Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text





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Sunday, January 31, 2010


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www.lakecityreporter.cor,


Hit-and-run leaves 1 dead


Reports: Driver
caught more than
a half-hour later.
From staff reports
A Perry man died late
Friday evening after he
was struck and killed by a
passing motorist on
Interstate 75, according to
reports. '


Ivan N. Branch, 56, died
From the injuries he suf-
fered as a result of the col-
lision.
According to reports
from the Florida Highway
Patrol, Branch was
crossing the interstate
near the U.S. Highway
90 interchange around
10:40 p.m. Friday. A 1999
Mercury van, driven by


Blanca Flor Duran, 18,
of Smyrna, Ga., was trav-
eling northbound at the
same time.
For unknown reasons,
the van struck Branch as
he was crossing the road.
Duran did not stop follow-
ing the collision, and con-
tinued traveling north on
Interstate 75.
The van was stopped


more than a half hour later
by FHP troopers near the
463 mile marker of 1-75.
Duran, nor passengers
Tomas Arreola-Duran,
46, of Marietta, and Felix
Lopez-Santiago, 33, of St.
Cloud, were injured in the
crash.
Charges are pending the
outcome of the highway
patrol investigation.


A sinking problem


JASON MATTHEW WALKERJLake City Reporter
Fort White High School Principal Keith Hatcher surveys two of four sinkholes found in a fenced-in retention pond near the
football field Friday afternoon. A total of 12 sinkholes have been reported in southern parts of the county, including on people's
property and the road's rights-of-way. 'It concerns me,' principal Hatcher said. 'But fortunately the thing about these are that
they're in fenced-in areas. I would be a whole lot more concerned if students had access to this area.'


Sinkholes opening after


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County
Emergency
Management
officials are
investigating
a series of sinkholes that
have emerged since the
heavy rains in Columbia
County last week.
Columbia County
Emergency Management
Director Ronnie McCardle


said the departmenthas
received several calls
where residents have
reported sinkholes on
,their property, on road
rights-of-way and on
school property.
"Most of the sinkholes
are in the southern part of
the county," he said,
noting two sinks were
reported Wednesday.
'There's been 12
sinkholes reported since
the rain Thursday."


McCardle said th
have varied in size,
locations, ranging f
several inches wide
several feet wide.
"The size of the
sinkholes are rangi
where from the size
small bowl to large
to park a pickup tru
it," he said.
McCardle said th
no special safety co
with the emergence
the sinkholes, but p


heavy rains
ie sinks should report new sink
and holes to the Emergency
rom Management Office at
to 758-1125.
"We'll go out and inspect
it," he said. "If it's on
ng any private property there is
e of a nothing we can do about it,
enough but people need to notify
ick in their homeowner's
insurance provider. We'll
tere are come out and take pictures
ncerns of it and mark the
e of ' longitude and latitude of
people it."


Vol. 136, No. 12 E $1.00

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Still alive: $32.9M

broadband grant

remains possible


Application was
filed in August
2009.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The North Florida area is
still alive in its bid to receive
$32.9 million in stimulus
funding through a federal
broadband grant.
During the North Florida
Economic Development
Partnership board of direc-
tors meeting Friday morn-
ing, board members were
given an update on the
broadband grant applica-
tion filed in August 2009.
The meeting was held in
the Lake City Community
College administrative
building and attracted a
crowd of about 20 people.
North Florida Economic
Development Partnership


executive director Jeff
Hendry said there are only
two Florida broadband
grant applications to reach
this stage. The other Florida
broadband grant under con-
sideration is from the Palm
Beach County area.
'"There was a pot of
money available, specifi-
cally for broadband, with
broadband being able to
generate high-speed con-
nectivity throughout the
region," he said. "There
are pockets throughout our
region that have some high-
speed connectivity, but for
the most part being a rural
region, those high connec-
tivity points are few and far
between."
Funds from the $32.9 mil-
lion grant would be used to
build a wireless infrastruc-
ture that would serve a 14-
GRANT continued on 3A


Columbia Teacher

of the Year to be

announced Thursday


Fifteen finalists
from area schools
to compete.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter. com
Nominees for the 2011
Columbia County School
Teacher of the Year have
shown their dedication
toward their jobs with a
combination of hard work,
diligence, creativity and
selflessness. They've all
been honored for that hard
work as teachers of the year
at their respective schools,
but one of them will be
recognized at a higher level
this week.
Teachers from 14 schools
around the Columbia
County School District
are vying for that title,
which will be announced
at 4 p.m. Thursday at First


Presbyterian Church, 697
SW Baya Drive. The public
is invited to attend.
The featured speaker
will be Megan Allen, the
2010 Florida Teacher of the
Year and Christa McAuliffe
Ambassador of Education.
The teacher of the year
nominees are selected by
their peers at each of the
district schools. Nominees
include:
* Candace M. Hines,
a K-12 intensive reading
teacher at Columbia High
School with 37 years of
experience.
* Kimberly S. Bass, a 4th
grade teacher at Columbia
City Elementary School.
She has seven years of
teaching experience.
* A. Yevette Fuimaono, a
3rd grade teacher at Niblack
Elementary School with five
TEACHER continued on 6A


Best of the best: Two local teens achieve Eagle Scout ranking


jm',r0I MAI IItWVV VVLi ItLi I - -,."
Jonathan Smith, 17, is seen near two pergolas that he
designed at Alligator Lake Park as a service project, which
awarded him an Eagle Scout honor Saturday.


Crane, Smith
acquire scouting's
highest honor.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
Two local teenagers
received the highest rank
in scouting Saturday.
Casey Crane and Jonathan
Smith of Boy Scout Troop
85 became Eagle Scouts.
Scouts are required to
earn 21 merit badges to
receive the rank, said Scout
Master David Finley. It is a
multi-year process of fulfill-
ing requirements and par-
ticipating in activities.
"It's a recognition of their
accomplishments," he said.
Badges earned include


swimming, personal fitness,
and camping.
The troop has had more
than 100 Eagle Scouts dur-
ing its 85 year existence.
"Once an Eagle Scout,
always an Eagle Scout,"
Finley said.
One of Crane's friend's
got him interested in Cub
Scouts, he said. He contin-
ued with the program from
then on to his present rank
as an Eagle Scout.
"It's an honor not very
many people get," he said.
Scouting is about learn-
ing leadership skills and
being prepared in every
situation, Crane said. He is
the son of Carmen Crane.
Becoming an Eagle Scout
SCOUT continued on 5A


Casey Crane, 18, assisted the Ichetucknee Trace Tour by
adding on to the kiosks at Alligator Lake, Columbia City and
Cannon Creek.


,a !us !!!.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


5835
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 6A


Opinion... ............. ..4A
Business ................ IC
Obituaries ......... .. . . 3A
Lifestyle ................ I D
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Healthy market
forecast.


COMING
TUESDAY
School news from
the district.


~I


TI S:


�ip
-jr









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


." . . - AqrLOIDA
ezrlatcl- 44

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
3-25-32-34 18 1-6-10-14-21 Afternoon: 0-1-5 Afternoon: 3-2-6-9 ' 1-23-29-39-40-45 6-15-20-26-31
Evening: 6-0-0 Evening: 1-7-4-6 X3 PB9 X5


AROUND FLORIDA



Suffering well: Faith tested by pastor's cancer


By ERIC GORSKI
AP National Writer
DALLAS - Matt
Chandler doesn't feel
anything when the radia-
tion penetrates his brain.
It could start to burn later
in treatment. But it hasn't
beeh bad, this time lying
on the slab. Not yet, any-
way.
Chandler's lanky 6-foot-
5-inch frame rests on a
table at Baylor University
Medical Center. He wears
the same kind of jeans he
wears preaching to 6,000
people at The Village
Church in suburban
Flower Mound, where
the 35-year-old pastor is a
rising star of evangelical
Christianity.
Another cancer patient
Chandler has gotten to
know spends his time in
radiation imagining that
he's playing a round of
golf. Chandler on this
first Monday in January is
reflecting on Colossians
1:15-23, about the pre-
eminence of Christ and
making peace through the
blood of his cross.
Chandler wears a mask
with white webbing that
keeps his head still as the
radiation machine delivers
the highest possible dose
to what is considered to be
fatal and incurable brain
cancer.
This is Matt Chandler's
new normal. Each week-
day, he spends two hours
in the car - driven from
his suburban home to
downtown Dallas - for
eight minutes of radiation
and Scripture.


I' U~- I


In this Jan. 3, 2010 photo Pastor Matt Chandler looks up at a stop watch countdown before speaking to his congregation
for the first time since his brain surgery in Flower Mound, Texas. Chandler, a rising star in evangelical Christianity, is used to
preaching to 6,000 people. But these days, he spends time each day at a hospital, hands crossed over his chest, wearing a
special mask that keeps his head still as a radiation machine delivers the highest possible dose to his brain cancer. He wants
to grow old, to see his children grow up. Whatever happens, he says, is God's will. For Chandler, that does not mean waiting
for his fate. It means fighting for his life.


Chandler is trying to
suffer well. He would
never ask for such a trial,
but in some ways he wel-
comes this cancer. He says
he feels grateful that God
has counted him worthy to
endure it. He has always
preached that'God will
bring both joy and suffer-
ing but is only recently
learning to experience the
latter.
Since all this began
on Thanksgiving morn-


ing, Chandler says he
has asked "why me?"
just once, in a moment of
weakness.
He is praying that God
will heal him. He wants to
grow old, to walk his two
daughters down the aisle and
see his son become a better
athlete than he ever was.
Whatever happens, he
says, is God'.s will, and
God has his reasons. For
Chandler, that does not
mean waiting for his fate. It


means fighting for his life.
Thanksgiving, morning.
Chandler pours himself
a cup of coffee, feeds 6-
month-old Norah a bottle
and - as he is about to sit
down - collapses in front
of the fireplace.
At a hospital, Chandler
gets a CT scan, followed
by an MRI.
Not long afterward, the
ER doctor delivers the news:
"You have a small mass on
your frontal lobe. You need


to see a specialist"
It was Thanksgiving.
Chandler had not seen his
kids - Audrey, 7, Reid, 4,
and the baby - for hours.
He had collapsed in
front of them. For what-
ever reason, those grim
words from a doctor he'd
never met did not cause
his heart to drop. What
Chandler thought was,
"OK, we'll deal with that."
Getting the news meant he.
could go home.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Beauty queens vie for Miss America crown


LAS VEGAS
A group of 53 beauty
queens picked from
around the country for
their smiles, struts and
interview savvy were set
to woo a panel of judges in hopes
of winning the Miss America 2010
crown.
The young women from all 50
states plus the District of Columbia,
Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico will
cap a week of preliminary competi-
tion with the scheduled crowning
of a winner Saturday night in Las
Vegas.
The winner, crowned by reign-
ing Miss America Katie Stam, gets
a $50,000 scholarship and embarks
on a yearlong run with the title to '
represent the organization and raise
awareness for her chosen platform.
The 89-year-old pageant to be .
televised live on cable network TLC
is hosted by actor and "Extra" host
Mario Lopez, with help from Clinton
Kelly of TLC's "What Not to Wear."
The panel of judges include radio
talk show host Rush Limbaugh,
actress Vivica Fox, musician Dave
Koz, Miss America 2002 Katie
Harman, gymnast Shawn Johnson
and former "American Idol" final-
ist Brooke White. Comedian Paul
Rodriguez was set to be a judge,
but organizers said he pulled out
because of a family emergency.
Scores based on a week of prelimi-
nary competitions will be added to
Saturday's swimsuit, talent, evening
gown and interview competitions to
determine a winner. Each judge will
rank their five favorites in order, and
their ballots will be used to pick the
winner.
Miss Virginia Caressa Cameron,
Miss California Kristy Cavinder and
Miss Michigan Nicole Blaszczyk
each won $2,000 this week for win-
ning talent competitions among
three split fields of contestants. Miss
Oregon CC Barber, Miss New York
Alyse Zwick and Miss Puerto Rico
Mimi Pabon each won $1,000 in
nightly swimsuit competitions.
Miss Oklahoma Taylor Treat won
the $6,000 Quality of Life award,


Miss America contestants arrive at the 2010 Miss America Pageant, Thursday
at The Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino in Las Vegas.


given to the contestant judged to
excel most in volunteerism and com-
munity service.
In all, the Miss America
Organization planned to award
$340,000 in scholarships at the
national level. The organization says
its national, state and local chapters
gave more than $45 million last year
in cash and scholarships.

Music world preps for
Sunday's Grammys
LOS ANGELES - The music
world is celebrating all over town
this weekend with tributes, rehears-
als, parties and, of course, a gift suite
or two in anticipation of the 52nd
Annual Grammy Awards on Sunday
night at Staples Center.
Elton John, James Taylor, Dave
Matthews and more than a dozen
other artists honored Neil Young as
the MusiCares Person of the Year at
the Los Angeles Convention Center.
The singer-songwriter and more
than 2,000 other guests were treated
to new interpretations of 20 of his
timeless songs, including "Harvest
Moon" and "Cinnamon Girl," during
the nearly four-hour program.


Young was feted Friday night for
his decades of philanthropic' service,
including work with Farm Aid and
the Bridge School Concerts, which
raise money to provide services for
kids with severe speech and physical
impairments.
"I'd forgotten how many songs I'd
written," the 64-year-old musician
said.
Young watched the show with his
wife, Pegi, by his side. At the end of
the night, a humble Young took the,
stage and said he hoped the songs
he's writing today are as good as the
ones performed Friday.
"It's been a great night. It wore
me out," he said. "Now I've got to go
back and try and write some songs."
Taylor Swift performed a rollick-
ing version of her hit "You Belong
With Me" as she rehearsed for her
big Grammy moment, but she may
have provided the most excitement
when she came off the stage.
Several young fans were waiting
anxiously as Swift gave a couple
of quick television interviews.
Afterward, she posed for pictures,
and made one young man swoon
when she shook his hand.
' Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Ernie Banks is 79.
* Former U.S. Rep. Dick
Gephardt, D-Mo., is 69.
* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Nolan Ryan is 63.
* Singer KC (KC and
the Sunshine Band) is 59.
* Rock musician Jeff
Hanneman (Slayer) is 46.


* Actress Minnie Driver
is 40.
* Actress Portia de
Rossi is 37.
* Actor-comedian Bobby
Moynihan is 33.
* Actress Kerry
Washington is 33.
* Singer Justin
Timberlake is 29.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fa. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S.-Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(lIstrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any-
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m, to report a service
error for same day re-delivery. After 10:30
a.m., next day re-delivery or service relat-
ed credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............754-0407
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ...............$48.79
52 Weeks............... .... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ................ . $41.40
24 Weeks.................. $82.80
52 Weeks ............. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Daily Scripture

"Be completely humble and gentle;
be patient, bearing with one
another in love."


- Ephesians 4:2,


Chandler can be sober
and silly, charming and
tough. He'll call men
"bro" and women "mama."
He drives a 2001 Chevy
Impala with 144,000 miles
and a broken radio. He
calls it the "Gimpala"
One of Chandler's say-
ings is, "It's OK to not
be OK - just don't stay
there."
Chandler's long, meaty
messages untangle large
chunks of Scripture. His
challenging approach
appeals, he believes, to
a generation looking for
transcendence and power.
His theology teaches
that all men are wicked,
that human beings have
offended a loving and
sovereign God, and that
God saves through Jesus'
death, burial and resurrec-
tion - not because people
do good deeds. In short,
Chandler is a Calvinist,
holding to a belief system
growing more popular
with young evangelicals.
After college Chandler
became a fiery evangelist
who led a college Bible
study and traveled the
Christian speaking cir-
cuit. He was hired from
another church in 2002
at age 28 to lead what is
now The Village Church,
a Southern Baptist con-
gregation that claimed 160
members at the time.
The church now meets
in a renovated former
grocery store with a 1,430-
seat auditorium; two satel-
lite campuses are flourish-
ing in Denton and Dallas,
and Chaidler speaks to.
large conferences.,,.


I


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427














OBITUARIES


Helen Stoney McDaniel
Helen Stoney McDaniel, 98, was
born on January the 10, 1912 in
Chemnitz, Germany. She passed
away on January the 19th, 2010
at the Suwannee valley Haven
hospice House in Lake City.
She had resided in the Village
Retirement Center in Gainesville,
Florida since 1989. She was pre-
deceased in death by her husband
Don McDaniel, her parents
Joseph H. and Mabel (Watson)
Stoney, and his wife Helen
(Overbough) Stoney, her sister
Marion S. Campbell (Frank), her
brother-in-law Adfer McDaniel
(Beatrice). She is survived
by her nieces and nephews
Charlotte Winsheiner (Harry),
Bob Campbell (Ann) Carolyn
Johnson, John Campbell, Diane
Lesser, David McDaniel (Renee)
Vallen McDaniel (Sandy) Linda
Schack, Mary Sink (Richard),
Tamy Ahumada (Gilbert). And
numerous great and great-great
nieces and nephews. She is also
survived by her special friends
Lowell and Gwen O'Steen who
were also her caretakers for many
years. If anyone ever lived a
service-oriented life, it would be
Helen McDaniel. Helen's father
was a hosiery representative for
the Lord and Taylor department
store of New York City, a job
that necessitated his traveling
frequently, to Germany. Helen
was born at time when the family
was living in Germany, in a town
named Chemnitz. The family
did not move back to America
until Helen was four years old. It
was a time of unrest, just before
World War I, and the Germans
confiscated almost everything the
family had. With little worldly
goods, they settled in Briarcliff
Manor, a beautiful spot in
Westchester County in rural New
York State. Growing up, Helen
attends the local schools, and as
a teenager he created what was
probably her first service program
for the town of Briarcliff Manor.
After finishing high school,
Helen attended and graduated
from Oneonta State Normal
School prepared to go into a life
of teaching. For eight years she
taught kindergarten through fourth
grade, and during the summers,
along with volunteering for one or
two weeks as a counselor at young
peoples church conferences,
she seized. opportunities to
expand her knowledge by taking
extension courses offered by such
schools as Boston University, St.
Lawrence University, Syracuse
University, Columbia University,
and The University of Handicrafts
in New York City. Armed with
this background, she was able
to qualify as the Women's and
Girls Secretary at the YMCA of
Norwich, New York, and later
at the YMCA in Hagerstown,
Maryland. In 1947 Helen
became the Associate Program


Secretary at the \Vest Side YMC'A
in New York Cit\. It \\as there
that she met her lutLire hIusband,
Don McDaniel. \\ho \\as living
at the "Y" while studying in
New York City. In 1952, Helen
became the Assistant Director
of the Maplewood Comnunnit\
Recreation Service inl Maplew ood,.
New Jersey. In 1955, she became
Director of Women's and Girls
Youth Activities in Maplew'ood.
Don became Director of Women's
and Girls Youth Activities in
Maplewood. Don was working in
nearby South Orange Community
House, and in 1956 they were
married. Over the next few years,
Helen held district advisory
positions with Girl Scout councils
in Dade County, Florida and
Greater Essex County, New Jersey,
and in 1962 she became Program
Director of the YWCA OF jersey
City, New Jersey. In 1966 she and
Don moved to Florida, and Hlelen
became a rehabilitation therapist
at South Florida State Hospital
until her retirement in 1982.
They then moved to the Lake
City area where in 1983, sadly,
Don passed away. In. her spare
time, Helen worked as a volunteer
at the Veterans Hospital in lIake
City, helping a group of twenty-
five wheelchair patients. Helen
has been interested in poetry all
her life. Her grandmother gave
recitations in costume and was
known as a fine entertainer. Helen
has written many poems, and in
2004 she saw an advertisement
about an international poetry
contest. On a whim, she entered
one of her poems and was thrilled
when the poem was selected for
publication on the Internet. It was
published in a book, Colors of
. Life, of which Helen has a copy.
Since living at the Village, Helen
has continued her volunteer work;
she has worked at Rose Court
and continues to volunteer at the
library. She volunteered atthe P.K.
Young Developmental School and
was one of the 1st tow volunteers
for this program in 1993. It
was a pilot program. Memorial
services will be held February
6, 2010, lla.m. at Bethlehem
Baptist Church, Reverend Lowell
O'Steen. Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441,
Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.con.

Morris H. Ross
Mr. Morris H. Ross, 85, of Lake
City, died late Friday evening in
the VA. Medical Center Hospice
following an illness of several
months. A native of Atlanta,
Georgia, Mr. Ross had been a
resident of Lake City for more
than sixty years having moved


here from lAtlanta. Mr. Ross \\as ;
\ ieralin of \W.W\. II ha% ing secri ed
in the IUnited States Na\y. lHe
Nw worked lor more than thirty) t ears
\itlh the V.A. Medical Center
in Lake Cit retiring allter serv-
ing as the head of the Inhalation
Department.I le was also a
licensed contractor and a licensed
electrical contractor. Follow ing
his retirement Mr. Ross and his
w\ile, Mattie lee loved to travel.
One of their most enjoyable trips
x\\a aa tour of EIurope. li veer\
much enjoyed his home in the
mountains of Robbinsville, North
Carolina. The friends he made
there, attending the Cedar Cliff
Baptist Church, his beloved min-
ister and just riding through the
mountains were very special to
him. Mr. Ross was also active in
the Lake City Masonic Lodge #27
for fifty seven years. Ile was a
Past Master of the Lodge, a mem-
ber of the Lake City Shrine Club.
the Lake City York Rite Bodies,
the Morocco Shrine Center in
Jacksonville and was also a Past
Patron of the Minnie Lee Chapter
SI113 Order of the Eastern Star in
Lake City. lie was a current mem-
her of the Order of the Eastern Star
in Robbinsville, North Carolina.
In his younger years, Mr. Ross
enjoyed hunting and fishing. Mr.
Ross was a member of the First
Christian Church of Lake City.
lie will forever be remembered as
a mlan who s1ved his family and
loved serving his Lord. Mr. Ross
is survived by his wife of sixty-
iour years, Mattie Lee Ross; his
son and daughter-in-law, David
& Cathy Ross of Lake City; a sis-
ter, Edna McDougald of Atlanta,
Georgia; two grandchildren, Audy
Golff (Karen) of Lake City and
Melissa Anderson (Tony) of Lake
City and a sister-in-law Carol Ann
Andrews. Five great grandchil-
dren; a great-great grand-daughter
and several nieces and nephews
also survive. Funeral services for
Mr. Ross will be conducted at
2:30 P.M. Monday afternoon in
the First Christian Church with
Pastor Douglas Allen officiat-
ing and Pastor Daniel Stewart of
tile Cedar Cliff Baptist Church
assisting. Interment with Masonic
graveside services will follow in
Memorial Cemetery. The family
will receive friends for one hour
prior to the service at the church.
In lieu of flowers the family
requests that memorial donations
be made to the Prayer Partners
at First Christian Church of Lake
City, P.O. Box 967, Lake City, FL
32056. Arrangements are underthe
direction of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025. (386)752-1234 Please
sign the on-line family guestbook
at ' . .
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


F
A


Celebration of a new rank
Salem Primitive Baptist Church honored Chief Petty Officer Brent Bedenbaugh (second from
left) and his wife, Kim, (left) during the Jan. 3 service. Bedenbaugh recently received his
military rank. He has been deployed in trips around the world as well as the Persian Gulf
Area. His parents Mike and Betty Bedenbaugh are also pictured.



POLICE REPORTS


Arrest Log
The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been
arrested but not convicted.
All people are presumed
innocent until proven guilty.
Tuesday, Jan. 26
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Barney Alexander,
26, 748 Brandywine Apts.,
introduction of contraband
into a correctional facility.
* Richard Edward
Casper, 49, 4254 SW 76th
Trail, Lake Butler, war-
rant: Failure to appear for
charges of possession of
a firearm by a convicted
felon.
* Tammy Marie
Dennehy, 35, 954 SW
Newark Dr., Fort White,
driving while license sus-


pended/revoked (habitual)
and violation of probation
on original charges of pos-
session of a controlled sub-
stance and habitual driving
while license suspended/
revoked.
E Stephen Matthew
Harrington, 24, 2166 SW
Jim Witt Road, burglary
of a structure, grand theft


and dealing in stolen
property.
* Ralph Benard Hunt,
68, homeless, aggravated
battery.
* Rodney Murnahan,
24, 446 SW Old Niblack
Ave., Fort White, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of third-
degree grand theft.


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GRANT
Continued From Page, 1A
county region.
Hendry said . federal
officials sent notification
on Dec. 10 that this area
was still in the running to
receive the grant funds. He
said more than 2,200 appli-
cations were reviewed from.
across the nation.
Applicants that did not
reach phase two have already
been notified they were not
selected to receive the fund-
ing, but this region hasn't
received that notification.
"We're cautiously optimis-
tic," Hendry said. "Through
our 14 counties and various
businesses, community col-
leges and governments we
also generated an additional
$9.5 million in in-kind con-
tributions."
The in-kind contributions
include existing towers that
can be utilized as part of the
network and potential land
donations for construction
for additional towers.
"This is something very
exciting and ifts quite an
accomplishment to get to this
point, but the bottom line is
it's the end-game that matters
and that's hopefully getting
that money drawn down for
this region," Hendry said.
Requests for proposals
have already been issued for
a second round of broad-
band grants, so Hendry said
he expects to receive fund-
ing notification or a denial
within the next few days.
"We really, in fairness,
need to know whether we
were funded in round one so
if not we can retool our appli-
cation and get it in for round
two," he said. '"We expect to
hear something within the
next week. There's so much
potential for economic devel-
opment and it's been our
position that this broadband
grant could be a real launch-
ing pad for a lot of great eco-
nomic activity - not only for
the businesses, but also for
the community."


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LAK CTYREORER LOCAL SNAJNAY3,21


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427













OPINION


Sunday, January 31,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
0 PI


UR
NIO


Caution

needed on

roadways

So far, 2010 is shaping
up to be a harsh year
for motorcyclists. One
month into the new
year, and Columbia
County has registered two seri-
ous wrecks involving motor-
cycles, including one fatality.
These are accidents that
didn't have to happen. In both
cases, police reports indicate
that another vehicle - not the
motorcycle driver - may have
been at fault. Also from reports,
it appears that there was very
little evasive action the motor-
cyclists could have taken, given
the circumstances and timing
of the wreck.
It's no surprise that motor-
cycle use is rapidly growing.
Fueled by ever-soaring gasoline
prices, this is the trend in many
parts of the nation - and espe-
cially in the Sunshine State.
Florida ranked second in
motorcycle fatalities in 2008,
the most recent year for which
the National Highway Traffic
Highway Safety Administration
has data. Only top-ranked
California and third place Texas
even came close to the 523
motorcycle riders killed on
Florida's roadways that year.
That death figure repre-
sents more than 10 percent of
all motorcyclists killed in the
United States in 2008. Sadly,
2010 isn't looking to improve on
that number.
Motorcyclists are 35 times
more likely to die in an acci-
dent than the passengers of
the opposing vehicle. This is a
sobering statistic.
It's also a statistic that man-
dates extra caution on our
roadways.
Motorcyclists have a respon-
sibility to drive safely and be on
guard for dangerous situations
on our roads. But the most cau-
tious motorcyclist is powerless
against the careless actions of
another driver.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTO RY
Today is Sunday, Jan.
31, the 31st day of 2010.
There are 334 days left in
the year.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and .double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


JD ALNG k IEAT9


9TAIJL(


Rose Smith, gone


Local educator Rose
Smith died almost
exactly 23 years ago
this month of cancer.
She was recognized
statewide as an outstanding and
innovative educator.
Rose began teaching in our
school system in 1955 and
served, our students as a teach-
er, librarian, reading supervisor,
and director of elementary edu-
cation.
Then-superintendent Silas
Pittman said of Rose, "She made
some of the greatest contribu-.
tions to our school system of
any individual we ever had."
Vocational Education Director
Rosebud McColskey said, "She
was one of the finest, most
beloved educators I have ever
met and one of the dearest
people I'have ever known."
As a sign of the esteem in
which Rose was held county-
wide, the school system dedi-
cated that year's comprehensive
Southern Association accredi-
tation process to her loving
memory.
We still miss you, Rose!

Well done, Beverly
Beverly Schulz, children's
librarian, is retiring from the
local public library after 23
years work serving the children
of our community.
The downtown library is
hosting a drop-in reception for
Beverly today from 34:30 pm.
Drop by and tell Beverly how
much you appreciate her years
of dedicated service.

Book signing
Kevin McCarthy, co-author
with me of the book "Lake City,
Florida - A Sesquicentennial
Tribute," will be speaking at the
downtown public library at
2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 7. He
will also be available to sign
books there.
Kevin is one of the most pro-
lific Florida authors, having writ-
ten some 40 books on Florida
people and places.



LETTERS TO


Patient's experience
not typical
Letter to the Editor:
Having read a recent Letter
to the Editor, "Health care
costs out of control," (Jan. 27),
I felt compelled to respond to
this article in which is written:
"... the doctor sprayed some
liquid freeze on a small spot
on my face and then gave me
an overall skin check. His total
time with me took about four
minutes. Then his assistant


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williamsh2@firn.edu
372 W. Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055

The Lake City book will be for
sale that Sunday or you can buy
one at Hunter Printing for $20 or
order one by mail at www.hmor-
riswilliams.com for $25.

Museum thanks
School Museum thanks to
Emma Morrell for donating
newspaper clippings showing
reunion write-ups and pictures
of the CHS graduation classes
of 1933-36
She also donated a 1932
photo and article written in
1932 about that year's CHS
football team. That team went
undefeated and untied, yet did
not win the conference cham-
pionship due to a provision
in the Dickinson System that
gave the championship to a one
loss team that played a harder
schedule than an undefeated
team.
Oddly, the very next season,
CHS won the championship
with one loss over another
undefeated team under the
same rule that had worked
against them the year before.

Free yearbooks
Our School Museum has 12
spare 1998 Niblack Sixth Grade
Center yearbooks to give away.
Those 1998 sixth graders
probably graduated in 2004.
Some names from that year-
book are Aimee Ronsonet,
Dallas Sapp, and Kiley Dicks.
We would be glad to give a
yearbook to any interested indi-
vidual or, better yet, to a class
member who would take all of


THE EDITOR

(not a doctor or nurse) cut off
six small moles (skin tags)
around my neck. She spent no
more than five and a half min-
utes. My bill for this nine and
one half minutes of work was
$950. That comes to $100 per
minute!"
First, I would like to make it
clear that this patient is not,
and has never been, a patient
of CMSMG Dermatology, nor
has he ever been a patient of
mine. It is unfortunate that
he had his unpleasant experi-


23 years


them and give them away at
your next reunion.

Saint Cecelia
The St. Cecelia Music Club
no longer exists here but in its
heyday it was a vital part of our
arts community.
The first 12 presidents, all
women, were, in no particular
order: Pearl Jordan, Charlotte
Arnold, Essie Cone, Margaret
Montgomery, Maud Gray, Patsy
Summers, Neva Murphree,
Virgil Ives, Ann Wilby, Ola Lee
Means, Annie Shingler, and
Mary Porter. Bill Baldwin was
the first male member.
Saint Cecilia was the patron
saint of musicians and church
music because, it was said, she
heard heavenly music in her
heart when she was married
and she sang to God as she was
dying.

Homecoming miracle
Last football season, CHS's
homecoming win over Ed White
High School was little short of
a miracle. For three quarters
Ed White built up a seemingly
insurmountable 32-7 lead, and
it looked like our chances for a
happy homecoming victory and
a district championship were
going up in smoke.
Then the Tigers came alive
in the fourth quarter, staged a
comeback for the ages, and won
36-32. Some have said it was the
greatest comeback win in CHS's
long, storied history.

Better light
A drunken man was look-
ing for his lost keys under a
streetlight. Someone stopped to
help him and finally asked, "Are
you sure this is where you lost
them?" The drunk replied, "Oh,
no. I lost them two blocks down
the street but the light was
much better here."

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


ence at another dermatology
facility. It is not the policy of
CMSMG Dermatology, nor its
medical director, myself, to
have any non-physician per-
form any procedure on any of
our patients. All procedures
are performed exclusively by
myself, and not by any of my
staff members. Furthermore,
it is our policy to provide our
patients with an estimated
cost related to predictable
services.
J. Anthony Trott, M.D.


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportecomrn


Let's work

together to

save mural


lynch mob sharp-
ens pitchforks and
marches downtown,
let's all take a deep
breath and look closely at the
situation surrounding Lake City's
endangered downtown mural.
Let's keep a mindset of calm
thinking and working together.
If you haven't heard, the
Keith Goodson-created mural
on the side of the Kuykendall
building in downtown Lake
City may be in jeopardy. The
mural is a masterpiece that
depicts Ichetucknee Springs
and its ecosystem. It was com-
pleted in the spring of 2008.
John Kuykendall owns the
building and leased the wall for
the mural through 2012, with
options for one-year renewals
provided the mural is main-
tained. Kuykendall is planning
to renovate the top floor of his
building for additional office
space and he must meet fire
protection codes. An internal
stairway arrives at the second
floor of the building at the
back wall. He says officials
have instructed him that an
additional fire escape is neces-
sary and the required distance
from the existing stairway only
gives two options for an exter-
nal fire escape - the north
wall (the mural) or the south
wall (overlooking Northeast
Veterans Street). He said to
meet code, a new fire escape
must attach to the ground. Fire
escapes with sliding ladders
in the last stage are grandfa-
thered in if they already exist,
but not allowed for new
installations.
That's right, one option is
cutting a doorway-sized hole
in the mural and running some
sort of switchback metal fire
escape down the painted wall.
That's the ugly, unacceptable
option. There has to be a
better way.
John Kuykendall is a good
man. He's a solid business-
man and a responsible citizen.
He restored his current Gulf
Coast Financial Services office
building to near-original gran-
deur. His building is arguably
the best-looking building in
the downtown area. He does
not want to deface the mural
that takes up his north wall.
He needs the assistance of city
government to help him with a
workable solution.
Installing the fire escape
on the blank south side of the
Kuykendall building makes
the most sense, but the city
will have to cooperate by clos-
ing the sidewalk on Northeast
Veterans Street. The street
in this block is one-way with
traffic flowing west. Parking
is only allowed on the south
side of the street here, oppo-
site Kuykendall's building.
Kuykendall's building is the
only one on this block, so
closing this sidewalk does not
hamper any other business.
Why not close the sidewalk
beside Kuykendall's building,
allow the proper fire escape
to be installed, then break up
the concrete and turn it into a
nice landscaped greenspace?
Why not direct foot traffic to the
other side of the one-way street,
adjacent to where cars park?
Closing a sidewalk requires
government procedure, but it is
not difficult. The only precedent
it sets is saying that city govern-
ment realizes the mural is of


much greater public importance
than a side-street sidewalk.
May cool heads and good
judgment prevail.
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


4A


.l- R . .


I - ----


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


Water supply meeting reactions mixed


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

GAINESVILLE -* A
Thursday night meeting to
address declining water lev-
els in the Floridan Aquifer
and a water supply plan
to address the change is
receiving mixed reviews
from area residents.
The meeting, which was
held at the Alachua County
Health Department, was
designed to give the pub-
lic information about the
planning process that is.
being utilized to formulate
a water supply plan. The
Upper Santa Fe River Basin.
is experiencing decreasing
flow levels and some offi-
cials and residents believe
there maybe a connection
between the two problems.
The meeting, which was
hosted by the Suwannee
River Water and the
St. Johns River Water
Management districts,
was held Thursday night
to allow more interaction


from the general public in
the water supply planning
process.
"In the Upper Santa Fe
River Basin, we're still in the
subgroup process and look-
ing'at the modeling, conser-
vation, alternative water sup-
plies and all of those compo-
nents are being developed
right now," said Suwannee
River Water Management
District senior hydrogeolo-
gist Carlos Herd.
The due date for the water
supply plan is Dec. 12.
Water management dis-
trict officials are evaluating
whether water from the
Floridan Aquifer is now
Going to counties east of'
the Columbia County area
and basing their plans on
projected water usage for
the next 20 years.
"That would happen if
all the projected demands
were taken from ground-
water in 2030," Herd said
of the water shift. "We're
trying to figure out when
that would start happening,


and if it's happening now,
we don't have the tools that
we can say that's happening
now. We have seen some
declines in flows in our riv-
ers in the Upper Santa Fe,
but we're still evaluating
that data also."
Four Rivers Audubon
member and Lake City resi-
dent Frank Sedmera attend-
ed the meeting arid said
he was pleased to get the
information that officials
provided.
"I think they did as good
of a job as could have been
done with civilians who are
not scientists who really
don't understand much
about the technical part of
this," he said. "They did
a wonderful job of trying
to and in many cases suc-
ceeding, in getting people
to better understand what
we're depending on to try
to predict the future. It's
very difficult to predict the
future with that many vari-
ables."
Save Our Suwannee sec-


retary and spokesperson
Annette Long said she still
has concerns about the
studies.
"The concepts they pre-
sented were very complex
and presented in a really
short time," she said. "I'm
afraid that from the tenor
of the people from the St.
Johns Water Management
District, that they are on
the track to want to issue
more permits. It sounds like
there is going to be a lot
of pressure from the utili-
ties in the big cities and it's
all about money. I'm afraid
it's going to be an uphill
battle and fear that if we
want to protect our part of
the Suwannee and Santa Fe
water sheds that are starting
to move toward Jacksonville
already, we're going to have
to be the ones that do it.
We'll have to do without in
our area and maybe move
water from other parts of the
Suwannee District to that
part of the district. That's
my worst fear."


Black History Month kicks off Monday


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@/lakecityreporter.comrn

Several events and activi-
ties are planned in honor
of Black History Month in
Columbia County by local
non-profit organization, It's
About My Efforts, Inc.
The theme for the month
is "Black history is every-
one's history," said Bea
Coker, event organizer.
"This is a different spin
than you're use to hearing,"
she said. "We have a lot of
history here in Lake City
that could not be possible


without the efforts of non-
blacks."
The first event is a cel-
ebration at 6 p.m. Monday
at Richardson Community
Center.
Elders in the community
will share their stories, an
African dance group will
perform and students will
present information on
black history.
A calendar listing other
events taking place in honor
of Black History Month
will be provided at the pro-
gram.
Genealogy of original


black families from Lake
City will be collected
throughout the month .
Other major events host-
ed by the organization:
* Black History Movie
Festivals from 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. Feb. 6 and Feb. 20;
* a 70s party from 4 to
6 p.m. Feb. 14 at Annie
Mattox Park.
* a bus trip to Fort Mose,
Florida's all free black set-
tlement in St. Augustine, for
the "What Freedom Looked
Like" tour leaving at 7 a.m.
Feb. 27 from Richardson
Gym;


Share
your events

www.CALENDAR



www.lakecityreporter.com


* and a closing awards
program at 4 p.m. Feb. 28.
For more information
about any event contact
Coker at 697- 6075.

GET----

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* WEATHER
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was a big goal, Smith said.
"I'm excited," he said.
"All the work for the last six
years has come together.":
Smith joined the Scouts
at 11 through his father,
who is involved with the
organization. He is the son


of Steve and Cathy Smith.
As a scout, he has learned
invaluable skills for life,
Smith said.
"It's definitely given me
a lot of confidence and the
ability to be a leader," he
said.


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Council to consider

permit renewal


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn

The City of Lake City
Council will consider a res-
olution for a permit renewal
application for its wastewa-
ter treatment plant at 7 p.m.
Monday at City Hall.
If approved, the resolu-
tion will authorize the city
to enter 'into a contract
with Jones Edmunds &
Associates, Inc. to develop
a facilities permit renewal
application required by
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
The permit is for the St.
Margaret Wastewater
Treatment Facility.
Each water and sewer
facility has to have autho-
rization from the DEP to
operate, said city manager


Wendell Johnson. This per-
mit is to process and dis-
charge fluids.
Jones Edmunds has been
a consulting company with
the city for many years,
Johnson said. Its profes-
sional services extend to
certain studies, planning,
designing and construc-
tion of improvements to the
city's utility system.
"They assist in updating
the regulations and keeping
them current," he said.
Other business for the
meeting:
* Council will vote on the
consent agenda.
* Bettye Lane will address
the council.
* Mayor Stephen Witt
will issue a proclamation for
Black History Month during
February.


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Christ. The support has been
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I


V\


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


I f









LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


THE WEATHER


, , , .


PARTLY
CLOUDY,


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Tallahassee *
58/34
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53/38 Panama City
56/39


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* Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
Lake City, 53/37 Daytona Beach
58/35 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville * Daytona Beach Fort Myers
59/38 61 49 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
60/42 * Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
65/49 65/59 Miake City
Tampa * Naples
64/50 West Palm Beach Ocala
72/61 * Orlando
* Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 74/63 0 Pensacola
71/53 * Naples , Tallahassee
73/57 Miami Tampa
74/63 Valdosta
Key W.est W. Palm Beach
, .I .


Monday
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76/69/sh
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65/51/sh
62/50/sh
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76/68/sh
75/64/sh
68/53/pc
70/59/sh
60/48/pc
59/48/pc
62/48/pc
69/59/sh
61/48/pc
75/67/sh


Tuesday -

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TEMPERATURES SUN
High Saturday 68 Sunrise today 7:22 a.m.
Low Saturday 54 Sunset today 6:07 p.m.
Normal high 67 Sunrise tom. 7:21 a.m.
Normal low 43 Sunset tom. 6:07 p.m.
Record high 84 in 1957
Record low 20 in 1966 MOON
Moonrise today 8:05 p.m.
PRECIPITATION Moonset today 8:10 a.m.
Saturday 0.34" Moonrise tom. 9:13 p.m.
Month total 4.54" Moonset tom. 8:47 a.m.
Year total 4.54" - 0
Normal month-to-date 3.39"
Normal year-to-date 3.39" F e W .
Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.
5 13 21 28


5
RIDEMIE
30 nutesto bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

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weathervom


] Forecasts, data and graph-
^ @ 2010 i Weathr Central


Last Nw Frt Full . ' C, Madison, Wis.
0=-- www.weatherpublisher.com


COURTESY PHOTOS
The Columbia County 2010 Teacher of the Year Nominees are: (top
row, from left) Marah Miller, Teresa-L. Mack-Anderson, Mike McRae,
Mickey Ray Garrett, (second row, from left) Brandi Keen, Alisa Keen,
A. Yvette Fuimaono, Teresa Cameron, (third row, from left) Cynthia
LeaAnn Carroll, Kimberly S. Bass, Dede Darby, David G. Tompkins,
(bottom row) and Candace M. Hines. The ceremony is scheduled to
take place at 4 p.m. Thursday at First Presbyterian Church in Lake
City.


TEACHER: Of the Year to be named
Continued From Page 1A


years of experience.
* Alisa Keen, a 4th grade
teacher at Melrose Park
Elementary School. She
has six years of teaching
experience.
* Teresa L. Mack-
Anderson, a Westside
Elementary School 2nd
grade teacher. She has eight
years experience teaching.
* Brandi Keen, a 3rd
grade teacher at Summers
Elementary School. She
has nine years teaching
experience.
* Marah Miller, a 4th
grade teacher at Fort White
Elementary School with 11
years of experience.
* Dede Darby, a 6-8 grade
music teacher at Lake City
Middle School, who has 14


years of experience.
* Cynthia LeaAnn Caroll,
a kindergarten teacher at
Five Points Elementary
School with six years of
teaching experience.
* Teresa Cameron,
an Eastside Elementary
School K-5 music teacher.
Cameron has 15 years of
teaching experience.
* Mickey Ray Garrett,
a 6-12 science teacher at
Challenge Learning Center
with 28 years of experience.
* Wayne H. Hancock Jr.,
an 8th grade science teacher
at Fort White High/Middle
School with 20 years of
teaching experience.
, .-David G. Tompkins, a
Richardson Middle School
7th grade social studies


teacher who has four-and-a-
half years of experience.
E Mike McRae, a K-5
physical education teacher
at Pinemount Elementary
School. McRae has 19 years
of teaching experience.
"Teachers are really the
lifeblood of what goes on
in a classroom, and a good
teacher can make all the
difference for a struggling
student who is trying and
help them achieve to their
highest level," said school
superintendent Mike
Millikin. "Being named a
teacher of the year repre-
sentative from a school or
the district is a great honor,
and those people are for-
ever held in high esteem by
their colleagues.'


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NOW










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


, I


. com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, January 3 1, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White final
sign-up Tuesday
Fort White Youth
Baseball has final league
registration from 4-7 p.m.
Tuesday. Sign-up is at the
South Columbia Sports
Complex concession
building.
For details, call Tammy
Sharpe at 867-3825.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
USSSA tryouts
begin Monday
Richardson
Community Center is
hosting tryouts for its
boys 14-under USSSA
basketball team from
5:30-7:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday, and
3:30-5:30 p.m. on
Saturday.
For details, call Varion
Coppock at 754-7095.
YOUTH SOFTBALL
Warrior travel
team tryouts
The Gainesville
Warrior Girls Fastpitch
Softball Organization has
tryouts for its 16-tinder
spring/summer travel
team at 2 p.m. today, and
Feb. 7, at the Alachua
Water Works Field on
U.S. Highway 441.
For details, call
Andrew Strickland at
(352) 494-7562.
GATORS
Wine tasting
event Thursday
The North Florida
Gator Club's 3rd Annual
Wine Tasting Event is
6-8:30 p.m. Thursday
at The Country Club of
Lake City. Proceeds will
support the Patty Gill
Endowment and area
scholarships. Tickets are
$20 in advance and $25 at
the door. There also will
be a silent auction.
For details, call Bill
Cooper at (904) 259-3705.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Tuesday
* Fort White High girls
basketball vs. host Santa
Fe High in District 5-3A
tournament, 6 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
* Fort White High boys
basketball at Oak Hall
School, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
* Columbia High girls
weightlifting vs. Bradford
High, 4 a.m.
* Fort White High
softball hosts preseason
classic, 5 p.m.
* Columbia High
soccer in Region 1
quarterfinal, 7 p.m.
* Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Hawthorne
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
* Fort White High
wrestling in District 1-2A
tournament at Suwannee
High, 2 p.m.
* Fort White High
softball hosts preseason
classic, 5 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6) '
Saturday
* Columbia High
wrestling hosts District
2-2A tournament,
11 a.m.
* Columbia High
softball preseason
classic vs. Lafayette High,
Hamilton County High,


11 a.m., 5 p.m.


Another major


for Serena


Star stops Henin
in Australian
Open final.

By DENNIS PASSA
Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia
- Serena Williams won her
second straight Australian
Open, championship, end-
ing Justine Henin's hopes
of a Grand Slam title in
her return from retirement
with a 6-4, 3-6, 6-2 victory
Saturday.
Williams withstood aE
determined challenge from
Henin before securing her
fifth Australian Open title
overall and 12th Grand


Slam singles championship
overall, tying Billie Jean
King.
King was at the stadium
on Saturday night to take
part in a pre-match cere-
mony to honor the 40-year
anniversary of Margaret
Court's four Grand Slam
tournament wins in 1970.
"Billie, we are tied,"
Williams said. "So I've
reached my goal."
Williams' five Australian
titles is the most by any
woman in the Open Era,
since 1968, surpassing
the four held by Margaret
Court, Evonne Goolagong
Cawley, Steffi Graf and

WILLIAMS continued on 2B


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2010 Columbia High Lady Tigers are (front row, from left) coach Horace
Jefferson, Shaniqua Henry, Vikie Hill, Da' Brea Hill, Simone Williamson (back row, from left)
Moriah Marion, Shaiwong Whitaker, Mariah Harrington, Sharmayne Edwards and Katrina
Goodbread.


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High enters
a gauntlet in this weeks'
District 4-5A tournament in
Jacksonville.
The Lady Tigers have a
road to the final that includes
the only three teams that
have upended them in dis-
trict competition this sea-
son, but that doesn't mean
that Columbia shouldn't
make a final appearance.
Columbia (15-5, 5-3)
enters the tournament as
the third seed and will begin
play against Gainesville
High on Monday at 6 p.m.
The game takes place at
Robert E. Lee High School
in Jacksonville.
"Comparing records,
Buchholz and Lee are the
favorites," coach Horace
Jefferson said. "We must
defeat all three teams that
beat us during the year,
however, the second time is
in the district tournament.
The girls know that to be
champs, they must play
like champions. They see
the difference in a cham-
pionship team after P.K.
Yonge."
With a win against
Gainesville, the Lady Tigers
would play the winner of
the Lee High and Wolfson
High game at 7:30 p.m. on


Friday.
Top-seeded Buchholz
High will play the winner of
Middleburg and Ed White
high schools, which open
the tournament in a play-in
game at Ed White.
Ridgeview and Fleming
Island high schools play as
the four and five seeds.
After the preliminary
rounds, the tournament will
switch sites to Wolfson for
the semifinals and champi-
onship games.
Jefferson believes that
the Lady Tigers are capable
of making it through the
stretch.
'The keys for us are play-
ing good defense, shoot-
ing better and making
our free throws," he said.
"Gainesville will try to push
us. Our transition defense
was not very good against
PK. Yonge. They were
able to exploit our defense
and we have to play .bet-
ter defensively. It will come
down to our transition and
how well we run the floor.:
We're capable of running
the floor. We just haven't
run the floor."
Despite' falling to the
Blue Wave during the final
week of the season, hopes
are still high at Columbia.
The Lady Tigers had woo
CHS continued on 2B


Warner lauded at end of

storybook NFL career


Quarterback
battled up and
down career.
By BOB BAUM
Associated Press'

TEMPE, Ariz. - Kurt
Warner left the NFL on his
terms, knowing he could
still play at the highest
level.
His announced retire-
ment from the game has
been met with widespread
recognition of a potential
Hall of Famer who found
success the hard way -
first early with the St. Louis
Rams, then at the end with
the Arizona Cardinals.
The 38-year-old quarter-
back left thanking God, his
family and the teams and


coaches that gave him a
chance in a 12-year career
that saw him benched at
least four times only to fin-
ish as a prolific winner.
Those who had been
a part of his remarkable
journey through the league
praised him as much for his
conduct off the field as his
considerable accomplish-
ments on it.
"I have had the privi-
lege to watch and compete
against Kurt for the last 12
years, beginning in 1998 in
NFL Europe," Rams coach
Steve Spagnuolo said. "I
have always admired Kurt
for his athletic talents, but
more so for what he stood
for. His faith in Christ and
his character as a man are
tremendous examples to all
of us."


Fellow players . spoke
their admiration for the
quarterback who had to
work his way from stock-
ing grocery shelves to the
Arena Football League and
NFL Europe before getting
an opportunity in St. Louis
only because Trent Green
was injured.
"A great player and a
great person," Green Bay
quarterback Aaron Rodgers
said. "... The way he handled
himself and carried him-
self and what he does off
the field is as much a part
of who he is as a football
player. That's the highest
complement you can give
Kurt - he's as good or bet-
ter as a person than he is as
a player, and he's a heck of
WARNER continued on 4B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Arizona Cardinals quarterback Kurt Warner announces his
retirement from football Friday at the Cardinals' training
facility in Tempe, Ariz.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Serena Williams holds the trophy during a photo call after beating Justine Henin of Belgiumto.
win.the Women's singles at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne, Australia,


Through the gauntlet


Hopeshighfor

SLady Tigers


I


- ----~-------









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

:TV sports
Today
BOWLING
I p.m.
ESPN2 - PBA, Dick Weber Open, at
Fountain Valley, Calif.
EXTREME SPORTS
Noon
ESPN - Winter X Games, at Aspen,


Colo.
E SPN2 -
Colo.


7 p.m.
-Winter X Games, at Aspen,


1:30 a.m.
ESPN2-Winter X Games, at Aspen,
. Colo. (delayed tape)
- GOLF
7:30 a.m.
STGC - Nationwide Tour, New
Zealand PGA Championship, final round,
at- Christchurch, New Zealand (same-
. day tape)
9:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, Qatar
Masters, final round, at Doha, Qatar
(same-day tape)
I p.m.
TGC - PGATour, Farmers Insurance
Open, final round, at La Jolla, Calif.
3 p.m.
- ' CBS - PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance
Open, final round, at La Jolla, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I p.m.
-CBS - Regional coverage, Florida at
Tennessee or Minnesota at Ohio St.
3:30 p.m.
- FSN - California at Arizona
5:30 p.m.
FSN - Maryland at Clemson
7:30 p.m.
FSN -Virginia at North Carolina
NBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ABC"- Denver at San Antonio
3:30 p.m.
ABC - L.A. Lakers at Boston
- - NFL FOOTBALL
7:20 p.m.
-. ESPN - Pro Bowl, at Miami
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC - Detroit at Pittsburgh
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS - PBR,Tampa Invitational, at
Tanipa (same-day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
I p.m.
FSN - Oklahoma St. at Texas A&M
3 p.m.


ESPN2 - Purdue at Iowa
5 p.m.
ESPN2 - Baylor at Texas
Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN - Connecticut at Louisville
9 p.m.
ESPN -Texas at Oklahoma St.
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS - Buffalo at Pittsburgh
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 - Premier League, Sunderland
vs. Stoke City, at Sunderland, England
WOMEN'$ COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - Notre Dame at Rutgers

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 7


At Miami
New Orleans vs.
6:25 p.m. (CBS)

NFC Pro Bowl
Today


Indianapolis,


At Miami
AFC vs. NFC, 7:20 p.m. (ESPN)

TENNIS

Australian Open

At Melbourne Park
Mtelbourne, Australia
Saturday
Singles
Women
Championship
Serena Williams (I), United States, def.
Justine Henin, Belgium, 6-4, 3-6, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
Championship,
Bob and Mike Bryan (I), United States,
def. Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad
Zimonjic (2), Serbia, 6-3,6-7 (5), 6-3.
Junior Singles
Boys
Championship
Tiago Fernandes (14), Brazil, def. Sean
Berman, Australia, 7-5, 6-3. Girls.
Championship
Karolina Pliskova (6) Czech Republic,


def Laura Robson. Britain, 6-1, 7-6 (5).
Wheelchair Singles
Men
Championship
Shingo Kunieda (i),Japan,def. Stephane
Houdet (2), France, 7-6 (3). 2-6, 7-5.
Women
Championship
Katie Homan (I), Netherlands, def.
Florence Gravellier (2), France, 6-2, 6-2.
Quad
Championship
Peter Norfolk, Britain, def. David
Wagner, United States, 6-2, 7-6 (4).

Women's majors
(Through 2010 Australian Open)
AusFrenWimbU.S.Total
Margaret S. CourtI 1 5 3 5 24
Steffi Graf 4 6 7 5 22
Helen Wills Moody- 4 8 7 19
Chris Evert 2 7 3 6 18
Martina Navratilova3 2 9 4 18
Billie Jean King 1l I 6 4 12
SerenaWilliams 5 I 3 3 12
Maureen Connolly I 2 3 3 9
Monica Seles 4 3 - 2 9
Suzanne Lenglen - 2 6 - 8
Molla Mallory - - 8 8

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Denver at San Antonio, I p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Boston, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Detroit, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 7 p.m.
New York at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Monday's Games
Boston at Washington, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 8 p:m.
Phoenix at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Denver, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Utah, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Portland, 10 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 10 Purdue vs. Penn State, 3 p.m.
No. 14 Tennessee vs. Florida,
I p.m.
No. 17 Pittsburgh at South
Florida, I p.m.
No. 20 Ohio State vs. Minnesota,
I p.m.


WILLIAMS: Wins back-to-back titles
Continued From Page 1B


Monica Seles. Court holds
11 Australian Open titles
overall, most coming before
1968.
Henin, who had most of
the crowd support at Rod
Laver Arena, couldn't match
her fellow Belgian Kim
Clijsters' feat of winning in
her Grand Slam comeback
tournament. Clijsters won
,last year's U.S. Open in her
-return from a two-year retire-
-ment after getting married
and having a daughter.
Williams won the last
four games to clinch the
championship in just over
-two hours, falling on her
-back in celebration after
match point.
� - "It was definitely a tough
match mentally and physi-
cally," Williams said. "We
were both out there to prove
"something, and I think we
Sdid at the end of the day."
It was an impressive
run by Henin. She lost in
the final of the Brisbane
International tournament to
Clijsters two weeks ago.
The unranked and
unseeded Henin then
beat four seeded players
en route to the Australian
Open final, including No. 5
and Olympic gold medalist
Elena Dementieva in the
second round.
- "It's been a very emotion-



CHS

Continued From Page 1B

10-straight contests before
falling to the state's second-
ranked team.
. "I believe that the winner
of- this tournament should
advance deep into the state
tournament," Jefferson
said. "I think we're capable.
If we don't advance to the
final, I would be somewhat
disappointed."


al two weeks for me," said
Henin, who put her hand
on her heart as she thanked
the crowd for support. "I
thought it would never hap-
pen to me again. I'd like to
congratulate Serena. She's
a real champion."
Later, Henin said there
was a feeling of disappoint-
ment, but accomplishment.
"It's just more than what
I could expect, I just have to
remember that," Henin said.
"Even if it's quite soon after
the match now, I'm sure
there will be a lot of positive
things I can think about in
a few days. It's been almost
perfect. Just the last step, I
couldn't make it."
And she's certain now
about her decision to come
back on the tour.
"I was curious about what
my level would be and how
I was going to deal with
just the atmosphere on and
off the court, how it would
feel," Henin said.
"I felt I took the right deci-
sion, so it's good enough for
me already. I got the results
also in the last four weeks
- two finals. So I can be
really happy about that."
Henin saved two break
points to hold for 3-3 in a
four-game run in. the sec-
ond set, winning 13 of the
last 14 points in a dominant




Unscramble'these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
YUMST /


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All Rights Reserved.
TOQUA /



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finish to the set. She main-
tained the superiority early
in the deciding set, increas-
ing that to 18 of 19 points
before Williams held serve
to even the third set at 1-1.
Williams, with her right
thigh and left knee heav-
ily taped as it had been
for much of the tourna-
ment broke Henin to go up
2-1. The two then traded
breaks, with Williams going
up 3-2, a lead she never
relinquished.
"I thought I was just giv-
ing it to her at that point,"
Williams said. "I didn't want
to go out like that. I literally
said to myself, 'I need to
man up and start playing
better."'
Williams used an ace on
her second serve to hold for
a 4-2 lead, then broke again
to move within a game of
the title.
"It's good to have her
back, it's exciting," Williams
said of Henin. "She can defi-
nitely be No. 1, especially
with our ranking system, if
she keeps doing well."
The American holds an
8-6 edge in career meetings
between the pair, including
a 6-2, 6-0 win in Miami in
2008. At the time, it equaled
the worst loss for a reigning
No. 1, and Henin quit tennis
two months later.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirlon and Jeff Knurek


HE IPN'T LAUGH
AT THE BO55' JOKE
BECAU5E HE WAS --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: U X1 X
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: AWFUL REARM TANGLE LEEWAY
I Answer: When she had lunch with the champion
swimmer, she thought he was - "ALL WET"


Hoyas get best of Duke


Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Chris
Wright and Georgetown
put on a show for the com-
mander in chief.
With President Barack
Obama and Vice President
Joe Biden seated in the
front row, the No. 7 Hoyas
used five early turnovers to
run away from No. 8 Duke,
89-77 on Saturday.
It couldn't have been
a much bigger day for
Georgetown: the president
at his first Hoyas game, its
first sellout this season at the
Verizon Center, a crowd wear-
ing "We Are Georgetown"
T-shirts, the 200th win for
coach John Thompson III
and the launch of an initia-
five for Darfur.

No. 4 Syracuse 59,
DePaul 57
ROSEMONT, Ill. - Wes
Johnson scored 16 points
and grabbed 13 rebounds,
and the Orange rallied from
18 down to win their eighth
straight game.
Syracuse scored 16
straight to cut its deficit to
two late in the first half, then
took the lead with a 16-2


run in the second. DePaul's
Will Walker missed a 3 in
the closing seconds.

No. 9 West Virginia 77,
Louisville 74
MORGANTOWN, W.Va.
- Da'Sean Butler scored
a season-high 27 points,
including the go-ahead bas-
ket with 16 seconds left,
as the Mountaineers over-
came a 12-point second-half
deficit.
West Virginia (17-3,6-2 Big
East) snapped a four-game
losing streak to the Cardinals
(13-8, 4-4), who managed
only two baskets over the
final seven minutes.

No. 15 Temple 64,
La Salle 52
PHILADELPHIA -
Ramone Moore scored 14
points, Lavoy Allen-had 12
points and 10 rebounds and
the Owls held on before a
crowd that included long-
time coach John Chaney.
Temple (18-4, 6-1 A-10)
got key buckets down the
stretch from their second-
teamers during an 11-2
run that helped squash La
Salle's upset bid.


Marquette 70, No. 19
Connecticut 68

HARTFORD, Conn.
- Jimmy Butler's driving
shot with 2.4 seconds left
gave the Golden Eagles
their first road win of the
season.
Butler finished with 21
points and Lazar Hayward
had 20 for Marquette (13-8,
4-5 Big East).

Florida State 61,
Boston College 57
BOSTON - Derwin
Kitchen hit Florida State's
only 3-pointer of the game
in the closing minute and
Solomon Alabi scored 16
points and had six rebounds,
lifting the Seminoles to a
scrappy 61-57 win over
Boston College on Saturday.
Michael Snaer, Chris
Singleton and Ryan Reid
each finished with 10 points
for the Seminoles (16-5, 4-3
Atlantic Coast Conference).
It was just Florida State's
third win in its last six
games after a seven-game
winning streak.
Rakim Sanders led the
Eagles (12-10, 3-5) with 17
,points.


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Answer to Previous Puzzle


U HS S ABU O E


ICHI



UNS MK O SIERA
G~ NAW FBS LOT
YAN CAST E
LOOPWAGM


S KI L VERI E S
GME N UKES TS P
TANG R N YEN


8 Fell to
9 Japanese port
10 Cradles
13 Get comfy
(2 wds.)
19 NASA counterpart


21 Mark's
successor
24 La -, Bolivia
25 Actress -
Meyers
26 QB org.
27 Sleeveless
top
28 Coll.
credits
30 Mil rank.
31 Ginza buy
32 Rapper Tone

33 Brillo rival
35 RN
assistants
36 Cloud-seeding
compound
39 Pitcher
handle
40 Maxed out
41 Blender
button
42 Willow shoot
43 Rumpled
44 Pulpit
45 Blarney
Stone site
47 Old Italian
currency
48 Kind of portrait
51 Modicum
53 Herriot, e.g.


ACROSS

1 Spinal item
5 Krypton
8 Nose job
11 As to
(2 wds.)
12 Univ.
marchers
14 Language
suffix
15 Small amount
16 Baseball
family name
17 Roam
18 Stories
20 Causes havoc
22 Psychic's
power
23 Green moth
24 Bamboo eater
27 Work da.
29 Dog sound
30 Shares a ride
34 Beaucoup
37 Scare word
38 11th President
39 Homer's works
41 Body of water


43 Fannie -
44 Melbourne
mate
46 Russian range
49 Med scan
50 Dah partners
52 Chicken style
54 Comb user
55 Periods
56 Gardner of
mystery
57 Poet's
adverb
58 Ben & Jerry
rival
59 Dotty

bOWN

1 Gloomy
2 - - for the
money
3 Muchacha, for
short
4 Capsized, with
"over"
5 Latch onto
6 ISP of note
7 Put away


Want more puzzles?
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Opel,

z- 0









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


Tebow has shaky outing


By JOHN ZENOR
AP Sports Writer

MOBILE, Ala. - Mardy
Gilyard once worked four
jobs to stay in school after
losing his scholarship.
The former Cincinnati
star turned in an awfully
strong audition for a much
more lucrative career in
Saturday's Senior Bowl,
racking up 103 yards
receiving and catching a 32-
yard touchdown pass in the
fourth quarter to help the
North race to a 31-13 vic-
tory over the South.
"All my hard work just
kind of came into one game,"
an exuberant Gilyard said.
"I'm truly blessed. I worked
my butt off and I played my
butt off. I've been through
so much in my career.
"This game sums up
everything, because I've


been through all the hard
work, all the ups and all the
downs, the peaks and the
valleys. I've been through
everything. I've been from
the brown sticky stuff at
the bottom of the barrel to
the cream at the top of the
coffee."
In 2006, an academically
ineligible Gilyard lost his
scholarship and had to take
jobs ranging from cutlery
salesman to construction
worker to pay his steep
out-of-state tuition bills. He
eventually won back his
scholarship.
Florida quarterback Tim
Tebow, meanwhile, had
a shaky outing running a
pro-style offense against a
sturdy defense.
He, fumbled twice and
finished 8 of 12 passing for
50 yards in the showcase
for senior NFL prospects.


Tebow's longest completion
was 11 yards and he netted
4 yards on four rushes, but
was never turned loose as
a power runner as he often
was with the Gators. He
battled strep throat early
but didn't miss any practice
time during a week when
he was trying to prove to
skeptical NFL teams and
draft analysts that he could
be a starting pro quarter-
back.
"I think I'm definitely
open to improving my fun-
damentals," Tebow said. "I
think I definitely showed
that by being here. If you
just watched the way I
played, you could see there
is room for improvement
and what I need to work
on."
One of the nation's
top all-purpose threats,
Gilyard also set up a third-


quarter touchdown with
a 43-yard catch down the
right sideline and had five
receptions. Both that pass
and the TD came from
Central Michigan's Dan
LeFevour.
Michigan defensive line-
man Brandon Graham had
two sacks and a forced
fumble and was chosen
the game's Most Valuable
Player. The South commit-
ted six turnovers.
"It shows that I'm going
to go hard 100 percent of
the time all day and who-
ever gets me is going to
love me," Graham, said.
Gilyard returned two
kicks for 52 yards and gained
24 on two punt returns.
He was chosen offensive
player of the game while
Mississippi State's Jamar
Chaney earned defensive
honors.


Saints-Colts a Super matchup


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

MIAMI - Peyton
Manning, the Big Easy.
Hardly a stretch for a
nickname, you know. The
NFL's dominant player can
claim New Orleans heri-
tage, after all. At 6-foot-5,
230 pounds, he's no shrimp.
And as the only four-time
league MVP, he makes this
quarterbacking thing look
simple.
Yet when Manning leads
his Indianapolis Colts
onto the field next Sunday
against the Saints in as
juicy a Super Bowl match-
up as anyone could imag-
ine, all of Nawlins - heck,
pretty much any place in
Bayou Country - will be
wishing the worst on a
native son.
Sorry, Peyton, the Saints
take precedence in their
quest for a first NFL cham-
pionship.
Manning, whose father
Archie was the first Saints
superstar, understands.
"It's certainly an exciting
opportunity for our team
to be going back to the
Super Bowl down in Miami,
and I'm very happy for the
New Orleans Saints and,
of course, the entire city
of New Orleans," Peyton
Manning says. "My parents
live there, my older brother
Cooper lives there. Eli and
I have both participated
in philanthropic organiza-
tions down in New Orleans,
whether it's Katrina relief
or just various charities. So
New Orleans is a huge part
of my life, as well as Eli's
life. My dad's been a part of
the Saints organization for
39 years in some ways. We
definitely have strong ties.
"The Saints have had a
great year. They deserve
it, and I know the city
is excited. And the New
Orleans Saints players do
just wonderful things for
the community down there.
It's been a great relation-
ship between the players
and fans, and what a great
way for these players to
reward them with a trip to
the Super Bowl."
But it's Manning's job to
spoil the party, to put some
misery into the Miami
Mardi Gras for those Saints
and their fans. Nobody is
better equipped to do so.
Manning once was criti-
cized for failing to win big
games, and his career play-
off record is just 9-8. He's
won six of the last eight,
though, and led the Colts
to the championship three
years ago, in the rain in
Miami. Indy is 16-2 this
time around, and it might
have been a perfect 18-0
if the Colts hadn't pulled
Manning and other starters
in the final two games of the
regular season. ,
Manning set an NFL
record for 300-yard playoff
games with his-seventh in
last week's AFC champi-
onship win over the Jets.
He has 22 TD passes, five
this year, and averages 284
yards through the air in the
postseason.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
South squad quarterback Tim Tebow (15), of Florida, looks for
a receiver during the first half of the Senior Bowl NCAA
college football game in Mobile, Ala., on Saturday.

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��51









LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


Pro Bowl serves

as Super Bowl

warmup in Miami


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

MIAMI - For 86 of the
NFL's best players, the sea-
son is ending where they
wanted: in Miami.
- Their timing's off,
though.
' With a new venue and
new slot on the league cal-
endar, the Pro Bowl will be
played Sunday as a prelimi-
nary to next week's Super
Bowl on the same field.
It definitely feels like a
warmup act.
"There's a bittersweet
taste," said quarterback
Tony Romo, a late addition
to-the NFC roster after his
Dallas Cowboys came up
two wins shy of a Super
Bowl berth. "You're always
hoping to play in the big
game."
The NFL is trying to
transform the Pro Bowl into
a bigger game by playing
it 'before the Super Bowl
for the first time. In a one-
year experiment, the league
also moved the game from
Honolulu, its home since
1980.
- The results: increased
media coverage and the
Best attendance in 51 years,
w iih a sellout crowd of more
than 70,000 expected.
- The changes haven't
helped participation,
though. Seven Colts and
seven Saints are missing
because they're preparing
for the Super Bowl, a draw-
back to playing the Pro
Bowl first.
Defections by players cit-
ing injuries were high, as
usual. More than a dozen
pulled out, leaving the all-
star teams with only some
stars.
"That has been historic,"
said Frank Supovitz, the
NFL's senior vice president
for events. "That's nothing
new."
And that's not what the
league sought to fix by
changing the date and site
of the game, Supovitz said.
"The changes were
meant to look at two things:,
Whether we could create
more excitement with the
Pro Bowl being the first
-event of Super Bowl week,
and whether it would have
an impact on TV ratings,"
he said.
Ticket sales -show the
excitement level is up,
Supovitz said. And he's opti-
mistic about the television
audience for the game.
"It's beipg shown on a
weekend when there's usu-
ally no football and interest
in the NFL is at its highest,"
he said.
Those tuning in will see
established stars such as
Ray Lewis, Antonio Gates
and DeMarcus Ware,
as well as first-time Pro
Bowlers such as DeAngelo
Williams, Clay Matthews
and Matt Schaub. The TV


audience they attract will
help the NFL decide where
and when to play future Pro
Bowls.
The game will return to
Honolulu in 2011 and 2012,
but the league hasn't decid-
ed whether to hold those
games before or after the
Super Bowl. The Pro Bowl
site for 2013 and beyond
hasn't been determined.
Players had mixed reac-
tions to this year's changes.
Many said they preferred
the old schedule so those
in the Super Bowl could
also be available for the Pro
Bowl.
"I'd rather have it after
the Super Bowl," 49ers line-
backer Patrick Willis said.
"I truly believe next year
we're going to be in the
Super Bowl, and I want to
play in the Pro Bowl too."
But Romo said he could
see the appeal of putting
the Pro Bowl first.
'"There's something to be
said for playing the game
during the season," he said.
"I think more people are
interested."
By moving the game to
the Super Bowl site, the
NFL created a bigger spot-
light for the Pro Bowl.
There are 1,076 creden-
tialed media members this
week, compared with 334 in
Honolulu a year ago.
That's good for the
league, and maybe not so
good for the all-stars.
'"There's a lot more media
here, that's for sure," said
eight-time Pro Bowl center
Kevin Mawae, addressing
a throng of reporters after
an AFC practice. "It's not
as relaxed here. There's a
little more hustle and bustle
here than there would be at
the resort where we stay in
Hawaii."
Still, practices this week
were pretty laid back. AFC
offensive linemen ran pass
patterns. Browns kick
returned Joshua Cribbs
took a wildcat snap. Eagles
receiver DeSean Jackson
threw a pass on an end-
around. Bengals receiver
Chad Ochocinco practiced
punting and kicking and
said he may boot one in the
game.
The primary goal seemed
to be having a few laughs,
which at the end of a long
season was understand-
able. For players who came
up short of the Super Bowl,
the Pro Bowl can be a con-
solation prize worth accept-
ing.
Running back Adrian
Peterson decided not to
play, then changed his mind
two days after his Vikings
lost in the NFC champion-
ship game.
"I was beating myself
up, and then I realized that
really wasn't the right route
tb go," Peterson said. "I'm
here, and I'm going to enjoy
myself."


WARNER: Was a man of deep faith in league


Continued From Page 11

a player."
A man of deep faith who
carried a Bible to each post-
game news conference,
Warned walked away with
a year left on a two-year,
$23 million contract, know-
ing he still had the skills to
play at the highest level.
"It's been an amazing
ride," Warner said. "I don't
think I could have dreamt
it would have played out
like it has, but I've been
humbled every day that I
woke up the last 12 years
and amazed that God
would choose to use me to
do what he's given me the
opportunity to do."
Warner had one of the
greatest postseason perfor-
mances ever in Arizona's
51-45 overtime wild card
victory over Green Bay on
Jan. 10, with more touch-
down passes (five) than he


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had incompletions (four)
but sustained a brutal hit
in the Cardinals' 45-14 divi-
sional round loss at New
Orleans six days later.
The Cardinals signed
Warner to a one-year
contract in 2005 largely
because no other team
would give him a chance
to be a starter. His oppor-
tunities over the next two
years were scattered and
even when coach Ken
Whisenhunt took over in
2007, Warner was the back-
up to Matt Leinart.
But when Leinart went
down with an injury five
games into the season,
Warner got his chance. He
started 48 of the remaining
49 games of his career.
Blessed with an uncanny
throwing accuracy and a
knack for reading defens-
es, Warner leaves the game


with three Super Bowl
appearances, two league
MVP awards and a Super
Bowl MVP nod. He has
the three best Super Bowl
performances in terms of
yards passing.
In a comparison with the
14 quarterbacks to make
the Hall of Fame in the
last 25 years, Warner has
a better career comple-
tion percentage, yards per
pass attempt and yards per
game. Only Dan Marino,
Brett Favre and Peyton
Manning have more career
300-yard passing games.
In 124 regular-season
games, Warner completed
65.5 percent of his passes
for 32,344 yards and 208
touchdowns. He and Fran
Tarkenton are the only NFL
quarterbacks to throw for
100 touchdowns and 14,000
yards for two teams.


But there is much more
to Warner, as accommodat-
ing a player to the media as
the NFL has known. *
Warner and his wife oper-
ate the First Things First
Christian charitable foun-
dation. Last year, he was
named the NFL's Man of
the Year for his off-field and
on-field accomplishments.
Cardinals general man-
ager Rod Graves called it
an emotional day "because
I realize once again how
extraordinary he was."
"I've only had the privi-
lege of being around one
other person that I can say
was close to him and that
was Walter Payton," Graves
said. "I think when you have
an extraordinary player and
one who is just as extraordi-
nary off the field, then you
realize you were in the pres-
ence of someone special."


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rd~ I


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


-- .













Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428


Lake City Reporter






BUSINESS


Sunday, January 31, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS


Healthy market forecast for 2010


Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcost .net

Ask your

customers
Treat with utmost respect
your power of forming opin-
ions, for this power alone
guards you against making
assumptions that are con-
trary to nature and judg-
ments that overthrow the
rule of reason.
- Marcus Aurelius


tomers about
your business
is so important.
If you are sell-
ing a product or service,
both market trends and
- customer desires should be
part and parcel of the deci-
sions you make about your
business, especially where
those decisions concern
a shift in your company's
orientation.
While a customer satis-
faction survey about the
quality of your customer
service provides great
information, there is so
much more that you should
be periodically asking your
customers. We are dealing
with a very neat entrepre-
neur who has an exercise/
spa business. The spa was
not doing well for numer-
ous reasons. To name just
a couple, they were having
difficulty finding qualified
nail and hair technicians
and attracting new busi-
ness.
Recognizing that the
spa space was not being
used effectively, the busi-
ness owner decided to
make over the space as
a wellness center that
would offer a dietician and
a formal weight loss pro-
gram. The wellness center
scheme sounded like an
appealing way to overcome
the difficulties with the
spa, and the change also
seemed to follow a nation-
wide trend, so the owner
decided to move in this
direction. However, she
never asked her customers
if they would support this
change in the orientation of
the business. Once I asked
her if she had sought her
customers' opinions about
the change, she quickly
realized that she had
missed this critical step and
that she needed to survey
them before proceeding.
When surveying your
customers, you must ask
the right questions in
order to ensure that you
are getting valid informa-
tion to base your decisions
on. A student of mine was
considering starting a
business selling custom
motorcycles. As part of
this project, he had to
conduct a survey in order
to gauge the demand for
this new business. He went
to a motorcycle event and
asked as many motorcycle
owners as he could to fill
out his questionnaire.
Having received
an extremely positive
response to his survey, he
decided that the business
was sure to be successful.
He based this judgment on
the fact that 98 percent of
respondents gave a posi-
tive answer to the question,
"Would you consider pur-
chasing a custom motorcy-
cle?" However, after having
some time to reflect on the
survey and the question,

ASK continued on 2C


Year-end sales
in 2009, 2008 are
comparable.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. com
Residential prop-
erty sales for
single-famly,
existing homes
in 2009 in the
Lake City/Live Oak area
have slightly decreased,
but they measure up to
be about even with the
same type of sales in 2008.
Buyers can look forward
to a good market in 2010,
officials said.
According to the Florida
Sales Report for Year End
2009 in the North Florida
.Forecaster. - a publication
of the Lake City Board of
Realtors - year end 2009
realtor sales for single-fam-
ily, existing homes in the
Lake City/Live Oak area
were at 372. Compared to
2008 - when year end real-
tor sales were at 377 - the
area has seen a one percent
decrease in these sales.
Dan Gherna, Lake City
Board of Realtors execu-
tive vice president, said
the sales have just about
stayed the same in 2009 as
they were in 2008.
"Basically sales have flat-
lined," said Gherna. "The
sales have stabilized."
Year-end 2009 median
sales prices for single-fam-
ily, existing homes in the
area were at $130,000, a 13


Residential single-family home sales dipped in 2009, but forecasters are predicting a solid market for the current year.


percent decrease from year-
end 2008, when they were at
$150,000, stated the report
"We've seen another price
correction in the median
prices," said Gherna.
Gherna said that buy-
ers are on the hunt for a
bargain.
"People are looking for
bargains right now," he
said, "and that's what is


driving the prices down."
The median sales prices
are lower in 2009 than in
2008 because of distress
sales - short sales where
the bank agrees to take
less than what the buyei-
owes or sales of properties
that the bank had fore-
closed on - said Gherna.
"Individuals are get-
ting a little more realistic


about their prices because
they realize that they're
competing against distress
property sales, and we had
more distress sales this
year than we had in 2008,"
Gherna said.
Buyers can look forward
to what the 201Q real estate
market will have to offer,
said Gherna, and the mar-
ket is returning back to


normal, he said.
"It's a good market if
you're a buyer," Gherna
said. "Buyers can expect
low prices, and the interest
rates are at historic lows.
Hopefully those rates will
stay low.
"I'd say we're getting
back to a normal market.
We're selling homes to
what the market will bear."


Google attack highlights 'zero-day' black market


'By JORDAN ROBERTSON
AP Technology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO
- The recent hacking
attack that prompted
Google's threat to leave
China is underscoring the
heightened dangers of pre-
viously undisclosed com-
puter security flaws - and
renewing debate over buy-
ing and selling information
about them in the black
market.
Because no fix was avail-
able, the linchpin in the
attack was onp of the worst
kinds of security holes.
Criminals treasure these
types of "zero day" security
vulnerabilities because
they are the closest to a
sure thing and virtually
guarantee the success of a
shrewdly crafted attack.
The attackers waltzed
into victims' computers,
like burglars with a key to
the back door, by exploit-
ing such a zero-day vulner-
ability in Microsoft Corp.'s
Internet Explorer browser.
Microsoft rushed outfa fix
after learning of the attack.
How did the perpetra-
tors learn about the flaw?
Likely, they merely had to
tap a thriving underground
market, where a hole "wide
enough to drive a truck
through" can command
hundreds of thousands
of dollars, said Ken Silva,
chief technology officer of
VeriSign Inc. Such flaws
can take months of full-
time hacking to find.
"Zero days are the safest
for attackers to use, but
they're also the hardest to
find," Silva said. "If it's not
a zero day, it's not valuable
at all."
The Internet Explorer
flaw used in the attack on
Google Inc. required trick-;
ing people into visiting a
malicious Web site that
installed harmful software
on victims' computers.
The attack, along with
a discovery that com-
puter hackers had tricked
' human-rights activists


In this Jan. 26 photo, a signature review meeting is held at TippingPoint Technology in Austin,
Texas. TippingPoint founded the Zero Day Initiative, a program for rewarding researchers for
disclosing vulnerabilities like the recent programming flaw in Internet Explorer that was used
to attack Google employees.


into exposing their Google
e-mail accounts to outsid-
ers, infuriated Google and
provoked a larger fight
over China's censorship
of the Internet content.
Google has threatened to
shut down its censored,
Chinese-language search
engine and possibly close
its offices in China.
Pedram Amini, manager
of the Zero Day Initiative
at the security firm
TippingPoint, estimated
that the IE flaw could
have fetched as much as
$40,000. He said even more
valuable zero-day flaws are
ones that can infect com-
puters without any action
on the users' part.
Zero days refer to securi-
ty vulnerabilities caused by
programming errors that


haven't been "patched,"
or fixed, by the products'
developers. Often those
companies don't know the
weaknesses exist and have
had zero days to work on
closing the holes.
In this case, Microsoft
actually knew about the
flaw since September but
hadn't planned to fix it until
Febi uary, as companies
sometimes prioritize fixing
other problems and wait on
the ones they haven't seen
it used in attacks.
Microsoft often fixes
multiple vulnerabilities
at once because testing
patches individually is
time consuming and costly,
said Chris Wysopal, do-
founder of security com-
pany Veracode Inc.
But criminals know how


the patch cycle works, and
Wysopal said the Google
attackers may have realized
their zero-day flaw was get-
ting old - and thus struck
in December just before
they thought Microsoft was
going to fix it.
"They likely thought
the bug would be fixed in
January or February," he
said. "They were right."
Microsoft certainly could
have fixed the bug ear-
lier and prevented it from
being used on Google, but
security experts caution
that an adversary that is
well-funded or determined
could have easily found
another bug to Ufse.
"Zero days aren't
difficult to find," said
Steve Santorelli, a for-
mer Microsoft security


research who now works
with Team Cymru, a non-
profit research group. "You
don't have to have a Ph.D.
in computer science to find'
a zero-day exploit. It really
is a factor of the amount of
energy and effort you're
willing to put in."
In fact, such exploits
are widely available for
the right price. VeriSign's
iDefense Labs and 3Com
Corp.'s TippingPoint divi-
sion run programs that
buy zero-day vulnerabilities
from researchers in the
so-called "white market."
They alert the affected
companies without publicly
disclosing the flaw and use
the information to get a
jump on rivals on building
protections into their secu-
rity products.
There's also another,
highly secretive market for
zero days: U.S. and other
government agencies,
which vie with criminals to
offer the most money for
the best vulnerabilities to
improve their military and
intelligence capabilities and
shore up their defenses.
TippingPoint's Amini
said he has heard of gov-
ernments offering as high
as $1 million for a single
vulnerability - a price tag
that private industry cur-
rently doesn't match.
Little is publicly known
about such efforts, and
the U.S. government typi-
cally makes deals through
contractors, Amini said.
Several U.S. government
agencies contacted by The
Associated Press did not
respond to requests for
comment.
One researcher who has
been open about his expe-
rience is Charlie Miller, a
former National Security
Agency analyst who now
works in the private sector
with Independent Security
Evaluators. Miller netted
$50,000 from an unspeci-
fied U.S. government con-
tractor for a bug he found
in a version of the Linux
operating system.


---


--I












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


The Best Time
to Buy
Q What percentage gain should
1 shoot for with a stock'?
When should I sell? - S.H.,
Mansfield, Ohio
A Instead of thinking of
percentages, consider whether
the company is still executing well.
Many people bail out after a partic-
ular gain, such as 10 percent or 30
percent. But it's often more prof-
itable to hang onto the stock for
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growing and you retain faith in it.
You would have regretted selling
Microsoft shares in 1990 after a 100
percent gain, right? It would have
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years. Don't hang on blindly,
though. Follow the company's
progress and prospects.


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week, month or year to buy or
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or calendar for that -'
look to your notebook or noggin.
Ask yourself if you've done
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determine whether the current
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Evaluating a company's fair value
is not easy, though. Measures such
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price-to-cash-flow ratios can help,
* but in order to keep improving your
results, aim to keep learning more
about investing. You can do so at
www.fool.com/how-to-invest and
at Morningstar.com.
Once you're confident that


you've found a great company sell-
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the best time to buy.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
-see Write to Us


I Askthe ool


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When familiar compa
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In this March 2, 2007 file photo, some of about 20,000 mobile homes and travel trailers
owned by the Federal Emergency Management Agency sit at the Hope Municipal Airport near
Hope, Ark. The trailer industry and lawmakers are pressing the government to send Haiti
thousands of potentially formaldehyde-lac'ed trailers left over from Hurricane Katrina, an idea
denounced by some as a crass and self-serving attempt to dump inferior American products
on the poor.


Push to send FEMA trailers

to Haiti stirs backlash


By CARLY EVERSON
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - The
trailer industry and lawmak-
ers are pressing the govern-
ment to send Haiti thou-
sands of potentially form-
aldehyde-laced trailers left
over from Hurricane Katrina
- an idea denounced by
some as a crass and self-
serving attempt to dump
inferior American products
on the poor.
"Just go ahead and sign
their death certificate,"
said Paul Nelson of Coden,
Ala., who contends his
mother died because of
formaldehyde fumes in a
FEMA trailer.
The 100,000 ti-ail-
ers became a symbol of
the Federal Emergency
Management Agency's
bungled response to
Katrina. The government
had bought the trailers to
house victims of the 2005


storm, but after people
began falling ill, high levels
of formaldehyde, a chemi-
cal that is used in building
materials and can cause
breathing problems and
perhaps cancer, were found
inside. Many of the trailers
have sat idle for years, and
many are damaged.
The U.S. Agency for
International Development,
which is coordinating
American assistance in
Haiti, has expressed no
interest in sending the
trailers to the earthquake-
stricken country. FEMA
spokesman Clark Stevens
declined to comment on
the idea.
Haitian Culture and
Communications Minister
Marie Laurence Jocelyn
Lassegue said Thursday
she had not heard of the
proposal but added: "I
don't think we would use
them. I don't think we
would accept them."


In a Jan. 15 letter to
FEMA, Rep. Bennie
Thompson, D-Miss.,
. chairman of the House
Committee on Homeland
Security, said the trailers
could be used as tempo-
rary shelter or emergency
clinics.
"While I continue to
believe that these units
should not be used for
human habitation, I do
believe that they could be
of some benefit on a short-
term, limited basis if the
appropriate safeguards are
provided," he wrote.
For the recreational-
vehicle and trailer industry,
which lost thousands of
jobs during the recession,
the push to send the units
to Haiti is motivated by
more than charity.
Bidding is under way in
an online government-run
auction to sell the trailers
in large lots at bargain-
basement prices.


New York jury rules for

shareholders in Vivendi suit


By LARRY NEUMEISTER
Associated Press
NEW YORK-A jury
on Friday decided in favor
of U.S. and European
shareholders who said the
Vivendi media group lied
about its shaky finances,
setting the stage for the
possible distribution of
several billion dollars in
damages.
The company was found
liable, but not its execu-
tives, according to the ver-
dict in U.S. District Court
in Manhattan.
Vivendi said it will
appeal and any potential
payouts should it fail would
be more than a year away.
The jury deliberated 14
days before reaching its
verdict.
Plaintiffs said in a
release that the potential
payout to investors could
total $9.3 billion. A lawyer
for Vivendi said it was
impossible at this stage to
estimate actual damages
because it was not clear
how many were in the
class and who will seek
payouts.
Thousands of investors
from the United States,
France, England and the
Netherlands said Vivendi
covered up its troubles in
2001 and 2002. The compa-


ny flirted with bankruptcy
before reorganizing suc-
cessfully.
Jean-Marie Messier was
forced out as CEO in July
2002, when the company
was known as Vivendi
Universal.
Defendants in the trial
were Vivendi, Messier and
former chief financial
officer, Guillaume
Hannezo.
The jury concluded on
57 separate claims that
Vivendi was completely
responsible for misstate-
ments or omissions that
misled shareholders.
Messier and Hannezo,
however, were not individu-.
ally responsible, the jury
found.
It found that Vivendi
acted recklessly rather
than knowingly in the dam-
age the jury found that it
caused. It also concluded
that at times the misstate-
ments or omissions inflated
the company's stock by as
much as $11.
The amount of money
plaintiffs will receive if
the verdict does not get
reversed is based on the
jury's calculation of how
much the shares were
inflated as a result of any
misdeeds.
Outside court, Vivendi
attorney Paul Saunders


said the company was dis-
appointed and is focused
on its appeal, which he said
"we expect to wif."
"We feel very good about
the appeal," he said, adding
that the company would
ask the judge within a
month to toss out the case
entirely.
He said the company
was pleased that the jury
gave the plaintiffs only half
of the rate per share that
they were requesting.
'To that extent, this is a
partial victory for us," he
said.
He said that if the case
is not thrown out, it would
take at least a year to.
determine how many peo-
ple deserve compensation
and how much money was
at stake.
"We have just really
begun to fight," he said.
"We are going to challenge
everything we can chal-
lenge."
Saunders said the com-
pany would challenge on
appeal whether the court
had proper jurisdiction
over a foreign company,
whether it was proper to
calculate damages by esti-
mating the amount of infla-
tion that resulted to share
prices and whether the
judge's rulings were wrong
during the trial.


ASK: Customer opinions matter


Continued From Page 1C
he realized that it was not
valid as most people would
consider buying a custom
motorcycle.
Following this realiza-
tion, he amended the ques-
tion to read, "Would you
buy a custom motorcycle
that was priced about
$5,000 more than a stan-
dard motorcycle?" The
revised question received
positive responses from


only 1 percent of respon-
dents, and he quickly
abandoned the idea. As a
result of this experience,
he learned that asking the
wrong question on a sur-
vey could potentially sink a
new venture.
Each and every business
must continually and con-
stantly ask its customers
how it can serve them bet-
ter. Of equal importance,


business owners must also
frame the questions in a
way that extracts the infor-
mation that is needed.
You can do this!

* FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.


) I_ ��~� �


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember ShaIes7peare?
Remember "As You Like It "?
In Elizabethan (davs, Fool. were the only
people wh/o could get away wivith telling the
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Yum! Looks to India
Already established in China, Yum!
Brands (NYSE: YUM), operator of
Pizza Hut, Taco Bell and KFC,
recently outlined its growth plans for
India. The company intends to open
1,000 fast-food outlets by 2015. While
investors invariably think of China
when it comes to overseas growth,
they need to look at India, too.
Like China, India offers the
promise of an exploding middle-class
population. But India differentiates
itself through the sheer size of its
youth population - the median age
in India is 25, and a stunning 30 per-
cent are under 14 years old. These are
young consumers preparing
to make their first foray into '7-,
the workforce, and they .
represent potential lifelong
customers. Aligning with India's
youth culture presents an exciting
growth proposition for companies.
Yum! is already huge in China,
where it makes about a third of its
operating profit.' While its current
footprint in India is relatively small,
it has done an excellent job adapting
to China, a skill that should help it in
other emerging markets.
India needs major boosts in
infrastructure, education and health
care, all of which should offer excel-
lent investment opportunities. The
McKinsey consultancy estimates that
private consumption in India should
quadruple from 2005 to 2025.
If Pizza Hut, Taco Bell and KFC
snare even a small piece of the
growing consumption pie, Yum's
bottom line should benefit.


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


*














Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


Y NYSE
6,883.78 -146.83


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
EKodak 6.05 +1.69 +38.8
LiveNatn 11.47 +2.31 +25.2
Deluxe 18.61 +272 +17.1
AcornlntI 5.94 +.84 +16.5
CallonP h 2.29 +.32 +16.2
IndepHId 8.13 +1.13 +16.1
Textainer 17.04 +2.32 +158
JPM FTLgC30.41 +4.11 +15.6
Culp Inch 13.01 +1.66 +14.6
PSBMetDS 19.75 +2.42 +14.0

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K-Sea 9.20 -4.61 -33.4
CaptlTr pf 2.30 -.89 -27.9
Heckmn un 7.20 -2.75 -27.6
CapitolBcp 2.30 -.86 -27.3
QiaoXMob 2.45 -.75-23.4
HorizLns 4.74 -1.43 -23.2
InterOilg 59.11-17.90 -23.2
CitizFT pfA 14.74 -4.30 -22.6
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SPDR Fncl8438201 14.18 -.00
FordM 6683472 10.84 +.32
iShEMkts 4837840 38.28-1.33
DirFBear rs4072392 19.92 +.04
GenElec 3864342 16.08 -.03
Motorola 3413941 6.15-1.06
iShR2K 3404861 69.11 -1.62

Diary
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Name Last Chg %Chg
HMG 4.70 +1.18 +33.6
BioTimewt 3.21 +.62 +23.9
HallwdGp 44.23 +8.22 +22.8
PacAsiaPn 4.57 +.62 +15.7
NTS RIty 5.40 +.69 +14.6
SwGAFn 11.00 +1.35 +14.0
BioTimen 5.11 +.55 412.1
CagleA 4.48 +.45 +11.2
Libbey 10.30 +1.03 +11.1
ASpectRIty 23,00 +2.25 .+10.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AsiaSpSun 6.81 -2.31 -25.3
SkyPFrtJn 5.38 -1.58 -22.7
AsiaSpcSit 5.91 -1.55 -20.8
CoffeeH 3.90 -.97 -19.9
Shenglnnn .6.04 -1.47 -19.6
VirnetX 3.01 -.69 -18.6
SeabGldg 24.07 -5.36 -18.2
NA Pall g 3.41 -.68 -16.6
NthglM g 2.53 -.45 -15.1
CheniereEn 2.85 -.48 -14.4

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Taseko 200363 4.26 -.61
GoldStrg 177631 2.76 -.12
NthgtM g 174503 2.53 -.45
NovaGIdg 140324 5.26 -.39
NAPallg 136148 3.41 -.68
NwGold g 103727 4.06 -.14
VantageDrl 80897 1.41 -.17
TanzRyg 77550 3.90 -.40
GrtBasGg 77088 1.64 -.13
Rentech 72937 1.19 -.01

Diary
Advanced 209
Declined 359
New Highs 22
New Lows 10
Total issues , 590
Unchanged 22
Volume 576,900,558


Nasdaq
2,147.35 -57.94


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Conologrs 2.11 +.77 +57.5
CamcoF 3.01 +.95 +46.1
FstCapVA 9.00 +2,60 +40.6
VACmce 5.81 +1.60 +38.0
ThStreetlIf 3.17 +.84 +36.1
PhvateB 13.60 +3,60 +36.0
SevernBc 3.10 +.81 +35.4
KeyTrn 4.86 +1.08 +28.5
QCR HId 9.79 +2.14 +28.0
BncTrstFn 3.92 +.84 +27.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Yucheng 3.55 -3.45 -49.3
Zaggn 2.02 -1.13 -35.9
HutchT 6.73 -3.04 -31.1
eOnComm 3.76 -1.32 -26.0
Cytori wt 4.20 -1.40 -25.0
Imunmd 3.35 -.99 -22.8
KongZhg 8.47 -2.50 -22.8
CascadeFn 2.21 -.64 -22.5
ATA Inc 3.00 -.86 -22.3
Irid wi13 2.02 -.56 -21.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ865202242.79-1.37
Microsoft 4982785 28.18 -.78
Intel 3840750 19.40 -.51
Qualcom 2963132 39.19-7.59
Cisco 2939899 22.47 -.50-
Apple Inc 2480275192.06 -5.69
ETrade 2338057 1.52 -.12
HuntBnk 1808881 4.79 +.10
Oracle 1743205 23.06 -1.09
Yahoo 1719498 15.01 -.87

Diary
Advanced 894
Declined 1,966
New Highs 126
New Lows 55
Total issues 2,922
Unchanged 62
Volume 13,034,821,396


The Week in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.68 25.36 -.03 -0.1 -9.5 JPMorgCh NY .20 38.94 -.22 -0.6 -6.4
Alcoa NY 12 12.73 -.67 -5.0 -21.0 Lowes NY 36 2165 -.66 -3.0 -74
Apple Inc Nasd .. 192.06 -5.69 -2.9 -8.9 McDnlds NY 2.20 62.43 -.96 -1.5
AutoZone NY 15503 -.84 -0.5 -1.9 Microsoft Nasd .52 28.18 -.78 -2.7 -7.5
BkolAm NY .04 15.18 +.28 +1.9 +.8 Motorola NY 6.15 -1.06 -147 -20.7
BobEvn Nasd .72 27.91 -1.20 -4.1 -3.6 NY Times NY 12.92 +47 +3.8 +4.5
CNBFnPA Nasd 66 1496 -.11 -0.7 -6.4 NobltyH Nasd . 1036 -.13 -1.2 -.9
CSX NY .88 42.86 -1.26 -2.9 -11.6 NokiaCp NY .52 13.69 +.97 . +7.6 +6.5
Chevron NY 2.72 72.12 2.47 -3.3 -63 OcciPet NY 132 78.34 +2.24 +2.9 -3.7
Cisco Nasd ... 2247 -.50 -2.2 -6.1 Oracle Nasd 20 23.06 -1.09 -45 -6.0
CiFigrp NY 3.32 +.07 +2.2 +.3 Penney NY .80 24.83 -.44 -1.7 -6.7
CocaCI NY 1.64 54.25 +.01 .. -4.8 PepsiCo NY 1.80 59.62 -.77 -1.3 -1.9
Delhaize NY 2.01 77,68 +1.70 +2.2 +1.3 Pfizer NY .72 18.66 -.30 -1.6 +2.6
DirFBearrsNY . 19.92 +.04 +0.2 +25 Potash NY .40 99.35 -9.70 -8.9 -8.4
DirFBull rs NY .29 69.40 -.89 -1.3 -6.4 PwShs QQQNasd .21 42.79 -137 -3.1 -6.5
ETrade Nasd ... 1.52 -.12 -7.3 -13.6 PrUShS&PNY ... 37.54 +1.25 +3.4 +7.1
EMCCp NY ... 16,67 -.09 -0.5 -4.6 Qualcom Nasd .68 39.19 -7.59 -16,2 -15.3
ExxonMbl NY 1.68 64.43 -1.67 -2.5 -5.5 RegionsFnNY .04 6.35 -.25 -3.8 +20.0
FPLGrp NY 1.89 48.76 +.62 +1.3 -7.7 Ryder NY 1.00 36.40 -103 -2.8 -11.6
FamilyDIr NY .62 30.88 +,52 +1.7 +11.0 S&P500ETFNY 2.29 107.39 -1.82 -1.7 -3.6
FordM NY ... 10.84 +.32 +3.0 +8.4 SearsHldgs Nasd ... 93,28 -5.02 -5.1 +11.8
GenElec NY .40 16.08 -.03 -0.2 +6.3 SiriusXMhNasd .. .84 +.15 +21,5 +40.3
HomeDp NY .90 28.01 +,29 +1.0 -3.2 SouthnCo NY 1.75 32.00 -.10 -0.3 -4.0
HuntBnk Nasd .04 4.79 +,10 +2.1 +31.2 SprintNex NY ... 3.28 -.09 -2.7 -10.4
iShChina25NY .55 38.36 -.71 -1.8 -92 SPDRFnclNY ,25 14,18 -.00 ... -1.5
iShEMkts NY .58 38.28 -1.33 -3.4 -7.8 TimeWrn rs NY .75 27.45 +.25 +0.9 -5.8
iShR2K NY .72 60.11 -1,62 -2.6 -3.7 WalMart NY 1.09 53.43 +.49 +0.9
Intel Nasd .63 19.40 -.51 -2.6 -4.9 WellsFargo NY .20 28.43 +1.17 +4,3 +5.3

Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified pnce. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press, Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.07 0.05
6-month 0.14 0.14
5-year 2.34 2.33
10-year 3.60 3.59
30-year 4.51 4.51


1-week
11,000


10,500


10,000


9,500


9,000


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 10,067.33
change:-105.65 (-1.0%)


23.88 -2.57 41.87 -115.70 -53.13


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


A S O N D J


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCO TotRetis Cl 115,919 10.96 +1.7 +15.1/C +7.1/A NL 5,000,000
American FundsGrthAmA m LG 66,116 26.12 -4.4 +36.0/C +2.5/B 5.75 250
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 58,324 46.53 -2.8 +25.3/C +3.4/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 58,004 26.49 -3.5 +35.4/B +0.7/B NL 3,000
Fidelity Contra LG 57,153 55.61 -4.6 +30.7/D +4.0/A NL 2,500
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 56,527 32.21 -5.5 +39.1/C +5.2/A 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 49,431 15.14 -2.3 +29.8/B +2.6/B 5.75 250
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 49,143 24.93 -3.9 +31.7/D +1.3/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 5001nv LB 48,312 98.97 -3.6 +33.1/C +0.1/C NL 3,000
Vanguard Instldx LB 44,401 98.31 -3.6 +33.3/C +0.2/C NL 5,000,000
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 40,624 36.23 -5.5 +44.3/B +6.8/A 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 39,986 94.27 -1.9 +42.7/A -0.6/C NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 38,906 23.90 -3.0 +27.0/D +0.1/C 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 36,757 30.57 -4.0 +61.4/A +4.8/A NL 2,500
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 33,009 24.33 -5.1 +41.5/B +5.2/A 5.75 250
Fidelity DivrlntI d FG 32,048 26.54 -5.2 +39.1/D +3.0/D NL 2,500
American Funds FninvA m LB 30,966 31.46 -3.9 +38.0/B +3.8/A 5.75 250
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl 30,268 10.96 +1.7 +14.8/C +6.9/A NL 5,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 29,740 2.05 -0.4 . +37.6/A +4.0/A 4.25 1,000
American Funds BalA m MA 29,690 16.03 -1.1 +27.0/C +2.1/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 28,379 98.98 -3.6 +33.3/C +0.2/C NL 100,000
Vanguard Welltn MA 28,289 28.36 ' -1.7 +27.0/C +4.7/A NL 10,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 28,159 65.26 -5.4 +39.0/B +4.3/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotStlAdm. LB 27,762 26.50 -3.5 +35.6/B +0.8/B NL 100,000
American Funds BondA m Cl 27,358 11.97 +1.8 +16.8/B +2.7/E 3.75 250
Vanguard TotIntl FB ; 26,043 13.68 -5.1 +47.4/A +4.5/B NL 3,000
Vanguard InstPlus LB 24,767 98,31 -3.6 +33.3/C +0.2/C NL 200,000,000
CA -Conservate Allocation, C -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock. FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeG owth, FV -Foregn
Large Value, IH -Wond Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Lage Growth, LV -Lage Value, MA -Moderate Alocaon, MB -Mid-Cap Blnd, MV -
Mki-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Tot Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performnned vs.
others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name -Div YId PE Chq %Chq Last


ABB Ltd .44
AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.12
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.68
AU Optron .09
AbtLab 1.60
AberFitc .70
Accenture .75
AMD
Aetna .04
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
AlliedCap ...
Allstate .80
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.36
AmbacF
* AMovilL 1.22
AEP 1.64
AmExp .72
AIntlGp rs ...
AmTower
AmenBrg s .32
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .80
Annaly 2.54
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .36
ArchDan .56
ATMOS 1.34
BB&TCp .60
BHP BilIL 1.64
BJ Svcs .20
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .75
BcoSantand .87
BcSBrasil n ...
BkofAm .04
BkAm pfS ...
BkNYMel .36
BarVixShT ...
BarrickG .40
Baxter 1.16
BeazerHm ...
BerkH Bs ...
BestBuy .56
Blockbstr ...
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.28
BrkfldPrp .56
BurlNSF 1.60
CB REllis. ...
CBS B .20
CIGNA .04
CSX .88
CVS Care .35
Cameron ...
CapOne .20
CardnlHlt-s .70
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.68
Cemex .40
CenterPnt .78
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.72
Chimera .43
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .35
Coach .30
CocaCI 1.64
Comerica .20
ConocPhil 2.00
Conseco
ConsolEngy .40
ConEd 2.38


+.04
16 -.39
16 -.67
+.15
... -1.03
12 -.03
... -.75
14 -1.57
67 +1.56
17 -1.19
39 -.42
11 -1.33
5 -.55
... -.07
... -.67
... +.10
-.05
74 -3.53
11 +.15
... -.04
+.37
12 -.77
25 -.93
... -2.27
63 +.27
15 +.60
... +.65
34 -.80
14 +.31
... -2.91
30 -3.73
17 -.50
12 -.51
24 -.28
... -3.84
40 +.40
33 +1.16
... -.82
... -.72
... +.08
... +.28
... +.21
... -.09
... -.25
... -1.68
16 -1.15
... -.20
35 +6.33
14 -.50
... +.05
34 +2.83
.. -.37
14 -.24
8,, -.01
20 +.62
... -.17
22 -.37
12 -2.95
15 -1.26
13 -.87
17 -1.42
49 -.67
16 +1.10
15 +.03
37 -2.01
... -1.36
14 -.25
... -1.84
12 -2.47
10 -.07
... +.07
52 -2.42
18 +.84
20 +.01
... -1.11
13 -2.60
... -.09
16 -2.55
13 +.23


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


ConstellEn .96
CtlAir B
Corning .20
DJIA Diam 2.59
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.12
Deere 1.12
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .08
DevonE .64
DirxEMBear...
DirFBear rs ..
DirFBull rs .29
DirxSCBear...
DirxSCBull 4.75
DirxLCBear ..
DirxLCBull 6.85
DirxEnBull 4.78
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .96
DukeRlty .68
Dynegy
EMC Cp ...
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGld g ...
EmersonEl 1.34
EnCana gs .80
ENSCO .10
EvergrnEn ...
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.68
FPLGrp 1.89
FairchidS ...
FannieMae ...
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM
ForestLab ...
FredMac
FMCG .60
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .34
Genworth ...
Gerdau .16
GoldFLtd .13
Goldcrpg .18
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrtAtlPac ...
HCP Inc 1.84
Hallibrtn .36
HarleyD .40
HartfdFn .20
HItMgmt ...
HeclaM
Heinz 1.68
Hess .40
HewlettP .32
HomeDp .90
HonwIllntl 1.21
HostHotls .10
IAMGId g .06
ICICI Bk .46
iSAstla .66
iShBraz 2.72
iSh HK .38
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor .32
iShSing .33
iSTaiwn .21
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .55
iSSP500 2.16
iShEMkts .58
iShSPLatA .75


-.26 -8.2 32.28
-1.24 +2.6 18.39
-.48 -6.4 18.08
-1.08 -3.4 100.55
+.59 +8.5 11.79
-.02 -3.6 42.04
-3.07 -7.7 49.95
-1.06 +7.5 12.23
-1.08 -8.4 13.55
-.45 -10.9 8.25
-2.39 -9.0 66.91
+.58 +23.6 6.17
+.04 +2.5 19.92
-.89 -6.4 69.40
+.79 +9.3 10.78
-3.03 -11.0 38.04
+.98 +10.4 18.88
-2.77 -11.2 46.62
-3.27 -14.0 34.14
+.22 -7.0 13.68
-.43 -8.4 29.55
-.34 -3.8 37.46
-.67 -2.0 27.09
-.02 -4.0 16.53
-.86 -7.0 11.32
-.21 -10.5 1.62
-.09 -4.6 16.67
-.71 +3.3 10.15
-1.40 -16.4 11.84
-.54 -2.5 41.54
-1.64 -5.6 30.59
-1.95 -2.3 39.03
-.13 -13.4 .29
-.99 -6.7 45.62
-1.67 -5.5 64.43
+.62 -7.7 48.76
-.61 -10.1 8.98
-.03 -18.6 -96
-.51 -6.1 43.62
+.32 +8.4 10.84
+.21 -7.7 29.64
+.01 -19.7 1.18
-7.54 -16.9 66.69
-,.26 -9.9 19.77
+.73 +8.8 16.15
+.22 -8.5 19.08
+1.43 +21.9 13.84
-.76 -20.6 13.45
-.93 -12.9 11.42
-2.97 -13.7 33.96
-5.40 -11.9 148.72
+.10 -5.4 13.34
-.64 -36.5 7.49
-1.00 -7.2 28.35
-1.94 -2.9 29.21
-.85 -9.8 22.74
-.62 +3.1 23.99
-.13 -8.7 6.64
-.65 -26.2 4.56
+1.69 +2.0 43.63
-.90 -4.5 57.79
-2.22 -8.6 47.07
+.29 -3.2 28.01
-1.24 -1.4 38.64
-.48 -9.2 10.60
-1.37 -15.5 13.21
-.68 -6.4 35.28
-.94 -7.6 21.10
-3.28 -13.3 64.69
-.22 -6.6 14.63
-.33 +1.0 9.84
-2.17 -4.6 45.44
-.28 -6.2 10.78
-.28 -6.9 12.07
-.88 -3.9 15.90
-.71 -9.2 38.36
-1.95 -3.7 107.66
-1.33 -7.8 38.28
-1.71 -10.8 42.62


Name
iS Eafe
iSR1KG
iSR2KG
iShR2K
iShREst
ITW
IngerRd
IBM
IntlGame
IntPap
Interpublic
Invesco
ItauUnibH
JPMorgCh
Jabil
JanusCap
JohnJn
JohnsnCtl
JnprNtwk
KB Home
Keycorp
KimbClk,
Kimco
Kinross g
Kohls
Kraft
LSI Corp
LVSands
LennarA
LillyEli
Limited
LincNat


I Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.44 2.7 ... -1.39 -5.1 52.48
.69 1.4 ... -1.07 -4.5 47.61
.34 .5 ... -1.85 -4,2 65.20
.72 1.2 ... -1.62 -3.7 60.11,
1.94 4.5 ... -.37 -5.4 43.43
1.24 2.8 22 -1.76 -9.2 43.59
.28 .9 ... -2.78 -9.2 32.46
2.20 1.8 12 -3.11 -6.5 122.39
.24 1.3 35 -2.30 -2.3 18.34
.10 .4 31 -1.52 -14.5 22.91
... 26 -.39 -12.5 6.46
.41 2.1 33 -1.53 -17.8 19.30
.46 2.4 ... -.47 -16.1 19.16
.20 .5 17 -.22 -6.4 38.94
.28 1.9 ... -1.21. -16.6 14.48
.04 .3 33 -.80 -9.2 12.21
1.96 3.1 14 -.34 -2.4 62.86
.52 1.9 31 -1.65 +2.2 27.83
... 58 -.12 -6.9 24.83
.25 1.6 ... +.93 +11.7 15.28
.04 .6 ... -.07 +29.4 7.18
2.40 4.0 14 -.84 -6.8 59.39
.64 5.1 ... -.42 -6.7 12.62
.10 .6 ... -1.51 -11.6 16.26
... 17 -.08 -6.6 50.37
1.16 4.2 17 -.21 +1.8 27.66
... 38 -.74 -17.0 4.99
... ... -.78 +3.7 15.50
.16 1.0 +.58 +20.3 15.36
1.96 5.6 9 -.32 -1.4 35.20
.60 3.2 61 +.64 -1.1 19.02
.04 .2 ... +.11 -1.2 24.58


Name Div YId PE
LiveNatn ... ... ...
LloydBkg 1.43 ... ...
MBIA ... ... ...
MEMC ... ... ...
MFA Fncl 1.08 14.7 7
MGIC ... ... ...
MGMMir ... ... ...
Macys .20 1.3 11
Manpwl .74 1.4 80
MarathonO .96 3.2 20
MktVGold .11 ... ...
MktVRus .08 .3 ...
Marshals .04 .6 ...
Masco .30 2.2 ..
MasseyEn .24 .6 22
McKesson .48 .8 13
Mechel ... ... ...
Medtrnic .82 1.9 21
Merck 1.52 4.0 10
MetLife .74 2.1 16
MetroPCS ... ... 13
MitsuUFJ ... ... ...
Monsanto 1.06 1.4 22
Moodys .42 1.5 17
MorgStan .20 .7 ...
Mosaic .20 .4 ...
Motorola ... ...
NCR Corp ... ...25
NRG Egy ... ... 6
NYSE.Eur 1.20 5.1 10
Nabors ...
NatGrid 2.89 5.7 ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last
+2.31 +34.8 11.47
-.14 -.3 3.26
+.01 +23.9 4.93
-.61 -7.6 12.58
+.09 +.1 7.36
-.10 +4.7 6.05
-.56 +21.3 11.06
+.36 -5.0 15.93
-.75 -5.1 51.79
-.77 -4.5 29.81
-3.07 -11.9 40.72
-.42 -.4 31.08
+.05 +26.8 6.91
-.35 -1.8 13.56
-2.66 -8.3 38.52
-1.75 -5.9 58.82
-2.70 +5.2 19.79
-.41 -2.5 42.89
-.69 +4.5 38.18
-.80 -.1 35.32
-.25 -26.2 5.63
-.25 +4.3 5.13
-2.01 -7,2 75.88
+.62 +2.9 27.59
-.97 -9.5 26.78
-5.12 -10.4 53.51
-1.06 -20.7 6.15
-.10 +7.5 11.97
-.62 +2.1 24.11
-.21 , -7.5 23.41
-1.58 +1.9 22.30
-1.09 -7.4 50.37-


Name Div
NOilVarco .40
NatSemi .32
NY CmtyB 1.00"
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .40
Nexen g .20
NiSource .92
NobleCorp .20
NokiaCp .52
NorflkSo 1.36
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.32
OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 1.78
OwensIll
PG&ECp 1.68
PNC .40
Pactiv
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .28
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.80
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.17
Petrobras 1.16
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.32
PlainsEx
Potash .40
PS USDBull...
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltDow .55
PrUIShDow ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ ...
ProUltSP .35
ProUShL20 ...
PrUShCh25...
ProUShtRE ...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUShtBM ...
ProUltRE .13
ProUltO&G .23
ProUltFin .04
ProUBasM .18
ProUSR2K ...
ProUltR2K .06
ProUSSP500...
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp .16
ProLogis .60
PulteH .
QntmDSS ...
QksilvRes ...
QwestCm .32
RRI Engy ...'
RadianGrp .01
Raytheon 1.24
RegionsFn .04
RiteAid
RylCarb ...
SLM Cp ...
SpdrGold ..
S&P500ETF2.29
SpdrHome .15
SpdrKbwBk .36
SpdrKbw RB .46
SpdrRetl .48
SpdrOGEx .28
SpdrMetM .46
STMicro .12
Safeway .40
StJude
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .44
Schlmbrg .84
SemiHTr .50
SiderNac 1.12


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


10 -1.63
95 -.44
13 +.14
8 -.90
26 -1.57
... +.76
13 -.10
6 -1.27
... +.97
17 -2.59
... -3.39
21 +2.24
-.31
.. -3.67
9 -2.28
11 -1.37
13 +1.81
9 -1.11
7 -1.49
27 -2.98
21 -.44
18 -.77
... -1.93
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13 -.30
15 -1.30
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30 -9.70
+.37
... +.92
... +1.25
... -.88
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-.28
... +.29
... +.11
... +.01
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-.09
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-.04
... -3.03
... +1.25
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-.39
12 -.14
... +.12
... +.30
... -,34
... -.85
10 -.10
7 -.06
..: -.26
11 -.58
-.25
-.10
35 +.67
75 +.13
... -1.21
... -1.82
... +.16
... +.13
... -.28
-.10
... -1.95
... -3.80
.. -.18
12 -.29
16 -.30
s... -.87
20 +.44
23 -1.78
... -.88
... -.12


-7.2 40.90
-13.7 13.26
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-9.6 13.57
-9.4 42.86
-8.3 21.94
-7.3 14.25
-.9 40.32
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-7.4 26.25
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-17.9 10.41
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-12.6 2.56
-11.5 13.29
4.21
-13.5 4.95
-12.0 6.43
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+20.0 6.35
-9.9 1.36
+3.2 26.09
-6.6 10.53
-1.3 105.96
-3.6 107.39
15.11
+9.1 23.09
+8.2 24.07
-2.8 34.62
-4.2 39.46
-10.5 46.17
-12.2 8.14
+5.4 22.45
+2.6 37.73
-10.3 8.46
-.3 12.14
-2.5 63.46
-11.3 24.76
-8.8 29.12


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SilvWhtng ...
Smithlnt .48
SouthnCo 1.75
SthnCopper .44
SwstAirl .02
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.00
SprintNex ...
SP Matis .58
SP HIthC .57
SP CnSt .73
SP Consum .45
SP Engy 1.03
SPDR Fncl .25
SP Inds .65
SP Tech .31
SP Util 1.27
StateStr .04
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SunTrst ,04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TJX .48
TaiwSemi .46
TalismE g .23
Target .68
TeckRes g ...
Telmxintl .25
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro .20
Texlnst .48
Textron .08
3M Co 2.04
TimeWrn rs .75
TitanMet ..
Transocn
Travelers 1.32
TycoElec .64
Tycolntl .80
Tyson .16
UBS AG ...
US Airwy
UnionPac 1.08
UtdMicro
UPSB 1.80
US Bancrp .20
USNGsFd ...
US OilFd
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .03
Vale SA .48
Vale SApf .48
ValeroE .20
VangREIT 1.96
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.90
Visa .50
VMware
Walgm .55
Weathflntll ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WDigital ..
WstnUnion .24
WmsCos .44
XL Cap .40
XTO Engy .50
Xerox .17
Yamana g .04
YingliGrn ...


... -1.04 -8.4 13.76
43 +.38 +11.6 30.32
15 -.10 -4.0 32.00
50 -3.03 -19.1 26.63
... -.35 -.9. 11.33
32 -2.56 -11.0 42.88
17 -.74 +3.6 21.25
... -.09 -10.4 3.28
...-1.49 -8.6 30.14
-.38 +.7 31.28
-.09 -1.0 26.20
-.11 -2.9 28.91
... -1.80 -4.4 54.50
-.00 -1.5 14.18
-.46 -1.5 27.38
-.70 -8.6 20.96
-.29 -4.8 29.53
12 -.48 -1.5 42.88
... -1.66 -10.4 31.65
... +.49 -18.8 13.51
... -.22 +19.9 24.33
33 -.71 +15.7 14.71
... -.06 +34.6 2.76
16 +.52 +.2 27.99
15 +1.27 +4.0 38.01
... +.07 -11.2 10.16
... -.41 -11.1 16.57
18 +.89 +6.0 51.27
... -3.66 -6.1 32.82
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21 +.35 +2.8 5.54
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13 -.47 -7.7 12.50
19 -.49 -13.7 22.50
... -1.79 +3.8 19.53
18 -.99 -2.6 80.49
... +.25 -5.8 27.45
.32 -.81 -7.1 11.63
8 -.98 -+2.3 84.74
8 +2.36 +1.6 50.67
... -.10 +1.3 24.88
...-1.42 -.7 35.43
... +.05 +12.6 13.82
-1.00 -16.1 13.01
+.07 +9.7 5.31
16 -3.35 -5.3 60.50
... -.35 -9.5 3.51
34 -.98 +.7 57.77
31 +.41 +11.4 25.08
... -1.04 -7.6 9.31
-.70 -9.3 35.64
...-10.57 -19.4 44.43
10 -.16 +8.3 33.00
...-1.85 -11.2 25.79
..-1.32 -9.0 22.58
... +.24 +10.0 18.42
... -.33 -5.5 42.27
...-1.04 -6.7 38.24
21 -.92 -11.2 29.42
26 -.70 -6.2 .,82.03
74 +3.83 +7.1 45.41
17 +.06 -1.8 36.05
34 -2.20 -12.5 15.68
6 -1.38 +9.3 63.72
33 +1.17 +5.3 28.43
... -.19 -1.7 4.61
9 -2.75 -14.0 37.99
15 -.26 -1.6 18.54
24. -1.28 -1.1 20.84
... +.29 -8.5 16.77
14 -1.04 -4.2 44.57
16 -.25 +3.1 8.72
17 -.70 -11.5 , 10.07
... -.11 -20.8 12.52


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Aastrom ... ... ...-.02 -30.2 .22
ActivsBliz ... ... 41 -.21 -8.6 10.16
AdobeSy ... ... 44 -2.08 -12.2 32.30
AkamaiT ... ... 31 -1.12 -2.5 24.70
AlteraCplf .20 .9 25 +.10 -5.8 21.32
Amazon ... ... 62 +3.98 -6.8 125.41
AmCapLtd .19 -.22 +51.2 3.69
Amgen ... 13 +1.88 +3.4 58.48
AmkorT If ... ... -.42 -20.5 5.69
Amylin ... ... ... +.74 +26.7 17.98
ApolloGrp ... ... 15 -.60 ... 60.59
Apple Inc ... ... 24 -5.69 -8.9 192.06
ApIdMatI .24 2.0 -.45 -12.6 12.18
AresCap 1.40 11.4 ... -.47 -1.2 12.30
ArmHid .11 1.2 ... +.13 +6.0 9.07
AsscdBanc .04 .3 ... -.04 +15.5 12.72
Atmel ... ... ... -.34 +.7 4.64
Autodesk ... ... ...-1.31 -6.4 23.79
AutoData 1.36 3.3 15 -.38 -4.7 40.79
AvagoTn :.. ... ... -.18 -5.0 17.38
BMCSf ... ... 17 +1.68 -3.6 38.64
BareEscent ...20 +.05 +48.6 18.17
BedBath ... ... 19 -.37 +.2 38.70
BrigExp ...... ... -.21 -3.8 13.04
Broadcom ... ... ... -1.71 -15.1 26.72
BrcdeCm ... ...... -.54 -10.0 6.87
CA Inc .16 .7 16 -.76 -1.9 22.04
Cadence ... .. .... -.16 -3.0 5.81
Celgene ... ... 34 -1.79 +2.0 56.78
CellTher rsh... ... ... +.01 -2.6 1.11
CentAI ... ... ... -1.80 -30.1 11.32
CienaCorp ..... ... +.51 +17.6 12.75
Cisco ... 23 -.50 -6.1 22.47
CitizRep h ... ... ... -.13 +10.1 .76
CidrixSys ... ... 40 +.15 -.1 41.55
CognizTech 26 -1.51 -3.7 43.66
Comcast .38 2.4 15 -.02 -5.5 15.83
Comcspcl .38 2.5 14 -.07 -4.8 15.14


Nasdaq Most Active


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Compuwre
Conexant
CorinthC
Costco
Crocs
Cyclacel
CypSemi
Dell Inc
DItaPtr
DirecTV A
DryShips
ETrade
eBay
ElectArts
EgyXXI rs
EricsnTel
EvrgrSIr
Expedia
FifthThird
Flextrn
FocusMda
GenVec
GileadSci
Google
HercOffsh
Hologic
HudsCity
Incyte
IntgDv
Intel
Intersil
Intuit
JA Solar
JDS Uniph
JetBlue
JoyGIbl
KLA Tnc
LaJollPh h


12 -.42
... +.23
13 +.56
23 +.36
... +.14
... -.44
... -.65
17 -.74
... +.06
24 -1.03
... -.33
... -.12
12 -.56
... -.49
... +1.03
... -.15

... -.36
18 +.34
... -.48
... -2.62
... -1.32
17 +2.19
26-20.07
-.89
-.72
12 +.15
... +1.21
-.69
25 -.51
... -.19
23 -.49
-.27
... -.22
24 -.64
10 -3.89
.. -2.66
-.05


+5.0 7.59
+64.7 3.82
+1.7 14.00
-2.9 57.43
+27.8 7.35
+78.8 1.86
-4.8 10.05
-10.2 12.90
+22.1 1.27
-9.0 30.35
-5.5 5.50
-13.6 1.52
-2.2 23.02
-8.3 16.28
+57.0 18.13
+5.3 9.68
-4.6 1.44
-16.8 21.41
+27.6 12.44
-13.3 6.34
-15.3 13.42
+39.2 1,67
+11.6 48.27
-14.5 529.94
-18.4 3.90
+3.9 15.07
-3.4 13.27
+17.2 10.68
-12.4 5.67
-4.9 19.40
-12.2 13.47
-3.6 29.61
-24.6 4.30
-4.7 7.86
-9.4 4.94
-11.3 45.74
-22.0 28.20
-14.4 .14


Name Div
LamResrch ...
Level3
LibGlobA ...
LibtyMlntA ...
LifeTech
LinearTch .92
MarvellT ...
MaHel .75
Maximlntg .80
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.36
MicronT
Microsoft .52
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .12
NewsCpB .12
NexMed
Novell
Novlus
Nvidia
OceanFrt ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .20
PDL Bio 1.00
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .36
PacEthan ...
Palm Inc
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .61
Poniard h ...
Popular
PwShs 000.21
PrivateB .04
Qlogic
Qualcom .68


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... -1.28 -15.8 33.01
... ... -.11 -9.2 1.39
... ... +1.84 +15.9 25.38
... ... -.41 -4.2 10.38
... 27 +1.25 -4.8 49.71
3.5 24 -1.27 -14.6 26.10
... ... -1.38 -16.0 17.43
3.8 19 -.23 -1.3 19.72
4.6 67 -.47 -14.0 17.48
... ... +.05 +6.3 3.57
5.3 27 -.40 -11.2 25.81
... ... -.41 -17.4 8.72
1.8 16 -.78 -7.5 28.18
59 -1.65 -15.2 29.13
31+11.36 +13.0 62.25
1.0 ... +.20 -7.9 12.61
.8 ... -.06 -7.8 14.68
... ... -.06 +82.5 .52
... ... -.17 +7.7 4.47
... ... -.07 -10.5 20.90
... ... -1.07 -17.6 15.39
... ... -.06 -10.3 .83
... ... -.46 -18.3 7.21
.9 20 -1.09 -6.0 23.06
15.6 5 -.19 -6.7 6.40
... 17 -.09 -8.2 7.95
1.0 74 -.13 -.7 36.03
... ... +.05 +191.5 2.07
... ... -1.54 +3.6 10.39
1.3 39 -1.23 +.1 15.36
4.3 21 -.34 -5.4 28.99
3.8 52 +.18 -3.2 16.17
... ... -1.01 -12.6 1.60
... ... +.03 -4.9 2.15
.5 ... -1.37 -6.5 42.79
.3 ... +3.60 +51.6 13.60
... 25 -2.00 -8.9 17.19
1.7 32 -7.59 -15.3 39.19


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Chq Last


RF MicD ...
Rambus
ReprosTh h ...
RschMotn ...
RossStrs .44
STEC
SanDisk
Sanmina rs ...
Schwab .24
SeagateT ..
ShandaGn ...
SIcnware .28
SiriusXMh ...
SkywksSol ...
Solarfun
SouthFn h ..
Staples .33
Starbucks ...
StlDynam .30
SunPowerA ...
Symantec ..
TD Ameritr ..
Tellabs .02
TevaPhrm .60
3Com
TriQuint
UAL
UrbanOut ...
Verisign ' ...
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.22
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .64
YRC Wwde ...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


... -.19
.. -2.80
... +.01
15 +1.23
15 +2.10
15 -1.06
15 -2.97
... +1.29
27 -.53
... -1.69
... -1.11
... -.04
+.15
24 -1.12
... +.13
... -.26
21 -.65
42 -1.12
... -1.22
30 -.70
18 -1.34
17 -.26
22 +.47
61 +,04
41 -.10
... +.13
... -.98
30 +.52
23 -.43
-.92
-... -.09
12 -.24
21 -.26

36 -.87
... +1.31


Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
Adventrx ...
AlIdNevG ...
AlphaPro ..
AmO&G ...
ApolloG g ...
Audrizon g ...
BPW Acq
BPW Acq wt..
BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ..
BrclndiaTR ...
BootsCoots ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn ...
CheniereE 1.70
ChMarFd n ..
ChNEPet n ..
Continucre ..
Comente g ..
Crystallx g ...
DenisnM g ...
EndvSilv g ..
ExeterR g
FrkStPrp .76
FrontrD g
GabGIdNR 1.68
GascoEngy ..
GenMoly ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
Hemisphrx ...
Hyperdyn ...
IA Global ...
InovioBio ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Name Div
IsoRay
KodiakO g ...
MagHRes ...
Metalico
Minefndg ...
Nevsun g ...
NDragon
NwGold g ...
NA Pall g ...
NthnO&G
NthgtM g ...
NovaGldg ...
Oilsands g ...
On2 Tech ...
Palatin
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAlh ...
PionDrill
PlatGpMet ...
PolyMet g ...
Protalix
Quaterrag .
Rentech
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G
SeabGldg ...
SulphCo ...
TanzRy g ...
Taseko
TianyinPh .10
TmsatlPtn ...
US Geoth ...
US Gold ...
Uluru
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantaqeDr ...


... ... -.16 +12.4
... ... -.09 +6.3
... ... +.05 +37.4
... ... -.36 +.2
... ... -1.40 -11.1
... -.29 -21.0
... ... -.01 -11.5
... ... -.14 +11.5
... ... -.68 -2.6
... ... -.86 -6.7
... 13 -.45 -17.9
... ... -.39 -14.2
... ... -.09 -27.8
... ... -.01 +11.5
... ... -.01 -21.6
... ... -.27 +3.4
... ... +.23 +1.5
... ... -.85 +.6
... ... -.29 -14.2
... ... -.36 -5.2
... -.15 +3.5
-.48 -30.4
11 -.01 -3.3
-.44 -15.1
-.01 +8.3
... ... -5.36 -.8
... ... -.21 -31.3
... ... -.40 +11.7
... -.61 +.9
2.8 11 -.28 -14.8
... ... -.04 -17.5
... -.27 -19.6
... ... -.14 -10.1
... ... -.03 -11.4
... ... +,01 -6.2
... -.37 -20.4
... ... -.17 -12.4


SWeekly Stock Exchange Highlights


Weekly Dow Jones


Currencies '
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.1291 1.1173
Britain 1.5993 1.6127
Canada 1.0691 1.0651
Euro .7211 .7154
Japan 90.32 89.90
Mexico 13.0310 13.0330
Switzerind 1.0608 1.0514
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


1.00
2.36
2.13
4.93
9.16
1.92
.12
4.06 .
3.41
11.05
2.53
5.26
.83
.68
.29
1.50
1.99
7.95
1.82
2.90
6.85
1.33
1.19
4.00
.26
24.07
.46
3.90
4.26
3.58
2.82
1.23
2.23
.20
1.22
3.01
1.41


VV-%











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Legal

Public Auction
2001 HYNDAI 4 Dr
Vin# KM1HDN45D41U092077

in Columbia County on February 18,
2010, at 10:00am at Auto Emporium,
2832 SE Main Blvd
Lake City Fl. 32025

04537430
January 31, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000619
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A..
Plaintiff,
vs.
GRACE E. BROWN A/K/A
GRACE EARLONDA BROWN;
TERRENCE J. BROWN; UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S): IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE'
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-i
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 6th day of January
2010, and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000619, of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein BANK OF AMERICA,
N.A. is the Plaintiff and GRACE E.
BROWN A/K/A GRACE EARLON-
DA BROWN; TERRENCE J.
BROWN; UNKNOWN TENANT
(S); JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the AT COURTHOUSE at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 10th day of February, 2010, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
EXHIBIT A
LOT 3 OF THE SUBDIVISION OF
A PART OF BLOCK 309, WEST-
ERN DIVISION. CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 103, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
TOGETHER WITH A PORTION
OF LOT 10 OF SAID SUBDIVI-
SION, AND BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID
LOT 3 AND THENCE RUN
SOUTH 01�17'18" EAST, ALONG
THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 3,
A DISTANCE OF 104.75 FEET TO
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID LOT 10 AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-
TINUE SOUTH 01�17'18" EAST,
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID LOT 10, A DISTANCE OF
22.80 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 89052'05" WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 70.26 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF
SAID LOT 10; THENCE RUN
NORTH 01�16'16" WEST ALONG
SAID WEST LINE, A DISTANCE
OF 21.87 FEET TO THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 10;
THENCE RUN NORTH 89006' 59"
EAST, ALONG THE LINE BE-
TWEEN LOT 3 AND LOT 10, A
DISTANCE OF 70.24 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE'A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 19,90 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 11th day of January, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of The Circuit Court
By /s/: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone:(954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438

04537286
January 24 and 31, 2010



Get Connected















Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,.
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191

Services


Legal

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
TIHE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF LAKE CITY COM-
MUNITY COLLEGE WILL RE-
CEIVE BIDS FOR THE FOLLOW-
ING:
IMTS RENOVATION - BUILDING
59
LAKE CITY COMMUNITY COL-
LEGE LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
LCCC BID NO. 10-1-03
ARCHITECT'S PROJECT NO.
0827
Date & Time for
Receiving Bids:
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010
AT 2:00 P.M.
Date, Time and Place for
Pre-Bid Conference: All interested
bidders are required to attend the
MANDATORY PRE-BID CON-
FERENCE to be held at 10:00 A.M.
local time on TUESDAY, FEBRU-
ARY 16, 2010. The Conference will
begin in the Board Room, Building
001 which is located on the Col-
lege's Main Campus at 198 SE Staff
Way, Lake City, Florida 32025.
Place for Receiving Bids:
Bids may be mailed as follows:
Lake City Community College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-87103
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Lake City Community College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Platce
Room 138 Administration Building
001
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid opening date/time. The College
will not be responsible for Postal or
other delivery service delays thit
cause a bid to arrive at Room 138,
Building 001 after the designated bid
opening date/time. Bids that are
mailed must be clearly marked on
the outside of the envelope "BID #
10-1-03, IMTS RENOVATION -
BUILDING 59, LAKE CITY COM-
MUNITY COLLEGE, LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA, BID OPENING TUES-
DAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2010". Bids
will be opened in a public bid open-
ing in Room 101, Building 001.
Contractor's Prequalification:
ALL PRIME CONTRACTORS
WISHING TO BID THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUALIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to prequalify with
Lake City Community College for
this project must request a prequalifi-
cation package from the College's
Director of Purchasing, Bill Brown
at (386) 754-4360 or by email at
brownb@lakecitycc.edu. COM-
PLETED prequalification packages
must be returned to the College's
Purchasing office using the delivery
methods and associated address stat-
ed in the Place for Receiving Bids
section above. Packages must arrive
not later than 10:00 A.M. local time
on TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16,
2010. The College will not be re-
sponsible for Postal or other delivery
service delays that cause a prequali-
fication package to arrive at Room
138, Building 001 after the desinat-
ed date/time.
Bid Documents: Please register
at the following web address to view
and print Bid Documents.
http://www.csa-
architect.com/bid documents.htm
Project Description: The work in-
cludes, but is not limited to, an addi-
tion to the northeast comer of the
building: the subdividing of approxi-
mately 2,200 square feet of existing
open area into new Study Areas, uti-
lizing four foot high, 4" metal studs
and veneer plaster knee walls, topped
with double glazed aluminum store-
front.
The existing restrooms are to be de-
molished with the new layout de-
signed to meet the A.D.A. Handicap-
ped Code, adding new fixtures. This
work includes new ceramic tile, new
stud walls, new toilet partitions and
associated work.
The addition will be CMU walls with
stucco; bar joists and insulattion;
standing seam roof and fascia to
match existing, aluminum storefront
windows; new fluorescent lighting
and a suspended'acoustical tile ceil-
ing. The extension of existing duct-
work and branch circuit electrical
and data outlets is also included in
both the existing'building and the ad-
Sdition.
See Section 01100 - Alternates, for
additional work, which involves re-
carpeting the entire building and lim-
ited demolition.
Right to Waive Irregularities
and Technicalities: Lake City
Community College reserves the
right to waive minor irregularities
and/or technicalities associated with
this solicitation. The Director of
Purchasing of Lake City Community
College shall be the final authority
regarding waivers of irregularities
and technicalities.
FOR THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES
OF LAKE CITY COMMUNITY
COLLEGE

Charles W. Hall, President

04537409
January 31, 2010 (
February 7, 14, 2010


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


020 Lost & Found

AFRICAN GRAY w/ red tail lost
01/19 around Gwen Lake down by
the Workcamp. REWARD! Call
386-755-1464 or 386-288-3687

BLACK/TAN DOG,
Mixed breed, found in Eastside
Village area on Thurs., Jan. 21 .
Call 386-758-8848
LOST DOG "BUSTER"
brindle bull-dog mix While on
muzzle, chest, and lips of feet I
black toenail on left back foot.
Last seen CR 252 &
Price Creek Rd REWARD
344-8128 or 344-8116

LOST MALE solid gray cat.
Family pet. Missing since Sunday
01/24. Mayo Rd. area west of town
386-754-0614 or 365-5694

10010ob
Opportunities

04537127
GOOD OPPORTUNITY!
NOW HIRING An Experi-
enced Stylist with clientele
Southern Exposure
386-752-4614

04537396
SUPERVISOR NEEDED
Supervisor sought for Older
Americans Act & Volunteer
programs to oversee client
activities, transportation, menu
quality, outreach and telephone
reassurance and to recruit, train
and retain volunteers. Four year
degree required. EOE. 30hrs/wk.
Send resume' to P.O. Box 1772,
Lake City, FL 32056

3RD CIRCUIT COURT
ADMINISTRATION
Child Support Enforcement Hearing
Officer www.jud3.flcourts.org
A Terrific Opportunity
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company
$100.000+ Earning Potential,
Benefits, Pension, 401K & BCBS
Insurance for those who qualify!
Call 1-800-257-5500


L..AKE CITY
ED MMINI TY EDL liE5
PROGRAM DEVELOPER
POSITION # P99983
(Grant Funded)
The Program Developer will assist
in the development of certificates
and degrees leading to 21st century
careers. Primary responsibilities are
establishing Program need,
maintaining program changes, and
developing and implementing new
programs. Requires Bachelor's degree
in education or workforce
education andIthree years of
professional experience, including
teaching and some supervisory
experience, plus experience in
developing workforce curriculum
and programs.
SALARY: S 37,500 annually
plus benefits
Application deadline: 2/12/10
Persons interested should provide a
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Applications and full position details
are available on our website
www.lakecitycc.edu
Inquiries: Human Resources
149 SE College Place
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4594
E-mail: humanrAlakecitycc.edu
LCCC is accredited by the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in
Education & Employment



.ILAIE CITY
_T 1 IMMUNITY COLLEliE
REGISTRAR ASSISTANT I
(Part-time 20 hours per week)
Position #OP9965
IResponsible for evaluating.
processing and verifying transcripts and
other duties associated with tlie
Registrar's Ofhice and fllicial studcint
records. t igh school diplonia or its
equivalent plus two years clerical
experience. Additional education imay
substitute on a year for year basis for
required experience iiin related area.
Special consideration will be given to
applicants with an Associate Degree or
Certificate mi a related area. Computer
literate. Must be proficient in MS Word
and tLxcel. College employment
application required.
Salary S9.90 per hour.
Application deadline: 2/10/10
Position details and application
available on the web at:
www.lakecilvcc edu
Inquiries: I lHuman Resources
Lake City Communily Collegec
149 SE College Place .
Lake Ci'ty. iFL 32025
Phlione: (386)754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4594
tE-mail: liumaniia hlakecilycc.eduii
LG('CC is accredited by lie Southern
Association oCi ('ollees ani Schools
SVPADIA/IA/ hO College in
l-ducalituon & I inplovieit


Two h ighly motivated ind:-tividual




Wilhl trainthe ight person.l~j]:
Grai -Pay - I -401, - i d-Vacation
Appy i prso at258. W Hw 9
or callChrs a 38-75- 063


100 Job
Opportunities
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit.
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
wwvw.youravon.conm/tdavies
BLUE JEAN JOB $ CASH $
Seeking sharp go getters. Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock-n-Roll
Environment. Call Skhyler
1-321-432-4142. 9am-6pm.
Must start Immediately!
CHILDCARE worker needed.
Christian Heritage Church.
Contact Debbie Dant at
386-752-9119
CLASS A CDL Long haul driver.
Must have frameless dump exp.
Must pass drug test. Requires out
of town travel. 386-719-9482
between 9a & 5p
Electrician / Traffic Signal
Installer wanted. CDL
Class A or B required.
Good pay & benefits. EOE.
Call Bobby (813) 433-7851
Gotta Go Transport a flatbed Co.
in High Springs needs Class A
CDL Driver. Min. 2 years exp.
Home weekends, safety bonus and
vacation pay. Call 386-454-0532.
Great opportunity for dependable,
qualified, experienced CHEF for
Clhristian retreat center. Applicant
must be mature, have excellent
people skills, be capable of
supervising others, time mgmt, food
cost and other management duties.
Work most weekends, very flexible
hours. Send resume to Camp Weed
fax 386/362-7557
frontdesk@campweed.org
INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for self motivated goal
oriented sales person in both
life/health and property/casualty
ins. A 220 and 215 license a plus
but not reqd. Must have exc.
comm. skills, be organized and de-
pendable. Must be team oriented
and have computer skills.
Send reply to
Box 04086, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
OWNER OPERATORS WANTED
Flatbed, stepdeck OTR operation
based out of Fort White, FL. Good $.
Must have good equipment, and be
willing to work it!
Call Mike at 386-623-4801.
Part time office position, M W F
mornings. Knowledge of
computers a plus.
Send resume to P 0 Box 3176
Lake City, Fl 32056
Seeking Assistant Bookkeeper
salary neg. based on exp. Reliable
w/ own transportation. Email
resume to kimsrcc@yahoo.com

110 Sales
Employment

1)5522947
SALESMAN NEEDED
Must be aggressive and self moti-
vated. Also must be willing to
travel and work some weekends.
Fax resume to (386) 963-2809 or-
email it to: srlh(Ssrloghomes.com



1An Medical
120U Employment

14537240
RN Needed
Experience Preferred.
Full Time with Benefits.
Email Resume to:
Angela Akins RN/SDC
At
aakins@gulfcoiasthealthlcare.com
Or
Fax Resume to:
386-364-5174
EOE/V/D/M/F


04537445




MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Sr. VP of Public Relations
& Development
Demonstrated Exp in
Not-For-Profit Advancement
Gainesville

Lake City
PRN / On-Call Needs :
Psych Exp RN
Varying Shifts
LPN
Varying Shifts
C.N.A.
Varying Shifts
Children's Outpatient
Program Manager
Lake City
Mental Health & Substance
Abuse
Hospital Liaison Case Mgr
Required travel to
State Hospital
Recreational Therapist
CSU Lake City
CO IV/Discharge Planner
CSU Lake City


1 0n Medical
120 Employment

LPN or RN needed Fulltime
3PM-IIPM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive.
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V
REHAB TECH
Part time Rehab Tech needed at LTC
facility in Jasper. Responsible for as-
sisting PT, OT, & Speech
therapists. CPR cert. Req. Send
resumes to i.anderson@(fprehabh.com
or fax to 888-531-2697.

240 Schools &
240 Education _

(4536763
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-02/01/10
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-02/08/10
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-03/16/10.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



30 Livestock &

Fresh Cut Hay, no weeds; fertil-
ized and barn kept, approximately
800 lb rolls, $35 per rol.l Bahia
/Coastal mix. Discount on large
amt. 386-209-0399 /386-362-7441


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver. Glassware,
Costume Jewelfy & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

MEDIUM CHEST type freezer.
Almond color. Works well
$100.00
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

STAINLESS STEEL/BLACK
Microwave, (Sharp)
Great Condition
$50, Call 386-755-3350
VERY NICE Whirlpool
White Dryer. Guaranteed to work
well. $120.00.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$145.00 Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.


403 Auctions

04537449
ABSOLUTE AUCTION
Wed., _ Feb. 10th _ 10:30 AM
FRESH MARKET
GROCERY STORE
10940 SAN JOSE BLVD.
JACKSONVILLE, FL
Offering includes: Tyler
walk-in, Tyler service meat, deli
& seafood cases, Hobart
rotisserie, Hobart tabletop
Grinder, Berkel meat slicer,
McDonald 60" baler, Tyler
compressor racks, qty stainless
tables, sinks & prep equipment
plus much much more. 13%
buyer's premium (3% discount
for cash or guaranteed funds).
Visit www.grafeauctiofi.coni for
complete listing, photos and
terms. Judd Grafe FL Lic.
AU3128, Grafe Auction FL Lic.
AB2386. In association with
TB Auctions.
GRAFE AUCTION
COMPANY
1025 Industrial Drive, Spring
Valley, MN 55975
800-328-5920



405 Bicycles

LIKE NEW 3 wheel bike.
Used one time. $200.00
386-344-0764



408 Furniture

Blue Recliner
Medium size $60.00 obo.
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387

CHINA CABINET.
Dark wood, glass doors
and knobs. $550.00 obo
386-758-3285
ELECTRIC RECLINER
Good Condition, Leather
$500
Call 904-504-2620
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
for medium to large TV with extra
shelving. $35.00 obo
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
PATIO FURNITURE
w/umbrellha. PVC Pipe style, table
4 chairs, needs replacement
cushions. $50. Call 386-755-3350

SMALL ANTIQUE coffee table
with end tables. $65.00 obo.
386-754-9295 or


386-984-0387
STURDY ROCKING CHAIR
with cushions, great condition
$50
Call 386-755-3350


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
***********.i ..*A:r;*A****:k**


Foster Parents Needed
Please visit our website
for more details

www.mbhci.ore
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP


ti iMo










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


413 Musical
Merchandise
FREE Piano
In good condition,
legs need somework
SOLD
YAMAHA CVP 405 Clavinova.
Like new. Still has plastic on loot
pedals. All instructions still in un-
opened box. Sales for $7,999.95.
Asking 54000. 386-623-6989

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$150 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.

440 Miscellaneous
ROLLING/SITTING WALKER
with brakes. $100.00. obo.
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387
Mobile Home
620Lots for Sale
1 ACRE lot. 3 min. from Walmart
Only $19.900!
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm martin23@yahoo.com
Mobile Homes.
630 for Rent
14 wide 2/2
Quiet, clean country park.
$475.mo + Deposit.&References
No pets. 386-758-2280.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$450 - $600. monthly.
Also, Irg 2 br. furnished, apt.
386-752-6422
2br/2ba on 2 ac, owner mows,
unfurnished, all appliances incl.,
no pets inside, Ref. req., $600
mo./$300 dep, 386-935-2461.
3B/2BA DWMH w/ carport &
back porch in nice condo. Good lo-
cation. $700 mo., 1st, last, $500
dep. Small dog. 386-752-6333
FREE RENT 1 st month. Spacious
3/2, & 2/2 MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very private Manufactured
4br/2ba. Home on 1 ac. 41N close
to 1-10. $700/mo. 1st, last &

Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. n3o. Call now,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511
Mobile Homes
�4 for Sale
2000 SF Palm Harbor 3Bd/2Ba with
retreat/office. 2X6 Walls, 8' Ceilings
(T&T), Plywood Floors, Extra Insu-
lation, 2 Sliding Glass Doors, Appli-
ances, Ceramic Floors, 16 inch con-
struction. Reduced Price Call Gary
Hamilton (386) 758-9824 Possible
Owner Finance!!
2010 BRANDNEW 4/2 DW,
CH&A, skirting, steps, set-up &
delv. All this for only $39,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452.
jetdec@windstream.net
4/2 ONLY
$289.00 per month.
with set/up. -'
Call John T. 386-752-1452.
BRAND NEW 2010
4br/2ba on your property, for
pymts of only $321.56 a mo.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net


640 Mobile Homes
64U for Sale
FACTORY REPO'S,
built two many 28x40 s.
Only 2 left for $28,500.
Call John T. 386-752-1452
GREAT REPO 2 bed. Single-
wide. completely refurbed. Set uip
on your land. $11,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm_martin23@ yahoo.com
NO MONEY DOWN
When you own your land.
Payments on doublewides
start @ 239/month.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm _martin23@yahoo.com
ENERGY STAR Homes R-30
ins., Heat Pump, thermal panes.
Free electric for 1 year.
Must mention this ad.
Homes start at $29,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm_ iartin23@yahoo.comn
NO MONEY down on new
Manufactured homes.
Call for more details on program.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
READY TO move in 2001 3br
doublewide on .87 acres. In Co-
lumbia Co., $1500 down, $350
mo. Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
BANK REPO
Nice 3/2 doublewide,
over 1,300 sq. ft. only $15,000.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
REPO'S REPO'S REPO's
We have many to choose from!
Homes starting @ $10.500.
These homes won't last long!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK FORECLOSURE! 2001
3/2 DW on I acre of land! banks
loss your gain @ only $49,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
Only 2 left, turn key packages. In
nice, up scale community. These
Jackobsons won't last long.
Call John 386-344-5234.
Owner financing available.
'71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES!
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649per mo.!!!
$299 MOVES YOU IN
Law Enforcement Discounts
Teacher Discounts
Veteran Discounts
Student Discounts
FREE RENT
7*1 200 FREE CHANNELS
- BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

!!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
Pol,


386-758-81
(Bad Credi

$400 MOVES'
1 or 2 BR ap
2 or 3 BR Mobi
(386) 755-2
Brandywine Ap
Now Rent
1, 2 and 3 bed
Central Heat
Ph. 386-752
W. Grandview A
Equal Housing C


nday 2-4
New 2700sft 4BR/
Lots of Upgrades
Premier Neighbor
... . Price: $289,900
Dire-ctions: 90 West to 252B, Go 1/4mile to Th

A~~-ar- icesn(8)8733 A


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, rrfotorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


For-Moe Detals Cal


a710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
***LIMITED TIME ONLY***
WINDSONG APARTMENT
IIOMES
1 BD $499
2 BDI) $535
3 131)BD $617
NO DEPOSITS
2 MONTI IS FRIE
EXPIRES ()2/28/201t)
*Some Restrictions Apply
Tel: (386) 758-8455
1 OR 2BR APT.
Downtown Location. Clean.
$600 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2 br/lba w/garage on the West side
1st. last &security.
Call
386-755-6867
2br/lba duplex, Newly renovated,
tile floors, washer/dryer. Energy
Efficient. $475/Mo. $300 Dep.
Req'd. Call: 386-755-1937
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
WASHER DRYER HOOK UP.
$650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
look up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex w/ga-
rage. all electric. AC, W/D hook
up DW. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Share Pool Home! Full use kitch-
en, laundry, separate bedroom and
bath. $500/mo. + 1/3 electric.
Call Derek 386-344-3261
www.biefl6ridahome.com
Studios & 1Br's from $140/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
VERY NICE 2b/lb duplex. $495
rent. First month free. Call
386-963-4974 to see upon app.
approval, $295.00 moves ypu in.
X-CLEAN SECOND story 2/2,
private acre 8 mi. to VA. No dogs
$500 a mo + dep. Ideal for
sihgle/traveler 386-961-9181

Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
1BR/1BA HOUSE on Ichetuck-
ne.e River. Quiet setting. Close to
boat ramp. $600. mo.
plus $400 deposit. 386-397-3258


toO 3BR/1.5BA. Convenient in town
�029, location. Bonus room
it OK) $600. mo.
386-755-2672
YOU IN!
Is. and Beautiful 2005 home. Secluded
le Homes area. 3/2 split bedroom 1/4 mile
le Homes
243 $800. security. 386-719-5616
artments
ting Beautiful Newer 3BR/2BA, on
rooms CR 18, 30 mins. to Gville., 30
and Air mins. to L.C., $950 p/m + last +
-3033 sec., go to website for photo at
yve. 32055 www.property4you.biz,
opportunityy Call 386-365-3865.
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$800/mo.
864-517-0522.
Cute 2/1 CHA, laundry rm-W/D,
dinning rm, large yard, some pets
13 BA ok, Close to VA, storage shed, 607
Camp $675/mo. 386-755-5936
hood HOME FOR rent $750 mo.'
4br./lba. Irg patio, shed & fenced,
Absolutely no pets!
e Preserve 386-623-7379 or 386-755-4483
PROVIDENCE, IBR,
1.5 BA,w/d,c-h/a,l ac. fenced,
private,nice, most pets ok. $650
Ist/lst/dep. 386-752-2555/c-
" 352-494-1989
Rural beauty fand privacy near
71 I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
"L 2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


750 Business &
Office Rentals
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on illwy 41. 900 sqfl.
$650/io. plus tax
Call Tom 386-961-1086

770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool. no pets. Ref. req'd
$1000 mo . $1000 dep.
*386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560
820 Farms &
2 Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well. septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
2 acs. out from Macclenny on
12 IN. On the F1 and Ga. line. Well
septic, It pole, fenced. $38,000.
912-843-2078 or 904-259-5260
5 ACRES FSBO in Southern
Columbia Co. Owner financing
available for $30,000. or $25,000
CASH. (352)356-2563
Q830 Commercial
83J0 Property
Specialty Discounted Bldgs.
Some under $8k Call to reserve;
I per Buyer. Can Construct
IAS-AC 472 Mfg. Cert.
www.scg-grp.com Source # 1FL
352-505-4558.
951 Recreational
95 Vehicles
2006 Park model. Friendly park. 2
slideouts. lbr/1ba. Sliding door to
custom screened porch. Wood
deck. transferable warranty to
2013. $17,900 obo. 772-349-5313


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


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08 Nissan Altima
31i ;,,,


07 Mini Cooper
015,908


05 Nissan 350Z
1h o.- 8


07 Chevy AfWla


06 Toyota-Camry


$22S/1.1


09 Toyota Coro
s25/m0.


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06 Buick Terraza
8249I..
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06 Acura TLS
l37D..
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08 Toyota RAV 4



07 Ford Mustang
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4Runner SR5
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08 Ford Fusion
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08 Toyota Matrix 08 Nissan Frontier
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Story ideas?


Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmaye@l/akectyreportercom


Sunday, January 31, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


FRUGAL LIVING


Sara Noel


Enjoy a

cup of

rose-hip

tea
D EAR SARA: I
have three or
four rose hips.
How many
rose hips
would it take to make a pot
of tea? - Juju, Virginia
DEAR JUJU: You could
get a decent cup with four
rose hips. Cut the rose
hips in half, and remove
the seeds or strain after
boiling. Boil water in a
nonreactive pan, add the
rose hips, and steep until
desired strength. I recom-
mend at least 10 minutes.
When you have more rose
hips, you can let them
steep in a slow cooker
overnight, too. Sweeten
with honey or sugar, or add
some fresh mint or lemon
juice for added flavor.
DEAR SARA: Can I use
dryer lint for stuffing when
I make stuffed animals?
Have you tried it, and what
were your results? - M.H.,
Texas .
DEAR l*.H.: I haven't
tried it and wouldn't
bother. It's so fine that
your project would lose its
shape, couldn't be washed,
and you would get dust
particles coming out of
whatever you make. You
can use it to make clay.
Here's a recipe: www.
planetpals. com/dryerlint_
crafts.html. Or stuff it into
toilet-paper rolls to use as
fire starters.
DEAR SARA: What are
your frugal standby foods?
What kinds of things do
you keep on hand for
hungry teenagers (or just
family members who eat
like one)? I am seeing
it would be beneficial to
have a couple frugal filler-
type foods to offer when
I've met my limit on more
expensive foods (example:
homemade bread). But I
need more ideas than just
bread, because if I make
it too often, it starts going
stale because the, novelty
wears off. My 4-year-old ate
four waffles for breakfast
today. At this rate, will he
be eating 16 of them in 12
years? I better buy stock in
Eggo! - W.H., Florida
DEAR W.H.: You can
make your own homemade
waffles, which will be big-
ger, healthier and cheaper.
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking
powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon,
optional
1-1/2 cups milk
1/4 cup butter, melted
1 teaspoon vanilla
3 eggs, separated
2 tablespoons sugar (can
adjust to taste)
Heat the waffle iron. Stir
together the flour, baking
powder, salt and cinnamon.
Stir together the milk, but-
ter, vanilla and egg yolks,
add to the dry ingredients,
and blend until smooth
but don't overmix. Whip
together the sugar and egg
whites, and fold into the
batter. Pour the waffle bat-
ter onto the iron, and cook
until golden brown.
You don't want to sim-
TEA continued on 21


An


S
F


Dr. Jean-Felert Cadet, a Lake City family physician ar
to take to Haiti for a one-week mission trip. Dr. Cadet
Croiz-Des-Bouquets.





Answe



Doctor to le

By ANTONIA ROBINSON always
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com "I always

hit by a from me. I
massive 7.0 beca
magnitude
earthquake
Jan. 12, Dr. Jean-Felert
Cadet knew he wanted to
help his native country.
Cadet, who is from Haiti,
said he received his
medical education in the
country for free.
"I always wanted to go
back and help my country,"
he said. "They deserve to ;:
get help from me. I want to
donate what I can because . ''
of the education they gave .,
me."
Cadet responded to an
e-mail asking for doctors to
go help in the country, he
said. Finally, he got a call
from the Gaskov Clerg6
Foundation.
"I want to help people,"
he said. "I know how to
help people. I've been in
missionary work."
Cadet departed Friday
with a group of 20 doctors .- -
and nurses to Croiz-Des-
Bouquets, which is Cadet said that althc
'also his hometown. earthquake-stricken
'To go to my town is a some attention to the
blessing," he said.
The Gaskov Clerge
Foundation is a Prince, but does nc
nonprofit and philanthropic receive any supplies
organization that has led Cadet said. Just as
annual medical missions in people are wounded
Southern Haiti since 1999. without food in oti
In response to the of Haiti.
earthquake, it is planning "They get almost
a four week relief mission ing," he said. "Ever
to provide groups of doc- stays in Port-au-Pri
tors and nurses, medicine The Haiti he kne
and medical supplies in years ago is much
the area, Cadet said. The then what remains
first group will stay in the especially after the
country for a week, and earthquake, Cadet
then another will come in Cadet and his wi
to relieve them. lost relatives in the
Cadet also will help quake.
provide lodging, food and '"That's unfortun
security for the medical 'said. "I feel the mis
group while in the town. people are in."
Croiz-Des-Bouquets The earthquake'
is just eight miles from on his county has
) Haiti's capital, Port-au- mixed emotions, C


-- JASON MATTHEW WALKER- I.,: i, -. :1',-'
ind Haiti-born native, poses next to medical supplies, an autoclave sterilizer and medicine that he plans
is traveling with a group of 20 people, sponsored by the Gaskov Clerg6 Foundation, to his hometown of


ring the


call


nd hand to ailing Haiti


wanted to go back and help
y.They deserve to get help
want to donate what I can
cause of the education S
they gave me."


- Jean-Felert Cadet,
Lake City doctor


ough Croiz-Des-Bouquets is eight miles from Port-au-Prince, the village, as well as many other
towns, do not receive any aid and that the capital is the hub for helping hands. He stressed that giving
e smaller towns will distribute some much-needed help to many of the Haitian people.


)t
es,
many
ed and
ler areas
t noth-
rything
nce."
w 25
different
today,
said.
ife both
earth-
ate," he
sery my
s impact
caused
adet


said, and noted it is a bless-
ing and sad at the same
time.
"It allowed the world to
see what the country has
been through," he said.
"Before it was a lot differ-
ent. The world is laying its
hands on Haiti."
Countries all over the
globe have rallied to help
Haiti, Cadet said.
"I think we're all broth-
ers and sisters," he said.
"Even if we don't know
each other, our blood looks
the same."
Money is the main need
for the country, because it
costs so much to ship food
or supplies, Cadet said. No
amount is too small.
"Anybody can help," he


said.
However, people
donating for Haiti relief
should make sure they
know their money is going
to a legitimate organiza-
tion, Cadet said. Every
thing does not always go to
the country.
"A lot of people are tak-
ing money," he said.
More than just medi-
cal help will be needed as
the country continues to
rebuild, Cadet said.
Ultimately, Cadet wants
to work with the Lake City
community to adopt an
area in Haiti, and he will
identify the best way to do
so.
* "We cannot help the
whole country," he said.


"We can help the less for-
tunate and adopt a little
place."
The community could
adopt a school, church or
neighborhood, and it is not
just limited to his home-
town, Cadet said.
Adopting the area will
not be just about rebuild-
ing and then leaving, Cadet
said. It will be an ongoing.
process.
"We want to make the
community better," he
said.
Cadet will continue to
go back and forth to Haiti
to access the needs of the
people, he said.
"I left (Haiti), but my
heart is still there," he
said.


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


-


L7


IP,�~


�r\


-op










LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010


WEDDING


Williams-Mullins
Thayla Dawnyelle
Williams of Lake City and
Tyrone Mullins of Lake
City were united in mar-
riage on Dec. 21, 2009, at
the Lake City Church of
Christ.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Joyce Griffin and
Donald Williams of Lake
City, and the groom is the
son of Reginald Mullins
and Cynthia Williams of
Lake City.
The bride was given in
marriage by her father, and
Dr. I.C. Spivey officiated


the ceremony.
The bride is a 1994
graduate of Columbia High
School. She received her
Bachelor of Science in
Education degree from
St. Leo University and is
currently teaching second
grade in Gainesville. The
groom is 1996 graduate
of Columbia High School,
and graduated from Lake
City Community College
in 1999. He is currently a
barber in Lake City. .
. Thayla and Tyrone would
like to thank all those
involved in making their
wedding day a success.


BIRTHS

Bailey ounces, and measured 18
- inches.
Kevin and Hillary Bailey , The grandparents are
of Lake City announce the Richard and Donna Lee,
birth of their son, Aiden and Russell and Dorothy
Jackson Bailey, on Jan. 11, Bailey. The great-
2010, at the North Florida grandparents are Carolyn
Regional Medical Center. Dorch and Eunice
He weighed 6 pounds, 3 Herndon.


Graham She sighed 7 pounds,
raham 2 ounces, and measured 20
Marlene and Willard inches.
Graham of Lake City The grandparents are
announce the birth of their Leon and Vera McCall
daughter, Alexa Mackenzie and Ronald and Murvyn
Graham, on Dec. 14, 2009, Graham. The great-grand-
at the Women's Center in parents are Muriel Roberts
Gainesville. and Alice Hudson.



Economy shrinking


children's
By LISA ORKIN EMMANUEL
Associated Press
DAVIE- Ooopsy the
Clown threw in a bubble
machine for the monkey-
themed party marking
Nicholas Castillo's first
birthday. She usually
charges extra, but what's
a clown -to do in a reces-
sion that has some parents
throwing less extravagant
celebrations for their kids?
Ooopsy, aka Amy Tinoco,
estimates the entertainment
company she co-owns took
in about $80,000 before
taxes and expenses last
year. That's about $46,000
*less than in 2008. She used
to do an average of 12 par-
ties a weekend. Now it's
down to three.
"I didn't realize how good
it was," said Tinoco, who


LCCC graduates, where are they now?


ast November
I started a
column called
"Where are they
now?" which is
designed to let you know
what some of our Lake City
Community College gradu-
ates have been doing since
they left Lake City. My
second installment begins
with Barbara McGlamery.
Barbara, or Barbie,
as many of us know her,
graduated from Lake
City Community College
in 1988. While at LCCC,
McGlamery was involved
in some of the college's
theatrical performances
under the direction of
Professor Larry Gunter.
From Lake City, she trans-
ferred to Florida State
University where she
majored in theater. After
graduating from Florida
State, she moved to Los
Angeles to pursue an act-
ing career, but moved back
'home after a year for per-
sonal reasons. During that
time she directed a few
plays for LCCC.
In 1994, McGlamery
and some classmates
from FSU moved to New
York where they found
odd jobs and auditioned
for acting gigs. Working
three part-time jobs took
a toll on Barbara's act-
ing career. One of those
part-time jobs was work-
ing at a doctors' office,
where she met a couple of
'patients who .were librar-
ians. They spoke to her
about going into their
field. Coincidently, one of
her other part-time jobs
was at Barnes and Noble,
where she enjoyed helping
customers locate books. In
1995, McGlamery landed a


parties
wore a red wig, multicolored
skirt and blue clown shoes
for Nicholas' bash. "It's a
huge difference. I have a lot
of people telling me they are.
having a party, they are just
not having entertainment
and catering."
Party planners and
parents around the coun-
try have seen a pullback,
though they agreed some
will always take kid birth-
days over the top. David
Tutera, a New York-based
event planner, said his cli-
ents still want to have par-
ties, but they're not making
them quite so lavish.
"I think they are not get-
ting the $5,000 birthday
cake for their 5-year-old,"
he said. "They are still
going to have the fun
theme party.... It's not
going to be so opulent."


TEA: And healthy foods


' Continued From Page ID
ply fill kids up. You want
to make sure that it's
nourishing food rich in
protein, iron, calcium and
zinc. You can offer foods
such as pasta, rice, soups,
sandwiches such as peanut
butter or wraps, baked
potatoes, lentils/beans
such as hummus dip, cot-
7 stage cheese, whole-grain
crackers, breads and
cereal such as oatmeal,
fruit smoothies, salads,
popcorn, applesauce, hard-
boiled eggs and nuts in
- moderation, fruits, cheeses
-and raw vegetables. Most
teens crave junk food.
Some healthier choices
can include homemade


Mike McKee
LCCC executive director of media
and community information
job at the New York Public
Library; during that time
she attended Long Island
University and earned a
master's degree in Library
and Information Science.
For the next five years,
she enjoyed her work at the
library, but when an oppor-
tunity at Entertainment
Weekly magazine came
about she took it. As Data
Librarian, McGlamery
maintained large entertain-
ment taxonomy, organizing
and creating relationships
for movies, music, and
people for the magazine's
Web site. Four years later,
she accepted a similar
position with Time Life as
an ontologist (ontology-a
branch of metaphysics
that studies the nature of
existence). When I inter-
viewed her in late 2009,
she was about to start work
for Martha Stewart Living
Omnimedia in New York
as a taxonomist, creating
a classification system for
use on Martha's Web site.
She lives in Greenpoint,
Brooklyn, New York with
her husband Adam and
their two children, Lorenzo
and Ezra.
Our next gradu-
ate attended Lake City
Community College
from 1986 to 1988, where
he played guard on the


Timber wolf basketball
team. His name is Keith
Edwards. He says he
wasn't a star on the team,
but made a contribution
and learned the work ethic
he has today from Coach
Tony Johnson. From Lake
City, Edwards headed to
Tallahassee and Florida
State University, where
he earned an engineer-
ing degree. Keith's dream
was to become an aero-
space engineer and work
at NASA or McDonnell
Douglas, but during his
senior year at FSU the aero-
space industry experienced
massive layoffs and jobs
were difficult to come by.
The petrochemical indus-
try, on the other hand, was
expanding and hiring, so he
took a job as an engineer
with Phillips Petroleum in
Oklahoma in the plastics
division. During his time at
Phillips, Edwards became
an expert in chemical pro-
cess optimization, which
means he improved the pro-
cesses of the manufacture
of items such as Solo and
Sweetheart cups and other
plastics, including medi-
cal equipment. Because of
this expertise he traveled
extensively in Europe,
Asia, Mexico, and Canada.
Oklahoma is also where he
met his wife Erin, who was
also an engineer at Phillips.
In 1999, an opportu-
nity to become a territory
manager with Chevron
Phillips in Cincinnati pre-
sented itself and Edwards
accepted, partly because it
was a promotion, but also
because his wife was from
Michigan and she could
be closer to family. He
stayed at Chevron Phillips
until 2004.


Today, Edwards is
the North America
Biodegradables Business
Manager for the world's
largest chemical com-
pany, BASE He works on
new technologies for the
German-based company,
including biodegradable
plastics. He tells me that
his company has developed
biodegradable shopping
bags. He says that 80
percent of bag sales are
in Europe, and his job is
to market the product in
America.
Keith looks back on his
time at Lake City Community
College and remembers his
Physics professor, Frank
Sedmera, who lectured about
solving problems using an
innovative perspective. He
says it didn't dawn on him
at the time, but he has used
Professor Sedmera's lecture
often.
If you know of someone
that has graduated from a
local high school and Lake
City Community College
and has an interesting
story to share, please call
or e-mail me.
Contact McKee at mck-
eem@lakecitycc.edu or by
calling (386) 754-4329.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Shane Russell
Dennis Thomson
February 6, 2010

Lindsey Morton
George Pridgeon
February 20, 2010

Carlee Wilson
Trey Beauchamp
March 6, 2010

Aimee Ronsonet
Brent Williams
March 20, 2010

Abigail Crow
Matt Dicks
April 10, 2010

Heather Thornton
Marc Vann, Jr.
May 1, 2010
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

SWARD'S
, JEWELRY & GIFTS


Hear ye


[ear ye.


pizza or taco salads, or
make baked wings versus
fried or baked apples with
cinnamon. Instead of ice
cream, offer frozen yogurt,
cinnamon toast instead of
doughnuts, quick breads
or muffins instead of cake,
baked potato skins instead
of potato chips or graham
crackers instead of cookies.
* Sara Noel is the owner
of Frugal Village (www.fru-
galvillage.com), a Web site
that offers practical, money-
saving strategies for every-
day living. To send tips, com-
ments or questions, write to
Sara Noel, c/o United Media,
200 Madison Ave., 4th Floor,
New York, NY 10016, or e-
mail sara @frugalvillage.com.


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427














Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 31, 2010 3D


DEAR ABBY


Diner resents getting the


rush when server buses table


DEAR ABBY: When my
partner and I eat at a restau-
rant, the server often clears
my partner's plate before I
am finished. I am not a slow
eater, but I generally finish
after she does.
When the server removes
her plate, I'm left feeling like
I have to rush to finish my
meal and that our "shared
dinner time" is over.
Am I wrong to feel that
it's rude to take away the
dishes before everyone at
the table is done? As a host-
ess at home, I wait until the
entire table is finished eating
before I clear. On the other
hand, just about every place
where we eat out does this,
so maybe I should get used
to it. What do you think? -
SUE IN GLOUCESTER,
MASS.
DEAR SUE: Here in the
United States, it is common
for servers to take the empty
plates from the table. In
Europe, diners often linger
over a meal, enjoying coffee
- a liqueur, perhaps - and
good conversation.
How does your partner
feel about having her plate
cleared? If she would prefer
that it remain while you
finish your dinner, all she
needs to do is say to the
server, "Please leave it until
Sue is done." If she's unwill-
ing to do that, then I think
you'll have to get used to it.
DEAR ABBY: My fiance
died three years ago of
cancer. He was only 27. His


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
diagnosis was a shock, and
he was gone from complica-
tions of treatment barely a
month later.
Prior to this, while plan-
ning our life together, I
became close with his family.
After his death, I don't know
what I'd have done if they
hadn't been there for me.
Although many people sym-
pathized, my almost-in-laws
came closest to understand-
ing my devastation and pain.
Simply put, we helped each
other through it.
We remain close to this
day. I spend time with his
mom and sisters, am invited
to birthday dinners and holi-
days, and we get together on
his birthday and the anniver-
sary of his passing.
Is this OK? Is it normal?
When people hear that we're
still so close, I have had reac-
tions from, "That's wonder-
ful!" to "You're holding onto
the past." Although there
are still some tears, there is
now more laughter when we'
share memories. And I have
begun dating again.
I don't feel that by pre-
serving our relationship we


are stuck in the past. Do
you? - DOUBTING IN
WALNUT CREEK, CALIF.
DEAR DOUBTING:
There are degrees of involve-
ment. You came very close
to being an official mem-
ber of that family, but fate
thought otherwise. Whether
your ties remain as tight
when you fall in love again
remains to be seen. But for
now you are all meeting each
other's needs - and as long
as it doesn't hold you back,
it's all right with me.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I married four
years ago. My oldest daugh-
ter dates my husband's
brother and they're expect-
ing a baby together, although
they are not married.
Can you please tell me
what this child should call
me, my husband and our
other children? We're con-
fused about it and don't want
the child to be confused
about who's who. Any help
you can offer on this will
be greatly appreciated. -
TAMI IN PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR TAMI: You are the
baby's biological grandmoth-
er, and your husband is the
baby's biological uncle and
step-grandfather. Your chil-
dren are going to be aunts or
uncles. Congratulations to all
of you.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Challenge yourself
mentally and physically and
you will attract attention and
impress someone special.
Don't waste your time try-
ing to help someone who
doesn't want to be helped.
Don't lend or borrow money
or possessions. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Do your best to visit
someone you don't get to
see often enough. You need
to remember past experienc-
es if you want to avoid future
mistakes. Stand by your con-
victions and focus on what
you do best. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Think before you act.
You will be emotional and
will blow things out of pro-
portion. Talk to people you
trust, especially if you are
questioning your current
beliefs. You may need to
revamp some of your ideas
or plans. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Recount what you have
been through financially,
professionally, legally or
medically and tally up what
you need to do to avoid any
reoccurring problems. You
can make some serious
changes regarding your


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
lifestyle that will lessen your
stress and help you build a
better future. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Focus on financial opportu-
nities that can lead you out
of a tight spot. An innovative
service can be turned into
a lucrative endeavor. Don't
let someone's negativity
stop you from striving to
improve. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Concentrate on the
projects you do well and you
will impress someone who
has an interesting proposal.
Doing things with friends
or the youngsters in your
family will open your eyes to
other possibilities that you
can incorporate into your
current plans. ***
I LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take your mind off
expensive items or entertain-
ment and focus on helping
others. You will run short
of cash if you are too easy-
going with your spending
habits. Set up a budget and
get involved in something
that will make a difference
to society. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: T equals L
SBT GBO Y U H HK NHU K F Z GLSS Z U.
K F B K GBO , OHC G HS ' K I Z
XLY BV V H LSK Z X ." - VL KMFZ U K CJ
W M J U B G

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "If black boxes survive air crashes - why don't they
make the whole plane out of the stuff?" - George Carlin


SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Join forces with people
in your community to bring
about reform. A problem
at home will cause emo-
tional grief if you don't take
care of issues immediately.
Overindulgence may be one
of the underlying factors. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): An entrepre-
neurial attitude will help you
find a way to use old ideas
and materials to get ahead
now. Look at the best possi-
ble way to make your money
work for you. Putting any
debt you've incurred behind
you will relieve stress and
give you greater freedom.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't blame your-
self. You don't have to spend
to impress. If you don't feel:
secure about your financial
future because someone you
love has been demanding,
question the relationship.
You are doing just fine but
you do need to make some
personal changes. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Overindulgence
coupled with deception can
lead you down the wrong
path. Rethink your strategy
regarding both your per-
sonal and professional lives.
Emotional matters will sur-
face if you step over a line
with someone who can influ-
entce your future. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't believe what
you are told when accuracy
is vital to maintaining your
reputation. Deal with past
mistakes so you are free to
move ahead without road-
blocks. An old friend will be
able to help you. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


ABRIDGED EDITION By David Kwong and Kevan Choset/ Edited by Will Shortz 11 12 1 4 la 416 m 7 18la1In 110= 11 112 l3 l14 *=15 :16 117 118 119 120 1


Across
I Letter-shaped ,
woodworking
vise
7 Times, e.g.
11 Inuit word for
"house"
15 Butchers'
offerings
21 Former New
Jersey governor
James
22 "Typee" sequel
23 Junket
24 Out
25 Rolling in the
grass?
27 Party leadership?
29 Comic strip "_
and Janis'
30 Parting locale
31 "Still ..."
32 Onlyperson to
win Emmys for
acting, writing
and directing
33 1992 Robin
Williams movie
34 National
Geographic
inserts
35 Mall attraction
37 Cookie holders
39 Medium power?
40 Verandas
42 Hypotheticals
43 "___ luego!"
45 Intersection of
the x and y axes
49 Biologist
Stephen Jay ___
51 Buddhist sect
52 "Who ?"
54 Kind of artery
55 Cross swords?
56 Oct. ordeal for
jrs.
58 Zeniths
61 Lamp locales
63 The Father of
Mexican
Independence

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


65 It may rain in
these
66 Where a tab goes
67 Botanical balm
69 "Rule, Britannia"
composer
70 "The Oblong
Box" author
72 Heroin, slangily
73 TV Guide info
76 Stubbornness
79 Quick on the
uptake
80 Hinged fasteners
83 Publication
founded in 1952
featuring
artwork that
does the same
thing as this
puzzle
85 Suisse peaks
87 Kosh B'Gosh
88 Bittersweet
performance
90 Run longer than
expected
92 Dance move
94 Neither Rep. nor
Dem.
.95 Headed for
overtime
97 PlayStation
alternative
98 Monopoly token
102 Nudge
104 Visibly very
embarrassed
107 Like tennis
serves
109 Shells out
110 Mystique
111 Dumas's Monte
Cristo, e.g.
113 Propelled, in a
way
114 Flight
115 Musical score
abbr.
116 Lacking skill in
117 Become
depleted
118 Hanukkah
serving
120 Camera type,
briefly
122 1950 Asimov
classic
124 Quick refresher
127 "Joyeux" time


128 Trillion: Prefix
130 Latin 101 word
131 Bingo call
135 Salve ingredient
137 Electrician's
need
139 Roman's
country
141 Five-star review
142 Place for
breaking things?
144 Classy
publication?
146 First name in
soul
147 Morales of "La
Bamba"
148 Adequate, old-
style
149 Gold Glover
Suzuki
150 Narrow
waterway
151 Rink fake-out
152 A century in
Washington:
Abbr.
153 "Roger
Book of Film"

Down
1 B, essentially
2 Mild cigar
3 Humble
4 Some early New
. Yorker cartoons
5 1997 Will
Smith/Tommy
Lee Jones
blockbuster, for
short
6 Have-not
7 With 14-Down,
what to do on the
dotted lines to
reveal six hidden
things that have
something in
common with
this puzzle
8 Elision
9 All alternative
10 One-piece
vestments
11 What "ipso"
means
12 Orange spots
13 Woe for Fido
14 See 7-Down
15 Claws


16 World Service
airer
17 Labor Dept.
watchdog
18 Football Hall-of-
Fame coach
Greasy
19 Writers Bagnold
and Blyton
20 Rein, e.g.
26 Gradually
remove
28 Like some
elephants and all
tigers
36 Come to the
rescue
38 Kind of infection
40 "1 Shot Andy
Warhol" star
Taylor
41 The like
44 Pierre's
girlfriends
45 Planets, e.g.
46 Casting
requirement
47 Prefix with
Chinese
48 Valve in some
fireplaces
50 Han's hon
51 Veer quickly
53 Polar feature
55 Corey of "Stand
By Me"
56 Bamboo lover
57 Vulgar person
58 "Just __!
59 Tour de France
I stage
60 Some Army
NCO's
62 P atriotic
women's org.
64 Trawler
68 LAX data: Abbr.
71 Bob Marley
I classic
74 Edition: Abbr.
75 Ham on stage
77 Coquette
78 China's Sun __-
sen
80 R.N. locales
81 Put,___ to (end)
82 Tel Aviv coin
84 "America" singer
in "West Side
Story"


86 Eda who wrote
"When Your
Child Drives You
Crazy"
89 Mental acuity
91 Fire
93 Correctional
96 Prefix with -gon
99 Brain-busting
100 Lulu
101 Small vortex.
103 Jingle writer,
maybe
105 Where to find
Lux.


106 ___ al-Fayed,
companion of
Princess Diana
108 Lopsided
victory
112 Part of an
Ironman
competition
115 Mowgli's friend
in "The Jungle
Book"
116 Cold response?
117 Gershwin-
musical of 1928
119 Monopoly token
120 Engage in a
certain college
prank


121 Nielsen of "The
Naked Gun"
123 Star of "Charles
in Charge"
124 Tot tenders
125 Like good
guards
126 Motor-driven
129 Church recesses
131 Astronomer who
lost part of his
.nose in a duel
132 Animal with
four toes on its
front feet and
three toes on its
back feet


133 Six-time U.S.
Open champ
134 Circus
(ancient Roman
arena)
136 This, in Madrid
138 Start of
Massachusetts'
motto
140 This might
make you red in
the face
143 X
145 Toxic chemical,
for short


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
M SIOB EWI ES S AL
R0WENA ANIIMATO0 ESPANA
E RASER GODSHONESTRUTH
AR R S 1UT1E AGO ALER
NAIL RIGHTURNONLY

BRAN PTA PEP ARROWS
LEl TOILETRAINIENG FLY
NNARDS Rob DOBIE TEC
POSSE MINOS RET PITH

ALEE RON FRAME ASSET
FAR TORTS EMI CENTURY
A YR NTHEFASTRACCK ESP
LOROX WAD AN0 N RITE
AR T ABET SCRANT 0 N
THEPARENTRAP H 0 J 0
ALIA LEN SRA EARFULS



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17896 9 L E 1














SPOTLIGHT


Sunday, January 31, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


ENTERTAINMENT







Troy Roberts
Phone: (386) 754-0427
troberts@olakectyreportercom


Get out


of my


head

ver get a song
stuck in your
head and find
it impossible
to dislodge, no
matter how hard you try?
Good, that means you
know what I'm currently
going through.
I may not keep up with
the music industry like I.
once did, but I typically
know or have heard many
of the top hits playing on
the radio these days. So
when I see a song show up
at No. 1 on iTunes for sev-
eral weeks in a row that I
don't recognize, my curios-
ity is piqued.
And that led to my cur-
rent problem - meet
Ke$ha. Sheis a singer arid
she won't leave me alone.
I don't particularly like
her song - in fact, "TiK
ToK" could qualify as the
Most annoying song of the
year, and it's only January
- and from what I can tell,
I don't particularly like her:
Her image is something of
- a destitute, off-putting
version of Taylor Swift.
Come on, one of her lyrics
discusses brushing her
teeth with whiskey.
(Just an aside to those
out there who don't know,
whiskey is not a healthy
alternative to toothpaste
and has not been
clinically proven to stop
tooth decay.)
But her hit song, auto-
tuner and all, has this beat
that just won't get out of
my head. My current crop
of favorite songs hasn't
been able to do the job
at releasing me from this
pain, so I scour iTunes
nightly, trying to find
something to soothe my
suffering.
And it's not like this
is the first time this has
happened. At least once
a year, I stumble upon a
song so bad, so achingly
detrimental and atrocious,
that it clings to me like
a disease you could only
pick up in the worst cor-
ners of the earth. A few
years ago it was Gwen
Stefani's "Hollerback Girl."
Before that it was Shakira's
"Wherever, Whenever."
Before that, it was
"Mambo No. 5" by Lou
Bega, possibly the worst
Song in the existence of
music. And I'm serious
about that - music that
was created before speech
was invented is likely
preferable to listening to
lyrics like "A little bit of
Monica in my life." Toss in
SAqua's "Barbie Girl," the
Baha Men's "Who let the
dogs out?," and anything
by the likes of Limp Bizkit
and Hanson and you have
a collection of music that
represents the worst the
. industry has to offer.
And you know what? At
one time or another, I've
cursed each and every one
of those songs because
" they're playing on
continued repeat in my
head.
Anyone have any sugges-
tions on how to evict these


terrible, loud and rowdy
tenants?

* Troy Roberts is the
assistant editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


Apple stuns with iPad tablet computer


By JESSICA MINTZ and
RACHEL METZ
AP Technology Writers
SAN FRANCISCO
Apple CEO Steve
Jobs unveiled
the company's
much-anticipat-
ed iPad tablet
computer Wednesday, call-
ing it a new third category
of mobile device that is
neither smart phone nor
laptop, but something in
between.
The iPad will start at
$499, a price tag far below
the $1,000 that some ana-
lysts were expecting. But
Apple must still persuade
recession-weary consum-
ers who already have other
devices to open their wal-
lets yet again. Apple plans
to begin selling the iPad in
two months.
Jobs said the device
would be useful for reading
books, playing games or
watching video, describing
it as "so much more inti-
mate than a laptop and so
much more capable than a
smart phone."
The half-inch-thick
iPad is larger than the
company's popular iPhone
but similar in design. It
weighs 1.5 pounds and
has a touch screen that is
9.7 inches diagonally. It
comes with 16, 32 or 64
gigabytes of flash memory
storage, and has Wi-Fi and
Bluetooth connectivity
built in.
Jobs said the device.
has a battery that lasts
10 hours and can sit for a
month on standby without
needing a charge.
Raven Zachary, a con-
tributing analyst with a
mobile research agency.
called The 451 Group, con-


sidered the iPad a laptop
replacement, especially
because Apple is also sell-
ing a dock with a built-in
keyboard.
But Forrester Research
analyst James McQuivey
said he does not believe
the iPad offered enough
additional features for con-
sumers to justify buying
yet another gadget, or to
call it a new category.of
device.
In an e-mail, he criticized
its lack of social features,
such as ways to share pho-
tos and home video and
recommend books.
Sitting on stage in a cozy
leather chair, Jobs dem-
onstrated how the iPad is
used for surfing the Web
with Apple's Safari brows-
er. The CEO typed an
e-mail using an on-screen
keyboard and flipped
through photo albums by
flicking his finger across
the screen.
He also showed off a
new electronic bookstore
and a book-read-
ing interface
that emulates
the look of a
paper book.
That puts the l
iPad in coui
petition with
Amazon c" -in
Inc.'s Kindle and
e-book store.
Tim Bajarin of


ON TELEVISION


In this May 29, 2009, file photo provided by NBC shows
Conan O'Brien interviewed by Jay Leno during Leno's final
taping as host of The Tonight Show in Burbank, Calif.


Has late-night battle

wounded Leno?


By DAVID BAUDER
AP Television Writer
NEW YORK - Certainly
Jay Leno would love to
wake up to find that the
last six months was just a
nightmare.
That way, he'd be prepar-
ing another 'Tonight" show
monologue, not going on
the national shrink's sofa
across from Oprah Winfrey,
as he was Thursday. He
wouldn't have seen a photo
of himself doctored to look
battered on the cover of
Entertainment Weekly, sym-
bolizing television's biggest
flop ever. And he wouldn't
have heard the rough jokes
with the serious subtext
that he had sandbagged
Conan O'Brien.
NBC is hoping that it all
goes away, too. The network
won't know until March 1
whether he's been perma-
nently damaged or not by
the disastrous decision to
try him in prime time and
the clumsy way he recov-
ered his old job. March 1
is when Leno returns to
late night, opposite David


Letterman on CBS.
"He's going to be com-
petitive and I think his
audience is going to come
back over time," says Jeff
Gaspin, NBC Universal
Entertainment chairman.
During his Winfrey
appearance, Leno said he
was devastated when NBC
executives asked him to
leave the "Tonight" show
because they wanted to
give the show to O'Brien.
He said he told "a white lie
on the air" when he said he
was going to retire because
he assumed he would find
another job in show busi-
ness.
Leno said he "felt really
bad" for O'Brien.
Except for the Winfrey
interview, Leno will do -
little talking after his
10 p.m. EST show ends
Tuesday, Feb. 9, making
way for coverage of the
Winter Olympics. NBC
will promote his return
to late night but in a low-
key fashion since it's been
only a few months that it
hyped his prime time show,
Gaspin said.


- lower than what had
been speculated - it was
accompanied by the sound
of glass shattering.
Like iPods and the
iPhone, the iPad can sync
with Apple's Macintosh
and Microsoft's Windows
computers. Jobs said the
iPad will also be better for
playing games and watch-
ing video than either a lap-
top or the small screen of a
smart phone.
Unlike a laptop, the iPad
has an accelerometer, so
gamers can tilt the device
to control what's happen-
ing on the screen. And the
iPad is lighter and easier
to hold for long periods
of time while watching a
movie or TV show.
Its large screen makes it
much easier to touch type
than on a smart phone, and
it is extremely responsive
to finger swipes and taps
for easy scrolling through
Facebook, photo albums
and news articles.
The iPad comes with
software that includes a
calendar, maps, and video
and music players. All
seem to have been slightly
redesigned to take advan-
tage of the iPad's bigger
screen.


Creative Strategies Inc.
called the iPad a great mul-
tipurpose mobile device
- and the first tablet with
a chance of success with
consumers.
But Bajarin said Jobs'
presentation only touched
the tip of what the iPad
could do for newspapers,
magazines and book pub-
lishers, three industries
struggling in the transition
to the digital age.
A new newspaper reader
program from The New
York Times and a game
from Electronic Arts Inc.
were demonstrated dur-
ing the event. The iBook-
store launched with titles
from Penguin, Simon &
Schuster, HarperCollins,
Hachette Book Group and
Macmillan, and will open


up to other publishing
houses.
Carolyn Reidy, chief
executive of Simon &
Schuster, called the iPad a
"terrific device" that gives
readers the ability to adjust
the typeface and turn
pages by touching a finger
to the screen, as opposed
to pushing a button, as the
Kindle requires.
Applause rang out as
Jobs stepped onto the
stage to introduce the
iPad to hundreds of ana-
lysts, bloggers and other
guests at the Yerba Buena
Center for the Arts in San
Francisco.
Accompanied at times
by executives from Apple
and other companies,
Jobs played showman
throughout the hour-and-
a-half presentation,
slowly revealing
details about the
iPad. When he
announced the price


oses are redC violets are blue, send Love Lines

to show them that your love is true.

The Lake City Reporter
Presents: 110

Put little love in someone's heart this
Valentine'sDay Frith the Lake City Reporter's
'Love Lines. 'Make it a special day for those
you love by writing a message to your n e s
sweetheart. We'll include it on our
'Valentine Love Line' page on February 14.

Love Line Rates are as follows:
15 WORDS for $12.00 Each additional word 15�
Add a border for $2.65 or a photo for $5.25


#1


#2
V


' 1
<&


#3 #4






-/1


#5 V
9
v





^..


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Your Name:
Phone:


Art#


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City/State/Zip:


Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 - 755-5440
ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT THE TIME OF PLACEMENT. DEADLINE IS FEB. 9,2010.


4D


'... so much more intimate than a
laptop and so much more
capable than a smart phone.'
- Steve Jobs, Apple CEO, on the new iPad


_ __ CI I




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