Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text







Steinbrenner, 80
Yankees owner remembered
for his winning attitude.
Sports, I B
000015 120110 ***3-DIGIT 3':.
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007 LORIDA
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


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Wednesday, July 14, 2010


Economic platform
Republican Senate candidate
Marco Rubio reveals campaign plan.
Around Florida, 2A






'porter


Vol. 136, No. 151 75 cents


Crash critically injures cyclist


Life flight takes
Lake City woman
to Gainesville.

From staff reports
A Lake City woman was
critically injured Tuesday
afternoon when she was
struck from behind by a
pick-up truck while riding


her bicycle beside U.S.
Highway 41.
Michelle A. Pelky, 46,
was taken by helicopter to
Shands in Gainesville with
injuries she suffered in the
mishap.
The incident occurred
around 1:20 p.m. on U.S.
Highway 41, south' of
Bastom Norris Road.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol- reports,


a 2003 Chevrolet pick-up
truck driven by Joshua
W. Edwards, 33, of High
Springs, was heading south
on U.S. Highway 41 on the
roadway's outside lane.
Pelky was traveling south
on the roadway's paved
apron on an Epoch bicycle
at the same time.
Witness statements say
Edwards' vehicle drifted
from the outside lane into


the paved apron, striking
the rear of Pelky's bicycle
with the right front area of
the truck.
Pelky was knocked from
the bicycle and fell onto the
pavement.
Edwards was not injtired
in the incident.
Charges in connection
with the wreck are pending
completion of a FHP crash
investigation, reports said.


PATRICK SCOTTISpecial to the Reporter
Officers interview Joshua Edwards after he was allegedly
involved in a Tuesday morning crash.


CHEERFUL EVENT


At,
Lai'
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,. " ' ' . . , : , - - " I , * . -


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Former Jacksonville Jaguars cheerleader Kristin Doakes (center) dances alongside Kiley Craig, 6, as anotherex-Jag (right)
joins other girls perform a dance routine Tuesday at the Teen Town Recreation Center.


Former Jaguars

provide roaring

dance sessions


Girls Club of Lake
City seeks more
cheer clinics.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
amp time
becaine a
dance session
for several
local girls.
Professional Cheerlead-
ers Alumni hosted a cheer
clinic Tuesday at the Girls
Club of Lake City.
The group includes
former Jacksonville
Jaguar cheerleaders and
teaches clinics all over
Jacksonville, said Kristin
Looney Doakes, president.
This is the first clinic done
in Lake City.
Junior teen cheerlead-
ers with the organization


"She used to be,
one of my little
girls, and now her
daughter is, too."
Terri Phillips
Supervisor
led the clinic, which had
25 girls in attendance, she
said. They learned skills
such as team building, self
confidence and working
together in addition to
dancing and cheering.
The alumni work with
the juniors as a mentor-
ing initiative, Doakes said.
Having them lead the
clinic in turn allows them
to mentor younger girls.
The juniors work with
the alumni and dance and
cheer at Jaguar games in
the Honor Rows section,
she said. The girls range
in age from 16 to 18.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kristin Doakes autographs water bottles for Alexia Scott, 12,
a member of the Girls Club of Lake City. 'I'm really excited
because I. do this daily,' Scott said. 'I'm on the Richardson
Middle School cheer team.'


The Girls Club was
excited Doakes con-
tacted them to host the
clinic and want to have
more in the future, said
Terri Phillips, supervi-
sor.


Doakes grew up in
Lake City and used to
come to the Girls Club.
"She used to be one of
my little girls, and now
her daughter is, too,"
Phillips said.


Police: Lone


suspect eyed


in robberies


Officials release
photo, ask for
public's help.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Local authorities are
continuing investigations
into three robberies that
occurred in a four-hour
span Monday afternoon and
evening, piecing together
evidence and trying to iden-
tify a suspect in the case.
The Lake City Police
Department is handliiig
two of the robbery investi-
gations, while the Columbia.
County Sheriff's Office is
handling the third.
Sgt.' John Blanchard,
public information officer
of the Lake City Police
Department, said authori-
ties have released pictures
of the suspect and are hop-
ing that someone will come
forward and make a posi-
tive identification.
Blanchard said authori-
ties believe two different
vehicles were used in the


two robberies but pre-
sume that a lone sus-
pect committed all three
,crimes.
"We don't have any infor-,
mation about whether he
is a local person or not,"
he said. 'We're just very
concerned in that a person
would commit three robber-
ies in such a short period of
time in a close proximity."
Blanchard, using his
experience as a narcotics
officer, said that usually
means that someone has a
chemical dependency issue
and is going through a cri-
sis.
"It's going on 24 hours
now and we have not heard
from him, so we don't know
if he's left the area or still
in the area, but he has the
potential to come back,"
he said. "We are very con-
cerned and we want this
case to come to a success-
ful conclusion by arresting
him and finding out why
he may have done some, of
these things:"
The first robbery occurred
ROBBERIES continued on 5A


Sheriff's deputy

suspended after

K-9 death probe


Handler admits
leaving 'Brutus'
inside vehicle.

By-TONY BRITT
tbrjtt@lakecityreporter.com
A Columbia County
Sheriff's Office deputy,
who was placed on admin-
istrative leave last month,
is now suspended without
pay after an internal inves-
tigation showed he left his
K-9 in his patrol vehicle for
more than an hour result-
ing in the dog's death.
The dog, K-9 Brutus, was
found dead in the patrol
vehicle June 10 and the
sheriff's office launched an
investigation the following
day. Deputy sheriff Randy
Harrison, Brutus' handler,
was immediately placed


on administrative leave
while the investigation took
place.
Sgt. Ed Seifert, public
information officer of the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office, said the investiga-
tion began June 11 and con-
cluded June 24.
. Tuesday afternoon the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office released findings
from its investigation that
showed Harrison acciden-
tally left K-9 Brutus in his
patrol vehicle at his home
on June 10.
Reports said Harrison
fully admitted to making
a catastrophic mistake by
leaving Brutus in the vehi-
cle unattended.
Officials said there was
neither intentional malice
nor criminal intent on behalf
K-9 continued on 3A


~I I[I!II II CALLUS:
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Opinion
Obituaries ......
Advice & Comics...
Puzzles. . . .
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TODAY IN
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T'_j0_,- i -i.' eet


COMING
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PF'e. the I.lt- :
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-MOVAUMMISOMMI iMommormOll-


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 5-8-5
Evening: 2-6-9


S: " Tuesday:
SAfternoon: 1-2-7-3
Evening: 7-9-8-3


-MS^
"". Monday:
-1-9-10-12-25


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Stamos testifies in extortion trial


MARQUETTE, Mich.
ctor John Stamos testi-
fled Tuesday that he was
"heartbroken" over the
separation from his wife
six years ago when he
first met a woman now charged with
conspiring to extort $680,000 from
him. I
The "Full House" and "ER" star
took the stand during the fed-
eral trial of Allison Coss and Scott
Sippola, who are accused of demand-
ing money from Stamos, saying they,
had photos of him with cocaine and
strippers they could sell to a maga-
zine. :
Under questioning by prosecutors,
Stamos said he met Coss in Orlando
in 2004,when he was taken there by
friends trying to cheer him up after
separating from his wife, actress and
supermodel Rebecca Romijn.
"I was very heartbroken at the
time," he said.
Stamos said he met Coss at
Pleasure Island, a club where
patrons must be at least 18. The 46-
year-old Stamos said Coss told him
she was on "college" spring break.
Stamos said Coss and a friend
were among several people who
came to his hotel room and stayed
for a couple hours. He described
their time together as "just hanging
out" and "socializing."
He said he later began commu-
nicating with Coss via e-mail and
described their conversations and
"flirty" but "friendly." Defense attor-
ney Sarah Henderson had alleged
that Coss met Stamos when she was
17 and that the two had a romantic
fling, which his attorney denies.

Ed Norton won't play
Hulk in 'Avengers' flick
LOS ANGELES - Ed.Norton
is speaking out on Facebook after


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actor John Stamos arrives at the federal courthouse for the second day of an
extortion trial, in which Stamos was the alleged victim, in U.S. District Court in
Marquette, Mich., Tuesday.


Marvel Studios announced last week
that the actor won't reprise his Hulk
role in its forthcoming "Avengers"
film.
Norton says he took to the social-
networking site Monday because he
felt it would be rude not to respond
to an outpouring of support from
fans.

Keith Richards' wife tells
Vogue she beat cancer
NEW YORK - The wife of
Rolling Stones guitarist Keith
Richards is a cancer survivor.
Patti Hansen reveals in the August
issue of Vogue magazine that she
was diagnosed with bladder cancer
in 2007.
She says she first underwent che-
motherapy, which shrunk the.tumor
but didn't get rid of it completely. .
One doctor said she had two to three
years to live.


Polanski victim says
case should end
LOS ANGELES - ThT woman
who was the teenage victim in the
Roman Polanski sex case says he is
not a threat to anyone and charges
should be dismissed.
Samantha Geimer, who long
ago'identified herself, told the Los
Angeles Times in a story posted
Tuesday that the':case should have
been resolved 33 years ago when it
happened.
"Enough is enough," she said of
the continuing efforts to prosecute
Polanski. She was barred from talk-
ing about her'civil suit settlement
with the director but said it didn't
influence her views. "I've felt this
way from the beginning."
Polanski pleaded guilty to unlawful
sexual intercourse with her in a plea
bargain that has been the subject of
controversy.
* Associated Press


* Playwright Arthur Laurents
is 93.
* Actor Dale Robertson is
87.
* Actress-Polly Bergen is 80.
* Former football player
Rosey Grier is 78.
* Actor Vincent Pastore is
64.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS,
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


* Actor Jerry Houser is 58.
* Actor-director Eric
Laneuville is 58.
* Actor Stan Shaw is 58.
M Movie producer Scott
Rudin is 52.
* Singer-guitarist Kyle Gass
is 50.
* Actress Jane Lynch is 50.


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day redelivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................. $48.79
52 Weeks ................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks......... ....... $41.40
24 Weeks................$82.80
52 Weeks ................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a'concem, question or suggestion, please
call'the executive editor. Corrections and clarifidations will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Laptops stolen
from contractor
TAMPA - Thousands
of laptops were stolen
from the Florida office of
a private contractor for
the U.S. military's Special
Operations Command.
U.S. Special Operations
Command coordinates the
activities of elite units from
the Army, Navy, Air Force
and Marines. A spokes-
woman said Tuesday that
none of the stolen laptops
contained military informa-
tion or software.
The Virginia-based com-
pany iGov was awarded
a $450 million contract
earlier this year to supply
mobile technology ser-
vices linking special opera-
tions troops worldwide. A
company executive says
iGov is cooperating with
authorities and the March
6 break-in at its Tampa
facility remains under
investigation.
Surveillance cameras
caught up to seven people
loading the computers into
two trucks for nine hours.

Rubio releases
economic plan
TAMPA - Republican
Senate candidate Marco
Rubio announced an eco-
nomic platform Tuesday
that is heavy on tax
cuts, calls for repealing
President Barack Obama's
health care package and
includes additional tax
breaks for Gulf coast busi-
nesses harmed by the oil
spill.
Rubio's plan calls for
permanently extending
President George W.
Bush's income tax cuts
of 2001 and 2003, which
are scheduled to expire
after this year. Obama has
called for extending them
only for individuals making
less than $200,000 a year
and families making less
than $250,000.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sky's the limit for educator
Barbara Sistrunk, assistant principal at Greenland Pines
Elementary School in Jacksonville, skydives with skydiving
instructor Todd Lundgren in this recent photo. Sistrunk agreed
to skydive when the Parent Teacher Association at Greenland
Pines Elementary School met their parent participation goals.


Rubio also called for
permanently repealing the
estate tax. After several
steps, it was reduced to
zero this year but is set to
jump back to 55 percent on
estates worth more than
$3.5 million for individuals
and $7 million for couples
next year if Congress
doesn't act. Smaller estates
are exempt

16-year-old dies
in ATV crash
SOUTHWEST
RANCHES - A teenager
riding on the back of an all-
terrain vehicle died after
striking a wooden utility
pole in South Florida.
The Broward Sheriff's
Office says 16-year-old
Daniel Perez of Pembroke
Pines was pronounced
dead at a hospital Monday
afternoon.
Authorities are investi-
gating how Perez crashed
into the pole. A 16-year-old
Southwest Ranches teen
driving the ATV was not
injured. Neither teen was
wearing a helmet.


Murder suspect
under evaluation,
MIRAMAR BEACH
- A man accused of fatally
shooting two Chilean stu-
dents in north Florida is
in jail waiting for another
evaluation after being
discharged from a state
hospital.
SDannie Baker was
released Tuesday from
the Florida State Hospital
in Chattahoochee. He was
sent there in Nov. for treat-
ment after being found
incompetent to stand trial.
Depending on the latest
findings of the psycholo-
gists, state prosecutors
will determine whether to
have another competency
hearing. He would either
be sent back to the metal
hospital or face trial.
Baker is being held at
the Walton County Jail.
Authorities say he fired
into a town home where
about 20 young people,
many of them part of a cul-
tural exchange program,
were socializing in early
2009.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


CHANCE ' CHA CNCE CHCE CHANCE CHANCE
-STORMS l- STORMSTOMS -STORMS -STORMS


H195 HI 933OHI HI941 W72 HI194L0 ?3
.. m ii .q..:.,i*_..Hi';~ -- -

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Valdosta
*94/74 City Thursday Friday
J lacksonvile Cape Canaveral 59 78.1 89 18 pc
Tallahassee * Lake City 94 75 Daytona Beach 9.2 7 90 1) pc
9E. 75 Ft. Lauderdale ,I ) O 'I ,7 pv
e*DtaDaytona Beacach
S nsacola Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers 94 76i 94 6
S 95 79 Panama City 5 7J 91 Gainesville 93 73' 94 7 pc,
92 79 Ocala Jacksonville * i, t 93, 74, pc
4/7 * a Key West 89/79/t 89/80/t
Oando Capldanaveral Lake City 93/73/t 93/72/pc
a 93/76 977 Miami 90/80/t 89/79/t
92/71 : \ Naples 92/76/t 90/76/pc
West Palm Beach Ocala 92/73/t 94/73/pc
. 90/79 e Orlando 93/76/t 92/76/pc
S- FtlLauderdale Panama City 92/77/t 90/77/pc
S. Ft Myers. 90/81 *; Pensacola 95/77/pc 92/76/t
94/75 "Naples . Tallahassee 94/74/t 92/74/pc
S92/77 Miami Tampa 92/78/t 92/78/pc
S 9/80 Valdosta 93/73/t 94/73/pc
S.. K -ey West :* 2: W. Palm Beach 90/79/t 89/78/t
89/82



TEMPERATURES SUN IA er
high Tuesda . 92 Sunrise.today 6:39 a.m. || | . '
Low Tuesday 76 Sunset today 8:34 p.m. blOg1 ti
Normal high 91 Sunrise tom. 6:39 a.m. WIVRllt i ,e,;
Normal low 71 Sunsettom. 8:34 p.m. 10 iiiueslimtD b
Record hign 98 in 1946 T.3,,i,'S
Record low 65 in 1922 MOON ullr3ioiet TheC WeAheI
Moonrise today 9:48 a.m. faosaatior riIT Claiailt.l
PRECIPITATION Moonset today 10:42 p.m. 'r earorn .
Tuesday 0.00" Moonrise tom. 10:55 a.m. t
Month total 4.12" Moonsettom. 11:17 p.m. 1
Year total 30.84'" H:lf,
Normal month-to-date 2.64" * ) ( weathere com


Normal year-to-date


26.67"


7a lp
Wednesday


, "
j,-'


July July Aug. Aug. .- Forec
18 25 3 9 I -- cs@
First Full Last New LC. ' ,
www..


7p Tla 6
Thursday


--- Forecasledteemperatire "Feels ke" temperatre
.*'..


On this date in
1995, a July heat
wave continued
through much of the
Midwest. Toledo,
Ohio, set its all-time
record high tempera-
ture with a reading
of 104 degrees.
Midway Airport in
Chicago record an
all-time high tem-
perature of 108
degrees.


asts, data and graph-
2010 Weather Central
Madison, WIs.
weatherpubllsher.com


i Get Connected






| 'a ;'l;f.lL 1 w | i k J. Ji[ l~l.N i 1aa J i]
I ^^^^^


WaH3.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture

"Therefore God exalted: him to
the highest place and gave him
the name that is above every
name, that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bow, in
heaven and on earth and under
the earth, and every tongue
confess that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of Godithe Father."
- Philippians 2:9-I I


Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


I


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














School district officials forecast more budget cuts


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

The county school dis-
trict suffered budget cuts
worth millions of dollars in
fiscal year 2009 to 2010 and
foresees the reductions as
only getting worse by the
millions within the next few
years.
The Columbia County
School Board reviewed
the past year's budget and
looked ahead to those of
the coming years at a bud-
get workshop Tuesday,
with heavy discussion
on the issue of class size
reduction and its budget-
ary impact.
Revenue for the 2009


to 2010 fiscal year totaled
almost $74 million from
federal, state, local and
other monies, but was
approximately $3.5 million
less than the previous fis-
cal year.
"We knew that we were
going to be down some
revenues," said Mary
Loughran, director of
finance, "but it's more than
one part," she said, noting
that cuts were made to all
revenue budget parts.
'The bottom line is we're
down $3.5 million," she
said.
The district predicts that
it will have a budget of
about $68 million for the
2010 to 2011 fiscal year


and projected a lesser one
for the 2011 to 2012 fis-
cal year of about $63.8 mil-
lion, a difference of almost
$4.5 million. Lex Carswell,
assistant superintendent
for instruction, called the
reduction "a cliff."
For the 2010 to 2011 fis-
Scal year, possible class size
reduction penalties to the
district would amount to
almost $780,000.
Carswell said the district
would save approximately
$580,000 of that penalty if
it submits a plan to the
Florida Department of
Education to reduce class
sizes, losing about $195,000
in penalty money instead.
No district in Florida is


in compliance with class
size reduction, Carswell
said, and if none of them
come into compliance, the
district would gain back
the penalty imposed.
The district does not
plan to hire the 28 teachers
that would be necessary
- costing at least $1' mil-
lion - to fix its class size
reduction issue, Carswell
said, but has been work-
ing with teachers already
hired to "think outside the
box" on how to come into
compliance.
Board member Charles
Maxwell noted that the dis-
trict will not "hold off on
hiring" if there is an educa-
tional need for more teach-


ers.Because of upcom-
ing legislation that could
change class size reduction
compliance, Carswell said
the district is unsure of the
exact budgetary impact it
may have.
"This is the kind of goril-
la in the room that we're
not sure how it will affect
us next year," he said.
Carswell said the dis-
trict will try to meet both
the budget and class size
reduction, but said he
thinks meeting the budget
takes precedence.
The district also dis-
cussed its anticipated mill-
age for the 2010 to 2011
fiscal year to be set at 8.167
percent based on past,


trending millage rates.
District expenditures for
the 2009 to 2010 fiscal year
were down almost $3 mil-
lion from the previous year,
but still decreased district
funds by approximately
$700,000 because of rev-
enue cuts.
Projected spending for
the 2010 to 2011 fiscal year
amounted to almost$200,000
over budget, an amount that
Loughran said "should bal-
ance" because not all federal
monies are "recorded" for
that year's budget
"We recognize this year
is the critical year where
we have to tighten the belt
in every way possible,"
Carswell said.


K-9: 'Personal events' distracted sheriff's deputy, official report said
Continued From Page 1A


of the deputy. According to
official reports, Harrison
had become distracted
by personal events on the
evening of the incident.
Harrison left his home to
attend to a personal mat-
ter and returned over an
hour later to find that he
left. Brutus in his patrol
vehicle.
'The deputy's 15-day sus-


pension began June 24 and
will end later this week,"
Seifert said. "An. employee
is placed on administrative
leave while an 'investiga-
tion is being conducted.
Administrative leave is not
punitive and there is no
loss of pay or benefits. The
suspension without pay is
punitive and takes effect
after the sheriff reviews the


internal investigation."
Columbia County Sheriff
Mark Hunter reviewed
the internal investigation
report and concurred with
its findings.
Hunter disciplined
Harrison by revoking his
K-9 handler status and
suspending him from'duty
without pay for 15 days.
Reports say Harrison's


exemplary work record
was taken into account dur-
'ing the discipline process
and the unpaid suspension
was significant and appro-
priate.
Harrison, who has
been employed as a local
deputy sheriff since 1998,
will return to patrol duties
once the suspension has
been fulfilled.


OBITUARIES


Elizabeth W. Haven
A memorial gathering to cele-
brate the life of Dr. Elizabeth W.
Haven will be held at Life Style
EnrichmentCenterThursday July
15th from 3-5pm. with an oppor-
tunity to share memories of her
contributions to our community.

Ruth Eva Lee Hinkle
Ruth Eva Lee Hinkle, 86, of
Lake City, FL, formerly of Anna,
IL, departed this life on July 12,
2010 at Haven Hospice Care
Center. Born August 9, 1923
to Clarence and Nettie Vowels,
she married Carl Preston Hinkle
on January 6, 1941. Ruth was a
' homemaker and lived in Anna,
Illinois, until 2009, where she
volunteered countless hours at
the Illinois Veterans Home. She
was preceded in death by her
parents, her husband of 62 years
and two brothers, Robert Vowels
and Bill Vowels. Survivors in-
clude son Joe (Joanne) Hinkle,
of Lake City, FL and daughter
Rebecca (Steve) Stadt of Gor-
eville, IL; four grandchildren;
Carly (Nick) Schrader of Tal-
lahassee, FL, Melanie (James)
Perreault of Columbia, SC, Me-
lissa Stadt and David Stadt of
Goreville, IL; one great-grand-
daughter, Jillian.Lee Schrader of
Tallahassee, FL. The funeral will
be Friday, July 16, and arrange-
ments are under the direction
of LUTZ & RENDELMAN
FUNERAL HOME, Anna, IL.
In Lieu of flowers, memori-
als may be made to Suwannee
Valley Haven Hospice Care
Center, Lake City, FL, or Illi-
nois Veterans Home, Anna, IL.
Dorothy Elizabeth Smith
Thomas
Dorothy Elizabeth Smith Thom-
as, 90, went'to be with her heav-
enly father on July 13, 2010 at
the home of her children Rebec-
'ca and Leonard Murray after an
extended illness. She was a faith-
ful servant of the Lord, devoted
wife, and loving mother. She was
born on March 17, 1920 in Jes-
sup, Georgia to parents Sarah E.
Anderson Smith and William F.
Smith. At a young age, her fam-
ily moved to Quincy, Fl, where
she graduated from high school.
In 1944, she married Ira Alvin
:Thomas. The family moved to
Lake City, FL in 1956 where she
spent most of her adult life. Ira
preceded her in death after 63
years of marriage in 2007. Sur-
viving children include daugh-
ters; Elaine Thomas Barber,
Lake City, FL Cece Thomas
Grillo (Ray) St. Augustine,
FL Rebecca Thomas Murray
(Leonard) Fruit Cove, FL Teresa
Thomas Allison (Steve) Lake
City, FL and one son, Ira Der-
rick Thomnas, Little Meadows,
PA. She was known as Nana to
eleven grandchildren; Thomas
Barber, Derrick Thomas, Gerald
Thomas, Wendy Thomas Hasty,
Duane Thomas, Ryan Grillo,
Daryl Grillo, Matthew Murray,
Joshua Murray, Stephanie Alli-
son and Amanda Allison. Eight
great grandchildren also sur-
vive. She had six siblings and
is survived by one sister, Louise
Jammes, of Jacksonville, FL.
Visitation will be at Guerry Fu-
neral Home, 2659 SW Main
Blvd, Lake City, FL 32025, and
1:00 P.M. to 2:30P.M. Saturday,
July 17, 2010. Memorial ser-
vice will,follow at 2:30P.M at
the funeral home. Rev. Suzanne
Cole Wages of Northeast Florida
Community Hospice will of-
ficiate. Internment will be the


following day, Sunday, July
18th, at 10:00A.M. at Pellicer
Creek Cemetery, St. Augustine,
FL with Rev. Sylvia Thomas
from West Virginia officiating.
The family wishes to thank
Northeast Florida Community
Hospice and all the medical


personal of Jacksonville Florida
who supported the family in the
last days of life. Also, special
thanks to Sara Cliffton, Marga-
ret Mick and Amanda Lindboe
who helped care for "Nana"
during her illness. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, Lake


City, Florida is in charge of ar-
rangements. (386) 752-2414

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. Fqr details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Linda Lou
Davis
DOB: 04/24/58
Height: 5' 7" - Weight: 130 Ibs.
Eyes: Hazel -Hair: Brown
Wanted for: Felony Driving
Under the Influence; Driving
While License Suspended or
Revoked
WANTED AS


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Jackson
DOB: 11/5/50
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 180 Ibs.
yes: Brown - Hair: Black
noted for: VOP: Grand Theft;
court Ordered Revocation:
Grand Theft


ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!





F COLUMBIA COUNTY

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded wholly or in part by the Office of the Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund.


"This situation was a tragic
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for Deputy Harrison and his
family," said Hunter in a pre-
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4


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424














OPINION


Wednesday. July 14,2010


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Carnegie

skills pay

dividends


executives and
owners know that
investment is criti-
cal if their enter-
prise to thrive, but one of the
best investments a professional
can make is honing managerial
and leadership skills. That's
the idea behind Dale Carnegie
Training, and it's a good one.
Although Carnegie training
is generally reserved for larger
communities, Lake City will
play host to the eight-week
seminar that has helped fuel
the careers of Warren Buffet
and millions of others. Through
a partnership of Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce and the Lake City
Reporter, the business seminar
designed to build self-confi-
dence and sharpen manage-
ment and leadership skills is
available locally. .
Opportunities for business
investment abound no matter
what enterprise you might be
engaged in. Opportunities for
personal investment of the Dale
Carnegie. magnitude are more
rare.
Embracing that rare opportu-
nity now makes good business
sense, and can continue to pay
dividends long after that initial
investment is made.

'HIGHLIGHTS
IN H IS TORY
Today is Wednesday, July 14,
the 195th day of 2010. There
are 170 days left in the-year.
On July 14, 1789, during the
French Revolution, citizens
of Paris stormed the Bastille
prison and released the seven
prisoners inside.
* In 1798, Congress passed
the Sedition Act, making it a
federal crime to publish false,
scandalous or malicious writ-
ing about the United States
government.
* In 1853, Commodore
Matthew Perry relayed to
Japanese officials a letter from
President Millard Fillmore,
requesting trade relations.
* In 1881, outlaw William H.
Bonney Jr., alias "Billy the
Kid," was shot and killed by
Sheriff Pat Garrett in Fort
Sumner, N.M.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
SSince 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
, We believe strong newspapers build.
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work. ,
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Remembering 2 who passed away


upon hearing that
Betty Haven had
died on Saturday was
to check my saved
e-mail. There it was - my last
correspondence with her, dated
June 10.
That e-mail is important to
me, because like many of you,
I'm not ready to let Betty go.
Her death was a shock, and
rereading her last editorial
comment helped me to stay con-
nected while the news of her
death sank in.
t'Typically, Betty's e-mails,
were of two varieties. She either
needed some press for whatever
current community adventure of
which she was part, or she was
thanking me and every staff
member involved, for providing
that coverage. Those e-mails
always came in pairs - never
did a request pass without a
thank you to follow.
And what a thank you Betty
could write. I share here a
portion of her last message
to me, concerning a story-we
had written about the Lake
City-Columbia County Humane
Society and animal shelter.

Subject line: Kudos to the
Lake City Reporter staff
Hi Guys and Dolls,
Your issue on the "Cats" was
phenomenal. Even before the
paper came out, Terry (Marques,
animal shelter director) was
excited at our Board meeting the
previous evening. I enjoyed your


Tom Mayer
tmayer@lakecityreportercom

column, Tom, especially the end
when you mentioned playing with
a spool of yarn at 2:00 AM. You
would have enjoyed watching
Munchkin, the black and white
Animal Shelter cat, parading up
and down the conference table
stopping momentarily in front
of each board member to receive
a little loving all during our
meeting. Jason (Walker, LCR
photographer) has already won
our hearts but more so now when
Terry said he was down on the
floor to get the best cat pictures.
We must not forget the great job
Antonia (Robinson, staff writer)
did. These two work so well
together ... a Dream Team.

It takes class to write a thank
you like that, and class Betty
Haven had in full supply. Highly
. educated and even more highly
civic minded, Betty shared her
time, talent and treasure and,
made Lake City a better place
for all of us. That was especially
true for those of us who might
otherwise have slipped away
unnoticed: the elderly, displaced
homemakers, single mothers.
Today there is a void engulf-


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Great way to celebrate Government bondage
Independence Day often leads to revolt


To the Editor:
Thanks you to the Lake City
Reporter for sponsoring the fire-
works display on July 4. They
were spectacular. A great way
to help Lake City celebrate our
independence.
Diane Walker
Lake City


To the Editor:
Reading how our Founding
Fathers fought for their inde-
pendence in 1776 should make
us proud as America was born.
The root causes of the.colonists
actions were too many restric-
tions, too many taxes and too
much government. This govern-
ment bondage led to the revolu-
tion. Does this sound familiar?
Since the Democrats gained


ing Lake City, the town and
community Betty and her
deceased husband, Bob, adopt-
ed more than two decades ago.

Farewell to 'The Boss'
And coming myself, like Betty
Haven, from more northern
pastures, this column would not
be complete without mention of
another recent death.
I grew up in New York and
during my life I've never known
an owner of the Yankees who
wasn't George Steinbrenner.
At the time Steinbrenner
took ownership of the team,
the Yankees were not the
world-class, billion dollar orga-
nization they are today. It took
Steinbrenner's win at any cost
- and any expense - drive to
do that.
What a drive that was: seven
World Series championships, 11
American League pennants and
16 AL East titles in less than
four decades.
And what a team. I remember
the Yankees signing Catfish
Hunter to a then-unheard-of
multi-million dollar contract
in 1975, and that summer we
were all Catfish on the pitcher's
mound in the sandlot
For almost 40 years,
Steinbrenner kept us enter-
tained, kept us angry and most
of all kept us proud of our con-
nection to the team that signi-
fies America's national pastime.
* Tom Mayer is'editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


control of Congress four years
ago and the presidency 18
months ago, America has been
free-falling. Their motto should
be "let go and let government"
"The meaning of America is
not to be found in a life without
toil. Freedom is not only bought
with great price; it is maintained
by unremitting effort," Calvin
Coolidge: Address at Johns
Hopkins University Feb. 22,
1922.
Bill Glover
Lake City


4A


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmaredu


Why doesn't

everyone

have tenure?

he Chronicle of
Higher Education
periodically reports
on the outlook for
the academic insti-
tution called "tenure." It isn't
good.
In fact, the current issue
includes an article titled
'Tenure, RIP: What the
Vanishing Status Means for the
Future of Education." Writer
Robin Wilson reports on a'
study by the U.S. Department
of Education showing that over
the last 30 years the percent-
age of the professoriate that is
tenured or on the tenure track
has "plummeted," from 57
percent ir 1975 to 31 percent
in 2007.
Other studies show similar
declines. At community col-
leges, which teach about half
of all American college stu-
dents, four out of five instruc-
tors are off the tenure track.
Around half of all undergradu-
ate courses at all colleges are
taught by "contingent" faculty,
instructors who are hired on a
short-term, part-time basis at a
pay rate that is extremely cost
effective for the institution,
if not for the instructor. The
trend is clear.
Not everyone thinks this is
a bad thing. Somehow, tenure
has acquired a reputation as
the source of many shortcom-
ings in American education.
From the outside, tenure
appears to provide a cushy job-
for-life that permits long, lazy,
unproductive careers, as well
as subsidized opportunities
for academics to make savage
attacks on the hand that feeds
them.
But at the college where I've
had tenure for many years, the
policy is clear: My job-for-life
is "terminable" in the case of
my program's decline or dis-
continuance or the college's
"financial exigency."
The policy also lists 17
infractions that could result
in dismissal, ranging from
"unprofessional conduct" to
"insubordination."
However, the one thing that
I can't be dismissed for- and
this is the point - stating or
publishing an idea or position
that the administration, the
governing board or the gen-
eral public doesn't approve of.
And if this is what tenure
really means, I wonder why
the guys who take out the
trash or mow the campus
lawns don't have it, as well.
I'm being only slightly face-
tious. After all, the reasons for
tenure's disrepute and decline
don't really have much to do
with what goes on in the class-
room.
What about tenure for cus-
todians and yardmen, at least
in terms of having the freedom
to' express their ideas without
fear of losing their jobs?
In fact, some form of
"tenure" might have come
in handy on the Deepwater
Horizon drilling rig, where
� I'm betting that experienced
tool pushers and drilling-floor
hands and lower-level manag-
ers and supervisors knew very
well that BP was pushing into
very risky territory.
Would things have turned
out differently if someone at
any level had been able to but-
tonhole C.E.O. Tony Hayward,
without fear of losing his job,
and say, "Pal, this thing's
gonna blow and the blowout
preventer ain't gonna stop it"?

* John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


Initiative aims to weed out -

crime, enhance life quality ua'X-


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Weed and Seed steer-
ing committee wants to
hear how certain areas can
be improved in Columbia
County.
Residents can voice their
opinions during a communi-
ty meeting at 6:30 p.m. today
at New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church.
Weed and Seed is an
initiative through the U.S:.
Department of Justice
designed to enhance the
quality of life in the area it
serves, said Ron Williams,
Columbia County Board of
Commissioners chairman
and head of the steering
committee. -In the past,
groups were awarded $1
million if selected to be a
Weed and Seed community,
he said.
The' weeding process
involves removing and pre-
venting crimes in. an area.
Seeding provides commu-
nity .revitalization.
Currently, no funding is
available for the Weed and
Seed program,, and applica-
tions are not being accept-


"The purpose of community
meeting is to get a clear
understanding of what we are trying
to accomplish."


Ron Williams
Chairman
Columbia County Board of Commissioners


ed, said Michelle Person,
public information officer
of the DOJ Office of Justice
Programs. There is a pro-
posed change for a new, but
similar, initiative known as.
the Burn Criminal Justice
Innovation Program for
which funding will not be
decided on until Congress
approves the 2011 budget.
However, the local steer-
ing committee is preparing
an application for submis-
sion once a program and
funding' has been estab-
lished, Williams said.
Part of the application
process is hosting com-
munity meetings to get
comments of what type of
improvements residents
want to see in the area, he
said. Today's is the second
community meeting.


The area identified in
Columbia County includes
Precinct 10, part of Precinct
12 and all of the Five Points
area.
The steering commit-
tee is made up of several
agencies representing law
enforcement, the school
board and family services.
'There are a lot of stake-
holders that bring some-
thing to the table," Williams
said.
People should come out
to .the meeting with any
questions, concerns about
Weed and Seed, he said.
"The purpose of commu-
nity meeting is to get a clear
understanding of what we
are trying to accomplish,"
Williams said. "It's very,
very important as many
people come out."


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Lake City Mayor Stephen Witt (left) and McAlister's Deli store manager Shane Ward pose for
a photograph Tuesday afternoon. The Lake City McAlister's Deli is participating in a contest
to win the title of Tea Town USA. Visitors can vote for the store daily at the store's website
and on Facebook and Twitter. the honor also yields a $5,000 prize to go to the city park and
recreations department for improvements.


Deli brews campaign


to win sweet tea title


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter. corn

Lake City, Tea Town USA
has a sweet ring to it.
Local officials definitely
thinks, and they are join-
ing with local McAlister's
Deli staff to help the local
store - and Lake City -
earn the title of Tea Town
USA in a nationwide com-
petition.
As one of McAlister's
Deli's 294 stores nation-
wide, the Lake City fran-
chise is battling it out online
- through its website,
Facebook and Twitter - to
win the contest. The win-
ner receives the Tea Town
USA title, a celebration at


the local store and $5,000
that will be given to the
city park and recreations
department for improve-
ments locally.
"With tight budgets, any-
thing that the private sector
can do to help the commu-
nity is very important," said
Lake City Mayor Stephen
Witt.
To help win the title,
visit www.teatownusa.com.
McAlister's Deli store
manager Shane Ward 'said
visitors can vote daily for
the Lake City store, and
points culminated from that
will have a big impact on
who is declared the even-
tual winner. Ward said the
Lake City store is currently


at the top of Florida loca-
tions, but trails other stores
nationwide.
"We're getting aa.lot of
community support, and
hopefully we can get a,
whole bunch of buzz for
this," he said.
Additional ways of col-
lecting points include online
competitions and challeng-
es, as well as showing up
on Free Tea Day, July 29.
The McAlister's that gives
away the most points on
that day will receive a large
chunk of points that may
boost a store to the top.
"It would be a great rec-
ognition for the commu-
nity," Witt said. "Besides,
everyone loves sweet tea."


CHECK


THIS


OUT!


COURTESY PHOTO
In this, image provided by local authorities Tuesday, the suspect in the string of local robberies
is shown on a TCBY security camera.


ROBBERIES: Suspect disguised himself


Continued From Page 1A

around 4:17 p.m. at the
Home Depot, 215 SW
Home Depot Drive, when
a white man walked to the
clerk in the store's garden
center and passed a note
demanding cash. -
Less than three hours
later, around 7:30 p.m.,
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office deputies were called
to the Tractor Supply
Company building, on West
U.S..Highway 90, when a
suspect, who didn't display
a weapon, gave the store
clerk a 'note demanding
money. The clerk refused'
and the suspect left. the
store without incident.
About 8 p.m., Lake City
Police Department officers,
were dispatched to another
possible robbery at TCBY
in the Westfield Square,
where a suspect walked
into the store and gave the


clerk a note demanding
money.
The clerk complied and
gave the suspect an undis-
closed amount of cash.
Blanchard said authori-'
ties are hoping someone
from the public comes for-
ward and is able to identify
the man from one of the
photos.
'We would rather have.
that information and find
out it is not the person than
to overlook a possible sus-
pect," he said.
Authorities say the sus-
pect took steps to disguise
himself at the different rob-
bery sites, by wearing .dif-


ferent hats or a wig, but
some of the clothing was.
the same from the other
robbery sites.
As the investigation con-
tinues, authorities plan to
analyze more of the video
surveillance tapes in an
attempt to identify the sus-
pect, as well as study evi-
dence.
"We did find some phys-
ical evidence at the scene
and we're currently pro-
cessing it to see wheth-
er it's valuable dr not,"
Blanchard said. "That,
unfortunately, will proba-
bly take quite a bit of time
for us to find out."


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


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has been skimmed from the sea, the beaches and estuaries have
been cleaned up, and the region has been pronounced oil-free.
And none of the costs of our efforts will be paid by taxpayers.

Our commitment is that we'll be here for as long as it takes.
We may not always be perfect, but we will make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
www.floridagulfresponse.com


@ 2010 BP E&P


<4


/ am from Louisiana and I know our beaches are our home,
our way of life and our livelihood. Protecting the4coast and
cleaning up the beaches is very personal to me.
- Keith Seilhan, BP Cleanup


bp


- , . 2 . -- Z- , ;.-.. - o , - t'. ". f.' .












Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


Wednesday, July 14, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

GATORS
Gator Club golf
tourney July 30
The North Florida
Gator Club will host its
annual golf
tournament on July 30
at The Country Club at
Lake City. All proceeds
benefit the club's
scholarship program.
Lunch is at 11:30 a.m.;
golf begins at 12:30 p.m.
For details, call Ron at
(386) 397-3378, Angela at
(386) 961-1766 or Ian at
(352) 3164305.

LAKE CITY OPEN
Tournament set
for Aug. 7-8
The Lake City Open
golf tournament is
Aug. 7-8. The first round
will be played at Quail
Heights Country Club
and the final round will
be played at The Country
Club at Lake City. Entry
fees are $90 for club
members and $100 for
non-members, $60 for
lady members and $70
for lady non-members
and $175 for pros. There
will be a $10 discount for
entries paid by Aug. 1.
Entry deadline is Aug. 5.
Format is 36-hole stroke
play for all divisions,
which are pre-flighted by
handicap. Seniors, ladies
.., and last flights will use
handicaps.
For details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266.

' YOUTH GOLF
Arrowhead Tour
hosts event


Arrowhead Junior Golf
Tour has The Bridges
Junior Classic in Bay St.
Louis MS for junior (ages
12-18) and college
golfers on July 24-25. The
36-hole tournament is
ranked by the National
Junior Golf Scoreboard.
Registration deadline is
6 p.m. Sunday.
To enter, go online at
www.arrowheadjgt.com.


FORT WHITE VOLLEYBA
J Camp planned
for July 26-28


ALL


Fort White High is
hosting a volleyball camp .
in the gym from 9 a.m. to
noon on July 26-28. The
camp is for girls
interested in trying out
for Fort White's
varsity, junior varsity and
middle school teams.
Registration forms are at
the school's front office.
Cost is $50 through today
($60 after) and includes a
camp T-shirt.
For details, call coach
Doug Wohlstein at
.(386) 497-5952.

fGU F i', .. " y-,'i.
Carter camp is
Friday-Saturday
The Jerome Carter
Football Camp for boys
and girls ages 7-14 is
Friday and Saturday at
Memorial Stadium. The
camp is co-sponsored
by the Columbia County
Recreation Department,
the Lake City Recreation
Department and the
Richardson Community
Center Annie Mattox
Park North Advisory
Council. Registration
is 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays at Richardson
Community Center. Cost
of $10 includes a T-shirt.
For details, call Adee
Farmer at 754-7096.

a From staff reports


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 8, file photo New York Yankees chairman and
principal owner George M. Steinbrenner (right) sits with his
daughter, Jennifer Steinbrenner Swindal, in the family' private
box watching the Yankees defeat the Philadelphia Phillies 7-5
in a spring training baseball game at Steinbrenner Field in
Tampa.'The Yankees owner died Tuesday.


Lake City All-Stars
begin tournament
on Thursday.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It was a perfect 5-0
for the Lake City A
All-Stars in district
play, and now it's on
to the state level for
the local troops.
Coach Shayne Edge is
hoping that the third
time is the charm for this
group.
"It's their third time
going to the state level
in three years," he said
from practice on Tuesday.
"We went down to West
Palm and the nine-year-
old team went to Sanford
last season. We finished
third in the state, but this
year we went 5-0 in the
district championship
tournament."
With a group that has
been together for three
years, Edge has seen the
dedication it takes to win
at the state level. It came
together for the All-Stars
during a championship
run that included a 10-0
win against Madison in the
final game.
'The closest anyone
came to beating us was a
6-2 win against Live Oak,"
Edge said. 'We were 10-
run ruling most of the
teams we played. I think
we have a really good
chance. We're practicing
really hard, and everything
* the coaches say to do, the
kids are doing it."
The tournament is in
the San Jose region of
Jacksonville beginning on
Thursday, and Edge plans
to have the team there
throughout the duration of
the tournament.
'The kids deserve to
stay," he said. "They've
worked hard to get there,
Sso we're going to let them
stay."
Out of the 10 teams that
made it to the state level,
Edge has heard through
the grapevine that Lake
City will be one of the


Steinbrenner dies at 80


Yankees owner
remembered for
winning attitude.

By RONALD BLUM
Associated Press

NEW YORK - George
Steinbrenner, whose big
wallet and win-at-all-cost
attitude whipped the New
York Yankees into a billion-
dollar sports empire, died
Tuesday. He had just cel-
ebrated his 80th birthday
July 4.
Steinbrenner had a
heart attack, was taken to
St. Joseph's Hospital in
Tampa, and died at about
6:30 a.m, a person close
to the owner told the
Associated Press. The per-
son spoke on condition
of anonymity because the
team had not disclosed
those details.
"George was The Boss,'
make no mistake," Hall
of Famer Yogi Berra said.
"He built the Yankees
into champions, and that's
something nobody can ever
deny. He was a very gen-
erous, caring, passionate
man. George and I had our


differences, but who didn't?
We became great friends
over the last decade and I
will miss him very much."
In 37-plus seasons as
owner, Steinbrenner led
the Yankees to seven World
Series championships, 11
American League pennants
and 16 AL East titles.
"He was and always will
be as much of a New York
Yankee as Babe Ruth, Lou
Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio,
Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra,
Whitey Ford and all of the
other Yankee legends,"
baseball commissioner Bud
Selig said. "Although' we
would have disagreements
over the years, they never
interfered with our friend-
ship and commitment to
each other. Our friendship
was built on loyalty and trust
and it never wavered."
Steinbrenner's death on
the day of the All-Star game
was the second in three
days to rock the Yankees.
Bob Sheppard, the team's
revered public address
announcer from 1951-07,
died Sunday at 99.
New York was 11 years
removed froni its last cham-
pionshipwhen Steinbrenner


headed a group that bought
the team from CBS Inc. on
Jan. 3, 1973, for about $10
million.
He revolutionized the
franchise - and sports
- by starting his own tele-
vision network and ball-
park food company. Forbes
now values the Yankees at
$1.6 billion, trailing only
Manchester United ($1.8
billion) and the Dallas
Cowboys ($1.65 billion).
"He was an incredible
and charitable man,", his
family said in a statement.
"He was a visionary and a
giant in the world of sports.
He took a great but strug-
gling franchise and turned
it into a champion again."
He ruled with obsessive
dedication to detail, over-
seeing everything from
trades to the airblowers
that kept his ballparks spot-
less. He admittedly was
overbearing, screaming at
all from commissioners to
managers to secretaries.
His reign was inter-
rupted for suspensions,
including a 15-month ban in
1974 after his guilty plea to
BOSS continued on 4B


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City Babe Ruth Baseball's 10-under A All-Stars show off the District 6 championship trophy on June 13. Team
members are (front row, from left) bat boy Colby Strickland, Ethan Umstead, Micah Krieghauser, Brock Edge, Noah Sapp and
Hunter Houston. Second row (from left) are Cody Collins, Dylan Blair, Chandler Parish, Noah Sapp, Austin Harris and
Caleb Strickland. Back row (from left) are head coach Shayne Edge and coaches Wayne Sapp and Sid Strickland.


Ryan Matthews is also on the te

teams to beat once the
tournament begins on
Thursday.
"In talking to some of
the coaches, I've heard we
should be in the mix," he
said. "We should be one of
the top one, two or three
teams."
Lake City opens with
the Mandarin Athletic
Association out of
Jacksonville at 9:30 a.m.
on Thursday. Edge has his
team focused on a game-
by-game basis.
"It doesn't matter who
we play," Edge said. "All
that matters is us. I ask
the kids before every
game who we're playing,
and they always tell me
it doesn't matter. We've
been telling them that if we
play our game we can beat


anybody, and if we don't
play up to our potential,
anybody can beat us."
The focus on team has
paid off for the All-Stars
to this point, and created
a team unity that Edge
credits with his teams'
success.
"Our strength is that
we're together," he said.
'We just enjoy each others
company. The chemistry is
very good. We have great
parents who are committed
to thisiteam, and when the
kids see that the parents
are committed, they
become more committed.
We have great base
coaches in Wayne Sapp,
and Sid Strickland. That's
why the team continues to
win."
With a group that has


been together for three
seasons, Edge knows
that he can count on
each player to carry their
weight. He doesn't like to
put an emphasis on any
position, and believes the
line-up is solid from top to
bottom.
"It's going to take
everyone together hitting
and pitching," he said.
"They're all going to have
to field, and there's no
one position.that's more
important than the other."
Lake City will continue
to play at 9:30 a.m. each
day with a win. A loss, and
the team would be forced
into back-to-back games.
Edge isn't looking at what
happens with a loss.
"We're down there to
win," he said. "We're not


down there to play around,
and the kids are buying
into that. They're buying
into the one out at a time
approach. They're buying
into what we're selling
them. It has shown."
Beside the state
tournament, the Lake City
All-Stars will also break
into individual competition.
Among the competitions
are base running, long toss
and a home run deiby.
Two players from each
team will compete for the
top-individual honor.
Nine players from each
team will be allowed to
compete in the around
the horn challenge. The
challenge will have each
player run around the
bases with the best times
advancing.


I


� �














LAKE CITY REPORTERSPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS - Tour de France, stage 10,
Chambery to Gap, France
GOLF
10:30 am.
ESPN - Exhibition, Champions
Challenge, at St.Andrews, Scotland

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pet GB
New York 56 32 .636 -
Tampa Bay 54 34 .614 2
Boston 51 37 .580 5
Toronto 44 45 .494 12'h
Baltimore 29 59 .330 27
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 49. 38 .563 -
Detroit 48 38 .558 'A
Minnesota 46 42 .523 3h
Kansas City 39 49 .443 10'/
Cleveland 34 54 .386 15'/
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 50 38 .568 -
LosAngeles 47 44 .516 4'
Oakland 43 46 .483 7'A
Seattle 35 53 .398 15
Today's Games
No garhes scheduled
Thursday's Games
Texas at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota,
8:10 p.m.
Seattle at L.A.Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 52 36 .591 -
NewYork 48 40 .545 4
Philadelphia 47 40 .540 4'A
Florida 42 46 .477 10
Washington 39 50 .438 13'v
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 49 41. .544 -
St. Louis 47 41 .534 I
Milwaukee 40 49 .449 8'h
Chicago - 39 50 .438 9h'
Houston 36 53 .404 12'h
Pittsburgh 30 58 .341 18
SWest Division
W L Pct GB
San Diego 51 37 .580 -
Cdlorado 49 39 .557 2
Los Angeles 49 39 .557 2
Sin Francisco 47 41 .534 4
'Arizona 34 55 .382 17'h
S Today's Games -
No games scheduled .
Thursday's Games
Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
. Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

AL leaders


Hamilton Tex
MiCabrera Det
'Morneau Min
.Boesch Det
Cano NYY
ABeltre Bos
"ISuzuki Sea
:DeJesus KC
Butler KC
.Crawford TB


AB R
341 59
312 64
296 53
243 34
342 61
324 44
362 35
328 45
329 44
330 70


H Pct.
118.346
108.346
102.345
83.342
115 .3.36
107.330
118.326
107.326
106.322
106.321


RUNS-Crawford, Tampa Bay, 70;
Youkilis, Boston, 67; MiCabrera, Detroit,
64; Teixeira, New York, 63; Cano, New
York, 61; Jeter, New York, 60; Hamilton,
Texas, 59.
RBI-MiCabrera, Detroit, 77;
Guerrero, Texas, 75; ARodriguez, New
.York, 70; Hamilton, Texas, 64; Konerko,
-Chicago, 63; TorHunter, Los Angeles, 62;
Longoria,Tampa Bay, 61; Quentin, Chicago,
61.
. HITS-Hamilton, Texas, 118; ISuzuki,
Seattle, 118; Cano, New York, 115;
MYoung, Texas, 109; MiCabrera, Detroit,
108;ABeltre, Boston, 107; Dejesus, Kansas
City, 107. /
DOUBLES-Markakis, Baltimore, 28;
.MiCabrera, Detroit, 27; Longoria, Tampa


Bay, 27;ABeltre, Boston, 26; Butler, Kansas
City, 26;VWells,Toronto, 26;AleGonzalez,
Toronto. 25; HamiltonTexas, 25; Morneau,
Minnesota, 25; DelmYoung, Minnesota, 25.
TRIPLES-Span, Minnesota, 7;
Crawford, Tampa Bay, 6; Pennington,
Oakland, 6;Youkilis, Boston, 5; 8 tied at 4.
HOME RUNS-JBautista,Toronto, 24;
MiCabrera, Detroit, 22; Hamilton, Texas.
22; Guerrero,Texas, 20; Konerko, Chicago,
20; Quentin, Chicago, 19;VWells,Toronto,
19. -'
STOLEN BASES-Pierre, Chicago, 32;
Crawford,Tampa Bay, 31; RDavis, Oakland,
27; Gardner, New-York, 25; Podsednik,
Kansas City, 25; BUpton, Tampa Bay,125;
Figgins, Seattle, 24.
PITCHING-Sabathia, NewYork, 12-3;
Price,Tampa Bay, 12-4;'Pettitte, NewYork,
11-2; PHughes, New York, 11-2; Lester,
Boston, 1-3; Verlander, Detroit, 1-5;
Buchholz, Boston, 10-4; Garza, Tampa Bay,
10-5; Pavano, Minnesota, 10-6.
STRIKEOUTS-JerWeaver, Los
Angeles, 137; FHernandez, Seattle, 131;
Lester, Boston, 124; Liriano, Minnesota,
117; Morrow, Toronto, I I; Verlander,
Detroit, I 10;JShields,Tampa Bay, 109.
SAVES-Soria, Kansas City, 25;
RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 23; NFeliz, Texas,
23; Gregg, Toronto, 20; Papelbon, Boston,
20; Rauch, Minnesota, 20; MRivera, New
York, 20.

NL leaders


Prado AtI
Ethier LAD
Polanco Phi
Byrd ChC
Pagan NYM
CGonzalez Col
DWright NYM
Votto Cin
Loney LAD
Pujols StL


G AB
87 372
70 275
62 261
87 331
80 298
77 325
87 3.25
84 309
88 337
87 321


R H Pct..
61 121 .325
43 89.324
39 83.318,
47 105.317
46,94.315
56 102.314
52 102.314
59 97.314
47 104.309
55 99.308


RUNS-BPhillips, Cincinnati, 66; Prado,
Atlanta, 61; Votto, Cincinnati, 59; Kemp,
Los Angeles, 58; CGonzalez, Colorado, 56;
Uggla, Florida, 56;Weeks, Milwaukee, 56.
RBI-Hart, Milwaukee, 65; Howard,
Philadelphia, 65; DWright, New York, 65;
Pujols, St.Louis, 64; Loney, Lbs Angeles, 63;
CYoung, Arizona, 61; Gomes, Cincinnati,
60; CGonzalez, Colorado, 60; Votto.
Cincinnati, 60.
HITS-Prado, Atlanta, 121; BPhillips,
Cincinnati, 108; Byrd, Chicago, 105; Loney,
Los Angeles, 104; Braun, Milwaukee, 102;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 102; DWright, New
York, 102.
SDOUBLES-Byrd, Chicago, 27;Werth,
Philadelphia, 27; Dunn, Washington, 26;
Holliday, St. Louis, 25; Loney, Los Angeles,
25; Prado, Atlanta, 25; DWright, New
York, 25.
TRIPLES-Victorino, Philadelphia, 8;
SDrew,Arizona, 7; Fowler, Colorado, 7; Bay,
NewYork, 6; Pagan, NewYork, 6;JosReyes,
New York, 6; AEscobar, Milwaukee,. 5;
Furcal, LosAngeles, 5; Morgan,Washington,
5; Olivo, Colorado; 5.
HOME RUNS-Dunn,Washington,22;
Votto, Cincinnati, 22; Hart, Milwaukee, 21;
Pujols, St. Lois 21; Fielder, Milwaukee, 20;
Reynolds, Arizona, 20; AdGonzalez, San
Diego, 18.
STOLEN BASES-Bourn, Houston,
28; AMcCutchen,' Pittsburgh, 20; Morgan,
Washington, 20; Pagan, New York,-19;
JosReyes, NewYork, 19; HRamirez, Florida,
18; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 17; Torres, San
Francisco, 17; Victorino, Philadelphia, 17;
CYoung,Arizona, 17.
PITCHING--imenez, Colorado, 15-
I; Wainwright, St. .Louis, 13-5; Pelfrey,
New York, 10-4; Latos, San Diego, 10-4;
Halladay, Philadelphia, 10-7; 10 tied at 9.
STRIKEOUTS-Lincecum, . San
Francisco, 131; Halladay, Philadelphia, 128;
Kershaw, Los Angeles, 128;Wainwright, St.
Louis, 127; Haren,Arizona, 125;JoJohnson,
Florida, 123; Gallardo,,Milwaukee, 122.
SAVES-FCordero, Cincinnati, 24;
HBell, San Diego, 24; Capps,Washington,
23; BrWilson, San Francisco, 23;
FRodriguez, New York, 21; Lindstrom,
Houston, 21; Nunez, Florida, 20; Wagner,
Atlanta, 20.

GOLF

Golf week

ROYAL & ANCIENT GOLF CLUB
OF ST.ANDREWS
British Open
Site: St.Andrews, Scotland.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: St: Andrews, Old Course


(7,305 yards, par 72).
Purse: $7.19 million. Winner's share:
$1,273,790.
Television: ESPN (Thursday-Friday;
5 a.m.-6 p.m., 7-10 p.m.; Saturday, 7 a.m.-
3 p.m., 7-10 p.m.; Sunday, 6 a.m.- 1:30 p.m.)
and ESPN2,(Sunday, 9 p.m.-midnight).
Online: http://www.opengolfcom
PGA Tour site: http://www.pgatour.com
PGA European Tour site: http://www.
europeantour.com
PGATOUR
Reno-Tahoe Open
Site: Reno, Nev.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Montreux Golf and Country
Club (7,472 yards, par 72).
Purse: $3.5 million. Winner's share:
$630,000.
Television: Golf 'Channel (Thursday,
4-7 p.m.; Friday-Sunday, 1-4 a.m., 4-7 p.m.;
Monday, 1:30-4:30 a.m.).
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Chiquita Classic
Site: Maineville, Ohio.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: TPC River's Bend (7,180
yards, par 72).
Purse: $550,000. Winner's share:
$99,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
2-4 p.m.; Friday-Sunday, 8-9:30 a.m.,
2-4 p.m.; Monday, 8-9:30 a..).
LPGATOUR
Next event: Evian Masters, July 22-25,
Evian Masters Golf Club, Evian-les-Bains,
France.
Online: http://www.lpgo.com
CHAMPIONSTOUR
Next event: Senior British Open, July
22-25, Carnoustie Golf Links, Carnoustie,
Scotland.
OTHERT6URNAMENTS
Men
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION: U.S.
Amateur Public Links Championship,
through -Saturday, Bryan Park Golf &
Conference Center, Champions Course,
Greensboro, N.C. Online: http://www.
usgo.org

CYCLING

Tour de France

Tuesday
Ninth Stage
(A 127.1-mile ride in the Alps from
Morzine-Avoriaz to Saint-Jean-de-
Maurienne-five climbs, including the first
"Hors" Category climb of this year's tour
and two Category I climbs)
I. Sandy Casar, France, Francaise des
SJeux, 5 hours, 38 minutes, 10 seconds:
2. Luis-Leon Sanchez, Spain, Caisse
d'Epargne, same time. ,
3. Damiano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-
Farnese, 2 seconds behind.
10. Levi Leipheimer, United States,
Team RadioShack, 2:07.
18. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Team RadioShack, 2:50.
Overall Standings
I. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team
Saxo Bank, 43 hours, 35 minutes, 41
seconds.
2. Alberto Contador, Spain,Astana, 41
seconds behind.
3. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadi, 2:45.
6. Levi Leipheimer, United States,Team
RadioShack, 3:59.
31. Lance Armstrong. United States,
Team RadioShack. 15:54.

July 13 - Stage 9, Morzine-Avoriaz-
Saint-Jean-de-Mauriennre, high moun-
tain, 204.5 (127.1) (Sandy Casar, France;
Schleck)
'July 14- Stage 10, Chambery-Gap,
medium mountain, 179 (111.2)
July 15 - Stage I I, Sisteron-Bourg-
les-Valence, plain, 184.5 (114.6)
July 16 - Stage 12, Bourg-de-Peage-
Mende, hilly, 21,0.5 (130.8)
July 17 - Stage 13, Rodez-Rev1l,
plain, .196 (121.8)
July 18 - Stage 14, Revel-Ax-3
Domaines, high mountain, 184.5 (114.6)
July 19- Stage 15, Pamiers-Bagnes-
de-Luchon, high mountain, 187 (116.2)
July 20 - Stage 16, Bagneres-de-
Luclhon-Pau, high mountain, 199.5
(124.0)
July 21 - Rest day in Pau
July 22 - Stage 17, Pau-Col du
Tourmalet, high mountain, 174 (108.1)
July 23 - Stage 18, Salies-de-Bearn-
Bordeaux, plain, 198 (123.0)
July 24 - Stage 19, Bordeaux-
Pauillac, individual time trial, 52 (32.3)


BRIEFS


ALL-STARS
Fort White 15U
fundraiser set
Fort White Baseball's
15-under All-Stars will have
a yard sale and car wash
at Walgreen Drug Store in
Lake City from 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday. The team
is raising money for a trip
to the state tournament in
Fernandina Beach.
For details, call Jeanne
Howell at 497-2962.

TRACK

Oak Hall camp
starts Monday
A track camp for ages
10 and older is 8:30 a.m.
to noon Monday through
July 23 at Oak Hall School
in Gainesville. Former
Columbia High runner
Dusty Smith is camp
instructor. Cost is $195.
SFor details, contact
Smith at
pusty@halfmiletiming. com,
or go to www.oakhall.org to
sign up.


SWIMMING

Lifeguard class

offered July 22-24


lifeguard class is offered
on July 22-24. Fee is $160.
For details, call Drew
Sloan at 755-8195.


An American Red Cross N From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
JV by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek'
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Watch your TRAN
one letter to each square, back They're GLOBAL
to form four ordinary words. I heavy AIRLINES
I CAINP I Ixeet llots
CAINP E i of exercise!


Answer here:


Yesterday's Jumble:
Answer:


(Answers tomorrow)
MOUNT TACKY HITHER IRONIC
What she went through on her successful
diet - THICK AND THIN


GOLF REPORTS


Cox, Reeves tops in Toss


Saturday was the MGA
Toss Tournament was
Saturday. In the format, a
player can toss the ball on
each hole and it doesn't
count as a stroke.
Chris Cox won the A
flight gross with a 54. Larry
Reeves won first net with a
48 and Garrett Odom won
second net with a 50.
In the B flight, Snuffy
Smith was gross winner
with a 65. Al Cohoon won
first net with a 48 and Joe
Herring. was second net
with a 51.'
Wednesday Blitz winners:
A Division - Chris Cox,
first Chet Carter, second;
Terry Mick and Don Horn,
tied for third;'
B. Division - Tim
Tortorice, first; Sheltonr


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy Gainey

Keen, second; Emerson
Darst, third;
C Division - Pete
Skankzos, first; Joe
Herring, second; Gary
Dampier, third;
D Division - Gerald
Smithy, first; Keith
Denmark, second; Chuck
White and Richard Skipper,
tied for third.
Cox and Carter each had
two skins. Tortorice and
Keen had one.
Eight teams played in the
Wednesday Scramble.
The team of Kevin
Odom, Joe Herring and
Keith Hudson took the win


at 4-under-par.
The team of Joann Lee,
Darlene Horn and Sue
Terlage braved the weather
and, won the Ladies Day
scramble on July 6.
STop of the Hill winners
from July 5:
A Division - Ralph
Beelkman, first; Don Horn
,and Shelton Keen, tied for
second;
B Division - Joe
Herring, first; Gerald
Smithy, second.
The next Junior Clinic is
July 26-30.
We have a new V1 Golf
Analysis System. It gives
a clear understanding of
your current golf swing and
how to improve it - "the
key to lower scoring" and
less frustration.


No doubt in Diamond Extreme


There was no doubt
about the -winning team
in the Diamond -Extreme
tournament. Billy King,
Chris Stamper, Charlie
Culp and Tony Kent shot
61 for an impressive four-
stroke win over two teams.
Runner-up teams were-
Joey Edge, Mike Tuley,
Brian Dicks and Garrett
Hill, and Charlie Timmons,
Kirk Koon, Garrett Finnell
and Kevin Stalder.
Closest to the pin prizes
went to Koon, Kent and
Timmons.
Charlie Timmons ran
away with Wednesday Blitz
with a score of +11. Don
Combs settled for second
with +5. Claude Ste-Marie
and Travis Timmons tied
for third at +4.
The first four holes
produced four winners in
the skins game. Jonathan
Allen, Travis Timmons,
Steve Patterson and Combs
had the only birdies on
those holes. Jordan Hale
broke the string with a
winner on No. 12.


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

All three pot holes
dodged the bullet again
and carried over.
Positive scores were
scarce in the Saturday
Blitz. Scott Kishton and
Steve Thomas had the only
positive numbers at +4 to
split all the winnings.
Thomas' two birdies
and Kishton's birdie also
took the lion's share of
skins. Steve Patterson and
Andrew Johnson had one
each.
The LGA completed a
two-month long quest to
find the most improved
players and the "ringers."
Natalie Bryant eked out
the most improved title by
a minuscule .013 strokes
over Caroline Stevens.
Players used their best
scores on each hole for the
whole period to earn the
"ringers" title.
Gross ringer was Cathy


,{ er, , ..i 3.j"Get


ACROSS 3
4
1 Mosey along
6 Shamelessly 4
bold 4
12 Celtic priests 4
14 Picked up
15 Colorful annual 4
16 Thinks the
same 4
17 PC key 4
18 Cubs org. 5
19 Meadow mur- 5
mur
21 Lamas'chants 5
23 Natural elevs. 5
26 Portable bed 5
27 Ms. Thurman
of films
28 Downy fruit
30 Likely
31 Util. bill '
32 Excessive
interest
33 Light brown
35 Rascal
37 Sen. Kennedy
38 Monica - of
tennis


19 Python
10 Brenda or
Peggy
11 Cook's vessel
12 Newman role
.3 Novelist -
Rand
4 Cousin of a
banjo
*6 Subside
18 Masculine
i1 Thundered
55 Invented a
word
56 More curious
57 Calcutta cash
58 Quick kisses

DOWN

1 Wood-shaving
tool
2 3-D scan
3 Cinnamon -
4 Ronstadt or
Hunt
5 Ms. Falco
6 Lets slip
7 Fixes the fight


Steen at 68, followed by
Sally Rivers. Net ringers
were Nicole Ste-Marie and
Dottie Rogers in a dead
heat at 50.
The highlight of Good
Old Boys play was an eagle
on the par-5 No. 9 hole by
Monty Montgomery.
In the featured team
match, Ed Snow, Joe
Persons, Jim Stevens and
Carl Jones took a three-
way contest over Monty
Montgomery, Bobby
Simmons, Jim Bell and
Mike Spencer, 7-5.
Stan Woolbert, Bill
Wheeler, Jim Evans and
Dan Stephens finished
third with 4 points.
Montgomery needed
his eagle to put him in the
medalist seat with 37-34-71
over Woolbert at 35-37-72.
Simmons and Snow
shared front-nine honors
with 39. Evans was the solo f
back nine winner with 39.
The next Junior Golf
Clinic is July 20-23. Thef
nextJunior Tennis Camp is:
July 27-30.


.. . ".vww.laKecltyreporter.com
S. Lake City
4w Reporter




Answer to Previous Puzzle


SUINEKELP ASH
OHE URSA DOOR
AAH BRUT LU GE
MURALS SHIP
LUNA ABBY
KI WDNLEYO WE
MESHOEOSONCIE
AMTISIPMVP EIL
VIR FIANCE
RE BA ORJAIL
URNS S NA F US
PASO WAl F T RU
OLEO IDLE EAR
WAIL K MOO R0 R JYJE


8 Chalets, often
(hyph.)
9 Sault - Marie
10 Look at
11 NFL gains
13 Seven-veil dancer


19 She lost her
sheep (2
wds.)
20 - the Hun
22 Chevy model
24 Without any
slack
25 Block from
view
26 Hansoms
27 Sporty trucks
28 Insect stage
29. Jekyll's alter
ego.
34 Real
36 Up-to-date
42 Pays atten-
tion
43 Humiliate
45 "Fish Magic"
artist
47 Old comics
flapper
48 TV hookup
49 Debt memo
50 Pants prob-
lem
52 Rocker-
Ocasek
53 Startled cry
54 Rx givers


7-14 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


I


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


T'JoW r J2I 7 /4VE- ro,
F)C61/R oUTiF Te pEtviL 16
ATriILA 7rE HLI oR eRIC
7rEogL.., -


DEAR ABBY: My girl-
friend, "Donna," and I have
shared a wonderful relation-
ship for nearly three years.
During her college days she
had a sexual encounter with
her best female friend. (They
had been friends since high
school.)
Although they graduated
from college five years ago,
they continue to see each oth-
er. Donna tells me that noth-
ing sexual goes on between
them. Personally, I don't trust
her friend. Please help me
get over this. - TONY IN
WH=ITIER
DEAR TONY: Forget
about not trusting Donna's
longtime friend. Do you trust.
Donna? You have been to-
gether nearly three years and
obviously, you talk about ev-
erything. Ask her if, after ex-
perimenting with her friend,
she still has hankerings in
that direction. If the answer is
no, believe her.
DEAR ABBY: I have been
in a relationship with a lady
for the past few months. How
do I tell her that I want out
without hurting her badly?
I have tried a couple of
times to end- things; but she
gets hysterical, starts crying
and accuses me of wanting
someone else, which is not:
true. Please give me some
advice. - IN A FIX, PAS-
CAGOULA, MISS.
DEAR IN A FIX: If you
want out, prepare yourself for


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
her emotional reaction. As
you can see, she does not take
this kind of news well. Tell her
again that you want to end the
relationship. When she starts
crying and accusing you of
wanting someone else, hand
her a tissue and tell her you
think she's "great," but you're
not ready to settle down with
anyone right now.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band doesn't like to go to
funerals. In the 25 years we
have been together, I think
he has only been to three
- and that was only be-
cause he had been asked to
be a pallbearer. Fortunately,
we haven't had to deal with
many losses on either side
of the family.
We were talking recently
and he shared that he would
not go to his own mother's
funeral! They have a very
close relationship, and he
explained that he only wants
to remember her in life, not
in a coffin. I feel he should
set aside his own uncomfort-
able feelings and be there
for the rest of the family -
especially his brothers and


sisters. What do you think?
- PAM IN SPRING-
FIELD, OHIO
DEAR PAM: Your hus-
band's feelings may change
when the inevitable hap-
pens. However, whatever
he decides - and I cannot
stress this strongly enough
- you should back him up,
be there for him and not
judge him.
DEAR ABBY: I recently
completed' my first year of
college. During the year, I
met my current boyfriend.
My goal this summer is to
have him meet my parents.
Because we live six hours
apart, I thought it would
be best if he stayed over at
my parents' house - in the
guest room, of course.
My father objected to
it, but said that if it were
deemed acceptable by you,
he would reconsider. What
do you say, Abby? Is there
really a problem with having
one's boyfriend sleep over
at one's parents' house? -
CURIOUS CO-ED
DEAR CURIOUS CO-
ED: If the sleeping accom-
modations are as you have
described - and as long as
there isn't any hanky-panky
going on in the wee hours
of the morning - I see no
problem with it.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): An emotional
matter that concerns one of
your peers can upset mat-
ters at work and at home.
Strive for perfection in all
,that you do to avoid criti-
cism. Don't limit your op-
tions because you don't
think you have enough ex-
perience. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Matters pertain-
ing to children or social ac-
quaintances will raise some
doubt Be direct Work
responsibilities may get to
you but your ability to deal
with matters efficiently will
lead to a better position and
greater income. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Expand your in-
terests, turning something
you enjoy doing into a prof-
itable endeavor. Don't make
an impulsive decision about
someone. This person is'
likely to have something to
offer you that you will value
in the future. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You need to be
on your toes and ready
to make changes if called
for. Love is on the rise, so
alterations at home that ac-
commodate your personal
needs should be put into
play. Don't let uncertainty
confuse you. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
.22): You cannot let some-
one else. redirect you for


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

'his or her own purposes.
Take control of your finan-
cial situation as.well as your
prospects for the future.
Emotional issues will be
costly if you lend cash or
possessions. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You can form an al-
liance with someone who
shares your issues of con-
cern. A personal matter can
be taken care of with a little
bit of a push on your part.
Once you know what you
want, don't be afraid to ask.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Be smart about the
way you do things, especial-
ly if it will affect people you
are close to. Taking matters
into your own hands with-
out getting the approval of
others will have its reper-
cussions. A partnership
may be in jeopardy if you
overreact or are indulgent.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You have some-
.thing to offer that you've
been sitting on because
you don't think it's ready.
You are losing valuable
time while others pass you
by. Get on with whatever
you've been working to-
ward and present and pro-
mote. ****


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): There is the
chance you'll meet with op-
position, emotional decep-
tion, added burdens and
anguish if you don't pull
your weight. Find a way to
turn an investment into a
valuable commodity. Con-
sider real estate or projects
that can make money from
home. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You cannot
lose as long as you don't
hesitate. You have plenty of
passion, lots of interest and
certainly the opportunity to
bring people together and
to turn something small
into something large. Mon-
ey is in the picture and a
loving partnership is appar-
ent. -*****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You have more
to offer than you realize;
Let your experience speak
for itself. You will be offered
favors for your knowledge
and will impress someone
who interests you as a part-
ner. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): There is
work to be done but with
it comes satisfaction, rec-
ognition and advancement.
You have what it takes to
step into a leadership posi-
tion. The time to make both
professional and personal
change is now. ***


FRANK & ERNEST


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: I equals K
"YKL PLWOXYF TS YKXHVN VTXHV TH
WPTZHC JL XN JTPL XHYLPLNYX-HV
YKWH YKL SWHYWNXLN TS YKL
MTPOC X MTPI XH." - CLHHXN
KT E EL P
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Recommend to your children virtue; that alone can
make them happy, not gold." - Ludwig van Beethoven
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 7-14


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY


Bisexual past overshadows

couple's close relationship


Page Editor: Emma Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods plays a shot on the 10th hole during a practice round on the Old Course at St
Andrews, Scotland, prior to the British Open Golf Championship, on Tuesday.


Woods going for more


history at home of golf


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland
- From the middle of the
ninth fairway, just to the
right of a pot bunker that
he managed to avoid, Tiger
Woods considered two
options from 85 yards into a
gentle breeze and executed
both.of them perfectly.
He gave a hard rap with
his new putter and sent the
ball bouncing along the
links of St. Andrews until
it rolled onto the green
and settled 12' feet left of
the flag. Then with a sand
wedge, Woods sent the ball
into the air with just the
right trajectory. It never left
the flag and stopped about
6 feet away.
' The sand wedge was the
safer shot, and the right
one for this day.
"But it depends on the
wind," Woods said later dur-
ing his practice round at the
British Open. "If the wind
is 'blowing hard, you can't
hit it in the air. You have to
putt it."
For Woods, the key to
the British Open always has
been about control.
. This year, that holds true
on and off the golf course.
His biggest test Tuesday
came not from the gorse
bushes and pot bunkers
that dot the landscape on
the Old Course, but from a
full house of reporters who
wanted to know as much
about his personal, life. as
how he plans to play the
Road Hole.
: Unlike his last big press
conference at a major, he
didn't lose his cool.
: Asked about his mar-
riage at the U.S. Open, he
snapped back, "That's none


of your business." Asked
on Tuesday if his divorce
is final, Woods calmly said,
"I'm not going to go into
that."
He did reveal details of a
breakup - with his putter.
Woods is changing the flat
stick for the first time in 12
years, going to a Nike model
that he says will allow him
to cope with greens that are
on the slow side.
One reporter grilled him
on his language, his spit-
ting, throwing clubs and
his tantrums on the golf
course, then asked if he had
any plans to be respectful at
the home of golf.
"I'm trying to become
a better player and a bet-
ter person, yes," Woods
replied.
Of the 34 questions he
fielded, only 16 of them were
related tq his game, the
claret jug and St Andrews.
Then again, Woods already
has answered plenty of
questions about winning an
Open at the home of golf.
The way he has played
the last two times at
St. Andrews, it looks as
though he owns the place.
Woods captured his first
claret jug in 2000 when he
did not hit into a single
bunker all week - talk
about control - and won
by eight shots with a record
score to par of 19-under
269. He won by five shots
when the Open returned to
St. Andrews five years
later.
Now, he has a chance at
even more history in a gray
old town dripping with it.
No one has ever won the
claret jug three times at
St.. Andrews. Woods
remains the betting favor-
ite, and not even his biggest


rivals dispute that he likely
will be a factor.
"I think he's going to
play well here because he
has a lot of heart, he's got
an incredible short game
and he hits the ball a long
ways," Phil Mickelson said.
"His irons are as good as
anybody's in the game, and
I think the golf course ...
he's obviously won on it
twice. He has gutted out
two fourth-place finishes in
majors when he probably
didn't have his best stuff,
and this course sets up very
well for him.
"So he will be in conten-
tion on Sunday," Mickelson
said. "I don't know how any-
body can question that."
Yet there remain so many
questions.
Woods caused a small stir
last week when he flew to
Ireland for a two-day charity
event that ended Tuesday,
and instead of sticking
around to get adjusted to
links golf, flew home to
Florida to spend time with
his children.
Five years ago when
he last won the Open at
St, Andrews, he had been
married nine months.. He
now can barely escape a
press conference without
getting questions about the
chaos in his personal life.
His image is not what it
once was, although Woods
doesn't think that matters
when he puts a tee in the
ground.
"I'm here to play a cham-
pionship, and this is the
Open Championship at St.
Andrews," he said. "I mean,
this is as good as it gets. It's
the home of golf. I'm just
like every other player in
this field. ... I would like to
win no matter what."


BOSS: Demanded championships


Continued From Page 1B

conspiring to make illegal
contributions to President
RichardNixon's re-election
campaign. He was pardoned
15 years later by President
Ronald Reagan.
The son of a shipping
magnate, Steinbrenner
lived up to his billing as
"the Boss," a nickname he
earned and clearly enjoyed
as he ruled with an iron fist.
While he lived in Tampa he
was a staple on the front
pages of New York news-
papers.
"He was truly the most
influential and innovative
owner in all of sports," for-
mer New York Mayor Rudy
Giuliani said. "He made
the Yankees a source of
great pride in being a New
Yorker."
Steinbrenner's man-
sion, on a leafy street in
an older neighborhood of
south Tampa, was quiet
Tuesday. Private security
guards milled around on
the empty circular driveway
inside the gates. A police
Officer turned away report-
ers along thenarrow street.
News vehicles lined the
other side of the street.


'The passing of George
Steinbrenner marks the
end of an era in New York
City baseball history," rival
Mets owners Fred and Jeff
Wilpon and Saul Katz said.
"George was a larger than
life figure and a force in the
industry."
Steinbrenner was known
for feuds, clashing with
Berra and hiring manager
Billy Martin five times while
repeatedly fighting with him.
But as his health declined,
Steinbrenner let sons Hal
and Hank run more of the
family business.
Steinbrenner was in frag-
ile health for years, result-
ing in fewer public appear-
ances arid pronouncements.
Yet dressed in his trade-
mark navy blue blazer and
white turtleneck, he was
the model of success.
"Few people have had a
bigger impact on New York
over the past four decades
than George Steinbrenner,"
Mayor Michael Bloomberg
said. "George had a deep
love for New York, and
his steely determination
to succeed combined with
his deep respect and appre-


ciation for talent and hard
work made him a quintes-
sential New Yorker."
He appeared at the new
$1.5 billion Yankee Stadium
just four times: the 2009
opener, the first two games
of last year's World Series
and this year's homer open-
er, when captain Derek
Jeter and manager Joe
Girardi went to his suite
and personally delivered his
seventh World Series ring.
"He was very emotional,"
said Hal Steinbrenner, his
father's successor as man-
aging general partner.
Till the end, Steinbrenner
demanded championships.
He barbed Joe Torre dur-
ing the 2007 AL playoffs,
then let the popular man-
ager leave after another
loss in the opening round.
The team responded last
year by winning another
title.
"I will always remember
George Steinbrenner as a
passionate man, a tough
boss, a true visionary, a
great humanitarian, and a
dear friend," Torre said.
"It's only fitting that he went
out as a world champ."


. , British Open facts & figures


Event: 139th British Open
Dates:July 15-18
Site: St.Andrews (Old Course)
Length: 7,305 yards
Par: 36-36-72
Field: 156 players (nine amateurs).
Prize money: 4.8 million British
pounds (approximately $7.3 million).
Winner's share: 850,000 pounds
(approximately $1.3 million).
Defending champion: Stewart Cink.
Last year: Cink was a winner and a
villain at Turnberry, easily winning the
four-hole playoff and denying 59-year-old
Tom Watson a chance to become golf's
oldest major champion. Cink holed a
12-foot birdie putt on the 18th hole that


St.Andrews layout

No. I, 376 yards, par 4 (Burn): A
short opening hole with no bunkers in
the generous fairway, the only issue being
the Swilcan Burn that runs down the
right side of the fairway and across the
face of the green. As with everything at
St.Andrews, the wind dictates the ease of
this hole. It can be a long iron off the tee
and a lob wedge, or a driver and mid-iron.
Players should avoid going after a hole
location toward the front of the green.
No. .2, 453 yards, par 4 (Dyke):
The ideal tee shot is a drive between
Cheape's bunker on the left at just over
300 yards from the tee and the edge of
the rough qn the right, which features
thick gorse. Championship pin positions
are often found on the high left side of
the green beyond a sharp ridge that can
throw the ball left into a deep bunker
or right toward the lower level of the
green.
No. 3, 397 yards, par 4 (Cartgate
Out): Another good birdie opportunity
in favorable conditions.The drive should
be to the right side of the fairway, which
is lined with three pot bunkers and small
gorse bushes. That leaves the best .angle
to avoid Cartgate Bunker, which is shaped
like a crescent and cuts deeply into the
.left side of the green. A small, subtle
ridge in front of the green can produce
strange kicks.
No. 4, 480 yards, par 4 (Ginger
Beer): The options off the tee are to go
straight at the flag down a narrow strip of
fairway hemmed by dunes and gorse or
to take the drive over mounds on the left,
wherethe fairway widens to merge with
the inward 15th hole.The farther left the
tee shot, the more difficult the approach
with a bunker on the left and the green
sloping away to the right.
No. 5, 568 yards, par 5 (Hole
O'Cross Out): Typically the easiest hole
on the Old Course at most champion-
ships. One of only two par 5s, but easily
reachable in two shots as long as the
wind is not into the players' faces. The
tee shot must avoid seven bunkers on
the right between 270 and 320 yards.The
best place to lay up is between two spec-
tacle bunkers.The sheer size of the green
- 92 yards from front to back - can
frustrate many birdie chances.
No.6,412 yards, par 4 (Heatherly
Out):The tee shot is completely blind,so
bunkers to the left and right are hidden
as the hole drops to a lower level beyond


appeared to be good only for second
place.Watson only needed a par on the
final hole. His 8-iron went long, he putted
to 8 feet and missed the putt. Cink made
two birdies in the playoff to capture his
first major.
Last time at St.Andrews:Tiger Woods
took the lead with a birdie on the ninth
hole of the opening round and never gave
it back over the final 63 holes. He closed
with a 2-under 70 for a five-shot victory
over Colin Montgomerie.
Open champions at St.Andrews:Tom
Kidd (1873), Bob Martin (1876, 1885),
Jamie Anderson (1879), Robert Ferguson
(1882),Jack Burns (1888), Hugh Kirkaldy
(1891), J.H. Taylor (1895, 1900), James

the gorse-covered ridge. A hidden dip
runs across the front of the green, mak-
ing the approach shot deceptive. Still, it
should be nothing more than a wedge to
a relatively flat putting surface.
No. 7, 371 yards, par 4 (High
Out): This starts the famous St.Andrews
loop, a six-hole stretch of short par 4s
and two par 3s. On the only true dogleg
on the Old Course, most players will hit
iron to a flat area beyond a large mound
where the seventh and I Ith holes cross.
The green is guarded by Shell.Bunker and
slopes from left to right.
No. 8, 175 yards, par 3 (Short):
The only par 3 on the outward nine,
with the skyline of St. Andrews and its
prominent towers and steeples on the
.horizon. Depending on the wind, this
can be a short iron or a 5-iron. A large
green is partly obscured by a ridge, and
while relatively flat, the tough hole loca-
tion is behind a vertical-faced bunker on
the left side.
No. 9, 352 yards, par 4 (End):This
might play as a long par 3 for some big
hitters because the green is relatively
flat with no trouble in front of it; making
it reachablee off the tee. Gorse bushes
creep close to the left edge of the green,
but there is a wide expanse of fairway
between the gorse and two bunkers on
the right
No. 10, 386 yards, par 4 (Bobby
Jones): In calm conditions, this is anoth-,
er par 4 that can be reached off the tee.
The landing area is tighter, with rough to
the left and two small bunkers on the
right about 290 yards away. The green
slopes much more than the ninth hole,
falling away from a raised front.
No. II, 174 yards, par 3 (High In):
The final par 3, and far more intimidating
than the other. It could be anything from
a 9-iron to a 3-iron depending on the
wind.The green is guarded by bunkers so
severethat Bobby Jones once tore up his
card after three swings in one of them.A
ball in Strath Bunker in front of the green
could require players to go backward.
The green slopes severely to the front.
No. 12,348 yards, par 4 (Heathery
In): This short hole is deceptive because
of four bunkers that are hidden from the
tee. Craig Wood first drove the green
in the 1933 Open, and Sam Snead did it
in 1946. The hole location dictates the
line of the tee shot. The top level of a
two-tiered green is only 12 paces deep
and demands utmost accuracy with the
wedge. Look for most players to go for


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'


ff you are interested in being a Sponsor,

Please call Mary at 386-754-0401

TO ENTER:
Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00) to the Lake City
Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056,
or email information & photo to ads@lakecityreporter.com subject:
Baby Contest


All pictures will be published along with the winners in
the Lake City Reporter's July 25, 2010 edition. So show off
your child, grandchild, godchild, niece or nephew.



I' DEADLINE:

r" July 16th, 2010
For More Information Please Call Mary at 754-0401


Braid (1905, 1910),Jock Hutchison (1921),
Bobby Jones (1927), Denny Shute (1933),
Dick Burton (1939), Sam Snead (1946),
Peter Thomson (1955), Bobby Locke
(1957), Kel Nagle (1960), Tony Lema
(1964), Jack Nicklaus (1970, 1978), Seve
Ballesteros (1984), Nick Faldo (1990),
John Daly (1995), Tiger Woods (2000,
2005). No one has ever won the British'
Open more than twice at St.Andrews.
Noteworthy: Tom Watson has won
the British Open on every course in
Scotland except for St.Andrews.
Quoteworthy: "It will teach you
everything you need to know about play-
ing golf." - Scott Verplank, on the Old
Course at St.Andrews.

the green.
No. 13, 465 yards, par 4 (Hole
O'Cross In): A brutal stretch of holes
begins with a shot that must avoid a line
of Coffin bunkers down the left side.
,The approach could require a long iron,
which must carry the entire way to a
green that is slightly elevated, and should
stay left of the flag. A shallow hollow
filled with rough on the left, and a deep
bunker on the right, guard the entrance
to the green.
No. 14, 618 yards, par 5 (Long):
An out-of-bounds wall runs down the
right side and a group of four Beardies
bunkers on the left require a 250-yard
carry. Into 'the wind, the second shot
should be played toward the fifth fairway
to avoid Hell Bunker. Into the wind, this
is a three-shot par 5. The face of the
green rises steeply before dropping away
back and left.
No. 15,455 yards, par 4 (Cartgate
In):The Sutherland bunker in the middle
of the fairway could be a factor into the
wind. The fairway tightens at about 300
yards, and the drive should be aimed at
the church steeple between two hillocks.
The approach is open to a sloping green,
but it should be a high shot to avoid the
humps and bumps in front of the green.
No. 16, 423 yards, par*4 (Corner
of the Dyke): The fence that marks the
route of the old railway into St.Andrews
runs down the right side of the entire
hole, leaving only a narrow strip of fair-
way between the fence and a cluster of
three bunkers called the Principal's Nose.
The drive should be left of those three
"bunkers to set up an open shot to a
green that rises sharply at the front and is
guarded by a bunker front and behind.
No. 17, 495 yards, par 4 (Road):
The Road Hole is the most famous in
the Open rotation with a reputation as
the toughest par 4 iir championship golf.
An additional 40 yards means the drive
should carry 260 yards over the replica
railway sheds to reach the right edge of
the fairway. Approach should be to the
right half of the green to avoid the Road
Hole Bunker.Anything long will result in a
shot from the road behind the green.
No. 18, 357 yards, par 4 (Tom
Morris): The closing hole is short, simple
and dramatic. It can be reached from the
tee, but a road runs along the right side,
and shots toward the green - the first or
the second - must carry a swale known
as the "Valley of Sin." The most famous
part of.the hole is the Swilcan Bridge.


1 s, 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
*Winners are not guaranteed prizes from every sponsor

Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


1 '
















Your marketplace source for Lake iy and oluba County
Your marketplace source for Lake City land Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010 1C


Bargain hunting furnishes deals for Lake City shoppers


F furniture &
Furnishings in
Lake City oper-
ates daily by its
slogan - "high-
quality furniture at bargain
prices."
The home furnish-
ings store, located in a
Victorian-style home in
downtown Lake City, off
South Marion Avenue, spe-
cializes only in the highest
quality of furniture, but
since opening in February,
has been able to maintain
its low, bargain-like prices.
The store specializes in
not just indoor and out-
door furniture, but new
and used collectibles,
paintings, antiques, mir-
rors and stained glass,
as well as other forms of
home decor.
"Because we're in an
old home, a lot of people
think we're just an antique
shop," said owner Charlie
Murray.
.Murray, along with
his partner, Young Park,
have operated Furniture
& Furnishings since
February. Before that,
Murray and Park operated
Catering Done Beautifully
for more than 20 years.
While the catering busi-
ness had been good to
them, Murray said ,he and
Park had begun to look for
something else in recent
years. They eventually-
settled on home flipping
- buying and remodeling


.TROY ROBERTS/Lake City Reporter
Charlie Murray,-owner of Furnitu're & Furnishings, poses for a photograph in his store on Tuesday. The business, which has
been open since February, specializes in selling high-quality furniture at bargain prices.


homes before selling them
at a higher price.
But remodeling the
homes' furnishings proved
to be an expensive ordeal.
"We were trying to
shop for high-quality used
furniture, but we found
that many of the used fur-
niture stores were charg-
ing almost new prices,"
Murray said.
They soon found auc-


tions and wholesale pur-
chases led to lower prices,
and the pair found they
could pass those savings
onto local customers.
Certainly Murray and
Park could charge more
for their furnishings --
most items, both new and
used, are sold at prices
substantially less than
retail - but Murray said
he believes in treating the


customer fairly.
S'We buy it at a bargain
and sell it at a bargain," he
said.
Much of Furniture &
Furnishings' business
comes from the curiosity
of those just walking by
- the store's come-and-
see policy encourages
those shoppers who are
interested to stop in and,
look around - but the


customers who make pur-
chases come from previ-
ous shoppers' referrals.
Murray said they've seen
purchases from all over
the state - they've even
sold items that have been
shipped overseas - due to
customer referrals.
Much of this response
comes from good cus-
tomer service, Murray
said, and a willingness


to help customers find
what they need - there
are currently more than
100 entries in their BOLO
(Be on the Lookout) book
with names of customers
looking for specific items.
When those items - or
similar ones - are found,
Murray gives them a call
to let them know.
"It's a people business,
not a furniture business,"
he said.
An advertising campaign
with the Lake City Reporter
also has gotten the word
out about Furniture &
Furnishings.
Since opening, Murray
said the business has run
advertising with the news-
paper, but for a few weeks,
the furniture store stopped
its advertising. During that
time, business slowed dra-
matically.
"We started running
ads again and it magically
started up," Murray said.
"I don't know if it was just
the right time or what,
but advertising helps. I
have people who specifi-
cally come in and say I've
seen the advertising in the
newspaper."
Furniture &
Furnishings, located at 297.
South Marion Avenue, is
open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.,i
Monday through Friday,
and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
on Saturday. Call the fur-
niture store at (386) 984-
7226.


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bottle of Frubob' choice of
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__---------- m









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


MWUYgI




FIND IT
isgC~nn


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


One Item per ad $250
4 lines * 6 days ach additional
Rate apples to private InditIdualsselling
personal mehande totalling $100 or less.
is s a norn-refundable rate,
S Each Item must InClude a price




One item per a additional
4.lines * days additiona
Rate apples to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each item must include a price.
Tis is a non-refundble rate.




One tem per adl 16
4 lines * 6da Each additional
Sli4 lines * y ne $1.15
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1 0 or less
Each item must Include a price.
This l a non-refutndble rale.






Each item must include a price.
This a no-refundable rate.



One Item per ad l
S lne item r adaysEach additional
4 lines ays ne $1.55
Rate applies to private Individuals selling



One itolem per ad
Personal mIerchandise totall ng $4,00 or less. ,
S ach Item ,~~st include a price.
^ .'. ,s a on-refundable rate.,l















3 days E io
IndeSids 2 519gn Eatl ltOdM1 i n'4165


'Lihited to service type advertis-
ing only. .
4 hnes one imornrh '92.00
$10 80 each addironal line
includes s an additional$2.00 pe'u
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755:5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-'
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to.the Classified
Department. .
EMAIL; classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by; FaxlEmail by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday -Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.; 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10;00a.m. Wed.,9:00 am.
Friday Thrs.,10:00a.m. Thrs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fd., 10:00 a. Fr., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fi.,10:00a.m. Fri:,9:00am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




'Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all'advertisements under'
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of theadvertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published; nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply.
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreporter.coni


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 ES.
Notice is hereby given that the.Horn
VI, LLC of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property and
name in which it was assessed is as
follows:
Certificate Number: 2174
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 26
TWN 5S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 093292-007 ,
COMM NE COR OF NW 1/4 OF
NW 1/4 & RUN W 664.31 FT TO
POB, CONT W 332.16: FT, S 436.53
FT, E 163.89 FT,. S' 227.84 FT,
CONT S 231.50 FT, S 79 DG E
166.12',E, N 925.67 FT. TQ POB.
ORB 841-508;.QC 1069-2241. QCD
.1071-2338. QCD 1073-884.
Name in which assessed: BELINDA
S. RADFORD ,' .
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according tO law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 9th day
of August, 2010;'at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITTCASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH. DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If youare a person with
a disability who 'needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cosi to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04540513
July 7, 14,21,28,2010


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 ES.
Notice is hereby given that the Mark
of Marfaret Sullivan of the following
certificate has filed said certificate
for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of
issuance, the description of the prop-
erty and name in which it was as-
sessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 274
SYear of Issuance: 2004
Description of Property: SEC 16
TWN 2S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 01631-018
LOT -18 SUWANNEE HIGH-
LANDS S/D. ORB 669-630
Name in which assessed: .JEROLD
& JUDY THOMAS
All of said ,property being in the
,County ofi'oehmbia:; State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 9th day
of August, 2010; at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OE COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you,to the provision of
certain .assistance.. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coorditator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) Working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired, call (800)
955-8770.
04540515
July 7, 14, 21, 28, 2010


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Ply-.
mouth Park Tax Services LLC of the
following certificate has filed said'
certificate for a Tax Deed to be is-
sued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description.
of the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows;
Certificate Number; 1914
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description -of Property: SEC 07
TWN 4S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 08110-000
NW 1/4 AS LIES S OF BURNETT
ORB 649--691-701, 667-15, 1EX A
PARCEL DESC ORB 722-606 ORB
707-339, ORB 746-763, ORB 746-
763 EX 40 ACRES .DECS ORB
754-1981, EX CO RD R/W FOR
DEANNA RD DESC ORB 767-802
& EX 13.90 AC FOR HOLLY HILL
S/D & EX 1.01 AC DESC OEB 829-
2208 & EX 0.50 AC DESC ORB
886-20023 & EX 0.19 AC DESC
ORB 895-2037 & EX 0.50 AC IN
ORB 915-447 & EX 1.02 AC DESC
ORB 900-739 & EX .051 AC ORB
943-2171 & EX 0.82 AC FOR RD
R/W TO COUNTY AS DESC ORB
944-2382 & EX 0,51 AC DESC
ORB 961-866& EX APPROX 0.93
AC DESC OR 973-161 & EX 0.72
AC DESC ORB 979-44, EX .90 AC
DESC IN ORB 983-2062. EX .52
AC DESC IN ORB 986-304. ORB
826-313, FJ DIV #03-529 DR 987-
2693, EX .58 AC.DESC IN ORB


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Tree Service

Hazardous Tree Trimming LLC.
Removal & stump grinding.
24 hr Emergency Service
386-590-7798 or 963-3360


Legal

993-2979, EX 0.41 AC DESC IN
ORB 1008-2362 & EX 2.50 AC
DESC IN ORB 1021-770 & EX 4.06
AC DESC ORB 1021-775 & EX 2.5
AC DESC ORB 1022-826 & EX
11.50 AC DESC ORB 1031-1503,
PROB #0.5-147 CP 1057-421 THRU
438. PROB 1087-2572 THRU 2574,
WD 1088-556
Name in which assessed: LOVE-
LESS DEVELOPMENT COMPA-
NY.
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said&certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 9th day
of August, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.;
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order.to parniLipie in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
withintwo (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call '(800)
955-8770.
04540516
July.7, 14, 21,28, 2010

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 ES.
Notice is hereby given that the Horn
VI, LLC' of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a Tax
Deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance,
the description of the property and
name in which it was assessed is as
follows:
Certificate Number: 2148
.Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 22
TWN 5S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 09330-002
COMM N LINE OF SEC & E R/W
US-41, RUN S ALONG R/W 952.15
FT FOR POB, CONT S 472.0 FT,E
1216.58 FT, N 1358.84 FT, W
349.80 FT, SW 1185.90 FT, W
327.64 FT, N 180.2 FT, SW 91 FT,
N 101 FT, SW 261.50 FT TO POB
EX 1.02 AC & EX .26 ACRES BE-
ING EXCEPTIONS ORB 1068-
1309
Name in which assessed: MASON
BUTLER LLC '
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such c*-n;'..ii will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Mionay the 9th day
of August, 20'10,, at 1:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within:two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
.you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770. '
04540514
July 7, 14, 21,28, 2010


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX:DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Horn
VI; LLC of the following certificate
has filed said certificate.for'a Tax
Deed to be issued thereon. The cer-
tificate number and year of issuance,
the description-of the property and.
name in which it was assessed is as
follows:
Certificate Number: 2290
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: SEC 31
TWN 6S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 09818'015
(AKA PART OF LOT G COUN-
TRY OAK FARMS UNREC):
COMM SW COR OF NW 1/4, RUN
E 50.94 FT TO E R/W OF A CO
GRD RD; RUN N ALONG R/W
38.63 FT, E 1551.66 FT FOR POB,
RUN N 29 DG W 316.97 FT, N 50
DG E 488.38 FT, N 39 DG W
498.47 FT, N 50 DG E 268.57 FT S
39 DG E 328.57 FT, S 275.40 FT, N
27 DG W 686.09 FT TO POB ORB
636-768, PROB #92-163-CP, DC
763-1909, 905-1875 THRU 1885
Name in which assessed: TERRY
BALLOU (DECEASED)
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate'shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 9th day
of August, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS'
AMERICAI4S WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you.are loice impaired'call (800)
955-8770.
04540512
July 7, 14,21,28,2010

o00 Job
Opportunities
Lake City Christian Academy
Certified Jr & High School
teachers needed. Send resume:386-
758-3018 or Call 386-758-0055


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04540630
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY.
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for Landfill Spotter.
Primary responsibility is
performing manual labor in the
sorting of wood & yard' waste,
metal, liquids, & tires from
Class I disposal area. Variety of
maintenance work; removes
litter from roadsides, rakes &
cleans, cuts grass & weeds with
hand tools & mowers.
Minimum Experience: High
, School diploma/G.E.D.
preferred & one-year experience
in maintenance work; or an
Equivalent combination of
training & experience. Valid
Florida Driver's License prefer-
red. Salary is $8.67 per hr. plus
benefits. Succeistld! applicant
must pass j pr erCmploymen1
physical &,drug screening.
Applications may be obtained at
the Human Resources Office,
Board of County Commission-
ers, 135 NE Hernando, #203,
Lake City, FL 32056, or online
at www.columbiacountyfla.com
(386)719,2025, TDD (386)758-
2139. Deadline: 07/23/10.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.


04540799
Heavy Equipment Shop
.Mechanic
Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a heavy
equipment mechanic and a shop
'mechanic. You may fill out an
application at 871 Guerdon Rd.,
Lake City, FL. Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Employer.

04540816
First Federal Bank of Florida
has an Executive Adm. Asst.
position available.. Detailed
administrative assignments.
Requires excellent computer
skills, 'organizational and
communication skills. Ability
to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Three to five
years previous administrative
experience required. Full
benefits package. Applications
may be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources, P.O. Box
2029, Lake City, Fl. 32056 or
email to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment Opportunity
Employer. -

0, -.,.i34
S&S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life ins,
vacation & sick leave)
Apply in person at the
SS&SOffice
134 SE Colbumrn Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS
DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE

04540716
OPS Juvenile Probation Officer
F/T non-career service
.Department of Juvenile Justice
-Working with Delinquent Youth
Four Year Degree, Background
Screen Drug Test, Valid
Driver's License req'd.
Mail State of Florida
, Application to:
Tom Witt, 690East Duval. '
Street, Lake City 32055
or Fax (386) 758-1532

License CDL Driver
w/2 yrs Logging Exp. Must have
Clean CDL. Contact
Bill Koon 386-365-8292
MIDNIGHT SHIFT
Full Time Cashier, Experience
Preferred, Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.


Motorcoach Operator
$100-$200 a day. CDL P+
www.FabulousCoach.com .Also:
Dispatch position available.
(866)352-7295
OTR Driver: Must have clean
MVR &DMV printout. 3 yr. Reef-
er'exp. LTL. Physical Great work
ethics. Ref. req'd. 386-963-3153
SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY
Immed FT/PT openings,
customer sales/service, will train,
conditions apply, all ages 17+
(386)269-4656


Wanted Forestry machinery
operator, with 2 yrs. exp.
Must have valid DL.
Koon Timber 386-623-1757


Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025
WHACK-A-DO Stylist positions
open Guaranteed pay, paid vaca-
tion Flexible hours.
Call Darlene 386-984-6738

120 Medical
12 Employment

04540425
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
.(904)566-1328


141 Babysitters
In-Home Child Care
lic #F03C00007 6A-7P
M-F drop off Ft. White bus stop
meals served 386-755-7875


180 Money to Loan

05523244
PREMIER LOAN SERVICES
Working to achieveyour
financial goals
Loans that change lives
Personal loan,'Business & Debt
loans Home loan, Auto loan,
Fixed rate All credit welcome,
No fees. Quick!
Call 1-877-990-9889


S240 Schools &
240, Education

04540812
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-07/26/10 ,
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/19/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
SContinuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com '



310 Pets & Supplies


AKC CHOC LAB Pups.
$350. Available August 1st.
Hlth Certs M/F POP $50. dep.
386-965-2231

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
haine mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
e,.p Cah Pd Pewi IR6-(063-2621

402 .Appliances
GE White Washer
Works Good
'$100 FIRM
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387,

Small portable dishwasher.
Works great.
$75. FIRM
386-754-9295,or 386'-984-0387


406 Collectibles

THOMAS KINKADE
Certificate of Authenticity
Village. $50.00 FIRM
386-344-4495


407 Computers

Dell Demention 3000 Desktop,
Windows XP, Pentium 4,
Many extras. Complete Computer
$100. 386-755-9984


408 Furniture

SBASSET medium oak attractively
designed chaise lounge w/beige
upholstery w/matching pillow
head rest, solidly made &hand
carved cane back like new valued
at $999, asking $300, call Eileen
386-755-8623


Large Entertainment Center.
Med Oak. Will hold'a 40" or better
TV. Several shelves. $145.obo
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
SLike new Weed Eater
PUSH MOWER. Runs good
22" cut. 4.5 hp. $75.
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

POULAN YARD Tractor
S 5 speed, 42 in. cut.
Runs good. $485. obo.
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927.


411 Machinery &
4 10Tools


Heavy Duty Drill Press
$100. obo
Works good.
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

'Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


REPORTER Classifieds 430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
In Print and On Line All Yard Sale Ads
www.lakecityreporter.com Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
9 pc. Patio Furniture Set
Metal w/cushions.
$300. 00
SOLD
July Special Quarter Horse Mare
w/papers, 2 horse-bumper pull
trailer,w/tack room & saddle Plus
91 Mustang Convertible Limited
Edition, 21K mi $8,000 obo for all
MIRROR
beautiful,heavy large gold
Asking $50
call to see 386-965-2231
Rolling Microwave table
Med oak wood.
Looks good $40. 00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
Upgraded Running Boards
Rubber covered. Fits Ford truck.
Extended or King cab. $100.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


450 Good Things
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

610 Mobile Home
610 Lots for Rent

Beautiful lots. Huge shady oaks.
Off Wester Rd. 2 mi. from 1-75.
$250. ea Also: 1/1 MH $450. mo
(904)545-5485 or 904-651-8383


RV PARKING SPACES
Available. Elec., Cable, water, '
septic hook-tips included..
$325.00 mo. 386-752-2412

620 Mobile Home
620 Lots for Sale

MOBILE HOME LOT. 1/2 acre f
w/well, septic and power pole.
Noith 441. $19,900.
Owner Finanpe. 386-754-6699

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good.Location! CH/A $525/Mo.
S+ $250 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
Also, 3br/2ba house in town
$750. mo. 386-752-6422
2/2 MH for rent in Lake City.
Large lot, quiet neighborhood.
No pets. $400 per month.
. .Call 386-454-7324.
2br/lb n CH/A, screpr orch iLg
yrard. fishing pond. Clean, quiet.
No Pets. References. Long term
rentals $475 mo. $475 sec. Smoke
free environment. 386-719-9169.
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3/2, MH. Quiet park. Small pets
ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
LG 3BR/2BA DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/lba SW
$600.'mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-397-1522
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Residential RV lots. Between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 Call for
terms. Cottage options avail.
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice pafk setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$166. MONTH
Remodeled S.Wide (2br/2ba)
New carpet, appliances,
Delivery/set up included. Owner
finance available w/3K down.
Gary Hamilton (386)758-9824
FSBO: Owner Financing. 1 Acre
w/big DWMH, Near Ichetucknee
Springs North entrance. $29,000
$1,000 down. Call (352)356-2563

71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
L4540360
Voted BestApartment 2010
Come see Why.
Rent from $499.
(Income guidelines apply)
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2/1 Apt in duplex for rent. $575
mo. w/$575 dep. no pets, w/car-
port, off Branford Hwy
386-752-7578
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+ Dep.
Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208


ADvantage
A~vantag


)










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


710 Unfurnished Apt.
I, For Rent
MOVE-IN SPECIALS
2br/2ba w/garage on the
West side
Call 386-755-6867 for details
Nice Apt downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
S & fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
0 Home For Rent
04540710
THIS MAKES CENTS!!
Newer brick duplexes for rent.
2 units available for $850./mo
each. Both units are 3BR 2BA
with 1 car garage. Great location
close to all amenities.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co. @
386-365-5884.

3B/1BA BRICK home. Comer lot
off Monroe St. CH/A, clean.
$850 a month, 1st & security
deposit. 954-559-0872
3br in the Country but
close to shopping $700. mo
plus deposit.
386-344-0579
3br in town. Close to VA and
shopping. Nice neighborhood.
$630. mo plus deposit
386-344-0579
4br/2ba CHA'Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., east of LC, CR 245A. Ceram-
ic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800 dep
(904)708-8478 Application req'd
739 Monroe St. 3br/lba. &
,751 Monroe St. 3br/2ba. CH/A.
All electric. No Pets. $650. mo
$500 dep. 386-961-1482
BRICK HOUSE. 3/2 w/2 car
garage. Mayfair S/D off Branford
Hwy. $975. mo., last plus security.
386-867-2283
NICE AND SECLUDED,
3 BR/2 BAHouse, close to town,
rent $795 mo. + sec. $550,
appl. required Call 386-963-4974
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo; Optional-pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Very nice older home, 2br/2ba
'.wfferiedy~dd, garage, hugek.
room. CHA, appli. Application,
credit check & lease req'd. 1st, last
& sec. $650/mo. (904)259-4126

'740A Furnished
740 Homes for Rent
FOR SALE OR RENT
3 BR/2 BA, Exec. home, 3,000 sq.
S ft.,, screened pool/patio, fireplace,
office, 3-car garage, many extras!
$1,200 mo. 386-697-3804
S 750 Business &
0 office Rentals
04540745
10,000sft WAREHOUSE
SFOR LEASE
18' Clearspan, overhead Doors
1 Dock Height Door. A/C Avail,
Aaron Nickelson
386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group

' , 104540746
Office Suites
FOR LEASE on BAYA
Very Affordable, Various Sizes
240sft Single office or
3300sft Space.
Utilities & Electric Included
Aaron Nickelson
- 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group


805 Lots for Sale
PRIME LAND for Sale
in Ft. White off Hwy 18.
CASH ONLY.
904-288-1632 or (904)353-9391
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
* disability, fai~ilial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
- ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free atl-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2br/lba. In-town. Remodeled.
New CH/A, wiring, plumbing.
Owner Finance if qualified.
$5000/dn $483/mo. 386-755-6916
S HOUSE for Sale on
Lake Jeffery Rd. 3br/1.5ba.
Call for more information.
(404)366-0759


810 Home for Sale
Owner Finance. Nice 3br/lba.
East Lake City Small down
$575. mo 386-590-0642/867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com

820 Farms&
Acreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre .
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
0 Property
Former 84 Lumber Store for Sale!
1824 W US Highway 90,
Lake City, FL 32055
Call,724-228-3636 for,
price and info!
Great visibility from Hghway 90!!


Classified Department: 755-5440


930 Motorcycles

ELECTRIC SCOOTER,
camp ground type.
Paid $375. Sell for $250.
386-497-2910


950 Cars for Sale

1996 CHEVY Cavalier
Runs good, looks, good.
$1,200. obo.
386-292-3297 or 438-7900

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles

1994 FORD Van, 6 cyl. A/C P/B
Handicap Equipped W/E side
door. Low miles. incl. ele. Wheel.
chair. $10,000.386-288-3854


Stephen Corn



' tSaturday, July 17



Comedance the night away


with southern classic rock!


1- 7A '0 5,-
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952 Vans& Sport
95 Util. Vehicles
1998 CHEVY Tahoe
$3000. OBO
386-697-9919


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.


North Florida






Homes * Acreage * Commercial






Lake City Reporter


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIFIED


WEDNESDAY, JULY 14, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


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word search is
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get attention
with a fun new
puzzle every
week at a price
any business
can afford.


Fin .6

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ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle". The price of the vehicle must be,
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


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Up To 5 Quarts of Oil

RONTREEtTE E MORE'S 95 Rountree
Expires. ( TOYOTA
NEWEST 8/31/10

D D ALERSHIP ROUNTREE MOORE I
.... f , I. .' I a


I Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
SNot valid with any other offer
expires 8/31/10


&.a a a


v.... w.. . . e wwwaspnla a kcity.com



SUNDAY & WEDNESDAY 0-l
lKidc 1. arnd unalr ,cat fr with [r.o purCh39d Of a regular Butn MphA. P . s l I .


Quote of the week:
"I love Willy J's Subs because there is never too
much bread like those other sub shops. You can
taste the meat - Dave Riggs
Big 98-3p-7p
Listen to Mixed 94.3 and Big 98 to win FREE SUBSI
Open Monday - Saturday 0lam-pm
Sunday 11am-7pm
, a (' ,, / .. ... :it


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\ paseO cal 15241293

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A+ EveCare

IDLB Eyeglasses
- Contacts
-- , Exams
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555-5555


15FT. Bass Boat
90hp Mercury engine,
good shape.
$6,500
Call
334-758-8458


1994 Ford Van
6 cyl., AC, PB, handicap
equipped w/E slide door,
low mileage, incl. elect.
wheel chair.
$10,000
Call
386-288-3854


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