Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text







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" Tigers take on
Pn-hholz High in


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Saturday, April 3, 2010 1www.lakeci




Crash injures 1


Area events
Activities around the
community to liven up
your spare time.
Local, 8A


orter


Vol. 136, No. 65 E 75 cents


Motorcyclist in
critical condition
at hospital.
From staff reports
A Lake City man was crit-
ically injured Fridaky after-
noon when his motorcycle
was struck from behind by
another motorist, according
to reports.
David Wayne Davis, 28, of
Lake City, suffered severe
head injuries in the Friday
afternoon crash, which
took place on State Road


47, just West of Interstate
75. He was flown to Shands
at the University of Florida
in Gainesville where he was
listed in critical condition
Friday evening.
The wreck took place
at approximately 1:40 p.m.
at the intersection of State
Road 47 and SW Ridge
Street.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Davis was traveling west on
State Road 47, attempting
to make a left turn into the
Stop-and-Go convenience


store parking lot. A 2004
Cadillac Deville, driven by
17-year-old Justin Morris of
Lake City, also was travel-
ing west and approaching
Davis' stopped 1992 Harley
Davidson.
FHP's initial investigation
determined Morris didn't
see Davis' stopped motor-
cycle in time and collided
with the rear of the Harley
Davidson. The impact from
the collision tossed Davis
into the windshield of the
WRECK continued on 3A


TROY ROBERTS/Lake City Reporter
David Wayne Davis of Lake City remained in - critical condition Friday evening following an
afternoon accident on State Road 47 when his motorcycle was struck by a car.


Treasured antiques


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Jimmy Ryles, of Hazlehurst, Ga., pulls a load of children in his 'Ryles Express' Friday, as part of the 22nd Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine Show at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park. The event will continue throughout the
weekend.

Visitors view, learn at Tractor & Engine Show


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.cdm
WHITE SPRINGS
. he constant
purr of motors
cranking, run-
ning and get-
ting started
seemed to be a continu-
ous sound at the Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park Friday.
It was the first day
of the Department of
Environmental Protection's
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
22nd Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine Show
on Friday. The event will
take place throughout the
weekend, and children as
well as adults made them-
selves at home touching,
viewing and learning about
the various exhibits.


Event exhibitors are
admitted free of charge,
while admission to the pub-
lic is $5 for a vehicle with
up to eight passengers.
David Rudolph, of
Clermont, told jokes and
played to the crowd as he
explained the intricacies of
a Maytag water powered
washing machine driven
by a 1934 Fairbanks motor.
"This water pump
was dug out of a river in
Michigan by a fellow run-
ning a dragline in the early
1950s," Rudolph said. "I
purchased it in 1982 at an
engine show, restored it
and it's been running ever
since. It's fully restored as
when it was first built."
Jim Peronto was with
his wife, Ramona, and
son, Aaron, looking at
Rudolph's antique washing
machine display and told


his family members what
it was before Rudolph
could begin detailing the
machine's history.
"This is wonderful
- it's great. It's a lot of
fun," he said, looking at
the machine. "It's wonder-
ful just seeing all the old
vintage equipment, see-
ing how the people used
to work and seeing they
can get all their resources
done and everything
going. We've been here at
the park before but this is
the first time we've ever
seen anything like this."
Rudolph said he learned
how to restore the engine
by talking to one of his
friends, and he now goes
to 'several antique shows
to display and demonstrate
how washing machine
parts work together.
"We come here every


year if we possibly can to
demonstrate, show what
we have and show part of
our history," he said, not-
ing he has attended the
event for close to six years.
"It's just a huge network'of
collectors and we just like
playing with our stuff."
Fernandina Beach resi-
dents Richard Conrad and
his wife, Leslie, made their
trip to the annual tractor
show a family outing as
part of their children's
homeschooling class.
"This is a dream come
true to me, because I
enjoy old things like this,"'
Richard Conrad said, not-
ing he like the tractors
and engines more than the
antique cars. "I grew up
with a little bit of this old
stuff, so I'm pretty familiar
TRACTOR continued on 3A


15-year-old


faces burglary


charges


Reports: Boy
confesses to 4
burglaries.
From staff reports
A 15-year-old Lake City
boy was arrested and
charged in connection with
a string of at least four bur-
glaries on the north side
of town. Lake City Police
Department officers arrest-
ed the juvenile Thursday,
and he now faces additional
burglary charges.
According to LCPD
reports, around 10:52 p.m.
Thursday officers were
dispatched to a home at
926 NW Georgia Ave. for a
reported burglary.
The homeowner there
returned home to find that
someone had broken .in,
stealing money, jewelry and
weapons.
After investigating the
crime scene, officers devel-
oped the 15-year-old as a
suspect in the home bur-
glary.
Reports say the juvenile
was interviewed where he
confessed to committing
burglaries at 521 NWGibson


Lane, 480 NW Gibson Lane,
800 NW Georgia Lane and
670 NW Long St.
Authorities were able
to recover several items
from the recent burglaries,
including: $428 in cash; two
shot guns, three hand guns,
an Xbox 360 game console,
a safe, a bracelet and one
woman's watch.
Information from the
police department indicates
one of the hand guns was a
.380-caliber taken from the
home at 800 NW Georgia
St., while one of the shot
guns and the safe was taken
from 926 NW Georgia St.
The Xbox 360 game console
was taken from 670 NW
Long St:-and was recovered
at the suspect's grandmoth-
er's residence on Northwest
Canton Lane.
Authorities have reported
the juvenile also confessed
to committing two burglar-
ies in the county.
'The 15-year-old was
charged with one count of
burglary and possession of
a firearm by a convicted
felon. He has been turned
over to the Department of
Juvenile Justice.


LCPD: Teen shot

in hand, officers

investigating


Report: Boy, 17,
claims 'enemy'
shot him.
From staff reports
The Lake City Police
Department has launched
an investigation into a
Thursday night shooting
where a 17-year-old suf-
fered gunshot wound to his
hand.
According to LCPD
reports, around 6:58 p.m.
Thursday, officers respond-
ed to Shands at Lake Shore
Hospital in reference to a.
patient who had a gunshot
wound to his right hand.


Once there, authori-
ties spoke to the 17-year-
old patient. When officers
asked the victim what hap-
pened, he was only able to
say "an enemy had done
this," reports say.
Authorities say certain
parts of the victim's account
of the incident are in ques-
tion, but they believe the
shooting took place near,
the intersection of Montana
and Joe Cohey streets.
. Investigators are ask-
ing that anyone who may
have information about the
incident to call the LCPD
anonymously on its TIP line
at 719-2068.


1 i84!26 llo0I 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


85
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion .


' .Local .................. 5A
" Faith & Values ............ 6A
' \ Advice & Comics......... 4B
, Puzzles................ 2B


TODAY IN
FAITH
PF bbi r,,n-,i t,:


COMING
SUNDAY
. . ulnrt be.nLi
F'r,:,ie.:- t hl n-ipr .


v


I










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010


CA H 3 . Friday:
Afternoon: 3-4-6
Evening: 8-9-0


Friday:
- Afternoon: 2-8-7-1
Evening: 8-6-6-7


evnatchc.
Thursday:
" 5-18-21-27-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



'Dynasty' star Forsythe dead at 92


LOS ANGELES

John Forsythe, the hand-
some, smooth-voiced actor
who made his fortune as the
scheming oil tycoon in TV's
"Dynasty" and the voice of
the leader of "Charlie's Angels,"
has died after a yearlong battle with
cancer. He was 92.
Forsythe died late Thursday at his
home in Santa Ynez from complica-
tions of pneumonia, publicist Harlan
Boll said Friday.
"He died as he lived his life, with
dignity and grace," daughter Brooke
Forsythe said.
Despite his distinguished work
in theater and films, Forsythe's
greatest fame came from his role as
Blake Carrington in producer Aaron
Spelling's 1981-89 primetime soap
opera "Dynasty."
Forsythe lent dignity to the tale
of murder, deceit, adultery arid
high finance, which often brought
Carrington into conflict with his
flashy, vengeful former wife, Alexis
Colby, played to the hilt by Joan
Collins.
"He was one of the last of the
true gentlemen of the acting profes-
sion," Collins said in a statement.
"I enjoyed our nine years of feud-
ing, fussing and fighting as the
Carringtons."
Heather Locklear, another
"Dynasty" co-star, called him "a
gentleman in every sense of the
word," and a "gifted actor who knew
the true meaning of being gracious
and kind."
Forsythe was an important part of
another hit Spelling series without
being seen.
From 1976 to 1981, he played the
voice of Charlie, the boss who
delivered assignments to his beau-
tiful detectives, including Farrah
Fawcett, via telephone in "Charlie's
Angels."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a Sept. 24, 1986, file photo, actor John Forsythe is joined by 'Dynasty' actresses
Joan Collins (left) and Linda Evans, at a party celebrating the production of 150
episodes of the popular series, in Los Angeles. Forsythe, the actor who made his
fortune as TV's affable 'Bachelor Father' and the scheming oil tycoon in 'Dynasty,'
died late Thursday in Santa Ynez, Calif., said publicist Harlan Boll. He was 92.


Friend: Jesse James
wants to save marriage
LOS ANGELES - Jesse James is
a "a broken man" and is hoping that
rehab and some privacy will help
him recover and save his marriage
to Sandra Bullock, his friend and
attorney said..
Joe Yanny told The Associated
Press that allegations of marital infi-
delity against James and the ensuing
media "feeding frenzy" have ruined
the biker businessman's life.
"This whole thing has 'destroyed
Jesse's entire universe," Yanny said.
"Right now, he's a broken man."
He said James is still in love with
Bullock and hopes the marriage can
be saved.
James checked into a reha-


bilitation center after weeks of
reports that he cheated on Bullock
throughout their marriage. Yanny
declined to say what James is being
treated for, but said people shouldn't
assume it is for sex addiction. He
also wouldn't rebut specific allega-
tions lodged against the West Coast
Choppers owner or say whether
there are plans for the couple to get
a divorce.
"The allegations back and forth
about what happened - those
are private matters to be resolved
between a husband and a wife,"
Yanny said. "It's not appropriate for a
public airing."
He said the vast majority of stories
about James are untrue.
"Jesse is in love with Sandra,"
Yanny said.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress-singer Doris
Day is 87.
* Actress Marsha
Mason is 68.
* Singer Wayne Newton
is 68.
* Singer Billy Joe Royal
is 68.
* Singer Tony Orlando
is 66.


* Singer Richard
Thompson is 61.
* Actor Alec Baldwin is
52.
* Actor David Hyde
Pierce is 51.
* Comedian-actor Eddie
Murphy is 49.
* Actress Amanda
Bynes is 24.


Daily Scripture

"Now as Jesus was going up to Jerusalem,
he took the twelve disciples aside and said
to them, "We are going up to Jerusalem,
and the Son of Maq will be betrayed to
the chief priests and the teachers of the
law.They will condemn him to death and
will turn him over to the Gentiles to be
mocked and flogged and crucified. On the
* third day he will be raised to life!"


- Matthew 20:17-19



Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
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Fax number .............752-9400 BUSINESS
Circulation ...............755-5445 SINSS
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com Controller Sue Brannon... . 754-0419
(sbrannon @lakecityreportercom)
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- CIRCULATION
wished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055. should be. completed by '6:30 a.m.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and a.m. on Sunday.
The Associated Press.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
All material herein is property of the Lake problems with your delivery service.
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or In Columbia County, customers should
in part is forbidden without the permis- call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes vice related credits will be issued.
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home delivery
Lake City, Ra. 32056. is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Publisher Todd Wllson .....754-0418 vice related credits will be issued.
(twilson@lakecityreporter.cm) Circulation ...............755-5445.
NEWS (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
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ADVERTISING Rates include 7% sales tax.
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52 Weeks................. $179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Nine-legged
octopus on menu
TARPON SPRINGS -
Nineopus. Novopus. Freak
of nature.
Whatever you want to
call it, the nine-legged
octopus probably had a leg
up on all the other crea-
tures in the Gulf of Mexico
- until it was caught and
found its way to Hellas
Bakery and Restaurant in
Florida.
Head Chef Emmanuel ,
Psomas says he was
steaming the octopus
Thursday when he dis-
cpvered that it seemed,
well, leggier than normal.
Psomas says he's cooked
octopus for 40 years - it's
a-Greek delicacy - and
has never seen one with an
extra leg.
� He says he counted the
legs three times in disbelief.
"I'm like, this can't be,"
Psomas said. "I've seen a
16t of octopus."
He's keeping the octo-
pus in his refrigerator for
now, but he plans to enjoy
it soon with a bit of vin-
egar, lemon juice, olive oil
and herbs.

Report: No drugs
found in victims
MELBOURNE
- Autopsy reports show
that three Florida middle
school students had no
drugs in their systems
when they were truck by
a train.
Fifteen-year-old Jennifer
Reichert and Wraya Hadley
and Ciara Lemn - both 14
- died as they crossed a
Melbourne bridge Feb. 20.
They were classmates at
Southwest Middle School
in Palm Bay.
The Brevard County
Medical Examiner's Office
released their autopsy
and toxicology reports
Thursday. They said the
girls didn't test positive for
drugs.


-A


I MOSTLY MOSTLY
" SUNNY SUNNY


HI 85 1 57 HI 84 LO 57


*4.


Festival finds support.
In an Oct. 6, 2009, photo, ibises feed on a flooded tide flat
beside the island's causeway on Jekyll Island, Ga. Jekyll
Island's.popular fall birding festival, a draw to Florida
residents, has outgrown the all-volunteer board that once ran
it. Rather than having it take flight, the state park's governing
authority is taking over the festival and hired a staff to run it.


The reports list the
cause of death for each girl
as "multiple blunt force
injuries."
Police said a teen boy
made it across the bridge
'ahead of the girls and saw
the train barreling toward
them. He yelled to warn
the girls, but they weren't
able to get out of the way.

Sink: Probe of
Fla. GOP improper
TALLAHASSEE
- Chief Financial Officer
Alex Sink says Attorney
General Bill McCollum
shouldn't have had the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement investigate
the Florida Republican
Party.
Sink suggested Friday
that state or federal
prosecutors investigate
instead of an agency that
-McCollum, a GOP leader,
helps run as a Florida
Cabinet member.
Gov. Charlie Crist
agreed federal prosecu-
tors should investigate due
to potential income tax
implications. A McCollum
spokeswoman said FDLE
at this time is the "appro-
priate authority" but
McCollum doesn't object


to others also investigat-
ing.
The investigation focus-
es on allegations a former
party chairman steered
money to his consulting
firm.
Sink; a Democrat, and
McCollum are running for
governor.

911 call in Disney
bus crash released
LAKE BUENA VISTA
- The recording of a 911
call made moments after
a 9-year-old boy was killed
in a collision with a Walt
Disney World bus has
been released.
During the nine-minute
'recording, an unidentified
woman tells the dispatcher
there is nothing that could
be done to help save the
child. He was declared
dead at the scene.
The Florida Highway
Patrol has identified the
boy as Chase Brubaker of
St. Petersburg. Authorities
say his bicycle veered off
the sidewalk and struck
the side of a passenger
bus.
Investigators say he was
then pulled under the right
rear tire.
* Associated Press


Tallahassee *
83/52 ,
Pensacola
71/59 iPa,,ma City
73/57


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
, Record high
. Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7a Ip
Saturday


Salosta
84/52 *Jack
Lake City i82
85/52
Gainesville * Da
,,85/51
SOcala *
�85/52
S Orlan
84/5
Tampa,
82/61


84
48
78
52
89 in 1935
32 in 1919

0.00"
0.00"
11.66."
0.24"
11.40"


City
ksonille Cape Canaveral
2/55 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
o 6na Beach Fort Myers
8V56 Gainesville
* Jacksonville
do Cape Canaveral Key West
58 78/59 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
81/66 * Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
81/68 0 Pensacola
Naples * Tallahassee
2/61 Miami Tampa


MOON
Moonrise today 1202 a.m.
Moonset today 10:19 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 12:59 a.m.
Moonset tom. 11:12 a.m.


April April April April
6 14 21 21 28
Last New First Full


7p Y~ufday 6aI


-Fomerecatmvid eubn -FeeA Eetmqm�


On this dale n
1990. ra,n and
snow prevaile irn
the northeastern
U.S. Boston, Mass.
was soaked with
2.91 inches of rain.
Up to half a foot
of snow blanketed
the hills of Steuben
County, N.Y. that
Tuesday night.


REIONAL FRCS A o audy pi
Saurays.ih 5.fdynihts o


Sunday
79. 66, s
80/59/s
80/69/s
85/62/s
84/54/pc
82/57/s
77/63/s
86/54/pc
82/68/s
85/61/s
84/54/pc
84/59/s
74/60/s
75/58/pc
84/55/s
82/63/s
85/54/s
80/66/s


Monday
.76 61,s
80/59/pc
80/69/s
85/62/s
86/56/s
83/58/s
75/61/s
86/56/s
81/69/s
83/63/s
85/56/s
84/59/pc
75/62/s
76/61/s
85/57/s
82/63/s
85/56/s
80/67/s


Ft Myers,
85/61 *


S�, , 81/67 Valdosta
Key West w . Palm Beach
80/65


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.
I


. 7:17 a.m.
.7:51 p.m.
7:16 a.m.
7:51 p.m.


9

1 ingtestolx
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
.:^ '--- X


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.corn


Forecasts, data and graph-
. '% ' y Ics 2010 Weather Central
ai, Lh' LLC, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


."71M1, -


I SEI B



fat aonne

""gmjg


MPRI
SATURDAYMMI


SUNDAY
-I!-- I I - I - I R%.I-


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


TUESDJAY


WEDNES


r� LAKE CITY ALMANAC


I


_----.----------------------------_ _










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010 3A


Asphalt tankers catch fire


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityrepor ter. corn

Units from the Columbia
County and Lake City fire
departments doused a liq-
uid tanker truck blaze at
the Anderson-Columbia
office Friday, which
severely- damaged two
tankers.
The fire occurred 2:15
p.m. at the Anderson-
Columbia site at 871 NW


Guerdon St.
According to Lake City
Fire Department reports,
three tanker trucks were
set up in an isolated area
where Anderson-Columbia
employees offload excess
liquid asphalt.
Lake City Fire
Department Lt. Don Wilson
said in order to open, the
valve, employees have to
heat it and as they were
heating it Friday, the grass


caught on fire.
"We had a good knock
down of the fire in about 20
minutes," Wilson said. "No
one was injured, but we had
a firefighter who twisted
his ankle. Two of the three
tankers were burnt pretty
bad --including their tire
and wheels."
The Columbia County
Fire Department respond-
ed to the scene with two
tanker trucks and an


engine, while the Lake City
Fire Department respond-
ed to the scene with its
Haz-Mat (Hazardous
Materials) truck and one
engine.
Firefighters were at the
scene for more than an
hour.
Wilson said Anderson-
Columbia has its own envi-
ronmental specialist and
their team was going to
handle the clean-up.


. -


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Gene Fourakre (from left) shows Hailey Bowen, Rebecca Bowen, Joshua Lewis, Scott Peterson and Debbie Peterson how
corn is ground into grits during his corn grinding display at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park Friday.

TRACTOR: Show continues today, Sunday


Continued From Page 1A

with a little bit of this stuff,
and there are some things
I have never seen that's


interesting. With the kids
being homeschooled, I
would say they're learning


something."
This is their first time
coming to the event, Leslie


said.
"I would say we're enjoy-
ing it a lot," she said.


CRA to consider


funds for hotel

evaluation


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Approving funding for a
structural study could be
the next step in determin-
ing the City of Lake City's
future involvement with the
Blanche Hotel.
The Community
Redevelopment Agency
will consider appropriating
$24,5000 of tax increment
financing funds for a struc-
tural evaluation by Jones
Edmunds of the Blanche
Hotel at 6:30 p.m. Monday
at city hall. The recommen-
dation will then go before
city council to accept the
money.,
The mayor and city
council meet as the CRA.
The Blanche Hotel is the
most historical building in
Columbia County, said City
Councilman George Ward.
'To just to allow it to dete-
riorate doesn't make any
sense," he said.
The study will determine_
if the city can help turn the
Blanche around and make
it a viable place, Ward said.
If the Blanche is deemed
not structurally sound, the
city will probably not want
to touch it, he said.
"That's the whole reason
we're having the study," he
said. "This is the first step,
to see if we get involved."
Investors with the
Blanche Hotel have com-
mitted to split the cost of
the study with the city,
Ward said. ,
In other CRA business:.


* The CRA will consider
authorizing $49,794.00 from
the CRA Trust Fund to
provide money for the city
to demolish and remove
the old city hall structure
under a proposed contract
with A & A Trucking &
Excavating.
* A resolution authoriz-
ing the CRA to appropriate
an amount not to exceed
$94,100 of TIF funds for the
city to use the services of
IBI Group Inc. to prepare
a new CRA Redevelopment
Plan will be considered.
* Authorizing the CRA
to appropriate $50,000 to
provide TIF funds for the
Facade Grant Program will
be considered. The recom-
mendations from the CRA
will be presented to city
council during the regular
meeting at 7 p.m. Monday.
During the, city council
meeting
* Council will hold a pub-
lic hearing about the city's
proposed revisions and
increase in the water and
sewer utility rates and other
charges.
* Jenny Drawdy, Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
president and Joel Foreman,
Chamber Government
Relations committee, will
address the council.
* Mayor Stephen Witt
will issue a proclamation for
Linda Pennington Day.
* Council will consider
an ordinance relating to the
proposed water and sewer
utility rate increases.


Residents asked to

roundup hazardous

products for event


TROY ROBERTS/Lake City Reporter
A man reacts to a crash Friday afternoon that involved a motorcycle and a Cadillac Deville. A Lake City man was injured in
the crash and taken to a Gainesville hospital with severe head injuries, according to law enforcement.

WRECK: Charges are pending investigation
Continued From Page 1A


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Instead of simply throw-
ing away household hazard-
ous wastes, residents are
asked to round them up and
bring them to the proper
disposal.
The 11th annual Columbia
County Toxic Roundup is
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. April
l1 at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds.
The event is a part-
nership between the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
and . Columbia County,
said Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourism
Development Council exec-
utive Director.
"They combined forces
in an effort to encourage
residents to properly dis-
pose of hazardous materi-
als," he said.
Many of the items are
harmful to the environment,
he said.




Iww orrllc


"Some people dump the
waste in the ground or
just throw it in the trash,"
Campbell said.
Household hazardous
wastes such as aerosol
cans, fluorescent lamps,
paint thinners, old paint;
used oil, pesticides ,and'
insecticides will be col-
lected free for residents.'
Businesses will have to pay'
a fee.
Personnel'will be on hand
to help collect the items,
which will be loaded into'
*containers. The process is,
simple, he said.
"We've got a convenient
central location," Campbell
said, "Bring your waste."


'car, reports said, which
caused his severe injuries.
Reports state Davis was


wearing a helmet at the
time of the crash.
Traffic in the area was


delayed for more than an
hour while crews worked to
clear the scene.


Charges are pending the
outcome of FHP's investiga-
tion. ,


HEPARIUER


A A - -U
HAV YO O A OVE OE SFFEEDA SUDENUNXPLINE
DELNEI HATH F O I OUDBEDE OTH SEO





hospitals . ciis& hra ies thro ghoutAmercaincudngou lca aea
AT RN YALA W ltsihevisateisan ug s.
15 EMds onS t.Lae iy.FL30550
ACOS.RM H CU'l1SECMMNY SD N
DILYI
CADAMAR UGR


Easter unrise ce i
At First Baptist Church of Lake City
Join us on Easter Sunday, April 4 at 10:30 AM as we celebrate the
Resurrection of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ! Pastor Stephen
Ahrens will be presenting a special Easter Drams, "The Roman
Centurion: One Life Changed." It will truly be an uplifting and
moving service. For more info contact us at 386-752-5422
_ or www.firstbaptistlc.com _
- First Baptist Lake City located at: 182 NE Justice St., Lake City, FL
32055 (2 blocks East of Marion St. On Hwy. 90)






2744 SW in Blvd. Lake Ci FL
7 2=63 B0 Back Flow #T05-08-8053


J


Page E ditor: Allison Candreva, 754-0424













OPINION


Saturday, April 3, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


* OUR


OUR
S OPINION


Chocolate

good, in

moderation

With the Easter
Bunny poised
to make a
scheduled
appearance in
homes throughout Columbia
County Sunday, news con-
cerning the health benefits of
chocolate couldn't have come at
a better time.
. As we reported Thursday,
;. a new study published in
European Heart Journal indi-
cates that small doses of choco-
late every day could reduce the
chance of heart attack or stroke
by as much as 40 percent
For chocolate-loving
Americans, that's good news.
- Consuming candy for good
health is no bitter pill to swal-
low.
But it's news that comes with
a caveat The license to eat
chocolate is not license to make
unbridled trips to the candy
jar. At a time when Centers for
Disease Control reports that
57 percent of Florida adults are
overweight or obese, the last
thing we need is a prescription
for weight gain.
To put the benefit in perspec-
tive, healthy heart results are
achieved by consuming as little
as one square of a chocolate
bar every day.
Taken in such moderation,
this is an easy recipe for good
health we can live with.

H I.G H LIG H TS
IN HISTORY\
Today is Saturday, April
3, the 93rd day of 2010.
There are 272 days left in the
year.
* On April 3,.1860, the leg-
endary Pony Express began car-
rying mail between St Joseph,
Mo., and Sacramento, Calif.
(The delivery system lasted only
18 months, giving way to the
transcontinental telegraph.)
* In 1865, Union forces
occupied the Confederate capi-
tal of Richmond, Va.
* In 1882, outlaw Jesse
,James was shot to death in St.
Joseph, Mo., by Robert Ford, a
member of James' gang.
* In 1936, Bruno
tHauptmann was electrocuted
in Trenton, N.J. for the
kidnap-murder of Charles
Lindbergh Jr.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874 ,
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
* Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


GOP's complaining turns unhealthy


What was the
charming little
phrase that
conservatives
would say to
those of us disappointed when
George W. Bush became presi-
dent? It's hard to believe that
it has receded down the rabbit
hole of memory. It was so won-
derfully pithy.
Ah yes, I remember now. "Get
over it!" This was considered
the height of conservative wit
back in 2000 and 2004 and all
the long years after. You might
call it almost Oscar Wilde-like in
its cleverness - that is, if Oscar
had not been gay.
Hey, Mr. Liberal, you think
the election was stolen because
the public was bamboozled by
the voting machines? Get over
it! Hey, Mrs. Liberal, you think it
unfair that the public was bam-
boozled by gay marriage amend-
ments and the like? Get over it!
So we did get over it, sort of,
because we didn't think we had a
choice. It never occurred to us to
behave like spoiled children who
didn't get their way, pouting and
stamping our feet
Oh, there was mumbling and
grumbling, some crying in our
beer, but most liberals aren't
much interested in being in a
permanent state of agitation.
They weren't interested then
in forming tea parties for any
purpose other than sharing
cupcakes. They weren't inter-
ested in wearing guns to public
events, and not only because
they looked odd when worn
with kaftans and Birkenstocks.
Most liberals care about other
people more, than they care about
hating other people, and hence'
they do not like living with a
permanent political wedgie. This
explains why most don't find it
entertaining to have their brains
pickled by talk-radio vinegar,
something that inevitably filters
down and knots the underpants.

LETTERS TO

Health care is job
well done
To the Editor:
I am so overjoyed that health
care will now be available for all
Americans. I am so very proud
of Barack Obama. He did it.
I have lived in Europe many
times over the last two decades.
Unfortunately, I was in a very
serious accident while I stayed
in Germany in 1999. It was
while riding a horse in the
Alps out in an.apple orchid.
Unfortunately the horse got
spooked and he ran into a large
tree branch and fell on top of
me. I broke every rib on my
right side, my shoulder blade*
was shattered and my lung was
collapsed. An ambulance had to
come pick me up and I stayed
in the hospital there for two
weeks. I was uninsured at that
time and was very surprised
when the bill was covered by
te German health care pro-
gram.


Reg Henry
.rhenry@post-gazette.com
Most, not all. On the circle of
political opinion, the far left and
the far right sit uncomfortably
next to each other and both are
certifiably nuts. But the reality
is that the far left has been a
small sliver for the past 30 years
while the far right is such a
large cohort that it now repre-
sents mainstream opinion in the
Republican Party. Really.
The so-called health care
debate is the perfect example.
The claims made about its
passage - death panels! gov-
ernment takeover! socialism!
Marxism! - came straight and
unfiltered from extreme politi-
cal fantasyland. Never mind that
the legislation has no public
option and lets the highwaymen
(you know them as the insur-
ance companies) continue to ply
their trade, but just in a way that
does not leave travelers on life's
troubled roads so robbed of cov-
erage as to be completely naked.
To the nation's shame, the
rage over the legislation has
no equal in recent history.
Some have suggested that the
Democrats are co-conspirators
in the lack of bipartisanship.
The Democrats are not with-
out fault - hey, they are the
Democrats, a party that could
,not organize a booze-up in a
brewery - but the basic sug-
gestion is ridiculous.
Not a single Republican
voted for the reform package, a
display of like mind that would
have been the envy of the
Supreme Soviet. It was amaz-

THE EDITOR
I was so impressed that I
made a comparison to our
health care and saw we fell ter-
ribly short. In comparison, I
knew some older couples here
in the states that were dropped
after paying health insurance
for up to 50 years after the first
time one of them had a myocar-
dial infarction.
Way to go Obama team. I
am so very thankful to have a
true leader and one of authentic
visionary qualities. It is time to
evolve America.
Erin Brinkman
Wellborn

Sheriff rides to the
rescue
To the Editor:
Upon leaving the 16th Annual
Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo on
March 20, I fell in the bleachers
'and woke up with paramedics at
my side.
They wanted to take me to


ing how they recycled their
"Country First" slogan from the
presidential election to the more
workable "Politics First."
In truth, they set outto be
supreme obstructionists in
the hope of besting President
Barack Obama. Health care was
to be his Waterloo. Who knew
he would play the part of the
victorious Duke of Wellington
and not the beaten Napoleon?
All the while, the Republicans
insisted that they really wanted
health care reform and just
wanted to start over to get it
right. Well, as they used to
say in the old country, pull my
other leg - it's got a bell on it.
Anybody half awake knew that
"just start over" was their code
for doing nothing ever.
They speak as if insuring 32
million more people is a spe-
cial horror, not something that
some of us crazy idealists think
is an imperative of the Gospels.
(Funtny that the GOP, which
used to be God's Own Party,
seems to have sided with mam-
mon in the health care debate.)
And what a fuss about proce-
dure! The Democrats rammed
it through due to the dastardly
advantage of majority rule. Can
you believe it? Now various con-
servative state attorneys gen-
eral will sue to subvert the will
of the people as expressed in
the last presidential election, the
sort of tactic that the conserva-
tive columnist George E Will
used to flay liberals for trying.
This effort may well succeed
- judicial activism now being
an equal opportunity employer
and George Bush having made
the Supreme Court his gift that
keeps on giving.
But it would be better for the
nation if conservatives heed
their own advice before the rage
and madness spread. Elections
have consequences. Get over it.
* Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


the hospital but said I didn't
want to go because.I had fam-
ily from Michigan visiting, and
they didn't know their way
around Lake City.
Sheriff Mark Hunter hap-
pened to be at the Rodeo. He
came over to talk to me, and
said he would stay with them
and not to worry.
They exchanged cell numbers
and he instructed them to fol-
low him to the hospital. He then
stayed with them in the hospital
for more than an hour before
leaving.
The next day Sheriff Hunter
called them to inquire about
me. Needless to say, my family
was highly impressed with our
sheriff.
They felt relieved to have had
someone to turn to for assis-
tance. I, as well, was relieved
that my family was made com-
fdrtable and looked after in this
emergency.
Dorothy C. Fedak
Lake City


Cliff May


Palestinian

sees the

Israeli side

President Barack
Obama thinks
Israel's policies are
the biggest obstacle
to peace in the
Middle East. Hamas disagrees.
The problem for Hamas,
writes Mosab Hassan Yousef,
has never been "Israel's poli-
cies." The problem for Hamas is
"Israel'svery existence." Hamas,
Yousef adds, is "animated by
religious fervor and the theol-
ogy of jihad," and is "dedicated
to the extinction of Israel.""
He should know. He is the
son of Sheikh Hassan Yousef,
one of Hamas's seven founders
and perhaps its most popular
leader. Not that long ago, it
seemed inevitable that the son
would follow in his father's
footsteps. As he recounts in
"Son of Hamas," a stunning
and instructive memoir, at
the age of 17 he "could think
of nothing except joining the
military wing of Hamas." But
he came to see terrorism as
immoral and repugnant. In
reaction, he embarked on a
remarkable journey.
That journey began in a
West Bank village where his
father, a religious and political
leader before he helped create
Hamas, believed that "Allah
had given us the responsibil-
ity of eradicating the Jews ...
though he personally had noth-
ing against them."
The Israelis repeatedly
imprisoned the father and,
when the son procured weap-
ons, they quickly threw him
in jail as ivell. Both were dealt
with harshly. But, in prison,
Yousef was shocked to learn
that Hamas leaders were ev6n
more brutal toward their own
members. Those suspected of
cooperating with Israelis were
tortured - sometimes with
needles inserted under their
fingernails, sometimes with
plastic food trays melted on
their bare skin.
In 1996, Yousef was
approached by the Shin Bet,
Israel's domestic intelligence
agency. He considered becom-
ing a double agent - figuring
he could mislead his handlers
and perhaps get the chance to
kill a few.
Then came Camp David: In
2000, President Bill Clinton
put pressure on Israeli Prime
Minister Ehud Barack who
offered Yasser Arafat, presi-
dent of the Palestine Liberation
Organization and leader of
Fatah, "about 90 percent of the
West Bank, the entire Gaza
Strip, and East Jerusalem as
the capital of a new Palestinian
state. But even so, it was not
enough for Arafat," who reject-
ed the offer, refused to negoti-
ate further, and launched a
bloody intifada against Israel.
Why?
Yousef knew that by working
for the Israelis he would be seen
as "a traitor in the eyes of my
people." But it was the only way
he could save both Palestinian
and Israeli lives, the only way he
could contribute to "the ongoing
war on terrorism in which Israel
plays a leading role."
In 2007, Yousef left the
Middle East. He now lives in
* California. He also has left
Islam. He is now a devout
Christian. He wrote "Son
of Hamas" because, "When
Middle Eastern nations -
Jews and Arabs alike - start
to understand some of what
I understand, only then will
there be peace."
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A


�TAULF R.


H w I












Page Editor: Allison Candreva, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter

Visitors watch washing machine demonstrations at the Tractor & Engine Show
David Rudolph (from left) explains how an antique washing machine was set-up and used to Lawtey residents Jim Peronto, Aaron Peronto and Ramona Peronto during the first day of the
22nd Annual Antique Tractor and Engine Show Friday at the Stephen Foster Folk. Culture Center State Park.


Nurse hears calling after mother dies


From staff reports

When Jody Waldron's
mother passed away in
South
Dakota a
few years
ago, she.
had hos-
Spice care.
Waldron
Waldron was with
her, and
the experience changed
her life.
"I knew then that being
a hospice nurse was what
I wanted to .do," said


Waldron, an O'Brien resi-
dent who has lived in the
Suwannee Valley for 10
years.
And thanks to Waldron's
initiative, Haven Hospice
helped her achieve her
dream of becoming a hos-
pice nurse.
. She began by volunteer-
ing at Haven's Suwannee
Valley Care Center and then
enrolled in and excelled
as a student in the nurs-
ing program at Lake City
Community College. Haven
offered her a nursing schol-,
arship, which also gave


Waldron the opportunity
to observe Haven's nursing
staff at work during each of
her semesters. She gradu-
ated in May of 2009 and a
month later became a full-
time Haven Hospice regis-
tered nurse.
"She comes to us so'
highly qualified that it's a
delight to work with her,"
said Polly Tyler, adminis-
trator of Haven Hospice in
Lake City.
Haven also took steps
to ensure that Waldron
has all the support she
needed, assigning her no


fewer than four seasoned
Haven registered nurses
to teach and guide her.
As an end-of-life nurse,
she specializes in comfort-
ing her patients' families,
answering their questions
and teaching them what to
expect.
She has learned how to
provide comfort and care.
Waldron said she felt
a calling to' serve and
compassion for those in
need.
"You have to truly care
about patients and fami-
lies," she said.


4 women in space,

most at one time S


By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL
Space is' about to have a
female population explosion.
One woman already is
circling Earth in a Russian
capsule, bound for the
International Space Station.
Early Monday morning,
NASA will attempt to launch
three more women to the
orbiting outpost - along
with four men - aboard
shuttle Discovery.
It will be the most women
in space at the same time.
Men still will outnumber
the women by more than
2-to-1 aboard the shuttle
and station, but that won't
take away from the remark-
able achievement, coming
27 years after America's
first female astronaut, Sally
Ride, rocketed into space.
A former schoolteacher
is among the four female


astronauts about to make
history, as well as a chem-
ist who once worked as an
electrician, and two aero-
space engineers. Three are
American; one is Japanese.
But it makes no differ-
ence to 3-year-old Cambria,
daughter of educator-astro-
naut Dorothy Metcalf-
Lindenburger.
'To her, flying is cool.
Running around is being
cool. Just learning and
growing up as a kid is cool.
There aren't a lot of dis-
tinctions, and that's how I
want it to be," said Metcalf-
Lindenburger, 34, who used
to teach high school science
in Vancouver, Wash.
Indeed, the head of
NASA's space operations
was unaware of the immi-
nent women-in-space record
until a reporter brought it
up last week. Three women
have flown together in space
before, but only a few times.


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Former New York Mayor
Rudy Giuliani will cam-
paign with Senate candidate
Marco Rubio .'
The two will appear
together Monday in Miami,
where Giuliani is expected
to endorse Rubio in the
Republican primary against
Gov. Charlie Crist.
In a statement released


by the Rubio campaign,
Giuliani said, "Marco Rubio
is one of the Republican
Party's true rising stars.
He's a bold leader who
will bring common 'sense
to Washihgton where it's
badly needed."
Giuliani sought Crist's
endorsement when he ran
for president in 2008, but
Crist instead endorsed
eventual nominee Sen. John
McCain.


LOCAL STOCKS

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD .YTD
Name Ex DIv YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE4 Last Chg%Chg
AT&T nc NY 1.68 6.4 .12 26.11 +.27 -6.8 iShR2K NY .75 1.1 .. 68.43 +.63' +9.6
ApldMati Nasd .28 2.1 ... 13,35 -.12 -4,2 Lowes NY .36 1.5 20 24.54 +.30 +4.9
AutoZone NY ... ... 14 174.88 +1.79 +10.6 McDnids NY 2.20 3.3 16 67.58 +.86 +8.2
BkofAm NY .04 .2 ... 18.04 +.19 +19.8 MicronT Nasd ...... 64" 10.17 -.20 -3.7
BobEvn Nasd .72 2.3 13 30.81 -.10 +6.4 Microsoft Nasd .52 1.8-16 29.16 -.13 ,-4.3
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 4.4 15 15.14 -.30 -5.3 NYrTimes NY ... ... 21 11.07 -.06 -lb.4
CSX NY' .96 1.8 18 52.20 +1.30 +7.7 Nob"lyH Nasd ... ... . 9.79 ... -6.3
Chevron NY 2.72 3.5 15 76.69 +.86 -.4 OcciPet NY 1.32 1.5 23 86.60 +2.06 +6.5
Chimera NY .54 13.8 9 3.91 +.02 +.8 Penney NY .80 2.4 31 32.93 +.76 +23.8
Cisco Nasd ...... 25 25.83 -.20 +7.9 PepsiCo NY 1.92 -2.9 18 66.68 +.52 +9.7
Citigrp NY ...... ..4.18 +13 +26.3 Pfizer NY .72 4.2 9 17.08 -.07 '-6.1
CocaCi NY 1.76 3.2 19 55.30 +.30 -3.0 Potash NY .40 .3 36 117.51 -1.84 +B.3
Delhaize NY 2.01 2.4 .. 82.42 +1.93 +7.4 PwShsQQQNasd .21 .4 48.16 ... +5.3
DirFearrs NY ... 13.14 -.33 -32.4 RschMotn Nasd ... 15 68.48-5.49 +1,4
FPLGrp NY 2.00 4.1 12 48.84 +.51 -7.5 Ryder NY 1.00 2.6 35 39.19 +43 -4,6
FamilyDIr NY .62 1.7 17 37.00 +39 +33.0 S&P500ETFNY 2.21 1.9 ... 117.80 +.80 +57
FordM NY ......, 16 12.63 +.06 +26.3 SearsHIdgs Nasd ...... 53 108.75 +.32 +30.3
GenElec NY .40 2.2 18 18.33 ,+.13 +21.2 SriusXMh Nasd ......... .84 -.03 +40.0
HomeDp NY .95 2.9 21 32,38' +.03 +11.9 SouthnCo NY 1.75 5.2 16 33.42 +.26 +,3
iShJapn NY .14 1.3 .. 10.60 +.16 +8.8 TimeWam NY .85 2.7 15 31.41 +.14 +7.8
iSTaiwn NY .21 1.6 ... 12.88 +.33 -.7 USNGsFd NY ...... ...7.29 +.38 -27.7
iShEMkts NY .58 1.3 ... 43.22 +1.10 +4.1 WalMart NY 1.21 2.2 15 55.49 -.11 +3.8


Hometown Business?
Hometown Bank!


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three female astronauts that will fly aboard space shuttle
Discovery: (from left) Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
astronaut Naoko Yamazaki, mission specialists Stephanie
Wilson and Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger arrive at the
Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral Thursday.
Discovery is scheduled to launch Monday on a mission to the
International Space Station.


Teacher recognized by national music program


From staff reports

Martha Mier of Lake
City was recently honored
by the Music Teachers
National Association as an
MTNA Foundation Fellow
at the 2010 MTNA National
Conference inAlbuquerque,
N.M.
The MTNA Foundation
Fellow program offers
a meaningful method of
recognition for individuals
who have made outstand-


ing contributions to music
teaching. The award is
bestowed when a peer or
group of peers donates
$1,000 to the MTNA
Foundation Fund in an
individual's name.
Mier, a Nationally
Certified Teacher of
Music, is an internation-
ally renowned composer
and clinician who joined
Alfred Music Publishing
in 1989.
Mier owned a piano stu-


dio in Lake City for many
years and has been active
in church music and as a
professional accompanist.
Along with MTNA and the
Florida State MTA, she
also is a member of the
National Guild of Piano
Teachers. Mier is a fre-
quent clinician and adju-
dicator, having presented
workshops for teachers
in Australia, New Zealand
and the United States and
at the MTNA National


Conference, among other
events.
She is a co-author of
Alfred's Premier Piano
Course and more than 200
other educational piano
publications.
For additional informa-
tion about MTNA or the
MTNA Foundation Fund,
please contact MTNA
national headquarters at
(888) 512-5278, mtnanet@
mtna.org or visit the Web
site at www.mntna.org.


If you care about where your business banks, perhaps you
should choose a bank that cares aboutyour business. Peo-
ples State Bank is nota branch of an out of state bank run
by a "Regional Executive" seeking to improve their annual
bonus by offering short-term incentives to lure you in before
the end of the next quarter. We are a Lake City bank and our
focus is on the local economy and your business. We lend
our money locally and seek to establish stable, long-term
relationships with our customers. Perhaps it's old fash-
ioned, but wejust think it's the right way to do business.


350 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025
3882 W. US Hwy 90, Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
www.psb.biz Member FDIC


P PEOPLES
STATE BANK


Giuliani, Rubio to campaign


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Allison Candreva, 754-0424


LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010














FAITH


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


Angie Land
ongieland3@windstream.net

Broken

trust

can be

repaired
No doubt you've
heard the old
saying, "Fool
me once,
shame on you.
Fool me twice, shame on
me!" So, what happens to a
relationship when trust is
broken. Can you continue
to-love someone that you
don't trust? Absolutely,
although it can be confus-
ing, the reality'is that you
can love someone deeply
and not trust him or her at
the very same time. Love
is a free gift that you give
someone, even if they don't
deserve it. Trust is earned.
It must be built, and often
in relationships it gets dam-
aged or completely broken
and must be rebuilt for the
relationship to survive.
Authors and Christian
psychologists Cloud
and Townsend explain:
'Trust is the ability to be
totally real, authentic, and
unguarded with (another).
It means being able to
bring all parts of yourself,
good and bad, strong and
weak, without fear or con-
demnation or judgment."
This is a deep level of rela-
tionship to attain, and most
of us are painfully aware
that taking the risk to trust
someone at some point in
our life has cost us plenty.
This.causes us to raise our
guard and keep it high so
that we don't risk experi-
encing that kind of pain a
second time. In fact, our
first response when trust
takes a hit is to promise
ourselves we will not ever
let that happen again.
Trust can be broken
in many ways: betraying
a confidence, saying one
thing and doing another,
white lies, financial
betrayal, broken promises,
unfulfilled commitrients,
sexual unfaithfulness at any
leverand being inconsis-
tent as a person. Here are
a few steps to help heal our
hearts: ,
1. Face the reality about
what caused the broken
trust. If you are the source
of the problem, admit your
fault. You cannot heal or
repair that which is kept
hidden or denied. If you
have been betrayed, admit
your feelings to the other
person.
'2. Take broken trust seri-
ously. Trying to brush it off
as unimportant only serves
to deepen the wound.
3. Let the one you love
know how much you regret
what-you did. In the healing
process,,the one who was
betrayed will need to be
reassured of the other per-
son's commitment to them.
4. Give the process
time as you take action to
change.
Trust is a vital element
in our relationships. When
trust is broken, it is likened
to the foundation of your
home being cracked, it
must be repaired, or it will
no longer be a desirable
place to live.

* Heart Matters is a
weekly column written by
Angle Land, Director of the
Family Life Ministries of the
Lafayette Baptist Association,
where she teaches bible
studies, leads marriage and
family conferences and offers
biblical counseling to individu-
als, couples and families.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The 'circuit riding' Rabbi Marshal Klaven preaches before 80. Catholics, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Baptists and Methodists who have joined their Jewish
neighbors and helped fill the wooden pews of the 105-year-old Temple B'nai Israel, in Natchez, Miss., on March 12. Klaven, who has worked since last
summer for the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life in Jackson, works with congregations that are too small to sustain their own full-time
rabbi, sometimes working in three or four small communities a weekend, performing weddings, leading sabbath services and visiting congregants who are ill.

Rabbi roams southeast, serving several temples


By EMILY WAGSTER PETTUS
Associated Press
NATCHEZ, Miss.
As the sun
inched below
the horizon in
this Mississippi
River town,
people arrived alone or in
small groups and walked
up the steps of Temple
B'nai Israel on Shabbat.
Only about a dozen
Jewish residents remain
in Natchez, a city of about
16,400 best known for its
elaborate plantation homes.
As younger generations
moved away, the congrega-
tion hasn't had its own full-
time rabbi since 1976.
With a circuit-riding
rabbi visiting on this
Friday night, about 80
Catholics, Episcopalians,
Presbyterians, Baptists
and Methodists joined
their Jewish neighbors and
helped fill the wooden pews
of the 105-year-old temple.
Rabbi Marshal Klaven
gave people an extra 10
minutes to slip in before the
service; joking that under
"Jewish Standard Time," it's
not unusual to run late.
"This is Shabbat. It's a
time of joy. It's a time to
get to know one another,"
Klaven said. "So, I invite
you right now: Go and say-
hi to somebody you don't
know. Say, 'Shabbat, sha-
lom,' which means, 'The
Sabbath, peace."'
Klaven serves small


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rabbi Marshal Klaven (left) joins in singing along with members of the Shirim Ensemble,
including Sarit McDonald during a Shabbat service in at'the Temple B'nai Israel in Natchez,
Miss., on March 12. Klaven serves as a sort of 'circuit riding' rabbi visiting a number of small
Jewish temples and congregations that cannot support a full-time rabbi.


Jewish communities in 13
states across the South,
from Oklahoma to Virginia
and from Kentucky to the
Florida panhandle.
The 31-year-old St.
Louis native has worked
since last summer for the
Goldring/Woldenberg
Institute of Southern
Jewish Life in Jackson,
Miss., where his office has
a hand-stitched sign featur-
ing a Star of David and the
slogan, "Shalom Y'all."
This is Klaven's first full-
time job since finishing rab-


binical school, and he's the
third traveling rabbi since
the institute started hiring
them in 2003. Each works a
three-year contract.
Klaven bungee jumps
for fun, has worked as a
U.S. Air Force chaplain
and, years before becom--
ing an Eagle Scout, says
he was booted out of reli-
gious school as a preteen
for laughing too hard at a
,flatulence joke.
He travels the rural
South in rented cars, work-
ing with congregations that


are too small to sustain
their own full-time rabbi.
Klaven, who is single,
sometimes works in three
or four small communities
a weekend, performing
weddings, leading sabbath'
services and visiting con-
gregants who are ill.
During Passover week,
he planned to be in
Vicksburg, Miss.; Bowling
Green, Ky.; and the north-
ern Georgia towns of Rome
and Dahlonega.
"During the Exodus, I'll
literally be doing an exo-


dus," he joked.
Natchez is home to
Mississippi's oldest Jewish
congregation, dating back
to 1843. The current tem-
ple was built in 1905.
"It's a struggle to keep
it open," said congregation
president Jay Lehmann.
"I used to say I was the
youngest member of the
congregation. I'm 67.
We've gotten a few people
who have moved to town
that are a little bit younger
than me. But there's no
one under 40 at all."
A quartet called the
Shirim Ensemble had also
traveled from Jackson to
participate in the Friday
evening service, perform-
ing ethereal holy music in
Hebrew and English.
Klaven sprinkled his les-
son with pop culture refer-
ences, quoting composer
Aaron Copland, singer-song-
writer Paul Simon and even
the movie "Happy Feet"
Days before going to
Natchez, Klaven said he
hopes to visit at least 10
states this year. He pointed
to a map in his Jackson
office that showed the
133 Jewish congregations
in his territory that don't
have a full-time rabbi. Tiny
circles were marked with
U for unaffiliated, R for
reform, RE for reconstruc-
tionist, C for conservative
and 0 for orthodox. He
serves any congregation,
he said, according to its
own style of worship.


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Movie showing
A showing of "The
Rescue" is at 7 p.m. today
at Christ Central Complex,
217-SW Dyal Ave. The movie
is rated PG and about hope
and healing. Admission is
free, along with popcorn and
soda.

Sunday
Easter service
Faith in Christ Anglican
Church is hosting a
Resurrection Day, Easter
Sunday, service at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday. The church is locat-
ed six miles east of the B&B
Food store on U.S. Highway
90 and six miles west of
Interstate 75, next to Star


Tech computer store. Call
(386) 208-9882 or visit www.
ficang.org.

Vineyard sunrise service
The Vineyard of Lake City
is having Easter sunrise ser-
vices at 6:30 a.m. Sunday.
Breakfast will be served after
the service. Normal worship
service is at 10 a.m. with
special music from the praise
team.

Easter service, egg hunt
& potluck dinner
An Easter Sunday service
is at 8 a.m. and 11 a.m.
Sunday at First Presbyterian
Church. The community
is invited to bring flowers
to decorate the cross. An
Easter egg hunt for children
up to fifth grade is at
4:30 p.m. After the egg hunt


there will be a potluck din-
ner in the fellowship hall.
Families staying for the din-
ner are asked to bring a side
dish. The meat is provided.
Call the church office for
additional information at
752- 0f70.

First Baptist Easter
service
First Baptist Church
of Lake City is celebrat-
ing Easter at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday. Pastor Stephen
Ahrens will be presenting a
special Easter drama, "The
Roman Centurion: One Life
Changed." Call (386) 752-
5422 or visit www.firstbap-
tistlc. com.

Philadelphia Baptist
Easter service
Resurrection service


is at 8 a.m. Sunday at
Philadelphia Baptist Church.
Breakfast and Sunday
School is at 9:30 a.m. fol-
lowed by an Easter pageant
at 11 a.m.

Tustenuggee sunrise
service
Tustenuggee UMC is hav-
ing Easter sunrise service at
7 a.m. Sunday. Breakfast will
be served after the service.
Normal worship is at
11 a.m.. Follow County Road
131 one mile south of County
Road 18 in Fort White.

Falling Creek sunrise
service
Falling Creek Chapel is
having Easter Sunrise ser-
vice at 7 a.m. Sunday. The


church is located at 1290
.NW Falling Creek Road.

Movie showing
A showing of "The
Rescue" is at 9 a.m., 11
a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday at
Christ Central Complex, 217
SW Dyal Ave. The movie is
rated PG and about hope
and healing. Admission is
free, along with popcorn and
soda.
Submit events and
announcements to be
included in the Lake City
Reporter's Church Notes in
writing no later than 5 p.m.
Tuesday to Tom Mayer at
tmayer@lakecityreporter
com, (386) 754-0428, fax to
(386) 752-9400 or visit 180 E.
Duval St., Lake City.


Saturday, April 3, 2010


6A










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010


Stormy


Weather


We all need
dependable shelter when
the tragedies of life rain
down upon us. Yet, like
the pedestrian who didn't
replace his battered
umbrella with a stronger
one, many of us wait until
our situation is desperate
before we start looking
for protection.
Don't wait until the
pelting storms of your life
turn your spirit inside
out; come to know the
love of the Creator of the
Universe. In Psalm 57:1,
it is proclaimed, "I will
take refuge in the shadow
of your wings until the
disaster has passed."
You can meet God in
His sanctuary as you
worship each week. He
will give-you shelter from
the storms in your life.


Scriptures Selected by The American Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. 0. Box 8187, .Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440






t -.- II., =E. d1,.,,- a
ar * ^rj. d.


Hunter, Inc.
Chevron Oil
Jobber


Holly ectnc, 'Inc.
"Quality work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
"I can do all lllnu lhrogh Christ huh sItrenghenl me"
Plilippians.I 13

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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

To Advertise in .
this Directory
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755-5440


RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A
(Old Valdosta Hwy) 1.
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

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this Directory
Call Mary
'755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881 SWMcFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
SundaySchool: ' 9:45AM"
Sunday Service: , 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: . 7:00PM

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH.
SR47 S* 755-0900'
Simday School *9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM.
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Pastor: Larry E. Sweat �
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 1 lAM.& hi'MN
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Pastor Hugh Dampier

FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
Columbia/Suwannee Co. Line Rd.
Rev. Glen Lawhon * 386-963 1028
San. S' h,:ol Ii-'fiANM
Morning Wirship I 11.00F1
Wed, Prayer Service. " iipMl .
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunda\ Bible Srud, .AMI
Sunday Worship Itl:311iM .StnnOPM
1Wed. h6-iiPM Ptjvyet Servie. hd
Cilddrens Mari- ' 6 15PM
Downti.own Lake Ciry * 52-542
Rev Stephen Airens Pa sior
OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPriST CHURCH
541 N E Dai Sieet
1.3861752-Nl90
Ronald V Wailers, Pasior
SundaySchool ' 9:45AM1
Sunday Momrning Worship ' 11:00AM
Wed,,Mid-WeekWorship - h'..1PM
'ii Gd's \W rd,' . Will Way'"

PARkVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lak, letneri Rd. *752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30, 9:45 & 11AM
Sunday Worship . 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM
AWANA 5:30 PM
EveningWorship . 6:00 PM
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation) 5 PM
Children's Ministry 6PM
YouthWorship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
ThursdayEvening Schedule - St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge . 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
. 386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
SundayWorship HAM'& 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson


CELEBRATION COMMUNITY CHURCH
Hw\ 47 between Ft.Whie & Columbia Cit
Sunday Services
Bible Study 9AM
Worship 10:15AM
I'ednesdav Everng Stheiule
SAWANA - 6:30PM
Prayer and Bible Study - 7:PM
Pastor: Bill Blackrick 754-1144
SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10;30AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
- 388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553
S Sunday: -


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worshp
Wednesday:
AW.,NJA
Prayer & Bible Study


9-IS AM
10:30AM
6:15PM
-5:45PM
6-15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
ir' dependeri Bapns)
144 SE Mi ,-,nse Ate 752-4274
Sunday School 10 1AM
Sun Mor. Wuiship II AM
Sunday )ie. 6 PM
- Wed Piqaye Meteerin 7:30PM
Paior Mike Normanr,
THE VINFY'ARD
A Southert Bapost Chui(h
2091 SW M,fii, d. a 1)2 .1126
Sunday Worhip I'. t g1AM
Where lesus is Preached
and leans diare appropriate
Pasirxt Bo Hammock

EPIPHANY CAHOLIC CHURCH
19H6SW EpiphparyCourt- 752 4-470
Sartiday Vigil Mass 5 r PM
Sunday Ma, 8-15iAM, 10-30AM,
5.00 PM iSpanish/Englishi
' Sunday School / Religioutis Educaton
9.00 AM 10:15 AM


Hwy 247 S.' 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Su on.W'Mor ship 10:30PAM
Wed. Prayer Meeting " 7PM

SNEW HORIZON
a* church of'Christ
Directions &Times 755-1320
Jack ExumJr:, Minister

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. * 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7YPM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
SundayWorship 1 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"ShockYouth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway


ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake -
City, F132025 - 386:752-2218
Email: stj~nesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 6:00pmr
Yoga Classes: Mon. 4:30pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon:The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Directorof Music Dr. Alfonso Levy

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
I 12' miles S. of i .7 o Sk 4;
75j.-,199
Sunday Semces 9 30AM
iNursry Proidrdi
Christian Edu(anin hloui
for all ages ai IU 1 45.M
Pasirt Ret Bruce A1hre
SPIRIT OF CHRIST LU1 HERAN
Hvy 1. 1.5 mile, ess oil s1.75,- - .l.8)0
Sunday iv rslup li uIfAM
Nursery Avail
Wed Pot Lid. 6PM Wri ip 7PMN
Pastor RobernR.Luiz


ISAIAH 58:6-7 MINISRIE.
A Messianic i fll:w ivship
138 SW UenesisCi * L. Wiate
Saitdiv Serv ces* ,38h447. t m ')
forah SrSdv 9 30, Worlhip 11:011


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHUBCfl
4869 IS 441 South
Sunday Wofrhip Services
Traditional Services 8:30 I1 i.ii.I
rry(hri4',eartnhlrineti
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ate.
386-752-4488
Sunday School - q.45A
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Service 8:3i1M
Tradidonal Service .I I-'0lAM
Program opporrunines available in all
, areas for all agr
i,:r a t.i)nplelr scle,'luJe
S524488

N'ESLEYMEMORIL UNITED
1272 SWMcFailane',752-3513
tAdjjcenri o Summiers t huol)
Sunday School 9:00AM
Worship 10:00AM
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
AWANA -Wed. , '5:00PM
Nursery Provided
Pastor: Louie Mabrey
. www.wesleymem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School . 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship . 11AM&6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn


LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services'
Sunday School 945AM
Suridd WUIsl-ip I1.45A.M. 16.iUPM
Wednesday 6"-i)PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Chiddlten's Miritltr\
Pasium. Craig Henderronii
Nursery Prouded
SW SR 47 and Aalea Park Place

FIRSr PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Bay DEive' 52-ilJ6bJ
Suida Conmemporary Worship 9 fl",51
Sunday School 10:011AM
Tradinonal Serces I1.00AM
NURSER) PROt7DED
Paslir. Dr. Roy A Martin
Direut l Music Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE jones Way & NE Waslnmgton St.
Sunday School ' 0:tJO,'\AM
Morning Wor hip I l:Ou AM
Eangelisnc Serice h.ll PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid week Service - Wednesday -00 PM
F nr 'li., ..ill 7';. 144.9 * [Es ur lthn'- Wt .,.,m
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

CHRIST CENTRAl MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 10:30AM
' Wednesday Service 7:00PM
SaturdayNite Services . 5:00PM
217 DyalAve., fromHwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left.* 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns.
'A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones * 752-9119 �
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL


Falling Creek Road * 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM
Thursday ' 8PM
No Nursery Available ,
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance


FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
Sunday @ 10:00 AM
UNDERSTANDING* FUN* REAL
We are a non-denominational and
non-charismatic church meeting
at the Holiday Inn in Lake City
(386) 365-8535
www.FellowshipStuff.com


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


1752 1293!


Toadetienths hrc iretoy al75-44


CIay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440

01GENTIVA'
great healthcare has come home-'
*Nursing *Orihopedic Rehab Program .Balance Dsfunction
Program *Physical & Occupational Therapy i
'*MSW *Ilomeiealladi Aide Semces
Medicare/Medicaid Certified/CAIHO Accredited
Mii4A206340963 & UHA29991379
Lake City 386-748-3490 * Live Oak 386-364-4593
DCA-ON


Tires luo every need
US 90 oWeVl across Fm Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
lour Complete decorating and
home furnishings sore
VA LI, frih Ml ' ['j , 1 1 ,- .-,r , f'1:I. aemountR
.1, ,, "1 , , ".? urii .. ..b d So ]ay .,

Patty Register -.
386-961-9100 -
Northside Motors, Inc.-
In Goa We Trust
1 4 E Dui il t Mon, *.ri 0 a m.-5:00 pm.
L ie.- ry Ft i2.155 (Cir.- Wednesday

ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC:
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCLAL. INDUSTRIALL
"ie irTparaiin.r * K.id Batidinl * Parking Lots
,rAnf & Draincge
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St. Lake City

, HARRY'S
-He ab't &s Air Coniditioningjnc.,
-tana At..:ie- Pwsident

Pu R. 752-2308\

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this Directory
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- 755-5440








Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED - PET SUPPLIES - LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS * CHAIN SAWS * TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST* LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
-7OSltr 755-7050


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this Directory
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755-5440


., "
':. , -v


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this Directory
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755-5440

BAYWAYjnitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residendi.l & Commercial
755-6142








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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


W


GM
Chevron


7 " �l ivi F.11 ol
4p'ercenter
"LOWPNC
LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427


Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010


TONY BRITTILake City Reporter


Are you ever too young to learn to drive a tractor? She thinks not.
Erin Starling (sitting) shows her grandmother Sandra Starling that she knows how to steer a tractor while sitting on Claude Starling's antique John Deere tractor.


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today
Antique Tractor and
Engine Show
The 22nd Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine Show is
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today
at the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park/'
Activities will include a
parade: children's games,
barrel races, concessions
and more. Admission is $5
per car, up .o eight people

Centennial celebration
Friends and f?'-ily of
Clarence M. Bai; will cele-
brate his centennial birthday
fron. 1 to 4 p.m. today at the
Columbia County Women's
Club. A celebratory dinner
also will be held in his honor
at Sisters Welcome Baptist
Church April 11 after morn-
ing church service.

Movie showing
A showing of "The
Rescue" is at 7 p.m. today
at Christ Central Complex,
217 SW Dyal Ave. The movie
is rated PG and about hope
and healing. Admission is
free, along with popcorn and
soda.

Stephen Foster art in
the park
Art In The Park is from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today in the
Stephen Foster Craft Square.
Admission is free with the
tractor show.

Open house for
Suwannee River Yoga
Suwannee River Yoga
is having an open house
today. Demonstrations are
from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. It is
located at 16548 Spring St.
in White Springs.

Learn to paint workshop
-A painting herbs workshop
with Janet Moses' is from
10:30 a.m. to noon at 16538
Spring St. in White Springs.
The cost is $35.

Music outside in White
Springs
Lucindagail will be singing
and playing guitar from 1 to
3 p.m. today at Spring Street
Antiques in White Springs.
The address is 16543 Spring
St.


Southern Rhythm Cloggers prepare for national competition
Southern Rhythm Cloggers, a local clogging team under the direction of Dalita Diaz de Arce and based out of Lake City
Dance Arts, is pictured here at the Lake City MADD festival on March 27. In February, the team represented Lake City in state
competition in Fort Myers, where they returned with six first-place trophies, one second-place trophy, and one third place tro-
phy. They also qualified for national competition in October in Maggie Valley, North Carolina.' Pictured are (back row, from left)
Brooklyn Crews, Brianna Butcher, Dalita Diaz de Arce, Savannah Hoffman, Brooke Russell, Amber Yates, (front row, from left)
Eva Kirby, Amanda Moore, Miranda Hand, Tobie Williams, Kallie Horton, Masi Williams, Tara Thomas and Allie Robinson. Not
pictured are Stephanie Harris and Madeline Adkins.


CSC challenge
Christian Service Center
is participating in the Alan
Feinstein Foundation $1 mil-
lion giveaway challenge until
April 30. The community is
asked to donate money or
canned goods.'Based on
donations, CSC will receive
a percentage of the $1 mil-
lion. Monetary donations
for the Feinstein Challenge
can be mailed to Christian
Service Center, P.O. Box
2285 or dropped off, along
with food, at 441 NW
Washington St. Call (386)
755-1770.

Fill a Bag Challenge
Catholic Charities Lake
City Regional Office is kick-
ing off "Fill a Bag" with non-
perishable food for a month


in cooperation with the
Alan Feinstein Foundation
$1 million dollar giveaway
challenge until April 30.
Donations can include cash,
checks, pledges and food
items. The office is located
at 258 NW Burk Ave., Lake
City, FL 32055. Donate
on-line at catholiccha'rities-
lakecity.org or call (386)
754-9180.

March of Dimes
Volunteers Needed
March for Babies is
April 17 in Olustee Park..
Volunteers are needed to
help with the walk. Teams
can still be formed. Go to
marchforbabies.org and reg-
ister a team. Spirit stations,
are needed, too. Please call
Kathy ' 1.:': ,i.-e, at (386)
623-1505.


Old car donations
The Boys and Girls Clubs
are taking old car donations.
Call (800) 246-0493 for more
information.

Sunday
Easter Sunrise Service
at Stephen Fpster
The 43rd Easter Sunrise
Service is at 7 p.m. Sunday
on the greenway lawn
between the Stephen Foster
Museum and Carillon Tower.
Area ministers, choirs and
soloists will take part in the
annual event. Park gates
will open at 6:15 a.m., and
at 6:45 a.m. there will be an
Easter Carillon Concert. The
event is free. Refreshments
will be served following the
service. For more informa-


tion, call (386) 397-4331 or
visit www. floridastateparks.
org/stephenfoster.

Antique Tractor and
Engine Show continues
The 22nd Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine Show is
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday
at the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park/
Activities will include a
parade, c iil,:irni's games,
barrel races, concessions
and more: Admission is $5
per car, up to eight people

Movie showing
A showing of "The
Rescue" is at 9 a.m., 11
a.m..and 6 p.m. Sunday at
Christ Central Complex, 217
SW Dyal Ave. The movie is
rated PG and about hope


* To subniit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


and healing. Admission is
free, along with popcorn and
soda.

Monday
Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight
Loss Surgery Support Group
meets at 7 p.m. Monday in
the Classrooms at Lake City
Medical Center. Dietitian
Katalin Ross has prepared a
discussion on protein. A walk
will be before the meeting
at 6:15 p.m. E-mail thethin-
nerme@gmail.com or call
(386) 288-9153 and leave a
message.

Tuesday
UF Master Gardeners
are available
The University of Florida
Master Gardeners are at the
Columbia County Extension
Office from 9 a.m. to noon
Tuesday. They answer
gardening questions and
conduct soil pH tests free
of charge. Call (386) 752-
5384, or stop at the UF/IFAS
Extension Office at the
-Columbia County fairgrounds
for more information.

Lake City Lions to meet
The Lake City Lions meet
at 7 p.m. Tuesday, at the
Guangdong restaurant, in
the Lake City Mall. Call Truett
George,at (386) 497-2050
or Marshall Barnard at (386)
497-3536 for more informa-
tion.

Wednesday
Friendship Luncheon set
for Wednesday
The March Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers is at 11:30 a.m.
April 7 at DeSoto Drugs, 297
North Marion Ave. All friends,
members and guests along
with any newcomers to the
area are welcome. Call 758-
2026 or 935-1548.

Moose Lodge Bingo is
open for everyone
Bingo games at the Moose
Lodge, 624 NE Williams, are
open to everyone. Games
are at 3 p.m., 6:45 and
7 p.m. on every Wednesday
and Friday.


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Saturday,April 3,2010


, www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom

I have

golf

fever
It may be the
upcoming Masters.
It may be that
I've been working
on a series of golf,
stories over the last two
weeks, but whatever the
case is, I've come down
with golf fever.
With the spring time
weather in the air, it's the
best time of the year to
hit the links. Whether an
average golfer or a skilled
player, Lake City offers
something for everyone
in this area.
Golf is unlike any other
sport in that it combines a
mental aspect with physi-
cal ability. There's a rea-
son that smaller guys are
consistently able to drive
past the big guys. If golf
were all about yardage,
John Daly would have
been Tiger Woods.
For most of us, we
haven't conquered . the
mental aspect of the
game. That's what keeps
us all coming back.
Many golfers' only
complaint is that there's
a lack of daylight. Those
are the true fanatics, and
the players that can afford
to play the 'game on a
daily basis.
For those of you like
me, there may not be as
many opportunities to
play, but there's some-
thing that keeps us all
coming back..
For me, ift's the thought
of that perfect shot. Ifs
easy to forget the duffs,
missed putts and duck-
hook drives. It's not easy
to displace the shot that
set me up .for birdie on
the third hole.
In my last outing, after
struggling early in the day,
I was able to bring home
a 39 during my final nine-
hole session. This isn't
the greatest of scores,
but there were glimpses
of greatness. That's what
every golfer longs for.
I could point out any
number of gpod shots
that I hit in the round.
I could also point out a
number of bad ones that
I've hit in the last couple
of weeks, but for some
reason, unlike other
sports, the good comes to
the front even in a terrible
performance.
That's the thing about
golf. Even though it's
been three years since
I've been in the game, and
I'm trying to reconstruct
a flawed swing, there's
still enough good in it to
keep me coming back.
At the worse, I get
a round in outside and
begin to feel what living
in Florida is all about. I
doubt many people are
saying the same about
their weather in Maine
this morning.
Whether it's early morn-
ing, around noon or later in
the evening, the only thing
that can keep a willing golf-
er from making it to the
course is a lack of sunlight
(or a honey-do list).

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Obama's first pitch will

mark 100-year tradition


President will
follow in past
leaders' footsteps.
By FREDERIC J. FROMMER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - One
hundred years ago this
month, a rotund right-
hander, President William
Howard Taft, started a
baseball tradition by throw-
ing out the ceremonial first
pitch at the Washington
season opener. On Monday,
the Nationals turn to a
sveltq southpaw, President
Barack Obama, to make his
Nationals Park debut.
For much of the last cen-
tury, baseball was king in
Washington, and presidents
were on the throne, as
Congress often recessed so
members could attend what
became known as the presi-


dential opener. From Taft
to Richard Nixon, every
president made at least
one opening-day toss in
WaThington. After a 33-year
absence, baseball returned
to Washington in 2005, and
George, W. Bush resumed
the tradition by throwing
the opening pitch for the
Nationals.
This will be Obama's first
Washington opener'and his
second time pitching as
president. He did the hon-
ors at last year's All-Star
Game in St. Louis and noted
that he was allowed to prac-
tice his throw beforehand.
"I did not play organized
baseball when I was a kid,
and so, youi know, I think
some of these natural
moves aren't so natural to
me," Obama said.
The president has
been warming up this
time around, too, playing


catch on the White House
grounds to prepare for
Monday's opener.
"Just like all the pitch-
ers around the majors, the
southpaw president has
engaged in a little spring
training in the Rose Garden
to get his curve ball in
Opening Day order," said
White House spokesman
Robert Gibbs.
Obama's pitch last
year wasn't the greatest.
Cardinals first baseman
Albert Pujols, a future Hall
of Famer, saved him from
the embarrassment of a
short hop by moving up to
scoop the low pitch inches
off the ground.
Taft got similar help from
another Hall of Famer, pitch-
er Walter Johnson, as The
Associated Press reported:
'The throw was a little low,
PITCH continued on 3B


1 ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this 1912 file photo, President William Howard Taft is.
seen throwing out the first ball of a baseball game for the
Washington Senators in Washington. A hundred years ago, a
portly right-hander, President William Howard Taft threw out
the first pitch at a Washington Senators game, a weak lob
from the stands to the great Walter Johnson. On Monday, the
Nationals bring in the left-hander, President Barack Obama.


igers


Columbia beats
Buchholz, 4-3, to
move into first.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
With first place in District
5-4A on the line, Columbia
High sent Blake King to
the mound. The pitcher
escaped jams twice to pick
up the win and move to the
top of the district.
It was King's bat that
made the difference in
the end, as he batted in
Cameron Sweat (who had
reached on a double) for
'what would be the differ-
ence in the 4-3 game dur-
ing the bottom of the fifth
inning. It helped the Tigers
build a 4-1 lead at the time,
but Buchholz (11-5, 7-1).
battled back.
King gave up dingers in
the sixth (Tyler Dale) and
seventh (Graham Cason) to
cut the lead to 4-3, but he
struck out the final batter to
hang on for the win. He fin-
ished with a complete game
victory after allowing eight
hits, walking five and strik-
ing out four batters.
"He didn't have his best
stuff," Columbia High coach


Greg Gillman said. "I told
him that its games like this
that will define him, and he
still came out on top without
his best stuff. I take him
without his best any day."
The Tigers trailed
1-0 heading into the fourth
inning, and responded with
three runs. Jacob Tillotson
drew a walk, and King
reached on a hit. The throw
to first on King's' hit went
behind the first baseman
and allowed the runners to
reach second and third. J.T.
Gilliam delivered with an
RBI-single to tie the game,
and Brandon Scott hit a sac-
rifice fly to bring in Josh
Faulkner (who pinch ran
for King). Columbia ended
the inning with Mikey
Kirkman's double to bring
in Gilliam for a 3-1 lead.
The win moved the
Tigers (14-5, 6-1) into first
place in the district.
"We set the goal at
the beginning .of the
season,"Gillman said. "It gets
us in the door, but we still
have Lee. It's kind of like
when the 1980 United States
hockey team beat Russia and
still had to play Swedep."
Columbia travels to
'North Florida Christian at
4:30 p.m. on Monday.


Columbia High's Blake
March 17.


/ JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
King (13) looks to steal second base against Lincoln High on


Turner, Boeheim


receive AP awards


Ohio State junior
is named player
of the year.
By JIM O'CONNELL
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - As
Evan Turner clutched his
trophy and posed for yet
another, photo, he couldn't
escape a little ribbing.
"That going to fit at
home?" Ohio State team-
mate David Lighty said
Friday as Turner walked
past with The Associated
Press player of the year
award.
"This is going to be a
window ornament," Turner
shot back as both laughed.


It's got to be a good feel-
ing to receive almost every
player of the year honor
and have a couple of team-
mates make a 2'/hour drive
to see you get the latest one
as part of the Final Four
festivities.
"They have been there
for me my whole career,
and they are here now,"
Turner said. "They really
are family, and this shows
it."
Turner, a 6-foot-7 junior
swingman who averaged
20.3 points, 9.2 rebounds
and 5.9 assists, received
54 votes from the 65-mem-
ber national media panel.
Kentucky freshman John
Wall was second with nine
votes.


Syracuse's Jim Boeheim
was selected the AFs coach
of the year, receiving 39
votes, while Kansas State's
Frank Martin was next with
eight.
Lighty and Dallas
Lauderdale never hesitated
about making the 175-mile
drive from Columbus, Ohio,
to see the presentation.
"He told us he was get-
ting this, and we said we'd
come," said Lauderdale,
who quickly added neither
he nor Lighty missed class
to be there.
There weren't many
people who thought Turner
would win national honors
after he broke two bones in
TURNER continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ohio State junior Evan Turner holds his trophy after being
named The Associated Press' college basketball player of the
year Friday, in Indianapolis.












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


The Lake City Kiwanis
Club has a four-person
scramble golf tournament
planned for May 21 at The
Country Club at Lake City.
Lunch is at 11:30 a.m. with
a shotgun start for golf at
1 p.m. Cost is $60 per
player. Hole sponsorships
are $50 and $100.
For details, call Matt
Greene at 487-1374.

RMS CHEERLEADING

Tryouts planned

for April 14-16

Richardson Middle
School has cheerleading
tryouts for 2010-11 set
for April 14-16. Tryouts
packets are available at the
school, and also at Melrose
Park, Eastside, Five Points
and Niblack elementary
schools. Completed
packets are due at
Richardson by April 12.
For details, call Shannon
Hall at 623-4058.


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
3:30 a.m.
SPEED - Formula One, Malaysian
Grand Prix, at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4 p.m.
ESPN - NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
Nashville 300, at Lebanon,Tenn.
BOXING
10 p.m.
FSN - Featherweights, Miguel Angel
Garcia (20-0-0) vs. Tomas Villas (22-6-4);
welterweights, Mike Alvarado (26-0-0) vs.
Lenin Arroyo (20- I - I), at Corpus Christi,
Texas
GOLF
I p.m.
NBC - PGA Tour, Houston Open,
third round, at Humble,Texas
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - LPGA, Kraft Nabisco
Championship, third round, at Rancho
Mirage, Calif.
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
NBC - NTRA, Wood Memorial, at
Ozone Park, N.Y. and Santa Anita Derby,
at Arcadia, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
WGN - Preseason, Chicago Cubs
at Arizona
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
CBS - NCAA Division I tournament,
Final Four semifinals, at Indianapolis
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
WGN - Charlotte at Chicago
NBA DL BASKETBALL
II p.m.
VERSUS - Erie at Maine (same-day


PREP BASKETBALL


S1:30 a.m.
ESPN2 - Girls'
championship, at Baltimore
1:30 p.m.
ESPN - Boys'
championship,at Baltimore
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.


Invitational


Invitational.


ESPN2 - Premier League, Manchester
United vs. Chelsea, at Manchester,
England
TENNIS
12:30 p.m.
CBS -ATP/WTA Tour, Sony Ericsson
Open, women's championship match, at
Miami

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Toronto at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 7 p.m..
New Orleans at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m.


Miami at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Cleveland at Boston, I p.m.
San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Houston at Indiana, 6 p.m.
New Jersey atWashington:6 p.m.
Golden State at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Memphis at Orlando. 6 p.m.
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
New York at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

NCAA Final Four,

National Semifinals
Today
Michigan State (28-8) vs. Butler (32-4),
6:07 p.m.
West Virginia (31-6) vs. Duke (33-5),
40 minutes following
National Championship
Monday
Semifinal winners

NIT

Championship
Dayton 79, North Carolina 68

AP awards voting


Player of theYear
Evan Turner, Ohio State
John Wall, Kentucky
Da'Sean ButlerWest Virginia
Luke Harangody, Notre Dame
Coach of theYear
Jim Boeheim, Syracuse
Frank Martin, Kansas State
Steve Alford, New Mexico
Bill Self, Kansas
John Calipari, Kentucky
Fran Dunphy,Temple
Mike Brey, Notre Dame
Jamie Dixon, Pittsburgh
Scott Drew, Baylor
Mike Krzyzewski, Duke
Rick Majerus, Saint Louis
Matt Painter, Purdue
Buzz Williams, Marquette


Women's Final Four

National Semifinals
Sunday
Stanford (35-1) vs. Oklahoma
(27-10), 7p.m.
Connecticut (37-0) vs. Baylor (27-5),
9:30 p.m.
National Championship
Tuesday
Semifinal winners

Women's NIT
Semifinals
Thursday
California 61, Illinois State 45
Championship
Today
Miami (22-13) vs. California


(23-13),2 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL schedule

Sunday's Game
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 19-8) at Boston
(Beckett 17-6), 8:05 p.m.,
Monday's Games
Cleveland (Westbrook 0-0) at Chicago
White Sox (Buehrle 13-10), 2:05 p.m.
Toronto (Marcum 0-0) at Texas
(Feldman 17-8), 2:05 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 19-9) at Kansas
City (Greinke 16-8),4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Baker 15-9) at LA.Angels
(Weaver 16-8), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (Hernandez 19-5) at Oakland
(Sheets 0-0), 10:05 p.m..

NL schedule
Monday's Games
Philadelphia (Halladay 17-10) at
Washington (Lannan 9-13), 1:05 p.m.
Florida (johnson 15-5) at N.Y. Mets
(Santana 13-9), 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Carpenter 17-4) at Cincinnati
(Harang 6-14), 1:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Padilla 4-0) at Pittsburgh
(Duke I 1-16), 1:35 p.m.
Colorado , (jimenez 15-12) at
Milwaukee (Gallardo 13-12), 2:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 9-7) at
Atlanta (Lowe 15-10),4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Garland 11 -13) at Arizona
(Haren 14-10), 5:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 15-7) at
Houston (Oswalt 8-6), 7:05 p.m.

Spring Training-Florida

Today's Games
Pittsburgh vs Philadelphia at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs Baltimore at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs Washington at Viera,
4:05 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
NATIONWIDE
Nashville 300
Site: Lebanon,Tenn.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; race, 4 p.m.
(ESPN, 3:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Nashville Superspeedway (oval,
1.333 miles).
- Race distance: 300 miles, 225 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Malaysian Grand Prix
Site: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 4-5:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 4 a.m.
(Speed, 3:30-6 a.m.; 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.).
Track: Sepang International Circuit
(road course, 3.44 miles).
Race distance: 192.88 miles, 56 laps.


BRIEFS


ADULT SOFTBALL YOUTH FOOTBALL

Women slowpitch Fundraiser for '

meeting Monday Pop Warner teams


A meeting for women
interested in playing in a
slowpitch softball league
is 6:30 p.m. Monday at the
Girls Club.
For details, call Casandra
at 365-2168.

GOLF

Lion's Club

tourney April 10

The Lion's Club golf
tournament is 9 a.m.
April 10 at The Country
Club at Lake City. Cost
is $60 per person. A $125
sponsor package includes.
golf for one, a sign and
entry to the social event.
For details, call the pro
shop at 752-2266 or Tim
Carson at (386) 288-8874.


The Richardson
Community Center Annie
Mattox North Advisory
Council is selling tickets
to raise money for its Pop
Warner youth football
teams. The fundraiser
is a $25 ticket for a fully
cooked Boston butt.
For details, call Kim
Stephens at. 623-2954.

SWIMMING

Summer team

starts April 19

The Summer Gators
swim team begins April 19
at the Columbia Aquatic
Complex.
For details, call (352)
375-4683, Ext. 4595, or go
to gatorswimclub.com.

CHS SOCCER


6 p.m. April 20 in the
school cafeteria. Elections
are scheduled for board
positions.
For details, e-mail
julia. rodriguez@va.gov.

CHS ATHLETICS

Physicals offered

April 12 at gym

Columbia High has
athletic physical for high
school and middle school
girls and-boys set for
4 p.m. April 12 in the CHS
gym. Parents need to be
present to sign forms.
For details, call Trey
Hosford at 755-8080.

YOUTH BASEBALL

Christ Central

sets registration

Registration for Christ
Central Sports T-ball (ages
4-6) and coach pitch (ages
7-10) is under way through
April 16. Fee is $35.
For details, call Ronny
Busscher at 365-2128.

* From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirlon and Jeff Knurek


WHAT THE LOTTERY
WINNER PIP WHEN HIE
BOUGHT THE
. PENTHOUS.E,
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


The CHS Soccer Booster
Club has a meeting at



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. E

IMERG


@2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
CHOVA




HADILA

SLIMUHE-

I..IMUHE. '


Answer: " 11
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ODDLY LOVER IMBIBE HALVED
eseray Answer: Passing the signs on the road for hours left
them - BILL BORED I


League reports

Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follows.
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Road Kill;
2. Taz (36-16); 3. The Fantastic 4
(33.5-22.5).
High scratch game: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 202; 2. Liz Randall 172;
3. Linda Sutton 170. 1. Matt Stephan
234; 2. A.J. Dariano 222; 3. Joe
Cohrs 218.
High scratch series: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 539; 2. Liz Randall 483;
3. Phyllis Benton 465. 1. Joe Cohrs
635; 2. Bryan Taylor 626; 3. A.J.
Dariano 599.
High handicap game: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 250; 2. Lisa Vasil 229; 3. Linda
Sutton 225. 1. Matt Stephan 250;
2. (tie) Emerson Darst, A.J. Dariano
241; 4. Rod Murnahan 240.
High handicap series: 1'. Cheryl
Jacks 683; 2. Lisa Vasil 667; 3. Angela
Pond 630.1. Bryan Taylor 692; 2. A.J.
Dariano 656; 3. Terry Shay 653.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
167; 2. Mandy Deliberis 151;
3. Phyllis Benton 149.1.JoeCohrs 192;
2. Mark Moore 188; 3. Carl McGhghy
183.
(results from March 28)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Just Do It
(32-16); 2. Spare Us (30-18, 595
average); 3. High Five (30-18, 466
average).
High handicap game: 1. Cythe
Shiver 238; 2. (tie) Susan Newbern,
Karen Gardner 237.
High handicap series: 1. Linda
Mobley 674; 2. Karen Gardner 641;
3. Ruth Heims 624.
(results from March 30)
THURSDAY NITE MIXED
Team standings: 1. Wrecking
Crew (73-43); 2. John Deere Green
(68.5-47.5); 3. Party Time (62.5-53.5).
High scratch game: 1. Liz Randall
234; 2. Phyllis Benton 168; 3. Kim Tice
158. 1. Joe Cohrs 225; 2. Leonard
Randall 190; 3. Brett Reddick 185.
High scratch series: 1. Liz Randall
494; 2. Phyllis Benton 449; 3. Okie
Van Hoy 398. 1. Joe Cohrs 559;
2. Brett Reddick 525; 3. Leonard
Randall 508.
High handicap game: 1. Liz
Randall 264; 2. Shireen Trichler 230;
3. Kim Tice 217. 1. Paul Benton 230;
2. Harold Van Hoy Sr. 223; 3. Gino
Frazier 216.
High handicap series: 1. Shireen
Trichler 624; 2. Donna Evans 603;
3. Okie Van Hoy 596. 1. Paul Benton
617; 2. Terry Goodman 595; 3. Andy


BOWLING

Haber 593.
High average: 1. Liz Randall 166;
2. Phyllis Benton 151; 3. Kim Tice 133.
1. Joe Cohrs 199; 2. Brett Reddick
181; 3. Leonard Randall 179.
(results from March 25)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Quirky Quad
(81-39); 2. Ups & Downs (67.5-52.5);
3. Who Cares (66.5-53.5).
High scratch game: 1. Jane
Sommerfeld 187; 2. Louise Atwood
184; 3. Joyce Hooper 177. 1. Dan
Ritter 258; 2. Jack Stanfield 214;
3. Ross Meyers 201.
High scratch series: 1. Louise
Atwood 514; 2. Betty Brown 491;
3. 'Jane Sommerfeld 488. 1. Dan
Ritter 636; 2. David Duncan 591;
3. Earl Hayward 563.
High handicap game: 1. (tie) Louise
Atwood, Jane. Sommerfeld 228;
3. Joyce Hooper 225; 4. Debi Evert
220. 1. Dan Ritter 291; 2. Jackl
Stanfield 253; 3. Jerry Ellis 233.
, High handicap series: 1. Louise
Atwood 646; 2. Betty Brown 641;
3. Joyce Hooper 624. 1. Dan Ritter
735; 2. Vernon Black 666; 3. Earl
Hayward 665.
High average: 1. Phyllis Benton
157; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 154;
3. Louise Atwood 152. 1. Bill Dolly
180; 2. Lee Evert 180; 3. Art Joubert
169.
(results from March 25)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(150-106); 2. The Pink Panthers
(148-108); 3. Golden Oldies
(146-110).
High scratch game: 1. Sandi
Johns 209; 2. Janet Nash 192;
3. (tie) Yvonne Finley, - Roberta
Giordano 180. 1. Art Joubert 201;
2. (tie) Mike Helvey, Martin Griher 200;
4. Ross Meyers 195.
High scratch series: 1. Janet Nash
512; 2. (tie) Sandi Johns, Phyllis
Benton 476; 4. Roberta Giordano
444. 1. Ross Meyers 550; 2. Lee Evert
529; 3. Martin Griner 522.
High handicap game: 1. Sandi
Johns 269; 2. Janet Nash 254;
3. Roberta Giordano 235. 1. Martin
Griner 248; 2. Chuck Pressler 242;
3. Mike Helvey 234.
High handicap series: 1. Janet
Nash 698; 2. Sandi Johns 647; 3..Vy
Ritter 610. 1. Chuck Pressler 668;
2. Martin Griner 666; 3. Mike Helvey
612.
High Average: 1. Phyllis Benton
158; 2. Louise Atwood 150; 3. Yvonne
Finley 144. 1. Dan Ritter 174; 2. Lee
Evert 173; 3. Art Joubert 167.
(results from March 23)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Donna


Wynkoop 211; 2. Pat Fennell 203;
3. Carla Nyssen 201. 1. Adam Alford
255; 2. Bill Dolly 243; 3. Mark Koppa
235.
High scratch series: 1. Donna
Wynkoop 565; 2. Lorie Niquette 499;
3. Susie Flick 482. 1. Adam Alford
625; 2. Bill Dolly 618; 3. Tom Sewejkis
611.
High handicap game: 1. Carla
Nyssen 266; 2. Pat Fennell 261;
3. Lorie Niquette 235. 1. Adam Alford
273; 2. Ken Watson 269; 3. Mark
Koppa 252.
High handicap series: 1. Donna
Wynkoop 679; 2. Susie Flick 659;
3. Amanda Meng 657. 1. Michael
Mclnally 711; 2. Bill Dolly 696;
3. Bobby Robinson 684.
High average:. 1. Gloria Dennis
161; 1. Tom Sewejkis 189.
(results from March 30)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Ronsonet Buick
(33-15); 2. TownHomes LLC (29-19);
3. North Florida Tower (28-20).
High scratch game: 1. Zech Strohl
278; 2. Brian Meek 264; 3. Josh
Bisque 249.
High scratch series: 1. Zech
Strohl 787; 2. Brian Meek 694; 3. Bill
Coleman 631.
High handicap game: 1. Zech
Strohl 286; 2. Brian Meek 279; 3. D.J.
Suhl 271.
High handicap series: 1. Zech
Strohl 811; 2. Brian Meek 739; 3. Bill
Coleman 727.
High average: 1. Zech Strohi
203.1; 2. Bill Duncan 202.54; 3. Wally
Howard 200.38.
(results from March 15)
TGIF
Team 'standings: 1. 3 Gators & A
Nole (70.5-45.5); 2. BDR Hay Sales
(66-50); 3. Fun Tyme Travel (65-51,
72,069 pins); 4. Back At Ya! (65-51,
71,678 pins).
High scratch garfme: 1. Presley
Gissendanner 266; 2. (tie) Shannon
Brown, Karen Coleman 212. 1. Zech
Strohl 246;. 2. Rich Madden 236;
3. Mark Rowland 227.
High scratch series: 1. Presley
Gissendanner 658; 2. Karen Coleman
560; 3. Pat Gallegos 557. 1. Zech
Strohl 670; 2. Curtis Gutzmer 655;
3. Rich Madden 648.
High handicap game: 1. Presley
Gissendanner 287; 2. Shannon Brown
244; 3. Shannon Howard 243.1. Mark
Rowland 259; 2. Rich Madden 256;
3. Frank Howell 254.
High handicap-series: 1. Presley
Gissendanner 721; 2. Chris Pauwels
665; 3. Pat Gallegos 662. 1. Curtis
Gutzmer 727; 2. Rich Madden 708;
3. Kamara Hollingsworth 697.
. (results from March 26)


Bryant signs extension with Lakers


Associated Press

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. -
Kobe Bryant is staying with
the Los Angeles Lakers for
another three years..
With the deal the Lakers
achieved two main objec-
tives going into the season
- signing Bryant and Pau
Gasol to extensions.


ACROSS


1 Weeps
5 Little kid
8 Cuba, for one
12 Band
instrument
13 High card
14 Polite address
15 Farm unit
16 Tenant
18 Sealskin canoe
20 Stadium noise
21 Hwys.
22 Spurns
25 Tummy mus-
cles
28 Deep-dish
desserts
29 Perfume scent
33 Soup
ingredient
35 Mawkish
36 Doldrums
37 Turn down a
page (hyph.)
38 Kemo - (Lone
Ranger)


"We were ablq to accom-
plish those goals, helping
to keep the core of this
team intact for the foresee-
able future and in turn help
to ensure the franchise's
continued success over the
years to come," General
manager Mitch Kupchak
said Friday on the team's
Web site.


39 - colada (rum
drink)
41 Tijuana "Mrs."
42 Rubdown
45 Noncom
48 New Deal org.
49 Gapes open
53 Forest young-
sters (2 wds.)
56 Marsh bird
57 Glimpse
58 Gov't narcs
59 Bus route
60 Fragrant flower
61 Antique
62 Worry a lot

DOWN

1 Rapid City's st.
2 Shamu, i.e.
3 Hide treasure
4 Dirty streak
5 Eastern philos-
ophy
6 Build up
7 Coffee orders
8 Sitter's handful


Financial terms of the
deal weren't announced.
The 31-year Bryant could
have terminated the last two
years of his contract and
become an unrestricted free
agent last July. He could've
gotten a new, longer deal
if he had opted out, but he
wouldn't have necessarily
made more money.


Answer to Previous Puzzle



MLLE L E'GO REL
REPO ABANDONS
SNORERS ROMEO


INAR VIOEN NJ



SA S EN TS


9 Gennan industrial
region
10 Make shore
11 Tsp. and oz.
17 Antenna type
19 Visored caps


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comr


23 Puppeteer -
Baird
24 Urban haze
25 Linen
vestments
26 Bartok or
Lugosi
27 Put-down
30 Luau
instruments
31 Burn
32 Actress -
Sedgwick
34 Abound
35 Submarine
37 Double helix
39 Fake
40 Peron's third
wife
43 Crescent
44 British peers
45 Ten-four
buddy
46 Senor's coin
47 Licks
50 Postpone
51 Prime-time
hour
52 Vast number
54 Deli loaf
55 Long-faced


4-3 � 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Kiwanis Club golf Booster meeting
tourney May 21 on April 20


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010


Huggins, Krzyzewski back at Final Four


By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - On
one bench, there's Bob
Huggins, a coach who has
dealt with an NCAA inves-
tigation, suffered a heart
attack, been arrested for
DUI, endured the stain of
a zero-percent graduation
rate and the tumult of two
contentious job changes.
On the other, there's
Mike Krzyzewski, a coach
making his 11th Final Four
appearance who has more
or less defined modern-day
stability - and solid citizen-
ship - in college sports.
So why is it Coach K
who's been taking all the
heat lately?
Well, such is life when
you're the coach at Duke
and. your program - the
program you built and
recruited all the talent to
- doesn't make the Final
Four for five straight sea-
sons.
"People expect us to
always be at this stage,"
Blue Devils forward Lance
Thomas said Friday, the
last day of practice before
the games begin.
Duke's return to the
Final Four, where the Blue
Devils (33-5) will play West
Virginia in today's second
semifinal, has quieted a
growing cadre of skeptics.
Since 2004, when the Blue
Devils lost to Connecticut
in the national semifinals,
Krzyzewski has kept the
talent coming in and won
four ACC tournament and
two regular-season titles.
But during that span, Duke
hadn't advanced past the
NCAA regional semifinals
until this year.
That, combined with the
two national championships
North Carolina has won in
the same span, has certain,
ly made it easier to criticize
a program that already has
its share of haters.
Naturally, job security is
of no concern to CoaEh K,
in his 30th. year at Duke.
He insists he's listened (to


very little of the critiquing
outside, of what the people
in his own circles tell him,
and the only time he, or
anyone, should feel pres-
sure is when they're in over
their head.
"I think pressure is when
you're asked to do some-
thing you're not capable of
doing," Krzyzewski said.
"So you should train and be
in a position where you're
capable of doing what
people ask of you. And if
you're continually feeling
pressure, you should prob-
ably try to do something
you can do."
Duke has done it this
year with a very un-Duke-
like combination .- one
that includes lots of height,
starting with 7-foot-1 Brian
Zoubek, plenty of rebound-
ing and defense and nary a
superstar.
The program that gave
us Grant Hill, Shane Battier,
Christian Laettner, Jason
Williams and dozens more'
NBA players has .produced
a 2010 team with pro tal-
ent, but no lottery picks
- a team with players who
can score and defend but
nobody -who dominates
nightly.
The man who turned it
into Final Four material:
Krzyzewski, who insists he
never let the criticism get
to him.
"I think everyone feels
pressure, but not the pres-
sure from the outside," he
said. "It's the pressure from
within, to do as well as you
think you can do."
Facing Krzyzewski on
the other bench will be
Huggins, who has brought
West Virginia (31-6) back
to the Final Four for the
first time since 1959 and is
making his first appearance
since 1992, when he was
with Cincinnati.
An 18-year drought
would gnaw at most coach-
es, a hyper-competitive
bunch. But the 56-year-old
Huggins insists he hasn't
spent much time - any
time, really.- during that


ASSOCIATED PRESS
West Virginia head coach Bobby Huggins instructs guard Jonnie West during a practice session for the NCAA Final Four
college basketball tournament Friday, in Indianapolis.


span wondering if he would
make it back or worrying
about his shortcomings.
"Notreally,"he said, when
asked if there's anything
specific that eats at him. "I
can't say I worry about our
guys,,because our guys are
really good guys. I. want
them to be successful and
do well. But I've never lived
my life worrying."
If he did, there'd be
plenty of material to choose
from.
An abridged look at the
list includes the 0.0-percent
graduation rate at Cincinnati
for several seasons and the
heart attack in 2002. He
ran what was widely viewed
a rogue program, cited by
the NCAA for the dreaded
"lack of institutional con-


trol" in 1998. But "Huggy
Bear" didn't get chased
from the Cincy sideline until
he started fighting with the
school president after his
2004 DUI arrest was caught
on video.
Though beloved at West
Virginia, Huggins remains a
divisive figure in Cincinnati,
where memories of his bad
temper, along with the other
baggage, are still vivid.
The fact that the Bearcats
haven't 'enjoyed near the
success since his departure
plays into the mix.
"I had countless oppor-
tunities to leave and didn't
want to because I didn't
want to leave the city, the
people, and more specifi-
cally, I didn't want to lose
my players," said Huggins,


who was forced out after
16 years.
After the tough ending
in Cincinnati, his faith in
school administration was
restored during a single
season at Kansas State.
Despite the positive experi-
ence, he bolted when his
alma mater came calling.
West Virginia sports are
more than simple games in
that state, and not surpris-
ingly, any program with a
half-century drought will be
patient with a hometown
boy who returns. Huggins
rewarded the faithful quick-
ly, and has done it with little
of the trouble that followed
him earlier in his career.
Only three years into
the job, he found- a group
of players, led by Da'Sean


Butler, who buy into his
mantra: "Do What We Do,"
and don't try to do too
much.
"He came in and said,
'I'm going to turn you into
my guys,"' Butler said. "He
said, 'You're going to be
guys who play hard, defend,
rebound, things like that."'
They are. As are
Krzyzewski's boys at Duke.
It's a matchup of two
coaches who have ended
droughts - long by Coach'
K's standards, nothing
to worry about the way
Huggins sees it.
"They say it balances
out," Huggins said. "If it bal-
ances out, we should be in
great shape - if the people
who say that know what
they're talking about."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Butler's mascot, Blue II, sits on the court during a practice session for the NCAA Final Four
college basketball tournament Friday, in Indianapolis. Butler faces Michigan State Saturday
in a semifinal game.


Butler to see if home


is sweet in Final Four


By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
They've snarled traffic,
made cheesy mustaches
fashionable and drawn a
bigger crowd for practice
than their fabled field-
house can hold. One of the
players even got asked to
prom.
Butler is enjoying
the kind of lovefest that
Michigan State saw at last
year's Final Four - and
then some. Playing a mere
5.6 miles from their cam-
pus, the Bulldogs have
brought what seems like
the whole Hoosier state
along for their first appear-
ance on college basket-
ball's biggest stage.
Who knew there were
that many Butler alums
out there?
"Just turning every
corner and seeing Butler
shirts, Butler jerseys,
Butler hats, any kind of
Butler apparel on every


corner, I don't think it gets
much better than that,"
point guard Ronald Nored
said Friday. "I think that
could be the case if we
were playing anywhere,
but for it to be here in
Indianapolis makes it even
more special."
Butler -(32-4) plays
Michigan State (28-8) in the
first semifinal Saturday.
On paper, playing at
home would seem to be a
huge advantage: you're the
overwhelming fan favorite;
a long red light on the trek
from campus is the extent
of your travel drama; and
there's no need to scout
out restaurants or practice
sites.
All that enthusiasm also
can cause a headache.
When the Spartans made it
to last year's Final Four in
recession-battered Detroit,
90 miles from campus,
almost 10,000 fans showed
up just for a pep rally at a
suburban mall.
"It comes with a lot of fun


and excitement. But it also
comes with distractions,
as well," said Draymond
Green, whose hometown
of Saginaw, Mich., is two
hours north of Detroit.
"You know everyone.
Everyone just wants to be
around, from someone you
knew in kindergarten, to
someone you just met last
week.
"It's a big difference
from just being in town for
a regular-season game."
Of the 10 previous
schools who played in a
Final Four in their home
state, five won it all. But
it hasn't been done since
1975, when UCLA won in
San Diego.
Now, the Spartans aren't
blaming their shellacking
by North Carolina in last
year's title game on the
distractions of being so
close to home. Coach Tom
Izzo jokes that he could
have brought an All-Star
team and still not made a
run at the Tar Heels.


SPITCH: Has evolved over times
Continued From Page 1B


but the pitcher struck out
his long arm and grabbed
the ball before it hit the
ground."
Monday's game will fea-
ture a rematch of the 1910
opener, Washington host-
ing Philadelphia, but not
the same teams. The old
Washington team - known
as both the Nationals and
the Senators - became
the Minnesota Twins, and
their 1910 opponent, the
Philadelphia Athletics, now
play in Oakland. Today's
Nationals, who moved
from Montreal, take on the
Phillies.
But some things haven't
changed. The new Nationals
have yet to have a winning
season in five years and had
the worst record in baseball
the last two. The old Nats
began their existence with
nine straight losing seasons
and were coming off a last-
place finish in 1909.
In 'contrast with the cho-
reographed presidential
pitches of the modern era,
Taft appeared a 'bit befud-
dled about what to do. After
the umpire brought the
ball over to him, "the presi-
dent took the sphere in his
gloved hand as though he
were at a loss what to do
with it," the AP reported.
Taft stayed for the entire
game - something presi-.


dents rarely do these days
- and the Nats blanked
the Athletics, 3-0, behind
Johnson'is 1-hitter. The
Washington Post gushed
over the win, calling it "a
sun-kissed, victory-blessed,
roaring, rollicking, rous-
ing opening day for the
Nationals!"
"Walter Johnson and
President Taft were the
twinkling luminaries of the
day - the 'star perform-
ers,' if you will," the paper
reported.
The tradition has evolved
over time.
In the beginning, the pres-
ident threw the ball from
the stands to the starting.
pitcher or even the umpire.
Later,, the president would
toss the ball over a scrum of
photographers into a crowd
of players from both teams
who would battle for the
ball, which the president
would autograph.
Nowadays, the nation's
leaders take the mound
and throw to the catcher or
another player.
"It's hard to think of tra-
ditions that are a hundred
years old, and to be able to
participate in one, I think is
something really special for
our franchise, for our entire
sport, antd it's a real thrill
to be involved in it," said
Nationals president Stan


Kasten.
President Franklin
D. Roosevelt threw out a
record eight Opening-Day
pitches, including a 1940
toss that smashed into, a
newspaper photographer's
camera.
"It was one of the worst
that ever left a presidential
arm, and that is saying some-
thing, for Hoover, Coolidge,
Harding -and Wilson have
heaved some wild ones,"
the Post quipped.
In 1950, Harry Truman
threw out two ceremonial
pitches - one from each
hand. A lefty, his right-
handed toss didn't quite
make the cut.
Later, it was the presi-
dential autograph that was
found lacking. In 1961,
PresidentJohn F. Kennedy's
opening toss was retrieved
by White Sox outfielder Jim
Rivera, who demanded a
more legible signature after
JFK signed the ball.
"Do you think I can go
into any tavern on Chicago's
South Side and really say
the president of the United
States signed this base-
ball for me?" Rivera said,
according to a report years
later by Chicago Tribune
writer David Condon. "I'd
be run off."
A laughing Kennedy
signed it again.


TURNER: Wins despite missing 6 games


Continued From Page 1B

his back when he fell after a
dunk on Dec. 5.
He missed six games -
which, the Buckeyes split
- then he returned to lead
them to the Big Ten title
and a No. 2 seed in the
NCAA tournament.
"I was going to be as cau-
tious as I possibly could to


make sure he was 100 per-
cent when he came back,"
Ohio State coach Thad
Matta said. "He would sit
and watch practice, drib-
bling the ball around his
chair, between his legs. He
was diligent in his work
ethic and did a great job."
Turner said awards were


the last thing on his mind
during those weeks when
he was forced to watch his
teammates get ready for
the conference season.
"I just wanted to get back
to my team and be the same
player I was," said Turner,
who hasn't decided if he will
return for his senior season.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, APRIL, 2010


DILBERT


I ASKED FOR A
TRANSFER TO OUR
MISSILE GUIDANCE
ENGINEERING
DIVISION.
)


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


02010 Crealor corn


8 ONCE THEY GET TO
KNOW MAE, THEY'LL
ONLY GIVE M\E UNIt\-
SPORTANT TASKS SO I
0 WONT ACCIDENTALLY
i DESTROY A FISHING
VILLAGE.

6 . --0


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Man hesitates to reconcile

with girlfriend he dumped


THE GREAT THING
ABOUT UNIMPORTANT
TASKS IS THAT NO ONE
REALLY CARES IF YOU
DO THEM.
-


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Getting together
with people who are as ag-
gressive as you are will lead
to profits. A challenge will
get you moving in spite of
some of the setbacks you've
encountered. Stay within
your budget. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Your day will be
nonproductive if you leave
room for someone to com-
plain. Taking action will
work but discussing a moot
point will lead to setbacks
and family feuds. Do some-
thing without being asked
that will please your family.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You may be in-
clined to stretch the truth,
especially if someone is try-
ing to outdo you. Instead,
stick to your game plan and
focus on learning, sharing
and caring with the people
who mean the most to you.
Someone who depends
on you can also help you.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Bb prepared to
answer any questions that
you are asked with facts,
figures and whatever else.
is required. The sooner you
put people's minds at ease,
the easier it will be to follow
through with your plans. 3

LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

22): Get away from work-
related matters and focus
more on fun and games. A
short trip will lead to activi-
ties, events and people who
will share valuable informa-
tion, ideas and alternatives
to the way you've been plan-
ning to proceed with your
life. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You can avoid being
strung along by a big talker
who is unlikely to honor
promises made. Travel in
order to have a face-to-face
conversation. The rapport
that develops will be well
worth your time, effort and
expense. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Taking on too much
or overindulging in any way
will cause you grief both
personally and financially.
You can expect to experi-
ence problems with some-
one you care about over
a money matter. Put your
time and effort into fixing
up your home. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You may want to
change the nature of your
business but, before you go
down that path, check out
the cost. It's probably better
to take what you've already
got and rework it to fit your
new plans. ***


SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Put your
effort into your home and
comfort. Do as much of the
work yourself as you can.
Travel will be costly and
will lead to unexpected de-
lays and problems with au-
thority figures. Don't devi-
ate from the rules. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Love is in
the stars and you should be
planning to do something
entertaining either with
your current partner or that
will allow you to meet some-
one special. Don't limit your
choices because you are too
set in your ways. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Rethink your
future and strategize about
what you want to do, can
do and should do. You will
get a good response if you
put a new resume.together.
Getting involved in volun-
teer work will provide you
with some added bonuses.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't let your
guard down, especially
when working with people
who are after the same
goals you have in mind. You
can expect the competition
to be fierce and, the un-
derhandedness downright
dirty. Don't give away your
secrets. Remain calm. **


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: B equals J
"GU INHA'Y VCHWROY PCXR'O
KGJWX OPW RCTW, PW TGAPO
RWSWH PCSW IWWR IBNHR." -
PLTNHGYO TCHOM GRXGJ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Champions are made from something they have
deep inside them - a desire, a dream, a vision." - Muhammad Ali
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 4-3


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
|I' HQ lW, MOM- I | I've BEEM Too usy To
I WHATS FO -"I |THK ABOUT suPp.
l " M BUT, . JI'
IIn\r ,c,-r' I *HUNQFW 1OW.1/


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I DON'T UNDERSTAND IT...


-ik


HOW CAN E LS05E I HEN
UE'RE 50 SINCERE .2


DEAR ABBY: I broke up
with my girlfriend of almost
two years last July because I
thought I was going to be get-
ting a job overseas and she
would be staying in the States.
We have always had a long-dis-
tance relationship (me being
from New York and she from
New Hampshire), and it didn't
look like it would be any differ-
ent for the next five or so years
what with graduate school,
etc.
I was becoming more and
more distant in our relation-
ship because I'd see her only
for a weekend every other
month or so, and the lack of
physical contact left me feeling
single but unavailable.
It has been many months
now, and it turned out I didn't
get the job after all. She's now
living two hours 'away, and
we're 'still on good terms. We
talk occasionally but never
about us. Our families loved
each other, and we never had
any deal-breaking fights.
Part of me wants to see if
she wants to give it another
shot, but the other half feels
almost embarrassed to ask.
What would you suggest I do?
- MUSING IN THE EM-
PIRE STATE
DEAR MUSING: Sitting
around "musing" won't solve
your problem. So get off the
dime and ASK her before
someone else steps in and
does!
DEAR ABBY: I have been
married a year and a half. My
husband works three jobs
because he wants material
things. We spend very little
time together and when we


CELEBRITY CIPHER


He was killed six months lat-
er in a car accident. His best
friend, 'Tom," was driving.
I went to visit Tom in the
hospital and from then on we
became inseparable. At first,
it was to soothe each other's
pain of losing someone we
both loved, but it grew into
something more.
I currently live with Tom's
family and work in their busi-
ness without pay. Essentially,
I'm one of the family. I could
not ask for a more loving adop-
tive family, but I don't want to
be "family." I lie awake at night
thinking about Tom, blush
if our hands touch and have
to catch my breath when he
looks at me.
How do I tell the man I love
that I have fallen for him when
he considers me like a little
sister? Is what I'm feeling even
appropriate? - UNSURE IN
NEW YORK
DEAR UNSURE: I think
so. You suffered a devastating
loss. Tom and his family have
filled the void, so your feel-
ings are understandable. You
will never know whether Tom
feels the same way about you if
you don't bring up the subject.
If you're afraid to do that, then
talk to his mother. She'll be
able to give you some insight
- and perhaps some encour-
agement. But don't wait much
longer, because if he doesn't
feel the, same, you need to
move out and move on with
your life.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
do, it's sleep and sports. We :
don't go out to dinner or mov-
ies. I feel like I'm just here so
he can get the material things
he wants. - LONESOME IN
PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR LONESOME: You
and your husband are overdue
for some serious discussions
regarding priorities, goals and
values because it appears you
are far out of sync. Tell him
that while you admire his drive
and ambition, successful mar-
riages take work, too.
While many people can
hold down two jobs, trying to
hold down three is a challenge.
A person can't put forth his
best effort if he's exhausted all
the time - and fatigue leads to .
mistakes and inefficiency. For
the sake of your husband's
health, he should rethink what
he's doing.
P.S. Speak up now, because
if you truly believe you're just
there so he can get the mate-
rial things he wants, it doesn't
take a crystal ball to see this
marriage may not be one of
long duration.
DEAR ABBY: Two years
ago I met someone who be-
came larger than life to me.
I was happier than I ever
dreamed, but it wasn't to be.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404


C










Classified Department: 755-5440


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2008-CA-000543
DIVISION
HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE ,
ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS
OF THE DEUTSHE ALT-A SE-
CURITIES, INC. MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2005-1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEVE E. BROWN, et al,
Defendant(s)..
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated March 24,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000543 'of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for HSBC BANK USA, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE , ON BEHALF OF THE
HOLDERS OF THE DEUTSHE
ALT-A SECURITIES, INC. MORT-
GAGE LOAN TRUST CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2005-1, is the
Plaintiff and STEVE E. BROWN;
AMANDA L. BROWN; are the De-
fendants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE 'COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00
AM, on the 5th day of May, 2010,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment:
A STRIP OF LAND ONE ACRE
SQUARE IN THE SOUTHWEST
� CORNER OF THE FOLLOWING
DESCRIBED LANDS AND
BOUNDED ON THE SOUTH BY
COUNTY ROAD NO. 13 (ALSO
KNOWN AS * GUM SWAMP
ROAD): THAT PORTION ONLY
OF THE EAST HALF OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER (EAST
1/2 OF EAST 1/2 OF NORTHEAST
1/4 OF SOUTHWEST 1/4) OF SEC-
TION 21, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, LYING NORTH
OF SAID COUNTY ROAD NO. 13.
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 1509 GUM SWAMP ROAD
NE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on March 25, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
' Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F08034329 SPSFIDELIT-CONV-
NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida-33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
04538820
April 3, 10,2010


Public Auction
1994 Ford Van.
Vin# 1FDEE14H8RHA34193
in Columbia County on April 22,
2010, at 10:00am at Auto Emporium,
2832 SE Main Blvd
Lake City Fl. 32025

04538890
April 3, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000169
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RONALD MONTGOMERY, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated March 24,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000169 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, is the Plaintiff and STEVE E.
BROWN; RONALD MONTGOM-
ERY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS; WELLS
FARGO BANK, NA; are the De-








Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

fendants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00
AM, on the 5th day of May, 2010,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 7, DUCK POND SUBDIVI-
SION, A SUBDIVISION ACCORD-'
ING TO THE PLAT BOOK 5,
PAGE 66, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on March 25,2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09024847 NMNC-SPECFHLMC-
NOTICE
In' accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962,: telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
04538827
April 3, 10,2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000Q04
DIVISION
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MEL-
LON FKA HE BANK OF NEW
YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
BENEFIT OF THE ASSET-
BACKEP CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2007-2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THERON E. WATERS et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF , FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated March 24,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000304' of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for THE BANK OF NEW
YORK MELLON FKA HE BANK
OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE AS-
SET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2007-2, is the Plaintiff and
THERON E. WATERS; CHANDRA
D. WATERS; MARVYNE A WA-
TERS A/K/A MARVYNE C. WA-
TERS; TENANT #1 N/K/A LANI-
TRA SAPP are the Defendants, I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at FRONT STEPS OF
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on
the 30th day of June, 2010, the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 2 AND THE WEST, 1/2 OF
LOT 3, BLOCK D, NORTHSIDE
ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION, AS
PER PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 18,
OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A SPRINGDALE GLENN,
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on March 25,2010.
P. DeWitt Cason . .
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:./s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09030607 COUNTRY-CONV B/C
NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
04538837
April 3,10,2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000217
DIVISION
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DWAYNE J. WORDEN, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated March 24,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000217 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for CHASE HOME FI-
NANCE LLC., is the Plaintiff and
DWAYNE J. WORDEN; RITA G.
WORDEN; CAVALRY PORTFO-
LIO SERVICE, LLC AS ASSIGN-
EE OF CAVALRY INVEST-
MENTS, LLC AS ASSIGNEES OF
AMERICREDIT; are the Defend-


ants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00
AM, on the 5th day of May, 2010,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 10, BAR D ESTATES, UNIT


Legal

2, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 105, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON, SERIAL NUMBERS
GAFL534A79083AV21 &
GAFL534B79083AV21
A/K/A 544 SW CLINT WAY,
LAKE CITY, FL 320240000
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on March 25, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09033903 CHASEDIRECT-FHA
NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is/located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.

04538831
April 3, 10, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT . IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000454
DIVISION
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP F/K/A CPUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS SERVICING,
L.P.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DEBRA A. WAINWRIGHT, et al,
Defefidant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated March 24,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000454 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for BAC HOME LOANS
SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUN-
TRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERV-
ICING, L.P., is the Plaintiff and DE-
BRA A. WAINWRIGHT; JOSEPH
B. WAINWRIGHT, JR. A/K/A JO-
SEPH BARNEY WAINWRIGHT
A/K/A JOSEPH B. WAINWRIGHT;
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 28th day of April,
2010, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
LOT 15, ROYAL POINTE SUBDI-
VISION, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
1, PAGES 13 THROUGH 17, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the'Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale. 4
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on March 25, 20.10.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09055370 COUNTRY-SPSFIDE-
LIT
NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
04538830
April 3, 10,2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND /FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000391
DIVISION .
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, AS
TRUSTEE OF BANC OF AMERI-
CA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST 2006-7 MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BIPINKUMAR G. PATEL, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated March 24,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000391 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, AS TRUSTEE OF BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST 2006-7 MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES, is the Plaintiff and BIPIN-
KUMAR G. PATEL; ULLAS B.
PATEL; SUNSTATE FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION; are the Defend-


ants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00
AM, on the 5th day of May, 2010,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment:


Legal


LOT 11, CYPRESS LANDING I
SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDINING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 40-43 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO- P
SLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 999 SW JAGUAR pR,
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property 'owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on March 25, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 R
F09056989 BANKAMERICA2-
CONV-
NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1.-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior io this proceed-
ing.
04538835
April 3, 10, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000418
DIVISION
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUST-
EES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST JERRY W.
HULL DECEASED, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated March 24,
2010 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000418 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for WELLS FARGO BANK,
NA, is the Plaintiff and THE UN-
KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIE-
NORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST JERRY W. HULL DE-
CEASED; KEITH WAYNE HULL,
AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF
JERRY W. HULL, DECEASED;
JOHNNY LYN HULL, AS AN
HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF JERRY
W. HULL, DECEASED; ROBIN
LEE HULL, AS AN HEIR OF THE
ESTATE OF JERRY W. HULL,
DECEASED; ROBIN LEE HULL,
AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF '
JERRY W. HULL, DECEASED;
NY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN CLAIMANTS; are the De-
fendants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT .
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00
AM, on the 28th day of April, 2010,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment:
PARCEL A
A PART OF LOTS 9, 10,11, 12, 13,
14, 15 AND 16 IN BLOCK 2 OF
MASON CITY AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 31 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRI-
BED AS FOLLOWS:
A PART OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4
OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 5
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE ARE A POINT
WHERE THE NORTH 'LINE OF
SAID SECTION 22 INTERSECTS
THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE
OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 41;
THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 51
MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST,
ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, 1182.15 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 03
DEGREES 51 MINUTES 44 SEC-
ONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
EAST, RIGHT OF WAY LINE,
147.60 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID
BLOCK 2; THENCE NORTH 88
DEGREES 40 MINUTES 13 SEC-
ONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
SOUTH LINE, 289.83 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 32


Legal


MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST,
159.81 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 86
SECONDS 15 MINUTES 17 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 290.42 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
PARCEL B
A PART OF LOTS 1 AND 32 IN
BLOCK 3 OF MASON CITY AS
PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 31 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
A PART OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4
OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 5
SOUTH, RANGE, 17 EAST CO-
LUMBIA, FLORIDA, BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRI-
BED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE
AT A POINT WHERE THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION
22 INTERSECTS THE EAST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S.
HIGHWAY NO. 41; THENCE
SOUTH 03 DEGREES 51 MI-
NUTES 44 SECONDS EAST,
ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, 1379.80 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 03
DEGREES 51 MINUTES 44 SEC-
ONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
EAST, RIGHT OF WAY LINE,
44.35 FEET; THENCE NORTH 86
DEGREES 23 MINUTES 37 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 289.10 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 32
MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST,
32.85 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
NORTH LINE OF BLOCK 3;
THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 40
MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG SAID NORTH LINE,
289.56 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
SCHEDULE A
PART OF ORANGE STREET AS
LIES EAST OF US HIGHWAY NO.
41/441 AND. BEING A PART OF
MASON CITY AS PER PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 31, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT
NO. 12 OF BLOCK 2, OF MASON
CITY, SAID POINT BEING ALSO
ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY
NO. 41/441 AND RUN NORTH 88
DEGREES 40 MINUTES 13 SEC-
ONDS EAST,.- ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT NO."
12 AND LOTS NO .13 OF SAID
BLOCK 2, A DISTANCE OF
289.83 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 58 SEC-
ONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF
50.04 FEET TO THE SOUTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID
ORANGE STREET, SAID POINT
BEING ALSO ON THE NORTH
LINE OF LOT NO. 32 OF BLOCK
3 OF SAID MASON CITY;
THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 40
MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG THE SAID NORTH LINE
OF LOT 32 AND- LOT 1. OF
BLOCK 3 A DISTANCE OF 289.56
FEET TO THE SAID EAST RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGH-
WAY NO. 41/441; THENCE
NORTH 03. DEGREES 51 MI-
NUTES 44 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
LINE, A DISTANCE OF 50.05
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
A/K/A 10891 SOUTH US HIGH-
WAY 441, LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on March 25, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09063049 NMNC-SPECFNMA -
NOTICE
.In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
045A8832
April 3, 10, 2010

Job
100 JOpportunities

AVON!!!, EARN.up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Cosmetology Instructor
Must have 6 years of full time
experience. 386-647-4202
for information.


The Lake City Reporter.
is looking for a dynamic and capable sales


professional to sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and online products.
We need a person with the ability to make
strong presentations.

Professionalism, being actiue in the field and closing sales-
.are three key attributes for which we are looking. We offer
a salary and a strong commission plan. along with a good
benefits package If you ha'e a strong desire to succeed and
the skills to back it Up, we want to hear from you.

Please e-mail your resume to: Lynda Strickland, marketing director,
at istrickland@lakecityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055.
- NO PHONE CALLS-


I


- ADvantage


I









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, APRIL 3, 2010


100 Opportunities

(4538674
A/R Collections Clerk needed
for fast paced environment. Ind.
must have data entry exp.,
be able to type 45 cwpm, be
detailed oriented dependable
and have the ability to work
with others. Previous collections
exp. a must. DFW.
Fax resume to 386-758-4523
Attention "Collections Clerk"

4P538789
LEGAL SECRETARY
NEEDED for law firm in Lake
City, Florida. Candidate must
type a minimum of 50 wpm
using WordPerfect, have good
computer skills, secretarial
skills, people skills and
organizational skills. At least
2 years legal experience desired.
Please fax cover letter/resume to
386-758-0950.

ADMIN. ASSIST
Medical sales office seeking long
term professional. Sales exp. a
plus. Telemarketing exp a must.
Mon - Fri 9-5. $7.50 per hr plus
bonus $400-$2000. Based on sales
average per location.
Fax resume to 904-278-6172
Exp. Pet Groomer needed for a
busy shop. Must have own equip
Apply in person Tue. - Fri. with
references at 872 SW Main Blvd
Floor Technician needed. Must
be able to strip, wax floors & have
at least one years exp. Afternoons
& evenings. Salary negotiable
depending on exp. Clean drivers
license & ability to get to Live
Oak. Fax resume to 386-362-6822
HELP WANTED?
Come help us market our
business. We need 3 or 4 people to
start immediately. Must be fun,
energetic and professioional.
Call Ashley at 386-438-8674
Delivery Driver Trainee
Dr Pepper, Snapple
Benefits and good pay
www.dpsg.com
OFFICE MANAGER.
Mortgage Processing,
Finance Experience a Plus.
Fax Resume to: 386-755-8608
Live-in CNA/housekeeper for
Paraplegic in Suwannee Co.
Honest/dependable w/ref. Call for
salary details. 386-658-1230
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
F/T Secretary/Clerical position
open in local Professional Office.
Must have High School Diploma
and experience with Microsoft
Outlook & Excel. Punctual/Team
Player Benefits Available
Medical/401K/Profit Sharing
Apply in person: Idaho Timber
1786 SE SR 100
Stylist/Barber wanted.
Busy shop, most make $10-$15
per hr plus tips. Paid vacation.
Full time & Part time.
Call 386-984-0101 for interview.

2 Medical
0 Employment
LPN or RN Fulltime Relief
needed for all 3 shifts. Lake City
Cluster ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V
Needed Nurse Practicioner or
Physicians Assistant for Internal
Medicine practice. Call N4ancy at
Southern Internal Medicine for
interview. 386-719-2540
Part time: Nurse 15 hrs;
Receptionist 20 hours per week;
Call 904-389-0444


240 ASchools &
240 Education

045385S7
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-04/l 2/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/12/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-05/04/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE 8 Week old kittens. Black
White. Healthy & in need of good
homes. Very adorable & playful. .
Wormed & flea free ALL GONE

GOLDEN RETRIVER puppy.
CKC registered. POP.
Female. $350. 386-623-1577 or
386-754-5361
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Registered German Shepherd
puppies $350. Ready NOW.
Parent On Premisis
386-365-2935.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies

CATTLE - Cows, Angus bulls,
bred heffers & yearlings.
'PIGS Beautiful white Yorkshire.
386-755-3500 or 365-1352


361 Farm Equipment
Kubota M9000 tractor, 4WD,
90HP, 495hrs, Custom built
forestry cage w/ door, full belly
pans and easy access maintenance
panels, front-end loader
w/ reinforced bucket, replaceable
teeth, under-mount cutting
edge/scraper, quick attach and
adjustable forks(includes forks),
custom A/C system, Brown Tree
Cutter included. $30K Call Tom
(678)877-5938 for all the details.


401 Antiques


ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
Apartment size Kenmore Washer
& Dryer on rollers. $350. obo.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

Very Nice HEAVY DUTY
Whirlpool Dryer. White,
works well. $135. 00.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387
WASHER & DRYER - Heavy
Duty White Roper set, like new.
Works great. $150.00. obo
386-867-1106

408 Furniture

25" Color TV.
$75.00 obo..
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387


408 Furniture
ANTIQUE QUEEN size
(Dark Wood) bed frame.
$250.obo
386-754-9295 or 984-0387
Blue Recliner
Medium size $35.00.
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
for medium to large TV with extra
shelving. $35.00 obo
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
Lt. Tan Very comfortable
large suade recliner.
Like new $265. obo
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
MEDIUM OAK Rectange coffee
table w/end table. Smoked glass.
$50. 00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
WANTED Junk Cars,
Trucks, RV's etc.
Paying CASH $225.00 and up.
Free pickup 386-867-1396
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$225 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Fri & Sat. 7-? 407 NW Desoto.St.
Behind Post Office. Christmas
stuff, Hull potery, tools,
much much more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat 8-12. Estate, LR & BR fum.,
camping, (hitch, dishes,etc) motor-
cycle items & trailer, crafts, books
725 NW Zack Dr. 386-984-5217
Sat. 8-2 Emerald Forest.
(Brandford Hwy). Small book-
shelf, desk, microwave, clothes,
lava lamp, lots more misc.

440 Miscellaneous
2 METAL Patio
Rocking chairs.
$100. obo.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
2 QUEEN QUILTS.
LIKE NEW. $80. 00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

Gun Cabinet w/glass locking
door. 3'Wx80"L. Homemade/great
quality. Holds 10 rifles & 10 hand-
guns. Must sell $50. 386-867-1106

530 Marine Supplies
Pair of 20ft Pontoons.
Make great floating dock, etc.
$500. obo. Call for more
information. 386-752-7229

6302 Mobile Homes
JVU for Rent
14-16 WIDE-MOBILE HOMES
3br/2ba. $525-$550.
Quiet, clean country park. No pets.
Dep. &Ref's 386-758-2280.
2br/lba. MH w/screen porch.
Newly renovated. Small main-
tained park. No Pets. Credit check.
$475. mo. $475. sec. Smoke free
environment. 386-719-9169.
Clean 2br/2ba on 5 acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coun-
try setting'just north of LC. $400.
mo. 1st, last & sec. (954)818-4481
Move in Discount $100. 2br/lba
from $450 & 3br/2ba from $550.
Includes water & sewer. No Pets!
Se labla espanol 386-961-0017


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rentom
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
Very Clean Remodeled 3br/2ba
DWMH 10 mi. SW of LC.
Fenced, private. NO PETS!
$750.mo. + sec.. 386-984-7478.

640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
Don't Miss this 5 bedroom/2bath,
2100 sqft home, inc. options like
thermopane windows & more.
$50,675. John T. 386-752-1452
FACTORY REPO'S 5 left.
Don't miss out on this 4br/2ba for
just $385. per mo. Inc.. Delivery,
set up w/AC, skirting and steps.
Call John T. 386-752-1452
FOR SALE LAKE CITY, 2006
4br/2ba MH on 5 ac. already
fenced. Only 10% dn of $104,900
WAC. Call Jim 386-752-7751
Got Horses or Farm Animals??
4 acres & 2006 -4br/2ba 2000 sqft.
Mobile Home, Concrete floor
garage & fenced. Lake City area.
10% dn of $109,900 W.A.C.
Call Jim at 386-752-7751
I'll sell any singlewide & I have
5 ready to go right now for
$150. over Invoice Now that's
the best deal in Florida.
CallJohn 386-752-1452,
Live Oak Area off CR 250, 1 acre
& 2007 Mobile HOme. 3br/2ba,
1480 sqft., 10%dn of $89,900
W.A.C Call Jeff@ 386-752-7751
Tired of people trying to tie up
your property. Get in this 3br/2ba
for just $265. a mo. No land
invloved. John T. 386-752-1452

710 ( Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
04538278
*THEY CALL IT WINDSONG*
SWE CALL IT HOME
Still The Best Deal in Town
(386) 758-8455

04538666
FREE RENT
Monthly Specials!
1 BR and 2 BR's-
starting at $500.00 and up
Security Gate, Pool,
Free Cable or water.
Choose between 5 properties
386-754-1800
386-754-8029

A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba.
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR/2BA apts., garage
W/D hook up. patio. $600 & up, +
SD, 386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Studios & IBr's from $140/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.No contracts,
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

04538824
Cute 2BR/2BA brick duplex
unit for rent. Well kept.
Convenient location at 216 SW
Cannon Creek Dr., close to S.R.
47 and 1-75. $800/month plus
deposit. Call Maston Crapps at
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
(Realtor) 386-365-1444.

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer.1 ac fenced, private, effi-
cient,'9.5, some pets, lease. 1st,
last, sec, ref. Lake City area $650
386-752-2555/352-494-1989
2 homes: 4br/2ba near Hwy 47 &
1-75. & a Large 2br in town.
Jane S. Usher, Lic. Real Estate
Broker. 386-755-3500/365-1352
3B/2BA BRICK, 2 car carport.
Large yard.
Country Club Rd. South
$950 month. 386-365-5464
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
.$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
3BR/2BA CB home Carport hard-
wood floors. CH/A Fenced yard.
Good area. $825 mo plus security.
386-752-0118 or 623-1698
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$800/mo.
864-517-0522.
FOR RENT 4br/2ba CHA Brick
home on 1 ac., CR 245A. Ceramic
tile and capet throughout $800. mo
$800 deposit (904)708-8478
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo: 386-752-6082
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

04538572
3 bd/ 2 ba home in nice S/D
2 car garage. $950 month
Susan Eagle, Realtor
386-623-6612
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
Very Nice 2 bedroom, 1 bath
house for rent in town,
$700/ mo and 700 deposit.
386-758-3922
Very nice 3br/2ba brick home.
$745. mo. plus $400. Security dep.
Call 386-963-4974
Application required.

750 Business &
S V Office Rentals

Office Building, Convient
location w/6 offices, Conference
Room, kitchen, ample parking.
Partially' furnished. $2,500 mo.
For appointment 386-754-9293

Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Space available at Country Club
Plaza East Baya Ave. 2000 sq ft.
, 2 restrooms, new carpet. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622


770 Condos For Rent

St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560


790 Vacation Rentals

Trout Season Horseshoe Beach
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink. Avail
wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
I.i (.l m RIPORI I R


805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$256/mo. $24,900. 352-215-1018

1 AC. in Columbia City. Well
already installed on gorgeous Oak
shaded home site. Owner Financ-
ing. No down pmt. $29,900. -
$307. mo. 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/2 on 10 ac. w/3 out buildings
and fruit trees in O'Brien.
$154,888. Call 386-755-6178 or
(828)754-4537

4br/2ba on 5 ac. Rent or Sale.
1 mi to Food Lion. Indoor pets ok
Close & private. $800. mo.
386-755-9333 or 755-7773
For Sale/Lease 3bd/lba brick,
near downtown. New carpet, paint
(in/out), doors, etc. Lg yard w/Pe-
can trees. $700 mo. 561-723-4306
OWNER FINANCE. Nice MH
4br/2ba. w/fireplace 32X70. on 5
ac. South of Lake City. Sm down
$950. mo. 386-590-0642/867-1833
Owner Financing 13 ac. fenced,
pond, w/3/2 MH. 40X90 barn,
horse stalls, well. Will divide
3/2 MH & fenced 5 ac. if needed.
386-590-0642 or 867-18,33

820 Farms&
SAcreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.cpm


940 Trucks
1995 FORD RANGER XLT
Short Wheel base, 5 speed.
Cold AC. $3675.00. OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

/952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
91 DODGE MINIVAN.
Runs good. Good on gas.
$800.00. OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


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Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with

Your Individual Logo

For just pennies a day.
Call today,

755-5440.


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does riot sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


F For-Mre-Dtail Cal




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