Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text





This week in sports
Local residents beat the heat by


. . . *A DAY AT THE LAKE

Identification, please


Officials look to curb underage drinking , Iell


JASUN MAI ITI W WALKERILaKe City Reporter
Kanzil Patel, a cashier at a Chevron gas station on U.S. Highway 90 and Marion Avenue, checks the driver's license of a cus-
tomer buying a four-pack of beer. State officials report a 74 percent compliance rate of local retailers refusing to sell minors
alcoholic beverages.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Curbing the sale
of alcoholic
beverages to
minors con-
tinues to be a
problem for area and local
retailers, according to state
officials.
In April, the Division of
Alcoholic Beverages and
Tobacco reported stores
in the Gainesville District,
which includes Columbia
and several other North
Florida counties, had a 74.
percent compliance rate.
The 74 percent compli-
ance rate is below the
state average, which is
86 percent. During April,
Alcoholic Beverages and
Tobacco agents conducted
824 alcohol compliance
checks around the state,
resulting in an overall com-

ALCOHOL continued on 3A


JASON MArTHEW WALKER I : . F.-' . -.,
Robert Ryder, 37, picks up a six-pack of beer at an S&S Food Store at Bayo Avenue and
Southeast Country Club Road. 'I was legal when I first started to drink,' Ryder said. 'It's
important because some people don't know how to judge their drinking.'


ANTONIA ROBINSONILake City Reporter
Sandon Raulerson, 6, of Lake City enjoys a day of fishing at
the All-American Fishing Derby.


Hundreds


attend annual


fishing derby


Organizers say
10th annual event
well-attended.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
. arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
Several times a week,
Clara Roberts of Lake City
gets a call from her grand-
sons, asking to go fishing.
"They love to go fishing,"
she said.
The boys got their chance
at the annual Lake City's
Kids All-American Fishing
Derby Saturday at the
Alligator Lake Recreation
Complex. The annual event
is sponsored by Walmart.
More than 100 children
and adults attended the
event, which was for ages
15 and under, said Nathan
Morgan, Walmart depart-
ment manager for sporting
goods.
"It's just a good event,"
he said. "There's good fish,
and for a lot of kids, it's
their first fishing event out'
here."
Walmart has hosted the
event for more than 10
years and also partnered
with Columbia County,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council and
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission


INSIDE


* More pictures from the
All-American Kids Fishing
Derby 8A


for the derby.
The event used to be held
at Walmart, but for the past
six years it has been held at
the Ponderosa Pond in the
Alligator Lake complex.
The FWC keeps the pond
stocked with fish, including
bass, blue gills and brim,
said William Sargent, FWC
reserve captain. Participants
were able to catch an aver-
age of eight or more fish in
different sizes.
Bait and refreshments
were provided at the derby.
The children could either
keep the fish or throw them
back.
It was a great day for fish-
ing, said Laura Gardner of
Lake City.
"It wasn't too hot and it
was a great fishing pond for
little ones," she said.
Her daughter Maddy, 7,
caught nine fish at the derby
and enjoyed the event.
"She told me it was great;"
Gardner said. "She likes the
hooking."
FISHING continued on 5,A


'Walk About' brings art exhibits to Wellborn


Inaugural event
features art, crafts
and vendors.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
WELLBORN - Art
brought a little fun to
Wellborn in the form of the
inaugural Arts Walk About
on Saturday.
"This is our first one, and
we're kind of happy with
the turnout," said Cathy


Willson, Whistle Stop Deli
co-owner and event orga-
nizer.
The Whistle Stop spon-
sored the event, which fea-
tured eight vendors selling
crafts at different locations
in Wellborn. Crafts included
carved walking sticks, cro-
cheted items and paintings.
"It helps make Wellborn
a little more well known,"
she said. "Ift's growing."
Several artists also entered
a paint-off, judged by Chris
Flanagan of Live Oak.


The Arts Walk About was
a great idea, she said.
"It's something to get the
community out and meet
their neighbors," she said.
Sheila Reinhardy of
Suwannee County came to
sell her acrylic paintings at
the event. The day was nice
and people were friendly as
they came to view the art,
she said.
"It's important to expose
people to art," Reinhardy
said. "So many don't even
look at it."


People with common
interests in art came togeth-
er at the event, said Rita
Ramsey of Lake Helen, who
likes to dabble in acrylic
painting.
Her grandson and son
both entered the paint-off,
and the event was "a good
fellowship," she said.
More walk about are
planned for the future in the
community, Wilson said.
"It's a beautiful day for a
walk about at the Whistle
Stop in Wellborn," she said.


.-" RO'' ' iO r ., .; ... .:,*
Rita Ramsey of Lake Helen works on an acrylic painting at
the Arts Walk About Saturday in Wellborn. Ramsey said she
likes to dabble in painting.


CALLUS: 8 -'
(386) 752-1293 89
SUBSCRIBE TO T-Storm Chance
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
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c>S7Ij~


Opinion ................
Business ................
O bituaries ..............
Life .. .............
Puzzles .................


i+1
in


TODAY IN
LIFE
Native plant
group gears up.


COMING
TUESDAY
News from the
school district.


ste hoc its. -Still Available
COOKINGG sth --"L AT LAKE CITY REPORTER &
SOKING Tuesday, May 18
,fresh picked
favorites Lake City Community College Gymnasium
* Doors Open: 5:00 p.m. * Show Starts: 6:30 p.m.


EgCT^ ^OWL









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


ez'i.atch0 4


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
4-15-24-44 16 4-20-21-32-33 Afternoon: 9-1-3 Af ernoon. 3-9-3-8 4-11-22-31-34-37 37-51-52-53-58
Evening: 1-4-9 Evening: 7-8-2-1 X4 PB38 X2


AROUND AMERICA



Secretive speed traders in spotlight after crash


By. BERNARD CONDON
AP.Business Writer
NEW YORK - If you
saw a penny on the side-
walk, would you pick it up?
You may think it's not
worth the effort, but a
breed of investors who
have been in the news do.
Using super-fast comput-
ers, high-frequency trad-
ers in effect bend down
to pick up pennieslying
about in the stock market
- then do it again, some-
times thousands of times a
second.
More than a week after
the Dow Jones industrial
average fell nearly 1,000
points, its biggest intraday
drop ever, regulators are
still sifting through buy
and sell orders to figure
out what sparked it. One
big focus are orders placed
by high-frequency trad-
ers, or HFTs, and for good
reason. These quick-buck
firms barely existed a few
years ago but now account
for two-thirds of all U.S.
stock trading.
In other words, all those
TV pictures of the stately
New York Stock Exchange
building on the evening
news are an illusion. The
real action on Wall Street
is far away in Kansas City,
Mo., and in New Jersey,
in towns like Carteret and
Red Bank, where HFTs
named Tradebot and
Wolverine and Tradeworx
ply their trade..
High-frequency trad-
ing firms, which number
over 100, use computers
programmed with complex
mathematical formulas to


In this May 6 file photo, traders from Barclays Capital work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, in New York. Using
super-fast computers, high-frequency traders in effect bend down to pick up pennies lying about in the stock market, then do
it again, sometimes thousands of times a second.


comb markets for securi-
ties priced too high or
too low because traders
haven't had time to react
to the latest data. The com-
puters then buy or sell in
a split second, locking in a
profit.
The opportunities seem
hardly worth noting.
They're not just fleeting, but
small, often a penny or less.
But those pennies can
add up to a lot of money,
enough to draw the atten-
tion of Goldman Sachs
Group Inc., the giant


Chicago hedge fund
Citadel Investment and
other big financial firms.
In recent years they've
paid hundreds of millions
of dollars for stakes in
high-frequency trading
companies.
The money has stoked
what was already fierce.
competition among the
firms for a leg up.
To spot opportunities
and act on them before
others, HFTs are constant-
ly hunting for faster com-
puters. They also locate


themselves close to the big
exchanges' data centers.
That can cut their, trade
times by milliseconds.
One way these traders
make money is by exploit-
ing the fact that stock
indexes sometimes don't
immediately reflect falling
or rising prices of their
component stocks, said
Manoj Narang, chief exec-
utive at Tradeworx of Red
Bank, N.J. If Microsoft
shares rise 5 percent but
an index fund that includes
it such as the SPDR S&P


500 lags by a fraction of
second to adjust, his com-
puters will automatically
buy shares of SPDR S&P
500 at the lower price and
then sell them again when
they are fully valued.
Or maybe Microsoft
is trading in London at a
penny less than it's trad-
ing at the same moment in
New York. A high-frequen-
cy trader will buy shares in
London and wait for them
to rise.
Since the discrepancy
lasts a mere fraction of a


' second, speed is key.
Narang boasts it takes
only 15 millionth of a sec-
ond for his computers to
place a buy or sell order
after detecting an oppor-
tunity.
Or, as he puts it, "If you
try to pick up the penny,
we'll probably beat you to
it."
So is that good or bad
for the market?
, If you listen to HFTs,
all their fast trading ben-
efits big and small inves-
tors alike. More trading
means more bids and asks
for shares, and that cuts
the time needed to find
someone willing to buy
what you're selling or vice
versa. Costs also fall. With
more bids and asks, the
difference between the
price you seek and the
price offered (what traders
call the "spread") will like-
ly narrow. You get to keep
more of your money.
High-frequency traders
see themselves as part of
a long tradition of using
technology to shake up
Wall Street.
Critics of high-frequency
trading say all this talk
about narrowing spreads
for ordinary investors dis-
tracts from a key problem:
Split-second trading with-
out human supervision is a
recipe for disaster
Exhibit A: the May 6
crash.
Whatever the answer,
this much is true: These
secretive firms are likely
to grab the spotlight for a
while now. And their trad-
ing might get even more
frenetic.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


School tries to revive music in Afghanistan


KABUL
From the outside, it looks
like any other school in
Kabul. A red two-story
building is sealed off from
the street by a high wall.
A few trees stand in the front yard.
Children constantly go in and out.
But listen carefully. When the
noise of the traffic dies down, you
can hear the gentle sounds of vio-
lins being played and the patter of
drums. In this city where music
was illegal less than a decade ago, a
new generation of children is being
raised to understand its joys.
'"This school is unique in
Afghanistan," said Muhammad Aziz,
a 19-year-old student who dreams of
becoming one of the world's greatest
players of the tabla, a South Asian
drum. "It's the only professional
ynusic school and there are so many
good teachers here."
The new National Institute of Music
has been offering some courses for
the past several months, but the for-
rmal opening will be later in May.
The school's aims: to revive long-
pneglected musical traditions, to
-stock schools with qualified teachers
'and, perhaps one day, to form the
coui�try's first symphony orchestra.
Of the school's students - there
:are 150 now, though there will soon
-be 3Q00 - half are either orphans or
*among the tens of thousands of chil-
dtren who spend their days working
on Afghanistan's streets.
Over a 10-year course they'll
rediscover old traditions, master new
instruments and learn their musical
heritage. They'll study the music
of Afghanistan, South Asia and the
West. It's also a regular school, with
courses in English, math and history.
William Harvey, who came from
-the United States to teach at the new
school, knows what he has found.
"Great talent can come from unex-
pected places," said Harvey, a classi-
cal violinist from Indiana.
Just a few years ago, things were
-very different.
In 1996, Kabul was captured by
Taliban militants as they fought to
take over the entire country and


:"i ,., TE D PPE'.,,
In this May 11 photo, students play music at the National Institute of Music in
Kabul, Afghanistan. In this city where music was illegal less than a decade ago, a
new generation of children is being raised to understand its joys.


impose their version of Islamic fun-
damentalism. The changes were
immediate: men had to wear beards,
women had to be,veiled or at home.
Music was destroyed. Joyous
Taliban fighters unwound audio
cassettes in the streets of Kabul,
stringing the tape from trees like
Christmas decorations. Only sing-
ing was allowed - often limited to
religious songs or songs praising
the Taliban - and playing musical
instruments was banned.
But in 2001, the Taliban fell, and
one man dreamed of musical renew-
al. Ahmad Sarmast, an Afghan music
scholar and the son of a classical
composer and conductor, came back
to Afghanistan from Australia to
rebuild its music scene after 25 years
of war and five years of Taliban rule.
And, he thought, it had to begin
with children.

Police: TV chef cooked
up murder-for-hire plot
SANTA MONICA, Calif. - A for-


mer television chef and Food Network
host is under arrest
in an alleged murder-
for-hire plot involving
homeless people,
Santa Monica police
said.
Juan-Carlos
. _ Cruz, one-tinie
Cruz host of "Calorie
Commando," was
arrested Thursday and booked on
suspicion of solicitation to commit
murder, Sgt. Jay Trisler said.
Homeless people told the city's
homeless liaison officers that Cruz
asked them to kill someone, Trisler
said. They agreed to help police inves-
figate the alleged mtrder-for-hire plot.
"They felt confident that they
could divtlge this information) and
be treated fairly and be listened to,"
he said.
Detectives discovered where,
when and how the targeted indi-
vidual was to be killed and how
much money Cruz , .;, , offered,
Trisler said.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Pierce Brosnan
is 57.
N Actress Debra Winger
is 55.
* Olympic gold medal
gymnast Olga Korbut is 55.
* Actress Mare
Winningham is 51.
* Rock musician Boyd
Tinsley (The Dave Matthews
Band) is 46. ,


* Singer Janet Jackson
is 44.
* Actor David Boreanaz
is 41.
s Actress Tracey Gold is 41.
" Actress Tori Spelling is 37.
" Actress Melanie Lynskey
is 33.
0 Actress Megan Fox is 24.
m Actor Marc John
Jefferies is 20.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... . (386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.,
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a service
error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30
a .m., next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............754-0407
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ........ ... ... . $26.32
24 Weeks.................. $48.79
52 Weeks ... .......... ... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks .. .............. $4140
24 Weeks .. . ........... $82 80
52 Weeks..... ..... . ... .$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Daily Scripture


"As you do not know the path
of the wind, or how the body is
formed in a mother's womb, so
you cannot understand the work of
God, the Maker of all things."

- Ecclesiastes 11:5


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427










Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


..-~, j'~*


'*"- " " '


Art Walk About features arts, crafts in downtown Wellborn
(LEFT) Cathy Willson, Whistle Stop Deli owner and Chris Flanagan look at some of the entries for the paint out at the Arts Walk About. (RIGHT) Clarice Neal of Cross City works on a project
at the Arts Walk About Saturday in Wellborn. She and several friends sold items at Hall's Handicrafts. The inaugural event, which took place Saturday, featured arts and crafts.


City to

discuss

bond

financing
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Moving to the next phase
of bond refinancing is the
goal for the City of Lake
City Council.
The council will consider
several resolutions relating
to its sales tax bonds at 7
p.m. Monday in City Hall.'
Resolutions will include:
retaining the law firm of
Bryant Miller Olive, PA. as
its bond counsel; authoriz-
ing the issuance of, not to
exceed, $4,374,500 of Sales
Tax Revenue and Refunding
Bond, Series 2010 to refund
the Sales Tax Revenue and
Refunding Bonds, Series
2000; and retaining Gollahon
Financial Services, Inc., a
financial advisor to the city
with respect to the issuance
of bonds, notes and/or
other debt instruments.
Refinancing the bonds
will generate $2 million in
revenue for the city's gener-
al fund, said City Manager
Wendell Johnson.
The money will be used
to fund capital needs proj-
ects, such as a new dump
trunk and fire truck, as well
as road, ditch and street
improvements.
"We've put a lot of work
into it these the last four to
five months," he said.
Council will also review
charter amendments from
the review board will be con-
sidered for the upcoming
city general election ballot.


Cooking

school

tickets

available
From staff reports

Tickets for Tuesday
night's Taste of Home
Cooking School remain
available.
The event, sponsored
by the Lake City Reporter
and Lake City Community
College, is scheduled to take
place Tuesday night at the
college's Howard Conference
Center. The doors open at 5
p.m., and the show will begin
at 6:30 p.m.
General admission tick-
ets are still available at the
Lake City Reporter office for
$10 each.
National sponsors, such
as Gallo, Jimmy Dean,
Mushroom Council,
Philadelphia Cream Cheese,
Velveeta and Ziploc are pro-
viding door prizes, and the
first 800 people through the
door will receive goody bags
that include great offers and
a Taste of Home cookbook.
Tickets for the Taste of
Home Cooking School can
be purchased at the Lake
City Reporter, 180 E. Duval
St., by cash or check.


ALCOHOL: Officials say underage drinking is a problem locally


Continued From Page L
pliance rate of 86 percent.
In Columbia County, the
surveys were done April 8
and three of the seven local
retailers surveyed sold
alcohol to underage youth.
'"The surveys are ABT
agents going into the
establishments with under-
age individuals attempting
to buy alcohol," said Alexis
Lambert, press secretary
for the Department of
Business and Professional
Regulation. She said if the
underage person can pur-
chase alcohol, that's a posi-
tive survey.
Lambert said the sur-
veys are done on a month-
ly basis throughout the
year, although the agency
is working "Operation
Boutonniere Bust", a corn-


-1'


pliance effort to ensure
alcoholic beverage retail-
ers do not make underage
alcohol sales during this
year's prom and graduation
season.
Alcoholic Beverages
and Tobacco law enforce- .
ment agent Lt. Jonathan
Parrish, who works out of
the Gainesville office, said
underage alcoholic con-
sumption is a problem in
Columbia County.
"We're currently work-
ing with the local law
enforcement agencies,
the Lake City Police
Department, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office and
we also have a partner-
ship with the local Alcohol
Coalition in Columbia
County," he said, noting


they are running survey
operations to verify compli-
ance numbers.
Parrish said the inci-
dents of retailers meeting
compliance guidelines to
prevent the sale of alcohol-
ic beverages and tobacco
to minors seems to be on
the increase.
"Over the last year, the
compliance rate is rela-
tively high," Parrish said.
"We are seeing compliance
by the retailers most of the
time, but there are times,
like the detail that we did
on April 8, where seven
operations were done
and we made three buys.
Most of the time they are
complying and checking
identifications, but there
are times when they are


not doing it."
During the April 8
detail, authorities also sent
underage operatives into
local stores attempting
to purchase tobacco
products.
"Thirteen stores were
checked for selling tobacco
to underage people and we
actually made five arrests
for selling tobacco prod-
ucts to a minor, which is a
second-degree misdemean-
or," Parrish said.
Retailers that sell alcohol
or tobacco to the inves-
tigative aides are issued
notices to appear in court
and educated on checking
identification.
Selling alcohol to indi-
viduals under the age of 21
can result in a $1,000 fine


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and a seven-day license
suspension for the first
occurrence. Individuals
who sell or give alcohol to
an underage person can be
sentenced to 60 days in jail
and a $500 fine.
Retailers can take pre-
cautions to prevent their
employees from selling
alcoholic beverages and
tobacco to underage cus-
tomers.
'The stores need to
have their employees
check identifications more
thoroughly," Parrish said.
"They need make sure the
store clerks are asking for
identifications and looking
at the identification and
verifying that the person
standing in front of them is
the person on the ID."


- www. lakecityreporter.com
. . . . . . . , . , " ,


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Free Preschool Screening
Ages 3 years to 4 years and 6 months
Lake City Mall

Tuesday, May 18 * 10:00am-6:00pm
Wednesday, May 19 * 10:00am-5:30pm
Ft. White Elementary

Thursday, May 20 * 3:00pm-5:30pm
All children will be screened in the following areas:
*Functional Hearing and Vision *Motor Development
* Speech/Language Development * Concepts
These screenings are FREE to parents and are being conducted jointly
by the Columbia County Schools, and Florida Diagnostic and Learn-
ing Resources System (FDLRS/Gateway). Each parent will have an
opportunity to discuss their child's screening results with a member
of the FDLRS/Gateway staff or the Columbia County School District
staff. For children under age 3, call FDLRS/Gateway for informa-
tion or resources.
Parents interested in information about Voluntary PreK, Headstart, or Subsidized
Child Care may get details at this screening.
(Parents should plan approximately two hours time to complete the screening)
FREE Goody Bags
Foro More Information Call: Columbia County Student Services Office at 755-8049 Ext. 122 or
Jo Ann Laseter, FDLRS/Gateway at 1-800-227-0059


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


-.^: .. -. .. .,-t;.., . I"
" '''� " - 4' "" ""; r











OPINION


Sunday, May 16,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


Oil spill


fallout


affects


all of us
I t isn't possible that BP
could pump money into
cleanup and recovery
efforts as fast as the mas-
sive April 20 Deepwater
Horizon explosion is hemor-
rhaging oil from the bottom of
the Gulf of Mexico.
At a reported 210,000 gallons
of oil filling the Gulf each day
- with some scientists now
suggesting that that number
could be 10 times that amount
- the financial fallout is almost
unfathomable. Even a BP-
reported tens of millions of dol-
lars per day pumped into those
efforts seems insignificant.
That's especially so in terms of
what it will take to clean and,
recover from a spill that could
be 10 times the size of 1989's
Exxon Valdez disaster. For the
record, the tally at that time for
cleanup and damages broached
almost $4 billion.
Not least among these costs
is the financial damage now
inflicted upon businesses
dependent on the Gulf's waters.
BP has rightly earmarked
hundreds of millions of dollars
through the federal govern-
ment to compensate coastal
businesses, but this program
*has limited reach. It does noth-
ing to aid Florida's interior
businesses - from seafood to
recreation to tourism - that
similarly depend on the Gulf of
Mexico.
It was discouraging that at a
recent legislative breakfast in
Lake City our state lawmakers
had no options to offer local
Business leaders other than
direction to a Website for a fed-
eral program that doesn't apply
to their needs.
. We expect more. Our legisla-
tors would do well to remember
that what happens in Pinellas
County doesn't stay in Pinellas
County.
Our lawmakers must make
it a priority to take care of busi-
ness in Columbia County as
well as along the state's coast.
Oil and water is a poor cocktail,
but not so poor as politics and
shortsightedness on the
homefront.


'Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
Scommunity-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


Following the Greek example


final denouement
of the liberal proj-
ect, the welfare
state in all its
subsidy-happy, business-stifling,
nation-ruining glory and the
direction in which the United
States is headed just as fast as
it can go. The evidence is not
hard to find.
Just look at the federal deficit
for April, a reported $82.69 bil-
lion that was four times as high
as the deficit in April of 2009.
An anti-recession stimulus
tax cut and stimulus spending
along with bailout spending
obviously had something to do
with what turns out to be a new
record, but don't figure on this
being a one-time deal that will
go away when the recession
goes away. '
Another recent report tells of
how the Congressional Budget
Office has been refiguring the
cost of the health-care remake
and has added $115 billion to
the cost over the first 10 years,
meaning that the total for that
period will be more than $1 tril-
lion.
Even that $1 trillion is mis-
leading - we have a four-year
stretch before most benefits
kick in - and the cost of the
next 10 years is more likely to
be something like $2.2 trillion.
The craziness here is that this
new entitlement comes on top
of existing welfare-state entitle-
ments - chiefly Social Security,
Medicare and Medicaid - that
by themselves threaten to
wreck our economy minus sub-
stantial restructuring.
One huge demographic


Jay Ambrose
Speoktojay@ool.com


issue, as Harvard economist
Jeffrey Miron reminds us
in a New York Times blog
site, is that life expectancy is
increasing while birth rates
aren't. The result: Ever fewer
people are going to be pay-
ing forever more recipients in
programs for the elderly. And
so what happens in 20 years?
Kerwhamm! Or, as David
Leonhardt of the Times puts it
in a front-page piece, we will
have a debt that is 140 percent
of gross domestic product,
compared to the 115 percent
debt of Greece today.
Not to worry, says Times
columnist Paul Krugman. He
thinks Obama will fix every-
thing, and there you have it:
eternal bliss. But, of course,
most of what threatens us could
. and should have been fixed
decades ago in ways much
easier than what's available to
us today, and what the Obama
administration has done so far
is to make everything twice
as bad. It is precisely to spur
us to get moving that many
people every bit as sophisti-
cated in economics as Princeton
Professor Krugman are issuing
their warnings.
My own solution is fairly
simple - elect people like


Republican Gov. Chris Christie
of New Jersey. Faced with the
worst deficit of any state, he has
already cut billions through a
spending freeze and is taking
on teachers' unions and all sorts
of other special interests in an
effort to effect substantive, long-
range reductions, saying that if
the voters want to get rid of him
after his state-saving work is
done, so be it.
He is refusing to do what
liberals want - solve all prob-
lems with the kinds of tax
hikes that have already caused
businesses to flee his state,
shut down, reduce operations
or stay away, helping to cost
tens of thousands of jobs in
the private sector. Liberals
tend to think that major tax
hikes are the most important
*answer on the federal level,
but first off, they cannot begin
to pay for entitlement increas-
es unless exorbitant to the
point of utter economic col-
lapse, and second, they inhibit
growth in even smaller doses.
You've got to hack spend-
ing. Or, in other words, you
have to do what the left chief-
ly dreads, drastically reduce
the welfare state we already
have, return this society to a
greater resemblance of self-
reliance, support instead of
cripple businesses and keep
in mind what happens if you
don't: Greece.

E Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


It took the 1989 mas-
sive Exxon Valdez oil
spill in Alaska to nudge
Congress into passing
the Oil Pollution Act in
1990, which made oil compa-
nies responsible for paying all
spill cleanup costs. The law set
a liability cap for oil companies
at $75 million for economic
damage claims caused by a
spill.
Clearly, that was being too
kind to oil producers, as the
ongoing massive spill in the
Gulf of Mexico makes painfully
clear.
Fishing fleets remain
grounded. Shrimpers' boats
have been converted into
makeshift cleanup crafts to
reckon with the 5,000 barrels
of crude that's widening the oil
slick daily. Beach resorts are
seeing bookings drop as tour-
ists shy away from visions of
oil-soaked beaches.
Now lawmakers from coastal
states - including Sen. Bill


Nelson and Rep. Kendrick
Meek - are pushing to raise
that cap to make sure BP and
other oil companies in future
spills are liable for damages
incurred by such disasters.
Bills in the House and
Senate would raise the liability
cap to $10 billion and make it
retroactive to cover this ongo-
ing spill. Congress should
approve the bills, and do it
quickly.
If this seems steep, think
again.
In the first quarter of 2010,
BP saw its profits rise to $6.1
billion from $2.6 billion a year
earlier.
BP can afford to pay the
claims of the fishermen, the
shrimpers, the hoteliers seeing
their livelihoods sink under
the sludge.
BP also should pay the miti-
gation costs for environmental
damages, which could take
years to fully assess.
If this seems unfair, it's not.


While most attempts to make
new laws retroactive would
skirt constitutionality because
they deal with something
already done, the spill is still a
catastrophe in progress.
That's why Congress should
act now.
Unlike Exxon, which tried
every maneuver possible to
slither out of its obligations for
the Alaskan spill, BP has been
front and center on taking
responsibility. It set up a $25
million fund for states to use to
combat the slick.
But it has also repeatedly
said it will pay only for "legiti-
mate" damages, whatever that
means.
Sounds too much like wiggle
words. Congress should make
sure BP is as responsible for
all damages as it keeps prom-
ising to be.


* Miami Herald


OK,,,,( GIM1AT
CORK 15 A
O(,E 11 s


IF \N6 WANT
TO ea- CK
TO EOIL?

I\m kJ


4A


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com


Obamacare

paperwork

you can

believe in


promised Americans
"health care
reform." So far,
"health care form"
is more like it.
ObamaCare is devolv-
ing into the Paper Industry
Salvation Act of 2010. This new
law spans 2,562 tree-killing
pages. Far worse, it will force
Americans to spend countless,
irritating hours completing,
transmitting, and filing endless
reams of federal paperwork.
The scariest news for
America's forests may be a
brand-new mandate that will
compel each business - from
General Electric to the neigh-
borhood handyman- to file
an IRS Form 1099 for every
business on which it spends
at least $600. Form 1099 today
applies only to independent
contractors (such as a graphic
artist who earns $1,000 for
designing a sales brochure.)
Come 2012, ObamaCare vastly
will expand 1099s to sellers of
goods as well as services, and
not just the self-employed, but
also businesses - large and
small.
"This will create a two-fold
whammy for small business-
es," predicts Rep. Dan Lungren
(R -Calif.), who is sponsoring
legislation to repeal this provi-
sion. "They will have additional
accounting costs that will con-
sume time and money. They
will be required to keep a run-
ning tab with every vendor, all
the way from restaurants to
anything they buy - a piece of
equipment, an airline ticket, or
a hotel room. And when they
reach the $600 threshold, they
will be required to file 1099s
for each of those vendors."
"Second," Lungren adds,
"small companies most likely
will see less business. Most
people will streamline this
process by moving to large
vendors. Why go to your local
hardware stores, since you will
have to keep track of several
tabs? Why not go to one big
box store? As for restaurants,
why not go to the chain rather
than local restaurants?"
In perhaps the most surreal
aspect of this idiotic new drag
on the economy, the IRS has
yet to write the specific regula-
tions to govern this measure.
It is waiting for guidance from
none other than the Secretary
of Health and Human Services.
What does this ticker-tape
parade of paperwork have to
do with overhauling the US
health care system? Yet again,
here comes Uncle Dracula to
suck every corpuscle of blood
from any available taxpayer
to finance ObamaCare. Over
10 years, this measure would
extract $17 billion from the
jugulars of America's already
anemic small businesses.
Even more paper will fly as
employers investigate whether
their employees have oxymo-
ronic adult children between
ages 18 and 26. If so, compa-
nies must determine whether
these "kids" carry their own
health insurance or remain on
their parents' plans.
Congress should halt this
growing misery and repeal
ObamaCare. If not, it should
launch a new program to treat
paper cuts.
* New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


OTHER OPINION


Liability cap increase necessary


'twtmWr








Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & NATION


SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


. . . - Bet won: Florida

. . man wears same
Sneakers for 4 years
...'-', n � -a ,. : ...


- i

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Workers in protective suits walk towards 14-month-old Hannah Cooney as they comb the beach at Dauphin Island, Ala. on
Friday. The community was bracing for a possible land fall of an oil spill caused by the explosion of BP's Deepwater Horizon
oil platform more than three weeks ago.

Officials: Gulf oil siphon to work after setback


By JEFFREY COLLINS
Associated Press

ROBERT, La. - BP
expected a mile-long tube
to start siphoning oil from
its blown-out well in the
Gulf of Mexico by Saturday
night after a setback. If suc-
cessful, the deepsea experi-
ment would reduce but not
end a spill that's spewed
millions of gallons of crude
into the ocean.
Technicians have been
working since early Friday
to insert the tube into an
oil pipe a mile beneath
the surface using robotic
submarines. The tube is
intended to suck oil up like
a straw to a tanker on the


surface, while a stopper
surrounding it would keep
crude from leaking into the
sea. Even if it works, a
smaller leak that has been
estimated to be contribut-
ing one-fifth of the spill
would remain.
On Friday night, the com-
pany pulled the insertion
tube back to the surface to
readjust its connection to a
tanker intended to collect
oil at the surface, said Doug
Suttles, BP's chief operat-
ing officer. The company
was working again to insert
it and expects to be pump-
ing at least some of the oil
to the surface by Saturday
night.
Other efforts to fight


the spill continued above
and below the surface.
BP also began spray-
ing chemical dispersants
Saturday beneath the sea,
a contentious development
because it has never been
done underwater. Federal
regulators had a day ear-
lier approved the underwa-
ter use of the chemicals,
which act like a detergent
to break the oil into small
globules and allows it to
disperse more quickly into
the water or air before it
comes ashore.
"We didn't cross this
threshold lightly," Coast
Guard Rear Adm. Mary
Landry said of the disper-
sants. "This is a tool that


will be analyzed and moni-
tored."
Interior Secretary Ken
Salazar, who first disclosed
the insertion tube setback,
said at the news conference
that high-level government
officials were convening
over the' weekend to dis-
cuss the best way to end
the spill.
A day earlier, President
Barack Obama assailed oil
drillers and his own adminis-
tration Friday as he ordered
extra scrutiny of drilling
permits. He condemned
the shifting of blame by oil
executives and denounced a
"cozy relationship" between
the companies and the fed-
eral government.


By JEFFREY S. SOLOCHEK
St. Petersburg Times

LAND O'LAKES - Ben
Hedblom's tattered black
sneakers flap when he
walks, turning his white
socks a little grayer with
every step.
The toes of his size 11
feet stick out of the dilapi-
dated cross trainers. Plastic
bags offer the only puddle
protection on stormy days.
Yet Hedblom still sports
the shredded, treadless
Nike Shox he first tied on
as a Land O'Lakes High
School freshman. A bet,
after all, is a bet.
Four years ago, Hedblom
made a wager with Spanish
teacher Adrian Antonini that
he would wear the same
shoes through to graduation
day. The loser would shave
his hair and eyebrows.
Antonini, who picked the
terms of the bet at random,
left the school after that
year. But Hedblom, now 17,
kept his end of the bargain.
Now, as he prepares to
graduate, he has found that
the shoes have come to define
him even more than his sta-
tus as .the popular captain
of the 9-2 football team. And
the lessons he has learned


Irom wearing them propelled
him to a perfect score on
his senior class project, while
also providing the realization
that there are some caring
people in the world willing to
help a teen who looks down
on his luck.
"It made me think less of
what other people think of
me. And it made me approach
them and talk to them. And
they got to know me as a
person. That goes way past
the physical experience," he
said. "I've learned a lot about
self image. You are what you
believe you are."
His story is practically
legend in the halls of Land
O'Lakes High. There's
hardly anyone who hasn't
heard about the shoes.
Sophomore Arielle- Le-
Tran said she felt sorry for
him when she first saw the
shoe remnants laced to his
feet.
She, like so many others,
asked what Hedblom was
up to. He launched into his
tale of his wager, his effort
to stay true to his word and
his experiences with strang-
ers who approached him at
McDonald's offering to buy
him new shoes.
His dedication amazed
some.


Astronauts forced into shorter shuttle survey


By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL
- A snagged cable forced
Atlantis' astronauts to
resort to a more inconve-
nient and less comprehen-
sive method of inspecting
their space shuttle Saturday
as they sped toward a week-
end rendezvous with the
International Space Station.
Mission Control, mean-
while, was monitoring a
piece of space junk that was
threatening to come too
close to the space station.
The debris was 'projected
to pass within six miles of
the complex this morning,
shortly after the shuttle's
scheduled arrival.
Flight director Mike
Sarafin said the estimated
gap was right at the allow-
able limit, and noted that
even a small error in deter-
mining the location and tim-
ing of the junk could have
dire consequences. Experts


did not know how big the
object was or where it origi-
nated.
Flight controllers were
going to decide Saturday
evening whether to move
the space station into a
slightly lower orbit. Even
if the station has to dodge
out of the way, it won't delay
Sunday morning's sched-
uled docking by Atlantis.
The condensed safety
survey of Atlantis also will
not interfere with the dock-o
ing, Sarafin said.
The inspection is a stan-
dard - and essential -
procedure the day after lift-
off. A 100-foot boom is used
to survey the heat shield on
both wings and the nose in
a hunt for launch damage.
On Saturday morning, how-
ever, the astronauts could
not tilt the bundle of laser
sensors and TV camera on
the end of the pole.
It turns out a cable was
pinched by the camera at
the end of the boom. The


astronauts didn't think they
could free it.
"Oh come on, man, we've
got faith in you," Mission
Control said. "Can't crack
the whip with a little cen-
trifugal acceleration?"
"Need to pull some
G," replied commander
Kenneth Ham, referring
to gravity forces. "Spin her
up," joked Mission Control.
The six astronauts used
cameras and binoculars
to beam down close-up
pictures. The cable was
dented where it was being
squished, Ham reported.
Finally, after several
hours, Mission Control had
the astronauts use the back-
up set of lasers and camera
hard-mounted to the boom,
which left out some poten-
tial problem areas. They
were limited to the daytime
side of Earth because of the
digital camera equipment.
The crew focused on the
most vulnerable areas -
the heat shield on the wings


and nose. It was unlikely
they would -get everything
they needed from the left
wing.
Sarafin said he expects to
get all the necessary images
one way or another, either
from extra zoom-in photos
taken by the space station
crew during Atlantis' final
approach Sunday or follow-
ing the linkup.
It's possible the astro-
nauts could free the cable
during one of the three
planned spacewalks for the
mission, if deemed neces-
sary. Sarafin said it was
too soon to know whether
the equipment was put in
wrong or whether the cable
was shaken out of position
during liftoff.
Day-after-launch and
day-before landing shut-
tle inspections were put
in place following the
2003 Columbia disaster.
Columbia shattered during
re-entry because of a hole
in the left wing.


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Trey Regar, 4, of Lake City shows off his worm bait. Derby participants received free bait at the event.


FISHING: Derby features full day of fun, activities
Continued From Page 1A
Anytime children can Raulerson of Lake City. Sandon, 6, to the derby on "I'n not telling him, 'let's
be involved in the out- Raulerson said he's been Saturday. go,' because he loves to
doors and get outside the fishing since a young age "He'll stay here all fish, and that's all thai
house is good, said John and brought his grandson day," Raulerson said. matters."


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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Blood mobile taking
donations
"- The LifeSouth blood
mobile will be at Ole' Times
Country Buffet from 11 a.m.
to 6 p.m. today. Donors will
receive a free buffet courtesy
of Ole' Times Country Buffet.

Master and emerging
artists exhibit
The community is invited
to the Masters and Emerging
Artist Exhibit at the Levy
Performing Arts Center at the
Lake City Community College
runs through June 23 The
exhibit is sponsored by the
Art League .of North Florida.
Two $250 Art Fellowships will
be awarded to the winning
artists in the Emerging Artist
category. This show features
artists in the community pre-
senting works in a variety
of mediums. Most of the art
work will be for sale and will
contribute to the continuation
of the art fellowship program.

Volunteers and
donations needed
Catholic Charities is look-
ing for summer interns.
Students can get their bright
futures volunteer hours. Work
will include: bagging grocer-
ies, answering phones, filing,
raking, mowing gardening,
running errands and data
entry. Also there is an imme-
diate need of the following
donations: cereal, peanut
butter and jelly, juice boxes,
dry spaghetti, noodles, soup,
dog and cat dry food, dry
laundry powder, plastic gro-
cery bags. The organization
is located at 258 NW Burk
Avenue. Call (386) 754-9180.

Mall Walkers
Rain or shine, the Lake City
Mall is open at 7 a.m. Monday-


A friendly wave from a new graduate,
Psychology major Britney Coleman (centers) waves at family and friends as she takes her seat during commencement.


Saturday and 10 a.m. Sunday
for those who want to walk
for exercise.

Monday
Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support Group
meets at 7 p.m. Monday in
the Classrooms at Lake City
Medical Center. Meetings
are for people that have had
weight loss surgery, contem-
plating surgery or just trying
to lose weight on their own.
E-mail thethinnerme@gmail.
corn or call (386) 288-9153
and leave a message.


Musical Evening with
Friends at LCCC
The Annual Musical
Evening With Friends is at
7:30 p.m. Monday at the
Levy Performing Arts Center.
The event will feature the
LCCC Gateway City Band
conducted by Harry Wuest,
Matt Johns, Lelani Clark,
Ben Grier, Anthony Mobley,
Heather Smith, Dan Hanley
and Carl Manna. There will
be special appearance by
"Salt & Pepper Duo," Alfonso
Levy and Tony Buzzella. The
event is free and in memory
of and dedicated to Margaret
Wuest.


New sign dedication at
VA Hospital
The VA Hospital is having
a sign dedication ceremony
at 10 a.m. Monday by the
ER entrance. The sign
was donated by the Sgt.
Maj. Thomas H. Griggs Jr.
Detachment of the Marine
Corps to honor the commit-
ment of our US Serviceman.

Tuesday
Taste of Home Cooking
School
A Taste of Home Coooking
School is at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
at the Lake City Community


College Gymnasium. Doors
open at 5 p.m. Tickets are
$10 for general admission
and available at the Lake City
Reporter, 180 E. Duval St.

Preschool screenings
Free Preschool Screening
is from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Tuesday and 10 a.m. to
5:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Lake City Mall, and 3 to
5:30 p.m. May 20 at Fort
White Elementary School.
Screenings are for ages 3
to 4 years and six months,
Screens take about two
hours to complete. Call
Columbia County Student
Services office 755-8049
ext. 122 or Jo Ann Laseter,


Florida Diagnostic and
Learning Resources System/
Gateway at 1-800-227-0059.

NARFE monthly meeting
The NARFE meeting is
at 1 p.m. Tuesday in the
Fellowship Hall of Parkview
Baptist Church. Capt. Roy
Brown of the Florida Game
and Fresh Water Fish
Commission. There will also
be a demonstration by the
K-9 officers. Contact Miriam
Stanford at 755-0907 or Jim
Purvis at 752-8570.

Haven Hospice Healing
Hearts Support Group
Haven Hospice is offer-
ing a free six-week support
program for adults grieving a
loved one starting from 10 to
11 a.m. Tuesday and through
June 22. These sessions are
free, but register to attend.
Haven Hospice is located at
6037 W. US Hwy. 90. Call
(386)752-9191.

Spring concert
Richardsoh Middle School
is hosting its spring concert
6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the
RMS auditorium. Playing that
night under the direction of
Sherrod Keen, is the jazz
band, percussion ensemble/
drumline, symphonic band
and beginning band. The
school is located at 646 SE
Pennsylvania St.

Underclassmen awards
ceremony
Columbia High School
Underclassmen Awards
ceremony is at 7 p.m. in the
auditorium. Ninth, 10th, and
1th grade students earning
academic awards will be hon-
ored at this event. All parents
and guardian are encouraged
to attend with their child. Call
the Student Activities office at
755-8080 ext. 154 or 139.


U.S. 41/CR-252 project among

those that could affect traffic


From staff reports

Road construction proj-
ects in Columbia and sur-
rounding counties could
affect traffic this 'week.
Those projects include:

Columbia County

* Interstate 75 -
Possible daytime lane clo-
sures in both directions
between Interstate 10 and
the Suwannee County line
to work on the roadway
shoulders and replace the
guardrail. No lane closures
are allowed weekends
b beginning Friday at 6 a.m.
until Sunday at 6 p.m. The
speed limit is reduced to 60
mph during lane closures
and is strictly enforced by
FHP. Work also continues
at the Interstate 10 inter-
change to replace the high
mist lights.
* Springville Road.-The
road remains closed at the
1-75 overpass until a dam-
aged beam can be replaced,
expected to begin May 24
(postponed from this past
week). Traffic is detoured


to White Springs Road to
State Road 136 during the
closure.
* State Road 238
- Daytime lane clo-
sures are scheduled to
resume Monday after
8:30 a.m. between U.S. 441
in Ellisville and the Olustee
Creek Bridge at the Union
County line while crews
begin resurfacing the road.
Crews plan to begin Monday
in the Union County section
and proceed west towards
U.S. 441.
* U.S. 41/441 South
- Crews are scheduled to
completely close the road-
way at County Road 252 (by
Columbia High School) on
Monday for up to 10-minute
periods between 1:30 and
3 p.m. while crews hang
new traffic signal wires
across the roadway (post-
poned from this past week).
Law enforcement will direct
traffic when the signals are
switched over. Also, CR 252
just east of U.S. 41/441 will
be closed for up to 10-min-
utes to hang signals across
the intersection. Possible
daytime lane closures for
the rest of the week to paint


crosswalks and work on
signals.

Union County

* State Road 238
- Daytime lane closures
are scheduled to resume
Monday after 8:30 a.m.
beginning at State Road
238 in Lake Butler and pro-
ceeding west towards the
Columbia County line while
crews begin resurfacing
the road. While lane clo-
sures will begin at State
Road 238, traffic may be
impacted on State Road 238
between State Road 100 and
State Road 121. Motorists
should allow an extra 10-15
minutes to reach their des-
tination.

Alachua County

* Archer Road (State
Road 24) - Daytime lane
closures between the Levy
County line and Southwest
13th Street (U.S. 441) to
allow inmate crews to
repaint the roadway mark-
ings.


is pleased to announce the addition of


to our Practice.

Accepting New Patients
Specializing in adult medical care including:
* Primary Care * Arthritis
* High Blood Pressure * Low Back Pain
* Heart Disease * Fudl Dizziness,
* Lung Disease vertigo and balance
* Gastrointestinal diagnosis and
* High Cholesterol treatment
* Diabetes * Optifast" Weight
* Women's Health Loss System
Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans accepted, worker compensation


Barry Coleman
Barry Coleman 50, went home
to be with the Lord Wednesday,
May 12, 2010 at North Floridda
Regional Medical Center in
Gainesville, Florida after an
extended illness. Mr. Coleman
was born in New York in 1959,
but raised in Alabama. For the
past 23 years he made Lake City
his home endearing himself to
many in the community, forming
relationships, touching lives as a
coach, mentor, friend, and Pastor
of Joy Explosion Church for over
ten years. Those left to cherish
memories; his wife of 28 years,
Alberta; three sons, Preston,
Christopher (Brittany Danille),
Brandon; one daughter, Brittany
Joye; 2 grandchildren, Payton
and Aiyden; one brother, Shaw
V. Coleman; brother-in-law and
family, Billy (Sharon) and kids,
Billy, Jr., Briana, Stoshia; a host
of aunts, uncles, nieces nephews,
in-laws and friends. Funeral
services for Mr. Coleman will
be Monday, 1:00 P.M. May 17,
2010 at Joy Explosion Church.
The family will receive friends
Sunday, May 16, 2010 from 6:00
- 8:00 P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements are entrusted
to Combs Funeral Home. 292
NE Washington Street. Lake
City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"


OBITUARIES

Sylvia Sweat Reeves Cousino
Sylvia Sweat Reeves Cousino,
78, died Thursday, May 13, 2010
following an extended illness.
Born in Lake City, October 18,
1931 to the late Bill Sweat and
Sadie Scarborough Sweat. A
native and longtime resident of
Lake. City, Mrs. Cousino was
a graduate of Columbia High
School, where she was active
in Girl Scouts, played in the
band, and was an avid basket-
ball player on the varsity squad,
a team undefeated during her
senior year. She received a busi-
ness education in accounting and
office automation in Tallahassee
and subsequently worked as a
bookkeeper for several Lake City
businesses, including Haygood
Summers Auto Sales, Hackney
Brothers, and Summerall
(Hunter) Printing. For many
years, she was an active member
of American Legion Auxiliary
#57 in Lake City, holding sev-
eral offices including President.
She was a member of the Lake
City Moose Lodge Chapter
1399. In recent years she served
as a volunteer assisting senior
citizens. She was a long time
member of the First Presbyterian
Church of Lake City. She espe-
cially enjoyed fresh and salt
water fishing, playing bingo,
and assembling picture puzzles.
She was preceded in death by


her husband Albert Cousino.
Survivors include her daughter,
Diane Cronin & grandson, Jason
Cronin both of Jacksonville, FL;
sisters, Sharon Greene (Richard
Stanley-deceased) of Lake
City, FL and Soriya (August)
Johnston of Chesterfield, VA;
brothers, Sam (Barbara) Sweat
of Lake City, FL & Ray (Linda)
Sweat of Hopkins, SC; numer-
ous nieces and nephews also
survive.The family wishes to
thank the staff of Baya Pointe
Nursing and Rehabilitation
Center for their loving care dur-
ing her final months as a resident
there.Graveside funeral services
will be conducted in Memorial
Cemetery at 10:30 a.m., on
Wednesday, May 19, 2010 with
Dr. Roy Martin officiating.
Visitation will be held Tuesday
evening May 18, 2010 at the
funeral home from 5:30 p.m.
until 7:30 p.m. Memorials may
be made to the charity of your
choice. Gateway-Forest Lawn
Funeral Home 3596 U.S. Hwy
441 S., Lake City, FL 32025 (386)
752-1954 is in charge of arrange-
ments. Please sign our guestbook
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


kE Exploring College at

Lake City Community College
(Florida Gateway College effective 07/01/2010)






SO\








Got Questions about College? We've got Answers!
Two informative sessions will be held in the
Barney E. McRae Jr., M.D., Medical Technology Bldg. 103.
Thursday, May 27, 2010

3-4 p.m. and 6-7 p.m.
Reserve your place by calling Amanda Schulz,
college recruiter at (386) 754-4246
or e-mail at schulza@lakecitycc.edu.

A[II} ] rfiii J) IJ .I * , JI3 l[ Ii JIJ , J ' I ) [[ I 'lf l O I \ khl- I A,-Iy m, J1 ,1 I-0 I' JS , Iv ItJl0'u 8oI
, S( 12 1IS , I I" I, S 'h I' J I n h J..It In1 u,it(I I ,,IJ 7 'I . 1 -11 JI ll) I J1l;1I. I.A , I ('O t lL I rI)L"


if










Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


As U.S. Capitol Police officer Sharon Barnett stands post,
President Barack Obama pays tribute to peace officers who
died in the line of duty last year during a memorial ceremony
Saturday at the U.S. Capitol in Washington.


Obama pays tribute to officers


By CHRISTINE SIMMONS
Associated Press

WASHINGTON
President Barack Obama
paid tribute Saturday on
behalf of a grateful nation
to law enforcement officers
who made the ultimate sac-
rifice while safeguarding
their communities.
Americans "rely on a
certain order in .our lives,
a certain sense of security
that lets us sleep safely in
our beds and walk around
our neighborhoods free
from fear and go about our
daily lives without being the
victims of crime. That sense
of security doesn't come on
its own," he said in brief


remarks on the west front
lawn of the Capitol during
Peace Officers Memorial
Day, which honors officers
killed in the line of duty.
"What makes it possible,
what makes freedom pos-
sible, are the law enforce-
ment officials that we honor
today," he said.
The event is part of
National Police Week,
an annual tribute to law
enforcement service and
sacrifice.
The president said he was
proud of law enforcement
officials who chose their
careers out of a sense of call-
ing to serve their neighbors,
neighborhoods and "to live
a life in service of others."


"It's a calling that car-
riers immense risk," he
added, citing the uncertain-
ty of what that next duty call
might bring.
"Every day in America,
families go about their lives"
- work at the office, drop-
ping kids at school, said
Obama, who was joined
at the event by Attorney
General Eric Holder.
"We often take it for
granted, this cycle of life."
But, he added, "chance can
change everything over-
night."
Figures from the National
Law Enforcement Officers
Memorial Fund show that
officer deaths declined
from 138 in 2008 to 116


in 2009. That's the fewest
line-of-duty deaths since
1959, when there were 109,
according to the data.
More officers died in
traffic-related incidents in
2009 than from any other
single cause of death,
but the number killed by
gunfire increased by
more than 20 percent,
according to the group's
report.
Some of those honored
at the memorial service
included the four officers
killed near Seattle by an ex-
convict; four who were shot
to death in Oakland, Calif.;
and three other police
officers shot to death'in
Pittsburgh.


A Thai army soldier and a sniper fire at anti-government protesters after getting fire from them in Bangkok, Thailand, on
Saturday. Thai troops faced off against die-hard protesters vowing to defend their fortified encampment in downtown Bangkok
on Saturday, following two days of running gunbattles that killed 16 people and wounded nearly 160.

Thai PM defends crackdown as death toll rises


By VIJAY JOSHI
Associated Press

BANGKOK - Thailand's
leader defended the deadly
army crackdown on protest-
ers besieging the capital's
heart, saying Saturday the
country's very future was at
stake. Protesters dragged
away the bodies of three
people from sidewalks -
shot by army snipers, they
claim - as soldiers blocked
major roads and pinned up
notices of a "Live Firing,
Zone."
"I insist that what we are
doing is necessary," Prime
Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva
said ii a defiant broadcast.
on national television, mak-
ing it clear he would not
compromise. "The govern-
ment must move forward.
We cannot retreat because
we are doing things that
will benefit the entire coun-
try."
On Saturday, the pro-
testers launched a steady
stream of rudimentary mis-
siles at troops who fired
back with live ammunition
in several areas around a
key commercial district of


Bangkok.
Army snipers were
perched with high-powered
rifles atop tall buildings,
viewing the action below
through telescopicsights.
Thick black smoke bil-
lowed from tires set ablaze
by demonstrators as gun-
fire rang out.
The spiraling violence
has raised concerns of sus-
tained, widespread chaos in
Thailand - a key U.S. ally
and Southeast Asia's most
populartourist destination
that promotes its easygo-
ing culture as the "Land, of
Smiles."
"The situation right now
is getting close to a civil
war each minute," Jatuporn
Prompan, a protest leader,
told reporters. "Please
don't ask us how. we 'are
going to end this situation,
because we are the ones
being killed."
Since Thursday, the
once-bustling commercial
and shopping district has
become a war zone with
Red Shirt protesters firing
weapons, throwing home-
made explosives, and hurl-
ing rocks at troops firing


live ammunition and rubber
bullets.
The violence ignited after
the army started forming
a cordon around the pro-
testers' encampment and
a sniper shot and gravely
wounded a rogue gener-
al reputed to be the Red
Shirts' military adviser.
At least 24 people have
been killed' and more
than 194 wounded since
Thursday. Previous violence
since the protest began
in mid-March caused 29
deaths and injured 1,640.
This is the most pro-
longed and deadliest bout
of political violence that
Thailand has faced in
decades despite having a
history of coups - 18 since
it became a constitutional
monarchy in 1932.
The protesters have
occupied a tire-and-bam-
boo-spike' barricaded,
1-square-mile zone in
one of the capital's ritzi-
est areas, Rajprasong, for
about two months to push,
their derriands for Abhisit
to resign immediately, dis-
solve Parliament and call
Snew elections.


The crisis had appeared
to be near a resolution
last week when Abhisit
offered to hold elections
in November, a year early.
But the hopes were dashed
after Red Shirt leaders
made more demands.
The political uncertainty
has spooked foreign inves-
tors and damaged the vital
tourism industry, which
accounts for 6 percent of
the economy, Southeast
Asia's second largest.
Abhisit, in his first com-
ments since Thursday,
said the protesters have
"held the people of
Bangkok hostage" and
described them as "armed
terrorists" who attacked
security forces.
"Officers on duty have
the right to defend them-
selves," he said.
The Red Shirts, drawn
mostly from the rural and
urban poor, say Abhisit's
coalition government came
to power through manipula-
tion of the courts and the
backing of the powerful mil-
itary, and that it symbolizes
a national elite indifferent
to the poor.


Poll: Only a .




lawmakers back


By ALAN FRAM
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
People want Democrats
to .control Congress after
this fall's elections, a shift
from April, according to an
Associated Press-GfK poll
released Saturday. But the
margin is thin and there's
a flashing yellow light for
incumbents of both par-
ties: Only about one-third
want their own lawmakers
re-elected.
The tenuous 45 percent
to 40 percent preference
for a Democratic Congress
reverses the finding a month
ago on the same question: 44
percent for Republicans and
41 percent for Democrats.
The new readout came as
the economy continued
showing signs of improve-
ment and the tumultuous
battle over the health care
law that President Barack
Obama finally signed in
March faded into the back-
ground.
"To the extent that
Democrats can focus on job
creation rather than health
care, they tend to do better,"
said Jack Pitney, a politi-
cal scientist at California's
Claremont McKenna
College.
Democrats hold a
254-177 majority over
Republicans in the House,
with four vacancies, while
Democrats control 59 of
the Senate's 100 seats,
counting support from
two independents. Despite
those disadvantages, the
GOP has gained politi-
cal momentum in recent
months and its leaders
hope to win control of
at least one chamber of
Congress this November.
Compared with the last
AP-GfK poll in April, the


survey showed Republicans
losing some support among
married women, a key com-
ponent of many GOP victo-
ries. Democrats picked .up
ground among young and
rural voters.
"I'm a new Democrat,"
said Harley Smithson, 51;
of Baltimore, who said he
had recently switched from
the GOP. "I want to be with
a party that's for something
instead of against every-
thing."
,Even so, the poll under-
scores that the political
environment remains omi-
nous for Democrats.
Just 35 percent say the
country is heading in the
right direction, the low-
est measured by the AP-
GfK survey since a week
before Obama took office in
January 2009. His approval
rating remains at 49 per-
cent, as low as it's been
since he become president.
Congressional Democrats
win approval from only 37
percent, though congres-
sional Republicans score an
even drearier 31 percent.
Democrats and Republicans
are about evenly trusted
to handle the economy, an
issue Democrats once domi-
nated and one that is crucial
at a time when the country's
job situation, though bright-
ening, remains grim.
Only 36 percent said they
want their own member of
Congress to win re-election
this fall, a noteworthy drop
from the 43 percent who
said so in April and the low-
est AP-GfK poll measure-
ment this year. Much of
the restiveness seems to be
among Republicans: Whil6
Democrats were about
equally divided on the ques-
tion, Republicans expressed
a preference for a new face
by a 2-to-1 margin.


Candidates threatened in local Mexico elections


By ALEXANDRA OLSON
Associated Press

MEXICO CITY - One
candidate was gunned down
with his son inside his busi-
ness. Another is missing after
assailants torched her home.
In some towns near the U.S.
border, parties can't find any-
one to run for mayor.
The violence is intensify-
ing fear that Mexico's drug
cartels could control July 4
local elections in 10 states by
supporting candidates who
cooperate with organized
crime and killing or intimi-
dating those who don't.
Nowherehas the intimida-
tion been worse than in the
border state of Tamaulipas,
where Mexican soldiers are
trying to control an inten-
sifying turf battle between
the Gulf cartel and its for-
mer ally, the Zetas gang.
Gunmen burst into the


farm supplies business
of Jose Guajardo Varela
Thursday and killed him
and his son, after he ignored
warnings to drop his bid for
mayor of Valle Hermosa, a
town about 30 miles south
of Brownsville, Texas.
"Organized crime wants
to have total control over
local elections," said Carlos
Alberto Perez, a federal law-
maker for Calderon's con-
servative National Action
Party, known as the PAN.
The election climate
highlights how difficult it
is to stop drug gangs from
controlling Mexican elec-
tions, because the influence
doesn't normally appear as
campaign contributions.
The federal government
makes it difficult to for drug
money to infiltrate national
and local campaigns with
lavish public financing, free
television and radio ads, and


tight restrictions on private
donations. No candidate has
been charged with receiv-
ing donations from drug
traffickers since Calderon
took office in 2006.
Instead, candidates have
rumored ties to cartels that
predate their campaigns
and that benefit their busi-
nesses or private lives in a
country that bans consecu-
tive terms.
When 12 mayors from
President Felipe Calderon's
home state of Michoacan
were arrested on charges
of protecting the La Familia
cartel last year, all but two
were released for lack
of evidence - a blow to
Calderon's attack on politi-
cal corruption.
"There is no way in
Mexico to control this,"
said Manuel Clouthier, a
PAN congressman repre-
senting Sinaloa, where he


says it's an open secret that
drug money controls much
of the politics in his state.
"This supervision of fund-
ing is just another sham."
In Tamaulipas, PAN lead-
ers have complained pub-
licly for weeks that their
candidates were getting
death threats.
Calderon has con-
demned Guajardo's -assas-
sination. Interior Secretary
Fernando Gomez-Mont
said Friday that the govern-
ment has provided security
in appropriate cases - but
in discreet ways that won't
interfere with the candi-
date's political activities.
Last week, assailants
torched the home of Martha
Porras, who had been seek-
ing the leftist Democratic
Revolutionary Party nomi-
nation for mayor of Nuevo
Laredo, a city across from
Laredo, Texas.


THE BLAKE SCHOOL
since 1967

We start children at age 3 in our

accredited educational program.

The cost is about the same as day

care, so why pay for day care

when you can have true education

for your child?
The Blake School has a 20-acre campus located
approx. 4 miles west of 1-75 towards Live Oak.
7443 US Hwy 90 West, Lake City, Fl. 3055
Accredited by
A.I.S.F., S.A.C.S., C.I.T.A. & N.C.P.S.A.

Call today 386-752-8874


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010









LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


THE WEATHER
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83/72


* Valdosta
88/67
Tallahassee * Lake City
87/67 89/66
0 Gainesville *
Panama City 89/67
83/70 Ocala
0 /09


* Jacksonville
89/68

Daytona Beach
88~71
*


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


' U/ 0?5 9 p Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
91/70 86/71 Lake City
Miami
Tampa * Naples
90/73 West Palm Beach Ocala
86/75 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers -;. 77 * , Pensacola
91 7 *2 Naples * Tallahassee
:- ' ' Miami Tampa
S7 76 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
56: ,


Monday
85/70/t
85/69/t
86/76/t
88/73/t
86/67/t
85/67/t
84/76/t
86/66/t
87/75/t
87/73/t
86/68/t
87/70/t
81/70/t
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Tuesday 5
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ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter

Hundreds attend fishing derby
Tanay Tillman, 11, of Lake City goes fishing in Ponderosa Pond at the annual Lake City's Kids
All-American Fishing Derby Saturday at the Alligator Lake Recreation Complex. Nearly 200
attended the annual event.


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday


iNormal nigh
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


9
4


88
62
87
62
7 in 1985
6 in 1917


0.00"
0.40"
15.05"
1.20"
15.22"


SUN , r
Sunrise today 6:36 a.m.
Sunset today 8:18 p.m.
Sunrse tom. 6:36 a.m. VEHIGItI
Sunset tom. 8:19 p.m. ' I0mhitesoblmn
Tfdad 's
MOON , ,'re.l-r v
Moonrise today 8:39 a.m. ralia[ionr rn,.
Moonset today 11:15 p.m. . tr the ar.a or
Moonrise tom. 9:44 a.m. 1 i +cale ,',r,,
Moonset tom.
S.+ ' .eathercom
May May June June " * "
May May June June Forecasts, data and graph-
20 27 4 12 Ics � 2010 Weather Central
First Full Last New , LLC, Madison, Ws.
" ' www.weatherpublisher.com



S On lhiS , iae n ,in '
monday h.i
nIrneaurrig up .n. ; I
inches ridCimeter
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Iempatre - --.- . ~


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter

Looking for the first bite of the day
Max Handy 10, of Lake City, focuses on making a catch at the fishing derby. Nearly 200
children and adults were in attendance at the annual Kids All-American Fishing Derby on
Saturday.


,.**


sears


iAOO


Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today!


Membership is open to everyone in Alachua,
Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!3


--,ail ,, '



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mortgage position are required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply Property and flood insurance may be required. Example: a .'.' loan at 3 99%
for 5 years: 60 monthly payments of $1,842.20; total finance charge of $10,671.06; total payments of $110,472.06; amount financed: $99,801.00; ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE of 4.07'1% 2 On loans
over $125,000, title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. 3 Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required.'Mention this ad and we'll waive the $15 new member fee.


LkCiy13S Bascom Noris r vle . Cmus10 S hAve .W . Capu g100S a * S . )nsvl 0 W 4thTra ce untr'I Wak 115NW43r *S.ToeSqae52SW7tS.
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--- 7 1


LENDER


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427









L.ke City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityrepoirtercom


Sunday, May 16, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
YOUTH BASEBALL
Blaze tryouts
set for today
The North Florida
Blaze 9-under baseball
travel team has tryouts
at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at
the Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 755-1456
or (386) 234-0423.
AQUATICS
Water aerobics
begin Monday
Water aerobics classes
for all ages begin at
5 p.m. Monday at the
Columbia Aquatic
Complex.
For details, call the
popl at 755-8195.
YOUTH SOCCER
Summer soccer
registration set
Columbia Youth Soccer
Association has summer
registration for ages
4-16 planned at the CYSA
complex from 6-8 p.m. on
Monday, Thursday and
May 25. Fee is $60.
For details, contact
Scott Everett at
scotteverett60@yahoo. com.
WOMEN'S SOFTBALL
Coaches meeting
planned Monday
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department
is sponsoring a Women's-.
Summer Softball League.
Church and commercial
leagues will be offered.
Registration is 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. through Friday
at Teen Town. Fee is
$350 per team. A coaches
meeting is 6:30 p.m.
Monday at the Girls
Club Center.
For details, call
Heyward Christie at
754-3607.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Openbasketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
6234817.
CHS BASEBALL
Summer tryouts
set for Saturday
Columbia High
baseball has summer
tryouts beginning at
10 a.m. Saturday. Tryouts
are for ninth- through.
12th-graders.
For details, call J.T.
Clark at 365-1754.
YOUTH VOLLEYBALL.
Lady Tiger clinic
June 8-10
The Columbia High
volleyball program is
hosting its 2nd Annual
Future Lady Tiger
Volleyball Clinic from
9 a.m. to noon on
June 8-10 at the CHS
gym. The camp is for
girls entering the fourth
through 12th grades.
Cost of $65 includes a
T-shirt and free
admission to CHS
volleyball matches.
Registration is at Brian's
Sports through June 4.
For details, call coach
Casie McCallister at
755-8080, Ext. 254.


* From staff reports


Lookin At Lucky

h wins Preakness


Super Saver fades
in second leg of
Triple Crown.
By BETH HARRIS
Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Change
in jockeys, change in for-
tune.
So it was for trainer Bob
Baffert and his Preakness-
winning colt Lookin At
Lucky, who stayed out of
'trouble with Martin Garcia
aboard and held off First
Dude to win by three quar-
ters of a length Saturday.
Kentucky Derby winner
Super Saver faded to eighth
as the 9-5 favorite in the


12-horse field, squandering
a perfect trip and foiling
jockey Calvin Borel's boast
of a Triple Crown.
"When I asked him, he
kind of just folded up. It
happens," said Borel, who
didn't ride the rail this time
- his signature trip.
Jackson Bend was anoth-
er head back in third.
Lookin At Lucky ran 1
3-16 miles in 1:55.47, giving
Baffert his fifth Preakness
victory, tying him with D.
Wayne Lukas for second
all-time. It was the Hall of
Famer's first Triple Crown
win since 2002, when War
Emblem won at Pimlico.
PREAKNESS continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Martin Garcia celebrates aboard Lookin At Lucky after winning the 135th Preakness horse
race at Pimlico Race Course, Saturday, in Baltimore.


defense


CHS holds second
scrimmage of
spring season.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@iakecityreporter.com
Defense wins champion-
ships, according to the old
football saying. If the old
saying holds true, Columbia
High coach Craig Howard
�will:'be h]:ipl ..ith where
the Tigers stand after
Saturday's scrimmage.
"The defense dominated
today," Howard said. "Justin
Kennedy was a guy that
stood out, that we expected
to stand out. With Timmy
(Jernigan) out, we expect
to be even better with him.
We did a great job today
at pressuring the quarter-
back. Ben Bell is a guy that
consistently has done well
all spring. He had a couple
of big breakups and open-
field tackles. Devontae Bell
also had a couple of sacks
and some pressure."
With the play of the
defense, the offense strug,
gled throughout the scrim-
mage, managing only two
touchdowns.
Nigel Atkinson had the
best day of the quarter-
backs with 8-of-9 passing for
135 yards and a touchdown.
Jared Butler completed 6-
of-11 passes for 33 yard and
Jayce Barber was 3-7 for 42
yards and a touchdown.
"There wasn't a lot of
offensive production today,"


CHS continued on 2B Friday.


01' Celtics, or just

old? Boston to

show vs. Magic


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce (34) drives against Cleveland Cavaliers center Shaquille
O'Neal (33) during the second half of Game 6 in Boston on Thursday. The Celtics won 94'85.


First game of.
conference finals
tips off today.
By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press
ORLANDO - Plopped
on the couch in his living
room, Stan Van Gundy was
watching Boston blow past
Cleveland in the Eastern
Conference semifinals and
thought it was some sort
of replay from the Celtics'
2008 NBA title run.
There were the famil-
iar scenes: Kevin Garnett
pounding his chest, Ray
Allen swishing 3-pointers
and Paul Pierce pumping


his fist. Boston was win-
ning, and winning big.
Orlando's coach was per-
plexed.
"If you look at, them,
that's the (same) team," Van
Gundy said. "What would
be the difference?"
These days, it might be
hard to tell.
Turning back the clock
to make another champi-
onship run, the resurgent
Celtics are healthy again
and looking to take down
the playoff-perfect Orlando
Magic starting Sunday in
an Eastern Conference
finals pitting the past two
conference champions.
ORLANDO continued on 3B


shines


S* "-... - * . * -;. .' - - * 4

BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High offensive lineman Laremy Tunsil (right) works on blocking drills with coach Ken Fasnacht during practice onw


SPORTS












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED - Formula One, Grand Prix
of Monaco
Noon
FOX - NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Autism
Speaks 400, at Dover. Del.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - NHRA, Southern Nationals,
final eliminations, at Atlanta (same-day
tape)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
I p.m.
FSN -Big 12 Conference, champion-
ship game, at Oklahoma City
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS - Tour of California, first
stage, Nevada City to Sacramento, Calif.
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, Open
Cala Millor Mallorca. final round,- at
Majorca. Spain
I p.m.
TGC - Nationwide Tour, BMW
Charity Pro-Am, final round, at Greer, S.C.
3 p.m.
CBS - PGA.Tour, Texas Open, final
round, at San Antonio
4 p.m.
TGC-LPGA, Bell Micro Classic,final
round, at Mobile,Ala.
7 p.m.
TGC - Champions Tour, Regions
Charity Classic, final round, at HooverAla.
(same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
TBS - Minnesota at N.Y.Yankees
2:10 p.m.
WGN - Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN - Philadelphia at Milwaukee
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m.
SPEED - FIM World Superbike, at
Johannesburg, South Africa (same-day
tape)
12 Midnight ,
SPEED -AMA Pro Racing, at Sonoma,
Calif. (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m.
ABC - Playoffs, Eastern conference
finals, game I, Boston at Orlando
NHL HOCKEY
3 p.m.
NBC - Playoffs,Western Conference
finals, game I, Chicago at San Jose
7 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs, Eastern
Conference finals, game. I, Montreal at
Philadelphia
NLL LACROSSE
2 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs,' championship
game
RODEO
10 p.m.
VERSUS - PBR, Pueblo Invitational, at
Pueblo, Colo. (same-day tape)

C Monday
CYCLING
5 p.m.
VERSUS -Tour of California, stage 2,
Davis to Santa Rosa, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN - Boston at N.Y.Yahkees
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
TNT - Playoffs,Western Conference
finals, game I, Phoenix at L.A. Lakers

BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Today
Boston at Orlando, 3:30 p.m.
Monday
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 9 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Friday
Philadelphia 4, Boston 3, Philadelphia
wins series 4-3
CONFERENCE FINALS
Today
Chicago'at San Jose, 3 p.m.
Montreal at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.


BASEBALL

AL standings


Tampa Bay
New York
Toronto
Boston
Baltimore


Mi
De
Ch
Cle
Ka


Te:
Oa
Lo
Se:


East Division
W L
25 II
24 12
22 16
19 17
12 24


Central Division
W L
nnesota 22 14
etroit 20 16
hicago 14 21
eveland 13 20
nsas City 13 23
West Division
W L
xas 20 17
ikland 18 18
s Angeles 16 21
battle 14 22
Friday's Games
Boston 7, Detroit 2
Baltimore 8, Cleveland I


Pct GB
.694 -
667 I
.579 4
.528 6
.333 13

Pct GB
.61 1 -
.556 2
.4007 1/2
.3947 1/2
.361 9

Pct GB
.541 -
.5001 1/2
.432 4
.3895 1/2


N.Y.Yankees 8, Minnesota 4
Toronto 16,Texas 10
Seattle 4,Tampa Bay 3
Kansas City 6, Chicago White Sox I
L.A.Angels 4, Oakland 0
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 7, Minnesota I
Toronto 6,Texas 0
Tampa Bay 3, Seattle 2
Boston at Detroit (n)
Cleveland at Baltimore (n)
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City (n)
Oakland at L.A.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Boston (Lackey 4-1) at Detroit
(Galarra'ga 0-0), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 3-1) at NI.Y.
Yankees (Mitre 0-1). 1:05 p.m.
Texas (C.Lewis 3-1) at Toronto
(Morrow 2-3), 1:07 p.m.
Cleveland (Westbrook 1-2) at
Baltimore (D.Hernandez 0-5), 1:35 p.m.
Seattle (CI.Lee 1-1) at Tampa Bay
(Garza 5-1), 1:40 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 1-3) at
Kansas City (Bannister 1-3), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 1-1) at L.A. Angels
(Pineirdf 2-4), 3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Detroit,
7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
L.A.Angels atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 22 13
Washington 20 16
Florida 18 18
NewYork 18 18
Atlanta, 17 18
Central Division
W L
St. Louis 21 15
Cincinnati 19 16
Pittsburgh 16 20
Milwaukee 15 21
Chicago 15 - 22
.Houston 13 23
West Division
W L
San Diego 22 13


Pct GB
.629 -
.5562 1/2
.5004 1/2
.5004 1/2
.486 5

Pct GB
.583 -
.5431 1/2
.444 5
.417 6
.4056 1/2
.361 8

Pct GB
.629 -


San Francisco 20 15 .571 2
Los Angeles 18 17 ..514 4
Colorado 17 1.8 .486 5
Arizona 14 22 .3898 1/2
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 10, Chicago Cubs 6
Florida 7,,N.Y. Mets 2
St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 3
Atlanta 6, Arizona 5
Philadelphia 9, Milwaukee 5
Washington at Colorado, ppd., rain
L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 3
San Francisco 8, Houston 2
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 4, Chicago Cubs 3
Colorado 6,Washington 2, 1st game
San Francisco 2, Houston I
Philadelphia 10, Milwaukee 6
Arizona at Atlanta (n)
N.Y. Mets at Florida (n)
St. Louis at Cincinnati (n)
Washington at Colorado, 2nd game
(n)
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (Niese 1-1) at Florida
(Nolasco 3-2), 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Penny 3-3) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 2-2), 1:10 p.m.
Arizona (Haren 4-2) at Atlanta'


(THudson 3-1), 1:35 p m.
Pittsburgh (Ohiendorf 0-I) at Chicago
Cubs (Lilly 1-3), 2:20 p.m.
Washington (Olsen 2-1) at Colorado
(Francis 0-0). 3.10 p.m.
Houston (Myers 2-2) at San Francisco
(Zito 5-1),4:05 p.m.
L A. Dodgers (Billingsley 3-2) at San
Diego (LeBlanc 2-0), 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 3-2) at Milwaukee
(D.Davis I-4), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Arizona at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

FORMULA ONE
Monaco Grand Prix
Site: Monte Carlo, Monaco.
Schedule: Today, race, 8 a.m. (Speed,
7:30-10 a.m.).
Track: Circuit de Monaco (street
course, 2.075 miles).
Race distance: 161.9 miles, 78 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA Southern Nationals
Site: Commerce, Ga.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2,7-10 p.m.).
Track:Atlanta Dragway.

Autism Speaks lineup

At Dover International Speedway
Dover, Del.
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
157.315.
2. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 157.274.
3. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
157.198.
4. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 157.006.
5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
156.904.
6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
156.849.
7. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
156.829.
8. (43) Aj Allmendinger, Ford, 156.706.
' 9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 156.678.
10. (77) 'Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge,
156.597.
11. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
156.576.
12. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 156.427.
13. (00) David Reptimann, Toyota,


156.406.
14. (I I)
156.331 .
15. (24)
156.25.
16. (14)
.156.236.


Denny Hamlin, Toyota,

Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,

Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,


17. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
156.223.
18. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 156.2 16.
19. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 156.074.
20. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
155.871.
21. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 155.73.
22. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 155.615.
23. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 155.534.
24. (16) Greg Biffle: Ford, 155.092.
25. (46) J.J.Yeley, Dodge, 155.005.
26. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota,
154.999.
27. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
154.779.
28. (42)Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
154.652.
- 29. (82) Scott Speed,Toyota, 154.573.
30. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
154.487.
31. (26) David Stremme, Ford,
154.361.
32. (09) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet,
154.182.
33. (71) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet,
154.01 1.
34. (55) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
153.892.
35. (66) Dave Blaney,Toyota, 153.807.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
153.787.
37. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
153.734.
38. (34) Travis Kvapil Ford, 153.721.
39. (83) Casey Mears,Toyota, 153.564.
40. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 153.094.
41. (37) Kevin Conway, Ford, Owner
Points.
42. (7) Robby Gordon,Toyota, Owner
Points.
43. (36) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet,
152.795.


Forsman shoots record 62


Associated Press


HOOVER, Ala. - Dan
Forsman made two eagles
on his way to a tourna-
ment-record 10-under 62
on Saturday, leaving him a
stroke behind leader Bobby
Clampett after the sec-
ond round of the Regions
Charity Classic.
. The 50-year-old Clampett,
-a TV analyst who won the
1982 Southern Open for his
lone PGA Tour title, shot a
64 to finish at 15-under 129
- the best 36-hole score in
the history of the event - on
the Robert Trent Jones Golf
Trail's Ross Bridge course. *
Forsman, a five-time
winner on the PGA Tour,
bogeyed the second hole,
but rebounded with three
birdies and an eagle over
the next six holes. He had a
stretch of four consecutive
birdies on the back nine
and eagled the 16th.
"I executed some nice


shots early .on, and the
momentum just kept build-
ing," said Forsman, who
played the four par 5s in 6
under. "I knew on the back
nine that I was having a
special round."
The 62, the 52-year-old
Forsman's lowest score in a
PGATour-sanctioned event,
broke the tournament
record of 63 set by Jack
Keifer in 1992 at Greystone
and matched six times.
Clampett broke the tour-
nament 36-hole record
of 130 set by Hale Irwin
and Gil Morgan in 2001 at
Greystone.
"To put two good rounds
together is hard to do, but I
feel like I've executed well
this week," said Clampett,
making his second
Champions Tour start" "I've
hit a lot of good shots."
Peter Senior (66) was
third at 13 under, and Joey
Sindelar (67) was 12 under.
Ken Green, playing in his


first stroke-play event since
having the lower part of his
right leg amputated follow-
ing an auto accident last
June, was 6 over after a 76.
Forsman's 12-foot birdie
putt on No. 17 stopped at
the lip of the cup.
"I thought I had a birdie,"
Forsman said. "It was on
the edge to go 11-under. It
was hanging and hanging. I
wanted that one bad."
Forsman finished his
round more than 90 min-
utes before Clampett, who
was in the day's final group.
At the time, Clampett trailed
Forsman by three shots, but
birdied four of the final six
holes - holing a 50-footer
on No. 14.
"It's been an emotional
experience to be back up
on the leaderboard," said
Clampett, who has yet to
make a bogey in the tourna-
ment after having six three-
putts in his Champions Tour
debut two weeks ago.


i1


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Adrian Hill looks for extra yardage after catching a pass at practice on
Friday. Hill led the Tigers in the receiving game with six catches for 82 yards in Saturday's
scrimmage.


CHS: Purple and Gold game this week

Continued From Page 1B


Howard said. "It wasn't as
good as the week before."
Howard was complimen-
tary of two offensive line-
men.
"I would say that Jordan
Morris and Laremy Tunsil
look game ready," he said.
'Tunsil looks really, really
good. He's dominating.
Both are more than game


ready."
The thought now for the
Tigers is focusing on two
game-week situations.
"We'll try to have a com-
petitive Purple and Gold
game," Howard said. "We'll
probably keep it offense
versus defense and try to
have some type of scor-
ing system. The following


ACROSS 38 Mexico's Sierra


1 Grease job
5 Beaver's pro-
ject
8 Keeps pursu-
ing
12 Related.
13 911 responder
14 D'Artagnan
prop
15 Potato skin
16 Puffy hairdo
18 Mix-ups
20 Cameos,
maybe
21 Outfit
22 Morass
23 Hold sway
26 Serf
29 Lay low
30 Cafe au -
31 Noon on a sun-
dial '
33 Juan's gold
34 Dad's sister
35 Irresolute
36 Tennyson maid


39 Food additive
40 Males
41 Run - of the
law
44 New kittens
47 Frisco sight (2
wds.)
49 Enthralled
51 Buffalo's lake
52 Charge it
53 Wrap presents
(2 wds.)
54 Bug repellent
55 Finish
56 Former JFK
arrivals

DOWN


1 Racing circuit
2 Luau strum-
mers
3 "Tres -, mon-
sieur!"
4 Make bigger
5 Troubleshoot


week, we'll get ready for
Trinity Catholic. We're at
the standpoint that we have
a lot to look forward to.
There are two different
games. That's a neat thing
about Florida spring foot-
ball. We get to play against
other competition. We'll
keep pushing through and
it'll be interesting."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

M U TIE DDS O1IL
A SI TP T RI
Z U N MARATHON


0 0M AP T
GV FS EGA D
OPTTR K DADEF


FiE ER
MAT LEE
B BOP SLALO




LEASHLA W RUSE
ANN IOTA EDIE
B Y E DUT DENT


6 Cookie magnate
7 E. Lansing cam-
pus
8 Clears the wind-
shield
9 Fall birthstone


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


L,


19 110 111 I


10 - -splicing
11 Cliques
17 Ice
19 Surfer's warn-
ing
22 Worm, maybe
23 Letter after pi
24 Blarney Stone
. locale
25 Superstar
26 Barn topper
27 Pink-slipped
28 Polygraph
flunker
30 Respiratory
organ
32 Dwight's nick-
name
34 Usher's beat
35 Classifieds (2
wds.)
37 Talisman
38 NYC opera
house
40 Stuck in the
mud
41 Made a hole in
one
42 Trip charge
43 Oscar's
cousin
44 Croquet site
45 Big heads
46 Easy win
48 Miler
Sebastian
50 Nav. guide


5-17 @ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


s
L
c
A


. ,
i S


2 13









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, MAY 16. 2010


Defending champ


eager to end slump


By DAN GELSTON
Associated Press

DOVER, Del. - Jimmie
Johnson is in a slump. A big
one by his standards.
He's finished two of
the last three races in the
garage instead of on the
track. Johnson hasn't won
in six races and no longer
holds the Sprint Cup points
lead.
Throw in a busted rear
axle in the season-opening
Daytona 500 and he already
has two more DNF's than
he did all of last year.
Johnson is suddenly
hearing questions he's not
accustomed to answering.
Has Johnson's luck
finally run out? Have other
drivers - notably the ones
at Joe Gibbs Racing -
finally caught up with the
four-time defending
champ?
Ahh, not so fast.
For all the issues that
have hit Johnson's No. 48
team this season, he still
has three wins and is a lock
to qualify for the Chase
for the championship. And
no driver dominates those
final 10 championship races
quite like Johnson and his
Hendrick Motorsports
crew.
Count out that fifth title at
your own risk.
Still, watching Johnson's


Chevrolet limp toward the
garage after getting caught
up in wrecks has to have
the rest of the field hoping
some of that misfortune lin-
gers well into October and
November.
"We've been saying this
all along with the 48 car
being at the top of its game,
this stuff doesn't last for-
ever," Johnson said. "The
garage area get smarter,
teams, drivers, everyone
is developing and trying
to make their equipment
faster and better."
Johnson refuses to blame
NASCAR's early-season
shift to the spoiler as the
reason. Instead, it's been
bad luck and accidents
that have some thinking he
might finally be vulnerable.
He's not fearful ,this lit-
tle stretch is a sign of bad
things ahead.
"We're not where we
want to be," he said, "but
we're still awfully competi-
tive. We're not as worried
or concerned as some of
the headlines may read
and some speculation that
might be out there."
Johnson has finished 31st
and 36th in two of his last
three races. His miserable
race last week at Darlington
Raceway ended in a crash.
Johnson acknowledges
NASCAR's change from the
wing to a spoiler has been


an adjustment, but crew
chief Chad Knaus and the
HMS team were prepared.
As Johnson has cooled,
his closest competitors have
ripped off hot streaks. Over
Johnson's winless streak,
Denny Hamlin has won
three times. Kevin Harvick,
who grabbed the points
lead, has a win and four
straight top-sevens. Kyle
Busch has been steady and
Johnson's HMS teammate
Jeff Gordon has no wins to
show for some otherwise
fantastic up-front runs.
All are nipping at the shot
to end Johnson's reign.
"If we can beat them in
the first 10, we can beat
them in the last10," Harvick
said. "It's not about winning
every week. You have to
run 10 races at the end
of the year to pull it all
together.
Jeff Burton,' ninth in
'the standings, doesn't feel
Johnson's time is up just
because of some recent
struggles.
"I've seen, over the last
four years, times in the
season where they've done
just what they've done right
now and been strong when
it counted," he said. "So,
I wouldn't count them out
just yet. I do believe they're
still second in points.
But it's not like they're
23rd."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jimriie Johnson signs a helmet prior to practice for NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Showtime
Southern 500 auto race in Darlington, S.C., on May 7.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Phoenix Suns' Steve Nash comes off the court during the fourth quarter of Game 4 of a
Western Conference semifinals NBA basketball series on May 9, in San Antonio. Nash's
right eye needed six stitches after taking an errant elbow from Tim Duncan. Phoenix won
107-101, winning the series 4-0.



Suns smirk at Jackson's


'traveling' accusation


By BOB BAUM
Associated Press

PHOENIX - The
Phoenix Suns have reacted
with a collective smirk to
Phil Jackson's suggestion
that Steve Nash travels
with the basketball.
Nash even had a subtle
retort worthy of Jackson
himself.
"It's news to me. I'm
fortunate. I don't know if
I've been called for a carry
yet," he said after the Suns
practiced Saturday, then
he added straight-faced:
"I've never heard anyone
accuse me of carrying it. I
mean, the best coach in the
league Gregg Popovich (of
San Antonio) didn't have a
problem with it last week."
Get it? Popovich the best
coach in the league?
'We have the best offi-
cials in the world," Nash
continued. "I'll just leave it
up to them."
Jackson had grinned


when asked on Friday if
it's tough for the Lakers to
prepare to face Nash, the
reigning NBA skills cham-
pion, because of the Suns
guard's frenetic style.
"Yeah,'because you can't
carry the ball like he does
in practice," Jackson said,
making a gesture of palm-
ing the basketball. "You
can't pick that ball up and
run with it."
Phoenix coach Alvin
Gentry laughed off the
accusation.
"You guys got to admire
Phil," Gentry said. "C'mon,
the stuff that he throws out
there, I mean I think it's
great. He's very creative.
There's a reason. But I
think you've got to under-
stand that there's kind of
a method to his madness.
If you let it affect you, then
it will."
Gentry went on to
praise Jackson for his abil-
ity to create- champion-
ship chemistry on teams


with great players, calling
it "probably the toughest
thing in the NBA to do."
He said the Suns weren't
going to get drawn into
what they consider
Jackson's psychological
ploy.
"How can we win that?"
Gentry said. "We're not
going to win that battle
anyway."
But the Phoenix coach
added a jab at the Lakers
when he was asked
jokingly if the team
worked on ball handling
skills.
"We spent the day duck-
ing elbows on post-ups, to
see if we could duck elbows
on post-ups, "'Gentry said,
a not-to-thinly veiled nod
to the Lakers' style. "So it
all works out, it all works
out."
Amare Stoudemire
.probably spoke for the rest
of the team with his reac-
tion.
'Typical Phil," he said.


ORLANDO: Host Celtics
Continued From Page 1B


The Celtics, with 17 NBA
titles and names such as
Larry Bird and Bill Russell
hanging from the rafters,
want to add to their lore
and prove that the bullies
from Beantown are back.
They'll have to do it against
a favored Orlando team
that's hungry to win its first
NBA championship.
"Orlando was the team
coming into the season
where if you wanted to get
out of the East, you had to
beat Orlando," Celtics coach
Doc Rivers said. '"They're
the team that won the East
last year, not Cleveland, and
I want to make sure our
guys focus on that."
The motivated Magic,
spurred by last year's NBA
finals loss, swept through
the first two rounds and
have won 14 straight going
back to the regular season.'
They eliminated the Celtics
in seven games in the sec-
ond round a year ago, and
went 3-1 against Boston this
year.
That might not mean
much now.
Garnett, the centerpiece
of Boston's last title, was
out with a right knee injury
in last year's playoffs and is
now close to full strength
for the first time since.
Orlando's starting point
guard, Jameer Nelson, also
was sidelined with a tear
in his right shoulder last
season.
Add some fresh faces -
headlined by Vince Carter
for the Magic and Rasheed
Wallace for the Celtics -
and put a conference title at


stake, and this year's series
is getting a facelift.
"You're talking about
pretty much two differ-
ent teams," Pierce said. "It
should be an interesting
matchup."
The roles are now
reversed.
The Magic are the ones
with home-court advantage,
rolling past Atlanta and
Charlotte in the opening
rounds. They have peaked
at the right time, winning 28
of their last 31 games, many
in blowouts.
"I think for us if we want
to win the series, we have
to do all the things we did
in the first two series,"
Orlando's Dwight Howard
said. "And if we do that, we
should win. We should win
this series, but we all have
to believe that and we have
to understand that it's not
going to be easy."
I The Magic will have had
six days between series and
plenty of practices. They
also had time to watch
Boston take out LeBron
James and the Cleveland
Cavaliers with Garnett, who
turns 34 next week, leading
the way.
Too old to challenge for
a title? The Magic don't
believe it.
"There's no possible
way somebody could have
watched their 11 play-
off games and think that
age is any problem," Van
Gundy said. "The only
way people could say that
is they literally could not
have been watching the
games."


PREAKNESS: Lucky win


Continued From Page 1
"When they turned for
home, he can really fin-
ish," Baffert said.
Lucky's win means yet
another year will pass with-
out a Triple Crown cham-
pion. Affirmed was the
last to sweep the Derby,
Preakness and Belmont in
1978.
Lookin At Lucky paid
$6.80, -$4.60 and $3.80 as
the 2-1 second choice. First
Dude returned $16.60 and
$9.20, while Jackson Bend
paid $6.60 to show.
Baffert made a gutsy
decision when he replaced
Garrett Gomez with Garcia
after Lookin At Lucky fin-
ished sixth on a sloppy
track as the Derby favorite
two weeks ago.


At Churchill Downs, the
bay colt was compromised
by his starting position on
the rail. He was immedi-
ately checked hard along
the fence under Gomez,
who rode Lookin At Lucky
in his first nine races,
including a troubled trip
as the beaten favorite in
the Santa Anita Derby.
For this race, he made
his own luck.
Lookin At Lucky and
Super Saver broke next to
each- other in the starting
gate.
Garcia kept Lookin At
Lucky clear and out of
trouble while running
mid-pack down the back-
stretch, behind paceset-
ting First Dude.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurok
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. ,I ks We l',
so eerie nnoj
HECAF soee

"-nli Tr,T-une Media Services, Inc - -
ii 1 jii Reserved. ' ' .
LUXTE -


EPSOOPI



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I^ I< ~


WHAT THE FOGGY
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Now arrange the circled elteis
to form the su rpis,' answoi. ns
suggested by the above cma toon


Answer:
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Saturday's Jumbles FINIS CRAWL FACADE BECKON
Answer: When the ice skater fell. the result was a
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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420







B LAKE CITY REPORTER WE. IN SPORTS PHOTOS SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


qu


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Colton Jones attempts a field goal during the second quarter of the Red and Black game in Fort White on Friday as the Indians continue spring practice.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Jay Croft, 13, gasps for air while practicing his butterfly stroke at the Columbia Aquatic
Complex on Thursday.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High head coach
Demetric Jackson (right) talks
to quarterback Xavier Wyche
during the Red and Black
game in Fort White on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Tyler Harding (left) and Reece Chasteen build up leg strengths as they practice at the
Columbia Aquatic Complex on Thursday.


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Published on May 23,2010
Deadline for entry:
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BUSINESS


Sunday, May 16, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS

SLocal home sales on the rise


First quarter reports reflect increase in homes sold

eBy ANTONIA ROBINSON
Jerry Osteryoung arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
(850) 644- 3372 Tax credits for first-time
jostery@comcost.net qnA d +y;,-, hb m, bi-, -


Should

officials

intervene?

"Every individual neces-
sarily labours to render
the annual revenue of the
society as great as he can.
He generally, indeed, nei-
ther intends to promote the
public interest, nor knows
how much he is promoting
it. By preferring the support
of domestic to that of foreign
industry, he intends only his
own security; and by direct-
ing that industry in such a
manner as its produce may
be of the greatest value, he
intends only his own gain,
and he is in this, as in many
other cases, led by an invis-
ible hand to promote an end
which was no part of his
intention. Nor is it always
the worse for the society
that it was no part of it. By
pursuing his own interest he
frequently promotes that of
the society more effectually
than when he really intends
to promote it. I have never
known much good done by
those who affected to trade
for the public good."
- Adam Smith

For the past 10
years, I have
been aware of
the additional
regulations and
restrictions that our gov-
ernment has put on small
businesses. It has troubled
me both because of the
cost as well as because of
the way it limits a business'
ability to compete effec-
tively.
In 1776, Adam Smith,
who is considered the
father of economics, wrote
the classic book entitled
"The Wealth of Nations.".
In this book, Adam Smith
argues that if left unfet-
tered, businesses will
compete to provide the
maximum value at the min-
imum cost to consumers.
He called this the "invisible
hand of competition."
The "invisible hand" is
the force of competition
that ensures goods are
delivered at a fair and rea-
sonable price. After all, if
one firm charges $10 for a
product, and another firm
charges $8, it is only logi-
cal that customers will go
to the $8 vendor until the
more expensive firm low-
ers its price.
When I had to read this
classic text in graduate
school, I had no idea that it
was written the same year
that our country earned its
independence. Obviously,
Adam Smith understood
the role of competition, as
did our founding fathers.
With. only certain excep-
tions (e.g. regulated utili-
ties), when the government
tries to influence the price
of products delivered to
consumers, it tends to
destroy the way our free
markets operate. And free
markets, of course, are the
basis of capitalism.
What really caused me
to blow my gasket was
Spirit Airline's announce-
ment that they would begin
assessing a $45 charge
for carry-on luggage. I
was actually not upset that
Spirit wanted to do this.
In fact, being a frequent

INTERVENE continued on 2C


anu exsu IIgOlll 111II UUy-
-ers helped increase home
sales by 10 percent in the
Lake CIty-Live Oak area
for single-family existing
homes, said Dan Gherna,
executive vice president
and CEO of the Lake City
Board of Realtors.
There were 93 homes
sold during the first quar-
ter of 2010, compared to 84
in the first quarter of 2009,
according to the Florida
Sales Report.
"We've seen sales units
increase, not significantly,
but it's been a steady
increase," he said. 'We've
kind of leveled out. We're
in a stable market."
However, the median
sales price of homes was
down 10 percent this quar-
ter. The price dropped from
$136,500 to $122,400 in 2010.
The median prices are
often skewed by having
a couple of high-selling
homes and several lower
ones, he said.
"Home prices are at the
bottom," Gherna said. "I
can't see them dropping
again."
Lake City-Live Oak's
median sales percentage
is in line with the state's,
which is 5 percent, he said.
Some areas dropped a little
bit more in their selling.
Other areas in
North Florida, such
as Jacksonville and


This four-bedroom, two-bathroom home, located at 132 Nprthwest Silverleaf Lane,is one of many homes for sale in Lake
City. Homes had a better chance of being sold in the first quarter of 2009 than in 2008, reports said.


Gainesville, also saw
increases in sales and
declines in prices.
"We're really following a
state-wide pattern," Gherna
said.
Jacksonville significantly
increased by 34 percent
from 2,212 homes sold dur-
ing the first quarter of 2009
to 2,955 in 2010. The area's
sales price dropped only
6 percent, from $150,700
last year to $141,600 this


quarter.
Gainesville's increase
was slightly more than the
Lake City-Live Oak area, at
14 percent from 325 sales
in the first quarter of 2009
in 2009 to 370 in 2010. It
only had a 4 percent drop
in sales, from $160,400 to
$154,700.
Jacksonville and
Gainesville have more tran-
sient markets than Lake
City-Live Oak, Gherna said.


These areas have the abil-
ity to attract more people,
but in comparison, Lake
City-Live Oak is doing OK,
he said.
Information in the
Florida Sales Report is
based on a survey of
Multiple Listing Service
sales levels from Florida's
Realtor boards and associa-
tions. It does not include
all homes sold in the area,
but the ones that went


through the service.
Effects of the tax credit
will continue to linger for
several months and will
appear in the next quarter
report, Gherna said.
"When the next mar-
ket report comes out we
should see a increase in
sales," he said. "It will
probably be the same as
the first or maybe a little
more and as high as 15
percent."


Congress close to deal

to pay for tax cuts


By'STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Congress is finally getting
around to extending more
than 50 popular tax breaks
that expired at the end of
last year, including money
savers for homeowners,
businesses and shoppers in
states with no income tax.
Lawmakers want to raise
taxes on investment fund
managers to help cover the
cost.
Legislation combining
the tax breaks with more
aid for people who have
been unemployed for long
stretches is expected to
come up for a vote in the
House next week. The bill
would extend unemploy-
ment benefits for up to 99
weeks in many states and
subsidize health insurance
premiums for laid-off work-
ers through the end of the
year.
Details are still being
worked out, but lawmakers
also plan to expand a feder-
al bond program that sub-
sidizes local infrastructure
projects, and to protect
doctors from a scheduled
21 percent cut in Medicare
payments.
The tax breaks would
be retroactive to Jan. 1
but would again expire
at the end of December.
They include a property
tax deduction for people


who don't itemize, lucra-
tive credits that help busi-
nesses finance research
and develop new products,
and a sales tax deduction
that mainly helps people
in states without income
taxes.
Delays in extending the
tax breaks have left thou-
sands of businesses unable
to plan for their tax liabili-
ties. Delays in passing a
long-term extension of
emergency unemployment
benefits has forced thou-
sands of laid off workers to
live month to month with
no certainty of income,
Unemployment benefits for
many will start to run out
June 2, unless Congress
acts.
Congress routinely
extends the tax breaks
each year - the House
and Senate have already
passed competing ver-
sions for 2010. But law-
makers have been unable
to agree on how to pay for
them.
House and Senate nego-
tiators said this week they
are close to a deal that -
would increase taxes on
investment fund managers
and some multinational
companies. Also on the
table: Requiring lawyers,
doctors and other service
providers to pay Medicare
taxes on income they
receive through their
businesses.


Susan Eagle


AGENT OF THE WEEK
Raised in Ft. Pierce. Florida, I moved to Lake City in 1978 and have
been a proud member of the Lake City Board of Realtors for 21 years.
I have earned the National Association of Home Builders' Certified New
Home Sales Professional certification, and throughout my career have
regularly ranked in the top 5',: in sales volume of the Lake City Board
of Realtors.
I specialize in residential real estate and particularly enjoy working
with families, in trying to find them the right home, community, and
schools that tit their needs. I am happily married to Tom Eagle, with 2
children. 5 step children, and 16 grandchildren.


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2010/03/30/pros-answer-your-top-
4-money-questions.aspx.


9 Name That Company

S ,. Based in California, I'm
America's second-largest
O integrated energy company,
./ involved in every aspect of
the crude oil and natural gas
- . industry. I'm investing in alterna-
tive energies, too. I employ about
60,000 people globally, including
roughly 4,000 service station
employees, and my annual sales top
$160 billion. My roots go back to the
1870s and the Pacific Coast Oil Co., which
later became Standard Oil Co. of Califor-
. nia. I got my current name when I acquired
Gulf Oil in 1984. I merged with Texaco in
2001. I produced 2.7 million barrels of net


Really Underwater
My dumbest investment was buy-
ing shares of a newly public under-
water construction and diving ser-
vices company. The stock's initial
public offering (IPO) was around
$15 per share, and within about a
year, it filed for bankruptcy protec-
tion. Good thing I did not follow my
broker's advice and make a "real-
estate-sized" investment (meaning a
lot more money than the token
investment I made). - C.H., online
The Fool Responds: Be careful
with IPOs. They can be exciting, but
they also often don't perform so well
once their hype dies down.
Many end up trading for
less than their offering
price, and some, like
yours, can even run into big trouble
quickly. It can be smart to hang back
and watch such companies for a year
or more, to see how they do.
It's critical to research a company
well before buying into it, and that
can be hard to do with IPOs, as they
generally don't have years of finan-
cial statements for you to examine.
* Some are tied to shaky companies,
Stood, and their shares can be quite
volatile. Consider focusing on great,
established companies, instead.
� : Do you have an embanussing
. lesson learned the hard way?
* Boil it down to 100 woids (or-
less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My
: Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked?
* Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we
print yours, you '11 win a Fool' cap!


C


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The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
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people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you 'II laugh all
the way to the ba.nk.
.. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .


SanDisk's Sweet Spot
These are sweet times for com-
puter memory makers - the ones
that survived the terror of 2007 and
2008, that is.
Flash memory specialist SanDisk
(Nasdaq: SNDK), for example,
recently reported first-quarter sales
up by 65 percent, to $1.1 billion,
,with earnings up sharply, too.
Hot demand for consumer
electronics helped power SanDisk's
brilliant results. The company also
provides storage for cell-phone and
smartphone products, and it hopes to
capitalize on the incoming surge of
tablet computers imitating the iPad,
as flash-based storage is the only
sensible option in that kind of
product for numerous technical
and aesthetic reasons.
"With our leading technology,
large-scale manufacturing, diversi-
fied end markets, broad
product portfolio, premium
brand, and a strong balance .
sheet, we have powerful
momentum to capitalize on future
opportunities," said CEO Eli Harari.
Given the technology's numerous
advantages - low power, no moving
parts, lots of storage in a small phys-
ical space, ultrafast data reads, and
more - it's not hard to see flash
memory chips moving into many
new markets. The rise of smart-
phones that store lots of media and
feature upgradable flash'storage has
been an absolute boon for SanDisk.
SanDisk recently sported a price-
to-earnings ratio of 13, making it a
stock well worth considering.


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER


I'm a huge global communications company, the top U.S. provider of local
and long-distance voice services, and America's largest directory publisher,
delivering millions of print directories. I'm also the nation's largest broad-
band provider, with more than 17.3 million high-speed Internet subscribers,
and the nation's largest Wi-Fi provider, offering customers access at more
than 125,000 hot spots. I serve more than 85 million customers with my 3G
network. My "three-screen" integration strategy delivers services to the
three screens people rely on most- mobile devices, PCs and TV. My ticker
symbol sounds like a popular British drink. Who am I? (Answer: AT&T)


oil-equivalent per day in 2009. Who am I? W, rite to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
S F he Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
l, ..i" /It 1 ', . -" Sdhl 11o us with Foolish Trivia onl the top and to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
I, .'I // I'l t'. , .,Itil. a Jawving for a nifty prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can providee individual financial advice.
( 2010 Till Mollt i F xI l si. ni UNIVI RSl Un ICK (iC RI.ELLASE 5/13/2010)


B^^^~ ~ ' . t eo

^ ..B
momp0"

O0


In this photo taken on Wednesday, a man on his mobile phone walks by a mobile phone store in New York. So far this year,
customers have been making a big shift away from two-year contracts toward prepaid service without contracts. That signals
a new era for the industry, where old recipes for growth will need to be replaced.

Wireless users shying away from long plans


By PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK - For wire-
less subscribers, commit-
ment is out and short-term
relationships are in.
This year, customers
have been making a big
shift away from two-year
contracts toward "prepaid"
cell phone service, which
often costs less and does
not require contracts. This
is happening even though
contracts are needed to
get popular phones such
as the iPhone and the
Droid.
Now prepaid service
looks like it will get even
more attractive, with
further price cuts. That's
because wireless carri-


ers.have hit a wall when
it comes to finding new
customers who will sign
contracts.
"I would love to have an
iPhone. I just can't swallow
the $70 or more bill that
would come with it," said
Jeff Finlay, a 45-year-old
stay-at-home dad in San
Antonio who uses a pre-
paid plan.
Unlike contract plans
that bill subscribers each
month for the services
they used the previous
month, prepaid services
traditionally let subscribers
buy minutes in advance for
around 10 cents to 20 cents
each. When the minutes
are used up, people "refill"
their accounts as needed.
For years, such plans


were marketed primarily
to people who did not have
the credit to qualify for
plans with contracts. About
one-fifth of Americans
with cell phones are on
prepaid, according to the
New Millennium Research
Council, a Washington-
based think tank.
But as the recession
forced more people to
cut costs, prepaid service
appealed to a broader slice
of the market, and prepaid
services responded by
offering better deals.
Now it's possible to
make unlimited calls and
text messages on a pre-
paid plan for $45 a month
- half of what it costs a
customer with a contract
on Verizon Wireless. At


Tracfone, the largest
independent provider of
prepaid service, customers
pay an average of $11 per
month.
The popularity of text
messaging is also making
some people move away
from contract plans that
provide a big bucket of
monthly minutes that may
not get used.
Finlay uses prepaid ser-
vice from Virgin Mobile,
a division of Sprint Nextel
Corp., because he talks no
more than 15 to 20 min-
utes on the phone each
month. That costs him $5
per month. He sends and
receives up to 2,000 text
messages, so he tacks on
an unlimited-texting option
for $20 per month.


INTERVENE: In business
Continued From Page 1C


traveler who has been hit .
in the head with flying lug-
gage too many times to
count, I would like to see' a
decrease carry-on luggage.
Additionally, I have seen
how often the TSA line
slows significantly - or
even stops completely
- because someone with
carry-on luggage did not
know the rules about liq-
uids or some such issue.
I, myself, always check
my bags so that I do not
have to deal with the
hassle of TSA or force-fit-
ting the luggage into the
overhead bin. Of course,
what I like or, do not like is
really immaterial. I just had
to vent a bit here as this is
one of my pet peeves.
What does trouble me
about the luggage charge
is that the government is
saying that Spirit should
not implement this fee and
is looking for ways to leg-
islatively stop them from.
doing so. In my opinion,
the government should
stop meddling in this issue
as well as in so many oth-
ers. Unless there is collu-
sion or price-fixing, Adam
Smith's invisible hand of
competition will control
how successful Spirit will
be with this carry-on lug-
gage charge.
Ordinarily, one of two
things can be expected to
occur as a result of this


Share
your events



EamEmENpe


www.Iakecityreporter.com


new pricing strategy. The
first possible outcome is
that customers will stop
flying Spirit, making it
necessary to repeal the
charge. The second is that
customers will be willing to
pay this price for a whole
variety of reasons - lower
total prices, for instance.
The bottom line is that
businesses operate best
when that invisible hand of
competition is permitted to
function as it forces them
to operate in a manner that
ensures customers are
receiving the highest value.
Too often, entrepreneurs
tend to sit back and let
governmental regulations
hamper their operations.
However, there are many
ways to become active
in limiting the number
of these regulations.
Chambers of commerce
and lobbying organizations
for each individual industry
are just a couple options.
Additionally, running for
office is a great but difficult
way to influence the gov-
.ernment's ability to impact
businesses.
You can do this!

* FSU .Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.



Share
your photos







www.lakecityreporter.com


The Motley Fool�

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


I Ak he Fool I


I v'a NMI I iT'M-'T ii


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


f












Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

NYSE Amex A Nasdaq

7,077.64 +161.46 1,848.68 +56.32 2,346.85 +81.21


Gainers (S2 or more) Gainers (S2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Sybase 64.65+25.11 +63.5 Ever-Glory 360 +100 +38.5 HaupgDigh 3.93 +2.90 +281.6
WilmCS 2.01 +.53 +35.8 GerovaFn 10.17 +272 +36.5 InfoLgxrsh 6.65 +3.79 +132.5
CascdeCp 38.39 +9.73 +3,9 NeoStem 3.41 +.86 +33.7 BioSphre 4.30 +1.72 +66.7
7DaysGp n 12.17 +2.86 +.7 US Gold 412 + 85 +260 ChinWind n 5.21 +1.62 +45.1
NACCO 10439+22.74 +27.9 MetroHlth 309 +.81 +255 AuthenTec 3.17 +93 +41.5
ConsGph 4385 +9.08 +26.1 VirnetX 6.13 +113 +22.6 Encormrsh 3.35 +.95 +39.6
Textainer 25.04 +5.04 +25.2 ExeterR gs 7.93 +1 43 +220 NexstarB 709 +2.00 +39.3
PortglTel 9.52 +1.91 +25.1 Servotr 10.04 +1.70 +20.4 SpeedUsh 3.37 +.95 +39.3
BrkfldH 1124 +2.17 +23.9 Gerovaun 10.55 +1.75 +19.9 IntnCon 5.84 +1.64 +39.0
Standex 27.59 +5.27 +23.6 ChiArmM 5.42 +.87 +19.1 Pacerlntl 8.87 +2.43 +37.7


Losers (S2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DeanFs 9.57 -5.06 -34.6
DirxSCBear 6.13 -1.47 -19.4
PrUPShR2K45.02-10.78 -19.3
BkA BM RE 2.61 -.57 -17.9
RAIT Fin 2,83 -.55 -16.3
Prestige 7.90 -1.39 -15.0
DirREBear 6.87 -1,18 -14.7
PrUPSM40051.43 -8.40 -14.0
DirEMBr rs 47.82 -7,60 -13.7
ProUSR2K 18.81 -2.81 -13.0

Most Active (Si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 37268176 3.98 -.02
S&P500ETF13439681113.89 +2.83
BkofAm 9628110 16.34 +.16
SPDR Fncl6059906 15.35 +.26
FordM 5520304 12.11 +.60
iShEMkts 5391995 39.49 +1.30
GenElec 4314510 17.64 +.76
iShR2K 4209559 69.56+4.20
DirFBear rs4076233 13.75 -1.06
SpdntNex 3418511 4.36 +.52

Diary
Advanced 2,811
Declined 421
New Highs 231
New Lows 35,
Total issues 3,256
Unchanged 24
Volume 29,032,357,610


Losers (S2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ASpecRit s 10.20 -2.58 -20.2
NIVSIntT 2.59 -.50 -162
TravelCtrs 3.08 -.40 -11.5
OronEngy 3.87 -.43 -10.0
SunLink 2.17 -.23 -9.5
EngySvcs 3.35 -.34 -9.2
Bamwell 3.80 -.35 -8.4
StreamGSv 6.09 -.52 -7.9
NTS RIty 4.50 -.37 -76
Sifco 11.65 -.91 -7.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg


GoldStr g
CFCda g
NwGold g
NovaGId g
RadientPh
Taseko
NthgtMg
Rentech
GrtBasG g
NA Pall g


4.67 +.67
15.20 -.10
6.15 +.48
8.37 +.68
1.37 +.43
5.65 +.65
3.16 +.09
1.14 -.02
1.84 +.11
4.07 +.13


Diary
Advanced 409
Declined 141
New Highs 41
New Lows 11
Total issues 566
Unchanged 16
Volume 623,371,557


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MdwstB pf 2.11 -3.39 -61.6
AtlBcGp 2.75 -1.66 -37.6
TiVo Inc 10.16 -5.45 -34.9
Cowitz rs 5,21 -1.59 -23.4
DARA hrs 4.55 -1.39 -23.3
SinoCkgn 13.17 -3.32 -20.1
HampRBk 2.03 -.50 .-19.8
OCR HId 10.39 -2.57 -19.8
MgeNetrs 2.50 -.59 -19.1
ImperlSgr 11.96 -2.79 -18.9

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ557126446.93+1.52
intel 4399975 21.89 +.58
Cisco 4091410 24.94 +.23
Microsoft 3026823 28.93 +.72
SiriusXM 2973029 1.07 +.06
ETrade 2371608 1.57 +.07
Comcast 2237768 17.60 -.76
MicronT 1908745 8.94 +.37
HuntBnk 1658160 6.53 +.52
Nvidia 1599279 12.96-1.00


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


AT&T Inc NY 168
AMD NY
Alcoa NY .12
AutoZone NY
BkofAm NY .04
BarVixShT NY ...
BobEvn Nasd .72
CNBFnPA Nasd .66
CSX NY .96
Chevron NY 2.88
Cisco Nasd
Chtigrp NY
CocaCI NY 1.76
Comcast Nasd .38
Delhaize NY 2.01
DirFBear rs NY
DrxFBull s NY .15
DirxSCBearNY
ETrade Nasd
FPL Grp NY 2.00
FamilyDIr NY .62
FordM a NY
GenElec NY .40
HomeDp NY .95
HuntBnk Nasd .04
iShChina25NY .55
iShEMkts NY .58
iSEafe NY 1.44


25 40 +.30
8 80 +.42
12.36 +36
180.31 +4.23
1634 +.16
26.86 -2.39
29.36 +1.57
15.86 +1.86
55.03 +2.36
77.83 +.73
24.94 +.23
3.98 -.02
53.34 +.67
17.60 -.76
80.81 +4.51
13.75 -1.06
28.00 +.95
6.13 -1.47
1.57 +.07
52.71 +1.49
40.20 +1.24
12.11 +.60
17.64 +.76
35.20 +1.77
6.53 +.52
38.88 +.64
39.49 +1.30
49.99 +.78


+1.2 -9.4
+5.0 -9.1
+30 -233
+2.4 +14.1
+1.0 +8.5
-8.2 -21.2
+5.6 +1.4
+13.3 -.8
+4.5 +13.5
+0.9 +1.1
+0.9 +4.2
-0.5 +20.2
+1.3 -6.4
-4.1 +5.0
+5.9 +5.3
-7.2 -29.2
+3.5 +13.3
-19,4 -37.8
+4.7 -10.8
+2.9 -.2
+3.2 +44.4
+5.2 +21.1
+4.5 +16.6
+5.3 +21.7
+8.7 +78.9
+1.7 -8.0
+3.4 -4.8
+1.6 -9.6


Name Ex Div
iShR2K NY .75
Intel Nasd .63
JPMorgCh NY .20
LVSands NY
Lowes NY .36
McDnlds NY 2.20
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .52
NY Times NY
NobltyH Nasd .
OcciPet NY 1.52
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShs QQQNasd .21
PrUShS&PNY
QwestCm NY .32
Ryder NY 1.00
S&P500ETFNY 2.21
SearsHIdgs Nasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1,82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FnclINY .20
TimeWarn NY . .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg
69.56 +4.20 +6.4 +11.4
21.89 +,58 +27 +7.3
39.89 -.87 -2.1 -4.2
23.43 +2.24 +10.6 +56,8
26.07 +.76 +3.0 +11.5
69.59 +1.58 +23 +11.5
8.94 +.37 +4.3 -15.3
28.93 +.72 +2.6 -5.1
9.15 +.21 +2.3 -26.0
9.60 -.41 -4.1 -8.1
81.96 +1.35 +1.7 +.7
27.54 -.07 -0.3 +3.5
66807 +1.50 +2.3 +8,7
16.20 -.26 -1.6 -10.9
102.93 +2.96 +3.0 -5,1
46.93 +1.52 +3.3 +2.6
32.06 -1.91 -5.6 -8.5
5.28 +,20 +3.9 +25.4
44.99 +2.53 +6.0 +9.3
113.89 +2.63 +2.4 +2.2
108.34 +2.86 +2.7 +29.8
1.07 +.06 +5.9 +78.3
34.47 +.55 +1.6 +3.5
'4.36 +.52 +13.5 +19.1
15.35 +.26 +1.7 +6.6
30.56' +.31 +1.0 +4.9
52.12 +.03 +0.1 -2.5
32.04 +1.22 +4.0 +18.7


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones industrials 404.71 -36.88 148.65 -113.96 -162.79
Close: 10,620.16 *)i y ! ti *
1-week change: 239.73 (2.3%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
11,500


11,000


10,500





9 00f tl D J F Mr A M



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load invt


PIMCO"
America
Vanguar
Fidelity (
America


America
Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. Vanguard
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks., p = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split America
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at America
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership, wd = When distributed. wi = Vanguar
When issued. wt = Warrants. Dodge &
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or America
redemption fee. I = Iront load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's Aei
net asset value s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and merica
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1, Volume In Dodge &
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial. America
PIMCO"


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week


Prime Rate


3.25


Maly Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
a - Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-25
Advanced 2,296 Treasuries
Declined 561 3-month 0.15 0.13
New Highs 234
New Lows 72 6-month 0.22 0.19
Total issues 2,913 5-year 2.14 2.16
Unchanged 56 10-year 3.44 3.42
Volume 12,499,036,242 30-year 4.32 4.28


A l artsu ia


R.ii . vn 1 wi


America
Currencies FrankTer
-- ,. Vanguar
Last Pvs Day America


3 9211 1 1130


TotRetls
n Funds GrthAmA m
d TotStldx
Contra
n Funds CaplncBuA m
n Funds CpWldGrIA rm
Ai 5001nv
n Funds IncAmerA m
n Funds InvCoAmA m
d Instldxl
& Cox Stock
n Funds EurPacGrA m
n Funds WAMutlnvA m
Cox IntlStk
n Funds NewPerspA mr
TotRetAdm b
n Funds FnlnvA m
mp-Franklin Income A m
d TotStlAdm
n Funds BalA m


Vanguard 50OAdml


.... ......... -..-- I vanauara welitn


Canada 1.0321 1.0169
Firo .8074 .7957


.l nan


Moexi-.n


929 21


92.84


0 78521 12 3180


Fidelity GrowCo
Fidelity LowPriStk d
American Funds BondA m
Vanguard Totlnti d


128,736
67,975
65,222
59,228
57,634
55,402
51,508
50,350
49,825
48,636
43,365
39,521
39,349
38,799
32,886
32,666
32,183
31,694
31,416
30,732
30,360
30,024
29,838
29,370
27,372'
27,146
27,032


+13.1/C
+25.3/E
+32.7/A
+29.7/C
+17.2/D
+20.4/E
+29.8/B
+25.3/8
+24.2/E
+29.9/B
+30.7/B
+20.7/B
+25.5/D
+28.1/A
+25.8/C
+12.8/C
+26.4/D
+30.6/A
+32.8/A
+22.0/C
+29.9/B
+17.7/E
+21.6/D
+36.6/A
+38.1/D'
+14.8/C
+21.6/B


1,000,000
250
3,000
2,500
250
250
3,000
250
250
5,000,000
2,500
250
250
2,500
250
1,000,000
250
1,000
100,000
250
100,000
2,500
10,000
2,500
2,500
250
3,000


Switzerlnd 1.1308 1.1147 CA -onservalive Allocation, Cl -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES-Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -World Alcataion, LB -Large Bend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Alocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV -
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specaty-heath, WS -World tock, Tota Return: Chn in V with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund perormnned vs.
ers show dollar in foreign currency. oerswithsameobjective: A is intop20%, E in bottom20%. Minltinv: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund, Source: Momingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


2.4 .. +.58 -5.7
... 10 +.77 -19.9
2.4 14 +1.63 -.8
1.3 53 -.04 -27.8
... ... +.48 -7.4
6.6 12 +.30 -9.4
3.6 13 -.22 -10.2
1.9 16 -1.33 -6.0
... 7 +.42 -9.1
.1 10 +1.49 -6.1
.3 89 +1.57 +19.2
... ... +.02 -23.5
1.0 ... +.3A -23.3
2.5 14 +.07 +6.1
6.5 11 +.85 +10.1
... ... -.05 +60.2
2.6 18 -.28 -8.5
5.1 11 +1.08 -5.1
1.8 21 +.04 +.3
... ... +1.02 +32.5
.6 83 -1.56 -8.2
2.9 25 +.04 -12.0
16.8 5 +.17 -8.0
.6 15 +.75 -8.6
2.3 ... -1.24 -28.8
1.7 .. +.13 +7.7
2.2 11 +.83 -14.5
... ... +1.37 +37.7
1.1 22 -1.22 -24.4.
4.8 13 +.78 -4.4'
3,2 22 -1.08 -12.7
1.8 35 +1.81 +34.2
2.5 ... +.41 -13.3
1.3 40 +1.12 +12.1
5.4 ... +.51 -40.0
4.4 ... +.50 -12.5
7.9 ... +.61 -36.5
1.8 ... +.89 -20.3
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1.2 ... -.36 +6.2
1.2 .. +1.59 +3.1
... ... -2.39 -21.2
.9 ... +2.80 +15.8
2.7 12 -1.59 -25.8
... 4 +.28 +8.1
22 +1.82 +16.0
1.3 14 +2.04 +9.1
9.8 ... +.08 -6.6
3.5 11 -.21 -25.0
... ... +.03 -39.6
2.4 43 +3.10 +29.0
... ... +.45 -24.1
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9 +.51 +16.6
1.0 14 +.92 +11.1
... 18 +1.72 -10.8
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.1.1 18 +.89 +18.6
2.6 33 +2.78 +13.8
92 +.81 -6.4
5.5 12 +.60 -2.5
1.3 17 +.71 -12.6
3.7 12 +.73 +1.1
13.6 7 +.16 +2.6
...100 -.02 +20.2
1.0 26 -2.00 +17.1
1.5 19 +1.78 +9.7'
1.4 16 +.73 +25.3
3.3 18 +.67 -6.4
3.9 12 +1.16 +9.3
1.0 15 +1.87 -19.3
5.4 13 +.70 -2.2
2.6 1 +1.98 +3.7
... ... +2.04 +15.2
1.1 10 +.42 -7.0
1.6 ... +1.05 -6.6
1.1 +.09 +20.6
4.5 13 +1.61 +8.5


15 +.13 -3.8 10.69
50 +1.30 -8.3 33.72
... +.18 +130.5 1.86
49 +3.19 +53.5 38.90
20 -.10 +3.3 23.37
56 +3,55 -4.5 128.53
5 +.41 +127.0 5.54
11 +.23, -3.3 54 69
8 +.20 -6.1 6.72
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... +1,83 -48.9 11.46
25+17.96 +20.4 253.82
... +.45 -7.1 12.95
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. ... +.18 +17.4 5.41
58 +.71 +21.1 30.77
16 +.24 -2.4 41.80
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...+10.03 +79.9 73.98
19 +1.55 +15.2 44.46
... +.53 +25.2 16.96
46 +.30 +2.6 32.29
... +.42 -15.3 6.46
14 +2.65 -2.4 55,01
15 +.02 -8.7 20.51
... +.18 +13.0 6.77
33 +1.93 +6.7 59.42
... +.01 -56.1 .50
.. +.60 -26.3 11.93
19 +.70 -3.7 32.63
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25 +3.78 +109.7 14.30
21 +.23 +4.2 24.94
... +.09 +66.7 1.15
38 +2.89 +11.8 46.51
+.11 -12.3 .35
27 +2.37 +10.1 49.89


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


DeanFds
DeltaAir
DenburyR ..,
DevelDiv .08
DevonE .64
DrxEMBII s5.77
DirFBear rs ...
DrxFBull s .15
DirREBear .04
DirxSCBear ...
DirxSCBull 4.85
DirxLCBear ...
DirxLCBull 8.22
DirxEnBear ...
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DrPepSnap ,60
DukeEngy .96
DukeRlty .68
Dynegy
EMC Cp ..
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGidg .05
EmersonEl 1.34
.ExcoRes .12
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.76.
FPL Grp 2.00
FairchldS ...
FannieMae ,.
FidNatinfo .20
FirstEngy 2.20
FlagstrB h ...
Fluor .50
FordM
ForestLab ..
FredMac ...
FMCG 1.20
GameStop ..
Gannett .16
Gap .40
Genworth ..
Gerdau .21
GoldFLtd .17
Goldcrp g .18
GoldmanS 1.40-
Goodyear ...
GrtAtlPac ...
Hallibrtn .36
HarmonyG .06
HartfdFn .20
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .95
HonwillntI 1.21
HostHotls .04
HovnanE
Huntsmn .40
IAMGId g .06
ING
iSAstla .66
iShBraz 2.72
iSCan .33
iSh HK .38
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor .32
iShMex .70
iShSing .33
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver
iShChina25 .55
iSSP500 2.22
iShEMkts .58
iShB20 T 3.70
iS Eafe 1.44





Name Div
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
Compuwre ..
Costco .84
Cree Inc
Crocs
Ctrip.com s ..
CypSemi ...
Dell Inc
DItaPtr
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DiscvLabh ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DryShips
ETrade
eBay
EagleBulk ...
ElectArts ...
EricsnTel .28
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...
FifthThird .04
Flextrn
FosterWhl ...
FresKabirt ...
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
Google ...
HaupgDig h ...
HudsCity .60
HumGen ...
HuntJB .48
IntgDv .
Intel .63
InterMune ...
Intersil .48
Intuit ...


8 -5.06 -47.0 9.57
.. +2.04 +20.7 13.74
... -.35 +11.0 16.43
.. +.40 +32.1 12.23
11 +1.48 -10.1 66.06
...+1.90 -22.3 26.11
...-1.06 -29.2 13.75
... +.95 +13.3 28.00
...-1.18 -46.3 6.87
... -1.47 -37.8 6.13
... +8,97 +32.5 56.62
... -1.50 -15.7 14.43
... +3.65 +3.0 54.08
... -.83 -7.0 10.49
7 +.16 -3.2 14.24
18 +.65 +5.6 34.06
14 +.77 +5.3 40.99
23 +1.84 -1.0 27.34
19 +1.53 +31.6 37.25
13 +.23 -2.5 16.78
... +.59 +8.5 13.20
... +.11 -28.2 1.30
30 +.49 +6.3 18.57
11 +1.01 +22.8 12.07
54 +1.72 +25.3 17.75
22 +.93 +15.2 49.06
5 +1.43 -19.5 17.08
10 +.67 -14.7 41.68
14 +.34 -6.7 .63.60
13 +1.49 -.2 52.71
..22 -1.8 9.81
... -.02 -14.4 1.01
18 +.93 +26.7 29.69
13 +1.68 -20.9 36.74
... +.05 -1.7 .59
15 +5.33 +13.9 51.28
6 +.60 +21.1 12.11
10 -.03 -17.3 26.54
... +.08 -6.8 1.37
12 +2.13 -13.2 69.72
10 -.73 -.4 21,85
8 +.71 +6.1 15.76
14 +.B6 +10.1 22.96
65 +1.06 +37.4 15.59
... +.25 -14.8 14.42
23 +1.27 +5.6 13.85
... +2.92, +16.1 45.68
6 +.24 -15.2 143.23
... +.94 -7.4 13.05
... +.32 -46.9 6.26
26 +.58 -6.6 28.09
... +1.02 +2.1 10.38
9 +.91 +12.7 26.21
77 +.63 +.2 6.19
53 +.23 +2.7 12.24
13 -.68 -7.3 56.06
13 +.70 -7.9 47.43
22 +1.77 +21.7 35.20
16 +1.96 +16.0 45.48
... +.15 +27.6 14.89
+.95 +79.7 6.90
... -05 -12.6 9.87
33 +1.25 +21.0 18.92
... +1.37 -14.2 8.42
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...+1.88 -11.8 65.78
... +1.00 +3.9 27.36
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-.01 +2.0 9.93
. +1.80 +2.2 48.69
... +1.69 +3.3 50.46
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+.64 -8.0 38.88
... +2.82 +2.2 114.28
... +1.30 -4.8 39.49
... -.70 +5.6 94.88
... +.78 -9.6 49.99


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg' Last
iShR2K .75 1.1 ... +4.20 +11.4 69.56
iShREst 1.86 3.6. +1.84 +12.0 51.45
IngerRd .28 .7 28 +3.51 +8.4 38.75
IBM 2.60 2.0 13 +9.09 +.2 131.19
IntlGame .24 1.1 40 +1.01 +11.8 20.98
IntPap .50 2.1 42 +.75 -11.2 23.78
Interpublic ... ... 73 +.33 +9.1 8.05
Invesco .44 2.1 27 +.71 -11.4 20.82
ItauUnibH .55 2.8 ... +.39 -12.4 20.00
JPMprgCh .20 .5 15 -.87 -4.2 39.89
Jabil .28 2.0 88 +.10 -18.7 14.12
JohnJn 2.16 3.4 14 +.66 -.7 63.97
JohnsnCtl .52 1.7 19 +.94 +12.4 30.62
JnprNtwk ... ... .. +.77 +3.1 27.50
KB Home .25 1.5 -.09 +18.5 16.21
Keycorp .04 .5 .. +.55 +51.9 8.43
Kimco .64 4.1 ... +.72 +16.3 15.73
KingPhrm ... ... 36 -.64 -27.1 8.95
Kinrossg .10 .5 54 +1,59 +3.0 18.95
Kohls ... 16 -.23 -.9 53.45
Kraft 1.16 3.9 11 -.04 +10.5 30.03
LDKSolar ... -.10 -13.3 6.08
LSICorp . .. 17 +.12 -7.0 5.59
LVSands ... +2.24 +56.8 23.43
LeggMason .16 .5 25 +5.79 +11.3 33.57
LennarA .16 ,9 ... +.92 +44.2 18.41
LillyEli 1.96 5.8 9 -.21 -5.0 33.92
Limited .60 2,4 19 +.52 +32.3 25.45
LloydBkg 1.43 ... ... +.16 +2.8 3.36
LaPac ... ... ... -.77 +36.8 9.55
MBIA ... ....... -.42 +108.8 8.31
MEMC ... ... ... +.25 -13.4 11.79


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly. YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
2.1 14 -.76 +5.0 17.60
,2.2 13 -.60 +6.1 16.88
... 12 +.26 +10.2 7.97
1.5 22 +.43 -2.4 57.74
... 64 +5.64 +27.9 72.10
... ... +.86 +86.1 10.70
... ... +5.06 +5.7 37.99
... ... +.35 +11.0 11.72
... 21 +.IA +5.5 15.15
... ... +.06 +26.9 1.32
... ... -.15 +66.5 43.76
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... ... +.05 -17.3 .52
18 +1.60 +10.3 22.90
... +.11 -10.7 5.20
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11 +.77 -5.4 22.25
14 +.37 +4.2 5.16
. .. -.21 -1.9 17.42
2.7 ... +.37 +13.5 10.43
1.2 21 +.80 -11.4 22.80
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-.02 -4.9 6.95
10 +2.25 -9.4 26.66
... ... +.06 -42.7 .17
... ...-1.34 +2.9 50.43
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... 23+14.39 -18.1 507.53
... ... +2.90 +357.0 3.93
4.6 12 +.28 -5.2 13.01
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... ... -.62 -19.6 10.48
3.5 ... -.06 -11.1 13.64
... 26 +1.52 +15.6 35.53.


Name Div YId PE


JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc .60 1.9
KeryxBio
LeapWirlss ...
Level3 ... ...
LibGlobA ... ...
LibtyMIntA ...
LinearTch .92 3.3
MarvellT ...
Mattel .75 3.4
MaximIntg .80 4.3
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.37 4.9
MicronT
Microsoft .52 1.8
MdwstBc h ..
NasdOMX ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15 1.1
NewsCpB .15 .9
Novell
Novlus
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .20 .8
PDL Bio 1.00 17.4
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .36 .8
PacCapB ...
Palm Inc
PattUTI .20 1.5
Paychex 1,24 4.2
PeopUtdF .62 4 3
Popular


Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg


+.14 +6.8
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38 +.39 +4.8
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... +2.72 -3.2
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... -.02 -43.4
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... +.23 +56.2


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
PwShs000.QQQ21 .4 ... +1.52 +2.6 46.93
priceline ... ... 20-17.11 -4.6 208.28
Qualcom .76 2.0 20 +,80 -19.4 37.30
RFMicD ... ... 20 +.14 +7.5 5.13
RschMotn ... ... 15 +1.24 -2.0 66.16
STEC ... ... 11 +.44 -18.5 13.31
SanDisk ... ... 11 +4.29 +44.5 41.90
SeagateT ... ... ... +.23 -1.2 17.98
Sequenom ... ... +.79 +33.6 5.53
SiriusXM ... ... ... +.06 +78.3 1.07
SkywksSol ... ... 21 +.58 +9.9 15.59
SouthFnh ... ... ... +.07 +3,9 .67
Staples .36 1.6 21 +.46 -10.0 22.12
Starbucks .40 1.5 27 +1.06 +15.0 26.51
StlDynam .30 2.0 24 +.37 -14.0 15.24
SunesisP h ... ... ... +.03 -11.2 .95
SunPowerA ... ... 24 -1.30 -44.9 13.05
Symantec ... 19 +.50 -9.9 16.12
TDAmeritr .. ... 17 ... -5.6 18.30
Tellabs .08 .9 22 +.47 +51.6 8.61
TevaPhrm .68 1.2 26 -.38 +1.1 56.80
TibcoSft 28 +1.26 +26.0 12.13
TiVo Inc ... ... ... -545 -.2 10.16
TriQuint ... 21 +.37 +16.7 7.00
UAL ... +1.96 +53.8 19.85
UrbanOut... .. 25 +.99 +2.5 35.88
ValueClick ... ... 12 +1.55 +6.1 10.74
VirgnMdah .16 1.0 . +.47 -4.0 16.15
Vivus ... +1.09 +28.7 11.84
Vodafone 1.22 6.2 . -.26 -14.5 19.74
WholeFd . ... 37 +4.15 +48.7 40.83
Windstrm 1.00 9.3 16 +.51 -2.4 10.73
Xilinx .64 2.7 19 -.39 -4.0 24.05
YRCWwdh... ... ... -.02 -47.7 .44
Yahoo ... ... 20 r r -29 1639
ZionBcp .04 .1


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


MFA Fncl .96 13.7
MGIC
MGMMir ...
Macys .20 .9
Manpwl .74 1.5
MarathonO1.00 3,2
MarinerEn ...
MktVGold .11 ...
MktVRus .08 .3
MarlntA .16 .5
Marshlls .04 .5
Masco .30 2.0
MasseyEn .24 .6
MasterCrd .60 .3
McGrwH .94 3.2
Mechel
Medtrnic .82 1.9
Merck ' 1.52 4.6
MetLife .74 1.8
MetroPCS ... ...
Mirant
MitsuUFJ ...
Monsanto 1.06 1.9
Moodys .42 1.9
MorgStan .20 .7
Mosaic .20 .4
Motorola
NCR Corp ...
NRG Egy ...
Nabors
NBkGreece .31 11.4
NatGrid 2.89 6.4


6 +.19
... +.39
... +.53
21 +.60
... +.34
15 +.85
19 -.11
... +4.02
... +2.15
39 +1.27
.. +.47
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33 +4.00
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12 -1.30
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20 +1.14
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13 +.61
20 +1.57
3 +2.01
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19 -4.48
12 -1.79
34 -.67
71 -.40
75' +.19
17 +.70
8 +.07
... +.70
... +.04
... +.89


-4.4 7.03
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-33.2 54.61
-19.5 21.57
-8.5 27.08
-20.0 47.76
-12.5 6.79
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-3.8 22.71
-10.4 19.61
-48.0 2.71
-16.8 45.26


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


NOilVarco .40
NatSemi .32
NY CmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .40
NiSource .92
NikeB 1.08
NobleCorp .20
NokiaCp .56
Nordstrm .64
NorflkSo 1.36
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.52
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 1.74
PG&ECp 1.82
PMI Grp ...
PNC .40
PPL Corp 1.40
PatriotCoal ..
PeabdyE .28
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.92
Petrohawk ..:
PetrbrsA 1.34
Petrobras 1.34
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.32
Pier 1
Potash .40
PS USDBull...
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ...
PrUIShDow ...
ProUltQQQ ..
PrUShQQQ...
ProUltSP .41
ProUShL20 ..
ProUSRErs...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUFin rs .30
ProUltO&'G .22
ProUSR2K ...
ProUltR2K .04
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp .16
ProLogis .60
Prudentl .70
PSEG .1.37
PulteGrp ...
QuantaSvc ...
QksilvRes ...
QwestCm .32
RAIT Fin ...
RRI Engy
RadianGrp .01
RangeRs .16
Raytheon 1.50
RegionsFn .04
RiteAid
SAIC
SLMCp
SpdrDJIA 2.47
SpdrGold ...
SP Mid 1.67
S&P500ETF2.21
SpdrHome .13
SpdrKbwBk .25
SpdrRetl .50
SpdrOGEx .25
SpdrMetM .37
Safeway .40
Saks
SandRdge ..
SaraLee .44
Schlmbrg .84
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .55


11 +.80 -9.5 39.91
52 +.17 -8.5 14.05
14 +.68 +10.2 15.99
14 +.80 +9.9 16.49
17 +4.29 +21.9 57.68
16 +.44 +2.7 15.80
21 +3.13 +11.6 73.74
5 -1.14 -14.9 34.64
... -.47 -20.0 10.28
18 -.30 +5.8 39.76
19 +3.07 +11.2 58.29
... +.99 -1.6 45.89
18 +1.35 +.7 81.96
... +.25 -.3 6.43
.. +1:23 -6.4 111.27
14 +.46 -2.3 43.63
... ,+.41 +79:0 4.51
17 +1.47 +24.3 65.61
23 +.82 -20.9 25.56
16 +.39 +16.5 18.01
27 +.95 -7.5 41.81
26 -.07 +3.5 27.54
17 +1.50 +8.7 66.07
30 +1.37 -16.9 19.94
... +1.35 -21.4 *33.31
... +1.16 -21.0 37.65
9 -.26 -10.9 16.20
14 +.14 -3.4 46.56
10 +1.14 +60.5 8.17
28 +2.96 -5.1 102.93
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...-1.42 -3.9 50.49
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34 +1.26 +20.7 14.70
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29 -.35 -10.4 - 16.87
... +.47 -1.7 27.45


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


SiderNac s .19
SilvWhtng ...
Smithlntl .48
SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAirl .02
SwstnEngy...
SprintNex ....
SP Matls .52
SP HIthC .53
SP CnSt .73
SP Consum .41
SP Engy 1.00
SPDR Fncl .20
SP Inds .59
SPTech .31
SP Util 1.26
StdPac
StarwdHtl .20
.StateStr .04
StratHotels ...
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Sybase
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TJX .60
TaiwSemi .46
TalismE g .25
Target .68
TeckRes g .40
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texinst .48
Textron .08
3M Co 2.10
TW Cable 1.60
TimeWam .85
Total SA 3.23
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.44
Tycolntl .83
Tyson .16
UBS AG
US Airwy
UtdMicro ...
UPS B 1.88
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ...
USOilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .03
UnumGrp .33
Vale SA .52
Vale SA pf .52
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.90
ViacomB ...
Visa .50
Vonage h ...
Walgm .55
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WstnUnion .24
WmsCos .50
XL Cap .40
XTO Engy .50
Xerox .17
Yamana g .06
YumBrnds .84


... +.21 -2.1
46 +2.70 +40.7
95 +1.66 +60.3
14 +.55 +3,5
... +.39 +11.8
24 +1.90 -19.0
... +.52 +19.1
... +.46 -4.2
... +.25 -3.5
... +.53 +3.0
+.83 +10.9
... +1.25 -1.4
+.26 +6.6
... +1.16 +12.2
... +.66 -2.3
... +.83 -3.5
64 +.37 +54.0
43 +1.14 +31.6
... +.29 -4.4
-.36 +166.1
... +.41 -12.2,
20 +.13 -36.1
... +2.36 +47.0
29+25.11 +49.0
... +.42 +56.1
16 +.74 +8.0
16 +1.73 +23.8
-.02 -13.7
... +1.44 -6.0
17 +.87 +14.1
... -.74 -2.3
33 +.28 +3.9
70 +.18 +4.3
... +.62 -4.5
15 +.14 -4.5
... +2.19 +20.0
17 +2.05 +2.4
16 +2.13 +24.7
14 +.31 +4.9
... +.40 -24.9
7 -1.69 -19.9
8 +.86 +.5
... +1.82 +7.8
... -.92 +44.3
... +.54 -8.6
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-.01 -12.6
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AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yid PE Chg %Chg Last
AbdAsPac .42 6.7 ... +.09 +1.2 6.29
Advntrx rs ... ... ... +.09 -72.7 2.39
AlIdNevG .. 64 +1.80 +31.8 19.88
AmO&G ... ...... +.64 +60.5 6.74
Anooraqg ... .. ... -.10 +41.4 1.23
AntaresP ... ... +.13 +45.6 1.66
ApolloG g ... ... +.04 -23.9 .34
ArcadiaRs ... ... ... +.17 +50,0 .75
Aurizong ... ... ... -.18 +16.4 5.24
BarcGSOil ... ... ... -1.14 -12.5 22.64
BrclndiaTR ... ... ... +1.28 -1.3 63.22
BootsCoots ... ... 49 +.01 +78.8 2.95
CardiumTh ... ... .... +.03 -25.7 .51
CelSci ... ...... +.04- -27.4 .65
CFCdag .01 .1 ... -.10 +10.3 15.20
CheniereEn ... ... ... +.01 +39.3 3.37
ChiArmM ... ... 34 +.87 +71.0 5.42
ChinaMda ... ... ... +1.93 +21.6 12.89
ChNEPetn ... ... 8 +.01 -28.1 6.65
Crystallx g ... ... ... +.03 +23.7 .47
Endvrint ... ... ... +.23 +42.6 1.54
EndvSilvg +.40 +10.7 4.03
ExeterR gs ... .. +1.43 +47.6 7.93
Fronteer g ... ... +.52 +49.6 5.88
GabGldNR 1.68 9.7 +.49 +6.2 17.35
GenMoly +.44 +92.8 4.01
GoldStrg ... ... 58 +.67 +49.7 4.67
GranTrra g ... ... ... +.30 -5.1 5.44
GrtBasGg ... ... ... +.11 +7.6 1.84
Hemisphrx ... ..... +.09 +33.9 .75
Hyperdyn ... ... ... +.14 +21.8 1.06
JavelinPh ... ... +.01 +68.5 2.19
KodiakO g .. ... +.07 +60.4 3.56
LibAcqwt ... ...... -.26 +36.2 .94
LucasEngy ... ... -.27 +230.6 1.99
MagHRes ... ... +.72+236.1 5.21
Metalico ... ... 61 +.04 +11.2 5.47
*talline ... ... -.06 +9.1 .84


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


MetroHlIth ...
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US Gold
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VistaGold


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... +.06 +21.8
... -.01 -22.3
... ... +.48 +69.0
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... +.59 +21.5
... 18 +.09 +2.6
... ... +.68 +36.5
... ... +.00 -30.3
... ... +.01 +23.3
... ... -.02 -24.3
... ... +.12 +20.7
+.56 -23.5
... ... +.26 +18.9
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... ... +.43 +470.8
... 19 -.02 -7.3
.. ... -.27 +150.0
... ... + 30 -17.0
... +.09 +1825
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3.1 10 +.22 -23.8
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-.11 +3.8
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-.00 -28 2
... ... +.34 -18.3
17 +.13 +7,5
... ... -8.6


Walterlnv 2.00 11.6 12 +.55 +20.8 1731
YM Bioq ... ... ... +.13 +5.9 1,43


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ABB Ltd .44
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AbtLab 1.76
Acceriture .75
AMD
Aetna .04
Agnico g .18
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Allstate .80
Altria 1.40
AmbacF h ...
AEagleOut .40
AEP 1.68
AmExp .72
AlntlGp rs ...
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .80
Annaly 2.69
Apache .60
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .40
ArchDan .60
ArvMerit
AssuredG .18
ATMOS 1.34
Avon � .88
BB&T Cp .60
BHP BillLt 1.66
BakrHu .60
BcBilVArg .59
BcoBrades .76
BcoSantand .82
BcSBrasil n .20
BkofAm .04
BkNYMel .36
Barclay .22
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .40
Baxter 1.16
BeazerHm ...
BerkH Bs ...
BestBuy .56
Blackstone 1.20
BlockHR .60
Blockbsth ...
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.28
CBS B .20
-CNO Find ...
CVS Care .35
Cameron
CapOne .20
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.68
Cemex .40
CenterPnt .78
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.88
Chimera .54
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .56
Coach .60
CocaCE .36
CocaCI 1.76
ConocPhil 2.20
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
CtlAirB ..
Corning .20
Covidien .72
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.12


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ActivsBliz .15
AdobeSy ...
AEterna g ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp If .20
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
AmkorTIf ...
Antigenics ...
A123 Sys n ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .28
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP
Atmel
Autodesk ...
Autobata 1.36
BMCSft ...
Baidus .
BedBath ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .32
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Bucyrus .10
CA Inc .16
Cadence
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CentAl
ChkPoint
CienaCorp
Cirrus
Cisco
CitizRepB ...
CitrixSys ...
Clearw rt
CoqnizTech...


.


, v


d


IM


n iatirB


10


0 6541 1 4643










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


BUYIT'i


ELL I


SSSSTT


One item per additional
4 lines * 6 days a .25
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S100or less.
Each Item must Includetsaprice.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One item per ad
4 lines * 6 days additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S500 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate



One Item per ad
o nes t 6 daysr Each additional


4 lines * 6 d line $1.45
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling ,00 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One item per ad
4 lines * 6 days Each additiona l



, line $1.45
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $00 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refindable rate.



One Item per ad
4 lines * 6 days a add utional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
Each item must Include a price.
This is a non-reflndable rate.



One Item per ad 30V
4 lines * 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private idlviduaon en
personal merchandise totalling s6 oE aes.
Each item must include a price.
. This I on-refndable rate.


41 in1es$95
3 days 179
Includes 2 Signs a frid iOfialt it IS1V


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter:
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com


ci.


Ad is to Appear: Call by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m.


Fax/Email by:
Mon., 9:00a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Thurs., 9:00a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Fri., 9:00 a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.



Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lal keeitvreportcr.comn
I


Legal

NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY TO ADOPT RULE AND
SET PUBLIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia
County will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, June 22, 2010, at 7:00 p.m.,
at the School Board Administrative
Complex, 372 West Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida, on proposed
amendments to rules, regulations and
procedures for the operation of the
Columbia County School System.
The public is invited to attend. Ac-
tion is anticipated at this meeting.
Persons with disabilities who require
assistance to participate in the public
hearing are requested to notify the
Office of the Superintendent at 755-
8000 at least 48 hours in advance so
that their needs can be accommodat-
ed.
TITLE: Policy 7.05 ^ Internal Funds
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Word-
ing to align procedures concerning
monthly reporting dates.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1010.04;
1011.06; 1011.07, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 9.01 ^ Parent
Organizations and School Support
Groups
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To re-
vise current board policy on Parent
Organizations and
School Support Groups.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43;
1001.32(2), Florida Statutes
A complete text of the proposed
amended rules, regulations and pro-
cedures can be obtained at the Office
of the Superintendent of Schools,
372 W. Duval St., Lake City, FL, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. Monday ^ Friday. After
June 4, 2010 between the hours of
7:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday'
Thursday. Economic impact state-
ments, where applicable, are on file
in the Office of Superintendent at the
above listed address.
DATED THIS 11TH DAY OF
MAY, 2010.
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
BY: Keith Hudson, Chairman
ATTEST: Michael F. Millikin, Su-
perintendent
04539676
May 16,2010


IN.THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 09-711-CA
JOY S. FERGUSON, et al,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
EILLIS WRIGHT and LARRY L
ROBINSON,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 22, Block A, Southern Hills, a
subdivision as recorded in Plat Book
5, page 63 and 63A, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment rendered in the
above styled action dated May 13,
2010, at the Columbia County Court-
house in Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., on June
16, 2010, to the best and highest bid-
der for cash. Any person claiming an
interest in any surplus from the sale,
other than the property owner as of
the date of the Notice of Lis Pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
13th day of May, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of Court
By: /s/J. Harris
Deputy Clerk
04539684
May 16, 23,2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 10-109-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF CHARLES
RALPH HILTY, JR., a/k/a
CHARLES R. HILTY
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Charles Ralph Hilty, Jr., a/k/a
Charles R. Hilty, deceased, whose
date of death was March 24, 2009, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The names and ad-







Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

05523135
Construction Project?
Feasibility Study needed?
PENN PRO, Inc. provides a
variety of ARCHITECTURAL
and ENGINEERING
services for industrial,
commercial, retail, religious
assembly, residential, etc.
Please call 863-648-9990 x.225
DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

I do Housekeeping. 10 years exp.
Great references & Great rates
Detail Work!!! CALL ME!
386-628-1091


Legal

dresses of the personal representative
and the personal' representative's' at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims with
this court within 3 months after the
date of the first publication of this
notice.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
'IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is May 16, 2010.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Tom W. Brown
Attorney for Paula Braisted
Florida Bar No. 0091332
Btannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock.
P.A.
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City , FL 32056
Telephone:(386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524'
Personal Representative:
.By:/s/ Paula Braisted
820 Oleander Drive SE
Winter Havpn, Florida 33880
04539650
May 16, 23, 2010


020 Lost & Found

Found: Tiger Cat. Friendly young
gray male. Stumpy tail. Clipped
left ear. Neutered. Owner or Free
to good home. 386-755-0057

LOST DOG: Lake City Airpark
area. Missing Wed. 5/12. Black
Male Dachshund. If found please
call 386-365-6641

LOST: Lg. Grey Cat. No Tail.
"Smokey" McFarlane by Amber-,
wood Apts. Needs Meds. 386-288-
8195 or 386-758-5860 REWARD
r ,- - ----


S0

I 0



I



0
1b



I.





I


I


- 0




I 0



I
I


me'


020 Lost & Found
REWARD! White gold birthstone
ring, mnth of Aug. w/diamonds
around it. Left 4/23@ LCMC
Oupatient MRI 386-755-6440


060 Services
Honest Dependable Cleaning.
Res'lI/Comm'l. Great references &
rates avail. For a free estimate
today! 386-365-6386 (Cerissa)
North Florida Farrier Service
CJF Offering barefoot trimming to
therapeutic shoeing. Call anytime.
386-623-6214
100 Job
SOpportunities

14538577


The Lake City Reporter is
looking for a dynamic and
capable sales professional to
sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and
online products. We need a
person with the ability to make
strong presentations.
Professionalism, being active in
the field and closing sales are
three key attributes for which
we are looking. We offer a
salary and a strong commission
plan, along with a good benefits
package. If you have a strong
desire to succeed and the skills
to back it up, we want to hear
from you. Please email your
resume to:
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director, at
Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St.,
Lake City, FL 32055.
NO PHONE CALLS

Manager and Assistant Manager
Positions Available local chain
restaurant must have minimum
5 years experience in restaurant
management. Benefits Available.
Pay Negotiable. Send resume to
Restaurant Management Position
PO Box 252 Lake City, FL
32055-0252
NOW HIRING Are you Fun
Enthusiastic and professional.
Are you looking for a full time job
that pays at least $400 weekly.
We need 3 or 4 people to start
immediately. Call Ashley
386-438-8674 leave message.


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04539505


Part Time Telemarketing
Professional
The Lake City Reporter is
looking for an energetic
telemarketing professional to
join our expanding sales team.
Successful candidates will
posses excellent telephone and
customer service skills, be
computer literate and enjoy the
thrill of the sale. We offer a
great work environment and
competitive compensation.
To apply, please send resume to
Lynda Strickland,
Marketing Director at
lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com
No phone calls please. EOE

04539611
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available in
Human Resources. Provides
administrative assistance to the
HR Director. Requires excellent
organizational and communica-
tion skills. Ability to multi-task
and strong attention to detail.
Previous administrative
experience required. Applica-
tions may be obtained from any
First Federal Branch and
submitted to Human Resources,
P.O. Box 2029, Lake City, Fl.
32056 or email to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National
Life Insurance Company
Full Training Provided - Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.

Sitel is hiring! Good pay, paid
training, comfortable environment,
benefits after 90 days. Need good
attitude and computer skills - must
be reliable. Apply at
www.sitel.com or in person at
1152 SW Business Point Dr. in
Lake City. EOE

SUMMER WORK
GREAT PAY
Immed FT/PT openings,
customer sales/service, will train,
conditions apply, all ages 17+
(386)269-4656


Eadie
Insurance Agency
4447 NW American Lane

(386) 752-6058

S~~'rp


11


(386) 752-7034


o100 Opportunities

04539653

S SiVance

SiVance, LLC, a manufacturer
of specialty fine chemicals and
located in the Airport Industrial
Park in Gainesville, is looking to
fill the following opening:
Instrumentation & Electrical
Technician
A full time position is available
in a chemical manufacturing
plant for an experienced Instru-
ment and Electrical Technician.
QUALIFICATIONS:
* Candidate must have demon-
strated experience in the
selection, configuration,
installation, and troubleshooting
of process instrumentation
and motor controls.
* In addition, an understanding
of basic process control
equipment, its operation, and
troubleshooting is required.
* Candidate must also have an
understanding of basic electrical
(AC and DC) conduit, wiring
and components to 480V.
Qualified candidates must
possess at least 5 years of
industrial experience. Pay rate
range of $16-$26/hr based upon
. level of experience.
We offer an excellent benefit
package including medical/
dental plans, paid vacations/
holidays, 401K, pension, etc.
Apply by forwarding resume
and cover letter to:
E-mail
zoeann.moss@sivancellc.com
No phone calls please
EOE / DFWP

Accepting applications for
Weekend Breakfast attendant &
Housekeeping/relief maintenance
position. Apply in person at Cabot
Lodge 3525 US Hwy 90W.
No phone calls.

CDL A Drivers needed, team
operation, dedicated account.
Please call Michael 727-479-7501
between 11am and 5pm
DRIVERS: Gotta Go Transport a
flatbed Co. in High Springs needs
Class A CDL driver. Min. 2 yrs -
exp. Home weekends, safety bonus
and vac pay. Call 386-454-0532.


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words hidden in the word search
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the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval
Street, Lake City, FL by 5:00pm, for
your chance to win


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BELL 3322 W US

386-755-9673 386-755-


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Kidd9 Club
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Pre-K & VPK

755-0256
1290 SE Baya Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
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ORTI IODONTICS
(1-11A MARVIIN. D.M.D
755-1001
701 SW SR 47 Lake City, FL 32025






GAINEY

AUTOMOTIVE

& TOWING
3468 SW CR 130,1T. WHITE
386-454-3580


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Deadline is Monday, May 17, 2010 at 5:00 p.m.

Lake City Reporter
JI- - Vegetable ..


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1798 US 90 West

752-5890

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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


1io Job
t1 OOpportunities
DUMP TRUCK Driver
w/Asphalt experience.
386-497-3131


SEWING MACHINE Operator
Good hourly wage.
Call Hafners
386-755-6481

Teacher needed for I yr olds.
Also, Childcare Worker. Must be
VPK Certified. Must have hours.
386-755-7677 or 344-5363.
Other teaching positions available
Tire Tech. Must have exp w/pas-
senger, truck, tractor tire repairs.
Valid DL req'd. Pay based on exp.
Apply in person Thomas Tire CR
25A. Lake City. 386-752-8648

Wanted Highly motivated individ-
ual for Sales Position. Rountree -
Moore Ford Lincoln Mercury
Great benefits, paid vacation.
Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Chris. @ 386-867-0560
Wanted: Heavy Truck Mechanic
for busy shop. Only experienced
need apply. Call between 8am &
Noon. Mon. - Fri. 386-752-9754

1n Sales
Employment

04539606
MARKETING LIAISON
Accomplished Marketing
Executive willing to be trained
in Health Care, 4 yr Degree
preferred, Excellent work
History, Valid Drivers License
necessary, Extensive local travel
required. Attractive Salary and
benefits. Please send email to:
groberts@eulfcoasthealthcare.com


04539638 (Sales)
I AM LOOKING FOR
A PARTICULAR
TYPE PERSON
SALES
MANAGER TRAINEE
We will...
* Train you...& train you well,
in classroom and field.
* Pay you...& pay you well,
$75,000+ in your first year:
* Provide advancement
opportunity limited only by
your own desire and ability.
To schedule a confidential
interview call Patti Forster at
800-628-6428 ext. 1381.


-20 Medical
0h9U Employment

04539643
Medical Billing Manager
Several years experience in
medical insurance billing req'd.
Fax resume to: 386-785-5987

04539664
Director of Nursing
RN with exceptional communi-
cations skills , effective cost
control, knowledge of MDS,
Medicare, State and Federal
regulations, leadership
abilities and high standards of
quality care. Three years
management/supervisory experi-
ence in a skilled nursing envi-
ronment required
RN and LPN for
1 lpm-7am shift FT
Dietary Aide PT
Apply Baya Pointe Nursing &
-Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave, Lake
City, Fl 32025 or fax resume
386-752-7337.
EOE/DFWP

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Therapists & Case Managers
for community based program
working w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.

Experienced Front Desk
person for a busy medical office in
Lake City. Pediatric exp a plus.
Must be a team player.
Fax resume to 386-758-5628


120 Medical
120 Employment
License Massage Therapist need-
ed for "Caring Physical Rehab".
New Lake City office will open in
June. Call Karen (904)868-9747

240 Schools &
240 Education

Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant. $429
next class-06/07/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-06/07/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-07/13/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS
Litter trained.
Also, free young adult cats.
386-288-2899 leave message.
Mini Schnauzers.AKC.
Salt/Pepper and White.
$400-$500.00. Raised in home.
POP 386-288-5412
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

406 Collectibles
THOMAS KINKADE
Certificate of Authenticity Village.
$55.00 FIRM
386-344-4495

408 Furniture
Dining Table Solid Oak w/24 inch
leaf. Seat up to 6. 4 oak dining
chairs. Asking price $500.00 Call
386-752-3078 or 352-281-4003

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
WANTED Junk Cars,
Trucks, RV's etc.
Paying CASH $225.00 and up.
Free pickup 386-867-1396
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648:.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

PLAY STATION 2
plus 10 games of
your choice. $110.00
386-758-4731
Restaurant Equip. Hot Box $400.
6ft. fridge $400. Ele Rotisserie
$400. 6ft stainless steel hood w/fan
$200. Call Charlie. 386-984-7226.

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440
7 5 5" - I&AWL-- A-1 0m i,


530 Marine Supplies
SKI'S - Kidder mod 200. Sport
series, high performance, Slaloim
and as pair. Graphite. New $160.
Sale for $75. 386-755-1922

630 (Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2 br/2 full bath MI I
ready to rent Ft White
$500.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $400-$550.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$425 - $650. monthly.
Water & sewer furnished.
Cannon Creek MHP 386-752-6422
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$750 a month. 1st, last and $375?
security. Please call 386-397-2619
or 386-365-1243.
LArge clean 3br/2ba all electric in
the 5 Points area No pets.
1st month & deposit.
Call 386-961-1482 for info.
Move In Special 2br MH. Low
SD moves you in. Water & mow-
ing included. No Pets.No washers.
Call for an Appt. 386-755-5488
Quiet Setting w/lots of oaks
2br/lba from $450 & 3br/2ba from
$550. Includes water & sewer. No
Pets! 386-961-0017
SOUTH 41 2br/lba. Washer/
Dryer. Satallite TV incl. Pets ok on
approval. $550. mo + dep.
386-758-2408 Avail. June 1st
SWMH 1.5BR/IBA. Washer/
Dryer. In country on 2 acres. Off
of SR 47. $450. mo + deposit.
386-961-9990 before 9pm.

640 iMobile Homes
640 for Sale
$148. A MONTH
for only 8 yrs w/$4K down. Newly
remodeled 14 wide 2br/2ba. New
Carpet, appliances, Del. & Set up.
Owner Finance available. Call
Gary Hamilton @ 386-963-4000
2004 Cavalier Manuf. Home- LG
2200 sf 4br/3ba, eatin kitchen
w/island, f-place, laundry rm. Like
new cond. 2 attached decks. Pd
$85K new. Sacrifice for $50,000.
Mothers passing forces sale. Must
be moved! Bids to move between
$5-$8000. Must see it to appreciate
386-438-0285 to set up a viewing
and walk through

Mobile Home
650 & Land
1800sf Manufactured Home.
4br/2ba plus retreat/office, 2
porches, walks. Concrete founda-
tion, appliances. Plywood w/ce-
ramic floors, metal roof. 5 ac., cor-
ner lot (treed) Horses OK, Gary
Hamilton (386)256-6379. Possible
Owner Finance (Lake City)

710 \ Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423

04539328
!! 5 COMPLEXES !!
IBR from $500
2 BR from $525
*FREE CABLE*
*2 POOLS*
ONE GATED
Washer/Dryer Hookups
386-754-1800

14539356
30th Anniversary Celebration
Windsong Apts
Our Gift to You
$300.00 off and Employee Pricing
(386) 758-8455

2BR/2BA DUPLEX
on McFarlane.
Rent $625. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
2br/2ba w/garage on the
West,side
1st, last &security.
Call 386-755-6867


710 nfurnished Apt. 805 Lots for Sale
JU For Rent8 5 LtsfrSf


Great location W of I-75, spacious
deluxe 213R aps , garage. W/D
hook up. patio $600 & up, + SD,
386 965-0276 or 466-7392

Studios & IBr's from $140/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-514-2950(
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 + sec. Also. Ibr for
$425.mo. Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric.
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73O Unfurnished
/730 Home For Rent
3BR/2BA Nice & Clean
$800. mo 1 st and last NO pets
6 miles to town
386-752-1677

3br/2ba Southwood Estates
off 47S. $950. with security.
Credit check.
386-758-3166
4br/2Ba Brick Home, Lrg Kitchen,
Frig, Dishwasher & W/D included,
Lrg yard, Quiet area. $1,000
575-749-6117/575-763-5336
Branford Area. Completely reno-
vated. 2br/lba Mobile home $400
sec. $550 mo. Conveniently locat-
ed. 386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
Lg 3BR/2BA on 1.3 ac. on the
Westside., Water, trash
& lawn maint.included. $875. mo
plus security. 386-719-9702
NICE 3br/2ba Home. Close to
LCCC. Rent $825. mo. Security
Dep. $750. Application required.
Call 386-963-4974

Owner Financing, 3/2 MH on 2.5
beautiful acres. S. of Lake City
Hard road frontage. Sm. Down
$875 mo. 386-590-0642/ 867-1833
Rent to Own 3/1 ba. All appl.
incl. On 2 city lots. $650 mo. 1st,
last, sec. Located off Baya Ave.
352-225-1641 or 352-493-5252
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3Br,
I +Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

74A Furnished
4I Homes for Rent
Branford Area. Share home.
$400. mo $400. dep. 1/2 utilities.
Lots of other benefits.
Please call (352)221-5858

750 Business &
Office Rentals
Office Building, Convenient
location w/6 offices, Conference
Room, kitchen, ample parking.
Partially furnished. $2,500 mo.
For appointment 386-754-9293

Office Space located Across
from the Mall on Hwy 90.
$450/mo. plus tax.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
Space available at Country Club
Plaza East Baya Ave. 2000 sq ft.
2 restrooms, new carpet. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622

770 Condos For Rent
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

790 Vacation Rentals

Scalloping in.Horseshoe Beach
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg
waterfront porch, dock, fish sink.
Avail wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633


1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$256/mo. $24,900. 352-215-1018

Owner Financing Ft. White 5ac.
$59,995. $995 dn. $428.82 mo.
Paved Rd. Wooded, Homes only
vargasrealtv.com (352)472-3154
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians,-pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
$115,000 3B/2BA
Den or 4th bedroom.
Cypress Landing
386-466-7168

FSBO, Lulu area, 3br/2.5ba home
2 story, built in 2003. Fenced, �
40 x 48 barn, located on 5+ ac.
$224K 386-623-5820

820 Farms&
Acreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com


Classified Department: 755-5440


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If yourvehicle does not sell
within those, 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line' classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


.I ; .

2001 Chrysler
Sebring Convertible
LXI, fully loaded. 32,000
miles.
$4,500
Call
386-752-8157 or
386-397-6717


2000 Ford Crown
Victoria
Silver, cloth seats, all
power, loaded, runs &
looks great, must sacrifice.
$3,500
Call
386-496-0780
Leave message


For Moe Detals Cal


ARE YOU OUR MISSING PIECE?
r,


Comfnlortable.
work


J - C rl
.. Career.
.... Opportunities


Apply Online or In Person!


SITEL


jYour skills
and
positive attitude


1152 SW Business Point Dr
Lake City, FL 32025
386.754.8562
www.sitel.com EOE


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.





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eatez �e 386.755.5445


* The Lake City Reporterl
is looking for a dynamic and capable sales
professional to sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and online products.
* We need a person with the ability to make
strong presentations.

Professionalism, being active in the field and closing sales
are three key attributes for which we are looking. We offer
a salary and a strong commission plan, along with a good
benefits package. If you have a strong desire to succeed and
the skills to back it up, we want to hear from you.

S Please email1 your resume to: Lynda Strickland. marketing director,.
Sat lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055.
- NO PHONE CALLS -


820 Farms &
SAcreage

Owner Financing 8 ac. mol
fenced, 40X90 barn, horsq stalls,
Pasture and well. Lg metal shed on
concrete slab. Sm. down $600 .mo
386-590-0642 or 867-1833

Reduced FSBO 10 ac. Horses &
more. 5 stall stable. Pastures,
board fenced, tool shed. 32'X75'.
4brManuf. Hm w/carport & deck.
$190,000. FIRM. 386-965-3357
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

930 Motorcycles

2002 Suzuki Bandit 1200
Excellent cond. Adult driven.
Kerker header. Very fast. Low
miles. $2,800 obo. 386-867-6947

940 Trucks

1986 FORD F-250 Diesel
4 wheel drive. Excellent condition.
Call Hafners
386-755-6481


950 Cars for Sale

2000 Ford Crown Victoria. Silver,
cloth seats, all power, loaded. "
Runs & looks Great. Must sacri-
fice. $3500. 386-496-0780 Iv msg
2001 Chrysler Sebring
Convertible LXI Fully Loaded
32,000 miles. $4,500.00
386-752-8157 or 386-397-6717


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.

Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


ImA


i-Ai

pH~l~J

,STATION


Residential, Commercial I
& New Construction I I
Free Plumbing Home Inspection / U2
with every Service Call! OFF
Discounts to AARP and Veterans I I
Voted Best of the Best Any Service
(386) 752-6306
FC 3* Back Flow #05-08-8053 Cannot be combined with any other
CFC 1427643 Back Flow #T05-08-8053 cuns or discounts.
M -J LL-A .


Rountree
,I TOYOTA
| - -"- . , S-
: :'*W US"-T ' 9g
( -*** ) ;.+-;*** : *


Rotate &
Balance
Tires
Most cars & trucks
Plus tax & supplies
Not valid with any other offer


Quality Senrvice at Competitive Prices!
SAutoDetailing
Carpet Cleanin,
Floor Waxing
Vii u, ,h, , p, i ,f , ip eci'ai,, ,,, ,, Grout Cleaning


NOW OPEN!
Daily Lunch Specials
All regular and Biggie Subs
Under $500
Delivery Available


Hours Monday - Saturday 10am-9pm
Sunday 11lam-7pm
(386) 752-7949 � 3525 Bascom Norris
(Across from Wal-Mart in the old Quiznos location)


-- . lip To . Oulr, to Oili

ROUNTREE MOORE S
I


DEALERSHIP, ROUNTREE MOORE
\'\ ' !---- ----


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayet@lakectyreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, May 16, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Cool

annuals,

warm

annuals
We are so
fortunate
to be living
in North
Florida
where we can grow
colorful annuals nearly all
year long. If you have
flower beds, have you
noticed that you spend
plenty of time during the
year planning, shopping,
and planting those
annuals? That's because we
are changing our flowers
out as our Florida weather
changes.
In terms of flowers, we
have three very different
growing situations. In
winter, there are cool days
with occasional frosts or
freezes at night. In the
summer we have hot days
and warm nights, frequent
rain showers, and high
humidity. During the fall
and spring, the days are
warm, the nights are cool-
er, and the average pre-
cipitation is lower. When
referring to annuals, the
saying "'Right Plant, Right
Place" should also include
"Right Time."
Thebeautiful annual
flowers that are the life of
the landscapes and back-
yard gardens right now are
the "cool" season flowers.
They have had a great
growing season this year
because the nights have
been so cool, just the way
they like it. Some of these
garden jewels include the
pansy, viola, sweet William,
petunia, snapdragon,
larkspur and sweet alys-
sum. Trim back the spent
blooms if they have slowed
down and you should get
another flush of blooms
before the heat finishes
them.
Flowers that can stand
up to the heat of our sum-
mers are called "warm"
season annuals. Many can
tolerate dry spells and
poor, sandy soil. Many will
be colorful all summer if
placed where they can have
a little shade from the hot
afternoon sun. And some
just like it hot Those that
like that full strength hot
sun include the marigold,
zinnia, amaranthus, straw-
flower, melampodium and
celosia. Find a full list of
cool and warm season
annuals for Florida at
http://solutionsforyourlife.
cornm.
Even if you plant at
the right time of year,
pay attention to the other
requirements or your plant
won't live long. Plant tags
often indicate the require-
ments of a plant. Group
plants together that like
moist soil. Make a group-
ing of plants that don't like
fertilizer. Combine plants
that have similar needs and
they'll all perform better.
Take time to plan ahead for
"Right Plant, Right Place,
Right Time."

* Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and


Agricultural Sciences.


natural' Florida.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jim Flegert, owner of Falling Creek Nursery, checks on the status of various native plants in his greenhouse, including columbine, fennel, milkweed, cardinal
flowers and climbing aster plants. Flegert is also a member of the Gainesville chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society. 'I think it's good for people to use
native plants because it gives them an opportunity to landscape without the use of so much fertilizer and water,' he said. 'They're used to being in this ,
climate.'


New organization

focuses on state's

native landscapes,

plant communities


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Interested in learn-
ing about Florida's
native plants and
how to protect the
state's landscape?
A state conservation
organization - the Florida
Native Plant Society - will
be starting a new chapter
in Lake City.
The chapter's inaugu-
ral meeting will be held
Tuesday.
FNPI is an organization
dedicated to "conservation,.
preservation and restora-
tion of native plants and
native plant communities
of Florida," said Karina
Veaudry, society executive
director.
Members of the new
chapter would be involved
in field trips, community
programs for conservation
and preservation, socials
with "native edibles" such
as acorn bread or elderber-
ry wine, and monthly meet-
ings that include education
on native plants, landscape
design and guest speakers,
Veaudry said.
'We have a good time
when we do our monthly
meetings," she said. 'We
make-it fun."
Veaudry said there are
"wow points" of being
involved with the society,
like how Florida wildlife
is sustained by the land-
scape's native plants.
"A lot of the general pub-
lic does not understand the
concept that when we do
development and growth
in Florida and we don't put
back some of the native
plants that were once
there, we're basically starv-
ing the native birds, butter-
flies and wildlife that has*
co-evolved with the native
plants," she said. "We need
to put native plants back
in our communities to pro-
vide the food and nesting


sources that our wildlife is
looking for."
Veaudry said this is just
an example of the type of
information society mem-
bers can learn about
FNPS currently has
3,000 members and almost
35 chapters throughout
Florida, Veaudry said. The
society is represented from
the Keys to the western
Panhandle "and every-
where in between," she
said.
Veaudry said FNPS
wanted to bring a chapter
specifically to Lake City.
'"The reason why we
chose Lake City to try
-this is because we already
know there is a huge inter-
est in native plants," she
said. "We're hoping to ful-
fill that need there."
. The first meeting of
the new chapter will be
at 6:30 p.m. at the main
branch of the Columbia
County Public Library.
Information on becoming
a member will be available
at the meeting, Veaudry
said.
By joining the chap-
ter and thus the society,
Veaudry said members
will be actively involved in
maintaining Florida's native
landscape.
"By joining the society,
you can be a part of an
organization that proac-
tively seeks out conserva-
tion in Florida," she said.
"If you're interested in pre-
serving native ecosystems
and balancing preservation
in Florida, you will be a
part of a larger organiza-
tion that pursues that in
Florida.
"Now that we have a
chapter in Lake City,"
Veaudry said, "we'll be able
to be proactive in conserva-
tion and preservation in
Lake City."
For questions, contact
Veaudry at (321) 388-4781.
Visit www.fnps.org.


JA UnO M I IInE LW WALKEI.ILP - '.i'y ', :.r':i
(ABOVE) Flegert waters natural Florida salvia plants while in his garden. It is easier to
maintain a garden with native plants because they do not require as much attention as foreign
plants and could lead to less fertilizer contamination seeping into the area's water supply.
(BELOW) A milkweed is another domestic plant that also acts as a host plant for butterflies. In
fact, most of the plants that he sells in his nursery have been known to attract hummingbirds
and butterflies, beautifying many gardens.








LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


Dual enrollment deal for high school students


The deal is this:
the state of
Florida will
pay for college
classes and
instructional materials if
you are an eligible high
school student All quali-
fied high school students
have the opportunity to ful-
fill high school graduation
requirements while gain-
ing credit toward a cer-
tificate, diploma or college
degree program. Lake City
Community College's Dual
Enrollment/Early College
Program provides a cost-
free means for high achiev-
ing students to have access
to expanded course options
beyond high school.
Lake City Community'
College offers the Dual
Enrollment, Program to
. public, private and home
education high school stu-
,dents. To enter an academ-
ic or vocational program,
a student must reside in
the five-county district
served by LCCC - Baker,
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
or Union counties - be
enrolled in grades 10-12
and be at least 15 years
old. Students cannot par-
ticipate beyond age 19.
Students on the academ-
ic track must have at least
a 3.0 Grade Point Average
and test into college-level
coursework by-taking
the CPT, ACT, or SAT.
Students on a vocational
track must have at least a
2.0 GPA and test.into col-
lege-level coursework by
taking either the College


Linda Williams
LCCC dual enrollment coordinator

Placement Test or the Test
of Adult Basic Education.
Both tests can adminis-
tered on our campus.
Before a student enrolls
into the program, both the
parent and the guidance
counselors evaluate the
readiness of each student.
This includes academic
preparation, emotional/
social maturity and the
ability to study and learn
independently. We want
our students to be success-
ful, so dual enrollment will
not be the best option for
any high school student
who is not ready in all of
the above areas.
It is important to know
that all LCCC professors
who are teaching dual
enrollment courses have
college level teaching
credentials - holding a
master's degree, with at
least 18 graduate hours
in the subject field they
teach. Courses are taught
on our college campus, our
campus centers, and at dis-
trict high schools during
school hours, after school
hours and during summer
terms. All dual enroll-
ment courses use identical
course content, and may


be taught in traditional
classrooms, delivered via
distance learning (video
or television) or taught via
the Internet. High school
students and college stu-
dents are enrolled in the
courses together, where
they receive college credit
immediately upon passing
the college semester cours-
es with a "C" or better.
Dual enrollment differs
from other accelerated
mechanisms in that stu-
dents are enrolled in actual
postsecondary courses,
and they receive college
credit for the success-
ful completion of those
courses. In contrast, col-
lege credit is only awarded
for Advanced Placement
courses taught at the high
schools if the students
meet a designated score
on a standardized state
examination at the end of a
year-long course.
Statistical studies have
confirmed the rigor and
quality of the dual enroll-
ment program in preparing
high school students for
success. Can you believe
that one-third of the mem-
bers in our LCCC Xi Phi
Chapter of the Phi Theta
Kappa International Honor
Society are high school
dual enrollment students?
Data confirms dual enroll-
ment students earn higher
grades than non-dual
enrollment students, and
once in a university, they
continue to earn similar'
grades. We are fortunate
to have a statewide course


numbering system in
Florida which allows for
classes taken at LCCC
to transfer to any Florida
public college or university,
as well as transfer to most
private colleges and univer-
sities.
The dual enrollment
program serves more
than 35,000 high school
students in Florida each
year. Lake City Community
College exhibited the
largest growth with a 4.1
percent increase in stu-
dent participation during
2007-2008. There are now
more than 600 district high
school students in our pro-
gram, and of that number,
34 students will graduate
with a college degree,
diploma, or certificate by
the time they graduate
from high school this year.
What a cost savings to
parents!
Remember, specific
criteria must be met by
high school students in
order to be eligible for
this program and there
are firm application and
registration deadlines.
Summer registration con-
tinues through June 21
for Summer B semester, ,
with classes to begin on
June 30. Fall semester reg-
istration' is running now
through Aug. 20. Classes
begin on Aug. 23. The
Dual Enrollment office is
located on the LCCC main
campus.
Contact Williams, at wil-
liamsl@lakecitycc.edu by.
calling (386) 754-4443.


Camps step up with better training on bullying


John Knight spends time with his rescued dog Liesl, a 3-year-
old female, at his home in Dallas, on May 7.


Shelter or store?

Most Americans

opt for pet adoption


By SUE MANNING
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES-
Remember that old song,
"How much is that doggie
in the window?" For most
Americans, it seems it's no
sale.
More than half of people
in an Associated Press-
Petside.com poll said they
would get their next dog or
cat from a shelter, nearly
seven times the number
who said they would buy
their next pet from a store.
And more than four in 10
said they thought store pets
could have hidden medical
or psychological problems.
That's significantly more
than those who expressed
the same concerns about
pets from animal shelters or
breeders.
"I believe they overbreed
the pets. I believe they


couldn't care less about
the pets, they're really in it
for the money. I think you
are more likely to get a pet
at a pet store that is ill or
has problems," said Sandra
Toro, 62, of Colton, Calif.
Just 8 percent of those
polled said they would get
their next cat or dog at a
store, while 13 percent said
that's where they got the
pet they have now. Fifty-
four percent of those polled
said they would probably
get their next pet from a
shelter, while 23 percent
went for a breeder.
Toro, who has a 14-year-
old rescue terrier mix
named Dancer, said she
doesn't understand how
anyone can buy a pet from
a store or a breeder.
"There are so many won-
derful pets out there that
will be euthanized," she
said.


By LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press
At 16, Kayla Robbins
\vill soon head off for her
ninth summer at sleepaway
camp, not far from home in
Concord, N.H. This year,
she'll spend much of her
time as a junior.staffer and
i.-ookirtg'Ti~ardito help-
ing little kids learn to swim.
. Camp, she said, has
always been a welcome
break, "It's like going on
vacation from all the bad
drama stuff at school."
;..But for other kids,
'"drama" may not be so far
behind. Summer camps
inust contend with a prob-
lem that has long bedeviled
schools: bullying.
About 10 million kids
will attend day or over-
night camp this summer
After the final clang of the
school bell, facing new
peer groups and settings
that can invite conflict In
the shower house, when


campers are vulnerable, or
at lights out, when coun-
selors might be outside of
earshot, bullying does arise
despite generally improved
adult-to-kid ratios and better
monitoring of unsupervised
moments, when savvy bul-
lies are apt to strike.
In Newton, Mass.,
Felicia Falchuk's 9-year-old
daughter will soon begin
her second summer of
sleepaway camp in a dif-
ferent New Hampshire
program. When she and
her husband picked it, they
were looking for a zero-
tolerance policy "for not
being nice."
"At school, a teacher
or someone on the play-
ground only has so much
time and so much ability
to deal with it," she said,
recalling one camper
she saw when she and
her husband toured the
camp wearing a T-shirt
emblazoned with: "Camp
Evergreen, where being


a good friend is the most
important thing."
That, Falchuk said, "ulti-
mately is what camp's all
about Learning to live with
other kids, respect and
acceptance, independence
and resilience. At school, a
teacher only has so much
time and so much ability to
deal with it"
According to a
2009 American Camp
Association survey, 54 per-
cent of responding camps
said problem behaviors
overall were one of the
important issues they
handled in the prior three
years. In 2007, 52 percent
responded that way.
Years ago, camp direc-
tors and their counselors
might not have been so
quick to acknowledge
such problems. Now,
many camps hire anti-bully
experts to help out.
Renee Flax has spoken to
thousands of New York-area
parents as a camp place-


ment adviser for the associ-
ation that offers parents the
comfort of accreditation.
She wishes more would
take care when choosing a
camp for their kids.
Rarely, she said, "does
the conversation of bully-
ing come up" when parents
seek her advice.
"When people are look-
ing for a camp, they tend to
be much more focused on.
activities. I actually push
them in the direction of
what the camp community
is all about," Flax said.
"You have a camp director
who's making a policy deci-
sion. This is their domain.
This isn't public school.
You're picking something
that has a philosophy that
is directing everything that
they're doing."
If a child is being picked
on or bullied in "most
aspects of their life, then
something is going on a
camp director should know
about," she said.


�', ' 1 ,

I i "


( / 1 /0,^ Call Mary TODAY to

rTo our ,onderlI place a surprise ad
parents: for someone you love!

S tremendous 755-5440or

year 755-5441
Love between 8:00am & 5 00pm
ou Children


New York public garden features

poet Dickinson's favorite flowers


By JIM FITZGERALD
Associated Press
NEW YORK - They're
growing dandelions at
the New York Botanical
Garden. On purpose.
The Edenic estate in
the Bronx has mounted
an exhibition. called "The
Poetry of Flowers." It
focuses on the 19th-cen-
'tury poet Emily Dickinson,
whose verse and letters
described blossoms of all
kinds and who was better
known, when she lived, as
a gardener than as a poet.
It's a wide-ranging,
indoor and outdoor spring-
time show, incorporating
a breathtaking display of
flowering plants in the
Enid A. Hatipt conserva-
tory, a collection of 60
Dickinson-related artifacts
in a gallery and dozens
of outdoor stations that
highlight her poems in the
midst of the .flowers she
celebrated.
The Poetry Society of
America, which turns 100
this year, is a co-presenter.
The flower garden
installed in the giant
glass conservatory is
. designed to resemble the
grounds of Dickinson's
home in Amherst, Mass.,


ASSuCIAI TU P
This undated photo provided by The New York Botanical
Garden shows the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory decorated
to re-create a 19th century New England flower garden
and Dickinson's Homestead in Amherst at The New York
Botanical Garden in the Bronx borough of New York.


by including the flowers
she favored, based on her
poems and letters.
"We don't know exactly
what her garden looked
like but we know lots and
lots of the plants she had,"
said Francisca Coelho,
who's in charge of the con-
servatory. "And there were
plenty of ideas in what she
wrote."
Describing a red tulip's
emergence from its under-
ground bulb, Dickinson
wrote:
"She slept beneath a tree


Remembered but by me.
I touched her Cradle
mute -
She recognized the foot

Put on her Carmine suit
And see!"
The display includes
windowed facades meant to
look like Dickinson's own
home and her brother's
next door, and there's a
representation of the poet's
bedroom with a window
providing a view like the
one she had.


Sto b teLakeCiy eprerfo yu

copietr0nggmn akg


" Wdrds Jwer&Git


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, MAY 16, 2010


DEAR ABBY


Wife sinks husband's teeth


into zealous housecleaning


DEAR ABBY: The other
day my wife of 45 years was
cleaning our bathroom and
I popped in to ask her a
question. I saw her remove
my denture brush from the
cup and begin cleaning the
cracks and crevices of the
bathroom with it
When she realized I was
watching her, she said,
"Obps, busted! Oh, well, it's
not like you put it in your
mouth." She also admitted it
wasn't the first time. Do you
think I should be concerned?
- BRUSHED OFF IN
WISCONSIN
DEAR BRUSHED OFF:
You absolutely should be
concerned. Although the
denture brush doesn't go
into your mouth, it does have
contact with the appliances
that do. Your wife's behavior
could be a sign of ignorance
or bad judgment, but it could
also be a sign of senility. This
should be reported to your
doctor, who should explain
to your wife how ill-advised
this practice is - or give her
a diagnosis.
DEAR ABBY: Two years
ago, after much search-
ing, I found the love of my
life, "Laura," and we were
married. Most of our time
together is harmonious; the
remainder is volatile.
Laura is insanely jealous
of practically everything I do.
The most recent episode was
over a junk e-mail she had
seen in my inbox. She asked


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobbycom
me about it as we were going
to bed, and I told her I had
no idea what it was. The next
day she asked me to look for
it. I did, but I couldn't find
it. Laura then accused me of
hiding and deleting it. Well,
I always delete the Spamm" e-
mail I receive.
Laura had a horrible first
marriage and was wronged
in the divorce. She keeps
telling me it isn't the reason
for her suspicions, but it's
hard to believe that doesn't
play a part. These arguments
are horrible and are caus-
ing trouble in our marriage.
I am open and honest with
her, and I truly want to be
with her for the rest of my
life. But her doubts, fears
and mistrust are driving
me crazy. What do I do?
- UNDER CONSTANT
ATTACK IN TEMPE,
ARIZ.
DEARi UNDER
ATTACK: If you want your
marriage to survive, tell
Laura that although you love
her, you will no longer toler-
ate her inability to trust you...
and the volatile scenes her
insecurity has caused.


Whatever is driving her
paranoia, she needs to work
it through with a licensed
mental health professional.
Because she may be resis-
tant to the idea, start by
insisting you both see a mar-
riage counselor. That person
can be an ally in guiding her
into the counseling she seri-
ously needs. I wish you luck,
because I suspect her issues
go back farther than her first
marriage.
DEAR ABBY: With the
push in stores to buy their
reusable shopping bags, I
was wondering what the rule
is about bringing bags from
different stores. Is it rude
if I use bags I purchased
from somewhere else?
- SHOPPING GREEN IN
BLOOMFIELD, N.M.
DEAR SHOPPING
GREEN: Not at all. Stores
are in the business of sell-
ing merchandise, and if they
can bring in money and at
the same time promote their
brand by selling bags with
their logo, that's a double
bang for their buck. But'
please don't feel obligated
to use store-brand shopping
bags in every establishment
you patronize - or you'll
wind up owning more than
you can reasonably use. And
that's not budget-wise or
"green" either.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.QearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): 'ult a little
pizzazz back into your life.
Take on a physical chal-
lenge tiat will test yotIu
endurance and motivate
you. Romance is high-
lighted but don't neglect to
spend quality time with the
one you love or you may
be faced with a disgruntled
partner. ****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Someone from your
past may want to inch back
into your world but only to
meddle and cause you grief.
Prepare to say no and then
put your focus on someone
you truly want to be with.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You may be faced with
some emotional situations
if you haven't cleared up
past relationships. Giving
someone a false impression
or offering to do more for
someone than you are capa-
ble of doing will be a costly
mistake. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You may get backed
into a corner but that
doesn't mean you should lie
or keep secrets. Be upfront
in order to end old condi-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
tions and start anew. A posi-
tive change is heading your
way. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You have to find out
information first hand so
your plans are based on
solid evidence. Taking any-
one or anything for granted
will result in criticism and
a heated discussion. Listen
to the voice of experience.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You've got a lot, on
your plate and must con-
centrate on what needs to
be done. Expect someone
who isn't keen on your
recent choices to create an
emotional conflict that slows
you down. Put your creative
imagination to work. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Schedule and organize
your plans and time wisely.
An error will leave you at
a loss and may cause you
some emotional problems
with someone you care
about. Don't take anyone for
granted or you will pay the
price. **.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
Dy LUIS Campos
Celebrity Ciplier cryptogranis are crated from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another
Today's clue: U equals P
" JRX MLG X JZ K JOG VLGR MLG HACE
MN HGOJAR MAFLM AR J SWX VJC
ONHG U JARYWP MLJR MLG HACE AM
MNNE MN SPNCCNO." - JRJAC RAR
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "No man is entitled to the blessings of freedom unless
he be vigilant in its preservation." - Gen. Douglas MacArthur
(c) 2010byNEA, Inc. 5-17


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Let your creativ-
ity lead the way. A project
could turn into a money-
maker. Positive changes at
home will make your place
more conducive to produc-
tivity. Don't let someone's
disapproval slow you down.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): The best way
to accomplish your goals is
to do it yourself. It's always
nice to get help but those
closest to you will only slow
you down. A lover will play
with your emotions if you
are neglectful. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Do things
with family and focus on
ways to help the ones you
love accomplish their goals.
Your insight, determination
and strong family ties will
ensure greater support and
progress lies ahead. Love,
money and security are in
the stars. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Love is in the
stars and emotional matters
will rise to the top, giving you
reason to make some inter-
esting, life-altering moves. A
creative plan can be put into
play. A moneymaking project
will bring in positive resourc-
es. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Look and
listen before you make a
promise that is unfair to
you. Additional responsi-
bilities may sound doable
but, in the end, you will be
faced with impossible tasks.
Think matters through
before you give your word.
**


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


MS. CONCEPTIONS By Elizabeth C. Gorski / Edited by Will Shortz ,234-o[7Uo l12,3 16.,1 17 118 1

WHEN THIS PUZZLE IS DONE, A BONUS MESSAGE WILL APPEAR IN THE CIRCLED BOXES READING FROM TOP TO BOTfOM. 9 / .20 [2'" 1 122


Across
1 New _, N.Y.
6 W.W. II beachhead
south of Rome
11 "Amen!"
15 Battle of
Normandy site
19 Japanese
porcelain
20 Washington zoo
attraction
22 Squares for
breakfast
23 Programming
tool created by
Grace Hopper
(1906-92)
26 In that capacity
27 Stimpy's pal-
28 World
29 Item of apparel
created by Mary
Phelps Jacob
(1891-1970)
36 Kissers
39 River of St.
Petersburg
40 Mexican wrap
41 Active Japanese
volcano
42 Pet food brand
44 Like this
50'Medical
discovery of
Gertrude Elion
(1918-99)
56 Having no talent
for
57 Rocky's love
58 It's south of Eur.
59 Songlike
60 Really prospered
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554. ,


64 Woodworking
tool created by
Tabitha Babbitt
(1784-1853)
68 Block
70 2008 Wimbledon
champ
71 Office item
created by Bette
Nesmith Graham
(1924-80)
77 Practice game
83 Chaperons,
typically
84 ___ king
86 Singer Kitt
87 Actress T6a
88 Driving
convenience
created by Mary
Anderson (1866-
1953)'
94 Slightly faster
than moderately
slow
96 Ramblers and
Hornets
97 Cape ___
98 Like some
companies' day
care facilities
101 Pike, e.g.
103 Music and
dance, e.g.
104 Rock group
whose name is
an appropriate
alternative title
for this puzzle
111 Fly
112 Money machine
CO.
113 First family
starting in 2009
117 Food formula
created by Ruth
Wakefield
(1903-77)


124 Lunar effect
125 Entry-level
carpentry jobs'?
126 Proctor ___
(small appliance
brand)
127 Shangri-la
128 Twists the truih
129 Act badly?
.130 Journal jotting

Down
1 Common type
2 Old Testament
prophet
3 Bell ___
4 Whitlings, e.g.
5 Zippo
6 Before now
7 Pilfer, old-style
'8 Microwave
9 Accustom
10 Frolickers by a
stream
11 Yevtushenko's
"Babi ___"
12 Copy ctr. blowup
13 Lead role in "The
Piano"
14 Telephone part
15 "Pardon me,
- Arturo ..."
16 Banquo, e.g.
17 "La Grande
Parade" artist
Fernand
18 Yellow-and-white
flower
21 Tubular pasta
24 Julie of "The
Early Show"
25 Joe and Jane
30 "Golda's
Balcony" subject
31 Roundish


32 Agatha Christie
title
33 Sombrero part
34 Eastern princess
35 Where
Polynesian
Airlines is based
36 ___ Speaker
37 F.D.A. guideline
38 Primitive
percussion
instrument
43-"Don Giovanni"
aria "Dalla
pace
45 Start of a spell
46 Home in the
woods
47 Bride and groom
exchange
48 Jorge's house
49 Crock pot dinner
51 Donate, to Burns
52 LAX watchdog
53 Popping pills
54 Letters ont a
bucket
55 Celtic land
59 On the same side
61 Little rascal
62 Court grp.
63 Beer source
65 Dorm V.I.P.'s
66 Public health
agcy.
67 Former Mideast
inits.
69 Interpret
71 Refrain syllables
72 Esquire in
"Henry VI, Part
2"
73 "Eris isum"
("You will be
what I am")
74 Forearm part


75 "Put '
writing!" ,
76 Literary inits.
78 Gaping mouth
79 Brief look
inside e?
80 Stock phrase.
81 War of 1812
treaty site
82 Takes in
85 "Brilliant!"
88 First parl of a
r record


89 Preceder of many
words'?
90 "There-ls ___..."
(song by the
Cure)
91 Hungarian patriot
Nagy
92 Coll. major
93 Future atty.'s
challenge
95 Removed with
force
99 Add a hint of
color to


100 Make secret
102 Midnight Poison
maker
103 Relief pitcher?
104 Having a dull
surface
105 Egglike
106 What appears
above a pifiata?
107 Rock's Van _
108 Land in East
58-Across: Abbr.
109 Drag race sound


110 Like many a
sumo wrestler
114 Jazz.
vibraphonist
Jackson
115 Impressionist
116 Like a hottie
118 Swiss canton
119 Have a good cry
120 Nav. rank
121 "Koochie-__!"
122 Subway line to
Columbia U.
123 Needle point?


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
D I N GIS M|U GM UNCUT T AC H E S
ER 0 0 CA P~N CURSE SH RT
C O NTRIAV I OLAT I 0 N S A M 0 A
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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


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SPOTLIGHT


Sunday, May 16, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Latifah wrong in 'Just Wright'


By CHRISTY LEMIRE
AP.Movie Critic
It's clear we're in fan-
tasyland early on in "Just
Wright," when the New
Jersey Nets play their
home opener in front of a
sold-out, raucous crowd on
their way to winning the
Eastern Conference cham-
pionship.
And the whole world -
not just the sports media
but also the trashy gossip
magazines - is fascinated
by the team's star player,
Scott McKnight, chasing
him around to find out who
he's dating and speculating
about what he'll do once
his contract is up at the
end of the season.
As fantasies go, though,
this is a superfamiliar


.one - it's the Cinderella
fairy tale, set in the bas-
ketball world - and
director Sanaa Hamri and
writer Michael Elliot don't
breathe much new life
into it. Pity, too, because
Hamri made a surpris-
ingly refreshing romantic
comedy, "Something New,"
just a few years ago. "Just
Wright," on the other hand,
is full of cliches, contriv-
ances and stock characters.
And a bland performance
from producer and star
Queen Latifah does noth-
ing to elevate the material.
Ordinarily a bold and
engaging personality,
Latifah plays it safe and
sweet as physical therapist
Leslie Wright, who's in
her mid-30s but has never
fallen in love because men


always perceive her as
more of a pal. Not only is
Leslie a hugely knowledge-
able basketball fan, she
also likes wearing team
jerseys when she goes to
Nets games, even though
her mother (Pam Grier)
and her stylish childhood
friend, Morgan (Paula
Patton), insist she should
dress up to bag a man or
- better yet - a player.
Of course this is meant
as a source of comedy, the
contrast of their shallow-
ness and her substance,
but it's still an uncomfort-
ably archaic depiction
of feminine logic. It also
demonstrates how overly
simplistic the script is:
There is no gray area
when it comes to these
characters.


In this video game image released by Capcom, a scene is shown from, 'Lost Planet 2.'


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this film publicity image released by Fox Searchlight Films, Paula Patton (from left), Queen
Latifah, and Common are shown in a scene from, 'Just Wright.'


'Lost Planet 2' bigger, not better


By LOU KESTEN
Associated Press
Video-game publishers
seem bent on changing the
perception of the hobby
as a solitary pursuit. Over
the past few years we've
seen a flood of games that
are meant to be enjoyed by
two or more players, either
online or on the same
couch, working together
toward the same goals.
Sometimes teaming up
makes sense, as in the
mercenary adventure
"Army of Two" or the
zombie thriller "Left 4
Dead." But in other games,
like the revenge drama
"Splinter Cell: Conviction"
or the horror epic
"Resident Evil 5," coopera-
tive play feels tacked-on


and absurd.
Many gamers, for
example, found the sec-
ond playable character in
"Resident Evil 5" more irri-
tating than helpful. But pub-
lisher Capcom was pleased
enough that it has turned
.,Lost Planet," another prom-
ising franchise, into a purely
multiplayer experience.
It's a puzzling decision
that's likely to alienate far
more fans than it attracts,
and it makes "Lost Planet
2" (for the Xbox 360,
PlayStation 3, $59.99) one
of this year's most disap-
pointing releases.
Capcom's Website boasts
a "deep single-player
mode," but don't believe
it; if you play "Lost Planet
2" alone you will find it
uncommonly frustrating.


The'uninviting design
takes over even before you
start the game. To launch a
solo game, you have to cre-
ate a lobby (as you would
in an online match) and
then fill out your team with
computer-controlled play-
ers. Once you're fighting,
you'll be amazed at how
stupid the artificial intel-
ligence is, with teammates
often doing nothing at all
to help out.
So you need three other
humans, but even then
Capcom seems to have
gone out of its way to suck
all the fun out of co-op play.
You can't jump into the
middle of a mission. If you
want to play a later mission
but your friends haven't
made it that far yet, forget
it.


- Advertisement -


Gegee's: where it begins with personal


S 9 lhe staff at
*Gegee's
Studio Salon
and Day Spa
would like to
thank the readers of
the Lake City Reporter
for their support in vot-
ing Gegee's as the Best
of the Best Day Spa and
the Best place to get a
massage. We are truly
honored and send a big
thank you to all of our
loyal friends and clients.

At Gegee's Studio,
it really is all about
the client. We strive to
make each visit a relax-
ing experience. Owner
Karen Green first opened
Gegee's Modeling School
and Skin Care in 2000.
She took time off from
2005 to 2007 to start a
family, and then reopened
as Gegee's Studio Salon
and Day Spa. The name
Gegee's comes from
Green's niece. Green's
grandmother tried to get
her great granddaughter
to call her GG for great
grandmother. She did,
but began calling her
aunt Karen GG instead of
her great grandmother!
Gegee then became the
name Green was known
as by all of her nieces
and nephews.

Mrs. Green is a
licensed esthetician
as well as a cosmetolo-
gist and provides all the
skin care and makeup
services at the Studio.
She also will design a
home skin care routine
for her clients to follow.
One of the more popular
services at the Studio is
the microdermabrasion
treatment. "It is the exfo-
liation of the top layer of
skin and removal of dead


skin cells" Green said.

Gegee's has two full
time hairstylists at the
studio, which can help
you look your best.

Shirley deTreville is
a seasoned professional
and has studied under
many of the industry's
leaders in hair color and
design. When you visit
Shirley for your hair ser-
vice, whether it be for
a Keratin Smoothing
Treatment and color, or
just an updated haircut,
you will be glad you sat
in her chair. Her most
recent accomplishment
was to complete tiain-
ing as a Redken Master
Specialist. This training
includes the latest in hair
color techniques and
design.

Tonya Koon has
recently joined the team
at Gegee's. She is a grad-
uate of the Cosmetology
program at Lake City.
Community College. Ms.
Koon brings with her a
contemporary vibe to
hair design and color.
Hair extensions as well
as Keratin Smoothing
Treatment services are
also available. Ms. Koon
will also take care of all
your nail needs with Spa
Manicures and Pedicures
as well!

Ashley Prevatt is a
graduate of Redken's
'The Salon Professional
Academy". Although she
now makes her home
in Georgia, Ms. Prevatt
continues to be a part
of our team. She is avail-
able by appointment for
hair and nail services on
Friday and Saturdays.


Joan Kniseley is the
studio's wonderful mas-
sage therapist. She spe-
cializes in integrative
massage therapy using
Reiki reflexology. You
will feel like a new you
after your massage with
Joan.

Also, Dr. Richard
Sadove, a board certified
plastic surgeon comes to
the studio once a month
by appointment. He spe-
cializes in facial rejuve-
nation.

The staff at Gegee's
i� very passionate about
their profession and
the clients they serve.
They all take pride in


what they do and it real-
ly shows. The moment
you begin your consul-
tation with Mrs. Green
you can sense the pas-
sion and excitement she
has both for her calling
as an esthetician and the
guests she serves.
"I can't imagine having
any other career", Ms.
Green said.
"Every day I wake up
excited about what I do.
How many people can
truly say that", Ms. deT-
reville remarked.
"I love being a part of
an industry that touch-
es people in a way that
makes them look and feel
good about themselves",
added Ms. Koon.


Gegee's offers a full
menu of hair, skin and
nail services. Our newest
service is body sugaring.
This is a form of hair
removal that is much
gentler on the skin than
waxing. We also offer
Spa Days, bridal parties,
special event parties,
and make-up applica-
tions to look your best
for that special occasion.
We pride ourselves in
offering the best in retail
products for the hair
and skin. We now offer
Minardi hair care. This
line was developed by
Beth Minardi, a leading
authority in professional
hair color.


Gegee's is located at
440 E. Duval Street in
Lake City. The phone
number is 386-758-2088.
Business hours are from
9:30 AM until 6:00 PM
Monday thru Friday. We
are also available for eve-
ning hours or Saturday
by appointment. Walk-ins
are welcome but appoint-
ments are preferred to
better serve the client.

We would like to invite
everyone to visit us at
Gegee's and experience
why we say,
"Gegee's Studio
where it begins with per-
sonal."


4D


Joan Kniseley, Karen Green, Tonya Koon, Shirley deTreville and Ashley Prevatt




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