Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






Road work
Local projects could
delay motorists traveling


in Columbia Co
Local, 3A


unty.

,TO3-DIGIT
HISTORY


0F360 R 43
FL 3261


326


AN N"J


Tuesday, July 6, 2010 www.lakecityrep rted


All-Stars
Mauer, Pujols lead
fan voting for 2010
Midsummer Classic
Sports, 2B






Sporter


Vol. 136, No. 144 E 75 cents


HAVING


A BLAST


A firework explodes Sunday night over Lake DeSoto. More than 25,000 people attended the annual fireworks display, which
took place in downtown Lake City.


Thousands attend fireworks festivities


DRUG ARREST


Suspect, out

on bond, faces

new charges


Officials: Man
tried to destroy
drugs in sink.
From staff reports
A Lake City man was
arrested fate Friday after
law enforcement officials
discovered cocaine and
marijuana in his house,
according to reports. This
is the second time in less
than two months the man
has been arrested on drug
charges.
Joseph Anthony Harris,
45, 141 NE Montrose Ave.,
was charged with posses-
sion of cocaine, possession
of a controlled substance,
tampering with evidence,
possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana and pos-
session of drug parapherna-
lia. He also faces posses-
sion of cocaine charges
stemming from a felony
warrant.
.-H~ ias-booked ixto the
Columbia County Detention
Facility on $53,000 bond.
According to reports


from the
Columbia
County
Sheriff's
Office,, at
around 11
p.m. Friday,
Harris deputies
attempted
to serve an arrest warrant
to Harris at his residence.
Deputies entered his house
and found crack cocaine
smoking devices, canna-
bis, various prescription
pills and cocaine. Deputies
believe that Harris also
attempted to destroy or
conceal narcotics by flush-
ing them down a kitchen
sink, and some cocaine was
recovered from the kitchen
sink's drain.
This is the second time
since May that Harris has
been arrested by local offi-
cials. On May 4, he was
arrested by the Columbia
County Multi-Jurisdictional
Task Force and charged
with possession of narcotics.
He was out on bond at the
time of his arrest Friday.


By,ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter., com
ain didn't keep
the crowd away
from the annual
July Fourth
Celebration
around Lake DeSoto.
An estimated 25,000
people were in atten-
dance at the event, which
was sponsored by the
Lake City Reporter, Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce,,
Columbia County Board'
of Commissioners, City of
Lake City and First Baptist
Church.
"The massive crowd
that turned out for the
fireworks show gives testi-
mony to just how important
this event is and what it: .
means to our community,"
said Todd Wilson, Lake
City Reporter publisher.
'"The fact that 25,000 people
waited through two down-
pours in the two hours
before the fireworks says
it all. I want to thank them
all for their determination
to make sure this Fourth of
July tradition in Lake City
went off with one of the
largest crowds in history."
After her first year at the
annual celebration, Lake
City's Kimberly Smith said
she will be back next year.
"I think it brings people
together," she said.
Smith said she enjoyed
the entertainment and the
fireworks, especially the
finale.,
"It was awesome," she
said.
Christy Bell of Lake City
has been coming to the
FOURTH continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1 293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-544S
Fax: 752-9400


PATRICK SCOTTISpecial to the Reporter
(ABOVE) Brandon Craig (left) and Kiley Craig (right), both of Lake City, attempt to feed
six-month-old Aubrey Craig during the Fourth of July festivities on Sunday in downtown Lake
City. (BELOW) Edwin Penaranda (left) and Derwin Moore, both of Coral Springs, take a break
before the fireworks begin on Sunday.,


91 7
Isolated T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ... . ... . 4
Business . . . .. ... SA
Obiuaries ... ........ 6A
Advice & Comics . ..... 4B
Puzzles .. .... ...... 2B


AN I UNIA KUUINSUNILaKe uity Keporner
As a hotdogger, Brian Mallioux travels to places such as
Ellisville in the Oscar Mayer.Wienermobile.


Oscar Mayer

Wienermobile

visits Lake City


Visit part of new
store celebration
for S&S Foods.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comn
ELLISVILLE - The new-
est S&S Store celebrated its
grand opening with a little
help from the Oscar Mayer
Wienermobile Monday.
S&S #38 is located in
Ellisville, and is an older
store that was totally remod-
eled, said Keith Brown,
S&S vice president of
marketing.
"It's different than any of
the S&S stores," he said.
The store features a new
product, milkshakes.
"It's the first one to have
them," Brown said.


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Health ,'-..r ul
p)l o r ;, i;,n , I r, I I-


In August, a full service
restaurant will be opened
next door to the store, he
said.
S&S was voted best place
for a hot dog in the Lake
City Reporter's Best of the
Best Contest, and in recog-
nition, Oscar Mayer sent
the Wienermobile, Brown
said.
Free pictures were avail-
able by the Wienermobile,
and coupons and mini
whistles were given out,
said hotdogger Brian
Mallioux.
People were also able to
enter a contest to win the
use of the Wienermobile for
a day and $5,000.
Also on hand for the
store's celebration were
Chester Cheetah and Icee
Bear.


COMING
WEDNESDAY
' li- |['li l,,:l h : . :.,'_
,_ijd- t,_ bu:in, i;


HOTDOGGIN' IT


. -,-, . , .�- I . --V . .-. -, , : -- -- i j ,V .7 � .


IYYIIIIIIII










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


t Monday:
S Aftprnoon: 6-2-3.
Evening: N/A


? Monday:
- ". " Afternoon: 0-8-1-4
%. Evening: N/A


ezRatch.
Sunday:
1-6-17-31-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



'Eclipse' rises to $82.5M over holiday


LOS ANGELES

Eclipse" has risen to an
$82.5 million haul over
the long Fourth of July
weekend and lifted its
total to $175.3 million after just six
days, according to studio estimates
Monday. *'
The vampire romance from
Summit Entertainment finished at
No. 1 over the four-day weekend,
despite a steep drop in its daily
take after a $68.5 million start last
Wednesday, the second biggest
opening day ever.
"Movies that pop this big on open-
ing day, it's virtually impossible to
.keep up that breakneck pace," said
Paul Dergarabedian, box-office ana-
lyst for Hollywood.com. "We've seen
-this with a lot of movies where the
-first day is their biggest day, then it
kind of settles into a more normal
-pattern."
: Coming in seorid for the week-
end with $53.2.million from Friday to
' Monday was Paramount's action fan-
tAsy "The Last Airbender," pushing
:its total to $70.5 million since open-
:ing Thursday. The movie did strong
business despite terrible reviews.
. Disney's Pixar Animation block-
buster 'Toy Story 3," which had
:been No. 1 the two previous week-
:ends, slipped to third-place with
$42.2 million, raising its domestic
total to $301.1 million.
'Toy Story 3" shot past last year's
"Up" at $293 million to become
the No. 2 hit for Pixar, behind only
"Finding Nemo" at $339.7 million.
"Eclipse" waned after its huge
opening day, with Summit lowering
projections for the movie, through
the weekend. On Sunday, the com-
pany was expecting a $181 million
total for the movie's first six days,
but revenues came in nearly $6 mil-
lion lower.
Summit overestimated how big


In this film publicity image released by Summit Entertainmeht, Kristen Stewart
(right) and Robert Pattinson are shown in a scene from, 'The Twilight Saga:-
Eclipse.'


an audience "Eclipse" would draw
on Sunday, when peoplewerie busy
with Fourth of July barbecues and
fireworks, said Richie Fay, the com-,
pany's head of distribution..
"I don't think it's a reflection on
the movie or Twilight' fatigue at this
point," Fay said.
"Eclipse" earned better reviews
than the two previous 'Twilight"
movies and the fan base has expand-
ed, with males accounting for 35 .
percent of audiences, compared to
just 20 percent for last year's "The
Twilight Saga: New Moon."
"New Moon" took in $142.8 mil-
lion in its three-day opening week-
end last November. That movie
debuted on Friday, and the figure
includes its record opening day*
gross of $72.7 million. .
For its first six days, "Eclipse" is
$3.6 million behind "New Moon,"
which had taken in S178.9 million at
that point. ,


Former Miss California
Prejean marries QB
SAN DIEGO - Former Miss
California Carrie Prejean is now
Mrs. Kvi Boler, after marrying the.
Oakland Raiders quarterback at a
San Diego resort,
The San Diego Union Tribune says
the dethroned beauty queen and the
29-year-old quarterback tied the knot
late Friday in a private ceremony at
the Grand Del Mar.
Among the guests were Gateway
computer founder Ted Waitt, Green
Bay Packers quarterback Aaron
SRodgers and former Philadelphia
Eagles quarterback Matt Nordgren.
The 23-year-old bride made head-
lines last ,ear after making contro-
versial remarks during the 1Miss '
USA pageant that marriage should .
be between a man and a woman.
SAssociated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former first lady Nancy
Reagan is 89.
* Actor William Schallert is
88.
* Actor Donal Donnelly is
79.
* Singer-actress Della Reese
is 79.
* The 14th Dalai Lama of
Tibet, Tenzin Gyatso, is 75.
* Actor'Ned Beatty is 73.


* Singer Gene Chandler.is
70.
* Country singer Jeannie
Seely is 70.
" Actor Burt Ward is 65.
* Former President George
W. Bush is 64.
* Actor-director Sylvester
Stallone is 64.
* Actress Nathalie Baye is.
62.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
:E; Duval �St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
,in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880. . '-
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056;
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .... .. .754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(�strickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by'6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30'
'a.m. on Sunday. ' .
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service. '
lp Columbia County, customers should
call before 10*30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10'30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available,, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ................755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks............... $48.79
52 Weeks.... .. .....$83.46
Ratesindide 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12Weeks................. $41.40
24 Weeks."....... : .....$82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If yoq have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Attorney says
Greer 'not guilty'
ORLANDO - A crimi-
nal defense attorney for
ousted Florida GOP chair-
man Jim.Greer Monday
promised to make defense
witnesses of some.of the
most powerful men in
Florida politics --Gov.
Charlie Crist, Attorney
:General Bill McCollum ' :
and state Republican chief
John Thrasher.
J. Cheney Mason also
said he'll depose prospec-
tive Florida House Speaker
Dean Cannon (R-Winter
Park) and soon-to-be
Florida Senate President ,
:Mike Haridopolis (R-
'Merritt Island). Greer, his
lawyer said, was the victim
of right-wing conservatives
who turned against Crist,
the man who picked Greer
to head the state party, and
decided to punish the gov-
ernor by ruining.Greer.
"I believe we'll be able
to prove Jim Greer is not
guilty whatsoever," said
Mason.
Greer, 48, of Oviedo,
was indicted in May by
a statewide grand jury
that charged him of
six felonies, including
'theft, organized fraud
and money laundering.
:Records released by the
'Florida Department of Law
Enforcement and Office
-of Statewide Prosecution
accuse Greer of funneling
:$125,000 from the state
.party into his personal
'bank accounts.
Greer was not at
Monday's Orlando news
conference, and Mason
.would not discuss the evi-
dence against Greer, much
of which splashed into the
news last week as prosecu-'
tors released to the public
hundreds of pages of
documents - the nuts and
bolts of their case.
Instead, Mason
denounced state GOP
officials and their motives,
especially McCollum,


Repairing oil booms
Aaron Broadus of Mobile, Ala., repairs 'il retention booms
at the Theodore Staging Area in Theodore, Ala., on Sunday.
Oil from the Deepwater Horizon disaster continues to wash
ashore along the Alabama and Florida coasts. .


whose Office of Statewide
Prosecution handled the
grand jury investigation
and is now trying to con-
vict Greer.

Bodies in plane
crash recovered
DESTIN - The bodies
of two men whose small
plane crashed into the Gulf
of Mexico nearly a mile
off the north Florida coast
have been recovered.
Officials pulled the bod-
ies and some of the wreck-
age from the water early
Sunday morning. Rough
waters had prevented
recovery after the World
War II-era plane crashed
into the Gulf Friday
afternoon.
The National
Transportation Safety Board
reports that salvage crews
were able to bring in all but
the plane's wings and tail.
Authorities say 57-year-
old Tim McDonald, of
Niceville,-was flying the
plane, and his brother-
in-law, 46-year-old Tim
Turner, of Omaha, Neb.,
was the passenger.
Witnesses on the Destin


beach say the yellow air-
plane had been performing
stunts when it looped and
nose-dived straight into
the water.

Three killed in
1-95 crash
TITUSVILLE - Three -
people were killed when
their vehicle swerved off
Interstate 95 in Brevard
County and crashed into
a tree.
The Florida Highway
Patrol reports the 60-year-
old Jeff Cain was driving
on the highway Sunday
afternoon when the grill
from a truck ahead of
him fell off. Cain swerved
to the right to avoid the
grill, and the car started
spinning and rolling onto
its side. It came to a stop
when it hit the tree.
Cain and two of his pas-
sengers - 58-year-old
Terri Cain and 53-year-old
Ruth Dye - were killed.
Another passenger,
51-year-old Terry Dye of
Melbourne, was taken to
a Melbourne hospital in
serious condition.
N Associated Press


THE WEATHER

if- .

ISOLATED PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY] CHANCE.
T-STORMS CLOUDY CLOUDY T CLOUDY STORMS


HI 91 Wl70 HI96LO1 H9471 H94LO | HI 92 LO
- ..a ' . .. ' ' . s- r ' * ,, ' : .. . ... ..
e WE 5 aerm ima


it 7


87/78
[ esa01


Tallahassee *
92/72
*
Panama City
88/76


SValdosta
92/70
Lake City
91/ 70
Gaines
' 90/,7


Tan
92/


'I


City W


* Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
1 90/73 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
70 90'75 Gainesville
Ocala - Jacksonville
91 71 *Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
91/74 88/76 Lake City
Miami
ipa * Naples
'76 West Palm Beach Ocala
88..'78 0 Orlando
* FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 89, 80 * Pensacola
91 " 76 Naples * Tallahassee
90 76 Miami Tampa
K89 .-78 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset t xla,
Sunnse ltom.
Sunset lom.


6:35 a.m.
8:36 p.n-i
6:35 a.m.
8-36 p.m.


MOON
Moonnse toaay 1:49 a.m.
Moonset t wa 1 .3:-3 p.m.
Moonnse tom. 2:28 a.m.
Moonset tom. 4:44 p.m.


July . July July Aug.
11 18 25. 3
New First Full Last


On tris Oat-e in
1987, thunder
storms brought
severe weather
to 21 state east
of mne Rockies.
Reynolds, III.. set
saw o\er 5 inr.-res
Of rain in an hour
Rochnester. r11 . ..se
a 24r.our rairf.iII
re':or'3 mtr, 3.25
inr ne-


30mhbtestobum
Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
ror Ihe area on
a .cale from' i
t,) 10+.


wednesday Thursday
9S' 76 I S3 7 i
91 7 3 p,- 91 73 p.: .
90 '80'1 91 1 p:
93 75 i 90 76 i
93 Ni7 p 94 71 ,:
92 73 93 ; p.:
90 51 90 0 p:
96 71 p: 94 71 V:
90 79 I 9 . 9 I t"
92 75 91 76 .
92 71 p.: 93 72 pc,
93 71.1 93 74 p:
S9 76 I 91 E'. p
89 77 1 91 7 '
95 73 i 96 73 p;
92 7, r 9 7 p':2 '
94 71 pc: 91 70
. 79 90 791,


An exclusive
service
n!.,. , to
our readers
by
r, Weather




i eathercom
*. . .- ' a a


v ., Forecasts, data and graph-
- "-. .'- Ics � 2010 Weather Central
- ' , ^ LLC, Madison, WIs.
Swww.weatherpubllsher.com
4'


* I



et Connected
:!I

-;


TEMPERATURES
High Monda,y
Li-.., Monai,)r
rjorrimal nigh
l Jornimal low
Record higri
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal .,earto.date


85
73
91
70
98 in 1998
64 in 1947


0.00"
0.36"
27.08"
1.07"
25.10"


7a_ . lp 7p la 6a
- . Tuesday Wednesday








- Foreastdtemdperabr "Fels I"temperabte


Daily Scripture


"In that day you will say: "Give
thanks to the LORD, call on his
name; make known among the
nations what he has done, and
proclaim that his name is
exalted.'


- Isaiah 12:4


AROUND FLORIDA


88/ 79


~R~w~` ~~~"~"`


~CL-(c---~\�


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


2A,


~;_~~~~_~









TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE


FDLE agents arrest Jacksonville

man on child porn charges


From staff reports


Agents with the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement Computer
Crime Center and investi-
gators with the Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office yesterday
arrested John Michael
Fleehart, 39, of Jacksonville,
for, possession of child
pornography.
The investigation began
in May after investigators


observed videos of child
pornography being shared
over the Interinet. The inves-
tigation revealed the child
pornography was down-
loaded from a computer at
Fleehart's residence.
Fleehart was charged
with one count of posses-
sion of child pornography,
a third degree felony, He
was booked into the Duval
County Jail.
' FDLE is an active member


of the three Internet Crimes
Against Children Task
Forces in Florida. There
are 59 federally-funded task
forces nationwide created
solely to investigate Internet
crimes against children that
include the online sexual
exploitation of children and
child pornography.
Visit the www.secureflor-
ida.org website to review
tips for keeping your chil-
dren safe online.


ANTONIA ROBINSONIul-:i, '
Projects could slow traffic local .ly ahOears
ProjectscoulocallyWhistles, cheetahs and polar bears
From staff reports ing poles are installed. All days at Southwest Birley (ABOVE) Sydney Southwell, 5, of Fort White, relaxes in the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile
work will be suspended this Avenue for construction of with her whistle Monday. (BELOW) ChesterCheetah, Keith Brown, S&S vice president of
Florida Department Friday through Monday. a new westbound turn lane. marketing, and Icee Bear, welcome the community to the new S&S Food Store.
of Transportation con- E Southwest Birley Also, daytime lane closures ma
struction projects could Avenue - Possible daytime between the Suwannee and. .' - _-: l . '"
Columbia and surrounding at U.S. 90 for construction inmate crews to repaint the .& " : , - :
counties. of a new westbound turn roadway markings '


Columbia County.

* Interstate 75 -
Daytime and nighttime lane
closures scheduled to begin
this morning and continue
tonight and run into the
early morning hours on
Wednesday to finish paving
the northbound outside lane
between Interstate 10 and
the Suwannee County line.
Daytime lane closures today
through Thursday at the
Interstate 10 interchange
while new high mast light-


lane.
* Suwannee Valley Road
- All repairs should be
completed and the overpass
at 1-75 was reopened to all
traffic on Jurre 21.
* State Road 238
- Daytime lane closures
Wednesday after 8 a.m. at
the Olustee Creek Bridge
(Union County line) for
work on the barrier wall
and bridge joints. Also,
crews will be painting the
final roadway lines today
through Thursday.
* U.S. 90 - Daytime lane*
closures after 8:30 a.m. week-


Alachua County

* Archer Road-Daytime
lane closures between
the Levy County line and
Southwest 13th Street to
allow inmate crews to repaint
the roadway markings.
* Newberry Road (State
Road 26) - Daytime lane
closures between the
Gilchrist County line and
Southwest 34th Street in
Gainesville to allow inmate
crews to repaint the road-
way markings.


Volunteer
divers can
no longer
help at parks

By BARBARA BEHRENDT
St. Petersburg Times
HOMOSASSA SPRINGS
- For more than 16 years,
Bill and Peggy Goldberg
have made regular 150-
mile round' trips from
Citra in Marion County to
Homosassa Springs to wash
windows.
But these are no ordinary
sheets of glass.
Surrounded by thick
schools of fish and curious
manatees, the Goldbergs
and other volunteer scuba
divers would drop 'into a
scenic spring and scrub
algae from the windows
of the Fishbowl observa-
tory at the Ellie Schiller
Homosassa Springs
Wildlife State Park in
Citrus County.
Now, the Goldbergs,
along with almost all of
the 40 or so volunteer div-
ers, have quit. They have
been forced out, they say,
by a new state rule aimed
at improving safety but
which the volunteers say is
overkill.
Since March, the state
has required all volunteer
divers working at state
parks to be certified as com-
mercial divers.
That means mandatory
physical, first-aid classes
and tests, including swim-
ming 400 yards in 12 min-
utes or less.
That is excessive for the
work they do, the former
volunteers say.
At the Fishbowl, "All you
have to do is swim 15 feet
in any direction with equip-
ment before you could stand
up in waist-deep water," Rick
Walker, a volunteer and a
scuba instructor wrote in
an e-mail.
Divers at the Weeki
Wachee Springs State Park
who clean the windows for
viewing the world-famous
mermaid shows work at
similar shallow depths.
Maybe so, noted a
state Department of
Environmental Protection
spokeswoman, but the rules
must apply to everyone.
"In order to ensure the
safety of staff and vol-
unteers while they are
performing diving activi-
ties, DEP implements, the
same standards for divers
statewide," Kristin Lock
said.


FOURTH: Featured food, activities
Continued From Page 1A


event with her family for
the past 15 years, and she
said the celebration always
provides good clean fun for
the family.,
"Ift's a time for every-
body to get together with
their families and come out
here," Bell said.
Sfevei Clemente of Live
Oak was looking forward
to hotdogs and fireworks


, and the event, he said,
and noted celebrating the
Fourth of July is an impor-
tant community activity.
"Independence Day
is for all Americans, and
the community is all
American," Clemente
said. "We come together
to celebration the fact
that we still have our
freedom."


The celebration's atmo-
sphere was nice and light,
complete with a beautiful
view for the fireworks,
said Jesse Combs of Fort
White.
It's important the com-
munity comes together in
unity to celebrated the day,
he said.
"Happy Fourth of July,
America," Combs said.


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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE














OPINION


Tuesday, July 6, 2010


OTHER


OT H. ER
OPINION


Recovery

or further

recession?


perhaps Sen.
Olympia Snowe
(R-Maine) is right
about H.R. 4213,
'The Promoting
American Jobs and Closing Tax
Loopholes Act of 2010": If the
votes aren't there to pass this
grab-bag mix of tax policy and
job stimulus measures in its
entirety, the Senate should at
least. consider extending unem-,
ployment benefits included in
the bill for millions of out-of-
work Americans.
Failing to do so puts far too
many families at risk of bank-
ruptcy and losing their homes
once their unemployment
checks run out. That, in turn,
would jeopardize our nation's
already shaky recovery from
the deepest recession since the
1930s.
But here's the rub: It is by
no means certain a stand-alone
measure to extend unemploy-
ment benefits will fare any
better than the overall bill that
remains stalled in the Senate,
where it lacks the necessary
60 votes to end a Republican
filibuster.
Nor is it a given that another
measure that Snowe has sup-
ported in the past - a federal
subsidy to help states pay their
share of Medicaid - would be
approved if that funding also
was carved out of the overall
bill for a simple up-or-down
vote.
The hanig-ilp for many sena-
tors is not wanting to add to our
country's ballooning federal
-deficit That's a fair concern.
But concern over the ris-
ing deficit must be balanced
against the needs of 15 million
Americans still looking for jobs
that don't exist Do we really
think a return of the bread . .
lines prevalent during the Great
Depression of the 1930s is bet-
ter than extending unemploy-
ment benefits?
* The Times Record

HI GH LIG H TS
I N HIS TORY
T. oday is Tuesday, July 6, the
187th day of 2010. There are
178 days left in the year.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 18,74
T'he Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Wewspapers
gel things done!"
'Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
tt)rough the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
Work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
P POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone riumber for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL'32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


President Barack
Obama and the coun-
try were hoping for a
little good economic
news going into the
July Fourth weekend. They
didn't get it.
True, the June unemployment
iate dropped from 9.7 percent
' to 9.5 percent, the lowest since
last July, but that's a misleading.
figure. It's only lower because
652,000 people quit looking for
work altogether and thus aren't
counted as part of the work
force.
Total payroll fell by 125,000
jobs, driven largely by 225,000
temporary Census jobs coming
to an end. If there is a small ray
of light, the.private sector added
83,000 jobs, the sixth straight
month of gains, but the econo-


www.lakecityreporter.com


Understanding the First Amendment


A few years ago,
David Giles, a media
lawyer, and I were
asked to visit our
company's newspa-
pers and television properties
to discuss a number of issues
including libel, the dangers of
the Internet and a variety of
other subjects - he from the
legal standpoint and me from
the editorial.
In our year of traveling back
and forth across the country
we made a startling discovery.
The lack of understanding of
the First Amendment to the
Constitution even among those
we considered to be the front
line of defense of our rights
- editors, reporters, producers
and anchors - was startling.
They simply were unaware
of the importance of the
constitutional language that
is the bedrock of the nation's
democracy.
We would begin each lecture,
asking for a show of hands as
to how many of our cherished,
freedoms the amendment guar-
antees. Invariably, most people
would come up with one or two
or even three but not the five
that the amendment covers.
Even more incredibly some for-
got to mention the press and in
every session someone would
say the right to bear arms,
which, as we all know, is the
Second Amendment.
Surveys have revealed
that this same constitutional
ignorance is even more drasti-
cally apparent in the general
population. A colleague, Robert'
Saltzberger, editor of the
Bloomington (Ind.) Herald-
Times, notes that, "Most
Americans don't know what the
First Amendment says. When
pressed they can probably come
up with freedom of speech."
Saltzberger and others from


Dan K.Thomasson
coast to coast have decided to
*try and change that. As mem-
bers of the American Society
of News Editors, they have
begun a campaign endorsed
by educators, librarians, politi-
cians, religious leaders, attor-
neys and celebrities to spread
the gospel about how we
have maintained through this
simple paragraph the freest
society in the history of the
world. There is really nothing
fancy or ambiguous abdut the
first of the 10 amendments to
the Constitution, the "Bill of
Rights," written in 1789 and
then added after ratification
in 1791. That our founders
placed it at the top of their list
showed how important they "
considered its basic tenets
to the survival of a young
nation still struggling to attain
the promise held out in the
Declaration of Independence
15 years earlier.
, That First Amendment says
in almost perfect eloquence
that: "Congress shall make no
law respecting an establishment
of religion, or prohibiting the
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech or of the
press, or the right of the people
to peaceably assemble, and to
petition the Government for a
redress of grievances."
Those 44 words have stood as
a bulwark against actions that
would tear down our church
in favor of another, spike our
presses, prevent our protesting.
and punish us for seeking legal


relief from despotic govern-
ment. They have been a key
element of the checks and bal-
ances so brilliantly conceived by
our ancestors, and there is no
better day to renew our commit-
ment to them than July 4 when
we celebrate the birth of our
independence.
Americans everywhere
should burn those words into
their minds and their children's
minds just as they do the
national anthem and the pledge
of allegiance to the flag. But .
more than just regarding them
as a recitation of the rights the
amendment assures us, we all
should also make an effort to
understand the responsibilities
to ourselves and our country
the words carry with them
- that while each freedom is
guaranteed, distortions of those
rights at the expense of our fel-
low citizens are not.
One can only hope that the
ASNE campaign is success- ,
ful and that the readers of the
Bloomington Herald Times and
dozens upon dozens of other
newspapers do so thoughtfully
and that the listeners and view-
ers of the daily broadcasts of
our radio and television breth-
ren do so attentively.
Hundreds of thousands of
Americans have given their lives
to guarantee the freedoms out-.
lined in the First Amendment.
They are still doing so daily.
We owe it to them to honor that
sacrifice as the "bombs burst in
air" either as celebratory fire-
works here or as the real thing
in Afghanistan. I
For years a close colleague of
mine, Dale McFeatters, has had
only one toast - 'To the First
Amendment!" Join him.

* Dan K.-Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


my has to create 100,000 jobs a
month just to stay evert.
Other key indicators - fac-
tory orders, home sales, con-
struction spending, consumer
confidence, the market indices
-'were down. The average
workweek was slightly shorter
and the average hourly wage
down 2 cents to $22.53. ,
The underemployment rate,
which perhaps comes closest to
how people feel about their job
prospects, fell slightly in June to
16.5 percent from 16.6 percent
the month before. That counts
those looking for work, those
who have given up looking and
those with part-time jobs who
want to work fulltime.
And a lot of jobless workers
are about to have the safety net
yanked out from under them.


Before Congress went home for
the Independence Day recess,
Senate Republicans blocked
ant extension of unemployment
benefits, leaving 1.3 million
people without aid. Unless the
Republicans relent, that number
will grow to 3.3 million by the
end of the month.
Republicans claim to be
concerned about adding to
the federal deficit, something
that didn't bother them all the
years they were adding to it.
The Obama administration says
the spending is a necessary
evil, that the economy is not far
enough along in its recovery to
forgo stimulus spending. It all
depends very much on what the
lawmakers hear over the recess.

* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Obama's

regulatory

romance

President Obama's
love affair with
regulation has the
same problem as
most affairs, insuf-
ficient objectivity about likely
outcomes.
/ Judging by his rhetoric,
he is utterly enamored of the
idea that enough instructions.
and decrees from on high.
can make life blissful down
below - that if federal rules
are sufficiently exhaustive,
sternly fashioned and strin-
gently enforced, society and
the economy will purr. We will
have heaven on Earth and little
can then go wrong.
If he would detachedly reflect
that some regulations can be
bad, less cure than an affliction,
maybe he'd get it that there's
something powerfully wrong
with a financial regulation bill
from the Democrats meant to
save us from another recession
like the one we've been going
through.
The first hint is the thick-
ness of the concoction. It is
2,500 pages long, suggesting it
is overly complicated. Taken as
a whole, the bill is said by one
student of the subject to be
incoherent and incomprehen-
sible. Even if it has some good
points,.it is, thought tointer-
vene where it shouldn't, skip
some straightforward, clearly
needed fixes and to entrust
bureaucrats with responsibili-
ties beyond their competence
and powers beyond their con-
stitutional prerogatives.
In part because new regu-
lations are always aimed at
fighting the last war instead of
addressing a future not even
the smartest central planner
can imagine, the enactment of
the bill into law would likely
leave us as much at risk as
ever and probably more so
because of restrictions on
non-perilous but economically
advantageous activities.
Though Obama would
never admit it, regulatory
enthusiasm often give us
such results. Regulations can
even kill. The Food and Drug
Administration has sometimes
kept life-saving drugs off the
market longer than was neces-
sary for safety testing, says
Henry Miller of the Hoover
Institution. Government rules
have put Americans in smaller,
more dangerous cars than they
would otherwise have been
driving, increasing traffic fatali-
ties by the thousands, accord-
ing to reputable studies.
And when they aren't put-
ting us in early graves, regula-
tions can rob us of everyday
liberties. In her Senate hear-
ing, Supreme Court nominee
Elena Kagan gave us a lesson
in the liberal acceptance of
nanny-state encroachment.
She was asked to consider an o
abhqrrent and clearly unconsti-
tutional proposition - that the
government has the author-
ity to make us each eat three
vegetables a day. Instead of
whacking that fly with a swat-
ter, she treated it as a mat-
ter requiring deep, complex
thought. Oh, dear.
The point of regulation, Mr.
President, is to have the right
regulations enforced the right
way, not just to spot a problem
and then to endorse a bunch of
' regulations you did not previ-
ously have. Please break off
the regulatory romance.
* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial.
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


OTHER OPINION

Jobs continue to lag in economic recovery














Troubled Toyota recalls about 92,000 cars in Japan


By YURI KAGEYAMA
AP Business Writer

TOKYO - Toyota on
Monday began recalling
more than 90,000 luxury
Lexus and Crown vehicles
in Japan as part of a global
recall over defective engines
- the latest setback for the
automaker beset with qual-
ity problems.
On Friday, Toyota Motor
Corp. said it would recall
a total of 270,000 Lexus


and Crown vehicles world-
wide to fix flaws in the
valve springs, a crucial
engine component, that
could make the automobile
stall while in motion. That
includes 138,000 vehicles in
the U.S., 91,903 in Japan,
15,000 in Europe, 10,000 in
the Middle East, 6,000 in
China, 4,000 in Canada, and
8,000 in other regions.
"We apologize for incon-
veniencing our customers.
We hope to fix the prob-


lem soon," Toyota spokes-
man Paul Nolasco said in a
statement.
No accidents or injuries
have been reported because
of the defect. About 220 com-
plaints have been reported.
Toyota said it is replac-
ing the valve spring in the
recalled vehicles, produced
between July 2005 and
'August 2008 - Lexus mod-
els GS350, GS450h, GS460,
IS350, LS460, LS600h,
, LS600hL and Crown mod-


els. Vehicles from the 2009
and 2010 model years are
not affected.
The quality problem
affecting top-of-the-line
products comes as Toyota
struggles to move on from
massive global recalls
that started in October. It
already has recalled more
than 8.5 million vehicles for
various problems, including
sticking gas pedals, breaking
software glitches and defec-
tive floor mats.


The world's top auto-
maker was fined a record
$16.4 million in the United
States for responding too
slowly when the recall cri-
sis erupted.
The latest woes come on
top of a recall last week
for 17,000 Lexus hybrids
after testing showed fuel
can spill during a rear-end
crash. Analysts say the lat-
est recalls do little to instill
consumer confidence after
Toyota President Akio


Toyoda, facing sharehold-
ers last month, vowed to
improve vehicle quality
inspections.
"It is not doing a good job
in communicating a mes-
sage about what exactly it
is doing to beef up qual-
ity checks," said Shotaro
Noguchi, auto analyst with
Nomura Securities Co. in
Tokyo. "So it is hard for
people to believe Toyota is
taking the customer's view
as it is promising to do."


Firm aims to keep wayward walkers on path


By BROOKE DONALD
Associated Press

PALO ALTO, Calif.
- Todd Atwood says he
doesn't worry, too much
about accidents when walk-
ing down the street using
his iPhone to make calls,
send text messages or
check his e-mail.
But he's seen the con-
sequences of paying more
attention to the gadget than
what's ahead.
"I saw someone walk
right into a sign," recalled
the 32-year-old Silicon
Valley resident "She didri't
hurt herself but she was
startled. She dropped her
phone, then her friends
starting laughing at her.
It was funny but I guess
it could've "been more
serious."
While using a cell phone
while driving has triggered
the most alarm bells and
prompted laws in several
states, experts say, pedes-
trians are also suffering the
consequences of mobile
distraction - tripping on
curbs, walking into traffic,
even stepping into man-
holes as they chat or*type
while walking..
To help these sidewalk
stumblers. step out more
safely, technology compa-
nies are now stepping in,
creating applications that
do everything from make
a smartphone screen trans-
Sparent to transform speech
into text.
Whether the technolo-
gies will prevent injuries and
embarrassment remains
,to be seen, they are being
welcomed as a move in the
right direction.
- "I don't think we're going
to eliminate people from
walking into things out-
right and of course we want
people to be responsible,
but what we're trying to


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken Wednesday, a woman text messages while walking, across the street in
San Francisco. While using a cell phone while driving has triggered the most alarm bells and
prompted laws in several states, experts say pedestrians are also suffering the consequences
of mobile distraction tripping on curbs, walking into traffic, even stepping into manholes as
they chat or type while walking.


do is eliminate the friction
point ... and give the user
back a little mental band-
with," said Travis Bogard,
the executive director for
product management and
strategy at San Francisco-
based Aliph, which makes
bluetooth earpieces.
Aliph's Jawbone . ear-
piece incorporates voice-
to-text technology which
eliminates the need to
glance down at the key-
pad to send an e-mail or
text message. It also has
caller ID that speaks" to
the wearer so he or she
doesn't have to pickup the
phone to see who is calling
and a function that allows
wearers to call up their
contacts using their voice
rather than fingers.
"All of this gets rid of
the need to touch your
phone, which causes your
eyes sto move away from


'what's in front of you,"
Bogard said.
Other programs also on
the market aim to make it
easier to type while walk-
ing. They tap into a smart-
phone's camera to beam an
image of what's in front of
the user over the message
screen so typers can see
what's ahead. They include
Text Vision, Type n Walk
and Email 'n Walk.
"See-through screens,
yes, would" solve part of
the problem," said Clifford
Nass, 'a professor of com-
munications at Stanford
University and one of the
authors of a study on mul-
titasking. "But there's still a
second problem, which has
to do with engagement of
the brain."
Same goes with voice-to-
text technology, Nass said.
"It can help a little bit but
the fundamental problem is


Bank issues two-month warning

for NFL credit card holders


By EMILY FREDRIX
AP Marketing Writer

NEW YORK - The
National Football League's
decision to move its brand-
ed credit card business from
Bank of America to British
banker Barclays is forcing
customers of the Charlotte,
N.C.4 bank to scramble to
spend reward points before
they expire next month.
On message boards, in
between talk about upcom-
ing training camps, fans
are discussing how they'll
spend their points in Bank
of America's "NFL Extra
Points" program. They have
until the end of August, just
before Barclays' new pro-
gram begins in September.
Fans can get a one-hour
appearance from the Denver
Broncos mascot Miles for
40,000 points, Pittsburgh
Steelers head rest covers
for 3,250 points, or rep-
lica team jerseys for 10,400
points. Fans also can buy
"experiences" such as visit-
ing the playing field before
the game. A point typically
equals $1 spent on the card.
There's a giant count-
down clock ticking away
the time on the program's
site, www.nflextrapoints.com
- 57 days as of Monday. *
Ann Weinzimmer has
racked up about 5,000 points
on her Cleveland Browns
card. The 33-year-old
Cleveland lawyer is frustrat-
ed that her accounts seem


1-800.

gj GOT POINTS? GET A GIFT CARD' I USE UP THOSE LAST NFI
. .:^^ ._ .- . * -* <- ii ' ,-, ..,K^ ^ '^ - ..''" '' 'L '


TArt.W;.i


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This website screen grab from www.nflextrapoints.com shows
an advertisement reminding people to use their extra points
on NFL branded credit cards.


to keep changing owner-
ship. She's planning to look
for better point deals rather
than get a new NFL card.
Weinzimmer - who
notes she's really more of
a Cincinnati Bengals fan
- will probably spend her
points on baseball caps. "I
might as well, otherwise
you're just throwing it
away," she said.
The market for credit
cards affiliated with sports
teams, universities or other
special-interest ventures has
been growing and consolidat-
ing-amid the financial shake-
out The NFL likes having
credit card partners because
it gets a cut of the business
beyond the initial payment
for the rights to the fran-
chise. Credit card companies


that we're stuck with brains
that can't do all that much
when we're doing other
things," he said.
Two years ago, the
American College of
Emergency Physicians
issued an alert warning of
the dangers of text messag-
ing while walking, driving,
biking and in-line skating
based on anecdotal evi-
dence from physicians.
Manhattan physician
Mark Melrose said he's
seen his' share of .hear-
misses on the city's busy
sidewalks and heard of bad
accidents.
"A personal friend almost
walked right into a manhole
while looking at her phone,"
he said. "Another friend was
actually run over by a bike
messenger. She wasn't pay-
ing attention,' walked into
the street and the bike mes-
senger walloped her."


like the programs because
rabid fans don't need much
convincing to sign up.
Bank of America won't
,say. why it and the NFL
failed to reach agreement
on an extension of a con-
tract it has held since 1995.
. It is still the official bank
of Major League Baseball
and for four NFL teams, the
Washington Redskins, New
England Patriots, Carolina
Panthers and Dallas
Cowboys, which let it issue
debit cards with their logos
but not credit cards.
Bank of America's credit
card business is large. It
reached a peak of $184 bil-
lion in balances outstanding
in 2008, but it was stung in
the recession by growing
defaults.'


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


r..i-:t-L�.:











LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & STATE


TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LOCALS CELEBRATE FOURTH FESTIVITIES


Clerk fatally shoots

robbery suspect


Associated Press

DELRAY BEACH - A
clerk at a Delray Beach con-
venience store fatally shot
an armed robber.
Police say the apparent rob-
ber, who was later found to
be carrying no identification,
entered the Community Food
Market armed with a hand-
gun Saturday night When
one of the clerks hid behind


the counter, the robber report-
edly shot at him. The other
clerk then took a weapon and
fired at the robber.
The robber left the
store, and the clerks called
authorities. Police found the
suspect laying face down,
holding a handgun, several
blocks away. He was taken
to a nearby hospital, where
he was' pronounced dead
froin a gunshot wound.


SFor Life Insurance
Go With
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ohn Burns, IIIary H. Summera
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Independence festival featured fun, face-painting
Tiffany Keller (left) of Lake City takes a picture of her son Ransom Mitchel, 4, after he had his face painted during the Fourth
:6f July festival Sunday, while family friend Demetrea Hardman, also of Lake City, looks on.


Tour the fully furnished
Savannah 1021 Model home.


Bryan -:' Zecher
HOMES
AN irDUPENC-tr ;ANCFISE OF
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Awaiting the fireworks at Lake DeSoto
Military veterans Enmia Decker (left) and Donald Barnard, both of Lake City, enjoy refreshments at Lake DeSoto Sunday
evening while awaiting the fireworks.



At-sea oil cleanup idled by poor weather


:By BRENDAN. FARRINGTON
-and TOM BREEN
Associated Press

PASS CHRISTIAN, Miss.
- Across a wide stretch of
the Gulf of Mexico, the clean-
-up of the region's worst-ever
,oil spill has been essentially
'landlocked for more than
,a week, leaving skimmers
stuck close to shore.
- Last week, -the faraway
Hurricane Alex idled the
skimming fleet off Alabama,
Florida and Mississippi
with choppy seas and stiff
winds. Now they're stymied
-by a succession of smaller
storms that could last well
.into this week.
"We're just lying in wait
:to see if we can send some
people out there to do
some skimming," said
:Courtnee Ferguson, a
'.spokeswoman for the Joint
Information Command in
,Mobile, Ala.
Officials have plans for


the worst-case scenario:, a
hurricane barreling up the
Gulf toward the spill site.
But the less-dramatic weath-
er conditions have been
met with a more makeshift
response.
Skimming operations
across the Gulf have
scooped up about 23.5 mil-
lion gallons of oil-fouled
water so far, but officials
say it's impossible to know
how much crude could
have been skimmed in good
weather because of the fluc-
tuating number of vessels
and other variables.
Jerry Biggs, a com-
mercial fisherman in Pass
Christian, Miss., who has
had to shut down because
of the spill, is now hiring
out his 13 boats and 40-man
crew to BP for cleanup. He
said the skimming opera-
tion is severely hampered
by the weather.
"We don't even have the


right," Biggs said. 'The
(equipment) we're trying to
do this with is inoperable in
over 1 foot of seas."
From Louisiana, where
skimming resumed after
a three-day halt last week,
to Florida, there are about
44,500 people, nearly 6,600
boats and 113 aircraft enlist-
ed in the cleanup and con-
tainment effort,- according
to BP PLC.
The British company has
now seen its costs from the
spill reach $3.12 billion, a
figure that doesn't include
a $20 billion fund for dam-
ages the company created
last month.
For many involved in
the cleanup effort, nag-
ging storms have whipped
up choppy seas and gusty
winds that make offshore
work both unsafe and inef-
fective, stranding crews on
dry land.
"We have to send our


equipment to do the job .guys outevery day and look


at the weather and ask, 'Can
we do this?"' said Courtnee
Ferguson, a spokeswoman
for the Joint Information
Command in Mobile, Ala.,
which oversees operations
in Alabama, Florida and
Mississippi.
In the absence of off-
shore skimming, efforts
in the three Gulf states
east of Louisiana have
turned largely on con-
tainment boom, about
550 miles of which has
been deployed along the
entire Gulf, and shoreline
efforts to clean tar balls
and other . oily debris
from beaches.
"We're operating 24
hours a day on the beaches,
and anything that washes
ashore we're able to get,"
Ferguson said.
It may be days before
those beach crews are
aided by skimming vessels,
though, according to weath-
er forecasters.


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OBITUARIES


;Jodie Shiree Hurst Norris
- Mrs. Jodie Shiree Hurst
;Norris, 23, of Starke, died Friday
-morning from injuries receiv-
:ing in an automobile accident
-t1ear Lake Butler. She was born
"in Gainesville and lived near
Lake Butler until 2005 when she
moved to Starke. She was a clerk-
typist for the Union Correctional
Institution near Raiford. She was
a 2005 graduate of Union County
'High School. Mrs. Norris is sur-
vived by: Her husband, Chris
Norris of Starke; one daughter,
Hydee Shiree Norris of Starke;
her mother, Naomi Nicholas
Hollingsworth of Providence;
her fahter, Joseph Scott Hurst
of Lake Butler; three sisters,
Patricia Ford and Brittriey Hurst,
both of Providence, and Brandy
Holmes of Lake City; three
stepsisters, Amanda Martinez


and Grace Willis, both of Lake
City, and Maranda Stewart of
Lake Butler; two stepbrothers,
Johnathan Steward of Lake City
and Dustin Hollingsworth of
Keystone Heights; her paternal
grandmother, Barbara Keene of
Lake Buterl; and her maternal
grandfather, Lowell Nicholas
of Ocala. Funeral services
will be held Tuesday, July 6,
2010, at 11 a.m. in the Chapel
of Archer Funeral Home of
Lake Butler with Rev. Paul
O'Steen officiating. Burial will
follow at Oak Grove Cemetery,
west of Lake Butler. Archer
Funeral Home of Lake Butler
is in charge of arrangements.

John Eli "J.E." Box
Mr. John Eli "J.E." Box, 74,
of Lake Butler, died Sunday eve-
ning at Lake City Medical Center


after ahn extended illness. Mr.
Box was born in White Springs
and lived in Lake Butler most of
his life. He retired in 1986 as an
office engineer with the Florida
Department of Transportation.
He was a member of the First
Baptist Church of Lake Butler.
He was the son of the late Alfred
and Natalie Christie Box. He
was also preceded in death
by a brother, Michael Daniel
Box. Mr. Box is survived by:
his wife of 56 years, Emogene
Stafford Box of Lake Butler;
one daughter, Debbie Box (hus-
band David) Rogers of Raiford;
three sons, Wayne (wife Janice)
Box of Jacksonville, Greg (wife
CeeCee) Box of Lake Butler,
and Kevin (wife Kim) Box of
Lake Butler; five sisters, Lovurn
Rivers and Alief Bryant, both of
Sanderson, Josephine Addison
of Lake Butler, Delores Brannen


of Lake City, and Durelle Bailey
of Ellisville; one brother, A.C.
Box of Lake Butler; 11 grand-
children, seven great grand-
children and numerous nieces
and nephews. Funeral services
will be held Thursday, July 8,
2010, at 11 a.m. at the First
Baptist Church of Lake Butler
with Rev. Jason Johns offi-
ciating. Burial will follow at
Mt. Zion Cemetery near Lake
Butler. Archer Funeral Home
of Lake Butler is in charge
of arrangements. The family
will receive friends at Archer
Funeral Home on Wednesday
evening from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


NATION & WORLD


TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


BRIEFS


Carriage horses
kill 1, injure 23
BELLEVUE, Iowa
- Sandie Crilly was help-
ing her 8-year-old son,
12-year-old niece and
2-year-old granddaugh-
ter pick up Tootsie Rolls
from the ground during
Bellevue's annual Fourth of
July parade when someone
yelled to get out of the way.
Looking up, the Willow
Springs, Ill., native saw two
panicked horses dragging
a carriage charging toward
them.
Someone pulled her
granddaughter to safety,
but Crilly, 46, said her niece
broke her wrist and lost her
two front teeth. At least 22
other people were injured,
some critically, and one-
woman was killed, police
and hospital officials said.
Janet Steines of
Spragueville, whose
husband was driving the
carriage, died Sunday
evening at the University
of Iowa Hospital in Iowa
City, according to the
Hachmann Funeral Home
in Bellevue.
The horses got spooked
after they rubbed heads
and one's bridle fell off,
police said. They galloped
for several blocks through
downtown Bellevue, a town
of about 2,300 residents
along the Iowa-Illinois bor-
der. The wagon overturned
at some point, dumping its
four passengers.
Most of the injured were
treated at hospitals and
released, but at least four
people remained in critical
condition late Sunday and
several others were seri-
ously hurt, according to
police and hospital officials.

Ex-champ crashes
hot dog contest
NEW YORK-- Even as
he missed weigh-in, eating
champion Takeru Kobayashi
was telling media in his
native Japan that he wanted
to compete in the Coney
Island Fourth of July hot
dog contest Contestants
speculated that the six-time
champ would make a sur-
prise appearance.
And his publicist said
Kobayashi planned to
attend the annual Nathan's
Famous International Hot
Dog Eating Contest in 'the
hopes of putting on a free
eating demonstration for
the crowd on the Brooklyn
boardwalk.
Instead, Kobayashi sur-
prised everyone Sunday by
trying to crash the contest
after Joey "Jaws" Chestnut
gobbled his way to a fourth
consecutive champion-'
ship. He jumped onstage,
wrestled with police and
was arrested.
Kobayashi, 32, did not
compete in the Fourth
of July event because he
refused to sign a contract
with Major League Eating,
the fast food equivalent of
the NFL. On his Japanese-
language blog, hie said he
wanted to be free to enter
contests sanctioned by
other groups.

Geologist gets 8
years in China jail
BEING -An
, American geologist
detained and tortured
by China's state security
agents over an oil indus-
try database was jailed
for eight years Monday
in a troubling example of
China's rough justice sys-
tem and the way the U.S.
government handles cases
against its citizens.
Beijing's No. 1
Intermediate People's
Court convicted Xue Feng
of collecting intelligence


and illegally providing state
secrets and immediately
sentenced him.
Xue's lawyer Tong Wei
described the sentence as
"very heavy," just short
of the maximum 10 years,
and said he would confer
with Xue over whether to
appeal. *
* Associated Press


Jay and Sheryl Raether of'Oconomowoc, Wisc., with their triplets (from left) Vincent, Mira,
and Luk, visitCapitol Hill in Washington, on June 15. The first stage of President Barack
Obama's health care overhaul is expected to provide coverage to about 1 million uninsured
Americans by next year, according to government estimates. That's a small share of the unin-
sured, but in a shaky economy, experts say it's notable.


First provisions of health

overhaul beginin 20 11


By RICARDO ALONSO-
ZALDIVAR -
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - The
first stage of President
Barack Obama's health
care overhaul is expected
to provide coverage to
about 1 million uninsured
Americans by next year,
according to government
estimates.
That's a small share of the
uiinsured, but in a shaky
economy, experts say it's
notable.
Many others - more
than 100 million people
- are getting new benefits
that improve their existing
coverage.
Overall costs appear mod-
est at this point, split among
taxpayers, employers and
individuals who' directly
benefit, although the big-
gest part of the health care
expansion is still four years
away.
S'For weeks, the White
House has been touting
the new law's initial benefit
changes, even as Obama
dares Republicans to make
good on their threat to
repeal his signature social
policy achievement Now, a
clearer picture is starting to
emerge from the patchwork
of press releases.
In 2014, government
tax credits will help unin-
sured workers and their
families pay premiums, and
Medicaid will take in many
more low-income people.
Eventually, more than 30
million will gain coverage,
sharply reducing the num-
ber of uninsured and put-
ting the nation on a path to
coverage for all citizens and
legal immigrants.
Political salesmanship
and an attempt to address


some glaring health insur-
ance problems'are key ele-
ments of the strategy to
explain the initial changes
resulting from the law. After
battling for a year to pass
the legislation, Democrats
desperately wanted to have
tangible accomplishments
to point to in high-stakes
congressional elections this
fall. But they also have to
deflect lingering questions,
often stirred up by opposi-
tion candidates, and doubts
about the effectiveness of
the overhaul and its costs.'
"We've seen increasing
numbers of people losing
their health insurance, par-
ticularly in this recession,"
said Sara Collins, vice presi-
dent of the Commonwealth
\Fund, a New York-based
health research' clearing-
house. "Providing this early
relief will help people who
are particularly affected
by the downturn." Collins
reviewed coverage esti-
mates in federal regulations
for The Associated Press.
Among the beneficiaries
will be many people locked
out of insurance because of
medical problems.
The Raether family .of
suburban Milwaukee will
gain from two of the chang-
es: Elimination of lifetime
coverage limits and a ban
on insurers turning away
children in poor health.
Four-year-old daughter
Mira, who was born pre-
maturely and has kidney
problems, exhausted the
lifetime limit on her par-
ents' policy earlier this year.
Mira now has -temporary
Medicare coverage because'
of a kidney, transplant, but
her parents were worried
about what would happen
when they have to get her
back on private insurance.


"A huge weight has been
lifted,"-said. Sheryl Raether, '
the mother. "She has ongo-
ing health care .needs, and I'
was afraid she'd hit another
lifetime limit." Medicare
not only covers seniors, but
people of any age with per-
manent kidney failure.
The major early coverage
benefits include:
* Allowing young adults
to stay on their parents' cov-
erage until they turn 26. In
2011, an estimated 650,000
young people who would
otherwise have been unin-
sured will gain coverage.
Another 600,000 will benefit
by switching from individu-
ally purchased policies to
less costly, more compre-
hensive employer plans.
The number with coverage
will grow in 2012 and 2013.
N A health plan for unin-
sured people with pre-exist-
ing health conditions. From
200,000 to 400,000 could
benefit in 2011, accord-
ing to the Congressional
Budget Office. The gov-
ernment may limit enroll-
ment if $5 billion allocated
through 2013 starts to run
out, as projected. Beginning
in 2014, insurers will be
required to accept all appli-
cants, regardless of medical
history, .
* Ending lifetime limits
on coverage, and restrict-
ing annual limits. As many
as 20,400 people a year hit
lifetime limits, as did Mira
Raether. Many more - an
estimated 102 million - are
in plans that impose such
limits and will no longer be
able to do so.
* Requiring insurers to
cover children with medi-'
cal problems. An estimat-
ed 51,000 uninsured chil-
dren are 'expected to gain
coverage.


Senators say Steele is on

hot seat as GOP chairman


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Sens.
John McCain and Lindsey
Graham spoke from the
war zone Sunday to con-
demn GOP chairman
Michael Steele's comment
that Afghanistan was a "war
of Obama's choosing."
Neither GOP lawmaker,
however, was outraged
enough to demand Steele's
resignation, as some other
Republican have done. Both
said from Kabul it was up to
Steele to decide whether he
could continue to lead the
party.
Steele's remarks, a politi-
cal gift to Democrats in a
congressional election year,
were captured Thursday
on 'camera, during a
Connecticut fundraiser
that was closed to the news
media, and posted online.
The comments would make
it difficult for Republican
candidates to have Steele
campaign for them.


"I think those statements
are wildly inaccurate and
there's no excuse for them,"
McCain. said,' adding that
Steele sent
the Arizona,
senator
an e-mail
saying the
remarks
"were mis-
construed."
Steele "I believe
we have to win here. I believe
in freedom. But the fact is
that I think that Mr. Steele
is going to have to assess as
to whether he can still lead
the Republican Party as
chairman of the Republican
National Committee and
make an appropriate deci-
sion," McCain told ABC's
"This Week."
Graham (R-S.C.) described
himself as "dismayed, angry
and upset It was an unin-
formed, unnecessary,
unwise, untimely comment"
He told CBS' "Face the
Nation" that "this is not


President Obama's war.
This is American's war. We
need to stand behind the
president."
Asked whether Steele
should quit, Graham said,
"It's up to him to see if
he can lead the Republican
Party. It couldn't have come
at a worst time."
At the fundraiser, Steele
said, "This was a war of
Obama's choosing. This is
not something the United
States has actively prose-
cuted or wanted to engage
in.
"If he's such a stu-
dent of history, has he
not understood that, you
know, that's the one thing
you don't do is engage in
a land war in Afghanistan?
All right? Because every-
one who's tried, over a
thousand years of his-
tory, has failed," Steele
said. "And there are rea-
sons for that. There are
other ways to engage in
Afghanistan."


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Square Dancing at Teen
Town tonight
The Dixie Dancers Open
House is at 6:30 p.m. today
at Teen Town Community
Center. Both square and
round dancing is done. Bring
a partner and join the fun.
Call (386) 754-1478.

Summer Tennis Camp
registration begins
. The Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department is
hosting summer tenriis camp
for children. Classes start
July 12-22 and will be from
9 to 11 a.m. Monday through
Thursday at the Young's Park
tennis courts. Classes will
run for four weeks and cost
$50. Andy Creel, Columbia
High School tennis coach,
will -be the instructor. Register
for the camp at the Teen
Town office from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Call Heyward Christie
at (386) 754-3607.

UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are at the
Columbia County Extensiorn
Office from 9 a.m. to noon
today. They answer garden-
ing questions and conduct-
soil pH tests free of charge.
Call (386) 752-5384, or stop
at the UF/IFAS Extension
-Office at the Columbia
.County fairgrounds for more
information.

Lake City Lions to meet
The Lake City Lions
meet at 7 p.m. today, at the
Guangdong restaurant, in
the Lake City-Mall. Call Truett
George at (386) 497-2050 or
Marshall Barnard at (386)
497-3536 for more information.

Wednesday
Friendship Luncheon
The July Friendship ...
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomer's will be at
11:30 a.m. Wednesday at


Thousands celebrate independence at fireworks display
A firework explodes on Sunday over Lake DeSoto in downtown Lake City.


Conestoga's Restaurant,
which is located at 14920
Main Street in Alachua. All
members, friends, and new-
comers to the community are
welcome. Call (386) 935-1548.

Rotary Club of Lake City
Downtown to meet
The Rotary Club of Lake
City Downtown meets at
7:15 a.m. each Wednesday,
in the Lifestyle Enrichment.
Center, 628 SE Allison Court.
Call (386) 755-7969 for more
information.

Moose Lodge Bingo is
open for everyone
Bingo games at the Moose


Lodge, 624 NE Williams, are
open to everyone. Games
are at 3 p.m., 6:45 and
7 p.m. on every Wednesday
and Friday. There is free ice
tea and coffee. Food is avail-
able for purchase. Call (386)
755-3730.

Thursday
Park to host leather
working workshop
The Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park will
host a leather working work-
shop for children at 10 a.m..
Thursday in the Craft Square
Area. The workshops are for
children 7 and up. Register
early, and a parent or guard-


ian must be present with all
students during workshop
activities. Call (386) ,
397-1920 or visit wwwste-
phenfosterCSO. org.

Friday
Web of Life
The Columbia County
Public Library presents
Sam Cole: Web of Life at
11 a.m. Friday at Fort White
Community Center.'

Car donations being
accepted
The Boys and Girls Clubs
of Lake City is taking old car
donations. People donat-


ing will not only get.rid of
unwanted cars, but will be
contributing to the clubs and
will be able to take a dona-
tion for income tax purposes.
Call 800-246-0493.

Volunteers Needed
The Lighthouse Gift Shop
at Lake City Medical Center
is looking for volunteers.
Various shifts and days are
available. Applications are
available at the hospital front
desk or in the gift shop.. For
more information call (386)
719-9000 or (386) 719-9008.

Kindergarten
Orientation
Registration for kin-


dergarten is now taking
place and children can be
registered at the school
which they are zoned for.
School zoning information is
available from any school.
Items needed to register
are: the child's birth certifi-
cate, immunization record,
and a record of physical
examination that has been �
completed within a year
before school begins. The
criiid social security card
is also needed if available,
but is not required. Each
elementary school is open
7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Thursday.

Saturday
Local AARP to meet
Lake City Chapter AARP
will meet 11 a.m. Saturday
at the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison Court.
Sonny Hartley will entertain
in song. Please bring "Socks
for School Children," the
community project and
food for a covered dish
lunch at noon. Call Elsie,
752-3703.,

Sunday
Meet the Author
Program
The Friends of the
Columbia County Public
Library welcome Befaithful
Coker, author of Etiquette for
.the African American at 2 p.m.
Sunday. Coker is a Lake City
businesswoman and a mother*
of three. Her program about
her book will also include eti-
quette demonstrations.

Coming up

Military and Oversees
Voting
Military and overseas
civilians can contact the
Columbia County Supervisor
of Elections if they will be
traveling or living overseas
during the 2010 election and
would like to. vote absentee.
Call (386) 758-1026 x103 or
send an e-mail to absentee@
votecolumbia.com.


1 ,2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!


If you are interested in being a Sponsor,

Please call Mary at 386-754-0401

TO ENTER:
Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00) to the Lake City
Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056,
or email information & photo to ads@lakecityreporter.com subject:
Baby Contest

All pictures will be published along with the winners in
the Lake City Reporter's July 25, 201.0 edition. So show off
your child, grandchild, godchild, niece or nephew.


DEADLINE.

, July 16th, 2010
S For More Information Please Call Mary at 754-0401


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@iokecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Tuesday. lulv 6.2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH TENNIS
Camps offered
in Lake City
The Lake City
Parks and Recreation
Department has a
Summer Tennis Camp
planned for July 12-22 at
Youngs Park. Andy Creel
is the instructor.
The camp is
9-11 a.m. Monday
through Thursday of
both weeks at a cost of
$50. Registration is
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
weekdays at Teen Town.
For information, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
Johnny Young is
offering a series of Junior
Tennis Camps at The
Country Club at Lake
City. The next camp is
planned for July 13-16.
The camps are
8:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesday
through Friday. Cost is
$65 for club members
and $75 for
non-members, and
includes drinks and
snacks.
Registration and
information is available
at The Country Club at
Lake City and Brian's
Sports. Other camps are
scheduled for July'27-30
and Aug. 10-13.
For details, call Young
at 752-0721.


Association sets
cheer clinic .
The Columbia Cheer
Association is sponsoring
a cheer clinic for girls
ages 4-12 from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Saturday at
the Richardson Middle
School gym. Cost is
$10. Columbia High and
Richardson cheerleaders
will teach cheers.
For details, call Wilda
Drawdy at 292-4668.
DANCE
Fundraiser for
Angels team
The Angels Dance
Team has a yard sale
planned for 8 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday at the
Journey Fellowship
Church on Duval Street.
Proceeds will help the ,
girls cover uniform and'
camp expenses.
For details, call coach
Whitney Parks at
292-9048.

ALL-STARS
Lake City 10U
fundraiser set
Lake City Babe Ruth
Baseball's 10-under
All-Stars have a
breakfast fundraiser
planned at Kazbor's
Grille in Lake City from
7-10 a.m. Saturday.
Donations will be
accepted to help with the
team's trip to the state
tournament
For details, call Shayne
Edge at 365-0221 or Ryan
Tuten at 984-6304.
TRACK
Oak Hall camp
on July 19-23
A track camp for ages
10 and older is 8:30 a.m.
to noon
July 19-23 at Oak Hall
School in Gainesville.
The camp will end with a
* track meet. Cost is $195
per camper.
For 'details, contact
Dusty Smith at Dusty@
halfmiletiming.cornm.


* From staff reports


Tennis


anyone?


COURTESY PHOTO
Spencer Lofton, White Springs' summer youth enrichment program director (back center, from left); Mayor Helen Miller and head teaching 'Pro Tom ioore
stand with the age 5-7 Gators tennis team.

White Springs receives USTA-Florida Grant to start program


By RICK VACH
Special to the Reporter
WHITE SPRINGS - A
two-stoplight town and a
cement slab in north Florida
will start one first-time
tennis program this sum-
mer, thanks to community
donations and a grant from
the United States Tennis
Association-Florida.
White Springs received
a USTA Florida "Share
the Love" grant in June,
comprised of QuickStart
Tennis equipment to begin
a summer program for area


children. Spencer Lofton,
White Springs' summer
youth enrichment program
director, said he expects
program participants to
top out at approximately
75 children - roughly 10
percent of the town's total
population of 760.
Local teaching pro Tom
Moore will instruct the
juniors, many of whom are
trying tennis for the first
time, and has secured a local
company to donate asphalt
to re-pave an existing slab
of concrete to create a ten-
nis court and mini-courts


for QuickStart Tennis.
"Our new mayor, Helen
Miller, received a grant for
the H.O.PE. (Helping Our
People Excel) Summer
Enrichment Program, and I
volunteered to teach tennis
if we were able to get a grant
for the equipment," said
Moore, outlining the chal-
lenges of the small town.
"White Springs is a town
that is 1.2 square miles in
area, bordered on two sides
by the Suwannee River, with
two blinking' lights and a.
per capital income of around
$12,000."


Miller was. elected the
first-ever woman mayor ear-
lier this year, coincidentally
spurred on to run for office
by a home break-in that
eventually led to ... a tennis
program.
'The Summer Youth
Enrichment Program was
founded by the mayor after
her house was robbed,"
Lofton said. "After an inves-
tigation into the robbery,
she found out there were
little after-school activities
in White Springs to ,keep
children occupied and
out of trouble. She went


down to the courthouse
and checked through all
the proceedings and she
found out that there was
really nothing for the chil-
dren to do after school.
There was nothing to do
on the weekend and there
were certainly no summer
programs. She wanted to
change all that so she ran
for city council and she got
elected mayor. Along with
the H.O.P.E. Committee
she supports all sorts of
programs, such as the
GRANT continued on 3B


Rafa, Serena pull away from the rest


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England
It was the middle Sunday at
Wimbledon, the tournament's
traditional day off, and the best
players in men's tennis were
scattered around the All England
Club's practice courts.
Rafael Nadal was there, going
through a relatively light training
session. To his right stood Roger
Federer, hitting on the next court
over. To Nadal's left was Andy
Roddick, also on an adjacent court.
Andy Murray was out there, too,
along with Novak Djokovic and
Robin Soderling.
All were in close quarters that
'afternoon.
A week later, it's clear that the
gap between 2010 Wimbledon
champion Nadal and the rest
- including Federer - is quite
pronounced.
"His backhand's good. His
serve's good. His forehand's good.
His movement is good. He does
everything really, really well,"
Murray said after being picked
apart by Nadal in a straight-set
semifinal.
And Murray went on to add this:
"He's one of the greatest players
ever."
For years, Federer was No. 1,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spain's Rafael Nadal poses with
his trophy after winning the men's ,
singles final at the All England Lawn
Tennis Championships at Wimbledon
on Sunday.
Nadal was No. 2, and no one else
was even close. They combined
to win 17 of 18 Grand Slam titles
in one stretch. But it appears to
be a fading rivalry, because their
last match against each other at
a major tournament was 1/2 years
ago.
Indeed, right now, Nadal is
alone at the top, much the way
the woman who is No. 1 and won
Wimbledon, Serena Williams, has


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Serena Williams of the United States
holds her trophy after winning the
women's singles final at the All
England Lawn Tennis Championships
at Wimbledon on Saturday.
distanced herself from the pack -
in the rankings and on the court.
Williams won all 14 sets she
played at the All England Club this
year and set a tournament record
with 89 aces. She's won five of
the last eight Grand Slam titles.
The only other woman who's even
reached two major finals in that
span is Dinara Safina. She lost
both, then made a first-round exit
at the French Open in May and


withdrew from Wimbledon with a
back injury.
Williams' older sister Venus is
now 30, hasn't won a Grand Slam
tournament in two years, hasn't
even made it past the quarterfinals
at the last four majors and dropped
to No. 4 in Monday's rankings.
"It's not just about how many
Slams you win or how many
tournaments you win - it's just
your game overall. And (Serena's)
definitely got all the goods,"
18-time major champion Martina
Navratilova said. "It would have
been fun to play her, but at the
same time, I'm glad that I didn't
have to."
Nadal, meanwhile, is 31-1 with
five titles since mid-April. Not only
has he regained the top ranking,
but as of Monday, Federer slipped
to No. 3 for the first time since
November 2003.
Plus, after reaching a record 23
consecutive Grand Slam
semifinals, 16-time major cham-
pion Federer has lost in the
quarterfinals at two majors in a
row.
Nadal now stands halfway to
Federer's record total. By
managing the tricky transition ,
from clay to grass and following
up his fifth championship at the
TENNIS continued on 3B


--~ - III I I












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS


TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
8:30 a.m.
VERSUS - Tour de France, stage 3,
Wanze, Belgium to Arenberg Porte du
Hainaut, France
SOCCER
2 p.m.
ESPN - FIFA, World Cup, semifinal,
Uruguay vs. Netherlands, at' Cape Town,
South Africa
WNBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 - Connecticut' at San
Antonio
10 p.m.
ESPN2 - Phoenix at Los Angeles

SOCCER

World Cup

SEMIFINALS
Today
Uruguay vs. Netherlands, 2:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Germany vs, Spain, 2:30 p.m.
THIRD PLACE
Saturday
Semifinal losers, 2:30 p.m.
CHAMPIONSHIP
Sunday
Semifinal winners, 2:30 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 50 31 .617 -
Boston 49 33 .598 I'A
Tampa Bay 48"' 33 .593 2
Toronto 41 42 .494 10
Baltimore 25 57 .305 25'h
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 44 37 .543 -
Minnesota 44 38 .537 'A
Chicago 42 38' .525 - I'k
Kansas City 36 46 .439 8'h
Cleveland 32 49 .395 12
West Division
W L" Pct GB
Texas 48 33 .593 -
Los Angeles 46 38 .548 3'A
Oakland 41 42 .494 8
Seattle 34 47 .420 14
Sunday's Games
Oakland 3, Cleveland'
Seattle 8, Detroit-1 .
N.Y.Yankees 7,Toronto 6, 10 innings
Baltimore 6, Boston 1
Tampa Bay 7, Minnesota 4
Chicago White Sox 5,Texas 3
L.A.Angels I 1, Kansas City 0
S . Monday's Games
� Detroit 2,-Baltimore 9 -
L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox (n)
Boston at Tamrpa Bay (ri)
Cleveland atTexas (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Oakland (n)
Kansas City at Seattle (n)
Today's Gambes
Baltimore (Arrieta 2-2) at Detroit
(Galarraga 3-2), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 9-6) at Toronto
(Litsch 0-3), 7:07 p.m. .
Boston (Undecided) at Tampa Bay
(Niemann 6-2),7:10 p.m. .
Cleveland (Masterson 3-7) at Texas
(C.Wilson 6-4), 8:05 p.m.
LA.Angels (Jer.Weaver 8-3) at Chicago
White Sox (Peavy 7-6), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 10-3) at
Oakland (Cahill 8-2),.10:05 p.m. ,
Kansas City (Greinke 4-8) at Seattle
(Bedard 0-0), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Baltimore at Detroit; 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
LA. Angels at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB


Atlanta 48 34
New York 46 36
Philadelphia 42 38
Florida 38 43
Washington 36 47
Central Division
W L
Cincinnati 47 36
St. Louis \ 45 37
Milwaukee 37 45
Chicago 35 47
Houston 32 51
Pittsburgh 30 52
-West Division
W L
San Diego 49 33
Los Angeles 45 36
Colorado 44 38
San Francisco 41 40
Arizona 32 50
Sunday's Games
N.Y. 'Mets 9,Washington 5
Pittsburgh 8, Philadelphia 5
St. Louis 7. Milwaukee I


Pct GB
.566 -
.549 I'h
.451 9'
.427 I1'
.386 15
.366 16'

Pct GB
.598 -
.556 3%'
.537 " 5
.506 7'
.390 17


Cincinnati 14, Chicago Cubs 3
Colorado 4, San Francisco 3, 15
innings
San Diego 3, Houston 2
LA. Dodgers 3,Arizona I
Florida 3,Atlanta 2
Monday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Arizona (n)
San Francisco at Milwaukee (n)
Atlanta at Philadelphia (n)
Cincinnati at N.Y. Mets (n)
Florida at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta (Jurriens 1-3) at Philadelphia
(Hamels 6-7), 7:05 p.m.
San Diego (Richard 6-4) atWashington
(L.Hernandez 6-4), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Tr.Wood 0-0) at N.Y. Mets
(J.Santana 5-5), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (B.Lincoln 1-2) at Houston
(W.Rodriguez 5-10), 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 0-2) at
Milwaukee (Wolf 6-7), 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Hawksworth 2-5) at
Colorado (Francis 2-3), 8:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Silva 8-2) at Arizona
(Enrlght 1-0), 9:40 p.m.


Florida (Volstad 4-7) at L.A. Dodgers
(Padilla 2-2), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
San Diego atWashington, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at N.Y. Mets,7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Florida at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

TENNIS

Wimbledon champions

Men's Singles - Rafael Nadal (2),
Spain
Women's Singles - Serena Williams
(I), United States
Men's Doubles - Jurgen Melzer,
Austria, and Philipp Petzschner.,Austria
Women's Doubles - Vania King,
United States, and Yaroslava Shvedova,
Kazakhstan-
Mixed Doubles - Leander Paes, India,
and Cara Black (2), Zimbabwe
Gentlemen's Invitational Doubles
Donald Johnson and Jared Palmer,
United States
Senior Gentlemen's Invitational
Doubles - Pat Cash and Mark
Woodforde,Australia
Ladies' Invitational Doubles -
Martina Navratilova, United States, and
Jana Novotna, Czech Republic
Boys' Singles - Marton Fucsovics
(I 3),lHungary
Girls' Singles - Kristyna Pliskova (9),
Czech Republic
Boys' Doubles - Liam Broady and
Tom Farquharson, Britain
Girls' Doubles - Timea Babos,
Hungary, and Sloane Stephens (4), United
States
Men's Wheelchair Doubles - Robin
Ammerlaan, Netherlands, and Stefan
Olsson, Sweden
Women's Wheelchair Doubles -
Esther Vergger and Sharon Walraven (I),
Netherlands

AUTO RACING

Coke Zero 400

At Daytbna International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Saturday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (I) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 166
laps, 122.8 rating, 195 points, $344,751.
2. (20) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 166, 92.4,
170, $239,440.
3. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 166,
107.1, 170, $212,176.
4. (13) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
166,75.1, 160,$144,100.
5. (8) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 166,
11 1.4, 160,$159,340.
6. (12) Carl Edwards, Ford, 166, 98.8;
150, $153,673.
- 7. (6) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 166, 117:3,
151,$161,123.
8. (24) Reed Sorenson,Toyoia, 16'6,684,
142, $145,573.
9. (35) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet. 166,67.4,
138,$110.925.'
10. (27) Scott Speed,Toyota. 166,65.6,
134, $121,573.
I I.(19) David Reutimann,Toyota, 166,
95.1, 130, $132,556.
12. (32) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 166.
67.1, 132,$120,398.
13. (39) Steve Park, Chevrolet, 166,
58:6, 129, $100,400.
14. (33) Kevin Conway, Ford, 166,45.5,
121,$101,500.
15. (7) Matt Kenseth. Ford, 166, 71.2,
118,$143,251.
16. (37) Bobby. Labonte, Chevrolet,
166,60, 115, $97,275.
17. (15) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 166,
71.3, 117, $104,075.
18. (23) Paul Menard, Ford, 165, 56.3,
109, $103,250.
19. (41) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, 164, 45.9,
106.
20, (10) Greg Biffle, Ford, 163, 70.3,
108, $103,750.
21. (30) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
accident, 159, 102.3, 105, $100,800.
22. (29) Elliott Sadler, Ford, accident,
159,83.8, 102, $100,075.
23. <34) Robert Richardson Jr., Ford,
159,45.1,94,$106,823.
24. (4) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, 15, 69,
96, $107,475.
25. (9) Tony. Stewart, Chevrolet, 158,
59.4,93, $127,448.
26. (14) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
accident, 148, 67.8, 85, $124,004.
27.(22)Juari Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
accident, 148,95.7,87, $124,13 I.
28. (11) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
accident. 148,50.1,84, $ 105,100.
29. (16) Joey Logano, Toyota, accident,
148,65,76, $123,615.
30. (26)" Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
accident, 147, 92.7,78, $ 112,460.
31. (2) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I EUQUE I


E
LUBBEA




ROPOLY,


/accident, 147,90.1, 75, $139,578.
32. (28) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
accident, 147. 50.8, 67, $105,473.
33. (31) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
accident, 147,53.9, 64, $92,275.
34. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, accident.
145, 34.7, 61, $103,860.
35. '(18) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 141,
73.9, 58, $83,975.
36. (21) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 136,47,
55,$121,176.
37. (36) David Stremme, Ford,
accident, 135, 38.5, 57, $91,650.
38. (25) David Ragan, Ford, accident,
I 16,61.3,49, $91,500.
39. (17) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
accident, 116,71.9,46, $121,004.
40. (3) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident,
103,81.9,48, $131,281.
41. (42) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
electrical, 38, 30.2,40, $83,050.
42. (40) Max Papis,Toyota, vibration, 6,
25.4,37, $81,950;
S 43. (43) Dave Blaney, Toyota,
transmission, 4, 24.8, 34, $83,313.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
135.719 mph.
Time of Race: 3 -hours, 3 minutes, 18
seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.092 seconds.
Caution Flags: 9 for 37 laps.
Lead Changes: 4.7 among 18 drivers.
Top 12 in Points: 1. K.Harvick, 2,684;
2. J.Gordon, 2,472; 3. J.Johnson, 2,459;
4. Ku.Busch, 2,439; 5. D.Hamlin, 2,400;
6. Ky.Busch, 2,376; 7., M.Kenseth, 2,322;
8. J.Burton, 2,319; 9. T.Stewart, 2,251;
10. G.Biffle, 2,234; II. D.Earnhardt Jr.,
2,177; 12. C.Edwards, 2;170.

CYCLING


Tour de France

Monday
Second Stage
(A 124.9-mile hilly leg from
Brussels to Spa)
1. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Quick
Step, 4 hours, 40 minutes, 48 seconds.
2. Maxime Bouet, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, 3 minutes, 56 seconds behind.
3. Fabian Wegmann, Germany, Team
Milram, same time.
4. Robbie McEwen, Australia, Katusha,
same time.
5. Christian Knees, Germany, Team
Milram, same time.
Overall Standings
(After second stage)
I. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Quick
Step, 10 hours, I minute, 25 seconds.
2. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland,Team
Saxo Bank, 2 minutes, 57 seconds behind.
3.Tony Martin, Germany, Team HTC-
Columbia, 3:07.
4. David Millar, Britain, Garmin-
Transitions, 3:17.
.5. Lance Armstrong, United States,
Team RadioShack, 3:19.

July 3 - Prolog, Rotterdam,
Netherlands, 8.9 kilometers (5.5
miles) (Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland;
Cancellara)
July 4-Stage I, Rotterdam-Brussels,
plain, Belgium, 223.5 (138.9) (Alessandro
Petacchi, Italy; Cancellara)
July 5 - Stage 2, Brussels-Spa,
Belgium, hilly, 201 (124.9) (Sylvain
'Chavanel, France; Chavanel)
Today - Stage 3, Wanze, Belgium-
Arenberg Porte du Hainaut, France, plain,
213 (132.4)
July 7 - Stage 4, Cambrai-Reims,
. plain, 153.5 (95.4)
July 8 - Stage 5, Epernay-Montargis,
plain, 187.5 (116.5)
July. 9 - Stage 6, Montargis-
Gueugnon, plain, 227.5 (141.4)
July 10 - Stage 7, Tournus-Station.
des Rousses, medium mountain, 165.5
(102.8)
July II - Stage 8, Station des
Rousses-Morzine Avoriaz, high moun-
tain, 189 (117.4)
July 12 - Rest day in Morzine
Avoriaz
July 13 - Stage 9, Morzine-Avoriaz-
Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, high mountain,
204.5 (127.1)
July 14 -Stage 10, Chambery-Gap,
medium mountain, 179 (111.2)
July 15 - Stage II,Sisteron-Bourg-
les-Valence, plain, 184.5 (114.6)
July 16 - Stage 12, Bourg-de-Peage--
Mende, hilly, 210.5 (130.8)
July 17 - Stage 13, Rodez-Revel,
plain, 196 (121.8)
July 18 - Stage 14, Revel-Ax-3
Domalnes, high mountain, 184.5 (114.6)
July 19 - Stage IS, Pamiers-Bagnes-
de-Luchon, high mountain, 187 (116.2)
July 20 - Stage 16, Bagneres-de-
Luchon-Pau, high mountain, 199.5
(124.0)
July 21 - Rest day in Pau
July 22 - Stage 1.7IT, Pau-Col du
Tourmalet, high mountain, 174 (108.1)
July 23 - Stage 18, Salies-de-Bearn--
Bordeaux, plain, 198 (123.0)

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


'
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: THE "L" OF
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PUDGY KETCH PRAYER NINETY
I Answer: Important to do in trying times -
KEEP TRYING


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Minnesota Twins' Joe Mauer received the most votes in fan balloting for the All-Star teams.



Mauer, Pujols top fan voting


By HOWIE RUMBERG .
Associated Press

NEW YORK - With a
bevy of aces to choose from
for his National League
All-Star staff, manager
Charlie Manuel thought
there was no reason' to
rush rookie sensation
Stephen Strasburg into the
Midsummer Classic.
'I say let him.pitch and,
let .-him get his feet on
the ground in the. major
leagues and kind of let him
earn his way," Manuel said
Sunday after Major League
Baseball announced the
rosters for the July 13 All-
Star game in Anaheim,
Calif.
. AL MVP catcher Joe
Mauer was the fan's favor-
ite with 5,372,606 votes,
the third-highest total ever.
Albert Pujols earned the
most votes in the National
League.
The Mets' David Wright
surged past the Phillies'
Placido Polanco in the
final weeks to win the NL
starting third baseman spot.
Wright had a super June,
hitting .404 and driving in
29 runs while Polanco is on
the disabled list because of
a sore elbow.
Each squad still has one
more spot on their 34-man
rosters. Fans will make the
decision, choosing from a
list of five candidates in
each league in an Internet
runoff.
The World Series cham-
pion New York Yankees
and Boston Red Sox have


ACROSS

1 Discern.
5 Blank space
8 Hawk
12 Greek-salad
cheese
13 Bartender's
rocks
14 Auction site
15 Lake rentals
17 Yearn
18 RSformexpert
19 Raised the lid
21 Cranny
24 Grant and
Irving
25 I, to Wolfgang
26 Comfort
30 - & the Gang
32 Groovy
33 Turndowns
37 "Orinoco Flow"
singer
38 - been had!
39 Gaius' garb
40 Heat conduc-
tors
43 Sharp turn


AL All-Stars

Pitcher
Clay Buchholz, Boston
Trevor Cahill, Oakland
Fausto Carmona, Cleveland
Neftali Feliz,Texas '
Phil Hughes, N.Y.Yankees
Cliff Lee, Seattle
Jon Lester, Boston
David Price,Tampa Bay
Mariano Rivera, N.Y.Yankees
CC Sabathia, N.Y.Yankees
Joakim Soria, Kansas City
Matt Thornton, Chicago White Sox
JoseValverde, Detroit
Catchers
x-John Buck, Toronto
z-Victor Martinez, Boston
s-Joe Mauer, Minnesota
Designated Hitter
s-Vladimir Guerrero,Texas
David Ortiz, Boston
Infielders
Elvis Andrus,Texas
Adrian Beltre, Boston
Miguel Cabrera, Detroit
s-Robinson Cano, N.Y.Yankees
s-Derek Jeter, N.Y.Yankees
y-lan Kinsler, Texas
s-Evan LongoriaTampa Bay
s-Justin Morneau, Minnesota
z-Dustin Pedroia, Boston
Alex Rodriguez, N.Y.Yankees
TyWigginton, Baltimore
Outfielders
Jose Bautista,Toronto
s-Carl Crawford,Tampa Bay
s-Josh Hamilton,Texas
Torii Hunter, L.A.Angels
s-lchiro Suzuki, Seattle
Vernon Wells.Toronto
Final Man
Paul Konerko, Chicago White Sox
Nick Swisher, N.Y.Yankees
Delmon Young, Minnesota
Michael Young, Texas
Kevin Youkilis, Boston
s-starter; x-replaces Victor Martinez;
y-replaces Dustin Pedroia; z-injured, will
not play

a leading six All-Stars each,
but Boston second base-
man Dustin Pedroia and.
catcher Victor Martinez
are out with injuries.
Atlanta's 20-year-old


44 Rock-concert
need
46 Napped leather
48 Noisy gulps
50 PIN prompter
51 Back from
work
52 Crooked
57 - -aching
back!
58 Visa and pass-
port
59 - lang syne
60 Techniques
61 Poor grade
62 Clingy fabric

DOWN

1 Fast-food
chain
2 "Paleo-" oppo-
site
3 Baseball's Mel

4 Weather alert
5 Billion, in com-
bos
6 Top-notch pilot


NL All-Stars

Pitchers
Jonathan Broxton, L.A. Dodgers
Matt Capps,Washington
Chris Carpenter, St. Louis
Yovani Gallardo, Milwaukee
Roy Halladay, Philadelphia
Tim Hudson, Atlanta
Ubaldo Jimenez, Colorado
Josh Johnson, Florida
Tim Lincecum, San Francisco
Evan Meek, Pittsburgh
Arthur Rhodes, Cincinnati
Adam Wainwright, St. Louis
Brian Wilson, San Francisco
Catchers
Brian McCann,Atlanta
s-Yadier Molina, St. Louis
Infielders
Adrian Gonzalez, San Diego
Ryan Howard, Philadelphia
Omar Infante, Atlanta
x-Brandon Phillips: Cincinnati
s-Martin PradoAtlanta
s-Albert Pujols, St. Louis
s-Hanley Ramirez,'Florida
y-Jose Reyes, N.Y. Mets
Scott Rolen, Cincinnati
z-Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado
z-Chase Utley, Philadelphia
s-David Wright, N.Y. Mets
Outfielders
Michael Bourn, Houston
s-Ryan Braun, Milwaukee
Marion Byrd, Chicago Cubs
s-Andre Ethier, L.A. Dodgers
Corey Hart, Milwaukee
s-Jayson Heyward,Atlanta
Matt Holliday, St. Louis
Chris Young,Arizona
Final Man
(one added based on fan voting)
Heath Bell, San Diego
Carlos Gonzalez, Colorado
Joey Votto, Cincinnati
Billy Wagner, Atlanta
Ryan Zimmerman,Washington
s-starter; xsreplaces Chase Utley;
y-replaces Troy Tulowitzki; z-injured, will
not play

Justin Heyward, on the
15-day disabled list with a
deep bone bruise in his left
thumb, said he might play,
using the appearance like a
rehab start.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


ABCIS BEDCN

FRULEU^ LAIT OLD

SWOR E THWACK
NUA 1 AO0
IDOWID Y MERE

NEE FOOTSTEPR
so B E S HERLI
SO A H PL
RIAIDIR




WRAP LAT



IMP KANGAROOS
LEE NYA EMIT
END SEE RELY


7 Pancho Villa's
coin
8 Forceful
9 Dark wood
10 Ponytail sites
11 Changed color


16 Tarzan's pals
20 Boot liner
21 Winged
Victory
22 Mouse target?
23 Bok -
27 Not the half -

28 Volcanic emis-
sion
29 "Green
Mansions"
hero
31 Eels
34 Flow slowly
35 Victorian oath
36 Kitchen herb
41 Mind-reading
42 Former JFK
arrivals
44 Honolulu hello
45 Karloff role
47 Alaskan craft
48 Movie
49 Went down
50 Cathedral part
53 Sonnet kin
54 Drab color
55 New Haven
student
56 Insect killer


� 2010 by UFS, Inc.


N


IWant more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


�I �


1
1











Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Several cars crash and burn during a wreck in the final laps of the Coke Zero 400 auto race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach early Sunday morning.



Harvick survives wild Daytona race
' * ~~~~.1c ' ., *!' .U 1,d.


By MARK LONG.
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH - The
cracked, deteriorating and
patched track held up better than
most of the cars and some of the
competitors.
A wild night race at Daytona
International Speedway - the
last one on the track's 32-year-
old surface -- ended with Kevin
Harvick taking the checkered'
flag, teammate Clint Bowyer spin-
ning through the infield grass and
several angry drivers searching
for answers.
Just another restrictor-plate
race? Maybe. But this one also
might be remembered as one
of the more chaotic events at
NASCAR's most famous track.
"Every time I looked up, there
was a crash going on," second-.
place finisher Kasey Kahne said.
It ( sure seemed that way,
especially over the final 45 laps
Saturday night.
Despite a record 18 leaders and
47 lead changes, the real excite-
ment resulted from six multi-car


crashes in the second half of the
race that essentially swiped out
half the field. The biggest of them.
all, a 20-car melee that included
four-time defending series cham-
pion Jimmie Johnson, came with'
12 laps to go and halted action for
20 minutes.,
There was even more. com-
motion after the race. With 'fire-
works exploding high above the
track and smoke lingering frbm
Harvick's celebratory burnout,
Carl Edwards and Kurt Busch
had a heated exchange.,
Edwards felt Busch roughed
him up on the final lap.i Busch's
car hit the wall just past the finish
line following the contact.
"He ended up wrecking him-
self," Edwards said. "I guess it
didn't work out for him. I think
he was frustrated he didn't have
a good'day."
Busch refused to talk to
Edwards after. climbing out of
his car, then reminded every-
one that Edwards was the same
driver who deliberately retaliated
against Busch's teammate, Brad
Keselowski, at Atlanta earlier this


year.
"He completely turned right
after the start/finish line," Busch
said. '"There's convincing evidence
of that. We've seen him turn right
before and wreck a Penske car."
With the last-lap action tak-
ing place in his rearview mirror,
Harvick cruised across the finish
lipe for his second victory of the
season and his first at Daytona
since the 2007 Daytona 500.
"This has been a great place for
us," Harvick said. "Daytona has.
been one of those magical places
for us ever since we started com-
ing here."
Kahne posted his third top-five
finish in the last four races. Jeff
Gordon was third, followed by
Dale Earnhardt Jr., Jeff Burtofh,
Edwards and Busch.
Junior may have benefited
most from all those crumpled
cars.- He ran in the middle of.the
pack all night and even radioed to
crew chief Lance McGrew that,
"It ain't gonna drive good no mat-
ter what." But Earnhardt eluded
the big one with a nifty move low
and avoided a couple more late


wrecks for his fourth consecutive
finish in the top 11. -
This one moved him into 11th
place in the all-important Chase
for the championship.
"We got lucky, real lucky to
get what we got," Earnhardt said.
"I'm proud of the work, the guys
did, but you'd rather be good than
lucky. Anybody wants to trade
you some luck like they all did
tonight, we'll take it."
Others felt the same w.
Reed Sorenson (eighth), Mike
Bliss (ninth), Scott Speed (10th),
Steve Park (13th), Kevin Conway
(14th) and Bobby Labonte (16th)
enjoyed their best finishes of the
season. For Park, it was his first
Cup race in nearly seven years.
"It was a great night, but it was
ugly," Conway conceded.
The race started 90 minutes
late because of rain, and drivers
were cautious early on a slippery
track that had even less grip than
normal because of the showers.
But it didn't take long for things
to liven up.
AJ Allmendinger had a heated
conversation with boss Richard


Petty in the garage following a
wreck.
Kyle Busch, who gave up the
lead early because of a loose
wheel, drove back 'to the front
before turning into Juan Pablo
Montoya and ending his night.
Elliott Sadler blamed Sam
Hornish Jr. for his early exit, say-
ing "I was trying to stay away
from him."
Harvick and his Richard
Childress Racing tean. -ites,
Clint Bowyer and Jeff Burton,
were poised for a sweep before
several late cautions.
A three-car accident moments
before Bowyer took the white flag
set up NASCAR's version of over-
time, and Bowyer and Harvick
had to restart side-by-side for the
final two-lap sprint. Harvick wast-
ed no time taking the-lead, while
Bowyer slid backward.
He ultimately spun off the track
as Harvick took the checkered
flag.
It could be more hairy in
February. The track begins a
revamping project next week that
could create even edgier racing.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Netherlands' Wesley Sneijder (second from left) scores a goal during the World Cup
quarterfinal soccer match between the Netherlands and Brazilat Nelson Mandela Bay
Stadium in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, on Friday.


South American surprise

Uruguay takes on Dutch


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

CAPE, TOWN, South
Africa - The World Cup
turned sour for South
America in the quarter-
finals. Only one team from
the continent advanced -
Uruguay, the least likely of
all to make the final four.
Yet here the Celeste
are, ready to play the
Netherlands tonight for a
spot in the World Cup final.
The last nation to make the
32-team field, needing a
playoff against Costa Rica
to get in, Uruguay is alive
and well in South Africa.
"Uruguay is a. strong
side and we will have to be
very concentrated," Dutch
coach Bert van Marwijk
said. "They are fighters,
survivors."
Indeed. From that two-


game playoff with Costa
Rica to winning their first-,
round group and not allow-
ing a goal, the Uruguayans
have made an impressive'
showing.
They punctuated it .with
wins over South Korea, 2-1
in the second round and
Ghana, 4-2, on penalty kicks
in the quarterfinals.'
Tough as they have been,
the Uruguayans needed the
"hand of Suarez" to stay in
the tournament.
Striker 'Luis Suarez
.blocked a Ghana shot with
his arm at the goal line in
the final seconds of extra
time on Friday night. He
drew a red card and is sus-
pended for the semifinal,
but Asamoah Gyan hit the
crossbar with the ensuing
penalty kick.
Reprieved, Uruguay won
the shootout, and Suarez


was hailed as a hero back
home.
But he's also been
accused by some of cheat-
ing. That annoys coach
Oscar Tabarez. I
I "It's a shame that people
are speculating that," he
said. "It (the handball) was a
natural reaction. The player
didn't know that they were
going to miss the penalty."
The young forward, who
has three goals in the tour-
nament, said it was "compli-
cated" to be ejected from a
World Cup game. "But the
way in which I was sent off
- truth is, it was worth it,"
he said.
Without Suarez, Uruguay
is a long shot to win its third
title and first since 1950.
The Uruguayans are a 10-1
longshot, while Spain is 2-1
and both the Netherlands
and Germany are 9-5.


TENNIS: Eight majors for Nadal
Continued From Page 1B


French Open with his
second at Wimbledon,
Nadal is up to eight major
trophies, including the
2009 Australian Open.
Bjorn Borg was
the French Open and
Wimbledon champion in
1978, 1979 and 1980, but
nobodylelse won both in
the same season for the
next 27 years. Now it's
been done three times in
a row: by Nadal in 2008,
Federer in 2009, and
Nadal again.
"If you want to play well,


(you're) going to find a
way," Nadal said. "So if
you really want to play
well in one surface, and
you are a good player, I
*think in the end, (you're)
going to find a way."
Simple as that, huh?
After easily beating
Tomas Berdych 6-3, 7-5,
6-4 in the Wimbledon
final, Nadal was asked
about chasing Federer's
Grand Slam record.
"Eight more? That's too
complicated ... too hard,"
Nadal said. "I never


imagined I'd have eight'
Grand Slam titles today, at
24 years old."
That's right Nadal is
only 24, and he already
owns the same number
of major championships
as Andre Agassi, Jimmy
Connors and Ivan Lendl
did when they retired -"
and one more than John
McEnroe.
What must be
daunting for Nadal's
contemporaries is that
he keeps getting better
and better.


GRANT: QuickStart is for 10-unders


Continued From Page 1B
Workforce One programs,
Which helps 'find jobs for
teens in the summertime,
so we're also getting those
kids to work with the
smaller kids in the tennis
and the Summer Youth
Enrichment Program."
Moore taught part-
time in Miami before
relocating to White Springs
for its small-town appeal.
He recently .attended a
USTA Florida QuickStart
Tennis workshop in
Gainesville, specially
designed for teaching pros,
parents, and other instruc-
tors working with 10-and-
under children.
QuickStart Tennis is the
USTA-approved format
for teaching children age
10-and-under, featuring
smaller court sizes and
racquet sizes, foam and.
decompressed balls, a sim-
ple scoring system, and net
heights adjusted to ease
kids into the sport.
Moore also teaches
tennis in Lake City.


"The main economic
appeal is eco-tourism, with
the State of FloridaTourism
Center here in town and
two state parks - Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
and Big and Little Shoals
State Park," said Moore,
who has rallied plenty of
help for the tennis program
with local city officials and
staff. "I also have a teach-
ing pro that lives in White
Springs that is willing to
assist in this program."
Now that the ball is roll-
ing in regard to multiple
sports programs for White
Springs children over
the summer, the nearby
Stephen Foster Memorial
Park has donated build-
ings to the summer pro-
gram. Officials are work-
ing on getting a multi-
purpose building autho-
rized for their ultimate goal
- a year-round and after-
school program offering
tennis and other sports.
"Hamilton County is the
poorest per capital income


county in the state of
Florida and the 35th poor-
est in the country, and the
fact they are interested in
offering tennis to the kids
in the community is fantas-
tic," said Andy McFarland,
USTA Florida Associate
Executive Director-Play
Tennis Division. "It will be
really inspiring to see how
tennis is going to change
the culture of the White
Springs community. With
the big-hearted efforts of
people like Tom Moore,
Spencer Lofton and Mayor
Helen Miller, the town of
White Springs is going to
be a tennis community. It
is exciting to play a part in
their tennis future."
The USTA Florida
"Share the Love" campaign
is a $500,000 initiative on
top of the organizations'
regular annual giving to
help fund tennis programs
.and projects throughout
Florida communities dur-
ing challenging economic
times.


�


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


~2~s~~I� i


S~E~Y~"1*










& COMICS TUESDAY, JULY 6,2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
I'VE HAD IT! I'M TOTALLY SWAMPED
WITH MORE WORK THAN I CAN
- POSSIBLY HANDLE IN
ONE DAv11
-'.TAKE IT
SEAS,' S




' ,' . ' ,'
." _______ ovvi~s� ^


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE'


DEAR ABBY


What goes around keeps

coming around in recycling


DEAR ABBY: On May
13, "Diana in Lakewood, Ca-
lif.," asked you how to reuse
or donate little jewelry box-
es. You offered some great
tips, but you should have let
folks know about two terrific
resources for giving away or
recycling odd things.
Freecycle.org is an on-
line network where people
can give away or find.free
stuff in their local neighbor-
hood. It is a great way to re-
cycle items - like the jew-
elry boxes - to a local thrift
store, a crafter or a teacher.
Earth911..com is also an
amazing directory of. local
reuse and recycling options.
I work at a thrift store for
home improvements. (In-
stead of donating clothing or
furniture, some people give
us lumber, kitchen cabinets,'
hardware, etc.)-Most people
don't know that stores like
ours exist. Reusing items
from your neighbors wastes
no energy and builds a sense
,of community. Abby, thanks.
'for touching on this irmpor-
tant topic. - RUTHIE M.
IN EDMONSTON, MD.
DEAR RUTHIE: Many
readers wrote to remind
me that one man's trash is.
another man's treasure, and
we all must do whatever it
takes to keep items out of
landfills. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: I am an
activity director at a small


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
long-term-care facility and
would love to receive those
jewelry boxes. People don't
realize how grateful we are
to provide a home for their
extra greeting cards, craft
supplies, fabric scraps,
wrapping paper, games,
cards - the list goes on and
on. Diana should consider
contacting her local nurs-
ing home activity director
and put those boxes to good
use.
Budgets are tight. With
every cut our state and fed-
eral governments make
to nursing homes, activity
directors are always happy
to give new life to no-lon-
ger-needed items. - THE
ACTIVITY GODDESS,
BUHL, IDAHO
DEAR ABBY: I have an-
other suggestion for Diana
in Lakewood. Quit buying
so much stuff.-
Recycling is only a par-
tial. solution to a wasteful
lifestyle. Millions of tons of
plastic, no matter how many
times it is recycled, end up
in our oceans, where Texas-


sized flotillas of plastic goo
will outlast us all. The key is
to generate less in the first
place.
When considering a
purchase, consider all four
"R's": Reduce, Reuse, Re-
cycle and Repair. In this
case, the option to "Reduce"
should be observed by ei-
ther buying less jewelry, or
asking the vendors to quit
over-packaging the stuff. -
DR. JAMES HAYES-BO-
HANAN, PROFESSOR
OF ENVIRONMENTAL
GEOGRAPHY
DEAR ABBY: Diana
should donate the boxes to;
Goodwill, Salvation Army.
Habitat for Humanity, pre-
schools, Girl Scouts and
Sunday schools - not the
landfill! - ELSIE K., OAK
RIDGE, TENN.
DEAR ABBY: Perfectly
good items should never be
tossed into a landfill. There
is always someone who can,
use whatever it is as long as
it's in good condition (and
sometimes even when it's-'
not). It should be the re-
sponsibility of the consumer
to find that someone. While
it may not be a legal respon-
sibility, it is' the right thing
to do. - ROSIE W. IN.
.DENVER
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Romance is look-
ing good and social engage-
ments will prove beneficial
both professionally and per-
sonally. Talk about your,
plans and you will attract
a lot of interest as well as
suggestions that can make
things easier and speed up
the process. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You have to fin-
ish what you start Don't let
uncertainty slow you down.
Figure out what you need
to do and start the ball roll-
ing. Wandering aimlessly
will cause stress and worry.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Added resppn-
sibilities due to promises
you made will be taxing but,
once completed, you will re-
alize the value in living up
to your word. Don't spend
money because someone \is
trying to get you to buy into
a scheme or a purchase you
don't need. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't rely on a
big talker promising to do
great things for you. If you
don't do the work yourself, it
won't be done to your liking.
You'll find out quickly who
you can count on. **** ,
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Emotions will be difficult to
control. Think outside the
box and you can avoid some


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

,of the personal issues you
aren't prepared to deal with
just yet. An offer geared to-
ward physical enhancement
isn't likely to be as reward-
ing as you expect. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Get'out and mingle,
lend a helping hand or get in-
volved in a project or a learn-
ing or travel experience that
will bring you knowledge,
friendships and a chance to
promote your own ideas and
plans: You can gain respect
from people with something'
to offer for'your future goals.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Not everyone is look-
ing out for your best inter-
ests. Problems at home and
within partnerships can be
expected if you have made
promises you haven't kept
or you keep changing your
mind. A creative approach
to helping others will be re-
quired. -***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Love lessons will
turn into a harsh reality if
you have neglected some-
one who needs your atten-
tion. You may be engrossed
in something you enjoy
doing or a job that has con-
sumed every waking min-
ute but that is no excuse for


letting your personal life fall
' apart. -*
SAGfITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll be
looking for adventure, a
challenge or a love connec-
tion but, once found, you
will realize that nothing is as
you expected it to be. Don't
play games of chance with
your future. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Personal and
financial matters should be
on your mind. Renovations
or a residential move will
help you feel more secure
and comfortable about
your future. Your relation-
ships with friends, family or
your lover will be enhanced
by the choices you make.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Avoid anyone try-
ing to pick a fight with you
or drag you into a personal
matter that doesn't concern
you. Arguing will be a waste
of time but compromise will
help you avoid trouble and
win respect **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Sharing with
new and old acquaintances
will help you get a better
perspective on something
you are trying to develop. A
strong partnership can form
with someone you bring
back into your life. Mend
bad feelings. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: K equals B
"TS ISSM GN USRSRKSU OBUNVV
JSISUOGANIV GPOG GPSUS AV OV
RYBP GN DSOUI OV GPSUS AV GN
G SO B P . " - J D N UAO VG SA I S R
PREVIOUS 'SOLUTION: "Idealists foolish enough to throw caution to the winds
have advanced mankind and have enriched the world." - Emma Goldman

(c) 2010 by NEA, inc. 7-6


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
I'M LOOKING FoRlJRRD ARS WELL AS BEING-
o5 "TtlS ,VAC-inON PRRENTS,-, I lkontT-iFHE
RND HAVING-"TtME_- KPS TO SEE US F9
TOGrHeR-Ly, . TREAI-,BASIC HUMRN
L BEINGS


CLASSIC PEANUTS


TE VIN T WELLLIN


IT' KIND OF NICE TO GET
HOME TO 'WOR OWN BEO AAIN!


MAYBE A NICE
HUG WOULD



'4 __


HOW WAS YOUR A LITTLE
DAY, DEAR? OUT OF THE
ORDINARY




-'l


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.,


FRANK & ERNEST


I I


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


Y













Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010

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abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.alieeeityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVI-
'SION
CASE NO: 2008-CA-000183
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI-
ATION, AS TRUSTEE
PLAINTIFF
VS.
JOSEPH E. BACON A/K/A JO-
SEPH BACON; JEAN BACON;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) "WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; PRIME
ACCEPTANCE CORP.; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION
DEFENDANTS)
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENpur-
suant to a Summary Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated June 15, 2010
entered in Case No. 2008-CA-
000183 of the Circuit Court of the
3rd Judicial Circuit in and for CO-
LUMBIA County, LAKE CITY,
Florida, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at at the CO-
LUMBIA County Courthouse locat-
ed 173 NE HERNANDO AVENUE,
LAKE CITY, FL 32055 in LAKE
CITY, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
21 day o# July, 2010 the following
described property as set forth on
said Summary Final Judgment, to-
wit:
LOT 27, PRICE CREEK LAND-
INGS, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED ON
PLAT BOOK 5 PAGES 98-98A, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
. date of the lis pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 16th day of June, 2010
P. DeWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
B. Scippio I
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J.
STERN
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND ROAD
SUITE 400
PLANTATION, FL 33324-3920
08-37425"(ASCF)
IN ACCORDANCE. WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINIS-
TRATION, at the COLUMBIA
County Courthouse at 386-758-1342,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
04540349
June 29, 2010
July 6, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 10-115'-CA
SUBRANDY LIMITED PART-
NERSHIP, a Florida limited partner-
ship,
Plaintiff
vs.
MARKA. ROGERS,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 3, Meadowlands,Phase 1, a sub-
division as recorded in Plat Book 7,
Pages 139-140, public records of
COLUMBIA County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public, sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment on the above styled
action dated June 23, 2010, at the
Columbia County . Courthouse in
Lake City; Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
July 21, 2010, to the best and highest
bidder for cash. Any person claiming
an interest in any surplus from the
sale other than the property owner as
of the date of the notice of lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
23rd day of June, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By: B. SCIPPIO
Deputy Clerk
04540483
June 29, 2010
July 6 2010

l.KL CITi RIrOITFR


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
� & ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Tree Service

Hazardous Tree Trimming LLC.
Removal & stump grinding.
24 hr Emergency Service
386-590-7798 or 963-3360


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000060
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
VICTOR L. SANDIDGE A/K/A
VICTOR SANDIDGE; MARY. A.
REINKE A/K/A MARY REINKE;
PATRICIA SPAK A/K/A PATRI-
CIA STRONGIN; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF PATRICIA SPAK
A/K/A PATRICIA , STRONGIN;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VICTOR
L. SANDIDGE A/K/A VICTOR
SANDIDGE; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final,Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 14th day of June,
2010, and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000060, of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A. is the Plaintiff and VICTOR L.
SANDIDGE A/K/A VICTOR SAN-
DIDGE; MARY A. REINKE A/K/A
MARY REINKE; PATRICIA SPAK
A/K/A PATRICIA STRONGIN;
.UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PATRI-
CIA SPAK A/K/A PATRICIA
STRONGIN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF VICTOR L. SANDIDGE A/K/A
VICTOR SANDIDGE; UNKNOWN
TENANTSS; IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are
defendants. I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at the AT
COURTHOUSE at the Columbia
County Coulthouse in Lake City,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 15th
day of September, 2010, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in
said Final judgment, to wit:
LOT 1, SOUTHPOINTE ESTATES,
A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PA-
GES 196-197, OF TH PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH
THAT CERTAIN 2001 GENE
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME
IDENTIFIED BY VIN NUMBERS;
GMHGA4450027731A AND
GMHGA4450027731B.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN- "
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hemando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 14th day of June, 2010.
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By /s/: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk'
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
04540380
June 29, 2010
July 6, 2010

100 J01
100 Opportunities
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
for stylist. Full service, paid vaca-
tion. Flexible hours. Guaranteed
pay. Call Darlene 386-984-6738
Accounting clerk needed for full
time position. Experience needed
in Accounts Payable and Accounts
Receivables Candidate must be
able to multi-task, be a team player
as well as require little
supervision. Position is
Monday-Friday 9am-6pm.
Benefits available after 6 months.
Please send resume to PO Box N,
Live Oak, FL 32060, or email to
wlofmacctg@hotmail.com.
Anytime Fitness is now hiring
Personal Trainers. Please apply in
person at: 1191 SW Bascom
Norris Dr Lake City,FL 32025
Experienced Diesel Mechanic
needed full time.
Contact Melissa or Mary
386-935-2773
High School Math Position
Private School
Bachelor's Degree Required
3863644800
PRN FACILITIES person need-
ed. 5+ yrs. experience in electri-
cal, plumbing and maintenance re-
quired. Apply at CHC Labs E US
SHwy 90. **No phone calls please
PT Clerical position. Must be a
people person with good organiza-
tional, telephone and customer
service skills. Ability to multi task.
Hours 8-12 noon M-F. Send re-
sume & references to Box 04099,
* C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Sitel is hiring! Good pay, paid
training, comfortable environment,
benefits after 90 days. Need good
attitude and computer skills - must
be reliable. Apply at
www.sitel.com or in person at
1152 SW Business Point Dr. in
Lake City. EOE
TEACHER NEEDED


CDA & experience preferred. High
School diploma a must. Paid
vacation, sick leave & holidays.
Apply in person at
Happy House Child Care Center,
544 NW Lake Jeffery Rd.
LC#30129 EOE


100 Job
o100 Opportunities

Staff Assistant. In addition to
secretarial duties (filing, typing,
phone etiquette, scheduling appt.,,
etc.) This position will provide
administrative support, to manage-
ment staff w/office management
responsibilities. Must be able to
work independently. Requires
flexible hours & occasional week-
ends. Send reply to Box 04102,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY
Immed FT/PT openings,
customer sales/service, will train,
conditions apply, all ages 17+
(386)269-4656


j120f Medical
1 Employment

04540425
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

04540456
GREAT OPPORTUNITY.
Looking for D.O.N.
3-5 yrs. Long Term exp. Req.
Nursing Admin. Exp. preferred.
Competitive Beiefifs
Send resume to
groberts@gulfcoasthealthcare.com
EOE/V/D/M/F

04540636
SHANDS LAKE SHORE
has the following positions
available:
Accounting Manager
BS degree in Accounting
required. 2-3 years of equivalent
experience preferred.
Payroll Specialist/
Staff Accountant
High School degree required.
As degree in Accounting or
1-2 years equivalent
experience preferred.
Accounts Payable Clerk
High School degree required.
2-3 years of
experience preferred.
Competitive salary and benefit
package.
Fax resumes to (386)292-8295
EOE, M/F/V/D,
Drug Free Workplace.

04540637
HANDS LAKE SHORE
has the following positions
available:
Practice Manager
Responsible for managing
2 Rural Health Clinics and
2 Speciality Clinics with overall
responsibility for 30+
Physicians. Health Management
business degree or equivalent
experience needed. Must have
strong financial, operations and
customer service skills. Start-up
office experience preferred.
Patient Account Rep/
BiUing Clerk
clerk for busy multi speciality
billing office. Responsibilities
include daily patient
interactions, billing inquiries,
account follow-up and
coordination of documentation.
Previous billing, coding and
collection experience required.
Competitive salary and benefit
package. Resumes may be
faxed to 888-281-5359
Or.email to
chris.weistin(5)hma.com
EOE, M/F/V/D
Drug Free Workplace


� 120 Medical
-120 Employment

04540682
We are still growing!!



Join our family of
caring professionals
in our Branford Office
PRN Staff
ARNP
RN
LPN
CNA / HHA
Job summary, other open
positions and applications found
at:
www.hospiceofthenaturecoast.org
Fax: 352.527.9366
hrl(hospiceofcitruscountv.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, F1 34464
DFWP/EOE

04540683




Join our family of
caring professionals
in our Branford Office
Community Education
Manager
Responsible for development
and implementation of a
program to increase awareness
and referral activity for Hospice
of the Nature Coast's Services
throughout service area.
Minimum of a Bachelor's.
degree with at least 3 to 5 years
experience and a proven track
record within the development
services arena.
Job summary as well and
application can be found at:
www.hospiceofthenaturecoast.ore
email:
hrlahospiceofcitruscounty.ore
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464
Fax: 352-527-9366
DFWP/EOE

Full time receptionist
needed to check in and out
patients for busy doctors office.
Fax resume to 386-758-5987
Homecare RNs/LPNs
needed. 9a-6p. Weekends Lake
City. Maxim Healthcare.
352-291-4888.
Medical Assistant
Neededfor doctors office
Experience necessary
Please fax resume to
386-758-5987
PRN Medical Biller Needed
1-2 yrs clinical billing exp prefer-
red but not required. Apply at
CHC Labs E US Hwy 90
*Please no phone calls*


140 Work Wanted

Do you need a Personal Shopper,
cook, someone to clean for your
elderly person? I can help. Exp. &
ref's. 386-365-8944 or755-5295


240 Schools &
" Education

04540226
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-06/21/10 6
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-06/21/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-07/13/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

AKC LAB Puppies. Chocolate &
Black. Parents on premises
Health certs. $400. ea Bom April
30, 2010. 386-623-3134
FREE KITTENS.
11 weeks old. Hemingway.
8itoed. De-wormed. Ready to go.
386-497-3808 or 965-6003
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from.a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
'have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you ate
, unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

GARAGE KEPT 2008 Branson
2400 Tractor, 4X4, w/4'loader, 4'
bushhop, 4'disk, 5'grader, lift
pole, 2 yr. remains on warranty.
Includes 18ft dual axle trailer
w/brakes, 2 spares, box & winch.
All for $14,000. obo 386-984-7227


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

UPRIGHT FREEZER
66 1/2H -30"D
$250.00
386-752-3423


407 Computers

Dell Demention 3000 Desktop,
Windows XP, Pentium 4,
Many extras. Complete Computer
$100. 386-755-9984


408 Furniture

ANTIQUE ROLL
top desk. $300.
386-752-3856


LAKE CITY
USED FURNITURE
'We specialize in
making beds"

NEW MATTRESS
& BOXSPRING.
IN STOCK NOW
Twin $11999, Full $13999
MON-SAT 9-5:30 Queen 16999, King $1999"


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.




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&Att deru4/ 386.755.5445


BUY ITJ
a r




SE~LL I











LAKE CITY REPORTER . CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JULY 6, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


408 Furniture
CHAIR WITH
cane seat
$50.
386-752-3856
LARGE OAK
Office desk.
$400.
386-752-3856
OAK SWIVEL
Office chair.
$75.
386-752-3856
SINGER SEWING
Machine in cabinet
$100.
386-752-3856
413 Musical
413 Merchandise
Hammond XK3 2 manuals,
portable stand, bench, 13 note
pedals pluse expression pedal.
Leslie speaker cabinet. $8,500.
Call Len 386-755-8623

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
FOR SALE ASPCA Dog Kennel.
4X8X6. Fully assembled w/canopy
Excellent condition. $200.
Call 386-755-5586 leave message
FOR SALE Foosball Table.
Excellent condition.
$75. 38.6-755-5586
leave message.
Freezer, double recliner,
rocker recliner,
TV cabinet and misc items.
386-935-3422
JAZZY ULTRA 3 Power
Wheelchair - $1,400. (paid $2800)
Excellent Condition.-
386-792-2952
PERFORM CROSSWALK
365 Treadmill
$250.00
386-752-3423


Professional Treadmill -
$100.00
Excellent Condition.
386-792-2952

450 tGoodThings
450 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

520 Boats for Sale


12' JON Boat. New troll motor
& trailer. Life Jackets, oars &
paddles. $1,500 FIRM..
Cell 386-871-7005. Anytime
15 FT. BASS BOAT
90 HP Mercury Engine
Good Shape $6500.
386-758-8,458
610 Mobile Home
Lots for Rent
Beautiful lots. Huge shady oaks.
Off Wester Rd. 2 mi. from 1-75.
$250. eaAlso: 1/1 MH $450. mo
(904)545-5485 or 904-651-8383
RV PARKING SPACES
Available. Elec,, Cable, water,
septic hook-ups included.
$325.00 mo. 386-752-2412
620 Mobile Home
62 Lots for Sale
MOBILE HOME LOT. 1/2 acre
w/well, septic and power pole.
North 441. $16,900.
Owner Finance. 386-754-6699

To place your
classified ad call
755-5440
MMMUMM


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 WIDE - 3BR/2BA Clean,
Quiet Country Park $525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $525/Mo.
+ $250 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP
Also, 2br/lba house in town
$600. mo. 386-752-6422
2/1 & 3/1 available.
$375 & up, plus deposit.
Water, trash & lawn svc included.
386-438-8673 or 813-482-1902
DWMH available NOW
S3tir/2ba. $695. mo. 1st & securi-
ty. West side of Lake City.
Good schools/ 386-938-5637
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3/2, MH. Quiet park. Small pets
ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White . Contact 386-397-1522
or 386-292-0114
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer.
No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
June Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
.386-623-7547 or 984-8448
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511

i70 Unfurnished Apt.
1 For Rent
04539801
!! FREE RENT!!
1 and 2 BR starting at $499.
* POOLS
* Washer/Dryer Hookups
* Gated Community
* Pets Welcome
* Low Deposit
* Move-In Specials
Call US!! 386-754-1800
04540360
Voted Best Apartment 2010
Come see Why.
Rent from $499.
(Income guidelines apply)
Windsong Apartments
(386) 758-8455
2BR/1BA. Close-to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922


Brick Duplex 2/1 off Baya. CH/A,
Carpet, tile, $575 mo,+ Dep.
Call' 386-752-0118 or
386-623-1698
MOVE-IN SPECIALS
2br/2ba w/garage on the
West side
Call 386-755-6867 for details


Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., 1/bd, ba, LR, dining & extra
room. Ref. req. $450. mo & sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec.
Michelle 386-752-9626
72 0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2BR/2BA Nice & Clean
$800. mo 1st and last NO pets
6 miles to town
386-752-1677
3B/1BA BRICK home. Comer lot
off Monroe St. CH/A, clean.
$850 a month, 1st & security
deposit. 954-559-0872
3BR/2BA Brick Squthwood
Estates off SR 47,,tile floors, fire-
place, large yard, pets ok $950 mo.
plus deposit. 386-758-3166


n Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3br/lba Block Home. 2 car detach-
ed garage. new carpet & paint.
Screened back porch. 441S. $850.
mo + $500 sec. Bkground check
req'd. Blaine 386-623-3166 or
Ryan 386-623-3182
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., east of LC, CR 245A. Ceram-
ic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800 dep
(904)708-8478 Application req'd
Clean lBr/lBa, Florida Room
CH/A 5 mi. S. Lake City $400
Dep $550mo 386-590-0642/ 867-
1833.suwanneevallevproperties.com
Recently Refurbished
3br/2ba Clean. $650. mo.
No Pets!
386-758-0057
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Very nice older home, 2br/2ba
w/fenced yard, garage, huge Fl.
room. CHA, appli. Application,
credit check & lease req'd. 1st, last
. & sec. $700/mo. (904)259-4126

750 Business &
Office Rentals
04540561
Office Suites
FOR LEASE on BAYA
Very Affordable, Various Sizes
240sft Single office or
3300sft Space.
Utilities & Electric Included
Aaron Nickelson
386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group

04540567
10,000sft WAREHOUSE
1 FOR LEASE
18' Clearspan, overhead Doors
1 Dock Height Door. A/C Avail,
Aaron Nickelson
386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, of discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the heating
'impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2br/lba. In-town. Remodeled.
New CH/A, wiring, plumbing:
metal roof. Owner Finance if
qualified. $54,900. 386-755-6916
HOUSE for Sale on
Lake Jeffery Rd. 3br/1.5ba.
Call for more information.
(404)366-0759

820 Farms &
Acreage
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

T83 Commercial
OJ0 :Property
Former 84 Lumber Store for Sale!
1824 W US Highway 90,
Lake City, FL 32055
Call 724-228-3636 for
price and info!
Great visibility from Hghway 90!!

950 Cars for Sale
2001 Chrysler 300M
Lightly used, mileage 34,000.
All electric, leather interior.
Very clean. $6,500. 386-755-1190


<







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Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
, Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


1994 Ford Van 2001 Chrysler 300M
6 cyl., AC, PB, handicap Lightly used, mileage
equipped w/E slide door, 34,000. All electric, leather
low mileage, incl. elect, interior, very clean.
wheel chair.
$10,000 $6,500
Call
386-288-3854 Call
386-755-1190


In Print,

& Online

One Low

Price!


Adoption

ARE YOU PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
ADOPTION? Loving married couple seeks to
adopt. Will be Full-time Mom (age 36) and De-
voted Dad. Financial security. EXPENSES PAID.
Kim/Bill (888)399-3255 FL Bar# 0150789


Announcements


Advertise in Over 100 -Papers throughout
Florida. Advertising Networks of Florida, Put
us to work for You!'(866)742-1373 www.florida-.
classifieds.com.


Auctions


AbsoluteAuction-Commercialproperty-Lincoln,
Alabama near Honda plant-3 buildings (60K+/-
sq ft), 19+/- acres. July 22, 1PM, gtauctions.com,
(205)326-0833 Granger, Thagard & Associates,
Jack F.-Granger, 873

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do you earn $800 in
a day? 25 Local Machines and Candy $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033 CALL US: We will
not be undersold!


Financial


CASH NOW! Get cash for your structured set-
tlement or annuity payments. High payouts. Call
J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-
738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bu-
reau.

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging.
Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-
Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com

For Sale

CHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never
used, brand new in factory boxes. English Dove-
tail. Original cost $4500. Sell for $895. Can de-
liver. Call Tom (954)302-2423

LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original
plastic, never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice
$975. Can deliver. Call Bill (305)420-5982


Help Wanted


Drivers - INTERMODAL OWNER OPERA-
TORS. High Weekly Pay, Practical Miles, Home
Daily, Regional Runs. 2 years intermodal exp.,


CDL Class A. Contact Mac/Janice at (904)644-
0948

Drivers - FLORIDA TRUCK DRIVERS
NEEDED ASAP! IN-STATE DRIVING POSI-
TIONS AVAILABLE! CDL-A w/ 1 yr. experi-
ence Outstanding pay & Benefits! Call a recruiter
TODAY! (877)484-3042 www.oakleytransport.
com

DRIVER- GREAT MILES! NO TOUCH
FREIGHT! No forced NE/NYC! 6 months OTR
experience. NO felony/DUI last 5' years. Solos/
Teams Wanted. Company call: (877)740-6262.
www.ptl-inc.com


Miscellaneous


AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high pay-
ing Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. CALL Aviation Institute of Mainte-
nance (866)314-3769.

Out of Area Real Estate

NC MOUNTAINS - BEST LAND BUY!
2.5acres, spectacular views, gated, paved road.
High altitude. Easily accessible, secluded. Bryson
City. $45,000. Owner financing: (800)810-1590
www.wildcatknob.com

NC MOUNTAINS CLOSEOUT SALE! Cab-
in Shell, 2+ acres with great view, very private,
big trees, waterfalls & large public lake nearby,
$99,500 Bank financing (866)275-0442


Real Estate Auctions


FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION 700+
Homes I Auction: 7/29 Open House: July 17, 24
& 25 REDC I View Full Listings www.Auction.
corn RE Brkr CQ 1031187


RV's/Mobile Homes


PUBLIC AUCTION 450 + Mob Homes/Camp-
ers Online Bidding Available NO MINIMUM
PRICE Sat July 10 @ 9am Carencro, LA www.
hendersonauctions.com (225)686-2252 Lic#136'



ANF
ADVERTIeING ' 5 5 fOR10A

Ca ieeofic' ' , .i- ., Daily



( Week of Juuly 5, 2010 )


m


ci


51, .. . -


Savvy home shoppers reach for the classified ads

before they hit the streets. The newspaper

classified section offers everything they need to

make an informed purchasing decision.

WVant to make a move?

Check the classified ads first.




classified





the first place to look for everything







Lake City Reporter


ForMor-Deais Cll.ar




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