Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text







Ra_. e-werek1

S'UakF-Git MotorspoR0-s Park to,
ost weekend boggin- event


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Newly chalked
base lines
and freshly
mowed fields
will await soc-
cer, softball and baseball
tournament players and. all
who come with them at the
Southside Sports Complex
for this weekend's multi-
team sports tournaments.
The county landscape
and parks department has
been working hard and fast
to prepare the complex's
fields and common areas
for the influx of more than
1,000 tournament players
and their families, coaches
and friends.
"It's a major, major
undertaking on the whole
deal," sAid Clint Pittman,
Columbia County
landscape and parks
director.
On Wednesday, Pittman
said his staff - with the
additional help of inmate
crews - has been mowing,
edging and weed-eating all
the turf areas and raking
the baseball and softball
clay, both by machine and
by hand, to prepare the
fields for playing condition.
"We'll be out here the
entire week," Pittman said.
"It'll be a week-long event
prepping for Saturday and


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Alvin Meeks (right) rides a bunker rake to level and soften the clay on a baseball diamond


while Todd Green mows the field
Sunday play."
Equipping the fields
specifically for tourna-
ments requires detailed
work, Pittman said, such as
setting different base pat-
terns and pitching mound
distances for different age
groups.
After field lines are paint-
ed and chalked, Pittman
said his workers will move
on to laying out parking
areas and making sure the
complex's restrooms and
common areas are clean.
Pittman said his depart-


ment has "prepped" for
events of this scale, but
never for three tourna-
ments occurring simulta-
neously. He also said his
full staff and inmate crews
will continue working on
the preparations today and
Friday with other county
.projects on their plates.
'We have to maintain
properties countywide,
not just here, so that's
what makes it so difficult,"
Pittman said.
Harvey Campbell,
executive director of the


Columbia County Tourist
Development Council, said
he has been coordinating
elements for the tourna-
ments, such as spraying for
mosquitos, putting up vari-
able message signs, send-
* ing out traffic advisories
and providing local hotels
with maps for tournament
guests.
'We do the legwork and
he (Pittman) does the hard
work," Campbell said. "And
we're blessed that Clint
CREWS continued on 5A


UNDER INVESTIGATION



1 dead in


fiery crash


Officials: Driver's
identity still
unknown.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Authorities are continu-
ing their investigation into
a fiery crash Wednesday
morning where a truck
driver and his dog were
killed after his rig ran off
the road, into a group of
trees, and struck a cul-
vert before bursting into
flames.
Authorities have not
been able to determine the
driver's identity.
The wreck occurred
around 3:30 a.m.Wednesday
in the southbound lanes
of Interstate 75 at the
Interstate 10 interchange,


about eight miles north of
Lake City.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports, a
2004 Freightliner tractor
trailer was traveling south-
bound on the roadway in
the outside, right travel
lane, approaching the 1-10
interchange.
For unknown reasons,
the driver allowed the vehi-
cle to veer off the road to
the right, where it went
onto the grassy shoulder
on, the west 'side of the
road. The truck continued
to travel' in a southwest
direction, without any such
corrective actions as brak-
ing or steering, across the
shoulder into a tree-line,
reports stated. The front
of the truck then struck
CRASH continued on 5A


Commission to

discuss $750,000

in grant money


Grant can be
awarded for
special projects.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The county has begun
the process of trying to get
its hands on $750,000 in fed-
eral state grant money for
community development
projects.
The , Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will discuss
these projects and the pos-
sibility of the grant money
- among other agenda
items - at its meeting
tonight.
Dale Williams, county
manager, said the Fiscal
Year 2009 Community
Development Block Grant
has a maximum of $750,000
that can be awarded for spe-
cific projects under catego-
ries such as neighborhood
revitalization or economic
development.
The board will discuss
and could nominate projects
at the meeting for Martha
Orthoefer, North Central
Florida Regional Planning


Council senior planner for
Community Development
Block Grants, who will be
attending
. the meet-
ing, to
Evaluate,
.3L Williams
said.
Williams
said the
Williams g r a n t
money is "very, very com-
petitive."
"We want to submit for
the project what we think
we would have the best
chance or the most suc-
cess," Williams said.
In the consent agenda,
the county is also set to
vote on almost $117,000
in federal grant money
for the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office, and
almost $200,000 in forced
account expenses to
AECOM railroad during
the construction of the
Bascom Norris connector
road project.
The ,Board of County
Commissioners will meet
at 7 p.m. today at the
Columbia County School
Board Administrative audi-
torium, 372 W. Duval St.


'Haunted' museum tours set for Saturday


North Florida
Mystery Trackers
will conduct tours.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
The Lake City-Columbia
County Historical Museum
has long been thought to be
haunted.
"We've had things hap-
pen that we can't explain,"


said Pat.McAlhany. "I love
to think something is going
on."
Interested thrill seekers
can possibly experience the
happenings at the museum
during a free ghost tour
from 8 to 10 p.m. Saturday.
The North . Florida
Mystery Trackers, a para-
normal research team, con-
ducts the tours. The team
previously investigated the
museum twice, including


during an overnight stay,
said Laura Rose, lead inves-
tigator and co-founder.
"It was kind of scary,"
she said. 'We heard foot
steps all night long."
One ghost attributed to
the house is Cora, niece of
the original owners John
and May Vinzant. She lived
there in the 1800s, but died
in the upstairs bedroom
from yellow fever the day
she was to graduate from


the Lake City Institute.
The tour includes a his-
torical walk though while
the museum is pitch black,
James said. Then the group
conducts a mini paranormal
investigation with equipment
such as a dowsing rod.
Visit www. nfmysterytrack-
ers.com or call (352) 240-
2885 to RSVP for the tour.
"You'll learn more about
the museum, and it's a fun
experience," Rose said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Paranormal tours are scheduled to take place Saturday at the
Lake City-Columbia County Historical Museum.


1 I 4264 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


93
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


\ ^ i Opinion ................ 4A
* ,% Local ................... 5A
"';L , Obituaries .............. 3A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
LOCAL
Donation benefits
local group.,


COMING
FRIDAY
'It's Your Weekend,'
plan ahead.


** -..,'^ ^ -^-.-


I


Making preparations


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jonathan Mick, a landscape technician with the Columbia County Landscape and Parks, rakes a mound at a baseball filed at
the Southside Sports Complex Wednesday afternoon. Crews will be prepping the facility's soccer, softball and baseball fields
for tournaments that will take place all day on Saturday and Sunday. More than 1,000 people are expected to attend.

Crews ready for weekend tournaments












LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 4-2-1
Evening: 2-6-5


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 2-7-1-3
Evening: 1-3-8-8


eomatch-
Tuesday:
11-15-18-19-32


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Who will be the 'Dancing' champ?


LOS ANGELES
One more week until a
new "Dancing" champ is
crowned. Who will it be?
The final slate is
set,. with singer Nicole
Scherzinger, Olympic figure skater
Evan Lysacek and sportscaster Erin
Andrews competing for the mirror-
ball trophy.
Lysacek and Scherzinger have
topped the judges' leaderboard
.throughout the spring season, and
finished with identical, one-point-
from-perfect scores after their semi-
final performances. Andrews, whose
professional partner is fan favorite
Maksim Chmerkovskiy, landed three
points behind her fellow finalists.
All said nerves were running
high during the semifinals, and they
expect it to be worse next week.
"I don't even want to think about
it," Andrews said, nervously picking
at the sequins on her costume.
Lysacek and his professional part-
ner, Anna Trebunskaya, are already
preparing for the final showdown.
Timing - on the calendar, not the
dance floor - remains their tough-
est hurdle.

Penn urges help
for Haiti hospitals
WASHINGTON - Actor Sean
Penn says the biggest challenge
facing post-quake Haiti is getting
hospitals staffed and supplied during
its current rainy season and ahead of
the upcoming hur-
ricane season.
Penn told the
Senate Foreign
Relations Committee Jf
on Wednesday that
the problem requires
"immediate atten- , Penn
tion" anid shouldn't
be held up by any bureaucratic dis-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nicole Scherzinger and her partner
Derek Hough perform on the celebrity
dance competition series, "Dancing
with the Stars," May 10, in Los
Angeles.
agreements.
Penn has been involved in relief
efforts in Haiti since the country
was devastated by an earthquake in
January.

Conan O'Brien headlines
Turner's TBS sales pitch
NEW YORK - Conan O'Brien
says he can't wait to get back to hav-
ing fun on television again.


The comic touted his upcoming
TBS talk show to an audience of
advertisers Wednesday. He said it
was his first time back in New York
since NBC brought ----
him in a year ago
this week to promote
his takeover of the , ..
'Tonight" show.
O'Brien lasted
a half year before
leaving rather than u
move his time slot O'Brien
to accommodate Jay Leno. He joked
that his vision for the new show is
to "pick up where 'Hee Haw' left
off," with corny jokes and old coun-
try music. His TBS show begins in
November.

Bieber-mania: Justin
tries to be normal kid
WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif.-
When you're a 16-year-old pop star
who jets around the world, hangs out
at the White House, gets chased by
hysterical girls on the regular - and
maintains the most perfectly coifed
hair in the universe - it's hard to be
a typical kid.
Still, Justin Bieber tries.
During a recent
interview, he talked
about setting up
time to spend with a
friend. Except unlike
L - other kids bumming
around town, Justin
Bieber 'will be flying out his
buddy to spend the
weekend in a.plush hotel, and will
hang with him only after he's done
with the myriad of responsibilities
that befall the hottest entertainer on
the planet.
"I try to spend as much time with
my friends and just be a regular kid
as I can on top of work," says Justin.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor-author James
McEachin is 80.
* Singer Joe Cocker is 66.
Singer-actress Cher is 64.
* Actor-comedian Dave
Thomas is 61.
* Actor Anthony Zerbe is 74.
* Actor David Proval is 68.
* Rock musician Warren
Cann is 58.
* New York Gov. David

Daily Scripture


Paterson is 56.
* Actor Dean Butler is 54.
* TV-radio personality Ron
Reagan is 52.
* Rock musician Jane
Wiedlin (The Go-Go's) is 52.
* Actor Bronson Pinch

ot is 51.
* Singer Susan Cowsill is 51.
* Actor John Billingsley is


"But the wisdom that comes
from heaven is first of all pure;
then peace-loving, considerate,
submissive, full of mercy and
good fruit, impartial and sin-
cere. Peacemakers who sow in
peace raise a harvest of righ-
teousness." - James 3:17-18."


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... .(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
* (Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter-
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30.
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or set-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ............,755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates r
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12Weeks .... .. . . .... $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks.... ...... ......$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mailrates
12 Weeks. . .............. . $41.40
24 Weeks ............... . $82.80
52 Weeks.......... .... $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Shuttle astronaut
untangles cable
CAPE CANAVERAL
- A spacewalking astro-
naut freed a snagged cable
on the inspection boom
for shuttle Atlantis on
Wednesday, accomplishing
the job in a matter of min-
utes and earning a "super-
hero" title.
With that behind him,
Stephen Bowen got started
on a slew of space station
battery replacements.
. Bowen tackled the
cable as soon as he floated
out on the second space-
walk of Atlantis' visit to
the International Space
Station.
The tangled cable had
prevented the shuttle
astronautsifrom thorough-
ly inspecting their ship for
any possible damage from
last week's launch. NASA
wanted it fixed as soon
as possible, and added
the chore to Wednesday's
spacewalk.
Astronauts working
inside moved the end of
the 100-foot inspection
boom within easy reach of
Bowen.
"Keep coming. Another
6 inches or so," Bowen
called out. "Perfect. Stop."
A few minutes later,
he announced: "I have it
unsnagged."
"Well done, superhero,"
shuttle pilot Dominic
'Tony" Antonelli radioed
from inside.

Attorney: Combine
oil spill lawsuits
MIAMI - An attorney
wants more than 100 law-
suits filed against BP and
other, companies involved
in the massive Gulf of
Mexico oil spill combined
quickly in a single federal
court to avoid what he
called legal chaos that
could delay potential pay-
ments of billions of dollars
in damages.


THE WEATHER


- PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 93 LO 66


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Astronaut Stephen Bowen adjusts a cable on the end of the
orbiter boom on Wednesday. The cable was inhibiting a cam-
era from maneuvering correctly.


Louisiana lawyer Daniel
Becnel on Wednesday
asked a federal judicial
panel in Washington state
to order the lawsuits in five
Gulf Coast states central-
ized in New Orleans or a
federal court elsewhere
in Louisiana, the state so
far hit hardest by the spill.
There are currently about
130 lawsuits, although that
list grows each day.
The panel, formally
known as the U.S. Judicial
Panel on Multidistrict
Litigation, earlier this
month said it would not
decide on consolidation
of oil spill cases until July,
but Becnel wants them to
reconsider that decision.

Sansom perjury
.charge dropped
TALLAHASSEE - A
prosecutor Wednesday
said he's dropping a per-
jury charge against former
Florida House Speaker
Ray Sansom, but the
criminal case against the
ex-lawmaker and two co-
defendants will continue
on other counts.
State Attorney Willie
Meggs announced his
decision at a case man-
, agement conference with
Circuit Judge Terry Lewis.


No trial date was set,
but Lewis agreed to hear
defense motions June 16
and June 18 on the remain-
ing charges of grand theft,
conspiracy and official mis-
conduct.
One of the pending
motions seeks dismissal of
all counts due to prosecu-
torial misconduct includ-
ing allegations Meggs
had made unethical public
comments and illegally
released grand jury testi-
" mony.

28 starving
horses removed
ASTATULA - Twenty-
eight emaciated horses
that were removed from a
central Florida home are
getting medical care and
food from animal services.
County officials went to
the home in January after
being a complaint about
the starving horses and
the animals were placed on
a monitoring program by
animal services.
The horses were seen
chewing bark and fencing.
A judge will determine
whether the owner can get
the horses back. They may
be auctioned off by animal
services.
M Associated Press


Pensacola
87/71


PARTLY'
CLOUDY ;'


HI 90LO :.


* Valosta
. . ,, .. .9 2 /6 7

Tallahassee * Lake City
92/67 93/66
� , " Gainesville *
Panama City 92/66
90/70 Ocala
92/67
0
9
Tampa *,
90/74,


City Friday
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 85/71/pc


Daytona Beach
88/69


Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


* - Key West
riando Cape Canaveral Lake City
1/69 86/70 Lake mity
Miami


West Palm Beach
88/74 0


Naples
Ocala
Orlando


S-* Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 87/76 0 Pensacola
93/71 * Naples * Tallahassee
89/72 Miami Tampa
88/75 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
85/78


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


89
66
87
63
96 in 1944
50 in 1979


0.00"
0.79"
15.44"
1.59"
15.61"


7a lp 7p la 6a
Thursday Friday





- temp

Forecasters .a ..re "Feels like temperature


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:34 a.m.
8:20 p.m.
6:33 a.m.
8:21 p.m.


1:04 p.m.
1:30 a.m.
2:08 p.m.
2:06 a.m.


May May June June
20 27 4 12
First Full Last New



r.11. , . i


1982, Milford, Ohio
received 2.5 inches
of rain in 30 min-
utes.


10
VERYWAl.
10ir9e to buLn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


.rzp, t.&.;.Cr'


87/71/pc
88/77/pc
94/72/pc
90/66/pc
87/66/pc
86/75/t
90/65/pc
88/76/pc
92/71/pc
91/67/pc
90/70/pc,
88/70/t
88/71/pc
92/67/t
92/74/pc
92/65/pc
86/75/pc


PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 90 LO '4


Saturday
82/70/pc
86/71/pc
88/77/pc
92/71/pc
89/66/pc
86/67/pc
86/77/t
90/65/pc
87/76/t
91/72/s
90/67/pc
89/70/pc
84/70/pc
87/71/pc
'90/66/pc
90/72/pc
89/65/pc
87/75/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


j . Forecasts, data and graph-
"" ics � 2010 Weather Central
' LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpublisher.com






r -


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754'-0424


, Mi.wi.-akec il t r r 0r i
" �I L7,keCit R,;pote


7 6/09
Da tona Beach












LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010


Part of oil slick reaches powerful current


By GREG BLUESTEIN
Associated Press


U.S. Coast Guard Response Policy Director Rear Adm.
Paul Zukunft, speaks to panel of lawmakers, Wednesday on
Capitol Hill in Washington.


ROBERT, La. - Federal
scientists said Wednesday
that a small portion of the
oil slick from the blown-out
well in the Gulf of Mexico
has reached a powerful cur-
rent that could take it to
Florida.
National Oceanic and


Atmospheric Administration
scientists said they have
detected light to very light
sheens in the loop current,
which circulates into the
Gulf and takes water south
to the Florida Keys and the
Gulf Stream.
The agency says that any
oil would be "highly weath-
ered" and could evaporate
before reaching Florida.


And it might never reach
the state at all. But scien-
tists said diluted oil could
appear in isolated locations
if persistent winds push the
current toward Florida.
The Coast Guard
announced Wednesday that
tar balls washing ashore
in the Florida Keys were
not from the Gulf spill, but
that did little to soothe fears


the oil could spread dam-
age along the coast from
'Louisiana to Florida.
The U.S. and Cuba were
holding talks on how to
respond to the spill, U.S.
State Department spokes-
man Gordon Duguid said,
underscoring worries about
the oil reaching the loop
current and being carried
.to the Florida Keys.


OBITUARIES


George Wesley Barber, Jr.

Mr. George Wesley Barber, Jr.,
75 of Lake Butler died Monday
morning, May 17, 2010, at the
Veterans Admin-
istration Medi- .
cal Center in ;
Gainesville after *
-an extended ill-
ness.. Mr. Barber was born in
Jacksonville where he lived until
he graduated high school and en-
listed in the U.S. Marine Corps.
He was a veteran of the Korean
Conflict and the Viet Nam War
before retiring as a Master Ser-
geant E8 after 23 years of ser-
vice. He moved to Lake Butler in
January of 1979 and was a clas-
sifications officer with the Flor-
ida Department of Corrections
until his retirement in 1995. Mr.
Barber was the secretary of Ma-
sonic Lodge #52.of Lake Butler
and was District Deputy Grand
Master of District 10 in 2007.
He was a member of the Mo-
rocco Temple Legions of Honor
of Jacksonville and was. Adjutant
Finance Officer. He was past
commander of the American Le-
gion of Lake BUtler. He was trea-
surer of the Order of Eastern Star
Chapter #40 of Lake Butler. He
was past FSA Legions of Honor
Commander for 2010-2011. Mr.
Barber was an active member
of the First Baptist Church of
Lake Butler where he taught
Senior Adult Sunday School
since 1992. Mr Barber was the
son of the late George Wesley,
Sr. and Ellen Norman Barber.
Mr. Barber is survived by: His
wife of 49 years: Linda Tomlin-
son Barber of Lake Butler. One
daughter: Shari Barber (hus-
band Tim) Pittman of Deltona.
Two sons: David (wife Terri)
Barber of Lake City; Robbie
(wife-Rhonda) Barber of Lake
Butler. One brother: Jerry (wife
Dora) Barber of -Jacksonville.
Ten Grandchildren: Joshua Pit-
tman, Jessica Pittman (husband
Blake) Nicholas, Aaron Barber,
Blayne Barber, Andrew Barber,
Shayne Barber, Jayce Barber,
Shelbie Barber, Shaylin Barber
and Bobbie Grace Barber. Two
Great Grandchildren: Nolan


Pittman and Braelyn Nicholas.
Memorial services will be held
Saturday, May 22, 2010 at 4:00
P.M. at the First Baptist Church
of Lake Butler with Rev. Jason
Johns officiating. ARCHER
FUNERAL HOME OF LAKE
BUTLER is in charge of ar-
rangements. The family will
receive friends at the First Bap-
tist Church on Saturday from
2 P.M. to 4 P.M., just prior to
the start of the service. Family
request in lieu of flowers dona-
tions be made to: The Ameri-
can Cancer Society; North
Central Area; 2119 S.W. 16th
Street; Gainesville, FL 32608

Pauline Bullard Christie

Mrs. Pauline Bullard Christie,
age.81, of Lake City, Florida died
Tuesday, May 18, in the Select
Speciality Hospital, Gainesville,
Fla. following a long illness.
She had resided in Lake City,
Fla. all of her life . She was a
homemaker and enjoyed fishing.
and playing bingo. She attending
the Lantern Park Baptist Church.
She was preceded in death by her
parents, Richard Nevada Bullard
and Mary Elizabeth Waldron
Bullard, her husband Howard
Laverne Christie, Sr. and her
son, Howard Laverne "Buddy"
Christie, Jr. She is survived by
her three daughters, Gail (Randy)
Dyal of Ocklawaha, Fla., Audrey
(Mark) Giebeig of Lake City,
Fla. and Ethel (Ken) Brookins of
Wellborn, Fla.: Two sons, Bobby
(Martha) Christie and Heyward
(Deborah) Christie both of Lake
City, Fla.: One brother, Talmage
(Gladys) Bullard of Lake City,
Fla.: -Sister-in-law, Alva Prich-
ard of Jacksonville, Fla.: Ten
Grandchildren and eleven great-
grandchildren - also survive.
Funeral services will be conduct-
ed at 11 A.M. Saturday, May 22,
in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral
Home with Rev. John Harrison
officiating and assisted by Rev.
Lester Curry. Interment will be
in Memorial Cemetery, Lake
City, Fla. Visitation will be 6 to 8
P.M. Friday, May 21, a GUER-
RY FUNERAL HOME, 2659


S.W. Main Blvd. Lake City, Fla.

Letisha Graham

To every thing there is a season,
a time to be born and a time to
die. After having lived a long and
useful life, the Lord chose this
season to take
home hisoser-
vant Mrs. Le-
tisha Graham.
Mrs. Graham
86, was born
in Lake City,
Florida to the.
late Thomas "
and Katie Perry. She was edu-
cated in the schools of Colum-
bia County. At a very early age
she joined Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church and was a life
long member, serving in vari-
ous capacities until her health
failed. She will be remembered
as a loving mother, grandmother,
great-grandmother and will be
missed by all who knew her.
Cherishing memories: her chil-
dren, Mary (Ted) Kannady, Be-
nard (Louise) Graham, Ozell
(Emma) Graham, Mae Zeighler,
Loretta (Tommy) Reed, Larry
(Tina) Graham, Rachel Munoz;
grandchildren, great-grand-
children, great-great grand-
children, sister, Vashti McMa-
hon; a host of nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends.
The celebration of life for Mrs.
Graham will be held 11:00
A.M. Saturday, May 22, 2010
at Olivet Missionary Baptist
Church. 901 NE Davis Street.
Rev. Ronald Walters, Pastor.
The family will receive friends
Friday, May 21, 2010 at the
church from 5:00 - 7:00 P.M.
Arrangements entrusted
to COMBS FUNERAL
HOME. 292 NE Washing-
ton Street. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"


James Bernard Monroe

James Bernard Monroe, resident
of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. passed
away Thursday, May 13, 2010.
He was a former resident of Lake
City, and was the owner and op-
erator of Rick's Lawn Service.
Survivors include his mother,
Viola Monroe Comerford, Ft.
Lauderdale, Fl; Father, James
Monroe, Lake City, Fla. Sis-
ter Jada Deidre Ellen Monroe,
Accokeek, Maryland; Brother,
Belseri Comerford, Ft Lauder-
dale, Fl.; Aunts, Betty Williams,
Lake City, FL., Ann Gervin, Mi-
ami, Fl., Patricia A. Brown, Ft.
Lauderdale, Fl., Ethel Adeuisei-
Poku, of New York; Uncles,
Theadore (Elouise) Aaron, Lake
City, Alonzo Aaron, Kentucky,
John (Gayle) Aaron, Ft. Lauder-
dale, Fl.: Aunt, Lola (Tut) Mon-
roe, Lake City, Fl. Great Aunt,
Ola Duncan, Lake City, a host
of cousins and devoted friends.
Funeral services for James Ber-
nard Monroe, will be 11:30
a.m. Saturday at McWhites
Funeral Home. 3501 West Bro-
ward Blvd. Ft. Lauderdale, Fl.
Announcement courtesy of:
COOPER FUNERAL HOME,
251 N.E. Washington Street; Lake
City,Fla. WillisO. Cooper, L.F.D.

Bernice Poole Norris

Bernice P. Norris, 60, of
Trenton, FL, passed away
Wednesday, May 12, 2010.
Survivors in-
clude her lov-
ing husband,
Paul Norris,
Trenton, FL; A
three sons Eric
Jones (Anna), i.
Ocoee, FL,
David Ellison .


(Chovonna) and RonDell -El-
lison both of Trenton, FL; one
daughter Talea Norris, Trenton,
FL; two stepsons Curtis Norris
(Clara), Tampa, FL and Leonard
Norris, Gainesville, FL; three
brothers Wayne Wilson (Betty),,
Lake City, FL, Ricky Poole
(Sharon) and Curtis Poole both
of Pensacola, FL; seven sisters
Barbara Bryant (Jimmy), Na-
hunta, GA, Mary Louis Rhyme
(Leonard), Folkston, GA, Vera
Jennings (Raymond), Lake City,
FL, Janet Chambers (Tom),
Pearlie Mae Williams. both of
Chiefland, FL, Mary Poole and
Lillie Mae Poole both of Pen-
sacola, FL; sister-in-law Joyce
Fredrick, Groveland, FL, twen-
ty-one grandchildren and a host
of nieces, nephews, cousins and
sorrowing relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Mrs. Poole
will be held at Trenton High
School, 1013 N Main Street,
Trenton at 11:00 a.m., Satur-
day, May 22, 2010, Evangelist
Robert Scott, eulogist. Burial'
will follow at Trenton' Com-
munity Cemetery, Trenton, FL
under the care of CHESTNUT
FUNERAL HOME, 18 NW 8th
Ave, Gainesville, FL. Visita-
tion will be Friday 2:00-7:OOPM
Chestnut Chapel and on Satur-
day at the school one hour be-
fore the -service. There will be
no viewing after the eulogy. The
cortege will form at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Norris'217 SE
3rd St, Trenton, FL at 10:15 a.m.
"A Chestnut Service"


Betty Taylor

Ms. Betty Lou Taylor, a resident
of Jacksonville, Florida, passed
away on May 12, 2010. Betty
was born February 17, 1946 to.


*2


Lawrence
and Pinkie
Taylor. Her
early educa-
tion began in
Palm Beach,
Florida. She
continued her
education at
.Edward Waters .College, gradu-
ating with a Bachelor Degree
in Criminal Justice. Ms. Taylor
was a business owner for over
twenty years in Jacksonville. She
is preceded, in death by her par-
ents and sister, Edna Ann Taylor.
Left to cherish memories: chil-
dren, Beverly (Charles) Ser-
vance, James Harmon, . Ill,
Reginald (Tina) Harmon, Nissey
Rose (Eugene) Edwards, Hillard'
Graham, Avery Harmon; sis-
ters, Mary (Julius) Taylor, Betty
Jean Howard; brothers, Law-
rence Taylor, Samuel (Cynthia)
Taylor, Alonzo (Annie) Taylor;
grandchildren, great-grandchil-
dren, 'a host of nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Ms. Taylor
will be 11:00 Saturday, May
22, 2010. at Philippian Commu-
nity Church, Bishop Virgil C.
Jones, Pastor. 7578 NewjKings
Road. Jacksonville, Florida.
Visitation with the family will
be Friday, May 21, 2010 from
6-7 P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals".


Obituaries are' paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


* 7















OPINION


Thursday, May 20, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OU
OPIN


R
ION


Send money

now, or

maybe not

Let the giver beware.
Billions of dol-
lars each year are
lost to telephone
scams, the Federal
Trade Commission reports
- and Columbia County is not
immune to the problem.
Recently the concern has
been exasperated by scam
artists working overtime,
according to Columbia County
Sheriff's Office. More than
a few local residents have
received calls asking for dona-
tions to local law enforcement
agencies - calls that did not
originate in Columbia County.
For the record, CCSO and
police and fire departments do
not contact the public directly,
for monetary donations. Those
agencies are covered by public
funding and will not solicit tele-
phone "donations."
As the economy sours and
the needs of nonprofit agencies
increase, it can be tempting to
share your resources with oth-
ers. The residents of Columbia
County have always been gen-
erous when it comes to assist-
ing those in need.
But the FTC warns that this
spirit of giving could -do per-
sonal harm. If the organization
on the other end of the phone
is not legitimate, entire life sav-
ings, the commission reports,
can be lost to telephone scams.
Before you give, the FTC
suggests you know with whom
you are doing business. Ask
that more information be sent
to you through the mail and
never agree to demands that
the gift be made immediately
over the telephone.
Legitimate organizations
won't have a problem fulfilling
such simple requests - and
when they do so, you won't
have a problem fulfilling their
requests.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, May 20,
the 140th. day of 2010. There
are 225 days left in the year.
* In 1961, a white mob
attacked a busload of Freedom
Riders in Montgomery, Ala.,
prompting the federal
government to send in U.S.
marshals to restore order.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BYE-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


A reading list for my first grandchild


They were old, dear
friends, the kind that
made me light up,
made me smile just
to see their faces. Or
rather, their covers.
I loved the books my children
loved. Whether I read to them
or they read to me, some of our
best times together were spent
in the fine company of books.
I grew up in a home where
stories abounded, but books
were rare, aside from the Bible.
In the South, everybody owned
a Bible. It was not called "the
Bible Belt" for nothing.
My mother read a newspaper
cover to cover every day. My
stepfather pretended to read
it, though he never learned to
read. A lack of books didn't
mean we didn't value reading.
It was just, as a rule, we valued
eating more.
The exception to that rule
was my father's mother, who
didn't have a dime to waste, but
lived on a farm, raised her own
food and never considered read-
ing a waste of money or time.
To earn "extra," she churned
butter, sold it in town and used
it to buy fabric for making doll
clothes, yarn for crocheting
snowflakes, watercolors for
painting sunsets, pens for writ-
ing poetry and all manner of
reading materials.
Grandmothers don't get bet-
ter than that. I badgered my
mother mercilessly to let me
visit my grandmother on her
farm.
And as any child will tell
you, badgering may not make



LETTERS TO


Putting a child's
needs first, daily
To the Editor:
National Foster Care Month,
in May, is an opportunity for me
to thank the countless unrec-
ognized heroes who do so very
much for this area's abused and
neglected children.
As circuit director of the
Guardian ad Litem Program
(whose sole mission is to advo-
cate for the best interests of
abused and neglected children
whose cases are involved with
the courts), I see people putting
forth extraordinary efforts to
benefit children on a daily basis.
However, when a child is
removed from his parents and
home and all that he knows and
cares about, few needs are more
important than matching the
child with the right temporary
caregivers.
Time and again, I've wit-
nessed situations in which the
odds for success were quite


Sharron Randall
you popular, but it always
pays off. I spent the best
hours of my childhood with
my grandmother learning to
sew and crochet and paint
and such.,I helped her churn
several cows' worth of butter.
And I learned to read before I
started school.
Until my teen years, when
I developed a taste for more
worldly pursuits, my favorite
place on Earth was with my .
' grandmother.- and a book.
In college, I seldom had time
to read for pleasure. Then I
moved to California, to get mar-
ried and start a family.
Just before Christmas, when I
was eight months' pregnant and
god-awful homesick, my grand-
mother sent me three gifts: A
blanket she had made for my
baby; a dozen crocheted snow-
flakes for our Christmas tree;
and the copy of "Uncle Remus"
she had read as a child, and had
so often read to me.
It reminded me of my love
for reading and what it had
meant to me in growing up.
Like most parents, I wanted
my child to have every oppor-
tunity - all the ones I'd had,



THE EDITOR

poor. However, in almost every
instance, placement with a
capable, caring, consistent, pro-
tective and patient adult made
all the difference.
Effective foster parents pro-
vide our most vulnerable chil-
dren with the basic necessities
of life. They provide time and
comfort and gentle guidance
under awful circumstances.
They improve lives and enhance
communities, and for doing so
they deserve much recognition.
On behalf of 458 local
children represented by the
Guardian ad Litem Program and
our 93 volunteers, I thank you.
Linda Dedge, circuit director
Guardian ad Litem program
third circuit

A grammatical
fundraiser
To the Editor:
An advertisement for Lake
City Community College's name


and especially the ones I had
missed. I wanted to surround
him with books. But I had no
idea where to start.
So I asked my friend Ginny,
a librarian, who gave me a long
list of her favorite children's
books and authors, the ones she
read to her own children.
I carried that list in my purse
for five years, two more babies
and countless trips to the
library until I knew it by heart.
We read our way through
"Goodnight, Moon," "The
Runaway Bunny," "The Very
Hungry Caterpillar," "Winnie
the Pooh," "Where the Wild
Things Are" and pretty much
everything by Dr. Seuss, Shel
Silverstein, Rosemary Wells,
Tomie de Paola, Roald Dahl and
Russell and Lillian Hoban.
And, of course, now and then,
we read a little "Uncle Remus."
We loved those books, my
kids and I, but over the years,
we've forgotten so many of
them.
I wish I'd saved the list. I'd
like to reconstruct it now that
I'm expecting my first grand-
child. Maybe you will help me?
I want to be the kind of
grandma who surrounds a child
with books and love, anything
it takes to make him badger his
parents to let him come see me.
If you have any tips, I'm all
ears. But speak up, will you? I
don't hear as well as I used to.
* Sharon Randall can be
contacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson NV 89077, or at www.
sharonrandall.com.


change reads in part, "Got
Questions about College? We've
got Answers!"
Well, you may "got answers,"
but you "ain't got" correct
grammar. Why would an
educational institution submit
an advertisement using
incorrect grammar?
I suspect it was an attempt
to play off the "Got Milk?" ad
campaign. That ad was some
advertising executive's idea of
a cute catch phrase to sell milk.
Maybe the college could have
a fundraiser by selling "Got
Grammar?" T-shirts with a mark
through the word "got," and the
word "have" inserted above it.
The new name for the college
would be advertised, proper
grammar would be promoted,
and money could be raised for
the school. That would be a way
of correcting the error.
How about it Florida Gateway
College? Got correction?
Sylvia Williams Lynch
Lake City


Martin Schram
rnrtin.schrom@gmail.com


Great orator,

but maybe

not great

communicator


S hat with the
M Tea Party all
the rage these
days and angry
voters seem-
ing like the new norm, even
Washington is anti-Washington.
Incumbents are running
scared (except for-those
too scared to run). And all
Washington Insiders have
urgent new insights (gleaned
from a fact-finding drop-by out-,
side the Beltway) about what is
wrong with where they work..
America had high hopes on
Jin. 20, 2009, as we watched
the Inauguration of President
Barack Obama. He was, after
all, an impressive intellect and
a gifted orator, and we hoped
that somehow he would be able
to deliver us from our miseries
of two wars and a shattering
global economy.
. Now, 16 months after that
winter day, we are in the spring
of our discontent It is a para-
doxical season. America's vot-
ers say they are fed up with
those bailouts of ingrate bank-
ers. (Voters don't seem grate-
ful that our economic crises
seem to have eased, apparently
thanks to government actions
started by President George'W.
Bush and continued/modified
by President Obama. As a mes-
sage politics mantra, "too-big-to-
fail" failed.)
Yet while the Obama admin-
istration and many experts tell
us Americans will be far bet-
ter off because of the newly
enacted reforms, critics have
been equally strong in spread-
ing a far different message
that frightened millions. Critics
convinced them that Obama's
reforms can cause them to
lose their present doctors and
insurance plans. And cost them
more.
We have seen presidents who
seemed very intelligent and
some who seemed not so very
(which may explain why we
never read any Wilsonisms but
all have our favorite Bushisms).
We have also seen presidents
who were intelligent but not
smart; that is, not skillful at
manipulating their levers of
power (which may explain
Jimmy Carter's Camp David/
Mideast Peace highs and presi-
dential lows.)
In Obama we may be wit-
nessing the difference between
a Gifted Orator and a Great
Communicator. Ronald Reagan,
famously known as the Great
Communicator, didn't know
or want to know all details of
his policies - but he was a
master at communicating their
thrust and themes to people.
So did Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Both excelled at grasping the
concerns and fears of ordinary
people - and speaking in
short, simple, concise phrases
that eased their fears and won
their support.
Obama, a most intelligent
president and gifted orator, has
become famous for mastering
his policies and giving journal-
ists and voters long and detailed
answers that cover all relevan-
cies of complex policies.
As a president, Obama has
been "The Man Who Knew
Too Much" - and unlike
Alfred Hitchcock's stars, he has
been intent on telling us all he
knows.
Who knew that oratory and
intellect could be handicaps to
presidential salesmanship and
leadership?

* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A














_ - ,Boys and Girls Club receives $4,000 donation


COURTESY PHOTO
JCPenney of Lake City made a donation of more than $4,000
to the local Boys and Girls Club. Pictured are (from left) Boys
and Girls Club Director Bill Caley, board members Edith
Marcy, Wanda Jones, Evilana Hamilton and JCPenney store
manager Candy Douglas.


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter. corn
The local Boys ana Girls
Club will have extra fund-
ing this year, just in time for
the busy summer season,
thanks to a fundraiser by a
Lake City business.
OnWednesday,JCPenney
of Lake City donated
$4,065.69 to the local Boys
and Girls Club as part of
its "JCPenney After School"
program, in which stores
nationwide partner with a
local nonprofit organiza-
tion. The funds raised come
from the store's "Round-Up"


event, which takes place
four times annually - in
April, August, October and
December. During these 8-
10 day periods, JCPenney
cashiers ask customers if
they would like to round
up their purchase to the
nearest dollar, and the addi-
tional money will go toward
the store's Boys and Girls
Club donation.
For example, if some-
one's total price is $21.39
and a customer chooses to
round up to the nearest dol-
lar, approximately, 61 cents
would go toward the Boys
and Girls Club.


During 2009, the local
store raised $4,065.69 for
the organization.
"One of JCPenney's mis-
sion statements is to be a
partner with the communi-
ty that we service, and this
is one of the ways to show
JCPenney's mission," said
Candy Douglas, JCPenney
store manager.
Bill Caley, director of the
Lake City Boys and Girls
Club, said the funds will be
used for the organization's
general operating budget.
"It's a tremendous asset
to our organization, and
helps with our programs


so we can continue to take
care of the youth of our
community," Caley said.
The local Boys and Girls
Club serves approximately
125 members on a daily
basis, and more during the
summer months.
JCPenney is looking for
an even better donation for
2010 - funds raised in April
were more than double what
they were in 2009.
"It's an easy program, it's
fun and I think people are
more likely to donate when,
they know it will be going'
somewhere local," Douglas
said.


CREWS
Continued From Page 1A
and his crew are terrific at
what they do."
Law enforcement and
EMS personnel will be
present at the event, and
Pittman said his crews'will
man the fields for mainte-
nance throughout the event
due to play or rain.
Tents with mister
systems will be provided
for guests to escape the
heat and water can be
purchased at available
concessions, Pittman
said.
Additional trash
containers, dumpsters,
restroom facilities and
designated parking areas
will also be available. No
parking will be allowed
on the roadsides for safety
reasons, Pittman said.
Even though the crews
working to prepare for
the tournaments are
"swamped," Pittman said,
all the work will be finished
on time "no problem."
"We're in good shape
right how," Pittman said.


CRASH
Continued From Page 1A
several trees, but continued
forward and then struck
the embankment of a cul-
vert, where it came to an
abrupt stop.
As the truck struck the
embankment and suddenly
stopped, the contents in
the trailer were thrown
forward through the front
of the trailer and into
the rear of the cab,
spilling around the crash
scene. Simultaneously,
the truck cab became
engulfed in flames and was
destroyed.
The driver was not able to
get out the vehicle and was
subsequently consumed by
the fire. .
Authorities have not been
able to determine whether
the driver's fatal injuries
were the result of the ensu--
ing collision or from the
fire.
The roadway was closed
five to six hours as a
result of the fiery crash
and reopened just before
9 a.m:
Florida Highway Patrol
Troop B Capt. Eileen
Powell said no permanent
damage was caused to the
roadway, as a result of the
fire. However, she noted
that officials have not been
able to determine what was
on the trailer, but it is being
described as "non-hazard-
ous".
"The body has been
sent to the Fourth District
Medical Examiner's Office
in Jacksonville, which is
where they are routinely
sent from this area in the
case of a fatality," Powell
said. "It could take approx-
imately 4-6 weeks to get
the person's identity or
it could be sooner than
that."
In addition to learn-
ing the driver's identity,
authorities also hope the
autopsy will shed some
light on what caused the
wreck.
"When the autopsy is
completed, which should
take a couple of days, due to
the extent of the nature of
the injuries involved, hope-
fully they are able to come
up with an exact determina-
tion of the cause of death,"
Powell said.


FCAT retake results mixed locally,

comparable to state average


By TROY ROBERTS
tf'oberts@lakecityreporter. corn
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test retake
results were released late
Wednesday, and Columbia
County students' scores
were comparable to their
state counterparts.
The test results released
on Wednesday were for
reading and math retakes,
taken by students in grades
10-12 and adult education
students.
In Columbia County,
approximately 262 students-
took the reading retake, and


110 took the math retake
portion of the FCAT.
On the reading portion
of the retake, 10 percent of
Columbia County students
in grade 10 passed the exam;
25 percent of students in
grade 11 passed; and 18
percent in grade 12 passed.
Seven percent of the local
adult education students
passed the retake exam.
These results are compa-
rable to the state average
- 13 percent of students
in grade 10 passed at the
state level, and 23 percent
and 16 percent in grades 11
and 12 passed at the state


level. In the adult education
category, 19 percent passed
at the state level.
In the math retake cat-
egory, 49 percent of stu-
dents in grade 11 passed
the retake, as well as 26
percent in grade 12. In the
adult education field, 45
percent of students who
took the retake passed.
At the state level, 25 per-
cent of students passed in
grade 10, 37 percent passed
in grade 11, and 28 percent
passed in grade 12. Also,
39 percent of students in
the adult education field
passed.


Man arrested in Tuesday robbery


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man faces
multiple charges after he was
arrested Tuesday morning
for allegedly attempting to
rob two women at gunpoint
Calvin E. Jackson, 25, of
800 SW Symphony Loop,
was charged with armed
robbery, aggravated battery,
aggravated assault, battery


on a law enforcement'offi-
cer, resisting arrest without
violence, resisting arrest
with violence and petit theft.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
reports, officers were called
to the B&B convenience
'store at U.S. Highway 441
and County Road 252 in
reference to a. robbery.
Deputy J. Joyner inter-
viewed the women and


one of them told him they
were preparing their news-
papers for the day when
an unidentified black man
walked up to her and placed
a gun against her back and
demanded that she give
him money.
Deputies later identified
Jackson as a suspect near
Sundial Apartments, and
after a brief chase, he was
arrested.


POLICE REPORTS


The following information
was provided by local law '
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are presumed
innocent until proven guilty.

Tuesday, May 18
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Jimmy Beeman, 40,
1412 NW Moore Road,
warrant:. Order revoking
bond on original charges of
petit theft and possession
of a controlled substance,
felony fleeing a police offi-
'cer and non-support.
* Phyllis Bradley, 53,
384 SW Tustenuggee Ave.,


I in Loving Memory










The Lond sayv that you were tired and
wanted to rest. He swnummoned the angels
to come as he coded out your namtne. Left
behind your children wept..praerfuilly
watch as you slept.
We have loving memories oftheyears oJ
jov and love, a life well spent caring and
prayingfor those you loved
And now to God a Mother's scent.
On angel wings u took heavenlyfligih
Its been (10 Years) Mother since you've
been gone. Yet we Ikowyou are resting
in ourw- master's armn.
We love you.


warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charge
of burglary of a convey-
ance, third-degree grand
theft and credit card fraud
(unauthorized use).
* Steven Ray Jordan, 37,
219 Avocado St., Lexington,
Ky., warrant: Driving while
license suispended/revoked
(sixth offense).
* Jontavius Laquan-
Shaeron Monroe, 21, 152
Neil St., Plant City, war-
rant: Violation of probation
on original charges of fel-
ony fleeing a law enforce-
ment officer and driving
while license suspended/
revoked.
From staff reports.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


- . .. . . . ...- .......- - - -











LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010


ON HEALTH







Dr. Peter Gott
MD


Child's
0
growing

pains


real?

DEAR DR. GOTT:
My 5-year-old grandson
sometimes awakens in
the night with pain in his
legs, ankles or wrists. My
daughter says he has grow-
ing pains. Is this true?
DEAR READER:
Yes, it is, sort of. Up
to 40 percent of children
experience "growing pains"
during two periods - from
the ages of 3 to 5 and 8 to
12. There is no evidence
to substantiate that bone
growth causes pain. What
is experienced is likely
caused by activities such as
running, jumping, climbing
on a jungle gym, and being
extremely active during
the day. Most of the pain
is concentrated in muscles
behind the knees, in the
calves and on the front por-
tion of the thighs. It is often
severe enough to awaken
a child in the middle of
the night, leaving a parent
unsure of what to do.
When any unusual symp-
tom such as fever, fatigue,
rash, loss of appetite or
weakness occurs, a pedia-
trician should be involved.
There may be something
going on that truly needs
to be addressed. In the
case of a serious medi-
cal condition, a child will
prefer not to be touched,
' because movement com-
monly increases pain;
however, if the child has
growing pains, massage,
stretching, the use of a
heating pad and general
comforting techniques will
be welcomed.
DEAR DR. GOTrT:
I had a bout with plantar
fasciitis several years ago.
The treatment at that time
was cortisone shots in my
feet to help ease the pain
until it went away. I have
developed another case,
but this time my doctor
will not do the shots. He
has given me exercises to
do and pain medication to
ease the pain. However, it
is not working, and I do not
understand why he cannot
give me the shots which
were like a, miracle last
time.
I am on my feet on con-
crete most of the day. Do
you know of any other rem-
edies to help with this?
DEAR READER:
Plantar fasciitis is a pain-
ful foot condition marked
by inflammation of the
band of tissue running
from the heel along the
arch of the foot. It is seen
in middle-aged men and
women and is common
in athletes and runners.
Symptoms are typically
worse early in the morning,
when first awakening, but
once a person is walking
and the foot is stretched
and the ligaments loose,
the pain generally sub-
sides. The pain can be
worse with prolonged peri-
ods of walking or standing.
Recommendations for
care include ice packs,
stretching exercises, over-
the-counter anti-inflam-


matory medications, shoe
inserts, properly fitting
shoes and rest. A new treat-
ment known as extracorpo-
real shockwave therapy is
being investigated.

* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet," available at
most chain and independent
bookstores, and the recently
published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Cookbook."


Researchers test vaginal gels vs. HIV


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON - Try after
try to make vaginal creams that
could repel the AIDS virus have
failed. Now researchers are
testing if a drug used to treat
HIV infection finally might give
women a tool to prevent it - by
infusing the medicine into vaginal
gels and contraceptive-style rings.
Even quick-dissolving anti-HIV
films are being created, the same
style now used for breath-freshen-
ers or allergy medicines but made
for fingertip application in the
vagina.
Called microbicides, this kind
of woman-controlled protection
is considered key to battling the
HIV epidemic - especially in
developing countries where the
virus is at its worst and women
too often can't get their partners
to use a condom.
For two decades, scientists
tried less powerful medications
in disappointing microbicide
attempts. Results from the first
study to see if this new strategy
works - South African women


,r^P .1,,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lin Wang, a research assistant at the MaGee Women's Research Institute
in Pittsburgh, tests the durability of a medicated vaginal film formulated with
drugs to target against HIV infection In this photo taken May 14.


tested a gel made of the AIDS
drug tenofovir - aren't due until
July.-
But researchers gathering
for the biennial International
Microbicides Conference in
Pittsburgh next weekend express
cautious optimism.
"Frankly, blocking transmis-
sion of the virus appears to be


a lot harder than anyone under-
stood it would be at the begin-
ning," says meeting co-chair Dr.
Sharon Hillier of the University of
Pittsburgh and a principal inves-
tigator of the Microbicide Trials
Network.
"The reason we're not
depressed in the microbicide
world? We actually have learned


a lot and moved on to think about
potent drugs .and really cool deliv-
ery methods."
Antiretroviral drugs have
revolutionized AIDS care, help-
ing people live far longer with the
virus. They've also successfully
lowered the risk that an infected
pregnant woman passes HIV to
her child. So it was logical for sci-
entists to begin testing whether
swallowing an antiretroviral drug
-every day could protect'the still
healthy, both men and women,
from getting infected. More than
half a dozen studies of this so-
called pre-exposure prophylaxis
are under way among high-risk
populations around the world,
largely using the drug tenofovir
because it tends to cause fewer
side effects than many other
AIDS drugs.
Even if that eventually proves
protective, taking daily pills has
drawbacks - systemic side
effects, the risk of drug resis-
tance, what happens if people
miss a dose or share tablets
with an already infected relative
- that make the approach con-
troversial.


Efforts to fight

TB have flopped


By MARIA CHENG
AP Medical Writer
GENEVA - Global
efforts.to control tuber-
culosis have failed and
radical new approaches
are needed, experts said
Wednesday.
With more than 9 mil-
lion people infected last
year, including 2 million
deaths, officials sa# there
is more tuberculosis now
than at any other time
in history. In a special
tuberculosis edition of
the British medical jour-
nal Lancet published on
Wednesday, experts said
past failures prove new
strategies are required.
For years, the World
Health Organization and
partners have fought TB
largely with a program
where health workers
watch patients take their
drugs - even though the
agency acknowledged in
a 2008 report that this
treatment program didn't
significantly curb TB
spread. Experts said TB
.isn't only a medical prob-,
lem, but is intertwined
with poverty, as it spreads


widely among people liv-
ing in overcrowded, dirty
. places. They said TB pro-
grams need to go beyond
health and include other
sectors like housing, edu-
cation and transportation.
Some officials ques-
tioned whether continued
U.N. programs could
even combat TB. "The
.main priority for TB con-
trol is improved living
conditions and economic
growth, which is outside
the control of the U.N.,"
said Philip Stevens, a
health policy expert
at International Policy
'Network, a London-based
think tank. 'TB cannot.be
tackled in isolation."
Stevens said the global
health community also
needs to be more vigilant
about the drugs they
buy for TB programs.
According to a 2007
report from the Global
'Fund to fight AIDS,
Tuberculosis and Malaria,
half of the drugs the fund
bought for poor countries
didn't comply with their
own drug quality
standards.


Research links

pesticides with

ADHD in children


By CARLA JOHNSON
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO --A new
analysis of U.S. health
data links children's atten-
tion-deficit disorder with
exposure to common 'pes-
ticides used on fruits and
vegetables.
While the study
couldn't prove that pesti-
cides used in agriculture
contribute to childhood
learning problems,
experts said the research
is persuasive.
"I would take it quite
seriously," said Virginia
Rauh of Columbia
University, who has stud-
ied prenatal exposure
to pesticides and wasn't
involved in the new study.
Children may be


especially prone to the
health risks of pesticides
because they're still grow-
ing and they may con-
sume more pesticide resi-
.due than adults relative to
their body weight.
In the body, pesticides
break down into com-
pounds that can be mpa-
sured in urine. Almost
universally, the study
found detectable levels:
The compounds turned
up in the urine of 94 per-
cent of the children.
The kids with higher
levels had increased
chances of having ADHD,
attention-deficit hyperac-
tivity disorder, a common
problem that causes stu-
dents to have trouble in
school.


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Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkitby@loket/yreporetercom


Thursday, May


Lake City Reporter


SPORTS


20, 2010


www.Iakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

BENEFIT
Jerseys raffled
for donations
Two jerseys
autographed by former
Florida Gators are being
raffled off with proceeds
going to the Baldeon
family of Branford, who
lost their home in a
fire. Tickets are $3 and
the drawing will be at
halftime of the Branford
High/Bell High spring
game on May 27.
For details, call David
Blackman at (386)
454-4247 or Branford fire
chief Robert Yates at
935-3131.
SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Falcons tryouts
this weekend
The Columbia County
Falcons semi-pro football
team has tryouts planned
for 3 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday at Richardson
Middle School. There
also will be tryouts on
June 5-6.
For details, e-mail
. Bryan Jennings at
ccfalcons@grnail. com.
YOUTH SOCCER
Summer soccer
sign-up today
Columbia Youth
Soccer Association has
summer registration for
ages 4-16 planned at the
CYSA complex from
6-8 p.m. today and
Tuesday. Fee is $60.
For details, contact
Scott Everett at
fcotteverett60@yahoo. corn.
CHS BASEBALL
Summer tryouts
set for Saturday
Columbia High
baseball has summer
tryouts beginning at 10
a.m. Saturday. Tryouts
are for upcoming ninth-
through 12th-graders.
For details, call J.T.
Clark at 365-1754.
WOMEN'S SOFTBALL
League sign-up
through Friday
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
is sponsoring a Women's
Summer Softball League.
Church and commercial
leagues will be offered.
Registration is 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. through Friday
at Teen Town. Fee is
$350 per team.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
GOLF
Kiwanis Club
golf tournament
The Lake City Kiwanis
Club's scramble golf
tournament is Friday
at The Country Club at
Lake City. Lunch is at
11:30 a.m. with a shotgun
start for golf at 1 p.m.
Cost is $60 per player.
For details, call Matt
Greene at 487-1374.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Friday
* Fort White High
football vs. Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
* Columbia High
football Purple & Gold
Game, 7 p.m.
May 27
* Columbia High
football at Trinity Catholic


High, 7 p.m.


Motorsports Park
to host weekend
event in Lake City.
From staff reports

Lake City Motorsports
Park is hosting a dirt drag
racing event on Saturday at
-the track on U.S. Highway
441 north of Lake City.
There will be the
Townsend Timber Co.
300-foot Pond Race, along
with side by side and con-
sistency racing on a dirt
race track.
There is no entry fee
for the pond race, which is
open to all and pays $100
for first place and $50 for
second.
RACE continued on 2B


Marshall out


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jason Ferguson (95), Brandon Marshall (19) and Channing Crowder (52) ride stationary
bikes during Miami Dolphins football training camp in Davie, Wednesday.


Freshman



Tunsil offered (


by Trojans


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
The people of Lake City
may not have heard of
Laremy Tunsil as of yet, but
they soon will as the fresh-
man phenom takes the field
for Columbia High this fall.
Before ever taking a
varsity snap, the freshman
offensive tackle has caught
the eye of coaches around
the country.
When Southern California
coach Ed Orgeron was in
to watch the Tigers prac-
tice last wveek, he was so
impressed that the coach
informed Columbia head
coach Craig Howard that
the Trojans would have an
offer waiting on him.
"The coach talked to me
and he offered at practice,"
Howard said. "He saw him
at practice drive blocking
a guy across the field, and
thought he was a senior.
He's not able to have con-
tact, but let me know that
they would have a scholar-
ship available for him. He
can't get the big head now.
He's got to go out there and
prove it. It's an awesome
thing though to know that
he has a scholarship avail-
able."


Tunsil was surprised
at the news when learn-
ing from it from coach
Howard.
"It was very surprising,"
he said. "I was speechless. I
couldn't say anything when
it happened."
Despite the offer, Tunsil
hasn't put the Trojans
toward the top of his list
for possible college destina-
tions.
"I would say that Florida,
Texas, Texas Tech, Georgia
Tech and Miami are my top
five now," he said., "USC
isn't there yet, but they will
be."
He recalled when he first
became a fan of what the
USC program is all about.
. "I know that they're real-
ly good," he said. "I can
remember sitting there
watching them play Texas
for the championship when
I was 11. It was a really
good game."
Another possible desti-
nation for Tunsil is South
Florida, where a group of
former Tigers (Tiger Powell
and Jamaal Montague)
signed' this spring. Tunsil
admitted there's a little
interest in being the next
CHS continued on 2B


Dolphins wide
receiver to miss


voluntary camp.
By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press
DAVIE - Brandon
Marshall milled about the
Miami Dolphins practice
field, donning an orange
cap and sneakers instead of
a helmet and cleats.
He'll be doing a lot more
of that over the next few
weeks.
Marshall is recovering
from surgery, the details
of which neither he nor
Dolphins coach Tony
Sparano would disclose
Wednesday, when most


of the wide receiver's new
teammates took part in one
of Miami's organized team
activity days, or offseason
practice. Sparano indicated
Marshall would be back for
training camp.
"We don't play a game
today," Sparano said. "We
play a ganme down the road
somewhere. ... No disap-
pointment at all. He's been
here for eight weeks now,
throwing and catching and
doing all the things nec-
essary. I mean, he was
throwing and catching the
day that the procedure
was done. So, not real con-
cerned about it."
Marshall shook off ques-
MARSHALL continued on 2B


phenom


olumbia High freshman offensive tackle leads the Tigers through stretch
practice on Tuesday.


. . - -B7 7 .- W


A - - , ..








BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter


thing excercises at


r7V -~


- -.
JIF ^ '^ ;1/^:1'-^^ '


DAVID KISELICK Specral to e Reporter
The onehelluvarack.com Chevy Blazer plows through the 300-foot pond at Lake City Motorsports Park. A dirt drag racing
event will be at the track on Saturday.


Section B


Race
week ,,


week











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS -Tour of California, stage 5,
Visalia to Bakersfield, Calif.
GOLF
10 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, BMW
PGA Championship, first round, at Surrey,
England
I p.m.
TGC - LPGA, Sybase Match Play
Championship, first round matches, at
Gladstone, N.J.
3 p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour, Byron Nelson
Championship, first round, at Irving,Texas
6:30 p.m.
TGC - LPGA, Sybase Match Play
Championship, first round matches, at
Gladstone, N.J. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
WGN - Chicago Cubs at
Philadelphia
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs, Eastern
Conference finals, game 3, Philadelphia
at Montreal
SOCCER
8 p.m.
ESPN2 - MLS, Columbus at New
York

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Tuesday
Boston 95, Orlando 92
Wednesday
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers (n)
Saturday
Orlando at Boston, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 8:30 p.m.
Monday
Orlando at Boston, 8:30 p.m.
May 25
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 9 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Tuesday
Philadelphia 3, Montreal 0
Chicago 4, San Jose 2
Today
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Friday
San Jose at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Saturday
Philadelphia at Montreal, 3 p.m.
Sunday
San Jose at Chicago, 3 p.m. ."

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Tampa Bay 28 I I .718 -
NewYork 25 14 .641 3
Toronto 24 17 .585 5
Boston 20 20 .500 8h
Baltimore 13 27 .325 15'h
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 24 15 .615 -
Detroit 22 17 .564 2
Chicago 16 22 .421 7'k
Cleveland 15 22 .405 8
Kansas City 15 25 .375 9ki
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 22 18 .550 -
Oakland 20 20 .500 2
Los Angeles 18 23 .439 4'h


Seattle 14 25 .359 7',
Tuesday's Games
Toronto I I, Minnesota 2
Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 2
Tampa Bay 6, Cleveland 2
Boston 7, N.YYankees 6
Baltimore 4, Kansas City 3, 10 innings
Texas 8, L.A.Angels 7
Oakland 6. Seattle 5, 10 innings
Wednesday's Games
Kansas City at Cleveland (n)
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Minnesota at Boston (n)
Baltimore at Texas (n)
L.A.Angels at Chicago White Sox (n)
Detroit at Oakland (n)
Toronto at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Kansas City (Hochevar 3-2) at
Cleveland (Talbot 5-2), 12:05 p.m.
Detroit (Bonderman 1-2) at Oakland
(T.Ross I-I), 3:35 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 4-1) at Seattle
(J.Vargas 3-2), 3:40 p.m.
Tampa Bay (J.Shields 4-1) at N.Y.
Yankees (Pettitte 5-0), 7:05 p.m.
I Minnesota (Liriano 4-2) at Boston
(Lester 3-2), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Matusz 2-3) at Texas
(Feldman 1-4), 8:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels (E.Santana 2-3) at Chicago
White Sox (Buehrle 2-5), 8:10 p.m.

Interleague schedule

Friday's Games
Baltimore at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Colorado at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Florida at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
L.A.Angels at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Toronto at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Francisco at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Diego at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 24 14 .632 -
Florida 21* 19 .525 4
Washington 20 20 .500 . 5
Atlanta 19 20 .487 5'A
NewYork 19 21 .475 6
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 23 16 .590 -
St. Louis 23 17 .575 '
Chicago 18 22 .450 5'/
Pittsburgh 17 22 .436 6
Milwaukee 15 24 .385 8
Houston 13 26 .333 10
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Diego 23 16 .590 -
San Francisco 22 16 .579 'A
Los Angeles 22 17 .564 I
Colorado 19 20 .487 4
Arizona 16 24 .400 7'A
Tuesday's Games
Cincinnati 5, Milwaukee 4
Florida 8, Arizona 0
Pittsburgh'2, Philadelphia I
Atlanta 3, N.Y. Mets 2
Chicago Cubs 6, Colorado 2
St. Louis 3,Washington 2
San Francisco 7, San Diego 6, 12
innings
L.A. Dodgers 7, Houston 3'
Wednesday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia (n)
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh (n)
N.Y. Mets atWashington (n)
Cincinnati at Atlanta (n)
Colorado at Houston (n)
Florida at St. Louis (n)
San Francisco at Arizona (n).
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers (n).
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 2-4) at
Philadelphia (Blanton 1-2), 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 4-0) at Atlanta
(Hanson 3-3), 1:05 p.m.
Florida (N.Robertson 4-3) at St. Louis


(Wainwright 5-2), 1:40 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 3-1) at
Pittsburgh (Maholm 3-3). 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Maine 1-3) at Washington
(Atilano 3-0), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 7-1) at Houston
(Oswalt 2-5), 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 5-0) at
Arizona (R.Lopez 2-2), 9:40 p.m.
San Diego (Correia 4-3) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 3-2). 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Game
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
noon-3 p.m.), qualifying (Speed,
5-7:30 p.m.); Saturday, Sprint Showdown,
7:30 p.m., All-Star Race, 9 p.m. (Speed,
7-1I p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distances: Sprint Showdown, 60
miles, 40 laps; All-Star Race, 150 miles,
100 laps in segments of 50,20,20 and 10,
with only green-flag laps counting in the
final segment.
Next race: Coca-Cola 600, May 30,
Charlotte Motor Speedway, Concord,
N.C.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
North Carolina Education
Lottery 200
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
9 a.m.-noon), qualifying (Speed, 3:30-
5 p.m.), race, 8 p.m. (Speed, 7:30-
10:30 p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 201 miles, 134 laps.
Next race: WinStar World Casino
400k, June 4,Texas Motor Speedway, Fort
Worth.Texas.
NATIONWIDE
Next race: Tech-Net Auto -Service
300, May 29, Charlotte Motor Speedway,
Concord, N.C.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA Summer Nationals
Site:Topeka, Kan.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 8-10 p.m.); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.).
Track: Heartland Park Topeka.
Next race: Route 66 NHRA Nationals,
June 3-6. Route 66 Raceway, Joliet, Ill.
Online: http://www.nhro.com
INDYCAR
Next race: Indianapolis 500, May
30, Indianapolis Motor Speedway,
Indianapolis.
Qualifying schedule: Saturday,
pole qualifying (Versus, II a.m.-
6:30 p.m.); Sunday, qualifying (Versus,noon-
6:30 p.m.).
Online: http:llwww.indycar.com
FORMULA ONE
Next race:Turkish Grand Prix, May 30,
Istanbul Speed Park, Istanbul.
Online: http://www.formula f.com

SOFTBALL

Division I regionals

.At Katie Seashole Pressly Softball
Stadium, Gainesville
Friday
Game I - UCF (35-21) vs. Florida
International (36-19), 3:30 p.m.
Game 2 - Bethune-Cookman
(32-22) vs. Florida (43-8), 6 p.m.

At UGA Softball Stadium
Athens
Friday
Game I - Florida State (43-16) vs.
Radford (36-15), 2:30 p.m.
Game 2 - Elon (38-19) vs. Georgia
(43-11), 5 p.m.


MARSHALL: Sparano praises player


Continued From Page, 11

tons about his on-field
absence.
"It's definitely frustrat-
ing, but you know, some
things you can't control,"
said Marshall, who didn't
appear to be wearing any
braces or show any other
obvious sign of injury. "In
my past, I learned that, not
to worry myself and hold
my head down when I can't
control it. I'm just going to



CHS

Continued From Page 1B

Tiger to become a Bull.
"It'd be good to play
with some of the same
teammates that were here
before," he said.
Tunsil still has three years
before he'll have to make a
decision for which team to
play with after the Tigers.
He'll show off his skills in
the Purple and Gold game
at 7:00 p.m. on Friday.


do the best I can with the
mental reps and prepare
myself that way."
As the workou4 began,
Marshall took a spot on an
' exercise bike set up behind
one of the end zones, then
joined teammates, often
stopping to chat with Ricky
Williams, Ronnie Brown
and others while following
along with the plays and
trying to pick up whatever




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I BAITH i


nuances of the offense he
could.
"Since the day he showed
up here, I thought the way
he handled teammates, his
introduction to the team,
I can remember it like it
was yesterday because he
came into the weight r6om
... went around to every
player in the room and
introduced himself,"
Sparano said.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


GASYRS ( " A__
, Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
S- suggested by the above cartoon.

A: TO
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ANNOY CHIME MOTIVE PIRACY
I Answer: What the patrolman considered his flat
feet - THE "ARCH" ENEMY


COURTESY PHOTO
Michael Moore celebrates a Street Stock victory on Saturday, his first feature win at North
Florida Speedway.


Moore, O'Neil take first wins


By RANDY HARRIS
Special to the Reporter

North Florida Speedway
was entertained by the
high-octane performance
of the Florida Mini Sprints
on Saturday.
Steve Crabtree, in the
No. 5 car, out-drove his
competitors and crossed
the finish in first place.
In Pure Stock, track
favorites such as Dave
Hess, Tim Odom and Brent
Zimmerman dominated the
front pack until the last
few laps. Willard Driggers
surged ahead and captured


the checkered flag.
The Street Stocks pro-
.duced a few caution flags
and . provided Michael
Moore in the 65w with his
first win ever.
The Box. Stocks yielded
a first-time winner as well,
with Robert O'Neil captur-
ing the checkered flag.
In the Open Wheeled
Modifieds, Henry Hall
(No. 131) blasted down the
straightaways; Chip Owen
and Kyle Owen were in hot
pursuit, with Joff Sweeney
and Ronnie Chance not far
behind.
As they battled for posi-


RACE: This weekend

Continued From Page 1B


The side by side rac-
ing has separate classes
for street legal, ATV 'and
ATV consistency with the
fastest times down the
185-foot dirt track' deter-
mining the winner in each
class.
The truck consistency
race' follows and is open
to any vehicle. The event
is not a race, but a test of
skill to match the driver's
two run times. There is
no limit to the number of
times a driver may enter.
In addition to the racing
there is a two-acre mud
hole available for anyone
to bog or play in. Parking
is available and vendors
are on hand. Gates open
at 10 a.m. Admission is
$10 for adults; children
younger than age 12 get


1
6
11 I
12
13 c
15 I
16 -
18 I
19
21 1

22 I
23 '

25 F
28 (
30 I
311


in free.
. For vendor information,
call Billy Tomlinson at
623-4637; for race informa-
tion, call Steve Raulerson
at 365-3082.



Results of the -Spring Mud Fling
at Lake City Motorsports Park on
April 10:
POND RACE
1. Chris Papoi, 2. Jonathon Jones, 3.
Curtis Moates, 4. Cody Pitts, 5. Rick
Bubby;
STREET LEGAL
. C.W.SRobertson,2.Amanda Fender,
3. Paul Moore, 4. Lonnie Freeman, 5.
JamesTaylor;
ATV CONSISTENCY
1. Colby Holton, 2. Sarah Conquest,
3. Colten Raulerson, 4.Alyse Raulerson,
5. Dason Raulerson;
TRUCK CONSISTENCY
I. (tie) Gene Henry and Jody
Raulerson, 3. Chris Diotte, 4. Rick
Raulerson, 5.Jeff Boston.


ACROSS 38 Superman's
girlfriend
Not even one 40 - - your par-
Marshy hollow don!
Hawaii hi 41 Gamble
Camel halts 42 Breathing fire
Swiss lake 43 Festive quaff
Excursion 46 Legendary
- telepathy sportscaster
Mexican Mrs. Howard
Verse lead-in 48 Planet next to
Down for the Saturn
count 50 Tree frog
Pub pints 54 Rumpus
Tended the 55 Actor's whis-
garden per
Rip 56 Canoes and
Grumpy moods tugs
Mao - -tung 57 Lens setting
Mammal's (hyph.)


need
32 Put out a run-
ner
33 Sighs of dis-
tress
35 Tale with a
moral
37 Volcanic emis-
sion


DOWN


Zig's opposite
Seine moorage
Wolf Man por-
trayer
Lab worker
Not lack


tion, Jamie Carter (No. 15)
maintained his lead over
the field. He crossed the
finish line well ahead of the
second-place car to experi-
ence the thrill of victory.
North Florida Speedway
racing action on May 29
will feature the National
Late Models, Pure Stqck,
Sportsman and Limited
Mod divisions. It also will
be Driver Trading Card
Night, with door prizes and
drivers giving away trading
cards to their fans.
For information, visit
www. northfloridaspeedway.-
corn.


Columbia Motorsports

Columbia Motorsports Park results
for May 15:
TBARA SPRINTS
1. 18 Shane Butler, 2. 20 Larry Brazil,
3. 0 Dude Teate, 4. 3x Bo Hartley, 5. 78
Joey Aguilar, 6. 55 Tommy Nichols, 7. 56
Bobby Rose, 8. 27 Sonny Hartley, 9. 2
Johnny Gilbertson, 10. 81 Steve Heisler,
11. 16 Ben Fritz, 12. 15 D.J. Hoelzle, 13.
28 Larry Brazil;
SPORTSMAN
1. 8 Wesley Keller, 2. 07 Jeff Prescott,
3. 21 Sean Monaghan, 4. 44 Charlie
Seroki, 5. 14 Tater Stalnaker, 6. 16 Brian
Hull, 7. 121 Gordon Cade, 8. 76 Jim
Higginbotham, 9. 20 Tony Kuhr, 10. 20
Len Stapleton, 11. 67 Russell Patterson,
12. 1 Bobby Ford, 13. 14 Oral Tanner;
PURE STOCK
1..22 Randy O'Neal, 2. 15 Justin
Ellison, 3. 39 Tim Alldredge, 4. 96 Don
Cruce;
HORNETS
1. 69 Mark Copeland, 2. 2 Bert
Daugherty, 3. 1 Donald Davis;
V-8 BOMBERS
1. 27 Nathan Huffingham, 2. 76 Andy
Nichols, 3. 16 Mike Parsell, 4. 15 Derek
Davis, 5. 7 Shawn DeSotle, 6. 7 Timmy
Manning, 7. 02 Mark Chinell;
E-MODS
1.01 J.F. McClellan, 2.6 Micky Wright,
3. 31 Heather Bell, 4. 27 Andy Waldron.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

BORD CRAFTS
EMBERS OODLES
ASA ILCA JO0L E
C PAONO0
T K EA I RIA
GT1 PN0 N O0B S
OR D ADA ETO0P
RA IDS MOE ADO0
P I N ES OYL TE T
T E SR LE
PGA TEA
RE SOX EMP IRE


FILIAX E N S ALFS


6 Music category
7 Opposite of
ruddy
8 Tries to find out
9 Smirk's kin
10, Is, to Pedro


14 Pharaoh's
amulet
15 Green carv-
ings
17 Feet, slangily
19 Arm bones
20 Whinny
22 Movie dog
24 Telephone trio
25 "Star Wars"
crime lord
26 Ran a fever
27 Cyclist
LeMond
29 Mr. Hurok
34 Tramps
36 Without a goal
39 Ladder rung
43 Insensitive to
pain
44 Hydrox rival
'45 Fundraiser,
often
46 Pool hall
items
47 Table extender
49 Safety or mos-
quito -
51 Peach center
52 Ancient Tokyo
53 Sales agent


@ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books,
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10



13 4 5F
mmm--Ti m^ I


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


5-20










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010


DILBERT


BLONDIE
BOV, THESE GUYS REALLY! THEY
WE PLAY IN THE HUMILIATE
LEAGUE TEVERVBODY
TONIGHT* - * /- *
ARE '
PRETTY) M �Ia--
60000


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Friendships met halfway


can survive separation


DEAR ABBY:,I can em-
pathize with "Deeply Hurt
inArizona" (March 16), who
travels back to her home-
town to see her large ex-
tended family and struggles
to make time for her long-
time friend "Judith," who
nonetheless feels slighted.,
My husband and I grew
up in the Northeast but now
live out of state. We have'
flown hundreds of miles
with our children to visit our
families back there. Once
we arrived, it seemed we
were expected to continue
traveling from town to town
to do all the visiting. It be-
came very stressful.
These people made little
effort to visit us in our state
or even come to our "base"
while we were in their area.
While "Hurt" visits her
elderly parents, Judith ap-
pears to be sitting around
waiting for her and making
little effort Why doesn't
Judith go to the parents'
home? Or, better yet, have a
girls' weekend in Arizona or
somewhere in between?
We have gotten past our
irritation with family and
friends and do two things:
1. We tell people in advance
when we're coming so they
can make plans. Groups
- especially friends - can
double up, and see us and


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
see each other. 2. We use
our time the way we want
and not the way we feel we
are obligated to.
"Hurt" should urge Ju-
dith to try to come to her.
The road goes both ways.
- WORKED IT OUT IN
ALPHARETTA, GA.
DEAR WORKED IT
OUT: Thank you for writ-
ing. The scenario in "Hurt's"
letter hit a nerve with a num-
ber of readers. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: When my
kids visit from out of state,
I have an open house so
the family can come to one
place and spend time with
them. This gives my kids
more time to visit with me
and any special friends they
may want to see. It also less-
ens the guilt of not being
able to see everyone. This
has worked well for us, and
now the family expects me
to do it every time the kids
come back. - DIANA IN
OHIO
DEAR ABBY: I agree
that Judith is selfish and


immature. I have friends
all over the U.S., and when
they come to visit, I under-
stand that most of their time
will be spent with family.
Judith needs to grow-
up and realize that not ev-
erything revolves around
her. Instead of complain-'
ing about the lack of time
"Hurt" has, for her, Judith
should make the most of the'
time she does get to spend.
- SHELLIE IN INDIANA
DEAR ABBY: There
may be a crisis in Judith's
life that she is displacing
onto "Hurt" When the emo-'
tions around thatcrisis calm,
she will need her old friend.
Is there anyone in town who
could find out what is going
on?
I knew a woman who cut
everyone out of her life in a
rage after the betrayal of an
assault by a loved one. An-
other person did the same
thing after a cancer diagno-
sis. Once the shock faded
and they began to deal with
their issues, 'they confided
in their old friends about
what was really happening
and were able to reconnect.
.- SUSAN IN CENTER-
VILLE, OHIO

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Set your goals
high and don't stop until
you reach them. Your drive
and determination will at-
tract and impress people.
Once you get things going,
you will get lots of response
as'well as help. *-****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Play the game
the best you know how but
don't take personally what
others do or say. Challeng-
es can be a good outlet for
you to blow off steam. Ar-
gue less and you'll prosper
more. Romance is in the
stars. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Get chores out
of the way and you will feel
much better. Participating
in a cause you believe in is
fine, but don't be too quick
to part with your hard-
earned cash. Donate time
not money. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Before you get
all caught up in what every-
one else 'is doing and say-
ing, ask yourself what you
want. Don't get led down a
path that doesn't suit you
because you are afraid to go
it alone. Embrace change.

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Beings anxious will
lead to mistakes. Settle
down and relax before you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

take on a challenge that can
change your future. Now is
not the time to gamble or to
be too generous with your
cash. "'
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't let your emo-
tions get the better of you
or it may cost you financial-
ly. You can't pay for others'
mistakes. Meddling will be
your downfall and will stand
in the way of important op-
portunities that are heading
your way. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You can offer your
services to a worthy cause
but don't let it cost you fi-
nancially. You should be
putting your money into
.your own pursuits. A love
relationship will cause you
to question your future.
Consider the legal aspects.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Know what you
want before you 'enter ne-
gotiations. You can get the
benefits you require if you
ask. A relationship you are
in will be more prosperous
than you anticipated. Shar-
ing and caring will lead to
satisfaction and happiness.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Stick to the


truth. If you are honest, you
can avoid complaints and
put your ideas and plans
into motion. Talks will lead
to a deal that can change
your life. An emotional re-
lationship may be in jeop-
ardy. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): A deal will be
presented that you cannot
turn down. Partnerships
will pay off but you must
get everything in writing.
You can prosper from an
investment that has to do
with property. Love is evi-
dent if you make plans for
two. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): A partnership
will enable you to get much
further ahead. Make a list
of what you can offer and
what you expect in return.
Be aggressive and produc-
tive and you'll avoid a heat-
ed discussion over an emo-
tional matter. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You may feel:
pretty happy with your own
performance but never un-
derestimate what the com-
petition might do to under-
mine you. Join forces with
someone you know can add,
depth to whatever you do. A
solid partnership will bring
you' strength and courage.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: I equals C
"WAA SPG WZCGXYKSD K'CG PWZ KO
BD AKTG, WAA BD SXHJLAGY WOZ
HLYSWIAGY, PWCG YSXGORSPGOGZ
B G " - UWAS ZKYOGD

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Life is a dream for the wise, a game for the fool, a
comedy for the rich, a tragedy for the poor." - Sholom Aleichem
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 5-20


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS

YOU'RE iI YOU'LL NEVER BE A 600D
OPeLESSI j RABBIT HOUND! NEVER!


F G S IT 'ST BE HEREDITY.
TY DAD SED TO RON WITH
THE HOUND, BUT HI5
^ *PATH' LA4 EL�EHERE..


WELL, GIVING UP T'S TRUE
BEFORE WE EVEN
BOWL <


WAIT A SECOND! DEFAULTING BY
SAVING OUR TEAM HAS THE SWINE
--; LU IS AN OPTION!

I i


FIRST ASCENT NOW THAT YOU MENTION IT,
ri ~1 \^A IT I5 PRETTY
jI II / < II iTIRONIC
� THAT HI15
-I J NAM if/AS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010


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immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inlujiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In I tiid Online
WWn ! 11. .'*'. *', hi.l rd.'.. i II


Legal

Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 06/08/2010
Time: 8:00 A.M.
2006 Chevrolet
VIN# IG1AK55F467661080

04539740
May 20, 2010


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 97-186-CA
UNITED STATED OF AMERICA,
acting through the United Stated De-
partment of Agriculture, Rural De-
velopment, f/k/a Farmers Home Ad-
ministration,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SANDRA L. CLAYTON, a single
person,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 'that
pursuant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on Janu-
ary 16, 2007, and the Order Setting
Foreclosure Sale entered on May 11,
2010, by the above entitled Court in
the above styled cause, the under-
signed Clerk of Court or any of his
duly authorized deputies, will sell the
property situated in COLUMBIA
County, Florida, described as:
Lot 13, Block 3, WOODLAND
GROVE, Unit 2, a subdivision ac-
cording to the plat thereof recorded
in Plal Book 3, Page 73, public re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida.
Street address: 2103 Maple Drive,
Lake City, FL 32025.
at public outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash on June 6, 2010,
at the Columbia County Courthouse,
Register With the Crerk, 173 NE
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055, subject to all ad valorem
taxes and assessments for the real
property described above.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN, THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AF-
TER THE SALE.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES NEEDING SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATIONS TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE
OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA-
TOR, 145 N. HERNANDO
STREET, 2ND FLOOR, LAKE
CITY, FL 32055, TELEPHONE
(386)758-2163, WITHIN TWO (2)
WORKING DAYS OF OUR RE-
CEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF
HEARING IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-
800-955-8771, OR VOICE (V) 1-
800-955-8770, VIA FLORIDA RE-
LAY SERVICE.
DATED on May 11, 2010
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
PostOffice Drawer 2069
Lake City, FL 32056-2069
by:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04539708
May 20,27, 2010


NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: FORT
WHITE AUTOMOTIVE gives No-
tice of Foreclosure of Lien and intent
to sell these vehicles on 06/05/2010,
08:00 am at 8493 SW US Hwy 27
Forth White, FL 32038, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes. FORT WHITE AUTOMO-
TIVE reserves the right to accept or
reject any and/or all bids.

JA3AA11A6TU020439
1996 Mitsubishi

04539741
May 20, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICI CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVI-
SION
CASE NO: 12-2009-CA-000805
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.R,
PLAINTIFF
VS.
PATRICIA A. WILKINS, ET AL
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICE OF ACTION-CON-
STRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: PATRICIA A. WILKINS AND
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PATRI-
CIA A. WILKINS
whose residence is unknown if
he/she/they be living; and if
he/she/they be dead, the unknown
defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, and all
parties claiming, an interest by,
through, under or against the De-
fendants, who are not known to be
dead or alive, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right, title or








Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


I do Housekeeping. 10 years exp.
Great references & Great rates
Detail Work!!! CALL ME!
386-628-1091

Construction

Matt Forsyth
Building Construction
Carpentry
386-965-7053


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 12-2009-CA-000419 Divi-
sion
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB.
f.k.a WORLD SAVING BANK,
FSB
Plaintiff,
CRISTINO HERNANDEZ AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment for Plaintiff entered
in this cause on April 6, 2010, in the
Circuit Court of Columbia County,
Floridti, I will sell the property situ-
ated in Columbia County, Florida de-
scribed as:
LOT 96, CALLAWAY, PHASE III,
A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7. PA-
GES 145 AND 146, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
and commonly know as: 281 SW
WILSHIRE DR., LAKE CITY, FL
32024; including the building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on May
12, 2010 at 11:00 a.m.
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the


.. '- w-",, -"
77


6 TEMP Farmworkers needed
6/21/10 - 11/8/10. Workers will
cultivate, cut, house, & strip tobac-
co. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
'non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
$9.7 I/hr. Worksites in Carlisle Co
KY. Report or send a resume to
nearest local FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office &
reference Job # KY 0398646.
Russelburg Farm -
Fancy Farm, KY

Elementary & Middle School
teachers needed for private
Christian School BA required
Fax resume to: 386-755-3609


Legal

interest in the property described in
the mortgage being foreclosed here-
in.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property:
TRACT 8 OF A.C. MILTON
TRACT, AN UNRECORDED SUB-
DIVISION:
A PART OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF
SECTION 29; AND A PART OF
THE NORTH 1/2 SECTION 32,
ALL IN TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, MORE PARTIC-
ULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 29,
AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEG. 04
MIN. 26 SEC. WEST ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION
32,39.79 FEET; THENCE NORTH
89 DEG. 39 MIN. 12 SEC. EAST,
1967.97 FEET FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 00
DEG. 23 MIN. 27 SEC. WEST,
550.96 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89
DEG. 37 MIN. 59 SEC. EAST,
655.88 FEET TO THE EAST LINE
OF SAID SECTION 29; THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEG. 24 MIN. 07 SEC.
EAST, ALONG SAID EAST LINE,
504.16 FEET TO THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF SAID SEC-
TION 29 AND BEING ALSO THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID
SECTION 32; THENCE SOUTH 00
DEG. 07 MIN. 07 SEC. WEST,
160.52 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEG. 25 MIN. 42 SEC. WES%,.
654.16 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00
DEG. 23 MIN. 27 SEC. WEST,
116.05 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
SUBJECT TO A PERPETUAL,
NON-EXCLUSIVE INGRESS-
EGRESS EASEMENT OVER AND
ACROSS THE WEST 40.00 FEET
THEREOF.
TOGETHER WITH A PERPETU-
AL, NON-EXCLUSIVE INGRESS-
EGRESS EASEMENT OVER AND
ACROSS A 40.00 FOOT WIDE
EASEMENT WHOSE WEST LINE
IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 29 'AND RUN
SOUTH 00 DEG. 23 MIN. 27 SEC.
EAST, 40.00 FEET TO THE
SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD NO. 349 FOR -A
POINT OF BEGINNING FOR
SAID EASEMENT; THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEG. 23 MIN. 27 SEC.
EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE
OF SAID 40.00 FOOT EASE-
MENT, 767.84 FEET TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE
FOREGOING DESCRIBED LAND
HEREIN BEING CONVEYED.
TOGETHER WITH A 1996 SKY-
LINE DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME WITH ID NOS.
6H6301911A AND TITLE NOS.
70753579 AND 70753578.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on DA-
VID J. STERN, ESQ. Plaintiff's at-
torney, whose address is 900 South
Pine Island Road, Suite 400, Planta-
tion, FL 33324-3920 on or before
June 11, 2010, (no later than 30 days
from the date of the first publication
of this notice of action) and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition filed
herein.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court at COLUMBIA County,
Florida, this 22 day of March, 2010
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
BY:/S/ B. SCIPPIO
DEPUTY CLERK
THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID J.
STERN, P.A. ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF
900 South Pine Island Road, Suite
400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954) 233-8000
09-85101 CWF
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINIS-
TRATION, at the COLUMBIA
County Courthouse at, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Servce.

04538864
May 20, 27, 2010


Legal

date of lis pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 7th (lay of April, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04539110
May 13,20, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-487-CA
MERCANTILE BANK, a division
of Carolina First Bank,
Plaintiff
JUANA JO LYTTE and JAMES A.
LYTTE,
Defendants.
NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated May 7,
2010 and entered in Case No. 09-
487-CA of the Circuit Court of the
Third Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, wherein
MERCANTILE BANK is the Plain-
tiff, and JUANA JO LYTTE, is the
Defendant, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash, at the Co-
lumbia County, Courthouse, Third
Floor, 173 N.E. Hernando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida, at 11 a.m. on the
16th day of June, 2010, the following
described property as set forth in said
Summary Final Judgment of Fore-
closure:
Lot 9, STAR LAKE ESTATES, a
subdivision according to the Plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7,
Page 119, Public Records of Colum-
bia County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus form the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens, must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
DATED this 10 day of May, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT
BY:/S/ B. SCIPPIO
Deputy Clerk

(14539699
May 20, 27, 2010


020 Lost & Found

LOST DOG: Lake City Airpark
area. Missing Wed. 5/12. Black
Male Dachshund. If found please
call 386-365-6641

REWARD! White gold birthstone *
ring, mnth of Aug. w/diamonds
around it. Left 4/23@ LCMC
Outpatient MRI 386-755-6440


060 Services

Honest Dependable Cleaning
Res'l/Comm'l. Great references &
rates avail. For a free estimate
today! 386-365-6386 (Cerissa)

100 Job
0 Opportunities

04538577



The Lake City Reporter is
looking for a dynamic and
capable sales professional to
sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and
online products. We need a
person with the ability to make
strong presentations.
Professionalism, being active in
the field and closing sales are
three key attributes for which
we are looking. We offer a
salary and a strong commission
plan, along with a good benefits
package. If you have a strong
desire to succeed and the skills
to back it up, we want to hear
from you. Please email your
resume to:
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director, at
lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake'City, FL 32055.
NO PHONE CALLS

04539505



Part Time Telemarketing
Professional
The Lake City Reporter is
looking for an energetic
telemarketing professional to
join our expanding sales team.
Successful candidates will
posses excellent telephone and
customer service skills, be
computer literate and enjoy the
thrill of the sale. We offer a
great work environment and
competitive compensation.
To apply, please send resume to
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director at
lstricklanld@lakecityreporter.com
No phone calls please. EOE


The Lake City Reporter
is looking for a dynamic and capable sales
professional to sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and online products.
We need a person with the ability to make
strong presentations.

Professionalism, being active in the field and closing sales
are three key attributes for which we are looking. We offer
a salary and a strong commission plan, along with a good
.benefits package. If you have a strong desire to succeed and
the skills to back it up, we want to hear from you.

Please e-mail your resume to: Lynda Strickland. miirkeimg director.
at lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055.
- NO PHONE CALLS - A


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.
[; - i-, -w.IFm wm- n,;ilreI


!"r -~ n'~- ~ I


[IlN'D T


100 Job
Opportunities

(14539653
:1 SiVance

SiVance, LLC, a manufacturer
of specialty fine chemicals and
located in the Airport Industrial
Park in Gainesville, is looking to
fill the following opening:
Instrumentation & Electrical
Technician
A full time position is available
in a chemical manufacturing
plant for an experienced Instru-
ment and Electrical Technician.
QUALIFICATIONS:
* Candidate must have demon-
strated experience in the
selection, configuration,
installation, and troubleshooting
of process instrumentation
and motor controls.
* In addition, an understanding
of basic process control
equipment, its operation, and
troubleshooting is required.
* Candidate must also have an
understanding of basic electrical
(AC and DC) conduit, wiring
and components to 480V.
Qualified candidates must
possess at least 5 years of
industrial experience. Pay rate
range of $16-$26/hr based upon
level of experience.
We offer an excellent benefit
package including medical/
dental plans, paid vacations/
holidays, 401K, pension, etc.
Apply by forwarding resume
and cover letter to:
, E-mail
zoeann.moss@sivancellc.com
No phone calls please
EOE / DFWP



Accepting applications for
Weekend Breakfast attendant &
Housekeeping/relief maintenance
position. Apply in person at Cabot
Lodge 3525 US Hwy 90W.
No phone calls.
ACCOUNTANT. Full time
position at local CPA Firm.
Accounting or closely related
degree required. Salary based
upon experience and
qualifications. Email resume with
Salary history to:
admin@PowellandJonesCPA.com.
Manager and Assistant Manager
Positions Available local chain
restaurant must have minimum
5 years experience in restaurant
management. Benefits Available.
Pay Negotiable. Send resume to
Restaurant Management Position
PO Box 252 Lake City. FL
32055-0252

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY
Immed FT/PT openings,
customer sales/service, will train,
conditions apply, all ages 17+
. ,(386)269-4656


100 Job
Opportunities

6 TEMP Farmworkers needed
6/21/10 - 12/31/10. Workers will
cultivate, cut, house, & strip
tobacco. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
$9.71/hr. Worksites in Todd &
Logan Co KY. Report or send a
resume to nearest local FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office &
reference Job # KY 0399647.
Penick Farms - Allensville, KY

Service Plumbers Needed..
Experience a Must! Excellent
Opportunity. Call The Plumber at:
(386)755-9789 or 364-FAST.
Sitel is hiring! Good pay, paid
training, comfortable environment,
benefits after 90 days. Need good
attitude and computer skills - must
be reliable. Apply at
www.sitel.com or in person at
1152 SW Business Point Dr. in
Lake City. EOE
Tow Truck Operator
Bryant's Towing is now hiring
Drivers to work in an environment
where you can truly make a
difference each and every day! If
you have a White Knight mentality
a clean MVR and like to work a
variety of hours talk to us!
6 Day work week Night and
Weekend hours required. Salary.
386-752-7799

Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-867-0560
Wanted: Heavy Truck Mechanic
for busy shop. Only experienced
need apply. Call between 8am &
Noon. Mon. - Fri. 386-752-9754

Medical
120 Employment

04539643
Medical Billing Manager
Several years experience in
medical insurance billing req'd.
Fax resume to: 386-785-5987

04539732
Medical Technologist
Ed Frasier Memorial Hospital
has an immediate opening for a
full-time night shift core lab
Medical Technologist, 3 days
Wednesday-Friday (2)-14 hours
and (1)-12 hour shift. Must have
Florida License for Hematology,
Chemistry and Serology.
Ed Frasier Memorial Hospital
159 N. 3rd Street
Macclenny, FL 32063
(904)259-3151 ext. 2247
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010


1 Medical
120 dEmployment

01i "-, !
We are still growing!!



Join our family of
caring professionals
in our Branford Office
PRN Staff
ARNP
RN
LPN
CNA / HHA
Job summary, other open
positions and applications
found at:
www.hospiceo ithlenaturecoast.ore
Fax: 352.527.9366
hr@hospiceofcitruscounty.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Fl 34464
DFWP/EOE

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Therapists & Case Managers
for community based program
working w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.

License Massage Therapist need-
ed for "Caring Physical Rehab".
New Lake City office will open in
June. Call Karen (904)868-9747
LICENSED PT/PTA needed for
outpatient clinic
Experience preferred.
Fax resume to 386-752-0939
Looking for Hygienist for
fast paced Dental office .
Fax Resume to 386-755-7024


240 Schools &
240 Education

04539702
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-06/07/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-06/07/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-07/13/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

Mini Schnauzers.AKC.
Salt/Pepper and White.
$400-$500.00. Raised in home.
POP 386-288-5412


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOT 1,
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a lieillth
ccrtiicale Ifromi a licensed
veterinarians docuinetliiig thec
have mandatory slhols and iare
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn.. China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

406 Collectibles
THOMAS KINKADE
Certificate of Authenticity Village.
$55.00 FIRM
386-344-4495

408 Furniture

Beautiful Solid oak
table & 4 chairs.
$400.obo
386-752-0167
Sofa, love seat and end tables.
$200. Good condition.
386-754-9433


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
* Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
WANTED Junk Cars,'
Trucks. RV's etc.
Paying CASH $225.00 and up.
Free pickup 386-867-1396
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Moving Sale Thur. - Sat: 8-4.
1 mi south of 349 off Tustenuggee.
Lots of household items, Way too
much to list. Don't want to move it
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

PLAY STATION 2
plus 10 games of
your choice. $110.00
386-758-4731


440 Miscellaneous
2 ELICTRIC Wheelchairs. (I1) in
very good cond. $1000. oho. (I l
needs batteries. $350. obo.
386-752-5332
American Ileriitage Pool lTable.
Full size. 3/4" slate. Cover.
hanging light, all accessories.
Serious Inquires only!
$1000. FIRM! 386-365-5099
Restaurant Equip. Hot Box $400.
6ft. fridge $400. Ele Rotisserie
$400. 6ft stainless steel hood w/fan
$200. Call Charlie. 386-984-7226.

530 Marine Supplies
SKI'S - Kidder mod 2001. Sport
series, high performance, Slalom
and as pair. Graphite. New $160.
Sale for $75. 386-755-1922

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 br/2 full bath MH
ready to rent Ft White
$500.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705

2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean. Quiet Park $400-$550.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422
2br/lba MH. Excellent Cond.
$500/Mo. + $500. sec. dep.
Call: 954-258-8841

3BR/2BA Double wide.
$750 a month. 1st, last and $375.
security. Please call 386-397-2619
or 386-365-1243.
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
2/2 MH. Quiet park. Small pets
.ok. $500.dep. $550./mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Ft. White Country living.
2br/lba Aptartment
or 3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.
LArge clean 3br/2ba all electric in
the 5 Points area No pets.
1st rionth & deposit.
Call 386-961-1482 for info.
Move In Special 2br MH. Low
SD moves you in. Water & mow-
ing included. No Pets.No washers.
Call for an Appt. 386-755-5488
Quiet .Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer. No
Pets! 386-961-0017
Residential RV lots Between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to
1-75 & 441 Also, lbr. available in
High Springs area. (352)317-1326


640 fMobile Homes
6 for Sale

$148. A MONTH
for only 8 yrs w/$84K down. Newly
remodeled 14 wide 2hr/2ba. New
Carpet.l appliances. Del. & Set up.
Owner Finaince available. Call
Gary Hamilton @ 386-963-4000

Mobile Home
650 & Land

1800sf Manufactured Home.
4br/2ba plus retreat/office, 2
porches, walks. Concrete founda-
tion. appliances. Plywood w/ce-
ramic floors, metal roof. 5 ac., cor-
ner lot (treed) Horses OK, Gary
Hamilton (386)256-6379. Possible
Owner Finance (Lake City)

SUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423


! 5 COMPLEXES!!
IBR from $500
2 BR from $525
*FREE CABLE*
*2 POOLS*
ONE GATED
Washer/Dryer Hookups
386-754-1800

30th Anniversary Celebration
Windsong Apts
Our Gift. to You
$300.00 off and Employee Pricing
(386) 758-8455
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
2br/2ba w/garage on the
West side
1st, last &security.
Call 386-755-6867
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec. Also, lbr for
$425.mo. Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent

NO Lease. NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable. W1-F1, maid,
micro-fridge, phone: Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands.
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 UUnfurnished
7 Home For Rent
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + ist & last Req'd., Credit
Check , No Pets (386)755-9476
3BR/2BA Nice & Clean
$800. mo 1 st and last NO pets
6 miles to town
386-752-1677
4br/2Ba Brick Home, Lrg Kitchen,
Frig, Dishwasher & W/D included,
Lrg yard, Quiet area. $1,000
575-749-6117/575-763-5336
Branford Area. Completely reno-,
vated. 2br/lba Mobile home $400
sec. $525 mo. Conveniently locat-
ed. 386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
Lg 3BR/2BA on 1.3 ac. on the
Westside. Water, trash
& lawn manint.included. $875. mo
plus security. 386-719-9702
Owner Financing, 3/2 MH on 2.5
beautiful acres. S. of Lake City
Hard road frontage. Sm. Down
$845 mo. 386-590-0642/ 867-1833
Rent to Own 3/1 ba. All appl.
incl. On 2 city lots. $650 mo. 1st,
last, sec. Located off Baya Ave.
352-225-1641 or 352-493-5252
Rural beauty and privacy near
l-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
Office Space located Across
from the Mall on Hwy 90.
$450/mo. plus tax.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


Space available at Country Club
Plaza East Baya Ave. 2000 sq ft.
2 restrooms, new carpet. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622


770 Condos For Rent


St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$256/mo. $24,900. 352-215-1018


Classified Department: 755-5440


* Q0 Farms &
: 8 Acreage


4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
Consider Partial Financing
8 ac. mol, fenced, 40X90 barn,
horse stalls, Pasture, well. Metal
shed on slab. Offers Negotiable.
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
Reduced FSBO 10 ac. Horses &
more. 5 stall stable. Pastures,
board fenced, tool shed. 32'X75'.
4brManuf. Hm w/carport & deck.
$190,000. FIRM. 386-965-3357

950 Cars for Sale
2000 Ford Crown Victoria. Silver,
cloth seats, all power, loaded.
Riuns & looks Great. Must sacri-
fice. $3500. 386-496-0780 Iv msg


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.









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805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex.
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaperare are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
$115,000 3B/2BA
Den or 4th bedroom.
Cypress Landing
386-466-7168
2004 3br/2ba custom built home
on 8 ac. Huge Oaks w/paved road
frontage. 24X48 pole barn
w/24X24 workshop. 386-365-3607
No Realtor please. Asking $299,K
FSBO, Lulu area, 3br/2.5ba home
2 story, built in 2003. Fenced,
40 x 48 barn, located on 5+ ac.
$224K 386-623-5820










LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR THURSDAY, MAY 20, 2010


Race: All-Star Race
I Where: Charlotte Motor Speedway
When: Saturday, 9 p.m. (ET)
TV: SPEED
B 2009 winner: Tony Stewart (right)


Race: Tech-Net Auto Service 300
Where: Charlotte Motor Speedway
When: May 29, 2 p.m. (ET)
TV: ABC
2009 winner: Mike Bliss


Race: N.C. Education Lottery 200
Where: Charlotte Motor Speedway
When: Friday, 7:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: Speed
2009 Winner: R6n Hornaday


4A
" - " " - '".. .

Richard Petty surprnes fans as he gets out of his car to welcomelthe criwc
NASCAR Hall uf Fame at the G.and Opening May 11 in Charlotte, N.C. (NASCAR.


t's been nearly 20 years
since Richard Petty drove in
his final race, at Atlanta
Motor Speedway in the 1992
season finale, but he's still out
there spending his golden years
as an ambassador for NASCAR.
And that's in addition to the
duties he's taken on as the head
of Richard Petty Motorsports.
But that's nothing new for
NASCAR's longtime King.
Lately, he's been making the
media rounds as part. of his
induction this weekend into the
inaugural class of the NASCAR
Hall of Fame. He also was the
Grand Marshal for Sunday's
Autism Speaks 400 at Dover
International Speedway.
In between all that, he took
time to reflect on racing matters
with members of the press at
Dover.
Interestingly, but not surpris-
ingly, the circuit's all-time win
leader with 200 Cup victories
and seven championships said
there are plenty of others in
NASCAR's past who could have
been alongside him in the Hall's
- - first class of five.
"I am sure there were a lot of
people that were more impor-
tant to the overall deal with
putting up money and taking
gambles to make NASCAR what
it is-today," he said, adding that
the sacrifices and struggles of
the pioneers aren't fully appreci-


ated by those who are reaping
the benefits today.
"A lot of these drivers that are
doing pretty well today don't
realize what some of the guys
went through to get it to this
point," Petty said. "Bill France
took a huge gamble and got peo-
ple to follow along behind him.
You had guys like Junior
Johnson, Curtis Turner and Lee
Petty that sacrificed a lot way
back. To be chosen out of that
crowd is jusf a heck of an
honor."
Another place that Petty
stands ahead of his peers is in
his dealings with fans.
Throughout the years, he always
seems to find time to sign auto-
graphs and visit with fans.
The late NASCAR journalist


Bill Robinson often told a tale
about the last race of the season
in the early 70s, at a short track
in Byron, Ga.
The race was long over. It was
dark and.beginning to rain. Still,
Petty was there in the pits sign-
ing autographs. Robinson, then
with The Atlanta Journal, finally
asked Petty: "How much longer
are you going to stay here?"
Petty's reply: "Until they're all,
taken care of."
It's a concept that many driv-
ers today don't grasp, and some-
thing that Petty often finds him-
self explaining.
"The deal is that for the first
15 or 20 years of NASCAR there
were no sponsors," he said. "The
fans were the ones sponsoring
because they bought the tickets,


Team owners Richard Childress (left) and Richard Petty hug Sunday prior to the start
of the Autism Speaks 400 at Dover International Speedway. (NASCAR photos)


and when the race was over you
would go pick up what money
you had coming to you depend-
ing where you finished.
"Back then the fans were who
you had to play to because they
were the ones that were sup-
porting it. It was a no-brainer to
say we had to keep them on our
side. We had to keep them buy-
ing tickets.
"I came through with the
Allisons and the Pearsons and
that crowd, who did the same
thing. They realized that without
the fans there wouldn't be any
racing. Without the fans there
wouldn't be a Richard Petty from
the stock car part of it."
And Petty pointed out that
NASCAR wouldn't be where it is
today without mechanics like
his brother Maurice, or his
cousin Dale Inman or others
like Smokey Yunick and Herb
Nab. He hopes future Hall of
Fame induction ceremonies will
recognize men from the other
side of the pit wall.
"I hope they look at people
that sacrificed for the drivers,"
he said. "We are different than
football or baseball. You have
your first baseman or quarter-
back and they stand alone. No
driver stands alone. It is a team
effort, so when you see Richard
Petty in the Hall of Fame,
Richard Petty just happened to
be the one out front."


Hendrick gives nod to JGR

NASCAR team owner Rick Hendrick stirred
the pot last week with his comment to reporters
in Charlotte that Joe Gibbs Racing had passed
his own Hendrick Motorsports crew, perform-
ance-wise.
It is true that JGR is on a roll of late, winning
five of the past seven Sprint Cup races including
Kyle Busch's victory in Sunday's Autism Speaks
400 at Dover International Speedway. But
Hendrick's own team isn't bad by any stretch, as
evidenced by Jimmie Johnson's dominating run
at Dover before a pit-road-speeding . ...i. -..
him back.
JGR's Denny Hamlin, a three-time winner in
the past seven races, interpreted Hendrick's
comments as more of a motivational speech to
his own team than an honest assessment of the
situation.
"Rick [Hendrickl does a good job of motivating
his team," Hamlin said. "I just think that is
maybe motivation. His team always seems to
stay on top. There are peaks and valleys that
every team has, and Hendrick is rarely ever on
the down slope.
'"They're good. The 24 [Jeff Gordon] is one of
the best cars every week, and the 48 |Jimmie
Johnson] really has just had bad luck lately. We
can still consider them the teams to beat."
Joe Gibbs himself pointed out that all it takes
is some bad racing luck on his team's part to
turn things back in Hendrick's favor.
"I'm always conscious of the knuckle sandwich
that is waiting right around the corner;" he said.
"We're just getting started really here. I'm
thrilled that the last seven, eight weeks have
gone so well for us, but the reality is that can all
turn in a week ...
"We've got great teams out there we've talked
about [Johnson's team, and to say that we're
there would be ridiculous ," Gibbs said. T1le
pretty much dominated things. They had a great
car again [at Dover]."


Kyle Busch, No. 18, and Jimmie Johnson, No. 48, battle it
out last Sunday at Dover Intl. Speedway. J i". : A photo)

Concern over Vickers' illness

The news that Brian Vickers was hospitalized
with blood clots and wouldn't be able to race at
Dover and possibly other upcoming races, was
humbling for many of his peers and helped them
to put things in perspective.
"When you're in this sport, you believe that the
only thing that matters is this sport," i '.,., 1 .
said. "But the reality of it is that there are things
that are more important ... Sitting out a race, or
two, three, four; five or ten. ain't going to ruin his
career. And it's not going to make it to where he
can't be competitive.
"It's certainly not what he wants, and to him
I'm sure it feels like the worst thing that can pos-
sibly happen. But the main thing is that he's
healthy. I've had to be out, and it's not a pleasant
experience, but he'll be OK."
Jimmnie Johnson told reporters at Dover last
Friday that he'd spoken to Vickers by phone.
"Until they can find out what's going on,
there's a lot of worry and concern. It's weird to
talk to a guy, and I talked to him on the phone,
and he was just happy, not necessarily happy
about being out of the car, but healthy and
sounds find and normal."


.n. Prices in Effect Thru 7-4-10


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