Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








Dreams impact? N
Tourism officials review the Local ch
potential impact of the prODOSed AC^----
base 000023 120110 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIB OF FLORIDA pIHSTORY
Lo PO BOX 117007 OID
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


lew officers
lapter of Military Officers
^--- -r merica installs
icers
5A


Title showdown
Columbia High takes on
Fleming Island in District 4-5A
championship game
Sports, I B


Reporter


Friday, January 29, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 136, No. I0 O 75 cents


Water supply plans reviewed


Meeting between
St. Johns River,
Suwannee officials.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Groundwater with-
drawal reductions from
the Floridan aquifer could
become a reality in the near
future.
Thursday night more


than 60 people attended
a joint meeting hosted by
the Suwannee River and St.
Johns Water Management
District, where officials
spoke about the reduc-
tion in water levels of the
Floridan aquifer and the
plans and studies taking
place to address the falling
aquifer level. If the levels
continue to decrease reduc-
tions may be necessary.
Suwannee River Water


Management District senior
hydrogeologist Carlos
Herd addressed questions
about the water reduction
in the Upper Santa Fe River
Basin, while David Hornsby
addressed questions which
focused on the St. Johns
River Water Management
District area.
Officials are review-
ing studies to determine
whether there will be
enough water for consump-


tion without harmful effects
on the environment. Their
studies will be used to
formulate a water supply
plan for the Upper Santa
Fe River Basin - from
O'Leno at River Rise,'head-
ing east. The water supply
plans will affect Alachua,
Baker, Bradford, Clay,
Columbia, Duval, Flager,
Nassau, Putnam, St. Johns
WATER continued on 5A,


Vital to education


CHAMBER MIXER


Mixing it up at AT&T
Pam Dennis (from left), Brent Williams, Chase Moses, Leslie
Reed McDaniel, Dennile Roberts Folsom and Paul McDaniel
mingle at the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce mixer at the AT&T store Thursday night.


Mural status


up in the air


Fire exit needed
to meet code
requirements.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Only time will tell the fate
of a downtown mural.
The mural was paint-
ed - on the Kuykendall
Building nearly two years
ago from money donated
from local resident James
Montgomery.
A new fire exit may have
to destroy the mural as
part of an upstairs renova-
tion project of the building,
said building owner John


Kuykendall.
Based on codes,
Kuykendall said his
options require the exit
come through either the
wall on which the mural is
painted or a side wall that
faces Northeast Veterans
Street. A public sidewalk
would have to be closed
to accommodate the side
wall exit.
However, he said he was
told closing the sidewalk
is not something the city
coulddo.
If a consensus is not
reached of where the exit
can be installed, Kuykendall
MURAL continued on 5A


J r ASON 1MATT W I l KVV Lr _ 41. _ r.,, i 1.. ..,'1
Dawn Mansukhani, a second-grade paraprofessional at Columbia City Elementary School, receives applause as she is
announced the 2010 Columbia County School-Related Employee of the Year Thursday. She was one of 15 candidates
nominated for the distinction.

Mansukhani recognized for school work


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.comrn
Dawn
Mansukhani,
a second-
grade para-
professional at
Columbia City Elementary
School, was named the
2010 Columbia County
School-Related Employee
of the Year on Thursday.
Mansukhani, who has
served in the position for
six-and-a-half years, bested
14 other school employees
for the award.
"I'm surprised,"
Mansukhani said follow-
ing the announcement at
the Lake City Church of
Christ. "There are very
deserving people here,
some with more than 30
years of experience.
"I just really love my
job," she said.
The honor is given to
recognize outstanding
school support personnel
in the Columbia County
School District. There are
approximately 700 support
personnel on staff in the
district.
Thursday's event
marked the 20th annual
awards ceremony for the
school-related employee of
~ '~-'^ !


CALL US:
S(386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 84264 000201 Fax: 752-9400


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILI..i 111,i f.-:
The candidates for the 2010 Columbia County School-Related Employee of the Year pose
for a photograph. Pictured are Edith English (front row, from left), Niblack Elementary;
Sharon Johnson,'Eastside Elementary; Barbara Caldwell. Richardson Middle; Mansukhani;
Diane Hodges, Five Points Elementary and Mary Fleming, Fort White Elementary. Rebecca
Wise (middle row, from left), Columbia High; Majorie Dewey, Summers Elementary; Celeste
Bradley, Challenge Learning Center and Della Kilgore, Westside'Elementary. Janet Hostetler,
Lake City Middle; Teresa Jett, Melrose Park Elementary; Joseph Knapp, Pinemount
Elementary; Sherry Williams, CCSD Administrative Complex and Audrey Adams, Fort White
High..


the year. The 15 employees
nominated for the county
award, each from a differ-
ent school in the district,
accounted for more than
177 years of experience
- they have each worked


71 60
Partly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


from a half-year to 37 years
on the job.
Nominees included
Celeste Belvin Bradley,
Challenge Learning
Center; Rebecca E.
Wise, Columbia High


Sch ool; Sharon Johnson,
Eastside Elementary
School; Diane Hodges,
Five Points Elementary
School; Mary Fleming,
SCHOOL continued on 5A


Syi Opinion ................ 4A
- % Local................... 5A
O bituaries .............. 3A
Advice & Comics ......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


Tri-county vacation

guide now available


Guide highlights
local tourism
opportunities.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Vacationing in North
Florida just got easier.
The Columbia County
Tourist Development
Council and the Lake City
Reporter worked together
to produce the Suwannee
River Valley Vacation
Guide, a comprehensive
travel guide of Columbia,
Suwannee and Hamilton
counties.
The guide was released
Jan. 19.
Harvey Campbell, TDC
executive director, said the
reason for publishing the
guide was simple.
"We needed it," he said.
'We have been lacking a
Suwannee River Valley vaca-
tion guide period, and we
needed something that was
a comprehensive overview
of Columbia, Suwannee and
Hamilton counties. We hope
to increase visitation with it"
The guide highlights the
tourism opportunities the
region has to offer, said
Todd Wilson, publisher of
the Lake City Reporter.
"It's a beautiful magazine
that showcases the recre-
ational quality of our area,"
Wilson said. "The natural
beauty of our region is con-

TODAY I
STATE

.tii pla-i r,.


veyed throughout the pub-
lication."
Campbell said the guide
can be utilized by both visi-
tors and locals alike.
"It is certainly something
that is intended to allure
people to come visit our
area," he said. "It is also
intended to be a piece for
people that are already here.
I think there are locals who
may not realize some of the
very special things we have
in this area, particularly a
newcomer."
Wilson said the guide is
.also a tool for the TDC.
"Our tourist develop-
ment council officials do
an outstanding job of tell-
ing others throughout the
Southeast what a relaxing
place Columbia County
and the Suwannee River
Valley Region truly is," said
GUIDE continued on 5A

N COMING
SATURDAY
: TigeI look for
diStrict title.


City


_












2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


FLORIDA'


Wednesday:
1-23-29-39-40-45 X3


(A$tII"


ez)/lut('ll


Thursday: Wednesday: Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-3-2 11-17-26-29-32 Afternoon: 1-5-5-2
Evening: 2-0-5 Evening: 9-6-1-8

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Wednesday:
6-15-20-26-31
Powerball: 9 X5


'Catcher in the Rye' author J.D. Salinger dies


NEW YORK

D. Salinger, the legendary
author, youth hero and fugi-
tive from fame whose '"The
Catcher in the Rye" shocked
and inspired a world he
increasingly shunned, has
died. He was 91.
Salinger died of natural causes
at his home on Wednesday, the
author's son, actor Matt Salinger,
said in a statement from Salinger's
longtime literary representative,
Harold Ober Associates, Inc. He had
lived for decades in self-imposed
isolation in a small, remote house in
Cornish, N.H.
"The Catcher in the Rye," with
its immortal teenage protagonist,
the twisted, rebellious Holden
Caulfield, came out in 1951, a time
of anxious, Cold War conformity and
the dawn of modern adolescence.
The Book-of-the-Month Club, which
made "Catcher" a featured selection,
advised that for "anyone who has
ever brought up a son" the novel will
be "a source of wonder and delight
- and concern."
Enraged by all the "phonies" who
make "me so depressed I go crazy,"
Holden soon became American
literature's most famous anti-hero
since Huckleberry Finn. The novel's
sales are astonishing - more than
60 million copies worldwide - and
its impact incalculable. Decades
after publication, the book remains
a defining expression of that most
American of dreams: to never grow
up.


A'5OCiATE[, PRESS
In this 1951, file photo, J.D. Salinger,
author of 'The Catcher in the Rye,'
'Nine Stories' and 'Franny and Zooey'
is shown.
/ song.
; -, Jones would not
Essay who will per-
form on the track
"because we've got
to make sure we've
got who we got," but
that the revamped
Jones song will feature a
new roster of all-star musicians.

Matthews on Obama:
'Forgot he was black'
NEW YORK - MSNBC's Chris
Matthews says President Barack


S Obama has done so
Quincy Jones wants 'We much to heal racial
Are the World' Haiti redo ' . divisions that he
"forgot he was blac
LOS ANGELES - Quincy Jones, : while watching his
76, is re-recording the charity.song i State of the Union
"We Are the World" and sending the address.
proceeds to Haiti. Matthews Those four word


Jones says musicians are gather-
ing Monday.at a Los Angeles record-
ing studio to redo the 25-year-old hit


O

*k"



s


so instantly set me
Twitter world afire that Matthews
came back less than 90 minutes later


Wednesday night to explain what he
meant.
The MSNBC commentator said it
was noteworthy to him that a black
president was addressing a room
of mostly white people and how it
didn't seem to be an issue. He said
he saw it in the context of growing
up at a time racial divisions were
ever-present.

Spike TV looking to
get into late-night
NEW YORK - The Spike cable
network is looking to get into late-
night television, but Conan O'Brien
need not apply.
The network geared to young men
said Thursday that it was developing
a new late-night talk and comedy
show with Thom Beers, who helps
make the network's "1000 Ways to
Die" series. The new late-night entry
hopes to scour the country for talent.
Sharon Levy, head of program-
ming for Spike, said she wants the
show to go beyond the typical late-
night fascinations of movie stars and
politics. She said Spike will seek out
ordinary people doing extraordinary
things, like a convenience store
clerk who faced down robbers or a
stockbroker who quit his job to fight
in Afghanistan.

Metallica posts
condolences for Va. fan
RICHMOND, Va. - Metallica has
posted condolences on its Web site
to the family and friends of Morgan
Harrington, 20, a fan whose remains
were found three months after she
disappeared while attending the
band's concert in Virginia.
The remains of the Virginia Tech
student were found this week in a
farm field about 10 miles from the
Charlottesville arena where,the band
played Oct. 17.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


0 Actor John Forsythe is 92.
E Actor Noel Harrison is 76.
E Actor Tom Selleck is 65.
E Rhythm-and-blues singer
Bettye LaVette is 64.
0 Actor Marc Singer is 62.
0 Actress Ann Jillian is 60.
N Rock musician Tommy
Ramone (Ramones) is 58.
* Rock musician Louie Perez
(Los Lobos) is 57.
* Rhythm-and-blues/funk
singer Charlie Wilson is 57.
* Talk show host Oprah
Winfrey is 56.
* Country singer Irlene
Mandrell is 54.
* Actress Diane Delano is
53.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number .........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, PO. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayerglakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


* Actress Judy Norton Taylor
("The Waltons") is 52.
* Actor Nicholas Turturro is
48.
* Actor-director Edward
Burns is 42.
* Actress Heather Graham
is 40.
* Actor Sharif Atkins is 35.
* Actress Sara Gilbert is 35.
* Actor Andrew Keegan is
31.
* Actor Jason James Richter
is 30.
* Blues musician Jonny
Lang is 29.
* Pop-rock singer Adam
Lambert ("American Idol") is
28.


CLASSIFIED
'To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ............... 755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks............ ... .. -$26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ............ . $41.40
24 Weeks ...... .. ......... $82.80
52 Weeks . . . . ............ .$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Man poses as
twin after DUI
AVON PARK -An
Avon Park man faces fraud
charges after reportedly
pretending to be his twin
brother after he was pulled
over for driving under the
influence.
The Highlands County
Sheriff's Office reports
that David Michael Cohen,
43, was pulled over Jan.
20 and charged with
DUI. But deputies say
Cohen initially identified
himself as Aaron Michael
Cohen and signed that
name on his citation
and jail forms. Deputies
discovered Cohen's real
identity the next day. He
reportedly told deputies
that he used his brother's
name because his driver's
license was suspended.

Haitian patients
moved for game
MIAMI - Patients
being treated in South
Florida after the earth-
quake in Haiti will be
transferred to other hospi-
tals to make room before
the Super Bowl.
The U.S. military is
evacuating Haitian vic-
tims to northern portions
of Florida to make sure
Miami emergency rooms
are ready for the big game
on Feb. 7.
Gov. Charlie Crist also
asked the federal gov-
ernment Wednesday to
ensure future patients can
be treated in hospitals in
other states.

Police: Man drains
$800K account
MIAMI - Authorities
say Douglas J. Koufman,
57, cleaned out his elderly
mother's savings, worth
over $800,000.
Koufman is charged
with exploitation of an
elderly person or dis-
abled adult for more than


MOSTLY . PARTLY{ " SHOWERS
SUNNY' CLOUDY. 1


S HI57LO35 i H162LO H1I67L0O45
.-~Ur.4riin~tU~i 2O a. -. - i -*5ja-.-- -r . a


Let's have a hearty laugh
President Barack Obama (right) and Vice President Joe
Biden share a laugh during a question and answer session at
a town hall meeting at the University of Tampa, Thursday.


$100,000. He surrendered
Tuesday at the Palm
Beach County Jail and
posted bail Wednesday.
Koufman's attorney
Michael B. Cohen says:
"We vigorously deny the
allegations and we believe
that the evidence will
eventually show that Mr.
Koufman will be exoner-
ated."

Suit: Drill left in
woman's head
TAMPA - A lawsuit
claims a dentist's drill bit
was left in a Tampa wom-
an's head for nearly a year.
The lawsuit says Donna
Delgao's surgeon left an
inch-long piece of steel in a
wound after dental surgery
in 2008. The tool piece
lodged in her right maxil-
lary sinus was removed 11
months later by another
surgeon.
The lawsuit says Delgao
suffered nosebleeds and
sinus infections after her
original dental surgery.

Teen charged as
adult in stabbing
DELRAY BEACH - A
15-year-old boy has been
charged as adult in the


stabbing of a fellow stu-.
dent at a South Florida *
high school.
Police say the teen is
charged with aggravated
battery and possession
of a weapon on school
property. He remained
held Thursday. at the Palm
Beach County jail. No
attorney was listed for him
in court records.
Police say he stabbed
another student in the
back and head on Jan. 8
at Atlantic High School in
Delray Beach.

Man accused of
shooting rampage
BROOKSVILLE - A
man accused of going on
a shooting rampage that
left three people dead was
released from the hospital
and taken to jail.
. Officials say John
Kalisz, 55, was taken from
a Gainesville hospital
Thursday. As his ambu-
lance got into Hernando
County, a judge conducted
first appearance proceed-
ings in the vehicle.
Kalisz is accused of
shooting four women,
killing two of them, in
Hernando County.
* Associated Press


Pensacola
64/52


* Valdosta
.69/58
Tallahassee Lake City
67/59 71/60
0, Gainesv
Panama City 72/6
65/61


Tan
75/


* Jackso
,CO/0


City Saturday
Ville Cape Canaveral 78/56/sh.
00 ayoaOec


*� 'uo/o "Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
30 73'62 Gainesville
Ocala * Jacksonville
73/60 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
77/61 74/63 Lake City
7 /Miami
npa ,, Naples
.62 West Palm Beach Ocala
78/65 * Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 78/69 * Pensacola
78/61 * Naples * Tallahassee
80/64 Miami Tampa


Key West
73/72


.TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


69
32
67
43
in 1950
in 1940

0.00"
4.20"
4.20"
3.15"
3.15"


7a Ip 7p la
Friday Sat








' Forecastedteiperature "Feelslike


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.


Sunday
67/54/s
62/47/s
74/63/pc
71/52/pc
58/38/pc
53/39/pc
71/62/sh
57/35/pc
76/63/sh
71/55/pc
59/41/pc
67/48/s
59/39/s
55/38/s
60/34/s
65/49/s
58/36/s
73/61/sh


.7:23 a.m.
6:05 p.m.
7:22 a.m.
6:06 p.m.


MODI

Today


MOON ultr
Moonrise today 5:42 p.m. rad
Moonset today 6:45 a.m. for
Moonrise tom. 6:55 p.m. to .
Moonset tom. 7:30 a.m.

03CCCL
Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb.
30 5 13 21
Full Last New First




6a On this date in
turday6a 1990, a fast moving
cold front produced
high winds in the
western U.S. Winds
along the coast of
Oregon gusted to
*' 65 mph at Portland,
and high winds gen-
erated 22 to 26 foot
seas which battered
the coast. Winds
near Reno, Nev.
"tempSetl gusted to 78 mph.


5

4iftestoD b
Jay's
a-violet
nation risk
the area on
cale from 0
10+.


77/50/t
82/63/pc
78/57/pc
71/40/sh
71/38/t
74/65/pc
70/37/sh
82/65/pc
78/62/pc
72/43/sh
78/54/t
61/38/sh
55/34/c
63/37/sh
72/52/t
60/38/sh
81/63/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.corn


Forecasts, data and graph-
"-! Ics � 2010 Weather Central
" ' LLC, Madison, Wis.
--' www.weatherpubllsher.com




Get Co0nnected


Daily Scripture
"God is spirit, and his worshipers
must worship in spirit and in truth."
- John 4:24
Thought for Today
"Any idiot can face a crisis - it's this,
day-to-day living that wears you out."
- Anton Chekhov,
Russian short-story writer and physician (1860-1904)

Lake City Reporter


80/70 Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


''S I I- ---------


1111~'~


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


Bi~tm~Wu~;l~


I














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


Robert Lewis Giddens
Robert Lex\ is Giddens, 77. a resi-
dent ofLake City, Fl. passed away
January 27, 2010 at his home
following an extended illness.
Mr. Giddens x\as a native of
Jacksonville. Florida \where he
graduated from the Robert E. Lee
High School class of 1948. lie
moved the family to St. George,
Ga. where his children attended
and graduated high school. He
moved to Lake City later on
in life. Hle was a member of
the Jacksonville First Baptist
Church. Charter member of the
American Legion Post 137 Jack-
sonville, Fl. and was awarded the
Legionaire of the year in 1971-
72. He xwas a life member of
the Old Guard Association, life
member of the Conibat Infantry-
man's association and a member
of the Grand Lodge of Georgia F
&A.M. He was also a veteran of
Korea serving in the U.S. Army
where he was awarded the Sil-
ver Star and the Purple Heart.
Survivors include his wife of
Forty Six Years, Judith L. Gid-
dens, Lake City, Fl. One daugh-
ter: Missie (Jimmy) Hale,
Middleburg, Fl. and one son:
Bert (Patty) Giddens, Lake City,
Fl. One sister: Vivian Teague,
Jacksonville, Fl. One brother:
Marcus (Eleanor) Giddens, Lake
City, Fl. One sister-in-law: Diane
Walker, Newport News, Virgin-
ia. Four grandchildren and four
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Gid-
dens will be conducted Satur-
day, January 30, 2010 at 2:00
P.M. in the Chapel of Guerry
Funeral Home with the Rev
Fred Gaylord, officiating. Inter-
ment will be at a later date. The
family will receive friends from
1:00-2:00 P.M. just prior to the
service on Saturday. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME 2659
SW. Main Blvd. Lake City
is in, charge -of arrangements.


Emily Jean Jones
Emily Jean Jones, 80, a resident
of Lake City, Florida passed away
January 25, 2010 at her home.
Mrs. Jones had resided in Lake
City for the past forty-five years
and is the daughter of the late Otis
and Nora Edwards Privette, Sr.
She was past president of AARP
Chapter, Lake City, member of
the Homemakers Club, Mem-
ber of the Golden Age, Member
of Red Hat Society, a volunteer
at Columbia County Public Li-
brary, a Sunshine Lady of Pine
Grove Baptist Church and vol-
unteer for local nursing homes.
She was also a member of the
Pine Grove Baptist Church. She
is preceded in death by her hus-
band, Silas Jones, Sr. one son Si-
las Jones, Jr. Two brothers, Otis
Privette Jr. and John B. Privette.
Survivors include Two Daugh-
ters: Patricia Lynn (Jim) Dur-
den, Lake City, Fl. and Susan
Gooding, Ashburn, Ga. One son:
Matt (Moshe Rashif) Jones, Ash-
ville, N.C. Three sisters: Marce-
ne O'Neal, Hartsville, S.C,, Ann
Tabor, Sparta, TN and Paulette
Johnson, Lulu, Fl. One'Sister-In-
Law: Nancy Privette, Lake City,
Fl. Six grandchildren, eight great
grandchildren and two great
great grandchildren. Several
nieces and nephews also survive
Funeral services will be con-
ducted Friday January 29, 2010
at 11:00 A.M. in the Chapel of
Guerry Funeral. Home with the
Rev. John Thompson, officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in the
Memorial Cemetery. The fam-
ily will receive friends Thursday
January 28, 2010 from 6:00-
8:00 P.M. at the funeral home.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME
2659 SW. Main Blvd, Lake City
is in charge of all arrangements.

Minister Willie Lee Jones
Minister Willie Lee Jones was
born March 18,1930 in Jasper,
Florida to the late Henry and
Katie Jones. He was educated
in Jasper Floi-
ida. There he
met and mar-
ried Mary Lee
Crockett. They
were united
for twenty two
years from this
union nine
children were born. A beautiful
life came to an end on Friday, Jan-
uary 22, 2010. He leaves to cher-
ish his memory eight children:
Freddie Jones (Sharon), Earnest
Jones, Jimmie Jones (Lazoni) all


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\\anda). and Barbara Jones, all
ofl Li e Oak, Florida, Geraldine
O\\ens and Jacqueline White
(Dessie), Lake City, Florida;
two brothers, Walter Jones and
Samuel Jones, both of Mayo,
Florida; twxo sisters, Irene Jones
and Zadie Mae (Bill) Cook,
both of Mayo, Florida; forty-one
grandchildren, forty-two great
grandchildren; brother-in-law,
Willie Norris; and a host of niec-
es, nephews and devoted friends.
Special friend Oliver Jackson.
Home going celebration is to be
held Saturday January 30, 2010,
12p.m. at the Little Galilee Ho-
liness Church, Mayo, Florida.
Evangelist Annie Sellars is the
pastor and will officiate. Burial
will tbllow in the Garden of Rest
Cemetery. The family will re-
ceive other relatives and friends
from 6 to 8p.m. Friday, Janu-
ary 29, 2010 at Little Galilee
Church in Mayo, Florida. ERIC
A. BROWN & SON FUNER-
AL HOME, INC. is incharge
of all the final arrangements.

Samuel Burns Marion
Mr. Samuel Burns Marion, 88
of Jacksonville, Al. passed away
January 26, 2010 in Anniston, Al.

Donald Harry Lee
Shreffler
Donald Harry Lee Shreffler,
93, a resident of Lake City,
Florida passed away Janu-
ary 27, 2010 at his residence.
Mr. Shreffler was a resident of
Lake City, Florida for the past
twenty years and
prior to moving o ;- .
to Lake City he
resided in Ocala, . "
Florida. He was - *
born in Ashland,
Ohio, the son of the late Gail
Borden and Mae Harry Shreffler.
He is preceded in death by his
wife Dorothy Elizabeth Shreffler.
He was a veteran of WW II serv-
ing in the U.S. Army Air Corps.
Survivors include two daughters:
Mary Ann (William) Big Moun-
tain, Ocala, Florida and Linda
(John) Turrill, Helen, Ga. One
granddaughter: Kathy Smith,
Lake City, Fl. one greatgrandchild
Kolby Niewisch, Lake City, Fl.
Graveside funeral services will
be conducted Monday, February
1, 2010 at 12:30 P.M. at the Flor-
ida National Cemetery, Bushnell,
Florida with the Deacon Sam
Langley,' officiating. - The fam-
ily will receive friends Sunday,
January 31, 2010 from 3:00-4:00
P.M. at the funeral home. In
lieu of flowers donations may be
made to the Haven Hospice of
Suwannee Valley Care Center,
6037 W US Highway 90, Lake
City, Florida 32055. Guerry
Funeral Home 2659 SW. Main
Blvd. Lake City, Fl. is in charge
of arrangements. 386-752-2414
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.






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SHang 0n
a minute ,V


() O ctmers receive
a Complimentary
L copy of the
Lake City Reporter
hlulen they drop off&


TDC reviews Dream Park's potential impact


OBITUARIES


information, meal costs
and other hypothetical
financial information, they
estimate the local impact
for Columbia County if the
partnership was formed to
be in the range of $14-$15
million annually. They esti-
mate the total direct and
indirect economic impact
for 12 weeks to be approx-
imately $24.6 million.
Initial projections after a
local group took a trip to
Cooperstown Dream Park
headquarters in Salisbury,
N.C. to be as much as $28-
$56 million.
A meeting has been
scheduled for 10 a.m.
Monday where local offi-
cials will once again review
the figures and the pos-
sibility of going forward
with the proposed partner-
ship.
Cooperstown Dreams
Park officials are inter-


ested in the Southside
Recreational complex
to use as a facility for a
little league program,
but wants the county to
spend about $4 million for
upgrades if the partner-
ship is formed.
"Will it work. Can we
finance it. Can we afford
it - we don't know... ,"
said TDC chairman Ron
Williams, noting account
Richard Powell will review
the numbers. "We've got
to have a hard dollar fig-
ure and go through that
criteria before the Board
(Columbia County Board
of County Commissioners)
can make a decision on it.
It comes down to dollars
and cents."
TDC officials also noted
costs considerations that
would be unique to the
area including: $1.2 million
to light eight fields and re-


light eight softball fields
to top quality levels; $3.75
million for $60 barracks
at $62,000 each (barracks
in Cooperstown have been
built for $42,000 each, but
are not heated or cooled
and have no sprinkler sys-
tem and are not built to
meet hurricane standards;
$56b,000 for bath house
buildings (anticipated con-
struction cost is $80,000
per building and $2.5 mil-
lion for a cafeteria, which
TDC members believe
would need to be a large,
gymnasium-styled air-con-
ditioned steel building.
Williams also said
it is important to make
sure local youths aren't
adversely affected by the
partnership and wants
the county to be able to
continue providing local
youths with recreational
opportunities.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com

Tourist Development
Council members believe
the potential economic of
forming a partnership with
Cooperstown Dreams Park
may be less than originally
estimated.
During Wednesday's
Tourist Development
Council meeting at
the Columbia County
Emergency Operations
Center, TDC director
Harvey Campbell and
board member Nick Patel
said they didn't under-
stand the numbers pro-
vided by Cooperstown
Dream Parks officials and
found the numbers were
representative of another
area.
After plugging in local
information, including
hotel room rates, bed tax


AiManrum




752-6306

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Licensed & Insured CFC1427643

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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427














OPINION


Friday, January 29, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


Giving praise

where praise

is overdue

If educators are the
unsung heroes of our
children's lives, how
much less do we hear
about those who sup-
port teachers and others in our
schools?
The Columbia County
School-Related Employee of the
Year honor is a chance to sing
the praises of those who work
with little recognition. For two
decades, each county school or
education center has offered a
candidate for the award. This
year, 15 school-related employ-
ees with a combined work
experience approaching two
centuries vied for the honor.
Columbia City Elementary
School paraprofessional Dawn
Mansukhani claimed the No. 1
spot on Thursday.
That's a lot of experience
supporting our educators,
administrators and parents.
Multiple that by the total 700
support personnel in the dis-
trict and the wealth of knowl-
edge this employee base has
to share is considerable and
irreplaceable.
For 179 days every school
year, our support personnel
work quietly alongside teach-
ers and students. On Thursday
they were rightly heard.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Friday, Jan. 29,
the 29th day of 2010. There
are 336 days left in the year.
* On Jan. 29, 1860 (accord-
ing to the New Style calendar),
Russian author and playwright
Anton Chekhov was born in
the port city of Taganrog.
* In 1845, Edgar Allan Poe's
poem "The Raven" was first
published, in the New York
Evening Mirror.
* In 1861, Kansas became
the 34th state of the Union.
* In 1919, the ratification
of the 18th Amendment to the
Constitution, which launched
Prohibition, was certified by
Acting Secretary of State Frank
L. Polk.
* In 1936, the first mem-
bers of baseball's Hall of
Fame, including Ty Cobb and
Babe Ruth, were named in
Cooperstown.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


cmL


Obama says he gets the message


The signs have been
there for several
months - declining
overall job approval
ratings, polls that
show a sharp increase in inde-
pendent voter unhappiness and
strong opposition from so-called
Tea Party conservatives. But
either through arrogance, inex-
perience or just plain stubborn-
ness, the Obama administration
ignored what was happening
in an electorate clearly at odds
with the president's ambitious
health care demands and the
failure to stem job losses.
Reforming 16 percent of the
economy in a single stroke is
not only an enormous task in
itself, its complexities are so
overwhelming the average
American is left vulnerable to
misunderstandings that cause
deep personal concerns, some
imaginary, some real. With
those fears in hand, as we all
know now, they went to the
polls in Massachusetts and
reacted in a way that may have
killed the 2,700-page monstros-
ity.
From the very beginning,
veteran observers warned that
an agenda that included such
a gigantic undertaking with
its all consuming legislative
ramifications had a low level of
expected success, particularly
in the first year of a presidency
that also faced so many other
problems here and abroad.
Allies and critics alike urged a
slowing of the process, a little
smaller bite of the problem. The
cornerstone of the original plan,
a public insurance option that
was the first step toward univer-
sal health care, was abandoned
in a compromise to save the ini-
tiative, alienating liberals.
Now the president vows to
keep the health care fight alive.

LETTERS TO

Where's the outcry
over Haiti?
To the Editor:
Not long ago, Bush and his
administration was vilified by
the press and media for Bush's
poor response to Hurricane
Katrina.
On Jan. 12, Haiti was greeted
with an earth-shattering earth-
quake. The devastation was
so complete that only via the
Internet were we able to know
what had happened.
On Jan. 13, a trauma relief
team was organized by a group
of eminent surgeons. The group
was ready to leave immediately
to offer orthopedic and surgical
care. Yet, due to bureaucratic
delays, valuable time passed.
Finally, Jan: 16, the team
was allowed to land, along with
other relief teams. Dr. Soumitra
R. Eachempati, made the follow-
ing comment: "The U.S. is an
embarrassment." Their group
'received hardly any support
from any branch of the U.S.
government, including the state


Dan K.Thomasson
To meet the demands of 10
months of political uncertainty
until the midterm elections,
he has assembled the old
campaign team that improb-
ably took him from a freshman
senator to the White House in
2008. But if current trends hold,
Republicans could make sizable
inroads in Congress with as
many as six Senate seats chang-
ing hands.
Considering that the party
in the White House historically
loses congressional seats at
this halfway point under normal
circumstances, it won't be easy
for Obama. The last few state
elections, including the one in
Massachusetts, have clearly
shown a Republican resurgence
fueled by high unemployment,
worries about a possible double
dip recession, continuing casu-
alties in Iraq and Afghanistan, a
housing market still not healed
and last but not least the poten-
tial costs of it all combined with
a soaring national debt.
Did the president spend too
much time and energy trying
to sell health care reform at
the expense of other problems?
Probably. His strategy also was
too influenced by the 1994 deba-
cle when Bill Clinton's health
care proposal developed by a
task force headed by Hillary
Clinton met an early demise in
Congress. Obama this time left
it up to Capitol Hill to produce
the details of the package, an
always-iffy approach, while he

THE EDITOR

department, because there was
no central command for medi-
cal emergencies. The surgeon's
comments was editorialized in
The Wall Street Journal.
Remember the outcry fol-
lowing "Katrina?" Today, where
is the press and media outcry
from the lack of preparedness
under Obama? It is still the
same old bias ... when will they
learn? We are not stupid people.
Milton F Muskewitz
Lake City

Charity starts at
home
To the Editor:
What can you say to people
who always want to help oth-
ers during times of need, but
not worry about their fellow
Americans? I personally think
charity should start at home.
First of all, I don't see how
you can give more than $100
million dollars in aid to a foreign
country when you have to bor-
row the money from China or


lobbied the public. It was as
warned, a flawed strategy.
The pundits most like to
compare Obama to Franklin
Roosevelt, whose first 100 days
in office were filled with radical
legislative achievement aimed
at relieving the pressures and
anxieties of a depression that
already had been underway
for three years and was grow-
ing more difficult daily. But the
current recession, while the
worst of its kind since then,
still is not nearly as debilitating.
Unlike Obama, Roosevelt took
few chances with Congress. His
young advisors were a "brain
trust" that wrote the New Deal
proposals and shoved them
through the legislature with
little alteration from free-lance
lawmakers.
There is considerable evi-
dence that voters are becoming
increasingly concerned by the
mounting costs of health care
and other initiatives. There is a
discernible lack of faith in finan-
cial projections for all of the
president's plans - that what
the average American will have
to shell out to offset the costs
are being low-balled for politi-
cal reasons. The current costs
in the health bill over 10 years
are estimated at between $870
billion in the Senate bill and
$1.3 trillion in the House ver-
sion. Experts believe the cost of
either version could exceed $2
trillion. Polls also reveal a build-
ing resentment by Americans
over provisions that force them
to buy insurance or face penal-
ties.
The president says he got the
Massachusetts' message. One
wonders why he wasn't listen-
ing sooner.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


some other country, because
you don't have any here to use.
I don't think the president
should have the power to send
any money anywhere without
asking Americans first. I feel
sorry for any country that has a
disaster, and if we can help, by
all means we should help. But,
if you don't have any money, it
is hard to help anyone. Just in
case you don't know it, some-
time in the future, the money
has to be paid back, whether it
be by us, our children or our
grandchildren.
As far as Hurricane Katrina
goes, maybe if we sent some of
the aid going to Haiti to those
people they would have a place
to live, too.
As far as aid goes, I am sure
that anyone that wants to can
write a check and they will glad-
ly accept it. But leave my money
alone. I will spend it as I see fit,
not like the government would
spend it.
Tom Riegel
Wellborn


THE TIMES -PICAYUNE
S 2. o0 0


BUT
I DON'T
WANT
TO DWELL
ON JUST
DEMOCRATS.


4A


Jose De La Isla
joseisla3@yohoo.com

The winds

of political

climate

change?

An unusual cold snap
hit throughout most
of the nation the
week of January
17. California had
rain and mudslides, turbulent
storm clouds were over much
of the Eastern Seaboard, bit-
ter cold in the Midwest, and
there was a special election
in Massachusetts for the U.S.
Senate seat previously occu-
pied by the late Edward M.
Kennedy.
The national political climate
changed, too.
Prior to. the Massachusetts
contest, Congress seemed on
the way to reconciling and
passing historic health care
legislation. Banking reforms
and the possibility of compre-
hensive immigration were on
tap - all under an overlay of
jobs, jobs, jobs.
When Democratic candi-
date Martha Coakley's polling
numbers slumped drastically,
President Obama went to
Massachusetts to campaign for
her. That's when the air start-
ed coming out of the reform
balloon.
Just like the financial bust
precipitated the damned-if-
you-do, damned-if-you-don't
dilemma, going forward now
in any reasonable direction is
political quicksand.
In the Southwest, the
phenomenon is known as a
sidewinder. Mariners, novel-
readers and moviegoers know
it as a "perfect storm." By
whatever name, it is a reversal
of fortune and the course that
had seemed so fine-tuned, so
pitch perfect before, is now
vulnerable.
When Scott Brown trounced
Coakley, his victory came like
a surprise political aftershock
from Haiti, even though days
before, polling suggested
a likely upset. Irish bookie
Paddy Power paid off bets
early on Brown.
The day following the spe-
cial election was put in the
context of a pattern after the
November GOP gubernato-
rial wins in New Jersey and
Virginia. Good policy folds
under the weight of bad-tem-
per politics.
For instance, MSNBC com-
mentator Chris Matthews
berated former Democratic
chairman Howard Dean's inter-
pretation of the Massachusetts
outcome. Mathews' question-
ing centered on ideology and
how politics is the art of war
played out as Machiavellian
maneuvers. Dean argued that
voters were registering a pro-
test to the Democratic estab-
lishment they had endorsed in
November 2009 for selling out
to special interests that shows
up as flaws in the Byzantine
health care bill.
Never mind that the ava-
lanche of new analyses show-
ing how and why an enlight-
ened immigration policy is
good for the nation, economic
development and peaceable
communities. Politics trumps
policy.
That is the weather report
during this winter of our dis-
content. But Feb. 2 is coming
up, when Punxsutawney Phil
will prognosticate on Ground
Hog Day whether we will have
six more weeks of winter or a
welcomed, much needed, early
spring.
The good news, and rea-
son to not despair, is that the
Punxsutawney Chamber is
planning a pancake breakfast
that day, with photo opportuni-
ties with Phil, the groundhog
related games and - I swear
- a pinata.
* Jose de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power".
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


I q _ _ _ _ I


T70��-








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


MOAA installs 2010 officers, directors


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The Suwannee River
Valley Chapter of
the Military Officers
Association of America
installed its 2010 officers
and board of directors
at their dinner meeting
Thursday night.
Officers installed this
year were retired Navy
Lt. Cmdr. Steve Casto as
president, retired Air Force
Maj. Connie Callahan as
the new first vice president,
retired Air Force Capt. Bob
Moschetti as second vice
president, retired Air Force
Capt. Dennis Tarkington as
secretary and retired Navy
Lt. Susan Palmer as the
new treasurer.
Directors installed this
year were retired Army
Capt. Vernon Lloyd, retired
Air Force Maj. Mo Becnel,
former Navy Lt. Cmdr. Ed
Matthews as a new director
and retired Navy Lt. Cmdr.
Tandy Carter.
Moschetti will serve as
the 2010 chaplin and Yvette
Graham will serve as the
2010 national auxiliary liai-
son.
Callahan, Palmer and
Matthews said they are
happy to be serving the


Former Navy Lt. Cmdr. Ed Matthews (front from left), retired Navy Lt. Susan Palmer, retired
Air Force Maj. Connie Callahan, retired Army Capt. Vernon Lloyd, retired Air Force Capt.
Dennis Tarkington, retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. Tandy Carter (back from left), retired Navy Lt.
Cmdr. Steve Casto, retired Army Col. Bob Bachmann, Northeast area vice president of the
Military Officers Association of America Florida Counsel and Chapters, retired Air Force Maj.
Mo Becnel and retired Air Force Capt. Bob Moschetti (not pictured) are installed as officers
and directors for the Suwannee River Valley chapter of MOAA Thursday. Bachmann acted as
installation officer to induct the officers and directors.


association in their new
positions.
'"This is a way for me
to give back to the local
military community and is
a fulfilling experience for
me," said Callahan.
"I wanted to help out the
group," said Matthews.


"We've got a great group
of people here," said Palmer,
"and I'm looking forward to
serving them."
Casto said it is his third
year serving as the chap-
ter's president, and he said
he enjoys heading up the
MOAA efforts to serve the


local veteran community.
"I've always felt since I
got in the chapter that we
could do more for the local
veteran community," he
said. "We're very active in
the local veteran associa-
tions and that's what MOAA
is all about."


and Union counties.
Officials are currently
working on a water sup-
ply assessment and a water
supply plan.
A draft of the water sup-
ply plan maybe available
to the public in March or
April and officials hope to


have the final water supply
plan available for adoption
by Dec. 12.
Herd said Suwannee
River Water Management
District officials are evalu-
ating the flows in the upper
Santa Fe River basin, but
the district has not been


able to set the Minimum
Flows and Levels in the
entire district. Minimum
Flows and Levels are the
minimum amount of water
it takes for a body of water
to remain healthy.
Officials, who have ini-
tiated water conservation


measures in both water
management districts, say
water conservation will be
crucial to the water supply
plan.
"Water conservation is
by far the first and cheapest
part of our water resources
plan," Hornsby said.


MURAL: Compromise could be reached
Continued From Page 1A
will wait until the mural's said. "I bought the build- to utilize it, he said. tic a compromise will be
lease expires Jan. 12. 2012 ing with the idea I would City and other officials reached.
and proceed with renova- remodel'the upstairs." have know about the pos- "I think (the mural is)
fions, he said. Kuykendall is paying sibility of the mural being terrific, but it's my wall,"
"I love the mural, but I'm a taxes and fire assessments removed since last year, Kuykendall said. "We'll have
business man," Kuykendall on the upstairs but not able he said. He is not optimis- to see how it plays out."


SCHOOL: Related employees recognized


Continued From Page 1A
Fort White Elementary
School; Audrey L. Adams,
Fort White High School;
Janet S. Hostetler, Lake
City Middle School;
Teresa Jett, Melrose .
Park Elementary School;


Edith Gene English,
Niblack Elementary
School; Joseph A. Knapp,
Pinemount Elementary
School; Barbara Jeanette
Caldwell, Richardson
Middle School; Majorie


Dewey, Summers
Elementary School;
Della Kilgore, Westside
Elementary School; and
Sherry Williams, CCSD
Administrative Complex.
Each nominee received


a check for $125, and
Mansukhani also received
an additional $125 for win-
ning. She also received
a key to the city, pre-
sented by Lake City Mayor
Stephen Witt.


GUIDE: Is available
Continued From Page 1A


Wilson. 'They market our
region with a passion. Now,
they have this visual tool
to help convey the pristine
beauty."
Campbell said the goal
is to have a new, updated
edition of the guide pub-
lished in about 12 to 15
months.
Wilson and Campbell
said they are pleased with
the finished product and


appreciate the support the
tourism industry provided
for the project through their
advertising.
"We think the Lake City
Reporter (lid a terrific job
for us," Campbell said.
'They were the low bidder
on the product and we got
terrific value.
"We are absolutely
delighted with the
product."


Sign up at
All Springs Veterinary Hospital
All Dog Breeds Welcome
Puppies must be 10 weeks
Course defines terms like air scenting,
trailing, track laying, etc.
865 for 6 Weeks



r Kanapaha Botanical Gardens
28th Annual Winter Bamboo Sale


Offering 18 types of bamboo including:


Giant Timber
Chinese Goddess
Wong Chuk


Buddha's Belly
Stripestemb
BlAck Bamboo


Dug-to-order Jan. & Feb. only
Call 352 372-4981 or visit www.kanapaha.org
Located on S-24 1 mi. west of 1-75 in Gainesville


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1 Includes lenses & frames.
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COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JANUARY 31, 2010


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INSURANCE COVERS EYECARE

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SOLE TIMES




COUNTRY BUFFET
"Home cookin'the way Mama does it"

We Cater All Year Round

Gift Cards Available


Wednesday Night

'All You Care to Eat' Ribs and Steaks



'I I You (are to Eat I



Friday and Saturday Nights

Seafood & Steak Buffet.


Starts at
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No w hv'T G',Eprsslie


386-752-1670 * Located in the Lake City Mall


WATER: Supply assessment considered
Continued From Page 1A


-j


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


L , ,, I


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY JANUARY 29, 2010


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 26, 2007, file photo, the new high speed train motor unit and coaches that will
open the way for the first commercial high speed link through the LGV East railway line,
enters a railway depot in Pantin, northeast of Paris. High-speed rail projects in California,
Florida and Illinois are among the big winners of $8 billion in grants announced Thursday by
the White House.


White House: $8 B for fast trains


By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
High-speed rail projects
in California, Florida and
Illinois are among the big
winners of$8 billion in grants
announced Thursday by the
White House - the start of
what some Democrats tout
as a national rail-building
program that could rival the
interstate highways begun
in the Eisenhower era.
President Barack Obama


announced the awards dur-
ing a town hall meeting in
Tampa - a follow-up to
Wednesday's State of the
Union address that focused
on getting Americans back
to work. Thirteen passe. iger
rail corridors in 31 states
will receive grants, which
are funded by the economic
recovery act enacted last
year.
A half-dozen Cabinet
members and other senior
administration officials
were fanning out across


the country for rail events
Thursday and Friday. The
White House said rail proj-
ects will create or save
thousands of jobs in areas
including track laying,
manufacturing, planning,
engineering and rail main-
tenance and operations.
Obama told the crowd at
Thursday's town hall that
when the high-speed . rail
line connecting Tampa and
Orlando is finished, "I'm
going to come back down
here and ride it."


Man, child injured in boating mishap


From staff reports also aboard when the acci-
A Jacksonville man and dent occurred but were not
his 4-year-old son were injured.
injured Tuesday night The Jacksonville
when the boat the father Sheriff's Office contacted
Was operating ran into a the Florida Fish and
dock at Pottsburg Creek. Wildlife Conservation
Wayne Allen Lipscomb, Commission at 7:26 p.m.
35, and his son, T scom, Officers responded, and
Lipscomb, were taken to the injured man and boy
Shands Hospital after their were taken to the hospital.
vessel ran into the dock. Their injuries were serious
The boy's mother, Amber but not life-threatening.
Wehr Lipscomb, 33, and The child was the only
Jonathan D. Wehr, 26, were one w eating a life jacket,
according to EWC officers.


From the preliminary
investigation, Lipscomb
said he had just left the
ramp at Pottsburg Creek
but decided it was too. dark
to venture farther. He was
returning to the boat ramp
when he ran into the dock
near the ramp.
The vessel is a 17-foot,
1985 Astroglass, owned
by Lipscomb. Officers will
retrieve the damaged boat
from the dock today.
The FWC is continuing
the investigation.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Retirement plans sealed with a kiss
Current Executive Director of the Lake City/Columbia County Humane Society Terry
Marques plants a kiss on Margaret Smith, who retired as executive director of the facility on
Dec. 31, after awarding her the Sarah Hope Award at her retirement celebration Tuesday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment Center. 'She's been an inspiration to me for 14 years. I was honored
to get a call from her,' Marques said. 'Like many people say, 'No one can say no to Margaret.'
I have some big shoes to fill. I'm going to do my best.'

v


4* _ _, _


-- -


COURTESY PHOTO
Boys and Girls Club gets boost from CCR
Columbia County Resources/Smokin' Pig Fest presents a check on Jan. 20 to the Boys and
Girls Club of Columbia County in the amount of $1,000. The check represents proceeds
from the Smokin' Pig Fest held last fall at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Pictured here
are Bill Caley, Boys Club executive director (from left); Everlena Hamilton, Boys Club Board
of Director; Wanda Jones, Boys Club Board of Director/Columbia County Resources secre-
tary/treasurer; Lamar Boozer, vice president Columbia County Resources; Ronnie Edenfield,
Board of Director Columbia County Resources; Jimmy .Sparks, Board of Director Columbia
County Resourceas;lMike Nelson, president Columbia County^Resources; Bubba Norton, vice
presendt.nBoys Club, ...


'I


PR EE 3973 HWY90 WEST LAKE CITY

HOME CENTERS 386-752-7751 OR 1-800-355-9385


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@laoketyreporter com


SPORTS


Friday. January 29. 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS
r-


Championship


showdown


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-042 1
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Time for

a title

C olumbia
High's soccer
team dodged
the district
tournament
minefields to make it to
the championship game
today at Ridgeview High.
The Tigers, seeded
No. 2 in District 4-5A, will
play No. 1 seed Fleming
Island High at 7 p.m.
The Golden Eagles
handed Columbia its only
district loss this season.
With 67 wins and
counting, the Tigers
are coming off the best
four-year stretch in the
history of the program.
Columbia's semifinal win
on Wednesday assured
the Tigers a spot in the
state playoffs for the
fifth time.
Columbia also made
the field in 1998 and
2001-02-07, all as a
district runner-up.
What is left now is to
bring the first soccer
district championship to
the school.
It won't be easy.
Fleming Island is on a
streak of seven
consecutive playoff
appearances under coach
Frank Pontore. The
Golden Eagles are 10-6
in that stretch, including
a state runner-up finish
in 2008.
When the Tigers last
made the playoffs, it
was Fleming Island that
beat them in the opening
round, 3-2.
So, a win today would
be doubly sweet, and this
senior-loaded team could
be the one to pull it off.
After falling to lower
seeds in the last two
district tournaments,
Columbia has avoided
the upset this time.
The games have been
tight
Columbia nipped
Middleburg High, 2-1, in
the first round, after
beating the Broncos in
the regular season,
5-1. A 1-0 win over host
Ridgeview followed on
Wednesday. The Tigers
routed Ridgeview, 6-0, in
the regular season.
In 2009, Columbia
lost to Eastside High
in a shootout, after
sweeping the Rams in
the regular season by a
combined score of 9-1.
In 2008, Columbia swept
Vanguard High in the
regular season, only to
lose to the Knights in the
tournament.
Those problems are
past in 2010. Columbia
has already assured its
playoff spot and can go
all out for that elusive
district title.
It would be fitting to
win the championship
for coach Trevor Tyler,
who has put together a
78-31-12 record in his
five years as head coach,
after serving as an
assistant for a couple
of years.,
The next best four-year
run for Columbia soccer?
Sixty-four wins in Tyler's
playing days.
* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Columbia takes
on Fleming Island
in District 4-5A.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High has a
chance to do something for
the first time in their 21
year soccer history. Never
before have the Tigers
won a district champion-
ship, but Columbia has a
chance tonight as it takes
on Fleming Island.
The District 4-5A cham-
pionship between the top
two seeds takes place at
Ridgeview High at 7 p.m. in
Jacksonville.
Columbia (204-1) lost to
Fleming Island in the two
teams only meeting in the reg-
ular season. The Tigers fell
behind 2-0 behind poor mark-
manship on corner kicks.
"We didn't execute what
we practiced," coach Trevor
Tyler said. "We went away
from everything we prac-
ticed. We were dribbling


-A


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Repor
Columbia High's Moriah Marion (right) is congratulated by
coach Horace Jefferson after Senior Night in Lake City.


too much, didn't set up cor-
ner kicks the right way. It
comes down to execution.
We had our chances, but
we just didn't put away the
shots."
The two teams play
similar styles according to
Tyler and both will try to
push the ball forward to the
wing to draw fouls and set
up plays.
Besides the actual
dynamics of the game,
Tyler points out mental
conditioning as a key for
the Tigers.
"We have to be loose and
ready to play," he said. 'We
have to get the butterflies
out Most weren't around as
freshman, and it's been a
while since we've been in a
championship game. We've
played for tournament cham-
pionships, but nothing this
big. We have to be mentally
and physically ready and
then go out and execute."
Win or lose, Columbia
is already in the state's 5A
playoffs. The Tigers have
the chance to host a first-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Chase Stamper avoids an Eastside High defender in a game played earlier
this season. The Tigers play for the District 4-5A championship at Ridgeview High today in
Jacksonville.


round game with a district Tigers would host the first-
championship. round, game at 7 p.m. on
If Columbia wins, the Thursday against Chiles,


Lincoln or Leon high
school. A loss would result
in a trip to Tallahassee.


Special night



for Seniors

Lady Tigers bounce back


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
What a difference a night
made for the Columbia High
as the Lady Tigers bounced
back from their first loss in
11 games to end the season
on a high note.
The Lady Tigers mount-
ed a 17-point run in the
second quarter on their
way to a 64-23 win against
Hamilton High.
"It was a good way to go
out," coach HoraceJefferson
said. "We bounced back and
I expected us to bounce
back. I said last night that
it could either help us or
hurt us, but I thought we
would benefit from the loss.
We have been preparing
for Gainesville, Lee and
Buchholz in district play."
ter Sharmayne Edwards
was three points off of her
career high in her final reg-


ular-season game as a Lady
Tiger. The senior dropped.
in 31 points.
"At first I was a little
overwhelmed with it being
my last home game as a
senior," Edwards said. "I'm
really happy, and looking
forward to going on to play
in college. I want to thank
my teammates for playing
hard and together. It was
a fun experience and I'm
happy."
Edwards may have been
the star this season, but the
star of the fourth quarter
was Moriah Marion with
nine points.
The senior had the crowd
excited as she converted on
late buckets.
"She's an inspirational
player," Jefferson said. "She
knows that she's not the
most athletic player on the
team, but we all love her.
When she's that good of a


teammate, how could they
not love her? As a coach,
when she scores a basket
and jumps up and down,
how could I not love that?"
Vikie Hill scored nine
points, Shaniqua Henry
scored seven points,
Da'Brea Hill had six points
and Shaiwong had two
points.
Still, Jefferson couldn't
help to praise his seniors.
"I'm going to miss
Sharmayne, but she went
out with a bang," he said. "I
wish I had her for four years
instead of three. She's start-
ing to ascertain the nuianc-
es of being a point guard.
Whichever team gets her
on the next level is going
to have a special player,
because her best ball is ii
front of her. I hope that our
seniors choose to play in
college. I think we can find
them all a place."


Murray in position to


be Great Scot, or not


Player reaches
his second Grand
Slam final.
By JOHN PYE
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia
- There he was, mouth
agape, roaring like a
Highlands warrior in full
battle cry in "Braveheart"
The force from Andy
Murray's lungs seemed to
add heft to the forehand
winner he hurled down
the line. The match turned
there - in the fifth game
of the second set - and it
would not be long before
the 22-year-old Scot was on
his way to the Australian
Open final.
After dropping serve
twice in the opening set
to Croatia's Marin Cilic,
Murray recovered to win


the semifinal 3-6, 6-4, 6-4,
6-2 and reach .his second
Grand Slam final.
"It was really impor-
tant because I don't want
to say the match was slip-
ping away from me, but the
momentum was definitely
with him," Murray said.
Now, with only top-
ranked. Roger Federer or
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga ahead,
he is one win from breaking
a drought for British men at
the four majors that dates
to Fred Perry's Wimbledon
victory in 1936.
That's a lot of pressure
on Murray. It proved too
much for the likes of Tim
Henman, John Lloyd and
others. But the pressure
valve was released, at least
for a few sets Thursday
night, in one riveting point.
Murray raced to the net to
reach a ball that had caught
the net and dropped onto


his side. He then made a
lunging volley to extend the
rally and sprinted back to
the baseline to chase down
Cilic's deep lob. Somehow,
spinning as he swung the
racket blindly right to left,
he hit a forehand winner
past Cilic.
Then he roared a pro-
longed roar.
The challenge from Cilic,
who had beaten Murray in
straight sets in the fourth
round of the U.S. Open,
faded. The more than eight
hours he had spent on
court across five matches
had taken its toll.
"He played some really
aggressive tennis ... was
putting me under a lot of
pressure," Murray said.
"But, yeah, that shot made
a big difference. I just man-
aged to chase it down."
AUSTRALIAN continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Andy Murray of Britain reacts to a point won against Marin
Cilic of Croatia during the Men's singles semifinal match ,
at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne,
Australia, Thursday.


/II ' - I -- - -


Egg











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


Fort White Youth
Baseball has league
registration planned for
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
and 4-7 p.m. Tuesday.
Sign-up is at the South
Columbia Sports Complex
concession building.
For details, call Tammy
Sharpe at 867-3825.

CHS TRACK
Fundraiser meal
planned Saturday
Columbia High girls
track has a breakfast
fundraiser at Kazbor's
Grille from 7:30-10:30 a.m.
Saturday. Proceeds also
will benefit the Eye of the
Tiger middle school team.
For tickets, e-mail April
Morse at
eanbz@bellsouth. net.

ADULT BASEBALL
Workout/draft
planned Saturday


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
ATHLETICS
8 p.m.
� ESPN2 - Millrose Games, at New
York
BOXING
10 p.m.
ESPN2 - Super middleweights Jesse
Brinkley (34-5-0) vs. Curtis Stevens
(21-2-0), at Reno, Nev.
EXTREME SPORTS
S' Noon
ESPN2 -Winter X Games, at Aspen,
Colo.
7 p.m.
. ' ESPN - Winter X Games, at Aspen,
Colo.
I a.m.
ESPN2 -Winter X Games, at Aspen,
-Colo. (delayed tape)
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, Qatar
Masters, second round, at Doha, Qatar
(same-day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance
Open, second round, at La Jolla, Calif.
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, men's
semifinal, at Melbourne, Australia (same-
day tape)
3:30 a.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open,
women's championship match, at
Melbourne, Australia

FOOTBALL

NFC Pro Bowl roster
(i-injured, will not play; r-replacement;
s-Super Bowl participant; x-starter)
Offense
Quarterbacks- s,x-Drew Brees, New
Orleans; i-Brett Favre, Minnesota; x-Aaron
Rodgers, Green Bay; r-Donovan McNabb,
Philadelphia; r-Tony Romo, Dallas
Running Backs - i-Steven Jackson,
St. Louis; x-Adrian Peterson, Minnesota;
DeAngelo Williams, Carolina; r-Frank
Gore, San Francisco
Wide Receivers - x-Miles Austin,
Dallas; ix-Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona;
x-DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia; i-Sidney
Rice, Minnesota; r-Steve Smith, New York
Giants; r-Roddy White, Atlanta
Tight Ends - x-Vernon Davis, San
Francisco;Jason Witten, Dallas
Fullback - x-Leonard Weaver,
Philadelphia
Centers - i,x-Andre Gurode, Dallas;
x-Shaun O'Hara, New York Giants;
r, s-Jonathan Goodwin, New Orleans;
r-Ryan Kalil, Carolina
I Guards - x-Leonard Davis, Dallas;
s;x-Jahri Evans, New Orleans; x-Steve
�.,Hutchinson, Minnesota; r-ChrisSnee, N.Y.
Giants
Tackles - Bryant McKinnie,


Minnesota; x-Jason Peters, Philadelphia;
Jon Stinchcomb. New Orleans; s,x-Jahri
Evans, New Orleans
Defense
Ends - x-Jared Allen, Minnesota;
Trent Cole, Philadelphia; x-Julius Peppers,
Carolina
Interior Linemen - x-Darnell
Dockett, Arizona; Jay Ratliff, Dallas;
i,x-Kevin Williams, Minnesota; r-Justin
Smith, San Francisco
Inside-Middle Linebackers -
s-Jonathan Vilma, New Orleans; x-Patrick
Willis, San Francisco; London Fletcher,
Washington
Outside Linebackers - i,x-Lance
Briggs, Chicago; r-Clay Matthews, Green
Bay; x-Brian Orakpo, Washington;
x-DeMarcus Ware, Dallas
Cornerbacks-i-Dominique Rodgers-
Cromartie, Arizona; x-Asante Samuel,
Philadelphia; ix-Charles Woodson, Green
Bay; rx-Terence Newman, Dallas; r-Mike
Jenkins, Dallas
Strong Safety - x-Adrian Wilson,
Arizona; s,x-Roman Harper, New Orleans;
s-Wuintin Mikell, Philadelphia
Free Safeties - x-Nick Collins, Green
Bay; s,x-Darren Sharper, New Orleans;
r-Antrel Rolle,Arizona
Specialists
Punter -Andy Lee, San Francisco
Kick Return Specialist - DeSean
Jackson, Philadelphia; r-Percy Harvin,
Minnesota.
Placekicker - David Akers,
Philadelphia
Special Teamer - Heath Farwell,
Minnesota
Long Snapper - Jon Dorenbos,
Philadelphia

All-Star games
Saturday
Senior Bowl
At MobileAla.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFL)

TENNIS

Australian Open
At Melbourne Park
Melbourne, Australia
Thursday
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Andy Murray (5), Britain, def. Marin
Cilic (14), Croatia, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2.
Women
Semifinals
Serena Williams (1), United States, def.
Li Na (16), China, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (I).
Justine Henin, Belgium, def. Zheng Jie,
China, 6-1, 6-0.
Doubles
Men
Semifinals
Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad
Zimonjic (2), Serbia, def. Ivo Karlovic,
Croatia, and Dusan Vemic, Serbia, 6-4, 6-4.
S. Bob and Mike Bryan (I), United States,
def. Michael Kohlmann, Germany, and
Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 6-1, 6-4.


Women
Semifinals
Serena and Venus Williams (2), United
States, def. Lisa Raymond, United States,
and Rennae Stubbs (6), Australia, 6-3,
7-6 (6).
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Liezel
Huber (I), United States, def. Maria
Kirilenko, Russia,andAgnieszka Radwanska
(15), Poland, 6-1, 1-6, 6-3.
Junior Doubles
Boys
Semifinals
Justin Eleveld and Jannick Lupescu,
Netherlands, def. Jason Kubler and
Benjamin Mitchell, Australia, 6-3, 6-0.
Kevin Krawietz and Dominik Schulz
(2), Germany, def. Huang Liang-chi,Taiwan,
and Yasutaka Uchiyama (4), Japan, 6-3,
7-6 ( 1).
Girls
Semifinals
Jana Cepelova and Chantal Skamlova,
Slovakia, def. -Eugenie Bouchard, Canada,
and Luksika Kumkhum, Thailand, 6-3,
3-6, 10-7.
Timea Babos, Hungary, and Gabriela
Dabrowski (1), Canada def. Ulrikke Eikeri,
Norway, and Camila Silva (4), Chile, 7-5,
6-2.
Wheelchair Singles
Men
Semifinals
Stephane Houdet (2), France, def.
Martin Legner,Austria, 6-2, 6-0.
Shingo Kunieda (I), Japan, def. Robin
Ammerlaan, Netherlands, 6-4. 6-3.
Women
Semifinals
Florence Gravellier (2), France, def.
Jiske Griffioen, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-4.
Korie Homan (I), Netherlands, def.
Aniek van Koot, Netherlands, .6-1, 6-7
(4), 6-2.
Quad
Championship
Peter Norfolk, Britain, def. David
Wagner, United States, 6-2, 0-6, 6-3.
Third Place
Nick Taylor, United States, def. Johan
Andersson, Sweden, 6-3, 6-0.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Boston at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Chicago at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Denver at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Miami at Detroft, 8 p.m.
Washington at New Jersey, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Memphis at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Utah, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New York at Washington, 8 p.m.
Miami at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Charlotte at Sacramento, 10 p.m.


BRIEFS


-YOUTH BASEBALL
*Spring sign-up
ends Saturday
Lake City Columbia
`County Youth Baseball
..has final registration for
its Cal Ripken (ages 5-12
:.as of April 30) and Babe
-Ruth (ages 13-15) spring
league play from 5-7 p.m.
-today, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
-Saturday at the Southside
- Sports Complex Babe Ruth
- Baseball building. Player
- fee is $75 ($50 for ages
'5-6). A parent or
guardian must accompany
. the player and provide a
.copy of player's birth
certificate. Coaches and
sponsors are needed.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810 or
Kevin Stalter at 623-9497.

EnI t Whitfa lannmmi


Adult Baseball League's
workout/draft is 2 p.m.
Saturday at North Florida
Community College in
Madison. Participants who
have not already signed up
can do so online at www.
leaguelineup. corn/
northfloridamabl.
For details, call Greg
Vickers at (850) 253-5107.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fort White league
registration set
The Fort White Girls
Softball Association has
league registration for girls
ages 4-16 set for 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday, and Feb.
6. Sign-up is at the South
Columbia Sports Park
concession stand. Cost is
$40 per player.
For details, call Rodney
Cole at (904) 813-8910.


lU B I, IU ll Ull II i�ll
for 01ustee 5K.
The 2010 Step Fitness



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


AWBEER



RANOUD



A: A ITsI

I Jumbles: JOKER


Blue Grey 5K is 7:30 a.m.
on Feb. 13. The race will
benefit the March of Dimes
in honor of Alexander Ross
McCollum. Business and
personal donations are
being sought. Registration
is available online at www.
active.corn (search Lake
City) and by mail. Student,
senior and team discounts
are offered.
For details, call Step
Fitness at (386) 438-5830.

VOLLEYBALL
Instruction league*
during March
A five-week Instructional
Volleyball League for girls
in grades 4-7 is planned
during the month of
March.
For details, call
Columbia High coach and
North Florida Fusion
co-director Casie
McCallister at 365-3158, or
e-mail
casiek32@hotmail.com.

N From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


"\\ '-T I I - '
WHEN THE GOLFER I
PE5CRIBEP HIS
INCREDIBLE PUTT,
IT 1ECAMVE A ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
TROTH LIMPID INFECT


Yesterday'sI Answer: What the pool player did when he won the
bet - "POCKETED" IT


Ochocinco wants



to kick in Pro Bowl


By JOE KAY
Associated Press

CINCINNATI - Chad
Ochocinco hopes to show
a Pro Bowl audience that
he can kick it as well as
catch it.
The Bengals receiv-
er made some kickoffs
Thursday during practice
for the Pro Bowl in Miami,
hoping to convince the
coaches that he's capable of
going toe-to-toe. He showed
off his punting skills during
warmups a day earlier.
Ochocinco told The
Associated Press in a phone
interview after practice that
he's also planning to kick
field goals during practice


this week. He wants to per-
suade AFC coaches that he
could be more than a just
receiver during the game
on Sunday.
"Yesterday was punting,
today was kickoffs, tomor-
row will be field goals,"
Ochocinco said of his lob-
bying effort. "I don't know.
We'll see what happens."
If the coaches want more
proof, he's got the tape.
The six-time Pro Bowl
receiver is an international
soccer fan and practices
kicking. He had never
done it during a game until
last August, when Bengals
kicker Shayne Graham was
bothered by a sore groin in
practice before a preseason


game against New England
in Foxborough.
Ochocinco kicked an
extra point and had a deep
kickoff as Graham's replace-
ment, providing the win-
ning point in Cincinnati's
7-6 victory.
Afterward, he referred
to himself as "Esteban
Ochocinco, the most inter-
esting footballer in the
world."
He'd like to do it again on
the all-star stage.
"It shouldn't be a prob-
lem," he said. "If they're
going to let me do it, I'm
going to do it early in the
game before they get, seri-
ous and they start to play
for real."


AUSTRALIAN: Williams advances
Continued From Page 1B


After watching the replay,
he added in his understated
monotone: "I never realized
my mouth was so big."
And, by the way, he
insists he practices that
shot.
Murray is the first British
man to reach two Grand
Slam finals in the Open era
and the first to reach the
Australian Open final since
Lloyd in 1977. He will watch
Friday night's semifinal
between Federer, a three-
time Australian champ, and
Tsonga, the 2008 runner-up.
Federer, who beat
Murray in the U.S. Open
final in. 2008, is in his 23rd
consecutive Grand Slam
semifinal - more than
double the previous record
stretch - and has won a
record 15 major singles
titles.
The Swiss star was in
every Grand Slam final last
year, losing in Australia to
Rafael Nadal and losing
at the U.S. Open to Juan
Martin del Potro.
But Murray, who beat an
injured Nadal in the quar-
terfinals, has a 6-4 record in
head-to-heads with Federer
and is 2-1 against Tsonga.


ACROSS

1 Wine barrel
5 Throng
8 An evening
hour
12 Rank above
marquis
13 Cobbler's tool
14 Bullfight bravos
15 Move about
16 August kid,
maybe
17 Pod veggie
18 "- vincit
amor"
20 Painter's
ground
22 Ben & Jerry
rival
23 Golly!
24 Closes
-27 Population survey
30 Greer and
Roach
31 - the hatchet
32 Band job
34 Epoch
35 Looks at


That gives hope to millions
of Britons. And that's also
why Murray is happy to
be on the other side of the
world.
"You don't really feel it
that much. Wimbledon is
a bit different, especially in
the lead-up to the tourna-
ment," he said. "But when
you're away, don't take any
notice of it ... just kind of
avoid it, I guess."
There are 'no expecta-
tions on Tsonga. He can
swing with the. freedom
he did in his five-set win
over 2008 champion Novak
Djokovic in the quarterfi-
nals.
In 14 Grand Slam tourna-
ments, he'd never played
a five-set match. Now he's
played two back-to-back.
Immediately after beating
Djokovic, to avenge his-loss
in Australia two ,years ago,
he told the stadium fans he
was ready for more right
away, pointing to the crowd
and asking for volunteers.
But he faces the best in
the business in Federer.
After falling a set and .a
break down against No.
6 Nikolay Davydenko in
the quarterfinals, Federer


36 Fr. miss
37 Climbing gear
39 Polyester
partner
40 Literary
collection
41 Tweak the
memory
42 Awaken rudely
44 Dame - Sitwell
47 Spring up
48 Versatile
vehicle'
50 Actor - Everett
52 Kick in a chip
53 Music genre
54 Sighs of
relief
55 Jumble
56 Printer's
measures
57 Roll


DOWN

1 Investment
options
2 Wheels
3 Read quickly


changed gears and won
13 straight games to take
the match away from the
Russian, who had been
riding a 13-match winning
streak.
Justine Henin did much
the same thing to Zheng
Jie, who won only the first
game of their semifinal
on Thursday. Henin, once
ranked No. 1, saved three
break points in the next
game. That was the start of
a 12-game roll that ended
6-1, 6-0 in 51 minutes - the
shortest match of the tour-
nament and the most lop-
sided in 27 years.
Henin, only two tourna-
ments into a comeback
from a year and a half in
retirement, is aiming for an
eighth Grand Slam title and
first in Australia since 2004.
She'll have to get past four-
time Australian Open cham-
pion Serena Williams first.
And Williams has never
lost a final at Melbourne
Park.
The top-ranked Williams
had to work to hold off Li
Na, who rallied past older
sister Venus Williams in
the quarterfinals in two tie-
breakers.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


G ASHDISCO
POMPOM AURORA
EROICA TEASER
NEST YET OWS
ZEPHYRS
UTA LOS OOZY

SAHOSTEL HOLEUP
FIERCE ENDURE




ABLAZE ITALIC
MELLO W COMETS
PLATO OISE


Nutmeats
Singapore's
language
Feel grateful
Online journal
keepers


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
I at QuillDriverBooks.com


8 Slipknots
9 Genres
10 Roman fiddler
11 Rocket
launcher
19 Ego
companions
21 Counting-out
start
24 That girl
25 Dodge City
marshal
26 Eurasian
range
27 Billiard sticks
28 Unattractive
29 Farm structure
31 Inherently
(2 wds.)
33 - -Xer
35 Many ages
36 Enchanting
38 Hosiery
shades
39 Wand
41 SomeCherokees
42 Mathematician
- Descartes
43 Muesli base
45 Far East cuisine
46 Mocking
laughs
47 Escape
49 Cap
51 Summer hrs.


@2010 by UFS, Inc.


The North Florida Men's


.ru I e ViI league
sign-up Saturday RUNNING
R aictratinn nnon


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


2B











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


DILBERT
OH NO. IF I DON'T --
FORWARD THIS
E-MAIL TO FIFTY
FRIENDS, I'LL DIE
WITHIN A WEEK. F-


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
I' LIKE TO COMMENT YOU ANO
THE ENTIRE POLICE FORCE ON
THE MARVELOUS JOB YOU'RE
) ,come /


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH
I'M BLACK BART, GRAMPY, GOOD
AN' I'M GONNA ROB TH' LUCK, P
BANK AN' KEEP ALL TH' JUG-
GOLD !!. -"- -HAID
-G " I -


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


Copy~ght 0,0 C~eo,, cornJohnHartStudlcr ' h~'

FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Cash-strapped parents regret

deathbed promise made to son


WHAT I'M
ARE YOU UPPING
SENDING IT TO
HIr"\ NOW? SIXTY
FRIENDS.


DEAR ABBY: My 31-
year-old son, "Joey," who
needs a heart transplant,
almost died a few weeks
ago. The doctors told us he
wouldn't make it through
the weekend. I was beside
myself. On what we thought
was his deathbed, I told
Joey I would give him any-
thing he wanted if he pulled
through. He wanted a very
expensive sports car.
Well, my son pulled
through, but has other
physical challenges. My
husband and I are send-
ing him $500 a month until
he starts receiving money
from Social Security. It's the
best we can do right now.
The problem is, Joey keeps
hounding me about the
sports car. I cannot afford
this gift. We have offered to
have his current vehicle re-
conditioned or give him my
year-old car with its very
low mileage.
I do not want this to be-
come an issue with my son.
I have told him his heart
condition is the priority and
to let everything else fall
into place. It's eating me
alive that I can't give my
son what I promised. On
the other hand, his request
is unreasonable. Please'
help. - JOEY'S MOM IN
IAS CRUCES
DEAR MOM: Unless


pleasant experience with
Aaron when a roommate
mentioned an old friend of
hers - a boy, but not a boy-
friend. Aaron became very
"hurt" by the conversation.
So now Crystal wants -no
reminders of her past - es-
pecially regarding other
boys.
Is this normal? I don't
know what to do. I wonder
whether they need counsel-
ing before they marry, but I
don't want to interfere. My
daughter becomes angry
with me over little things.
She even ignored us when
we asked her to come cel-
ebrate her brother's birth-
day. She just wants to be
with her true love; nobody
else seems to matter. - A
WORRIED MOM
DEAR MOM: Your idea
of premarital counseling
is an excellent one. Aaron
appears to be extremely
insecure, and your daugh-
ter is so in love she can't
see the handwriting on the
wall. When you invited her
to celebrate her brother's
birthday, did you also in-
clude her fiance? If so, and
she still didn't want to come,
Aaron may be trying to dis-
tance her from the family.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Nothing will be
simple. The faster you ad-
just to the way things are,
the better the outcome. A
good attitude and less fran-
tic behavior will help con-
siderably. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Be sure to make
your-own decisions. You'll
be troubled by the prob-
lems an older relative is ex-
periencing. It won't be easy,
but it will give you greater
understanding. Don't fight
the inevitable. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): The more time
you take to make a .deci-
sion, the harder it will be
for you to recoup any loss
you've incurred. Money
matters can be resolved if
you collect or pay an old
debt. Get busy before it's
too late. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Get into some-.
thing that really interests
you and it will lead to a
richer and more rewarding
lifestyle. Learning some-
thing new or starting a new
project will put you one step
closer to your goals. Travel
will bring you knowledge
and life experience, ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): A situation that devel-
ops will make it difficult for
you to deal with partners,
bosses or any authoritative


THE LAST WORD,
Eugenia Word

figure. Don't let your emo-
tional feelings confuse you.
Focus on moneymaking
deals or making upgrades.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Everyone will come to
you for solutions. You will
be put on the spot and must
be ready to cover your back.
Someone is probably trying
to put the spotlight on you
as a diversion. Take care
of other people's dilemmas
quickly and launch your
plans. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): The clearer you are
about what you want, the
easier it will be, so don't
beat around the bush.
Someone you are close to
will play devil's advocate
and question what you are
trying to accomplish. Let
this guide you, so you don't
make mistakes. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Touch base with
someone from your past
who can shed light on a
situation you face in your
personal life. Experience
in such matters will help to
clear up questions, 'allow-
, ing you the mental freedom
you need to move forward.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Don't fight a
losing battle. Stick to your
original plans and you will
reach your goal. Money
deals can be made but they
must be within your bud-
get. Don't leave anything
to chance or you will take a
loss. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): 'Patience
and tolerance may not be
enough when it comes
to dealing with personal
matters and partnerships.
Have everything looked- at
by a mediator/lawyer be-
fore you decide to deal with
someone who isn't rational.
***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Expect someone
to make a change that will
throw you off-course. Show-
ing your versatility and abil-
ity to stick to a schedule will
impress someone who can
improve your future. Deal-
ing with authority figures
or partners will be difficult
Stick to the truth. *** -
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You are ca-
pable of doing anything
you put your mind to and, if
you do, you will raise your
profile and gain the respect
you long for. Don't focus
on the people who let you
down. A couple of positive
actions will bring you a big
return. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: A equals L
"ATDW TI PHSM DVS WKWSEVYW..
O P H O' I L P E O PWSW' I I R B P H YTBW
SWLHSM HO OPW WYM VD TO." -
HTMHY GRTYY
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "A young painter who cannot liberate himself from the
influence of past generations is digging his own grave." - H. Matisse

(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 1-29


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


E
I DON'T HAVE THAT
MANY FRIENDS! I NEED
TO MAKE MORE FRIENDS,
SAND FAST!!!

I {#4/


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
you put a stop to it now, this
WILL become an issue with
your son. Surely he is in
touch enough with reality
that he knows your financial
situation - and if he doesn't,
please inform him. While
you're at it, explain that
when you thought he was
on his deathbed, you were
out of your mind with grief
- and you can't be held to a
promise made under such
duress. At $500 a month,
you can hardly be accused
of being a withholding par-
ent, so stop beating your-
self up.
DEAR ABBY: My 21-
year-old daughter, "Crys-
tal," has been engaged to
her boyfriend, "Aaron," for
several months. When she
was here recently I asked
her to clean out some of
the stuff from under her
bed and in her closet. She
proceeded to throw out her
yearbooks, photos from
high school dances - even
old journals!
It seems she had an un-


J WHAT's UP NO
WITH THAT? TELUN'





,- A.i


HE MUST WE'D
51 UP 701 5ETTER
SOME'RIING . ARRES T
* HIM

- C"" T-A-


HOROSCOPES


BUT I'M A-FEARED THAT WALL
STREET GANG BEAT'CHA TO IT !!
_- s--- -s ---Ts 's .


""~Y" '' ""


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404


CLASSIC PEANUTS













LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


lies 1795
3 days Li
Includes 2 Signs : el:hIe i ill r



,Limited to service type advertis-
*ing only.
4-'lies, one month....s92.00'
$10.80 each additional line
ktcludes an additional $2.00 per
s dTor each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
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a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
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classified ads in person, and some
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ment. Our office is located at 180
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copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
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Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.laikecityreporter.com


Legal

NOTICE OF ABANDONMENT
Stor-it America - Mini Storage
The following units will be auc-
tioned off on Saturday, February 6,
2010, at 9:00 AM. Location is 2 1/2
miles north of the post office on
Hwy. 41, owned by Stor-it America.
Authorized Carpet Cleaning #79
Conn, Terry #7
Davis, Sheba #67
Donaldson, Irvin #70
Hampton, Kim #16
* Hobby, David #38
Kitchen, William #11
Michael Murphy #6
Ruise, Renee #51 & 60
Kayshea Smith #42
04537361
January 29, 2010
February 5, 2010
NOTICE OF BOARD MEETING
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
The District Board of Trustees, Lake
City Community College, will hold a
public meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tues-
day, February 9, 2010, in the Board
Room of'the Gilchrist County School
Board Office, 310 NW llth Ave.
Trenton, Florida.
Topics of consideration will be rou-
tine college business. In addition to
routine college business the follow-
ing items will be considered: Board
Policy , 6Hx 12:06-07, Equal
Access/Equal Opportunity; Board
Policy 6Hx 12:06-10, Grievances;
Board Policy 6Hx 12:06-23, Harass-
ment. Any person wishing to be
heard on any agenda matter will be
provided an opportunity to do so by
appearing before the Board in the
Board Room of the Gilchrist County
School Board Office.
All objections to this notice and pro-
priety of the scheduled meeting
should be filed with Lake City Com-
munity College prior to noon, Fri-
day, February 5, 2010. All legal is-
sues should be brought to the Trust-
ees' attention and an attempt made to
resolve them prior to the meeting.
Please notify the President's Office
immediately if you require accom-
modation for participation in the
meeting.
A reception will be held at 3:30 p.m.
in the Gilchrist County School Board
Office prior to the regular Board
meeting.
04537377
January 29, 2010
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of The Se-
cure Group at 136 SW Prism Loop
Lake City, FL. 32024
Contact Phone Number: 386-752-
3753 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: MARK MAGSTADT
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Mark Magstadt
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 25 day of January, A.D. 2010.
by:/s/ ROBERT STEWART

04537354
JAnuary 29, 2010


020 Lost & Found

AFRICAN GRAY w/ red tail lost
01/19 around Gwen Lake down by
the Workcamp. REWARD! Call
386-755-1464 or 386-288-3687

BLACK/TAN DOG,
Mixed breed, found in Eastside
Village area on Thurs., Jan. 21.
Call 386-758-8848
LOST DOG "BUSTER"
brindle bull-dog mix White on
muzzle, chest, and' tips of feet 1
black toenail on left back foot.
Last seen CR 252 &
Price Creek Rd REWARD
344-8128 or 344-8116
LOST MALE solid gray cat.
Family pet. Missing since Sunday
01/24. Mayo Rd. area west of town
386-754-0614 or 365-5694

100 Job
Opportunities

04537127
GOOD OPPORTUNITY!
NOW HIRING An Experi-
enced Stylist with clientele
Southern Exposure
386-752-4614







Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191

Services


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit.
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tcldavies

BLUE JEAN JOB $ CASH $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock-n-Roll
Environment. Call Skhyler
1-321-432-4142. 9am-6pm.
Must start Immediately!
2 Temporary Farm Workers
needed 3/1/10 - 12/20/10.
Performs variety of manual.
animal-and-crop-raising tasks on
general farm under close supervi-
sion. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $8.12/hr. Applicants
should report or send a resume to
the nearest FL Agency or
Workforce Innovation office &
reference JO # AL 516413.
Cannon Farms - Theodore, AL
CLASS A CDL Long haul driver.
Must have frameless dump exp.
Must pass drug test. Requires out
of town travel . 386-.719-9482
between 9a & 5p
Gotta Go Transport a flatbed Co.
in High Springs needs Class A
CDL Driver. Min. 2 years exp.
Home weekends, safety bonus and
vacation pay. Call 386-454-0532.
Great opportunity for dependable,
qualified, experienced CHEF for
Christian retreat center. Applicant
must be mature, have excellent
people skills, be capable of
supervising others, time mgmt, food
cost and other management duties.
Work most weekends, very flexible
hours. Send resume to Camp Weed
fax 386/362-7557
frontdesk@campweed.org
INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for self motivated goal
oriented sales person in both
life/health and property/casualty
ins. A 220 and 215 license a plus
but not reqd. Must have exc.
comm. skills, be organized and de-
pendable. Must be team oriented
and have computer skills.
Send reply to
Box 04086, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
OWNER OPERATORS WANTED
Flatbed, stepdeck OTR operation
based out of Fort White, FL. Good $.
Must have good equipment, and be
willing to work it!
Call Mike at 386-623-4801.


100 Job
100 Opportunities
17 Temporary Farm Workers
needed 3/1/10 - 12/31/10. Work-
ers will seed, set, cut. house, and
strip tobacco. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers. Trans-
portation & subsistence reim-
bursed to worker upon completion
of 50% of contract. Pay rate is
$7.25/hr & $8.00/hr depending on
crop activity. Applicants should
report or send a resume to the
nearest Florida Agency of Work-
force Innovation office & refer-
ence JO # KY 0394328.
S David Harper - Allensville, KY

110 Sales
Employment
)5522947
SALESMAN NEEDED
Must be aggressive and self moti-
vated. Also must be willing to
travel and work some weekends.
Fax resume to (386) 963-2809 or
email it to: srlh(@srloRhomes.com

Are You Earning What You Are
Worth?
Growing company looking for
SUPER STAR sales representative
386-487-1742 or email resume to
industrialsupplyjobs@gmail.com

1 8 Medical
120 Employment

04537240
RN Needed
Experience Preferred.
Full Time with Benefits.
Email Resume to:
Angela Akins RN/SDC
At
aakins@gulfcoasthealthcare.com
Or
Fax Resume to:
386-364-5174
EOE/V/D/M/F

CNA/Medical Assistant wanted
for local medical office. Send re-
sume to 184 S.W. Macon Street
Madison, FL 32340
LPN or RN needed Fulltime
3PM-11PM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V


f240 Schools &
240 Education

045-,i7( i
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant. $429
next class-02/01/10
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-02/08/10
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-03/16/10.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books.
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

STAINLESS STEEL/BLACK
Microwave, (Sharp)
Great Condition
$50, Call 386-755-3350

UPRIGHT FREEZER.
Frost Free $150. 00
or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$150.00 Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.


408 Furniture

BLACK METAL frame futon
with cushion.
$50.00
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.

DOUBLE RECLINER SOFA
Brown
$400
Call 386-961-8623
ELECTRIC RECLINER
Good Condition, Leather
$500
Call 904-504-2620
NICE ROLLING Microwave
Table with slide out meat cutting
board $35.00 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
PATIO FURNITURE
w/umbrella, PVC Pipe style, table
4 chairs, needs replacement
cushions, $50, Call 386-755-3350
STURDY ROCKING CHAIR
with cushions, great condition
$50
Call 386-755-3350

413 Musical
413 Merchandise

FREE Piano
In good condition,
legs need somework
SOLD

YAMAHA CVP 405 Clavinova.
Like new. Still has plastic on foot
pedals. All instructions still in un-
opened box. Sales for $7,999.95.
Asking $4000. 386-623-6989


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$150 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

1261 NW Turner Ave. Fri - Sun.
8-? Appliances, Decor, pictures
flower arr. , clothes, purses, shoes,
lots misc.

FLEA MARKET
Inside Lake City Shrine Club-
Brown Rd. Jan 29, 30 31. Rain or
shine/hot or cold. Rent table for
$10/day, $25 for 3 days. Call Lory
at 758-5814


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
****************H***********


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430 Garage Sales

Fri & Sat. 8-5, rain/shine.
Housewares. electronics-lots of
misc. exercise equipment. 2213
SW Birley Ave. 386-755-0661


440 Miscellaneous

100 FOOT ROLL RED TOP
WIRE. 4 foot. with 4 inch squares.
never used, $100 or best offer.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
42" HITACHI
Large Screen Projection TV
$450
Call 386-961-8623
IMPEX POWERHOUSE
Home Gym,
Exercise Machine, $50
Call 386-961-8623
STONE GRINDER
For making flour
$30
Call 386-961-8623

620 Mobile Home
620 Lots for Sale
1 ACRE lot, 3 min. from Walmart
Only $19,900!
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com

630 Mobile Homes
0JU for Rent
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$450 - $600. monthly.
Also, Irg 2 br. furnished, apt.
386-752-6422
2br/2ba on 2 ac, owner mows,
unfurnished, all appliances incl.,
no pets inside, Ref. req., $600
mo./$300 dep, 386-935-2461.
3B/2BA DWMH w/ carport &
back porch in nice cond. Good lo-
cation. $700 mo., 1st, last, $500
dep. Small dog. 386-752-6333
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3/2, & 2/2 MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Very private Manufactured
4br/2ba. Home on 1 ac. 41N close
to 1-10. $700/mo. 1st, last &
$350. sec dep. 386-365-1438
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511

64f RMobile Homes
0 for Sale
2000 SF Palm Harbor 3Bd/2Ba with
retreat/office. 2X6 Walls, 8' Ceilings
(T&T), Plywood Floors, Extra Insu-
lation, 2 Sliding Glass Doors, Appli-
ances. Ceramic Floors. 16 inch con-
struction. Reduced Price Call Gary
Hamilton (386) 758-9824 Possible
Owner Finance!!
2010 BRANDNEW 4/2 DW,
CH&A, skirting, steps, set-up &
delv. All this for only $39,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452.
jetdec@ windstream.net
4/2 ONLY
$289.00 per month.
with set/up.
Call John T. 386-752-1452.
BRAND NEW 2010
4br/2ba on your property, for
pymts of only $321.56 a mo.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
FACTORY REPO'S,
built two many 28x40's.
Only 2 left for $28,500.
Call John T. 386-752-1452
GREAT REPO 2 bed. Single-
wide, completely refurbed. Set up
on your land. $11,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm martin23@yahoo.com
NO MONEY DOWN
When you own your land.
Payments on doublewides
start @ 239/month.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
NO MONEY down on new
Manufactured homes.
Call for more details on program.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
ENERGY STAR Homes R-30
ins., Heat Pump, thermal panes.
Free electric for 1 year.
Must mention this ad.
Homes start at $29,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jmmartin23@yahoo.com
READY TO move in 2001 3br
doublewide on .87 acres. In Co-
lumbia Co., $1500 down, $350
mo. Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
BANK REPO
Nice 3/2 doublewide,
over 1,300 sq. ft. only $15,000.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
REPO'S REPO'S REPO's
We have many to choose from!
Homes starting @ $10,500.
These homes won't last long!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK FORECLOSURE! 2001
3/2 DW on 1 acre of land! banks
loss your gain @ only $49,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
Only 2 left, turn key packages. In
nice, up scale community. These
Jackobsons won't last long.
Call John 386-344-5234.
Owner financing available.

710 Unfurnished Apt.
.For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES !
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!!$649 permo. !!!

$299 MOVES YOU IN
Law Enforcement Discounts
Teacher Discounts
Veteran Discounts
Student Discounts
FREE RENT
7 200 FREE CHANNELS
* BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

! Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2 and 3 bedrooms
Central Heat and Air
Ph. 386-752-3033
W. Grandview Ave. 32055
Equal Housing Opportunity


710 Unfurnished Apt.
/71 For Rent
***LIMITED TIME ONLY***
WINDSONG APARTMENT
HOMES
I BD $499
2 BD $535
3 BD $617
NO DEPOSITS
2 MONTHS FREE
EXPIRES 02/28/2010
*Some Restrictions Apply
Tel: (386) 758-8455
1 OR 2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$600 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2 br/lba w/garage on the West side
1st, last &security.
Call
386-755-6867
2Br Apt. Gorgeous lake view.
Great location.
$485. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
2br/lba duplex, Newly renovated,
tile floors, washer/dryer. Energy
Efficient. $475/Mo. $300 Dep.
Req'd. Call: 386-755-1937
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
WASHER DRYER HOOK UP.
$650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex w/ga-
rage. all electric. AC, W/D hook
up DW. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Share Pool Home! Full use kitch-
en, laundry, separate bedroom and
bath. $500/mo. + 1/3 electric.
Call Derek 386-344-3261
www.bigfloridahome.com
Studios & 1Br's from $140/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
VERY NICE 2b/lb duplex. $495
rent. First month free. Call
386-963-4974 to see upon app.
approval, $295.00 moves you in.
X-CLEAN SECOND story 2/2,
private acre 8 mi. to VA. No dogs
$500 a.mo + dep. Ideal for
single/traveler 386-961-9181
7 0 Furnished Apts.
2 U For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
73 Unfurnished
3 Home For Rent
2BR/1BA, $480 A MONTH
MOVES YOU IN.
668 S.E. Nassau Street,
Call 386-697-9950


73n Unfurnished
7/3 Home For Rent
I BED $350, 2 BED $475. 3 BED
$500-550. Central A/C, small/
quiet community. 352-505-9264 or
800-805-7379. Only 4 left!
IBR/IBA HOUSE on Ichetuck-
nee River. Quiet setting. Close to
boat ramp. $600. mo.
plus $400 deposit. 386-397-3258
Beautiful 2005 home. Secluded
area. 3/2 split bedroom 1/4 mile
from Hwy 90 No Pets. $895. mo
$800. security. 386-719-5616
Beautiful Newer 3BR/2BA, on
CR 18, 30 mins. to Gville., 30
mins. to L.C., $950 p/m + last +
sec., go to website for photo at
www.property4you.biz.
Call 386-365-3865.
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$800/mo.
864-517-0522.
Cute 2/1 CHA, laundry rm-W/D,
dinning rm, large yard, some pets
ok, Close to VA, storage shed, 607
Camp $675/mo. 386-755-5936
Great Location! Lg 3br/2ba w/ga-
rage at Southern Oaks CC. Wash-
er/dryer avail. $1,100 me. plus de-
posit.386-752-3991 or 397-4550
HOME FOR rent $750 mo.
4br./lba. Irg patio, shed & fenced,
Absolutely no pets!
386-623-7379 or 386-755-4483
PROVIDENCE, IBR,
1.5 BA,w/d,c-h/a,l ac. fenced,
private,nice, most pets ok. $650
Ist/1st/dep. 386-752-2555/c-
352-494-1989
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90NWof Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086

770 Condos For Rent
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

810 Home for Sale
In Lake City. 3br,3b,LR,DR
Den, Office, Generator,
Well Sprinkler System, 2500 sq. ft.
$189,000 386-792-2952

820 Farms &
2 vAcreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
2 acs. out from Macclenny on
121N. On the Fl and Ga. line. Well
septic, It pole, fenced. $38,000.
912-843-2078 or 904-25975260


www.lakecityreporter.com


Lae ieyRe..ore


10
DAY
FORONL
$4 .


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of -
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just:
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


Fo'MreDeais al Mry


Swww.akecityreporter.com






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Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
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ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT THE TIME OF PLACEMENT. DEADLINE IS FEB. 9,2010.
j jkLCommunity.
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^iAHBHH^^^^^~H~^^*"""'8^"^^^


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Classified Department: 755-5440







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2010


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a~jkigy~~tj Add~tionalI


Discounts for
Active and
Retired


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Irweek.


Military!


24 monlh lease 51999 due ol signing 12k mnles per year Plus io liwle & fte,


36 monlh Ileae S2499 due ot lignlng 12k miles per year Plus loax llle 8 lees


surance IOw7 gLfI 2i @oS W.l@@9s� '
don't just
great deals, VALDOSTA, GEORGIA 31602
ve create - 2.11
ationships!
CALL TOLL-FREE: 7 = ~=430 �
www.hyundaiofvaldosta.net


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See dealer for details.


Advertised payments plus tax, title and fees. Must present buyers order signed by management for same vehicle and we'll match price. See dealer for Hyundai Assurance program certificate
for complete details. Must quality for all rebates. Restrictions apply. Pictures for illustration purposes only.- See dealer for details.


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