Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


***.3-DIGIT 326
000015 120Di HISTORY
LIE OF FLORIDF A ORDA
PO BOX 117007
SM UNIV OF FLORIDA19
0NESVILE FL 32611-1943
GA ESVLL Y' T.j o


I


Unlucky 13?
Colorado's Ubaldo Jimenez tries to break
American League dominance over National
League in tonight's All-Star game.
Sports, IB






ity Reporter,
. P


Tusd ly 1 3, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol.. 136, No. 150 * 75 cents



Lake City teen killed in U.S. 90 crash


Five others
injured in Baker
County wreck.
From staff reports
BAKER COUNTY - A
15-year-old Lake City boy
was killed and four teens
in his car seriously injured


Sunday when the vehicle
they were traveling in was
struck by a pick-up truck,
authorities say. The driver
of the other vehicle, was
also seriously injured as the
result of a two-vehicle colli-
sion in rural Baker County.
Travis Suggs, 15, of
Lake City, was killed in the


mishap.
The ,wreck occurred
around 3:20 a.m. Sunday
in Baker County on U.S.
Highway 90, about five
miles east of Sanderson.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
William C. Hardin, 22, of
Live Oak, was, traveling


east on U.S. Highway 90
in a 2000 Chevrolet pick-up
truck.
Suggs was heading west
on the roadway in a 1999
Ford four-door with Todd
Gainer, 18; Dustin Bailey,
16; Elizabeth Stolling, 14
and Lydia Little, 18, as pas-
sengers in the vehicle.


Reports say Hardin allowed
his truck to travel across the
roadway's centerline and onto
the westbound lane where it
ran into the path of Suggs'
vehicle. The vehicles collided
and as a result of the collision
Suggs was pronounced dead
at the scene.
Hardin, as well as the pas-


sengers in Suggs' vehicle,
were taken by helicopter
to Shands Jacksonville. All
were reported to have seri-
ous injuries resulting from
the crash.
Charges in connection
with the crash are pending
the conclusion of an FHP
investigation, reports say.


h - HAVEN REMEMBERED


damage Rash of robberies

ATM in

incident A


Attempted
robbery took
place late Sunday.
From staff reports
The Lake City Police
Department is investigating
an incident where a bank's
electronic automatic teller
machine was damaged
during the weekend in an
attempted burglary.
SAccording to Lake City
Police Department reports,
around 11:26 p.m. Sunday
officers were dispatched to
the First Federal Bank at
707 SW Main Boulevard to
check an ATM alarm.
Officer Michael
DelCastillo found that the
ATM had been damaged
in an attempt to gain entry
into the machine.
Reports say a witness
reported seeing a dark col-
ored vehicle occupied by
two black men approach the
ATM. The alarm reportedly
sounded and they left.
ATM continued on 3A


Suspects

burglarize

cars at

local hotels
Vandals strike six
vehicles at two
Lake City hotels.
From staff reports
Local authorities are
investigating a rash of bur-
glaries where thieves tar-
geted six vehicles at two
local motels, stealing vari-
ous items.
The series of vehicle
burglaries occurred Friday
evening.
According to Lake
City Police Department
reports, around 8:52 a.m.
Saturday officers respond-
ed to the Jameson Inn, 285
SW Cormnerce Blvd. and
Comfort Inn, 3690 SW U.S.
Highway 90, to investigate
the crime.
When authorities arrived
at the scene, they learned
a total of six vehicles were
broken into between the
two locations and various
personal items were taken
out of each vehicle.
Lake ' City Police
CARS continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTT'i-.p:.a l :.-li pEpr, rl ,.
Lake City Police Department officers stand outside Home Depot on Monday. The home improvement store, along withltwo
other businesses, was robbed on Monday. Authorities believe the same suspect was involved in all three incidents.


Trio of businesses robbed Monday
Tri ses robbe ,:U


By TROY ROBERTS,
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
hree Lake City
businesses
were robbed
on Monday, ;
and authorities'
believe the same suspect
could have been involved
in all three incidents.
The robberies took place
across a four-hour span
Monday - Home Depot in
the afternoon, and Tractor
Supply Company and
TCBY during the evening.
The first incident took
place around 4:17 p.m.
According to reports,
officers with the Lake
City Police Department
responded to 215 SW
Home Depot Drive in refer-
ence to a possible robbery
on Monday. Upon arrival,
officers made contact with
a store clerk in the garden
center.
According to statements
from the clerk, a white
male, approximately 30 to
40 years old, with a thin
build, long blonde hair and
tape on his fingers, parked
a black mid-sized extended
cab truck in front of the
garden center. The man
walked to the clerk and
brandished a note demand-
ing money from the reg-
ister. The clerk gave the
suspect an undetermined
amount of money, accord-


PATRICK SCOTTISpecial to the Reporter
Law enforcement officers responded to an attempted robbery at Tractor Supply Company on
-Monday before being'called to another robbery at TCBY.


ing to reports, and the man
'walked back to his vehicle
and drove toward the north
end of the parking lot.
Officers issued a BOLO
(Be on the Lookout) for
the vehicle, but were
unable to track it down.
At around 7:30 p.m., offi-
cers were called to Tractor
Supply Company, located
on West U.S. Highway 90,
in reference to a possible
robbery. According to
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information offi-


cer, the suspect did not
receive any money during
the attempted robbery of
Tractor Supply Company.
Seifert said the suspect
implied he was armed but
did not brandish a weapon.
While CCSO depu-
ties were or the scene at
Tractor Supply Company,
LCPD officers were called
away to another possible
robbery at 8 p.m., this
time at TCBY in Westfield
Square.
Sgt John Blanchard,
public information officer


for LCPD, said the robbery
at TCBY was similar to the
other two.
'The guy walked in,
walked up to the clerk at
the register and handed
them a note," he said. "No
weapon was displayed.
Money was turned over
and he walked out."
. Based on the manner
of robbery and physical
description of the suspect,
Blanchard said officials
think only one person was
ROBBERIES continued on 3A


Local

activist

Haven

dies at 85

Haven was
very involved
in community.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
Community activist, ani-
mal lover and staunch sup-
porter of the arts and edu-
cation, Elizabeth "Betty"
Wright Haven died Saturday.
She was 85.
Haven, who was origi-
nally from Wilkes-Barre,
Penn., had lived in Lake
City for more than 20 years.
She was preceded in death
by her husband Robert
"Bob" Haven, a professional
photographer.
Haven held a Master's
Degree from Columbia
University in mathemat-
ics and a doctorate degree
from the Uiiversity of
Pennsylvania in education
and mathematics. She was
the first woman to serve on
the staff of the Educational
Testing Service in
Princeton, NJ.
Before coming to Lake
City, she and her husband
spent three years on a ship
sailing around the world.
She served as the editor
of the ship's newspaper for
more than two years.
While in Lake City, Haven
continued to flourish in
opportunities to teach oth-
ers, and was known for her
involvement with several
organizations and programs
designed to improve the
community. She developed
a curriculum and taught
the first course of displaced
homemakers and welfare
mothers and 80 percent
were subsequently placed
in jobs.
Haven was also chairman
of the Lake City-Columbia
County Fine Arts Council
from 1983-1984.
HAVEN continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


9374
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion. .......... . 4A
Business .... ....... . 5A
Obituaries ... ......... 6A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
WORLD
'Castrio appears'
S*',r tele . i:, i.


COMING
WEDNESDAY
C oIlunbi, . Inc... .Jl77
' -1_ Jl'J t',: . 'l-]fli''I" -'-


r~�lll-�l�l��.-~sl��~ICiP�~�P~III~J~~~:L


�rr~n~�~��am*nuurm~urunrrm~iulW\~i~fi~2~1


,t�.'.J' i.'-" y;?^.,-: -;










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


Monday:
Afternoon: 3-6-1
Evening: 6-8-8


: 4) Monday:
Afternoon: 2-4-0-2
Evening: 7-8-7-0


ez~ atch.
Sunday:
3-9-30-31-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Last panel for iconic comic artist


CLEVELAND -

Harvey Pekar, whose .
autobiographical comic
book series "American
Splendor" portrayed
his unglamorous life
with bonedry honesty and wit, was
found dead at home early Monday,
authorities said. He was 70.
The cause of death was unclear,
and an autopsyy was planned, officials
said. Pekar had prostate cancer,
asthma, high blood pressure and
depression, said Michael Cannon, a
police captain in suburban Cleveland
Heights.
Officers were called to Pekar's
home by his wife about 1 a.m.,
Cannon said. His body was found on
the floor between a bed and dresser.
He had gone to bed around:4:30 p.m.
Sunday in good spirits, his wife told
police.
Pekar took a radically different
track from the superhero-laden com-
ics thatched dominated the industry.
He instead specialized in the lives
of ordinary people, chronicling his
life as a file clerk in Cle~eland and
his relationship with his third wife,
Joyce Brabner. Hi's 1994 graphic
novel, "Our Cancer Year," detailed
his battle with lymphoma.
.The dreary cover scene shows
him sprawled beside his .wife on a
snowy curbside with shopping bags
on the ground. "Harvey, forget about
the groceries, honey. Let's get you
inside first," she says.
Pekar never drew himself but
depended on collaborations with
artists, most notably his friend R.
Crumb, who helped illustrate the
first issue of the ironically titled
"American Splendor," published. in
1976. It was made into an acclaimed
2003 film starring Paul Giamatti as
Pekar. The most recent "American
Splendor" was released in 2008.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 1986 file photo, comic-book writer Harvey Pekar poses with a copy of his,
'American Splendor' in his Cleveland Heights, Ohio, home. Pekar, whose comic
was made into a 2003 film starring Paul Giammati, was been found dead in his
Ohio home early Monday


New Mel tape mentions
allegedly hitting girlfriend
NEW'YORK - Mel Gibson is
heard allegedly acknowledging
that the actor hit the mother of his
8-month daughter in a recording'
released by a celebrity news website.
' The eight-minute recording posted
Monday by RadarOnline. com is pur-
pdrtedly a phone argument between
Gibson and then-girlfriend Oksana '


Grigorieva. A voice sounding dis-
tinctively like the
.Academy Award-
winner is heard
'telling Grigorieva
that she "deserved"
,to be hit after she
chastised him-for
S allegedly punching
Usher in the face and
Gibsonbreaking two of her
: teeth.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Patrick Stewart is
70.
* Actor Robert Forster is
69.
* Actor Harrison Ford is
68.
* Singer-guitarist Roger
McGuinn (The Byrds)'is
68.
* Actor-comedian Cheech
Marin is 64.


* Actress Daphne Maxwell
Reid is 62.
* Actress Didi Conn is 59.
* Singer Louise Mandrell
is 56.
* Actor-director Cameron
Crowe is 53.
* Tennis player Anders
Jarryd is 49.
* Country singer-songwrit-
er Victoria Shaw is 48.'


HOW TO REACH US
Main number........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityrepoiter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an.affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval.St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and:
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295. .
Editor Tom Mayer .. .....754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com) -
ADVERTISING '
Director Lynda Strickland . ,754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419'
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
-should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks ................. $8346
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks............ .....' $41.40
24 Weeks.....'........... $82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern,question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Parents charged
in kids' drowning
JACKSONVILLE - A
north Florida couple are
charged in connection to -
the deaths of their two
children who drowned in a
neighbor's pool after being
left home alone.
Jail records show 45-
year-old Markanthony C.
Ibeagwa and 41-year-old.
Jovita Ibeagwa each face
charges of aggravated
manslaughter of a child
under 18 years by cul-
pable negligence and child
neglect.
They were arrested
Monday after surrendering
to authorities with their
attorney Tom Fallis. Fallis
refused to comment on the
case when contacted by
The Associated Press.
Authorities say they
learned that neither par-
ent was home when their
-two children, aged 6 and.
3, were found dead in their
neighbor's pool June 19.
They were pronounced
dead at a hospital.

Man dies in house
fire; 2 survive
SCLEARWATER- A
man died in a Gulf coast
house fire, but a woman
and child were able to
escape.
Authorities say the wife
woke up early Monday and
was able to get herself and
her son out of the house.
She couldn't go back in
for her husband. The
American Red Cross is
providing food, shelter and
counseling for the woman
and her son.
About two dozen fire-
fighters are at the scene.
Authorities are trying to
identify the man and deter-
mine the cause of the fire.

Haitians get stay
of 6 more months
MIAMI - The deadline


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Final salute for Florida Marine
-Marines fire rifle volleys during the burial service for Lance
Cpl. Justin J. Wilson, U.S. Marine Corps, at Arlington National
Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Monday. Wilson, of Palm City, a
U.S. Marine, was killed in action in Afghanistan.


for Haitians to apply to
legally stay and work in
the U.S has been extended
until January.
Citizenship and
Immigration Services
Director Alejandro
Mayorkas said Monday
'that the government
extended the July 20
deadline in response to
community advocates who
said many Haitians needed
more time to file the
paperwork and pay fees
totaling $470.
U.S. officials say roughly
35,500 Haitians so far have
been granted temporary
protected status. That
allows immigrants from
countries experiencing
armed conflict or environ-
mental disasters to stay
and work for 18 months.
Only Haitians who were
already living in the U.S.
illegally when the earth-
quake struck Jan. 12 are


eligible. ' "
About 55,000 have
applied, and about 1,200
applications have been
denied.

Alligator bites off
man's hand
NAPLES - A man is
hospitalized in southwest
Florida after an alligator
bit off his left hand.
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
spokeswoman Gabriella
Ferraro says 18-year-1ld
Timothy Delano of Naples
was swimming with three
friends in a Collier County
canal around 9:30 p.m.
Sunday when the alligator
attacked.
The men swam to shore
and drove -to a gas station,
where they called 911.

* Associated Press
I


THE WEATHER



S cC. OFT- , CHC. OI CHC. OF CHC. OF CHC. OF
STORMSp -STORMS -STORMS -STORMS, "-STORMS


HI 93 LO 7 HI 96 L73 HI 94 LO 73 HI 94 L0 HI 93 LO '



, . VaCdosta
93'74 City Wednesday Thursday3
0* Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 901), ;i, S 9, ;5, i
Tallahassee * k 947 Daytona Beach 91/77/1 92/i 7/i
' 94/75 93/ 4 Ft. Lauderdale 90.3 1 91 90 r
Pensacola Gainesvile DaytonaBeach Fort Myers 94 , r 9 -
SPanama City 9.7 * 16 Gainesville 4 73 93 73
9903.79 Oca Jacksonville 9 76 r 93 76 ,
Canv Key West i 79. I 90 70
Oriando Cap Canaveral ae
95 77 90.7 6 ,Lake City 73 1 9J 3
Miamii'0 1 ' 1 r Il
Tam a * Naples 9' 77 r 9 7 7
S9.3 1 West Palm Beach Ocala 9 4 71 - 9 4
S92 80 * Orlando ' 7 93 77 I
, Ft Lauderdale Panama City 0 'l 91 79 I
Ft Myers 93 80 0 Pensacola 94 7 p: 93 7S
94' 76 Naples * Tallahassee '4 73 95 74 j
S90.,8 Miami Tampa 7';,
Key West* W. Palm Beach '9, bS r i 1
.90. 79


.4,.lr~ """" "L~ar aa~~ c -


,"._...


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
LOw rMondal
rJonmal nigh
S rm,:,rrj1 Iow
Record nigh
RPci:,r,3 l.�\

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


88
76G
91
71
98 in 1937
E.4 r, 1913


0.43"
4.12"
30.84"
2.45"
26.48"


ia Ip 7p la 6a
Tuesday Wednesday


-- Foreras ta temperature


"Fsels libe" temperifin


SUN 1
Sunnse today 6:38 am. .
Sunset ioda 8:3J p.m.
Surinse ton. 6:39 a.m. VERIltt
Sunset oni. 8:34 p.m 1 lOmuntetobu

MOON ultra-.iol
Moonnse today 8:39 a.m. radiation, rs '
Moonsettoday 10:04p.m. for ine are .orn
Moonrise tom. 9:48 a.m. ",.1,, '
Moonset tom. 10:42 p.m.


July July Aug. Aug. Forecast
18 25 3 9 -. I Fca. @2
First Full Last New ~- -. LLC, Ma
,.--' Www.we


I. ~: 'it. :i


On this date in
1895, a tornado
hit Cherry Hill, N.J.,
causing $50,000 in
damages. Another
tornado struck
the Harlem and
Woodhaven areas
of New York City,
before ending as
a waterspout over
Jamaica Bay.


An exclusive
service

our readers
by
The 'We ai1er




weather comrn

sts, data and graph-
010 Weather Central
adison, Wis.
eatherpubllsher.com


I ,.''. -


Get Connected


00H3I
AC 9


Daily ScriDture


"Then he (Jesus) began to:'
upbraid the cities where most
of his mighty works had been
done, because they did not
repent."
- Matthew, 11:20



Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


f4'i~


F


ww.lakec I tyeprtirco I[iu ti

Lae it Rpote


*V-2- -- '


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


*~ -�l *� t*I-"-*


ik


ia











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


BP affixes new cap on Gulf oil well


By TOM BREEN
and HARRY R. WEBER
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS - BP
robots attached a new,
tighter-fitting cap on top of
the gushing Gulf of Mexico
oil leak Monday, raising
hopes that the crude could
be kept from polluting the
water for the first time in
nearly three months.
Placing the cap on top of
the leak was the climax of
two days of delicate prepa-
ration work and a day of
slowlylowering it into posi-
tion a mile below the sea.
The capping project - akin
to building an underwater
Lego tower - is just a tem-
porary fix, but the oil giant's
best hope for containing the
spill.
The next unknown is
whether the 18-foot-high,
150,000-pound metal stack
.of pipes and valves will
work. BP plans to start tests
Tuesday, gradually shutting
the valves to see if the oil
stops or if it starts leaking
from another part of the
well.
Residents have been


skeptical BP can deliver
on its promise to control
the spill, but the news was
still welcome on the coast.
Dwayne Touchet, a 44-year-
old shrimper from Welsh,
La., said he was relieved
to hear the cap was on and
can only pray that it works.
Touchet is working in the
Vessels of Opportunity pro-
gram, where BP employs
local boat owners and fish-
erman out of work because
of the spill.
"It's not over, there's still
a lot of oil to clean up. We
don't know how it will affect
it (the water) in the years to
come, all we' can do is trust
in the Lord," he said.
Around 6:30 p.m. CDT,
live video streams trained
on the wellhead showed
the cap being slowly low-
ered into place, 11 hours
after BP Chief Operating
Officer Doug Suttles said
the company was close to
putting, the seal in place. BP
officials said the device was
attached around 7 p.m.
The cap will be tested and
monitored to see if it can
withstand pressure from oil
and gas starting Tuesday


morning for six to 48 hours,
according to Natiofial
Incident Commander Thad
Allen. On his Facebook
page, Allen also shared
news of the development
"Getting there," Allen wrote
in a status update shortly
after the cap landed on the
well.
The cap will be tested by
closing off three separate
valves that fit together snug-
ly like pairs of fists, choking
off the oil and blocking it
from entering the Gulf.
*BP doesn't want the
flow of oil to stop instan-
taneously, said Don Van
Nieuwenhuise, director of
Professional Geosciences
Programs at the University
of Houston. Shutting the oil
off too quickly could cause
another explosion, he said.
"Rather than like a train
running into a brick wall,
it'll be more like putting
the brakes on slowly," he
said. 'That's what they're
aiming for. You can keep
the brakes on and every-
one arrives alive, or you
hit the wall and have big
problems"'
Engineers will be watch-


ing pressure readings. High
pressure is good, because it
would mean the leak has
been contained inside the
wellhead machinery. But
if readings are lower than
expected, that could mean
there is another leak else-
where in the well.
"Another concern right
now would be how much
pressure the well can take,"
and whether intense pres-
sure would further damage
the well, said Eric Smith,
associate director of* the
Tulane Energy Institute.
Even if the cap w6rks,
the blown-out well will still
be leaking. But the newer,
tighter cap will enable BP
to capture all the oil, or help
funnel it up to ships on the
surface if necessary.
One of those ships,'the
Helix Producer, began opei-
ating Monday and should
be up to its capacity of col-
lecting roughly 1 million
gallons of oil a day within-
a few days, Chief Operating
Officer Doug Suttles said.
A permanent fix will have
to wait until one of two relief
wells being drilled reaches
the broken well.


ROBBERIES: Investigation


Officers collect evidence at TCBY.


Continued From Page L

involved in the t6io of rob-
beries.
"We believe it's the same
person based on the vehi-
cle description and suspect
description," he said, not-
ing that detectives believe
the suspect.was wearing
a wig during the Home
Depot robbery.
Officers were processing


evidence Monday night,
. and Blanchard noted
detectives also were
reviewing store
surveillance videos.
The investigation is
ongoing and anyone with
information about the inci-
dent is encouraged to call
the LCPD TIP line at (386)
719-2068.


HAVEN: Served on several local boards


Continued From Page 1A

Perley Richardson, Lake
City-Columbia County
Humane Society and Animal
Shelter president, served
with Haven on that board as
well as on the Community
Concerts Board of Lake
City.
"She served on the com-
munity concert board and
did the editorial work,"
Richardson said: "She did
excellent work."
Richardson was president
of the Community Concerts
Board for five years and
Haven was there then. He
said she served on the
board for lose to f6 years.
"She did all the commen-
tary for the programs that


we had," he said. "She was at the Lifestyle Enrichment
also kn~wvii for" her- dedia-"-Center.


tion to the animal shelter
board, and she served on
there for about 15 years."
Richardson said Haven
was known for her love of
the community.
"She was a real commu-
nity-minded person," he
said. "She was interested
in getting 'the community
involved in all phases of
activities. She also was
instrumental in creating the
photo library atthe Lifestyle
Enrichment Center. Her
husband, Bob, was a big
photography buff and did
beautiful work. She funded
and started that program


"She leaves a tremendous
void, not only in the com-
munity, but in the individ-
ual groups that she served
with," Richardson said.
Susan Hadley had known
Haven for close to 15 years
and served on several local
boards with Haven.
"Betty was known for
her philanthropy duties to
Columbia County," Hadley
said. "She always felt she
should share."
Hadley said Haven wasn't
a person who gave "lip ser-
vice" and noted Haven had
a passion for all the organi-
zations that she served.


"If she was apart of an
organization, she felt strong-
ly about it," Hadley said. "She
didn't just come to board
meetings and sit, she went
and did. She wrote letters
and she would do whatever
you needed her to do that
her health and age permit-
ted her to do. She would not
give 'lip service' to being on
a board. She didn't do it just
to get the 'glory', she did
it because she felt strongly
about the principles and
missions of each of those
organizations."
Memorial service
arrangements for Haven
are incomplete and will be
announced at a later date.
* ' ' /


Changes taking


place at local


Shands hospital


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Twelve days into it's
new lease agreement
with Shands Healthcare
and Health Management
Associates, the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board
appears to be poised for
changes needed to become
a regional hospital.
During the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board
meeting Monday evening,
Lake Shore Hospital admin-
istrator Rhonda Sherrod
gave board members a
brief report detailing some
of the changes taking place
as part of the partnership
agreement between Shands
and Health Management
Associates.
One of the more notable
changes is that the hospital
will have its own informa-
tion services staff as well as
accounts payable division for
the .three community hospi-
tals which will be managed
by Health Management
Associates; Shahds Lake
City, Shands Live Oak and
Shands Starke. The move
will result in at least 11 new
positions at the hospital.
'Zachary Bielling was intro-
duced as the new assistant
administrator.
"It's been a good experi-
ence with a lot of change,"


she said. "This is a good
thing for our community,
the hospital and patients."
She said representatives
from Health Management
Associates are scheduled to
come in and evaluate the
hospital's, community's and
patients' needs.
'This is growth and this
is jobs for our community,"
Sherrod said.
Board member Bruce
Naylor asked for a monthly
report detailing the chang-
es and Sherrod agreed to
provide the information.
Hospital Authority attor-
ney Marlin Feagle also
detailed contract informa-.
tion about the new part-
nership and lease, while
accountant- Richard Powell
informed board members
that hospital's bonds have
been paid.
In other business, the.
board:
* Hired Shelia Thomas
to a full-time, administrative
assistant position. The job.
duties for the position are
scheduled to redefined.
* Spoke about the possi-;'
bilities of opening a satellite
office.
* Scheduled a 5:15 p.m.
July 26 workshop to hear
a presentation from Lake..-
City Medical Center repre-.
sentatives about an indigent.
health care proposal.


ATM: Robbery attempt


Continued From Page 1A
"It appears no money was
taken," said Lake City Police
Department public infor-
mation officer Sgt. John
Blanchard, in a prepared'
statement. '"This investiga-
tion is ongoing."
Blanchard said LCPD
investigators are contacting"


other agencies to see if they
have experienced attempts'
in their area.
Anyone having informa-
tion about this incident can
contact the Lake City Police
Department anonymously
on the department's TIP
liWe at 719-2068.


CARS: Burglarized


Continued From Page 1A
Department public infor-
mation officer Sgt. John
Blanchard said all the
vehicles were processed for
fingerprints and authorities
are continuing the investi-


gation.
Anyone having informa- ,
tion about the break-ins is.
asked to call thegLake City,
Police Department TIP line.
at 719-2068.


POLICE REPORTS


The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are presumed
innocent unless proven
guilty.
Friday, July 9
Columbia County
SSheriff's Office
* Shannor D. Campbell,
no age given, unknown
address, cultivation of
marijuana.
* Rick Matthew
Diercks, 31, 600 NW
�shley St., grand theft.
* Nichole Downing, 26,
9120 Derby Acres Lane,
Jacksonville, warrant:
Violation of probation on,
original charge of posses-
sion of a controlled
substance.
* William Fleming, 41,
2344 NW 178th Place High
Springs, warrant: Violation
of probation on original
charge of aggravated child


abuse.
* David John Norell,
22, 3841 East U.S. Highway
90, warrant: Violation of
probation on original
charges of burglary of
a structure and grand
theft.
* Roy K. Roberts, 30,
358 SW James Turner
Glen, Fort White, lewd or
lascivious molestation.
. Jordy B. Smith, no
age given, 22912 Robinson
Lane, Olustee, tampering
with evidence, possession
of less than 20 grams of
marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia and
resisting arrest without
violence.
Florida Highway
Patrol
* Christopher Marlon
Padgett, 20, 368 SE
Lakeshore Boulevard,
Branford, driving while
license suspended/
revoked (habitual
offender).


~--"-..r }-ek-2- //.-/- ../


. - - -,- . . . _- ...


SMaking room for new inventory!
BirdHouses BrdsBaths rJ I'
SWind Chimes r[ Fl r J
CandlesandMore! .,J Jl.J J .l J'J
re I AT I.- 1 ol*
* * * S I


Lake City
Police Department
* Ronald L. Rust Jr., no
age given, 220 NE Ernest
Green Glen, possession of
less. than 20 grams of mari-
juana and tampering with
evidence.
Saturday, July 10
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Blake Thomas Selph,
21, 10100 Baymeadows
Road, Jacksonville, war-,
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
possession of a controlled


substance and possession
of less than 20 grams of
marijuana.
* Samuel Elias
Watson, 32, W. Adams
St., Jacksonville, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of uttering
a forgery and petit theft.
Lake City
Police Department
* Kimberly J. Davis,
no age given, 150 NW
Jupiter Court, driving while
license suspended/revoked
(habitual traffic offender).
From staff reports.


Advertise in over 100 papers

One Call - One Order - One Payment

www.national-classifieds.com

info@national-classifieds.com

1-866-742-1373


Put US to work

Sfor you!


Al. "ANF
W' IIRtsNG NETWORKS Or rl ORIDA
sl fied DliayjIMel, o Dafly


GENERATORS SHIPPED DIRECT TO YOU.

CAP:i O[ FULFILLMENT
80095-966o. vv .blstrpu.com


�


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


BLACKOUT PROTECTION

- UU, ii














OPINION


Tuesday, July 13, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


Making

sure your

vote counts

The basis of our
democracy is that
come election time,
every vote counts.
But you can't make
your vote count if you can't vote
- and that's what makes July
26 a day to watch out for.
Voters who haven't updated
or submitted their registration
to vote by that date could be
disallowed to vote for their can-
didate of choice, or not allowed
to vote all together in August's
primaries.
Because the supervisor of
elections closes the books in
late July for the August prima-
ry, now is the time for voters to
* decide which closed primary -
either Democrat or Republican
- in which they would like to
cast a ballot. It's not permis-
sible to switch parties after July
26 if you haven't made your
intentions clear by changing
*your voter registration form.
, And of course, it's not pos-
�sible to vote at all - unless you
have paid a visit to 971 West
Duval St. to register in the first
place.


SHIG H LIG H TS
IN HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, July 13,
the: 194th day of 2010. There
are 171 days left in the year.
., On July 13, 1960. John EF
Kennedy von.i.he, .Dep.ratic
presidential nomination on
the first ballot at his party's
convention in Los Angeles,
outdrawing rivals includ-
ing Lyndon B. Johnson,
Stuart Symington and Adlai
Stevenson.
* In 1787, Congress enacted
an ordinance governing the
Northwest Territory.
* In 1793, French revolu-
tionary writer Jean-Paul Marat
,was stabbe to death in his
:blth by Charlotte Corday, who
was executed four days later..
' In 1863, deadly rioting
against the Civil War military
:draft erupted in New York
City. (The insurrection was put
down three days later.)
* In 1960, in the second All-
Star game played in three days,
the National League defeated
the American League 6-0.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
-through the teamwork of professionals
'dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
ToddWilson, publisher
Tom .Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue.Brannon, controller

Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
, Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
paced. Letters should not exceed
4 00 words and will be edited for
Il6ngth and libel. Letters must be
Signed and include the writer's name,
.address and telephone number for
-,erification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
:ihe writers and not.necessarily that of
fThe Lake City Reporter.
:. BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


'Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
,1:80 E. Duval St. downtown.
SBY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
: BY E-MAIL:
Snews@lakecityreporter.com


Steele is right about Afghanistan


Whether or not
Republican
National
Chairman
Michael
Steele survives his own mouth
because of past gaffes, his
assessment of the,nature of
the war in Afghanistan and the
probable inability of winning
it are absolutely accurate and
most top politicians and military
men, active and retired know it.
First of all, the chairman's ref-
erence to this being President
Obama's war is spot on. He is
the commander in chief and the.
surge that escalated the conflict
was his idea. He is in charge..
Secondly, there was really never
any hope of "winning" anything
but a little time to train Afghan
forces to control their own des-
tiny.
Defeatiiig the Taliban out
right at this stage is probably
not a possibility and if the presi-
dent believes otherwise he is in
scary denial. How do you defeat
a culture based on an unyield-
ing religious ideology? All the
enemy has to do is lay low until
U.t. forces are gone.
, Already Afghan President
Hamid Karzai is considering
a way to compromise with the
Taliban, even turning over con-
trol of some iural territory to
them if necessary. That could
end badly for his government
given the fact that trusting
them not to demand more and
more is not only foolish policy
but also a recipe for one's own
demise. There is hope that
Karzai could enlist aid from
Pakistan after U.S. troops begin
to leave next year and he report-
edly is seeking to improve rela-
tions with that government.
We are clearly straining our


Dan K.Thomasson
reason for being there in the
first place. While the Taliban
did harbor the al Qaeda ter-
rorist machine, Osama bin
Laden and his lieutenants were
able to escape U.S. force when
President George W. Bush
decided that Saddam Hussein
was an even bigger threat to
U.S. security. Forces that had
the Taliban on the run in total
disarray were siphoned off for
the Iraqi invasion, in a colossal
blunder. The Bush White House
can't escape that responsibility.
But nearly two years into his'
administration, Obama contin-
ues to pursue policies that are
just as invalid. Instead of bogus
weapons of mass destruction
as the reason for this military
excursion, however, the cur-
rent president continues to view
this backward, mountainous
nightmare of a country a threat
to America's national security.
It may have been briefly, but
we just plain blew the chance to
deal with that. It seems a stretch
now to consider Afghanistan as
vital to our national safety at this
time, especially when terrorism
eggs cells have spread all over
the globe.
Republicans have a chance
here to back their chairman in
his assessment of the situation.
and demand that Obama live up
to his campaign promise to get
us the hell out of these wars.


Steele is far from alone in his
views even though his.party's
bigwigs can't seem to admit that
outside their own bedrooms
where they whisper it to their
spouses at night.
Come'on boys and girls, fess
up and take a chance. You won't
be risking an indictment as anti-
American and of failing to sup-
port our troops, most of whom
clearly want this over.
The other day while attend-
ing a free-wheeling discus-
sion of the pros and cons of
Afghanistan with a number of
distinguished conservatives and
a couple of liberals, it was star-
tling to see in a show of hands
that only one person, a promi-
nent Democrat, was in favor of
continuing the war. His argu-
ment was the one cited earlier
about national security. It had
been a vigorous but polite dis-
cussion so no one threw their
dessert
Steele clearly has difficulty
with political correctness and
that sometimes is,a bad thing.
This time, however, was not
one of those. The change of
command in Afghanistan may
or may not yield the results
desired - to stabilize the gov-
ernment long enough for its
forces to prevail.
The betting is against them.
But the Republican chairman
may be one of the few political
figures in the GOP and most of
the Democratic Party with the
courage to speak up. It is time
to leave and everyone knows
it. After all it will take quite a
while, even if one starts now.
Sometime next year is pretty
vague.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


The National Mall in
Washington, D.C.,
like most of our
national parks, has
a backlog of main-
tenance, much of it not readily
visible to the casual visitor. But
one glaring exception is the sea
*wall in front of the Jefferson
Memorial. It has been steadily
sinking and pulling away from
the plaza surrounding the
monument.
If the sea wall were left
untouched, the only way a visi-
tor could contemplate the 19-
foot statue of Jefferson as our
third president contemplates
the White House in the distance
would be by wading out to the
favored scenic vantage point
That vantage point is now
closed in any case because work
is under way to replace the


timber piles supporting the sea
wall with 41 four-foot concrete
caissons braced by 18-inch
concrete-filled pilings. Workers
are how pulling out the granite
blocks that abut the Tidal Basin
and cataloging them so the wall
can be rebuilt with the original
stone.
President Franklin Roosevelt
laid the cornerstone for the
memorial in 1939. The work-
ers, for whatever reason, sank
the pilings supporting the sea
wall into the mud but not the
bedrock below. Why they did
so remains a mystery because
the 634 caissons and pilings that
support the 32,000-ton marble
monument itself are sunk deep
into the bedrock.
The Jefferson Memorial
is a simple domed structure
modeled after the Pantheon


in Rome, one of Jefferson's
architectural inspirations.
Originally it was to have been
a much more elaborate affair,
but was scaled back so as not
to compete with the venerated
Lincoln Memorial, dedicated in
1922, some 21 years before the
Jefferson.
The new stronger and more
stable sea wall is expected to
be completed next spring, per-
haps when the cherry trees
that surround the memorial are
in bloom and the Mall is at its
most beautiful.
The $12.4 million project is
being funded by the stimulus
bill, the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act. No matter
how you feel about that law, this
is a good use of the public's dol-
lars.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


1 more

big event

to cover

he face seemed out
of place under the
magazine name-
plate, "AARP." But
there it was: the
unwrinkled face of unretired
Valerie Bertinelli, the actress
who grew up with us, the
actress who lost 50 pounds
and gained a lot of money
pushing Jenny Craig all over
the country, the actress who
just turned 50 and qualified for
membership in the American
Association of Retired Persons.
Fifty.
That's the age when a so-
called friend rents a big pink
elephant and parks it beside
the highway with the message
in marquee-size letters, "Ain't
it nifty, Valerie is fifty." That
same friend will throw you a
birthday party and decorate
with black balloons, which are
about as funny as a case of
gout
Fifty is dangerously close to
the time when middle age sur-
renders to senior, when beauti-
ful and handsome yield to well-
preserved. The final, popular
adjective for the fit and active
is spry, which describes people
who are 90 and still mow their
own yards.
But those are stereotypes.'
Older Americans don't like
stereotypes any more than
other classes and races of
people. I learned a long time
ago to steer clear of "gee-whiz"
descriptions when writing
about older people: "Gee whiz,
he's 85 and still goes to work
every day."
Why shouldn't he? If that's
what a man wants to do at 85,
why should we be surprised?
If a woman wants to start her
own business at 75, more
power to her. Heck, the comic-
strip heroine Wonder Woman
Just turned 69, and she's still
kicking tail.
Age is merely a number,
nothing else.
Actually, if I were eligible
to be a cover boy, I'd choose
AARP Magazine. My cherubic
cheeks and double chin would
be flanked by such enticing
headlines as "Boost Your Brain
Health" and "No More Knee
Pain" and "Easygoing Walking
Vacations."
I'll never get the chance,
though. But why not?
Clint Eastwood made the
AARP cover. Why not me?
What's he done that I haven't,
other than make countless suc-
cessful movies and 'a slop jar
full of money? Has he ever sat
through a boring meeting of
the Cheraw City Council and
turned out a newspaper story
that held readers' attention for
more than 20 seconds? Neither
have I.
But nobody's perfect.
Bruce Springsteen made the
AARP cover when he turned
60. Why not me? What's The
Boss got that I don't have,
other than a voice that can
sing (scream) a crowd into
a frenzy? Shoot, I sing in the
church choir. Can he say that?'
I know, I know. You've got
to be famous in some way to
get on the cover of AARP. But
maybe it won't be that way
forever. One of these days, a
common guy or gal who's 50
or older and just enjoys being
active will make the cover.
For now, I can look at
Valerie Bertinelli on the cover
of AARP and say she is beauti-
ful. And I expect she will be
beautiful when she's 85.

* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


4A


OT H E R O PIN I ON


Thomas Jefferson's sinking seawall


I












Paae Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


Credit scores sink to new lows


By EILEEN AJ CONNELLY
AP Personal Finance Writer

NEW YORK- The cred-
it scores of millions more
Americans are' sinking to
new lows.
Figures provided by
FICO Inc. show that 25.5
percent of consumers -
nearly 43.4 million people
- now have a credit score
.of, 599 or below, marking
them as poor risks for lend-
ers. It's unlikely they will
be able to get credit cards,


auto loans or mortgages
under the tighter lending
standards banks now use.
Because consumers
relied so heavily on .debt
to fuel their spending in
recent years, their restrict-
ed access to credit is one
reason for the slow eco-
nomic recovery.
"I don't get paid for loan
applications, I get paid
for closings," said Ritch
Workman, a Melbourne
mortgage broker. "I have
plenty of business, but I'm


struggling to stay open."
FICO's latest analysis is
based on consumer credit
reports as of April. Its find-
ings represent an increase'
of about 2.4 million people
in the lowest credit score
categories in the past two
years. Before the Great
Recession, scores on
FICO's 300-to-850 scale
weren't as volatile, said
Andrew Jennings, chief
research officer for FICO in
Minneapolis. Historically,
just 15 percent of the 170


million consumers with
active credit accounts, or
25.5 million people, fell
below 599, according to
data posted on Myfico.com.
More are likely to join
their ranks. It can take sev-
eral months before payment
missteps actually drive down
a credit score. The Labor
Department says about 26
million people are out of
work or underemployed,
and millions more face
foreclosure, which alone
can chop 150 points off an


individual's score. Once the
damage is done, it could be
years before this group can
restore their scores, even
if they had strong credit
histories in the past.
SOn the positive side,
.the number of consumers
who have a top score of
800 or above has increased
in recent years. At least
in part, this reflects that
more individuals have cut
spending and paid down
debt in response to the
recession.


Failing credit
More than 43 million people,
now have a credit score of 599
or below, marking them as poor
risks for borrowing money.
Credit scores
Poor cv Fair U Moderate
* Good 1 Excellent
3o; 3 q-49. i
15%1 .r: .33c a-I

12% - ,
15% '.1J 951.
. __ -69 - I 11.9 .


Pre-recession April 2010
SOURCES: FICO Inc.; myfico.com AP


Stocks in narrow range ahead of earnings season


By STEPHEN BERNARD
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK - Stocks
traded in a narrow range
Monday as investors grew
more cautious with the
approach of second-quarter
earnings reports.
The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 9 points. The
Dow's modest advance fol-
lowed its best week in a
year.
Investors were mak-
ing few big moves as they,
waited for the release of
Alcoa Inc.'s earnings report
after the close of trading. So
they showed little reaction
to news of several corporate
acquisitions.
Insurance broker Aon
Corp. said it will buy human
resources company Hewitt
Associates for $4.9 billion in
cash and.stock, and Playboy
Enterprises Inc. founder
Hugh Hefner offered to
take the media company
private. Also Avon Products
Inc. agreed to buy Silpada
Designs for $650 million in
a bid to expand its jewelry
business.
Investors generally see
acquisitions as a sign that
companies are confident
and willing to spend cash
to expand.
Earnings are likely to
dominate trading for the
next few weeks,. Investors
are seeking insight into the
state of the economy not
only from how well com-
panies fared during the
April-June period, but also


Trader Sal Suarino (left) checks his ndte pad as he works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday


from their forecasts for the
coming quarters. In par-
ticular, investors want to
see whether sluggish retail'
sales, waning consumer
confidence and high unem-
ployment have actually hurt
corporate profits.
Ahead of Alcoa's report,
analysts were upbeat but
also expected that compa-
nies did see some impact


Summer gas prices

should be fairly steady


By SANDY SHORE
AP Business Writer

Gasoline pump prices
should stay in a fairly nar-
row range this summer,
putting less'strain on family
budgets for summer driv-
ing trips and commutes to
work.
The national average for
a gallon of unleaded regular
was $2.715 Monday, accord-'
ing to AAA, Wright Express
and Oil Price Information
Service. That's down almost
a penny from a week ago
and 17.8 cents higher than
a year ago.
The government releases
its weekly report on retail
gasoline prices on Monday
afternoon.
Analysts don't expect a
big change in pump prices
in the next four to six weeks
unless something unexpect-
ed happens, like a hurri-
cane in the Gulf of Mexico.
that could crimp supplies or
a big jump in oil prices.
"If you're going to see a
rally or a big movement as
opposed to a crawl either





Columbia, nec.









Wednesday
Lake City Reporter


way, it's going to have to be
event-driven and right now
there's no event to drive it,"
said Tom Kloza, publisher
and chief oil analyst at Oil
Price Information Service.
"I think we're looking at
a very, very sort of placid
picture for at least through
July."
Most analysts say
demand is moderate at
best this summer amid
ample gasoline supplies as
consumers curb spending
because of worries about
jobs and the pace of the
economic recovery.
Consumers may get a
better picture of where the
economy is headed' this
week as major companies
begin reporting their sec-
ond-quarter earnings. If
earnings come in weaker
than expected, that could
affect oil prices and, in
turn, the price at the pump,
PFGBest analyst Phil Flynn
said.
"So much of the price
of oil really is based on
the perception of economic
recovery," Flynn said.


from the choppiness of the
economic recovery.:
"We will have some good
news" during earnings sea-
son, predicted Steve Stahler,
president of the Stahler
Group in Baton Rouge, La.
"But it will be harder to
find it."
Greg Estes, fund manag-
er at Intrepid Capital Funds
in Jacksonville Beach, said


of companies' forecasts,
"people are really wanting
to see things get, better."
He said some industries
like technology were more
likely to report improve-
ment versus those that
rely more on consumer
spending.
In afternoon trading, the
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age rose 9.31, or 0.1 percent,


LOCAL STOCKS

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&Tlnc NY 1.68 6.8 11 24.84 +.1 -11.4 Lowes NY .44 2.2 17 20,36 -.07 -13.0
AMD NY ...... 6 7.36 +02 -24.0 McDnlds NY 2.20 3.1 16 69,94 +.72 +12.0
Alcoa NY .12 1.1 ... i0.87 -07 -32.6 Microsoft Nas .52 2.1 13 24.83 +.56 -18.5
A'uloZone NY ... 15 202.69 +2.57 +28.2 NYTimes NY ...... 8 9.39 +.38 -24.0
BPPLC NY .. ... 7 36.76 +2.71-36.6 NextEraEn NY 2.00 3.9 13 51.91 +.48 -1.7
BkofAm NY .04 .3 72 15.21 +.10 +1.0 NobltyH Nasd ......... 9.48 +62 -9.3
BobEvans Nasd .72 3,0 11 24.24 +.02 -16.3 OcciPet NY 1.52 1.9 18 80.91 -.20 -5
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 6.0 11 10.94 -.16 -31.6 Penney NY .80 3.5 19 22.56 -.80 -15.2
CSX NY .96 1.8 17 52.46 +.70 +8.2 PepsiCo NY 1.92 3.0 16 63.74 +.24 +4.8
Chevron NY 2.88 4.0 11 71,85 +.01 -6.7 Pfizer NY .72 4.8 9 14.93 +.16 -17.9
Citigp, NY .. .,.. 4.11 +.07 +24.2 Potash NY .40 .425 92.81 -.19 -14.5
CocaCI NY 1.76 3.4 18 52.45 +.05 -8.0 PwShs0QQNasd ,26 .6 .. 44.75 +.13 -2.2
Delhaize NY 2.02 2.6 ... 76.56 +.02 -.2 Ryder NY 1.00 2.4 33 40.84 -.28 -.8
DirFnBear NY ......... 14.78 -.01-23.9 S&P500ETFNY 2.22 2.1 ... 108.03 +.07 -3.1
DrxFBuls NY .15 .7 ... 22,01 -.04 -10.9 SearsHldgs Nasd ..... 32 63.14 -.25 -24.3
FamilyDIr NY .62 1.7 14 36.11 +.11 +29.8 SiriusXM Nasd ......... .96 -04 +60.3
FordM NY ...... 6 11,10 +.25 +11.0 SouthnCo NY 1.82 5.2 14 34.78 +.07 +4.4
GenElec NY .40 2.7 16 14.93 -.02 -1.3 ,SprinlNex NY .........4.50 +.22 +23.0
HomeDp. NY .95 3.3 17 28.31 +05 -2,1 SPDRFncl NY '.17 12 ... 14.53 +.02 +.9
iShEMkts NY .59.1.5 .,, 39.65 -.33 -4.5 TimeWarn NY .85 2.8 14 30.10 -.09 +3.3
iShK NY .77 1.2 ... 62.23 -.71 -.3 WalMart NY 1.21 2.4 13 50.12 +.69 -6.2
Intel Nasd .63 3.1 19 20.57 +.33 +.8 YRCWwdhNasd ........ .21 +09 75.5


Tour the fully furnished Bryan -1 Zecher
Savannah 1021 Modefhome. H OMES
Ah INDEPENDENT FRANCHISE Of
-- - . . '. ,llltiir K # l. > . l ltcr~ H,.',I-,
. .... Sv� ,CS^ '_ i;r�]1 -i 1.,,,, *m, I.... m


Carpet Cleaning Specialist
Voted Lake City Best Of the Best Carpet Cleaning


3 ROOMS & HALL 5 ROOMS & HALL
$79.00 $118.00


p


DISC VER


VISA C


S.--:,, The lNeeds Of Home rd Industy


to 10,207.34. The
& Poor's 500 index
or less than 0.1
1,077.88, while ti
composite index
or 0.1 percent, to
About two stock
every one those
on the New Y
Exchange, whei
came to a light 54
'shares.


Although the market
just had its biggest weekly
gains in a year, some ana-
lysts are unsure about how
long the rebound will last.
Trading volume remains
light, which means many
investors are still sitting on
the sidelines, and the Dow
is still down 9 percent from
its 2010 high reached in late
April.
Economic news this
week should shed some
light about how well the
recovery is going. In addi-
tion to earnings reports,
readings are also due on
retail sales, weekly job-
less claims, manufacturing
activity, consumer senti-
ment and inflation.
Shares ofAlcoa and other
materials stocks slipped.
A drop in commodities
imports in China, particu-
larly copper, hurt shares
of companies like Freeport
McMoran Copper & Gold
Inc. Alcoa fell 17 cents
$10.77. Freeport McMoran
fell $3.20, or 4.9 percent, to
$62.68.
CIATED PRESS Hewitt shares jumped
$11.57, or 32.7 percent,
'to $46.97. Aon shares
e Standard fell $2.51, or 6.5 percent,
:x fell 0.08, to $35.83. hewiPlayboy
percent, to jumped $1.63, or 41.4 per-
he Nasdaq cent, to $5.57. Avon rose 3
rose 2.90, cents'to $28.30.
2,199.35.1 Bond prices traded in a
cks fell for tight range. The yield on
that rose the benchmark 10-year
ork Stock Treasury note, which
re' volume moves opposite to its price,
V7.6 million fell to 3.05 percent from
3.06 percent late Friday.


Bn iUhtway
INSURANCE
Auto I Home Business I Life
386.752.2345 PHONE
877.322.7343 FAx
, 386.965.4120 cLL
vance.cox@brightway.com
brightway.com
742 SE Baya Dr., Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32025


Call for details 386-752-2500
1866 West US Hwy 90 * Lake City, FL


M.n -0* .1


' BA 'IWAY 1 ' '


386-755-6142 / 386-362-2244
All rooms 300sq max per room. LR, DR combo count as 2 rooms. Not valid with any other offer. Residential only. Offer expires 7/31/10


r,


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010 Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


.N To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today Friday

Town Council meeting Recovery program
dates changed registration
White Springs Town Haven Hospice and
Council Meeting'has been Meridian Behavioral
changed from the Third Healthcare will host
Tuesday of each month to . the "Choice, Hope and
the Second Tuesday of each ':,Recovery" program from 10
month. The next regularly a.m. to 12 p.m. Aigust 4 at
scheduled Council Meeting Haven Hospice. This series
will be today. .:., of programs, for adults 55
...�, . and older, is designed to
Summer Tennis camp '- . ', help people handle situa-
, A c... tions when it appears there is
registration under way no where else to turn. Haven
The tke Ci Pars .d Hospice is located at 6037
Recreation Department is . ,.US Hwy 90. Register by July

for children. Classes started b,"ext. 8313 or send an e-mail
Monday and will be from 9 to dottiebaker@mbhci.org.
to 11 a.m. Monday through
Thursday at the Young's Park. Saturday
tennis courts. Classes will run
for four weeks and cost $50. Art program registration
Andy Creel, Columbia High begins
School tennis coach, will be
the instructor. Register for the . Registration for the Young
camp at the Teen Town office . ,Da Vinci Art Program is from
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday . 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday
through Friday. Call Heyward .., at the Columbia County
Christie at (386) 754-3607. COURTESY PHOTO Public Library West Branch.
u Program times are 10 a.m.
Play auditions at Marion Richardson Middle School's Young ArtiSts of the Month to 12 p.m. July 24,.31 and
Street Cafe today Aug. 7. The free art program
Richardson Middle School's Young Artists of the Month for July are (from left) Carlos Diaz, Tyler Bethea, John Amaro and is for children ages 10 to
Auditions for "Steel RMS art teacher Gwen Gill. The Young Artists of the Month program is a business partnership between the Columbia County 14.Contact Joan Fetchen at
Magnolias" are today at the School System and local. businesses. (386) 697-4622.
Marion -Street Cafe.


Plant Society meeting is
today Geri Actors looking for
. Mda


the second Florida Native
plant society meeting is
at 6:30 p.m. today at the
Columbia County Public
Library. The Florida Native
Plant Society Program is
"Creating a Healthy Yard" by
JaCqui Sulek. Call Barney
Barnard at 386) 497-3536.

UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are at the
Columbia County Extension
Office from 9 a.m. to noon
today. They answer garden-
ing questions and conduct
soil pH tests free of charge.
Call (386) 752-5384, or stop'
S at the UF/IFAS Extension
Office at the Columbia
County fairgrounds for more
information.


eIImpersI 3
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle Entrenchment
Center are looking for mem-
bers. Meetings are 12:45-2
p.m. today and Thursday.
Anyone retired and interest-
ed in becoming an adtor or
actress is invited. Call Frank
at 752-8861.


Lake City Lions to meet
The Lake City Lions
meet at 7 p.m. today, at the
Guangdong restaurant, in
the Lake City Mall: Call Truett
George at (386).497-2050 or..
Marshall Barnard at (386) 497-
3536 for more rifo'rmarrion

Square Dancing
The Dixie Dancers weekly


dance is held at 6:30 p.m.
every Tuesday at Teen Town
Community Center. The
group does square and
round dancing. Couples 12
and older are welcome. Call
(386) 497-2834.

Wednesday
Newcomer's Meeting
The Lake City Newcomer's
monthly meeting will be
at 11 a.m. on Wednesday
at Quangdong Chinese
Restaurant, located in the
Lake City Mall: The luncheon
is $10 and the speaker
will be Butch Harrison. All
members, friends, and new-
comers to the community .
are welcome. Call (386) 935-
1548 or (386) 935-2625. '

Medicare assistance
SHINE, a volunteer


program with the Florida .
Department of Elder Affairs
offers freehand confiden-
tial one-on-one counsel-
ing for Medicare concerns
from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the Columbia
County Public Library. Call
the Elder Helpline at 1-800-
262-2243.

Rotary Club of Lake City
Downtown to meet
The Rotary Club of Lake
City Downtown meets at
7:15 a.m. each Wednesday,
in the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison Court.
Call (386) 755-7969 for more
information.

Moose Lodge Bingo is
open for everyone
Bingo games at the Moose
Lodge, 624 NE Williams, are
open to everyone. Games


are at 3 p.m., 6:45 and 7
p.m. on every Wednesday
and Friday. There is free ice .
tea and coffee. Food is avail-
able for purchase. Call (386)
755-3730.

Thursday

Park to host weaving
workshop.
The Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park is hosting a weaving
workshop for children at 10
a.m. Thursday in the Craft
Square Area. The work-
shops are for children 7
and up. Register early, and
a parent or guardian must
be present with all students
during workshop activities.
'Call (386)' 397-1920 or visit
www. stephenfosterCSO.


Coming up

Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support
Group meets at 7 p.m. July
19 in the Classrooms at
Lake City Medical Center.
Meetings are for people that
have had weight loss'sur-
gery, contemplating surgery
or just trying to lose weight
on their own. E-mail thethin-
nerme@gmail.com or call
(386) 288-9153 and leave a
message.

Magic Show to take
place July 20
The. Great Loudini will
.perform a magic show
at 11 a.m. July 20 at the
Coulumbia County Library
Main Branch.


OBITUARIES


Wilbur L. Purdy
Wilbur L. Purdy, 89, of Lake
City, passed away on Saturday,.
July 10, 2010. Wilbur was born
onNovember29, .-
1920, in Bush-
nell, Florida, a ,.
son of the late
Edward Graf-
ton Purdy and Virginia Estelle
Howell. Wilbur was a veteran
of World War II serving in the
U.S. Army. He was employed
as a salesman with Indepen-
dent Life Insurance Company
until he.retired in 1980. Wilbur
was an avid reader, and enjoyed
gardening, and staying fit with
his daily walk and exercise rou-
tine. He was an active member
of Eastside Baptist Church.
Wilbur is survived by his daugh-
ter, Clarice Randall, of Ocala,
and two sons, Leroy, (Mari-
lyn) Purdy of Naples, Grafton
(arolyn) Purdy of Live Oak,
six grandchildren, Greg, (Kim)
Purdy of Cape Coral, Matthew
Purd of Naples, Chris,(Vickie)
Ranll of Ocala, Kelly; (L.A.)
Wilson of Ocala, Kevin Randall
of Ocala, and Elizabeth Mobley
of Gainesville, and six great-
grandchildren, Derrick, Drew,
Nicky, Randall, Josh, and Kai.
He was preceded in death by his
wife, Clara, being married for 56
years, and later to Lucille Bow-
man for five years. Also, pre-
ceded in death by his sisters, Dot
Shepler, and Irma Hollis, and
brothers, Theron and Eddy Purdy.
Funeral services will be conduct-
ed at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday,
July 14, 2010 in the chapel of
GATEWAY FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596 U.S.
Hwy441 S., Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 752-1954 with Pastor Hugh
Dampier officiating. Visitation
with the family will be one hour
prior to service time. Interment
witl follow in Memorial Ceme-
tery. Please sign our guestbook at
wiw.gatewayforestlawn.com


Clarita Irene Rice
Clarita Irene Rice 87,passed
away from this earthly plane on
July 8, 2010 at the Health Cen-
ter of Lake City, Florida, where
she received loving care from
the staff during her stay. She
was the last surviving child of
Walter L. Fuller and Clara M.
Savage Fuller. Clarita was pre-
ceded in death by the love of her
life, Frederick Darwin Rice, in
June of 1994. They were both
veterans .of the United States
Army where they were married
on August 1, ,1945. Both dedi-
cated their lives to serving our
nations veterans as officers of
the American Legion Post 638
in Falconer NY, the Disabled
American Veterans Suwannee
SMemorial 126 in Live Oak, FL
and in later years, Clarita joined
the Ladies Auxiliary to the Vet-
erans of Foreign War,'Post 7122
in Floral City, FL, where she was
a life member. Left to keep her
memory are her two daughters,
SLynda Carr of Lake City, widow
of Truman Carr, and Cynthia
Shaw, married to William Shaw
of Floral City, 5 beautiful grand-
children; Darlene. Gambel, Mi-
chael Reynolds, Jason Reynolds,
Diana'Jacobs, 'John Reynolds, 6
great grandchildren and 4 great-
great grandchildren. Always
the optimist, her favorite saying
was: "Tomorrow will be' a bet-
ter day." Now, everyday will be
a better day for her in heaven.
Last honors will be performed
at the Florida National. Cem-
etery, Bushnell, FL, by the VFW
Post 7122 Honor Guard on July
19, 2010 at 11:00 a.m., where
her last remains will be laid
to rest with her husband of 49
years. Final Arrangements en-
trusted to ICS CREMATION &
FUNERAL HOME,
Lake , City, 1 FL


Thomas Bradford Shuler
Thomas Bradford Shuler, 74,
Lake City, FL died on Sunday,
July 11,2010. Born in St. Charles,
VA, he had lived in Florida since
1970, residing in
Lake City for the
past 20 years.
He was a gradu-
ate of Washing-
ton College Academy, Washing-
ton College, TN; Dell School of
Medical Technology and Radi-
ology, Ashville, NC; Duke Uni-
versity, Durham, NC and Palm
Beach Junior College, Lake
Worth, FL. He held advanced
certification in several special-
ized areas of medical technology.
He served in the United States
Air Force. After 38 years em-
ployment in both medical tech-
nology and radiology at several
medical facilities in North Caro-
lina, Kentucky, Tennessee, and
Florida, he retired from the State
of Florida. He was a member of
the American Medical Technol-
ogy Association and the Ameri-
can Association of Radiology.
He loved travel and woodwork-
ing. He was a member of Samar-
itan Purse Operation Christmas
Child and Seniors United. He
was a member of Berea Bap-
tist Church and enjoyed par-
ticipating' in outreach ministry.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Lon Bradford and
Dora (Turner May) Shuler; two
brothers, Dixie May and Harold
May; five sisters, Jeanette (May)
Williams, Sarah (Shuler) Sch-
reiber, Elizabeth (Shuler) Mor-
gan, Peggy Shuler, and Mary
(Shuler) Milhorn; and close
spiritual mentors, Grant Green
and G. B. "Barney"' Sallee.
Surviving are his wife of 47
years, Arnita (Lawson) Shuler;


Furnit

Furni
High Oudlity Bdrf


daughter and son-in-law, Nancy
(Shuler) and Paul Giovanetti,
Deltona, FL; son and daugh-
ter-in-law, Michael and Carol
Shuler, Lake City, FL; grandson
and granddaughter-in-law, Paul
Michael and Brianne Giovanet-
ti, Pierre, SD; granddaughter,
Elizabeth Giovanetti, Deltona,
FL; two great-grandchildren,
Isabella and Liam Giovanetti,
Pierre, SD; three brothers, Lon
Shuler and E.J. "Pete" Shuler,
Kingsport, TN and Jack Shuler,
Gate City, VA; four sisters, Dor-
othea (Shuler) Sallee, Kingsport,
TN, Barbara (Shuler) Mason,
Clemmons, NC, Rebekoh (Shul-
er). Hood and Glenda (Shuler)
Clemons, Gate City, VA; nu-
merous nieces, nephews and
extended family members; and
close friends: Walter Goins, Jr.,
Stockbridge, GA, Fred Kiger,
SFruitland Park, FL, Mary Aus-
tin, Loxahatchee, FL, Giovanni
Repetto, Genoa, Italy and Ro-
berto Barnos, Sao Pablo, Brazil.
Memorial services will be held
at Berea Baptist Church, Lake
City, FL at 2 p.m. on Friday,
July 16, 2010 with the Rever-
end Larry Sweat officiating and
at Old Kingsport Presbyterian
Church, Kingsport, TN (date
and time to be determined)
with Lucian Lawson, Jr. and
David Hambrick officiating.
Interment with military honors
will be held at the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell, FL
(date and time to be determined).
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to the Samaritan
Purse Operation Christmas Child,
Veterans Administration Medi-
cal Center, Lake City, FL., and
Haven Hospice, Lake City, FL.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
.ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.



ure &

shing
din Furniture


ECOME-n-SEE
386-984-7226 * 297 S. Marion Ave.
1 Block South of Bus Station


' ADOPTION
,.-
\


.. " -" . . , . . . - -; . . ... , .-.. '. . ', -.. -, -' .. � ' .


? For Life Insurance

Go With

Someone You Know
John Burns,III Mary H. Summer
Agent Financial Services Rep.

"j 234 SW Main Blvd. * 752-5866
-.,... - ---n.--n.---------- ----


,BoaBAnge]



FREE 2-NIGHT VACATION!
Donate Car * Boat * RV * Motorcycle
1-800-227-2643

www.boatangel.com


i.a ..%. , w
,-o �* **


lArt & Bebe DERINGTON
965-4300 McQuillan Properties, LLC


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427














SCritics: US too low-key


Ea on Islamic radicalism talk


In this April 12 file photo, top administration counter-terror
deputy John Brennan addresses reporters during a
briefing with White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs
(right) in Washington. The Obama administration's recent
move to drop references to Islamic radicalism in order to build
relations with Muslim nations-is drawing fire in a new report
warning the decision ignores the role religion can play in
motivating terrorists.


By LOLITA C. BALDOR -ists poses a knotty problem.
Associated Press The U.S. is trying to mend
fences with Muslim com-
WASHINGTON- The munities while toughening
Obama administration's its strikes against militant
recent move to drop rhe- groups.
�torical references to Islamic In the report, scheduled
radicalism is drawing fire in to. be released this week,
a new report warning the counterterrorism experts
decision ignores the role from , the Washington
religion can play in motivat- Institute for Near East
ing terrorists. Policy argue that the U.S.
Several prominent coun- could clearly articulate the
terterror experts are chal- threat from radical Islamic
lenging the administration's extremists "without deni-
shift in its recently unveiled grating the Islamic religion
National Security Strategy, in any way."
saying the terror threat President Barack Obama
should be defined in order has argued that wdrds mat-
to fight it. ter, and administration offi-'
The question of how to cials have said that the use
frame the conflict against of inflammatory descrip-
al-Qaida and other terror- tions linking Islam to the


terror threat feed the ene-
my's propaganda and may
alienate moderate Muslims
in the U.S.
In the report, which was
obtained by The Associated
Press, the analysts warn that
U.S. diplomacy must sharp-
en the distinction between
the Muslim faith and vio-
lent Islamist extremism,
identify radicalizers within
Islamic communities and
empower voices that can
contest the radical teach-
ings.
Militant Islamic pro-
paganda has reportedly
been a factor in a spate
of recent terror attacks
and foiled attempts within
the U.S.
Maj. Nidal Hasan, the


suspect in the Fort Hood,
Texas, mass shootings
last year, is believed to
have been inspired by the
Internet postings of vio-
lent Islamic extremists, as,
was Faisal Shahzad, who
pleaded guilty to terrorism
and weapons charges in the
May 1 attempted car bomb-
ing in New York's Times"
Square.
The report acknowledg-
es that the Obama admin-
istration has beefed up.
efforts to work with the
Muslim community in the
U.S. and abroad and has
also expanded counter-
terrorism operations and
tried to erode and divide
al-Qaida and its affiliated
groups.


Analysis: How 2 million lost jobless benefits


By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Keeping unemployment
benefits flowing for mil-
lions of workers whose jobs
were eaten by the recession
should have been a slam
dunk in an election year.
But until this month,
Senate Democrats havel
been unable to bring them-
selves to pass a simple bill
that just does it. Instead
they've demanded a series
of unrelated and often con-
troversial tax and spending
add-ons that have- enabled
Republicans to mount suc-
cessful filibusters.
Now that the legislation
has been shorn of all the
extras, the bill could win
final passage soon.-It can't
come soon enough for more
than 2 million people whose
checks have been cut off.
in a five-month impasse
in which there's plenty of
blame to go around:
* Democrats and their
leaders made several deci-
sions that in retrospect look
like miscalculations, like
pulling the rug out from
under a bipartisan measure
launched back in February
and loading a subsequent
bill with $24 billion for gov-
ernors - guaranteeing that
most Republicans would
vote against it.
* Republican moderates
voted one way in March
to help the bill pass but
changed their minds just
weeks later, having gotten
religion from GOP leaders
and tea partiers on the bud-
get deficit. -
Little remembered amid
the ongoing partisanship


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 13 file photo, retiring Sen. Jim Bunning (R-Ky.)
speaks in Hebron, Ky. Now that it's been shorn of unrelated
tax and spending provisions that held it up for over four
months, the bill to extend unemployment benefits finally.
seems poised to pass. Bunning single-handedly held up the
bill for days, demanding the bill be paid for so as not to add
to the spiraling national debt. But after Bunning folded on
March 2, it seemed like Republicans wanted no part of stand-
ing in the way of extending jobless benefits.


and recrimination is that
jobless benefits also got
sideswiped by President
Barack Obama's health
care overhaul.
To reduce the health care
bill's impact on the deficit,
Democrats decided to close
almost $30 billion in tax
loopholes. Until the final
health care push, those rev-
enues had been designated'
to cover the cost of extend-
ing other popular family


and business tax breaks as
part of a broad bipartisan
jobless benefits package.
Besides the jobless aid,
the measure contained
a payroll tax holiday for
businesses, tax breaks for
business, health insurance
subsidies and help for doc-
tors facing a cut in their
Medicaid payments. It had
support from across the
political spectrum, from
Obama to conservative


Seriate Republicans.
Some liberals, however,
balked at the deal, which
was cut principally by
Senate Finance Committee
Chairman Max Baucus (D-
Mont.) and the commit-
tee's senior- Republican,
Sen. Charles Grassley of
Iowa. The liberals didn't
like that their "j6bs agen-
da" seemed hijacked by
business lobbyists, who
won items like research
and development tax cred-
its and some arcane mea-
sures such as tax breaks
for NASCAR tracks. With
unemployment 'hovering
just under 10 percent, they
also thought it was too light
on subsidies for preserving
and creating jobs.
. So Senate. Majority
Leader Harry Reid blew
up the agreement, instead
advancing a pared-back
jobs bill excusing business-
es from having toqpay the
employer share of .Social
Security taxes this year on
any new workers they hire.
Economists were dubious it
would produce many jobs.
Meanwhile, unemployment
aid would wait for later leg-
islation.
"We could have had this
bill passed in three days
and ... Reid decided to scut-
tle it," Grassley complained.
"Baucus read about it in the
paper."
The delays meant that
Congress had to pass a
short-term extension of job-
less benefits at the end of
February. Reid and Senate
Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) worked
out a deal for a quick vote
to avoid an interruption in
benefits.


M- 'Ai


Licensed & Insured

\


COME CHEER

WITH US!
FABULOUS ALL STARZ
. .;M" INI & YOUTH

LOCATED IN GLEN ST. MARY, FL
FA(04)SOWORS.CO88
FAIFU055F007WORk'S.COM


SLand Clearing
Tree Removal


N


Ponds
Driveways
Demolition


' Clint S. Davis LLC

* B B404'


Edward Jone'
IAriurG �EN�E QF irjvtTirN


Robert Woodard
Financial Advisor
S

148 North Marion Ave
Lake City, FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-752-1215 TF Fax 800-217-2105
TF. 888-752-1215
robert.woodard@ledwardjones.com


Texas man faces charges in

beating death of six-year-old son


Associated Press

HOUSTON -AHouston
man who beat his 6-year-old
son for eight hours until
the boy went into a seizure
and died has been charged
in the child's killing, police
said Monday.
Alex Duncan, 34, is
charged with murder and
his girlfriend,. 30-year-
old Tammyra Lanette
Sampson, who witnessed
thle beating early Sunday,
is charged with injury to
a child by omission, police
said.
Both defendants are
being held on -a $50,000
bond.'
Tekerrious"T.K"Jackson
lived with his mother but
was spending the summer
with his father, police said.


Share
your photos


Saturday night, Duncan
was angry because T.K.
wouldn't go to sleep so
he made the boy kneel
with his arms extended
in front of him for eight
hours, Sgt. Brian Harris
said. Whenever T.K. low-
ered his arms, Duncan
delivered -a "flurry of
punches" to the boy's
chest and body as part of
what Duncan called "chest
boxing," according to the
police report.
Duncan refused to allow
T.K. to go to the bathroom,
and beat the boy after he
urinated on himself, accord-
ing to court records.
Duncan told investigators
he beat his son to teach him
how to "man up," police
said.
Sampson told police that


at one point she stopped
Duncan from beating his
son so she could show him
"how to properly discipline
a child with a belt," police
said. She said she had wit-
nessed other attacks in the
past several days.
The child was rushed
to the hospital after he
appeared to have a sei-
zure. Police said Duncan
told investigators the
boy's bruising came from
attempts to revive him by
slapping him and giving
him chest thrusts.
Sampson's daughter, an
11-year-old girl who was
not named, told police that
Duncan forced her to watch
the beatings for several
days. The girl is now stay-
ing with her grandmother,
police said.


109"
reg. 16.99
32-Gal.
Wheeled
Trash Can
Two handles
lock down tokeep
lid secure from
pests. W 314 994 F6
While supplies last.


Your tboci





' ,,. reg. 6.99


, li -,! 2 lie A,-.,rAAA I ,.


n-L"or
,., . reg. 6.99





H K' i





l'


*~ *1


799
rag. 14.99
P-Pc. Weekend Paint Tray Kit
Includes 2 roller frames, 4 roller covers,
angle sash brush, deep well tray and
tray liner. P 815 094 B5 While Supplies last.


Lake City
Sunshine The Value * 1420 SW Main Blvd.
Phone (386) 755-2680 * Mon.-SaL 7:30am-6pm * Sun. 9-5 l/
Fort White j OwIv


SSunshine TLue Value of FL White Hwy 47 N
Across St. From School
Phone (386) 487-1708 * Mon.-Sat. 8am-5:3Opm * Sun. 0-5


START RIGHT. START HERE'"


www.edwardjones.com


752-6306
CFC1427643 * Back Flow #T05-08-8053



2744 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL


Go Painlessly


Mary Ann W. TomW.



Ounce for Ounce - Compare and Save!
The top-quality & top-value pain creme


www.lakecityreporter.com


;carsr rItC3 Iow rEf i'rlllt le1

iis EIEF~tI v~r ct I


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


. 7A


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


New al-Qaida threat:

Somali group claims blast


By MAX DELANY
and JASON STRAZIUSO
Associated Press

KAMPALA, Uganda
- East Africa saw the
emergence of a new inter-
national terrorist group
Monday, as Somalia's most
dangerous al-Qaida-linked
militia claimed responsibil-
ity for the twin bombings in
Uganda that killed 74 peo-
ple during the World Cup.
The claim by al-Shabab,
whose fighters are trained
by militant veterans of the
conflicts in Afghanistan
and Iraq, resets the secu-
rity equation in East Africa
and has broader implica-
tions worldwide. The group
in the past has recruited
Somali-Americans to carry
out suicide bombings in
Mogadishu.
Al-Shabab has long
threatened to attack outside
of Somalia's borders, but
the bombings late Sunday'
are the first time the group
has done so.
"We warned Uganda
not to deploy troops to
Somalia, they ignored us,"
said Sheik Ali Mohamud
Rage, al-Shabab's spokes-
man. "We warned them to
stop massacring our peo-
ple, and they ignored that.
SThe explosions in Kampala
were only a minor message


to them. ... We will target
them everywhere if Uganda
does not withdraw from our
land."
Rage said a second
country with peacekeep-
ing forces in Mogadishu
- Burundi -- could soon
face attacks. Fighting in
Mogadishu between mili-
tants and Somali troops or
African Union peacekeepers
frequently kills civilians.
The attacks outside
Somalia represent a danger-
ous new step in al-Shabab's
increasingly militant path
and raises questions aboutits
future plans. The U.S. State
Department has declared
al-Shabab a terrorist orga-
nization. Other neighboring
nations - Kenya, Djibouti
and Ethiopia, along with
Burundi - may also face
new attacks, analysts say.
Despite the threats,
Uganda's army spokesman
said the county would not
withdraw. "Al-Shabab is the
reason why we should stay
in Somalia. We have to pac-
ify Somalia," said Lt. Col.
Felix Kulaigye.
The death toll in Sunday's
twin blasts rose to 74 on
Monday, Ugandan officials
said. Investigators combed
through the blast sites, one
an outdoor,screening at a
rugby club and the other
an Ethiopian restaurant


- a nation despised by al-
Shabab. Investigators found
the severed head of what
appeared to be a Somali
suicide bomber.
A California-based aid
group, meanwhile, said one
of its American workers was
among the dead. Officials
said 60 Ugandans, nine
Ethiopians or Eritreans, one
Irish woman, and oneAsian
were also among those
killed. Two people couldn't
be identified. Eighty-five
people were wounded.
At least three of the
wounded were in a church
group from Pennsylvania
who went to an Ethiopian
restaurant in Kampala early
to get good seats for the
game, said Lori Ssebulime,
an American who married a
Ugandan. Three Ugandans
in the group were killed
when a blast erupted. One
of the wounded was 16-
year-old American Emily
Kerstetter.
"Emily was rolling around
in a pool of blood scream-
ing," said Ssebulime, who
has helped bring in U.S.
church groups since 2004.
"Five minutes before it
went off, Emily said she
was going to -cry so hard
because she didn't want to
leave. She wanted to stay
the rest of the summer
here."


Polanski free, Swiss reject

US extradition request


By BRADLEY S. KLAPPER
and FRANK JORDANS
SAssociated Press

SBERN, Switzerland,
- Roman Polanski was
declared a free man on
Monday after. Switzerland
rejected a U.S. request to
extradite ,hiM .to, be. sen-
tenced for having sex in
1977 with a 13-year-old
girl.
The Swiss government
blamed the decision on U.S.
authorities, saying they had
failed to address defense
.arguments that the 76-year-
old filmmaker had actually
served his sentence before
fleeing Los Angeles three
decades ago.
Nine months after arrest-
ing Polanski, the Swiss
Justice Ministry said U.S.
officials should have backed
up their request by provid-
ing confidential testimony
about Polanski's sentencing
procedure in LA
"Mr. Polanski can now
move freely," Justice
Minister Eveline Widmer-
Schlumpf declared. "He's a
Free man."
The stunning decision
could end the United States'
long pursuit of Polanski.
France, where he has spent
much of his time, does not
extradite its own citizens
and Polanski has had little


In this image released on Saturday by the state media Cubadebate website, Cuban leader
Fidel Castro (right) stands next to unidentified people during a visit to the National Center-
for Scientific Investigation in Havana on July 7. Castro had not been photographed in public
since falling seriously ill in July 2006.


Fidel Castro suddenly

back in view on Cuban TV


By PAUL HAVEN
Associated Press

HAVANA - Fidel Castro
is striding back into the
limelight after years behind
the scenes and out of view.
Days after being photo-
graphed in public for the
first time since he fell ill in
2006, the 83-year-old revo-
lutionary leader was sched-
uled to make a highly pro-
moted appearance on state
television on Monday to
discuss his concerns about
the Middle East.
Castro's appearance on
the Mesa Redonda - or
Round Table - a daily talk
show about current events
that is usually transmitted
live on state media across
the island, was announced
in a front-page story in the
Communist-party daily
Granma.
The announcement did
not specify if the program
would be broadcast live,
and government officials
contacted by The Associated


Press had no comment.
Castro also appeared ,in
videotaped interviews with
,Cuban television in June
and September 2007.
But appearances have
been extremely rare since a
serious illness in July 2006
forced him to step down
- first temporarily, than
permanently - and hand
power. over to his younger
brother Raul. Photos of the
elder Castro greeting work-
ers at a science.center were
published in pro-govern-
ment blogs and on state
media over the weekend,
the first time he has been
photographed in public in
that time.
Castro's sudden reemer-
gence comes after the dra-
matic announcement last
week that Cuba will free
52 political prisoners in
the next few months under
a deal with the Roman
Catholic Church. .
While Cubans have
become accustomed to
reading Castro's writings


on world affairs in the local
Press, he has stayed largely
out of the public eye since
ceding power, helping Raul '
Castro solidify his place as
the country's leader after a
lifetime spent in his more
famous brother's shadow.
Cubans reacted with
surprise to word of Fidel
Castro's relative media
blitz.
"I think it will have a
positive effect on people,"
21-year-old student David
Suarez told AP, "It will give
hope that once again he
will help to solve our prob-
lems."
Magaly Delgado Rojo,
a 72-year-old retiree in
Havana's Playa neighbor'-
hood, said the appearances
must. have been carefully
thought out by Cuban lead-
ership.
'The photos (published
over the weekend) and now
the Round Table are meant
to send a message: 'I am
here and I am on top of
everything. ..."


In this photo, French-born film director Roman Polanski
waves during a media presentation in Berlin.


trouble traveling through-
out Europe - even if he's
stayed away from Britain.
The U.S. cannot appeal
the decision, but Polanski is
still a fugitive in the United
States.
'That warrant remains
outstanding," Los Angeles
Superior Court spokesman
Allan Parachini. said, add-
ing that Polanski could be
arrested and sent back to
the U.S. if he traveled to
another country that has
an extradition deal with the
United States.
The Swiss decision was
praised by senior govern-
ment officials in France
and Poland, where Polanski
holds dual citizenship. But
there was criticism from


groups representing vic-
tims of sexual abuse.
The Oscar-winning
director of "Rosemary's
Baby," "Chinatown" and
'The Pianist" was. accused
of plying his" victim with
champagne and part of a
Quaalude during a 1977
modeling shoot and raping
her. He was initially indict-
ed on six felony counts,
including rape by use of
drugs, child molesting and
sodomy, but pleaded guilty
to one count of unlawful
sexual intercourse.
In exchange, the judge
agreed to drop the remain-
ing charges and sen-
tence him to prison for
a .90-day psychiatric
evaluation.


Report: Israeli raid planning flawed


By IAN DEITCH
Associated Press

TEL AVIV, Israel -
Flawed intelligence-gath-
ering and planning led to
Israel's botched and deadly
raid on a Gaza-bound pro-
test flotilla, with security
forces underestimating the
potential for violence, said
the official report released
Monday.
The report, however,
praised the commandos who
took part in the operation,
saying they were justified
. in opening fire and killing
nine after being confronted
by violent pro-Palestinian
activists on board one of
the ships.
The report -concluded
that intelligence-gathering
was deficient and that vari-
ous intelligence units did
riot communicate properly
with each other. It criticized
the operation's planners for
not having a backup plan in
the event of violence.
It did not recommend


any dismissals, though it is
possible that some senior
officers will be ousted or
demoted in an ensuing
shake-up.
"We found that there
were some professional
mistakes regarding both
the intelligence and the
decision-making process
and some operational mis-
takes," the report's author,
retired general Giora
Eiland, toldreporters at a
Defense Ministry briefing
where declassified sec-
tions of the report were
discussed.
Some of the mistakes
took place at fairly high lev-
els of command, he added,
giving few details.
The report itself was not
made public,
The criticisms that were
aired at the briefing - as
well as the praise for the
soldiers who took part in
the raid - have been wide-
ly voiced inside Israel since
the May 31 raid.
Video footage of Israeli


commandos beingbeaten by
the activists on the Turkish
vessel Mavi Marmara, cou-
pled with an international
outcry over the bloodshed,
led Israelis to close ranks
around their military.
But the raid also had an
effect opposite to the one
Israel desired. It focused
international attention on
the three-year-old blockade
on the Hamas-ruled Gaza
Strip and forced Israel to
ease the movement of goods
through land crossings.
Israel's naval blockade on
the territory, meant to keep
weapons from reaching
Hamas militants, remains
in place. Later this week the
blockade will be challenged
again, this time by a Libyan
protest ship.
In a statement, the Israeli
military chief of staff, Lt.
Gen. Gabi Ashkenazi, said
the inquiry did' not reveal
failures or negligence, but
"brings up mistakes which
must be corrected for future
incidents."


7 -.' 4 ,



1 ,2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
*Winners are not guaranteed prizes from every sponsor
Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!

if you are interested in being a Sponsor,
nl �...... #I Jim....., J.. o_/-1 131A113.


S r elStu UCall MIiary aL O-/-I U'f-uui

. TO ENTER:
' Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00) to the Lake City
Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056,
or email information & photo to ads@lakecityreporter.com subject:
Baby Contest
r" * k


All pictures will he publisned along witn the winners in
the Lake City Reporter's July 25, 2010 edition. So show off
your child, grandchild, godchild, niece or nephew.


DEADLINE:
July 16th, 2010
For More Information Please Call Mary at 754-0401


I
I


I "


~n..


w vl W, -q.


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


I


F*r:F 1




:I"~











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor,
754-0421
tkrby@lakecityreportercom


Tuesday. julv 13.2010


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
12U travel team
players sought
Experienced
players are being sought
for a 12-under travel
baseball team to play
in local tournaments
and possibly go to
Cooperstown. Tryouts
are 3:30 p.m. July 25.
For details, call Chris
Williams at 344-5975.

YOUTH FOOTBALL
Carter camp is
Friday-Saturday.
The annual Jerome
Carter Football Camp for
boys and girls ages 7-14
is Friday and Saturday at
Memorial Stadium. The
camp is co-sponsored
by the Columbia County
Recreation Department,
the Lake City Recreation
Department and the
Richardson Community
Center Annie Mattox
Park North Advisory
Council./Registration
is 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays at Richardson
Community Center. Cost
of $10 includes a T-shirt
Flyers also are available
at Brian's Sports.
For details, call Adee
Farmer at 754-7096.

POP WARNER
Registration has
been extended
Regitr adton for Pop
Warner football and
cheerleadinig has been'
extended until all spots
are filled. Sign-up is
5-7 p.m. weekdays at
Richardson Community
Center. Cost for
cheerleading is $150
and includes insurance,
uniform and shoes. Cost
for football is $80 and
includes insurance, game
uniform, helmet and
shoulder pads.
For details, call Lavell *
George at 755-8747 for
cheerleading, and Nicole
Smith or Adee Farmer at
754-7096 for football.

FORT WHITE VOLLEYBALL
Camp planned
on July 26-28
Fort White High is
hosting a volleyball
camp in the gym from
9 a.m. to noon on
July 26-28. The camp is
for girls interested in
trying out for Fort
White's varsity, junior
varsity and middle school
teams. Registration
forms are at the school's
front office. Cost for the
nine hours of
instruction is $50
through Wednesday
($60 after) and includes
a camp T-shirt.
For details, call coach
Doug Wohlstein at
(386) 497-5952 or e-mail
wohlstein@firn. edu.
YOUTH TENNIS
Lake City camp
is under way
The Lake City
Parks and Recreation
Department is offering
a Summer Tennis Camp
for children at Youngs
Park. Classes continue
through July 22 from
9-11 a.m. Monday
through Thursday. Andy
Creel is the instructor.
Cost is $50. Registration
is 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays' at Teen Town.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.


M From staff reports


Jimenez, Price to start All-Star Game


Rockies ace looks to
help National League
break 13-year drought.

By JANIE McCAULEY
Associated Press
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Ubaldo
Jimenez is always eager to share
his accomplishments with a sup-
port system that runs from Denver
to the Dominican Republic.
His home nation and adopted
hometown will be tuned in when
Jimenez takes the mound for one
of his most memorable outings
yet. The Colorado ace will start for
the National League in the All-Star'
game, while the AL will counter
with Tampa Bay's David Price.
* In this year of the pitcher, Jimenez
was a fitting pick Monday by Phillies
manager Charlie Manuel.
S"One of the great talents in base-
ball and he's a treat to watch pitch,"
Manuel said of choosing Jimenez
over Florida's Josh Johnson. "This
guy's 15-1. His record speaks for
itself."
The NL will try tonight to end
a 13-year drought in baseball's
Midsummer Classic. Jimenez has


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Colorado Rockies pitcher Ubaldo
Jimenez works in the first inning
against the St. Louis Cardinals in
Denver on Thursday.

a 2.20 ERA in 18 starts and 127-
innings for the surging Rockies.
Price is 12-4 with a 2.42 ERA.
Johnson is' 9-3 with a majors-best
1.70 ERA for the Marlins.
"I said Jimenez from the begin-
ning," Johnson said. "He was my
pick."
Jimenez's parents will be in the
stands ht Angel Stadium, along
with his host family from Colorado


-^ - -
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tampa Bay Rays pitcher David Price
delivers a pitch against the Boston
Red Sox in St. Petersburg on
Wednesday.

and other family and friends.
"Any little thing is going to be
huge for your career," Jimenez
said. "Its just a huge honor for me
to be out here. Hopefully we can
put everything together and break
the losing .streak."
Philadelphia slugger Ryan
Howard will be the National
League's. designated hitter and bat
cleanup for his regular skipper.


COURTESY PHOTO
The Fort White Swaggers 14-under All-Stars march in the opening ceremony of the Babe Ruth Softball 2010 Florida State
Championships in Ponte Vedra Beach on Thursday. The Swaggers placed fifth in their division with a record of 2-2.



Swaggers fifth at state


FortWhite 14U
All-Stars go 2-2 in
softball tourney.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

The FortWhite Swaggers
14-under All-Stars posted
a 2-2 record and placed
fifth in the Babe Ruth
Softball 2010 Florida State
Championships at Ponte
Vedra Beach.
The Swaggers lost to New
Smyrna, 8-3, in the opening


round on Thursday. The
team rebounded with a pair
of wins on Friday - 16-1
over Green Cove Springs
and 19-10 over NFGS. Fort
White was eliminated by
MSA, 16-0, on Saturday.
Altamonte Springs was
the 14-under champion,
beating MSA in the title
game.
"The two teams that beat
us finished second and
third," coach Jay Harvey
said. "I am proud of the
girls. They have never been
to a tournament like this


before."
Brianna Selgas was the
pitcher of record in all four
games for Fort White.
In the opening loss to
New Smryna, Selgas was
2-for-2 with two walks and
scored a run. Courtnay
Harden was 2-for-3.
Shea Chesney led the
hit-patade over Green Cove
Springs, going 3-for-4 with
two RBIs. Ashley Chesney
Was 3-for-5 with a triple and
three RBIs. Kayla Redwine
was 2-for-2 with a triple, two
walks and two RBIs.


Arianna House led the
way in the win over NFGS
with a 3-for-4 game and
three RBIs. Selgas was 2-for-.
4 with a pair of triples, two
walks, four RBIs and four
runs scored. Redwine went
2-for-3, got hit by a'pitched
and walked twice. She
scored four runs. Caitlyn
Bruce also had two hits and
drove in three runs.
FortWhite's secondgame
on Friday lasted more than
four hours and the team
had nothing left for MSA on
Saturday morning.


"Not only is he my guy, he's got
119 at-bats against left-handed pitch-
ers and 65 RBIs," Manuel said. "He
can hit 'em. He's hitting .294. He's
very capable of hitting fourth in an
All-Star lineup."
There was some confusion, how-
ever, about Boston third baseman
SAdrian Beltre. AL manager Joe
Girardi announced that Texas third
baseman Michael Young would
replace Beltre, who left Sunday's
game at Toronto with a strained left
hamstring.
But less than an hour, later, Beltre
said he planned to play.
MLB executive Phyllis Merhige
said an announcement about
Beltre's status was made prema-
turely. He planned to test his leg at
the ballpark before making a final
decision.
"They announced it without tell-
ing me," Beltre said. "I'm think I'm
going to play and I'm going to be on
the active roster."
Girardi is starting Evarn Longoria
of the Rays at third base, meaning
Alex Rodriguez will come off the
bench.
"Hopefully I can come in in the'
middle of the game and get a big
- hit," A-Rod said.


Tour de

France

down to

three

'Tour's finished
for me' -Lance
Armstrong..

By JEROME PUGMIRE
Associated Press

MORZINE, France
- The Tour de France
is shaping up as a three-
way race among leader
Cadel Evans of Australia,
defending - champion
Alberto Contador of
Spain and Andy Schleck
of Luxembourg.
Evans leads Sohleck
by just 20 seconds, after
Schleck won the hardest
stage so far on Sunday
- a grueling Alpine trek
where Lance Armstrong
cracked.
"Getting the yellow
jersey at the Tour is
always something spe-
cial," the 33-year-old
Evans said on Monday's
rest day in Morzine. "To
swap the (world cham-
pion's) rainbow jersey
for the yellow jersey is a
rare feat that I've had the
honor to experience."
With two-time Tour
winner Contador short of
his best form, Evans real-
izes he has a good chance
to win. He slightly injured
his left forearm in a minor
TOUR continued on 2B


Spain sets standard


Country could be
entering a golden
generation era.

By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG -
Now, about creating that
soccer dynasty.
Spain has won the sport's
two toughest tournaments,
adding the first World
Cup held in Africa to its
European Championship
of 2008. After edging the
Netherlands 1-0 in extra
time, the Spaniards were
too exhausted and exhila-


rated to contemplate any-
thing more than how good
that golden prize looked
and how much it meant.
So others can look
ahead, not only to where
this golden generation of
Spanish soccer might take
the nation, but to where
the World Cup is headed
and what the tournament
needs.
Many countries, includ-
ing the seemingly jinxed
Dutch, have been blessed
with one group of supreme-
ly talented players who
learn the game together and
apply those lessons on the
biggest stages. In Andres


Iniesta, who scored the
Cup-winner Sunday, David
Villa, Xavi, Xabi Alonso,
Iker Casillas, Sergio Ramos
- the list seems endless -
Spain has that crew. Nearly
all are in their prime or just
approaching it.
They have leader-
ship, superb goalkeeping
- mark Casillas down
for both of those as cap-
tain and possibly the best
keeper in the sport - and
a clear understanding of the
stylish Spanish way of
playing soccer. After 44
years without a major title,
CUP continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former South African President Nelson Mandela (left) waves
to spectators next to his wife Graca Machel before the World
Cup final between the Netherlands and Spain at Soccer City
in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Sunday.


Section B


,77 - 7












Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
7 am.
VERSUS - Tour de France, stage
9, MorzJne-Avoriaz to Saint-Jean-de-
Maurienne, France
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
FOX - AII-Star Game, at Anaheim,
Calif.
SOCCER
9 p.m.
ESPN - Women's national teams,
exhibition, United States vs. Sweden, at
Omaha, Neb.
WNBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - Los Angeles atTulsa

BASEBALL

AL standings


Ne
Tai
Bo
To
Ba


Chl
De
Mi
Ka
Cl


Te
Lo
Oa
Sea


East Division
W L
wYork 56 32
mpa Bay 54 34
ston 51 37
ronto 44 45
Itlmore 29 59
Central Division
W L
hicago 49 38
etroit 48 38
nnesota 46 42
nsas City 39 49
eveland 34 54
West Division
*W L
xas 50 38
sAngeles 47 44
akland 43 46
atle 35 53
Sunday's Games
Minnesota 6, Detroit 3
Boston 3,Toronto 2


Tampa Bay 6, Cleveland 5, 10 innings'
Chicago White Sox IS, Kansas City 5
Baltimore 4,Texas I
Oakland 5, LAAngels 2
N.Y.Yankees 8, Seattle 2
Monday's Gamnes
No games scheduled.
Today's Game
All-Star Game at Anaheim, Calif,
8:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pat GB"
Atlanta 52 36 .591 -
NewYork 48 40 .545 4
Philadelphia 47 40 .540 4'h
Florida 42 46 .477 10
Washington 39 50 .438- 13'h
SCentral Division
W -L Pet GB
Cincirnati *- "' 49 -" 4" '.44'`-
St.Louis 47 41 .534 I
Milwaukee 40 49 .449 8'
Chicago * 39 50 .438 9A
.Houston 36 53 .40+ 12'h
Pittsburgh. 30 58 .341 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Diego '51 37 .580 -
Colorado 49 39 .557 2
Los Angeles 49 39 .557 2
San Francisco 47 41 .534 4
Arizona 34 55 .382 17'h
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Mets 3,Atlanta 0
Philadelphia I, Cincinnati 0
San Francisco 6,Washington 2
St. Louis 4, Houston 2
Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgi 5
San Diego 9, Colorado 7
Florida 2,Arizona 0
L.A. Dodgers 7, Chicago Cubs 0
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
I Today's Game
All-Star Game at Anaheim, Calif,
8:05 p.m.

AUTO RACING

LifeLock.com 400

At Chicagoland Speedway
Joliet, Ill.
Saturday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (7) David Reutimann, Toyota, 267
laps, 133.6 rating,.90 points, $321,531.


2. (I ) Carl Edwards, Ford, 267, 116.6,
175, $242,423.
3. (6) Jeff Gordon. Chevrolet, 267,
122.9, 170. $218,526.
4. (15) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 267,
108.1, 165, $154,725.
5. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 267,
125.7,160, $182,929.
6. (12) Kasey Kahne, Ford,-267, 96.1,
150, $149,540.
7. (14) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet; 267,
100.4, 146,$142,915.
8. (17) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 267, 90,
142, $122,625.
9. (3) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 267,
102.1, 138,$138,448.
10. (9) Paul Menard, Ford, 267, 91.5,
134, $109,200.
11. (8) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 267,
101.5, 130, 98,700.
12. (26) David Ragan, Ford, 267, 82.9,
127, $106,800.
13. (34) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 267, 75.5,
124, $145,351.
14. (13) A J Allmendinger, Ford,.267,
83.2, 121,$131,976.
15. (21) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 267,
82.2, 118, $110,525.
16. (0)juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
267,84.6. 120, $129,281.
17. (33) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 267, 66.8,
112,$136,781.
18. (30) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 266,
73.3, 109,$119.135.
19. (18) Joey Logano,Toyota, 266,67.9,
106, $127,365.
20. (4)) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 266,
57.2,103, $98,425.
21. (16) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 266, 71.6,
100, $99,475.
22. (19) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
266,66.4,97, $123,354.
23. (25) Dale Earnhardt Jr.; Chevrolet,
266,63.4,94, $97,350.
24. (5) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 266,
61.2,91, $96,050.
25. (2) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 266,
107.9, 98, $138,453.
26. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 265, 56.1,
85,$129,198.
27. (24) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 265,
54.5, 82, $124,123.
28. (23) Marcos Ambrose,Toyota, 265,
53.5, 79, $1 13,248.
29. (20) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
265,43.3,76, $84,875.
30. (39) Scott Speed,Toyota, 264,49.2,
73,$101;198.
31. (43) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 261, 37,
70,$104,185.
32. (40) David Gilliland, Ford, 261,32.1,
67,$95,798:
33. (42) Kevin Conway, Ford, 256,30.2,
64, $83,975.
34. (27) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 251,
56.8,61,$118,176.
35. (4) Greg Biffle, Ford, engine, 225,
77,58, $88,600.
36. (36) David Stremme, Ford, 184,
35.2,55, $88,400.
37.,(29) Bill Elliott, Ford, accident, 176,
43.4, 52, $80,175:
38. (38) Robby Gordon, Toyota,
accident, 174, 39.6,49, $92,023.
39. (32) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
'brakes; 73, 35.9.46; $79,750.' '
S40. (35) Casey .Mears, Chevrolet,
brakes, 49, 34,43, $79,530.
41. (37) Mike BlissToyota, brakes, 40,
33,40, $79,280.
42. (31) Max.Papis.Toyota, overheating,
40,27.8,37, $79,110.
43. (28) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, rear
gear, 20,28.6,34, $79,38 1.
.Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
145.138 mph.
STime of Race: 2 hours, 45 minutes,
34 seconds.
Margin ofVictory:0.727 seconds.
Caution Flags: 4 for 21 laps.
Lead Changes: 10 among 7 drivers.
Top 12.in Points: I. K.Harvick, 2,745;
2. J.Gordon,.2,642; 3. J.Johnson, 2,557;
4. D.Hamlin, 2,542; 5. Ku.Busch, 2,524;
6. Ky.Busch, 2.488; 7. J.Burton, 2,465;
8. M.Kenseth, 2,446; 9. T.Stewart, 2,389;
10. C.Edwards, 2,345; II. G.Biffle, 2,292;
12. C.Bowyer, 2,286.

SOCCER

World Cup champions

Sunday
Spain I,Netherlands 0

2010-Spain
2006, 1934-38-82-Italy
2002,1958-62-70-94-Brazil
1998-France.
1990, 1954-74-West Germany
1986, 1978-Argentina


1966-England
1950, 1930-Uruguay

CYCLING

Tour de France

Sunday
Eighth Stage
(A 117.4-mile high-mountain ride to
the Alps from Station des Rousses to
Morzine-Avoriaz)
I. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team
Saxo Bank, 4 hours, 54 minutes, II sec-
onds. .
2. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadl, same time.
3. Robert Gesink, Netherlands,
Rabobank, 10 seconds behind.
61. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Team RadioShack, 11:45 behind.
Overall Standings
1. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing
Team, 37 hours, 57 minutes, 9 seconds.
2. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team
Saxo Bank, 20 seconds behind. \
3. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana,
1:01.
8. Levi Leipheimer. United States,Team
RadioShack, 2:14.
S23. Christopher Horner, United States,
Team RadioShack, 6:33.
39. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Team RadioShack, 13:26.

July 3 - Prolog, Rotterdam,
Netherlands, 8.9 kilometers (5.5
miles) (Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland;
Cancellara)
July 4-Stage I. Rotterdam-Brussels,
plain, Belgium, 223.5 (138.9) (Alessandro
Petacchi, Italy; Cancellara)
July 5 - Stage 2, Brussels-Spa,
Belgium, hilly, 201 (124.9) (Sylvain
Chavanel, France; Chavanel)
Today - Stage 3,Wanze, Belgium-
Arenberg Porte du Hainaut, France, plain,
213 (132.4)
July 7 - Stage 4, Cambrai-Reims,
plain, 153.5 (95.4)'
July 8 - Stage 5, Epernay-Montargis,
plain, 187.5 (116.5) (Mark Cavendish,
Britain; Cancellara)
July 9 - Stage 6, Montargis-
Gueugnon, plain, 227.5 (141.4) (Cavendish;
Cancellara)
July I1 -'Stage 7,Tournus-Station
des Rousses, medium mountain, 165.5
(102.8) (Chavanel; Chavanel)
July II. - Stage 8, Station des
Rousses-MorzineAvoriaz,high mountain,
189 (117.4) (Andy Schleck, Luxembourg;
Cadel Evans,Australia)
July 12 - Rest day in Morzine
Avoriaz
July 13 - Stage 9, Morzine-Avorlaz-
Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, high mountain,
204.5 (127.1)
July 14 - Stage 10, Chambery-Gap,
medium mountain, 179 (111.2)
July IS - Stage I I, Sisteron-Bourg-
les-Valence, plain, 184.5 ( 14.6)
July 16 - Stage 12, Bourg-de-Peage--
Mende, hilly, 210.5 (130.8)
July 17 - Stage 13, Rodez-Revel,
plain, 196 (121.8)
July 18 - Stage 14, Revel-Ax-3
Domaines, high mountain, 184.5 (114.6)
July 19-- Stage 15, Pamiers-Bagnes-
Sde-Luchon, high mountain, 187 ( 16.2)
July 20 --Stage 16, Bagneres-de-
Luchon-Pau, 'high mountain, 199.5
(124.0)
July 21 - Rest day in Pau
July 22 - Stage .17, Pau-Col du
Tourmalet, high mountain, 174 (108.1)
July 23 - Stage 18, Salies-de-Bearn-
Bordeaux, plain, 198 (123.0)
July 24 - Stage 19, Bordeaux-
Pauillac, individual time trial, 52 (32.3)
July 25 - Stage 20, Longjumeau-
Paris Champs-Elysees, plain, 102.5 (63.7)
Total - 3,641.4 kilometers (2,262.6
miles)

BOWLING

League reports

Results of Lake City Bowl league play:
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: I. Team 2 (65-35);
2.Team 3 (62-38); 3.TheTechs (61-39).
High handicap game: I.Terry Shay 303;
2. David Adel 279; 3. Zach Daughtry 268.
High handicap series: I.Terry Shay 772;
2. Bill Duncan 741; 3. (tie) Mike Murrey,
David Adel 699.
High average: I. J.. Hilbert 211.73;
2. George Rye 201.87; 3. Wally Howard
200.33.
(results from July 5)


TOUR: Back to mountains after rest

Continued From Page 1B


crash Sunday.
"The legs are still going,
which is the important
thing," Evans said. 'That
is what the main concern
is right now. It's a little bit
uncomfortable right now."
Contador trails , by 61
seconds ahead of today's
ninth stage.:
The punishing Alpine
route,featuring two catego-
ry 1 climbs, and a tougher
one that is beyond classi-
fication: a mammoth 15.9-
mile ride up the Col de
la Madeleine, one of the
Tour's' most formidable
mountain passes,
Meanwhile, Armstrong
finished in 61st place in the
eighth stage and is more
than 13 minutes behind
Evans.
"He can't come back from
it ... especially against some
of the best climbers in the
world," Armstrong's for-
mer U.S. Postal teammate
Frankie Andreu said.
It was a collective victory
for all three Tour contend-


ers to see the 38-year-old place. "Obviously the Tour's
Armstrong plummet to 39th finished for me," he


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,.
to form four ordinary words


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
Suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: AND.
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: SUEDE QUAIL UNPACK TACKLE
SAnswer: The track star trained on the beach because
It was - "QUICKSAND"


COURTESY PHOTO
The new tennis court in White Springs is under construction. Emphasizing the.rural nature of
the program is a deer in the background.


White Springs tennis has


benefited from local support


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

The new tennis program
in White Springs, sparked
by a USTA Florida "Share
the Love" grant, has many
area benefactors, accord-
ing to ,teaching pro Tom
Moore.
Mayor Helen Miller
received the grant for the
city, through the "Helping
Our People Excel Summer
Enrichment Program" she
helped establish.
"It was great to get the
grant from the USTA to
purchase equipment, but
without the local support


this program could not
reach the level necessary
to succeed and continue in
the future," Moore wrote in
an e-mail.
Moore said Anderson
Columbia was asked to
resurface an old slab of
asphalt to turn it into a ten-
nis court for a QuickStart
Tennis program.
"Anderson Columbia has
gone above and beyond all
expectations -by not only
removing the old asphalt
but planning on putting
down a new foundation,"
Moore said. "Hamilton
County has provided equip-
ment and manpower to dis-


tribute and compact the
foundation."
Moore said a request
has been made to Advance
Polymer of Pennsylvania to
donate paint, which could
cost $1,200.
Moore has agreed to
serve as an instructor for
the junior program and
enlisted the aid of White
Springs native Johnny
Young, who conducts sum-
mer tennis camps at The
Country Club at Lake City.
"Johnny is volunteer-
ing his time to work with
the 48-plus children in the
HOPE program and future
programs," Moore said.


Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - Get
ready for a First Four
before the Final Four.
The NCAA unveiled its
plans for the expanded
68-team men's basketball
tournament on Monday,
opting for a format, that
involves the lowest seeds
and last at-large qualifiers
in a "First Four" round.
Beginning next March,
eight teams will play early
in the first week, with the


ACROSS

1 Get a tan
4 Brown sea-
weed
8 Queens stadi-
um
12 Ernesto
Guevara
13 - Major
14 Kind of prize
15 Long sigh
16 Drier than sec
17 Racing sled
18 Wall paintings
20 Use FedEx
22 Pale-green
moth
23 Popular advice
giver
25 Chili bean
29 Part of IOU
31 Chicken wire
34 Dawn goddess
35 Single time
36 Lb. and oz.
37 Baseball
award
38 Ring out


winners advancing to games
on Thursday or Friday.
The NCAA decided
against picking the lowest
eight seeds for the new
round.
Instead, two of the early
games will match the tour-
nament's lowest seeds,
Nos. 65 through 68, with
"the winners advancing, to
play a top seed. The other
two games will match the
last four at-large qualifiers.
The format probably will
prevent mid-majdrs from


39 Caesar's man
40 Groom-to-be
*42 "Fancy" singer
44 Aloud.
47 Coffee brewers
49 Foul-ups
51 El -, Texas
53 Very thin
model
55 Capote's nick-
name
56 Bread spread
57 Like gossip
58 Maize unit
59 Take a stroll
60 'Boggy land
61 Reuben bread

DOWN

1 Cheat
2 Mover's rental


being over-represented in
the first round, and could
also mean that two teams
from bigger conferences
- those generally seeded
between 11th and 13th -
will be out before the tour-
nament really gets going.
"You're not going to
come up with the perfect
model," committee chair
Dan Guerrero said. "But
we felt that this model
provided the opportunity to
do something special for
the tournament."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

LARD VET EMMA
ASIA ERA FEAR
BALM SNOWFALL
sPLATTE HELL
GDS SCS


BACH BIC
D PT WIL
ERS T-R
OF T VI I
ABOO RIATAS
0L IVE VOIL TI LE
EP EE EC PL EDEN
O|NS TEA NEEDS


n(ypn.)
3 Hindu leader 7 Butter
4 Genghis's squares
grandson 8 Wing it (hyph.)
5 Blows it 9 Broth starter
6 Baton Rouge 10 Harley, to
campus some


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11 Afore
19 Pharaohs'
amulets
21 Farm bale
,24 Youth org.
26 Half, in com-
bos
27 Exploding
star
28 Cable channel
30 Moray
31 NBA player
32 Mideast title
33 Coffeecake
topping
35 Puccini genre
40 Air mover
41 Bestow
43 Trout's home
45 Later than
46 Virginia cav-
erns
48 Do the back-
stroke
49 Barn neighbor
50 Positive
51 Wham!
52 Pie-mode link
54 Flurry


7-13 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


March Madness adds a first four


TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


Florida driver wins Sprint Cup race
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver David Reutimann celebrates with his crew members in
Victory Lane after winning the LifeLock.com 400 race at ChicagoLand Speedway in Joliet, Ill.,
on Saturday. Reutimann isfrom Zephyrhills and the son of Buzzie Reutimann. The Reutimann
family raced throughout Florida for years, often coming to the tracks in Columbia County.


Haslem agrees to deal with Heat


Associated Press

MIAMI - Add Udonis
Haslem to the list of play-
ers taking less money to.
play for the Miami Heat and
team president Pat Riley.
Haslem signed a five-
year deal Monday worth
around $20 million, roughly


$14 million less than he
could have received with
more lucrative offers from
the Dallas Mavericks and
Denver Nugget.
LeBron James, Dwyane
Wade and Chris Bosh all
took less money in their
Heat deals last week to allow
Miami the flexibility to sign


certain players, and Haslem
- Wade's teammate for all
seven of their pro seasons
- was at the top of their
collective wish list.
"He is the epitome of what
the Heat is about," Riley
said. "He is our anchor, he
is a true warrior and a great
professional."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spain's Andies Iniesta (right) scores the winning goal past Netherlands' Rafael van der Vaart
during the World Cup final soccer match between the Netherlands and Spain at Soccer City
in Johannesburg, South Africa, on Sunday.

CUP: Officiating must be addressed


Continued From Page 11
they dominated Euros two
years ago, then gave Espana
its greatest sports moment
in this World Cup.
"I am very happy to have
won it and so proud to be
part of this team and this
generation of players," star
striker Villa said. "WO all
cried a bit ... the occasion
called for it and now we just
have to celebrate."
Few nations sustain
such success through the
decades; only Brazil,comes
to mind, although Germany
comes close. With more
countries and continents
becoming proficient at the
sport, particularly Africa
despite its disappointing
showing this year, Spain's
biggest challenge is main-
taining that fine edge that
results in championships.
"I'm proud to be from
a country like Spain and I
think our country deserved
a victory like this and I'm
really proud of all the work
we've done today in the
game," Sergio Ramos said.
More work will be
required, but the Spaniards'
recent successes have
carried them to a level of
confidence that leads to
tears of joy.
For 31 other teams
at South Africa 2010,
there were no such tears.
Especially for the Dutch,
who have been to three
World Cup finals 'and lost
them all.
They also lost their cool
in the title game, which


led to one of the dirtiest
matches in any tournament:
14 yellow cards and one
ejection.
The Dutch forgot what
carried them perfectly
through qualifying and all
six previous World Cup
matches.
The Netherlands also
has a strong cast that will
be formidable at the 2012
Euros and probably the
2014 World Cup in Brazil.
Hopefully, that tourna-
ment will produce nicer
moments and better soc-
cer than this one. While
South Africa proved it can
handle big events and said
Monday it will consider a
bid for the 2020 or 2024
Summer Olympics, only a
handful of pleasant soccer
memories came out of this
World Cup.
* The attacking style of
Germany as it combined
creativity with its usual pre-
cision and power to finish
third.
* The grittiness of
Uruguay, the, last team to
qualify for the tournament.,.
The Celeste surged all
the way to the semifinals,
where they lost 3-2 to the
Netherlands. Diego Forlan
won the Golden Ball as best
player, a fully deserved
honor.
* Goalkeeping brilliance,
from the veteran Casillas
to the previously untested
Maarten Stekelenburg
for the Dutch to Ghana's
Richard Kingson and


Paraguay's Justo Villar.
On the other side, FIFA
has several problems it
must address, starting with
the officiating.
England's Howard Webb
was lauded for his previ-
ous work in this tourna-
ment, then lost complete
control of the most impor-
tant math. He handed out
so many yellow cards early
that by the second half, he
ignored fouls rather than
eject players with a second
yellow or even a direct red
card.
That finished off a World
Cup in which the officiating
was, to be very charitable,
mediocre. Missed goals
(England against Germany,
United States against
Slovenia) and offside goals
allowed (Argentina against
Mexico) plagued the event.
If FIFA president Sepp
Blatter doesn't seriously
consider using technology
to help referees - even if
only for deciding goals - he
endangers the world's most
popular sporting event.
Too often, teams turned
conservative, particu-
larly in the opening group
stage. Thankfully, most of
the nations who advanced
emulated the Germans and
Brazilians the rest of the
way.
And maybe the lasting
memory of this World Cup
will be a Spanish team that
finally became a champion
and tried to keep the beauti-
ful game beautiful.


Creamer cracks major


barrier with Open win


Associated Press

OAKMONT, Pa. - Paula
*Creamer won her- first
major tournament, never
giving up the lead during
a steady final round of the
U.S. Women's Open.
Creamer, only 23 but
long considered the best
women's golfer to not win
a major, went into the final
round at sunny Oakmont
Country Club with a three-
shot lead that never dwin-
dled below two. She played
23 holes Sunday with a
sore left thumb, includ-
ing the final five holes of
the weather-delayed third
round.
Her final-round 2-under
69 gave her a 3-under 281
for the tournament. Na
Yeon Choi of South Korea
and Suzann Pettersen of
'Norway tied for second at
1-over 285;
Creamer joins 2007 win-
ner Cristie Kerr as the
only Ameiicans to win this
tournament in the last six
years.

John Deere Classic
SILVIS, Ill. - Steve
Stricker defended his title,
holding on for a two-shot
victory after leading by
seven strokes.
Stricker shot a 1-under
70 in the final round to
finish at 26-under 258. He
edged Paul Goydos, who
dazzled the golf world with
a 59 in the opening round.
Stricker entered the
last round having set a
54-hole PGA Tour record
and ahead by six strokes.
He went up by seven after
a birdie on the first hole.
Stricker had to battle
the rest of the way but
sealed his victory with
a 6-foot birdie putt on
No. 17. Goydos' final
chance ended when he hit


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Paula'Creamer reacts to saving par on No. 8 during the
final round of the U.S. Women's Open golf tournament at
Oakmont Country Club in Oakmont, Pa., on Sunday.


into the water on No. 18.
SBrian Davis hopped on
one of the charter flights
that brought more than
two dozen players direct-
ly from the John Deere
Classic to St Andrews.
There's a catch: Davis is
only the first alternate for
the Open, so his hopes of
playing depend on some-
one else dropping out.
Still, Davis figured it was
worth a shot, doling out a
$1,250 donation to the John
Deere charity fund for a
seat on the flight.

Scottish Open
LUSS, Scotland -
Edoardo Molinari of Italy
claimed his first European
Tour victory, shooting a
.3-over 74 to beat Darren
Clarke by three shots.
Scoring was very high
after a long spell of rain
in the morning at Loch
Lomond, .where. Molinari


finished at 12-under 272.
Clarke, of Northern
Ireland, had begun the day
a shot behind Molinari but
had a 76.
Frenchman Raphael
Jacquelin closed with a 68
to place third at 8 under.

Wayne Gretzky Classic
CLARKSBURG, Ontario
- Peter Tomasulo shot a
10-under 61 to come from
eight shots back and win'
on the Nationwide Tour
by one stroke over rookie
Keegan Bradley.
The 28-year oldTomasulo
rallied on the final y, rac-
ing by the leaders to finish
with a 24-under total 261 at
the Georgian Bay Club.
Bradley birdied the final
hole for, a 6-under 65 to
finished in second. Kevin
Chappell, who held a five-
stroke lead after three days,
managed a 70 to wind up at
22, under inthird place.


C


FPL.




Working


to improve


your service


We're always working to deliver safe, reliable electric
service, and that includes streetlights.
If you notice a streetlight problem, please let us know
by visiting www.FPL.com/streetlight or by calling
1-800-40UTAGE (1-800-468-8243). When you contact
FPL, please have the following information ready:
> The location of the streetlight, including the
nearest street address and any nearby
landmarks. Alternately, you may provide
the 11-digit number mounted on the
streetlight pole.
,, A description of the problem.
> Your contact information, including
name, address, e-mail address or
phone number.





I t:, anll ;ireeipll are. < ' *'
i:wned or rrm n-ii irie ite'
t, FF'L I:ur rIJ :lue' i
nr rrreuir ,.riijr
or nm:m c w re,


nmp: ir, al repair

rtilh Flirid a law
FP'L , rinn, illl,,
Puthii ri. ire'.;i-


putiln.1: 1-i , rn:.w
I,. ri--p. I ririin :erative
or maunitui rnironiq
Sree elligrS


___j


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


., -










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
t -Y -1-


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST
FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Man schemes to relive his

'glory days' without wife


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band started exercising, is
now on a strict diet and lis-
tening to love songs from the
'60s. He has never been inter-
ested in these things before.
I overheard him on the
phone talking about going
to his high school reunion
this summer, 400 miles away.
When I asked him why he
hadn't mentioned it to me,
he said it's because I'm not
invited. I was shocked. Then
he said he's going with three
of his old "buddies." I asked
if their wives were going
and he said, "No, they're di-
vorced, but have girlfriends."
My husband is now giv-
ing me the silent treatment.
He has a history of keeping
things from me, but never
anything like this. This is his
50th reunion, and the first one
he has ever wanted to go to.
I'm sick about it. What do you
make of all this? - HEART-
SICK IN OREGON
DEAR HEARTSICK:
I make of it that you don't
trust your husband because
he tries to sneak things past
you and wasn't upfront about
this from the beginning. If he
had said he was planning to
attend, and that he and three
of his old buddies wanted to
pretend they were teenagers
again, you might have felt dif-
ferently. Because he didn't, I
can see why you would find
the situation threatening.
Since you seem to have


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
trouble communicating your
feelings to each other, some
sessions with a marriage
counselor might help you
reach a better understand-
ing.
P.S. While he's gone, ar-
range to do something fun
with some. of your women
friends. A girls' weekend
might be a pleasant diver-
sion, and at this point you
need one.
DEAR ABBY: I left my
wife for a much younger-
woman two years ago. De-
spite what my ex-wife says,
it was not a mid-life crisis. I
was very unhappy with my
wife and our marriage. Our
divorce has been final for
seven months - although I'm
beginning to wonder if it will-
ever truly be "final."
My girlfriend, "Nicole," is
anxious for us to be married
and start building a life to-
gether. I'm still overwhelmed
from hoW unbelievably pain-
ful the whole divorce process
has been, and I can't begin to
think about getting married
again at the moment.
I have told Nicole that I'm


not ready and I need some
time. She says I'm "stringing
her along," and even though
she doesn't want to have kids,
she still feels her clock is
ticking for finding an accept-
able mate. It has reached the
point where Nicole says she
is going to leave me if I don't
commit to marrying her.
What is a reasonable time
to expect someone to recover
and be emotionally ready to
remarry after an extremely
bitter divorce? And what
do you suggest? - STILL
HEALING IN WASHING-
TON
DEAR STILL HEAL-
ING: Some people are ready
to remarry within months of a
divorce. For others, the heal-
ing process can take years.
I suggest you call Nicole's
bluff. She is anxious because
she is beginning to doubt.
that she'll get you to the altar
- and the "biological clock"
business she's handing you
is ridiculous in light of the
fact that she doesn't want
children.
The feelings you are ex-
periencing are normal after a
bitter divorce. Please do not
allow yourself to be stamped-
ed. When the time is right for
you to remarry, you will know
it without my telling you.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Revisit ideas and
prospects that crossed your
path last year and you will
discover a new approach
with the potential, to be
successful. You should be
able to find new means to
make things work for you.
Increased assets or greater
earning potential look posi-
tive. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): If you let some-
one else stick his or her
nose into your business,
you may be led astray or
negatively influenced. Nur-
turing a relationship will
benefit you in ways you
can't imagine. You can be-
come much closer to some-
one with whom you share
responsibilities. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Do what feels
right even if someone
doesn't agree with your
choices. Don't let a person-
al relationship cloud your
vision about offering your
help to others or making
a move that will lead to a
better professional future.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Your responsi-
bilities may seem like a bur-
den but what you receive in
the end'will be gratifying. A
job that has brought with it
plenty of uncertainties will
work out to your advantage
if you let things unfold natu-
rally. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Expect all sorts of
changes in your life. Travel
will entice you and new. ac- .
quaintances, hobbies and
knowledge will catch your
interest. Your emotional out-
look will improve through
the conversations you have
with others. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Observation will be
your greatest asset, allow-
ing you the knowledge re-
quired to manipulate any
situation you face. Money
matters can improve with
wise choices and, although
not everyone will be happy
with your decisions, put
your bank book and peace
of mind first *** ,
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): A partnership looks fa-
vorable. Don't base your de-
cision on which is the easi-
est route. Change is upon
you but you are in control
to make the final decision.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You may feel
pulled between the past,
present and future. You
have to let go in order to
move forward. Keep an
open mind and you will dis-
cover that something very
positive can come out of the
change. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): You can alter
your current financial situa-
tion if you are smart about
the deals ,you make and
the people you get involved
with. Letting someone in-
fluence where and what
you do will be a stumbling
block to the goals you want
to accomplish. *****
CAPRICORN (Deb.
22-Jan. 19): Investments,
real estate or working to-
ward your own enterprise
will pay off. Love, contracts
and legal matters will all
play a major role in the
long-term, financial deci-
sions you make. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You have to
make up your own mind
but, before you do, make
an honest assessment of
where you are mentally,
physically, emotionally and
financially. If things aren't
the way you want them to
be, make the necessary
changes even if it means
major adjustments to your
lifestyle. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Figure out
ahead of time if you are
capable of doing what's be-
ing asked of you or if you
should consider taking a
path more suited to your
qualifications. There is a
partnership or deal that you
can make, however, it may
come as a surprise that it
isn't the one you expected.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: 0 equals G
"XW V.ZTTWMS CZ RZA X VFKBSXWM
UKXCAW; CFHC HBZMW VHM THEW
CFWT FHGGR, MZC OZBS." -
BASJKO UHM NWWCFZUWM
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Things turn out best for the people who make the
best out of the way things turn out." - Art Linkletter
(6) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 7-13


CLASSIC PEANUTS


,iF.E iJE
NEJe P
I ETF


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


- ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


One item per ad "250
4 lines * 6 days ain$ io
S Rate apples to p ndividualsselling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Each m must Include a pce.
ThasI anon-retundablee.



One Item per ad a dd nl,
4 lines * 6 days t iadd $1ti0al
Rate apples to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This s a non-refundable rate..




One Item per ad 16
4 lines 6 daysEah additional
Rateapplies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling ,000 or ss.
Each Item must Iclude a price.




One tem parad a2 l 3 7 iti
4 lines * 6 days,,,, $1.45 '
Rate applies to private Individual selling
personal merchandise totalling !2,500 or lass.
Each em must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad - ,. ,|
4 ines o 6 days Each5ddtional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S4,000 or lessI
Each Itam must Include a price.
This~lisanon-refundabi at~ae.


One tem per ad 3 i
mom 0 r C ays Each additional
4 lines * 6 days n. $1 65
Rate apple ir, pnate ir-alilauals selling
s Lc. item ,.='l ,l.. ar a Pil,








l3 days s1750
Iu17o
tdei l sips Eatnadilllo line65


Limited to service typeadvertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each' Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,.
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street:
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
'EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Adisto Appear Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 1100a.m. Man., 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon, 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 am. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00 am.
Saturday Fri., 10:00am. Fd.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fd10:00a. m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to changewithout notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first'word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lal ecityreporter.coml


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 12-2008-CA-000467
AURORA LOAN SERVICES,
LLC, Plaintiff, vs. GORDON D.
COPE, et al, Defendants. EX-
PARTE MOTION TO RESET
FORECLOSURE- SALE DATE
COMES NOW, Plaintiff, AURORA
LOAN SERVICES, LLC, by and
through its undersigned counsel, and
moves this Court to Reset Foreclo-
sure Sale Date, and as grounds there-
of would state as follows: 1 A Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure-
was entered in favor of Plaintiff by
this Court on April 28, 2009, sched-
uling the foreclosure sale for June 3,
2009 2 Plaintiff cancelled the Fore-
closure Sale set for June 3, 2009, to
afford the Defendant additional time
for a Loss Mitigation workout. 3
That there was no resolution to the
foreclosure action; therefore the fore-
closure sale was reset for January 20,
2010. 4 Plaintiff cancelled the. fore-
closure sale set for January 20, 2010
to afford the Defendant additional
time for a Loss Mitigation workout.
5 That there was no resolution to the
foreclosure action; therefore Plaintiff
hereby wishes to obtain a new fore-
closure sale date. WHEREFORE,
Plaintiff, AURORA LOAN SERV-
ICES, LLC, respectfully requests
that this Court enter an Order Reset-
ting Foreclosure Sale. I HEREBY
CERTIFY that a true and correct
copy of the foregoing Motion was
mailed this 29th day of June, 2010 to
defendants on. the attached service
list:
Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson,
P.A. 1800 N.W. 49th Street, Suite
120 Fort Lauderdale; FL 33309 Tele-
phone: (954)453-0365/(800)441-
2438 Facsihiile:(954)771-6052
By:/s/'Sean A. Marshall, Esq. Bar
Number 676071
05523247
July 13, 20, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-136-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARGUER-
ITEA. BURKE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Marguerite A. Burke, deceased,.
whose date of death was June 6,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bateDivision,, the address, of which
is 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055, The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
.attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er'persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
within 3 months after the date of the
first publication of this notice.
ALL CLAIMS. NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED'TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first 'publication of
this notice is July 13, 2010.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Tom W. Brown
Attoreys-for Co-Personal Represen-
tatives
Florida Bar. No. 0091332
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A.
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City , FL 32056
Telephone: (386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
Personal Representative:
By:/s/Charles P. Burke
1705 Austin Lane
St. Augustine, Florida 32092
By:/s/ James W. Burke, Jr.
P.O. Box 2752
Lake City, Florida 32056
04540794
July 13, 20, 2010

Public Auction
2001 Jeep UT
Vin# 1J4FT48S41L503118
in Columbia County on July 28,
2010, at 10:00am at Auto Emporium,
2832.SE Main Blvd
Lake City Fl. 32025.
04540822
July 13, 2010


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm.'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


Tree Service

Hazardous Tree Trimming LLC.
Removal & stump grinding.
24 hr Emergency Service
386-590-7798 or 963-3360


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 10-283-CA
THE SHILOH RIDGE COMPANY,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff
vs.
WILLIAM F. MATHEWS and JAN-
ICE G. MATHEWS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
THE CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in the above-styled
cause now pending in said court, that
I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash on the third floor of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 173
N.E. Hemando Avenue, Lake City
Florida 32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m.
on August 11. 2010, the following
property described in Exhibit "A" at-
tached hereto.
EXHIBIT "A"
Lot 76
THE NW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF
THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 16,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA. THE EAST 30 FEET OF
SAID LANDS BEING SUBJECT
TO AN EASEMENT FOR IN-
GRESS AND EGRESS.
TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
PROPERTY:
A STRIP OF LAND 60 FEET IN
WIDTH BEING 30 FEET EACH
SIDE OF A CENTERLINE DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COM-
MENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF THE SW 1/4 OF THE
NE 1/4, SECTION. 15 TOWNSHIP
7 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EACH, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE S 89'03'48"
W, 20.45 FEET TO THE WEST
LINE OF FRY ROAD AND TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE CONTINUE S
89"03'48"W, 3952.99 FEET TO
THE EAST LINE OF SECTION 16,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, THENCE S 89'06'19" W,
661.99 FEET TO. THE REFER-
ENCE POINT "C", THENCE CON-
TINUE S 89' 06' 19" W, 1323.98
FEET TO REFERENCE POINT D
AND TO THE POINT OF TERMI-
NATION. ALSO BEGIN AT REF-
EREINCE POINT C AND RUN
THENCE N 00'45'21" W, 701.45,
FEET TO THE RADIUS POINT OF
A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 50 FEET AND TO THE
POINT OF TERMINATION. ALSO
BEGIN AT REFERENCE POINT C
AND RUN THENCE S 00'45'01" E,
1323.00 FEET, THENCE S
00-44'52" E, 701.59 FEET TO THE
RADIUS POINT OF A CUL-DE-
SAC HAVING A RADIUS OF 50
FEET AND TO THE POINT OF
TERMINATION. ALSO BEGIN AT
REFERENCE POINT D AND RUN
THENCE N 00*45'46" W, 701.37
FEET TO THE RADIUS POINT OF
A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 50 FEET ANDTO TOHE
POINT OF TERMINATION. ALSO
BEGIN AT REFERENCE POINT D
AND RUN THENCE S 00'46'12" E,
1323.42 FEET, THENCE S
00'46'00" E, 701.68 FEET TO THE
RADIUS POINT OF A CUL-DE-
SAC HAVING A 50 FOOT RADI-
US AND TO THE POINT OF TER-
MINATION.
Said sale will be-made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Summary Final Judgment f
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale
other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated: July 2, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
BY:/S/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04540768
July 13, 20, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 09-378-CA
PEOPLES STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PATRICK R. TITTERINGTON, JU-
LIE A. TITTERINGTON, and
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
SCHEDULE "A" TO NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE
PEOPLES STATE BANK v. TIT-
TERINGTON
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH - RANGE
S17 EAST
SECTION 26: From the NE Comer
of the NE 1/4 of SW 1/4, Section 26,
Township 4 South, Range 17 East,
proceed N 1"02'30" W, 373.99 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING;
thence proceed S 86"15'45". W,
513.88 feet; thence N 1' 11'15" W,
270.00 feet; thence S 86'15'45" W,
484.00 feet; thence N 1'11'15" W,
150.00 feet; thence N 86"19'45" E,
346.46 feet; thence N 41'13'45" E,
229.43 feet; thence N 87"07' E,
499.00 feet; thence S 1"02'30" E,
570.57 feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING. Columbia County, Flori-
da.
LESS AND EXCEPT
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH - RANGE
17 EAST
SECTION 26: From the NE Corner
of the NE 1/4 of SW 1/4, Section 26,
Township 4 South, Range 17 East,
proceed N 1'02'30" W for a distance
of 373.99 feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING; thence S 86"15'45" W, a
distance of 513.88 feet; thence N
1'11'15" W, a distance of 270.00
feet; thence N 86'15'45" E, 513.88
feet; thence S 1'02'30" E, 270.00
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Columbia County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment on the above styled
action dated July 7, 2010, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse in Lake
City, Columbia County, Florida, at


11:00 A.M., on Wednesday, August
4, 2010, to the best and highest bid-
der for cash. Any person claiming an
interest in any surplus from the sale


Legal

other than the property owner as of
the date of the notice of lis pendenS,
must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
7th day of July, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By: /s/ SOL S. RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
04540789
July 13, 20. 2010

PUBLIC NOTICE
This is to inform you that Suwannee
River Economic Council, Inc. will
hold eleven (11) pre-bid conferences
and walk-thru's for the weatheriza-
tion work of one hundred-twenty
(120) Single-family dwellings partic-
ipating in the Bradford, Columbia,
Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madi-
son Taylor and Union County
Weatherization Programs.
Meeting Schedules for one hundred-
twenty (120) Pre-bid conferences are
as follows:
July 12, 2010 six (6) units at 8:00am
Bradford County (bid due date July
15, 2010 at noon)six (6) units at
12:00pm Bradford County (bid due
date July 15, 2010 at noon) July 13,
2010 six (6) units at 8:0qam Taylor
County (bid due date July 16, 2010
at noon) six (6) units at 12:00pm
Taylor County (bid due date July 16,
2010 at noon) July 14, 2010 six (6)
units at 8:00am Columbia County
(bid due date July 19, 2010 at noon)
six (6) units at 12:00pm Columbia
County (bid due date July 19 2010
at noon) July 15, 2010 six (6) units at
8:00am Gilchrist County (bid due
date July 20, 2010 at noon) July 15,
2010) six (6) units at 8:00am Hamil-
ton County (bid due date July 20,
2010 at noon) six (6) units at
12:00pm Hamiltorr County (bid due
date July 20, 2010 at noon) July 22,
2010 six (6) units at 8:00am Brad-
ford County (bid due date July 27,
2010 at noon) six (6)'units at
12;00pm Bradford County (bid due
date July'27, 2010 at noon) July 22,
2010 six (6) units at 8:00am Lafay-
ette County (biddue date e July 27,
2010 at noon) six (6) units at
12:00pm Lafayette County (bid due
date July 27, 2010 at noon) July 23,
2010 six (6) units at 8:00am Union
County (bid due date July 28, 2010
at noon) July 27, 2010 six (6) units at
8:00am Dixie County (bid due date
July 30, 2010 at noon) six (6) units at
12:00pm Dixie County (bid due date
July 30, 2010 at noon) July 28, 2010
six (6) units at 8:00am Columbia
County (bid due date August 1, 2010
at noon) six (6) units at 12:00pm Co-
lumbia County (bid due date August
* 1, 2010 at noon) July 29, 2010
six (6) units at 8:00am Madison
County (bid due date August 2,
2010 at noon) six (6) units at
12:00pm Madison County (bid due
date August 2, 2010 at noon) ALL
will begin at the respective S.R.E.C.,
Inc. location:
Bradford Outreach Office, 1210 A:-
drews Circle (PO Box 1142), Starke,.
FL 32091 Taylor Outreach Office,
1708 S Byron Butler Parkway, Ste B,
Perry, Florida 32348 Columbia Out-
reach Office, 303 NW Quinten
Street, Lake City, Florida 32056 Gil-
christ Outreach Office, 101 NE 1st
Street, Trenton, Florida 32693 Ham-
ilton Outreach Office, 1114 NW US
Hwy 41 (PO Box 852) Jasper, FL
32052 Lafayette Outreach Office,
114 SW Community Circle, Mayo,
Florida 32066 Union Service Center,
855 SW 6th Ave, Lake Butler, FL
32054 Dixie Outreach Office, 357
SE 22nd Avenue, Cross City, Flori-
da, 32628 Madison Service Center,
146 SE Bunker St. (PO Box 565),
SMadison, FL 32341
The conferences and walk-thru's are
mandatory, no exceptions, for con-
tractors who plan to bid. SREC, Inc.
requires each contractor to be prop-
erly licensed, carry general liability
insurance of at least $1,000,000.00,
POI (Pollution Occurence Insurance)
and Workers Comp Insurance (NO
Exemptions) before bid opening.
Please mark envelope 'Sealed Bid
for name of Homeowner". Bids are
to be opened and awarded July 15,
16, 19, 20, 27,28, 30, and August 1st
and 2nd, 2010 at 12;30 p.m. respec-
tively. SREC, Inc. has the right to re-
ject any and all bids. The bids will be
awarded on the most cost effective
basis
05523246
July 13, 2010


020 Lost & Found

CASH REWARD!! Lost purse &
camera in Post Office area.
Around June 25th. Please return
very important. 386-397-6621


100 O ortunities

04540799
Heavy Equipment Shop
Mechanic
Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a heavy
equipment mechanic and a shop
mechanic. You may fill out an
application at 871 Guerdon Rd.,
Lake City, FL. Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Employer.

5 Temporary Job Openings
08/21/2010 - 01/31/2011
Tobacco, Straw/Hay & General
Agricultural Workers Needed
HHR LLC
Bracken Co, KY
$9.7 I/hour. 3/4 of hours listed on
job order guaranteed. Work tools
will provided at no cost. Free
housing provided to those who
cannot reasonably return to their


permanent residence each working
,day..Transportation & subsistence
paid when 50% of contract is met.
May be required to take random
drug and/or alcohol tests. Apply.
for this job at the nearest One Stop
Center in your area.


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04540816
First Federal Bank of Florida
has an Executive Adm. Asst.
position available. Detailed
administrative assignments.
Requires excellent computer
skills, organizational and
communication skills. Ability
to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Three to five
years previous administrative
experience required. Full
benefits package. Applications
may be obtained from any First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources, P.O. Box
2029, Lake City, Fl. 32056 or
email to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment Opportunity
Employer.

05523254
S&S Food Stores
(Food Service Only)
Accepting applications
Part-Time/Full-Time/
Management
Benefits available for
Full-Time employees
(Health, dental & life ins,
vacation & sick leave)
Apply in person at the
S & S Office
134 SE Colbum Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS
DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE

04540716
OPS Juvenile Probation Officer
F/T non-career service
Department of Juvenile Justice
Working with Delinquent Youth'
Four Year Degree, Background
Screen Drug Test, Valid
Driver's License req'd.
Mail State of Florida
Application to:
Tom Witt, 690 East Duval
Street, Lake City 32055
or Fax (386) 758-1532

Lake City Christian Academy
Certified Jr & High School
teachers needed. Send resume:386-
758-3018 or Call 386-758-0055

License CDL Driver
w/2 yrsLogging Exp. Must have
Clean CDL. Contact
Bill Koon 386-365-8292

MIDNIGHT SHIFT
Full Time Cashier, Experience
Preferred, Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy'441, No Phone Calls Please.

Motorcoach Operator
$100-$200 a day. CDL P+
www.FabulousCoach.com .Also:
Dispatch position available.
(866)352-7295

Sitel is hiring! Good pay, paid
training, comfortable environment,
benefits after 90 days. Need good
attitude and computer skills - must
be reliable. Apply at
www.sitel.com or in person at
1152 SW Business Point Dr. in
Lake City. EOE

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY
Immed FT/PT openings,
customer sales/service, will train,
conditions apply, all ages 17+
(386)269-4656

Wanted Forestry machinery
operator. with 2 yrs. exp.
Must have valid DL.
Koon Timber 386-623-1757

Wanted Medical Biller/Scheduler,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025

120 Medical
Employment

04540425
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offeredin Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


180 Money to Loan

05523244
PREMIER LOAN SERVICES
Working to achieve your
financial goals'.
Loans that change lives
Personal loan, Business & Debt
loans Home loan, Auto loan
Fixed rate All credit welcome,
No fees. Quick!
Call 1-877-990-9889


240 Schools &
Education

04540812
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-07/26/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/19/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-09/14/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GE White Washer
Works Good
$100. FIRM
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

Small portable dishwasher.
Works great.
$75. FIRM
386-754-9295 or 386-984-038'7


407 Computers

Dell Demention 3000 Desktop,
Windows XP, Pentium 4,
Many extras. Complete Computer
$100. 386-755-9984


408 Furniture

Large Entertainment'Center.
Med Oak. Will hold a 40" or better
TV. Several shelves. $145.obo
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment

Like new Weed Eater
PUSH MOWER. Runs good
22" cut. 4.5 hp. $75.
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927

POULAN YARD Tractor
5 speed, 42 in. cut.
Runs good. $485. obo.
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927.

411 Machinery &
411 Tools

Heavy Duty Drill Press
$100. obo
Works good.
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
bodt here for 10 consecutive.days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.
S m------ l ,---- ,,",,r ;- al


15FT. Bass Boat
90hp Mercury engine,
good shape.

$6,500

Call
334-758-8458


or More Details Call
Maya 8-755544


mmmwmmmm� -


BUY IT^
SELL T


FIND ITI











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010


Classified Departhment: 755-5440


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 -Miscellaneous
9 pc. Patio Furniture Set
Metal w/cushions.
$300. 00
386-755-6998
Rolling Microwave table
Med oak wood.
Looks good $40. 00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

450 Good Things
5j to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434
610i Mobile Home
610 Lots for Rent
Beautiful lots. Huge shady oaks.
Off Wester Rd. 2 mi. from 1-75.
$250. eaAlso: 1/1 MH $450. mo
(904)545-5485 or 904-651-8383
RV PARKING SPACES
Available. Elec, Cable, water,
septic hook-ups included.
$325.00 mo. 386-752-2412
Mobile Home
620 Lots for Sale
MOBILE HOME LOT. 1/2 acre
w/well, septic and power pole.
North 441. $19,900.
Owner Finance. 386-754-6699
630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $525/Mo.
+ $250 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
Also, 3br/2ba house in town
$750. mo. 386-752-6422
2/2 MH for rent in Iake City.
Large lot, quiet neighborhood.
No pets. $400 per month.
Call 386-454-7724'
FREE RENT 1st month. SpAcious
3/2, MH. Quiet park. Small pets
ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
LG 3BR/2BA DWMH $700. mo
All electric. Also 3br/lba SW
$600. mo 5 pts area. No Pets.
386-961-1482 $500. dep. req'd
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-397-1522
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Residential RV lots. Between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 Call for
terms. Cottage options avail.
Very clean & well maintained, 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
July Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Why Rent when you can.own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
,little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Callnow,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511
Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
$166. MONTH
Remodeled S.Wide (2br/2ba)
New carpet, appliances,
Delivery/set p included. Owner
finance available w/3K down.
Gary Hamilton (386)758-9824
FSBO: Owner Financing. 1 Acre
w/big DWMH, Near Ichetucknee
Springs North entrance. $29,000
$1,000 down. Call (352)356-2563

710 Unfurnished Apt.
54540360
Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come see Why.
Rent from $499.
(Income guidelines apply)
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+ Dep.
Call 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
.deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,.
386 965-0276 or 466-7392


Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $425. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563,6208
MOVE-IN SPECIALS
2br/2ba w/garage on the
West side
SCall 386-755-6867 for details
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utilities & cable
incl. Full kitchen. No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
2W For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
04540710
THIS MAKES CENTS!!
Newer brick duplexes for rent.
2 units available for $850./mo
each. Both units are 3BR 2BA
with I car garage. Great location
close to all amenities.
Call BJ Federico Century 21
The Darby Rogers Co. @
386-365-5884.
2BR/2BA Nice & Clean
$800. mo 1st and last NO pets
6 miles to town
386-752-1677
3B/1BA BRICK home. Comer lot
off Monroe St. CH/A, clean.
$850 a month, 1st & security
deposit. 954-559-0872
3br in the Country but
close to shopping $700. mo
plus deposit.
386-344-0579
3br in town. Close to VA and
shopping. Nice neighborhood.
$630. mo plus deposit
386-344-0579
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., east ofLC, CR 245A. Ceram-
ic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800 dep
(904)708-8478 Application req'd
739 Monroe St. 3br/lba. &
751 Monroe St. 3br/2ba. CH/A.
All electric. No Pets. $650. mo
$500 dep: 386-961-1482
NICE AND SECLUDED,
3 BR/2 BA House, close to'town,
rent $795 mo. + sec. $550,
appl. required Call 386-963-4974
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Very nice older home, 2br/2ba
w/fenced yard, garage, huge Fl.
room. CHA, appli: Application,
credit cheek & lease req'd. ;lst, last
& sec. $650/mo. (904)259-4126
7A(0 Furnished
740 Homesfor Rent
FOR SALE OR RENT
3 BR/2 BA, Exec. home, 3,000 sq.
ft., screened pool/patio, fireplace,
office, 3-car garage, many extras!
$1,200 mo. 386-697-3804

805 Lots for Sale
PRIME LAND for Sale
in Ft. White off Hwy 18.
CASH ONLY.
904-288-1632 or (904)353-9391
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis,
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
. the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2br/lba. In-town. Remodeled.
New CH/A, wiring, plumbing.
Owner Finance if qualified.
*$5000/dn $483/mo. 386-755-6916


810 Home for Sale
HOUSE for Sale on
Lake Jeffery Rd. 3br/1.5ba.
Call for more information.
(404)366-0759
Owner Finance. Nice 3br/lba.
East Lake City Small down
$575. mo 386-590-0642/867-1833
suwanneevallevproperties.com
820 Farms &
Acreage
Great Homesite. Four acres.
Well, septic. Columbia City area
off 47. $50,000
386-984-2922
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
830 Commercial
Property
Former 84 Lumber Store for Sale!
1824 W US Highway 90,
Lake City, FL 32055
Call 724-228-3636 for
price and info!
Great visibility from Hghway 90!!

930 Motorcycles
ELECTRIC SCOOTER,
camp ground type.
Paid $375. Sell for $250.
386-497-2910

950 Cars for Sale
1996 CHEVY Cavalier
Runs good, looks, good.
$1,200. obo.
386-292-3297 or 438-7900
' ans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
1994 FORD Van, 6 cyl. A/C P/B
Handicap Equipped W/E side
door. Low miles. incl. ele. Wheel
chair. $10,000.386-288-3854
1998 CHEVY Tahoe
$3000. OBO
386-697-9919





Contact us


at the paper.


CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
' 386-755-5445



ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
ads@lakecityreporter.com

Mon,-Fri.: 8a.m- 5:00 pm.

THIS REPORT WORKS FOR YOU!

Lake ity Rporte


180 East Duval SL
Lake City, FLorida 32055


M. KEVIN JONES
The Only Name You Need To Know When Buying a New or Used Home
Hwy 252, Lake City, FL * (386),755-8885 cell: (386) 344-3975


Tell'em L.C. Reporter sentya.


-SUBSCRIBERS-
Sign up today for EasyPay* and receive
one month FREE added to your subscription.

e&O4 dde"it 386.755.5445


G H J O A M L G

C N A F U C E E


Q H I I X BE F


U E A T U DY F


B B C S I U V B


E R E Q D C N I


U A P K G U XL


F FM O E
V F O H F M OE


H


I


-H


Adoption

ARE YOU PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
ADOPTION? Loving married couple seeks
to adopt. Will be Full-time Mom (age 36) and
Devoted Dad. Financial security. EXPENS-
ES PAID. Kim/Bill (888)399-3255 FL Bar#
0150789


Announcements


Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout
Florida. Advertising Networks of Florida, Put
us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.flori-
da-classifieds.com.

Financial

CASH NOW! Get cash for your structured
settlement or annuity payments. High payouts.
Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT
(1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better
Business'Bureau.

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!!
$$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Drag-
ging? Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs?
Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call To-
day! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapi-
tal.com

For Sale

CHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid Wood,
never used, brand new in factory boxes. Eng-
lish Dovetail. Original cost $4500. Sell for
$895. Can deliver. Call Tom (954)302-2423

LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original
plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice
$975. Can deliver. Call Bill (305)420-5982

Help Wanted

Colonial Life seeks entrepreneurial profes-
sional with sales experience to become a Dis-
trict Manager. Life/Health license is required.
Substantial earnings potential. Please contact
meredith.brewer@coloniallife.com or call
(904)424-5697

Drivers - FLORIDA TRUCK DRIVERS
NEEDED ASAP! IN-STATE DRIVING PO-
SITIONS AVAILABLE! CDL-A w/ 1 yr. ex-
perience Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a
recruiter TODAY! (877)484-3042 www.oak-
leytransport.com


C

M


L E

G OM

A iO


J W T


H S


A Q U

Y H 1C


L Y L jW


G L S E'


B I G V N

Lake City
Reporter's
popular weekly
word search is
a great way to
get attention
with a fun new
puzzle every
week at a price
any business
can afford.


Drivers- Flatbed CDL/A $2,000 Sign On bo-
nus. Great pay and benefits! 6 months Experi-
ence Required. Lease Purchase Available No
Felonies. (800)441-4271 x FL-100

*Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high
paying Aviation .Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.


Out of Area Real Estate


NC MOUNTAINS - BEST LAND BUY!
2.5acres, spectacular views, gated, paved
road. High altitude. Easily accessible, seclud-
ed. Bryson' City. $45,000. Owner financing:
(800)810-1590 www.wildcatknob.com

CROSSVILLE TN-Top 100 cities to live in.
Lots with spectacular mountain views,.under-
ground utilities, cool temps - low crime, prop-
erty taxes & INS. No state income tax. Priced
from the 20's. (931) 707-0393 www.crossvil-
lerealty.com

FARMS, REPOS, LAKES! 5 upstate NY
counties! 16 acres -Abuts State Land - $19,900;
5 acres - Lake Lot, 1 hr NYC - $39,900; 7
acres - Mini-Farm - $49,900. Catskills to the
Finger Lakes! Owner terms available! Hurry!
(888)698-1471

SOUTH EAST GEORGIA 292 AC - $1975/
AC Satilla River, lake, hardwoods & planted
pine. Outstanding recreational & timber in-
vestment. Just 20 miles from 1-95. Must see
pictures and more on website! (478)987-9700
www.stregispaper.com St. Regis Paper Co.


Real Estate Auctions


FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION 700+
Homes I Auction: 7/29 Open House: July 17,
24 & 25 REDC I View Full Listings www.Auc-
tion.com RE Brkr CQ1031187



ANF
ADVERTISING J I'- "' I i FFLORIDA




Week of July 12, 2010


in . for
!vaC


*.fAr


P A K I C


A+ EyeCare.


C .i. Eyeglasses
S Y tLN
. -.- Contacts

SExams

- . Sunglasses







555-5555


Fo mr no-to al'36'5 54
Dedin s enedy t4p


I




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EZ6SSL3S0_ZX9GZ7 INGEST_TIME 2011-05-31T22:20:31Z PACKAGE UF00028308_01298
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES