Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






/ .


000019 120110 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611 1943






Lake


CCSO investigates solicitations


Phone calls
request donations
to benefit agencies.
From staff reports
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office is warning
local residents about solicita-
tions from callers who claim
that donated funds will go
back into the community.


According to CCSO,.the
agency has been contact-
ed by local residents who
have received numerous
calls from organizations
claiming they are soliciting
donations on behalf of local
law enforcement agencies.
CCSO is a publicly fund-
ed agency that will never
solicit donations from the
community, according to


a news release issued by
CCSO on Tuesday.
Donations to this group
will not go toward fund-
ing locals departments,
reports said.
The statement also
noted that the Florida
Sheriff's Youth Ranches is
an endorsed charity, and
may send residents packets
by mail, but will not solicit


funds by phone.
The Florida Department
of Agriculture's
Department of Consumer
Services is investigating
the solicitations. Residents
who receive calls are asked
to request a packet by mail,
and then call the consumer
services hotline at (800)
435-7352 to report the
solicitation.


Chef's specialty


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Taste of Home Cooking School chef Michelle Roberts adds green peppers to a zesty penne dish she made at a demonstration
Tuesday night at the Lake City Community College. More than 600 residents attended the event where Roberts made dishes
including asparagus tomato salad, orange chocolate tart, freezer berry jam and angel hair pasta with chicken and artichokes.


Hundreds attend Cooking School


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Class was in ses-
sion, and Renee
Dandy of Lake
City made
sure she was
in attendance for the latest
cooking school.
"I love cooking," she
said.
Dandy was among more
than 600 people in atten-
dance Tuesday at the Taste
of Home Cooking School
at Lake City Community
College.
The Lake City Reporter
and LCCC sponsored
the event. National spon-
sors included Ziploc,
Velveeta, Philadelphia
Cream Cheese, Mushroom
Council, Jimmy Dean and
Gallo.
Taste of Home culinary
artist Michelle Roberts
demonstrated step-by-step
instructions for several
dishes - such as zesty
penhe sausage and pep-
per pasta, romaine Caesar
salad and seasoned crou-
tons and an updated ver-
sion of Gram's chicken pot
pie - for the audience.
Copies of each recipe were
available in a cookbook for
them to follow along.
"Michelle did not disap-
point," said Todd Wilson,
Lake City Reporter pub-

COOKING continued on 5A


PHOTOS BY
JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake C)ty Reporter

(ABOVE) Roberts
autographs complimentary
Taste of Home magazines
to some of her fans after the
demonstration.


(RIGHT) More than 600
were in attendance to watch
Roberts create easy-to-make
recipes that usually take less
than 20 minutes to create.


I L A


ATHLETIC 'TRAFFIC JAM'


Trio of sports


tournaments


this weekend


Thousands to


converge on Lake
City on Saturday.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
The definition of "traffic
jam" may be changed for
local residents this weekend
when teams participating in
three sports tournaments
converge on the area.
More than 1,000 children,
many accompanied by their
parents, coaches and fami-
lies, will be in town to take
part in either: An 80-team,
three-on-three soccer tour-
nament, a 59-team USSSA
baseball tournament or 38-
team girl's softball tourna-
ment All three tournaments
are slated to take place
Saturday and Sunday at the
Southside Sports Complex.
The influx of people will
affect the local roadways
and have already impacted
the local hotels and motels
with an increased number
of guests slated for the
weekend.
On Tuesday afternoon,
local officials from the
county recreation depart-
ment, tourist development
council, police department,


county ,and
representa-
l tives met
for an hour
to discuss
the rami-
fications
Campbell hosting the
multi-team tournaments.
"I want them to feel safe,"
said county manager Dale
Williams, referring to the
tournament guests. "I want
the restrooms to be reason-
ably clean, and if they want
something to drink, I want
them to have access to cold
drinks. This should be a tre-
mendous shot in the arm for
our local hotels and motels."
The meeting was led by
Harvey Campbell, executive
director of the Columbia
CountyTouristDevelopment
Council, who stressed the
traffic and safety-related
issues for the tournaments.
Campbell said traffic
increases are expected on
both Bascom Norris Road
and U.S. Highway 90 West,
particularly in the vicinity
of the Southside Recreation
Complex.
"Bascom Norris Road
will be extremely congest-
TOURNEY continued on 3A


Second Annual

Spring Fling takes

place Saturday


Annual fundraiser
to benefit CARC,
Happy House.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
An evening of dancing,
food, prizes, games and a
silent auction will serve as a
joint fundraiser for two local
agencies and will supple-
ment their budgets.
CARC-Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities
and Happy House Child
Care will be the benefi-
ciaries of this weekend's
Second Annual Spring
Fling.
The fundraiser will take
place at 7 p.m. Saturday
at the home of Jerry and
Carolyn Castagna, 521 NW
Old Mill Drive. Tickets are
$50 each. The ticket price
includes the cost of all foods
and beverages. Tickets can
be purchased at CARC, 512
SW Sisters Welcome Road;
Happy House, 544 NW
Lake Jeffery Road; Baya
Pharmacy East and West,
780 SE Baya Drive and 1465
W. U.S. Highway 90; John
Burns State Farm, 234 SW
Main Blvd: and all locations
of First Federal Bank of
Florida.
CARC provides services
for 70 physically or mental-
ly challenged clients, while
Happy House provides ser-


vices for 260 children.
Although this fundraiser
marks the second year of
the event, Carol Jewett,
CARC- Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities,
said Happy House and
CARC have been involved
in, joint fundraising events
since 1993.
"Both Happy House and
CARC have been hit with
cuts, like most organiza-
tions have, so it's really
important this year to raise
funds for this," she said.
Jewett said CARC plans
to use its 50 percent of the
proceeds to support its
group, home and its adult
day training program.
"I think the highlight
of the event is it's just an
opportunity for people to
get together, relax and have
a good time," she said.
Jewett said the Castagnas
are platinum sponsors of
the event and both orga-
nizations appreciate them
opening their home for the
event.
"The proceeds will help
the families who don't qual-
ify for state assistance," said
Happy House executive
director Sheryll Walker,
who noted the money will
also be used to help pay for
partial scholarships for the
children. "The proceeds will
allow us to help a lot more
families and help children
that need to be there."


1 ! :5' .n ,-.' ,:u 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


92
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


" Opinion ................ 4A
- " - State................... 3A
Local ................... 5A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
STATE
Expanding the
space station.


COMING
THURSDAY
NASCAR news
from the track.


One and done
Columbia baseball coach
Greg Gillman resigns after
first season
Sports, I B






porter











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


CA$H 3 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 5-6-2
Evening: 7-8-1


4 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 0-3-1-4
Evening: 3-2-0-4


eznatch.
Monday:
3-10-13-27-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




Parents of'tween Gleeks'



set hands on pause button


NEW YORK
K," went the e-mail
that circulated among
parents recently at
a New York City
elementary school.
"Is 'everyone' in the fifth grade
REALLY watching 'Glee'?"
A discussion ensued: To Glee or
not to Glee?
At issue wasn't the quality of the
hugely popular Fox series about a
high school glee club, which in just
its first season has won a Golden
Globe, seen its cast perform at the
White House, launched a national
concert tour, and is, to hear many
tell it, approaching the status of a
mini-pop culture phenomenon.
The question, rather: Is "Glee"
just too racy for the tweens who
love it?
It's a dilemma, and not just
because it's hard to fight with one's
offspring. "Glee," which kids love
for its infectious musical numbers
- a few critics call them over-
produced or sloppily lip-synched,
but let's not be grumpy about it,
because "Glee" is the very antith-
esis of grump - has an upbeat,
inclusive message that recalls the
"High School Musical" films.
But this ain't no "High School
Musical." For where those rosy-
cheeked Disney Channel films
barely contained a kiss on the lips,
"Glee" has sex. And teen pregnan-
cy It tackles issues of homosexual-
ity and losing one's virginity, and
one scene showed a character, well,
ejaculating in a hot tub.
So what's a parent of a tween
"gleek" - as fans call themselves
- to do?
For Scott Bienstock, the answer


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file publicity image released by Fox (from left) Lea Michele, Jenna
Ushkowitz, Amber Riley, H-eather Morris, Dianna Agron and Naya Rivera perform
in 'The Power of Madonna' episode of 'Glee.'


is to keep his hand nervously on
the pause button, ever at the ready
to order his 9-year-old daughter and
13-year-old son to close their eyes.
"It's pretty uncomfortable," says
Bienstock, a sales representative
in New York. That hot tub scene
particularly unnerved him, and he
thinks some of the numbers can
be a little provocative. But his kids
and his wife, Ruth, love the show so
much'that he has, basically, given
up the fight.

Boston Pops unveils
tribute to Kennedys
BOSTON - The Boston Pops is
taking the wraps off a musical trib-
ute to the Kennedys. .


The world premiere of "The
Dream Lives On: A Portrait of
the Kennedy Brothers," is set for
Tuesday night at Symphony Hall.
Celebrity narrators
Robert De Niro,
Morgan Freeman
and Ed Harris
will read from
famous speeches of
President John F
De Niro. Kennedy and Sens.
Robert and Edward
Kennedy.
Boston Pops conductor Keith
Lockhart commissioned com-
poser Peter Boyer and lyricist Lynn
Ahrens to write the piece.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* PBS newscaster Jim
Lehrer is 76.
* TV personality David
Hartman is 75.
" Actor James Fox is 71.
: Actress Nancy Kwan is 71.
" Author-director Nora
Ephron is 69.
" Actor Peter Mayhew is 66.
" Rock singer-composer ,
Pete Townshend (The Who)


is 65.
* Concert pianist David
Helfgott.is 63.
* Rock singer-musician
Dusty Hill (ZZ Top) is 61.
* Singer-actress Grace
Jones is 58.
* Rock musician Phil Rudd
(AC-DC) is 56.
* Baseball catcher Rick
Cerone is 56.


Thought for Today


"If every nation gets the
government it deserves,
every generation writes the
history which corresponds
with its view of the world."


- Elizabeth Janeway
American writer and critic (1913-2005)



Lake City Reporter
CLASIIE


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at. 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(ttmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a:m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice-related credits will be issued.
Circulation ................755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................ . $26.32
24 Weeks............ .....$48.79
52 Weeks.......... .....$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks............. . . ...$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Wildlife death-
toll uncertain
MIAMI -- Federal
officials say they don't
know whether a mas-
sive oil spill in the Gulf
of Mexico killed 189 sea
turtles, birds and other
animals found dead since
it started.
The total includes 154
sea turtles, primarily
the endangered Kemp's
ridley variety, plus 12 dol-
phins and 23 birds.
But in a phone news
conference Tuesday,
officials said they don't
know if any of the animals
were killed by oil or the
chemicals being used to
disperse it.
Barbara Schroeder
of the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric
Administration's fisheries
program says necropsies
have not detected oil
in the bodies of the sea
turtles.
Acting U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service Director
Rowan Gould says the
spill's effects could be
felt for decades and may
never be fully known
because so many affected
creatures live far off-
shore.

Man charged
with shooting
JACKSONVILLE
- A Jacksonville man has
been charged with shoot-
ing and injuring his sister
and her 10-month-old
daughter.
The Jacksonville
Sheriff's Office reports
that 22-year-old Angel
Luis Lopez was arrested
and charged Tuesday
with two counts of aggra-
vated battery and one
count of assault.
Witnesses say Lopez
confronted his sister
and a man she was with
when they tried to leave
an apartment complex


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this recent photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Dr.
Erica Miller, a member of the Louisiana State Wildlife
Response Team, cleans oil from a pelican at the Clean
Gulf Associates Mobile Wildlife Rehabilitation Station in


Plaquemines Parish, La.
Tuesday morning. As the
man and woman tried
to drive away with the
baby, witnesses say Lopez
opened fire. The baby
was hit in the leg, and the
mother was grazed by a
bullet.
The infant was taken
to a nearby hospital with
serious, but not life-threat-
ening injuries.
Lopez was being held
without bail.

Manatee rescued
from canal
ORLANDO - Wildlife
experts rescued an adult
female manatee from a
canal in central Florida.
The 8-foot manatee
remains in critical con-
dition at SeaWorld's
Manatee Rescue &
Rehabilitation Center.
She was probably hit by
a boat.
On Tuesday, veterinar-
ians will perform an x-ray
to search for internal
injuries.
The Florida Fish &
Wildlife Conservation
Commission and
SeaWorld Orlando's
Animal Rescue Team
rescued her on Monday
in the area of Satellite


Beach, which is east of
Orlando.

Arson suspected
at Isaac's home
TALLAHASSEE - The
state fire marshal's office
suspects a weekend fire
that nearly destroyed
the home of Gov. Charlie6
Crist's former commu-
,nications director was
arson.
Erin Isaac, who
resigned as the gover-
nor's chief spokeswoman
in November, declined
commentTuesday on
the fire that engulfed the
home at about 4:30 a.m.
Sunday.
She and her husband
were out of town at the
time.
After inspecting the
home just hours after the
blaze, Capt. Joe Steadman
of the Fire Marshal's
Office told the Tallahassee
Democrat the fire was
intentionally set and that
it was being classified as
arson.
No arrests have been
made. Damage to the
home, located in a trendy
midtown area of the capi-
tal city, was estimated at
$200,000.


THE WEATHER


PARTLY PARTLY j PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY
CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY


HI 92LO HI92LO LO 6 HI 91 L03i4 HI 91 LO H8 HI 88LOG

-. .. .. .. ,- -" '


Tallahassee *
89/66 ..
i . .. . . , .
Pensacola '0
86/69 ,. FPailma City
84/70


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


g7a
Wednesd


Ip
ay


SVald
89,
Lake
92,

.(


89
70
87
63
97 in 1930
49 in 1984


0.00"
0.79"-
-15.44"
1.49"
15.51"


osta
/63
aC �


lacksonville
90 IF6r


City
Cape Canaveral


uL. - /" Daytona Beach
/63 Ft. Lauderdale
ainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
)1/64 98,68 Gainesville
SOcala64 \ Jacksonville
"91/64 0 1 -'
l Oando Cape Canaveral Key West
91/68 82/69 Lake City
Miami
Tampa,* Naples
89/71 West Palm Beach Ocala
88/72 0 Orlando
*, FL Lauderdale Panama City
FtL Myers,. 87/75 0 Pensacola
90/70 * Naples * Tallahassee
87/72 Miami Tampa
Key West 88/75 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
85/76


SUN
Sunrise today 6:35 a.m.
Sunset today 8:20 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:34 a.m.
Sunset tom. 8:20 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 411:58 a.m.
Moonset today 12:50 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 1:04 p.m.
Moonset tom. 1:30 a.m.


May May June June
20 27 4 12
First Full Last New


7p la 6a
Thursday


S,
^*-'1

'b


F. orecalied temperate "Fees lie' "temperaire


On this date in
1984, the Texas
coastline saw rec
setting rainfall.
Beaumont receive
'4.22 inches of ra
in 6 hours, while
inches of rain fel
at Port Arthur in
hours.


10
VERYWlt
10 miMtes btol
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Thursday
83/75/pc
89/70/pc
88/77/pc
93/74/pc
91/66/pc
90/66/pc
86/75/pc
92/66/pc
90/76/pc
91/73/pc
92/67/pc
92/70/pc
86/70/pc
88/72/pc
91/66/pc
90/75/pc
91/65/pc
89/74/pc


Friday
83/75/pc
88/69/pc
89/77/pc
93/74/pc
90/67/pc
89/67/pc
86/76/pc
91/66/pc
90/76/pc
92/73/pc
91/68/pc
92/69/pc
86/71/s
88/71/pc
91/66/pc
92/74/pc
91/67/pc
89/74/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


_ Forecasts, data and graph-
"---' * Ics � 2010 Weather Central
S LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com




:ord
ed
gin
6
8


AROUND FLORIDA


, Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


mm*


MIM










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent until
proven guilty.
Friday, May 14
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Gary B. Calhoun, 30,
530 SE Monroe St., driving
while license suspended/.
revoked (11 suspensions
and two revocations).
* Antonio Maurice
Duhart, 30, 613 NW
Wilson St., warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of burglary
of a dwelling while armed
and felony fleeing.
* Thomas Alan Graham,
53, 9669 SW County Road
240, aggravated battery
with a firearm.
* Janet Laree Moses,
52, 254 SW Range Ave.,
Madison, worthless bank
checks.,
* Jessie James Smith,
49, 531 Rosemary Ave.,
West Palm Beach, warrant:
Burglary of a structure and
petit theft. .
Lake City
Police Department
* Jacquelin D. Douglas,
no age given, 205 NE
Washington St., aggravated
battery (domestic vio-
lence).


Saturday, May 15
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Jesse Bryant Dupree,
29, 1153 NE Gum Swamp
Road, fleeing and eluding,
reckless driving, resisting
arrest without violence and
driving while license sus-
pended/revoked (second
offense).
* Jonathon Clayton
Prouty, 29, 3598 W. U.S.
Highway 90, warrant:
Uttering and forgery, revo-
cation of release on own
recognizance supervision,
possession of a controlled
substance, possession of a
controlled substance with
intent to sell, possession
of a controlled substance
with trafficking and
possession of drug
paraphernalia.
* Christine Delores
Reeves, 26, 204 NW Farley
St., burglary, theft, trespass
'and criminal mischief.
Sunday, May 16
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Garrett S. Caldwell,
25, 154 SW Count Court,
warrant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
Possession of a controlled
substance (two counts).
* Bruce L. Johnson, no
age given, homeless, bat-
tery on a pregnant person
and disorderly intoxication.
* Henrithson Joseph,


no age given, 262 NE
Derby Terrace, driving
while license suspended
or revoked (habitual) and
warrant: Driving while
license suspended revoked.
* Andrea Robin
Bozeman, 37, 122 Condor
Ave., Orlando, possession
of more than 20 grams of
marijuana, introduction of
marijuana into state correc-
tional facility, possession
of marijuana with intent to
deliver and possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Lake City
Police Department
* Alvinesha Rashaenett
Roberson, no age given,
194 SW Santos Terrace,
burglary with battery and
giving a false name to law
enforcement officer.
Monday, May 17
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Derrick Eugene Elliot,
39, 1600 E. Duval St., fail-
ure of sex offender to reg-
ister with Columbia County
Sheriff's Office.
Tuesday, May 18
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Rebecca Anne McRae,
24, 150 SE Oakmont Court,
warrant: Failure to appear
for drug court on charges
of possession of a con-
trolled substance.

From staff reports.


Official: Oil regulations were 'lax'


By H. JOSEF HEBERT and
FREDERIC J. FROMMER
Associated Press Writers

WASHINGTON -
Grilled by skeptical law-
makers, Interior Secretary
Ken Salazar on Tuesday
acknowledged his agency
had been lax in overseeing
offshore drilling activities
and that contributed to the
disastrous oil spill in the
Gulf.of Mexico.
"There will be tremendous
lessons to be learned here,"
Salazar told a Senate panel in
his first appearance before
Congress since the April 20
blowout and explosion on
the Deepwater Horizon rig.
Describing pending reforms
in the Interior Department,


TOURNEY
Continued From Page 1A4

ed leading to the U.S. 90
interchange," he said, not-
ing residents should use
alternative routes if avail-
able. "All area motorists are
urged to allow several extra
minutes when traveling in
the vicinity of the Southside
Recreation Complex and to
be patient and courteous
with slow-moving traffic.
Traffic signage on Bascom
Norris willremind motorists
of the traffic conditions on
the weekend. Residents are
urged to be extremely cau-
tious around the Southside
Complex and mindful of
traffic entering and exiting
the sports facility."
Although an ambulance
will be posted at the com-
plex, officials continue to
harbor concerns about
parking associated with the
tournaments.
' Discussions centered
around alternative parking
and areas where visitors
to the area could park and
safely walk to the sporting
event of their choice.
Despite the anticipated
parking concerns, officials
seemed to be pleased with
the opportunity to host the
tournaments.
Scott Everett, president of
the Columbia Youth Soccer
Association, seemed to be
pleased with hosting such a
large sporting event.
"We have teams that can
come from all over the coun-
try, but most of them are
Florida-based teams," he said.
"This is the first time we've
ever had an 80-team tour-
nament for soccer. I know
baseball and everything has
been going pretty steady for
a while, but this is our first
big tournament for soccer. It
shows that soccer really has
grown around here."


Salazar cited a "collective
responsibility" for the spill
that included the federal
agency he manages, he
said.
His appearances before
two of the three Senate
panels holding hearings
Tuesday on the giant oil spill
came as federal officials kept
a wary eye on the expanding
dimensions of the problem.
The government increased
the area of the Gulf where
fishing is shut down to
46,000 square miles, or
about 19 percent of federal
waters. That's up from about
7 percent before.
New underwater video
released by BP PLC, the
oil giant that owns a major-
ity interest in the blown


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your events



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well, showed oil and gas
erupting under pressure in
large, dark clouds from its
crippled blowout preventer
safety device on the ocean
floor. The leaks resembled
a geyser on land. The five-
minute clip apparently was
recorded late Saturday and
Sunday afternoon from
aboard a remotely operated
submarine.
Salazar, testifying
before the Senate Energy
and Natural Resources
Committee, promised an
overhaul of federal regula-
tions and said blame for
the BP spill rests with both
industry and the govern-
ment, particularly his agen-
cy's Minerals Management
Service.


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your photos


Space station gets expansion

By MARCIA DUNN r /
AP Aerospace Writer .

CAPE CANAVERAL
- The Atlantis astronauts
attached a new Russian ./
chambertotheInternational 2
Space Station on Tuesday, -' . ,


using a robot arm to drive
in the 20-foot-long room
that will double as a closet
and mini-lab.
This was the first time
NASA delivered a Russian
compartment to the 12-
year-old space station and
required two astronauts
working a big robot arm.
Normally, Russian space
station modules dock auto-
matically. That's how a
similar compartment got
to the space station last
November.
Astronaut Garrett
Reisman operated the space
station's robot arm, driving
in the module with such
precision that the first cap-
ture sensor didn't even .go
off."
"He went right down the
middle and got a hole in


<-%� '


1~-~


... . ,



This Monday photo provided by NASA shows the space
shuttle Atlantis's cabin and forward cargo bay and part of the


International Space Station.

one," Mission Control said.
Reisman was assisted by
Piers Sellers, who called
out all the milestones.
The six space station
residents - especially the
three Russians - were
thrilled with the addition.
Commander Oleg Kotov
thanked NASA for deliv-
ering the compartment,


named Rassvet, or Dawn in
Russian.
"The International Space
Station has grown by one
more module," he called
down in Russian.
Kotov's enthusiasm was
diminished later in the day
when he photographed
the oil spill in the Gulf of
Mexico, calling it scary.


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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427














OPINION


Wednesday, May 19, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


Local voices

can make a

difference

Whether or not
you agree with
the issue, you
can't deny
citizen govern-
ment in action.
The recent presentation to
the supervisor of elections of
a petition seeking to change a
county-regulated utility service
is evidence that citizens not
only have a voice in local gov-
ernment, but that that voice is a
means to effect change.
What that change will be
is yet unclear - petition
signatures must be verified
before the document can be
certified - but if certification
is achieved, we do know this
much: Some parameter of the
county's decision to enforce its
new utility ordinances will be
altered. Either the county will
acquiesce to the-demands of
the petition, or the matter will
go before voters in November.
Not so long ago, such a
conflict might have reached
resolution through more violent
means. Property owners squar-
ing off with county employees
is not difficult to imagine.
Today, working within the
confines of the county charter,
the situation resulted in peace-
ful protest that has the potential
for an outcome binding to both
citizens and government.
While there is no way t6 pre-
dict what that outcome will be,
this much is sure - grassroots
government can make a
difference.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Wednesday, May
19, the 139th day of 2010.
There are 226 days left in the
year.
* In 1536, Anne Boleyn, the
second wife of England's
King Henry VIII, was
beheaded after being convicted
of adultery.
* In 1780, a mysterious
darkness enveloped much
of New England and part of
Canada in the early afternoon.
* In 1921, Corigress
passed, and President Warren
G. Harding signed, the
Emergency Quota Act, which
established national quotas for
immigrants.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
\The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by'
Community Newspapers Inc..
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
. Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman
LETTERS

POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for=
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the, Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


A closer look at hydrocarbon use


A friend in Lake
Charles reports, that
Louisianans are
buying shrimp in
50-pound lots and
freezing it in anticipation of
landfall by the proliferating oil
slick in the Gulf of Mexico. If
the oil comes ashore in mea-
sures anywhere close to its
malignant potential, the impact
will be devastating: the cost of
shrimp will skyrocket, many
animals will die, and shorelines
and marshlands will bear the
oily evidence for decades.
It could be very bad.
Still, in the interest of brutal
honesty, an oil spill like this
from time to time is instruc-
tive, a visible expression and
reminder of the toxic nature of
our primary source of energy,
hydrocarbons.
Our use of energy has always
had an impact on our environ-
ment; sometimes the impact is
more visible than at other times.
Ancient civilizations burned a
lot of wood, but I doubt if our
ancestors thought a lot about
the, smoke that drifted off on the
wind or the soot that collected
on the insides of their teepees
and temples. And deforestation
was a gradual, hardly noticeable
process; every generation left
behind only a little less.forest
than it had inherited.
Thus, over the course of
around 1,000 years, Easter
Island's growing population
reduced its expansive forests
to unproductive, barren ground
and was itself decimated. By the
time the Europeans" arrived in
the 18th Century, the island was
a desolate, squalid place. Its few
remaining inhabitants probably
had no idea what had happened.


- ,
John Crisp
jcrisp@delmar.edu


The consequences of our use
of energy became much more
evident during the Industrial
Revolution. Urban populations
mushroomed and energy con-
sumption in confined circum-
stances becarhe more intense.
People began to burn coal, as
well as wood, and cities were
smothered under grimy concen-
trations of hydrocarbon residue.
Charles Dickens' London was
a sinkhole of smoke and soot.
Chimneysweeps kept busy, and
their visible grime was a walk-
ing manifestation of the filth in
the air.
The switch to electricity
allowed us to move our coal
.burning away from the city,
where the smoke was less
obvious. Taller smokestacks
reduced local pollution, while
spreading sulfur and nitrogen
compounds over wider areas in
the form of "acid rain," a much
less visible but nevertheless
destructive form of pollution.
In the meantime, reduced
coal burning in cities was bal-
anced by increased vehicle
exhaust. Automobile emissions
are largely invisible, but one sci-
entist suggests that the proper
image is of a charcoal briquette
dropping from every tailpipe
about every quarter of a mile,
which would produce a kind of
"black snow" alongside the road


that would be hard to ignore.
Things have gotten better,
which is to say we've found
better ways to conceal the filth
that underpins our hydrocarbon
infrastructure. Visible pollution
over large cities has diminished,
and clean air laws have, for
the most part, put an end to
dramatic events like the "Big
Smoke," which is believed to
have killed as many as 12,000
Londoners over a 4-day period
in December, 1952.
In fact, one of the drawbacks
of an active environmental
movement is that visible pollu-
tion can be driven underground,
so to speak, where we find it
much more acceptable, while
real gains in emission controls
are largely offset by increases in
hydrocarbon consumption.
Rush Limbaugh speculated
that environmental wackos may
have sabotaged the Deepwater
Horizon well in order to cause
the kind of oil spill that will get
the public's attention. Unlikely.
Besides, there's no real need for
sabotage. Hydrocarbons - oil,
coal, natural gas - whether in
production or consumption, are
by their nature polluting, and
the consequences of their use
will eventually become evident.
The Deepwater Horizon oil
spill is only an exaggerated
and very public version of what
always happens when we use
hydrocarbons. It will be fully
evident soon in the marshes
along the shores of the Gulf
coast. Too bad we're not will-
ing to look at the consequences
more seriously.

E John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at bel Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


It's been more than four
years, since two prominent
former Florida political
leaders, former gover-
nor and U.S. Senator
Bob Graham and former
Congressman Lou Frey, began
pressing the urgency of teach-
ing school children more about
civics. Soon thereafter, former
U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor joined
forces saying in a visit-here,
'Today, civics, government and
American history are being
pushed out of the classroom,
and the results are as dismal as
they are unsurprising."
We are happy to have the
opportunity to salute the Florida
Legislature for, after three years
of false starts, making a strong
step forward by passing SB
1096/HB 105, which require
that students starting middle
school in the 2012-2013 school
year take a semester-long civ-
ics class, with 7th graders
completing a civics course and


8th graders passing a statewide
standardized civics test to be
promoted to high school.
The Florida Department of
Education will provide the $1.5
million to give the new test, and
scores will be a part of every ,
school's grade from the state.
The new law, called the
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor
Civics Education Act, also
requires civics-related content
be taught in the language arts
curriculum of all grade levels
beginning with the 2011-12
school year.
This new requirement should
help in preparing youngsters for
more civic involvement - more
understanding of not only the
responsibilities of government,
but also of the governed - all
citizens; all voters - and maybe
even with less of the shooting-
from-the-lip circus that domi-
nates today's ideological battles.
The emphasis on more civ-
ics education came in tandem
with the Legislature's boost


in science and math educa-
tion through Senate Bill 4.
Beginning this fall and through
the 2014-15 school year it will
phase in geometry, Algebra
II, biology, chemistry or phys-
ics, plus one rigorous science
course, in order to graduate
from high school ...
One help may be in the law's
requirement for schools, start-
ing in middle school, to help
students plan their futures
through counseling about the
new graduation requirements,
about vocational certification
options and career and college
planning, including the Bright
Futures Scholarship Program.
So students; as this school
year comes to a close, enjoy
your summer and prepare for
the new demands ahead. You've
heard it before, but it's true: On
down the road, you'll be glad to
have the advantages of a better
education.
* Tallahassee Democrat


Troy Roberts
Phone: (386) 754-0427
troberts@lakecityreportercom

To text or

not to text.

It's not a

question

was working on a
story in Gainesville on
Tuesday when a man -
around my age, maybe
a little 61der - drove up
beside me at a red light.
I'd noticed him a few blocks
before that red light for two
reasons - one, he was driv-
ing a Chevrolet Corvette, a car
that will borrow the gaze of any
man on the face of the earth
for at least a few seconds. The
other reason, and the more
serious one, is that he was
texting between red lights and
driving with his knees.
His windows were down, so,
being the thoughtful person
I am, I thought I'd give him a
little help.
"Beautiful car," I called out
to him. "2001?"
He seemed a little taken
aback at' first, but like most men,
are glad to talk about their cars
- especially if they have a blaz-
ing fast eight-cylinder power
plant in them. "Ifs actually a
2002, but good guess."
"Great, awesome," I said, try-
ing to make the next few w5rds
not seem as demeaning. "Hey,
you know, I'd hate to see that
car ruined. Maybe you shouldn't
text while you're driving."
"What's that?" he asked.
"Maybe you shouldn't text
while you're driving," I said
again, a little louder this time.
I guess his response
shouldn't have surprised me,
but it did - a well placed fin-
ger, an obscenity directed-in my
direction and squealing ties at
the green light as he sped away.
* You can't blame me for try-
ing to be helpful.
While law enforcement
officers for years have called
distracted driving one of the
worst problems motorists face
on today's roadways, texting is
quickly becoming worst. Here
are some statistics that may
put that into perspective, cour-
tesy of Distraction.gov, the offi-
cial U.S. Government website
for distracted driving.
* Driving while using a cell
phone reduces the amount of
brain activity associated with
driving by 37 percent.
* Drivers who use hand-held
devices are four times as likely
to get into crashes serious
enough to injure themselves.
* And using a cell phone
while driving - hand-held or
hands-free - delays a driver's
reaction time as much as having
a blood alcohol concentration at
the legal limit of .08 percent
And that's just talking on the
phone, not texting, which obvi-
ously requires more attention
on your phone and less on the
roadway.
Those texting are even
more at-risk. According to a
study done by Virginia Tech
University in 2009, drivers
of heavy vehicles and trucks
who are texting are more than
23 times more likely to be
involved in an accident than
those who are not.
That's a significant increase.
If someone told you that you'd
be 23 times more likely to die
if you ate a certain brand of
food or read a certain maga-
zine, you'd stay away from it;
right? I hope you would.
So when you hear that beep
alerting you to a new text
message, let it wait a few
minutes. Your fellow drivers
will be glad you did.


* Troy Roberts is the assistant
editor of the Lake City Reporter.


4A


OTHER OPINION

New school demands a boon for education









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


PHOTOS BY JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
(TOP LEFT) Attendees were handed goody bags that featured Taste of Home magazines
as well as coupons from some of the events sponsors. Selected attendees also won door
prizes like a kitchen sink, cooking pots and pans, gift cards, and freshly made dishes from
the food demonstration. (TOP RIGHT) Roberts (center) instructs Terri Bass (left) and Lake
City Reporter staff writer Leanne Tyo on how to prepare certain foods before the event starts.
(BOTTOM RIGHT) Lake City Reporter graphic designer Josh Blackmon keeps the crowd
entertained while ingredients for the next food segment is being prepared.


COOKING: School a success
Continued From Page 1A


fisher. "She shared 12
wonderful recipes with the
crowds."
Roberts also gave out
door prizes, which includ-
ed cookbooks.
"At my show, I like to
have a lot of excitement,"
she said. "If you win, you
have to jump up and say 'I
love food.'"
Cooking school is held
around the nation and it
was previously in Lake City
in 2004 and 2007.
It's been far too long
since the last cookifig
school, said Glenda Taylor
of Lake City.
"They need to have it
more often," she said.
"Have it at least once a
year."
Taylor attended cooking


State owes

company

$7 million
Associated Press

ORLANDO - A judge
has ordered the state of
Florida to pay $50,000 a
month until it makes good
on a $7 million judgment it
lost to a Canadian company
over whether bingo halls
can operate in Florida.
The order from Circuit
Court Judge. Lawrence
Johnston in Orlando was
received Tuesday by attor-
neys in the case.
It ordered Florida
Attorney General Bill
McCollum to pay off the
judgment to Bradenton
Group Inc.
The Attorney General's
Office'went after Bradenton
in 1995 using Florida's rack-
eteering law.




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school in 2007.
"It's the next thing to
going to see Paula Deen,"
she said.
Lisa Raulerson of Lake
City had a lot of fun the
last time she came to
cooking school, she said.
"I like to cook," she
said. "I'm always looking
for new and better ways to
cook."
Anything from a Taste
of Home is "awesome,"
Raulerson said. Cooking
school brings together
hundreds of people
interested in the same
thing.
Dawn Peisel of Lake City
said she has been cooking
for 10 years and wanted
to get some new cooking
ideas at the event. She


subscribes to the Taste of
Home magazine.
Attendees learned a vari-
ety of recipes to try at the
event.
"(Cooking school)
brings a little something
different to the commu-
nity," she said.
Volunteers from the
Women's Club of Lake City
assisted Roberts during the
day and helped seat people
at the event. Also several
junior ROTC cadets helped
give out goody bags, which
included coupons and cook
books.
"I want to thank every-
one that came out," Wilson
said. "The community
always supports this event
we're honored to sponsor
and bring to Lake City."


Share
your photos





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www.lakecityreporter.com


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
www.columbiacrimestoppers. net
Funded wholly or in part by the Office of the Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust Fund.






We know you're busy.
We work harder to
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We enroll children at age 3 in our
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The tuition is about the same as
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We serve all students age 3
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Call today 386-752-8874


(386) 755-9130)
A - 6am-2pn * Sat 7amt 12p *, Sun amn-21pm
bok hcmks eaf o/ Iwin't Bticak on I II 90


Columbia County's Most Wanted
.- Eddie Murphy
, Wanted as of 5/17/10
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.'! *":-:- :." '* "-* .W anted for:


Burglary ot a Structure (x28)
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Dealing in Stolen Property (x3)


ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THIS INDIVIDUAL IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!


* Convenient Drive Thrus
* Free Delivery (,,iited area)
* Faster Service ,
- Most prescriptions can te filled in 15 iilntutes
.- If , our doctor calls in our prescription "
it s ill De waitingg for jou \hen )ou arrive.
- All prescriptions are filled local)
* 3 Convenient Locations
347 SW Main Blvd 3718 Hwy 90 W Hwy 27, Ft. White
758-6770 755-9300 497-2580


o
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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427








6A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010 Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx






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THE BAR IS ABOUT TO BE RAISED EVEN HIGHER.





IMPORTANT NEWS FOR MERCANTILE BANK CUSTOMERS








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as well as other filings containing information about The Toronto-Dominion Bank and The South Financial Group, Inc., without charge, at the Securities and Exchange Commission's (SEC) internet site (http //wwwsec gov). Copies of the proxy statement/prospectus and the filings with the SEC that will be incorporated hy
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for its most recent annual meeting, as filed with the SEC, and in TD Bank Financial Group's annual report and notice of annual meeting and proxy circular, as filed with the SEC.









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkrrby@lokectyreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday, May 19, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FISHING
Kingfish tourney
in Fernandina
The 28th annual
Nassau Sport Fishing
Association Tournament
of Champions Kingfish
Tournament is
June 17-19 in Fernandina
Beach. First prize for the
biggest fish is $25,000,
second prize $6,500 and
third prize $5,000, with
prizes paid out for the
20 largest fish. In all, 80
percent of entry fees are
paid out based on 200
boats. There are
special cash prizes for
the Lady Anglers, the
Junior Anglers and the
Class of 23 boats.
The tournament
is sanctioned by the
Southern Kingfish
Association in
accordance with SKA
Code of Conduct and
Angling Rules amended
to meet local conditions.
Tournament fee is $350
through May 31, then
$400 until registration
closes at 8 p.m. June 17.
Complete rules and
regulations may be found
at the Website
www.fishnsfa. com.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
Camps offered
at Stetson
Stetson University is
offering a series of boys
basketball camps this
summer. Shooting camp
is June 11-13, followed by
position camp on
June 13-17, high school
team camp on June 26-27,
and individual camp on
July 25-29.
For details, contact
Chris Capko at
ccapko@stetson. edu.
YOUTH VOLLEYBALL
Lady Tiger clinic
June 8-10
The Columbia High
volleyball program is
hosting its 2nd Annual
Future Lady Tiger
Volleyball Clinic from
9 a.m. to noon on
June 8-10 at the CHS
gym. The camp is for
girls entering the fourth
through 12th grades.
Cost of $65 includes a
T-shirt and free
admission to CHS
volleyball matches.
Registration is at Brian's
Sports through June 4.
For details, call coach
Casie McCallister at
755-8080, Ext. 254.
YOUTH SOFTBALL
Crushers camp
set July 19-23
The Columbia
Crushers Softball
Organization has a
softball camp for girls
of all ages planned for
8 a.m. to noon on July
19-23. Girls will receive
, instruction in fielding
and hitting. Registration
is at Brian's Sports with a
deadline of July 5.
For details, call Chad
Padgett at 755-4271.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Friday
* Fort White High
football vs. Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
* Columbia High
football Purple & Gold
Game, 7 p.m.
May 27
* Columbia High
football at Trinity Catholic


High, 7 p.m.


One and done


Columbia High
baseball coach Greg
Gillman steps down.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Coach Greg Gillman has become
Columbia High's version of a one-
hit wonder. After guiding the Tigers
to a 24-6 record, the head baseball
coach decided on Tuesday to step
down from the position.
"I appreciate the opportunity
the administration gave me,"
Gillman, said. "The support of the
dugout club has been phenom-
enal. The facilities were top notch.
Physically, it was a grind to run
the program. I'm the type that has
to do something 100 percent."
Gillman plans to stay involved
in the football program.
"When I first came here, coach
Craig Howard was one of the first
people r talked to and wanted to
be involved," he said. "With the
-


amount of time that takes and the
way the staff works, I just wanted
to devote my time to that. I believe
in what CHS football is, and that's
not a knock on baseball. I just
think at this point in my life that
ifts one or the other. I think we've
laid a good foundation and I always
want to be a part of the program."
Gillman also gave his endorse-
ment for the next head coach.
"I think there's plenty that will
apply," he said. "Coach J.T Clark
will stay involved in the summer
program. I advised him to apply,
and I think he deserves a shot."
Still, Gillman enjoyed his time
with the Tigers, and knew that it
wouldn't be a long-term stay.
"It was a year full of memories
that I'll keep forever," he said.
"Part of me wanted,to continue,
but when I accepted it in August
I did so under the conditions that
it wouldn't be for the long term.
At this point in my life, to head a
program of this caliber, I knew I
was past my twilight."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High head coach Greg Gillman talks to first baseman Cody Blackwell
in a game earlier this year. Gillman stepped down as Tigers' coach Tuesday.


i


Crimson Tide in
town to look at
Tigers' talent.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
It wasn't a stealth aircraft,
but everybody going on
board acted that way.
The University of
Alabama jet was parked at
Lake City Municipal Airport
on Tuesday.
Alabama head coach
Nick Saban had previously
journeyed to Lake City and
Columbia High on the jet,
but head coaches cannot do
any recruiting in the month
.of May.
Defensive Coordinator
Kirby Smart and defensive
coach Jeremy Pruitt, who
recruits this area for the
Crimson Tide, were the
passengers.
Heading out to the plane,
the coaches said they were
the pilots but someone was
already sitting in the -pilot's
seat.
"We're here to evaluate
players, to see what they
look like," Smart said.
Columbia defensive play-
er Tim Jernigan has drawn
the interest of schools
throughout the United
States, but Smart said he
could not own up to it..
"We're* not allowed to
comment on any specific
kid," Smart said.
TIDE continued on 2B


'Ill


10.


AiL/


1
. -


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Alabama defensive coordinator Kirby Smart prepares to board the University of
Alabama jet at Lake City Municipal Airport on Tuesday.

BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
BELOW: Columbia High offensive coordinator Ken Fasnacht talks with Florida Atlantic
assistant coach Joe Corozza at practice on Tuesday.
, 1t.. '" " :'t i..., ."-'t ' ' '' ''' ....: '- " ! .-,. -" . :'


Howard says CHS
has seen more
than 50 coaches.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
With three coaches in at
Columbia High on Tuesday,
it was just another day of
practice for the Tigers.
Coaches stopping in to eval-
uate talent has become a
regular thing this spring for
Coach Craig Howard and
the 2010 football team.
Among the biggest attrac-
tions is defensive tackle
Timmy Jernigan, who could
be among the nation's most
attractive recruits. Other
players are getting looks as
well, including wide receiv-
er Adrian Hill and defensive
back Ben Bell.
Jernigan has been held
out of practice throughout
most of the spring with a
hamstring injury, but the
senior has a date in mind
for his return.
"I'll be back Friday and
then it's on," he said at prac-
tice Tuesday.
Other players have ben-
efited as recruiters weren't
able to focus all their atten-
tion on Jernigan. Of course,
recruiters can't comment
on a specific player until
after signing day.
Among the coaches in on
Tuesday were Kirby Smart
(Alabama), Kris Cinkovich


CHS continued on 2B


Indians of the future


Fort White Middle
School closes spring
with scrimmage.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.comrn
FORT WHITE - Fort White
Middle School football had a mod-
ified Red & Black Game to end
spring practice on Tuesday.
The Indians ran their first
offense against the defense for a
half, then switched it around for
the second half.
"The fifth-graders participated
in the spring, but they could have
no contact," Fort White head
coach Mike Hunter said. "We
were limited in numbers and, with
the addition of them, several will
contribute in the fall."


Tyler Reed quarterbacked the
first offense to a series of big
plays. Starting from midfield,
the offense scored on nine of 10
drives.
Reed had three long touch-
down runs and completed three
scoring passes to Stephen Harris.
Cameron White ran for three
touchdowns. Corey Pentolino had
several carries for good yardage.
"The biggest advantage of this
spring was we had our quarter-
back situation in place," Hunter
said. "We were able to do a lot
more. I was pleased with spring
practice."
Starting on the offensive
line were Omar Allen, Randall
Fraddosio, Brason Caley, Jacob
Covington and Dustin Williams.
INDIANS continued on 2B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White Middle School head coach Mike Hunter talks to the players at the
end of spring practice in Fort White on Tuesday.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


Stephen Arnau was the tight
end and John Byrne played
wide receiver. Austin Terry
played running back.
The defense turned in a



TIDE

Continued From Page 1B

Columbia head coach Craig
Howard said the coaches
,-were two of many who have
visited CHS this spring.
"They can't get anything
more than transcripts,
height, weight, home
address, those things,"
Howard said. "We have had
double the coaches in this
year than last. Most of the
SEC has been here and
some of the Big Ten."
Howard said coaches are
allowed to watch practice,
but the Alabama duo were
boarding their jet (an Astra,
built by the Israel Aircraft
Industry) about 2 p.m. -
for parts unknown.
True to form, Smart said
he could not say where they
were headed.


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
9 p.m.
SPEED - NASCAR, exhibition,
Pit Crew Challenge, at Concord, N.C.
(same-day tape)
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS -Tour of California, stage 4,
San Jose to Modesto, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN -Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
TNT - Playoffs,Western Conference
finals, game 2, Phoenix at LA. Lakers

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE .FINALS
Monday
LA. Lakers 128, Phoenix 107
Tuesday
Boston at Orlando (n)
Today
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.
Saturday
Orlando at Boston, 8:30 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
STampa Bay $ 28 II
- NewYork 25 13
,Toronto 24 17
Boston 19 20
Baltimore 12 27
Central Division


Pct GB
.718 -
.658 2'�
.585 5
.487 9
.308 16


W L Pct GB.
Minnesota 24 15 .615 -
Detroit 22 17 .564 2
Chicago 16 22 .421 7%
Cleveland 15 22 .405 8
Kansas City 15 24 .385 9
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas .21 18 .538 -
Oakland 19 :20 .487 2
Los Angeles 18 22 .450 3'3.
Seattle 14 24 .368 6A
Monday's Games
N.Y.Yankees I 1, Boston 9
Kansas City 4, Baltimore 3
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, ppd.,
" rain
Minnesota 8,Toronto 3
TampaBay 4, Cleveland 3, 11 innings
Texas 4, LA.Angels 3
Oakland 8, Seattle 4
Tuesday's Games
Toronto 11, Minnesota 2
Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 2
Tampa Bay 6, Cleveland .
Boston at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Kansas City at Baltimore (n)
L.A. Angels at Texas (n)
Seattle at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
. Kansas City (Meche 0-4) at Cleveland
(Masterson'0-4), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (W.Davis 3-3) at N.Y.
Yankees (AJ.Burnett 4-1),7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 4-3) at Boston
(Buchholz 4-3),7:10 p.m. ,
Baltimore (Guthrie 2-4) at Texas
� (Harden 2-1), 8:05 p.m.
LA.Angels (J.Saunders 2-5) at Chicago
White Sox (Danks 3-2), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 4-2) at Oakland


(Braden 4-3), 10:05 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 2-2) at Seattle (Fister
3-1), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Kansas City at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Toronto at Seattle, 3:40 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
LA. Angels at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.

NL standings


Philadelph
Florida
Washingto
New York
Atlanta


East Division
W L
iia 24 13
21 19
on 20 19
19 20
18 20
Central Division


W L
Cincinnati 23 16
St. Louis 22 17
Chicago 17 22
Pittsburgh 16 22
Milwaukee 15 24
Houston 13 25
West Division
W L
San Diego 23 15


Pct GB
.649 -
.525 4'A
.513 5
.487 6
.474 6'A

Pct GB
.590 -
.564 I
.436 6
.421 6'A
.385 8
.342 9's

Pct GB
.605 -


-San Francisco 21 16 .568 I'A
Los Angeles 21 17 .553 2
Colorado 19 19 .500 4
Arizona 16 24 .400 8
Monday's Games
Philadelphia 12, Pittsburgh 2
Arizona 5, Florida I
Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 3
N.Y. Mets 3,Atlanta 2
Chicago Cubs '4, Colorado 2, II
innings
St. Louis 6,Washington 2
San Diego 3, San Francisco I
L.A. Dodgers 6, Houston 2
Tuesday's Games
Cincinnati 5, Milwaukee 4
Florida 8,Arizona*0
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (n)
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta (n)
Colorado at Chicago Cubs (n)
Washington at St. Louis (n)
San Francisco at San Diego (n)
Houston at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Gorzelanny 1-4) at
Philadelphia (Moyer 5-2), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Wolf 3-3) at Pittsburgh
(Burres 2-1), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Undecided) at Washington
(L.Hernandez 4-2), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Harang 2-5) at Atlanta
(Kawakami 0-6), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (G.Smith 1-2) at Houston
(FPaulino 0-6), 8:05 p.m.
Florida (A.Sanchez 2-2) at St. Louis
(J.Garcia 4-2), 8:15 p.m..'
San Francisco (Wellemeyer 2-3) at
Arizona (I.Kennedy 2-2), 9:40 p.m.
San Diego (Garland 4-2) at L.A.
Dodgers (Ra.Ortiz 1-1), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
-Cincinnati atAtlanta, 1:05 p.m.
Florida at St. Louis, 1:40 p.m.
Milwaukee at'Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
Byron Nelson Championship
Site: Irving, Texas.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.


Course: TPC Four Seasons Resort
Las Colinas (7,166 yards, par 70).
Purse: $6.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.17 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Friday, mid-
night-3 a.m., 3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.;
Saturday, midnight-3 a.m.) and CBS
(Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatourcom
LPGATOUR
Sybase Match Play Championship
Site: Gladstone, N.J.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Hamilton Farm Golf Club
(6,585 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.5 million. Winner's share:
$375,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
1-3 p.m., 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Friday, 3-5 a.m.,
1-3 p.m., 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 3-5
a.m., 2-5 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.; Sunday,
2-4 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.lpga.com
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
BMW PGA Championship
Site:Virginia Water, England.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Wentworth Club, West
Course (7,261 yards, par 71).
Purse: $5.52 million. Winner's share:
$919,795.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 10 a.m.-I p.m.; Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-
S1:30 p.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Sunday, 9:30-
1:30 a.m., 7-9:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantourcom
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Rex Hospital Open
Site: Raleigh, N.C.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: TPC Wakefield Plantation
(7,257 yards, par 71).,
Purse: $550,000. Winner's share:
$99,000.
Television: None.
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Next event: Senior PGA
Championship, May 27-30, Colorado
Golf Club, Parker, Colo.
OTHERTOURNAMENTS
Women
COLLEGE:NCAA Division IWomen's
Golf Championships, through Friday,
Country Club of Landfall, Wilmington,
N.C. Online: http://www.ncao.com

SOFTBALL

Division I regionals

At Katie Seashole Pressly Softball
Stadium
Gainesville
Friday
Game I - UCF (35,21) vs. Florida
International (36-19), 3:30 p.m.
Game 2 - Bethune-Cookman
(32-22) vs. Florida (43-8), 6 p.m.

At UGA Softball Stadium
Athens-'
Friday
Game I - Florida State (43-16) vs.
Radford (36-15), 2:30 p.m.
Game 2 - Elon (38-19) vs. Georgia
(43-11),5 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Tuesday
Montreal at Philadelphia (n)
Chicago at San Jose (n)
Thursday
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Friday
San Jose at Chicago, 8 p.m.


CHS: Coaches show up in Lake City


Continued From Page 1B


(Arkansas) and Joe Corozza
(Florida Atlantic).
-Hill reportedly has
sparked the interest of FAU,
but coach Corozza couldn't
comment on the recruit.
He did evaluate the senior
receiver and plans on hav-


ing contact with him once
the NCAA rules allow it.
Coaches have been in
from across the nation
panning from Florida
to California. Southern
California recruiting coor-
dinator Ed Orgeron was in


on Friday to look at the
Tigers.
With another week to
go before the spring show-
down against Ocala's Trinity
Catholic, the coaching train
will continue to run through
Lake City.


couple of plays in the open-
ing half. Leevander Griffin
had a sack and Tristan
Nelson picked off a pass.
Josue Romero, Christopher




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

NONAY I


' IMECH __



VIMOTEI


z
YIPRAC
I L \7
__^, _^ ,


Futch and Nathan Thomas
combined for a sack.
The first defense, was
dominant in the second
half.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

r ,x?^ Ahhhl , 1
That feels'
.. good l|l=J |


WHAT THE
PATROLMAN
C-ON51PEREP
HIS FLAT FEET.

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: THE 3 ( I" I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SEIZE DIZZY GUILTY YELLOW
I Answer: When the twins wore matching outfits, they
were - WELL "SUITED"


GOLF REPORTS


Mick doubles up in stress ball


The Men's Golf
Association had a blind
draw, three-man team
stress ball tournament on
Saturday, with team and
individual competition.
The team of Don Horn,
Terry Mick and Randy
Heavrin won by complet-
ing all 18 holes with their
stress ball with a score of
80.
Each player on the team
had to play the stress ball
every third hole and that
score was carded for the
stress ball score.
In individual matches,
Mick was first with a net
score of 64.4, Heavrin was
second with a 65.4, Tim
Tortorice was third with a


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
J.D. Dedge

69.4 and Horn was fourth
with a 70.8.
Wednesday , Blitz
winners:
A Division -Terry Mick,
first; A.J. Lavin, second;
Frank Soucinek and Mike
Kahlich, tied for third;
B Division - Ralph
Beekman, first; Rusty
Depratter, second; Shelton
Keen, third;
C Division - Bruce
Park, first; Al Cohoon, sec-
ond; Joe Herring, third;
D Division - Gary
Dampier, first; Keith


Denmark * and Jerry
Perkins, tied for second.
Chet Carter, Tim
Tortorice, Soucinek,
Kahlich and Keen each had
one skin.
Creeks No. 1 was pulled
as the pot hole. Keen,
Tortorice and Carter tied
the hole to force a carry-
over for the fifth week.
Top of the Hill was rained
out on Monday.
Dates have been set for
Junior Golf Camps: Session
1, June 7-11; Session 2,
June 21-25; Session 3, july
5-9; Session 4, July 26-30;
Session 5, Aug. 9-13.
For details, call the. pro
shop at 752-3339 or visit
www.quailheights. com.


Kiwanis Club scramble Friday


The Lake City Kiwanis
Club's annual scramble
tournament is Friday. Tee
time is 1 p.m. with a shot-
gun start.
The Bradford Booster
Club tournament had a
field of 48.
In the Gross Division,
Clayton Thomas, Michael
Kooi, George Tyler and
Glenn Roberts posted a
two-stroke win over John
Livingston, Kris Shamblin,
Matt Register and Todd
Taylor.
In the Net Division,
Patrick Van Asch, Kevin
Van Asch, Dustin Lee and
Nathan Allen waltzed to a
four-shot victory over Jay
Barnes, Jeffery Barnes,
Andy Young and -Travis
Arnold.
Steve Patterson posted
the best of a host of good
scores for first place in the
Wednesday Blitz. His +12
was enough to overcome
Donald Roberts at +10 and
Ed Higgs at +9.
In skins play, Charlie
Timmons was ready to


ACROSS

1 Bulletin-
6 Knitting and
macrame
12 Glowing coals
14 Heaps
15 Attack
16 Coax
17 Spreadsheet
pro
18 Yoko
19 Word to Fido
21 Green parrot
23 S&L offering
26 1960s muscle
car
27 Ballpoint
28 Cabinet hard-
ware
30 California fort
31 Tooth-puller's
org.
32 Legally impede
33 Plunders
35 Stooge with
bangs
37 Hubbub
38 Yearns


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


count his winnings after
carding four birdies,
including three on the big
pot holes. Sorry, Charlie.
All. four were covered; no
pot, not even a skin.
Bob Randall, with two
skins,. Bob Budwick and
Travis Timmdns, with one
each, shared the payout.
Scores in the Wednesday
PM .scramble were also
good. Keith Shaw, Ed Higgs
and Dustin Walker finished
at -6 for a one-stroke mar-
gin over two teams.
Buddy Slay, and Shaw
had birdies on the pot
hole, forcing another
carryover.
The LGA divided into
two flights for a gross/net
contest.
Cathy Steen triumphed
in first flight gross with a
nice 82. Sally Rivers made
the game look easy with a
blistering 61 in first flight


39 Popeye's Olive

40 New Year in
Hanoi
41 Jeans go-with
42 AARP mem-
bers
43 Guitarist Paul
44 Tour group? ..
46 Orange pekoe
48 Boston team (2
wds.)
51 Realm
55 Bad weather
culprit (2 wds.)
56 Corroded
57 Pale yellow
58 Zoo clowns

DOWN


1 Ms. Arthur
2 Lama's chants
3 Stomach mus-
cles
4 Give feedback
5 Melt, as an ici-
cle


net play.
Nancy Edgar's 75 took
second flight gross and
Nicole Ste-Marie won the
net prize with 73.
Both Good Old Boys
matches were closer than
in recent weeks. Monty
Montgomery, Bobby
Simmons and Carl Jones
took the first contest,
8-6, over Mark Risk, Stan
Woolbert and Jim Bell.
Ed Snow, Don
Christensen, Howard
Whitaker and ', Dan
Stephens chalked up seven
team points for another
two-stroke win over Merle
Hibbard, Terry Mick, Tom
Elmore and Joe Persons.
Risk was medalist for the.
third straight week with
another sub-par round of
33-37-70. Montgomery was
close behind with a 71,
followed by Snow, Mick
and Woolbert, all with 77.
Simmons and Stephens
split the front nine, each
with 38. Hibbard and Jones
also had a tie on the back
nine at 39.


' www.lakecityreporter.com
lLake City
ilil Reporter




Answer to Previous Puzzle

EEIK WHIR TO FU
CI EURO IVAN
SOD IIGT READ





MAGI LEL DINE


B EE ICERAl


TE M VIS I ION
AN 0RAIL LAY


TIES ABLY DST


Winter warmer
Sorrel or bay
Borders on
"Alice" waitress
Util. bill
NNW opposite


13 Allayed, as
thirst
19 Narrow water-
way
20 Antiseptic
22 Inflame with
love
24 Turn on an
axis
25 Dwellings
26 Trail mix
27 Free ticket
28 Stem-to-stern
timber
29 Laundry prob-
lem
34 Toss out
(hyph.)
36 Pearl source
42 Anglo- -
43 Expire
45 Missing
47 Flightless
birds
48 TKO official
49 Annex
50 Spiral mole-
cule
52 Make - -
double
53 Theology subj.
54 Mag execs


INDIANS: First defense dominates

Continued From Page 1B


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 2 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

-I i~ I^


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


DILBERT


BABY BLUES

tc1 WW WN'










BUMSTEAD WHAT AM ,
BREAK UP TrHAT A GLO2FI:
SCUFFLE!! A5VSITTER?!:








BEETLE BAILEY


WCUDo SO ITM No
Cl4e nPUPTS !4R L A�Tn� PADl0

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- LOOK, - OKAY! I WANT TO
BUMSTEA0! STOP RUNNING
IF YOU WANT INTERFERENCE FOR
STO STOP ou _ Y
RUNNING __
INTERFERENCE - '
FOR ME
JUST SAY
SO!!ff


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Affair with stripper exposed

by paper trail from jewelry


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band had an affair with a
stripper. I found out about
it because he bought her
some jewelry and was stu-
pid enough to have the bill
sent to our home.
We have been married
more than 20 years and I
love him, but this haunts me
every day. I am heartbroken,
but I'm trying to make our
marriage work. He never ad-
mitted to any of it and says
nothing happened between
them.
I don't know whether to
keep on trying or leave him
and hope to get on with my
life. What's your advice?
- WOUNDED HEART IN
OKLAHOMA
DEAR WOUNDED
HEART: You have my sym-
pathy, but one person can't
save a marriage alone. It
takes effort on the part of
both husband and wife, plus
honest communication and
often professional counsel-
ing to heal a relationship
when there has been infidel-
ity. Your husband may say
"nothing" happened with the
stripper, but the only man I
can think of who bought jew-
elry for a woman he wasn't
related to or romantically
involved with was Michael
Jackson when he gave some -
to Elizabeth Taylor.
Even though you love
your husband, it's time to
start taking care of yourself.
And the place to start is by


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
insisting on professional
counseling. If he won't go,
go without him.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I have a 24-year-old
developmentally disabled
son who lives with us. Three
months ago, he met a nice
girl at the mental health pro-
gram he attends. They hold
hands, go to the movies and
occasionally smooch.
Recently, "Jasper" had a
mark on his neck. We were
over at a friend's house
for dinner when my best
friend noticed the mark. She
then proceeded to tell me I
should consider getting Jas-
per "fixed." At first, I wasn't
sure I'd heard her correctly,
so I asked her to repeat it. I
am shocked that she thinks
I should have my son steril-
ized.
Jasper is diagnosed with
ADD and Asperger's syn-
drome. According to his
mental health counselor, he
could someday be married,
have children and lead a pro-
ductive, independent life. It
just may take him longer to
get to that point in compari-
son with his peers.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST

CONSTITuTIONAI. WE'P ;INDch eutN, ewv oDY
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UOHNbH'y DON'T YOU1
ThRowO OUT TTOSE I fQ
pnRa3FUL ^
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IlO CON~rTS'? C,^ 1 .!


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Try new activi-
ties and hobbies and attend
events that will introduce
you to new people. You will
discover a hidden skill or
talent. The chance to make
extra cash is apparent.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Problems at
home or dealing with per-
sonal issues could end in
an argument if you aren't
diplomatic. A mistake that
disrupts your home and
family will be costly. Deal
with it quickly. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Added respon-
sibilities may get you down
but, in the long run, taking
on a little more will bring
you more. Use your energy
wisely to accommodate
what is asked of you. Love
is apparent but can also cost
you emotionally. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You need a
change. Look at your op-
tions and what's available
professionally. Someone
you meet will have some-
thing to offer that will come
in handy. You can surprise
people and move ahead
with your plans. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Don't miss out be-
cause of an emotional tie to
someone who is jealous or


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

threatened by your inter-
ests. Stop second-guessing
your next move. Look out
for yourself and don't worry
about what everyone else is
doing. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Keep your plans a se-
cret. You should catch ev-
eryone off guard in order
to make the biggest impact.
Travel, learning and alter-
ing your philosophy or
lifestyle will help you open
doors, bringing you greater
freedom. Don't leave any-
thing to chance. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Focus on others. Try-
ing to deal with personal
issues will only cause more
problems. You can make
some changes to your home
that will provide you with
more comfort. It's time to
meet new people and visit
new places. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Someone may
try to set you up for a fall.
An emotional matter is like-
ly to cause upset at home.
Make sure everyone is be-
ing honest about how they
feel, including you. Finish
what you start and no one
will be able to complain.

SAGHITARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Your past
achievements will help you
grab the attention of some-
one who can help. You must
not take on responsibilities
that will cut into your time
or stand in the way of your
own success. Love is on the
rise. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't leave
anything undone if you want
to control matters. There is
money to be made if you
are strict about how you
handle your cash. Changes
at home will add to your as-
sets. Love is on the rise and
a romantic evening should
be your intent. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Take a long hard
look at what's behind you
and what's ahead. You may
have to make some tough
choices. Love is apparent -
if you are single, get out and
socialize. Or, make plans
with that special someone
in your life. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't make
promises you cannot keep.
A change in your living ar-
rangements may take you
by surprise but, in the end,
will be better for you. Re-
connecting with someone
from your past may be dif-
ficult but will be worth your
while. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: C equals P
" HOUR 01 Y STR Y G U KT E N R FOIR, Y

D Y GR UKT ENR UK K H, Y V KGRSX UKT

ENR TOVN, Y ETYDRSX UKT ENR


C K K T . "


INKHKG YHROVNRG


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "A person dishonored is worse than dead." - "Alas!
all music jars when the soul's out of tune." - Miguel de Cervantes
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 5-19

CLASSIC PEANUTS

JW THE 0 I T N6ER0HURT iWYE OR FIN6-RNAIL$ I NEVER EVEN KNEW THE
I MATTER W TH- ARE TOO TIGHT... WERE ADJU$TALE!
71 71


. ME AND My
IG MOUTH!






. : - -. . " - ,


THAR SO DARN
DIRTY NO VIRUS
STANDS A CHANCE !!


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404


How should I respond
to my friend about her sug-
gestion? When she made it,
I didn't know what to say.
- SPEECHLESS IN NEW
HAMPSHIRE
DEAR SPEECHLESS:
If you still want to maintain
the friendship with the wom-
an, tell her what your son's
mental health counselor
said about his prospects for
the future. But first, if you
haven't already, make sure
Jasper clearly understands
everything he needs to
know to protect himself and
his nice girlfriend from pre-
mature parenthood.
DEAR ABBY: Please an-
swer a question for me. Why
do we fall in love with people
who we absolutely, positive-
ly cannot have? - HEART-
BROKEN IN INDIANAP-
OLIS
DEAR HEARTBRO-
KEN: You have asked a
question for which there is
more than one answer. Some
people do it because they
don't recognize the warn-
ing signs quickly enough
to back off before becom-
ing enmeshed. Others can't
resist a challenge. And still
others do it because - be-
lieve it or not - it's less
threatening than falling in
love with someone we abso-
lutely, positively CAN have.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.











LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


age Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


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Event Dates: Wednesday, May 19- Tuesday, May 25, 2010. Prices and items available only in the USA (may vary in Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, or online at Walmart.com"). For the store location nearest
you, please call 1-800-881-9180 or check online at Walmart.com. The "spark" design , Walmart, and Save money. Live better, are marks and/or registered marks of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.


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WALMART'S ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE POLICY - We intend to have every advertised item in stock. However, we may not offer some items in all locations, and quantity or availability may vary due to unexpected demand or other circumstances beyond our control. If an advertised item is out-of-stock at your
Walmart, upon your request, we will issue you a Rain Check so that you can purchase the item at the advertised price when it becomes available, In addition, we may offer to sell you a similar item at the advertised price or a comparable price reduction. While Supplies Last" items, "Bonus" items, items identified as
being available in limited quantities, and items that are not carried at your Walmart do not qualify for Rain Checks or offers of substitute items. "WHILE SUPPLIES LAST" items are items that we carry at a special pnce for a limited time or that we do not intend to continue to carry on a regular basis. "BONUS" items
are items that include a bonus amount of the same item or an additional bonus item at no extra cost. "ROLLBACK" means that the advertised price is even lower than the previously offered Every Day Low Price. In all cases, we reserve the right to limit quantities to normal retail purchases or one-per-customer or
household, and to exclude dealers. Our advertising circular may vary by geographic region, and any particular regional circular will apply only to stores in that region. Offers and limitations void where prohibited by law. We apologize for, but will not be bound by, any errors in our advertisements. This advertised
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Pets: Shelter or store? 4C


Wednesday, May 19,2010 www.lakecityreporter.com IC


Debby Freeman


(386) 755-0235


Just in

case you

didn't

know

Last month, after
my column ran,
I had an inter-
esting phone
message from
a gentleman here in town.
His message was that he
found the articles very
interesting but he really,
wished that he knew where
we were!
So for this gentleman.
and the others whom I
have failed to let know
where we are, here is a lit-
tle information. Physically
we are located at 628
S.E. Allison Court which
is off of Baya Avenue
across from Melrose Park
Elementary School. We
have a nice lighted sign out
front which says LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. It
now also says CC Senior
Services. We are located
in a beautifully wooded
area. We have built a facil-
ity that we hope will make
senior adults want to come
and "enrich their lives."
We have a fully equipped
Nautilus Gym, an art
room, a computer lab, a
library and, a safe place for
walking.
The grounds are con-
tinually being developed
to entice our guests to
enjoy the out of doors
in good weather. We are
open 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tuesday-Friday.
Lunch is served Tuesday
to Friday. We will begin
serving breakfast in June.
Transportation is provided
for shopping and doctor's
appointments here in
Columbia County. We have
support services for family
caregivers and for families
dealing with dementia
patients, We are currently
working with the Florida
Center for the Blind to
identify people (not neces-
sarily 60-plus) who have
vision problems which are
making it difficult for them
to remain independent.
You do not have to be blind
to be eligible for this free
service. Once people are
identified who need help,
there is a 48 hour course
designed to teach you how
to remain independent.
We also have resources
for the newly diagnosed
dementia patient who
would like the opportunity
to sit with other people
with the same diagnosis to
discuss how this new situ-
ation impacts their future.
Caregivers are invited to
meet with caregivers of the
newly diagnosed patients.
This is an eight-week
support group set up to
provide information and
support in this very stress-
CCSS continued on 4C


S. . . - . ...: . .. .. LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Geri Actors strike a silly pose at their meeting at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center on Thursday. Pictured are Frank Hubert, 75, (from left) pres-
ident of Alligator Community Theater Inc. and the group's volunteer leader, Maurice Northern, 46, Helen Flanagan, 81, Norman Burnham, 74, Nancy Welty
Ornelas, 71, Claudette Mears, 75, Jane Hussar, 92, and Mary Gaston, 65, all of Lake City. The Geri Actors is an acting group for senior citizens who want to
perform and learn about acting and theater, Hubert said.






An act to follow


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

For almost a
dozen Lake
City senior
citizens, the
Geri Actors
acting group is a chance to
embrace life.
"I can get away with
being crazy," said Norman
Burnham of Lake City, 74,
one of the group's mem-
bers for eight months.
The Geri Actors is a
senior's theater group at
the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center that performs
about four short plays
a year at the center,
said Frank Hubert, 75,
president of Alligator
Community Theater Inc.
and the group's volunteer
leader.
The group is an oppor-
tunity for senior citizens to
learn the practice of acting
and the "basics of theater"
such as stage placement,
Hubert said.
He said the Geri Actors
does only reader's theater,
a form of legitimate the-
ater that requires the actor
to have a script while on
stage.
"We don't want to put
the pressure on the par-
ticipants of memorizing
lines," Hubert said.
The actors perform a
range of different types of
plays, Hubert said.
"We try to give them a
variety of plays," he said.
"Of course, comedy is the
most loved thing in the-
ater. Everybody loves to
laugh."
Hubert said the Geri
Actors put on plays that


deal with "serious issues"
that have comedic ele-
ments so that "the audi-
ence doesn't suffer from
them."
"It's taking something
that could be serious and
doing it with tongue in
cheek," he said.
Meetings are held twice-
weekly for play rehearsal
and to practice different
exercises like impromptu
to help the actors "get


back in the groove" when.
the unexpected happens
on stage, Hubert said.
"Surprisingly you get
some really good stuff out
of it," Hubert said, "and
somebody always comes
up with a line that finalizes
it."
Hubert said participat-
ing enables the actors to
stay active and to discover
new talents.
"When you reach a cer-


tain age, society seems to
say you're no longer worth
anything," he said. "I'm a
firm believer if, you don't
use it, you lose it."
Acting in the group also
serves as a type of "ther-
apy" and gives members
"a purpose" while building
their confidence, Hubert
said.
Being involved in the
Geri Actors is primarily for
enjoyment, Hubert also


S..


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Norman Burnham (left) of Lake City, 74, and Maurice Northern of Lake City, 46, read back
and forth from a script during an acting exercise at a Geri Actors meeting Thursday. The Geri
Actors is a seniors' acting group at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center that performs reader's
theater, a type of theater that requires its performers to read from their scripts while onstage.


said.
"You're invited and we
try to make you welcome
and encourage you," he
said, "but we do not bad-
ger you. This is for you
to enjoy yourself. If an
actor on stage is enjoying
himself, I guarantee you
the audience is enjoying
themselves."
Nancy Welty Ornelas
of Lake City, 71, said she
both acts with and writes
plays for the Geri Actors
that they have performed.
"Writing is my favorite
part," she said. "That has
been a lifelong interest and
this has been an expansion
'of that."
Ornelas said the acting
experience has been a way
for her to learn.
"It was all totally new to
me and I've had a lot of fun
with it," she said.
Helen Flanagan of
Lake City, 81, said she
most enjoys the group's
camaraderie.
"What I really like is
being with the people,"
she said.
Hubert said he is thank-
ful for all who participate
ih the Geri Actors and
the talents the actors '
contribute.
"I have been blessed
here with just super peo-
ple," he said, "such mar-
velous people. You never
know where they come
from, they just come out of
the woodwork."
The Geri Actors meet
from 12:45 p.m. to 2 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays
at the Lifestyle Enrichment
Center. Call Hubert at
(386) 752-8861.


I Li








LAKE CITY REPORTER


ACT2


WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


Dr. Lori
www.DrLoriV.com


Tulipomania
blooms in art
and antiques


mildly fragrant
tulip announces
the coming of
spring. Tulips
are celebratory in their
form and suggest some
historically-interesting
symbolism regarding
prosperity.
Botanist Carolus Clusius
brought the first tulip
bulbs from Constantinople,
Turkey, to Leiden, the
Netherlands, in 1593.
Originally used in medi-
cal research experiments,
the exotic flower sparked
great economic and social
interest. High-priced
sales of tulips and their
onion-shaped bulbs spread
throughout Europe.
Tulipomania resulted
as well-to-do Dutchmen
developed a taste for the
buds and the bulbs as
luxury item. Some social-
ites regarded the precious
bulbs as even too valuable
to plant.
By the 1630s, both the
tulips' popularity and price
had increased significantly.
Even expensive property
and other transactions took
place all in the pursuit of
tulips. The flower served
as a status symbol reflect-
ing a taste for the expen-
sive.
Tulip imagery and ico-
nography suggested luxury
in the history of art and
antiques. In art or antiques,
tulips are the flowers that
may have once adorned
the beloved objects found
in a king's mansion or
duke's manor house.

Privileged petal
Since the late 1500s, the
tulip has been the flower of
the privileged. Following
Rembrandt and Vermeer,
many Dutch baroque paint-
ers such as Rachel Ruysch,
Willem de Heem, and oth-
ers painted floral still lifes
featuring tulips for a new
breed of art collectors. At
international auctions, this
type of 17th Century floral
art commands six figures
from collectors. Today, the
favorite flower of the Dutch
helps promote Holland's
tourist industry and gives
art and antique lovers an
recognizable image to look
for when seeking out great
pieces.
Tulip motifs can be
found on many diverse
antiques: Tiffany lamps,
colonial applique quilts,
Newcomb pottery, trinket
boxes - an 18th century
example recently sold for
$5,000 - tollware, barn
door hinges, etc. A tulip's
appearance in the history
of art'and decorative art,
that is antiques, says high
status and high style.

Close to Home
In American antiques
and vintage objects, tuli-
pomania took place as the
flower became popular
with collectors. Americans'
interest in tulips peaked in
the 19th Century as images
of tulips could be found on
historic birth certificates
or frakturs, blanket chests,
and functional redware
vessels. Tulips decorated
these pieces as an indica-
tion of the owner's wealth
or as signs of the hope for
achieving a life of privilege.
In the 20th century,
tulips extended prosperity
symbolism to American
soldiers and their young
families after World War
II. In the historic suburban
Levittowns, the tulip form
decorated wrought iron


TUUPS continued on 4C


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo provided by Colorgarden Publishing/Owner-CEO Pamela Crawford shows container pepper plants (center) surrounded by other plants
and flowers in a garden. Containers can provide a surprising yield of edibles. This gardener was able to harvest 236 small, spicy peppers all at once from four
plants growing in a 20-inch container.


How your garden grows


By DEAN FOSDICK
For The Associated Press
Two of the hottest
trends in gardening are
containers and cultivat-
ing fresh food, and many
savvy families are begin-
ning to combine the two.
They're growing their veg-
etables in pots.
Improvements in pot-
ting soils and fertilizers
have made this a straight-
forward and generally
successful exercise, said
Pamela Crawford, a
landscape architect from
Canton, Ga., who has writ-
ten four books about con-
tainer gardening.
"It's so easy to put a.
tomato into a pot. It almost
grows itself," Crawford
said. "It's a whole differ-
ent ball game than putting
one in the ground. There's
less weeding involved
and fewer insects to fight.
Container gardens are
more productive and
involve less work."
Shapely pots and color-
ful plants are a great com-
bination for growing edi-
bles - especially where
garden space is lacking.
Containers can deliver the


Health care
extensions
foryoung not
universal

By TOM MURPHY
AP Business Writer
The most valuable col-
lege graduation gift your
child receives this spring
might come from a health
insurer.
The health care overhaul
calls on insurers to extend
coverage for dependents
on a parent's health insur-
ance plan to age 26. The
law says the extension is
effective for the first plan
year on or after Sept. 23.
Waves of insurers have
recently announced exten-
sions that start much soon-
er, in part to keep young
adults from hitting cover-
age gaps that arrive when
PLANS continued on 4C


goods and in remarkably
large quantities.
"I've been able to
harvest as many as 236
small spicy peppers all at
once from four plants in a
16- to 20-inch container,"
Crawford said, referring
to habaneros. "I've also
been able to get my fill of
tomatoes from a pot that
included a few ornamental
sweet potato vines with
their large root systems.
It's amazing how little
"ground space plants need
to be productive. They can
tolerate being crowded."
Mixing flowers with
ornamental vegetables
makes good container
sense. Cucumbers, coleus
and begonias are eye-
catching when planted
together. Other great pot-
ted pairings include rose-
mary surrounded by let-
tuce, viola tucked among
some long-legged broccoli
plants and spinach grow-
ing alongside mounded
chrysanthemums. Viola
and chrysanthemum pet-
als are edible, by the way.
Adding flowers also
extends the life of the
combos, Crawford said.
"In many of my contain-


ers, with flowers that
lived much longer than
the vegetables, I simply
cut the dead vegetable
branches off and left
the flowers to fill in the
remaining space," she
wrote in her latest book,
"Easy Container Combos;
Vegetables and Flowers"
(Color Garden Publishing,
2010).
Most any kind of con-
tainer will serve, provided
it has the necessary open-
ings for drainage. Having
too much water in the soil
is almost as deadly as hav-
ing too little. It rots the
plant roots.
Baskets are good
choices. So are window
boxes, kitchen totes and a
whole range of recyclables
including old barrels,
buckets and milk jugs.
Just be careful about col-
ors and breathability.
"I've had good experi-
ence with clay pots and
plastic pots," said Joseph
Masabni, an assistant
professor and extension
horticulturist with Texas
A&M University. "If you
live in a hot area, I don't
recommend black or dark
containers. They can
overheat plants. I prefer


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EdwardIones
MAKIG SESE O INVSTIN


- in pots


clay because it breathes
if it isn't coated. (Plant)
roots are never starved for
oxygen."
Vegetable gardening in
containers is also a good
way to involve children.
The size of the project
won't be overwhelming,
Masabni said.
"Practicality is probably
the major consideration.
Older people who are still
gardeners at heart but


who live in apartments
also can grow their fill of
vegetables or small fruit-
ing shrubs in pots," he
said.
Even people with plenty
of land find growing in
containers easier with
certain produce, such as
potatoes, he said.
"There's no digging
required," Masabni said.
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LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


WORD OF


MOUTH


Tips for Lifelong Oral Care

FAMILY FEATURES


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# -43
4'.'


IH c 's something to sink your teeth into - each stage of life brings a new stage of oral care. The
.Ival of the first tooth is a heralded milestone for a baby. Then, the loss of baby teeth is celebrated
h', a visit from the Tooth Fairy; but as we get older, we work hard to prevent the loss of teeth.
Additionally, our pursuit of the perfect smile often starts as ateenager with the wearing of braces
.,i.1 continues into adulthood as we work to make our teeth whiter. And throughout it all, we spend
u...Il.l..e, li.,, I'll .,lig, flossing, rinsing and visiting the dentist to prevent cavities from marring our teeth.
d!',k, i Ip .11. i-.,Ii. the unique life stages of oral care'? Read on for useful information and tips.


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Until children are able to spit out tooth-
paste, parents should consider using a
fluoride-free alternative, such as Baby
Orajel Tooth and Gum Cleanser or
Orajel Toddler Training Toothpaste.



Infants and Children
Get little ones started off right
Most babies' firsi teeth appear between three
months and one year after birth. As the teeth push
through the gum line, it's quite common for babies
to experience symptoms such as drooling,
irritability, restlessness, and inflamed gums.
A simple home remedy for teething pain is
giving the baby something cold and firm to chew
on as the hard surface provides relief through
pressure while the coolness soothes tender gums.
Another solution is mom-trusted Baby Orajel
Teething Pain Medication, which can be applied
quickly to tender gums to provide instant relief.
This topical anesthetic offers fast-acting pain relief
that helps neutralize the pain instantly. It is also the
No. I1 teething brand used by pediatricians.
It's important, too, for parents to begin cleaning
their baby's teeth and gums every day at an early
age. While fluoride is important for good oral
health, swallowing too much fluoride at a young
age can also cause fluorosis, which can lead to
spotting on future permanent teeth. Until your
child is able to spit out toothpaste, parents should
consider using a fluoride-free alternative as a way
to gently clean teeth and gums.
As children get old enough to brush by them-
selves, they should learn proper techniques, such
as holding the brush at an angle and using short,
clean strokes.. To encourage kids to brush the
dentist-recommended two minutes, parents might
try these tips:
* Encourage kids to hum a song while brushing
- or even count to 100 slowly in their head.
* Bring along a "friend" to the bathroom sink,
such as a loved stuffed animal or doll who
will keep the child company and make the
experience more fun.
* Consider purchasing a children's battery-
operated powered toothbrush. Research shows
'that kids brush 38 percent longer with a
powered brush than a manual brush.


To keep adult teeth looking their whitest, use a tooth
cleanser with a high amount of baking soda, such as
ARM & HAMMER Advance White Brilliant Sparkle
toothpaste, which.removes up to five times more plaque
in hard to reach places than ordinary toothpastes.



Adults
As you grow up - your oral care
habits need to grow up, too
It's time to join the power toothbrush revolution
and give your old manual toothbrush the heave-ho.
After all, power toothbrushes deliver a deeper,
superior clean than manual brushes, and the newer
power brushes are priced better than ever.
Upgrade from your manual brush and take the
ARM & HAMMER Spinbrush Pro Clean for a
spin. Available at an affordable price, this brush,
removes up to 70 percent more plaque in hard-to-
reach places than a manual brush. Or, for whiter
teeth in just 14 days, give the ARM & HAMMER
-Spinbrush Pro Whitening powered toothbrush a try.
A recent innovation in power toothbrushes is
the sonic brush, which is defined by the high rate
of speed that their brush head vibrates. ARM &
HAMMER Spinbrush Pro Clean Sonic and Pro
Whitening Sonic toothbrushes are the first
toothbrushes on the market to offer advanced
sonic clean without the high price tag to go
along with it. The brushes deliver up to
16,000 brush strokes per minute and offer
dymiamic fluid action to help dislodge food
and remove plaque between the teeth. Sold
for approximately $15, these brushes offer
sonic technology at an affordable price.
Of course, adults don't just want their teeth
to be clean and healthy - they want them to
also look great and as white as possible!
Dentists use dental grade baking soda to
whiten and clean their patients' teeth because
they know that dental grade baking soda
gently polishes enamel for whiter teeth.
loosens plaque for easier and more complete
cleaning, and neutralizes acids from foods
and food debris for fresher breath. An
effective at-home option for getting white,
brighter teeth is using a toothpaste with
baking soda, which will provide that "fresh
from the dentist" clean feeling.


Help rebuild enamel and strengthen
aging teeth with cleansers such as ARM
& HAMMER Age-Defying Toothpaste,
which contains fluoride and Liquid
Calcium.



Older Adults
Your oral care needs have changed ...
so should your oral care routine
As we age, it becomes even more important to care for our teeth
to ensure that they stick around as long as we do! But it can be a
challenge for older adults as they encounter new obstacles.
For example, their good habit of regularly brushing their teeth
may be altered due to arthritis or other maladies that make it
difficult to grip a toothbrush or squeeze a tube of toothpaste.
Older adults are also at risk for oral care issues because
they often don't get to the dentist as often as they should. For
example, some patients lack good transportation options to get
to dental appointments. For others, insurance to cover such
visits may not be as good as it was when a person was employed
full-time.
In addition, years of aggressive brushing and acidic foods can
lead to enamel erosion and discoloration. Fortunately, ARM &
HAMMER Age Defying Toothpaste is specially formulated with
fluoride and Liquid Calcium (i.e. amorphous calcium phosphate)
to help rebuild enamel and strengthen teeth.


7 w -. . - . . . . . . z . . ...

Ageless Tips for Healthy Teeth
* Brush at least twice a day for two minutes.
* Remember to floss daily, too - it helps remove particles


between teeth.
* Visit a dentist at least yearly - arid preferably twice a year -
for a professional cleaning and check-up.
* Replace toothbrushes or brush heads every 3 months to prevent
against worn bristles.
* Avoid too many sugary sweets, as well as sticky foods that can
damage your teeth.
* Drink heavily acidic beverages (colas, tea, coffee, soda) in
moderation as they wear teeth down.
* Ensure your diet has enough calcium as calcium helps teeth and
bones grow strong.


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


C ;7


INNEMMMMEM








LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Knight gets a lick from his rescued dog Liesi, a 3-year-old female, as they play at his
home in Dallas on May 7.


Shelter or store? Most

Americans say no question


By SUE MANNING
Associated Press
Remember that old
song, "How much is that
doggie in the window?"
For most Americans, it
seems it's no sale.
More than half of people
in an Associated Press-
Petside.com poll said they
would get their next dog
or cat from a shelter, near-
ly seven times the number
who said they would buy
their next pet from a store.
And more than four in
'10 said they thought store
pets could have hidden
medical or psychological
problems. That's sig-
nificantly more than those
who expressed the same
concerns about pets from
animal shelters or breed-
ers.
Just 8 percent of those


polled said they would get
their next cat or dog at
a store, while 13 percent
said that's where they got
the pet they have now.
Fifty-four percent of those
polled said they would
probably get their next pet
from a-shelter, while 23
percent went for a breeder.
Toro, who has a 14-year-
old rescue terrier mix
named Dancer, said she
doesn't understand how
anyone can buy a pet from
a store or a breeder.
"There are so many
wonderful pets out there
that will be euthanized,"
she said. "There's no rea-
son for it."
John Knight, 45, of
Dallas, got his 3-year-old
mutt named Liesl (rhymes
with diesel) from an ani-
mal shelter that was hold-
ing a weekend adoption


day at Petsmart.
"There are plenty of ani-
mals out there that need
good homes that don't
have them. There's no rea-
son to continue to breed
animals when there are so
many that have to be put
down," he said.
When asked where their
present pets came from, 26
percent said breeders and
30 percent said shelters
- a much smaller number
than said they would go to
a shelter for their next pet.
More than half of those
polled said their dogs or
cats came from places
other than shelters, breed-
ers or stores. They might
have been strays, gifts
from friends or favors for
neighbors. Since some
people have more than one
pet, the numbers add to
more than 100 percent.


PLANS: Aim to close coverage gaps


Continued From Page 2(

they finish school. But that
doesn't mean you can auto-
matically sign up your kid
before the first strains of
"Pomp and Circumstance"
play.
These voluntary exten-
sions come with a host of
qualifications. Whether
your child gets one also
can depend on your
employer.
Q: When does coverage
usually end for depen-.
dents?
A. Many insurers will
keep young adults on a
parent's'plan until they
turn 19 or graduate from
college.
Most states,also call
for coverage extensions
beyond those time frames
for certain types of cover-
age. For instance, depen-
dents .in New Jersey can
remain covered under
some plans up to age 31 as
long as they are unmarried
or have no dependents of
their own. But that's an
extreme. Most states allow
for extensions to around
age 25.
A state-by-state list is
available from the National
Conference of State
Legislatures at http://bit.
ly/9Sg5El.
Q: How much will this
extension cost me, as a
parent?
A: That depends on
your coverage and your
employer.
Insurers offer several
types of coverage, includ-
ing plans for single people,
an adult plus a child or
family coverage. With fam-
ily coverage, there's usu-


ally no additional cost to
add a person.
Employers pay, on aver-
age, about 73 percent of
an employee's insurance
premium, according to the
Kaiser Family Foundation.
The new health care
legislation doesn't spell out
how much of the premium
your employer has to pick
up for an extra dependent,
said Karyn Schwartz, a
senior policy analyst with
Kaiser.
Details of the law have
yet to be written, said
Steve Wojcik, vice presi-
dent of public policy for
the National Business
Group on Health. But he
believes it intends for all
dependents, to be treated
equally.
"It implies you should
provide dependent (child)
coverage in the same way
you're currently providing'
it and not have two sepa-
rate classes," he said.
Q: Can my employer
decline to offer this exten-
sion even if my insurer
announces plans to pio-
vide it?
A: Yes. Companies that
self-insure, or pay their
own medical claims and
have an insurer administer
the policies, can wait until
on or after Sept. 23 to start
the coverage extensions.
Also, the law says that if
your dependent has a job,
and that employer offers
coverage, then your insur-
er or employer doesn't
have to cover him or her,
Wojcik said.
Q: What is the federal
government, which oper-


ates the country's largest
employer-based health
benefits program, doing
with its own employees?
A: The 8 million people
covered under the gov-
ernment's health plan are
going to have to wait until
Jan. 1 to get extended cov-
erage.
Unmarried depen-
dents of federal workers
- including the children
of lawmakers - are now
covered until their 22nd
birthday. The Office of
Personnel Management,
which runs the feds' health
plan, said it would like to
provide the new extended
coverage earlier but is
precluded from doing so
under the law.
Walton Francis, author
of an annual guide to
the federal employee
health program, said he
believes the government
will charge no additional
premium for those who
already have family
coverage.
Large corporations that
are being encouraged by
the Obama administration
to act now will take note
of what the government is
doing with its own employ-
ees, said Paul Dennett,
vice president for health
reform at the American
Benefits Council.
"There really is a discon-
nect here between what
(the Obama administra-
tion) is urging employers
to do and what the govern-
ment is doing with its own
employees," he said.


TULIPS: Signs of luxury, wealth
Continued From Page 1C


porch railings, kitchen
tables, and mailboxes. For
vintage 1950s style object
collectors, tulips were
the decorative elements
of choice for Hull cookie
jars (values to $1,200),
Blue Ridge china ($75 per
plate), and embroidered
caf6 curtains ($20 pair).


Flowers and finances
Even early 21st cen-
tury banks embrace the
tulip image. As a logo,
the prosperous tulip icon
is often chosen to repre-
sent savings and financial
institutions.;The icon sub-
liminallv indicates wealth


to a.bank's customers.
So, if you want to collect
antiques and prosper,
look for the sign of luxury
- look for the tulip.

/ * Dr. Lori presents
antique appraisal events
nationwide.


We believe in compassionate care. We believe in industry-leading
excellence. And we believe there's no place like home for healing.
Maybe that's why so many patients and physicians turn to us every
day for skilled nursing, rehabilitation and therapy services.


aie v ccep patlerin '- c e reG-a.dl, sc'i;qe i.ce r-oio-, rr w tlra oa I i,, , elu ; sex d.�Hb,',v Ob Q 4 e nI,, , .bi e^ ,'a ,.-'r ,[ - ;e d
s'bled etcern af t!eV'eaItrI l ra, or ',y oth' ca egory ,teoc y,*,r c' c . r. re r va c-rev't, :. 2 ,XD ? :: H ji=; ft ' !e . inc


------nm-m-


CCSS: Provides myriad services


Continued From Page 1C

ful situation. This program
is also free.
For people who are
suffering from hear-
ing loss, the Florida
Telecommunications Relay
representative is here on
a monthly basis to help
you apply for a special
telephone which adapts to
your hearing level. This is
also a free service.
If you are having
difficulty understand-
ing your Medicare and


other insurance, the
Florida Department of
Elder Affairs provides a
counselor on the fourth
Wednesday of the month
to help you determine the
best policy for your needs.
This is a free service.
It is the mission of
Columbia County Senior
Services, Inc. to help
senior adults maintain
their independence and
stay in their own homes
for as long as safely pos-


sible. We will continue
to bring programs to the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center which assist you
or your family members
to make the most of your
retirement years. Help us
to get the word out about
all of the services available
through Columbia Couqty
Senior Services, Inc. The
number is (386) 755-0235.
* Debby Freeman is execu-
tive director of Columbia
County Senior Services.


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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


?














olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Personal customer service keeps Willy 's on a roll


W welcome to
Willy J's!"
That's
what every
customer
will hear when they walk
through the doors of Willy
J's Subs in Lake City, said
Willy J. Reichardt, the
sandwich shop's owner.
Every customer is
greeted because customer
interaction and building
relationships with custom-
ers - and his employees
- are the healthy busi-
ness basics for Reichardt.
"It's all about interper-
sonal relationships," he
said. "It's how you relate
to people and how you
communicate. That's why
we greet people when they
come in the door. I want to
make them feel at home.
We want them to know
that we care about them
and that we'll do anything
to serve them."
Willy J's Subs offers
sandwiches, salads and
soups, but specializes in
made-to-order subs.
"We create it right in
front of you," Reichardt
said.
The shop offers a vari-
ety of creative products
and specials such as the
Tiger Tail sub named after
Columbia High School's
mascot and an all-day
lunch special that includes
a six-inch sub, chips and a
drink for $6 including tax.
"We don't cut any cor-
ners on our product,"
Reichardt said. "We offer
a very fair product at a fair


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
William James 'Willy J' Reichardt, the co-owner of Willy J's Subs, is seen in the new restaurant at 3525 Bascom Norris Road


with one of his many subs.
price."
Delivery, catering,
boxed lunches and party '
subs are also available.
The sub shop - which
opened in January - may
be a new business to Lake
City, but Reichardt is not
new to the business.
Reichardt said he has
been in the restaurant
business for about 30
years, starting first with a
"big fancy" restaurant in
the mall in Gainesville and
most recently owning four
different Gainesville loca-


tions of a restaurant called
Joe's Deli before opening
Willy J's Subs.
Reichardt --who
came to Florida from
Wisconsin to play Gator
football at the University
of Florida - said he has
lived in Gainesville since
he graduated from UF in
1976. He said he phased
out some of his Joe's Deli
locations before having
to sell the business to
rebuild his home after it
was flooded and damaged
by Hurricane Frances five


years ago.
, The Lake City location
Willy J's now inhabits
was an "opportunity,"
Reichardt said.
"I got this opportunity
in October and I started
putting things together
and working on this new
concept," he said.
With a new name and
a new look, Willy J's Subs
is "similar, but a little sim-
pler" than Reichardt's pre-
vious Joe's Deli restaurant
because of maintenance,
-the range of products


offered and the possibil-
ity of future expansion,
Reichardt said.
"I wanted something
that would be easily dupli-
cable," he said. "My real
goal eventually is try to
open more of these Willy
J's sub shops. I'm looking
at trying to expand and go
to Live Oak, Fort White,
Ocala and Gainesville. In
the long term that's what
I'm trying to do."
Willy J's Subs is also
conscious of the commu-
nity it's located in.


Reichardt said the shop
gave out about 1,000 free
subs over the past two
months to local blood
donors through LifeSouth
Community Blood Center
Inc.
The best thing about
owning and operating a
restaurant is the people,
Reichardt said.
"I love the interaction
with the customers," he
said. "When I had my
other businesses I was
always the front person
taking the orders and
communicating with the
customers.
Advertising with
the Lake City Reporter
- which allowed him to
do Buy One Get One Free
offers - is also beneficial
for business, Reichardt ,
said.
"We got a pretty good
response from that," he
said.
Willy J's Subs is located
on 3525 Bascom Norris
Road and is open from
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday
through Saturday and 11 -
a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sundays.
Call (386) 752-7949.
Reichardt said he is
happy to be back in the
restaurant business.
"Ift's been something I've
done for the last 30 years,"
he said. "Once you get it,
in your blood they say, you
have it. I thought I'd never
get back into it about five
years ago after the flood,
but here I am, I'm back
into it and doing it again."


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iDE ALERSHIP * ROUNTREE MOORE
Hours Monday - Saturday loam-9pm I
Sunday Ilam-7pmL LCRI,
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0


mriffiffmmfu


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a,~WMIO
*^1% FI


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an appPintment (38 ) 755-0903
all f0t.
n ar Windsor Arms in -City Middle School
DIBlvd." Suite 103 (Located' e d Lake
�Aw










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


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Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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f , , - . .
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Limited to service type advertis-
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m.to 5:00p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
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You can also fax or email your ad
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FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
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Advertising copy is subject to
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be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
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for that portion of the advertisement
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Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

InI " 141 nd Online
wwwi,.iikeeitrelorter.coim


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec.,197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 4
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 13
TWN 2S RNG 15 PARCEL NUM-
BER 00048-007
SW 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SE 1/4. ORB
429-106, WD 994-2837. WD 1067-
1723 -
Name in which assessed: ALIX
MONTES & ANTHONY BOX '
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless-said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 21st day
of June, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04539533
May 12, 19, 26, 2010
June 2,2010

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 6
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 13
TWN 2S RNG 15 PARCEL NUM-
SBER 00049-000
NW 1/4 OF SE 1/4, EX5 AC & EX
2.02 AC DESC AS: COMM SW
COR OF NW 1/4 OF SE 1/4, RUN E
420 FT N 420 FT. FOR POB, CONT
N 420 FT, E 210 FT, S 420 FT, W
210 FT TO POB. ORB- 801-2216,
963-847,WD 1067-1723.
Name in which assessed: ALIX
MONTES & ANTHONY BOX
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to .the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 21st day
of June, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WJTH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04539534
May 12, 19,26,2010
June 2, 2010


INVITATION TO BID
BID NO. 2010-B
ANNUAL CONCRETE CON-
STRUCTION
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept bids on the
above referenced project. Bids will
be accepted through 2:00 P.M. on
June 9, 2010. All bids submitted
shall be on the form provided.
Specifications and bid forms may be
obtained by contacting the office of
the Board of County Commissioners,
Columbia County, 135 NE Hernando
Ave. Room 203, Post Office Box
1529 Lake City, Florida 32056-1529
or by calling (386) 719-2028. Co-
lumbia County reserves the right to
reject any and/or all bids and to ac-
cept the bid in the County's best in-
terest.
Dated this 19th day of, May 2010.
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners
Ronald Williams, Chairman
04539612
May 19, 26,2010







Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.



I do Housekeeping. 10 years exp.
Great references & Great rates
Detail Work!!! CALL ME!
386-628-1091


Construction

Matt Forsyth
Building Construction
Carpentry
386-965-7053


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 1047
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 33
TWN 6S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 04042-000
COMM SE COR OF SW 1/4 OF
NW 1/4, RUN N 210 FT, W 840 FT
FOR POB, RUN N 210 FT, W 520
FT, S 210 FT, E 520 FT TO POB.
ORB 491-84,630-791, 631-530.
Name in which assessed: DAVID
GRIFFIN
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 21st day
of June, 2010, at 11:00A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you arq entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04539535
May 12, 19,26,2010
June 2, 2010
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE NORTH FLORIDA
BROADBAND AUTHORITY RFP
#2010-02 EVALUATION COM-
MITTEE
The North Florida Broadband Au-
thority ("NFBA") announces meet-
ing of the NFBA RFP #2010-02
Evaluation Committee that all inter-
ested persons are invited to attend.
The NFBA is a legal entity and pub-
lic body created pursuant to the pro-
visions of Section 163.01, Florida
Statutes, and an Interlocal Agree-
ment among Baker, Bradford, Co-
lumbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton,
Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy, Madison,
Putnam, Suwannee,, Taylor, Union
and Wakulla Counties and munici-
palities of Cedar Key. Cross City.
Lake City, Live Oak, Monticello,
Perry, White Springs and Worthing-
ton Springs, Florida. The NFBA's
RFP #2010-02 Evaluation Commit-
tee meeting will be held at 11:00
a.m. on Wednesday, June 2, 2010; at
the offices of the Suwannee River
Water Management District, 9225
County Road 49, Live Oak, FL
32060. The NFBA's RFP #2010-02
Evaluation Committee meeting is to
evaluate proposals submitted to the
NFBA in response to the Request for
Proposals "NFBA RFP #2010-02--
Grant Administration and Compli-
ance Services Broadband Technolo-
gy Opportunities Program (BTOP)".
If a person decides to appeal any de-
cision made by the NFBA with re-
spect to any matter considered at the
meeting, such person will need a re-
cord of the proceedings and may
need to ensure that a verbatim record
is made, including the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be made. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing special accommodation
or an interpreter to participate in this
proceeding or have any questions
please contact Faith Doyle, Clerk to
the NFBA Board at (877) 552-3482
or (407) 629-6900 at least one (1)
business day prior to the date of the
meeting.

04539728
May 19,2010


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 1160
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 20
TWN 7S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 04264-002
COMM NW COR OF S 1/2 OF
GOV'T LOT 2, RUN S 140.73 FT
FOR POB, CONT S 407.93 FT TO
N R/W CR-138, SE ALONG R/W
187.84 FT, NE 294.78 FT, NW
462.55 FTTO POB. ORB 818-2310-
2312 PR DEED 949-99
Name in which assessed: SANDRA
JEFFERSON
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 21st day
of June, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

04539531
May 12, 19, 26, 2010
June 2, 2010


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2008-CA-000588
DIVISION
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, AS TRUSTEE FOR MASTR
ASSET BACKED SECURITIES
TRUST 2006-AM2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BERNAVETTE PERRY, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling.
Foreclosure Sale dated May 10, 2010
and entered in Case No. 12-2008-
CA-000588 of the Circuit Court of
the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and
for COLUMBIA County, Florida
wherein US BANK NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR MASTR ASSET BACKED
SECURITIES TRUST 2006-AM2, is
the Plaintiff and BERNAVETTE
PERRY; OCTAVIUS PERRY; are
the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 16th day of June,
2010, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
FOR A POINT OF REFERENCE
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF LOT 3,
BLOCK 5, ALLINIE THOMPSON,
ADDITION NO.1, A SUBDIVI-
SION ACCORDING TO PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED ON PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 25 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 11
MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
LOTS 7 AND 6 OF SAID BLOCK
5, 70.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 51 MI-
NUTES 30 SECONDS WEST,. A
DISTANCE OF 208.92 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF LONG
STREET; THENCE RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 10
SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE, A
DISTANCE OF 39.85 FEET;
THENCE RUN NORTH 4 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES 00 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF
108.27 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 53 DEGREES 37 MI-.
NUTES 49 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 19.22 FEET;
THENCE RUN NORTH 77 DE-
GREES 37 MINUTES 54 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF
75.37 FEET; THENCE RUN'
NORTH 00 DEGREES 49 MI-
NUTES 21 SECONDS EAST, A'
DISTANCE OF 75.00 FEET TO
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER LOT
9 OF SAID BLOCK 5, ALLINE
THOMPSON ADDITION NO. 1;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 13 MINUTES 03 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF LOTS 9, 8 AND 7 OF
SAID BLOCK 5, ALLINE THOMP-
SON ADDITION NO. 1 A DIS-
TANCE OF 139.98 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
A/K/A LONG STREET, LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus form the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as f the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on May 10, 2010
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Cirduit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F08063049-ASC-CONV--
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act: If you are a
person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to he pro-
vision of certain assistance. Persons
with a disability who need any ac-
cbmmodation to participate should
call Court Administration, 173 NE
Hernando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 3"86-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800)955-9771; if
you are voice impaired call
(800)955-8770

04539711
May 19, 26, 2010
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on June
4, 2010 at 9:00 am at Mini-Storage
& Record Storage of Lake City, 442
SW Saint Margaret Street, Lake
City, FL 32025; will sell at public
sale by competitive bidding, the per-
sonal property heretofore stored with
the undersigned:
F- ll: Carla Davidson
H-01: Sharlene Williams
H-17: Sandra L Castro
1-06: Woodrow Jeff Faulkner
I-19: Karen LaDuke
1-33: E Lynn Adams
J-05: John H Jackson
L-01: Cathy Harry
M-02: Carmen M Royals
M-18: Samuel Moore
N-06: Melinda Sue Johnson
O-16: Angel M Agosto
S-11: Carla Davidson
T-14: Leah C Warnmer
T-22: Ammie Farmer
T-26: Leah C Warner
GG-02: Lekeysha Mitchell
R-03: Lorida Cruz
U-01: Paula Griffin
U-02: Laverne Roberson
U-19: Jessica Ann Gonzales
Z-11: Monica McCrary
2000 Saturn
Vin # 1G8)U52F2YY662502
04539677


May 19, 26, 2010

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is. herby given that pur-
suant to a Writ of Execution issued
in Circuit Court, of Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on the 26th day of
March, 2010 in the cause wherein
CAMPUS USA CREDIT UNION,
was Plaintiff and VICKI ROBIN-
SON FRAZIER, an individual, was
Defendant, being Case No.: 09-692-
CA, in said Court, I Mark Hunter, As
Sheriff of Columbia County, Florida,
have levied upon all the right, title,
and interest of the defendant, VICKI
ROBINSON FRAZIER, in and to the
following described person property,
to-wit:
2007 Toyota Matrix
VIN: 2T1KR32E07C652545
I shall offer this property for sale
June 22, 2010, at the Columbia
'County Detention Facility, 389 N.W.
Quinten Avenue, Lake City, State of
Florida, at the hour of 10:00 A.M., or
as soon thereafter as possible. I will
offer for sale all the said defendant's
Vicki Robinson Frazier, right, title,
and interest in the. aforesaid personal
property, at public auction and will
sell the same, subject to any and all
taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances
and judgments, if any to the highest
and best bidder for CASH IN
HAND. The proceeds to be applied
as far as may be to the payment of
costs and the satisfaction of the
above described execution.
MARK HUNTER, As Sheriff
of Columbia County, Florida
BY: , Sergeant Robert Holloway,
Deputy Sheriff
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing special accommodation to partic-
ipate in this proceeding should con-
tact the individual or agency sending
notice no later than seven days prior
to the proceedings at 4917 US High-
way 90 East, Lake City, Florida
32055. (386) 758-1109.

04539697
May 19, 26, 2010
June 2, 9, 2010
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 11
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 23
TWN 2S RNG 15 PARCEL NUM-
BER 00069-003
BEG NW COR OF SE 1/4 & RUN E
670.54 FT, S 935.58 TO NE R/W.
OF 1-75, THENCE N 47 DG W
ALONG R/W 920.29 FT JO W
LINE OF SE 1/4, N 294.69 FT TO
POB. (AKA PARCEL #3). ORB
527-795 & 1039-1966, FJ OF PAR-
TITION 1057-2435.
Name in which assessed: RAN-
DOLPH TAYLOR
All of said' property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 21st day
of June, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04539536
May 12, 19,26,2010
June 2, 2010


020 Lost & Found

LOST DOG: Lake City Airpark
area. Missing Wed. 5/12. Black
Male Dachshund. If found please
call 386-365-6641
LOST: Lg. Grey Cat. No Tail.
"Smokey" McFarlane by Amber-
wood Apts. Needs Meds. 386-288-
8195 or 386-758-5860 REWARD
REWARD! White gold birthstone
ring, mnth of Aug. w/diamonds
around it. Left 4/23@ LCMC
Outpatient MRI 386-755-6440


060 Services

Honest Dependable Cleaning
Res'l/Comm'l. Great references &
rates avail. For a free estimate
today! 386-365-6386 (Cerissa)

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04538577



The Lake City Reporter is
looking for a dynamic and
capable sales professional to
sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and
online products. We need a
person with the ability to make
strong presentations.
Professionalism, being active in
the field and closing sales are
three key attributes for which
we are looking. We offer a
salary and a strong commission
plan, along with a good benefits
package. If you have a strong
desire to succeed and the skills
to back it up, we want to hear
from you. Please email your
resume to:
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director, at
lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, FL 32055.
NO PHONE CALLS

04539505



Part Time Telemarketing
Professional
The Lake City Reporter is
looking for an energetic
telemarketing professional to
join our expanding sales team.
Successful candidates will
posses excellent telephone and
customer service skills, be
computer literate and enjoy the
thrillo tlYe sale. We offer a
great work environment and
competitive compensation.
To apply, please send resume to
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director at
lstrickland@lakecitvreporter.com
No phone calls please. EOE

Tow Truck Operator
Bryant's Towing is now hiring
Drivers to work in an environment
where you can truly make a
difference each and every day! If
you have a White Knight mentality
a clean MVR and like to works
variety of hours talk to us!
6 Day work week Night and
Weekend hours required. Salary.
, 386-752-7799

Manager and Assistant Manager
Positions Available local chain
restaurant must have minimum
5 years experience in restaurant
management. Benefits Available.
Pay Negotiable. Send resume to
Restaurant Management Position
PO Box 252 Lake City, FL
32055-0252
CDL A Drivers needed, team
operation, dedicated account.
Please call Michael 727-479-7501
between 1 lam and 5pm


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?






JYour skills
V1 and
positfVe attitude







Apply Online or In Person! 1152 SW Business Point Dr
SLake City, FL 32025
s TEL 386.754.8562
Sh1 m. www.sitel.com EOE



* The Lake City ReporterI
is looking for a dynamic and capable sales
professional to sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and online products.
We need a person with the ability to make
strong presentations.

Professionalism, being active in the field and closing sales
are three key attributes for which we are looking. We offer
a salary and a strong commission plan, along with a good
Benefits package. If you have a strong desire to succeed and
the skills, to back it up, we want to hear from you.

Please e-mail your resume to: Lynda Strickland, marketing director.
*at lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055.
- NO PHONE CALLS - 94


-J j ~


[FIND ff]










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


100 Job
Opportunities


(539


39602
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY


Columbia County is accepting
applications for Maintenance
Technician I, Landscape and
Parks Dept. Supervisory and/or
manual work in directing &
participating in landscape and
park maintenance of County
properties. Minimum
requirements: High School
diploma/G.E.D., 18 years of
age. Two (2) years experience
in a supervisory position of two
or more employees; & one
(1) year experience in grounds
keeping or similar maintenance
work or any equivalent combi-
nation of training & experience.
Valid FL driver's license.
Salary: $10.02 per hour plus
benefits. Successful applicants
must pass pre-employment
physical, drug screening &
criminal history check. Applica-
tions available on website:
www.columbiacountyfla.com or
the Human Resources Office,
Board of County Commission-
ers, 135 Hemrnando, Suite 203,
Lake City, FL 32055.
(386)719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139.
Deadline: 05/28/10.
AA/EO/ADA/VP Employer.

04539653

".:SiVance

SiVance, LLC, a manufacturer
of specialty fine chemicals and
located in the Airport Industrial
Park in Gainesville, is looking to,
fill the following opening:
Instrumentation & Electrical
Technician
A full time position is available
in a chemical manufacturing
plant for an experienced Instru-
ment and Electrical Technician.
QUALIFICATIONS:
* Candidate must have demon-
strated experience in the
selection, configuration,
installation, and troubleshooting
of process instrumentation
and motor controls.
* In addition, an understanding
of basic process control
equipment, its operation, and
troubleshooting is required.
* Candidate must also have an
understanding of basic electrical
(AC and DC) conduit, wiring
and components to 480V.
Qualified candidates must
possess at least 5 years of
industrial experience. Pay rate
range of $16-$26/hr based upon
level of experience.
We offer an excellent benefit
package including medical/
dental plans, paid vacations/
holidays, 401K, pension, etc.
Apply by forwarding resume
and cover letter to:.
E-mail
zoeann.moss@sivancellc.com
No phone calls please
EOE/DFWP



Accepting applications for
Weekend Breakfast attendant &
Housekeeping/relief maintenance
position. Apply in person at Cabot
Lodge 3525 US Hwy 90W.
' No phone calls.
ACCOUNTANT. Full time
position at local CPA Firm.
Accounting or closely related
degree required. Salary based
upon experience and
qualifications. Email resume with
Salary history to:
admnin()PowellandJonesCPA.com.
DUMP TRUCK Driver
w/Asphalt experience.
386-497-3131

NOW HIRING Are you Fun
Enthusiastic and professional.
Are you looking for a full time job
that pays at least $400 weekly.
We need 3 or 4 people to start
immediately. Call Ashley
386-438-8674 leave message.
Service Plumbers Needed.
Experience a Must! Excellent
Opportunity. Call The Plumber at:
(386)755-9789 or 364-FAST.
SEWING MACHINE Operator
Good hourly wage.
Call Hafners
386-755-6481
Sitel is hiring! Good pay, paid
training, comfortable environment,
benefits after 90 days. Need good
attitude and computer skills - must
be reliable. Apply at
www.sitel.com or in person at
1152 SW Business Point Dr. in
Lake City. EOE
SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY
Immed FT/PT openings,
customer sales/service, will train,
conditions apply, all ages 17+
(386)269-4656
Tire Tech. Must have exp w/pas-
senger, truck, tractor tire repairs.
Valid DL req'd. Pay based on exp.
Apply in person Thomas Tire CR
25A. Lake City. 386-752-8648
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-867-0560
Wanted: Heavy Truck Mechanic
for busy shop. Only experienced
need apply. Call between 8am &
Noon. Mon. - Fri. 386-752-9754


120 Medical
120 Employment

04539643
Medical Billing Manager
Several years experience in
medical insurance billing req'd.
Fax resume to: 386-785-5987

License Massage Therapist need-
ed for "Caring Physical Rehab".
New Lake City office will open in
June. Call Karen (904)868-9747


20 Medical
20 Employment

04539716
We are still growing!!
11 li)SIfCh


Join our family of
caring professionals
in our Branford Office
PRN Staff
ARNP
RN
LPN
CNA / HHA
Job summary, other open
positions and applications
found at:
www.hospiceofthenaturecoast.org
Fax: 352.527.9366
hr@hospiceofcitruscounty.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, Fl 34464
DFWP/EOE

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Therapists & Case Managers
for community based program
working w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.
LICENSED PT/PTA needed for
outpatient clinic
Experience preferred.
Fax resume to 386-752-0939
Looking for Hygienist for
fast paced Dental office .
Fax Resume to 386-755-7024


04539732
Medical Technologist
Ed Frasier Memorial Hospital
has an immediate opening for a
full-time night shift core lab
Medical Technologist, 3 days
Wednesday-Friday (2)-14 hours
and (1)-12 hour shift. Must have
Florida License for Hematology,
Chemistry and Serology.
Ed Frasier Memorial Hospital
159 N. 3rd Street
Macclenny, FL 32063
(904)259-3151 ext. 2247
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER


240 Schools &
2 Education

04539702
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-06/07/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-06/07/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-07/13/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS
Litter trained..
Also, free young adult cats.
386-288-2899 leave message.
Mini Schnauzers. AKC.
Salt/Pepper and White.
$400-$500.00. Raised in home.
POP 386-288-5412
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

408 Furniture
Beautiful Solid oak
table & 4 chairs.
$400. obo
386-752-0167
Dining Table Solid Oak w/24 inch
leaf. Seat up to 6. 4 oak dining
chairs. Asking price $500.00 Call
386-752-3078 or 352-281-4003
Sofa, love seat and end tables.
$200. Good condition.
386-754-9433


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
WANTED Junk Cars,
Trucks, RV's etc.
Paying CASH $225.00 and up.
Free pickup 386-86771396
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
2 ELECTRIC Wheelchairs. (1) in
very good cond. $1000. obo. (1)
needs batteries. $350. obo.
386-752-5332
American Heritage Pool Table.
Full size, 3/4" slate. Cover,
hanging light, all accessories.
Serious Inquires only!
$1000. FIRM! 386-365-5099


440 Miscellaneous
PLAY STATION 2
plus 10 games of
your choice. $110.00
386-758-4731
Restaurant Equip. Hot Box $400.
6ft. fridge $400. Ele Rotisserie
$400. 6ft stainless steel hood w/fan
$200. Call Charlie. 386-984-7226.

530 Marine Supplies
SKI'S - Kidder mod 2001. Sport
series, high performance, Slalom
and as pair. Graphite. New $160.
Sale for $75. 386-755-1922

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 br/2 full bath MH
ready to rent Ft White
$500.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705


63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $400-$550.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$750 a month. 1st, last and $375.
security. Please call 386-397-2619
or 386-365-1243.
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
2/2 MH. Quiet park. Small pets
ok. $500.dep. $550./mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281 -2450
Ft. White Country living.
2br/lba Aptartment
or 3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.
LArge clean 3br/2ba all electric in
the 5 Points area No pets.
1st month & deposit.
Call 386-961-1482 for info.


30 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Move In Special 2br MH. Low
SD moves you in. Water & mow-
ing included. No Pets.No washers.
Call for an Appt. 386-755-5488
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer. No
Pets! 386-961-0017

{640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
$148. A MONTH
for only 8 yrs w/$4K down. Newly
remodeled 14 wide 2br/2ba. New
Carpet, appliances, Del. & Set up.
Owner Finance available. Call
Gary Hamilton @ 386-963-4000
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


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1.) Go to www.lakecityreporter.com


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Mobile Home
650 & Land

1800sf Manufactured Home.
4br/2ba plus retreat/office, 2
porches, walks. Concrete founda-
tion, appliances. Plywood w/ce-
ramic floors, metal roof. 5 ac., cor-
ner lot (treed) Horses OK, Gary
Hamilton (386)256-6379. Possible
Owner Finance (Lake City)


710 Unfurnished Apt.
0 0For Rent

$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

D4539356
30th Anniversary Celebration
Windsong Apts
Our Gift to You
$300.00 ofA and Employee Pricing
(386) 758-8455


Submit Events
to be poste- on
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calendar


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Classified Department: 755-5440










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, MAY 19, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


710 Unfurnished Apt. 750 Business &
For Rent Office Rentals


015 S393'S
!! 5 COMPLEXES!!
IBR from $500
2 BR from $525
*FREE CABLE*
*2 POOLS*
ONE GATED
Washer/Dryer Hookups
386-754-1800
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
2br/2ba w/garage on the
West side
1st, last &security.
Call 386-755-6867
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec. Also, lbr for
:$425.mo. Michelle 386-752-9626
720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
'cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
73 Home For Rent
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
-Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
" Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check , No Pets (386)755-9476

3BR/2BA Nice & Clean
$800. mo 1st and last NO pets
6 miles to town
386-752-1677
4br/2Ba Brick Home, Lrg Kitchen,
Frig, Dishwasher & W/D included,
Lrg yard, Quiet area. $1,000
575-749-6117/575-763-5336
Branford Area. Completely reno-
vated. 2br/lba Mobile home $400
.sec. $525 mo. Conveniently locat-
ed. 386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
Lg 3BR/2BA on 1.3 ac. on the
Westside. Water, trash
& lawn maincluded. $875. mo
plus security. 386-719-9702
Owner Financing, 3/2 MH on 2.5
beautiful acres. S. of Lake City
� Hard road frontage. Sm. Down
$845 mo. 386-590-0642/ 867-1833
Rent to Own 3/1 ba. All apple.
incl. On 2 city lots. $650 mo. 1st,
last, sec. Located off Baya Ave.
352-225-1641 or 352-493-5252
Rural beauty and privacy near
1-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
l+Ba, $725/mo, Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


Office Building, Convenient
location w/6 offices, Conference
Room, kitchen, ample parking.
Partially furnished. $2.500 mo.
For appointment 386-754-9293
Office Space located Across
from the Mall on Hwy '90.
$450/mo. plus tax.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
Space available at Country Club
Plaza East Baya Ave. 2000 sq ft.
2 restrooms. new carpet. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622

770 Condos For Rent
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pint.
$256/mo. $24,900. 352-215-1018

To place your
classified ad call
755-5440
rY Md[lM=irI t 'r"r'lj&


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.
. .-
.'.' .. K-10eif &&T.t.yffh^.ST


Fo MoreA T~ Details Call~
Maryat 36-75-544


Adoption

ARE YOU PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOP-
TION? Loving married couple seeks to adopt. Will be
Full-time Mom (age 36) and Devoted Dad. Financial
security. EXPENSES PAID. Kim/Bill (888)399-3255
FL Bar# 0150789

Announcements

Advertising that Works. Put your ad in Over 100
Papers throughout Florida for one LOW RATE! Call
(866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida-classifieds.com

Auctions

ART AUCTIONS TO BENEFIT CHILDREN'S
CHARITY - NO BUYER'S PREMIUM! Chagall,
Picasso, Dali, Miro, Max, Neiman, Tarkay, Maimon,
Nechita, Agam and more! FREE Admission! FREE
food & drinks! Raffles and prizes. BATERBYS -
PALM BEACH, Saturday, May 22nd - 5pm Preview,
6pm Auction - 13900 Jog Road Delray Beach, FL
33446. BATERBYS - ORLANDO, Saturday, May
29th - 5pm Preview, 6pm Auction - 9101 Internation-
al Dr., Unit 1008, Orlando, FL 32819. RSVP at www.
baterbys.com or call (866)537-1004 or email spring-
auction@baterbys.com AB#2746 AU#3750

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do you earn $800 in'a day?
25 LocalMachines and Candy $9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033 CALL US: We will not be undersold!

Up To $2,000.00 Weekly Income. We pay you. Work
at home. Start making money today. For details come
visit us at: www.TheInBizPlace.com


Financial


CASH NOW! Get cash for your structured settle-
ment or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G.
Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-
8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau.Fi-
nancial Services

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$ As
seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need
$500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY
NQW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-
8321 www.lawcapital.com

Help Wanted

Heating/Air Tech Training. 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environment. State of Art Lab.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement
Assistance! CALL NOW: (877)994-9904.

Drivers - FOOD TANKER DRIVERS NEEDED
OTR positions available NOW! CDL-A w/Tanker


REQ'D. Outstanding pay & Benefits! TEAMS WEL-
COME!! Call a recruiter TODAY! (877)484-3042
www.oakleytransport.com

Driver CDLA- Company Drivers & Owner Opera-
tors! Excellent Pay, Benefits, & Rider Program.Ad-
ditional Benefits for Company Driver Medical Ins,
401k, Paid Holidays & Vacation. Star Transportation
(800)416-5912 www.startransportation.com

REGIONAL DRIVERS NEEDED! More Home-
time! Top Pay! Up to $.41/mile company drivers!
12 months OTR required. HEARTLAND EXPRESS
(800)441-4953 www.heartlandexpress.com

DRIVER- GREAT MILES! PTL Company Solos/
Teams call: (877)740-6262. Owner Operator Solos/
Teams call: (888)417-1155. Requires 12 months ex-
perience. No felony or DUI past 5 years. www.ptl-
inc.com

Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying
Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved pro-
gram. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-
3769.


Out of Area Real Estate


CENTRAL GA 49 AC - $1,325/AC Gently roll-
ing, abundant wildlife, mature pine, near Flint River.
(478)987-9700 stregispaper.com St. Regis Paper Co.

NEW LOG HOME AT THE LAKE 1.7 AC- $59,900
w/FREE Boat Slips Gorgeous, ready to finish 1200 sf
log home & beautifully wooded 1.7 acre lake view
homesite w/ free boat slips on private, recreational
lake in Tenn. Quiet, gated community. Excellent fi-
nancing. Call now (888)792-5253, x.3482 TN Land/
Lakes, LLC

Steel Buildings

BUILDING SALE! 25x30 $4577. 30x40 $7140.
32x60 $11,950. 32x80 $18,420. 35x60 $13,990.
40x70 $14,650. 40x100 $24,900. 46x140 $37,600.
OTHERS. Ends optional. Pioneer MANUFACTUR-
ERS DIRECT (800)668-5422.




ANF
AD'VERfi�,Q NEPVOR OK - W- FLORIA

e fsifd lDsU pidy Metr Dly



( Week of April 26, 2010


805 Lots for Sale

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color. religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

$115,000 3B/2BA
Den or 4th bedroom..
Cypress Landing
386-466-7168


Tell em L.C. Reporter sent ya.




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eC tye pines t& ent


. ..% . .5
- . , -. ,
- . - '-;-'"i


Friday Night, May 28, 2010
... ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... ... ... .. .......... .... ....................... ........


" "Saturday

Night,

May 29, 2010


810 Home for Sale

2004 3br/2ba custom built home
on 8 ac. Huge Oaks w/paved road
frontage. 24X48 pole barn
w/24X24 workshop. 386-365-3607
No Realtor please. Asking $299,K
FSBO, Lulu area, 3br/2.5ba home
2 story, built in 2003. Fenced,
40 x 48 barn, located on 5+ ac.
$224K 386-623-5820

820 Farms &
O vAcreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
Consider Partial Financing
8 ac. mol, fenced, 40X90 barn,
horse stalls. Pasture, well. Metal
shed on slab. Offers Negotiable.
386-590-0642 or 867-1833


820 Farms &
SAcreage

Reduced FSBO 10 ac. Horses &
more. 5 stall stable. Pastures,
board fenced, tool shed. 32'X75'.
4brManuf. Hm w/carport & deck.
$190,000. FIRM. 386-965-3357


950 Cars for Sale
2000 Ford Crown Victoria. Silver,
cloth seats, all power, loaded.
Runs & looks Great. Must sacri-
fice. $3500. 386-496-0780 Iv msg
2001 Chrysler Sebring
Convertible LXI Fully Loaded
32,000 miles. $4,500.00
386-752-8157 or 386-397-6717








Lake City Reporter


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