Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






Saban in town
National rhamniron
000023 120110 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611143


Sity


Healing hands
Haiti's hospitals, clinics
are running low on
medical needs, supplies
Faith, 6A




Reporter


Saturday, January 3


w~ww.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No. I I *75 cents


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
Lake City Police officer Juan Cruz
handcuffs John Haefeker Friday after
an alleged road rage incident. Haefeker
faces aggravated assault with a firearm
charges.


LCPD: Road rage turns , .


into gun play, 2 arrests M


Report: Gun drawn
during attempted
vehicle altercation.
From staff reports
Two men, each driving their
own vehicle, were arrested
and face numerous charges
after a road rage confronta-
tion, in which they attempted
to hit each other's vehicle, led
to gun play on U.S. Highway
90 Friday afternoon. No one
was injured in the incident,


police reports say.
Donald Joseph Gilmore, 57,
194 SW Naples Glen, Lake
City, was charged with aggra-
vated assault with a motor
vehicle in connection with the
incident. His bond was set at
$10,000.
John Doran Haefeker, 63,
10155 112th Circle, Live Oak,
was charged with aggravated
assault with a firearm and was
also being held on a $10,000
bond.
Police officers were called
to the area of U.S. Highway


90 and Brookside Drive in ref-
erence to a disturbance and
a person armed with a gun,
around 2:44 p.m.
According to Lake City
Police Department reports,
officer Brian Bruenger inter-
viewed both men and each
gave a different account of
the incident.
Gilmore told authorities
that Haefeker was stopped
at a red light and he yelled
out that he could turn right
POLICE continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
Lake City Police officer Brian Bruenger
escorts Donald Gilmore to his patrol car-
Friday. Gilmore faces aggravated assault
with a motor vehicle charges stemming
from an alleged road rage incident.


Lake City honors exemplary service


Plane diverted


to Jacksonville

in terror scare


JASON MATTHEW WALKER I. - ':i, 1 ::..1.
Lake City City Manager Wendell Johnson awards Sandra Caslow, a code enforcement officer, with a certificate for the
Employee of the Year at the City of Lake City Annual Awards Banquet Friday at the Country Club of Lake City.




Jobs well-done


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
New Employee of the Year for
the City of Lake City, Sandra
Caslow, said the award was a
"shock."
"It's awesome," she said. "It
-feels good to be recognized for everything
I do."
. Caslow received the distinction at the
city's Annual Awards Banquet Friday at
the Country Club of Lake City.
Caslow is a code enforcement officer,
a position she has been in for six years.
Previously she worked for the police
department for two years.
"I love working with the citizens and
helping when I can," she said. "I enjoy my


job."
Often, Caslow brings her work home,
said her husband, Jonathan. She works
late into the night trying to find solutions
for people.
"She fights for these people," he said.
Employee of the Year is the most pres-
tigious award the city offers, said City
Manager Wendell Johnson. He also pre-
sented awards to several other employees.
Grayson Cason, administrative services
director, was the first recipient of a new
award, Supervisor of the Year.
"What a great honor," he said. "It has
been a real pleasure working for the city."
Cason serves in several capacities and
demonstrates consistent progress, Johnson
CITY continued on 3A


Mistaken identity
places passenger
on fed no-fly list.
By EILEEN SULLIVAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A
Continental Airlines jet
flying from Newark, N.J.,
to Bogota was diverted to
Jacksonville on Friday over
concerns a passenger was
on the government's watch
list of suspected terrorists
banned from commercial
flights. It turned out to be a
case of mistaken identity.
The passenger - one of
75 on board - was cleared
by the FBI at Jacksonville
International Airport and
permitted to continue on
the flight to Colombia, the
Transportation Security
Administration said.
\ Despite its safe conclu-
sion, the tense situation
that arose from diverting a
passenger jet after takeoff
because of security fears
was unlikely to ease the anx-
iety of the American flying


public after the Christmas
Day bombing attempt. The
government was expect-
ed to investigate how the
passenger was allowed to
board the plane before he,
was positively deemed safe.
An airline is not supposed
to issue a boarding pass to a
person on the government's
no-fly list.
It was not immediately
clear whether the passen-
ger, who was not identified,
went through additional
screening in Newark before
boarding the plane.
The airlines do not have
any information other than
the names on the list. Some
airlines have already moved
to the. new program, called
Secure Flight. All domes-
tic carriers are expected to
move to the new program
by March.
Under the current sys-
tem, if a person has a name
similar to someone on the
no-fly list, that person goes
through additional screen-
ing. In some instances, that
person could be banned
from boarding a flight.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERJLake City Reporter
Grayson Cason, the city's
administrative services
director, is named Supervisor
of the Year, Friday.


Rotary provides shelters for Haiti relief


Donations will
send ShelterBoxes
to those in need.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Rotary Club of Lake
City is sending aid - in


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


the form of shelter - to
Haiti's relief effort. The
organization raised $5,000
for ShelterBoxes to go to
the country that was struck
by a 7.0 magnitude earth-
quake Jan. 12.
Rotary began raising
money for Haiti spon after
the earthquake hit.


7039
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


"We set it out as a chal-
lenge to see if we could
sponsor one box," said
Chris Candler, board mem-
ber.
ShelterBox is an organi-
zation that delivers boxes of
aid to people after a disaster
has hit. It was started sev-
eral years ago by a Rotarian


in England and is funded
directly through donations.
"We just wanted to do
something good for the peo-
ple that needed the money,"
Candler said.
The boxes costs $1,000
each. Inside a big shipping
SHELTER continued on 3A


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
Woman injured in collision
Columbia County emergency responders work on Latisha
Wyche, 21, of Lake City, following a Friday night wreck on
State Road 47, where the vehicle she was traveling in as
a passenger was struck from behind. According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports, the wreck occurred at 6:20 p.m. when
James A. Stuart, 36, of Lake City was traveling south and ran
into the rear of a vehicle driven by Chasity D. Johnson, 21,
also of Lake City. Johnson had stopped and was attempting.
to make a turn into a private drive, reports indicate.

h TODAY IN COMING


BUSINEl::S SUNDAY
Toyota recall: Oh First comes the rain,
what a feeling. then the sinkholes.
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La.


O pinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................












LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010


FLORIDA"


Wednesday:
1-23-29-39-40-45 X3


(A$H ;l

Friday:
Afternoon: 8-3-6
Evening: 2-6-3


eznatch.

Thursday:
1-2-5-10-31


Friday:
Afternoon: 4-2-7-9
Evening: 6-6-8-5


Wednesday:
6-15-20-26-31
Powerball: 9 X5


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Music world celebrates ahead of big event


LOS ANGELES
rom parties to rehearsals
to gift suites, Grammy-
related activities were
taking over L.A's week-
end scene in advance
of Sunday night's awards show at
Staples Center. Here's a tour around
town:
Polishing the pitch: It was
back-to-back star power at Friday's
Grammy rehearsals. Dave Matthews,
Maxwell, Green Day, Black Eyed
Peas, Taylor Swift, Sheryl Crow,
Stevie Nicks, Mary J. Blige, Andrea
Bocelli, Drake, Eminem and Lil
Wayne were all scheduled to run
through their numbers for Sunday
night's awards ceremony.
Birthday bash: Grammy nomi-
Snee Anthony Hamilton was in cel- .
ebration mode even before Sunday's
show - he turned 39 this week. And
to celebrate, Nike's Jordan Brand
threw the R&B crooner a party at
the swank restaurant Phillipe in
Beverly Hills, with a guest list that
included Common, actress Victoria
Rowell, DJ Beverly Bond and MC
Lyte.
Suite of swag: Leery of looking
gauche, some celebrities shy away
'from having their photo taken when
-they hit up gifts suites and get free
swag.
All-American Rejects singer Tyson
Ritter is not among them. He happily
posed for photos Thursday.


Is5.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 7, 2009, file photo, music mogul Clive Davis arrives to his pre-Grammy
party in Beverly Hills, Calif.


IEdwardsrt


Rielle Hunter
was granted a tem-
portry restraining
order against for-
mer Edwards aide
Andrew Young in
a North Carolina
court. It seeks the


return of photos
and videos, including one she says
she made in 2006 while working for
Edwards.


R&B singer Etta James

Edwards' mistress wants hospitalized with infection


return of 'private' tape
- HILLSBOROUGH, N.C. - The
mistress of former presidential can-
didate John Edwards wants a "very
private and personal" videotape back
from a former aide who wrote a
book about the politician, according
to court documents obtained Friday
-by The Associated Press.


RIVERSIDE, Calif. - The son
of Etta James, 72,
says.the R&B singer
is hospitalized in
Southern California
with a serious infec-
tion but he expects
her to be released
soon.
Etta James Donto James says


his mother has been at Riverside
Community Hospital for about a
week and is recovering from sepsis
caused by a urinary tract infection.

Diddy, Queen Latifah to
host BET concert for Haiti
NEW YORK - Sean "Diddy"
Combs, Queen Latifah and Pharrell
are set to host a two-hour concert
and telethon to benefit Haiti on Feb.
5.
Wyclef Jean, Chris Brown and Lil
Wayne will perform.
The concert is titled "SOS Saving
OurSelves - Help for Haiti." It will
be held at the American Airlines
Arena in Miami and will air live on
BET, MTV, VH1 and Centric at 8
p.m. EST.
Proceeds will aid organizations
including Yele Haiti, CARE, Project
Medishare and Children's Safe
Drinking Water.
* Associaed Press


* Actor Gene Hackman is
80.
* Actress Tammy Grimes is
76.
* Actress Vanessa Redgrave
is 73.
* Chess grandmaster Boris
Spassky is 73.
* Former Vice President
Dick Cheney is 69.
* Singer Phil Collins is 59.
Daily Scripture


* Actor Charles S. Dutton
is 59.
* World Golf Hall of Famer
Curtis Strange is 55.
* Actress-comedian Brett
Butler is 52.
* The King of Jordan,
Abdullah II, is 48.
* Country singer Tammy
Cochran is 38.
* Actor Christian Bale is 36.


"Sitting down, Jesus called the Twelve
and said, 'If anyone wants to be first,
he must be the very last, and the
servant of all."'
- Mark 9:35
Thought for Today
"History repeats itself in the large
because human nature changes with
geological leisureliness."
- Will and Ariel Durant,
American historians (1885-1981), (1898-1981)

Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number.........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates inude 7% /osals tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ....... .......... $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Coast Guard: $5B
in drugs seized
CLEARWATER - The
U.S. Coast Guard seized
illegal drugs worth more
than $5 billion last year.
Coast Guard
Commandant Thad Allen
. says crews helped the FBI
-and other federal agencies
S-seize or disrupt delivery of
175 tons of cocaine and 35
.tons of marijuana on the
sea in 2009. Fifty-eight ves-
sels were seized, and 322
people were arrested.
The Coast Guard is the
nation's lead agency for
maritime law enforcement.
" Neighbors' fight

seen as hate crime
FORT LAUDERDALE
- Police are investigat-
ing a conflict between
neighbors as a hate crime
after two people allegedly
- attacked a man and shout-
ed sluis at him.
Police say Ricardo
SRivera is accused of beat-
Sing up his neighbor in
September when the man
complained about the
loud music and yelling in
Rivera's home. Police say
- Rivera knocked the victim '
l down and shouted slurs
about his sexual orienta-
tion. Police say the man
was injured.
" The next day, the neigh-
l i5or saw Rivera's car and
went to take down the
tag number. Police say
Bedsaida Rivera, Rivera's
wife, allegedly attacked the
victim with pepper spray.
Police say she also yelled
derogatory slurs at him.

2 fishermen catch


E


T-STORMS


HI 70 LO 39


S MOSTLY PARTLY
., SUNNY - SUNNY


HI 58L34 H16546


PARTLY
SUNNY


HI 67 LO 45


REIOA FOREC.AST APorStudyJaury3


, - ,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Remains have been found
Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office investigators dig and sift
an area that was underneath a concrete slab in the backyard
of a home in Plant City Thursday. Human remains have been
found near a home where investigators were searching for
the body of Abraham Shakespeare, a missing man who won
millions of dollars in the lottery nearly four years ago, Florida
sheriff's officials said.


they released the shark
before it was weighed.
Sharks have been gath-
ering along the beach in
the annual chase of bait-
fish.

Cocaine supplier
pleads guilty
JACKSONVILLE - A
Jacksonville cocaine sup-
plier who hid the drugs
in car batteries has been
sentenced to 14 years in
prison.
Albert "Amigo" Garcia,
30, was sentenced
Thursday in federal court.
Police describe him as the
kingpin and a "genius"
for his ability to move the
drugs and avoid detection.
The drug supply route
stretched from Mexico to
Live Oak to Jacksonville.
The drugs were hauled in
hollowed-out car batteries.


hammerhead shark Oz exhibit at Miami


RIVIERA BEACH -
Two fisherman caught
a 9-foot-9-inch hammer-
head shark along a South
Florida public beach.
The fishermen, who
were not identified, were
fishing from shore, and


Children's Museum
MIAMI - The Miami
Children's Museum kicks
off The Wizard of Oz
Children's Educational
Exhibition.
Children can experience


kid-sized replicas of impor-
tant sets from the
70-year-old film. The inter-
active journey includes
the tornado that swept
Dorothy to the land of
Oz; the Lollipop Guild in
Munchkin-land; the Yellow
Brick Road; the Witch's
Castle; and the Emerald
City.

Man pleads guilty
to murder-for-fire
TAMPA - A Pasco
County man has pleaded
guilty in federal court to
participating in a murder-
for-hire plot.
Court records show that
Joseph Lee Musson, 33,
pleaded guilty Thursday to
using interstate commerce
facilities in the commission
of murder-for-hire, carry-
ing a firearm during and
in relation to a crime of
violence, and possessing a
firearm after having been
convicted of a felony.
Prosecutors say he tried
to hire someone to kill
Robert Shane Ballard, but
the hit man was working
with officers and recorded
the conversations.
* Associated Press


Tallahassee *
67/38 ,..
Pensacola ,' ,
52/34 "Pania Crty
62/38


66/37--
Lake City,
70/39
" Gaiesville *
,72/41
Ocala
7 IA/


Tam
72/


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


71
41
67
43
85 in 1950
21 in 1940


0.00"
4.20"
4.20"
3.27"
3.27"


* Jacksonville
70/40

Daitona Beach
77/49
* \
i * *


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


, a Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
77/54 75/57 Lake City
S*Miami
pa .* " Naples
54 West Palm Beach Ocala
83/62 � Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers, 84/64 0 Pensacola
78/59 1 Naples * Tallahassee
79/62 Miami Tampa
Key West 85/67 Valdosta
74/64 * . W. Palm Beach
74/64_0


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:22 a.m.
6:06 p.m.
7:22 a.m.
6:07 p.m.

'6:55 p.m.
7:30 a.m.
8:05 p.m.
8:10 a.m.


Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb.
30 5 13 21
Full Last New RFirst


Saturday S7unday


On this date in 1977,
the great "Buffalo
Blizzard" ended
after three days. ,
The storm dropped
a foot of new snow.
Winds gusting to 75
mph reduced vis-
ibilities to near zero,
produced snow drifts
twenty-five feet high,
and kept wind chill
readings 50 degrees
below zero.


2

60 nites t bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Sunday
66/55/s
61/49/s
74/62/sh
71/54/pc
59/37/s
55/37/s
72/62/sh
58/34/s
75/64/sh
74/57/pc
61/39/pc
66/52/s
57/39/s
54/38/s
60/35/s
65/50/s
58/34/s
73/61/pc


Monday
71/60/pc
69/55/pc
75/68/r
76/60/pc
67/49/c
62/48/c
71/62/t
65/46/c
75/67/r
75/62/r
68/51/pc
73/57/pc
60/47/pc
61/45/pc
63/45/pc
71/58/pc
62/44/pc
75/66/r


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers.
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


�_ f .., J Forecasts, data and graph-
S'._.. Ics � 2010 Weather-Central
LLUC, Madison, Wis.
" 4www.weatherpubllsher.com


Gel Connected
'j- -�'
:<^-^

.vasssssBs^m
JMBPtfBi^MaM
|HNIMIMBMRHMMMRMMMMMI


Celebrity Birthdays


li I SUN


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


MON


L AKE CITY ALMANAC


WEATHER BY-THE-HOUR WEATHER HISM ITh, SPONSORED BY











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010


Fire guts mobile home, 5 homeless


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

FIVE POINTS - A
Thursday morning fire gut-
ted a Lake City mobile home
leaving two adults and three
children homeless:
Units from the Lake City
Fire Department as well as
the Columbia County Fire
Department responded to
the blaze at 186 NW Gerson
Lane, just outside the city
limits on the north side of
town.
Units from the fire
departments were dis-
patched to the scene at
3:20 a.m. Thursday. The
Lake City Fire Department
responded with two units
and six firefighters, while
the Columbia County Fire
Department responded
with three units.
Initial reports to the fire
department indicated the
blaze was burning multiple
structures, however the
first units on the scene only
found a single-wide mobile


PATRICK SCOTT/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Fire Department firefighters respond to a blaze at 186 NW Gerson Lane on
Thursday. Officials believe faulty wiring ingited the fire.


home in flames.
Lake City Fire
Department reports indi-
cate the mobile home was
fully involved and the fire
was in the west end of the
mobile home and rapidly
advancing to the middle
areas.
"Further investigation
shows a possible electri-
cal shortage in the bed-


room on the west end of
the home with extension
traveling to the living room
area where the fire attack
was made and travel was
stopped," wrote Lake City
Fire Department Battalion
Chief Buddy Crews in his
report.
Firefighters controlled
the blaze in about 10 min-
utes, but remained on site


for about two hours.
Reports say the mobile
home sustained an estimat-
ed $12,000 worth of dam-
age.
Contents of the home
sustained about $3,500
worth of damage.
The American Red Cross
was notified and provided
housing for the two women
and three children.


CITY: Awards for years of service, commitment


Continued From Page 1A

said. He shows genuine
concern and is a true asset.
Beverly Harry, cus-
tomer service coordinator,
received the Achievement
Award.
"I'm very appreciative,"
she said. "I couldn't do it
without my team and my
boss."
Harry has great enthu-
siasm is all areas of work,
Johnson said. She empa-


thizes with customers and
is upbeat.
Joyce Bruner, execu-
tive assistant, received the
Dedication Award.
"It feels so good," she
said. "I was very surprised,
and I'm very appreciative."
Bruner is always on time
and willing to stay late,
Johnson said. She greets
everyone with a warm atti-
tude, he said.


Laura Davis received the
Volunteerism Award.
She has just started with
the IT department, but lead-,
ing up to her employment,
she volunteered 480 hours,
Johnson said.
Under Johnson, a new
system was implemented
using ranking sheets to
determine award recipients,
said Audre Sikes, banquet
committee chair apd city


clerk. Committee members
were able to learn a great
deal about the employees.
"One thing is for cer-
tain," she said. "We have
many deserving individuals
for awards."
Recognition was also
given to employees and
council members for their
years of service. Employees
are the backbone of the city,
Johnson said.
k.


SHELTER: Boxes can each house 10 people
Continued From Page 1A


crate are items such as a
10-person tent, coloring
books and crayons for chil-
dren, thermal blankets and
basic tools.
The organization tailor-
fits the boxes depending
on where they go.
"It's really got a lot of the
most essential things that a
family or group would need
to survive when they've
lost everything," Candler
said.
An anonymous donor in
the club offered to match
up to $500, and soon Rotary
had enough for two boxes,
Candler said. Through
personal donations from
the 75 club members and


OBITUARIES

Minister Willie Lee Jones
Minister Willie Lee Jones was
born March 18,1930 in Jasper,
Florida to the late Henry and Ka-
tie Jones. He
was educated
in Jasper Flor-
ida. There he
met and mar-
ried Mary Lee
Crockett. They
were united -
for twenty two
years from this union nine chil-
dren were born. A beautiful life
came to an end on Friday, Janu-
ary 22, 2010. He leaves to cher-
ish his memory eight children:
Freddie Jones (Sharon), Earnest
Jones, Jimmie Jones (Lazoni) all
of Mayo Florida, Wilbert Jones
(Joanne), Raymond Jones (Le-
wanda), and Barbara Jones, all
of Live Oak, Florida, Geraldine
Owens and Jacqueline White
(Dessie), Lake City, Florida;
two brothers, Walter Jones and
Samuel Jones, both of Mayo,
Florida; two sisters, Irene Jones
and Zadie Mae (Bill) Cook, both
of Mayo, Florida; forty-one
grandchildren, forty-two great *
grandchildren; brother-in-law,
Willie Norris; and a host of niec-
es, nephews and devoted friends.
Special friend Oliver Jackson.
Home going celebration is to be
held Saturday January 30, 2010,
12p.m. at the Little Galilee Ho-
liness Church, Mayo, Florida.
Evangelist Annie Sellars is the
pastor and will officiate. Burial
will follow in the Garden of Rest
Cemetery. The family will re-
ceive other relatives and friends
from 6 to 8p.m. Friday, Janu-
ary 29, 2010 at Little Galilee
Church in Mayo, Florida. ERIC
A. BROWN & SON FUNER-
AL HOME, INC. is in charge
of all the final arrangements.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


businesses the amount of More ShelterBoxes could
money raised continued to come from Rotary, Candler
grow. said.


"As money keeps coming
in, hopefully we'll do more
boxes," he said.


S.. . -. , Ei IF



Auto Industry Shocked


By Local Dealer Who


Bucks The System


Wade Raulerson Honda Sells Vehicles Directly To
The Public At Wholesale Auction Prices


Gainesville, FL -
"We send thousands of
vehicles to wholesale auctions
every year," began Jason Dil-
lon, Used Car Sales Manager
of Wade Raulerson Honda.
"And vehicles at these auc-
tions are typically sold well
below market value. For ex-
ample, last week we sold a
ninety-four Honda Accord
for $2710. That car would
have been over $6075 if it
were on a local dealer's lot."
Only licensed auto bro-
kers are allowed to attend
these wholesale auctions,
where vehicles are sold for lit-
erally pennies on the dollar.
Additionally, auction atten-
dees are charged a hefty sum
to participate, making it vir-
tually impossible for the pub-
lic to attend.
"What we're doing here
at Wade Raulerson Honda
goes against the grain of what
everyone else is doing in the
auto industry. Instead of sell-
ing excess vehicles at whole-
a sale auctions, we're selling
them to the public at whole-
sale auction prices. If we have
to sell a vehicle at a loss, why
not sell it to a Gainesville res-
ident who'll benefit from the
vehicle," stated Dillon regard-


ing the dealership's one day,
nine-hour "wholesale to the
public" sales event.
"With the bankruptcy of
domestic manufacturers and
low interest rates, we've been.
inundated with trades all

"Think about it - as long
as we get the same
amount for the car as we
would at auction
- why would I care who
buys it? This way, we at
least get to develop a
relationship with a local
consumer. "
- Jason Dillon,
Used Car Sales Manager
Wade Raulerson Honda
BW__-.^--^ -a-
*ia.*


yearlong. We can't house die
entire inventory and are going
to have to send 137 vehicles
to the auction house. But be-
fore we do, we're going to
give the Gainesville public a
chance to) buy a used car at
auction price. Think about it -


as long as we get the same
amount for the car as we
would at auction - why would
I care who buys it? This way,
we at least get to develop a re-
lationship with a local con-
sumer," added Dillon.
The "wholesale to the
public" sales event is this Sat-
urday from 8:25am to
5:25pm at Wade Raulerson
Honda.
"The wholesale to the
public event will only be held
at our location on Main
Street," noted Dillon.
"Since the 137 vehicles
must be disposed of, we can
only hold this event for nine
hours this Saturday. Although
we close at 6pm on Saturday,
we have to insist that all sales
be concluded by 5:25pm.
That way we have enough
time to prepare the paper-
work and get the remaining
vehicles on trucks to take to
the auction. I've been in the
auto business for a long time
now and this is the first time
I've ever done something like
this. If you're even consider-
ing buying a used car, I can't
urge you enough to come by
this Saturday. This may be the
opportunity of a. lifetime,"
ended Dillon.


Interested consumers should contact the
dealer directly at 1-866-980-2617


Crist expects more funds for rail


ASSOCIATED PRESS

TALIAHASSE -- G(;ov.
Charlie Crist says lie
expects m)-ore federal
money to pay for a high
speed rail system between


Tamll)a and Orlando. Crisl
on Friday called President
llarack Obama's announce-
ment that Florida would
get $1.25 billion in stimu-
lus money for the project a
"down payment."


POLICE: Asking for help


Continued From Page 1A
on red. Haefeker turned
right and Gilmore followed,
but as Gilmore came along-
side Haefeker's vehicle,
Haefeker allegedly pointed
a pistol at him. Gilmore said
he then attempted to ram
Haefeker's vehicle.
Haefeker told authori-
ties that Gilmore did yell
obscenities at him to tuin
on the red signal and that
Gilmore then tried to ram
him. He reportedly then
pulled out his gun, but did


not take it out of its holster.
"Neither party attempt-
ed to disengage from the
violent altercation," Lake
City Police Department
public information officer
Sgt. John Blanchard said
in a statement. "Bruenger
arrested both subjects and
took two pistols into evi-
dence from Haefeker."
Anyone having additional
information about the inci-
dent is asked to call the
LCPD at 719-2068.


Sign up at
All Springs Veterinary Hospital
All Dog Breeds Welcome
Puppies must be 10 weeks
Course defines terms like air scenting,
trailing, track laying, etc.
$65 for 6 Weeks


Residential, Commercial
& New Construction
We would like to send out a special
"Thank You" to all of our loyal customers.
We would not be as successful without
each and every one of you.
Thank you for another great year serving
Columbia County and surrounding areas.
Emergency Service Available
Discounts to AARP and Veterans







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Where the warmest
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*See Store f
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THE WOOD STOVE
AND FIREPLACE CENTER
OPEN Ph. 377-9535
St. M-F 9:30. 5:30
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611 N. Main
Galnesvill


Hometown Business?
Hometown Bank!


If you care about where your business banks, perhaps you
should choose a bank that cares about your business. Peo-
ples State Bank is not a branch of an out of state bank run
by a "Regional Executive" seeking to improve their annual
bonus by offering short-term incentives to lure you in before
the end of the next quarter. We are a Lake City bank and our
focus is on the local economy and your business. We lend
our money locally and seek to establish stable, long-term
relationships with our customers. Perhaps it's old fash-
ioned, but wejustthink its the right way to do business.


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3882 W, US Hwy 90, Lake City. FL 32055
Telephone 386.754.0002
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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428













OPINION


Saturday, January 30, 2010


www.lakecityreporter-com


OTHER
OPINION


'Nuclear

Option'

blows up,

now what?
f their health-care reform
bill is such a great idea,
why have Democrats felt
compelled to resort to
nuclear weapons to get it
passed?
Prior to the historic special
election to fill the seat once
held by Sen. Ted Kennedy,
Democrats were strategiz-
ing how to pass their health-
care reform bill without
the necessary 60th Senate
vote a Republican victory in
Massachusetts would have
denied them.
Now that Republican Scott
Brown did indeed win, chas-
tened Democrats seem to have
stepped back from the brink.
In fact, House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi had to admit that she did
not have the votes necessary
to simply approve the Senate
health-care bill as-is.
That makes it appear as
if the current incarnation of
health-care reform is dead.
Let's hope so, and pray that
Democrats finally work with
their Republican colleagues
to fashion a bill we can all live
with.
But you have to wonder:
After bribing each other with
hundreds of millions of dollars
of our money, failing to win any
bipartisan support, and now
falling short of the 60 votes
necessary to end debate in the
Senate, why in the world were
Democratic leaders willing to
go "nuclear" to get their way?
Its real name is "recon-
ciliation" - it's nicknamed the
"nuclear option" - and it's a
process of tinkering with the
taxes and spending in a bill that
only requires 51 Senate votes,
not the usual 60.
It's certainly odd that the
Democrats would even want
to pass such a sweeping bill
without any bipartisan support
whatsoever, and when polls
show Americans are increas-
ingly opposed to it.
That they've been willing to
do it while resorting to every
trick in the book is truly a mar-
vel. It would be unprecedented
in U.S. history in both its arro-
gance and its foolhardiness.
Scott Brown may have saved
Democrats from themselves.
And the rest of us along with
them.
',-The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY: MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
. Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY:FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY-E-MAIL;
news@lakecityreporter.com


Put 40 kids with 40 old people


In June of 1948, Ann and I
were married. We spent
our honeymoon night in
a hotel on Miami beach.
We had purchased a 1931
Chevy four-door sedan. Total
cost was $82.05 cents. At top
speed it would make 35 miles
per hour. The next morning
we stopped by my home in *
Miami and said good-bye to my
parents. As we moved toward
the car that housed everything
we owned, I said to Ann, "Look
back and tell me what you see."
She whispered a reply, "I see
your Mom and Dad standing
together in the entry way of
your house."
I said with some satisfaction,
"They started it and they fin-
ished it." I was the last of seven
children to be married. Dad had
given me $200 cash. That was
the beginning.
We honeymooned on the
way to our first ministry of the
Largo church of Christ. The
membership numbered about
50 and they agreed to pay me a
salary of $30 a week. Included
in our agreement was the use of
a house that closely resembled
a "barn." The water had sulfur
in it and that gave it the unique
smell of an outhouse. Ann
exclaimed, "Something died in
the well and it stinks."
After a few months in Largo,
I got the smashing idea of how
to double the membership over
night. Buy a bus and haul in 50
kids from the "boonies." Bring
them in each Sunday morning
for Bible Study and assembly. At
the time, to a 20-year-old minis-
ter, the idea looked like a "piece
of cake." But there were prob-
lems. We had no elders, no sur-
plus of money, and no one with
other ideas. I started asking,
pleading, begging for money
for the purchase of a bus. One
seven-year-old brought her
piggy bank and revealed the
contents: 1,700 pennies. Soon


T . -. '
\' T




Jack Exum
Phone:(386) 755-9525
jhe@netzero.net
we had the enormous total of
$356 dollars.
Ahah! This hefty amount
led to my first major mistake.
I found an old 1936 bus (out in
the weeds) in north Florida that
had been sitting there for who
knows how long. There were no
individual seats, just two in the
middle (back to back) and one
on each side, and one seat for
the driver. I bought it.
The motor fell apart just
outside the city limits of Largo.
Another was located and donat-
ed and I used a bucket of yellow
paint to brush over the exterior.
A bus route was designed in
a single day. This was before
anyone I knew ever did any
"church bussing." The route
ran to six-points, and then this
way and that. The bus had little
or no brakes and insurance and
liability was out of the question.
I loved kids, and had a bus and
was willing to rise early, run the
route and bring them in. For
years I got 'em, brought 'em in
and took 'em home. I influenced
their lives.
The bus produced some
undesired effects. Our church
was filled with the "old guard."
These were the "young Turks."
The battle began. One Sunday
it "happened." It was during
the main service. It was funny,
outrageous and most unusual.
This mama was sitting with her
seven kids near the front. One
of her boys about 5 years old
became bored with the sermon.
So what mama did "just came
naturally." She unbuttoned her


- tough!


blouse (no undergarment) and
proceeded to "nurture" this
overgrown kid. It seemed to be
quite satisfying, for in just a few
minutes, the sucking sound was
replaced by sound sleep. I saw it
all and just kept speaking with-
out missing a beat.
After the final amen, one of
our most sophisticated ladies, of
the old guard, came up in tears,
whispering in a shocked way,
"Did you see that!"
"What," I said, as if I knew
nothing of the event. "That!"
she exclaimed, as if she was in
serious pain. "Just what are you
referring to," I said.
Realizing I knew she fell
limp into my arms as if she was
going to faint. I saw tears in her
eyes. "Sally, Sally," I whispered,
and said something my mother
had said to me at times. "You
best save those tears for some-
thing that really matters."
Now, more that 50 years have
passed since that Sunday morn-
ing in Largo. From that day
forward I saw a pivotal change
in Sally. She turned to the poor
and was often found carrying
groceries to those in need. I
have often wondered how many
times she has said to her grand-
children, "Best save those tears
for something that really mat-
ters."
Jesus said, "Suffer little chil-
dren to come unto me, and
forbid them not; for of such is
the kingdom of heaven ... And
accept ye be converted and
become as little children ... who-
soever will humble himself as
a little child, the same is great-
est in the kingdom of heaven"
(Matthew 18: 34; 19:14).
God help us to save our tears
for what really matters.

* Jack Exum has two books
available free at the Lake City
Reporter office. He is an
Amy-Award-winning religious
writer and resides in Lake City.


0 ~
0


LETTERS


Leave downtown like
quaint attraction it is
To the Editor:
In the Lake City Reporter
on Jan. 27, I was appalled at
the article about the mural
depicting the many facets of


TO THE EDITOR


the Ichetucknee River. It is
an added attraction to the old
downtown and much cost and
talent went into the mural. Why
destroy it? There must be anoth-
er alternative to save it.
The story also stated it is
the first series of murals to be
painted downtown - why? To


be destroyed at a later date
when one decides to do another
renovation?
Leave our old downtown as it
is - it is a tourist attraction of
old quaint buildings and shops.

Mary C. Hathaway
Lake City


I--
Reg Henry
rtienry@post gazette.com


No longer out

of touch, and

regretting it
went away to snow-cov-
ered Maine for a few
days - I believe the
words "snow-covered"
and "Maine" are actually
part of the Pine Tree State's
official title - and I lost touch
up there in the winter wonder-
land with what was going on.
When I came back, every-
thing had changed. Health-
care reform, which had been
talked to death, had apparently
expired under the weight of
the discussion.
Then the U.S. Supreme
Court, where these days good
laws go to die, decided that
a corporation had the same
rights to free speech as a regu-
lar person. This came about
as a result of judicial activism
becoming an equal-opportunity
employer - so a big welcome
to you conservative justices. Of
course, you were pretty much
in the activist club anyway, but
this makes it official.
As soon as I cleared the
snow from my boots, I asked:
What the heck is going on?
You can't even stop and scan
the horizon for a moose these
days without everything shift-
ing behind your back. No won-
der Sarah Palin shoots them
with such relish lest her world
be disturbed.
The first and biggest
shock was when Republican
Scott Brown claimed the late
Ted Kennedy's seat in the
Massachusetts Senate race last
week, thus inflicting political
rigor mortis on health-care
reform. Many theories have
been advanced for this star-
tling - and, to some of us,
depressing - turn of events.
Perhaps it was a referendum
against government-sponsored
health care, its cost and doubt-
ed effectiveness.
Maybe it was a reaction
against a clueless Democrat,
Martha Coakley, part of a dull
tradition of Democratic politi-
cians from Massachusetts such
as Michael Dukakis and John
Kerry - the type of people
who are called by the police
to hostage scenes so that gun-
men will drop their weapons
out of sheer boredom.
It could have been a case
of conservatives and indepen-
dents coming out because they
think President Barack Obama
is a socialist while the lefties
simultaneously stayed home
because they know he isn't.
My theory is that voters
wanted a one-time nude model
whose daughters are available,
which of course was a little
joke he made to cheer up the
30 million or so people who
now won't be getting health
insurance. As they say, laugh-
ter is the best medicine - and
it better be, because it will be
the only medicine they can
afford.
All these theories may be
equally valid, but that doesn't
change the fact that it was
weird.
The people of Massachusetts
who so loved Ted Kennedy
and so recently mourned him
turned around and repudiated
his life's work in a fit of pique.
Who has words to explain the
changing political winds that
whip up such volatile anger
that people bang their cups
with their spoons as if they
were prisoners of democracy?
The truth is that with anger
making people lash out blindly
without thought for conse-
quences, this is the hour when
any rough beast can slouch
toward Washington to be
elected.
If it happens, I am going
back to Maine to cuddle up
with a corporation. I hear they
are the best friends to have
these days -- and such good
conversationalists.
* Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


4A


%AHLFK- .
7HEOCLUMBUS DISFATC14-aolcl










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & BUSINESS SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Meredyth Waterman, from Burriliville, R.I., and her boyfriend David Whitty, from Attleboro,
Mass., stand next to Whitty's 2010 Corolla, Friday, in Providence, R.I. Waterman and Whitty
both bought 2010 Corollas as their first new cars late last year. Toyota has recalled 4.2 million
vehilces because of faulty gas pedals that may stick.


Toyota: Gas pedals at factories


By TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writer

DETROIT - The
Associated Press has learned
that Toyota is sending new'
gas pedal systems to car
factories rather than dealer-
ships who want the parts
to take care of millions of
customers whose pedals
may stick.
Toyota spokesman Brian
Lyons confirms informa-
tion in a company e-mail
obtained by the AP that
says parts were shipped to
factories. Lyons says that's
how the company normally
distributes parts.
But some dealers say
they should get the parts
first because they now have
no way to fix. the pedals
on any of the 4.2 million
recalled vehicles affecting
eight U.S. models.
Toyota has halted pro-
duction and sales of the


models, -including the best-
selling Camry sedan.
Lyons said Toyota did not
send the parts to dealers
because it has not decided
whether to have the sys-
tems in the recalled vehi-
cles repaired or replaced.
ThecompanyonThursday
presented a remedy to the
National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration, and
it is awaiting a decision
before proceeding.
"We're not ready to
launch this program yet,"
Lyons said, adding that let-
ters must be sent to custom-
ers whose vehicles were
recalled and service techni-
cians must be trained on
whatever solution the com-
pany ultimately decides.
He said he did not know
if any parts had been
shipped from factories to
parts depots, which is the
next step in the process,
but dealerships don't have


them.
Engineers and other'
workers were up all night
Thursday getting the pro-
cess ready, he said.
The company has said
its highest priority is fix-
ing the pedals for existing
customers.
"Nothing is more impor-
tant to Toyota than doing
the right thing for our cus-
tomers - and restoring
their confidence in the safe-
ty of our vehicles," Toyota
said in a statement.
But dealers and custom-
ers were unhappy with the
delays in getting parts.
Earl Stewart, owner of a
Toyota dealership in North
Palm Beach, said his ser-
vice technicians might not
know the details of how to
fix the gas pedal systems,
but they know to install new
ones, and the parts should
have gone to dealers rather
than factories.


BRIEFS


Miramax offices
close, brand OK
LOS ANGELES - The
offices of award-winning
Miramax Films were closing
on Friday, but the brand will
continue to exist for at least
two years.
The closures were in line
with plans announced in
October to slash Miramax's
movie production to three
per year, down from six to
eight. Miramax owner Walt
Disney Co. also announced
then that Miramax president
Daniel Battsek was leaving
the company this month.
Miramax's operations are
being folded into Disney's
studio. Disney confirmed it
has six Miramax films to be
distributed through 2011,
including "The Baster" and
"The Debt" set for this fall.
Disney did not elaborate on
its plans beyond that.

PSC: Increases
for FP&L users,
TALLAHASSEE - The
price of power is going up
soon for customers Florida
Power & Light in South
Florida.
The Florida Public Service
Commission set rates Friday
for all FP&L customers,


increasing residential cus-
tomers by $1.03 a month on
March 1 for residents using
a thousand kilowatt hours,
which is considered average
for a small home.
The Juno Beach-based
utility serves about 4.5 mil-
lion homes, businesses and
other customers in South
Florida and along the state's
east coast.


Gas pipeline price
tag: $41B
JUNEAU, Alaska - The
company holding an exclu-
sive license with the state of
Alaska to develop a major
natural -gas pipeline esti-
mates the project will cost
$20 billion to $41 billion,
depending on the route.
The Alaska Pipeline
Project seeks to move natu-
ral gas from the harsh North
Slope to market in Alaska,
through Canada and to the
Lower 48.
More details of the plan
came in a filing Friday with
federal regulators that's the
first step toward an "open
season," when the compa-
nies behind the project will
court, gas producers and try
to secure commitments for
shipping deals.


Mental health
coverage broadens
WASHINGTON - Many
Americans will get broader
coverage for mental illness
and substance abuse treat-
ment under rules issued
Friday by the Obama admin-
istration.
Health plans offered by
employers with more than
50 workers will be required
to treat mental health ben-
efits the same way they
handle coverage for physi-
cal ailments. That means no
separate annual deductibles
for mental health treatment.
And copayments for visit-
ing a psychiatrist or social
worker can't be more than
the charge for going to the
family doctor or a medical
specialist.

Car maker Tesla
Motors plans IPO
NEW YORK - Electric car
manufacturer Tesla Motors
Inc. says it is planning a
public offering of stock
The Palo Alto, Calif.-based
company says in a filing with
the Securities and Exchange
Commission on Friday it
plans to go public. But it did
not set a date for when it will
start selling stock.
* Associated Press


Roadwork may impact local traffic


From staff reports
The following is a list
of roadwork, supplied by
the Florida Department of
Transportation, that may
impact traffic.

Columbia County
* Lake Jeffery Road
(County Road 250) daytime
lane closures after 8:30 a.m.
at the Interstate 75 overpass
Saturday through Monday
to install guardrail and
from Interstate 75 to the
Suwannee County line on
Saturday while crews paint
the roadway lines.
* State Road 238 daytime
lane closures after 8:30 a.m.
Monday and Tuesday at the
Olustee Creek Bridge while
crews install temporary
barrier wall for work on the
bridge railing.

Baker County
* Interstate 10 daytime
lane closures at the U.S.
90 overpass (Exit 324)
Wednesday and Thursday
from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
for routine bridge mainte-
nance.


* U.S. 90: Crews will
be repainting the roadway
lines between the Columbia
and Nassau County lines.
Alachua County
* Archer Road (State
Road 24): Crews will be
repainting the roadway
lines between Interstate 75
and Southwest 13th Street.
* County Road 235A:
Possible daytime lane clo-
sures from U.S. 441 to north
of Santa Fe High School to
construct sidewalks.
* Newberry Road (State
Road 26): Crews will be
repainting the roadway
lines between the Gilchrist
County line and Southwest
Second Avenue (State Road
26A).
* North Main Street
(County Road 329):
Possible daytime lane clo-
sures between Eighth and
23rd avenues while crews
place the final pavement
markings.
* North Main Street
(State Road 329): Traffic
has been shifted onto the
new paved lanes on the west
side of the road between
University and Eighth
avenues. One lane in each


Roses are red, violets are blue, seu

to show them that your love

The Lake City Reporter
Presents:

Put a little love in someone's heart this
Valentine's Day with the Lake City Reporter's
'Lore Lines. 'Make it a special day for those
you love by writing a message to your
sweetheart. We'll include it on our
'Valentine Love Line'page on February 14.

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direction will be maintained
while crews reconstruct
the east side of the road-
way. Sections of sidewalk
are closed and pedestrians "
should cross Main Streef
at designated crosswalks
only.
* South Main Street
(State Road 329): Traffic
is detoured around the
intersection with Depot.,
Avenue for underground
utility work. Motorists will
be directed to Southwest"
Fourth Avenue, Southwest
Sixth Street, Southwest
16th Avenue and back to
Main Street. Local, traf-
fic has access, but will be
unable to cross the inter-
section.
* U.S. 301 in Orange .,
Heights: Possible daytime
lane closures just south of
State Road 26 while crews :
work on the roadway shoul- ,.4
der and in the median to -,
build a new overpass.
* U.S. 41 Possible
daytime lane closures at
Southwest 30th Avenue
south of Newberry for con-.
struction of a westbound
turn lane and to pave a
small section of Southwest
30th Avenue.











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Print your message here:


Your Name: '
Phone:
Address:
City/State/Zip:


Art#


Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 - 755-5440
ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT THE TIME OF PLACEMENT. DEADLINE IS FEB. 9,2010.


*1


LOCAL STOCKS


' STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.68 6.6 12 25.36 -.18 -9.5 McDnMIs NY 2.20 3.5 15 62.43 -.40 0.0
AutoZone NY ... 12 155.03 -.39 -1.9 Microsoft Nasd .52 1.8 16 28.18 -.98 -7.5
BkofAm NY .04 .3 ... 15.18 -.19 +.8 Motorola NY .. ...... 6.15 -.33 -20,7
BobEvn Nasd .72 2.6 ... 27.91 -.32 -3.6 NYTimes NY ....... 12.92 -.09 +4.5
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 4.4 15 14.96 +.09 -6.4 NobltyH Nasd ......... 10.36 -.14 -.9
CSX NY .88 2.1 15 42.86 -.82 -11.6 OcciPet NY 1.32 1.7 21 78.34 +.84 -3.7
Chevron NY 2.72 3.8 12 72.12 -1.12 -6.3 Penney NY .80 3.2 21 24.83 +.02 -6.7
Cso Nasd ...... 23 22.47 -.05 -6.1 PepsiCo NY 1.80 3.0 18 59.62 -.12 -1.9
Citigrp NY ...... . 3.32 +.08 +.3 Pizer NY .72 3.9 13 18.68 +.03 +2.6
CocaCI NY 1.64 3.0 20 54.25 +.07 -4.8 Potash NY .40 .4 30 99.35 -5.14 -8.4
Delhaize NY 2.01 2.6 ... 77.68 -.73 +1.3 PwShsQQONasd .21 .5 ... 42.79 -.76 -65
DirFBear rs NY ...... .. 19.92 +.41 +2.5 PrUShS&P NY ...... ..37.54 +.81 +7.1
ETrade Nasd ......... 1.52 -.08 -13.6 Qualcom Nasd .68 1.7 32 39.19 -1.29 -15.3
FPLGrp NY 1.89 3.9 12 48,76 -.25 -7.7 Ryder NY 1.00 2.7 31 36.40 -.12 -11.6
FmilyDIr NY .62 2.0 14 30.88 +.19 +11.0 S&P500ETFNY 2.29 2.1 ... 107.39 -1.18 -3.6
FordM NY ...... 13 10.84 -.57 +8.4 SearsHIdgs Nasd ......... 93.28 -1.22 +11.8
GenElec NY .40 2.5 16 16.08 -.08 +6.3 SidiusXMh Nasd ......... 84 +.03 +40.3
HomeDp NY .90 3.2 21 28.01 +.67 -3.2 SouthnCo NY 1.75 5.5 15 32.00 +.05 -4.0
iShEMkls NY .58 1.5 ... 38.28 -.42 -7.8 SPDRFncl NY .25 1.8 ... 14.18 -.10 -1,5
iShR2K NY .72 1.2 .. 60.11 -.67 -3.7 TimeWmrs NY .75 2.7 ... 27.45 +.64 -5.8
Intel Nasd .63 3,2 25 19.40 -.52 -4.9 WalMart NY 1.09 2.0 15 53.43 +.82 0.0
Lowes NY .36 1.7 18 21.65 -.33 -7.4 WellsFargo. NY .20 .7 33 28.43 -.02 +5.3


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428















FAITH



Saturday, January 30, 2010 v


&


VALUES


&-ww.Iakecityreporter.com


BIBLICAL MEDITATION I


. Carlton McPeak
corlton_mc@msn.com


Overview

teaches

specific

lessons

R leading the
entire Bible in
2010 was a chal-
lenge I wanted
R- to undertake.
After consulting several
.plans, I chose to daily read
"some of the history of the
-nation of Israel, some of
the Wisdom literature (Job,
psalms, Proverbs, Song of
Solomon, and Ecclesiastes)
arid some of the New
Testament.
. From reading the book
of Genesis I found that it
tells about the beginning
of a lot of events. It tells
about the beginning of the
earth and all the stars of
heaven. It tells about the
'beginning of mankind;
-the beginning of sin; the
beginning of the first
family. It also tells about
the first murder; the first *
destruction of the world;
and the destruction of a
city because of its wicked-
ness.
It tells about the prom-
* ises God makes to a man
by the name of Abraham.
These promises (cited in,
Genesis 12) are that from
the descendants of this
man God will build a great
-nation and give them a
land to possess. God also
-informs this great man of
'faith of how through his
."seed" all the families of
"the earth will be blessed
-(Genesis 12:3).
-" As I read this book, in
an overview fashion, I
found that there were some
specific lessons that were
taught.
- The first family began
with a man and a woman.
:The woman was created by
God as someone suitable
for the man. She was not
like the animals, but was
Part of his body; "bones
.of [his] bones and flesh of
[his] flesh" (2:23). I found
that this man and this
woman were to "cleave" to
each other.
The writer of Genesis,
commenting on this union,
said, "For this cause a
man shall leave his father
and his mother, and shall
cleave to his wife; and
they shall become one
flesh" (2:24). Who were
the "father and mother" of
Adam and Eve?
Another thing I saw
was the graciousness of
.God before He brought
"about destruction. God
told Noah about the
upcoming destruction of
'the world by water. God
also told Abraham about
impending destruction by
fire and brimstone of the
city where his nephew
Lotlived.
- - The story of Joseph
taught me that God can
work in the lives of people
when they are not even
aware of His activities. God
can even take "evil" that is
done against a person and
turn it into something good
for that individual as well
Sas others.
Overview reading can
reveal a lot of lessons.
U Carlton G. McPeak is
* -an evangelist working in
the Lake City, Florida area.
All Scriptural quotations
are from theNew American
Standard BibleHolman Bible
Publishers, unless otherwise
stated.


People reach across the aisles at Saint John's African Methodist Episopal Church in downtown Montgomery, Ala., to hold hands as they pray during their Haiti
Earthquake Prayer Vigil service on Wednesday evening.


Medicine running low in Haiti's hospitals, clinics


By BEN FOX
Associated Press
PORT-AU-PRINCE,
Haiti - Doctors and aid
workers are running dan-
gerously low of supplies
in Haiti's capital and in the
countryside, complicating
efforts to treat 2.00,000
people in need of post-
surgery care following the
earthquake 'and increasing
the potential of many more
deaths due to infection and
disease.
As days'turn to weeks,
doctors struggling to keep
up with demand in devas-
tated hospitals and impro-
vised clinics are warning
of a looming public health
calamity as earthquake
survivors with untreated
injuries fail to get proper
attention, Elisabeth Byrs,
of the U.N.'s humanitarian
coordination office said
Friday in Geneva.
Poor sanitation can also
kill as tens of thousands of
Haitians living in squalid
camps with limited water,
she said.
Medical teams also are


seeing a big shift in the
types of cases they are
treating, World Health
Organization spokesman
Paul Garwood said Friday
in Geneva. He said there
are a growing number of
diarrhea cases, as well as
unconfirmed reports of a
rise in measles and teta-
nus cases in resettlement
camps - a particularly
worrying development
because of the high
population density in the
camps.
"The health care system
in Haiti has been terribly
affected by the earth-
quake," said Joe Lowry,
a spokesman for the
International Federation of
the Red Cross. "Medical
staff have been killed
and injured, hospitals
destroyed and stocks dam-
aged and depleted."
Dr. Nancy Fleurancois,
volunteering at a damaged
hospital in the Haitian
coastal town of Jacmel, said
Thursday that her team is
treating 500 people a day
- many for the first time
since the Jan. 12 quake


- and desperately needs
antibiotics and surgical
supplies.
"You see people
come here and they are
at death's door," said
Fleurancois, a Haitian-
American from Newark,
Delaware. "More help is
needed."
Anthony Banbury,
deputy head of the U.N.
peacekeeping mission in
Haiti, said during a tour of
Jacmel that he would try to
resolve Fleurancois' short-
ages - but he noted there
is a "grave need" for medi-
cine all over Haiti.
Those needs are com-
peting with the urgency
of delivering tons of food,
water and tents which, like
the medicine, are delayed
by bottlenecks as a result
of damaged roads and
ports and a tiny airport
that is unable to accommo-
date the backlog of flights
waiting to deliver supplies.
Coordination remains a
problem, leaving big gaps
in the distribution of food
and medicine.
An estimated 200,000


family-size tents are need-
ed as temporary shelter for
the homeless, international
agencies say, but only a
fraction of that number are
in Haiti or on their way. In
Jacmel alone, more than
20,000 people are home-
less.
Food is also still in short
supply: The U.N. World
Food Program says it has
delivered more than 4
million rations, equivalent
to more than 13 million
meals, to 500,000 people.
But it projects that 2 mil-
lion Haitians need food
aid - now and until
December.
Desperate Haitians long
accustomed to relying on
themselves rather than
government handouts have
resorted to looting the.
collapsed stores in Port-
au-Prince. Armed Haitian
police have tried to stop
them by firing guns in the
air and threatening them
with their batons. Several
people have been injured.
On Friday, hundreds
of demonstrators near
downtown Port-au-Prince


protested against the police
actions while cheering U.S.
troops who have confined
their activities to clearing
rubble.
Officials estimate the
quake killed as many as
200,000 people and injured
another 200,000. Among
the injured are more
than 2,000 people who
have had amputations,
a number that is likely
to increase, said Dr. Jon
Andrus, deputy director of
the Pan American Health
Organization. Those
patients are in need of post-
operative care to prevent
infection.
At the chaotic General
Hospital in downtown
Port-au-Prince,
amputees groan in pain
while recovering in canvas
tents in the courtyard of
the damaged structure.
There is a shortage of
painkillers as well as
crutches, wheelchairs and
physical therapy equip-
ment, said Dr. Bob Norris,
who leads an International
. Medical Corps team of
physicians.


Another loss in priest shortage: Anointing sick


By MARY FOSTER
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - It
was John B. Baus's 82nd
birthday. When he was get-
ting ready to go out with
his wife, he had a heart
attack and ended up on
his way to the emergency
room instead.
Doctors there worked
to stabilize him and per-
formed surgery to implant
a pace maker. Mary Adele
Baus, his wife, went home
after the surgery, assured
that her husband was rest-
ing comfortably.


Sunday
Women's Missionary
Society
The Women's Missionary
Society of Mt. Tabor A.M.E.
Church is hosting a wor-
ship service at 3 p.m.
Jan. 31. The speaker
is Min. Narragansett M.
Smith. Contact Sis. Evelyn
Hambrick at (386)755-9123
or (386)438-4803. The
church is located at 519 SW
L.M. Aaron Drive.

Church revival
White Springs Church of
.God is having a revival at 6
p.m. Jan. 31 and 7 p.m. Feb.
1-5. Evangelist Keith Speed for


Instead, at 3 a.m. doctors
were working frantically
with oxygen and electric
paddles to keep Baus alive.
In the midst of the effort
Baus asked for a Roman
Catholic priest, fearing death
was only moments away.
"He said 'I'm a dying
man, and I want to see
a priest,"' Mary Baus
remembered. "All they said
was that they didn't have
one."
Baus survived, but his
wife said it was a traumatic
event that left both her and
her husband shaken.
'There used to be a


chaplain available if you.
needed him," she said. "Or
you could get a priest to
come to.the hospital. Now
it's not for sure that you
will see anyone."
Finding a priest to be at
the bedside of the dying
is becoming harder and
harder across the country.
The shortage of priests has
been a problem for years,
but its implications become
most clear at dire times for
the ill.
New Orleans Archbishop
Gregory Aymond says that
across the country there
are fewer priests and fewer


young men who want to
become priests.
'We are challenged to
find young men looking for
vocations," Aymond said.
"We are getting fewer, and
the process of preparing
for the priesthood can take
six to eight years. It makes
it difficult to have people
who can step in for retiring
priests."
Once called the Last
Rites or Extreme Unction,
the death bed ritual has
changed for Catholics in
recent years. The once-
obligatory deathbed rite
has been replaced with a


CHURCH NOTES
South Carolina is the speaker. gregational singing of old time be in revival at 10:30 a.m. and
favorites at the end. There is no 6 p.m. Feb. 7 and 7 p.m. Feb.
Friday, Feb. 5 admission but a love offering 8-14 at the Lake City Church of
will be collected. The church is God. The church is located at
Youth fundraiser located at 388 SE Baya Drive. 173 SE Ermine Avenue.


The Lake City Church of
God's Youth will be having a
chicken and rice dinner Feb.
5. Dinners are $6 a plate.
Call the church office at 752-
5965 or 438-5836 for tickets.
The church is located at 173
SE Ermine Avenue.

Gospel Sing
Southside Baptist Church
is having a gospel concert at
7 p.m. Feb. 5. Featured art-
ists include Delivered, Seven
Days, The Duprees and Taylor
Thompson. There will be con-


Coming up
West Virginia natives
celebration
Epiphany Church is
having its annual WV Day
Celebration at 11:30 a.m.
Feb. 6. Bring a covered dish
of your favorite Hillbilly food
to share. RSVP at (386)754-
1760 or (386)365-2172.

Church Revival
Evangelist Marilyn Weeks will


New Song at Wesley
Memorial
A New Song International
Celebration Tour 2010 from
Chile, South America will
be in concert at 10 a.m.
Feb. 7 at Wesley Memorial
United Methodist Church.
The church is located at
1272 SW McFarlane Avenue.
Admission is free, offering
will be taken at closing. For
information, please phone
the church office at (386)
752-3513 or e-mail wmum-
coffice@gmail. corn.


new sacrament known as
the anointing of the sick.
"It's not like you used
to see in movies with the
priest anointing a dying
man," Aymond said. "Now
we urge people to have
it before they go into the
hospital. It should be a
community celebration, not
something administered in
isolation."
* That works if it's a
scheduled hospital visit,
but for people like Baus,
taken to the hospital dur-
ing an emergency, there is
no time to prepare before-
hand.


New Song at First
Presbyterian
A New Song International
Celebration Tour 2010 from
Chile, South America will
be in concert at 6 p.m. Feb.
7 at the First Presbyterian
Church. The group is made
up of 8 young adults. The
group is celebrating its anni-
versary, and the concert's
theme is "Grateful Hearts."
N Submit events and
announcements to be
included in the Lake City
Reporter's Church Notes in
writing no later than 5 p.m.
Tuesday to Tom Mayer at
tmayer@lakecityreporter com,
(386) 754-0428, fax to (386)
752-9400.


6A












LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010


Sunday Monday . Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Acts Matthew Mark Luke Leviticus Deuteronomy Galatians
12.1-19 22.15-46 12.28-44 10.25-42 19.1-18 6.1-9 1.1-24
Scriptures Selected by The American. Bible Society
Copyright 2010, Keister-Williams Newspaper Services, P. O. Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www.kwnews.com


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"


GWHunter, Inc.
Chevro Chevron Oil
I Jobber




Holly/ :AEn Inc.
"Quality /ork at a reasonable price"

(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
" can do all things through Christ which slrcngihencth me"
Phlippans 4:1

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


First Advent Christian
1881SWMcFarlaneAve.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM'
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

FAITH IN CHRISTANGLICAN CHURCH
9317 90 West, 6 miles West of 1-75
386-754-2827
Sunday Holy Communion 9:30 AM
1928 Prayer Book
"A Traditional Episcopal Church"
Rev. Don Wilson

BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S * 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM.
Sunday Wiorsnhip 10.45AM i SPM
Wednesday Eve. Service - 7PM
Pastor: LarryE. Sweat

EASTSIDE BAP0IST CHURCH
196 SE lames Ave.* 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM&6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Pas.Aor Hugih Dampier

FELLOWSHIP BAPIlSI CHURCH
Rev. Stephen Shaw * 386-963-1028
Sun. School 10:00AM
MomingWorship 11:00AM
EvrningW,,rship 6:00PM
Wed Prayer[ ewrvte 7:00PM

FIRSTBAPTIST CHURCH.
Sunday Bible Study . 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 1i):3fiAM & 6.iiuPM
Wed. h-00PM PiaVri Senice, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rrv Siephen Ahirns. Pa.-iori

SFL.WHITE BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday School 10AM
Worship 11AM
Sun. EveningWorship 6PM
Praei & Bile Study . 7PM
Yough Group Meeting 7PM
Need a ride call the church: 386-497-1388

OLIVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E.-Davis Street
(386) 752-1990. ,.
Ronald V.Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed, Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
. In God's Word, Will& Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268 NW Lake Jeffery Rd. *752-0681
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & 11AM
SundayWorship 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM


AWANA
Evening Worship
Wed. Eve. Schedule


5:30 PM
6:00 PM


Family Supper (Reservation) 5 PM
Children's Ministry 6PM
Youth Worship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting &:p0 PM
Thursday Evening Schedule - St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
SundayWorship . 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson

CELEBRATION COMMUNITY CHURCH
Hwy 47 between Ft.,White & Columbia City
Sunday Services
Bible Study 9AM
Worship 10: 15AM
Wednesday Evening Schedule
AWANA 6:30PM
Prayer and Bible Study 7:PM
Pastor: Dick Shorr' 754-1144
SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST .
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
S' 52-4198

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive 755-5553


Bible Study'
1Moming Worship
Evening Worthip
AWANA Wednesday.

Payer b Bible Srudy


I '.AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274
Sunday School .10 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

THEVINEYARD
A Southern Baptist Church
2091 SWMain'Blvd. *623-0026.
SundayWorship 10:00AM
Where Jesus is Preached
and jeans are appropriate.
Pastor, Bo Hammock

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905.SW Epiphany Court - 7524470
Saturday Vigil Mass, 5:00 PM
SundayMass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Educatiori
S 9:00AM-10:15AM

LAKE CrTY CHRISTIACHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
.Sunday School 9:30 AM'
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting - 7PM

CENTRAL CHURCH OF CHRIST
Directions & Times 755-1320
- John Lit Cole

LAKE CITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
3614 Hwy 47 South * 752-6010
Sun. Bible Study 9 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship -10 AM
Sun. Evening Worship 6 PM
Wed.'Bible Study 7:00 PM
Minister: Ryan Tuten


LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.* 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen * 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Email: stiamesepis330@bellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wednesday: 6:00pm
Yoga Classes: Mon. 4:30pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Deacon: The Rev. limmie Hunsinger
Director of Music Dr. Alfonso Levy

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 V2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299
Sunday Services 9:30AM
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire

SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 * 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Pastor: David E. Winter


ISAIAH 58:6-7 MINISTRIES
A Messianic Fellowship
138 SWGenesis Ct. Ft. White
Saturday Services * 386-497-1800
Torah Study 9:30 'Worship 11:00


BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
4869 US 441 South
SundayWorship Services,
Traditional Services 8:30 & 11:00AM
386-755-1353
trychrist@earthlink.net

First United Methodist Church
973S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday-School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Contemporary Service 8:30AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
,2300 SW McFarlane * 752-3513 -
IAdiaiieni toi Summers School ,
Sunday S:hoil 900AM
Sunday Worship 8AM & 10AM
Youth Meeting . 4:30PM
Praise &Worship 6PM
S,. Nursery Provided
' Pisti- ' iue Mabey
www.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODISTCHURCH
U.5 9 . tum on Cn Oritz Inexlo Quailiry
lnd) right on OCiraaJ.
SundaySchool 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
SundayTraining 5PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn


LAKE CITY CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
SundaySchool . 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR47 and Azalea Park Place

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCiH
S629 SWBaya Drive* 752-0670
Sunday Contemporary Worship 9:00AM
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Traditional Services ' 11:00AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin .
SDireclii of Music- Bill Poplin '

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH ,
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St.
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services- Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service -Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408' EveryoneWelcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES


Sunday 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 10:30AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
Saturday Nite Services 5:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left.' 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Cikcle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones * 752-9119


FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel
MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy 47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM
Thursday 8PM
No Nursery Available
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance
FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
Sunday @ 10:00 AM
UNDERSTANDING * FUN* REAL
We are a non-denominational and
non-charismatic church meeting
at the Holiday Inn in Lake City
(386) 365-8535
www.FellowshipStuff.com

WAYWORD MINISTRIES
"The Way to Heaven is in the Word"
Sunday School 9:45AM'
Morning Worship 11AM
Wednesday Bible Study 7PM
315 NW Brown Road
www.wayword.info
Pastor Gary B. King
752-6892


To List





Your





Church





on the





Church


Call


Toadetie.nths hrc iretoyCal5-54


IS ay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


GENTIVA
great healthcare has come homes
-Nursing .*Onhoelie Rer ii 'reoramn *ii.daice [) niif colon
P'rogin *'lohoc:d & OcculiiOinii.d Tlheramp
*MSW *IIonice Ile.dilh Aide S '�emcs
Mhedicare/iedic:ddi CeriediJculoAccredaiil
iiii2bi063 )63 & iiiL\29 )1 '3i9
Lake Cit) 386-748-3490 * -ie Oak 386-364-14593




Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054

Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store ' -
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat 8:00-5:30 * Closed Sunday

Patty Register -,
386-961-9100 -
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
1974 E. Duval St. Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. - 5:00Yp.m.
Lake City, FL 32055 Closed Wednesday

� A NDERSON COLUMBA4 CO., INC.
.SPIUT PAYING "
(O t�ERLU I *INDtiSTRIAL
Site Preparation * Road Building * Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City

SB HARRY'S
Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

Pi.O 752-2308

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Central States
. Enterprises -
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED - PET SUPPLIES - LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
Mi10 ERs * CHAIN SAWS * TRIMMERS
1 12 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
.-. . 755-7050


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


N To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today
Gator-Knap-ln
The Third Annual Gator-
Knap-In is from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. today, at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park. The event will
include demonstrations
and classes in flint knap-
ping, ceramics, cordage
and carvings. Vendors
and exhibitors will have
displays and materials for
sale. Park admission is $5
per vehicle of up to eight
passengers.

5th Annual Elvis Tribute
Artist Contest
. The 5th Annual Elvis
Tribute Artist competi-
tion is at 1 and 6 p.m.
today at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park. An
Elvis impersonator will
perform Saturday night.
Admission prices are $25
for general admission or
$40 for reserved seating.
Call (386) 364-1683, e-mail
the SOSMP at spirit@
mnusicliveshere.com or go to
the Web site at www.musi-
cliveshere.com.

CHS class meeting
-The Columbia County
High School Class of 1985
is having an informational
meeting about its 25th


reunion from 3 to 5 p.m.
today at Kazbors. The res-
taurant is located at 255 N.
Common Loop.

Sunday
5th Annual Elvis Tribute
Artist Contest
A gospel music and
brunch event with some
of the Elvis Tribute con-
testants starts at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday. Admission prices
are: $10. Call (386)364-
1683, e-mail the SOSMP at
spirit@musicliveshere.comrn
or go to the Web site at
www. musicliveshere. corn.

Monday
Black History Month
Celebration
The month-long tribute
to Black History Month
begins at 6 p.m. Monday
at Richardson Community
Center. Free food, enter-
tainment, activities and
more will be at the celebra-
tion. The community can
also learn about the histo-
ry and events taking place
throughout the month.

Weight loss support
group meets
The Thinner Me Weight'
Loss Surgery Support
Group is meeting at 7 p.m.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Key to city presented for job well-done
Lake City Mayor Stephen Witt awards Dawn Mansukhani, a second-grade paraprofessional
at Columbia City Elementary School, with the key to the city. Mansukhani was announced the
2010 Columbia County School-Related Employee of the Year on Thursday.


Monday in the classrooms
at Lake City Medical
Center. Anyone that wants
to socialize can show
up around 6:30. Should
you have an article or an
experience please bring it
or be prepared to share.
Meetings are for people
that have had weight loss
surgery, contemplating
surgery or just trying to
lose weight on their own.


E-mail thethinnerme@
gmail.com or call (386) 288-
9153.

Tuesday
Bingo and more.
The Marine Corps
League is hosting sev-
eral activities Feb. 2 at
the Wellborn Community
Center. Bingo is from 3


to 6 p.m. Cards are just
25 cents each. A potluck
dinner follows from 6 to 7
p.m. for only $5 per plate.
Following dinner, a month-
ly meeting begins at 7 p.m.

Wednesday
Bluegrass event
Bluegrass celebrity
Valerie Smith and her band


Liberty Pike featuring
Becky Buller will perform
during a special appear-
ance at 7 p.m. Feb. 3 in
the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park Music Hall.
Doors open to the Music
Hall at 5 p.m. Admission is
$5 per person. E-mail spir-
it@musicliveshere.com or
go to the Web site at www.
musicliveshere. corn.

February Friendship
Luncheon
The February
Friendship Luncheon of
the Lake City Newcomer's
will be held at 11:30 a.m.
Feb. 3, at Mike's Cafe and
Grill, 426 S. W. Commerce
Drive. Call 758-2026.

Saturday
Health fair
A health fair for the
senior community is from
9 a.m. to noon Feb. 6 at
Richardson Community
Center.

Miss Olustee Festival
The 2010 Olustee
Festival Pageant is at 4
p.m. for age divisions
from 13 months to 9 and
6:30 p.m. for ages 10
to 20 on Feb. 6, at the
Columbia County Schools
Administrative Complex.


2 charged in murder-for-hire plot Woman arrested 30 times by age 26


From staff reports

-MADISON - The
Madison County Sheriff's
Office and Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement have arrest-
ed Leroy Dennett Cruce,
58, and Jeanette Elaine
Thompldns, 45, for their
alleged role in a murder-
for-hire plot


The investigation began
when the MCSO received
allegations that Cruce and
his girlfriend, Thompkins,
attempted to hire someone
to murder Cruce's wife.
Cruce was charged
with criminal solicitation
to commit murder, a first-
degree felony. Thompkins
was charged with principal
to solicit 'murder, a first-


degree felony. They face up
to 25 years in prison.
They were booked in the
Madison County Jail.
The Hamilton County
Sheriff's Office and
the Third Circuit State
Attorney's Office assisted
in this case.
The investigation is active
and ongoing, according to
the sheriff's office.


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Authorities say a Gainesville
area woman has been
arrested 30 times by the
age of 26.
Ashley Pearson was
first arrested at the age of
13. Her latest arrest was
Tuesday for the alleged
beating and robbery of a


handicapped person.
Alachua County Sheriff's
spokesman Art Forgey says
Pearson had spent a year in
prison as an adult.
Forgey says her record
includes multiple convic-
tions for grand theft, forg-
ery, credit card crimes and
driving without a license
along with convictions for
burglary, grand theft auto,


dealing in stolen property
and aggravated battery with
a deadly weapon.
Pearson was being held
Friday in jail with bond set
at $500,000.
It was not immediately
known if she had an attor-
ney.
A message was left on
a phone number listed for
Pearson.










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkiby@lakectyreporter.com


Saturday. january


SPORTS


30,2010


www.lakecityre~porter.com


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@Jakecityreporter.com


Overtime

objection

to NFL

T here's been a
lot of debate
over recent
years about
the NFL
version of overtime. My
question is, why do we
even call it overtime?
The NFL has a
sudden-death period,
plain and simple. There
is no overtime, and for
America's favorite
pastime, it's just
unacceptable.
In the NBA, when
there's a tie after
regulation, games aren't
settled by the first team
to hit a shot. The MLB
doesn't declare that if a
team scores in the top
half of the inning that
the opposing team won't
have a shot at tying the
game in the bottom half.
When golf holds its
U.S. Open, how do you
think they determine
champion? They
certainly don't do it by
crowning the first golfer
to make a birdie as their
champion. They play 18
holes.
So why do the
powers that be in the
NFL think that a
sudden-death overtime
is suitable when
determining its winner?
Why do we settle for
such a controversial
ending after what has
been 60 minutes of
stellar play?
There are many
alternatives to changing
the way the NFL does its
overtime, but I like
adding an extra quarter.
It doesn't matter if that
quarter is 10 minutes or
15 minutes, but football
is the ultimate game of
field position.
Why give one team a
chance to score a field
goal from 50 yards and
determine them to be the
superior team?
The true struggle
would be to watch the
teams compete for an
extra period of time as
� their bodies wear thin.
To see which team could
gut it out for an extra 15
minutes would be
incredible to watch,
especially if a title is on
the line.
Could you have
imagined watching the
New Orleans Saints and
Minnesota Vikings duke
it out for another 15
minutes on Sunday?
I make the assumption
that the ending would
have been much better
than watching the
referees give New
Orleans a field goal after
a phantom pass
interference call.
An extra quarter for
the NFL would just be
too easy though. In
reality, we'll probably be
subjected to the same
lame finish that we've
been victim to for years.
For all the smarts that
the bigwigs of the NFL
possess, they lack one
thing ... common sense.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Alex Gilmer (14) is double-teamed by Columbia High's Nigel Atkinson (left)
and lan Benjamin (right) in Lake City on Jan. 22.


Fort White falls


to Suwannee


Bulldog
off ndia
with 11

By TIM KIRI
tkirby@lakecit

LIVE OA
High basl
long-range
Suwannee
The Bul
11 3-pointe
District 5-3
Keith Cl
seniors cc
night for
three earl;
Bulldogs r
16-5 lead
accounted
White's ear
Chandle
Wes Oster
with 3s of t
Indians, an
free throv
quarter lea
Both
silent for
minutes
quarter.
senior I
ignited an
run.
Fort


ys knock stemmed the tied as Dustin
ans, 61-43, Stout had six points down
the stretch for a 28-20
3-pointers. Bulldogs lead at the half.
Roy Blake came alive
BY for the Indians with
yreporter.com six points in the third
quarter. Osterhoudt added
dK - Fort White five points and Stout scored
ketball faced a four. Griffith banked
attack at in a 3-pointer late to cut
High on Friday. Suwannee's lead to 45-38.
dogs poured in The Bulldogs had four
:rs and won the 3-pointers in the third quar-
A game, 61-43. ter and it was all Suwannee
herry, one of six in the fourth quarter.
celebrating their The home team scored
Suwannee, hit the first 14 points in the
y treys and the period, before Zach Lewis
*ushed out to a hit a trey for the Indians and
. A.J. Legree Kyle Raulerson put back a
for all of Fort rebound at the buzzer.
rly points. Fort White scorers were:
r Kitzman and Stout, 10, Osterhoudt,
houdt answered 8, Legree, 7, Roy Blake,
their own for the 6, Griffith, 4, Kitzman, 3,
d Chris Griffith's Lewis, 3, and Raulerson, 2.
v cut the first- For Suwannee (12-8,
id to 16-12. 3-4), Andre Zanders and
teams were Sam Cherry led with 13
the first 3-plus points apiece. Both Keith
of the second Cherry and Brandon Solar
A 3-pointer by scored 10.
Brandon Solar Fort White (7-10, 1-7)
8-0 Suwannee travels to Oak Hall School
for a 7:30 p.m. game on
White again Tuesday.


Golden Eagles prove too good


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's soccer team receives the District 4-5A runner-up trophy following a 2-0 loss to Fleming Island High in the final at Ridgeview High on Friday.

Tigers will begin soccer playoffs on the road after finals loss


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

ORANGE PARK - Columbia
High hasn't won a district
championship in 21 years of soccer
history, and it will have to wait at
least one more season to capture
its first after falling 2-0 to Fleming
Island High.
The message after the game
wasn't a District 4-5A champion-
ship; however, coach Trevor Tyler


kept the Tigers focused on the
bigger picture.
"The season is not over," he told
his players. "We can still win a state
championship. That has to mean
something to you guys. We put
everything out there tonight, but
now we'll go to Tallahassee to play
someone and they'll feel the wrath
of the Tigers."
Columbia will play Chiles,
Lincoln or Leon high school in the,
first round of the 5A state playoffs.:


Fleming Island will host the
opening playoff game on Tuesday.
Both of the Golden Eagles'
goals came in the first half of play.
Fleming Island scored off a corner
kick in which a header bounced off.
the crossbar and Seth Dedmon fol-
lowed it up with a header for a goal
at 28:55.
The Eagles' second goal came
at 11:25 remaining in the first half
when Tanner Hall found Cameron
McCurry for a 2-0 lead.


Saban stops in Lake City


Alabama coach
visits Howard at
Columbia High.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Nick Saban, coach of
the national champion
University of Alabama
Crimson Tide football team,
made a quick stop in Lake
City on Friday morning.
Norbie Ronsonet, owner
of Ronsonet Buick-Pontiac-
GMC, picked up Saban
at the Lake City Airport.
Ronsonet played football
at Alabama under the leg-


endary coach Paul "Bear"
Bryant.
"It was early this morn-
ing," Ronsonet said. "I took
him to the (Jones) Field-
.house
MM and he
went in
to see
C Coach
(Craig)
Howard.
S .He was
Saban with the
director
of player development and
they told me I had to stay
outside."
Howard said Urban
Meyer of Florida and Rich


Rodriguez of Michigan have
also visited CHS, in addition
to many assistants.
"AlmosteverySEC school
has come in," Howard said.
"They come to Lake City
becau,,e we have got a lot
of good-looking prospects.
They can talk to our seniors,
and they are all interested
in one of our underclass-
man - Tim Jernigan."
Offensive line coach
Ed Stults, who came, to
Columbia from Ball State,
explained the procedure for
a college coach visiting a
high school.
SABAN continued on 2B


The Tigers had chances with 10
shots in the game, but only one was
on goal.
Cameron Harper kept the Tigers
afloat in the second half and
Columbia had a. chance to mount a
comeback. Harper had 27 saves in
the contest.
"We played well and much more
evenly than our first matchup a few
weeks ago," Tyler said. "There was
SOCCER continued on 2B


Dolphins' Taylor wants

to play again in 2010


NFL sacks leader
may not be in
Miami's plans.
Associated Press

MIAMI - NFL active
sacks leader Jason Taylor
says he wants to play in
2010 and hopes to remain
with the Miami Dolphins,
but concedes he might not
be wanted back.
"They're looking for
replacements right now,"
Taylor said at an event for
his foundation Friday. "If
they don't find who they


want and if teams don't
find who they want, then
that's when your phone
starts ringing."
A six-time Pro Bowl
pick, Taylor has spent 12
of his 13 seasons with the
Dolphins. He was exiled
to the Redskins in 2008,
then returned to Miami in
2009 with a one-year con-
tract. He had seven sacks,
an interception and forced
three fumbles this season,
and at 35 he wants to con-
tinue his career.
"I know I can play. It's
just a matter of being in the
right situation," he said.


Section B











LAKE CITY REPORTER' SPORTS SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
BOXING
10 p.m.
FSN - Jorge Arce (52-6-1) vs. Angky
Angkota (23-4-0) for vacant WBO super
flyweight title, at Mexico City
EXTREME SPORTS
4 p.m.
ESPN2 -Winter X Games, at Aspen,
Colo.
9 p.m.
ESPN - Winter X Games, at Aspen,
Colo.
I a.m.
ESPN2 -Winter X Games, at Aspen,
Colo. (delayed tape)
GOLF
7:30 a.m.
TGC - Nationwide Tour, New
Zealand PGA Championship, third r6und,
at Christchurch, New Zealand (same-day
tape)
9:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, Qatar
Masters, third round, at Doha, Qatar
(same-day tape)
I p.m.
TGC - PGATour, Farmers Insurance
Open, third round, at La Jolla, Calif.
3 p.m.
CBS - PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance
Open, third round, at La Jolla, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN - Louisville atWestVirginia
ESPN2 - La Salle at Temple
I p.m.
CBS - Duke at Georgetown
2 p.m.
ESPN - Oklahoma St. at Missouri
ESPN2 - Indiana at Illinois
3:30 p.m.
FSN -Washington St. atWashington
4 p.m.
ESPN -Vanderbilt at Kentucky
6 p.m.
ESPN2 - Notre Dame at Rutgers
7 p.m.
ESPN - Kansas at Kansas St.
8 p.m.
ESPN2 - Pacific at UC Riverside
NBA DL BASKETBALL
II p.m.
VERSUS - Bakersfield at Idaho
(same-day tape)
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS - PBR, Tampa Invitational,
at Tampa
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
ESPN2 - Premier League, Fulham vs.
Aston Villa, at London
TENNIS
3:30 a.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, men's
championship match, at Melbourne,
Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
5:30 p.m.
FSN -Arizona St. at California


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follows.
DRIFTERS
Team standings: 1. Eric's Green
Machine; 2. PCP's; 3. Pin Busters.
High scratch game: 1. Phyllis
Benton 179; 2. Oni Allen 164; 3. (tie)
Jennifer Freeman, Judy Currie 163.
1. John Smith 201; 2. Bill Dolly 194;
3. Eric Pope 181.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis
Benton 510; 2. Oni Allen 465;
3. Jennifer Freeman 461. 1. Bill Dolly
545; 2. John Smith 529; 3. Eric Pope
475.
High handicap game: 1. Lori
Zuccola 230; 2. Judy Currie 224;
3. Oni Allen 218. 1. John Smith 223;
2. Paul Benton 218; 3. Bill Dolly 214.
High handicap series: 1. Oni Allen
627; 2. Judy Currie 623; 3. Phyllis
Benton 621.1. Paul Benton 626; 2. Bill
Dolly 605; 3. John Smith 595.
High average: 1. Cythe Shiver 168;
2. Phyllis Benton 159. 1. Bill Dolly 177;
2. John Smith 175.
(results from Jan. 19)
MONDAY LADIES
* Team standings: 1. Lake City Bowl;
2. Mambajambas; 3. Just Us Girls.
High scratch game: 1. Julia Myers
200; 2. Dee Nickodam 190; 3. Jackie
Young 188.
High scratch series: 1. Julia Myers
550; 2. Cythe Shiver 513; 3. Jackie
Young 511.
High handicap game: 1. Dee
Nickodam 235; 2. Tootie Chesser 231;
3. Donna Privette 226.
High handicap series: 1. Dee
Nickodam; 2. Judy Daniels; 3. Loretta
Perdue.
High average: 1. Jackie Young 182;
2. Julia Myers 181.
(results from Jan. 18)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. North Florida
Tower (13-3); 2. TownHomes LLC
(13-3); 3. Ronsonet Buick (11-5).
High scratch game: 1. Dustin
Coleman 246; 2. Mitch Young 239;
3. Wally Howard 237.
High scratch series: 1. Mitch Young
652; 2. Dustin Coleman 650; 3. Mark
Moore 619.
High handicap game: 1. John
Quinn 283; 2. Dustin Coleman 258;
3. Bill Coleman 257.
High handicap series: 1. John
Quinn 705; 2. Mitch Young 697;
3. Don Suhl 692.
High average: 1. Wally Howard
202.38; 2. Bill Duncan 201.94;
3. Gregg Moravec 197.92.
(results from Jan. 18)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Advantage
Auto Repair (12-4); 2. (tie) Taz, Lucky
#7 (11-5); 4. (tie) Brooklyn Bowlers,
The Fantastic 4 (9-7).
High scratch game: 1. Cheryl


FOOTBALL

NFC Pro Bowl

Sunday
At Miami
AFC vs NFC, 7:20 p.m. (ESPN)

All-Star games

Today
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFL)
Saturday, Feb. 6
Texas vs.The Nation All-Star
Challenge
At El PasoTexas
Texas vs. Nation, 3 p.m. (CBSC)


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New York at Washington, 8 p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Denver at San Antonio, I p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Boston, 3:30 p.m.
Orlando at Detroit, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Toronto, 6 p:m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 7 p.m.
New York at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Kentucky vs. No. 21 Vanderbilt,
4 p.m.
No. 2 Kansas at No. I I Kansas State,
7 p.m.
No. 4 Syracuse at DePaul, 2 p.m.
No.5 Michigan State vs. Northwestern,
7 p.m.
No. 6 Texas vs. No. 24 Baylor, 4 p.m.
No. 7 Georgetown vs. No. 8, Duke,
I p.m.
No. 9 West Virginia vs. Louisville,
Noon
No. 12 BYU vs. Utah, 9 p.m.
No. 13 Gonzaga at San Francisco,
9:30 p.m.
No. 15 Temple vs. La Salle, Noon
No. 18 Mississippi vs.Arkansas, 4 p.m.
No. 19 Connecticut vs. Marquette at
the XL Center, Hartford, Conn., Noon
No. 22 Georgia Tech vs. Kentucky
State, I p.m.
No. 23 New Mexico at TCU,
6:05 p.m.
No. 25 UAB vs. UTEP, 8 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 10 Purdue vs. Penn State, 3 p.m.
No. 14 Tennessee vs. Florida,
I p.m.
No. 17 Pittsburgh at South


BOWLING

Jacks 191; 2. Phyllis Benton 166;
3. Liz Randall 164. 1. Joe Cohrs 263;
2. Mikey Rutter 245; 3. Carl McGhghy
222.
High scratch series: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 531; 2. Liz Randall 477;
3. Phyllis Benton 451. 1. Joe Cohrs
669; 2. Mikey Rutter 610; 3. Carl
McGhghy 567.
High handicap game: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 240; 2. Shirley Berry 217;
3. Phyllis Benton 215. 1. Mikey Rutter
298; 2. Joe Cohrs 267; 3: Chris
Minnich 239.
High handicap series: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 678; 2. Michele Dariano 627;
3. Phyllis Benton 598. 1. Mikey Rutter
739; 2. Joe Cohrs 673; 3. Chris
Minnich 622.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
167; 2. Mandy Deliberis 152; 3. Cheryl
Jacks 146. 1. Joe Cohrs 196; 2. Mark
Moore 189; 3. Mitch Young 186.
(results from Jan. 17)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(110-74); 2. Golden Oldies (106-78);
3. Jo's Crew (102-82).
High scratch game: 1. Yvonne
Osborn 186; 2. Phyllis Benton 182;
3. Bea Purdy 171. 1. Dan Ritter 200;
2. Ross Meyers 186; 3. Art Joubert
180.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis
Benton 510; 2. Yvonne Osborn 494;
3. Bea Purdy 475. 1. Art Joubert 527;
2. Dan Ritter 516; 3. Ric Yates 504.
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Osborn 243; 2. (tie) Bea Purdy, Ellie
DeRosa 224; 4. Sandi Johns 223.
1. Joe Peterson 231; 2. Bill Nash 225;
3. (tie) Morrell Atwood, Jim Bellgard
224.
High handicap series: 1. Yvonne
Osborn 670; 2. Ellie DeRosa 635;
3. Bea Purdy 634. 1. Morrell Atwood,
652; 2. Jim Bellgard 628; 3. Bill Nash
623.
High Average: 1. Phyllis Benton
156; 2. Louise Atwood 154; 3. Yvonne
Finley 146. 1. Lee Evert 179; 2. Dan
Ritter 174; 3. Art Joubert 166.
(results from Jan. 19)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Just Do It
(10-2); 2. High Five (9.5-2.5); 3. Spare
Us (8-4).
High handicap game: 1. Dorothy
Giffen 234; 2. Sharon Tuning 227;
3. (tie) Cathy Pelley, Karen Gardner
224.
High handicap series: 1. Sally
Christopher 602; 2. Patricia Warne
601; 3. Karen Gardner 600.
(results from Jan. 26)
THURSDAY NITE MIXED
Team standings: 1. John Deere
Green (48.5-31.5); 2. Wrecking Crew
(48-31); 3. Party Time (40.5-39.5).
High scratch game: 1. Kim Tice
201; 2. Liz Randall 138; 3. Okie Van
Hoy 157. 1. Gino Fraiser 215; 2. Jack
Devries 210; 3. Joe Cohrs 205.


Florida, I p.m.
No. 20 Ohio State vs Minnesota,
I p.m.


TENNIS

Australian Open

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne,Australia
Friday
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Roger Federer (I), Switzerland, def. Jo-
Wilfried Tsonga (10), France, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2.
Doubles
Women
Championship
Serena and Venus Williams (2), United
States, def. Cara Black, Zimbabwe,'and
Liezel Huber (I), United States, 6-4, 6-3.
Mixed
Semifinals
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, and
Jaroslav Levinsky, Czech Republic, def.
Flavia Pennetta, Italy, and Marcelo Melo,
Brazil, vs. 6-0, 4-6, 10-8 tiebreak.
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Leander
Paes (I), India, def. Lisa Raymond, United
States, and Wesley Moodie (7), South
Africa, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (5), 10-7 tiebreak.
Junior Singles
Boys
Semifinals
Sean Berman, Australia, def. Marton
Fucsovics (6), Hungary, 7-6 (5), 6-3.
Tiago Fernandes (14), Brazil, def.
Glanni Mina (2), France, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2.
Girls
Semifinals
Laura Robson, Britain, def. Kristyna
Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-1.
Karolina Pliskova (6), Czech Republic,
def. Tang Hao Chen, China, 26, 7-6 (6),
6-2.
junior Doubles
Boys
Championship
Justin Eleveld and Jannick Lupescu,
Netherlands, def. Kevin Krawietz and
Dominik Schulz (2), Germany, 6-4, 6-4.
Girls
Championship
Jana Cepelova and Chantal Skamlova,
Slovakia, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, and
Gabriela Dabrowski (I), Canada, 7-6 (I),
6-2.
Wheelchair Doubles
Men
Championship
Stephane Houdet, France, and Shingo
Kunieda (2), Japan, def. Maikel Scheffers
and Robin Ammerlaan (I), Netherlands,
6-2, 6-2.
Women
Championship
Florence Gravellier, France, and Aniek
van Koot, Netherlands, def. Lucy Shuker,
Britain, and Daniela di Toro (2), Australia,
6-3,7-6 (2).
Quad
Championship
Nick Taylor and David Wagner, United
States, def Peter Norfolk, Britain, and
Johan Ahdersson, Sweden, 6-2, 7-6 (5).


High scratch series: 1. Kim Tice
521; 2. Okie Van Hoy 448; 3. Liz
Randall 438. 1. Joe Cohrs 609; 2. Jack
Devries 560; 3. Leonard Randall 542.
High handicap game: 1. Kim Tice
262; 2. Okie Van Hoy 228; 3. Kellie
Martin 214. 1. Gino Fraiser 269;
2. Jack Devries 238; 3. Larry Porter
231.
High handicap series: 1. Kim Tice
704; 2. Okie Van Hoy 661; 3. Kellie
Martin 617. 1. Gino Fraiser 666;
2. Jack Devries 644; 3. Larry Porter
627.
High average: 1. Liz Randall 166;
2. Phyllis Benton 152; 3. Kim Tice 135.
1. Joe Cohrs 199; 2. Brett Reddick
183; 3. Leonard Randall 178.
(results from Jan. 21)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1.'Quirky Quad;
2. (tie) Who Cares, Ups & Downs
(48.5-34.5); 4. Wild Things (48-35).
High scratch game: 1. Phyllis
Benton 195; 2. Joanne Denton 170;
3. (tie) Janie Posey, Betty Carmichael
166. 1. Buck Roberts 243; 2. Bill Dolly
218; 3. David Duncan 192.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis
Benton 491; 2. Joanne Denton 442;
3. Joyce Hooper 441. 1. Bill Dolly
567; 2. Buck Roberts 551; 3. David
Duncan 538.
High handicap game: 1. Phyllis
Benton 235; 2. Debi Evert 232; 3.
(tie) Judy Sanders, Janie Posey 230.
1. Buck Roberts 275; 2. Ray Denton
237; 3. (tie) Bill Dolly, Tom Evert 233.
High handicap series: 1. Debi Evert
638; 2. Janie Posey 619; 3. Phyllis
Benton 611.1. (tie) Buck Roberts, Tom
Evert 647; 3. Jack Stanfield 644; 4. Bill
Dolly 612.
High average: 1. Jane Sommerfeld
156; 2. Phyllis Benton 155; 3. Louise
Atwood 152. 1. Lee Evert 184; 2. Bill
Dolly 183; 3. Lee McKinney 170.
(results from Jan. 21)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Carla
Nyssen 181; 2. Lori Davis 178;
3. Lorie Niquette 172. 1. Mark Koppa
229; 2. Tom Sewejkis 217; 3. Adam
Alford 213.
High scratch series: 1. Danni
Krueger 468; 2. Lorie Niquette 463;
3. Gloria Dennis 456. 1. (tie) Tom
Sewejkis, Mark Koppa 576; 3. Adam
Alford 548.
High handicap game: 1. Carla
Nyssen 250; 2. Lindsey Tanner 230;
3. Lori Davis 224. 1. (tie) Adam Alford,
Tom Sewejkis, Rudy Nyssen 229;
4. Bobby Robinson 223; 5. Vernon
Black 212.
High handicap series: 1. Danni
Krueger 660; 2. Cari Wende 617;
3. Lorie Niquette 607. 1. Mark Koppa
636; 2. George Mulligan 634; 3. Ken
Watson 594.
High average: 1. Maggie Battle
162; 1. Tom Sewejkis 194.
(results from Jan. 26)


SABAN

Continued From Page 1B

"A coach can stop in any
high school one time dur-
ing the contact period,"
Stults said. 'There are four
different recruiting peri-
ods and we are in the con-
tact period right now."
Stults said face-to-face
contact with juniors is not
allowed unless the coach
bumps into the player.
"In my opinion, Nick
Saban came to see'Coach
Howard to express interest
in Tim Jernigan for next
year, like a lot of coaches
have done," Stults said.
Saban was driven back
to the airport and flew out
immediately after his visit
to CHS.


SOCCER: Made playoffs


Continued From Page .

chance after chance, but
when we got the chances,
we weren't able to finish.
The effort was bar-none."
Columbia begins its
playoff road in Tallahassee




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

FLAUW


2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved. -

ARREM

7 ~ �

GLANET



7-F-r C ----- --- l --^L


on Thursday at 7 p.m.
If the Tigers advance,
there's a possibility of a
third game against Fleming
Island in the second round
of the playoffs.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHEN SHE HAP L-UNCH
WITH THE CHAMPION
SWIMMER, SHE
,THOUrGHT HE WAS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: I T
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: LURID ITCHY BEWARE. AROUND
Answer: When the golfer described his incredible putt,
it became - A WORDY BIRDIE


DAY

FOR ONL

141


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


SIn Print




1991 Corvette Cony. ' ine
White w/blue flames, 80k miles, 2008 Polaris 2000 Buick LeSabre
full power V8, 206 wheels, Sportsman 400 Very clean, garage kept.
custom exhaust Vortex Ram air Water cooled, 1 hour on meter. 1 Low
system. new A/C Health forces sale. $4,600
$9,995 $4,000 OBO *
Call Call Call Price!
386-497-4763 386-719-6537 386-961-8407


ForMor Deais- Cll ar
at3B-755-5440


ACROSS

1 Burst '
4 Front line
7 Round
number
11 Cousins of
"urnm"
12 The "elephant
boy"
13 Comet, to
ancients
14 Lost in the
office
16 Pole on a ship
17 Idaho export
18 Jazzman -
Blake
20 Den device,
once
21 Thin gold layer
22 Port near Hong
Kong
25 Exercise
aftermath
27 Young'-, in
slang (kids)
28 Shark
30 Vaccines


34 Chew at
36 White lies
38 Portion
39 Anecdote
41 Social stratum
43 Downtown
Chicago
45 Witty one
46 Metallic
fabrics
48 Sibyl
52 Rice wine
53 Horse rental
stables
55 Feds (hyph.)
56 Hilo guitars
57 Kitchen meas.
58 Zip
59 Cartoon
Chihuahua
60 Ginza cash

DOWN

1 Draw water
2 Great Lakes
state
3 Attention-getter
4 Courage


Answer to Previous Puzzle

CASK MOB NINE
DUKE AWL OLES
STIR LEO OKRA
OMNIA GESSO
EDY GEE
SEALS CENSUS
SHALS BURY GIG
ERA E YES MLLE
PITONS RAYON

ANA JOG
ROUST EDITH

LEAP UTE CHAD
ANTE RAP AAHS
MESS EMS LIST


5 Homer's dad
6 Unclothed
7 Rum drinks
8 Click "send"
(hyph.),
9 Stopwatch button


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


FL
r -7


12 13


10 Thunder Bay *
prov.
12 Prime-time
series
15 Bean used in
falafel
19 Word of disgust
22 Tankard
23 - -Margret
24 1860s initials
25 Related
26 Male swan
29 Kenya's loc.
31 Raised railways
32 Compost
33 Had a meal
35 Last state in
the roll call
37 False alarms
40 Chest-beater
42 Thickening
agent
43 Alpaca
44 Like some
chests
45 Made on a
loom
47 Run words
together
49 Metro area
50 - majeste
51 NASCAR
broadcaster
52 Noncom
54 Mike & -


1-30 @ 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Visit www.lakecityreporter.com


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


7-1









Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010 3B


DILBERT


YOU'RE AN INCOMPETENT
CEO, BUT THE DOGBERT
INVESTMENT BANK
CAN HELP YOU PRETEND
TO UNLOCK SHARE-
HOLDER VALUE.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


| ANOTHER COMMERCIALS ARE .I THEY KEEP |'I WELL, LIE l OAGWOOO, ARE YOU BUSY?
COMMERCIAL! ) MADE SY PEOPLE INTERRUPTING IS FULL OF --
> WHAT ARE WHO TRY TO GET THE GOOD COMMERCIALS SEE, , ._
COMMERCIALS , YOU TO 00 STUFF' THERE'S
FOR, ANYWAYV SOMETHING ONE RIG'HTr
-
- N.-O--W . - |.O



- io - J-


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.

PEVEt-oP A --U0PI>E-Mc-*iptjL,--opY` WEPPIM(t� VOWS INCITE THE
OSE351F,55'0NWITH Plt4I( ,AP-MN E't-tMEU VACUJATIOM
FtAAII't ob'sOF THRE AlAIN5TE-E~s COL-oNt.


FRANK & ERNEST


iT'S AM0LT A,69OUP OF 5PACf TRAVWL-9g
ok MAROONPbAMON6
i f� .7 K I-UTZY t-iFf
S~ IC I7 rr FORMS.


DEAR ABBY


Teenager isbewildered by

parents' short fuses


8 I'LL ARRANGE AN
UNWISE MERGER SO
YOU CAN CASH OUT
WHILE I COLLECT AN
� OBSCENE COMMISSION.
r
E c
0 .
l5 \
S c ^ ---^ ^


IT'S LIKE A BRIBE,
BUT INSTEAD OF GOING
TO JAIL, A STRANGER
WILL WRITE A BEST-
SELLING BOOK WITH
S YOUR NAME ON IT.
CAN I 6
REAT?
1 -


DEAR ABBY: My
parents just aren't
"there" for me anymore.
I need to be able to go to
them for advice, but now
I can't. They get mad
when I ask them for help
on anything. I don't know
what I'm doing wrong. I
mean, I cook, clean, help
around the house, but it
doesn't seem to help.
Please don't get me
wrong. I love my par-
ents, but they get mad
so easily. I'm not sure if
it's because they're ag-
ing - they are 44 and 46
- or if it's something I
have done. I also feel like
they aren't being fair to
me because my siblings,
who are younger AND
older than I am, get more
privileges than I do.
I just want a better re-
lationship with my par-
ents, the kind I had when
I was younger. I mean, I
haven't changed. (I only
changed fashions. Like,
I dress better and stuff.)
Oh, and in case you're
wondering, my parents
don't drink or smoke.
So how do I talk to
them in a way they will


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): A strategic,
disciplined approach to
whatever you do will be re-
quired. Take on a physical
challenge that will get your
adrenalin flowing and your
mind racing. Don't let any-
one limit you. A romantic
encounters apparent. ***-

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Stay calm and
get what needs to be done
out of the way. Getting all
worked up will only lead to
setbacks. You may be ques-
tioned if you aren't com-
pletely honest about the
way you feel. Try to com-
promise in order to keep
the peace. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Plan your next
vacation. It will give you
greater incentive to work
hard. Make friends with
people who can offer an
interesting way of doing
things. An older relative or
friend will have some very
wise advice to share with
you. ****r
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Take care of your
debts and stop worrying
about the past. Living in the
present and looking posi-
tively toward the future will
lessen your stress and help
you advance. Don't shy
away from change. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): A romantic encounter


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

may be tempting but weigh
the pros and cons before
you decide to get involved.
Someone will lead you on
or tamper with your emo-
tions if you are too trusting.
Don't let anyone push you
around or make decisions
for you. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't believe every-'
thing you are told. Go to
the source and find out
first hand what's possible
and what isn't. Spend time
having fun with friends and
you will release some pent-
up frustrations. A change
of plans will take you on an
adventure. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Position yourself so
that you can counteract any
personal affront that comes
your way. Don't meddle,
just keep a watchful eye.
Friends who offer positive
input can contribute to your
plans. Share your thoughts.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Do something
that will contribute to your
knowledge or skills. The
more information you pick
up, the more prepared you
will be to counteract any
negative reaction from
someone you are close to.
Do your best and don't look


back. **
SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Focus on
finance and any lucrative
proposition. You can ex-
pect to come into cash or
be given a gift - don't ltt it
slip through your fingers. A
location change may seem
appropriate but it will be
a costly and unnecessary
venture. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Someone
who is anxious to have you
make a commitment will
pressure you. If you feel
uncomfortable, back away.
Feeling guilty or obliged
should be your first hint
that you are probably mak-
ing a mistake. A**
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't make
waves and, most of all, re-
fuse to meddle or get in-
volved in someone else's
fight. Focus on your own
life. Deal promptly with
any health concerns you
have. A romantic encounter
should brighten your day.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Opportunities
will be present and must be
taken advantage of before
it's too late. An emotional
lesson will be learned if
you become involved with
someone too fast. It's time
to do things a little differ-
ently. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: I equals P
"VU DGSHR DPFXY YJOEVEX SVO
HOSYLXY - ZLN WPK'A ALXN C'SRX
ALX ZLPGX IGSKX PJA PU ALX
YAJUU?" - MXPOMX HSOGVK
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Life is hard for everyone. That's why there's such a
nice reward at the end of it." - Aidan Quinn
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 1-30


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
understand and con-
sider thinking about
my feelings without get-
ting mad? - ANONY-
MOUS TEEN, PASCO,
WASH.
DEAR TEEN: You
may not be doing any-
thing wrong. Many adults
are under pressure in the
workplace and/or finan-
cially - which can make
them appear to be short-
tempered and distracted.
Your parents may also be
trying to encourage you
to think independently
or be less reliant on them
for advice. Maybe you
should ask your parents
what's wrong.
I don't know them, but
at 44 and 46, I am sure
their problem isn't "ag-
ing" because they are in
the prime of their lives.
However, if their prob-
lem is stress-related, the


next time you want to dis-
cuss something serious,
try it about an hour after
dinner when they are re-
laxed and not distracted,
and you may have better
luck.
DEAR ABBY: I re-
cently attended a concert
in the hall that is home
to our local symphony
orchestra. Imagine my
dismay when the couple
sitting behind me pro-
ceeded to unwrap candy,
then crumple up and
throw the wrappers on
the floor.
It was, to say the least,
distracting - and leaving
the wrappers on the floor
was low class. For pity's
sake, folks, clean up after
yourselves!
In this age of food aller-
gies, eating peanut butter
snacks in a crowded con-
cert hall seems a doubly
poor choice. Abby, would
you please remind your
readers to remember
their manners during a
live performance? - AP-
PALLED IN AKRON,
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


U.L


CLASSIC PEANUTS










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JANUARY 30, 2010

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


* ADvantage


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000639
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRUCE S. WILLINGHAM; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF BRUCE S.
WILLINGHAM; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT (S); IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judginent of Foreclo-
sure dated the 13th day of January,
2010, and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000639, of the Circuit
Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein CHASE HOME FINANCE
LLC is the Plaintiff and BRUCE S.
WILLINGHAM; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BRUCE S. WILLING-
HAM; UNKNOWN TENANT (S);
JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT PROPER-
TY are defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for 'cash at
the AT COURTHOUSE at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse in Lake
City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
17th day of March, 2010, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit: '
LOT 19, REPLAT OF SPRING-
FIELD ESTATES, PHASE 1, A
SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 7, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hemando
Street, Lake City. FI 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 13th day of January, 2010.
PR Dewitt Cason
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By:/S/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
S1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
' Telephone: (954) 453-0635
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
04537228
January 23 and 30, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000664
HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION III,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROSA M HUEY A/K/A ROSA A
HUEY: FLORIDA CREDIT UN-
ION; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION III; GLENN M
HUEY; UNKNOWN TENANT (S);
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE- OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 13th day of January,
2010, and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000664, of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION III is the Plaintiff
and ROSA M HUEY A/K/A ROSA
A HUEY; FLORIDA CREDIT UN-
ION; HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION III; GLENN M
HUEY; UNKNOWN TENANT (S);
JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT PROPER-
TY are defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
the AT COURTHOUSE at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse in Lake
City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
17th day of March, 2010, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 15, BLOCK A, SOUTHWOOD
MEADOWS UNIT 2, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 6, PAGE 84 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PER-
SON CLAIMING AN INTEREST
IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans







Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
**A*A**4*+****************+*+**


Legal

with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA).
disabled persons wiho, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator ilt 145 N. Hemrando
Street, Lake City.
FL 32055 or Telephone (386) 758-
1041 prior to such proceeding.
Dated this 13th day of January, 20110.
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By:/S/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
04537225
January 23 and 30, 2010


020 Lost & Found

AFRICAN GRAY w/ red tail lost
01/19 around Gwen Lake down by
the Workcamp. REWARD! Call
386-755-1464 or 386-288-3687
BLACK/TAN DOG,
Mixed breed, found in Eastside
Village area on Thurs., Jan. 21.
Call 386-758-8848
LOST DOG "BUSTER"
brindle bull-dog mix White on
muzzle, chest, and tips of feet 1
black toenail on left back foot.
Last seen CR 252 &
Price Creek Rd REWARD
344-8128 or 344-8116
LOST MALE solid gray cat.
Family pet. Missing since Sunday
01/24. Mayo Rd. area west of town,
386-754-0614 or 365-5694

o 10Job
v100 Opportunities

04537127
GOOD OPPORTUNITY!
NOW HIRING An Experi-
enced Stylist with clientele
Southern Exposure
386-752-4614

04537396
SUPERVISOR NEEDED
Supervisor sought for Older
Americans Act & Volunteer
programs to oversee client
activities, transportation, menu
quality, outreach and telephone
reassurance and to recruit, train
and retain volunteers. Four year
degree required. EOE. 30hrs/wk.
Send resume' to P.O. Box 1772,
Lake City, FL 32056

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
BLUE JEAN JOB $ CASH $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock-n-Roll
Environment. Call Skhyler
1-321-432-4142. 9am-6pm.
Must start Immediately!
CLASS A CDL Long haul driver.
Must have frameless dump exp.
Must pass drug test. Requires out
of town travel . 386-719-9482
between 9a & 5p
Electrician / Traffic Signal
Installer wanted. CDL
Class A or B required.
Good pay & benefits. EOE.
Call Bobby (813) 433-7851
Gotta Go Transport a flatbed Co.
in High Springs needs Clas's A
CDL Driver. Min. 2 years exp.
Home weekends, safety bonus and
vacation pay. Call 386-454-0532.
Great opportunity for dependable,
qualified, experienced CHEF for
Christian retreat center. Applicant
must be mature, have excellent
people skills, be capable of
supervising others, time mgmt, food
cost and other management duties.
Work most weekends, very flexible
hours. Send resume to Camp Weed
fax 386/362-7557
frontdesk@campwecd.org
INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for self motivated goal
oriented sales person in both
life/health and property/casualty
ins. A 220 and 215 license a plus
but not reqd. Must have exc.
comm. skills, be organized and de-
pendable. Must be te,,n oriented
and have computer skills.
Send reply to
Box 04086, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOTreq'd. Call - 888-697-6576.
OWNER OPERATORS WANTED
Flatbed, stepdeck OTR operation
based out of Fort White. FL. Good $.
Must have good equipment, and be
willing to work it!
Call Mike at 386-623-4801.
Part time office position, M W F
mornings. Knowledge of
computers a plus.
Send resume to P O Box 3176
Lake City, FI 32056


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Seeking Assistant Bookkeeper
salary neg. based on exp. Reliable
w/ own transportation. Email
resume to kimnsrcc(Q@yahoo.comn

110 Sales
-110 Employment


SALESMAN NEEDED
Must be aggressive and self moti-
vated. Also must be willing to
travel and work some weekends.
Fax resume to (386) 963-2809 or
email it to: srll(nasrloghonies.com

Are You Earning What You Are
Worth?
Growing company looking for
SUPER STAR sales representative
386-487-1742 or email resume to
industrialsupplyjobs@gmail.comn

t120 Medical
120 Employment

W.53 7.2-I0
RN Needed
Experience Preferred.
Full Time with Benefits.
Email Resume to:
Angela Akins RN/S DC
At
aakins@gullfcoasthealthcare.coin
Fax Resume to:
386-364-5174
EOE/V/D/M/F

CNA/Medical Assistant wanted
for local medical office. Send re-
sume to 184 S.W. Macon Street
Madison, FL 32340
LPN or RN needed Fulltime
3PM-11PM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V

240 Schools &
Education

04536763
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
SNursing Assistant, $429
next class-02/01/10
* Phlebotomy national
certification.
$800 next class-02/08/10
SPharmn Tech national
certification
$900 next class-03/16/10.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books.
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

MEDIUM CHEST type freezer.
Almond color. Works well
$100.00
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

STAINLESS STEEL/BLACK
Microwave, (Sharp)
Great Condition
$50, Call 386-755-3350
VERY NICE Whirlpool
White Dryer. Guaranteed to work
well. $120. 00.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$145.00 Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.


405 Bicycles

LIKE NEW 3 wheel bike.
Used one time. $200.00
386-344-0764


408 Furniture

Blue Recliner
Medium size $60.00 obo.
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387

CHINA CABINET.
Dark wood, glass doors
and knobs. $550.00 obo
386-758-3285
DOUBLE RECLINER SOFA
Brown
$400
Call 386-961-8623
ELECTRIC RECLINER
Good Condition, Leather
$500
Call 904-504-2620
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
for medium to large TV with extra
shelving. $35.00 obo '
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387


408 Furniture

PATIO FURNITURE
w/umbrella, PVC Pipe style, table
4 chairs, needs replacement
cushions. $50. Call 386-755-3350
SMALL ANTIQUE coffee table
with end tables. $65.00 obo.
386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387
STURDY ROCKING CHAIR
with cushions, great condition
$50
Call 386-755-3350

S413 Musical
S1.5 Merchandise
FREE Piano
In good condition,
legs need somework
SOLD
YAMAHA CVP 405 Clavinova.
Like new. Still has plastic on foot
pedals. All instructions still in un-
opened box. Sales for $7,999.95.
Asking $4000. 386-623-6989


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood & .
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$150 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
1261 NW Turner Ave. Fri - Sun.
8-? Appliances, Decor, pictures
flower arr. , clothes, purses, shoes,
lots misc.
FLEA MARKET
Inside Lake City Shrine Club-
Brown Rd. Jan 29, 30 31. Rain or
shine/hot or cold. Rent table for
$10/day, $25 for 3 days. Call Lory
at 758-5814
Fri & Sat. 8-5, rain/shine.
Housewares, electronics-lots of
misc, exercise equipment. 2213
SW Birley Ave. 386-755-0661
SAT. 8-1 Moving sale!
Inside garage. Brown Rd. left on
Horizon follow signs to
615 NW Lona Loop. Lots of misc.

440 Miscellaneous

42" HITACHI
Large Screen Projection TV
$450
Call 386-961-8623
IMPEX POWERHOUSE
Home Gym.
Exercise Machine, $50
Call 386-961-8623
ROLLING/SITTING WALKER
with brakes. $100.00. obo.
386-754..9295 or
386-984-0387
STONE GRINDER
For making flour
$30
Call 386-961-8623

62" Mobile Home
Lots for Sale
1 ACRE lot, 3 min. from Walmart
Only $19,900!
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm martin23@yahoo.com

r63o Mobile Homes
OJ3 for Rent

2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$450 - $600. monthly.
Also, Irg 2 br. furnished. apt.
386-752-6422
2br/2ba on 2 ac, owner mows,
unfurnished, all appliances incl.,
no pets inside, Ref. req., $600
mo./$300 dep, 386-935-2461.
3B/2BA DWMH w/ carport &
back porch in nice cond. Good lo-
cation. $700 mo., 1st, last. $500
dep. Small dog. 386-752-6333
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3/2, & 2/2 MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very private Manufactured
4br/2ba. Home on I ac. 41N close
to l-10. $700/mo. 1st, last &
$350. sec dep. 386-365-1438
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals avatila-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511
64 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
2000( SF Palm Harbor 3Bd/2Ba with
retreat/office. 2X6 Walls, 8' Ceilings
(T&T), Plywood Floors. Extra Insu-
lation, 2 Sliding Glass Doors, Appli-
ances, Ceramic Floors, 16 inch con-
struction. Reduced Price Call Gary
Hamilton (386) 758-9824 Possible
Owner Finance!!
2010 BRANDNEW 4/2 DW,
CH&A, skirting, steps, set-up &
delv. All this for only $39,995.
Caldl Eric @ 386-752-1452.
jetdec@windstream.net
4/2 ONLY
$289.00 per month.
with set/up.
Call John T. 3;6-752-1452.
BRAND NEW 2010


4br/2ba on your property, for
pymts of only $321.56 a mo.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
FACTORY REPO'S,
built two many 28x40's.
Only 2 left for $28,500.
Call John T. 386-752-1452


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
GREAT REPO 2 bed. Single-
wide, completely refurbed. Set up
on your land. $11,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm martin .. ...
NO MONEY DOWN
When you own your land.
Payments on doublewides
start @ 239/month.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm_mairtin23@yahoo.comn
ENERGY STAR Homes R-30
ins., Heat Pump, thermal panes,
Free electric for I year.
Must mention this ad.
Homes start at $29,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jmnmartin23@yahoo.com
NO MONEY down on new
Manufactured homes.
Call for more details on program.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
READY TO move in 2001 3br
doublewide on .87 acres. In Co-
lumbia Co., $1500 down, $350
mo. Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
BANK REPO
Nice 3/2 doublewide,
over 1,300 sq. ft. only $15,000.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
REPO'S REPO'S REPO's
We have many to choose from!
Homes starting @ $10,500.
These homes won't last long!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net

Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK FORECLOSURE! 2001
3/2 DW on I acre of land! banks
loss your gain @ only $49,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
Only 2 left, turn key packages. In
nice, up scale community. These
Jackobsons won't last long.
Call John 386-344-5234.
Owner financing available.

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES !
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!!$649permo.!!!

$299 MOVES YOU IN

Law Enforcement Discounts
Teacher Discounts
Veteran Discounts
Student Discounts

FREE RENT
* 200 FREE CHANNELS
7, BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

!!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
***LIMITED TIME ONLY***
WINDSONG APARTMENT
HOMES
1 BD $499
2 BD $535
3 BD $617
NO DEPOSITS
2 MONTHS FREE
EXPIRES 02/28/2010
*Some Restrictions Apply
Tel: (386) 758-8455
I OR 2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$600 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2 br/Ilba w/garage on the West side
1st, last &security.
Call
386-755-6867
2br/lba duplex. Newly renovated,
tile floors, washer/dryer. Energy
Efficient. $475/Mo. $300 Dep.
Req'd. Call: 386-755-1937
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
WASHER DRYER HOOK UP.
$650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-2018-2421
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2 and 3 bedrooms
Central'Heat and Air
Ph. 386-752-3033
W. Grandview Ave. 32055
Equal Housing Opportunity
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex w/ga-
rage. all electric. AC, W/D hook
up DW. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Share Pool Home! Full use kitch-


en, laundry, separate bedroom and
bath. $500/mo. +'1/3 electric.
Call Derek 386-344-3261
www.bigfloridahome.com
Studios & IBr's from $140/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292


Unfurnished Apt.
710 For. Rent

Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
VERY NICE 2b/lb duplex. $495
rent. First month free. Call
386-963-4974 to see upon app.
approval, $295.00 moves you in.
X-CLEAN SECOND story 2/2,
private acre 8 mi. to VA. No dogs
$500 a mo + dep. Ideal for
single/traveler 386-961-9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

IBR/IBA HOUSE on Ichetuck-
nee River. Quiet setting. Close to
boat ramp. $600. mo.
plus $400 deposit. 386-397-3258
3BR/1.5BA. Convenient in town
location. Bonus room
$600. mo.
386-755-2672
Beautiful 2005 home. Secluded
area. 3/2 split bedroom 1/4 mile
from Hwy 90 No Pets. $895. mo
$800. security. 386-719-5616
Beautiful Newer 3BR/2BA, on
CR 18, 30 mins. to Gville., 30
mins. to L.C., $950 p/m + last +
sec., go to website for photo at
www.property4you.biz,
Call 386-365-3865.
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$800/mo.
864-517-0522.
Cute 2/1 CHA, laundry rm-W/D,
dinning rm, large yard, some pets
ok, Close to VA, storage shed, 607
Camp $675/mo. 386-755-5936
Great Location! Lg 3br/2ba wv/ga-
rage at Southern Oaks CC. Wash-
er/dryer avail. $1,100 mo. plus de-
posit.386-752-3991 or 397-4550
HOME FOR rent $750 mo.
4br./lba. Irg patio, shed & fenced,
Absolutely no pets!
386-623-7379 or 386-755-4483
PROVIDENCE, 1BR,.
1.5 BA,w/d,c-h/a,l ac. fenced,
private,nice, most pets ok. $650
Ist/Ist/dep. 386-752-2555/c-
352-494-1989
Rural beauty and privacy near
1-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


750 Business &
S Office Rentals

Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086


770 Condos For Rent

St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1964 or 758-7560


810 Home for Sale

In Lake City. 3br,3b,LR,DR.
Den. Office. Generator,
Well Sprinkler System, 2500 sq. ft.
$189,000 386-792-2952

820 Farms &
82V Acreage

10 acres. Owner Financed
Well. septic, power pole
Deas Bullarf BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
2 acs. out from Macclenny on
12 IN. On the FI and Ga. line. Well
septic, It pole, fenced. $38,000.
912-843-2078 or 904-259-5260
5 ACRES FSBO in Southern
Columbia Co. Owner financing
available for $30,000. or $25,000
CASH. (352)356-2563


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