Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




























Crash snarls traffic ,


Report: Improper,
lane change near
Courthouse annex.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Traffic on U.S. Highway
90 westbound , near
the Columbia County
Courthouse annex was
reduced to one lane after
a three-vehicle collision
closed the other lane of
traffic for more than 30
minutes Monday. No one
was injured in the wreck.
The wreck occurred just
before 1 p.m. at the intersec-
tion of U.S. Highway 90 and
NW Hernando Avenue.


According to Lake City
Police Department crash
reports, a witness told
authorities that westbound
traffic was stopped when he
saw a 1987 Mazda pickup
truck driven by Phillip W.
Black, 31, of Lake Butler,
traveling west on the road-
way, change lanes and run
into a van on the rear pas-
senger side. The van was
turning from the roadway
into NE Hernando Avenue.
The van was a- 2003 Ford
van driven by Charles J.
Ruiz. 61. of Fort White.: Ruiz
was traveling with Connie
E. Ruiz, no age given, as his
passenger.
Black told authorities
he was traveling west on


U.S. Highway 90 and was
going to make a left turn
on U.S. Highway 441. He
got on the.turn lane to turn.
into Hernando Avenue and
struck the van.
Ruiz told officers that he
was turning into Hernando
Avenue and that traffic was
stopped and as he was turn-
ing, Black's pickup truck
ran into his van.
Evette Ross, 46, of Lake
City, was traveling in a 1992
Honda with Marilyn C.
Lane, no age given, as her
passenger and her car was
stopped at the stop sign on
NW Hernando Avenue.
Ross' vehicle was at the

WRECK continued on 3A


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Fire Department firefighters Gramby Croft (from left) and Gerald Ford attempt to lift
the hood of a truck involved in a Monday afternoon crash at the,intersection of U.S. Highway
90 and NW Hernando Street. No one was injured in the three-vehicle crash.


Libraries help children dive into reading


SUMMER


'SPLASH'


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Stephanie Tyson, the Columbia County Public Library main branch children's program specialist, reads from Ken Geist's
and Julia Gorton's children book 'The Three Little Fish and the Big Bad Shark.' Summer reading programs at county library
branches begin June 15.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Parents want-
ing to promote
literacy this
summer need
to look no fur-
ther than the Children's
Summer Programs at the
Columbia County Public
Library, said Stephanie
Tyson, children's program
specialist.
"It's free," she said. "You
don't have to pay anything
for it."
A Kickoff Carnival for
the summer programs
is from 10 a.m. to noon
Saturday at the West
Branch.
Summer programs run
from June 15 to July 23,
and each year more than
150 children participate.
"We have programs for
all ages, from babies up to
teenagers," Tyson said.
This year's theme is
"Make A Splash." Each
week will also have its own


i .a Io t, i 00 I


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


sub-theme as a focus for
activities.
Children can wear
swimsuits at the kick-off
carnival. It will feature
water-related games and


crafts, such as a water bal-
loon toss.
There will also be a
giant ocean scene for chil-
dren to help color through
the use of water, Tyson


said. Every family will
receive a free book at the,
carnival.
.Several other special
UBRARIES continued on 3A


City: The key to

saving old jail is

public benefit


Councilman
champions cause
of preservation.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Interests in saving the
old City of Lake City jail has
spread to the City Council.
Discussion about the jail
was raised by Councilthan
Jake Hill at a meeting
Monday.
Hill said he'd like to see
the city use the jail as a
police substation, because
there's a lot of illegal activ-
ity taking place in the area.
The jail, which is located
on 249 NE Escambia St,
was approved March 16 for
demolition along with other
structures on the property.
A citizen, Judi Canavan,
had previously expressed
interest in preserving the
jail back in April, said City
Manager Wendell Johnson.
He stopped further work
on the building until after
the June 21 meeting so she
could present a concrete
plan of action.


Hill said he spoke with
Johnson several days agb
about the jail.
"I'm wide open to what
the coun-
cil wants
to do," he
said.
The
city has
already
spent
money y
Johnson looking
into possi-
bly saving
the Blanche Hotel, which
it doesn't own, Hill said.
Money could be spent on
preserving a city-owned
property.
The jail is considered
dilapidated, but Hill said he
thinks it could be restored.
"I believe it would be less
to fix (the old jail) than the
Blanche," he said.
Over the next few days,
Johnson and staff will gath-
er information about what
could be done afid what
possible costs for saving
the jail would be. The key


JAIL continued on 3A


Then there were 3:

Charter amendments

will appear on ballot


City candidate
requirements
added last.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Tyson and Ja'Nae DuBois, 18, stuff bags filled with a newsletter featuring jokes and games, a
reading log and bookmarks for children younger than 10.


9466
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


..A[ l , Opinion. .....


.. 4A


Business .. ... ... 5A
Obituaries . ............ 6A
Advice & Comics ..... ..4B
"Puzzles ...... . .... 2B


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.corn
Three proposed amend-
ments - not two as previ-
ously planned - for the/
City of Lake City Charter
will appear before voters.
City Council unanimous-
ly rescinded an adoption
of an ordinance amending
sections 401, city manager
requirements and 509, the
assumption of office, of
the city charter atf.a meet-
ing Monday. Council then
approved a new ordinance
with the two amendments


TODAY IN
LOCAL
['iu.iC P -l,.k plan
".e'-:end part.


and an additional one for
section 301 (b), eligibility
requirements for how long
a candidate has to live in a
district for voter eligibility.
Sections 401 and 509 were
recommended to council,
through a letter from the
charter review board. The
board meets every 10 years
to recommend changes.
"The charter review
board really did a good job
analyzing the recommenda-
tions," said Mayor Stephen
Witt.
It was then suggested by
council to add section 301
(b) for a. proposed change
at a special called meeting
on May 24.
CHARTER continued on 3A

COMING
WEDNESDAY
S Columbia, Incr: The
point o bui, .ne'-.e,


"!*;, i- 7*" '6.Lr.a - r M �f~ia s"i'cv 3~--~b' --y? ' n* L':- -' ' -.- - - ' - .-


. .. , . - - & . ..;.; " 1 %










Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010


S Monday: y
3 . Afternoon: 2-0-1 _
Evening: 0-2-0


Monday:
Afternoon: 0-7-6-2
Evening: 6-3-2-1


FLO RI D A
LOTT


Saturday:
5-25-29-32-41-48
X4


Sunday:
1-4-15-23-27


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



'Twilight' eclipses bleep-happy Movie Awards


UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif.
S andra Bullock was kissing
and telling at the MTV
Movie Awards.,
Bullock, wearing a glit-'
tery black dress, received
a standing ovation as she accepted
the MTV Generation Award in her
first live televised appearance since.
she split with unfaithful husband
Jesse James earlier this year. The
45-year-old actress used her accep-
tance speech to clear up tabloid
rumors - "No. 1: I'm not dead." -
and smooched Scarlett Johansson.
. "No matter what you might have
seen or heard or read lately, I love
what I do," vowed Bullock, "and I'm
not going anywhere."
Bullock was presented with the
show's highest honor by her "All
About Steve" co-star Bradley Cooper,
'The Proposal" co-star Betty White
and inexplicably Johansson, the wife.
bf her absentee "Proposal" leading
man Ryan Reynolds.
When it came to the awards at
Sunday's freewheeling and often-
bleeped ceremony at the Gibson
Amphitheatre in Universal City,
Calif., "The Twilight Saga" eclipsed
the competition for the secorid year.
"New Moon" sucked up trophies
for best movie, kiss, female perfor-
mance for Kristen Stewart and male
performance and global superstar
for Robert Pattinson.
"I guess Twilight' is really awe-
some, and I agree," said Stewart.
"Woo!"

Tucci signs on to
'Captain America' saga

LOS ANGELES - Stanley Tucci
-has signed on to help put Captain
America in business.
The Academy Award-nominated
:a'tor has joined the cast of the
.superhero saga "Captain America:.
-The First Avenger." Tucci will play
;Dr. Abraham Erskine, who in the


Actors Betty White (from left), Bradley Cooper and Scarlett Johansson are seen on
stage at the MTV Movie Awards in Universal City, Calif., on Sunday.


Marvel Comics
series was a scientist
behind a super-sol-
dier program that
gave the title hero
his powers.
Due in theaters
Tucci July 22, 2011,
"Captain America"
stars Chris Evans in the title role
and also features Hugo Weaving and
Hayley Atwell.

Demi Moore memoir
set for 2012 release
NEW YORK - Demi Moore, an
actress famous for showing all, will
now tell all.,
HarperCollins
announced Monday
that it had acquired
a "candid" memoir
by the raspy-voiced
star. The book will
cover her life and
Moore career and is tenta-
tively scheduled for release in 2012.
The book doesn't have a title


yet. Moore had shopped the book
around with several publishers.
The 47-year-old Moore has
acknowledged a troubled upbring-
ing. HarperCollins says the narra-
tive will be "framed by her compli-
cated relationship with her mother,
Virginia King."

Coleman's ex-wife says
they planned to re-wed
NEW YORK - Gary Coleman's
ex-wife calls their relationship "gold-
en" and says that before his recent
death they had planned to renew
their marital vows.
In an interview aired on Monday's
"Good Morning America," Shannon
Price says she had ordered that
Coleman be taken off of life support
on the advice of his doctors. The
one-time child actor died May 28 in
Utah at age 42 after, suffering a brain
hemorrhage two days earlier.
The couple had divorced in 2008,
but Price says they later agreed that
divorce "wasn't the right choice."
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former First Lady Barbara
Bush is 85.
* Actor-comedian Jerry
Stiller is'83.
* Comedian Joan Rivers is
77.
* Singer Nancy Statra is 70.
* Musician Boz Scaggs is
66.


* Actor Don Grady is 66.
* "Dilbert" creator Scott
Adams is 53.
* Actor-director Keenen
Ivory Wayans is 52.
* Actress Julianna Margulies
is 43.
* Rapper-producer Kanye
West is 33.


Daily Scripture
"Before the mountains were born or
you brought forth the earth and the
world, from everlasting to everlasting
you are God. For a thousand years in
your sight are like a day that has just
gone by, or like a watch in the night."
- Psalm 90:2,4

Thought for Today
"Malice drinks one-half of its own
poison."
- Seneca,
Roman statesman (circa 5 B.C.-A.D. 65)


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Doctor took out
wrong organ, fined
TALLAHASSEE - The-
state Board of Medicine
says Bernard Zaragoza,
who performed a gallblad-
der operation but took
out a healthy kidney by
mistake, wasn't inept or
careless.
The bpard said Zaragoza
is a good doctor, but he
had bad luck. A state hear-
ing officer recommended a
penalty of a $5,000 fine and
50 hours of community
service.
Zaragoza has to reim-
burse the state $25,000 for
the state's costs of investi-
gation and prosecution.

Crist gets
anti-abortion bill
TALLAHASSEE - After
a wait of more than five,
weeks, lawmakers finally
sent Gov. Charlie Crist the
most contentious bill of
the 2010 legislative session
on Monday.
Lawmakers passed a
health care bill on April
30 containing some last-
minute amendments that
would require women
seeking an abortion during
the first trimester to under-
go an ultrasound exam and
'pay for it Estimates on
the cost of an ultrasound
varied from a few hundred
dollars to about $1,500.
The amendments tacked
onto the otherwise non-
controversial measure
would require women to
view the live ultrasound
image or have it described
by a doctor unless they
could prove they were
victims of rape, incest or
domestic violence.


EI-SDJ


PARTLY PARTLY CHANCE CHANCE
CLOUDY ' CLOUDY -STORMS T-STORMS


" HI94L066 HI94 69 L HI96WL72 " HI 950 72



L'*.;;;1-g'l-'L Btfi F !


Just the sun, fun and oil
Josiah and Lydia Holmes'of Gulf Shores, Ala., sit on the
beach in Perdido Key and watch as an oil cleanup crew
works to find bits of oil and tarballs that have come ashore on
Monday.


Authorities say the alli-
gator turned up in front of
Stewart-Middle School's
cafeteria early Monday
morning.
Hillsborough County
school district spokeswom-
an Linda Cobbe said the ,
alligator was found before
students arrived and they
were kept away. No one
was hurt.

Deputies: Toddler


died from complications
while giving birth.
The whale, a 20-year-old
orca named Taima, died
Sunday afternoon.
Park officials say
Taima's fetus was in an
unusual position during
the delivery. Park veteri-
narians attempted to assist
but the complications were
too severe.
The calf was stillborn.


struck by SUV, dies Teen chokes on


WESTGATE - The
Palm Beach County
Sheriff's Office says a
3-year-old girl has died
after being struck by an
SUV driven by her mother.
The toddler was
hit Sunday evening in
We'stgate at about 8:20
p.m.
A sheriff's spokesman
said the girl's mother was
moving the SUV in front of
a house when the toddler
was hit. It was unclear how
she got out of the home.


Gator caught
outside of school Killer whale dies
TAMPA - A 7-fnnt while giving birth


alligator was caught in the
parking lot of a Gulf coast
-middle school.


ORLANDO - Officials
say a killer whale at
SeaWorld Orlando has


hot dog, dies
TAVARES - A central
Florida middle school stu-
dent died after choking on
hot dog at school.
The Lake County
Sheriff's Office incident
report released Monday
says the incident occurred
on Friday at East Ridge
Middle School.
Authorities say attempts
were made to give the teen
"rescue breaths," but those
efforts were unsuccessful.
EMS workers eventually
established a partial air-
way and appeared to sta-
bilize him before he was
taken to a hospital.
* Associated Press


SV6d6ta
93/67 -


92/75acla
92/75


Tallahassee * Lake Cit
94/70 -, 94/66
S , .. .\ Gainesvile �
.Panama City 93/67
89/75 . \ Ocala
S , . 3/67

Tamn,
94/7V/


SJacksonville
89/co


CHANCE
STORMS


H 193 0 71


City Wednesday
Cape Canaveral 88, 7 4 /p:


/ , ,. -Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale,
Daytoa Beach Fort Myers
87- , Gainesvllle
* Jacksonville

Odando Capl Canaveral KeyWest
92/72 86/73 ake City
Miami


West Palm


,hd


89/77 *
\ . FL Lauderdale
Ft Myers 88/79 4
93/75 * Naples
92/76 Mii
Key West _ 99/77
8 8 /7 8 ..


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high,
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal monthto-date
Normal year-to-date


-93
77
89
67
99 in 1985
58 in 2006


0,00",
1.70"
19,43"
1.37"
18.62"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn,
Sunset tom.


6:28 a.m.
8:31 p.m.
6:28 am.�
8:31 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 3a17am.
Moonset today 4:58 p.m.
Moonrise torn. 3:54 am.
Moonset tom. .5:59 p.m.

oV 0
June June June July
12 19 26 4
New First Full , Last


On tnmis date in
1988. overnight
tnurnderstorms
in Iowa produced
5.20 inches of rain
at Coon Rapids.
Thunderstorms in
the Florida Keys
drenched Tavernier
with 7.16 inches of
rain in 24 hours.


Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


1iiNesobum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


88/74/pc
91/79/t
94/76/t
93/69/s
91/70/pc
87/78/t
94/69/s
91/79/t
92/77/t
93/71/s
93/74/pc
90/75/pc
93/75/s
95/71/pc
91/77/pc
94/72/s
90/79/t


Thursday
89,'76/pc
92/, 74/pc
90/79/pc
94/77/t
95/72/pc
94/74/pc
87/77/t
96/72/pc
90/78/t
90/77/pc
95/73/pc
94/75/pc
91/74/pc
92/76/pc
96/71/pc
92/78/pc
94/74/t
90/78/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


x / . Forecasts, data and graph-
les � 2010 Weather Central
LL" C, Madison, Wis.
w'p"F : www.weatherpubllsher.com


Ii IConnecte,


Lake City Reporter
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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY JUNE 8, 2010


Trailblazer Helen Thomas ends

White House career amid uproar


. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Rushee Soni, 8, a frequent library patron, finds a quiet spot to do a little light reading at
Columbia County's main branch library.

LIBRARIES: To host literary summer


Continued From Page 1A

events will take place as
part of thd summer pro-
grams: Didgeridoo Down
under is at 11 a.m. at the
Main Branch and 2 p.m. at
the Fort White Community
Center June 16; Reading
is Magic Gentle Carousel
Ponies is at 11 a.m. at the
main branch and 1 p.m.
at the community center
June 29; and The Great
Loudini is at 11 a.m. July
20 at the main branch and
11 a.m. June 23 at the com-
munity center.
There will also be age-
specific programs daily at
the three branches, Tyson
said. Programs are only
about one hour.


"We try to do something
at each of the branches,"
she said. "All of them will
have something going on."
Packets containing a
schedule of programs, a
book mark and reading"
logs, to track the number
of hours read weekly,
.are now available at the
library. Prizes - includ-
ing toys and food coupons
- are earned by reading a
minimum of two and a half
hours per week.
Library staff will sign off
on the reading logs, and
a fish representing par-
ticipants will 'be placed on
the Reader Hall of Fame
at the main library. Scales


will be added to the fish *
to indicate the number of'
additional hours read each
week..
Many children look
at reading as a chore
and think the summer is
the time to take a break
from it, Tyson said. The
activities associated with
the programs will try to
encourage more reading.
"There are lots of fun
books," Tyson said.
The school year is over,
but learning can still con-
tinue with the library's
summer programs.
"It helps keep their mind
and reading skills sharp,"
, she said. "Plus it's fun."


CHARTER: Amended every 10 years


Continued From Page 1A

A second reading of the
ordinance will be at the
next regular council jneet-
ing.
'Each of the proposed
amendments will appear as
separate items on the Nov.
2 ballot.
"All three issues are
something the voters will
decide on," Witt said.
In other business:
* Resident John Price
spoke before the council


about the city not being
able to accept utility bill
payments over the phone
with a debit or credit card.
* Council approved an
ordinance rezoning land
from Single Family 2 to
Residential, Multi-Family 2
for the proposed Sugar Mill
Apartments Phase II.
* Council approved
payment of an invoice for
$245,000 to Bailey Bishop
& Lane Inc. and Anderson


Columbia, pending, receiv-
ing' necessary documenta-
tion for work completed on
engineering and construct-
ing the replacement of the
Lqquat Bridge. The project
is something people in the
area have "hounded" him
about since he was first
elected, said Councilman
George Ward.
The next City Council
meeting is at 7 p.m.
June 21 in City Hall.


JAIL: May be worth saving, Hill says
Continued From Page 1A

to saving the jail is showing "Anything has to show city to try and do the right
how it can benefit the corn- some type of benefit to the thing for the jail.
munity, the city'.manager public," Johnson said. "This building belongs to
said. Ultimately Hill wants the the city," he said.


WRECK: EMS, fire fighters respond


Continued From Page 1A
stop sign when Ruiz's van
struck the car on the front
driver's side after the initial
impact. ,
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office , depu-


ties, Lake City Police
Department officers, Lake
City Fire Fighters and an
EMS unit responded to the
scene, but no injures were
reported as of press time


on Monday.


By JIM KUHNHENN and
DAVID BAUDER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON-Helen
Thomas, the opinionated
White House correspon-
dent who used her seat in
the front row of history to
grill 10 presidents and often
exasperate them, lost her
storied perch Monday in a
flap over calling on Israelis
to get "out of Palestine."
Thomas, 89, who made
her name as a bulldog for
United Press International
and was a pioneer for
women in journalism,
abruptly retired as a col-
umnist for Hearst News
Service. The announce-
ment, in a terse statement
by Hearst, came after video-
taped remarks-she made to
an independent filmmaker
spread virally through the
Internet.
She apologized, but
White House spokesman
Robert Gibbs denounced
her comments as "offen-
sive and reprehensible."
Her press corps col-
leagues with the White
House Correspondents
Association issued a rare
admonishment calling
them "indefensible." ;
Thomas joined UPI in
1943 anad began cover-


ing the White House for
the wire service in 1960.
Fiercely competitive, she
became the first female
White House bureau chief
for a wire service when
UPI named her to the posi-
tion in 1974. She was also
the first female officer at
the National Press. Club,
where women had once
been barred as members.
"Helen was just a vacuum
cleaner about information,"
said author Kay Mills, who.
took dictation from Thomas
as a young UPI staffer and
wrote "A Place in the News:
From the Women's Pages
to the Front Page."
"She made sure she had
everything," Mills said.
"She may have been cover-
ing Jackie Kennedy and a
birthday party for one of
the children, but I'll tell
you, the desk had every
bit of information it ever
needed."
When., the Watergate
scandal began consum-
ing Nixon's presidency,
Martha Mitchell, the noto-
riously unguarded wife of
the attoKney general, would
call Thomas late at night to
unload her frustrations at
what she saw as the betray-
al of her husband, John, by
the president's men.
She retained her place on


the front row of the White
House briefing room after
joining Hearst in 2000 and
remained persistent to the
point of badgering.
A daughter of Lebanese
immigrants, she did little
to hide her pro-Arab views.
During George W. Bush's
presidency, her questions
to both the president and
his press secretaries were
almost exclusively about
the war in Iraq.
She sharply questioned
President Barack Obarma
two weeks ago.
"Mr. President, when
are you going to get obet
of Afghanistan? Why are
you continuing to kill and
die there? What is the real
excuse? And don't give u's
this Bushism, 'If we don't
go there, they'll all corie
here,"' she said.
Former Bush spokesman
Ari Fleischer said journal-
ists had privately expressed
discomfort over Thomas'
role with what they per-
ceived as her advocacy
from a plum spot in the
White House press room..
"Helen had a special stat-
ure that she earned," hl
said. "That's what's so sad,
in that she diminished what
she earned."


I ASSOCIATED PRESS
Veteran White House journalist Helen Thomas asks a question of President Barack Obama
during a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, in this:photo
takeri May 27. Thomas abruptly retired Monday as a columnist4or Hearst News Service fol-
lowing remarks she made about Israel that were denounced by the White House and her
press corps colleagues.


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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010







f I *U L_^ LJIIIIOL.� 10


OPINION


Tuesday, lune 8, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OTHE


OPINION


A jobless

number not

as good as

it appears

,S ince the first of the
year, the economic
statistics have gener-
ally been g6od, indica-
tive of a recovering
economy. But there's only one
word for the May unemploy-
ment figures - disappointing.
Certainly Wall Street found
them so. The major market.
indices swooned at the news.
Superficially, the numbers
looked good - a jobless rate of
9:.7 percent, down from 9.9 per-
cent in April, and a net increase
in jobs of 431,000.
But that 9.7 percent is not all
that much below last October's
10.1 percent, a 26-year worst,
and it only looks good com-
pared with April because
322,000 people lefttthe work
force for whatever reason.
Of those new jobs, 411,000 of
them were temporary census
workers whose numbers begin
winding down this month.
Private employers added only
41,000 jobs, the fewest since
January, It will take four to five
times that number to begin
niaking a dent in the unemploy-
nient rate. Just to stay even, the
economy needs to add 125,000
jobs a month.
- Unlike Wall Street, Presideiit
Barack Obama,saw the glass as
half full: "While we recognize
that our recovery is still in its
early stages, and that there are
going to be ups and downs in
the months ahead - things
never go completely in a
smooth line - this report is a
sign that our economy is get-
ting stronger by the day:."
Some economists already see
some "downs in the months
ahead." They think unemploy-
ment might edge back into
double-digit territory this sum-
mer and stay above 9 percent
through the November elec-
tions. This is a fine "welcome to
the work force" for the 1.6 mil-
,lion graduating college seniors.
Although all kinds of other
indicators - consumer spend-
ing, retail sales, car sales, new
claims for job benefits, etc. -
are positive, until the economy
starts generating jobs in abun-
dance, they are just numbers.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
Strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
: Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
S" typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of


the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter,
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400,
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Thoughts about handling the oil spill


t's being called the worst
environmental disaster
in the history of the
United States. And itfs
not over yet
This last weekend I drove
over to my favorite place in
Florida. I walked on the clean
white beach, had a nice view
of the Gulf from Frog's restau-
rant window, and had a great
seafood lunch. It was business
as usual in Cedar Key. Fluffy
clouds took turns covering the
warm sunshine, and an easy
breeze whipped up small waves
that sparkled in the sunshine.
There was no sign of the oil
spill from the deep water off of
the Louisiana coast, and peli-
cans and gulls carried on with
their fishing and preening and
hanging around. People dined,
picnicked, walked and boated.
All the news channels have
covered the story. On WUFT's
"Need to Know" program
Carl Safina of the Blue Ocean
Institute reported "The Gulf
may never be the same, in our
lifetime." Many entire plant
and. animal species will be lost
for decades. The Gulf spill is
reported to already be many
times greater than that Alaskan
Exxon Valdez disaster, and will
continue until brought under'
control - maybe in August of
this year. In the meantime, it
will likely involve most of the
Gulf. If picked up by the Gulf
current into the Gulf Stream,
may pass through the Florida
Keys and charge up the east
coast into the greater Atlantic
Ocean.
How has this impacted all
of us who love the region and
the beautiful coastline? We are
likely to experience feelings
of shock, sadness,, fear, worry,
frustration, and anger. What can
we do to deal with this tragedy?

LETTERS TO

Census is community
issue
To the Editor:
The 2010 Census is in full
swing and even if you haven't
mailed in your Census form,
there's still time to ensure that
our community counts.
Households that haven't yet
participated in the 2010 Census
will receive a visit from a cen-
sus enumerator. These census
workers are from our commu-
nity and will ask you' the same
questions that are on the 2010
Census questionnaire. The visit
should take no more than 10
minutes and your participation
will benefit our community for a
decade. Don't worry about the
confidentiality of your informa-
tion; it is protected by law and
no one, not even the president,
has access to it
It's important to be counted
on the Census, because Census
numbers at least partially deter-
mine the amount of funding our
community gets for everything
from health care services to
school programs, roads and
bridges to federal disaster relief
programs. It also-determines
our representation in Congress.
Rural counties, like ours, have


Robert Denny
denny@lakecitycc.edu
�


When a traumatic event
happens, we are likely to feel
a loss of control, a fear of the
unknown, helplessness, and
frustration. We may feel more
discouraged when we realize
that there are many oil compa-
nies and other countries drilling
in the deep waters of the Gulf,
and there aren't effective inter-
national-laws and enforcement
institutions that adequately pro-
tect us from more of the same.'
Modern technology is. strug-
gling with what to do about
stopping the flow.
Instead of holding onto
thoughts like "Who's to blame?"
"I can't do anything about it!"
'The world will be different,"
we can replace the negative
thoughts with more positive
thoughts. "When one door clos-
es, another opens." "It's always
darkest before the dawn." "If it
doesn't kill you, it'll make you
stronger." There have been
disasters throughout history:
the Mount Vesuvius eruption,-
world wars, tsunamis, earth-
quakes, and plagues. But man-
kind always recovered. We have
always risen to the challenge,.
and may have become better
as a result. "It's less important
what happens to you, but more
important what you do about
it." You may feel powerless.
Discomfort can provoke us into
taking action. Decide to take


THE EDITOR
been historically underrepre-
sented in the census. In 2000,
Florida's 32 rural counties had
an average response rate of only
52 percent. That means nearly
half of the state's rural county
residents weren't counted.
We can do better. Open your
door to the clearly-identified
census taker. A few minutes
is all it takes to make sure our
community counts.
For more information about
the 2010 Census, visit sunshine-
census2010.com or 2010census.
gov.
Ronald Williams, chairman,
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners

America deserves
. better leadership
To the Editor:
As the leader of this great
nation, Obama should be totally
neutral when the issue is race,
but is he? His actions so far
speak eloquently that he is not
with a black father, a white
mother and raised by a white
grandmother. He has myriad of
reasons to be neutral but that
"beer summit" and his remarks
prior to that were the "begin-
ning" indications he is not
As to the "beer" summit, what


charge of the situation, seeing
it as an opportunity to assert
our will to influence all levels of
government, BP, and the world
petroleum industry to effec-
tively repair darimage and do
everything possible to restore
the Gulf, and to participate in
setting up regulatory controls of
companies and countries of the
world to ensure a cleaner, safer
future.
On an. individual level, what
can we do? Communicate with
government representatives,
share ideas with others at a,
local level, vote, contribute
money or supplies, volunteer
your own labor if it's called for,
and support green technology.
No, we can't expect to change
the whole world. Some things
we're going to need to deal with
on an emotional level. On 9/11
we lost some 3,000 people when
the Twin Towers went down.
We grieved together, memorial-
ized, and developed feelings of
strength and confidence as we
built stronger security and more
effective responses to terrorism.
We now work closer with other
nations, and maintain channels
of communication with all world
powers to make world peace
more of a possibility. We learn
what mistakes were made, and
'how to avoid them in the future.
Finally, we can influence our
feelings by the way we think
and believe. It's your world.
Life presents us with some \
very serious challenges. It's not
what happens to us that mat-
ters; ifs what we do about it.
Get on with your life. It's still a
beautiful world. See the beauty
and appreciate it. It'll give you
strength to meet this, and other
challenges we're sure to face in
the future.
* Contact Robert Denny at (386)
754-4269. .


a poor example he sets for our
children. Alcohol is one of the
"drugs" that causes a multitude
of problems in our land. Some
people have a "flaw" that will
lead them to addiction of many
substances. Alcohol, I believe,
is one. Lack of judgment or
common sense seems to be in
short supply in this man who
has been elected to the highest
office in our great land.
Now he chooses to slight
our veterans who have always
been honored in every top spot
of this nation, in our capitol
- and where does he choose
to go? A cemetery whose name
just happens to be Lincoln, the
Great.Emancipator. Is this coin-
cidence?
.1 think even God showed his
disapproval with that thunder-
storm that put him in his place
and off that podium with his
remarks which, since he has
been in office, are often not con-
ducive to uniting our country. I
believe we need to start think-
ing now about election time and
choose more carefully the man
who will lead and represent our
country, America the greatest
land on earth, and replace one
who does not seem to give it
complete and total unswerving
allegiance.
Martha Allbritton
Lake City


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmaoil.com


Tobacco

finances

terrorism
The next terror
attack on America
could be a self-
inflicted wound
- specifically a
cigarette burn.
Politicians expand tobacco
* taxes to discourage smoking
and feed their own nicotine-
like addiction to public spend-
ing. Like so many others, this
government action smolders
with unintended consequenc-
es. Tobacco taxes create a
perfect arbitrage opportunity
that radical Muslims exploit
to collect money for terrorist
groups that murder Americans
and our allies. Tobacco taxes
should be cut, or at least fro-
zen, before they fuel further
Islamic - extremist violence.
The incentive grows as
tax-hungry politicians raise
tobacco levies to finance gov-
ernment spending. President
Obama signed a 62-cent-per-
pack federal cigarette-tax
increase - from 39 cents to
$1.01. New York governor
David Paterson, a democrat,
wants to boostiper-pack taxes
from $2.75 to $3.75.
Terrorists move' cigarettes
because they are light, por-
table, otherwise legal, and pro-
duce cash. "Law enforcement
officials in New York State
estimate that well-organized
cigarette smuggling networks
generate between $200,000
and $300,000 per week," a 2008
House Homeland Security
Committee staff report con-
cluded. "A large percentage
of the money is believed to
be sent back to the Middle
East, where it directly or indi-
rectly finances groups such
as Hezbollah, Hamas, and.al-
Qaeda."
* The notorious
- "Lackawanna Six" Islamic-ter-
ror cell reportedly traveled in
2001 from Buffalo to al-Qaeda's
al Farooq training camp in
Afghanistan. They scored
$14,000 in travel money from
Aref Ahmed, a former gas-sta-
tion operator who was among
five defendants convicted in
2004 for cigarette trafficking
and money laundering.
* Mohamad Hammoud
was convicted in June 2002
on federal charges of materi-
ally supporting terrorism.
His brother, Chawki, was
convicted on related charges,
and eight others pled guilty in
this case. These conspirators
bought cigarettes in North
Carolina, which then had a
5-cent-per-pack tax, affixed
phony tax stamps, and then
sold them in 75-cent Michigan.
Over four years, this 70-cent
tax spread yielded A $1.5 mil-
lion profit, part of which this
gang forwarded to Hezbollah,
along with laptops, night-vision
goggles, stun guns, blasting
equipment, and more.
* Last May 5 and 6, New
York State tax agents arrested
Khader Awawdeh, Fahmi
Hassan, Hakim AI-Saydi, and
Dhafer Ghaleb in the Bronx.
Collectively, officials say, they
possessed 1,924 illicit cigarette
cartons and 36,832 counterfeit
tax stamps.
As an asthmatic that hates
the piercing stench of tobacco
smoke, I find myself in rare
agreement with those whose
product makes me sick.
Nonetheless, the tobacco
industry's convincing case for
cutting or freezing cigarette
taxes is a matter of life and
death. Tobacco-tax-hiking poli-
ticians have created a poten-
tially lethal situation in which
lighting a cigarette is like ignit-
ing the fuse on a bomb.
* New York commentator Deroy
Murdock is a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


4A










LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS TUESDAY,-JUNE 8, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Nov. 11, 2008, photo released by ArborGen shows a field of genetically engineered eucalyptus trees in Sebring. South
Carolina-based ArborGen has received federal approval to plant about 250,000 more trees in locations- around the South for
use by International Paper, MeadWestvaco and Rubicon LTD.


Paper industry tests genetically altered trees


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BkofAm NY .04 .3 71 14.83 -.52 -1.5 Microsoft Na$d .52 2.1 13 25.29 -.50 -17.0
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By MITCH STACY
Associated Press

TAMPA - The commer-
cial paper industry's plans
to plant forests of genetical-
ly altered eucalyptus trees
in seven Southern states
have generated more cries
from critics worried that
such a large introduction of
a bioengineered nonnative
plant could throw natural
ecosystems out of whack.
ArborGen, a biotechnol-
ogy venture affiliated with
three large paper compa-
nies, got U.S. Department
of Agriculture approval last
month for field trials involv-
ing as many as 250,000
trees planted at 29 sites
during the next few years.
Much smaller lots of the
genetically altered trees
have been growing in some
of the states for years.
Australian eucalyptus
trees grow faster than
native hardwoods and
produce high-quality pulp
perfect for paper produc-
tion, but thus far, they have,
been able to thrive only in
,very warm climates. South
Carolina-based ArborGen
genetically altered the
trees to withstand freezing
temperatures, and the idea
with the test forests is to
see how far north they can
now be grown.
The test sites will
cover a total of about 300
acres in Florida, South
Carolina, Texas, Alabama,


Mississippi, Georgia and
Louisiana.
While genetically engi-
neered crops such as-corn
and soybeans have become
common, ArborGen's
experiment marks the first
large planting of designer
trees in the United States.
The company says plan-
tations of hearty, faster-
growing eucalyptus could
produce more timber in
a smaller area and allow
conservation of natural for-
ests.
But critics say that
despite the USDA's assur-
ance that the trees pose
no environmental threat,
not enough is known about
their effect on natural sur-
roundings.
"We have many reserva-
tions about it," said Neil J.
Carman, a biologist who
serves on the Sierra Club's
genetic engineering com-
mittee. "We don't think the
scientific evidence is in yet
that says this is a good
idea."
Anne Petermann, execu-
tive director of the activ-
ist group' Global Justice
Ecology Project, said euca-
lyptus trees are invasive,
require vast amounts of
water that could reduce
groundwater levels, and
increase the wildfire risk
because they are so flam-
mable.
"This is quite a danger-
ous tree to be mass plant-
ing," Petermann said.


But ArborGen CEO
Barbara Wells said eucalyp-
tus trees have not proven
invasive in dozens of tropi-
cal countries where they
are widely grown on plan-
tations. Also, ArborGen
genetically ,modified the
trees to limit their ability to
disperse seed and spread.
Although the new field
trials - will significantly
increase the number of
genetically engineered
trees being grown, Wells
called it "very confined
research."
S"The total is 300 acres,
but when you're doing tree
research, that really is very
small acreage," she said,
noting that about 20,000
acres of genetically unal-
tered eucalyptus trees are
already grown in central
and southern Florida for
production of wood chips
and mulch. The new test
forests will show whether
the genetically altered trees
can thrive farther north
in Florida, where freezing
.temperatures can occur in
the winter.
Donald Rockwood, a
professor emeritus in the
University of Florida's
School of Forest Resources
and Conservation, has
worked for about 30 years
on developing eucalyptus
trees that thrive in Florida.
He uses traditional breed-
ing techniques, not genetic
modification.
The genetically unaltered


trees growing in controlled
plantations in Florida have
not proven invasive, are
relatively efficient users
of water and are no more
flammable than other hard-
woods, said Rockwood, who
was hired by ArborGen to
do a report on eucalyptus
trees' invasiveness because
of his experience, working
with them at the university.
Still, Rockwood said,
introduction of any geneti-
cally altered species poses
risks. For example, the
gene that makes the trees
resistant to cold could be
transferred to surrounding
plants, allowing them to
spread !farther north than
nature intended.
"It certainly needs to
be done carefully, it needs
to be regulated and there
needs to be a period of
well-defined observations,"
Rockwood said.
, The ArborGen trees will
be planted in seven cbun-
ties throughout Florida,
four counties each in
South Carolina and Texas,
two each in Alabama and
Mississippi and single
counties in Georgia and
Louisiana. Rockwood said
they can grow about 25 feet
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Consumer

borrowing

up slightly

in April

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER'
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON-
Consumer borrowing
increased slightly in April,
a sign that Americans may
have more faith in the eco-
nomic recovery.
Borr6wing rose by $954.8
million in April, the Federal
Reserve said Monday. But
the government revised
away a gain it had origi-
nally reported for March.
Instead, it reported that
credit fell a sharp $5.44 bil-
lion during that month.
The April increase, if it
stands, would be only the
second gain in the past 15
months. Economists are
hoping that households will
soon feel confident enough
to borrow more and help
sustain the recovery.
Consumer credit also
rose in January. Beyond the
January and April gains,
consumer credit has post-
ed a string of declines that
started in February 2009.
Households have cut back
on their spending to repair
their battered balance
sheets.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


COURTESY PHOTO
The Combs family (from left), Shanna, Sue, Anne, Mike and Seann, stand in front of the newly renovated Combs Building on
the Lake City Community College Campus. The building was rededicated on May 2.


LCCC Combs Building rededicated


From staff reports

The Combs Building on
the Lake City Community
College campus has been
renovated and now hous-
es the Testing C-nter,
Disability Services and the
Anatomy and Physiology


Lab. The Combs Building,
is named for Anne Combs.
Combs is a former district
board of trustees member
who returned recently,
with family members, to
tour the new building. She
joined the board beginning
in 1962 and served approxi-


mately 18 years.
"It feels good to be
back here," Combs said.
"At the, time, I was the
only'woman on the. LCCC
District Board of Trustees.
I really learned a lot from
the other board members.
Both of my sons are gradu-


ates of LCCC, Seann, my
grandson, just graduated
from here and my grand-
daughter, Shanna, attend-
ed the college as a dual
enrollment student. And
Sue Combs, my daughter-
in-law, graduated froth the
nursing school as well."


Women's heath fair

set for Friday will

focus on prevention


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Many health care profes-
sionals credit screenings
and early detection as the
key factor in caring for and
curing serious illnesses.
Later this week, local
women will have an oppor-
tunity to attend a health fair
where a variety of screen-
ings will be provided to
they can get an early start
on caring for potential seri-
ous illnesses.
The Shands Lake Shore
Women's Advantage pro-
gram will host a women's
health fair from 8:30 a.m. to
noon on Friday at the Lake
Shore Hospital Authority
Administration Complex,
259 NE Franklin St.
The health fair is free
for Shands Lake Shore
Women's Advantage pro-
gram members. People
planning to attend the
health fair can .sign up for
membership in the Shands
Lake Shore Women's
Advantage program, which
is free.
To register for the event,
call (866)-961-1185 or regis-
ter on line at www.shands.
org/WA.
The Shands Lake Shore
Women's Advantage
Program is a program that
allows women in the com-
munity to have access to
current and relevant health
information.
Shands HealthCare
Health promotions coordi-
nator Marsha Mott said the
program is at least a decade


old.
"The . purpose of the
health fair is to promote
awareness in women's
health issues," she said
"Some of the common
health issues that people
around America struggle
with are diabetes, high
blood pressure and heart
disease. We try to provide
information and screenings
for those illnesses to get
women aware to them."
As part of the health fair
the event will feature many
health. screenings includ-
ing blood .pressure, bone
density and blood, compo-
sition. Cholesterol screen-
ings will be offered for a
fee of $5. Information on
health, nutrition, diabetes
and exercise will also be
available.
Mott said organizers
are expecting at least 100
people to attend Friday's
event.
"We had about 125 peo-
ple last year," she said.
As part of the health fair,
University of Florida and
Shands clinic representa-
tives are scheduled to be
in attendance as well as
representatives from the
Columbia County Health
Department, Elder Options
and the SHINE (Serving
the Health Insurance Needs
of Elders) program.
"I think the main reason
this is important is to get
the information about these
illnesses to women as early
as possible so that they can
be advocates for their own
health needs," Mott said. :


ARREST REPORT,


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent until
proven guilty

Friday, June 4
Columbia, County.
Sheriff's Office
N Jonathan Woodrow
Bennett, 19, unknown
address, interference with'
child custody (two counts)
and giving false identifica-


tion to law enforcement
officer.
* Brian L. Johnson, 28,
299 SW Forest Terrace,
exploitation of the elderly,
uttering a forgery (27
counts), forgery (27
counts), fraudulent use of
a credit card (five counts)
and grand theft.
* Breiida E. Spies, '51,
5239 91st. Place,. Live Oak,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charge
of uttering a forgery (two
counts).


Department of
Probation
and Parole
* Jeremy A. Cameron,
no age given, 636 NW
Palm Drive, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of forgery
and grand theft and third-
degree grand theft.
n Antonio Maxwell
Jones, no age given, 1410
NW Labonte Lane, war-
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charges
of trespass of an occupied
structure.


Lake City
Police Department
* Brandy Lynn
Sandage, no age given,
236 SW Paradise Glen,
warrant Violation of pro-
bation on original charge
of possession of controlled
substance and possession
of a controlled substance
and possession of drug
paraphernalia.
* James Edward Shipp,
no age given, 125 NW
McCraken St, grand theft.

From staff reports.


Robert Woodard
Financial Advisor
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MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING

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Bus. 386-752-1215 TF Fax 800-217-2105
TF. 888-752-1215
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www.edwardjones.com




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OBITUARIES


Marguerite Ann Burke
Mrs. Marguerite Ann Burke,
age 87, of Lake City, Fla. died
Sunday, June 6, in the Haven
Hospice, Suwannee Valley Care
,Center, Lake City, Fla. following
a brief illness. She was born in
St. Louis, Missouri and resided
in Kansas City, Mo. and Nash-
ville, Tenn. before moving to
Lake City in 1979. She was a
homemaker and did volunteer
work with the Cerebral Palsy
Association and loved ceramics,
needle point and gardening. She
attended the Epiphany Catholic
Church, Lake City, Fla. She was
,preceded in death by her parents,
Charles and Florence Sills Paul
and was preceded in death by
husband of 62 years, James W.
Burke, Sr. She is survived by
two daughters, Mary (Sonny)
*Sallee of Dearborn, Missouri
and Elizabeth Ann Guhl of
Olathe, Wisconsin: Two sons,
Charles P. (Melissa) Burke, Sr.
of St. Augustine, Fla. and James
W. (Jeanne) Burke, Jr. of Lake
City, Fla.: One brother, Ray Paul
of Oskosh, Ws.: One sister, Dot-
tie Collins of Evansville, Ind.:
Six grandchildren, James W.
.Burke, III, James Brandon Guhl,
Eric Kristin Sallee, Stephanie
Laura ,Sallee, Charles "Chase"
Paul Burke, Jr. and Christian
James Burke: Two great-grand-
children, Zachary Burke and
Shayla Burke: Graveside funeral
.services will be conducted at 2
P.M. Wednesday, June 9, in For-
est Lawn Memorial Gardens,
Lake City, Fla. with Father Mike
Pendergraft, Pastor of Epiphany
Catholic Church, officiating.
Visitation will be from 6 to 7
P.M. Tuesday, June 8, at GUER-
RY FUNERAL HOME, 2659
'S.W. Main Blvd, Lake City, Fla.
* Please make meimnorials to the
American Heart Association or
Haven Hospice, Lake City, Fla.

David W. Fritz
David W. Fritz of Lake City died
.Monday May 31st at home of
natural causes. David was born


on January 8th 1926 in Scran-
ton, Pennsylvania, the 3rd son
of Lottie B. and . -
Stephen P. Fritz. .
David joined .
the Navy after ;,. -.- -
the outbreak, *""*
of the second World War and
saw action with the 7th Seabee
Construction Battalion on the
islands of Saipan'and Okinawa
in the Pacific Theater. Follow-
ing honorable discharge, Da-
vid returned to Newark, ,New
Jersey in 1945 where he met
his future wife Marie Collins.
They were married in 1948.
David worked as a mechanic
for the Public Service Electric
and Gas Company and later as
a sales representative and ware-
house manager for the Paulus
Dairy in New Brunswick, New
Jersey and the Rosenberger
Dairy in Hatfield, Pennsylva-
nia before retiring in 1985. He
moved to Lake City in 1989.
-He is predeceased by his brother
Roland and sister-in-law Eliza-
beth of Coplay, Pennsylvania. He
is survived by Marie, his wife of
62 years; his son Alan and wife
Sharon of Monmouth Junction,
New Jersey; his daughter Linda
Litchfield and husband Douglas
Litchfield of Coplay, Pennsylva-
nia, four grandchildren and one
great grandchildren. He is also
survived by his brother Floyd and
sister-in-law Lois of Lake City.
Funeral arrangements are pri-
vate. In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests that contributions
be made to the American Heart
Association in his memory.
Arrangements are under the
care of ICS CREMATION
AND FUNERAL HOME,
Lake City, FL 386-752-3436.

Ronald Jones
Ronald Jones of lake City,
Florida, formerly of Panama
City, Florida was born Septem-
ber 22, 1946 in
Bankston, Ala- 8
bama. He died
on June 5, 2010,
in the V.A. I los- " .


pital, Lake City, Florida. Special
thanks to the nurses and doctors
of the Palliatville Care Unit, VA
Hospital, Gainesville, Florida
and of Serenity Place, VA Hospi-
tal, Lake City, Florida who cared
foi him during his valiant battle
with cancer, ron served in the US
Army during the Viet Nam era.
He attended schools in Cen-
tral Florida including Lyman in
Longwood, Florida and gradu-
ated with a B.S. degree for FSU.
His last job was with the Bay
District School System before
he moved to Lake City in 2004.
Ron especially enjoyed the mu-
sic of the 50s and 60s and an-
tique cars. He was a member of
the Masonic Orange, Lodge No.
36F & AM, Apopka, Fl. He was
a very private person but also a
kind, generous and friendly man.
He believed everyone should
be educated and gave finan-
cial assistance to relatives en-
rolled in college as he was able.
He was preceded in death
by his step-father, Grady L.
Wilson, Panama City, -Fl.
Left to cherish his memory:
Mother: Sybil P. Wilson, Lake
City; Father: Lawrence Scott
(Carol) Jones, Rapid City, S.D.;
Sister: Faye (Emerson) Darst,
Lake City; Nephews: Stephen
(Jolee) Oder, Huntsville, AL,
Lawrence Scott Oder (fiancee'
Summer Howell), Gainesville,
Fl., Lee (Ann) Darst, Tallahas-
see, Fl; Niece: Deanne (Paul)
Plemmons and their children, Cl-
ermont, Fl; Grand-nephews and
Grand-nieces: Simone McDan-
iel, Kennesaw, Ga., Christopher
Oder, Jacksonville, Fl, Saman-
tha Oder Philman, Lake City;
Great-nephew: Ronnie Michael
(Trey) Philman III, Lake City.
Special Friends: Rick (Marrilee)
Moquin, Longwood, Fl. Wayne
(Ruth) Langston, Havana, Fl.,
Connie (Mike) Hrisko, Norfolk,
Va., Elizabeth Clark and Kenny
Onraet, both of Panama City, Fl.
In lieu of flowers, Ron requested
donations to a "no-kill" ani-
mal rescue organization of your
choice or SkunkieAcres, P.O. Box
769, White Springs, Fl. 32096
Visitation: 5-7pm Tuesday.


Graveside Service: 2:00
pm Wednesday @ - Panama
City Beach, FL. in the Gar-
den of Memories Cemetery.
Under the direction of:
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME in Lake
City, Fl. 3596 S. US Hwy 441,
Lake City, Fl 386-752-1954

Nell Imogene Pettyjohn
Mrs. Nell Imogene Pettyjohn,
age 70, of Lake City, Fla. died
Sunday, June 6, in the Suwannee
Valley Care Center, Lake City,
Fla. following a long illness.
She was bom in Mayo, Florida
and lived in Ft. White, Fla. be-
fore moving to Lake City, Fla. 63
years ago. She worked as a den-
tal receptionist for many years
and then became a full time
homemaker with her husband,
children and grandchildren. She
was a member of the First Chris-
tian Church, Lake City, Fla. She
was preceded in death by her
parents, Leon and Dorothy Bo-
hanan Walker and her brother,
Louie Walker. She is survived by
hep husband of 51 years, Gene
Pettyjohn of Lake City, Fla.:
Two daughters, Brenda (Hal)
Johns of Macclenny, Fla. and
Lisa Turman of Lake City, Fla.:
One son, Don (Nancy) Pettyjohn
of Macclenny, Fla.: One brother,
Ray (Diane) Walker of Lake
City, Fla.: Seven grandchildren
and five great-grandchildren also
survive. Funeral services will be
conducted at 11 .A.M. Wednes-
day, June "9, in the Chapel of
Guerry Funeral Home with Rev.
Larry Sweat, Pastor of Berea
Baptist Church, officiating, In-
ternment will be in Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens, Lake City,
Fla. Visitation will be from 6 to 8
P.M. Tuesday, June 8, at GUER-
RY FUNERAL HOME, 2659
S.W. Main Blvd., Lake City, Fla.


Obituaries are paid 'advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
SCORE workshop
SCORE of Suwannee
Valley is hosting a
STARTUP 101 workshop
from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
today at Guangdong
Restaurant Tickets are
$20 and include lunch and
materials. Call 752-2000.

Political rally
A political rally hosted
by the Columbia County
Republican Executive
Committee is at 7 p.m.
today.at the Fort White
Community Center. There
will be a free chicken pilau
dinner.

Photography Club
Seniors are invited to
attend a special workshop
session at 2 p.m. today at
the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center. Bring up to five of
your favorite photographs
for critiquing by guest
photographer/artist Joan
Fetchen, former Lake,
City CommunityCollege
photography professor and
current Head of the Art
Guild of North Florida.

Ultimate backyard
barbecue package
Tickets are available
for the Ultimate Backyard
BBQ Packager through
June 30. The drawing is
at 12 p.m. July 2. Tickets
are $2 each or'three for
$5. Call (386) 364-7720
or (386) 758-1170. A
$50 Publix gift card is
included. Proceeds ben-
efit Voices for Children
of the Suwannee Valley,
Inc. Helping Abused and
Neglected Children in
Need.

Adopt-A-Cat Month
June is Adopt-A-Cat


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Nikki Howeth (left) and Jennifer Carron cheer on their daughters Jaida Leo, 4, and Deena Brinkley, 2, as they reach the top of
a ladder at a playground at the Southside Recreational Center on Monday.


Month and the Lake City
Humane Society has a
wide variety of cats and
kittens available. During
the entire month of June,
adoption fees will be
waived for all cats over 6
months old. Most are fully
vaccinated and spayed or
neutered and some are
already declawed. Visit
lakecityhumane.org or call
(386)752-3191

Wednesday
Newcomer's meeting
Lake City Newcomer's
regular meeting and lun-


cheon
The regular monthly
meeting of the Lake City
' Newcomer's is at 11 a.m.
June 9 at Quail Heights
Country Club, located on
the Branford Highway.
Price of the luncheon is
$10. This is the annual
picnic. The speaker, Kathy
Wisner, will be explaining
H2U, formerly Seniors
United. All members,
friends, guests along with
any newcomers to the
community are welcome.
Call 935-9272 or 719-5661.

Hope for homeowners
Wealth Watcher's, Inc., a


HUD Certified Counseling
Agency will be available
to help families facing
foreclosure or having
trouble making mortgage.
payments from noon to
5 p.m. June 9'at State
Representative Debbie
Boyd's District Office 212
North Marion Avenue,
Suite 203. Call: (386)719-
4592 Or (904)265-4765
Please bring copies of your
most recent: Mortgage
Statement, Bank Statement
(1 month), Paycheck Stub
(1 month), Verification
of Other Income, Utility
Statement, Property
Taxes, Homeowners


Insurance and Recent
Filed Tax Return.


June 10 at Guangdong
Chinese Restaurant
Sherry Rowan, of the
Florida Department of
Investigations, is the
speaker. Call 755-0110.


Friday
Al Stone to perform
Al Stone will be per-
forming June 11 at Marion
Street Cafe, 281 N. Marion
Street

RHS 40th class reunion
The Richardson High
Class of 1970 is celebrating
ifs 40th reunion June 11-
12 at Winfield Community
Center. Call Macy Wilson
at (386),752-3471 or Dennis
Murphy at (386)697-3739.


Saturday
AARP meeting
Lake City Chapter
AARP will meet at 11 a.m.
June 12 at the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center, 628 SE
Allison Court The guest
speaker is Polly Taylor,
Hospice Care Center
administrator. Please'bring
food for a covered dish
lunch at noon. Call Elsie at
752-3703.


YEP Speed Networking
ecnednepednIe nippilihP


A Young Emerging
Professionals Speed
Networking event is from
5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Oaks.
The event is sponsored
by Brian Zecher Homes.
RSVP to sonja@lakec-
itychamber.com. '

Thursday
Landlord's meeting
The next monthly land-
lord's meeting is at 6 p.m.


Day
The Filipino American
Cultural Sqciety of Lake
City is hosting a Philippine
Independence Day cel-
ebration and general meet-
ing from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
June 12 in Alligator Park
Main Pavilion. There will
be cultural food, games,
entertainment and more.
Call Bob Gavette at 965-
5905.


Police: Gunman kills 4 women but no men


By SUZETTE LABOY
Associated Press
HIALEAH - A gunman
shot and killed his wife out-
side a South Florida res-
taurant where she worked,
then targeted women inside
and killed three others
before committing suicide,
police said Monday.
Police said the shooter
bypassed at least two men
when he fired at the women
inside. Three women were
hospitalized in critical
condition, Hialeah police
Detective Eddie Rodriguez
said.
"He went straight for the
women," Rodriguez said.
The shooting Sunday
.night began in a park-
ing lot outside the Yoyito
:Restaurant in Hialeah,
where 38-year-old Gerardo


Regalado of Coral Gables
was seen arguing with
Liazan Molina, Rodriguez
said. According to Florida
marriage records, the cou-
ple married in 2007.
According to police,
Regalado shot and killed
Molina, 24, then entered
the restaurant and fired at
six women inside.
One employee called her
brother after the shooting,
saying she had been shot
and was bleeding.
I Felix Fuentes said' his
sister, Ivette Coronado, told
him to "please call 911." He
said the 32-year-old woman
was recovering Monday
after undergoing surgery
for gunshot wounds to her
chest and one of her arws.
Regalado drove off after
the shooting, police said.
Officers found him dead


Man says report of a

bomb on plane was joke


By FRANK ELTMAN
Associated Press

CENTRAL ISLIP, N.Y.
- A Chicago man arrested
after telling a flight atten-
dant he might have a bomb
in his carry-on luggage
later told authorities he had
been making a joke.
Draco Slaughter, 75, was
ordered held on $50,000 bail
Monday at his arraignment
in Suffolk County District
Court. His court-appoint-
ed attorney entered a not
guilty plea on his behalf to a
charge of reporting a false
incident, a felony.
Wearing a red bowling
shkrt, Slaughter seemed
anxious to tell District
Court Judge William Ford
what had happened, but his
attorney cautioned him to
remain silent during the
proceeding.
Draco was arrested after
Southwest Airlines Flight


373 from Chicago had
arrived at about 2:35 p.m.
Sunday at Long Island
MacArthur Airport in
Ronkonkoma, about 50
miles east of New York
City. As passengers were
exiting the Boeing 737, a
flight attendant noticed a
carry-on bag near the rear
of the jetliner ahnd asked
those nearby if they knew
* its owner. '
"I said it was mine and
kidding I also said that
there could be a bomb in
there," Draco said in his
statement to police follow-
ing his arrest. He conceded
the flight attendant immedi-
ately warned him he could
be arrested for what he had
said.
As he left the aircraft, he
was met by security per-
sonnel, who took him into
custody. A two-hour search
of the jetliner turned up
nothing dangerous.


of an apparent suicide a few
blocks away, with the same
weapon used in the restau-'
rant shootings, Rodriguez
said.
People inside the Coral
Gables house where
Regalado and Molina lived
refused to answer a report-
er's knocks at the door. A
person who answered the
phone identified himself
only as a family friend and
said the family didn't want
to talk.
It was not immediately
clear if the women shot
were restaurant employees
or customers. The shoot-
ing began at 10:15 p.m.,
shortly after the restaurant
had closed.
A spokeswoman- for
Jackson Memorial Hospital


declined to release any
information about the three
women being treated there
because all had requested.
privacy.
Regular customers gath-
ered in shock outside the
restaurant Monday.
"They are good people,"
said Valentin Perez, 52,
who visits the' restaurant
for his Cuban coffee every
morning.
Octavio Guzman, anoth-
er customer, said the res-
taurant workers are always
generous with those who
can't afford a meal.
"You tell anyone here,
'I'm hungry and I don't
have money,' and they give
it to you," Guzman said.
No further details were
available by press time
Monday.


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Gates to spend $1.5B

on women's health


By ROBERT BURNS
AP National Security Writer
WASHINGTON -
Philanthropist Melinda
Gates announced Monday
that the Bill & Melinda
Gates Foundation will
spend $1.5 billion over five
years to support maternal
and child health projects
abroad. -
Gates, whose hus-
band Bill is co-founder of
Microsoft Corp. and one of
the world's richest people,
made her announcement at
an international conference


on women's health attended
by U.N. Secretary-General
Ban Ki-moon. The event
was billed as the largest-
ever conference on wom-
en's health.
Gates said the world is
not lacking in know-how
to reduce the number of
deaths in childbirth.
* "It's that we haven't tried
hard enough," she said.
"Policymakers in' both
rich and poor countries
have treated women and
children, quite frankly, as if
they matter less than men,"
Gates said.


lary H. Summerall
ancial Services Rep. I


I 234 SW Main Blvd.* 752-5866




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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & STATE


TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


v1 w ^'asis
*_ -,xii~ *^


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Matt Polczyn�ki (left) looks for tarballs as he walks along the beach, in Gulf Shores, Ala.,
Monday. At right Will and Wes Thibodeaux of Elmer, La., also walk the beach.


Coast Guard: Cap collecting oil


By MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press
PENSACOLA BEACH
- The geyser of oil spew-
inig from sea floor is taper-
ing off more day by day
with the help of a wellhead
cap,, but there's no quick
fix for containing, much of
the crude that has already
escaped and is spreading
across the Gulf of Mexico.
The cap is now keeping
up to 462,000 gallons of oil
a day from leaking into the
Gulf, Coast Guard Adm.
Thad Allen said Monday in
Washington. That's up from
about 441,000 gallons on
Saturday and about 250,000
on Friday.
Federal authorities have
estimated the ruptured pipe
is leaking between 500,000
gallons and 1 million gal-
lons a day.
The battle against the
oil already in the Gulf now,
involves "hundreds of thou-
sands" of individual patch-
es, said Allen, the govern-
ment's point man for the
spill response. Small ves-
sels in the area have been


enlisted to help capture
those patches using skim-
mers.
The patchy oil slick now
stretches from 100 miles
east of the Texas-Louisiana
border to near the middle
of the Florida Panhandle,
and down to the open sea
about 150 miles west of
Tampa, officials said.
Allen elaborated on com-
ments over the weekend
that the spill cleanup would'
last into fall, acknowledg-
ing .the full cleanup would
take much longer.
"Dealing with the oil spill
on the surface will take
a couple of months," he
said, but the process of get-
ting oil out of marshlands
and other habitats "will be
years." ,
In Florida,� tar balls con-
tinued to roll onto Pensacola
Beach on Monday morning
and left a distinct line in
the sand from the high-rise
condos above as the sun
rose. Beach walkers had
to stay between the line
of dime- and quarter-size
tar balls :and the retreat-
ing surf or risk getting the


gummy, rust-staining gunk
stuck to their feet.
Jody Haas, a tourist from
Aurora, Ill., was among the
few walking the beach early
Monday after a crowded
weekend here. Haas, who
had visited the beach
before, said it was not the
same.
"Itwas pristine, gorgeous,
white sand," she said. "This
spot is light compared to
some of the other spots far-
'ther down and (the tar) is
just everywhere here. It's
just devastating, awful."
Officials put out a report
late Sunday that dead,
oiled birds had been found
in Texas but retracted, it
Monday morning. U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service
spokeswoman Nancy
Brown blamed the mistake
on a clerical error.
BP said Monday that
the cost of the response
has reached about $1.25
billion. The company said
the figure does not include
,$360 million for a project to
build six sand berms meant
to protect Louisiana's wet-
lands from spreading oil.


COURTESY PHOTO
Park Street Band performs its original music this weekend at Spirit of Suwannee Music Park.

Music Park: Band stretches genres


From staff reports

At Spirit of Suwannee
Music Park this weekend,
Teddy Mac teaches line
dancing and entertains,
and the Park Street Band of
Jacksonville is in the house
with its Jam Band, Jazz,
experimental sound.
Ted "Teddy Mac"
McMullen, an Elvis tribute
artist, will teach line danc-
ing from 7-8 p.m. Friday
before an evening of great
music and dancing.
On Saturday night, the
Park Street Band will per-
form. This band is com-
posed of four musicians
who met at an open jam
held at Yesterday's Social
Club on Park Street in


'COURTESY PHOTO
Ted 'Teddy Mac' McMullen in
performance as Elvis.

Jacksonville. The group's
original music is called
alternative soul, because
influences range from the


Allman Brothers to Jack
Johnson to Janis Joplin and
Phyllis Hyman. The band
is currently working on its
first CD.
Park Street Band mem-
bers include Myrna
Stallworth on vocals (song
writing and arranging);
John Parkeruban on guitar
and vocals; Ray Lunn on
bass and Duane Washburn
on drums and vocals.
The Music Hall doors
open at 5 p.m. Friday for
dinner. Admission is $5 and
can be applied to meal and
beverage tab. Admission
Saturday night is $10 per
person.
For more information
call (386) 364-1683 or visit
www. musicliveshere. com.


Glitches delay release of FCAT scores


Associated Press

MIAMI - The Miami
Herald is reporting that
some student scores on
the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test have been
delayed for weeks because
the testing company hired
by the state had problems
administering and grading
the exams.


NCS Pearson received a
$254 million contract from
the Florida Department of
Education to administer
and score the exams on
paper and pilot the state's
new computer-based tests.
Memos obtained* by
The Herald from the state
department of education
and South Florida school
districts detail the prob-


lems throughout the test-
ing season. The glitches
include incompatible data-
bases, technical issues with
computerized tests and the
failure to deliver testing
materials to some schools.
A Pearson spokes-
man did not immediately
respond Sunday to phone
or e-mail messages.


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Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Tuesday. lune 8. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Finals are Boston bound


Celtics even up
series as it heads
back East.

By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

BOSTON - Chin resting
in his hand, mouth barely
moving as he spoke, Kobe
j3ryant had the look of
someone who would have
rather been .anywhere but
Staples Ceriter.
The next few nights
might make him-long to be
back home.
The NBA's best rivalry is
returning to its East Coast
headquarters, site of per-
haps the most miserable
moment of Bryant's- career
last time he and the Los
Angeles Lakers were here
for the finals.
And the Boston Celtics
and their green-clad fans
can't wait to welcome him
back.
"I feel good going back to


the jungle," Celtics forward
Kevin Garnett said Sunday.
Those familiar "Beat L.A!
Beat LA!" chants that have
echoed through the Garden
during so many springtimes
will be booming again, and
the Celtics can lock up an
18th NBA title if they can
do just that three times.
Game 2 is Tuesday
night, followed by games
Thursday and Sunday in
Boston.
The Celtics evened the
series at a game apiece
with their 103-94 victory in
Game 2, with guards Rajon
Rondo and Ray Allen taking
turns punishing the Lakers,
and Bryant often powerless
to stop them because of foul
trouble.
A fuming Bryant had
little to say afterward, offer-
ing terse responses as he
looked back on that game
and ahead to the next one.
"It's the most important

BOSTON continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston Celtics guard Rajon Rondo (bottom), Los Angeles
Lakers guard Derek Fisher (center) and Boston forward
Kevin Garnett go after a rebound during the NBA finals'
Sunday, in Los Angeles.


Izzo to Cleveland?


Michigan State
coach being
pursued by Cavs.

By LARRY LAGE
Associated Press

Tom Izzo has another
suitor.
Michigan State athletic
director Mark Hollis told
The Associated Press on
'Monday the Cleveland
Cavaliers are interested in
replacing fired coach Mike
Brown with Izzo
"There is not a contract
offer on the table;" Hollis
said in a telephone inter-
view. "Last week, there was
talk that Chicago and New
Jersey were interested.
If I was anywhere but at-
Michigan State, I would
be interested in Tom, too,
because he's the best coach
in college basketball."
The . News-Herald of
Willoughby, Ohio, reported
Sunday the Cavaliers have
made an offer to Izzo, cit-


ing an unidentified league
source.
The (Cleveland) Plain
Dealer reported Monday
that Cavs owner Dan Gilbert
discussed the framework
of a deal, worth. about $6
million a season for up to
five years, with perks such
as using one of his private
jets.
"As far as I know, nothing
has changed," Hollis said.
Gilbert reiterated in an
'e-mail to the AP the team's
policy is to not comment on
"any rumor about potential
new hires, trades, free agent
signing, etc." Complicating
his coaching search is the
uncertainty surrounding
LeBron James, the jewel
of the marketplace when
free agency opens July 1.
James said, in an interview
last week Cleveland has "an
edge" in re-signing him.
Messages by phone and
text were left with Izzo.
The Lansing State Journal

IZZO continued on 3B


On to

World's No.1
ranked player
wins 5th Frendh.

By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

PARIS - Twice Rafael
Nadal sprawled onto the
clay he loves. He joined-
the crowd in applauding
and shed tears of joy. Then
the King of Clay posed for
photos with the-queen of
Spain.
The celebration of
Nadal's fifth French Open
title was exuberant but
brief. It didn't include
plans for a party in Paris
on Sunday night
"Difficult to have a big
celebration if you have to
practice tomorrow," Nadal
said.
Wimbledon awaits. The
year's third and most pres-
tigious Grand Slam tourna-
ment is only two weeks
away, and Nadal wanted to
begin his grass-court prep-
arations Monday.
The switch in surfaces
comes after he completed
an undefeated clay-court
season Sunday by beating
Robin Soderling in the final
at Roland Garros, 6-4, 6-2,
6-4. With. the win, Nadal'
regained the No. 1. rank-
ing from Roger Federer,
magnifying the stakes


gras,
should the two meet in the
Wimbledon final July 4.
Their rivalry has been
dormant lately - they've
met only once in the past
year, and haven't played
each other in a Grand Slam
tournament since February
2009. .
There was no showdown
at Roland Garros .because
defending champion
Federer lost to Soderling
in the quarterfinals. And
there was no showdown
at Wimbledon last year
because Nadal missed
the tournament with knee
trouble after beating
Federer inr the dramatic
2008 final.
Now Nadal's healthy
again and riding a 22-match
winning streak. He'll play
the grass-court warmup
event at Queen's this week,
and hell be seeded No. 1 at
the All England Club.
Nadal figures the title in
Paris helps his chances in
London.
"Confidence always is
the most important thing,"
he said. "So winning here
and winning the last 22
matches on clay is always
very good preparation for
grass."
The victory at Roland
Garros capped Nadal's
comeback from a tumultu-
ous 2009, when he endured
tendinitis in both knees


for Nadal


and the separation of his
parents. That's why the win
left him sobbing - a ritual
for Federer following a
major final, but uncommon
for Nadal.
"It's the most emotional
day in my career," Nadal
told the crowd in French
during the trophy ceremo-
ny.
His slump last year
included a loss tctSoderling
in the fourth round at
Roland Garros. He avenged
that defeat and now has a
career record of 38-1 in the
tournament. '
"Apparently. my game
is perfectly suited to this
surface," Nadal said. "I
love it with all my heart,
because it gave me so
much joy."
He became the second
man' to win the French
Open at least five times.,
Next year he'll have a
chance to match Bjorn
Borg's record of six titles.
"rafa. nadal best ever
on clay..., period," Andy
Roddick tweeted.
Nadal said he'll let oth-
ers decide that.
"First of all,. it's going
to be very arrogant if I
say for myself I am the
best of the history," Nadal
said. "Second thing, I don't
believe I am the best of the
history. I try my best every.
day, and we will see when I


finish ify career."
Nadal's not inclined to
rest on his achievements.
He has beenrworking to
improve everything from
his serve to his footwork,
and Wimbledon will pro-
vide a test of progress.
The Spaniard hasn't won
the U.S. Open yet, either.
And seven Grand Slam
titles leave him nine behind
Federer's record of 16.
'To really be satisfied,
I have to become the best
tennis player of all time,"
Nadal said. "That'd be real-
ly great"
His play was up to that
caliber against Soderling,
a dangerous opponent
because of his overpower-
ing serve and forehand.
Nadal robbed ground-
strokes of their sting with
dogged defense, chasing
down balls all over the court
and repeatedly extending
rallies until Soderling final-
ly misfired.
Soderling's coach,
Magnus Norman, said
Nadal took his game to a
new level.
"This was something
special," Norman said. "It's
unbelievable. You have to
win the point three or four
times."
Nadal was at his best
at pivotal moments, saving
all eight break points he
faced.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spain's Rafael Nadal holds the cup after defeating Sweden's
Robin Soderling for the French Open championship at the
Roland Garros stadium in Paris, Sunday.


IN THE PITS


Time for Tom Logano to

let Joey fight own battles


Wreck leads to
post-fight drama
in Sprint Cup.

By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Joey Logano made it clear on
pit road at Pocono that he's
sick and tired of being pushed
around. Its about time.
Logano, the scrawny
new kid on the playground
finally stood up to one o
the neighborhood bullies
by essentially telling Kevin
Harvick he was done play
ing nice. If the confront
tion following Sunday's rac
wasn't enough to make his
point, Logano followed up
with three pointed shots a
the veteran driver in a live


television interview.
One of them was about
Harvick's wife!
Who knew the kid had it
in him? F
After all, it was long 'over-
due display of backbone for
Logano, who likely earned
- a fair share of respect for
n finally standing up for him-
s self after a season-and-a-half
d of being polite. Problem is,
his newfound moxie has
y been somewhat overshad-
1, owed by. the presence of
f Daddy.
s Ah, yes, Tom Logano.
n Back in the center of-the
- storm.
I- The elder Logano learned
e a hard lesson last year, when
s NASCAR pulled his creden-
p tial for entering pit road to
t confront Greg Biffle follow-
e ing the Nationwide Series


race at California. He was
angry at how Biffle had
raced his son, who only two
weeks earlier had rolled his
car seven times in a spec-
tacular accident at Dover.
Young Joey was clearly
shaken following that
wreck, and his post-acci-
dent demeanor raised ques-
tions about his mettle. It
didn't help that TV cameras
caught Tom Logano mak-
ing a panicked sprint to the
care center, painting a pic-.
ture of a scared little boy in
need of his father.
It was probably an unfair
characterization, but big-
time pro sports can be
cutthroat and Joey Logano
endured a decent dose of
whispering about the back-
to-back incidents and the
role of his father, the over-


. ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joey Logano (left) and Kevin Harvick head out of Turn 2 during the NASCAR Sprint Cup
Series auto race, Sunday, in Long Pond, Pa. A few laps later, near the end of the race,
Harvick nudged Logano into the wall.


zealous protector.
Yet there he was again
on Sunday at Pocono,
where he was the second
to reach Joey's cat after he
was spun by Harvick in the
closing laps. The first was
a Joe Gibbs Racing crew-
man, who made an honest
effort to keep the. driver
from wading into the sea of
yellow-clad team members
who had formed a barrier
around Harvick. The guy
might have succeeded, too,
if Tom Logano - a tall, fit,
hot-tempered Italian - had
not pried him away from


his son.
What happened next is
up for interpretation, but
multiple replays seemed
to show the father encour-
aging his son to confront
Harvick with both a ges-
ture and what appeared to
be a shout of "Go Ahead!"
Joey Logano never got that
close to Harvick, but he
was red-faced and shouting,
behavior never before seen
in NASCAR from the polite
20-year-old.
At some point in all the
commotion, Tom Logano
apparently shoved a televi-


sion reporter out of his way,
an action 'that earned the
father his own trip to the
NASCAR hauler.
Just like that, NASCAR
had its very own Little
League dad.
That's not to say Tom
Logano wasn't already cat-
egorized that way. He's
been hands-on for Joey's
entire career, which took
off after he sold the family's
waste management compa-
ny in Connecticut and used
the funds to help his two
children pursue their
dreams.


I - ` I


�











Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 - World Series, finals, game 2,
teams TBD, at Oklahoma City
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ABC - Playoffs, finals, game 3, LA.
Lakers at Boston
SOCCER
3:55 p.m.
ESPN2 - Men's national teams, exhi-
bition, Spain vs. Poland, at Murcia, Spain

BASKETBALL

NBA Finals

Boston vs. L.A. Lakers
Sunday
Celtics 103, Lakers 94,
Today
LA. Lakers at Boston, 9 p.m.
Thursday
LA. Lakers at Boston, 9 p.m. \

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Tampa Bay 37 20 .649 -
New York 35 22 .614 2
Boston 33 25 .569 4'
Toronto 33 25 .569 4h
Baltimore 16 41 .281 21'
Central Division
I W L Pct GB
Minnesota 33 24 .579 -
Detroit 29 27 .518 3A
Chicago 24 32 .429 8'
Kansas City 24 34 .414 9A
Cleveland 21 34 .382 II
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 30 26 .536 -
Los Angeles 31 28 .525. 'A
Oakland 30 28 .517 I
Seattle - . 22 34 .393 8

Sunday's Games
N.Y.Yapkees 4,Toronto 3
Baltimore 4, Boston 3, II innings
Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 7
Kansas City 7, Detroit 2
Tampa Bay 9,Texas/5,
Oakland 5, Minnesota 4
LA.Angels 9, Seattle 4
Monday's Games
Boston at Cleveland (n)
Seattle at Texas (n)
LA.Angels at Oakland, (n)
Today's Games
Boston (Wakefield 1-4) at Cleveland
(D.Huff 2-6), 705 p.m.'
N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 7-1) at
Baltimore (Millwood 0-6), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Tallet 1-1) at Tampa Bay
(Niemann 5-0), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-4) at Texas
(C.Lewis 4-4), 8:05 p.m.
Detroit (Galarraga 2-1) at Chicago
White Sox (Floyd 2-6), 8:10 p.m. '
Kansas City (Greihke I1-7) at Minnesota
(Slowey 6-3), 8:10 p.m.
L.A.Angels (jer.Weaver 5-2) at Oakland
(Mazzaro 1-0), 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 33 24 .579 -
Philadelphia 30 25 .545 2
NewYork 30 27 .526 3
Florida 28 30 .483 5'A
Washington 27 31 .466 6%A
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 33 24 .579 -
St. Louis 33 i24 .579 -
Chicago . 25 31 .446 7'h
Pittsburgh 23 33 .411 9A
Milwaukee 23 34 .404 10
Houston 22 35 .386 II
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Diego 33 23 .589 -
Los Angeles 33 24 .579 'A
San Francisco 30 25 .545 2'A
Colorado 29 27 .518 4
Arizona 22 35 .386 I I'A


Sunday's Games
N.Y. Mets 7, Florida 6
Cincinnati 5,Washington 4, 10 innings
. San Diego 6, Philadelphia 5, 10 innings
San Francisco 6, Pittsburgh 5, 10
innings
Houston 6, Chicago Cubs 3
LA. Dodgers S,Atlanta 4, II innings
Colorado 3,Arizona 2
Milwaukee 4, St. Louis 3, 10 innings,'
Monday's Games
Chicago Cubs 6, Pittsburgh I
San Diego at Philadelphia (n}
San Francisco at Cincinnati (n)
Houston at Colorado (n)
Atlanta at Arizona (n)
St. Louis at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Garmes
Florida (Volstad 3-6) at Philadelphia
(K.Kendrick 3-2), 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 1-1) at
Washington (Strasburg 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
San Diego (Richard 4-3) at N.Y. Mets


(Pelfrey 8-1),7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 4-4) at Cincinnati
(LeCure 1-1),7:10.p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Lilly 1-5) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 6-2), 8:10 p.m.
Houston (Moehler 0-2) at Colorado
(Francis I-2), 8:40 p.m.
Atlanta (Medlen 3-1) at Arizona
(E.Jackson 3-6), 9:40 p.m.
St. Louis (Carpenter 7-1) at, L.A.
Dodgers (Kuroda 5-4), 10:10 p.m.

Division I regionals

Norwich Regional
Saturday
Connecticut 25, Central Connecticut'
State 5, CCSU eliminated
Florida State 6, Oregon 4
Sunday
Oregon 4, Connecticut 3, UConn
eliminated
Florida State 5, Oregon 3

Gainesville Regional
Saturday
Florida Atlantic 12, Bethune-Cookman
6, Bethune-Cookman eliminated
Florida 10, Oregon State 2
Sunday
Florida Atlantic II, 'Oregon State 7,
OSU eliminated
Florida 15, Florida Atlantic 0

Coral Gables Regional
Saturday
Dartmouth 15, Florida International 9,
FIU eliminated
Miami 14,TexasA&M I
Today
Texas A&M 4, Dartmouth 3, Dartmouth
eliminated
Texas A&M II ,'Miami 7

AUTO RACING


Fusion ProGlide 500

(Start position in parentheses)
I. (5) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 204 laps,
144.3 rating, 195 points, $112,875.
2. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 204, 124.7,
175, $220,854.
3. (6) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 204,
98.2, 165,$163,146.
9 4. (22) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 204,
113.2, 165,$153,249.
5. (25) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 204,
110.1, 155, $150,243.
6. (4) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 204, 81.5,
155, $146,196.
7. (13) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,' 204,
107.9, 146, $123,488. \
8. (7) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
204, 93.8, 142, $ 17,654.
9. (2) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 204,
I 19.7, 143, $88,150r.
10. (17) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 204,93.
134,$118,149.
II. (19) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 204,
84.2, 135, $85,975.
12.(26) Carl Edwards, Ford, 204, 80.8,
127,$112,846.
--13. (12) Joey Logano, Toyota, 204, 94,
124, $112,138.
14. (9) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 204,
76.5, 121,$107;177.
15. (29) David Reutimann,Toyota, 204,
68.4, 118, $103,154.
16. (33) Paul flenard, Ford, 2.04, 56.4,
I 15, $79,850.
17. (15) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 204, 76.1,
112,$116,399.
18. (24) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 204,
64.9,109, $78,800.
19. (3) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
204,81.6, 106, $78,450.
20. (31) Scott Speed,Toyota, 204, 61.2,
103, $89,246.
21. (I I) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 204,
61.7, 100, $97,433.
22. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 204, 46.6,
97, $90,483.
23. (23) Casey Mears,Toyota, 204,54.3,
94, $107,971.
24. (43) David Stremme, Ford, 204,'
52.6,91, $82,900.
25. (27) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 204,
75.6,88, $68,625.
26. (35) David Ragan, Ford, 204, 54.5,
85, $76,975.
27. (8) Kasey Kahne, Ford, accident,
203, 91.9, 82, $108,363.
28. (28) Greg Biffle, Ford, accident, 203,
77.2,79, $75,675.
29. (14) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, acci-
dent, 203, 66.2,76, $85,025.
30. (16) Marcos Ambrose,Toyota, acci-
dent, 203, 67,73, $92,496.
31. (21) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 203, 52.8,
70, $72,725.
32. (10) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, acci-
dent, 203, 84.2, 67, $1 12,449.
33. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 202,38.9,
64, $80,421.
34. (20) Max Papis, Toyota, 200, 36.7,
61,$64,150.
35. (42) Kevin Conway, Ford, 199,34.4,
58, $66,000.
36. (18) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
accident, 167, 57.9, 55, $101,952.
37. (36) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, brakes, 40,
34.6, 52, $63,600.
38. (41) Bobby Labonte,' Chevrolet,
electrical, 32, 31.9, 54, $63,475.,
39. (32) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
brakes, 27,33.4,46, $63,350.
40. (34) Dave Blaney, Toyota, overheat-
ing, 24,34.6,43, $63,200.
41. (40) Geoff Bodine, Chevrolet, rear
gear, 23, 31.5,40, $63,045.
42. (39) Chad McCumbee,Toyota, rear
gear, 22, 27.3, 37, $62,890.


43. (30) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, trans-
mission, 11, 27.5. 34, $63,276.

'Race Statistics
Average. Speed of Race Winner:
136.303 mph.
I'ime of Race: 3 hours, 44 minutes,
30 seconds.
Margin of Victory: Under Caution.
Caution Flags: 7 for 26 laps.
Lead Changes: 14 among 7 drivers.
Lap Leaders: Ky.Busch 1-4; D.Hamlin
5-17; B.Labonte 18; Ky.Busch 19-
37; C.Bowyer 38-77; D.Hamlin 78-
79; C.Bowyer 80-98; Ky.Busch 99-100;
K.Harvick 101-105; D.Hamlin 106-158;
Ky.Busch 159-165; D.Hamlin 166-168;
Ku.Busch 169-171; S.Hornish Jr. 172-187;
D.Hamlin 188-204.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led,
Laps Led): D.Hamlin, 5 times for 88 laps;
C.Bowyer, 2 times for 59 laps; Ky.Busch,
4 times for 32 laps; S.Hornish Jr., I time
for 16 laps; K.Harvick,, I time for 5 laps;
Ku.Busch, I time for 3 laps; B.Labonte, I
time for I lap.
Top 12 in Points: I. K.Harvick, 2,063;
2. Ky.Busch, 2,044; 3. D.Hamlin, 1,927; 4.
M.Kenseth, 1,893; 5. Ku.Busch, 1,881; 6.
J.Johnson, 1,849; 7. J.Gordon, '1,827; 8.
J.Burton, 1,803; 9. C.Edwards, 1,729; 10.
G.Biffle, 1,727; I I. M.Martin, 1,71 I1; 12.
C.Bowyer, 1,686.

TENNIS

French Open champs

Men's Singles - Rafael Nadal (2),
Spain
- Women's singles - Francesca.
Schiavone (17), Italy
Men's Doubles - Daniel Nestor,
Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic (2), Serbia
* Women's Doubles - Serena and
Venus Williams (I.), United States
Mixed Doubles - Katarina Srebotnik,
Slovenia, and Nenad Zimonjic (6), Serbia �
Legends Under 45 Doubles -Yevgeny
Kafelnikov, Russia, and Andrei Medvedev,
Ukraine
Legends Over 45 Doubles - Andres
Gomez, Ecuador, and John McEnroe,
United States
Legends Women's Doubles - Martina
Navratilova, United States, and Jana
Novotna, Czech Republic
Boys' Singles - Agustin Velotti,
Argentina
Girls' Singles - Elina Svitolina (8),
Ukraine
Boys' Doubles - Duilio Beretta, Peru,
and Roberto Quiroz (7), Ecuador
Girls' D6ubles - Timea Babos,
Hungary, and Sloane Stephens (5), United
States

Men's Grand Slam Titles Without
Losing A Set (1968-present)
Rafael Nadal, 2010 French Open
Rafael Nadal, 2008 French Open
Roger Federer, 2007 Australian Open
Bjorn Borg, 1980 French Open
Bjorn Borg, 1978 French Open
Bjorn Borg, 1976 Wimbledo1n
Ilie Nastase, 1973 French Open (first
two matches were best-of-3)
Ken Rosewall, 1971 Australian Open'
(five matches)

SOFTBALL

College World Series

Saturday
Florida 5, Missouri 0, Missouri
eliminated
Arizona 4, Washington 3, Washington
eliminated
Georgia 3, Florida 2, Florida
eliminated
Arizona 5, Hawaii I, Hawaii
eliminated
Sunday
UCLA 5, Georgia 2, -Georgia
eliminated
Arizona 8,Tennessee 0
TArizona 5, Tennessee 2, Arizona
advances

HOCKEY

Stanley Cup finals

Philadelphia vs. Chicago
Sunday
Blackhawks 7, Flyers 4
Wednesday
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.

GOLF

World Golf Ranking
1.Tiger Woods USA 10.33
2. Phil Mickelson USA 9.48 �
3.LeeWestwood Eng 7.54
4. Steve Stricker USA 7.33
5.Jim Furyk USA 6.86
6. lan PoulterEng5.72
.7. ErnIe Els SAf5.69
8. Luke Donald Eng 5.66
9.,Paul CaseyEng 5.57
10. Rory Mcllroy NIr 5.32
I I.Anthony Kim USA 4.99
12. Martin Kaymer Ger 4.75
13. Robert Allenby Aus 4.66
14. Padraig Harrington Irl 4.46
15. CamiloVillegas Col.4.24
16. Zach Johnson USA 4.11
17. Retief Goosen SAf 4.10
18. Geoff Ogilvy Aus 4.00


SCOREBOARD


YOUTH GOLF
Foundation offers
clinic funds
The North Florida
Youth Sports Foundation
has scholarship money
available for youth golfers
interested in participating
in the Junior Golf Clinics
at The Country Club of
Lake City.
Children of country
club members are not
eligible.
For details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266.


Tiger Camp set
for June 14-17
The Summer 2010 CHS
Tiger Youth Soccer Camp
is 5-8 p.m. June 14-17 at
the CYSA Complex. Cost
for girls and boys is $50
for grades 2-5 and $80 for
grades 6-8.
For details, call camp
director Trevor Tyler at
623-3025 or e-mail tyler_
tOW@firn.edu.


Diamond Extreme
golf tourney
Diamond Extreme travel
baseball team has a golf
tournament planned for
July 10 at The Country
Club at Lake City. The
team is raising money for
its trip to Cooperstown,
N.Y., and donations
will be accepted for the
scramble tournament ,
For details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266 or
Kirk Koon at 961-1961.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Falcons tryouts
this week
The Columbia County
Falcons semi-pro football
team has tryouts planned
for 3 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday at Richardson
Middle School.
For details, e-mail
Bryan Jennings at
ccfalcons gmail. comn.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Crushers camp
set for July 19-23
The Columbia
Crushers Softball

ACROSS 43 20
Au
1 Hoist a car 44 La
5 Yang comple- 46 Fi
ment su
8 Pepper grinder 48 La
12 Jai- 50 25
13 Yalie 51 BI
14 Melville novel 52 Gi
15 Piece of good 57 SI
fortune 58 Co
17 Comics pen- 59 M
guin bl
18 "- Kapital" 60 W
19 Papa 61. B
Hemingway 62 Pe
21 Sticky soils C
24 Capably
25 Wildcat strike
26 Babies do it
30 Comet, to an 1 G
ancient 2 R'
32 Hosp. scan b
33. Opened a crack 3 Li
37 Patella site 4 T(
38 Zany 5 F.
39 Auntie of fic- 6 F(
tion 7 A
40 Applied paint si


MARSID

LA ^ __ ^ __ A


BRIEFS

Organization has a softball
camp for girls of all ages
planned for 8 a.m. to noon
on July 19-23. Girls will
receive instruction in the'
fundamentals of fielding
and hitting. Registration
is at Brianfs Sports with
a deadline of July 5. The
camp is limited to the first
100 girls.
For details, call Chad
Padgett at 7554271 or visit
columbiacrushers@gmail.com.

FISHING
Q-back Club bass
tourney June 26

Columbia County
Quarterback Club's
6th Annual Open Bass
Tournament is June 26 at
Clay Landing.
For details, e-mail Jamie
Albritton atJAlbritton@
bakerdist. corn

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Camps offered at
Stetson
Stetson University is
offering a series of boys
basketball camps this
summer. Shooting camp
is June 11-13, followed by
position camp on June 13-
17, high school team camp
on June 26-27, and individ-
ual camp on July 25-29.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I TEWCI .


-- -- " Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
S_ _ suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FIFTY LAPEL FEEBLE SIMILE
eserays Answer: The cameraman described his photo of the
moonshiners as a - "STILL" LIFE


101, to
ugustus
ip dog
re chief's
ispicion
ima's chant
52 calories
MW rival
old and gems
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longer
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roncos org.
enn or
onnery

DOWN

ossip
ope-a-dope
oxer
ttle Engine verb
ot
ans' cries
feverish
swan Dam
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Answer to Previous Puzzle

P. LAN BIIC PEG
GRE, OR BS EAR'
A GEANSEA PSI,
JDIE RUSSET
.EDDYETA IL'
L .
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K HIEIABATE
WIM E





0RNRAC E



ATE EDAM ETAL
M EN ELSUNOR


Silvery ray
Oblige
Awful
Tookabeatrig
Zippy
Super Bowl roar


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Bruce retires as a Ram


By, JIM SALTER
Associated Press

ST. LOUIS - Isaac Bruce
will go out as a Ram.
The Rams announced
Monday that they have
acquired the four-time Pro
Bowl wide receiver from
San Francisco in advance
of a retirement news con-
ference on Wednesday. A
spokesman said team offi-
cials wouldn't comment on
Bruce's career until then.


The ceremonial trade did
not include an exchange of
players or draft picks, Rams
spokesman Casey Pearce
said.
Bruce, 37, was chosen
in the second round (33rd
overall) of the 1994 draft
out of Memphis by the Los
Angeles Rams and spent
the next 13 seasons in St.
Louis after the franchise
relocated here.
He holds franchise
records for receptions,


receiving yards and receiv-
ing touchdowns. Along
with Kurt Warner, Marshall
Faulk and Torry Holt, Bruce
was the core of the high-
scoring "Greatest Show on
Turf' team that went to two
Super Bowls. He caught the
winning touchdown pass
from Warner in the 23-16
win over Tennessee in the
2000 Super Bowl.
Bruce is second all-time
in the NFL in receiving
yards (15,208).


21 Fix a meal
22 Sketch
23 Toward shel-
ter
27 Jane Austen
heroine
28 Latin 101 word
29 Course of
events
31 Suit acces-
sories
34 Gets wedged
in
35 BBs
36 Bridle part
41 Above, to
Tennyson
42 Computer info
44 Zahn or Abdul
45 Eventually
become (2
wds.)
47 Oxidizes
48 Apple comput-
ers
49 Two fives for

50 School
clanger
53 NBA official
54 Suffix for for-
feit
55 Estuary
56 Untold cen-
turies


6-8 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


For details, contact
Chris Capko at ccapko@
stetson.edu.

ADULT BASKETBALL

Men's games at
Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at 623-
4817 or Mario Coppock at
754-7095.

YOUTH FOOTBALL
Pop Warner

sign-up in June
Registration dates and
times for Pop Warner foot-
ball are 5-7 p.m. June 21-24
at Richardson Community
Center. Fee of $80 is
required at registration
along with a birth certifi-
cate and last report card.
Four divisions are offered
with ages 5-11 and weight
restrictions. Teams are
filled on a first come-first
serve basis.
Fore details, call league
president Mario
Coppock or football com-
missioner Adee Farmer at
754-7096.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


I












Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY JUNE 8, 2010


Tigers' Galarraga wants

more than brush with fame


By LARRY LAGE
Associated Press

DETROIT - Armando
Galarraga knows he will
always be remembered as
the pitcher whose perfect
game was ruined by an
umpire's blown call.
The Detroit Tigers right-
hander wants to be known
for more than that
"I want to keep doing my.
job and have a nice life as
a baseball player for more
than 10 years," Galarraga
said. "I don't want this to be
the only thing people talk
about with me."
Galarraga will pitch for
the first time since his
brush with fame Tuesday
night on the road against
the Chicago White Sox.
"He ain't throwing a no-
hitter against us," White
Sox manager Ozzie Guillen'
declared.
Tigers manager Jim
Leyland said Galarraga
wouldn't have made the
start if he didn't have the
one-hit performance, but
he will face Chicago and
the other pitchers in the
rotation will get an extra


day of rest
"I was skipping him in
his next start," Leyland
acknowledged last week.
Galarraga wants to finish
the season strong - after
starting, it in the minors
- and have a long and
successful career to make
his one-hit game last week
against the Cleveland
Indians just a part of his
story.,
"For sure, I want more
than that," he said. 'What
happened with the umpire,
there's nothing I can do
about it."
Galarraga was at the cen-
ter of a series of events
that were so compelling
the story transcended
sports, meriting attention
on national morning shows
and creating a buzz on
Twitter and Facebook.
With two outs in the ninth
inning against Cleveland on
Wednesday night, Jim Joyce
emphatically called Jason
Donald safe when he was.
in fact out as replays clearly
showed and the first base
umpire later admitted.
"I just cost that kid a per-
fect game," Joyce said som-


berly.
Galarraga handled the
devastating moment with
grace, smiling at Joyce and
walking back to the mount.
Unlike Leyland and some
of his teammates, he didn't
lash out at Joyce after the
final out.
"I think he was very,
very professional," Guillen
said. "I swear to God, I had
tears in my eyes. I think,
'Wow, this is a great thing
for baseball."'
Instead of blending
in with the other 20 per-
fect games, including Roy
Halladay's last month, the
gaffe and fallout will make
Galarraga more famous.
While most could name
many of the pitchers who
have thrown perfect games,
no one will forget Galarraga
had one taken away by
human error.
"When people talk about
perfect games, my name
might not be on the official
list, but everyone will talk
about my game," he said.
"The first 28-out perfect
game."
A month ago, Galarraga
wasn't on the sports radar


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Detroit Tigers pitcher Armando Galarraga tips his hat to fans before a baseball game against
he Cleveland Indians in Detroit on Thursday.


in the Motor City or else-
where as he pitched for the
Triple-A Toledo Mud Hens
and tried to make a come-
back.
The unlikely star was
recalled from the minor
leagues on May 16 after
pitching poorly during
spring training,, finishing
in a distant third place -
behind ex-Tigers Dontrelle
Willis"and Nate Robertson
- in a competition for the
final spot in Detroit's rota-


tion.
The 28-year-old native
of Venezuela signed with
Montreal as, a free agent
in 1998. He was traded by
Washington to Texas as
part of the Alfonso Soriano
trade .in 2005 and made his
major league debut two
years later.
The Rangers dealt him
to Detroit in 2008, for
minor leaguer Michael
Hernandez.
Galarraga had success


two years ago, going 13-7
with a 3.73 ERA, then was
6-10 with a 5.64 ERA last
season.
"Sometimes this game
is not about ability," he
explained. "It's more about
focusing and concentrat-
ing."
Galarraga's next task
will be staying mentally
sharp with more eyes on
him, following his season
and career after his nearly
perfect game.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston Celtics center Rasheed Wallace (left), guard Tony Allen (top) and forward Glen Davis
try to block the shot of Los Angeles Lakers center Andrew Bynum during the first half in
Game 2 of the NBA basketball finals Sunday, in Los Angeles.


BOSTON: Evens series in Game 2 win
Continued From Page 1B '


game. Game 1 was the most
important, Game 2 was the
most important, now it's
*Game 3," Bryant said. "It's
just the next game, simple
as that."
The finals are deadlocked
after two games for the first
time since 2004, when the
Detroit Pistons split a pair
in Los Angeles before com-
ing home and winning three
straight to take the series.
That was Bryant's first loss
in the championship round.-
His other one came two
years ago, on a-night the
Lakers will never forget.
The Celtics pummeled
them 131-92 in a Game 6 rout
that was decided after mere
minutes. While Garnett,
Allen and Pierce celebrated
their long-awaited first NBA
title, the humiliated Lakers
sat trapped in their team
bus as Boston fans taunted
them from the street
"Obviously there's feel-
ings involved and there's
memories that are in
there, which should help
us, should help us to push
through and to battle even
harder," Lakers forward Pau
Gasol said of that night.
Both teams were off
Monday following the
cross-country flight from
Los Angeles. The 2-3-2
format in the NBA finals
was instituted in the mid-
1980s, when Lakers-Celtics
matchups were as common
in June as graduation par-
ties, to limit the amount of
coast to coast trips. But a


return to California won't
be needed if either team
can win three straight.
"We took home court, so
we've got a chance to play
three games (at home),"
Celtics forward Paul Pierce
said Sunday. "But I told you
all yesterday that doesn't
guarantee we're going to
win !the games because
we're at home. We've. got
to go out there and play
the game. They're going to
be coming into our house
and we can't assume any-
thing. We can't take it for
granted."
The Celtics turned things
around following their 102-
89 loss in their opener by
toughening up theirdefense,
limiting the Lakers to 41
percent shooting. Rondo
tracked down the long
rebounds of many missed
shots to ignite Boston's fast
break, and Allen capitalized
on the open looks that cre-
ated by making an NBA
finals-record eight 3-point-
ers while scoring 32 points.
The Lakers were frus-
trated by the foul trouble
for Bryant and top reserve
Lamar Odom, who has been
ineffective in both games.
Bryant was more annoyed
with his team's defense
against Boston's guards,
wasting strong efforts from
Gasol and center Andrew
Bynum.
"It has nothing to do with
scoring. Nothing. It's all
defensively," Bryant said.
"We gave them too many


easy baskets and blew too
many defensive assign-
ments. That's it."
Now they'll have to play
better on the road than
they have in some' previ-
ous series, having lost twice
at both Oklahoma City and
Phoenix earlier in the post-
season.
Just like in those series,
they're searching for ways.
to slow down a dynamic
point guard. Rondo had 19
points, 12 rebounds and 10
assists in his fifth career
triple-double, repeatedly
beating the Lakers to loose
balls and then beating them
down the court.
"In a sequence like this,
there's no doubt it's a blow
'to us to lose the home
court, but we anticipated
this might happen, and
we're just going to have to
go pick it up," coach Phil
Jackson said.
- Los .Angeles dropped all
three road games during the
2008 finals, but the Celtics
aren't as dominant on the par-
quet now as they were back
then. The Lakers haven't lost
in Boston since that night
that ended their season two
years ago, posting a pair of
regular-season victories.
"Game 3 is the biggest
game of the series so far.
These two games are behind
us," Rondo said. "You know,
they're not in a bad situa-
tion at all. They're a good
road team, and we're a good
home team. It's going to be
a good game."


IZZO: Yet to comment on Cavs opening


Continued From Page 1L

said it received a text from
Izzo on Sunday night in
which he questioned the
degree of substance in the
reports.
Izzo has been regularly
mentioned as a candidate
for NBA and other college
jobs since Michigan State
won a national champi-
onship in 2000, when he
turned down the Atlanta
Hawks. They wound up
hiring Lon Kruger, who
joined a long list of college
coaches who failed in the
league.
"I'm not worried," Hollis
insisted. "But Tom has to.
make the decision that is
best for his immediate fam-
ily."
As a relentless recruiter
and respected tactician,
Izzo has turned a good
program into a great one
at Michigan State.
He led the Spartans to
the Final Four six time in
12 seasons. The late John
Wooden at UCLA and
Duke's Mike Krzyzewski
are the only other coaches
who have accomplished
that feat.
Izzo makes more than
$3 million a season and
is under contract through
2016. Kentucky gave John
Calipari an eight-year con-
tract topping $31 million
last year, the largest known
deal for a college basket-
ball coach.
If the Cavs want Izzo,
they could offer him a
chance to make twice as
much as he does in East
Lansing, -Mich., where he
has deep roots. Izzo was


born in native of Iron
Mountain, Mich., and has
been Michigan State's
coach since the 1995-96
season, when he was pro-
moted to replace retiring
mentor Jud IHEathcote.
Izzo is believed to be
on the short list of candi-
dates preferred by Gilbert,
a Michigan State graduate,
who. didn't ask Hollis for
permission to talk to Izzo.
"That's not normal pro-
tocol when you're talking
about pro teams going
after college coaches,"
Hollis said. "Dan is a great
Spartan and I have a lot of
respect for him with what
he's done in the NBA and
with his business."
Gilbert is the founder of
Michigan-based Quicken
Loans Inc. His team is in
the midst of a summer
overhaul. In addition to
James' free agency and
the coaching search, gen-
eral manager Danny Ferry
resigned last week.
During a conference call
after Ferry's split, Gilbert
didn't say if. the Cavs had
interviewed any coaching
candidates. The team has
inquired about former New
Orleans coach Byron Scott
and Milwaukee assistant
Kelvin Sampson.
Shaquille O'Neal, who
played for the Cavs last
season, posted on Twitter:
"I think brian shaw should
get interviewed for that
cleveland cavaliers job,
he's really good."
Assistant GM Chris
Grant has taken over for
Ferry, who guided the


Cavs through their most
successful run. The Cavs
made it past the first round
in each of Ferry's five sea-
sons, but didn't advance to
the finals the past two years
despite successful .gular
seasons. Gilbert and Grant
have a news conference
scheduled for Tuesday at
the team's training facility.
On'Friday, Gilbert said
he was "moving very
quickly" in his search to
replace Brown, who won
143 games the past two
seasons. Gilbert said it
would be ideal to have a
coach in place by July ,1
but wasn't sure that would
happen.
Gilbert has long been
impressed with Izzo. At
a late-season game in
Cleveland, months before
his team's playoff flop,
Gilbert said Izzo was "one
of the nicest guys I've met"
and praised his defensive
philosophy.
Hollis said he talked to
Izzo on Monday and sever-
al times over the weekend,
insisting that wasn't unusu-
al because they have been
.friends for more than two
decades. Izzo was the best
man at Hollis' wedding and
the two were roommates
when starting careers at
Michigan State.
"I know Dan and Tom
talk and that Dan has
reached out to talk to Tom
in the past," Hollis said.
"The only other thing I can
tell you at this point is there
is a strong interest from
the Cleveland Cavaliers in
Tom Izzo."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This April 1, file photo shows Michigan State Spartans' head coach Tom Izzo during an
interview session for the NCAA Final Four college basketball tournament, in Indianapolis.
Michigan State athletic director Mark Hollis told The Associated Press on Monday, the
Cleveland Cavaliers are interested in Izzo, but have not yet given him the chance to
replace fired coach Mike Brown.


Surfs
4^ ". .- fl


Get Connected www.lakecityreporter.com
Lake City
lO Reporter


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010 4B


DILBERT
I c .


WE'RE HAVING A
BIRTHDAY CAKE
FOR SCOTT IN THE
BREAK ROOM.


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


NO THANKS. I PREFER
CAKE THAT ISN'T
FROSTED WITH THE
SPIT OF RECENT
CANDLE-BLOWING.


r � /)

"Iu~^


, -u.-


OOOH, LOOK AT THE
QUEEN OF ENGLAND
WHO LIKES HER CAKE
WITHOUT SPIT. WHAT'S
IT LIKE TO BE FANCY?




1


DEAR ABBY


Mom must work to overcome

contempt she has for daughter


j DEAR ABBY: "Anony-
mous in Washington State"
(March 25) can't stand her
10-year-old daughter but
adores her two sons. I have
worked for more than 20
years for a nonprofit orga-
nization whose mission is
to improve parenting and
prevent child abuse.
"Anonymous" can access
more information from the
Washington State Depart-
ment of Social and Health
Services online (www.dshs.
wa.gov) or via telephone
at (360) 902-8400 to find
out about free or low-cost
mental health/counseling
services in her area. Parent
Trust for Washington Chil-
dren may be able to provide
information on support
groups and other services.
The phone number is (206)
233-0156. Finally, there is
Childhelp USA ((800) 422-
4453) if she wants to speak
to a counselor who can di-
rect her to local services. -
SUZANNA IN MILWAU-
KEE
DEAR SUZANNA:
Thank you for sharing
some valuable resources.
That letter struck a nerve
- with many readers who
reached out to offer help as
well as share similar experi-
ences. Read on:
I DEAR ABBY: As a


after thousands of hours
of therapy and hard work,
I choose to believe that I
am worthy and loving. I'm
in a healthy marriage and
have a 2-year-old daughter.
The thought of repeating
the pattern of abuse makes
me ill. I hope "Anonymous"
will do whatever she can
to change her attitude to-
ward her daughter. - J.H.,
LONG BEACH, CALIF.
DEAR ABBY: Children
mimic what they see. "Anon-
ymous"-has two sons who
are watching and learning
how to treat people, espe-
cially women. - READER
IN MILES CITY, MONT.
DEAR ABBY: My moth-
er was physically and men-
tally abusive to me while she
doted on my three brothers.
I used to pray for someone
to rescue me. I vowed nev-
er to have children because
I feared there was a defect
my mother had passed on
to me, and I never wanted
anyone to feel the way she
made me feel. Ironically,
my three brothers never
even call my mother, and
after tons of therapy, I am
now her loving caregiver.-
- BEEN THERE IN CAL-
IFORNIA
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Set the record straight
if you haven't been specific
about the way you feel. A
personal problem will devel-
op due to a misunderstand-
ing. Now is not the time to
overreact or overindulge.
***-
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Dealing with personal
issues will be emotional but
gratifying. It will be a relief
to have your position out in
the open. You can expect
someone to be jealous of
you or what you are doing.

,GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Putting money, time
and energy into what you
already own or have to sell
will lead to an opportunity.
Be forceful when trying to
find out information that can
help you with legal matters
or a claim you need to make.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Possessiveness in
love will work against you.
Instead, take on a positive
attitude and you will find op-
tions that fit into your plans.
Avoid making a promise
that you don't really want to
-honor. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Prepare to take advantage
of every opportunity that
comes your way. Getting in-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

volved in activities or events
that you would usually walk
away from will spark your
imagination and help you
make a decision. *****--
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Put a little thought into
how you can raise the value
of your home or downsize
to meet your financial situa-
tion. Money can be obtained
by collecting old debts or
through gifts, winnings or a
new contract you are com-
peting for. -***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Give and take should
be your answer to a problem
you face at work. You can
establish good relationships
both professionally and per-
sonally if you compromise.
A fast move on your part
will produce a financial in-
crease. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): It will be difficult
to keep things mellow if
you engage in talks with a
partner who doesn't always
agree with you. Honesty will
be important if you don't
want to experience repercus-
sions or an alteration to your
current mode of living. Un-
certainty will be your weak-
ness. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Take hold of
whatever situation you face
and make your ppint clear
and your ideas heard. You
may be teetering in your
personal life but, before you
decide to move in one direc-
tion or another, strategize
carefully. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): A chance to make
money on property or an-
other asset is likely if you
act fast when you see an
opportunity arise. You'll be
surprised how well things
will go if you refuse to let a
friend or relative interfere in
your business. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Complete honesty
is a must if you want to get
your plans off the ground
and reach your goals.-Don't
count on others being up-
front when it comes to mon-
ey matters. Don't let your
emotions lead you down a
path of no return. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't make the same
promise to too many people
you meet. A partnership can
be a solution to a business
venture. Someone with a
good accounting background
can, take over responsibili-
ties you don't have time for.


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: G equals M
"Y HH XKP NYLR E K SK 0O AB KF
FN RTR X KP 'TR DKO B D . E N R
YBI FRTI FOHH VKG R E K XKP KU
E N ROT KF B YVV KTS. " - RYTH
BODNEOB DY HR
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The only people who never tumble are those who
never mount the high wire. This is your moment. Own it." - Oprah Winfrey
(c) 2010 by UFS, Inc. 6-8


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I I-


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010


4B


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
teacher, I would occasion-
ally have a student I didn't
like. I gave myself the 'Ten
Rule." I'd make 10 posi-
tive comments about the
student before I allowed
myself to make a negative
one. The process worked
miracles.
I don't know if I changed
because I made the effort
to find good qualities, or if
the child changed because
of the positive input. Before
long, I found myself liking
and enjoying that student
as much as I did the others.
- NANCY IN BROUS-
SARD, LA.
DEAR ABBY: I suffered
physical and verbal abuse
from my mother, who told
me often I was her "ugly"
child. The day I checked
out of the hospital for de-
pression she told me she
had never bonded with me
as an infant and that I an-
noyed her. I suffered from
low self-esteem for as far
back as I can remember.
I'm almost 40 now, and












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


4 lines * 6 days ,line $.10
personalcMerchandis ota,
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a personal merchandise totalling $100 or less. a
Each Itea must Include a price..
This is a non-refundablerat.




One Item per ad pr



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4ines .ays 1 $



Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Persona merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Each Item mst Includ 'ice'





This Is a non-refundable rate.
a us $0aap





One Item per ad Each additional
4 lines * 6 ay line$1.45
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Each Item must include a price.
ThisI s a nov-r i slne 1ra.








One Item per ad 2 7
4 lines * 6 ays h additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
persona merchandise totalling $2,500 orless.
Each Item must Include a price.








This is a o-refundable rate
One Item per ad
4 lines * 6 daysEach additional
Rate applies to private indivils sling
peronal merchandise totalling 0 less.
Each Item mst include i








This Is a no-refundbe ate



vimg~mg


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
rd for each Wednesday insertion.

A-

You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
.ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or erqail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad isltoAppear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mo., 10:00 a.m. Mn., 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m
Thursday Wed.,10:00 a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thus., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a . Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
bn the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further, information be
required regarding payments -or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.

mnrlIfomtol


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings, Copy should
be checked for errors by the'
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.comn


Legal

PUBLIC SALE
7-2-10 8:00A.M.
Rountree-Moore Ford
2588 W. US Hwy 90
Lake City, Fl. 32055

2007 Ford Focus
1FAHP34N67W236954

2000 Ford F-150
1FTRF17L4YNB15954

Each of you is hereby notified that
the above described vehicles were
towed at the request of the Florida
Hwy patrol and Lake City Police
Dept. and the above named towing
company is in possession of and
claims a lien on the above described
vehicles for towing and storage
charges.
The lien claimed by the above named
towing company is subject to en-
forcement pursuant to F.S. 713.78
and unless said motor vehicle is re-
deemed from said towing company
by payment as allowed by law, the
above described vehicle may be sold
to satisfy the lien. If the vehicle is
not redeemed and the motor vehicle
remains unclaimed, or for which the
charges for recovery, towing, or stor-
, age servicesi remain unpaid, may be
sold after 35 days free of all prior
liens. The owner of lienholder, if
any, has the rightt to a hearing as set
for in the subsection (4). The above
designated towing company propos-
es to sell the-vehicle as stated above.

04540055
June 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 10-151-CA
SUBRANDY LIMITED PART-
NERSHIP, a Florida limited partner-
ship,
Plaintiff,
vs. -
LUZ I. ROSADO,
Defendant
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is-hereby given that the fol-
lowing described-real property:
SEE SCHEDULE "A" ATTACHED
HERETO
SCHEDULE "A" TO
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
SUBRANDY vs. ROSADO
Lot 77 of an unrecorded subdivision
known as Cardinal Farms Phase 3.
A parcel of land in Section 2, Town-
ship 6 South, Range 16 East, Colum-
bia County, Florida, being more par-
ticularly described as follow:
Commence at the Southeast comer
of Section 2, Township 6 South,
Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida and run thence South
88"10'29" West along the South line
of said Section 2 a, distance of
1321.85 feet to the Southwest comer
of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast
1/4 of Section 2; thence North
0115'25" West along the East line
of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast
1/4 of Section 2 a distance of 580.60
feet; thence North 82'33'20" West a
distance of 292.40 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING; thence continue
North 82'33'20" West a distance of
474.14 feet; thence South 01"16'50"
East a distance of 643.13 feet to a
point on the Northerly maintained
right-of-way line of Old Ichetucknee
Road; thence Westerly along said
Northerly maintained right-of-way
line of Old Ichetucknee Road a dis-
tance of 60 feet, more or less; thence
North 01'16'50" West a distance of
710.47 feet; thence North 43*50'37"
West a distance of 745.64 feet to the
Northwest comer of the Southwest
1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 2;
thence North 88'00'39" East along
the North line of the Southwest 1/4
of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 2 a
distance of 1322.44 feet to the
Northeast comer of the Southwest
1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 2;
thence South 0115'25" East along
the East line of the Southwest 1/4 of
the Southeast 1/4 of Section 2 a dis-
tance of 100.79 feet; thence South
24'23'07" West a distance of. 667.91
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 14.72 acres, more or less.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment on the above styled
action dated June 2, 2010, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse in Lake
City, Columbia County, Florida, at
11:00 A.M., on Wednesday, July 7,
2010, to the best and highest bidder
for cash. Any person claiming an in-
terest in any surplus from the sale,
other than the property owner as of
the date of the notice of lis pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State' and County aforesaid this
2nd day of June, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04540075
June 8, 15, 2010


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
* **************************


Land Services

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds & ,
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Construction

Matt Forsyth
Building Construction
Carpentry
386-965-7053


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDIC-
TION DIVISION
CASE NO: 09-852-CA
THE BANK OF NEW MELLON
TRUST COMPANY, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION FKA THE BANK
OF NEW YORK TRUST COMPA-
NY, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR TO
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.
AS TRUSTEE
PLAINTIFF
VS.
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNNEES, LIENOR, CRED-
ITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE
OF JOYCE HELEN RYALS, ET AL
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF ACTION - CON-
STRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTER-
EST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE ESTATE OF HEL-
EN JOYCE RYALS
whose residence is-, unknown if
he/she/they be living;, and if
he/she/they be dead, the unknown
defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, and all
parties claiming an interest by,
through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be
dead or alive, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property described in
the mortgage being foreclosed here-
in.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property:
THE NORTH ONE HUNDRED
FIFTY (150) FEET OF THE FOL-
LOWING DESCRIBED PROPER-
TY: COMMENCE AT THE SE
CORNER OF THE NW 1/4 OF
SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 6
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, AND
RUN THENCE S 88 DEGREES 56
MINUTES W 1417 FEET TO THE
WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
STATE HIGHWAY NO. 25, RUN
THENCE N 9 DEGREES 33 MI-
NUTES E ALONG SAID RIGHT-
OF-WAY 1245 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; RUN
THENCE N 9 DEGREES 33 MI-
NUTES E 400 FEET; RUN
THENCE N 86 DEGREES 19 MI-
NUTES W 435.6 FEET; RUN.
THENCE S 9 DEGREES 33 MI-
NUTES W 400 FEET; RUN
THENCE S 86 DEGREES 19 MI-
NUTES E 435.6 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; CON-
TAINING FOUR (4) ACRES,"
MORE OR LESS SUBJECT TO: A
ONE-HALF (1/2) INTEREST IN
ALL OF THE OIL, .GAS AND
MINERALS LOCATED ON OR
UNDER SAID LANDS AS RE-
CORDED IN OFFICIAL, RE-
CORDS BOOK 5, PAGE 241, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER
WITH: THE RIGHT OF INGRESS
AND EGRESS FOR THE PUR-
POSE OF PROSPECTING FOR,
MINING AND REMOVAL FROM
SAID LANDS OF THE AFORE-
SAID OIL, GAS AND MINERAL
RIGHTS, LESS AND EXCEPT
THE FOLLOWING: COMMENC-
ING AT THE SE CORNER OF THE
NW _ OF SECTION 22, TOWN-
SHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST,
AND RUNNING S 88 DEGREES
56 MINUTES W 1417 FEET TO
THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO.
25; THENCE N 9 DEGREES 33 MI-
NUTES E ALONG SAID RIGHT-
OF-WAY 1645 FEET; THENCE N
86 DEGREES 19 MINUTES W 145
FEET FOR THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE S 9 DE-
GREES 33 MINUTES W 100
FEET; THENCE N 86 DEGREES
19 MINUTES W 50 FEET;
THENCE N 9 DEGREES 33 MI-
NUTES E 100 FEET; THENCE S 86
DEGREES 19 MINUTES E 50
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on DA-
VID J. STERN, ESQ. Plaintiff's at-
torney, whose address is 900
SOUTH PINE ISLAND ROAD,
.SUITE 400, 'PLANTATION, FL
33324-3920 on or before June 16,
2010, (no later than 30 days from the
date of the first publication of this
notice of action) and file the original
with'the clerk of this court either be-
fore service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition filed herein.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court at COLUMBIA County,
Florida this 17th day of May 2010.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY:/s/B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT,.persons with disabilities
needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINIS-
TRATION, at the COLUMBIA
County Courthouse at 386-758-1342,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) OR 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Service.
Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A.
900 South Pine Island Road
Suite 400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
09-90822 HCNW
04539917"
June 8, 15, 2010


Legal

COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PUBLIC NOTICE
As required by Section 255.20, Flori-
da Statutes, the Columbia County
Board of County Commissioners will
conduct a public hearing in the Co-
lumbia County School Board Audi-
torium, 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida, on Thursday, July 1,
2010 at 7:00 PM, to consider wheth-
er it is practical or advantageous and
in the public's best interest for the
County to perform the project using
its own services, employees and
equipment for the planned new con-
struction of the Westside Community
Center. The estimated construction
cost for the Community Center is
$587,345. The Community Center
will be located at Birley Road in
West Columbia County. Plans and
estimates may be reviewed at the,
County Manager's office located at
135 NE Hemando Avenue, Room
203, Lake City, Florida, during nor-
mal business hours.
The County Manager will present
written findings to the County Com-
mission which shall contain reasons
supporting the'conclusion that self-
performance of the . construction
management is advantageous to the
County, which findings must be rati-
fied and award approved by an affir-
mative vote of the County Commis-
sion.
All interested parties may appear and
be heard at the time and place speci-
fied.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision by the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above-
referenced public hearing, a record
of the proceeding may be needed and
in such event, such person may-need
to ensure, that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-'
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact.Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 - or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 4th day of June, 2010.
/s/ P. DeWitt Cason
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court

04540096
June 8, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-119-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF BETTY JEAN
CAPONEY A/K/A BETTY JEAN
H. CAPONEY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Betty Jean Caponey a/k/a Betty Jean
H. Caponey, deceased, whose date of
death was March 20, 2010, is'pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and 'the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below. All creditors of the
decedent and other person having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF .SERVICE OF
A COPY. OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME. PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. The date of the first
publication of this notice is June 8,
2010.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ John J. Kendron
Attorney for Estelle M. Scannella
Florida Bar No. 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
P.O. Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386)755-1334
Persona 1 Representative:
Estelle M. Scannella
2 Meadowlark Drive
Hamilton Square, New Jersey 08690

04540080
June 8, 15, 2010


010 Announcements


Enjoy doing repairs? Like to earn a
good income and/or start your own
business? Consider Heating/AC or
commercial refrigeration at Lake
City Community College. Enroll
now for day, night or Saturday
. classes. Classes begin August 23.
Financial aid available. No high
school diploma required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.
Enjoy working outdoors? Like to
earn a good income? Consider
welding at Lake City Community
College. Enroll now for day, night
or Saturday classes. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma or GED required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.

To place your
classified ad call


020 Lost & Found
\
LOST: Older Chihuahua mix in
the Winn Dixie area. Missing 5/30
in the evening. Please call
386-754-3102 or 754-0401


060 Services

Adult Family Home Care 24hr
care .3 meals/day, snacks trans to
& from doctors. Private rms, cable,
free long distance. 386-397-2920

WE FIX IT SHOP
Gas, diesel, welding, etc.
Implement Repair.
386-623-3200

100 Job
Opportunities

Enjoy doing repairs? Like to earn a
good income and/or start your own
business? Consider Heating/AC or
commercial refrigeration at Lake
City Community College. Enroll
now for day, night or Saturday
classes. Classes begin August 23.
Financial aid available. No high
school diploma required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.

Enjoy working outdoors? Like to
earn a good income? Consider
welding at Lake City Community
College. Enroll now for day, night
or Saturday classes. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma or GED required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.


04535848
Fantastic Opportunity
for individual seeking long term
employment. Must be self
motivated and. flexible with
work days.
SECURITY/HANDYMAN
Hampton Inn & Suites
Lake City
Position hours are 6pm-4amrn
with excellent work
environment. This full time
position offers industry
standard. Hotel experience
preferred but not required.
Apply 'in person at: Hampton
Inn and Suites, Lake City
450 SW Florida Gateway Drive
U.S. 90 and 1-75, exit 427
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE


04540035
Payroll Clerk
Anderson Columbia Co., Inc. is
accepting applications for a
Payroll Administrator.
Experience should include basic
knowledge of Payroll, federal
tax deposits, state withholding,
garnishment remittance and
multi-state filings. Applicants
must have a working knowledge
of Word and Excel. Accounting
exp. a plus. You may fax your
resume to 386-755-9132 or
e-mail to
wassoint(andersoncolumbia.com
You may also come in and fill
out an application at
871 Guerdon Rd, Lake City, FL.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

04540051



Part Time Telemarketing
'Professional
The Lake City Reporter is
looking for an energetic
telemarketing professional to
join our expanding sales team.
Successful candidates will
posses excellent telephone and
customer service skills, be
computer literate and enjoy the
thrill of the sale. We offer a
great work environment and
competitive compensation.
To apply, please send resume to
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director at
Istrickland( lakecitvreporter.com
No phone calls please. EOE

04540064
First Federal Bank of
Florida has a position available
for a full-time Collector in Lake
City. Solid understanding of
financial institution policies and
procedures. Experience
required in.dealing with
delinquent accounts. Resume
may be submitted to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com or mail
to Human Resources, P.O.
Box 2029, Lake City FL 32056.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer..

A/C SERVICE Tech
'Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767


ANYTIME FITNESS has
immediate openings for a Part time
Sales Associate and Personal
Trainers. Apply in person at:
Anytime Fitness i
1191 SW Bascom Norris Dr.
Lake City,FL 32025
Or e-mail resume to
leah@rimrockdesign.com


oo0 Job
Opportunities

Childcare worker needed
evenings & daytime. Experience
* needed; Staff credential preferred.
Please apply in person.
�Wee Care of Columbia County.
Dog kennel needs F/T Kennel
Tech to clean, feed, walk, bath
dogs. Includes weekends. Come by
J&K Canine'Academy High
Springs to apply. 386-454-3647

Heavy Equipment
Shop Mechanic
Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a heavy
equipment shop mechanic. You
may fill out an application at
871 Guerdon Rd., Lake City,
FL. Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

LESTER'S SUBS,
SALADS & MORE
Part-time positions available.
APPLY IN PERSON
4046 SW SR 47 (at I-75S)
.Lake City, FL 32024
(Inside S Food Store #41)
No Phone Calls Please
Drug Free Workplace - EOE
Mechanic for Heavy Truck &
Trailer shop. Experienced with
own tools. Southern Specialized.
1812 NW Main Blvd. Apply be-
tween 8am & noon. 386-752-9754
MIDNIGHT SHIFT
Full Time Casfier, Experience
Preferred, Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, character,
and energy. Applicants must be
outgoing and have the ability to
interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity to
learn a new career in a thriving
industry. Salary plus bonuses with
an excellent employee benefit
plan. Call Jeff at 888-664-4268 or
e-mail to jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information.
Sitel is hiring! Good pay, paid
training, comfortable environment,
benefits after 90 days. Need good
attitude and computer skills - must
be reliable. Apply at
www.sitel.com or in person at
1152 SW Business Point Dr. in
Lake City. EOE
SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY
Immed FT/PT openings,
customer sales/service, will train,
conditions apply, all ages 17+
(386)269-4656
Wanted Licensed Security Guard,
experienced. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd. Suite 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025

120 Medical
Employment

o4540036
Medical Billing Manager
Needed for busy 3 Doctor
Practice. Experience in Medical
Insurance Billing Necessary
Excellent Salary
Fax 386-758-5987

04540063
OT/COTA
Hiring a F/T OT or COTA in
Jasper, FL; offering a $7,500
Sign-on Bonus for OT & $5,000
for COTA! Call Jennifer @
888-531-2204 or
j.anderson(@)fprehab.com


04540084
Florida Department of
Corrections-Health Services
Employment opportunities for
ARNP located at Columbia,
RMC, Suwannee & Taylor CI
in northeastern Florida.
Comprehensive State of
Florida Benefits
For further info visit our website
www.fldociobs.com or contact:
Kathy Reed (386)496-6804
or e-mail:
reed.kathymvrnmail.dc.state.fl.us


05523209
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Looking for Hygienist for
fast paced Dental office.
Fax Resume to 386-755-7024

LPN/RN Qualified medical office
FT position. Must be willing to
travel Lake City to Gainesville.
Fax resume 352-331-6336
P/T medical assistant needed. 4-5
days a week. Send resume to
Box 04096, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056


LAKE CITY
USED FURNITURE
"We specialize in
making beds"

NEW MATTRESS
& BOXSPRING
IN STOCK NOW
Twin 1199, Full $1399
MON-SAT 9-5:30 Queen 61699, King $199'9


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BUY I>


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 2010


120 Medical
120 Employment
RN POSITION NEEDED
Suwannee Valley Nursing Center
Excellent salary. Excellent bene-
fits. $1,500.00 sign -on bonus. To
schedule an interview, call 386-
792-1868 ask for Danny or Sue.




141 Babysitters
BABYSITTER NEEDED
Locally. Call for information.
License Preferred
(229)300-0580

170 Business
Opportunities


Enjoy doing repairs? Like to earn a
good income and/or start your own
business? Consider Heating/ACtor
commercial refrigeration at Lake
City Community College. Enroll
now for day, night or Saturday
classes. Classes begin August 23.
Financial aid available. No high
school diploma required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.
Enjoy working outdoors? Like to
earn a good income? Consider
welding at Lake City Community
College. Enroll now for day, night
or Saturday classes. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma or GED required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.

n240 Schools &
S4 Education


04539702
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Tiraining offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-06/21/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-06/21/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-07/13/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
CHOCOLATE LAB Pup.
$350. Available August 1st.
$50. dep.
386-965-2231
GERMAN SHEPPARD puppies
5 white. & 6 black with brown.
AKC Parents on site. $350 Call
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452
POMERANIAN PUPPY for sale.
Registered, health certificate.
Born 4/8/10. 386-752-0882,
386-365-4707
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Refrigerator Whirlpool
21.7cuft. 1.5 years old.
$300.00
386-758-8724

408 Furniture
BUNK BEDS.nice w/ mattress,
$200 OBO.
386-292-3927 or -
386-754-9295
Large 6 drawers Dresser.
Solid dark oak.
$100.00. obo
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295
Large Entertainment Center.
Light Oak. Will hold a 40" or bet-
ter TV. Several shelves. $145.00
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
CRAFTSMAN RIDING mower
23 hp, 50 in. cut.
Runs good. Looks good. $500 obo
386-754-9295 or 386-292-3927.

411 Machinery&
411 Tools
CRAFTSMAN TABLE saw with
extended top, 10" blade with
fence, works great, $85.00
386-292-3927 or 386-754-9295

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
WANTED Junk Cars,
Trucks, RV's etc.
Paying CASH $225.00 and up.
Free pickup 386-867-1396
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$200 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
3.5 TON Carrier AC
split system. Used only
3 yrs. $750. obo.
(813)690-4202 (CELL)


440 Miscellaneous
4 NEW windows,
36"X76". Half circle top.
$70. obo .
(813)690-4202 (Cell)
BATHROOM FANS.
$36.00 for all.
(813)690-4202 (CELL)

BOWFLEX MOTIVATOR.
$350.00
386-758-6782

Nice, Commercial Built, tow
.behind Smoker. Freshly sandblast-
ed & painted. Access to grill from
both sides. $1500. 386-623-9427,
386-249-3104 or 386-719-4802


XBOX SYSTEM. 2 games, one
controller, w/all cables. Good
condition. Asking $75.00
Call 386-984-6685

450 Good Things
5. to Eat
BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK open.
Monday - Saturday. 7-12 and 4-7.
386-963-4220

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2br /2ba & lbr/lba Also Residen-
tial RV lots Between Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
3 BR/2BA moble home, in town,
private lot, front and rear porch.
$650/mo + security.
466-2266 or 752.-5911
4bd/2ba DW Mobile Home on
4 acres, many extras. 8 mi. to
Branford $800 mo + $800 sec.
No Pets! 386-935-1538
Nice 2br/2ba MH located on Hwy
241, Providence. Fully furnished
Ref req'd. No inside pets. 1st and
last sec. 386-752-4618\623-0925.


Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer. No
Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
June Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
*386-623-7547 or 984-8448

640 Mobile Homes
6-40 for Sale
BIG FAMILY "NO" Problem.
Several homes over 2,000 sq. ft.
Starting at $19,000.
Call Clint at 386-752-1452

NICE 2/1 Remodeled
only 1 left for $9,500.
Call Clint at 386-752-1452
NICE 4/2
In.Family Subdivision.
$464 per month. EZ Terms.
Call Clint at !! 386-752-1452.
LAND/HOME PACKAGE
2300 sqft. ft. 4/2 DW on 1/2 acre!
Owner is willing to short sale for
, only $74,995!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
BRAND NEW 2011
4/2 bath DW. Complete set & del.
for only $39,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@vindstream.net
REPO'S REPO'S!
We have several to choose from!
Singles, Doubles starting @
$10,500. Call Eric 386-752-1452
or jetdec@'windstream.net
FACTORY MISTAKE
Factory built wrong floorplan!
This will save you thousands on
this new 28'x64' 3/2 only $42,748.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
MUST SEE! 28 x 56 3/2 bath.
Living room & den.
For only $15,900.
Call John T. 386-344-5234.
16 X 66 2/2,
with fire place!!
Huge rooms, only $12,500.
Call John T. 386-344-5234.
FACTORY REPO!!
32 X 80 4/2 bath.
$5,000. Below invoice.
Call John T. 386-344-5234.

6c5 Mobile Home
650 &Land
Owner Financing 3br/2ba 2.5 ac.
Mayo. River access. Workshop.
$700mo. 386-590-0642/1867-1833
suwanneevalleyproperties.com
I'


7n1 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
I or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
045393-56
30th Anniversary Celebration
Windsong Apts
Our Gift to You
$300.00 off and Employee Pricing
(386) 758-8455

04539801
!! 5 COMPLEXES!!
IBR from $500
2 BR from $525
*FREE CABLE*
*2 POOLS*
ONE GATED
Washer/Dryer Hookups
386-754-1800

2br/2ba w/garage on the
West side
1st, last &security.
Call 386-755-6867
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652
Studios & IBr's from $130/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec. Also, lbr for
$425.mo. Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts. '
720 For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FH, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/1.5BA. BLOCK HOME.
Fenced back yard.
$825. mo $825. dep. References
req'd. 386-364-2897
3BR/2BA 2,000 sq. ft. home
for rent in Emerald Lakes on
Zack Drive. $1350/month.
. 386-752-8653
3BR/2BA Brick Southwood
Estates off SR 47, tile floors, fire-
place, large yard, pets ok $950 mo.
plus deposit. 386-758-3166
Clean & Secluded. 2Br/lBa
CH/A5 Mi. S. of LC. $400 Dep,
$550mo. 386-590-Q642 or 867-
.1833.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
FOR RENT 4br/2ba CHA Brick
home on 1 ac., east of town on CR
245A. Ceramic tile & carpet, $800
mo $800 deposit (904)708-8478
Next to VA! Large 2br/2ba, CHA,
large kitchen, detached office
/shop, fenced yard.
Available July 1st. (813)784-6017
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Bi,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals

04540065
Need Warehouse Space
w/office? Great location near
1-75. 1247sf, $750 mo.,
utilities included.
Call Scott Stewart
386-755-0757
Westfield Realty Group

04540066
A MUST SEE !!
Fantastic turn key office suite
w/2100sf. New carpet/paint.
Great location for
medical/retail space.
Call Scott Stewart
386-755-0757.
Westfield Realty Group

Office Building, Convenient
location w/6 offices, Conference
Room, kitchen, ample parking.
Partially furnished. $2,500 mo.
For appointment 386-754-9293


Big single-family
home
on 4 acres \with


S.c . " 1 il1iiing pool -
M O M Only $220,000
-, Call Rob Ste\\art
386-758-1880


ill RobStewart BURBACH
(386) 758-1880
1 REALTY SERVICES


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture In or we will take It for youl
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just Include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle In print and online.



2005 PIoneer Travel In Print,
Fully loaded, xcelnt & Online
condition. includes hitches
& stabilizer ne Low
Calo Price!
386-454-4947


750 Business &
I Office Rentals
Space available at Country Club
Plaza East Baya Ave. 2000 sq ft.
2 restrooms, new carpet. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622


805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$256/mo. $24,900. 352-215-1018
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings uadver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
$115,000 3B/2BA
Den or 4th bedroom.
Cypress Landing
386-466-7168

820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
Reduced FSBO 10 ac. Horses &
more. 5 stall stable. Pastures,
board fenced, tool shed. 32'X75'.
4brManuf. Hm w/carport & deck.
$190,000. FIRM. 386-965-3357
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2005 Pioneer Travel Trailer
M-18T6. Fully Loaded. excellent
condition. Includes hitches & stail-
izer. $6,500. SOLD

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Adoption


ARE YOU PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOP-
TION? Loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be
Full-time Morn (age 36) and Devoted Dad. Financial
security. EXPENSES PAID. Kim/Bill (888)399-3255
FL Bar# 0150789 '


Announcements


Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida.
Advertising Networks of Florida, Put us to work for
You! (866)742-1373 www.florida-classifieds.com.


Auctions


2 PUBLIC AUCTIONS. Saturday June 12. ***10am,
124 Park Center St, Leesburg, FL, Leesburg Commerce
Park commercial end unit. ***2pm, Mattioda Rd,
Groveland, FL, +/-20 acres. Heritage Realty & Auc-
tion, a licensed FL broker, David Farmer, CQ1032068/
BK3211668/AB 1652/AU2205. www.heritagesales.
com, (800)445-4608

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do you earn $800 in a day?
25 Local Machines and Candy $9,995. (888)62979968
B02000033 CALL US: We will not be undersold!


Financial


CASH NOW! Get cash for your structured settlement
or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G. Went-
worth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rat-
,ed A+ by the Better Business Bureau.


Financial Services


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As
seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-
$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW
BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321
www.14wcapital.com


It's quick and easy.


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OTR required. HEARTLAND EXPRESS (800)441-
4953 www.heartlandexpress.com

DRIVER- GREAT MILES! NO TOUCH FREIGHT!
Good Hometime and Benefits. 6 months OTR experi-
ence. NO felony or DUI in last 5 years. Solos/Teams
Wanted. Company Call: (877)740-6262. Owner/Op-
erator Call: (888)417-1155. www.ptl-inc.com


Miscellaneous


AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. CALL
Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769.

Very Active Storm Season opens opportunities for
New CAT Adjusters and those entrepreneurs in the
Estimating Business. High Income. Go to www.JEL-
Training.com or call (941) 752-1874.


Out of Area Real Estate


BANK FORCED LIQIUDATION SMOKY MTN
LAKE PROPERTY/TN. PRICED PENNIES ON THE
DOLLAR! ALL REASONABLE OFFERS ACCEPT-
ED! AMENITIES! CLOSEOUT SALE! JULY 9-10-11
CALL MAP & PRICING. 877-644-4647 x302

CENTRAL GEORGIA 280 AC - $1375/AC Au-
chumpkee Creek, rocky shoals, several pond sites,
hardwoods and planted pine. Pictures on website!
(478)987-9700 www.stregispaper.com St. Regis Paper
Co.

Oversize Lake Lot! 3+ ACRES- $29,900. FREE Boat
Slips! (was $49,900) Park-like hardwood setting near
lake. Enjoy deeded access to private lake, free boat
slips & pavilion. Quiet rd frontage, utilities, warranty
deed. Excellent financing. Must see, call now (888)792-
5253, x 3503

TENNESSEE CUMBERLAND PLATEAU 945+/-
Acres Great commercial or development Only minutes
from new Volkswagen Plant Will subdivide $1,995.00
per acre (931)235-5263 www.pineycreekllc.com


For Sale


LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET. In original plastic,
never used. Orig price $3000, Sacrifice $975. Can de-
liver. Call Bill (305)420-5982

CHERRY BEDROOM SET. Solid Wood, never used,
brand new in factory boxes. English Dovetail. Original
cost $4500. Sell for $895. Can deliver. (954)302-2423

Health

Don't Know What Vitamins to Take? Get a FREE
Assessment from Dr Mindell. Call (866)585-1390 or
visit www.vitaganic.com. Use Coupon FL0610A to get
additional savings today


Ilelp Wanted


REGIONAL DRIVERS NEEDED! More llometime!
Top Pay! Up to $.41/mile company drivers! 12 months


Real Estate


NC MOUNTAINS CLOSEOUT SALE! Cabin Shell,
2+ acres with great view, very private, big trees, water-
falls & large public lake nearby, $99,500 Bank financ-
ing (866)275-0442




ANF
ADVEPII',INJu fi TEI'iW OF FLORIDA

(Cli,,-IU , I ipiy Metro Daily



S Week of June 7, 2010


I


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