Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






























CCSO: $100,000 stolen


CCSO legal
assistant charged
with grand theft.
From staff reports
An employee with the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office was arrested
Saturday for allegedly steal-
ing more than $100,000
from the department dur-
ing a three-year period.


according
to a CCSO - '
report.
Pamela
M. Foxx,
47, 851
S.E. Myr-
tis Road, Foxx
Lake
City, was
arrested for 1st degree
grand theft at about 4:30
p.m. at her home. Foxx was
taken into custody without


incident, reports state. The
arrest warrant was issued.
by the 3rd Circuit State
Attorney's Office and was
served by CCSO deputies.
Foxx has been employed
with CCSO for 15 years.
She was assigned duty as
a legal assistant beginning
in 2003. According to the
report, Foxx's arrest came
after an investigation into
allegations that she had
misappropriated funds


from CCSO.
According to reports,
an investigation was initi-
ated on April 12 after an
employee noticed discrep-
ancies in a money transfer.
The office of the comptrol-
ler was notified that funds
were unaccounted for,
and Sheriff Mark Hunter
assigned two detectives to
conduct an in-depth audit
of the accounts to which
Foxx had access.


The investigation re-
vealed a pattern of thefts
that had occurred during
a three-year period, begin-
ning in 2007. Those thefts
resulted in Foxx allegedly
misappropriating more
than $100,000, the detec-
tives estimated.
According to reports,
during an interview with
detectives, Foxx admitted
to taking funds to which
she had access and depos-


iting them into'her personal
bank account.
"The charge against
Pamela Foxx is not a reflec-
tion on the employees of the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office," Hunter said. "This
was an isolated incident.
The public can be assured
that their sheriff's office
is staffed by the highest
caliber of people who do
THEFTS continued on 3A


SOUNDS OF


Country music singer Jason Michael Carroll performs at the Suwannee River Jam at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park.
dozen performers and groups highlighting the four-day event.


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ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Kyra Jordan, 5, (left) and Dillon Bass, 3, both of Lake City, take a moment to color while art-
ists perform at the Suwannee River Jam Saturday at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
I ' LIVE OAK-
chance to see
the Zac Brown
band is what
brought April
Bielling of Bell
to her first Suwannee River
Jam this year, and now
she's hooked.
"I plan on coming back
every year until I'm too
old to come," she said.
"I'll have to hang up my
diapers."
The four-day festival
was Wednesday through
Saturday at the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park
in Live Oak. The event fea-
tured several county music
artists including Travis
Tritt, Kansas and Justin
Moore.
"It's been great," Bielling
said. "You can listen to
country music."
Coming to the Suwannee
River Jam has been a relax-


SUCCESS


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Carroll was one of almost two


INSIDE


* Suwannee River Jam
goes head-to-head with
Wanee Festival in revenue
dollars. BUSINESS, IC

ing vacation, said Sherrie
Davis of Jacksonville. This
was her first visit to the
festival, and she made sev-
eral new friends.
"Everybody is so sweet,"
she said. 'These are some
great people."
This year she stayed in
a hotel, but Davis said she
and her new friends are
already making plans to
rent a cabin together next
year at the festival.
"Next year, we're all in
the park," she said.
Dusty Cullum of Lake
City brought eight of his
friends from Louisiana
to their first Suwannee

JAM continued on 3A


Agencies

partner

to feed

hungry


Food, services
given with no
questions asked.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Two agencies partnered
Saturday to provide free
food and services to people
in need.
Catholic Charities and
the Department of Children
and Families sponsored a
one-day community out-
reach event.
Free USDA food was
distributed to an estimated
100 families; said Suzanne
Edwards, Catholic Charities
Lake City Bureau execu-
tive director. To each fam-
ily, the organization gave
about 20 pounds of food
which included canned
goods, bread, frozen meat,
dry milk and cheese.
"We gave a whole lot
today," she said.
Recipients only had to
be from Catholic Charities'
service area - Columbia,
Hamilton, Suwannee and
Union counties - to receive
the aid.-Food was provided
with no questions asked.
"There is so much food
insecurity in our own
backyard," Edwards said.
"People have lost jobs with-
out a new one in sight. How
do we expect them to go
out and look for work if
they're hungry?"
Also on hand were six


JOB continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Lisa Liberty, Department .
of Children and Families
staff member, assists with
paperwork at a community
outreach event sponsored
in conjunction with Catholic
Charities on Saturday.


1 84264 OD021 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


84
T-Storm


-5,


4Ch
Chance


WEATHER, 8A


Opinion
Business
Obituaries
Advice.
Puzzles


.. . 4A
IC
. .. 7A
. . . . 3D
..... 2B


TODAY IN
LOCAL
SL I e '.it, n .-' .
r, ,, ,.-l ,3, n


COMING
TUESDAY
EjJ . ,t. r-n , - , rr. -_ t
t- ,[,I rl" ' I.:.,:-l


Suwannee River Jam wraps up 4 days, and one of

the largest line-ups in the event's 19-year history










LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


, ma^. .7AH35 PIaByaj *FLORIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
16-23-31-34 11 9-15-20-29-36 Afternoon: 5-9-5 Afternoon: 4-9-2-1 14-22-27-49-50-50 x2 11-34-41-49-55 PB20
Evening: 5-3-9 Evening: 7-1-1-5 x2


AROUND FLORIDA



Grandparents visit New York to see missing boy


By. COLLEEN LONG
Associated Press
NEW YORK
he grand-
parents of a
Florida tod-
dler who was
abandoned and
found wandering alone
at St. Patrick's Cathedral
reunited with the 3-year-
old on Friday, and hoped
for clearance to take him
home.
Donald and Frieda Fons
of Land O' Lakes, outside
Tampa, had a supervised
visit for several hours
with their grandson,
Nathaniel Fons, who was
has been in foster care in
New York since he was
found Tuesday by security
guards at the cathedral.
The Administration for
Children's Services said
he would remain in the
eity's care while legal
and custody issues were
Worked out, but the family
was welcome to visit him.
"This little boy has
been through a great
aeal this past week, and
ie are doing all we can
to ensure he is comfort-
able and secure," said
Commissioner John
Mattingly.
: The Fonses are seeking
Custody of the little boy,
believed by police to have
been left by a couple who
had been traveling with his
mother.
] Don and Frieda Fons,
Who arrived Thursday
evening, bought open-
ended tickets to New York
because they weren't sure
when they would able to
return with Nathaniel,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Donald (left) and Frieda Fons look at a picture of their grandson Nathaniel Fons in their home Wednesday in Land O' Lakes.


Nathaniel, who was reported missing on Monday, turned up unharmed at New York City's St.
The two had a supervised visit with their grandson, who is in foster care, in New York.


according to the boy's
uncle, Ryan Fons.
'They heard there
was a chance and they -
said, 'OK we're book-
ing a flight,"' Ryan Fons
,told The Associated Press
on Friday. "They were
extremely excited to head
up there."
Nathaniel was found


alone at the cathedral
Tuesday evening with a
notein his hand bearing
,the name of a detective in
Florida and the words "call
immediately."
The Fons haven't.seen
Nathaniel since June. They
had lived together with
the,boy's parents until
last year when Nathaniel's


father took a job on a
fishing boat outside
Vancouver, Wash. But his
father was arrested for
failing to notify his parole
officer and sent to jail in
Florida, the family said.
Records show he is still
jailed.
The grandparents want-
ed custody of their grand-


Patrick's Cathedral on Tuesday.


son, but his mother took
off with him, the family
said earlier this week. She
had been traveling with the
boy until her arrest Sunday
in Florida on counterfeit
charges, when she told offi-
cials that her son was in a
separate car traveling with
another couple.
After that couple's aban-


doned Chevy Suburban
was found by in a hotel
parking lot in Florida on
Sunday, authorities issued
a missing child alert for
Nathaniel. The couple
are suspected of taking
Nathaniel north and leav-
ing.him at the cathedral.
Ryan Fons said chil-
dren's services wanted
to see how Nathaniel
responds to them since
it has been almost a year
since he saw them.
'They have been
through stress the past
five days," Ryan Fons said
of his parents. 'They want
to bring him back home.
They were extremely sad
when he left last June
and went through a lot
of stress then. It's finally
about to be over, hope-
fully."
The couple believed to
have left Nathaniel at the
cathedral have not been
located. New York City
police said Thursday that
they are suspected in the
same counterfeiting opera-
tion in which Nathaniel's
mother was arrested and
would also face charges of
endangering the welfare of
a child in New York. The
woman was seen on sur-
veillance footage at famed
Fifth Avenue landmark
moments before Nathaniel
was abandoned, police
said.
Nathaniel's mother, Erin
Comeau, 26, is being held
in Florida. She said in a
written statement that she
would allow Donald and
Frieda Fons temporary
custody but did not want
to "permanently lose her
son."


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Brooks gets star on Walk of Fame


10 A, r.. SS - )
ASSOCIATED PR
Mel Brooks (left) pretends to look at his watch as his friend and associate Carl Reiner speaks at dedication ceremonies for
Brooks' new Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles Friday.


LOS ANGELES

walk all over Mel
Brooks. Until now.
The comedian, actor
and producer who gave
the world "Blazing Saddles," "Young
Frankenstein" and "The Producers"
got a star Friday on the Hollywood
Walk of Fame.
Brooks received the 2,406th star
during a ceremony in front of the
Egyptian Theatre. His son, Max, and
friend, Carl Reiner, attended.
.Brooks, who's 83, has won Emmy,
Grammy, Oscar and Tony awards.
He's working on a musical version
of "Blazing Saddles."

Michaels hospitalized
with hemorrhage
LOS ANGELES - Bret Michaels
is in critical condition suffering from'
a brain hemorrhage, his publicist


said Friday.
Joann Mignano, Michaels' New
York-based publicist, confirmed a
report on People magazine's Web site
that said the former Poison frontman
was rushed to intensive care late
Thursday after a severe headache.
The report said doctors discovered
bleeding at the base of his brain
stem.
Mignano said tests are being con-
ducted but did not know where he
was being treated.
The 47-year-old glam-rock reality
TV star had an emergency appen-
dectomy at a private care facility for
diabetics last week after complain-
ing of stomach pains before he was
scheduled to perform at Sea World
in San Antonio, Texas. Michaels later
wrote on his Web site that though
the surgery "has taken its toll," doc-
tors expected him to make a full
recovery.
Michaels is currently a contes-
tant on the third season of Donald


Trump's NBC competitive reality
show, "The Celebrity Apprentice."
For the first six episodes, Michaels
served as a lighting rod for the
show's male team, avoiding being
fired in the boardroom.
Trump said in a statement Friday
that he was "deeply saddened" to
hear of Michaels' condition.
"He's a great competitor and
champion, and I hope he will be
fine," Trump said.
Before joining "The Celebrity
Apprentice," Michaels starred as
the lothario on VH1's lusty reality
dating series "Rock of Love" from
2007 to 2009. For three seasons,
Michaels searched for the women of
his dreams amid a sea of implants,
tattoos and thongs.
He also served as a judge on
the fifth season of the USA sing-
ing competition "Nashville Star" in
2007.
a Associated Press.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Movie director-writer Paul
Mazursky is 80.
* Songwriter Jerry Leiber is
77.
* Actor Al Pacino is 70.
Rock musician Stu Cook is
65.
* Singer Bjorn Ulvaeus is 65.
* Actress Talia Shire is 64.
* Actor Jeffrey DeMunn is


63.
M Rock musician Michael
Brown is-1.
* Rock musician Steve
Ferrone is 60.
* Country singer-songwriter
Rob Crosby is 56.
* Actor Hank Azaria is 46.
* Rock singer Andy Bell is"
46.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fa. 32055.
Periodical postage paid a Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake.
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a service
error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30
a.m., next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks. .................. $48.79
52 Weeks ................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks ................. $41.40
24 Weeks................... $82.80
52 Weeks. ................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Daily Scripture


"My sheep hear my voice, and I
know them, and they follow me;
and I give them eternal life, and
they shall never perish, and no
one shall snatch them out of my
hand."

-John 10:27-28


'


Page Editor: Allison Candreva, 754-0424











Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


ANTONIA ROBINSONILake City Reporter
NAACP Life Members were honored with plaques at the Freedom Fund Luncheon Saturday at Winfield Recreation Center.


NAACP hosts Freedom Fund Luncheon


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
To Glynnell Presley, one
word described Saturday's
NAACP Freedom Fund
Luncheon: "Beautiful," said
Presley, event chairperson.
"Everything was just beau-
tiful."
The 28th annual lun-
cheon was held at Winfield


Recreation Center. The
event's theme was "Where
there is unity, there is prog-
ress." The Rev. William
Proctor; a Leon County
commissioner, was the
event's keynote speaker.
The luncheon show-
cased community together-
ness with the various orga-
nizations in attendance.
Organizations such as the


NAACP must continue their
work in its fight for justice
and equality, he said.
"God has their back
as they move forward to
achieve," Proctor said.
NAACP Award recipients
were Walmart Superstore
for community service and
Walmart Logistics for the
corporate award.
- New Bethel Missionary


Baptist Church also won
the membership drive by
signing up 101 members.
The church was presented
with the membership bell.
"Our future is bright,"
Presley said. "If you don't
have any children, then
your future's not good."
Almost 200 people
attended the event, a fund-
raiser for the NAACP


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A fan throws up his thumb in approval at the Suwannee River
Jam on Friday.


JAM: Party atmosphere


Continued From Page 1A

River Jam this year, he
said. He wanted to show
them a good time and the
Suwannee hospitality.
'They loved every min-
ute of it," he said. 'They
totally got the spirit of the
Suwannee."
The group had been at
the event since Wednesday


morning.
The Jam was better
than the Jazz Festival in
New Orleans, said Mark
Leto, of Louisiana. The
event has a great party
atmosphere for all age
groups.
"We'll be back next
year," he said.


JOB: Loss fuels local need for aid, director says


Continued From Page 1A
staff members from the
Department of Children
and Families. People were
able to apply for food
stamps and TANE
The collaboration was a
good opportunity to answer


questions and concerns of
the community, said.Cheryl
Twombly, community part-
ner liaison. Some people
might be reluctant to come
to the DCF office.
"We've been able to


THEFTS: Date to 2007
Continued From Page 1A


a great job day in and day
out. Although we are all
saddened by this.case, we
are treating, this like any
other 'criminal investiga-
tion."
Hunter said that in addi-
tion to other procedural
changes resulting from the
investigation, he has put in
place a policy that requires
multiple signatures "any-
time money is shifted in
the sheriff's office."
'The business practices
that have been put in place
as a result of this incident
will ensure that this situa-
tion cannot be repeated,"
Hunter said. "All of our
employees are held to a
high standard and I am
proud of their actions that
brought this matter to light.
Through their efforts, we
will continue to earn the


HORIZ ON'
Sat. May 1st
10am -4pm
Come early and stay late:
there'll be refreshments,
guided test drives of the
Horizon. make-it-take-its
on the Horizon and other
new Janome models,
door prizes, and more!
Call for more information.
or simply join us
for all the excitement.

FABRIC ART SHOP
158 SW Domino Way
(the Purple building behind
Dominos Pizza)
386-755-0179
I d . . . . . . . .


respect and trust of the
community."
Foxx is currently on
administrative leave with-
out pay. She is being held
on $30,000 bond.


Baby Proofing Your Bathroom
Once a child has discovered the
bathroom that is when a bunch of
problems begin. Your child has
now seen the big bowl of water
and the handle that you use to
flush with. They are thinking how
fun it would be to take an object,
maybe a toy or your wallet or
maybe your car keys 'and then
flush them into oblivion. That
would be a plumbing nightmare if
something got stuck in the toilet.
The drain is bad enough but the
toilet is another ball game.
As you child proofed your home,
the bathroom is no exception.
When they are traveling and
walking with assistance closing
the door will suffice but as they
learn to walk, closing the door
isn't enough. There are some
things you can do. In places like
Babies R Us or Wal-Mart, you can
buy a toilet seat lock; it simply fits
under the bottom rim of the bowl
and the lid. This way your child
can't life up the cover or anything
else.
If you have cabinets under the
sink use cabinet locks, these are
great for keeping your child safe.
Then there are drain covers so
your child cannot get his finger
or maybe their hair caught in the
drain when they are in the bath.
These drain covers would work
with no water in the bath and
they will prevent your child from
putting his fingers in the drain
anyway.
There are also medicine cabinet
closer. These are so that your
child cannot open the cabinet.
They just clip to the sides of the
medicine cabinet and the mirrorto
prevent your child from opening
it. Keep outlet guards in any open
socket, to prevent your child from
getting electrocuted, especially
with water in the bathroom.
Make sure your bathtub has a
non-slip mat in your tub; this will
work if your child gets into the
tub even without water and will
prevent your child from slipping.
Make sure your drains and drain
covers are on tightly. This way your
child doesn't have the opportunity
to put something in the drain.
Baby bathroom horrors can
happen at any time, if you have a
great baby proofing system you
can avoid health hazards as well
as plumbing problems as well.
Children love to see something;
they don't care what it is circle
down the toilet and into the
unknown.





752-6306
2744 SW Main Blvd. * Lake City, FL
CFC 1427643 * Back Flow #T05-08-8053


meet people in a different
environment than the DCF
office," she said.
Catholic Charities had 50
volunteers to help prepare
in advance for the event,
Edwards said. The goal is


to help provide as many
resources as possible for
the community.
"There's no reason in a
free America for people to
go hungry," the director
said.


yIAUTOMOTIVEACCESSORIES


anti LcitR. BROWmING MOSSYOAK,
steering Wheel Covers * Floor Mats * Tags * Etc

mmiurnImr . i ' ,,lpflp


Circulation Accounting Clerk

The Lake City Reporter has an
'immediate opening for a circulation
accounting clerk to join its progressive
newspaper team. The full-time position
requires experience in basic business
accounting practices, including payroll
.processing, and the right candidate will
possess proficient computer skills. Great
customer service ability also is a must in
this position. Full-time position offers
competitive salary, benefits and paid vacation.

E-mail resume to Todd Wilson, publisher,.
at twilson@lakecityreporter.com.
No phone calls. EOE.


-, S. O'

'- , ,.

.!.
* .






hours only!


Rarely Discounted Brands



*


'Ticket valid on your first regular, sale or clearance purchase, including Cosmetics & Fragrances. Excludes Brighton and Ugg. Not valid on phone orders or
on belk.com. Contact your store for a list of charities. All ticket proceeds benefit your favorite participating local charities. All unclaimed money from the
sale of Charity Sale tickets will be donated to a charity of Belk's choice after 90 days.
"BELK $1,000 SHOPPING SPREE RULES & REGULATIONS: 100 Belk gift cards per store valued anywhere from $5 to $1,000 will be given away. One
lucky person per Belk Division (for a total of 3 winners) will walk away with a gift card worth $1,000. No purchase necessary. One per adult customer,
while supplies last. Not valid by phone or on Belk.com. See a sales associate for details.
""RED DOT: Limited exclusions in Brighton, designer handbags, select junior denim in dept. 134 and Belk & Co. Fine Jewelers.
Fashion Accessories, Handbags, Small Leather Goods and Hosiery total savings are 60-75%. COUPONS NOT VALID ON RED DOT


~rl�.


LOCAL & STATE 'SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010'


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER





4*^


OPINION


Sunday, April 25, 2010


OUR


OUR
OPINION



Tax pay


program


could be


lifesaver

tainties of life is that
this November in
Columbia County
That taxman will
call. That's the month the new
tax roll is received and ad valor-
etn tax bills are generated.
In any economy,-but espe-
cially in today's recessionary
climate, that's one sure thing
that's hard to bank on.
This is why Columbia
County's quarterly installment
tax program is vital to many tax-
payers. Through this program,
taxpayers receive four bills, in
June; September, December
and March-- and ll the better
to budget with. More than this,
each quarterly bill besides the
March notice has a percentage
discount applied for taxpayers
who make timely payments,
S..a.plan similar to the 4 percent
I: 'discount given to residents who
pay in full in November.
For both county residents
and the tax collector's office the
relationship is symbiotic, and
a good-choice for households
'that would be hard hit by a lump
sum payment due at one time.
But the catch here - and
you knew there would be a
catch because that's another
Certainty of life - is that tax-
Spayers have only until May 1 to
Supply for the program. Unless
your application is received by
Saturday, the taxman's call this
fall could be a bit more difficult
to answer.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday, April
25, the 115th day of 2010.
There are 250 days left in the
year.
* On April 25, 1945, dur-
ing World War II U.S. and
Soviet forces linked up on the
Elbe River, a meeting that dra-
matized the collapse of Nazi
Germany's defenses.
M In 1507, German cartogra-
pher Martin Waldseemueller
named a huge land mass in
the Western Hemisphere
"America," in honor of Italian
navigator Amerigo Vespucci.

Lake City Reporter
SServing Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
, through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of


the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


he only thing more
unpopular with
voters than the
deficit would be
for Congress to do
something about it. The only
choices for dealing with the red
ink are politically unpalatable
- some combination of raising
taxes and cutting spending.
Unfortunately for the law-
makers, the two spending
programs driving the deficit,
Social Security and Medicare,
are among the most popular
with voters. In voting out a
nonbinding budget resolution,
the Senate Budget Committee
faced up to the problem - and
flinched.
The committee's budget,
passed mostly along party lines,
promises to do significantly
better than President Barack
Obama's budget in reducing the
deficit. Over five years, the com-


www.lakecityreporter.com


Of sky hooks, paper stretchers and such


hen I was 12
years old, I
got one of my
first paying
� jobs, working
as a "soda jerk" at the Seminole
Pharmacy on North Marion
Street for pharmacists Frank
Appell and Mack Lovette.
My first day on the job, I
arrived early ready to get to
work and earn my pay. Little
did I know that my bosses
had planned a good-hearted
"initiation" to welcome me
and help me to get to know
the town..
First thing, "Mr. Mack" called
me' into his office and told me
he needed me to run an errand.
He said he had loaned his "sky
hooks," his "paper stretcher,"
and his "left-handed monkey
wrench" to Max Law and
would I please go to Law's Fish
Market' nearby and get them.
Eager to please, I rushed to
the fish market but Max Law
(who was in on the joke all the
way) said he was sorry but he
had loaned those items out.
The sky hooks were now at -
John Giebeig's Grocery Store,
the paper stretchers were at
DeVane's Eagle Clothing Store,
and the left-handed monkey
wrench was at Nathan Zelkind's
Columbia Bargain House.
No problem, I thought, so
off I went. But there was a
problem. John Giebeig said
he had loaned the skyhooks
to the Baumstein's at the dry
goods store. The DeVanes
said they had loaned the paper
stretchers to Grady Cochran
at the hardware store, and Nat
Zelkind sent me all the way
uptown to Leo Gelberg's cloth-
ing store to retrieve the mon-
key wrench.
Obedient kid that I was, I


Morris W illiams
Phone: (386) 755-8 83
williams_h2@fim.edu
372 W Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055
went everywhere they sent me
- and every new store just sent
me to another store.
Right when I started wor-
rying that I might have to
report back to Mr. Mack empty
handed, I got a lucky break.
Ross Durden at Dollar Studio
told me yes, he did have the sky
hooks, but had just the minute
before sent them back to the
drug store.
Likewise, Claude Hurst of
Hurst's Hole-in'the-Wall said
he had also sent the paper
stretchers back, and some guy
at The Powell Hotel echoed a
similar story about the monkey
wrench. So, lucky me, all the
items were on their way back to
the drug store.
Sure enough, when I got
back to the drug store, a seri-
ous-faced Mr. Mack told me all
the items had been returned
and that I had done a good job
as an errand boy and wouldn't I
like a nice cold milk shake as a
reward. I said, "Yes sir" to that.
Deep within my curiosity, I
wondered just what a sky hook,
a paper stretcher, and a left-
handed monkey wrench looked.
like, but I figured I would learn
all that later on in the job.
And so I did. I worked at the
Seminole Pharmacy a long time
and loved every minute of it. As


I grew older, I became the one.
to send the young new employ-
ees all over town looking for
fictitious items and even added
striped paint and a bucket of fog
to the search, and the new kids
all took it as good-naturedly as
I had.
Of course, this happened
a long, long time ago and all
those stores have long since
changed hands or closed or
been demolished, but the happy
memory is still vividly within
me about the day my little 12-
year-old legs took me all over
the Lake City of my youth, look-
ing for skyhooks and paper
stretchers and such.

'Run. for your wife'
The current High Springs
Community Theater stage pro-
duction is "Run for Your Wife,"
a superb example of British
comedy by Ray Cooney. The
play will run weekends through
Sunday, May 9.
As usual, Lake City talent is
well represented. Three of the
major actors are Lake Citians:
Amanda Martinez, Brad Bullard
and Trish Way. Marshall
Morper, the Assistant Director,
David Hurner, lighting and
sound designer, and Jessica
Sheely, set designer, also hail
from Lake City.
Tickets are available at The
Framery on 855 SW Baya Drive
(754-2780), and at highspring-
scommunitytheater.com.

Oh so true
Bills travel through the mail
at twice the speed of checks.


* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


mittee's budget would reduce
the deficit from the current
$1.4 trillion to $545 billion. The
president's deficit in 2015 would
be $751 billion.
To reach that, however, the
committee would impose a
three- to four-year freeze on
most nonmilitary discretionary
spending that, once the public
gets wind of what that entails,
could be difficult for lawmakers
to enforce.
And the blueprint calls for
$114 billion in the problematic
closing of loopholes. It also
assumes that Congress will
come up with $400 billion in
annual patches to keep middle-
class taxpayers from being
caught up by the alternative
minimum tax.'
Despite the sketchy savings
and hopes for new revenues,
the budget would work for
five years. But beyond that the


deficits go over a cliff again. If,
as Congress and the Obama
administration plan, the Bush
2001 and 2003 tax cuts are
extended and lawmakers con-
tinue patching the AMT, the
national debt would grow by $3
trillion over the next 10 years.
Committee Chairman Kent
Conrad's solution to that is
simply not to look beyond five
years. Beyond five years, the
North Dakota Democrat said,
is the responsibility of Obama's
18-member deficit-reduction
commission that is to issue rec-
ommendations in December.
In effect, this proposed
budget postpones the tough-
est problems until after the
November elections, when the
deficit may not even be the
Democrats' problem anymore.
With a certain cruel justice, it
will be the Republicans.'
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Deroy Murdock
deroy.Murdock@gmail.com


New EPA

rules bad

news for

minorities

T he Environmental
Protection Agency
wants to curtail
greenhouse gases.
Black Americans
should be afraid - very afraid.
Five civil rights organiza-
tions recently condemned
EPA's plans to regulate car-
bon dioxide and other emis-
sions as part of its war on
so-called "global warming."
These groups' leaders argue
that the EPA's December 7
"Endangerment Finding" and
pending anti-C02 regulations
will slam Americans hard and
blacks and other minorities
hardest.
"President Obama wants to
price us out of energy," Harry
Alford of the National,Black
Chamber of Commerce told
Public Radio International.
'This is a war on how we live
in America and don't regard
it lightly. We need to fight
them, we need to fight them
hard, fight them fierce." Alford
represents some 100,000 black-
owned companies.
A recent Affordable Power
Alliance study foresees dire
consequences from EPA's
restrictions on traditional ener-
gy production as it chases the
chimera of so-called "global
warming."
"We estimated that imple-
mentation of the EPA Finding
would ... significantly reduce
U.S. GDP every year over the
next two decades, and by 2030
GDP would be about $500
billion less" than otherwise.
The report also predicts EPA's
destruction of 2.5 million jobs
by 2030.
APA expects the black
poverty rate to grow from 24
percent to 30 percent, and
Hispanic poverty from 23 per-
cent to 28.
Due largely to their already
low average incomes, APA
explains, "rising energy costs
have a disproportionately
negative effect on the ability
of minority families to acquire
other necessities such as food,
housing, childcare, or health
care.
Blacks and Hispanics "see
more sick days from work and
school, and increased medi-
cal costs due to the ravages
of greenhouse gas pollution,"
the EPA stated in its defense.
"We must act to stop this now,
while seizing the opportunity
to bring green jobs and green
small businesses."
As for so-called "global
warming," Washington
should not act before answer-
ing serious questions about
Earth's temperatures record.
After the ClimateGate scan-
dal at England's Climate
Research Unit, London's
Meteorological Office
announced that it is reevalu-
ating 160 years of climate
records. Alas, American clima-
tologists rely heavily on CRU's
now-dubious statistics.
Meanwhile, NASA concedes
that its temperature data is less
than reliable.
Until top trans-Atlantic sci-
entists stop scratching their
heads about whether Earth is
unnaturally warming or cool-
ing, would the EPA please
kindly stop torturing black ,
people?
* Deroy Murdock is a colum-
nist with Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


OTHER OPINION

Solution to the deficit - stall for time









Page Editor: Tom Mayer 754-0428LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


Firefighters offer free CPR training


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE - David
Bickel has been a firefight-
er for 23 years and has
responded to countless
emergencies.
He said he was often
frustrated with going to a
scene where a person had
a heart attack or was not
breathing and no one was
on site to give the victim
CPR
"It's real depressing
sometimes when you get
there, you do everything
you can do and you still
can't bring them back," he
said. "What our ultimate
goal is to get the folks;
being a neighbor, friend
or family member, to get
somebody that can step up
and help us by doing com-
pressions and CPR until we
can get there. Once we get
there, we'll have something
to work with."
To reduce those inci-
dents the Columbia County
Fire Department partnered
with local establishments to
provide free CPR courses.
The class is being taught
by Columbia County fire-
fighters Bickel, Cody
Bertram and Bickel's
wife, Linda, who is with
Shands Live Oak. Bickel
and Bertram are county
firefighters at Columbia
County Fire Department
Station 46 in Fort White,
where the classes are being
taught.
"The class is being
taught for people to assist
us," Bickel said. "A person
has 4-6 minutes without
oxygen before brain dam-
age. Anything after 10 min-
utes, very few people are
brought back."
He said they reviewed
emergency response calls
from the E-911 Center and
the average first-responder
response time was about 11
minutes.
"We're already behind
the 8-ball when we get
started," Bickel said. 'Very
few times have I been called


TONY BRITTILake City Reporter
Jason Nelson and Stephanie Nelson get CPR training on a mannequin at Columbia County
Fire Station No. 46 in Fort White. The class is being taught for free by firefighters at the
station.


to an emergency where
someone is not breathing
or doesn't have a heart
beat, where someone was
performing CPR. Just chest
compressions can help tre-
mendously."
The class is free to the
public and the county as
Bertram and the Bickels
teach it on their day off
at Station No. 46 in Fort
White.
The 'Shands at Lake
Shore Hospital Authority
Board recently donated
nearly $5,000 to aid in the
purchase of equipment
for the class. The funds
went toward the purchase
of CPR practice manne-
quins (adult and pediatric)
and Automatic External
Defibrillators trainers, a
device which charges the
heart in an attempt to make
it start pumping blood.
The Columbia County
Emergency Operations
Center purchased tables
and chairs for the class-
room space. The class is
being taught in a building
that was refurbished by the
county.


The first classes used
mannequins borrowed
from Lake City Community
College.
"It will be easier once
we have our own manne-
quins," Bickel said. "We'll
be more mobile."
The classes are based on
a single-night event, which
normally last about two and
one-half hours.
"What we're focusing
on big time is friends and
family CPR which is basi-
cally momS and pops sit-
ting around the house and
health care CPR, which is
more. for nurses, EMTs,
paramedics, firefighters
and people in the medical
field," Bickel'said. "We can
also teach First Aid." /
'At the end of the classes,
participants are given a cer-
tificate from the Columbia
County Fire Department
as well as an American
Heart Association card
stating they've successfully
completed a CPR training
course.
The first class was
taught in January with
about seven people, the


following class in February
had 16 participants.
"The ultimate goal is to
have at least one class per
month," Bickel said. "Once
our mannequins come in,
we want to go to the differ-
ent community centers and
give classes."
Columbia County Fire
Rescue Department office
manager Dohna Harmon
recently attended one
of the classes with her
parents.
"We attended the second
class, and we were totally
impressed," she said. "So
many things have changed,
even from the last time I
took a CPR course. It was
really a great class. I rec-
ommend it to everyone."
Harmon said she had her
initial CPR training courses
more than a year ago and
she wohld recommend-any-
one who was trained more
than a year ago to go back
to a class.


FDOT work to impact traffic


From staff reports
The following-roadwork
under way by the FDOT
may impact local traffic in
Columbia County.
E Interstate 75: Daytime
and nighttime lane closures
in both directions between
the Suwannee County line
and Interstate 10. Two lanes
are closed at night begin-
ning at 8 p.m. and ending
at 6 a.m. each day. Plans are
to begin at 8 p.m. Sunday
and close two lanes south-
bound. No lane closures are


allowed weekends begin-
ning 6 a.m. Friday until
6 p.m. Sunday. The speed
limit is reduced to 60 hph
during lane closures and is
strictly enforced by FHP.
Work also continues at the
Interstate 10 interchange
to replace the high mast
lights.
N U.S. 41/441 South
Daytime lane closures are
expected between 9 a.m.
and 4 p.m. Monday at the
intersection with County
Road, 252.


Peoples State Bank Celebrates Our Leaders


Renee' joined the Peoples State Bank team in 2005
as a Customer Service Representative and was'
named Customer Service Supervisor in 2008. She,
has over 7 years experience in the banking industry.'
Renee' is responsible for the day-to-day operations
in the Teller/Customer Service areas of the bank'
including deposits and New Accounts. In addition,'
she provides superior customer relations and ser-
vice to help her customers maximize their financial,
needs. Renee' is a2009 graduate of Saint Leo Uni' :
versity, where she received a'Bachelor's of Arts ir\i
Psychology. Outside of work, Renee' enjoys sRend-
ing time with her husband and family. In the past,
Renee' has been actively involved with the March.
of Dimes. She currently volunteers with the youth'.
and children ministries at Fellowship Church.

Being a community bank means having ties to the.
community. It means executives work where they
live and live where they work. It means knowing
local issues that affect client's lives. It means rec-
ognizing clients around town. It means... we will-
be here today and we will be here tomorrow. Visit
Peoples and try out the personal experience your:'
self. Peoples State Bank. Now That's banking!


, j. , " I


a ~
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Page Editor: Tom Mayer 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


Accident

leaves 1

in critical

condition
From staff reports

A single-vehicle wreck
Friday morning left a Glen
St. Mary woman in criti-
cal condition after she was
ejected from her vehicle,
according to a Florida
Highway Patrol report
released Saturday.
According to the report,
a 1991 Ford Explorer
driven by Brandi Estep,
30, was traveling east on
SR 100 when it drove onto
the south shoulder. After
the vehicle returned to
the road, it crossed both
lanes and traveled onto the
north shoulder. Following
this, the Explorer over-
turned several times, eject-
ing Estep before coming to
rest, upright, on the north
shoulder.
Estep was not wearing a
,seat belt, the report states.
Charges are pending the
:outcome of further investi-
:gation. No further informa-
:tion was available at press
-time.


,FSU chemist
claims 2010
Florida Award

From staff reports
TALLAHASSEE - A
Florida State University bio-
chemist whose work could
one day lead to the develop-
ment of drugs capable of
.controlling such potentially
:deadly diseases as tubercu-
-losis and the flu has been
honored as one of the top
scholars in his field in the
southeastern United States.
Timothy A. Cross, the
,Earl Frieden Professor
.of - Chemistry and
BIiochemistry, has been
selected to receive the
2010 Florida Award by
ithe Florida Local Section
:of the American Chemical
:Society. The award recog-
diizes contributions toward
:the advancement of the pro-
fession of chemistry.
"I am honored to have
been selected," Cross said.


COURTESY PHOTO

Columbia County's top law officers graduate from criminal justice seminar
Lake City Police Chief Argatha Gilmore (front, fourth from left) and Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter (middle, fifth from left) were among 24 senior
managers who graduated from the Florida Criminal Justice Executive Institute's Chief Executive Seminar at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement in
Tallahassee on Thursday. The participants took classes on succession planning, demography, budgeting, managing generations, ethics and implementing
strategic change. 'Not only was the structured curriculum educational and informative, the learning experience also came from our fellow chiefs and sheriffs
throughout the state of Florida,' Gilmore said.'Taking these kinds of courses at the beginning of my leadership ... will assist me greatly in my continued pursuit.
of Lake City Police Department becoming a premier agency in the country.'



'Woodsongs' host to highlight Florida Folk Festival


From staff reports
WHITE SPRINGS -The
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
Florida Park Service will
hostthe 58thAnnual Florida
Folk Festival on May 28-
30, at Stephen Foster. Folk
Culture Center State Park.
Syndicated radio host
Michael Johnathon will
join Billy Dean for a special
concert during the event's
opening evening.
Jdhnathbn is a folksing-
er, songwriter, concert per-
former, author - and now
playwright - who has a
worldwide radio audience
approaching 1 million lis-
teners each week. He also
created the world's first


Medicaid slows budget talk


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
STALLAHASSEE - Some
knotty issues, includ-
ing' whether to cut state
workers' pay and overhaul
Florida's Medicaid sys-
tem, remained unresolved
-as budget talks continued
:Saturday, the first day of
-the legislative session's last
week.
Budget leaders, though,
:did agree to open a new pri-
vately-run prison as a cost-
,:utting measure although
-;hat would mean closing
wirigs or dormitories at
-some state-operated pris-


ons and eliminating hun-
dreds of public employee
jobs in the process.
Dozens of differences
between the two chambers
have been resolved since
the talks began Monday,
first by conference commit-
tees and then by the two
chambers' budget chair-
men, Sen. JD Alexander
and Rep. David Rivera.
A compromise budget
for .the fiscal year begin-
ning July 1 must be on law-
makers' desks by Tuesday
to comply with a 72-hour
waiting period and end the
60-day legislative session
on time Friday.


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COURTESY PHOTO
Michael Johnathon
multi-camera weekly series
broadcast on the Internet,
"WoodSongs, Old-Time
Radio 'Hour." Billboard


Magazine headlined him
as an "UnSung Hero." He
has been featured on CNIN,
TNN, CMT, AP, Headline
News, NPR, Bravo and the
BBC.
Advance tickets for the
Florida Folk Festival are
$20 per day or $40 for
the weekend for adults
and $25 per day or $50
for the weekend at the
gate. Children younger
than 6 are admitted free.
Ticket prices for children
between the ages of 6 and
16 for the entire weekend
are $4 in advance or $5
at the gate. Credit card
purchases can be made
by calling (877)635-3655,
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday. To order


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by mail, send a check or
money order to: Florida
Folk Festival, Post Office
Drawer G, White! Springs,
Florida 32096. Checks
.should be made payable to
Florida Folk Festival.
In 2010, the Florida
Department of


Environmental Protection's
Florida State Parks is cel-
ebrating 75'years of recre-
ation and preservation.
For more information,
visit www.floridastate-
parks.org/stephenfoster o'
www. FloridaFolkFestival.
com.


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Page Editor: Tom Mayer 754-0428











Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
Watch 'The Rescue'
. Returning to Lake
City is "The Rescue," a
movie of hope and heal-
ing at 6 p.m. today at
Christ Central Complex.
Admission, popcorn and
soda are free. Childcare
is available. The church
is located at 217 SW Dyal
Ave. (386) 755-2525.


The Suwannee River
Water Management.
District Governing Board
teleconference meeting
is at 1 p.m. April 26 at
District Headquarters in
Live Oak.


Myrtle Hoffman with
FTRI is from 9:30 a.m.-
2:30 p.m. April 27 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison
Court Call 755-0235.

Computer class
A computer class is from



OBITUARIES

Mary Crawford Hoffman
Mary Crawford Hoffman,
79, born and raised in Lake
City, FL. Mary's family would
like to invite family ard friends
to a Celebration of her life on
Saturday, May 1, 2:00pm at the
Temple of the Salvation Army
located at 2807 N. Druid Hills
Rd. and 1-85 in NE Atlanta.
Mary went to her final home on
Sat. March 20, 2010 due to end
stage heart/lung weakness. It
was her wish that family, friends,
caregivers come together to
"celebrate" her life with those
she spent so many memorable
times with. She requests no
flowers or gifts; a memory book
will be available for those who
wish to leave a remembrance
for the family. Donations can
also be made to the Sacred
Journey Hospice, American
Heart or Lung Association. She
is survived by her sister, Doris
Brooks, son and his family, wife
Vicky and grandsons Tyler and
Thomas Hoffmann of Griffin,
daughters, Mitzi Hoffmann
(lifelong caretaker) and Ginger
Morosky, spouse Walter N. of
Ft. Worth, TX., along with the
families of several nephews and
a niece. Her spouse; Wilmarth E.
Hoffmann, preceded her death in
1972, and her parents Angus and
Eleanor Crawford. Arrangements
and assistance is being handled
by Conner-Westbury Funeral
Home of Griffin, GA 1891 W.
McIntosh Rd. 30223. 770-227-
2300
Roby Ward
Roby Ward, 68, of Lake City,
Florida, passed away on April
22, 2010, at the V.A. Medical
Center, Lake City, Florida.Roby
lived in Jacksonville for many
years, where he attended school,
finishing at Andrew Jackson
Sr. High School. Roby served
in the U.S. Army and was a
Vietnam veteran.Roby, along
with his wife, Peggy, owned
United Distributors in Lake
City for 25 years. Roby was
preceded in death by his mother,'
Inez ward, a sister, Bonnie Sue
Ward, his grandmother, Irene
Fomby, and his mother-in-law,
Margaret Lee.Roby is survived
by his wife of nearly 38 years,
Peggy Lee Ward; his son, Todd
(and Annette) Ward; his daugh-
ters, Rochelle Ward (and Terry
Butner) and Kristi (and Jon)
Neal; his grandchildren Terry
Ward, Lucas Ward and Coleman
Neal; his great-grandson,
Christopher Reyer; his sister,
Barbara Black; niece Heather
Black; and his aunt, Eula Wood.
A celebration of Roby's life will
be held graveside at Evergreen
Cemetery on North Main Street
in Jacksonville, Florida, on
Wednesday, April 28, 2010, at 3
p.m.Arrangements are under the
care of George H. Hewell and
Son Funeral Home, 747 Main
Street, Jacksonville, FL 32206.
(904) 355-9545.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.






ORNLI INE

mona,


10:30 a.m.-noon April 27 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison
Court Call 755-0235.

Diabetes Support Group
The Diabetes Support
Group with Lucy Hudson
meets from 10:30 to
11:20 a.m. Computer
class at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628
SE Allison Court. Call 755-
0235.


Birthday luncheon
Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church is hav-
ing a birthday luncheon
10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison
Court. Call 755-0235.


SHINE, a volunteer
program of the Florida
Department of Elder
Affairs that provides free,
unbiased and confiden-
tial assistance will meet
from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m.
April 28, at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628 SE
Allison Court. People with


questions about Medicare,
Medicaid, supplemental
insurance, Part D pre-
scription drug plans or
Medicare billings are invit-
ed. Individuals who cannot
come to a site or want to
know a site close to them
can call the Elder Helpline
at 1-800-262-2243.

Quilting Guild meeting
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild will hold its
monthly meeting at 10 a.m.
-April 28 at Teen Town 533
NW Desoto St. The April
program will feature Karen
Eberly an expert on Asian
fabrics. Contact (386)
496-3876

Thursday
Library meeting
The Columbia
County Public Library's
Community Planning
Committee will meet at
5:30 p.m. April 29 at the
Main Library.

Computer class
A computer class is
from 10:30 a.m.-noon
April 29 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter

Music festival: More than $1,000 for hospice
Funk rock band Red Paper Birds entertains the audience at the Lake City Loves Haven
Hospice Music Festival on Saturday in Olustee Park. The group was one of nine bands to
perform at the event, which featured bluegrass to rock, said Garrett Roberts, of Marion Street
Cafe. More than $1,000 was raised, said David Morse of Morse Chiropractic.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


CflkI










LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


THE WEATHER



T-STORMS PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY
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83 60


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83 61
Lake City,
CJ rJ


Gainesville *
Panama City 84 67
82 65 Ocala
35 67


Tampa 0
82 70


.
FL Myer
87/71


*


*


lacksonville
.3 66

Daytona Beach
85 69
* 0


Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral L
5 699 79 70 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
84/73 * Orlando
S FtlLauderdale Panama City
S 85/73 0 Pensacola
L Naples * Tallahassee
85/71 Miami Tampa


K West 86/73 Valdosta
K "ey * W. Palm Beach
84/77


-TEMPERATURES
-High Saturday
!' Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low,
SRecord high
0 Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
- Normal month-to-date
.- Normal year-to-date


87
66
.82
56
94 in 1999
39 in 1993


0.00"
0.07"
11.73"
2.38"
13.54"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


6:53 a.m.
8:04 p.m.
6:52 a.m.
8:05 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 5:22'p.m.
Moonset today 4:40 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 6:28 p.m.
Moonset tom. 5:15 a.m.


April May May, May
28 6 13 20
Full Last New First


Monday
79 65 I
Si 62;
54 '69 i
83 64 1
86 56 p,:
s56'5.9 c
83 72 I
56.. , pC
54 67'l
18'66 I
85t ib pc
85/61/s,
80/62/s
80/57/s
84/57/s
82/65/pc
84/55/s
82/66/t


Tuesday
.3 62 r
'5 6.0
SJ 67 .
,5 6 1 p
p3 56 p(

8.1 71
*3 f54 p:


83 56 cp
85/61/s
75/58/pc
80/56/pc
82/56/pc
81/64/s
77/53/s
82/63/s


ultra-violet 1U 'ltle er


a scale from 0





ul cs � 2010 Weather Central
rad LLC, Madims , Wis.
- www.weatherpubllsher.com


ANTONIA ROBINSONI Lake City Reporter

Making Lake City a cleaner place for everyone
Devan Waters (left) and Jordan Wade pick up trash during the City of Lake City Community
Cleanup on Saturday. 'I think it was really cool,' Waters said. 'It helps out the community.'
The event featured more than 100 people cleaning up in areas near Richardson Community
Center. Organizations and individual citizens participated in the cleanup.


On this dlate n
1895, the hignesa
April temnperaturei ro
date ia.s recor-ded
in \olcano Springs.
Calfi. Tne mer.
cur, rose to 118
degre.r-t:.


Celebration of nature at Alligator


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter

Lake Festival


Eileen Box, of Live Oak, picks out a black and blue sage and a red cardinal flower from
the Falling Creek Nursery booth at the Alligator Lake Festival on Saturday at Alligator Lake
Park. The event was sponsored by the Four Rivers Audubon and Gateway Wildlife Habitat
Organization and included vendors, information booths and speakers to highlight the lake
as a local natural resource. About 500 people were estimated to have attended the festival
throughout the day, said Jacqui Sulek, Four Rivers Audubon president.


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II


----�----�-----


Page Editor: Tom Mayer 754-0428


I


~ II----


I� ~- ..�- *I~








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042
tkirby@lakectyreportercom


SPORTS


Sunday.April 25.2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

ADULT BASKEBA
Men's game
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.

SKATEBOARDING
Spring Jam
set for Saturday
The Spring
Skateboarding Jam
presented by
buyitsellitlocal.com is
Saturday at the Live Oak
Skatepark. Registration
fee'is $5 andI begins at
10 a.m. Partnts must be
on hand to sign waiver
forms. Competition
begins at 11 a.m.
For details, call Billy
Tomlinson at 623-4637.

GOLF
The Edge golf
tourney Saturday
Rountree-Moore
presents The Edge golf
tournament is Saturday
at The Country Club at
Lake City. Former Gator
Shayne Edge is the host
for the scramble event
that has expanded to
benefit several local
sports and contribute to
scholarship funds.
Registration i at
Brian's Sports on U.S.
Highway 90 West, or call
club pro Carl Ste-Marie
at 752-2266.

Kiwanis Club
golf tournament
The Lake City Kiwanis
Club has a scramble golf
tournament planned for
May 21 at The Country,
Club at Lake City. Lunch
is at 11:30 a.m. with a
shotgun start for golf at
1 p.m. Cost is $60 per
player. Hole sponsorships
are $50 and $100.
For details, call Matt
Greene at 487-1374.

CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meets May 3
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club has its
first general meeting set
for 7 p.m. May 3 at the
Jones Fieldhouse. Spring
and fall football will be
discussed.
For details, call the
school at 755-8080.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
* Columbia High
baseball vs. Ridgeview
High in District 4-5A
tournament at Middleburg
High, 7 p.m.
Tuesday
* Fort White High
baseball vs. Williston
High in District 5-3A
tournament at Santa Fe
High, 4 p.m.
Wednesday
* Columbia High.girls
tennis in FHSAA, state
meet at Sanlando Park in
Orlando, 8 a.m.
Friday
* Columbia High track
in Region 1-3A meet at
Chiles High, TBA
Saturday
* Fort White High's
A.J. Legree in FHSAA
state track meet at
Showalter Field in Winter


Park, TBA '


The R oed o The Championshi

GoesF aghl R0 !


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Brach Bessant lifts in preparation for the FHSAA Class 2A state weightlifting
championship meet at River Ridge High on Saturday.


The


Back nine at Lake City
begins with toughest
par4 in the county.
* Edit'ir' note: This is the final
of a five-part series on playing better
golf in Columbia County.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Conquering Columbia concludes
this week on the back side of The
Country Club at Lake City.
Measuring at 3,151 yards, it's
a true test for every golfer. The
par-36 side is a traditional layout
with'two of the longest par-4 holes
in Lake City. r,;:' : ' : .
.i The Country Club's back nine
begins with the hardest hole on the
course. Measuring at 421 yards,
the par-4 10th hole can turn into
a three-shot challenge to reach
the green for some of the game's
shorter hitters.
Club professional Carl Ste-Marie
believes it's the hardest hole in the
area.
"It's definitely the hardest hole
in Lake City,"-he said. "I would be
surprised if its not the hardest hole
in Gainesville and Jacksonville. I'd
put it up against the 18th at TPC."
The hole is-a dogleg to the left
where water comes into play down
the left side. A sinkhole can come
into play if a golfer pushes his
shot out to the right with enough
distance, so the safest play from the
tee is to take a 3-wood or hybrid.
"Even a good drive, you're going
to still have 200 in, and that's all
uphill," Ste-Marie said. "If you push
your drive to the right, you're going
to have 220 or 230 into the green.
Then you still- have to putt when
you get there."
The green has a subtle slope,
as do most on the course, and two
putts is never a bad thing.
"Bogey isn't bad here," Ste-Marie
said.
* For those golfers that bogey


final


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Alan Moody blasts out of a sand trap while playing the back nine at The Country Club at Lake City.


the first hole of the back nine, the
par-5 11th may offer some relief.
Par 5's are generally considered
birdie opportunities for better
golfers, and this. hole will give
,them that opportunity. Measuring
at 521 yards, Ste-Marie doesn't


necessarily agree that the 11th is a
birdie hole.
"It's probably the hardest par-5,"
he said. "It's hard to hit it in two
shots. The fairways just doesn't
invite you to go for it in two. You
have to be in the right-center of


the fairway, an you'll still have 250
yards in. It's almost impossible to
hit it over the oak tree, and most
people play three shots."
If laying up is the route taken,
GOLF continued on 4B


Columbia baseball
is top seed for
district tourney.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinely@lakecityreporter.com
Mission One has been
accomplished by Columbia
High.
Coach Greg Gillman and
the Tigers set their sites
on coming into the District
5-4A tournament as the
No. 1 seed, and Columbia
will do just that starting
Monday against Ridgeview
High at Middleburg.
The Tigers became only
the second team in school
history to accomplish 20
wins by defeating rival
Suwannee High on Friday.
The next task is to bring
home a district title.
Ridgeview will enter the


State titlist


Tigers' Bessant.
dominates class
by 30 pounds.
From staff reports

Columbia High's Brach
Bessant has been chasing
a state weightlifting cham-
pionship for a while and he
won it going away at the
meet in New Port Richey
on Saturday.
Bessant coupled a
395-pound bench press with
a 315 clean and jerk and his
710 total topped the Class
2A 238-pound weight class


by 30 pounds.
"It feels good," Bessant
said. "After four years I am
finally going to get a ring. It
is kind of bittersweet. Todd
(Steward) is one of my real
good friends and I wanted
him to come out with one."
Steward had to settle
for second at 219 pounds
at 370-320-690, when he
missed on his final clean
and jerk attempt.
Fontaine Woodbury (238-
pound class) and Barnabas
Madison (154 pounds)
placed eighth.
UFTERS continued on 2B


game as the underdog to
the top-seeded Tigers after
knocking off Lee High, 6-0,
in a play-in game.
"They're a very young
team with a young staff,"
Gillman said. 'They are
heavily ninth- and 10th-
graders. I was a little sur-
prised with the win over
Lee, because I don't think
they had won a district
game. Come Monday morn-
ing, however, everyone is
0-0."
Still, Gillman feels like
the Tigers have the fire-
power to come out with
a win if they hit on all
cylinders.
"It's a game we expect
to win, but one we don't
want to go in with the
attitude that we've already
won it getting off the bus,"
he said. "We have to go in
and do what we have to do.


There are no reservations
for Thursday to go play. We
have to live to play another
day."
The Tigers have worked
their way to 20 wins behind
solid pitching and precise
hitting throughout the
season. The team has a
combined .359 batting aver-
age and holds a combined
2.37 ERA.
Blake King and Kellan
Bailey are the leading arms
for the Tigers. King has a
1.24 ERA for the season,
which is best on the team.
He's logged 50 innings this
season, while giving up nine
earned runs and 35 hits,
and has a 9-1 record.
Bailey, just a sophomore,
is second on the team with
a 5-1 record this season.
Bailey's ERA registers
TIGERS continued on 3B


nine


Mission continues


4 ,


. .'.- - . . . .,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Brandon Scott swings-at a pitch Wednesday
night in a game against Fort White High.


Ir I ' . . ~ � ` ,


L: ;- : - � ------











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
FOX - NASCAR, Sprint Cup,Aaron's
499, at Talladega, Ala.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN - Missouri at Texas A&M
GOLF
9:30 am.
TGC - European PGA Tour,
Ballantine's Championship, final round, at
Jeju Island, South Korea (same-day tape)
I p.m.
CBS - Champions Tour, Legends of
Golf, final round, at Savannah, Ga.
TGC - PGA Tour, Zurich Classic of
New Orleans, final round
3 p.m.
CBS - PGA Tour, Zurich Classic of
New Orleans, final round
7 p.m.
TGC - Nationwide Tour, South
Georgia Classic, final round, at Valdosta.
Ga. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
TBS - Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee
WGN - Seattle at Chicago White
Sox
8 p.m.
ESPN -Atlanta at N.Y. Mets
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m.
SPEED - FIM World Superbike, at
Assen, Netherlands (same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ABC - Playoffs, first round, game 4,
Boston at Miami
3 p.m.
ABC - Playoffs, first round, game 4,
Cleveland at Chicago
7 p.m.
TNT - Playoffs, first round, game 4,
Dallas at San Antonio
9:30 p.m.
TNT - Playoffs, first round, game 4,
Denver at Utah
NBADL BASKETBALL
Midnight
VERSUS - Playoffs, finals, game I, Rio
Grande Valley at Tulsa
NHL HOCKEY
2 p.m.
NBC - Playoffs,Western Conference,
quarterfinals, game 6, Phoenix at Detroit
9 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs,game 6,Vancouver
at Los Angeles
RODEO
4 p.m.
VERSUS - PBR, Nile Invitational, at
Billings, Mont.
SOCCER
I p.m.
ESPN2- Spanish Primera Division

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN - L.A. Dodgers at N.Y Mets
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT - Playoffs, first round, game 4,
Orlando at Charlotte
8:30 p.m.
NBATV - Playoffs, first round, game
4,Atlanta at Milwaukee
10:30 p.m.
TNT - Playoffs, first round, game 5,
Portland at Phoenix
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs, Eastern
Conference quarterfinals, game 6,
Washington at Montreal
10 p.m.
VERSUS - Playoffs, conference
quarterfinals, teams TBA


BASEBALL

AL standings


Ta
N
Tc
Bc
Ba


M
De
Cl
CI
K;


0;
Se
Lo
Te


East Division
W L
impa Bay 12 5
ewYork 12 5
oronto 10 . 7
oston 7 10
altimore 2 15
Central Division
W L
innesota 12 5
etroit 9 8
eveland 8 9
hicago 7 11
ansas City 6 10
West Division
W L
akland II 8
battle 9 9
s Angeles 9 10
xas 7 9
Friday's Games
Boston 4. Baltimore 3
Toronto 6,Tampa Bay 5
Texas 5, Detroit 4


Pct GB
.706 -
.706 -
.588 2
.412 5
.118 10


LIFTERS

Continued From Page 1B

New Smyrna Beach High
ran away with the meet,
scoring 30 points. There was
a four-team tie for second at
13 points and Columbia was
tied with two other teams
with 12 points.
"It is good to let every-
body khow Columbia High
is still in there," coach
Quinton Callum said. "We
have strong kids and we
are going to be there. Me
and Coach (Dennis) Dotson
are happy for Brach and
very proud of him. He eats,
sleeps and breaths weight-
lifting and it is rare to find
a guy like that nowadays.
Todd was awesome. He had
a chance on his last lift and
he is capable of doing it."


Minnesota 8, Kansas City 3
Chicago White Sox 7, Seattle 6
Oakland 10, Cleveland 0
LA.Angels. 6, N.Y.Yankees 4
Saturday's Games
Cleveland 6, Oakland I
N.Y.Yankees 7, L.A.Angels I
Chicago White Sox 5, Seattle 4
Toronto atTampa Bay (n)
Baltimore at Boston (n)
Minnesota at Kansas City (n)
Detroit atTexas (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (D.Hernandez 0-3) at
Boston (Wakefield 0-1), 1:35 p.m.
Toronto (Morrow I -) at Tampa Bay
(Price 2-1), 1:40 p.m.
Seattle (J.Vargas 2-1) at ChicagoWhite
Sox (Danks 2-0), 2:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Slowey 2- 1) at Kansas City
(Bannister 0-I), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello I-I) at Texas
(C.Lewis 2-0), 3:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Vazquez 1-2) at L.A.
Angels (Kazmir I-I), 3:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 0-2) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez I-I).4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston (Beckett 1-0) at Toronto
(Eveland 2-0), 7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Bonderman I-I) at Texas
(Harrison 0-1), 8:05 p.m.
Seattle (FHernandez 2-0) at Kansas
City (Davies 1-I), 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (D.Huff 1-2) at L.A.Angels
(Jer.Weaver 2-0), 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 10 6 .625 -
Florida 9 7 .563 I
New York 9 9 .500 2
Washington 9 9 .500 2
Atlanta 8 9 .471 2/'
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 10 6 .625 -
Milwaukee 8 8 .500 2
Pittsburgh 7 9 .438 3
Chicago 7 10 .412 3'/
Cincinnati 7 II .389 4
Houston 6 10 .375 4
West Division
W L Pct GB.
San Diego II 6 .647 -
San Francisco 9' 7 .563 I'A
Colorado 8 8 .500 2'
Los Angeles 8 9 .471 3
Arizona. 7 9 '.438 3'/
Friday's Games
Washington 5, L.A. Dodgers I
N.Y. Mets 5,Atlanta 2
San Diego 10, Cincinnati 4
Houston 4, Pittsburgh 3
Chicago Cubs 8, Milwaukee I
Florida at Colorado, ppd., rain
Arizona 7, Philadelphia 4
San Francisco 4, St. Louis I
Saturday's Games
L.. Dodgers 4, Washington 3, 13
innings
N.Y. Mets 3,Atlanta I
San Diego 5, Cincinnati 0
Florida at Colorado (2) (n)
Pittsburgh at Houston (n)
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee (n)
Philadelphia at Arizona (n)
St. Louis at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
San Diego (Richard 0-2) at Cincinnati
(H.Bailey 0-1), 1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 1-0) at
Washington (Olsen 0-I), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 0-3) at Houston
(Myers 0-I), 2:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 1-0) at
Milwaukee (Bush I-0), 2:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Penny 2-0) at San Francisco
(Cain 0-0), 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-0) at
Arizona (R.Lopez 1-0), 4:10 p.m.
Florida (Volstad I-I) at Colorado (De
La Rosa 2-1), 5:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson I-I) at N.Y. Mets
(Pelfrey 3-0), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 2-0) at N.Y.
Mets (O.Perez 0-2), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Latos I-I) at Florida (Jo.
Johnson 1-1), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Lannan I-I) at Chicago
Cubs (Silva 2-0), 8:05 p.m.,
Pittsburgh (Duke 2-1) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 1-2),8:10 p.m.
Atlanta (T.Hudson 1-1) at St. Louis
(Lohse 0-1),8:15 p.m.
Arizona (Haren 2-1) at Colorado
(Hammel 0-1), 8:40 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 4-0) at San
Francisco (.Sa chez 1-1), 10:15 p.m.


BASKETBALL

NBA playoffs

FIRST ROUND
Friday
Boston 100, Miami 98
San Antonio 94, Dallas 90
Utah 105, Denver 93
Saturday
Orlando 90, Charlotte 86




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. i

I HORAC I


A: A


Saturday's


Portland 96, Phoenix 87
Atlanta at Milwaukee (n)
L.A.'Lakers at Oklahoma City (n)
Today
Boston at Miami. I p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Denver at Utah, 9:30 p.m.
Monday
Orlando at Charlotte, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Phoenix. 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Miami at Boston,TBA, if necessary
Chicago at Cleveland,TBA
San Antonio at Dallas,TBA
Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers,TBA


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Aaron's 499
Site:Talladega,Ala.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (FOX,
noon-5 p.m.).
Track:Talladega Superspeedway.
Race distance: 500 miles, 188 laps.
NATIONWIDE
Aaron's 312
Site:Talladega,Ala.
Schedule: Today, race, following Sprint
Cup race.
Track:Talladega Superspeedway.
Race distance: 311.22 miles, 117 laps.

Aaron's 499 lineup

AtTalladega (Ala.) Superspeedway
Saturday qualifying canceled,
lineup determined.by owner
points; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet.
2. (17)Matt Kenseth, Ford.
3.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford.
4. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet.
6.(18) Kyle Busch,Toyota.
7. (88) Dale EarnhardtJr., Chevrolet.
8. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet.
9. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge.
10. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolt.
II. (11) Denny Hamlin,Toyota.
12. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota.
13.(14)Tony Stewart,Chevrolet
14. (33) Clint Bowyer; Chevrolet
15. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford.
16. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet.
17. (56) Martin Truex Jr.,Toyota.
18. (98) Paul Menard, Ford.
19. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota.
20. (82) Scott Speed,Toyota.
21.(I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet
22. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford.
23.(43) AJ Allmendinger, Ford.
24. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya,
Chevrolet.
25. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge.
26. (6) David Ragan, Ford.
27. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford.
28. (47) Marcos Arhbrose,Toyota.
29. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge.
30. (00) David Reutimann.Toyota..
31. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet.
32. (71) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet
.33. (38) Kevin Conway, Ford.
34. (34)Travis Kvapil, Ford.
35.(37) Robert Richardson Jr.. Ford.
36. (26) David Stremme, Ford, 2009
owner winner.
37. (09) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 2009
owner winner. �
38. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota,
attempts.
39. (36) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet,
attempts.
40. (13) Max Papis,Toyota, attempts.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
attempts.
. 42. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota,
attempts.
43. (55) Michael Waltrip, Toyota,
attempts.
Failed to Qualify
44. (46) Terry Cook, Dodge.
45. (35) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet


HOCKEY

NHL playoffs

FIRST ROUND
Friday
Montreal 2,Washington I
Buffalo 4, Boston I
Vancouver 7, Los Angeles 2
Detroit 4, Phoenix I
Saturday
Chicago 5, Nashville 4, OT
Pittsburgh at-Ottawa (n)
San Jose at Colorado (n)
Today
Phoenix at Detroit 2 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Monday
Washington at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 9 p.m.
Colorado at San Jose, TBA, if
necessary

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


League reports,

Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follows.
SEXY SENIORS
Final standings
Team standings: 1. Perky
Pals (166-106); 2. Golden Oldies
(154-118); 3. (tie) The Pink Panthers,
Jo's Crew (152-120).
High Average: 1. Phyllis Benton
160; 2. Louise Atwood 150; 3. Yvonne
Finley 145. 1. Dan Ritter 175; 2. Lee
Evert 174; 3. Art Joubert 166.
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Taz (46-22);
2. Road Kill (46-22); 3. The Fantastic
4 (43.5-24.5).
High scratch game: 1. Liz Randall
205; 2. Norma Yeingst 180; 3. Maureen
Osborn 178. 1. (tie) A.J. Dariano, Carl
McGhghy 220; 3. Joe Cohrs 212;.
4. (tie) Robert Pond, Mike Rutter 211.
High scratch series: 1. Liz Randall
574; 2. Phyllis Benton 500; 3. Norma
Yeingst 498..1. Joe Cohrs 620; 2. A.J.
Dariano 616; 3. Tony Vasil 600.
High handicap game: 1. Maureen
SOsborn 243; 2. Liz Randall 237;
3. Lena Bower 226. 1. Mike Rutter
253; 2. Ken Williams 242; 3. A.J.
Dariano 238.
High handicap series: 1. Dori
Trunnell 673; 2. Liz Randall 670;
3. Phyllis Benton 635. 1. Tony Vasil
675; 2. (tie) A.J. Dariano, Mike Rutter
670; 4. Leonard Randall 637.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
169; .2. Mandy Deliberis 151;
3. Phyllis Benton 150.1. Joe Cohrs 193;
2. Mark Moore 187; 3. Carl McGhghy
183.
(results from April 18)
THURSDAY NITE MIXED
Team standings: 1. Wrecking
Crew (84-44); 2. John Deere Green
(76.5-51.5); 3. Party Time (70.5-57.5).
High.scratch game: 1. Liz Randall
236; 2. Kim Tice 191; 3. Karen Martin
163.1. Joe Cohrs 223; 2. Jack Devries
210; 3. Harold Van Hoy Sr. 188.
High scratch series: 1. Liz Randall
657; 2. Donna Evans 439; 3. Kim
Tice 438. 1. Joe Cohrs 589; 2. Jack
Deyries 555; 3. John Nettles 523.
High handicap game: 1. Liz
Randall 265; 2. Kim. Tice 228;
3. Cookie Reddick 222. 1. Gino
Frazier 242; 2. Harold Van Hoy Sr.
S241; 3. John Mason 240.
High handicap series: 1. Liz
Randall' 744; 2. Carol Frazier 631;
3. Okie Van Hoy 616. 1. John Nettles
649; 2.' Gino Frazier 647; 3. John
Mason 642.
High average: 1' Liz Randall 169;


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING


2. Phyllis Benton 150; 3. Kim Tice 134.
1. Joe Cohrs 199; 2. Brett Reddick
181;3. Leonard Randall 178.
(results from April 15)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Quirky Quad
(89-43);.2. Ups & Downs (75.5-56.5);
3. Jo's Crew (72.5-59.5).
High scratch game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 205; 2. Betty Carmichael 185;
3. Dede Young 184. 1. Bill Dolly
243; 2. Earl Hayward 220; 3. David
Duncan 208.
High scratch series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 521; 2. Betty Carmichael
495; 3. Phyllis Benton 491. 1. David
Duncan 578; 2. Dan Ritter 571; 3. (tie)
Lee Evert, Bill Dolly 545.
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 253; 2. Dede Young 232;
3. Susan Stanfield 229. 1. Bill Dolly
261; 2. Earl Hayward 254; 3. Vernon
Black 243.
High handicap series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 668; 2. Bea Purdy 624; 3. Betty
Carmichael.621.1. Earl Hayward 671;
2. Frank Aiello.668; 3. Winton Brewer
666.
High average: 1..Phyllis Benton
157; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 153;
3. Betty Carmichael 153. 1. Bill Dolly
180; 2. Lee Evert 180; 3. Art Joubert
169.
(results from April 15)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Maggie
Battle 181; 2. Lori Davis 178; 3. Pat
Fennell 177. 1. Tom Sewejkis 221;
2. George Mulligan. 215; 3. Mark
Rowland 204.
High scratch series: 1. Lori Davis
483; 2. Maggie Battle 477; 3. Pat
Fennell 476. 1. Tom Sewejkis 599;
2. Mark Davis 572; 3. George Mulligan
560.
High handicap game: 1. Hillary
Yager 240; 2. Susie Flick 229; 3. (tie)
Carl Wende, Bertha Black 228..1. Tim
Thomas 250; 2. (tie) George Mulligan,
Billie Walker 242; 4. Bobby Robinson
234.
High handicap series: 1. Brandy
Watson 652; 2. Pat Fennell 650;
3. Staci Greaves 628. 1. Michael
Mclnally 680; 2. Tom Sewejkis 650;
3. Mark Rowland 645.
High average: 1. Maggie Battle
161; 1. Tom Sewejkis 189.
(results from April 20)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. -Ronsonet
Buick (40-24); 2. Club Basement
(40-24); 3. Budweiser (37-27).
High scratch game: 1. Doc Nichols
269; 2. Mark Scheiders 264; 3. George
Rye Jr. 253.
High scratch series: 1. Jim Rhoads


Saturday called off at Talladega


Associated Press


TALLADEGA, Ala.
- NASCAR canceled all
Saturday track activity at
Talladega Superspeedway
because, of threats of
extended periods of severe
weather.
Track officials said the
decision was made on advice
from the Talladega County


ACROSS

1 Berry product
4 Macrame unit
8 Popeye's Olive

11 Checkup
13 By mouth
14 Jellyfish habi-
tat
15 Thomas -
Edison
16 Mischievous
18 Tabloids "mon-
ster"
20 The Keystone

21 Fish-to-be
22 Slugger's stat
24 Not durable
27 Talks boastful-
ly
30 Female rabbits
31 Implores
32 Med. printout
34 Sault - Marie
35 Hudson Bay
tribe
36 Remunerated


Emergency Management
Agency and the National
Weather Service, which
said Talladega County was
one of the areas in Alabama
facing a high risk of severe
thunderstorms and torna-
does on Saturday.
The Nationwide Series
race scheduled for Saturday
will now be held today
following the Sprint Cup


37 Hormel rival
39 Pop quizzes
40 Rug rat
41 "Krazy -"
42 Mr. Greenspan
45 Lacking the
means
49 Type of kit (2
wds.)
53 Burglar's "key"
54 - Arbor, Mich.
55 Drachma's
successor
56 Lobby furnish-
ing
57 Hwy.
58 Really skimps
59 Dues payer, for
short

DOWN


Series race.
Rain last weekend in
Texas washed out both Cup
and Nationwide events, and
they were run back-to-back
on Monday. Drivers who
competed in both series
totaled 801 miles of racing.
There are 10 drivers
scheduled to. run both
races today, which would-
total 811.30 miles.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

HEM SPAR BLOB
ARI TUBE OIWIA

HARBORED DINA
TAUPE ADDS
PGE USE
LIGIEUISIE
SIAMIBIA IINUIRE ID
UTA PALI BOO
PE G N XT AL I
NI G H T S I VY LL
L AS FL[A
PIEIE L E THAIN
AIDA DE VII LRAY
SPUN AMEN I
PIECS BURG BEN


1 Novelist - 6 W. Hemisphere
Auel pact
2 Shaft 7 RNs' supply
3 Dallas cagers 8 Nobel Prize city
4 Seoul's locale 9 Shrill bark
5 Gun lobby 10 Fixes the table


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


inls Reservea. . - .

IFY




PEDo -
C WHAT THE 5TRANPE2P
S BOATERS CAME UP
WITH TO OET OFF
TED THE ISL-ANP.
S Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

OF L 'TI ' 'TOF

(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: CRAZE USURY JUGGLE BOILED
Answer: How the professor got his doctorate -
BY DEGREES "


12 Stoneworkers
17 Quite similar
19 Poison-
22 Storm
23 Urban trans-
port
24 NFL scores
25 Jot
26 Poet's con-
traction
27 Turn aside
28 Herbal brews
29 Short play
31 Very dry
33 Mdse.
35 Dove's cry
36 Flower parts
38 Natural elevs.
39 Light brown
41 Praise
42 On the hori-
zon
43 Bits of fiber
44 "Judith" com-
poser
46 Thunder
47 Biology sub-
ject
48 Gouda kin
50 Tiger's peg
51 Razor-billed
bird
52 III temper


@2010 by UFS, Inc.


688; 2. Doc Nichols 682; 3. Robert
Stone 680.
High handicap game: 1. Doc
Nichols 296; 2. Mark Scheiders 288;
3. (tie) Johnnie Croft III, Bill Coleman
277.
High handicap series: 1. Doc
Nichols 763; 2. Johnnie Croft III 756;
3. Jim Rhoads 724.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
204.01; 2. Bill Duncan 202.08;
3. Gregg Moravec 200.7.
(results from April 12)
DRIFTERS
Team standings: 1. PCP's; 2. Eric's
Green Machine; 3. Pin Busters.
High scratch game: 1. Oni Allen
181; 2. (tie) Jennifer Freeman, Phyllis
Benton 176. 1. Bill Dolly 258; 2. Rex
Robinson 247; 3. Adam Alford 213.
High scratch series: 1. Cythe
Shiver 476; 2. Phyllis Benton 472;
3. OnL Allen 465. 1. Bill Dolly 640;
2. Rex Robinson 599; 3. Adam Alford
564."
High handicap game: 1. Oni
Allen 237; 2. Jennifer Freeman 216;
3. Phyllis Benton 212. 1. Bill Dolly
280; 2. Rex Robinson 276; 3. Adam
Alford 220.
High handicap series: 1. Oni Allen
633; 2. Lori Zuccola 599; 3. Linda
Smith 589. 1. Bill Dolly 706; 2. Rex
Robinson 686; 3. Adam Alford 585.
High average: 1. Cythe Shiver 165;
2. Phyllis Benton 159. 1. Bill Dolly
176; 2. John Smith 175.
(results from April 13)
MONDAY LADIES
Team standings: 1. Mambajambas;
2. (tie) Alley Up, Gator Gals.
High scratch game: 1. Donna
Wynkoop 237; 2. Pat Gallegos 199;
3. Tootie Chesser 198.
High scratch series: 1. Donna
Wynkoop 597; 2. Pat Gallegos 544;
3. Tootie Chesser 522.
High handicap game: 1. Donna
Wynkoop 278; 2. Dorothee Call 245;
3. Tootie Chesser 243.
High handicap series: 1. Donna
Wynkoop 720; 2. Dorothee Call 666;
3. Shirley Highsmith 660.
High average: 1. Jackie Young
182; 2. Julia Myers 179.
(results from April 12)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Just Do It
(39-17); 2. Spare Us (36-20); 3. Alley
Oops (35-21).
High handicap game: 1. (tie)
Angie Meek, Shirley Highsmith 255;
3. Harriet Woods 243.
High handicap series: 1. Angie
Meek 673; 2. Donna Wynkoop 657;
3. Linda Adams 635.
(results from April 20)


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


mO








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY. APRIL 25, 2010
4


,, . . RECREATION ROUNDUP


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 3 file photo, Washington Redskins quarterback Jason Campbell throws a pass
against the San Diego Chargers in San Diego. The Oakland Raiders acquired Campbell in a
deal announced at the NFL Draft on Saturday.



A day for dealing


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
NEW YORK - Time to
draft and time to trade ...
and trade ... and trade.
NFL teams were almost
as busy dealing veter-
ans as they were making
draft picks Saturday. Jason
Campbell, LenDale White,
Kirk Morrison, Leon
Washington and Bryant
McFadden all changed
teams on the final day of
the draft.
With Donovan McNabb
inow - in Washington,
Campbell became expend-
able and was sent to
Oakland for a fourth-round
pick in 2012. Where that
leaves JaMarcus Russell,
the top overall pick of 2007
Swho has struggled with the
Raiders, is anyone's guess.
The Tennessee Titans
dealt White to Seattle,
reuniting the running back
with his college coach, Pete
Carroll. Later, the Seahawks
acquired another runner,
versatile Leon Washington,
from the Jets - who also
released standout guard
Alan Faneca.
"Just a great one-two
punch to add to our team,"
Carroll said of the new
runners, both of whom
come with question marks.


"We're real excited about
Leon.Washington. Our guys
loved him."
Washington missed half
of 2009 with a severe leg
injury. He re-signed with
the Jets, for whom he has
starred as a kick returned,
runner and receiver.
"It's a great opportunity,"
he said. "I'm just excited."
The burly and bruising
White helped Carroll win
a national' championship
with the Trojans. But he
lost his starting job to Chris
Johnson and had problems
being on time for meetings.
"As far as LenDale falling
out of favor, he practiced,".
Titans coach Jeff Fisher
said. "He was prepared to
play. I think I can't blame
him for wanting to play.
more. That's the kind of
players you want on your
roster. Considering the
circumstances,'he handled
things. There were issues
I don't need to bring up. I
thought he handled things
reasonably well."
Oakland also sent start-
ing middle linebacker
Morrison to Jacksonville as
the bartering got heavy in
Round 4.
"For me, it's a new begin-
ning," Morrison said.
Pittsburgh's fifth-
round deal brought back


McFadden, who won
a Super Bowl with the
Steelers in 2008. Arizona
drafted quarterback John
Skelton of Fordham with
the pick it received in the
trade.
The fourth round began
with St. Louis further bol-
stering its anemic offense by
taking wide receiver Mardy
Gilyard, who once lost his
scholarship at Cincinnati.
When new Seahawks
coach Carroll dealt for
one of his mainstays at
Southern California, get-
ting White from the Titans
for Seattle's fourth-rounder
and .sixth-rounder, Seattle
also received defensive
tackle Kevin Vickerson. The
Titans selected UCLA cor-
nerback Alterraun Verner
with the spot acquired in
the deal.
Southern Cal tight end
Anthony McCoy, who test-
ed positive for marijuana
earlier this year, went 185th
overall, also to Carroll in
Seattle.
All-American tight end
Aaron Hernandez of Florida
went to New England.
When DE Eric Norwood of
South Carolina was taken
by the Panthers at No. 124,
every eligible All-American
except placekicker Leigh
Tiffin had gone.


Quest for the Best AA runner-up
Diamond Extreme was runner-up in the 12-under AA division at the USSSA Quest for the
Best District 6 Championship in Lake City on April 17-18. Team members are (front row,
from left) Witt Register, Troy Brinkley, Tyler Morgan, Ryan Ellis, manager Kevin Stalter,
Aaron Barber, T.J. Price, Timothy Pierce, Ethan O'Hearn and Garrett Finnell. Back row
(from left) are coach Tommy Price, Dylan Stalter, coach Tommy Barber and Hunter Koon.


Quest for the Best Open runner-up
North Florida Ball Hawgs went 3-1 and was runner-up in the 12-under open division at the
USSSA Quest for the Best District 6 Championship in Lake City on April 17-18. Team
members are (front row, from left) Harrison Shubert, Tyler Myrick, Lucas Bedenbaugh,
Rhett Willis, Nic Tyre, Alex Mitchell and Logan Bedenbaugh. Back row (from left) are
coach David Bedenbaugh, Jake Thomas, Jake Bates, manager Jason Bates,
Kaleb Thomas, Jordan Culp and coach Billy Murphy.


Pop Warner Football fundraiser, sign-up


From staff reports

The - Richardson
Conununity Center .Annie
Mattox North Advisory
Council is selling tickets
to raise money for its Pop
Warner Football youth
teams.
The fundraiser offer is
a $25 for a fully cooked
plm----


Boston butt.
For details on the fund-
raiser, call Kim Stephens
at 623-2954 or e-mail
sfl69303@allstate.com.
Registration dates have
been set for Pop Warner
fall league play for,new
participants.
Sign-up is at Richardson
Community Center in two


age groups.
The times and dates
are: 5-9 p.m. June 18,
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 19, and
5-7:30, p.m. June 22.
Registration is on a first
come-first serve basis.
For details, call Pop
Warner Lake City
Association president Mario
Coppock at 754-7095.


------mm----.


71 $4$Qm i
s 11i.


________________________________~f|B~ I MW
VV l mv

TIGERS: Play Ridgeview on.Monday 1 Pair Eyeglasses 2 Complete Pair
Continued From Page 1B Includes lenses & frames. Eyeglasses
at 2.14; he's given up 10 21 dingers on the season, translates into a district Some restrictions apply. Includes Lenses & Frames
earned runs and leads the Five players (Blackwell, championship. Some restrictions apply.
team with 30 strikeouts. Sweat, Kirkman, Bailey and "We have nothing to COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES APRIL 30, 2010 COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES APRIL 30, 2010
t nth it;.-l L iL. ll h i T iJ U TUll Jtq 1 ) hnlu, " ln n "WT l


oL)Utll o ILll Will Uw e
counted on in the district
tournament.
The Tigers' bats are just
as deadly. Four batters
(King, Mikey Kirkman,
Zach Espenship and
Jamison Rossin) are batting
above .400.
Rossin leads the team
with a .556 batting aver-
age after taking over a
designated-hitter role for
the team recently. His big-
gest moment came with a
three-run homer in a win
against Fort White High on
Wednesday.
Espenship leads all bat-
ters that have had at least
70 at bats this season. He
enters the tournament with
a .450 batting average and
has scored 25 runs.
Cody Blackwell pro-
vides the firepower for the
Tigers. He leads the team
with eight homers and 34
RBIs. Blackwell bats .317 as
the cleanup hitter.
At the top of the order,
Cameron Sweat bats .361
and leads the team with
eight doubles. He's also
homered twice.
The Tigers have power
throughout the order with


jaOuu o in aULUIIo ilovc n ll-
tiple home runs.
Columbia hopes it all




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- -


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCENES FROM SPORTS


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


TOP LEFT: Columbia High's girls tennis team advanced to the state tournament with wins
over Pedro Menendez High and Ridgeview High last week. Susy Romero, returning a serve
against Ridgeview, won both her matches at No. 3 singles.

ABOVE: Columbia's Leandra Neal returns a ball in her win in the Ridgeview match on
Thursday. Neal also won on Tuesday against Menendez. As the district champion, Neal is the
first No. 1 Lady Tiger player to make state since 1992.

LEFT: Columbia High and host Fort White High played baseball on Wednesday with the
Tigers winning 6-4. The Indians' Jonathan Dupree (15) is chased back to first base. Both
teams play in district tournaments this week.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Orlando Magic's Dwight Howard (12) shoots over Charlotte
Bobcats' Gerald Wallace (3) during Game 3 of their NBA
playoff basketball series in Charlotte, N.C., on Saturday.


Magic go up, 3-0


Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C.
- With their superstar
center stuck on the bench
again, the Orlando Magic
showed the depth, grit and
experience of a champion-
ship contender.
Jameer Nelson scored 32
points and the Magic over-
came Dwight Howard's
continuing foul trouble and
a loud, towel-waving crowd
in Charlotte's return to the
playoff stage to beat the
Bobcats 90-86 on Saturday,
taking a commanding
3-0 lead in their first-round
series.
Howard played only 26
minutes and fouled out
with 3:32 left. But Nelson
had a key bucket down the


stretch and backup Center
Marcin Gortat hit two free
throws with 12 seconds
left to put it away.
Stephen Jackson scored
19 points, but was 6 of 18
from the field and missed
a key 3-pointer in the final
minute for the Bobcats.

Blazers 96, Suns 87

PORTLAND, Ore.
- Brandon Roy made a
surprising return from
knee surgery and scored
10 points, including a key
3-pointer in the fourth
quarter, and the Portland
Trail Blazers evened their
playoff series with the
Phoenix Suns.
LaMarcus Aldridge had
31 points and 11 rebounds.


GOLF: Hidden greens a signature of back side


Continued From Page 1B
there's a fairway bunker to
avoid 100 yards out from
the green.
"For most golfers, hitting
out of a fairway bunker is
one of the hardest shots in
golf," Ste-Marie said. "Once
they hit the green, putting
is a little difficult. Even an
uphill putt is down grain, so
it's still going to be fast."
* The 12th hole gives
golfers an opportunity to
play a short par 4. The 317-
yard hole gives golfers an
opportunity to put the driv-
er away, but also gives the
longer hitters a risk-reward
situation.
"The big knockers can
try to go over the trees
on the corner," Ste-Marie
said. "The best play is a
hybrid or a 3-wood. The
ideal play takes the bunker
and trees out of play, and
will leave about 100 yards
into the green. It sounds
like a broken record, but
the green makes the hole
and the greens make the
course. It's just navigating
those little, subtle breaks."
* The second par 4 mea-
suring over 400 yards is the
402-yard 13th hole.
"It's straight downhill
with a fairway bunker to
the right," Ste-Marie said.
"From 150, there's a big
greenside bunker on the
right. The pin placement
varies on this hole."
Marie recommends aim-
ing for the middle of the


green, and getting out with
two putts. He again noted
how there's subtle breaks
in the green, but pointed
out that a ridge running
across the green adds to
the difficulty.
* Hole No. 14 doesn't
sound long when reading
the 349 yards off the score-
card, but a 90-degree turn
makes this dogleg a little
more challenging.
"There's a couple of
fairway bunkers, and the
longer hitters will try to
go over the bunker to the
right," Ste-Marie said. "The
average golfer aims at the
150-yard marker."
What makes, the 14th
more difficult is the inabil-
ity to see the entire gieen.
"You can see the flag, but
much of the green is hid-
den," Ste-Marie said. "It's a
two-tier green. In the front,
the putt is downhill, and
it's exceptionally fast. In the
back it's an uphill putt that's
a little slower, but if you're
pin high you're going to
have a big breaking putt
from left to right or right to
left. You have to make sure
you're at the right level."
N Hidden greens is a
signature of the back nine
at The Country Club as the
par-3 15th hides much of its
green as well.
"You can see the front
right of the green,"
Ste-Marie said. "It makes
golfers uncomfortable, and


that makes it tougher out of
the gate. It's hard to carry
it there and keep it on the
green."
The green is hidden by
a bunker to the left, but
going long can also cause
problems. The green slopes
downhill at the back, and
brings bogey or worse into
play.
"Most golfers aim right,
take their two putt and go,"
Ste-Marie said. "If you miss
left, it's hard to get up and
down."
N Sandwiched in the mid-
dle of two par 3s is the par-
5 16th. Measuring at 515
yards from the blue tees,
this hole is-one of the last
birdie opportunities on the
course.
"It's a dogleg that turns
almost 90 degrees to the
left," Ste-Marie said. "The
drive is downhill, and the
big hitters can go over
the trees. For the average
hitters, the lake is going
to come into play on the
second shot. What makes
the hole hard is that golfers
have to stand on uneven
lies."
To hit the green in two
shots, most golfers will still
have to take out a long wood
or hybrid. A good drive will
leave anywhere from 220-
250 into the green.
"You have to make sure
to carry your second shot,"
Ste-Marie said.
For golfers that play it


safe and lay up on the par 5,
Ste-Marie calls the 16th one
of the most difficult to putt.
Par is a good score
for golfers that don't hit
the green on their second
shot.
* The 168-yard, par-3
17th is guarded by a kidney-
shaped bunker. Missing the
green in any position will
leave golfers in a difficult
position to make par.
"If they miss, it's a tough
up and down," Ste-Marie
said. "If they're left, it's a
tough two-putt. If-the pin
is the front, and a golfer
can hit the green, birdie is
achievable. Club selection
is very important due to the
pin placement."
* The final hole at The
Country Club of Lake City
has one of the tightest land-
ing areas for a drive on the
course. Measuring at 341
yards, the par-4 18th is a
difficult finishing hole for
most golfers.
"If you miss in the bunker
or to the left, the green is
very hard to hit," Ste-Marie
said. "It's very important
to hit the green. "There's
a greenside bunker, and
being to the right there's
worse trouble."
'The green slopes from
the back to the front, and
I can't stress enough how
the character of this course
is the slope. If you can putt
well, you really have an
advantage."


Players exit toward the clubhouse after finishing play on No. 18 at The Country Club at Lake City.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter











Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, April 25, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS


Musical stimulation

Live performances, events help economic recovery


Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcast.net

Finding,

the driving

process for

Success

When we are motivated
by goals that have deep
meaning, by dreams that
need completion, by pure
love that needs expressing,
then we truly live life.
- Greg Anderson
wo years ago,
I was lucky
enough to
be invited
by Fringe
Benefits Management
Company's President and
Florida Sterling Council
Board Member Lorraine
Strickland to attend the cer-
emony for the Governor's
Sterling Award in Orlando.
Prior to that time, I had
heard about the Sterling
Award, but I did not know
/exactly what it did or how
it operated. What I remem-
ber most about the ceremo-
ny was the absolute glee
that was apparent on the
faces of the staff of the win-
ning companies. That more
than made up for having to
wear a tux, which is not my
favorite thing to do, at all.
The Governor's Sterling
Award is presented to both
governmental agencies and
private businesses, and for
each winner, it seemed as if
the entire staff was on the
stage to receive the award.
I have never seen a happier
group than the recipients of
this very prestigious honor.
The Sterling Award is to
the state of Florida what
the Malcolm Baldridge
National Quality Award is
to the entire nation. Both
- programs seek to improve
the overall performance and
bottom line of each organi-
zation (whether for profit
or not-for-profit) through
process improvement.
- The Sterling process'
evaluates each applicant's
effectiveness in seven
areas: leadership, strate-
gic planning, customer
focus, measurement and
analysis, employee focus,
process management, and
of course, results. Clearly,
this award understands
how important processes
and process improvement
are to making organiza-
tions successful. They have
a very well-thought-out but
demanding path for achiev-
ing this award, and outside
examiners are brought in
to evaluate each firm.
To me, whether an
organization wins or not,
Merely going through this
very effective application
process is the real value as
it brings about some very
significant changes. I sit on
the boards of two organiza-
tions that are going up for
the Sterling Award, and I
have seen first-hand how
simply starting the applica-
tion process has triggered
changes in both staff
motivation and process
improvement.
Leading up to the
Sterling Award ceremony,
they hold their annual
conference, which helps
to educate and train staff
on how they can achieve
this prestigious award. But
SUCCESS continued on 2C


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

weeks in the
Suwannee River
Valley area have
been busy with
tourists attending major
events at the Sprit of the
Suwannee Music Park.
The natural compo-
nents of the springs in the
area and events featuring
national artists makes
tourists want to come and
spend time there, said
James Cornett, SOSMP
president/CEO.
"It puts the community
on the map nationally," he
said. "Combined with,the
natural beauty, we've got
a heck of a tourist attrac-
tiop."
But certain events
provide more of an eco-
nomic impact for Columbia
County than others.
The sixth annual
Wanee Festival ran April
15-17. It annually draws
about 20,000 people,
said Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council exec-
utive director.
"I saw an aerial photo
of people around the main
stage at Wanee and all I
could go is, "Wow,"' he
said.


The Wanee Festival annually draws around 20,000 people, and along with other festivals, draws hundreds of thousands of
visitors to the area each year.


Suwannee River Jam,
which wrapped up its
19th year Saturday, has
an equally large crowd,
Campbell said. Both events
started small, but over time


-.-
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sony senior producer Travis Williams (left) trains Jen Steele
to play on a 3-D console on a Sony PlayStation 3 at the 3-D
Gaming Summit held at the Universal City in Los Angeles on
Thursday.

3-D video gaming

aspires to become

newest spectacle


By DERRIk J. LANG
AP Entertainment Writer
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif.
- For moviegoers, watch-
ing a 3-D film is a relatively
easy experience. Audiences
didn't need to do anything
other than pay a few extra
bucks and slip on a pair
of special glasses to see
3-D versions of "Avatar" or
"Alice in Wonderland." For
gamers, however, enjoy-
ing a 3-D game requires a
bigger investment on their
part.
For example, to play
the popular online fantasy
game "World of Warcraft"
in 3-D, an inhabitant of
Azeroth would need hun-
dreds of dollars worth of
gear: a robust computer
setup with a compatible
graphics card, monitor
capable of displaying 3-D
and a pair of 3-D spec-
tacles. At this early stage,
it's an expense that many
virtual adventurers have
yet to adopt.
Dozens of.game develop-
ers, business executives
and other stereoscopic
3-D gaming advocates con-
verged at a Universal City
hotel this week to explore


that very conundrum and
witness the latest in 3-D
games at the first-ever 3-D
Gaming Summit. The con-
sensus was that whether
gamers push play on 3-D or
not, the home 3-D revolu-
tion is already in motion.
Television makers
Samsung and Panasonic
are now selling 3-D TVs.
Movie studios Universal
and Disney have released
3-D films on Blu-ray, such
as "Coraline" and "The
Polar Express." Discovery
Communications and
ESPN previously
announced they will launch
their own 3-D networks,
with ESPN first broadcast-
ing FIFA World Cup soccer
in 3-D this June.
"We've got to tell people
about it," said Phil Eisler,
general manager of
Nvidia's 3-D Vision, which
makes graphics cards with
3-D processing power.
"Hollywood has done a fan-
tastic job of educating con-
sumers and marketing to
them about the wonderful
experience in the theater.
We need to tell consum-
ers about the wonderful
experience that games are
in 3-D."


have expanded.
Wanee has more of an
economic impact specifical-
ly on the county, Campbell
said. Typically more out-
of-towners, from as far


as Connecticut, come to
the event and stay in local
hotels.
"I think that Wanee
tends to bring an affluent
crowd, especially out of the


area," Campbell said. 'That
says something about the
uniqueness of Wanee.
It's grown significantly
MUSIC continued on 2C


You wo n't




see this

ON THE NIGHTLY NEWS OR
A NATIONAL NEWS WEB SITE.


BUT YOU WILL FIND IT HERE.


News coverage of our
community and the
things that matter'most.


Local News.
Local Sports.
Local People.


Lake City Reporter


7<, .Siwe Call 755-5445


.�tojc C
Ye ,, ij�










LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


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US auto fleet


sales on the rise


By DEE-ANN DURBIN
AP-Auto Writer
DEARBORN, Mich.
- U.S. auto'sales to fleets
surged 47 percent in the
first quarter compared to
last year, an early sign of
economic improvement as
governments, construction
businesses and rental-car
companies began buying
again.
Automakers are expect-.
ing fleet sales to continue
to climb. Ford Motor Co.'s
Americas President Mark
Fields said Thursday the
company is expecting fur-
ther increases to daily-rent-
al and commercial fleets
for the rest of this year as
the economy improves,
although it believes gov-
ernment sales will level off.
Fields discussed the
industry's first-quarter fleet
sales jump at an event at
Ford's Dearborn headquar-
ters touting the automak-
er's fleet vehicles, includ-
ing a new police car due
out next year. Ford's fleet
sales soared 80 percent in
the first quarter over the
same quarter a year ago.
The fleet market is an
important one for Ford,
which is the largest player
in commercial fleets - or
businesses with five or
more vehicles - and gov-
ernment fleets, where it
controls 44 percent of the
market. Ford's F-series
truck is the top-selling fleet
vehicle in the country.
Fleet sales virtually
disappeared in 2009, as
governments, corporations
and rental-car companies
were hit by the recession.
For the full year, fleet sales
made up 17.1 percent of
the U.S. market, down
from a peak of 22 percent
in 2005, according to Jeff


Schuster, J.D. Power's
executive director of auto-
motive forecasting.
But things have been
improving. In January,
fleet sales increased to 25
percent of the market as
companies began to replen-
ish their supply. Schuster
said J.D. Power expects the
fleet percentage to eventu-
ally settle at around 19 per-
cent of industry sales.
The auto industry has a
complicated relationship
with fleets. If fleet Sales get
too high, they can damage
profits and flood the mar-
ket with used cars, Which
hurts residual values. Fleet
sales also are generally
less profitable than sales to
individual customers.
But Jesse Toprak, an
'economist for auto pricing
Web site TrueCarcom,
said fleet sales can be
profitable if they're
managed right. They can
also be a good way to get
customers to try vehicles
that they might not
otherwise have been
introduced to.
'There's so much volatil-
ity now, with this economy,
it requires constant moni-
toring," Toprak said.
Toprak and Schuster
said they're not concerned
about high fleet sales in
the first quarter because
companies needed to make
up for last year.
Historically, Detroit auto-
makers had heavy sales
to daily-rental companies,
but General Motors Co.
and Ford have cut back in
recent years to help repair
brand image and residual
values. Ford says 43 per-
cent of its fleet sales now
go to daily-rental firms,
compared to an average of
66 percent for other fleet
sellers.


Country music singer John.
Anderson performs on the
main stage at the Suwannee
River Jam at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park in
2009. The Jam, which ended
Saturday, attracts thousands
of visitors from around the
area, which helps stimulate
the local economy. Those
attending the event often
shop locally and stay in local
hotels, which has a direct
affect on the area's economy.


MUSIC: Thousands attend Wanee, Jam festivals
Continued From Page 1C


and become a specialized
event."
i Suwannee River Jam
attendees are usually from
the area and more likely
daytrippers, Campbell said.
People-camp typically out
at the SOSMP during the
event.
The Jam draws quite
a crowd like Wanee, but
attendees don't necessarily
come to Columbia County,
he said.
The Jam started
originally as being mar-


keted toward local people,
but now folks from out of
town are finding out about
it, Cornett said. More
local people are starting
to attend Wanee, which
began as an event to
attract people from out-of-
state.
Events promoting tour-
ism are a tremendous
resource for any area, he
said.
'Tourism in the com-
munity is underestimated
on its potential impact on


the community," he said.
"People have to be ready
to embrace it and help
encourage it."
The park has several
events throughout the year
to promote tourism in the
Suwannee River Valley
area.
"People are gener-
ally here for four days,"
Cornett said. "A lot camp
at the park and a lot go to
various hotels, Walmart,
gas stations and restau-
rants."


In the past 30 days,
approximately 100,000
have attended SOSMP
events.
"Most are affluent
people and have plenty
money to bring," Cornett
said. "We're hoping the
Suwannee River Valley
embraces tourism and the
dollars it offers."
"Welcome guests with
Suwannee hospitality, and
they'll have a wonderful
time and keep coming
back," he said.


SUCCESS: Right process for the right business


Continued From Page 1C
more importantly, it dem-
onstrates how to become a
more efficient and effective
organization. Their 2010
conference will be held
June 2-4 in Orlando, and
they will cover topics such
as "How to Avoid the Four
Human Ailments: Pitfalls
that Hold Us Back" and
"Leadership ... Let's Keep
it Real." It is an extremely


informative conference,
and I will be attending.
I was so impressed with
the entire process that I,
along with several oth-
ers, finally nagged John
Pieno, the executive direc-
tor of the Florida Sterling
Council, into developing a
Sterling process for small
businesses. Called the
Small Business Blueprint,


this is a series of work-
shops that brings the guts
of the Sterling Award to
small firms, and many
small business owners
have shared with me how
valuable this training has
been for them.
Whether you are a large
business, small business,
government entity or a non-
profit, Sterling has some-


thing for your organization.
You can get so much more
information about this orga-
nization at their Web site,
floridasterling.com.
You can do this!
* FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is,
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you 'II laugh all
the way to the bank.
.....................hn.... t .... . y... /.. k...... .......................


Future's Now for Netflix
Do you think of Netflix (Nasdaq:
NFLX) as a DVD-mailing service
or an online video site? It's currently
a little of both, but the disc-mailing
portion of the service is likely to
become merely an afterthought
within the next few years.
Instant-watch views are growing,
and some researchers suggest that
they might already outnumber
DVD shipments. Netflix manage-
ment says that 48 percent of its
customers viewed some streaming
media last quarter, up from 42 per-
cent the previous quarter. At the
same time, the company added
more than a million new net sub-
scribers. Since Netflix likes to
drop you onto the "Watch
Instantly" homepage whenever
you click in, the growth should
not be surprising.
There's much more to
come as the addressable
market for streaming views
continues to flourish.
It's getting harder to find a TV
set or Blu-rayplayer that doesn't
support Netflix streaming these
days, and streaming is also possible
to the Nintendo Wii, the Sony PS3,
the Microsoft Xbox 360, and recent
TiVo boxes, as well.
Blockbuster is fighting for sur-
vival and dipping its badly burned
toes into the streaming waters, but it
may be too little, too late. For Net-
flix, the future is already here. The
rest of the field is just playing catch-
up. (Netflix is a "Motley Fool Stock
Advisor" recommendation.)


I I


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


t

c
s

(














Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW




The Week in Review


Weekiv Stnck Exrhanae Hiahliahts


A NYSE A Amex Nasdaq

7,701.61 +116.99 1,982.28 +46.52 2,530.15 +48.89


Gainers (2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
CPI 25.76+10.81 +72.3 CompTch 2.80 +.68 +32.1 DearbmBc 3.96 +2.53+176.9
CenPacF 3.35 +1,23 +58.0 MtnPDiag 2.65 +.53 +25.1 MBTFnl 3.15 +1.86+144.2
ComellCos 2731 +8.84 +47.9 SearchMed 5.29 +1.04 +24.5 GenFinun 2.24 +1.08 +93.1
GrayTelev 4.53 +1.28 +39.4 Geokinetics 9.55 +1.66 +21.0 CmstkHme 3.16 +1.46 +85.9
CapitolBcp 348 +96 +38.1 Neuralstem 2.81 +.47 +20.1 FNBUtd 2.16 +.98 +83.1
BankAtl A 294 +.80 +37.4 ASpectRlty 22.77 +3.77 +19.8 PacCapB 5.11 +2.23 +77.4
TCFFnwl 6.36 +1.71 +36.8 ContMatls 17.50 +2.50 +16.7 AspenBio 3.74 +1.42 +61.2
WstnAliB 8.73 +2.28 +35.3 AdcareHwt 3.00 +.40 +15.4 FPBBncp 2.28 +.86 +60.2
FedAgrc 20.74 +5.11 +32.7 OrienPap n 10.80 +1.30 +13.7 CadenceFn 4.29 +1.60 +59.5
HovnanE 7.14 +1.75 +32.5 PacGE pfG 23.25 +2.65 +12.9 RivrvwBcp 3.66 +1.35 +58.4

LOSer (S2 or more) Losers ($2or more) Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
MLSPRt5-102.34 -.66 -22.0 RexahnPh 2.41 -.43 -15.1 AcuraPh 4.02 -1.84 -31.4
DirREBear 6.84 -1.59 -18.9 Engex 4.00 -.58 -12.7 Vitacostn 9.41 -3.17 -25.2
IFM nvn 5.10 -1.18 -18.8 ChiArmM 6.21 -.71 -10.3 ChiJoJors 4.65 -1.55 -25.0
Baxter 49.32 -9.78 -16.5 UnivPwr 3.06 -.34 -10.0 RetOppun 12.00 -3.50 -22.6
BkA BMRE104,95 -.93 -15.8 AMCON 53.50 -5.87- -9.9 ParkBcp 4.25 -.99 -18.9
McClatchy 5.52 -.94 -14.6 B&HO 4.45 -.46 -9.3 CdnSolar 18.32 -3.77 -17.1
NokiaCp 12.76 -2.18 -14.6 PacBkrMg 8.85 -.90 -9.2 Affymetrix 6.68-1.32 -16.5
NwcstlpfB 16.30-2.64 -13.9 SparkNet 3.45 -.35 -9.2 IntrCon 3.85 -.72 -15.7
BkASCBktO 646 -.98 -13.2 BcpNJ 11.43 -1.12 -8.9 Encormrrs 4.63 -.83 -15.2
LaBch 5,1,1 -,78 -13.2 VirnetX 5.00 -.47 -8.6 CombiMtrx 3.99 -.68 -14.6

Most Active ($1 or more) Most Active (si or more) Most Active ($1 or more
Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 51700684 4.86 +.30 NAPall g 178257 4.98 -.25 PwShs QQQ408907050.52 +.99
BkofAm 11052118 18.43 +.02 NwGoldg 156483 5.70 +.55 Microsoft 3752316 30.96 +.29
S&P500ETF9050252121.81+2.45 GoldStrg 148878 4.33 +.41 Intel 3390526 24.04 +.12
SPDR Fncl8015381 16.78 +.42 RexahnPh 146215 2.41 -.43 HuntBnk 2948704 7.17+1.61
QwestCm 4967952 5.28 -.07 VantageDd 125137 1.78 +.06 SiriusXM h2750040 1.12 +.04
FordM 4691187 14.21 +.79 BootsCoots116036 2.95 +.01 ETrade 2495307 1.90 +.16
DirFBearrs4691118 11.09-1.09 NovaGldg 107606 8.07 +.57 Qualcom 2195054 38.25 -4:49
AmbacF h3917617 1.96 +.20 Taseko 99007 5.96 -.03 Cisco 2163794 27.47 +.49
SpnntNex 3638093 4.32 +.24 Hyperdyn 96468 1.23 -.40 Yahoo 1893765 17.64 -.53
Pfizer 3566187 16.91 +.11 NIVSIntT 81277 3.30 -.12 Popular 1820886 3.91 +.11

Diary Diary Diary
Advanced 2,497 Advanced 335 Advanced' 1,998
Declined 697 Declined 210 Declined 852
New Highs 911 New Highs , 64 New Highs 613
New Lows 34 New Lows 7 New Lows 38
Total issues 3,245 Totalissues 572 Total issues 2,919
Unchanged 51 Unchanged 27 Unchanged 69
Volume 28,954,855,067 Volume 588,741,865 Volume 11,928,120,085


- STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST '


II .... - .......
mist misy nt


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&Tlnc NY 1.68 26.25 +.32 +1.2 -6.4
AmbcFh NY ... 1.96 +.20 +11.4+136.1
AutoZone NY ... 184.05 +3.94 +2.2 +16.4
BkofAm NY .04 18.43 +.02 +0.1 +22.4
BobEvn Nasd .72 33.61 +1.34 +4.2 +16.1
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 15.90 +.04 +0.3 -.6
CSX NY .96 56.82 +2.38 +4.4 +17.2
Chevron NY 2.72 82.67 +1.92 +2.4 +7.4
Cisco Nasd ... 27.47 +.49 +1.8 +14.7
Citgrp NY ... 4.86 +.30 +6.6 +46.8
CocaCI NY 1.76 53.88 -1.09 -2.0 -5.5
Delhaize NY 2.01 84.98 +1.24 +1.5 +10.8
DirFBearrs NY ... 11.09 -1.09 -8.9 -42.9
DirFBullrsNY .46 113.93 +9.54 +9.1 +53.7
ETrade Nasd .. 1.90 +.16 +9.2 +8.0
FPLGrp NY 2.00 51.30 +2.87 +5.9 -2.9
FamilyDIr NY .62 40.28 +1.87 +4.9 +44.7
FordM NY .. 14.21 +.79 +5.9 +42.1
GenElec NY .40 19.07 +.10 +0.5 +26.0
HomeDp NY .95 36.39 +1.38 +3.9 +25.8
HuntBnk Nasd .04 7.17 +1.61 +29.0 +96.4
iShEMkts NY .58 43.06 +.60 +1.4 +3.8'
iShR2K NY .75 74.13 +2.67 +3.7 +18.7
Intel Nasd .63 24.04 +.12 +0.5 +17.8
JPMorgChNY .20 44.94 -,61 -1.3 +8.0
Keycorp NY .04 9.19 +1.19 +14.9 +65.6
Lowes NY .36 28.22 +2.02 +7.7 +20.6
MGMMir NY ... 15.89 +1,52 +10.6 +74.2


Name Ex Div
McDnlds NY 2.20
Microsoft Nasd .52
NY Times NY
NobltyH Nasd ...
NokiaCp NY .56
OcciPet NY 1.32
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.92
Pfizer NY .72
Popular Nasd ...
Potash NY .40
PwShs OQQNasd .21
PrUShS&PNY
Qualcom Nasd .76
QwestCm NY .32
RegionsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.00
S&P500ETFNY 2.21
SearsHldgsNasd ...
SiriusXM hNasd
SouthnCo NY 1.82
SprintNex NY
SPDR FnclNY .20
TimeWarn NY .85
WalMart NY 1.21
WellsFargo NY .20
YRCWwd hNasd
Yahoo Nasd ...


WKly Wkly YTIU
Last Chg %Chg %Chg
71.15 +2.12 +3.1 +13.9
30.96 +.29 +0.9 j1I.6
11.61 -.74 -6.0 -6.1
10.40 +.28 +2.8 -.5
12.76 -2.18 -14.6 -.7
87.48 +2.42 +2.8 +7.6
32.00 +.91 +2.9 +20.3
64.71 -1.43 -2.2 +6.4
16.91 +.11 +0.7 -7.0
3.91 +.11 +2.9 +73.0
109.84 +2.04 +1.9 +1.2
50.52 +.99 +2.0 +10.4
28.49 -1.23 -4.1 -18.7
38.25 -4.49 -10.5 -17.3
5.28 -.07 -1.3 +25.4
8.95 +.65 +7.8 +69.2
47.35 +4.00 +9.2 +15.0
121.81 +2.45 +2.1 +9.3
122.01 +14.24 +13.2 +46.2
1.12 +.04 +3.5 +86.3
34.73 +.86 +2.5 +4.2
4.32 +.24 +5.9 +18.0
16.78 +.42 +2.6 +16.5
33.14 +.14 +0.4 +13.7
54.53 +.42 +0.8 +2.0
33.48 +.92 +2.8 +24.0
.74 +.10 +14.9 -11.9
17.64 -.53 -2.9 +5.1


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
II = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
ol at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. I = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's
net asset value, s = lund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
.Last Pvs Week


Prime Rate


rluIrII I ot PotI


3.25 3.25


0.75 0.75/b


Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.16 0.16
6-month - 0.24 0.22
5-year 2.59 2.46
10-year 3.81 3.77
30-year 4.66 4.67


:1'


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 11,204.28
1-week change: 185.62 (1.7%)
1 1 , 5 0 0 - . . - - , , : . . . -


9,500 O N D J


73.39 25.01 7.86 9.37 69.99


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


F M A


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Relurn/Rank Pct Mm Init
Name Onl ISMInsi NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
on.:* i~. C Il 5.i~n~~i iCH


F IMCO T.rlPiiR Ci
4, er,,: ,', Fu.'a,. ,I: rT .A 5T LG
Vanguard TotSlldx LB
Fidelity Contra LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
American Funds CpWIdGrlA m WS
Vanguard 5001nv LB
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Vanguard Instldx LB
Dodge & Cox Stock LV
American Funds.EurPacGrA m FB
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl
American Funds FnlnvA m LB
Fidelity Divrlnti d FG
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB
Vanguard 500Adml LB
Vanguard Welltn MA
Fidelity GrowCo LG
American Funds BondA m Cl
Vanguard Totlntl d FB
Fidelity LowPriStk d MB


-. v25
63,652
58,918
58,013
55,947
50,594
50,104
49,629
47,376
42,708
40,410
39,096
38,943
33,256
32,107
31,990
31,331
30,818
30,432
30,325
29,886
29,486
29,164
27,231
27,194
26,567


,-4t. Ci
+49.2/A
+43.2/C
+30.4/C
+41.8/D
+45.9/B
+37.1/B
+39.9/E
+46.1/B
+54.7/A
+42.7/C
+38.7/E
+55.7/A
+44.4/C
+14.7/C
+43.7/C
+41.4/D
+43.6/A
+31.8/D
+49.3/A
+46.0/B
+33.8/C
+52.8/A
+16.8/C
+47.0/B
+55.4/C


tJL S T.i )
5 7 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75- 250
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 100,000
NL 100,000
NL 10,000
NL 2,500
3.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500


CA -Conservatve Allocation, C -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV-Foren
Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Alokca on, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Spedaty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. M Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ABB Ltd .44
AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.12
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.68
AU Optron .09
AbtLab 1.76
Accenture .75
AMD
Aetna .04
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Aldlrish
Allstate .80
AlphaNRs ...
Attria 1.40
AmbacF h ...
AMovilL 1.22
AEagleOut .40
AEP 1.64
AmExp .72
AlntlGp rs ...
AmeriBrgs ,32
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .80
Annaly 2.69
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCbal .40
ArchDan .60
ATMOS 1.34
AvisBudg
Avon .88
BB&TCp .60
BHPBilILt 1.66
BJSvcs .20
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .76
BcoSantand .82
BcSBrasiln .20
BkofAm .04
BkNYMel .36
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .40
Baxter 1.16
BeazerHm ...
BerkH Bs ...
BestBuy .56
Blackstone 1.20
BlockHR .60
Blockbt h ...
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci
BrMySq 1.28
CB REllis ...
CBS B .20
CIGNA .04
CMS Eng .60
CSX .96
CVS Care .35
Calpine
CapOne .20
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.68
Cemex .40
CntryTel 2.90
,ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.72
Chimera .54
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .35
Coach .60
CocaCE .36
CocaCI 1.76
Comerica .20
ConocPhil 2.20
ConsolEngy.40
ConEd 2.38


... -1.24
11 +.81
17 +1.05
66 -2.50
... -1.01
12 +.32
... +.98
13 -1.06
19 +1.52
8 -.05
11 -.44
8 -.33
... +08
... +.20
. -.10
22 +1.34
69 +2.60
11 +.49
... +.20
+.11
21 +.31
11 +.29
25 +2.95
... +5.23
16 +1.25
... +.61
28 +.09
5 +.15
...-1.45
... +2.13
16 +.25
13 +.76
... +.44
23 -.46
35 +.52
... -1.09
... +2.67
40 +6.67
... -.07
... -.74
... -.22
88 +.02
... +.38
... -1.60
... +1.35
13 -9.78
... +1.12
23 +.23
15 +3.19
... +.16
11 +.13
... +.08
46 +4.34
... -.13
14 -.74
80 +1.17
34 +.97
7 -.50
17 +.66
19 +2.38
14 -.04
46 +1.35
18 +3.24
20 +3.80
49 +2.32
... +1.43
10 -1.73
... +1.01
16 +1.92
9 +.23
... +.30
65 +2.61
21 +1.31
19 -.12
18 -1.09
... +3.51
16 +2.04
15 +2.33
14 +.87


Name Div YId
ConstellEn .96 2.6
CtlAir B
Coming .20 1.0
Covidien .72 1.5
DRHorton .15 1.1
DTE 2.12 4.4
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .08 .6
DevonE .64 .9
DirFBear rs ...
DirFBull rs .46 .4
DirREBear .04 ..
DirxSCBear...
DirxSCBull 4.85 .3
DirxLCBear ...
DirxLCBull 8.22 2.5
Discover .08 .5
Disney .35 1.0
DomRescs1.83 4.4
DowChm .60 1.9
DukeEngy .96 5.9
Dynegy
EMC p ...
EIPasoCp .04 .3
EmersonE 1.34 2.5
EnCana gs .80 2.4
ExcoRes .12 .6
Exelon 2.10 4.8
ExxonMbl 1.68 2.4
FPLGrp 2.00 3.9
FannieMae ...
FstHorizon .80 ..
FirstEngy 2.20 5.9
FlagstrBh ...
FordM
FordM wt ...
ForestLab ...
FredMac ...
FMCG 1.20 1.5
FrontierCm1.00 12.8
GameStop ...
Gannett .16 .9
Gap .40 1.5
Genworth ...
Gerdau .16 .9
GoldFLtd .17 1.3
Goldcrpg .18 .4
GoldmanS 1.40 .9
Goodyear ...
GrtAtlPac
HRPT.Prp .48 5.9
Hallibrtn .36 1.0
HarleyD .40 1.1
HartfdFn .20 .7
HtMgmt ...
HeclaM
Hertz
HewlettP .32 .6
HomeDp .95 2.6
Honwlllntl 1.21 2.5
HostHotis .04 .2
HovnanE ...
iSAstla .66 2.7
iShBraz 2.72 3.7
iShHK .38 2.3
iShJapn .14 1.3
iSh Kor .32 . .6
iShSing .33 2.7
iSTaiwn .21 1.6
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .55 1.3
iShEMkts .58 1.3
iShB20T 3.68 4.1
iS Eafe 1.44 2.6
iShR2K .75 1.0
iShREst 1.86 3.5
ITW 1.24 2.4
IngerRd .28 .8


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
2 +.37 +6.2 37.35
-.97 +22.8 22.01
16 +.94 +7.9 20.84
...-1.90 +2.7 49.19
... +1.80 +30.4 14.17
15 +2.29 +10.0 47.93
-.86 +14.3 13.01
... +1.17 +24.5 18.42
+.25 +38.8 12.85
... +4.85 -4.7 70.04
... -1.09 -42.9 11.09
.. +9.54 +53.7 113.93
...-1.59 -46.6 6.84
... -.66 -45.1 5.41
... +7.24 +65.6 70.78
... -.84 -28.6 12.21
... +4.05 +28.5 67.48
9 +.90 +10.5 16.26
20 +.96 +14.1 36.79
14 +.59 +7.3 41.77
39 +.62 +12.8 31.16
14 +.24 -5.6 16.25
... +.06 -30.4 1.26
33 +.62 +14.4 19.98
... +1.41 +27.3 12.51
24 +.94 +23.8 52.74
11 +1.53 +.9 32.67
... +.01 -6.0 19.95
11 +.33-10.1 43.95
17 +1.31 +1.5 69.24
'13, +2.87 -2.9 51.30
... +5.1 1.24
... +.78 +10.4 14.80
13 -.34 -19.2 37.51
... +.05 +23.7 .74
18 +.79 +42.1 14.21
... +.63 +27.1 6.15
10 -.40 -14.7 27.40
... +.01 +3.4 1.52
14 -1.62 -.9 79.56
14 +.06 +.1 7.82
11 +.41 +14.9 25.22
9 +.24 +23.1 18.28
16 +1.06 +24.9 26.06
... +.86 +67.0 18.96
. +.23 +2.1 17.28
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... +1.46 +2.7 40.40
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..+.29 -24.9 8.86
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... +1.75 +85.9 7:14
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... +3.39 +16.9 53.68
20 +3.42 +9.3 52.43
27 -.06 +3.8 37.10


Name Div
IBM 2.20
IntlGame .24
IntPap .10
Interpublic ..
ItauUnibH .55
JPMorgCh .20
Jabil .28
JanusCap .04
JohnJn 2.16
JohnsnCtl .52
JnprNtwk ..
KB Home .25
Keycorp .04
Kimco .64
KingPhrm
Kinross g .10
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp
LVSands ...
LennarA .16
LillyEli 1.96
Limited .60
LincNat .04
LloydBkg 1.43
LaPac
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fncl .96
MGIC
MGMMir
Macys .20


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


13 -.64
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18 +.78
97 +.77
... -.38
17 -.61
... +.57
28 -.65
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7.35
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Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ARCA bio ...
ActivsBliz .15 1.3
AdobeSy .
AEternag ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp If .20 .8
Amazon
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
AmkorT If ...
Amylin
Apple Inc
ApidMatl .28 1.9
ArmHId .11 .9
ArrayBio
AsscdBanc .04 * .3
Atheros
Atmel
Autodesk ...
BMCSft ...
BedBath ...
Biogenldc ...
Bionovo h ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .32 .9
BrcdeCm
Bucyrus .10 .1
CA Inc .16 .7
CH Robins 1.00 1.6
Cadence
CdnSolar .
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CenlAl
CienaCorp ..
Cisco
CitizRepB
CitrixSys


.. +.81 +62.0 5.28
22 -.19 +4.4 11.60
53 +2.25 -1.4 36.25
... -.08 +45.0 1.17
44 +1.00 +35.0 34.22
22 +.28 +17.2 26.53
63 +1.46 +6.8 143.63
... +.78+150.4 6.11
12 -1.84 +4.1 58.88
15 +.40 +18.9 8.51
... -.65 +48.7 21.10
27+23.43 +28:5 270.83
... +.11 +3.8 14.47
... +.84 +38.9 11.89
... +.79 +35.6 3.81
... +.28 +36.1 14.98
38 +1.78 +22.8 42.04
...-.23 +24.3 5.73
65 +2.67 +34.7 34.22
18 +.70 +1.7 40.77
21 +2.51 +23.9 47.84
16 -1.05 -1.7 52.59
... +.04 +1.7 .48
7 +,42 +36.8 18.53
.. +52 +13.2 35.63
S+.18 -14.4 6.53
17 -1.41 +21.3 68.37
18 +.70 +4.8 23.54
29 +3.20 +4.9 61.58
... +.24 +22.7 7.35
13 -3.77 -36.4 18.32
36 -1.07 +7.4 59.81
.. +.01 -43.2 .65
.. -.03 -6.7 15.11
S+.50 +67.3 18.14
26 +.49 +14.7 27.47
... +.05 +95.7 1.35
39 -.02 +16.4 48.45


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Chg Last


CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Comc spcl .38
ConvOrgn h...
Costco .84
Cree Inc
Crocs
CybrSrce ...
Cyclacel ...
CypSemi
DearbrnBc ...
Delcath
Dell Inc ...
DItaPtr
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DryShips ...
ETrade
eBay
ElectArts
EricsnTel .19
EvrgrSIr
Expedia .28
FifthThird .04
FstNiagara .56
Flextrn
FosterWhl
Genzyme .
GileadSci ..
Google
HudsCity .60
HumGen
IntgDv
Intel .63
Intersil .48
Intuit
JA Solar ...


30 +.56 +17.6
15 +.64 +13.1
14 +.56 +13.5
... +.05 +58.2
23 +1.01 +1.7
70 -2.93 +40.5
+.42 +90.6
...+6.58 +27.4
-.25+130.8
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... +2.53+751.6
...+3.62+156.8
24 +.74 +21.9
+.09 +53.8
.. +1.20 +52.6
39 +1.09 +9.9
16 +.97. +8.3
-.26 +5.7
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13 -1.78 +4.3
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... +1.54 +34.5
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23 -.67 -6.0
23 +.92 +55.1
32 +,21 +4.9
... +.33 +12.9
12 +2.27 +8.7
... +.29 +10.0
13 -4.03 -3.7
25 -5.16 -12.1
12 -.78 -.8
... -3.60 -5.8
... +.27 - +8.7
22 +.12 +17.8
... -.70 +3.6
26 +.72 +17.8
... +.23 +6.7


Name Div
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc .60
KeryxBio ...
KnghtCap ...
Kulicke
LamResrch ...
Lattice
Level3
LibtyMlntA ..
LinearTch .92
MarvellT
Mattel .75
Maximlntg .80
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.36
MicronT
MicrOsoft .52
MdwstBch ...
NasdOMX ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
NorTrst 1.12
Novlus
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia .
OnSmcnd .
Oracle .20
PDLBio 1,00
PMC Sra .
Paccar .36
PacCapB
PacEthan
Palm Inc
PattUTI .20
PeopUtdF .62


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... +.32 +66.1 13.70
31 -.11 +19.6 6.52
1.7 ... +1.10 -4.6 34,48
21 -.30 +75.6 4.39
11 +.99 +1.3 15.60
. ... +60.1 8.63
47 +2.96 +9.4 42.90
58 ".80 +92.2 5.19
-.12 +1.3 1.55
38 -.01 +51.1 16.38
3.0 24 -.24 +1.6 31.04
+.08 +6.9 22.18
3.2 16 -.30 +17.8 23.54
3.9 80 -.19 +2.0 20.73
+.10 +44.3 4.85
4.5 34 +.46 +5.3 30.60
69 +.08 +4.2 11.00
1.7 16 +.29 +1.6 30.96
... ... +.30 +116.7 .78
... 16 +1.28 +14.4 22.68
... 35 +1.02 +5.3 36.17
.45+14.42 +81.0 99.73
.9 13 +.37 +17.8 16.12
.8 14 +.38 +16.2 18.50
2.0 18 -1.08 +7.5 56.31
. ... +1.15 +18.9 27.75
.. 20 +.51 +18.0 18.32
... -.62 -12.0 16.44
. 66 -.13 --2.9 8.56
.8 24 +.53 +8.0 26.48
15.6 6 +.14 -6.4 6.42
.. 15 -.24 +6.0 9.18
.7 .. +2,15 +32.5 48.04
. . +2.23+432.3 5.11
+.02 +64.8 1.17
-.56 -49.9 5.03
1.3 ... +1.20 +1.9 15.64


Name Div
Manpwl .74
MarathonO .96
MarinerEn ...
MktVGold .11
MktVRus .08
MarlntA .16
Marshlls ..04
Masco .30
MasseyEn .24
McMoRn ...
Mechel
Medtrnic .82
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Mirant
Monsanto 1.06
MonstrWw ...
Moodys .42
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
NCR Corp ..
NYSE Eur 1.20
Nabors
NBkGreece .31
NatGrid 2.89
NOilVarco .40
NatSemi .32
NYCmtyB 1.00
NY Times .
NewellRub .20





Name Div
PhaseFwd ...
Popular
PwShs QQQ.21
Powrwav ...
PrmWBc h
Qualcom .76
RF MicD
RschMotn ...
STEC
SanDisk ...
SeacoastBk...
SeagateT ...
Sequenom ...
SiriusXMh ...
SkywksSol ...
SoulhFnh ...
Staples .36
StarScient ..
Starbucks .40
SllDynam .30
StrlFWAh ...
Symantec ..
TDAmeritr ...
Tellabs .02
TevaPhrm .64
TriQuint
UAL
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.22
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 4.00
XOMA h
Xilinx .64
YRCWwdh...
Yahoo


53 -.49 -4.7 15.91 ZionBcp .04 .1


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.2 ... +4.34 +13.0 61.69
2.9 16 +1.06 +6.0 33.08
... 20 +.58+124.2 26.03
... +1.56 +4.3 48.21
.2 ... +.19 +13.6 35.42
.4 43 +3.69 +37.9 37.57
.4 ... +1.78,+87.0 10.19
1.6 ... +1.39 +32.9 18.35
.5 40 +2.18 +5.8 44.45
... ... -1.49 +72.9 13.87
...-1.55 +46.1 27.49
1.9 21 -.69 +.5 44.21
4.3 9 -.25 -3.0 35.46
1.6 34 +1.73 +33.2 47.10
... 16 +.35 +2.5 7.82
2 -.55 -25'1 11.44
1.6 22 +.93 -19.7 65.66
... ... +2.64 +4.9 18.25
1.6 15-1:17 -2.1 26.24
.6 40 +2.78 +7.9 31.94
.4 80 -.35 -10.0 53.78
... -.22 -8.6 7.09
19 -.80 +28.7 14.32
3.5 17 +1.62 +33.7 33.83
... +3.09 +3.3 22.61
9.9 ... -.47 -39.7 3.14"
5.7 ... +.41 -7.0 50.60
.9 13 +3.78 +4.9 46.26
2.1 57 -.40 -.6 15.27
6.0 14 -1.02 +14.0 16.54
... 10 -.74 -6.1 11.61
1.1 17 +1.05 +18.0 17.71


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
NewmtM .40 .8 19 +.95 +12.2 53.10
NiSource .92 5.5 20 +.39 +8.6 16.71
NobleCorp .20 .5 7 +3.25 +7.2 43.63
NokiaCp .56 4.4 ...-2.18 -.7 12.76
Nordstrm .64 1.4 24 +2.95 +22.1 45.90
NorflkSo 1.36 2.2 22 +1.41 +16.1 60.88
Nucor 1.44 3.1 ... +.42 -1.3 46.06
OcciPet 1.32 1.5 23 +2.42 +7.5 87.48
OfficeDpt ... ... ... +.44 +31.0 8.45
OilSvHT 1.81 .9 ... +9.70 +13.8 135.34
OldRepub .69 4.6 ... +1.34 +50.1 15.07
Omnicom .80 1.8 17'+2.84 +10.8 43.37
PG&ECp 1.82 4.1 14 +1.43 -1.5 43.96
PMI Grp ... ... ... -.45+163.1 6.63
PNC .40 .6 18 +6.62 +31.9 69.64
PatriotCoal ... ... 16 +1.91 +54.0 23.81
PeabdyE .28 .6 31 +3.19 +8.8 49.21
Penney .80 2.5 30 +.91 +20.3 32.00
PepcoHold1.08 6.5 16 -.11 -1.7 16.56
PepsiCo 1.92 3.0 17 -1.43 +6.4 64.71
Petrohawk .. ...... +.88 -3.2 23.23
PetrbrsA 1.07 2.8 ...+1.62 -8.7 38.72
Petrobras 1.07 2.5 ...+1.59 -8.6 43.59
Pfizer .72 4.3 9 +.11 -7.0 16.91
PhilipMor 2.32 4.5 15 +.40 +6.1 51.14
PhilipsEl .95 2.7 ... +2.59 +20.3 35.41
Pier ... ... 11 +.48 +85.5 9.44
Potash .40 .4 34 +2.04 +1.2 109.84
PrinFncl .50 1.6. 15,+2.00 +29.1 31.04.
PrUShS&P .. ... ... -1.23 -18.7 28.49
PrUIShDow ... ...... -.83 -16.1 24.72
ProUltQQ ... ...... +2.73 +20.7 71.80
PrUShQQQ ......... -.59 -20.1 15.21
ProUltSP .41 .9 .. +1.72 +18.8 45.43
ProUShl20 ... ... ... -.33 -5.0 47.37
PrUSCh25rs... ...... +.39 -7.4 38.86
ProUSRE rs... ...... -3.76 -32.1 25.48
ProUSOG rs... ... .. -4.71 -18.2 52.11
ProUltRE rs .50 1.1 ...+5.76 +36.6 47.06
ProUShtFn ..., ... ...-1.13 -29.9 16.98
ProUFinrs .30 .4 ...+4.43 +35.1 76.08
ProUSR2K .. ...... -1.33 -32.0 17.12
ProUSSP500... ...... -1.69 -27.0 26.50
ProUltCrude...... ... +.28 +7.6 13.65
ProgsvCp .16 .8 13 +.50 +16.0 20.86
ProLogis .60 4.5 ... -.14 -1.6 13.47
PulteGrp ... ... ... +2.09 +31.9 13.19
Questar .52 1.0 22 +5.26 +21.7 50.61
QwestCm .32 6.1 13 -.07 +25.4 5.28
RAIT Fin ... ... ... +.61 +126.7 2.97
RRIEngy ... ... 3 -.06 -28.8 4.07
RadianGrp .01 .1 ... +.44+150.8 18.33
RadioShk .25 1.1 14 -.15 +18.8 23.17
Raytheon 1.50 2.5 12 +1.40 +15.9 59.72
RegionsFn .04 .4 ... +.65 +69.2 8.95
RiteAid ... ... ... +.06 -6.0 1.42
Rowan ... ... 10+2.07 +43.6 32.50
RylCarb. .... ... 48 +1.70 +43.3 36.23
SAIC ... ... 15 +.49 -2.5 18.46
SLM Cp ...... 15 +.66 +18.4 13.34
SpdrDJIA 2.47 2.2 .. +1.78 +7.6 111.96
SpdrGold ... ... ... +1.95 +5.5 113.19
S&P500ETF2.21 1.8 ...+2.45 +9.3 121.81
SpdrHome .13 .7 ... +1.78 +30.0 19.64
SpdrKbwBk .25 .9 ... +1.46 +35.7 28.72
SpdrKbwRB.36 1.2 ... +2.11 +33.5 29.70
SpdrRetl .50 1.1 ...+1.75 +26.7 45.12
SpdrOGEx .25 .5 ... +2.12 +11.2 45.83
SpdtMetM .37 .6 ... +1.80 +15.1 59.38
Safeway .40 1.5 ... +.43 +25.7 26.77
StJude ... ... 16 +.02 +11.2 40.90
Saks ... ... ... +.87 +55.3 10.19
SandRdge ... ...... +.60 -17.4 7.79
SaraLee .44 3.1 12 +.17 +16.0 14.13
Schlmbrg .84 1.2 26 +6.88 +11.7 72.68
Schwab .24 1.2 34 +.92 +5.6 19.88
SemiHTr .45 1.5 ... +.29 +8.6 30.33
SiderNacs .19 1.0 ... -.16 +20.9 19.30
SilvWhtng ... ... 46 .+.79 +19.9 18.01


Name Div
Smithlntl .48
SouthnCo 1.82
SwstAirl .02
SwstnEngy ...
SprintNex ...
SP Matls .52
SP HIthC .53
SP CnSt .73
SP Consum .41
SPEngy 1.00
SPDRFncl .20
SP Inds .59
SPTech , .31
SPUtil 1.26
StdPac
StarwdHtl .20
StateStr .04
Suncorgs .40
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TCFFncl .20
TJX .60
TaiwSemi .46
TalismE g .23
Target .. .68
TeckRes g ...
Tenaris .86
TenetHth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .48
Textron .08
ThermoFis ...
3M Co 2.10
TimeWarn .85
TollBros
Transocn..
Travelers 1.32
TrinaSol s ...
Tycolntl .80
Tyson .16
UBSAG ...
US Airwy
UnionPac 1.08
UtdMicro
UPS1 1.88
USBancrp .20
US NGsFd ...
US OilFd
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .03
Vale SA .52
Vale SApf .52
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.90
ViacomB
VMware
Walgm .55
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WDigital ...
WstnUnion .24
WmsCos .44
XL Cap .40
XTO Engy .50
Xerox .17
Yamanag .04
YingliG ...
YumBrnds .84


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
1.0 69 +4.78 +80.9 49.15
5.2 17 +.86 +4.2 34.73
.1 ... +.58 +22.1 13.96
29 +2.61 -10.6 43.09
... ... +.24 +18.0 4.32
1.5 ... +.68 +6.1 35.01
1.7 ... -.28 +.9 31.35
2.6 ... +.12 +5.9 28.03
1.1 ... +1.30 +19.8 35.67
1.6 ...+2.79 +8.9 62.09
1.2 ... +.42 +16.5 16.78
1.8 ... +1.03 +19.2 .33.12
1.3 ... +.35 +5.0 24.08
4.1 ... +.78 -1.3 30.61
... 73 +1.07 +75.9 6.58
.4 55 +5.66 +47.5 53.95
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. ...+1.27 -2.1 34.56
.1 ... +.96 +45.1 29.44
2.2 9 -.98 +25.9 16.00
1.1 ... +.02 +72.7 3.54
3.2 17 +1.48 +11.6 31.19
1.1 26 +2.78 +38.3 18.84
1.2 17 +2.33 +31.4 48.01
4.2 ... +.11 -4.2 10.96
... ... +.88 -6.6 17.41
1.2 18 +1.95 +19.8 57.94
... ... +1.70 +25.3 43.80
2.0 ... +.77 -1.6 41.96
... 17 +.54 +17.6 6.34
... 81 +.87 +20.4 12.92
... ... +.70 -2.2 13.25
1.8 22 +.09 +2.3 26.67
.3 ... +1.91 +26.8 23.85
... 27 +.44 +12.6 53.70
2.4 19 +2.82 +4.7 86.58
2.6 16 +.14 +13.7 33.14
... +2.57 +22.3 23.00
.. 9 +2.93 +8.6 89.89
2.5 9 +1.24 +7.1 53.38
... 17 -.36 -4.8 25.70
2.0 ... +.62 +13.6 40.54
.8 ... +.27 +64.2 20.15
... -.58 +3.8 16.10
. -.52 +37.0 6.63
1.4 19 +1.15 +20.7 77.10
... +.09 -1.8 3.81
2.7 31 +.65 +20.0 68.86
.7 26 -.15 +21.3 27.30
... ... +.40 -24.8 7.58
+.35 +4.3 40.95
.3 ... -57 +7.5 59.24
.1 9 +.22 +1.5 30.95
1.6 ... -1.16 +11.3 32.30
1.9 ... -.77 ,+12.8 27.99
1.0 ... +.73 +18.7 19.88
1.3 ... +.53 +5.1 43.08
6.5 31 -.53 -12.3 29.05
... 14 +1.55 +22.9 36.53
... 84 +6.25 +47.8 . 62.64
1.5 16 ... -2.3 35.86
... 61 +1.20 -1.0 17.73
... 6-1.10 -.5 57.98
.6 13 +.92. +24.0 33.48
1.1 34 +.18 +17.3 5.50
... 8 +4.27 +1.3 44.71
1.3 15 +.54 -5.7 17.78
1.8 50 +.93 +16.2 24.50
2.0 33 +.24 +8.9 19.96
1.0 14 +.94 +4.5 48.61
1.5 21 +1.00 +33.8 11.32
.4 40 -+.34 -8.3 10.43
... ... +.25 -17.1 13.11
1.9 20 +.74 +24.2 43.44


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD
Yld PE Chg %Chg


67 +.03 +9.7
... +.11 +73.0
.. +.99 +10,4
85 +.13 +34.9
... +.35 -22.5
20 -4.49 -17.3
... -.05 +13.8
16 -1.41 +4.6
11 +2.56 -2.8
12 +6.87 +53.9
.. -.18 +30.1
... +1:52 +14.2
... +.20 +44.9
... +.04 +86.3
27 -.61 +9.6
... -.05 +31.8
23 +.35 +.1
... -.16 +162.9
35 +2.30 +18.2
27 -.78 -5.5
.. +.64+133.9
19 +.73 -2.7
19 +.31 +5.4
29 +.08 +47.5
66 -.89 +9.5
63 +.30 +36.8
... +.16 +78.1
... +1.35 +11.5
.. -.28
13 +.14 +1.2,
... +5.68 +53.7
-.03 +.1
24 -.19 +8.9
... 10 -11.9
32 -.53 +5.1
... +4.47 +133.8


Wkly
Last Name


S Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AbdAsPac .42
AdeonaPh ...
Adventrx
AlphaPro ...
AmO&G ...
Anooraqg ..
ArcadiaRs .
Augusta g ...
Aurizon g
BarcGSOil ...
BootsCoots ...
CardiumTh...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ChiArmM ...
ChNEPetn ...
Crossh glf ...
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DuneEn rs .
Endvrlnt
EndvSilvg ...
ExeterR gs ..
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GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
Hemisphrx ...
Hyperdyn
InovioBio
JavelinPh ...
KodiakOg ...
LibertyAcq ...
MagHRes .
Metalico


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Name Div
Minefnd g
NIVS IntT
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Nevsun g
NDragon
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NA Pall g
NthnO&G
NthgtM g
NovaGldg ...
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PlatGpMet ...
ProceraNt ...
Quaterrag ...
RadientPh ...
Rentech
RexahnPh ..
Rubicon g..
SamsO&G..
Senesco
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Taseko
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US Geoth
US Gold
Uluru
VantageDrl ...
Walterlnv 2.00
WidePoint..
WizzardSft..
Xenonics
YM Bio q


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE .Chg %Chg Last


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9.74
3.30
2.81
3.08
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5.70 '
4.9;
17.12
3.09
8.07
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.29
1.79
7.92
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1.74
1.15
1.17
2.41
3.79
.79
.59
.43
4.85
5.96
3.84
8.90
1.05
3.20
.17
1.78
17.00
1.06
.26
.53
'.4"


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0804 1.0773
Britain 1.5375 1.5389
Canada 1.0005 .9993
Euro .7468 .7510
Japan 94.03 93.35
Mexico 12.2020 12.2650
Switzerlnd 1.0726 1.0768
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


wee endME PROJE(




ONA A




BUDGET 41 . -



Easy Outdoor
Improvements

FAMILY FEATURES
While the outdoor living trend
continues to grow, many
homeowners are electing to
do projects themselves - and -
opting for simple and cost-
effective outdoor improvements.
According to a 2010 American Society of
Landscape Architects (ASLA) survey of residen-
tial landscape architects, larger scale projects
such as outdoor kitchens remain popular, but the W oo
appeal of more basic projects homeowners can
perform themselves has increased.
Here are some of the projects homeowners are
interested in tackling this year that could be done
over a weekend and on a budget: "
n Ornamental water features such as fountains I
or splash pools - 86.7 percent '
a Decks - 83 percent
w Fencing (includes gates) - 82.9 percent
If your to-do list includes any of these
improvement-related projects, here's what you
need to know to get some of them done in just I I '
one weekend.

Setting Posts
Fence posts, deck footings, trellises and arbors ... % 2
they all require solid posts set into concrete to A-
make them stable. This project guide will show .
you the basics for your post project. 5
Required Tools and Materials
m Quikrete Fast-Setting Concrete Mix -
poured dry from the bag and into
the hole
m Quikrete All-Purpose Gravel or
crushed stone
m Plumb line or level
n Shovel or post hole digger
n Pressure treated wood posts or .
galvanized steel posts
n Wood braces and nails (if needed)
n Deck or fencing hardware (if ,,
needed)
Note: To figure out how much concrete
you will need for your post project, visit
quikrete.com/calculator:
1. The diameter of the posthole should
be 3 times the post diameter. Hole
depth should be 1/3 the overall post
length, plus 6 inches (150mm) for the
gravel base.
When the post is to be used for
structural support, such as for deck- E
ing, the hole must extend at least 6
inches (150mm) below the frost line. .
Deck hardware, if applicable, should
also be kept away from water as a
safeguard versus rust and other corro-
sives. When installing basketball goal
poles or other equipment that requires
a solid footing for safe use, follow the
manufacturer's recommendations con-
cerning mounting hole depth and size. a
2. Tamp the sides and bottom of the hole "
until firm and place 6 inches (150mm)
of gravel or crushed stone in the hole -
to aid in drainage. Tamp it down with
the post, a 2 x 4 or tamping tool.
3.Position the post, checking that it is More
level and plumb.
4. Pour the concrete mix dry from the W weekend
bag into the hole until it reaches 3 Project Ideas -
to 4 inches (100mm) from the top. W iho ixigortos
Recheck the post for plumb and brace With no mixing or tools .,
as needed. ' required, fast setting i"_ .,
., concrete is a versatile "
5. Pour water onto the dry mix and allow material that can be
it to soak in. Depending on soil condi- used in any number of
tions, you will need about 1 gallon
of water for each 50 pound bag of landscaping and home.t ,
concrete mix placed in the hole. Dig innment r. ''s


larger, dish-shaped holes for posts set .,
in loose or sandy soil. n Concrete patios and
6. Fill the remainder of the hole with sidewalks
soil dug from the hole. n Fences and trellises
7. The concrete sets in 20 to 40 minutes. m Garden water
Wait 4 hours before applying heavy features
loads to the post, such as a basketball n' U Garden walls
backboard. (If the temperature is m Concrete landscap-
below 72 degrees, additional time for ing borders
curing will be required.) G-e b e
Get step-by-step guides
For Best Results for these and other home
Use pressure-treated lumber or apply . projects at quikrete.com.n
creosote equivalent to prevent below-
ground deterioration. Galvanized metal
should also be used to prevent rust.




A g


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427











Classified Department: 755-5440


nnraYI



SELL-


FINDIlIJT


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


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Reporter Classifieds!

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One -temperysad Each additional
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One item per ad $237
4 lines * 6 days Each additi
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One Item per ad
4 lines * 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling t4,000 or less. t
Each item must include a pice.
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4 lines 795
3 days .1
ncldoes 2 SIgns r r 10. I


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.

-I

You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-.
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mfn., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed,,10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 am.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was. incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.liakccitvreportcr.coin


Legal

ADVERTISEMENTS TO BID
NOTICE
Leware Construction Company of
Florida, Inc. an Equal Opportunity
Employer, is seeking inquires and
solicitation from interested FDOT
Qualified Minority-Owned (MBE)
businesses, Women-Owned (WBE)
businesses, Disadvantaged Business.
Enterprises (DBE), and Small Busi-
ness Enterprises (SBE) in all trades
for the construction portion of the
upcoming Design-Build project for
the replacement of CR 245 bridge
over. Olustee Creek in Columbia
County, Florida, FDOT FPN:
408613-52-01. Interested parties
please contact Bob Eison at Leware
Construction, (352) 787-1616 or by
e-mail, beison@lewarecc.com prior
to May 6, 2010 for bids due June 3,
2010.
04539131
April 23, 24,25,27,28,29,30,2010


NOTICE
TOWN HALL MEETING
A TOWN HALL MEETING WILL
BE HELD BY COMMISSIONER
JODY DUPREE IN DISTRICT
THREE (3) ON THURSDAY
APRIL 29, 2010 COMMENCING
AT 7:00 P.M. IN THE FORMER.
SITE OF THE COLUMBIA COUN-
TY WELCOME CENTER LOCAT-
ED ON 601 N.W. HALL OF FAME
DRIVE, OFF U.S. HIGHWAY 90
WEST, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA IN
FRONT OF THE WEST BRANCH
LIBRARY.
ALL CITIZENS ARE INVITED TO
ATTEND.
04539067
April 18,25,2010 '


020 Lost & Found
REWARD: Min. Silver Dapple
Female Dachshund & Min. Female
Pincher. Last seen together
4/19/10 near Brim & Ramone.
Lottie Acres. Please call
386-623-9798 or 752-7700
100 Job
Opportunities

04539104
Construction Project?
Feasibility Study needed?
PENN PRO, Inc. provides a
variety of ARCHITECTURAL
and ENGINEERING
services for industrial,
commercial, retail, religious
assembly, residential, etc.
Please call 863-648-9990 x.225

04539173
Advent Christian Village
Current JOBS Line
Advertisement
call 658-5627 or visit :
www.acvillage.net
24hrs/day, 7 days/week
Summer Program
Opportunities
2 positions-FT Seasonal
Sfor the Summer
Group lead/facilitator position to
oversee elementary school age
children during summer
program, including planning,
organizing, and implementing
daily activities for group.
participants. Experience with
elementary school-age children
in group settingpreferred. CDA
not required.
Apply in person at Personnel
Office Monday through Friday
from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.,
or fax resume/credentials to
(386)658-5160. EOE/Drug-Free
Workplace/Criminal
background checks required.

04539235
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

TRUCK DRIVER needed for
local manufacturing plant.
Individual must possess a valid
Class A CDL license and a clean
MVR. Excellent pay.
Benefits avail after 6 months of
employment. Apply in person at
Corbitt Mfg., Inc.,
854 NW Guerdon Street,
Lake City, FL 32055
386-755-2555 ext 3006
Mon-Fri. DFW 8am - 6pm







Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Svc.
Mow, weedeat, rake. Estimates on
any lawn job. Also offering trash
pick up in Wellbom.386-438-9191

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Do you need a
HOUSEKEEPER?
Call Ethel 386-303-1496.
Cleaning Done Your Way!
Honest Dependable Cleaning
Res'l/Comm'l. Great references &
rates avail. For a free estimate
today! 386-365-6386 (Cerissa)


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04539258
Housekeeping/Laundry
-Supervisor
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time'positions of
Housekeeping/Laundry
Supervisor.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon Health-
care and Rehabilitation Center
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900
EOE

04539330-Drivers-CDL-A


CONNECTED

Company Drivers, Owner
Operators, & CDL Grads!
Plenty of freight & miles,
Rapid weekly pay & settle-
ments, Committed lanes &
Regional runs!
866-594-5107
www.willisshaw.com


AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
f-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Church Secretary
Local church has opening for
secretary. Requirements: Christian
who possesses basic to moderate
computer skills (Microsoft Word
Suite) and the ability to meet with
and handle calls from the public,
as well as members.
Closing date: April 30, 2010
Salary: $19,000 based on 32 hour
week. Send resume' to:
Church Secretary: PO Box 2337,
Lake City, Fl. 32056
Counselor for substance abuse-
program at Baker Correctional.
AA-4 yrs exp or BA-2 yrs exp in
mental health or substance abuse.
Dayshift only. Fax resume to
386-752-2387 or email
SheliaRand@aol.com
Experienced Landscape/pesticide
person needed. Outside work. Out
of town travel required. Valid DL.
Clean background. Drug Free
Workplace. Apply at NaturChem
4134 S US HWY 441 S
Fairfield Inns and Suites
by Marriott now hiring.
Front Desk Associates, evenings
and weekends. No Calls please.
Apply in person. 538 SW
Corporate Dr. Lake City, FL.
Off Fl gateway Blvd.
FT Secretary/Receptionist. Must
be knowledgeable with computers
(word) and type 45 WPM.
Must mail resume to:
Resume, P.O. Box 526,
Lake City, FL. 32056
HELP WANTED?
Come help us market our
business. We need 3 or 4 people to
start immediately. Must be fun,
energetic and professioional.
Call Ashley at 386-438-8674
Leave message if no answer.
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
OTR Driver wanted. Must have
clean MVR. 3 yr. Reefer exp.,
LTL. Physical work. Great work
ethics. Ref. req'd. 386-963-3153
04539163
Lincare, leading national
respiratory company seeks
friendly, attentive Customer
Service Representative. Phone
skills that provide skills that,
provide warm customer
interactions a must. Maintain
patient files, process doctors'
orders, manage computer
data and filing. Growth
opportunities are excellent.
Drug-free workplace. EOE
Fax: 386-754-2795

RESIDENTIAL ESTIMATOR
for roofing company.
Immediate opening.
Fax resume to: 352-472-6371.
Semi-mechanic needed for
part-time & a semi washer needed
for weekend only. Contact
David Koon 386-623-1757
Truck Driver needed to run teams
in southeast. 2 wks on, 1 wk off.
Class A CDL req'd, clean MVR. 2.
yrs - reefer exp.. (803) 479-2136

110 Sales
Employment
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided - Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
Qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
EXP. SALESPERSON
MANUFACTURED HOMES
FT, Benefits, Vacation, 401K,
health benefits. 42 year old
business. Established location, ex-
cellent opportunity for motivated
individual. Call Jim, 386-752-7751
for an appointment.

120 Medical
120 Employment

04539263
ARNP or PA
Family Practice, Mayo, FL
Email:
dianam@doctorsmemorial.com
Fax: 850-584-0661


120 Medical
120 dEmployment

04539264
RN Position Available
Full Time, Part Time, and PRN
LPN Position Available
Full Time and Part Time
Now-Accepting CNA
Applications
All positions require at least one
year of work experience.
Benefits Available
Please apply in person at
Suwannee Health and Rehab
1620 East Helvenston Street
Live Oak, FL 32064
386-362-7860
EOE/V/D/M/F

04539297
Therapists
Hiring at Suwannee Valley
Nursing Center in Jasper, FL for
a F/T OT or COTA, F/T SLP
"& P/T PTA. Sign-on Bonuses
available! Contact Jennifer @
.888-531-2204 or
j.anderson @fprehab.com

04539333
Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center is hiring
for the following positions.
Director of Staff Development
for qualified LPN/RN
Responsible for Staff In-Service
Training, Employee Health,
and able to Schedule Nursing
Hours adhering to federal,re-
quirements.
RN/Unit Manager,
Full Time position.
LPN, 3711 Shift and PRN
Please apply 587 SE Ermine
Ave, Lake City, Fl 32025
Or fax resume to:
386-752-7337. EOE/DFWP

05523124
DENTIST, OFFICE
MANAGER,
RECEPTIONIST,
HYGIENIST,
DENTAL ASSISTANTS
Lake City
Technology advanced practices,
lucrative compensation package,
medical, life & disability
insurance, paid time off,
401(k).and much more!
Come and join our team!

Apply at CoastDental.com
Call (877) COAST-17 ext. 220
Fax (813) 289-4500


Coast

EOE/M/F/D/V
Drug-free workplace

AMIkids Family Services Program
seeks Therapists & Case Managers
for community based program
working w/ at risk youth &
families. Bachelor's degree req'd.
Req's travel to 7 counties.
Fax resume to 386.362.0932.
Busy outpatient surgery center has
immediate opening for part time
certified Surgical Technician.
Please email resume to
lregister@lcsurgerycenter.com' or
fax to 386-487-3935.


CNA/MEDICAL ASSISTANT
needed. Send resume to
826 SW Main Blvd Ste 102.
Lake City, FL. 32025. -
F/T Medical records position
available at busy
medical office. Fax resume to
386-487-1232.
Front Office & Medical
Receptionist needed for busy
Internal Medical Office. Has
experience in Insurance billing &
Verification. Fax Resume to
Nancy: 386-752-9073
Homecare RNs/LPNs
needed FT. Lake City.
Maxim Healthcare.
352-291-4888. 9a-6p..
Medical Billing
Several years experience in
medical insurance billing req'd.
Full time salary with benefits.
: Fax resume to: 386-758-5987
Medical Billing/Collection
FT Position; Responsibilities
Include: Posting Patient/Insurance
Payments, Answering Billing Calls
& Questions, & Insurance Follow-
Ups & Appeals. Previous Medical
Billing Experience Required.
Hourly Rate Based on Experience.
Fax Resume to 386-628-9231.
Attn: Billing Manager
04539157
Service Representative
.One of the Nation's major
suppliers of in-home oxygen &
respiratory therapy seeks a
service representative.
Responsibilities include making
oxygen deliveries (cylinder and
concentrator) and equipment.
checks to a patient bases on a
daily route. Also instruct
patients in the safe and proper
use of respiratory equipment.
MAy perform minor equipment
repairs. Will be responsible for
the maintenance of a company
vehicle. Works on-call evenings
and weekends on an as
scheduled basis. Must be 21
years of age, able to lift or move
up to 120 lbs. and have good
interpersonal skills. Must have
orbe able to obtain a
Commercial Drivers license
(CDL) and be DOT qualified or
DOT certifiable. Drug-free
Workplace. EOE
Fax: 386-754-2795


120 Medical
120 Employment
Very busy Medical office needs
experienced only in the
following areas:
* Medical assistant * Billing
* Authorizations and referrels
* Receptionist.
Fax resume to: Attn Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email:
to office manager: at
primarycaremedic.com.

240 Schools&
240 Education

04539175
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-0,4/26/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-05/24/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-05/04/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 of
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

7 Generation CKC Male
Toy Poodle. Black. $400.
Parents on Premises.
ALREADY GONE

German Sheppard Puppy 8
weeks old Black & Tan. Health
Certs. & shots, Parents on .
Premises. $250.00. 386-961-8130

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by iorida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 . Supplies
Cut Hay, HIGH QUALITY round.
rolls, reduced to $22. or
50 rolls or more $20. per roll.
386-209-0399 /386-362-7441


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances
Apartment size Kenmore Washer
& Dryer on rollers. $240.obo
386-754-9295 or 984-0387


408 Furniture

25" Color TV.
$50.00..
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387


ANTIQUE QUEEN size
(Dark Wood) bed frame.
$85.00.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

BEDROOM group, real wood.
Large mirror w/ dresser.
$260.00 obo
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

BUNK BEDS nice w/ mattress,
disney sheets and all.
$245 or make offer.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


408 Furniture
Full size solid wood beautiful
Rocking Chair.
$85.00. obo
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

Hide A Bed sofa
Fair condition.
$50 or Best offer.
386-752-6669
Lt. Tan Very comfortable
large' suade recliner.
Like new $210. obo
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

4 10 Lawn & Garden
4 Equipment
38" RIDING MOWER
$50.00
386-292-9570


Bolens Electric Lawnmower
w/leaf bag and cord.
Barely used. $100.00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

411 Machinery &
411 Tools

CRAFTSMAN Table Saw
Extended top, 10 in. Blade
$50.00
386-292-9570

FLOOR MODEL
TOOL CHEST
$25.00
386-292-9570


420 Wanted to Buy
Buying Guitars: I buy older
Gibsons Fenders & Martins.
Electric or acoustic in any
condition. Call 386-965-4085

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.


? )AA�E CITY
COMMUNITY CULLETE
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
(164 duty days - Tenured Track)
To Commence August 2010
Teach students in criminal justice major;
recruit students to program; update
and maintain curriculum; serve on
college committees; support students
both in the classroom and out of the
classroom; communicate with.law
enforcement officials to ensure we are
serving our students and producing
capable graduates. Requires Masters
Degree with at least 18 graduate hours
in criminal justice or related field.
Knowledge of the criminal justice
field; ability to teach effectively;
ability to recruit students; ability to
communicate with local and state law
enforcement officials; knowledge
of the law. Desirable Qualifications:
Direct experience in law enforcement
field; prior teaching experience;
past leadership experience in law
enforcement; 18 graduate hours in a
second discipline.
SALARY: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits
REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS WILL
�BEGIN: May 10, 2010
Persons interested should provide a
College employment application, vita,
and photocopies of transcripts. All
foreign transcripts must be submitted
with official translation and evaluation.
Applications and full position details are
, available on our website
www.lakecitvcc.eduI
Inquiries: Human Resouices
149 SE College Place
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4814
E-mail: humanr@lakecitvcc.edu
LCCC is accredited by lie Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO College m Education & Employment


s2,000 Sign On Bonus
If you are self-motivated, you could make
$70,000 this year. Plus, we have the BEST
.compensation package in the business.
New Car Sales Earn 30%-$200 min.
Health Insurance - Including Dental

Paid Vacation, 401 K & Bonuses
Self Starters, Please Apply in Person

, Hwy 90 West

(3/4 mi. past 1-75)
Chrysler-Dodge-Jeep Lake City



SThe Lake City Reporter
.is looking for a dynamic and capable sales
professional to sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and online products.
S We need a person with the ability to make
strong presentations. ,

Professionalism; being active in the field and closing sales
are three key attributes for which we are looking. We offer
a salary and a strong commission plan, along with a good
benefits package. If you have a strong desire to succeed 'and
the skills to back it up, we want to hear from you.

Please e-mail your resume to: Todd Wilson, publisher,
at twilson@lakecityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055.
- NO PHONE CALLS -


I


"T










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


Classified Department: 755-5440


420 Wanted to Buy
WANTED Junk Cars,
Trucks, RV's etc.
Paying CASH $250.00 and up.
Free pickup 386-867-1396
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat & Sun. 8-4.
5347 SW ELIM CHURCH RD.
off of Hwy 47. Household, racing
equipment, truck parts, misc.

440 Miscellaneous
Diamond Plate Tool Box for full
size truck. Great shape.
Full open lid. $100.00
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

520 Boats for Sale
14' STUMPKNOCKER
Galvanized trailer. 25 HP Mercury
w/extended shaft. $695.
386-965-9802 after 7 pm.
63 Mobile Homes
O630 for Rent
2 AND 3 BEDROOMS
Clean homes. $475-$550.
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2/1 Mobile Home for rent.
55+ Park
386-397-2616
2BR/1BA MH in park on
Racetrack Rd. CH/A
$425 mo. $100. dep.
386-755-6422
2br/lba MH. Excellent Cond.
$500/Mo. + $500. sec. dep.
Call: 954-258-8841

3b/2ba private & fenced lot.
Carport 3 miles west Lake City.
$700 month. $300 security.
386-758-3657 '
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$750 a month. 1st, last and $375.
security. Please call 386-397-2619
or 386-365-1243,.
Move in Discount $100. 2br/lba
from $45Q & 3br/2ba from $550.
Includes water & sewer. No Pets!
Se habla espanol 386-961-0017
Remodeled 14x70 SW Avail. 4/23
2br/2ba Water, sewer/garbage incl.
Private property. Lease req'd.
$600.mo. Ist, last, dep. 752-8978

640 Mobile Homes
640 forSale
2004 Cavalier Manuf. Home- LG
2200 sf 4br/3ba, eatin kitchen
w' '/ifsld; f-place, laundry rm. Like
new cond. 2 attached decks. Pd
$85K new. Sacrifice for $50,000.
Mothers passing forces sale. Must
be moved! Bids to move between
$5-$8000. Must see it to appreciate
386-438-0285 to set up a viewing
and walk through
Almost Finished Remodeled job
on 3br/2ba. DW w/many options.
$285. mo. Possible Owner Financ-
ing. Also: Remodeled SW 2br/2ba.
Del & Set up. $145.mo.
Gary Hamilton (386)758-9824
Factory Mistake
is your gain! They built 2 extra
3/2 DW's priced to sell @ only
$28,397. Call Eric @ 386-752-
1452 or Jetdec@windstream.net
For Sale. 2400 sqft home on
1/2 acre w/improvements fori
only $479.00 a mo.
Owner Financing available.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 Jet-
dec@windstream.net
2010 Brand New 4/2. CH/A,
skirting, steps, set up/del.
for only $39,995.00
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
Jetdec@windstream.net
: FOR SALE LAKE CITY, 2006
4br,.b.t MH on 5 ac. already
fenced. Only 10% dn of $104,900
WAC. Call Jim 386-752-7751
Got Horses or Farm Animals??
4 acres & 2006 -4br/2ba 2000 sqft.
Mobile Home, Concrete floor
garage & fenced. Lake City area.
10% dn of $109,900 W.A.C.
Call Jim at 386-752-7751


t640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Live Oak Area off CR 250, 1 acre
& 2007 Mobile HOme. 3br/2ba,
1480 sqft., 10%dn of $89,900
W.A.C Call Jeff @ 386-752-7751
REPO'S. We have several single-
wides & Doublewides to choose
from, Prices starting @ $10,500.
Hurry, Call Eric @ 386-752-1452
or Jetdec@windstream.net
i650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
1800sf Manufactured Home.
4br/2ba plus retreat/office, 2
porches, walks. Concrete founda-
tion, appliances. Plywood w/ce-
ramic floors, metal roof. 5 ac., cor-
ner lot (treed) Horses OK, Gary
Hamilton (386)256-6379. Possible
Owner Finance (Lake City)

705 Rooms for Rent
Housesitter Needed. Private BR
& Bath. Total use of home. Back-
ground check. Must have car and
phone. Very good deal for the
right person. Reply Via email:
lc2ho2(Svahoo.com
710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
04539328
FREE RENT
Monthly Specials!
1 BR and 2.BR's
starting at $500.00 and up'
Security Gate, Pool,
Free Cable or water.
Choose between 5 properties
386-754-1800
386-754-8029


D433936
30th Anniversary Celebration
Windsong Apts
Our Gift to You
$300.00 off and Employee Pricing
(386) 758-8455
2br/2ba w/garage on the
West side .
1st, last &security.
Call 386-755-6867
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575.' & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba -
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR/2BA apts., garage
W/D hook up. patio. $600 & up, +
SD, 386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC,
W/D hook up $625. mo.
386-397-2108 or 352-377-7652
Studios & IBr's from $140/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.N6 contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292

,T, � Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent


NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,.
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates: 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
Lg 3BR/2BA on 1.3 ac. on the
Westside. Water, trash
& lawn maint.included.,$875. mo
plus security. 386-719-9702
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 86-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


-uutr ,b. 1999 Mazda Pickup
Golf Club Car B4000 4x4
Mint condition, windshield, Low miles, loaded. Runs
golf bag holder & covers great, looks good. Serious
on back. inquires only!
$2,895 $6,500 OBO
Call Call
386-344-0329 386-623-3540 8a-llp

Mar-at3B-75


750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
Office Building, Convenient
location w/6 offices. Conference
Room. kitchen, ample parking.
Partially furnished. $2.500 mo.
For appointment 386-754-9293
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Space available at Country Club
Plaza East Baya Ave. 2000 sq ft.
2 restrooms, new carpet. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622


770 Condos For Rent

04539094
Golf Course Condo
2BR/2BA 1420 s.f. incl.
Most utilities & amenities
$1,000 per month. Call
RENTED
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560


790 Vacation Rentals
Trout Season Horseshoe Beach
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink. Avail
wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/rivbr ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$256/mo. $24,900. 352-215-1018.

Owner Financing Ft. White 5ac.
$69,995. $995'dn. $501.46 mo.
Paved Rd. Wooded, Homes only
vargasrealty.com (352)472-3154


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or,
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant.women and,
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble, on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


'. ---n n
IP V
I K C'
D I
W Z

IQ U


II


I S


I L R R Y A N D H


A T A E M.
I J P .V G


L A O D A X B M ,S


L. E


S H I N L Q G R


J F K N M
C I R M K


805 Lots for Sale

Recently Foreclosed, Special
Financing Available, Any Credit.
Any Income Vacant Land, located
at, 180th St., Lake City. $79,900.
Visit www.roselandco.com/7A4,
Drive by then call (866) 249-0680.


810' Home for Sale

$115,000 3B/2BA
Din or 4th bedroom.
Cypress Landing
386-466-7168

Owner Financing 13 ac. fenced,
pond, w/3/2 MH. 40X90 barn,
horse stalls, well. Will divide
3/2 MH & fenced 5 ac. if needed.
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
Owner Financing, Nicely wooded
3/2 on 2 ac. Clean, metal roof,
CH/A, near Ft. White, Sm. Down
$750 mo. 386-590-0642/ 867-1833

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com


T T B


820 Farms &
SAcreage
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financine.com
FSBO 10 ac. Horses & more. 5
stall stable. Pastures, board fenced,
-tool shed, well shed. 32'X75'.4br
Manuf. Home w/carport & deck.
$199,900. neg. 386-965-3357
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

930 Motorcycles
2005 HARLEY davidson Road
King Classic FTIHRC . 4800 Mi.
Rider/Pass. backrest, extended
warranty. (D) 623-7500 (N) 752-
6001 $13,500

940 Trucks
1999 Mazda Pickup B4000 4X4
Low miles, Loaded, Runs great,�
looks good. Serious Inquires Only!
$6500. obo 386-623-3540 8a-11p-

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


I U M J A A .B


Contact us

at the paper.
. ,

-----I

CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440

SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445

ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293

ELECTRONIC APS SEND TO
ads@lakecityreporter.com

Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.
THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU!


180 East Duval St.
Lake City, FLorida 32055


G B S M F E T O T S I,
S K I U S U O N O P A


E N U N P D C A P


I R E M M
S P O O F


I Y


C S ,Z E L R
C L W E C A


I .O M F K N N C
I M N H Q O E F
T N E I D H P R


N U T L W A E F Z Y S


Ready town?
Find all 16 of the'Administrative Name:
Professionals Day words hidden in
thPwonrdsarch ahnove Wordrsnan Phone Number:


be found in the.banners above the
ads listed below. Complete the puzzle
and retum i to the Lake City Reporter,
180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, FL by
5:00pm, for your chance to win


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SV E E S N J W E N S


G T G Q V -F I


ENTRY FORM


Address:


Subscriber: : Yes [ No

Deadline is Monday, April 26, 2010 at 5:00 p.m. Lake City Reporter


SI. --------------------------------- ml


T elephon


Administrative
Professionals.







Lak e Cit9

Kiddy Club
'VWhere learning is/fi l
Pre-K & VPK

755-0256
1290 SE Baya Drive
Lake City, FL 32025

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3322 W US HWVy90
386-155-2502





GW Hunter; Inc.


Chewroo


woo


Chevron
Oil
Jobber


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4447 NW American Lane

(386) 752-6058
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IEagle

Properties
Apartment

Rentals

Available
(386) 752-9226
*Paper.Cip


.0'ee Dspese


Martin
ORTl()DONTIC(S
(ELIA MARTIN. D.M.D.
755-1001-
701 SW SR 47 Lake City, FL 32025






GAINEY

AUTOMOTIVE

&TOWING
3468 SW CR 138, FT.WHITE
386-454-3580

Receptionist^


All at Sale Prices!


Drive A Little and Save A Lot

PALM CADILLAC

. Gainesville, FL

352-376-7581


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A H M F K M P P S


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A T T S C R -P U M I W F R T


I N F R E N C Q. F E E


---


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. . . . ,














Story ideas?


Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lakecityreporter.com

Sunday, April 25, 2010


Lake City Reporter





LIFE




www.lakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK
I .


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Recharge

aquifers

with rain

gardens

"rain garden"
is not a new
concept, but it.
is one that is
gaining popu-
larity in our Florida home
landscapes. A rain garden
is a small depression or
swale in the yard that col-
lects excess rainwater for
a short period of time so it
can soak naturally into the
ground. This is one way to
help recharge the aquifer
with filtered water right on
your own property.
Before the Europeans
began to. clear and settle
the land, the natural land-
scape was able to take care
of the heavy rains without
any help from man. There
were natural depressions in
meadows and forests that
held the extra water until it
could soak in. As the water
moved through the layers
of soil and rock, particles
and pollutants were fil-
tered out. Clean water was
always replenishing the
underground streams.
We have replaced much
of that natural landscape
with buildings, paved
streets and other surfaces
that don't allow rainwater
to soak into the soil. We
have gutters, downspouts
and slopes to guide the
rainwater into storm sew-
ers and drains that empty,
dirty water into streams or
retention ponds. All of the
pesticides, oil, grease and
fertilizers that the water
picks up as it washes away
ends up as pollutants in
these water bodies.
The goal is to mimic a
natural depression that
cleans the water and lets
it move downward. Figure
S out where most of your
water is gushing during a
heavy rainstorm. It might
be coming from the roof
downspout, pouring onto
the driveway and then into
the street. Or maybe it is
running off the roof at a
valley where there is no
gutter. Either way, you can
choose a nearby location
for you rain garden and let
the water collect there. Be
creative and redirect the
flow of water with small
channels and berms.
The size of your garden
will depend on how much
runoff you have to inter-
cept. Two or three well
placed small depressions
may work just as well for
you as a larger one. The
rain garden should be 8-
to 10-inches deep. If you
dig into clayey backfill,
take it out and replace it
with sandy soil. The water
needs to be able to move
down quickly, usually
within several hours. The
water won't be there long,
so mosquitoes are not a
concern.
Most rain gardens are
planted with native plants
to help utilize water and
remove pollutants. Native
plants work well because
have had eons to acclimate
to the periods of heavy
rains as well as the peri-
ods of drought. Start with
GARDENS continued on 2D


Golden annivers



Epiphany Cdaholic:
., ~Scholol .,


COURTESY PHOTO
Epiphany Catholic School students and faculty are celebrating 50 years of educating the community. The school, which first opened in 1959, will be hosting
an anniversary ceremony on May 8.


Epiphany reflects on history, looks ahead


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
rrom its humble
beginnings,
Epiphany
Catholic School
S - has continued
its tradition of educating
students for 50 years in
Columbia County.
'Tm so proud of where
we've come from," said the
school's principal, Rita Klenk.
The school will officially
celebrate its anniversary
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
May 8 at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds.
Epiphany is the small-
est Catholic.school in the
Diocese of St Augustine,
but it has consistently grown
over the years, Klenk said.
The school opened in
downtown Lake City in a
small hall on Sept. 4, 1959.
Classes were offered for
first through fourth grade
to 29 students. Sisters of
Mercy, from Wexford,
Ireland, comprised the fac-
ulty and staff.
The school moved to its
present location between
Marion Avenue and U.S.
Highway 441 in 1960.
Fifth grade was added in
1961, followed by sixth in
1962. Seventh grade came
two years later and finally
eighth grade began in
1965. Then it was decided
in 1966 that the community
would be best served with
students in first through
sixth grade.
A library was added and
the school's lunchroom
was modified in 1968, and
the Glander Building was
erected for music and art
classes in 1974.
Later, the Sisters of
Mercy were called back to
Ireland, and the Sisters of
St. Joseph of St. Augustine
joined the school staff.
The school hired its
first non-clergy princi-
pal, J. Mark Akerman,
after Sister Marie Rene


ANTONIA ROBINSONILaKe City Reporter
Riley Robbins, 10, (from left) Nick Shelnut, 10, and Patrick Schretzmann, concentrate on completing an assignment in their
fourth-grade class at Epiphany Catholic School.
+


Azar was reassigned
by the Diocese in 1995.
Kindergarten was added
in 1996, and seventh grade
returned in 1999.
Klenk, then a teacher,
became principal in 2000,
after Akerman's depar-
ture, and the Carmelite
Sisters joined the Epiphany
Church and started work-
ing in the school in 2001. A
new class of eighth graders
also graduated in 2001.
Carol Ghionzoli became
principal, and Klenk
returned to the classroom
in 2003. In 2009, Klenk
again accepted the school's
top leadership post.
Various. athletic teams
also have been created over
the years at the school.
SToday, Epiphany has
20 acres of land, which
include the church, social
hall and playground. It is
also compliant with state
standards and now able
to accept students who


qualify for the McKay or
Step-Up Scholarships.
There are currently 75
students at the school and
13 teachers on staff.
'We've weathered all
the historical changes
and are planning for the
next 50 years," Klenk said.
"Epiphany has sustained
itself."
Standing by the school's
success is Epiphany
Catholic Church.
"Without the church,
there would be no school,"
she said.
Epiphany has always had
the reputation of a good,
solid education in the
community, said Melissa
Anderson, a first-grade
teacher at Epiphany and
also a former student
"Students go on to be very
successful adults," she said.
One of the school's
strengths is its family
atmosphere, Anderson
said. The teachers know all


the students and parents,
regardless of grade, and
classmates remain close.
"Students grow up with a
group of kids they'll have a
lifetime relationship with,"
she said.
The school does evolve
with society, but one thing
that remains constant at
the school is the attitudes
of standouts and parents,
said Jenalyn McCray, a
fourth-grade teacher at
Epiphany.
"We have such involved
kids here," she said. "They
really want to be here. The
parents put their children's
education as a priority. The
parent involvement is one
of the biggest aspects we
have here."
McCray is also a for-
mer student and attended
Epiphany from first
through sixth grade.
"It's been 11 years now,"
she said. "I've spent over
half of my life at the school."


Another'factor contrib-
uting to the school's suc-
cess is the support of the
community, Klenk said.
The anniversary event will
allow the entire community
to celebrate the school.
Everyone is welcome
to celebrate, whether they
attended the school or not,
she said. The event will
include food, music, door
prizes, inflatables, guest
speakers, a silent auction
and more.
Tickers for the celebra-
tion are on sale now and
cost $15 for adults and $10
for children. Ages 3 and
under are free.
Call or e-mail the school
for more information at
(386) 752-2320 or www.
epiphanycatholiclakecity.
com.
'We've worked so many
months for this to come
together," Klenk said. "It's
a family day to bring the
children out."


Section D












LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010 Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


ENGAGEMENTS


Melissa Wittenberg and Bradley Rigdon.


Wittenberg-Rigdon
Russell Wittenberg
of Ormond Beach and
Debbie Motes of Lake City
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Melissa
Wittenberg, of Lake City,
to Bradley Rigdon of Camp
Lejevne, N.C. Rigdon is
the son of Robert and
Marjorie Rigdon of Lake
City.
The wedding is planned


-Yvette Escalante and Bryan Wil

Escalante-Little
Marleen and Hugo
Escalante of Fort White
Announce the engagement'
and approaching marriage
of theirdaughter. Yvette
EIscalanTe of FrtorFhite.
to Bryan William Little of
Fort White. Little is the
son of Jay and Kim Little of
Fort White.
The wedding is planned
for 4 p.m. Sunday, May


for 6 p.m. Saturday
1, 2010, at the Beac
Vilano. A reception
low at the Reef Res
in St. Augustine.
The bride-elect i
graduate of Columi
High School, and a
graduate of Lake C
Community Colleg
The future groor
2006 graduate of C
High School, and is
rently active in the
Marine Corps.


liam Little.

2, 2010, at Christ C
Ministries.
The bride-elect i
graduate of Fort W
High School and is
ning her senior ye,
University of Flori
is currently a licen
massage therapist:
The future grool
a 2007 Fort White
School graduate, a
uates April 30 from
Fe College.


WEDDING


Part 3 o

here are
they now"
is a
column
k about
graduates of Lake City
Community College and
what they are doing since
they left Lake City. The
third installment begins
with Ethan Cooper.
Cooper graduated from
Columbia High School in
1990 and began attending
the college with a goal of
becoming a veterinarian.
TESY PHOTO While at LCCC, he oper-
ated his own landscape
business mowing and edg-
, May ing yards in the Lake City
ch at area. When graduation day
i will fol- arrived, Cooper was not
Itaurant sure being a veterinarian
was what he wanted to do.
s a 2006 He knew he enjoyed his
bia landscape business and
2008 being outdoors. He had
ity heard about the college's
e. golf and landscape pro-
m is a grams. He called several
olumbia golf courses and asked
s cur- to visit them to see what
U.S. types of jobs were avail- '
able. After those visits
Cooper knew he wanted to
become a golf superinten-
dant.
He met with John Piersol
who was, at the time, in
his fourth year as direc-
tor of golf and landscape
operations. Piersol said
that Cooper would have to
' complete a year of work
on a golf course before he
.^ 1' would be admitted. The
work policy was imple-
mented to make sure the



SCelebs ol
iTESY PHOTO

By LISA ORKIN EMMANUEL
-entral Associated Press

s a 2006 MIAMI - Jessica
rhite Simpson is her usual
begin- pretty blonde self on the
ar at the May cover of Marie Claire
da. She magazine. But where's the
sed makeup?
She looks like a natural
m is all-American beauty in
High unretouched photos that
nd grad- include her sitting in a
SSanta grassy field running her
hand through her air-dried
locks and looking into the
distance, the sun shining
on her face.
The spread makes her
the latest brave celebrity
(there aren't many) who
have been willing to be
seen by a mass audience


without the prerequisite
beautification process. *
"I think she was at'a
place in her life where she
felt comfortable doing it,"
said the magazine's editor-
in-chief, Joanna Coles.
SWhile few are willing
to go where Simpson has,


f 'Where are they now?'


Mike McKee
LCCC executive director of media
and community information

student really wanted a
career on a golf course.
When he let his parents
know of his decision to
change his career path,
they were concerned he
was not making a good
decision, but supported
him nonetheless.
After Cooper graduated
in 1997, he accepted a
position as assistant super-,
intendant at the National
Course at Reynolds
Plantation on Lake Oconee
in Greensboro, Ga., a
course he worked on as
part of his summer on-the-
job-training experience.
Since 1997, Cooper has
been assistant superinten-
dant or superintendent at
all six golf courses for the
Reynolds Plantation fam-
ily. His current position
is superintendent at the
Great Waters 'course that
has undergone a complete
renovation. When I talked
with him for this column,
he had just ridden the
newly renovated course
with the course designer
Jack Nicklaus.
Cooper loves his job and
knows' he made the right


decision back in 1992. He
has continued to support
Lake City Community
College and speaks to
students during frequent
visits to Lake City. He likes
to hunt and fish and lives
in Greensboro, Ga., with
his children Ethan and Ella
who are six year-old twins.
Our next graduate many
of you may remember from
his work.in radio while at
Columbia High School. His
name is Robert Lee. Lee
received his Associate in
Arts degree at LCCC in
1985. While a student, he
was active in the student
government association
and was editor of the
school newspaper, The
Timberchatter.
Next, he attended the
University of West Florida
and received a Bachelor's
Degree in communica-
tions arts specializing
in broadcast journalism.
After college he landed
his first television job as
a production assistant at
WEAR-TV in Pensacola.
From Pensacola, Lee took
a job as production assis-
tant at WCTI-TVin New
Bern, N.C., and within four
months was producing the
6 p.m. and 11 p.m. news-
casts.
In 1992, Lee moved
closer to home and took
a job at WJKS-TV channel
17 in Jacksonville. In the
early '90s, the television
landscape was changing
in Jacksonville. WAWS-TV
was becoming a FOX affili-


ate and was starting a news
Show at 10 p.m. Again he
took on the challenge, and
produced the news for
FOX 30. He later helped to
launch UPN 47's newscast
at 6 p.m. UPN would later
become the CBS affiliate.
In July 2001, he took
a job at CNN Headline
News as morning news
producer for the network.
On September 11,-Lee was
producing the news as he
had for two months when
the first plane hitthe World
Trade Center Tower. He
describes that morning's
events as the most terrify-
ing moments of his life, but
as a true professional he
Continued to do his job of
informing the nation that
we had been attacked by
terrorists.
Today, Lee is still pro-
ducing news for HLN, as
Headline News is now
abbreviated. He works
weekends with Natasha
Curry and weekdays with
anchors Richelle Carey,'
Christi Paul and Chuck .
Roberts. He lives in
Powder Springs, Ga., with
his wife Tricia and their
two daughters, Caroline
Grace and Katherine
Rebecca.
If you know of someone
that has graduated from a
local high school and Lake
City Community College
and has a story to share,
please give me a call.
Contact McKee at mck-
eem@lakecitycc.edu or by
calling (386) 754-4329.


pting for unretouched photos


more are popping up.
Kim Kardashian, Joy
Bryant and Amanda.de
Cadenet all posed unre-
Stouched - and naked
- for a story on body
image in the May Harper's
Bazaar. Kardashian also
went unretouched in a
bikini on the cover of Life
& Style last year. Claudia
Schiffer posed.for unma-
nipulated photos in the
September 2009 issue of
Tank, a British magazine.
Unretouched shots
of Britney Spears from
a Candie's ad surfaced
recently on the Internet
next to more buff images
the company actually used.
Marie Claire has asked,
many celebrities to go
bare faced, but none had
agreed, Coles said.
Simpson was motivated
by her VH1 show, "The
Price of Beauty," Coles
said. The show had her
traveling the globe with
two friends to examine
standards of beauty around


the world.
"I think it changed the
way she thought about
things. I think making that
show was really quite, a
profound experience for
her," Coles said. 'There
was something very liber-
ating for her ab6uti domn g
this."
Simpson faced criticism
for her'weight after she
wore a pair of high-waisted
jeans that cut her in all the
wrong places. She became
a household name during
"Newlyweds: Nick and
Jessica" for MTV, a reality
show with her then hus-
band Nick Lachey.
"I just think she's an
interesting person to do it
with because she is usually
so packaged," Coles said.
So few have gone unre-
touched that those who do
earn notice, both positive
and negative. In the original
photos of Spears, she looks
a little heavier, with cellu-
lite, a point not lost on some
commenters at a blog of


New York magazine.
"I don't think Britney
should be hired or used for
sex appeal anymore. You
can sell her face alone, just
do that," said one signed
MOBABY.
Another, ,,
BIRTHDAYGIRL, said:
"It's actually not as bad 'as I
would have expected."
In 2002, More magazine
ran photos of Jamie Lee
Curtis, flaws and all, in
undergarments.
"It's a gimmick," said
Lesley Jane Seymour,
-More's editor-in-chief.
"Aside from a gimmick,
you are not going to see
many celebrities bare
faced. They can't even go
to get the mail bare faced."
European publications
first photographed women
without makeup and no
retouching last year, then it
crossed the Atlantic. Often,
it's the celebs and their
publicists who demand
more retouching, Seymour
said.


Lindsay and Troy Markham.

Cheshire-Markham
SLindsay Cheshire
of Lake City and Troy
Markham of Lake City
were united in marriage
on April 2, 2010, in St.
Augustine Beach.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Mary Simmons of
Lake City, and the groom is
the son of Terry and Linda
Hillhouse of Live Oak.
The bride was given
away in marriage by Chyan
Torelli.


The reception was held
at St. Augustine Beach.
The couple will live in Lake
City.
The bride is a 2002 gradu-
ate of Lake City Community
College, and is currently
employed at Timco Aviation
Services as the supervisor
of purchasing.
The groom is a 1992
graduate of Columbia
High School, and is cur-
rently employed by New
Millennium Building
Systems.


"GARDEN: Utilize water


Continued From Page 1D

plants that have a good
root system already devel-
oped. They will need to be
watered during dry spells
during the first year to help
them become well estab-
lished. Cover the garden
area with a 2- to 3- inch
slayer of bark mulch.
Choose plants that like
moist soil but can tolerate
a dry spells. A few to con-
sider are blue-eyed grass,
muhly grass, southern
maidenhair fern, Florida
bluebell, common tickseed
and stokes aster. To find


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Heather Thornton
Marc Vann, Jr.
May 1, 2010

Emily Land
Ehrin Beach
May 29, 2010

Jamie Williams
Ronnie Crews
July 31, 2010

Holly Helms
Patrick Hadlock
August 21, 2010
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.
WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS

156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


many more suitable plants,
go to http://edis.ifas.ufl.
edu/epll and http://edis.
ifas.ufl.edu/ep061, or call
the Master Gardeners at
752-5384. Native plants will
also be available at the MG
plant sale on May 8 at the
UF Extension Office.


* Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


I













-P-a- -Edior Trov_ R s5 2K Y OA C COU P 50


DEAR ABBY



Man's search for father


yields more questions


DEAR ABBY: My bio-
logical father left soon after
I was born. Mom spent her'
life in orphanages and foster
homes, so she knows nothing
about her ancestry, genetics
or family information.
I was always curious
about where I came from,
so finally, at the age of 26,
I decided to do something
about it. Mom had always
told me about "Donny," who
she said was my father. I
was able to track him down
and made contact At first
he denied knowing Mom,
then he changed his story.
Because he was married
and had a family, the matter
was dropped.
Four years passed, and I-
contacted Donny again. This
time, I offered to meet him
on his terms to take a pater-
nity test He called my moth-
er a liar and said she had
been promiscuous. It made
me angry because Mom was
open with me about him and
we have always had a close
relationship. The paternity
test came back and - guess
what? Donny is not my
father! I feel like a fool for
pursuing him for nothing.
Mom acted surprised and
now refuses to talk about
'it I want to know my back-
ground, and it's eating away
at me that I was told Donny
was a deadbeat father and I
was lied to for so long. Am I
doomed to never know my
ancestry? - MAN WITH


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
NO PAST
DEAR MAN WITH
NO PAST: That's a pos-
sibility, and for that you
have my sympathy. When
someone clams up the way
your mother has, it may be
because the person is too
ashamed to admit the truth
- which may be that she
does not know who fathered
you. There may be reasons
why your mother behaved
the way she did, having
grown up not knowing who
her parents were and in a
series of foster homes. She
may have simply been look-
ing for someone to love her.
One thing is certain, how-
ever. She raised you to be
the man you are today and
did the best she could, so
please try to forgive her for
the deception.
DEAR ABBY: I am in my
mid-30s, blond, blue-eyed,
tall and slender. I am health-
conscious and physically
active. I have had a seven-
year marriage and a rela-
tionship that lasted for four
- but for the last five years
I have been unattached. It
took me a while to get used


v __


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Go the distance
and further when trying to
impress someone. It's the
detail and little extras that
will make you stand out from
the competition. Challenges
will help ease your stress
and enable you to show how
well you work under pres-
sure. ***
STAURUS (April 20-May
20): Organize your game
plan and strategy so you can
present and promote. You
will gather valuable informa-
tion if you attend a seminar
or discuss your plans with
someone who has the experi-
ence you lack. **-***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't let mixed emo-
tions lead to a mistake. If
you don't do the fact-finding
first, you will be heading into
unknown territory that is
likely to lead to uncertainty
and a change of plans. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Open your doors to
friends, neighbors and rela-
tives. You can make some
upgrades to your home or
get involved in an investment
that can improve your living
standards. Opportunity is
present if you take advantage
of the current economic cli-


THE LAST WORD
EugeniaWord
mate. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You may be tempted to go
away or get involved in an
unusual practice group that
interests you. Before doing
so, make sure you don't dis-
rupt your personal and home
life. Expect an argument if
your path threatens someone
who loves and cares about
you. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't sell yourself
short when you have so
much to offer. A plan to
invest will pay off. Someone
from your past will bring
about a change that allows
you to follow a dream. A
partnership will help you
surpass your goals. -***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Keep your emotions
in check, especially if you
are having personal prob-
lems with someone you
love. Offer a suggestion, not
cash, if someone asks for
your help. Anything short of
equality will lead to a prob-
lem. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Risks are not for
you but, calculating your


to being alone, but I have
realized something that
everyone needs to know:
Being single can be very
satisfying
I clean my house; it stays
clean. I have no extra dishes
or laundry to do. There's no
toothpaste left in the sink.
The toilet seat stays down.
I can relax. in front of the
fireplace because no one is
trying to get my attention.
My checkbook is always
balanced, with no surprises.
I can go to bed at night and
sleep without having to spend'
half the night explaining why
I'm not "in the mood."
Please reassure your
single readers that it's OK
to be single, and not'to allow
their well-meaning friends,
family or society to try to
convince them they "need"
to be in a relationship. If
they're happily single, as
am I, they can remain that
way and life will be just
fine if they let it be. For
me, it's the only way to be.
- HAPPILY SINGLE IN
SEATILE
DEAR HAPPILY
SINGLE: I have often said
it is better to be alone than
to wish you were. I have
also said that there are
worse things than being
alone, and evidently you
have experienced them.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


position and acting with
knowledge and experience
will pay off. An unusual
opportunity to step into a
better position financially is
apparent. Added responsi-
bility should lead to better
prospects. ***
SAGTITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Trying to be
something.you are not or
taking something that does '
not belong to you will lead to
a personal problem. You may
tome out ahead financially
but the emotional and per-
sonal cost will not be worth -
it. Think ahead, not just inm
the moment. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Your stamina,
insight and ability to get
things done will enable
you to move mountains.
Focus on home, family and
investments that can make
your life better and your
relationships solid. Love and
romance should be sched-
uled in. S*****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't give up on
someone or sometfiing you
believe in. The uncertainty
you feel about your own
direction should notinter-
fere with what you do with
the people you care about
most Separate the past from
the present. Listen and act
on the good advice being
offered. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Someone who
has ulterior motives may
fool you if you don't question
what everyone is doing and
why. Set the rules, especially
where personal matters are
concerned, and you'll have
no regrets. Don't let love
lead you in the wrong direc-
tion. **k'


SUNDAY CROSSWORD



WHATS-ITS By Randolph Ross / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 4 5 6 1*7 18 9 *0lo 11 12 13 14 ,15 16 17 18


Across
1 Your tongue
7 Trip preparation
10 Early 10th-
century year
14 Uncle
19 "Lemme!"
20 Sloping
22 Gland: Prefix
23 An idea
25 The picture
26 Identify
27 1986 parody of a
Sylvester
Stallone film
series
28 First name among
the Axis powers
29 Not going
anywhere?
31 Direct to the exit
34 It often follows
you
36 Summer coolers
38 Dragon roll
ingredient
39 Spots
42 Greek high spot
44 Gambler's
hangout, for
short
45 Retro upholstery
material
48 Dressing choice
49 Contract winner,
often
52 Leave in a hurry
53 Opera ___
(complete works:
Lat.)
54 TV "Miss"
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


/
56 Story
accompanied
57 "A Beautiful
Mind" star
58 You, in Yucatn .
59 Tool for making
eyelets
61 Old-fashioned
clothes presser
63 Org. with an oath
64 California's _
Valley
65 Created
67 Old buffalo
hunter
69 Closed-
captioning
problem
71 Expanse
73 Surgeon's tool
77 Kind of ring
79 Rube of bygone
funnies
80 Common cricket
score
81 Cause of a pain
in the neck
82 Yawn producer
83 Pouches
84'Curly pasta
86 Writer Anais
87 Like cornstalks
after about six
weeks
89 Weapon carried
in a speakeasy
90 Accommodations
with low
overhead?
92 Abbr. in many a
Qu6bec address
93 Fighter with a
shuffle
94 Math operations
that yield
remainders
97 Shaker ___, Oh.


98 Field tools.
100 Moses at the
Red Sea, e.g.
102 "In the
Bedroom"
actress, 2001
106 Rare
announcement
after balloting
108 Slams
111 Crow
112 A message
116 Prince Valiant's
wife
117 Didn't get a
good deal
118 Name associated
with fire
119 The light
120 Putter (around)
121 Sot's woe
122 Face

Down
1 Inexpensive pen
2 Joyful cry
3 Author Janowitz
4 Exes, sometimes
5 One __- (long
odds)
6 Eastern path
7 Home of Shalimar
Gardens
8 The point
9 Like dungeons,
typically *
10 Some garlic
11 Scorsese subject
12 Kamoze of
reggae
13 Big corp. in
defense
contracts
14 Bob ___, narrator
on TV's "How I
Met Your
SMother"


1.5 Present-day site
of the ancient
port city
Eudaemon
16 Hirsute
HIimalayan
17 J. Edgar Hoover
used one: Abbr.
18 Fictional terrier
21 1973 NASA
launch
24 Gillette's II
28 Major portion
30 Former Chinese
Communist
military leader
Lin
32 A deck of cards
33 Olympic discus
great Al
34'Not straight
35 The aisles
37 Announcement at
a terminal, in
brief
39 Poor support
'40 Sure loser
41 Sloppy spots
42 Southwest
Grill (restaurant
chain)
43 A pillow
45 Ticket site
46 An abacus.
47 "Humpty Dumpty.
___ great fall"
50 Angkor ___
(Cambodian
temple)
51 Lunch
52 Actress Sonia
55 Wharf workers'
org.
57 Crossword
creator, at times
60 Water source
61 Course calls


62 Part of a tuba
sound
66 Dressing choice
68 Spanish bear
69 Theater mogul
Marcus
70 Kournikova and
others
72 Without breaking
a sweat
74 2010 Denzel.
Washington title
role


75 Athletic shoe 94 They may be fed 107 Not much


brand
76 Second place?
78 River of York
80 Snuff
84 Far out
85 G.O.P. elephant
originator
88 Commit a
computer crime
89 Dirt
91 Does very well


downtown
95 Scots with lots
96 City SSW of
Moscow
98 Tuned to
99 Ups
101 Classical sister
102 Seven ___
103 Washed out
104 Suit to ___
105 Field opening?


109 Soccer immortal


110 California's
Valley
112 Nursery rhyme-
boy who "stole a
pig, and away he
run"
113 N.Y.C.'s A, B, C
or D
114 Night sch. class
115 Rug rat


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
UMIPIS CA DI Y POWER FIRAI I L
P0101LC I I E E L N LAISISIO
CHRI STMASTREATY ADI EIU
SC EMI SIN PON E T IE
CAP10NS IDAH

HAININABA RB AR TR I TIY IEIHRAN
E NiDOiR P AYM NT i L0 I S T
E NIRON F IN'DOUT W OE.S
KEIEIP E INGPASTY- C ICKIS
SD I COLOR SLIER CSA
HAG E SANTACARI TY
PLAY EMPEROR MAMI E
LPANS STATUTE I E EDINA
OLINDA RABBITWARRANTY
H IORM SITIY OMRIE ROSE
TEU ENA E DESSA

TIEIRI Z DS O ENT R S IEL T IO

AHRIE RR PIN RU P NT ARTIY
HIOiOiDS RE Y ESN IFA T E


1 4 6


6 8 1


5 9 8


2 6


1


9 6 3 4


29 3 4


1 7 5


5


V 6 L 9 Z L 8 ES9


9 EC 6 8 9 L L1IV


8191L Lit L7 9 6-IZ


Z V 8 1 819 �L6 91


L 9 8 1 6 V19 I -E


61L19 C1S9 zI7 L8,


E 8 6 9 1 9Z, V L


1L Z 9 V L 8 6 9 6


9 L VtZ C 6 1 89S


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE &CROSSWORD SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 2010


CELEBRITY CIPHER
CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: J equals W
"JFWM H THM BKWI, FW TAXSWXI
IZTW GHXC ZL CFW JZXBS." "RZA
H X W CF W B HMS. CF W B HM S- K I R ZA."
- TWXBKM ZBIWM
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Frisbeetarianism is the belief that when you die, your
soul goes up on the roof and gets stuck." - George Carlin














SPOTLIGHT


Sunday,April 25,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


IN REVIEW


Opening

'Secrets

of Eden'

By TOM MAYER
tmayer@lakecityreporter.corn
Secrets are sprinkled
throughout a Chris
Bohjalian novel like loose
change spilled from the
pockets of a master sto-
ryteller. A quarter here, a
dime the e and soon you've
bought a ticket for whatever
ride the novelist is currently
offering. So it went with
the New York Times No. 1,
"Midwives." So it went with
the hauntingly popular, 'The
Double Bind." And so it
goes with his newest novel,
"Secrets of Eden" (Shaye
Areheart Books,.$25).
Or does it? True enough,
this novel is about secrets.
But it's also about domestic
violence. And faith. And
the crossroads at which the
three meet.
The journey begins with
Alice hayward's baptism in
a pond in Haverill, a fictional
Vermont town. It continues
with her death eight hour
later at the hands of her abu-
sive husband, George, who,
with Alice, is also found dead.
Bohjalian doesn't make
the discovery easy. The
novelist exquisitely com-
plicates the murder-cum-
suicide plot by crafting
the story in four voices
- Reverend Stephen
Drew, the Baptist minis-
ter who administered the
baptism ai I is haunted by
Alice's final word, "there";
Alice's teenage daughter,
Katie; Heather Laurent,
a best-selling ,I" ihor who
- writes about angels; and
Catherine Benincasa,
a deputy state attorney
who knows she's being
deceived, but is derailed as
to the source of deception.
.Who knows what?
Whose assumptions are
accurate? And who's tell-
ing the truth? Bohjalian's
characters are overdrawn
at times, but Stephen does
warn us: "If there is a les-
son to be learned from my
fall .. it is this: Believe no
one. Trust no one. Assume
no one really knows any-
thing that matters at all.
Because alas, we don't. All
of our stories are suspect."
Suspect also is Stephen's
faith, which is one reason
Heather is drawn Lo him: "A
minister must have a reason
to stop praying," she says.
To which Stephen responds,
"I was no longer confident
that anyone was listening."
Heather listens. Heather
listens so intently that she
and Stephen begin an affair
destined for an untimely
end: Bohjalian drops clues
and hints leading to a
denouement which makes
it impossible for Heather,
given her own abusive past,
to continue the relationship.
And relationships are the
heart of this novel. And most
of all, the relationship from
which the book draws it title.
'"The beauty of Adam and
Eve's nakedness? It's that
they haven't any secrets at
all. Not a one. And maybe
that's that magic of Eden
- and what we've lost for-
ever," Heather says.
Maybe. But more than a
bit of that magic is rediscov-
ered in "Secrets of Eden."


Nobody wins with this bunch of 'Losers'


By GLENN WHIPP
For The Associated Press
Deadly only in its dull-
ness, the coma-inducing,
comic-book-adapted action
flick "The Losers" aims to
serve as a placeholder until
"Iron Man 2" arrives with
the summer's heavy artil-
lery.
That "The Losers" and
its ragtag band of Special
Forces operatives fail to
achieve even that modest
goal speaks to the filmmak-
ers' utter lack of imagina-
tion as well as the busy
smugness with which they
offer their smorgasbord of
nothingness.
What's interesting about
the movie has more to do
with the people involved
than the'mess they've
splattered mostly off
screen.
'The Losers" comes
from the caffeinated DC/
Vertigo comic series by -
writer Andy Diggle and
artist Jock. Diggle calls
the comics his "man-crush
love letter to Shane Black,"
the highly paid screen-
writer behind the "Lethal
Weapon" movies.
That man-crush was
likely shared by Peter Berg
("Hancock"), who adapted
Diggle's comic with
writer James Vanderbilt
("Zodiac"), Berg's collabo-
rator on the 2003 tongue-
in-cheek jungle adventure
"The Rundown."
These guys are capable
writers, comfortable in the
genre. So what-happened?
Instead of producing a
heady homage to slick, '80s
.action movies or a winking
salute to Sanr Peckinpah
and his wild ounch of


Actor Chris Evans (from left), an unidentified man, actor Jason Patric, actress Zoe Saldana, actor Jeffrey Dean Morgan and
actor Columbus Short arrive at the premier of the feature film 'The Losers' in Los Angeles on Tuesday.


losers or even a faithful
adaptation of a serviceable
comic, Berg and Vanderbilt
have watered down the
material to the point of
irrelevance.
We first meet our
Special Forces agents in
the Bolivian jungle where
they're on a search-and-
destroy mission to take out
a nasty drug lord. Each
Loser has a singe name
(Clay, Cougar, Pooch,
Jensen and Roque) and
exactly one defining char-
acteristic (in ordernamed:
brooder, cowboy hat guy,


ON TELEVISION


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 20 photo, television producer Shawn Ryan (left)
works on the pilot of his new police drama 'Ride-Along' in
Chicago.

Many called for, but

few TV pilots chosen


By FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer
NEWTON, Mass.
- Turreted and stately,
the house on a quiet street
in Newton had been vacant
for a while.
But for a few days last
month, its "For Sale"
signs went away. Trucks,
trailers, crews and actors
converged along Lake
Avenue after fliers in every
neighbor's mailbox gave
fair warning: This picture-
perfect homestead would
temporarily be occupied
as one of several shooting
sites around the Boston
area for a CBS pilot called
"Quinn-Tuplets."
This wannabe series
features Amber Tamblyn,
Kenneth Mitchell, Sam
Witwer, David Giuntoli
and Anna Chlumsky as
all-grown-up quintuplets
named Quinn.
But further details weren't
available, or worth a viewer
getting too excited about,
yet "Quinn-Tuplets" may
never make it to the air.
"Quinn-Tuplets" is just
one of 80-plus scripted
pilots in production and
due to be evaluated soon
by the five broadcast net-


works. Each is bucking for
a berth on a fall prime-time
schedule. But only a hand-
ful will make the cut.
That means if "Quinn-
Tuplets" doesn't pass mus-
ter with CBS execs, it will be
tossed, forever unseen by
the public, on the lofty scra-
pheap of busted TV pilots.
Such is the game of win
or lose played out each
pilot season in a high-
stakes, time-crunched
scramble.
Lately, a year-round
program rollout has found
favor in the industry. Even
so, the May "upfront" pre-
sentations - heralding
a new crop of fall TV to
advertisers and the world
- remain. This half-centu-
ry-old rite perpetuates the
need for pilots to sustain it.
Lots of pilots. Pronto.
Shawn Ryan, with series
to his credit including "The
Unit" and 'The Shield," has
a pilot in the works for Fox
called "Ride-Along."
"When you're producing
an ongoing show," he said
one hectic day last week,
"it feels like you're in an
out-of-control car hurtling
100 miles per hour and you
never know whether you'll
get someplace, or crash."


family guy, wacky T-shirt
guy, brooder who doesn't
like the other brooder).
The mission goes bad. A
bunch of cute ragamuffins
are killed in the most per-
functory manner possible.
The Losers get mad and
vow revenge, going after
the American-flag-lapel-pin-
wearing CIA "super spook
Jason Patric channeling
Goldfinger) who engi-
neered the betrayal.
Director Sylvain White
("Stomp the Yard") tries
hard to give the thin mate-
rial a kind of tossed-off


casualness, hoping the
explosions and heavy-metal
soundtrack will fill the
empty spaces of the con-
voluted plot. It's all noise,
no substance. The line at
the concession stand prob-
ably has more tension than
what's happening inside
the theater.
As the team's leader,
Jeffrey Dean Morgan '
comes off as a budget-
version George Clooney.
Better is Chris Evans, cast
against type as the nerdy
computer specialist. Evans
has a nice touch with the


recycled banter and deliv-
ers the movie's funniest,
moment with a spot-on
version of Journey's "Don't
Stop Believin'."
Geek It Girl Zoe Saldana
("Avatar") is on board, too,
fighting, shooting, disrob-
ing, usually at the same
time. The movie's one
great image.has Saldana
silhouetted on top of-a
mountain of cargo contain-
ers, a missile launcher
at the ready. What's she
doing here? Well, as Tom
Petty sings, even the losers
get lucky sometimes.


4D


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