Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








Tony Blair's memoir
Britain's former PM says
he cried for Iraq war victims.
Daily Briefing, 2A
000015 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


N%..m-ML U,


Opening defeat
Lady Tigers fall
to Union County.
Sports, IB


orter


Thursday, September 2, 2010 www.lake


Vol. 136, No. 193 N 75 cents


IDA mistake costs county $60,000


Audit reveals
overpayments
to industries.
By LEANNE TYO
.tyo@lakecityreporter.comrn

A "calculation mistake"
by the Columbia County


Industrial Development
Authority cost the county
$60,000 in revenue, offi-
cials said Wednesday.
IDA officials took full
responsibility for the mis-
cue after a special audit and
a legal opinion revealed the
problem.
The audit examined the


Poole
by the IDA.


county's
economic,
develop-
ment and
tax abate-
ment proj-
ects, which
w e r e
handled
The findings


INSIDE


M Is'Bascom Norris project
nearing completion?, 5A
discovered rebate overpay-
ments by the county to
various industrial partners
during consecutive years.
It also showed noncom-


pliance with job creation
commitments that were
required of certain indus-
trial partners in order to
obtain the tax rebates.
Jim Poole, IDA executive
director, said he is respon-
sible for the overpayments.
"I made the calculation
mistake," 'Poole said.


Tax abatement is an eco-
nomic development tool
that allows county govern-
ments to offer tax reduc-
tions or exemptions as an
incentive for creating new
jobs, said county manager
Dale Williams.

MISTAKE continued on 5A


FGC event provides venue for fellowship


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Student Nursing Association president Marrae Rukab shows David Bell-Higgins, 19, how to listen to his heartbeat at the
Florida Gateway College's student-faculty picnic Wednesday. 'It's a good thing that they put this on for the students,' Bell-
Higgins said.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Florida Gateway
College stu-
dents and
faculty had the
chance to get
to know each other a little
better at a special event
Wednesday.
The college's Student
Government Association
and Student Activities
Office hosted an outdoor
picnic on the campus
designed to give students
and professors a venue for
fellowship outside of the
classroom.
'We created this event
so they can more or less
become friends with the
'instructors, so the class-
room experience is a little
more friendly," said Barry
Cbngressi, 18, a full-time
student at the college and
SGA president.
A lot of students new
to the college experience
feel nervous or anxious
when they begin classes,
he said, an issue that SGA
and Student Activities
wanted to put to ease by


- - --.~.----'-.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Accounting professor Michael Cummings shares stories
with a group of FGC students during a student/faculty pic-
nic Wednesday. Pictured are Holly Deese, (from left), 21,
Sariah Sanders, 31, Joshua Benton, 18, Cummings and
Natalie Martinez.


allowing students and
instructors to gather in an
informal environment
"It's kind of an ice-
breaker for them," he
said.
"We have a feeling that
most people are going to
be able to connect and
unify with the instruc-
tors," Congressi said.
The 2010 to 2011 school
year is the first year the
event has taken place. The


event provided free lunch
and college clubs had
booths on site to share
information with attend-
ees.
Jimmie Rodgers, 50, a
sophomore at the college
and Student Veterans Club
president, said the faculty
welcomes students and
that professors' offices
"are like an open door
without the door."
He said the picnic was


a way to begin fostering
stident-teacher relation-
ships.
"It's to start off the
semester, so you can iden-
tify with that teacher, so
you're not as intimidated,"
Rodgers said.
"It's more or less to
show them that we're
human as well," said
Paula Cifuentes, profes-
sor of mathematics, who
attended the event. "We're
not as scary as they think
we are. We were students
once, too."
Cifuentes said interact-
ing with students outside
of class shows them
that the professors are
approachable and allows
her to build relationships
with her students.
"You get to know them
as a person as well, not
just as a math student,"
she said.
Kaitlin Martin, 18, a stu-
dent beginning her first
semester, said she saw the
event as an opportunity to
connect personally with

FGC continued on 3A


Local motels see


higher Bed Tax


collection rates


12 percent
increase equates
to $3K to $4K.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Local motels and camp-
grounds are experiencing
an increase in Bed Tax rates
- some were experiencing
the increase even before
the Bed Tax rate increased
by 1 percent, according to
the Florida Department of
Revenue.
Reports indicate the
-Columbia County Tourist
Development Tax contin-
ued a four-month increase
compared to statistics from
2009.
Harvey ' Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council tour-
ism director, said things
have seemed like a roller
coaster ride for the past
two years. 'In 2008, local
hotels had a record-setting
,year for collecting Bed Tax
revenue, but in 2009 the
numbers were drastically
reduced.
"We had hoped for and
were kind of expecting a


turnaround in 2010, but in
February we were down
about $250 from over a year
ago that made us think that
at least we've stopped the
bleeding," he said. "But
since March we've been up
fairly strongly, probably 12
percent."
The 12 percent equates
to roughly $3,000-$4,000
per month
increase
from the
local Bed
Tax collec-
tion rate
compared
cmbl to 2009 sta-
amthe 2 percent collection racs.
"2009 was not a good
year, but we certainly have
not reboundeA to the 2008
levels," Campbell said.
In April the Bed Tax
increased from 2 percent to
3 percent, which brought
additional funding in
through the tax levy. June
collections were $50,715 at
the new 3 percent collec-
tion rate.
In comparison, in 2009
the 2 percent collection rate
brought in approximately
MOTELS continued on 5A


Angler caught in net

of charges for alleged

tournament cheating


Bass fisherman
accused of fraud
and grand theft.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com .

A Chiefland man faces
numerous charges in con-
nection with alleged cheat-
ing at weekly bass tourna-
ments in Dixie County on
the Suwannee River.
CedricJerome Perry, who
was arrested Monday night,
reportedly confessed to
catching fish in other lakes
and then bringing them
to the weigh-in at the Joe
Anderson Boat Ramp in Old
Town, according to reports
released Wednesday by the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission.
Perry, 31, is charged with
fraud, grand theft, fishing
license and bag-limit viola-
tions. Authorities reported-
ly had Perry under surveil-
lance for close to a month.
Perry received more


than $1,000 as winner of
the 2010 Columbia High
Quarterback Club Open
Bass Tournament.
Tournament officials
declined comment on
Perry's arrest and FWC
officials did not indicate
whether foul play was sus-
pected in Perry's June 19
' tournament win.
According to FWC
reports, officer Sam
Dishman received infor-
mation about the possibil-
ity of. cheating occurring
at the weekly tournaments
and suspicions arose when
Perry began winning
numerous tournaments
and catching fish when no
one else was catching qual-
ity stringers.
Perry was under surveil-
lance at another tourna-
ment on Aug. 10.
'These tournaments gen-
erally start at 5:30 p.m. and
last until around 8:30 p.m.
We watched him the entire

ANGLER continued on 5A


Il!!1I1IIIICALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
...- ' :,. i Fax. 752-9400
^--A�C^nll~!^*;. i... . . .. ......


93
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WEATHER, 2A


Opinion
Obituaries
Advice & Comics
Puzzles
Around Florida


... 4A
S3.
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S2A


TODAY IN
HEALTH
Ti-me T.- , ,2-t


COMING
THURSDAY
I I ted .'. 3. fund
d ri l 5z I r, . t










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010


Slay 4


A$H3 Wednesday:
SAfternoon: 4-5-5
Evening: 6-8-8 *


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-1-4-1
Evening: 9-8-2-7


' Tuesday:
6-17-21-25-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Blair: 'I cried for Iraq war victims'


LONDON
Tony Blair regrets ban-
ning fox hunting, but not
invading Iraq. He was
captivated by Princess
Diana, intimidated by
Queen Elizabeth II. He heaps praise
on President George W. Bush but
calls his close colleague Gordon
Brown a man of "zero" emotional
intelligence. He acknowledges that
some find him delusional, and says
he possibly drank a bit too much,
Blair's long-awaited memoir hit
bookstores Wednesday, and the
revealing, self-justifying 700-page
volume provides plenty of fodder for
the former British leader's support-
ers - and detractors.
The former British prime minister
was paid $7 million advance for "A
Journey," which recounts his voyage
from political neophyte to youthful
prime minister to admired, and then
reviled, statesman.
Iraq is his most divisive legacy,
but Blair says he is not sorry for his
decision to enter the U.S.-led war,
- although he wept for its victims.
He is donating all proceeds from
the book to a charity for wounded
troops.
"I ... regret with every fiber of my
being the loss of those who died,"
Blair writes. 'Tears, though there
have been many, do not encompass
it."
But, he adds, "on the basis of
what we do know now, I still believe
that leaving Saddam in power was
a bigger risk to our security than
removing him."


Bullock: Son is 'crown
prince' in family of girls
NEW YORK - Actress Sandra
Bullock says her baby son is the
"crown prince" in the family because


ROOLI/t IcU r-oo
A copy of Britain's former Prime Minister Tony' Blair's newly-published book
is seen outside a bookshop in central London Wednesday. Tony Blair's long-
awaited memoir 'A Journey' says the former British prime minister doesn't regret
the Iraq war, although he wept for its victims, and carries revelations about the
politician's alcohol use, his interactions with the queen and his testy relationship
with his successor.


everyone else is female - even the
pets. Bullock called her' adopted
son from New Orleans, Louis Bardo
Bullock, her "little Cajun cookie."
She started the adoption process.
four years ago, and Louis' adoption
was finalized earlier this year.
In an interview airing Tuesday on
NBC's 'Today" show, Bullock says
she didn't want to use her celebrity
status to speed up the adoption pro-
cess.

Police: Hilton denied
owning purse, cocaine
LAS VEGAS - Paris Hilton
denied owning the purse in which
police say less than a gram of,
cocaine was found after a traffic stop
on the Las Vegas Strip, according to


an arrest report released Monday.
"She told-me the purse was not
hers, that she had borrowed it
from a friend," Las Vegas police Lt.
Dennis Flynn wrote in his report
of Hilton's arrest
shortly before mid-
night Friday. The
friend was not iden-
tified. The 29-year-
old celebrity social-
ite acknowledged
Hilton owning $1,300 in
cash, several credit
cards, a package of Zig-Zag rolling
papers and a broken tablet of the
prescription asthma medication
Albuterol also found in the purse
late Friday during her arrest at the
Wynn Las Vegas resort.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Dancer-actress Marge
Champion is 91.
* Former United States
Olympic Committee
Chairman Peter Ueberroth
is 73.
* Singer Jimmy Clanton
is 70.
* Football Hall of Famer
Terry Bradshaw is 62.
* Basketball Hall of Famer
Nate Archibald is 62.


* Actor Mark Harmon is 59.
* Tennis Hall of Famer
Jimmy Connors is 58.
* Actress Linda Purl is 55.
* Actor Keanu Reeves is
46.
* Actress Salma Hayek
is 44.
* Actress Kristen Cloke is
42.
* Actor-comedian Katt
Williams is 37.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval'St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fta.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have, a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


ARO

Fighter jets moved
from storm path


EGLIN AIR FORCE
SBASE - Seymour
Johnson Air Force Base
: in North Carolina is mov-
ing 30 F-15E Strike Eagle
fighter jets and three KC-
135R Stratotankers refuel-
" ing aircraft to the Florida
SPanhandle as Hurricane
SEarl approaches.
The Air Force is moving
the planes south and out of
the path of the major hurri-
cane. Officials at Florida's
Eglin Air Force Base said
the planes should begin
arriving around 10:30 a.m.
Thursday.

Greene sues
papers for libel
MIAMI - Failed
Democratic U.S. Senate
candidate Jeff Greene is
suing the St. Petersburg
Times and The Miami
Herald for libel over
articles Greene claims cost
him votes.
Greene is seeking $500
million in damages from
the newspapers, reporters
and editors. The lawsuit
was filed Wednesday in
Miami-Dade Circuit Court.
Greene said the papers
published knowingly
false stories and an edito-
rial implicating him in a
California mortgage fraud
case. Another story involv-
ing boxer Mike Tyson
detailed allegations of
illegal drug use aboard
Greene's yacht, which
Greene also says is false.

2 Oriental fruit
flies found
TALLAHASSEE - Two
male Oriental fruit flies
have been found in a trap
in Pinellas County, but
Mediterranean fruit flies
have been eradicated in
Palm Beach County.
State Agriculture


IUND FLORIDA


Holocaust memory hits home
Rosette Goldstein poses for photos in Boca Raton
Wednesday. The day Goldstein's father was taken away by
Nazi soldiers, shoved in a train and delivered to his death
is hitting close to home again. One of the major bidders to
construct the United States' first high-speed rail is the French
national railway SNCF, a company that has been scrutinized
for its role in transporting Jews and others to Nazi death
camps during World War II. Goldstein plans to raise the issue
that has long tormented her and other Holocaust survivors
today, when the Florida Department of Transportation holds a
public meeting in Orlando on the $2.6 billion high-speed rail
project, which would connect Tampa and Orlando.


Commissioner Charles
Bronson said Wednesday
that the Medfly eradica-
tion was one of the fastest
on record in Florida. The
Medfly infestation was dis-
covered in June. It was the
first in Florida since 1998.
Both pests are a threat
to Florida's $9 billion cit-
rus industry.

Advocacy group
proposes debate
MIAMI - If a new chil-
dren's advocacy group has
its way, an Oct. 16 debate
between the candidates for
Florida governor will focus
solely on issues affecting
youngsters.
The Children's
Movement of Florida
- also known as the
"milk party" - announced
the debate Wednesday
in conjunction with the


University of Miami. It
would take place on the
school's campus with a live
audience and be televised,
although details are still
being worked out. The
group said Democratic
candidate Alex Sink has
said she will participate.

Car crashes into
South Florida deli
TAMARAC - An elder-
ly woman drove her car
into a South Florida deli at
lunch time.
Police said the woman
and her female passenger
were not injured, but a deli
employee and five patrons
were taken to area hospi-
tals with minor injuries.
Authorities say there was no
permanent structural dam-
age and the business will be
able to remain open.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER



S MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY
SSUNNY , SUNNY CLOUDY


HI 93 LO HI 93 LO HI 94 LO
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93.' 74


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
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Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SValdost
92/6
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9.1.6S 93 61
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Ioday's
MOON ultra-violet r .,. .. -
Moonrise today 12:39 a.m. radiation risk . .
Moonset today 3:16 p.m. for the area on
Moonrise tom. 1:38 a.m. a scale from 0
Moonset tom. 4:10 p.m. to 1


Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. - Forecasts, data and graph.
8 15 23 30 '-- Ics � 2010 Weather Central
New First Full Last . LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpuhllsher.com


On this date in
2003, Tropical
Storm Ernesto
drenched Norfolk,
Va., with 8.93
inches of rain for
the city's greatest
single day rainfall on
record.


Get Connected

<",* -3'l | '..I.ldt4 ., i


Daily Scrioture


"Train a child in the way he
should go, and when he is old
he will not turn from it."


- Proverbs 22:6




Lake City Reporter


ta
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iy 91, 69 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
esville * Daytona Beach Fort Myers
67 .Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
92 68 *est
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key Wet
S -J -9 1 75 Lake City
Miami
ampa * Naples
2 76/ West Palm Beach Ocala
91/78 * Orlando
* Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 90/80 * Pensacola
93/75 * Naples * Tallahassee
90/77 Miami Tampa
Key Wt 92/78 Valdosta
a * ;' W. Palm Beach
90/81


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---------


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


i


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE


Special session on oil spill


not necessary, Cretul says


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE-Florida
House Speaker Larry Cretul
ended speculation over call-
ing a special legislative ses-
sion on the Gulf of Mexico oil
spill Wednesday by declaring
there's no need for one.
The Ocala Republican
wrote in a memo to his
members that reports from
six House working groups
examining spill-related
issues show none "require
immediate formal legislative
action."
Senate President Jeff
Atwater who had been
pushing for such a session,
bowed to Cretul's decision
and forwarded the speaker's
memo to senators.
Atwater, though, urged a
Senate committee thats been
studying spill-related issues to
"continue developing propos-
als, gathering data and work-
ing with incoming leadership
in preparation" for the 2011
regular session in the spring.
The terms of Atwater, a
North Palm Beach Republican
also running for Florida chief


financial officer, and Cretul
expire in November.
Both leaders would have to
agree before lawmakers could
be called back to Tallahassee.
Gov. Charlie Crist also has
the authority to call a special
session. Crist did call one as
a response to the spill in July
to consider a proposed. state
constitutional amendment It
would have
banned
offshore
. aIDk drilling in
state waters,
.. w h i c h
extend
about three
Crist miles into
the Atlantic Ocean and 10
miles into the gulf
The House rejected that
idea by voting on a nearly
straight party-line basis to
adjourn less than an hour
after convening without
even taking up the propos-
al. Republicans argued it
wasn't needed because state
law already bans drilling in
Florida waters. Democrats,
though, noted the House last
year voted to repeal that ban
but it was not considered by


the Senate.
A spokesman for Crist
had no immediate comment
Wednesday.
Democrats criticized
Cretul's decision.
"Florida's Republican leg-
islative leaders have once
again shown their disdain for
the people of this state," said
Rep. Adam Fetterman, (D-
Port St Lucie). "They have
turned their backs on those
Florida families and busi-
nesses hurt by the spill."
Sen. Dan Gelber, a Miami
Beach Democrat running
for attorney general, said
House leaders' claim in
July that they needed more
time to prepare for a spe-
cial session "was nothing
more than a political rope-
a-dope."
The Senate Select
Committee on Florida's
Economy and the House
working groups have-
looked at such issues as
tax relief for spill victims,
more funding for sea-
food testing and tourism
promotion and tougher
penalties for pollution
violations.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Fort White Mayor signs proclamation
The Edward Rutledge Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution witness Fort
White Mayor Truett George sign a proclamation at the Fort White Town Hall Wednesday
afternoon. Members of the DAR have been traveling around the local areas to promote
Constitution Week, starting Sept. 17 to Sept. 24. Pictured are DAR member Betty Wilson
(from left), regent Betsy Burch, George, and member Becky Stokes.



FGC: Professors and students meet
Continued From Page 1A


the teachers.
"Then you get to know
your professors on more
of a personal level,"
Martin said. "You get to
know them on more of a


one-on-one type basis."
Sean McMahon, pro-
fessor of history, said
the event kept students
active on campus and
"makes us feel more like


a college."
"They wanted to see
faculty and staff in a
more relaxed setting,"
McMahon said, "and this
is a perfect venue for it."


OBITUARIES


Willie Mae Graham
There is a time for everything,
and a season for every activity
under the heavens. A time to be
born and a time to die.- Eccle-
Mrs. Willie
Mae Graham
was born Jan-
uary 3, 1935
in Lake City,
Florida to
William and
Frances Brad-
ley. Both preceded her in death.
Willie Mae (as she was affec-
tionately.called) life came to an
end Thursday, August 26, 2010.
Being brought up in a Christian
atmosphere, she accepted Christ
at an early age. She was united
in Holy Matrimony to Mr. Hazel
B. Graham. Mr. Graham also
preceded her in death. Earlier
in life she was employed with
A-1 Motel, CARC and other


employers. Mrs. Graham oper-
ated a Foster Home for seniors
at her Lake City residence.
She will be lovingly missed
by her nephew and caregiver,
James L. Scofield (Shirley); fos-
ter brother, Anderson W. Perry
(Barbara); client-friend Ms. Gra-
cie L. Hines and Karen Albright;
a host of nieces, nephews,
step-children, step-grand and
great-grandchildren; numerous
cousins, friends and associates.
Funeral services will be Satur-
day, 11:00 A.M. September 4,_
2010 at Bethel AME Church.
Highway 242, Lake City, FL.
The family will receive friends
.Friday, September 3, 2010 from
6-8:00 P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"


John Larry Lenoir
John L. Lenoir, resident of Fort
Walton Beach, Florida and
former resident of Lake City,
Florida went to be with the Lord,
August 28,
2010, at,the
Fort Walton
Medical Cen-
ter. John was
born March
14, 1950 in
Lake Park, i t
Georgia, the
oldest of four :
siblings born
to Mrs. Alberta
Young. He was
educated in the
schools of Lake City graduating
with the class of 1968, attended
Lake City Community College
and Southern Illinois University.
In Lake City he attended Olivet
Missionary Baptist Church. Af-


ter extensive travels with the
United .States Air Force, John
retired after 24 years of service
with rank of MSGT. He returned
to Eglin Air Force Base and was
employed as a Civil Service An-
alyst from 2001 -2010. Son, Tra-
vis Lenoir preceded him in death.
Cherishing memories: Wife of
38 years, Fay Lenoir; daugh-
ter, Genita Lenoir (Monty El-
lis) Killen, TX; sons, Kelvin
Lenoir (Margaret), Jarvis Lenoir,
both of Niceville, FL.; adopt-
ed daughter, Desiree Swain;
mother, Mrs. Alberta Young,
Lake City, FL; sister, Gaynell
Lee (Andrew), Lake City, FL.;
brothers, Arthur L. Matthews,
Tacoma, WA, Tommy Young,
Leesburg, FL; ten grandchildren,
aunt, Nettie Gail Lenoir; nieces,
nephews, sisters & brothers-in
law; other relatives and friends.
Memorial services were held to-


day, September 2, 2010 in Fort
Walton Beach, FL, at Gregg
Methodist Church. McKin-
ney Funeral Home provid-
ing services in Fort Walton.
The family will receive friends
in Lake City, FL. Septem-
ber 3, 2010 from 5-7:00 P.M.
at Olivet Missionary Baptist
Church. 541 NE Davis Avenue.
Graveside and Committal ser-
vices will be conducted at
Garden of Rest Cemetery,
Saturday September 4, 2010
at 11:00 A.M. with Rev. Ron-'
ald V. Walters, Officiating.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
LakeCity, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"TTie Caring Professionals"


Otis Ray Todd
Otis Ray Todd died August
9, 2010 in Tampa, Florida
from complications of diabe-
tes. Born October 12, 1956
in Lake City, Florida, where
he lived most of his life.
He is preceded in death by
Harry L. Todd (father) and
Almera Todd (mother).
He is survived by one daugh-
ter Ashley, two brothers
Harry L. Todd, Jr. (Freda)
and E.W. Todd, Sr. (Ginger).
Grave side services will be
September 3, 2010 at .11:00
AM in Gateway/Forest Lawn
Cemetery, Lake City, Florida


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!3


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













OPINION


Thursday. September 2, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


-(O


OUR
PINION


New wheels:

Columbia

County is

ready to roll

That shiny new
buggy you'll soon
see loading and
unloading visitors
at Southside Sports
Complex and at the county's
myriad festivals represents
more than a convenient way to
handle parking and enhance
tourism - it's an example of
teamwork between local gov-
ernment and private business.
Ifs understood that a 12-pas-
senger tourist tram with the
associated vehicle to pull it are
luxury items on any county
budget, but that's especially
true in our county where belt
tightening is resulting in the
loss of public personnel.
But it's also understood that
such transportation elevates a
sports complex or festival and
makes the, event that much
more attractive to visitors
who would otherwise not be
inclined to hike from a bogged
parking lot to a local venue in
Florida's sunshine.
Meeting both needs would.
notbe possible had a private
business not rolled out the
answer on Tuesday: A gener-
ous donation from Century
Ambulance Service Inc. now
means that Columbia County
has the means to ferry visitors
whl need and desire the ser-
vice.
I. today's economic uncer-
tainty, not every business has
thenaeans to make a $17,000
doftaiorto its 'corhunuity. But
in this case, Centi fy did and '"
also saw the value in provid-,
ing a much-needed service to
one of the five counties it calls
home.
Thats a value and example
of community partnership that
will continue to drive visitors
into our county.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, Sept 2,
the 245th day of 2010. There
are 120 days left in the year.
* On Sept. 2, 1945, Japan
formally surrendered in
ceremonies aboard the USS
Missouri in Tokyo Bay, ending
World War II.
* In 1666, the Great Fire of
London broke out.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
w Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller


Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
SLetters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400.words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters; P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
qY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
E-MAIL:
ews@lakecityreporter.com


Proposed mosque an insult


In a recent opinion editori-
al published in "Politico,"
Jim Wallis, author and
self-described evangelical
Christian, made a case
for tolerance in construction
of a mosque at Ground Zero
in New York. Wallis, who says
he is personal friends with
Imam Faisal Rauf and his wife,
vigorously defends their right
to build a mosque at the site
where 3,000 people were killed
nine years ago by Muslim jihad-
ists. He implies that by opposing
the construction of a mosque
at what many Americans now
regard as "sacred ground," we
are intolerant and not showing
Christian love.
Like many people who have
never read the Qur'an, Wallis
calls true Islam a "religion of
peace." There may be some
peace-loving members of that
faith, but to declare it a religion
of peace is a gross misstate-
ment Numerous passages in
the Qur'an attest to the hateful
and downright hostile nature
of that document. Jews and
Christians are referred to as
"infidels," "pagans," "minions
of the devil," and "blasphem-
ers." Followers of Mohammed
are forbidden to even be friends
with them (Qur'an, Surah 4:89).
In Surah 5:72-73, the language.
is very pointed, stating emphati-
cally that 'They do blaspheme.
who say: 'God is Christ the son
of Mary.' They do blaspheme
who say: 'God is one of three
in a trinity:', for there' is no God
except one God Allah. If they
do not desist from their word
of blasphemy, verily a grievous
penalty will befall the blasphem-
ers among them." Note the
threat implied in those last few
words. Many other passages
of the Qur'an advocate similar
invectives against anyone who is
not Muslim.
In their book, "Unveiling
Islam," Ergun and Emir Caner,
both of whom were raised in
devout Islamic families, but who


Carolyn Abell
corbell 0I20@mchsi.com


are now Christians, write about
the jihadists who destroyed
the World Trade Center towers
and part of the Pentagon: "The
terrorists were not some fringe
group that changed the Qur'an
to suit political ends. They
understood the Qur'an quite
well and followed the teachings
of jihad to the letter."
Like Wallis, I am an evangeli-
cal Christian, and I don't want
to be judged by the actions of
a few who have distorted true
Christian beliefs. But just sup-
pose, for a moment, that some
radical American cult, in a mis-
guided "mission of Christianity,"
had crashed an airplane into a
mosque at Mecca, killing hun-
dreds or perhaps thousands of '
worshipers during Ramadan.
First of all, this would have
set off worldwide riots and
retaliatory violence against all
Christians. If we had managed
to live through that and if, years
later, som6 Christian organiza-
tion 15roposed to build a large
Christian church and cultural
center at the site as a so-called
offering of reconciliation for
what these murderers had
done, do you think there is even
a 1 percent chance of that hap-
pening? I can't think of a single
Christian denomination that
would even be so insensitive as
to suggest it.
Indeed, Christianity is a crime
in most Muslim countries,
where Shariah law is the law of
the land. Christians are not only
not allowed to build churches,
but they are attacked, beaten,


imprisoned, and killed every
day by fundamentalist Muslims
in Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia,
Sudan, and other such coun-
tries.
I strongly believe in the free-
dom that our country offers
to members of all faiths. As a
Christian, I try to implement
the teachings of Christ. But
although He taught us to love
our enemies, He did not teach
us to be doormats of political
correctness. He taught us to
use discernment and to not
trust the motives of those who
deny His Deity. "Be ye therefore
wise as serpents and harmless
as doves," admonished Jesus in
Matt. 10:16.
The-idea'that because we
are a nation of primarily loving
Christians, we should accept
this Islamic Mosque as a peace-
ful gesture toward a better
relationship between Muslims
and Christians is to assume that
Americans are not only naive,
but downright stupid. A look
at the history of Islam shows
that they traditionally erect
Islamic monuments to mark
sites of conquest. An example
is the Mosque al Aqsa and the
Dome of the Rock, which they
constructed on the Temple
Mount of Jerusalem. Jews and
Christians are not even allowed
to go inside these structures.
The proposed Cordoba House
in Manhattanwould be yet
another monument to the tri-
umph of Islam. '
If they truly wanted to offer
Americans a symbol of recon-
ciliation, they should propose to
sponsor a non-religious monu-
ment and perhaps a museum
dedicated to the memory of
those who were murdered on
Sept. 11, 2001. But a Mosque at
the site is the ultimate insult to
our nation, and I, for one, don't
believe it is intended to be any-
thing else.

* Local resident Carolyn Abell
is an occasional columnist.


his spring a blue-
ribbon roster of
retired military lead-
ers issued a report
titled, with charac-
teristic bluntness, 'Too Fat to
Fight," in which they said the
epidemic of childhood obesity
was posing a threat to America's
national security.
They found that 27 percent
of all young adults, ages 17 to
24, were too fat for military
service and that the problem
was quickly getting worse. In 10
years, the number of states with
40 percent or more of young
adults overweight went from
one to 39. Being overweight is
by far the leading reason would-
be recruits are rejected.
And the ones who do make
it into the military are not in as
good shape as their predeces-
sors. The New York Times said
it was "one of.the most pressing
issues facing the military today:


overweight and unfit recruits."
The percentages of male and
female recruits who fail the
military's basic fitness test are
up dramatically just since 2000
and so are the number of stress
fractures because of poor diets
low in calcium and iron.
In response, the Times
reports, the Army has changed
its physical training regimen
to better shape up its young
recruits. The new regimen has
less of the traditional pushups,
sit-ups and distance running and
more emphasis on exercises
that mimic what soldiers actu-
ally do in combat - sprinting,
climbing, rolling and crouching
with an emphasis on agility and
balance.
Once the recruits finish train-
ing, they still must face for the
duration of their careers the
Army's twice yearly physical
fitness test that still adheres
closely to tradition' pushups,


sit-ups and a two-mile run.
Army officials blamed the
increasingly unfit recruits on
junk food, video games and the
decline in gym classes, said
the Times. The retired officers
blamed the youthful obesity
almost entirely on junk food.
And they noted'that this isn't
the first time poor diet has
affected military readiness. In
World War II, they noted that
at least 40 percent of rejected
recruits were turned away for
reasons connected with poor
nutrition. They noted that after
the war, the general who ran the
military draft, Lewis Hershey,
was instrumental in winning
passage of the National School
Lunch Act.
Today the problem is over-
nourishment not under-nour-
ishment. Perhaps it's time for
another military intervention in
the national diet.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Jose.De La Isla
joseislo3@yahoo.com

Anchor

babies and

American

birthright

n anticipation of the 2012
Olympics, VisitBritain,
the UKs government-
funded tourism agency,
is providing tips on how
to greet people from abroad.
For instance, they are told
Indians may seem noisy and
impatient, the behaviors of
living in chaotic cities. Never
pour a glass of wine for an
Argentine backwards, a sign
of hostility. Avoid winking at a
Hong Kong visitor. And never
call a Canadian an American.
With Mexicans, don't bring
up the 1840's U.S.-Mexico war
or undocumented immigrants.
They prefer to talk about his-
tory, culture and museums.
Dan Pak recently wrote in
the Korea Times some words
of advice. Because Asian cul-
tures discourage showing emo-
tiQn in daily life, Americans
consider them too stiff and for-
mal. He said that although the
custom is changing, Korean
brides are prohibited from
smiling at their own weddings.
U.S. folks are easygoing,
he says. They even smile at
people they don't know.
Pak suggests, however, that
Koreans shouldnever try to
hide embarrassment with a
smile or a laugh. People in the
U.S. would be mystifiedwhen
the circumstances clearly sug-
gest embarrassment.
One reason is because ifs
all right to strike up a conver-
sation with anyone virtually
anywhere, even strangers, to
establish a new harmony. Of
all the people in the world,
U.S. dwellers are probably
the easiest to converse with,
and they don't care when one
has limited language skills.
Even pantomime, broken and
accented English win sympa-
thetic gestures.
But even an advanced stu-
dent of kinesics can get befud-
dled through mixed messages.
For example, by now everyone
knows there's a rhetorical flu
that associates undocumented
immigrants with what unfor-
tunately are called anchor
babies. An imagery has begun
to spread that undocumented
immigrants are having babies
in the United States and using
them like a hall pass, to serve
as the basis for parents and rel-
atives to gain citizenship after
the anchor infant reaches 18.
SIt's a long wait, but those
disposed to believe it are not
much interested in sociological
and demographic explanations,
or that most babies are prod-
ucts of romance, not policy
strategies. Some Washington
lawmakers claim it's all part of
a conspiracy to crawl through
green card and restrictive
immigration loopholes.
GeekyAsianGuy.com posted
on Aug. 13 six exceptionally
common-sense strong argu-
ments for maintaining birth-
right citizenship. He citedthe
case of San Franciscan Wong
Kim Ark, who in 1890 went to
visit China, his parents' birth-
place. U.S. authorities refused
to let him back in the country.
Many children of deported par-
ents could encounter a similar
prohibition one day in the near
future. Fortunately, in 1898 the
Supreme Court confirmed, in.
United States v. Wong Kim Ark
, the man's birthright.
If the subject comes up
again soon and you see a lot
of people smiling, it is because
they are embarrassed that,
in the current atmosphere, a
birthright has trouble staying a
birthright.

* Jose de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


4A


OTHER OPINION

Army tries new drills for unfit recruits


I' I '










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010


Commissioners set to OK Bascom parcel purchase


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com


The county is continu-
ing to move forward on
final decisions before the
Bascom Norris Road con-
nector project is put out
to bid.
The Columbia
County Bbard of County
Commissioners is set to
approve acquiring the land
rights for the Overflow
Land Trust parcel at its


meeting Thursday. The par-
cel is one of three left for the
county to acquire before con-
struction on the project can
begin after a bid is awarded.
It is necessary to adopt
right-of-way land rights on
the parcels in case the county
would need to use eminent
domain to acquire the proper-
ty, said Dale Williams, county
manager.
Additionally, an offer of
compensation for the par-
cel will be presented to the


board, which will allow Marlin
Feagle, county attorney, to
know how much he can
legally offer for the proper-
ty's purchase, Williams said.
According to reports,
two separate appraisals of
the parcel averaged to be
$391,500.
In other business, com-
missioners will discuss the
following:
* Hear from IDA execu-
tive director Jim Poole, who
is expected to share more


details on the IDA's plans to
correct a $60,000 industrial
tax-abatement and rebate
mistake.
* The board will also hold
four separate public hear-
ings to adopt annual rate
resolutions setting non ad
valorem assessment fees,
nonproperty taxes that apply
to all county residents.
* Fire protection ser-
vices rates, which have not
increased, will be voted on.
Williams said the board


will discuss two issues
regarding the fire protec-
tion services rates - the
continuing exemption of pri-
vate schools from the rates
and possibly changing the
method used to assess the
rates recreational vehicle
park lots pay.
"There is absolutely noth-
ing wrong with the way
it's currently being done,"
Williams said, "but we've
had at least one RV park
owner ask us to consider


using a different method-
ology. Basically it would
reduce their bill."
Other rates set for public
hearing and a vote are solid
waste services, which apply
only to residential units
and have not increased,
and municipal service ben-
efit units for Rolling Oaks.
and River Manor, whose
citizens chose to use the
assessment program to
get their roads paved,
Williams said.


MISTAKE: Columbia County obligated to correct overpayment, officials say
Continued From Page 1A


The industries that were
overpaid are economic
development projects that
involve rebating, a situa-
tion in which a company
pays its taxes in full and
the county reimburses it
later, Williams said.
According to audit
reports, local compa-
nies that were overpaid
in excess tax rebates
are Hunter Panels by
more than $24,500; New
Millenium Building
Systems by more than
$30,000; and Mayo
Fertilizer by -more than
$5,500.
The companies were
over-rebated for their
properties' original value
in addition to improve-
ments made on the prop-
erties, Williams said.
"The fact that they
were rebated the origi-
nal value of the land is
something that should've
been caught on the front
end," he said. "Plain and
simple, they got rebated
more than they should
that the audit indicated."
Williams said the coun-
ty is obligated to correct
the overpayment, a cor-
rection that he thinks the


Columbia County Board
of County Commissioners
will expect the IDA to
lead. Commissioners are
expected to discuss the
IDA predicament at their
7 p.m. meeting today.
Poole and Suzanne
Norris, IDA board chair-
woman, said the compa-
nies have
been noti-
fied they
will be
required
to pay
back what
D e they were
DuPree o v r -
over-
rebated.
Nor ris
said the


panies
agreed to
the pay-
Williams ments.
" W e
realized that we had some
discrepancies there and
we immediately acted on
it and brought it to every-
one's attention immedi-
ately," Norris said, "and
also proposed solutions
on how to rectify it. With
the relationships we have


with the companies, they
were all appreciative of it
and said to just take it off
-the next year's bill."
Poole said he will rec-
ommend to the county
commission at its meet-
ing today that the repay-
ments required by the
companies be deducted
from their next tax abate-
ment payments.
Commission chairman
Ron Williams said he was
aware of the issue and
the audit's findings, but'
did not want to comment
until he reviewed items
in depth.
A letter dated June 7
and received by the coun-
ty June 10 from Gregory
'Stewart, an attorney with
the firm Nabors, Giblin
& Nickerson P.A. that
reviewed the companies'
agreements, suggested
an ordinance adoption
to prevent overpayment
from happening in the
future.
Stewart stated in the
letter to the county, his
firm recommends that
the county adopt an ordi-
nance specifically imple-
menting tax abatement
exemption in accordance


with Florida statute,
instead of rebating.
Williams said tax
abatement is done in
accordance with state
statute with the property
appraiser deleting the tax
liability from the tax bill,
involving no rebate.
"The attorneys have
recommended that we
do all future projects as
abatements, that we don't
do rebates anymore," he
said. "The reason for that
is that way it's very spe-
cific."
The audit reports also
indicated Hunter Panels
was not in compliance with
its job creation commit-
ments, which will incur a
$31,000 penalty payment,
because the company
failed to maintain 45 full-
time employees in 2009.
New Millenium Building
Systems did not meet
employee salary require-
ments of its job creation
commitments, but reports
stated Mayo Fertilizer
was in compliance with its
job creation commitments
and Target Corporation
exceeded them.
Commissioner Jody
DuPree said his concern is


ANGLER: Investigators didn't buy fishing story
Continued From Page 1A


time and didn't see him
catch much," said' FWC
investigator Larry Ayers
in a prepared statement.
At the weigh-in Perry
had five fish, including
an 8- and 9-pound bass.
"We never saw him
catch either of these
fish," Ayers said. "Perry
also won this -tourna-
ment."
Perry participated in
another tournament on
Aug. 17, and FWC offi-
cers continued their sur-
veillance of his activities.
While other officers
watched Perry, Ayers
and another FWC officer
checked his vehicle at
the public boat ramp by
looking through the win-
dow, where they saw a
cooler on the passenger
floor board and reported
hearing an aerator run-
ning in the truck.
After discovering the


aerator, officers switched
the focus of their investi-
gation and began watch-
ing Perry's vehicle.
"When he got to the
truck, he removed the
cooler and put it in his
boat," Ayers said. '"There
were fish in the cooler. He
put them with, the other
fish he caught during the
tournament."
Perry won the tourna-
ment.
After the weigh-in, offi-
cers approached him and
interviewed him about the
fish.
"He explained he caught
those fish that morning
at Clay Landing," Ayers
said. "He also said he had
caught the two fish he won
the Aug. 10 tournament
with at Orange Lake."
During their investiga-
tion, officers also discov-
ered that Perry didn't'
have a valid fishing


license and there were
additional fish on his


boat, putting him over
the bag limit.


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that the audit reports indi-
cated that not all the jobs
created by the companies
were local ones, and if
tax abatement, according
to statute is followed, the
statute will allow the coun-
ty to be sure that local
jobs are being generated.
Local jobs are impor-
tant, DuPree said, because
they can return the money
companies save through
tax abatement back to the
local economy.
"It's a tool that I think
you've got to have in order
to grow your economy,"
he said. "It's imperative
that we have it. But it's
pointless to have it if the
jobs aren't local. That's


how I see it."
The tax abatement
mistake and its recom-
mended solutions will be
discussed at the county's
regular meeting, held at 7
p.m. today at the Columbia
County School Board
Administrative Complex
auditorium, 372 W. Duval
St-.
County voters have
control over the abate-
ment privilege extended
to Columbia County com-
missioners.
Williams said the
tax abatement issue
will be on the upcom-
ing November ballot for'
a vote on renewing the
practice.



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MOTELS: 3 major factors


Continued From Page 1A

$2,700. The one percent
increase in the Bed Tax is
expected to increase fund-
ing from $32,000 last year
to $52,000 this year, signal-
ing an increase in business
and the Bed Tax rate.
Since March, collections
are up just over $14,000
for the past four-month
period.
'.lliu 1 -s,- have been
up comparing apples and
apples, but up significantly
since we've increased the
bed tax," Campbell said.
He said the increase in
funding from the Bed Tax
has been influenced by
three major factors.
Those factors include
sports tournaments, which
draw people to the area
i(ad reasonably stable and
lower gas prices for most
of the year.
Campbell said the bulk
of business for Columbia
County's hotels comes


from people heading to
attractions and noted a
new attraction in Orlando
appears to be the other fac-
tor in generating additional
bed tax funds.
"I think the open-
ing of the Harry Potter
Experience helped a lot,"
he said. "A lot of people
were looking forward to
that as an extremely popu-
lar attraction."
While local hotels are
hopeful the increase con-
tinues, Campbell noted
that a spike in gas pric-
es, an act of terrorism or
additional slowing of the
national economy could
have a detrimental impact
on generating funds.
"Americans relish and
cherish their vacation time
and people are taking vaca-
tions, but I think they're
doing it with a whole lot
more budget conscious-
ness." Canpbell said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010


ON HEALTH


Dr. Peter Gott
MD


Medical

jargon


baffles


patient

D EAR DR.
GOTTA: The
results of my
thyroid ultra-
sound reveal
abnormal echogenicity of
the right lobe without a dis-
crete lesion identified with-
in the thyroid gland. I have
been taking 25 micrograms
of thyroid medication
since May. The goiter on
the right side of my neck
is noticeable. On May 21,
my TSH was 4.53. In July,
it was 3.5. Can you please
explain the ultrasound
results in English? Should
I ask my doctor for an
increase in my Synthroid
dosage or wait for the next
lab work in October?
DEAR READER: The
thyroid gland is situated in
the lower neck - below
the larynx and above the
collarbone. This gland uses
iodine to make hormones
essential for the proper
function of every cell in the
body. The pituitary gland
and hypothalamus at the
base of the brain regu-
late the rate at which the
hormones are produced
and released. The TSH to
which you refer stimulates
Hormone production. The
normal range for lab work
at my local hospital is any-
thing between 0.34 and
5.60. Thus, by these stan-
dards, both your readings
were normal.
The most common
causes of a goiter are from
the over- or underproduc-
tion of thyroid hormones,
nodules that develop within
the gland or a lack of
iodine in the diet, which,
in the United States, is
uncommon. A goiter
doesn't necessarily indicate
that the thyroid gland-is
,malfunctioning. Even when
visibly enlarged, the thy-
roid may produce sufficient
hormones or too much or
too little thyroxine (T4)
and T3 (which is the most
active form of thyroid hor-
mone).
Your ultrasound revealed
an abnormality of the right
lower lobe without directing
the abnormality to a spe-
cific lesion within the gland.
Your physician has you
on Synthroid because you
have been diagnosed with
hypothyroidism. Your gland
does not produce sufficient
amounts, and your body
requires supplemental medi-
cation. My guess is that you
have Hashimoto's thyroiditis
(an underactive thyroid),
which can be successfully
treated with medication.
If questions remain, I sug-
gest you speak with your
physician or request a refer-
ral to an endocrinologist to
obtain additional informa-
tion on your condition. In
the interim, I am sending
you a copy of my Health
Report 'Thyroid Disorders."
Other readers who would
like a copy should send
a self-addressed stamped
No. 10 envelope and a $2
check or money order pay-
able to Newsletter. Mail
it to Newsletter, PO. Box
167, Wickliffe, OH 44092-
0167. Be sure to mention
the title or print an order
form off my website at www.
AskDrGottMD.com.

* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet," available at
most chain and independent
bookstores, and the recently


published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Cookbook."


Time to get your flu shot, but just one


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
t's flu-shot season
already, and for the
first time health
authorities are urg-
ing nearly everyone
to get vaccinated. There is
even a new high-dose ver-
sion for people 65 or older.
What a difference a
year makes: Crowds lined
up for hours for scarce
shots during last fall's
swine flu pandemic, when
infections peaked well
before enough vaccine
could be produced. This
year, a record vaccine
supply is expected - an
all-in-one inoculation that
now promises protection
against that swine flu
strain plus two other kinds
,of influenza.
Shipments began so
early that drugstores are
offering vaccinations amid
their back-to-school sales.
But without last year's
scare factor, the question
is how many people will
heed the new policy for
near-universal vaccination.
No more stopping to check
if you're on a high-risk list:
A yearly dose is recom-
mended for virtually every-
one except babies younger
than 6 months - the shot
isn't approved for tots that
young - and people with
severe allergies to the eggs
used to brew it
"Influenza is serious, and
anyone, including healthy
people, can get the flu
and spread the flu," said
Dr. Anne Schuchat of the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention. "Flu vac-
cines are the best way to
protect yourself and those
around you."
The CDC was moving
toward that policy even
before last year's pandemic
brought home an inescap-
able fact The flu virus
doesn't just kill grandpar-
ents and babies and people
with weak lungs or hearts,
although they're particular-
ly vulnerable. It also can kill


� " - ,, . ,




,,
. �: A





4L 4
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joe Garbarino of Bethesda, Md. (left) gets a flu shot from nurse practitioner Susan Brown
Friday in Rockville, Md. It's flu-shot season again, and for the first time health authorities
are urging nearly everyone to get vaccinated. People 65 or older even can choose'to try a
new high-dose version.


healthy pregnant women
and 30-somethings. And 5-
year-olds.
"We were discuss-
ing how we were going
to go get his Star Wars
Halloween costume after
he got out of the hospital
... and all of a sudden his
eyes lost their focus," said
Serese Marotta of Dayton,
Ohio, describing for report-
ers how her son Joseph,
5, died of swine flu last
October before vaccine was
available in her community.
She urged families to make
vaccination a priority.
Here are some questions
and answers about flu:
Q: I got vaccinated
against both seasonal and
that so-called H1N1 flu last
year, so why do I need vac-
cine this year?
A: It protects against a
different strain of the H3N2
influenza family that has
cropped up, as well as last
year's swine flu, part of the
H1N1 family, and a Type B
strain. Every year a differ-


ent flu vaccine is brewed
to match the constantly
changing flu strains that
circle the globe.
Q: Why is there a new
high-dose version for
seniors?
A: Your immune sys-
tem weakens with age,
so it doesn't respond as
actively to a flu shot. Sanofi
Pasteur's Fluzone High-
Dose quadruples the stan-
dard dose for people 65 and
c'der. This winter, scientists
will track if that translates
into less illness. Until that
proof's in, the CDC says it's
OK to choose either option.
Sanofi is finalizing how
much to make, and avail-
ability may vary with
location. For example,
Dr. Marvin Bittner of the
Veterans Affairs Medical
Center in Omaha estimates
the new shot might benefit
one in four seniors and
said his center has ordered
enough for that population,
while other VA clinics aren't
ordering as much.


Benefits seen for high-risk

women in ovary removal


By CARLA K. JOHNSON
Associated Press

CHICAGO - Surgery
to remove healthy ovaries
gives a triple benefit to
high-risk women: It low-
ers their threat of breast
and ovarian cancer, and
boosts their chances of liv-
ing longer, new research
suggests.
The study is the largest
to date to find advantages
for preventive surgery for
women who carry BRCA
gene mutations. Women
with the faulty genes have a
dramatically higher cancer
risk than other women -
five times greater for breast
cancer and at least 10 times
greater for ovarian cancer.
The study, appearing
in Wednesday's Journal
of the American Medical
Association, found benefits
for women with two differ-
ent BRCA gene variants
whether they had previous-
ly had breast cancer or not
The results offer more
tailored evidence for women
considering ovary removal,
a surgery that ends fertil-
ity, fast-forwards them into
early menopause and may
contribute to osteoporosis
or heart problems later in
life.
"It's really critical to
have the best informa-
tion when making such a
profound decision," said
senior author Timothy
Rebbeck of the University
of Pennsylvania School of
Medicine.
The researchers fol-
lowed nearly 2,500 women
with BRCA mutations
in Austria,- England, the
Netherlands and the
United States. All the
women were cancer-free
at the start. They were
watched for an average
of four years. Most of the
women were younger


than 50 at the start of the
study.
They got counseling to
help them choose between
surgery or increased
screening to watch for can-
cers early.
Ten percent of the
women chose mastecto-.
my and 40 percent chose
to have their ovaries
removed; some had both.
More than half the women
had neither surgery.
The women who chose
ovary removal had impres-
sive results:

* 1 percent were later
diagnosed with ovarian
cancer that showed up in
cells missed by surgeons,
compared to 6 percent of
the women who kept their
ovaries.

E 11 percent were diag-
nosed with breast cancer,
compared to 19 percent of
the women who kept their
ovaries.

* 3 percent of those
who had surgery died,
compared to 10 percent of
the others.
The study also found
preventive mastectomy
lowered the risk of breast
cancer. No breast cancers
were seen in the women
who had their breasts
removed. That may seem
unsurprising, but mastec-
tomy can leave behind
breast tissue that can turn
cancerous.
The study was obser-
vational, meaning it can't
prove one choice was bet-
ter than another. Other
factors could have caused
differences in the women's
cancer rates.
But the results will
help doctors counsel
their patients, said Dr.
Virginia Kaklamani of
Northwestern University's


Feinberg School of
Medicine in Chicago, who
wrote an accompanying edi-
torial in the journal.
"I'll use it mostly in talk-
ing to people considering
genetic testing," Kaklamani
said. "I can tell them, 'If
we know you test posi-
tive, there are things to
do that will help you live
longer."'


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*Other minimally invasive
treatment


Q: Will I need just one
shot?
A: Most people will,
but any children under 9
getting their first-ever flu
vaccine will need two, a
month apart, to prime their
immune systems.
Q: What if my child's
first-ever vaccine was last
year and she got one dose
of seasonal and one dose of
swine flu vaccine?
A: She wasn't primed
enough and needs her
two doses this year, said
Dr. Michael Brady of
Nationwide Children's
Hospital, who co-authored
the American Academy of
Pediatrics flu vaccination
guidelines out Monday.
Q: Will there be enough
vaccine?
A: Manufacturers
project 170 million doses.
Obviously that won't cover
the entire population,
but the CDC knows its
near-universal vaccination
policy won't spark a stam-
pede for shots. Before


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last year, flu vaccine was
recommended for 85
percent of Americans but
only about a third got vac-
cinated. Last year nearly
all 114 million doses of
seasonal vaccine were
used, but as the swine
flu outbreak slowed, just
90 million doses of the
special vaccine were used
out of nearly 162 million
eventually produced for
the general public.
Q: Who's at high risk
from flu?
A: Young children,
anyone 50 or older, any-
one with chronic medical
conditions such as asthma
or heart disease, preg-
nant women. Also, health
workers and caregivers of
infants can infect the vul-
nerable unless vaccinated.
Q: Who can use the,
nasal spray vaccine?
A: FluMist is for
healthy people 2 to 49, no
pregnancy or underlying
health conditions.
Q: When should vacci-
nation start?
A: Chain pharmacies
already have started vacci-
nating; protection will last
all winter. It takes about
two weeks to kick in, and
flu typically starts circulat-
ing around November.
Q: How do I know it's
safe?
A: Unprecedented safety
monitoring last year turned
up no rare side effects from
the special swine flu-only
vaccine sold in the United
States. "We're hoping a lot
of the myths people had
about the influenza vaccine
may be a little bit less of a
concern," said pediatrics
specialist Brady.
Abroad, a few reports
of narcolepsy after a
European swine flu vac-
cine are being probed;
that vaccine didn't sell
here. An Australian sea-
sonal vaccine dosed for
young children won't
be sold here after being .
linked to some fever-
related seizures in that
country.


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@oakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, September 2, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

GATORS
Gator Club
social today
The North Florida
Gator Club is hosting a
kickoff social at 6 p.m.
today at the home of
John and Betty Norris at
1671 SE Inglewood Ave.
Hank Astengo of TV-20
Sports is guest speaker.
Dinner will.be provided
by the club. Bring lawn
chairs.
For details, call Bob at
752-3333.
SEMINOLES
Kickoff Tailgate
Party today
The Lake City
Seminole Club is hosting
a Kickoff Tailgate Party
from 6-9 p.m. today at
the Lake City Elks Club
on Lake DeSoto. Fans
are invited to bring their
favorite food to kick off
Seminole football.
For details, call Steve
Gordon at 3.65-5413.
AAU CROSS COUNTRY
Eye of the Tiger
meeting today
The AAU Eye of the
Tiger cross country team
for sixth- through
eighth-grade girls and
boys has a fall season
information meeting
for parents and runners
at 5:15 p.m. today at
Alligator Park.
For details, contact
coach April Morse
eanbz@bellsouth.net.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White fall
registration set
Fort White Youth
Baseball has fall league
registration set for
5-7 p.m. today and
Sept. 9, and 10 a.m. to
2.p.m. Sept. 11 at the
concession stand in the
South Columbia Sports
Complex. Cost is $50
for ages 7-12 and $55 for
ages 13-15. A birth
certificate isrequired for
new players.
For details, call
Tammy Sharpe at
867-3825 or 755-1519.
CHS SWIMMING
Moe's Night set
for Sept. 13
Columbia High's swim
team has a Moe's Night
fundraiser planned for
5-8 p.m. Sept. 13.
For details, call the
pool at. 755-8195.
CHEERLEADING
Columbia Cheer
sign-up Saturday
Columbia Cheer has
registration for little
league cheerleaders from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday
at Southside Recreation
Center. Cost is $90.
For details, call Wilda
Drawdy at 292-4668.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
* Fort White High
volleyball vs. Suwannee
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
* Columbia High
volleyball vs. Ed White
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Friday
* Columbia High
football vs. Brooks
County High, 7:30 p.m.
* Fort White High
football vs. Madison


County High, 7:30 p.m.


Strong start


Week one filled
with big games
to kickoff season.
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
It's sort of like starting
the season with a bowl
game.
For the third straight
year, the Georgia Dome in
Atlanta is the site for one
of the biggest games of col-
lege football's long opening
weekend.
No. 21 LSU faces No. 18
North Carolina on Saturday
night, making the Chick-fil-
A Kickoff Game 3 for 3 in
matching teams ranked in
the Top 25.
It seems like a great
idea: Find two good teams,


one from the Southeastern,
Conference and one
from the Atlantic Coast
Conference - both schools
located a reasonable drive
or short plane ride from
Atlanta - and have them
start .the season against
each other while most of
the other top programs
are playing patsies. Add in
events such as a cook-off,
tailgates and a fanfest, and
- bingo! - you've got that
(minor) bowl game atmo-
sphere.
"Let's do the Daytona
500 of college football,"
said Gary Stokan, CEO and
president of the Chick-Fil-
A Bowl, recalling what he
was shooting for after offi-
cials in Atlanta had their
PICKS continued on 2B


Opening


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 5, 2009, file photo LSU cornerback Patrick Peterson (left) leaps as he leads
Charles Scott (32), Trindon Holliday and others to the field to play Washington in an NCAA
college football game in Seattle.


defeat


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Haley Dicks (14) and Jessie Bates (13) stand by as they watch Arden Sibbernsen (15) return the ball
against Fort White High Thursday.

Lady Tigers fall to Union County


From staff reports

Fort White High
improved to 2-0 on the sea-
son, while the Columbia
High Lady Tigers opened
up the season with a loss to
Union County.
The Lady Indians got a
district win on the road
against Williston in five
sets 25-20, 19-25, 22-25,
25-10 and 15-12.
"We went on the road to
pick up our second win in
Willison's hot, hot gym,"


Fort White coach Doug
Wohlstein said. "We were
down 2-1 heading into the
third set, and to come back
like that was a pretty big
district win."
. Brigitte Lapuma led
the Lady Indians in kills
with 11 in the match.
She also had eight digs.
Sarah Stringfellow had
21 digs to lead the team.
Alison Wrench led with 32
assists.
Columbia was on the
wrong end of the five-set


game. The Lady Tigers fell
24-26, 26-24, 24-26, 25-21
and 11-15.
"This is the most talent-
ed team I have coached
at CHS, but until we learn
how to compete, we will
not reach our potential,"
Columbia coach Casie
McCallister said. "The
team has the capability of
beating everyone on our
schedule, but until we
develop a hunger for win-
ning, we will fall short of
my expectations."


Kelbie Ronsonet led the
Lady Tigers in kills with 11.
She also had eight blocks
and two aces. Taylor Messer
had nine kills, eight blocks,
two aces and four digs. Beth
Williams had 26 assists to
lead Columbia. Haley Dicks
had 15 service points, eight
kills and four aces.
Both teams are.in town
tonight. Columbia plays
Ed White High in a dis-
trict game at 6:30 p.m. Fort
White takes on Suwannee
High at 6:30 p.m.


Rivalries

renewed

Richardson hosts
Bradford Middle
at 7 p.m. tonight.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County's three
middle schools will again
play each other in football
in 2010.
Richardson Middle
School will be the first to -..
see action when the Wolves
host Bradford Middle
School at 7 p.m. today at
Columbia High Stadium.
'We are dedicating the
season to Kenny Johnson
Jr.," head coach Al Nelson
said. "He coached ard was
a teacher at Richardson. We
will honor his wife, Toni, at
the game."
Nelson, former wrestling
and JV football head.coach
at CHS, takes over as head
coach at Richardson this
season.
Lake City Middle School
also has a new head coach
in Billy Jennings. The
Falcons open on the road
against Bolles School at
5 p.m. Tuesday.
Mike Hunter returns
as head coach for Fort
White Middle School. The
Indians open at home at.
7 p.m. Tuesday against
Richardson.
Lake City hosts FortWhite
at Memorial Stadium on
Oct. 19 and the Commanders
Bowl between the Falcons
and Wolves is Oct. 26 at
Columbia High Stadium.
Richardson volleyball
begins on the road today,
and Fort White hosts a tri-
match of the three schools
on Tuesday.


No tempting fate


Miami opens up
season against
FAMU today.
By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
MIAMI - Damien Berry
simply could not keep a
'lr.ii.hlt face.
Miami's starting run-
ning back was sitting in the
Hurricanes' football meet-
ing room 'earlier this week,
inii-itin that Thursday
night's season-opener
against Florida A&M was
forefront in his team's
mind, and nothing - not
even the fast-approaching
Sept. 11 meeting at No. 2
Ohio State - could disrupt
that focus.


"We don't look over
nobody. We just go out
there and play to the best of
our ability," Berry was say-
ing, his smirk turning into
a grin, the grin turning into
a giggle, the giggle turning
into all-out laughter.
"Had to try," Berry said.
Not looking ahead to
Week 2 might be the tough-
est task the 13th-ranked
Hurricanes face in Week 1
against the Rattlers, who
have played Miami seven
times since 1980 and lost
them all by a combined 355-
49 count.
Miami rolled past Florida
A&M 48-16 a year ago, and
clearly has a huge edge in
size, speed and talent over
the Football Championship
Subdivision opponent.


"I think one of the chal-
lenges you have to have
when playing a team like
Florida A&M is making
sure that your guys under-
stand that part of the prepa-
rations, what we've done
in August and throughout
camp, (means you) have to
go through the process of
playing this team," Miami
coach Randy Shannon said.
"And staying focused."
The Hurricanes were
9-4 a year ago, and believe
they're one of the teams
capable of winning the
Atlantic Coast Conference
this season. While whatev-
er happens Thursday night
won't help or hinder those
plans, Miami knows not
getting off to a fast start in
2010 would be considered a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a Nov. 21, 2009, file photo, Miami running back Damien
Berry gestures as he walks off the field after an NCAA
college football game against Duke in Miami.

colossal disappointment, their biggest game of the
"I know they're going to season, probably. So we've
come out there and play us got to go out there and
like its their Super Bowl," take care of all the little
Miami left tackle Orlando things ... and get us pre-
Franklin said. "They're pared for what we're
going to come out here going to see later on in the
and play us hard. This is season.















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
BASKETBALL
9:30 a.m.
ESPN2 - FIBA, World Championship,
preliminary round, Tunisia vs. U.S., at
Istanbul,Turkey
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN - Southern Miss. at South
Carolina
8 p.m.
FSN - N. Illinois at Iowa St.
8:30 p.m.
VERSUS - Pittsburgh at Utah
II p.m.
ESPN - Southern Cal at Hawaii
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGCr- European PGATour, European
Masters, first round, at Crans Montana,
Switzerland
3 p.m.
TGC' - Nationwide Tour, Mylan
Classic, first round, at Canonsburg, Pa.
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 - U.S. Open, second round,
at NewYork
7 p.m. . \
ESPN2 - U.S. Open, second round,
at NewYork

FOOTBALL

Top 25 games


No. 2
7:30 p.m.
No. 13
7:30 p.m.
No. 14


Today's Games
Ohio State vs. Marshall,

I Miami vs. Florida A&M,


Southern Cal at Hawaii,


II p.m.
*No. 15 Pittsburgh at Utah, 8:30 p.m.

.NFL preseason

Today's Games
Buffalo at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.
Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
New England at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 8 p.m
New Orleans at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Baltimore at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Houston, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
Green Bay at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Washington at Arizona, 10 p.m.

NFL calendar

Saturday - Rostercutdown to
maximum of 53 players.
Sept. 9 - Opening game of regular
season.

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 82 50 , .621 -
Tampa Bay 81 51 .614 I
Boston 74 58 .561 8
Toronto 69 63 .523 13
Baltimore 49 83 .371 33
Central Division
W L. Pct GB
Minnesota 76 56 .576 -
Chicago 72 60 .545 4
Detroit 65 67 .492 II
Kansas City 56 76 .424 20
Cleveland 53 79 .402 23
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 74 58 .561 -
Oakland. 65 66 .496 8h.
LosAngeles 64 69 .481 10%O
Seattle 52 80 .394 22
Tuesday's Games
Baltimore 5, Boston 2
Chicago White Sox 4, Cleveland 3
N.Y.Yankees 9, Oakland 3
Toronto 13,Tampa Bay 5
Minnesota 4, Detroit 3
Kansas City 10,Texas 9
Seattle 3, L.A.Angels I
Wednesday's Games
Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 4
Boston at'Baltimore (n)
Oakland at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Toronto at Tampa Bay (n)
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
Texas at Kansas City (n)
L.A.Angels at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Oakland (Braden 9-9) at N.Y.Yankees
(Sabathia 18-5), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (Matsuzaka 8-4) at Baltimore
(Bergesen 6-9), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 14-8) at Minnesota
(S.Baker 12-9), 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Tomlin 2-3) at Seattle
(Fister 4-10), 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Boston,
7:10 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Texas at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Atlanta 77 55
Philadelphia 74 58
Florida 66 65
New York 65 67
Washington 57 76
Central Division
W L
Cincinnati 77 55
St. Louis 69 62
Milwaukee 62 70
Houston 62 71
Chicago 57 77
Pittsburgh 44 89
West Division
W L
San Diego 76 55
San Francisco 73 60


Pct GB
.583 -
.561 3
.504 10'
.492 12
.429 20'/

Pct GB
.583 -
.527 7'h
.470 15
.466 15IS
.425 21
.331 33'h

Pct GB
.580 -
.549 4


Colorado 69 62 .527 7
Los Angeles 68 65 .51 I 9
Arizona 54 79 .406 23
Tuesday's Games
Cincinnati 8, Milwaukee 4
Atlanta 9, N.Y. Mets 2
Florida I,Washington 0, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 14, Chicago Cubs 7
Houston 3, St. Louis 0
Arizona 7, San Diego 4
Philadelphia 8, LA. Dodgers 4
San Francisco 5, Colorado 2
Wednesday's Games
Houston 5, St. Louis 2
Chicago Cubs 5, Pittsburgh 3
.Philadelphia 5, LA. Dodgers I
San Diego at Arizona (n)
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (n)
N.Y. Met; at Atlanta (n)
Washington at Florida (n)
Colorado at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 10-9) at Atlanta
(T.Hudson 15-5), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Blanton 6-6) at Colorado
(J.Chacin 7-9), 7:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
N.Y. Mets at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers,
10:10 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week.

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Emory Healthcare 500
Site: Hampton, Ga,
Schedule: Saturday, practice (Speed,
II a.m.-2:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 4:30-
6:30 p.m.); Sunday, race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN,
7-11:30 p.m.).
Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway
(tri-oval, 1.54 miles).
Race distance: 500.5 miles, 325 laps.
Next race: Air Guard 400, Sept.
II, Richmond International Raceway,
Richmond,Va..
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
Great Clips 300
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Saturday, practice,
qualifying (Speed, 2:30-4:30 p.m.), race,
7 p.m. (ESPN2, 6:30-10 p.m.).
Track:Atlanta Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300.3 miles, 195 laps.
Next .race: Richmond 250, Sept.
10, Richmond International Raceway,
Richmond,Va.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Built Ford Tough 225
Site: Sparta, Ky.
Schedule: Today, practice;' Friday,
qualifying (Speed, 6-7:30 p.m.), race, 8 p.m.
(Speed, 7-10:30 p.m.).
Track: Kentucky Speedway (tri-oval,
1.5 miles).'
Race distance: 225 miles, 150 laps.
Next race: TheRaceDayRaffleSeries.
com 175, Sept. 18, New Hampshire Motor
Speedway Loudon, N.H.
INDYCAR
Kentucky 300
Site: Sparta, Ky.
Schedule: Friday, practice, qualifying
(Versus. 5-6 p.m.); Saturday, race, 8:45 p.m.
(Versus, 8-1 I p.m.).
Track: Kentucky- Speedway (tri-oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: Indy Japan 300, Sept. 18,
Twin Ring Motegi, Motegi, Japan.
Online: http://www.indycar.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Mac Tools U.S. Nationals
Site: Clermont, Ind.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying, Sunday, qualifying (ESPN2,
10 a.m.-2 p.m., 5-7 p.m.); Monday, final
eliminations (ESPN2, 1-6 p.m.).
Track: O'Reilly Raceway Park.
Next event: O'ReillyAuto Parts NHRA
Nationals, Sept. 16-19, zMax Dragway,
Concord, N.C.
Online: http://www.nhra.com
FORMULA ONE
Next race: Italian Grand Prix, Sept. 12,
Autodromo Nazionale di Monza, Monza,
Italy.
Online: http://www.formulal.com

BASKETBALL

WNBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlanta 2,Washington 0
Atlanta 95,Washington 90
Atlanta 101,Washington 77
NewYork I,Indiana I
NewYork 85, Indiana 73
Indiana 75, New York 67
Wednesday
Indiana at NewYork (n)
WESTERN CONFERENCE



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

SHARAJ I I


MOM TRASHEP
JUNIOR'S 5OCKK
BECAUSE IT
WASN'T ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BOOTY OUTDO PREFER GLANCE
Answer: What happened when the poor player joined
the poker game - HE GOT POORER


PICKS: Virginia Tech over Boise St.

Continued From Page 1B


Seattle 2, Los Angeles 0
Seattle 79, Los Angeles 66
Seattle 81, Los Angeles 66
Phoenix 2, San Antonio 0
Phoenix 106, San Antonio 93
Phoenix 92, San Antonio 73
CONFERENCE FINALS
Western Conference
Seattle vs. Phoenix
Today
Phoenix at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Sunday
Seattle at Phoenix. 3 p.m.

World championships

GROUP B
Wednesday
Croatia 84, Tunisia 64
United States 88, Iran 5 I
Slovenia 80, Brazil 77
Today
United States vs.Tunisia, 9:30 a.m.
Slovenia vs. Iran, Noon
Brazil vs. Croatia, 2:30 p.m.

TENNIS

U.S. Open singles.

At The USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Center, NewYork
Late Tuesday
First Round
Men
Julien Benneteau, France, def. Radek
Stepanek (28), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-2,
4-6.,674. )
David Ferrer (10), Spain, def.Alexandr
Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3.
Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Pere
Riba, Spain, 3-6, 6-1I, 6-4,4-6, 7-6 (1I).
James Blake, United States, def. Kristof
Vliegen, Belgium, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4.
Benjamin Becker, Germany, def. Daniel
Brands, Germany, 7-6 (I), 7-6 (5), 6-4.
Florent Serra, France, def. Florian
Mayer, Germany, 7-5, 6-2, 6-0.
Fernando Verdasco (8), Spain, def.
Fabio Fognini, Italy, I-6,7-5, 6-1,4-6,6-3.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Maximo
Gonzalez, Argentina, 7-5, 7-5, 6-I.
David Nalbandian (31), Argentina, def.
Rik deVoest, South Africa, 7-6 (4), 3-6,6-4,
6-7 (6), 6-4.
Rafael Nadal (I),'Spain, def. Teymuraz
Gabashvili, Russia, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Women
Maria Kirilenko (23), Russia, def.
Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech
Republic, 7-5, 6-4.
Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def.
Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-2, 4-6,
7-5.
Chang Kai-chen, Taiwan, def. Carla
Suarez Navarro, Spain, 6-2, 6-4.
Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, def.
Yaroslava Shvedova (30), Kazakhstan, 6-4,
3-6, 6-2.
Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, def.
Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 6-3,
6-4.
Maria Sharapova (14), Russia, def.
Jarmila Groth, Australia, 4-6,6-3,6-I.
Vera Zvonareva (7), Russia, def.Zuzana,
Kucova, Slovakia, 6-2, 6- I.
Kaia Kanepi (31); Estonia, def. Alize
Cornet, France, 3-6, 6-I, 6-0.
Bethanie Mattek-San.ds, United States,
def. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 4-6,
6-4,6-1.7
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. CoCo
Vandeweghe, United States, 6-1,6-0.
Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Nadia
Petrova (17), Russia, 6-2,4-6, 7-6 (4).
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, def.
Chelsey Gullickson, United States,' 6-1,
6-1.

Wednesday
Men
First Round
Victor Hanescu, Romania, def. Carlos
Berlocq, Argentina, 6-2, 6-4,6-3.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def.
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 6-3, 6-2, 7-6 (4).
Sam Querrey (20), United States, def.
Bradley Klahn, United States, 6-3, 4-6,
7-5, 6-4.
Dustin .Brown, Jamaica, def. Ruben
Ramirez Hidalgo, Spain, 6-4,7-6 (6), 7-5.
Nicolas Almagro (14), Spain, def. Potito
Starace, Italy, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4, 7-6 (5).
Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Andreas
Seppi, Italy, 2-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-2, 6-3.
* Ryan Harrison, United States, def. Ivan
Ljubicic (15), Croatia, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-3,
6-4.
Michael Llodra, France, def. Tomas
Berdych (7), Czech Republic, 7-6 (3),
6-4, 6-4.
Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Peter
Luczak,Australia, 6-7 (8), 7-5, 6-4, 6-2.
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Lukas
Lacko, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2.
Women
Second Round
Gisela Dulko, Argentina, def. Victoria
Azarenka (10), Belarus, 5-1, retired.
Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, def. Zheng Jie
(21), China, 6-3, 6-0.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (20), Russia,
def. Sania Mirza, India, 6-2, 6-4.
Virginie Razzano, France, def. Marion
Bartoli (13), France,7-5, 6-4.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


efforts to get in on the
Bowl Championship Series
rebuffed. '"We have created
that BCS experience at the
front side of the season."
That might be a stretch,
but they do make a tempt-
ing pitch to the schools
playing the game.
Organizers lure teams with
the promise of a payout of
around $2 million - Stokan
said North Carolina should
pocket around $1.75 million,
which is more than the Tar
Heels would make for a home
game - and some prime
time television exposure.
Still, it's not easy to lock
up attractive matchups..
Top teams from tough con-
ferences tend to be cau-
tious about loading up their
nonconference, schedules,
even though an early loss
to a good team is usually
not a season-killer.
The picks:
Thursday
Marshall (plus 28%) at
No. 2 Ohio State
Thursday night opener
for the Buckeyes! What's
next, playing Michigan in
October? ... OHIO STATE
42-10.
Florida A&M (no line)
at No. 13 Miami
Easy start to tough
schedule for Hurricanes ...
MIAMI 55-14.
No. 14 USC (minus
21 %) at Hawaii
It's sort of like starting
season with a bowl game
for Trojans ... USC 36-17.
No. 15 Pittsburgh
(plus 3) at Utah
Tough place for Pitt to
break in new QB ... UTAH
27-21.


Saturday
San Jose State (plus
37%/2) at No. 1 Alabama
Mark Ingram will not be
missed - yet... ALABAMA
48-7.
Miami of Ohio (plus
35) at No. 4 Florida
Tim Tebow will not be
missed - yet ... FLORIDA
50-14.
No. 5 Texas (minus
30%) at Rice
Longhorns get that run-
ning game going ... TEXAS
45-10.
No. 6 TCU (minus
13%) vs. Oregon State at
Arlington, Texas
Beavers never pass up a
tough game, though they
might want to now and then
... TCU 28-17.
Utah State (plus 34) at
No. 7 Oklahoma
Sooners starters get half
day ... OKLAHOMA 56-17.
Western Kentucky
(plus 37) at No. 8
Nebraska
Hilltoppers have lost 20
straight ... NEBRASKA 40-7.
Eastern Illinois (no
line) at No. 9 Iowa
Hawkeyes needed great
escape in last year's opener
against FCS team ... IOWA
35-10.
New Mexico (plus 34)
at No. 11 Oregon
Jeremiah Masoli will not
be missed - maybe at all
... OREGON 52-14.
No. 12 Wisconsin
(minus 20%) at UNLV
Another dicey trip to
Vegas . for Badgers ...
WISCONSIN 31-17.
South Carolina State
(no line) at No. 16
Georgia Tech


LOCAL RACING


Columbia Motorsports Park

Results of races at Columbia Motorsports Park on
Aug. 28:
SPORTSMAN
1. 21 Sean Monaghan, 2. 07 Jeff Prescott, 3. 7J Jason
Parker, 4. 14 Oral Tanner, 5. 76 Jim Higginbotham, 6. 1F
Bobby Ford, 7. 06 Josh Wise, 8. 16 Brian Hull, 9. 8 Wesley
Keller, DNS-20 Tony Kuhr; '-
PURE STOCK
1. 16 Eddie Gainey, 2. 58 Larry Welter Jr., 3. 22 Nevin
Gainey, 4. 39 Tim Alldredge, 5. 26 James Cook, 6.-5
Jerrelton Floyd, 7. 81 Morris Richardson, 8. 96 Don Cruce,
9. 12 Jason Garver, 10. 7P Tim Parrott,
HORNETS
1. 98 Todd Brown, 2. 28 Wesley Daugherty, 3. 46 Kim
Alldredge, 4. 69 Mark Copeland, 5. 1 Brandon Henault, 6.
1 Robert 0' Neail;


ACROSS

1 Glazier's units
6 Soaks up the
sun
11 Hate
12 Peddle
13 Elegant
14 Valuable fur
15 Uptight
16 Warm-water
shark
17 Grime
19 Cudgel one's
*brains
23 PIN promtpter
26 Lock
companions
28 Mine find
29 Prickly plants
31 Less
polluted
33 Waned
34 Lingerie item
35 Fair-hiring
abbr.
36 Trivial mistake
39 Cozy place to
sit


40 Sp. miss
,19 r~~i: ni L iE :l,


.4z tmi or sene1
44 "Hawkeye"
Pierce.
46 Locales S
51 Bay leaf source
54 Lagoon
surrounders 0
55 Chant
56 Omen
'seeker
57 Tolerate
58 Wading bird

DOWN

1 Pierre's dad
2 Two fives for
-- C
3 Monster's loch
4 Winding curves
5 Messy place S
6 Fox's sound
7 Chain mail 12
8 Travel on pow- 16
der
9 Tenn. neighbor 18
10 Sault - Marie
11 Insect killer 20


V-8 BOMBERS
1. 58 Larry Welter Jr., 2. 85 Larry Welter Sr., 3. 29 Rick
Montalvo, 4. 7 ShAwn DeSotli, 5. 11 Todd Breer, 6. 77 Dan
SBrkowitz, DNS-8 Mark Chinell;
E-MODS
1. 01 J:F. McCtellan,.2. 17 Nevin Gainey, 3. 12 John
Zedek, 4. 6 Mickey Wright, 5. 3 Travis Coffey, 6. 409 J.D.
Coffey, 7. 31 HeathertBell;
OUTLAW PRO SERIES
1. 24 Randy Glick, 2. 2 Harvey Johnson, 3. 28 Jake
Leeson, 4. 1 Glen Cormican, 5. 23 Jerry Heflin;
DAARA SPRINTS
1. 08 Dave Casa, 2. 77 Jack Sapp, 3. 5 Don Farnum,
4. 2 Bob Jordan, 5. 6 Jerry Paquin, 6. 60 Janice Strickland,
7. 56 Josh Rynd, DNS-80 Fred Strickland;
DAARA STOCK CARS
1. 93x Pat McNear, 2. 10 Stephan Abbott, 3. 18 Traci
Hess, 4.'0 Stephen Miller, 5. 38 Steve Parrish.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


Substantial
"Simpsons"
bartender
Gives the
go-ahead
Large artery


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


21 Move furtively
22 Deborah of
old films
23 Trellis
24 Where Lhasa
is
25 Ginnie -
27 Resort
29 Wax makers
30 Country rtes.
32 Web site
34 Student stat
37 Punch
server
38 Novelist
Levin
41 Moses'
brother
43 Enjoy the beach
45 Advance, as
money
47 Sound from
Simba
48 "Blondie" kid
49 Thicke of
"Growing
Pains"
50 Job applica-
tion info
51 Fleur-de- -
52 Crumb-
toter
53 Actress Hagen
54 Tool handle
wood


�2010 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


|E|U| nal vi | r


|ADA T I NS ASJ A


ORI E S T|I|C KED

UEDE� Lt-EHAP�


.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Yellow Jackets run it up
... GEORGIA TECH 48-10.
Tennessee Tech (no
line) at No. 17 Arkansas
Pass-happy hogs ...
ARKANSAS 55-14.
No. 18 North Carolina
(plus 11'/) vs. No. 21
LSU at Atlanta
How can Heels possibly
be prepared to play ... LSU
24-14.
Youngstown State (no
line) at No. 19 Penn
State
Lions roar ... PENN
STATE 45-7.
Samford (no line) at
No. 20 Florida State
Seminoles bounce Bobby
Bowden's alma mater ...
FLORIDA STATE 50-14.
Arkansas State (plus
31) at No. 22 Auburn
Cameron Newton
era starts for Auburn ...
AUBURN 42-17.
Louisiana-Lafayette
(plus 28) at No. 23
Georgia
Aaron Murray era starts
for Bulldogs ... GEORGIA
44-14.
Coastal Carolina (no
line) at No. 25 West
Virginia
Cue John Denver ...
WEST VIRGINIA 42-13.
Monday
No. 3 Boise State
(minus 21) vs. No.
10 Virginia Tech at
Landover, Md.
All that talk about Boise
State making national title
run, done ... VIRGINIA
TECH 34-21.
-
Last season total: 233-77
(straight); 151-139-4 (vs.
points).


(


SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010


YAIWAR




UNRATT
7~,7~ , ,
1 71 __ 1 /











ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010 3B


DILBERT


BLONDIE
SUMSTEAO! WHAT OH...JUST
IN BLAZES ARE CLEANING AND
YOU DOING?! POLISHING THE
INSIST OF MY








BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS
I AW ANPI ATI4MF M ToP Ap N J4U6TI AVEP
AE WHT I--ATAGMTKIPJ
A -r'RA5 !

^ ^ ^*J


GARFIELD


YA MEAN
HE ALWAYS
LANDS ON
HIS FEET ?


I MEAN HE NAPS
TWENTY-TWO
HOURS A DAY !!


B.C.

O.F AT THIS ,w 'oA, "Pw THI S IHAS e'T TO
s OFTIS i WOA, ow ES E&&
.t itp s~r!


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Son's 'no secrets' policy irks

his confiding mother


DEAR ABBY: My
son "Clay" has been mar-
ried seven years. There
are times I like to discuss
things of a personal na-
ture with him having to do
with our family, and I have
asked him not to mention
our talks with his wife.
These discussions have
nothing to do with her.
The problem is what-
ever he tells her, she re-
peats to her whole family.
I do not want our personal
problems and other mat-
ters to be known by every-
one.
My other son has no
trouble keeping our talks
just between us, but Clay
says he and his wife have
"no secrets" from each
other. Abby, is it OK to ask
a married son or daughter
not to divulge things to a
spouse that have nothing
to do with her or him? -
CONFIDENTIALLY IN
ST. LOUIS
DEAR CONFIDEN-
TIALLY: It's OK to ask;
it's also OK to say no.
When Clay married ,his
wife, she became part of
your family. Now that you
know your son keeps no
secrets from his wife, and
that she leaks like a sieve,


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
the better part of wisdom
would be to stop confiding
.in him. Don't you think?
DEAR ABBY: As a
therapist and regular read-
er, I was surprised and
dismayed by your advice
to 'Iubby in Purr-gatory"
(June 30). Apparently,
"Hubby" has grown an-
noyed with his wife's pre-
occupation with her two
cats.
Whatever blocks to
closeness have been cre-
ated for this couple are not
likely to be removed by
his demanding affection
and threatening infidelity
-. even in jest. (Re: your
comment, "He may adopt
a 'kitten' of his own.")'
People turn to excessive
. engagement with animals
because animals provide
warmth in easy, reliable
ways. Spouses would of-
ten do well to watch what
animals give and offer the
same things - especially


uncritical pleasure in each
other's company.
At the least, you could
have suggested "Hubby"
open a dialogue with his
wife about why she choos-
es the cats' company and
what he can do to be-equal-
ly appealing. - JULIE
IN RICHMOND, VA.,
CLINICAL PSYCHOLO-
GIST
DEAR JULIE: I'm sor-
ry you were dismayed. If
you read "Hubby's" letter
again you will see that he
tried "opening a dialogue"
-with his wife and got no-
where. She'has infandilized
the cats, which she calls
her "babies," to- assuage
her anxiety after her sons
moved out.
While some readers
assumed, I was "advisi g"
the husband to :'adopt a
'kitten' of his own," what I
was trying to convey was
that when a spouse (of ei-
ther sex, by the way) feels
ignored, unappreciated,
unloved or unimportant, it
is not uncommon for him
or her to seek valid tion
elsewhere. Inothc 'words,
I called it as I saw it.


I Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Taking on a new
project or investigating the
possibility of a personal or
business partnership is ap-
parent A pleasure trip is in
order but don't make impul-
sive plans. Research so you
can enjoy the experience.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Networking will
provide you with the con-
tacts you need to further
your plans and exploit your
ideas. The interaction you
have with others will help
you develop something
unique and serviceable.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Put your heart
on the line. Follow your
dreams and push for what's
important to you. Don't let
someone's impulsive deci-
sion or move cause you to
do something out of char-
acter that will set you back.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You may have to
rework some of your ideas
to accommodate the peo-
ple around you. Don't be
concerned that someone
doesn't agree with you. It's
only a matter of time before
you either convert or re-
move this person from your
life. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Love is apparent and
time put aside to spend
with someone special will


'THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

make you want.to do some-
thing to please. A few ad-
justments to your living
quarters or a move will be
exactly what you need to
grab someone's attention
and affection. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't let a financial
situation paralyze you. Talk
with confidence and you
will display how much you
have grown mentally. Being
self-assured will help you
attract offers whereby you
can implement your own
ideas. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You need a vacation or
' at least time to contemplate
your future and pursuing
the things you enjoy. Stop
doing what others want and
start implementing new
plans. Travel or a long dis-
tance move will help you ex-
plore new options. Don't sit
idle; take action. *****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Be aggressive
when it comes to business
ventures. You can make
things happen once you re-
alize you don't need anyone
to further your goals. Fol-
low through and present
and promote what you have
to offer. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): The person


you care for the most can
help you out now. Talk
from the heartland explain -
your desires in full - you
will get the response you
are looking for. Give and
take will be the name of
the game and the road to
the future. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You don't
have to rush when no one
else is. ready to make a
move. Use this time to de-
velop an idea or concept
and eventually you will be
able to turn it into a mon-
eymaker. Take care of per-
sonal paperwork, health
or settlements. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan.
20-Feb. 18): Talk about
your ideas and plans and
you will attract someone
who wants to share with
you. Money and good for-
tune are present and you
can end up with greater
cash flow as well as op-
portunities to get ahead.
Innovative thoughts will
bring monetary results.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Think before
you disrupt matters of a
personal or business part-
nership. You have to main-
tain a working relationship
with people if you want to
get ahead. Now is not the
time to let your emotions
,take over. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: 0 equals P
"P VUTPVUV EXSE PH P TDRZV
OSPAE EXSE HZDLUY PA .S XRWU
ITSZU, N DR T D R ZV A D E PWADYU PE.I
CUSREN." - WUDYWPS D'BUUHHU

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "But what is happiness except the simple harmony
between a man and the life he leads?" - Albert Camus
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 9-2


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


YOUVE NEVER ACTED ClE IN
OOR LIFE! WYO'RE CRABBW,
W'REBO YOE SELFIfH
ANDO qRE INCONSIeRATE!
WORE J05T"A6ITA"'(WNCTE'
As A PERON CAN 6 T!


J


i-lw


I'M AN "''NCUTIE"!





-\^ q-2-10


I WANT IT TO LOOK-
NICE IN CASE I EVER HAVE
ANYTHING TO PUT IN IT...




Lly J

�~- Ljf ~-^y vt- _:-L^ . '


IF I WEREN'T SO DOGGONED PROUD
THAT HE LEARNED THAT SARCASM
FROM ME - I HAVE FIRED -
HIM ON THE SPOTr





J~-------------~ -T ' -^' r | ---- -


O CALL qOV
''COTIE ".HA!
5r$AT LAeH1


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER










LAKE CITY REPORTER


Race: Emory Healthcare 500
Where: Atlanta Motor Speedway
When: Sunday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN
2009 winner: Kasey Kahne (right)


NASCAR THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010


Race: Great Clips 300
Where: Atlanta Motor Speedway
When: Saturday, 6:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN2
2009 winner: Kevin Harvick


Race: Built Ford Tough 225
Where: Kentucky Speedway
When: Friday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: SPEED
2009 winner: Ron Hornaday


On and off the track: 'Will the real NASCAR driver please stand up?'


S sometimes, 'when watching how
NASCAR drivers react off the track -
compared to how they behave behind
the wheel, the old TV game show "To Tell
the Truth" comes to mind.
At the end of the game show, where a
celebrity panel tries to decide which of the
three people before them is the central
character and which two are impostors, the
host asks: "Will the real (the central char-
acter's name) please stand up?"
Jeff Gordon, who usually is as pleasant
and professional as can be outside the car,
is at times a tiger behind the wheel.
So which is the real Jeff Gordon?
Here's what he had to say about the dif-
ferences in drivers off the track and on.
"I always like to think that on the race
track that's kind of your alter ego," he said,
adding that the environment on the track
affects behavior. "When you put the intensi-
ty that goes on inside the race car, especial-
ly at a place like Bristol ... the patience
level, the frustration level, is to me equally
as intense as it's ever been."
He said that it's not just race drivers
who get put in situations where a different
side of their personality comes out.
"If you're in a calm, controlled environ-
ment, then your emotions and your person-
ality is going to reflect on that," he said.
"You go into a highly intense environment
with a lot of pressure, a competitive
intense environment, it's going to affect
your personality and how you react to
things."
But Gordon said the bottom line answer
is that the person behind the wheel is clos-
er to who a driver really is.


"Ithfiiik ydu'ieally find out truly who you
are in those'moments, probably more so
than you do outside the race car in a more
controlled environment," he said.
Racing also has a way of affecting rela-


Jeff Gordon, driver of the No. 24 DuPont Chevrolet,
leads the field during July's Coke Zero 400 at Daytona
International Speedway. (NASCAR photo)


tionships between drivers."People who
might otherwise find lots in common and
get along well end up with strained rela-
tions because of situations.that occur on
the track.
Kevin Harvick said that's true of him
and Carl Edwards, a driver he's had a run-
in or two with over the years.
"Sometimes I just think people don't see
eye-to-eye on things," he said. "I enjoy rac-
ing on the race track with Carl (Edwards)
and that is all that matters.
"It doesn't really matter if he likes me or
if I like him, and I think'we both race each
other, and off the race track doesn't really
matter as long as on the race track we race
hard and enjoy racing with each other."
Edwards, who has had several on-track
incidents with Brad Keselowski this season
including intentionally wrecking him two
times, also talked about the differences in
the way a driver acts.inside and outside his
race car.
Interestingly, the in-car side of the usual-
ly affable Edwards seemed to come out
when asked to discuss the subject.
"It's really simple," he said. "I treat
everyone the way they treat me, I'm not
going to let somebody take advantage of
me. That's all there is to it. I don't think
I've ever gone out and been the aggressor
of a situation or a bully or anything like
that, but I'm not going to let somebody
take advantage of me ...
"The people who know me and know
what I'm about, it makes pretty good sense
to them, but, for some reason, I guess some
people don't like that or don't understand
it."


Said wins in Montreal by a hair
It hasn't happened in a long time, but on
Sunday at Montreal an underdog driver and
team finally won a major NASCAR race.
Boris Said, the road course specialist,
drove an underfunded Ford owned by Robby
Benton to victory, defeating Max Papis in a
near photo finish at the end of the NAPA
Auto Parts 200 at Circuit Gilles Villeneuve.
' The race saw many of the top contenders
drop out before the finish, but on the final
lap, Said, Papis and hometown favorite
Jacques Villeneuve were still in contention.
Said took the lead when Robby Gordon ran
out of gas with one lap to go. Then Papis
nosed into the lead on the next-to-last corner
only to see Said storm back in the final turn.
The two ran what amounted to a drag race
to the finish line with Said nosing ahead by
a .012-second margin. It was the closest
Natiobnwide finish on a road course and the
fifth closest overall in series history.
S"I don't think we had the fastest car today,"
Said told reporters after the race. "But we
definitely had the smartest race strategy
with Scott Zipadelli as the crew chief, the
first time I ever worked with him.
"We had great communication. He called a
great race, and it was really about managing
the race track, managing your brakes.
"I'm shocked ... overwhelmed. I thought I
was going to cry, but I didn't."
It was his first Nationwide win after nine
years of trying. He has one Camping World
Truck Series victory, at Infineon Raceway, in
1998, but otherwise had been shut out in
NASCAR competition.

Kyle Busch keeps on winning
Love him or hate him, it's hard to dispute
Kyle Busch's ability town NASCAR races.
After sweeping the weekend At Bristol '
Motor Speedway, Busch added a fourth-
straight NASCAR win
on Friday at
Chicagoland Speedway
in the EnjoyIllinois.com
225 Camping World
Truck Series races.
It was his fourth
truck triumph in nine
starts this season, and it
gave him 17 major
NASCAR wins this sea-
son, including three in
Cup and 10 in the
Nationwide Series.
Busch, driving his Kyle Busch
own Kyle Busch (NASCAR Photo)
Motorsports Toyota, dominated the race,
leading three tirpes for 121 laps, but he had
to hold off series points leader Todd Bodine
on a green-white-checkered-flag run to the
finish to seal the deal.
In his post-race interview, Busch acknowl-
edged that it takes more than a great driver
to run up the numbers he's posted this sea-
son.
"It comes down to a great team and great
equipment and stuff like that," he said. "I've
really been fortunate to be put in some of
these situations, and it's a lot of fun to do it."

Smith re-signs to drive No. 78
Colorado-based Furniture Row Racing has
signed driver Regan Smith to a contract
extension that will keep him in the No. 78
Chevrolet through the 2012 season.
The 26-year-old New York native is 30thi
in points with a best finish of 14th at
Atlanta Motor Speedway earlier this year.


-- '-- e:1 .: ... -




INTO BACK TO SCHOOL
Take advantage of our
special coupon for these items.
"See Store Personnel for Details"

Save Sl on any 1 Kellogg's Brand


Cereal when you purchase one
gallon of Gustafson Farm Milk.


SEPTEMBER 17 & 18
At the Columbia County Fairgrounds


-- . . .' 1 . .,
^ It .O V "0:I ^'L
'I M 'SB '.'''' ' A j''*f. "K . S'.'


NEXT


UP...


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Classified Department: 755-5440


BU- I



rssnnn^


i S E L .ITi


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010

Lake City Reporter





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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO: 12-2010-CA-000181
BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION
PLAINTIFF
VS.
SHAWN A. WALKER; DEANNA
L. WALKER; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIM-
ANTS; GTE FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION F/K/A NORTH FLORIDA
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated August 23,
2010 entered in Civil Case No. 12-
2010-CA-000181 of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for COLUMBIA County -Court-
house located at 173 NE HERNAN-
DO AVENUE in LAKE CITY, Flor-
ida, at 11:00 AM on the 29th day of
September, 2010 the following de-
scribed property as set-forth in said
Summary Final Judgment; to-wit:
LOT 18, CEDAR HILLS SUBDIVI-
SION, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT, THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 134, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1993' DOU-
BLEWIDE MOBILE HOME WITH
VIN # FLHMLCP3979308A AND
FLHMLCP3979308B.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pend6ns, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 23rd day of August, 2010.
P DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID.J.
STERN, P.A., ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF
900 South Pine Island Road Suite
400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954)233-8000 .
05523678
September 2,9, 2010


Notice of Sale
Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell
at Public Auction the following vehi-
cles to satisfy lien pursuant to.Chap-
ter 713.585 of the Florida Statutes on
September 16,.201'Q at 10 A.M..Auc-
tion .will occur where each
vehicle/vessel is located. Lot #
012290 1996 Pontiac Bonneville,
VIN # 1G2HX52KOT4206334
Located at: Lake City Auto Repair,
llc. 736 S. Marion Ave, Lake City,
FL 32025 Owner: Safeco Insurance.
PO Box 3838, Spokane, WA 99220
Customer: Nathaniel Stachen 996 SE
Putnam St. Apt 101, Lake City, FL
32055 Lienholder: None Lien,
Amount: $5410.36
a) Notice to the owner or lienor that
he has a right to a hearing prior to
the scheduled date of sale by filing
with the Clerk of the Court.
b) Owner has the right to recover
possession of vehicle by posting
bond in accordance with Florida
Statutes Section 559.917.
c) Proceeds from the sale of the vehi-
cle after payment lien claimed by lie-
nor will be deposited with the Clerk
of the Court.
Any persons) claiming any
interests) in the above vehicle con-
tact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc.,
(954) 920-6020 All auctions are held
with reserve Some of the vehicles
may have been released prior to auc-
tion LIC # AB-0001256
05523672
September 2, 2010'







Home Improvements

Davis Repair. All Home improve-
ments. Reliable 25 years exp.
Lic & Ins. FREE estimates. Larry
352-339-5056 or 386-454-1878

Do you need a Handy Man?
Pressure washing, rescreening,
yard work, leak repair, small house
repairs & upkeep. 386-209-1105


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg..


Services

Cleaning Done Your Way!
Do YOU need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Bush Hog 5 ac $249. Finish mow-
ing, land clearing, new driveways
& repairs. Gravel or Concrete. Lic.
CBC 013063 & Ins. 386-497-3219


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 10-190-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF LOOMIS
CARL SESSIONS,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
LOOMIS CARL SESSIONS, de-
ceased, whose date of death was Au-
gust 4, 2010; is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division; File Num-
ber 10-190-CP, the address of which
is 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-.
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN.THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All..other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS SEP-
TEMBER 2, 2010
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1318
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No 052454
Attorney for Personal.Representative
LARRY C. SESSIONS
Personal Representative
4377 72 Street
Live Oak, FL 32060
05523715
September 2, 9, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO; 10-277-CA
DIVISION:
COMPASS BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
STEVEN C' KING; SHERRY M.
KING; CYPRESS LANDING
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION
OF LAKE CITY, INC.; and UN-
KNOWN TENANT IN POSSES-
SION,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: STEVEN C. KING
933 S.W. Jaguar Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
(Last Known Address)
(CURRENT ADDRESS UN-
KNOWN)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida:
LOT 6 OF CYPRESS LANDING, A
PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DE-
VELOPMENT, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7,
PAGE 40, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
also known as 933 S.W. Jaguar
Drive, Lake City, FL 32025
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Mark J. Home, the Plaintiffs attor-
ney, whose address is 720 Black-
stone Building, Jacksonville, Florida,
32202, within thirty days after the
first publication, of the Notice of Ac-
tion, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on the Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint or petition.
DATED on August 24, 2010
P.DEWrIT CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT
BY:/S/B. SCIPPIO
AS DEPUTY CLERK

05523713
SEPTEMBER 2,9, 2010
PUBLIC NOTICE
ON INVITATION TO BID
ITB-023-2010
Sealed bids will be accepted by' the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until September 9, 2010 at
11:00 A.M. All bids will be opened
and read aloud at 11:15 A.M. in the
City Council Chambers located on
the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
for the purchase of:
PIPE, PIPE FITTINGS AND FIRE
HYDRANTS
Documents may be viewed on the
City website
http://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
m; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5818 or (386) 719-5816.
04541504
September 2, 2010
PUBLIC AUCTION to be held Oc-
tober 2, 2010 at 8AM at Ozzie's
Towing & Auto, 2492 SE Baya Ave.
Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
1993 Toyota
Vin #4TISKI2EXNU145110


05523716
September 2, 2010

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 09-337-CA
AMERICAN GENERAL HOME
EQUITY, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
ROSA PADILLA AND CHARLES
B. BROWN, III,
Defendant(s)
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE
UNDER F.S.CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with thd Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosire, dated August
24, 2010, in and above-styled cause,
I will sell the.property described be-
l1w to the highest and best bidder for
cash, on September 29, 2010, at
11:00 am at Columbia County Court-'
house, 173 NE Hernando Ave,
Courtroom One, Lake City, FL-
32055
Property described as:
LOT 27, BLOCK A,? COLUMBIA
ESTATES SUBDIVISION, A SUB-
DIVISION AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 112 AND
122A, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1997 GEN-
ERAL ADMIRAL MOBILE HOME
SITUATED THEREON WHICH IS
AFFIXED TO THE AFOREMEN-
TIONED REAL PROPERTY AND
INCORPORATED THEREIN,
IDENTIFICATION #'S
GMHGA1319611963A AND
GMHGA1319611963B
The highest bidder shall immediately
post with the clerk, a deposit equal to
5% of the final bid. The deposit must
be cash or cashier's check payable to
Clerk of Court. Final payment must
be made on or before 5:00 p.m. on
the day of the sale by cash or cash-
ier's check.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated: August 25, 2010
Columbia County, Clerk of Court
By: Is/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05523722
September 2, 9, 2010
IN THE COURT OF THE THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-399-CA
Julian E. Collins
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPOR-
TATION
Petitioner,
vs. DENNIS KEVIN MEEHAN *
IN RE: FORECLOSURE OF 2000
JEEP CHEROKEE; '
VIN: 1J4GW48S5YC387904
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DENNIS KEVIN MEEHAN
whose last known address was
1720 N.W. 38th Avenue
Ocala, Florida 24482
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to forfeit your interest in the follow-
ing property in Columbia County,
Florida:
2000 JEEP CHEROKEE
VIN: 1J4GW48S5YC387904
has been filed against you, and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on ENOCH
J. WHITNEY, Assistant Attorney
General, Petitioner's attorney, whose
address is The Capitol, Suite PL-01,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1050, on
or before September 15, 2010, and
file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on peti-
tioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will be
entered against you forthe relief de-
manded in the Complaint or Petition.
DATED: August, 9, 2010
As Clerk of the Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk'

05523532
August 19, 26, 2010
September 2, 9, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 10-265-CA
Division: Circuit Civil
RICHARD ANTHONY WOLZ,
Plaintiff
vs.
LINDA L. WOODS; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER AND AGAINST THE HERE-
IN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION; AARON WOODS,
Defendants)
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S.CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Default Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated August
24, 2010, in the above-styled cause, I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, at the front door of the
COLUMBIA County Courthouse,


Legal


173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, FL at 11:00 a.m. on September
15, 2010, the following described
property:
Commence at the SE comer of the
SW 1/4 of the NE,1/4 of Section 14,
Township 5 South, Range 16 East,
Columbia County, Florida and run
North 01 degrees 02' 26" East along
the East line thereof, 635.96 feet to
the Point of Beginning. Thence con-
tinue North 01 degrees 02' 26" East
along said East line, 346.02 feet,
thence South 89 degrees 41' 19"
West, 630.78 feet to the East Right
of way line of a county maintained
road, Thence South 01 degrees 04'
32" West, along said Right of Way
line, 346.02 feet, thence North 89 de-
grees 41' 19" East 630,99 feet to the
Point of beginning.
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated: August 24, 2010
PDEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court /
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I CERTIFY that a true and correct
copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale
under F.S. Chapter 45 has been fur-
nished by United States Mail on Au-
gust 24, 2010, to each of the follow-
ing: LINDA L. WOODS, 239 SW
Kemp Court, Lake City, FL 32024
LLOYD E PETERSON, JR. 905 SW
Baya Drive, Lake City, FL 32025,
and RICHARD ANTHONY WOLZ,
309 SW Precision Loop, Lake City,
FL 32024
/s/ B. Scippio
Court Clerk

05523711
September 2, 9, 2010


100 Job
Opportunities

Large Mfg Co. looking for
dispatchers...telemarketing
experience a PLUS! We need
HIGHLY MOTIVATED people
that are looking for a challenge!
This is a fast paced environment
and will require long hours. You
must posses good communication
skills, have an outgoing
personality, be able to cold-call
truck lines, handle multi-line
phone system, have computer
(Windows 95+, Excel, and Word)
and basic office equipment
experience. Fax resume to
386-758-4523. DFW
Optical Sales Associate.
Fast Paced. MUST be experienced
with eye glass fittings, repairs and
contact lens. Friendly, dependable,
accurate, Computers, great with
people. Apply in Person:
Family Focus Eye Care, 105
Grand Street, Live Oak. NO phone
calls. Fax resume: 386-362-5746
Telemarketing Sales
Customer Service
Ideal candidates will have previous
experience with outbound B&B .
sales. Must have excellent
telephone skills. Individual must
be enthusiastic, outgoing,
competitive, have excellent
computer skills and be able to
perform in a fast paced
environment. Medical and Dental
insurance available after 6 months.
401K after 1 year. Personal
and vacation time available.,
Closed all major holidays,
competitive salary. DFW
Please fax resume to
386-758-4523
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-8755-0630


010 Announcements Meal
120 Employment


05523566
Quality First Care
formerly located at
777 West Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida
is no longer in operation.
Certain medical records of the
clinic are now in the possession
of Dr. Rodrigo Quintana,
c/o Maria Quintana,
2631 NW 41st Street, Suite E-5,
Gainesville, FL 32606,
352.372.3181


100 Job
Opportunities

05523521
EARN Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages in the, Lake City
area. FT/PT, daily work, quick
pay, must be 18 yrs+, have driv-
ers license & insured vehicle
(800)422-1955 Ext. 4
8:00A-4:30P Mon-Fri


05523669
CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE
Fast Paced Call Center,looking
for outgoing, positive candidate
,bi-lingual a plus,basic computer
experience needed
Send Resume to: Joey Kitaif;
P.O. Box 3116 �
Lake City, FL 32056.

05523735
Assistant to Program Director,
due to new business, we need an
assistant to out program
director. Sales/Marketing exp. a
plus, we will train in our
specialty. We are a fifteen year
old consulting firm working
with a large number of the
public schools in Georgia. We
are located in historic White
Springs, Florida, Salary DOE,
Must be able to travel. Please
email resume to :
programdirector@
speced.org

05523736
Administrative Assistant
Growing Consulting firm needs
a sharp detail oriented person
able to work unsupervised. Must
have computer experience. Must
have verifiable office
experience. Position is open
NOW! Located in White
Springs, Florida PLEASE
SUBMIT RESUME TO
admin@speced.org

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies


04541405
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
Full-Time.Positions
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
Will be over ER, OR and Med
Surge Floor, Current RN
License, Ward or Hospital
Management Helpful.
Teaching andlor Supervisory
Exp. Preferred.
ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT
High School Graduate,
AA Degree in Acct. Preferred.
2 yrs Exp. in all aspects of Acct.
General Ledger, Accts Payable
and Payroll. Accounting Skills,
Computer Skills, knowledge of
Word, Excel Software &
10 key Punch
PRN Position
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPIST
Current Florida PT/ST/OT
license. Evaluate, Assess, Plan
and Implement Treatments.
Hand Therapy Preferred.
ARNP/PA
To'staff Emergency Room
Small Acute Care Critical
Access hospital. Exp. Required,
FT/PT/PRN
Great benefits and salary.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386)496-2323 EXT 258,
FAX (386)496-1611
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Drug Free Workplace

05523727
Needed CNA or Medical
Assistant PRN for ASC.
Please fax resume to
386-755-2169

05523728
Needed Registered Nurse
PRN for ASC.
Please fax resume to
386-755-2169

P/T CNA or LPN needed.
Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025.
Wanted Experienced Office
Manager for rural family medical
practice. Pay commensurate with
exp. Great crew to work with and
good benefits. Send resume t o
Three Rivers Medical 208 NW
Suwannee Ave. Branford, FL
32008. or fax to: 386-935-1667


REPORTER Classifieds

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Starting soon! Call now!
2367 W. US Hwy 90 Suite 115 1242 S. 6th Street
Lake City, FL 32055 . Cornerstone Square
Phone: 386-752-9426 Macclenny, FL 32063
Phone: 904-259-6992











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2010


240 Schools &
240 Education
0454 1226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/13/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/25/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstraningservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Boxer/Sheppard mix puppy, ready
for good home on 9/10/10,
Special needs dog 90% blind,
free/call for details 386-438-5385
Chocolate Lab Pups
AKC Registered, health certs
$350 males and females
386-965-2231
FREE (2) 14 wk old kittens
(1) Male -nutered.
(1) Female -spayed.
CALL FOR INFO 386-755-0920
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
. office for information.
REGISTERED
English Setter puppies.
Great Bird Dogs. $200. ea.
386-961-1855 or 755-6874'
Toy Poodle, Reg'd, Health
Cert/UTD shots, Male, White,
7 Months, Beautiful and Loving.
$500. obo. Call: 352-318-9452

330 Livestock &
Supplies.
BIG Boar Pig
about two years old
call for details
386-965-2215
Two mini mares,
can hold small children,
$500 each w/saddle, will deliver
Call for details 386-965-2231

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Hotpoint side-by-side,
Refrigerator/Freezer, 25 cu ft,
white, like new $395
Call Don 397-4889
Microwave Oven
good shape, works well, revolving
plate, welcome to see $30
386-755-3682

407 Computers
HP Computer,
Many extras
$100.00. firm
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

419 TV-Radio &
Recording
Entertainment Center, med oak
finish, glass doors on top, TV
opening 36 x 36 1/2" H 66", W-
54", D 20", $150 386-397-1118

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO'title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Fri & Sat, 8-4, back to school
clothes and more!
344 SE Jonathan Way
Rain' or Shine...
Huge Sale. Sat. 8-3 Combining 3
houses. Books, furn, fabric, collec-
tibles, carpet, much more. 1.5 mi.
West of Ichetucknee on Hwy 27
Metal shed, Look for signs.
Moving Sale Sat only, 8-12, furni-
ture, home school books, clothing
and household items, 169 NW
Lakeside Ct, Emerald Lakes
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Wellborn. Noon-4, Sat & Sun,
6330 150th P1. Off 61st Rd. Yard
tools, adult clothes, some furni-
ture, TV, sm appliances & misc

440 Miscellaneous

04541475
HUNTING LEASES
Available,


Baker and Clay counties,
deer, hog and turkey
American Forest Management
Attn: Matt Dykes 386-454-0260

Full Sized School Chalkboards
$25 each
386-344-5706 or
386-344-1783
Playground Equipment,sturdy
plastic, large & small cube shapes,
asking $75-$25 each or make an
offer for all pieces! 386-965-2231

450 Good Things
450 toEat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


520 Boats for Sale
Bass Tender Boat
10'2",w/trolling motor,
$500 Call for details
386-965-2215

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
1,2 & 3 BR 1 BTH
MH's & House
Close to town . 1st & Deposit.
386-755-5488
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 SINGLEWIDE
Mobile Home,
$375. mo. plus $200. dep
386-752-2254
2/2 Large MH, small park, near
LCCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo 12 mo lease
752-1971 or 352-281-2450.
2br/lba CH/A, screen porch. Lg
yard. fishing pond. Clean, quiet.
No Pets. References. Long term
rentals $475 mo. $475 sec. Smoke
free environment 386-965-3003.
2BR/1BA MH
Water & Garage included No Pets.
$450. mo. $300. security deposit,.
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633
LG 3br/2ba DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/2ba SW
$500. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White . Contact 386-623-2465
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move.In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town,
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

640 Mobile Homes .
640 for Sale
5 acres w/4br/2ba home.
(manufactured). Ceramic floors,
new metal roof, plywood, 2 porch-
es, utility shed, concrete founda-
tion & some furniture, $119K.
Owner fin @ $695mo. w/5%dn.
Gary Hamilton 386-758-9824
'7 0 Unfurnished Apt.
110 For Rent
. 553675
Voted Best of the Best
Unbeatable specials!
Rent from $436!
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Gatorwood on the Westside
Rent $650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
' 386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Move in special, $399, 2/1, newly
renovated, in town, includes water
$500 per month, easy qualifying
386-755-2423
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Open House held on Sat, Sept
11th, 1 & 2 bdrm apts and mobile
homes 386-755-2423 The sooner
you call, the cheaper the price!
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2,
country acre 8 mi to VA, off Lk
Jeff Rd. $500 mo + dep. No dogs.
Deck, w/d hookups 386.961.9181

7T 0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Americas Best Value Inn
(386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $179,2 ppl $189 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
SHome For Rent
2 Bedroom
Mobile Homes
* $375 per month and up
(386)755-2423
Call for move in special price!
2BR/2BA Nice & Clean
$800. mo 1st and last NO pets
Country setting on Nash Road
386-752-1677
3bd/2ba's
Multiple Locations
Call for details
386-755-3649.


730 HUnfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check , No Pets (386)755-9476
42/2 2800 sqft. 2nd fairway
Southern Oaks CC. 174
NW Harris Lake Dr. $1350. mo.
plus security. (941)545-6731
Alligator Lake 3/2, 2,200 sqft.,
deck, place, sunroom. Good cred-
it, lease/references req'd. $1,000
mo. $1,100. dep. 386-758-3166
Clean 1Br/lBa, Florida Room
CH/A 5 mi. S. Lake City $400
Dep $550mo 386-590-0642/ 867-
1833.suwanneevallevproperties.com
In Country 3br/lba. Fridge and
stove. CH/A Security dep. and
credit check required. No Pets.
$600. mo. 386-752-3225
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017
Mayfair Subdivision, 3/2,
fenced back yard, $1200 month
w/$800 security deposit
386-466-2254
NICE 3BR/2BA brick home
in Russwood Estates $895. mo
$700 security. Application
required 386-963-4974
Remodeled 3/2 w/2 Car Garage.
1/2 Acre near US 41 & 1-75. New
appliances, ceramic tile, interior
/exterior paint & roof $785 mo +
dep. 386-623-3834/904-514-3677
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$625 mo 1st, last,
1/2 of security.
386-365-1243 or 386-397-2619

750 Business&
Office Rentals
Convenient Store
with gas
for lease,
813-286-2323
RETAIL/COMMERCIAL
Approx. 1200 sq ft, Utilities Incl
$950/month. Call 752-5Q35
A Bar Sales 7 days 7-7

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Fall Special
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk.$795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$205/mo. $19,900. 352-215-1018
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain-of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
FSBO: No realtors please.
3br/2ba all brick. 1860 sqft. Built
in 2005. Great S/D. $178,000.
386-697-4136 or 697-4135
MUST SEE! New 3500 foot
'spec home. Reduced to $299,000
5% interest 0% down or trade.
386-752-1364
Saturn Lane 4/2 block, 5 ac, half
cleared,2 sheds, reduced from
$140K to $30K-MAKE OFFER
386-754-0800 or 755-7773

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mp 352-215-1018.
www:.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


DUPLEX COMMUNITY
An Adult Community


For formation: 3 -97-621
SFttrON rA NA. t.r I \N


Located on Country Club Road (CR 133),
2 miles south of Baya Avc on left
or 2 miles north ofCR 252 on right.
For Information: 38b-397-6621


Convrnictt Location 2 Bdniroom/2 Bath
PaNcd Street Laundrn/L'lty Room
Unldrrgroind LUtllcs i;rpeuCera-mic Tile
City water r Cable Ir
StorageB building Ava.ulbir
Locally Owned and Operated


930 Motorcycles
1995 HONDA Shadow 600cc
Motorcycle. Mileage 19,500.
New battery. $2.500.
386-752-8157 or 397-6717

940 Trucks
03 Freightliner FL70, 230 hp CAT
3126, 6 spd Fuller Trans, 20 ft flat-
bed, Crane,knuckle boom 160K
miles, $21,500 - (954)205-7031
1990 Ford F350 Dually
work truck, white, automatic
$2500
386-965-2215
1997 FORD F-250 Diesel
Extra cab. 5 sp., good AC.,
dependable. 7.3 turbo. $4,500.
(352)339-5158

952 Vans & Sport
S Util. Vehicles
1999 CHEVY Suburban 4 door,
leather (no cracks). Dual AC.,
Like new condition. $4,500
386-454-5120


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Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
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the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


F Mr Uoe - e is al r

Ia38-755-5440 1


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