Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text









000023 120110 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943








Wednesday, January 27,



Wednesday, January 27, L- 1


r- -


Tebow criticized
Heisman-winning quarterback to
take part in controversial Super
Bowl advertisement
Sports, 7A






porter



Vol. 136, No. 8 E 75 cents


Missing mural?


Painting could be victim to expansion


A CELEBRATED CAREER


John Kuykendall (left), president of GulfCoast Financial Services, and his vice president and son, Brent, pose in front of
the Keith Goodson mural depicting the many facets of the Ichetucknee River. There is a possibility that the mural might be
destroyed in order to make room for a fire escape to be built for the second story. 'We're just trying to find a solution,' John
Kuykendall said. 'We already started on the plans in 2007.'


By TONY BRITT
and ANTONIA ROBINSON
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

The mural which
was painted on
the Kuykendall
Building less
than two years
ago could become a victim
of expansion.
John Kuykendall, a co-
owner of the Kuykendall
Building, said the mural
could be removed when
the lease expires on Jan.
22, 2012, because he plans
to utilize and renovate the
building's top floor.
The mural, which depicts
animal life and activities
on the Ichetucknee River,
was completed in 2008
by Pensacola artist, Keith
Goodson. The mural cost
$18,000 and was paid for
by local resident James
Montgomery.
The mural is the first in a
series of murals to be paint-
ed in Downtown Lake City,
said Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council
executive director. A
committee was established
for the mural project.
Approval to paint the
mural was soughtfrom the
MURAL continued on 3A


7//I/A


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, '.."


i ' . .
:..: .". .. .. � ' . .


JASUN mAI IMHEW WALKERf L a -. '"-'I ': '"'".
The Kuykendalls look at a window on the south side of the building where they plan to
construct a fire escape. 'We're trying to keep a lot of the historical integrity of the building,'
Brent Kuykendall said.


JASUN VIA r 1-VV VVALKI , L , I . ,l *.'i
Margaret Smith dons a festive hat after being honored by
friends and co-workers.


Retirement party

honors Smith


She retired from
humane society
on Dec. 31.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Being humane society
executive director was a
thankless job at times, but
Margaret Smith was dedi-'
cated to the task.
"Ms. Smith, we appre-
ciated all the work you
have done," said Columbia.


County Commissioner Ron
Williams. "You set. the bar
high in Columbia County."
He and several others paid
tribute to Smith at her retire-
ment celebration Tuesday.
Smith retired as executive
director of the Lake City/
Columbia County Humane
Society on Dec. 31.
She will always be remem-
bered in the community for
her love and care for ani-
mals, Williams said.
.SMITH continued on 3A


Utility committee

adopts ordinances


Committee will
recommend
approval to county.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
The Columbia County
Utility Committee adopted
two proposed ordinances
and wpl recommend they
be adopted by the county
commission to establish
the service area and a con-
nection ordinance for the
Ellisville Utility.
Utility committee mem-
bers adopted the ordinanc-
es during the committee's
Tuesday morning meeting,
after reviewing draft ordi-
nances with attorney Brian


Armstrong, a partner with
the Neighbors, Giblin and
Nickerson law firm, who
also made changes to the
documents.
'"The utility service area
ordinance establishes the
fact the county is in the
water/wastewater busi-
ness and it says that in the .-
Ellisville area the county -
is the exclusive provid-
er of water/wastewater
services," Armstrong said.
He said in the future
the county may expand
services to additional
unincorporated areas of.
the county.
"Right now the exclu-
sive area is confined to the
Ellisville interchange area,"
he said.


S&S recognizes fundraising, employees


Company
raises $8,000 for
children's hospital.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
S&S Food Stores/
Scaff's Markets announced
employee awards and com-
mended their stores for
raising more than $80,000
in 2009 for the Children's

CALL US:
(386) 752-12
SUBSCRIBE
THE REPORT
Voice: 75S-54
1 84264 0002 1 Fax: 752-94


Miracle Network at their
employee awards luncheon
Tuesday.
"Last year you guys really
did kick some butt in fund-
raising," said Keith Brown,
vice president of marketing
and human resources for
S&S Food Stores.
Brown said the stores
raised money through sell-
ing CMN icons, raffling off
donated products from dif-
ferent vendors and other


93 6 1 3 1
TO Sunny
TER:
400 WEATHER, 2A


creative projects.
Monica Haynes, project
coordinator for the CMN
in Gainesville for Shands
Children's Hospital, said
the money raised by S&S
Food Stores will go into
the CMN "pot" and will be
distributed as needed.
Haynes presented two
different projects that the
CMN helped to fund in
2009 - a Shands pediatric
ambulance and a pediatric
'- Opinion ......
/ V Local .........
S Obituaries
Advice & Comia
Puzzles .......


outpatient surgical center
at Shands - to show the
S&S Food Stores employ-
ees how the money they
raise is being used.
"It really means a lot
that you put your time and
effoi t into those you don't
even know," Haynes said.
"We've seen a lot of patients
grow."
Dr. Bill Slayton, interim
S&S continued on 3A


........... 4A
..5A
..6A
cs . . . . . . . . . 5B
........... 8A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER I. .� , I pp:.,1,
Keith Brown (left), the vice president of marketing and human
resources for S & S Food Stores, awards Robert Layton with
a plaque for the 2009 Employee of the Year Tuesday.


COLUMBIA
INC.
A look at local
business.


COMING
THURSDAY
NASCAR news
from the track.


r' , I










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


(A$H 3 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 3-2-0
Evening: 3-5-2


Tuesday:
'" Afternoon: 9-1-8-9
Evening: 3-5-3-1


evnatch
Monday:
2-13-19-24-28


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Mel Gibson returns to screen after 7 years


LOS ANGELES
The last time Mel Gibson
starred in a movie, he
was grappling with alien
invaders and a misplaced
faith in the sci-fi thriller
"Signs."
That was seven and a half years
ago. In the intervening time, Gibson
became a cultural firebrand, direct-
ing the controversial 2004 box-office
- hit "The Passion of the Christ"
and the violent 2006 action epic,
"Apocalypto."
He also became a cultural pariah
in July 2006 when, after being pulled
over in Malibu for speeding and
driving under the influence, Gibson
made obscene, anti-Semitic remarks
to the arresting officer after being
handcuffed and put inside a police
car.
Gibson largely disappeared after
the incident, but returns to theaters
Friday with a new movie, "Edge of
Darkness," a thriller about a Boston
police detective seeking revenge for
the murder of his 24-year-old daugh-
ter. Receiving lukewarm reviews so
far, the movie is similar in tone with
past blood-drenched Gibson films
such as "Ransom" and the "Lethal
Weapon" franchise.
"It was time," Gibson, 54, said. "I
felt like getting back in the saddle.
I felt like I was getting stale about
seven or eight years ago. Stepped
back, did some things I wanted to
do. Did a few things I didn't want to
do. And then time to come back."

Timberlake wins Harvard's
Hasty Pudding award
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Justin
Timberlake will soon have a new
piece of hardware for his trophy case
- a pudding pot.
The Grammy and Emmy award
winner was named Harvard's
Hasty Pudding Man of the Year on
Tuesday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this film publicity image released by Warner Bros., Ray Winstone (left) and Mel
Gibson are shown in a scene from 'Edge of Darkness.'


STimberlake will
receive the award at
a roast set for
Feb. 5.
Hasty Pudding
Theatricals, the
nation's oldest
Tb k undergraduate
Tmbake drama troupe,
said in a statement that the singer,
songwriter, actor and producer was
selected because he's "one of pop
culture's most influential
entertainers."

Stewart is headed to
Hallmark Channel
NEW YORK - Martha Stewart is
heading to cable.
The lifestyle queen has signed a
deal to move her daily program to
the Hallmark Channel, effective this
September. "The Martha Stewart
Show" is currently syndicated to
broadcast channels
across the country.
S "r The announce-
( -- d ment was made
Tuesday by Martha
. Stewart Living
- Omnimedia Inc. and
I [Hallmark.
Stewart After Stewarfs


show, Hallmark will air 90 minutes of
programming created by Stewart's
production company.

AC/DC to release official
soundtrack to Iron Man 2
NEW YORK - AC/DC is putting
the metal in the upcoming "Iron
Man 2" film.
The band announced Tuesday
they will release the official
soundtrack, "AC/DC: Iron Man 2"
on April 19. The first video from
the album, "Shoot To Thrill," was
released on Tuesday.

Hopper's wife wants
custody of daughter
'LOS ANGELES - Court records
show Dennis Hopper's wife wants
full custody of their young daughter
as part of their divorce case.
Victoria Hopper filed a response
Monday to a divorce petition filed
Jan. 14,by Dennis Hopper that cited
irreconcilable differences.
The actor is battling prostate can-
cer.
He also is asking a judge to award
his wife spousal support. They have
been married nearly 14 years.
E Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Bobby "Blue" Bland
is 80.
* Actor James Cromwell is
70.
* Actor John Witherspoon
is 68.
* Rock musician Nick Mason
(Pink Floyd) is 65.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Nedra Talley (The Ronettes)
is 64.
* Country singer Cheryl
White is 55.
* Actress Mimi Rogers is 54.
Daily Scripture


* Rock musician Janick Gers
(Iron Maiden) is 53.
* Actress Bridget Fonda is
46.
* Actor Alan Cumming is 45.
* Country singer Tracy
Lawrence is 42.
* Rock singer Mike Patton
is 42.
* Actor Josh Randall is 38.
* Country singer Kevin
Denney is 34.
* Tennis player Marat Safin
is 30.


"Humble yourselves before the Lord,


and he will lift you up."

Thought for Today


- James 4:10


"Who never doubted, never half
believed.Where doubt is, there truth
is - it is her shadow."
- Gamaliel Bailey,
American abolitionist (1807-1859)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
Fax number ..............752-9400 BUSINESS
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of brannn
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- CIRCULATION
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Tuesday through.Saturday, and by 7:30
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and a.m. on Sunday.
The Associated Press.
Please call, 386-755-5445 to report any
All material herein is property of the Lake problems with your delivery service.
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or in Columbia County, customers should
in part is forbidden without the permis- call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
n of1the publisher U.S. Postal Service vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
POSTMASTER: Send address changes vice related credits will be issued.
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, In all other counties where home delivery
Lake City, Fla. 32056. is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418 vice related credits will be issued.
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
Circulation ...............755-5445
NEWS ' (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
If you have a news tip, call any member Home delivery rates
of the news staff or 752-5295. (Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428 24 Weeks................. $48.79
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com) 52 Weeks................... $83.46
ADVERTISING Rates indude 7% sales tax.
A VE ISING Mail rates
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417 12 Weeks.............. $41.40
(lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com) � 24 Weeks................... $82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Crist to propose
corporation tax cut
TALLAHASSEE - Gov.
Charlie Crist wants to give
Florida corporations a $100
million tax cut although
the state is facing a poten-
tial budget deficit of up to
$3.2 billion.
Crist on Tuesday said
his proposal is designed
to help businesses pro-
vide more jobs to reduce
Florida's 11.8 percent
unemployment rate.
He proposed the tax be
cut from 5.5 percent to 4.5
percent but only for the
first $1 million of a corpo-
ration's annual income.
That would mean a maxi-
mum savings of $10,000
for each corporation.

Flights over
stadium banned
MIAMI GARDENS -
Flights will be restricted to
go over the South Florida
stadium where the Pro
Bowl and Super Bowl will
be played.
The Federal Aviation
Administration says pilots
will not be allowed to fly
within a three-nautical-mile
area surrounding Sun Life
Stadium in Miami Gardens
from the ground to 3,000
feet.
The restrictions will
be enforced from 6:30
p.m. until midnight for
the Pro Bowl on Sunday.
For the Super Bowl on
Feb. 7, restrictions will be
enforced from 4 p.m. to
midnight.

Poll: Obama's job
approval drops
TALLAHASSEE -
A new poll released
Tuesday shows that both
President Barack Obama
and Gov. Charlie Crist
have seen their job approv-
al standing in Florida
decline as the state and
nation try to climb out of
the recession.


SUNNY



HI 61 LO


An inspiring word to kids
Florida Gov. Charlie Crist (left) gestures as he speaks to stu-
dents and staff at Bay Vista Elementary School after touring
the school Monday in St. Petersburg.


For the first time since
his election, President
Obama faces more Florida
voters who disapprove.
of his performance than
approve - 49 percent to
45 percent.

Pit bulls kill dog,
owner arrested
BRANDON - Dorothy
York, 36, faces charges
after her pit bulls report-
edly attacked and killed a
neighbor's dog.
Hillsborough County
Animal Services filed
charges of felony animal
cruelty and culpable negli-
gence against York.
Authorities say York's
two pit bulls got into
the neighbor's backyard
Wednesday and attacked
a mixed-breed dog. The
neighbor went outside to
separate the animals. One
of the pit bulls attacked
him, and he fatally shot it.

Man on bicycle
charged with DUI
NAPLES - A Tampa
man riding a bicycle was
charged with driving
under the influence after
Collier County depu-
ties stopped him in East
Naples.


The sheriff's office
reports that Tommy
Charles.Miller, 51, was rid-
ing a bike Saturday night
without any lights. When
deputies stopped him,
they reported that his eyes
appeared bloodshot, and
he smelled like alcohol,
Deputies also found two
cans of beer in the bike's
front basket.

Hippo turns 50
at state park
HOMOSASSA SPRINGS
- Lu the hippopotamus
is celebrating his 50th
birthday at the Homosassa
Springs Wildlife State
Park.
Park officials have two
parties scheduled on
Tuesday for Lu, one of the
oldest hippos in captivity.
When he was younger,
the African hippopotamus
was a part of the Ivan Tors
Animal Actors, which used
the Homosassa attraction
as its winter home begin-
ning in the late 1960s. Lu
and some of the other
animals were left at the
privately owned park when
it was sold.
Gov. Lawton Chiles
made Lu an "honorary citi-
zen" in 1991. This allowed
Lu to stay at the park.
* Associated Press


MOSTLY' PA RTLY CHANCE: MSL
SUNNY CdOLUDYJ ;$**HOWERS,�, SUNJ


HI 6810 ;'HI 73 LO5 1 HI62 LO ~Hi57 LO361


0''i * ..i ,- M I.:~ * ,


Tallahassee *
62/30


Pensacola
60/40


* Valdosta
60/32
Lake City,
61/31


Gainesville *
Panama City 62/32
62/39 Ocala
63/34


Tampa,
68/46


a
Ft Myers
72/48


* Jacksonville
'8 R/.9'


Keyl
71/


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal, high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


65
43
67
43
85 in 1950
18 in 1905


0.00"
4.20"
4.20"
2.91"
2.91"


City Thursday
Cape Canaveral 68/54/pc


68/49/s
75/65/s
78/57/s
69/43/s
66/45/s
72/62/s
68/42/s
76/64/s
75/57/s
70/46/s
71/51/s
68/51/s
66/54/pc
67/42/s
73/57/s
67/41/pc
75/63/s


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
6V39 Gainesville
Jacksonville
rando Cape Canaveral Key West
4/42 64/46 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
70/55 Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
72/59 0 Pensacola
* Naples * Tallahassee
70/49 Miami Tampa


st 72/59Valdosta
est* W. Palm Beach
61


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


0
Jan.
30
Full


7:24 a.m.
6:03 p.m.
7:23 a.m.
6:04 p.m.


3:18 p.m.
4:57 a.m.
4:29 p.m.
5:54 a.m.


Feb. Feb. Feb.
5 13 21
Last New First




On this date in
S 1988, the nation
got a breather fro
winter storms,
however, cold arc
air settled into th
southeastern U.S
Hollywood, Fla.
reported a record
low reading of 39
degrees.


Friday
75/64/pc
75/61/pc
78/69/s
79/61/pc
74/54/pc
72/55/pc
74/64/pc
73/52/pc
80/69/s
78/66/s
74/57/pc
78/60/pc
67/49/sh
68/45/sh
70/49/sh
76/60/pc
71/49/sh
79/69/s


An exclusive
Service
V brought to
"Hi our readers
30 mhuteto In by
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

weather.comrn

Forecasts, data and graph-
�"_ � Ics � 2010 Weather Central
-A; - _ *- LLC, Madison, Wis.
\\- \4www.weatherpublisher.com






ti Ge Connected


wwwnlakecityreporter.com


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


;u.ia - Mc~a


I











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


School board accepts


wellness grant

By LEANNE TYO Blue Shield of Florida, and
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com Tyson Johnson of Parks
Johnson Agency presented
The Columbia County two grant checks for $5,000
School Board received a each.
$10,000 grant check for a Spradley said the money
Columbia Schools'Worksite will go toward a wellness
Wellness Program at its project to improve the
meeting Tuesday night. health and safety of students
The board also recognized and staff in the district.
seven schools in the district The money will purchase
for their academic perfor- EpiPens - emergency
mance during the 2008 to treatments for allergic reac-
2009 school year. tions - for each public
The grant money was school for students,who are
provided by Blue Cross and financially underprivileged
Blue Shield of Florida part- and will be used to encour-
nered with Parks Johnson age healthy and active life-
Agency through their styles for both students and
BluePartners Community staff, said Spradley.
Investment Program, said "We want to encourage
Dorothy Spradley, volun- any activities that support a
teer/education marketing healthy lifestyle," said Mike
coordinator for the district. Millikin, superintendent of
Jimmy Kelly, sales direc- schools, "and the areas we
tor for Blue Cross and can focus on are providing


check
healthy meals and opportu-
nities for physical activity."
The board also rec-
ognized Columbia City
Elementary, Eastside
Elementary, Fort White
Elementary, Lake City
Middle School,, Melrose
Park Elementary, Niblack
Elementary and Westside
Elementary schools with
plaques for their academic
achievement in 2008-2009.
Spradley said the schools
were recognized for receiv-
ing "A's," improving in their
letter grade from the pre-
vious year or maintaining
their grade after improving
two or more letter grades
from the previous school
year.
Each of the schools will
be awarded additional fund-
ing for the recognition,
said Spradley.


MURACouldvanish from wall
MURAL: Could vanish from wall


Continued From Page 1A
city council, Campbell said.
Technically it was not allowed
under a city ordinance.
When the mural was
completed Goodson
remarked he expected it to
have close to a 20-year life
span, however Kuykendall's
plan for expansion may
result in a fire exit replacing
the mural.
'The last thing I want to
do is take the mural down
- personally, I think it's
a beautiful piece of art,"
Kuykendall said. "From a
business standpoint and
a citizen standpoint, if I
can't get the cooperation
to come out some place
else, I have to come out
the mural. I don't want the
people of Columbia County
thinking that I took the
mural down."

The expansion
Kuykendall and his wife
own the building. They
purchased it in 2006 and
refurbished it.
The building is currently
occupied by two busi-
nesses.
Gulf Coast Financial
Services has 3,500-square
feet of working space in
the downstairs portion of
the building, while the law
offices of Avera and Smith
has 1,500 sq. ft. next door.
Kuykendall is consid-
ering moving upstairs
with hopes of renting out
additional space on the
building's first floor to the
law offices. He has been
working on the plans for
more than a year.
"My son, who is also in
the business with me, and
I have been working a long
time on doing a remodel-
ing of the building up stairs
just to get started," he said.
Under the most recent
fire codes, to utilize the
second floor for office
space, Kuykendall has to
install a new fire exit from
the building.
He said he is required by
code to have an additional
exit at the east end of the
building.

Options
"According to the fire


codes, we have to have
another exit from upstairs,"
Kuykendall said. "The exit
has to be so many feet
from the existing exits,
which puts it somewhere
in the east quadrant of the
upstairs."
Kuykendall said there
are only two options avail-
able to him to meet the
building code require-
ments.
He said his first option
would be to put an exit on
the building's south wall,
where there is an existing
sidewalk on NE Veterans
Street, a one-way street.
The second option would
be to put the exit on the
side of the building where
the mural is located.
"I haven't really got-
ten a lot of cooperation
or support on closing the
sidewalk, so the only other
option is to come out the
mural," Kuykendall said.
City Councilman George
Ward said he doesn't think
the city has ever closed a
sidewalk for private
property. He said closing
off a sidewalk because
someone asks for their
private property is not
something the city should
get into.
"We would have to be
giving up the whole right-
of-way to close the side-
walk," he said.
. There seems to be no
options, Ward said.
"I'm sorry it has to hap-
pen, but I understand he
wants to renovate," he said.
Kuykendall said he
spoke to the city manager
before Thanksgiving as
well as Lake City Fire
Department officials and
Larry Lee, City of Lake
City Growth Management
Director.
"The consensus was that
the sidewalk was feasible,"
he said. "Since then I've
been told that's really not
an option. I met with the
new city manager but we
didn't come up with any
solutions."
City Manager Wendell
Johnson was not available
for comment.
Another option present-
ed was to build a fire exit'
inside the property, Lee


said. However doing so
would cause the building to
lose space inside, and it is
a costly option.
"Inside the property is
a big concrete vault," he
said. "It would have to be
worked around, and to
take it out would be a big
expense."

Reaching a consensus
Campbell learned of the
possibility of losing the
mural in October, he said.
Kuykendall approached
him and Jeff Bertram,
former Downtown Action
Corporation president, but
Campbell wanted to talk
after the holidays.
"I said, 'Look we're.
really busy with all this
Christmas stuff but as soon
as we get into January we
need to talk,'" he said.
Montgomery was told
the news of the lease end-
ing several days ago, he
said. Not knowing all the
details of getting a fire exit
will cause him to have to
wait and see the mural's
fate.
"I'm sure Mr. Kuykendall
doesn't want it to be
messed up either," he said.
The mural represents
so much to the downtown
area, Montgomery said.
"It really spices up down-
town," he said. "I hope the
mural can be saved."
A lot of labor and money
went into it.
"James Montgomery
paid a lot of money for
that mural," Bertram said.
"I would hate to see it
defaced with a door or fire
escape."
The future of the mural
could be up to the city and
if it is willing to make some
concessions, Bertram said.
"I'm certainly willing to
do my part to meet and dis-
cuss options," "Ultimately
it rests with the city."
Campbell said it is his
intention to sit down with
the city and Kuykendall to
work out a solution to keep
the mural downtown.
"Hopefully it's not the
final word," he said. "I can't
believe we can't come up
with a solution that doesn't
make anybody a loser."


STREET BRASSWORKS

9, Concert
Friday, January 29, 2010 at 7:30pm
First Presbyterian Church in Lake City
of America's Finest and Busiest Brass Ensembles"




fEveryone is invited tonal




information.


First Presbyterian Church
697 SW Baya Dr. Lake City, Florida
752-0670 fpclc@bellsouth.net
www.fpclc.org


Friends of Music Concert Series
WORSHIP
Contemporary Worship 9:00am
Traditional Worship 11:00 am
Sunday School 10:00am


IC


JASON MATTHEMW W LKER~t iL ... , Il- I1 -
S & S Food Stores/Scaff's Markets awards the Children's Miracle Network/Shands Children's
Hospital with a check for $80, 481.22 Tuesday afternoon that the company raised. Pictured
are CMN Project Coordinator Monica Haynes (from left), Dr. Bill Slayton, the interim divi-
sion chief of pediatric hematology/oncology, Keith Brown and Shands HealthCare Associate
Director of Development Margaret Friend.


S&S: Raised $8,000 for charity


Continued From Page 1A
division chief of pediatric
hemotology/oncology at
Shands Children's Hospital
at the University of Florida,
said the CMN has also
donated a large part of fund-
ing to renovate an exist-
ing unit to create a state-of-
the-art, family-friendly unit
where children who have
cancer who are undergoing
solid organ or bone marrow
transplants can be specifi-
cally cared for.
"I wanted to thank the
S&S stores and all of you


for raising money for
the Children's Miracle
Network," Slayton said. "I
want to tell you how much I
personally appreciate that."
Employees who had
anniversaries with the com-
pany in 2009 and the 2009
Employee of the Month
Award recipients were
recognized, and Robert
Layton, an S&S Food Stores
employee, walked away with
the 2009 Team Member of
the Year Award.
Brown said the award is


given to one of the employ-
ees of the month, and the
candidates are judged on
customer service skills,
overall work ethic and atti-
tude.
"Robert worked hard to
earn this," Brown said. "He
would do just about any-
thing in his store. He would
keep that store spotless."
"It just makes me proud
to work for a good compa-
ny like S&S," Layton said.
"Everybody does it, it's not
just me. It's a team effort."


SMITH: Honored for 30 years service
Continued From Page 1A


County commission meet-
ings were always packed
when talking about dogs, said
James Montgomery, former
commissioner. People didn't
want to hear about how they
should treat their animals.
"Some folks were very
rough on her, but I never
saw her lose her cool," he
said. "That's amazing."
Smith's love for animals



There's Clea

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SAuto I






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extended beyond just dogs,
said Marie Kennon.
"It wasn't just dogs she
was fooling with," she said.
"She caught a lot of ducks
at my house."
She would come catch
animals no matter what
time of day, Kennon said.
The celebration also
included a proclamation
by City of Lake City Mayor


Stephen Witt naming Jan.
26 Margaret Smith Day; a
formal portrait of Smith to
hang in the shelter's adop-
tion center was unveiled; and
Smith also was named the
first recipient of the Sarah
Hope Award, which rec-
ognizes the hope love ahd
change a person or business
has inspired by their actions
toward animals in need.


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�IlrI


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427















OPINION


Wednesday, January 27, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com,


OUR
OPINION


Information

flow vital to

the future

Water, water
everywhere.
For now.
Fresh water
is a luxury that
generations of North Floridians
have taken for granted. But
with a now-discovered, yet
unexplained, regional lowering
of the Floridan Aquifer, what is
a luxury today could be a scar-
city tomorrow.
A joint effort between
Suwannee River Water manage-
ment District and the St. Johns
River Water Management is
now under way to ensure that
water resources will be avail-
able for future generations.
Thursday, these groups will
publicly discuss a number of
20-year regional water sup-
ply plans designed to ensure
adequate water supplies for
future needs. This open meet-
ing in Gainesville is designed to
inform and educate the public
about how water is supplied.
It isn't likely that this meet-
ing will be heavily attended, but
it should be. The results of this
discussion will lay the ground-
work for the plan that will final-
ly be adopted in December.
That plan will affect how, and
how much water is supplied not
only to us, but to our children.
Stakes that high should be
enough to whet anyone's thirst
for knowledge.


HIG H LIG H TS
IN HISTORY
Today is Wednesday, Jan.
27, the 27th day of 2010.
There are 338 days left in
the year.
M On Jan. 27, 1880, Thomas
Edison received a patent for
his electric incandescent lamp.
* In 1756, composer
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
was born in Salzburg, Austria.
* In 1901, opera composer
Giuseppe Verdi died in Milan,
Italy, at age 87.
* In 1943, some 50 bomb-
ers, struck Wilhelmshaven in
the first all-American air raid
against Germany during World
War II.
* In 1944, the Soviet Union
announced the complete end
of the deadly German siege of
Leningrad.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
,and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


If driving, be careful out there


We are a car-driv-
ing culture and,
in turn, cars
drive the look
and feel of what
we see around us. They shape
where and how we live and
work, the places we go, and the
appearance of our land, our
cities, and our homes.
It's hard to think of anything
more American than the auto-
mobile. We grow up riding in
cars, and our most prominent
passage into adulthood is learn-
ing to drive one ourselves. We
come of age in cars, and the
view through a windshield is,
for'us, a thoroughly natural way
to see the world.
Often our cars are more than
just transportation; they're also
entertainment and a way of liv-
ing. We go everywhere in them.
We eat in them. Sometimes we
even sleep in them.
And a surprising number of
us die in them.
In fact, about 120 Americans
are killed in car accidents every
day.
I wonder why this under-
stated statistic doesn't distress
us more. It could be expressed
more dramatically. The Institute
for Transportation Engineers
points out, for example, that
the automobile death rate is the
equivalent of four major airplane
crashes every week. That would
be big news.
But we've become so accus-
tomed to the steady drumbeat
of vehicular carnage in the
background that we hardly
notice it. Zack McMillin makes
this point in a recent Scripps
Howard News Service article.



LETTERS TO


Health care costs out
of control
* To the Editor:
My recent visit to a derma-
tologist exemplifies why U.S.
health care costs are out of con-
trol. The doctor sprayed some
liquid freeze on a small spot
on my face and then gave me
an overall skin check. His total
time with me took about four
minutes. Then his assistant (not
a doctor or nurse) cut off six
small moles (skin tags) around
my neck. She spent no more
than about five and half min-
utes. My bill for this nine and
1/2 minutes of work was $950.
That comes to $100 per minute!
Why are health care costs out
of control? It's called unbridled
greed.
One simple action could help
cut health care costs in the U.S.
dramatically. All medical provid-
ers should be required by law
to post their fee schedules in
simple English. They should
also be required to provide their
patients with a written estimate,
like an auto mechanic,; before


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmon.edu

We venture out onto our'roads
and highways every day with
little thought of risk. Yet, as
McMillin notes, for Americans
between the ages of 1 and 34,
automobile accidents are the
leading cause of death. And
for Americans of all ages car
wrecks are the leading cause of
long-term disability.
We accept these statistics
casually, even though all of
us know of people who have
died in highway accidents or
whose lives have been affected
by them in dramatic ways. Of
course, to move from one place
to another has always required
the acceptance of a certain level
of risk. But even in a nation of
309 million, 41,000 sudden and
indiscriminate deaths per year,
without warning or logic, seem
like a lot.
Highways and cars have both
become safer in recent years.
But the death rate persists,
and we do little to decrease it.
Many of us still drink plenty of
alcohol when we drive, and we
drive when we're practically fall-
ing asleep. We grant a driver's
license to just about anyone,
good drivers and bad. And leg-
islators are often reluctant to
impose anti-texting laws, or any
other type of law, that would


THE EDITOR


impinge on their constituents'
driving pleasure.
And what about speed? You
don't have to know a lot about
physics to understand that
the energy level in a car crash
multiplies quickly as speed
increases. More speed means
more crashes and more deaths
and injuries. Yet we're a nation
of inveterate speeders. If you're
unconvinced, attempt the quaint
practice of scrupulously observ-
ing the speed limit for a day in
your neighborhood.
Given the risks, we don't take
speeding violations all that seri-
ously. By comparison, consider
a European trend, as reported
in a recent Associated Press
story: Switzerland, Germany,
France, and other countries
have begun t.o base speeding
fines on the violator's income,
resulting in a $290,000 speed-
ing ticket for a millionaire
who raced his Ferrari through
Switzerland without regard to
the speed limit.
I wouldn't look for Americans
to take speeding this seriously
anytime soon. But remember:
every day in our country,
including today, about 120 peo-
ple are killed in car accidents.
All of these victims began their
days in the most ordinary way,
with coffee and newspapers
and "Good Morning, America."
They had plans and tasks ahead
of them, but everything ended
abruptly in a shattering clash of
metal and glass. Do be careful
out there.

* John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


any work is done. That way the try" and we could change things
customer could compare prices, for the poor here and around
We need to insist that our pol- the world. How does that work:
iticians listen to us and not the Enslave folks like we have on
American Medical Association welfare? The writer goes on to
lobbyists., bash America for defending her-
Skyrocketing health care self against decades of terrorist
costs are eating up a huge por- attacks and declaring war on
tion of our gross domestic prod- terrorism.
uct. If this trend is not reversed, So far America is the safest
it will destroy our entire econ- place on earth. Do we want to
omy. maintain our safety? If so, we
Joe Zahler must fight for it. The letter end
Fort White bashing President Bush. Who is
"Bush"? I can't remember that
Our safety must be far back, so much damage has
happened in the last year.
maintained The other letter has good
intentions and good ideas in
To the Editor: reference to building mobile
Two Letters to the Editor Jan. homes for the Haitian citizens.
22 reference America's involve- This approach is better than
ment in the Haiti disaster ("Haiti sending money. As far as stimu-
support is vital to America's lasting the economy - probably
Interest" and "Helping hands not. Hopefully, we have already
could help United States"). learned we can't stimulate our
One letter refers to "these own economy using our own
people" several times. Who are money. Our economy recovery
"these people?" Are they me, depends on the private sector,
Tea Party people, the enemies not government.
of America, or all three? The let- Bill Glover
ter claims we are a "rich coun- Lake City


ITHE SUPREME COURT OKs ELECTION SPENDING BY CORPORATIONS1


won't make us itch once in
awhile. The mandate is "love
one another." And that's what
makes the world go 'round.
* Tom Mayer is editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


4A


I - -


Tom Mayer
tmoye@aokecayreportercom

Haiti: Your

vacation

destination?

A story in Sunday's
paper presents a
tough moral dilem-
ma. If you've still
got it, .take another
look at this story on Page
2: "Haiti cruises won't stop:
Without this, we don't eat.'"
Like many island nations,
Haiti is extremely poor in
natural resources but rich
in one thing tourists hunger
for: warm, sandy beaches.
As a result, much of this
impoverished nation relies on
tourist dollars to survive. It is
especially reliant on the type
of tourists who arrive on city-
sized cruise ships and make
regular and predictable port
calls.
Because the devastating
earthquake that struck Haiti
Jan. 12 was hundreds of miles
from many of its tourist ports,
cruise lines continue to make
calls to the island.
So now, with the knowledge
.that hundreds of thousands of
people are dead and millions
more are displaced just half a
nation away, what's a respon-
sible tourist to do? Keep the
cruise that was likely booked
and paid for months ago and
know that you are putting vital
dollars in Haiti's economy? Or
dismiss the trip, likely taking
a financial loss, out of respect,
guilt, compassion or-some
emotional cocktail of each?
Tough choice.
It'd be tougher if we actu-
ally had to make that choice,
wouldn't it?
But we do.
We may not have plans to
order shrimp and lobster on
Haiti's white beaches anytime
soon, but is that really so dif-
ferent from the choices we
make in Columbia County
every day?
Many of us overload our gro-
cery carts or choose to dine
out knowing that there are
children in our county going
to bed hungry. We build ever-
bigger houses while entire
families hunker down in a tem-
porary motel room - one step
from the street.
But listen: There's needn't
be anything wrong with this.
. There's nothing like grow-
ing up in a Catholic household
for the invitation to take guilt
trips. Gosh, by the time I was
16 the most prolific business-
man would have envied my
frequent traveler miles for the
amount of baggage I packed.
But we shouldn't feel guilty
for the blessings we have in
our lives anymore than we
should turn a blind eye to
those in need.
It's all about how you use it.
Few of us are inclined to
shake off the chinos, put on a
hair shirt and dine on locusts
and honey, but that doesn't
mean we aren't doing what we
can to help those less fortu-
nate.
Only you know how you
use the blessings you've been
given, and it's certainly not
for me to judge my next door
neighbor, anymore than it's my
place to judge someone on a
Haitian cruise.
Personally, I couldn't justify
a visit the island and enjoy
myself while being in such
close proximity to such total
loss - see the Catholic house-
hold paragraph above.
But that's me.
Yet I can take my beauti-
ful wife out to dinner, as I did
the night before last, and still
enjoy myself even knowing
that the poor are with us and
our two girls weren't invited
(but they're still amateurs in
the guilt trip division).
Because God doesn't want
us all to don that hair shirt.
But that doesn't mean he












LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Quilting Guild meeting
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild will hold its
monthly meeting at 9:30 a.m.
Jan. 27 at Teen Town, 533
NW Desoto St. Each special
project chairperson will give
a brief description of what
their committee does for the
guild. The guild is an organi-
zation for anyone interested
in quilts and the art of quilt-
ing. For more details contact
President Ramona Dewees
(386)496-3876

Goldwing Express at
Spirit of the Suwannee
The Goldwing Express is
performing Jan. 27 at the
Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park for a special concert
of classic country, gospel
and bluegrass music along
with comedy. Doors to the
Music Hall open at 5 p.m.
and dinner with the show is
at 7 p.m. Admission is $7
per person. E-mail spirit@
musicliveshere.com, call the
SOSMP at 386-364-1683 or
go to www.musicliveshere.
com.

Thursday
Art League Meeting
Art League of North
Florida is hosting chano-
ing of art activities at 6 p.m.
Jan. 28 at Haven Hospice.
Everyone is asked to bring a
dessert dish to share. Haven
Hospice is located at 6037
West US-90. Each artist may
bring up to six pieces of art
to display.

Caregiver's Summit
series
Altrusa Club of Lake City �
is hosting a workshop on
maintaining independence
and control from 5:30 to
8 p.m. Jan. 28 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Summit workshops are free
and for caregivers and
provide basic information.
Dinner is available for $10.
Sitter care is available for
free if an adult care receiver


Scientific siblings
Brayden Thomas (left), 14, his sister Savannah, 12, and brother Eli, 11, won first place in the Health and Medicine, Earth
Science, and Animal Science categories, respectively, at the 2010 Columbia County Science Fair.


cannot be left alone. Call to
register at 755-0235.

5th Annual Elvis Tribute
Artist Contest
Elvis weekend is from
Jan. 28-31 at the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park.
An evening of karaoke with
Elvis tribute artist Ted "Teddy
Mac Elvis" McMullen and
the audience is at 7 p.m.
Thursday. The Elvis Tribute
Artist party and karaoke
with Elvis contestants only
participating in the karaoke
kicks off at 7 p.m. Friday.
The 5th Annual Elvis Tribute
Artist competition is at 1 and
6 p.m. Saturday. McMullen
Will perform Saturday night
as Elvis. A gospel music and
brunch event with McMullen
and some of the Elvis con-
testants starts at 9:30 a.m.


Sunday. Admission prices
are: $5 for Thursday; $10
for Friday; $25 for gen-
eral admission or $40 for
reserved seating Saturday;
and $10 Sunday. Elvis Tribute
Artist contestant entry fee is
$50 for adults, no charge for
children. Entry form is avail-
able at www.musicliveshere.
com. Call (386)364-1683,
e-mail the SOSMP at spirit@
musicliveshere.com or go to
the Web site at www.musi-
.cliveshere.com.

Friday
Small steps to health
and wealth
The Suwannee County'
Extension Service is offer-
ing an eight week, hour-long
evening program that can be
used to'improve health, per-


sonal finances or both. Pre-
registration is required by
Jan. 29. The first class starts
at 6 p.m. Feb. 3 The fee is
$7 per person or $10 per
couple, which includes taste
testing and class materials.
Call the Extension office at
(386) 362-2771

Gator-Knap-ln
The Third Annual Gator-
Knap-In is from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Jan. 29-30 and 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Jan. 30, at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park. The event will
include demonstrations and
classes in flint knapping,
ceramics, cordage and carv-
ings. Kenneth E. Sassaman,
University of Florida Hyatt
and Cici Brown Professor
of Florida Archaeology, will
speak on "Archaeological


Insights on the Ancient
Shellworks of the St. Johns
River, Northeast Florida." A
flint knapping competition
for all skill levels will be held.
Vendors and exhibitors will
have displays and materials
for sale. Admission to the
event is free with paid park
admission of $5 per vehicle
of up to eight passengers.

Friends of Music
Concert
The Friends of Music
Concert Series presents the
"Bay Street Brassworks" at
7:30 p.m. Jan. 29 at the First
Presbyterian Church. The
Brassworks are known as
"One of America's finest and
busiest brass ensembles."
The concert is free and there
will be a' reception following
the performance. Call the


church office for additional
information at 752-0670.

Moose Lodge Bingo is
open for everyone
Ringo games are held at 3
p.m., 6:45 and 7 p.m. every
Wednesday and Friday, at
the Moose Lodge, 624 NE
Williams. There is free iced
tea and coffee, and the event
is open to everyone. Food
is available for purchase.
Call (386) 755-3730 for more
information.

Monday, Feb. 1
Black History Month
Celebration
The month-long tribute
to Black History Month
kickoffs at 6 p.m. Feb. 1
at Richardson Community
Center. Free food, entertain-
ment, activities and more
will be at the celebration.
The community can also
learn about the history and
events taking place through-
out the month. The kickoff is
sponsored by It's About My
Efforts, Inc.


Wednesday, Feb. 3
Bluegrass concert
Bluegrass celebrity Valerie
Smith and her band Liberty
Pike featuring Becky Buller'
will perform during a special
appearance at 7 p.m. Feb. 3
in the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park Music Hall.
Doors open to the Music
Hall at 5 p.m. Admission is
$5 per person. E-mail spirit@
musicliveshere.com, call the
SOSMP at 386-364-1683 or.gc
to www.musicliveshere.com.

February Friendship
Luncheon to meet
The February Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomer's will be held at
11:30 a.m. Feb. 3, at Mike's
Caf6 and Grill, 426 S. W.
Commerce Drive. All mem-
bers, friends and guests are
welcome. For more informa-
tion please call 758-2026 or
935-1548.


Union County student wins

national essay competition


From staff reports

WASHINGTON, D.C. -
The American Farm Bureau
Foundation for Agriculture
recently announced the win-
ners of the "Agriculture in
a Growing World" student
essay competition. The con-
test was sponsored by the
foundation with the support
of Alpharma. It recognizes
high school students and
teachers for increasing their
understanding of agricul-
ture using the foundation's
2008 Book of the Year, "The
Man Who Fed the World,"
an authorized biography of
Nobel Laureate Norman
Borlaug written by Leon
Hesser.
Bobbie-Jean Tatum, a
10th-grade student at Union
County High School, was
awarded $500 for her 1st
place essay. Her school
received a $1,000 grant to


further agricultural educa-
tion. Rebekah Raulerson,
Tatum's Honors English
teacher, received a $2,000
scholarship to attend the
2010 Agriculture in the
Classroom Conference in
Baltimore, Md.
Alix Bjorklund, a 10th-
grade student at Green
Bay East High School in
Wisconsin, received $250
for her 2nd place essay. Her
school was awarded a $500
grant to further agricultural
education.
Katie Brandes, an 11th-
grade student at Batesville
High School in Indiana, was
presented with $100 for her
3rd place essay. Her school
received a $250 grant to fur-
ther agricultural education.
"It is encouraging to see
young adults developing
informed opinions about
Dr. Borlaug's work and how
growing global food demand


should be met over the next
40 years," said Curtis Miller,
the foundation's director of
education. "We are pleased
to feature this book and pro-
vide the curriculum and the
opportunity for students to
apply the knowledge gained
from participation in this
program."
The Book of the Year
award springs from the
foundation's effort to iden-
tify "accurate ag books"-a
collection of more than 275
books for children, teenag-
ers and adults that accu-
rately cover agricultural
topics. In addition to their
accuracy, Book of the Year
selections reflect farmers'
and ranchers' love for the
land and what they do, cor-
rect misconceptions about
agriculture, inspire readers
to learn more and touch
readers' lives as well as tell
the farmer's story.


www.lakecityreporter.com
ric PORTER

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


2 arrested for misappropriating funds


From staff reports

Two North Florida resi-
dents were arrested by the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement after allega-
tions they misappropriated
funds that were to be used
for a school security sys-
tem.
Leonard Martin, 48, of
Apalachicola, and Nicole
Wood, 28, of Tallahassee,
were arrested and charged
with grand theft.
The Franklin County


Alice M. Cooke
Mrs. Alice M. Cooke, 89, of
Lake City, died late Monday
evening, January 25, 2010, in
The Health Center of Lake City
following an extended illness. A
native of Alford, Florida, Mrs.
Cooke was the daughter of the
late Joe & Gertrude Chatwood
Hughes. She had been a resident
of Lake City since 1975 hav-
ing moved here from Titusville,
Florida. She had been a home-
maker and caregiver. She was a
member of the Lake City Gar-
den Club, the United Methodist
Women and the Pleasant Grove
United Methodist Church. In her
spare time Mrs. Cooke enjoyed
gardening. She was preceded
in death by her husband, James
Cooke and two daughters, Caro-
lyn Riesebeck and Anita Patrick.
Mrs. Cooke is survived by her
daughter and son-in-law, Betty
& David Powell of Lake City.
Three brothers, two sisters,
eight grandchildren, ten great-
grandchildren and two great-
great grandchildren also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Mrs. Cooke will be conducted
at 11:00 A.M. on Friday, Janu-
ary 29, 2010 in the Pleasant
Grove United Methodist Church
Cemetery with Rev. Dusty Bai-
ley officiating. There will be no
visitation. Arrangements are un-
der the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234 Please sign the
on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.comrn

Ben H. Cockcroft
Ben H. Cockcroft, 75, of New
Smyrna Beach died Friday,
January 22, 2010. Ben was born
in Bay Harbor, FL and grew
up in Fernan-
dina Beach. He B . ,
graduated from
Andrew Jackson
High School in * ,,
1952 and later
attended Emory University in
Georgia where he obtained his
Associates degree in 1954. He
joined the United States Air
Force in 1955 and, upon dis-
charge, married and moved his
family to Denver Colorado. He
worked various jobs including
one at the Coors Porcelain Com-
pany, Rocket Fuel Division be-
fore entering the banking indus-
try where he spent the majority
of his working career. He gradu-
ated from the Colorado School of
Banking in 1966. Ben returned
to Florida in 1971 and worked
for the First National Bank of
Lake City before moving to
New Smyrna Beach in 1979. He
worked for the Southeast Bank
oh Canal Street for seven years
and was President of Volusia
County Bankers Association in
1983. He then worked as Vice
President of Tenchi Machinery
in Edgewater for 16 years before
retiring in 2000. During retire-
ment, he enjoyed working with
computers and loved the chal-
lenge of keeping up with the lat-
est technology. Ben also enjoyed
camping with his children and
grandchildren. He is preceded in-
death by his mother, Ruth Ward
and father Haywood Cockcroft
(Billie). He is survived by three
children, daughters, Cythe Shiver
and husband, Joe, of Lake City,
FL and Kynah Cockcroft of Port
Orange; son, Jason Cockcroft
of New Smyrna Beach; grand-
children, Nynah Billingsley and
husband Billy of Lake City and
Cassie Dobbins and husband
Dylan of San Francisco; great
grandchildren Bryannah, Bi-
ancah and Branson Billingsley;
Colin and Makena Dobbins; and
step-father, Dan Romhild of New
Smyrna Beach. A private family
memorial service is planned. In
lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to your favorite charity
of Hospice of Volusia/Flagler,
3800 Woodbriar Trail, Port Or-
ange 32129. To share a memory
with the family go to www.Bald-
winCremation.com Arrange-
ments entrusted to BALDWIN
BROTHERS CREMATION
SOCIETY, New Smyrna Beach.
Emily Jean Jones

Emily Jean Jones, 80, a resident
of Lake City, Florida passed away
January 25, 2010 at her home.
Mrs. Jones had resided in Lake
City for the past forty-five years
and is the daughter ofthe late Otis
and Nora Edwards Privette, Sr.
She was past president of AARP
Chapter, Lake City, member of
the Homemakers Club, Mem-
ber of the Golden Age, Member
of Red Hat Society, a volunteer
at Columbia County Public Li-
brary, a Sunshine Lady of Pine


School Board contact-
ed the Franklin County
Sheriff's Office with allega-
tions that Peter R. Brown
Construction, Inc. billed
them $130,000 for a secu-
rity system that was never
installed. The FCSO con-
tacted FDLE in February
2009 to investigate.
FDLE's investigation
revealed that PRBC project
manager Casey Kelley, 32,
of Wewahitchka, worked
with Leonard Martin,
owner of Martin Security


OBITUARIES

Grove Baptist Church and vol-
unteer for local nursing homes.
She was also a member of the
Pine Grove Baptist Church. She
is preceded in death by her hus-
band, Silas Jones, Sr. one son Si-
las Jones, Jr. Two brothers, Otis
Privette Jr. and John B. Privette.
Survivors include Two Daugh-
ters: Patricia Lynn (Jim) Dur-
den, Lake City, Fl. and Susan
Gooding, Ashburn, Ga. One son:
Matt (Moshe Rashif) Jones, Ash-
ville,N.C. Threesisters: Marce-
ne O'Neal, Hartsville, S.C., Ann
Tabor, Sparta, TN and Paulette
Johnson, Lulu, Fl. One Sister-In-
Law: Nancy Privette, Lake City,
Fl. Six grandchildren, eight great
grandchildren and two 'great
great grandchildren. Several
nieces ad also survive
Funeral services will be con-
ducted Friday January 29, 2010
at 11:00 A.M. in the Chapel of
Guerry Funeral Home with the
Rev. John Thompson, officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in the
Memorial Cemetery. The fam-
ily will receive friends Thursday
January 28, 2010 from 6:00-
8:00 P.M. at the funeral home.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME
2659 SW. Main Blvd, Lake City
is in charge of all arrangements.

Mrs. Juanita Parrish
McAlpin
Mrs. Juanita Parrish McAlpin,
78, of Lake City, FL passed away
on Sunday, January 3, 2010 fol-
lowing a
lengthy ill--
ness, through
which she was
comforted
and supported
daily by her
devoted hus-
band of 55
years, Kenneth A. McAlpin, Sr.
Juanita was born December 1,
1931 in Lake Butler, Florida
one of thirteen children born to
Thomas Avery Parrish and Mabel
Hendriicks Parrish. The family
later moved to Plant City." Juan-
ita Married Ken McAlpin, also
of Plant City, on June 20, 1954.
Juanita was a resourceful and
creative woman who made a
loving home for her husband and
family, making friends and ex-
ploring life in many parts of the
country, including New York,
Mississippi, New Jersey, Geor-
gia, North Carolina, and Florida.
She enjoyed working with her
hands, whether cooking, sewing,
or crafting hand made decora-
tions and gifts for fiends or for
charity. She enjoyed doing for
other people, and she was never
as happy as when she could be
of help to those she loved. She
made friends easily, and with
her husband, she adopted into
her family many friends over
the years. Juanita was a tender-
hearted defender of those who
stood alone or faced special
challenges. She could be Count-
ed on to reach out to the shy,
to the lonely, or to those who
had not yet found their place.
Together with her husband,
she instilled in all her children
a vision of a world more gen-
erous and humane, and each
daughter or son pursues that
vision in his or her own way.
Among the many memories her
children enjoy when thinking
of Juanita are the smell of bak-
ing desserts, the sound of her
voice as she read newspaper ar-
ticles to her husband, her time
volunteering with her church
or nearby nursing homes, and
her many encouragements to
live up to their talents. She be-
lieved those she loved could
do whatever they wanted to in
life if they worked toward it.
In addition to her husband, she
is survived by three children:
Kenneth A., Jr. (Linda Beall),
Tina Marie, and Charles Eric;
grandson: David Matthew
McAlpin; four sisters: Beatrice
Norman, Elena Veltheim, Mat-
tie Jordon (Bill); Sarah Sankey
(Bob), and a wealth of nieces,
nephews, grandnieces, grand-
nephews, and cherished life-
long friends and adopted family.
A memorial service will be
held 11:00 AM Saturday, Janu-
ary 30, 2010 at the Southside
Baptist Church, 388 SE Baya
Drive, Lake. City, FL 32025.
Arrangements are under the
care of ICS CREMATION
AND FUNERAL HOME,


Lake City, FL 386-752-3436.
The Family request that con-
tributions on Juanita's behalf
may be made to Hospice Care
organizations in your local area
or to Haven Hospice Care Cen-
ter at 6037 US Hwy 90 West,
Lake City, FL 32055. For more
information about the upcom-
ing Memorial Service, Please
feel welcome to call Charlie
McAlpin at (207) 952-0262.


and Purity Temporary
Employment, to misappro-
priate funds intended for
the school board's security
system. PRBC reimbursed
the school board and termi-
nated Kelley after the theft
was discovered.
The investigation fur-
ther revealed that between
2007 and 2008, Kelley
and Martin falsified PTE
employee timesheets and
billed PRBC approximately
$817,000 for work on other
projects that had not been


John Paul Robarts, Jr.

Mr. John Paul Robarts, Jr., 73,
of Lake City, FL, passed away
Saturday, January 16, 2010 at
the V.A. Hospital in Gainesville.
He is preceded in death by his
parents John Paul and Mayoda
Watts Robarts and one brother,
Charles Watts Robarts, Sr.
He is survived by his daugh-
ters, Paula Hagler (Eric),
Lake City, FL and Laurie Ad-
ams, Sulpher, LA; one son,
Craig Robarts, Lake City, FL;
brother, Jack Robarts (Sally),
Lafayette, LA; sister, Barbara
Phillips and sister-in-law, Judy
Robarts, Lake City, FL. Grand-
children, Christopher Peloni
(Amber), Lake City; Chelsea,
Casey, Cory and Cammie of
Sulpher, LA and great-grand-
son, Nolan Peloni also survive.
Graveside memorial services
will be held Thursday, January
28, 2010 at 4:30 P.M. at Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens with
Reverend Fred Gaylord of First
Advent Christian Church offici-
ating. Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. HWY 441,
Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
W W rl . I L ,,/ 'I , . .,?l ll ' t . ,

Mrs. Nan Page Williams

Mrs. Nan Page (Hall) Williams,
99, passed away Saturday Jan-
uary 23, 2010 at her Lake City
home after an extended illness.
Nan was a retired educator, and
finished out her teaching ca-
reer as a Latin teacher at Leon
High in Tallahassee. She was
a devoted wife and graciously
served with her husband vari-
ous churches within the Flor-
ida Conference of the United
Methodist Church. Most re-
cently they served Pleasant
Grove UMC in Lake City.
Nan is survived by her husband
of 57 years, Rev. Gerald Wil-
liams of Lake City. She was pre-
deceaspd by a brother and two
sisters. Nan also leaves several
nieces, nephews, and extend-
ed family to mourn her loss.
Funeral services for Mrs. Wil-
liams will be held Thursday,
January 28, 2010. A 3pm visi-
tation will precede the 4pm
graveside service at Bethel
Cemetery (US 441S). Ar-
rangements are under the
care of BEGGS FUNERAL
HOME, Tallahassee, Florida.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Haven Hospice names

new agencies of record


done. Martin's office man-
ager, Nicole Wood, allegedly
created fraudulent invoices
for time worked and billed
PRBC. Wood facilitated the
transactions and Kelley and
Martin split the profits.
Kelley and Martin were
charged with 43 counts
of grand theft; one first-
degree felony, 12 second-
degree felonies, and 30
third-degree felonies. Wood
was charged with 12 sec-
ond-degree felonies and 30
third-degree felonies.




I


Pn
Va

yo
sn


* Valentine neoveine'page on February 14.

Love Line Rates are as follows:
15 WORDS for $12.00 Each additional word 150
Add a border for $2.65 or a photo for $5.25


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Print your message here:


Your Name:
Phone:
Address:
City/State/Zip:


Art#


Mail to: Lake City Reporter, Classified Department
PO Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056 ~ 755-5440
ALL ADS MUST BE PAID AT THE TIME OF PLACEMENT. DEADLINE IS FEB. 9,2010.
Community.
Source.
S' Lake City Reporter
.CUrTM.nr


2Bi Davs,

... . 6 *-I^ **:; ^.u/il lt^ia& ^


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age consumer market-
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Gainesville-based FMG will
direct the organization's
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keting, communications,
events and philanthropic
programs.
Haven Hospice has
served the North Florida
region since 1979 and now
has seven offices, including
four inpatient hospice care
centers.


From staff repots

Haven Hospice, North
Florida's expert in end-of-life
care, has chosen Chernoff
Newman and Frankel Media
Group as their new agen-
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Florida and South Carolina,
has been selected to man-


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The Lake City Reporter

Presents: V

uta littlelovrein someone's heart this V
vlentine's Day with the Lake City Reporter's
ore Lines. 'Make ita special day for those
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Jill 1--


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreporter.com


SPORTS


Wednesday, January 27, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Page 7A


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White
registration set
Fort White Youth
Baseball has league
registration planned
for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday, and 4-7 p.m.
Tuesday. Sign-up is at the
South Columbia Sports
Complex concession
building.
For details, call
Tammy Sharpe at
867-3825 or 755-1519
(evenings).

YOUTH BASKETBALL
USSSA tryouts
in February
Richardson
Community Center is
hosting tryouts for its
boys 14-under USSSA
basketball team from
5:30-7:30 p.m. on
Feb. 1-5, and
3:30-5:30 p.m. on Feb. 6.
For details, call Varion
Coppock at 754-7095.

Tryouts set
for travel teams
The AAU Streethawks
travel basketball teams
for boys 13-and-under
and girls 15-and-under
have tryouts planned
for 6-8 p.m. Feb. 4-5 at
the Richardson Middle
School gym.
For details, call Joel
Thomas at 623-2018.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
North Florida
Sliders tryouts
North Florida Sliders
fastpitch softball has
tryouts planned for a
second-year, 12-under
team at 2 p.m. Feb. 7 at
the Columbia County
Girls Softball Association
fields. There also will be
tryouts for a first-year,
12-under team and a
10-under team.
For details, call Mitch
Shoup at 288-5170
(12-under second year),
Paul Perry at 365-7120
(12-under first year) or
Reavus Mancil at
623-1060 (10-under).

CHS BASEBALL
Alumni game
planned Feb. 6
Columbia High
baseball has Alumni Day
planned for Feb. 6,
beginning at 10 a.m.
For details, e-mail
columbiabaseball@gmail.
com.

* From staff reports


GAMES

Today
* Columbia High
wrestling at Suwannee
High, 6 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
soccer in District 4-5A
tournament at Ridgeview
High, 7 p.m.
* Columbia High girls
basketball vs. RP.K. Yonge
School, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
* Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
* Fort White High boys
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
* Columbia High,
Fort White High girls
weightlifting Section 4
qualifying at Belleview
High, 8 a.m.
* Columbia High


wrestling at Buchholz
High, 8 a.m.


7:- Tebow in under fire


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake-City Reporter
Flbrida quarterback Tim Tebow (right) gets off a pass before
being hit by a Florida International defender on Nov. 21.


CBS willing to air
more Super Bowl
advocacy spots.

By DAVID CRARY
Associated Press

NEW YORK - CBS
responded to complaints
over a conservative group's
planned Super Bowl ad
featuring football star Tim
Tebow by saying that it had
eased restrictions on advo-
cacy ads and would consid-
er "responsibly produced"
ones for open spots in its
Feb. 7 broadcast.
CBS Corp. said Tuesday
it had received numerous
e-mails - both critical and
supportive - since a coali-
tion of women's groups
began a protest campaign
Monday against the ad,
which the critics say will
use Tebow and his mother
to convey an anti-abortion
message.
Funded by the conserva-
tive Christian group Focus


on the Family, the 30-second
ad is expected to recount
the story of Pam Tebow's
pregnancy in 1987. After
getting sick during a mis-
sion trip to the Philippines,
she ignored a recommenda-
tion by doctors to abort her
fifth child. She later gave
birth to Tim, who won the
2007 Heisman Trophy and
helped his Florida team win
two BCS championships.
CBS said Tuesday that
the decision to air theTebow
ad reflected a change in its
policies toward advocacy
ads that has evolved over
the past several years.
"We have for some time
moderated our approach to
advocacy submissions after
it became apparent that our
'stance did not reflect pub-
lic sentiment or industry
norms," said spokesman
Dana McClintock. "In fact,
most media outlets have
accepted advocacy ads for
some time."
He said CBS "will con-
tinue to consider responsi-


bly produced ads from all
groups for the few remain-
ing spots in Super Bowl
XLIV."
In 2004, CBS was criti-
cized by many liberal orga-
nizations for rejecting an
ad by the United Church
of Christ highlighting the
"UCC's welcoming stance
toward gays and others who
might feel shunned by more
conservative churches.
CBS said Tuesday that,
under its new policies, the
UCC ad would have been
accepted for airing. The
network said that it has run
ads in the past year or so
with divergent views on top-
ics such as the health care
overhaul, climate change
and energy policy.
Thirty-second commer-
cials during the Super Bowl
are selling for $2.5 million
to $2.8 million.
On Monday, a coali-
tion led by the New York-
based Women's Media
TEBOW continued on 8A


Hurricanes run through CHS


Tigers stay with
Gainesville early,
lose 62-40.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High played to
a five-point deficit at the
end of the first quarter
against the Gainesville High
Hurricanes, but the peren-
nial power pulled away to
a 6240 victory Tuesday in
Lake City.
Gainesville held the
Tigers without a point
through the first five-plus
minutes of the second quar-
ter until Quantez Wilson
connected on one-of-two
free throws with 2:16
remaining in the half.
Columbia trailed 38-20 at
the half.
The Tigers weren't
able to hold pace as the
Hurricanes caught fire in
the second half on defense
and limited Columbia to five
points in the third quarter.
'They're like a heavy-
weight champ," coach Trey
Hosford said. "Losing is get-
ting hard, but it's a brand
new season in the districts.
I'm proud of my kids for not
quitting."
Ian Benjamin led the
Tigers with 11 points in the
contest. Kellan Graham had
10 points.
Columbia hosts Santa Fe
High on Feb 2.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter


Columbia High's Marquez Marshall (22) drives to the hoop against Gainesville in Lake City Tuesday.


Fit to be tied


Falcons semi-pro
team knotted up
in opener.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

After falling behind
14-0, the Columbia County
Falcons semi-pro football
team fought to a 20-20 tie
against the First Coast
Cardinals at Lake City's
Memorial Stadium on
Saturday.
"The good part is we're
still undefeated," coach
Dean Paukune said. "It is
not what we wanted, but we
didn't lose."
The Falcons matched the
14 first-quarter points of
the Cardinals in the second
period. Cliff Magby scored
on a three-yard run and
Jelani Newton caught an
eight-yard touchdown pass


from Clint Alford. Alford
scored a two-point conver-
sion.
Magby scored on a 10-
yard run midway through
the third quarter, but the
Cardinals capitalized. on
three personal foul pen-
alties to mount a scoring
drive that sent the game
into overtime. Neither team
scored in the overtime peri-
od.
Magby finished with
178 yards on 14 carries.
In addition to Newton's
touchdown catch, Paukune
said Jermaine Dye had
some "excellent
receptions."
On defense, David
Dunham had 13 tackles
and forced two fumbles.
Dewayne Newsome had
two interceptions and Ray
Bohannon had one.
FALCONS continued on 8A


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Falcons' players David Dunham (7) and Adam Norman (54) put local youth
through a training period at Memorial Stadium on Saturday.'


I I t . *


M wAVF-== 71 ,












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN - Notre Dame atVillanova
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - Texas A&M at Oklahoma
St.
9 p.m.
ESPN - Florida St. at Duke
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, men's
and women's quarterfinals, at Melbourne,
Australia (same-day tape)
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, women's
semifinals, at Melbourne, Australia
3:30 a.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, men's
semifinal, at Melbourne,Australia

FOOTBALL

NFL Pro Bowl
Sunday
At Miami
AFC vs. NFC, 7:20 p.m. (ESPN)

Senior Bowl
Saturday
At Mobile,Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFL)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
L.A. Lakers at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Miami atToronto, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Chicgo at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Denver at Houston, 8:30 p.m.


Atlanta at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.
New Orleans at Golden State,
10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Toronto at New York. 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 3Villanova vs. Notre Dame at the
Wachovia Center, 7 pm.
No. 6 Texas vs.Texas Tech, 9 p.m.
No. 8 Duke vs. Florida State,
9 p.m.
No. 12 BYU at No. 23 New Mexico,
10 p.m.
No. 14Tennessee vs.No.21 Vanderbilt,
7 p.m.
No. 15 Temple at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
No. 19 Connecticut at Providence,
7 p.m.
No. 20 Ohio State at Iowa, 8:35 p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open singles
Tuesday
Men
Quarterfinals
Marin Cilic (14), Croatia, def. Andy
Roddick (7), United States, 7-6 (4), 6-3,
3-6, 2-6, 6-3.
Andy Murray (5), Britain, def. Rafael
Nadal (2), Spain, 6-3,7-6 (2), 3-0, re ,red.
Women
Quarterfinals
Justine Henin, Belgium, def. Nadia
Petrova (19), Russia, 7-6 (3), 7-5.
Zheng Jie, China, def Maria Kirilenko,
Russia, 6-1, 6-3.
Doubles
Men
Quarterfinals
Michael Kohlmann, Germany, and
Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Fernando
Gonzalez, Chile, and Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia,
4-6, 6-1, 2-0, retired.
Bob and Mike Bryan (I), United States,
def. Eric Butorac and Rajeev Ram, United
States, 7-5, 4-6, 7-6 (2).


Women
Quarterfinals
Lisa Raymond, United States, and
Rennae Stubbs (6). Australia, def. Gisela
Dulko,Argentina,.and Flavia Pennetta (13),
Italy, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2.
Serena and Venus Williams (2), United
States, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United
States, and Yan Zi (8), China, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4.

GOLF

Golf week
PGATOUR
Farmers Insurance Open
Site: San Diego.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Courses: Torrey Pines, South Course
(7,568 yards, par 72) and North Course
(6,874 yards, par 72).
Purse: $5.3 million. Winner's share:
$954,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Friday, midnight-
3 a.m., 3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Saturday,
midnight-3 a.m., 9:30-11:3- p.m.; Sunday,
1-2:30 pm., 9:30-'11:30 p.m.) and CBS
(Saturday, 3-6 p.m.; Sunday, 3-6:30 p.m.).
On the Net: http://www.pgatour.com
PGA EUROPEAN TOUR
Qatar Masters
Site: Doha, Qatar.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday. b,
Course: Doha Country Club (7,388
yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.5 million. Winner's share:
$416,720.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Sunday,
midnight-3 a.m., 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.;
Monday, midnight-3 a.m.).
PGA European Tour site: http://www.
europeontour.com
NATIONWIDE TOURIPGA TOUR
OF AUSTRALASIA
New Zealand Open.
Site: Queenstown, New Zealand.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course:The Hills Golf Course (7,243
yards, par 72).
Purse: $600,000. Winner's share:
$108,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Saturday-
Sunday, 7:30-9:3,0 a.m.).


GOLF REPORTS


McGrath wins LGA Stableford


Judie McGrath walked
away as the big winner in
the LGA match. She took
first place in the Stableford
points contest and added a
chip-in to her winnings.
Caroline Stevens, Carol
Felton and Nicole Ste-Marie
shared second place. Anita
Campbell got on the board
with a chip-in.
Steve Thomas birdied
early and often to fend off
Bob Randall for a one-stroke
win in the Wednesday
Blitz.
Jordan Hale had an eagle
and a birdie to log two
winners in the Wednesday
skins game. Bob Budwick,
Mike McCranie, Keith
Shaw; Charlie Timmons
and Thomas each pocketed
one winner.
Thomas and McCranie


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

both birdied the Pot Hole
to force the prize into a car-
ryover for the 20th week.
Jerry West overcame a
string of early bogies with
a quartet of birdies to take
first place in the Saturday
Blitz at +6. Steve Patterson
finished two strokes back at
+4, followed by Steve Peters
another two back at +2.
Peters pulled off a rare
feat in the Saturday skins
game. His birdie on the first
hole held up as the game's
only winner, good for sole
possession of a triple-digit
payoff.
Good Old Boys Mark
Risk, Jim Bell, Mike Spencer


and Bobby Simmons
took Match 1 over Monty
Montgomery, Howard
Whitaker, Stan Woolbert
and Carl Jones, 7-5.
Match 2 was a 4-3
squeaker won by Ed Snow,
Joe Persons, Bill Wheeler
and Tom Hosford over
Merle Hibbard, Nick
Whitehurst, Tom Elmore
and Dan Stephens.
Risk repeated as
medalist with 36-37-73 over
Montgomery's 38-38-76 and
Snow's 40-39-79. Stephens
won front-nine honors with
38 to Hibbard's 39. Hosford
took the back side with a
39.
The Super Bowl Sunday
tournament has a two-man
9-hole scramble/9 hole
alternate shot format, with
a shotgun start at 9 a.m.


MGA Championship wraps up


The 2009 Men's Golf
Association Championship
is finally in the books after
several reschedules due to
weather. It was a two-day
event on Jan. 23-24 with
an individual Modified
Stableford scoring system.
- Flight winners were:
A Flight - Chris Cox,
first, at +4; David Crawford,
second, at -2; Lynn Smith,
third, at -3; Dave Kranke,
fourth, at -4;
B Flight - Larry Boone,
first, at even; Tom Harl,
.second, at -3; Alan Tuggle,
third, at -4;
Senior A Flight - Terry
Mick, first, at +3; A.J.
Lavin, second, at +1; Randy
Heavrin, third, at -2;
In the Senior B Flight, Al
Cohoon and Jerry Perkins
tied at + 3, and Cohoon
prevailed in a sudden-death
playoff on the second hole.
Wallace Christie was third.
Top of the Hill results
from Jan. 18:
A Division - Don Horn
and Gary Croxton, tied for
first;
B Division - Duane


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
J.D. Dedge

Rogers, first; Chuck White,
second.
Wednesday Blitz results
from Jan. 20:
A Division - Chet
Carter, Lynn Smith, Ralph
Beekman and Ed Higgs fin-
ished in a four-way tie for
first;
B Division -Terry Mick,
first; Bob Wheary, second;,
bon Horn, third-
C Division - Keith



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I JYKER i


Denmark, first; Jack
Tuggle, second; Stan
Musgrove, third;
D Division - Larry
Boone, first; Jerry Perkins
and Duane Rogers, tied for
second.
There were five skins
on Saturday for the MGA.
Bruce Park had two,
while Dave Kranke, David
Crawford, and Steve Nail
had one each.
There were six skins on
Sunday. Dave Kranke and
Kevin Odom had two; A.J.
Lavin and David Crawford
had one.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


THE CANPIPATE'5
POGG'EP RESPONSE
IN THE PEBATE WAS
PESCRIE-I P A5 ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:LI I I "1"
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: YACHT OAKEN LEDGER CALIPH
Answer: When the grouch answered the phone, it
turned into a - "CRANK" CALL


Childress says he won't give

Favre a decision deadline


Associated Press

EDEN PRAIRIE,
Minn. - The Minnesota
Vikings must wait to hear
from Brett Favre about
whether he'll play next
season.
Coach Brad Childress
says he won't set a dead-
line for the 40-year-old
quarterback to


decide.
Childress said Tuesday
at his season-ending
news conference that he'd
prefer to know sooner rath-
er than later, but that the
team will plan for both pos-
sibilities.
Favre insisted after
the NFC championship
game loss in New Orleans
that he wouldn't take


months to reach a decision,
unlike last summer's back
and forth.
Childress also took
responsibility for the cost-
ly too-many-men-in-the-
huddle penalty that
preceded . Favre's
interception in the fourth
quarter against the Saints
with the Vikings driving for
the go-ahead field goal.


TEBOW. NOW asks to scrap Tebow ad


Continued From Page 7A

Center, with backing from
the National Organization
for Women, the Feminist
Majority Foundation and
other groups, urged CBS


to scrap the Tebow ad.
"An ad that uses sports
to divide rather than to
unite has no place in the
biggest national sports


event of the year - an
event designed to bring
Americans together," said
Jehmu Greene, president
of the media center.


FALCONS: Play North Florida Saturday
Continued From Page 7A


The Falcons sponsored game and Paukune said he
a youth camp and flag foot- plans to make that a regu-
ball the afternoon of the lar feature.


The Falcons play the
North Florida Rams
in Jacksonville at 3 p.m.


welcomes
Board Certified General Surgeon

Michael J. Stumpf, D.O.
Office Hours
Monday - Thursday 8am - 5pmi
Friday 8am - 12pmrn

Dr. Stumpf has experience in a full range of
General Surgery procedures and has a special interest
in the Management of Breast Disease
Gateway Surgical Group
3140 NW Medical Center Lane, Suite 120
Lake City, Florida 32055
_(386) 755-6682


LAKE CITY

MTEDiCAL CENTER


ACROSS


1 Stingy
6 Illustrious
11 Gaul invader
13 Dining area
14 Band
15 Flag
16 Patagonia loc.
17 Before now
18 Rank above
maj.
21 Characterized by
anger
23 Flat-needled
tree
26 GI mail drop
27 London
gardens
28 Bombay attire
29 Common fertil-
izer
31 Marched along
32 Gung-ho
33 Permeating
profoundly
36 Gas in signs
37 Moo goo -
pan


38 Bridal
notice word
39 Winding curve
40 Rose pest
42 Come-ons
43 Seek
damages
44 NFL scores
46 Wear off by
scraping
49 A martial art
53 Wrinkled fruit
54 Habituated
55 Tortilla snack
56 Renowned
recluse

DOWN

1 Shot meas.
2 Pith helmet
3 Poetic
adverb
4 Everest
locale
5 Red
powdery
condiment
6 Erupt


Answer to Previous Puzzle

BBS PA NE SRI
A L EDEN TAOS
N UT P VEMENTS
GL S OR GA

NOTAOOH 0T1K O
E NLAN RI 1BAD
ALL LA^R LO P^AR E
TA K K ISS UIRLS



INSINUAE A U K
AIM-� A iMIB^yi
GAVE FDIC MBA
N PR OOPS P A Y


7 Oxy-5 target
8 Calendar abbr.
9 Day before
10 "The," to
Wolfgang
12 Feel sorry about


13 Help a crook
18 Incisor neighbor
19 Conjectures
20 Jackpot
games
22 Anchors -!
23 Cooked
cereal
24 Put a crease
in
25 Narrow crests
28 R-V
connector
30 Prez after
Jimmy
34 Rum drink (2
wds.)
35 Auction
action
40 Sound
41 Hammer part
43 Obi
45 Robber gull
46 Prince
Valiant's son
47 Bleat
48 Rocker -
Ocasek
50 Label on
seconds
51 New
socialite
52 Prefix with
meter


� 2010 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
r-^- -^-"^IH~f ? ^ 0


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


AMBALS












olumia

Your marketplace source for Lake City andd


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


" ** ;1*
'n
I ,
i.' ,
'i^


rj,


Columbia County


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Boutique offers big-city trends, hometown service


Sparkling jewelry,
colorful scarves,
an array of gift
baskets and a
friendly face will
greet customers as they step
inside Southern Exposure
Salon and Boutique in Lake
City.
"My business is a ser-
vice industry," said owner
Danette O'Neal.
O'Neal's salon offers a
variety of services, with
competitive prices, such
as men and women's hair
cuts, pedicures, manicures
and waxing. Her boutique
also provides a trendy
shopping experience for
her customers.
"We can do it all," she
said.
Southern Exposure
Salon and Boutique opened
in July 2006 and the gift
shop was added to the
business in December of
that year.
The boutique was origi-
nally located in the back
of the building, and then
was moved to the front of
the building near the main
entrance, a decision that
proved to be good for busi-
ness, O'Neal said.
"Our business tripled
when we moved the gift
shop up front," she said.
The boutique is stocked
with a range of styling
products, hair tools and
gifts.
'We sell jewelry, purses,
gift baskets and any kind of
different, trendy gift item,"
O'Neal said. "Any kind of
gift you can imagine that
is unique and different.
To me, it's like Christmas
every week because I get


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Southern Exposure Salon and Boutique stylist Vicki Krahnke (from left), boutique manager Loie Plath, owner Danette O'Neal
and stylist Crystal Black pose inside the boutique where customers can browse before and after their salon services.


to open new things every
week."
O'Neal said prices in the
gift shop range from $5 to
$40, and the boutique is a
good place to purchase a
gift for someone.
"Customers love to buy
a gift for a teacher here, or
even for a Sunday school
teacher," she said. lWeV
offer inspirational gifts,


too."
O'Neal said the boutique
manager, Loie Plath, is
available to help a custom-
er find just the right item.
"She will try to find what
people are looking for, and
she is always helpful to
assist them," said O'Neal.
The boutique also offers
free gift wrapping, and can
always deliver gift baskets,


O'Neal said.
While the gift baskets
are designed in the store
and already put together
for the customer, O'Neal
said they will ctistomize a
gift basket if the customer
requests it.
Thesalon staffs seven
different stylists, and
always keeps up with the
latest styles, O'Neal said.


"We try to keep very,
very current on stylings
and treatments," she said.
"Our stylists do a good job,
and we want our girls to be
very professional."
A pedicurist and mani-
curist and three different
receptionists are also on
staff, O'Neal said, and
every member of her staff
is there to serve the cus-


to siestafor


Tax


FREE-191f HOW t6m
Ust guy with
pordtase of $999 or
more of regular
rdta$
T'V ftrr9or
LprimccA merchandne"


go oh. to m1ww rrsubmw
Mid pm yowuqBp"tFromma
\i of "" o N*#pudWt*I


SPRING AIR
Julia Plush or Firm


$499


h* w A14 A."
to DW4


GRACE
Eure Top or Plush


$899"
Floi tso ,...... $
fl! St,,,, , (7W


461 SW Deputy J Davis Lane
Lake City # FL 32024
386-7524910


just Right:


Check us out at


tomer.
"We are here to accom-
modate the customer,"
she said. "We offer a good
product and it's all about
standing behind that prod-
uct and making the cus-
tomer happy.
"My question to the cus-
tomer is always, 'What else
can we offer you?'"
Running special promo-
tions ads in the Lake City
Reporter is another way
to reach customers, said
O'Neal.
'We get a great response
from the ads," she said.
O'Neal said her custom-
ers will always be taken
care of in a timely manner,
whether they call ahead or
just decide to stop in.
'We take walk-ins, call-
ins, anything," O'Neal said.
'We can accommodate
anyone that comes through
the door."
O'Neal said she enjoys
her job because of the
interaction with customers.
"I'm a people person. I
love to visit with people,"
she said. "I'm very active
and I love to interact with
people. To me, it's just a
fun job. I love this type of
business."
Southern Exposure
Salon and Boutique is
located on 296 S. Marion
Ave. Hours are 9 a.m. to
7:30 p.m. Monday through
Saturday, but O'Neal said
her stylists will customize
their schedules to meet the
scheduling need of a cus-
tomer. The shop is closed
Sunday.
Call (386) 752-4614.









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


One ile p .i ad ,d
4 lines * 6 days '', .....'



I.A.


One irem p.: d d
Lines * 6 days '',"-.






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S4 lines * 6 days ,"

Und r.. .





4 lines ' 6 days '.1 "'' ';'"






One item per ad
4 lines * 6 days
. lines
4 3ines d s ys






ne mited tom per adtype advertis-
4 lines * 6 daysonly


**:*~~ ~~ :*^ * ig





4 linesl$
. 3 days
Includes 2 Signs * II t



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only. -
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line'
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion,



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment.:Our offices located-at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: 'elasbifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon,,10:00 am. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed,, I )0a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thus., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:001a.m. Fri., 9.00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
. reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
S be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
.. to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
- not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
� www.lakecilTyreporter.comn


Legal

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting appli-
cations for a Librarian II. This is
full-time professional library work
coordinating and conducting services
and activities in the Youth Services
area. Minimum training: MLS or
equivalent from an American Library
Association accredited University
plus two years of library experience.
A comparable amount of training,
education or experience may be sub-
stituted for the above minimum qual-
ifications. Valid FL Drivers License.
required. Salary is negotiable within
$14.05- $17.56 hourly range plus
benefits. Successful applicants must
pass pre-employment physical &
drug screening. Applications may be
obtained at the Human Resources
Office, Board of County Commis-
sioners, 135 NE Hemando Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32055, or online at
www.columbiacountyfla.com,
(386) 719-2025, TDD (386)758-
2139. Review of applications will
begin on 02/12/10 and continue until
the position is filled. Columbia
County is an AA/EEO/ADA/VP
employer.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 09-614-CA
REGIONS BANK D/B/A REGIONS
MORTGAGE
Plaintiff
vs.
BORGELLA, ELIE, et al.;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DAVID THELUSMA
230 ANDREWS LANE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
DAVID THELUSMA
260 REOCK ST.
ORANGE, NJ 07050
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID
THELUSMA
230 ANDREWS LANE
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID
THELUSMA
260 REOCK ST.
ORANGE, NJ 07050
AND TO: All persons claiming an
interest by, through, under, or against
the aforesaid Defendant(s).
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclosure a mort-
gage on the following described
property located in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida:
A portion of SECTION 14, TOWN-
SHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST,
Columbia County, Florida, being
more particularly described as fol-
lows; Begin at the point where the
West right of way line of Price Creek
Circle intersects the North right of
way line of .Andrew Road and run
South 89' 44' 29" West along the
North line of Andrew Road, 470.63
feet; thence North 0� 15' 31" West
-'315.00 feet ithncce North '89' 44'
29" East 359.09 feet; thence South
19" 45' 26" East along the West line
of Price Creek Circle 334.16 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
has been filed against you, and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to this ac-
tion, on Greenspoon Marder, PA.,
Default Department, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is Trade
Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West
Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauder-
dale, FL 33309, and the file original
with the Clerk within 30 days after
the first publication of this notice, or
on or before January 22, 2010, other-
wise a default arid a judgment may
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL
OF SAID COURT on this 21 day of
December, 2009.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of said Court
By: /s/ B. Scrippio
As Deputy Clerk

05523036
January 27,2010
February 3, 2010
NOTICE IS hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):
DANIELLE A. AKERLUND
Last known address of:
5725 SW COUNTY RD 242
LAKE CITY, FL 32024

TOPEKA L. AKINS
Last known address of:
S883 SE MONROE ST
LAKE CITY, FL 32025

RONALD H. ALLBRITTON, JR.
Last known address of:
266 NE MOATES CT
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

DONALD D. BASS
Last known address of:
770 SW MAULDIN AVE







Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191

Services


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
** 5. * ** * * ** ** ** * *** ***


Legal

LAKE CITY, FL 32024

ROSIE L. BERRY
Last known address of:
411 NW BASCOM NORRIS DR,
#203
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

SHAWNEE I. BLACK
Last known address of:
141 NW FANTASY GLN
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

ATTOYA C. BUIEY
Last known address of:
285 NE COLVIN AVE
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

CONI M. CORWIN
Last known address of:
480 NW HAMILTON ST
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
NAHSHAN E. FINDLAY
Last known address of:
6893 SW OLD WIRE RD
FT WHITE, FL 32038

NATASHA GORDON
Last known address of:
435 NW BASCOM NORRIS DR,
#206
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
WILLIAM G. GREEN
Last known address of:
5563 SW OLD WIRE RD
FT WHITE, FL 32038

HEATHER M. HALL
Last known address of:
245 NW GENELL LOOP
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

RODRIC T. HARRIS
Last known address of:
1023 SEMONROE ST
LAKE CITY, FL 32025

EVENIAL. HICKS
Last known address of:
1166 ST. JOHNS ST., #5
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

TINA R. HOLLINGSWORTH
Last known address of:
-305 SW THOMPKINS LOOP
LAKE CITY, FL 32025

SHIRLEY HOWARD
Last known address of:
921 NW REDDING AVE
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

WILLIE J. JERNIGAN
Last known address of:
1011 NW TEXAS AVE
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

RODGER S. MENA
Last known address of:
4484 E. US HIGHWAY 90
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

L.C. MERRICKS
Last known address of:
942 NW GEORGIA AVE
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
RENE L. OWENS
Last known address of:
1752 SW OLD WIRE RD
LAKE CITY, FL 32024

STACEY E. STAFFORD
Last known address of:
294 NE OMAR TER
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

VINCENT S. UNDERWOOD
Last known address of:
885 NW PARNELL AVE
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

SAMUEL J. WELCH
Last known address of:
283 SW LEONARD TER
LAKE CITY, FL 32024

JAMES T. WHITE
Last known address of:
797 NE SAM CT
LAKE CITY, FL 32055

COLBY 0O. WILSON
Last known address of:
188 SE POLK LN
LAKE CITY, FL 32025

is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
Ph: 386-758-1026
04537310
January 27, 2010
REGISTRATION OF Fictitious
Names
We. the. undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of All About
U Salon & Day Spa at 265 SW Ma-
lone St. Ste 115 Lake City, Florida
32025

Contact Phone Number:
386-754-9640 and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
Name: LISA WALTRIP
Extent of Interest: 100%
by: /s/ Lisa Waltrip
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to an subscribed before me
this 25th day of January, AD. 2010
by: /s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO

05523041
January 27, 2010


020 Lost & Found


AFRICAN GRAY w/ red tail lost
01/19 around Gwen Lake down by
the Workcamp. REWARD! Call
386-755-1464 or 386-288-3687


020 Lost & Found

LOST WEDDING ring. Across
the street from Say-A-Lot or
Wendy's pkng lot on Friday 01/15.
FOUND!!

100 Job

100 Opportunities

04537127
GOOD OPPORTUNITY!
NOW HIRING An Ekperi-
enced Stylist with clientele
Southern Exposure
386-752-4614

3RD CIRCUIT COURT
ADMINISTRATION
Child Support Enforcement Hearing
Officer www.jud3.flcourts.org
4 TEMPORARY NURSERY
'WORKERS needed 2/22/10 -
11/15/10. Workers will plant,
cultivate, harvest, grade, store &
ship container & field grown horti-
cultural products. Guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free.housing provided
for non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence reim-
bursed to worker upon completion
of 50% of contract. Pay rate is
$8.74/hr. Applications should
report or send'a resume to the
nearest Florida Agency of Work-
force Innovation office &
reference JO # NY 0928216.
Russell's Tree & Shrub Farm LLC
- East Amherst, NY
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
5 TEMPORARY Farm Workers
needed 2/22/10 - 11/18/10. Workers
will plant, cultivate, and harvest,
grade, & pack produce. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers. Transpor-
tation & subsistence reimbursed to
worker upon completion of 50% of
contract. Pay rate is $9.00/hr. Appli-
cants should report or send a resume
to the nearest Florida Agency of
Workforce Innovation office & refer-
ence job order # MD 0946166.
Brad's Produce - Churchville, MD
++ Gen Ranch Maintenance **
Must be exp in yard work, elec,
plumbing, mowing, mechanical.
and live stock. Housing provided.
386-963-1200 or 867-2910
INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for self motivated goal
oriented sales person in both
life/health and property/casualty
ins. A 220 and 215 license a plus
but not reqd. Must have exc.
comm. skills, be organized and de-
pendable. Must be team oriented
and have computer skills.
Send reply to
Box 04086, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
OWNER OPERATORS WANTED
Flatbed, stepdeck OTR operation
based out of Fort White, FL. Good $.
Must have good equipment, and be
willing to work it!
Call Mike at 386-623-4801.
TEMPORARY: # of openings: 13
Tobacco, Hay/Straw & General Ag-
ricultural Workers Needed
Employer: Wilkerson Farms, Inc.,
Eddie Ray Kirks & Kyle Kirks-
Graves & Calloway Counties, KY
Dates: 03/01/2009-12/15/2010 Wag-
es: $7.25 - 8.00/hour. 3/4 of hours
listed on job order guaranteed. Work
tools will be provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to those who
cannot reasonably return to their per-
manent residence each working day.
Transportation & subsistence paid
when 50% of contract is met. Physi-
cally able to meet & perform all job
specifications. May be required to
take random drug and/or alcohol
tests. May be required to submit to a
criminal background check. Apply
for this job at the nearest One Stop
Career Center for further details.


-,LAKKE �CCITY
o UtMMUN IY OLEtSE
REGISTRAR ASSISTANT I
(Part-time 20 hours per week)
Position #OP9965
Responsible for evaluating,
processing and verifying Iranscripts and
other duties associated with the
Registrar's Office and official student
records. High school diploma or its
equivalent plus two years clerical
experience. Additional education may
substitute on a year for year basis for
required experience in related area.
Special consideration will be given to
applicants with an Associate Degree or
Certificate in a related area. Computer
literate. Must be proficient in MS Word
and Excel. College emnploymient
application required.
Salary S9.90 per hour.
Application deadline: 2/10/10
Position details.and application
available on the web at:
www lakecitycc.edu
Inquiries: Human Resources
Lake City Community College
149 SE College Place
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4594
E-mail: humanr(a;lakecitycc.cdu
LCCC is accredited by the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in
Education & Employment

To place your
classified ad call

755-.5440
I mylM^^ M.C


100 Job0
SOpportunities

SUWANNEE COUNTY
COORDINATOR
LIVE OAK, FLORIDA

The Suwannee County Board o!f
County Commissioners is currently
seeking applicants for the full-time
position of County Coordinator.
This is a highly responsible adminis-
trative and executive position report-
ing to the County Commission. The
County Coordinator's powers and
duties are administrative in nature
and do not include any legislative
governmental power instilled in the
Board of County Commissioners as
the governing body of Suwannee
County. Administers and carries out
the directives and policies of the Su-
wannee County Board of Commis-
sioners and enforce all orders, reso-
lutions, ordinances, and regulations
of the Board to assure that they are
faithfully executed. Attends all
meetings of the Board of County
Commissioners with authority to par-
ticipate in the discussion of any mat-
ter. Responsible for preparation and
delivery of formal presentations; at-
tends meetings, conferences and
seminars requiring periodic travel.
. Develops public policy for adoption,
advises the County Commission and
communicates with the press and
public, relative to a variety of public
administration issues. This position
will be responsible for the adminis-
tration and overall management of
Building Maintenance & Custodial,
Administrative Services, Protective
Inspection, Airport, Code Enforce-
ment, Addressing, and Planning and
Zoning. Experience and Training
Guidelines include graduation from
an accredited college or university
with a Bachelor Degree in Business
or Public Administration and five
years of progressively responsible,
upper-level management, preferably
in public administration; or any
equivalent combination of training
and experience. Must possess a val-
id Drivers License. Salary range is
$58,000 - $88,000 annually. Inter-
ested applicants may obtain a de-
tailed job description and an applica-
tion at the Suwannee County Admin-
istrative Services Department, 224
Pine Avenue, Live Oak, Florida
32064 (386) 362-6869. Applicants
are encouraged to submit resumes,
letters of reference, or other bio-
graphical information with their ap-
plication. Successful completion of
a drug test is a condition of employ-
ment. Background checks may be
required. Within six months from
date of hire must reside in Suwannee
County. Deadline for submitting ap-
plications is February 4, 2010 at 4:30
p.m. The Suwannee County Board
of County Commissioners is an
equal employment opportunity em-
ployer that does not discriminate
against any qualified employee or
Sapplicint becausetc of ra'e, color,; na-
tional origin, sex including pregnant,
cy, age, disabihrliy; Ofmaritaltstatus"
Spanish speaking individuals are en-
couraged to apply. EE/AA/V/D
Posted 1/05/10

TEMPORARY: # of openings: 16
Tobacco, Hay/Straw, Row crops &
General Agricultural Workers Need-
ed Employer: Teddy E. Morgan-
Christian County, KY
Dates: 03/15/2010- 2/31/2010
Wages: $8.00/hour. 3/4 of hours list-
ed on job order guaranteed. Work
tools will be provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to those who
cannot reasonably return to their per-
manent residence each working day.
Transportation & subsistence paid
.when 50% of contract is met. Physi-
cally able to meet & perform all job
specifications. May be required to
take random drug and/or alcohol
tests. May be required to submit to a
criminal background check. Apply
for this job at the nearest One Stop
Career Center for further details.


110 Sales
Employment

35522947
SALESMAN NEEDED
Must be aggressive and self moti-
vated. Also must be willing to
travel and work some weekends.
Fax resume to (386) 963-2809 or
email it to: srlhOsrloghomes.com


Are You Earning What You Are
Worth?
Growing corfipany looking for
SUPER STAR sales representative
386-487-1742 or email resume to
industrialsupplyjobs@gmail.com


Medical
120 Employment

04537240
RN Needed
Experience Preferred.
Full Time with Benefits.
Email Resume to:
Angela Akins RN/SDC
At
aakins@gulfcoasthealthcare.com
Or
Fax Resume to:
386-364-5174
EOE/V/D/M/F


120 Medical
120 Employment

CNA/Medical Assistant wanted
for local medical office. Send re-
sume to 184 S.W. Macon Street
Madison, FL 32340
FULLTIME LPN
needed, for medical office.
IV cert. & computer skills a plus.
Fax resume to 386-754-1712.
LPN or RN needed Fulltime
3PM-11PM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V
REHAB TECH
Part time Rehab Tech needed at LTC
facility in Jasper. Responsible for as-
sisting PT, OT, & Speech
therapists, CPR cert. Req. Send
resumes to j.anderson( ifpehab.com
or fax to 888-531-2697.

240 Schools&
240 Education

04536763
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-02/01/10
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-02/08/10
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-03/16/10.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE TO GOOD HOME,
one AKC boxer
7 yrs. old female,
TOY POODLE
CKC (w/papers), 10 weeks
shots & health cert.,
$275. 386-719-4900.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621
FINE CHINA Japan Circa 1950.
Never used, complete set for 8.
: AnrdotraPatterf #6509 $300.00
, . Call 386-623-6198


402 Appliances

KENMORE GAS STOVE
Beige/Black
$125
Call 386-755-3350
STAINLESS STEEL/BLACK
Microwave, (Sharp)
Great Condition .
$50, Call 386-755-3350
UPRIGHT FREEZER.
SFrost Free $150. 00
or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.
WHIRLPOOL ,
WASHER/DRYER
4 yrs old works well.
$200 386-590-3754
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$150.00 Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.


405- Bicycles '

Girls Bicycle, Excellent Condi-.
tion!. Orange County Chopper
Pink/Black. $50.
386-755-3350


408 Furniture

BLACK METAL frame futon
with cushion.
$50.00
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.
DOUBLE RECLINER SOFA
Brown
$400
Call 386-961-8623
ELECTRIC RECLINER
Good Condition, Leather
$500
Call 904-504-2620
NICE ROLLING Microwave
Table with slide out meat cutting
board $35.00 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
PATIO FURNITURE
w/umbrella, PVC Pipe style, table
4 chairs,�needs replacement
cushions, $50, Call 386-755-3350
STURDY ROCKING CHAIR
with cushions, great condition

Call 386-755-3350


SUWANNEE- KI


HAMILTON l

TECHNICAL CENTER


2B


C~i~"


I FND I "








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


4143 Musical
Merchandise
FREE PIANO
In good condition, legs need'some-
work .Call 754- 9524
leave message


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$150 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.
WANTED TO BUY
Good used car, truck tires and
customs rims. Will pay top dollar.
386-752-4215


430 Garage Sales

FLEA MARKET
Inside Lake City Shrine Club-
Brown Rd. Jan 29, 30 31. Rain or
shine/hot or cold. Rent table for
$10/day, $25 for 3 days. Call Lory
at 758-5814


440 Miscellaneous

100 FOOT ROLL RED TOP
WIRE, 4 foot. with 4 inch squares,
never used, $100 or best offer.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

42" HITACHI
Large Screen Projection TV
$450
Call 386-961-8623
5-Men's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) 1-Seiko, 1-Titan,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.
IMPEX POWERHOUSE
Home Gym,
Exercise Machine, $50
Call 386-961-8623
STONE GRINDER
For making flour
$30
Call 386-961-8623

620 Mobile Home
Lots for Sale

1 ACRE lot, 3 min. from Walmart
Only $19,900!
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 wide 2/2
Quiet, clean country park.
$475.mo + Deposit.&References
No pets. 386-758-2280.
2&3 Bedroom Mobile homes.
$450 - $600. monthly.
Also, Irg 2 br. furnished, apt.
386-752-6422
2BR/2BA, MH
On 5 acres, References, first & se-
curity, lease, Avail. January 28th
Call 386-755-0300.
3B/2BA DWMH w/ carport &
back porch in nice cond. Good lo-
cation. $700 mo., 1st, last, $500
dep. Small dog. 386-752-6333
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3/2, & 2/2 MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
M/H 2 BR, new carpet completely
furn. linens, dishes etc. or unfum.
Carport, patio & utility shed.
Quite, safe clean park.
Special discounts. $550
386-752-0981 or 386-755-4965
Mobile Home at Wilson Springs
in Ft. White. $400. mo or
$100. per week.
386-623-9026 or 497-1315
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511

60� Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2000 SF Palm Harbor 3Bd/2Ba with
retreat/office. 2X6 Walls, 8' Ceilings
(T&T), Plywood Floors, Extra Insu-
lation, 2 Sliding Glass Doors, Appli-
ances, Ceramic Floors, 16 inch con-
struction. Reduced Price Call Gary
Hamilton (386) 758-9824 Possible
Owner Finance!!
2010 BRANDNEW 4/2 DW,
CH&A, skirting, steps, set-up &
delv. All this for only $39,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452.
jetdec@windstream.net
4/2 ONLY
$289.00 per month.
with set/up.
Call John T. 386-752-1452.
4/2 ONLY
$289.00 per month.
with set/up.
Call John T. 386-752-1452.
BRAND NEW 2010
4br/2ba on your property, fof
pymts of only $321.56 a mo.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@ windstream.net


Ed & Linda McQuatters
Formerly of Hopkins Motor Co. Paint 8 Body Shop
Announce the opening of

Competition Plus

Auto Body
Full Service Paint/Auto Body/Collision
a We Handle ALL Insurance Claims
685 NW Waldo St.* (386) 752-1415
(Located in the Cars Unlimited bldg. across from Central States)
"Give us a try...we'll earn your business "


Al VII I iUM-1J 1112 1 l


Classified Department: 755-5440







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


64 Mobile Homes
60 for Sale
FACTORY REPO'S,
built two man; 28x40"s.
Only 2 left for $28.500.
Call John T. 386-752-1452
FACTORY REPO'S,
built two many 28x40's.
Only 2 left for $28,500.
Call John T. 386-752-1452
GREAT REPO 2 bed. Single-
wide, completely refurbed. Set up
on your land. $11,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
NO MONEY DOWN
When you own your land.
Payments on doublewides
start @ 239/month.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
ENERGY STAR Homes R-30
ins., Heat Pump, thermal panes,.
Free electric for 1 year.
Must mention this ad.
Homes start at $29,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jmmartin23@yahoo.com
NO MONEY down on new
Manufactured homes.
Call for more details on program.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
READY TO move in 2001 3br
doublewide on .87 acres. In Co-
lumbia Co., $1500 down, $350
mo. Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
BANK REPO
Nice 3/2 doublewide,
over 1,300 sq. ft. only $15,000.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
Palm Harbor-Foreclosures,
Dealer Repo's and short sales.
Never lived in! 4/2
On your property.Financing
Avail, up to $94k off
1-800-622-2832
REPO'S REPO'S REPO's
We have many to choose from!
Homes starting @ $10,500.
These homes won't last long!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
650 Mobile Home
650 & Land _
BANK FORECLOSURE! 2001
3/2 DW on 1 acre of land! banks
loss your gain @ only $49,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
Only 2 left, turn key packages. In
nice, up scale community. These
Jackobsons won't last long.
Call John 386-344-5234.
Owner financing available.
Only 2 left, turn key packages. In
nice, up scale community. These
Jackobsons won't last long.
Call John 386-344-5234.
Owner financing available.
710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
! LUXURY HOMES !
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649 per mo. !!!
$299 MOVES YOU IN
Law Enforcement Discounts'
Teacher Discounts
Veteran Discounts
Student Discounts
FREE RENT
1K 200 FREE CHANNELS
7 BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800
!!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
***LIMITED TIME ONLY***
WINDSONG APARTMENT
HOMES
1 BD $499
2 BD $535
3 BD $617
NO DEPOSITS
2 MONTHS FREE
EXPIRES 02/28/2010
*Some Restrictions Apply
Tel: (386) 758-8455


71 0Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
2 br/lba w/garage on the West side
1st, last &security.
Call
386-755-6867
2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$600 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2Br Apt. Gorgeous lake view.
Great location.
$485. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex w/ga-
rage. all electric. AC, W/D hook
up DW. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Share Pool Home! Full use kitch-
en, laundry, separate bedroom and
bath. $500/mo. + 1/3 electric.
Call Derek 386-344-3261
www.bigfloridahome.com
Studios & IBr's from $140/wk.
Utilities & cable incl. Full kitchen,
fridge & range.No contracts.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND story 2/2,
private acre 8 mi. to VA. No dogs
$500 a mo + dep. Ideal for
single/traveler 386-961-9181
720 Furnished Apts.
2 y "For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
I BED $350, 2 BED $475, 3 BED
$500-550. Central A/C, small/
quiet community. 352-505-9264 or
800-805-7379. Only 4 left!
1BR/1BA HOUSE on Ichetuck-
nee River. Quiet setting. Close to
boat ramp. $600. mo.
plus $400 deposit. 386-397-3258
2BR/1BA, $480 A MONTH
MOVES YOU IN.
668 S.E. Nassau Street,
Call 386-697-9950
Beautiful Newer 3BR/2BA, on
CR 18, 30 mins. to Gville., 30
mins. to L.C., $950 p/m + last +
sec., go to website for photo at
www.property4you.biz,
Call 386-365-3865.
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$800/mo.
864-517-0522.
Great Location! Lg 3br/2ba w/ga-
rage at Southern Oaks CC. Wash-
er/dryer avail. $1,100 mo. plus de-
posit.386-752-3991 or 397-4550
HOME FOR rent $750 mo.
4br./lba. Irg patio, shed & fenced,
Absolutely no pets! .
386-623-7379 or 386-755-4483
PROVIDENCE, 1BR,
1.5 BA,w/d,c-h/a,l1 ac. fenced,
private,nice, most pets ok. $650
Ist/Ist/dep. 386-752-2555/c-
352-494-1989
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
- 2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
* available. (626) 512-5374
750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086

770 Condos For Rent
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560
810 Home for Sale
In Lake City. 3br,3b,LR,DR
Den, Office, Generator,
Well Sprinkler System, 2500 sq. ft.
$189,000 386-792-2952


82O Farms &
2U Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic. power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

950 Cars for Sale
1991 CORVETTE conv. white
w/blue flames. 80,000( mi. Full
power, V-8, Z06 wheels, custom
exhaust, $9,995 386-497-4763
2000 BUICK Le-Sabre
Very clean. Garage kept.
$4,600.
Call 386-961-8407
951 Recreational
95 Vehicles
2008 POLARIS Sportsman 400,
Water Cooled, 1 Hour on Meter,
health forces sale, $4,000 OBO
(386) 719-6537


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Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JANJARY 27, 2010 5B


DILBERT


THE URGENT E-M\AIL
YOU FORWARDED TO
THE ENTIRE COMPANY
IS A HOAX.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
J�YOU KNOW WHAT
WOULD 5E PRETTY WHAT'S
COOL, MP. 5."? THAT,
ELMO?




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FRANK & ERNEST


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DEAR ABBY


Daughter despairs over tense

relationship with her mother


8 PEOPLE DON'T REALLY
BURST INTO FLAMES
IF THEY USE THEIR
CELL PHONES DURING
AN ECLIPSE.


AND tMORE BAD NEWS:
THE WITLESS PRO-
TECTION PROGRAM
ISN'T A REAL THING.


DEAR ABBY: I am a 16-
year-old girl and I fight with
my mother almost daily. It
makes me sad and upset all
the time, and I don't know
what to do. The last fight
we had was over something
so dumb I don't even know
why I dragged it out for so
long. I said things I didn't
mean - things that were
hurtful and cruel.
No child should ever
treat a parent like I treat my
mom. I take her love and
kindness for granted, and
never tell her how much
I really do appreciate her.
What I said to her in anger
made her cry.
How can I tell or show
my mom how sorry I am
and how much I love her
and admire her, and how
can I stop myself from ex-
ploding and saying things
to her that I don't mean?
- UPSET IN INDIANA
DEAR -UPSET: The
most direct way to make
amends would be to hug
your mom 'and apologize
for flying off the handle and
saying things you didn't
mean. Tell her you love her
and will try hard to do better
because you are ashamed
of your behavior and know
it wasn't justified.
It's important to under-
stand that the average per-


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Pushing for
advancement may not be
easy but it will be worth
fighting for. Getting what
you want will consume you
and, although that can be
good, make sure you don't
neglect your personal re-
sponsibilities. **
TAURUS (April 20,
May. 20)): You will do
yourself more harm than
good if you get caught up
in other people's personal
lives. Instead, concentrate
on the things you enjoy do-
ing most. Distance yourself
from anyone who isn't sup-
portive. ****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): If you don't move
swiftly, you will give people
around you the wrong im-
pression. Your inability to
make a decision will reflect
on how well you will do in
a leadership position. An in-
novative idea will separate
you from the crowd. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July -22): Make some per-
sonal changes. An attitude
adjustment will enable you
to come to an agreement
with someone you share a
lot of time and space with.
Don't give up what you
love. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Taking life too seri-
ously will work against


'THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

you. The more exciting you
make your day, the better
equipped you will be to deal
with people who interest
you. Getting out socially
will lead to a good partner-
ship. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Your timing needs to
be flawless. You can mix
business with pleasure
and get a foothold on a fu-
ture position. Don't wait for
changes to come to you; go
after your goals. Be a par-
ticipant. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Being outspoken will
help you today. Once you
make it clear what you are
intent on pursuing, you
can move forward without
guilt or someone stand-
ing in your way. Love and
romance should be part of
your agenda. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): The more re-
sponsible you are, the bet-
ter you will feel about your
accomplishments and the
more you will impress the
people you deal with. Make
a difference in your com-
munity by being diligent
in bringing about reforms.

SAGnITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Throw your-


self into your work and
making more money, not
your personal life. You will
run into trouble at home
and .if you deal someone
you love and don't want to
disappoint. A business trip
or conference will help you
avoid difficulties and get
you ouitof fhehouse ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): If you be-
lieve in your talent, so will
everyone around you. Lay
your cards on the table and
advancement and success
will be yours. The more dis-
ciplined and detailed you
are, the more attention you
will attract. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Dealing with
authority figures, institu-
tions or large corporations
will result in problems. Let
people come to you, not
you to them. You must take
care of your responsibili-
ties without accepting help.
Someone is eager to make
you look bad. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You can use
emotional tactics to get
what you want but be pre-
pared to have to make a
quick change of plans in
order to avoid criticism. It's
best to work by yourself
and avoid lending or bor-
rowing money. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created frorin quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: H equals J
"AX S RW WXC, TMG ETVAWSO FAJJ
P W C W U AXWC XTS TXJO PO FRYS FW
VGW Y S W PMS PO FRYS FW GWUMEW
ST CWESGTO. " - H.V. EYFRAJJ

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "That's the beauty of our show. Comedy or politics.
We're sort of a mix. A Space Age polymer of both." - Jon Stewart
(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 1-27


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I COULD BECOME RiCH !AND
I WOULDN'T HAVE TO SELL
VERmYANY OF TH4EM,EITHER.,.

/


Wll, I& R HOWUCH I'D
MAKE IF I OLSOLD
A6 LITTLE A6 ONE A DAY!


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
son can experience frus-
tration that leads to anger
multiple times a day. Anger
is a normal emotion.
The challenge that ev-
eryone faces is how not
to deny the feeling, but to
express it in ways that are
productive for ourselves
and not hurtful to others.
One way to accomplish
this is recognizing what
pushes our buttons. What
provoked you? Were you
under pressure? Or were
you angry about something
else so you "dumped" on
an innocent party (in this
case, your mom) because
she was handy?
In my booklet, "The An-
ger in All of Us and How
to Deal With It," I explain
that one of the unhealthi-
est ways to deal with an-
ger is to deny or repress it.
However, because most of
us have been trained from
early childhood to suppress
anger, many of us need to
learn to express it appropri-
ately.


The Anger booklet can
be ordered by sending your
name and mailing address,
plus a check or money or-
der for $6 (U.S. funds) to
Dear Abby- Anger Booklet,
PO. Box 447, Mount Mor-
ris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping
and handling are included
in the price.
In it are suggestions for
managing anger, includ-
ing how to express anger
in constructive ways, such
as a few well-chosen words
that will make your point.
It takes maturity to identify
and verbalize negative emo-
tions instead of "lashing
out" and saying - or doing
- something you'll regret.
Being able to calmly say,
"When you do (blank), it
makes me angry," before
flying off the handle will
earn you respect from oth-
ers. If you resort to name-
calling, the other person
hears only the "static" and
doesn't get your message.
The first step in controlling
anger is to recognize that
the emotion is building, to
understand that there are
healthy and effective ways
to express it, and to diffuse
it before you lose control.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


FOR BETTER ORWORSE





LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2010


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