Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text







Storm season
Hurricane season begins
Tuesday. Officials want to make
sure locals are prepared
a *. EI v%


Year in review
Columbia, Fort White teams
have banner year
Sports, I B


000018 120110 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


'JI


Sunday, May 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Surviving history


Resident reflects on World War II memories


JASON MAN HEW W4LKERiU , .:|. i,--I,
-Gerald E. Sims, 95, sits in his home next to a digital painting of a North American B-25 Mitchell, nicknamed the 'Tin Liz' that
he worked on during Vorld War II. Sims, who was a part of the 345th Bomber Group's 501st Bomb Squadron, was the only
crew chief for the plane before it was ultimately shot down on a bombing and strafing mission.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
erald Sims of
Lake City, a
World War II
veteran, is the
only known
direct, surviving link of a
curious story about a once-
lost WWII medium bomber
plane that disappeared in
the combat of war.
That plane - the 'Tin
Liz," a B-25 Mitchell with
a five-man flight crew
aboard, was shot down


in May 1944 by enemy
groundfire. The plane was
missing in the New Guinea
jungle until its remnants
were discovered in 2007 by
an expedition crew, com-
posed of relatives of the
lost flight crew, said Duffy
Soto, Sims' son-in-law and a
local artist.
More than 65 years later,
Sims, 95, is still the 9nly
person known with imme-
diate association with the
Tin Liz, Soto said.
Sims was the Tin Liz's
only crew chief, Soto said,,


and was a part of the 501st
Bomb Squadron, one of
four squadrons that com-
prised the "Air Apaches" -
the U.S. Army Air Corps'
345th Bomb Group.
The story of the Tin Liz
has come "full-circle" for
Sims, Soto said, because
he was the plane's original
and only crew chief for the
duration of its missions,
lived through the year of
the plane's wreckage dis-
covery and lives today to
help tell its story.
Sims - who had been


living in Lake City with his
family since 1930 - said he
tried to enlist in the U.S. mili-
tary the day after Japanese
planes bombed Pearl Harbor
in December 1941.
He said the government
wanted him to leave imme-
diately for the war, but
because he wanted to sort
out the job he would leave
behind, he decided against
enlistment.
About a month later, he
was drafted into-the U.S.
PILOT continued on 3A


Partnership could increase services


Lake Shore will be
regional medical
center on July 1.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
A partnership between
Shands HealthCare and
Health Management
'Associates will mean more
services for patients at the
Lake Shore Hospital, hospi-
tal officials say.
Lake Shore Hospital
Authority Board chairman
Marc Vann said Health
Management Associates
has a lot more experience
in managing rural hospi-
tals and they'll combine
their area of expertise
with Shands' medical care
resources to improve the
local Shands' hospital.
"Their intent is to
upgrade the hospital facili-
ties and, in the long-term,
really do a lot of work on
the hospital itself," he said.
"We think there will be
lots of improvements. The
improvements will help
free-up a lot more money
for what the authority is


Shands HealthCare CEO Tim Goldfarb (from left), Senior Administrator Rhonda Sherrod and
CEO and President of Health Management Associates Gary D. Newsome pose for a
photograph after a news conference Thursday where a partnership of the two was
announced. Shands Lake Shore will officially become Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical
Center starting July 1.


designed to do and that's
help with health care in the
community - not just indi-
gent care, but health care
for everybody."
During a news conference
earlier this week, represen-


tatives from both groups
announced their partner-
ship tQ jointly own and
govern Shands' three com-
munity hospitals - Shands
Lake Shore, Shands Live
Oak and Shands Starke.


"The patients will see
many more services avail-
able to the community as a
result of this partnership,"
said Lake Shore Hospital
HOSPITAL continued on 3A


POLICE INVESTIGATION


Shooting suspect

apprehended by

local authorities


Reports: Gardner
claims self-defense
in incident.
From staff reports
A suspect in a Thursday
night shooting turned him-
self in to local authorities on
Saturday, according to Lake
City Police Department
reports.
Earl Gardner, 38, 825 NE
Joe Coney Terrace,% was
labeled a suspect Thursday
night, after he allegedly
shot a man twice. Gardner
faces potential charges of
attempted murder, aggra-
vated battery, discharging
a weapon in public and pos-
session of a weapon by a
convicted felon.
LCPD investigators
responded to 805 NE
Congress Ave. around 11:42
p.m. Thursday in reference
to a shooting, and they dis-
covered Antonio Dortly
with a gunshot wound
to the chest: Dortly told
authorities he was shot by


Gardner following an argu-
ment. Dortly was flown to
a' Gainesville hospital for
treatment.
According to reports,
Gardner turned himself in
to LCPD
investigator
Eddie Black
onSaturday.
Gardner
told Black
that he shot
Dortly in
Gardner selfdefense,
and also claimed he was shot
during the incident During
the interview, he showed a
"grazing" gunshot wound
he had suffered to his right
shoulder, reports said.
No gun has been recov-
ered.
Gardner was booked
into the Columbia County
Detention Facility on
$40,000 bond.
The investigation is ongo-
ing, and anyone with infor-
mation about the incident
is encouraged to call the
LCPD TIP line at 719-2068.


[--1



LEANNE TnOL +,.i, ]:"..
Peter Murdock (from left) of Monticello, Catherine Murdock
of Lakeland and Tyler Murdock of Monticello talk with each
other and look on as Aesa Jarvis (right) of Hawthorne carves
a piece of rustic furniture at his wood-carving booth at the
58th Annual Florida Folk Festival.

58th annual

Folk Festival

continues today


Event features
more than 300
festival performers.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS
- Thousands of people
flocked from near and far to
experience Florida's culture
and traditions Saturday.
The weekend-long
58th Annual Florida Folk
Festival offered attendees
an opportunity to enjoy
Florida's music, dance,
stories, crafts and food
through more than 300 fes-
tival performers and almost
30 food vendors.
The festival will contin-
ue from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m.
today at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park.
Bob Giarda, park ser-
vices specialist, said the


FOLK FESTIVAL

* Event continues from
10 a.m. to I I p.m. today
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
in White Springs.

festival is a way to cele-
brate Florida and to pass
the state's culture and tra-
ditions from ci'nt r:tion to
generation.
"The festival is to cel-
ebrate all the things that
make Florida a great place
to live and call 'home,' " he
said.
The "big requirement" for
performers at the event is
that they must have "some
kind of a tie to Florida,"
Giarda said.
"That's the kind of tradi-
tion we're looking to per-
petuate," he said.
"We get Floridians for
FESTIVAL continued on 5A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


-" " '
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 8A


O pinion ................ 4A
Local ................... 3A
Obituaries .............. SA
Life ............... . . . . . I D
Puzzles ................. 2B


r


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Sports stimulates
local economy.


COMING
TUESDAY
Observing
Memorial Day,


HaiCt










LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


.,1 ,IA.N A; t) 4) FLO RIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
13-17-30-31 5 7-10-15-20-21 Afternoon: 0-8-8 Afternoon: 6-5-6-3 2-3-25-30-35-40 1-6-10-13-20 32
Evening: 8-8-0 Evening: 4-3-7-0


AROUND FLORIDA



Military couples balance raising children, warfare


By MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press
GLIN AIR
FORCE BASE
- Four-year-old
Ava abandons
: her playmates
at school, flying into the
arms of Air Force Sgt.
Stacia Zachary. The moth-
er and daughter head to
the playground.
Their afternoon routine
will change in August,
when Zachary deploys
to Afghanistan for six .
months and her husband,
Air Force Sgt. Christopher
Zachary, tackles the
solo parenting duties for
Ava and her 13-year-old
stepbrother. Then in
December, dad will deploy
and the kids will go to
Idaho and stay with an
aunt until mom returns.
Growing numbers of
American servicemen
and women are married
to each other - up 35
percent from 2000 to 2007
- and eight years of war
that have stretched the
military's resources mean
deployments for both
spouses can come in rapid-
fire succession.
Many of those couples
have children, although
the Pentagon does not
track that number. For the
kids, it means rarely hav-
ing both parents at home
simultaneously. When both
are gone, or when duties
keep the home partner too
busy, extended families
often come into play. Kids
head to grandparents,
aunts or other relatives,
sometimes across the
country. -


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Air Force Sgt. Stacia Zachary and her daughter, Ava, 4, play at an Eglin Air Force Base park in Panama City Beach after
school in this recent file photo. Ava is among thousands of children with both parents serving in the military.


It's a unique sacrifice
military families make to
combine having a normal
life with a state of drawn-
out war. It has its own
stresses and rewards,
couples say.
"In a lot of ways, our
children serve, too," says
Stacia Zachary, a combat
photographer.
For the parents, it can
put added strain on mar-
riages as they spend
months apart and worry,
like the kids, about a loved
one on the battlefield.
"We've been mar-
ried seven years, but


we figured that we've
spent only two and half
of those together," says
Christopher Zachary, who
serves in the Air Force
special forces.
But dual military mar-
riages can also foster
closer ties with extended
family, and help sustain
a solid marriage because
fellow soldiers, sailors, air-
men and Marines better
understand the demands
and culture of military
life than civilian spouses,
couples say.
The Zacharys were
among 128,347 active duty


and reserve members of
the military married to
other service members
in 2007, the latest year
for which Department of
Defense statistics are avail-
able. That was a 35 per-
cent increase since 2000,
when there were 95,336
dual military couples. It
does not, however, track
the number of children
dual military couples have.
With no end in sight to
the wars, more military
couples are deciding not
to put off having chil-
dren, said Ann Huffman,
a psychology professor


at Northern Arizona
*University who has studied
dual military couples for
the Army. The economy
has played a role too
- the military offers good
paying, steady jobs, and
couples are reticent to give
up one income in this eco-
nomic downturn, she said.
Dr. Michelle Freedman,
chief of Family and Child
Service at Madigan
Army Medical Center's
Department of Psychology
in Tacoma, Wash., says
the center recently saw
a lot of 4 and 5 year olds
with deployed parents


getting kicked out of pre-
schools. Freedman said
the kids were acting out
because they were upset
about changes at home.
The worst-case scenario
for children who have too
much upheaval is an inabil-
ity to form an attachment
to any caregiver, she said.
"But as long as a care-
giver is sensitive and
loving and nurturing, the
children will get through
the transitions pretty well.
Kids are really very adapt-
' able," she said.
Tiny Ava Zachary has
saluted the American flag
since before she could
talk. Klyer, her 13-year-old
stepbrother, worries about
his dad and stepmother
whenever they leave on
another deployment He's
long been old enough to '
understand they are head-
ed to dangerous places.
The deployments aren't
easy for the Zacharys'
extended family - her
parents and his sister -
who are helping raise the
children. Stacia Zachary's
father, Gary Tieman, said
his granddaughter was
just 10 months old the first
time he cared for her at
his home in Delran, New
Jersey, while his daughter
was away.
"But on the second
deployment she was 3 and
understood a lot more,"
Tieman said. "There were
times when she just want-
ed to go home to Florida
and be with her mom and
dad and brother."
Saying goodbye to Ava
when her parents returned
was tough because they
had grown close, he said.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Actor-director Dennis Hopper dies


LOS ANGELES


Dennis Hopper, the
high-flying Hollywood ,
wild man whose memo-
rable and erratic career
included an early turn
in "Rebel Without a Cause," an
improbable smash with "Easy Rider"
and a classic character role in "Blue
Velvet," has died. He was 74.
Hopper died Saturday at his home
in the Los Angeles beach community
of Venice, surrounded by family and
friends, family friend Alex Hitz said.
Hopper's manager announced in
October 2009 that he had been diag-
nosed with prostate cancer. �
The success of "Easy Rider," and
the spectacular failure of his next
film, "The Last Movie," fit the. pat-
tern for the talented but sometimes
uncontrollable actor-director, who
also had parts in such favorites as
"Apocalypse Now" and "Hoosiers."
He was a two-time Academy Award
nominee, and in March 2010, was
honored with a star on Hollywood's
Walk of Fame.
After a promising start that
included roles in two James Dean
films, Hopper's acting career had
languished as he developed a reputa-
.tion for throwing tantrums and abus-
ing alcohol and drugs. On the set
of 'True Grit," Hopper so angered
John Wayne that the star reportedly
chased Hopper with a loaded gun.
He married five times and led
a dramatic life right to the end. In
January 2010, Hopper filed to end
.his 14-year.marriage to Victoria
Hopper, who stated in court filings
that the,actor was seeking to cut
her out of her inheritance, a claim
Hopper denied.

Oliver Stone promotes
Hugo Chavez film
CARACAS, Venezuela - American
filmmaker Oliver Stone said Friday
he deeply admires Hugo Chavez but
suggested the Venezuelan president
might consider talking a bit less on
television.
Promoting his new documentary
"South of the Border" in Caracas,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 26 photo, actor Jack Nicholson (left( congratulates Dennis Hopper
after Hopper was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los
Angeles. Dennis Hopper, the high-flying Hollywood actor-director whose memo-
rable career included the 1969 smash 'Easy Rider,' died Saturday at his Venice,
Calif. home, surrounded by family and friends. He was 74.


Stone heaped praise on Chavez,
saying he is leading a movement
for "social transformation" in Latin
American. The film features informal
interviews by Stone with Chavez and
is six allied leftist presi-
dents, from Bolivia's
Evo Morales to
Cuba's Raul Castro.
"I admire Hugo. I
like him very much
as a person. I can
Stone say one thing ...
Stone lie shouldn't be on
television all the time," Stone said at
a news conference. "As a director I
say you don't want to be overpower-
ing. And I think he is sometimes that
way.

Kevin Eubanks ends
18 years with Leno
NEW YORK - It's a wrap for
F'Tonight Show" bandleader Kevin
Eubanks after 18 years backing up
host Jay Leno.
"I don't think we've ever had


an argument," Leno said, bidding
Eubanks farewell on Friday's show.
"We've had a lot of fui."
Eubanks, whose duties included
comic sidekick to Leno as well as
guitarist, had been aboard since
Leno took over NBC's "Tonight"
in 1992. Eubanks became musical
director when Branford Marsalis left
in 1995.
The 52-year-old
Eubanks joined Leno
last fall for the short-
lived 'The Jay Leno
Show" in prime time,
then came back to t
'Tonight" when Leno
reclaimed the show Eubanks
from Conan O'Brien
in March. O'Brien left NBC rather
than move 'Tonight" to a later slot to
make room for Leno in late night.
In April, Eubanks announced his
plans to depart, but he insisted the
recent turmoil had played no part in
his decision. He said he was seeking
a career change of pace.
* Associated Press


* Country,.musician Johnny
Gimble is 84.
* Actor Clint Walker is 83.
* Actor Michael J. Pollard
is 71.
* Pro and College Football
Hall of Famer Gayle Sayers
is 67.
* Country singer Wynonna
Judd is 46.


* Rock musician Patrick
Dahlheimer (Live) is 39.
* Actress Idina Menzel is 39.
* Actor Trey Parker is 38.
* Rapper Cee-Lo is 36.
* Rapper Remy Ma is 30.
* Actor Blake Bashoff is 29.
* Christian rock musician
James Smith (Underoath) is
28.


Daily Scripture
"But from everlasting to ever-
lasting the LORD's love is with
those who fear him, and his righ-
teousness with their children's
children - with those who keep
his covenant and remember
to obey his precepts."
- Psalm 103:17-18


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland . .754-0417
(Istrickland @lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
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Rates indude 7% sales ltax.
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12 W eeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks ......... . . . .... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424









Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


(LEFT) The original flight crew of the 'Tin Liz' is seen in front of the high-altitude bomber. The plane belonged to the 501st Bomb Squadron, which was a part of the 345th Bomber Group,
nicknamed 'The Tree-top Terrors.' Flight crews used the B-25 to attack enemy positions on beaches and around islands and to destroy resources like gun emplacements, food, troop convoys
and fuel supplies. (RIGHT) Lake City resident Gerald E. Sims is seen in 1944 sitting on the engine cowling of a North American B-25 Mitchell, named the 'Tin Liz.' Sims, now 95 years old and
currently living in Lake City, was the only crew chief the 'Tin Liz' ever had.

PILOT: Local resident only crew chief of 'Tin Liz' before it was shot down


Continued From Page 1A
Army Air Corps, known
today as the U.S. Air Force,
Sims said.
Approximately four
or five months after he
was drafted, Sims said he
became the crew chief -
with the rank of Sergeant
- for the Tin Liz.
Sims said the flight crew
flew the plane for practice
in states such as South
Carolina, where it would
shoot targets in the water
with its machine guns.
He said they later flew
to Australia, which would
be the Tin Liz's "last stop"
before it reached the
Japanese-controlled New
Guinea in the Pacific Ocean.
Soto said U.S. forces had
to "take" New Guinea to
prevent the Japanese from
capturing Australia.
"It was nasty, nasty fight-
ing," Soto said.
Soto explained Gerald
Sims' job as crew chief,
which was to inspect and
ready the Tin Liz for every
mission it flew, such as
making sure it was proper-
ly prepared for flight, had
the correct ammunition
and had the correct bomb
load.
"He was responsible for
the airplane's fitness," Soto*
said.
While Sims was crew
chief, Soto said the origi-
nal flight crew flew 50 1.


-, .,; - F',m..a

COURTESY PHOTO
The 'Tin Liz' is seen With reinforced armor and .50 caliber machine guns before flying out on its final mission to Dugua, New
Guinea, where it was shot down after dropping a 2,000-pound bomb load on May 21, 1944. All on board were lost.


missions on the Tin Liz
of "mostly" bombing and
strafing where the flight
crew would search for
things like enemy encamp-
ments on the ground,
enemy ships or enemy
airstrips.
Sims said although he
wasn't flying on the mis-
sions, he was still on dan-
gerous ground.
"Just because we weren't
on a bombing mission
doesn't mean we were out
of it," he said.
While the Tin Liz was
flying on a mission, Sims
said a foxhole where he


and some others had made
camp and usually stayed
was bombed by the enemy,
killing some of his com-
rades. Sims said he hap-
pened to be somewhere
else at the time of the
bombing while writing a
letter to his wife, Bertha.,
"I was fortunate," he said.
The original Tin Liz
flight crew flew 50 mis-
sions before they were
rotated back to the U.S.
and a second flight crew
was assigned to the plane,
Soto said.
Sims said he had to
remain in New Guinea as


the plane's crew chief, but
the Tin Liz's second flight
crew only survived one
mission before the plane
was shot down and lost
in the New Guinea jungle
during the crew's second
mission.
Sims survived the war
and said he returned to
Florida, first to the Orlando
area before moving back
to Lake City with his wife
in 1945.
He said he worked for 30
years for Powers Service
in Lake City - a Pontiac
and Cadillac dealership,
Soto said - before retiring


HOSPITAL: Will better serve needs of community


Continued From Page 1A

Authority manager Jack
Berry, noting he was uncer-
tain whether theo additional
services will come at high-
er costs. "The partnership
will not increase what the
hospital pays for indigent
care."
The Hospital Authority
Board is scheduled to
hold a special meeting at
5:15 p.m. Thursday at
the Lake Shore Hospital
Authority Building to dis-
cuss what the partnership
will do for the local facility..
During the meeting,
board members are sched-
uled to hear a presentation
from Health Management
Associates and board
members could vote to
add Health Management
Associates to the lease as
part of the new partner-
ship.
The Lake Shore Hospital
Authority is an independent
special district of Florida,
an independent special pur-


pose government. It was
established originally to
construct and operate Lake
Shore Hospital.
In 1987, the hospital
was leased to Santa Fe
Healthcare and in 1996,
it was leased to Shands
Healthcare.
Under the lease arrange-
ment, the authority has
entered into an indigent
care agreement with the
hospital for it to take care of
Columbia County residents'
emergencies.
Through the agreement,
the authority pays 50 per-
cent of indigent in-patient
care and 30 percent of indi-
gent out-patient care.
As part of the lease
agreement, the authority is
obligated to levy a 1.5 mills
tax levy which is devoted
to indigent care at the hos-
pital and to support an indi-
gent clinic.
"When they take over
(Health Management


Thinking of Selling? Call mme.
',,a I 71e
r S

Charlie Sparks

Westfield
REALTY GROUP
�.3 �z
R e s i d e n t i a I /C d"m": Merdal
755,


Associates), we'll be
charged at the same rate
we're charged with Shands,"
Berry said.
Health Management
takes over July 1 and one of
the first changes that will be
made is a name change for
the local Shands' hospital.
Shands Lake Shore Hospital
will become Shands Lake
Shore Regional Medical
Center.
Vann said the hospi-
tal authority will continue
to own its property and
the only change will be
the limited partnership
between Shands and Health
Management Associates,
where both will be the
authority's tenants.
"We've got to put a plan


together for the needs of
this community," Berry
said. "We really don't have a
formal list of priorities right
now. That's still in nego-
tiations and will be settled
prior to the time the board
votes on this contract."
Berry and Vann said a
study performed years ago
indicated that more than 40
percent of local residents
went outside the county for
all medical services.
'"That's what we're attack-
ing - trying to lower
that number," Berry said.
"Services just weren't avail-
able here, but these ser-
-vices will become available
and in the coming months
I think residents will visibly
see that."


Is Your Child



.41.I.m 1".


Reading * Tutoring
Speech Therapy
*Scheduling for
summer appointments


S' ,
^;-'" "pI
f- 'V;t?


Speech & Reading Center

386.752.9919
speechreading@bellIsouth.net
Medicaid & CMS Provider


more than 30 years ago.
Soto said the Tin Liz had
accumulated almost 90 suc-
cessful missions between
its original flight crew and
other flight crews when
it disappeared. The plane
had also destroyed enemy
aircraft and enemy ship
tonnage, Soto noted.
For about 60 years, the
Tin Liz was "unaccounted
for," Soto said.
Through different
connections, Soto said
contact was made between
him and a few.of the lost
flight crew members'
great-relatives - Andy


Share
your events





www.lakecityreporter.com


Decker of Wisconsin
and Brandon Hogan of
Valencia, Calif. - that
began to wonder what
happened to the Tin Liz.
With Sims as the only
known association of the
plane, Soto said he and his
family were able to provide
Decker and Hogan with
some of the information
they were seeking.
"He became the sort-of
hero because he was the
direct link," Soto said.
Soto said Hogan eventu-
ally went on an expedition
in Papua New Guinea in
2007 that discovered some
of the Tin Liz's wreckage
and that both Decker and
Hogan are planning
another trip to excavate the
site.
"He (Sims) was the
alpha and they were the
omega." Soto said.
Bertha Sims, 83,
said when her husband
returned from the war, he
didn't talk about his war
experiences. The time that
has transpired between
now and then has been a
part of the healing process,
she said.
"I just praise God every
day for all of his goodness
and mercies," Bertha Sims
said. "We've been well-
blessed to still be'healthy
and to still have each
other."








* WEATHER
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THE BLAKE SCHOOL
since 1967

We enroll children at age 3 in our

accredited educational program.

The tuition is about the same as

child care. The hours are 7:30 am

to 3 pm, 5 days a week. Extended

care is available until 5:30 pm.

We serve all students age 3
through grade 12.
Accredited by
A.I.S.F., S.A.C.S. & N.C.P.S.A.

Call today 386-752-8874


I


I














OPINION


Sunday, May 30, 2010


OUR


OUR
OPINION



County


recalls


ultimate


sacrifice

Unlike more than two
dozen communities
across the United
States, Columbia
County doesn't
claim to be the birthplace of
Memorial Day. What we do
claim for that day is a time of
remembrance with roots that
run as deep as in any commu-
nity in the nation.
According to the National
Archives, 27 service members.
from Columbia County died in
World War II. We remember
them.
Throughout our nation's wars
and conflicts, untold others
from our county have similarly
made the ultimate sacrifice. We
remember them.
In today's wars, others will
be called upon to give their
lives for our country. We will
remember them as well.
In the midst of this three-
day holiday, it can be easy to
forget that Monday is a day
to recall those who have died
in our nation's service. But
in Columbia County, Friday's
observance ceremony at the VA
Medical Center made it impos-
sible to erase those memories.
Monday, a National Moment
of Remembrance at 3 p.m. will
echo throughout our county.
The resolution passed in
2000 asks that at that time all
Americans "voluntarily and
informally observe in their own
way a moment of remembrance
and respect."
In Columbia County, those
echoes will ring loud. They
must. The sacrifice has been
that great

HIGH LIGHTS
IN HISTORY
' Today is Sunday, May 30,
the 150th day of 2010. There
are 215 days left in the year.

N On May 30, 1922, the
Lincoln Memorial was dedi-
cated in Washington in a cer-
emony attended by President
Warren G. Harding, Chief
Justice William Howard Taft
and Robert Todd Lincoln.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work..
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
t Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed:or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name, ,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E.'Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


moo " -re 'lo J FS


Rest in peace, Benjamin Duke


"Forestry Service
U.S. Department
* of Agriculture
Ocean Pond Picnic Area
Dedicated to the memory of
Benjamin Franklin Duke
Forester on the Osceola and
Choctawhatchee
National Forests in Florida
in 1939 and 1940
Who gave his life in the
Service of his country on
June 18, 1943, World War II"
I - (Plaque at Ocean Pond)

ho, of all
American
war dead, will
you think of
tomorrow on
Memorial Day? I will think of
Benjamin Franklin Duke and
the day my unexpected prayer
became part of his memorial
service.
You have probably never
heard of Benjamin Duke. I
never knew him. He was, a
young forester who worked in
the Osceola National Forest in
1940.
When World War II started,
he left the Forest Service to join
the army and he was killed in
action June 18, 1943, while serv-
ing our country.
In 1947, the U.S. Forest
Service decided to dedicate
the brand new Ocean Pond
Recreation Area in Benjamin
Duke's memory. The dedication
ceremony was set for March,
1947.
Five Lake City Boy Scout
troops were invited to attend
the dedication ceremony and
all accepted. I was one of five
scouts, one from each troop,
selected to participate in the
formal program. My part was to
lead the pledge to the flag.
The ceremony was held on
the north side of Ocean Pond,
and it was there we all gathered
outdoors in a large circle on
that cool, bright March day.
The program began exactly
on time. The master of ceremo-
nies looked out over the 100-
plus uniformed scouts and other
guests and welcomed them.
He then began calling on first
one scout to recite the scout's
oath, then another to say the
scout's laws, all according to a


LETTERS


TO


Spill the blame
on the High Court
To the Editor:
We have a Wall Street col-
lapse and bailout. We have an
automotive collapse and bailout.
Now we have BP's oil spill.
Everyone is pointing the finger
of blame at everyone else.
Who do I blame? Tihe
Supreme Court. They're the
ones who ruled that business
couldn't be prevented from con-
tributing to political parties.
Big business buys
Washington with large sums of
money and says, "Don't send
your inspectors around check-
ing on me." Hence Wall Street,
GM and others and BP Blame
the Supreme Court!
Must be nice to sit with your


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
wdhamsh 2@afin.edu
372 W Duvol St.
Lake Cty. FL 32055
rehearsed plan.
I was scheduled to be next, to
lead the pledge to the flag, and I
was ready. Nervous but ready.
"And now," he said, "Morris
Williams, Troop 87, will lead
us...."
I was actually looking forward
to my part. I would stand tall
and say in my clearest voice, " I
pledge allegiance to the flag of
the United States of America..."
But then the emcee finished
his sentence, "..in our opening
prayer.
My mind went blank. I
couldn't believe it! I was not
supposed to say a prayer. That
was someone else. I was to lead
the pledge!
All the scouts removed their
caps for the prayer. The group
fell silent. They waited for the
prayer to begin. I waited, too,
thinking, hoping the scout des-
ignated to pray might begin his
prayer even though my name
had been called.
No such luck. I had to do it.
Mentally staggering, I almost
began, "Dear Lord, I pledge
allegiance to the flag..."
Then I took a deep breath
-and began: "Dear God, thank
you for Benjamin Duke. Thank
you for his work in this forest.
Thank you for the sacrifice of
his life for our country. We hope
his family will like this memorial
to him. Amen."
The caps went back on and
the program continued to its
conclusion. The other scouts
returned to their camp sites and
their normal routines. But my
mind was still reeling. I worried
about my little prayer. It hadn't
even seemed to me like a real
prayer. I yearned for some sign
of reassurance. When you are


THE EDITOR
head in an over 200-year-old
document that has almost no
relevance today and smile as if
it meant something. Where in
the document did the writers
say anything about cell phones,
the Internet and instant pornog-
raphy for everyone?
Yep, the Supreme Court says
it does. Welcome to dreamland
judges.
W R. Wright
Lake City

Hall's complaint
looks frivolous
To the Editor:
I've been following the story
about former assistant state
attorney KrisAnne Hall since it
started and I am wondering how
this got out of the "just another


14 years old, you find lots to
worry about.
Miserable and depressed, I
walked to the truck we came in
and climbed into the back. I sat
there alone for a long time feel-
ing sorry for myself.
The mix-up in the program
was bothering me but I real-
ized I was also feeling guilty. I
was thinking about me when
I should have been thinking
about Benjamin Duke.
I left the truck and headed
toward my scoutmaster, L.O.
Collier. I knew I could depend
on him to make me feel better.
Suddenly I was in her arms
and felt her soft kiss, and her
tears on my cheek.
"I am Benjamin Duke's
mother," she whispered. "I have
felt such a heavy burden since
Ben left us. Today, I felt part of
that burden lifted. Your prayer
helped me so much. I will
always remember it."
Back home a week later I got
a letter from her. She thanked
.me for participating in the
dedication ceremony. In part of
her letter, she recalled my little
prayer almost word for word.
That's how I can recall it now.
She asked me to write to her
from time to time. I never did.
Fourteen year olds don't write
many letters. I wish I had writ-
ten her. I never heard from her
again.
Recently I traveled to the
Ocean Pond Recreation Area to
see the memorial plaque. It is
still there. The plaque reminded
me that a young forester gave
his life for our country some
60 years ago, and that a grate-
ful country memorialized his
supreme sacrifice the best way
it knew how.
The plaque also reminded me
of Ben Duke's grieving mother
and the high price she, and all
like her, have paid for giving
their sons and daughters for our
country's freedom.
Rest in peace, Benjamin
Duke, and all the Benjamin
Dukes of American History.
Memorial Day is for you.
(Reprint from May 25, 2003)

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


"employee not following the
bosses orders" category?
If I went to a place and said
some things and when I got to
work my boss told me to stop or
I would be terminated, it seems
I would have two choices. Quit
or keep talking and be termi-
nated. Where does this differ?
Hall has a right to speak, but
the law says the boss has the
last word. This just seems like
another frivolous lawsuit with
someone hoping to get some
cash from the turnip. Most
probably the lawyers for the
complainants.
Sometime we just have to
admit we messedl up and put it
in the file of learning a lesson
and go on and find another job.
Clarence Duvall
Lake City


4A


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojoy@ool.com


Rand Paul

right, but

foolish


ian, a beginner
politician and the
recent winner of
a Republican pri-
mary for the U.S. Senate in
Kentucky, was extraordinarily
foolish to get in a conversation
about the 1964 Civil Rights Act
on MSNBC's "Rachel,Maddow
Show" the other day, even
though the views he expressed
were basically right
He said he believed in the
act's overall purposes but had
problems with the requirement
that private businesses had to
serve people they might not
want to serve. While he later
said on another show that he
would have voted for the act
even so, he has been held up
as a mentally and morally defi-
cient throwback to the era of
Jim Crow racism, which is itself
a mentally and morally defi-
cient assessment
I say as much although I also
believe the Civil Rights Act *
was one of the most important
pieces of domestic legislation in
the 20th century.
What this country had
done to its black citizens was
unspeakable. We had to change
and change dramatically,
although, in the instance of
commanding unwanted trans-
actions, that change betrayed
individual rights. In upholding
the abridgment, the Supreme
Court cited the Commerce
Clause, which is absurd. The
clause lets thie federal govern-
ment facilitate trade between
the states. It does not let tile
federal government do any-
tiling and everything it wants
whenever it wants and in any
way it wants.
Paul's libertarian philosophy
has a lot to be said for it, and
I myself embrace at least one
version of it. To me, liberty that
respects the rights of others is
the most blessed of our political
values, fundamental to our very
humanity, the prime mover of
prosperity and the essential
factor making America excep-
tional in the world.
. And yet I do get it that - as
in tihe case of the Civil Rights
Act - there are other values,
and I sometimes think at least
a few of my libertarian acquain-
tances do not take them seri-
ously enough.
I myself vastly prefer Paul's
ideas to those of arrogant stat-
ist bullies flexing their oppres-
sive muscles. The threat now is
not too little government. It is
too much.
A question nonetheless is
whether this Tea Party-backed
ophthalmologist running for
office for the first time can beat
one of those menacing goofs
ill the general election this
November.
Some may think politics is
easy. It is actually very hard.
It involves among other requi-
sites a keen, refined sense of
knowing what not to talk about,
and here is a subject a candi-
date should avoid: a nuanced
objection to one piece of a
properly revered law that was
enacted 46 years ago and is at
this point an integral part of
what we are as a nation.
Try it and thle candidate
quickly finds out what happens
- nothing else about him gets
any attention at all. And an
unsympathetic media sledge-
hammer slams Ilis fine distinc-
tions into smithereens.
* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is
a columnist living in Colorado.










Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION


SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


CCSO: Student

brought BB gun

to Columbia High


Kelly Giarda, 16, of Chattanooga, Tenn., gazes at a dream catcher at the Native Art and Bead Work vendor Friday afternoon
at the Florida Folk Festival at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park.


FESTIVAL: Expected to draw more than 30,000


Continued From Page 1A
Floridians," Giarda said.
Event headliners include
Mel Tillis, Billy Dean, Ben
Prestage, Michael Jonathan
and The Mayhaws.
Giarda also noted that
Alachua County is the
"spotlight" for this year's
festival.
The event will attract
more than 30,000 people
over the three days it is held,
Giarda said, and attend-
ees have traveled from
states such as California
and Washington to enjoy
the festival. He also said
the event attracted interna-
tional attendance through a
couple from Germany.
"We have people
coming from all corners
of the world and even our


own hometown," Giarda said.
He said the festival is a
family event that sees. fami-
lies return over genera-
tions.
"One of the nice things is
some folks come with their
parents and now they're
back with their kids,"
Giarda said.
Michael Murdock
of Lakeland and Peter
Murdock of Monticello,
brothers who attended the
festival with their families,
said they enjoy the event's
music and crafts and the
opportunity for family "qual-
ity time."
"We try to come every
year," Peter Murdock said.
"We come for family tradi-
tion. It's something we look


forward to. We enjoy the
music and relaxing."
Wren Underwood of
Martin County said she and
her son Owen Vincent, 5,
come each year to the fes-
tival to enjoy its events and
"homemade music."
"We love it," Underwood
said as she and her son
watched a musical pup-
petry demonstration at the
festival's Children's Area.
"It's all about creativity and
uniqueness."
Tickets at the festival
gate are free for children
under age 6, $5 for children
ages 6 to 16 and $25 for
adults.
Call (877) 635-3655 or
visit www.FloridaStateParks.
org/folkfest.


JASON MATTHEW WALKEPRLake City Reporter
Jeffrey Amundsen, of Jubal's
Kin, plays the bass during a
concert on Friday.


OBITUARIES


Beulah Bishop Tyre
Beulah Bishop Tyre, 96, went
home to be with her Lord and
Savior on Friday, May 28, 2010
after an extended illness. She
was born in Columbia County, to
the late Ben Bishop & Evelena
Beasley Bishop. Mrs. Beulah
was a longtime member of Lulu
Baptist Church. She was a lov-
ing wife, mother and grandmoth-
er who devoted her life to the
care of her family. In her spare
time she enjoyed, gardening
and. fishing. She was preceded
in death by her husband of 48
years, Leo Tyre Sr.; sons, Leo
Tyre Jr. and Tal Tyre; daughter,
Maurcine Robinson and sev-
eral grandchildren. Survivors
include her daughters, Bonnie
Tomlinson and Nelson Clark of
St. Augustine, FL, Sandra Tyre
(Robert) Hansford of Astor, FL;
son in law, Robert Robinson Jr. of
Mayo, FL; 11 grandchildren, 27
great grandchildren and 5 great
great grandchildren also survive.
Visitation with the family will be
held on Monday evening, May
31, 2010 from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m.
at the funeral home. Funeral ser-
vices for Mrs. Beulah Tyre will
be conducted on Tuesday, June
1, 2010 at 11:00 a.m. in the cha-


pel of' Gateway-Forest Lawn
Funeral Home. 3596 U.S. Hlwy
441 S. Lake City, Florida 32025,
(386) 752-1954. Interment will
follow in Ebenezer Cemetery.

Aleen Dorothy Williams
Aleen Dorothy Williams, 89, a
resident of Lake City, Florida
passed away May 28, 2010 at the
Suwannee Valley Care Center,
Lake City, Florida. Mrs. Williams
was born in Lulu, Florida and
had resided in Columbia County
all her life. She is the daugh-
ter of the late Loffie Ette and
Lester Agnes Cox Pearce. She
is preceded in death by her hus-
band Francis C. Williams two
sister, Kathleen Skidmore and
Lee DePoyster and one brother
Audrey Pearce. She was a mem-
ber of the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints. Survivors
include One daughter: Dorothy
(Monty) Morris, Lake City, Fl.
Two Sons: Freddie McBride,
Fleming Island, Fl. and Shelton
(Carol) Williams, Adairsville,
Ga. Two Sisters: Juanita Young,
Okeechobee, Fl. and Jeanette
Guntner, Lake City, Fl. One
brother: Bennard Pearce, Lulu,
Florida. Three grandchildren,
Ricky, Kenneth and Tammy


and five great grandchildren,.
Stephen. IHeather. Austin, T.J.
and Tvler. Funeral services for
Mrs. Williams will be conducted
Wednesday, June 2, 2010 at 11:00
A.M. in the Chapel of Guerry
Funeral Home with Brother
Neal Miles, Brother George
Clemmons and Dr. David Morse,
officiating. Interment will fol-
low in the Memorial Cemetery.


I The inamil \\ill receive friends
Tuesdlav lunee I, 2010 from
6:00-8:00 P.M. at the funeral
home. Guerrv Funeral Home
2659 SW. Main Blvd. Lake City
is in charge of arrangements.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


From staff reports

An 18-year-old Columbia
High School student report-
edly brought a BB gun on
campus Wednesday, accord-
ing to reports from the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office.
No one was injured dur-
ing the incident and reports
state there was no indica-
tion the teen planned to use
the gun while at school.
According to a CCSO
incident report obtained
Saturday, the presence of
the gun was brought to the
attention of Deputy Randy
Dowling, the school's stu-
dent resource officer, by


school officials on Thursday
after two students said
they'd seen another student
with a gun. Students also
told school officials that the
student planned to use the
gun while at school.
The studentwas removed
from the classroom and
questioned about the gun.
The student claimed he
had brought the gun on
Wednesday to give to a
friend and it was no longer
in his possession. He told
officers that at no time
had he planned to use the
gun.
The student was suspend-
ed for 10 days from school,
according to reports.


BP's top kill effort fails

to plug Gulf oil leak


By BEN NUCKOLS
Associated Press

ROBERT, La. - BP said
Saturday it failed in its latest
attempt to plug the oil leak
in the Gulf of Mexico with
mud and cement.
BP Chief Operating
Officer Doug Suttles said
the company determined
the "top kill" method had
failed after studying it for
three days. The method
involved pumping heavy
drilling mud into a crippled
well 5,000 feet underwater.
"We have not been able
to stop the flow," Suttles
said. "We have made the
decision to move onto the
next option."
It was the latest setback


for the company trying to
stop the crude from further
fouling waters, wildlife and
marshland. Other attempts
included a gigantic box
placed over the leak and a
tube inserted to siphon the
oil away.
The box failed after ice-,
like crystals clogged it,
while the tube was removed
to make way for the top kill
after it sucked up more than
900,000 gallons of oil.
The spill is the worst
in U.S. history and has
dumped between 18 million
and 40 million gallons into
the Gulf, according to gov-
ernment estimates.
BP says it's already pre-
paring for the next attempt
to stop the leak.


OUR YOUTH ARE ON THE ROAD AGAIN...


This year our trip is to New Orleans to help on
the continued Hurricane Relief Project.
The youth have a passion for mission work,
encouraging and rebuilding from the heart.



onth msso


B~i~hway,,,.,* Currently writing policies
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1 7Th ANNUAL[ WEllboRN

Blueberry Festival
JUNE 4 & 5, 2010
FRidAy, 9AM-9pM * SATURdAy, 7AM-5pM






For directions, information or schedule.
www.wellborricommunityassociation.com
call 386-963-1157










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


Monday
Walk at the mall daily,
rain or shine
Rain or shine, the Lake
City Mall is open at 7 a.m.
Monday - Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday for those who
want to walk for exercise.

Civil Air Patrol to meet
Suwannee Valley
Composite Squadron - Civil
Air Patrol. Meets 6:30 to 9
p.m. Monday. For more
information, please call Maj.
Grant Meadows, (386) 365-
i341.

Tuesday
Ultimate Backyard BBQ
Package
S-Tickets are now available
for the Ultimate Backyard
BBQ Packager through June
.30. The drawing is at 12 p.m.
.July.2. Tickets are $2 each or
:three for $5. Call (386) 364-
7720 or (386) 758-1170. A
$50 Publix gift card is includ-
ed. Proceeds benefit Voices
for Children of the Suwannee
.Valley, Inc. Helping Abused
and Neglected Children in
,Need.
Lulu baby shower on

Tuesday
Lulu Community Center
is hosting a baby shower to
-benefit the Pregnancy Care
:Center at 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Bring an unwrapped gift. Call
Eva Nelson at 755-6574.

Geri Actors
The Geri Actors at the
LifeStyle Entrenchment


POLICE

REPORTS
The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are presumed
innocent until proven guilty.
Thursday, May 27
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Shelley Sue Brock,
22, 198 SW Mabrey Glen,
grand theft
* Ray Jerrold Brooks,
19, 1011 NE Aberdeen St.,
felony fleeing and attempt-
ing to elude, no valid driv-
er's license and warrant:
No valid drivers license.
* Joseph Daniel Robson,
.47, 516 SW Maple St., Live
Oak, warrant Violation
of probation on original
charges of possession of a
controlled substance (two
counts), possession of
marijuana and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
* Maryellen Rose, 51,
139 SW High St, warrant
Violation of probation on
charges of introduction of
contraband, selling a con-
trolled substance and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
Friday, May 28
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Walter S. Reeves, no
age given, 379 SW Susan
Circle, aggravated battery.
* Daniel Monroe Sims,
59, 323 SW Shellcracker
Dr., Fort White, battery
(domestic violence), simple
battery and parole violation.
From staff reports.

In Loving vtemnj'of rJ
Line Morgan Wison
'December 5 1978- 9fay 31, 2003








I Seven years hav. ou ...i' v,.. , ,. ,. '
sacy goodbye. ) .... .. .. ,* , ,. .
i knew it aInd only God knows why. Some
,.' ' . "v come into our lives , ..,


i... . . .. some stay awhile and leave
on our hearts, and we are
Never tie satne. We were so blessed to
S.you in our lives /.lr those short 24
. and are left with immi' wonderful
nmricis , We 'till luok for you to walk
l/ioith i,he floor and brighten our day
with /that quick wit, that sense of umnor
and your beautiful snile. There is ...
a day' that goes hy that we don't .
you. You are forever in our hearts,
iand will always he loved and missed
Your Loving Family and Friends j


Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice
Robert Weaver, 86, who served in the U.S. Army in the 4th Infantry Division, looks on as he remembers all those who died in
battle.


Center are looking for
members. Meetings are
12:45-2 p.m. Tuesday and
Thursday. Anyone retired
and interested in becoming
an actor or actress is invited.
Call Frank at 752-8861.

UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are at the
Columbia County Extension
Office from 9 a.m. t$ noon


Tuesday. They answer
gardening questions and
conduct sbil pH tests free
of charge. Call (386) 752-
5384, or stop at the UF/IFAS
Extension Office at the
Columbia County fairgrounds
for more information.

Lake City Lions to meet
The Lake City Lions meet
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, at the
Guangdong restaurant, in the
Lake City Mall. Call Truett


George at (386) 497-2050
or Marshall Barnard at (386)
497-3536 for more informa-
tion.

Square Dancing
The Dixie Dancers weekly
dance is held at 6:30 p.m.
every Tuesday at Teen Town
Community Center. The
group does square and round
dancing. Couples 12 and
older are welcome. Call (386)
497-2834.


Thursday
Save Green by Going
Green
The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber is hosting a
workshop on green strategies
to improve business from
4 to 6 p.m. Thursday. Ellen
Reed, US Green Building
Council North Florida
Chapter president is the
speaker. The event is free to
chamber members and $10


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


for non-members. Call (386)
752-3690.

Friday
Wellborn Blueberry
Festival begins Friday
The 17th Annual Wellborn
Blueberry Festival is Friday
and Saturday in Andrews
Square on the grounds of
the Wellborn Community
Center. Admission is free. The
Country Store will be selling
blueberry pies, cobbler, syrup,
jam, country items and more.
Arts & crafts and food vendors
will be open on both Friday
and Saturday, and there will
be live entertainment by the
Willow Creek Band both
days. The Blueberry Festival
is hosted by the Wellborn
Community Association, a
non-profit 501 (c)3 corporation.
Visit www wellbomcommuni-
tyassociation.com, call (386)
963-1157, or e-mail wendells-
nowden@prodigy.net.

Women's Club Fish Fry
The Columbia County
Women's Club is sponsor-
ing a Fish Fry beginning at 6
p.m. Friday. A sandwich and
drink is $5.50, and dessert
is $1. Contact Eddie Mae
McKenzie at (386)623-1714,
Sandra Trowell at (386) 752-
8717 or Angela Woody at
(386) 965-8000.

Big Community Garage
Sale
A community garage sale
is 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday
and Saturday at the Lulu
Community Center. Rent a
table for $10 or half a table
for $5. Call Eva Nelson at
755-6574.


From the desk of State Representative Leonard Bembiy
Dear Neighbors

As I reflect on the 2010 Legislative Session, I am reminded of the tremendous responsibility you have entrusted
in my care as your State Representative. I understand today, as I did when I first entered office, that what
happens here in Tallahassee impacts our lives and those of our children and grandchildren.

Florida's economic outlook may be improving, according to the most current estimates, but the difficult
financial environment will continue to challenge how we fund the budget. I am committed to remaining
vigilant in holding the line on new taxes and protecting our small counties and communities in the budget
process.

The State budget was effective in protecting our future and serving the needs of our people by maintaining
adequate funding including libraries, rural health services, rural fire services, small county wastewater grants,
and a host of other needs. However, in my opinion, there were many areas critical to our district that did not
receive adequate funding:

* 'Bright Futures Scholarships
* The Transportation Trust fund, which has the potential to cost up to 10,000 jobs
* Nursing homes and rural hospitals
* Did not provide enough incentives for bio-mass renewable energy production

I was proud to sponsor successful legislation that:

* Waives state park fees for disabled veterans and discounts fees for all veterans
* Streamlines permitting process for our limestone mines, and helps entice high paying jobs
* Honored law enforcement officers that have fallen in the line of duty and others that contributed to
Florida's growth

Again, thank you for the opportunity to serve as your State Representative. I look forward to hearing your
concerns and ideas to make our district a better place to live, work, worship and raise a family.




Representative Bemb ry: Legislative Priorities this session were:
v/ Strengthen our Greenbelt Agricultural tax exemptions
V Protect our agricultural interests /fiom unnecessary permitting and development intrusion
/ Remain diligent for the interests ofsmall and rural counties, provide them tax relief and protection
from unfimded state mandates
/ Protect our State workers in the budget process - during debate, I spoke in favor of maintaining benefits
for state .. /., ..... and retirees
/ Con/inite to support our educational system and teachers
V/ Supported a resolution uwging Congress to provide for a balanced federal budget
/ Supported a House Joint Resolution, creating a ballot initiative, to prohibit persons and employers from
compelled participation in anyi health care system

For a detailed summary ofIthe 2010 Leislative Session, and to read the fidl state budget, go to:


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427













Construction to delay traffic


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter

Spreading the gospel
Louis Joseph, pastor of First Haitian Baptist Church of Lake City, spreads his arms as he
sings at the second annual International Gospel Explosion in Olustee Park Saturday. Dozens
of Lake City residents attended the event - a gospel music concert that offered music,
preaching, dancing, food and testimonies. Pastors and participants came from local churches
and churches from Atlanta, Ga. to Miami, said Vanessa Layland, event coordinator. 'We want
to bring unity in the city of Lake City with all churches and businesses coming together to
celebrate Jesus Christ,' Layland said.


From staff reports


Florida Department of
Transportation cpnstruc-
tion projects could delay
traffic in Columbia and
surrounding counties
beginning Tuesday. Road
construction will not take
place on Monday due to
the Memorial Day holiday.

Columbia County
* Interstate 75 - All
northbound lanes will be
closed to traffic Tuesday
and Wednesday from 9
p.m. to 6 a.m. from 1-10
to State Road 136 (Exit
439) for repairs to the
Suwannee Valley Road
overpass. All traffic will
be detoured to 1-10 (Exit
435) westbound for five
miles to County Road
137 (Wellborn exit in
Suwannee County) or Exit
292, then north for nearly
three miles to County
Road 136 and then west
for one mile back to 1-75
(Exit 439). Eastbound I-
10 traffic wanting to head
north on 1-75 will use this
same detour route, which
adds an extra five miles
to the trip. Westbound
1-10 traffic wanting to
head north on 1-75 will be
detoured to U.S. 41 (White
Springs exit in Columbia
County) or Exit 301, then
north for six miles to State
Road 136 in the Town of
White Springs and west
for about two miles back
to 1-75 (Exit 439). One
lane will be closed from 6
a.m. to 9 p.m. to prepare
to remove the damaged
beam. The speed limit will
be reduced to 60 mph.
* Suwannee Valley
Road - The road remains
closed at the 1-75 overpass


until a damaged beam
can be replaced. Traffic is
detoured to White Springs
Road to State Road 136
during the closure.
* State Road 238
- Daytime lane closures
Tuesday through Friday
after 8 a.m. between U.S.
441 in Ellisville and the
Olustee Creek Bridge at
the Union County line
while crews resurface the
road.
* U.S. 41/441 - South
Daytime lane closures
at County Road 240 in
Watermelon Park for work
on a new driveway for
Nettles Sausage.
* U.S. 90 - Nighttime
lane closures Sunday from
10 p.m. to 2 a.m. between
Sisters Welcome Road and
Branford Highway (State


Road 247) for routine sign
maintenance.
Union County
* State Road 238
- Daytime lane closures
Tuesday through Friday
after 8 a.m. between State
Road 238 in Lake Butler
and the Columbia County
line while crews resurface
the road. Motorists should
allow an extra 10-15 min-
utes to reach their destina-
tion.

Hamilton County
* County Road 132
- Daytime lane closures
at the Interstate 75 over-
pass Tuesday through
Thursday from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. for routine bridge
maintenance.


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personal appointment:
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PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Reporter

DUI spells trouble at check point
Florida Highway Patrol Lt. Mark Boatright (left) and Columbia County Sheriff deputy Lt. Pete
Spurlock speak to an unidentified driver at aDUI check point Friday night.


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LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


A Iik










LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


THE WEATHER


fb ^"',A!" - i ... . . , :' '"
CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE , CHANCE CHANCE
-STORMS, -STORMS f iS T-STORMS T-STORMS OwT-STORMS


HI 87 LO 67 HI87LOHI 90 LO ; HI 91 LO . HI90 LO
FOT 1%


';"O i.1 a, "


A A *W'1~ ~S~LASSOF2O1O


Valdosta
86/68
Tallahassee * Lake City,
86/69 87/67
� . Gainesville *
Panama City 87/67
84/72 Ocala
:88/68


Tampa ,
88/73


FL Myei
90/72


City
SJacksonville Cape Canaveral
85/69 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
85'71 Gainesville
Jacksonville
Orlando Cape Canaveral KeyWest
88/71 84/73 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
87/74 0 Orlando
' Ft Lauderdale Panama City
irs 87/76 * Pensacola
* Naples .* Tallahassee
90/73 Miami Tampa


Key
86,


88/76 Valdosta
West W. Palm Beach
/77


Monday
85/71/t
85/71/t
88/77/t
92/73/t
88/66/t
86/69/t
87/77/pc
87/66/t
88/76/t
91/74/t
89/67/t
89/71/t
86/73/t
86/71/t
88/69/t
89/74/t
88/67/t
87/75/t


Tuesday
85/71/t
87/71/pc
88/76/pc 1
91/73/t
91/67/pc
88/69/pc
87/76/pc
90/67/pc
88/75/t
89/73/pc
91/67/pc
90/70/pc
85/73/pc
86/71/pc
90/69/pc
89/73/pc
89/69/t
88/74/t


Columbia High School Senior Class Vice President Brandon Mansmann delivers the.opening
remarks for the commencement ceremony.


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


89
67
88
65
99 in 1908
53 in 1988


0.00"
2.37"
17.02"
2.90"
16.92"


SUN
Sunrise today 6:30 a.m.
Sunset today 8:26 p.m.
Sunri tom. 6:30 a.m. BliEMEBE
Sunsettom. 8:27 p.m. lOmnstes to ii
Today s
MOON ultra-violet
Moonrise today 11:04 p.m. radiation risk
Moonset today 8:41 a.m. for the area on
Moonrise tom. 11:43 p.m. a scale from
to 10+.
Moonset tom. 9:39 a.m.


June June June June . Forecas
4 12 19 26 .f' l" Ics � 2
Last New First Full ; ; LLC, M."
w'WW.WC


JA5our'M ITTHWI n vv * L crIL 3. '.d, r'-pj.,.,
Abraham Lainez (center) waves to family and friends in the bleachers while marching to his-
seat on Friday.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.





its, data and graph-
010 Weather Central
idison, Wis.
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Sh nd t F o m - S ri* ilsCo mo s92 0NW39hAv . Ocla3 97S Cllg R . Eat cla2 44E. 0 e Sprng *ld. W stMaio 1 1 5 W9 SdCor0 R . 0 rrn r Ie~I 9 0 S w ,4


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r WETE IN-HU


%% I AM I% reporterxt, I n
I'ahe City IlePorter


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby(@lakecityreporter com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. May 30. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Tuesday
The Columbia County
Quarterback club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the Jones Fieldhouse.
All parents are urged to
attend.
For details, call Blake
Lundy at 754-5810.
CHEERLEADING
Columbia Cheer
coaches meeting
Columbia Cheer
Association has a
mandatory meeting for
returning coaches and
others interested in
coaching little league
cheerleading at 6:30 p.m.,
Tuesday at Southside
Recreation Center.
Interested community
members are welcome.
For details, call
(386) 2924668.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
6234817.
FISHING
Q-back Club bass
tourney June 26
Columbia County
Quarterback Club's
6th Annual Open Bass
Tournament is June 26 at
Clay Landing.
For details, e-mail
Jamie Albritton at
JAlbritton@bakerdist.com.

Kingfish tourney
in Fernandina
The 28th annual
Nassau Sport Fishing
Association Tournament
of Champions Kingfish
Tournament is
June 17-19 in Fernandina
Beach. First prize for the
biggest fish is $25,090,
second prize $6,500 and
third prize $5,000, with
prizes of lowering value
paid out for the 20th
largest fish. In all, 80
percent of entry fees are
paid out based on 200
boats. There are
special cash prizes for
the Lady Anglers, the
Junior Anglers and the
Class of 23 boats.
The tournament
is sanctioned by the
Southern Kingfish
Association in
accordance with SKA
Code of Conduct and
Angling Rules amended
to meet local conditions.
Tournament fee is $350
through Monday, then
$400 until registration
closes at 8 p.m. June 17.
For complete rules, go
to www.fishnsfa.com.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
Camps offered
at Stetson
Stetson University is
offering a series of boys
basketball camps this
summer. Shooting camp
is June 11-13, followed by
position camp on
June 13-17, high school
team camp on June 26-27,
and individual camp on
July 25-29.
For details, contact
Chris Capko at ccapko@
stetson, edu.


* From staff reports


I


ack


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Tiger Powell looks for the end zone in a 36-32 win against Ed White High to claim the District 4-5A championship last season.


Columbia, Fort White have banner year


Tigers' district
championship
highlights season.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It started with an upset
and ended with a signing.
Columbia High's 2009-2010
sports' seasons have had
both highs and lows. The
Tigers were able to claim
their first district cham-
pionship in football since
2003, and ended with a title
in baseball at the end of
the year. In between, there
were signing, records and
upsets.
The school year of sports
began with an upset to Fort
White High in the annu-
al kickoff classic for the
Tigers. It was the first time
Columbia has lost to the
school, falling 13-12.
Columbia followed it up
with its second-straight
season competing in the
"Border Wars" football
series. The Tigers battled
to a 48-48 tie against peren-
nial Georgia powerhouse
Charlton County. The first
win for the football team
came the following week
against Gainesville High.
October saw a plethora
of highlights for the Tigers,
starting with Heather
Burns record-breaking per-
formance in the 100 back-
stroke with a time of 1:06.15
on Oct. 7.
Burns wasn't the only
record breaker that month
as Pheobe Johnson set the
school record in the 5k
with a time of 21:19.37 at
the Greater North Florida
Invitational at Alligator Park
on Oct. 24.
A week later, Blayne
Barber used a 3-under 69
'to win the Alachua County
CHS continued on 3B


1 , . 10111, 0



Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Fort White High's Montre Cray breaks away for yardage in the Indians' 13-12 win
-against Columbia High in the Kickoff Classic.

BELOW: Fort White High's Chris Griffith won the Indians' first ever state championship with a
victory in weightlifting. More pictures from both schools can be found on 2B.

--L-.,


Victory over
CHS set tone for
Indians' season.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE - The
biggest sports win in the
history of Fort White High
came before the football
season started and carried
over to a feel-good year for
the school.
Fort White also pro-
duced its first individual
state champion, when
senior Chris Griffith won
the weightlifting title he
had been chasing since the
sixth grade.
There was one schol-
arship ceremony, as Levi
Hatcher signed to play
baseball at Florida State
College.
On Aug. 28, Montre Cray
scored two touchdowns in
the fourth quarter - the
second one coming with 28
second left on the clock -
and Joseph Johnson added
the deciding PAT in the
football game.
Upstart Fort White upset
host Columbia High, 13-
12, in the kickoff classic
between the two teams
to set off a celebration all
through the south side of
the county.
While the Tigers pooh-
poohed the game as only
a preseason exhibition, the
Indians were having none of
that. Fort White produced
T-shirts and plaques com-
memorating the event.
However, the Indians
missed the football playoffs
after two straight appear-
ances, despite shedding
the district yoke that was
Madison County High.
Fort White finished third
behind Florida High and
INDIANS continued on 3B












2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 30 20 10


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED - Formula One, Turkish
Grand Prix, at Istanbul
I p.m.
ABC - IRL. Indianapolis 500
5 p.m.
FOX - NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Coca-Cola 600, at Concord, N.C.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN2 - Southeastern Conference,
championship game, at Hoover, Ala.
FSN - Big 12 Conference,
championship game, at Oklahoma City
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
I p.m.
ESPN - NCAA Division I, super
regionals, Columbia (Mo.) Regional, game
2, Oregon at Missouri
3:30 p.m.
ESPN - NCAA Division I, super
regionals, Columbia (Mo.) Regional, game
3, Oregon at Missouri (if necessary)
GOLF
9 am.
TGC - European PGA Tour, Madrid
Masters, final round, at Madrid
I p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza
Invitational, final round, at Fort Worth,
Texas
3 p.m.
CBS - PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza
Invitational, final round, at Fort Worth,
Texas
NBC - PGA of America, Senior
PGA Championship, final round, at Parker,
Colo.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
WGN - Chicago White Sox at
Tampa Bay
2:15 p.m.
TBS - St. Louis at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m. ,
ESPN2 -Texas at Minnesota
TENNIS
Noon
NBC - French Open, early round, at
Paris (same-day tape)

Monday
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
SPEED - Rolex Sports Car Series,
Memorial Day Classic, at Lakeville, Conn.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
WGN - Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh
MEN'S COLLEGE LACROSSE
3:30 p.m.
ESPN - NCAA Division I
tournament, championship game, at
Baltimore
MOTORSPORTS
5 p.m,
SPEED -- FIM World Superbike, at
Salt Lake City (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
TNT - Playoffs, conference finals,
game 7, Phoenix at L.A. Lakers (if
necessary)


ESPN2
16, at Paris


TENNIS
Noon
French Open, round of


BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Friday
Boston 96, Orlando 84, Boston wins
series 4-2
Saturday
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 8:30 p.m.
Monday
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m., if
necessary


BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Tampa Bay 33 16 .673 -
New York 29 20 .592 4
Toronto 29 22 .569 5
Boston 27 23 .540 6h
Baltimore 15 35 .300 I8'/
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 29 20 .592 -
Detr6it 25 22 .532 3
Chicago 21 27 .438 7'/,
Kansas City 21 28 .429 8
Cleveland 18 29 .383 10
West Division
W L PctGB
Oakland 26 23 .531 .-
Texas 26 23 .531 -
Los Angeles 24 27 .471 3
Seattle 19 29 .396 65'
Friday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 8, Cleveland 2
Oakland 5, Detroit 4
Toronto 5, Baltimore 0
Chicago White Sox 4,Tampa Bay 2
Kansas City 12, Boston 5
Minnesota 2,Texas I
Seattle 8, L.A.Angels 3
Saturday's Games
Cleveland 13, N.Y.Yankees II
Toronto 5, Baltimore 2
L.A.Angels 5, Seattle 1, 10 innings
Minnesota 8,Texas 3
Oakland at Detroit (n)
Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay (n)
Kansas City at Boston (n)
Today's Games
Cleveland (Masterson 0-5) at N.Y.
Yankees (A.J.Burnett 5-2), 1:05 p.m.
Oakland (Braden 4-4) at Detroit
(Galarraga 1-1), 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 3-4) at Toronto
(R.Romero 4-2), 1:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Meche 0-4) at Boston
(Lester 5-2), 1:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 3-4) at
Tampa Bay (J.Shields 5-2), 1:40 p.m.
Seattle (Snell 0-3) at L.A. Angels
(J.Saunders 3-6), 3:35 p.m.
Texas (Holland 2-0) at Minnesota
(S.Baker 4-4), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cleveland at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Oakland at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.


Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p min.
Minnesota at Seattle, 10 10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 27 20
Atlanta 26 22
New York 25 24
Washington 25 24
Florida 24 25
Central Division
W L
Cincinnati 29 20
St. Louis 28 22
Chicago 24 26
Milwaukee 20 28
Pittsburgh " 20 29
Houston 16 32
West Division
W L
San Diego 28 20


Pct GB
.574 -
.542 I
.510 3
.510 3
.490 4

Pct GB
.592 -
.560 I '
.480 5'
.417 8's
.408 9
.333 12'%

Pct GB
.583 -


Los Angeles 27 21 .563 . I
San Francisco 25 22 .532 2',
Colorado 25 23 .521 3
Arizona 20 29 .408 8'/,
Friday's Games
St. Louis 7, Chicago Cubs I
Cincinnati 15, Houston 6
Philadelphia 3, Florida 2
Atlanta 7, Pittsburgh 3
Milwaukee 2, N.Y Mets 0
L.A. Dodgers 5, Colorado 4
Washington 5, San Diego 3
San Francisco 5,Arizona 0
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, St. Louis 0
Houston at Cincinnati (n)
N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee (n)
Philadelphia at Florida (n)
Pittsburgh at Atlanta (o)
L.A. Dodgers at Colorado (n)
Washington at San Diego (n)
Arizona at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Houston (FPaulino 0-7) at Cincinnati
(Leake 4-0), 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Moyer 5-4) at Florida
(Ani.Sanchez 4-2), 1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Maholm 3-4) at Atlanta
(Kawakami 0-7), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Dickey 1-0) at Milwaukee
(Wolf 4-4), 2:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Wainwright 6-3) at Chicago
Cubs (Dempster 3-4), 2:20 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 4-3) at
Colorado (J.Chacin 3-2). 3:10 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 3-3) at San
Francisco (Wellemeyer 3-4), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (L.Hernandez 4-3) at San
Diego (Garland 6-2), 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games-
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Washington at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 9: 10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

INDYCAR
Indianapolis 500
Site: Indianapolis.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (ABC,
noon-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Indianapolis Motor Speedway
(oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 200 laps.
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP


8
11
12
13 I
14 F

16 I
17 I

18 I
20 I

21
t


Coca-Cola 600
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, race, 6 p.m. (FOX,
5-1 I p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 600 miles, 400 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Turkish Grand Prix
Site: Istanbul.
Schedule: Today, race, 8 a.m. (Speed,
7:30-10 a.m.).
Track: Istanbul Speed Park (road
course, 3.32 miles).
Race distance: 192.25 miles, 58 laps.


TENNIS

French Open singles

Men
Third Round
MikhailYouzhny( II), Russia, def.Viktor
Troicki, Serbia, 2-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2, 6-3.
Teimuraz Gabashvili, Russia, def. Andy
Roddick (6), United States, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2.
Jurgen Melzer (22).Austria, def. David
Ferrer (9), Spain, 6-4, 6-0, 7-6 (1).
Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def.Victor
*Hanescu (31), Romania, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Nicolas Almagro (19), Spain, def.
Aleksandr Dolgopolov Jr., Ukraine, 6-3,
6-3, 6-4.
Thomaz Bellucci (24), Brazil, def. Ivan
Ljubicic (14), Croatia, 7-6 (4), 6-2, 6-4.
Fernando Verdasco (7), Spain, def.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (30), Germany, 2-6,
6-3, 6-3, 6-7 (1), 6-4.
Robby Ginepri, United States, def.
Juan Carlos Ferrero (16), Spain, 7-5, 6-3,
3-6. 2-6, 6-4.
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Lleyton
Hewitt (28),Australia, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3.
Women
Third Round
Serena Williams (I), United States, def.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (29), Russia, 6-1,
1-6, 6-2.
Nadia, Petrova (19), Russia, def.Aravane
Rezai (15), France, 6-7 (2), 6-4, 10-8.
Jarmila Groth, Australia, def. Anastasia
Rodionova,Australia, 6-3. 5-7, 6-2.
Shahar Peer (18), Israel, def. Marion
Bartoli (13), France, 7-6 (7), 6-2.
Daniela Hantuchova (23), Slovakia, def.
YaninaWickmayer (16), Belgium, 7-5,6-3.
Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def.
Alisa Kleybanova (28), Russia, 6-2, 4-6, 6-0.


SOFTBALL

Div. I Super Regionals

Gainesville Regional
At Katie Seashole Pressly Softball
Stadium
Saturday
Arizona State vs. Florida (n)
Today
Arizona State vs. Florida, 3:30 p.m.
Arizona State vs. Florida, 6 p.m., if
necessary


HOCKEY

Stanley Cup finals

Philadelphia vs. Chicago
Saturday
Philadelphia at Chicago (n)
Monday
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Wednesday
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.


ACROSS 34 Sanskrit dialect
35 Lingerie item
Jowly canine 38 Type of parking
Snug retreat 39 Nose-bag
Ouch! morsel
Triumphant cry 40 Sauce in a wok
Coercion 41 Pub brew
ET craft 44 Skunk
Printer of yore 48 Actress Ms.
(hyph.) Merkel
Fib 49 Bakers' dozens
Bundles of 51 Geol. formation
wheat 52 "The Eve of St.
Runs into -
Landed a hay- 53 Ladle
maker 54 Violirr knob
Afternoon 55 Road map info
break 56 Loop trains


22 Church official
25 Proofs of pur-
chase (2 wds.)
29 "Alice" wait-
ress
30 Go out with
31 Cartoon
Chihuahua
32 Wide st.
33 And, for
Wolfgang


DOWN

1 Cushions
2 Oops! (hyph.)
3 Concert pro-
ceeds
4 Eminent
5 Makes a wrong
move
6 Biol. or astron.


.
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JA MAH .






JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Columbia High's


ABQVE:
Allison V
for a bas
played la
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Heather Burns competes in a home meet last season.
,MEMENIMI E .A.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER]
Lake City2RepoOer

Fort White High's
Wrench connects -. Ef/.
3e hit in a game 7 ,
)st season. Wrench
emher of the Ladv


Indians playoff team, which
beat Willison in the district
tournament to earn a playoff
spot.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

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7 Lone Star cui-
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8 Festive log
9 Never heard -

10 Misfortunes
10 Misfortunes


Want more puzzles?
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12 Kind deed
15 -- fresh
start
19 Lunch
21 Nailed at a
slant
22 Writer -
Hunter
23 Strauss of
jeans
24 Remnant
25 Part of N.B.
26 Out loud
27 Volcano god-
dess
28 Bad mood
30 Hearts or
spades
34 Check endors-
er
36 Shed tool
37 Cream of -
38 Battery units
40 Chafed places
41 Gravy no-no
42 Kitty starter
43 Posse's quar-
ry
44 Knotty wood
45 Yield
46 Indigo plant
47 Sugar amts.
,50 Elev.


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Il\NI I I'OC'll ALWAYS UNEASY
iiti il I ,ti n ii l ou vl vou woikl in ani elevator
!'ill.!i Ii S Ill' AND DOWNS


!..:, ., lirandon Finley, 754-0420


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Tiger Powell (from left), Brach Bessant and Jamaal Montague all signed
college football scholarship in February.


CHS: Ends season with district title
Continued From Page 1B


TournamentChampionship.
The ladies team advanced
to the regional tournament
on Oct. 21, and Darian Ste-
Marie was named to the
all-district team.
Columbia volleyball
ended its season against
Fleming Island in the dis-
trict tournament on Oct. 26,
but the Tigers' football team
rallied to win a district title
by the end of the month.
Columbia used a 73-yard
run from Jamaal Montague
to start a 25-point come-
back against Ed White for
the District 4-4A title. Tiger
Powell used his last carry at
home as a Tiger to cap off
the 36-32 victory.
November began with
Courtney Schmitt placing
second at districts in bowl-
ing with scores of 197-162-
166 for a 525 total to advance
to the state tournament.
The Tigers' track team
advanced to regional with
a fourth place finish at the
district tournament behind
Brandon Scott, who led the
team with a time of 16:23,
on Nov. 7. Scott qualified
for state at the Region 1-
3A final in Tallahassee on
Nov. 14. He finished 12th
at the 3A state tournament.
Scott signed with Webber
International in April.
Two signings took place
that month. Celeste Gomez
signed to play softball for
Florida State and Jacob
Tillotson became a member
of the University of Florida
baseball program by sign--
ing with the Gators.
Columbia High ended
2009 by falling, to Lincoln,
20-14 in the state playoffs.
The Tigers finished the
2009 football season at 9-
3-1.
The new year saw
Columbia soccer advance
to the playoffs with a win


in the district tournament
against Ridgeview High.
Geoff Beardsley scored the
game's only goal in the 1-0
win off an assist by Jimmy
Rukab.
Signing day for college
football came on Feb. 3
with three Tigers sign-
ing the dotted line. Brach
Bessant pledged to play for
the Trojans of Troy State,
while a pair of teammates
(Powell and Montague) will
join forces at the University
of South Florida.
Six Tigers (Powell,
Bessant, Montague,
Cameron Sweat, Timmy
Jernigan and Jordan
Morris) were named to the
all-state football team on
Feb. 12.
Columbia basketball fin-
ished it's rast season under
coach Trey Hosford with
a 9-14 record after falling
to Lee High in the district,
tournament. Hosford had
over 100 victories in seven
seasons as the head coach.
The Lady Tigers finished
the regular season with
a 16-6 'record, but fell in
the playoffs to Gainesville
High.
Another group of ladies
from Columbia made his-
tory by becoming the sec-
ond team to win a state
championship in ' weight-
lifting. The Lady Tigers
defeated Navarre High,
22-21, to take home the
state title. Alaina Timmons
(129-pound weight class)
and Gomez (183) each won
individual titles.
Brandon Sdott signed
with Coastal Georgia to
round out February.
Three members of the
Columbia High soccer team
were named to the North
Florida Boys Senior All-Star
team. GeoffBeardsley, Chris
Beardsley and Cameron


Harper competed in the
game. Shelby Widergren
was the only member to
be selected from the Lady
Tigers.
. Widergren signed a soc-
cer scholarship with the
University of South Florida
on March 3. Chelsey
Waters, also a member of
the soccer team, signed to
play with South Georgia.
Columbia softball won
the regular season district
title with an 11-1 win against
Lee, but was upset in the
district tournament.
The Lady Tigers' tennis
team had a banner year with
a district championship.
Columbia edged Ridgeview,
16-14, to advance to the
state title.
Bessant set a schbol
record in the clean and jerk
on March 19 with a 345-
pound total. A month later,
on April 24, Bessant won
the state title in the 238-
pound weight class with a
710 total.
Columbia had three
champions at the District 4-
3A track meet in April with
Johnson, Powell and Seth
Peterson winning individual
titles.
April ended with a final
district championship for
the Tigers. This time, the
Columbia baseball team
captured a championship
with a 4-2 win over Buchholz
in the 4-5A final. Columbia
finished the season at 24-
6 in coach Greg Gillman's
only season as Tigers' head
coach. He stepped down on
May 18.
The last signing took
place on Friday as Sweat
became the final Tiger to
sign the dotted line for
the class of 2010. Sweat, a
two-sport athlete, inked a
deal with St. Johns River
Community College.


JASON MATTHE WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Levi Hatcher makes a pitch in a game played earlier this season. Hatcher
was part of the Indians' baseball team, which made the playoffs last season.

INDIANS: Win another Battle for Padd?
Continued From Page 1B


Taylor County High. East
Gadsden, Union County
and Bradford high schools
fell below Fort White in
District 2-2B, which will be
the same for dhe 2010 sea-
son.
The Indians closed with
two wins, including its con-
tinued domination over
Santa Fe High in the Battle
for the Paddle, and finished
the season at .500.
The tough non-district
teams of Madison County,
Suwanncc, North Florida
Christian and Newberry
will be back for the upcom-
ing season, in addition
to another classic with
Columbia.
Lady Indians volley-
ball was the first team to
compete in Fort White's
new core District 5-3A,
which included Suwannee
High and Santa Fe mov-
ing down from 4A, and old
foes Williston High and
Newberry High.
Coach Doug Wohlstein's
team made its second con-
0 M -MrnM-M-


secutive trip to the state
playoffs as district runner-
up.
The Lady Indians beat
Williston in the semifinals
to insure the state --,t, and
coach Chad Bond's base-
ball team also beat the Red
Devils in the same situation
to produce playoff book-
ends for the school.
Both teams lost to Trinity
Catholic High in the play-
offs.
Fort White's weightlift-
ing team tied for fourth in
the Class A state tourna-
ment. In addition to Griffith,
the Indians got team points
from Corey Railey (fourth),
Cray (fourth) and Jacob
Summerlin (sixth). Tyler
Howard also qualified for
state.
Fort White basketball
and soccer did not fare well
in the new district, although
the Lady Indians did win a
soccer district .tournament
game. All four teams fin-
ished at or near the bottom
of the district standings for


m m m


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the regular season.
The bottom fell out in the
last month of the season for
Fort White's softball team,
but the Lady Indians took
Williston to the wir ;n ,t!
district tournament befoi'
falling 3-2. The Lady Devils
made the state semifinals.
In track,. Fort White pro-
duced district champions in
Sitia Martinez (100 meters,
300-meter- hurdles), A.J.
Legree (high jump, triple
jump) and Sydni Jones
(1,600 meters). Thirtebn
Indians qualified for region
by placing in the top four.
Legree eventually quali
fled for state in the high
jump and tied for eighth.
earning a medal.
Chad Stinnett was a
district champion at 145
pounds in wrestling and
was joined at region by five
teammates.
Fort White also fielded
teams in cross country
(boys 10/15 at district, girls
11/12), girls weightlifting
and bowling.


m m--rmnirnm-i-i--


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Includes lenses & frames.
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F'


F'
'I
n

;~-~- F'


CONTACTS


EYE


EXAMS
by Independent Optometrist


Open in our

New Location


C Exploring College at
ILIiECITY A e

Lake City Community College
(Florida Gateway College effective 07/01/2010)


















Two informative sessions will be held in the
Barney E. McRae Jr., M.D., Medical Technology Bldg. 103.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

3-4 p.m. and 6-7 p.m.
Reserve your place by calling Amanda Schulz,
college recruiter at (386) 754-4246
or e-mail at schulza@lakecitycc.edu.
.ake ( ily Community Collegec does not d(liscrinate in educalini or empiniymein related dcisioMI on hil e bai o1 IaIe. color. ricgiion,
national origin, gcilnei',age. (lisability, marilital qatlls, genetic intioi ain. or any l(ithc legally protc( lIted M k.it in accoin1a1 ce with ie law.
TIh' quietly Olficer is Sharon Best., diecour of ium iiii n sources, 14. l Sli ('Collge Place. Lake Ciy. Fl. 312025.; anl may hc ieacli at ((38 )
754-4i313, Siti n(iltsI will disiilililicts 1i:y oihclain l tlihcl l assistance ai ii i oi' nai ioin by calling J l' e iwni , coordinator of diablilt seii vices,
at (396) 754-4215. The Disabihtilly Sclvices Office is located in lhlilini 1017, Room 2 21l. 14) SI: ('ollitt Place, la,;kc (i . HoI'linda 32025.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









4B LAKE CITY REPORTER- WEEK IN SPORTS PHOTOS SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High coach Craig Howard (right) talks with the Tigers prior to Thursday's spring game against Trinity Catholic High in Ocala. The Tigers return to practice on June 14.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Middle School's Lonnie Underwood (2) is tackled by Jesse Nolan (12) and Jordan
Nash (73) as Brandon Little comes in from the front.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High offensive coordinator Ken Fasnacht goes over the play with quarterback Nigel
Atkinson during the spring game against Trinity Catholic High in Ocala on Thursday.


COURTESY PHOTO
North Florida Ball Hawgs players show off trophies and plaques the team has won over the
past two seasons. The Ball Hawgs leave for Cooperstown, N.Y, on Friday to participate in the
American Youth Baseball Hall of Fame Invitational Tournament. The trip will include a visit to
the Baseball Hall of Fame, participation in the American Youth Baseball Hall of Fame
tournament and special induction of the team into the American Youth Baseball Hall of
Fame.


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BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida coaches Chuck Heater (far left) and Dan McCarney (right) talk to Alan
Moody before Columbia High's spring game against Trinity Catholic on Thursday. The
coaches were evaluating talent, although they can't comment on any recruit due to NCAA
rules.



i/- JiJ .



We work harder to
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* Convenient Drive Thrus
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Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lokecatyreporte:com


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, May 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS


Tourney provides sports stimulus


Officials: Weekend event creates $500,000 boost


Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcost.net

Handling

customers

by phone


"Look through your
customer's eyes. Are you the
solution provider or part of
the problem?"
- Marlene Blaszczyk
D during my
recent trip to,
South Florida,
a colleague
of mine was
checking out of the hotel
that we were staying in.
The morning that we were
due to check out, the hotel
somehow neglected to put
a bill under her door, and
she had to go up to the
front desk to request a
copy.
Just as she began speak-
ing to the front desk
attendant, his phone rang.
He answered the phone,
leaving my friend standing
there while he dealt with
the problem - a guest
needed directions to a
restaurant. As soon as he
hung up, another call came
in. This time it was direc-
tions to the airport, and my

PHONE continued on 2C


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com,
trio of athletic
sports tour-
naments for
youngsters
brought an
estimated $500,000 to the
\ local economy last week-
end, officials said Friday.
The tournament fea-
tured 80 soccer teams, 60
baseball teams (27 were
turned away) and 39 soft-
ball teams, many of which
lodged and ate in local
facilities and establish-
ments.
"I would say the tourna-
ments had the potential
of creating as much as
$500,000 of economic
boost to our restaurants,
retail businesses, gaso-
line stations and hotels,"
said Harvey Campbell,
tourism director of the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council.
He estimated 5,000
people attended the tour-
naments and he said the
formula from the state
indicates those travelers
normally spend $104 per
person, per day.
Campbell said area tour-
ism officials were not able
to conduct a survey of local
hotel and motel occupancy
rates, but in speaking to
Nick Patel, owner of the
Hampton Inn, Comfort
Inn-and Country Inn and -
Suites, during a tourna-
ment critique meeting


Pam Stebleton and Barbara Jernigan spread new sheets in a standard two-bed room at the Holiday'lnn Hotel & Suites. The
hotel has 127 rooms and features a 24-hour fitness center, an indoor pool, a whirlpool and a sauna.


on Wednesday, Patel said
the hotels' occupancy rate
during Friday night was
estimated at 75 percent,
while normally on Friday
nights during this portion
of the year the hotels tradi-
tionally have a 50-percent
occupancy rate. He said
Patel estimated a 95-per-
cent occupancy rate on
Saturday night, where the
occupancy rate is typically


60 percent Campbell said
there were some lodging
cancellations Friday night
due to the bad weather.
"It was a good event,"
Campbell said. "We were
nervous about our abil-
ity to successfully handle
those kinds of crowds. In


hindsight it was a good
weekend of business of
what would have been
slow. Everyone worked
together and the event
went extremely well."
Campbell said local mer-
chants and tournament
officials received compli-


ments on the geographical
convenience of the lodg-
ing and restaurants to the
hotels and sports fields
and the hospitality that was
exhibited by the hotels'
staff.
STIMULUS continued on 2C


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Section C










2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


When High's Too High
Q Is something wrong if a
company has a return on
equity above 100 percent? -S.B.,
Nashua, N..
A Not necessarily. The return
1on equity (ROE) reflects the
productivity of the net assets (assets
minus liabilities) that a company's
management has at its disposal.
Simplified, it's a ratio dividing
net income by shareholder equity,
which is another term for net assets.
(Net income is found on a
company's income statement.
Shareholder equity is found on the
balance sheet, and it's also what you
get when you subtract liabilities
from assets.)
A company's ROE can be skewed.
by high debt levels. Tempur-Pedic'
International, for example, recently
reported ROE above 100 percent. A
glance at its balance sheet explains
much of that - about $38 million in
cash and $393 million in debt. Debt
can be worrisome unless a company
seems able to pay it down.
***
Q What is a "golden parachute"?
-lH., Opelika. Ala.
A You'll find golden parachute
Clauses in the contracts of many
top executives, With such a clause, if
the bigwigs job is terminated due to
the company being bought out or
perhaps even going out of business,
he or she will receive hefty benefits,
such as one or more of the follow-
ing: a large cash payout, a generous
severance package, and stock options.
As an example, in 2007, Bob Nardel] i
left Home Depot's CEO post after six
years with $210 million.
As you might imagine, sharehold-
ers don't love these clauses, espe-
cially since the executives involved
are often the ones who orchestrate the
buyouts in the first place, or who
contribute to the company's failure.
Also, these clauses aren't tied to
merit. A CEO can mismanage a firm
causing its shareholders to lose
money, while he ends up leaving the
company with millions.

Got a questiondfor (he Fool? Send it in
- see Write to Us


g The Motley Fool'

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


Insights From Omaha
Early in May, more than 35,000
Berkshire Hathaway shareholders
flocked to Omaha, Neb., to listen to
Chairmnnan Warren Buffett and his
partner, Charlie Munger, answer
questions for five hours. Here are
some snippets from the annual meet-
ing and the subsequent press confer-
ence, paraphrased:
On corporate governance:
Berkshire's board of directors don't
do well unless the shareholders do
well. That wasn't the case at Citi-
group and elsewhere..Unlike
many other companies, Berk- ....
shire does not protecrits offi-
cers and directors with insur- -
,ance against lawsuits. Buffett
explained that with directors and
executives, "there ought to be a
downside" to poor behavior.
On intelligence: A high IQ can get
in your way. They pointed to the
example of the Long-Termn Capital
Management hedge fund, run by
Nobel Prize winners and others, that
imploded and lost billions. It's more
important to know where the limits
are to your circle of competency than
to have a big circle of competency
You don't have to be brilliant --just


avoid doing dumb things.
On doing well in business and
life: If you want to have a good
partner, be a good partner.
On success in the insurance
business: They're willing to take
a huge hit in any given year while
their competitors are not, because
of most insurance companies' focus
on short-term results. Buffett and
Munger are OK with "lumpy," not
smooth, earnings.
On diversification: Buffett
invested some money in about 20
Korean companies because he didn't
know enough about Korean invest-
ments. He has also recommended
broad-market index funds, such as
ones based on the S&P 500, for most
American investors.
On what's ahead for America:
Buffett praised Alan Simpson and
Erskine Bowles, who are heading
President Obama's bipartisan com-
mission on reducing the deficit. He
noted that they will invariably have to
recommend reducing spending or
raising taxes (or both), and that those
won't be popular. The Federal
Reserve is also going to have to
increase interest rates at some point.
We'll offer a few more nuggets next
week. In the meantime, read Buffett's
educational letters to shareholders at
www.berkshirehathaway.com.


P Name That Company

Based in Massachusetts, I'm a
world leader in the movie theater
industry, operating more than 1,000
screens in the U.S., U.K. and Latin
J America. I'm also a partner in the
online ticketing service MovieTick-
ets.com, and the parent company of
both Viacom and CBS. My brands include
a few names you may have heard of: Show-
case cinemas, MTV, Comedy Central, BET, TV
Land, Logo, VH1, Spike, Nick at Nite, Country
Music Television and Paramount Pictures,
among others. I encompass about 170 television


Through the Floor
When I was new to investing, I
fell for an e-mail pitch from an
online penny stock "investment
adviser" who appeared to offer
knowledgeable advice about up-
and-coming stocks that were going
to go "through the roof" very
soon. I liked that I could buy
1,000 shares for only $1,250.
What I didn't do was read the fine
print at the end of the solicitation,
where I would have
learned that the company -,
had paid the website /
$50,000 to promote its
stock. I ended up selling my
shares for a total of $15. I think
the company is still in litigation.
Some of life's lessons are expen-
sive. - L.C.L., Minneapolis
The Fool Responds: You're
lucky to have lost only that much
when the stock went through the
floor instead of through the roof.
Many investors suffer through
much more costly lessons. Be
wary of stocks that trade for only
a few dollars or pennies per share,
and don't believe anyone promis-
ing "through the roof" results..
The best way to get rich with
stocks is to buy into healthy,
growing companies you under-
stand well and to hang on.
Do you have an emban-ssing
S lesson learned the hard way?
Boil it down to 100 words (or
less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My
Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked?
Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we
print yours, you'll win a Fool' cap!


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you'll laugh all
the way to the bank



Mouse House Rocks
Disney (NYSE: DIS) is back.
The family entertainment giant
recently posted better-than-expected
second-quarter results, with revenue
up 6 percent over year-ago levels to
$8.6 billion, and adjusted earnings
up 12 percent..
Three months ago, just one of
Disney's five subsidiaries - media
networks - posted year-over-year
quarterly revenue growth. This time,
all five posted top-line growth. A slip
in operating profits in the Theme
Parks and Resorts division stemmed
from healthy promotional activity
and higher fuel costs for Disney
Cruise Line vessels. Strength in
Disney's cable properties helped off-
set a 24 percent slide in broadcasting
operating profits at ABC.
However, the balance of
Disney's media conglomer-
ate is humming along
nicely. The success of "Iron Man 2"
and the near-certain success of the
upcoming "Toy Story 3" validate the
company's acquisitions of Marvel
and Pixar. Sequels are also on the
way for "Cars" and "Monsters, Inc."
The appetite for Disney's product
also remains strong; its ABC stream-
ing application has been one of the
more popular iPad downloads.
Disney's decision to wean tourists
-off deep theme-park resort discounts
will be a cliffhanger to watch during
the summer, but it's hard to bet
against Disney when the company's
starting to fire on all cylinders. (Walt
Disney is a "Motley Fool Inside
Value" and "Motley Fool Stock
Advisor" recommendation.)


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Born in Dallas in 1975, I'm a top global casual dining chain, with more than
1,700 restaurants and 125,000 employees in 27 countries. Most of my units
bear the Chili's name, but I also operate Maggiano's Little Italy. I'm selling my
On the Border Mexican Grill and Cantina brand, and recently sold a majority .
interest in Romano's Macaroni Grill. My stock has beaten the market over
the past decade. My ticker symbol is what I want my customers to do in my
restaurants - frequently. I've pledged $50 million.to the St. Jude Children's
Research Hospital. Who am I? (Answer: Brinker International)


,. ,, ..fH Image-conscious Youth

~ . rein in social networking


Customers lineup outside the Apple store.Friday as they wait to be among the first to pur-
chase the iPad in Montreal.

Long lines in Europe, Asia for iPad


By DANICA KIRKA
Associated Press
LONDON -,
Technophiles mobbed
Apple Stores in Europe and
Asia on Friday in a quest to
snatch up the hottest gadget
of the moment - the iPad.
Long lines snaked down
streets in London, Paris,
Frankfurt and Tokyo as
eager buyers vied to wield
their credit cards. Screams
and cheers rose from the
crowd in central London as


students, professionals and
self-proclaimed computer
geeks clutched boxes con-
taining the slim black device.
"If I was a music fan, it
would be like the launch of
a Lady GaGa album in the
U.S.," said comedian Stephen
Fry, known in Britain as a
champion Tweeter.
Apple Inc., based in
Cupertino, California, said
earlier this month that
it had sold 1 million of
the devices in the United
States in just 28 days. The


company started taking
orders for the iPad abroad
on May 10 after pushing
back its international deliv-
ery target amid extreme
demand at home.
The. computer looks like
a larger version of Apple's
iPhone and can be used to
send e-mails, draw pictures
and play games. It is also
seen as a potential savior of
the struggling newspaper
industry, because it can
be used as an electronic
reader.


STIMULUS: Helps local economy


Continued From Page 1C

He said the tournaments
helped the local economy
because many attendees
will share the positive
experience they had in the
area with their friends as
"word-of-mouth" advertis-
ing.
'The success we're
having is because of word-
of-mouth, which is the
best form of advertising,"


Campbell said.
Although officials were
able to meet the goals
they set for last weekend's
tournaments; Campbell
said that amount of tourna-
ments at the same time
won't be the norm.
"I would guess that we
would not embrace three
tournaments at the same
time," he said. "That's


really stretching the
resources.'!
He said earlier this
week Florida Travel Ball
scheduled nine new
tournaments locally that
,will take place during the
remainder of the year. In
addition, six tournaments
have been scheduled in
June on the weekends from
June 4-27.


By MARTHA IRVINE
AP National Writer
CHICAGO - What's
that? A young college grad
lecturing her elders about
online privacy?
It might go against con-
ventional wisdom, but a
new report from the Pew.
Internet & American Life
Project is adding fuel to the
argument that young peo-
ple are fast becoming the
gurus of online reputation
management, especially
when it comes to social
networking sites.
Among other things,
the study found that they
are most likely to limit
personal information online
- and the least likely to


trust free online services
ranging from Facebook to
LinkedIn and MySpace.
Marlene McManus,
21, is.among those
young adults. On the job
hunt since graduating
from Clark University in
Massachusetts, she's been
"scouring" her Facebook
page, removing photos
that contain beer cups
and any other signs of col-
lege exploits. She's also
dropped Twitter altogether.
"I have to present a pub-
lic face that doesn't have
the potential to hurt my
hnage," McManus says.
She has seen otherwise
upstanding adults, well past
their 20s, sharing compro-
mising photos and question-


able rants with too many
people online. "I get embar-
rassed for these people
and sometimes just want to
shake them," she says.
In this instance, adults
. over the age of 30 might
do well to listen. The Pew
study and a mounting body
of new research is showing
that the very generation
accused of sharing too
much information online is
actually leading the pack in
online privacy.
The Pew study found,
for instance, that social
networkers ages 18 to 29
were the most likely to
change the privacy settings
on their profiles to limit
what they share with oth-
ers online.


PHONE: Service is vital for business
Continued From Page 1C


friend was basically ignored
while the attendant helped
the caller. Believe it or not,
this happened a third time
with a guest who wanted
to leave a wake-up call!
Each minute that passed,
my friend got angrier and
angrier, but she managed to
maintain her composure in
spite of the incredibly bad
customer service.
I have no idea why
so many staff members
believe that they have to
deal with the telephone
first rather than the client
who is looking them in the
face. I cannot tell you the
number of times this has
happened to me in doctors'
offices, and I have found
this to be one of the rud-
est things possible. I have
made an actual trip into the
office, and then the priority
is given to someone who


calls in, regardless of the
purpose of the call. This is
just bad business.
I believe the best policy
is to always give the prior-
ity to the customer who is
physically present in the
business. However, this is
not to say that staff should
ignore the telephone if they
are with a customer. If an
employee is dealing with
a live customer and the
phone rings, the employee
should ask the customer
if he or she could answer
the phone quickly. They
can then answer and say
something along the lines
of, 'Thanks for calling XYZ
Company. I am currently
assisting another customer.
Would you mind if I put you
on hold for X minutes (how-
ever many they think the
delay will be)?" This way
the staff member acknowl-


edges the customer on the
phone but gives priority to
the person in front of them.
While this sounds like
such a simple concept, it
really needs to be said over
and over again with some
sort of monitoring.
We have gotten this
point across very success-
fully by using role-playing
scenarios, after which we
observe staff to ensure that
the training worked.
Now go out and make
sure your staff has been
trained on how to assign
priority when serving cus-
tomers.
You can do this!
* FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.


1


f channels and 430 digital media properties in more
than 160 countries and territories. Who am I? Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
< S' Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
you'll be entered into a dravingfor a niJht prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individual financial advice.
S2010 Tl t Mortn Fooil/DSt.BVy UNIERSAl UclwK (FOR RELrSF 5/27/2010)


"-[-"-'


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427







\


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW * THE WEEK IN REVIEW * THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW




The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights=

A NYSE A Amex A Nasdaq
6,791.57 +16.12 1, 780.19 +36.26 2,257.04 +28.00


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
XinyuanRE 3.19 +.81 +34.0
OwensC wtB 3.72 +.83 +28.6
Acomlntl 4,10 +.83 +25,4
USEC 5.28 +1.04 +24.5
DoralFncl 3.20 +.59 +22.6
US Airwy 8.83 +1.62 +22.5
GIbShipLs 3.08 +.51 +19.8
GIbShipun 2.95 +.45 +18.0
McClatchy 4.84 +73 +17.8
Mesab 19.16 +2.77 +16.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MLSel10 5-125.27-2.23 -29,7
NaviosAcq 6.56 -2.47 -27.4
BrMSq pf 400.00-125.04 -23.8
BkABMRE 2.58 -.62 -19.4
GATXpf 141.85-32.52 -18.6
Hornmbeck 15,28 -3.13 -17.0
Heinz pf 700.00-128.42 -15.5
UnvslCp 40.87 -6.82 -14.3
BarVixShT 28.58 -4.73 -14.2
AEagleOut 13.10 -2.00 -13.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 42448637 3.96 +.21
S&P500ETF14103893109.37+.25
BkofAm 9685424 15.74 -.25
SPDRFncd6190326 14,68 -.07
iShEMkts 6012968 38.14 +.76
SprintNex 5818916 5.13 +.72
FordM 5275994 11.73 +.47
iShR2K 4162518 66.25 +1.18
DirFBear rs4079307 14.93 -.24
GenElec 4040254 16.35 -.07

Diary
Advanced 2,417
Declined 808
New Highs 69
New Lows 156
Total issues 3,255
Unchanged 30
Volume 30,373,481,446


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChinaNet 4.11 +.73 +21.6
MagHRes 4.85 +.85 +21.3
CAMACn 4.50 +.78 +21,0
ExeterRgs 7.54 +1.17 +18.4
Advntrx rs 2.23 +.34 +18.0
BioTimewt 4.30 +.60 +16.2
NIVS IntT 2.61 +.36 +16.0
Engex 4.80 +,65 +15.7
NthnO&G 14.43 +1.86 +14.8
SeabGldg 34.61 +4.43 +14.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DGSE 2.51 -.44 -14,9
Gerovaun 15.39 -2.65 -14.7
BovieMed 3.65 -.51 -12.3
GerovaFn 12.82 -1.79 -12.3
AldDefen 3.22 -.42 -11.5
NewConcEn 4.20 -.50 -10.6
HaderaPap 70.00 -8.25 -10.5
CaracoP 5.26 -.59 -10.1
StreamG un 6.15 -.60 -8.9
Aerocntry 19.50 -1.75 -8.2

Most Active (1s or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg


JavelinPh
NwGold g
NA Pall g
GoldStr g
Taseko
NovaGId g
KodiakO g
NthgtM g
GranTrra g
CFCdag


1.69 -.11
6.07 +.77
3.45 +.30
4.25 +.20
5.31 +.39
7.17 +,45
3.24 +.10
2.95 +.12
5.28 +.39
15.04 +.47


Diary
Advanced 354
Declined 197
New Highs 10
New Lows 36
Total issues 572
Unchanged 21
Volume 478,532,431


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CenJrsyBc 7.00 +3.55 +102,9
FSI Intl 4.20 +1.40 +50.0
Neurcrine 4.00 +1.28 +47.1
OdysseyHIt 26.56 +7.27 +37.7
WestwdOn 13.69 +3.67 +36,6
MELASci 7.53 +1.88 +33.3
Limoneira 20,25 +5.05' +33.2
RodmanR 3.59 +.89 +33.0
OriginAg 9.29 +2.19 +30.8
PhysnsF h 3.90 +.90 +30.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GTx Inc 2.03 -1.22 -37.5
DJSP Ent 6.38 -3,62 -36.2
ReadgIntB 6.41 -3.39 -34.6
DJSP un 12.00 -6.00 -33.3
ZionO&Gwt 2.89 -1.01 -25.9
HaupgDig 2,69 -.93 -25.7
Broadwind 2.21 -.75 -25.3
IderaPhm 3.76 -1.06 -22.0
BlueCoat 21.47 -5.91 -21.6
Codexis n 10.34 -2.66 -20.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ610114345.60 +.76
Microsoft 5452076 25.80-1.04
SiriusXM 3984882 1.03
Intel 3899916 21.42 +.51
Cisco 2681638 23.16 -.30
ETrade 2540882 1.48 +.02
Oracle 1822651 22.57 +.41
MicronT 1776745 9.09 +.16
DellInc 1715251 13.33 -,02
Comcast 1539419 18.09 +1.06

Diary
Advanced 1,754
Declined 1,096
New Highs 66
New Lows 229
Total issues 2,918
Unchanged 68
Volume 12,491,772,729


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg Name


AT&T lnc NY 1.68 24.30 -.55 -2.2 -13.3
AutoZone NY ... 190.88 +7.41 +4.0 +20.8
BkofAm NY .04 15.74 -.25 -1.6 +4.5
BobEvn Nasd .72 29.04 +,61 +2.1 +.3
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14.38 +.24 +1.7 -10.1
CSX NY .96 52.25 +1.40 +2.8 +7.8
Chevron NY 2.88 73.87 -.61 -0.8 -4.1
Cisco Nasd ... 23.16 -.30 -1.3 -3.3
Citigrp NY ... 3.96 +.21 +5.6 +19.6
CocaCI NY 1.76 51-.40 -.19 -0.4 -9.8
Delhaize NY 2.02 78.33 +.53 +0.7' +2.1
DirFBearrsNY . 14.93 -24 -1.6 -23.2
DrxFBull s NY .15 24.14 -.31 -1.3 -2.3
DirxSCBearNY ., 6.86 -.48 -6,5 -30.4
ETrade Nasd ... 1.48 +.02 +1.4 -15.9
FPLGrp NY 2.00 49.93 -.66 -1.3 -5.5
FamilyDIr NY .62 40.74 -.52 -1.3 +46.4
FordM NY ... 11.73 +.47 +4.2 +17.3
GenElec NY .40 16.35 -.07 -0.4 +8,1
HomeDp NY .95 33.86 +.84 +2.5 +17.0
iShChina25NY .55 39.38 +1.17 +3.1 -6.8
iShEMkts NY .58 38.10 +.76 +2.0 -8.2
iSEafe NY 1.44 48.32 -.30 -0.6 -12.6
iShR2K NY .75 66.25 +1.18 +1.8 +6.1
Intel Nasd .63 21.42 +.51 +2.4 +5.0
ItauUnibH NY .55 18.41 +.21 +1.2 -19.4
JPMorgCh NY .20 39.58 -.47 -1.2 -4.9
LVSands NY ., 23.48 +2.48 +11.8 +57,2


Wkly Wkly YTD
Ex ' Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


+.55 +2.3 +5.8
+.04 +0.3 +36.6
-.44 -0.7 +7.1
+.16 +1.8 -13.9
-1.04 -3.9 -15.4
+.29 +3.2 -24.9
-.50 -5.3 -13.9
+.05 +0.5 -21.2
+3,10 +3.9 +1.4
+.41 +1.8 -8.0
+.16 +0.6 +3.3
-.69 -1.1 +3.4
-.17 -1,1 -16.3
+1,58 +1.6 -8.6
+.76 +1.7 -.3
-.29 -0.9 -1.9
+1.46 +3.4 +9.2
+.25 +0.2 -1.9
-.31 -0.3 +5.8
... +71.7
-.92 -2.7 -1.9
+.72 +16.3 +40.2
-.07 -0.5 +1.9
+1.13 +3.8 +6.3
+1.49 +5.8 -6.3
-.81 -1.6 -5.4
-1.42 -4.7 +6.3
-.00 -0.3 -57.7


Lowes NY .44
MGMMir NY
McDnlds NY 2.20
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .52
NY Times NY
NobltyH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .56
OcciPet NY 1.52
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .21
PrUShS&PNY
Ryder NY 1.00
S&P500ETFNY 2.21
SearsHIdgs Nasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FnclNY .20
TimeWarn NY .85
Vale SA NY .52
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
YRC Wwd h Nasd


Stock Footnotes: g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
II = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs ='Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt i Right to buy security al a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, Wi =
When issued, wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid frofih fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption tee,. I = front load (sales charges), m = Multiplu fees are charged. NA= not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed In tabled at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume In
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate , 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.16 0.16
6-month 0,22 0.22
5-year 2.09 1.99
10-year 3.30 3.19
30-year 4.21 4.06


CurrenciesF
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.1823 1.1788
Britain 1.4463 1.4588
Canada 1.0510 1.0505 F
Euro .8139 .8079
Japan 90.88 90.84
Mexico 12.8670 12.8560
Switzerind 1.1579 1.1504
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars, All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 10,136.63
1-week change: -56.76 (-0.6%)
11,500


11,000


10,500


10,000


9,500 .... D . ... . ....


-126.82


MON


-22.82 -69.30 284.54


TUES WED THUR


F M A M


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AES Corp ... ... 10 +.65 -22.8 10.27
AFLAC 1.12 2.5 13 +.91 -4.2 44.30
AKSteel .20 1.3 52 +1.20 -29.9 14.96
AMR ... ... ... +.83 -.8 7.67
AT&T Inc 1.68 6.9 11 -.55 -13.3 24.30
AU Optron 09 .9 ... +.16 -18.9 9.72
AbtLab 1.76 3.7 13 +.62 -11.9 47.56
Accenture .75 2.0 16 -.62 -9.6 37.52
AMD 7 +.17 -11.5 8.57
Aetna .04 .1 9 +.42 -8.0 29.16
AlcatelLuc ... ... ... +.11 -22.6 2.57
Alcoa .12 1.0 ... +.29 -27.8 11.64
Aldlrish ... .... .. -.11 -24.8 2.64
Allstate .80 2.6 13 +.29 +2.0 30.63
Altria 1.40 6.9 10 -.72 +3.4 20.29
AmbacF h ... ... ... +.18 +44.6 1.20
AmAxle ... ... ... +.71 +11.8 8.97
AEagleOut .40 3.1 14 -2.00 -22.9 13.10
AEP 1.68 5.3 11 +.50 -8.1 31.96
AmExp .72 1.8 21 +.05 -1.6 39.87
AIntlGp rs ... .....-.58 +18.0 35.38
Ameriprise .72 1.8 13 -.62 +2.5 39.79
AmeriBrgs .32 1.0 16 +.45 +20.0 31.28
' Anadarko .36 .7 76 -2.50 -16.2 52.33
AnalogDev .88 3.0 20 +.75 -7.6 29.17
Annaly 2.69 15.9 5 +1.24 -2.2 16.96
Apache .60 .7 14 -.04 -13.2 89.54
ArcelorMit .75 2.5 -.29 -33.7 30.32
ArchCoal ..40 1.9 ... +1.14 -3,1 21,55
ArchDan .60 2.4 11 -.14 -19.3 25.27
AssuredG .18 1.1 22 +1.30 -22.8 16.80
ATMOS 1.34 4.9 12 +.32 -7.8 27.12
Avon .88 3.3 21 -.17 -15.9 26.49
BB&TCp .60 2.0 31 -1.12 +19.2 30.24
BHP BilILt 1.66 2.6 ... +2.31 -15.3 64.84
BakrHu .60 1.6 33 -3.69 -5.8 38.14
BcoBrades .76 4.7 .. -.23 -17.8 16.34
BcoSantand.82 8.1 ... -.83 -38.3 10.15
BcSBrasil n .20 1.9 .. -.39 -25.3 10.42
BkofAm .04 .3 75 -.25 +4.5 15.74
BkNYMel .36 1.3 -.62 -2.8 27.20
BarVixShT -.. . -4.73 -16.1 28.58
BarickG .40 1.0 ... +1.26 +6.9 42.08
Baxter 1.16 2.7 11 +1.56 -28.0 42.23
BeazerHm ... ... 4 -.10 +2.7 4.97
BerkH Bs ... ... 20 -2.46 +7.3 70.55
BestBuy .56 1.3 14 +.45 +7.1 42.25
Blockbst h ... ... ... -.01 -49.9 .34
Boeing 1.68 2.6 39 -.38 +18.6 64.18
BostonSci ... ... ... -.19 -32.8 6.05
BrMySq 1.28 5.5 12 +.25 -8.1 23.21
CBRElis ... ... 43 +81 +16.7 15.83
CBS B .20 1.4 39 +.24 +3.6 14.56
CIT Grpn ... ... ...+1.34 +33.2 36.79
CMSEng .60 4.1 15 -.10 -6.3 14.68
CVSCare .35 1.0 13 +.33 +7.5 34,63
Calpine ........ +.93 +24.5 13.70
Cameron ... ...17 +.36 -13.4 36.20
CapOne .20 .5 16 -.51 +7.7 41.30
Carnival .40 1.1 17 +.62 +14.3 36.23
Caterpillar 1.68 2.8 31 +.67 +6.6 60.76
Cemex .40 ... 90 +.68 -8.4 10.83
CenterPnt .78 5.7 12 +.29 -6.1 13.62
ChesEng .30 1.3 17 +1.33 -13.7 22.34
Chevron 2.88 3.9 11 -.61 -4.1 73.87
Chicos .16 1.3 23 -.11 -13.0 12.23
Chimera .54 13.7 7 +.13 +1:5 3.94
Citigrp ... .. 99 +.21 +19.6 3.96
CliffsNRs .56 1.0 27 +5.39 +21.2 55.86
Coach .60 1.5 19 +2.68 +12.5 41.11
CocaCE .36 1.4 16 +.74 +23.1 26.10
CocaCI 1.76 3.4 18 -.19 -9.8 51.40
ConAgra .80 3.3 13 -.58 +4.9 24.18
ConocPhil 2.20 4.2 11 +.39 +1.5 51.86
ConsolEngy.40 1.1 13 +1.00 '-26.7 36.48
ConEd 2.38 5.6 13 -.70 -6.3 42.59
ConstellEn .96 2.7 1 +2.03 +.6 35.38
CIIAirB ... ... ... +1.65 +17.7 21.10
Corning .20 1.1 10 +.50 -9.7 17,43




Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cho Last


ADCTel ...
ASML Hid .27
ATP O&G ...
ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AlteraCp If .20
Amazon
AmCapLtd..
Amgen
AmkorTIf ...
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .28
Atmel ...
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.36
BMC Sft ...
Baidu s .
BedBath ...
Biogenldc ...
BlueCoat ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .32
BrcdeCm
Bucyrus .10
CAInc .16
Cadence ...
Celgene
CellTherrsh...
CentAl
ChkPoint ..
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco
CilizRepB ...
CitrixSys ...
CoqnizTech ,,


... *.58 t33.0 8.26
... -.64 -17.1 28.26
... -2.49 -41.8 10.64
16 +.51 -3.2 10.75
.47 -.10 -12.8 32.08
50 +.79 +56.7 39.72
20 +.30 +4.2 23.57
55 +2.74 -6.7 125.46
5 +.29+118.4 5.33
11 -.66 -8.5 51.78
8 +.27 -4.9 6.81
13 -2.34 -12.2 53.16
25+14.56 +21.9 256.88
37 +.27 -7.3 12.92
... +.05 +10.7 5.11
53 -.11 +15.2 29.26
15 +.26 -4.5 40.88
17 +.79 -7.7 37.01
... +2.36 +78.0 73.21
20 +.60 +16.2 44.87
14 -1.55 -11.3 47.43
23 -5.91 -24.8 21.47
... +2.32 +26.8 17.18
49 +1.83 +9.6 34.50
27 +.09 -28.6 5.45
14 +3.50 -5.0 53.56
14 +.40 -9.8 20.25
... +.26 +11.9 6,70
29 -3.39 -5.2 52.76
-.09 -68.4 .36
+.42 -35.1 10.51
18 -.45 -9.5 30.67
... -.05 +43.6 15.57
25 +1.35+108.4 14.22
20 -.30 -3.3 23.16
... +.06 +59.4 1.10
35 -1.06 +4.8 43.61
27 +.55 +10.4 50.04


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Cho Last


Covidien .72 1.7
DR Horton .15 1.2
DTE 2.12 4.7
DeanFds
Deere 1.20 2.1
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .08 .7
DevonE .64 1.0
DiaOffs .50 .8
DiamRk .03 .3
DirFBear rs ...
DrxFBulls .15 .6
DirREBear .04 ...
DirxSCBear...
DirxSCBull 4.85 .4
DirxLCBear ...
DirxLCBull 8.22 3.6
DirxEnBear ...
DirxEnBull 5.18 1.8
Discover .08 .6
Disney .35 1.0
DomRescs1.83 4.7
DowChm .60 2.2
DukeEngy .96 6.0
Dynegy rs ...
EMC Cp ...
EIPasoCp .04 .4
EldorGId g .05 ..
EmersonEl 1.34 2.9
ENSCO .14 .4
Exelon 2.10 5.4
ExxonMbt 1.76 2.9
FPL Grp 2.00 4.0
FannieMae ...
FidNatlnfo .20 .7
FirstEngy 2.20 6.2
FlagstrBh ... ...
FlagstB rs ......
FordM
FredMac ...
FMCG 1.20 1.7
FrontierCml.00 12.6
GLG Ptrs ...
GameStop ...
Gannett .16 1.0
Gap .40 1.8
Genworth ...
Gerdau .21 1.6
GoldFLtd .17 1.2
Goldcrpg .18 .4
GoldmanS 1.40 1.0
Goodyear ...
GrtAtlPac
Hall rtn .36 1.4
HarleyD .40 1.3
HartfdFn .20 .8
HItMgmt ...
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess ' .40 .8
HewlettP .32 .7
HomeDp .95 2.8
Honwillntl 1.21 2.8
HostHotis .04 .3
HovnanE
Huntsmn .40 4.0
ING
iSAstla .66 3.3
iShBraz 2.72 4.3
iSh HK .38 2.6
iShJapn .14 1.5
iSh Kor .32 .7
iShMex .70 1.4
iShSing .33 3.0
iSTaiwn .21 1.8
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .55 1.4
iSSP500 2.22 2.0


Name Div YId
Comcast .38 2.1
Comc spcl .38 2.2
Compuwre ...
CorinthC ...
Costco .84 1.4
Cree Inc ...
Crocs
CypSemi
Dell Inc
DItaPtr
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk 2.00 ..
DrmWksA ...
DryShips
ETrade
eBay
EstWstBcp .04 .2
EleclArts
EricsnTel .28 2.8
Expedia .28 1.3
FifthThird .04 .3
Flextrn
FosterWhl ... ...
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMIC s...,
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .60 4.8
HumGen
Intel .63 2.9
Intersil .48 3.6
Intuit
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph...
JetBlue


... +1.06
.. -.07
13 +.12
9 +.27
17 -1.05
+.24
... +.15
.. +.33
11 +.78
7 -7.45
-.47
... -.24
... -.31
... -.74
... -.48
.. +2.20
... -.42
.. +.64
... -.26
... -.25
7 -.08
18 +.55
13 -.11
23 +.44
12 -.04
.. -.37
31 +.66
11 +.48
51 +1.22
20 +.51
7 -1.36
10 -.83
14 -.42
13 -.66
... +.02
17 +1.35
12 +.33
.. +.03
... +.68
6 +.47
... +,02
12 +3.04
13 +.24
... +.021
10 +1.49,
8 +.96
13 -.35
65 +1.08
... +.53
23 +1.16
1.. +2.27
6 +3.99
... +.57
-.10
23 -1.81
... -.66
9 +.81
17 +.22
67 +.13
49 +.91
13 +.29
13 -.57
20 +.84
15 +.70
+.18
+.12
+.98
-.29
+.82
... +2.38
+.18
-.24
-.10
... +1.58
+.06
-.01
... +.74
... +1.17
+.30


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
14 +1.06 +7.9 18.09
13 +.98 +8.2 17.22
14 +.22 +13.3 8.19
9 -1.13 -2.8 13.39
21 +.81 -1.6 58.25
59 -.32 +17.7 66.37
... +1.09 +80.0 10.35
.. +.11 +7.9 11.39
17 -.02 -7.2 13.33
.. -.01 +13.5 1.18
... +1.70 +65.1 43.40
28 +.46 +13,0 37.69
17 -.18 +.4 20.85
18 -5.18 -25.7 29.69
. +.11 -17.4 4.81
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... +.47 +7.6 17.00
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-.05 +9.2 10.04
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20 -.19 +33.3 13.00
... +,14 -10.3 6.56
9 -.72 -18.4 24.01,
... -.76 -.7 48.65
11 -.65 -17.0 35.92
22+13.58 -21.7 485.63
46 +.33-12.9 23.65
... +.24 -34,7 3.12
32 -.18 +2.8 14.90
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20 +.51 +5.0 21.42
... +.30 -13.2 13.31
21 +.73 +16.3 35.74
-.17 -14,6 4.87
+.39 +39.4 11.50
41 +.58 +13.8 6.20


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.48.89
-4.2 11.01
-12.4 11.36
+9.0 18.03
-6.8 39.38
-1.9 109.70


New York Stock Exchange


















Columbia; Inc.


r marketplace source f


Like Cioy aLd


... C Wednesday



Lake City Reporter


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
iShEMkts .58 1.5... +.76 -8.2 38.10
iShB20 T 3.70 3,8 -1.93 +7.4 96.50
iS Eafe 1.44 3,0... -.30-12.6 48.32
iShR2K .75 1.1 +1.18 +6.1 66.25
IShREst 1.86 3.7 ...+1.18 +8.8 49.95
IBM 2.60 2.1 12 -.16 -4.3 12526
IntlGame .24 1.2 38 +.26 +4.3 19.57
IntPap .50 2.2 41 +.95 -13.3 23.23
Interpublic ... .. 76 +.58 +13.1 8.35
Invesco .44 2.4 24 -.61 -21.0 18.56
ItauUnibH .55 3.0 ... +.21-19.4 18.41
JPMorgCh .20 .5 15 -.47 -4.9 39.58
Jabil .28 2.0 86 +.54 -21.2 13.69
JanusCap .04 .4 21 -.70-20.7 10.66
JohnJn 2.16 3.7 13 -2.04 -9.5 58.30
JohnsnCtl .52 1.8 17 +.34 +4.7 28.53
JnprNtwk ... ... ... +.23 -.2 26.62
KB Home .25 1.7 ... 52 +5.8 14.48
Keycorp .04 .5 +.16 +44.5 8.02
Kimco .64 4.5 +.02 +5.7 14,30
KingPhrm... 35 +.11 -29.3 8.67
Kinross g .10 .6 49 +.58 -6.5 17.21
Kohis . . 15 -1.02 -5.9 50.75
Kraft 1.16 4.1 10 -1.09 +5.2 28.60
LSICorp ... ... 17 +.02 -11.3 5.33
LVSands ... ... ...+2,48 +57.2 23.48
LennarA .16 .9 . -.17 +35.5 17.30
LillyEli 1.96 6.0 9 -.33 -8.2 32.79
Limited .60 2.4 16 +.04 +29.2 24.86
LincNat .04 .2 29 +.95 +6.4 26.46
LiveNatn ... ... ... -.40 +43.7 12.23
LloydBkg 1.43 ... ... +.05 +.6 3.29


Name


Div YId PE


MBIA
MEMC
MFAFncl .96 13.1
MGIC ...
MGMMir ,. ...
Macys .20 .9
Manpwl .74 1.6
MarathonO 1.00 3.2
MarinerEn ...
MktVGold 11 ...
MktVRus .08 ,3
MarlntA .16 .5
Marshals .04 .5
Masco .30 2.2
MasseyEn .24 .7
Mechel
MedcoHIth ...
Medtrnic, .82 2,1
Merck 1.52 4.5
MetLife .74 1.8
MetroPCS ...
Mirant
Monsanto 1.06 2.1
Moodys .42 2.0
MorgStan .20 .7
Mosaic .20 .4
Motorola
NCR Corp ...
Nabors
NBkGreece .31 12.7
NatGrid 2.92 7.2
NOilVarco .40 1.0


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Cha Last


... +.35
... +.34
7 +.34
.. +.67
.. +.04
20 +1.16
... -.60
15 -.33
18 -.38
... +2.65
.. +1.02
38 +.51
-.04
... -.39
30 +1.98
... +.57
21 +1.57
14 -1.15
10 +1.65
13 +1.01
21 +.60
3 +.75
17 -4.08
12 -1,52
34
69 +.46
76 +.01
18 +.96
... +1.30
-.16
-.64
11 +1.24


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


NatSemi .32
NY CmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .40
NiSource .92
NikeB 1.08
NobleCorp .20
NokiaCp .56
NorflkSo 1.36
Novartis 1.99
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 1.74
Omnicom .80
PG&ECp 1.82
PMI Grp
PNC .40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .28
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.30
Petrobras 1.30
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.32
PlainsExs
Potash .40
Pridelntl
ProShtS&P ..
PrUShS&P ..
PrUIShDow ...
ProUltQQQ ..
PrUShQQQ ...
ProUltSP .41
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSRErs...
ProUShtFn.
ProUFinrs .30
ProUltO&G ,22
ProUSR2K .
ProUltR2K .04
ProUSSP500.
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp .16-
ProLogis .60
Prudentl .70
PulteGrp ...
QwestCm .32
RRI Engy ...
RadianGrp .01
Raytheon 1.50
RegionsFn .04
RioTinto s .45
RiteAid
Rowan
SLM Cp
SpdrDJIA 2.60
SpdrGold
SPMid 1.67
S&P500ETF2.21
SpdrHome .13
SpdrKbwBk .25
SpdrRetl .50
SpdrOGEx .25
SpdrMetM .37
Safeway .48
SandRdge ,.
SaraLee .44
Schlmbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .55
SiderNac s .19
SilvWhtng ...
Smithlntl .'48
SouthnCo 1 82
SwstAirl .02
SwstnEngy ...


52 +.10 -8.5 14.05
14 +.66 +10.6 16.05
15 +.94 +11.0 16.66
16 +1.48 +13.8 53.82
15 +.10 -2.7 14.96
21 +.99 +9.6 72.38
5 -3.35 -28.6 29.07
... +.05 -21,2 10.12
19 +1.65 +7.7 56.46
12 -.11 -17.3 45.01
... +.10 -7.7 43.05
-3.10 +1.4 82.51
-.14 -10.1 5.80
-5.22 -17.4 98.21
15 -.41 -3.1 37.95
13 -.26 -7,1 41.50
... +.61 +86.1 4.69
16 -.01 +18.9 62.75
15 +1.05 +7.8 16.67
25 +1.56 -13.8 38.96
23 +.16 +3.3 27.49
16 -.69 +3.4 62.89
29 +.97 -19.8 19.23
... +123 -26.9 30.97
... +1.55 -25.3 35.62
9 -.17 -16.3 15.23
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SprintNex ...
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SP Inds .59
SP Tech .31
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StateStr .04
StratHotels ...
Suncor gs .40
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Sybase .
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Sysco 1.00
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Teradyn
Tesoro
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Tiffany 1.00
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Total SA 3.23
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Travelers 1.44
TrinaSols
TycoElec .64
TycolntlI .83
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UBS AG ...
US Airwy ...
USEC
UnionPac 1.32
UtdMicro ...
UPS B 1.88
US Bancrp .20
USNGsFd-,.
US OilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .50
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Vale SApf .52
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VenzonCm 1.90
ViacomB ...
VimpelC n ...
Visa .50
Wabash ...
Walgm .55
Weathflntl ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WDigital ...
WstnUnion .24
WmsCos .50
XL Cap .40
XTO Engy .50
Xerox .17
Yamanag .06
YingliGm ...


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
KLATnc .60 1.9 ... +.54 -14.9 30.77
Level3 ... . .. .. +.05 -12.4 1.34
LibGlobA .. ... ... +2.10 +17.9 25.80
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MarvellT ... .... ... -.34 -8.5 18.98
Mattel .75 3.5 15 +.21 +8.4 21.66
Maximlntg .80 4.5 32 +.07 -12.6 17.76
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Microchp 1.37 4,9 23 +.49 -4.1 27.85
MicronT ... ... 57 +.16 -13.9 9.09
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NasdOMX ... ... 13 -.18 -6.2 18.59
NetApp ... ... 32 +4.85 +9.7 37.68
Netlix ... ... 50+11.68 +101.8 111.15
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NewsCpA .15 1.1 10 +.25 -3.6 13.20
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Novell ... ... ... -.17 +40.5 5.83
Novlus ... ... ... +.89 +10.6 25.82
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Nvidia ... ... 29 4.41 -29,7 13.14
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PriceTR 1.08 2.2 25 -1.47 -7.0 49.52
Qualcom .76 2.1 19 -.14-23.1 35.56
RFMicD . ... 18 +.04 +.6 4.80


Name Div
Rambus ..
RschMotn ...
SanDisk
SeagateT ...
Sequenom ...
SiriusXM ..
SkywksSol ..
Solarfun
Sonus
SouthFn h ...
Staples .36
Starbucks .40
StlDynam .30
SunPowerA ...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr ...
TakeTwo
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .68
TiVo Inc
TriQuint
UAL
UrbanOut ...
Veecolnst ...
Verisign
VertxPh
VirgnMdath .16
Vivus
Vodafone 1.26
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 1.00
XOMA h ...
Xilinx .64
YRC Wwd h...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


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YId PE Chg %Chg Last
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Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
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Aurizon g ... .. . +.08 +8.2 4,87
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ChinaMda ... ... ... +1.07 +25.0 13.25
Crystallxg .. . .. . +.13 +65.3 .63
DenisnM g ... ... +,09 +6.3 1.35
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EndvSilv g 9 +.15 -1.9 3,57
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GabGldNR 1.68 101 +.63 -1.4 16.10
GenMoly . . +.39 +80.8 3,76
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Hemisphrx . .. ... -.01 +17.3 .66
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+.33 -2.4
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-.20 +278.8
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-.58 -21.2
-1.42 +6.3
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-1.20 -21.2
+.06 -15.3
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20.01
5.13
30.75
28.87
26.35
32.37
53.05
14.68
29.60
21.64
28.76
5.05
38.17
4.90
30.46
26.95
64.33
2.96
29.81
45.46
9.75
16.99
54.53
34.02
5.72
10.98
11.70
24.42
20.67
79.31
45.43
30.99
17.67
21.07
46.63
56.77
49.47
17.50
28.82
36.19
17.58
13.33
8.83
5.28
71.43
3.31
62.76
23.96
7.43
34.04'
47.21
29.07
23.10
27.19
23.05
18.68
38.20
27.52
33.61
15.55
72.46
7.16
32.04
14.12
28.69
4.51
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15.96
19.75
17.61
42.74
9.31
10.76
9.16


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Ch9g Last
LibertyAcq ... ... ... -.01 +2.4 9.90
LucasEngy ... ... +.08+177.4 1.67
MagHRes .... ... +.85+212.9 4.85
Metalico ... ... 55 +.28 +.8 4.96
MetroHIth . .. 10 +.18+103.5 4.05
Minelndg .. ... +.26 -14.2 8.84
NIVS IntT ... ... +.36 +1.2 2.61
NeoStem .... ... -.17 +80.6 2. ,
NwGold g ... ... +.77 +66.8 6.07
NA Pallg ... ... ... +.30 -1,4 3.45
NDynMn g ... ... ... +.54 -10.5 7.39
NthnO&G ... ... ... +1.86 +21.9 14.43
NthgtMg ... ... 16 +.12 -4.2 2.95
NovaGldg ... ... ... +. 45 +17.0 7.17
Oilsands g ... ... ... -.04 -37,5 .72
ParaG&S ......... -01 +6.9 1.55
PlonDnll ... ... ... +40 -24.9 5.93
PlatGpMet .. ... ... +.12 +.9 2.14
RadientPh ... .. . +.04 +395.8 1.19
RegeneRx .. . . +.00 -37.8 .34
Rentech ... .. 18 +.04 -14.6 1.05
RexahnPh ..... .. +.16+111.8 1.44
Rubicong .. . ... .. +.27 -25.7 3.50
SamsO&G . ... +.02+150.0 .60
SeabGldg +4,43 +42.6 34.61
SulphC ... .. -02 -51.3 33
laseko ... +.39 +25.8 5.31
lirnsatlPIn ... ... ... +,17 -6.4 3.20
UQMTech -.23 -49.8 3.44
US Geoth ... ... +.07 -45.1 .84
US Gold ... ... ... +45 +59.3 3.95
UIlu .. ... -.01 -37,3 .14
Ur-Energy +.06 +23.9 .95
UraniumEn . ... -.10 -32,0 2.57
VantageDrl ... 16 .+.07 -1.9 1,58
VistaGold . ... .. . +04 -22.4 1.90
Wallerinv 2.00 12.3 11 +.11 +13.7 16.30


Weekly Dow Jones


-122.36


FRI


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCO TotRetls Cl 128,736 11.10 -0.1 +12.2/C +7.2/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 67,975 26.33 -8.1 +15.4/E +2.1/B 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 65,222 27.25 -8.0 +23.2/A . +1.1/B NL 3,000
Fidelity Contra LG 59,228 57.25 -6.6 +20.4/B +4.1/A NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 57,634 44.83 -6.4 +10.1/D +2.8/C 5.75 250
American Funds CpWldGrIA m WS 55,402 30.38 -10.1 +9.8/E +4.0/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 5001nv LB 51,508 100.68 -8.0 +20.9/B +0.2/C NL 3,000
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 50,350 15.00 -5.8 +18.7/A +2.6/B 5.75 250
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 49,825 24.62 -8.6 +15.2/E +0.9/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Instldxl LB 48,636 100.02 -8.0 +21.1/B +0.3/C NL 5,000,000
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 43,365 93.77 -9.4 +22.5/B -1.1/D NL 2,500
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 39,521 34.25 -10.0 +8.6/B +5.5/A 5.75 250
American Funds WAMutInvA m LV 39,349 23.76 -8.0 +17.3/1 -0.3/C 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 38,799 28.93 -11.4 +14.1/A +3.6/A NL 2,500
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 32,886 23.77 -8.9 +14.7/C +4.7/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 32,666 11.10 -0.1 +11.9/C +6.9/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds FnInvA m LB 32,183 31.36 -8.5 +16.1/E +3.4/A 5.75 250
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 31,694 2.01 -5.5 +23.1/A +3.8/A 4.25 1,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 31,416 27.26 -8.0 +23.4/A +1.2/B NL 100,000
American Funds BalA m MA 30,732 16.06 -5.5 +16.3/C +2.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 30,360 100.69 -8.0 +21.1/B +0.3/C NL 100,000
Fidelity Divrint d FG 30,024 24.83 -10.6 +5.8/E +1.6/D NL 2,500
Vanguard Welltn MA 29,838 28.32 -5.4 +15.5/D +4.4/A NL 10,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 29,370 69.07 -7.6 +26.3/A +4.5/A NL 2,500
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB 27,372 32.72 -7.7 +27.1/D +3.9/A NL 2,500
American Funds BondA m Cl 27,146 12.05 +0.2 +13.3/B +3.0/E 3.75 250
Vanguard Totlntl d FB 27,032 12.83 -10.8 +8.5/B +3.3/B NL 3,000
CA -Conservatve Alocaon, C -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV-Foregn
Large Value, IH -World A ocaton, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Alocatin, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV -
Md-Cap Value, SH -Spealty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return Chng in NAV with didends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objectve A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Mn Int Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.


( ,olftA't











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010

Lake City Reporter





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NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The School District of Columbia
County, Florida announces they will
hold a Courageous Leaders Follow-
Up Workshop, to which all persons
are invited to attend as follows:
DATE: Tuesday, June 29, 2010
TIME: 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
PLACE: Price Creek Water
Treatment Facility Training Room at
Lake City Community College
144 SE Ozone Loop
Lake City, Florida 32025
PURPOSE: To discuss issues per-
taining to District Accreditation and
other items of interest to the District.
No action will be taken at this meet-
ing.
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in the above:
workshop is asked to advise the:
School Board at least 48 hours be-
fore the workshop by contacting
Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida.
By:/s /
Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools
04539477
May 30, 2010

PUBLIC NOTICE
ON
INVITATION TO BID
ITB-019-2010
Sealed bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until Thursday, June 17, 2010
at 11:00 A.M. All bids will be
opened and read aloud at 11:15 A.M.
in the City Council Chambers locat-
ed on the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205
N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da.
TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV-
AL ANNUAL TERM CONTRACT
Documents may be viewed on the
City website http://www.lcfla.conim/ur-
chasiniz.htm; by contacting purchas-
ing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818.
04539956
May 30,2010


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welding at Lake City Community
College. Enrpll now for day, night
or Saturday classes. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma or GED required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.

100 Job
Opportunities
Enjoy working outdoors? Like to
earn a good income? Consider
welding at Lake City Community
College. Enroll now for day, night
or Saturday classes. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma or GED required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.

04538577



The Lake City Reporter is
looking for a dynamic and
capable sales professional to
sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines-and
online products. We need a
person with the ability to make
strong presentations.
Professionalism, being active in
'the field and closing sales are
three key attributes for which
we are looking. We offer a
salary and a strong commission
plan, along with a good benefits
package. If you have a strong
desire to succeed and the skills
to back it up, we want to hear
from you. Please email your
resume to:
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director, at
lstrickland@lakecitvreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, FL 32055.
NO PHONE CALLS


SUWANNEE VALLEY 4Cs will be
expanding Early Head Start services
(birth-3yr olds) for the 2010-2011
school year in Columbia, Hamilton
and Suwannee counties. We will
have multiple positions including
teachers, family 'support specialists
and a cook. Applicants must pass
physical/DCF background require-
ments. For information on job de-
scriptions, qualifications/require-
ments and how/where to apply see
our website www.sv4cs.org or call
386-754-2222 X110. Submit re-
sumes to SV4Cs PO Box 2637, Lake
City, Fl 32056, or apply in person at
236 SW Columbia Ave, Lake City F1
32025 or 842 SW Marymac St., Live
Oak Fl 32060 or email:
arobinson@sv4cs.ore







Services


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.



Construction

Matt Forsyth
Building Construction
Carpentry
386-965-7(053


100 Jo0
100 Opportunities

04539505



Part Time Telemarketing
Professional
The Lake City Reporter is
looking for an energetic
telemarketing professional to
join our expanding sales team.
Successful candidates will
posses excellent telephone and
customer service skills, be
computer literate and enjoy the
thrill of the sale. We offer a
great work environment and
competitive compensation.
To apply, please send resume to
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director at
Istrickland@lakecityreporter.coin
No phone calls please. EOE

04539804
State Veterans'
Domiciliary Home
Lake City, Florida
149 bed ALF with ECC
Activities Director-Requires 2
years experience in occupation-
,al, recreational, rehabilitation or
physical therapy program or in
providing direct services in a
health or rehabilitative services
program. Preference to Certified
Activities Director or degree in
related field. Non-certified
applicants may be required to
obtain certification
following appointment.
. Apply on line at
https://myflorida.peoplefirst.co
mn
Req. #50000037; Call Kim
Graham at 386-758-0600
ext. 3117
Closes 06/01/10. EEO/AAE

A/C SERVICE Tech
Min 5 yrs experience
F/T with benefits
Please call 386-454-4767
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National
Life Insurance Company
Full Training Provided - Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
FLOOR TECH
Mop, wax and buff floors. Must be
experienced. Full time days
and some weekends.
Apply Baya Pointe Nursing & Reha-
bilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave..
Lake City, FL 32025
EOE/DFWP
Full Time Marketing -
Advertisement Director
Looking for an energetic person with
experience in marketing to join our
team. Must have excellent computer
and telephone skills, be self motivat-
ed and creative with dependable
transportation.
Fax resumes to 386-755-6376
Attn: Marketing.
LOCAL LAW FIRM has
immediate openings for
Legal Secretary
Experienced in Probate,
Estate Planning, Workers Compensa-
tion/Personal Injury.
Send reply to Box 04095, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
MIDNIGHT SHIFT
Full Time Cashier, Experience
Preferred, Ellisville Exxon,
Hwy 441, No Phone Calls Please.
Enjoy doing repairs? Like to earn a
good income and/or start your own
business? Consider Heating/AC or
commercial refrigeration at Lake
City Community College. Enroll
now for day, night or Saturday
classes. Classes begin August 23.
Financial aid available. No high
school diploma required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.
Sitel is hiring! Good pay, paid
training, comfortable environment,
benefits after 90 days. Need good
attitude and computer skills - must
be reliable. Apply at
www.sitel.com or in person at
1152 SW Business Point Dr. in
Lake City. EOE


SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY
Immed FT/PT openings,
customer sales/service, will train,
conditions apply, all ages 17+
(386)269-4656
Wanted: Heavy Truck Mechanic
for busy shop. Only experienced
need apply. Call between 8am &
Noon. Mon. - Fri. 386-752-9754

120 Medical
120 Employment

05523209 1
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Growing Medical Office Seeking
Medical Assistant
Only Experienced Need Apply.
Please fax resume to
Attn: Melissa, 386-961-9541


Looking for Hygienist lor
last paced Dental office .
Fax Resume to 386-755-7024

MEDICARE AGENCY seeking
1HHA/C.N.A. for homecare
patients. Fluent in Spanish is a
must. Call Suwannee Medical
386-755-1544.
MEDICARE AGENCY seeking
LPN's with homecare exp. for
PRN and 12 hr shifts. Weekends
and travel req. Call Suwannee
Homecare 386-755-1544.


12 tj Medical
120 Employment

RN POSITION NEEDED
Suwannee Valley Nursing Center
Excellent salary. Excellent bene-
fits. $1,500.00 sign -on bonus. To
schedule an interview, call 386-
792-1868 ask for Danny or Sue.



170 Business
1 v Opportunities

Enjoy working outdoors? Like to
earn a good income? Consider
welding at Lake City Community
College. Enroll now for day, night
or Saturday classes. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma or GED required.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.

240 Schools &
240 Education

04530702
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-06/07/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-06/07/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-07/13/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTENS lo a good home,
cute. litter trained, Call for more
information
386-755-7624.
GERMAN SHEPPARD puppies
5 white. & 6 black with brown.
AKC Parents on site. $350 Call
386-496-3654 or 352-745-1452
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

NICE LARGE Whirlpool
Side by side Refrig.. Ice & Water.
24 cu. ft., whitd, $400 firm.
386-984-0387. or 386-754-9295
PORTABLE ROLLING GE
Dishwasher, w/ butcher board top,
$120 OBO., Works Great.
386-754-9295 or 386-292-6511.

408 Furniture

BUNK BEDS nice w/ mattress,
$200 OBO .
386-292-6511 or
386-754-9295

CORNER KITCHEN Cabinet,
Floral print on doors
$40 Call 386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387
Large Entertainment Center.
Light Oak. Will hold a 40" or bet-
ter TV. Several shelves. $150
386-292-6511 or 386-754-9295
LOVE SEAT,
Excellent Condition
$75.00
Call 386-754-0813

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Bolens Electric Lawninower
w/leaf bag and cord.
Barely used. $100.00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
CRAFTSMAN RIDING mower
23 lip, 51 in. cut.
Runs good. Looks good. $550 obo
386-754-9295 or 386-292-6511.
PUSH MOWER, Looks good,
Runs good
$60 Call 386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387

411 Machinery &
1l Tools
CRAFTSMAN TABLE saw with
extended top, 10" blade with
fence, works great, $ 100
386-292-6511 or 386-754-9295


420 Wanted to Buy
K&Hll TIMBER
We Buy Pine Ihlrdwood &
Cypress. L large or small tracts.
Call 386-961- 1 1,.

WANTED)
Automolive
litinine Stand.
386-344-0226
WANTE) .Iunk Cars,
Trucks, RV's etc.


Paying CASH $225. t0 and up.
Free pickup 3886-867-1396
Wanted Junik Cars. Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CAStI! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. 8AM-? 3003 SE CR 245.
Hwy 100 to CR 245. Follow signs.
Great bargains, nick nacks,
furniture, kitchen items and more.


440 Miscellaneous

FIREARMS For Sale!
AR 15 $1,400. AK 47 $600.
. Judge Revolver $500. More hand
guns for sale! 386-365-1016.

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $400-$550.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2/2 MH for rent in Lake City.
Large lot, quiet neighborhood.
No pets. $400 per month.
Call 386-454-7724
2br /2ba & lbr/lba Also Residen-
tial RV lots Between'Lake City &
G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2br/lba MH. Excellent Cond.
$500/Mo. + $500. sec. dep.
Call: 954-258-8841

2BR/1BA, BEACHVILLE, FL.
Large lot. Quiet neighborhood. No
pets $425/month.
Call 386-454-7724.
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$750 a month. 1st, last and $375.
security. Please call 386-397-2619
or 386-365-1243.
LArge clean 3br/2ba all electric in
the 5 Points area No pets.
1st month & deposit.
Call 386-961-1482 for info.
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer. No
Pets! 386-961-0017
Very clean & well maintained 2/2
units in nice park setting. Move In
June Special. Rent includes water,
sewer & trash p/u.. Close to town.
386-623-7547 or 984-8448

\640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

$148. A MONTH
for only 8 yrs w/$4K down. Newly
remodeled 14 wide 2br/2ba. New
Carpet. appliances, Del. & Set up.
Owner Finance available. Call
Gary Hamilton @ 386-963-4000
BIG FAMILY "NO" Problem.
Several homes over 2,000 sq. ft.
Starting at $19,000.
Call Clint at 386-752-1452

NICE 2/1 Remodeled
only 1'left for $9,500.
Call Clint at 386-752-1452
NICE 4/2
In Family Subdivision.
$464 per month. EZ Terms.
Call Clint at !! 386-752-1452.
LAND/HOME PACKAGE
2300 sq. ft. 4/2 DW on 1/2 acre!
Owner is willing to short sale for
only $74,995!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net n.
BRAND NEW 2011
4/2 bath DW. Complete set & del.
for only $39,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
REPO'S REPO'S!
We have several to choose from!
Singles, Doubles starting @
$10,500. Call Eric 386-752-1452
or jetdec@windstream.net


640 rMobile Homes
640 for Sale

FACTORY MISTAKE
Factory built wrong floorplan!
This will save you thousands on
this new 28'x64' 3/2 only $42,748.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net

MUST SEE! 28 x 56 3/2 bath.
Living room & den.
For only $15,900.
Call John T. 386-344-5234.
16 X 66 2/2,
with fire place!!
Huge rooms, only $12,500.
Call John T. 386-344-5234.
FACTORY REPO!!
32X80 4/2 bath.
$5,000. Below invoice.
Call John T. 386-344-5234.

Mobile Home
650 & Land

1800sf Manufactured Home.
4br/2ba plus retreat/office, 2
porches, walks. Concrete founda-
tion, appliances. Plywood w/ce-
ramic floors, metal roof. 5 ac., cor-
ner lot (treed) Horses OK, Gary
Hamilton (386)256-6379. Possible
Owner Finance (Lake City)

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent


$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423


30th Anniversary Celebration
Windsong Apts
Our Gift to You
$300.00 off and Employee Pricing
(386) 758-8455

04539801
!! 5 COMPLEXES !!
1BR from $500
2 BR from $525
*FREE CABLE*
*2 POOLS*
ONE GATED
Washer/Dryer Hookups
386-754-1800

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
2br/2ba w/garage on the
West side
1st, last &security.
Call 386-755-6867
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652

4 LAKE CITY

STAFF ASSISTANT I
PUBLIC SERVICE TRAINING CENTER
The Staff Assistant 1I.Public Sen ce Training Center,
sees a dual role, supporting both the Criminal
Justice Training Center and the Emergenca Medical
Series program The StaffrAssistant handles
telephone and e-mail inquiries, performs typing and
filing, and maintains detailed records for all programs
in these areas. igh School graduate or equivalency
plus two years clerical experience. Additional
education may be substituted on a year for year basis
for required experience in related area. Special
consideration ill be given to applicants with an
associate's degree or cerificate in a related area.
SALARY: $20,583 a nnally, plus benefits.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 6L/1010
College employment application required
Applications and full position details areavailable on
our wcbsite b i w.clakei2nL cc cdl
Inquiries: human Resources
149 SE College Place
tLake City, Fl, 32025
Phone: (386) '54-314 Fax: (386) 754-1414
of Colleges and Schools
VP/ADAE)A/FO College in Education &
Employment


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?






IS. Your kill'
"and ,s







Apply Online or In PersonI 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
Si EL 386.754.8562
S h1 * www.sitel.com EOE



* The Lake City ReporterI
is looking for a dynamic and capable sales
professional to sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and online products.
We need a person with the ability to make
strong presentations.

Professionalism, being active in the field and closing sales
arc three key attributes for which we are looking. We offer
a salary and a strong conunission plan, along with a good
benefits package. If you have a strong desire to succeed and
the skills to back it up, we want to hear from you.

tI'lesec ci.ii your resume to: Lynda Strickland. marketing director,
at Istrickland@ilakccityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055.
- NO PHONE CALLS - '


iiih~r

BUY ITJ


hiSELIII











CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


710\ Unfurnished Apt.
7 U For Rent
Studios & IBr's from $130/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen.
fridge & range.No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/lile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec. Also, Ibr for
$425.mo. Michelle 386-752-9626
072 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Cozy Cottage lbr/lba S. Hwy. 41
$550/mo. + security. Includes all
utilities & satellite TV. Pets OK.
(386)758-2408
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
3 Home For Rent
3BR/2BA 1628 sqft. 559 Gwen
Lake, totally remodeled, Lg fenced
yard. Must see. $995. mo. plus
$1,000 deposit 813-541-3935.
3BR/2BA Brick Southwood
Estates off SR 47, tile floors, fire-
place, large yard, pets ok $950 mo.
plus deposit. 386-758-3166
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease ppt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check , No Pets (386)755-9476�
FOR RENT 4br/2ba CHA Brick
home on 1 ac., east of town on CR
245A. Ceramic tile & carpet, $800
mo $800 deposit (904)708-8478
NICE 3br/2ba Home. Close to
LCCC. Rent $825. mo. Security
Dep. $750. Application required.
Call 386-963-4974
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
750f Business &
I '75 Office Rentals
Office Building, Convenient
location w/6 offices, Conference
Room, kitchen, ample parking.
Partially furnished. $2,500 mo.
For appointment 386-754-9293
Office Space located Across
from the Mall on Hwy 90.
$450/mo. plus tax.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626'
Space available at Country Club
Plaza East Baya Ave. 2000 sq ft.
2 restrooms, new carpet. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622

790 Vacation Rentals
Scalloping in Horseshoe Beach
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink. Avail'
wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
RECENTLY FORECLOSED,
Special Financing Available, Any
Credit, Any-Income Vacant Land,
located at, 180th St., Lake City,
'$79,900. Visit
www.roselandco.com/7A4,
Drive,by then call (866) 249-0680.


805 Lots for Sale
I AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner 'Finaul., No down pint.
$256/mo. $24,900. 352-215-1018
Owner Financing Ft. White 5ac.
$59,995. $995 dn. $428.82 mo.
Paved Rd. Wooded, H1omes only
vareasrealty.com (352)472-3154
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "pny preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper ate availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
$115,000 3B/2BA
Den or 4th bedroom.
Cypress Landing
386-466-7168

820 Farms &
S Acreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.corn
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
Reduced FSBO 10 ac. Horses &
more. 5 stall stable. Pastures.
board fenced, tool shed. 32'X75'.
4brManuf. Hm w/carport & deck.
$190,000. FIRM. 386-965-3357
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

950 Cars for Sale
(04533644
V1994 Grand Marquis $4,495.
$400 dn. +Tax + Tag.
.1997 Lincoln
Continental$4. 195
$400. dn + tax + taeg.
v 2003 Buick Century $6,195
$500. dn + tax + tag.
v1994 Ford Ranger $3,495
$200. dn. + tax + tag
.,1999 Ford Windstar $2,2001
Cash + tax + tag
v 1995 Nissan Maxima $1,500
Cash + Tax + Tag,
v1998 Chevy Malibu $4,595
$400 dn + tax + tag.
payments plus tax and tag.
Youngs Auto Sales
7066 E. Mt. Vernon St. Glen St.
32040 Contact Missy -
Ph: 904-259-4679


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture fpr you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


1995 Dodge Class B
Motorhome
Pleasureway, 316 V-8, AT,
78,500 mi., fully equipped.
$11,000
Call
352-262-1438 or
386-758-3949


In Print,

& Online
One Low
Price!


a-o More Detail Call~ ru~


950 Cars for Sale
2002 H111K Lebihre. 4 door
sedai, excelleilt condition,
Call .386-758-8606
After 6:00 p.m.


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
ILke City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


Q^^^^^'II


Q T


U


I


Sawy home shoppers reach for the classified ads

before they hit the streets. The newspaper

classified section offers everything they need to

make an informed purchasing decision.

Want to make a move?

Check the classified ads first.




Sclassified





the fist place to look for everthing






Lake City Reporter


-----� �- -- --�- - - - -- -- - - E


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A Z I U W X E X M Q Z X G Y L I M A F A
A A M E R I C A N F L A G. D M A J T T Y


ENTRY FORM


ReaIdy to Wi?
Find all 16 of the'Memodal Day' Name:
words hidden in the word search
above. Words can be found in the Phone Nu
banners above the ads listed below. Address:
Address:


Complete the puzzle and return it to
the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval
Street, Lake City, FL by 5:00pm, for
your chance to win

------------- MIM M M iggagg


ITACO

BELL
386-755-9673




Lake Citg

Kiddg Clib
"Where learning is fuli
Pre-K & VPK

755-0256
1290 SE Baya Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
lT0TS


Subscriber: - Yes _ No
Deadline is Tuesday, June 2, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.
Lake City Reporter
Decoa tion Day M-ilitaryService


r1., ,. a"rti ii

ORTHODONTICS
CELIA MARTIN . D.M.D,
755-1 :?-1
701 SW SR 47 Lake City, FL 32025





GAINEY

AUTOMOTIVE

& TOWING
3400 SW CR130, F. WHITE
386-454-3580
S g~


1798US 9 Wes


(386) 752-7034


Great Home for the Money!


Q nIlurjy, Call listing agent
1.. . (352) 317-4476
THE DARBY-ROGERS COMPANY .
www.c21dArbyrogers.com MIS


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Insurance Agency
3322 W US HWV 90 4447 NW American Lane
386-755-2502 (386) 752-6058


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


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ROUNTREE MOORE'S I 9 I

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My favorite is the Biggie Italian."
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Open Monday - Saturday loam-9pm
Sunday llam-7pm
(386) 752-7949 * 3525 Bascom Norris
(Acro from Wal-Mart, next to Low.)


Rountree
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4310 W US Hwy 90
(386) 755-0631
Monday-Friday 7ant-spm


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DR. SUITE 101

ACROSS FROM WAL-MART
LAKE CITY, FL


FREEC POINTS
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INV INTERMNET CFW coupon only. Expires 6-30-10. AVM
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Classified Department: 755-5440


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmoyet@lakecityrepo rtercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, May 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Butterfly

gardening

flutters to

the rescue

I t's a great time to
start a butterfly
garden for your own
enjoyment, for the
benefit of butterflies,
and for the preservation
of Florida wildlife com-
munities. Of all the states,
Florida is one of the best
for attracting a wide vari-
ety of butterflies to your
flower garden. There are
at least 180 species found
in Florida and 40 of those
are found primarily within
Florida's borders.
Gardening to attract
butterflies can be a very
rewarding hobby for sev-
eral reasons. Plants that
attract the adult butterfly
have interesting shapes
and lovely colors. The
dreamlike flight of a but-
terfly among the flowers
adds another dimension of
movement and interest to
a flowerbed. By creating
a habitat for butterflies, a
natural environment has
also been maintained for
other organisms that share
the same space.
Nectar plants are needed
to attract and feed the adult
butterflies. The female
adult may enjoy a variety
of nectar sources, but
she is very picky about
where she lays her eggs.
Although you can attract
adult butterflies without
the larval plants, the adults
will remain in an area if
you also have plants for the
eggs and larvae (caterpil-
lars). A larval host plant is
usually a native plant that
is eaten only by specific
species.
In nature, plants and
insects have some very
interesting relationships
that help them survive
together. A butterfly needs
to find the flower for nectar
and the plant needs to be
pollinated by the activity of
that butterfly. It is a mutual
relationship because they
both help each other.
When your garden has a
diverse population of visit-
ing butterflies, you have
succeeded in providing a
habitat for other wildlife.
Butterflies are called an
"umbrella" species. By
caring for these gentle
insects, you are also caring
for all-the other organisms
interacting in that habitat.
So the butterflies are the
"umbrella" of life support
for everything else seen
and unseen in the garden.
Gardening opens the
door to greater enjoyment
and broader knowledge
of Florida wildlife. If you
would like to learn more
about the flora and fauna
of Florida's many ecosys-
tems, plan to attend classes
at the Columbia County
Extension Office and
become a Florida Master
Naturalist.
Classes will be held
from June 7 through June
18. Contact Derek Barber,
the UF/IFAS Natural
Resources Agent for
Columbia County at 386-
752-5384 for more informa-
tion.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


PREPARING FOR WORST


Are you ready for the hurricane season?


FILE PHOTO
Columbia County has dodged most of the damaging effects from Atlantic hurricanes during the past few years, but some events, such as this scene taken
from the hurricane in 2004, have been quite destructive.


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.corn


FILE PHOTOS
The last major hurricane to severely affect Columbia County residents was
in 2004.

Have a Family Disaster Plan
* Discuss the type of hazards that could affect your family. Know
your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind.
* Locate a safe room or the safest areas in your home for each
hurricane hazard. In certain circumstances the safest areas may not
be your home but within your community.
* Determine escape routes from your home and places to meet.
* Have an out-of-state friend as a family contact, so all your fam-
ily members have a single point of contact.
* Make a plan now for what to do with your pets if you need to
evacuate.
* Post emergency telephone numbers by your phones and make
sure your children know how and when to call 911.
* Check your insurance coverage - flood damage is not usu-
ally covered by homeowners insurance. National Flood Insurance
Program
* Stock non-perishable emergency supplies and a Disaster
Supply Kit.
* Use a NOAA weather radio. Remember to replace its battery
every 6 months, as you do with your smoke detectors.
* Take First Aid, CPR and disaster preparedness classes.

SOURCE: National Hurricane Center


Hurricane season
begins Tuesday, and
Columbia County
officials want to
make sure residents
are prepared for the worst.
The National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
predicted on Thursday that there
will be 14 to 23 tropical storms
in the Atlantic basin this year.
This includes eight to 14 hur-
ricanes, three to seven of which
are predicted to be Category 3
or higher, with sustained winds
exceeding 111 mph.
Hurricane season ends Nov.
30.
In recent years, Columbia
County has dodged most of
the damaging effects from the
Atlantic hurricanes, which have
amounted to only wind and rain
locally.
"I don't know if you can
describe any place in Florida
as being safe from a hurri-
cane," said Harvey Campbell,
public information officer for
Columbia County Emergency
Management. "Having said that,
Lake City probably comes as
close to such a location if there is
one. We're roughly 70 miles from
both coasts. If you had a direct
hit of a major hurricane, it would
be at least a little diminished in
terms of their direct impact on
Lake City."
The last major hurricane to
severely affect Columbia County
residents was in 2004, when
Hurricane Charley cut a swath
across Florida. The storm system
is considered the fifth costliest
Atlantic hurricane in history,
ranking behind Katrina, Andrew,
Ike and Wilma, and its effects on
Columbia County were no differ-
ent - trees were felled, flooding
was an issue and some residents
were without power for days.
"In -'" 1, one of the things that
happened was that for a while,
we had largely escaped being
in the 1)ath of a hurricane, and
people tended to get a little lax
with tree trimming," Campbell
said. "People may think, 'this
tree may be a problem, but I'll
deal with it later,' and then a hur-
ricane comes with its accompany-
ing winds and rains, and it's too


Being prepared
Harvey Campbell said
it's best to lbe prepared in
advance, rather than wait- -
ing until a hurricane forms
and its path is projected
toward Lake City.
"You've got to under-
stand, if you react to the
imminent threat, many
times the water,' bread
and non-perishable foods
have already been raided,"
he said. "Plywood and
tarps the same way - it's
a supply-and-demand
issue. There are all types
of issues - batteries
and flashlights, important
papers, and what if you
have a significant power
outage, and all of a sudden,
your bank can't open and
the ATM doesn't work?"

late to deal with it. Then that tree
damages a house or takes down
electricity lines. That's a risk we
run here in 2010 - we've been
largely unaffected for a while,
and one of our biggest concerns
if that people become compla-
cent. You know, they'll read us
talking about it in the paper and
hear us talking about the need to
prepare, and nothing happens -
it's kind of a cry wolf syndrome."
Campbell said that while dam-
aging winds are always at the
front of people's minds when a
hurricane's path is projected, it's
the "unanticipated consequenc-
es" he said people need to be
wary of as well.
"Beyond the obvious, there is
flooding," he said. "When you get
significant amounts of rain, the
flooding can cause sink holes to
open up, as well as contamination
of wells. It can damage homes, or
at the very least, cut off people
from their normal access. And
with that much water, septic
tanks can be compromised.
"The obvious thing of your
roof being ripped off may not be
the case, but there are unexpect-
ed consequences you may not
think of," Campbell said.











LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


50TH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY


Oscar and Revia Munch.

Munch
The children of Oscar and Revia Munch request the pleasure of your company at a
drop-in reception honoring their parents' 50th wedding anniversary. The celebration
will take place between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 12, 2010, at the Branford
Shrine Club in Branford. The couple requests that no gifts be brought.


ENGAGEMENT


Carpenter-Lussier
Rick and Sandy
Carpenter of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Jennifer
Dianne Carpenter of Lake
City, to Todd Gregory
Luss.ier of Lake City.
Lussier is the son of Greg
and Barb Lussier.
- -The wedding is planned
,ftr:Saturday, June 26,
2010, at First United
Methodist Church of
Lake City. A reception will
follow at Tucker's Fine
Dining.
The bride-elect is a 2010
-graduate of the University
of Florida, with a Bachelor
of Arts in advertising, and
is employed by Global
Innovations as an advertis-
- ing coordinator.
The future groom is
a graduate of Saint Leo
University with a Bachelor
of Arts in Criminal Justice.
. He is employed as a detec-
.:tve with the Columbia
:.oU.nty Sheriff's Office,
and is a assistant varsity
soccer coach at Columbia
High School.


Jennifer Dianne Carpenter and Todd Gregory Lussier.


Educational assistance


for veterans at LCCC


As Memorial
Day approach-
es, I would like
to acknowledge
all veterans
who are currently serving
in the military, the veterans
who were injured while
serving, and those veter-
ans who lost their lives.
Over the last year there
has been an increase in the
number of veterans return-
ing to college. This is due
to a number of reasons
- some have retired from
the military while others
are getting out after their
period of enlistment has
ended, and others were dis-
charged due to a service-
connected disability. For
the veteran that decides
to attend college, there is
financial assistance avail-
able from the Department
of Veteran Affairs.
A few of the benefits
that are available to veter-
ans are the Montgomery
GI Bill, The Post 9/11 GI
Bill, The Montgomery
GI Bill-Selected Reserve,
The Reserve Educational
Assistance Program,
and The Dependents
Educational Assistance
(available for children,
spouses and surviving
spouses of veterans).
Some of you may be
eligible to transfer your
benefits to your depen-
dents (spouse/children).
The first-time applicant
can expect to allow six-
to-eight weeks process-
ing time from the time
that the veteran submits
the application to the VA
until the time that the
VA sends a certificate of
eligibility informing the
veteran about the benefits
they will receive and the
amount of time they have
to use their benefits. For a
veteran that is returning to
school, changing schools,
or changing from one ben-
efit type to another benefit


Amanda Luke
LCCC registrar specialist II


type - the processing
time will be less.
The Montgomery GI
Bill provides education
benefit payments,to eligible
veterans who served on
active duty for at least two
years, have earned either
a high school diploma or
its equivalent either prior
to or during the period of
enlistment and have been
honorably discharged from
the military. On Aug. 1,
2009 the VA implemented
the Veterans Education
Assistance Act also known
as the Post 9/11 GI Bill.
This bill is the broadest
educational benefit pack-
age for veterans since the
original GI Bill went into
effect in 1944. The maxi-
mum benefit this bill will
pay to an eligible veteran
is the cost of tuition and
fees at the school, provide
a yearly book stipend of up
to $1,000 per year, and a
monthly housing allowance
that is equal to the basic
housing allowance that an
E-5 with dependents would
receive for the area that is
closest to the school that
the veteran attends. The
benefit amounts vary based
on the veterans' meeting
certain criteria that have
been established by the
VA.
If the eligibility criteria
are met - for example; a
veteran that has served in
the military for 36 months
or more or a veteran that
has served at least 30
continuous days on active
duty - these veterans
may be covered at 100


percent. Some veterans
have a choice of benefits
they can choose such as
the Montgomery GI bill
or the Post 9/11 GI Bill.
Once you select the Post
9/11 GI Bill and the VA
sends you a certificate of
eligibility - you cannot
go back and change your
selection to the previous
chapter. Some veterans
are also eligible to transfer
their benefits over to their
dependents.
The Montgomery GI
Bill-Selected Reserve
provides benefits to eligible
veterans who are enlisted
in the Selected Reserve,
have a high school diploma
or equivalent, have com-
pleted Initial Active Duty
Training, and is satis- '
factorily participating in
required training in the
selected Reserves.
The Reseive
Educational Program
provides educational
assistance to members of
the reserve components
that have been called or
ordered to active duty. .
The Dependents
Educational Assistance
Program provides educa-
tional benefits to the chil-
dren, spouses and surviv-
ing spouses of veterans.
The most impor-
tant thing to do is your
research and compare the
types of GI Bill benefits
that you may qualify for to
determine which GI Bill
would be the most benefi-
cial for you. Regardless of
the reason a veteran leaves
the military, some veterans
may experience difficulty
making the transition from
military life to civilian life.
There are various types of
assistance available to help
make this transition a little
easier.
Contact Luke at lukea@
lakecitycc.edu or by calling
(386) 754-4398 for more
assistance.


Pet wallet photos top AP poll


By SUE MANNING
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - The
next time.someone reaches
for photos and offers: "Let
me show you some pic-
tures of my little darlings,"
you might be surprised
who's mugging for the
camera.
According to a recent
Associated Press-Petside.
com poll, nearly half (45
percent) of all pet owners
say they carry around


photos of their pets
- in wallets, purses, cell
phones, laptops, iPods,
iPads and other mobile
devices.
Dog owners (48 percent)
are a bit more likely than
cat owners (37 percent)
to carry pet pictures with
them, and women (52 per-
cent) are more likely than
men (36 percent).
Over half of those under
age 50 say they carry pet
pictures, but the number
diminishes with age. Just


under a quarter of those
age 65 and up still carry
such photos,
Tigger, a 6-year-old
Persian cat, is such a
fashion plate and so agree-
able that Larry Beal of
Newburyport, Mass., can't
help but take photos. "Plus
we love him," the 66-year-
old former teacher said.
"He will do anything
you ask him to. My wife
dresses him in all kinds of
doll clothing and stuff," he
said.


BIRTH

Phillips
Lara Jewell of Lake City announces the birth of her son, Logan Bentlee Phillips,
on May 17, 2010, at North Florida Regional Medical Center. He weighed 7 pounds, 6
ounces, and measured 19-and-a-half inches. The grandparents are Cathy Phillips and
Everett Lee Phillips. The great grandparents are Everett and Kathy Phillips and Ruth
and Bob Coffee.


Yogurt crosses cultures with trends


By MICHELLE LOCKE
For The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO
- Every culture sees
its share of trends. Even
yogurt.
And as yogurt hipsters
know, the days of fruit-on-the-
bottom and pina colada-fla-
vored puddings are so passe.
An explosion of
yogurt options has given
Americans bold new
choices, from goat's milk
to Greek-style to soy and
even coconut milk yogurts.
And have you tried the
Icelandic-style brands like
siggi's? It's a stick-to-your-
ribs product that Errol
Schweizer, senior global
grocery coordinator for
Whole Foods Market,
describes as "sort of like
Greek yogurt for Vikings."
Yogurt's cultural trans-
formation is most notice-
able at upscale grocers.
Atlanta copy editor Lauren


Vogelbaum jokes that when
a Whole Foods opened near
her apartment a few years
ago, "I was introduced to a
new universe of yogurt."
But mainstream markets
also have seen a change,
as products once limited
mostly to natural food
stores - such as Greek-
style strained yogurts and
kefir, a drinkable, ferment-
ed dairy product - have
become widely available.
'There's been a big
increase in the number of
yogurts and the different
cultures available," says
Robert Garfield, senior
vice president of public
policy and international
affairs for the National
Yogurt Association, a non-
profit industry group based
in McLean, Va.
Though the recession
slowed yogurt sales in
2009, especially yogurt
drinks, sales of both grew
32 percent between 2004


and 2009, reaching nearly
$4.1 billion in sales, accord-
ing to market research
company Mintel.
Icelandic yogurts are
dense nutrient-packed
products that are so
thoroughly strained they
can be classified as soft
cheeses. Two brands are
sold in the United States
- Skyr.is, imported
from Iceland, and siggi's,
made in America by Siggi
Hilmarsson, an immigrant
from Iceland.
The Skyr.is brand, avail-
able exclusively at Whole
Foods, is currently avail-
able on the East Coast;
as well as cities including
Denver and Seattle, with
plans to roll out the prod-
uct in other regions this
year. The brand is "just
growing bigger and big-
ger," says Blair Gordon,
president of E&B's Natural
Way company, which is
based in Frederick, Md.


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427












LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MAY 30, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Moment of remembrance


to honor fallen defenders


DEAR ABBY: As a
nation, we Americans are
at our best when we come
together bonded by a noble
purpose. It is my privilege
to invite our citizens to unite
for the National Moment
of Remembrance at 3 p.m.
(local time) tomorrow on
Memorial Day, Monday,
May 31. Our hope is that
your readers will pause at
that moment whether at a
ballgame or barbecue, in
the swimming pool or at the
shopping mall, in respectful
silence to honor America's
fallen.
To unite the country in
remembrance, Congress
officially established
the National Moment of
Remembrance in 2000. And
as has been done in the
past, in observance of this
National Moment, Major
League Baseball games'
will stop, Amtrak trains
will blow their whistles
and the National Grocers
Association and Food
Marketing Institute will
have customers and staff
pause in more than 30,000
stores throughout our coun-
try.
Abby, your patriotism and
compassion, united with that
of your millions of readers,
have helped us - and con-
tinue to help us - unite our
country in remembrance of
our fallen on Memorial Day.
We must ensure that their
lives, their deaths and the


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
memory of their sacrifice
will never be forgotten. So
let us stop for a moment
at 3:00 (local time) tomor-
row and commit to live
honoring America's fallen
every day that we breathe
the fresh air of freedom
in our land of hope and
promise. - CARMELIA
IA SPADA, EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR, WHITE
HOUSE COMMISSION
ON REMEMBRANCE
DEAR CARMELIA:
Thank you for your beau-
tiful letter. I accept your
kind invitation on behalf of
myself and Dear Abby read-
ers everywhere. This act of
unity on Memorial Day will
be a time of respect, 'reflec-
tion and commitment in
memory of the almost 2 mil-
lion men and women who
have died in the service of
our nation. Their sacrifices
for us live on in each con-
stitutional right we practice,
and in our hearts always.
DEAR ABBY: I am 14
and will attend a private
high school in the fall. Both
of my sisters were star ath-


letes at the same school. I
am gifted in both academics
and athletics, and I'll be tak-
ing two honors classes.
My dad recently pointed
out that I am required to
play a sport. I believe if I
do, I will be too stressed out
and my grades will slip. He
wants me to be this "super
child" that I am not and go
to Harvard. Everyone who
knows me overestimates
me. How should I approach
him to tell him how I
really feel? - PUSHED
TO MY LIMITS IN
ALBUQUERQUE
DEAR PUSHED: If
you're unsure about your
ability to carry the load,
approach your father as
you have approached me.
However, before you do, I
wish you would take into
consideration that partici-
pating in a sport can be an
effective way of releasing
stress - including academ-
ic pressure. If sports are a
requirement at your school,
there is a good reason for it.
So please, at least give it a
try. If it's too much for you,
talk to your parents, as well
as your counselor at school.,
P.S. As to "everyone who
knows you overestimating
you," has it occurred to you
that you may be underesti-
mating yourself?
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You will come
up against people who will
slow you down, get in your
way and cause you grief.
Focus on what you can
learn from the experiences
you have and make the
most of whatever situation
you face. Financial gains
can be made. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You can get off on
the right foot if you make.
suggestions, ask opinions
and include everyone in
your plans. Participate in
something that interests
you and you will make new
friends. Love is highlighted.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't lead someone
on. Be precise and don't
play games. A chance to
make some extra cash or
be given a gift is apparent.
Plan to spend whatever you
get on something that will
enhance your home or your
lifestyle. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Address emotional
issues so you better under-
stand someone you care
about. Love and romance
are highlighted. Make-
plans to do something that


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
includes the people you
love most and you will build
greater personal security.

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Refrain from taking on
an impossible task just to
impress someone. Instead,
do less and do it well. You
will have the opportunity to
turn an idea you have into
a feasible sideline. Focus
on what you can do to get
ahead. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): A window of opportu-
nity is apparent. A project
you are excited about will
allow you to express your '
individualism, your talent
and your skills. A positive
change in your romantic life
will occur if you make your
move and reveal your inten-
tions.*****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Do everything accord-
ing to plan or you will face
adversity. Your personal life
will be compromised if you
don't pay enough attention
to what friends, family or
your lover are asking of
you. A change at home will


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher standsfor another.
Today's clue: U equals W
"T KOCPR YH HRECRIC UKR KTH
XYNCI KYH RP KCP GYZ'C WR
HREC WKYIX D Y XX CP 'WK TI RICHC G Z . "
- ARHCB K STE BDCGG
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "If your lifeguard duties were as good as your singing,
a lot of people would be drowning!" - TV critic Simon.Cowell


surprise you. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-1
Nov. 21): A chance to try
something new will lead to
meeting new people. A part-
nership that can add qual-.
ity and depth to a project
you've been working on will
develop if you attend events
that include people in your
profession. **** -' -
SAGITTARIUS (Ndov
22-Dec. 21): You may-
feel the urge to reinvent
yourself. A change will do
you good and help you
move into a higher earning
bracket. An unusual occur-
rence at home will lead to
a change. Get rid of the old
and bring in the new. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): The chance
to get involved in a project
that requires your skills- ill
develop. Now is the perfect
time to move from one
thing to another. A personal
partnership is highlighted.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Your plans and
motives will be questioned
'by the people who care -
about you, making it neces-
sary to listen to the advice
being offered. Consider a
change of plans before you
make a personal and emo-
tional mistake. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Plan your
strategy. A new source of
income will help you moni-
tor your expenses and give
you the freedom to get
involved in projects that
interest you. Developing a
service you can offer from
home will enhance a part-
nership. ****


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


FLIP-FLOPS By Yaakov Bendavid / Edited by Will Shortz 11 21314


Across
1 Frozen dessert in
France
6 Vise parts
10 Personnel IDs
14 Michelle
Robinson, now
19-Nearby school,
maybe
20 Jai
21 "While, you're

22 First sign
23 Where ETs do
knitting and art?
26 Country singer
Chesney
27 Old fogy
28 Bell site
29 David, for one
30 Gjve ___ (say
O.K.)
32 Current regulator
34 Thug living next
to humorist
Will?
42 Org. for Venus
and Serena
Williams
43 Comical Johnson
44 Keats's nightfall
45 Place for grain
46 "Get that first
down ... and
don't fumble"?
53 Book contents:
Abbr.
55 Home of the
N.C.A.A.
Spartans
56 Wine city north
of Lisbon
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


57 Pacific atoll in
1943 fighting
59 Frozen dessert
61 Shortish piano
piece
64 Home of the
, N.C.A.A.
Minutemen
66 Bright lights
67 Watching over
Warsaw's
national
emblem?
71 Relevant, in law
74 Former Yankee
pitcher Hideki
75 Biennial golf
competition
79 "Parade de
Cirque" artist
81 Future seeds
84 Verdi tragedy
85 Ill-mannered one
86 "Platoon"
setting, for short
88 Waiting in line
for hooch?
91 Alan of
Hollywood
93 Pen name
95 Skin ___
96 Dorm V.I.P.'s
97 Competition
among shrinks?
105 Paid attention
to, with "of"
106 Santa ___
107 Long bones
110 Halloween
purchase
114 Fireplace cavity
118 Gave heartburn,
say
119 Visitors' fair
warning?


121 Capital city
more than 9,000
feet above sea
level
122 Prefix with
logical
123 Maintain
124 Start of the
French Lord's
Prayer
125 Temptress
126 Relish
127 Round of golf,
informally
128 County of
Newark, N.J.

Down
1 Five-time U.S.
Open champ
2 Disney title
character from
Hawaii
3 Hertz rival
4 Husband of
Pompeia
5 Cause of some
storms
6 Big bump
7 Word said with a
tear, maybe
8 Ride the breeze
9 Web presence
10,Plato's "tenth
Muse"
11 Lost zip .
12 "Good
comeback!"
13 Chateau
Michelle winery
14 Art supply store
stock
15 Inspirations
16 " No
Woman," 1973
hit for the Four
Tops
17 Computer
offering


18 " sow ..
24 Jam
25 Blood fluid:
Prefix
29 Undercover jobs
31 Not to be
persuaded
33 Ooze
34 Philippines'
highest peak:
Abbr.
35 Blathered
36 Growling sound
37 [Ignore edit]
38 Blood: Prefix
39 Airhead
40 Colleague of
Lane and Kent
41 No contests
42 "___ next?"
47 Clothier, in
Cambridge
48 Hassock
49 Thwart
50 Salad green
-51 Super Bowl
XXXIV champs
52 Famous movie
river
54 Milton works
58 Observatory subj.
60 Kick oneself over
62 "In the," in Italy
63 Place to stick a
comb
65 "Charlotte's
Web" setting
68 Pumice source
69 Be flush with
70 Pedestal topper
71 Royalties org.
72 Passes out
73 Like some
complexions


76 "Bewitched" aunt 89 Like Saint- 101 Job legislation
77 nerve Saens's "Urbs estab. in 1973
78 Sci-fi escape Roma" 102 Stray
ciclescape Symphony 103 Dead Sea
vehicles 90 Norman of TV Scrolls writer


80 They're just not
done
82 Spanish
demonstrative
83 Small-runway
aircraft, briefly
87 Standard part of
. a food pyramid


fame
92 Impel
94 Say "I lost," say
98 Dr. Seuss title
animal
99 Spurs
100 "Boy, am I
shvitzing!"


104 Exuberant cries
107 Recommended
reading for
newbies
108 Thread holder
109 Kiev-born
Israeli P.M.
111 ___ Bator,
Mongolia


112 10 years before
the Battle of
Hastings
113 Nobel Prize -
category: Abbr.
115 A lot of mil.
personnel
116 "Able was
117 Creature in a
"King Kong"
fight
119 Guru
120 Fall behind


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
FAMi E IRM IN T HER D SPAN0
AREGOmRE T DR T I TC H T E R
DEFOIG BBEAUFOIRTmmHECTOR
ENA EITE K EI N NIYm PIEAIHENm


DONNE CIAVI -AITITER SGT
VOW NDWA AYINU mSEAEE TH
0 IDEAMAN E A RSm 1R T m
I~~~~~ ~~~~ D ||' ~oLDC|ARsi|~'
CON V 1l N 0N N J FNE R
ESSE EMU S IR TG I. ARC
D U RAT IO N C NT E T 0 N
TGVTO S SAVANNAm ITSA LOITI
SAIlNL ERM H 0 PNANDIN0O T EKE
U M D E S C A E T D D
U LM DE mTEE R SEM A IR K Il DDY
IPC I =E olPEAY r IRI AIITN o0


C 0 MIlC S H 0 L L 0 W E D IJ 0NI C
P L IN| KS S|T E EPE N S O|R|E"CC K
LI iTITE TR T QTSE NE T T


7 9 1

6 8 4


8 4 13


4 8


5 9 7

1 5 2 6

3 6 4 9 8 2

2 4 9 3


__2 1 7


L V 9 L ZC 8 9 6

8 1 6 1 9 9 ZLL



L 19 8 6 L I7 9 C


9 1 6L 79 L 6 8


V 8 L 6 6 L 9 Z 9


9 6 L6 9- 8 LS -


C L 9 9 L 7 6 8-





Z 9 8 9 L 6 1V-LI


. Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424













SPOTLIGHT


Sunday, May 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


4D


'Prince of Persia' slips from memory


By CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP Movie Critic
A "s we await the eventual
arrival of "Donkey Kong:
The Musical!" - which
surely must be coming some-
day, right? - yet another
movie based on a video game, "Prince
of Persia: The Sands of Time," arrives in
theaters.
Now as this genre goes, "Prince of
Persia" doesn't have the shoddy appear-
ance of, say, "Alone in the Dark" or
"House of the Dead" or any number of
films from the infamous German director
Uwe Boll. No,
this is a Jerry
Bruckheimer
production, so
it looks cheesy
in the kind of
monster-budget


way you can
only achieve
through copi-
ous amounts of
computer-gen-
erated imagery.
There's noth-
ing terribly
memorable
about "Prince
of Persia";
recalling the
plot a half-hour


and characters and, you know, acting.
Jake Gyllenhaal, as our courageous and
resourceful hero Dastan, always has an
engaging presence about him - those
big, blue eyes, that goofy smile - and
that sweetness helps keep the mood light
when "Prince of Persia" threatens to take
itself too seriously.
Gyllenhaal has been to the gym, clear-
ly, and he learned Parkour to perform
some of his own stunts, leaping across
walls and over rooftops and camelbacks
with the agility of, well, a video-game
character. It may seem like a weird fit
for an actor whose filmography include-
"Brokeback Mountain," 'The Good Girl"
and "Donnie
P'W.", Darko," but


ASSOCIATED PRESS
.In this.film publicity image released by Disney,
Gemma Arterton (right) and Jake Gyllenhaal are
shown in a scene from, 'Prince of Persia: The
Sands of Time.'


afterward might
require some effort.
Somewhere beneath all the fake,
glossy effects - which in no way sug-
gest anything even remotely resembling
a tangible reality - there must be a story


perhaps becaus-.
he's not a tradi-
tional action star,
his performance.
ends up being
more intriguing.
than what you
might get from
a Hugh Jackman
or a Gerard
Butler.
He also has
some nice,
snappy, old-
Hollywood-
adventure-
style banter
with Gemma


Arterton as the feisty Princess Tamina,
with whom his character teams up to
protect an ancient dagger that contains
powerful sand which allows the possessior
to reverse time. Or something. Dastan
leads an attack on her city, Alamut, at the


film's start, believing there are weapons
being hidden there for supply to Persia's
enemies. This should sound familiar to
you.
While "Prince of Persia" doesn't try to
replicate the sensation of playing a video
game, as so many of its predecessors did,
its structure is undeniably episodic. As
Dastan vanquished
onc for after anoth-
n' in i.il i.'t n urv .il lr
I -Isia. it lusI-.
Ilkl \\-"'i- waik h- . .
ing him dchllh
huini uIh l v l .-
..ach challenge.
in "r _,sing in dif-
Mike New ell .
diliec.td the ilm I
lr iin i script by
Buaz Y.kin :iand
D[),.i' Mir-1 & Culo0
Birnalrd I, hast:d
on tlit. vido, ,Vcihnrtga
.nilaln Mcchliner
creah.d back in 19,,.
This also might seeml
likt:- an unusual fit for
Ner ell. director ,.if
such eclectic moivie-s as
"Fulr "\eddings and a
Funeral" and "Donnie
Bra-sco." But Newll
also made the fourt-h
Harry Potter pic-
ture, tht high-tech
enor'nity uf \ which
was probably guod
prcpaj.atitun lfor
this


And "Prince of Persia" does have its
fleeting moments of swashbuckling fun.
Dastan and Tamina must hang onto the
dagger - which Dastan sometimes car-
ries in the front of his pants, the handle
sticking out in an obviously phallic
manner - to keep it from falling into
the wrong hands. But any goodwill the
performances may have engendered gets
obliterated by the climactic ending, a
noisy, garish. swirling spectacle of sand
and light and screaming. It's enough to
make you want to hit the reset button.


'Love Heals'

CD delivers
.its promise

By TOM MAYER
tmayer@lakecityreporter. com
T ending lunch with
S Wynonna Judd
is easier than
you think. As
of Monday, the
five-time Grammy Award
winner's new CD, "Love
Heals," is available - but
only at Cracker Barrel.
An artist granting mar-
ket exclusivity might seem
limiting, but for "Love
Heals," the plan isn't solely
about CD sales. Wynonna's
partnership is in collabora-
tion with and support of the
Wounded Warrior Project,
-' an orga-
nization
wounded
o raise
ware-
ess for
he tens
bft thou-
sands of injured soldiers
returning from war. The
project is headquartered in
Jacksonville.
Unlike other cause-
related releases, "Love
Heals" stands on its own.
-The disc offers nine of
Wynonna's top hits, includ-
ing her solo breakout from
1992, the love song "She Is
His Only Need," the rock-
ing No. 1 "No One Else on
Earth" and favorites "Rock
Bottom," and'Tell Me
Why."
It also includes two
tracks never before avail-
able for sale, radio versions
of "Sing" and "Wheri I
Fall In Love" - and new
release, "Let Your Light
Shine," a gospel-flavored
Wynonna cut that echoes
the intensity of her early
departure from the mother-
daughter duo, the Judds,
in 1991.
In Wynonna's liner notes
for "Love Heals," the singer
thanks American service
members for their duty,
and the business she is
partnering with for support
of the project that comes
to their aid. But for her
fans, the thanks goes to the
nine-time Country Music
Award winner.
"Love Heals" is a solid
disc that mixes classic
Wynonna with enough
twists to embrace long-time
listeners, and welcome a
hiew fan or two.


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