272' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNA' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
8c152075ca8c6f03c0160249ae3f208a
bfbefe37672fb7bab28ac00e89254cffb4c0c385
describe
'208486' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNB' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
362fee0324214ab7ada2241a3e9c688a
c9acae6c07935ab82d06db6f88ea6c90bd7ace31
describe
'382512' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNC' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
5823fbe8d0c86cae8b2bf1aa2a480036
aec27d02b479fd1ac3389adecbc7185e24c903b5
'2011-09-20T01:11:56-04:00'
describe
'109010' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVND' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
db8d051a5c2322338ef2b8b678c8da9e
5e268f6ebc377eccae502e0394067e48ecbe9bba
describe
'230337' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNE' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
be124f1137ea5bb594cabb38d65f4b54
bd266e0a04bff2426c79b5ea6d0cda031c7114cc
describe
'404806' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a12ee7d75b2c1167f63c65f6b72d415c
b8efefd46fa102abacdfbde2b30d344123f34e04
describe
'119984' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNG' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b8b5b82d78c4fc85be12f7a736c44516
be2562bf94221ed62cfde7ff355273bb1a0ba445
describe
'212557' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNH' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
75618075cfd14d33ae8fb22e04b077a2
b1ce7d4cd0732fd4a498325864a8a09541460e62
describe
'361511' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNI' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
bd809329024c26a4a4acb5e0362aee6d
40df48eb590f9fa672f13639a89b451ca5cb2835
describe
'101651' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNJ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
838845335269d42da55072d81aeda43d
f4062aa07442b3c834072bb431ed76d0c936ca86
describe
'223296' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNK' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
7b4b4917ad5c7778e63533ab3ef2a786
534125949765357551be728023fe0e890aceb80b
describe
'410806' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
dbca229b14d0e6aa320bebb3c5c7d724
2d18bc4b96b1c2c9934d88a914183d06e9a22f2a
describe
'123213' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
063406b14a86f9d0ade472c1e9d778d8
34e951e92a8a247885493f5f0b9f37e0f285331f
describe
'205292' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNN' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
7ebd8806b10c7445290e367162483e67
fc809c09f30568a2f524ec7b490c3e2c126214d2
describe
'365646' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNO' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
058aca0ac68c568fc39749cda8cd0e28
21d6c5a9787b9d29d1ad284161bce3b3f9f0fca2
describe
'106753' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNP' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
28dfa7ffd7ee459a114b5819899eedd8
7486354e9ae159f59505a8afc51bbf27aa03f3a4
describe
'221257' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
90553ca76dc0ba48d73edd98d3bea810
7647ac00bd009b2523409c212dd7585c38175b88
describe
'429506' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNR' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
cad90f3405055a946e355ecdac27b2df
1570627ca5be2f842fbb5e7d8151e27a381d1682
describe
'128366' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNS' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
633bfa967ced83c5088628a6d01f858f
f773886cdfcacb55681c70f97e3f7b432d32aa1a
describe
'209071' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNT' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
3162f29a345e7e730504e63af220b59a
50da2c28ab8c84dbfd014d3399114272e172d3da
describe
'400461' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNU' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
214f68e1bea0a7852c58f4ed06e145b0
222c2ad77a80a92caeaebdb510a02e9181d7bb4a
describe
'114562' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
228aa39619773cb301c93e31afbc0c6c
7785deeb287d107bca771395f886d2761bb6c903
describe
'227292' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNW' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
2635515aac737517aea9abe2ab25b256
176b7d27cf07dd7fd69c04ebf56a97504d633b93
describe
'413651' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
4a380efbce2fd0f1d0babdc6ca65752a
ec857afab5d700c0c5f097211bc17a5aef0f9960
describe
'123439' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNY' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
52b6db0c2217ac3b8b8ce60bf89ff341
17446015f4ef1119795a1baf1269d039021f18be
describe
'208773' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVNZ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
710ff9648872ac6aea726c4a70631c50
0432d7ca5b14a0313beb9232cc50bb71a4baafa8
describe
'375573' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOA' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
b5579f22f3953cd6da0d9e3d80881fff
f4bf763f8ae9873b0e298aafdb3e5579c87a9c8e
describe
'107052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOB' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
e43a0b3c99dbad7c66abaa3f83ad3a65
53589614a232644e864517832c566aa43540437f
describe
'227121' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOC' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
89f9a0de17a4d9e639046004d48d4ae0
b205a6a50749f902ea1d0963edc1b49b043aaabe
describe
'435815' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOD' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
2f53c7894a0f89823e21366da712caef
d224e32308981416b25aef90a29edf753712cfef
describe
'131972' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOE' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
6bbc28af95f9eb18cdecd4b618bead53
0e377891ffe354b8173be332a1f2862551512cdb
describe
'206988' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOF' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
f15ee0fa0454ef95d1700884d9e9959f
a87928e5eb982d717a521d0ee6452dfdd2a04e11
describe
'402872' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOG' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
d2d3e8581d1809acc0fb9e5812619a0d
e07870a59c597efc43a496f191de9e56d3c3f772
describe
'115189' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
aace983bf489176f0f8ced803e265f92
d4929ff36bfc2bb1e7684c9befbf969612d65b50
describe
'224903' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOI' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
4818a0adea8489cd0d2afab1e8540d88
1be366f1bc2a68a660d6c1bd4be016b9e3597bb6
describe
'420200' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOJ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
fdd6c8d792208da9a5ea086caaaa25be
73cfe29a295ef9c8969c0ecfe5e7e23bfe08f96a
describe
'125606' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOK' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
613466a7d78d34538c01cca637b6d705
934923b9a621a700c6533d4e26da01af59488e22
describe
'213125' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOL' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
8acd2883b27935c26efdd49e68ebe9f1
2d54fbe3569061e21ba98941a7b3e7730d81a938
describe
'296155' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOM' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
a3cc42ac9c92f1598a3df2d4ad576f9e
5bc4b6d51779236645dbf0e51545b3c864938f2e
describe
'78963' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVON' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
b1d6a70c3b30bc8f87a6e18487d80f83
7059a78d7541e777d604d687d3756e262461c75d
describe
'234732' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOO' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
101d773ad49d3d961bd11d6203a2855a
d53d4cfe88ea64f255a648c7d66a973f26e95a3e
describe
'401401' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOP' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
5d805e0e1de37b6cae7a1bd647201209
b427c1a8d71e2d0a586991bbc2077d3560e1207b
describe
'116538' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOQ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
6e050d2e2c67171e98faea58e55dfb85
ff33d72e41c428960622206c21688107d929305a
describe
'219174' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOR' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
f09b345d0b426b656b0225a0f12ef060
e79b5b0469445b42991d33432595d545d2616905
describe
'418845' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOS' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
9f334e810281b446b13d209364d3e40d
c71667d5e908f193b4e28308538c0890a857bb2e
describe
'123727' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOT' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
2b22145eab4c8e17e8b9f148a2f43dea
3b20162112832c43b447c670e8632ac48443264c
describe
'213318' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOU' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
ef3f384860938a13866863ca7992b177
ba36876388b5d65460ddb2a614120b971a646ad9
describe
'416446' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOV' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
09b0d9022357900396f09b4666ada233
007aaa1ea70d3cad3012db963ac7d32203a53a7a
describe
'121618' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOW' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
dcc59f20c45d2e095044dd3e6dcb5dac
ddedf0c0ceca4747119159a74fe76b59083d7e60
describe
'224235' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
cab69f846c6502845e974e9310fe8dc4
565f4070d6e07250d40e30ae06269da96e30e40e
describe
'399735' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
bc06194bf5f46cb7905089b6c9ea8bb8
0f8933d634de243c3872dd3deaba8aa7ccf6d6d2
describe
'116323' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVOZ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
a837642622f8677d6b302e68099f7715
2b473acb80530a995b90f41f34dd7dd047e21251
describe
'214071' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
d48caff5cc49a9f75b736f7f1f64a785
2f04ab7e49386a8738d30b6aee17f2c332ca371d
describe
'365611' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPB' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
88463e31f30cf0da13de029205b07821
784f7afd763309e9a0172df0e4c7183df41639d5
describe
'105230' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPC' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
73c2862a9847161b239e900268375915
f1e880e936c2f6d605b78dfef66102d6eacc33e8
describe
'229661' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPD' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
3af99b8f71771a20948d5d0c6e860763
a9e928500b6a26e19d784efbf0b0dfccf8ead991
describe
'436220' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
41182a777d7732b484d27e1adeaa4b2a
e1584e9927ef46ccb5577e25bb8d4e9f4810c414
describe
'128319' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPF' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
db3d9e79df3b68a2d72f09b64f16bde2
a408719b2d07eeba784b830f0013f36693fd86fb
describe
'212889' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPG' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
a694c718669c0bdc9a9f563f433a848d
0ffb5cc46f85ed4b805a0d2e483eeaa4701d9067
describe
'408065' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPH' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
3870519d4f0a1d759fe7c576c3b13a26
c5a40839a57454a01dd81110082276fce7a66086
describe
'118345' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPI' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
7c270586f5009d405ff523a6adf3b53d
28bc9e236edca42ac19e8ff299ef3819eff264e7
describe
'226888' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPJ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
66db00996f85780a67d3c10df20ba9fd
c6b8bb0e7cdc51a07684fd899f746f60d6b1533e
describe
'416855' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPK' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
8b577dee0dbeac642bca54e992b95e12
2455bf61f3440bc885afb6b1c49804939691c533
describe
'123653' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPL' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
177f1c21f5e6461cb7722c7051d930e8
c32172642aa4bcfe38c8289ddc8041720e2fb2a6
describe
'213372' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPM' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
215b8d25b8b371de60558b796bccac41
d3b595ae15ff907bb8afdbb6be1507ebe875ef03
describe
'409009' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPN' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
f189305d09922e881a6ebf31daa7cb54
4e910b367cef48b17202c77e6eba39fc27b39d60
describe
'119849' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPO' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
51abc7439e1e5fa0ac1727c5d2cda0cc
d18cc22fcbaab232635569e9ce31bde2d05758ac
describe
'224477' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPP' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
34c53887daf8bba7e67d39c6df0b5d03
ee9fbee50e1cc6285946491ae329689b9e479ce9
describe
'437818' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPQ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
73012c3d233aecd8a0c3005fa51bcf2f
ddd38bd25fbdfb6003d725c781601e861b80e757
describe
'128814' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPR' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
64cc0d7a50f83f8a9ed13f9ee81b9b5c
4578e4e9224486d09318a4fc27147d896ce8fbcb
describe
'210484' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPS' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
300547427bb19329ab01405de3737526
0495f602f4c8c3ee7c47cb2cbc5d1a72fbbe36bd
describe
'413310' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPT' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
4e00d6dbc2ecc48f17f30e8590438d56
de3fc1b5194a1168fd7c39177da054e079befa3f
describe
'119609' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPU' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
e981494462d2254f60a2eb5fd89d3482
981e7c6e721cd265eccfa0f2c9774661f6959432
describe
'221476' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPV' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
fc068a1346ccd58ba65a889fb83ff61c
03d6273b66ca635bac5c123319c82da822fa1fbb
describe
'432466' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPW' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
22b4de41d7a790dcc1d4547f9d2804a6
c2a049867745ce557a8f2d9d84d74ac5c5b343c5
'2011-09-20T01:10:53-04:00'
describe
'128777' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
15f570ced4acd5e3477e423f52afb160
ec6299de14de142e492f40c0640e3ca15d6fd513
describe
'214259' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPY' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
c752811e869cc83c293f28229bb50d22
006f00cf03f60266398deb69e970adf24113c86d
describe
'319446' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVPZ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
85eaecce567cc93ab0586c3af2dfd1be
21200c73e27b56771b56d15aab8d6db2a6db6054
describe
'87622' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQA' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
cfa34e82bfd52a6ca3a0d43d532596a6
209fa2c510443f215178dc2515e8f550c84efe0e
'2011-09-20T01:12:52-04:00'
describe
'220853' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQB' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
2dd2d587e3a0978777bfdf23db759096
fc584f0b0e694a7979bb12fbe7f87ce5f29ffeeb
describe
'397989' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQC' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
d93f6baaf8087daa5d589eaf778e9d89
5a4fe24a89b3dc2c72ef7e6e70f0e1a0be8fc0b8
describe
'114063' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQD' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
01ff9cef65262798328abe575585089c
afcd6b30039937f3d5926ee1a18cd435d58ec939
describe
'209983' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQE' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b1d134709db6239d6057e2f741dc68cd
6a8fc1d9c2744b643f4eaf4d9bac05244b63e6f2
describe
'414317' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQF' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
f41bbf83e14d7cbacca344f7f42d87f1
2d5f70264dc0b8e39b55973289b15ca1930933b1
describe
'119783' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQG' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
594dbddd94f66502d7d55eaa856a2d6a
a98224d81a121ce1a4328e0ae8ccdd8418a2219d
describe
'218943' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQH' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
ec297017a885d502986311d479f3dcaa
1c88f68d9a6d59bce215cec96cb8ffbfb1a00a7b
describe
'432584' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQI' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1c37100300dae47ccf59ce0b9236c0b6
9be034b17c453aebb2e0ce653401209deb8c5b27
describe
'128748' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQJ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
4aa9eb65b1bc8dd0c7c8b0d6c47ef05a
e3bd66ea2bdf76f5e3f3cc73a67aca0cb022fc33
describe
'211764' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQK' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
778c34dd69022cb5f10fea0ded6d66f2
974088289b6b7eb19e52c6814599b0ee2a7abace
describe
'410238' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQL' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
e2411a057c5f58706add0792efa71594
ec0f02c391f0ab0550c641e134669b52da603bc6
describe
'119313' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQM' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
65265f09f10fb7557b958df1f8a98cc2
abe7d3b53e11fb7a6fc523b21681d2a765a2d72e
describe
'227295' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ecde777f803c52986636c7c440cbf580
521249774908215270925577a0cd38181cf3e42e
describe
'414787' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQO' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f076c6c462cc85e6c194e84b8c77767f
ff2de49dbfff9b4a96657a133e26a58ca6895121
describe
'119693' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQP' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
9744b6fb6655ae12a22b5a1dffd7e8e3
03f068656c00d7723798f6c1d4ddc193fff97daa
describe
'229246' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQQ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
c2707886ea733cfc6fb82dde17a0e27d
c297c769972c98158e7ebc5df661d167c6b805eb
describe
'407660' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQR' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
7c51493f8dc136c39e2c17297a0d5572
1e3959148e66675a7fab2d81d52153c68261040a
describe
'118580' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQS' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
4b86769572a9b5279c2ccb970d4a6f4f
3c26cdc1e30d9e7d6d675edac6d5befa98b557eb
describe
'226089' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQT' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
d86bb4b5398520832b074d6bb799d06a
9edd2846967eda0ea6a353a7b3d7bedc25c9db62
describe
'428184' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQU' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
cd75143a4b602a8976e5824f9cc811e6
af6b51f673424f85525eeec705f871689af2b9dc
describe
'127602' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQV' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
bdfe51e1a65ddee80511d0eeca8348df
34c2ea00b110f313a60fb65bbc1c1f601fc57d49
describe
'211746' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQW' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
b5cecf4bf61c2f0fd1c56fb958513cd6
be68ed366e58bf4038e82614c5efa11e269477e8
describe
'407220' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQX' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
a38a45fcfd7c5e1cff643e61198a42bc
72c79000c12e605d7d72be48c37c85a4e1793438
describe
'118057' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQY' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
307ac04f15e8540332cac3e5e2d814e5
1169b71e9124439c119ba8035db0b4f3a40b9ff8
describe
'126268' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVQZ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
1c0eb41bb2d259c91cd103d370a3a1b6
e2fb5c97281527364f65751cf2db8e9627d25547
describe
'215729' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRA' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
ccd3c074f03ddbd8538f5a748e82dc68
be746f5de7100f04b2d3ef911eae8b586d163e29
describe
'302286' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRB' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
4b4532156f4a8b7ea5d651185e51f24e
ebaf849e3d2b3d384832fec2b5b14f1c169c2bcb
describe
'81384' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRC' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
d021b8062c166f6553d4d8d3cb172442
b025264aa3e1274524d96d4c0361cc12fa1b7c30
describe
'236066' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRD' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
46e479995c1af3746b6bf40313473f21
53b303523b2cdc403dbd685e01465b3a61c89118
describe
'398363' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRE' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
bb0fec08bbbe64593fdff36fcaf07567
be4ee3b335e2a184c76da059c7a46b18c229150a
describe
'113905' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRF' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
eb338413659c7a733a9d05aa212be259
9d56d293e697ddc486b7447917c27357a45a48d6
describe
'221150' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRG' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
ce23acd2c567d3ae2d18067ddcafe675
0f27aaa4688965a3f7d4a8b61304e77dbfcb7a09
describe
'385274' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRH' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
024ef75e2705772396b320461c378230
cf66ddea3001e77bffa7bbabb919de884d895726
describe
'108314' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRI' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
cbdae0e378e2fef63b83a6c8de782720
c3d3e7ec931062734a661776dfdcc48a55c8e353
describe
'214144' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRJ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
e776fbe16548a28456d45ca2eefd1495
0f6624a84b395df70acacaac85e6fa1056738e9a
describe
'394511' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRK' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
2d7037c0b244452a1e94a7ebdbdc74a1
c9eb1eaff131b520dacb1ca9486ef557ae61f098
describe
'115997' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRL' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
7bca9a96114de72eeb01ceb9184f5b04
1637257e3835b1a1661afaf301850efa95403567
describe
'221044' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRM' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
f448035c1973e165be5991ecfcee858d
0ea248a0f9a751665a14948b8a5154d5edacdad9
describe
'416295' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRN' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
f8987131b48a3c3a01e942cc191e8fd2
20421436787caf52fb04e663b063a5f5290ccc3a
describe
'121230' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRO' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
ecbeca112693210cc4eb39aea1a4ddce
6478d7c20a7e38b688388c0c2b5b6df215ec27e4
describe
'214663' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
106448339d81ebbda8df0b5322cd6400
a99a8ec091e956c6d4c1299dbef5ce97124e7f6a
describe
'394772' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRQ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
f6a95a9195bb3345cd08dea72a72808d
c7a64eb725c5c1349b999eb623883ced2f6956a9
describe
'116263' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRR' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
bfde456e8ea5b611c7d27d9726b3d4f2
3ec32dbf3d73fb275a25136eac169b35e8b6e1aa
describe
'221154' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRS' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
485f84243b5ef5631d71e527ca1bb8c5
c30e7fd61a8778a3a4463dd104bbd7aa61bf2c77
describe
'427117' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRT' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
c54cd76e6da7342ad9977db3bcc1f261
b625903c225ddf2e1fbf95ed4ec9dabd255e7d52
describe
'125842' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRU' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
fc49e0cb9a949f90378fc06e872d5574
ab44c74ddf278fc10f503bb76a2a73b4eb9b80ee
describe
'212303' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRV' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
190363f86e3ec96e2b62098ab10f9a9a
952f4ae8bfc64266b17004e0d0b16f20c6938989
describe
'295553' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRW' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
49ec8367c1a3877fcd7e8acb4b9d227a
86b211955dea740a3b1d1f9834e6b4c342b32b54
describe
'81429' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRX' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
abbcc841b502c46b5d576b90886a60fd
27e4dec7bd35c26ed1fddfd7a30e34943c0c193e
describe
'220877' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRY' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
7b463d6d3453e849f9cc4c8894bb9064
c3471133696ce5b055da8e3306eb7207003d6cbb
describe
'327867' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVRZ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
d5d36bda137677306cd81a6e0ee83173
048826ac96558108392238cf2b3ffd6dcfc0aeab
describe
'95237' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSA' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
653406c0f0dc96fba9c611d79f9a8f41
89ae478ed3caa84f18757c0964ca276b97840ab4
describe
'223393' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSB' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
d28587baae3a6ec216382a7b83a8940d
c0d337b551f470f63ac19344ad11f88410610ef6
describe
'387052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSC' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
0d8cc69e1910ca63b6f515e89df346ff
540264e49f2f5097836c7b03c288c23c62757ad1
describe
'114741' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSD' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
31f7756e0bb2118fa755e8c7895cc79b
5218182487ed681a3c15295bc68f57d386834a6f
describe
'219259' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSE' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
f93332c4c3db0c00e88a4aa3a548a865
d4481d5621d5751e6e87547010edf40ddc5ea07d
describe
'355880' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSF' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
3cb2b1887253be10298a71baf012a1d6
347ff60ba33d6db4f709cc6c13336be263ddee45
describe
'104672' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSG' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
34cc231d8eeb7496fca5ea053613f943
e1cdb5db6c05bea09e5a1a5e8bb55d54ce8028ee
describe
'218753' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSH' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
24ca53c39e9cbc6091e0637c17dc730d
6a70afb4719b97d65868062e15c386e3a1a735e2
describe
'341546' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSI' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
4e7cd2a42c2c8b2d7e40001055e007e8
0bc79a6524ef583092308a101eb4ce412c9d8c92
describe
'103558' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSJ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
284d975d5c446a77c4c5ec802e169239
9c8ff7f6c35c5885669d3421fcddbf241dd7e159
describe
'234849' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSK' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
4c4fa2c2ee8c5409a37730b46a5ef615
c81f821d35d7df2da68cd57ab27aabf54ff782a2
describe
'306762' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSL' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
7fb2b72b7cadabc0726aed082c78e475
8f46468d8738c218fb05e7f2cd5e7fccc201ed28
describe
'83567' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSM' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
90c40817fe43bed295414af3a16e3c3c
d6b63841fca0e4fa74c768503923d3e29f8d2136
describe
'259050' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSN' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
04fb1c8870055f99a5c901a8692383fb
55fd65ccb83e34656bb86428f20febdf287d769f
describe
'576554' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSO' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
498827e91db669af58a148fdab9b45f7
be369cfc2c110fc4cbd7a67dfc3a7f80902341e7
describe
'118428' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSP' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
848071fcae5e7efb9994f6b42860379d
10efae4dc8986af40b224169895a13475f1efc11
describe
'255209' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSQ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
1963e9cfea89f1766892d352fcb7d76d
1a374df7952dd4f2f662c578822bf92d0e727982
describe
'193929' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSR' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
a526ed6d25920e34e511b9af9e58850b
4ba651b615ab4add36aa1bfd41f85e6273cbd90d
describe
'50156' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSS' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
ad81d2b3884b6d7a18dd33429c7adea9
9ded375cc43befc6d2304baf7df0c58cf881bdcf
describe
'61614' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVST' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
d47ef584a214dd9e6605646921790cc1
97cb9a019dede61bd740dfd02d5306f7fcd9fd1f
describe
'80' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSU' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
d2ada6eb125f4b67f12ff056b549d589
0bdc8075834df51dab9ca0f0efa1daf2d11d8ffb
describe
'24' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSV' 'sip-files00001.txt'
c9b9a3788a86d4ff8b9b6924c5a1543a
311c664d9d17dac32895973f9dbd7a4497e90eea
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSW' 'sip-files00002.txt'
1232f3d854a4c1e0835fe93511d38b9b
7d97f50892782209d05d2ad16e197c932015347b
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSX' 'sip-files00003.txt'
7215ee9c7d9dc229d2921a40e899ec5f
b858cb282617fb0956d960215c8e84d1ccf909c6
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSY' 'sip-files00005.txt'
d128cb0e0c833522da4d5e61853b256d
e14d5c8de79fc872043f503ecdc59f422a847dc3
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'292' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVSZ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
b6f6cb490d825a3e89bd120355f5ff16
d22d913bdbb771e445870fc12a30e74e1fa7c0a1
describe
'660' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTA' 'sip-files00007.txt'
8a35f353e1f4e278d022c0a092941823
c4630c8bf7208228e7b2bcc0c1c3c8ad1a9ca8cb
describe
'720' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTB' 'sip-files00008.txt'
260a30c78d0496196ee2b346e043d324
b00873e90df58df75b44f1cf16c301adfcf74c83
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTC' 'sip-files00009.txt'
0615e60850ce52252f6c8f55f011b225
bed3e522fead1cb9d777a205c97714d1af2f51cd
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTD' 'sip-files00010.txt'
ffec63098a5509a2dfa665b09ce384e7
b4e840f4e7aa3fc1ca549c15a3a81a8b033759d2
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTE' 'sip-files00011.txt'
7ec2c6e5460d47f2a1ef84228311191f
b6081072d878d428177a12b7b4a55affd980db2a
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTF' 'sip-files00012.txt'
8bcd93a6fe6c6d5a923a0f485be587cf
53252605218f07cd1aaa9c0a36fb36da250e8097
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d9363409f57201e5be2327b5edeeb746
d837e6019fac3a708f9402afe7265ca664c0caa9
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTH' 'sip-files00014.txt'
4184f6013e080dace42f28443b36c23b
58f24b1e318b2a5be14813a9c2134d606c7ce929
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
03ef51390d527c9025929ad6bda6e68a
2cba85afddc501c8779238d99d03402a49d8809b
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTJ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
158041c94c7eb770f82b691ca8452ae7
3db23a04186c100ab662f3932e23d61822d0be92
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTK' 'sip-files00017.txt'
d503d7791bdd1a69e77e3d9e5af58ace
89aea9c815c83e7353debcbc24af2124212cb496
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTL' 'sip-files00018.txt'
d66498c966d51559a09d8446a5e80134
3c76bb50804196e58e8f4881705eb2ebf56f48de
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTM' 'sip-files00019.txt'
5f3ca7f474c35f57f361d39a537bd7b7
1f102af013d2563d21082ae9645408fb4f676294
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTN' 'sip-files00020.txt'
fb1d39f6deb2923679bc240901b64b59
e514ea4518f06d67f7b9feb33118fd4b99aa4599
describe
'790' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTO' 'sip-files00021.txt'
21c6d4696b1119cd4f5631193e2a56b0
8ad6c1db409c6f21b6b0bfc944a572dc926cf2e7
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTP' 'sip-files00022.txt'
179dff268ee27c6b0261157b96e03161
0cc3df70ef1a7b806e1dd63925aafd4d056bb99d
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTQ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ce55463353ed9047cc81913f3df98aac
ee89a167e2b90a0e54d26b874a0dd07fbf20b39b
describe
'145' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTR' 'sip-files00024.txt'
aa2a8bee9aec34c90fb2c379a2b529f2
e9e6721d50ed893756d02e17e342e842528b42ff
describe
Invalid character
'1196' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTS' 'sip-files00025.txt'
554dd38cf532c02f3cd86aa43ef98a99
1aff1a98b5190dbd86b773df47cbc41d49b9cdbd
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTT' 'sip-files00026.txt'
59743b9299969bac7189b7ec54b2106e
e6e44e75494fb1cef736e90af9a82701da162b0d
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTU' 'sip-files00027.txt'
43d933012baef50bc6c856c05a9da779
e4a3bb8fed5d5f789e3d3ff746dcfd870195d2e9
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTV' 'sip-files00028.txt'
5e228e179c82dbd2ab8291c20607eaf7
2c206f335211c3a2848ad862521a9a21e3f11707
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTW' 'sip-files00029.txt'
1c496ad30a1ab951789d9df184b731b6
f60ea32a3fe50e5b0185d898deaa23d8d02dc103
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTX' 'sip-files00030.txt'
8b3ecb38fc24a62f5e02a26b5a1fd28f
19fb695d714d76382c35b3cc3d90790abfd4c511
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTY' 'sip-files00031.txt'
fa5034cd9870e3f03093597ea2015e5c
1b1ed3612e4716d90fdb9f28069e45e54ef120e6
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVTZ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
c5d6bb8d18cbd9bf4fe2bdbabe7643b2
91144beb225e427c334b0b23732edcdda5b3c510
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUA' 'sip-files00033.txt'
aa8f2f8d70ffd36e4e601d4fc8486cbb
d7c3abd2ccafa442565927a0ffae72a3b4e3b59b
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUB' 'sip-files00034.txt'
34da45831cc71889ce42fec44981451a
3791d5933721710576c03a720e3d80a0fcf0eaf0
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUC' 'sip-files00035.txt'
730ddcece6ce6ef4f24ae427b768e8d5
e4f087dcb1dd884bc08c90a058d3926f90c946c6
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUD' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6009afd35798a4b2de07aa240cdb41c8
8aa13c7ee9a43a674cad30a1321a5a35128169f5
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUE' 'sip-files00037.txt'
47bbf1497e40a8ccc7393ed8a98a8c40
c955e59588269e806af25b917a8441a65ca7a528
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUF' 'sip-files00038.txt'
97dbe0ba7fd36007237d8ae04f20c2cf
0051f113ab077ff1c440e6c9fa7fcec4cd0b9ddb
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUG' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f96f26216950f5414d2b1acaab477b7c
d6535a81aef2433aee12f43084c54bb51202c5bb
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUH' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d9960db7e69bcf81f16ae26fbfafa0d6
339c9988be7a01bfc8a80a507166fc4d6c12d3de
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUI' 'sip-files00041.txt'
89fd9aa2ef44a2647366d9a5673600f6
8e03c5a0ed81d57c4fbeb2c7353498f6513ca8f4
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUJ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
7f877198adfcf506e4df9a49f4b17e6c
cd02819ab4c92240383565de17260a623aeed273
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUK' 'sip-files00043.txt'
b1ecc2f5652c31bc5d9908e73ff2df0a
eb8fba1bbfcc64691923c626bebee5fc7acf43ff
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUL' 'sip-files00044.txt'
ff4073550ff3b01e5f5a2c60262034f9
35ccf9eefb45aee5910ba2b5fe71e37952f72f9b
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUM' 'sip-files00045.txt'
af9ae10de837d070787a53c3456ac100
67c42be42ab75cdebd5cfea69c4cd3d8db3eb135
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUN' 'sip-files00046.txt'
34383e045da703fb6ad6f48d0f5a20e7
817f45053e0c6cda00e31b83bfe8d336dd7061c6
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
f2e35c54ce1fb9b3a63af05817f13e3c
59ccf1f31dbb41b85d940ecbf3e2fa864dccedff
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUP' 'sip-files00048.txt'
be86654cc05ca78010ab02a7583e9b18
09b79b046932cfb7812bf41791f7c4212e2fa100
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUQ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
bc77fc66b22ed85a42fde725f613a827
895a3eadc03c7faaf0f999d51a61109ce89f2efb
describe
'500' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUR' 'sip-files00050.txt'
a359d7641c9da1b4288d7d3aaa98f163
6b283109225f75912dd5c0402d4a156bef819483
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUS' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8b9574565810b9d1da138af379bb5b81
eced983634b67533f6f4b6642eaedae470674d5c
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUT' 'sip-files00052.txt'
a68c506687628ebeef771b8fdf9109e0
547aa1dabd9c956be59b268f6e7dee1917a23979
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUU' 'sip-files00053.txt'
513f8bdc8f3fecf06a02694d8c74a2f3
d55feb3a96b4d3f4616b75a16342e0f0f35b3dbb
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUV' 'sip-files00054.txt'
7a5234cb2dd334e2cef8908a1d5bc7d7
d7c6bdf32aa2b7936c1f2ab6f7d8d70072277014
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUW' 'sip-files00055.txt'
3421994cba1ffd2c93f589d8ab98e86e
1e8cbfd3e3c44e9e52448b32c50d0b887af56619
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUX' 'sip-files00056.txt'
39d06f0fb7a1b684d9159ff0f2100bbb
afeb3539609e7cccdb09a0cedf5a1d8a898e182a
describe
'82' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUY' 'sip-files00057.txt'
1ead5338dd7ccb3ef372dd5b0296c802
857c18c8b7c39028477b19edda7637465b41bf74
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVUZ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
4162e5ac8eb6f836d34e38f7bbec8dee
3ff3b27d9d34feb81a9ced155589a3a2b2870148
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVA' 'sip-files00059.txt'
13b50a2f61607f1d51b4e263a23cbf15
b8a6339c9f70e96de3ac5bc984a9744f490a057c
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
8fa16039b7fa81c8e528e43e23a1b480
c37ad6d4c6243b439e450c58805b5c16f23ad695
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVC' 'sip-files00061.txt'
8a4275fbb155bbc5b2dd5cb820179a84
fad569e2c9cf6a5b45bba12799596c3dcdb6d4d0
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVD' 'sip-files00062.txt'
cfe3172a5283f4c8fc22e691fb72de21
fd6c1d3bbe9ab6715e46cd8ed53447d7122225cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVE' 'sip-files00063.txt'
6f85fe6d628e76d25cf25adb38593075
483b85d2ad586679545ece59409d58728e63ea1f
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVF' 'sip-files00064.txt'
fbdf03afc33c77c98e4a87ccf153d48f
ebafe4da0963b1ac7fe9bab013e76667c1d3b2ac
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVG' 'sip-files00065.txt'
31a63cc1ceef62b8ebb542bdeb519118
56d4b3d0883dd86d0b0dec55803c2bbc7b0bfc57
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVH' 'sip-files00066.txt'
0e6c9954ae8c7ed7b0481db80ff55aef
26ac618f79e4752153803ecf1aab70f34b76a51b
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVI' 'sip-files00067.txt'
eb64bfb8f44d6e76ca71884ffa1b8e6e
a69162fd625054ca0e81838bcd1443362138398a
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVJ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
889468160e82a8a4ce36f5d73842ef48
fa4923aff9bf539608bc7adbcfaa1cd8ee717c64
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVK' 'sip-files00069.txt'
c76a112629affe69033fa50b478cef2d
f29220263f44887b26032823b7097e4010b2df7a
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVL' 'sip-files00070.txt'
12d74524c80a858c594c3141d7104632
c1c09caa901d06828980371aacbd73e8369aaca3
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVM' 'sip-files00071.txt'
6ae6f2948ad45d3ed75306da4e19a8f9
b8685a108dc480db8985e4749e8203ad74476999
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVN' 'sip-files00072.txt'
39de46c91262e312b8564e4318b8bd83
6b4cdb542434bf46ade7778bb88a2eb5d5ff1add
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVO' 'sip-files00073.txt'
12ab98e004ecaa2ab276b59ff70bfdf6
c3c63b4b4387f494bac8f851a827349fc80971e1
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVP' 'sip-files00074.txt'
fd5686bbf5711cc4c89a5d129de3bb16
c0ff1eba3c0320a59ddb7455437dc821667f0d30
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVQ' 'sip-files00075.txt'
37143bf360285fba340d3b692f2fdeb3
00aad3b448973eeae31b60226d755ae59d0d90be
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVR' 'sip-files00076.txt'
507f3dbf5ba18f94f955c3cecb329862
590fcb225488e5bf4fb51f04bcc14663f01364f6
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVS' 'sip-files00077.txt'
8fae133e0b13cfd039b552b1c67198c1
841b1cbaca44d9a08dacf133025d8565c04c6433
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVT' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b46c36f8a4f28df2479d7f620e24b46f
7a3f7866560a7b5e0c83daf4ba0dfcab75e4f06d
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
a370a9254c5e58ad569f71b86775b6ca
5e8391e0b20655e78338ccf1e30edd794cdd99d4
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVV' 'sip-files00080.txt'
5c6a4c2842ccc93bc8730f392ed48923
4168d86a3fef7c1c855ba30d0c5a15371ac5a0d4
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVW' 'sip-files00081.txt'
3f10d52b31e5b81f7a887f6ca37112eb
c46be48b045e24edc7a385ddce0078039b72ca7b
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVX' 'sip-files00082.txt'
35ba97749e2f1b6d918474dc97ebfee8
1667ebd50265c027440cb6cb95c9d06d2e12d1ea
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVY' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1bd460fcbda38e44574691dc8847d55b
32a52e72e55a7730b530350edb05ce0e76affd0c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVVZ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
849203de1b3a250a2b6509a6c08db019
d00cba3a4d4a7a32e584cd36afbefc94ef5e16e4
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWA' 'sip-files00085.txt'
8d775ed57e57858ebfeeeebda2c31a56
8a5ff685efb1033bf654b4a15b29fda6c858f5ab
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWB' 'sip-files00086.txt'
f5b0c366b077974b5a3360f10acf9cb6
c91ac80b3ba8f04971bbc52037598b84815d4a1c
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWC' 'sip-files00087.txt'
e31ecee7d0381bc611adcd049bfb5685
f7443309f3752ecbd1d05d310285da782d27e2a1
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWD' 'sip-files00088.txt'
56a58d422d4e91bb2486215faac077d5
dcefcaa8e8f906469c7827c8e93b15ec50bb9def
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWE' 'sip-files00089.txt'
354e750ccefc8e531384cc1259666261
12437c3d37263edb804e332b282f8cc9f45e87d4
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWF' 'sip-files00090.txt'
52b99eab0846c753c6eafeb82b42c8a8
32e37e8059d9a0835cd84661c96b6c625e94f01c
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWG' 'sip-files00091.txt'
27200a1b7e0df9550583a9a8dd117ee7
d71ee06f2b46631bfc2bdd917a455a074354eab7
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWH' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b8f2f4fdd795a82035e8899af01dc062
0485b0329064ae1e968c680d141554a4b159aaf9
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWI' 'sip-files00093.txt'
87733b8d220ecd1e81516345b5502def
68e9f0b6c94e6928c240c16152d4323e8de1c0dd
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWJ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
5647d933835af8182c50fe524a370cdc
d28a2028617ffe02f84c44f56f01f76a6e537c22
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWK' 'sip-files00095.txt'
1efcd943a5cecaeccbeaf87137a6ddd8
da226295550ff4620cc173f22720a52e834f7d06
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWL' 'sip-files00096.txt'
c2ed42dc67334ffe7f11f483615473d3
82e49a19405f19bb54a6cb20ea7ce8f7d8412b69
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWM' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a19abf459fa93b4bb447010db2012edc
89fffad7f77df2026842943f1592ef8048bbc934
describe
'212' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWN' 'sip-files00098.txt'
9fbe6564dc8317cc3beab6cd683a932f
8b43bf2255407aa14fc6ee0ba44a12d42f9b6639
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
c78f95b9aebf4370e14b76dfa84d61a3
27bf76e3c013012f5e60a3fedabf70f84a0723b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWP' 'sip-files00100.txt'
dc181304743d75c82c900031cf7cad2b
0a147164e51a40558c263609e3063bea6f8b7a2d
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWQ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
8b6a72a30f0f5a079dbc1104aac7d5a1
224e7fa427faf806d247becffb4fc2b9cbde7061
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWR' 'sip-files00102.txt'
e5d22e44d053817932008f93631bb8b9
9125d9f564bb089c04ea8f11f8797fd8de598efb
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWS' 'sip-files00103.txt'
774b116a91ff691b64499a83a04d3a53
a07d26a5afac0d0017314121d77879fb68efd814
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWT' 'sip-files00104.txt'
604b26e4f1a6adf5ac87b970704dbce3
18f25655f9af899eb1b332dcc3cb7871907b560a
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWU' 'sip-files00105.txt'
eb24b846e10ba84e810de425fc9962e1
bb3e71c1a05019cc34b37ad1082de43f6b2c5db3
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWV' 'sip-files00106.txt'
5f1df622d1ce686ff668ab926ce8fefe
052f3369a26d98c5981129d191d4cfe3c7fca46c
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWW' 'sip-files00107.txt'
23fb23d71990532778bbd7e9f03b275c
81a17777779c0220a25f1c7535375362ae5a9168
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWX' 'sip-files00108.txt'
b11f0927b1a2e50ca546910963d36099
e26e9d235697e1da50912cd1eb7a44216d161f25
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWY' 'sip-files00109.txt'
f4f8b1c06689c1a09457b24b1cc10c8e
6590847f6ea3da5903c6ec997500f4ccae563084
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVWZ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b500bea9009ecb15cb592ff9dee3dfb2
5c368fd3d85d89ff752918f9e937c976e762cc54
describe
'559' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVXA' 'sip-files00111.txt'
89abeee22bf00428ce6abf59c7f27253
be71c7d2f558c4cc64a6d7b4d27bdc6d18d1f2ec
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVXB' 'sip-files00112.txt'
7f26736b1d235320517ac6270d9f63d8
37b98a259cd88c28edaad1195a00bc1cf97238a7
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVXC' 'sip-files00113.txt'
b5054dbdcef736c20c511337dd447eb2
86905904efedc211587abd8f37370e6ac04d8a80
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVXD' 'sip-files00114.txt'
6777f9091466b14e178f3017d5714583
c4289816cc219ceb0162b886ac0757b32446a35e
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVXE' 'sip-files00115.txt'
ecf520f4d599df7221e6498139559186
38340cad325efd5d78fa753e20433179b9844fb8
describe
'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVXF' 'sip-files00116.txt'
b5ff688ab5fd523a6bb1bfb90a21486a
52a30eccda97a14b9930684284eaf8d39c7c7788
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20080728_AAABDAfileF20080729_AACVXG' 'sip-files00117.txt'
6382a7cecd8c4e9afa88f2ed5d35cb33
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TP
ee
a |
|| Oe



TALES oF ONG COR








The Baldwin Library

University
RmB Florida












— eMarcus Warp & Co, Lonvon,

& ROYAL ULSTER WORKS, BELFAST.




THE BROTHERS

OR

TALES OF LONG AGO

BY

F. LEVIEN

AuTuHoR oF ‘‘Maccir’s Picrures,” Etc.







Dondon:
MARCUS WARD & CO., 67, 68, CHANDOS STREET
AND ROYAL ULSTER WORKS, BELFAST
1877




CONTENTS.



CHAP. ; PAGE
I.—THE CONTRAST x fs : eh
II.—THE BEGINNING 5 a . . 2
III.—Joun’s TROUBLES . : Sa ete a Sy
IV.—THE STORY OF THE RAINBOW : : 49
V.—PERPLEXITIES . . F 7 SO)
VI.—ABRAHAM’'S SACRIFICE . F . . 75
VII.—IsAAc’s BLESSING . : f "I , 85
VIII.—JOSEPH AND EIS BRETHREN . . . 99
IX.—THE JOURNEY THROUGH THE WILDERNESS « 108

X.—A WONDERFUL DISCOVERY . 5 3 118




THE BROTHERS.



CHAP. I.—THE CONTRAST.

SOHN and Stephen Wright stood side
| by side, looking at each other.

GE Nobody would have taken them for
brothers ; Valentine and Orson in the fairy
tale were not more unlike, and perhaps that
is what these boys were thinking as they
stood looking into each other’s face. They
felt shy and strange, for they could not re-
member ever having met before; and they
were silent, not knowing how to begin speak-
ing. Their meeting had taken place at a
railway station—not exactly the place for
two people to stand still and think and look
at each other. And so the boys began to
find out, when two trucks, a porter, and half-


8 The Brothers.



a-dozen passengers had run up against them
in turns.

“Is that your box, Stephen?” John asked
at last, and Stephen nodded,

“Then we had better take it away,” said
the other. “ There’s the carrier outside ; he'll
take it down to aunt’s for you.”

John was nine years old and Stephen eight,
both tall strong boys for their age; and the
box was small enough; they found no diffi-
culty in carrying it through the station to
the cart, which was standing outside in the
little country road, under the trees.

“T’ve met my brother, Mr. Brown,” John
said to the carrier. “And here’s his box, if
you'll be kind enough to take it to aunt’s.”

The carrier —a stout countryman, with
big blue eyes—stared with all his might at
- Stephen.

“What! is he your brother?” he asked,
surprised ; for John’s rosy cheeks and blue
eyes and rings of yellow hair formed the
strangest contrast to his brother’s face, which
was dark as a gipsy’s. Still more unlike was
John’s neat look to Stephen’s neglected ap-
pearance and shabby dress; John’s springing
step to Stephen’s slouching tread; John’s
frank gaze to Stephen’s timid, furtive glances.
The Contrast. 9



. John crimsoned as the carrier spoke, and
took hold of Stephen’s hand.

“Yes,” he cried stoutly. “He is my brother,
and he is coming to live with aunt and me
now.”

Stephen stood hanging his head and taking
no notice.

“Well, to be sure!” said Mr. Brown, and
he drove off without any more words, looking
back, However, more than once at the boys, who
were walking soberly along the road, until a
turning was passed and he lost sight of them.

By-and-by he came to a pretty little farm-
house like a nest among the trees, just then
unfolding their new spring leaves. Here he
stopped and lifted out Stephen’s box, while a
woman in a widow’s dress, with a sweet, sad
face, came hastily down the little garden path
and opened the gate to him.

“Has my nephew come, Mr. Brown?” she
asked eagerly.

“That he has, Mrs, Baynes; and a fine
rough one he looks—not a bit like your
Johnnie.”

“Poor little fellow! he has been brought
up very differently,” she answered. “They
were left orphans when they were quite little
things. I took Johnnie, but poor Stephen
10 The Brothers.



went to some rough relations of his father
in a mining district, where I fear he has not
been kindly treated. Often enough I have
fretted to have both my dear sister’s children
with me, especially as I had none of my own,
but my dear husband was afraid of the charge.
Now that I am alone, it’s different.”

Her voice failed her a little, and she helped
Mr. Brown to carry in the box without more
words.

“The boys are not far behind me, Mrs.
Baynes,” said the carrier, as he drove away.
She smiled and nodded as she went back to
the gate and stood for some time watching,
her eyes shaded with her hand.

At length the two little figures were to be
seen coming quietly along under the trees.
As Johnnie caught sight of her, he took hold
of his brother’s hand and set off running ; but
Stephen pulled his hand away, and let him
run on alone.

“Here he is, auntie!” cried John triumph-
antly. “But I think he’s tired; he won't
speak.”

“Hush!” Mrs. Baynes said; and she came
out into the road and walked a few steps to
meet her nephew.

“Dear Stephen, I am so glad to see you,”
The Contrast. II



she said gently, and put her arm round him
and kissed him.

He only hung his head, making no reply;
and his aunt, holding his hand, led him into
the house.

“TI expect you have been a long time on
your journey, my dear,” she said.

“Yes.”

“And you must be very tired and hungry.
Johnnie shall take you to your bedroom to
wash your hands and face, and then we will
have some tea.”

“Come along, Stephen; you’ve to sleep
with me, you know; and we have a jolly
room, looking over the hay-field.”

Still no answer ; and John ran upstairs, and
waited at the top, while Stephen slowly fol-
lowed him.

A bullfinch was whistling in his cage; soft
spring air was coming in; and the sunshine,
that had got too low in the sky to look in at
the window, might still be seen sparkling
through the trees. The room was very neat
and pretty too, and John looked for some
sign of pleasure from his brother at finding
himself in such a pleasant place. But Stephen
said nothing, and neither smiled nor took any
notice.
12 The Brothers.



“Isn't he a beauty?” said Johnnie, pointing
to the bird. “I’ve had him these two years,
and he’s as tame asa dog. When I let him
out of the cage he'll follow me all round the
rcom.”

Then he waited in vain for an answer.

“Don’t you like birds, Stephen ?”

“J don’t know.”

The voice certainly sounded Saige but
Johnnie felt sure he was only tired, and has-
tened to pour him out some water, and to
suggest the preparations for tea. Stephen
silently obeyed, and never said another word
till he was seated in Mrs. Baynes’ comfortable
kitchen, with his tea before him. He seemed
very hungry, said “Yes, please,” to everything
his aunt and brother offered him, and ate it
up quickly.

Afterwards he seemed so sleepy that his
aunt sent him at once to bed, Johnnie going
too, “for company’s sake,” he said.

Stephen was asleep almost as soon as his
head touched the pillow ; but his poor brother
was awake a long time, thinking over a cir-
cumstance which distressed him very much.
Stephen had got into bed without saying any
prayers!

The bright sunshine woke Johnnie very
The Contrast. 13

early next morning ; they were always early
risers at the farm, having a good deal to
attend to before breakfast; but he would
not wake his brother, who was still sleeping
soundly, and presently ran downstairs and
out to his work, whistling like one of the
blackbirds that were about.

Mrs. Baynes was already up, and busy with
a woman who came in to help her with her
dairy-work ; and John had no opportunity,
even if he had the wish, to tell her of his
trouble last night. About seven o’clock he
ran up to waken Stephen, and tell him that
breakfast would be ready in half-an-hour.

“Yes,” said Stephen, and rose slowly and
sleepily.

“T wonder when he will seem happy and
talk,” thought Johnnie to himself, as he
handily set out the breakfast things and made
the room ready for their morning meal.

He repeated his wonder to his aunt, who
came in just then with a jug of new milk in
her hand.

“Poor Stephen! He has been unhappy
and frightened, I believe ; he will be all right
by-and-by, if you are good to him.”

“Will he come to school with me this
morning, aunt?”
14 The Brothers.





“Not just yet, while he seems so strange,
and has not anything very tidy to go in.
There’s your last year’s things, that you’ve
grown out of; I must have them done up for
him.”

So John went off to school by himself that
day ; and when Stephen was told he might
amuse himself as he pleased, he went out into
the garden, and stood leaning over the gate.
He looked so dull that by-and-by his aunt
called him and asked him to help her with
her flowers. She was a great gardener, and
she talked away pleasantly to the boy, ex-
plaining her work to him, and telling him
the names of the plants. Stephen seemed
pleased, though he hardly said anything ; and
the morning was passing pleasantly enough,
when poor Stephen managed to upset a fine
geranium ina pot. It was a beautiful flower,
and had only been set out for a little while to
enjoy the sunshine ; and now it was snapped
right in two, and the blossoms fell like a
heavy head upon the ground!

Mrs. Baynes was fond of her flowers, but
she was much more distressed at the effect of
the accident upon Stephen than upon the
geranium. For the poor child had shrank
back with such a look of terror, and put up
The Contrast. 15



his arms as if expecting a blow. The move-
ment, the expression of his face, told a sad
tale of what his childish experiences had
been.

“Never mind,” she said, putting her arm
round him tenderly; “it was only an acci-
dent. Let us pick up the blossoms, Stephen,
and put them in water; they'll last a long
time so, and make the room quite gay.”

He looked very much astonished, but fol-
lowed her into the house, and watched her
putting the flowers in water with the greatest
interest.

After that morning he followed his aunt
everywhere, watching all her work, and smil-
ing silently whenever she found some little
business for him to do.

She soon found that Stephen had a true
and earnest nature, and that he had at least
learned a horror of falsehood and dishonesty.
For the rest he was sadly untaught, though
-very anxious to learn. He seemed delighted
to repeat the easy prayers she taught him,
and listened eagerly when she spoke to him
about our Saviour, and how we ought to love
and serve Him. ;

So matters went on very quietly all the
week, till Sunday morning came, and Ste-
16 The Brothers.



phen, tidy and clean, looked far more like
Johnnie’s brother than when he first came.
However, he was very silent still, and only
coloured when Mrs. Baynes said at breakfast,
“Stephen will begin going to Sunday school
to-day.”

John had ceased to expect answers from
his brother, so he talked on describing the
school, and trying to cheer Stephen up and
make him laugh, but it was all in vain.

Mrs. Baynes walked with them to the gate
when school-time approached, and sighed as
she felt the tight clasp of Stephen on her
hand, as if he feared to let her go.

“Good-bye, my dear,” she said, kissing him
when they reached the end of the garden.
“Be a good boy.”

Then she was obliged to pull away her
hand, and John led his brother off; she
watched them for a while along the road, and
then went indoors and sat down to read.
How pleasant the stillness was, after her’
week’s work!

Outside, only the birds’ songs and the
‘wind among the trees moving ever so softly ;
within, the clock ticking, the purring of the
cat. This was all she heard. She opened
her Bible at some words she loved.
The Contrast. 17



“There remaineth therefore a rest unto the
people of God.”

That was indeed a verse for Sunday, she
thought, as she bent over her Bible. It was a
large, handsome book, with pictures in it, just
such beautiful pictures as you see here. Mrs.
Baynes had many loving recollections belong-
ing to that book. How often her husband
had read to her from it! How often she had
shown Johnnie the pictures on quiet Sunday
afternoons, and taught him Bible lessons from
them !

I think she had lost herself in some such
remembrances, when she was suddenly roused
by hasty footsteps; the door was pushed
open hurriedly, and Stephen ran in. He was
sobbing as if his heart would break ; and Mrs.
Baynes, in some alarm, took him on her lap
and begged him to tell her what was the
matter.

“TI won't go to school any more!” he
gasped. “I won't go! I won't go!”

“Why, Stephen? What has happened?”

Stephen only sobbed ; but presently he put
his arms round her neck and began to im-
plore her—

“Don’t send me there again! don’t send
me!”

B
18 The Brothers.



“But tell me why, dear child! Johnnie
always likes going.”

“Johnnie! Hecan read; Ican’t. He can
write; I can’t. He knows all about what
they ask at the school, and I don’t. And
they put me in among the little ones; and
they laughed at me. And I heard some of
the others whisper, “Fancy Johnnie Wright’s
brother being such a dunce! He’s not a
bit like Johnnie,” they said; “and then 73
And coming to the bitterest part of his story,
the child’s voice failed altogether.

Mrs. Baynes kissed him, and told him not
to mind.

“Ts that all?” she asked.

“Oh no! oh no!”

“What else did they say? I am afraid
they are very naughty boys.”

“They said that—that Johnnie was ashamed
of his brother.”

“Then you know they said what is not
true. Johnnie ashamed of his brother! If
he was ashamed of his brother, I am sure I
should be ashamed of him.”

And then she soothed and petted him as if
he had been a baby. Poor child! He re-
membered no such caresses in his earlier
years ; his memory could recall little but hard


The Contrast. 19



blows and harder words; and just now the
love seemed too much for him, and made it
all the harder to stop crying.

Indeed the church bells were ringing before
Stephen could be persuaded to hold up his
head, and he had only time to wash his face
and make himself presentable before his aunt
took him with her to church.

There all was strange; he could not re-
member ever going to church before, and the
service was quite incomprehensible to him.
But his morning’s trouble seemed to have
loosed his tongue ; he asked various questions
as he went home, and showed his aunt how
much she would have to teach him.

Then when Johnnie begged to know what
had made him run away from school, Stephen
found words to tell him all about it.

Johnnie crimsoned.

“What a shame!” he cried in great wrath.
“You show me to-morrow who said it, and
see if I won’t knock him down for his impu-
dence.”

“Johnnie!” cried his aunt so severely that
Stephen quite started.

“T beg your pardon, aunt ; but really he
deserves it.”

“Deserves! Oh, Johnnie, I hope we shall
20 The Brothers.



none of us get all we deserve. That would be
dreadful !”

Johnnie said no more, and they sat down
to dinner in silence.

“And you are not coming to school this
afternoon?” John asked of his brother, as
two o'clock approached.

Stephen looked beseechingly at his aunt.

“You had better make his excuses this
afternoon, Johnnie. He is coming to school
to me.”

The boys laughed.

“And remember, Johnnie, I shall be seri-
ously displeased if you make any quarrels out
of this matter.”

John’s face looked a little gloomy as he
walked away, but Mrs. Baynes took no notice;
and as soon as she had finished “washing up
the dinner things,” she took out her big Bible
again, and invited Stephen to come and look
at the pictures.




CHAP. Il.—THE BEGINNING.

“ saey are nice pictures,” said Stephen.
“ But I don’t know what they mean.”

“They are pictures belonging to the story
of the world, the true story, as we find it in
the Bible. And I want you to learn what
they mean very much. Will you listen and
try to remember, if I tell you?”

Stephen was quite ready to promise that
he would ; he turned back to the first picture,
and fixed his eyes upon it as his aunt began.

“You can tell me, Stephen, who is the
Maker of all things in heaven and earth?”

“You told me that God Almighty made us.”

“Yes. Our Father in heaven, the great and
merciful God, whom we cannot see, but who
always sees us, called us into being, as well as
the earth, the trees, the flowers, the sun and
stars, and all creatures that you see. We
read in the Bible that ‘in the beginning God
created the heaven and the earth. And at
22 The Brothers.



first the earth was dark and empty, with the
waves of the sea roaring all over it, until God
said, ‘Let there be light, and there was light.’
Then God caused the sea to gather together
in its place, and let the dry land appear; and
when there was dry land for the plants to
grow upon, God made them grow, and cover
the earth with grass and trees. And He
made the sun, the moon, and the stars.
Afterwards He caused live things to come
into the world—fishes in the sea and birds in
the air; then other animals. At last, when
all the earth was ready for a man to live in,
God made a man to live there. We read,
‘And the Lord God formed man of the dust
of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils
the breath of life; so man became a living
soul.’ ”
“Had the first man a home to live in?”
“We read that God placed him in a gar-
den—a beautiful place, full of lovely trees and
* fruits and flowers, and with a great bright
river flowing through it to water the garden ;
and all kinds of gentle and pretty animals
and birds were there ; it was a happy place.”
“And did the man have it for his own ?”
“Yes, it was all his own—the Lord God
gave it to him; all the trees and the animals

The Beginning. oe



were to be his. The first man, Adam, might
walk about the garden, and have everything
for himself.”

“He must have been very happy.”

“Yes; but he wanted something else. Can
you guess what it was? What would you
have wished for in his place, I wonder ?”

Stephen thought of the lovely garden, the
shining river, and the birds with their pleasant
song.

“T should not have wanted anything,” he
said, “except for you and Johnnie to come
and be in my garden with me.”

“And that is what Adam found; he was
very lonely in his beautiful garden—he wanted
a friend. Man is not meant to be happy all
alone ; we can only be really happy when we
have some one near us to share our happiness
with. It leaves off being real happiness as
soon as we get selfish, and want it all to our-
selves. So as Adam could not be happy all
by himself, the Lord God made a woman,
called Eve, who was to be Adam’s wife,
and live with him in the garden. Adam was
asleep when the Lord God made Eve; but
we can fancy how pleased he felt when he
woke up and saw her coming towards him
under the trees. And how pleased she must
24 The Brothers.



have been to find herself with Adam in that
lovely place.

“There were all manner of beautiful things
for her to see, as I told you; pleasant shady °
trees, sweet and gay flowers, roses and lilies
perhaps; all sorts of fruit trees, orange trees —
with their dark leaves and golden fruit, vines -
with their clusters of purple grapes. The
air was full of sweet sounds as the song--
birds sang to their mates; beautiful animals
bounded across the soft grass, or drank of
the clear water of the streams which flowed
murmuring through the garden.”

“She must have been pleased,” said Ste- ~
phen.

“Yes; altogether it was the most beautiful
place you can imagine. But you must not
think that Adam and Eve had nothing else
to do than to enjoy all those beautiful things.
In some respects they were like grown-up
people, but in other ways they were more like
children. They had a man’s and a woman’s
power of learning, but they had to learn like
children. Yes; God had put them into that
beautiful garden that they might fear. Per-
haps you will ask what sort of things they
had to learn.

“T fancy they were intended to learn all

\
The Beginning. 25



about the trees and flowers, the birds and
beasts that were about them.”

“ And how would they learn all that ?”

“Well, by observation—by using their eyes
and other senses.

“But I think God intended them to learn
much more important things than those.
They were not only God’s creatures, they
were God’s children ; so it was necessary for
them to learn about their Father in heaven.”

“ And how could they learn that?”

“Perhaps God sent some of His holy angels
to talk with them.”

“What were they?” Stephen asked.

“This man and woman were not the first
creatures the Lord God had made to love
and serve Him. He had some other servants
(who did not live in this world), called His
‘angels’ —that means ‘messengers.’ They
were something like men, the Bible says; but
they could fly, and do other things that men
cannot do, because men are meant to serve
God in one way and the angels in another.
Perhaps, as I said, some of these holy mes-
sengers were sent to talk to Adam and Eve.
But I rather think, from what the Bible says,
that they had a higher and better teacher
than even the angels.
26 The Brothers.



“Who could so well teach them about the
Father as the Son of God, whose good plea-
sure it has always been to reveal the Father
to us?

“But you cannot so well understand that
yet; we will go on to the great lesson which
Adam and Eve would have to learn about
that heavenly Father, and of the duty they
owed to Him. This was the great lesson we
all have to learn, the lesson which God has
placed us on this earth to learn, the great
lesson of obedience. You know what that
means ?”

“Doing what we are told to do,” Stephen
answered.

“Yes; and the remembrance of that great
lesson brings us to a very difficult and very
sad part of this story. I have told you that
Adam and Eve had to /earn—above all, that
they had to learn obedience. Now they
could only learn obedience by having some
rule to obey, and by being able to disobey
it if they wanted to do so. Of course the
Almighty God could have made of them
creatures who could not disobey if they had
tried, or who could never have felt a wish to
disobey Him. But such obedience as that—
forced obedience, that they could not help—

\
The Beginning. 27



would not have been pleasing to God. He
had given them all good things; and, best of
all, He gave them the power of pleasing Him
by obeying Him, if they liked. He left their
choice free; they could obey if they liked,
they could disobey if they liked. That is
the only way in which their obedience could
really show that they loved God and wanted
to serve Him; therefore it was the only way
in which their obedience could be pleasing to
Him. And so it is with us; God wishes us
to serve Him because we love Him and wish
to serve Him, not because we must. It is so
with ourselves, in a way. I should not care
for you to do things for me only because you
could not help it. If I thought you /ked to
do them, then I should be pleased.

“So you see there was no help for it. If
man had to learn to please God by his
obedience, he must run the risk of diso,
bedience. And there must be some trial to
show whether he would obey or not. It
mattered very little what the trial was, so
that it was a trial ; and God appointed one for
Adam and Eve that was suited to their way
of life and the place in which they lived.

“It was this. In the beautiful garden there
was a tree, which was called the Tree of
28 The Brothers.



Knowledge of good and evil. The fruit of
this tree God strictly forbade them to eat.
They might take the fruit of every tree but
this one, but of this the Lord God told them
that in the day they ate of it they should die.
Here was their trial. This would show what
was in their hearts, whether they would obey
God or no. But this was not the whole of
their trial. This was only the shell, as it
were, of their trial; the kernel of it was very
different, and far more serious. However
beautiful the tree might be, however tempting
was its fruit, its merely being there in the
midst of the garden was not a sufficiently
searching test of obedience. The tree could
not speak and ask them to take of its fruit,
and the very idea of doing so might never
strike them.

“Now in order that Adam and Eve should
reach their highest good—that is, pleasing
God by choosing to obey Him—it was needful
for some one to put the idea of taking the
forbidden fruit into their head, and that they
should refuse to disobey when they were free
to choose their own course. This test was at
hand.

“There was an enemy preparing to try and
lead them wrong; and perhaps, if you think
The Beginning. 29



over what I have said, you will see a little
why he was allowed by God to doit. There
is a wicked angel who has rebelled against
God, and who is always striving to displease
Him as much as the holy angels try to serve
Him; and this wicked angel made his way
into the beautiful garden to tempt Adam and
Eve to rebel against God, even as he had
done.

“In some way he contrived to speak to
Eve without frightening her too much, and
then he began to talk about the tree of know-
ledge, trying to make her believe that God
was not good to her in keeping back from
her this fruit, which the wicked angel said
was best of all. It would do more for her
than any other fruit, he told her, and that
was why God had told her not to eat it, and
that she should die if she did so. She would
not die because of eating it, he said. Eve
had never heard a lie before; but she knew
enough of God’s goodness and truth not to
believe the wicked angel’s words, if she had
thought properly about it all.

“But instead of turning away from the tree
and the voice of the tempter, to remember
the goodness and wisdom of God, and assure
herself that it must be right to obey Him, she
30 The Brothers.



let her eyes rest upon the tempting fruit, and
listened to the wicked words, till she began
to long to disobey. She saw that the fruit
was ‘pleasant to the eye’ and ‘good for food,’
and ‘a tree to be desired to make one wise;’
and at last she stretched out her hand and
picked the fruit and ate of it, and then she
gave some to her husband, and he ate of it
also.

“This beginning of sin in the world is what
we call ‘The Fall of Man, because Adam
and Eve fell from a state in which they knew
no harm, and became sinners, who must know
sorrow and die. Though they did not die at
once, though the Lord gave them time to
repent, yet they knew now death was coming.
This is partly what the words mean— Thou
shalt die ;’ and partly they refer to sin itself,
which is called in the Bible ‘death,’ because
it kills goodness in the soul; it is, to use a
hard word for it, ‘spiritual death.’

“This was the Fall; they had disobeyed,
and now they knew kow to be wicked, while
before they had only known goodness. Every-
thing was changed to them; they began to
feel unhappy and frightened for the first time.
The evening came, and then they heard the
voice of the Lord God calling to them, and
The Beginning. 31



they were afraid, and hid themselves among
the trees of the garden.

“But we cannot hide from God; He sees
us always, and knows all we do, all we think,
every moment of our lives. He saw them
among the trees, as He had seen them all
day long, and he called to Adam, ‘ Where art
thou?’ And Adam said, ‘I heard Thy voice
in the garden, and I was afraid.’ And the
Lord God asked him what he had done.

““Hast thou eaten of the tree whereof I
commanded thee that thou shouldst not eat?’

“Then Adam, like every one who does

- wrong, felt inclined to excuse himself and
throw the blame upon somebody else, and he
answered—

“ with me, she gave me of the tree, and I did
eat.’

“And the Lord God asked Eve—

“What is this that thou hast done?’

“And Eve had her excuse too; she said it
was the bad angel who had persuaded her to
take the fruit.

“But of what use were excuses? They
had done the wrong; they were no longer
sinless creatures; and therefore they could
no longer be allowed to stay in the garden of
32 The Brothers.



Eden. The Lord God banished them from
their beautiful home; they were driven forth
by an angel into the great wide world.”

“How unhappy they must have been,”
Stephen said.

“They must indeed, especially when they
came to know that their children, and all
mankind who came after them, would follow
their bad example, and be sinners too. But
the Lord God was merciful to them, and did
not leave them without hope. He promised
(though in words that they could not quite
understand then) that mankind should have a
Deliverer, who should some day help them
out of their sad state of sin, and make them
good and happy again. This Deliverer was
our Saviour, about whom I have been telling
you lately ; the Son of God, who became man
to help us.

‘There was no other good enough
To pay the price of sin ;
He oa could unlock the gate
Of heaven and let us in,’
You know I have told you how He died to
save us all; He died for all mankind—for
Adam and Eve, and all who lived before He
came into this world, as much as for us who
live after.
The Beginning. 33



“We must never read this sad story without
thinking of Him who is called in the Bible
the Second Adam, because He showed us in
His perfect life all that the first Adam should
have been, and was not. He fulfilled exactly
all that God meant man to be; He was per-
fect in obedience; He overcame the tempta-
tions of the bad angel.

‘He died that we might be forgiven ;
He died to make us good;
That we might go at last to heaven,
Saved by His precious blood.’

If we will but trust in Him, and do His will,
He will give us back more than all that Adam
lost. He will bring us to a better paradise,
and make us happy there for ever.”




CHAP. IIL—JOHN’S TROUBLES.

(\TEPHEN was sitting thinking over what
he had heard, and looking at the Bible
pictures, when the click of the garden gate
disturbed him, and he looked up to see his
brother appearing ; not, as usual, with a light
step and laughing face; indeed he looked so
gloomy that Stephen ran to him and asked
what was the matter.

It was an improvement that the younger
brother could look up at him frankly now, and
speak easily ; that day’s trouble and sympathy
seemed suddenly to have carried him over the
barriers of shyness and restraint. Yesterday,
Johnnie would have been full of delight at
his brother’s show of friendship ; but now his
brow did not clear—no smile came to his
lips. He only put his arm round Stephen,
and began to walk up and down the garden
with him.

“What is the matter, Johnnie?”

The other did not answer.
John’s Troubles. 35



“Ts anything the matter?”

“Yes; I’m in a scrape—such a scrape as I
never was in before at school ;” and Johnnie
looked still more put out.

“Tell me about it, do!”

“It’s no good telling. But I’ve been treated
unjustly ; and I don’t care what they say. If
they don’t treat me fairly, I won’t behave
myself, and so I tell them.”

John’s voice had a sound of rebellion in it,
and his eyes flashed; Stephen looked very
much awe-struck, but he made no answer, for
at the moment Mrs. Baynes had come up to
them, and was looking surprised and dis-
tressed at John’s loud voice and excited
face.

“My dear boy, you have not been getting
into trouble at school ?”

“Yes, I have,” he said, rather sullenly.

“But what was it? Iam sure you did not
wish to give your teacher trouble, Johnnie.”

“Mr. Moore said he should come and tell
you all about it,” said John bitterly.

Mr. Moore was the rector of the parish,
and the idea that he should come to com-
plain of her boy, whom she loved to think
one of the pattern boys at the school, quite
frightened Mrs. Baynes.
36 The Brothers.



“Oh, Johnnie! surely Mr. Moore is not
displeased with you?”

“He-said he was, aunt.”

“But do tell me what it is all about; you
do not know how anxious and unhappy you
are making me.”

“They were unjust to me,” said Johnnie
sturdily ; and then, catching sight of a figure
coming along the road, he exclaimed, “ There
now! there’s Mr. Moore. He'll tell you ;”
and, turning from then: *hastily, he ran into
the house. Stephen followed him, and Mrs.
Baynes turned to meet a kind-faced old gen-
tleman who entered the garden a moment
afterwards and shook hands with her in
friendly fashion.

“TI do hope, sir,” she began anxiously, “that
my Johnnie has not been giving you trouble.
He’s not like himself this afternoon.”

“Well, so I thought. I never remember
hearing a complaint of John before. But this
afternoon his teacher come to me quite dis-
turbed about him. ‘I told him to look over
the hymn-book with Ned Rice, he said. ‘And
some sort of a whisper passed between them,
and John got into such a rage he knocked
Ned off the form, threw down tke book, and
all I can say will not make him pick it up
John’s Troubles. $7



again, or go on with his lesson.’ So I had
to go and see what I could do, Mrs. Baynes.
I desired John myself to pick up the book
and go on with his lesson; but finding him
stubborn, I would not contend with him, but
put him at the bottom of the class, in dis-
grace. After school I spoke to him privately,
and tried to persuade him to beg his teacher’s
pardon; but he was as obstinate as possible.
You must mind you do not spoil him, Mrs.
Baynes; he has no father to correct him. If
I were you I would send him off to bed at
once, to show him you are displeased.”

“But perhaps, sir, Ned teased him. His
brother has been much neglected, and the
other boys mocked at him this morning, and
Johnnie could not bear that.”

“My dear Mrs. Baynes, could a silly speech
from a school-fellow justify all that display of
temper and disobedience to his teacher and
myself? Forgive me if I say, do not let your
kind heart blind your good sense, for I know
you have the best of good sense of your own.
Do not let it be misled into spoiling the boy.
He is a very nice boy, but all children may be
spoiled.”

“T will do my best, sir, indeed,” she an-
swered so humbly and earnestly that Mr.
38 The Brothers.



Moore’s wish to scold her passed away, and
he only talked a little while pleasantly about
her flowers, and then bade her good-bye.

Mrs. Baynes walked slowly into the house ;
called Stephen downstairs, and asked him to
get out the tea things; then went up to John,
who had taken refuge in his own room.

He was sitting on the edge of his bed
looking down gloomily, and he did not stir
as she came in, nor even when she sat
down beside him and put her hand on his
shoulder.

“My dear child, what is it all about? Did
Ned Rice say anything about Stephen ?”

“Hed made a picture of him, with a fool’s
cap on, in his hymn-book, and I wasn’t going
to look over it with him after that. I just
shoved him one way and the book the other.
And they never asked what I did it for,
but ordered me to pick it up and go on.
I wasn’t going to pick up Ned’s old book for
him, I know. They might have asked me my
reasons ; but if they like to be unfair, I’m not
going to behave myself.”

Mrs. Baynes sat silent for a few moments;
then she said suddenly—

“How long is it that you have been to
Sunday school, Johnnie?”
John’s Troubles. 39



“These four or five years—since I was ever
so small.”

“And Mr. Mason has been so kind to you
all the time before you got into his class.
How often he has played with you and noticed
you. I remember his letting you ride home
on his shoulder once, and then another time
his bringing you that big coloured ball you
used to be so proud of. And when you had
the fever a year ago, how he used to come
and see you. When you were getting better,
it was always, ‘When is Mr. Mason coming
again?’ and you had a drawer full of the
pictures he brought you. And you had the
Bible he gave you at Christmas with you this
afternoon. How soon all that kindness is for-
gotten, because one day he did not understand
how another boy had put you in a passion!”

John got very red, but said nothing.

“And Mr. Moore! I should have thought
there was no friend you could respect like
him, who was so good to us when your dear
uncle was dying, who has been so kind to
you all your life. Oh, Johnnie! is it possible
that you can have unkind, ungrateful feelings
to him ?”

“I don’t know,” returned Johnnie, in a
rather unsteady voice.
40 The Brothers.



“My dear child, think about it, try to
know. I cannot help hoping you do not feel
ungrateful ; but indeed what you did was un-
grateful—disrespectful too. If you think it
over, I am sure you will be ashamed of your-
self, and scold yourself, which will be far
more useful than my scolding you.”

Johnnie felt ashamed enough already, and
sorry enough too; it seemed “babyish” to
cry, he thought; but when he was left alone
he could help it no longer, the tears would
have their way. Yes, he had behaved very
badly. He could feel it now that the wave of
passion had retreated and left the truth bare.

He was very miserable for perhaps half-an-
hour ; that was a long time for Johnnie to be
unhappy ; his troubles generally cleared away
in half that time. He was only beginning to
recover himself when Stephen came in softly
and timidly. He had some vague idea that
his brother’s trouble was connected with him-
self; but he dared not ask, and the idea only
made him shy.

“Won't you have your tea, Johnnie?” he
said with an effort.

Johnnie jumped up and ran to wash his
face.

“I want to go out again,” he said, trying to
John’s Troubles. 4l



steady his voice. “It was too bad of me this
afternoon, and I'll just go and say so to Mr.
Mason, and to Mr. Moore too.”

Stephen’s heart sank. What dreadful thing
was this that his brother was going to do?
He trembled to think of it.

But Johnnie rushed downstairs as if his
spirits had returned to him, and darted into
the kitchen to his aunt.

“TI am very sorry,” he said eagerly. “I
want to go and tell them.”

Mrs, Baynes quite understood what he
meant, and smiled with pleasure as she an-
swered, “You are right, my boy;” but there
was a depth of satisfaction in her tone that
made Stephen glad of his brother’s deci-
sion, terrible as it appeared to him. Johnnie
was out of the house and speeding away on
his errand before any more could be said,
though as he came near the Rectory his pace
slackened a little, and a certain shyness made
his cheeks burn again. But he was fortunate
in the moment of his arrival, for the rector
was walking in his garden, and the very Mr.
Mason himself at his side.

They were talking very earnestly, and did
not notice the approaching footsteps till John
stood close beside them; then they turned
42 The Brothers.



and perceived the little fellow, looking up
with a flushed face and a very much ashamed
expression. :

“Well, Johnnie, have you come to your
senses?” asked Mr. Moore quite kindly.

“I’m very sorry, sir. If you'll try me again,
I shall behave better, I hope. I’m very sorry,
sir.” This second apology was addressed to
Mr. Mason.

“That is well,” said Mr. Moore. “You have
been a very good boy in general, Johnnie, and
I hope you mean to try for the future to keep
up that character. I’ve no doubt your teacher
will be quite willing to overlook what hap-
pened to-day.”

Mr. Mason signified his willingness, and
then, perhaps pitying his pupil’s confusion,
said they must not keep the rector any longer
now; it would soon be church-time, and so
went off with the boy. They were great
friends really, and Mr. Mason had heard the
whole story before they reached Mrs. Baynes’
gate. ;

“I don’t wonder that it tried your temper,
Johnnie,” he said kindly. “I wish I had seen
it at the time.”

They shook hands and parted better friends
than ever
John’s Troubles. 43



How could Johnnie look so bright after all
that trouble? Stephen wondered, as the three
went off very quietly to church together. He
felt unhappy for his brother and for himself;
he could not forget what he had suffered that
morning.

But people who cannot get over their
troubles quickly perhaps learn the more from
them ; so Stephen had some advantage over
his brother.

It was a lovely evening when they came
out of church; the sun had set, but had left
a great deal of light behind him in the sky—
a soft, low light that made everything look
beautiful.

It had not been a very happy day, Stephen
thought ; but the evening seemed so pleasant
and still, as if it would make up for all that
had gone wrong. He would have felt almost
happy again, as the three walked along to-
gether, but for the thought of to-morrow.

Had not his aunt said that he must begin
going to day-school to-morrow? And how
dreadful that would be, if the Sunday-school
had been so bad!

Stephen’s dreams that night were disturbed
with visions of troubles in school ; sometimes
the boys were teasing, sometimes the rector
44 The Brothers



was scolding him for being so great a dunce;
so that it was a relief to wake and find the
morning had come, and that Johnnie was
already up and whistling gaily.

Only, as he recollected in a moment, the
real troubles were coming now, and the
thought made him sink back on his pillow
with a deep sigh.

“What’s the matter?” said Johnnie, stop-
ping suddenly in the middle of “Rule, Bri-
tannia.”

“ Johnnie,” Stephen began, then he stopped
again, but brought out at last—“I’m afraid of
going to school.”

“Afraid! Why, our master, Mr. Willis, is
as kind as can be. You needn’t be afraid.”

“Tt’s—it’s—I wouldn’t mind the master
beating me. I’ve been beaten often enough.”

Johnnie stared,

“Mr. Willis won’t beat you, Stephen.”

“No; it’s the boys I’m afraid of.”

“Oh, they daren’t say a word in school
when Mr. Willis is there. It’s different on
Sundays; they take liberties then.”

“Are they so frightened for Mr. Willis,
then?” ;

“Frightened! No; but he makes them
afraid of doing anything wrong.”
John’s Troubles. 45



A little consoled by these assurances, Ste-
phen found spirit to rise and follow Johnnie
out of doors, to help in his various tasks.
But he was very silent and sober again, and
so he showed himself at breakfast, and during
their walk to school.

“Oh, Johnnie!” he said in a whisper as they
reached it, “how I wish I was not going in!”

Johnnie laughed, and told him not to mind.
The bell was ringing loudly; a number of
boys were running in; the brothers joined
them ; and what with the clatter of feet, the
buzz of voices, and the clanging of the bell,
Stephen felt quite bewildered, but his brother
pulled him by the sleeve, and led him up
the school. “There’s Mr. Willis,” whispered
Johnnie, and Stephen scarcely found courage
to look up at a gentleman who was standing
by a desk at the upper end of the room—a
gentleman with a bald head and a beard, a
kind, thoughtful face, with grave quick eyes
that seemed to see every part of the room at
once. This was Mr. Willis.

“This is my brother, sir,’ said Johnnie,
presenting him.

“Your brother,” the master returned, in a
low, clear voice. “A younger brother, I
suppose.”
46 The Brothers.



“Yes, sir; and he has not been to school
before, so he has to begin at the beginning.”

“Well, every one must do that some time
or other, I suppose. What is your name, my
boy ?”

“Stephen Wright, sir.”

“You have not learned to read yet, Ste-
phen?”

It was not nearly so difficult to say “No”
as Stephen had feared; somehow the master
did not seem at all as if he were going to be
shocked.

“No? Then you shall begin this morning.
Be very attentive. Come this way;” and
Stephen found himself placed at the bottom
of a form full of very little boys ; but nobody

seemed to notice him, or made any remark.

"The big bell stopped ringing at the moment
the master walked to his desk and touched a
little bell which stood there. It was the
signal that all noise should cease; at the
sound every voice was hushed, every boy sat
down quietly in his own place. The whole
school became still as a frozen river.

“Stand!” All the boys stood up as straight
as soldiers and sang a hymn ; afterwards came
some prayers; then all set to work.

Pupil teachers began to instruct the younger
John’s Troubles. AT



classes; but Mr. Willis’ eyes seemed on every
one at the slightest disturbance; his low“hush”
was enough to bring back perfect order.

Indeed it was soon easy for even Stephen
to see how difficult it would be to disobey the
gentle determination of the master’s manner,
or to elude his all-seeing observation.

But there was the young pupil teacher
pointing out the letters on the board, and
making the children repeat them after him.
Stephen set to work with all his might to
learn the looks of these strange black things,
which meant so much.

How hard it seemed at first! But there
were these little, tiny children learning them,
and he would—he would! :

Mr. Willis noticed the eager earnestness of
Stephen’s dark eyes, and said to Johnnie
when school was over—

“You might try and get your brother on at
home. Iam sure he wants to learn.”

“Yes, I will, sir, thank you, if he likes.”

And the boys went out with the stream.

“There now! You did not mind it much,
did you?” asked Johnnie, quite triumphantly,
as he met his brother’s smile.

“No, it was not half so bad as I thought ;
and Mr. Willis does seem kind.”
48 The Brothers.



“Ah! and he is kind too,” said Johnnie.
“But what is he like when he’s angry?”
said Stephen. “I suppose, if they will not
behave themselves, he is angry sometimes ?”
“Yes. Tm sure I hope, Stephen, he will
never be angry with us. Its enough to
frighten you; he’s so quiet, and yet his voice
is like thunder; and he looks but I hope
you'll not see it, Stephen; that’s all.”
Certainly Stephen hoped so too,






CHAP. IV.—THE STORY OF THE RAINBOW.

CEPHEN had made up his mind that he
would soon cease to be a dunce; when
afternoon school was over, Johnnie must find
a little time to teach him the letters. In the
evening, when his aunt was sitting at her
needlework, he begged her to let him have
the Bible with the pictures again, and to tell
him another story out of it.

“T was thinking yesterday I never should
learn anything,” he said. “But to-day seems
like beginning again; and I hope I shall learn
as much as Johnnie some day.”

“That beginning again every new day that
comes is a great blessing to us,” said his
aunt. “We go to bed at night tired, or dis-
appointed, or sorry because the day has gone
by and we seem not to have done all we
meant in it; then we have a good rest, and
we wake up and find everything new again—
a new day to work in and hope in—new

dD :
50 The Brothers.



strength and spirits to begin all over again,
just as if we were fresh labourers come to a
piece of work of which others had got tired
out. We ought to thank God for our new
beginnings every morning.”

“It was a big ‘new beginning’ my coming
here,” said Stephen gravely; and in his own
heart he said to himself, “I am sure I ought
to thank God for that.”

“It is about the great ‘new beginning’ of
the world that I was going to tell you to-
night, Stephen,” his aunt went on. “You
know you heard about the first beginning of
all yesterday.”

“Yes—and how soon people left off being

ood.”

“After those days they seem to have gone
on getting worse, instead of better; the more
men there were living together, the more
harm was done, till there was no peace in the
world because of their violence and of their
wickedness ; and at last they grew to be so
dreadfully bad that the Lord God saw that it
was better they should not live on the earth
any more, for the longer they lived the worse
they grew; it was better that their bodies
should return to the earth, and their souls
should be called to God.
The Story of the Rainbow. 51



“But in the midst of all those wicked
people there lived one good man, whose
name was Noah. The Lord God saw that,
in spite of all the dreadful things that were
going on around him, Noah lived a good,
quiet life, and did all he could to serve God,
and teach his sons to be good men. He had
three sons, whose names were Shem, Ham,
and Japhet. Now in those days people used
to live for a very great number of years,
and when Noah was more than four hundred
years old, it pleased the Lord God to speak
to him, and tell him that an end was coming
to all the terrible wickedness that was filling
the earth. Every one was going on boldly
with his bad deeds, just as if there was no one
to punish them ; but all the time the end was
coming nearer and nearer. And the Lord
God said to Noah that a great danger was
hanging over all the world, and that he was
to begin at once and build for himself a great
ship, called an ‘ark ;’ it was rather more like
a house than a ship perhaps, but it was all to
be made of wood, that it might float upon the
waters. It was to have a window and a door,
and to be three storiés high; and it was to
be very large. ‘And,’ the Lord God said,
‘behold I, even I, do bring a flood of waters
52 i The Brothers.



upon the earth to destroy all flesh wherein is
the breath of life from under heaven, and
everything that is in the earth shall die.’

“But Noah and his wife, and his sons and
their wives, were to go into the ark and be
safe ; and they were to take two of every kind
of animals into the ark too, to keep them
alive; and birds as well, two of every kind.”

“And that was why the ark had to be so
big ?” Stephen asked.

“That was the reason ; and when Noah had
heard the words of the Lord God, he set to
work and began to build the ark directly.”

“Did the people know that the flood was
coming ?”

“I believe that all the many years Noah
was building the ark he kept on telling them
why he was making it, and warning them
of the danger that was coming upon them.
But they would not heed him. Noah went
on working and working; year by year the
ark grew larger. Perhaps many came and
watched his work; perhaps they laughed at
him for taking so much trouble for nothing.
At any rate, they did not believe in the
dreadful flood that was coming, but went on
with their business and their pleasure and
their wickedness, until at last the ark was
The Story of the Rainbow. 63



finished, and Noah took into it all the crea-
tures that the Lord God had told him to
take, and then went in himself with his wife
and family.

“Very likely the wicked men mocked the
more at that, when they saw Noah and his
family enter into their ship on dry land; and
a week went by, and nothing happened. And
then, in the midst of the feasting and merri-
ment and wickedness, came the terrible end -
of it all; there came on a wonderful deluge
of rain, and the sea rolled in great waves
upon the land, farther and farther, till all the
cities and fields and mountains were covered
with water, and all living creatures that lived
upon the land perished in the waves.

“But over the flood the ark went floating,
quite safely, though it must have been terrible
for those inside to hear the rush of waters
above and the dashing of the sea below, and
to know that underneath those waves a whole
world lay buried.

“For forty days the rushing torrents of
rain went on, never stopping day and night ;
then that sound ceased, and all was still.
There was a great silence outside the ark, for
all voices were hushed in death, and every-
where spread a great endless sea. And fora
54 The Brothers.



hundred and fifty days the ark floated upon
the waters of the flood. Then the waters
began to: dry up again, and the tops of the
mountains appeared first of all, looking like
little islands in the great sea, And it was on
the top of one of these mountains that the
ark rested at last. Noah waited quietly for
forty days more; then he opened the window
of the ark and looked out. No doubt he saw
nothing but the mountain tops and the great
sea; but he thought he would try if there
was any dry land near him, so he let out two
of the birds he had brought with him into the
ark—a raven and a dove. The birds flew
about, and found no place to rest upon. The
raven did not mind; it kept flying about till
the waters went down; but the dove soon got
tired, and went back to the ark, and Noah put
out his hand and pulled her in again.

“Then he waited for another week, and
after that let out the dove again; and she
flew about all day, and came back to him in
the evening with an olive leaf in her beak.
So then Noah knew that the waters must
have gone down a great deal; but he waited
patiently another week, and then he sent out
the dove again, and it never came back to
him any more.’

The Story of the Rainbow. BE



“Tt must have been very lonely, out by
itself in the world,” said Stephen.

“Noah and his family and the other crea-
tures soon came out afterwards. For when
Noah saw that his bird did not come back,
he lifted the covering from off the ark and
looked out, and there was the land again, all
fresh and green, and the great waves of water
had rolled back to the sea. And the Lord
God spoke to Noah again, and said to him,
“Go forth of the ark, thou and thy wife, and
thy sons’ wives with thee. Bring forth with
thee every living thing that is with thee of all
flesh, both of fowl and of cattle, and of every
creeping thing that creepeth on the earth.’

“So Noah did as he was told, and he came
out of the ark with his family and all his
creatures, and so the world had a new be-
ginning. Then the Lord God promised that
there should never be another great flood
to kill all living things. ‘While the earth
remaineth, the Lord said, ‘seed-time and
harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and
winter shall not cease.’ And the Lord blessed
Noah and his sons, and said that all the world
and all the creatures in it should be given
them. They might kill the animals they
needed for their food; but if any man shed
56 The Brothers.



man’s blood, by man should his blood be
shed.

“And then the Lord God was so merciful
that He’ gave Noah and his sons a sign that
there should be no more floods to destroy the
earth. This sign was the beautiful rainbow
that we see in the clouds. When rain had
fallen, and they began to be afraid, the sun
would shine upon the clouds, and they should
see the lovely coloured arch, and remember
God’s promise, and all His mercy and love.”

“How glad they must have been to see it!
And oh! how pleased they must have been
to get out upon the land again after all that
time in the ark!”

“Yes, indeed! And the sight of the rain-
bow might remind us often of Noah’s long,
patient waiting, till in God’s good time he
was allowed to begin his life again. The
rainbow might preach us a little sermon
every time it comes, and say, ‘Be patient, and
trust in God. He will keep you safely in the
midst of troubles. You will not get good all
at once, or wise all at once; you will have to
wait as Noah waited till the waters went
down, but in God’s good time your patience
shall have its reward. Begin again. Begin
again.’ ”
The Story of the Rainbow. 7



“That is a nice easy sermon,” said Stephen ;
“and short too.”

“You know the rainbow does not stay very
long at a time,” said his aunt, smiling. “ But
the shorter the sermon the easier it ought to
be remembered, so I hope you will remember
the rainbow’s.”

“T will try,” said Stephen in a low voice;
and presently he asked, “Did Noah and his
sons ever feel afraid of another flood after
they had seen the rainbow?”

“T should think not; but not very long
after their days the message of the rainbow
was forgotten. There were a great many
people living in the world by that time, and
as they were all descended from Noah’s
family, they all talked one language—not as
we do now-a-days, each nation speaking its
own kind of speech. Now these people
began to be afraid that something dreadful
would happen to them, in spite of the Lord’s
promise, and that they should be scattered
all over the earth. So they agreed to build a
city and a great tower, so high that the top
of it should reach up to heaven.

“But no doubt it was wrong of the people
to determine thus to show they did not trust
in God, or remember what He had promised.
58 The Brothers.



And when they had set to work to make ©
their tower, and to build and to carry out their
plan, the Lord God showed it to be His will
that their buildings should never be com-
pleted.

“Instead of letting them go on speaking
the same language, God caused them to begin
to speak with different tongues, so that they
might not understand each other; and this
caused such a confusion that they gave up
their plan altogether.

“They separated, and went some one way,
some another; I suppose they divided them-
selves into parties speaking the same tongue.
And in this way they came to be scattered
all over the earth, as they had determined
not to be.

“See, Stephen, their story only teaches
some more of the same lesson we have had
before—‘ Do not be in too great a hurry to
arrange things for yourselves, and to get your
own way. Have patience, and see what is
God’s will for you. Begin again. Begin
again.’

“Once more the message of the rainbow.”
TEEPE

CHAP. V.—PERPLEXITIES.

GeEHEN learned his letters quickly enough
to surprise himself as well as his teacher ;
he had soon risen from the lowest place in
the school. His eyes grew brighter and his
tongue more ready; indeed he felt those
days to be sunshiny outside and in. But an
interruption was coming only too soon, and
one morning, as they sat at breakfast, Johnnie
exclaimed—

“Why, there’s the postman!”

This was quite an event, so few letters
came to Mrs. Baynes’ house, and both boys
rushed out to see what had come.

It was a letter for their aunt, and Johnnie
darted back with it to her.

“A letter from Uncle John!” she said,
examining the postmark.

The boys stood, looking up at her, sur-
prised; they had never heard of “ Uncle
John” before.
60 The Brothers.



“No, it’s not from himself,” went on Mrs.
Baynes, as she read. “He got some one to
write for him. He was too ill to write him-
self.”

She finished the letter in silence, and then
sat holding it in her lap, thinking and looking
troubled. The boys gazed with a dozen ques-
tions in their eyes, till at last John could wait
no longer.

“What is it, aunt? Who's ill? What's
the matter?”

“My uncle, dear — your grandmother’s
brother—is very ill, and wants me to come
and see him. He lives twenty miles off, and
I was thinking how I could manage, and who
could take care of you and the house and all
if I went away for a few days.”

“Must you go, aunt?” asked Stephen in
rather an alarmed voice.

“TI think so, my dear. Besides, I wish to
go. Uncle John was always very kind to me,
and I should like to go to him if he wants
me. But you must be off to school now. We
can talk about it more when you come back.”

They went rather reluctantly, talking over
what they should do with their aunt away. -

“T know what she'll do,” said Johnnie, with
an air of superior wisdom. “She'll do as she
Perplexities. 61



did once before when she had to go away;
she had old Mrs. Hardy to come and sleep in
the house and see to everything. Don’t you
know that nice old lady that lives with her
daughter at the shop?”

There being only one shop in the village,
Stephen had the less difficulty in bringing
Mrs. Hardy to his mind.

Certainly she was a pleasant-faced old lady,
but it would be very sad to see her in his
aunt’s place. If Mrs. Hardy could only go to
Uncle John instead !

It is to be feared that Stephen was not
quite so attentive as usual at school that
morning. Certainly John was not, and he
drew upon himself one of Mr. Willis’ stern,
quiet questions, “What are you thinking of,
Wright?” which alarmed him very much.
And no wonder; Mr. Willis had a way of
asking those questions that was enough to
frighten any one.

You may be sure that Johnnie was much
more attentive for the rest of the morning;
but he was still glad when the clock struck
twelve, and all were free to run out of doors
again.

“T wonder what aunt will do?” said Ste-
phen as soon as he joined his brother.
62 The Brothers.



“And that’s what I’ve been wondering
about all the morning,” said Johnnie, laugh-
ing; “and Mr. Willis saw it. I do believe he
sees one’s thoughts.”

Stephen said he hoped not, and then they
had a race home—a race which Johnnie won
of course, but as he was kind enough to wait
for his brother at the garden gate, that did
not much matter.

Mrs. Baynes, who was putting dinner on
the table, looked up smiling as they ran in.

“Have you settled what you are going to
do, aunt?” cried Johnnie, while Stephen only
looked the question.

“Yes, my dear; I think I ought to go as
soon as possible. So I shall try and get off
to-morrow morning as soon as I have finished
churning; and Mrs. Hardy has kindly pro-
mised to come here and look after you and
the rest of my goods.”

“T thought you would,” said Johnnie rather
sorrowfully.

“Well, I hope it will not be for long, and
you must try how good you can be, and how
much you can help Mrs. Hardy. But now
come and have your dinner.”

Stephen looked more disconsolate titan
Johnnie even, and all the afternoon and
Perplexities. 63



evening he went about with quite a long
face.

“What shall we do to-morrow?” was the
last thing he said to his brother as they lay
down in bed.

“Do!” Johnnie laughed a little. “Do our
best, and leave the rest; aunt always says
that’s a good motto to have.”

And Stephen sighed, but said no more.

They had to say good-bye to their aunt
‘next morning before they went to school, for
her train started at eleven o’clock.

“Won't the house seem strange when we
come back?” said Johnnie; but his brother
made no answer.

His teacher found Stephen rather inatten-
tive again that morning, and when the clock
struck eleven it was all the boy could do to
avoid bursting into tears.

As to Johnnie, he seemed to have some-
thing else on his mind besides Mrs. Baynes’
departure. He told Stephen to “go on”
when they came out of school, and darted back
himself to have a talk with a school-fellow.
Stephen looked round, and saw it was with
Ned Rice he was talking, the boy with whom
he had quarrelled on Sunday. But Johnnie
soon forgot quarrels, and was friends again.
64 The Brothers.



“What can he want to say?” thought Ste-
phen, who did not forget so easily. He
walked on slowly, for he did not care about
getting home now; but he reached the gate
and went in before John came in sight.

“Good morning, Mrs. Hardy,” he said to
the neat, quick old lady who was getting
dinner ready. “Is aunt gone?”

“Yes, my dear, that she is; I saw her off
myself. And she was sorry to go and leave
you, and the chickens and the cows were very
much on her mind. But I promised her to
do my best for you all. I’ve had a large
farm, and family too, of my own in my day.
Where’s Johnnie ?”

“He’s coming,” said Stephen, as he went
upstairs. “ Begin again,” he thought to him-
self, remembering his aunt’s words. “ This is
another beginning with Mrs. Hardy. We
must try and begin well.”

His thoughts were interrupted by Johnnie,
who rushed upstairs laughing and rosy.

“Well, Stephen, so you got home first !”

“What did you want to say to Ned Rice?”

“Gunpowder treason and plot,” returned
the other, laughing. “Ah, Stephen! wouldn’t
you like to know?”

It was evident he was not going to be
Perplexities, 65



told, and he felt a little vexed at the idea of
his brother having a secret with Ned Rice,
away from him. So he wisely said no more
about it.

The afternoon and evening went by quietly,
and much as usual, though it seemed strange
to see Mrs. Hardy working in their aunt’s
place, and Stephen had not spirits to take
down the Picture Bible, now that Mrs. Baynes
was not there to explain it to him.

‘How I wish aunt would come back!” he
said next morning, and Johnnie said—

“ All in good time.”

But this morning it was easier to attend
to the lessons; and when he had read his
“a-b, ab; e-b, eb,” &c., with infinite pains,
he found that Mr. Willis was behind him
listening too.

“Very good, Wright,” said the master,
patting his head. “You have made a very
great progress in three weeks.”

Was it possible those words were said to
him, the dunce of the school ?

Stephen’s cheeks glowed, his eyes sparkled;
he had never been so proud and pleased in his
life.

Now he would really take courage to attend
the Sunday school again, as his aunt wished.

E
66 The Brothers.



“Boys,” said Mr, Willis that morning, just
before he dismissed the school, “I have lost a
new knife that was given me by a friend the
other day. I fancy I dropped it when walking
on Saturday from here to Maverly Woods.
It was in a green case, with my initials upon
it in gold letters, ‘H.W? If any one can find
it, or hear of it, I shall be very much obliged
by his letting me know.”

There was a chorus of “Yes, sirs;” but
Johnnie got very red, and, as soon as they
were out of school, ran up to Ned again and
seemed to be questioning him eagerly. What
could it be? Stephen thought. The knife?
No; if Johnnie had known anything about
that, he would have told the master at once,
Stephen was sure.

Then what could it be? He wished Johnnie
would not have secrets with Ned Rice; he
did not like it. And with a little cloud of
sullenness settling over him, he turned and
plodded slowly homewards. Yet when his
brother overtook him, merry and full of kind-
ness, the sulky words soon changed to pleasant
ones, and they were friends again. Stephen
felt happy, and forgot all about Ned Rice.

But that night—Stephen never forgot the
misery of it, not even when he was a grown
Perpleaities, 67



man—that night he was to be reminded of
the secret, indeed.

Stephen had been in bed a few minutes;
Johnnie was still moving about in the room,
but rather as if he were lingering idly than
doing anything in particular. By-and-by he
looked round at his brother, who was just
going off to sleep; but thinking Johnnie was
going to speak to him, he roused himself and
opened his eyes.

Johnnie, however, did not speak; he thought
his brother was sleeping already. Softly
he opened a little drawer, and drew out a
knife.

A large handsome knife, with a great white
handle. He opened one blade after another,
looked at them, flashed them backwards and
forwards in the candle-light, then shut them,
and put the knife softly back into the drawer.

Why had he hidden it there? What had
the master said to-day? What was Johnnie’s
secret with Ned Rice?

No; it was impossible. His brother—his
brave, kind, good, clever brother—a Ste-
phen could not end the sentence in his
own mind even. It was too terrible; it was
impossible. And yet what—what did it all
mean?


68 The Brothers.



Long, long hours after Johnnie was in bed
and asleep, the younger brother lay, cold with
horror and fright, thinking and thinking.

The blind was up, and the soft white moon-
light was falling in great streaks across the
room. Stephen raised himself on his elbow,
and looked at his brother.

Sleeping, so softly, with his head upon his
hand, the curls falling over his forehead, a
smile upon his lips. Johnnie—dear Johnnie—
you could not be a thief!

Stephen almost cried aloud with the terror
and misery of his thoughts: hour after hour
he could hear sounding from the church clock,
and still he had thought of no relief—no ex-
planation.

At last, when the dawn was coming pink
and bright over the sky, he fell asleep and
dreamed that he was happy—a dream that
made his awaking all the more sad.

John could not think what was the matter
with him, Distress had brought back all his
half-sullen shyness, and he was as silent as
when he first came to the farm. He could
not ask his brother for an explanation; he
knew he cou/d not, and yet he longed so to tell
him all.

“You can’t be well. You eat no breakfast,
Perplexities. 69



my dear,” said Mrs. Hardy; but she could get

no reply.

“What’s the matter?” said Johnnie, as they
walked off to school. “Is it aunt’s being
away that puts you out, Stephen?”

SEN?

The tone was so very unpromising, that
John shrugged his shoulders and took to
whistling.

Oh! how could he be so jolly if Stephen
trembled at the idea. The lessons were all
hard that day; the teacher scolded him, and
he did try to do better, but his head was full
of nothing but his dread.

At last a thought came to him ; perhaps it
was Ned’s doing. He had only asked Johnnie
to take care of the knife and not tell, and
Johnnie did not know whose it was. Or
perhaps it was another knife after all.

He went straight up to Ned when they
came out of school, and said in a low,
determined way—

“Ned, do you know anything about Mr.
Willis’ knife?”

Ned started at first, and turned very red;
then, recovering himself, he said rudely—

“What are you prying about now ?”

Stephen repeated his question.


70 The Brothers.



“T expect I know as much as you know,”
returned Ned. “Perhaps Johnnie knows the
most about it of any one.”

“Johnnie! Then—he”
faltered.

“Ah! you know all about it, I see,” sneered
Ned. “You'd better take care what you say
to me, or I'll just let Mr. Willis know what
you know.”

He turned and ran off, leaving Stephen
white and speechless with distress.

Mrs. Hardy and his brother thought him
very rude and sulky all that day, and his
teacher made him stand out of the class in
disgrace for his inattention in the afternoon.
It was the first time such a misfortune had
come to him, but he did not seem to mind,
not even when Mr. Willis looked down upon
him, saying—

s Why, Wright, I expected better things of

ou.’

That would have seemed very terrible
indeed yesterday, but now nothing mattered
—nothing could matter any more if Johnnie
was guilty.

“I think you must be ill, Stephen,” his
brother said next morning.

They had had a letter from Mrs. Baynes,



Stephen’s voice
Perplexities. 71



telling them her uncle was better, and she
hoped they would see her back on Saturday.
Would they pick the strawberries to-morrow
(Friday), and send them in to the market by
Mrs. Brown?

Stephen did not seem to care about the
letter at all, and hence his brother’s remark.
But it brought no answer, and things went on
as badly that day as the day before.

Very early on Friday morning Stephen got
up. His distress would not let him sleep, and
his brother drowsily told him to go and
gather the strawberries.

He took the basket and went to the beds,
where the red berries were making a fine show
the previous night. But what was his indig-
nation to find Ned Rice there already, eating
as fast as he could, trampling over the plants,
all the fruit devoured and destroyed.

“Ned!” he exclaimed angrily.

“Ay, it’s Ned,” retorted the other, grin-
ning, with his mouth full, and his face stained
with juice. “I’m enjoying myself, I am.”

“You thief, you!” cried Stephen, pas-
sionately.

“Oh! Pmathief,amI? Look out if there
isn’t a thief nearer home. You just look here,
Stephen Wright ; you go and say one word of
72 The Brothers



your catching me here, and I’ll tell the master
who’s got his knife. There’s plain speaking
for you; do you understand?” and Ned, who
was two years older than Stephen, took hold
of him fiercely. “You haven't said a word to
Johnnie about the knife?”

“No.”

“You hold your tongue then, and don’t say
a word about me to him, or about being here
to-day, or I'll just tell the master what the
good boy’s got of his; you may trust to
that ;” and, releasing his hold, Ned dashed off
across the beds, jumped the garden fence, and
vanished.

Stephen stood looking at the beds, spoilt—
all spoilt ; not a strawberry to send, and what
was he to say? How was he to join in this
deceit? How could he answer all the ques-
tions they would put to him? Oh!-how
miserable he was! What should he do? He
was sitting on the door-step, moodily enough,
when Johnnie came singing downstairs.

“Well, Stephen, have you gathered my
strawberries ?”

“No.”

“Hullo! you have been lazy. Here, give
me the basket ; I'll go and get them.”

“ There are none.”
Perpleaities. 7



“None! why, whatever do you mean? There
were plenty last night—there must be some ;”
and off he ran, but returned in a moment full
of consternation.

“Why, Stephen, somebody’s been in and
taken almost all, and trampled down the seed.
What a shame! There must be thieves
about.”

“There must be,” repeated the other in a
low tone.

“T wonder who ever it could have been. I
wish I'd been a little earlier to catch him, the
rascal! I never knew a thief to come into the
garden before.”

Stephen, with his elbows on his knees and
his face buried in his hands, neither answered
nor moved.

“ Did you see any one about, Stephen ?”

No answer.

“Tsay, did you see any one? Do just say
you know.”

Still no answer, and Johnnie’s patience gave
way.
“T do declare it’s a shame to be so sulky,”
he exclaimed. “One might as well have no
brother at all, as one that won’t speak to you ;”
and he rushed into the house.

Poor Stephen! they thought him very sulky
74 The Brothers.



at school too; his teacher kept him back as
the others went out, and when they were gone
took him up to Mr. Willis.

“JT am sorry to complain, sir, but nearly all
the week Stephen Wright has been very sulky
and idle, there is no doing anything with him,
and he was getting on so well before.”
Whereupon the teacher retreated, and left
Stephen alone with the master.

“How is this, Stephen? Why don’t you
behave yourself better ?”

“T can’t,” muttered the boy, huskily.

“But you were doing so well till the last
few days. Begin again, Stephen; try to get
on. There’s no worse motto than ‘I can’t’ for
any one. Say I can, and make it true. Don’t
let me hear these complaints again; you
mean to be a good boy, I’m sure. There! be
off with you, and come in a better temper this
afternoon.”

Stephen went away, choking down the sob
that was rising in his throat, and found
Johnnie waiting for him.

“Never mind,” he said kindly ; “you'll be
all right when aunt comes back ;” then they
walked home in silence.


CHAP. VI.—ABRAHAM’S SACRIFICE.

HEN Mrs. Baynes came home on Saturday,
she was a good deal surprised at the
change in Stephen, and took an opportunity
of asking Johnnie what was the matter; but
she could hear nothing, and the boy himself
seemed resolved not to speak.

He quietly went back to the Sunday school
when Sunday morning came, and when there -
was time in the afternoon he seemed glad to
hear some more about the Bible pictures, but
he was strangely silent all the time.

“There was once,” said Mrs. Baynes, “a
good man, whose name was Abraham, and
the Lord God called him to leave the country
in which he was living, and where all his
friends were, and go into another land which
was quite strange tohim. Abraham was very
full of faith—that is, he knew so well that
God knew best, and would love him and take
care of him, that he trusted in God altogether,
76 The Brothers



and was not afraid of leaving everything to
the mercy and holy will of his Father in
heaven. . In this we ought all to try and
follow Abraham’s example; we should re-
member that our Father is so wise He knows
exactly what is best for us, and so good and
merciful He wills exactly what is best for us,
so that whatever happens to us is just the
very best thing for us. If we can remember
this, and leave ourselves altogether to God’s
will, we have faith, as Abraham had faith.
There is a hymn that says—

“All is right that seems most wrong,
If it be Thy good will ;’

and it would be well for us to remember that
whenever we are troubled.

“It seemed hard to Abraham, I dare say, to
leave his country and all his relations to go
into the strange land. But he did it at once,
and the Lord promised him that some day all
that land should belong to his family, and
that he should be the father of a great nation,
as many as the starsin the sky. This seemed
very strange, as Abraham and his wife Sarah
had no children; but he knew that the Lord
was almighty, and left it all to him. At last
Sarah had a child, a little boy, and they
Abraham’s Sacrifice. 77



called his name Isaac, which in their language
meant ‘Laughter, because they were so
pleased to have him; and they loved him very
dearly, and only thought of bringing him up
well, thinking often, no doubt, of the great
people that should descend from him and
possess the land in which they were living as
strangers. And now, when Isaac had grown
_ to be a big boy, it pleased the Lord to give
Abraham a great opportunity of showing his
faith, and leaving a good example to all who
know his story.

“One night, when Abraham had laid down
to rest, he heard the voice of the Lord God
calling to him, and saying, ‘ Abraham!’

“And Abraham answered—

“* Behold, here I am,’

“ And then the Lord spoke again, and said—

“*Take now thy son, thine only son Isaac,
whom thou lovest, and get thee into the land
of Moriah, and offer him there for a burnt-
offering upon one of the mountains that I
will tell thee of.’

“What terrible words for Abraham to hear,
as he listened for God’s voice in the darkness !
His son, his dear child that he loved so, and
from whom he hoped so much—to be com-
manded to kill him!
78 The Brothers.



“Surely no one ever heard such a terrible
command as this, and we might expect to
hear it answered with a prayer to the Lord
to take anything but this—any sacrifice but
this.

“But Abraham made no answer; he knew
the Lord knew best; he would leave it all—
just a—to Him.

“And he did not wait; the Lord had
spoken, His servant should obey at once, and
when the morning light returned he rose up
very early and prepared for his journey. The
land of Moriah was many miles from the part
where Abraham lived, and he saddled his ass,
called two of his servants and his son Isaac to
go with him, and cut up some wood and took
it with him to be ready for the burnt-offering.

“Then he started on his strange, dreadful
journey, travelled for nearly three days, till on
the third day Abraham looked up and saw the
mountain of which the Lord had told him
lying before him.

“ All this time Abraham had said nothing to
his child of the object of his journey ; perhaps
he felt as if he could not tell him—perhaps he
thought to spare Isaac the terror of such news.

“ At any rate nothing was said, and when
the mountain was in sight, Abraham told his
Abraham’s Sacrifice. 79



servants to stay below with the ass, while he
and his son went up the mountain to make
their offering ; and he took the wood he had
prepared, and gave it to Isaac to carry, and
he himself took fire in something like a lamp,
and a knife.

“Tsaac understood quite well that there
were preparations for offering a sacrifice, but
he could not think what his father was going
to offer, and as they went away together he
said to Abraham—

“<«My father !’

“And Abraham answered—

“« Flere am I, my son.’

“And Isaac went on—

“*« Behold the fire and the wood, but where
is the lamb for a burnt-offering ?’

“Still Abraham would not tell him the
dreadful thing that was to be done, and he
only said—

“« My son, God will provide Himself a lamb
for a burnt-offering.’

“ And so they went on and on till they had
climbed all up the mountain, and then they
made an altar, and put the wood in its place
upon it; and then there was no help for it—
Abraham was obliged to tell Isaac all. We
are not told what Isaac said—whether he had
80 The Brothers.



learned from his father to be quite sure that
all must be right that was God’s will; we
only hear what Abraham did—that he bound
Isaac his son, and laid him on the altar upon
the wood, and then he stretched out his hand
and took the knife to slay his son.

The trial was over, Abraham had showed
his faith to the last, and now the help was
coming. Through the great stillness of the
mountain-top came a strange sound—a voice
that called from heaven—

“« Abraham! Abraham!’

“Tt was the angel of the Lord who was
calling, and who brought this message from
God—

“*Lay not thy hand upon the lad, neither
do thou anything unto him, for now I know
thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not with-
held thy son, thine only son, from me.’

“And as Abraham looked round, he saw
that the words he had spoken in his trouble
had come true in his joy; the Lord had pro-
vided a sacrifice, for behind him was a ram
caught in the thicket by his horns, sent by
God’s mercy to take the place of Isaac.

“Then Abraham released his son, and went
and took the ram, and offered it up for a
burnt-offering in the stead of his child.
Abraham's Sacrifice. 81



“ And again the angel of the Lord called to
Abraham out of heaven, and said to him—

“* Because thou hast done this thing, and
hast not withheld thy son, thine only son: that
in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying
I will multiply thy seed as the stars of heaven,
and as the sand that is upon the sea shore;
and thy seed shall possess the gate of his
enemies ; and in thy seed shall all the nations
of the earth be blessed; because thou hast
obeyed my voice.’

“This meant that from Abraham’s family
should come a great nation, stronger than
their enemies, and that when our Saviour
came into the world it should be as one of the
descendants of Abraham.

“ After hearing this message, so full of joyful
promise, Abraham and his son went down the
mountain again, back to the place where they
had left the servants. We can fancy what a
happy journey that must have been home
again—how every stone and tree they passed
must have reminded Abraham of the time
when he passed them in so much distress, to
return in such great joy.

“Now that is a beautiful story of faithful
Abraham, and, like all the Bible stories, it has
many lessons to teach us.

F
82 The Brothers.



“ One thing we see in it is, that it seems to
show beforehand what the mercy of God was
to do for man some day. As Abraham pre-
pared to offer up his son, so it pleased God
after many, many years to give up His son,
our Saviour Jesus Christ, to die for the sin of
the world. Abraham showed his love to God
by what he prepared to do, and the Lord God
showed His love to man by what He did.
Isaac carried the wood for the offering up the
mountain, not knowing why he did it ; but our
Saviour went forth, bearing His Cross to the
mountain where he was to suffer, well know-
ing what He did, desiring to die, that so He
might save us. Of Abraham we read— Thou
hast not withheld thy son, thine only son.’
Of the Lord God Himself it is said, ‘So God
loved the world that He gave His only begot-
ten Son, to the end that all that believe in Him
should not perish, but have everlasting life.’

“ And there is another lesson in this story
that concerns ourselves, our own conduct
especially. Dearly as Abraham loved his
son, he loved his God better; he was ready
rather to slay Isaac than to disobey the Lord.
This is a very important lesson for us. Dearly
as we love our friends, we must never let our
love lead us to do wrong for their sakes.”
Abraham's Sacrifice. 83



Stephen, who had been sitting very quietly
with his eyes on the book, suddenly reddened
at these words, and asked eagerly—

“ How could we do wrong for their sakes ?”

“If we did what we knew we ought not to
do to please them, or left off doing right
because our friends did not like it; or if we
allowed ourselves to be deceitful, to say what
was not true in order to hide the faults of
those who were dear to us, should we not be
doing wrong for their sakes ?”

Mrs. Baynes had no suspicion that Stephen
was in any particular need of this warning ;
she spoke only in general; but it seemed to
the boy as if the words were addressed to the
troubled thoughts of his heart.

That very morning there had been some
discussion about the strawberry business, and
Johnnie had been declaring in the innocence
of his heart that never had anything been so
mysterious.

“Stephen went down in the morning to
look, and then they had all vanished. He saw
nobody about.”

“Really, Stephen, that was very odd,” said
Mrs. Baynes, unsuspectingly. “How early did
you go down, my dear ?”

“T don’t know.”
84 The Brothers.



“And you did not hear any one run away,
or see any sign of the thieves?”

Stephen hesitated, he did not say a word
very distinctly, but yet he felt somehow that
he had consented to a lie.

It had been heavy on his heart all day; he
had never lied before, not even in his dark and
terrified days, and now that he knew better!

But he dared not speak for fear of betraying
Johnnie; and now what was this that he
heard ?—what warning about preferring the
friend to the right? Could this have been the
sacrifice that was asked of him, and had he
refused it? But then how could he sacrifice
Johnnie?

The idea troubled him so much that his
aunt could not help noticing the agitation of
his face.

“My dear, what is it?” she asked gently.
“Tell me what makes you look so unhappy?”

“No; I’ve nothing to tell,” said he, almost
crossly ; and then, to his great relief, his aunt
saw a neighbour coming down the garden,
and went away. Afterwards Johnnie came
in singing and smiling; Stephen watched him
sadly, and wondered more and more.


CHAP. VII.—ISAAC’S BLESSING.

ile quiet Sunday passed away, but it
seemed to bring none of its peace to
Stephen ; the thoughts that had troubled him
were with him all day. Sometimes he thought
of telling all to his aunt ; sometimes of speak-
ing to Johnnie himself, and imploring him to
give back the knife.

But he could not betray his brother, he told
himself; and then how angry John would be—
how horrified at Stephen’s discovering him!
No, he could not; and while he felt he dared
not do what he knew to be right, conscience
left him no peace in doing wrong.

So much the better for him, and yet it
made him very miserable.

At last bed-time came, and he went slowly
and sorrowfully upstairs, sat down at the side
of the bed, and thought.

Johnnie looked at him for a while, walking
86 The Brothers.



about the room, whistling the evening hymn
to himself. At last he began to sing it.

“Teach me to live, that I may dread
The grave as little as my bed.”

His brother’s dark eyes were raised and
fixed upon him.

“Being wicked,” said Stephen suddenly,
“would make you dread them both, I sup-

ose ?”

Stephen had been so silent lately, that John
was quite delighted to hear him speak of his
own accord ; but as he had not been thinking
much of the words he sang, he did not under-
stand the observation.

“ Dread what, Stephen ?”

Stephen repeated the lines slowly.

“T suppose you would be afraid of going to
bed, because you would have no peace there;
and afraid of dying, because you would have
to be judged then, and get no peace.”

“Well, I suppose so,” returned the other,
who was more given to singing hymns than
to considering what they meant.

“Tt would be dreadful to lie down in bed in
the dark, and remember some very bad thing
youhaddone. I should think it would go over
and over in your head and let you get no rest.”
Lsaac’s Blessing. 87



“T’m sure I hope we are not going to try,”
said John, in his offhand way. “We don't
mean to be thieves and murderers, do we,
Stephen?”

And then he stared with all his might, for
his brother pressed his hands together, and
cried out, “ Oh, Johnnie!” as if something had
hurt him.

John was by his side in a moment, putting
his arm round him, and begging to know what
was the matter.

“T’ve seen you weren’t all right the last day
or two,” he said, in his most loving voice.
“Do tell me, Stephen! If anything was on
my mind, I’m sure I'd tell you. If you are in
any scrape, do tell me; you know that must be
right.”

Oh, how Stephen longed to bring out the
truth! But no, the words seemed to choke
him, he could not speak.

“What is it, Stephen, dear?”

But the poor boy was too miserable to
answer gently.

“Let me alone!” that was all he could
utter, in a rough, sullen tone; and his brother,
who could not guess at all the love and sorrow
that were keeping him silent, grew vexed and
disappointed.
88 The Brothers.



“ As you like,” he said, and went off again
whistling.

“T will try and forget it all,” said Stephen
to himself next day, and he tried to talk and
laugh, to work hard at school, and wait on
his aunt at home, and be too busy to remember;
but he was remembering all the time.

In the evening, as his aunt was at work, he
begged her to go on explaining the pictures
to him; for he dreaded nothing so much as
sitting still to think. Mrs. Baynes could see
through all his busy ways that he was not
happy, and she was glad to give him some-
thing good to think about. So she complied
at once, and went on with the Bible story.

“When Isaac grew up, his mother died, and
Abraham, having no one left to care for but
his son, grew very anxious to see him com-
fortably married before he himself died.

“The women in the country to which God
had called Abraham were not very good
people, and Abraham wished Isaac to marry
one of his own relations, who lived in those
parts where Abraham was born. So one day
he called a faithful old servant that he had to
him, and told him that Isaac must not go back
to the old home, for the Lord had called him
from it. ‘But,’ he said, ‘thou shalt go unto
Isaac’s Blessing. 89



my country, and to my kindred, and take a
wife unto my son Isaac.’

“So the servant promised to do as his master
wished, and took ten camels to carry presents
for Abraham’s friends, and the other things
required, and started on his journey. And he
travelled on and on till he came to the city
where Abraham’s relations lived. It was one
evening that he reached it, and he rested a
little while just outside the city, by a well
that was there. Now the wells in those parts
were places where many women would meet
at this time in the day, for it was the custom
to drive all the flocks down to the well about
sunset, and give them water there, and draw
water besides for themselves. So Abraham’s
servant thought he would wait here and see if
he could find some woman amongst them who
might become Isaac’s wife. And while he
waited, he prayed to God and said, ‘O Lord
God of my master Abraham, I pray thee, send
me good speed this day, and show kindness
unto my master Abraham. Behold, I stand
here by the well of water; and the daughters
of the men of the city come out to draw water :
and let it come to pass, that the damsel to
whom I shall say, Let down thy pitcher, I pray
thee, that I may drink; and she shall say,
90 The Brothers.



Drink,and I will give thy camels drink also: let
the same be she that thou hast appointed for thy
servant Isaac; and thereby shall I know that
thou hast shewed kindness unto my master.’

“ The servant had not finished his prayer,
before he saw a young girl coming towards
him out of the city, with her pitcher on her
shoulder, to draw water from the well. As
she came nearer, he saw that she was beautiful,
and he watched her go down to the well and
fill her pitcher and come up again. Then he
came forward and asked her for water, as he
had said he would do in his prayer, and she
answered, just as he had prayed that the right
wife for Isaac might answer, ‘Drink, my
lord, and she gave him some water out of her
pitcher, and went on, ‘and I will draw water
for thy camels also, until they have done
drinking’

“ And the servant did not answer, but stood
wondering whether this was indeed the answer
to his prayer.

“But when she had given the camels all the
water they wanted, in a trough that was put
for cattle by the well, he took out some of
the presents he had brought with him—a
golden earring and bracelets—and gave them
to her, saying—
Isaacs Blessing. QI



“«Whose daughter art thou?’

“And she told him her father’s name, and
then the servant knew that she was one of
Abraham’s own relations. She begged him
also to come with her, for they had straw and
food enough for the camels, she said, and
room to put them in. And the man bowed
down his head, and thanked God for having
so far prospered his journey, while the girl
ran home to show her presents, and tell all
about the stranger she had met by the
well.

“ Hearing this, her brother, whose name was
Laban, now came out, and found the servant
standing by his camels, and Laban said to
him—

“Come in, thou blessed of the Lord;
wherefore standest thou without? for I have
prepared the house, and room for the camels.’

“Then the’ man followed Laban home,
taking with him the camels and the other
men that were with him, and they were all
most kindly received, and the animals were
attended to, and a meal prepared for the men
at once. But before Abraham’s messenger
tasted anything, he said—

« errand.’
92 The Brothers.



“ And then he told them all his story, and
what he had come for, and who his master
was, and how Laban’s sister Rebekah had
seemed to come to the well in answer to his
prayer. This made them think it was God’s
will that Rebekah should become the wife of
Isaac, so she consented to go back with the
servant to the land where Abraham lived.

“ One evening, Isaac, who was very unhappy
at having lost his mother not long before,
went out into the fields to walk about and
think, when, happening to look up, he saw a
party of camels coming towards him. They
were his father’s camels travelling with
Rebekah. She, too, caught sight of him as
she came nearer, and asked the servant who
he was. And the servant told her.

“Then she got off her camel, and walked
forward to meet him, and Isaac took her into
his mother Sarah’s tent, and she became his
wife; and he loved her, and was comforted
after his mother’s death.

“Isaac and Rebekah had two sons, called
Esau and Jacob. Esau, the eldest, was a
rough sort of youth, fond of hunting and
going out with his father ; Jacob was quieter,
and more content to stop at home with his
mother. So it happened that Isaac thought
Isaac’s Blessing. 93



the most of Esau, and Rebekah’s favourite
was Jacob.

“One day, when they were grown up to be
men, Esau had been out hunting, and coming
home very hungry, he saw that Jacob had
just got some dinner ready. So the elder
brother said—

“« Feed me, I pray thee, for I am faint.’

“And Jacob said he would, if Esau would
give up to him his rights as eldest son. Esau
was very careless and impatient, so he said in
a moment that he would give up all his rights
to Jacob. Then the younger brother gave
him the food he wanted, and Esau ate and
drank, and went out again, forgetting all
about this promise. But it was a very serious
thing, as he ought to have remembered, for
the eldest son, in those days, received a special
blessing from his father, when the time of the
fathers death drew near; and in Esau’s
family this blessing would have included the
promise that the Redeemer of the world should
be one of his descendants. But this rough,
impatient man did not think about it at all;
the Bible says, ‘He despised his birthright.’
This is what made him wrong. Jacob was
also wrong, but in another way; he valued
the birthright so much, that he was selfish for
94 The Brothers.



its sake. So time went on; Esau married
two wives (for people were allowed in those
days to take more than one wife), and his
wives were not good people, and caused his
father and mother great grief. At last Isaac
had become quite an old man, and his eyes
were dim so that he could not see, and he
thought the time had come for him to give
his eldest son the precious blessing before his
death.

“These blessings were not like ours, only
prayers for our children’s happiness; but
whatever the fathers foretold in those bless-
ings, the Lord gave to their sons.

“Tsaac did not seem to know anything
about the bargain Esau and .Jacob had made
together; he only called Esau, and said,
‘Behold now, I am old, I know not the day of
my death: now therefore take, I pray thee, thy
weapons, thy quiver and thy bow, and go out to
the field, and take me some venison ; and make
me savoury meat, such as I love, and bring it
to me, that I may eat ; that my soul may bless
thee before I die.’

“So Esau went out to hunt the deer for his
father, while Rebekah, who had overheard
them, called her son Jacob, and told him what
they were going to do.

Isaac’s Blessing. 95



“*Go now, she said, ‘to the flock, and
fetch me from thence two good kids of the
goats; and I will make them savoury meat
for thy father, such as he loveth: and thou
shalt bring it to thy father, that he may eat,
and that he may bless thee before his death.’

“Then she dressed Jacob in Esau’s clothes,
and put the skins of the kids upon his hands,
that his poor blind father might not feel the
difference between Esau’s rough hands and
Jacob’s smooth ones; and she got the meat
ready, and Jacob went in to deceive his father,
and pretend he was Esau come back from
hunting.

“Isaac was surprised at first at his coming
so quickly, and he called him near and felt
him, saying, ‘The voice is Jacob’s voice, but
the hands are the hands of Esau.’

“So poor old Isaac was deceived; he ate
the meat that Jacob brought, and blessed him,
saying—

“God give thee of the dew of heaven, and
the fatness of the earth, and plenty of corn
and wine: let people serve thee, and nations
bow down to thee: be lord over thy brethren,
and let thy mother’s sons bow down to thee:
cursed be every one that curseth thee, and
blessed be he that blesseth thee.’
096 The Brothers.



“Then Jacob went away, and had barely
got out before Esau came in from hunting,
and hurried to his father, saying that he had
brought the venison, and begged for the
blessing.

“Then Isaac trembled very much, and said,
‘Who art thou? Where is he that hath
taken venison, and brought it me, and I have
eaten of ‘all before thou camest, and have
blessed him? yea, and he shall be blessed ?’

“And Esau cried with a loud bitter cry,
‘Bless me, even me also, O my father.’
And he complained of his brother, and said,
‘ He hath taken away my birthright, and now
he hath taken away my blessing ;’ and he went
on imploring his father, and saying—

“* Hast thou but one blessing, my father?
‘Bless me, even me also, O my father” And
at last Isaac blessed him too, and said—

“* Behold, thy dwelling shall be the fatness
of the earth, and of the dew of heaven from
above; and by thy sword shalt thou live, and
shalt serve thy brother; and it shall come to
pass when thou shalt have the dominion,
that thou shalt break his yoke from off thy
neck.’

“Esau could get no better promise. Jacob
seemed to have prospered in his deceit, but
Isaac's Blessing. 97



he was soon to find how dearly anything is
bought at the expense of truth.

“ Rebekah soon heard that Esau was furious
against his brother, and even resolved to kill
him as soon as their father should be dead.
So she told Jacob that he must go away and
leave his home—the poor old father he had
cheated, and the mother who had loved him
too well—and. go to her brother Laban, to be
safe from Esau. Poor Rebekah! she, too,
had to learn that those who take up deceit
take up a heavy load that will crush them at
last. She sent away her favourite son, and
never, in all the weary years that followed, did
she look upon his face again.

“And Jacob went forth sorrowful, and, I
hope, repentant, to journey to the land and
kindred whom he did not know. Indeed the
Lord had pity on him, and the first night of
his wanderings,.as he lay down to sleep out
of doors, with stones for his pillow, he had a
beautiful dream. He saw a ladder set up on
the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven,
and on it the angels of God were going up and
down, and at the top was the Lord God, who
promised to take care of him then and for ever.

“ And so it came to pass; Jacob was always
protected by the Lord, yet his uncle Laban,

G
98 The Brothers



and afterwards his own children, cheated him,
and made him suffer by deceit, as he had
made his father and brother suffer.

“T think Jacob’s lesson is, most of all, to
fear deceit—to know that, however falsehood
seems to prosper, its punishment must come
at last, even if we repent and are forgiven.
Others will distrust us, as we shall get to dis-
trust them, one way or the other; if we are
false, we must be miserable.

“ Remember this, my dear child, if you are
ever tempted to be untrue; a lie is a terrible
load ; the farther you carry it the heavier it
grows. If you are ever so unhappy as to say
what is not true, remember this lesson, and lay
down the burden at once by speaking out;
do not try to go on your way carrying that
load, or it will crush you at last.”

Stephen drew a deep sigh. Had he not
begun taking up the load of falsehood? and
how could he ever lay it down? Ah! there
was no forgetting—none! He put up the Bible,
and walked out of the room without a word.

EKG


CHAP. VIIIL—JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

ge Oe lived many years with his uncle
Laban—”’so Mrs. Bayneswent on the next
time that Stephen was studying the Bible pic-
tures—“ and he did not go back to his old
home till he was quite an elderly man, and
the father of twelve sons. Esau had forgiven
him then, but Jacob lived to be reminded of his
old fault by the deceitful treatment he met
with from his own children.

“Of all his sons Jacob best loved Joseph,
who was the youngest but one, and very
good; and he made this son a coat of many
colours. The other brothers were jealous of
Joseph, more especially when he dreamed
some curious dreams, that seemed to them a
sign that he should rule over them all some
day.

“At last, when Joseph was almost a man,
it happened that his ten elder brothers were
feeding their sheep at some little distance
100 The Brothers.



from home, and Jacob told Joseph to go and
see how they were getting on. He went, and
when his brothers saw him, they felt very
angry with him, and said—

“* Look, this dreamer is coming.’

“And a dreadful thought came to them,
and they said, ‘Let us kill him, and throw
him down some hole, and tell our father that
a wild beast has eaten him; and we shall see
what will become of his dreams. But the
eldest brother Reuben would not hear of this
crime. He dared not tell his brothers so,
because some of them were so very violent
and wicked, but he tried to persuade them to
leave their brother in a great pit close by,
thinking, when they were gone, he could lift
Joseph out again, and take him home to his
father. So when poor Joseph came up to
them, they pulled off his coat of many colours,
and put him down into the pit to starve and
die. And just then there came up some men
who went about trading and buying slaves,
and as Reuben had left them for a little while,
they changed their minds and said they
would sell their brother for a slave. So they
lifted him up out of the pit, and sold him to
these strangers for twenty pieces of silver, and
he was taken away as a slave into a foreign
Joseph and his Brethren. 101



country—the land of Egypt. When Reuben
came back and saw that Joseph was gone, he
did not know what to do with himself, he was
so miserable. And the wicked brothers killed
a kid, and stained Joseph’s coat of many
colours with the blood, and brought it to Jacob,
saying, ‘We have found this; know if it be
thy son’s coat or no.’

“Jacob knew it only too well; the sight
almost broke his heart, for he thought some
wild beast had killed his son; the wicked
brethren pretended to comfort him, and
Reuben even hid their crime, and deceived his
poor father too. And yet I wonder how they
could have helped telling the truth, when they
heard the poor old man weeping, and saying—

“ mourning.’

“Meanwhile, Joseph had been sold as a
slave to a great officer in Egypt named
Potiphar, who at first treated him very kindly.
But the wife of Potiphar was a very wicked
woman, and she told her husband such stories
against Joseph, that his master got angry with
him, and cast him into prison.

“But even here Joseph’s goodness and
gentleness made him liked by all, and the
keeper of the prison employed him to take
102 The Brothers.



care of the other prisoners. Two of these
poor men happened to be servants of the king
of Egypt, whose name was Pharaoh, and it
chanced that they dreamed curious dreams
that had a great deal of meaning in them—for
people used sometimes to be allowed to do
that in those days. They did not understand
the dreams themselves, but the Lord gave
Joseph so much wisdom, that he told them
the meaning of their dreams, which was that
one should be put to death, and the other
restored to favour by the king.

“This came true, and the servant who was
restored to favour went back and waited on
King Pharaoh as before.

“ At first this man forgot all about Joseph
in his prosperity, but one day King Pharaoh
said he had had a strange dream, and none of
his wise men could tell him what it meant.

“ Then the servant remembered Joseph, and
asked the king to send for him. Pharaoh did
so, and the poor prisoner was fetched in a
hurry from the dark dungeon to the royal
palace.

“And Pharaoh said—

“«T have heard said of thee that thou canst
understand a dream to interpret it.’

“But Joseph answered—
Joseph and his Brethren. 103



“*No; itis not me. God shall give Pharaoh
an answer of peace.’

“Then Pharaoh told his dream, and Joseph
told him it meant that seven years of great
plenty were coming on the land, and then seven
years of famine; so that Pharaoh had better
get together all the corn he could in the seven
good years, that the people might not starve
in the bad ones.

“Pharaoh was so delighted with Joseph’s
wisdom, that he made him a great prince over
all the land of Egypt, and told him to see
about saving up all the corn he could for
food. Joseph did so, and managed so well
that, though the famine was dreadful, and
nothing grew for seven years, there was
enough of his saving to keep the people from
starving. Everybody was grateful to him,
and Joseph married a great lady, and all the
people in Egypt looked up to him as next to
the king. But the famine was very bad in
other countries too—in the land where Jacob
lived ; but there was a report there that there
was corn in Egypt. So Joseph’s ten elder
brethren came down to buy food. Their
father would not let Benjamin, the youngest,
go, for he was his favourite now that Joseph
was gone.
104 The Brothers.



“And Joseph’s brethren did not know him
at all; they took him for an Egyptian prince ;
but he knew them, and tried to find out if
they were any better than they used to be.

“He spoke roughly to them, and told
them they were spies. But they said very
humbly, No; they were only Hebrew people
come from their own country, where they had
left an old father and a younger brother
behind.

“Then Joseph said he should take one of
them, named Simeon, and keep him prisoner,
while they went home and took the food they
wanted, and brought back their younger
brother to show they spoke the truth.

“This made them very unhappy, and thinking
Joseph could not understand their language
(for he spoke in the Egyptian tongue to them),
they began saying among themselves how
miserable they were, and how this was a
punishment for ill-using Joseph.

“ This made Joseph turn away and cry; but
they did not see it, and he sent them home,
keeping Simeon behind.

“Jacob was very unhappy when he heard
it, and said Benjamin should not go down to
Egypt, for he said, ‘If mischief befall him by
the way in which ye go, then shall ye bring
Joseph and his ‘Brethren. 105



down my grey hairs with sorrow to the
grave.’

“ At last, however, they persuaded him to
let the young man go, and back they went to
Egypt.

“Joseph was so glad to see them, that he
had to hurry away to his own chamber to cry
there; afterwards he made all the eleven
brothers come and dine with him, and they
were merry with him.

“ But when they were going away, he made
his servants put back the money they paid for
their corn into their sacks, and in Benjamin’s
sack a beautiful silver cup of Joseph’s. The
brothers went away, knowing nothing of this ;
but presently a messenger came hurrying after
them, saying they had stolen Joseph’s cup, and
must come back again. They said they had
taken nothing; but when the messenger
looked, there was the cup in Benjamin’s sack.

“Then they all went back sorrowful and
afraid, and Joseph said he should keep Ben-
jamin in prison because he had stolen the cup.

“Then the brothers showed how changed
they were; they could not go back and leave
Benjamin behind, and break their father’sheart;
and one of those who had been so cruel to
Joseph now implored him to let Benjamin
106 The Brothers.



go home, saying he would stay in prison him-
self instead.

“Then Joseph could bear no more; he told
all his servants to go and leave him alone with
his brothers, and when they were alone he
cried and said, ‘I am Joseph! does my father
yet live?’ And they were too much frightened
and astonished to answer, till he spoke so
kindly to them that he made them happy
again. He told them that the famine would
last five years more, and they and their father
and all their families must come down to live
in Egypt, and he would take care of them;
and he kissed them all with tears, loving and
forgiving them. Then they all went home
and told their father, ‘Joseph is yet alive,
and is governor over all the land of Egypt.’
And Jacob’s heart fainted, for he believed
them not. And they told him all the words
of Joseph which he had said to them, and
Jacob said, ‘It is enough; Joseph, my son, is
yet alive. I will go and see him before
I die’

“ How joyful must that meeting have been
between Jacob and his long-lost son! After
all that sorrow, the poor old father found
happiness and peace at last, and lived near
his dearly-loved son until the day of his death.
Joseph and his Brethren. 107



“And Joseph passed the rest of his life in
Egypt, a prosperous and respected man.

“T think the lesson of his beautiful story is
this: that the wrong doings of others shall
not harm us really, if only we keep on doing
right ourselves,

“Tn Potiphar’s house, in the prison, in
Pharaoh’s palace, Joseph always did his best,
and prospered at last, in spite of all the wrong
he suffered. He acted always on the beautiful
command, ‘Be not overcome with evil, but
overcome evil with good.”




CHAP. IX.—THE JOURNEY THROUGH THE
WILDERNESS.

nC yERCOME evil with good,” Stephen thought
to himself, as he came out of school the
next day. “Iam sure that is very hard. I
think I am ‘ overcome of evil’ much more.”

And as he was thinking this, the very
person whose conduct had suggested the
thought to him stood at his side.

“Stephen,” said Ned Rice in a low tone,
but with a broad smile on his face, “I want a
word with you.”

“JT don’t want any with you,” retorted
Stephen, frowning. “I'll have nothing to do
with you.”

“Better not say that,” returned the other.
““We know what we know—eh, Stephen? We
don’t want to get our dear brother into trouble.
We'll have a little chat now, won’t we?”

Angry as he felt, Stephen dared not refuse,
but walked off by his tormentor’s side.
Through the Wilderness. 109



“Stephen,” said Ned in an impressive way,
“do you know that the cherries in your aunt’s
orchard are just ripe?”

“Yes, we've been picking some,” said Ste-

shen. “ But you can’t get at them as you did
at the strawberries; the wall’s too high, and
the door’s locked.”

“Yes; but you can unlock it for me, and
that’s what you've got to do to-night ; leave it
so that I may find it open early to-morrow.
Do you hear?”

Stephen’s indignation here suddenly boiled
over.

“How dare you say such things to me!
Ill tell my aunt that there are thieves about,
and get her to let the watch-dog loose to
catch them.”

“Say a word about me, or leave the gate
locked when I tell you to have it open, and
see what I’ll say of Johnnie!”

“T don't care,” retorted Stephen, running
away in a rage, pursued by a threatening
shout from Ned, to which he paid no atten-
tion, never stopping till he reached his brother
at the garden gate.

“Why, Stephen, what’s the matter?” Johnnie
called in his turn. “What was Ned saying
to you?”
110 The Brothers.



Stephen made no answer; he fell again
into a mood of sullen silence, and, passing his
brother without a word, ran up to his own
room.

What was he to do? “Overcome evil with
good ;” tell his aunt the whole truth, and
take the consequences? She would know
best what was to be done; she would be as
kind to Johnnie as any one could be. But no,
he could not. Yet of one thing he was quite
certain; he could not do this wicked thing
that Ned asked of him, let what would come
to pass.

Firm in this at least, he avoided Ned after
school, and ran home as fast as he could,
where he set to work helping his aunt, and
then learning how to spell “c-a-t,” and so
on, as usual. He dared not think about what
might be coming.

“Do you know why I am making this plum
cake?” said his aunt, smiling, as she showed
him one ready for the oven that afternoon.
“To-morrow is your birthday, Stephen, and
we must have a little feast.”

Stephen had never had any notice taken
of his birthday before, indeed he hardly knew
which day it was, and now he could not find
a smile and a “thank you” for his aunt. He
Through the Wilderness. III



was too unhappy to talk, and only felt relieved
when she took out her work and told him he
might fetch the Bible as usual.

“After many years had gone by,” Mrs.
Baynes said, “the descendants of Jacob grew
to be so many that they were quite a large
nation, and were called Israelites, or children
of Israel, because Jacob was also called Israel.

“Long after Joseph and all his generation
died, another Pharaoh reigned over Egypt,
and he was afraid of the Israelites getting too
strong for the Egyptians. So he treated
them very cruelly, and at last ordered that
every son that was born to the Israelites
should be thrown into the river—the great
river Nile that flows through Egypt. A little
while after this dreadful order was given, a
woman of the Israelites had a son, and hid
him in her own house for three months. Then,
thinking Pharaoh’s people were going to find
him and drown him, she did a curious thing.
She made a little cradle of rushes, and put him
in it, and laid it among the rushes on the river
brink, while his sister stood a little way off
watching it.

“By-and-by who should come past but a
princess—one of Pharaoh’s daughters! and,
seeing the cradle, she sent her maid to fetch
112 The Brothers.



it. When the princess opened it, and saw
the pretty baby which was in it crying, she
felt pity for it, and guessed that it was a poor
Israelite’s child.

“Then the sister took courage to come
forward and say to her, ‘Shall I go and call
a nurse, that she may nurse the child for thee ?’

“And the princess said, ‘Go.’ So Moses’
sister went and fetched the child’s own mother
to be his nurse, and the poor little baby was
kept safely under the protection of the
princess.

“But when Moses grew up and knew that
he was an Israelite, he could not bear to see
his people oppressed ; and when an Egyptian
was ill-using one of them one day, Moses
fought with the Egyptian and killed him.

“After this he had to leave Pharaoh’s
country, and he went into another land called
Midian. Here Moses worked as a shepherd
for a rich man named Jethro, and married his
daughter.

“One day Moses was out with his sheep,
when he saw a very strange thing—a bush all
burning with fire, and yet not being burned
up. He came near to look, and there he
heard the voice of God speaking to him out
of the midst of the fire. And God told him
Through the Wilderness. 113

that he was to go back to Egypt and lead the
people of Israel out, that they might not be
slaves to Pharaoh any longer, but go and
possess the Promised Land, that good land
which the Lord had promised to Abraham
long ago.

“Moses was to go and ask Pharaoh to let
them go, and as he had a great difficulty in
speaking, the Lord commanded his brother
Aaron to go and speak for him.

“When Moses and Aaron told Pharaoh
that they had a message from God for him,
telling him to let the people of Israel leave the
land of Egypt, the king refused to obey. But
the Lord sent many punishments, as plagues,
to him for his disobedience.

“ At last the Lord sent a message by Moses
and Aaron, that if Pharaoh would not let the.
people of Israel go, the eldest child of every
Egyptian should die that night. But the king
again hardened his heart, and would not obey.

“Then Moses told the children of Israel
the dreadful thing that was to happen that
night, and that every family of the Israelites
was to kill a lamb, and sprinkle the doors of
their houses with the blood. Then the
Israelites were to feast upon the lambs they
had killed, all standing up and ready for a

H
14 The Brothers.



journey, because after the Egyptian children
were dead, Pharaoh would be in a hurry to
let them go.

“ This feast was to be called the ‘ Passover,’
because the Egyptians should die, but the
Israelites should be passed over, when they
had sprinkled their doors with blood. Every
year they were to repeat this feast afterwards,
in remembrance of their deliverance out of
the land of Egypt.

“The Israelites did just as Moses com-
manded them, and they knew that God spoke
by him; they killed the lambs, and sprinkled
their doors, and feasted in haste, when that
terrible night came.

“And at midnight we read, ‘The Lord
smote all the first-born in the land of Egypt,
from the first-born of Pharaoh that sat on the
throne to the first-born of the captive that
was in the dungeon, and all the first-born of
cattle. And Pharaoh rose up in the night, he
and all his servants, and all the Egyptians,
and there was a great cry in Egypt, for there
was not a house where there was not one
dead.’

“Then in his fright the king sent for Moses
and Aaron, and told them to leave the country
at once, and take all the people of Israel with
Through the Wilderness. 115

them ; and the Egyptians hurried them away,
so afraid were they of keeping them any
longer. Thus it happened that the Israelites
got out of Egypt at last. And the Lord led
them by a pillar of a cloud that went before
them all day, and changed to a pillar of fire
by night.

“So they came to the shore of a sea which
lay between them and the road to the Pro-
mised Land, and here they found that Pharaoh
had repented of letting them go, and was
coming after them with his soldiers to get
them back. The Israelites were terrified ; the
sea before them, the enemy behind, they
could see no escape.

“But the Lord told Moses that they must
go forward, and He made the waves to roll
back to the right hand and to the left, and
leave a path for them in between. So the
children of Israel went on dry land through
the sea; but when the Egyptians tried to
follow, the water flowed back again and
drowned them all.

“On the other side of the sea there was a
great desert that the Israelites had to pass
through, where the Lord did many wonderful
things for them, and where He gave them His
ten commandments.
116 The Brothers.



“He fed them with a food that fell from
heaven every day, except on the Sabbath ;
it looked like hoar frost on the ground, and it
tasted like cakes made with honey.

“ Another time, when they came to a place
where there was no water, the Lord told
Moses to strike the rock, and water came
flowing out for all the people to drink. After
all these wonders, it seems as if the Israelites
ought to have trusted the Lord, and believed
that He would certainly bring them to their
journey’s end, but they were very far from
doing so. They were often falling into sin by
distrusting Him, and wanting to follow their
own way.

“For this cause it was that the Lord did
not permit them to enter the Promised Land,
till they had wandered in the desert for forty
years. Moses died just before the end of their
wanderings, and it was under another leader
that they entered at last into the good land
promised to Abraham so long ago. Their
history ends the first part of the Bible—the
five books written by Moses himself, which
formed at first the whole Bible for the people
of Israel.

“It is a great essen we are taught by those
wanderings in the wilderness. For as the



Through the Wilderness. 117



Israelites journeyed through the desert to a
home they had never seen, so we are all
travelling through this life to the better land
that God has promised to His people. We
meet with dangers as they did, with many
things to try our faith as they did; but we
have always to believe that the way God leads
us is the right way, however much we see to
frighten us.

“Tf we will only do what we know to be
right, and leave the rest to Him, all the
dangers and difficulties shall be got over at
last, and we shall enter that blessed home
where our Father wipes all tears away.

“ Only trust in God, and honestly follow the
right, and every difficulty will be got over at
last: ‘the crooked shall be made straight, and
the rough places plain.’

“ How good and comfortable is this the last
lesson, as it seems to me, of the first Bible.”

“Good and comfortable!” Stephen was
troubled at the words; he knew they were
true, and yet how could he follow them?

More cast down than ever, he bade his aunt .
good night, and went to bed, to lie long awake,
dreading Ned’s anger, and all that might
come to-morrow.


CHAP, X.—A WONDERFUL DISCOVERY.

Coenen slept heavily when he did fall
asleep at last, and his dreams were all of
troubles and fears. At last he woke with a
start of terror; he thought he saw Johnnie
cutting off Ned’s head with that dreadful
knife. He opened his eyes, and it seemed as
if he were dreaming still, for there stood his
brother by his bedside up and dressed, with
that very knife in his hand.

“Why, what’s the matter, Stephen? You
look quite frightened,” laughed Johnnie. “ Do
you think I am going to stab you? Look
here, what do you say to this? Isn’t it a
beauty ?”

He opened half-a-dozen blades, and held
out his treasure to Stephen, who gasped out—

“What is it?”

Johnnie roared with laughter.
A Wonderful Discovery. 119



“Tt’s a knife—a regular beauty—a birthday
present I’ve got for you. I’ve been hiding it
up ever so long. I was afraid you would see
it before the day.”

Stephen looked wonderingly at him.

“Where did you get it?” he whispered.

“Came by it honestly,” returned the other,
still laughing. “I bought it of that lame old
hawker you saw in the lane one day.”

Stephen gave him one more eager look,
and then, to Johnnie’s unspeakable astonish-
ment, burst into tears.

“Oh, Johnnie! oh, Johnnie!” was all he
would say at first, but after a while his
brother’s persevering questions brought out
the whole story.

“Ned said I stole the master’s knife, did
he!” cried Johnnie, in sudden rage ; “and you
believed him! Why, if he had told me a tale
like that of you I'd have knocked him down
for his pains. A pretty brother you are to
take up such tales of me!” And Johnnie
flung the knife on the ground, and dashed out
of the room.

Poor Stephen sobbed bitterly.

“Oh, if I had only spoken out at once
and asked Johnnie, or asked aunt! If I had
only done right at first, I should have told
120 The Brothers.



the truth about Ned and the strawberries,
and not have vexed Johnnie and been so
miserable !”

Vain regrets! They come to every one
who has not courage to be thoroughly straight-
forward and true; who dreads this consequence
or that consequence of speaking out, and so
“wanders out of the way in the wilderness.”
They come too late.

Before Stephen had time to think out half
a quarter of his regrets, his brother’s impetuous
step was on the stairs again, and he rushed
into the room.

“Hullo, Stephen,don’t cry; it doesn’t matter,
and I don’t mind. I recollect how it was now.
Ned saw me hide away the knife when you
came up, that’s what made him think I was
a thief! Like expects like; and then he
frightened you. I didn’t tell him I wanted to
keep it from you till your birthday. It was
no business of his. Come, cheer up, Stephen ;
it doesn’t matter now.”

But Stephen could not cheer up; he was
too much broken-hearted at having wronged
his brother, and at all the evil results of his
mistake. Even when his aunt had left her
work to comfort him, and forgive him, he
could not.shake off his distress,
A Wonderful Discovery. 121



“You see, my dear,” she said, “ you troubled
yourself about the consequences. If you
spoke out to Johnnie, he would be vexed. If
you told me the truth about the fruit, Ned
would do Johnnie harm. That is a great
mistake ; the consequences are not our con-
cerns. We must do the right, and leave the
consequences to God; they are not our
business at all. Our business is to keep His
laws, and He will take care of the rest.”

Stephen promised that he would try and
remember this truth.

“Indeed,” he thought to himself, “I have
been too unhappy to forget it soon.”

“Now, Stephen,” said Johnnie, as they
walked, to school, “I’m not going to quarrel
with that Ned—I promised aunt I wouldn’t ;
but just you see if J won’t astonish him.”

And Johnnie laughed triumphantly. He
seemed quite to have forgotten his morning’s
trouble; it was always the future, not the
past, that filled his mind.

Stephen looked up at him timidly, and
could not find an answer.

The boys were all assembled outside the
school; Ned Rice came up to Stephen, who
turned from him with a sort of fear and began
speaking to some one else. Ned made a
122 The Brothers.



grimace, but at the moment the bell began to
ring, and there was a general rush indoors.

“You'll see,” said Johnnie significantly to
Stephen, as they took their places.

Prayers, name-calling ended, Mr. Willis told
the first class to get their slates ; but there was
a pause—a murmur of astonishment—when
Johnnie, with a very grand air, marched up to
the master’s desk.

“TI beg your pardon, sir, but is this your
knife ?”

“My knife? No, my boy! Did you pick
it up somewhere ?”

“ No, sir,” Johnnie answered in a particularly
distinct tone; “I bought it of a hawker, but
some one seemed to think it was yours.” He
could not forbear a glance at Ned, who got
scarlet, and stared with all his eyes.

“Thank you, Wright, for asking. No; I’m
afraid I must give up my penknife as lost.”

And lost indeed it was; but it is to be
hoped that the lessons arising out of its history
were not lost, on Stephen at least.

As he went rapidly up the school, and soon
became as good a scholar as his brother, the
remembrance of this earlier teaching never
passed out of his mind. That he alone is the
true Christian, the true maz, who is strong
A Wonderful Discovery. 123



enough to do the right and leave results to
Him who knoweth all things, this was the
lesson that did abide with him from his first
study of the first Bible, and the experience of
his young life.

And so it should be with us all. Our lives
and our Bibles should teach us the same
lesson, since both are the revelations of God’s
holy will.. May Stephen’s lesson be learned
indeed by all who study with him the holy

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Nellie’s Playmates. By G. Hope MYDDLETON.
My Dolly. By H. RUTHERFURD RUSSELL.

Wildflower Win: the Journal of a Little Girl. By
KATHLEEN KNOX,

Elsie’s Victory. By ELEANoR P. Grary.

Lily of the Valley: a Story for Little Boys and Girls,
By KATHLEEN KNOX.

Meadowleigh: a Holiday History. By KaTHLEEN
KNOX.

Katie Summers: a Little Tale for Little Readers,
By Mrs. C. HALL.

Roses With and Without Thorns, By EsTHER FaIrTH-
FULL FLEET.

Little Ada’s Jewels. By Fanny LEVIEN.



MARCUS WARD & CO,

67 AND 68, CHANDOS STREET, STRAND, LONDON;
ROYAL ULSTER WORKS, BELFAST.

Catalogues of Illustrated Gift-Books, Educational Works, &¢.,
may be had, post free, on application.

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