Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text









Narrow Escape
(rS defeats FortWhite
000017 120110 ***, 3DI
LI OO FLORIDA HISTORYIT 326
20 BOX 117007
I205 SMA- UNIV OF FLIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943




Lake cu,


Complaint Dumped
Grand jury decides against investigating
opulent Florida appellate courthouse.
State, 3A





reporter


Thursday, September 30, 2010


'ter.com


Vol. 136, No. 217 0 75 cents


SRWMD sets budget at $56.5 million


District adopts
village for fiscal
year 2010-2011.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The Suwannee River
Water Management District
has sealed a budget of $56.5
million and an unchanged
millage rate for the upcom-


ing fiscal year.
The district's governing
'board adopted the budget
and a millage rate of 0.4399
mills Tuesday for the 2010
to 2011 fiscal year, which
begins Oct. 1.
Because of decreased
property values, the dis-
trict has lowered taxes
about $300,000 districtwide
by keeping the same mill-
age rate.


"Due to the hard economic times ...
the district has chosen not to place
extra burden on the taxpayer."
Melanie Robert
Director of mission support
SRWMD


Property owners with a erty taxes to the district
taxable value of $100,000 under the adopted millage.
would pay $43.99 in prop- Melanie Robert,


SRWMD director of mis-
sion support, said that the
tax rate has remained the
same since fiscal year 2008.
There is no change in the
village from the current
fiscal year.
"Due to the hard eco-
nomic times and the fact
that many of the district's
constituents are receiving
tax increases in other areas,
the district has chosen not


to place extra burden on
the taxpayer," she said.
The upcoming fiscal
year's budget will fund
numerous services .to the
public, such as completing
a water supply assessment
to develop a plan for the
Upper Santa Fe River Basin
and promoting protection of
natural resources with the
SRWMD continued on 3A


Flu-shot season


County prepares for H1N1 virus,

vaccinating dozens of residents


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Diana Simon, a registered nurse for the Columbia County Health Department, checks Fluzone flu vaccine syringes before
administering them to patients. It's recommended that anyone over the age of 6 months get yearly flu vaccines,' she says.
'It's better to get it for prevention than actually going through the flu itself.'


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
L ess than a week
into the Fall
season of 2010,
sporadic cases
of H1N1 influ-
enza have been reported
in different parts of the
county, and health depart-
ments across the nation
are inoculating people
with flu vaccines.
Hugh Giebeig,
Columbia County Health
Department administrator,
said more than 100 local
residents were inoculated
Tuesday alone.
"We're doing flu shots
by appointment. I think
we did a little over 100
(vaccinations) Tuesday,"
he said. "We could prob-
ably do a little more in a
day, but it's a pretty steady
business right now. That's
why we do it by appoint-
ments - so we can get


JASON MATTHEW WALKERIFLake City Reporter
Diana Simon administers a flu vaccination to Connie
Roberts on Wednesday. 'I get it every year,' Roberts says.
'People need to come and read the information and make
their own decisions.'


people in and out instead
of having them line up.
Hopefully we can get them
in and out-pretty quick."
About three weeks ago
the Columbia County
Health Department
received about 250 doses


of flu vaccine. Local health
department officials are
expecting to receive 550
doses of the flu vaccine
this season.
Flu vaccines cost $25
and Medicare part B is
accepted. The vaccina-


tions are being done
by appointments on a
first-come, first-served
basis. Residents can call
758-1069 to schedule an
appointment.
"Right now we have
more than 200 doses and
we have more coming,"
Giebeig said. "Several
drug stores are giving
flu shots, too, so as far
as I know there is plenty
of vaccine available right
now."
This year's flu vaccine
will cover three types of
influenza, including the
H1N1 virus and two other
strains.
Giebeig said he hasn't
received any notice from
the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
in Atlanta regarding influ-
enza predictions for the
flu season, but noted he's
read newspaper articles
FLU-SHOT continued on 3A


CCSO: Lake City

woman cooked

meth at home


Hazmat workers
dismantle druglab,
remove chemicals.
From staff reports
A Lake City woman
was arrested on charges
of manufacturing and pos-
sessing. methamphetamine
in a home on County
Road 240,.according to a
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office report released
Wednesday.
The Columbia County
Multi-Jurisdictional Task
Force on Tuesday seized an
active methamphetamine
laboratory after serving a
search warrant at 11199
S.W. County Road 240 in
Lake City. According to the
report, detectives served
the warrant at 5:45 p.m.
after they received com-
plaints from local residents
about possible illegal drug
activity in the home. .
. Detectives discovered
the drug laboratory in the
home "and seized multiple


items used in the manufac-
ture of methamphetamine,
according to reports.
Heather Hutchinson, 25,
was arrested in the home
and charged with manufac-
turing methamphetamine,
possession of drug para-
phernalia and possession
of methamphetamine.
Hutchinson was booked
in the Columbia County
SDetention
Facility
wi thout
incident,
reports
state. She
is held on
$41,000
Hutchinson bond.
A haz-
ardous-material contractor
assisted the task force in
dismantling the lab and
removing chemicals and
equipment. Those items.
will be sent to a hazmat-
approved disposal facility.
CCSO expects further
arrests relating to this inci-
dent as the investigation
continues.


Officials explain

November ballot's

economic impact


'Rudder team'
expresses support
for Amendment 4.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Two questions scheduled
to appear on the November
ballot could have a major
impact on Columbia
County's economic future.
On Wednesday morn-
ing, more than 20 members
of the Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority rudder team
spoke about the importance
of educating local voters
about Amendment 4, and
a local resolution offering
businesses tax exemptions.
The rudder team is not
in favor of Amendment 4,
a proposed amendment to
the Florida Constitution.
Amendment establishes
that before a local govern-
ment may adopt a new com-
prehensive land use plan,
or amend a comprehensive


land use plan, the proposed
plan or amendment shall
be subject to vote of the
electors of the local govern-
ment by referendum, fol-
lowing preparation by the
local planning agency, con-
sideration by the governing
body and notice.
Brian Kepner, Columbia
County
planner,
explained
how the
amend-
ment could
impact the
Kepner county if
adopted and addressed the
board about the county's
comprehensive land use
plan, noting that roads,
the aquifer and protection
of natural resources have
been big issues lately.
Tyson Johnson, chair-
man of the IDA rudder
team, said voting "no" on
Amendment 4 allows the
BALLOT continued on 3A


AN~~~~ -r A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


86 6y
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


, l" Opinion
y "Obituaries
Advice & Comics .
Puzzles ... ..
Health .....


. 4A
... 3B
2B
8A


TODAY IN COMING
HEALTH FRIDAY
H.::.., nu I L teen to c,) npete
P. i- rh 1 t,:t pa 2earflt


II! 1!!1










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010


H 3, Wednesday:
Afternoon: 4-1-5
Evening: 3-9-9


"A
E


Wednesday:
ternoon: 5-4-9-9
Evening: 5-8-9-0


Tuesday:
10-16-18-21-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Director of 'Bonnie and Clyde' dies


NEW YORK


Bonnie and Clyde" wasn't
a movie that director
Arthur Penn wanted to
make, but when he final-
ly agreed to, he made
sure that the violence provoked
by the lawbreaking couple from,
the 1930s - and that led to the
protagonists' bullet-riddled demise
- wasn't disguised.
"I thought that if were going to
show this, we should SHOW it,"
Penn recalled. "We should show �
what it looks like when somebody
gets shot"
His cinematic art, he noted, only
reflected the times: TV coverage
of Vietnam "was every bit, per-
haps even more, bloody than what
we were showing on film."
The director died Tuesday
night, a day after his 88th birth-
day, leaving behind films - most
notably "Bonnie and Clyde" and
"Little Big Man" - that refash-
ioned movie and American history,
made and broke myths, and sealed
a generation's affinity for outsid-
ers.
Daughter Molly Penn said
her father died at his home in
Manhattan of congestive heart
failure. A memorial service will be
held by year's end, longtime friend
and business manager Evan Bell
said Wednesday.
Penn - younger brother of the
photographer Irving Penn - first
made his name on Broadway as
director of the Tony Award-win-
ning plays "The Miracle Worker"
and "All the Way Home," then rose
as a film director in the 1960s,
his work inspired by the decade's
political and social upheaval.
"Bonnie and Clyde," with its mix
of humor and mayhem, encouraged
moviegoers to sympathize with the
marauding robbers, while "Little
Big Man" told the tale of the con-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 15, 2007, file photo, director Arthur Penn waves during a photo-
call at the 57th International Film Festival in Berlin where he was awarded the
Honorary Golden Bear for his lifetime achievement.


quest of the West with the Indians
as the good guys.


off Portland Ovations' 80th season.


. Hulk Hogan settles
Lza Minnelli falls ill, lawsuit over cereal ad
a.... KIA:B A aia aa


canUleis r, aine c;OlUt;Ci
PORTLAND, Maine - Singer
Liza Minnelli has canceled a concert
in Maine because of an illness.
The mayor of Portland had
expected to give singer a key'to the
city after her per-
formance at Merrill
Auditorium on
Wednesday night
' But the arts orga-
nization Portland
Ovations says
Minnelli fell ill before
Minnelli her afternoon sound
check and could not
perform as scheduled. She was on
her way back to New York City.
The 64-year-old was expected to
sing her greatest hits and material
from new CD, "Confessions," to kick


TAMPA - Hulk Hogan no longer
has a beef with Cocoa Pebbles.
The wrestler sued the cereal
Smoker Post Foods LLC in May,
claiming his likeness was being
used in an ad without his permis-
sion. The St. Petersburg Times
reported Wednesday that the suit
had been settled.
Hogan, whose real name is Terry
Bollea, took issue with a "Cocoa
Smashdown" TV ad featuring a
blond-haired wrestler with a cham-
pionship belt and mustache that
resembled Hogan.
Hogan's attorney, Joseph W. Bain,
wouldn't disclose the terms of the
settlement, but says the commercial
is no longer being aired and the
lawsuit has been dismissed.

N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Angie Dickinson
is 79.
* Singer Johnny Mathis is
75.
* Former Israeli Prime
Minister Ehud Olmert is 65.
* Actor John Finn (TV: "Cold
Case") is 58.
* Actor Barry Williams is 56.
* Actress Fran Drescher is
53.


0 Actor Eric.Stoltz is 49.
0 Actress Lisa Thornhill is 44.
0 Actress Andrea Roth is 43.
E Actor Tony Hale is 40.
R Actress Jenna Elfman is
39.
0 Actor Mike Damus is 31.
0 Tennis player Martina
Hingis is 30.
* Actress Lacey Chabert is
28.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ...........752-9400
Circulation .............. 7555445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E.- Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated,Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
if you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer.........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Kathryn Peterson .754-0417
(kpeterson@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................. $26.32
24 Weeks ..................$48.79
52 Weeks ................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks..... .......... $41.40
24 Weeks .................$8280
52 Weeks....... ...... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,' please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


Tropical storm
warnings ended
MIAMI - Forecasters
say a fraying Tropical
Storm Nicole could still
drop heavy rains over
South Florida and the
Keys.
Nicole developed
Wednesday over Cuba
after soaking the island
with downpours as a tropi-
cal depression.
By early Wednesday
evening, the storm's center
was about 165 miles west
of Nassau, Bahamas, and
moving north-northeast
at 12 mph. The National
Hurricane Center expects
the storm to dissipate by
Thursday.
Forecasters say four to
eight inches of rain were
possible across South
Florida and the Keys as
the storm pushes into the
Atlantic near the Bahamas.
The Florida Panthers
canceled their preseason
hockey game against
the Carolina Hurricanes,
but schools were open
Wednesday.

Man killed
during shootout
PENSACOLA- A
Pensacola man was killed
and an Escambia County
deputy was wounded dur-
ing a gunfight at an appar-
ent motel room meth lab.
The Florida Department
of Law Enforcement
reports that 21-year-old
Michael Scott Lee was
killed, and Deputy Jason
Ates was shot in the
upper thigh at a Motel 6
Wednesday morning.
Ates and another deputy
were at the motel looking
for Eric James Sherbutt
after a family member
reported concerns for his
safety. A debit card pur-
chase led authorities to the
motel.
The deputies went to
Sherbutt's room, where


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Walking in Florida rain
Debby Faber (left) and Janroelof Schenkel of the Netherlands
walk in the rain along Ocean Drive in Miami Beach
Wednesday. Forecasters say four to eight inches of rain
were possible across South Florida as Tropical Storm Nicole
pushes into the Atlantic near the Bahamas.


they found him, Lee and
an unidentified woman.
The deputies called for
backup a few minutes later.
It wasn't immediately clear
who shot Lee or Ates.


seven years.
Hernandez's attorney,
Michael Feiler, says he is
"hopeful and optimistic
that they can learn to coex-
ist and be good parents
together."


Priest gets equal
time, child custody Ex-students told
nf w.SCritv hrearch


PEMBROKE PINES
- A South Florida priest
on indefinite leave will get
equal time and custody
of the child he conceived
with a former stripper.
David Dueppen's attor-
ney, Raymond Rafool, con-
firmed Wednesday that his
client and the child's moth-
er, Beatrice Hernandez,
entered into a settlement
agreement earlier this
week. Under the agree-
ment, which must be final-
ized by a judge, Dueppen
will also pay monthly child
support.
Dueppen joined the
priesthood in 1999
and stepped away in
August after Hernandez
approached the arch-
diocese. He is no longer a
practicing priest.
Hernandez says she's
been Dueppen's on-again,
off-again girlfriend for


vI wvvuum n m
TALLAHASSEE - The
University of Florida
has notified 239 former
students that a computer
security breach has com-
promised their Social
Security numbers and
other personal data.
School officials said they
mailed letters to the for-
mer students Wednesday.
They could not find con-
tact information for anoth-
er 54 students.
The information was
part of a web-accessible
archive of computer sci-
ence class information cre-
ated by a faculty member
in 2003.
The university had used
Social Security numbers to
double as student identifi-
cation numbers until 2003
when the practice was
stopped.
N Associated Press


STHE WEATHER



PARTLY U MOSTLY r MOSTLY COATED SLATED
CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY SHOWERS SHOWERS


HI 86 L 60 HI86 L060 HI83 L05 H182 LO56 HI78L054

REIOA FRCSMAfoThrdySetme30


Mdost
85/59


Pensacola
86/64-


Talahassee.
87/59 ,
'\. V
Panama Cit
86/63


* Jacksmle


City Friday
Caa CanauAral 81, 74 /


83/70/s
87/75/pc
89/72/s.
85/62/pc
84/62/s
87/79/s
86/60/pc
88/74/pc
88/72/s
87/63/pc
86/67/s
86/65/s
87/64/s
86/61/s
89/72/s
86/59/s
86/73/pc


Lake Ciy 85/62 Daytona Beach
86/60 Ft. Lauderdale
Cnesvile Dayitna Beach Fort Myers
"86/61 8368 Galhesville
S,0ca * . Jacksonville
L 7/61 MI.Key West
OUlado Ca uaveral Ke
S 87/68 471 Lake City
87/68 OMlamI
Tasta.* Naples
88/ West Palm B Ocata


FL Myer
89/70


Key
86/


AKE CT AL


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal hign
Normal low,
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


-84
71
85
65
94 in 1972
50 In 1967

0.00"
1.34"
38.41"
4.26"
41.02"


SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset today
Sunrise torm.
Sunset tom.

MOON.
Moonrse today
Moonset today
Moonrse torm.
Moonset tom.


Saturday
85/73/pc
84/70/pc
88276/pc
90/72/pc
84/59/pc
82/59/pc
87/78/s
83/57/pc
88/75/pc
92/72/pc
86/61/pc
86/69/pc
86/61/pc
84/63/s
86/55/pc
89/70/pc
85/54/pc
87/74/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


I
weather.com


7:23 a.m.
7:17 p.m.
7:24 a.m.
7:16 p.m.


2:02 p.m.
12:30 a.m.
2:52 p.m.


Sept. Oct. Oct. Oct.
30 7 14 22
Last New First Full


6

30 ias to bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0.
to 10+.

OF8 .


Forecasts, data and graph-
SIcs � 2010 Weather Central
f.uc LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Daily Scripture

"Everyone who does evil hates
the light, and will not come into
the light for fear that his deeds.
will be exposed. But whoever lives
by the truth comes into the light,
so that it may be seen plainly that
what he has done has been done
through God." - John 3:20-21


Lake City Reporter


88/74 *, Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
89/77 * Pensacola
Naples , Tallahassee
88/,73 Mlami Tampa
\ 90/75 Valdosta
/7* -"/" W. Palm Beach
17a


- ---L----


~,_ I ~ ~_~,_


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


L VDER B-IE HOU













.^ Grand jury won't probe


'Taj Mahal' courthouse


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Leanna Roberts gets her temperature taken to ensure that she hasn't developed a fever.


FLU-SHOT: Vaccine good for season


Continued From Page 1A
indicating there were
reported cases of H1N1 in
Central Florida.
"There's nothing
going on as a big issue
at this point," he said,
adding that the CDC is
encouraging everyone
older than six months
to get vaccinated.


"There are no target
groups - everyone get-
ting vaccinated is what
they are encouraging."
Giebeig said flu sea-
son can start at any time
and health officials are
already seeing sporadic
cases across the coun-
try.


"The earlier you get
a flu vaccine, the better
off you are in case flu
season starts earlier.
It takes a while for the
vaccination to start tak-
ing effect," he said. "For
anyone who gets vacci-
nated now, it will cover
the entire flu -season."


SRWMD: Evaluating water supply


Continued From Page 1A
Ichetucknee Partnership.
Robert said that, among
the services with bud-
get allotments, the most
important is evaluating the
district's water supply and
establishing the Minimum
Flows and Levels to protect
area water resources. '
Florida statutes mandate
the district to establish and
implement MFLs on area


rivers, springs and lakes,
Robert said.
'This actually sets a level
of flow that our water bod-
ies cannot fall under with-
out experiencing harm,"
she said.
Although .the district is
receiviig- less ini "ad 'valor-
em taxes and state funding
has been withdrawn, it will
provide the same public


services on less funding,
Robert said.
'The district will contin-
ue to evaluate our efforts
and projects in order to be
as efficient as possible with
taxpayer dollars," she said,
"as well as provide the pub-
lic with natural resources
and protection of those
natural resources for the
future."


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
- A grand jury decided
Wednesday against investi-
gating a citizen's complaint
about a $48 million appel-
late courthouse so opulent
that.critics are deriding it as
a 'Taj Mahal."
The new home of the 1st
District Court of Appeal in
Tallahassee has become a
political football with politi-
cians blaming each other
for approving a sprawling
structure replete with a
rotunda, dome and columns
modeled after Michigan's
Supreme Court building.
Other features include
private bathrooms with
granite countertops for
each of the 15 judges as
well as big-screen televi-
sions and kitchens.
State Attorney Willie
Meggs said the grand
jurors didn't say why they
turned aside the complaint
but that he personally didn't
think there was any crimi-
nal wrongdoing by judges
who sought the project or


lawmakers who approved
it
'They went through
all the proper channels,"
Meggs said. "Nobody was
trying to hide the fact it was
going to built as a court-
house."
That contrasts with grand
theft and other criminal
charges
S Meggs is
pursuing
against
' former
Florida
House
Speaker
Crist R a y
Sansom for a $6 million
appropriation to Northwest
Florida State College for a
building at the airport in
Destin. That's Sansom's
hometown, about 15 miles
from the Niceville campus.
Meggs alleges Sansom
hid the building's intended
purpose as a hanger for
use by a political support-
er by labeling a joint use
emergency management
facility in the state budget
A motion to dismiss the
charges against Sansom


and two co-defendants is
pending.
Meggs has declined to
disclose the identity of the
citizen who complained.
"I get lots of these,"
Meggs said. "Most of them
don't generate any inter-
est"
This one, though, has
drawn plenty of attention
from the news media and
politicians.
Loranne Ausley, the
Democratic candidate for
chief financial officer, has
cited the courthouse as an
example of wasteful spend-
ing by Republicans who
control the Legislature such
as her opponent, Senate
President Jeff Atwater.
Gov. Charlie Crist, a for-
mer Republican now run-
ning for the U.S. Senate as
an independent, blames
his Republican rival, Marco
Rubio, who was House
speaker when the project
was funded in 2007. Crist,
though, signed the budget
that included the court-
house and a bill that includ-
ed a bond issue to fund the
project


BALLOT: Team supports resolution


Continued From Page 1
people who are in charge
of economic development
in our community to have
much more flexibility when
dealing with prospective
employers and attracting.
new employers into the
marketplace.
'These employers hire
people, they pay taxes and
those taxes benefit our-
school system," Johnson
said. "Our school system is
already starving for funds
and it doesn't look like it's
going to get better for them
anytime soon. Voting "no"
on Amendment 4 will allow
much more flexibility, not
just for ourcommunity,. but.
for the State of Florida, to
continue to thrive until this


economy turns around."
Columbia County voters
will also have the oppor-
tunity to vote on a reso-
lution which would allow
the Columbia County
Commission to grant
Property Tax Exemptions
to new businesses and
existing businesses who
are expanding.
The rudder team is sup-
porting local residents vot-
ing in favor of the resolu-
tion.
Doyle Crews, Columbia
County property appraiser,
addressed the board and'
detailed how the tax exemp-
tions _work and .explained
what happens when the
zoning on a property chang-


es and how that property is
then appraised.
Johnson later spoke about
the impact the resolution
could potentially have on the
inland port
"Voting "yes" on tax abate-
ment gives our local econom-
ic development officials the
opportunity to provide not
only economic .incentives,
but incentives for employers
to locate here," he said. "It
kind of softens the blow of
the initial investment they
have to make, but those tax
abatements or refunds gen-
erally comeketilci o tlis com-
munity multiple times over
igajnjn .the form of payroll
and additional taxes that
aren't abated."


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LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


t~lli ~'~8"8; j
~JC~Sd~F~�,, :-~
d� .:'-�:


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OPINION


Thursday, September 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Because

disaster can

strike like

lightning
C communication is
crucial to providing
services during any
emergency situation
- Florida's magne-
tism for tropical weather and
the lessons our nation learned
from 9/11 have taught us this.
Because of this, it is also cru-
cial to have in place a backup
system for communication
should an emergency remove
first-line options such as radio
dispatch.
Columbia County's backup
system was tested following a
fluke lightning strike Sunday,
and it passed - communication
between law enforcement, fire
and rescue and 911 remained
intact. Due to protocol and the
prescient purchase of redun-
dant parts to repair a damaged
communications tower, no
emergency situations through-
out the county were in danger
of going unreported.
Without such forward think-
ing not only would vital com-
munication between emergency
services had been in jeopardy,
but it could have remained that
way for more than a month.
Had the county not commis-
sioned the prior purchase of
the spare parts necessary to
correct Sunday's damage, the
repair could have taken as long
as six weeks. Instead, the tower
was again operational within
hours.
Minus a crystal ball, the
authorization of funding for
"maybe" scenarios is never
easy, but when those "maybes"
involve the public health it's the
right thing to do. There is no
telling how many crises will be
averted because of redundant
communication systems now
in place - and if such forward
thinking continues on.the part
of public officials and top law
enforcement agencies, we may
never have to know.

HIGH LI GHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, Sept 30,
the 273rd day of 2010. There
are 92 days left in the year.
* On Sept. 30,.1954, the first
nuclear-powered submarine,
the USS Nautilus, was commis-
sioned by the Navy.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
- This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and'hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
* typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Heeding the fickle voice of the people


fortunately, the politi-
cians of Campaign
2010 have finally
heard and heeded
the voice of the
people.
Unfortunately, the vox populi
resonated loud and clear, yet
again: "Please lie to me."
True to their craft, the candi-
dates have rushed to give the
people what they've said they
wanted. Just listen for yourself.
Here's the latest sound bite
from the voice of the people
when asked who they blame for
the sad state of the U.S. econo-
my and who they trust to fix it
(according to the latest survey
by CNN/Opinion Research
Corp. pollsters).
The people blame
Republicans in Congress most
for today's economic woes: 41
percent of adult Americans
said Republicans in Congress
"responsible for the country's
current economic problems,"
while just 35 percent blamed
Democrats in Congress.
But the people then say they
most trust the Republicans in
Congress to fix today's eco-
nomic woes: 47 percent said
Republicans in Congress are
more likely to improve the
economy; wpile just 41 percent
said Democrats in Congress
are more likely to improve the
economy.
Please do not adjust your
dials. That's precisely what the
American people are saying tell-
ing the pollsters. And they are
saying it because they really
believe it
Here's why they believe:
Because Republicans offer
them what sounds like a pain-
less prosperity. The people
heard Republicans' recite their
Campaign 2010 "Pledge to
America" - and it sounded
like sweet mantra to their ears.


Martin Schram
.martin.schrom@gmail.com,
What's not to like? Everybody
gets to keep getting tax cuts and
the federal deficit will somehow
go down. Details, shmetails!
Don't worry your head about
the details now, .we'll tell you
once we get back into control of
Congress.
Republicans learned long
ago that if they give the people .
details of what must be cut to
keep taxes going up and the def-
icit going down, they will only
make new enemies out of those
who want to be trusting friends.
So they indulge in the politics
of lying by withholding the rest
of the truth - the part about.
the cuts you will have to make
in their favorite government
services, subsidies, benefits,
and of course those earmarked .
public necessities (which are in
your congressional district), and
are not to be confused with bad
earmarked boondoggles (which
are in someone else's district).
Republicans just declare
themselves proud, pay-as-you-go
Republicans, recite their Pledge
- and say nothing more.
Telling lies and half-truths is
hardly a new political master
plan. In the 1960s, President
Lyndon Johnson assured
America that we can afford
what became known as "guns
and butter" - we could spend
to fight the Vietnam War and
still pay for the Great Society
domestic programs he cham-
pioned. Richard Nixon cam-
paigned for president promising


America that he.had a secret
plan to end the Vietnam War;
but he had no such plan.
Ronald Reagan assured
Americans we could sharply
increase defense spending, cut
taxes, cut government and bal-
ance the budget - but the defi-
cit soared and the government
grew.
Yet when people reflect upon
the Reagan presidency, in their
mind's eye they see a leader
who made us proud of our coun-
try and our presidency.
Fastforward: Today, all
polls say one issue concerns
Americans far more than
any other - unemploy-
ment Americans may blame
Republicans for policies that
* led us into this economic mess,
and may even believe President.
Obama stimulated the economy
enough to end the downward
spiral. But America is wallowing
in a jobless recovery and every-
ohe seems to feel it and fear it
And when people think about
the Obama presidency, they
.do not see that he has been
leading a fight to create jobs.
Nor do they see any image in
their mind's eye of Obama as
a jobs president Instead, they
see his historic health plan but
then hear Republicans blame it
for future deficits and bad out-
comes.
Substantively and symbolical-
ly, Obama, thegreat campaign
communicator and an intellectu-
al president, has failed to create
a plan, let alone communicate.a
mastery, of the issue that con-
cerns Americans the most ,
Which is why people today
are willing to roll their dice and
vote once more for the party
they blame for today's mess.

* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


o shock. Next lead-
er of North Korea
will be a Kim.
Had events fol-
lowed the script,
Kim Jong II would be introduc-
ing his oldest son, Kim Jong
Nam, 39, as his designated suc-
cessor to the Workers' Party
Assembly just as his father had
at the last assembly 30 years
ago. But the younger Kim was
caught using a fake passport
to make an unauthorized visit
to Tokyo Disneyland, and this
proved.to be a career killer.
Instead, the senior Kim this
week introduced his youngest
son, Kim Jong Un, to North
Koreans as their likely next dic-
tator by making him a four-star
general. Even by the secretive
standards of North Korea, the
"Young General," as the local
media have taken to calling him,
is a mystery.
He is believed to be 27. He
is known to have spent at least
a year at a Swiss boarding
school. And he attended a mili-


tary academy named after his
grandfather in Pyongyang. Only
two photos of him are known
to exist in the West, one taken
by the family cook when he
was quite young. Nothing in his
skimpy r6sum6 suggests that
he is even remotely qualified to
head a small and economically
failing state, especially one with
nuclear weapons and a belliger-
ent foreign policy.
His father had the benefit of
14 years as an understudy to his
father, Kim II Sung, the founder
of the North Korean state,
when the Great Leader died in
1994. The Dear Leader's need
to groom a successor took on a
sudden urgency two years ago
when he suffered an apparent
stroke. He has not looked at all
well since.
North Korea watchers say
that, in addition to his senior
military post, young Kim will
probably also be named to a
couple of political posts. They
describe his elevation as a try-
out, a sort of probation, with the


military watching carefully.
Passing a military dictator-
ship down through three gen-
eratipns will be something of a
first in modern history. Perhaps
to ensure that'the family busi-
ness remains in the family, Kim
also promoted his sister, Kim
Kyong Hui, 64, to four-star gen-
eral's rank. She is married to
Jang Song Thaek, the vice chair-
man of the National Defense
Commission, the most powerful
institution in North Korea.
If Kim is ailing, his sister and
her husband are ideally situated
to act as regents to give their
nephew time to grow into the
job. That may prove to be tricky
since, after 62 years of one-fam-
ily rule, there has to be a lot
of pent-up ambition in North
Korea's military and political
hierarchies.
Young Kim could effectively
remove one potential rival by
naming older brother Kim Jong
Nam the CEO of Pyongyang
Disneyland.
a Scripps Howard News Service


L


Sharon Randall
www.shoronrandall.conT


My phone

affair with

Mike still

on the line
eet my new
best friend,
Mike. I can't
remember his
last name, but
I've got his number on speed
dial.
Lately, I spend more time
talking to him than I do to
Myself. Which is to say, Mike
and I talk a lot. This is Mike,"
he shouted into the phone
when I called him this morn-
ing. In the background I could
hear what sounded like a
swarm of killer bees, or hope-
fully, I thought, for Mike's
sake, a really big electric drill.
"Hey, Mike," I said, "how's
your mama and them?" That
greeting was lost on Mike.
Bad connection, maybe. Or
perhaps it's that he's not from
'the South, and never learned
to appreciate the art of such
pleasantries. Or maybe he just
had bigger fish to fry than to .
stand around chewing the fat
with a woman who birddogs
him like a duck on a June bug.
"Hello, Mrs. Randall," he
said in a pleasant tone much
like that a nurse.might take
with a patient under anesthe-
sia. "What can I do for you
today?". ...
It was one of a dozen calls
I'd spentthe morning making
to various sources for various
reasons, and I had to think
hard for a minute to remember
why exactly I had called him.
Oh, right The roof. It leaks.
My phone affair with Mike
'began when my husband and I
decided we needed to. repair a
leaky roof on the patio.
The "we" in this case meant
"me," of course. My husband
left for work as usual. And I
- because I work at home
and will jump at any chance to
avoid it.- began making forty-
leven phone calls (the number
my mother preferred when -
quantifying things unquantifi-
able) to get bids and estimates.
When I called the company
that built the house, they sent
an inspector, who agreed it
was a problem in the construc-
tion. They'd redo the roof (hal-
lelujah!), but we had to remove
the solar panels and sunshades.
My job was to be around
whenever they arrived and let
them in the backyard. I was
good at that. But I was not
much good at being happy
about it.
That occurred to me this
morning after talking to Mike.
I'd told him we were con-
cerned about possible water
damage inside a column, so
he offered to delay the stucco
work and send some guys to
cut into the post to let us take
a look. It would take longer,
but he wanted us to be happy..
I hung up the phone think-
ing about what he'd said.
Happy? Suddenly I recalled
months ago, listening to a
friend, seeing the look in her
eyes as she described how it
felt to come home one night
to find on her door a notice of
foreclosure.
There's a fine line between
having your roof repaired and
having no roof at all. It's easy
to lose sight, to forget to be
thankful for things we take for
granted - good health, jobs,-
food on our table, friends and
loved ones who drive us half
* crazy - blessings in disguise.
Tomorrow I will call Mike to
thank him and his crew for all
their patience and good work.
Happiness is a matter of per-
spective. Let's hope I remem-
ber that a few months from
now when we start ripping out
our tile floors.
* Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394
Henderson NV 89077.


4A


OTHER OPINION N


No surprise: N. Korea's next ruler a Kim










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010 5A


Refinance will save school system $270K '4. I .


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.corn

FORT WHITE -
Officially refinancing $2.3
million of debt will save
the county school district
about $270,000 over three
consecutive years, savings
that will begin in the cur-
rent school year, a district
official said Wednesday.
The Columbia County
School Board unanimously'
approved a staff recom-
mendation at its meeting
Tuesday to refinance the
debt at a lower interest rate
bank loan, which will incur
the savings.
The interest rate will
decrease from 5.15 percent
to about 3.7 percent and
the repayment on the loan
is on a 17-year schedule.
'The district will save


interest over the next 17
years and the decision
frees up cash flow for the
current three years," said
Mary Loughran, district
director of finance.
The debt to be repaid was
in the form of Racetrack
Revenue Bonds and is the
balance left from building
Summers Elementary.
Loughran said the origi-
nal debt stems from a capi-
tal outlay issue in 1973 that
was almost paid off, but
was refinanced to add the
Summers Elementary debt
in 1998 to take advantage
of the interest rate at the
time.
Money saved from the
recent refinance decision
- sales tax revenue from
the state --will be used as
needed, Loughran said.
. "It depends on where the


board directs it," she said.
In addition, the board
unanimously approved
Nabors, Giblin &Nickerson,
PA. to serve as bond coun-
sel and Gollahon Financial
Services Inc. as financial
adviser.
A new auditorium at Fort
White High School was dis-
cussed at the Tuesday meet-
ing and officially planned
for when the board unani-
mously adopted its annual
Five-Year Plan for the 2010
to 2011 school year, a plan
outlining state funding
to be put toward capital
projects for five consecu-
tive years. The project will
cost about $3 million and is
scheduled in the Five-Year
Plan for the 2013 to 2014
school year. It was cut from
the school's original plan
because of cost.


Keith Hatcher, principal
of Fort White High and
Fort White Middle, said the
auditorium is necessary so
the drama program and
music programs can have
a venue to use rather than
the gymnasium. It would
also be an asset to the com-
munity, Hatcher said.
'The schools down here
are really the hub of the
community anyway," he
said. "I can foresee this
auditorium really enhanc-
ing that."
Charles Maxwell, school
board member, said the
board should consider a
"layaway auditorium" and
saving money for the proj-
ect.
"I do urge the board to
keep this a.focus and make
this a reality as soon as we
can," he said.


KATHY RIOTTO/Lake City Reporter

Autumnal puzzle brings prize
Lake City Reporter classified ad representative Bridget Lopez
congratulates newspaper subscriber Ernie Creel for the win-
ning entry in the Reporter's Autumn Word Search contest.





No Runaround, -- No Hassle


Could 'Goldilocks' planet be just right for life?


GBIS Disability, Inc.


Free Consultation


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
WASHINGTON
Astronomers say they have
for the first time spotted a
planet -beyond our own in
what is sometimes called
the Goldilocks zone for life:
Not too hot, not too cold.
Juuuust right.
Not too far from its star,
not too close. So it could
contain liquid water. The
planet itself is neither too
big nor too small for the
proper surface, gravity and
atmosphere.
It's just right. Just like
Earth. .
'This. really is the first
Goldilocks planet," said co-
discoverer R Paul Butler of
the Carnegie Institution of
Washington.
The new planet sits
smack in the middle of
what astronomers refer
to as the habitable zone,
unlike any of the nearly 500
other planets astronomers
have found outside our
solar system. And it is in
our galactic neighborhood,
suggesting that plenty of
Earth-like planets circle
other stars.
Finding a planet that
could potentially support
life is a major step toward
answering the timeless
question: Are we alone?
Scientists have jumped
the gun before on proclaim-
ing that planets outside our
solar system were habitable
only to have them turn out
to be not quite so condu-
cive to life. But this one is
so clearly in the right zone
that five outside astrono-
mers told The Associated
Press it seems to be the real
thing.
'This is the first one I'm
truly excited about," said
Penn State University's Jim
Kasting. He said this planet


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated handout artist rendering provided by Lynette Cook, National Science
Foundation, shows a new planet, right. Astronomers have found a.planet that is in the
Goldilocks zone - just right for life. Not too hot, not too cold. Not too far from its sun, not too
close. And it is near Earth - relatively speaking, at 120 trillion miles. It also makes scientists
think that these examples of habitable planets are far more common than they thought.


is a "pretty prime candi-
date" for harboring life.
Life on other planets
doesn't mean E.T. Even a
simple single-cell bacteria
or the equivalent of shower
mold would shake percep-
tions about-the uniqueness
of life on Earth.
But there are still many
unanswered questions
about this strange planet.
It is about three times the
mass of Earth, slightly
larger in width and much
closer to its star - 14 mil-
lion miles away versus 93
million. It's so close to its


version of the sun that it
orbits every 37 days. And
it doesn't rotate much, so
one side is almost always
bright, the other dark.
Temperatures can be as
hot as 160 degrees or as
frigid as 25 degrees below
zero, but in between - in
the land of constant sun-
rise - if would be "shirt-
sleeve weather," said co-
discoverer Steven Vogt of
the University of California
at Santa Cruz.
It's unknown whether
water actually exists on the
planet, and what kind of


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atmosphere it has.
The astronomers' find-
ings are being published-
in Astrophysical Journal
and were announced
by the National Science
Foundation on Wednesday.
. The planet circles a star
called Gliese 581. It's about
120 trillion miles away, so.
it would take several gen-
erations for a spaceship
to get there. It may seem
like a long distance, but
in the scheme of the vast
universe, this planet is "like
right in our face, right next
door to us," Vogt said.


Call
Mary or Bridget
TODAY to place a
surprise ad for
someone you Love!
755-5440 or
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ARREST REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent unless
proven guilty.
Friday, Sept. 24
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Albert Richard
Allen, 26, 9587 226 Place,
O'Brien, possession of a
controlled substance, pos-
session of drug parapher-
nalia and retail theft.
* James D. Allen, 27,
504 NW Carrie Court, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charge of driv-
ing while license suspend-
ed/revoked.
* Autumn Leigh
Beeman, 36, 153 NW
Sugar Glenn, possession
of a controlled substance
(Xanax) and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
* Franklin Lamar Davis,
23, 169 NE Colvin Ave.,
burglary of an occupied
dwelling, driving while
license suspended/
revoked (habitual) and
resisting arrest without
violence.
* Joshua Walter Feagle,
23, Columbia County
Detention Facility, war-


rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charges
of burglary of a structure,
dealing in stolen property
(trafficking) and uttering a
forgery.
* Stephen John Lewis,
19, 830 SW Bobcat Drive,
Fort White, grand theft
and burglary of a convey-
ance.
* David Justin Medlock,
18, 145 SE Circus Drive,
High Springs, grand theft
and burglary of a convey-
ance.
* Kimberly Dawn
Reigner, 35, 1413 Chablis
Court, Orange Park, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on the original charges of
possession of drug para-
phernalia, failure to drive
in a single lane and failure
to obtain replacement driv-
ers license.
* Ashley Shafer,
25, Columbia County
Detention Facility, warrant:
Third-degree grand theft.
Saturday, Sept. 25
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Thomas Murray
Gordon, 39, 200 SE
Hanover Place, possession
of cocaine and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
* Tyler M. Strength, 18,
336 NW Kenmore Glen,


grand theft auto and deal-
ing in stolen property.
Lake City
Police Department
* Stanley Wilson
O'Quinn, no age given,
179 SE McCray St., aggra-
vated battery (domestic
violence).
Sunday, Sept. 26
Columbia County
Sheriff' Office
* Christina Marie
Edwards, 34, 428 NW
County Road 25-A, aggra-
vated battery (domestic
violence).
* James Leon Queen
Jr., 19, 1854 SW Judy
Glen, aggravated stalking,
burglary with battery and
battery.
Monday, Sept. 27
Columbia Cotnty
Sheriff's Office
* Jennie Raye Jarrell,
31, 155 SE Spring Court,
warrant: Uttering a forg-
ery (two counts) and
third-degree grand theft.
* Cody Alan Martin,
22, 133 SE Savannah Glen,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charges
of forgery and uttering a
forgery.
* Brandy Sandage, 26,
236 SW Paradise Glen,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charges


of possession of a con-
trolled substance.
* Tavarez Maurice
Smith, 31, 2426 S.
Timberlane St., Lakeland,
warrant: Lewd or lascivi-
ous exhibition in the pres-
ence of corrections staff.
* From staff reports


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Page Editor: Torm Mayer, 754-0428











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today

Fall Jubilee at SOSMP
Suwannee River Fall
Jubilee is at 7 p.m. today
until Saturday at the Spirit
of Suwannee Music Park.
The event includes three
nights of gospel music.
Advance ticket prices are
$30 per person for all three
nights. Tickets at the gate
are $15 per person for
each night. Call (386) 364-
1683 to purchase tickets or
visit the website at www.
musicliveshere. com.

0wo Days of high praise
G.L. Hawthorne is the
guest speaker at Miracle
Tabernacle Church at 7:30
p.m. today and Friday.
Hawthorne is the pastor
of New Life Deliverance
Center in Winter Haven.
MTC is located at 1190 SW
Sister's Welcome Road.
Call Audre' at (386) 344-
9915.

Blood pressure checks
Free Blood Pressure
Checks are 11 a.m. to 12
p.m. today at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.

Lyceum Series opening
Internationally-known
singer and songwriter


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Gondolier Restaurant offers sweet experience
Dimitrios Sioutis (center), the co-owner of Gondolier Italian Restaurant & Pizza, samples
some of the sweet desserts on display during the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce mixer on Sept. 23. Pictured are Anson Simque (from left), general manager Tim
Pappas, co-owner/manager Dimitra Pappas, Sioutis, Joel Toigo and Dennille Folsom.


Stella Parton is performing
at 7 p.m. today at Florida
Gateway College in the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. She is the open-
ing performance of this
season's FGC Lyceum
Series, a yearly series of
shows. Tickets for the show
are $15 for adults, $14 for
seniors (age 55 and older),
and $13 for Florida Gateway
College staff and students


and students from other
schools. Season tickets
for the entire 2010-2011
Lyceum Series are avail-
able. Call (386) 754-4340.

SOS meeting
' Robert L. Knight is the
guest speaker at the Save
Our Suwannee meeting at
7 p.m. today at Fort White
Community Center. His
presentation, "Restoring


Florida's Springs" will help
identify the biggest chal-
lenges to Florida springs
and share the most prom-
ising solutions.

Friday

Craft workshop
An aromatherapy work-
shop is at 10 a.m. Friday
and on Oct. 8, 16 and 23 at
the Stephen Foster Folk


Cultural Center State
Park. The cost is $100.
Students will learn how to
use essential oils for bet-
ter health and how essen-
tial oils are created. They
will receive a notebook
and an essential oil kit.
A minimum of 24-hour
advanced registration is
required. Call (386) 397-
1920 or visit www.stephen-
fosterCSO.org.

SOSMP variety show
The "Mike Mullis
Variety Showcase is 7 p.m.
Friday at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Hall.
This is an event for all
ages. The $5 admission fee
can be used as a voucher
toward a meal and quali-
fies for a prime rib dinner
giveaway. Call (386) 364-
1683 for details.

Craft workshop
I An aromatherapy
workshop is at 10 a.m.
Oct. 1, 8, 16 and 23 at
the Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State
Park. The cost is $100.
Students will learn how to
use essential oils for bet-
ter health and how essen-
tial oils are created. They
will receive a notebook
and an essential oil kit.
A minimum of 24-hours
advanced registration is


required. Call (386) 397-
1920 or visit www.stephen-
fosterCSO.org.

Saturday

Yard sale
The Wellborn Communiy
Association is hosting a
fall yard sale from 7:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
at the community center.
A 12x12 space is $5. Tent
and table must be sup-
plied. Also, a blueberry
pancake breakfast is from
7:30 to 10 a.m. Prices
are $5 for adults and
$3 for children. Lunch
will be available and the
Bloodmobile will be at
the event. Call Wendell
at 963-1157 or visit www.
wellborncommunityasso-
ciation.com.

Ford fundraiser
Drive one for your
school is .9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday at Rountree-
Moore Ford Lincoln
Mercury, 2588 US Hwy.
90 West. Ford Motor
Company is donating $20
per test drive to a club or
organization of the driv-
er's choice at Columbia
High School. The goal
is 300 test drivers for
$6,000.


OBITUARIES


John Louis Anschultz
Mr. John Louis Anschultz, 50
of Lake City passed away early
Wednesday morning, September
29, 2010 at the Haven Hospice
Suwannee Val-
ley Care Center
in Lake City.
A native of
Detroit, Michi-
gan, John has
lived in Lake
City since
1972 moving,
here with hissfAiil frbrif De-
troit.-He was a graduate of the
Columbia High Slchool d~lis of
1978 and a member of Epipha-
ny Catholic Church. John was
known as a "Jack of all trades"
by his family and friends. He
enjoyed spending time with his
family and his friends. John
was preceded in death by his
father, James W. Anschultz in
2006 and an infant son, John
Louis Anschultz, Jr. in 2002.
Mr. Anschultz is survived by
his wife, Tammy J. Anschultz,
two sons, Matthew and Michael
Anschultz and one daughter,
Alaina Anschultz all of Lake
City, his mother, Janet An-
schultz, Gainesville, two broth-
ers, Paul Anschultz (Angela),
Lake City and Peter Anschultz
(Wendy), Hawthorne, two sis-
ters, Adana Anschultz, Gaines-
ville and Kim Anschultz, Lake
City and 6 nieces and nephews.
A funeral mass for Mr. Anschultz
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.,
on Saturday, October 2, 2010, at
Epiphany Catholic Church with
Father Michael Pendergraft offi-
ciating. Interment will follow at
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens
at a later date. Visitation with
the family will be from 5-7:00
PM Friday evening at the funeral
home. In lieu of flowers dona-
tions may be made to the Epiph-
any Catholic School at 1937
SW Epiphany Ct., Lake City, Fl
32025. Arrangements are under
the direction of GUERRY FU-
NERALHOME, 2659 SW Main
Blvd., Lake City. 386-752-2414

Georgia Keith
Georgia Keith a life long resi-
dent of Fort White, Florida (97
Years) passed away peacefully
on September 26, 2010 at Haven
Hospice in Lake City, Florida.
She is remembered by one son
Nathaniel Keith, one Godson
Billy Mack and one daughter
Virginia Bing (Clyde), three
grandsons, Greg Sr., Clyde Jr.
and Fredrick Bing, seven great-
grand children and a host of oth-
er family members and friends.
The family will receive friends
for visitation at Antioch Baptist
Church, in Fort White, Florida
from 4-7 PM, Friday, October 1,
2010. Funeral services will be at
11:00 AM, Saturday, October 2,
2010 at Antioch Baptist Church,
in Fort White, Florida. Interment
will follow at Fort Call Cem-
etery located in Lake Butler,
Florida. Please send all flow-
ers to Antioch Baptist Church,
in Fort White, Florida. Profes-
sional Mortuary services pro-
vided by CHARLES T. HALL
FUNERAL HOME
of Live Oak, Florida.

Lucy Pennell Means
Lucy Pennell Means, 84, of the
Mikesville community, died
Sunday, September 12, 2010.
She was born in Abbeville,


South Carolina, on November
26, 1925. She received her AB
degree from Erskine College,
Due West, S.C. and her MA
from Presbyterian School of
Christian Education, Richmond,
VA. She was former director of
Christian Education in Presbyte-
rian churches in FrederickSburg
and Clifton Forge, VA, as well
as Memphis, TN. For a number
of years she wrote Christian Ed-
ucation curriculum for the Pres-
byterian Church US, and was au-
thor of several children's books
distributed by the denomination.
Her marriage brought her to
Florida in 1970, where she be-
came an active member of the
historical Mikesville Presbyteri-
an Church. She applied her train-
ing and experience as she served
within this loving congregation.
She was preceded in death by her
parents, Mr. Clarence H. Pennell
and the late Mrs. Pennell, by her
sister, Lillian Pennell of Staunton,
VA; and by her husband, Mr.
David Harold Means, a lifetime
resident of the Mikesville com-
munity.' She is.survived by her
brother, Mr. John C. Pennell and
his wife, Linda, of Houston ,TX
; by her nephews, Frank Pennell
and Jake Pennell of Houston,
TX; by her sister-in-law, Mar-
jorie M. Brown of Lake City:
by her niece, Cherilyn Clements
Moses and her husband, Noidre,
of Lake City; and by her neph-
ew, Donald Emery Brown and
his wife, Becky, of Orlando, FL.
A memorial service for Lucy


will be held at Mikesville Pres-
byterian Church this Sunday,
October 3rd at 2:00 P.M. with
the Rev. Rhonda Link-Cum-
mings officiating. Private family
interment services were previ-
ously conducted in the church
cemetery. The family requests
that in lieu of flowers, dona-
tions be considered for Mikes-
ville Presbyterian Church,
384 SE Clubhouse Lane, Lake
City, FL 32055. Arrangements
were under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL "HOME, 45' - ,
Marion Ave., Lake Ci., Fl
752-1234 . Pl.. i. o"L1
on-line family guest book at
parrishfamilyfimeralhome. com

Jerry K. SpiVey
Mr. Jerry K. Spivey, 62, of
Lake City died on Wednesday,
.September 29, 2010 at the V.A.
Medical Center
in Lake City,
FL. A native of
Tampa, Jerry had
lived most of his
life in Lake City. He graduated
from CHS in 1967, then entered
the U.S. Army and spent 2 tours
in Vietnam, where he received
the Purple Heart, National De-
fense Service Medal, Mechan-
ics Badge, Sharpshooter Expert
Badge, Vietnam Service Medal
with 3 Bronze Stars, and the
Vietnam Campaign Medal. He
retired from PCS Phosphate as


an engineer after 25 years of ser-
vice. He was a loving husband,
father, and grandfather, who en-
joyed fishing, buying and refur-
bishing antiques, and was an avid
Gator Fan. Jerry was preceded in
death by his father, Curtis Spivey.
He is survived by his wife, Terri
Bedenbaugh 'Spivey: mother,
Lucille Spivey Denison; daugh-
ters, Shane (Brandon) Beadles,
Destiny (Brent) Whitcomb, Ta-
batha (Ryan) Hudson & Hunt-
er Rose all of Lake City, FL;
brother, Bobby (Janice) Spivey
of Steinhatchee, FL;, sister,
Nancy (Larry) Jordan of Lake
City; grandchildren, Laura Van
Beadles, Gamble Whitcomb,
Gavin Hudson and Talon Hud-
son of Lake City also survive.
Graveside funeral services will
be conducted at 11:00 a.m.
Saturday, October 2, 2010 in
Bethel United Methodist Church
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the
family requests that donations
be made to the Lake City V.A.
Medical Center, ATTN: Volun-
tary Services, 619 South Marion
Ave., Lake City, FL, 32024,
(In Memory of Jerry Spivey in
memo line), or the National Pri-
on Disease Pathology Surveil-
lance Center (Case Western Re-
serve University) 2085 Adelbert
Rd. Room #219 Cleveland, OH
44106-4907 in Jerry's honor.
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home 3596 U.S. Hwy 441 S.
Lake City, FL 32025, (386) 752-
1954. Please sign the guest book
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com


Lassie Curinton Thomas
After a lengthy illness, Mrs.
Lassie Curinton Thomas, affec-
tionately known to her nieces
and nephews as "Aunt La" qui-
etly answered
her Master's
call on Sunday
night, Septem-
ber 26, 2010.
She was born
on January
31, 1922,
in Colum-
bia County to the late Mizell
and Ivy Jones" - Curinton: -
Mrs. Thomas was a member
of Trinity United Method-
ist Church where she served
"faithfully in several posi-
tions. She lived a very active
and meaningful Christian life.
She was a graduate ofRichardson
High School and Bethune-Cook-
man College, DaytonaBeach, FL,
where she received her B.A. De-
gree in Business Administration.
Mrs. Thomas was united in
Holy matrimony to Mr. Ar-
thur Mann Thomas in 1958,
who preceded her in death.
Two siblings also preced-
ed her. in transition, Dea-
con Francis H. Curinton
and Mrs. Lillie C. Williams.
Celebrating her homegoing
and cherishing sweet memo-
ries are her sisters: Ms. Rosa
L. Curinton, Lake City, FL and
Mrs. Oretha V. Jackson, Jack-


sonville, FL; nephews, Pastor I.
L. Williams (Betty) Lake City,
and Mr. Harold Wright, Tallahas-
see, Fl; nieces, Ms. Debra Jack-
son, Jacksonville, Fl; Ms. Karen
Chatfield, Pompano Bch, Fl;
Mrs. Linda Emamdie (Michael),
St. Augustine, Fl; and Mrs. Lisa
Simpson (Brett), Tallahassee, Fl;
grandnephews, Mr. Harold, Mr.
Darold Wiliams and Mr. Chris-
topher Wright; grandnieces;
Ms. Andrea Jackson-Lucas, Sa-
mantha, Michelle and Danielle
Emamdie; Cpurtney. and Sid-
ney Simpson; beloved cousins
and caregivers, Mt Ervin and
Mrs. Geraldine Curinton, and
Mrs. Joyce Tunsil and numer-
ous other relatives and friends.
The Homegoing celebration will
be held at Trinity United Meth-
odist Church, Rev. Fatha De-
Sue, Pastor, 310 NE Dr. Martin
L. King Jr. Drive on Saturday
October 2, 2010 at 11:00 AM.
The family will receive friends
at Trinity United Methodist
Church on Friday October 1,
2010 from 5-7 PM. Arrange-
ments are entrusted to the care of
COMBS FUNERAL HOME,
292 NE Washington Street,
Lake City, Fl. (386)752-4366,
Marq Combs-Turner, LFD.
"The Caring Professionals"

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


YOUR OLD COLUMBIA

COUNTY FAIR PHOTOS

The Lake City Reporter
will be publishing the
56th Annual Columbia
, - . County Fair Magazine.


SWe are looking for old fair
_A. photos from our readers.
- If you have interesting, fun
fair photos let us know!

Digital photos can
be submitted via
iL . e-mail to Josh at
jblaclon @ lakecityreporter.com
Please indcde your name, address, phae,
date of photo and photo descaiptos.
Or stop by the Lake City
S Reporter to have us
scan your photos.
" Monday-Friday
* 8am-5pm

Lake City Reporter
180 E. Duval Street
Lake Ci'y, FL 32055


Magzin cll Kahyr at(36) 54-41


IT ~ Is I I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424







LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010 7A






U.S. GOVERNMENT


OBVERSE 'REVERSE
U.S. WEST POINT MINT
GOVERNMENT GOLD
FULL REFUND IF NOT 100% SATISFIED

CHECK OR BANK WIRE ONLY .,
S24 HOURS A DAY "


FINAL 3,832 GOLD

COINS AVAILABLE

AT-COST
The United States Coin and Gold Reserve
Main Vault Facility today announces THE
FINAL RELEASE OF U.S. GOV'T ISSUED
GOLD COINS previously held in the West
Point Depository/U.S. Mint. For the first time
in recent history, U.S. citizens can buy Gov't
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cost price of only $143.13 each. An amazing
price because these U.S. Gov't Issued Gold
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up. That's correct, our cost. Gold, which re-
cently skyrocketed past $1,200 per ounce,
is predicted by experts to have the explo-
sive upside potential of reaching $5,000 per
ounce in the future. Please be advised: our
U.S. Gov't Gold inventory priced at $143.13
per coin could sell out. Call immediately to
avoid disappointment! Orders that are not
immediately received or reserved with the
order center could be subject to cancellation.
Good luck. We hope that everyone will have
a chance to purchase this special U.S. Gov't
Issued Gold at-cost. If you are not completely
satisfied with your Gold purchase, we offer a
100% money back guarantee. Order imme-
diately before our vault sells out completely!
Call Toll-Free 1-877-316-9696 today.

FULL REFUND IF NOT 100% SATISFIED


* All Americans are advised to buy * By Executive Order of Congress
Government Issued Gold. Public Law 99-185, Americans can
now buy new Government Issued Gold.


* Smart individuals are moving up to
30% of their assets into U.S. Gov't Gold
Coins.
* $50,000 in U.S. Gov't Gold Coins
could be worth up to $250,000 in the
future.
* Now could be the best time to
take your money out of the
bank and transfer it into U.S.
Government Gold Coins.

7---- r,- --.-.
" . .. . .1 :


' �1 ,


* Congressionally authorized United
States Gold Coins provide American
Citizens with a way to add physical
Gold to their portfolios.
* Gold American Eagles are always
sold through special U.S. Mint
Distributors. The United States
Coin and Gold Reserve has a special
allocation of this Gold from an official
U.S. Mint Distributor.


~~..........
AIL al~u~
vi ' M


I "1~~P'I


AUTHORIZED BY CON RKSSo OFFICIAL LEGAL TENDE


Special Arrangements made for Gold
S orders over $50,000
1- GOVERNMENT ISSUED GOLD COIN $143.13
(PLUS INSURANCE, SHIPPING & HANDLING $31.00)
5 - GOVERNMENT ISSUED GOLD COINS $715.65
(PLUS INSURANCE, SHIPPING & HANDLING $31.00)
10 - GOVERNMENT ISSUED GOLD COINS $1,43130
(PLUS INSURANCE, SHIPPING & HANDLING $36.00)
DUE TO EXTREMELY HIGH GOLD DEMAND, GOLD COIN
PRICES COULD CHANGE. A LIMIT OF 10 COINS ($1,431.30) PER
-HOUSEHOLD IS STRICTLY ADHERED TO.

OFFER EXPIRES: OCT. 27, 2010
0


t


a ~ wwwwo % ,%~ i�Of m -ffa%'%�-









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010


ON HEALTH







Dr. Peter Gott
MD


Son, 12,

still wets

the bed

D EAR DR.
GOTT:My
son is 12
years old and
had never wet
the bed until recently. Now,
all of a sudden, he has wet
the bed for the past seven
nights in a row. We have
taken him to see a doc-
tor, but thus far they have
taken a urine sample that
came back normal.
DEAR READER:
Bedwetting, also known as
nighttime incontinence or
nocturnal enuresis, is com-
mon in children up to age 6
or 7. This is because blad-
der control may not be fully
established, meaning the
bladder may not signal that
it is full, causing the child
not to know that he or she
needs to urinate.
Most children outgrow
bedwetting on their own. By
age 5, 15 percent of children
wet the bed, and this is fur-
ther reduced to less than 5
percent ofchildren between
ages 8 and 11. It affects boy
more than girls. ADHD and
a family history of bedwet-
ting increase the child's risk.
Most cases of bedwetting
are simply due to a slow
development of the central
nervous system. It may also
be the result of a small blad-
der, a hormone imbalance,
urinary-tract infection, dia-
betes, sleep apnea, chronic
constipation, stress or a
defect in the neurological or
urinary system. It is never
the result of the child being
too lazy to get out of bed at
night or being unclean.
Because your son is 12
and didn't previously wet the
bed on a regular basis, his
pediatrician or a pediatric
urologist should examine
him to determine whether
there is an underlying rea-
son. You said your son had a
urine sample taken but don't
mention what he was tested
for. There are different types
of urine tests with the most
basic done in office with the
aid of a small testing strip
to determine if there are
abnormal levels of protein,
white blood cells, etc. This
.lest is insufficient at detect-
ing an infection; therefore,
he should undergo a clean-
catch urine test, which will
then be sent to a laboratory
to cheek for bacteria. If pres-
ent, the lab will then deter-
mine which antibiotic will be
most effective in eliminating
the infection.
Treatment isn't necessary
in most cases but varies
depending on the cause in
those instances when it is. It
is most important to be calm
and understanding with the
child, because there is no
control of the occurrence
that can lead to embarrass-
ment, anxiety and frustra-
tion.
Home remedies include
.avoiding caffeinated foods "
and beverages in the eve-
ning, limiting all fluid intake
at night, urinating on a -
schedule during the day and
double voiding before bed
(once at the start of the bed-
time routine and again just
before falling asleep). It may
also be helpful to use plastic
covers over the mattress


(under the sheets), using
* thick, absorbent underwear
to reduce urine leakage onto
the bedding, and keeping
an extra set of pajamas and
bedding nearby for quick
change.

* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet," available at
most chain and independent
bookstores, and the recently
published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Cookbook."


Debate: How much is a life worth?


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
Associated Press
BOSTON
- Cancer
patients, brace
yourselves.
Many new
drug treatments cost near-
ly $100,000 a year, spark-
ing fresh debate about
how much a few months
more of life is worth.
The latest is Provenge,
a first-of-a-kind therapy
approved in April. It costs
$93,000 and adds four
months' survival, on aver-
age, for men with incur-
able prostate tumors. Bob
Svensson is honest about
why he got it: insurance
paid.
"I would not spend that
money," because the ben-
efit doesn't seem worth it,
says Svensson, 80, a for-
mer corporate finance offi-
cer from Bedford, Mass.
His supplemental
Medicare plan is paying
while the government
decides whether basic
Medicare will cover
Provenge and for whom.
The tab for taxpayers
could be huge - pros-
tate is the most common
cancer in American men.
Most of those who have
it will be eligible for
Medicare, and Provenge
will be an option for many
late-stage cases. A meet-
ing to consider Medicare
coverage is set for Nov..
17.
"I don't know how
they're going to deal
- with that kind of issue,"
said Svensson, who was
treated at the Lahey Clinic
Medical Center in subur-
ban Boston. "I feel very
lucky."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bob Svensson is hooked up to a blood infusion machine'under the care of Nancy Grant, a.
registered nurse at the American Red Cross in Dedham, Mass., as he undergoes a $93,000
prostate cancer treatment in this Aug. 16 file photo.


For the last decade,
new cancer-fighting drugs
have been topping $5,000
a month.
Only a few of these
keep cancer in remission
so long that they are, in
effect, cures.
For most people, the
.drugs may buy a few
months or yeals. Insurers
usually pay if Medicare
pays. But some people
have lifetime caps and
more people are unin-
sured because of job lay-
offs in the recession. The
nation's new health care
law eliminates these life-
time limits for plans that
were issued or renewed
on Sept. 23 or later.
Celgene Corp.'s


Revlimid pill for multiple
myeloma, a type of blood
cancer, can run as much
as $10,000 a month; so
can Genentech's Avistin
for certain cancers.
Now Dendreon Corp.'s
Provenge rockets price
into a new orbit.
Unlike drugs that
people can try for a month
or two and keep using only
if they keep responding,
Provenge is an all-or-noth-
ing $93,000 gamble. Its a
one-time treatment to train
tie immune system to fight
prostate tumors, the first
so-called "cancer vaccine."
Part of why it costs so
much is that it's not a pill
cranked out in a lab, but a
treatment that is individu-


Exercise could cut womb

cancer risk by 30 percent


Associated Press

LONDON - Women
who regularly work up a
sweat exercising have a
30 percent lower risk of
developing endometrial
cancer, a new study says.
Researchers at the
United States' National
Cancer Institute analyzed
14 previous studies and
found physical activity
cuts the risk of endome-
trial cancer by 20 to 40
percent when compared
to sedentary women. The
study was published online
Wednesday in the British
Journal of Cancer. It was
paid for by the National
Cancer Institute.
Scientists have long

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ally prepared, using each
patient's cells and a protein.
found on most prostate can-
cer cells. It is expensive and
time-consuming to make.
Ifs also in short supply,
forcing the first rationing
of a cancer drug since
Taxol and Taxotere were
approved 15 years ago. At
the University of Texas
M.D. Anderson Cancer
Center, doctors plan a
modified lottery to decide
which of its 150 or so eli-
gible patients will be among
the two a month it can treat
with Provenge. An insur-
ance pre-check is part of
the process to ensure they
financially qualify for treat-
ment
"I'm fearful that this will'


become a drug for people
with more resources and
less available for people
with less resources," said
M.D. Anderson's prostate
cancer research chief, Dr.
Christopher Logothetis.
For other patients on
other drugs; money already
is affecting care:
* Job losses have led
some people to stop tak-
ing Gleevec, a $4,500-a-
month drug by Novartis
AG that keeps certain
leukemias and stomach
cancers in remission.
Three such cases were
recently described in the
New EnglandJournal of
Medicine, and all those
patients suffered relapses.
* Retirements are
being delayed to preserve
insurance coverage of can-
cer drugs. Holly Reid, 58,
an accountant in Novato,
Calif., hoped to retire
early until she tried cut-
ting back on Gleevec and
her cancer recurred. "I'm
convinced now I have to
take this drug for the rest
of my life" and will have
to work until eligible for
Medicare, she said.
* Lifetime caps on insur-
ance benefits are hitting
many patients, and laws are
being pushed in dozens of
states to get wider coverage
of cancer drugs. In Quincy,'
Mass., 30-year-old grad stu-
dent Thea Showstack testi-
fied for one such law after
pharmacists said her first
cancer prescription exceed-
ed her student insurance
limit "They said 'OK, that
will be $1,900,'" she said. "I
was absolutely panicked."
The federal health care law
forbids such caps on plans
issued or renewed Sept 23
or later.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


Thursday. September 30. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS WRESTING
Fundraiser at
Publix Friday
Columbia High's
wrestling program has
a fundraiser planned
at Publix on Friday.
Wrestlers will accept
donations from
3:30-6:30 p.m.
For details, call Kathy
Schreiber at 623-4266.

FORT WHITE SOCCER
Fundraiser set
for Saturday
The Fort White High
soccer program will be
accepting donations at
Winn-Dixie and Publix in
Lake City from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday.
For details, call coach
Perry Sauls at 752-3722.

CHS CHEERLEADING
Cheer Clinic
set for Saturday
A Future Tiger Cheer
Clinic will be sponsored
by the Columbia High
cheerleaders from 9 a.m.
to noon Saturday at the
CHS gym. Registration is
before the clinic and the
$25 fee includes a T-shirt
and snack. Participants
will have the opportunity
to perform at the CHS
junior varsity football
home game on Oct. 7.
For details, call coach
Debbie Godbold at
755-8080, Ext. 149.

YOUTH SOCCER
Winter league
registration set
Columbia Youth
Soccer Association's
winter recreational
league registration for
ages 3-16 is 6-7:30 p.m.
Thursday and 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday through
October atthe CYSA
clubhouse. Registration
fee is $65.
For details, call Scott
or Melody Everett at
288-2504 or 288-4481.

BOYS RANCH
Open house,
horse show set
The Florida Sheriffs
Boys Ranch Open House
and Horse Show is
Friday through Sunday.
Free primitive camping,
horse games and live
entertainment are among
the activities. Admission
is $5 for the weekend..
For details, visit
www.youthranches. org.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
* Fort White High
volleyball at Suwannee
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
* Columbia High JV .
football at Eastside High,
7 p.m.
* Fort White High
JV football at Keystone
Heights High, 7 p.m.
Friday
* Columbia High
football at Madison
County High, 7:30 p.m.
* Fort White High
football- vs. North
, Florida Christian School,
7:30 p.m.
Saturday
* Columbia High cross
country in Bale 'n' Trail
Cross Country Original
at Bartram Trail High,
8 a.m.
* Columbia High
swimming vs. Yulee High,
Fernandina Beach High,


9 a.m.


Indians play


numbers game


North Florida
Christian visits for
Friday kickoff.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE - Fort
White High and North
Florida Christian School
found each other last year
when both schools were
trying to fill out a schedule.
The two will complete
the second year of their
contract when the Eagles
visit Arrowhead Stadium on
Friday. Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.
Both teams are 3-1, with
the losses coming in week
one.
Since falling to Class 4A
Mosley High, North Florida
Christian has beaten FAMU,
Wakulla and Bishop Snyder
high schools. The win last
week was the district open-
er for the Eagles.
Fort White is a 2B
school, while North Florida
Christian is 1A. However,
the program roster ,from
2009 listed twice as many
Eagles as Indians.
'They have a big group


of guys, but it looks like
not as many two-platoon as
last year," Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
said on Tuesday. "Their
offensive and defensive
lines do two-platoon. Alexis
(Blake) and Trey (Phillips)
are probably the only ones
who will play both ways
for us and we will try to
limit their time on defense."
That deficit in numbers
hurt Fort White last year
in a 41-14 loss. The Indians
scored first on an 80-yard
bomb from Alex Gilmer to
Alexis Blake, but trailed
13-7 at the half.
North Florida Christian
led 20-7 after three quar-
ters and scored first in
the fourth quarter. After a
Gilmer sneak for a touch-
down, the Eagles tacked on
two late touchdowns.
Fort White was held to 30
yards rushing, Blake had
four catches for 101 yards
and AJ. Legree has three
catches for 33 yards.
"It was one time I didn't
think our' players. fin-
ished the game," Jackson
said. 'This week we will
concentrate on doing the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's JR Dixon (11) breaks between two tacklers against the Union County High
Tigers on Friday in Lake Butler.


little things and finishing
the game."
North Florida quarter-
back Clint Trinkett threw
three -touchdown passes
last year, and has joined
his coaching dad at Florida
State.
Nick Graganella caught
two of the touchdowns
totaling 64 yards, but is not
on the 2010 roster. Hehas
committed to play baseball
at Texas Christian.
Chris Carroll (two TD'
runs) and Wesley Bell (TD
catch) graduated. Warren


W . , � . _
S JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High senior Arden Sibbernsen (15) strikes the ball over the head of Fort White's
Kaycee Baker (4) Wednesday.


Hart had a 40-yard touch-
down run as a sophomore.
In last week's win over'
Bishop Snyder, Michael
Railey had three touch-
down runs. Quarterback
.Matt Dobson was 12 of 17.
for 250 yards and touch-
down passes of 15 and 79,
yards to Travis Rodney.
Travis Blanks had a 95-yard
interception return for a
touchdown.
"No. 8 (Blanks) is one
of their premier players,"
Jackson said. 'They are run-
ning the same style offense


as last year. Dobson looks
like more of a runner, but
he throws the ball good."
The Indians defense will
face many formations.
."They run a multiple
spread,, some with no back,
some doubles and some
triples," defensive coor-
dinator Ken Snider said.
'Their quarterback came in
late last year and hurt us
and he is much improved.
No. 20 (Hart) is a threat in
the backfield and they have
a great receiving corps.
They have a lot of athletes."


Close call


CHS grabs victory
in narrow escape
at Fort White.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.corn

FORT WHITE -
Columbia High showed up
late to Wednesday's meet-
ing against the Lady Indians
in Fort White, but rallied to
win in five sets.
Fort White jumped out to
an early two-set advantage
before the Lady Tigers got
things together in the third.
After jumping. out to an
8-0 lead, the Lady Tigers
allowed Fort White to slip
back into the fourth set and
tie the game at 19-19. A
third win would have given
the Lady Indians the game,
but the Lady Tigers held on
to win 25-17.
In the end, Columbia-
came away with the 15-25,
26-28, 25-17, 25-21 and 15-7
victory.
"We started out flat,"
Columbia High coach
Casie McCallister said.
"Arden Sibbernson was


sick, Taylor Messer has a
strained back and' TIHley:
Dicks .hyper-extended her
elbow. The battle showed
that we wanted it. Against
a team like that, you can't
come out flat."
Messer came up with an
all-around performance for
the Lady Tigers. She had
17 service points, nine kills
and five blocks.
Beth Williams led-with 18
assists. Jessie Bates had 11
digs to lead the Lady Tigers.
Taylor Owens had 14. ser-
vice points and Sibbernson
had eight kills.
Fort White coach Doug
Wohlstein thought his team
needed a few more big plays.
"When it was. time for a
big serve, we didn't come
up with it," he said. "You
have to give them the cred-
it They earned it"
Sarah Stringfellow led
the Lady Indians with 28
digs in the match. Lync6
Stalnaker had 14 service
points, five kills and 19 digs.
Angel Dowda had six kills,
two digs and six blocks.
Alison Wrench led the Lady
Indians with 22 assists.


New coach, same story


Howard expects
Cowboys to keep
old-style football.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Madison County High
will have a new coach calling
the shots when Columbia
High goes into Boot Hill
at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, but
Columbia High coach Craig
Howard believes it will be
the same Cowboys.
Mike Coe takes over the
head coaching spot after
serving as offensive coor-
dinator previously under
coach Frankie Carroll.
"They'll still be the same,"
Howard said. 'They'll bring
in the 3-4 defense and the
Wing-T will be. explosive.
(Kevin) Singletary is good,
but they may only throw
four times a game. They
have a stable of running
backs that play with a pas-
sion."


Going into Boot Hill will
be something that Howard
hopes prepares the Tigers
to play in any environment.
Making it out with a win is a
tough task for any team.
"We haven't been there in
a while, but they're passion-
ate about their football,"
Howard said. "It's kind of
out there on the farm, wide
open. Our 'players have
heard of the legendary Boot
Hill. They have a great fan
base, but we do too."
Last year, the Cowboys
came into Tiger Stadium
and came away with a one-
sided win. Howard doesn't
believe that a repeat perfor-
mance is on tap.
"That was well-played
high school football, but
we should be better," he
said, "Everyone knows
about Madison County.
We want to be Columbia
County."
Both teams enter Friday's
game with undefeated 4-0
records.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/ake City Reporter
Columbia High players (from left) Quaysean Monismith, Anjre Caldwell and Felix Woods
congratulate Darius Williams (far right) after Williams made a game-saving interception
against Buchholz High on Sept. 17.












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
5 p.m.
SPEED - ARCA, Kansas Lottery 150,
at Kansas City, Kan.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN -Texas A&M at Oklahoma St.
GOLF
4 p.m.
TGC - Nationwide Tour, Soboba
Classic, first round, at San Jacinto, Calif.
8 p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour,Viking Classic, first
round, at Madison, Miss. (same-day tape)
2:30 a.m.
ESPN - Ryder Cup, first round, at
Newport,Wales
UNITED FOOTBALL LEAGUE
6 p.m.
VERSUS - LasVegas at Florida

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
z-Tampa Bay 94 63
z-New York ' 94 64
Boston 87 70
Toronto 81 76
Baltimore 62 95
Central Division
W L
x-Minnesota , 92 65
Chicago 84 73
Detroit 80 77
Cleveland 67 91
Kansas City 65 92
West Division


Pct GB
.586 -
.535 8
.510 12
.424251/2
.414 27


W L Pct GB
x-Texas . 88 70 .557 -
Los Angeles 78, 80 .494 10,
Oakland 77 81..487 II
Seattle 61 97 .386 27
z-clinched playdff berth
x-clinched division
Tuesday's Games
Detroit at Cleveland, ppd., rain
N.Y.Yankees 6,Torbnto I
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 0
Seattle 3,Texas I
Chicago White Sox 5, Boston 4
Kansas City 10, Minnesota I
L.A.Angels 4, Oakland 2
Wednesday's Games
Texas 6, Seattle 5
LA.Angels 2, Oakland I,11 innings
Cleveland 4, Detroit 0, Ist game
N.Y.Yankees atToronto (n)
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, (n)
Detroit at Cleveland, 2nd game (n)
Boston at Chicago White Sox (n)
Minnesota at Kansas City (n)
Today's Games
Detroit (Bonderman 8-9) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 10-14),7:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels (Kazmir 9-15) atTexas (CI.
'Lee 12-9), 8:05 p.m. ,:'
Bqstop i,(Lester, 19-8) af Chicago
White Sox (Danks 14-11), 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Garza 15-9) at Kansas
City (Greinke 9-14), 8:10 p.m.
Toronto (Sh.Hill 1-2) at Minnesota
(Liriano 14-9), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 14-9) at Seattle
(Fister 6-13), 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Detroit at Baltimore; 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
LA. Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Oakland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
x-Philadelphia 95 64
Atlanta 90 69
NewYork 77 80
Florida 77 81
Washington 68 91
Central Division
W L
x-Cincinnati 88 70
St. Louis 82 76
Houston 75 83
Milwaukee 74 83
Chicago . 72 85
Pittsburgh 56 102
West Division
W L
San Francisco 89 68
San Diego 87 70
Colorado 83 75


Pct GB.
.597 -
.566 5
.490 17
.487171/2
.428 27

Pct GB
.557 -
.519 6
.475 13
.471131/2
.459151/2
.354 32


Los Angeles 78 81 .491 12
Arizona 64 '93 .408 25
x-clinched division
Tuesday's Games
Washington 2, Philadelphia I
Atlanta 3, Florida 2
Cincinnati 3, Houston 2
N.Y. Mets 4, Milwaukee 3
Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 2
L.A. Dodgers 9, Colorado 7
Chicago Cubs 5, San Diego 2
San Francisco 4,Arizona 2
Wednesday's Games
St. Louis 4, Pittsburgh I
L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 6
Milwaukee 8, N.Y. Mets 7, Ist game
Atlanta 5, Florida I
Philadelphia 7,Washington I
Houston 2, Cincinnati 0
Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 2nd game (n)
Chicago Cubs at San Diego (n)
Arizona at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Arizona (Enright 6-6) at San Francisco
(Bumgarner 6-6), 3:45 p.m.
, Chicago Cubs (Gorzelanny 7-9) at San
Diego (Garland 14-12), 6:35 p.m.
Houston (Myers 14-7) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 16-10), 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 11-9) at N.Y.
Mets (Gee 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Duke 8-14) at Florida
(Volstad 11-9), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 10-8) at St. Louis
(C.Carpenter 15-9), 8:15 p.m.
Friday's Games
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Sunday's Games
Denver atTennessee, I p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Buffalo, I p.m.
Seattle at St. Louis, I p.m.
San Francisco at Atlanta, I p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, I p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
New England at Miami, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Kansas City, Dallas, Minnesota,
Tampa Bay

College games

Today
Hampton (2-1) at Delaware St. (0-3),
7:30 p.m.
Texas A&M (3-0) at Oklahoma St.
(3-0), 7:30 p.m.
Tenn.-Martin (1-3) at Tennessee Tech
(1-3), 8 p.m.
Friday
BYU (1-3) at Utah St. (1-3), 8 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Saturday
No. I Alabama vs. No. 7 Florida,
8 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio State at Illinois, Noon
No. 3 Boise State at New Mexico
State, 8 p.m.
No. 4 Oregon vs. No. 9 Stanford,
1 1:15 p.m.
No. 5 TCU at Colorado State, 2 p.m.
No. 8 Oklahoma vs. No. 21 Texas at
Dallas, 3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Auburn vs. Louisiana-Monroe,
Noon
No. I I Wisconsin at No. 24 Michigan
State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 LSU vs.Tennessee, 3:30 p.m.
No. 16 Miami at Clemson, Noon
No. 17 lowa .vs. No. 22 Penn State,
8 p.m.
No. 18 Southern Cal vs.Washington,
8 p.m.
No. 19 Michigan at Indiana, 3:30 p.m.
No. 23 North Carolina State vs.
Virginia Tech, 3:30 p.m.
No. 25 Nevada at UNLV, 10 p.m.

GOLF

Ryder Cup

Site: Newport,Wales.
Schedule: Friday and Saturday, four
morning fourball (better-ball) matches
and four afternoon foursomes (alter-
nate-shot) matches; Sunday, 12 singles
matches.
Course: Celtic Manor Resort, The
Twenty Ten Course (7,378 yards,'par 71).
Television: ESPN (Friday, 3 a.m.-
I p.m.), ESPN2 (Friday, 1-10 p.m.) and
NBC (Saturday, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunday,
7 a.m.-I p.m.).
United States (c-captain's pick): c-
Stewart Cink, c-Rickie Fowler, Jim Furyk,
Dustin Johnson, Zach Johnson, Matt
Kuchar, Hunter Mahan, Phil Mickelson,Jeff
Overton, Steve Stricker, Bubba Watson, c-
Tiger Woods. Captain: Corey Pavin.
Europe: c-Luke Donald, England; Ross
Fisher, England; Peter Hanson, Sweden; c-
Padraig Harrington, Ireland; Miguel Angel
Jimenez, Spain; Martin Kayrper, Germany;
Graeme McDowell, Northern Ireland;
Rory Mcllroy, Northern Ireland;c-Edoardo
Molinari, Italy; Francesco Molinari, Italy; lan
Poulter, England; Lee Westwood, England.
Captain: Colin Montgomerie, Scotland.
Series: United States leads 25-10-2.
Last matches: In 2008 at Valhalla in
Kentucky, the United States won 16 1/2-
II 1/2 for its first victory since 1999.
Jim Furyk's 2-and-I victory over Jimenez
gave the U.S. team - playing without the
injured Woods - the decisive point.
Last week: Furyk won the Tour
Championship, earning $1.35 million for
the tournament victory and'$10 million
for the FedEx Cup title. He closed with
an even-par 70 for a one-shot victory
over Donald in a steady rain at East Lake
in Atlanta. Furyk has three victories this
year.... England's John Parry won the
Vivendi Cup in France for his first PGA
European 'Tour title, beating Sweden's
Johan Edfors by two strokes.
Notes:Woods has played on only one
winning Ryder Cup team in his career....
The United State hasn't won in Europe
since 1993 atThe Belfry....The team from
'Britain and Ireland vwas expanded in 1979
to include all of Europe. ...The course is
the first specifically for the Ryder Cup.
It combines nine new holes created by
European Golf Design and nine renovated
holes from the Wentwood Hills course
designed by Robert Trent Jones jr.... The




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each 'square,
to form four ordinary words..

MEFAL I I


2012 event will be played at Medinah
near Chicago.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Price Chopper\400
Site: Kansas City, Kan.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
1-2:30 ll.m.), qualifying (Speed, 4:30-
6 p.m.); Saturday, practice (ESPN2, 6:30-
7:30 p.m.); Sunday, I p.m. (ESPN2, noon-
I p.m.; ESPN, 1-4:30 p.m.).
Next race: Pepsi 400, Oct. 10, Auto
Club Speedway, Fontana, Calif.
Online: http://www.noscar.com
NATIONWIDE
Kansas Lottery 300
Site: Kansas City, Kan.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
3-4:30 p.m., 6-7 p.m.), Saturday, qualifying,
10 a.m.; race, 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2, 3:30-
6:30 p.m.)
Track: Kansas Speedway (oval, 1.5
miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: CampingWorld.com 300,
Oct. 9, Auto Club Speedway, Fontana,
Calif.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Next race: Kroger 200, Oct. 23,
Martinsville Speedway, Martinsville,Va.
INDYCAR
Cafes do Brasil Indy 300
Site: Homestead
Schedule: Friday, practice, qualifying.
(Versus, 4 p.m.); Saturday, race, 7 p.m.
(Versus, 6-9 p.m.).
Track: Homestead-Miami Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps..
Next race: 2011 season opener, Grand
Prix of St. Petersburg, March 27, Streets of
St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg.
Online: http://www.indycor.com
FORMULA ONE
Next race: Japanese Grand Prix, Oct.
10, Suzuka International, Suzuka,Japan.
Online: http://www.formula I.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Next event: Toyo Tires NHRA
Nationals, Oct. 8-10, Maple Grove
Raceway, Reading, Pa.
Online: http://www.nhro.com
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN'LE MANS SERIES: Petit
Le Mans, Saturday (Speed, 11 a.m.-9:30
p.m.), Road Atlanta, Braselton, Ga. Online:
http://www.omericonlemons.com

BASKETBALL

NBA preseason

Sunday
New York at Armani Jeans Milano
(Italy), 12:30 p.m.
Maccabi Haifa (Israel) at New Jersey,
7 p.m.

FIBA Worlds

SEIGHTH-FINALS
Wednesday
United States 83,Australia 75
Belarus 74, Greece 70
France 49, Canada 47
South Korea 65, Japan 64
Czech Republic 84, Brazil 70
Russia 76, Spain 67

Classification (13-16)
Wednesday
15th Place: Mali 69, Senegal 67, OT
13th Place: China 86,Argentina 60
QUARTERFINALS
Friday
Belarus vs. Russia, 7:15 p.m.
United States vs. South Korea,
9:30 a.m.
Australia ' vs. Czech Republic,
12:30 p.m.
France ys. Spain, 2:45 a.m.

Classification (9-12)
Friday
Greece vs. Japan, 3 a.m.
Canada vs. Brazil, 5 a.m.


HOCKEY

NHL preseason

Today's Games
Buffalo at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Atlanta' at Carolina, 1:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Columbus atWashington, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. .
Toronto at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Anaheim, 10 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


RAHDLE
- WHEN SHE INHERITED
THE WEAVING PVICFE,
| SHIE PFSCRIIEP IT1
GROANJ AN ---
S Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: L X I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PRIOR SHEEP POROUS EMPIRE
Answer: What an overloaded dock can create -
PIER PRESSURE


Florida-Alabama, round 1?


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

This Florida-Alabama
game might just be Round
1 for the seventh-ranked
Gators and top-ranked
Crimson Tide.
The last two seasons
Florida and Alabama have
met in the Southeastern
Conference championship
game, both times with a
trip to the national title
game on the line. Both
times the winner went on
to win it all.
Now for the first time
since 2006, Florida and
Alabama will meet in the
regular season Saturday
night in Tuscaloosa.
"It's definitely one of the
most anticipated games
in flip rm~inrt" FlI;idn


iln
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JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida athlete Trey Burton (8) leaps over a
Kentucky defender during the Gators' 48-14 victory at Ben
Hill Griffin StadiunI in Gainesville on Saturday.


i Le counllu y, ' oriUa Iu I
defensive lineman Justin (minus 4) vs. No. 21
rattou said. Texas at Dallas
The picks: Maybe Sooners 'D,
Saturday last in Big 12, will revive
No. 7 Florida (plus 9) 'Horns sluggish offense ...
t No. 1 Alabama OKLAHOMA 24-17.
Gators not ready to beat Louisiana-Monroe
ide - yet ... ALABAMA (plus 34') at No. 10
8-17. Auburn
No. 2 Ohio State If not for Denard
ninus 19) at Illinois Robinson, Cam Newton
First road game for might be Heisman front-
uckeyes ... OHIO STATE runner ... AUBURN 49-13.
5-20. No. 11 Wisconsin
No. 3 Boise State (pick) at No. 24 Michigan
ninus 41) at New State
[exico State Home team has won
Broncos due for letdown, five straight in series ...
ot that it'll matter much WISCONSIN 24-20.
is week ... BOISE STATE , Tennessee (plis- 14)
2-14. ' at No. 12 LSU
No.,9 Stanford (plus 'LSU's Jordan Jefferson
) at No. 4 Oregon hasn't reached 100 yards
Start moved up to'8 p.m., passing in last three games
o no one has to lose sleep ... LSU 27-14.
Swatch ... STANFORD No. 16 Miami (minus
0-28. 3) at Clemson '
No. 5 TCU, (minus 33) Road team has won
t Colorado State each time teams have met
First game outside Texas as ACC rivals ... MIAMI
ir Horned Frogs ... TCU 27-21.
5-10. No. 22 Penn State
No. 8 Oklahoma (plus 7) at No. 17 Iowa


Nittany Lions last win
in Iowa City was 1999 ...
IOWA 24-14
Washington (plus
10%') at No. 18 Southern
California
Trojans porous pass
defense should boost Jake
Locker's stock ... USC
37-24.
No. 19 Michigan
(minus 10A) at Indiana
Hoosiers last beat
Wolverines in 1987 ...
MICHIGAN 42-35.
Virginia Tech (minus
3) at No. 23 North
Carolina State
Wolfpack's Russell
Wilson second in nation
with 11 TD passes ... N.C.
STATE 28-21.
No. 25 Nevada (minus
20) at UNLV
Now that Nevada is in
Top 25, expect Pack to be
there a while ... NEVADA
42-14.

Lastweek: 18-3 (straight);
10-7-1.
Season: 71-10 (straight);
37-31-3 (vs. points).


Columbia Motorsports Park

Results of races at Columbia Motorsports Park in
Ellisville on Sept. 25:
SPORTSMAN
1. 44 Charlie Seroki, 2. 1M Matt Walker, 3. 16 Brian
Hull, 4. 06 Josh Wise, 5. 76 Jim Higginbotham, 6. 14 Oral
Tanner, 7. 31 Roy Crain, 8. 1F Bobby Ford, DQ-8 Wesley
Keller, 21 Sean Monaghan;
PURE STOCK


ACROSS

1 Clutch at
6 Jack London
venue
11 Anyone home?
(hyph.)
12 Isolated
13 Not here
14 Gallery
15 Biscayne Bay
city
16 Stead
17 "Moonstruck"
Oscar-winner
19 Roman's gar-
ment
23 9-digit no.
26 Japanese soup
28 Dine
29 Elvis' home-
town
31 Complain
33 Exhilarating
34 Map feature
35 Not even
36 Ms. Ferber
39 Strive
40 Coral formation


42 Bear constella-
tion
44 Jean Auel
heroine
46 Harebrained
51 Lite (hyph.)
54 Traditional say-
ings
55 Censors
56 Happens again
57 Nursery buy
58 Laid off from'
work

DOWN

1 Asian desert
2 Diva Ponselle
3 Attention-getter
4 - boom
5 Saucepan
6 Distant past
7 Full-length
8 New Zealand
parrot
9 Like
Methuselah
10 PBS "Science
Guy"


1. 12 Jason Garver, 2. 39 Tim Alldredge, 3. 96 pon
Cruce, DNS-71 Jason'Warsing, DQ-5 Jerrelton Fjoyd;
HORNETS
1. 2 Bert Daugherty, 2. 7 Tyler Prescott, 3. 60 Doyle
O'Bryant, 4. 71 Bill Bollier, 5. 46 Kim Alldredge;
V-8 BOMBERS
1. 85 Larry Welter Sr., 2. 22 Stan Lang, 3. 28 Tony
Deas, 4. 7 Shawn DeSotle,-5. 76 Andy Nichols, 6. 54 Mark
Chinell;
E-MODS
1. 01 .J.F. McClellan, 2. 77 trevor McKinley.



Answer to Previous Puzzle

TA CO ZoONES
MANORS TIRADE



ERASED

PINTA TRACED
COOER RADAR
STONE WRITE
ANTLER IDEAL
YEARN S'
RAF RTE HIRT
WAPI TI ABASED
OCTAVE MERIT ITS
NESTS AIPSE


11 Orange veggie
12 Animal shelters
16 Aloha token
18 MD employer
20 Willow shoot
21 Kind of sack


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


22 Imitated
23 Glove leather
24 Digging imple-
ment
25 Jarrett of
NASCAR
27 Charge it
29 Explorer
Heyerdahl
30 Strong soap
32 Elev.
34 - Vegas
37 Blunts
38 Hunter's org.
41 Turned toward
43 Facilitated
45 Mouths,
slangily
47 Salt's formula
48 Feverish chill
49 Geek
50 Dangerous
curve
51 Many oz.
52 Flamenco
shout
53 Petite, plus
54 Onassis nick-
name


9-30 @ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


LOCAL RACING


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


BUT4oT 6& U NbMroTM4LE
As iu6 i iF.Dowr' Try.
PUgLIC DID)COM





^^~i ,


DEAR ABBY


Friend resists choosing


sides in couple's breakup


DEAR ABBY:' My 3-year-
old goddaughter, 'Tammy,"
is one of the most important
people in my life. So are her
parents, "Sophie" and "Zack."
I was friendly with them sepa-
rately before they got togeth-
er. As a couple, they selected
me to be godmother. They
have since split up.
Zack is understanding
about my staying neutral and
continuing to be friendly with
him and his ex. But Sophie
gets mad and won't talk to me
for weeks if she hears I went
to see Tammy on a weekend
she's with her daddy.
Even though I am closer
to Sophie, Zack is a great fa-
ther and a good friend. I don't
think it's fair that Sophie ex-
pects me to take her side. I
feel their issues are theirs
alone, and my main focus is
that my goddaughter have my
support regardless of which
parent she happens to be
with.
Am I doing something
wrong? If not, how do I handle
Sophie? - HONORED IN
OMAHA
DEAR HONORED: You
are doing nothing wrong.
However, viewed from So-
phie's perspective, it may ap-
pear that you have "chosen"
her ex over her. A way to
handle this would be to tell
Sophie that you are not visit-
ing Tammy when she's with
Zack because you prefer his
company over Sophie's. It's
that you want your goddaugh-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
ter to have continuity, and if
Sophie is upset with Zack, she
shouldn't displace her anger
onto you because it's not fair
to you or her daughter. And
further, if this continues, So-
phie will drive a caring friend
(you) away.
DEAR ABBY: In this age
of electronic devices, how ap-
propriate is it to take photos
at the table in a restaurant? I
suppose it depends on the es-
tablishment - probably not
a problem in a casual buffet
environment.
My boyfriend and I like to
go to fancy restaurants (on
our own and with friends),
and we enjoy taking pictures
of each other, our friends and
the food. How do we handle
this? Do other patrons care
how many times we "flash"
our cameras? - SNAP-
HAPPY IN 'BLOOMING-
TON, IND.
DEAR SNAP-HAPPY:-
When making reservations at
San expensive restaurant, ask
whether it would be disrup-
tive to take pictures. While
some diners might not object,
I can think of several reasons


why some would find it intru-
sive. Because some "foodies"
enjoy snapping photos of their
table and the various dishes
as they're presented, it may
be possible to be seated in a
location where the flash will
not be a nuisance. However,
the restaurant staff should be
warned in advance.
DEAR ABBY: I volunteer
at a hospital and help with
mail sorting for the patients.
I know it is important for pa-
tients to receive their mail
- even if they are no longer
being treated at the hospital.
Abby, please advise your
readers that when they send
Get Well cards, to always
use the person's OWN name
- like, "Betty Jones" instead
of "Mrs. John Jones." Also,
when sending a card or note
to someone in the hospital, to
always put the patient's home
address as the return address
on the envelope - not their
own. If your readers do this,
the person is sure to receive
it, even after he or she has
been discharged from the
hospital. - JUDY IN LO-
RAIN, OHIO
DEAR JUDY: Thank you
for two perfectly logical sug-
gestions - which I'm sure
the majority of people don't
always consider when they're
sending their good wishes.
Readers, take heed.
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Expect to ex-
perience difficulties with
people wanting too much
or asking for the impos-
sible. Problems at home
can include a difference of
opinion with someone you
live with or a physical prob-
lem to your environment
that needs immediate atten-
tion. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't take any-
thing or anyone for grant-
ed. Take ahold of your life
and make whatever amend-
ments are required in order
to achieve the happiness
and satisfaction you de-
serve. A romantic situation
can go either way, depend-
ing on how attentive you
are. ****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Someone from
your past of whom you
think fondly may help you
out of a professional situa-
tion you face. Make contact
and your efforts will help to
stabilize your personal life
as well. Networking will be ,
a great vehicle to help you
get ahead. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Use your emo-
tions to help you get your
way with children or your
current lover. It's how you
express your needs that will
give you the upper hand.
Take advantage of an op-
portunity for a position or
project that interests you.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last


LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Don't let an emotional
display ruin your chance to
get ahead. If you focus on
what you have to offer, you
will stand a better chance
of joining forces with those
working toward a similar
goal. A disciplined, self-re-
liant attitude will pay off.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't question the
facts. It's a waste of time
and will only stand in the
way of progress. Love is on
the rise and the opportunity
to start a new relationship
or enhance the one you are
currently in should be on
your agenda. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't let depres-
sion hold you back. You
may be feeling the pangs
of pressure from burdens
and added responsibilities,
but that28, doesn't mean
you should stop trying.
Use your imagination and
you will find the solutions.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You can make a
difference if you are open
and honest about your situ-
ation and what you intend
to do about it. Sharing your
concerns will give you a dif-
ferent perspective. Change


can be good and can make
your life better. ***
SAGfITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Expect to
face opposition and unex-
pected changes. Overreact-
ing will be your downfall
when dealing with friends,
relatives and peers, Listen
first You may change your
mind once you hear what
everyone else thinks and
plans to do. *****-
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Lay your
cards on the table. Once
you know where everyone
else stands, it will be easier
to proceed in a fashion that
allows you control. Love is
in the stars, so spend time
with someone you fancy.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You may want to
take precautions if you are
traveling or dealing with
matters that can influence
your lifestyle or a relation-
ship that means a lot to you.
If you face situations that
need massaging, it's best
to take care of them face-to-
face. *** ,
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Home and
family should be your tar-
get for improvements. Find
ways to bring you all closer
together. Instigate projects
that enhance your family
life physically, emotionally,
mentally and financially.
*******


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: X equals S
"R EKZKH HKTCCS CDDV WDH
TESNPREI... R BTVK JM RE NPK
ADHERE TEG BPROPKZKH BTS IDG


N J H EX AS WKKN, R I D .


M K T H C


U T R C KS

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Nothing is built on stone; all is built on sand, but we
must build as if the sand were stone." - Jorge L. Borges
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 9-30


FOR BETTER ORWORSE
MICKAEL, YOU'REE INFRCT-Y-\00
NOT Too YoONG- IT -rO US
TO DO SOME
WJORK F-UND
HEREl \ _.. .


CLASSIC PEANUTS










. LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010


Race: Price Chopper 400
Where: Kansas Speedway
When: Sunday, 1 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN
2009 winner: Tony Stewart (right)


Race: Kansas Lottery 300
Where: Kansas Speedway
When: Saturday, 3 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN2
2009 winner: Joey Logano


A SSS53S3Sa SaESSS3l*.I
Race: Kroger 200
Where: Martinsville Speedway
When: October 23,12:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: SPEED
2009 winner: Timothy Peters


Denny Hamlin (left) has a heated exchange with Kevin Harvick after an incident on the track during practice for the AAA 400 at Dover on Sept. 25. (NASCAR photo)


Hamlin not afraid to steer into controversy


A long with his successes on Sprint Cup
race tracks this year, Denny Hamlin
... Also stands out because he has become
one of the few drivers who doesn't mind speak-
ing his mitid.' ' " "
And eyen though his outspokenness over.
NASCAR's alleged use of"debris" cautions to
liven up races has cost him a $50,000 fine fiom
series officials, he weighed in heavily about
Clint Bowyer's penalty for an illegal car at
S New Hampshire Motor Speedway, something
most other' top drivers declined to do in detail.
During his weekly media session at Dover
International Speedway last Friday, Hamlin
offered his insight on the situation that led to
Bowye, being docked 150 points, which
S dropped him from second in the standings to
12th. And his comments likely weren't what
S NASCAR officials wanted to hear. They also
S' didn't go over well with Bowyer's teammate
Kevin Harvick, who bumped into Hamlin in
practice then had a heated exchange with
him afterward.
Hamlin started it offby saying there was a
good reason his second-place car at New
Hampshire passed the post-race technical
inspection while Bowyer's winning car did
not.
"Our car came back and it was correct, but
S' it wasn't built incorrectly and ... [Bowyer's]
. car was built incorrectly," Hamlin said, adding
that the fact that the difference between a
passing height and a failing height on
Bowyer's car was just 60 thousandths of an
inch doesn't mean it, didn't create a big
S advantage on the track.
"You can talk about how small the thing
was off and you can really try to say that
60-thousandths didn't help him perform
any better ... that is a crock," Hamlin said.
"Let me tell you something, that helps a
lot. '


FOOD STORES






POWERADE,
32oz Assorted or


Water Liter size

5 for S
S . Or '1.19 each
HI SFree Fair Ticket with Quantity Purchaose


"I know when we gain five points of.down-
force, our car runs a ton better ...
"NASCAR has beeh very, very lenient, I feel
like, on this car, and they've given those guys
tiL, :'. I think that [Bowyer's-teanmi.
should justbe happy that they're in the Chase'
at this point. They were warned and they were
warned before Richmond. Everyone in the
garage knows that. They're the ones who want-
ed to press the issue and get all they could to
make sure they got in the Chase."
And Hamlin said the Bowyer car has been
wrong for a lot longer than it might appear.
"In the garage, everyone has known it for.
months," he said. "They've been warned for a
long time, way before Richmond.... They
wanted to get everything they could. What did
they have to lose really? You almost can't fault
them for that."
NASCAR apparently didn't say anything to
Hamlin about his comments, but an ESPN
report indicates his team president, J.D. Gibbs,
did tell Hamlin to tone it down.
For their parts, Bowyer and team owner
Richard Childress continued to say their car
was legal when it arrived at New Hampshire,


and they say the reason it failed to pass
inspection was that the car was damaged
either during the race or when it was pushed
to Victory Lane by a tow truck.
-: They'll make their case in an appeal sched-
uled for Wednesday.
And Bowyer didn't hold back when airing
his thoughts on the issue, saying among other
things, that the NASCAR rumor mill forced
series officials into issuing such a hefty penal-
ty, one that he'll find difficult to overcome.
He said that it makes no sense for a team
that knows it's under scrutiny to try to slip
something past the inspectors.
"Who in their right mind, knowing that
inspectorsl are going to take that car, wouldn't
have made triple sure that thing was right.
before it went to the race track?" he said, while
also raising questions about the inspection
process that officials used to check the car once
it was taken back to Concord, N.C..
"They take the car apart, completely apart
to measure this thing, and in my opiniofi
that's not the way the car was raced on the
race track," he said. "I think that's something
to be said."


Denny -l.ainjin spins out at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on Sept. 19. (NASCAR photo)


NEXT


UP ..m


2010 CHASE CONTENDERS
Points standings mrce results from Sunday's
AAA 400 at Dover International Speedway
and commentary by Rick Minter

1. Denny Hamlin - 5,368 (finished ninth)
His average finish, in the past three
September races at Dover was 32.7, but this
time he got a top 10 and escaped his worst
track with his points lead intact.
2. Jimmie Johnson -35 (finished first)
There's nothing that will cure what's. iling
the No. 48 team any more than a trip to Dover.
' Johnson started on the pole, led the most laps
and won for the third time in his past four
races at the Delaware track.
3. Kyle Busch -45 (finished sixth)
He felt his car was better than the finish indi-
cated. "We legitimately had a second-place car.
We didn't quite finish where we wanted to."
4. Kurt Busch 59 (finished fourth)
Unlike some of his fellow Chasers, he was
able to bounce back from a pit-road speeding
penalty and get a solid finish on a tricky
track. "Dover was one of the tracks I was
worried about."
5. Kevin Harvick -65 (finished 15th)
He greatly improved on his 33rd starting
position but that's not good enough in the
Chase. "The same guys are going to run up
front each week, and its going to be difficult
for everybody every single week," crew chief
Gil Martin said.
6. Carl Edwards -73 (finished fifth)
After another solid finish, he's headed to
Kansas Speedway where he figures he has a
good chance of winning. "We obviously
haven't gone out and won anything yet ...
but we closed it by 20-25 points on the leader.
If we do that every week, well be all right."
7. Jeff Burton -80 (finished second)
He was.strong at Dover but has a ways to go
points-wise. "We're not going to leave a race in
the next few weeks with the points lead. We
started far enough behind where that is just
not going to happen."
8. Jeff Gordon -83 (finished 11th)
He came up short at Dover but is looking
ahead to tracks that historically are good for
him. "So now we go to Kansas and some other
places that I think are much better tracks for
us, and we've got to capitalize on-that.
9. Greg Biffle-140 (finished 19th)
He was running well before being caught
two laps down because of an untimely caution
flag. "We were running on the lead lap, and I
thought we were a top-10 car ... That probably
right there was kind of our Chase hopes."
10. Tony Stewart -162 (finished 21st)
He's had no luck so far in the Chase. A gas
gamble at New Hampshire came up about a
lap short and he was caught speeding on pit
road at Dover and couldn't make up the lost
ground.
11. Matt Kenseth -165 (finished 18th)
Blowing a tire after missing pit road doomed
him to a poor finish at one of his best tracks.
'This is the only track we've run worth a dar
at in about four or five months probably, so
there was a lot of pressure to try to get a good
finish out of here and we couldn� get it."
12. Clint Bowyer -235 (finished 25th)
After a week spent dealing with a 150-point
penalty following New Hampshire, he strug-
gled in the race, getting a speeding penalty on
pit road and hitting the wall.













LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010


Lake City Reporter





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deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
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be checked for errors by the
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will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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In Print andl Online
WvW.liltct) reporter.coll


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA'
CASE NO.: 09-735-C
AMERICAN GENERAL HOME
EQUITY, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JONATHAN W. TUCKER, et al.,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to an order or a final judgment of
foreclosure entered in the above-cap-
tioned action, I will sell the property
situated in Columbia County, Flori-
da, described as:
The land referred to in this exhibit is
located in the State of Florida in the
county of Columbia in Deed Book
844 page 241 and more particularly
described as follows:
Comtrence at the NW corer of the
S 1/2 of Block 294, Eastern division
of the city of Lake City, Florida, and
run South 200 feet; thence run East
along the north right of way of East
St. Johns Street 75 feet; thence run
North 100 feet; thence run West 25
feet; thence run North 100 feet to the
South right of way line of nassau
Street; thence run West 50 feet along
the South right of way line of Nassau
Street to the point of beginning.
Said lands being less and except the
West 12 feet for right of way for
Marsh Street.
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, in Courtroom 1 of
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, in accordance
with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, at
11:00 a.m. on the 6th day of October,
2010.
That any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of
the date/of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said.
Court on September 13, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SIDNEY E. LEWIS, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Plaintiff
300 W. Adams Street, Suite 300
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904) 355-9003
04541690
September 23, 30, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-416-CA
SUBRANDY LIMITED PART-
NERSHIP, a Florida limited partner-
ship
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTOINE JABOUIN,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 6, Meadowlands Phase 1, a sub-
division as recorded in Plat Book 7,
Pages 139-140, public records of
COLUMBIA County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled,
action dated September 16, 2010, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
October 20, 2010, to the best and
highest bidder for' cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
,owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
16th day of September, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04541689
September 23, 30, 2010
Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 10/12/2010
Time: 8:00 A.M.
1995 Ford
VIN# 2FALP71W2SX194013
1995 Nissan
VIN# JN1CA21DOST048917

04541798
September 30, 2010

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.Iakecityreporter.com


Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Lawn-& Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.



Land Services

Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lie.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.: 12-2010-CA-0004,68
Division:
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPI-
TAL I INC. TRUST 2007-HE3
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-
HE3
Plaintiff,
v.
FRANK JAMES CLARK JR.; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANK
JAMES CLARK JR.; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTH-
ER CLAIMANTS,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF ACTION
Frank James Clark, Jr.
Last Known Address: 286 S. W. Au-
drey Street, Lake City, Fl 32025
Current Address: Unknown
Previous Address: 11971 S.W. 179th
Terrace, Miami, FL 33177
Previous Address: 286 S.W. Audrey
Street S.A., Lake City, Fl 32024
ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTH-
ER CLAIMANTS.
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida;
SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORJDA,
FURTHER DESCRIBED AS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SW 1/4
OF THE NE 1/4 AND RUN'N 86
DEG. 29' 46" E ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF SW 1/4 OF NE
1/4 A DISTANCE OF 240.02 FEET;
THENCE N 1 DEG. 22' 55" W,
881.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE N 1 DEG. 22' 55" W, 211.50
FEET; THENCE N 86 DEG. 29' 46"
E, 205.00 FEET; THENCE S 1
DEG. 22' 55" E, 208.50 FEET;
THENCE N 86 DEG. 29' 46" E,
5.00 FEET; THENCE S 1 DEG. 22'
55" E, 3.00 FEET; THENCE S 86
DEG. 29' 46" W, 210.00 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
ALSO KNOWN AS LOT NO. 11,
OF THE UNRECORDED SUBDI-
VISION OF THE CANNON
CREEKS ACRES.
This property is located at the Street
address of : 286 S.W. Audrey Street,
Lake City, FL 32025 has been filed
against you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses
on or before October 11, 2010 a date
which is within 30 days after the first
publication, if any, on Elizabeth R.
Wellborn, P.A., Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address is 1701 West Hills-
boro Blvd., Suite 307, Deefield
Beach, Florida 33442, and file the
original with this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney, or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This Notice shall be published once a
week for two consecutive weeks in
the Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
the Court on September 10, 2010.
PDEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/B. Scippio
I Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Jami Beasley Watkins, Esquire
Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A.
1701 West HiUsboro Blvd, Suite 307
Deefield Beach, FL 33442
Telephone: (954) 354-3544
Facsimile: (954) 354-3545
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICAN'S WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, If you're a person with a
disability who needs accommodation
in order to participate in this pro-
ceeding, you are entitled at nb cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. please contact the ADA Coor-
dinator, Court Admin, 3301 E. Ta-
miami Tr., Naples, FL 34112, or call
1-239-774-8800 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this Notice to
Appear if you're hearing impaired,
call 1-800-955-8771; if you're voice
impaired, call 1-800-955-8770.

04541692
September 23, 30, 2010
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of Legacy
Forestry Services at 4818 W US
Hwy 90, Suite 100, Lake City, FL
32055


Contact Phone Number: 386-438-
5896 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: James T. Mastin
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ James T. Mastin

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF ALACHUA
Sworn to and subscribed before me


this 3rd day of September, A.D.
2010.
by:/s/ Mindy B. Goston

05524031
September 30, 2010


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12 2008 CA 000427
DIVISION:
DLJ MORTGAGE CAPITAL, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs,
SHALONDA CLARK A/K/A SHA-
LONDA L. CLARK A/K/A SHA-
SLONDA LASHONTA CLARK, et
al.,
Defendants)
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated September
16, 2010 and entered in Case NO 12
2008 CA 000427 of the Circuit Court
of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and
for COLUMBIA County, Florida
wherein DLJ MORTGAGE CAPI-
TAL, INC., is the Plaintiff and SHA-
LONDA CLARK A/K/A SHALON-
DA L. CLARK A/K/A SHALONDA
LASHONTA CLARK; COLUMBIA
COUNTY; FLORIDA CREDIT UN-
ION are the Defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
at FRONT STEPS OF THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00 A.M., on the 20th
day of October, 2010, the following
described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment:
LOT 21, GRANDVIEW VILLAGE,
UNIT 4, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 8 PAGES 57 THROUGH 59
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 1175 SW YORKTOWN
GLEN, LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest from
the sale, if any, other than the prop-
erty owner as of the date of the Lis'
Pendens must file a claim within six-
ty (60) days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this court on September 16, 2010
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124, 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770, (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F08044727-SPSFIDELITY-CONV..

05524016
September 30, 2010
October 7, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVILACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000545
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SUNG HUN KIM, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated September
16, 2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000545 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, N.A., is the Plaintiff and
SUNG HUN KIM; THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF SUNG HUN
KIM; YUN 'J. KIM; TENANT #1
N/K/A DANA GREEN, are the De-
fendants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY'COURTHOUSE at 11:00
AM, on the 20th day of October,
2010, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
LOT 7, OAK MEADOW PLANTA-
TION, UNIT 3, A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 43-44 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 694 NW SAVANNAH CIR-
CLE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60)'days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on September 16, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to.participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should call Court
Administration, 173 NE Hemando
Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, Flor-
ida 32055, 386-719-7428, within two
(2) working days of your receipt of
this notice, if you are hearing im-
paired call (800) 955-8771; if you
are voice impaired call (800) 955-
8770.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09082765

05524015
September 30, 2010
October 7, 2010


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND' FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.:10-332-CA
GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC,
1400 Turbine Drive, Suite 200
Rapid City, SD 57703
Plaintiff,
v.
JOHN T. NESSMITH A/K/A JOHN
NESSMITH, IF LIVING, BUT IF
DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIE-
NORS, AND TRUSTEES OF JOHN
T. NESSMITH A/K/A JOHN NES-
SMITH, DECEASED, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE NAMED DE-
FENDANTS,'
TENA L. NESSMITH,'and CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS,
AND TRUSTEES OF JOHN T.
-NESSMITH A/K/A JOHN NES-
SMITH, DECEASED, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE NAMED DE-
FENDANTS,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil
action has been filed against you in
the Circuit Court, County of Colum-
bia, State of Florida, to foreclose cer-
tain real property described as fol-
lows:
LOT 10 OF DAVIS SUBDIVISION
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PAGES 11 AND 11A, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO-
GETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN
1998 60X24 SPRINGHILL MO-
BILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBER:
GAFLV34AB26507SH21
You are required to file a written re-
sponse with the Court and serve a
copy of your written.defenses, if any,
to it on Timothy Padgett, Plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is 2878
Remington Green Circle, Tallahas-
see, Florida 32308, at least thirty
(30) days from the date of first publi-
cation, and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
Dated this 21ST day of September,
2010.
CLERK OF COURT
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Timothy D. Padgett, Esq
Timothy D. Padgett, P.A.
2878 Remington Green Circle
Tallahassee, FL 32308, (850) 422-
2520 (phone) (850) 422-2567 (fax)
05524030
September 30, 2010
October 7, 2010

Notice is hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):

RICHARD E BRANDMAYR II
Last known address of:
176 SW CODYS CT
LAKE CITY, FL 32024

CELIA N. BULLINGTON
Last known address of:
197 SW LUCKY DR
LAKE CITY, FL 32024
MICHAEL D. HILL
Last known address of:
467 SE FRITZI CT
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
JEFFERY S. ROBERTS
Last known address of:
664 SW KENTUCKY ST
FT WHITE, FL 32038


Legal

is potentially .ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-.
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor. of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(386)758-1026
04541802
September 30, 2010

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of Legacy
Wildlife Services at 4818 W US
Hwy 90, Suite 100, Lake City, FL
32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-438-
5896 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: James T. Mastin
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/James T. Mastin

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF ALACHUA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 3rd day of September, A.D.
2010.
by:/s/ Mindy B. Goston
05524033
September 30, 2010

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of ERKING-
ER INSPECTION SERVICES at
248 SE NASSAU ST., LAKE CITY,
FL. 32025

Contact Phone Number: 386-755-
5555 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: MATTHEW ERKINGER
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/Matthew Erkinger
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 28 day of September, A.D. 20'10.
by:/s/KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
04541822
September 30, 2010



020 Lost & Found

LOST White, female, bulldog
w/brown brindle spots/patches lost
off of CR 242, pis call,
Children miss dog! 386-697-1197

100 Job
SU Opportunities

CDL Class A Driver needed
Great miles and great home time
Call Frank At 727-916-1055
Hour To Call 11am to 5 pm

Childcare teacher wanted. Expe-
rience required, F/T and P/T avail.
Apply in person. Wee Care Pre-
school & Daycare.


*PET COSTUME CONTEST ENTRY FORM9I

Pet's Name: I
Snt u'aar�m^a. I
'wII~*au~


Address:

Phone:
Please indude a self addressed stamped envelope to have I
your pets photo returned to you. All entries must be prepaid. I


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


ffI[Cili

BUIYI


name:.


Classified Department: 755-5440


VWlner a











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2010


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

0.1541599
The Mobile Mechanic is a
full-time position that is
responsible for the maintaining
and repairing a fleet of vehicles,
diagnosing vehicle mechanical
issues, managing parts
inventory, accurately charging
parts and labor to work orders
and performing all other
maintenance duties as assigned.
Mobile Mechanic's hours of
work vary by assigned location.
This position offers a
competitive base pay plus
incentives which includes
PepsiCo stock options, health
care benefits, retirement and
savings benefits such as
pension, 401(k) and much more.
Please apply at
www.fritolayemployment.com


04541181
Senior Teller Position
Florida Credit Union has an
immediate opening for a Senior
Teller in Lake City. Applicants
must have supervisory
experience with a financial
background. Experience with
high volume cash handling,
maintaining cash drawer,
balancing, cross-selling ability,
and customer service expertise
is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience necessa-
ry. Excellent benefits and
Incentive Plan. Resumes
without salary requirements will
not be accepted. Stop by our
branch on 583 W. Duval Street
to complete an application or
send resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661 E-
mail: krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V
EOE Drug Free Workplace

(1454181 S)
Teller FT Florida Credit
Union - Lake City Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake City branch
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing, cross-selling
ability, and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit
Union, Attn: HR/TLR, P.O.
Box 5549, Gainesville, Fl
32627. Fax: 352-264-2661
E-mail: krose@flcu.org
M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

Experienced Sewing Machine
Operator, wages based on ability,
Call Hafner's
386-755-6481
Local Class A CDL Driver needed.
Seasonal position. Call ,
386-492-1111 for instructions
and information. EOE.

120 Medical
Employment

04541824
.RN/LPN
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for RN and LPN positions.
Day and Evening PRN
positions available.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent Benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon Health-
care and Rehabilitation Center.
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

Medical Biller Needed.
1-2 Clinical Lab Billing exp.
Preferred but not required.
Apply at CHC Labs E US Hwy 90
- Please no phone calls +
Need English/ Spanish Medical
Assistant for a Dermatology office
in Lake City: Florida. Experience
is required, but not necessary. We
will train. Call 386-758-1965
or Fax to: 386-758-6923


1 ^A Medical
120 Employment
Suwannee Homecare, a Medicare
Certified Homecare agency, is
seeking PT/OT/ST/HHA, with
homecare exp for PRN employ-
ment, pls call 386-755-1544


170 Business
7JL Opportunities
P/T Business. Nets $65K+
Christian Themed publication.
No exp necessary. Clients estab-
lished for you. Retiring $29,900
(941)685-8291

190 Mortgage Money
STOP FORECLOSURE,
go to:
www.fles.
americanbusinessdirect.com

240 Schools &
24 Education

04541570
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/27/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-10/26/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Free, kitten
American short hair/calico,
call to see
386-867-4660
PET MARKET. Buy or sale. Oct
2nd from 9-5. Bradford Co Fair-
grounds,2300 N Hwy 301 Starke,
FL. Free Adm. For Vendor info.
(352)376-9038
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
SSupplies
Single Lane Farms
(1)-2 years old black Limosene
bull. (1) 2.5 yr old angus bull.
Dwane Hingson. 386-776-1090

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp.,Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
GE Chest type freezer,
15 cu ft,works great
$165 obo
386-292-3927 or 984-0387
GE washer
$125. obo.
(870)291-1845

Heavy Duty, Maytag, Washer,
White,
$165
386-292-3927 or 984-0387
Kenmore Washer & Dryer Set,
good condition
$175
386-697-6621
Kitchen Aid dryer
$150 obo.
(870)291-1845

New GE Late Model
Gas Cook Top , still in the box!
Costs $700, will sacrifice for $285
386-292-3927 or 984-0387


402 Appliances
Whirlpool Dryer
works great
$50
386-935-0654


404 Baby Items
Evenflo - Tribute Convertible Car
Seat, Brown and Navy Blue Plaid
in great condition. $35. Call for
additional info. 386-792-4688
Graco Infant car seat-Tan & Aqua
green-w/base. Excellent condition,
smoke free, non pet home. $45 or
can negotiate price. 386-792-4688

407 Computers
E-MACHINE
$80.00.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
BOYS BEDROOM SET.
Solid wood. Captains Bed, dresser,
mirror, night stand & desk chair.
$450. 386-752-5784
Sofa & Loveseat Set $200
Navy Blue & Black Velveteen
extremely comfortable, excellent
condition Call 386-935-0654

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
22" Murray Mower
(Easy Push), 4HP,
$70
386-984-0387 or 386-292-3927

411 Machinery &
411 Tools
18" Tile Saw,
used one time,
$200
SOLD
Dremel 6" Scroll Saw,
$100
Good Condition
SOLD
Heavy Duty Auto Jack Stands
(2), $10 each,
New
call 3'86-963-4560

419 TV-Radio &
41 Recording
Galvanized Remote Control
Antenna, 36 Ft High, Tri pod,
$100
Call 386-963-4560

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
3 FAMILIES. Russwood Estates.
Sat. 8am-2pm.
Branford Hwy to Troy Street
, turn right. Look for signs.
Multi Family: Sat. Oct. 2 - 8-?
Hwy 100 to Price Creek to Plant.
St. to Mossy Ct. Look for signs.
Fum., baby items & Much more!
PLANTATION S/D 90W Oct. 2
8-1p. 2nd house on right. Small
kitchen appliance, Bose radio, ori-
ental rugs, household, lots of misc.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat only, 8-2pm, baby & mens
clothes, toys, big screen TV, books
and much more! (Emerald Forest)
219 SW Stanley Ct.


440 Miscellaneous
FULL MATTRESS Box Spring,
Like new,
$100
Call 386-288-8833


440 Miscellaneous
Wooden White Storage Cabinet
36Wx20Dx72H
like new $60
386-935-0654
Wooden White Storage Cabinet
Like Brand New
29 l/2Wx20Dx72H
$50 386-935-0654

520 Boats for Sale
2006 8FT Dingy, 2 seat, 4 hp,
Suz, 4 stroke motor, w/trailer, new
tires, 386-965-3110/758-6098,
$600* Can be seen on wkends
PROJECT BOAT 1993 SeaRay
Boat 18' Bow Rider w/trailer hull,
good condition with 150 mercury
motor. $800.obo 386-935-3773

r3n Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1 bd/1 bth, S/W, recently remod-
eled,CH/A, no pets, $450 monthly
plus dep, off Turner Rd
very clean! call,386-752-1941
14x55 MH, 2Br/1Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $395/Mo.
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
14X80. 3br/2ba. Total electric,
country living. Pets ok. Garbage,
water sewer inc. 1st, last, dep.
w/lease. $600. mo. 386-752-8978
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 (full baths), S/W, 1 acre
secluded lot, Bascom Norris By-
pass, $500 dep, $600 month,
386-623-2203 or 386-623-5410
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2 DW $800/mo on 3ac. hot
tub/pool, remodeled.6/10 livestock
& pets ok. (937)938-1727,:3353
230th Terr. Lake City off SR 247
3/2 S/W& D/W, updated units
.off of Lake City Ave ,
No Pets
386-984-0616
3Br/lbath, Remodeled, D/W, new
kitchen, carpet, A/C &
paint,fenced yard, nice cond, $575
month, Sec & 1st 954-649-1037
Clean bedroom, Large treed lot
on Turner Road.
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, LakerCity & Ft.
White . Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114 .
Nice clean 2 & 3 bdrm, Five
Points, NO PETS, also 2 bd home
163 NE Escambia St, 1 mon rent
& dep 386-961-1482
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park. Move In Spe-
cial. 1st mo $199. then $575. Rent
incl water, sewer, trash p/u. Close
to town 386-623-7547 or 984-8448

t640 Mobile Homes
64 for Sale
Very nice 3/2 Skyline DW on 3.3
ac. fenced yard, dead end street,
nice trees. Financing available.
$75,000 386-303-1258 / 365-1406

705 Rooms for Rent
Newly Renovated ROOMS W/
FREE Utilities, Cable. WiFi, Local
& Long Distance Calls, Maid
Service. Microwave & frige in ea.
room. 1prs $165, 2ppl $175
Jasmine Garden Inn. Clean &
Under New Mgmt! 386-755-4308

710 fUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
055239/7
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455


710 AUnfurnished Apt. 750 Business &
710 For Rent 75 Office Rentals


2 bdrm/1 bath, I car garage, W/D
hook up, $550 month, no pets
1 month sec,
386-961-8075 Realtor
2/1 w/garage,
east side of town,
1st, last & sec
386-755-6867
2Bd/l1 1/2bth, Townhouse,nice,all
tile downstairs,prvate fenced back
yard, close to VA Hosp,
$650 plus sec, 386-854-0686
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plusadeposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
LARGE 1BR Apt
over looking lake. Screened pool.
CH/A, washer/dryer, full kitchen,
$650 mo. 38.6-344-3261
Move in specials available,
1 & 2 bedroom units,
starting at $350 per month,
386-755-2423
One bedroom'apt, all utilities in-
cluded, cable, one downtown /one
on west side, $450 mo,
plus $200 sec 386-397-3568
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Utilities'& cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Unfurnished 2br Apt.
In town. Close to shopping.
$500. mo plus deposit.
Must see! 386-344-2972
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626&

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Park Model Trailers (Studio), all
utils, use of pool, $500 per month,
NeverDunn's RV Park.
386-961-8540 or 755-4945

73n Unfurnished
7J3 Home For Rent
2 Bed/1 Bath,clean quiet home,
5 miles south of Lake City, $550
monthly, 386-867-1833/590-0642
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2BR/1BA CH/A. Large carport,
great location, near Downtown.
$650 mo $650 dep. references
req'd. 386-752-9144 or 755-2235
3bedroom/2bath
in city. $450. mo.
plus deposit No Pets!
386-758-0057


In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225 .


Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Small 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $500 month, $400 dep, no
pets!, pls leave message 386-365-
1920 or 386-454-7764 after 6pm
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$575 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus bonus
room. w/1.5 bath. Quail Heights
CC. $750. mo plus $250 damage
dep. 386-752-8553. Lv. message.

750 Business &
S U Office Rentals
1200 sq ft of office space in store
front, across from Courthouse,
newly remodeled, 3 offices and
recept area, along w/kitchen area
152 N Marion Ave $650 mo,
1st & last required 386-867-4995
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$750. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


SunocoConvenient Store
with gas for lease,
N 441 & 1-10
813-286-2323


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal ,
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which, is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

Lease 3/2 Block, 5 ac.,
$115,000 or make offer.
$750 mo, 1st, month & security.
386-754-0800 or 755-9333
Owner Fin., 3/2, on 1.5 ac,near
Branford, sm down, $700 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com

Farms &
820 Acreage
20 acre Hunting Lease, between
Columbia City & Ft. White, next
to 1500 acres of timbered land,
contact Paul Thomas
@ 386-965-9822
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
* NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots: Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


930. Motorcycles
05 Harley Davidson,
Dyna Super Glide. Sequential
� 27k mi. No tire kickers. $7000.
386-752-2861

940 Trucks
05 GMC Sierra 1500, 2 WD, V6,
auto, power steer, cruise, A/C,
trailer pack, 80K miles, 6 ft box,
$7,900 obo, 386-623-6860

9 1 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2007 Club Car w/golf club rain
cover, windshield, ex cond., very
low hrs, w/charger, $2200 obo,
� 386-288-8833 or 386-438-5592

952 Vans & Sport
95 Util. Vehicles
2000 DODGE 3/4 ton Van,
* runs good. Cold AC.
$1,500.
386-752-2861
95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Ltd,
V-8, 4-whl dr. All factory opts,
cold air, orig sticker, Will bring
car to you! $4500. 386-658-2380


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Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
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Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


1998 Honda Accord
6 cyl, AC, Radio/CD,
power steering, locks and
power seat, moon roof,
mag wheels.

$4,000 OBO
Call
630-915-2712


$800 OBO


Call
386-365-3773


1oUU
Single cab, 2WD, V6, AT,
power steering, cruise, AC,
trailer pkg., 80,000 miles,
6 ft. box.
$7.900 OBO
Call
386-623-6860


2006 8Ft. Dingy
2 seat, 4hp, Suz, 4.stroke
motor, w/trailer, new tires.

$600
Call
386-965-3110 or
386-758-6098
Can be seen only on weekends.


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