Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








Spring game
Indians prepare for
Friday kickoff.
000019 120110 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
05 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943



L ay, May 18,



Tuesday, May 18, 2010


Forewarned
School group hears one
man's story about the
danger of tobacco use.
Local, 6A





orter


Vol. 136, No. 102 E 75 cents


Report: Man tries to lure children


Woman says man
tells children to
get in his car.
From staff reports
Law enforcement detec-
tives are investigating a


suspicious incident involv-
ing two children that alleg-
edly took place Sunday
afternoon in Lake City.
According to Lake City
Police Department reports
received Monday, at
around 3:33 p.m. Sunday,
officers responded to 1750


SW Camellia Way in refer-
ence to a suspicious inci-
dent.'Upon arrival, officers
met with a woman who said
her two children had been
playing outside of their
apartment when they were
approached by the driver
of a gray, four-door car with


no hubcaps.
The driver, reported to
be a black male, stopped
the vehicle and told the
children to get inside the
car, according to reports.
Rather than get into the
car, the children ran inside
their home and told their


mother, who called police.
Officers issued a BOLO
- be on the lookout alert
- for the vehicle, but after
canvassing the area, were
unable to find the car.
Police are not labeling
this an attempted kidnap-
ping, but are looking for


any information about
this or similar incidents
that may have taken place
recently.
The driver is described
as a black male, who is
bald or has very short hair,
SUSPICIOUS continued 3A


BUILDING


DREAMS


One Habitat for Humanity home at a time


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Lacoya Scippio (from left) finishes up one area of her forthcoming Habitat house while Sylvia Scippio and Larry Lee look on.
This will be the fourth house Habitat for Humanity has built in Columbia County.


Home will take
about six to eight
months to finish.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Helping deserving
families achieve the dream
of home ownership is the
mission of Lake City/
Columbia County Habitat
for Humanity, but it takes
community support to
reach that dream, an orga-
nization official said.
"This is not a handout.
This is a hand-up," said


George Burnham, board
chairman. "The partner
family has to help build the
house and pay for it. It's
not a gift."'
The local Habitat
affiliate is now building
its fourth home, this one
oh NW Dyson Street
for Lacoya and Jeremy
Scippio.
About 25 volunteers
have worked on the house
each Saturday for the
past few weeks, said Paul
LeClair, building commit-
tee chairman.
Work is coming along
steadily at the house, said


Larry Lee, building com-
mittee co-chairman. The
foundation and slab have
been poured.
"We've been doing good
for one day of work," he
said. "We're doing it one
step at a time."
More volunteers could
help speed up the process,
Lee said. He estimates the
house will take about six
to eight months to com-
plete.
"It would be nice to get
more volunteers to work
through the week," he
said. "It would definitely
help out."


Volunteers don't need
any experience and can
serve in several capaci-
ties, including construc-
tion, lunch preparation or
administrative services,
Burnham said. The age
minimum is 18, and volun-
teers must sign a waiver
for safety reasons.
Burnham said he would
like Habitat to be able to
build more than one house
a year. The challenges of
finding qualified applicants
and gaining enough dona-
tions limit the process.
HABITAT continued 3A


Cooking School will hold 'class' tonight


Group finalizes

petition drive

against county,

forced utilities


Once signatures
are verified, CAFU
gets certification.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Local citizens working
against mandatory connec-
tions for county utilities
have gathered more than
enough support for their
cause.
Citizens Against Forced
Utilities - a political action
committee formed against
mandatory utility connec-
tions within the county
- turned in almost 4,000
signatures, on a legal peti-
tion and ordinance with the
intent to get the county's
adopted mandatory connec-
tion ordinance' revoked, to
the supervisor of elections'
office Monday.
"We are not against util-
ities, but we are against
forced utilities," said Elaine
Reeves, CAFU chairwom-
an.
Frank Singletary; candi-
date coordinator and stat-
istician for the supervisor
of elections' office, said
the group needs 2,632 - 7
percent of voters from the
last general election from
three different districts
-- of the signatures they
turned in verified by the
office. If verified, the office
will issue a certification
that CAFU can take to the
county.
According to the county


charter, Singletary said,
if CAFU submits a certifi-
cation, the county has to
either accept it and place the
petitioned ordinance on the
general ballot in November
for voters to vote on or they
have , to
adopt the
petitioned
changes
to the ordi-
nance.
" The y
cannot
Dale Williams deny it,"
Singletary
said.
Dale Williams, county
manager, said the county
commission is in favor, of
the citizens having petition-
ary rights.
"The only comments that
I've heard from the commis-
sioners is that they respect
the rights of citizens to "
petition their government,"
Williams said.
"They do believe there
has been some misinfor-
mation," he said, "but as
far as the citizens having
the right to petition their
government and address
what they think is wrong, I
believe the county commis-
sioners themselves support
that type of grassroots gov-
ernment
'They perfectly under-
stand that right and they
understand that the citizens
have the right to use that,"
Williams said.
PETITION continued 3A


Tickets available at the
door; first 800 to get
goody bag, cookbook.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
The Taste of Home Cooking School
will take place tonight at Lake City
Community College, and remaining
tickets will be available at the door.
The event, sponsored by the Lake
City Reporter and LCCC, will take


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


place at 6:30 p.m.
Doors open at
5 p.m.
"Demand for tick-
ets has been over-
whelming, but we
have a few left that
we will be selling Roberts
today at the office
and tonight at the
door," said Todd Wilson, publish-
er of the Lake City Reporter. "This
is a can't-miss event. The Cooking
School is entertaining and informa-


8964
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


tive and we have giveaway bags for
those who attend, plus we will be
giving away dozens of door prizes
during the evening."
General admission tickets are $10
each.
This is the third time Taste of
Home's popular cooking school has
taken place in Lake City, following
up on the, successful 2004 and 2007
shows. Like those shows, audience
members will be dazzled by the cook-
DOORS continued 3A


"bSi OFJOpinion
Business . . ..
Obituaries .... ..
Advice & Comics
Pu-zzles


SA -


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Dennis Grimes, 64, (left), Joyce Collins, 62, and other
residents gather outside the Supervisor of Elections office
Monday afternoon as they turn in bins containing almost
4,000 signatures against the recently adopted ordinance
demanding mandatory utility connections in Ellisville. 'This
is a freedom of choice,' Grimes said. 'We want to be able to
vote on it. We want government by the people.'


-1 * ;. *; .* ;-" *.:. .,.**..a~~f*.*.*t �*.*s .M ^ ^ i p . :: , i^
^ .^<^ TODAY IN I COMING


LOCAL
Fe 'i.i . e- I -ri
i- l 1 'i ' C l


WEDNESDAY
- t - Healthy, active
;rni:.r living.


.. .. -.... . . *..- ... ::-, .. . -- --: ........ ...:.-.- . . ..;... .. ...... ......--. ., s-x,'-..........









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


CA$H Af Monday:
- Afternoon: 0-6-0
Evening: 4-0-3


Monday:
Afternoon: 2-9-5-1
Evening: 5-5-5-7


Saturday: e .
8-13-17-25-27-37 Sunday:
X4 1142227Sunday:
1-14-22-27-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Arab-American crowned 2010 Miss USA


LAS VEGAS
ebanese immigrant Rima
Fakih says it was a certain
look from Donald Trump
that tipped her off that she
had won the 2010 Miss
USA title.
The 24-year-old Miss Michigan
beat out 50 other women to take the
title Sunday night, despite nearly
stumbling in her evening gown.
' She told reporters later that she
believed she had won after glanc-
ing at pageant owner Trump as she
awaited the results with the first run-
ner-up, Miss Oklahoma USA Morgan
Elizabeth Woolard.
' "That's the same look that he
gives them when he says, 'You're
hired,'" on Trump's reality show
"The Apprentice," she said.
"She's a great girl," said Trump,
who owns the pageant with NBC in a
joint venture.
Fakih took top honors at the
pageant at the Planet Hollywood
Resort & Casino on the Las Vegas
Strip after strutting confidently in an
orange and gold bikini, wearing a
strapless white gown that resembled
a wedding dress and saying health
insurance should cover birth control
pills.
Fakih, an Arab-American from
Dearborn, Mich., told pageant orga-
nizers her family celebrates both
Muslim and Christian faiths. She
moved to the United States as a baby
and was raised in New York, where
she attended a Catholic school. Her
family moved to Michigan in 2003.

Bank teller Diaz-Twine
wins 'Survivor'
LOS ANGELES - The numbers
were in Sandra Diaz-Twine's favor
again on "Survivor: Heroes vs.
Villains."
The brazen 34-year-old bank teller
from Fayetteville, N.C., overcame
fellow villains, sneaky 27-year-old


I~


Miss Michigan Rima Fakih (left) reacts as she is crowned Miss USA 2010 by
Kristen Dalton, Miss USA 2009, Sunday in Las Vegas.


former boxer Parvati
S_- Shallow and sinis-
, ter 3.7-year-old oil
company owner
Russell Hantz, to
win the CBS real-
ity competition's $1
Diaz-Twine million grand prize
Sunday. Diaz-Twine
also claimed the ultimate bragging
right: She's the first person to win
"Survivor" twice.

Conan O'Brien to work
from Warners lot
NEW YORK - Conan O'Brien
will host his new TBS talk show
from a California stu-
dio that most recent-
ly housed "America's
S Best Dance Crew."
But it does have a
rich movie history.
His show begins
in November, and
O'Brien will be recorded on


the Warner Brothers lot in Burbank.
That's close to where. O'Brien did
the "Tonight" show at NBC, a job
he held for a little more than six
months.

Demi Moore meets with
publishers about memoir
NEW YORK - Demi Moore
wants to tell her story.
Moore's agent, Luke Janklow,
confirmed Monday that the actress
is working on a memoir and is meet-
ing with publishers
in New York. He
declined to comment
further.
The 47-year-old
Moore is known for
her work in the films
"Ghost" and "A Few
Moore Good Men." In 1991,
she posed naked and
pregnant on the cover of Vanity Fair
magazine.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Bill Macy is 88.
* Actor Robert Morse is 79.
* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Brooks Robinson is 73.
* Bluegrass singer-musician
Rodney Dillard (The Dillards)
is 68.
* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Reggie Jackson is 64.
* Actress Candice Azzara
is 63.
* Country singer Joe Bonsall

Daily Scripture


(The Oak Ridge Boys) is 62.
* Rock musician Rick
Wakeman (Yes) is 61.
* Actor James Stephens is
59.
* Country singer George
Strait is 58.
M Actor Chow Yun-Fat is 55.
M Comedian-writer Tina Fey
is 40.
* Rock singer Jack Johnson
is 35.


"Oh, the depth of the riches of the
wisdom and knowledge of God! How
unsearchable his judgments, and his
paths beyond tracing out!"
- Romans 11:33
Thought for Today
"People find life entirely too
time-consuming."
- Stanislaw J. Lec,
Polish writer.-(1909-1966)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
Fax number ..............752-9400 BUSINESS
Circulation ...............755-5445S
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com Controller Sue Brannon... . 754-0419
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliated, an affiliate (sbrannon@akectyeportofercom)
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- CIRCULATION
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ha. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and a.m. on Sunday.
The Associated Press. mo Sunday .
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
All material herein is property of the Lake problems with your delivery service.
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or In Columbia County, customers should
in part is forbidden without the permis- call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
sion of thepublisher. U.S. Postal Service vice error for same day re-delivery. After
No. 310-880. 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
POSTMASTER: Send address changes vice related credits will be issued.
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home delivery
Lake City, Fla. 32056. is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Publisher Todd Wilson .....)754-0418 vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
NEWS (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call'any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428 24 Weeks.........: ..... $48.79
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com) : 52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
ADVERTISING Mall rates
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417 12 Weeks........ ....$41.40
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com) 24 Weeks .......... ....... $82.80
I . 52 Weeks............... $179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


2 lemurs born
at Busch Gardens .


TAMPA -Two endan-
gered red-ruffed lemurs
were born at Busch
Gardens in Florida Gulf
coast.
The animals were born.
'at the theme park's Jambo
Junction on April 21.
- -The sex of the babies is
not yet known. They each
weigh a little more than
a half-pound. Lemurs can
grow to about eight to 10
pounds.
,All 50 species of lemurs
,aie native to Madagascar.
They're considered an
endangered species.

Device explodes,
school searched
TAMPA - Tampa
authorities have lifted a
lockdown at a high school,
which went into effect
after a small device explod-
ed on campus.
The explosion caused
one minor injury.
The Tampa Police
Department searched
Chamberlain High School
Monday to make sure
there are no more devices.
The unidentified device
exploded in a hallway,
burning the clothing and
causing minor injury to
one student.
No other injuries have
been reported.

Man crashes car
into parked plane
DESTIN - A man in
north Florida was arrested
after the car he was driv-
ing allegedly crashed
through a fence and struck
a plane at the Destin
Airport.
Authorities say Brian
Mowen, 30, remains in
jail Monday and faces
charges including DUI.
The crash is estimated to
have caused $500,000 in
damage.
The privately owned


A plane crashes on house
Rescue workers tend to an injured man at the scene where
a small plane crashed into a neighborhood in Clearwater .
on Sunday. Florida authorities say nobody in the home was
injured. A city spokeswoman says the plane hit the roof of
one house and landed in the back yard. Three people were
on board, but none suffered life-threatening injuries.


plane is a Cirrus SR22,
which is a small single
engine aircraft.

Threats made
with crossbow
INVERNESS - Anthony
Keller, 47, is being held
in the Citrus County Jail
on charges he threatened
police with a crossbow.
Jail records show Keller
is being held without bail
Monday on charges of
aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon on a law
enforcement officer and
domestic assault. There
was no attorney informa-
tion available for him.
Authorities say deputies
responded to his home in
Inverness on Sunday on a
domestic disturbance call
for threatening his wife.

Teen gets 20
years in prison
FORT LAUDERDALE
-- A South Florida teen-
ager who authorities say
strangled Neica Marie
Gibbs, 14, has been sen-
tenced to 20 years in
prison.
Jason Hartley, 17; was
sentenced on Monday


after admitting to the judge
that he was guilty. He had
initially pleaded not guilty
to second-degree murder.
He changed his plea, and
under terms of a deal
agreed to by prosecutors,
the judge then sentenced.
him to the prison term.
It will be followed by five
years of probation.

Body of missing
Jet Skier found
LAKE MARY --The
body of a man who fell off
his Jet Ski has been found
in Lake Mary in central
Florida.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission has not yet
released the 20-year-old
victim's name. His body
was found floating not
far from where officers
believe he fell from the
personal water craft.
An autopsy will be per-
formed to confirm the
cause of death.
Divers used sonar
Sunday to search for him.
A witness says the man
fell off his Jet Ski the day
before and was not wear-
ing a life jacket.
N Associated Press


THE WEATHER



C.HANCEPARTLY . PARTLY
OF CLOUDY CLOUDY
T-STORMS . 90

HI 89 LO 64 HI 90 LO 64 HI91LO 65


- ISOLATED ISOLATED
T-STORMS . T-STORMS


HI 89 LO 64 HI 88 L0 65


* aldostaCity Wednesday Thursday
87 * eJacksonville Cape Canaveral 82/72/pc 85/73/pc
Tallahassee * Lake City 88/66 Daytona Beach 89/70/pc 89/70/pc
89/67 89/64 Ft. Lauderdale 88/76/t 87/78/pc
Pensacola * Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers 90/72/t 90/73/t
86/68 Panama City 89/66 Ganesville 90/65/pc 90/66/pc
82/70 Ocala Jacksonville 89/65/pc 89/65/pc
90/66 nd* Cap CanaveralKey West 84/75/t 86/75/pc
S89/69 86/74 Lake City 90/64/pc 91/65/pc
Miami 88/75/t 88/81/pc
Tampa, * Naples 87/73/t 90/75/pc
87/73 West Palm Beach Ocala 91/66/pc 91/67/pc
87/72 * Orlando 92/69/pc 92/71/pc
Ft Lauderdale Panama City 84/71/pc 86/71/pc
Ft Myers, 87/75 0 Pensacola 88/70/pc 89/71/pc
89/72 *Naples * Tallahassee 89/64/pc 91/66/pc
87/72 Miami Tampa 89/72/pc 88/74/pc
K 88/74 Valdosta 88/63/pc 92/66/s
8KeyWest W. Palm Beach 87/74/t 85/77/pc
. _ 84/76


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


82
71
87
62
96 in 1915
47 in 2006


0.28"
0.79"
15.44"
1.39"
15.41"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:35 a.m.
8:19 p.m.
6:35 a.m.
8:20 p.m.


10:51 a.m.
12:05 a.m.
11:58 a.m.
12:50 a.m.


10 mnuest b bn
Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk


for
a s
to


May May June June
20 27 4 12
First Full Last New
\ \



On this date in
nesday 1980, Mount St.
Helens erupted.
Smoke plumes rose
to 80,000 feet, and
winds carried ash
from the volcano to
the East Coast in 3
days. 2,000 people
were evacuated due
to mudslides and
flooding from melted
snow.


the area on
scale from 0
10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weather.com


S.- Forecasts, data and graph-
"'* ' Ics � 2010 Weather Central
" LLC, Madison, Wis.
=-- www.weatherpublisher.com


Ge CoRlected


c=S S


M='


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


FLORIDA"
U"m








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


City finalizes


charter review;


voters get say

mon August 24


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Jeremy Scippio puts in some of his sweat equity for his Habitat home on Saturday. He and his wife,'Lacoya, are the fourth
partner family for the local Habitat affiliate.


HABITAT: Home is fourth for Columbia County


Continued From Page 1A

Donations needed include
building materials, money
or in-kind services.
Any money left over
from building a house is
used to start the next one.
'"The Lord seems to
bless up with enough fund-
ing," he said. "Once we
complete one house, we've
got the funding for the sec-
ond one."
A family selection
committee goes through
applications to see which
families meet the quali-
fications, LeClair said.


There are only three selec-
tion criteria for potential
Habitat homeowners: a
family must have a need
for decent, affordable
housing that cannot be
met through traditional
means, they must be able
to repay a zero-interest
mortgage loan, and there
must be a willingness to
partner with Habitat and
provide 300 hours of sweat
equity.
The houses that Habitat
built would normally cost
anywhere from $90,000 to


$100,000, Burnham said.
Through volunteer labor
and donated items, it costs
about half that amount.
The land for the fourth
house was donated by a
family several years ago,
he said. The completed
Scippio house will be
1,200-square-feet with
three bedrooms and two.
bathrooms.
Habitat is successful
because it provides a
mortgage payment without
interest, Burnham said.
Payments range from $300


to $320 a month, and that
includes insurance and
property taxes. Mortgage
payments for the same
house without Habitat's
rate would run from $750
-to $800.
Anyone. interested in
helping build the latest
home can call 755-0014 or
visit hfhlakecity.org.
"We build a qual-
ity house," LeClair said.
'"These Wre good homes
with quality material and
everything done right. I'm
proud of what we. do."


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Voters will have the
final say on proposed City
of Lake City charter revi-
sions.
The review board
approved and presented a
letter to the City Council
recommending two chang-
es for the charter at its
meeting Monday. The coun-
cil also accepted the-recom-
mendations at its meeting
that night.
An ordinance with the
changes will be presented
for a referendum vote at the
Aug. 24 primary election.
The recommended
changes are inserting mini-
mum requirements for the
city manager position, such
as a bachelor's degree and
10 years of experience, in
section 401, and incoming
council members take the


oath of office at the first
regularly scheduled coun-
cil meeting in section 513.
Serving on the review
board was a learning expe-
rience, said Chairwoman
Ann Skinner.
"It's a wonderful example
of how the system oper-
ates," she said.
Every citizen had the
opportunity to voice their
issues and concerns for the
charter, Skinner said.
The review board mem-
bers put in a lot of work
and discussion into the pro-
posed changes, said Mayor
Stephen Witt.
"What they did was ben-
eficial to the city," he said.
Board Member O.J. Lake
was absent due to a meet-
ing conflict.
The council will have a
first reading of the ordi-
nance during a special
meeting at 6 p.m. Monday.
I


DOORS: Open at 5 p.m.


Continued From Page 1A

ing prowess of one of Taste
of Honfe's top culinary art-
ists - this year will feature
Michelle Roberts - who
will whip up mouth-water-
ing and flavorful dishes on
stage. During the show,
audience members will be
able to learn, through step-
by-step instructions, - and
then return home to create
those meals at home.


National sponsors, such
as Gallo, Jimmy Dean,
Mushroom Council,
'Philadelphia Cream
Cheese, Velveeta and Ziploc
are providing door prizes
that will be given away dur-
ing the event. The first 800
people through the door
will receive goody bags that
include great offers and a
Taste of Home cookbook.


PETITION: Successful, members say


Continued From Page LA
Reeves said the petition
signatures were collected
in 17 days and represent
residents from all five of
the county's districts.
"We got support county-
wide and we really appreci-
ate it," she said.
Reeves, and Chris
Williams, a CAFU mem-
ber, said they held peti-
tion drives at the Columbia
County .Fairgrounds and


Lake City
advances
toward bond
repackaging

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
All that remains is the
closing for the repackaging
of sales tax bonds for the
City of Lake City.
The City Council
approved several resolu-
tions for the bonds at its
meeting Monday.
The law firm of Bryant
Miller Olive, PA., is ap-
proved as bond counsel, and
Gollahon Financial Services
Inc. is the financial advisor.
Also, the issuance of (not to
exceed) $4,374,500 of Sales
Tax Revenue and Refunding
Bond, Series 2010 to refund
the Sales Tax Revenue and
Refunding Bonds, Series
2000 has been authorized
through the resolutions.
Once the closing occurs,
$2 million will be deposited
into the city's account at
First Federal Bank, said City
Manager Wendell Johnson.
The money will help fund
capital need projects, such
as street improvements.


SUSPICIOUS
Continued From 1A4
and a goatee. The car was
last seen driving west on
Grandview Street in Lake
City.
Anyone with information
is encouraged to call LCPD
at (386) 719-2068.


went door-t,-duor eigh-
borhdoods to collct fthe sig-
natures.,
Residents would also
"stop by" the fairgrounds
to pick up petitions to take
them to places like church
or work to have them
signed, Reeves said.
"Our biggest hurdle was
getting the word out," she
said. "There was still a
lot of people in Columbia


County that didn't know
tfe ordinances was passed
and is law."
Chris Williams said "a lot
of people" offered "extra
hands" to help CAFU
supersede their goal for
signatures.
"It's a representation
that an overwhelming
number of people want this
changed," the CAFU mem-
ber said.


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Lake City, FL 386-755-5440


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OPINION


Tuesday, May 18, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Oil and state

constitution

don't mix

We were against
the plan to
allow oil drill-
ing a few miles
off Florida's
shores long before a rig '
exploded April 20 and began
dumping crude into the Gulf
.of Mexico. It's scary to think
-how much more environmental
harm Florida would be facing if
the same kind of accident had
occurred in state waters.
But we can't endorse the
knee-jerk proposal from Chief
-Financial Officer Alex Sink and
other top Florida Democrats for
a special legislative session to
endorse a constitutional amend-
ment banning drilling in state
.waters.
. Authorities aren't even sure
what caused last month's
accident. And the state con-
stitution is the wrong place
to make energy policy. Who
knows, decades from now,
what advances might be made
in-drilling, and what energy
demands Florida and the nation
might be grappling with?
Grandstanding is to be
expected in political campaigns,
but it shouldn't be enshrined in
the Florida Constitution.

* Orlando Sentinel

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTO RY
Today is Tuesday, May 18,
the 138th day of 2010. There
are 227 days left in the year.
* On May 18, 1980, the
Mount St Helens volcano in
Washington state exploded,
leaving 57 people dead or miss-
ing.
* In 1860, the Republican
Party convention in Chicago
nominated Abraham Lincoln
. for president.
*- In 1896, the Supreme
Court, in Plessy v. Ferguson,
endorsed "separate but equal"
racial segregation, a concept
that was renounced 58 years
later with the Brown v. Board
of Education of Topeka deci-
sion.
* In 1910, Halley's Comnet
passed by earth, brushing it
with its tail.
* In 1920, Pope John Paul
II was born Karol Wojtyla in
Wadowice, Poland.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
P POLICYY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


High Court: Only Ivy Leaguers need apply


H


o hum. It's just
another day in the
Supreme Court
neighborhood
where only those


from the Ivy League seem privi-
leged to be chosen to play. Who
better then to anoint than U.S.
Solicitor General Elena Kagan,
who is not only a Harvard grad-
uate but the former dean of its
law school?
Republicans may fume that
she will be the mouthpiece for
her benefactor, Barack Obama,
and that she lacks the judicial,
experience to make momentous
constitutional decisions fairly
but in the end it won't make
much difference and she will
take her place on the liberal
side of the bench replacing
retiring Associate Justice John
Paul Stephens.
Even the nervous African-
American organizations, which
don't see much in her career
to give them optimism about
k her commitment to civil rights
and don't believe enough was
done to finmI a black woman for
the job, will go along. She was
a clerk to Justice Thurgood
Marshall, the first black to
serve on the court and one of
her stated heroes. They would
have been somewhat less gener-
ous had she been nominated by
a Republican president. Kagan
is after all the choice of Obama,
whom they trust has done the
right thing in this selection.
The Supreme Court is
certainly an elite institution.
More and more it is the final
word about how we conduct
ourselves in this country gov-
ernmentally and socially. As if
to emphasize that point, for at
least half a century it has been
the overwhelming province of
those whose legal training has


Dan K.Thomasson
been in a handful of elitist insti-
tutions. As a recent newspaper
account-noted, in 50 years there
have been 28 appointments to
the court and 18 of them have
come from Ivy schools. That's
64 percent and growing with
the nomination of Kagan. That
sefids several discouraging
messages to other first rate law
schools, including a warning not
to over promise their graduates
about what a degree from their
institution might.achieve at least
in the judicial theater.
This sameness other than
being monotonous also leaves,
us at the mercy of legal philoso-
phies sanctioned by a relatively
few professors. While the minds
of those being taught may be
different, they ultimately are
imprinted by the attitudes and
ideals of their schools, one of
which is certainly not humility.
There is something incestuous
about it all.
The fact that the court is
utterly unbalanced when it
comes to religion may or may
not be relevant depending on
the issue being considered. This
is a nation where an overwhelm-
ing number of its Christian
citizens are Protestant yet the
court with the departure of
Stephens will have six Catholics
and three Jews as members.
There is one black and one
Hispanic justice and who knows
what when it comes to sexual
orientation. Neither Kagan


nor Justice Sonya Sotomayor
have husbands - Sotomayor is
divorced - or children follow-
ing in the footsteps of retired
Justice David Souter whose
personal life before the court
seemed utterly sterile.
Some academics like to deny .
that early development includ-
ing religion and geography has
an impact on an otherwise quali-
fied candidate's later actions.
Baloney! Life's experiences
growing up can't be ignored
when trying to determine how
one might rule on a given
issue. If one has never faced
the problems of marriage and
parenthood, how can he or
she be trusted when deciding
these issues? Judging even on
the constitutional level can't be
entirely bloodless.
Kagan has spent much of
her career in public service
and the rarefied atmosphere of
academia. From early on her
existence seemed one of cere-
bral endeavor until becoming
Solicitor General where she has
been forced to deal with prob-
lems confronting most of us.
One can only hope her lack of
prior experience on the bench
actually may bring a refreshing
insight to her decisions. Her
GOP opponents would be on
more solid ground had they not
once defended the aborted nom-
ination of Harriet Miers who
had no judicial record. There is
no requirement that a member
of this highest, hugely power-
ful court even be a lawyer. The
only such requirement is in the.
position Kagan now holds.
Barring some sensational per-
sonal revelation about her, there
is little chance that she will not
be confirmed. Boola! Boola!
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


You've probably never
heard of a Mahindra.
But if you're past a
certain age, there
was a time in your
life where you'd never heard of
Toyota, either.
Mahindra is a big deal in
India, where its trucks hold 64
percent of the market and its
SUVs 80 percent. Although it
sells vehicles elsewhere around
the world, it is unknown in the
U.S. The company hopes to
change that by the end of the
year when it begins selling its
compact diesel pickup here.
The Wall Street Journal
reports that the company hopes
to get final Environmental
Protection Agency certification


this summer. The company is
soliciting dealers - it is said to
have 300-plus on board - and
the company's website is solic-
iting Americans to take test
drives.
The company will probably
just call the truck a Mahindra
just to get the name known,
although it could save time by
buying the rights to the Pontiac
and Oldsmobile names. The
Jeepy-looking 2.2-liter truck will
compete with the Ford Ranger,
Toyota Tacoma and the Nissan
Frontier, but it is the only diesel
in the compact pack.
It's possible that the Indians
may beat their big economic
rival, China, to the U.S. market.
Chinese auto manufacturers


have been making noises about
selling here, possibly in partner-
ship with GM or such nontra-
ditional outlets as Walmart or
Costco, but so far no Cherys,
Geelys or Great Wall Gwkullas
have materialized in American
driveways.
The Journal says Mahindra
hopes to capture from 5 per-
cent to 7 percent of a market
approaching 300,000 vehicles.
A second Indian automaker,
Tata, is planning to enter the
U.S. market next year with its
tiny Nano, a sort of four-door
Smart Car. If you really get
into Indian cars, you can put
the Nano in the bed of your
Mahindra and drive around that
way as a conversation starter.
U Scripps Howard News Service


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


Telling

stories for

fun and

for profit

(ur mother always
told us children
not to tell sto-
ries. That was
a nice way of
saying, "Don't you lie to me,
young'un."
But now I realize that telling
stories is not only sanctioned,
but profitable, too. In fact, a
guy named Bil (with one 1)
Lepp makes a living off of
lying. He travels all around
the country, telling tales so tall
that a 40-foot ladder couldn't
reach them.
And he's not alone. The
woods are full of professional
storytellers - many of them
expert liars and proud of it.
Bil Lepp of South
Charleston, W.Va., is a cham-
pion liar. He won the West
Virginia Liars' Contest not
once, but five times. The story
that brought him national
attention was about a dog
named Buck, whose mother
was a German shepherd and
daddy a determined basset
hound. He looked like a shep-
herd, but he had basset hound
legs and basset hound ears.
Picture, if you can, the mat-
ing process.
"I always said I didn't believe
it myself until I saw a basset
hound running through the
neighborhood with a steplad-
der tied to his back," Lepp
says.
The late Buck really was
the Lepps'dog, and he really.
was a cross between a German
shepherd mama and a basset
hound daddy. Anything else
Lepp says about that dog is a
story. Pretty good for a former
Methodist preacher.
Lepp came by his lying hon-
estly. He says everybody in his
family lied, usually around the
dinner table. Somebody would
start telling something that
happened, but then over the
years, the story would grow
and grow into some wild, fan-
tastic tale. It was up to the lis-
tener to figure out if anything
was true.
As far as Lepp was con-
cerned, storytelling started
with his grandfather. Same *
thing with Rosann Kent,
assistant director of the
Appalachian Studies Center in
Dahlonega, Ga. Her grandfa-
ther, Arthur Kent of Maysville,
Ga., told practical joke stories
that held the rapt attention of
everyone in the family, even
previously bored teenagers.
He'd tell about tying a snake
to a plow handle to frighten
his oldest brother, Carey, not
to mention the mules; about
burning the log over the creek,
forcing Carey to take the long
way home; about tying the tails
of two 'possums together and
setting them on the chest of
his sleeping brother, Bob.
Today, Rosann Kent her-
self is a grandmother and a
storyteller, "hoping to ascend
the throne as the bearer of
oral tradition in our family,"
she writes in a paper about
her grandfather's storytelling.
College has sanitized her pub-
lic language, banning all ain'ts
and cain'ts, all have wents
and done gones. But now she
remembers the richness of her
linguistic heritage and yearns
to give voice once again to the
story language she gave up
long ago.
So, mamas, telling a story
can be all right, if it's done
right. Through storytelling,
the memories of a beloved
grandfather - and even a dog
named Buck - live on in the
most amusing ways.
* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


4A


OTHER OPINION


Yet another foreign car for U.S. markets










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


Blood donors hope to

make visual statement


From staff reports
Take 1,500 blood donors
and their invited guests,
dress them in red T-shirts,
line them up just so and
you have a photo oppor-
tunity for one very giant
human blood drop.
At least that's the hope
when LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers' North
Florida District holds its
annual Donor Picnic at
Camp Kulaqua near High
Springs on Sunday.
The human blood drop
formation is a special addi-
tion to the annual gathering
to honor LifeSouth's most
frequent donors in North-
Florida.
"The organization
America's Blood Centers
suggested this as a way
to bring attention to the
need and the impact of
blood donation and to also
raise awareness of World
Blood Donor Day on June
14," said LifeSouth North
Florida District Director
J.D. Pettyjohn. "A few years
back, the Canadian Blood
Services .did this with
nearly 1,000 people, and we
think we can top that."
The participants will fill
in a grid set in a field near
the camp's water park. A
photographer, suspended
by a crane donated for the
occasion, will then attempt



Manager:

Utility fee

could fund

city needs

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Things aren't as bad as
originally anticipated for the
City of Lake City's fiscal
year 2011 budget.
"I'm very pleased I can
see the light at the end of the
tunnel," said City Manager
Wendell Johnson.
General fund revenue
estimates for fiscal year
2011 were discussed at a
City Council budget work--
shop Monday.
Johnson said staff had
been estimating a 15 per-
cent reduction in gross tax
value from ad valorem taxes.
After talking to the prop-
erty appraiser, the number
is actually 9 percent.
The city is not planning
on drawing from the gener-
al fund reserve or a transfer
from the enterprise fund in
the next fiscal year.
Gaining $2 million from
the sales tax bond revenue
will allow the general fund
to focus on operations and
maintenance needs, he said.
The money is earmarked
to use for capital improve-
ments.
Johnson also presented
possible budget enhance-
ment initiatives at the work-
shop.
One such source is to
implement a residential
stormwater utility fee to
fund capital needs.
Anywhere from $250,000
to $360,000 could be gener-
ated, Johnson. Creating a
stormwater enterprise fund
would enhance the public
works general fund budget
instead of taking away from
it.
The next budget work-
shop will focus on general
fund expenditures.
"At this point, I'm a lot
more optimistic," Johnson
said. "I hope it doesn't
change."


to make a digital memory
of the event.
While 1,000-plus sounds
like a lot of people, it's a
number with a familiar ring
for Pettyjohn.
"Just to supply the hospi-
tals here in North Florida
takes about 1,000 donors
every week," Pettyjohn
said.
Pettyjohn explained that
LifeSouth can regularly
reach that mark with the
help of the "galloneers"
who will be attending the
picnic, and with partici-
pation of students on, the
University of Florida cam-
pus who donated.
"In the summer it
becomes a real challenge
when the student popula-
tion drops and many of our
regulars are traveling, so
any attention we can bring
to this need can only help,"
Pettyjohn said.
Nationally, it's estimated
that only about 4 percent
of Americans donate blood
regularly.
To donate, a person must
be 17 or older, or 16 'with
written parental permis-
sion, weigh a minimum of
110 pounds, and be in good
health.
A photo ID is also
required. For more infor-
mation visit www.lifesouth.
org or call (888) 795-2707.


* -a


. :" ' ". ' . * -


COURTESY PHOTO
Canadian Blood Services form a 'human blood drop' with
nearly 1,000 volunteers. LifeSouth is hoping for a bigger
version at its Sunday picnic.


Contemporary to Traditional


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Crist vetoes pair

of agriculture bills
Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE -- Gov.
Charlie Crist has vetoed
two bills that would have
expanded a tax break
on agricultural land and
exempted farms from local
environmental laws.
Crist over the weekend
also signed bills putting
more restrictions on horse
meat consumption (HB
765), authorizing a medical
school at Florida Atlantic
University (HB 1581) and
creating a specialty license


plate for St. Johns River
conservation (HB 53).
Crist on Monday signed
a bill (SB 1736) expected
to give 100,000 jobless
Floridians 14 more weeks
of compensation.
The governor vetoed
the agriculture tax bill (HB
981) because it also would
benefit developers.
As for the environmental
exemption (HB 7103), Crist
objected to taking author-
ity away from local govern-
ments.


LOCAL STOCKS

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.68
AutoZone NY ...
BkolAm NY .04
BobEvn Nasd .72
CNBFnPA Nasd .66
CSX NY .96
Chevron NY 2.88
Cisco Nasd ...
Citigrp NY
CocaCl NY 1.76
Delhaize NY 2.01
DirFBear rs NY ..
DrxFBulls NY .15
DirxSCBear NY ..
FPLGrp NY 2.00
FamilyDIr NY .62
FordM NY ..
GLG Ptrs NY
GenElec NY .40
HomeDp NY .95
iShEMkts NY .58
iShR2K NY .75


6.5 12 25.77 +,37 -8.1
... 14 183.72 +3.41 +16.2
.2 78 '16.35 +.01 +8.6
2.5 13 29.33 -.03 +1.3
4.1 17 16.17 +.31 +1,1
1.8 18 54.67 -.36 +12,7
3.7 12 77.73 +.62 +1.0
... 21 24.87 -.07 +3.9
.. 97 3.86 -.12 +16.6
3.3 18 53.41 +.07 -6.3
2.5 ... 79.44 -1.37 +3.5
... ... 13.77 +.02 -29.1
.5 ... 28.00 ... +13.3
... ... 6.10 -.03 -38.1
3.8 13 52.62 -.09 -.4
1.5 17 40.51 +.31 +45.6
... 6 11.95 -,16 +19.5
... -.4.36 +1.45 +35.4
2.3 19 17.56 -,08 +16.1
2.7 23 35.59 +.39 +23.0
1.5 ... 39.25 -.24 -5,4
1.1 ... 69.69 +.13 +11.6


Name Ex Div YId PE Last
Intel Nasd .63 2.9 20 22.02
JPMorgCh NY .20 .5 15 39.84
Lowes NY .36 1.4 21 25.26
McDnlds NY 2.20 3.1 17 70.14
NY Times NY .... 8 9.26
NobltyH Nasd ...... 9.60
OcciPet NY 1.52 1.9 17 80.53
Penney NY .80 2.9 23 27.62
PepsiCo NY 1.92 2.9 17 66.75
Pfizer NY .72 4.5 9 16,.11
Potash NY .40 .4 27 101,46
PwShsQQQNasd .21 .4 ... 47.08
PrUShS&P NY ...... ... 32.00
Ryder NY 1,00 2.2 37 45.57
S&P500ETFNY 2.21 1.9 ... f13.95
SearsHIdgs Nasd ... . 53 108.90
SiriusXM Nasd ... ... ... 1.09
SouthnCo NY 1.82 5.3 14 34.63
SprintNex NY ...... ... 4.49
SPDRFncl NY .20 1.3 ... 15.36
TimeWam NY .85 2.8 14 30.63
WalMart NY 1.21 2.3 14 52.73


YTD
Chg? %Chg
+.13 +7.9
-.05 -4.3
-.81 +8.0
+.55 +12.3
+.11 -25.1
-.01 -8.2
-1.43 -1.0
+.08 .+3.8
+.68 +9.8
-.09 -11.4
-1.47 -6.5
+.15 +2.9
-.06 -8.7
+.58 +10.7
+.06 +2.3
+.56 +30.5
+.02 +81.7
+.16 +3.9
+.13 +22.7
+.01 +6.7
+.07 +5.1
+.61 -1.3


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


Man spits at smokeless tobacco's can of 'lies'


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
Rick Bender knows a little about the per-
ls .f t.o-,acco us.i - he lost a portion oc
hi r- i t_.' spit tobacco . which he bhc l ie i
t. 'ln_, 1 t thl [ e ,:,fe 1-'
R-,nder spiloke on l-liasla y to thl-.
S:de at I I )run Di i-Fr,- h uls Atdisoi y Cuncil
'at tlie '-NSV Fuod st,-res ollice about the risks
as-,,ciate-.d '. ith lobacco, use. Bnder. whu has
appe,_aredi r,_-c,.nll in a rnum-ber of tel,-vision
c, inlmmercials pirnlolting tlobacco awajiness, also
ql,:oke t l students at a1
1tIill lub I of _choioils in
thei Columbia Clunty "It's called smo
V ",ch,,l I)islrict. ..... r .. . -


77


11i-idl-i. said II h i -began I
using snul at lhi age and pretty? D(
of 1', t\ t, rv fit in har
- hi. didn't \'.ant to 'molke
cigar,.tt.-s bIcause of the Ric
dangers asscialed withl
smoking. but said snuff.
better known as ,mok l-ss
l.ibaccu., oi as B-iinder calls it. "spit tobacco" - was
aidvertis.ed as being the sat- alternative to smoking.
"It turneird out lo be the biggest lie I was ever told." he
said
- Bender. who played high
S chooul baseball and was a
minor league player for the
-., Caliturnia Anigels, said
S his usage ouf snulf went
utip as lit got older
- in high school, lhe
,. used one can every
three to four weeks.
but a few years later.
l he was using a can
per day. In February
19,8.. Bender said he
discovered a whitr-
sore on the side of
his. tongue - he'd
had a felt bitfore, so lie
. ignored it, thinking it
would gu away.
. It didn't. But at
onl\ 25 years o)ll.
B1nider knew it
couldn't be cancer
- lie was too
.Yoing to have
cancerr.
But a biopsy


0


ci


Rick Bender, who battled a
fast-growing cancer, shows
two cans of smokeless
iota':co: before the
S.fe ani [rul-Fru e
SchLcols Ad'.v'scry
Council ron
Monday v -


Power outage interrupts spacewalk's camera views


By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer.

CAPE CANAVERAL
- A partial power outage
at the International Space
Station briefly interrupt-
ed Monday's spacewalk,
knocking out robotic cam-
era views of the two astro-
nauts as they worked to
install a spare antenna.
The outage happened
two hours into the 7 1/2-
hour spacewalk by Atlantis
crewmen Garrett Reisman
and Stephen Bowen. The
space station's main com-
mand-and-control com-
puter suddenly crashed. A
backup computer kicked
in, but power temporarily
was lost to some equip-
ment, including the video
monitors being used by
the. robot arm operator,
Piers Sellers.
Reisman was perched
on the end of the space
station's 58-foot robot


arm when Sellers lost his
camera views. Bowen was
working with connectors
on the space station's
framework. Both were
told to stop what they were
doing.
NASA said neither
spacewalker was ever in
any danger. In less than a
half-hour, everything was
back to normal, although
the backup computer
remained in charge.
"Ah, much better,"
Sellers said when his cam-
era views came back.
The spacewalkers had to
contend with a tough con-
nector and refasten some
bolts. A few hours later,
the 6-foot dish antenna and
its boom were installed on
the space station. Bowen
proudly shook the 14-foot
structure. "It doesn't wob-
ble anywhere," he report-
ed.
A tiny gap remained
between the dish andboom,


however, and Mission
Control had the astronauts
strap the assembly down
as engineers analyzed the
situation.
The astronauts next
hooked up a storage plat-
form for the station's
Canadian-built robot,
named Dextre, and loos-
ened the b61lts on six batter-
ies that will be replaced on
the next two spacewalks.
They jokingly asked for
more work as the space-
walk went into an hour of
overtime.
"You guys might not be
tired, but I'm done," said
Dominic "Tony" Antonelli,
who monitored everything
from inside.
Reisman spent the
entire spacewalk on the
end of the robot arm, and
enjoyed the ride.
"I'm way the heck up
here now," Reisman called
out from his perch. "I
might only be about 5-foot-


4, but right now, I think
I'm the highest person
around. Woooo!"
, "Yeah, like you're 'two-
thirds of the way up of being
like a Hubble guy," replied
astronaut Michael Good
.from inside the space sta-
tion. Good worked on the
Hubble Space Telescope
last May in a considerably
higher orbit.
Shuttle Atlantis and its
crew of six delivered the
antenna and other spare
parts to the space station
Sunday.
NASA wants to stockpile
as much equipment at the
orbiting complex as possi-
ble before the shuttle pro-
gram ends. Only two more
shuttle missions remain.
For Atlantis, though, this
is it.
NASA may add an extra
chore to the second or
third spacewalk coming
up this week. A cable is
snagged at the end of the


shuttle's inspection boom.
Mission managers said it
should be a quick and easy
job to free it. The problem
prevented the shuttle crew
from properly checking


Atlantis over the weekend
for launch damage. Mission
Control will have the astro-
nauts use the shuttle robot
arm Tuesday to check the
sections of the left wing.


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Mildred Ann "Donna"
*Frisbee
Mrs. Mildred Ann "Donna"
Frisbee, 52 of Lake City passed
away on Friday, May 7, 2010 at
her home. A native of York, PA,
Mrs. Frisbee had lived most of
her life in Lake City. She enjoyed
watching her husband driving
race cars, crocheting and cook-
ing. She was of the Baptist faith.
Mrs. Frisbee is survived by her
husband of thirty eight years,
J.C. Frisbee, one son, .Chris
Frisbee, both of Lake City, her
daughter, Samantha Price of
Pensacola; two grandchildren.
Her mother, Doris Pittinger; one"
brother, Ted Harding both of
Lake City and one sister, Betty
Jo Mendit of Neptune Beach.
The family will receive friends
Friday, May 21, 2010 from 5pm
to 6pm at Guerry Funeral Home.
Arrangements are under
the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME,
2659 SW Main Blvd.,
Lake City. 386-752-2414

Phebee Marie Nicole Joss
Phebee Marie Nicole Joss a
beautiful, sun shiny, bright smil-
ing baby girl was born, Tuesday,
April 20, 2010 to two wonder-
ful parents, Ashley Coberly &
Garrick Joss, but now she has
grown wings and went to
heaven Friday, May 14, 2010.
She is survived by her parents,


brothers, Kevin & Jesse; sis-
ters, Chelsea & Chloe; maternal
grandparents, Edith and Phillip,
paternal grandparents, Kathy and
John, great grandmother, Dorothy
Givens, Springfield, Ohio; aunts
& uncles, Regan, Tina, Marie
and Rex, and many great friends.
Funeral services for Phebee
Joss will be conducted Wednes-
day, May 19, 2010 in the cha-
pel at Gateway-Forest Lawn
Funeral Home at 2:30 p.m.
Visitation will be held one
hour prior to service time.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596
U.S. Hwy 441 S., Lake City,
Florida 32025 (386) 752-1954
is in charge of arrangements.

Joyce Irene Martin
Nachtrieb
Mrs. Joyce Irene Martin Nach-
trieb, 83, of Lake City, died Fri-
day, May 7, 2010, in the Lake
City Medical
Center follow-
ing a brief ill-
ness. A native
of Tonawanda, r
New . York,
Mrs. Nach-
trieb had been i ""l
a resident of
Lake City for the past six years
having moved here from Gaines-
ville, Florida where she had
been a resident for fifty years.
Mrs. Nachtrieb was the daughter
of the late Jason and Wilhemina


Buhlman Martin. She worked as
a book keeper in both the hotel
and nursing home industries for
many years. Mrs. Nachtrieb was
very active in several organiza-
tions while in Gainesville. She
was a member of the American
Business Women's Association
Arrendo Chapter and served as
their President in 1977 and was
voted Woman of the Year in
1978. She was extremely active
in the Gainesville Chapter 1098
Women of the Moose. On March
31, 2010 she was awarded Life
Membership in the Chapter for
Fifty years of service. She re-
ceived her Academy of Friend-
ship Degree in 1962 followed by
the College Degree in 1969. In
1967 she was crowned Women
of the Moose Queen of Spon-
sors. She was also an active
member of the "Dazzlin Dar-
lings" chapter of the Red Hat
Society. Mrs. Nachtrieb loved
to travel, garden and dance and
kept her keen mind sharp by
solving the cross word puzzles
daily. Mrs. Nachtrieb was a char-
ter member of the Gethsemane
Lutheran Church in Gainesville
and was currently a member of
the Spirit of Christ Lutheran


Church here in Lake City.
Mrs. Nachtrieb is survived by
her daughters, Diane Holbrook
of Lake City, Florida and Wen-
dy Smith (Ralph Brigham) of
Gainesville, Florida. Her step-
grandchildren, Leah Harrell
and John Palmer of Live Oak,
Florida; a favorite brother-in-
law, Ric Maurer of Pembroke,
New York; and numerous niec-
es and nephews also survive.
Memorial services for Mrs.
Nachtrieb will be conducted at
7:00 P.M. on Saturday, May 22,
2010 in the chapel of the Dees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home
with Pastor Ken Hamilton of-
ficiating. A celebration of life
will immediately follow at the
Lake City Moose Lodge. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025. (386)752-1234
. : .,' , ', ,,+ ,,+, .- , .,",, " + ;,


A D OPTION
IN .. NG FAMILIES FOR FLORIDA'S KIDS


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart- ' .:.
m e n t a t 7 5 2 - 1 2 9 3 . , :. " . - - , .- '


, . (386) 7' 5-9130
S, F im-2p-S a tni 'l O Oan-12pm I Sun 8cnn-2p (
T '-^ :Hocks ca.%I ol ,,i 4 l I(Mil Kik on go


on his tongue before the end of the year revealed the
worst - an aggressive, fast-growing cancer. ,
"The only way to remove it was to cut it out, or else it
was going to kill me," Bender said.
On April n ). 1'-.'-19. Bend,-rr uunderwient n.i-e than 12
hoursI u surgery D,,ctors iw.rv forced to cut through
his j:iw to reacIh the cancel.-'-us gr, wth. rn molrved a third
of his. tonlige, and had to ,, ig down the side *if his neck
It re-ach the full extentl o the cancer The surgery also
caused nerve damai>-. which nmadh: hinm lose around 25
percent uf use in his arni
DoJctr-. didn't think he'd make it thr.,_ugh - Bender
%kas given [r ,i, year-. to:i live
But he continued to
tight.
keless.... I hate that A fet-w niore surgeries
sound all nice, neat l_ k pla' c to remove
the- reninants of tlihe
iesn't it also sound cancer. and an infection
lesss" around his- jaw forced
the remnioal of what
k Bender remained of the right
-iduI of hi iaw That
saine infection reic-
curred just last year on
the It-ft side of his face. and lie was forced to undergo
nimore surgery.
"Twenty years later I'm still dealing with the conse-
quences of using tobacco." Bender said.
Bender has been tobacco-free for 22 years. and for
thie past 17 years has done speaking engagements.
warning children and teenageris about the dangers of
tobacco use.
"What I want to do with our kids if give them informa-
tiun that I didn't have at their age so they can make a
better choice than I did." he said.
And it's difficult. he said. because much of s.nuff
tobacco is marketed toward first-time users. He said
the use of snuff has increased by nearly 4-111 percent in
recent years, due in part to non-smoking policies imple-
mented natidniide, and that it is marketed as a safe-
alhernative to smoking.
"It's called smokeless." he said. "I hate that word.
Doesn't it sound all nice. neat and pretty? Doesn't it also
sound harmless?"
But it isn't, Bender said - a single can of snuff con-
tains the same amount of nicotine that three to four
packs of cigarettes do, and have 28 different carcino-
gens in each can.
"That's 2S different ways to getting cancer from this
stuff." he said.
And now tobacco companies are marketing new
brands of tobacco products. such as Camel's Snus
- spitless tobacco that comes in small packets..
-It's the same lie. just a different package." he said.
"There is no safe form of tobacco."


OBITUARIES


496 F


Page Editor: Roni Toldanes, 754-0424


wort II IJl I I- I t I I


b










LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


Bulletin Board


NEWS BOUT UR SCOOL


LCCC honors nursing
graduates
Lake City Community College had 39 graduates from its
nursing program in 2010. Those students are (front row, from
left) Bertha Godoy (Alachua), Lyndsey Goodson (Columbia),
Christen Jones (Columbia), Jessica Lane (Union), Jenifer
Coker (Columbia), Whitney Park (Columbia), Mutinta Tembo
(Duval), Laura Nicula (Bradford), Alisha Owen (Lafayette),
Kristen Mehl (Columbia), (second row, from left) Wendy
Connell (Columbia), Heather Ostendorf (Columbia), Chelsey
Gay (Columbia), Kori Drake (Columbia), Leah Weeks (Levy),
Merilea Vinton (Alachua), Shital Patel (Bradford), Christina
Keast (Baker), Shawna Wine (Columbia), (third row, from
left) Stacey Foster (Columbia), Olivia Wdeks (Dixie), Carissa
Dugan (Columbia), Eva Dyal (Lafayette), Lindsay Rollison
(Dixie), Debra Dighton (Dixie), Laura O'Neail (Suwannee),
Deseray Perkins (Duval), Monica Cannon (Columbia), Lolly
Sumner (Gilchrist), Frank Wilson,(Suwannee), (back row,
from left) Whitney Bishop (Baker), Ashley Stalvey (Columbia),
Kelly Brannin (Dixie), Cheryl Turner (Dixie), Crystal Bennett
(Hamilton), Rebekah Samson (Suwannee), Latoya Holton
(Baker), Rhonesha Watson (Alachua), Candace Brannen
(Union).


COURTESY PHOTO
Shannon Evans, a student at Lake City Middle School,
was the winner of the county and district Tropicana Speech
Competition.

Evans wins county,

district speech

competition
From staff reports


Shannon Evans, a sixth
grade student at Lake City
Middle School, was the win-
ner of both the county and
district Tropicana Speech
Competition.
Evans won the county-
wide competition on April


23, and went on to compete
at the district level on May
2. The district level covered
Alachua, Baker, Bradford,
Columbia and Union coun-
ties. Evans won that com-
petition as well. Her pre-
sentation was on home-
lessness.


Summers Elementary investigates 'crime scenes'


Solving
mysteries,
investigating
crimes
Mrs. Stanton's 5th
grade class at Summers
Elementary School took part
in a week-long journey of
investigation, using
observations, experimenta-
tion, questioning, inference
and interrogations. They
analyzed a crime scene using
fingerprints, handwriting
analysis, DNA and comprised
a list of suspects based on
the evidence.


Event explores college life at LCCC


From staff reports
Lake City Community
College admissions staff
will host an information
session on exploring life at
the college on May 27.


Prospective students
attending the college's
"Exploring College at
LCCC" event will teach
them about the educational
opportunities available,


and the steps required for
students to take advantage
of them.
There will be two ses-
sions held in the Lake City
Medical Center Auditorium


of the Barney E. McRae Jr.,
M.D. Medical Technology
Building 103 on May 27.
One session will be from
3-4 p.m. and one from 6-7
p.m.


ON CAMPUS


Columbia High
School
Columbia High School
has a number of upcoming
events, beginning with one
tonight.
The school's underclass-
men awards ceremony
takes place at 6:30 p.m.
tonight in the school audi-


torium. On May 26, the
CHS Baccalaureate will
take place. It begins at 7:30
p.m. in the CHS audito-
rium.
And graduation is set
for 7 p.m. May 28 at Tiger
Stadium.

FWES
First grade students at


Som ,Jell- er.


Lake City Reporter



LAKE CITY
y COMMUNITY COLLEGE
"Your Hometown College"
386.752.1822
www.lakecitycc.edu


Fort White Elementary
School have been busy
studying balance and
motion in science. They
have been engaged in
making tops and zoomers.
First grade students also
went on an exciting and


educational field trip to the
Jacksonville Zoo on April
23.
All students are finish-
ing up projects and test as
they count down the days
to summer vacation, school
official said.


For Life Insurance
l ~ Go With
l Someone You Know
John Burns, III Mary H Summera
Agent Financial Services Rep.
234 SW Main Blvd. * 752-5866



* ,D


COURTESY PHOTO


Support tomorrow's
agriculture, today.
Purchase an agricultural education specialty license plate at
your local tax collector's office today.
Proceeds benefit nearly 30,000 students enrolled in
agricultural education - the future of the agricultural industry.

Fresh
SFlorida.
Sponsored by the To teanm more.
Florida Department of Agnclture visit us online at
and Consumer Services www.flaffa org/tag


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427



















Today
Taste of Home
Cooking School
A Taste of Home
Coooking School is at 6:30
p.m. today at the Lake
City Community College
Gymnasium. Doors open
at 5,p.m. Tickets are $10
for general admission and
available at the Lake City
Reporter, 180 E. Duval St.

Preschool screenings
Free Preschool
Screening is from 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. today and 10
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. May 19
at Lake City Mall, and 3 to
5:30 p.m. May 20 at Fort
White Elementary School.
Screenings are for ages 3
to 4 years and six months.
Screens take about two
hours to complete. Call
Columbia County Student
Services office 755:8049
ext.- 122 or Jo Ann Laseter,
Florida Diagnostic' and
Learning Resources
System/Gateway at (800)
227-0059.

NARFE monthly meeting
-The NARFE meet-
ing is at 1 p.m. today in
the Fellowship Hall of
Parkview Baptist Church.
Roy Brown of the Florida
Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission. There
will also be a demonstra-
tion by the K-9 officers.
Contact Miriam Stanford
at 755-0907 or Jim Purvis
at 752-8570.

Haven Hospice Healing
Hearts Support Group
Haven Hospice is offer-
ing a free six-week support
program for adults griev-
ing a loved one starting
from 10 to 11 a.m. today
to June 22. These sessions
are free, but register to
attend. Haven Hospice is
located at 6037 W. US Hwy.
90. Call (386)752-9191.

Spring concert
Richardson Middle
School is hosting its spring
concert 6:30 p.m. today
at the RMS auditorium.
Playing that night under
the direction of Sherrod
Keen, is the jazz band,


Ducking out for an afternoon at Lake Isabella
Curtis Washington, 17, feeds a flock of ducks bits of bread Monday afternoon at the Isabella F
view of the lake,' Washington said. 'I like the atmosphere and to be around different creatures


percussion ensemble/
drumline, symphonic band
and beginning band. The
school is located at 646 SE
Pennsylvania St.

LCCC Board Meets
The Lake City
Community College
District Board of Trustees
will meet at 4 p.m. today,
at the Union County
School Board Office in
Lake Butler. A complete
agenda will be available
prior to the meeting. Call
(386) 754-4248.

Underclassmen awards
ceremony
Columbia High School
Underclassmen Awards
ceremony is at 7 p.m. in
the auditorium. Ninth,
10th, and llth grade stu-
dents earning academic
awards will be honored at
this event. All parents and
guardians are encouraged
to attend with their child.
Call the Student Activities.


office at 755-8080 ext. 154
or 139.

Wednesday
Lake City Woman's Club
fundraiser
The Lake City Woman's
Club will be holding a
luncheon for their monthly
fundraiser from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. May 19.

Thursday
Community CPR
Training
Columbia County Fire '
Rescue and Lake Shore
Hospital Authority are
hosting community CPR
training from 2 to 4:30
p.m. May 20 at the Lake
Shore Hospital Authority
Administrative Complex
Upstairs Classroom. Sign
up by Lt. David Bickey
(386)288-7408 or LSHA
office (386)755-1090 ext.
103


9-12 monthly meeting
.The 9-12 Project *
monthly meeting is ato7
p.m. May 20 at the Taylor
Building, 128 SW Birley
Street. Kris Ann Hill is
the featured speaker. She
will be speaking on the
Constitution and founding
fathers. Diane Berryhill,
who is running for District
2 U.S. Congressional seat,
will also be present. Call
John at (386) 935-0176 or
Sharon at (386)935-0821.
Visit www.northcentral-
florida912project.org.

Friday
Jeopardy town hall
meeting
It's About ME is spon-
soring a community
Q&A at 6 p.m. May 21 at
Richardson Community
Center. Citizens are invited
to test county, city and
school board officials on


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 7540428

U To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


-- and beyond. Call 755-7257.

Saturday
- .- CHS 1940 class


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Park parking lot. 'I just like the
, especially the ducks.'

education, city news and
county happenings. Submit
questions to itsaboutmyef-
forts@gmail.com or call
(646) 338-4442.

International Mission
Event
First Presbyterian
Church is hosting a mis-
sion event May 21-23. The
theme is "Serve local,
Share Global." Guest
speakers Parrish Jones
. and Milton Fulton will talk
on "Disaster Assistance."
An international covered
dish dinner followed by a
worship service is at 6:30
p.m. Friday. Workshops
on disaster assistance are
from 2 to 5 p.m. Worship
services at 8 and 11 a.m.
Sunday will address
mission. The Mission
Fair is at 10 a.m. in the
Fellowship Hall with tables
featuring local mission
partners describing how to
serve the local community


reunion
The Columbia High
School Class of 1940 will
be celebrating the 70th
anniversary of their high
school graduation on
Saturday, May 22, 1 p.m.,
at Tucker's Restaurant in
the historic Blanche Hotel.

Bowl-A-Thon
The Columbia County
,Senior Services 16th
Annual Bowl-A-Thon is
from 1 to 3 p.m. May 22.
A minimum sponsorship
is $75 for a five-member
team. This includes two
games of bowling, shoes
and a T-Shirt. The top
three teams and indi-
viduals who raise the most
money will be awarded.
Call 755-0235.

Spring Fling
The Second Annual
Spring Fling is at 7 p.m.
May 22. at the home
of Jerry and Carolyn
Castagna. There will be
dancing, dinner, bever-
ages, prizes and a silent
auction. All proceeds ben-
efit CARC-Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities
and Happy House- Day
Care of Lake City. Tickets
are $50 and are available at
CARC, Happy House, John
Burns State Farm Agency,
and all Lake City loca-
tions of Baya Pharmacy
and First Federal Savings
Bank. Call CARC at 752-
1880, ext. 103 or 104 or
Happy House at 752-4736.

May 25
Arts reception
The community is
invited to a reception and
awards presentation for
the Master and Emerging
Artists at the Performing
Arts Center at the Lake
City Community College
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 25.
The Art League of North
Florida is sponsoring the
event, which includes two
fellowships for two win-
ning artists.


Mike Miller, Purple Hatter's Ball this weekend


From staff reports

: The third annual Purple
Hatter's Ball festival will be
held Friday to Sunday at
the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park in Live Oak. In
a separate event, the Mike
Miller Band will entertain
guests Saturday in the
Music Hall.
The line-up for the Purple
Hatter's Ball includes Big
Gigantic, DubConscious,
Yo Momma's Big Fat
Bootyband, The Ralph
Roddenbery Band, The
Burnin' Smyrnans, The
Malah, 3rd Stone, Catfish
Alliance, Greenhouse
Lounge, Gravity A, Flight
Risk, Corporal Boil, Trial
By 'Stone, Pepper Drive,
Dead Circus and Lucid
Groove.
. Bear Creek Presents and
New Earth Music pres-


ent the -Purple Hatter's
Ball honoring the memo-
ry of Rachel Morningstar
Hoffman. Festival tickets
are $40 and include the
music, three nights of prim-
itive camping and all taxes
and fees. The SOSMP is
also offering a discount on
cabins and golf carts for
this event. A cabin for two
nights and a golf cart for
four is $400. Day tickets
for $20 are available for
Sunday only and are only
available at the gate.
Gates open at noon
Friday and music starts at
5 p.m. in the Music Hall.
On Saturday and Sunday,
events will be held in the
Purple Hat Amphitheater
and on the Campground
Stage. Gates will open 10
a.m. Saturday and Sunday
and music starts at noon.
All guests are invited to


wear costumes Saturday
night that include the color
purple, commemorating
Rachel's favorite color.
The Mike Miller Band
will take the stage in the
Music Hall Saturday night


for dancing, dinner and
beverages. Admission for
the event is $10.
Call (386) 364-1683,
visit www.musicliveshere.
corn or e-mail spirit@musi-
cliveshere.com.


Brightway
INSURANCE

386 752 2345 :HrjE
877.322 7143 ..
386 965 4120 .LL
vance.cox@bnghtway.com
brightway.com
742 SE Baya Dr., Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32025


0 n~u uAlu iu








0 : e . a=-


Professional and Quality Service ForYour Southern Comfort

RI A N Rose Departs December 29th, 2010.

The Rose Parade and Mexican
M IX EParade Riviera cruise aboard Camival
and Mexican Cruise line can't be missed!
Experience the 122nd annual
le R Serv ce Riviera Cruise Rose Parade! Enjoy the brilliant colors, the
e come to 12-DAYS fragrance of thousands of flowers and reserved
come to you"grandstand seats to the most fantastic parade in
Phone: (386) 438-8284 Cell: (386) 623-0835 America. After "rhe p r , 1,,u II br..ard the Splendor
Keith F. Frost and visit Cabo San Lucas, Matzatlan and Puerto
RVIA/RVDA Certified Vallarta for more fun than should be allowed. PPDO:
-08-0005366 plus $299tax/services. Low cost air available.


COURTESY PHOTO
Mike Miller and the Mike Miller Band will headline an event
Saturday at Spirit of Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak. Also
this weekend at the park is the third annual Purple Hatter's
Ball. Call (386) 364-1683 or visit www.musicliveshere.com.


,\"vItaly Tour
AnCient Lands/
-he KMdPatch iediterranean Cruise
19-DAYS



Promo code CN 101113
pr." - -qi


= |Departs December - February,
2010 r', u II' , 1: ' Fme r ' ,, 're
and , - , a : -,r 3 : ,
Peters Cathedral. Enjoy the art in
Florence. Bask in the beauty of Pisa and Venice,
before boarding MSC's Magnifica. Then relax as
,:.,j.r rji , i i.=r'.n r.n - ,, :i.:. . q ~r B ri Crete,
r: 'el rnl 1 i, ([, r-u1 , i - ,u 1 , :iri.: ' ,i ri .-'i ..., ,uch as
Olympia. Greece, Croatia and Ravenna, Italy before
ji. e-nb yr in. ii h ,'erire'r '"PPDO; plus $348 taxiservices.
Low cost air available.
P - t An... - I


I I * IItI
,Vfaread-navialeioensay we al f a e


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I
tkirby@lakecityreportertcom


SPORTS


Tuesday, May 18, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

GOLF
Kiwanis Club
golf tournament
The Lake City Kiwanis
Club has a scramble
golf tournament Friday
at The Country Club at
Lake City. Lunch is at
11:30 a.m. with a shotgun
start for golf at 1 p.m.
Cost is $60 per player.
Hole sponsorships are
$50 and $100.
For details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266 or
Matt Greene at 487-1374.
YOUTH SOCCER
Summer soccer
registration set
Columbia Youth
Soccer Association has
summer registration for
ages 4-16 planned at the
CYSA complex from
6-8 p.m. Thursday and
May 25. Fee is $60.
For details, contact
Scott Everett at
scotteverett60@yahoo.com.
CHS BASEBALL
Summer tryouts
set for Saturday
Columbia High
baseball has summer
tryouts beginning at
10 a.m. Saturday. Tryouts
are for upcoming ninth-
through 12th-graders.
For details, call
J.T. Clark at 365-1754.
DIRT RACING
Dirt Drag Racing
on Saturday
A Dirt Drag Racing
day is planned for Lake
City Motor Sports Park
at 10 a.m. Saturday.
Trucks, street legal and
ATVs will race side by
side for trophies, prizes
and cash. A bounty mud
hole and two-acre open
play hole will be
available. Admission is.
$10 with children
younger than 12 free.
For track and ven-
dor sponsors call Billy
Tomlinson at 623-4637.
For race information, call
Steve Raulerson at
(386) 365-3082.
WOMEN'S SOFTBALL
League sign-up
through Friday
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
is sponsoring a Women's
Summer Softball League.
Church and commercial
leagues will be offered.
Registration is 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. weekdays
through Friday at Teen
Town. Fee is $350.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
SUMMER CAMP
Southside camp
sign-up ongoing
Registration for
Southside Summer Camp
for ages 7-14 is under
way. The camp is
7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on
June 8 through Aug. 13.
Cost is $225 and 80 spots
are available.
For details, call Wayne
Jernigan at 758-5448.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Friday
* Fort White High
football vs. Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
* Columbia High
football Purple & Gold '


Game, 7 p.m.


ndian


audition


. -



BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High Black team members A.J. Legree and Kyle Leland (58) bring down Red team running back J.R. Dixon (11). The combined Black and Red
defenses for the Indians produced seven turnovers and held the offenses to less than 300 yards. 'The defense was real physical - I liked the way they flew
around,' Fort White head coach Demetric Jackson said.


Fort White tunes
up for spring
game on Friday.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE - Fort
White High football had
40 players dressed out for
the Red & Black Game on
Friday.
Most had an opportunity
to make their case for play-
ing time.
The Indians will get a
look under the lights on
Friday when Hamilton
County High visits for the
spring game. Kickoff is


7 p.m.
The Black team rolled
up 236 yards and nine first
downs, but the Red team
kept it close before falling,
14-13.
Five lost fumbles were
costly for the Black team.
Eleven players, got to
carry the ball.
For the Black team,
Xavier Wyche had 44 yards
on 11 carries, followed by
Soron Williams (12 car-
ries-36 yards), Wesley Pitts
(7-30), Zach Cormier (6-16),
Joseph Chatman (4-12) and
Edward Garrison (2-4).
Pitts had touchdown
passes of 23 and 32 yards to
A.J. Legree.


For the Red team, Kellen
Snider had 33 yards on nine
carries, with J.R. Dixon
gaining 16 yards on nine
carries. Colt Pearce had
five carries, while Alexis
Blake and Robert Bias each
had one.
Dixon had a rushing
touchdown and Snider
threw a touchdown pass to
Ron Gates..
Head coach Demetric
Jackson kept Blake under
wraps for most of the game.
Only one pass was thrown
his way. '"We know what he
can do," Jackson said.
A.J. Kluess, Dalton
O'Dell, Zach Bentley, Kyle
Leland, Dylan Newman and


I,
'I


" - .. . .
Ake. -


IS.~~~~~ � i - .- L


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter

Summer Splash competition
Linzie Hair competes in the 12-under 100 freestyle during the Gator Swim Club's Lake City
Summer Splash at the Columbia Aquatic Center on Saturday. More Summer Splash
pictures are on page 3B.


Caleb Bundy made up the
offensive line for the Black
team.
The Red O-line had Dylan
Graham, Kurtis Norris,
Jonathan Dupree, Chris
Waites, Anthony Pearce
and Ron Gates.
"I am proud of the offen-
sive lines," Jackson said.
"We need them to gel, but
had to split them up."
Coach Ken Snider said
the new 3-4 defense is a
work in progress.
"It was hard to tell,"
Snider said. "We couldn't
go good against good. We
have 4-5 sitting out, some
for medical reasons and
some who are not eligible


to play. We won't know for
sure until the fall."
The combined defenses
forced seven turnovers
and kept the total yardage
under 300.
"I was pleased with
the new defense, with
having the kids split up,"
Snider said. "We are tired
of hitting each other and
ready to look at a different
team. We will put the best
we have on the field against
Hamilton and that will give
,us an idea of what we need
to tweak over the summer."
Fort White's middle
school team has an intra-
squad scrimmage planned
for 5 p.m. today.


Benefit show


for local man


Darrell Johnson
has rare cancer
liposarcoma.
By DAVID KISELICK
Special to the Reporter
Lake City Motorsports
Park is sponsoring the
Darrell Johnson Benefit Car
Show, which will be hosted
by The Lake City Mall front
4-6 p.m. Thursday.
Darrell Johnson, the
youngest son of L.C. and
Clara Johnson, was born
in Lake City in 1978 and
graduated from Columbia
High in 1996.
Earlier this year Darrell,
32, was diagnosed with
liposarcoma, a rare cancer
that has affected only a few


individuals in the United
States at this time. He has
been undergoing treat-
ments in Tampa, with his
family making regular trips
to be with him.
Darrell has volunteered
himself to the medical com-
munity to be a source of
study to help find the cause,
and possibly a cure, for this
rare. disease.
Darrell's dad said from
his young days Darrell loved
custom and fast cars. For his
9th birthday he received his
first car and over the next
five years, with the help
of his dad, he completely
rebuilt the vehicle. He want-
ed to be ready for his 14th
birthday when he joined
SHOW continued on 3B


t* s













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS -Tour of California, stage 3,
San Francisco to Santa Cruz, Calif.
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN - Draft Lottery, at Secaucus,
N.J.
8:30 p.m.
ESPN - Playoffs, Eastern Conference
finals, game 2, Boston at Orlando
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs, conference finals,
game 2, Montreal at Philadelphia
10 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs, conference finals,
game 2, Chicago at San Jose

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Sunday
Boston 92, Orlando 88
Monday
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers (n)
Today
Boston at Orlando, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Phoenix at LA. Lakers, 9 p.m.
Saturday
Orlando at Boston, 8:30 p.m.


BASEBALL

AL standings


Tampa Bay
New York
Toronto
Boston
Baltimore


Minnesota
Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Kansas Cit


East Division
.W L
26 II
24 13
23 16
19 19
12 26
Central Division
W L
23 14
22 16
15 20
15 22
:y 14 24
.West Division


Pct GB
.703 -
.649 2
.590 4
.500 7'A/
.316 14'h


W L Pct GB
axas 20 18 .526 -
akland 18 20 .474 2
s Angeles 18 21 .462 2'/
battle 14 23 .378 5h/
Sunday's Games
Detroit 5, Boston I
Minnesota 6, N.Y.Yankees 3
Toronto 5,Texas 2
Cleveland 5, Baltimore I
Tampa Bay 2, Seattle I
Kansas City 5, Chicago White Sox 3
LA.Angels 4, Oakland 0
Monday's Games
Boston at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, ppd.,


Kansas City at Baltimore (n)
Minnesota atToronto (n)
Cleveland atTampa Bay (n)
L.A.Angels atTexas (n)
Seattle at Oakland (n)
-Today's Games
Minnesota (Pavano 4-3) at Toronto
(Marcum 2-1), 12:37 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (F.Garcia 2-2) at
Detroit (Porcello 3-3), 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (D.Huff 1-5) at Tampa Bay
(Price 5-1), 1:10 p.m.
Boston (Beckett I-1) at N.Y.Yankees
(Sabathia 4-2), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Greinke I-4) at Baltimore
(Millwood 0-4), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Jer.Weaver 4-2) at Texas
(C.Wilson 3-1),8:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 2-3) at Oakland
(Sheets 2-3), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follows.
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Just Do It (48-
20); 2. Alley Oops (41-27); 3. Legal
Ladies (40-28, 569 average); 4. The
Four Ladies (40-28, 564 average).
High handicap game: 1. Linda
Herndon 229; 2. Shirley Highsmith
225; 3. Cathy Pelley 219.
High handicap series: 1. Elsie
Huddleston 610; 2. Cathy Pelley 608;


Tampa Bay at N.Y Yankees, 7 05 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 7-10 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 8.05 p.m.
LA. Angels at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Toronto at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W �L Pct GB
Philadelphia 23 13 .639 -
Florida 20 18 .526 4
Washington 20 18 .526 4
Atlanta 18 19 .486 5'/,
New York 18 20 .474 6
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 21 16 .568 -
St. Louis 21 17 .553 'h
Pittsburgh 16 21 .432 5
Chicago 16 22 .421 5'/2
Milwaukee 15 22 .405 6
Houston 13 24 .351 8
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Diego 22 15 .595 -
San Francisco 21 15 .583 /
Los Angeles 20 17 .541 2
Colorado 19 18 .514 3
Arizona 15 23 .395 7'h
Sunday's Games
Florida 10, N.Y. Mets 8
Cincinnati 7, St. Louis 2
Atlanta 13,Arizona I
Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 3
Colorado 2,Washington I
San Francisco 4, Houston 3
L.A. Dodgers I, San Diego 0
Philadelphia 4, Milwaukee 2
' Monday's Games
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (n)
Arizona at Florida (n)
Milwaukee at Cincinnati (n)
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta (n)
Colorado at Chicago Cubs (n)
Washington at St. Louis (n)
San Francisco at San Diego (n)
Houston at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Milwaukee (M.Parra 0-2) at Cincinnati
(H.Bailey 1-2), 12:35 p.m.
Arizona (Buckner 0-0) at Florida
(lo.johnson 3-1), 1:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Duke 2-4) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 6-1),7:05 p.m. "
N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 3-2) at Atlanta
(Medlen I-1), 7:J0 p.m.
Colorado (j.Chacin 2-1) at Chicago
Cubs (Silva 4-0), 8:05 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 1-2) at St. Louis
(Carpenter 4-I), 8:15 p.m.
San Francisco (J.Sanchez 2-3) at San
Diego (Latos 3-3), 10:05 p.m.
Houston (Norris 2-4) at L.A. Dodgers
(Kuroda 4-I), 10:10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Florida at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Autism Speaks 400

Dover (Del.) International Speedway
Sunday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (4) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400 laps,
132.8 rating, 190 points, $327,706.
2. (17) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 400,
118.7, 175, $231,740.
3. (21) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 400, 103.3,
170,$210,101.
4. (14) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400,
108.3, 160, $145,275.
5. (13) David Reutimann, Toyota, 400,
110.2, 160,$153,131.
6. (24) Greg Biffle, Ford, 400,87.7, 150,
$117,025.
7. (30) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400,
88.5, 146, $146,476.
8. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 87.2,
142, $136,773.


BOWLING


3. Shirley Highsmith 603.
(results from May 11)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Fun Tyme
Travel (82-58, 87,264 pins); 2. Back At
Ya! (82-58, 86,697 pins); 3. 3 Gators &
A Note (80.5-59.5).
,High scratch game: 1. Karen
Coleman 230; 2. Presley Gissendanner
212; 3. Pat Gallegos 211. 1. Kamara
Hollingsworth 255; 2. Jim Wynkoop
245; 3. Curtis Gutzmer 235.
High scratch series: 1. Karen
Coleman 622; 2. Ida Hollingsworth


9. (16) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 400,
91.8, 138, $133,173
10. (18) Joey Logano,Toyota, 400, 95.1,
134, $133,040.
1 1. (15) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet. 400,
86.9, 130, $136,251.
12. (1) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 400,
90.1, 132, $98,675.
13. (6) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400,
77.1, 124, $125,679.
14. (8)AJ Al Amendinger, Ford, 399, 97.3,
121. $127,576.
15. (3) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 399,
80.7, 118, $106,125.
16. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 399,
129.4, 125, $139,353.
17. (7) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 399,
87.1,1 12: $96,775.
18. (20) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 398,
67.3, 109, $114,610.
19. (12) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 398, 87.6,
111, $128,898.
20. (2) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 398, 84.3,
108, $132,765.
21. (23) Paul Menard, Ford, 398, 67.4,
100, $93,800.
22. (39) Casey Mears,Toyota, 397, 58.2,
97, $122,748.
23. (29) Scott Speed, Toyota, 396, 58,
94, $102,823.
24. (37) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 396,
53.6, 91, $91,600.
25. (40) David Gilliland, Ford, 395,46.1,
88, $103,135.
26. (22) David Ragan, Ford, 395, 58.8,
85, $90,275.
27. (31) David Stremme, Ford, 395,
48.8, 82, $90,625.
28. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 394, 44.8,
79, $88,975.
29. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 393, 42.1,
76, $80,825.
30. (27) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
390, 55.4, 73, $88,675.
31. (42) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 386,
37, 70, $95,098.
32. (11) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
354, 86.9, 67, $115,004.
33. (41) Kevin Conway, Ford, 351, 32.3,
64, $94,748.
34. (10) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 312,
47.8, 61, $85,025.
35. (28) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
suspension, 283,56.8,58, $ 112,206.
36. (26) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
accident, 222, 60, 55, $96,748.
37. (25) J.J. Y6ley, Dodge, engine, 127,
34.1,52, $76,505.
38. (36) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, brakes,
67,38.7,49, $76,395.
39. (33) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
electrical, 65, 40.4,46, $76,280.
40. (32) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet,
suspension, 36, 29,43, $76,150.
41. (35) Dave Blaney, Toyota, electrical,
36,30.4,40, $75,970.
42. (34) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
brakes, 33, 30.4, 37, $75,890.
43. (43) Jphnny Sauter, Chevrolet,
electrical, 29, 27.2, 34, $76,262.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
128.790 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 6 minutes, 21
seconds.
Margin of Victory: 7.551 seconds.
Caution Flags: 5 for 24 laps.
Lead Changes: 20 among 8 drivers.
Top 12 in Points: I. K.Harvick, 1,768;
2. Ky.Busch, 1,699; 3. M.Kenseth, 1,642;
4. J.Johnson, 1,637; 5. D.Hamlin, 1,618;
6. J.Gordon, 1,605; 7. G.Biffle, 1,581;
8. J.Burton, 1,569; 9. Ku.Busch, 1,531;
10. C.Edwards, 1,487; I I. M.Martin, 1,475;
12. M.Truex Jr., 1,434.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Sunday
Chicago 2, San Jose I
Philadelphia 6, Montreal 0
Today
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Thursday
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Friday
San Jose at Chicago, 8 p.m.


559; 3. Candace Christie 544. 1. Zech
Strohl 644; 2. Bryan Taylor 642; 3.
Dustin Coleman 629.
High handicap game: 1. Karen
Coleman 254; 2. Pat Gallegos 246;
3. Tina Sherrod 244. 1. Jim Wynkoop
281; 2. Kamara Hollingsworth 273; 3.
Bryan Taylor 259.
High handicap series: 1. Karen
Coleman 694; 2. Tina Sherrod 650; 3.
(tie) Patti McGrath, Chi Snipes 647. 1.
Bryan Taylor 726; 2. Lee Young 717; 3.
Roger Snipes 712.
(results from May 7)


COURTESY PHOTO


Gatorfest Challenge runner-up

The North Florida Ball Hawgs placed second in the Gatorfest Challenge in Waycross, Ga.
Team members (front row, from left) are Jordan Culp, Logan Bedenbaugh,
Lucas Bedenbaugh, Tyler Myrick, Alex Mitchell, Nic Tyre and Kaleb Thomas.
Back row (from left) are coach David Bedenbaugh, Jake Thomas, Jake Bates,
manager Jason Bates, Harrison Shubert, Rhett Willis and coach Billy Murphy.


FORT WHITE BASEBALL BANQUET



4) .. .




,.,












COURTESY PHOTO

Fort White High's baseball awards banquet was Saturday at the First Baptist Church in
Lake City. Award winners (front row, from left) are: Justin Kortessis, Offensive Player of the
Year; Victor Gonzalez, Josh Barton Award); Brandon Sharpe, Academic Award; Johnathan
Dupree, Warrior Award; Levi Hatcher, Most Valuable Player and Senior Captain Award.
Back row (from left) are: Alex Gilmer, Most Versatile and Senior Captain Award;
Kevin Dupree, Rising Indian; Bryce Beach, Defensive Player of the Year; Joel Glenn,
Academic Award.


.18



COURTESY PHOTO

Fort White High's junior varsity baseball award winners (from left) are: Kody Moniz,
Coaches Award; Robbie Howell, Top Player and Silver Slugger Award; Brady Wilkinson,
'Academic Award; Coach Pete Blanchard; Zach Gaskins, Rising Indian; Brandon Brooks,
Most Improved Player. Anthony Gonzalez received the Gold Glove Award and Kien Cade
received a Silver Slugger Award.


COURTESY PHOTO

Fort White High's middle school baseball award winners (front row, from left) are:
Kodey Owens, Rising Indian Award; Alex Mitchell, Warrior Award and Academic Award;
Trace Wilkinson, Defensive Player of the Year and Academic Award; Rhett Willis,
Coaches Award. Back row (from left) are: Willie Carter, Offensive Player of the Year;
assistant coach Tyler Sherrod; Dalton Sweat, Coaches Award and Academic Award.


ACROSS

1 Mouse alert
4 Buzz
8 Health food
buy
12 Biol. or astron.
13 Dollar rival
14 "Terrible" czar
15 Instant lawn
16 "- -Around"
17 Leafed through
18 Tribal council
20 "Moonstruck"
star
22 Took a gander
23 Sports network
25 Rock band
crew member
29 Relief
31 Pageant fig-
ures
34 Pioneered
35 Eat out
36 Hideous giant
37 Before
38 Party-tray
cheese
39 Busy worker


40 Abrasion
42 Go steady
44 RN employers
47 Crawl with
49 Foresight
51 Be sincere
53 Kind of
hygiene
55 Make a bet
56 Wholly
absorbed
57 Diamond or
Simon
58 Barely manage
59 Work da.
60 Skillfully
61 Summer hrs.

DOWN

1 Latin I verb
2 Pierre's school
3 Tot
4 Goofball
5 Greets warmly
6 Wrath
7 Univ. marchers
8 Makeshift
swings


Answer to Previous Puzzle

LUBE DAM DOGS
AKIN EMS EPEE
PEEL BOUFFAN T
SNAFUS ROL ES
RIG 0 BOG






ICABLEDA L AGOG




TE SG MOWE UP


9 Was owed a
credit
10 LAX regulators
11 Sturm - Drang
19 Hair-raising
21 Half a bray


24 1492 caravel
26 Obi-Wan por-
trayer
27 Earl -
Biggers
28 Hunch
30 LBJ or JFK
31 Horde
32 Like prime
steak
33 Gorilla or
chimp (2 wds.)
35 Regards as
40 Got it?
41 Quaker State
burg
43 Hikers' shel-
ters
45 Fixed a
squeak
46 Drenches
48 "- Lisa"
49 Colorado ski
town
50 Moscow turn-
down
51 "A-Team"
member (2
wds.)
52 Perfume label
word
54 CSA defender


� 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Te
0
Lo
Se


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


F


17










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


Magic face first adversity


By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press

ORLANDO - Play time
is over.
The trick shots that
had become a ritual after
Orlando Magic practices
were gone Monday. So
were the usual jokes and
playful banter.
They were small but
telling signs of just how,
much has changed in the
Eastern Conference finals
after the Boston Celtics
took home-court advan-
tage, shattering the Magic's
playoff invincibility.
Orlando will now have,
to overcome a loss for the
first time in more than six
weeks when the Magic
face the resurgent Celtics
in Game 2 of the Eastern
Conference finals today.
"It was a good wake-up
call for us," forward Matt
Barnes said. "I can't speak
for everyone, but we may
have been feeling ourselves
too much. They kicked our
tail last night, and now we
have to.get back to work."
There's plenty on the
agenda.
The Celtics swarmed
Dwight Howard from the
opening tip, with four
different big men -
Kendrick Perkins, Rasheed
Wallace, Glen Davis
and Kevin Garnett - all
taking turns. Boston bul-
lied its way past the Magic
in punishing fashion.
Howard was held to 13
points and 12 rebounds on
3-for-10 shooting. But he
also had a game-high seven
turnovers, some coming at
the worst of'times.
Boston's scrappy play in
the paint, elbows and fore-
arms constantly jabbing,
frustrated Howard again.
"I'm just playing him
tough," Wallace said. "The
difference is I'm clean
with it. Some guys who do
that, they're dirty, with it.
They're walking under you
when you're shooting a
jump shot. I'm just playing
him tough.
"I don't do no dirty play.
It's just all tough."
The ripple effect allowed
the Celtics to close out
fast on the Magic's potent
3-point shooters, who went
cold - especially early
when Boston went ahead
by 20 - and never allowed


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard (left) is guarded by
Boston Celtics center Kendrick Perkins (43) during Game 1
of the NBA Eastern Conference finals in Orlando on Sunday.


to get in rhythm. Orlando
shot 41 percent from the
field and 22 percent from
beyond the arc.
The Magic, who swept
Atlanta and Charlotte in the
first twd rounds, haven't
lost consecutive home
games all season. They're
banking on that streak con-
tinuing heading into Game
2, or their hopes of redeem-
ing last year's NBA finals
loss to the Lakers could be
crushed.
"You can't allow it to hap-
pen again," Howard said.
While the Magic are
trying to prove they can
overcome adversity, the
Celtics are looking to regain
their knockout punch.
Streaky for parts of the
season, the Celtics have


only now started to find the
defensive prowess that car-
ried them to an NBA title
two years ago. They spent
the season, hobbled by inju-
ries, dazzling one minute
and baffling the next.
Boston coach Doc Rivers
cautioned his team not to
get overly excited Monday,
knowing such success
hasn't lasted long. The
Celtics haven't won more
than four straight - their
current streak - since
they won 11 in a row before
Christmas.
"We didn't handle (win-
ning) well all year," Rivers
said. "When we won three
or four in a row, you could
count on it, 'Here it comes.'
And we're a veteran team
and we didn't handle it well.


It's a human game at the
end of the day.
"I always worry about
that. I worry about us when
we win one game, I really
do," Rivers said. "We just
haven't been the type of
team, veteran teams usually
handle that well, we have
not all year."
How the Magic will react
after their first playoff set-
back is unknown.
They cruised through the
first two rounds with rela-
tive ease, beating Atlanta by
the largest margin of defeat
in league history. Boston,
of course, is a much more
proven opponent.
The Celtics went ahead
65-45 in the third quarter.
Even if the slow start was
the rust of a six-day lay-
off, Magic coach Stan Van
Gundy doesn't accept that
as an excuse.
He was upset with the
lack of effort and focus
from his players more than
anything.
"I was surprised to start a
series with our energy level
being what it was," Van
Gundy said. "I don't think
we ran in either direction.
We didn't get back defen-
sively, probably the most
disappointing thing.
"We didn't make a big
effort to get back, and then
we just walked up the court
offensively," he added. "As
good as they were defen-
sively and as good as they
are, I think we made it
worse because we played
right into their hands."
After being the comeback
team all last season, the
Magic now have do it again.
They twice returned
from series deficits to win
last year - including going
down 3-2 to Boston in the
second round - and over-
came suspensions and inju-
ries to starters. But the fact
remains they haven't been
faced with such a challenge
this postseason.
Until now.
"Nobody's perfect," said
Magic forward Rashard'
Lewis, who had six points
on just 2-for-10' shooting
in Game 1. "It would have
been'great if we could have
swept everybody and won a
championship that way. But
you're going to lose games.
Good teams bounce back
from losses, and we're a
good team.",


With Prokhorov up front, Nets seek lottery win


By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

NEWYORK-With their
new owner sitting front row,
the New Jersey Nets will
.have the best chance to win
the NBA draft lottery
They could sure use the
help.
Mikhail Prokhorov will
represent the Nets on
stage tonight in Secaucus,
NJ., for the lottery, which
his team hhs a 25 percent
chance of winning after
finishing with a league-
worst 12-70 record. ,
Kentucky freshman point
guard John Wall is consid-
ered the top prize in this
year's class, with player of



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ZISEE

�2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved
YIZZD



LITGUY ] -



WOELLY .
U ), i "


the year Evan Turner of lately. I
Ohio State also expected to Not since, 2004, when the
go high next month. Orlando Magic selected
"From my perspective, I Dwight Howard, has the
think that we are in a very team with the worst record
good position. We're going won the lottery. Last year,
to get a really good player, the Sacramento Kings
so I'm excited about that," tumbled to fourth- though
Nets president Rod Thorn they did end up with
said. "You always want to ,eventual Rookie of the Year
get as high as you can, Tyreke Evans.
because the higher you get, Thorn believes the lot-
the more leverage it gives tery system works and has'
you. We're hoping for the always been supportive of
best, but we do know that it, going back to when he
wherever we end up, we'll worked in the league office,
get a good player." though he joked that,
The Nets can finish "Hopefully I won't be upset
no worse than fourth.
However, the lottery hasn't
been kind to the team that __ -
needs the most assistance


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles:. CHAFE EXULT OPPOSE QUAVER
I Answer: What the foggy night gave the driver -
THE "CREEPS"


tomorrow night."
The Minnesota
Timberwolves (19.9 per-
cent) and Sacramento
(15.6 percent) are the
other teams with high
lottery probabilities.
Golden State (10.4 percent)
and Washington (10.3)
round out the top five.
The 14 teams that
missed the playoffs are
in the lottery. The lottery
determines the top three
picks, with the next 11
spots being determined in
inverse order of a team's
record.


SDo You Need to

1 QUPOPTIHE

4 QUESTION?


I remember
eat 1 da'
so spedal
and sweet,
much more
in our future
if you will


CALL Mary
TODAY to place a
P i surprise ad for
someone you Love!

755-5440 or

755-5441
between 8:00am & 5:00pm


eLI (^47


SUMMER SPLASH


'- ii i '"


p. "..


- -. . .-- a
JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Brendan Napier competes in the 10-under 50 freestyle at
the Lake City Summer Splash on Saturday.


2-


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Dalton Williams competes in the 10-under 200 freestyle at
the Lake City Summer Splash on Saturday.


SHOW: For donations
Continued From Page 1B


the Southern Nights Car
Club in Lak ..'7y.
Darrell .built several
custom and race cars
and won his share of tro-
phies and prizes. He has
driven drag racers at the
Gainesville Raceway, and
attended The Atlanta
Motor Speedway Driving
School with Richard Petty
and won an eight-lap,
-165-mph event.
He met Dale Earnhardt
Jr. at the event and has a
picture with him and the
winner's certificate.
For the past 22 years fast
- or custom cars have been
Darrell's life. Fighting this
disease, he has not lost
hope for another victory..
The Darrell Johnson


Benefit Car Show is
open to cars, trucks and
bikes, and trophies will be
awarded for first through
third in each category:.
There is no entry fee.
Also on hand will be
Chris Collins' , Team
Aggression MonsterTruck
"Tribal Tendency" and the
band Jeff Thomas and
The Rainmakers. There
will be door prizes and
other giveaways.
The show is at the south
entrance to Lake City Mall.
There is no admission fee
and parking is free.
All donations will go
to the Darrell Johnson
Family.
For details, call Steve
Raulerson at 365-3082.


Call for details 386-752-2500
.1866 West US Hwy 90 * Lake City, FL


Luxury Vehicle &Vessel Auction
Broxward County IConvention Center
Ft. Lurtdcal, I1 June 3, 2010
2007 W\i'rrn YYahr 201 0 Lamborghini LP-670SV
S o 2005 Riv Auairiva Super 2008 Rolls-Royce Phainrom
coicrd &l-tcd 1999 Sea Ra' Suindancer 2009 Bcntley (ontinental GTC
l thProgranm 2009 MNascrmin (I .2008 Mercedes-lBen SLR MIcClaren
2008 Bul.airri V'cyron i And MA ore
SE 1vwww.treas.gov/auctions/treasury/gp
-. ~. wwwricklevin.com I 888.534.2828



FISH DAY
Now Is The Time For Stocking
*4-6" Channel Catfish *6-8" Channel Catfish
*Bluegill (Coppernose) *Redear *largemouth Bass
*Black Crappie (if Avail.) *Fathead Minnows *Koi .
We will service you at:
Bailey's Farm Center in South Lake City, FL
Thursday, May 27 * 10AM-11AM
Permit Required for all Triploid Grass Carp! No Exception!!
To-Pre-order call
Arkansas Pondstockers 1-800-843-4748
Walk Ups Welcome


I~d hav to bei pJ~glaced by 4pm
II~ ~~~-dy pro to Iperac in 1^IU~ffflf~fBf
DEADLINT J ^ I Lak Cit Reporterlif.ff


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


P.,










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


DILBERT


IF YOU HELP BRING
IN A NEW ACCOUNT,
I'LL GIVE YOU A RAISE,
UNLESS THERE'S NO
MONEY IN THE BUDGET
THEN FOR RAISES.-


BABY BLUES
SM P ToThe
x' f y . WE:





4- A 7


IT'S
BETTER
THAN
NOTHING.

tl


NO IT
ISN'T!
%.

/ :I .


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


FO 25 MILLION DOLLARS, I'
- CLEAN OU A PIGSTY '
(_WHAT'RE YOU MUMBLING
A-- OUT, DAG?


.l hir ,


DEAR ABBY


White-collar woman keeps her

blue-color beau under wraps


DEAR ABBY: I'm a di-
vorced, middle-aged pro-
fessional woman with a
Ph.D. who has been keep-
ing company with a man
my age for seven years.
"Burt" treats me well. He
takes me out, has helped
with some major home
renovation projects, sends
me flowers and I enjoy his
company. I'm perfectly
happy in his world, and I
like most of his friends.
On the flip side, Burt is
overweight, has a drink-
ing problem and never fin-
ished college. My problem
is, I can't bring myself to
introduce him to those in
my "professional circle."
I'm afraid he will say some-
thing boorish, show up
drunk or otherwise embar-
rass me.
Is there something in-
trinsically wrong with me
that I'm ashamed to have
the man I love meet people
with whom I work and so-
cialize? Is there something
wrong with the relation-.
ship? - IT'S COMPLI-
CATED IN WISCONSIN
DEAR IT'S COMPLI-
CATED: There doesn't ap-
pear to be anything wrong
with the relationship. It has
worked for seven years.


What's "wrong" may be
S. . . '









"settled" for someone who
isn't up to the -tandards of
those in your professional
circle. If you are happy,
why do you feel you must
live up to someone else's
standards?
Of course, this doesn't
have to be a deal breaker.
If you and Burt are a happy
couple, keep your personal
and professional lives sepa-
rate. Many couples do.
DEAR ABBY: I am a'
young, single mother of
two girls. I work full time
and I'm involved in my
daughters' lives. I go to
all their school functions,
coach their soccer team,
serve as the Cookie Mom
for Girl Scouts and volun-
teer for anything else I can
manage to squeeze into my
schedule, but I have a hard
time making friends with
any other moms.
None of the other moth-


ers wants to get to know
me. I wait at the bus stop
with my girls and the moms
talk to each other, but not
to me. I get a weird "vibe"
from them, as if they think
I'm too young to know any-
thing. I try to join in, but
it seems they really don't
care for me.
I have friends my age,
but they don't have chil-
dren. I want friends who
have families because they
face the same kind of is-
sues I do. What can I do
to make these moms like
me? - FRIEND-CHAL-
LENGED IN CYPRESS,
TEXAS
DEAR FRIEND-
CHALLENGED: There is
no way to "make" someone
like you, and if a clique has
already been established, it
can be difficult to break in.
It is possible that because
of your youth and single
status you are perceived
as a threat to them - but
I do have a suggestion, and
your youth can be an ad-
vantage. Start asking them
for advice, and it's possible
* they may take you under
their collective wing;
M. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.


-CALL WAITIt im





0.! .

f2010 Creators c-1


A sERVICE P&VIse-
WITh ThE so.E ITEMT
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"'I ^F~it�^--^ -2-* L.^
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FRANK & ERNEST

SI ~MY TI6RAP6T
-.j--. RKC.OMMNDD A SOT-o ,
M JUDO CLA---




4 - .\ " ... . ...VE 5
^^.L -7.: ,_* *: ^Sr.^:^.F ^a


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Know your busi-
ness and be prepared to
answer questions that may
trigger changes in the way
you proceed. In the end,
persistence will pay off. A
physical challenge will ease
your stress. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't leave any-
thing to chance. The more
information you share and
the ease at which you dis-
play it will help to keep the
peace. A change at home
will be to your advantage
and can even bring you
monetary gains. ****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Your help will
be appreciated and will en-
courage others. A chance to
try something new will lead
to an entertaining pastime.
Make creative changes at
home and you will be able
to get a lifelong dream off
the ground. -***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't expect ev-
erything to run smoothly
but deal quickly and effi-
ciently with the problems
that arise. You will elimi-
nate your stress and move
in a positive direction to-
ward a better future. Don't
let uncertainty drag you
down. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): The unexpected will
leave you wondering what


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

to do next. Someone else
may not like your plans or
the direction you are tak-
ing but you have to do what
works for you. Don't waste
time. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Detail will be your
guide and picking apart
what's being done around
you or asked of you' will
help, you make the right
choice. An investment can'
turn out well if you do your
research. A change you
make now will bring you
greater freedom in the fu-
ture.'**** .
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Concentrate on your
performance and produc-
tivity, not what others are
doing or saying. Distance
yourself from emotional
matters that you cannot win
at the moment. A trip or vis-
iting someone with infor-
mation will pay off. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Now is the time
to present, promote and
discuss your plans and op-
tions with people who can
offer you something in re-
turn. Avoid anyone who is
trying to derail you. Follow
your heart, your head and
your plans, not someone
else's. *****
SAGITIARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): You may be
faced with a decision with
the potential to change
your life. Take a long hard
look at the prospects and
don't let anyone influence
the choices you make. You
need to be surrounded by
positive people who sup-
port you. *****:
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You are up
for- change and must not
scoff at the prospects that
are brought to your atten-
tion. Who does what in a
partnership may need al-
tering. Put a little pressure
on someone if it will help
you' get what you want and
improve your current situa-
tion. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You need a break
from your current lifestyle.
Get involved in an organi-
zation or a program that
will offer you options you
haven't been able to grasp
in the past. A new direction
will do you good physically,
mentally and emotionally.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): It's time to
revamp some of the situa-
tions in your life. A deeper
look into some of your rela-
tionships will enable you to
make helpful choices, bet-
ter utilizing your options.
It's time for new beginnings


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: I equals J
"D WTJ R B L G H RA B LBJTG H R KBJ RT


X A D L G T D G . "


" DZ D R ! D Z Z FY R H U


I D J R K A T L X A T ,R B Y Z' R B Y X B S


X Y L T . "


F H N YTZ GT UTJ E D LXT R


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a
bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom." - Anais Nin
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 5-18


CLASSIC PEANUTS

IL ET BLUE? A HA HA
! I ARIBEAN 5
13EAUTIFULTHI HANMA HAHANA!
TIM qE OF EARI. DEEP BLUE!OH CkARLIE 6BRN,
C WATERAW, I U ER
THEY SAY THE YOU SLAYMEl wWY iiWOULD WATER
MAF;~ /^ ~ .I4OIftACETIHAAANUTUKi



�11A A ^ w \f


PLEASE DON'T SAY
WHAT I THINK YOU'RE
@ GOING TO SAY NEXT.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


One itUm per ad "
4 lines * 6 delays, "'"""



S,


One ,km pel d o
4 lines * 6 days.. :., ,,
, , ., , . , , , - , , ,, ,









.WR ' " . ').' :
St S





SOne ilcm per ad 6.
S4 lines * 6 days '','...












l < . ,' '.; . ..-
LS '237)-
One ilcm per ad








: 4 lines * 6 days'
$* ^ 'o *"U - - * -<







1 4line^s. 6 days'.. .".


4 lines 795
3 days 1i
Includes 2 Signs Eacl additional line 1.65



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon. 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Min.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.mn,
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Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice




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on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, land
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
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credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
adyertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
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ever, the first word of each ad may
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In Print and Online
ww1'w..1! .. . i' . ,p t -'.ilmIII


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
Case No.: 10-49-DR
Division:
ANTOINETTE SHEMWELL-ST.
MATTHEWS,
Petitioner,
and
TRU-LOVE ST. MATTHEWS
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSO-
LUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: TRU-LOVE ST. MATHEWS
Respondent's Last known address:
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
has been filed against you and that
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
ANTOINETTE SHEMWELL-ST.
MATTHEWS, whose address is 142
NW BATTLEHILL LANE, LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA 32055 on or Be-
fore June 7, 2010 and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this Court at 173
NE Hernando Street, Lake City,
Florida 32055, before service on Pe-
titioner or immediately thereafter. If
you fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the petition.
Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available
at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's of-
fice. You may review these docu-
minents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court's office notified of your
current address. (You may file No-
tice of Current Address, Florida Su-
preme Court Approved Family Law
Form 12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the address
on record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure, re-
quires certain automatic disclosure of
documents and information. Failure
to comply can result in sanctions, in-
cluding dismissal or striking of
pleadings.
P. DEWITT CASON, CLERK OF
CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/ Sol. S. Rodriguez
Deputy Clerk
04539431
May 4, 11, 18, 25, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 10-216-CA
GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC,
1400 TURBINE DRIVE,, SUITE
200, RAPID CITY, SD 57703
Plaintiff,
V.
THOMAS WOMBLES, IF LIVING,
BUT IF DECEASED, THE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-
ITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUST-
EES OF THOMAS WOMBLES,
DECEASED, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING - BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST 'THE NAMED DE-
FENDANTS:
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
THOMAS WOMBLES, IF LIVING,
BUT IF DECEASED, THE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-
ITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUST-
EES OF THOMAS WOMBLES,
DECEASED, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE NAMED DE-
FENDANTS:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil
action has been filed against you in
the Circuit Court, County of Colum-
bia, State of Florida, to foreclose cer-
tain real property described as fol-
lows:
LOT 15, CYPRESS CREEK SUB-
DIVISION, A SUBDIVISION AS
RECORDED THEREOF IN PLAT
BOOK 6, PAGE 128, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER WITH
THAT CERTAIN 1996 FLEET-
WOOD HOMES, 76X16 MOBILE
HOME, SERIAL NUMBER:
GAFLS07A34532W221.
You are required to file a written re-
sponse with the court and serve a
copy of your written defenses, if any,
to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plain-
tiff's attorney, whose address is 2878
Remington Green Circle, Tallahas-
see. Florida 32308, at least (30) days
from the date of first publication, and
file the original with the clerk- of this
court either before service on Plain-
tiffs attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise, a default will be en-

d 0




Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 lv msg.


Services


Construction Project?
Feasibility Study needed?
PENN PRO, Inc. provides a
variety ofARCHITECTUAL
and ENGINEERING
services for industrial,
commercial, retail, religious
assembly, residential, etc.
Please call 863-648-9990 x.225

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
~.$*55.3* *********43>~3*.*5*5***


Legal

tered against you fort he relief de-
manded in the complaint.
Dated this 30 day of April, 2010.
CLERK OF COURT
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04539558
May 11, 18, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 09-365-CA
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI-
ATION AS INDENTURE TRUST-
EE FOR AMERICAN HOME
MORTGAGE INVESTMENT trust
2005-4, MORTGAGE-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, 2005-4,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRIAN KULL, et al.
defendant(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to the Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated February 25, 2010 in
the above action, I will sell to the
highest bidder for cash at Columbia,
Florida, on June 9th, 2010, at 11:00
A.M., at 3rd Floor of courthouse -
173 N. E. Hernando Ave., Lake City,
FL 32055 for the following descri-
bed property:
Lot 14, Block C, of Wise Estates, a
subdivision according to the plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7,
Pages 164-167, of the Public Re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale. The Court, in its discretion,
may enlarge the time of the sale. No-
tice of the changed time of sale shall
be published as provided herein.
DATED: May 10, 2010
P. DeWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/R. Scippio
Deputy Clerk of the Court
Gladstone Law Group, P.A.
101 Plaza Real South, Suite 217
Boca Raton, FL 33432
"If you area person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the ADA Coor-
dinator, Ms. Barbara Dawicke at
P.O. Box 1569, 173 N.E. Hemando
St., Room 408, Lake City, FL 32056;
telephone number 386-758-2163 two
(2) working days of your receipt of
this notice: if you are hearing im-
paired, call the Florida Relay Serv-
ices at 1-800-955-8771 (TTY); if
you are voice impaired, call the Flor-
ida Relay Services at 1-800-955-
8770."
04539700
May 18, 25, 2010


020 Lost & Found

LOST DOG: Lake City Airpark
area. Missing Wed. 5/12. Black
Male Dachshund. If found please
call 386-365-6641
LOST: Lg. Grey Cat. No Tail. '
"Smokey" McFarlane by Amber-
wood Apts. Needs Meds. 386-288-
8195 or 386-758-5860 REWARD
REWARD! White gold birthstone
ring, mnth of Aug. w/diamonds
around it. Left 4/23@ LCMC
Outpatient MRI 386-755-6440


060 Services

Honest Dependable Cleaning
Res'l/Comm'l. Great references &
rates avail. For a free estimate
today! 386-365-6386 (Cerissa)
North Florida Farrier Service
CJF Offering barefoot trimming to
therapeutic shoeing. Call anytime.
386-623-6214
1oo Job
Opportunities

04538577



The Lake City Reporter is
looking for a dynamic and
capable sales professional to
sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and
online products. We need a
person with the ability to make
strong presentations.
Professionalism, being active in
the field and closing sales are
three key attributes for which
we are looking. We offer a
salary and a strong commission
plan, along with a good benefits
package. If you have a strong
desire to succeed and the skills
to back it up, we want to hear
from you. Please e-mail your
resume to:
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director, at
lstrickland@lakecitvreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, FL 32055.
NO PHONE CALLS

Tow yTruck Operator
Bryant's Towing is now hiring
Drivers to work in an environment
where you can truly make a
difference each and every day! If
you have a White Knight mentality
a clean MVR and like to work a
variety of hours talk to us!
6 Day work week Night and
Weekend hours required. Salary.
386-752-7799
Sitel is hiring! Good pay, paid
training, comfortable environment,


benefits after 90 days. Need good
attitude and computer skills - must
be reliable. Apply at
www.sitel.com or in person at
1152 SW Business Point Dr. in
Lake City. EOE


100 Job
100 Opportunities

0-1539505



Part Time Telemarketing
Professional
The Lake City Reporter is
looking for an energetic
telemarketing professional to
join our expanding sales team.
Successful candidates will
posses excellent telephone and
customer service skills, be
computer literate and enjoy the
thrill of the sale. We offer a
great work environment and
competitive compensation.
To apply, please send resume to
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director at
lstrickland@lakeeityreporter.com
No phone calls please. EOE


0453)653

S'SiVance

SiVance, LLC, a manufacturer
of specialty fine chelnicals and
located in the Airport Industrial
Park in Gainesville, is looking to
fill the following opening:
Instrumentation & Electrical
Technician
A full time position is available
in a chemical manufacturing
plant for an experienced Instru-
ment and Electrical Technician.
QUALIFICATIONS:
.* Candidate must have demon-
strated experience in the
selection, configuration,
installation, and troubleshooting
of process instrumentation
and motor controls.
* In addition, an understanding
of basic process control
equipment, its operation, and
troubleshooting is required.
* Candidate must also have an
understanding of basic electrical
(AC and DC) conduit, wiring
and components to 480V.
Qualified candidates must
possess at least 5 years of
industrial experience. Pay rate
range of $16-$26/hr based upon
level of experience.
We offer an excellent benefit
package including medical/
dental plans, paid vacations/
holidays, 401K, pension, etc.
Apply by forwarding resume
and cover letter to:
E-mail
zoeanni.moss@sivancellc.comin
No phone calls please
EOE/DFWP

CDL A Drivers needed, team
operation, dedicated account.
Please call Michael 727-479-75p1
between 1 lam and 5pm
DUMP TRUCK Driver
w/Asphalt experience.
386-497-3131

Manager and Assistant Manager
Positions Available local chain
restaurant must have minimum
5 years experience in restaurant
management. Benefits Available.
Pay Negotiable. Send resume to
Restaurant Management Position
PO Box 252 Lake City, FL
32055-0252
NOW HIRING Are you Fun
Enthusiastic and professional.
Are you looking for a full time job
that pays at least $400 weekly.
We need 3 or 4 people to start
immediately. Call Ashley
386-438-8674 leave message.
SEWING MACHINE Operator
Good hourly wage.
Call Hafners
386-755-6481
SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY
Immed FT/PT openings,
customer sales/service, will train,
conditions apply, all ages 17+
(386)269-4656
Teacher needed for lyr olds.
Also, Childcare Worker. Must be
VPK Certified. Must have hours.
386-755-7677 or 344-5363.
Other teaching positions available
Tire Tech. Must have exp w/pas-
senger, truck, tractor tire repairs.
Valid DL req'd. Pay based on exp.
Apply in person Thomas Tire CR
25A. Lake City. 386-752-8648
Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-867-0560
Wanted: Heavy Truck Mechanic
for busy shop. Only experienced
need apply. Call between 8am &
Noon. Mon. - Fri. 386-752-9754

no Sales
Employment

0;153.96I6
MARKETING LIAISON
Accomplished Marketing
Executive willing to be trained
ins Iealth Care, 4 yr Degree
preferred. Excellent work
History, Valid Drivers License
necessary, Extensive local travel
required. Attractive Salary and
benefits. Please send email to:
erobcrts uil st coastlialthcare .cor

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


1 Medical
120 Employment

045396(13
Medical Billing Manager
Several years experience in
medical insurance billing req'd.
Fax resume to: 386-785-5987

04539716
We are still growing!!

I llr- I' I,


Join our family of
caring professionals
in our Branford Office
PRN Staff
ARNP
RN
LPN
CNA/ HHA
Job summary, other open
positions and applications
found at:
www.hospiceofthenaturecoast.org
Fax: 352.527.9366
hr@hospiceofcitruscounty.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, F1 34464
DFWP/EOE

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Therapists & Case Managers
for community based program
working w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.

License Massage Therapist need-
ed for "Caring Physical Rehab".
New Lake City office will open in
June. Call Karen (904)868-9747
LICENSED PT/PTA needed for
outpatient clinic
Experience preferred.
Fax resume to 386-752-0939
Looking for Hygienist for
fast paced Dental office .
Fax Resume to 386-755-7024

04539732
Medical Technologist
Ed Frasibr Memorial Hospital
has an immediate opening for a
full-time night shift core lab
Medical Technologist, 3 days
Wednesday-Friday (2)-14 hours
and (1)-12 hour shift. Must have
Florida License for Hematology,
Chemistry and Serology.
Ed Frasier Menorial Hospital
159 N. 3rd Street
Macclenny, FL 32063
(904)259-3151 ext. 2247
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER

240 Schools &

Education

04539702
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-06/07/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-06/07/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-07/13/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTENS
Litter trained.
Also, free young adult cats.
386-288-2899 leave message.

Mini Schnauzers. AKC.
Salt/Pepper and White.
$400-$500.00. Raised in home.
POP 386-288-5412
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China. Silver, Glassware,
Costumse Jewelry & Gold 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


* The Lake City Reporter
is looking for a dynamic and capable sales


i


professional to sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and online products.
We need a person with the ability to make
strong presentations.

Professionalism, being active in the field and closing sales
are three key attributes for which we are looking. We offer
a salary arid a strong commission plan, along with a good
benefits package. If you have a strong desire to succeed and
the skills to back it up, we want to hear from you.

I'l, i em l Otlu icMnc hto: l.ynda Strickland. nii kcnni' , iecci,
at IstricklandCalakecityrcporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St.. Lake City, FL 32055.
- NO PHONE CALLS-


I do Housekeeping. 10 years exp.
Great references & Great rates
Detail Work!!! CALL ME!
386-628-1091


BU Tihii




4~l M ^____


406 Collectibles
THOMAS KINKADE
Certificate of Authenticity Village.
$55.00 FIRM
386-344-4495


408 Furniture

Dining Table Solid Oak w/24 inch
leaf. Seat up to 6. 4 oak dining
chairs. Asking price $500.00 Call
386-752-3078 or 352-281-4003
Sofa, love seat and end tables.
$200. Good condition.
386-754-9433



420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
WANTED Junk Cars,
Trucks, RV's etc.
Paying CASH $225.00 and up.
Free pickup 386-867-1396
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm-
386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

2 ELECTRIC Wheelchairs. (1) in
very good cond. $1000. obo. (1)
needs batteries. $350. obo.
386-752-5332
PLAY STATION 2
plus 10 games of
your choice. $110.00
386-758-4731
Restaurant Equip. Hot Box $400.
6ft. fridge $400. Ele Rotisserie
$400. 6ft stainless steel hood w/fan
$200. Call Charlie. 386-984-7226.


530 Marine Supplies

SKI'S - Kidder mod 2001. Sport
series, high performance, Slalom
and as pair. Graphite. New $160.
Sale for $75. 386-755-1922

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 br/2 full bath MH
ready to rent Ft White
$500.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $400-$550.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422
LArge clean 3br/2ba all electric in
the 5 Points area No pets.
1Ist month & deposit.
Call 386-961-1482 for info.
Move In Special 2br MH. Low
SD moves you in. Water & mow-
ing included. No Pets.No washers.
Call for an Appt. 386-755-5488
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer. No
Pets! 386-961-0017

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

$148. A MONTH
for only 8 yrs w/$4K down. Newly
remodeled 14 wide 2br/2ba. New
Carpet, appliances, Del. & Set tip.
Owner Finance available. Call
Gary Hamilton @ 386-963-4000

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
1800sf Manufactured Home.
4br/2ba plus retreat/office, 2
porches, walks. Concrete founda-
tion, appliances. Plywood w/ce-
ramic floors, metal roof. 5 ac., cor-
ner lot (treed) Horses OK, Gary
Hamilton (386)256-6379. Possible
Owner Finance (Lake City)

* n 7 10 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010


710 Unfurnished Apt. 770 Condos For Rent
I.UFor Rent I


19')132
!! 5 COMPLEXES!!
IBR from $500
2 BR from $525
*FREE CABLE*
*2 POOLS*
ONE GATED
Washer/Dryer Hookups
386-754-1800

30th Anniversary Celebration
Windsong Apts
Our Gift to You
$300.00 off and Employee Pricing
(386) 758-8455
2br/2ba w/garage on the
West side
1st, last &security.
Call 386-755-6867
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Studios & IBr's from $140/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-514-2950
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec. Also, lbr for
$425:mo. Michelle 386-752-9626
T720 Furnished Apts.
I2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest. Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3br/2ba new const.in nice S/D
Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo. $700
Dep, + 1st & last Req'd., Credit
Check , No Pets (386)755-9476
3BR/2BA Nice & Clean
$800. mo 1st and last NO pets
6 miles to town
386-752-1677
3br/2ba Southwood Estates
off 47S. $950. with security.
Credit check.
386-758-3166
4br/2Ba prick Home, Lrg Kitchen,
Frig, Dishwasher & W/D included,
Lrg yard, Quiet area. $1,000
575-749-6117/575-763-5336
Branford Area. Completely reno-
vated. 2br/lba Mobile home $400
sec. $550 mo. Conveniently locat-
ed. 386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
Lg 3BR/2BA on 1.3 ac. on the
Westside. Water, trash
& lawn maint.included. $875. mo
plus security. 386-719-9702
Owner Financing, 3/2 MH on 2.5
beautiful acres. S. of Lake City
Hard road frontage. Sm. Down.
$875 mo. 386-590-0642/ 867-1833
Rent to Own 3/1 ba. All appl.
incl. On 2 city lots. $650 mo. 1st,
last, sec. Located off Baya Ave.
352-225-1641 or 352-493-5252
-Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
1+Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
Office Building, Convenient
location w/6 offices, Conference
Room, kitchen, ample parking.
Partially furnished. $2,500 mo.
For appointment 386-754-9293
Office Space located Across
from the Mall on Hwy 90.
$450/mo. plus tax.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
Space available at Country Club
Plaza East Baya Ave. 2000 sq ft.
2 restrooms, new carpet. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622


St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice. clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$256/mo. $24.900. 352-215-1018


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis:
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
$115,000 3B/2BA
Den or 4th bedroom.
Cypress Landing
386-466-7168
2004 3br/2ba custom built home
on 8 ac. Huge Oaks w/paved road
frontage. 24X48 pole barn
w/24X24 workshop. 386-365-3607
No Realtor please. Asking $299,K
FSBO, Lulu area, 3br/2.5ba home
2 story, built in 2003. Fenced,
40 x 48 barn, located on 5+ ac.
$224K 386-623-5820
820 Farms&
Acreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
Owner Financing 8 ac. mol
fenced, 40X90 barn, horse stalls,
Pasture and well. Lg metal shed on
concrete slab. Sm. down $600.mo
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
Reduced FSBO 10 ac. Horses &
more. 5 stall stable. Pastures,
board fenced, tool shed. 32'X75'.
4brManuf. Hm w/carport & deck.
$190,000. FIRM. 386-965-3357
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some ,with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

950 Cars for Sale
2000 Ford Crown Victoria. Silver,
cloth seats, all power, loaded.
Runs & looks Great. Must sacri-
fice. $3500. 386-496-0780 Iv msg
2001 Chrysler Sebring
Convertible LXI Fully Loaded
32,000 miles. $4,500.00
386-752-8157 or 386-397-6717


fora


Savvy home shoppers reach for the classified ads

before theVy hit the streets. The newspaper

classified section offers everything they need to

make an informed purchasing decision.


Want to make a move?

Check the classified ads first.













the first place to look for everything









Lake City Reporter


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can,place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


To place your

classified ad call


755-5440


Lake ityReport


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.





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