Citation
Little Floy

Material Information

Title:
Little Floy : the story of a day
Creator:
Griswold, F. Burge ( Frances Burge ), 1826-1900 ( Author, Primary )
Pierce, William J. ( Illustrator )
Herrick, Henry Walker, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
G.T. Day & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
D. Lothrop & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
79 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Girls -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1877 ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1877 ( local )
Baldwin -- 1877 ( local )
Genre:
Juvenile literature ( rbgenr )
fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- New Hampshire -- Dover
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Published simultaneously by G.T. Day & Co., Dover, N.H.
General Note:
Some illustrations signed Peirce, or Herrick.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. F.B. Smith.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
023787443 ( ALEPH )
23275107 ( OCLC )
AHM2083 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text


Goch ena ite

Ce sa eel lithe ee hel clea



The Baldwin Library

University
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LITTLE FLOY:

Tee STORY OF A DAY.

By MRS. F. B. SMITH.



Boston:

Published by D. Lothrop & Co.
Dover, N.H.: G. T. Day & Co.



Copyright by
D. LOTHROP & CO.
1877.



FLOY,

JOE,

TOWSER,

THE SUN,

HELPING,

CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

CEU AAV EA Rati

CHAPEER Tlic

CHAPTER IV.

CHARA E Ra Ve

« 12

une)

- 27

eG)



GARDENING,

GOD’S WORK,

THE BEE,

MATTIE RUDD,

PAPA,

CONTENTS.

CHARA Re Vile

GEA RATER: aViiile

CHAPTER VIII.

CHAPTER Ix.

CHARTER X:

AG)

55)

eanOs)

o of









tece.

sp

onti.

Fr



LITTLE. PLOY.



CHAPTER I.

FLOY.

SEEPING in at the window of the




W284) brown cottage under the old butter-
nut, the golden sun finds my darling fast
asleep on her pillow. She opens her eyes to
greet him as he comes across the floor, and
touches her forehead gently with his warm kiss.

“Dear little Floy!” he says, “don’t you
hear the robin singing on the apple-tree

bough? He is as pleased as pleased can be,
7



8 LITTLE FLOY.

for his mate has laid a beautiful bluish-green
egg in her nest, and he is thinking of the baby
birds that shall be by and by, and so he
sings right merrily. How his red breast shines
amid the green leaves! Oh, you're missing
grand things as you lie here in your bed, while
the whole earth is awake and bright with the
freshness of the early dawn. The dew stands
like diamonds on the grass-blades, and the
flowers are dressed for the day, and you should
be with them, my little Floy!”

The child is half dreaming as she sits up in
the bed and listens to the bird’s voice as it
trills louder and louder. The sun not only

kisses her brow, but infolds her as with loving







FLOY. 9

arms. What a flood of light is all about
her!

She hears her little brothers in the next
room playing at fisticuff, as is natural to boys,
but her first impulse as she feels the glory
around her is to kneel before God and clasp
her hands, and say, with her eyes raised to-
ward heaven where she seems to see a gra-
cious Father, “ How I love Thee!”

And God loves thee, sweet little Floy,
whose heart goes up to him the very first
thing in the early morning!

What a tiny figure it is, kneeling in the
snowy bed, with the glory enwrapping it! Yet

not so small but that the Divine Eye is upon



10 LITTLE FLOY.

it, and the angels behold and rejoice in it, and
mother and father look upon it as the most
beautiful creation in the house.

A tiny figure in the white night-gown, and a
tiny figure still when wholly clad in the neat
purple print and white apron, and the little
boots buttoned close around the ankles, and
the soft, brown hair smoothed under the sun-
bonnet, and all ready to go out and see the
grand things that the sun spoke about.

Eight years are not very long to have lived
upon the earth. No older than that is my Floy,
that God sent to us in the blessed spring-time,
when the peach-blossoms filled the air with

their sweet fragrance, and all things were



FLOY. 13

bursting into renewed life and beauty, and fill-
ing the world with joy.

It is but little past her eighth birthday now,
when you see her going from the back door of
the brown cottage into the garden, where the
proud robin sits boastful of his bluish-green
egg that shall turn into a feathered songster

in God’s good time.

oe



CHAPTER IIL
JOE.

E is hoeing around the currant-




3; bushes.
“We shall have plenty of fruit this summer,”
he says, “the stems are set very full. These
mites of yellow on a green, slender thread
don’t look now as if they would stand out
round and scarlet in the July sun, and make
one’s mouth water to see them.”

Joe is the man of all work about the prem-
ises. He digs, and plants, and culls, and loves

his labor as dearly as Floy does her doll. He
12



JOE. 13

thinks it beautiful to watch the coming up
of the seed from the dull earth, and the unfold-
ing of bud and leaf, and the gradual growth
and ripening of fruit. Joe’s eyes and thoughts
are not upon the toil, but upon the result. It
is a great reward to trace a beautiful end to
our labor.

Floy likes to talk with the old man. He is
never cross to her; never turns her off with
short answers to her questions; but is patient
and willing, and even glad to hear her inno-
cent prattle, and to tell her all that he knows
about the wonderful things that are inclosed
by the garden fence. He is quick to hear her

little feet patting down the walk, and he rests



14 LITTLE FLOY.

for a minute upon his hoe to look at her as she
draws near,

“You up so early?” he says. “ Well, it is
good to come out while the dew glistens ;
every thing is prettier and fresher.”

“T couldn’t lie in bed any longer. The sun
was shining in my face, and Bobby called me
from the apple-tree bough. Hear him! how
sweetly he sings! Will there be robins up in
heaven, Joe?”

The old man stops to think. “TI shouldn’t
wonder,” he says. “The birds haven’t done
any thing wrong; ’tisn’t any harm to believe
that God will have every thing that is beautiful

and innocent there.”



JOE. 15

“Ym glad! I hope so,” says Floy, satis-
fied that if Joe thinks so, it will surely be.
She has great faith in the old man’s wisdom,
he has told her so many wonderful things
about the flowers and fruits of the garden.

“T am going on through the gate into the
meadow,” she says. “I want to pick some

_wild flowers to put by mother’s plate at break-
fast. They'll tell her how dearly I love her ; but
I know just what she will say, — ‘ My flower is
the sweetest of all.” I-like to hear her say
that every day; it is none too often.”

“Pick your way where the grass is not wet,”
says Joe. “Let me see, are your boots thick ?

Ah, yes ; the dew won’t harm you. Go along,



16 LITTLE FLOY.

little one, and let me finish my work, — I can’t
hoe very fast when Floy is about here.”

He is talking to himself now, and thinking
of a little daughter of his own, of Floy’s age,
who used to run after him in a garden across
the sea, and who is now in a country still far-
ther away, where he can not reach her until
God shall call him from his earth-labor up to
the beautiful land above.

“Tm not murmuring,” he says, as he wipes
a tear from his eye. “ Oh, no; I wouldn’t turn
over my hand, if it would bring her down again
from the sinless world. It was a great honor
for God to take her out of my poor arms into
his Infinite bosom. What a selfish father I



JOE. eZ

should be, if, for my own comfort, I could take
my little child away from such glory! Oh, no;
I’m not murmuring. I’m very grateful, I'll
go on cheerfully awhile with my digging and
pruning, and before long, maybe, God will send
for me to meet my darling, since she can nev-

ermore come to me.”





CHAPTER IIL.

TOWSER.

LOY is down by the brookside, where



bY, the white daisies are nodding towards
the water. She stands upon the foot-bridge
and sees her face in the stream. She takes
off her sun-bonnet and holds it by one string
in her hand, and lets the cool breeze blow upon
her forehead. Upon her left arm she carries
her baby. Floy is seldom without that; she
is such a mother in her small way.

“Tl make a bed for you with my bonnet,

here on the bridge,’ she says to the child,
18















Towser’s mischief. Page 19.



TOWSER. 19

“and you must lie still while I get some of
those yellow buttercups. I want my hands
free. I won’t leave you very long, dolly, and
I think nothing will come near to hurt you, so
be as quiet and good as you can, till I am
back again.”

Floy is so intent upon the golden blossoms
and the pretty white daisies which she is
intermingling that she does not hear Towser,
the little terrier, that has ferreted her out, and
followed her footsteps.

The dog has a great fancy for this particu-
lar rag-baby, which has with much care been
kept from his destructive teeth and paws.

Now is his time; he sees it lying there
2



90 LITTLE FLOY.

within his sure reach, and makes a pounce up-
on it, shaking and tearing the blue dress, and
soiling the ribbons that loop up the sleeves.

Floy hears him as he growls with satisfac-
tion; and such a miserable little face! She
drops her flowers and gives chase to the
naughty Towser over the bridge and away to
the farther end of the meadow.

It is such fun for the dog ; such wretched-
ness for the little girl! Children feel for
their dolls in their trouble almost as a mother
feels for her baby when it is in any pain.

“Oh, Towser!” says Floy as she reaches
him at last and holds her torn doll tenderly to

her breast. “How could you! I don’t think



TOW SER. 21

dogs will go to heaven, if robins will, I must
ask Joe.”

The big tears roll down her cheeks and fall
upon the bruised baby ; and poor Floy forgets
her flowers and walks sorrowfully toward
home, the terrier following as demurely as if
he had wrought no mischief at all.

When she reaches the seat under the apple-
tree in the garden, she is more hopeful as she
examines the extent of the injury. Little peo-
ple put away their griefs if but one ray of
sunlight pierces the clouds.

“After all, he has only torn the frock
badly,” she says. “Perhaps Alice will show

me how to make another, and when my doll is



22 LITTLE FLOY.

newly dressed she will be as nice as ever, and
I will be more careful of her. Mothers ought
never to leave their little babies alone.”

“ What has happened ?” asks Joe, seeing the
sorrowful face that was so bright a little while
ago. ‘Oh, I know; that is Towser’s work.
Well, it’s the nature of a terrier to shake and
tear whatever he gets hold of. When dolly
is all right again, with a new frock and rib-
bons, we'll be more particular to keep her out
of Towser’s reach, won’t we?”

Joe has a way of including himself in every
fault of Floy’s which he wishes to correct.

There’s a great deal of comfort in that sort

of sympathy and companionship, and it helps



TOWSER. 25

little children wonderfully. They do not feel
so far off from the right that it seems impossi
ble to get back again.

“TJ think Pll carry Minnie into the house,
and put her in a safe place,” says Floy ; “and
then Pll stay in the garden till breakfast time ;
"tis so pleasant out here. Shall I trouble you,
Joe?”

“Oh no! I like to see you flitting about.
"Tis true I don’t get along quite so fast with
my work, for I must look up once in a while
and talk, as if my own little girl were on earth
again; but it helps my heart, and that is a
good thing done, so long as my master’s gar-

den does not suffer.”



94 LITTLE FLOY.

“There’s a half hour to prayer-bell,” says
Alice, as Floy returns from her chamber,
where she has placed her dolly in safety.

“Mother’s dressing the boys, and pretty
soon youll hear the tinkle. Don’t go far away.
You know father never likes to have any one
tardy.”

“Only out in the garden with Joe,” says
Floy.











































































CHAPTER IV.

THE SUN.

O wonder the sun sees grand things



when he rises and peeps even into the
small space just around the brown cottage!
No wonder he hastens in through the win-
dows to awake the little people, that they may
lose none of the glory! Floy is so glad, so
- grateful, as she looks up at him, and shades
her eyes from his bright beams,
“Oh, you beautiful!” she says, “I wouldn't
be sleeping for any thing while you play about

here!”
25



26 LITTLE FLOY.

“Whom are you talking to?” says Joe.

“Only the sun. It seems to me like father
when he smiles and puts his arm around me,
so warm and loving!”

“You're a queer little one,” says the old gar-
dener. “Strange ideas come through chil-_
dren’s brains; it puzzles me to understand
them sometimes.”

“How is the sun like God, Joe?” asks
Floy.
She is thinking of what her mother read to
her the other day about the Sun of Righteous-

ness. :

“You know how dark the night is,” says the

old man, “and how every thing sleeps and is



THE SUN. 27

almost like death, and how when the bright-
ness of the light comes, things spring up into
a new life and beauty?”

“Yes.” :

“Well, the world was like the night in
darkness and sin, until our blessed Lord and
Saviour came to bring light and glory. He
shines into these naughty dead hearts of ours,
_ and makes them warm with love toward him,
so that they bring forth flowers and fruit.”

“Oh, I see!” says Floy. “Is it flowers, Joe,
when I am pleasant all day, and try to make
my little brother happy, and when I do all
that mother wishes?”

“Yes, flowers and fruit, the very prettiest



28 LITTLE FLOY.

and best, and what God dearly loves in little
children,” says Joe.

“The sun has waked up the caterpillars,”
says Floy, as a velvety creature goes crawling
before her in the garden path. “How soft
his coat looks! I should think he would be
too warm, with velvet, in hot weather.”

“They are cold-blooded things, all worms,”
says Joe.

“There he goes down that toad’s throat!”
exclaims the little girl, as a great brown
warty fellow runs out his red tongue and
licks in the furzy worm. “Ugh! what an
ugly mouthful !”

“Master Toad doesn’t think so,” says Joe.









THE SUN. 29

“Tis a very nice breakfast indeed. for him.
How his eyes glistened and snapped as he
saw the tempting morsel!”

The creature hops off to find something else
for his appetite,—some ants and bugs and
other insects. ie

“ Joe,” says Floy, “lift me up to the bough
of the apple-tree that has the nest upon it,
please. I want to look in.”

She is so delighted when she sees the egg.
“Oh! we shall have little robins holding up
their heads and opening wide their bills for
food,” she says.

“Tt will be some time yet,” says Joe, “but

we mustn’t be impatient. In about three



30 LITTLE FLOY,

weeks I think we shall have a lively twittering
up there, and there'll be plenty of work for the
old birds.”

“Little people are a good deal of care,
birds or real babies, — an’t they, Joe?”

Floy is so grave as she says this that the
old gardener laughs in spite of himself He
thinks her a very wise little child.

“ Yes,” he answers, “and a good deal of com-
fort too. We can’t have any pleasure in this
world without a bit of trouble ; but fathers and
mothers are not apt to count care and labor
when it is for the little ones that they dearly
love. I know how the children can make it

ht and easy too.”

¢



THE SUN. 81

“Tell me,” says Floy, her gentle face all
aglow with eagerness.

“Qh, there’s a gentle, sweet, nestling sort
of way with some little ones, that smooths
the roughest life to the parents,—a way of
twining about father and mother, and helping
them all the day long by words and acts of
love. I know a little girl that doesn’t forget
to have her father’s slippers ready for him
when he comes home tired at evening, and
that puts away his hat and gloves, and brings
him the paper, and watches to see if she can
save his weary footsteps; and I know a little
girl who waits upon her mother as if she were

her little maid-servant, only she does it for



82 LITTLE FLOY.

love and not for money. She follows the dear
mother from room to room, and whatever the
big hands find to do the little hands want a
finger in, and it makes work almost play to
the fond parent.”

“Do I know the little girl?” asks Floy,
with much interest.

“T shouldn’t wonder.”

“Does she live anywhere about here?”

“Not very far away.”

“What is her name?”

“Guess.”

There’s such a twinkle in the old man’s eye,
as he looks at the child, that the truth flashes
upon her.



THE SUN. 33

“T hope it is Floy,” she says.

“Yes, that’s the name of the little helper
that I was thinking about. I don’t believe
father and mother would say, ‘She is a great
care and trouble to us.” I am certain they
find her a real treasure and comfort.”

“ Ah! there’s the bell,” says Floy. “You're
coming, Joe?”

“To be sure! I wouldn't miss prayers for
any thing. I should be a heathen, indeed, to
open my eyes to such a beautiful day, and for-
get the Giver.”

Joe goes to the kitchen to wash his hands
and to put on his linen jacket, while Floy joins

father and mother and Alice and the little



34 LITTLE FLOY.

brothers in the breakfast-room. She isn’t
quite easy till she sees the old man in his
wonted seat, with his hands folded on his lap
and his eyes intent upon the master, who is
reading the Word of life; then her little heart
is restful, for all the household is assembled ;
even Towser lies on the mat by the door, and
forgets his antics.

Floy sits by father and reads every other
verse. Once in a while she falters at a very
long word, but is soon helped over it, and
goes on nicely. When reading and prayers
are ended, every body repeats a scripture sen-
tence ; even the little boys say, “God is love,”

and “ Suffer little children to come unto me;”



THE SUN. 35

and Alice and Joe have a verse ready, which
is their text for the day, and is to be food for
the soul, as the bread that they eat will be food
- for the body.

3

a



CHAPTER V

HELPING.

aAHAT is to be done to-day?” asks mo-



ther, as she gathers her brood around
the table, and Joe and Alice have gone to the
kitchen. “Work and lessons and play all have
their place ; nobody was born to be idle in this
world, or in the world to come. Who is going
to be very diligent this morning in his tasks ?”

Three little right hands are raised, and two
big right hands, for father and mother neyer
like to be left out when good resolutions are

made. They wish the children to feel that
36



HELPING. 37

they also are struggling as well as the tiniest
boy or girl to perform their life-work faithfully
and well.

Oh, it is pleasant to go along together, old
and young, on the pilgrimage toward heaven !

Often and often the little feet out-run the
big, and the sweet faces, looking back from a
beautiful goal won, lure us toil-worn and aged
to quicken our pace that we may reach the
same blessedness.

“Well, now we have all made an agree-
ment,” says mother, “and we must abide by
_ it. I hope I shall not be the first to flag or
grow weary.”

The children are so encouraged by this.



38 . LITTLE FLOY.

It is great strength to them to feel that even
mother is in some danger, and has to try to be
really faithful.

“And I must use every effort,” says father,
“or the night will surely overtake me before
my task is done.”

“Can’t we help you?” asks little Floy, re-
membering what Joe has told her.

“Yes, darling, very much indeed. Every
' time I think of you at home here, plodding
patiently over your lessons, and loving and
obedient to mamma, it will put such joy in my
heart, and such energy into my nerves, that I
shall work with a right good will; and so, per-

haps through your influence, I shall finish my



HELPING. s 39

task and be enabled to come home again very
early.”

The children think of this as their little
heads bend over their books, and it helps
them to shut their eyes to the bright hum-
ming-birds that are darting about in the vines
before the window, and to resist the call of
the sunshine and the flowers, “Come out,
. come out, and play with us!”

Floy is strongly tempted as she catches
sight of the butterflies and the bees flitting
from blossom to blossom in the garden, and
as she observes Joe training the roses over
the summer-house. She almost wishes there

were no books, and no busy hours of study,



40 LITLE FLOY.

but that she were made like the birds and in-
sects, to dwell in the sunshine all the day.

Mother seems to see what her mind is upon.
She has been watching the little girl’s eyes,
and has noticed the direction they have taken
and the slight shadow that is upon her brow,
so she comes to the rescue.

“Those roses are very beautiful that Joe is
training,” she says.

Floy looks up a little startled. She does
not yet perceive the drift of her mother’s
remark.

“They were not at all thrifty when the old
man first came to us,” continued mamma.

“It took long culture and enriching and prun-



Yj
Yj

eo





































































































10.

uee

Pr



HELPING. Al

ing, to bring them to such perfection. They
seemed quite stunted in their growth, but
since he undertook them they have put forth
new and vigorous shoots, and now the roses
delight us all by their beauty and fragrance.
What if they had been left without care or
nurture! They would probably have borne no’
flowers, or else a feeble dwarfish growth.”

Floy begins to see that there is a moral in
her mother’s words. She is a quick little
creature in her perceptions.

“T shall be like the stunted rose-bush if I
do not study?” she says, with an inquiring
glance at her mother.

“Yes, daughter, no rare beautiful flowers of



42 LITTLE FLOY.

intellect by and by to delight and bless;
God’s wondrous gift of mind dwarfed and
unimproved. Fix your thoughts upon your
book, my darling, for the few study-hours, and
let nothing outside withdraw them, and when
you have mastered your lessons, then you will
all the better enjoy these works of nature
that you will learn about.”

It is easier after this for Floy to apply her-
self to her studies. The beauty of her moth-
ers comparison impresses her. “I should
like to give such joy to others as the roses
give to me,” she says.

The reading and spelling go on bravely,

and their mamma has lessons in arithmetic



HELPING. 43

and geography, and tells the children a few facts
in history which they can easily remember.

School-hours are so quickly and agreeably
passed, that all would willingly prolong them,
but mother has a certain system, and never
allows one thing to overreach upon another.
She is just as particular to give the little peo-
ple their recreation as their tasks. “ Rest
from labor is part of God’s wise plan for us,”
she says.

It is so true about enjoying better our free-
dom out of doors with the works of creation,
after a morning spent in the busy school-room.
How the children revel in the sweet flower-

scented air!



CHAPTER VI.

GARDENING.

ie 1S EN and Willie get their little hoes and



dig away in the small garden-patch
allotted them. Their cheeks glow with the
healthful exercise, and their hearts are light
and merry. They touch tenderly the little
green plants that give promise of pretty blos-
soms.

“See! here is a bud,” says Willie. “It
will be a bright flower by to-morrow.”

Ben and Floy run to look and admire.

There is such happiness in hope; in
44



GARDENING. 45

watching a beauteous development! The
children will dream of the little bud to-night,
and will rise in the morning to sce its full
expansion. How good of God to let things
grow while we sleep! To give the sure in-
crease, after our planting and watering, and
to fill us with such joy in the fruits of our
toil !

PSister, 1m tired of hoems, ‘says little Bem
“Let us sit on the bench while you make
a leaf basket.”

Floy picks the largest currant leaves she
can find, and pins them together with tiny
bits of a twig, in a hollow form. Then she

makes a handle of willow, and the little boys



46 LITTLE FLOY.

run off to the meadow to fill the rustic basket
with wild-flowers for mother.

The grass is almost up to baby Ben’s head,
and the white daisies form such a lovely
adornment around him, Only his golden hair
is visible floating above the verdure and the
blossoms, and his chubby hands outstretched
to pluck the flowerets.

Willie has run farther on, to the spot where
the speckled calf lies in a little inclosure.
The children call it Fleck, and hold out salt
in their palms for it to lick. It loves to see
them coming towards it, and pokes its nose
through the fence to get at the white grains.

Country pleasures are so charming to the





Kleck. Page 46.



Pages
47 - 48
Missing

From

Original



GARDENING. 49

little people. Every summer they come te
this brown cottage in the midst of foliage and
grass and flowers, and have real enjoyment
with the things of nature, so much the more
real, because of the months spent in the pent~ _
up city. The little children who live contin-
ually in the country can not begin to know
the joy of these released prisoners, who come
as from close alee and therefore revel in
their freedom.

They dread the time when they must go
back to winter quarters. “If we could but
take Fleck with us,” they say, “and the but-
terflies and bees, and the robins that sing

to us from the old apple-tree, and the tit-



50 LITTLE FLOY.

mouse, or chick-a-dee that has its nest in the
hollow oak.”

Next summer, Fleck will be almost as large
as her mother, and the young birds will keep
house for themselves and have broods of their
own; such changes are wrought for us in a
few short months.

The children, too, will progress in knowl-
edge and goodness, we hope. None of us can
stand still in this life. We must move either
forward or backward, either toward God and
heaven, or toward the evil one.

Dear little Floy seems to think of her re-
sponsibility already, and to be trying to walk
toward the Light.



GARDENING. 51

And she often leads her young brothers away
from mischief, and puts them in the straight
path again.

Little feet and big will wander sometimes
from it; but, thank God, there is a sure way
back, if we do but try to find it.

To-day the children have kept pretty nearly
in the true path. Once Willie strayed, in an
angry fit, and raised his hand to strike his lit-
tle brother, but Floy caught his arm before the
naughty deed was done, and spoke very gently
to him about: Jesus, who loves peaccful little
people, and he was sorry in a minute, and gave
Ben a kiss instead of a blow. Ah! that was

beautiful. It made joy up in heaven among



52 LITTLE FLOY.

the angels. It always gives them joy when
we repent of a wicked impulse, and by God’s

grace change it to a good one.




CHAPTER VIL

GOD’S WORK.



JOE has finished his hoeing, and is put-





ye } ting radish-seeds into the ground while
Floy watches him.

There are rows in different stages of growth,
some just peeping their green heads from the
earth, and some with their full leafage above
the ground and their ripe roots below; every
variety, — white, red, and violet, —round and
spindle-shaped, but all pungent, and good to
the taste.

“It is pleasant to see them growing,” says
4 53



54 LITTLE FLOY.

Floy. “In the city the poor carry them from
door to door in baskets, and cry them about
the streets, ‘Radishes! Radishes!’ The tops
look wilted, and the roots do not taste like
these that we eat fresh from the ground.”

“People don’t more than half live when
they are in large towns,” says Joe. “They
are shut in from so much of God’s work.”

“T know a little girl,’ says Floy, “who nev-
er saw a field of corn or potatoes.”

Joe thinks it a great pity. “They look so
beautiful growing,” he says.

Floy knows all about that. She has watched
both, from the planting of the grain and of the

tuber until the harvest, when the ripe ears





P:
age db
o4



GOD'S WORK. 55

were gathered, and the crops dug from the
earth.

She has walked between the rows of “gi-
gantic grass,” as papa called the broad green
corn leaves that waved far above her head,
shielding her from the hot summer sun, and
has gloried in their fresh, cool shadow. She
has wondered at the bunches of flowers at the
tops of the long stems, and has touched the
silken tassels that hung gracefully down. She
has parted the tender husk to see the young
grain that stood in white, milky rows, and has
watched it growing large and plump, and
changing to a golden yellow or to a creamy-

white, and sometimes to a purple, and to vari-



56 LITTLE FLOY.

egated. Joe can not tell little Floy any thing
about the corn. She saw them put the heavy
ears in the granary, and shell them, and carry
the grain to the mill. She rode in the open
wagon with Willie on the top of the bags, and
had such fun; and she watched the grinding
process, and saw the white meal come from
the crushed kernels ; and when Alice makes a
johnny-cake for breakfast she can think, as she
butters and eats the nice morsel, away back
to the little golden grain that was put in the
lack earth, and can trace it from the begin-
ning to the end.
She remembers, too, as she takes a nice po-

tato upon her plate at dinner, how Joe cut the



GOD'S WORK, 57

tubers or brown bulbs in pieces, with an eye
or bud in each piece so that it would sprout
and grow; and how he dropped the bits into
the earth and covered them over; and after
a while up came the leaflets, five or seven, lan-
ceolate-oval, with lesser ones between them,
like big brothers and sisters taking charge of
the little ones, and surrounding them with a
jealous care.

She does not forget how the sun and the
rains gave vigor to the plants, until they stood
a foot and a half above the soil, and spread out
delicate flowers, violet, bluish-pink, and white.
How beautiful they were, though but potato

blossoms!



58 LITTLE FLOY.

Floy does not wonder that the little Irish
children on the Island of Ronaldsay walk with
delight among the potato vines, and as they
gather the flowers, call the purple ones “my
Leddy Mc’ Tavish’s roses,” and the white ones
“the lilies which the saints in heaven carry
before the throne.”

Oh, all the plants and flowers upon the
earth come from the hand of God, and must
needs be beautiful !

We try to imitate them. We make them
out of wax, and muslin, and velvet, and paper,
and silk, and our work is often marvelous, but
it lacks a Divine touch. That is easy to be

seen.



GOD’S WORK, 59

Old Joe covers his last radish-seed, and ris-
ing from his stooping posture looks over the
neat garden with pride.

“°Tis back-breaking work to bend down so
much, isn’t it?” asks Floy.

“Rather,” says Joe, “but then it pays;
people do a good many harder things with no
real pleasure or profit in the end. I don’t
mind a pain now and then if I can see such
beauty as that,” waving his hand toward the
garden beds with their variety of green.

“There isn’t much rest for you, is there,
Joe?” The little girl seldom sees him with-
out his garden implements in his hands.

“’Tis rest for me when I know that things



60 LITTLE FLOY.

are growing thriftily,” says Joe, “if there’s
no worm at the roots gnawing the life away
and making the leaves wither and droop; and
if the weeds do not spring up and_ choke the
young plants; and if the hot sun does not
scorch them. ’Tis rest to me to watch and
toil; I should be tired all the time if I had no
work to do. Thank the Lord, 42s rest that he
will give us by and by is to be for ever active
and busy, only without being weary. Our
strength will never fail; he will make it new

every hour.”



CHAPTER VIII.
THE BEE,

‘HERE'S a great outcry from the



ye Wi} meadow. Little Ben has seen a bee
fastened to a clover blossom, its legs all golden
and its wings shining in the sun. The child
tried to clasp it in his little hand, and it stung
his finger. It thought him an enemy, and
therefore used the weapon of defense that God
had given it. Older people than Ben wince
when this little double dart pierces their flesh.
No wonder, when we ‘sce through the magni-

fying glass what a venomous thing it is! It
61



62 LITTLE FLOY.

has a sharp point with a number of barbs like
an arrow. There is a groove through which
the poison from a full sac passes into the
wound made by the sting ; this poison inflames
the flesh, and causes swelling.

Joe knows in a minute what has happened
to the little boy, who comes running and
shaking his painful finger in the air. The old
man calls to Alice, “Bring me some whiting
and a small strip of linen.”

By the time the child reaches him he has
the whiting moistened with cold water, and
ready to apply.

Mamma runs out, anxious and troubled, but

the pain ceases almost the moment Joe has



THE BEE. 63

bound this remedy upon the finger, and little
Ben smiles through his tears, and presents the
pretty basket of flowers that he has held fast
despite his sorrow and suffering. The thought
of dear mamma and of the pleasure the little
gift would bring to her was uppermost in his
agony.

So we remember God even in our sharp an-
guish, and keep our loving hearts in our hands
to give to him who prizes the offering most
when we have held it safely amid trial and
pain, and come smiling through our tears to
present it.

“The little basket of meadow-flowers is

beautiful,” says mamma. “Golden-eyed dai-
» Say



64 LITTLE FLOY.

ses with the pretty, white frill; yellow sat-
in buttercups ; pink and white clover so sweet.
Thank you, my darling!”

It is almost worth being stung, to see
mother’s joy over these simple treasures.
She sprinkles them with fresh water, hangs
the basket in the shady window, and nev-
er looks at it once through the afternoon
that there does not: come before her eyes the
vision of a cherub boy, almost a baby, with a
round, sparkling face and golden curls, in the
very midst of the blossoms.

The children rest for a while upon the
garden bench. Foy brings her doll and her

work-box, and sews upon the new dress that



THE BEE. 65

Alice has found time to cut and baste together
for her.

How nimbly the little fingers fly! and how
fast the shining steel goes back and forth in
the pretty fabric!

The stitches are even and nice, for mamma
has been careful to teach her little daughter
long ago. By and by she will be very help-
ful in making up the family linen, and will
be glad of every patient stitch set in her
childhood.



CHAPTER IX.

MATTIE RUDD.

BAREFOOTED, ragged little girl

comes in at the garden gate, and



stands gazing wistfully at neat little Floy
sewing under the apple-tree.

Floy drops her needle in a minute, and
goes to meet her, for her heart pities her
forlorn condition, so like her torn soiled
dolly.

She knows who it is, — Peter Rudd’s little
girl, from the old house at the edge of the

woods. The father keeps himself drunk with
66



MATTIE RUDD. 67

whisky, and the mother and child suffer for
food and clothing.

“Tll give you one of my frocks, if mamma
will let me,” says Floy, leading the little girl
into the house.

She remembers what her mother has often
said, — “that no day is well spent when some
good action is not performed toward the
needy, some word of kindness and sympathy
spoken, some help given over hard places,
some tears wiped away, some wounded soul
* bound up, some naked body covered, some
hungry mouths filled.”

It is drawing toward the evening, and God

who loves to see his children growing in his
5



68 . LITTLE FLOY.

own blessed likeness, has sent this opportunity
to crown this day with good. Floy is so happy
at the thought, and her face is full of joy as
she asks mother for the frock.

“You can not well spare it,’ says mamma,
“I make so few for you now that you grow
fast.”

“But this is such a poor ragged thing,”
says Floy, holding .the child’s tattered gar-
ment in her fingers.

“There is your strong plaid gingham,” says

mamma. “If you think you can be careful

enough with your other dresses to spare this, °

you may run and get it for Mattie, if it will
fit her.”

i i ae



MATTIE RUDD, 69

“May I take her up-stairs and dress her?”

“Yes ; in the kitchen chamber you will find
soap and water and towels, and a comb and
- brush. Let me see what you can make of
your little friend.”

Floy is the happiest creature in the world,
as she trudges up the stairs, holding Mattie
by the hand and thinking what kind of a
little girl will come down with her again.

She scrubs the child’s face and hands
with a_soft sponge, and laughs merrily as
she sees the fresh fair skin, for Mattie has
one of those complexions that never tan, and
it is only dirt and neglect that keep it so

dull and brown.



70 LITTLE FLOY.

°

Floy washes the little dusty feet until they
shine with a pink glow and show the blue
veins. Then she combs the flaxen hair, and
ties a blue ribbon around to keep it from
her eyes, and when the neat plaid frock is
buttoned up, she mounts Mattie in a chair
by the mirror to see the change.

Nothing in all the day has given her
such delight as this taking the poor child
out of the mire and making her sweet and
tidy. :

“Now you must try to keep so, Mattie,”
she says; “at least you can have your face
and hands and feet always clean. ° God gives

every body pure water enough to use.”

»





Floy and Mattie. Page 70.



Pages
71 - 72
Missing

From

Original



MATTIE RUDD. 73

The little girl almost thinks the figure in
the glass some other child. She scarcely
knows herself, so great is the change. Floy
thinks it a good time to. teach her a les-
son as to keeping neat and tidy in the fu-
ture.

“It helps us to see ourselves just as we
are,” says Floy, “so that if any thing is
wrong or out of the way about us, we can
make it right. There’s a little broken piece
in the wood-house that you shall carry home
to dress by, and mamma will give you a
comb, and a sponge and towel, so there
will be no excuse for tumbled hair or soiled

skin any more.”



74, LITTLE FLOY.

“Some fairy has been at work,’ says
mamma, as Floy leads the changed Mattie
before her again. “It is worth parting with
every extra garment to see how beautiful it
makes the destitute!”

Mamma looks from one child to the other.
“Not only is Mattie transformed, but there is
an added grace fo Floy’s face,” she says to
her own heart. “Her soul is so happy that it
shines out. I hope she will all her life long
be as willing as now to help the poor and
needy.”

“Such a heap of good things!” says Mat-
tie as she runs home, feeling very rich and

grand,







Pp:
age
74













































































MATTIE RUDD. 75

She is so wonderful in her new frock
and pretty smooth hair, that Peter does not
go out for whisky after tea, but is content
to sit and look at his bright little girl, and
hold her on his lap, and talk to her like
a kind father, as he would always be but
for the poisonous drink, and her mother
thinks there never was so beautiful a figure
in the world as this little girl that went away
dirty and ragged like a beggar’s child, and re-
turned like a princess in royal robes. " It
takes so little to satisfy the poor and. make

them joyous and glad.



CHAP TER Xs





PAPA.
KANG ND what has my Floy been doing all
LMS Nei
ie Au this summer day?” asks papa, as he



comes from the city to his quiet country-
house, and lifts the little daughter to her
favorite perch on his knee.

“Trying to help you and mamma by doing
all that I thought would please you, dear -
papa.”

“You see I am home a half-hour earlier
‘than usual,” says her father. “I think I owe

it to the good resolutions made this morning,
16



PAPA. 77

for I felt that all would be earnest to keep
them, and that made my heart so light
that I worked with a will, and so was en-
abled to take the first train to the village.
There’s nothing like bright glad home faces
to help a man in his business, and quicken
his steps toward the old roof-tree.”

Papa does not look as if he had a care
in the world, as he sits in his big easy-chair
with mamma at his right hand, and Floy and
Willie and Ben clustering about him, with
their loving hearts on their lips as they prat-
tle pleasantly.

“Tt is so refreshing,” he says, “to come

away from the dust and business of the city,



78 LITTLE FLOY.

to this dear home that God has given me!
Mother,’ —that is what he always calls his
wife, —“I don’t think heaven itself would
be much happier to me than this sweet Chris-
tian household, but for the immediate pres-
ence of God, and the freedom from tempta-
tion to sin.”

That is such a blessed thing for a man
to be able to say. And it is so delightful
for wife and children to feel that they can
help to make this earthly home something
like the heavenly, at least so that there shall
be a certain foretaste of immortal joys.

The sun that rose this morning to awaken

little Floy with a warm kiss, and stir her up



PAPA, . 79

to the day’s duties and pleasures, touches her
head with a a sort of blessing as it sinks to
rest, and seems to say, “God has helped you
to be his own little girl to-day, my darling,
and he has spread glory and beauty all over
your pathway. Don’t forget to thank him as
you go toyour bed, and ask him to keep you
for ever under his guidance and protection.”

And Floy looks at the rosy light as it
grows fainter and fainter in the western sky,
and thinks of the beautiful land where “ there
shall be no night, but the night shall be
as clear as the day, for the Lord God and
the Lamb shall be the light thereof.”

THE END,


















Full Text


Goch ena ite

Ce sa eel lithe ee hel clea
The Baldwin Library

University
Rae
Florida




LITTLE FLOY:

Tee STORY OF A DAY.

By MRS. F. B. SMITH.



Boston:

Published by D. Lothrop & Co.
Dover, N.H.: G. T. Day & Co.
Copyright by
D. LOTHROP & CO.
1877.
FLOY,

JOE,

TOWSER,

THE SUN,

HELPING,

CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

CEU AAV EA Rati

CHAPEER Tlic

CHAPTER IV.

CHARA E Ra Ve

« 12

une)

- 27

eG)
GARDENING,

GOD’S WORK,

THE BEE,

MATTIE RUDD,

PAPA,

CONTENTS.

CHARA Re Vile

GEA RATER: aViiile

CHAPTER VIII.

CHAPTER Ix.

CHARTER X:

AG)

55)

eanOs)

o of






tece.

sp

onti.

Fr
LITTLE. PLOY.



CHAPTER I.

FLOY.

SEEPING in at the window of the




W284) brown cottage under the old butter-
nut, the golden sun finds my darling fast
asleep on her pillow. She opens her eyes to
greet him as he comes across the floor, and
touches her forehead gently with his warm kiss.

“Dear little Floy!” he says, “don’t you
hear the robin singing on the apple-tree

bough? He is as pleased as pleased can be,
7
8 LITTLE FLOY.

for his mate has laid a beautiful bluish-green
egg in her nest, and he is thinking of the baby
birds that shall be by and by, and so he
sings right merrily. How his red breast shines
amid the green leaves! Oh, you're missing
grand things as you lie here in your bed, while
the whole earth is awake and bright with the
freshness of the early dawn. The dew stands
like diamonds on the grass-blades, and the
flowers are dressed for the day, and you should
be with them, my little Floy!”

The child is half dreaming as she sits up in
the bed and listens to the bird’s voice as it
trills louder and louder. The sun not only

kisses her brow, but infolds her as with loving

FLOY. 9

arms. What a flood of light is all about
her!

She hears her little brothers in the next
room playing at fisticuff, as is natural to boys,
but her first impulse as she feels the glory
around her is to kneel before God and clasp
her hands, and say, with her eyes raised to-
ward heaven where she seems to see a gra-
cious Father, “ How I love Thee!”

And God loves thee, sweet little Floy,
whose heart goes up to him the very first
thing in the early morning!

What a tiny figure it is, kneeling in the
snowy bed, with the glory enwrapping it! Yet

not so small but that the Divine Eye is upon
10 LITTLE FLOY.

it, and the angels behold and rejoice in it, and
mother and father look upon it as the most
beautiful creation in the house.

A tiny figure in the white night-gown, and a
tiny figure still when wholly clad in the neat
purple print and white apron, and the little
boots buttoned close around the ankles, and
the soft, brown hair smoothed under the sun-
bonnet, and all ready to go out and see the
grand things that the sun spoke about.

Eight years are not very long to have lived
upon the earth. No older than that is my Floy,
that God sent to us in the blessed spring-time,
when the peach-blossoms filled the air with

their sweet fragrance, and all things were
FLOY. 13

bursting into renewed life and beauty, and fill-
ing the world with joy.

It is but little past her eighth birthday now,
when you see her going from the back door of
the brown cottage into the garden, where the
proud robin sits boastful of his bluish-green
egg that shall turn into a feathered songster

in God’s good time.

oe
CHAPTER IIL
JOE.

E is hoeing around the currant-




3; bushes.
“We shall have plenty of fruit this summer,”
he says, “the stems are set very full. These
mites of yellow on a green, slender thread
don’t look now as if they would stand out
round and scarlet in the July sun, and make
one’s mouth water to see them.”

Joe is the man of all work about the prem-
ises. He digs, and plants, and culls, and loves

his labor as dearly as Floy does her doll. He
12
JOE. 13

thinks it beautiful to watch the coming up
of the seed from the dull earth, and the unfold-
ing of bud and leaf, and the gradual growth
and ripening of fruit. Joe’s eyes and thoughts
are not upon the toil, but upon the result. It
is a great reward to trace a beautiful end to
our labor.

Floy likes to talk with the old man. He is
never cross to her; never turns her off with
short answers to her questions; but is patient
and willing, and even glad to hear her inno-
cent prattle, and to tell her all that he knows
about the wonderful things that are inclosed
by the garden fence. He is quick to hear her

little feet patting down the walk, and he rests
14 LITTLE FLOY.

for a minute upon his hoe to look at her as she
draws near,

“You up so early?” he says. “ Well, it is
good to come out while the dew glistens ;
every thing is prettier and fresher.”

“T couldn’t lie in bed any longer. The sun
was shining in my face, and Bobby called me
from the apple-tree bough. Hear him! how
sweetly he sings! Will there be robins up in
heaven, Joe?”

The old man stops to think. “TI shouldn’t
wonder,” he says. “The birds haven’t done
any thing wrong; ’tisn’t any harm to believe
that God will have every thing that is beautiful

and innocent there.”
JOE. 15

“Ym glad! I hope so,” says Floy, satis-
fied that if Joe thinks so, it will surely be.
She has great faith in the old man’s wisdom,
he has told her so many wonderful things
about the flowers and fruits of the garden.

“T am going on through the gate into the
meadow,” she says. “I want to pick some

_wild flowers to put by mother’s plate at break-
fast. They'll tell her how dearly I love her ; but
I know just what she will say, — ‘ My flower is
the sweetest of all.” I-like to hear her say
that every day; it is none too often.”

“Pick your way where the grass is not wet,”
says Joe. “Let me see, are your boots thick ?

Ah, yes ; the dew won’t harm you. Go along,
16 LITTLE FLOY.

little one, and let me finish my work, — I can’t
hoe very fast when Floy is about here.”

He is talking to himself now, and thinking
of a little daughter of his own, of Floy’s age,
who used to run after him in a garden across
the sea, and who is now in a country still far-
ther away, where he can not reach her until
God shall call him from his earth-labor up to
the beautiful land above.

“Tm not murmuring,” he says, as he wipes
a tear from his eye. “ Oh, no; I wouldn’t turn
over my hand, if it would bring her down again
from the sinless world. It was a great honor
for God to take her out of my poor arms into
his Infinite bosom. What a selfish father I
JOE. eZ

should be, if, for my own comfort, I could take
my little child away from such glory! Oh, no;
I’m not murmuring. I’m very grateful, I'll
go on cheerfully awhile with my digging and
pruning, and before long, maybe, God will send
for me to meet my darling, since she can nev-

ermore come to me.”


CHAPTER IIL.

TOWSER.

LOY is down by the brookside, where



bY, the white daisies are nodding towards
the water. She stands upon the foot-bridge
and sees her face in the stream. She takes
off her sun-bonnet and holds it by one string
in her hand, and lets the cool breeze blow upon
her forehead. Upon her left arm she carries
her baby. Floy is seldom without that; she
is such a mother in her small way.

“Tl make a bed for you with my bonnet,

here on the bridge,’ she says to the child,
18












Towser’s mischief. Page 19.
TOWSER. 19

“and you must lie still while I get some of
those yellow buttercups. I want my hands
free. I won’t leave you very long, dolly, and
I think nothing will come near to hurt you, so
be as quiet and good as you can, till I am
back again.”

Floy is so intent upon the golden blossoms
and the pretty white daisies which she is
intermingling that she does not hear Towser,
the little terrier, that has ferreted her out, and
followed her footsteps.

The dog has a great fancy for this particu-
lar rag-baby, which has with much care been
kept from his destructive teeth and paws.

Now is his time; he sees it lying there
2
90 LITTLE FLOY.

within his sure reach, and makes a pounce up-
on it, shaking and tearing the blue dress, and
soiling the ribbons that loop up the sleeves.

Floy hears him as he growls with satisfac-
tion; and such a miserable little face! She
drops her flowers and gives chase to the
naughty Towser over the bridge and away to
the farther end of the meadow.

It is such fun for the dog ; such wretched-
ness for the little girl! Children feel for
their dolls in their trouble almost as a mother
feels for her baby when it is in any pain.

“Oh, Towser!” says Floy as she reaches
him at last and holds her torn doll tenderly to

her breast. “How could you! I don’t think
TOW SER. 21

dogs will go to heaven, if robins will, I must
ask Joe.”

The big tears roll down her cheeks and fall
upon the bruised baby ; and poor Floy forgets
her flowers and walks sorrowfully toward
home, the terrier following as demurely as if
he had wrought no mischief at all.

When she reaches the seat under the apple-
tree in the garden, she is more hopeful as she
examines the extent of the injury. Little peo-
ple put away their griefs if but one ray of
sunlight pierces the clouds.

“After all, he has only torn the frock
badly,” she says. “Perhaps Alice will show

me how to make another, and when my doll is
22 LITTLE FLOY.

newly dressed she will be as nice as ever, and
I will be more careful of her. Mothers ought
never to leave their little babies alone.”

“ What has happened ?” asks Joe, seeing the
sorrowful face that was so bright a little while
ago. ‘Oh, I know; that is Towser’s work.
Well, it’s the nature of a terrier to shake and
tear whatever he gets hold of. When dolly
is all right again, with a new frock and rib-
bons, we'll be more particular to keep her out
of Towser’s reach, won’t we?”

Joe has a way of including himself in every
fault of Floy’s which he wishes to correct.

There’s a great deal of comfort in that sort

of sympathy and companionship, and it helps
TOWSER. 25

little children wonderfully. They do not feel
so far off from the right that it seems impossi
ble to get back again.

“TJ think Pll carry Minnie into the house,
and put her in a safe place,” says Floy ; “and
then Pll stay in the garden till breakfast time ;
"tis so pleasant out here. Shall I trouble you,
Joe?”

“Oh no! I like to see you flitting about.
"Tis true I don’t get along quite so fast with
my work, for I must look up once in a while
and talk, as if my own little girl were on earth
again; but it helps my heart, and that is a
good thing done, so long as my master’s gar-

den does not suffer.”
94 LITTLE FLOY.

“There’s a half hour to prayer-bell,” says
Alice, as Floy returns from her chamber,
where she has placed her dolly in safety.

“Mother’s dressing the boys, and pretty
soon youll hear the tinkle. Don’t go far away.
You know father never likes to have any one
tardy.”

“Only out in the garden with Joe,” says
Floy.





































































CHAPTER IV.

THE SUN.

O wonder the sun sees grand things



when he rises and peeps even into the
small space just around the brown cottage!
No wonder he hastens in through the win-
dows to awake the little people, that they may
lose none of the glory! Floy is so glad, so
- grateful, as she looks up at him, and shades
her eyes from his bright beams,
“Oh, you beautiful!” she says, “I wouldn't
be sleeping for any thing while you play about

here!”
25
26 LITTLE FLOY.

“Whom are you talking to?” says Joe.

“Only the sun. It seems to me like father
when he smiles and puts his arm around me,
so warm and loving!”

“You're a queer little one,” says the old gar-
dener. “Strange ideas come through chil-_
dren’s brains; it puzzles me to understand
them sometimes.”

“How is the sun like God, Joe?” asks
Floy.
She is thinking of what her mother read to
her the other day about the Sun of Righteous-

ness. :

“You know how dark the night is,” says the

old man, “and how every thing sleeps and is
THE SUN. 27

almost like death, and how when the bright-
ness of the light comes, things spring up into
a new life and beauty?”

“Yes.” :

“Well, the world was like the night in
darkness and sin, until our blessed Lord and
Saviour came to bring light and glory. He
shines into these naughty dead hearts of ours,
_ and makes them warm with love toward him,
so that they bring forth flowers and fruit.”

“Oh, I see!” says Floy. “Is it flowers, Joe,
when I am pleasant all day, and try to make
my little brother happy, and when I do all
that mother wishes?”

“Yes, flowers and fruit, the very prettiest
28 LITTLE FLOY.

and best, and what God dearly loves in little
children,” says Joe.

“The sun has waked up the caterpillars,”
says Floy, as a velvety creature goes crawling
before her in the garden path. “How soft
his coat looks! I should think he would be
too warm, with velvet, in hot weather.”

“They are cold-blooded things, all worms,”
says Joe.

“There he goes down that toad’s throat!”
exclaims the little girl, as a great brown
warty fellow runs out his red tongue and
licks in the furzy worm. “Ugh! what an
ugly mouthful !”

“Master Toad doesn’t think so,” says Joe.



THE SUN. 29

“Tis a very nice breakfast indeed. for him.
How his eyes glistened and snapped as he
saw the tempting morsel!”

The creature hops off to find something else
for his appetite,—some ants and bugs and
other insects. ie

“ Joe,” says Floy, “lift me up to the bough
of the apple-tree that has the nest upon it,
please. I want to look in.”

She is so delighted when she sees the egg.
“Oh! we shall have little robins holding up
their heads and opening wide their bills for
food,” she says.

“Tt will be some time yet,” says Joe, “but

we mustn’t be impatient. In about three
30 LITTLE FLOY,

weeks I think we shall have a lively twittering
up there, and there'll be plenty of work for the
old birds.”

“Little people are a good deal of care,
birds or real babies, — an’t they, Joe?”

Floy is so grave as she says this that the
old gardener laughs in spite of himself He
thinks her a very wise little child.

“ Yes,” he answers, “and a good deal of com-
fort too. We can’t have any pleasure in this
world without a bit of trouble ; but fathers and
mothers are not apt to count care and labor
when it is for the little ones that they dearly
love. I know how the children can make it

ht and easy too.”

¢
THE SUN. 81

“Tell me,” says Floy, her gentle face all
aglow with eagerness.

“Qh, there’s a gentle, sweet, nestling sort
of way with some little ones, that smooths
the roughest life to the parents,—a way of
twining about father and mother, and helping
them all the day long by words and acts of
love. I know a little girl that doesn’t forget
to have her father’s slippers ready for him
when he comes home tired at evening, and
that puts away his hat and gloves, and brings
him the paper, and watches to see if she can
save his weary footsteps; and I know a little
girl who waits upon her mother as if she were

her little maid-servant, only she does it for
82 LITTLE FLOY.

love and not for money. She follows the dear
mother from room to room, and whatever the
big hands find to do the little hands want a
finger in, and it makes work almost play to
the fond parent.”

“Do I know the little girl?” asks Floy,
with much interest.

“T shouldn’t wonder.”

“Does she live anywhere about here?”

“Not very far away.”

“What is her name?”

“Guess.”

There’s such a twinkle in the old man’s eye,
as he looks at the child, that the truth flashes
upon her.
THE SUN. 33

“T hope it is Floy,” she says.

“Yes, that’s the name of the little helper
that I was thinking about. I don’t believe
father and mother would say, ‘She is a great
care and trouble to us.” I am certain they
find her a real treasure and comfort.”

“ Ah! there’s the bell,” says Floy. “You're
coming, Joe?”

“To be sure! I wouldn't miss prayers for
any thing. I should be a heathen, indeed, to
open my eyes to such a beautiful day, and for-
get the Giver.”

Joe goes to the kitchen to wash his hands
and to put on his linen jacket, while Floy joins

father and mother and Alice and the little
34 LITTLE FLOY.

brothers in the breakfast-room. She isn’t
quite easy till she sees the old man in his
wonted seat, with his hands folded on his lap
and his eyes intent upon the master, who is
reading the Word of life; then her little heart
is restful, for all the household is assembled ;
even Towser lies on the mat by the door, and
forgets his antics.

Floy sits by father and reads every other
verse. Once in a while she falters at a very
long word, but is soon helped over it, and
goes on nicely. When reading and prayers
are ended, every body repeats a scripture sen-
tence ; even the little boys say, “God is love,”

and “ Suffer little children to come unto me;”
THE SUN. 35

and Alice and Joe have a verse ready, which
is their text for the day, and is to be food for
the soul, as the bread that they eat will be food
- for the body.

3

a
CHAPTER V

HELPING.

aAHAT is to be done to-day?” asks mo-



ther, as she gathers her brood around
the table, and Joe and Alice have gone to the
kitchen. “Work and lessons and play all have
their place ; nobody was born to be idle in this
world, or in the world to come. Who is going
to be very diligent this morning in his tasks ?”

Three little right hands are raised, and two
big right hands, for father and mother neyer
like to be left out when good resolutions are

made. They wish the children to feel that
36
HELPING. 37

they also are struggling as well as the tiniest
boy or girl to perform their life-work faithfully
and well.

Oh, it is pleasant to go along together, old
and young, on the pilgrimage toward heaven !

Often and often the little feet out-run the
big, and the sweet faces, looking back from a
beautiful goal won, lure us toil-worn and aged
to quicken our pace that we may reach the
same blessedness.

“Well, now we have all made an agree-
ment,” says mother, “and we must abide by
_ it. I hope I shall not be the first to flag or
grow weary.”

The children are so encouraged by this.
38 . LITTLE FLOY.

It is great strength to them to feel that even
mother is in some danger, and has to try to be
really faithful.

“And I must use every effort,” says father,
“or the night will surely overtake me before
my task is done.”

“Can’t we help you?” asks little Floy, re-
membering what Joe has told her.

“Yes, darling, very much indeed. Every
' time I think of you at home here, plodding
patiently over your lessons, and loving and
obedient to mamma, it will put such joy in my
heart, and such energy into my nerves, that I
shall work with a right good will; and so, per-

haps through your influence, I shall finish my
HELPING. s 39

task and be enabled to come home again very
early.”

The children think of this as their little
heads bend over their books, and it helps
them to shut their eyes to the bright hum-
ming-birds that are darting about in the vines
before the window, and to resist the call of
the sunshine and the flowers, “Come out,
. come out, and play with us!”

Floy is strongly tempted as she catches
sight of the butterflies and the bees flitting
from blossom to blossom in the garden, and
as she observes Joe training the roses over
the summer-house. She almost wishes there

were no books, and no busy hours of study,
40 LITLE FLOY.

but that she were made like the birds and in-
sects, to dwell in the sunshine all the day.

Mother seems to see what her mind is upon.
She has been watching the little girl’s eyes,
and has noticed the direction they have taken
and the slight shadow that is upon her brow,
so she comes to the rescue.

“Those roses are very beautiful that Joe is
training,” she says.

Floy looks up a little startled. She does
not yet perceive the drift of her mother’s
remark.

“They were not at all thrifty when the old
man first came to us,” continued mamma.

“It took long culture and enriching and prun-
Yj
Yj

eo





































































































10.

uee

Pr
HELPING. Al

ing, to bring them to such perfection. They
seemed quite stunted in their growth, but
since he undertook them they have put forth
new and vigorous shoots, and now the roses
delight us all by their beauty and fragrance.
What if they had been left without care or
nurture! They would probably have borne no’
flowers, or else a feeble dwarfish growth.”

Floy begins to see that there is a moral in
her mother’s words. She is a quick little
creature in her perceptions.

“T shall be like the stunted rose-bush if I
do not study?” she says, with an inquiring
glance at her mother.

“Yes, daughter, no rare beautiful flowers of
42 LITTLE FLOY.

intellect by and by to delight and bless;
God’s wondrous gift of mind dwarfed and
unimproved. Fix your thoughts upon your
book, my darling, for the few study-hours, and
let nothing outside withdraw them, and when
you have mastered your lessons, then you will
all the better enjoy these works of nature
that you will learn about.”

It is easier after this for Floy to apply her-
self to her studies. The beauty of her moth-
ers comparison impresses her. “I should
like to give such joy to others as the roses
give to me,” she says.

The reading and spelling go on bravely,

and their mamma has lessons in arithmetic
HELPING. 43

and geography, and tells the children a few facts
in history which they can easily remember.

School-hours are so quickly and agreeably
passed, that all would willingly prolong them,
but mother has a certain system, and never
allows one thing to overreach upon another.
She is just as particular to give the little peo-
ple their recreation as their tasks. “ Rest
from labor is part of God’s wise plan for us,”
she says.

It is so true about enjoying better our free-
dom out of doors with the works of creation,
after a morning spent in the busy school-room.
How the children revel in the sweet flower-

scented air!
CHAPTER VI.

GARDENING.

ie 1S EN and Willie get their little hoes and



dig away in the small garden-patch
allotted them. Their cheeks glow with the
healthful exercise, and their hearts are light
and merry. They touch tenderly the little
green plants that give promise of pretty blos-
soms.

“See! here is a bud,” says Willie. “It
will be a bright flower by to-morrow.”

Ben and Floy run to look and admire.

There is such happiness in hope; in
44
GARDENING. 45

watching a beauteous development! The
children will dream of the little bud to-night,
and will rise in the morning to sce its full
expansion. How good of God to let things
grow while we sleep! To give the sure in-
crease, after our planting and watering, and
to fill us with such joy in the fruits of our
toil !

PSister, 1m tired of hoems, ‘says little Bem
“Let us sit on the bench while you make
a leaf basket.”

Floy picks the largest currant leaves she
can find, and pins them together with tiny
bits of a twig, in a hollow form. Then she

makes a handle of willow, and the little boys
46 LITTLE FLOY.

run off to the meadow to fill the rustic basket
with wild-flowers for mother.

The grass is almost up to baby Ben’s head,
and the white daisies form such a lovely
adornment around him, Only his golden hair
is visible floating above the verdure and the
blossoms, and his chubby hands outstretched
to pluck the flowerets.

Willie has run farther on, to the spot where
the speckled calf lies in a little inclosure.
The children call it Fleck, and hold out salt
in their palms for it to lick. It loves to see
them coming towards it, and pokes its nose
through the fence to get at the white grains.

Country pleasures are so charming to the


Kleck. Page 46.
Pages
47 - 48
Missing

From

Original
GARDENING. 49

little people. Every summer they come te
this brown cottage in the midst of foliage and
grass and flowers, and have real enjoyment
with the things of nature, so much the more
real, because of the months spent in the pent~ _
up city. The little children who live contin-
ually in the country can not begin to know
the joy of these released prisoners, who come
as from close alee and therefore revel in
their freedom.

They dread the time when they must go
back to winter quarters. “If we could but
take Fleck with us,” they say, “and the but-
terflies and bees, and the robins that sing

to us from the old apple-tree, and the tit-
50 LITTLE FLOY.

mouse, or chick-a-dee that has its nest in the
hollow oak.”

Next summer, Fleck will be almost as large
as her mother, and the young birds will keep
house for themselves and have broods of their
own; such changes are wrought for us in a
few short months.

The children, too, will progress in knowl-
edge and goodness, we hope. None of us can
stand still in this life. We must move either
forward or backward, either toward God and
heaven, or toward the evil one.

Dear little Floy seems to think of her re-
sponsibility already, and to be trying to walk
toward the Light.
GARDENING. 51

And she often leads her young brothers away
from mischief, and puts them in the straight
path again.

Little feet and big will wander sometimes
from it; but, thank God, there is a sure way
back, if we do but try to find it.

To-day the children have kept pretty nearly
in the true path. Once Willie strayed, in an
angry fit, and raised his hand to strike his lit-
tle brother, but Floy caught his arm before the
naughty deed was done, and spoke very gently
to him about: Jesus, who loves peaccful little
people, and he was sorry in a minute, and gave
Ben a kiss instead of a blow. Ah! that was

beautiful. It made joy up in heaven among
52 LITTLE FLOY.

the angels. It always gives them joy when
we repent of a wicked impulse, and by God’s

grace change it to a good one.

CHAPTER VIL

GOD’S WORK.



JOE has finished his hoeing, and is put-





ye } ting radish-seeds into the ground while
Floy watches him.

There are rows in different stages of growth,
some just peeping their green heads from the
earth, and some with their full leafage above
the ground and their ripe roots below; every
variety, — white, red, and violet, —round and
spindle-shaped, but all pungent, and good to
the taste.

“It is pleasant to see them growing,” says
4 53
54 LITTLE FLOY.

Floy. “In the city the poor carry them from
door to door in baskets, and cry them about
the streets, ‘Radishes! Radishes!’ The tops
look wilted, and the roots do not taste like
these that we eat fresh from the ground.”

“People don’t more than half live when
they are in large towns,” says Joe. “They
are shut in from so much of God’s work.”

“T know a little girl,’ says Floy, “who nev-
er saw a field of corn or potatoes.”

Joe thinks it a great pity. “They look so
beautiful growing,” he says.

Floy knows all about that. She has watched
both, from the planting of the grain and of the

tuber until the harvest, when the ripe ears


P:
age db
o4
GOD'S WORK. 55

were gathered, and the crops dug from the
earth.

She has walked between the rows of “gi-
gantic grass,” as papa called the broad green
corn leaves that waved far above her head,
shielding her from the hot summer sun, and
has gloried in their fresh, cool shadow. She
has wondered at the bunches of flowers at the
tops of the long stems, and has touched the
silken tassels that hung gracefully down. She
has parted the tender husk to see the young
grain that stood in white, milky rows, and has
watched it growing large and plump, and
changing to a golden yellow or to a creamy-

white, and sometimes to a purple, and to vari-
56 LITTLE FLOY.

egated. Joe can not tell little Floy any thing
about the corn. She saw them put the heavy
ears in the granary, and shell them, and carry
the grain to the mill. She rode in the open
wagon with Willie on the top of the bags, and
had such fun; and she watched the grinding
process, and saw the white meal come from
the crushed kernels ; and when Alice makes a
johnny-cake for breakfast she can think, as she
butters and eats the nice morsel, away back
to the little golden grain that was put in the
lack earth, and can trace it from the begin-
ning to the end.
She remembers, too, as she takes a nice po-

tato upon her plate at dinner, how Joe cut the
GOD'S WORK, 57

tubers or brown bulbs in pieces, with an eye
or bud in each piece so that it would sprout
and grow; and how he dropped the bits into
the earth and covered them over; and after
a while up came the leaflets, five or seven, lan-
ceolate-oval, with lesser ones between them,
like big brothers and sisters taking charge of
the little ones, and surrounding them with a
jealous care.

She does not forget how the sun and the
rains gave vigor to the plants, until they stood
a foot and a half above the soil, and spread out
delicate flowers, violet, bluish-pink, and white.
How beautiful they were, though but potato

blossoms!
58 LITTLE FLOY.

Floy does not wonder that the little Irish
children on the Island of Ronaldsay walk with
delight among the potato vines, and as they
gather the flowers, call the purple ones “my
Leddy Mc’ Tavish’s roses,” and the white ones
“the lilies which the saints in heaven carry
before the throne.”

Oh, all the plants and flowers upon the
earth come from the hand of God, and must
needs be beautiful !

We try to imitate them. We make them
out of wax, and muslin, and velvet, and paper,
and silk, and our work is often marvelous, but
it lacks a Divine touch. That is easy to be

seen.
GOD’S WORK, 59

Old Joe covers his last radish-seed, and ris-
ing from his stooping posture looks over the
neat garden with pride.

“°Tis back-breaking work to bend down so
much, isn’t it?” asks Floy.

“Rather,” says Joe, “but then it pays;
people do a good many harder things with no
real pleasure or profit in the end. I don’t
mind a pain now and then if I can see such
beauty as that,” waving his hand toward the
garden beds with their variety of green.

“There isn’t much rest for you, is there,
Joe?” The little girl seldom sees him with-
out his garden implements in his hands.

“’Tis rest for me when I know that things
60 LITTLE FLOY.

are growing thriftily,” says Joe, “if there’s
no worm at the roots gnawing the life away
and making the leaves wither and droop; and
if the weeds do not spring up and_ choke the
young plants; and if the hot sun does not
scorch them. ’Tis rest to me to watch and
toil; I should be tired all the time if I had no
work to do. Thank the Lord, 42s rest that he
will give us by and by is to be for ever active
and busy, only without being weary. Our
strength will never fail; he will make it new

every hour.”
CHAPTER VIII.
THE BEE,

‘HERE'S a great outcry from the



ye Wi} meadow. Little Ben has seen a bee
fastened to a clover blossom, its legs all golden
and its wings shining in the sun. The child
tried to clasp it in his little hand, and it stung
his finger. It thought him an enemy, and
therefore used the weapon of defense that God
had given it. Older people than Ben wince
when this little double dart pierces their flesh.
No wonder, when we ‘sce through the magni-

fying glass what a venomous thing it is! It
61
62 LITTLE FLOY.

has a sharp point with a number of barbs like
an arrow. There is a groove through which
the poison from a full sac passes into the
wound made by the sting ; this poison inflames
the flesh, and causes swelling.

Joe knows in a minute what has happened
to the little boy, who comes running and
shaking his painful finger in the air. The old
man calls to Alice, “Bring me some whiting
and a small strip of linen.”

By the time the child reaches him he has
the whiting moistened with cold water, and
ready to apply.

Mamma runs out, anxious and troubled, but

the pain ceases almost the moment Joe has
THE BEE. 63

bound this remedy upon the finger, and little
Ben smiles through his tears, and presents the
pretty basket of flowers that he has held fast
despite his sorrow and suffering. The thought
of dear mamma and of the pleasure the little
gift would bring to her was uppermost in his
agony.

So we remember God even in our sharp an-
guish, and keep our loving hearts in our hands
to give to him who prizes the offering most
when we have held it safely amid trial and
pain, and come smiling through our tears to
present it.

“The little basket of meadow-flowers is

beautiful,” says mamma. “Golden-eyed dai-
» Say
64 LITTLE FLOY.

ses with the pretty, white frill; yellow sat-
in buttercups ; pink and white clover so sweet.
Thank you, my darling!”

It is almost worth being stung, to see
mother’s joy over these simple treasures.
She sprinkles them with fresh water, hangs
the basket in the shady window, and nev-
er looks at it once through the afternoon
that there does not: come before her eyes the
vision of a cherub boy, almost a baby, with a
round, sparkling face and golden curls, in the
very midst of the blossoms.

The children rest for a while upon the
garden bench. Foy brings her doll and her

work-box, and sews upon the new dress that
THE BEE. 65

Alice has found time to cut and baste together
for her.

How nimbly the little fingers fly! and how
fast the shining steel goes back and forth in
the pretty fabric!

The stitches are even and nice, for mamma
has been careful to teach her little daughter
long ago. By and by she will be very help-
ful in making up the family linen, and will
be glad of every patient stitch set in her
childhood.
CHAPTER IX.

MATTIE RUDD.

BAREFOOTED, ragged little girl

comes in at the garden gate, and



stands gazing wistfully at neat little Floy
sewing under the apple-tree.

Floy drops her needle in a minute, and
goes to meet her, for her heart pities her
forlorn condition, so like her torn soiled
dolly.

She knows who it is, — Peter Rudd’s little
girl, from the old house at the edge of the

woods. The father keeps himself drunk with
66
MATTIE RUDD. 67

whisky, and the mother and child suffer for
food and clothing.

“Tll give you one of my frocks, if mamma
will let me,” says Floy, leading the little girl
into the house.

She remembers what her mother has often
said, — “that no day is well spent when some
good action is not performed toward the
needy, some word of kindness and sympathy
spoken, some help given over hard places,
some tears wiped away, some wounded soul
* bound up, some naked body covered, some
hungry mouths filled.”

It is drawing toward the evening, and God

who loves to see his children growing in his
5
68 . LITTLE FLOY.

own blessed likeness, has sent this opportunity
to crown this day with good. Floy is so happy
at the thought, and her face is full of joy as
she asks mother for the frock.

“You can not well spare it,’ says mamma,
“I make so few for you now that you grow
fast.”

“But this is such a poor ragged thing,”
says Floy, holding .the child’s tattered gar-
ment in her fingers.

“There is your strong plaid gingham,” says

mamma. “If you think you can be careful

enough with your other dresses to spare this, °

you may run and get it for Mattie, if it will
fit her.”

i i ae
MATTIE RUDD, 69

“May I take her up-stairs and dress her?”

“Yes ; in the kitchen chamber you will find
soap and water and towels, and a comb and
- brush. Let me see what you can make of
your little friend.”

Floy is the happiest creature in the world,
as she trudges up the stairs, holding Mattie
by the hand and thinking what kind of a
little girl will come down with her again.

She scrubs the child’s face and hands
with a_soft sponge, and laughs merrily as
she sees the fresh fair skin, for Mattie has
one of those complexions that never tan, and
it is only dirt and neglect that keep it so

dull and brown.
70 LITTLE FLOY.

°

Floy washes the little dusty feet until they
shine with a pink glow and show the blue
veins. Then she combs the flaxen hair, and
ties a blue ribbon around to keep it from
her eyes, and when the neat plaid frock is
buttoned up, she mounts Mattie in a chair
by the mirror to see the change.

Nothing in all the day has given her
such delight as this taking the poor child
out of the mire and making her sweet and
tidy. :

“Now you must try to keep so, Mattie,”
she says; “at least you can have your face
and hands and feet always clean. ° God gives

every body pure water enough to use.”

»


Floy and Mattie. Page 70.
Pages
71 - 72
Missing

From

Original
MATTIE RUDD. 73

The little girl almost thinks the figure in
the glass some other child. She scarcely
knows herself, so great is the change. Floy
thinks it a good time to. teach her a les-
son as to keeping neat and tidy in the fu-
ture.

“It helps us to see ourselves just as we
are,” says Floy, “so that if any thing is
wrong or out of the way about us, we can
make it right. There’s a little broken piece
in the wood-house that you shall carry home
to dress by, and mamma will give you a
comb, and a sponge and towel, so there
will be no excuse for tumbled hair or soiled

skin any more.”
74, LITTLE FLOY.

“Some fairy has been at work,’ says
mamma, as Floy leads the changed Mattie
before her again. “It is worth parting with
every extra garment to see how beautiful it
makes the destitute!”

Mamma looks from one child to the other.
“Not only is Mattie transformed, but there is
an added grace fo Floy’s face,” she says to
her own heart. “Her soul is so happy that it
shines out. I hope she will all her life long
be as willing as now to help the poor and
needy.”

“Such a heap of good things!” says Mat-
tie as she runs home, feeling very rich and

grand,




Pp:
age
74










































































MATTIE RUDD. 75

She is so wonderful in her new frock
and pretty smooth hair, that Peter does not
go out for whisky after tea, but is content
to sit and look at his bright little girl, and
hold her on his lap, and talk to her like
a kind father, as he would always be but
for the poisonous drink, and her mother
thinks there never was so beautiful a figure
in the world as this little girl that went away
dirty and ragged like a beggar’s child, and re-
turned like a princess in royal robes. " It
takes so little to satisfy the poor and. make

them joyous and glad.
CHAP TER Xs





PAPA.
KANG ND what has my Floy been doing all
LMS Nei
ie Au this summer day?” asks papa, as he



comes from the city to his quiet country-
house, and lifts the little daughter to her
favorite perch on his knee.

“Trying to help you and mamma by doing
all that I thought would please you, dear -
papa.”

“You see I am home a half-hour earlier
‘than usual,” says her father. “I think I owe

it to the good resolutions made this morning,
16
PAPA. 77

for I felt that all would be earnest to keep
them, and that made my heart so light
that I worked with a will, and so was en-
abled to take the first train to the village.
There’s nothing like bright glad home faces
to help a man in his business, and quicken
his steps toward the old roof-tree.”

Papa does not look as if he had a care
in the world, as he sits in his big easy-chair
with mamma at his right hand, and Floy and
Willie and Ben clustering about him, with
their loving hearts on their lips as they prat-
tle pleasantly.

“Tt is so refreshing,” he says, “to come

away from the dust and business of the city,
78 LITTLE FLOY.

to this dear home that God has given me!
Mother,’ —that is what he always calls his
wife, —“I don’t think heaven itself would
be much happier to me than this sweet Chris-
tian household, but for the immediate pres-
ence of God, and the freedom from tempta-
tion to sin.”

That is such a blessed thing for a man
to be able to say. And it is so delightful
for wife and children to feel that they can
help to make this earthly home something
like the heavenly, at least so that there shall
be a certain foretaste of immortal joys.

The sun that rose this morning to awaken

little Floy with a warm kiss, and stir her up
PAPA, . 79

to the day’s duties and pleasures, touches her
head with a a sort of blessing as it sinks to
rest, and seems to say, “God has helped you
to be his own little girl to-day, my darling,
and he has spread glory and beauty all over
your pathway. Don’t forget to thank him as
you go toyour bed, and ask him to keep you
for ever under his guidance and protection.”

And Floy looks at the rosy light as it
grows fainter and fainter in the western sky,
and thinks of the beautiful land where “ there
shall be no night, but the night shall be
as clear as the day, for the Lord God and
the Lamb shall be the light thereof.”

THE END,