Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








Earl triggers fli
000015 120110 ****3-DI
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-19





Laake


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oods
:GIT 326

43


Football Friday
Columbia rolls;
Fort White stumbles.
Sports, I B


VCitIeporter
"IC


Saturday, September 4, 2010


www.lakecityrere'r.com


Vol. 136, No. 195 0 75 cents


Grand jury: Missing cash is $294K


Today
Monthly ALL-Walk
Four Rivers Audubon
at Alligator Lake hosts its
monthly ALLI-Walk: Bird/
Butterfly/Nature's Garden
outing from 8 to 11 a.m.
today. Jerry Krummrich,
biologist, Virlyn Willis,
avid birder, and others will
share their knowledge.
Bring a hat, sunscreen,
water, binoculars and a
snack. No fee is charged.
All levels of participation
and knowledge are wel-
come. Call Loye Barnard at
497-3536.
Road Cleanup
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City is having its "Adopt-A-
Highway Program #4" from
8 to 10 a.m. today. Meet at
the Columbia Bank parking
lot on the corner of US 90
and Turner Road. Call Bob
Gavette at 965-5905.
Southside Idol
Auditions for the
Southside Idol competi-
tion is from 9 a.m. to noon
today. Students in fourth
through eighth grade are
eligible to participate. The
center is located at 693 SW
Margaret's St. Call Wayne
Jernigan, Liz Coker or
Tiffanni Aguirre at 758-
5448 or 758-5450.

Art Exhibit
The Art League of
North Florida is present-
ing the 6th Annual All
Media Juried Art Exhibit
through Oct. 28 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.

Festival Vendors
The Alligator Festival is
looking for 19th century
traders, modern food ven-
dors and other various ven-
dors wishing to participate
in this year's festival. Call
Doug Vasco at 438-5487 or
Ray Macatee at 755-6177 or
344-0855.

End Child Hunger
Kiwanis is hosting its
End Child Hunger Project
through September. The
canned food drive benefits
Food Bank of Suwannee
Valley and Catholic
Charities. Donation sites
and items needed can be
found at www.mykiwanis.
org and at www.catholic-
charitieslakecity.org.

Sept. 8
LifeStyle Enrichment
A classical piano perfor-
mance from Rachel Dubi is
from 11- 11:45 a.m. in the
dining hall at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Bingo
is at 1 p.m. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court. Call 755-0235 or 755-
0264.


Report chronicles
indictment
details.

From staff reports

A grand jury indictment
charges former Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
employee Pamela Foxxo


with stealing more than
$277,000 in evidence cash
and administrative fees
since 2004, a timeframe
that spanned the terms of
three different sheriffs. .
Foxx, 47, was indicted
on one count of grand theft
of more than $100,000 on
Aug. 19.
Kelly Crews, CCSO
comptroller, also was


indicted
on Aug.
19 and
charged .
-with six
counts
of grand
theft.
She is
charged
with theft
$16,723.59


Foxx


of a total of
that was


included
in six
differ -
ent cash
evidence
l deposits
that were
Cr placed. in
Crews her pos-
session, but never made
it to the bank, according
to the grand jury report.


LERT


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Harold Barry, an officer with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, patrols Watertown Lake in search
of any suspicious activity. FWC will be actively looking for boaters under the influence, checking fishing licenses and
looking for operational personal flotation devices, fire extinguishers, whistles and. registration.


Authorities ready to patrol


for summer's last holiday


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
State law enforce-
ment officials
will have an
increased pres-
ence on local
roads and waterways
as part of special Labor
Day holiday enforcement
details.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission and Florida
Highway Patrol have
both committed numer-
ous resources to holiday
enforcement details.
"We'll have officers
out there 24/7 from 6
p.m. Friday evening
until midnight Monday,"
said Karen Parker, FWC
North Central Region
public information coordi-
nator. "What we're check-
ing for is to make sure
everybody stays safe;
that impaired boaters are
taken off the water and
that everyone has the
right safety equipment."
Parker said during
holiday enforcement


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
State law enforcement officer Harold Barry checks 53-
year-old Michael Johnson's fishing license as he fishes
for bream. 'I love fishing,' Johnson said. 'Everyday, if I'm
not working I'm on some creek. Other people may take
pills for their medication, but this is my medication.'


details the most common
violation FWC officers
traditionally encounter
involve boaters not hav-
ing the correct safety
equipment.
With temperatures
hovering around the 90-
degree mark, officials
expect a healthy portion
of the population to take
advantage of on-the-water
activities during the


Labor Day period.
"We definitely want
everybody to have a good
time, but I would advise
against drinking (while)
operating a boat," Parker
said. "Boaters should also
stay aware of their sur-
roundings. A lot of times
that accidents that we
see are caused simply by
people not paying atten-
tion."


"This year has
been extremely
quiet.There's
been no strikes
reported this
year of sturgeon
hitting boaters."
Karen Parker
FWC North Central Region
public information
coordinator
The Suwannee River is
a common destination for
boaters and Parker noted
that sturgeon strikes -
where Atlantic Sturgeon
jump from the water
- has been minimal this
summer.
"This year has been
extremely quiet," she
said. '"There's been no
strikes reported this year
of sturgeon hitting boat-
ers."
Lt. Patrick Riordan,
Florida Highway Patrol
Troop B public affairs
officer, said state troop-
ALERT continued on 3A


The Columbia County
grand jury's present-
ment - or report - was
released as a public docu-
ment Friday afternoon.
The details of a grand
jury's findings are sealed
for 15 days by law, then
the findings become pub-
lic record. Third Judicial
CASH continued on 3A


LC man

killed in

O'Brien

shooting

Fight centered
on girlfriend,
sheriff says.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
O'BRIEN - A 20-year-
old Lake City man was fatal-
ly shot Thursday morning
when a handgun discharged
and the bullet struck him in
the face while he and anoth-
er Lake City man struggled
to get control of the pistol,
Suwannee County authori-
ties said.
Zachary Pritchard, 20,385
SW Marcus Terrace, Lake
City, was killed in the shoot-
ing. His body has been sent
to the Medical Examiner's
office in Jacksonville for an
autopsy.
Pritchard was reported-
ly fighting Trenton Lance
Lacy, 24, of 112 SW Golden
Glen, Lake City, when the
gun discharged and the bul-
let struck Pritchard in the
face.
According to Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
reports, the shooting
occurred 4 a.m. Thursday
morning in an eastern
Suwannee County home in
the O'Brien area.
KIU.ED continued on 3A


Learning

center to

receive 4

new PCs

Happy House
recipient of IBM
program grant.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Happy House will soon
have more educational
equipment in its tool belt
worth $10,000 to help pre-
pare its young learners for
school.
By October, the non-
profit organization will
receive four new computers
equipped with high quality,
early education software.
The computers will come to

HAPPY continued on 3A


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . *..*.- .T.^ f'^'v :*;


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


9268
Isolated T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................ 4A
O bituaries .............. 3A
Advice & Comics ......... .4B
Puzzles ................. 2B
Faith & Values............ 6A


TODAY
IN WORLD
hit: J-.. Zei rnd ,


COMING
SUNDAY
LiLrar.r books solid
return ron in.er-, .'-'irienrt.


IGH


Ji !l001H











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010


Friday:
Afternoon: 5-2-1
Evening: 8-5-3


Friday:
Afternoon: 1-6-7-0
Evening: 4-7-0-5


SThursday:
1-11-18-20-24


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Brooks & Dunn end 20-year career


NASHVILLE, Tenn.
The first song Brooks
& Dunn ever sang
together has become
their last.
The country music
duo closed out a 20-year career
at Nashville's Bridgestone Arena'
on Thursday night with their 1991
debut single, "Brand New Man,"
during the encore.
The sold-out show was the final
stop on their Last Rodeo Tour and
doubled as a fundraiser for the
Country Music Hall of Fame and
Museum.
Kix Brooks said early in the
night, "This isn't a funeral. We did
show up to party."
They ran through many of their
23 No. 1 hits, including "Neon
Moon," "My Maria," "Red Dirt
Road" and "Boot Scootin' Boogie." ,
Reba McEntire made the only guest
appearance, singing a few lines dur-
ing "Cowgirls Don't Cry."
Both Brooks and Ronnie Dunn
joked about the reasons for their
split. Brooks blamed it on his crazy
concert ideas, like picking old songs
and hoping the crowd, would help
if he forgot the words. Dunn said
he was jealous of the cowboy hats
Brooks got to wear all these years.
Dunn explained that it was the
reason he got a tattoo of the word
"Cowboy" on his right forearm.
Brooks acknowledged those in
the. audience who played a part
in the duo's success, including
songwriters and people behind the
scenes. In a nod to the fans, he said,
"Most importantly, to the people
who paid our rent for the last twenty
years, all I can say is, 'Thanks."'
Walking off stage for the final
time, Brooks gave Dunn a playful
push.
The duo has sold more than 30
million albums and won more that
80 major industry awards.


i ASSOCIATED PRESS '
In this April 19 file photo, Kix Brooks (left) and Ronnie Dunn accept the ACM
Milestone Award during 'The Last Rodeo' tribute concert in Las Vegas. The coun-
try music duo closed out a 20-year career at Nashville's Bridgestone Arena on
Thursday night with their 1991 debut single, 'Brand New Man,' during the encore.


Tim Allen becomes
Chevy pitchman
DETROIT - The star of "Home
Improvement" and the 'Toy Story"
movies is becoming a pitchman for
Chevrolet
-General Motors
Co. says Tim Allen
-. will be a spokes-
man for the brand'
and will star in a
series of TV ads for
the 2011 Chevrolet
Cruze that begin
Allen airing on Tuesday.
Allen, 57, is best-
known for playing a tool buff in the
TV series "Home Improvement." He
was also the voice of Buzz Lightyear
in the 'Toy Story" trilogy.
The Cruze ads will feature


voiceover.from Allen and will offer
comparisons of the Cruze with com-
petitor models. The Cruze, a com-
pact sedan, is a key vehicle for GM
as it aims to compete in the small
car segment.

Eminem, Jay-Z team up
for Detroit shows
DETROIT - Rap royalty has
come to a Detroit locale where base-
ball is usually king.
Eminem and Jay-Z took the stage
in separate sets for the first of two
shows at Comerica Park Thursday
night. They were performing before
a crowd of at least 40,000.
The home of the Detroit Tigers
also will host the hip-hop heavy-
weights on Friday night
M Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Mitzi Gaynor is
79.
* World Golf Hall of Famer
-Raymond Floyd is 68.
* World Golf Hall of Famer
Tom Watson is 61.
* Actor-comedian Damon
Wayans is 50.
* Rock musician Kim Thayil
is 50.

Daily Scripture


* Actor Noah Taylor is 41.
* Actress lone Skye is 40.
Rhythm-and-blues singer
Richard Wingo (Jagged
Edge) is 35.
* Actor Wes Bentley is 32.
* Singer Dan Miller
("Making the Band") is 30.
* Singer Beyonce Knowles
is 29.


"This is what the LORD says -
your Redeemer, the Holy One
of Israel:'l am the LORD your
God, who teaches you what is
best for you, who directs you in
the way you should go.'"
- Isaiah 48:17


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... (386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880. ,
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
.(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia Courity, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks . . .............. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks......... . .. ... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks . ...............$41.40
24 Weeks .................. :$82.80
52 W eeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Law banning Cuba
travel upheld
MIAMI - A federal
appellate court has upheld
a Florida law that prohibits
funding for academic and
research travel to nations
that are considered "spon-
sors of terrorism."
The 11th Circuit Court
of Appeals in Atlanta ruled
Tuesday that the state law
does not conflict with fed-
eral control over foreign
policy.
. Professors at several
state universities filed a
lawsuit against the state
in 2008. A federal judge.in
Miami ruled that the law
was unconstitutional.
State Rep. David Rivera,
R-Miami, who supported
the 2006 legislation, said
the appellate court's deci-
sion was a victory for
Florida taxpayers who
do not want their money
going to countries like
Cuba.
University of Florida
professor Carmen Diana
Deere, a plaintiff in the
original suit, said the law
is a barrier to all levels of
research.

Captain gets jail
for fatal voyage
WEST PALM BEACH
-The captain of a Haitian
smuggling voyage that
ended when the boat
capsized, killing at least
nine people, has been sen-
tenced to 14 years and four
months in prison.
U.S. District Judge
Kenneth Mara sen-
tenced 40-year-old Jimmy
Metellus on Friday.
Survivors of the May
2009 sinking testified they
had been promised a safe
and comfortable journey.
Instead, more than 25
people were crammed
onto the boat. It lost power
and capsized off the South
Florida coast.
Anoller man running


Unemployment numbers up
Job seeker Carmen Diaz, of Hialeah (right) points to the
computer screen as South Florida Workforce employee
Rodney DeMorin looks on at the South Florida Workforce
office in Hialeah Gardens Thursday. The unemployment
rate rose in August for the first time in four months as weak
hiring by private employers wasn't enough to keep pace with
a large increase in the number of people looking for work.


the voyage, 33-year-old
Jean Morange Nelson, was
sentenced Thtirsday to 13
years in prison.
The judge explained that
Metellus, as captain, had a
great responsibility for the'
condition and safety of the
boat.

Man gets life
for baby's death
BRADENTON - A
Manatee County man has
been sentenced to life in
prison for beating a tod-
dler he was baby-sitting to
death.
A jury found 23-year-old
Dwight A. Baldwin guilty
Friday of first-degree
murder, and the judge sen-
tenced immediately after
the verdict.
Authorities say Baldwin
and his girlfriend, Audrey
Lawrence, were watch-
ing 2-year-old Tez-arrion
Armour in October 2008.
Prosecutors say Baldwin
placed the child on a train-
ing toilet and beat him for


several hours.
A doctor testified that
the child died from head
injuries.
Baldwin testified that the
struck the child but never
.in the head.

Woman gets 27
years for murder
LARGO - A Largo
woman has been sen-
tenced to 27 years in
prison for fatally stabbing
another woman following a
romantic feud in 2009.
A Pinellas County judge
sentenced 20-year-old
Rachel Wade on Friday.
She was convicted in July
of second-degree murder.
Wade was 19 when
authorities say a long-run-
ning feud with 18-year-old
Sarah Ludemann over
a young man ended in
bloodshed in a Pinellas
Park neighborhood. Wade
stabbed Ludemann in the
heart with a kitchen knife
the night of April 15, 2009.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


ISO. STORMS CHANCE CHANCE :
T-STORMS -STORMS T-STORM


HI8992 LO 8 I 89L ' HI 90 LO i HI 91 LO
. -"l ' / , " I./ j l ,a , .. J .0..',* : , ,..' - , . * : - t . . . . - . .


Pensacola
91/70


Tallahassee *
92/67 ,.

Panama City
90,71


* Valdosta
90,66
Lake City,
92/68
, Gainesville *
\92/69
N Ocala
"91/70


Tampa *
90/77p


FL Mye
91/7t


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high .
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


91
70
89
* 70
97 in 1912
61 in 1972


0.00"
0.00"
37.07"
0.56"
37.32"


City
SJacksonville Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
Gainesville
* Jacksonville
* ' Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral KeyiWest
92/75 89/75 Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
91/75 Orlando
S Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
rs, 92/77 * Pensacola
5 Naples Tallahassee
90/78 Miami Tampa
vey West " 92/77 Valdosta
eyet* ,. W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.


7:09 a.m.
7:50 p.m.
7:10 a.m.
7:48 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 2:43 a.m.
Moonset today 5:00 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 3:51 a.m.
Moonset tom. 5:46 p.m.


Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.
8 15 23 30


New First Full Last


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SHOWERS



HI 91 LO

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Sunday

90/i4/t
90/78/t
91/75/t
92/69/t
.89/70/t
88/81/t
89/67/pc
91/77/t
89/75/t
92/70/t
91/74/t
87/71/pc
89/71/pc
89/68/pc
91/77/t
89/64/pc
90/75/t


Monday
-'I/ i ~
Iit o6/pc
89/80/pc
92/74/t
91/69/pc
90/72/pc
90/80/t
90/69/pc
90/78/t
90/76/t
92/70/pc
92/74/pc
90/74/pc
91/75/s
92/71/pc
92/76 i
92/6E p.c
89/7 I


S VERVI I , :;



H.r
: -, . !


' Forecasts, data and graph-
-'"--- "* Ics � 2010 Weather Central
- "* LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected



'. ' ,l t I


CASH3
'I '


AROUND FLORIDA


72


I JI'l, 9


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


'a "51


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.*\'. .- .'^' - -










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010


Auditions start


.... for Southside's


singing idol


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Harold Barry, an officer with the Florida Fish.and Wildlife Conservation Commission, patrols Watertown Lake Friday afternoon
for any violators of game and fishing regulation. During Labor Day weekend, law enforcement officers are cracking down on
those breaking the law on Florida's busy road and water ways.


ALERT: More officers deployed to patrol roadways


Continued From Page 1A
ers will conduct their
Labor Day Holiday patrol
enforcement during the
same time period as the
FWC and they'll have addi-
tional manpower patrolling
the state's roadways.
"Like most holiday peri-
ods where we recognize
we're going to have an
increase in traffic, so we
suspend office duties for
our people in administra-


tive roles and those people
hit the roads," he said.
'We've got more enforce-
ment and more visibility
on our roadways."
' Troopers will keep
an eye out for speeders,
aggressive drivers and
people driving under the
influence of drugs or alco-
hol. Authorities have also
set up field sobriety tests
on several roads as part of


the holiday enforcement
patrols.
"Ift's important to have
an increased presence
because there's going to
be more people out on the
roads," Riordan said. "It's
just not for enforcement
purposes only. We're going
to monitor the traffic and
make sure we have a good
flow of traffic and if people
break down we would like


to be out there and be able
to identify those people in
need of assistance."
Riordan suggested
people who plan to travel
during the Labor Day
holiday period make sure
that their vehicle is road
ready, they know where
they're going and know
alternate routes in case
they encounter traffic.
problems.


CASH: Missing evidence funds traced back to 2004


Continued From Page DL

Circuit State Attorney Skip
Jarvis filed the charges
and released the report.
the findings presented
to the grand jury were
investigated by Michael
Sibley, a certified pub-
lic accountant and foren-
sic auditor specializing
in fraud involving local
government agencies.-
Sibley was called in to
investigate concerns sur-
rounding Foxx in May
2010 and, while examin-
ing records, discovered
evidence that led to the
indictment of Crews.
The grand jury find-'
ings do not appear to link
the charges against Foxx
and Crews.
Also, no theft of tax-
payer money is in ques-
tion, according to the
findings. All of the
money in question in the
theft charges are cash
funds that were evidence
cash administrative fees


from claimants paying
towing charges and for
the return of their seized
motor vehicles.
"The claimants would
pay these costs with cash
money," the grand jury
narrative reads. "The
cash money was collected
by Ms. Foxx, however on
many occasions she sim-
ply kept the money her-
self and did not properly
turn the money over to
the CCSO financial office
or deposit the funds into
CCSO bank accounts."
The grand jury deter-
mined the first event
where Foxx allegedly
took money was Nov. 2,
2004, while Frank Owens
was sheriff.
"We have determined
that Ms. Foxx was
engaged in 159 instanc-
es where she signed
out money to forfeiture,
return to owner, bank or
other notation, but that


no documents or subse-
quent deposit supported
the ultimate disposition
of the funds," the grand
jury report reads. The
violations- also spanned
the terms of former
Sheriff Bill Gootee (2005-.
2009) and current Sheriff
Mark Hunter.
In April,. two cases
handled by Foxx drew
the attention of Crews,
the department's comp-
troller. "... Claimants had
repeatedly made efforts,
to have their funds
returned to them made
contact with the CCSO
comptroller," the report
reads. "The comptroller
became concerned when
she learned the money of
the claimants had been
removed from evidence
several months before by
Ms. Foxx."
When Foxx was con-.
fronted by Hunter and
could not produce the


funds, she was placed on
administrative leave and
Hunter launched an inves-
tigation and contacted 'the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement. The grand
jury began its investiga-
tion in May. Its indictment
charges Foxx with theft
of $247,735.20 in cash
evidence, plus $30,027 in
claimants fees where vehi-
cles were towed or seized
then returned.
"Not all of this money
was taken and permanent-
ly kept by Ms. Foxx," the
report reads. "It is appar-
ent that some of the cash
money was returned to
cover claims ... the exact
amount of money perma-
nently taken by Ms. Foxx
for her personal use may
never be known."
Investigators discov-
ered that Foxx's person-
al bank account showed
$105,185.14 in unex-
plained cash deposits.


HAPPY: Computers will be used in Pre-K program


Continued From Page 1A

Happy House by way of the
*2010 IBM KidSmart Early
Learning Program Grant.
The Early Learning
Coalition of Florida's
Gateway nominated Happy
House to receive the com-
puters and the Association
of Early Learning.
Coalitions, which the
ELC of Florida's Gateway
belongs to, applied for the
grant, receiving, a portion
of it.
That portion will enable
the AELC to distribute 100
computers loaded with
educational software - col-
lectively worth $250,000
- to nonprofit early learn-
ing sites across the state
that serve low income chil-
dren, according to a news
release.
Because Happy House is
a high quality early learn-
ing center that met the
grant's requirements of


being a private nonprofit
and nonchurch-affiliated
early learning site, they
were nominated by the
ELC of Florida's Gateway,
said Thomas Logan, coali-
tion executive director.
"We were quite fortunate
that we had Happy House
that would be eligible for
this," he said. "Also, Happy
House is a very high qual-
ity center. .They offer an
excellent program for chil-
dren and I knew the com-
puters would be well-used
at Happy House."
Sheryll Walker, Happy
House executive direc-
tor, said the comput-
ers will be used in the
center's Voluntary Pre-
Kindergarten program, a
free, legislative-mandated
program that gives 4-year-
old children an opportu-
nity to prepare for kinder-
garten.


'They use computers
when they get to kinder-
garten now," she said, "so
any experience they have
with us is beneficial before
they get to school."
Logan agreed and said
the computers will be a
good opportunity for chil-
dren to familiarize them-
selves with the technology
before they go to school.
He also said the com-
puters are extra items that


Happy House, or any of
the coalition's early learn-
ing centers, could not have
afforded otherwise because
of hard economic times.
"It's the kind of thing
that no center could do on
its own," Logan said, "and
I'm very happy for them."
Walker said Happy
House is excited to be a
recipient.
'"We're thrilled to get the
new computers," she said.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Southside Community
Center is looking for Lake
City's very own young
singing idol.
Auditions for the
Southside Idol competi-
tion start from 9 a.m. to
noon today at Southside
Community Center. Other
auditions will also be held
Sept. 11 and 18.
Southside Idol is a new
initiative through the com-
munity center to promote
local youth and their tal-
ent, said Wayne Jernigan,
supervisor.
The competition is
geared toward students
in fourth through eighth
grade.
"We want to do some-
thing positive for the chil-


dren in the community,"
he said.
At the audition, stu-
dents are asked to per-
form a three- to five-min-
ute song accompanied
by their own music.
The top 10 students
will be selected to par-
ticipate in the Southside
Idol Night Sept. 25 at the
Columbia County School
Board auditorium.
The winner will receive
an all-expenses-paid trip
to Disney World.
There is no regis-
tration fee required to
audition or enter the
competition, Jernigan
said.
The center is located
at 693 SW Margaret's St.
Call the center for more
information at 758-5448
or 758-5450.


KILLED: Shot in the face
Continued From Page 1A


"There was an argument
between two guys over
one of their girlfriends and
they started fighting," said
Tony Cameron, Suwannee
County Sheriff. "At this
time we're unclear as to
exactly how the gun came
into play, but one of them
had the gun in their pos-
session."
Cameron said Pritchard
and Lacy began to fight
and struggle over the gun,
with both of them hav-
ing their hands on the
gun. Another man, who
authorities did not iden-
tify, reportedly attempted
to break up the fight by
grabbing the gun and the
weapon discharged.
"The gun went off and hit
one of them in his face near
his eye," Cameron said. "At
the present time we are still
investigating the incident"
Reports indicate authori-
ties recovered a handgun
at the scene, but they are
uncertain whether it was
the gun involved in the


"There was
an argument
between two
guys over one
of their
girlfriends and
they started
fighting."

Tony Cameron
Suwannee County Sheriff
shooting. Investigators are
continuing to interview wit-
nesses.
No arrests have been
made in the case.
Cameron said he plans
to request the information
from the case be brought
before a grand jury.
'There are some things
that remain unanswered to
my satisfaction," he said.
"I'm going to ask that a
grand jury be' convened
and let them make a deci-
sion as to whether some-
body should be prosecuted
or not."


Jeanette Roberts
Jeanette Roberts, 88, Wellborn,
Fl passed away on Wednesday,
September 1, 2010 after a long
illness. The Ocilla, Ga native
moved to Wellborn in 1958
from Ocilla. She was a member
of Crawford Lake Primitive
Baptist Church in McAlpin, Fl
Mrs. Roberts is survived by her
daughter: Alicia and Tony Hill-
house, Live Oak, Fl; two sons:
Dennis and Mickey Roberts,
Wellborn, Fl. Daryl and Mel-
anie Roberts, Live Oak, Fl;
one brother: Oswald Harper,
Tennessee; eight grandchil-
dren; six great-gratidchildren


and one great great grandchild.
Services will be held at 11:00
am Saturday, September 4,
2010 at Crawford Lake Primi-
tive Baptist Church with
Elder Wendell Horton and
Elder Herman Griffin offici-
ating, Interment will follow
in Crawford Lake Cemetery.
DANIELS FUNERAL
HOMES AND CREMATO-
RY,INC., LiveOak&Branford,
FLin charge fall arrangements.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


TiRED OF ALL THE PENALri-ES?


Then bnatPols Stat Ban. Yown'









torak- atochow fr ou Cmeinan
se ene M UtohorCrstina.Sm est


OBITUARIES


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


(2EEE3SEID














OPINION


Saturday, September 4, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


The issues

crossing

our border

policies

Anyone who thinks
America's open
border is a thing of
compassion needs
to see what 72 dead
bodies looks like.
That's the number of mur-
dered migrants found recently
in a Mexican ranch house
near the U.S. border - men
and women.from Central and
South America believed to be
headed for the open U.S. bor-,
der, but killed by their ruth-
less smugglers, perhaps over
a lack of money.
They aren't the first.
"On July 23," says one news
report, "police discovered 51
corpses, many of them buried
in shallow mass graves, in a
field near Monterrey. And on
May 29, they found 55 bodies
that had been thrown into an
abandoned mine near the cen-
tral Mexican town of Taxco."
It seems the drug cartels,
which have been poisoning
America for decades, have
increasingly branched off into
human smuggling.
Along the way, they kidnap
migrants and try to squeeze
ransom payments out of fam-
ily members. It's clear what
happens when the money
runs short.
Nearly 10,000 migrants
were kidnapiped thusly in
just 'a 'six:tn6th period' from"
September 2008 to February
2009, according to the
Mexican National Human
Rights Commission.
The unwillingness - the
active, purposeful refusal - of
the U.S. federal government
to secure the border has only
contributed to the conditions
that are giving rise to such
bloody massacres.
Far from compassionate,
the U.S.' open-border policies
are nurturing a culture of
death to our south.
America's failure to abide
by and enforce its own laws
has spawned violent lawless-
ness on its border.
Compassionate?
Hardly.
* The Augusta Chronicle

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
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BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Leash these cougars on the prowl


When my father
was about 95
and living in a
nursing home,
he complained
to me about the younger women
he had met there. "These
younger women," he said, "they
can't make good conversation
- they don't know anything
about football."
His younger women oblivious.
to football would have been in
their 80s at the time.
A universal lesson lurks.here
and it happens to be relevant
to my topic today - the matter
of age and its bearing upon the
relationships between the sexes.
In other words, the rise of cou-
gar-ism.
Of all the changes in my life-
time, and I know some of you
unkindly say I am so old I knew
several of the pharaohs person-
ally, perhaps the most strange
is the rise of the cougar. There
were no cougars, back in the day
- my old mind stretches back
just far enough to remember.
And, really, how unfair is
that? That's just when some of
us needed a cougar after a hard
day designing the pyramids.
An explanation is overdue.
For those readers who have
been living in cloistered reli-
gious communities, a cougar
in this context is a woman of a
certain age who has an eye for
the younger fellows. They are
cougars. Hear them roar.
If you believe the mega-
phones of popular culture,
cougars are everywhere. They
pack saloons to such an extent
that honest old drunks can
hardly get to the bar. They go
on cougar cruises, casting their
naughty eyes around for fresh
dessert after the late-night buf-
fet. They even have a TV show
dedicated to their phenomenon,
ABC's "Cougar Town."
Of course, it is not my place
to condemn new trends in
dating. That is a job for those


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
who preach from the nation's
pulpits, and it would be rash
of me to' invoke the wrath
of the Amalgamated Priests
and Ministers Union and the
Federation of Archbishops and
Chief Rabbis, Local No. 1. Just
because older women didn't
pounce on me when I was a lad,
that is no reason to be bitter.
Still, it is pretty gross. Yes,
what is good for the goose is
good for the gander, but the
male bird has been pretty bad'
over the years and his fowl
behavior is hardly fit to be emu-
lated on the grounds of equal
gender opportunity.
The trouble with lizard-
skinned Lotharios preying on
innocent young women was
always the preying. The moral
equation does not change just
because the would-be seducer is
wearing heavy mascara.
What a sad state of affairs
when a fresh-faced boy of ten-
der years can't venture into a
Tiki bar without some cougar
leaping from the bamboo cur-
tains to give him a torrid tiki-
ing.
A caveat must be entered.
Love is a strange thing and
sometimes biological age
doesn't matter.
Many years ago, I was walk-
ing on a Greek island just mind-
ing my own business when I
saw this young woman, rather
short of clothing, rise from the
ocean like a vision of Botticelli's
Birth of Venus.
Well, I was completely smit-
ten, even though I was five
years older than she was, and


before long I was in a strange
land with strange new relatives
eating Thanksgiving dinner and
thinking: Where am I? What the
heck happened?
What happened was an old-
fashioned outbreak of love.
She could have been 30 years
older and it would not have mat-
tered. But love is one thing and
purposefully going on a cougar
cruise to find sweet young deli-
cacies on the half shell is anoth-
er. Life shouldn't be,a raw bar.
And if I may speak on behalf
of older gentlemen, what a
waste it is for the mature
woman to concentrate her affec-
tions on young men.
The older man can be a
splendid ruin. His bald spot
can reflect the setting sun and
prolong a romantic evening.
His stomach is likely to be well
sculpted by beer and sand-
wiches, giving it that pleasing,
rounded look. In bed, he will
provide a symphony of melodi-
ous snores, his way of letting
you know that you will never be
alone, short of getting a sound-
proof room.
Concerning bed, older men
are best placed to keep at bay
America's latest horror: the
bedbug. They know the old line
- "Sleep tight, don't let the
bedbugs bite" - and under-
stand the importance of having
several martinis before bed in
order to get tight. When the
blood-sucking bedbugs do bite,
they become inebriated and can
be easily dispatched once they
start singing rugby songs.
As I said to Cleopatra one '
time, you can sleep with as
many young men -as you like.
The problem won't be that they
have nothing to say about coli-
seum sports.
The problem will be that they
will never shut up about coli-
seum sports.

* Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


The decision by a
federal judge to
temporarily block
federal funding for
embryonic stem-cell
research throws this potentially
groundbreaking work into tur-
moil. It also should prompt fed-
eral lawmakers to finally write
rules guiding such research.
We question the legal footing
for the temporary injunction
issued by U.S. District Judge
Royce Lamberth, but ultimately
believe it is up to Congress to
codify and build upon President
Obama's executive order of last
year that removed barriers to
ethical stem-cell research.
Congress ought to revive Rep.
Diana DeGette's well-vetted
stem- cell research bill, which
twice has passed Congress but,
unfortunately, twice was vetoed


by President George W. Bush.
The current legal controversy
centers on the meaning of the
so-called Dickey-Wicker amend-
ment, an appropriations rule
that has been attached to federal
spending bills consistently since
1996. It forbids federal fund-
ing for "research in which.a
human embryo or embryos are
destroyed."
Subsequent administrations
have negotiated paths around
this prohibition by refusing to
fund work that results in the
destruction of an embryo, but
allowing federal funding of
research on the cell lines devel-
oped from the embryos. Judge
Lamberth rejected that reason-
ing.
It's a thorny but important
parsing because federal support
for this time-consuming and


expensive research is crucial to
its continuation.
Much is at stake. The poten-
tial for stem-cell research is
enormous, and may yield thera-
pies for Alzheimer's, spinal cord
injury, strokes, burns, heart
disease and diabetes.
This work could benefit peo-
ple who are suffering tremen-
dously, and the research must
continue. That's why we were
disheartened to hear of the
court's temporary restraining
order blocking federal funding.
We believe the Obama admin-
istration is right to challenge the
temporary injunction. The legal
bar for issuing such an order is
high, and there is a promising
case to be made that the court
stretched to justify the move.

E The Denver Post


Cliff May


Ashamed

of today's
Time


magazine

H enry Luce would
have been morti-
fied. The founder
of Time maga-
zine believed
Americans had a responsibility
to stand up to the enemies of
freedom and democracy. He
saw the 20th century as "the
first great American century."
He would have wanted the
United States to lead in the
current era as well.
Now Time has hired Fareed
Zakaria who is perhaps best
known for "The Post-American
World" which, he insists, "is
not a book about the decline of
America, but rather about the
rise of everyone else."
Among those rising: self- -
identified jihadis and Islamists
about whom Zakaria expresses
minimal concern.,On his CNN
show the other day, he noted
that a synagogue in Beirut is
being restored. Hezbollah, he
said, supports the restoration:
"Yes, Hezbollah'- the one that
the United States has designat-
ed a foreign terrorist organiza-
tion. Hezbollah's view on the
renovation goes like this. 'We
respect divine religions, includ-
ing the Jewish religion. The
problem is with Israel's occu-
pation of Arab lands ... not with
the Jews.' Food for thought"
Let's chow down. Among
the reasons Hezbollah has
been designated a terrorist
organization is that in 1983 it
dispatched suicide bombers to
strike American peacekeepers
in Beirut. The terrorists killed
220 Marines - the deadliest
day for Marines since Iwo
Jima. Eighteen Navy personnel
and three Army soldiers also
were slaughtered. .
Perhaps Zakaria thinks
Hpzbollah has mellowed
over the years since? Hassan
Nasrallah, secretary-general
of Hezbollah, has declared:
"Regardless of how the
world has changed after 11
September, 'Death to America'
will remain our reverberating
and powerful slogan."
Zakaria might have inquired
as to how many Jews are in
Lebanon. In 1948, there were
24,000. After decades of per-
secution, as few as 50 remain.
Most Lebanese Jews have fled
to Israel which, as George
Will recently pointed out, "was
founded on one-sixth of 1 per-
cent of the land of what is care-
lessly and inaccurately called
'the Arab world.'"
Can Zakaria really be igno-
rant of all this?
Zakaria arrives at Time at an
interesting moment The weekly
recently featured a cover story:
"Is America Islamophobic?" The
question was rhetorical. The
evidence: a poll finding that "46
percent of Americans believe
Islam is more likely than other
faiths to encourage violence
against nonbelievers."
The Lebanese historian,
Antoine Sfeir, has written that
"to attack the Islamists, to
denounce their actions and
their lies, is not to attack Islam.
To attack the Islamists is, on
the contrary, to defend the
Muslims themselves, the first
though not the only victims of
the Islamists." Zakaria, Klein
and others at Time can't seem
to grasp this idea. Henry Luce
would not have put up with
them.
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A


OTHER OPINION

Stem-cell research must continue


4-c 4CNV











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & WORLD SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010


Earl triggers NC floods,


moves to New England


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

'The GreatLouidini' performs rare rabbit trick
Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church Pastor Louie Mabrey, aka 'The Great Loudini,' per-
forms a magic trick on Barbara Jeffords on Thursday. He turned her into a rabbit.



Families calling for justice

for US soldiers, Marines


By JOHN MILBURN
Associated Press

LEAVENWORTH, Kan
- As major U.S. combat
operations in Iraq end,
some families of soldiers
and Marines convicted of
crimes during battle hope
the nation doesn't forget
their sons.
The men, known as the
"Leavenworth) 10," were
convicted by military courts
for the murder of Iraqis
over the past seven ,years.
They're serving sentences,
which range from 10 to 40
years, at Fort Leavenworth.
But their families say it's all
an injustice and want other
Americans to share their
outrage over what hap-
pened to their loved ones.
"For a soldier not to get
any benefit of .the doubt,,
for, serving their countryy.
it's a horrible situation,"
'said Vicki Behenna, whose
son is serving time at Fort
Leavenworth. "Unless you,
see your men die in battle
and don't know where the
next (bomb) is coming
from, I think ift's unfair for
us to second-guess their
actions."
On Saturday, the fami-
lies led by Vicki and her


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Thursday photo,Vicki
Behenna holds a photograph
of her son, Michael Behenna,
as she poses for a photo in
Oklahoma City. Families of a
group of soldiers convicted
'of killing Iraqi civilians dur-.
ing the war are hoping other-
Americans see-the injustice
in their sons' sentences.

husband, Scott Behenna of
Edmond, Okla., are hold-
ing a motorcycle rally in
Leavenworth to .help raise
awareness about the men's
cases.
The soldiers and Marines
were convicted for actions


during a span in the Iraq
war when conditions were
extreme. Mounting U.S.
casualties amid attacks
from insurgents, foreign.
terrorists and rival Shfite
and Sunni religious fac-
tions led to intense fight-
ing. The violence led to
changes in U.S. tactics and
a surge of troops in 2007 to
stanch civilian and military
deaths.
The conduct of U.S. sol-
diers and Marines in the
conflicts came under scru-
tiny after reports surfaced
of. abuse and torture of
detainees at the Abu Ghraib
prison.
The Behennas say the
"Leavenworth 10" are vic-
tims of injustice who were
caught up in changing mili-
tary policies and frustrated
by seeing their buddies.
wounded and killed., . .
But former military pros-
ecutor Michelle McCluer
says commanders, who
decide to file such charges
against soldiers, and court
martial juries that issue
verdicts and sentences, are
familiar with thd "fog of
war" or stress of combat.
They take all of that into
account when deciding
how to handle cases.


By BOB SALSBERG
Associated Press

CHATHAM, Mass. - A
Weakening but still dan-
gerous Hurricane Earl
steamed toward the gray-
shingled cottages and fish-
ing villages of Cape Cod on
Friday, disrupting people's
vacations on the unofficial
final weekend of the short
New England summer.
Packing winds of just
80 mph, the storm swirled
up the Eastern Seaboard
after sideswiping North
Carolina's Outer Banks,
where it .caused flooding
but no injuries and little
damage. For the most
part, it was expected to
swing wide of New York
City and Long Island, and
much of the rest of the
mid-Atlantic region, but
pass close by Cape Cod,
Nantucket Island and
Martha's. Vineyard late
Friday night, bringing rain
and high winds.
Vacationers pulled their
boats. from the water
and canceled Labor Day
weekend reservations on
Nantucket, the well-to-do
resort island and old-time
whaling port expected to
-get the worst of the storm.
Shopkeepers boarded up
their windows. Swimmers
in New England were
warned to stay out of the
water - or off the beach
altogether - because of
the danger of getting swept
away by high waves.
Airlines canceled doz-
ens of flights into New
England, and Amtrak
suspended train service
between New York and
Boston.
As of Friday afternoon,
no large-scale evacuations
were ordered for the Cape
Cod area, where fishermen
and other hardy year-round
,residents have been dealing '
with gusty nor'easters for
generations. : '* *-
"We kind of roll with the
punches out here. ,It's not
a huge deal for us," said
Scott Thomas, president of
the Nantucket Chamber of
Commerce.-
On Cape Cod, Ellen
McDonough and a friend
waited for one of the last.
ferries to Nantucket before


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nathan King directs his wife, Angela, as he attempts to pull
a stranded motorist from standing water in Nags.Head,
N.C., Friday after Hurricane Earl dumped heavy wind and
rain on North Carolina's Outer Banks.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vehicles are stranded on a flooded street in Atlantic City,
N.J., as Hurricane Earl moves up the eastern coast, Friday.


service was suspended
because of the approach-
ing storm. "It's not a 3-foot
snowstorm. I think us New
Englanders are tough,"
McDonough said. "We've
had this weekend planned,
and no hurricane is going
to stop us." .
Nantucket Police Chief
William Pittman warned
'island residents against
' complacency,' saying Earl.
was still a dangerous storm
with'%e9 re Wefid '.
By midday Friday, Earl
had dropped to, a Category
1 storm - down from a
fearsome Category 4 with
145 mph winds a day ear-
lier. Forecasters said it
could weaken to a tropical
storm by the time it passed'
about 50 to 75 miles south-
east of Nantucket


As Earl lost steam and
veered .farther. east, the
National Hurricane Center
reduced the New England
areas under a hurricane
warning to Cape Cod,
Nantucket and Martha's
Vineyard, the elite vaca-.
tion spot that President
Barack Obama left just last
weekend.
The, National; Weather
eicw, ,,forecasting
winds up to 65 mph on
Nantucket with gusts up
to 85 mph. On Cape Cod,
winds up to 45 mph with
gusts of up to 60 mph. were
expected. The last time the
Cape was hit directly by a
hurricane was 1991, when
Bob brought 75 mph gusts
that snapped trees and tore
roofs off the weathered gray
homes. /


Powerful 7.1 quake hits southern New Zealand


By RAY LILLEY
Associated Press

WELLINGTON, New
Zealand - A powerful
7.1-magnitude earthquake
struck much of New
Zealand's ,South Island
early Saturday and caused
widespread damage, but
there were just two reports
of serious injuries. Looters
broke into some damaged
shops in Christchurch,
police said.
The quake, which hit 19
miles west of the southern
city of Christchurch accord-
ing to the state geological
agency GNS Science, shook
a wide area, with some resi-
dents saying buildings had
collapsed and power was


Associated Press.
"Roads .haye subsided
where water mains have.
broken and a lot of people
evacuated in panic from
seaside areas for fear of a
tsunamii" she said, adding
that "there is quite signifi-
cant damage, really, "with
reports that some people
were, trapped in damaged
houses."
Christchurch . Hospital
said it had treated two men
with serious injuries and a
number of people with minor
injuries.
One was hit by a falling
chimney and was in serious
condition in intensive care,
while a second was badly
cut by glass, hospital spokes-
woman Michele Hider said.


severed. No tsunami alert
was issued.
GNS Science initially
reported the quake as mag-
nitude 7.4, but later down-
graded it tfter re-examin-
ing quake records. The
U.S. Geological Survey,
in America, measured the
quake at 7.0.
Christchurch Mayor Bob
Parker declared a state of
emergency four hours after
the quake rocked the region,
warning people that continu-
ing aftershocks could cause


masonry to fall from dam-
aged buildings.
The emergency meant
parts of the city would be
closed off and some build-
ings closed as unsafe, he
said.
Minister of Civil Defence
John Carter said a state
of civil emergency was
declared as the quake was
"a significant disaster," and
army troops were on stand-
by to assist
Parker said the "sharp,
vicious earthquake has


caused significant damage
in parts'of the city ... with
walls collapsed that have
fallen into the streets." .
Chimneys and walls had
fallen from older buildings,
with roads blocked, traffic
lights out and power, gas
and water supplies disrupt-
ed, he said.
"The fronts of at least five
buildings in the central city
have collapsed and rubble is
strewn across many roads,"
Christchurch resident
Angela Morgan told The


r' In Loving Memory of
Inez Fuller Hamilton I
1915-2007
I l,


Mothers are a gift from God
above sent from Heaven
with special loveiWe love
and miss you Mama.
Your Loving Children,
Grandchildren &
', Creat-Grandchildren ^
I I I I I U


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A police officer is seen on a street blocked by rubble from a damaged building following a 7.4-magnitude earthquake in
central Christchurch, New Zealand, early Saturday. No tsunami alert was issued and there were no reports of injuries, but
looters broke into some damaged shops in Christchurch, police said.


LOCAL STOCKS


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.68 6.1 12 27.44 +.04 -2.1 McDnids NY 2.20 2.9 17 75.09 +.07 +20.3
AutoZone NY ... .. 16 218.45 +1.51 +38.2 Microsoft Nasd .52 2.1 7 24.29 +.35 -20.3
BkofAm NY .04 .3 90 1350 +.22 -104 NY Times NY ...... 8 8.10 +.33 -34.5
BobEvans Nasd .80 29 13 27.50 +.43 -5.0 NextEraEn NY 2.00 3.7 14 54.64 ... +3.4
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 5,0 13 13.21 +33 -17.4 NoyH Nasd ........ 9.50 ... -9.1
CSX NY .96 1.8 16 53.67 +.81 +10.7 OccPet NY 1.52 1.9 15 78.32 +.48 -3.7
Chevron NY 2.88 3.7 9 78.00 +.55 +1.3 Penney NY .80 3.7 17 21.59 +.18 -18.9
Cisco Nasd ...... 16 21.04 +.52 -12.1 PepsiCo NY 1.92 2.9 17 65.57 +.60 /'.
Cigrp NY .. ... 3.91 +.03 +18.1 Pfizer NY .72 4.4 9 16.46 +.OF -9.5
CocaC NY 1.76 3.1 18 57.56 +.18 +1.0 Potash NY .40 .3 32 148.50 -.05 +36.9
Delhaize NY 202 2.9 ... 69.78 +.30 -9.0 PwShs000Nas .26 .6 ....46.01 +.,5 +.6
DirFnBear NY ......... 13.64 -.86 -29.8 PrUShS&P NY ......... 31.81 -.86 -9.2
DrxFBuOls NY .15 .7 .. 21.62 +123 -12.5 Ryder NY 1.08 2.6 30 40.99 +.49 -.4
FamilyDr NY .62 1.5 17 42.51 -.99 +52.7 S&P500ETFNY 2.22 2.0 ... 110.89 +1.42 -.5
FordM NY ... .. 7 12.07 +.36 +20.7 SearsHklgs Nasd. ... 28 68.39 +1.89 -18.0
GenElec NY .48 3.1 16 15.39 +.24 +1.7 SiriusXM Nasd ......... 1.01 +.02 +68.3
HomeDp NY .95 3.2 17 29.85 +.44 +3.2 SouthnCo NY 1.82 4.9 15 36.99 +.15 +11.0
iShEMkts NY .59 1.4 ... 42.03 +.49 +1.3 SpnntNex NY ........ 4.34 ... +18.6
iShR2K NY .77 1.2 ... 64.33 +1.13 +3.0 SPORFncI NY .17 12 ... 14.52 +.30 +.8
Intel Nasd .63 3.4 11 18.43 +.15 -9.7 TimeWam NY .85 2.7 14 31.72 +.32 +8.9
JPMorgCh NY .20 .5 12 39.17 +1.01 -5.9 WaMart NY 1.21 2.3 13 52.04 +.28 -2.6
Lowes NY .44 2.0 17 21.,96 +.02 -6.1 WelsFargo NY .20 .8 10 25.84 +.74 -4.3


"The fronts of at least five buildings in the central city have collapsed
and rubble is strewn across many roads."

Angela Morgan
Christchurch resident
' '


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














FAITH


Saturday, September 4, 2010 v


&


VALUES


mww.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS



Praying for more faithful


nie LMethodist survey aims to stop membership decline


Angie Land
angieland3@windstreom.net


Dealing

with our

personal

famine

n the days when the
judges ruled, there
was a famine in
the land and a man
from Bethlehem in
Judah, together with his
wife and two sons, went to
live for a while in the coun-
try of Moab. The man's
name was Elimelech, his
wife's name Naomi, and
the names of his two sons
were Mahlon and Kilion.
They were Ephrathites from
Bethlehem, Judah. And
they went to Moab and lived
there." (Ruth 1:1-3)
"In the days when the
judges ruled" actually sets
the stage for our characters.
A peek back to the final
verse of the Book of Judges
clarifies that "In those days,
Israel had no king; everyone
did as he saw fit" (Judges
21:25)
Let's not miss the chance
to consider this theory,
because at first glance
"everyone doing as they see
fit" might seem like a good
idea. In reality, however, the
result would be chaos and
famine.
According to Leviticus
26:3-5,14,19-20, the Lord
makes a clear and specific
connection between obedi-
ence to Him and abundance:
"If you follow my decrees
and are careful to obey my
commands, I will send you
rain in its season and the
ground will yield its crops
and the trees of the field
their fruit ... But if you will
not listen to me and carry
out all these commands ... I
will break down your stub-
born pride and make the
skyabove you like iron and
the ground. beneath you like
bronze. Your strength will be
spent in vain because your
soil will not yield its crops,
nor will the trees of the land
yield their fruit"
It is important to note that
a famine doesn't just apply
to a lack of food. In fact, by
definition a famine can be
a lack, want. or scarcity of
anything.
In our personal lives, a
famine can occur in our
finances, marriages, careers,
and health. Less visible, but
no less a reality, is a famine
of contentment, joy, and
peace.
Recently, I have been
reminded that God allows
personal famine, not only to
correct disobedience, but
also to remind us to trust
Him. This summer our fam-
ily has gone through several
major changes: We packed
up our younger son and
moved him away to college
and simultaneously brought
our pre-teen niece to live
with us.
While these are good
things, worthy of celebra-
tion, both required at major
transition. During this time, I
was surprised to experience
a personal famine of sorts
... until one morning God's
Word reminded me loud and
clear that "my strength will
be spent in vain," if I forget
to trust Him.
While the transition is still
very much in progress, I am
happy to report that the har-
vest is looking plentiful.
* Heart Matters is a weekly .
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
. she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


By ROSE FRENCH
Associated Press
NASHVILLE,
Tenn.
- It's the
conundrum
Protestant
denominations with
declining memberships
and shrinking budgets are
desperate to solve: How
to stem the decades-long
losses and attract new
worshippers.
The United Methodist
Church, the third larg-
est denomination in the
country, thinks it could
be closer to finding the
answer. It commissioned
an ambitious survey of
nearly all its 33,000 U.S.
churches to find out what
its growing memberships
are doing to keep congre-
gations thriving.
Of those churches, the
four key factors of vitality
stood out as "crystal clear
findings that are action-
able," according to the
survey:
* Small groups and
programs, such as Bible
study and activities geared
toward youth.
* An active lay leader-
ship.
* Inspirational pastors
who have served lengthy
tenures at churches.
* A mix of traditional
and contemporary wor-
ship services.
One of the successful
churches is St. Luke's
United Methodist Church
in Indianapolis, which
has seen its membership
steadily grow over the
years to nearly 6,200.
The church's senior
pastor, the Rev. Kent
Millard, said it has offered
both traditional and con-
temporary worship ser-
vices for years. At a con-
temporary service, con-
gregants kick back with
doughnuts and coffee,
a live band plays music
and clips from Hollywood
movies are shown to illus-
trate Gospel messages.
"Worship is like going
to a mall," Millard said.
"There are all kinds of
stores. Some people like
specialty shops. Some like
department stores. When


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Worshippers listen to a rock band at The Garden, a contemporary service of St. Luke's United Methodist Church, at the.
Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre in Indianapolis on Sunday. 'Worship is like going to a mall,' the church's senior pastor, the
Rev. Kent Millard said. 'There are all kinds of stores. Some people like specialty shops. Some like department stores. When
you have variety, people can go where they like.'


you have variety, people
can go where they like."
Religious scholars
say the exhaustive sur-
vey is likely the first of
its kind to try solving
problems that for years
have plagued mainline
Protestant denomina-
tions like the Methodists,
Lutherans, Presbyterians
and Episcopalians.
The U.S. membership
of the United Methodist
Church, which has
most of its offices and
operations in Nashville,
dropped by nearly 1 per-
cent last year, to 7.9 mil-
lion members, according
to Yearbook of American
& Canadian Churches,
released by the National
Council of Churches.
The Methodists' survey,
conducted by consulting
firm Towers Watson and
sent out to churches in
May, found that about
5,500 Methodist churches
were considered vital,
with high attendance,
growth and congregation
engagement. The project
cost about $200,000.
Churches and pastors
were asked survey ques-
tions like, "Approximately,
what percent of your
church's children par-
ticipate in programs other


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Angela Cain-Crawford (left) and her husband, George
Crawford, listen to a speaker at The Garden, a contempo-
rary service of St. Luke's United Methodist Church, at'the
- Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre in Indianapolis on Sunday.


than worship?" and to rate
the "general effectiveness
of the lay leadership in'
motivating and inspiring
vitality in the life of the
congregation."
"The most important
outcome of the research
is that there are clearly
drivers that are abso-
lutely understandable
and actionable," said Neil
. Alexander, president and
publisher of the United
Methodist Publishing
House and co-chair of the
steering committee that


commissioned the survey.
"This gives us great
hope. We-believe we can
see dramatic, positive
results in more congrega-
tions over the next few
years.""
Millard agrees with the
importance of longer-serv-
ing pastors.
"I have been here 17
years and my predeces-
sor was here 26 years,"
Millard said. 'We've had
two very long-term pas-
tors and I think that's part
of the reason why the


church has thrived."
His church also has a
very active lay leadership
with a governing board of
12 - composed of attor-
neys, business owners,
teachers and other profes-
sionals. And the church
recently brought on four
new staff members to
help develop children and
youth ministries. About
1,200 children and youth
participate.in the church's
programs.
"All pastors and bishops
have anecdotes and ideas
about what makes a vital
church," Millard said.
"But we've never done
a survey of all United
Methodist churches like
this.
William B. Lawrence,
Dean of the Perkins
School of Theology at
Southern Methodist
University, said he's not
aware of other major
denominations doing simi-
lar surveys.
'We are a denomination
that still has the capacity
to look at ourselves and
ask some hard questions,"
he said. "It's an attempt
to examine seriously the
challenges facing the
church todlay and the
opportunities facing the
church in thd future."


CHURCH NOTES


Sunday
Homecoming
Celebration
Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church is having
a homecoming celebra-
tion at 11 a.m. Sept. 5. The
speaker is Rev. Wyndell
Wallace, pastor. The
church is located at 1015
SW Birley Ave.

Revival services
A revival is coming to
White Springs Church
of God at 10:30 a.m. and
6 p.m. Sept. 5 and 7 p.m.
nightly Sept. 6-10. The
speaker is Evangelist
David Lamb. The church
is located at 10574 NW 1st
Street in White Springs.

Thursday
Women's Conference
An inaugural Women's
Conference is Sept 9-12
at True Church of God
in Unity. The theme is
"Loved by the King."
Services are at 7 p.m.
Sept. 9 and 10. Three
workshops - "A purpose
filled Woman," "Growing
in Wisdom" and 'Women
getting equipped for


Ministry" - are Sept 11.
The Sunday service is at
11:30 a.m. The registra-
tion fee for this confer-
ence is $10, which include
'the Saturday Luncheon
and gift bag. The church
is located at 629 NE Annie
Mattox Street. Call (386)
697-6896.

Five Great Thursdays
Dr. Ed Johnson, Florida
Baptist Convention
Cooperative Program
director, is the speaker
at 7 p.m. Sept. 9 at First
Baptist Church of Lake
City. "Father & Sons
Quartet" featuring Florida
State Representative
Dennis Baxley and his
three sons will also per-
form. The event is free
and homemade refresh-
ments will be available.
The church is located at
182 NE Justice St Call
(386) 752-5422.

English/literacy classes
Free English speaking
and literacy classes pro-
vided by Columbia County
School District's Career
and Adult Education
Program is from 5:30 to
8 p.m. every Thursday
beginning Sept. 9 at Unity


of God Ministries, Inc. in
Wellborn. Activities for
children will be provided.
Call (386) 755-8190. The
church is located at 12270
County Road 137.

Sept. 10
Women Empowerment
Conference
The annual Word to
Women Empowerment
Conference kickoff at
6:30 p.m. Sept. 10 at
Olivet Missionary Baptist
Church. The theme is
"Restore, Renew and
Revive." The Rev. Ronald
V. Walters, pastor, is the
speaker. The church is
located at 541 NE Davis
Avenue.

Sept. 11
Encouragement
Breakfast
The annual Home
Mission Encouragement
Breakfast is at 9 a.m. Sept.
11 at Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church. Lake
City Police Chief Argatha
Gilmore is the speaker.
The church is located at
541 NE Davis Avenue.


Women's Conference
The Greater Truevine
Baptist Church "Women
of Truth" will be hosting
their annual women's con-
ference prayer breakfast
at 9:30 a.m. Sept. 11. The
speaker is Helen Davis.
Call Conda Green at 719-
3852.

Sept. 12
Women's Conference
The 'Greater Truevine
Baptist Church "Women
of Truth" will be hosting
their annual women's con-
ference worship service
at 3 p.m. Sept. 12. Janice
Stockton is the speaker.
Call Conda Green at 719-
3852.

Church anniversary
St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church is cel-
ebrating its 71st church
anniversary Sept. 12. The
11 a.m. speaker is Rev.
Alvin L. Green, pastor.
The 3 p.m. speaker is
the Rev. Jerome Lennon,
pastor of Morning Star
Missionary Baptist
Church of Gainesville.
The church is located at
222 Oosterhoudt Lane.


Every Tuesday
Addiction support
group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday
in the fellowship hall of
Christ Central Ministries,
217 SW Duval Ave. The
group provides spiritual
and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting.
Call 755-2525.

Free Biblical counseling
Free Biblical counsel-
ing is available at Hopeful
Baptist Church. Many
are struggling with prob-
lems including marital,
financial, communication,
emotional, spiritual and
addiction. To make an
appointment, call (386)
752-4135 between 8:30
a.m. and 4 p.m.
Submit events and
announcements to be
included in the Lake City
Reporter's Church Notes
in writing no later than
5 p.m. Tuesday to Tom
Mayer at tmayer@lakecity-
reporter.com, (386) 754-
0428, fax to (386) 752-
9400 or visit 180 E. Duval
St., Lake City. Call (386)
754-0428 with questions.


6A










LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010


Our moods, our interests, our longings... all play a part

in determining our happiness. What we believe makes a

difference, too. There are those for whom happiness arises

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32.1-22 33.1-33 34.1-37 35.1-36.4 36.5-33 37.1-24 1-
Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P 0. Box 8187, Charlonesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.c.om


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We also do solar hool-ups
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FOOD STORES
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To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A - .
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours


First Advent Christian
1881 SW McfadaneAve
j6- ;'52-39J1f
Sunday School: 9 4'AM
Sunday Service II 110 AM
Wednesday Service: 710PM

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
'q3 NW Like leflery Road
lm ,-7T -, II6 *TI
Sunday dl'orhip i( l uIAl F.PA M
Wed. FVin. Bible Stud .t I1JPM
"A (hurih hri iEiJS js Feal'

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 75'- 04i0
Sunday School 9"-3,AM
Sunday Worship 10:45M & 6PM
Wedriesdai Ee Servict 7PNM
PaIor[ Larry E Sweat
EASISIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave.* 386-752-2860
Sun Bible Study 9:45AMI
Sun WorsLip I lAM 6F'M
Wed Prie Mig/Bible Study 6PM
Ri Braindun G Wit

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study j H1AM
Sunday Woishp 10 3J0M & 6 0Oi1PM
Wed 6 0lPM Piayer Service, &
Children Mni;str 6:ISPM
Donitown Lake City 75*-542.
Re Siephen, Arens Pasior
OLIVE MiSSIONAiY' BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E Dajnsureet
lA61 52-199li
Ronald V Walters, Pastor
Sunday School ' 9 45AM
Sunday Morning Worship I LOOAM
Wed. Mid-Week Woiship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
26 NW Lale letteryRd. * 52-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
iww.pbclc corn
Sunday School 8:30, 9 415 & 11AM
Sunday Wurship 9:45 & 1IAM 6PM


AWANA
Evrring Worship


30 PM
:00 PM


6 PM
u0 PM
,)IJ fPM
812"1 IN
:.0PWM


5
6:


Wed Pte Schedule
FaitS. Supper e(Roeinoril
Children s Mihnitry
Youth Wi.rship ,
Praver Meeting h
Thursday) Eitning Schedule St 8
Parkviet' Edge 81
Pasit'r Michael A later


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids &Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor. Ron Thompson


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPfIST
Sunday Services t 10 AM
Pastor Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
'Ji88i SE Baa Dire' 755-5553


Sunday:
Bible Study
Morning Woiship
Evemng WVorpshp
Wednesday
PrAN u
Pliayr .v Bible Srul',


9.15 AlM
IO.JOAM
6 15PM

' IfPM
r. I ", p k


TABERNACLE BAPI1ST CHURCH
ib-dependent Bapapils
144 SE Monrose A\e *752.427'4
Sunday Sihool IU AM
Sun Morn Worchip II AMP
Sunday Eve. 6 PM
Wed Prayer Meeing 7-30 PM
Paitor Mike Norman
THE VINEYARD
A(outhern Bapist Church
2091 SW Main Blvd.' 6?3 0026
Sunday Worslip 10 00IAM
Where less is Preachded
and eIins are appropriate
Palto. Bo)Hamrmoc

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court - 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mas.s 5On PM
Sunday Ma), 8.'15,AM. 1 30 AM,
5:iji PM Ibparuish/Engish
Sunday SchooliReligous Education
9:00AM-10:15A,

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service . I1:00AM
Wednesday Eiening Service 7 30 PM
LAKE cm CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy :'47 S 559436


Sunday Sithooli
Sun Mom Worship
Wed Praler Meeting


9 JO AM
10.311 AM
7PM


NEW HORIZON
church of Chrisi
Directons & Times 755-1320
lack Exum,ji, Mnister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. *752-5965
Sunday School 945, AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM N 6100PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed southh Servce 7PM
Pastor Carroll Lee

EVANGELCHURCHOFGOD
370 SW Monitor Glen' 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
SundayWorship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment - 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor. John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stjamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 &OAM
Wednesday: 5:15pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director ofMusic Dr. Alfonso Levy


*1 ____________________________


OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Piovidedl
Chrinsan Educanon Hour
For all ages at 10-45AM
Pastor. Rev Brute Alkue

SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90, 1 5 miles Wei of 1l-75 752- 07j7
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail
Wed Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7pM
Vicai lothnDavid Bryant


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 .115441 South
Sunday Worship Services
Traditional Srves8 30& I1:0.'AM
. 386-755- 353 �
uythnsit'eartlinknei
Finir Unit Methodist Church
973 S. Maribn Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9f45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Service 8:31AM
T[adirionral service 1 OOAI00
Programripportunitie available in all
areas for all age.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
7524488
WESLEY'MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane * 752-3513
iAdiaceni t) Summers Shooll
Sunday School 9:00AMi
Wurship 8 [lii & l" .O00.M
" Nursery provided
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
A.VW A siarns 9111Wed 5 00PM
Pastor. The Re-v. I LouieMabrey
ww-v ebleyqmem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
IJ S. 90 E rnm on Cortez inei toQuahly
Ind. i nght un Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun Worship i LAM i&b 6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbumr


SLAKE Cm' CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Semces:
Sunday Schuol 9.45AM
Sunday Worstup lo45,A.I, h630PM
Wednesday 6.3UPMI
Adult, south Mirnstry, Chuldien's Ministry
Pasrur Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and jlea Paik Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
f ,i \' Ba\a Liriut , -,iit.il
Snridav S6:hool 'tMu0
9unday Sieroce 10.1ll AM
NORSER YPPRODED'
Pastur Dr R)o A. Muran
Duictor ofl Music Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE jones vay ' NE Washingio Si
Sunday School Ill:01 AM
Monung Wioship 1100 AM
Evangelisuc Service 6.i)0 PM
'Youth Services , edne>day 7-00PM
Mid-week Semce - Wednesday 7:UI0 PM
Fori rnk cfl' 7.'.J-.,4i1. ry. rireW, ciinme
Pastor Rev. Stan E Oli

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
sunday Morning 11I00A
Wednesday Se-ice OPM
217 Dyal Ave., fom Hwv 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd. go 5 mdles, South,
church :in left. @755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner bR 47 & Hudson Cuicle
Sunday Celehranon 10.30 AM
Pastor Chnris ones '752 9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road * ,5 il'58il
Fust and Third Sundays 9:30 11AM.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:0u P.M.
Faster Re Cheryl R Pingel
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
MorningWorship 1 1.00AM
Sunday Evenihg 6:OOPM
Wednesday , 7:00PM
A Fuli Gospel Church . Everyone Welcomed
(386)755-5197
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir Hwy 41' to Columbia City.
one mile East on Cl 240
Sunday IOAM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM


No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


Call





752-129310,
t . .


To. -adve rtiseaintisD


~Ilay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

�OGENTIVA
greaj helait.coa n,,* .:u,.� r.:,-,
. 'r .,, u , *t. r., , . ,, ,, ili""J' ^.. -,.."
* I *i ,,,, n,: l~r, ,.I. ,-,,., .






Tires lor every need
US 90 West across Irom Wnal-Man
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnihings siore
S'. [( u'f. ., ki1 l , ,f La,'r.. | i|T,. ,I, h rl ' .',iiT- il A l 1 I,


Patty Register -,.
386-961-9100
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
]174f iJurjlU ML n i n , 1ul,1 ' ;ll U' pT . 71) ,
Lair (.ry FL 31V6 (.:hJ .'] -i.dJy

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
. ASPHAT PAVING
COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIALL
'iir ptparinii - * Road Building * Parking Lots
trading & Drainage
S 752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

HARRY'S
SHeating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President


n 752-2308 14k

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED - PET SUPPLIES - LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS * CHAIN SAWS * TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST * LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
4s '755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

BAYWAYjanorial seruict
FIRE & Waier Resiorjlron
Floor & Ciarpi: Carc

755-6142


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


--.1







8A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010


WE PAY THE MOST FOR YOUR;


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TM










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, September 4, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE







Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom

Picks by

an 'expert'
Smay not get every
Game right this
weekend, but I can
almost guarantee
that Miami, Ohio
State and Utah come
away with wins.
OK, I may have
cheated a little bit on
those games, but have
no fear, I'm back with
another year of expertf' '
picks.
The new era of
Florida football kicks
off in Gainesville at
noon today when John
Brantley leads the
Gators against Miami of
Ohio. This game doesn't
spark interest from the
opponent, but it does
spark interest.
Most don't know
what to expect from the
Gators. Does the team
stall after the loss of Tim
Tebow, Riley Cooper,
Brandon Spikes and
many others?
Could Brantley be
exactly what the doctor
ordered for the passing
of Tebow? One thing is
for sure, the Gator Nation
has some excitement for
the unknown entering
today's game.
With that said, it
should be a beating.
Brantley's offense
will resemble more
of what Gator fans
are accustomed to
witnessing with the
downfield attack. Gone
will be the 270 carries of
Tebow, and in will be a
more diverse offense.
Miami of Ohio won a
single game last season.
There's a reason the
Gators open with them. It
gives the team a chance
to establish an identity.
That identity will be of
a pass-happy offense.
Remember the name
Andre Debose, because
he very well could be the
next Gator great.

Florida 52,
Miami (Ohio) 10
Just as one era ends
in Gainesville another
has been left behind
in Tallahassee. I find it
interesting that in the
post Bobby Bowden era,
the Seminoles will open
with Bowden's alma
mater. It would have
been interesting to see
him coach against them
in his final season.
Fisher will lead the
Seminoles onto the field
against cupcake Samford.
Though the school is
located in Alabama, it
doesn't hold a candle
compared to the other
state schools.
Florida State could
be sneaky good this
season. Ranked No. 20
heading into the season,
I have a feeling that the
Seminoles won't stay
there for long.
Christian Ponder
is among the best
quarterbacks in the
nation, and he'll stand
behind a very good
offensive line. The key
for the Seminoles is
finding out what players
will be able to make


PICKS continued on 2B


Cowboys lasso


Indians, 31-0


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Alexis Blake (1) is being tackled by a host of Cowboys during Madison
County High's 31-0 win against the Indians on Friday in Fort White.


Madison County
rolls up 472 yards
during victory.
By TIM KIRBY ,
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com

FORT WHITE - Fort
White High football's
one-sided history against
.Madison County High
continued Friday as the
Cowboys shut out the home
team, 31-0.
Madison dominated the
statistics in the game, out-
gaining Fort White 472-71
yards, but the game was
not as lopsided as the score
makes it look.
The Indians had a real
chance to win, following a
goal-line stance at the end


How the war was won


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan is congratulated by his teammates after laying a big hit on Brooks County High's
Deric Herring during the Tigers' 38-13 win against the Trojans on Friday in Lake City.

CHS dominates Brooks County, 38-13


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

It's said that the big-
gest improvement comes
in the first two weeks of a
football season. Columbia
High showed that improve-
ment in a 38-13 win against
Brooks County (Ga.) in the
third-annual "Border Wars"
on Friday in Lake City.
Timmy Jernigan ignited
a team that was stagnant
through the first quarter


with a 37-yard touchdown
run in the second quarter
to tie the game at 7-7, and
Columbia never looked
back.
It looked like a replay
of last week during the
first quarter as the Tigers
knocked, on the door, but
couldn't get an answer.
Rakeem Battle ran the
opening kickoff back
77 yards to the Trojans'
11-yard line, but Columbia's
Hayden Lunde missed a


26-yard field goal.
After exchanging posses-
sions, the Trojans opened
the scoring during their
second drive. It lasted only
two plays.
Freshman quarterback
Malcolm Parirish connect-
ed with Todd Manning on a
59-yard pass to give Brooks
County a 7-0 lead. It would
stay that way until the 9:26
mark in the second quarter
when Jernigan scooped up
a fumble to give Columbia


the ball, at the 37-yard line.
He then scampered 37
yards sending a wake-up
call to the Tigers. Lunde
converted the extra point
to tie the. game.
"The offense and defense
play as I play," Jernigan
said. "It's a role I adopted.
After (the touchdown), the
switch just turned on."
The Trojans committed
a turnover on a second


CHS continued on 2B


of the first half and a solid
start to th second half.
Madison County put
together scoring drives of
83 yards'on nine plays and
73 yards on five plays to
take a 13-0 lead with 6:29
left in the second quarter.
Dantonio Denson scored
the first touchdown on a
two-yard run and Tommie
Young scored from 16 yards
out.
More of the same ensued,
after the Cowboys got lucky
when a fumble bounced
through the hands of Alexis
Blake who would have
scored. Madison marched
to a first-and-goal at the
4 with less than 30 seconds
left in the quarter.
INDIANS continued on 3B


Golfers


into


swing

Columbia opens
season with two
wins this week.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
, Columbia High is off to
a hot start to the 2010 golf
season under coach Steve
Smithy after picking up
two wins this week. It's not
only the fact that the Tigers
have two wins that makes
it a hot start, but also what
teams the wins have come
against.
Columbia defeated 'Santa
Fe High, 153-175, at The
Country Club of Lake City on
Tuesday to open the season.
In their second match, the
Tigers knocked off Buchholz
High for only the second
time in Smithy's 10 years
with the Tigers. Columbia
shot 150 to beat Buchholz by
four shots at Quail Heights
Country Club.
Dean Soucineck was the
medalist in both matches
with scores of 38 and 35.
"I'm very proud of his
first two matches," Smithy
said. "It showed a lot of
poise and he acted like he
had a lot of experience for a
sophomore."
Nick Jones and Bryce


GOLF continued on 2B


Something to prove


Miami (Ohio)
comes into the
Swamp today.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE
Florida coach Urban Meyer
believes his team has more
questions now than it did
in 2007.
Could it happen again?
Maybe, but Meyer doesn't
anticipate a similar rebuild-
ing effort.
"I think we've got bet-
ter answers than we had
in 2007," Meyer said.
"There's a lot of questions.
But you're returning a lot
of guys you're anxious to
see play. In '07, we had no
idea what we were deal-
ing with. We actually know
what we're dealing with
now, and we're real excited
about this group."


No. 4 Florida gets its first
chance to respond to those
looming questions Saturday
against Miami (Ohio). Will
quarterback John Brantley
emerge from Tim Tebow's
shadow? How will Florida's
revamped defense perform?
Who are the team's new
playmakers?
"People are expecting
this huge drop-off," guard
Carl Johnson said. "We
watch TV just like every-
body else. We see, They
lost this and they lost this
guy.' We're just going to
prove everybody wrong."
That might have to wait
at least a week or two.
The Gators have won 20
consecutive openers and
haven't lost a non-confer-
ence game at home since
2003. The RedHawks, mean-
while, have dropped back-
to-back openers against
Southeastern Conference
teams (Kentucky and


Vanderbilt) in lopsided
fashion and are coming off
a 1-11 season.
"It's going to be a true
experience for our young
team," said Miami coach
Michael Haywood, whose
team is a 35-point under-
dog.
Haywood has talked to
his players about "embrac-
ing the atmosphere" at
Florida Field. He's been to
The Swamp several times
and knows how loud the
partially sunken stadium
can get.
The RedHawks have
simulated crowd noise
all week in practice and
worked on silent cadence,
but Haywood knows it still
doesn't come close to the
real thing.
"As far as the intimida-
tion factor, you talk to guys
about what our goals are,"
GATORS continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 7, 2009, file photo, Florida cornerback Janoris.
Jenkins (1) breaks up a Vanderbilt pass to Alex Washington
(4) on the goal line in Gainesville.










LAKE CITY REPORTER ' SPORTS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
II a.m.
SPEED - NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Emory Healthcare 500, at
Hampton, Ga.
1:30 p.m.
SPEED - NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series:' final practice for
Emory Healthcare 500, at Hampton, Ga.
2:30 p.m.
SPEED ,- NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Great Clips 300,
at Hampton, Ga. .
4:30 p.m.
SPEED - NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Emory Healthcare 500, at
Hampton, Ga.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - NASCAR, Nationwide
- Series, Great Clips 300, at Hampton, Ga.
8 p.m.
VERSUS - IRL, Kentucky 300, at
Sparta, Ky.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN - Miami (Ohio) at Florida
ESPN2 -W. Michigan at Michigan St.
12:30 p.m.
FSN - Illinois vs. Missouri, at St.
Louis
3:30 p.m.
ABC - Regional coverage, UCLA at
Kansas St., Connecicut at Michigan, OR
Kentucky at Louisville
ESPN -Texas at Rice
ESPN2 - UCLA at Kansas St. OR
Connecicut at Michigan
NBC - Purdue at Notre Dame
7 p.m.
FSN - Washington St. at Oklahoma
St.
7:45 p.m.
ESPN - Oregon St. vs. TCU, at
Arlington,Texas
8:07 p.m.
ABC - LSU vs. North Carolina, at
Atlanta
10p.m.
ESPN2 - Cincinnati at Fresno St.
II p.m.
VERSUS -Wisconsin at UNLV
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC- European PGATour, European
Masters, third round, at Crans Montana,
Switzerland
3 p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank
Championship, second round, at Norton,
Mass. '
6:30 p.m.
TGC - Champions Tour, First Tee
Open, second round, at Monterey, Calif.
12 Midnight
TGC - Nationwide Tour, Mylan
Classic, third round, at Canonsburg, Pa.
(same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
WGN - N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs
4 p.m.
FOX - Regional coverage, Cincinnati
at St. Louis, L.A. Angels at Oakland, or
Texas at Minnesota
MOTORSPORTS
8 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 250, at
Export, Pa. (same-day tape)
9 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 450, at
Export, Pa. (same-day tape)
10 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Racing, at Millville,
N.J. (same-day tape)
TENNIS
II a.m.
CBS - U.S. Open, third round, at
NewYork

FOOTBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Alabama vs. San Jose State,
7 p.m.
No. 4 Florida vs. Miami (Ohio),
Noon
No. 5 Texas at Rice, 3:30 p.m.
No. 6 TCU vs. Oregon State at
Arlington,Texas, 7:45 p.m.
No. 7 Oklahoma vs. Utah State, 7 p.m.
No. 8 Nebraska vs.Western Kentucky,
7 p.m.
No. 9 Iowa vs. Eastern Illinois, Noon
No. II Oregon vs. New Mexico,
3:30 p.m.
No. 12 Wisconsin at UNLV, II. p.m.
No. 16 GeorgiaTech vs. South Carolina
State, I p.m.
No. 17 Arkansas vs. Tennessee Tech,
7 p.m.
No. 18 North Carolina vs. No.21 LSU
atAtlanta,8 p.m.
No. 19 Penn State vs. Youngstown
State, Noon
No. 20 Florida State vs. Samford,
Noon
No. 22 Auburn vs. Arkansas State,
7 p.m.
No.23 Georgia vs. Louisiana-Lafayette,
12:20 p.m.
No. 25 West Virginia vs. Coastal
Carolina, 3:30 p.m.
Monday's Game
No. 3 Boise State vs. No. 10 Virginia
Tech at Landover, Md., 8 p.m.

College scores

Thursday
EAST
Buffalo 3 I, Rhode Island 0
Delaware 31,West Chester 0
Rutgers 31, Norfolk St. 0
SOUTH
Austin Peay 38, Cumberland,Tenn. 6
Carson-Newman 35, Bentley 28.
Florida Atlantic 32, UAB 31
Georgia St. 41, Shorter 7


Indianapolis 38, Ky.Wesleyan 10
Miami 45, Florida A&M 0
Minnesota 24, Middle Tennessee 17
N.C. Central 59, Johnson C. Smith 0
South Carolina 41, Southern Miss. 13
Tulane 27, SE Louisiana 21
Wake Forest 53, Presbyterian 13
MIDWEST
Ball St. 27, SE Missouri 10
Cent. Michigan 33, Hampton 0
Illinois St. 55, Cent. Missouri 54
Indiana 51,Towson .17
Iowa St. 27, N. Illinois 10


Kent St41. Murray St. 10
Ohio St. 45, Marshall 7
WEST
Arkansas Tech 34, Lambuth 19
Idaho 45, North Dakota 0
N.Arizona 48,W. New Mexico 0
Nevada 49, E.Washington 24
USC 49, Hawaii 36
Utah 27, Pittsburgh 24, OT

NFL preseason

Thursday's Games
Detroit 28, Buffalo 23
Cincinnati 30, Indianapolis 28
N.Y. Giants 20, New England 17
Pittsburgh 19, Carolina 3
Jacksonville 13,Atlanta 9
N.Y.Jets 21, Philadelphia 17
Dallas 27, Miami 25
Tennessee 27, New Orleans 24
St. Louis 27, Baltimore 21
Tampa Bay 24, Houston 17
Cleveland 13, Chicago- 10
Kansas City 17, Green Bay 13
Minnesota 31, Denver 24
San Francisco 17, San Diego 14
Oakland 27, Seattle 24
Arizona 20,Washington 10

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Emory Healthcare 500
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
II a.m.-2:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 4:30-
6:30 p.m.); Sunday, race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN,
7-11:30 p.m.).
Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway
(tri-oval, 1.54 miles).
Race distance: 500.5 miles, 325 laps.
NATIONWIDE
Great Clips 300
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule:. Today, practice,
qualifying (Speed, 2:30-4:30 p.m.), race,
7 p.m. (ESPN2, 6:30-10 p.m.). -
Track Atlanta Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300.3 miles, 195 laps.
INDYCAR
Kentucky 300
Site: Sparta, Ky.
Schedule:Today, race, 8:45 p.m. (Versus,
8-11 p.m:).
Track: Kentucky Speedway (tri-oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
MacTools U.S. Nationals
Site: Clermont, Ind.
Schedule. Today, qualifying, Sunday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.,
5-7 p.m.); Monday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 1-6 p.m.).
Track: O'Reilly Raceway Park.

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
New York 85 50
Tampa Bay 83 51
Boston 76 58
Toronto 69 65
Baltimore . '49 86
Central Division
*W L
Minnesota . 77 57
Chicago 73 60
Detroit -66 68
Kansas City 56 77
Cleveland 54 80'
West Division
W L
Texas 75 58
Oakland 65 68
Los Angeles 65 69
Seattle 52 82


Pct GB
.575 -
.549 3'h
.493 II -
.421 20'h
.403 23

Pct GB
.564 -
.489 10
.485 10'h
.388 23'h


Thursday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 5, Oakland 0
Boston 6, Baltimore 4
Detroit 10, Minnesota 9, 13 innings
Cleveland 6, Seattle 3
Friday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 7,Toronto 3
Tampa Bay 4, Baltimore I
Chicago White ,Sox at Boston, ppd.,
rain
Detroit at Kansas City (n)
Texas at Minnesota (n)
L.A.Angels at Oakland (n)
Cleveland at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Toronto (Rzepczynski 1-3) at N.Y.
Yankees (Vazquez 10-9), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Jer.Weaver I IJ10) at
Oakland (Cahill 14-6), 4:10 p.m.
Texas (C.Lewis 9-1I) at Minnesota
(Pavano 15-10), 4:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (J.Shields 13-11) at
Baltimore (Guthrie 8-13), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 9- I) at
Boston (Lackey 12-8), 7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 7-11) at Kansas City
(Chen, 9-7), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Talbotj 8-11) at Seattle
(Pauley 2-6), 10:15 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Boston,
1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Texas at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 4; 10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Atlanta 78 57
Philadelphia 77 58
Florida 68 65
New York 66 69
Washington 57 78
Central Division
W L
Cincinnati 78 56
St. Louis 70 62
Houston 62 71
Milwaukee 62 72
Chicago 58 77
Pittsburgh 45 89
West Division
W L
San Diego 76 56
San Francisco 74 60
Colorado 69 64
Los Angeles 68 66
Arizona 55 79


Pct GB
.582 -
.530 7
.466 15'%
.463 16
.430 20'A
.336 33

Pct GB
.576 -
.552 3
.51.9 7h'
.507 9
.410 22


Thursday's Games


N.Y. Mets 4, Atlanta 2
Philadelphia 12, Colorado II
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 7, N.Y. Mets 6
Philadelphia I, Milwaukee 0
Pittsburgh 8,Washington 5
Florida 6,Atlanta I
St. Louis 3, Cincinnati 2
Houston at Arizona (n)
Colorado at San Diego (n)
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (Mejia 0-2) at Chicago Cubs
(boleman 1-I), 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Tr.Wood 4-2) at St. Louis
(Wainwright 17-9), 4:10 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 9-7) at San Diego
(Garland 13-9), 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Bush 7-11) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 16-10), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 6-6) at Pittsburgh
(Maholm 7-13),7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (urrjens 6-4) at Florida (Jo.
Johnson I 1-5), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Norris 6,8) at Arizona
(j.Saunders 2-4), 8:10 p.m.
San Francisco (M.Cain 10-10) at LA.
Dodgers (Lilly 8-9), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at Florida, 12:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnatt St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers,
8:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Eastern Conference
Atlanta vs. NewYork
Sunday
Atlanta at New York, 7 p.m.
Tuesday
New York at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 9
Atlanta at New York, 7:30 p.m. if
necessary
Western Conference
Seattle vs. Phoenix
Thursday
Seattle 82, Phoenix 74
Sunday
Seattle at Phoenix, 3 p.m.
Wednesday
Phoenix at Seattle, 10 p.m., if
necessary

World championships

EIGHTH-FINALS
At Istanbul
Today.
Game 61 - Serbia vs. Croatia, II a.m.
Game 62 - Spain vs. Greece, 2 p.m.

TENNIS

U.S. Open singles

At The USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Center
NewYork
Late Thursday
Men
Second Round
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def.
Andreas Beck, Germany, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3.
Kei Nishikori, Japan, def. Marin Cilic
(II), Croatia, 5-7, 7-6 (6), 3-6,7-6 (3), 6-1.
Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, def.
Guillaume Rufin, France, 7-6 .(3), 6-4, 6-3.
Robin Soderling (5)., Sweden, defTaylor
Dent, United States, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4.
Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, def.
Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-3, 3-2,
retired.
Jurgen Melzer (13), Austria, def.
Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 6-4, 6-7 (4),
6-3, 1-6,7-5.
James Blake, United States, def. Peter
Polansky, Canada, 6-7 (I), 6-3, 6-2, 6-4.
Juan Carlos Ferrero (22), Spain, def.
Ricardo Mello, Brazil, 6-1, 6-4,6-4.
Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def.
Thomaz Bellucci (26), Brazil, 6-7 (4), 6-4,
5-7, 6-4, 7-6 (2).
Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, ldef. Philipp
Petzschner, Germany, 7-5, 6-3, 7-6 (6).
Women
Second Round
Jelena Jankovic (4), Serbia, def. Miriana
Lucic, Croatia, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2.
Maria Kirilenko (23), Russia, def.
Yvonne Meusburger, Austria, 4-6, 7-5, 6-0.
Alexandra Dulgheru (25), Romania;
def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 7-6 (5), 6-1.
Kaia Kanepi (31), Estonia, def. Akgul
Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-2, 6-4.
Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def.
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States,
3-6, 6-3, 7-5.
Maria Sharapova (14), Russia, def. Iveta
Benesova, Czech Republic, 6-I,6-2.
Peng Shuai, China, def. Agnieszka
Radwanska (9), Poland, 2-6, 6-I, 6-4.

Friday
Men
Second Round
Tommy Robredo, Spain, def. Julien
Benneteau, France, 6-4, 6-6, retired.
Michael Llodra, France, def. Victor
Hanescu, Romania, 7-6 (2), 6-4, 6-2.
Women
Third Round
Sam Stosur (5), Australia, def. Sara
Errani, Italy, 6-2, 6-3.
Elena Dementieva (12), Russia, def.
Daniela Hantuchova (24), Slovakia, 7-5,
6-2.
Kim Clijsters (2), Belgium, def. Petra
Kvitova (27), Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-0.

Money leaders

(Through Wednesday)


WTA
I. Serena Williams $4,266,011
2.Venus Williams $2,223,556
3. Francesca Schiavone $1,890,256
4. Jelena Jankovic $1,629,983
5. Sam Stosur $1,567,295
6. Caroline Wozniacki $1,467,427
7.Vera Zvonareva $1,461,083
ATP
I. Rafael Nadal $5,681,738
2. Roger Federer $3,552,635
3.Andy Murray $2,260,507
4. Robin Soderling $1,984,563
S.Tomas Berdych $1,845,216
6. Novak Djokovic $1,683,422
7.Andy Roddick $1,549,738


BRIEFS


CHEERLEADING

Columbia Cheer

registration set

Columbia Cheer has
registration for little
league cheerleaders (girls
ages 4-12) from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. today at Southside
Recreation Center. Cost of
$90 includes complete
uniform, T-shirt,
insurance, trophy,
end-of-year party and
homecoming parade.
For details, .call Wilda
Drawdy at 292-4668.

SOFTBALL
Women's league

registration set

Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
has registration for its
fall women's softball
league 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays from Tuesday
through Sept. 17 at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Fee is $350 per team and
due by Sept. 17.
For. details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607 or
e-mail christieh@lcfla.com.

CHS SWIMMING
Moe's Night set

for Sept. 13

Columbia High's swim
team has a Moe's Night
fundraiser planned for
5-8 p.m. Sept. 13..
For details, call
755-8195.

GATORS

Packages for

football games

"Journey to the Swamp"
is a Columbia County
Tourist Development
Council initiative with
Lake City Holiday Inn &
Suites and Fabulous Coach
Lines to provide packages
and transportation from
Lake City to the Florida
games against Kentucky,
LSU, Mississippi State and
South Carolina. Holiday
Inn is offering a two-night
package, and Fabulous
Coach Lines will provide
motor coach
transportation. Local fans
can take advantage of the
transportation.


1
5
9 1

12 I
13 (

14
15 (
16
18 1
20 I
21
22
23 1
26 i


For details, visit www.
fabulouscoach.com or
call the Holiday Inn at
754-1411.


For details,,visit
information@girlssoftball
association.org or call
Chad at 755-4271.


RUNNING Fall season
Alligator Lake 5K sign-up extended
c t fnr n(t 923


The 3rd Annual Alligator
Lake 5K is 8 a.m. Oct
23 at Alligator Lake Park.
This year's race will be
followed by an elementary
mile run. Preferred online
registration is $15 for the
5K and $5 for the fun run
by Oct. 20. Mail-in
registration is $20 for the
5K and $7 for the fun run
by Oct. 16. Online
registration is at www.
active.com, keyword
alligator lake run.
For details, e-mail
dusty@halfniletiming. com.

YOUTH SOFTBALL

Wood memorial

tourney Sept. 18

The Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County is hosting
the Jodi Elaine Wood
Memorial Mush Softball
Tournament, beginning at
9 a.m. Sept. 18. Proceeds
will go to her children.
Groups are encouraged to
form teams at a cost of $10
per member. Teams may
register at Brian's Sports.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

RIVOY I I


Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County's registration for
its fall league has been
extended through Sept. 11
at Brian's Sports. Ages are
4-17 for T-ball, machine
pitch and fastpitch leagues.
Cost is $45 or $65 for two
players from the same
family. A birth certificate is
required at registration.
For details, e-mail
information@girlssoftball
association.org.

BOYS RANCH

Horse show

at open house

The Florida Sheriffs
Boys Ranch Open House
and Horse Show is
Oct. 1-3. Free primitive
camping, horse games
and live entertainment
are among the activities.
Admission is $5 for the
weekend.
.For details, visit www.
youthranches.org or call the
Columbia County Sheriffs
Office at 752-9212.

* From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Print answer here: L - A , l l A "


Yesterday's IAnswer:s:
I Answer:


ACROSS 45 Cold-
shoulder
Gallon fraction 48 Prefix for
Weevil meal "below"
Muser's mum- 51 Man, woman,
bling or child
Pavarotti piece 53 Carnival fare
Chocolate (2 wds.)
cookie 56 Pittsburgh
- de cologne river
Gaunt 57 Before
Tax categories 58 Psyche's suitor
Makes tea 59 Prefix for
Puts a stop to dynamic
Is, in Madrid 60 Heavy-hearted
Deadly snake 61 Tooth
Eyed anchor
Hurricane track 62 Expedition


30 Barbecue extra
33 Chalet feature
34 Jai -
35 Game plan
37 Threshold
39 Sprout
40 Downy
fungi
41 Winter
forecast
43 Plastic - Band


DOWN


Buddies
Fuming
Poker pair
Become fond
of (2 wds.)
Shortens
Hockey great
Pasture


(Answers Monday)
CLEFT MINCE JUNIOR MAROON
What it costs to get hitched -
THE,"UNION" RATE


Answer to Previous Puzzle


FL P HU M AF
APRIL EMO MOA

ANGEL MAXIMUM
CABS IDOLS
THEME CEE

LII ALLY AMFM
OAR SLAM LILT
AREAS JTIBE DAN
FADE ADAM GIS
VCR LABEL
EASEL ASIA

IMPRESS LYCRA
ROC RUT SEOUL
ERA KEA DO ES


8 Highland lakes
9 Shoe part
10 Marshal Dillon
11 Tousle
17 Iota
follower


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 2 19 I 14 5 16 17 18 9 110 111


19 Book part
22 Designer
Simpson
24 Rodeo rope
25 Harm
27 White
vestment
28 Frat letter
29 Concealed
30 Basinger or
Novak
31 Tokyo, to
shoguns
32 Toothpaste
choice
36 Make pretty
38 - majeste
42 Gullet
44 Reformer
Ralph
46 Flashlight
carrier
47 Bete-
48 Freezes over
49 Ibsen
heroine
50 Scrooge's
nephew
51 Furtive
whisper
52 Cubbyhole
54 Juan's gold
55 Baby
babble


9-4 �2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010 3B


Miami already thinking showdown


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES - Ohio
State and Miami no longer
need to pretend otherwise.
Marshall and Florida A&M,
they were merely warmup
acts.
The true early test for the
Buckeyes and Hurricanes
comes next Saturday -
against one another.
Both No. 2 Ohio State and
No. 13 Miami opened their
season with eerily similar
wins Thursday night Both
offenses racked up exact-
ly 45 points, and neither
defense allowed a point
Marshall's lone touchdown
came on a blocked field
goal return, while Florida
A&M fell victim to the
Hurricanes' first shutout
since 2006.
So now, the hype can
begin building.
The Hurricanes (1-0) and
Buckeyes (1-0) meet Sept
11 at Columbus, Ohio, the
first time they've played
since the 2003 Fiesta Bowl
where Ohio State denied
Miami its second straight
national title. And the cur-
rent sides, although some
players were in elementary


school when that title game
was held, started buzzing
about it moments after their
respective opening-night
routs were in the books.
"It's going to be a more
difficult world next week,"
Ohio State coach Jim
Tressel said.
Countered Miami coach
Randy Shannon, who wants
no part of the obvious
comparison between this
matchup and the one that
decided the national title
eight seasons ago: "Games
are games, and they go and
come. You just have to enjoy
the times you play in them
and keep moving on."
Whether Shannon likes it
or not, this one might carry
more weight than just any
run-of-the-mill non-confer-
ence game.
Ohio State is touted by
many as a true national
championship contender,
while Miami thinks 'its
among the teams that could
break into that picture by
season's end. While there's
virtually an entire season
left to be played, whatev-
er happens next Saturday
might go a long way
toward making either the
Buckeyes' or Hurricanes'


Bowl Championship Series
plans a reality.
"You get the feeling that
team feels like they're back
on the rise like they were in
the early 2000s," said Ohio
State linebacker Brian Rolle,
who returned an intercep-
tion for a touchdown against
Marshall. "We've got to play
our brand of football, and at
the end of the game next
week we'll be able to assess
where we are."
Rolle's name likely is
familiar to many Hurricanes
fans.
He's from Immokalee,
Fla., a Palm Beach County
town best known for farm-
ing and football. Rolle's
favorite team growing up
was Miami, and he wanted
to play for the Hurricanes
at one time. And his cousin,
Antrel Rolle, was on the
field that night in Arizona
when Ohio State beat the
'Hurricanes 31-24 in double-
overtime for the national
title.
Maybe ironically, Antrel
Rolle was the first Miami
player to wrap his arms
around cornerback Glenn
Sharpe in celebration after
the Hurricanes thought
they stopped Ohio State


on fourth down in the first
overtime. Then official
Terry Porter's yellow pen-
alty flag sailed into the pic-
ture after he called Sharpe
for pass interference, the
championship game con-
tinued, and the Buckeyes
eventually prevailed.
"I was a little young, but I
remember it," Miami defen-
sive lineman Olivier Vernon
said. "It's revenge time.
Nobody's forgotten about
it I feel like I was playing
that game."
Vernon was just 12 when
that Fiesta Bowl took
place.
Still, he and the' rest of
today's Hurricanes are
convinced they can hang
with the team fhat won the
Rose Bowl last season. And
the team Miami eased past
Thursday night thinks the
same.
Florida A&M coach Joe
Taylor faced Miami last
season as well, and after
his Rattlers took their 45-0
loss Thursday, he said the
Hurricanes of 2010 are eas-
ily better than the team that
finished 94 a year ago.
"They're a year older, but
ifs the same guys," Taylor
said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami mascot Sebastian the Ibis leads the team onto the field
during introductions before an NCAA college football game
against Florida A&M, Thursday in Miami.


Fisher making


coaching debut


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 20, file photo, Florida State head coach Jimbo
Fisher gives instructions from the field during a spring NCAA
colelge football game in Tallahassee.


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Jimbo Fisher says he has a
lot of wonderful memories
from his playing and coach-
ing days at Samford. Now
he'd like to add another,
but at the expense of the
school that gave him his
start
Fisher also doesn't
plan to show any mercy
in his head coaching
debut Saturday, when
20th-ranked Florida State
"hosts- the much smaller,
lower-division Southern
Conference school,
After all, he's taking over
for Bobby Bowden.
"I hope they have a
great experience, but I
don't want them to have
that great an experience,"
said Fisher, who spent one


year as player and five
as an assistant coach at
Samford. "It's time to play
a game, that's for sure."
With Oklahoma up next,
Fisher is eager to see what
he's got without look-
ing ahead. He's remind-
ed Florida State players
all week of the struggle
they had last year, when
they defeated -another
lower-division school from
Alabama, Jacksonville
State, 19-9 to start the sea-
son.
"We have talent," said
Fisher, adding that he
would have no hesitation
opening the playbook
despite next weekend's
date in Norman, Okla.
"We want to set a tone
for how we want to play
the season by the way we
play the game, the way we
execute."


CHS: Jernigan makes plays on both sides of ball


Continued From Page 1b
consecutive possession
with Anjre Caldwell inter-
cepting a Parirish pass and
returning it to the Brooks
County 14-yard line.
Jernigan and the
Columbia offensive line
handled the rest Four car-
ries from the' two-platoon
player gave the Tigers a
14-7 lead after a Lunde
extra point
The turnover bug gave
Columbia another posses-
sion in Trojans' territory as
Ben Bell recovered a fum-
ble. This time, Atkinson
would do the scoring
honors.
The junior quarterback
capped off a four-play,
25-yard drive with a boot-
leg from six yards to give
the Tigers some breath-
ing room. Lunde added the
extra point and followed
with one of three touch-
backs of the night on the
ensuing kickoff.


With 2:24 remaining in
the half, the Trojans drew
the lead within 21-13 with
an 11-play drive. The scor-
ing play came with a jump
pass from Parirish to Tyre
Christopher from two yards
out
Columbia added to the
lead with 10 points in four
minutes beginning at the
10:21 mark of the third
quarter on the Tigers' first
possession.
Lunde converted on his
second field goal try of
the night, and Columbia
pulled some shenanigans
with an onside kick on the
following kickoff. Cameron
Wimberly recovered to
give the Tigers the ball at
the 48-yard line.
Following a 15-yard pen-
alty for too many men on
the field, Atkinson connect-
ed with wide receiver Nate
Ayers from 34 yards to give
the Tigers a 31-13 lead.


"I was just trying to
stand in the pocket and
keep my eyes down the
field," Atkinson said. "My
job is to give the ball to
other people and let them
make plays. I feel like we're
starting to prove ourselves,
and getting back a little bit
of that swagger."
Punts downed deep in
Trojan territory by Shayne
Barber and two quarter-
backs knocked from the
game by Jernigan hits, left
the Trojans' offense look-
"ing for an identity in the
second half.
Columbia was content
with running the clock, but
found the end zone a final
time with 3:10 remaining in
the game.
Austin Reiter recovered
a fumble from Brooks
County and returned it to
the one-yard line. Braxton
Stockton capped off the
drive with a touchdown for


the final score of 38-13.
"As a coach I like to
look for explosive -plays,"
Columbia coach Craig
Howard said after the game.
"The thing I like when I see
that we had 14 explosives
(plays over 15 yards) is that
they're not all by Johnny.
Every quarter we had a dif-
ferent guy involved in an
explosive play."
.Perhaps the most explo-
sive was Jernigan, who
knocked two players out
of the game with ferocious
hits.
"The coaching staff
started handing out an
award called the hammer,"
he said. "It's a defensive
award that goes to the
player with the 'most big
hits, and for me, it was
love at first site. I had to
get my motor going more,
because I want one."
Against the Trojans, he
earned it


INDIANS: Defense produces two goal-line stands


Continued From Page 11
Fort White stuffed
the middle twice and the
second time the Indians'
Donnell Sanders came out
of the pile with the ball.
Followingthe second-half
kickoff Fort White forced a
punt from the Cowboys 8.
AJ. Legree returned the
kick 11 yards. but fumbled
it away at the Madison 30.
The Cowboys marched
down to another
first-and-goal and again
Fort White's defense was
up to the task. Madison
committed a personal foul


and ended up missing a
33-yard field goal.
However, Fort White
couldn't make any head-
way and Madison County
dominated the rest of the
game.
"We held them and made
them punt, but we had
some major miscues in the
second half and lost that
momentum," Fort White
head coach Demetric
Jackson said. "Well be OK
if we keep our heads up
and keep improving week
to week."


Madison pounded the
ball with Young later in the
third quarter. Young added
a 36-yard touchdown run
and finished with 228 yards
rushing on 21 carries.
Tevin Roundtree added
a touchdown on a six-yard
run early in the fourth
quarter, and Deonshay
Wells scored from eight
yards out with 2:22 left in
the game.
"Obviously we have got a
lot of work to do," defensive
coordinator Ken Snider
said. "Our whole goal is to


keep them out of the end
zone and we didn't do that
enough."
. It was a baptism of fire
for freshman quarterback
Andrew Baker making his
first start
"I was pleased with his
effort," Jackson said. "He
managed the game well
and did some things we
knew he could do. His
height hurt him against
some of their big players
and he missed a couple of
shots downfield. He made
some good runs."


GATORS: Open at noon
Continued From Page 1B


he said. "We want to be a
dangerous, relentless foot-
ball team. We want to com-
pete for 60 minutes, where
the clock doesn't matter,
the scoreboard doesn't mat-
ter. We want to win the one-
on-one battles, and if we win
the majority of the one-on-
one battles, then we'll be in
this football game."
Meyer expects to see
some "wide eyes," especial-
ly in guys making their first
starts.
Brantley could be one of
them. He spent three years
waiting for this opportunity,
coming to Florida a year
after Tebow and sitting
behindthe bulky left-hand-
er. Brantley's career high-
lights have come in mop-
up duty, but the Gators are
confident he's ready for his
new role.
There are even more
questions around him.
Can receivers Deonte
Thompson, Carl Moore
and Chris Rainey, and
tight end Jordan Reed be
legitimate playmakers?
Can speedy running back


Jeff Demps handle a big-
ger workload? Can run-
ning back Emmanuel
Moody stay healthy and be,
the team's short-yardage
specialist, the role Tebow
handled the last four
years?
How will the offensive,,
line hold up after losing its-
top two left tackles? Xavier
Nixon (knee) and Matt
Patchan .(wrist) won't play,
prompting several shifts for
the first two games.
"You're probably going to
see a bunch of real wide eyes
because there's a bunch of
new players going to play,"
Meyer said. "But I expect
to see a bunch of energetic,
enthusiastic guys that are
ready. Ifs payday for them.
You don't come here to prac-
tice. You,come here to pre-
pare and train and get ready
to play in The Swamp."
Florida has similar con-
cerns on defense.
How will cornerbacks
Moses Jenkins or Jeremy
Brown fare in place of
first-round draft pick Joe
Haden?


PICKS: VT over Boise St.
Continued From Page 1B


plays. Against Samford,
there should be plenty.

FSU 45, Samford 3
Quick hitters....
Virginia Tech ends Boise
State's title hopes in a
Labor Day Classic. Hokies
34, Broncos 27. ... TCU
could be better this year
than they were last, and
will prove it against Oregon
State. Horned Frogs 27,
Beavers 23.... What could
have been the game of


the week will simply just
be another example of
why the Southeastern
Conference trumps all
others. LSU was shaping
up for a war against
North Carolina's talented
defensive front With as
many as 16 starters out
for the UNC, the Tigers
should roar. LSU 36,
UNC 17.

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


GOLF: CHS has depth
Continued From Page 1B


Hawthorne both carded
41s against Santa Fe. Tim
Bagley rounded out the
scoring with a 43.
"rm very happy with the
guys coming out of the gate
on Tuesday and playing a
good round," Smithy said.
"Out of the six, I didn't have
a score over 44. Although I
think we can play better as
a team, I really like the con-
sistency of it It was really a
good effort"
The Tigers didn't let up
against Buchholz.
"They have been my nem-
esis from day one," Smithy
noted. "We have played
them twice a year for the
last 10 years. I think I've
beat them one time, so that
was a big win."
Shayne Barber and Nick
Jones came in with 37s dur-


ing the match. Mike Creech
rounded out the scores with
a 41.
Smithy expects this team
to compete well all season.
"The one thing I can
say about this team is that
I have depth that I didn't
have in years past with three
seniors," he said. "With the
influx of freshman and soph-
omores, that are talented
already, it's added some
competition within the team.
You can see them pushing
each other every day."
Columbia has two match-
es next week. The Tigers
take on Union County at
4 p.m. on Tuesday at Quail
Heights before hosting
Lincoln in an 18-hole match
at 2 p.m. on Thursday at
The Country Club of Lake
City.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


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OF ',POER ,l51O. .0 /


DEAR ABBY


This designated driver


needs a refresher course


DEAR ABBY: A few
weeks ago, I met a group of
friends at a local pub. "Char-
lie" was the designated driver.
As the evening progressed, I
noticed Charlie was drinking
beer. When I mentioned it, he
said he'd had only three. Then
he insisted he was fine and "it
was only beer."
I tried to explain the dan-
ger of driving while "buzzed"
and told him I'd walk home.
Charlie then became insulted
that I didn't trust him to know
his limits. He said I should re-
lax and quit being so uptight.
Afew days later, some of my
friends told me I had caused
"unnecessary drama" that
night and that my standards
for the designated driver were
"unrealistic." They also said
that Charlie wasn't drunk and
was totally capable of driving. o
But the fact remains, our des-
ignated driver wasn't sober,
and I wasn't comfortable get-
ting into a car with him.
I voiced ,my opinion; now
I'm being punished for it. Did
I judge Charlie too harshly?
- VALUES MY SAFETY,
DAVIS, CALIF.
DEAR VALUES YOUR
SAFETY: Not in MY book,
and not in the one published
by the California Department
of Motor Vehicles. In its Cali-
fornia Drivers Handbook, un-
der the section titled "Desig-
nated Driver Program," it lists
the requirements for some-
one to be a designated driver.
Among them: "Must abstain


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
from consuming alcoholic
beverages for the duration of
the outing." That means not
drinking anything with alco-
hol in it. Zilch!
You were right to speak up.
In the future, if you decide to
socialize with these folks, ar-
range to meet them. And if the
location is not within walking
distance, take a cab.
DEAR ABBY: 'Tracey"
is beautiful, caring and fun to
spend time with. I fell hard for
her and knew I could love her
forever. When she broke up
with me to "be on her own," I
was very hurt.
My best friend, "Henry,"
says he started sleeping with
Tracey right after our break-
up. I was his best man when
he married "Jill." Now Henry
has left Jill for Tracey, and I
am left with a sick stomach.
How do I heal my wounds
while supporting Jill, which
keeps them painfully open?
- HEARTSICK IN OHIO
DEAR HEARTSICK
One way would be to remind
yourself that as "caring and
fun" as Tracey was to be with,
she had no reluctance about
dating a married man. Anoth-


er would be to level with Jill,
explain that spending time
with her is a painful reminder
of the way you were dumped,
and take a break from it until
you have healed.
DEAR ABBY: I became
fast friends with one of my
husband's co-workers after
meeting her at a happy hour.
We had fun going out, usually
to dance clubs.
One night when my hus-
band tagged along, I over-
heard her tell him, "If you
weren't married, I could be
with you." When I confronted
her about it the next night,
she apologized, saying she
had been feeling no pain and
can't believe she said it. My
husband chalks it up to her
being stupid drunk, but I can't
let it go.
Now when I see her at
work functions, I am cordial
and .she acts like nothing
ever happened. We could
have been great friends if she
hadn't said what she did, but
each time I think I can bury
the hatchet, I get angry and
upset all over again.
Should I just get over it?
Or am I justified in feeling I
can't be friends with someone
I can't trust? - DISTRUST-
FUL IN ILINOIS
DEAR DISTRUSTFUL:
You're justified. And I'm say-
ing it cold sober.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


WE NEED
TO BAKE
YOU A CAKE,
BUY YOU
PRESENTS,
DECORATE
AN' THROW YOU
PARTY
/H \ 1


. ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't overreact
to situations that can alter
a relationship you value.
A loving, affectionate re-
sponse to anyone you love
or whose friendship you re-
spect will help to keep the
peace and lead to a better
understanding. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't sit there
complaining about being
bored or unhappy. If you
don't like what is going
on, take responsibility and
drum up your own enter-
tainment. You will learn a
lot from people who know
how to have fun. ****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Take a break.
The more relaxed you are,
the better you will feel.
Avoid letting someone or
something at work play on
your mind. Now is the time
to enjoy more and do less.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You'll be difficult
to get along with if things
don't go your way. Take a
back seat before you harm
a relationship that means
something to you. There
is only room for generosity
and kindness if you want to
avoid trouble. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Keep your thoughts
to yourself and your plans


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last,

a mystery. A surprise you
have for someone special
will turn out well. Don't let
an opportunity slip away
because you don't have the
time, when all you have to
do is reschedule your plans.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You can offer sugges-
tions and set up reforms
that will help a group you
want to join. Networking
will lead to new connec-
tions. It's the overall out-
look and interaction you
have with others that will
make a difference. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take a back seat for
the moment and observe.
It's not your turn; if you try
to take it now, you will be
faced with questions. you
may not be able to answer.
Too much too soon will lead
to mishaps. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You can't avoid
what needs doing by hiding
or not making a move. Face
whatever comes your way
and you will gain respect as
well as confidence. A trip or
move will lead to bigger and
better things. *****-
SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't over-
spend, overdo or overin-.


dulge. It is likely to cost you
an important friendship as
well as an opportunity to
get your ideas heard. Make
changes to your home that
stabilize your position and
bring you additional recog-
nition. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Take care
of personal business. The
more time spent looking af-
ter something that can alter
your life in the future, the
better you will feel. Don't
let an emotional encoun-
ter with someone lead to a
change of plans. Complete
what you set out to do.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Forget about
work and colleagues and
concentrate on your person-
al efforts to make your life
better. Love and romance
are in the stars. An oppor-
tunity to join forces with
someone you care about
will reduce your overhead
and personal debt. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Your creative
ideas can pan out nicely
as long as you don't over-
spend getting them off the
ground. Talks will lead to
options you haven't consid-
ered in the past. Don't let
your emotions or feelings
stand in the way of prog-
ress. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: H equals V
"JSDSGTEWZ E K HSTZ ISETU ."

AMHEST GMTUSF - "ZYB'TS PYW
OMFYBK BPWED FZ FYWRST RMK

RSMTU YO ZYB." AMZ DSPY
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Life has never been easy. Nor is it meant to be. It is
a matter of being joyous in the face of sorrow." - Dirk Benedict
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 9-4


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
DRHDD'-/-HRF'S R OK-6<
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CLASSIC PEANUTS


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PUT AS THE ONLY

REASON GOING!


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


4B LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010

Lake City Reporter





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omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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not be abbreviated.

tIn P,,i ' "I f .
aww l i : ' : ; ,- 'l i


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 10-310-CA
COLUMBIA BANK, f/k/a COLUM-
BIA COUNTY BANK
Plaintiff
vs.
BRIAN A. WAVRA and TAMARA
WAVRA
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 12, Country Landings, according
to the map or plat thereof as recorded
in Plat Book 6, Page 90 of the public
records of COLUMBIA County,
Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated August 31, 2010, at the
Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, it 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
October 6, 2010, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
the lis pendens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
31st day of August, 2010
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/-J. Harris
Deputy Clerk
04541512
September 4, 11, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 10-196-CA
COLUMBIA BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LEWIS G. WALKER; HEATHER.
C. WALKER, a/k/a CHEYENNE
WALKER, a/k/a HEATHER CHEY-
ENNE WALKER, a/k/a HEATHER
C. CROSBY; LEWIS WALKER
ROOFING, INC., a Florida corpora-
tion; VOLUSIA PENNYSAVER,
INC., a Florida corporation, d/b/a
THE COMPLETE PHONE BOOK;
THE UNITED STATES OF AMER-
ICA; and AMERICAN BUILDERS
AND CONTRACTORS SUPPLY
CO., INC., a Florida corporation,
d/b/a ABC SUPPLY CO., INC.,
Defendants
.NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property;
SCHEDULE "A" TO NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE
CASE NO. 10-196-CA
COUNT I
Parcel 1:
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH - RANGE
16 EAST
Section 29: Commence at a concrete
monument being the Southeast cor-
ner of Section 29, Township 6 South,
Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida; thence N01'12'32" W a dis-
tance of 792.28 feet to a concrete
monument being on the North right
of way line of State Road No. 20,
and being the Point of Beginning;
thence continue on the same bearing
a distance of 532.33 feet to a con-
crete monument, being the Northeast
comer of the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4;
thence run S 87�47'38" W along the
North line of the SE 1/4 of the SE
1/4 a distance of 604.54 feet to a
concrete monument being On the
North right of way line of State Road
No. 20; thence run S 49'41'18" E
along said Right of Way line a dis-
tance of 148.81 feet to a P.K. nail;
thence run along said right of way
line N 40'18'42" E a distance of
10.00 feet to a P.K. nail; thence S
49'41'18" E a distance of 649.65
feet along said right of way line to
the Point of Beginning.
And
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH-RANGE 16
EAST
Section 29: Begin at the Southeast
comer of the NE 1/4 of SE 1/4, Sec-
tion 29, Township 6 South, Range 16
East, Columbia County, Florida, and
run.S 87'47'38" W along the South
line of said NE 1/4 of SE 1/4 a dis-
tance of 589.75 feet to its intersec-
tion with the Northeasterly right-of-
way line of State Road No. 20 (U.S.,
Hwy No. 27); thence N 49'41'18" W
along said Northeasterly right-of-
way line of State Road No. 20 a dis-
tance of 265.43 feet; thence N







Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878
Do you need a Handy Man?
Pressure washing, rescreening,
yard work, leak repair, small house
repairs & upkeep. 386-209-1105

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

Cleaning Done Your Way!
Do YOU need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.

Land Services


Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep. ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200
Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219


Legal

40"18'42" E 296.00 feet; thence N
49'41'18" W 296.00 feet; thence N
40"18'42" E 200 feet; thence N
87'47'38" E 263.86 feet; thence S
1"12'32" E 327.66 feet; thence N
87*47'38" E 208.73 feet; thence S
1'12'32" E 208.73 feet; thence N
87'47'38" E 208.73 feet to the East
line of said Section 29; thence S
1'12'32" E along said east line
208.73 feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING.
LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at
the Southeast comer of the NE 1/4 of
SE 1/4 of Section 29, Township 6
South, Range 16 East, Columbia
County, Florida, and run S 87'47'38"
W along the South line of said NE
,1/4 of SE 1/4 a distance of 589.75
feet to its intersection with the
Northeasterly right-of-way line of
State Road No. 20 (U.S. Highway
No. 27); thence N 49'41'18" W
along said Northeasterly right-ofway
line of said State Road No. 20 a dis-
tance of 265.43 feet; thence N
40"18'42" E 296.00 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING; thence N
49"41'18" W 296.00 feet; thence N
40'18'42" E 200.00 feet; thence N
87'47'38" E 263.86 feet; thence S
01"12'32" E 327.66 feet; thence S
81'19'46" W 176.27 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO: a 12 foot wide ease-
ment for ingress and egress, more
particularly described as follows:
Commence at the Southeast comer
of the NE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of Section
29, Township 6 South, Range 16
East, Columbia County, Florida and
run S 87'47"38" W along the South
line of said NE 1/4 of SE 1/4 a dis-
tance of 589.75 feet to its intersec-
tion with the Northeasterly right-of-
way line of State Road No. 20 (U.S.
Highway No. 27); thence N
49'41'18" W along said Northeaster-
ly right-of-way line of State Road
No. 20 a distance of 253.43 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence
continue N 49'41'18" W still along
said Northeasterly right-of-way line
a distance of 12.00 feet; thence N
40'18'42" E 296.00 feet; thence N
81'19'46" E 18.28 feet; thence S
40'18'42" W 309.80 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.
AND
Parcel 2:
Lot 119, HOLIDAY HAVEN
CAMPSITES, UNIT NO. 3 accord-
ing to the map or plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 21, Pages 57-58,
of the Public Records of Lake Coun-
ty, Florida.
AND
Parcel 3: TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH,
RANGE 15 EAST
Section 11: Begin at the Southeast
comer of the SW 1/4'of the NW 1/4
of Section 11, Township 7 South,
Range 15 East, Gilchrist County,
Florida; thence run S 89'55'06" E
along the South line of the SE 1/4 of
the NW 1/4 of said Section 11, 16.13
feet to the West line of a County
Road; thence run North 01'25'10" E,
660.53 feet, thence run N 89'53'10"
V, 1021.58 feet; thence run S
00'04'45" W, 659.96 feet to: the
South line of said SW 1/4; thence
run S 89'55'06" E, 990.00 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment as to Count I in the
above styled action dated August 31,
2010, at the Columbia County Court-
house in Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., on Wed-
nesday, October 6, 2010, to the best
and highest bidder for cash. Any per-
son claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, other than the
property owner as of the date of the
notice of lis pendens. must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
31st day of August, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ J. Harris
Deputy Clerk

04541501
September 4, 11, 2010

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04541527


.1'

The Mobile Mechanic is a
full-time position that is
responsible for the maintaining
and repairing a fleet of vehicles,
diagnosing vehicle mechanical
issues, managing parts
inventory, accurately charging
parts and labor to work orders
and performing all other
maintenance duties as assigned.
Mobile Mechanic's hours of
work vary by assigned location.
This position offers a
competitive base pay plus
incentives which includes
PepsiCo stock options, health
care benefits, retirement and
savings benefits such as
pension, 401(k) and much more.
Please apply at
www.fritolavemployment.com


04541534
Carpenters/Cabinetmakers
We need your job skills. Wages
negotiable based on skills and
experience of one year or more.
Stable work history. Benefits
include: paid holidays, paid
vacations, family health
insurance, and a 401-K plan.
Some hand tools required.
Please apply in person at
Hunter Marine on Highway 441
in Alachua, Fl.

Financial Services office seeks


mature, professional person for
receptionist. Entry level position
that offers opportunity for self
starter. Must be computer
proficient in Microsoft Word and
Excel. Email your resurme to
ikuvkendll(fgeulfcoastfinancial.net


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

05523521
EARN Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the Lake City.
area. FT/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

05523669
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Fast Paced Call Center,looking
for outgoing, positive candidate
,bi-lingual a plus,basic computer
experience needed
Send Resume to: Joey Kitaif;
P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, FL 32056.

05523735
Assistant to Program Director,
due to new business, we need an
assistant to our program
director. Sales/Marketing exp. a
plus, we will train in our
specialty. We are a fifteen year
old consulting firm working
with a large number of the
public schools in Georgia. We
are located in historic White
Springs, Florida, Salary DOE,
Must be able to travel. Please
email resume to :
programdirector@
speced.org

05523736
Administrative Assistant
Growing Consulting firm needs
a sharp detail oriented person
able to work unsupervised. Must
'lave computer experience. Must
have verifiable office
experience. Position- is open
NOW! Located in White
Springs, Florida PLEASE
SUBMIT RESUME TO
admin@speced.org
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
wwiw.youravon.com/tdavies

Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatchers...telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
(Windows 95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW.
Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105
Grand Street, Live Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-8755-0630


100 Job
� Opportunities
Telemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
experience with outbound B&B
sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
computer skills and be able-to
perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
Please fax resume to
386-758-4523

120 Medical
120 Employment

04541405
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
Full-Time Positions
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
Will be over ER, OR and Med
Surge Floor, Current RN
License, Ward or Hospital
Management Helpful.
Teaching and/or Supervisory
Exp. Preferred.
ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT
High School Graduate,.
AA Degree in Acct. Preferred.
2 yrs Exp. in all aspects of Acct.
General Ledger, Accts Payable
and Payroll. Accounting Skills,
Computer Skills, knowledge of
Word, Excel Software &
10 key Punch
PRN Position
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPIST
Current Florida PT/ST/OT
license. Evaluate, Assess, Plan
and Implement Treatments.
Hand Therapy Preferred.
ARNP/PA
To staff Emergency Room
Small Acute Care Critical
Access hospital. Exp. Required,
FT/PT/PRN
Great benefits and salary.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611 *
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Drug Free Workplace

05523727
Needed CNA or Medical
Assistant PRN for ASC.
Please fax resume to
386-755-2169

05523728
Needed Registered Nurse
PRN for ASC.
Please fax resume to
386-755-2169

Wanted Experienced Office
Manager for rural family medical
practice. Pay commensurate with
exp. Great crew to work with and
good benefits. Send resume t o
Three Rivers Medical 208 NW
Suwannee Ave. Branford, FL
32008. or fax to: 38.6-935-1667.


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


240 Schools &
240 Education

04541226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/13/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

Chocolate Lab Pups
AKC Registered, health certs
$350 males and females
386-965-2231

FREE (2) 14 wk old kittens
(1) Male -nutered.
(1) Female -spayed.
CALL FOR INFO 386-755-0920
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Toy Poodle, Reg'd, Health
Cert/UTD shots, Male, White,
7 Months, Beautiful and Loving.
$500. obo. Call: 352-318-9452

30n Livestock &
330 Supplies

BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
386-965-2215

Two mini mares,
can hold small children,
$500 each w/saddle, will deliver
Call for details 386-965-2231


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold.' 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


407 Computers

HP Computer,
Many extras
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Furniture For Sale: Sofa sleeper,
dining table, portable dishwasher.
Much more. Call for details
Prices negotiable.214-793-7011

Petite Corner Cabinet w/decor,
2 1/2 feet tall & 2 feet wide
$25
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927
Wooden Desk w/Hutch,
Call for info
$35
.386-754-9295 or386-292-3927


- . u,.-.





ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.
... ... Z-,-- r W .. - -


1993 Harley
Davidson FXRP
Super Glide, 23K miles,
crash bar, windshield,
good condition.
$4,900
Call
386-758-9750


In Print, Online





1 Low Price!


Fo Mo-reDetailsClMr Bi

^^B^^^'at 386-755-5440 B^B


- ADvantage *










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
22" Murray Mower
(Easy Push). 4H-IP,
$70
386-754-9295 or. 386-292-3927
Craftsman Rider
42" cut, runs good,
$475
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

419 TV-Radio &
1 Recording
Entertainment Center, med oak
finish, glass doors on top, TV
opening 36 x 36 1/2" H 66", W-
54", D 20", $150 386-397-1118

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Fri & Sat, 8-4, back to school
clothes and more!
344 SE Jonathan Way
Rain or Shine...
Huge Sale. Sat. 8-3 Combining 3
houses. Books, fum, fabric, collec-
tibles, carpet, much more. 1.5 mi.
West of Ichetucknee on Hwy 27
Metal shed, Look for signs.


Moving Sale Sat only, 8-12, furni-
ture, home school books, clothing
and household items, 169 NW
Lakeside Ct, Emerald Lakes
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat only, 8-12, new kitchen items,
clothes, wind chimes,a little bit of
everything, 570 SW Quail Heights
Terrace, off Branford Hwy
Wellborn. Noon-4, Sat & Sun,
6330 150th Pl. Off 61st Rd. Yard
tools, adult clothes, some furni-
ture, TV, sm appliances & misc

440 Miscellaneous

04541475
HUNTING LEASES
Available,
Baker and Clay counties,
deer, hog and turkey
American Forest Management
Attn: Matt Dykes 386-454-0260

Car/Truck Hauler Trailer,
Heavy Duty
$475


440 Miscellaneous
Playground Equipment.sturdy
plastic, large & small cube shapes,
asking $75-$25 each or make an
offer for all pieces! 386-965-2231


450 Good Things
S to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat
10'2",w/trolling motor,
$500 Call for details
*386-965-2215

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 SINGLEWIDE
Mobile Home,
$375. mo. plus $200. dep
386-752-2254
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
2br/lba CH/A, screen porch. Lg
yard. fishing pond. Clean, quiet.
No Pets. References. Long term
rentals $475 mo. $475 sec. Smoke,
free environment. 386-965-3003.
2BR/1BA MH
Water & Garage included No Pets.
$450. mo. $300. security deposit,.
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633


LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482'$500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White . Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lIba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

A640 Mobile Homes
640y for Sale
5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch-
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion & some furniture, $119K.
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn.
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824


705 Rooms for Rent
Gentlemen offers room/non-smok-
ing home, kit privileges, w/d , ca-
ble TV, VA area. fishing & dock
nearby $400 mo 386-755-6198

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Move in special, $399, 2/1, newly
renovated, in town, includes water
$500 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Open House held on Sat, Sept
11th, 1 & 2 bdrm apts and mobile
homes 386-755-2423 The sooner
you call, the cheaper the price!
Studio Apt. Private. Rent includes
utilities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets For info
call. 386-963-1002
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
38'6-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 , For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $179,2 ppl $189 + tax

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons,$150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

2BR/2BA Nice & Clean
$800. mo 1st and last NO pets
* Country setting on Nash Road
386-752-1677


386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927 REPORTER Classifieds 2 Bedroom
Full Sized School Chalkboards In Print and On Line Mobile Homes
. $25 each a on$375e per month and up
386-344-5706 or www.lakecityreporter.com (386) 755- 2423
386-344-1783 Call for move in special price!


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04541539
FOR RENT
* 841 SW Grandview Ave...
3/2 1900 sf. brick home in great
location on large city lot
$865./mo
* 3083 SW SR 47...3/1.5
brick remodeled brick home on
1.5 acre wooded lot
$895./mo
*1772 SW Grandview Av
#102...Newer 3/2 brick duplex
with 1237 sf. and I car garage
$790./mo
*438 Bumette Lane...Nice
3/2 country home partially re-
modeled on I acre $975./mo
9403 Baya Ave...3/2 home
1440 sf. near downtown.
schools, and hospital
$790./mo
*169 SE James Ave...Re-
modeled 2/1 bungalow with
large fenced in back yard
$575./mo
All rentals require first, and
security. Call BJ Federico
Century 21 The Darby Rogers
Co. at 386-365-5884

3bd/2ba's
Multiple Locations
Call for details
386-755-3649.
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check, No Pets (386)755-9476
4/2/2 2800 sqft. 2nd fairway
Southern Oaks CC. 174
NW Harris Lake Dr. $1350. mo.
plus security. (941)545-6731
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,000
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-758-3166
Clean lBr/lBa, Florida Room
CH/A 5 mi. S. Lake City $400
Dep $550mo 386-590-0642/ 867-
1833.suwanneevallevproperties.com
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
NICE 3BR/2BA brick homd
in Russwood Estates $895. mo
$700 security. Application
required 386--963-4974 .
Remodeled 3/2 w/2 Car Garage.
1/2 Acre near US 41. & 1-75. New
appliances, ceramic tile, interior
/exterior paint & roof $785 mo +
dep. 386-623-3834/904-514,3677
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$625 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


75 (0 Business &
50 Office Rentals
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft. Utilities Inci
5950/month. Call 752-5035
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633


805 Lots for Sale
I AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$205/mo. $19,900. 352-215-1018
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
MUST SEE! New 3500 foot
spec home. Reduced to $299,000
5% interest. 0% down or trade.
386-752-1364 -
Saturn Lane 4/2 block, 5 ac, half
clearel,2 sheds, reduced from
$140K to $19K-MAKE OFFER
386-754-0800 or 755-7773

820 Farms &
OV Acreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com


4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com


820 Farms &
SAcreage

WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

(920 Auto Parts
920 & Supplies
Set of 4 Good Used Tires
235 x 17"
$165
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927
Spare tire and wheel
235x85x 16, 6lug
(poss.Z71 factory mag) $65
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

940 Trucks
03 Freightliner FL70, 230 hp CAT
3126, 6 spd Fuller Trans, 20 ft flat-
bed. Crane.knuckle boom 160K
miles, $21,500 - (954)205-7031.
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$2500
386-965-2215

950 Cars for Sale
1978 Chevy Malibu
305 eng-30 over, rac +rv cams,
new pistons, rings,rod bear, etc.
$1500 obo 386-754-4643

952 Vans & Sport
SUtil. Vehicles

95 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited,
V-8, 4-wheel dr. All factory opts,
cold air, orig wdw sticker, every-
thingworks. $4500. 386-658-2380


|G E" T www.lakecityreporter.com


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