Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text







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Friday, April 2, 2010 www.lakecityreporter.com


CCSO: Drugs fuel beating


Deputies find
two suspects
in home.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office detectives
are investigating aThursday
afternoon robbery which
they have labeled as drug-


related.
The incident occurred
about 4:30 p.m. Thursday
at 1412 NW Moore Road,
north of Lake City.
According to sheriff's
office reports, a victim was
beaten during the robbery.
"Operation Safe Street
units were familiar with the
location and suspects," said
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office public information


officer Sgt. Ed Seifert. "We
responded to the residence
where one suspect was
taken into custody."
He said a thorough search
of the home yielded a hid-
ing spot where authorities
found that suspect - the
second of two who deputies
were.searching for-Jessie
Beeman.
"The second suspect
(Beeman) had sustained a


serious stab wound prior to
this incident," Seifert said.
"EMS responded and he is
being flown to a trauma hos-
pital. We will file for a warrant
on the second suspect"
A first suspect was
arrested for robbery in con-
nection with the incident.
Authorities did not 'release
the name of that suspect or
any additional information
by press time.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County EMS technicians (left) prepare to pick up
a man involved in a robbery Thursday afternoon while a
Columbia County Sheriff's Office deputy takes statements.


Baorr History restored'


moves


forward

County officials
approve $674K
counteroffer.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County offi-
cials took another step
toward making the Bascom
Norris Connector Road a
reality during Thursday
night's county commission
meeting by bargaining for
land that will be used on the
property.
Board members approved
a counteroffer of $674,000
to Lake Jeffrey Land Trust
in the attempt to purchase
a necessary parcel for the
Bascom Norris Road con-
nector project.
Officials say the property
is required in relation to the
Bascom Norris Connector
Road project being com-
pleted.
The county reviewed two
appraisals on the property:
* Candler Appraisal
Services Inc., listed as
$653,000
* Appraisal Services
Company, listed as
$696,300
However, the county pro-
posed a $674,000 counterof-
fer, which was unanimously
adopted by commissioners.
Barbara Lemley of Lake,
City said she thought the
board should "compromise"
regarding the land purchase
land said she "saw no reason
to pay more."
According to county
records, the county received
ROAD continued on 3A


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Jim Kauffman gets on one of his John Deere antique tractors Thursday afternoon while setting up for the 22nd Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine Show at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park in White Springs. The event will take place
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today through Sunday.

Tractor show displays antique collections


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS
ome people collect
tractors. Some
people collect
engines. Some
people collect-
chainsaws. If man made it,
man collects it," said Jim
Kauffman as he looked at
a small portion of his John
Deere tractor exhibit
Kauffman, a Fernandina
Beach resident, is in
White Springs as part
of the Department of
Environmental Protection's
Stephen Foster Folk


Culture Center State Park
22nd Annual Antique
Tractor and Engine show
this weekend.
And he is not the only
person who believes in that
collection theory: People
from around the area and
nation pulled out their
' antique tractors or engines
for the annual show.
As part of the event,
antique tractors and farm-
ing equipment reflect-
ing 200 years of rural
American history will
be on display. Events
Exhibitors are admit-
ted free of charge, while
admission to the public is


$5 for a vehicle with up to
eight passengers.
Kauffman has been into
collecting and restoring
tractors for about 30 years.
Although he has more than
25 restored tractors at his
home, he brought green
and yellow, John Deere
tractors si his exhibit
for this year's show. The
display tractors are from
the early 1930s to the late-
1940s.
"Each time I go to a
show I try to set up a dif-
ferent display," he said.
"Last time I was here, we
had red tractors, this time
we have green ones. Next


time it may be orange
ones. I have quite a few
tractors I've restored over
the last 30-40 years."
Kauffman, also who col-
lects antique chainsaws
- his collection numbers
close to 400 - travels to
other states showing off
his tractors and chainsaws.
He said he enjoys talking
and sharing his informa-
tion with children and peo-
ple who remember tractors
from another era.
"It's the only way to
share this information with
the younger generation,"
TRACTOR continued on 3A


Margaret Wuest

Activist,

former

editor

dies at 76

Margaret Wuest
was a community
advocate.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The community was
at the heart of Margaret
Wuest, a community activist
and former society editor
for the Lake City Reporter.
Wuest, 76, died Thursday
at the Good Samaritan
Center in Dowling Park.
"She wrote in a posi-
tive vein," said Deborah
Freeman: a longtime friend
and Columbia County Senior
Services director, about
Wuest's newspaper work.
"That was Margaret. She
wrote the good to promote
the whole community."
Over the years, Wuest
was also active in promot-
ing several -aspects of the
community.
"I don't think there was
anything about Lake City
she didn't love," Freeman
said.
Developing Senior
Services was one of Wuest's
WUEST continued on 3A


Pregnancy Center to hold Walk/Run n


Proceeds to go
toward clinic
development.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityrepbrter. corn
The Pregnancy Care
Center is hoping to make
a strong comment about
the importance of life at
its annual Walk/Run
Challenge, but it's going
to take the support of the
community.
"How wonderful would it
be on that Saturday if we


have 1,000 people walk for
life?" said Donna Sandage,
executive director. "What a
statement that would make
in Lake City."
The three-mile chal-
lenge begins 9 a.m. May 1
at Olustee Park. There is
no registration fee, but par-
ticipants are asked to raise
money through pledges.
"We walk in support of
life," she said. "We are pro-
life."
The center is a nonprofit
ministry that assists preg-
nant women. It is volunteer-
based and averages 150 cli-


ents a month.
"We have resource for
moms that can't provide
adequately for their babies,"
Sandage said.
Clients can meet with
counselors, attend parent-
ing classes and obtain-baby
items. The center operates
through donations.
Coming in May is a new
component: a medical clin-
ic. With that addition, the
center will be able to per-
form sonograms.
Proceeds from the chal-
lenge will help with the
operating expenses for the


clinic and the center over-
all, Sandage said.
Aiming at increasing
those proceeds, this year
the walk/run is incorporat-
ingia church challenge.
Churches can sign up
a team, and the one that
raises the most money will
get a trophy for a year, she
said. Churches will be able
to compete each year for
the trophy,
Individual prizes will also
be awarded for different
amounts of money.
CHALLENGE continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Donna Sandage, executive director of the Pregnancy Care
Center, stands near a sonogram machine on Thursday.
Proceeds from an upcoming May 1 Walk/Run Challenge will
help fund a medical clinic the center will soon have that will
be able to perform sonograms.


S-- 4


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 75S-5445
SFax: 752-9400


- P X'~~ ~ ~ ~ A-


8 - 5
85 ?2
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


--- Opin~on ..


....... 4A


Local.... .. .... . . 5A
Obituaries . . . ..3A
... Advice & Comics ... 3C
Puzzles .. ..... .. 2B


TODAY IN
LOCAL
Students skip
spring break.


COMING
SATURDAY
'Faith and Values'
for your weekend.











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


A . Thursday:
Afternoon: 4-9-8
Evening: 8-2-4


7 ' . . Thursday:
"' . Afternoon: 3-9-5-0
Evening: 0-3-4-5


-FLORDA

Wednesday:
23-29-32-34-41-44 x4


ezmatch .
Wednesday:
11-14-20-22-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Hudson joins Weight Watchers, as rep


NEW YORK
ennifer Hudson didn't gain a
huge amount of weight when
she was pregnant with her
son, but it was enough to
make her do a double-take
when she saw a picture of
herself.
."I didn't realize it was me," the
singer and actress said Thursday. "I
was like, "Who? ... Oh, my God, this
is me.' And now when I look back,
wow, look at the difference from
then to now."
Hudson, a former "American
Idol" finalist who won a best sup-
porting actress Academy Award
for "Dreamgirls," has lost the baby
weight and more, and she says it's
because of Weight Watchers - for
which she is the new spokeswoman.
Hudson said she has always been
happy with her curves but after she
gave birth to David Daniel Otunga
Jr. last August she felt the need to
take control of her body and her eat-
ing habits.
She said that her lifestyle change
has even rubbed off on her fiance,
David Otunga, who has recently
been wrestling for World Wrestling
Entertainment.
"Now he's in the habit of writing
down what he's eating," she said.
"He's doing weigh-ins. He's super
healthy, and he's a bodybuilder type,
but he is inspired by it."

Fey, Phillippe, Sidibe are
'SNL hosts for April
NEW YORK - Tina Fey, Ryan
Phillippe and Gabourey Sidibe will
be taking turns as "Saturday Night
Live" hosts this month.
NBC said Thursday that Fey, for-
mer "SNL" cast member and head
writer, is hosting the April 10. show '
and will be joined by pop star Justin
Bieber.


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, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jennifer Hudson poses at a news conference Thursday after debuting her national
advertising campaign with Weight Watchers in New York.


Phillippe is set to host the April
17 show with Ke$ha as the musical
guest. On April 24, "Precious" star
and Oscar nominee
Sidibe will take on
hosting duties and
the band MGMT is
to perform. . .-
Fey, the star and:
creator of NBC's "30
Fey Rock," is making her,
second appearance
as host, while Phillippe and Sidibe
are first-timers.
Phillippe is in the upcoming film
"MacGruber," an adaptation of the
"SNL" sketch about a hapless spe-
cial-ops man, played by Will Forte. ,,

Jarvis joins Saturday
'Early Show' on CBS
NEW YORK - Rebecca Jarvis is
joining the Saturday edition of CBS'


"Eatly Show" as its news reader.
The network announced Thursday
she also will serve as business and
economics correspondent for CBS
News.
Jarvis comes from CNBC, where
she reported stock, currency and
commodities market
news. She also con-
tributed to MSNBC
and NBC News
programs, and regu-
larly guest-anchored
"Closing Bell,"
Jarvis "Squawk on the.
Street" and "Power
Lunch."
Jarvis previously wrote for pub-
lications including Crain's Chicago
Business and Business 2.0. She also
has worked in investment banking
and foreign currency trading. A"
native of Minneapolis, she graduated
from the University of Chicago.
M Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


" Actress Rita Gam is 82.
" Actress Sharon Acker is
75.
" Singer Leorr Russell is 68.
" Jazz musician Larry
Coryell is 67.
" Actress Linda Hunt is 65.
" Singer Emmylou Harris is
63.
* Social critic and author
Camille Paglia is 63.


Daily Scripture


* Actress Pamela Reed is
61.
* Rock musician Dave
Robinson (The Cars) is 57.
* Country singer Buddy
Jewell is 49.
* Actor Christopher Meloni
is 49.
* Singer Keren Woodward
(Bananarama) is 49.
a Actor Clark Gregg is 48.


"The fool says in his heart,
'There is no God.' They
are corrupt, their deeds
are vile; there is no one who
does good."

- Psalm 14:1



Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Asso6iated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U:S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits willbe issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks . ................ $83.46
Rates indude 7%/ sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Officials release
IDs of bodies
FORT LAUDERDALE
- Authorities have tenta-
tively identified the bodies
found in an algae-covered
minivan recovered from an
Alligator Alley canal as a
Tampa woman and her two
daughters.
The Broward Sheriff's
Office reports that
homicide detectives, the
county's medical examiner
and a Florida Gulf Coast
University anthropologist
met Thursday morning.
They agreed the bodies
were likely 27-year-old
Nelta Jacques and her.
daughters, ages 7 and 5,
who disappeared in 1999
as they drove from Fort
Lauderdale to their Tampa
home. Officials will still
have to wait several weeks
for DNA confirmation.
BSO divers were
on a training mission
Wednesday when they
found the van in 18 feet of
water near a rest area.
The investigation-contin-
ues, but detectives do not
suspect foul play.

Sheriff: $1M in
cars, drugs stolen
NEW PORTRICHEY
- Authorities say 12 men
have been indicted in
federal court for stealing
vehicles and prescription
drugs from the Tampa Bay
area and unloading the'
items in Alabama.
Pasco County Sheriff
Bob White said Thursday
the men are accused of
stealing more than $1
million in cars, construc-
tion equipment, lawn care
equipment and a litany of
prescription drugs taken
from pharmacies.
The drugs involved
included oxycodone,
morphine, methadone,
amphetamine, hydrocodo-
ne, Viagra and high blood
pressure medication.


MOSTMOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY


HI84-L054 Hi84L56 Hi85L057 H184L058


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Officers track inmate to hotel
Marion County Sheriff's deputies and SWAT team mem-
bers, who believe they have located a robbery suspect,
surround the Two Rivers Inn in Dunnellon on Wednesday.
Sheriff's deputies tracked escaped Alabama jail inmate Justin
Williamson to the hotel after he reportedly robbed a woman
outside a nearby restaurant.


Court issues new Shooting suspect
mediator rules taunted, teased


TALLAHASSEE - The
Florida Supreme Court is
cracking down on the mar-
keting practices of media-
tors -- referees who help
resolve civil or commercial
disputes outside of the for-
mal judicial system.
In an opinion issued
Thursday, the court
stated that former judges
shouldn't use the pres-
tige of their former
offices to advance private
interests.
The new rules prohibit
mediators who previously
served as judges from
using the title "judge" in
advertisements or other
marketing materials.
Former judges also must
not appear in judicial robes
in ads for mediation ser-
vices.
Former judges are
allowed to mention their
experience in biographical
sketches.


TARPON SPRINGS
- Friends of the 41-year-
old woman who allegedly
shot and killed a former
co-worker at a supermar-
ket told a newspaper that
the woman was teased and
taunted at work.
A woman who work at
the Publix supermarket
told the St. Petersburg
Times that Arunya Rouch
was teased at work.
The Tarpon Springs
Police Department said
Rouch killed 40-year-old
Gregory Janowski in the
Publix parking lot at about
noon Tuesday.
Still armed, Rouch went
in the store and then fired
at officers who came in
after her. She was shot at
least twice and is still in
the hospital.
A Publix spokeswoman
said Rouch was fired
Tuesday morning.
M Associated Press


I ' I' ' S S. 'S


Tallahassee *
84/53
Pensacola * "
76/60 Panama City
77/58


'Valdosta
86/54 * ack
Lake City 8
85/52
, Gainesville * Da
..85/53
3 Ocala
'83/52
lOdan
85/5
Tampa ,
84/6-1


Ft. Myers
84/61 0

Key We
79/6E


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


82
47
78
52
91 in 2005
33 in 2003


0.00"
0.00"
11.66"
0.12"
11.28"


7a Friday 1p 7p at







Fortetemn "Flsme
- Forecsted tenpertur "Feelslike"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


ksonville
3/54


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach


Ft. Lauderdale
ytona Beach Fort Myers
79 ,58 Gainesville
* Jacksonville
Key West
do Cape Canaveral LaKey West
57 75J59 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
79/67 S Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
81/68 * Pensacola
Naples * Tallahassee
80/62 Miami Tampa
80/68 Valdosta


7:19 a.m.
7:50 p.m.
7:17 a.m.
7:51 p.m.


W. Palm Beach


VER
10n
To


MOON ult
Moonrise today rad
Moonset today 9:28 a.m. for
Moonrise tom. 12:02 a.m. to
Moonset tom. 10:19 a.m.


April April April April
6 14 21 28
Last New First Full .




6 On this date in
turday 1990, a storm
system produced
snow and gale
force winds across
northern Michigan,
with 8.3 inches of
snow reported at
Marquette.



teperaturein


10

umtesto blm
day's
ra-violet
jiation risk
r the area on
scale from 0
10+.


Saturday
76/62/s
80/58/s
81/69/s
86/60/s
84/55/pc
82/55/s
79/66/s
84/54/pc
82/69/s
82/62/s
84/53/pc
83/59/s
76/59/pc
74/60/pc
83/52/pc
82/62/s
83/57/s
80/67/s


Sunday
77/66/s
,82/61/s
80/68/s
86/61/s
84/57/pc
83/58/pc
76/63/s
84/56/pc
81/68/s
84/64/s
84/56/pc
84/57/s
74/61/s
76/59/pc
83/55/s
82/64/s
82/56/pc
80/66/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


( a Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics � 2010 Weather Central
*' LLC, Madison, Wis.
t. www.weatherpubllsher.com





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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


SCounty could explore regional utility


By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter.com

The county made
advancements Thursday
toward exploration of a
regional utility.
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners approved a
motion for county staff to
prepare a request for pro-
posals on the cast of a study
that would determine the
rate of water for a possible
regional utility.
During the meet-
ing, Commissioner Jody
DuPree said he met with
city officials to discuss
the possibility of pursuing
a regional utility. DuPree
said the city may not be
interested in the utility, but
said the county could do
the study - in addition to
a feasibility study - at its


own cost.
"Do we want to look at
a feasibility study, under-
standing that when we do it,
it may not mean anything?"
asked DuPree.
DuPree said the cost of
the two studies together
could "be really expensive,"
and Commissioner Dewey
Weaver made the motion
to see what the rate of the
study would be.
Also Thursday, the board
approved a proposal td
renovate the supervisor of
election's office space for
more than $44,000.
Weaver said the board
could not afford the cost to
rent additional space, but
the proposed renovation
would take care of space
issues.
"That's a one-time cost,"
he said, "and will be able
to meet the supervisor of


election's needs."
Renovations would
include changes to the
reception area, the removal
of some existing walls and a
new canvassing room.
"All this work can be per-
-formed by staff we already
have," Weaver said.
Discussion on
Emergency Medical
Services in the county
continued Thursday, and
Commissioner Stephen
Bailey asked county staff
to draft a letter on the
county's "position" for city
councilmembers.
"This is a battle I'm tired
of fighting," Williams said.
In other items, the board
discussed a revised policy
on local bid preference. No
action wis taken on the
policy, but will be on the
agenda for the next regular
meeting, April 15.


ROAD: Project now near final phase


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Donna Sandage, Pregnancy Care Center executive director, holds up the T-shirt participants
will receive if they pledge $150 at the Pregnancy Care Center Walk Run Challenge. Team's
are forming now for the May 1 event.


CHALLENGE: Raised $20K in Live Oak
Continued From Page 1A


"We're real excited about
life," Sandage said. 'We
want everybody excited
about life to come out.
"People look forward to
it," she said. "People have
been asking about it."
Sandage believes the cen-


ter can raise at least $20,000
from the challenge.
"We raised $20,000 at
the Live Oak walk/run
in October," she said. "I
believe we can do it in Lake
City just like we did there.".
Call the Pregnancy Care


Center at (386) 755-0058 for
sponsor and information
forms.
"We want Lake City of
be a part of what's happen-
ing," Sandage said. "Now
is the time to stand up for
life."


WUEST: Worked to help the elderly
Continued From Page 1A


biggest projects. She and
Freeman discussed what
they would like to put in
a senior center - if given
the chance - about 12
years ago. That talk mate-
rialized into the present-day
agency.
"She loved senior adults,"
Freeman said. "She wanted
them to have the best."
Until Wuest became too
sick, she would come and
help out at senior services,
the director said.
She loved this place,"
Freeman said. "She was a
big part of what we'do here.
She was always willing to do
anything for this agency."
Wuest was also a-cham-
pion for Alligator Lake, said
Steven Dopp of the North
Central Florida Regional
Planning Council. The coun-
ty purchased the then-pri-
vately owned property with
the help of a grant the plan-
ning council and Suwannee
River Water Management


District coordinated.
"She did a series of arti-
cles that basically explained
what was going on the with
lake," he said. "It helped
garner a lot of public sup-
port."
When it came to promot-
ing the arts in Columbia
County, Wuest would not
compromise, said Tony
Buzzella, a friend.
"Her firm belief was that
music and art really had an
affect on the soul," he said.
"She believed all citizens,
young and old alike, should
have access to arts. She
felt culture in our society
was very important and she
devoted her life to promot-
ing cultural events, and for
that I'm most'forever grate-
ful."
"Any time there was a
cultural event of some sort,
there would be Margaret,"
Buzzella said. "She was a
real treasure for Columbia
County."


Wuest showed a person
can make a difference in
the quality of life in a quiet
and dignifiedway and with-
out being loud or aggres-
sive, said Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council exec-
utive director.
"Once Margaret set her
mind to a project she was
pretty tenacious about it,"
he said.
She and Campbell also
worked together at the
Reporter.
"She was terrific and
extremely kind," he said.
"She put up with the rest of
us in the news department.
We were prone to play
pranks, and she grinned
and put up with us.
"She was not someone
who particularly sought
out recognition and the
limelight," Campbell said.
"She seemed to prefer
more operating behind the
scenes."


Continued From Page 1A
two appraisals on 21.76
acres of land owned by Lake
Jeffery Land Trust, located
south of Lake Jeffery Road
and west of Bascom Norris
Road.
The Bascom Norris
Connector road was only
seven-tenths of a mile away
from ' being completed
with the county's previous
plans. '
The fifth and final phase
of the roadway that is left to
be completed is the portion
of Bascom Norris north
of Walmart, just south of


the New Millennium Corp.
building.
Funding for the Bascom
Norris Connector Road
project has come from a
multitude of sources.
One of the chief sources
was a 5 cent gas tax that was
imposed for five years and
ended in December 2005.
State funding and interest
,earnings on the gas-tax
revenue that was collected
added to the coffers for the
project.
In 2006, the projected
cost of the entire project


was listed as $16,002,606
and it was fully funded in
that economy.
The' Bascom Norris
Connector Road is a multi-
phase project.
Of the project cost, the
5 cent gas tax generated
nearly $9.9 million of the
total cost. Approximately
$6.5 million, was received
from the state as grant
funding.
In 2006 the projected
cost of the final phase of
the roadwork was listed as
$6,994,200.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Bob Weeks (left) gets registration information from Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State
Park employee Pat Cromer to sign-up for this weekend's 22nd Annual Antique Tractor and
Engine Show.


TRACTOR: From '40s on display


Continued From Page 1
he said. "I enjoy showing
the tractors because of the
people that you talk to. The
people are usually, as a
general rule, real nice and
most of them are a rural-
type of people who attend
shows like this."
He said people often ask
questions about the trac-


tors and his displays and
he enjoys this teaching
aspect of the shows.
Bob Weeks, of.
Newberry, was attending
his first antique tractor and
engine show as an exhibi-
tor.
Weeks brought a 1948
McCormick Farmall Cub


tractor-to the event and
will be showing how a
buzz saw attachment on
the tractor was used years
ago.
"I've been here as a
spectator many times, but
I decided to bring my trac-
tor this year and I'm glad I
did," he said.


OBITUARIES


Carl Edward Burkey
Carl Edward Burkey, 76, passed
away March 25, 2010 in the
Houston VA. Hospital from
medical com-
plications. Carl
was born on
August 1, 1933 . .
in Lakeland,
FL and graduated from Lake-
land Senior High School. Carl
is preceded in death by his par-
ents Robert and Louise Burkey.
He is survived by son Robert of
Texas, daughter Lidia of Califor-
nia, 3 granddaughters and I great
granddaughter. Carl was a Navy
Corpsman during Korea, attend-
ed college in California, worked
in the Chemical and Nuclear
industry all over the world and
finally returned to Lake City, FL
to start several businesses. Carl
was active in the NRA, Ameri-
can Legion, VFW, Moose Lodge,
Lions, and numerous shooting
clubs. Carl loved fishing, hunting
and all things related to marks-
manship. Memorial services
will be at Grace Community
Church in Houston, TX on Fri-
day April 16, 2010 at 1pm with
placement of his cremains in the
Houston National Cemetery in
Houston, TX. In lieu of flowers


Flo Co[veriing Idll

visit


please consider a contributions
to American Legion Post # 490.

Margaret H. Wuest
Mrs. Margaret H. Wuest, 76, of
Lake City died Thursday, April
01, 2010 at the Good Samaritan
Center in Dowling Park follow-
ing a lengthy illness. A native of
North Carolina, Mrs. Wuest had
been a resident of Lake City for
the past 45 years. She.was retired
from the Lake City Reporter, en-
joyed her grandchildren, travel-
ing, and photography. Mrs. Wuest
was a member of the Hatchbend
Apostolic Church. She was pre-
ceded in death by her daugh-
ter, Yulonda Leguire in 2001.
Mrs. Wuest is survived by her
husband of 19 years, Harry
West, Sr. of Lake City; grand-
daughter, Lindi Johnson (Jes-
se); great grandchildren, Keir-
ston Johnson, Amaris Johnson,
and Angel Johnson of Jackson-
ville, FL; step children, Harry
Wuest Jr. (Martha) of Atlanta,
GA; Ed Wuest of Orlando, FL,
Cathy Stromberg (Russell) of
Tallahassee, FL, Kristie Davis



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of Goldsboro, NC; step grand-
son, Gary Wuest, Orlando, FL;'
brother, Gene Batts (Barbara)
of NC, sisters, Betty Hobbs of
NC, Wanda Powell (JC) of NC;
son, Lyndon Leguire (Sharon),
& daughter Beverly Reed (Don)
both of Lake City, FL, eleven
grandchildren and 15 great
grand children also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs.
Wuest will be conducted at
11:00 A.M. 'Saturday, April
3, 2010 at Gateway-For-
est Lawn Memorial Chapel.
Interment services will be
held at 2:00 P.M. Saturday


afternoon at Hatchbend Ap-
ostolic Church Cemetery in
Hatchbend. Visitation with the
family will be held from 5:00-
7:00 Friday evening at the fu-
neral home. Arrangements are
under the direction of GATE-
WAY-FOREST LAWN FU-
NERAL HOME, 3596 S. HWY
441, Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www. gatewayforestlawn. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


V 3R ANNIVERSARY [s


t CELEBRATION Y.
Saturday, April 3rd from 9am-1 pm
Live Radio Remote * Refreshments * Give-A-Wags
GRAND PRIZE DRAWING
Will be held for a
Romantic weekend at
Fairfield Inn & Suites Lake City
386-755-0030 4196 West U.S. Highway 90, Ste 113


HEPARIN USERS

HI MAY; (APPLY"T YOU!
HAVE YOU OR A LOVED ONE SUFFERED A SUDDEN, UNEXPLAINED
DECLINE IN HEALTH? IF SO, IT COULD BE DUE TO THE USE OF
ulap �--j J
Call me to discuss your case: (386) 752-5222
In late 2007 & early 2008. Eco Cfa-m=inated Chi4ne�se �He-arin was sold to
hospitals. clinics & pharmacies throughout America. including our local area.
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Page Editor: Allison Candreva, 754-0424














OPINION


Friday, April 2, 2010


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Pirate's


greed


turns


them in
G iven the disdain for
dogs in the Muslim
world, it's quite
possible the Somali
pirates are unfamil-
iar with a canine conundrum
often cited in the West: When
a dog is chasing a car, what
would he do if he caught it?
Somewhere around midnight
at sea between Kenya and the
Seychelles, a band of Somali
pirates spied a ship whose silhou-
ette in the gloom promised great
size and thus great ransom.
The three pirates in the raid-
ing skiff set off after the ship
and opened fire preparatory
to boarding it. The ship was
indeed large and would have
been worth much ransom, but,
alas, it was thoroughly unsuit-
able for these particular pirates
because what this particular
ship was doing was hunting
these particular pirates.
The ship was the USS
-Nichols, a guided-missile frig-
ate, and it quickly captured the
three pirates and sank their
skiff. Then it hunted down their
mother ship and sank that, too,
after first taking into custody
two more pirates.
Why would. the pirates take
on a ship with enough fire-
power aboard to take out a
small country? A piracy expert
consulted by The Associated
Press speculated that the pirates
were young, unsophisticated
and greedy. Big ship equals
big money. And, except for the
three pirates killed after they
had the bad judgment to tangle
with the USS Bainbridge, piracy
has been rather an easy racket.
Customarily, the five pirates
would be turned over to Kenya
for trial, but Kenya says its
court system is swamped and
that it's time for other countries
to share the burden.
* Scripps Howard News Service

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Good Friday,
April 2, the 92nd day of
2010. There are 273 days left
in the year.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Colpmbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!".
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers..
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the.Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


President George
W. Bush instituted
it and three years
after it was formally
ended, a federal judge has ruled
that a program that allowed
the National Security Agency
to wiretap domestic communi-
cations without warrants was
illegal.
The 1978 Foreign Intelligence
Surveillance Act requires the
government to apply to a secret
court for wiretap warrants in
national security cases.
But post-9/11, it was the
Bush White House's view that
the president's wartime powers
allowed him to ignore or over-
ride laws that the administration
believed interfered with the
battle against terrorism.
Bush ordered up the Terrorist
Surveillance Program that gave
NSA virtually unlimited powers
to intercept domestic electronic


ww'wv.lakecityreporterxcom


Why so much violence?


We know about
the angry
outbursts
against (mainly
Democratic)
lawmakers as Congress-finished
work last week on health care
reform legislation. We know
that protesters spat on at least
one African-American member
of Congress, yelled the "n" word
at another, and used homopho-
bic slurs against a third. We
know lawmakers' home offices
have suffered smashed and
bullet-riddled windows. The
FBI has been brought in to
advise members of Congress
how to deal with threats not
only against their own lives, but
against the lives of their families
and children.
What we're less clear on is
why this is happening and why
now. Most of us would like to
\believe this is a case of first
impression. We cling to the uto-
pian vision of a peaceful citizen-
ry that eschews vitriol. But as
philosopher George Santayana
wrote, "Those who forget histo-
ry are condemned to repeat it."
A cursory glance at American
political history reveals it is rife
with violence.
The first president of four '
presidents assassinated was
Abraham Lincoln, whose fabled
murder was committed by
* angry Confederate John Wilkes
Booth in 1865. Sixteen years
later, a deranged, disappointed
office-seeker murdered James
Garfield, without an apparent
logical motive.
The 1901 assassination of
William McKinley was com-
mitted by a self-described
anarchist. The anarchist move-
ment was a furious frenzy of
immigrants and low-income
Americans reacting violently to
sudden riches for a few lucky
industrialists during the era of
industrialization.


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com

Finally, Lee Harvey Oswald,
designated by the Warren
Commission as a mentally ill
loner, killed President John F.
Kennedy in 1963.
So the "movement mania" of
the type we're seeing venom-
ously unfurl today, is hardly
without precedent.
Historian Richard Hofstadter
described what he desig-
nated, 'The Paranoid Style in
American Politics" in a 1964
article in Harper's Magazine:
"American politics has often
been an arena for angry minds.
In recent years we have seen
angry minds at work mainly
among extreme right-wingers,
who have now demonstrated in
the Goldwater movement how
much political leverage can be
got out of the animosities and
passions of a small minority. But
behind this I believe there is
a style of mind that is far from
new and that is not necessarily
right wing. I call it the paranoid
style simply because no other
word adequately evokes the
sense of heated exaggeration,
suspiciousness, and conspirato-
rial fantasy that I have in mind
.... The paranoid style is an old
and recurrent phenomenon in
our public life which has been
frequently linked with move-
ments of suspicious discontent."
Hofstadter calls 1950's
McCarthyism, and turn of the
(20th) century populism two
angry, radical, political move-


ments led by right-wing minori-
ties who terrorized peaceable
majorities. There are many
more such examples through-
out American history, predeces-
sors of today's vocal Tea Party
crowd.
So while anger-driven political
movements are not new, that is
not to say that there is nothing
new about today's venomous
attacks on lawmakers. Clearly,
the media amplify the anger.
When someone watching a pro-
test online or on TV sees other
people threatening politicians,
that makes more people think
it's ok. Angry media figures
(Glen Beck, Rush Limbaugh, et.
al.) make matters worse by rais-
ing the temperature in order to
gain attention and ratings.
Some politicians crossed over
the line as well. One example
is when Texas Republican
Rep. Randy Neugebauer called
another pro-life leader a "baby
killer."
Another is when Sarah Palin
urged supporters to "reload" to
fight health care:
While Tea Party violence or
racial or homophobic slurs are
clearly unacceptable, that does
not mean Tea Party protesters
don't have some valid politi-
cal points. Health care reform,
regardless what Democratic
sponsors say, is going to drive
up expenses and therefore taxes
at a time when we are already
suffering massive deficits.
It's impossible to extinguish
irrational anger, but not impos-
sible to quell rational anger.
The sooner Democrats and
Republicans figure out how to
bring angry protest to a peace-
ful resolution, the better off
we'll all be.

* Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


communication.
In 2004 the Treasury
Department proscribed as a
supporter of terrorism the
Oregon branch of Al Haramain,
a Saudi-based Islamic charity.
Sometime after that declaration,
the charity and its two American
lawyers began to suspect that
they were being wiretapped by
the government. They sued.
The case proceeded because
the government inadvertently
disclosed the wiretapping,
which the charity's lawyers later
confirmed from public sources.
In similar cases, the Bush
administration frequently
invoked the "state-secrets
privilege" that calls for a case to
be thrown out if allowing it to
proceed would endanger vital
national secrets.
For the first time the Obama
administration invoked state
secrets, arguing that the privi-
lege overrode the requirements


of FISA.
The Obama administration
gave federal district Judge
Vaughn Walker a classified-
description of the secrets it felt
were at risk. Vaughn was appar-
ently unimpressed and ruled
the wiretapped lawyers and the
charity could pursue damage
claims against the government.
Walker ruled that "FISA takes
precedence over the state-secrets
privilege" and then narrowed it
by adding: "in this case."
More importantly, he added
that the unfettered executive
branch discretion claimed by
the Bush administration - and
now perhaps by the Obama
administration - have "obvi-
ous potential for governmental
abuse and overreaching."
That's why we have laws like
FISA on ihe books and why
the government should respect
them.
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Jose De La Isla
joseisla3@yahoo.com



Torture


present


in Cuba

(n a tip from a
press officer, I
was paired with El
Heraldo's interna-
tional page editor
Fanny Riva Palacio to inter-
view poet Maria Elena Cruz
Varela, a recently freed Cuban
political prisoner. That was in
1994, when I was in Mexico
City to report on that nation's
presidential election.
It was Mexico's first
presidential election after an
extremely controversial one
in 1988. Both U.S. parties
- Republican and Democrat
- had sent observers to serve
as part of an international del-
egation.
After tailgating a pro-democ-
racy leader who had opposed
the Pinochet dictatorship in
Chile, I was impressed how
the arriving observer was
greeted like a rock star. He
shook hands with people wait-
ing to vote. "Como 'taz? Como
'taz?" he greeted, sounding
more South Texan than South
American to me.
Voters told me they wel-
comed the attention, that it
assured a fair process.
At the Hotel Maria Isabel,
Riva Palacio and I set up our
recorders in a sitting area
between the lobby and the
hotel administrative offices and
the press officer introduced us
to Cruz Varela.
Cruz Varela had been
released from Cuba that week
and, sponsored by the Jimmy
Carter Center, was sent to
Mexico to observe the elec-
tions. She had been a leader
of an artists' opposition group
called Criterio Alternativo.
In'1991, it had published a
manifesto calling for reforms,
national debates and free elec-
tions. She was given a two-
year prison sentence and kept
under house arrest.
Cruz Varela told us about
having been tortured. Her
words seemed at first like
a poet's hyperbole. "What
do you mean you are not
here?"
"My heart is in Cuba," she
said. "I died in Havana."
When two armed men in
uniform marched through the
lobby, a look of horror came
over her face. I felt I was in a
movie flashback until I realized
those were just armored car
personnel with rifles coming
to get the receipts from the
administrative office.
After the interview, Fanny
and I, in a walk around the
block, worked up the courage
to ask each other what we had
witnessed. We agreed we saw
the woman seated, with the
look of horror in her face, and
her spirit leaping out of her
body.
Nearly a decade later, in
the spring of 2003, the Cuban
government arrested and tried
75 human rights defenders,
journalists and librarians. They
were given sentences up to
28 years in prison. Ladies in
White formed two weeks after
the arrests. Each Sunday after
Mass at St. Rita's in Havana,
they form a ritual procession
to a nearby park.
The mobilization signifies
the next generation is going
to respond. They use as their .
slogan, "This is not a Cuban


issue; it's a human issue."
* Josi de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Government should respect privacy laws












Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


FWC lifts boating restrictions


From staff reports

The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission has lifted
boating restrictions on the
Santa Fe River that were
initiated because of recent
high water levels.
Santa Fe River floodwa-
ters at the Three Rivers
gauge fell below 17 feet,
allowing regulators to deac-
tivate boating restrictions
that have applied on the
river since Jan. 29.
The FWC lifted the idle-


speed, no-wake restriction
on Zone 5, which runs from
River Rise in O'Leno State
Park west to the confluence
of the Suwannee River.
This 32-mile segment is an
idle-speed, no-wake zone
as long as the Santa Fe
River is at 17 feet, as indi-
cated on the Three Rivers
gauge, where flood stage
is 19 feet.
"The Suwannee River
Water Management District
verified the water level has
fallen below the required 17
feet at Three Rivers," said


Capt Roy Brown, area super-
visor at the FWC's Lake City
office. "There are now no
active idle-speed, no-wake
zones on the river system."
An idle-speed, no-wake
restriction means a vessel
must proceed at a speed
no greater than what is
required to maintain steer-
age way and headway in
that river zone. At no time
is, any vessel required to
proceed so slowly that the
operator is unable to con-
trol it or anything it may be
towing.


I


- , -
..- ...- -,,. - ." ,' . :"' - '-"" " " " ... . "' '--- . ' '


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Beachgoers walk a dog at Sullivans Island, S.C., on Wednesday. Some island residents worry
offshore oil exploration announced by President Barack.Obama Wednesday could mean spills
that would damage the beach.

Offshore Atlantic drilling divides


By STEVE SZKOTAK
Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. -
Environmentalists called
President Barack Obama's
decision to open por-
tions of the East Coast to
oil and gas exploration a
"wholesale assault" on the
oceans, while some coastal
residents and lawmakers
applauded the idea of cheap
energy and jobs that oil
platforms off their beaches
could bring.
Environmental groups
from Maryland to Florida
said. Wednesday's decision
would exact a high envi-
ronmental cost while slak-
ing only a sip's worth of
the nation's huge thirst for
energy.
"We're appalled that the
president is unleashing a
wholesale assault on the
oceans," said Jacqueline
Savitz of Oceana, " an
environmental group.
"Expanding offshore drill-
ing is the wrong move if
the Obama administration
is serious about improving
energy security, creating
lasting jobs and averting
climate change."
Obama's plan modifies a


moratorium' that for more
than 20 years has limited
drilling along coastal areas
other than the Gulf of
Mexico. It 'allows new oil
drilling off Virginia's shore-
line and considers it for'a
large chunk of the Atlantic
seaboard.
Shrimpers welcomed the
idea of filling up their tanks
for less and pointed out
that oil rigs haven't harmed
their industry in the Gulf
of Mexico. Many in. the
tourism industry were less
enthused, worrying vaca-
tioners would shun their
area if there were ever a
spill.
Reaction among the
region's political leaders
was mixed. Some said
it would help ease the
nation's reliance on foreign
reserves.
"The president's deci-
sion to, allow energy explo-
ration off Virginia's coast
will mean thousands of new
jobs, hundreds of millions
in new state revenue and
tens of billions of dollars
in economic impact for the
commonwealth," said Gov.
Bob McDonnell in Virginia,
which is first in line to begin


drilling that wouldn't begin
for at least five years.
To the north, the idea
of expanded drilling
was denounced by U.S.
'Sens. Benjamin' Cardin
and Barbara Mikulski,
Maryland Democrats. The
Governors of the Carolinas
also said they have reser-
vations.
"Offshore drilling brings
with it great concerns
- from the potential of oil
spills to the protection of
our defense facilities locat-
ed along the coast - for
our national security. The
coastal states that are on
the front lines need to have
to a say' when it comes
to decisions that have an
impact far beyond one
state's coastline," Mikulski
said.
Many residents along
the East Coast were ambiv-
.alent, even some who live
in fishing villages or near
beaches.
"If they found it, and it
went to help the United
States, the people of the
United States, I'd be for it,"
said Tom Bell, 66, who lives
in South Bowers, Del., aa
small fishing village.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reponler

Biggest losers are biggest fitness winners
Lee Deland (from left), 24, Nick Martino, 14, and his father Joe, 48, completed the M&M
Fitness Center's 'Biggest Loser Contest,' and placed second, first and third, receptively, out ,
of 22 participants. The group collectively lost 171 pounds over the course of eight weeks.
Deland lost 23 pounds, Nick Martino lost 31 pounds and Joe Martino shed 18 pounds.
S&S Food Stores sponsored the contest. Winners were awarded $100, $300 and $50,
respectively.


Deadline looms to use foreclosure money


By TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press

LEHIGH ACRES - With
a use-it-or-lose-it deadline
just months away, commu-
nities have spent less than
half of the $4 billion available
under a federal program to
redevelop abandoned and
foreclosed properties.
Some city, state and coun-
ty officials say they've been


Fla. House

approves

$67.2 B

budget bill

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE - The
Republican-controlled
Florida House has passed
a $67.2 billion state budget
after a partisan debate.
The 74-44 vote Thursday
set the stage for talks with
the Senate over differences
in their.spending plans.
The Senate onWednesday
passed a budget that would
spend about $2 billion more
in the fiscal year that starts
July 1.
Democrats rapped the
House budget for cutting
education, health care and
other services. Republicans
boasted of balancing the
budget without raising
taxes.
One key difference is
that the Senate has includ-
ed $880 million in additional
federal Medicaid money,
though Congress hasn't yet
passed it.


ARREST REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agen-
cies. The following people
have been arrested but not
convicted. All people are
presumed innocent until
proven guilty.

Tuesday, March 30
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Amanda Faulkner, 26,
298 SW Newark St., For.t
. White, warrant: Felony
petit theft.
* David Michael
Mullen, 42, 151 NE Poppy
Way, driving while license
suspended/revoked.
Lake City
Police Department
* Latasha Reenee
Rossin, no age given, 537
SW Waldron Terrace,
aggravated battery
(domestic violence).

Wednesday,
March 31
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Steven Richard
Peterson, 30, 512 SE
Lomond Ave., possession
of more than 20 grams of
marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia, pos-
session of marijuana with
intent to sell and warrant:


Violation of probation on
original charge of posses-
sion of cocaine.
* Kenneth Truman
Presnel, 22, 469 SE
Waldron Terrace, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of posses-
sion of less than 20 grams
of marijuana.
* Aristides John
Hutchinson, 32, 354 SW
Utah St., Fort White, war-
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
possession of a controlled
substance.
* Christy Moore, 27,
186 SW Feagle Road, war-
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charges
of two counts of third-
degree grand theft, DUI,
(with damage to person
or property) and driving
while license suspended/


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revoked.
* Paul A. Ott, no age
given, 167 SE Faye Lane,
warrant: Violation of pro-
bation on original charge
of utter forgery.
* Donald Bradley
Slaten, 29, 443,NE
Sunnybrook St., warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of utter
forgery and grand theft.
* David Wayne Smith,
49, 1673 NW Oakland
Terrace, warrant: Non-sup-
port.
* Michelle Talley
Gardner, 29, 723 SW
Seville Place, warrant:
Robbery.
* Timothy James
Stearns, 38, Gwen Lake
Boulevard, driving while
license suspended/
revoked (habitual), posses-
sion of cocaine and posses-


sion of drug paraphernalia.
n Gorman Jenkins, 51,
701 Park Ave., Valdosta,
Ga., warrant: Sale of
cocaine.
* James Elroy Williams,
56, 14113 South U.S.
Highway 441, failure to
register as a sex offender
with the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office and failure
to register as a sex offend-
er with the department of
highway safety and motor
vehicles.
M James Wilson Jr.,
29, 252 SW Susan Court,
warrant: Two counts of
burglary of a structure,
third-degree grand theft,
burglary of a structure/
conveyance, two counts of
dealing in stolen property
(trafficking) and burglary
of a structure.
From staff reports


stymied by confusing and
ever-changing federal rules
-for the money, awarded in
the midst of the nation's
foreclosure crisis.
A year after the
Neighborhood Stabilization
Program started, about a
third of more than 300 local
governments given the help
have barely made a dent in
their funds, according to
a recent U.S. ..Department


of Housing and Urban-
Development report.
As of March 16, only 38
percent of the grant money
had been "obligated," mean-
ing a municipality has a-
formal contract at a specific
address in place - say, a
contract to buy a foreclosed
home. Governments must
commit the money to proj-
ects by September or it's
gone.


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Art in the Park
April 3 * 10am-4pm
. In the Craft Square
Stephen roster polk Culture Center State ParVt
Visit with Florida's artists and craftsmen as tnetj
demonstrate their skill at bandcrafts and stufd io art


Leather ' I L'nz,
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one-of-a-Lind items.
Get hands on w,'t th ,- r.-fter-
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Additional fec
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* Call 597-1920


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FrSpring Madness
Sale in the Gift Sho
Up to 500%


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


\
'*/.r.
** J


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


Camp Safe Haven to

help children cope

with loss of loved one


' COURTESY PHOTO
Film students from American University film and photograph a frog at Mallory Swamp on March 9. The students camped
along the banks of the Suwannee River during spring break while learning to film nature.

Trading big city for swamp lands

'Classroom in the Wild' offers Suwannee River adventure


From staff reports

LIVE OAK - Film
students at American
University in Washington,
D.C., exchanged fun in
the big city to camp in the
wilds of Florida for a week
during spring break.
"Classroom in the Wild,"
an alternative spring break
program, gave about a dozen
students an opportunity to
explore life on the banks of
the Suwannee River while
learning to film nature.


The students camped at
Adams tract river camp,
owned by the Suwannee
River Water Management
District, March 6-12. During
their stay, they toured the
Steinhatchee River Basin
and other district lands.
Edwin McCook, the
district's land management
specialist, gave a talk about
district lands and led a tour
of Mallory Swamp.
Scott Gregor, district
natural resource specialist,
spoke about the natural his-


tory of Mallory Swamp and
the district's restoration
efforts on the land.
Brian Kauffman, facilities
director for the R.O. Ranch
Equestrian Park, led a tour
of the park's facilities that
are under development.
Students also attended
a town hall meeting in
Mayo where district staff
explained hydrologic condi-
tions at Mallory Swamp and
the Steinhatchee Basin.
'"The natural communi-
ties and wildlife species on


district lands provided the
students with many unique
filming opportunities,"
McCook said.
While out on the trail,
students got to film a pre-
scribedburn atSteinhatchee
Springs, shoot .footage of
wildlife and a sunset at
Mallory Swamp.
The students will pro-
duce two films from their
experience that the district
will use for the promotion
of R.O. Ranch and Mallory
Swamp.


From staff reports
, Sadness, anger, confusion
- these are some of the
feelings people experience
when dealing with grief.
But children and adults do
not grieve in the same way,
so a different counseling
approach is needed.
Haven Hospice's Healing
Hearts program will host
Camp Safe Haven for
kids from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Apr. 8 at Camp Kulaqua in
High Springs.
The day camp is designed
for kids 6 to 12 who have
experienced the loss of a
loved one. The camp activi-
ties will provide an oppor-
tunity for them to have a
fun time among their peers
as well as sharing experi-
ences.
"Camp Safe Haven


is designed to educate,
encourage and empower
young people to experience
their grief in a healthy and
safe environment," said
Vonceil Levine, bereave-
ment specialist for Haven
Hospice. "Pain is a real,
natural emotional response
to loss and teens are not
immune. The goal is for the
kids to have some fun while
learning some tools to help
them through the pain."
The camp is free and
open to the public, but reg-
istration is 'required and
space is limited.
Lunch and snacks will be
provided.
For more information or
to register for Camp Safe
Haven, contact Vonceil
Levine at (352) 692-5105 or
.(800) 727-1889.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Reporter announces Expo winner
Lake City Reporter publisher Todd Wilson presents Margaret
Henry, of White Springs, with an ornamental spring basket
Wednesday at the Lake City Reporter's office. Henry was
the Altrusa Basket Winner from last weekend's Altrusa Expo
where she was chosen to win the basket from among several
hundred entries. The spring basket contains yard tools, flower
seeds, a bird house and several other spring planting items.


any purchase of $20 or more
Present this coupon at any of the

Applebee's locations Listed below.

Valid this weekend only (4/2/10-4/4/10).

Open at 10:30am Easter Sunday!


1
I
I


I


I

'I{:



I

'.I


Coupon cannot be combined with any other offers or discounts. One coupon per table. No cash value. Offer
does not include tax or gratuity and excludes the purchase of gift cards. Valid only at participating locations
listed below. See server for details.


Lake City
2893 West US Hwy 90
386-752-7087


Save the Date!









FLORIDA


Open House

Open Doors to Your Dreams
*0



Saturday and Sunday

April 10th and 11 th

1:00 -4:00 p.m.

Your opportunity to tour dozens of homes for sale all in one weekend.
Realtors and their clients will be hosting open houses in
Columbia, Suwannee and Hamilton counties for the
FIRS-EVR SAI-1NVIE OEN HUSEWEEEND


See the.Friday, April 19th edition of the Lake City Reporter
for full details, locator map and direct to the

Home of Your Dreams.


i . - ,



Lake Cit.y


$ .iui~ I


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@l kecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, April 2, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS

I Lte


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@Jakecityreportercom

Father of

Field Day

ifth-graders
from all over
Columbia
County
converged
on Columbia High
Stadium for Field Day on
Thursday.
The annual
occasion has grown
to nine elementary
schools - Columbia
County, Eastside, Five
Points, Fort White,
Melrose Park, Niblack,
Pinembunt, Summers
and Westside.
Participants were
estimated at the 1,000
mark for the part football
combine-style events and
part fun and games.
The first events were
the 50-yard dash and the
ball relay.
The 100-yard dash is
grouped with the dizzy
bat and sack races.
The 200-yard dash
joins the three-legged
race and balloon toss.
There are hurdles,
then the bucket relay and
tug of war to cap the day.
Physical education and
other teachers joined
volunteers to put on the
event. Mike McKee was
on the microphone in the
attempt to "herd cats."
The granddaddy of
all county PE. teachers,
Mason Farnell, was
making his 40th
appearance at Field Day.
Farnell has taught at
Eastside for 41 years.
It was Farnell who
brought the idea of Field
Day to Columbia County,
when he moved here
from Chiefland in 1969.
"We did it in Chiefland
and it was county-wide
because we were so
small," Farnell said. ."My
first year we didn't do it,
but in 1970 1 said let's do
this thing."
Four schools gathered
at Eastside for the first
Field Day.
"It was a disaster,"
Farnell said. "We
borrowed a PA system
from the armory and it
broke. We had no way to
communicate. We had to
run around a tell
everybody this is what
you do."
Still, the event caught
on and was moved to the
football field for the next
year.
"We figured out to go
to Memorial Stadium
and from then on the
event has been fantastic,"
Farnell said. "In the early
80s we had fourth- and
fifth-graders. A lot of
parents remember this
day."
There are more that
remember Farnell.
His 41 years at one
school is thought to be
a record for the county,
and he has two years to
go in DROP
He was one of the
founding fathers for
soccer in Columbia
�* County and his passion
S for miniature trains and
tracks is well-known.
Farnell's legacy will be
greater than Field Day.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Weight



watchers


CHS boys ready
for second state
qualifying meet.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High wrapped
up the team-competition
portion of their sched-
ule with wins over Santa
Fe and Union County on
Wednesday.
Columbia (3-1) won the
match with a total score of
50. Santa Fe finished with a
26 and Union County with
a 24 in the meet at Union
County.
First place lifters for the
Tigers were: Nate Williams
(225-200-425) at 139-pounds;
Barnabus Madison (275-
220-495) at 154-pounds;
Cameron Wimberly (260-


275-535) at 183-pounds;
Todd Steward (355-325-
680) at 219-pounds; Brach
Bessant (390-350-740) at
238-pounds; and, Timmy
Jernigan (390-300-690) in
the heavyweight division.
Second place lifters for
Columbia were: Willie
Howard (155-140-295)
at 119-pounds; Antonio
Pelham (175-155-330)
at 139-pounds; Ben Bell
(2750210-185) at 154-
pounds; Monterrance Allan
(265-225-490) at 199-pounds;
Fontaine Woodbury (350-
300-650) on 238-pounds;
and, Donovan. Harrington
(290-250-540) in the heavy-
weight division.
Bessant and Steward
each broke their own
records in their respective
weight classes.
"I'm very. proud that


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High seniors (back row, from left) Todd Steward, Brach Bessant, Blaine Crews,
Fontaine Woodbury, Donovan Harrington and Nate Williams (front) celebrate after a home
match.


the two broke records,"
Columbia High head
coach Quinton Callum
said. "Bessant broke his


Columbia


past

Gomez hits two
home runs in 7-6
win in Klassic.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Keeley Murray helped
Columbia High seal a clas-
sic finish at the Kissimmee
Klassic tournament against
Barron Collier High, 7-6,
with a diving catch to end '..
the game on Thursday.
"We were up 7-1, and
they scored five on us in
the bottom of the seventh," g
Columbia coach Jimmy
Williams said. "Keeley.
Murray made a nice diving
catch to win the game. It
was an ESPN moment."
Murray's catch helped
the Lady Tigers seal the win
for Jessica Keene (12 wins).
Keene pitched a complete
game allowing six hits, two
walks and struck out four
batters.
Columbia's Celeste
Gomez started the Lady
Tigers out in the first inning
with a two-out solo home
run. Columbi got one more
in the first with Amanda
Roach batting in Michaela
Burton for a 2-0 lead.
CHS continued on 2B Colt


Barron


umbia High's Michaela Burton (88)


old record at 345 with a
350-pound clean and jerk.
Steward was up to 325
from his old record of 320-


pounds."
Callum mentioned that
UFTERS continued on 2B


slides




C ollier


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
beats the ball to home plate in a game against Suwannee High School on March 23.


Lady Indians hold

strong against Santa Fe


Fort White suffers
district loss after
leading through 4.
From staff reports

Fort White High faired
much better in their road
contest against Santa Fe
High on Thursday. After fall-
ing victim to a perfect game
against the Lady Raiders in
their last outing, the Lady
Indians held a lead through
four innings in Santa Fe.
The Lady Raiders
answered for the 4-1 lead,


but Fort White High head
coach John Wilson was
proud of the effort.
"We have played two
good games against them,"
he said, "It's hard to say you
played a good game when
the other girl has a perfect
game, but they had three
key hits to score. Tonight
was more of the same thing.
They had opportunistic
times where they could hit
and score, and that's what
they did."
Fort White took the early
lead in the fourth inning
when Alex Neiland was hit


by a pitch with the bases
loaded to score Taylor
Douglass. Holly Polhill and
Allison Wrench also had
hits in the inning.
Douglass fell victim to
the loss as she pitched six
innings, allowed seven hits
and struck out six batters.
Fort White (8-7, 4-4)
resumes its season after
spring break.
The Lady Indians will
travel to Lafayette to fin-
ish out a district game
that was rained out, and
continue it with a
double-header.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Allison Wrench prepares to swing in a game
against Baker County on March 2.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
8 p.m.
-SPEED - NASCAR.Truck Series race,
at Lebanon,Tenn.
4 a.m.
--:SPEED - Formula One, qualifying for
rivlaysian Grand Prix, at Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia
- " BOXING
- - 9 p.m.
S-ESPN2 - Welterweights, Delvin
Rodriguez (24-4-2) vs. Mike Arnaoutis
(�2--2), at Uncasville. Conn.
GOLF
GC.. 4 p.m.
S-,'-TGC - PGA Tour, Houston Open,
se � nd round, at Humble,Texas
. ' 5 p.m.
-ESPN2 - LPGA, Kraft Nabisco
Championship, second round, at Rancho
Mirage, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
ESPN - Preseason, Baltimore vs. N.Y.
Yankeds, at Tampa
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN -Atlanta at'Cleveland
10:30 p.m.
ESPN - Utah at LA. Lakers
PREP BASKETBALL
. Noon
- ESPN2 - Boys' Invitational semifinal,
at Baltimore
2 p.m.
ESPN2 - Boys' Invitational semifinal,
at Baltimore
TENNIS
I p.m.
FSN -ATP/WTATour, Sony Ericsson
Open, men's semifinal, at Miami
7 p.m.
FSN - ATP/WTA Tour, Sony Ericsson
Open, men's semifinal, at Miami

BASKETBALL

NBA- schedule
Today's Games
Milwaukee at Charlotte, 7 p.m.


Miami at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Washington. 7 p.m.
Houston at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Atlanta,at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
Orlando at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
NewYork at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Utah at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Toronto at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Miami at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Denver, 9 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

NCAA Final Four
At Lucas Oil Stadium
Indianapolis
National Semifinals
Saturday
Michigan State (28-8) vs. Butler (32-4),
6:07 p.m.
West Virginia (31-6) vs. Duke (33-5),
40 minutes following
National .Championship
Monday
Semifinal winners

NIT
Championship
Thursday
Dayton vs. North CaroJina (n)

Women's Final Four
At Alamodome
.San Antonio "
National Semifinals
Sunday
Stanford (35-1) vs. Oklahoma
(27-10), 7 p.m.
Connecticut (37-0) vs. Baylor (27-9),
9:30 p.m.
National Championship
tuesday,April 6
Semifinal winners

Women's NIT
Semifinals
Wednesday


Miami 76, Michigan 59
Thursday
California at Illinois State (n)
Championship
Saturday
Miami (22-13) vs. California-
Illinois St. winner, 2 p.m.

BASEBALL

Spring Training-Florida
Today's Games
Washington vs Boston at Fort Myers,
1:05 p.m.
Baltimore vs N.Y. Yankees at Tampa,
1:05 p.m..
Pittsburgh vs .Philadelphia at
Clearwater, 7:05 p.m.
.Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh vs Philadelphia at
Clearwater, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs Baltimore at Sarasota,
1:05 p.m.
Boston vs Washington at Viera,
4:05 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
NATIONWIDE
Nashville 300
Site: Lebanon,Tenn.
Schedule: Today, practice; Saturday,
qualifying; race, 4 p.m. (ESPN, 3:30-
7 pim.).
Track: Nashville Superspeedwayj
Race distance: 300 miles, 225 laps..
. CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Nashville 200
Site: Lebanon.Tenn.
Schedule: Today, practice; qualifying;
race, 8 p.m. (Speed, 7:30-10:30 p.m.). ,
Track: Nashville Superspeedway.
Race distance: 200 miles, 150 laps.
FORMULA ONE
Malaysian Grand Prix
Site: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
2-3:30 a.m.); Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 4-5:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 4 a.m.
(Speed, 3:30-6 a.m.; 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.).
Track: Sepang International Circuit
(road course, 3.44 miles).


Stadler, Percy top leaderboard

after opening round in Houston


By CHRIS DUNCAN
Associated Press

HUMBLE, Texas -
Kevin Stadler and Cameron
Percy shot 5-under 67s on
Thursday to share the first-
round lead in the Houston
Open. i I ,
. Vaughn Taylor and James
Driscoll - Stadler's playing
partners in a morning three-
some - wdre a stroke back
along with fellow morning
starter Kevin Sutherland and
Anthony Kim, who played
in the afternoon when the
wind picked up and gusted
to 30 mph.
Phil Mickelson, Padraig
Harrington, Lee Westwood
and 2007 champion Adam.
Scott were topped a group
two strokes back at 69.
Ernie Els, coming off con-


secutive victories at Doral
and Bay Hill, opened with
70. Fred Couples, who has
won three straight starts on
the Champions Tour, shot
a 71.
Several top players have
come to Houston because
they view the Tournament
Course at Redstone as an
ideal dry run for next week's
Masters. Organizers have
groomed the 7,457-yard lay-
out to simulate the condi-
tions at Augusta National,
with fast greens, shaved
mounds,'light rough and
the fairways mowed toward
the tee.
But Harrington said
now that the tournament,
has started, the players
are focused on winning
more than fine-tuning their,
games.


"It's all about trying to
win the Houston Open,"
he said. "Augusta can wait
three more days."
Harrington said he played
conservatively after a dis-
appointing session on the
practice range. He made
three straight birdies on
the back nine,' playing his
best after the wind picked
up in the early afternoon.
"I was never quite sure
of myself," he said. "I was
happy to play the golf I
played. I made the most
of my opportunities when
they came around. I just
wasn't very confident." '
Kim was tied for the
lead, after making three
straight birdies oi his back
nine, then finished with an
adventurous bogey on the
difficult 18th.


CHS: Gomez hits two home runs


Continued From Page 11E

Holly Crumpton deliv-
ered an RBI-double to bring
in Payton Sund and give the
Lady Tigers a 3-0 lead head-
ing into the third inning.
Barron Collier (12-7) got
6rie back in the third, but
'Qmez responded.
* The senior hit her second
home run in the bottom
half, and Sund brought in
Burton for a 5-1 lead.
i "I wasn't expecting it,"
Gomez said. "I was just try-
mrg to get base hits for my




LIFTERS
Continue From Page 1B

both lifters -probably had
more gas left in the tank.
He also made mention of
his other lifters for their
dedication. . *
"This team has been very
dedicated," he said. "There's
good leadership. I'm very
proud of the young guys.
They have, been working
their butts off. They have
excelled all of my expecta-
tions."
Columbia host the sec-
ond' sectional qualifying
meet for the FHSAA state
final on April 9.
Tickets for the second
sectional qualifying meet
are $5 for adults and $3 for
children.


team, and hit them."
Gomez is one home run
shy of tying the tournament
.record with three: She has
seven home runs during
the season.
Columbia added two
more runs in the fifth
inning. Roach drew a walk
and Jordan Williams hit a
sacrifice fly to move her
over. It allowed Keene .to
bring in Roach on an RBI-
single. The Lady Tigers fin-
ished off their scoring with



Unscramble'these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ILODDYI .


a double by Holly Boris to
knock ip Keene.,
"We really had a good out-
ing," Williams said. "It was
kind of the ball we needed
to play. We had to come out
right away, and not get into
a hole. It turned into a little
nail-biter in the seventh, but
it was a solid win."
Columbia (13-4, 8-0) takes
on the Kissimmee High
Lady Cowboys at 6:15 p.m.
today as the Kissimmee.
Klassic continues.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


. Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
S/ suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: 111
(Answers tomorrow)
Y Jumbles: ELUDE WIPED UPTOWN OUTING
Yesterday's Answer: What Mom did when her son cut his hand -
WOUND THE WOUND


COURTESY PHOTO

Tigerettes on the town
The CHS Tigerette Competition Team recently returned from the U.S. Championships-Big
Apple at Manhattan Studios in New York. The Tigerettes placed second in the Hip Hop
Division and third for their pom routine. Team members are (front row, from left)
Sarah Elkins, Heather Coody, Tiffany Wilson and Rebekah Dashler. Second row (from left)
are Regina Witt, Megan Proveaux, Dani Davis, Haley Guerry, Caitlin DuCoeur and
Casey Stevens. Back row (from left) are Stephanie Bicknell and Jordan Williams.



Scheyer, Butler among


finalists for Wooden Award


Associated Press

LOS ANGELES - Jon
Scheyer of Duke and
Da'Sean Butler of West
Virginia are among 10 final-
ists for the John R. Wooden
Award as men's college bas-
ketball player of the year.
Kentucky freshmen
John Wall and DeMarcus -
Cousins were among the


other finalists announced
Thursday,
Scheyer averages 18.6
points for Duke, which
will play West Virginia in
the national semifinals on
Saturday. Butler averages
17.4 points and 6.3 rebounds.
for the Mountaineers.
The other finalists
are James Anderson of


Oklahoma State, Sherron
Collins of Kansas, Wesley
Johnson of Syracuse, Scottie
Reynolds of Villanova,
Evan Turner of Ohio State,
and Greivis Vasquez of
Maryland.
The Wooden Award will
be presented April 9 at
the Los Angeles Athletic
Club.


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE - Defensive end
Reggie Hayward has signed a one-year
contract with the. Jacksonville Jaguars,
keeping him with the team for a sixth
season.
Hayward, who missed most of last year
because of a broken leg, will make a
little more than the veteran minimum of
$850,000. The deal allows Hayward to
stay in Jacksonville and gives the Jaguars

ACROSS 36 Cave, often
37 Horse barn
1 Blank space 39 Unseals
4 Hit the books 41 La senorita
8 Links org. 42 Gulf st.
11 Mme.'s daugh- 43 Pastor's abode
ter 45 Hearth tool
12 Engineering 49 Kind of rug
toy 51 Essay byline
13 Family mem. 52 Lapel
14 Taken-back ornament
item 53 Extinct bird
15 Deserts 54 Office asst.
17 Sleep dis- 55 Mattress prob-
turbers lem
19 Ill-fated lover 56 Glimpsed
20 Annoy 57 Impatient
21 - de vivre chuck


22 Pertaining to
the moon
25 'Kind of
sausage
27 Copper source
28 Hoax
30 Slalom
obstacle
32 Viking name
34 Glasnost ini-
tials


DOWN


Hidden valley
Purina rival
"Will it play in
-?",
Kent or Gable
Yanks'
adversaries


added depth in case free agent signee
Aaron Kampman is slow to return from
knee surgery.
Hayward had been an unrestricted free
agent. A third-round draft pick by Denver,
,in 2001, Hayward has started 59 games in
nine seasons. He has 39.5 sacks, including
17.5 with the Jaguars.
He earned a starting spot last fall, but
broke his left leg in the season opener at
Indianapolis and spent the year on injured
reserve.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

NICHE HUMP
OCEANS PUREED
VIOLAS IGNITE
OCTAN E REF
CAST REST
OAR SAM TAVS
ENOW FLU WRAY
ROMA TOM SODA

SUCK BSMT
GET BISHOP
AMOE BA ENER G Y

SIRE STEPS


6 Turkish official
7 Marilyn or
Vaughn
8 Square dance
call


9 Chromosome
unit
10 Too
11 Fern. honorific
16 "How are you
-?"
18 Makes a typo
21 Nabors and
Backus
22 London lav
23 WWW
addresses
24 Straightening
up
25 Place for
posies
26 Two fives for

29 Island dance
31 Jr. naval
officer
33 Bogus
35 Drum sound
38 Combines
40 Most faded
42 Law breaker
43 Broom com-
panions
44 Diva's melody
45 Commanded
46 Cheers for
matadors
47 Lantern part
48 Utter
50 Bunion site


4-2 @ 2010 by UI-S, Inc.


Jaguars bring back Hayward

for another season with team


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


'Hoosiers' hero embraces

Butler connection


By CLIFF BRUNT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Bobby Plump settled in at
a table in the family restau-
rant and began spinning the
tale of his childhood, the
one everyone loves. The
one he loves.
As fans in nearby seats
stopped eating and leaned
in close to hear the details,
Plump patiently described
his buzzer-beating jumper
in the 1954 Indiana state
championship game. The
shot that led to "Hoosiers"
arid the shot that has thrust:
him, willingly, into a role
as Indiana's ambassador for
its beloved basketball and
his alma mater, Butler.
The 73-year-old Plump
smiles often, occasion-
ally bellowing in laughter
at details as he describes
Milan High's historic win
over Muncie Central as
though it happened yester-
day. He takes about five
minutes to describe 18 sec-
onds. Patrons young and
old nod in approval.
People have been wait-
ing in line at "Plump's Last
Shot" all week to talk with
the owner, to get.his auto-
graph, hear his voice. And
Plump? He may have been


waiting all his life for this -
who wouldn't love a chance
to relive ,a glorious piece of
your past?
"I've been weary after
these things," Plump says.
"It's. so much fun, and I
enjoy it, but I tell you what.
It does make you tired."
He's made numerous
appearances, including
some at Hinkle Fieldhouse
(site of that 1954 game),
and his interview schedule
ihas been daunting. He's
opened his restaurant three
hours early. Plump said
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels
has invited Plump and his
eight living Milan team-
mates to watch Saturday's
game with him in a suite at
Lucas Oil Stadium.
Everyone remembers
Plump's famous high school
shot. More and more are
remembering that he was
a star at Butler, which is in
the Final Four and will play
Michigan State on Saturday
night.
Plump was an all-confer,
ence guard and is in the
school's athletic hall of
fame. He remains close
to the program and likes
the fact that people can tie
Butler and the man who
made the dream shot..
"It's very satisfying for


Butler to get the recog-,
nition it deserves, and I
appreciate finally being con-
nected with the Bulldogs,"
he said.
As Plump addressed
his patient fans. Thursday,
he starts a conversation
with Dick Kuchen, former
coach at California and
Yale. Tall and. sophisticat-
ed, Kuchen's eyes sparkle
like a small child's as he
talks to Plump.
"Every summer I ran a
basketball camp, and the
movie I ran for every camp-
er that came in there was
'Hoosiers,"' he said. "I just
think it's a great story, and
he wears it well."
Bob Brown of Danbury,
Conn., isn't a Butler fan
- he backs Kansas - but
he'll cheer for the Bulldogs.
He brought his two sons to
the restaurant.
"When we decided to
come to the Final Four, we
said, 'We've got to come
to Plump's Last Shot,"' he
said. "They like the whole
story of Milan High School
and of course, the movie.
It's just great history."
Plump said real parallels
between Butler and Milan
are few. He said Butler is a
much better team and faces
higher stakes.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bobby Plump talks about the 1954 state high school basketball championship game between
Milan and Muncie Central, in his restaurant north of downtown Indianapolis, Thursday. Plump
hit a last-second shot to help Milan win the state title.


"These kids are playing
on an international stage,"
he said. "The pressure on
them is much greater than
us, and the only compari-
son is that we both had
pretty good ballclubs."
Another difference is
that Butler is the oddsmak-
ers' favorite against the
Spartans.
"I'm a little disappointed
in the bookies," he said.
"Butler's always an under-
dog and they made- them
the favorite," he said. "I'm


superstitious. I wish they
would have made them at
least a one- or two-point
dog."
As Plump tells the patrons
about Milan, he seems to
enjoy equally the chance to
talk about the Bulldogs. He
told one fan how much he
respects coach Brad Stevens,
and another that Butler
would have been the favorite
all along if the players had
Duke across their chests.
Plump says the Bulldogs
can win it all if they play they


way they have throughout
the NCAA tournament
"I definitely think they
can win it,'" he said. "If
they have 80 minutes in
them similar to the last two.
games, I truly believe we'll
be celebrating a champion-
ship here."
As he continues, he's
interrupted.
"Sorry, but these people
have been waiting for a long
time," the employee tells
Plump.
So has Plump.


Final Four teams


make it to Indy with D


ASSOCIATED PRESS
West Virginia basketball fans hold up signs of support during a sendoff rally at the Coliseuin
on Wednesday, in Morgantown W.Va. West Virginia plays Duke an a national semifinal -
basketball,game at the NCAA Final Four on Saturday, in Indianapolis.



Tiger impersonators


are hurting, too


By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - Fans
who love great shooting,
free-flowing basketball and
overworked scoreboard
operators might want to
bypass' the Final. Four this
year. Those who like watch-
ing teams grind and don't
mind seeing a few bod-
ies flying around -- well,
'Indianapolis is the place for
you.
The common theme at
this year's Final Four is
hard-nosed, stingy defefise.
Butler got here by shut-
ting down three of" the
nation's biggest playmakerst
Michigan State made it with-
out its leading, scorer. West
Virginia busted out a 1-3-1
zone trap to shut down its
opponents. Duke advanced
even though one of its best
players shot 0 for 10.
Entertaining?


"Probably not," Spartans
guard Raymar Morgan
said.
But competitive? If it's
anything like the rest of the
tournament, it should be.
Expect baskets to come
at a premium and bruises
to be in abundance when
Michigan State plays Butler
and West Virginia faces
Duke in the national semi-
finals Saturday. All four
teams have made it on the
strength of strong' defense
and rebounding - and
despite the absence of a
big-time scoring superstar.
"Our team totally wants
to rebound and play
defense," Duke coach Mike
Krzyzewski said Thursday,
when the teams practiced
'for the first time at cavern-
ous Lucas Oil Stadium. "It's
much different than some
Duke teams of the past.
But they've accepted what
they are, which is good, and


they've tried to become bet-
ter at who they are." . -.
Indeed, the thought of
Grant Hill or Christian
Laettner having an 0-for-10
night and the Blue Devils
still winning doesn't really
fit into the typical Duke
paradigm.
But against Baylor last
weekend, Kyle Singler did
that. Singler finished with
five points - 12 below his'
average - but spent most
of his energy trying to slow
down LaceDarius Dunn. In
the second round against
Cal, Duke's Jbn Scheyer
- the Final Four's most
prolific scorer at 18.2 points
a game - went 1 for 11.
The Blue Devils (33-5),
the only No. 1 seed at this
year's Final Four, won both,
thanks largely to a defense
anchored by 7-foot-1 cen-
ter, Brian Zoubek and five
more players at 6-8 or taller,
including Singler.


By TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press

Herme Chua got booed.
Canh Oxelson is no longer
getting the best 'tables at
restaurants, and will have
to wait longer to pay off
those student loans from
Harvard.
Think Tiger Woods' is
having problems? Try being
one of his lookalikes.
"A lot of people just don't
want to be associated with
Tiger right now," Oxelson
said.
For Oxelson and Chua,
that means what a steady
flow of extra cash has dried
up. The exposure of Woods'
double life is hitting his
doubles right in the wallet.
"I had to turn down a
job that would lhave paid
pretty well," said Chua, aka
Tiger 2. "It was an adult
nightclub that wanted me
to go to six cities in six
nights. But I'm active in
my son's school and help
coach a track team. If the
kids ever found out I was
helping to promote adult
nightclubs, it wouldn't be
appropriate."
Imagine if the real Tiger
had such moral reserva-
tions. Chua would probably
still have some work now.
Instead the Tiger Woods


impersonation business is
hurting almost as bad as
the real Tiger Woods busi-
ness. For the faux Tigers,
Woods' comeback in the
Masters can't come soon
enough.
"I'm tooting for him,"
said Oxelson, who goes by
the monicker Tigersdouble.
"Of course I ,have financial
reasons for that."
The life of a Woods looka-
like isn't what it used to be,
even in Southern California
where Woods was raised
and where Oxelson and
Chua ply their trade.
Before Woods' sex scandal
broke, they could pick up
some extra cash by making
appearances at anything
from. birthday parties to
golf outings.
It wasn't terribly diffi-
cult work, as long as they
dressed the part. And the
uniform was always the
same - black pants, red
shirt and black hat with the
Nike swoosh.
Chua was getting 10 to
20 gigs a year, a nice sup-
plement to his day job as
a database administrator.
He parlayed his look into
a small part in the comedy
"Parfection," due out later
this year, and made a recent
appearance on the "Maury"
show.


"The audience actually
booed me," he said. "That
was something new and
different. Normally you
get a positive reaction but.
because of the scandal it's
been a lot of negative."
Oxelson knows about
that. He had a part lined
up in' a commercial he
believes was for Gatorade
and a big convention show-
in San Diego, but both were
called off when the scandal
broke.-
Meanwhile, the looks he
gets while out and about in
the Los Angeles area have
changed.
"People yell things out at
me, like 'Hey, Tiger, how
about all those blondes,"'
Oxelson said. "Sometimes
I yell back, 'Blondes have
more fun' or something like
that. It's all in fun."
Oxelson said he used
to get great tables at res-
taurants because people
thought he was Woods.
Once he was at a restau-
.rant with friends looking at
pictures of himself dressed
like Woods when a woman
came up with her son
thanking him for what he
had done for black people
and golf.
"I couldn't say I'm sorry,
I'm not Tiger Woods," he
said. "She's not going to


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger.Woods impersonators Cahn Oxelson (right) and Herme Chua pose in Pasadena, Calif.,
Wednesday. Herme Qhua got booed. Canh Oxelson is no longer getting the best tables at
restaurants, and will have to wait longer to pay off those student loans from Harvard. Think
Tiger Woods is having problems? Try being one of his lookalikes.


believe it, especially with
me looking at all the photos
dressed like Tiger."
Oxelson, dean of students
at a private high school,
began his life as a Tiger
double about 13 years ago.
The idea came after he was
at the AT&T tournament at
Pebble Beach and people
kept asking if they could
have their picture taken
with him.
,"I figured I could pay
for my graduate school at
Harvard by doing lookalike


stuff," he said. "It takes a
while to pay off a Harvard
education but as long as I
kept getting events it was
good."
The future is more uncer-
tain, just as it is for the
real Tiger. Both Oxelson
and Chua say they were
shocked and disappointed
by the scandal, but are hop-
ing Woods can somehow
salvage his reputation down
the road.
Oxelson, who once
worked with Woods on a


commercial, said he still
believes resembling the
most famous athlete in the
world has been worth it,
though it can be a little dis-
concerting at times.
"I go to the mall or some-
thing and people look at me
even if I'm not dressed like
Tiger," he said. "I never
know why. Are they looking
at me because they think
I'm like Tiger Woods or is
it maybe because I have a
sign that says 'kick me' on
my back? You never know."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













Handling a pitching phenom is tricky


By FRED GOODALL
Associated Press

David Price shrugged his
shoulders and smiled.
, Tampa Bay's young
lefty made it look so easy
in- 2008. A phenom if ever
there was one, he blazed
out of the bullpen in Game
7 of the AL championship
series, fanned J.D. Drew
with the bases loaded and
then finished off the Boston
Red Sox.
Pitching in the World
Series barely a month after
his- :major league debut,
Price seemed like every-
thing scouts envisioned
when the Rays made him
the overall No. 1 draft pick
a year earlier - an ace
in the making, certain to
zoom even higher.
"I was living my dream,"
the 24-year-old said. "You
never forget something like
that."
: Fast forward to 2010.
* The 6-foot-6 Price remains
a big part of Tampa Bay's
future, though much of the
buzz surrounding him has
waned after an uneven sea-
son.
His path certainly empha-
sized there's no surefire
strategy in one of baseball's
most delicate arts - devel-
oping young pitchers, espe-
cially prize prospects such
as Price and the game's
top newcomer, Stephen
Strasburg.
The New York Yankees
employedthe so-called "Joba
Rules" with reliever-turned-
starter-turned-reliever
again Joba Chamberlain.


The Yanks won the World
Series, yet he's still trying
to figure out where he fits
in.
Rick Ankiel was a hotshot
who made his big league
debut with St Louis in 1999
at age 20. He blew away
batters the next year, that
is, until he lost his control
during the playoffs. These
days, he's an outfielder with
no mention of pitching in
his future.
The Washington
Nationals picked Strasburg
at No. 1 last summer and
rewarded him with a record
$15.1 million contract. He
was their best starter in
spring training, but the
Nats sent him to Double-A
Harrisburg for more sea-
'soning.
The Nats hope that once
the 21-year-old right-hander
is promoted to the majors,
he'll be there for good.
"I'm not a believer that a
player can come from ama-
teur baseball and step right
into the major leagues,"
Nationals general manager
Mike Rizzo said. "I've seen
terrific prospects attempt
it and the failure rate is
too great. This is a prized,
asset."
Price's rapid ascent hit a
speed bump last year. .
Tampa Bay left Price
off the opening-day roster,
largely because it wanted to
limit the number of innings
he pitched. He acknowl-
edged he initially didn't
handle returning to the
minors well - he'd shot
up from Class A to the bigs
in his first pro. season, and


thought he was there to
stay.
"I was crushed," said
Price, who was back in
the majors by end of May,
though it would take him
another month to get his
bearings. "That was my
dream. I had it, I pitched in
the World Series, and then
I had it taken away."
The former Vanderbilt
standout struggled with his
command and lost four of
his first seven decisions,
and rebounded to' go 7-3
with a 3.56 ERA over his
last 12 outings. He filiished
at 10-7 with a 4.42 ERA in
23 starts for the Rays.
But despite leading the
Rays in wins after the All-
Star break, beating Roy
Halladay twice and stop-
ping CC Sabathia's bid for
a 20th victory in his final
start, Price felt the season
was a letdown.
"The way last year went,
it's not how I would draw it,
up. But I learned so much
stuff. It's going to' help me
for the rest of my career,"
Price said.
The Rays won 84 games
- 13 fewer than the year
before - and finished third
in the AL East behind the
Yankees and Red Sox.
"Everybody expected to
have so much success, and
that's not what happened."i
he added. "People had big-
ger, expectations for me,
and I had even bigger ones
for myself."
The Rays, however, feel
their plan worked.
The objective was keep
Price fresh, in hopes he'd


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Yankees pitcher Joba Chamberlain stretches before a spring training baseball
game against the Toronto Blue Jays in Dunedin, Thursday.


be able to help the team
down the stretch and into
October. Problem was, a lot
of things went wrong and
the Rays didn't play mean-
ingful games much beyond
Labor Day.
"You look at every per-
son in the bigs. Derek Jeter
has had struggles. Alex
Rodriguez has had strug-
gles. Roy Halladay has
had struggles," Price said.
'That's what makes the
great ones great. Whenever
they do struggle,, they
bounce back. That's what I
learned from last year, how
to bounce back."
When he reported to


spring training this year,
he found fewer reporters
hanging around his locker
and embraced the solitude.
He quietly went about
his business, with plans to
build on the success he had
over the last half of 2009.
"I think the legend lives,
but it's been put a little
more on the back burner,"
Rays manager Joe Maddon
said.
"I mean that in a good
way," the manager added.
"A lot of the hoopla is gone
from the World Series year.
If he thinks he's back under
the radar, I kind of like that,
because I'd like him to just


concentrate on the things
he needs to get better at."
Tampa Bay has one of
the most fertile farm sys-
tems in baseball. And
since Andrew Friedman
took over as executive vice
president of baseball opera-
tions and hired Maddon in
November 2005, the Rays
have -not. been inclined to
rush top prospects.
Two years ago, Evan
Longoria was sent to the
minors before being called
up 11 games into the season.
He wound up being selected
an All-Star and being a major
contributor in the run to the
World Series.


Could

NCAA

involve

96 teams?

By JOHN MARSHALL
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - The
NCAA appears to be on
the verge of expanding the
men's basketball tourna-
mhent tc 96 teams.
Insisting that nothing has
been decided, NCAA vice
president Greg Shaheen
nonetheless outlined a
detailed plan Thursday that
included the logistics and
timing of a 96- .am tourna-
ment, how much time off
the players would have and
even revenue distribution.
Shaheen said the
NCAA looked at keeping
the current 65-team field
and expanding to 68 or
80 teams, but decided the
bigger bracket was best fit
logistically and financially.
It would be played during
the same time frame as the
current. three-week tour-
nament and include first-
round byes for 32 teams.
Although the plan still
heeds to be approved by the
Division I Men's Basketball
Committee and passed on
to the board of directors,
most of the details already
seem to be in place.
-'The men's tournament
last expanded in 2001, add-
ing one team to the 64-team
field that was set in 1985.
' The 96-team tournament
would likely envelop the 32-
team NIT, though Shaheen
said no decision has been
made on what to do with
the NCAA's other, indepen-
dently operated season-end-
ing tournament.
The newformatwould start
two days later than the cur-
rent 65-team field because it
would eliminate the Tuesday
play-in game and would con-
clude on the same day, a
Monday. It would be played
at one fewer venue - again,
th4 play-in game - and the
NCAA says it would include
no additional travel time for
teams.
The first-round games for
the 32 non-bye teams would
take place on Thursday and
Friday, with the winners
playing the top eight seeds
in each region.


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4 lines * 6 days y5
h ate applies to private individuals ling
personal merchandise totalling $S,000 or less.
Each item rust include a pce
a d- ' W ^ W R
6Ia ic additionl
ne $1 .6
to _rlvate individual selling..


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Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

Services

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RESUMES.
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Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
AND BUDGET HEARING
The North Florida Broadband Au-
thority ("NFBA") announces a public
meeting and budget hearing to which
all interested persons are invited.
The NFBA is a legal entity and pub-
lic body created pursuant to the pro-
visions of provisions of Section
163.01, Florida Statutes, and an In-
terlocal Agreement among: Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gil-
christ, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafay-
ette, Levy, Madison, Putnam, Su-
wannee, Taylor, Union and Wakulla
Counties and municipalities of Cedar
Key, Cross City, Lake City, Live
Oak, Monticello, Perry, White
Springs and Worthington Springs,
Florida. The Public Meeting and
Budget Hearing will be held on May
12, 2010 at 2:00 pm ET at the Su-
wannee River Water Management
District Office,.9225 County Road
49, Live Oak, Florida 32060. The
NFBA Board will address general
operating issues of the NFBA. If a
person decides to appeal any deci-
sion made by the NFBA with respect
to any matter considered at the meet-
ing, such person will need a record
of the proceedings and may need to
ensure that a verbatim record is
made, including the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be made. In accordance with the
'Americans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing special accommoda-
tions or an interpreter to participate
in this proceeding, or if you have any
questions regarding this meeting,.
please contact the Clerk to the NFBA
Board at (877) 552-3482, at least two
business days prior to the date of'the
meeting.
04538826
April 2, 9, 2010


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,'
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000324
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING
LP A/K/A COUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS SERVICING LP
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRIAN CARENTER; DIANE S.
CARPENTER; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant
to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 16th day of March 2010,
and entered in Case No 12-2009-CA-
000324, of the Circuit Court of the
3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, wherein
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING.
LP is the Plaintiff and BRIAN
CARENTER; DIANE S. CARPEN-
TER; UNKNOWN TENANTSS; IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the AT COURTHOUSE at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 21st day of April, 2010, the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST;. SECTION 24; BEGIN AT
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE SW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4, SEC-
TION 24, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH,
RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE
RUN 89 DEGREES 32'34" W
ALONG- :THE SOUTH LINE OF
SAID SW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4,
206.27 FEET; THENCE N 1 DE-
GREE 22'47" E, 471.08; THENCE
N 89. DEGREES 32'34" E, 370.15
FEET; THENCE S 1 DEGREE
22'47" W, 471.08 FEET TO THE
SOUTH LINE OF THE SE 1/4 OF
THE. NE 1/4 OF SAID SECTION
24; THENCE RUN S 89 DEGRRES
32'34"W ALONG SAID SOUTH
LINE 163.88 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS
BAING A PART OF THE SW 1/4
OF THE NE 1/4 AND NE 1/4.


Legal

ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
.In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hemando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 16th day of March, 2010.
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By:/S/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone:(954) 453-0365
Facsimile:(954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
04538635
March 26, 2010
April 2, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA - COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000434
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SHAWN VAUGHN; BLUE
WORLD POOLS, INC.; JOAN M.
PIERCE; TRACY VAUGHN; UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS; IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant
to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 18th day of March 2010,
and entered in Case No ,12-2009-CA-
000434, of the Circuit Court of the
3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, wherein
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is the


Legal

Plaintiff and SHAWN VAUGHN;
BLUE WORLD POOLS, INC.;
JOAN M. PIERCE; TRACY
VAUGHN; UNKNOWN
TENANTSS; JOHN DOE; JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS)
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY are defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, at the AT COURT-
HOUSE at the Columbia County
Courthouse in Lake City, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 21st day of April,
2010, the following described prop-
erty, as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT NO. 14, SPRING RUN, AN
UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION
BEING A PART OF THE W 1/2 OF
SECTION 16 AND ALL OF THE W
1/2 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION
16, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE
16 EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NW COR-
NER OF SAID SECTION 16 AND
RUN N. 88'11'19" E 25.00 FEET
TO THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF LAZY OAK ROAD ( A
50 FOOT COUNTY MAINTAINED
DIRT ROAD AS NOW ESTAB-
LISHED); THENCE CONTINUE
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SECTION 16, N 88"11'19" E
A DISTANCE OF 815.61 FEET;
THENCE S 00'28'58" E, 3792.45
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE N 88'11'19" E,
761.35 FEET TO ITS INTERSEC-
TION WITH THE WESTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE "OF A 60
FOOT ROAD RIGHT OF WAY TO
A POINT ON A CURVE CON-
COVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A
RADIUS OF 880.80 FEET AND A
CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF S 17'06'44" W AND
292.68 FEET; THENCE CONTIN-
UE SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID
ARCE OF CURVE 294.04 FEET
TO THE POINT OF TANGENCE
OF SAID CURVE; THENCE CON-
TINUE ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY LINE S 26'40'34"
W, 205.49 FEET; THENCE N
63�19'26" W, 650.60 FEET, 650.60
FEET; THENCE N 00"28'58" W,


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


Legal

147.20 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH A 2003 MERIT
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME
WITH VIN#'S
FLHML3B121326780A AND
FLHML3B121326780B
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 22nd day of March, 2010.
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By:/S/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone:(954) 453-0365
Facsimile:(954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
04538670
March 26, 2010
April 2, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000401
THE BANK OF NEW YORK
TRUST COMPANY, N.A. AS SUC-
CESSOR TO JP MORGAN CHASE
BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM R. SHELDON, SR.;
CAMPUS USA CREDIT UNION;
CAROLYN S. SHELDON; NICOLE
SHELDON; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S); WILLIAM R.. SHELDON
A/K/A WILLIAM R. SHELDON,
JR.; IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant
to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 18th day of March 2010,
and entered in Case No 12-2009-CA-
000401, of the Circuit Court of the
3RD Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, wherein
THE BANK OF NEW YORK
TRUST COMPANY, N.A. AS SUC-
CESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE is the
Plaintiff and WILLIAM R. SHEL-
DON, SR.; CAMPUS USA CREDIT
UNION; CAROLYN S. SHELDON;
NICOLE SHELDON; UNKNOWN
TENANTSS; WILLIAM R. SHEL-
DON A/K/A WILLIAM R. SHEL-
DON, JR.; -JOHN DOE; JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN
POSSESSION OF THIS SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the AT COURTHOUSE at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 21st day of April, 2010, the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
SOUTHERN DIVISION LOT 10
OLIVIA ADDITION BOOK 471
PAGE 221, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY. OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS'
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
with.Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their, disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 22nd day of March, 2010.
P. Dewitt Cason -
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By:/S/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone:(954) 453-0365
Facsimile.(954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
.04538671
March 26, 2010
April 2, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000841
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
JOON HOPARK, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
JACQUELINE D. PARK A/K/A
JACQUELINE DENISE JACKSON
A/K/A JACQUELINE / DENISE
PARK
Last Known Address: 143 Red Ma-
ple Way SW, Lake City, FL 32024
Also Attempted AT: 1690 Renais-
sance Commons Boulevard, Boynton
Beach, FL 33426; 2427 Bent Tree
Rd., #RR2514, Palm Harbor, FL
34683 7707 and 57 Newbury St., Apt
413, Peabody, MA 01960-3820
Current Residence Unknown
JOON HO PARK
Last Known Address: 143 Red Ma-
ple Way SW, Lake City, FL 32024
Also Attempted AT: 1690 Renais-
sance Commons Boulevard, Boynton
Beach, FL 33426; 2427 Bent Tree


Rd., #RR2514, Palm Harbor, FL
34683 7707 ahd 57 Newbury St., Apt
413, Peabody, MA01960-3820
Current Residence Unknown
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOON
HO PARK
Last Known Address: 143 Red Aa-
pie Way SW, Lake City, FL 32024
Also Attempted AT: 1690 Renais-
sance Commons Boulevard, Boynton
Beach, FL 33426; 2427 Bent Tree
Rd., #RR2514, Palm Harbor, FL
34683 7707 and 57 Newbury St., Apt
413, Peabody,MA 01960-3820
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to Foreclose a Mortgage on the fol-
lowing described property:
LOT 19, LAUREL LAKE SUBDI-
VISION, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF AS RECORDED I PLAT BOOK
7, PAGES 9 AND 10 OF THE PUB-


Legal

LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or be-
fore March 25, 2010, a date which is
thirty (30) days after the first publi-
cation of this Notice in the LAKE
CITY REPORTER and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA.
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 26 day of February, 2010
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04538246
March 26,2010
April 2, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION '
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000110
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FEARL RAY WHITEHEAD, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION .
TO:
FEARL RAY WHITEHEAD
Last Known Address: 737 SW
Manatee Terrace, Fort White, FL
32038
Other Address: P.O. Box 1019, Fort
White, FL 32038
Current Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
LOT 44, UNIT 12, THREE RIVERS
ESTATES, SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PAGE 117, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
Has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney
for Plaintiff whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE ,120, FT.
LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or be-
fore April 12, 2010, a date which is
within thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this Notice in the
LAKE CITY REPORTER and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiffs attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
In accordance with the Americans
with DisAbulities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled 'persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special, ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 10 day of March,;
2010.
P. Dewitt Cason
As Clerk- of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
04538436
March 26,2010
April 2, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 122010 CA000066
U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI-
ATION, AS TRUSTEE ON BE-
HALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE
CSFB MORTGAGE PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2005-CF1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JUDY ANDERSON, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ANNIE MAE BROWN
Last known Address: 1275 South-
west County Road 778, Fort White,
FL, 32038
- Current Residence Unknown
HOSEA BROWN
Last known Address: 1275 South-
west County Road 778, Fort White,
FL, 32038 h
Current residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to Foreclose a Mortgage on the fol-
lowing described property:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF SE 1/4 OF SE
1/4 OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 17 AND GO
EAST ALONG SAID SECTION
LINE 210 FEET FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING, THENCE NORTH
105 FEET, EAST 210 FEET,
SOUTH 105 FEET AND WEST 210
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, CONTAINING 1/2 ACRE
MORE OR LESS, LYING AND
BEING IN COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA..
Has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a.copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 on or be-


fore April 5, 2010, a date which is
within thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this Notice in the
(Please publish in LAKE CITY RE-
PORTER) and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 2 day of March, 2010
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk Of The Circuit Court


Legal

By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04538346
March 26, 2010
April 2,2010



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000144
DIVISION:
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUST-
EES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER, OR AGAINST, FREDERICK
J. HAYDEN, DECEASED, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, LIENORS, ASSIGNEES, LIE-
NORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST, FREDERICK J. HAY-
DEN, DECEASED
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS.
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in COLUMBIA
County, Florida:
LOT 4, SUNNYDALE FARMS, A
SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 53, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TO-
GETHER WITH A MOBILE
HOME LOCATED THEREON AS
A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND
AN APPURTENANCE THERETO.
VIN FLHMBFP127845501A AND
FLHMBFP127845501B.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses within 30 days after
the first publication, if any, on Flori-
da Default Law Group, P.L., Plain-
tiff's attorney, whose address is 9119
Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida .33634, and file the
original with this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for two. consecutive
weekss in the Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS 'my hand and the seal of
this Court on, this 17 day of March,
2010.
P. DeWittCason
Clerk of the Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
, Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018 *
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
COUNTRY-SPECFNMA
F10009427
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-,
ing.
04538634
March 26,2010.
.April 2,2010


100 Opportunities

04538674
A/R Collections Clerk needed
for fast paced environment. Ind.
must have data entry exp.,
be able to type 45 cwpm, be
detailed oriented dependable
and have the ability to work
with others. Previous collections
exp. a must. DFW.
Fax resume to 386-758-4523
Attention "Collections Clerk"

04538754 U O
CUSTOMER
* SERVICE/SALES
Position available. Looking for
Goal-oriented individuals.
Please email resume to:
greatjobs@lcjobs.info
or call 386-487-1742

F/T Secretary/Clerical position
open in local Professional Office.
Must have High School Diploma
and experience with Microsoft
Outlook & Excel. Punctual/Team
Player Benefits Available
Medical/401K/Profit Sharing
Apply in person: Idaho Timber
1786 SE SR 100


100 Job
100 hOpportunities

04538789
LEGAL SECRETARY
NEEDED for law firm in Lake
City, Florida. Candidate must
type a minimum of 50 wpm
using WordPerfect, have good
computer skills, secretarial
skills, people skills and
organizational skills. At least
2 years legal experience desired.
Please fax cover letter/resume to
386-758-0950.
ADMIN. ASSIST
Medical sales office seeking long
term professional. Sales exp. a
plus. Telemarketing exp a must.
Mon - Fri 9-5. $7.50 per hr plus
bonus $400-$2000. Based on sales
average per location.
Fax resume to 904-278-6172
ASE TECH NEEDED.
Apply 1070 NW Main Blvd. LC
'4/5 -4/9 8a-5p.
Must have own tools.
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Cosmetology Instructor
Must have 6 years of full time
experience. 386-647-4202
for information.
Floor Technician needed. Must
be able to strip, wax floors & have
at least one years exp. Afternoons
& evenings. Salary negotiable
depending on exp. Clean drivers
license & ability to get to Live
Oak. Fax resume to 386-362-6822
6 TEMP Farmworkers needed
5/3/10 - 1/15/11. Workers will
seed, set, cut, house, & strip
tobacco. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
$7.25/hr to $8.00/hr depending on
crop activity. Worksites in Ballard
Co KY. Report or send a resume to
nearest local FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office &
reference JO # KY 0397307.
Gage Tobacco - La Center, KY
HELP WANTED?
Come help us market our
business. We need 3 or 4 people to
start immediately. Must be fun,
energetic and professioional.
Call Ashley at 386-438-8674
Delivery Driver Trainee
Dr Pepper, Snapple
Benefits land good pay
www.dpsg.com
OFFICE MANAGER.
Mortgage Processing,
Finance Experience a Plus.
Fax Resume to: 386-755-8608
Live-in CNA/housekeeper for
Paraplegic in Suwannee Co.
Honest/dependable w/ref. Call for
salary details. 386-658-1230
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
Stylist/Barber wanted.
Busy shop, most make $10-$15
per hr plus tips. Paid vacation.
Full time & Part time.
Call 386-984-0101 for interview.
6 TEMP Farmworkers needed
5/3/10 - 12/18/10. Workers will
seed, set, cut, house, & strip
tobacco. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
* reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
$7.25/hr to $8.00/hr depending on
crop activity. Worksites in Todd
Co KY & Montgomery Co TN.
Report or send a resume to nearest
local FL Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & reference JO #
KY 0397205.
Walter Andrews - Guthrie, KY

12 Medical
120 Employment

LPN or RN Fulltiine Relief
needed for all,3 shifts. Lake City
Cluster ICF for Developmentally,
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,


Needed Nurse Practicioner or
Physicians Assistant for Internal
Medicine practice. Call Nancy at
Southern Internal Medicine for
interview. 386-719-2540
Part time: Nurse 15 hrs;
Receptionist 20 hours per week;
Call 904-389-0444


240 Schools &
240 1Education

04538587
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-04/12'/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-04/12/10
* Pharm Tech national certifica-
tion $900 next class-05/04/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE 8 Week old kittens. Black
White. Healthy & in need of good
homes. Very adorable & playful.
Wormed & flea free ALL GONE
, GOLDEN RETRIVER puppy.
CKC registered. POP.
Female. $350. 386-623-1577 or
386-754-5361
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
.and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species,of wild,
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Registered German Shepherd
puppies $350. Ready NOW.
Parent On Premisis
386-365-2935.

330 Livestock &
3J3 Supplies

CATTLE - Cows, Angus bulls,
bred heffers & yearlings.
PIGS Beautiful white Yorkshire.
386-755-3500 or 365-1352


361 Farm Equipment

Kubota M9000 tractor, 4WD,
90HP, 495hrs, Custom built
forestry cage w/ door, full belly
pans and easy access maintenance
panels, front-end loader
w/ reinforced bucket, replaceable
teeth, under-mount cutting
edge/scraper, quick attach and
adjustable forks(includes forks),
custom A/C system, Brown Tree
Cutter included. $30K Call Tom
(678)877-5938 for all the details.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

Apartment size Kenmore WVsmer
& Dryer on rollers. $350.B�6o.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387 ,

Very Nice HEAVY DUTY
Whirlpool Dryer. White,
works well. $135.00.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387.
WASHER & DRYER - Heavy
Duty White Roper set, like new.
Works great. $150.00. obo
386-867-1106


408 Furniture

ANTIQUE QUEEN size
(Dark Wood) bed.frame.
$250. obo
386-754-9295 or 984-0387
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
for medium to large TV with extra
shelving. $35.00 obo
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
Lt. Tan Very comfortable
large suade recliner.
Like new $265. obo
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
MEDIUM OAK Rectange coffee
table'w/end table. Smoked glass.
$50.00
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
WANTED Junk Cars,
Trucks, RV's etc.
Paying CASH $225.00 and up.
Free pickup 386-867-1396 .
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
1 995 k in CAS-HI tlrpp Piek lln!


l.h kL CI oItI r .n1 386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales


The Lake City Reporter
is looking for a dynamic and capable sales
professional to sell advertising in our
newspaper, magazines and online products.
We need a person with the ability, to make
strong presentations.

Professionalism, being active in the field and closing sales
are three key attributes for which we are looking. We offer
a salar) and a strong commission plan, along with a good
benefits package. HI you have a strong desire to succeed and
the skills to back it up, we want to hear from you.'

Please email your resume to: Lynda Strickland, marketing director,
at lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com
or mail it to 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055.
- NO PHONE CALLS - A


FIRST SATURDAY.APRIL 3.
Spring Street, White Springs
v Suwannee River River Yoga
Open House. 9:30 & 11:30
v Painting Herbs Workshop
w/Janet Moses. 10:30 - 12 noon.
v Lucindagail - Singing @
Spring St. Antiques 1 - 3pm
Fri & Sat. 7-? 407 NW Desoto St.
Behind Post Office. Christmas
stuff, Hull potery, tools,
much much more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads,
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat 8-12. Estate, LR & BR furn.,
camping, (hitch, dishes,etc) motor-
cycle items & trailer, crafts, books
725 NW Zack Dr. 386-984-5217


440 Miscellaneous

2KT DIAMOND Wedding Rings.
Paid $9000. Will sell for $4000.
Please call 386-755-7324
for more information.
Gun Cabinet w/glass locking
door. 3'Wx80"L. Homemade/great
quality, Holds 10 rifles & 10 hand-
guns. Must sell $50. 386-867-1106


440 Miscellaneous

TRAILER 4FT X 6FT.
VERY COOD CONDITION.
$275.
CALL 386-752-5996

630\ Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

14-16 WIDE-MOBILE HOMES
3br/2ba. $525-$550.
Quiet, clean country park. No pets.
Dep. &Ref's 386-758-2280.
2br/1ba. MH w/screen porch.
Newly renovated. Small main-
tained park. No Pets. Credit check.
$475. mo. $475. sec. Smoke free
environment. 386-719-9169.
3br/lba, Partly furnished,clean &
quiet private park. Off Turner
Rd.on Yates Loop Call: 386-752-
6269 or Iv message if no answer.
: Clean 2br/2ba on 5 acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coun-
try setting just north of LC. $400.
mo. 1st, last.& sec. (954)818-4481
Move in Discount $100. 2br/lba
from $450 & 3br/2ba from $550.
Includes water & sewer. No Pets!
Se habla espanol 386-961-0017
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
Very Clean Remodeled 3br/2ba
DWMH 10 mi. SW of LC.
Fenced, private. NO PETS!
$750.mo. + sec.. 386-984-7478.

�A0A Mobile Homes
60U for Sale

Don't Miss this 5 bedroom/2bath,
2100 sqft home, inc. options like
thermopane windows & more.
$50,675. John T. 386-752-1452
FACTORY REPO'S, 5 left.
Don't miss out on this 4br/2ba for
just $385. per mo. Inc., Delivery,
set up w/AC, skirting and steps.
Call John T. 386-752-1452
FOR SALE LAKE CITY, 2006
.4br/2ba MH on 5 ac. already
fenced. Only 10% dn of $104,900
WAC. Call Jim 386-752-.7751
Got Horses or Farm Animals??
4 acres & 2006 -4br/2ba 2000 sqft.
Mobile Home, Concrete floor
garage & fenced. Lake City area
10% dn of $109,900.W.A.C.
Call Jim at 386-752-7751
I'll sell any singlewide & I have
5 ready to go right now for
$150. over Invoice Now that's
the best deal in Florida.
CallJohn 386-752-1452
Live Oak Area off CR 250, 1 acre
& 2007 Mobile HOme. 3br/2ba,
1480 sqft., 10%dn of $89,900
W.A.C Call Jeff @ 386-752-7751.
Tired of people trying to tie up
your property. Get in this 3br/2ba
for just $265. a mo. No land
invloved. JohnT. 386-752-1452

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

$400 MOVES YOU IN!
-- or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423 -
04538278
*THEY CALL IT WINDSONG*
WE CALL IT HOME
Still The Best Deal in Town
(386) 758-8455

04538666
FREE RENT
Monthly Specials!
1 BR and 2 BR's
starting at $500.00 and up
Security Gate, Pool,
Free Cable or water.
Choose between 5 properties
386-754-1800
386-754-8029

A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2BR/2BA apts., garage
W/D hook up. patio. $600 & up, +
SD, 386 965-0276 or 466-7392
Studios & lBr's from $140/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73O Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent

04538824
Cute 2BR/2BA brick duplex
unit for rent. Well kept.
Convenient location at 216 SW
Cannon Creek Dr., close to S.R.
47 and 1-75. $800/month plus
deposit. Call Maston Crapps at
Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc.
(Realtor) 386-365-1444.

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, effi-


cient, 9.5, some pets, lease. 1st,
last, sec, ref. Lake City area $650
386-752-2555/352-494-1989
'2 homes: 4br/2ba near Hwy 47 &
1-75. & a Large 2br in town.
Jane S. Usher, Lic. Real Estate
Broker. 386-755-3500/365-1352
3B/2BA BRICK, 2 car carport.
Large yard.
Country Club Rd. South
,$950 month. 386-365-5464
3br/lba Brick on 5 acres. CH/A
On Suwannee Valley Rd. LC.
$750. mo +$700. dep.
Pet fee applies. 386-365-8543
3BR/2BA CB home Carport hard-
wood floors. CH/A Fenced yard.
Good area. $825 mo plus security.
386-752-0118 or 623-1698


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


DILBERT


I NEED TRAINING
TO USE OUR NEW
SOFTWARE.

-


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


PRETEND WE HAVE A
3JOB OPENING FOR A
TECHNICAL EXPERT IN
THAT FIELD. THEN ASK
APPLICANTS HOLW THEY
WOULD DO WHATEVER
IT IS THAT YOU NEED
TO DO.


I/fo /J


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Wife's mostly male colleagues

are threat to jealous husband


DOES YOUR
1 COMPANY "PROVIDE"
PROVIDE IS A
STRAINING? STRONG
E I WORD.


-JON .


1111111111 ............. I .................................... a- . 11-11- I.. . - 11, -1


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST.


ARIES (March: 21-
April 19): Keep a close
watch on your financial
situation. An opportunity to
make some subtle changes
will allow you the freedom
you've been looking for.
A ronin�tic dilemma will
leave you in limbo. ***-
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Troubles at home
and with your relationships
can be expected. Don't let
a stubborn attitude lead to
problems you can't reverse.
Focus on your goals, not
silly arguments. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Your involve-
ment in a good cause can
be beneficial but, if you are
too busy doing all the work,
you will miss meeting some-
one with something to offer
you. An unexpected change
of plans must be handled
honestly. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't be afraid
of change and you won't be
disappointed. Networking
can broaden your aware-
ness while helping you
scope out some interesting
alternatives to the way you
live your life. ***-*
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Get business out of
the way before you decide
to play. Emotional -decep-
tion can be costly if you
listen to a risky scheme.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

Focus on your goals, com-
pleting your work and get-
ting together with friends,
lovers or family. **** ,
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't believe every-
thing you hear. You will be
up against some tough com-
petition but, if you are hon-
est about who you are and
what you have to offer, you
will win in the end. Love is
in the stars, whether you
are with someone or single.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): The more time you
spend talking to others, the
sooner you will realize how
much you'have to offer. An
interesting change regard-
ing working will leave you
open to take on a project
that offers greater income.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You need to
forget about serious issues
and take a moment to relax.
If you push to get things
done, you will hit a brick
wall. You will accomplish so
much more if you can dis-
tance yourself from busi-
ness and emotional worries
that cannot be resolved
quite yet. ***
SAGIlTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You will


come into money in an un-
usual way but, if you aren't
honest and upfront, you
will face opposition. Keep a
low profile and don't share
information on how much
you have or. are entitled to
receive. Exaggeration will
lead to trouble. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Join forces
with people who have simi-
lar interests and you will
make headway. Don't, how-
ever, believe everythingyou
hear. Check out references
and ask questions that will
allow you to decide who is
a good fit for you and who
isn't. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Someone is like-
ly to withhold information.
Be as honest as you can.
Offer alternatives if some-
one is dissatisfied with your
plans. Be willing to work
with what's being offered
and you will find common
ground. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): If you want to
know what's going on, ask.
Your ability to twist things
around to fit your needs will
enable you to control a situ-
ation that has the potential
to spin out of control. Don't
fall victim to uncertainty
when a decision must be
made in order to get ahead.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter ip the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: F equals C
F'FZKCTUYDX KMG C K H G AMYC
XY-CGLZUDW LZGI ZKNG HGGT
UDXUHG LZGC - K HGXUMG, K


H MG KC, K NUXU YD ."


C J ZK C C K H


K E U
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "A lot of good arguments are spoiled by s6me fool
Who knows what he is talking about." - Miguel de Unamuno


(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 4-2


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band, "Hugh," and I have
been married 16 years. We
generally have a good rela-
tionship, with few arguments.
We seldom participate in ac-
tivities that don't include each
other.
Three years ago, I was
hired to work in the office of.
a manufacturing facility. The
majority of the workers are
men. Although Hugh denies
it, I suspect he's uncomfort-
able about it.
When I participate in com-
pany events for employees
only, he becomes jealous
and rants that it isn't fair for
spouses to be excluded. Once
in a while, my co-workers and
I go out for drinks after work.
When I'm asked to join them,
Hugh goes on the offensive,
demanding to know all the
details. He then calls my cell
phone repeatedly until I get
home.
I'm hurt that:he finds me
and my associates so untrust-
worthy. He has met the peo-
ple I work with and has seen
that they're all friendly and
happily married. I encourage
him to do things on his own
with his friends, hoping he'll
see that I trust him and will
return the favor. What can I
do to improve the situation?
- PULLED IN TWO IN
PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR PULLED IN
TWO: Have you talked to
your husband about his be-
havior and how itrhakes you


to make love when they are
houseguests isn't rude or dis-
respectful, provided the pic-
tures don't fall off the walls
and there are no complaints
about noise from the neigh-
bors. However, if the idea
makes you uncomfortable
and unable to relax and enjoy
the intimacy, then you and
your husband should vaca-
tion in a hotel where you can
expect to have more privacy.
DEAR ABBY: How do I
stop my shoes from squeak-
ing? I have a pair that I love,
but they squeak so badly it
drives me crazy. Everyone
can hear my shoes when I
am walking. Can you help?
- NOT THE OLD SOFT
SHOE
DEAR N.T.O.S.S.: Ac-
cording to the book "Haley's
Hints," a way to solve your
problem is to pierce the soles
of your squeaky shoes four
or five times with a darning,
needle at the ball of the foot.
If that doesn't do the trick,
"place the shoes in a solution
of salt water at room tem-
perature, just so the soles are
covered. After soaking for 15
minutes, dry them off and
place the soles in boiled lin-
seed oil overnight. The next
morning, remove the shoes,'
dry them well and your fin-
icky footwear should be com-
pletely silenced!"
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


Abigail Van Buren,
www.deorabby.com
feel? If not, you should. But
please understand that short
of quitting your job and go-
ing to work in a convent, you
can't improve the situation.
The problem is your husband
is insecure. Only he can fix
that, which would first re-
quire his admitting it. Sad to
say, he may not even be able
to admit it to himself.
This is a difficult time to
go job-hunting, so I don't ad-
vise it. But in the meantime,
please do not make his prob-
lem your own. Accept that he
has a problem, but don't allow
it to jeopardize your work re-
lationships.
DEAR ABBY: Is it OK to
have sex when you're a guest
in someone's home? I say
no, but my husband feels the
host knows we're married so'
it's not inappropriate. I think
it's rude and shows a lack of
respect for the host
Would you please settle
this once and for all? When
we stay with friends, we end
up fighting during our vaca-
tion. - UNCOMFORTABLE
IN TEXAS
DEAR UNCOMFORT-
ABLE: For a married couple


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404


CLASSIC PEANUTS












73O Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$800/mo.
864-517-0522.


FOR RENT 4br/2ba CHA Brick
home on 1 ac., CR 245A. Ceramic
tile and capet throughout $800. mo
$800 deposit (904)708-8478
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752,6082
Nice! Executive 2005 Brick Home
3/2 w/Lg master suite. Country
Club. Close to town. Tile Floors,
marble tops, stainless fridge, stove,
micro, d/washer. 1900 sqft.
$1500. Ist/last dep. 386-623-2156
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
04538572
3 bd/ 2 ba home in nice S/D
2 car garage. $950 month
Susan Eagle, Realtor
386-623-6612
' Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc
Very Nice 2 bedroom, 1 bath
house for rent in town,
$700/ mo and 700 deposit.
386-758-3922
Very nice 3br/2ba brick home.
$745. mo. plus $400. Security dep.
Call 386-963-4974
Application required.

750 Business &
Office Rentals
Office Building, Convient
location w/6 offices, Conference
Room, kitchen, ample parking.
Partially furnished. $2,500 mo.
For appointment 386-754-9293
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Space available at Country Club
Plaza East Baya Ave. 2000 sq ft.
2 restrooms, new carpet. Call
386-497-4762 or 386-984-0622


770 Condos For Rent
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560


790 Vacation Rentals
Trout Season Horseshoe Beach
Gulf Front 2br home, w/lg water-
front porch, dock, fish sink. Avail
wkends. $345. or wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633

805 Lots for Sale
1 AC. 3 Rivers Est. Beautiful
wooded, high & dry w/river ac-
cess. Owner Finan., No down pmt.
$256/mo. $24,900. 352-215-1018

1 AC. in Columbia City. Well
already installed on gorgeous Oak
shaded home site. Owner Financ-
ing. No down pint. $29,900. -
$307. mo. 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED

80_5 Lots for Sale I


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings a4ver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity bass.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

04538697 ,
Big home on quiet street
in established neighborhood
Call 269-1490 & leave message
BURBACH REALTY

2/2 on 10 ac. w/3 out buildings
and fruit trees in O'Brien.
$154,888. Call 386-755-6178 or
(828)754-4537
For Sale/Lease 3bd/lba brick,
near downtown. New carpet, paint
(in/out), doors, etc. Lg yard w/Pe-
can trees. $700 mo. 561-723-4306

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 Ac.,Ft. White. Well, Septic &
Power. Owner Financing!
NO DOWN! $69,900.
Only $613./mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
.4-1/2 AC. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks! Great area!
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.Land-Owner-Financing.com
WE FINANCE! Half to ten acre
lots. Some with w/s/pp
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1995 FORD RANGER XLT
Short Wheel base, 5 speed.
Cold AC. $3675.00. OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
2004 FORD F-150 Triton XLT
(4 door) pickup. Excellent condi-
tion, silver, too many extras to list.
$11,500. FIRM 386-752-5996

951 Recreational
5 Vehicles
2010 PUMA Travel Trailer 32ft.
2 slide outs, Air awning, King
Island Bed. Many extras. $18,900.
Lake City. (863)660-8539

at Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
91 DODGE MINIVAN.
Runs good. Good on gas.
$800.00. OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


I.- t . j l 2008 Chevy .
Cobalt C
T.42 :


.2 2006 Jeep
S Gr. Cherokee
.r f T 4 Te-..


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ROUNTREEMOORETOYOTA.COM


Lake City Reporter We hate to brag,

4 . but we thought our
>' Ar, 0 readers should hear
,I i ^. EnflglieerIng the good news about
- 1 ACCOUNTING the continued success
.... s w iw w ^': ^1 " ^ < our Help Wanted
a . C/ 0 section has had in

i'f o, matching thousands
CC . of readers with
great jobs.





Don't blow your chances. Read the Help Wanted section of the Classifieds

to hear about the latest job opportunities, and soon you'll be tooting your own horn!





Lake City Reporter Classifieds
Call 386-755-5445 and get the latest jobs delivered right to your door!
www.lakecityreporter.com


Classified Department: 755-5440


FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 2010


NEW 2010 YOYA . COROLLA


NEW 2010 CAM Y B


2009 Jeep 2003 Honda 2003 Toyota
SWrangler Element Avalor
- . l, r.1, 4 .4 L:... . Onl' , 6 t
. '>< " * - "1" _ 1 6 S


S '2003 Toyota
Tacoma


2009 D.odge
Challenger


2010 Ford ,- - - -
F-A150 LS .
T9380
� !~- -,. dV,


2000 Chevy
S-lo
so b


2008 Ford
Mustang
T9346


ROUNTREE MOORJE

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