Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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- 3-vehicle wreck claims 1


6'.


.. ^ . . ' . J ' . "- . ,, .>
-' . , , - - ,


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
Florida Highway Patrol troopers investigate a three-vehicle
wreck scene near Fort White Saturday afternoon. One person
was killed in the wreck which occurred on State Road 47, just
north of Fort White.


Fort White driver
dies, 3 others
injured in crash.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

FORT WHITE - A Fort
White resident was killed
Saturday in a multi-vehi-
cle wreck on State Road
47. Authorities have not
released the name of the


motorist, pending notifi-
cation of the driver's next
of kin. Three other peo-
ple involved in'the wreck
sustained minor injuries,
according to reports.
The wreck occurred
12:35 p.m. Saturday on State
Road 47 about a mile south
of County Road 238, and
involved three vehicles.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
a 1991 Ford F-150 pickup


truck was traveling south
on State Road 47 and for
unknown reasons, the
vehicle's driver allowed the
pickup to go into the north-
bound lane of the roadway,
directly into the path of a
1992 Jeep Cherokee driven
by Lydia Cherri, 39, of Fort
White.
The pickup truck col-
lided with Cherri's left rear
corner, causing her vehicle
to flip onto the east shoul-


der of the roadway.
The pickup truck contin-
ued south toward the road-
way's eastern shoulder as
a 1997 Ford Utility vehicle
driven by Henry Bussey, 31,
of High Springs approached
heading north. Bussey was
traveling with Marshall
Bussey, 28, of Fort White
as his passenger.
As Henry Bussey steered
WRECK continued on 3A


Road to becoming bus driver challenging


r~4


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County School Board personnel clerk Deidra Busscher enters employee fingerprints into the Cogent System. All
employees who come into contact with school children - from interns to bus drivers to vendors - are required to submit
fingerprints. If any employee is arrested within the country, the FBI and Florida Department of Law Enforcement sends the
system an alert.




PRECIOUS CARGO


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
C olumbia County School
bus drivers, like thou-
sandg around the nation,
are tasked with ensuring
the well-being of students
on the way to'and from school.
School district officials hope to reas-
sure local residents of that, following
the arrest of one of its district drivers
last week.
One school bus driver was arrest-
ed in connection with an attempted
drive-by shooting last week - driver
James Thomas Alford III was
arrested and charged following the
incident. Another substitute driver is


suspected to have been involved in
the incident, and according to super-
intendent Mike Millikin, that driver
will either resign or be terminated.
Millikin said there is no place
within the school district for actions
of this kind.
"We're obviously deeply disturbed
and saddened by these actions,"
Millikin said. "We believe this is an
isolated incident, but this is some-
thing we take seriously. We have one
employee who has resigned and the
other is going to be recommended
for termination."
The school district employs
approximately 80 full-time drivers,
and has another 20 to 25 on a sub-
stitute list who are used periodically


throughout the school year.
Potential drivers for the school dis-
trict must undergo a battery of tests
before being hired, To be considered
for the position, applicants must pos-
sess a commercial driver license,
must complete a driver training
course, pass a physical exam, be cer-
tified in CPR and first aid, and have
five years of driving experience.
They must pass a drug test before
being hired, and also'undergo
random drug tests throughout the
school year, said Frank Moore, direc-
tor of human resources/manage-
ment development for the Columbia
County School District.

DRIVERS continued on 3A


Charity ride


a boost for


needy vets


Donation benefits
work of Cabin In
the Woods.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Several county motorcy-
cle riders who once served
in the Armed Forces gath-
ered at the Cabin In the
Woods veterans' facility
on Saturday. They met to
make a financial donation to
a local program that offers
services for veterans who
need food and shelter.
The Rolling Thunder
motorcycle group, com-
posed of military veterans,
held a benefit ride months
ago to raise funds for the
program. They presented
the funds to program offi-
cials Saturday.
Mike "Maytag" Bradley,
a Vietnam veteran who lives
in Fort White, said 50 to 75
people, including State Rep.
Debbie Boyd, participated
in Saturday's check dona-


tion ceremony.
"This wasn't only a Rolling
Thunder event, this was an
event with the American
Legion and Legion riders,"
he said. "This was the first
event of many to come,
and we're talking about in
the springtime doing an
even larger run and having
Debbie Boyd participate."
He said he and other
Rolling Thunder members
felt it was important to par-
ticipate in the fundraiser to
help veterans who are less
fortunate.
"Anytime that a veteran
is in trouble, guys like
myself who have been a
little more fortunate in life,
it's a deal where we want
to say, 'Welcome home' to
all the veterans," Bradley
said. "Anytime we can help
a veteran get back on his
feet and get started in life-
again, that's our way of giv-
ing something back."
Boyd participated in
VETERAN continued on 3A


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
State Rep. Debbie Boyd (second from right) hands Larry
Smith (far right), program specialist with Volunteers of
America, a donation check from Rolling Thunder as riders
from Rolling Thunder look on. The check presentation took
place Saturday at the Cabin In the Woods site.


Jihycein
Weston, 6,
runs with the
football after
taking a handoff
from Columbia
County Falcons'
player Dewayne
Newsome.
The Falcons
held a free
football camp
for local youth
on Saturday


I j


at Memorial '. " '.
Stadium.


1 8464 00021 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter


77
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 8A


Camp passes on knowledge of game


Free event
connects youths
with mentors.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

Hitting the tackling
dummy, running pass pat-
terns and learning the
proper way to hold a foot-


ball is common knowledge
for college and professional
football players. But for
children who are younger
than 10 years old and just
learning the basics about
the sport, it's all new infor-
mation.
Saturday afternoon
youngsters where taught
the fundamentals of the
game by "guest coaches" as


Opinion ................4A
Business ................ I C
O bituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics .... . 3D
Puzzles ................. 2B


Columbia County Falcons'
coaches and players held
a free football, camp at
Memorial Stadium. The
camp served as a way of
giving back to the com-
munity as the Columbia
County Falcons players and
coaches taught children
fundamentals of the game,
coaches said.
"This is an opportunity


for us to give back a little
bit," said Columbia County
Falcons' middle linebacker
David Dunham. 'This is
our first children's football
camp and we hope to have a
couple more as the season
progresses."
As part of the camp,
more than 20 youngsters
FOOTBALL continued on 3A


TODAY IN COMING
BUSINESS TUESDAY
Bank on this Reports, news from
new enterprise, our local schools.
-".--* -, y -c a--^."r i~'trr a�^ff ' clSM i a B^ M ^ IrerR


. -










Pa e Editor: Tom Maye 8


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, , 4::) FLORIDA


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
18-22-34-42 16 2-16-20-34-42 Afternoon: 5-4-0 Afternoon: 0-1-3-5 4-11-15-22-23-27 x2 15-32-43-44-46
Evening: 7-0-6 Evening: 7-7-2-7 PB19 x4



AROUND THE NATION



Haiti cruises won't stop: 'Without this, we don't eat'


By TRAVIS REED and
VIVIAN SEQUERA
Associated Press
LABADEE, Haiti -
ith the
Celebrity
Solstice
cruise
ship
anchored just offshore this
beautiful expanse of white
sand Friday, vacationers
stretched out on beach
chairs in the sun, sipped
cold beer and pina coladas
with pineapple slices on
the rim and listened to
Haitian folk music.
The beach resort of
Labadee is just 60 miles
from Port-au-Prince, but
it's a world away from
the devastation of the
Haitian capital, where
some 200,000 people are
believed dead in an earth-
quake.
The cruise ships that
stop here have become the
center of a controversy:
Should vacationers relax
and have fun with so much
suffering elsewhere on
the island? Or would it be
worse to halt the port calls
and deprive locals of what
they earn from tourism?
, James Charitable, 20,
stood near the pier with
a sign offering tours.
"Without this," he said,
motioning toward the boat,
"we don't eat." He said he
makes $15 every time a
ship comes inp.
About 200 people work
here, and a few hundred
- - more vendors and service
providers are allowed in
whenever ships arrive.
The resort enclave, which


.~. I


, -


....k--, . --K, "

�- . - .



. Coa l .
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joseph Philibert holds a sign to offers day trips to passengers from the Celebrity Cruises ship Solstice in Labadee, Haiti,
Friday. Cruise ships continue to stop at the Labadee resort after a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck Haiti on Jan. 12.


has a beach, a zipline
in the mountains and
other activities, is leased
by the Haitian govern-
ment to Royal Caribbean
International, which also
owns the Celebrity cruise
line.
Royal Caribbean allowed
a team of journalists from
The Associated Press to visit
Labadee on Friday, but the
cruise company's spokes-
woman, Tracy Quan,
would not allow them to
interview or photograph
cruise passengers.
Carol Myers, 53, a nurse


from New Jersey, was not
on the cruise ship but was
enjoying the beach. She
had spent an intense week
tending to earthquake
victims in a hospital in
the nearby town of Milo,
and Was decompressing
for a few hours before her
scheduled return to the
U.S. on Saturday.
"I almost feel guilty for
being here after what hap-
pened," Myers said, sitting
in a beach chair in blue
scrubs. "But the people
need a job, the people
need to eat."


. Royal Caribbean
President and CEO Adam
Goldstein said the decision
to continue with scheduled
stops in Labadee was an
easy one. The site sus-
tained no damage, and he
said the Haitian govern-
ment welcomed the ship.
The country reaps a fixed
cost per passenger, plus
annual fees and the cash
tourists spend on local
goods at a marketplace
where artisans and artists
sell trinkets and crafts.
Royal Caribbean is also
donating $1 million, deliv-


ering food and water on
every call and pledging net
revenue from Labadee to
the relief effort. Maryse
Kedar, president of Royal
Caribbean's Haitian sub-
sidiary, SOLANO, said
the cruise visits are "the
only substantial commerce
taking place in northern
Haiti."
But the cruise line
found itself on the defen-
sive after criticism spread
online. Melissa Bacchus,
a Brooklyn, N.Y., teacher,
was among several veteran
cruisers to dominate mes-


sage boards on sites like
Cruisecritic.com with the
debate.
"I do think morally it is
wrong to go (to Labadee),
where less than 60 miles
away people are suffer-
ing," Bacchus said in an
interview. "And because
we have the resources, we
have the wealth, we can
frolic using the beauty of
their island?"
Bacchus suggested
Royal Caribbean pay Haiti
its regular port fees, but
not actually stop there.
She said they could also
give local artisans money
to go back home and assist
in the relief effort.
Public relations experts
quoted by AdAge.com
said Royal Caribbean had
made a mistake by mix-
ing leisure business with
humanitarian efforts. "The
brand will take a hit,"
Paul Gallagher, managing
director of WPP's Burson
Marsteller's issues and
advocacy practice, was
quoted as saying.
Haiti shares the island
of Hispaniola with the
Dominican Republic. The
Dominican Republic suf-
fered no damage from
the earthquake, but the
government is clearly wor-
ried that vacationers may
cancel trips there because
of the disaster on the other
side of the border.
The Dominican Ministry
of Tourism has issued
repeated statements that
it was unaffected by the
quake, including pointing
out that Port-au-Prince is
hundreds of miles and sev-
eral mountain ranges away.


By BOB THOMAS
, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Jean Simmons,
w- hose ethereal screen presence and
starring roles with Hollywood's top
actors made her a mid-century film
icon, has died at age 80.
The actress, who sang with
Marlon Brando in "Guys and Dolls;"
- costarred with Gregory Peck, Paul
Newman and Kirk Douglas; and
; played Ophelia to Laurence Olivier's
S Hamlet, died Friday at her home in
SSanta Monica, her agent Judy Page
told the Los Angeles Times. She had
lung cancer.
Already a stunning beauty at 14,
Simmons made her movie debut in
the 1944 British production "Give Us
the Moon."
Several minor films followed
- before British director David Lean
gave the London-born actress
her breakthrough role of Estella,
" companion to the reclusive
Miss Havisham in 1946's "Great
Expectations." That was followed
by the exotic "Black Narcissus,"
Sand then Olivier's Oscar-win-
ning "Hamlet" in 1948, for which
Simmons was nominated as best sup-
porting actress.
- - She would be nominated for
- another Oscar, for best actress for
1. 969's "The Happy Ending," before
.moving largely to television roles in
-the 1970s, '80s and '90s.
She won an Emmy Award for her
role in the 1980s miniseries 'The
Thorn Birds."
Her other notable films
included "Elmer Gantry" (with
Burt Lancaster), "Until They
Sail" (with Newman), "The Big
Country" (Peck), "Spartacus,"
(Douglas), 'This Earth Is Mine"
(Rock Hudson), "All the Way
Home" (Robert Preston), "Mister
Buddwing" (James Garner) and
"Rough Night in Jericho" (Dean
Martin).
Simmons had left Britain for
Hollywood in 1950, accompanied by
her future husband Stewart Granger.
There, they were befriended by
reclusive tycoon Howard Hughes,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this May, 24, 1950, file photo, Jean Simmons, British screen actress, holds the
trophy she received in London after being voted her country's No. 1 film actress
of the year in the fifth National Film Award ballot. Simmons, the stunning beauty
who sang with Marion Brando in 'Guys and Dolls' and played Ophelia to Laurence
Olivier's Hamlet, died Friday. She was 80.


who flew them to Tucson, Ariz., for a
surprise wedding.
"When I returned from the honey-
moon," Simmons told a reporter in
1964, "I learned that Hughes owned
me - he had bought me from
(British producer) J. Arthur Rank
like a piece of meat."
What followed was a string of
films that she would later dismiss
as terrible, although she took some
solace in the fact Hughes, legendary
in those (lays as a womanizer, never
bothered her.


"I was married to Jimmy
(Granger's real name was James
Stewart), so Hughes remained at a
distance," she recalled. "But those
movies! So terrible they aren't even
on videocassettes."
Among the titles: "Angel Face,"
"Affair with a Stranger" and "She
Couldn't Say No."
Simmons finally ended up suing
Hughes for the right to make more
prestigious films at other studios,
and the result was myriad feature
films.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Ernest Borgnine
is 93.
* Actor Jerry Maren ("The
Wizard of Oz") is 91.
* Actor Marvin Kaplan
('"Top Cat") is 83.
* Cajun musician Doug
Kershaw is 74.
* Singer-songwriter Ray


Stevens is 71..
* Singer-songwriter Neil
Diamond is 69.
* Singer Aaron Neville is
69.
* Actor Michael Ontkean
is 64.
* Actor Daniel Auteuil is
60.


Daily Scripture
"Jesus returned in the power of
the Spirit into Galilee, and a report
concerning him went out through
all the surrounding country.And he
taught in their synagogues, being
glorified by all."

- Luke 1:14,15


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.corn
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Community Newspapers Inc., is published
Tuesday through Sunday at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Periodical post-
age paid at Lake City, Fla. Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and The Associated
Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permission of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service No.
310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson @lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


. PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


'Guys and Dolls' star Simmons dies at 80


�


I L/ rI-V DUDnTFQ ll r) Y PF OR R JF)Y AN JRY242n


* .









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County School Board personnel clerk Deidra Busscher scans Director of Data
Processing Roger Noll's fingerprints using a print live scan system as an example of employ-
ee screening. 'It goes back five years,' Busscher said. 'I've seen hits come back on people
that have left us. It's pretty efficient.'


DRIVERS: Undergo strict screening


Continued From Page 1A

"There is random drug
testing that they do have to
go through, and the district
has to administer three
random, unannounced
tests done quarterly,"
Moore said. "The lab we
go through has a list of all
of the drivers, and they
generate a random list.
There is no district person-
nel involved in the list gen-
eration. It's truly random
in that, when they generate
the random list, theoretical-
ly you could have someone
on there every time. The
chances of that happening
are not great, but it could
happen."
School district officials
also conduct an employee
screening and background
check on all potential dis-
trict employees. School
bus drivers must pass a
Level 2 screening, Moore


said, who noted that the
list includes a variety of
crimes, including sexual
misconduct, elderly and
child abuse and certain
types of assault and battery
offenses.
If applicants has any
of these offenses in their
history, they are excluded
from being hired, Moore
said.
Having a criminal his-
tory does not necessar-
ily exclude a person from
being hired, however.
Moore said it depends on
the severity of the crime,
and also how long ago it
was committed.
"We want our drivers
to be persons of moral
character, and some people
may have things in the
past, but each is looked
at by my supervisor and
we look at how long ago it


was, the final disposition,
what the person has done
since - you may have
someone who was 17 and
was involved in something,
and now has straightened
up and turned their lives
around," he said.
Moore said that in the
past few years there have
been few who have been
disqualified for a criminal
history.
"Most people pre-screen
themselves," he said.
"In the grand scheme of
things, we really haven't
had a lot. Some people
are going to come back
with a traffic offense or
some other misdemeanor,
but since I've been here,
there has been only about
one case where it has
come through that we just
couldn't make the hire."


VETERAN: Group helps homeless


Continued From Page 1A

the Nov. 14 North Florida
Veterans Charity Ride,
which began at the
American Legion Post in
Gainesville and concluded
at the American Legion
Post in Lake City.
"The main goal was
to raise money for both
Cabin In the Woods and
our homeless shelters
for veterans," she said on
Saturday as she spoke of
the importance of dona-
tions and contributions.
Program specialist with
Volunteers of America
Florida, Larry Smith, who
received the check, said
the funds will be used to
help veterans staying at the
site.


FOOTBALL
From Page 1A

participated in route-run-
ning, passing, 'defending
and running drills. The
children were also able to
participate in a touch-tackle
football game.
"We went over a lot of
fundamentals with them,"
Dunham said. "We did a
couple of drills and tried to
lay some groundwork for
them. You've got to feed the
beast and you start with the
fundamentals."
Columbia High School
graduate Cliff Magby,
a running back with the
Columbia County Falcons,
said the children seemed
to be enjoying themselves
as they participated in the
camp.
"The children that are
here are liking the camp a
lot because they are learn-
ing a whole bunch of dif-
ferent things from start to
finish about how to play
football," he said. "It feels
good to come back and hold
this camp because when I
was little, we didn't have
anything like this. To be
able to come out here and
teach the children things
that I already know feels
good. We may have camps
like this in the future and
I hope that other children
come out here to learn a
little something about how
to play football."


"We're presently trying ities," he said. 'We'll assess
to improve our outside facil- our most important needs."


COURTESY PHOTO

Farm show shells out prize to county director
Director of the Columbia County Farm Bureau James Terry (center), of I.C. Terry Farms, Inc.,
wins the Grand Door Prize at the Georgia Peanut Farm Show and Conference in Albany, Ga.,
on Thursday.



,. ; " '


w





p. ~'~'
F


P.1


PATRICK SCOTT/Special to the Reporter
A 1992 Jeep Cherokee rests on its roof after it flipped when it was struck by a pickup truck in
a Saturday afternoon wreck on State Road 47.


WRECK: Occurs on State Road 47
Continued From Page 1A


to the eastern shoulder of
.the roadway attempting
to avoid the pickup truck,
the vehicles collided in a
head-on collision on the
eastern shoulder, reports
indicate.


The driver of the pickup
truck was pronounced dead
at the scene, reports say.
Cherri, whose vehicle
flipped, was taken by ambu-
lance to Lake Shore Hospital
with minor injuries.


Marshall Bussey was
also taken by ambulance
to Lake Shore Hospital, but
Henry Bussey, who had
minor injuries, declined to
be taken to the hospital,
reports say.


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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 7541-0428


�lr�












OPINION


Sunday, January 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OURI__


OUR
OPINION


Hospital

decision

is forward

thinking

The recent decision
by Lake Shore
Hospital Authority
to move forward on
a plan to add a suite
of buildings and offices to its
downtown Lake City property
is more than a healthy sign of
an expanding business. It's a
good faith investment in the
future of our community.
The project as designed
would bring additional medical
and pharmaceutical personnel
and 10,000 square feet of medi-
cal offices to the heart of Lake
City.
One promising component
of the plan is that the Authority
began downtown property
acquisitions four years ago
- before the real estate market
began its current path to bar-
gain prices. Even at that time,
board members recognized that
the future of any city lies in its
central arena and they planned
accordingly.
Because of that decision,
downtown Lake City is today
positioned for a face-lift.
Property now littered with
vacant houses and old buildings
will give way to a professional
outcrop of medical offices to
complement the hospital com-
plex.
But far more important than
appearance, the fruition of this
project means good things for
the overall health care options
of our community.
The job before the board now
is to tout the long-range attrac-
tiveness of its plan to the medi-
cal community. It shouldn't be a
hard sell. Increased resources
here will mean a county better-
equipped to care for its popula-
tion - and that's a statement
we don't have to take on faith.
H 1 GH LIG H T'S
IN H HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Jan. 24,
the 24th day of 2010. There
-are 341 days left in the year.
SE On Jan. 24, 1848, James
W. Marshall discovered a gold
nugget at Sutter's Mill in north-
ern California, a discovery that
led to the gold rush of '49.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The'Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our-primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
,through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatlywritten and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length.and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Niblack: Birthplace of principals


N black Elementary .
School has long
been recognized
for its fine faculty
but some have also
referred to it as the birthplace
of local principals. For example
four teachers on the 1997 fac-
ulty are now local principals.
* Keith Couey (Richardson
Middle School)
* Cherie Hill (Westside),
* Sonya Cole Judkins (Lake
City Middle School)
* Deborah Hill (Challenge
Learning Center).
There were'two other promo-
tions from that same faculty.
Niblack principal L. C. Bradley
later became assistant super-
intendent and Jenny Brewin
(who was Niblack's 'Teacher
of the Year" that term) is now
our school district's Director of
Technology.
To top it off, instructor
Melissa Boswell later became
our countywide 'Teacher of the
Year."

More books
The book "Lake City, Florida
- A Sesquicentennial Tribute"
by Kevin McCarthy and myself
is available once again at Hunter
Printing at 1330 SW Main Blvd.
They cost $20, including tax.
If you want to order by mail,
go to my Web site at hmorriswil-
liams.comn and find a link to an
order form on the home page.
There is a shipping and han-
dling charge and that total cost
will be $25.

Free yearbooks
The School Museum has
about 10 spare Niblack Sixth
Grade Center yearbooks from
1997 to give away. (These are
not CHS yearbooks).
Those 1997 sixth graders
probably graduated in 2003.
Some student names from that
yearbook are Charyll Bradley,
Brittany Waters, Tyler Sapp,
Justin Yelkin, Shawn Roe, J. R.
Perry, Jessica Lucas, Franshea
Steward, Rosalynd Tyre, Amy
Hizer, Kelly Rosenfeld, Jason


LETTERS TO

EMTs deserve our
appreciation, thanks
To the Editor:
Today marks one year sijice
I was injured in an accident.
On that day, it was the quick
response of the county's EMS
squad that made the difference
between having my entire leg or
having part removed. It was not
until May that I was informed
by my orthopedic surgeon that
had it not been for the quick


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williamsh2@fimn.edu
372 W Duval St.
Lake City. FL 32055

Williamson, Sean Vasquez, and
Joseph Register.
Hopefully, someone will pick
up one of these yearbooks for
personal memories or maybe
get all of them to hand out at a
future class reunion.

Also free
Our School Museum also has
all the newspaper clippings from
CHS's 1967 state championship
season. We have copied them
and would be glad to donate the
originals to anybody associated
with that team who would like
to have them. Call me at (386)
755-8183.

Parson Carson
The 2009 death of Carson
Brittain, First Baptist's 90-year-
old pastor emeritus, was a
momentous loss for one and all,
regardless of church affiliation.
"Parson Carson" was the per-
fect blend of preacher, pastor,
Bible scholar, mentor, friend,
jokester, humanitarian, and
spiritual guide throughout his
ministry.
Carson was, truly, a man for
all seasons and we may never
again see another one like him
in these parts.

Holy ground
In 2008, Helen Hill wrote
a book "Searching for Holy
Ground" which has lots of
history and pictures about
Watertown, Florida.
Helen is a wonderful writer
who writes from her heart,
and her 147-page book will be


THE EDITOR

response provided by the squad,
my.outcome could have been
very different.
Our county EMS squad is
drastically underappreciated.
We are so fortunate to have
experienced and well-qualified
EMTs and paramedics who are
capable of making split-second
decisions that mean the differ-
ence between a really good out-
come or one resulting in long-
term pain and damage. I was
fortunate that one person called


of special interest to any one
who has experienced a spiritual
search and/or has an interest in
Watertown. Her book costs less
than $15 and is available at The
Framery, 855 SW Baya Drive,
(386) 754-2780.

School museum
thanks
* To CHS grad George
Hunter for a purple and gold
CHS Tiger pillow from the early
1970s with a Tiger head logo
and the words "This is Tiger
Country," especially significant
because it was designed by the
late Booger Thompson, a promi-
nent local artist.
* To Roger Noll for a 12
inch "foot ruler" with the CHS
football schedule from 1963 and
the words "Make it a RULE to
support the Tigers," sponsored
by Brown, Greene, and Wall
Insurance and Real Estate Co.
* To Julia Osborn for a deco-
rative coffee mug labeled CHS
Class of 1947.
N* To Lelia Williams for a.
photo and funeral program for
Miss Alletha Choice (1915-
1988), a RHS graduate. Alletha
was afflicted with profound
physical handicaps, but rose
above it all to have perfect atten-
dance at school and become
one of the most outstanding
citizens in the white and black
community.
* To the CHS Class of 1949
which had some money left over
from their recent 60th reunion
and donated it to our School
Museurn.
* To the family of paraprofes-
sional Ann Mangham Shepherd
for donating the beautiful desk
clock she received when she
left the Kindergarten Center.

Too risky
The high-wire trapeze art-
ist decided to leave the circus
when his partner left the show.
He didn't want to work without
Annette.
* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


for a helicopter to take me to
the regional trauma center in
Gainesville so that I was being
wheeled into surgery within
the "golden hour" indicative of
improved trauma outcomes.
Take the time today to give
thanks to all our EMTs and
paramedics. You never know
when they'll be helping you or
your loved ones.

Janice Irwin
Lake City


_L
------------







Todd Wilson
twdson@lakeotyreport e.com


Southside

diamonds

continue

to shine


officials continue to
move cautiously in
evaluating the pos-
sibility of partnering
with Cooperstown Dreams
Park to lease Southside
Recreational Complex and
have it turned into a youth
baseball theme park.
Their thorough moves are
justified. Southside is a gem
that is utilized by one of the
largest segments of our popu-
lation - taxpaying parents
with young children. It's a
25-ball-field system that is, one
of the top facilities in North
Florida. Southside is the birth-
place of dreams for our local
youth baseball and softball
players, who, regardless of tal-
ent level, may envision one day
starring in the big leagues.
It's a great facility that
belongs to the people of
Columbia County. Officials
are well aware of this as they
evaluate the potential for the
Dreams Park idea to sprout in
Lake City.
Cooperstown Dreams Park
is a collection of fields and a
dormitory housing complex
in Cooperstown, N.Y., where
traveling baseball teams com-
prised of 12-year-olds flock
during the three summer
months each year.
Officials continue to wonder
if it's possible to replicate the
Dreams Park experience in
Lake City for players in the
8-11 age group.
The proposal currently is
only in the discussion stage,
but Dreams Park officials
initially threw out some gran-
diose revenue numbers about
how much money 96 team
families would spend in Lake
City during a 12-week summer
tournament season. They say
$56 million would be spent in
Lake City during the season.
They also said county officials
would need to invest $4 million
in upgrades to bring Southside
to its pristine standards. They
promise the development will
not disrupt our current recre-
ational league play.
County officials are taking
a much closer, conservative
approach during their analysis
of the numbers. The variables
are the number of people who
might come to the attraction
and the amount of money
they might spend each day
during their visit. County offi-
cials say their conservative
estimates are more realistic
in believing the attraction
would generate $14 million in
our local economy during the
12-week season, according to
Tourist Development Council
Executive Director Harvey
Campbell.
According to Visit Florida,
tourism dollars turn over in
a community an average of
1.7 times.
Cooperstown Dreams Park
officials are coming to Lake
City next month for a visit to
once again examine Southside
and have additional discus-
sions with county officials. The
big questions that still need
answers are what exactly the
$4 million upgrades would
entail and will the barracks
complex be a necessary com-
ponent in the plan for Lake
City?
And, most importantly, can
this project become a reality
without jeopardizing the cur-
rent structure of our youth
recreational baseball and
softball programs. First and
foremost, we must take care


of our children's opportuni-
ties. That's why the Southside
Recreational Complex is here
in the first place.
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


4A








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


Head Start gets grant boost


From staff reports

Suwannee Valley 4Cs,
the Head Start/Early Head
Start grantee for Columbia,
Hamilton, Lafayette and
Suwannee counties, was
awarded an expansion
grant through the American
Reinvestment and Recovery
Act to serve an additional 64
children (ages birth to three
and pregnant women) and
their families in Lake City,
Live Oak and Jennings.
The agency, a nonprofit
private corporation, cur-
rently serves 318 children
ages 3 to 5 and 112 children
birth to 3, and pregnant
women, at 10 centers in the
four counties.
Eighty percent of the
funding for the progranis
comes from the Federal
Department of Health
and Human Services. The
remaining 20 percent must
be raised by SV4Cs through
community support.
The Early Head Start
expansion grant will add 24
slots in Lake City, 24 slots
in Live Oak and expand the


Jennings center to serve
16 children birth to 3 and
pregnant women, which
currently serves children 3
to 5 only.
The agency plans to
begin serving the additional
children and their families
by Sept.1. Early enrollment
has already begun for the
programs and includes the
64 expansion slots.
The Early Head Start pro-
gram provides high quality
comprehensive early child-
hood services, including
education, health, dental,
nutrition and family servic-
es, for low-income families.
The program recognizes
the critical opportunity to
positively impact children
and families in the early
years and beyond. A few
highlights of the program
include:
* Low ratios of one
teacher for every four chil-
dren which allows teachers
to provide individual and
responsive care (group size
of eight);
* Children receive
health screenings/exams


to ensure early detection
and follow up treatment of
health-related concerns;
* Expectant families
receive proper prenatal and
postpartum health care,
prenatal education and
breastfeeding education;
* Parents are involved
in their child's education,
partner with the program
to establish personal goals,
participate in educational
workshops and are involved
in decisions regarding the
program's structure, gover-
nance and services.
Families must meet cer-
tain age and income eligibil-
ity requirements. Families
receiving public assistance,
homeless children and chil-
dren in foster care are auto-
matically eligible. Children
with a diagnosed disability
regardless of family income
and children of teen par-
ents are considered high
priority.
For enrollment informa-
tion in Lake City call (386)
754-2222; for Live Oak and
Jennings call (386) 364-
2915.


Caution: Roadwork under way


From staff reports

The following list of
roadwork underway by
the Florida Department of
Transportation may impact
local traffic.

Columbia County

N On CR 252B there will
be possible daytime lane
closures between 9 a.m.
and 2 p.m. for work on new
sidewalks on the west side
of the road between the
Preserve at Laurel Lakes
and Timber Ridge subdivi-
sions for students walking
to Westside Elementary



Mercantile
joins in Haiti,
Red Cross
relief efforts

From staff reports

Mercantile Bank's
branch locations are accept-
ing monetary donations for
the American Red Cross to
aid in the relief and recov-
ery efforts in Haiti.
Donations to the
American Red Cross sup-
port emergency relief and
recovery efforts to help
those people affected by
the earthquake in Haiti.
Mercantile Bank in
Lake City is located at U.S.
Highway "90 West. Call
(386) 754-9080.


OBITUARIES

Randal B. Hill
RandalBryanHill,age53,diedNo-
vember 15, 2009, in Greensboro.
A memorial service will be held
on Sunday, January 31, 2010,
2:00 P.M. at
United Meth-
odist Church,
with the Rev.
Jerry Smith
officiating.
The fam-
ily will receive
friends following the service
in the church fellowship hall.
He was a native of Asheboro.
Randal graduated from Santa Fe
Community College in Gaines-
ville, Fla., in 1977 with an A.A.
in Psychology and in 1985 with
a A.S.I.B.S. -in Cardiopulmo-
nary Medical Science; the Uni-
versity of West Florida in Pen-
sacola, Fla., in 1988 with a B.A.
in Psychology and in 1989 with
an M.A. in Cognitive Psychol-
ogy; and Vermont Law School in
South Royalton, Vt., in 1992 with
a JD (Juris Doctor). He graduated
Magna Cum Laude and was ad-
mitted to Alpha Sigma Laude.
He is survived by his daughter,
Diana Hill of Rutland, Vt.; son,
Alex Hill of Rutland, Vt.; parents,
Lucille Hanner Hill and Earl Bry-
an Hill of Asheboro; and brother,
Gregory Hill of Asheboro.
Information provided by Pugh
Funeral Home, Asheboro.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


School as part of the Safe
Routes to School project.
* Interstate 75 crews will
be repainting the roadway
lines between the Alachua
and Suwannee county
lines.
* Lake Jeffery Road (CR
250) there wil be daytime
lane closures after 8:30 a.m.
at the Interstate 75 over-
pass to install guardrail
and from Interstate 75 .to
the Suwannee County line
while crews paint the road-
way lines.
* On U,S. 90, daytime
lane closures between
the Suwannee and Baker
County lines will allow
inmate crews to repaint the


MAC JOHNSON


roadway markings.

Baker County

* On SR 2 crews will
be repainting the roadway
lines between the Georgia
state line and the Columbia
County line.

Suwannee County

* On Pinemount Road
(CR 252), there will be day-
time lane closures Monday
through Thursday after 8:30
a.m. between the Columbia
County line and CR 137 for
work on drainage pipes.


ROOFING
R O I. --- - j


104 SOUTHWEST 266TH STREET
NEWBERRY, FLORIDA 32669

352.472.4943 or 866.376.4943
website: www.macjohnsonroofins.com


. , ,


Has it been three years
since you went away?
My heart is still so full of
your love, your smile that
would touch anyone's heart.
Sometimes I feel a glow in
the room and I know its
your presence. We love and
miss you so much. But one
day we will be there with
you for the family reunion.

Love,
Mom, Monica, Bubba, Little
Man, "William", Sandra,
Gary, David, Lots of family
ao .. *and friends


, M E G A . - ':


* 1'


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


- 'State of the Union agenda: I get it


- .


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chaplain Lt. John Logan talks with Elisha Vivier, the daughter of Raymond Edward Vivier, a
homeless man living in Cleveland, who died in a boarding house fire with three other home-
less person, Friday, during burial services at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va.


Homeless veteran who

saved 5 in fire laid to rest


By BRETT ZONGKER
Associated Press
ARLINGTON, Va. - Ray
Vivier had been an adven-
turer, an ex-Marine who
explored the country from
South Carolina to Alaska,
and the father of five.
The 61-year-old also was
a man starting to get his life
back together after living for
years in a shanty beneath a
Cleveland bridge. He had
struggled with alcoholism,
but by November he had a
welding job, friends and a
place to stay at a boarding
house.
He rescued five people
from that house when
arsonists set it ablaze - but
Vivier couldn't save himself.
He and three others died,
and two people have been
charged in their deaths.
Vivier's body, unclaimed
and unidentified for weeks,
seemed destined for an


Cities: FEMA
flood maps
full of errors

By MICHAEL J. CRUMB
Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa -
More than a year and a half
after a massive flood left a
huge swath of eastern Iowa
underwater, the tiny farm-
ing community of Oakville
is clinging to survival.
Many of the town's 400-
or-so residents moved on
after the June 2008 disaster,
leaving local leaders des-
perate to lure new faces
to the community. But
they say their efforts are
being harmed by an ambi-
tious government initiative
to update and digitize the
nation's flood plain maps.
The Federal Emergency
Management Agency start-
ed the $200 million-per-year
project in 2004 as a way
to utilize advances in map-
ping technology to better
identify areas susceptible
to flooding. FEMA officials
say the new maps - some
of which have won final
approval and others which
are still in their preliminary
stages - will allow for bet-
ter zoning and help prevent
future catastrophes like the
flood in Iowa, which caused
an estimated $10 billion of
damage.
But critics, including
civic leaders, developers
and home owners in sever-
al states, have complained
that the new maps are
riddled with inaccuracies,
seem arbitrarily drawn, and
will stifle growth and hurt
property values.
"Anyone building new
construction, they are prob-
ably not going to settle
here," said Oakville Mayor
Benita Grooms. "Why would
they if they have to build
their homes up so high and
pay $2,000 for flood insur-
ance?"


anonymous, modest burial.
A soup kitchen volun-
teer, though, remembered
Vivier and heard about his
heroism. Jody Fesco and
her husband Ernie traveled
back to Cleveland from their
new home in Pennsylvania
to make sure Vivier wasn't
forgotten. They identified
his body, found his fam-
ily and arranged a proper
funeral.
On Friday, Vivier's ashes
were inurned at Arlington
National Cemetery with full
military honors.
"You can see from what
he did that he definitely
had a good heart," said
Mercedes Cruz, Vivier's
ex-wife of 23 years, who
attended the funeral with
the couple's children. "No
matter what our difficulties
were in our marriage, I'm
very proud of what's hap-
pened."
For his grown children


- who now are scattered
around the country-Vivier
had been gone for about 15
years. They know of his her-
oism now - but they don't
know much about the man
he was trying to become.
They remember their dad's
struggles with alcohol and
other troubles.
"What I'm trying to get
out of this is to have one
good, concrete memory
that 1 can have of him for
what he did to save those
people," said his oldest
daughter, Elisha Vivier.
."I'm proud of the man that
he was becoming."
Vivier was a private in
the U.S. Marine Corps in
1965 and 1966, though he
didn't see combat. He was
stationed at Parris Island,
S.C., Cruz said. After his
discharge, Vivier spent
years working as a machin-
ist, welder, iron worker and
other tough jobs.


INCOME TAX PREPARATION
Small Business Welcome
Call now for Evening & Saturday Appointment * Very Reasonable Rates
386-755-0030
Located in Premier Plaza, 1 mi. West of 1-75
, Linda E. Green, Tax Consultant
Retirees, Vets, State Employee Discounts

Dr. Jerry Register, Chiropractic Physician,
Is Now Accepting AV- MED Insurance
Most insurances accepted - BCBS
Medicare, United Health Care, Cigna,
Workers Comp and Personal Injury
Call to inquire if your insurance covers our care
(386)755-4379
Dr Register is celebrating
29 years ofpractice in 2010.





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Puppies must be 10 weeks
Course defines terms like air scenting,
trailing, tPack laying, etc.
$65 for 0 Weeks


By BEN FELLER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Seizing a chance to recon-
nect, President Barack
Obama will use his first
State of the Union address
to try to persuade the peo-
ple of a frustrated nation
that he's on their side, with
a familiar sounding agenda
recast to relate better to
everyday struggles.
In a time of deep econom-
ic insecurity, Obama will use
this stage on Wednesday to
offer hope after a grueling,
grinding first year of his
presidency, aides say. For
the many who think the
United States is still on the
wrong track, Obama will
attempt to present a clearer
sense of how everything
he's pursuing fits together
to help.
And for jittery Democrats
facing re-election this fall,
Obama will seek to give
them an agenda they can
sell to voters.
Obama will propose ways
to help the middle class.
But any new ideas probably
will play a supporting role
to the plainspoken narra-
tive he wants to tell, that
his agenda works for peo-
ple despite their growing


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Friday photo President
Barack Obama takes ques-
tions during a town hall style
meeting at Lorain County
Community College in Elyria,
Ohio.

doubts.
"Obviously you want to
write a speech in a way that
is interesting enough that
people want to listen, and
that leaves them feeling a
sense of momentum and
progress," senior Obama
adviser David Axelrod told
The Associated Press. "But
these are serious times. I


don't think this is a time for
rhetorical flights of fancy."
What to expect in the
speech, which comes dur-
ing a rocky period for
Obama?
Heavy does of health
care, despite the setbacks
of the past week, and job
creation. Obama will
address the budget defi-
cit, his bid to take on the
financial industry, energy,
education and immigration.
All those issue, he says, fit
into his plan to rebuild the
economy. '
On national security,
he will address terror-
ist threats, the wars in
Afghanistan and Pakistan
and nuclear disputes with
Iran and North Korea.
.Recent big events won't
escape notice, such as
Haiti's humanitarian crisis
and the Supreme Court rul-
ing allowing businesses and
labor unions more power to
influence elections. Obama
will directly confront a
seething frustration with
Washington, evident in
Republican Scott Brown's
stunning Senate victory in
Massachusetts that rattled
Democrats and cost Obama
the voting bloc he needed
in the Senate.


LAKCE CMIV
CGOMMDNIIY IILLEGE


2009-2010
Lyceum crici

Jan. 26 - 7:30 p.m.
Levy Performing
Arts Center
Tickets will he on sale January 19
at the P4 C Box Q/Office
9 a.in. -4 .. . We accept cash, check,
and debit or credit cards
(AlasterCard & Visa) ONLY
Dinner will be served in the college's
Lobo Cafe prior to the performance. For
details & reservations call (888) 845-0925
or (386) 438-5440




For ticket information call

(386) 754-4340


presents
The Spencers
Theatre of Illusion


Executive Director Sponsors
Community.
A Source.
Lake City Reporter 0A
........ ........ . . ..... TARGET

i " - ..'-,HT, ;


"Enhance Education and the Arts by supporting LCCC's Foundation"
If you have a disability and need assistance, please contact (386) 754-4340


1 Pair Eyeglasses

Includes lenses & frames.
Some restrictions apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JANUARY 31, 2010


FREE GLASSES
Buy one complete pair of glasses at
regular price & receive a


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COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JANUARY 31, 2010


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I
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from 9
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Eyeglasses
Includes Lenses & Frames
Some restrictions apply.
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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY. JANUARY 24, 2010


U.N.: Survivor search over


By VIVIAN SEQUERA and
FRANK JORDANS
Associated Press
PORT-AU-PRINCE,
Haiti -
Haiti's government has
declared the search and
rescue phase for survivors
of the earthquake over, the
United Nations announced
Saturday, saying there is
little hope of finding more
people alive 11 days after
much of the capital was
reduced to rubble.
The statement from the
Office for the Coordination
of Humanitarian Affairs
came a day after an Israeli
team reported pulling
a man out of the debris
of a two-story home and
relatives said an elderly
woman had been rescued.
Experts say the chance
of saving trapped people
begins diminishing after 72
hours, but one mother still
missing her children said
it's too soon to give up.
"Maybe there's a chance
they're still alive," said
Nicole Abraham, 33, wip-
ing away tears as she
spoke of hearing the cries
of her children - ages 4,
6 and 15 - for the first
two days after the Jan. 12
quake.
Meanwhile Saturday,
mourners gathered near
the ruins of the shattered
cathedral to pay final
respects to the capital's
archbishop and a vicar in
a somber ceremony that
doubled as a symbolic
funeral for all the dead.
"I came here to pay my
respects to all the dead
from the earthquake, and
to see them have a funer-
al," said Esther Belizaire,
51, whose cousin is among
the dead.
The 7.0-magnitude
quake killed an estimated
200,000 people, according
to Haitian government fig-


Nation at wat

Marines' Iraq
command ends
RAMADI, Iraq - The U.S.
Marines marked the end of
nearly seven years in Iraq
on Saturday by handing
the Army their command of
Anbar province, once one of
the war's fiercest battlefields
but now a centerpiece of
U.S.-Iraqi cooperation.
The changing of the guard
- overseen by military brass
and some of Anbar's influen-
tial Sunni sheiks - signals
the start of an accelerated
drawdown of American troops
as the U.S. increasingly
shifts its focus to the war in
Afghanistan.
American commanders are
trumpeting security gains in
places such as the western
Anbar province as a sign that
their partnership with Iraqi
security forces is working,
and that the local troops can
keep the country safe.

2 U.S. troops
killed by bombs
KABUL - A roadside
bomb killed two U.S. ser-
vice members in southern
Afghanistan on Saturday
as the country's top NATO
commander acknowledged
an increased risk to foreign
troops will accompany an
influx of reinforcements
aimed at routing the Taliban.
The deaths brought to
at least 22 the number of
American service members
killed so far this month -
compared with only 14 for the
whole of January last year.
A mild winter has brought no
respite to the fighting, which
traditionally drops off during
the cold months.
The south is the Taliban
heartland and is expected to
be a major focus of fighting
as the U.S. and NATO allies
send 37,000 additional troops
to turn the tide of the war.
"The end state of the mis-
sion is to protect the popula-


tion and isolate the insurgen-
cy in a way where it doesn't
constitute a threat to the
Afghan government," Gen.
Stanley McChrystal, the top
U.S. and NATO commander
in Afghanistan, said Friday.
M Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
People move quickly through a main street as a fire burns in one of the few buildings that
withstood last week's earthquake in Port-au- Prince, Friday. A 7.0-magnitude earthquake hit
Haiti on Jan. 12, killing and injuring thousands and leaving many homeless.


work they felt necessary.
"It doesn't mean the
government will order
them to stop. In case there
is the slightest sign of
life, they will act," Byrs
told The Associated Press.
She added, however, that


ures cited by the European
.Commission. The U.N.
said Saturday the govern-
ment had preliminarily
confirmed 111,481 bodies,
but that figure does not
account for corpses buried
by relatives.
Countless dead remain
buried in thousands of col-
lapsed and toppled build-
ings in Port-au-Prince,
while as many as 200,000
have fled the city of 2 mil-
lion, the U.S. Agency for
International Development
reported.
With the local govern-
ment essentially incapaci-
tated, the U.N. has coordi-
nated rescue efforts along-
side the U.S. and teams
from around the world.
Spokeswoman Elisabeth
Byrs said the Friday after-
noon decision does not
mean rescue teams still
searching for survivors
would be stopped from
carrying out whatever


Hear your
buddy's
bad jokes.


I


s~'i- ~


"except for miracles, hope
is unfortunately fading."
All told, some 132 people
were pulled alive from
beneath collapsed build-
ings by international res-
cue teams since the Jan. 12
disaster, she said.


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132 SW Columbia, Ste. 101 109 E. Howard St. 159 N. 3rd St.

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ASSOCIATED PRESS
A sister from Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity touches
the body of Archbishop Alex Serge Miot, who died in last
week's earthquake, at his funeral outside the ruins of the
National Cathedral, seen in background, in Port-au-Prince,
Haiti, Saturday. Mourners gathered near the ruins of the shat-
tered cathedral to pay final respects to the capital's archbish-
op in a somber ceremony that doubled as a symbolic funeral
for all the dead after the massive Jan. 12 earthquake.

Ed 8 Linda McQuatters
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Announce the opening of

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for Second Semester

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The Blake School has a 20-acre campus located
approx. 4 miles west of 1-75 towards Live Oak.
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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


THE WEATHER


NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system over the Midwest ..%ill generate rain and
snow showers throughout the region today. Temperatures will be warmer in the Mid-Atlantic,
where rain will develop. Rain will be accompanied by a few thunderstorms in portions of the
Southeast, some of which may be severe.


HI 68 LO


* Valdosta
74/54

Tallahassee * Lake City
70/53 77/61
0 Gainesville
Panama City 79/62


69/53


S


Ocala
79/63


Tampa *
77 6/W


I /


lU.


Ft. Mye
82/6


MOSTLY
SUNNY


HI 62 LO


MOSTLY
SUNNY


HI 65 LO


City Monday
* Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 73/47/sh
76/62 Daytona Beach 73/45/sh
Ft. Lauderdale 80/57/t
Daytona Beach Fort Myers 74/49/sh
80'/63 Gainesville 69/38/sh
* Jacksonville 68/40/sh
S ,* Key West 80/72/t
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West 80/72/tsh
80/62 80/65 Lake City 68/38/sh
Miami 80/57/t
Naples 74/54/sh
West Palm Beach Ocala 70/40/sh
81/71 * Orlando 72/45/sh
* Ft. Lauderdale Panama City 63/46/pc
ors .81/73 0 Pensacola 64/44/pc
6 e Naples * Tallahassee 64/36/pc
81/68 Miami Tampa 70/48/sh
.. ,. Valdosta ,. ?'
Key West * W. Palm Beach , 5 I


"_l)I _


I.


PARTLY
CLOUDY



1I 67 LO






Tuesday .
67/47/s.
66/42/s
73/55/s
71/47/s
63/34/pc
62/37/pc
77/63/s
62/33/pc
74/56/s
70/51/sI
64/36/pc,
67/43/s
60/45/s
62/40/s|
63/32/s.
65/45/s
'. ,11


Bangor
20s


Huiston *.
670s/47
70s


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


S4storm3
G! inna

St. u 1-.49
--l - -- l ,% ,0Charlnotte ' F
66/50
Me phis


'Nov -70l -F--
70/.18 z8 0 '
, OS ......
*,



High: 84�, Kendall, Fla. Low: -16, Berlin, N.H.
High: 841, Kendall, Fla. Low: -160, Berlin, N.H.


Saturday Today


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday.
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


70
50
66
43
86 in 1937
23 in 1960


0.00"
3.85"
3.85"
2.55"
2.55"


7a Ip 7p
Sunday










ri~atsitlemerathr'


la
Mon










'FeeKls ie' e


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.



Jan. Feb.
30 5
Full Last


7:25 a.m.
6:01 p.m.
7:25 a.m.
6:01 p.m.


12:25 p.m.
1:47 a.m.
1:14 p.m.
2:51 a.m.

-, . "

Feb. Feb.
13 21
New First


3
MODgPtRI
45 nistes to lul



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I..


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- Forecasts, data and graph-
ics � 2010 Weather Central
S_ "' LLC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


day I c,,i �.. rt rS LL i i
Wuraail er u

mosrci- r -. -1-1t~o ece

I re r r-


I. rir m- uii

enperalue ---- - - - - - -


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki-
hong Kong
Kingston


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
31/13/0
39/30/.04
14/3/0
43/42/0
41/28/0
23/19/.08
51/43/0
35/32/.01
39/34/.01
33/23/0
42/20/0
56/43/0
51/38/0
49/38/0
40/25/0
40/34/0
50/42/0
45/37/0
49/42/0
63/54/.02
70/55/0
45/28/0


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
84/70/0
37/32/.02
46/39/0
70/64/0
37/18/0
16/9/0
90/66/0
70/57/0
39/30/0
86/68/0
.61/55/0
84/75/0


Hi/Lo/W
41/39/pc
42/22/pc
19/8/s
61/43/t
49/47/r
27/9/sn
66/40/t
25/14/sn
44/33/pc
42/39/pc
49/39/sh
65/58/t
60/42/r
60/50/t
31/17/sn
43/28/rs
56/35/r
48/38/r
67/51/t
61/34/pc
80/63/t
34/20/pc


Today
Hi/Lo/W
88/72/s
35/28/rs
42/30/pc
75/63/pc
29/10/s
31/23/pc
86/71/s
65/52/pc
39/32/c
83/68/pc
4, - . p,
72/63/c
86/76/pc


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
40/35/.39
36/33/0
48/39/.17
-15/-22/0
49/35/0
39/22/0
79/68/0
74/66/0
48/37/0
70/46/0
59/50/0
54/43/0
52/37/0
59/44/0
56/43/0
62/47/0
83/72/0
36/32/.14
64/45/0
70/51/0
40/28/0
56/50/.03



Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
52/41/.43
77/72/0
45/41/.18
54/43/.04
81/46/0
25/5/0
5/-8/0
81/61/0
81/73/0
71/48/0
25/19/0
, 91/77/0
41/37/.06


Hi/Lo/W CITY
34/22/sn Omaha
47/34/r Orlando
52/29/s Philadelphia
-4/-21/s Phoenix
56/50/r Pittsburgh
40/38/sh Portland ME
80/67/s Portland OR
67/47/pc Raleigh
50/31/r Rapid City
67/41/t Reno
76/62/t Richmond
39/27/c Sacramento
51/36/pc St. Louis
58/34/t Salt Lake City
60/45/pc San Antonio
63/38/t San Diego
82/73/pc San Francisco
33/24/rs Seattle
69/46/t Spokane
70/48/t Tampa
47/45/sh Tucson
54/28/c Washington


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
'40/37/.15
76/55/0
42/29/0
56/46/.03
50/33/0
32/6/0
48/40/.01
49/30/0
36/21/0
38/19/0
47/30/0
54/40/.13
51/39/0
37/30/0
74/61/0
58/47/.10
53/45/.24
45/43/.08
40/21/0
77/54/0
51/39/.14
47/31/0


Hi/Lo/W
32/23/c
80/62/t
50/46/r
60/41/s
52/38/r
34/33/pc
46/39/r
62/54/sh
27/15/sn
39/33/sn
60/54/sh
51/44/sh
44/29/r
37/18/sn
72/38/s
60/50/pc
54/49/r
51/42/sh
'88/29/c
77/65/t
56/35/s
51/49/r


Today Saturday Today r
Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W
68/50/sh Rio. 91/75/0 86/71/t
77/63/t Rome 50/32/0 44/32/s
35/24/pc St. Thomas VI 84/79/.40 82/72/pc
50/42/sh San Juan PR 87/75/.27 '81/71/pc
78/50/s Santiago 82/61/0 90/62/pc
34/27/rs Seoul 30/14/0 27/9/s
1/-19/pc Singapore 90/79/.43 90/77/pc
81/61/t Sydney 106/72/0 93/70/pc
85/72/s Tel Aviv 68/54/0 61/53/sh
66/44/s Tokyo 48/37/0 43/33/s
19/11/sf Toronto 32/25/0 41/34/sh
89/75/t Vienna ... 21/12/0 35/25/pc
37/29/rs Warsaw 7/-2/0 15/1/s


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy, dr=drizzle, f=fair, fg=fog, h=hazy, i=ice, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunny,
sh=showers, sn=snow, ts=thunderstorms, w=windy.
Iv


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LaeOtl3SW acmNris D. Ville- .*Cmps 200SW5thAv.. Capu 100W*tht.Joesile 07NW14thTerae untr' W lk515 W4SdSt Twe Suae*72*S 7thSt


TS CHANCE CHANCE
T-STORMS .(SHOWERS


HI 77 LO











Pensacola
69/50


Saturday Today


C


~. \ p


_ r


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


71




1. lp











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreportercom


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


Sunday, January 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

GATORS
Wine tasting
event Feb. 4
The North Florida
Gator Club's 3rd Annual
Wine Tasting Event is
6-8:30 p.m. Feb. 4 at
The Country Club of
Lake City. Proceeds will
support the Patty Gill
Endowment and area
scholarships.
Tickets are $20 in
advance and $25 at the
door, and include a gator
wine bag, hors d'oeuvres
and wine from several
countries. There also will
be a silent auction. ,
For details, call Bill
Cooper at (904) 259-3705,
Angela Cox at (386)
961-1766 or Bob
McManus at 752-3333.

ADULT BASEBALL
Workout/draft
planned Saturday
The North Florida
Men's Adult Baseball
League's workout/draft
is 2 p.m. Saturday
at North Florida
Community College in
Madison. Participants
who have not already
signed up can do so
online at the Web site
www.leaguelineup. corn/
northfloridamabl.
For details, call
Greg Vickers at
(850) 253-5107.

RUNNING
Registration for
Olustee 5K
The 2010 Step Fitness
Blue Grey 5K is
7:30 a.m. on Feb. 13.
The race will benefit
the March of Dimes in
honor of Alexander Ross
McCollum. Registration
is available online at
www.active.com (search
Lake City) and by mail.
For details, call Step
Fitness at (386) 438-5830
or race manager Michelle
McCollum Richards at
(386) 208-2447.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
* Fort White High
basketball tri-match vs.
Trenton High, 4 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Middleburg
High in District 4-5A
tournament at Ridgeview
High, 7 p.m.
Tuesday,
* Fort White High
basketball tri-match at
Hamilton County High,
5 p.m.
* Fort White High boys
soccer vs. host Suwannee
High in District 5-3A
tournament, 7 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
* Columbia High
wrestling at Suwannee
High, 6 p.m.
* Columbia High girls
basketball vs. P.K. Yonge
School, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
* Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
* Fort White High boys
basketball at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
* Columbia High,
Fort White High girls
weightlifting Section 4
qualifying at Belleview
High, 8 a.m.
* Columbia High
wrestling at Buchholz


High, 8 a.m.


Meyer

speaks

Coach staying on
through spring'
practice.

By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE - Florida
coach Urban Meyer is
working out regularly, eat-
ing better and has gained
20 pounds since the end of
the season - all good news
for the Gators.
As for that leave of
absence?
Well, it might not even
happen.
Meyer, speaking public-
ly for the first time since
Florida beat Cincinnati
51-24 in the Sugar Bowl,
says his workload has been
about the same during the
recruiting season as it has
been in other years.


Florida knocks off

South Carolina in

conference play


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Chandler Parsons (25) dribbles down the court in
a game played earlier this season in Gainesville.


Gators go down
to the wire with
Gamecocks.

By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE-
Chandler Parsons hit a
3-pointer at the buzzer,
his second game-win-
ning shot in three weeks,
and Florida beat South
Carolina 58-56 Saturday
night.
Parsons finished with 10
points, 10 rebounds and
four assists. He missed
his first three 3s, but hit
the only one that
mattered.
Devan Downey led the
Gamecocks (11-8, 2-3


Southeastern Conference)
with 36 points, one shy of
his career high. Downey
spun out of a double team
and hit a short jumper to
put South Carolina ahead
56-55 with 5.1 seconds
remaining.
Erving Walker dribbled
to the foul line and hit
Parsons with a perfect pass.
Parsons got both feet under
him and stroked the 3 from
the left wing.
Parsons ran across the
court and got mobbed by
his teammates.
A similar celebration
unfolded Jan. 3 at 'North
Carolina State, when
Parsons hit a 75-footer at
the buzzer to lift Florida
(14-5, 3-2) to a 62-61
victory.


Tigers look to tame district


Columbia takes
on Middleburg in
first round.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.corn

Weather forced the
Columbia High Tigers to
cancel Thursday's game
against Fort White High,
but the Tigers don't view it
as a negative heading into
the District 4-5A tourna-
ment.
Following a 4-3 come-
from-behind victory against
Eastside on Friday, the
Tigers are ready to head
into district play.
Columbia (18-4-1, 6-1-1)
earned the No. 2 seed in
the tournament for its regu-
lar-season performance and
will take on Middleburg
High in the first round.
Game time is set for a 7
p.m. kickoff at Ridgeview
High on Monday.
Despite the game being
canceled, Columbia coach
Trevor Tyler feels good
about getting the rest head-
ing into districts.
"We're injured right
now," Tyler said. "Chris
Beardsley is still bat-
tling an injury and we've
been without Nick Tuttle
over the last two weeks
with a sprained ankle. It's
pretty bad. We're looking
to get healthy. Not having
a game. gives us a day to
rest."
Friday's win against
Eastside was a bit of revenge
for the Tigers, which were
knocked out of the playoffs
by the Rams last season.
Geoff Beardsley scored
four goals to lead the Tigers
from behind.
"Last year we faded in
districts," Beardsley said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Geoff Beardsley (2) dribbles between two midfielders during Friday's game against Eastside High at Tiger
Stadium. The Tigers won 4-3 behind Beardsley's four goals.


"This was a little revenge
for last season. We played
hard and came out with the
win. Now, we have to come
out and play hard to come
away with a district title."
Columbia looks to get
healthy before taking on the
Broncos on Monday. The
Tigers defeated Middleburg
in their regular-season con-
test, 4-1, but Tyler doesn't
want Columbia looking past
the Broncos.


'The key is to not look
past them," Tyler said. "Last
year, we lost to Eastside
after beating them twice in
the regular season. We have
to play to our full potential.
We better show up and play
the best we can. We have to
do what we do in practice
and execute."
If Columbia is able to
get by Middleburg, the
Tigers would take on the
winner of Wolfson High


and Ridgeview High on
Wednesday.
"It all comes down to
the playoffs and what you
come with," Tyler said. "We
have a real strong district.
Wolfson tied Ridgeview in
the regular season. Our dis-
trict is real close all the way
down to the sixth team. If a
team doesn't have a good
night, it's going to be in
trouble. We have to win the
balls in the air. Our back


four has been playing well
together. We have to shore
up on defense and have cov-
erage in the box. We beat
Wolfson, 4-1, in the regu-
lar season and played very,
very well against Ridgeview,
but it's all about -the
playoffs."
Fleming Island High
enters the tournament as
the top seed and would not
meet Columbia until the
final.


Offensive matchup for NFC title


The NFC
championship
game has no
shortage of
storylines for
today's contest between
.the Minnesota Vikings and
New Orleans Saints.
We predicted the
matchup before the
season's first kickoff and
there's still no clear-cut
winner in this contest.
There is, however, intrigue.
Fans will surely be split
on picking a favorite in
this contest. There will be


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
more than a handful of fans
rooting for Brett Favre to
end a storybook career
with a Super Bowl victory.


Then again, who knows if
this is Favre's last year.
There's another handful
of people that would like
to see New Orleans win a
Super Bowl to help heal a
city that was ravaged by
Katrina not long ago.
The game will be
played by two of the NFL's
highest-scoring teams,
but each defense also
possesses Pro-Bowl talent.
Minnesota has Jared
Allen, who accounted
for 14'L sacks this season
to lead the NFC. New


Orleans matches with
Darren Sharper in his
first year with the Saints.
Sharper has been much of
the reason for the Saints'
defensive turnaround this
season.
Still, the game is about
playmakers and both team
is loaded.
Both offenses start with
the quarterbacks. Favre
and Drew Brees are two of
the top competitors in the
NFL, but they each benefit
from playing in their
respective offenses.


Favre has the luxury of
having one of the NFU's
best backs to carry the
load in Adrian Peterson.
Brees has a plethora
of backs with different
strengths to help out.
Reggie Bush, Pierre
Thomas and Mike Bell
may not be Peterson, but
they each bring something
to the Saints. Bush, in
particular, can be deadly
on special teams and in the
passing game.

NFC continued on 4B


I I- - - ' ' -












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
BOWLING
I p.m.
ESPN - PBA, Tournament of
Champions, at Las Vegas
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, Abu
Dhabi Championship, final round, at Abu
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (same-day
tape)
4 p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour. Bob Hope Classic,
final round, at La Quinta, Calif.
7:30 p.m.
TGC - Champions Tour, Mitsubishi
Electric Championship, final round, at
Ka'upulehu-Kona, Hawaii
NFL FOOTBALL
3 p.m.
CBS - Playoffs, AFC Championship
game, N.Y.Jets at Indianapolis
6:30 p.m.
FOX - Playoffs, NFC Championship
game, Minnesota at New Orleans
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC - Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS - PBR, Tecate Light
Invitational, at Anaheim, Calif. (same-day
tape)
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN - Spanish Primera Division,
Malaga at Real Madrid
TENNIS
II a.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, round
of 16, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day
tape)
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, round of
16, at Melbourne, Australia
3:30 a.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, round of
16, at Melbourne, Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN2 - Michigan St. at Minnesota
4 p.m.
FSN - Oklahoma St. at Colorado
6 p.m.
FSN -Arizona St.'at Arizona
8 p.m.
FSN - Duke at Maryland

Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN - Georgetown at Syracuse
9 p.m.
ESPN - Missouri at Kansas
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS - Pittsburgh at N.Y.
Rangers
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, round


of 16, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day
tape)
9 p.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, men's
and women's quarterfinals, at Melbourne,
Australia
3:30 a.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, men's
and women's quarterfinals, at Melbourne,
Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - Ohio St. at Purdue

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
N.Y.Jets 24, Cincinnati 14
Dallas 34, Philadelphia 14
Baltimbre 33, New England 14
Arizona 51 I, Green Bay 45, OT
Divisional Playoffs
New Orleans 45,Arizona 14
Indianapolis 20, Baltimore 3
Minnesota 34, Dallas 3
N.Y.Jets 17, San Diego 14
Conference Championships
Today
N.Y.Jets at Indianapolis, 3 p.m. (CBS)
Minnesota at New Orleans, 6:40 p.m.
(FOX)


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
L.A. Clippers at Washington, I p.m.
Dallas at NewYork, I p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Toronto, 6 p.m.
Monday's Games
Indiana at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Denver, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Utah, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Portland, 10 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 9 Pittsburgh at Seton Hall, 2 p.m.
No. 18 Wisconsin vs. Penn State,
2;30 p.m.
No. 19 Georgia Tech at Florida
State, Noon
No. 20 Northern Iowa at Indiana
State, 2:05 p.m.

TENNIS"

Australian Open seeds

At Melbourne Park, Australia
Saturday
Men
Third Round


Roger Federer (I), Switzerland, def
Albert Montanes (31), Spain, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4
Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Denis
Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2.
Nikolay Davydenko (6), Russia, def
Juan Monaco (30),Argentina, 6-0, 6-3, 6-4.
Fernando Verdasco (9), Spain, def.
Stefan Koubek, Austria, 6-1, retired.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (10), France, def.
Tommy Haas (18), Germany, 6-4, 3-6,
6-1,7-5.
Mikhail Youzhny (20), Russia, lost to
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, walkover.
Lleyton Hewitt (22), Australia, def.
Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 6-0, 4-2.
retired.
Nicolas Almagro (26), Spain, def.
Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4.
Women
Third Round
Serena Williams (I), United States,
def. Carla Suarez Navarro (32), Spain,
6-0, 6-3.
Caroline Wozniacki (4), Denmark, def.
Shahar Peer (29), Israel, 6-4, 6-0.
Venus Williams (6), United States, def.
Casey Dellacqua,Australia, 6-1, 7-6 (4).
Victoria Azarenka (7), Belarus, def.
Tathiana Garbin, Italy, 6-0, 6-2.
Vera Zvonareva (9), Russia, def. Gisela
Dulko, Argentina, 6-1, 7-5.
Sam Stosur (13),Australia, def.Alberta
Brianti, Italy, 6-4, 6-I1.
Li Na (16), China, def. Daniela
Hantuchova (22), Slovakia, 7-5, 3-6, 6-2.
Francesca Schiavone (17), Italy, def.
Agnieszka Radwanska (10), Poland, 6-2,
6-2.
Friday
Men
Third Round
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Philipp
Kohlschreiber, (27), Germany, 6-4, 6-2,
2-6, 7-5.
Juan Martin Del Potro (4), Argentina,
def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 6-3, 0-6,
6-4, 7-5.
Andy Murray (5), Britain, def. Florent
Serra, France, 7-5, 6-1, 6-4.
Andy Roddick (7), United States, def.
Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-4,
7-6 (3).
Fernando Gonzalez (I I), Chile, def.
Evgeny Korolev, Kazakhstan, 6-7 (5), 6-3,
1-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Gael Monfils (12), France, lost to John
Isner (33), United States, 6-1, 4-6, 7-6
(4), 7-6 (5).
Marin Cilic (14), Croatia, def. Stanislas
Wawrinka (19), Switzerland, 4-6, 6-4,
6-3, 6-3.
Ivan Ljubicic (24), Croatia, lost to Ivo
Karlovic, Croatip, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7).
Women '
Third Round
Dinara Safina (2), Russia, def. Elena
Baltacha, Britain, 6-1. 6-2.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (3), Russia, def.
Angelique Kerber, Germany, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4.
Marion Bartoli ( I), France, lost to
Zheng Jie, China, 5-7, 6-3, 6-0.
Nadia Petrova (19), Russia, def. Kim
Clijsters (15), Belgium, 6-0, 6-I1.
Alisa Kleybanova (27), Russia, lost to
Justine Henin, Belgium, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Alona Bondarenko (31), Ukraine, def.
Jelena Jankqvic (8), Serbia, 6-2, 6-3.


UConn upsets




top-ranked Texas


Associated Press

STORRS, Conn. -
Jerome Dyson scored a
career-high 32 points and
Connecticut overcame a 10-
Spoint second-half deficit to
upset .top-ranked Texas 88-
74 on Saturday.
It was the Longhorns'
second consecutive loss
after winning their first 17
games.
The'Huskies (13-6) out-
scored Texas (17-2) 54-32 in
the second half and earned
their first win over a ranked
opponent this season in five
attempts.
Kemba Walker had 19
points and 10 assists, aiqd
Stanley Robinson added
17 points and 12 rebounds
for UConn, which again
was without coach Jim
Calhoun, who missed his
second game on a doc-
tor-ordered. leave of
absence.
Damion James led Texas
with 23 points and seven
rebounds, and Avery
Bradley added 15 points.

No. 2 Kentucky 101,
Arkansas 70

LEXINGTON, Ky.
- Darius Miller had a
career-high 18 points and
DeMarcus Cousins got
his 10th double-double as
No. 2 Kentucky coasted by
Arkansas 101-70 Saturday.
The Wildcats kept alive
the nation's only unblem-
ished record and a near
certain return to the top of
the college basketball rank-
ings.
Kentucky (19-0, 4-0
SEC) haven't topped The
Associated Press poll
since 2003, but that streak
is almost certain to end
Monday courtesy of their


dominating victory over
Kentucky alumnus John
Pelphrey's Razorbacks and
top-ranked Texas' loss to
Kansas State earlier in the
week.
This one was practically
over by tipoff. Kentucky
scored the game's 10 points,
stretched the lead to 30 by
halftime, then added the
first 14 points of the sec-
ond half. With that cushion,
Kentpcky was able to easily
withstand an 18-3 second
half run by the Razorbacks
(8-11, 1-3).

No. 3 Kansas 84, Iowa
State 61

AMES, Iowa - Cole
Aldrich tied a season high
with 19 points and grabbed
11 rebounds and the No. 3
Jayhakws won their fourth




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. Z

I KAROC-


straight to stay perfect in
the Big 12.
Marcus Morris added
16 for Kansas (18-1, 4-0),
which closed the'first half
on a 25-11 run and extend-
ed its lead to as much as
67-45 midway through the
second half.
Kansas held Craig
Brackins, who torched
them for 42 in Ames last
season, to just 13 points.
Marquis Gilstrap added 18
points and 12 rebounds for
the Cyclones (12-7, 1-3).

No. 5 Syracuse 76,
Marquette 71

SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Wes
Johnson scored 22 points,
including a momentum-
bursting alley-oop, and
added 15 rebounds to lead
fifth-ranked Orange.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


NUGHATC 1

I_ L T WHAT THE STAFF
_ CON51IEREP
TENNIA THE BAKER' ,
, - - \, Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
� -suggested by the above cartoon.

A: A L 111 T I 1"
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: FAINT YOKEL MIDWAY JUMPER
Answer: When a computer fails, it can be -
"TERMINAL"


League reports

Results of Lake City Bowl league:
DRIFTERS
Team standings: 1. Eric's Green
Machine; 2. PCP's; 3. Pin Busters.
High scratch game: 1. Phyllis
Benton 193; 2. (tie) Betty Dicks, Cythe
Shiver 188. 1. Bill Dolly 215; 2. John
Smith 187; 3. Rex Robinson 181.
High scratch series: 1. Phyllis
Benton 535; 2. Cythe Shiver 534;
3. Carolyn Waldron 422. 1. Bill Dolly
604; 2. Rex Robinson 521; 3. John
Smith 515.
High handicap game: 1. Betty Dicks
250; 2. Phyllis Benton 232; 3. Lori
Zuccola 224. 1. Bill Dolly 236; 2. John
Smith 208; 3. Rex Robinson 207.
High handicap series: 1. Phyllis
Benton 652; 2. Cythe Shiver 621;
3. Lori Zuccola 616. 1. Bill Dolly 667;
2. Rex Robinson 599; 3. John Smith
578.
High average: 1. Cythe Shiver 168;
2. Phyllis Benton 158. 1. Bill Dolly
177; 2. John Smith 175.
(results from Jan. 12)
MONDAY LADIES
Team standings: 1. Just Us Girls;
2. Lake City Bowl; 3. (tie) Evi' Divas,
Mambajambas.
High scratch game: 1. Jackie
Young 210; 2. Julia Myers 188;
3. Kelly Stokes 185.
High scratch series: 1. Jackie
Young 582; 2. Kelly Stokes 508;
3. Tina Church 501.
High handicap game: 1. Juliana
Griffis 243; 2. Lindsey Wayne 240;
3. Jackie Young 226.
High handicap series: 1. Jackie
Young 630; 2. Juliana Griffis 616;
3. Kelly Stokes 607.
High average: 1. Jackie Young
183; 2. Julia Myers 181.
(results from Jan. 11)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. North Florida
Tower (11-1); 2. TownHomes LLC
(11-1); 3. Club Basement (8-4).
High scratch game: 1. Wally
Howard 237; 2. Mitch Young 234;
3. (tie) Dan Adel, Jim Rhoads 226.
High scratch series: 1. Wally
Howard 655; 2. David Adel 620;
3. Mike Koon 618.
High handicap game: 1. Al Fooks
253; 2. Mitch Young 249; 3. Roger
Webb 248.
High handicap series: 1. Al Fooks
705; 2. Wally Howard 676; 3. David
Adel 662.
High average: 1. Wally Howard
202.87; 2. Bill Duncan 202.54;
3. Gregg Moravec 197.58.
(results from Jan. 11)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Taz (9-3); 2. (tie)
Advantage Auto Repair, The Fantastic
4, Lucky #7 (8-4); 5. (tie) Rebound,
Road Kill, Average Joe's (7-5).
High scratch game: 1. Phyllis
Benton 188; 2. Faye Darst 180;
3. Norma Yeingst 167. 1. A.J. Dariano
235; 2. Robert Pond 230; 3. Joe
Cohrs 226.
High scratch series: 1. Norma
Yeingst 475; 2. Shirley Berry 446;
3. Phyllis Benton 442. 1. Robert Pond
678; 2. A.J. Dariano 645; 3. Joe
Cohrs 642.
High handicap game: 1. (tie)
Michele Dariano, Phyllis Benton 237;
3. Faye Darst 236; 4. Shirley Berry
221. 1. Robert Pond 254; 2. A.J.
Dariano 253; 3. David Berry 238.
.High handicap series: 1. Michele


1
4
7
10 I

11
13
14
15

16
17

19
21
22 I
23

26

30


BOWLING

Dariano 632; 2. Shirley Berry 615;
3. (tie) Heather Ostendorf, Ness Wade
604. 1. Robert Pond 702; 2. A.J.
Dariano 699; 3. David Berry 673.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
167; 2. Mandy Deliberis 152; 3. Phyllis
Benton 145.1. Joe Cohrs 195; 2. Mark
Moore 190; 3. Mitch Young 187.
(results from Jan. 10)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(102-74); 2. Golden Oldies (100-76);
3. Jo's Crew (96-80).
High scratch game: 1. Louise
Atwood 183; 2. Sandi Johns 175;
3. Barbara Griner 159. 1. Mike Helvey
188; 2. Ross Meyers 181; 3. Tom
Evert 177.
High scratch series: 1. Louise
Atwood 471; 2. Sandi Johns 428;
3. Vy Ritter 415. 1. Ross Meyers 493;
2. Lee Evert 483; 3. Mike Helvey 476.
High handicap game: 1. Sandi
Johns 234; 2. Louise Atwood 224;
3. Ruth Lott 219. 1. Joe Peterson 232;
2. Morrell Atwood 230; 3. Wendell
Shay 227.
High handicap series: 1. Sandi
Johns 605; 2. Louise Atwood 594;
3. Janie Posey 584. 1. Morrell Atwood
635; 2. Jim Hawkins 631; 3. Keith
Herbster 609.
High Avelage: 1. Phyllis Benton
155; 2. Louise Atwood 154; 3. Yvonne
Finley 146. 1. Lee Evert 182; 2. Dan
Ritter 178; 3. Art Joubert 166.
(results from Jan. 12)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Spare Us
(8-0); 2. Just Do It (7-1); 3. High Five
(5.5-2.5).
High handicap game: 1. Elsie
Huddleston 247; 2. (tie) Catherine
Howell, Faye Darst 229.
High handicap series: 1. Elsie
Huddleston 644; 2. Faye Darst 623;
3. Patricia Warne 606.
(results from Jan. 19)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. 3 Gators &
A Note (47-29); 2. Fun Tyme Travel
(43-33, 46,706 pins); 3. Gutter Dusters
(43-33, 46,150 pins); 4. Alvin & the
Chickmonks (43-33, 45,908 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Karen
Coleman 204; 2. Pat Gallegos 196;
3. Donna Wynkoop 190. 1. Zech
Strohl 267; 2. Wally Howard 230;
3. Steve Fancy 222.
High scratch series: 1. Pat
Gallegos 541; 2. Shannon Brown 527;
3. Ida Hollingsworth 525. 1. Zech
Strohl 752; 2. Rich Madden 606;
3. Walt Sherrod 603.
High handicap game: 1. (tie)
Tina Sherrod, Cara Lashley, Donna
Wynkoop 235. 1. Zech Strohl 276; 2.
Steve Fancy 267; 3. Bob Feasel 257.
High handicap series: 1. Linda
Feasel 651; 2. Pat Gallegos 649; 3.
Nina Howd 646. 1. Zech Strohl 779; 2.
Walt Shqrrod 681 ;3. Bob Feasel 678.
(results from Jan. 15)
THURSDAY NITE MIXED
Team standings: 1. Wrecking Crew
(47-29); 2. John Deere Green (46-30);
3. Party Time (37.5-38.5).
High scratch game: 1. Liz Randall
168; 2. Maureen Osborn 147; 3. Okie
Van Hoy 146. 1. George Poultney 236;
2. Joe Cohrs 210; 3. Steve Merriman
208.
High scratch series: 1. Liz Randall
484; 2. Okie Van Hoy 409; 3. Phyllis
Benton 386. 1. George Poultney 582;
2. Leonard Randall 571; 3. Joe Cohrs
570.
High handicap game: 1. Maureen


ACROSS 35 Thermometer
*base
Vase, often 36 Bottled gas
Checkmated 39 Europe-Asia
Average grade divider
Famous 40 Heat meas.
numero 41 Is, for them
Wretched hut 42 Tibet's
"Norma -" capital
Genetic info 45 Charcoal grill
Title role for 49 Mantra chants
Madonna 50 Novelist -
Sitcom planet Hobson
Called from the 52 Meditation
Alps practice
Whimpers 53 Anaconda
Cave, perhaps 54 Natural
Boy fabric
Pine 55 Equator segment
product 56 Psychic's
Feudal power
tenants 57 Inc. cousin
Skip over 58 Fan cry


31 Damage
superficially
32 Moo - gai pan
33 A thousand
G's
34 Antiquity


DOWN .


Group of peers
Part of A.D.
Kind of hog


Osborn 221; 2. Okie Van Hoy 217;
3. Cookie Reddick 210. 1. George
Poultney 263; 2. Terry Goodman 243;
3. Steve Merriman 234.
High handicap series: 1. Okie Van
Hoy 622; 2. Cookie Reddick 597;
3. Maureen Osborn 575. 1. George
Poultney 663; 2. (tie) Larry Porter,
Leonard Randall 631; 4. Robbie
Evans 602.
High average: 1. Liz Randall 167;
2. Phyllis Benton 152; 3. Kim Tice 132.
1. Joe Cohrs 198; 2. Brett Reddick
183; 3. Leonard Randall 178.
(results from Jan. 14)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Quirky Quad
(63-17); 2. (tie) Who Cares, Ups &
Downs (45.5-34.5); 4. Wild Things
(45-35).
High scratch game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 184; 2. DeDe Young 182;
3. Betty Carmichael 178. 1. Bill Dolly
209; 2. David Duncan 203; 3. Ross
Meyers 197. *
High scratch series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 466; 2. Phyllis Benton 464;
3. Yvonne Osborn 463. 1. David
Duncan 558; 2. Lee McKinney 543;
3. (tie) Ross Meyers, Bill Dolly 517.
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 234; 2. Debi Evert 233;
3. Yvonne Osborn 228. 1. Ross
Meyers 238; 2. David Duncan 225;
3. Bill Dolly 224.
High handicap series: 1. Debi Evert
646; 2. Yvonne Osborn 622; 3. Aggie
Mumbauer 621. 1. Ross Meyers 640;
2. (tie) Lee McKinney, David Duncan
624; 4. Jim Hawkins 616.
High average: 1. Jane Sommerfeld
156; 2.'Phyllis Benton 155; 3. Diedri
Young 153. 1. Lee Evert 185; 2. Bill
Dolly 183; 3. Lee McKinney 170.
(results from Jan. 14)

Youth league

MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Just Throw
It! (8-0); 2. Blame It On Karen (6-2);
3. Two People and Chris (5-3).
High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 184; 2. Sara Sykes 167;
3. Christine Peters 164. 1. Cody
Howard 219; 2. Dale Coleman 212;
3. Cameron Wise 199.
High scratch series: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 482; 2. Christine Peters 467;
3. Sara Sykes 450. 1. Cody Howard
562; 2. Bobby Hosier 529; 3. Colin
Madden 519.
MAJORS
Team standings: 1. The Iron Bowlers
(44-20); 2. Flying Penguins (37-27);
3. Meek's Monkeys (34.5-29.5).
High handicap game: 1. Lauren
Snipes 232; 2. Chelsea Liston 230;
3. Holly Conway 224. 1. Shawn Perry
240; 2. Dustin White 234; 3. Keith
Harry 224.
High handicap series: 1. Lauren
Snipes 638; 2. Holly Conway 612;
3. Cheyenne Patterson 598. 1. Zach
Mauldin 637; 2. Keith Harry 634;
3. Dustin White 620.
BANTAMS
High' handicap game: 1. Lizzie
Proveaux 182; 2. Alyson Everette 173;
3. Alexis Menna 171. 1. Josh Kasper
181; 2. Juan Perez 171; 3. Blake
Lyons 165.
High handicap series: 1. Lizzie
Proveaux 480; 2. Alyson Everette 479;
3. Alexis Menna 478. 1. Josh Kasper
474; 2. Juan Perez 461; 3. Blake
Lyons 460.
(results from Jan. 16)


Answer to Previous Puzzle

BER G ESS LEWD
UTIL SHH ALAI.
GAPE PARIBOILS
TEAL RIA EE K
NSI OKERS
OKSlMUSK ROAN








c OLTE ENGLTETA
WENDOO RATTAT
RIEAMS GRTSITAITN


Interlaced
Roman poet
After taxes
Emulate a rooster
British peer
Cartoon shrieks


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


11 Most beautiful
woman
12 Prayer-wheel
turners
18 Fix typos
20 McMahon et al.
22 Shortening
23 Play
boisterously
24 Omani title
25 Fodder storage
26 Goodbye, to
Gaius
27 Water, in Baja
28 Dangle
29 Weeps
31 Diner list
35 La - tar pits
37 "Nova"
network
38 In the least
(2 wds.)
39 - renewal
41 Opened the
window
42 Brain part
43 Med. plans
44 Pronto
45 Track
46 Ivan or
Nicholas
47 Vindictive
goddess
48 Rainfall measure
51 Have a cold


1-25 �2010 by UFS, Inc.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


Northwestern's Kafka


shines in Shrine game


By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press
ORLANDO - Andrew
Quarless caught a 2-yard
touchdown pass from
Mike Kafka with 6 seconds
remaining, lifting the East
to a 13-10 win over the West
on Saturday in the annual
showcase for college all-
stars looking to make an
impression on NFL scouts.
The Northwestern quar-
terback overcame a slow
start to lead an 11-play, 55-
yard drive on a day when
his team's defense was
dominant. He finished with
150 yards passing and was
selected the Offensive Most
Valuable Player of the East-
'West Shrine Game.
A play before the winning
TD pass to Penn State's
tight end, Kafka was smoth-
ered .and surrounded by


pass rushers but somehow
managed to elude them for
9 yards up the middle.
Max Hall of BYU tossed
an 8-yard touchdown pass
to Ryan Moya of UCLA
moments before the East
rallied.
Joshua Sheene of Ole
Miss added field goals of
44 and 40 yards for the
East. And Texas' Hunter
Lawrence had a 47-yarder
for the West.
Van Eskridge of East
Carolina, who was chosen
defensive MVP, intercept-
ed a pass by Kansas' Todd
Reesing that hung in the
air far too long in the sec-
ond quarter. Wisconsin's
O'Brien Schofield intercept-
ed Hall earlier in the game.
After an unspectacular
first quarter, Hall came
back strong in the fourth.
He zipped a 41-yard pass


to Eastern Washington's
Nathan Overbay, the tight
end cutting across the mid-
dle of a wide-open field. Two
plays later, he connected
with Moya to give the West
a 10-6 lead with 6:59 left.
Then Kafka came back.
Finding tight seams in
the defense he had missed
earlier, the East's starting
quarterback made quality
throws on the final drive,
but his best work was done
on his feet.
He dropped back from
the West's 10-yard line and
didn't even have time to
set his feet before the pass
rush collapsed on him. He
ducked his head, buckled
his knees and prepared to
be sacked before somehow
slipping through the line
for a run that set up the
winning score and gave the
East a second straight win.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
West fullback Ryan Moya (center) of UCLA, celebrates after catching a pass for a touchdown
during the second half of the East West Shrine football game in Orlando on Saturday.









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TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Helping hands at Falcon football camp
Dylan Brantley, 7, of Wellborn, waits for a pass while being coached by Columbia County
Falcons' running back Clifford Magby during a Columbia County Falcons' free football
camp on Saturday.





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LAKE CITY REPORTER NFL SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


.Rematch with a Super Bowl at stake


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brett Favre stretches during
football practice Thursday in Eden Prairie, Minn. Minnesota
takes on New Orleans for the NFC Championship on Sunday.


Vikings vs. Saints


a tasty dish in

New Orleans


By MICHAEL MAROT
Asociated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - Jim
Caldwell traded the perfect
season for what he hoped
would be the perfect end-
ing.
On Sunday, Caldwell and
Indianapolis will play it by
the book.
Nearly a month after
the Colts coach pulled his
starters against the New
York Jets, granting Rex
Ryan's Christmas wish, the
Colts can show everyone
they made the right move
by redeeming themselves
in the AFC Championship
game.
"We're very eager to get
out there," Colts defensive
lineman Raheem Brock
said. "We've got some-
thing to prove. They've
got a good running game,
a good offensive line, but


now we've got to go out and
prove ourselves again."
In December, the Colts
didn't have to prove any-
thing.
They were rolling along
on an NFL record 23-game
regular-season winning
streak and had just set a
franchise record with their
13th consecutive home vic-
tory. They had swept the
AFC South, beaten seven
straight teams fighting to
make the playoffs, locked
up the AFC's top seed and
had everyone talking about
completing a 19-0 season.
Then Caldwell did the
unthinkable. With less
than six minutes to go in
the third quarter, the Colts
leading 15-10 and six quar-
ters from being 16-0, he
yanked Peyton Manning
and the other starters to
avoid risking injury.
Fans responded immedi-


ately with a cascade of boos
in Lucas Oil Stadium. Those
were replaced over the
next several days by even
louder complaints from fans
on local radio shows and
comments on blogs after
the Jets rallied for a 29-
15 victory. The decision set
off a national debate about
whether the Colts did the
right thing, and it became
so intense that Manning
eventually asked fans to for-
give the team.
Nobody has forgotten
what happened - least of
all the Colts (15-2).
"In history, they'll be
remembered as the team
that gave us our first loss
of 2009," Colts left tack-
le Charlie Johnson said.
"Going out and playing
everybody a. full four quar-
ters, it'll be a good test
for us to see who is really
better."


New York (11-7) took
advantage of the Colts' help
and hasn't lost since.
The Jets knocked off
AFC North champion
Cincinnati in the Giants
Stadium finale the follow-
ing week, clinching a play-
off spot. Then they won
the wild-card rematch at
Cincinnati. Last week, New
York upset the Chargers
17-14 in San Diego, setting
up Sunday's high-stakes
rematch in Indy.
It's the first time two
rookie coaches have met in
a conference championship
game. And it's not just the
Colts who feel they have
something to prove.
"If we end up beating
them, maybe they need to
look at that (pulling the
starters)," cornerback
Darrelle Revis said. "We
know that Peyton will be
playing in this game."


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS - What
a spicy Cajun mix for the
NFC championship game.
Brett Favre, headed for
the Hall of Fame some-
day, highlights yet another
comeback by facing the
team he rooted for while
growing up in Mississippi.
His Minnesota Vikings
(13-4) - ouch, say Packers
fans - are on the doorstep
of their first Super Bowl
trip in 33 years, with the
40-year-old quarterback
resembling the wide-eyed
youngster who took Green
Bay to the title in the very
same Superdome in 1997.
And those Superdome
tenants, the New Orleans
Saints, are hosting a confer-
ence championship for the
first time. A Super Bowl
would provide a massive lift
for a city still recovering
from Hurricane Katrina's
devastation and torment
more than four years ago.
A Saints victory Sunday
could set off Mardi Gras a
few weeks early, with the
celebration carrying on
right up until the Feb. 7 big
game in Miami.
Along with those tasty
story lines, remember that
these are the NFL's two
highest-scoring teams, with
offensive playmakers who
can light up scoreboards
and make fans' heads spin.
But they also have such
defensive standouts as
Vikings All-Pro end Jared


Allen, who led the NFC
with 14'/2 sacks; Saints end
Will Smith, who was second
to Allen with 13; and New
Orleans All-Pro Darren
Sharper, a ball-hawking
safety who ran back three
of his league-leading nine
interceptions for touch-
downs and, incidentally,
was dumped by the Vikings
last year after four seasons
in Minnesota.
TV couldn't come up with
a better script for prime-
time viewing.
"It's hard to explain,"
Favre said. "But as excit-
ing and as exhilarating as
the win is, the reality is
I was fortunate enough to
win one Super Bowl (1997
in New Orleans), the next
year we lose one. And I
think more about the one'
we lost than the one we
won. I can't explain it to you
how that feeling is, so the
championship game is no
different. I've always treat-
ed every playoff game like
it's the Super Bowl."
Few of the Saints (14-3)
have been in such a position.
As a long-underachieving
franchise since their found-
ing in 1966, the Saints have
been to exactly one confer-
ence final, losing at Chicago
three years ago. This is just
their seventh time in the play-
offs in a 44-year existence
perhaps most renowned for
their fans wearing paper
bags on their heads - nope,
Favre never went that far
growing up - and dubbing
the team Aints.


NFC: Title game offensive
Continued From Page 1B


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Both teams are loaded
at wide receiver, but Favre
has the advantage at tight
end this season. Jeremy
Shockey has had a good
career, but his light has
faded somewhat in New
Orleans. Visanthe Shiancoe
has come into his own with
Favre at the helm.
Marques Colston is the
best receiver in the game,
but Minnesota has more
weapons.
Percy Harvin, Sidney
Rice and Bernard Berrian
are all payers capable of
turning a 10-yard gain into
an 80-yard touchdown.
With Favre slinging the
gun, the receivers have
done just that this season.
In the end, home-field
advantage may play a
big part in this game.
Minnesota has been a
much better team at home
than on the road. The


Saints are also much better
at home.
For the Vikings to pull
off the upset, they'll have
to revert back to Peterson
and running the ball. Favre
will have to make select
plays when called upon,
but the Vikings must
control the clock. If they
can do that, the Vikings
will be in the Super Bowl.
If not, the Saints will keep
marching.
The marching stops
today as Peterson thrashes
the Saints front seven and
allows Favre hit a few big
plays on play-action passes
to beat New Orleans.

Minnesota 34,
New Orleans 27

E Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


"- "~~. ~ ~ ~ XX~X~XAX%
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an'd dan ~ .:�ap~tiliT,- eas.y N re L4,3i


Page Editor: Brandson Finley, 754-0420












Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmoyer@lakeciytcpoiler con


BUSINESS


Sunday, January 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS


Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcast.net

Keep your

eye on gap

analysis

Expectations is the
place you must always go
to before you get to where
you're going. Of course,
some people never go beyond
Expectations, but my job is
to hurry them along whether
they like it or not.
- Norton Juster

achieving them
are so important
in every aspect
of business, but
many businessmen and
entrepreneurs do not pay
enough attention to the gap
between where they are.
and where they want to be.
Gap analysis is the process
of looking at the difference
between your goal and
where you currently are.
Typically, when entrepre-
neurs look at the various
goals they want to achieve,
they often evaluate them
incorrectly. If the strategic
goal of a firm is to have
sales of $15 million for
2010, the focus is on the
wrong metric. Rather than
focusing on total sales, the
emphasis should be on the
gap between the $12 mil-
lion in sales they had in
2009 and the $15 million in
sales they want to achieve
in 2010. The $3 million
shortfall is the perfor-
mance gap, and gap analy-
sis focuses on that amount
as opposed to the total $15
million, presenting a much
clearer picture of what
must be done to achieve
the goal. This approach
assumes that everything
required to maintain the
current $12 million sales
level is also part of the stra-
tegic plan.
While gap analysis is
appropriate for any perfor-
mance issue, budgeting is
another major area where
gap analysis is critical. Gap
analysis places the focus
on the incremental funds
that you must spend and
the incremental benefits
of those expenditures. Too
often I see firms making
terrible mistakes as a result
of not focusing on the gap.
In one example, a firm
was considering two proj-
ects, the first of which cost
$1 million, and the second
of which cost $1.5 million.
The net benefit of the first
project was $100,000 a
year, and the net benefit of
the second was $110,000 a
year. Gap analysis focuses
on the $500,000 of addi-
tional funds needed for the
second project as well as
the $10,000 difference in
incremental annual benefit.
The gap analysis of this
scenario shows that by
choosing the second proj-
ect our yield will be only
two percent of the addi-
tional funds needed, and is
therefore, a very hard deci-
sion to justify. Gap analysis
clearly shows that the best
decision would be to select
project number one.
Yet another area where
gap analysis has critical
applications is training.
Gap analysis can quickly
determine what type of
training can produce the
best results. For example,

GAPS continued on 2C


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Heritage Bank of the South opened its first Lake City branch, at 463 West Duval St., at the beginning of January.




A new banking Heritage


By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter. corn
Lake City has
a new bank in
town.
The Albany,
Ga., based
Heritage Bank of the
South opened its first Lake
City branch - its third in
Florida - at the beginning
of January, after purchas-
ing the bank branch for-
merly operated by Atlantic
Coast Bank.
"It was a good situation
for us, and they needed
some more capital on their
books," said Mary Beth
Hobby, marketing direc-
tor for Heritage Bank of
the South. "We own two
banks in Ocala, and Lake
City makes three. Ocala
was our first foothold into
Florida, and that started
about three years ago.
We're trying to grow back
toward our region, and
Lake City was a perfect
spot for us."
Heritage Bank of the
South has operated for
55 years as a community
bank that began as a credit
union, Hobby said. The
Lake City branch is the
10th location for the busi-
ness.
"We're very customer-


service driven, and that's
what all of our employees
have been trained on,"
she said. "We have all of
the qualities of a big bank
- mobile banking, online
banking - all the things
that normally come with
the big regional bank, but
also the quality of being
a small town bank and
serving a small town com-
munity."
Hobby said that
although the bank has
changed hands, don't
expect to see many new
faces - most of the
employees at Atlantic
Coast Bank have'transi-
tioned to Heritage Bank.
"We believe in local
people making decisions
on a local level," she said.
"All of our employees
know the customers, and
that is the largest asset we
have walking into a new
community."
While some banks
across the nation have
been failing, Hobby said
Heritage Bank of the
South has continued
to expand - Lake City
marks the third new
branch opened in the past
six months.
"We've continued to
grow," she said. "While
many banks are sticking


with what they know. best,
we're strong enough to
grow and we're going to
capitalize on that. I think
one of the main reasons
people seek us out is that
we are strong, and I think
that's what people are look-
ing for in a bank."
Customers shouldn't
expect to see many
changes at the bank, and
shouldn't be worried about


increased interest rates or
higher fees, Hobby said.
"All of the accounts at
Atlantic Coast we have
grandfathered in, so cus-
tomers will get new checks
and debit cards, but other
than that, it'll be business
as usual for them," Hobby
said. "Aside from that,
they should see no major
changes at the bank."
Heritage Bank of the


South has plans for a rib-
bon cutting in the near
future, and also has plans
to be heavily involved in
the community.
"Our goal is to have a
big presence in Lake City,"
Hobby said. "We're very'
much community-minded
when it comes to sponsor-
ships, and as more people
get to know us, they'll
know we're here to stay."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Heritage Bank customers utilize the company's drive-through service Friday for a quicker and-
more convenient way to bank.


*-A,, Sundance to expand audiences


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this film publicity image released by the Sundance Film
Festival, Phillip Seymour Hoffman (left) and Amy Ryan are
shown in a scene from, 'Jack Goes Boating.'


By DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer
PARK CITY, Utah
- The prestige of a direc-
tor who makes it into the
Sundance Film Festival
often can be tindermined
by one simple question:
Where can their movies be
seen in the real world?
"Nowhere" often is the
answer, unless fans make
the journey to snowy Utah
during Sundance or hap-'
pen to live near another
festival or art house that
might play the films even-
tually.
Technology and a new
Sundance road show are
helping festival orga-


nizers and filmmakers
expand their audience.
On Thursday, as the event
heads into the closing
weekend of its 11-day run,
eight films and their direc-
tors will be in eight cities
around the country, giving
fans a taste of the nation's
top showcase for indepen-
dent cinema without hav-
ing to leave home.
"It's almost like vaude-
ville in a way," said festival
director John Cooper. "We
just decided to take it out
to the people, and we're
going to grow it from
there."
The titles going on the
road include Ben Affleck's


corporate-downsizing
drama "The Company
Men," written and directed
by John Wells ("ER, "The
West Wing"), playing in.
Brookline, Mass.; Philip-'
Seymour Hoffman's direct-
ing debut "Jack Goes - -
Boating," a romance in -
which he co-stars with
Amy Ryan, showing in
Chicago; and "Entourage"
star Adrien Grenier's
celebrity-culture documen-
tary 'Teenage Paparazzo,"
screening in Los Angeles.
There also will be
screenings in San
Francisco: Brooklyn, N.Y.;
Ann Arbor, Mich.; and -
Nashville, Tenn.


_ -----











LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


Footnotes and Tulips
Q Is it OK to just read a company's
filings without reading the foot-'
notes, too? - M.S., Tucson, Ariz.
A f you skip the footnotes,
you might miss some red
flags (or green ones). At
www.footnoted.org, Michelle
Leader offers a fascinating educa-
tion on footnotes. She recently *
reviewed the "worst footnotes" of
2009, citing Martha Stewart getting
$3 million to stay at her company,
. Chesapeake Energy disclosing that
it spent $12 million buying its
. CEO's antique map collection, and
Freddie Mac giving its new-CFO a
$2 million signing bonus (among
other things), after taking in more
than $50 billion in government aid.
(Chesapeake Energy is a Motley
Fool Inside Value recommendation
: and the Fool owns shares of it.)
This is good stuff to know about
companies that may interest you.
Less exciting are the useful
details you'll also find in footnotes,
such as the specific interest rates
that a company is paying on its
debt. You might not worry so much
about a 3 percent obligation versus
an 8 percent one.


Q Why do I occasionally see
tulips mentioned in my finan-
cial reading? - D.J, Dalton, Ga.
They're references to the
A great "tulipmania" phenome-
noni that took Holland by storm in
the mid-1600s. It's one of the first
documented cases of a speculative
investing frenzy. Incredibly, people
were taking out loans on their
Homes in order to buy tulip bulbs.
Prices soared to the modern-day
equivalent of tens of thousands of
dollars per bulb: Eventually, the
proverbial bubble burst, wiping
out many investors. The easiest
way to avoid "tulipmania" is to
avoid borrowing money to invest
and to be wary of stocks that seem
to have soared beyond reason.
(Check out the new Tuilipmania
board game arbouldergames.com
or www.funagain.com.)
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
S- see Write to Us


g The Motley Fool

To Educate, A muse & Enrich


Too Old for Stocks?
As you get older, it seems that no
one wants you to have any fun.
After a lifetime of investing experi-
ence, and after you've gotten famil-
iar with dozens of companies that
have served you well, financial
planners may tell you to bid
farewell to those trusty stocks -
even blue chips.
-Sure, there's some logic
there - as the recent bear
market made perfectly
clear. After all, when you're
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There's one big problem with
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older: Although falling stock
prices may seem like the biggest


. ani
res


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ple face other risks, too, as they
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Even if your portfolio is adequate
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Stocks, on the other hand, can
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Companies such as ExxonMobil,
Abbott Labs and McDonald's have
a long history of increasing their
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Retirees with substantial nest eggs
may choose to sell some of their
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Name That Company

My slogan is "Cover the
Earth." Founded in 1866 and
)ased in Cleveland, I'm America's :
largest specialty retailer of paint, :
stains, coatings, wall coverings :
d sundry items. I patented a
sealable tin can in 1877 and paid :
-1 -1*4


my first dividend in 1885. These
days I'm developing environmentally
friendly coatings. My brand names include
Dutch Boy, Krylon, Dupli-Color, Pratt &
Lambert, Purdy, Thompson's and Minwax.
I serve the automotive, industrial mainte-
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ers, and have more than 3,300 stores. I rake in
about $8 billion annually, and I've increased divi-
dends annually since 1979. Who am I?
SKnow the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and
you 'll be entered into a drawing for a nifty prize!
02010 THi MoiNlin xi FxIDi. in


From $5,000 to $5
I bought shares of Pacific
Ethanol because I read that Bill
Gates did. It turns out that Bill
Gates is a lousy investor. It was my
worst and best investment. It was
the worst because my $5,000
turned into $5. (No, I never
sold - 1I kept waiting for a ,q-,
comeback.) It was the best
because I learned some ,
lessons of a lifetime: Don't
buy on speculation of future earn-
ings. Don't buy nascent companies
with zero history of making money
in rough times. Don't buy because
someone else does. - C Adams,
West Chester, Pa. ,
The Fool Responds: Whether it's
Uncle Morty or Bill Gates who has
you looking at a particular stock,
always do your own thinking.
Remember that even great investors
get some decisions wrong. It's also
smart to favor companies with
respectable track records - or,
heck, great track records. A terrific
idea or product isn't enough - you
need growing profits, little or man-
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or http://CAPS.Fool.com and see
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Reemember Shakespeare?.'
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In Elizabethan daYs. Pools were the only
people who could get awvOa with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Moliey Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, ind hopes you /II laugh all
the wii to the hank.


P&G's Tricky Task
Recession-smacked Procter &
Gamble (NYSE: PG) lowered
prices on roughly 10 percent of its
products last year. Now it's trying to
squeeze more sales out of its most
popular brands - but that move
could flop badly.
Consider its Olay skin-care
brand, which raked in nearly $3
billion in fiscal 2009. The com-
pany is reportedly planning to roll
out a wrinkle-fighting body wash
next month in Olay's Total Effects
line, which currently consists
exclusively of facial products.
Given Olay's history as a facial
treatment, why lose that
focus? Well, it's cheaper and
faster to extend established
brands into new categories
than to build a fresh brand from
scratch. But offering too many prod-
ucts under the same brand can con-
fuse consumers and dilute the brand.
It's also risky to introduce value-
oriented versions of traditionally
premium brands, as the company
has done with Pampers and Tide. In
order for that to succeed, shoppers
must believe the premium product
is still worth the extra cost while
also viewing the value version as a
step up from the store brand. That's
a tricky task.
P&G plans to introduce 30 per-
cent more new products this year
versus last, so in all seriousness,
investors should keep an eye on the
consumer reception. (Procter &
Gamble is a Motley Fool Income
Investor pick and The Motley Fool
owns shares of it, too.)


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
I was founded in New York City in 1892. Early customers buying my outdoor
gear included Teddy Roosevelt and Amelia Earhart. By the early 1900s I was
selling clothing for women and men. Over the years I've offered golf lessons,
a kennel, hot air balloons, falconry equipment, hip flasks during prohibition
and much more. I filed for bankruptcy protection in 1977, was bought by The
Limited in 1988, and was spun off in 1998 as an independent company. I
operate more than 1,000 stores today, branded with my name or the Hollister, :
RUEHL or Gilly Hicks names. Who am I? (Answer: Abercrombie & Fitch)

/^_ Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or.
Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
Motley Fool. Sorry, we can providee individual financial advice.
a0***0S*************0S0OS0* ** ******** *** ** 0********e************


Umi sI( l Uui ik (III IR iu I( 1/21/2010)


CarMax hiring 600

workers for its stores


By MICHAEL FELBERBAUM
AP Business Writer
RICHMOND, Va. - Car
dealership chain CarMax
Inc. said Friday it plans
to hire at least 600 people
for its stores across the
country.
The positions are part
of the company's usual hir-
ing each year to prepare
for the spring and summer
car buying season, CEO
Tom Folliard said in a news
release.
,The company, based in
Richmond, said a majority
of the full- and part-time
positions are in sales, with
other openings in service
operations, business offices
and purchasing.
CarMax, which operates
100 stores that predomi-
nantly sell used vehicles,


has about 13,000 employ-
ees. The hiring plans
would boost that total by
about 5 percent.
The company announced
last month that it will open
previously built stores
- one in Georgia and two
in Ohio - in the next fiscal
year but doesn't plan any
further store growth until
the automotive market
improves.
At the time, CarMax said
stronger sales, cost-cutting
efforts and gains from its
financing division helped
it post a profit for its fiscal
third quarter.
Sales rose about 19 per-
cent in the quarter, while
sales at stores open at least
a year rose 8 percent. Still
sales remain about 16 per-
cent below levels seen just
two years ago.


Fast food equals fast profits

By ASHLEY M. HEHER Excluding a one-time estimates, expected the Because of its size and
AP Retail Writer benefit of 8 cents per chain to earn $1.02 per its increasingly popular
CHICAGO - More shale, McDonald's profit share for the quarter. dollar menu, McDonald's
hungry diners gobbling topped analyst estimates by Revenue climbed 7 per- was an early beneficiary
its cheap eats helped a penny per share. Analysts cent to $5.97 billion from of the recession as diners
McDonald's Corp.'s sales surveyed by Thomson $5.57 billion. Analysts traded down from pricier
and profit grow in its Reuters, who typically omit expected revenue of $5.94" restaurants.
and profit grow in its one-time items from their billion. But sales at its restau-


rourm quarter, me com-
pany said Friday in an
earnings report showing
it continued to weather
the downturn better than
many of its fast-food com-
petitors.
But sales growth at its
U.S. restaurants continued
to slow and net revenue
fell for the year.
For the three months
that ended Dec. 31, the
world's largest burger
chain earned $1.22 billion,
or $1.11 per share. That's
23 percent more than a
year earlier when it earned
$985.3 million, or 87 cents
per share.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 20 photo, a McDonald's restaurant is shown in
Doral, Fla. McDonald's Corp. said Friday that its sales and
profit grew in the fourth quarter as more hungry diners gob-
bled up its cheap eats.


rants that have been open
at least a year have slowed
as penny-pinching diners
tried to cut back still fur-
ther.
The figure grew 2.3
percent worldwide for
the fourth quarter and
0.1 percent in the U.S.,
McDonald's said Friday.
That was its weakest quar-
terly increase in at least
three years.
The figure is an impor-
tant measure for restau-
rants because it excludes
the effect of restaurants
opening or closing during
the year.


GAPS: Grow business
Continued From Page 1C


suppose your gap analysis
reveals that due to the
continual changes in tech-
nology, you need additional
training for your IT depart-
ment.
..First, you must deter-
mine the current skill level
of your employees, and
second, you must identify
. where you want them to be
relative to the new skill set.
Training should then focus
on getting them from their
current skill level to the
desired level.
Then by simply looking
at the alternative ways to
fill the actual gap between
where they are now and
where they have to be, you
can make appropriate deci-


sions.
Gap analysis is one of
those ways of thinking that
you have to work on. It is
just so easy to fall into the
trap of looking only at the
overall goal rather than the
gap that needs to be nar-
rowed or filled to achieve
that goal. Now go out and
make decisions using gap
analysis.
You can do this!



* FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.


I - I


I , , II ' I ' � - '


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428
















Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


The Week in Review


SNYSE
,030.61 -326.18


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Lasl Chg %Chg
BnnksHSec41.40 +9.98 +31.8
DirChiBear 47.37 +9.47 +25.0
WmsPtrs 37.94 +7.15 +23.2
DirLatBear 51.40 +8.82 +20.7
FstCwfth 5.70 +.95 +20.0
WllmsPipIn 28.02 +4.67 +20.0
DirxDMBear16.24 +2.50 +18.2
DirxEMBear 5.59 +.82 +17.2
FredMpfT 2.24 +.31 +16.1
DBAgDS 39.15 +5.33 +15.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ZaleCp 2.35 -.67 -22.2
DirxChiBull 31.60 -8.62 -21.4
Jaguarg 10.30 -2.50 -19.5
Gramrcy 3.49 -.84 -19.4
MauiLnd 3.21 -.77 -19.3
DirLatBpll 28.85 -6.85 -19.2
BeazerHm 4.10 -.92 -18.3
Wabash 3.03 -.67 -18.1
YingliGm 12.63 -2.58 -17.0
Medifast 18.88 -3.74 -16.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Ctigrp 26732950 3.25 -.17
BkofAm 13606566 14.90-1.36
SPDR 9413585109.21-4.43
SPOR Fncl6090482 14.18 -.76
FordM 4153072 10.52-1.08
GenElec 3779807 16.11 -.33
iShEMkts 3453974 39.61 -2.34
JPMorgCh3242454 39.16-4.52
DirFBear rs3049758 19.88 +2.39
Plizer 2951337 18.96 -.53

Diary
Advanced 659
Declined 2,526
New Highs 482
New Lows 9
Total issues 3,226
Unchanged 41
Volume 22,610,296,281


SAmex
1,820.31 -67.26


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Arrhythm 5.84 +2.13 +57.4
AlIdDefen 7.18 +2.47 +52.4
Lodgian 2.47 +.72 +41.1
SkyPFrtJn 6.96 +1.48 +27.0
HealthFit 8.71 +1.41 +19.4
TellnstEI 6.41 +.96 +17.6
SeabGldg 29.43 +3.43 +13.2
ChMdawt 7.17 +.82 +12.9
DocuSec 3.44 +.39 +12.8
BcpNJ 11.00 +1.24 +12.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AsiaSpcSit 7.46 -1.82 -19.6
AlphaPro 3.50 -.74 -17.5
AlexcoRg 3.07 -.63 -17.0
OrchidsPP 18.00 -3.60 -16.7
Shenglnnn 7.51 -1.50 -16.6
AlldNevG 12.93 -2.53 -16.4
UQMTech 5.00 -.97 -16.2
FrontrD g 4.40 -.84 -16.0
Intellichk 3.05 -.58 -16.0
Neuralstem 2.03 -.37 -15.4

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Taseko 268385 4.87 -.14
GoldStrg 255131 2.88 -.52
NA Pall g 180761 4.09 -.38
VantageDrld 145818 1.58 +.13
NovaGldg 139513 5.65 -.62
NthgtMg 134234 2.98 -.33
IsoRay 132699 1.16 +.33
NwGold g 72018 4.20 -.23
Rentech 70762 1.20 -.12
GrtBasGg 69307 1.77 -.13

Diary
Advanced 186
Declined 380
New Highs 47
New Lows 4
Total issues 598
Unchanged 32
Volume 604,262,890


Y Nasdaq

2,205.29 -82.70


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HanmiFncl 2.18 +.98 +81.7
GenVec 2.99 +1.25 +71.8
Somaxon 2.40 +.96 +66.7
RoyIBcPA 2.59 +.97 +60.1
AehrTest 2.00 +.66 +49.3
Toreador 13.05 +3.97 +43.7
ParkBcp h 6.43 +1.91 +42.1
FrontFn rs 4.83 +1.35 +38.8
ApplRecyc 3.50 +.83 +31.1
Stratasys 24.37 +5.74 +30.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Curis 2.37 -.85 -26.4
A-Power 12.31 -4.23 -25.6
ChinYida n 10.65 -3.35 -23.9
ChAdvCns n 5.38 -1.53 -22 1
Tri-Techn 15.44 -4.39 -22.1
PFSweb 2.96 -.82 -21.7
InfoLogxrs 2.84 -.76 -21.1
RepubAir 5.42 -1.43 -20.9
STEC 15.08 -3.98 -20.9
ChinWind n 5.35 -1.40 -20.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs OQQ588636044.16-1.69
Intel 3302013 19.91 -.89
Microsoft 2700303 28.96-1.90
Cisco 2037355 22.97-1.43
HuntBnk 1600185 4.69 +.41
FifthThird 1472290 12.10 +.74
eBay 1446235 23.58+1.11
MicronT 1375056 9.13-1.00
Oracle 1375034 24.15 -1.09
ETrade 1326611 1.64 -.20

Diary
Advanced 823
Declined 2,040
New Highs 253
New Lows 30
Total issues 2,927
Unchanged 64
Volume 10,149,860,304


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Name Ex Div
AT&TIlnc NY 1.68
AMD NY
Alcoa NY .12
AutoZone NY
BkofAm NY 04
BobEvn Nasd .72
CNBFnPA Nasd .66
CSX NY .88
Chevron NY 2.72
Cisco Nasd
Citigrp NY
CocaCI NY 1.64
Delhaize NY 2.01
DirFBear rs NY
eBay Nasd ...
EMCCp NY
ExxonMbl NY 1 68
FPLGrp NY 1.89
FamilyDIr NY .62
FifthThird Nasd .04
FordM NY
GenElec NY .40
HomeDp NY .90
HuntBnk Nasd .04
iShChina25NY 55
iShEMkts NY .58
iShR2K NY .72
Intel Nasd .63


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg
25.39 -.40 -1.6 -94
788 -.96 -10.9 -18.6
13.40 -223 -14.3 -16.9
15587 -.79 +0.5 -14
14.90 -1.36 -8.4 -1.1
29.11 -.16 -0.5 +.5
15.07 -.11 -0.7 -5.8
44.12 -5.92 -11.8 -9.0
74.59 -4.64 -59 -3.1
22.97 -1.43 -59 -4.1
3.25 -.17 -5.0 -1.8
54.24 -2.05 -3.6 -4.8
75.98 -94 -12 -1.0
1988 +2.39 +13.7 +2.3
23.58 +1.11 +4.9 +.2
16.76 -1.18 -6.6 -41
66.10 -3.01 -4.4 -3.1
48.14 -2.41 -4.8 -8.9
30.36 -.25 -0.8 +9.1
12.10 +.74 +6.5 +24.1
10.52 -1.08-9.3 +5.2
16.11 -.33 -2.0 +6.5
I7.72 -.85 -3.0 -4.2
4.69 +.41 +9.6 +28.5
3907 -238 -5,7 -7.5
39.61 -2.34 -5.6 -4.6
61.73 -195 -3.1 -1.1
19.91' -.89 -4.3 -2.4


Name Ex Div Last
JPMorgCh NY .20 39.16
Lowes NY .36 22.31
McDnlds NY 2.20 6339
MicronT Nasd 9.13
Microsoft Nasd .52 28.96
MorgStan NY .20 27.80
Motorola NY ... 7.21
NY Times NY 12.45
NobltyH Nasd .. 10.49
OcciPet NY 1.32 76 10
Oracle Nasd .20 24.15
Penney NY 80 25.27
PepsiCo NY J.80 60.39
Pfizer NY .72 18.96
Potash NY .40 109.05
PwShs OQQQNasd .21 44.16
PrUShS&PNY ... 3629
RegionsFn NY .04 6.60
Ryder NY 1.00 37.43
SearsHldgs Nasd .98.30
SiriusXM h Nasd ... .69
SouthnCo NY 1.75 32.54
SprintNex NY . 3.37
SPDR NY 2.29 109.21
SPDR FnclNY .25 14.18
TimeWrnrs NY .75 27.20
WalMart NY 1.09 52.94
WellsFargo NY .20 27.26


Wkly Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg
-4.52 -10.3 -5.9
-82 -3.5 -46
+1.11 +1.8 +1.5
-1.00 -9.9 -13.5
-1 90 -6.2 -50
-258 -8.5 -6.1
-.37 -4.9 -7.1
-.88 -6.6 +.7
-.01 -0.1 +.4
-2.82 -36 -6.5
-1.09 -43 -1.5
-.61 -2.4 -5.0
-1 90 -3.1 -.7
-53 -2.7 +4.2
-6.24 -5.4 +.5
-1.69 -3.7 -3.5
+2.65 +7.9 +3.5
+.08 +1.2 +24.8
-2.45 -6.1 -9.1
-407 -4.0 +17.8
+.02 +3.4 +15.5
-.80 -2.4 -2.3
-.45 -11.8 -7.9
-4.43 -3.9 -2.0
-.76 -5.1 -1.5
-.96 -3.4 -6.7
-.74 -1.4 -1.0
-.82 -2.9 +1.0


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified pnce. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership, wd = When distributed. wi =
When issued, wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1 Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.05 0.06
6-month 0.14 0.14
5-year 2.33 2.41
10-year 3.59 3.67
30-vyear 4.51 4.57


Currencies


I l


Last Pvs Day I I


1 1007 1 i059n


Britain 1.6121 1.6209
Canada 1.0587 1.0502
Euro .7073 .7091
Japan 89.85 90.38
Mexico 12.9320 12.7920
Switzerlnd 1.0418 1.0415
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 10,172.98
1-week change: -436.67 (-4.1%)
11,000


CLOSED 115.78


MON TUES


-122.28 -213.27 -216.90


WED THUR FRI


10,500


10,000


9,500


9,000 ,
i


A S O N D J


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pt Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetls
American Funds GrthAmA m
American Funds CaplncBuA m
Vanguard TotStldx
Fidelity Contra
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m
American Funds IncAmerA m
American Funds InvCoAmA m
Vanguard 5001nv
Vanguard Instldx
American Funds EurPacGrA m
Dodge & Cox Stock
American Funds WAMutinvA m
Dodge & Cox IntlStk
American Funds NewPerspA m
Fidelity Divrintl d
American Funds FnlnvA m
PIMCOTotRetAdm b
mrnkTemn--Franklin Inrome A m


American Funds BalA m
Vanguard 500Adml
Vanguard Welltn
Fidelity GrowCo
Vanguard TotStlAdm
American Funds BondA m
Vanguard Totlntl
Vanguard InstPlus


115,919
66,116
58,324
58,004
57,153
56,527
49,431
49,143
48,312
44,401
40,624
39,986
38,906
36,757
33,009
32,048
30,966
30,268
29,740
29,690
28,379
28,289
28,159
27,762
27,358
26,043
24,767


+14.6/C
+39.9/C
+27.0/C
+37.8/B
+34.7/D
+42.6/C
+31.4/B
+33.2/D
+35.1/C
+35.2/C
+48.9/B
+43.2/A
+28.3/D
+63.6/A
+46.0/B
+45.0/D
+41.9/A
+14.4/C
+40.0/A
+28.1/C
+35.2/C
+28.4/C
+44.0/B
+37.9/B
+16.9/B
+53.4/A
+35.3/C


NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL * 3,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 100,000
NL 10,000
NL 2,500
NL 100,000
3.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 200,000,000


CA-Conservative Alocation Cl -Inteediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB -Foregn Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foir
Large Value, IH -World Allocaan, LB -Lage end, L -Lare Grwth, LV large Value, MA Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV
Mkd-Cap Value, SH -Specalty-heah, WS -World Stock, Toal Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reivested. Rank: How fund performed vs
others with same objective: Aisin top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Mm nit Inv Minimum $ needed toinvest in fund. Source: Momrgstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
,Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


:..-2.05 -5.8 17.99
16 -1.02 -2.2 13.02
16 -2.01 +6.2 49.10
... -3.47 -5.4 20.19
... -.14 +2.8 7.95
13 -.40 -9.4 25.39
... -.88 -2.5 11.69
15 -.98 +1.0 54.51
64 -2.60 -14.0 29.98
17 -.63 +1.6 42.18
41 -.96 -18.6. 7.88
11 -.06 -1.3 31.30
... -.09 +2.9 5.37
... -.32 +2.4 3.40
..-2.23 -16.9 13.40
... -.05 +12.5 4.06
... -.93 -.2 29.98
80 -4.01 +1.8 44.14
11 -.71 +.4 19.71
-.02 -12.0 .73
... -3.29 -7.9 43.28
12 -.59 +1.8 35.42
25 -3.80 -4.8 38.59
.. -1.56 -11.6 26.50
... -2.76 +1.1 63.13
35 -1.20 -12.1 27.76
... -2.04 -3.5 38.77
13 -.11 -1.6 17.07
... -4.70 -9.1 41.59
35 -1.55 +11.5 24.80
17 -.07 -2.7 30.47
13 -.53 -4.3 28.13
23 -.42 +1.1 31.84
20 +,39 +11.0 28.15
... -6.04 -4.4 73.21
39 -1.19 +9.0 20.27
18 -3.01 +9.4 44.27
...-1.39 -12.6 17.38
...-1.58 -8.9 14.98
...-1.09 -14.2 11.96
... -1.36 -1.1 14.90
...-1.32 -.2 14.89
+.24 +4.6 29.27
... +2.38 -6.4 31.89
...-3.20 -7.3 36.50
16 -2.83 +.1 58.74
... -.92 -15.3 4.10
32 +5.16 +6.7 70.10
14 -1.78 -5.9 37.15
...-1.05 -2.9 12.74
... -.40 -40.3 .40
... -3.05 +6.7 57.77
... -.43 ... 9.00
14 +1.73 +13.3 16.91
32 +9.98 +26.8 41.40
13 -.47 -2.6 24.60
20 ... +.5 99.11
... -.91 -8.1 12.47
22 +.04 -5.3 13.30
13 -.12 +4.1 36.72
15 -5.92 -9.0 44.12
13 -.58 +3.2 33.24
... -3.60 -2.1 37.53
13 -.37 -.8 31.97
15 -.93 +5.1 33.30
25 -5.87 -4.8 54.25
... -1.20 -10.7 10.55
14 -.41 -2.1 14.20
... -1.29 +2.9 26.62
13 -4.64 -3.1 74.59
10 -.07 +2.8 3.99
-.17 -1.8 3.25
55 -7.38 -8.1 42.37
17 -2.75 -6.8 34.04
... -.30 -1.2 20.95
20 -2.05 -4.8 54.24
20 +1.15 -1.8 80.71
... +2.76 +20.5 35.62
13 -.12 +.4 23.14


Name Div
ConocPhil 2.00
Conseco ...
ConEd 2.38
ConstellEn .96
CtlAir B ...
Coming .20
Covidien .72
DJIA Diam 2.59
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.12
Deere 1.12
DelaAir
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .08
DirxEMBear...
DirFBear rs ...
DirFBull rs .29
DirxSCBear...
DirxSCBull 4.75
DirxLCBear ...
DirxLCBull 6.85
Discover .08
Disney .35
DomRescs 1.83
DowChm .60
DukeEngy .96
Dynegy
EMC Cp
EIPasoCp .04
Elanr .
EldorGldg ...
EmersonEl 1.34
EnCana g s .80
ENSCO .10
EqtyRsd 1.35
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.68
FPLGrp 1.89
FairchldS ...
FannieMae ...
FstHorizon .80
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM .
ForestLab ...
FredMac
FMCG .60
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .34
Genworth ..
Gerdau .16
GoldFLtd .13
Goldcrpg .18
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
GrtAtiPac ...
HCP Inc 1.84
Hallibrtn .36
HarleyD .40
HarmonyG .06
HartfdFn .20
HItMgmt ...
HeclaM
Hess .40
HewleftP .32
HomeDp .90
HonwIllntl 1.21
HostHotls .10
Humana
IAMGId g .06
ING
iSAstia .66
iShBraz 2.72
iSCan .33
iSh HK .38
iShJapn .14
iSh Kor , .32
iShSing .33
iSTaiwn .21


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


... -2.42
... -.53
13 -2.21
... -1.91
... -.90
19 -1.10
... +2.55
... -4.38
-.94
13.-1.87
17 -3.31
... +.55
... -.77
... -.53
... +.82
... +2.39
...-10.84
... +.84
... -4.40
... +1.85
.. -6.23
6.-1.30
16 -.62
12 -1.05
... -2.23
14 -.35
... -.01
35 -1.18
... +.49
+.16
32 -1.26
19 -2.24
8 -2.26
6 -3.60
33 -1.44
11 -1.99
15 -3.01
12 -2.41
... +.82
... -.11
... -.31
14 -2.56
... -1.08
10 -1.23
... -.21
13-10.07
8 -.47
9 -.68
13 -.70
... -.98
... -2.20
51 -.91
27 -2.72
7-11.09
... -1.78
-.66
62 -1.00
20 -2.88
23 -1.49
-.56
... -2.17
15 -.89
... -.95
56 -3.74
15 -3.18
21 -.85
14 -2.75
... -.90
9 +2.49
.81 -1.95
.. -1.25
... -1.60
... -5.57
... -1.64
... -.86
-.30
-1.79
-.54
-.87


50.60
4.85
43.51
32.54
19.63
18.56
50.75
101.63
11.20
42.06
53.02
13.29
14.63
8.70
5.59
19.88
70.29
9.99
41.07
17.90
49.39
13.46
29.98
37.80
27.76
16.55
1.83
16.76
10.86
8.04
13.24
42.08
32.23
40.98
31.93
46.61
66.10
48.14
9.59
.99
13.32
44.13
10.52
29.43
1.17
74.23
20.03
15.42
18.86
12.41
14.21
12.35
36.93
154.12
13.24
8.13
29.35
31.15
23.59
9.83
24.61
6.77
5.21
58.69
49.29
27.72
39.88
11.08
51.00
14.58
9.39
22.04
67.97
25.08
14.85
10.17
47.61
11.06
12.35


Name Div.
iShSilver ...
iShChina2.5 .55
iSSP500 2.16
iShEMkts .58
iS Eafe 1.44
iShR2K .72
iShREst 1.94
ITW 1.24
IngdrRd .28
IBM 2.20
IntlGame .24
IntPap .10
Interpublic ...
ItauUnibH .46
JPMorgCh .20
Jabil .28
JohnJn 1.96
JohnsnCtl .52
JnprNtwk
Keycorp .04
Kimco .64
KingPhrm
Kinross g .10
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LeggMason .12
LennarA .16
LexRItyTr .40
LillyEli 1.96
Limited .60


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... -1.27 +1.5 16.78
1.4 ...-2.38 -7.5 39.07
2.0 ... -4,39 -2.0 109.61
1.5 ... -2.34 -4.6 39.61
2.7 ... -3.18 -2.6 53.87
1.2 ... -1.95 -1.1 61.73
4.4 ...-1.91 -4.6 43.80
2.7 32 -2.53 -5.5 45.35
.8 ... -1.82 -1.4 35.24
1.8 13 -6.28 -4.1 125.50
1.2 39 +.35 +10.0 20.64
.4 33 -1.65 -8.8 24.43
... 27 -.31 -7.2 6.85
2.3 ... -1.49 -14.0 19.63
.5 17 -4.52 -5.9 39.16
1.8 ... -1.35 -9.7 15.69
3.1 14 -1.36 -1.9 63.20
1.8 ... +.17 +8.2 29.48
... 58 -1.63 -6.4 24.95
.6 ... +.37 +30.6 7.25
4.9 ... -.58 -3.6 13.04
-.35 +.5 12.33
.6 ... -1.54 -3.4 17.77
... 17 -1.06 -6.5 50.45
4.2 17 -1.71 +2.5 27.87
... ... -.13 -4.7 5.73
... ... -2.12 +9.0 16.28
.4 .. -3.47 -10.5 26.99
1.1 .. -1.14 +15.7 14.78
6.6 ... -.30 -.5 6.05
5.5 ... -.30 -.5 35.52
3.3 59 -1.01 -4.5 18.38


Name


Div YId PE


LincNat .04 .2
LloydBkg 1.43
MBIA
MEMC
MFAFncI 1.08 14.9
MGIC
MGMMir ...
Macys .20 1.3
Manitowoc .08 .7
Manpwl .74 1.4
MarathonO .96 3.1
MktVGold .11 ...
MkltVRus .08 .3
MarshM .80 3.7
Marshals .04 .6
MasseyEn .24 .6
McMoRn ...
Mechel
MedcoHIth ...
Medtrnic .82 1.9
Merck 1.52 3.9
MetLife .74 2.0
MetroPCS ...
Monsanto 1.06 1.4
MorgStan .20 .7
Mosaic .20 .3
Motorola
NCR Corp ...
NRG Egy
NYSE Eur 1.20 5.1
Nabors
NatGrid 2.89 5.6


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Cha Last


... -2.42. -1.6
... -.35 +4.0
.. -.48 +23.6
.. -1.06 -3.2
7 +.07 -1.1
.. -.14 +6.4
... -.47 +27.4
11 -.98 -7.1
... -2.16 +15.7
81 -4.52 -3.7
20 -1.06 -2.0
... -3.63 -5.2
.. -2.31 +1.0
42 +.03 -.8
. -.01 +25.9
23 -6.50 -2.0
... +1.42 +91.5
... -2.31 +19.5
24 -4.16 -3.7
21 -2.31 -1.5
10 -.60 +6.4
16 -1.73 +2.2
13 -.44 -22.9
23 -3.27 -4.7
... -2.58 -6.1
... -2.93 -1.8
... -.37 -7.1
25 +.03 +8.4
6 +.33 +4.7
10 -2.32 -6.6
... -1.67 +9.1
... -1.22 -5.4


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


NOilVarco .40
NatSemi .32
NY CmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .20
NewmtM .40
NiSource .92
NokiaCp .52
NorflkSo 1.36
Novartis 1.72
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.32
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 1.78
PG&ECp 1.68
PNC .40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .28.
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.80
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.17
Petrobras 1.16
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.32
PlainsEx
Potash .40
PS USDBull...
PrnFncl .50
PrUShS&P ..
ProUltDow .55
PrUIShDow ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ...
ProUltSP .35
ProUShL20 ...
PrUShCh25...
ProUShtRE ...
ProUShtFn ...
ProUShtBM...
ProUltRE .13
ProUltO&G .23
ProUltFin .04
ProUBasM .18
ProUSR2K ...
ProUftR2K .06
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp .16
ProLogis .60
Prudent .70
PulteH
QuantaSvc ...
QwestCm .32
RRI Engy ..
Raytheon 1.24
RegionsFn .04
RiteAid
Rowan
RylCarb
SLM Cp
SpdrGold
SpdrHome .15
SpdrKbwBk .36
SpdrKbw RB .46
SpdrRetl .48
SpdrMetM .46
Safeway .40
StJude
Saks
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .44
Schlmbrg .84
SemiHTr .50
SiderNac 1.12
SilvWhtng ...
SimonProp .48
Smithlntl .48
SouthnCo 1.75
SthnCopper .44
SwstAirl .02


11 -3.71 -3.5
98 -.67 -10.8
15 +.31 +2.6
8 -.44 -3.6
27 -3.18 -6.1
14 -.71 -5.2
... -.53 -1.0
16 -3.13 -5.3
16 +.69 -1.6
... -3.24 -5.3
25 -2.82 -6.5
... -.66 -7.1
... -8.60 +2.3
11 -1.40 -2.3
12 -3.06 +1.6
8 -3.22 +9.8
20 -3.18 -.2
22 -.61 -5.0
18 -1.90 -.7
... -1.51 +1.1
.... -2.69 -10.6
... -3.33 -11.8
13 -.53 +4.2
15 -2.81 -2.9
... +1.24 +20.7
22 -6.24 +.5
" +.3 .' .
14 -1.92"-2.9
... +2.65 +3.5
... -3.74 -4.8
... +2.36 +4.2
... -4.39 -7.2
... +1.38 +6.6
... -3.06 -4.1
:.. -1.24 -5.1
... +.98 +14.4
... +.60 +8.7
... +1.99 +1.8
... +1.06 +4.7
-.59 -9.6
-3.66 -3.5
-.52 -2.8
-4.71 -7.0
... +1.52 +1.7
... -1.88 -2.6
... -1.28 -14.8
13 -.54 -6.1
-1.15 -8.8
... -3.41 +.6
... -.78 +2.2
21 -.69 -11.9
10 -.17 +2.4
7 -.52 -12.4
11 -.97 +2.9
... +.08 +24.8
... -.08 -3.3
6 -2.03 -2.4
34 -1.71 +.6
74 -.35 -7.7
-3.69 -.1
-.68 -1.1
-.20 +8.5
... +.67 +9.4
... -1.11 -2.5
.. -5.41 -3.2
12 +1.43 +6.8
34 -.36 +3.4
.. -.40 +.8
... -.46 -1.1
19 -.40 -3.9
21 -5.59 +.2
... -1.26 -8.1
... -3.68 -8.4
... -2.35 -1.5
52 -4.30 -11.5
20 -.17 +10.2
.16 -.80 -2.3
56 -3.57 -9.9
... +.40 +2.2


Name


SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.00
SprintNex ...
SPDR 2.29
SP Matis .58
SP HIthC .57
SP CnSt .73
SP Consum .45
SP Engy 1.03
SPDR Fncl .25
SP Inds .65
SP Tech .31
SP Util 1.27
StateStr .04
Suncor gs .40
Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Symetra n ...
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TaiwSemi .46
Target .68
TeckResg ...
TelmxIntl .25
TenetHlth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro .20
Texinst .48
Textron .08
ThermoFis ...
3M Co 2.04
Tiffany .80
TimeWrnrs .75
TitanMet ...
TotalSys .28
Transocn ...
Travelers 1.32
TrinaSol s ..
Tycolntl .80
Tyson .16
UBSAG ...
US Airwy ...
UnionPac 1.08
UtdMicro ...
UPSB 1.80
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd ...
US OilFd ..
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .03
UnumGrp .33
Vale SA .48
Vale SApf .48
ValeroE .60
VangREIT 1.96
VangEmg .55
VerizonCm 1.90
ViacomB ...
Visa .50
Waigm .55
Weathfilnt ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WDigital ..
WstnUnion .24
WmsCos .44
XL Cap .40
XTO Engy .50
Xerox .17
Yamana g .04
YingliGm
YumBmds .84


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


34 -3.21 -5.7
17 -.13 +7.2
... -.45 -7.9
... -4.43 -2.0
... -2.17 -4.1
... -.56 +1.9
... -.48 ' -.7
... -.96 -2.5
... -2.96 -1.2
-.76 -1.5
-1.23 +.2
... -1.00 -5.5
-1.09 -3.9
12 +.69 , -.4
... -2.51 -5.7
... -2.55 -21.7
.. +1.16 +21.0
35 +1.10 +21.3

... +.17 +37.6
16 -.66 -1.7
... -.51 -11.8
18 +.21 +4.2
... -3.27 +4.3
... -.52 +1.1
20 -.88 -3.7
... -.57 -9.0
13 -.80 -4.3
30 -1.39 -11.3
... -.56 +13.3
23 -.71 -1.4
20 -1.89 -1.4
33 -4.58 -5.1
... -.96 -6.7
35 -1.32 -.6
13 -1.82 -14.9
8 -6.13 +3.5
9 -.48 -3.1
27 -3.82 -22.4
-.49 +3.8
-.12 +12.2
... -1.65 -9.7
... -.26 +8.3
17 -1.72 -.1
... -.30 -.5
35 -3.18 +2.4
30 +.05 +9.6
... +.11 +2.7
... -2.06 -7.5
...-7.04 -.2
10 -.59 +8.8
10 -1.11 +3.4
... -2.69 -4.8
...-2.24 -3.7
... -.59 +8.5
... -1.99 -4.8
... -2.42 -4.2
15 -.24 -8.4
17 +.12 -.5
26 -3.41 -5.4
17 -.61 -2.0
19 -.88 -.2
14 -1.55 +11.7
32 -.82 +1.0
... +.15 +2.3
10 -3.24 -7.7
15 -.73 -.3
26 +.75 +4.9
... -.61 -10.1
14 -1.74 -2.0
16 +.13 +6.0
19 -.78 -5.4
... -2.58 -20.1
16 -1.38' -1.9


45.44
21.99
3.37
109.21
31.63
31.66
26.29
29.02
56.30
14.18
27.84
21.66
29.82
43.36
33.31
13.02
24.55
15.42
12.75
2.82
27.47
10.09
50.38
36.48
17.94
5.19
9.76
12.97
23.11
21.32
47.04
81.48
40.79
27.20
12.44
14.69
85.72
48.31.
20.93
37.05
13.77,
14.01
5.24
63.85
3.86
58.75
24.67
10.35
36.34
55.00-
33.16.
20.19
27.64
23.90
18.18
42.60
3928
30.34
29.57
82.73
35.99
17.88
65.10
27.26
4.80
40.74
18.80
22.12
16.48
45.61
8.97
10.77
12.63
34.29


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Cha Last


A-Power ...
ASML HId .26
AVI Bio
Aastrom
ActivsBliz
AdobeSy
AkamaiT ...
AleraCp If .20
Amazon ...
AmCapLId .19
Amben
Amylin
Apple Inc
ApldMatl .24
AsscdBanc .04
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.36
BareEscent ...
Biogenldc ...
BrigExp
Broadcom ...
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .16
Cadence ...
CdnSolar ...
Celgene ...
CellTherrsh..
CentAl
CienaCorp ...
Cisco
CitizRep h ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Come spcl .38
Compuwre ...
Conexant ...
ConvOran h...


27 -4.23
... -1.00
... +.02
... -.01
41 -.53
46 -1.49
33 -.79
27 -.18
71 -5.71
... +.04
12 +.35
... +1.23
31 -8.18
... -1.10
... +.43
... -.07
... -.98
16 -1.10
20 +.05
18 -1.12
... -.23
... -1.08
... -.35
17 -.49
... -.25
... -4.27
74 +1.05
... -.05
... -2.49
... +.61
23 -1.43
... +.06
27 -2.75
15 -.78
14 -.65
12 +.23
+.73
... -.07


-32.7 12.31
-6.9 31.73
+10.3 1.61
-23.7 .24
-6.7 10.37
-6.5 34.38
+1.9 25.82
-6.2 21.22
-9.7 121.43
+60.2 3.91
+.1 56.60
+21.5 17.24
-6.2 197.75
-9.4 12.63
+15.9 12.76
+8.0 4.98
-1.2 25.10
-3.9 41.17
+48.2 18.12
-.8 53.06
-2.2 13.25
-9.7 28.43
-2.9 7.41
+1.5 22.80
-.3 5.97
-24.8 21.66
+5.2 58.57
-3.5 1.10
-19.0 13.12
+12.9 12.24
-4.1 22.97
+29.0 .89
-.4 45.17
-5.4 15.85
-4.4 15.21
+10.8 8.01
+54.7 3.59
+52.2 1.02


Name Div
Costco .72
Cree Inc
Crocs
Cyclacel
CypSemi ...
Dell Inc
DItaPtr
DirecTVA ...
DryShips ...
ETrade
eBay
ElectArts ...
EngyXXI .02
EricsnTel .23
EvrgrSIr
Expedia
FifthThird .04
FstSolar ...
Flextm .rn
GenVec
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
Google
HanmiFncl ...
Hologic
HudsCity .60
Illumina
Imunmd
Intel .63
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ..
JetBlue
JoyGIbl .70
KLATnc .60
KnghtCap ...
LeapWiriss ...
Level3
LexiPhrm ...


Wkly. YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg


Wkly
Last Name


23 -1.72 -3.5 57.07
85 +6.13 +6.7 60.14
... +.01 +25.4 7.21
-.32+121.2 2.30
... -.34 +1.3 10.70
18 -.77 -5.0 13.64
... -.07 +16.3 1.21
24 -1.94 -5.9 31.38
... -.45 +.2 5.83
... -.20 -6.8 1.64
12 +1.11 +.2 23.58
... -.26 -5.5 16.77
... -.05 +48.1 3.42
... -.28 +7.0 9.83
... -.14 -4.6 1.44
-.96 -15.4 21.77
17 +.74 +24.1 12.10
15-11.68 -17.0 112.39
... -.26 -6.7 6.82
... +1.25 +149.2 2.99
31 +.93 +11.0 54.38
18 +.56 +6.5 46.08
27-29.99 -11.3 550.01
+.98 +81.7 2.18
+.42 +8.9 15.79
12 -.72 -4.4 13.12
55 -2.52 +19.0 36.50
11 +.36 +35.2 4.34
26 -.89 -2.4 19.91
... -1.03 -19.8 4.57
... -.13 -2.1 8.08
... -.05 +2.4 5.58
11 -8.82 -3.8 49.63
...-2.48 -14.7 30.86
13 +.54 +2.3 15.76
... -1.59 -22.7 13.57
... +.07 -2.0 1.50
. ...+22.4 2.08


LibtyMIntA
LifeTech
LinearTch
MDRNA h
MarvellT
Mattel
Maximlntg
MelcoCrwn
Microchp 1
MicronT
Microsoft
NetApp
NeutTand
NewsCpA
NewsCpB
NexMed
NorTrst 1
Novell
Nvidia
OceanFrt
OnSmcnd
Oracle
OriginAg
PMC Sra
PacCapB
PacEthan
Palm Inc
PattUTI
Paychex
PeopUtdF
Poniard h
Popular
PwShs QQQ
Qlogic
Qualcom
QuantF hlf
RF MicD
Rambus


Div YId PE


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last


-.43 -.5
... -2.56 -7.2
25 -1.35 -10.4
... +25.9
-.77 -9.3
19 -.33 -.2
-.70 -11.7
-.23 +4.8
28 -1.18 -9.8
... -1.00, -13.5
19 -1.90 -5.0
63 -2.37 -10.4
14 -2.93 -28.0
... -.78 -9.3
... -.79 -7.4
... +.03 +103.5
14 +.52 -.6
... -.09 +11.8
... -.65 -11.9
-.07 -4.3
-.32 -13.0
21 -1.09 -1.5
.. -1.69 -8.1
17 -.20 -7.2
... +.29 +49.0
... -.11 +184.5
...-1.63 +18.9
43 -1.39 +8.1
22 -1.03 -3.3
52 -.47 -3.3
... +.45 +42.6
... -.04 -6.2
., -1.69 -3.5
29 -.31 +1.7
50 -1.75 +1.1
-.20 -19.8
-.24 -15.3
...+3,97 +1.4


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
RschMotn ... ... 15 -4.55 -8.7 61.68
STEC ... 16 -3.98 -7.7 15.08
SanDisk ... ... ... +.41 -2.1 28.39
Schwab .24 1.3 28 -.18 ... 18.82
SeagateT ... ... +.63 +1.2 18.40
Sequenom ... ... ... -. 12 +.7 4,17
Slcnware .28. 4.1 .-.60 -3.0 6.80
SiriusXM h ... ... ... +.02 +15.5 .69
SkywksSol ... ... 26 -.97 -2.7 13.81
Solartun ... ... ... -1.40 -7.2 7.08
Somaxon ... ... . +.96 +122.2 2.40
SouthFnh ... ... .. +.01 +11.6 .72
Staples .33 1.4 21 -1,00 -2.0 24.11
Starbucks ... ... 44 -.36 -.7 22.91
StlDynam .30 1.8 ...-1.61 -7.4 16.40
SunMicro ... ... . +.04 +1.0 9.46
SunesisPh ... ... ... -.04 +14.0 1.22
SunPowerA... 31 -2.53 -10.9 21.09,
Symantec ... ... . -.56 +2.2 18.29
TDAmeritr ... ... 18 -.30 -7.0 18.02
Tellabs 37 +.01 +4.9 5.96
TevaPhrm .60 1.1 61 -1.59 +.9 56.68
3Com 42 +.03 +.7 7.55
TiVo Inc ... ... .. +.19 -3.9 9.78
TriQunt ... .. . -.37 -2.2 5.87
UAL ... . ... -04 +2.3 13.21
UrbanOut ... ... 29 -1.40 -11.3 31.05
Verisign ... ... 24 -.64 -3.7 23.34
VirgnMda h .16 1.1 ... -2.02 -10.2 15.11
Vivus ... ... ... -.43 -3.2 8.91
Vodafone 1.22 5.7 ... -.54 -6.7 21.55
Windstrm 1.00 9.5 12 -.10 -4.0 10.55
Xllinx .64 2.7 21 +.32 -4.9 23.84
YRC Wwde ... ... ... +01 +10.7 .93
Yahoo ... ... ... -.94 -5.4 15.88
ZionBcp .04 .2 ...+1.40 +37.6 17.66


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AbdAsPac .42 6.6 .. -.12 +3.1 6.41
Adventrx ... ... ... -.01 -14.3 .30
AlexcoR g ... ... ... -.63 -18.4 3.07
AldDefen ... ... ... +2.47 +50.5 7.18
AlidNevG ... ... ... -2.53 -14.3 12.93
AmLorainn ... ...6 -.28 +4.9 3.20
AmO&G ... ......-.15 -6.4 3.93
Anooraqg ... ... ... -.20 +42.5 1.24
ApolloG g ... ... ... -.04 +1.6 .45
ArcadiaRs ... ... ... -.05 ... .50
AsiaSpS wt ... ...... -.15 +728.6 .58
Aurizon g ... ... ... -.56 -10.4 4.03
BPW Acq ... ... ... -.11 +1.4 10.68
BPW Acq wt... ... ... +.05 +53.3 1.38
BarcUBS36 ... ...... -1.13 -3.8 40.67
BarcGSOil ... ... ... -1.42 -7.5 23.93
BrclndiaTR ... ... ... -4.15 -4.5 61.15
CardiumTh ... ... ... -.03 +4.4 .71
CelSci ... ... ... -.16 -13.3 .78
CFCdag .01 .1 ... -.83 -1.5 13.57
CheniereEn ... ... .. +.17 +37.6 3.33
ChMarFdn ... ... 11 -1.11 -14.0 6.19
ChinaMda ... ... ... +.55 +20.8 12.80
ChNEPet n ... ... 11 -1.22 -5.5 8.74
Continucre ... ... 17 +.38 +15.1 5.03
Corrienteg ... ... ... -.25 -1.5 7.98
Crystallxg ... ... -.05 .-21.1 .30
DenisnMg ... ... ... -.09 +12.6 1.43
EndvSilv g ... ... ... -.57 -1.4 3.59
ExeterR g ... ... ... -.75 +3.1 7.32
FrkStPrp .76 6.0 34 -.83 -13.9 12.58
.FrontrDg ... ... -.84 +12.0 4.40
GascoEngy ... ...... -.03 -18.9 .43
GenMoly ... ... -.37 +26.9 2.64
GoldStr g ... ... -.52 -7.7 2.88
GranTrrag ... ... ... -.24 -14.8 4.88
GrtBasGg ... ... ... -.13 +3.5 1.77
HSBCCTI ... ... ... -.33 -4.2 8.86


Name Div
HealthFit ...
Hemisphrx ...
IA Global ...
IsoRay
JavelinPh ...
KodiakOg ...
Lodgian
Metalico ..
Nevsung ...
NDragon ...
NwGoldg ...
NA Pall g ..
NthnO&G ...
NthgtM g ...
NovaGldg ...
Oilsandsg ...
On2 Tech ...
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAth ...
PionDrill
PlatGpMet ...
PolyMetg ...
Protalix
RadientPh ...
Rentech
Rubicon g ...
SeabGd g ...
SkyPFrtJn ...
TanzRy g
Taseko
TianyinPh .10
TmsatPtn ...
US Gold
Uluru
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VistaGold


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
... 24 +1.41 +13.3 8.71
... ... -.04 +17.9 .66
... ... ... -13.2 .03.
... ... +.33 +30.4 1.16-
... ... -.04 -7.7 1.20
... ... -.44 +10.4 2.45
... ... +.72 +66.9 2.47
... ... -.81 +7.5 5.29
... ... -.18 -9.1 2.21
... ... -.01 -7.7 .12
... ... -.23 +15.4 4.20
... ... -.38 +16.9 4.09"
... ... -.61 +.6 11.91
... 15 -.33 -3.2 2.98-
... ... -.62 -7.8 5.65-
... ... -.22 -20.0 .92
... ... -.03 +13.8 .69
... ... -.15 +22.1 1.77,,
... ... +.07 -10.2 1.76
... ... -.79 +11.4 8.80
... ... -.16 -.5 2.11
... ... -.42 +6.5 3.26.
... ... -.40 +5.7 7.Q0
... ... +.02 +33.3 .32
... 11 -.12 -2.4 1.20-
... ... -.44 -5.7 4.44
...... +3.43 +21.3 29.43
... 16 +1.48 +68.9 6.96
+.28 +23.2 4.30'
... ... -.14 +15.4 4.87
2.6 12 -.65 -7.4 3.89
... ... -.32 -16.4 2.86
... ... -.18 -4.4 2.37
-.01 ... .22.
... ... -.27 -10.6 3.38
. +.13 -1.9 1.58"
... ... -.16 -2.4 2.39


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


ABB Ltd .44
AES Corp '...
AFLAC 1.12
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.68
AU Optron .09
AbtLab 1.60
AberFitc .70
Accenture .75
AMD
Aetna .04
AirTran
AlcatelLuc...
Alcoa .12
AlliedCap ...
Allstate .80
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.36
AmbacF
AMovilL 1.22
AEP 1.64
AmExp .72
AlntlGp rs ...
Anadarko .36
AnalogDev .80
AnglogldA .13
Annaly 2.54 1
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .36
ArchDan .56
ATMOS 1.34
Avon .84
BB&TCp .60
BHP BillLt 1.64
BJ Svcs .20
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .75
BcoSantand .87
BcSBrasil n ...
BkofAm .04
BkAm pfS ...
BkNYMel .36
BarVixShT ...
BardckG .40
Baxter 1.16
BeazerHm ...
BerkH Bs ...
BestBuy .56
Blackstone 1.20
Blockbstr
Boeing 1.68
BostonSci ...
Brinker .44
BrinksHSec ...
BrMySq 1.28
BudNSF 1.60
CB REIlis ..
CBS B .20
CIGNA .04
CSX .88
CVS Care .35
CapOne .20
CardnlHIts .70
Carnival .40
Caterpillar 1.68
Cemex .40
CenterPnt .78
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.72
Chimera .43
Citigrp
CliffsNRs .35
Coach .30
CocaCE .32
CocaCI 1.64
ColgPal 1.76
Comerica .20
ConAgra .80


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


- - -- - - -- I 1


artsu a . .
llI


71 I


IA i tqIi


JA


vyl














Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


lTake ADvantage of the
Reporter Classitieds!

755-5440


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY.
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000619
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
GRACE E. BROWN A/K/A
GRACE EARLONDA BROWN:
TERRENCE J. BROWN: UN-
KNOWN TENANT (S); IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 6th day of January
2010, and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000619, of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County. Florida,
wherein BANK OF AMERICA,
N.A. is the Plaintiff and GRACE E.
BROWN A/K/A GRACE EARLON-
DA BROWN; TERRENCE J.
BROWN: UNKNOWN TENANT
(S); JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the AT COURTHOUSE at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 10th day of February, 2010, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
EXHIBIT A
LOT 3 OF THE SUBDIVISION OF
SA PART OF BLOCK 309, WEST-
ERN DIVISION, CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN
.PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 103, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH' A PORTION
OF LOT 10 OF SAID SUBDIVI-
SION, AND BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID
LOT 3 AND THENCE RUN
SOUTH 01�17'18" EAST, ALONG
THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 3,
A DISTANCE OF 104.75 FEET TO
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID LOT 10 AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-
TINUE SOUTH 01�17'18" EAST,
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID LOT 10, A DISTANCE OF
22.80 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 89�52'05" WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 70.26 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF
SAID LOT 10; THENCE RUN
NORTH 10l616" WEST ALONG
SAID WEST LINE. A DISTANCE
OF 21.87 FEET TO THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 10;
THENCE RUN NORTH 89006' 59"
EAST, ALONG THE LINE BE-
TWEEN LOT 3 AND LOT 10, A
DISTANCE OF 70.24 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS. AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386) 758-1041 prior to such
. proceeding.
Dated this llth day of January, 2010.
P. DeWitt Cason
. Clerk of The Circuit Court
By /s/: B. Scippio








Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191

Services

COOPERS MOBILE HOME
. set up and repair. Lie/Ins.
S386-752-7108 386-623-7820
' Ask for Jesse


Legal

Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone:(954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438

04537286
January 24 and 31, 2010

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES
OF LAKE CITY COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
WILL RECEIVE BIDS FOR THE
FOLLOWING:
L.C.C.C. BID NO. 10-1-09
ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION
OVERHEAD TO UNDER-
GROUND CONVERSION -
PHASE I
JONES EDMUNDS PROJECT NO.
12040-012-01
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The general scope of work is descri-
bed as converting approximately 1/3
of the 13.2K(V distribution system
from overhead to underground at the
LCCC Main Campus. This portion of
the system is located between SE
Timberwolf DriA'e and SE College
Place along SE Student Way. Con-
duit for future communications will
also be installed as part of this work
along'the same corridor. Phase 1 is
divided mid-way into two sections;
Section One will be awarded as the
base bid, and Section Two will be
bid as an Add-Alternate subject to
award at the discretion of the Col-
lege.
Work to be completed under the base
bid consists of installing conduit for
future communications and convert-
ing approximately 700-ft of overhead
distribution to underground. This
will involve, but not limited to, re-
moving overhead primary and secon-
dary conductors, five concrete poles,
one wood pole, one pole-mount 3-ph
oil-switch, one pole-mounted 3-ph
transformer bank, one single-phase
pole-mounted transformer, and sev-
eral riser assemblies.
ELIGIBLE BIDDERS:
Only those General Contractors de-
fined in Section 489.105(3)(a), Flori-
da Statutes or Electrical Cbntractors
defined in Section 489.505(12), Flor-
ida Statutes and who are licensed and.
registered to conduct business in
Florida may submit a bid on this
project.
PREOUALIFICATION OF CON-
TRACTORS:
ALL ELIGIBLE BIDDERS WISH-
ING TO BID THIS PROJECT
. MUST BE PREQUALIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to prequalify with
Lake City Community College must
request a prequalification package
from the College's Director of Pur-
chasing, Bill Brown at '(386) 754-
4360 or by email at brownb@lakeci-
tycc.edu. COMPLETED prequalifi-
cation packages must be returned to
the College's Purchasing office not
later than 10:00 A.M. E.S.T. MON-
DAY, JANUARY 25, 2010.
TIME AND DATE FOR RECEIV-
ING BIDS:
2:00 P.M.E.S.T. THURSDAY JAN-
UARY 28, 2010
PLACE FOR RECEIVING BIDS:
Bids may be mailed as follows:
Lake City Community College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Lake City Community College
Purchasing Department
198 S.E. Staff Way
Administration Building 001,
Room 138
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Purchasing Department
representative prior to the specified
bid opening date/time. The College
will not be responsible for Postal or
other delivery service delays that
cause a bid to arrive at Room 138,
Building 001 after the designated bid
opening date/time. Bids that are
mailed must be clearly marked on
'the outside of the envelope
BID # 10-1-09,
ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION
OVERHEAD TO UNDER-
GROUND CONVERSION
PHASE I
JONES EDMUNDS PROJECT NO,
12040-012-01
JANUARY 28, 2010
PRE-BID CONFERENCE:

Service Plumber
Wanted
Must have valid DL
and at least 2 yrs.
experience as a
Service Plumber
Apply In Person
Only to:
2744 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City - DFWP


$2,000 Sign On Bonus
If you are self-motivated, you could make
$70,000 this year. Plus, we have the BEST
compensation package in the business.

New Car Sales Earn 30%-$200 min.

Health Insurance - Including Dental

Paid Vacation, 401 K 8 Bonuses

Self Starters, Please Apply in Person

/� � Hwy 90 West
. .t .(3/4 mi. past 1-75)

Chrysler-Dodge-Jeep Lake City


Legal

There will he a MANDATORY pre-
bid meeting beginning at 10:00 AM
MONDAY. JANUARY 25. 2010 in
the Board Room located in the Ad-
ministration Building (001) on the
main campus of Lake City Commiun-
ity College.
BID DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE
FROM:
Antonio Oruga. PE.
Jones Edmunds & Associates, Inc.
1100 Cesery Boulevard
Jacksonville, Florida 32211
Telephone (904) 744-5401
E-Mail:
aoruga@jionescdmunds.com
COST FOR BID DOCUMENTS:
Bid documents are available at a cost
of $125.00 per set which includes
shipping. Bid documents may only
be purchased in their entirely and the
cost is non-relundable.
RIGHT TO WAIVE IRREGULARI-
TIES AND TECHNICALITIES:
Lake City Community College re-
serves the right to waive minor irreg-
ularities and/or technicalities associ-
ated with this solicitation. The Direc-
tor of Purchasing of Lake City Com-
munity College shall be the final au-
thority regarding waivers of irregu-
larities and technicalities.
FOR LAKE CITY COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
Bill Brown, Director of Purchasing
04537036
January 10, 17 and 24, 2010


020 Lost & Found

AFRICAN GRAY w/ red tail lost
01/19 around Gwen Lake down by
the Workcamp. REWARD! Call
386-755-1464 or 386-288-3687

BLACK/TAN DOG,
Mixed breed, found in Eastside
Village area on Thurs., Jan. 21.
Call 386-758-8848
LOST WEDDING ring. Across
the street from Say-A-Lot or
Wendy's pkng lot on Friday 01/15.
REWARD! 386-965-3472

100 Job
100 Opportunities

04537127
GOOD OPPORTUNITY!
NOW HIRING An Experi-
enced Stylist with clientele
Southern Exposure
386-752-4614

04537253'
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications for
the following positions:
Detention Officer
LPN
Applications will be accepted
through 12 NOON,
Monday, February 8, 2010.
All applicants must have a high-
school diploma or its equivalent and
be Florida State Certified. Applica-
tions may be obtained at the
Columbia County Sheriff's Office
Operations Center at 4917 East U.S.
Hwy. 90 or on-line at
www.columbiasheriff.com
The C.C.S.O. is an EEO Employer

05522944
FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY
Guest Services Position
Currently Part time potential for
fulltime employment. Newest
Hotel, great working environment
MUST have good customer
service skills, strong work ethic,
typing skills preferred. Must be a
team player, able to work a
flexible schedule including
weekends, holidays and nights.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply at Comfort
Suites located next to Bob Evans
at US 90 & 1-75
interchange.

OWNER OPERATORS WANTED
Flatbed, stepdeck OTR operation
based out of Fort White, FL. Good $.
Must have good equipment, and be
willing to work it!
Call Mike at 386-623-4801.


100
1 Opportunities



We are growing again!!

-"
I i4h)spi( I.

Join our fairly of'
caring professionals
in our Branford Office

PRN Staff
RN
LPN
CNA (mnust have HHA)
Job summary, othlier open
positions and application loimind al:
www.liospiceo'tlhenaiiureciaslt.or
Fax: 352-527-9360(
hr(@)hospiceolfcitLruscounty.orgig
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverlyv Hills, FL 34464
DFWP/EOIE

05523007


ii t>< I i It ' Il !

Join our family of
caring professionals
in our Branford Office

Community Education
Manager
Responsible for development
and implementation of a
program to increase awareness
and referral activity for Hospice
of the Nature Coast's Services
throughout service area.
Minimum of a Bachelor's
degree with at least 3 to 5 years
experience and a proven track
record within the development
services arena.
Job summary as well and
application can be found at:
hr(hospiceofcitruscounty.ore
Fax: 352-527-9366
hr@hospiceofcitruscounty.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464
DFWP/EOE

A Terrific Opportunity
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company
$100,000+ Earning Potential,
Benefits, Pension. 401K & BCBS
Insurance for those who qualify!
Call 1-800-257-5500

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
White Springs Florida Consulting
firm Must have ability to deal with
clients in a positive manner.
Must have solid computer skills.
Must want a career not just a job.
Must have a strong work back-
ground and excellent references.
Must be a high school graduate.
Email resume to hr@speced.org
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

EXPERIENCED BOOKKEEPER
Friendly fast-paced company located
off CR 137 seeking organized multi-
tasker. Quickbooks exp. a must.
Please fax resume to 386-935-2289.

Gotta Go Transport a flatbed Co.
in High Springs needs Class A
CDL Driver. Min. 2 years exp.
Home weekends, safety bonus and
vacation pay. Call 386-454-0532.

"LIVE OAK TRACTOR CO. in
Live Oak. FL is now hiring a SALES
REP. to sell AG. EQUIPMENT in
the N. FL area. Ag sales experience
and bachelor's degree preferred.
Please e-mail resumes to
iiattlhew(nlbostontractorco.com ori
fax to 229-263-9178,
Attn: Matthew"


100 J*ob,
100 Opportunities

INSI RA NCE AGENCY
Looking for self mnoti\vated goal
oriented sales person in both
life/healthi and property/casualty
ins. A 220 and 215 license a plus
hut inot reqd. Must have ex\c.
comm. skills, he organized and de-
pendable. Must be team oriented
and have computer skills.
Send reply to
Box 04086. C/O The Lake City
Reported P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056

LOOKING FOR a mortgage pro-
cessor. Prior experience a huge
plus At least some mortgage
knowledge required. Competitive
salary and good growth potential.
Email resume to
lakecityresume@ yahloo.coin

Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT rcql'd. Call 1- 888-697-6576.

Wanted: Heavy Truck Mechanic
for busy shop. Only experienced
need apply. Call between 8am &
Noon. Mon. - Fri. 386-752-9754

ioi Sales
1H Employment


SALESMAN NEEDED
Must be aggressive and self moti-
vated. Also must be willing to
travel and work some weekends.
Fax resume to (386) 963-2809 or
email it to: srlh(@srloghomes.com

Are You Earning What You Are
Worth?
Growing company looking for
SUPER STAR sales representative
386-487-1742 or e-mail resume to
induslrialsupplyjobs@gmail.com

1 Medical
120 EEmployment

0453701S)






MERIDIANN
I1. ITI 1 SlIE

I A IlCII'N
PRN On-Call Needs:
PI'sych Exp RN
Var1tin Shifts
varying Shifts

Children's
Outpatient Program
Manager
Lake City
Mental Health &
Substance Abuse

Hospital Liaison
Case Mgr.
Required travel to
State Hospital

Recreational
Therapist
CSU Lake City

CO IV/Discharge
Planner
CSU Lake City

Foster Parents
Needed
Please visit our
website for more
details

www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP


(8-58 --we rlr lg u c


120 Medical
120 inEmployment


RN Needed
Experience Preferred.
Full Time with Benefits.
Email Resume to:
Angeia Akins RN/SDC
At
aakins@gullcoasthealthcare.comn
Or
Fax Resume to:
386-364-5174
EOF/V/D/M/l

05522'7I
CCSS, Inc. is accepting
applications for PT CNA's. and
Homemakers. Must have CPR.
First Aid training, and
dependable transportation.
Criminal Background and
Drug testing required. Drug Free
Workplace. Apply in person
628 S.E. Allison Court. EOE
ADMINISTRATOR
for skilled nursing facility in Lake
City. Requirements include a current
Florida NHA License, and minimum
3 years experience. Must have pro-
ven leadership and problem solving
skills, excellent interpersonal and
communication skills, and SNF
Medicare/Medicaid knowledge.
We want our leaders to focus on
team building, resource allocation,
monetary oversight, and AHCA
compliance. We offer an excellent
salary, 401k, and a full benefit pack-
age. Email your resume and salary
history to Robert Mead,
Regional Vice President
rmead@healthcaremgrs.com

BUSY OB/GYN OFFICE seeking
a mature PT helper for organizing
medical files & help in front
office. exp. preferred.
Fax resume to 386/755-9217
BUSY OB/GYN OFFICE
Seeking med. off. indiv. exp. in
check in/out, appt/surgery sched.
billing (CPT & ICD-9) coding,
referrals, MA, etc. Must have
"Medical Manager" computer
background and be multi-task
oriented. Preference given to those
with OB/GYN background.
Excel. benefits.
Fax resume to 386/755-9217
CNA/Medical Assistant wanted
for local medical office. Send re-
sume to 184 S.W. Macon Street
Madison, FL 32340
FULLTIME LPN
needed, for medical office.
IV cert. & computer skills a plus.
Fax resume to 386-754-1712.
LPN or RN needed Fulltime
3PM-11PM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V
04537216.
Service Representative
One of the Nation's major
suppliers of in-home oxygen &
respiratory therapy seeks a
service representative.
Responsibilities include making
oxygen deliveries (cylinder and
concentrator) and equipment
checks to a patient bases on a
daily route. Also instruct
patients in the safe and proper
use of respiratory equipment.
MAy perform minor equipment
repairs. Will be responsible for
the maintenance of a company
vehicle. Works on-call evenings
and weekends on an as
scheduled basis. Must be 21
years of age, able to lift or move
up to 120 lbs. and have good
interpersonal skills. Must have
or be able to obtain a
Commercial Drivers license
(CDL) and be DOT qualified or
DOT certifiable. Drug-free
Workplace. EOE
Fax: 386-754-2795


Sunday, January 24th 2-4pm



PRESERVE PRICES DRASTICALLY


REDUCED!!
Amenities of the neighborhood include clubhouse, pool,
tennis & basketball courts, and RV & boat parking. Aaron Nickelson
38_ -- -6-86........---- 7-3534


782 SW Rosemary Pl
MLS#64597 - $319,900
Hwy 90 to 252-B, Go South to Preserve, Turn
Right, Stay on Rosemary. Home is on Left.
Two story 4BR/4BA home with 3173sqft,
whirlpool tub, covered patio and more.


192 SW Maple Place
MLS#64598 - $289,900
Hwy 90 to 252-B, Go South to Preserve, Go to
first Left, then take next Right on Maple.
Upgraded 4BR/3BA home with 2691sqft,
vaulted ceilings, tile shower, and more.


I I


I'llormow



walsw












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


240 Schools &
24v0 Education
-

Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant. $429
next class-02/01/1(1
* Phlebotomy national
certification.
$800 next class-02/08/10
* Pham Tech national
certification
$900 next class-03/16/10.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE TO GOOD HOME.
one AKC boxer 7 yrs. old female,
Call
386-623-4720
TOY POODLE
CKC (w/papers), 10 weeks
shots & health cert.,
$275. 386-719-4900.

33O Livestock &
35 Supplies
CATTLE - Cows,
Angus bulls, bred
heffers & yearlings.
386-755-3500 or 386-365-1352

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621
FINE CHINA Japan Circa 1950.
Never used, complete set for 8.
Andora Pattern #6509 $300.00
Call 386-623-6198

402 Appliances
KENMORE GAS STOVE
Beige/Black
$125
Call 386-755-3350
UPRIGHT FREEZER.
Frost Free $150. 00
or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.
WHIRLPOOL
WASHER/DRYER
4 yrs old works well.
$200 386-590-3754
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$150.00 Please call.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.

405 Bicycles
Girls Bicycle, Excellent Condi-
tion!. Orange County Chopper
Pink/Black. $50.
386-755-3350

408 Furniture
BLACK METAL frame futon
with cushion.
$50.00
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.
DOUBLE RECLINER SOFA.
Brown
$400
Call 386-961-8623
NICE ROLLING Microwave
.Table with slide out meat cutting
board $35.00 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

420 Wanted to Buy
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$150 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.
WANTED TO BUY
Good used car, truck tires and
customs rims. Will pay top dollar.
386-752-4215

430 Garage Sales
FLEA MARKET
Inside Lake City Shrine Club-
Brown Rd. Jan 29, 30 31. Rain or
shine/hot or cold. Rent table for
$10/day, $25 for 3 days. Call Lory
at 758-5814

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreportercom


440 Miscellaneous
100 FOOT ROLL RED TOP
WIRE. 4 foot. with 4 inch squares.
never used. $100 or best offer.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
42" HITACHI
Large Screen Projection TV
$450
Call 386-961-8623
5-Men's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) I-Seiko. 1-Titan.
All for $60. (HI) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.
IMPEX POWERHOUSE
Home Gym,
Exercise Machine. $50
Call 386-961-8623
REMINGTON 1100 SHOT
GUN, 12 gauge with two barrels,
$500 OBO
Call 386-965-5580
STONE GRINDER
For making flour
$30
Call 386-961-8623

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
SMobile Home
20 Lots for Sale
1 ACRE lot, 3 min. from Walmart
Only $19,900!
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
14 wide 2/2
Quiet, clean country park.
$475.mo + Deposit.&References
No pets. 386-758-2280.
2/2 CH&A Mobile Home
21400 33rd Road.
$550 rent $500 dep.
352-493-3487
2/2 SWMH CH&A,all elect, gar.,
water & sewer fum. Private prop-
erty. Available 01/30. $600 mo.,
1st, last & dep. 386-752-8978.
2BR MH nicely furnished and
remodeled. Near Target
Distribution Center. $500. mo plus
security. 386-755-9784
2BR/2BA All electric.
Ft. White area. Very clean.
$450.mo plus security.
No Pets. 386-497-1404
2BR/2BA, MH
On 5 acres, References, first & se-
curity, lease, Avail.January 28th
Call 386-755-0300.
3B/2BA DWMH w/ carport &
back porch in nice cond. Good lo-
cation. $700 mo., 1st, last, $500
dep. Small dog. 386-752-6333
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3/2, & 2/2 MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 352-281-2450
KELLY'S RV Park. Furnished
Mobile Home for Rent. $500 +
electric. Includes TV. 1st, last &
deposit. 386-397-2616
M/H 2 BR, new carpet completely
furn. linens, dishes etc. or unfurn.
Carport, patio & utility shed.
Quite, safe clean park.
Special discounts. $550
386-752-0981 or 386-755-4965
Mobile Home at Wilson Springs
in Ft. White. $400. mo or
$100. per week.
386-623-9026 or 497-1315
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511

640 Mobile Homes
Sfor Sale
2010 BRANDNEW 4/2 DW,
CH&A, skirting, steps, set-up &
delv. All this for only $39,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452.
jetdec@windstream.net
4/2 ONLY
'$289.00 per month.
with set/up.
Call John T. 386-752-1452.
BRAND NEW 2010
4br/2ba on your property, for
pymts of only $321.56 a mo.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@ wihdstream.net
FACTORY REPO'S,
built two many 28x40's.
Only 2 left for $28,500.
Call John T. 386-752-1452


Classified Department: 755-5440


Brand New

2 Bedrooms
Security Gate * Pet Friendly
Washer/ Dryer Hookups * Pool


FREE RENT
200 Channels * Bahama Cruise


$649 per MO



Limited Availability
Open Saturdays 11-3
Law Enforcement Discounts
*Teacher Discounts * Veteran Discounts
* Students Discounts






754-1800
Next to Lake City Middle School


640 ( Mobile Homes
640 ffor Sale
GREAT REPO 2 bed. Single-
wide. completely refurbed. Set up
on your land. $11,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm_martin23@yahoo.comn
NO MONEY DOWN
When you own your land.
Payments on doublewides
start @ 239/month.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
ENERGY STAR Homes R-30
ins., Heat Pump. thermal panes.
Free electric for 1 year.
Must mention this ad.
Homes start at $29,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560.
jmmartin23@yahoo.con
NO MONEY down on new
Manufactured homes.
Call for more details on program.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
READY TO move in 2001 3br
doublewide on .87 acres. In Co-
lumbia Co., $1500 down, $350
mo..Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
BANK REPO
Nice 3/2 doublewide,
over 1,300 sq. ft. only $15,000.
Call Jay @ 386-719-5560
REPO'S REPO'S REPO's
We have many to choose from!
Homes starting @ $10,500.
These homes won't last long!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net

f650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
BANK FORECLOSURE! 2001
3/2 DW on I acre of land! banks
loss your gain @ only $49,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
FOR SALE OR RENT, 10 acres
fenced in Columbia Cty. with
1997 DW Mobile home. Close to
schools and town. 386-623-4606
FSBO - 4BD 2BA DWMH on +/-5
high & dry acres at end of paved
cul-de-sac. Convenient to Itchne-
tucknee Springs State Park. Bank
financing available to qualified
buyer. Seller agrees to pay up to
$1,500 of closing cost. Sale Price
$65,000, appraised for $70,000
Call 386-755-7932 & leave mes-
sage. All calls will be answered.
NO OWNER FINANCING.
Only 2 left,'turn key packages. In
nice, up scale community. These
Jackobsons won't last long.
Call John 386-344-5234.
Owner financing available.
Owner Financing. Large. MH
w/3.32 acres. South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590-0642 /867-1833

705 Rooms for Rent
ROOMMATE NEEDED for nice
house, includes room, utilities
and amenities,
Call 386-754-0287

'710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES !
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649 per mo. !!!

$299 MOVES YOU IN

Law Enforcement Discounts
Teacher Discounts
Veteran Discounts
Student Discounts

FREE RENT
* 200 FREE CHANNELS
* BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
Share Pool Home! Full use kitch-
en, laundry, separate bedroom and
bath. $500/mo. + 1/3 electric.
Call Derek 386-344-3?61
' www.bigfloridahome.com


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
***LIMITEl) TIME ONLY***
WINDSONG APIARITMiNT
1 IOMES
1 B) $40
2 BD $53'
3 BD SM17
NO DEPOSITS
2 MONT11S F EFI:
EXPIRES 02/28/20(10
' iSome Restiriction+s Apply
Tel (386) 758 S455
2 br/lba w/garage on the West side
1st. last &security.
Call
386-755-6867
2BR APT.
Downtown Location. Clean.
$600 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2Br Apt. Gorgeous lake view.
Great location.
$485. mo plus deposit.
c 386-344-2972
A Landlord You Can Love!
2br/1.5ba Duplex CH/A, W/D
hook up. Close to VA. $550.mo +
sec. 386-758-9351/352-208-2421
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts.. garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
Immaculate. 2br/lba Duplex w/ga-
rage. all electric. AC. W/D hook
up DW. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
PRIVATE Garage Apt.,
City Neighborhood, IBR/IBA,
walk-in closet, ref. req.
$550 + deposit. Call 386-755-0819
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
NO Lease, NO Deposits. ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
1 BED $350,C2eBED $475. 3 BED
$500-550. Central A/C, small/
quiet community. 352-505-9264 or
800-805-7379. Only 4 left!
3/1 HOME in town close to VA.
W/D, CHA, 1st & $600 Sec. Dep.
$600/mo. Mike Lienemann. West-
field Reality Group 386-867-9053.
4B/3BA, 2-Story, den , dining rm
newly renovated $1100 mo. +
$1100 sec. Ref. req. No pets. 386-
752-9144/755-2235/ 397-3500.
PROVIDENCE, 1BR,
1.5 BA,w/d,c-h/a,l ac. fenced,
private,nice, most pets ok. $650
Ist/lst/dep. 386-752-2555/c-
352-494-1989


730 Unfurnished
73 Home For Rent
Beautiful Newer 3BR/2BA. on
CR 18, 30a mins. to Gville., 30
mins. to L.C.. $950 p/m + last +
sec.. go to websile for photo at
www.property4you.hiz,
Call 386-365-3865.
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$800/mo.
864-517-0522.
Great Location! Lg 3br/2ba w/ga-
rage at Southern Oaks CC. Wash-
er/dryer avail. $1,100 mo. plus de-
posit.386-752-3991 or 397-4550
Rural beauty and privacy near
1-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 51-2-5374
WELLBORN AREA. 2 HOMES
Lg 3br/2ba, also avail. 2br/lba
Jane S. Usher. Lic. Real Estate
Broker. 386-755-3500/365-1352

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086

810 Home for Sale
In Lake City. 3br,3b,LR,DR
Den, Office, Generator,
Well Sprinkler System, 2500 sq. ft.
$189,000 386-792-2952

820 Farms&
SAcreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

950 Cars for Sale
'1991 CORVETTE conv. white
w/blue flames. 80,000 mi. Full
power, V-8, Z06 wheels, custom
exhaust, $9,995 386-497-4763
1996 BUICK ROADMASTER,
Excellent condition, elderly owner,
116k miles, $2,500
Call 386-755-7541.
2000 BUICK Le-Sabre
Very clean. Garage kept.
$4,600.
Call 386-961-8407

Recreational
951 Vehicles
2008 POLARIS Sportsman 400,
Water Cooled, I Hour on Meter,
health forces sale, $4,000 OBO
(386) 719-6537
31' TRAVEL TRAILER with
2 slide outs, 2007 Mountaineer Ed-
ition by Montana, very nice, sacri-
fice at $21,500. 386-752-1874

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


Exceptional home on 10 ac. located Brick Home on the Suwannee Beautiful setting, brick home with
close to town. 2599 sf, 3BR/2.5BA, River--Lge. open areas w/open front porch. Back porch, master
LR, FR, DR, breakfast nook & office. back porch, outside Fireplace. suite with tub & shower. Storage
Beautiful Kit w/stainless appl. & Floating dock, no walk up. Beautiful Building, 1989MH also on property..
custom cabinets. Screened porch, unobstructed views of the river. 2 parcels of Property a 3 acre + an-
IGP, pond, pole barn, workshop, $360,000. MLS#70790. 7.32 acre. MLS 67546 $279,900
guest house & much more. Only
$379,900, MLS#70229.


Exceptional home, 3 BR 2.5 Well maintained, home located Brand new brick home in Mayfair
Baths, 1726 Sq. Ft. Family room close to town. 2095 sq. ft. 3BR/2Ba. subdivision Super Location Close
With fireplace, eat in kitchen. 2 Spacious rooms, large kitchen, LR to all amenities. Split Plan. Covered
car garage. Large deck, beautiful W/fireplace, DR,FR,FI room. Fenced, back porch. $179,900 MLS 71475
landscaping. Spring fed creek , deck, and workshop Only $174,900
shed with electric and much more. MLS73597
Only $199,900 MLS 72591


Scenic setting for this ranch style Great location for this home. 1632 Location, location, location! 3/2,.
home on 4 acres. 2544 sf, 4 BR/ sq. ft., spacious floor plan, family 1826 sf Mobile home, spacious,
3BA, gorgeous pond, Ige. screened room with fireplace. Large kitchen, split bedroom plan. Large kitchen,
porch, 3 car carport w/attached beautiful hardwood floors, newer separate living room, dining room,
office & storage rms, guest house, roof. Only $89,900. MLS 73377 family room. 1 ac. lot, Ige. deck,
pole barn, tool shed & much more. fenced, carport & much more. Only-
Only $205,000. MLS#68970. $109,900, MLS#69819.


. .r ,IL


Price Reduced!! Now selling- ,
Beautiful, scenic property located
on a paved road. Abundant wildlife,
pine trees, great location. 33 ac. @
$184,250 MLS#54059.


wDdULautii t aUIc.r IUc LU Iviayu.
Approx 20 acres in planted pines,
Stocked fish pond and pasture.
Abundant wildlife, scenic location
Priced at $5000 per acre. MLS#
72884


77.5 acres farm. Mix of pasture and
pines. 30 acres of hay, 30 acres of
planted pines. 17.5 acre homesite.
with large pecan trees, fruit trees
1725 Sq. FT. mobile home. 56x96
barn workshop Priced at $5300 per
acre MLS 72772 $410,750


UIEM UEIG SIMPS ON (386) 365-6578:


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445




-U^^^^


COLDWILL BANKER f

BISHOPREALTY
Office is Independtntl) Ovned and Operat�d

8398WSR 247'-lAKE CITY, FL 32025 Lori Giebeig Simpson
(386) 365-5678






LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


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Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
(mayet@lkkecityrepot'ier.com


Lake City Reporter






LIFE


Sunday, January 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK
i - ao .~n , .. -., --


Nichelle Demorest
dndemor'est@ufl.edu


Tips

for the

January

gardener

Any gardener
can tell you that
at this date on
the calendar, we
are teetering on
the edge of a new growing
season. There are probably
some more frosty nights
ahead, so it's not quite time
to take that leap off the
edge. But there are a few
things the gardener can be
doing now to prepare for
an easier landing when it is
time to jump.
Plan your spring veg-
etable garden now. Cuddle
up by a sunny window on a
frosty morning and browse
your garden books and
seed catalogues. Decide
what vegetables you really
want to grow and where
you will place them in the
garden. Get your seeds
ordered if they are special-
ties and not available locally.
Bring a soil sample in
to the UF/IFAS Extension
Office on Tuesday,
Thursday or Friday morn-
ings and the Master
Gardeners will do a free pH
test for you. Then you can
prepare your soil, work in
manure and compost, and
make pH adjustments with
lime or sulfur products.
If you have a cool season
garden, there are a few last
minute additions you can
make now. Some cool sea-
son vegetables are beets,
broccoli, cabbage, carrots,
turnips, English peas, rad-
ishes and mustard. You can
also plant tomato and pep-
per seeds indoors in flats
or small pots so they'll be
ready to transplant outside
when the weather allows.
Keep an eye on the
weather because we aren't
out of the woods, yet. On
the average, our coldest
temperatures arrive during
the last week of January or
the first week in February.
Be prepared to cover your
tender plants with sheets
and blankets. A light bulb
placed under the sheet
will warm the air a couple
degrees. Make sure the
edges of the covering
reach to the ground to
hold the most heat. Water
during the day when you
expect a freeze because the
moist soil will store more
daytime heat and release it
slowly at night.
It is a great time to
install that new founda-
tion planting, or add some
trees and shrubs to your
landscape. Newly planted
ornamentals will have time
to establish a good root
system before hot, dry
days arrive.
The Columbia County
Master Gardeners can help
you with gardening prob-
lems on Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday mornings at the
Extension Office, or you
can call them at 752-5384.
Plan to attend their Spring
Vegetable Gardening pre-
sentation on Feb. 20 at 1.

* Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


* t~,4. .-,
~**~ �4 ~


JA .l.iN MAII IIMtW W Lr.tKI" l_3E,- '_II, I'- -i.
Barbara Ratliff (left) and Dorris Johnson tend to a purple coneflower that still shows signs of life after freezing temperatures killed off surrounding plants. Both
are members of the Columbia County Master Gardener Program, which offers support to local residents seeking advice on anything dealing with gardening
activities.




Masters of the garden



Lending a green thumb to the community


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
When Doris
Johnson
moved
from
Virginia to
Lake City, she didn't know
anything about growing a
garden in Florida.
"If my plants were to
survive, I probably needed
help," she said.
Help came in the form
of joining the Columbia
County Master.Gardener
Program, four years ago.
Master gardeners are
volunteers who receive
professional training to
assist in answering horti-
culture questions, conduct-
ing soil testing, designing
and maintaining garden
projects, teaching about
Florida friendly landscap-
ing practices and more.
Their services are free to
the community.
There are 42 members
in Columbia County's
program, said Nichelle
Demorest, horticulture
agent. Columbia County's
program began in the
spring of 2001 and is
housed at the UF/IFAS
Extension Office at the fair-
grounds.
The national master
gardener program was cre-
ated by a Washington State
extension service agent in
1972 and spread to Florida
in 1979.
The Florida Master
Gardener Program is a
part of the University of
Florida Extension Service
and Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences,
as well as the USDA and
county governments.
Members of the pro-
gram first attend 50
hours of training, which
is taught by specialists
and professors from the
University of Florida,


Ratliff (left) and Johnson spruce up the spice garden where rosemary, oregano, thyme and chive plants are growing. Master
gardeners are available three times a week to answer questions.


Demorest said. Training
covers topics such as pes-
ticides, Florida soil and
basic botany. Field trips
also are incorporated in
training.
"They touch on a lot of
different things," she said.
"They won't be experts,
but they're familiar with
everything."
After training, members
take a 15-page test com-
prised of questions resi-
dents might ask.
"They have premium
instruction, and in return
they are able to help resi-
dents with their problems,"
Demorest said.
First year master gar-
deners have to fulfill at
least 75 hours of volunteer
work, she said. After that,


only 35 hours are required
annually.
However, most go over
the requirement, even
after their hours have
decreased.
"They know it gets in
your blood and you're not
going to quit," Johnson
said.
B rbara Ratliff, of Lake
City, joined the program a
year ago.
"I have loved gardening
pretty much all my life,"
she said.
While living in Wilmont,
Del., Ratliff kept a garden,
but she had trouble main-
taining one after moving to
Lake City in 2005.
"Gardening here is dif-
ferent," she said. "A lot
different."


Joining the master gar-
dener program helped
supplement her existing
horticulture knowledge
and taught her even more,
she said, and noted the
program has so much
information and resources
available to the members.
"I think the knowledge
base is wonderful," she
said. "It's just been a
rewarding experience."
Members are able to
connect with the commu-
nity.
"I've met some of the
very nicest clients as well-
as my fellow master gar-
deners," Ratliff said.
Once a person joins
the program, they will be
hooked because of the fun,
Johnson said.


"It's an addiction," she
said. "If you haven't gar-
dened before, it helps you
get started."
Members range from
retirees to those working,
Demorest said. The men
and women in Columbia
County's program are
ready to answer anyone's
questions.
Master gardeners are
available to answer ques-
tions from 9 a.m. to noon
every Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday at the Columbia
County Extension Office
. Call (386) 752-5384 for
more information.
"We would like to see
even more participation
from the community,"
Johnson said. "We like
giving out information."


- � -- I II -I -- I











LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010


Mathematics for college and career excellence


In the spring of
2008, Lake City
Community College
received $95,305
in congressionally-
directed grant funds to
implement a mathematics
initiative, aimed at increas-
ing college-readiness
for regional high school
students and improving
success rates in college
remedial math coursework.
That Phase I funding for
LCCC's Math for College
and Career Excellence
program was followed by
an additional $95,000 in
2009 to increase the num-
ber of courses and faculty
members involved in the
initiative. Receipt of these
critical educational funds
was largely due to the
support of U.S. House of
Representatives member
Ander Crenshaw in 2008
and the joint advocacy of
Representative Crenshaw
and U.S. Senator Bill
Nelson in 2009. Here's
is what their efforts have
enabled the college to
accomplish.
Phase I: 2008
Congressionally-Directed
Grant Funds. Under the
guidance of Stephen Pape
(associate professor at


Paula Cifuentes
LCCC Math/Science faculty
coordinator and professor

the University of Florida
College of Teaching and
Learning) and me, devel-
opmental mathematics
curriculum at Lake City
Community College was
revised to more accurately
address skill sets needed
for success in later col-
lege-level math courses.
Faculty members also
modified their instructional
skills to encourage more
interaction and "hands
on" involvement by the
students in the classroom.
These discourse-based
instructional strategies
have proven successful in
increasing effective student
learning skills in a wide
variety of settings.
Pilot implementation
of the new course and
instructional strategies


has shown very promising
preliminary results. Of the
students enrolled in the
first semester at LCCC,
75 percent successfully
completed the course with
a "C" or higher and half of
the students earned an "A."
Scores also improved for
the departmental final and
the statewide exit exam.
These course grades, pass
rates, and exam scores
exceed baselines by
between 24 percent and 46
percent and exceed Phase
I projected outcomes by
between 14 percent and 36
percent. All of the students
that passed the course
also passed the statewide
exit exam on the first
attempt. Of the 113 stu-
dents enrolled in a similar
non-pilot-course, only 66.4
percent passed on the first
attempt; with scores aver-
aging more than 15 points
lower than the pilot cohort.
Although these num-
bers are preliminary, math
program faculty members
are encouraged. Anecdotal
information confirms
these positive outcomes.
The pilot course instruc-
tor describes a significant
change in students' behav-
iors, from passive and


disconnected to engaged
and interactive. The dis-
course-based instructional
techniques clearly impact-
ed student reasoning
strategies, demonstrated(
through their improved
ability to verbally process
complex and abstract
mathematical concepts.
Phase II: 2009
Congressionally-Directed
Grant Funds. The suc-
cessful Phase I pilot has
become the foundation
for a collegewide Quality
Enhancement Plan. During
Phase II of the Math
for College and Career
Excellence initiative, these
new strategies will be
incorporated within the
remaining developmental
math course sections and
other critical math courses
that often act as a bar- -
rier to successful college
progression. Students will
also learn to use wire-
less TI-Nspire (Texas
Instruments) graphing
calculators to further facili-
tate productive classroom
interaction. Because this
new approach to remedial
education depends on cer-
tain instructional skills,
instructors will participate
in intensive professional


development over a ten-
month period, receiving
rigorous feedback on
instructional expertise
through the use of video
monitoring.
The new TI-Navigator
system will create a wire-
less connection between
students' graphing calcu-
lators and the teacher's
personal computer, allow-
ing student work to be pro-
jected on a screen for class
discussion. This interactive
processing of mathemat-
ics applications provides a
shared visual resource and
a context for questions that
further enables students
to increase the effective-
ness of their reasoning
strategies. Past research
has demonstrated that this
approach improves stu-
dents' conceptual
understanding, quantity
and quality of responses,
time on task, peer collabo-
ration, and ability to gauge
their own level of under-
standing.
This intensive year of
planning, professional
development, and further
curriculum revision will
prepared faculty members
for a full-scale implementa-
tion of pilot coursework in


the fall of 2010. We look
forward to experiencing
similar success with the
initiative and benefiting
from a collegewide learn-
ing process about ways
to promote student suc-
cess. We are grateful for
the support we received
from Representative Ander
Crenshaw and Senator Bill
Nelson. Particularly in this
tough economy, resources
that support change and
growth are critical to
improving the learning
experience for the
residents of North Florida.
More good news in
tough times ... we just
received notice from
Representative Ander
Crenshaw's office that
Lake City Community
College will receive
$250,000 in 2010 congres-
sionally-directed grant
funds to create mobile
nurse training resources.
We look forward to shar-
ing the successes of that
program with you as the
initiative unfolds!
Contact Cifuentes at
cifuentesp@lakecitycc.edu or
by calling (386) 754-4260
for more information about
the college's innovative
mathematics programs.


ANNIVERSARY


Beverly Joyce Fields and Richard Cecil Kahlich.


Kahlich
Beverly Joyce Fields
of Lake City and Richard
Cecil Kahlich of High
Springs were united in
marriage on Nov. 20, 1959,
at Parkview Baptist
Church in Lake City. The
couple celebrated their
50th anniversary
on Sunday, Nov. 22, 2009,


with family on a family
trip to Dayonta Beach at a
party in their honor.
The couple had two
children - Leesa (Jesse)
Burd and Richard Glenn
Kahlich. They have three
grandchildren.
The bride is a retired
school teacher and the
groom is a retired school
administrator.


BIRTH


Bailey
Kevin Bailey and
Hillary Bailey of Lake City,
announce the birth of their
son, Aiden Jackson Bailey,
on Jan. 11, 2010, at North
Florida Regional Medical
Center. He weighed 6


Vancouver getting ready for Olympic moment


By JEREMY HAINSWORTH
Associated Press
VANCOUVER, British
Columbia - As snow
falls on the craggy peaks
providing the stunning
backdrop to this glimmer-
ing city on the Pacific,
Vancouver prepares to wel-
come thousands of athletes
and visitors from around
the world for the 2010
Winter Olympic Games.
More than 5,500 athletes
and coaches, almost 11,000
members of the media and
up to 350,000 visitors are
expected. In preparation,
Vancouver is being draped
in Olympic finery.
Giant murals of athletes
cover downtown skyscrap-
ers. Green, white and blue
Olympic banners adorn the
street poles. Participating
countries are putting the
final touches on pavil-
ions to ,welcome visitors
- including an Olympic
first, pavilions to welcome
.gay and lesbian visitors,
located in both Vancouver
and Whistler. The city's
Visitor Information Centre
and satellite kiosks will
be open throughout the
city, and hundreds of sky-
blue-uniformed volunteers
are trained and ready to
answer visitors' questions.
"The city is taking


shape," said Games orga-
nizing committee CEO
John Furlong.
This is Canada's third
time welcoming the
Olympics. It hosted the
Montreal 1976 Summer
Games and the 1988
Calgary Winter Games. But
no Canadian has ever won a
gold medal on home turf.
Vancouver is also the
most populous destination
ever to host the Winter
Olympics, with 2.1 mil-
lion people in the greater
Vancouver regional area,
according to Canada's 2006
census. And it considers
itself to be a sophisticated
destination, with five-star
hotels, glittering skyscrap-
ers and tremendous ethnic
diversity. About a third
of those who live in the
Vancouver metropolitan area
are of Asian descent, accord-
ing to census statistics.
Nearby winter resorts
such as Whistler, known
for its vibrant village and
challenging terrain, have
been compared to Vail
and other lively, ski towns.
But access to Whistler for
alpine Olympic events is
being strictly controlled.
Private cars without park-
ing permits won't get past
checkpoints at the town of
Squamish on the breath-
taking 90-mile Sea-to-Sky


Highway.
Those lucky enough to
get to Whistler can ride
the Peak 2 Peak gondola.
It has the longest unsup-
ported span for a gondola
of its kind in the world at
1.88 miles, and the highest
lift of its kind above the val-
ley floor at 1,427 feet.
Accommodations for
the games are scarce but
not impossible to find.
Organizing committee vice-
president of services Terry
Wright said the demand is
unprecedented for a winter
Olympics, but Tourism
Vancouver anticipates rooms
becoming available and sug-
gests checking its Web site
regularly for openings.
"There are still rooms
to be had in the down-
town core," said Tourism
Vancouver's Walt Judas.
Dozens of ads for pri-
vate accommodations dot
Web sites like such as
Craigslist.
For visitors with thinner
wallets, a 300-bed hostel is
opening at The Eldorado
Hotel on Kingsway
Avenue. Other hostels
operate in the Gastown
and Main Street areas.
If you don't have tickets
to the games, you can still
celebrate with other fans
at two so-called LiveCity
sites in the downtown


pounds, 3 ounces, and mea-
sured 18 inches.
The grandparents are
Richard and Donna Lee
and Russell and Dorothy
Bailey. The great-
grandparents are Carolyn
Dorch and Eunice
Herndon.


i ,- Ads cj lf *zlo En- -


area, where events will be
shown on giant screens.
But the 2010 Games
aren't just about sports.
The Cultural Olympiad will
present everything from
art shows to rock concerts
at theaters and other sites
throughout the region;
http://www. vancouver2010.
com/cultural-festivals-and-
events/.
To get around, visitors
will be encouraged to use
public transport. Parking
restrictions and road clo-
sures will be in effect dur-
ing the Games.
A new passenger tram
opening in late January
connects the athletes' vil-
lage and Granville Island,
which features artists stu-
dios and a public market to
tease the senses.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:

Shane Russell
Dennis Thomson
February 6, 2010

Lindsey Morton
George Pridgeon
February 20, 2010

Carlee Wilson
Trey Beauchamp
March 6, 2010

Aimee Ronsonet
Brent Williams
March 20, 2010

Abigail Crow
Matt Dicks
April 10, 2010

Heather Thornton
Marc Vann, Jr.
May 1, 2010
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

SWARD'S "
JEWELRY & GIFTS

Historic Downtown
156 N. Marion Ave.
752-5470


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427












Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 24, 2010 3D


DEAR ABBY


Mom tries to make gift


grab more meaning ul


DEAR ABBY: I have
chosen to celebrate my chil-
dren's birthdays with fam-
ily and one friend. I want
my children to understand
early on that birthdays are
not about getting loads of
gifts, but to celebrate life
with family. We are invited
to many parties for their
friends and classmates,
but I have always chosen
to attend only those of our
close friends.
I find it disheartening to
watch children these days
rip into a bunch of gifts and
toss them aside without
saying thank you or even
commenting on the gift. It's
all about the next package
and the volume.
Because of this, I'm
considering no longer
giving a gift but making
a donation to a charity in
honor of the birthday boy
or girl instead. But I'm wor-
ried about the reaction I'll
get from friends. On the
other hand, I feel much
better about donating to a
worthwhile charity instead
of another toy for children
who already have so much
these days. Is a donation
appropriate instead of a
gift? - WONDERING IN
BIRMINGHAM
DEAR WONDERING:
Your sentiments are noble,
but your teaching method
is heavy-handed and I


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearaobbycom
don't recommend it. If the
children are in grammar
school, a donation in their
name to a charity will go
over like a lead balloon.
Teach your children
proper manners by explain-
ing how to practice them
and setting a good example.
By preventing them from
interacting socially with
their friends and class-
mates, you are slowing
down their socialization and
isolating them.
Because you prefer that
your children not receive
"loads of gifts," when you
plan their birthday celebra-
tions, explain your phi-
losophy to your family and
your one friend and also
to your children. Then let
your kids choose a charity
and request that attendees
bring an item to be donat-
ed. That way all the chil-
dren can enjoy themselves
and learn the satisfaction
that comes from helping
others at the same time.
DEAR ABBY: My moth-
er - who is 50 - divorced


her husband about a year
ago. I fully supported her
through the divorce, but
now I am beginning to
regret it. I feel as if I have
been taking the place of my
father when, at 22, 1 should
be finding my way and
exploring the world.
I hate myself for feeling
this way because I love my
mother. I want her to be
happy, but she does not
try to meet new people or
make friends. I find myself
staying at home so she
won't be alone, and I know
I'm missing out. Should I
talk to my mother about
this? - DAUGHTER IN
NEW YORK
DEAR DAUGHTER:
Yes. Do it now, before
resentment builds and you
reach the point where you
say something you'll regret.
Do it when you are both in
a relaxed mood and won't
be interrupted.
Explain that you are wor-
ried about her and because
she is now a free woman
it's time for her to develop
new interests and meet
new people. Encourage her
to get out, be active, join
social or charitable groups,
take classes - ANYTHING
but sit at home alone.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Help others and you
will feel good about your-
self. You can meet someone
interesting with something
to offer you in return if you
get involved in a challenging
activity. Plan to do some-
thing romantic during the
evening hours. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll be given some
very interesting information,
enabling you to make a deci-
sion regarding someone you
have been uncertain about
lately. Make your move and
cut your losses. Say no to
anyone who has been slow-
ing you down or holding you
back. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You can shop for bar-
gains but, when it comes to
purchasing something that
promises the impossible,
think twice. Invest your
money in something that
can really do something for
you - like learning new
skills that can help you earn
more money. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Look for job opportuni-
ties with plenty of room for
growth. You can make some
changes in your personal life
that will help you lift some


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word
of the burden you've been
carrying. You will learn
something important from
someone with more experi-
ence., ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Stay calm and don't let any-
thing or anyone cause you
to make a costly mistake.
Investing in someone else
will not turn out as planned.
Love is in the stars and a
chance to become much
closer to someone is evident.
**
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Sign up for entertain-
ing events that bring you
in contact with enthusiastic
individuals. You need to
share your thoughts and
explore new avenues with
people who are just as keen
as you about getting ahead.
A sudden change in your
financial situation is appar-
ent. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You can get ahead if
you are willing to put in the
time and effort required. A
love interest will help you to
explore new avenues. Mix
business with pleasure and


CELEBRITY CIPHER
CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Ceenity Cpher cryptogram, s are created from quuotaonsb faby mous people, past and present
Today's clue X equals K
SFO G CDATSP TC VWAAG D FTD Z


HTMAGSR G . "


Y GCCG HGSDEOW


" KME RWS ' D FTS ESAG CC KME
AGWOS Z M F DM AMC G . " - XWO G G U
W V I E A - Y W V V W O
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I'm not feeling very well - I need a doctor
immediately. Ring the nearest golf course." - Groucho Marx


you can turn something you
like to do into a profitable
endeavor. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Follow your heart
and refuse to let anyone
defuse what you are trying
to initiate. Jealousy will be
the motive behind someone
trying to slow you down. Be
creative and make your own
opportunities. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Pick and
choose your battles wisely.
Focus on what's possible, not
what isn't. Avoid impulsive
moves that will cost you time
and money. Reconnecting
with someone from your past
will be a plus. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Create a space
that will be more conducive
to working at home. Let the
people you love take part
in your plan. A new look at
an old, unfinished project
will lead you to find a way to
bring it to life. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Do whatever you
can about a personal matter
that is bothering you so
you can move on. A strong
connection to someone will
make it easier for you to
decide what you must do.
Face your demons so you
can feel good about your
future. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): If someone
wants to play mind games
with you, refuse to par-
ticipate. Honesty will serve
you the best when dealing
with someone who is unfair
or manipulative. Don't be
fooled by insincere gestures
of friendliness. ****


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


SUBTLETIES By Cathy Allis / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 13 4 15 16 17 18 19 110 11 12 113 114 115 116


Across
I Blubber
4 Updates
electrically
11 Liturgical
reference
17 Ivanhoe's lady
20 Spiritedly, in
scores
21 Santiago is its
patron saint
22 Slip hider
23 Dr. Westheimer
telling it like it
is?
25 Grammar class
exercise
27 Chief Ouray's
tribe
28 Fourth word in
the "Star Wars"
opening crawl
29 Angel, e.g., for
short
30 Something an
office worker
might file
31 All you need to
brew a lot'of
coffee?
36 Huge opponents
38 Aging vessels?
39 Whence the
phrase "sour
grapes"
43 Healthful husks
45 Educ. group
46 Kind of talk
47 Male'symbol
components
48 What you might
bow your head to
get
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


49 Result of a
plumbing
disaster in the
apartment
above'?
54 Pitcher plant
victim
55 Viscera
57 Playmate of
Piglet
58 Gillis of
1960s TV
59 Spade, e.g., for
short
60 Rapper's retinue
61 Father of Ariadne
63 Abbr. after many
a capt.'s name
64 Essence
65 Tome that makes
a pub owner feel
nostalgic?
70 "Hard ___
72 Pol Paul
73 Cel
74 Great trait
77 Eighth or ninth
word in the "Star
Wars" opening
crawl
78 Law school
course
80 1977 Sex Pistols
song ... or their
first record label
81 Longtime Buick
model
83 Scottish seaport
84 Where to find a
best-selling CD?
87 "Ghost
Whisperer" skill
88 Bleach brand
90 Cabbage batch?
91 Julio to julio
92 Sacrament, e.g.
93 Tea leaves
alternative


94 Help, wrongly
96 "The Office" city
99 Something kids
might very well
tune out?
102 Orange-roofed
establishment, in
brief
104 Inter___
107 Author
Deighton
108 Married mujer:
Abbr.
109 Scoldings
112 Advice to Tin
Man costume
designers?
117 "Good Guys
Wear Black"
star, 1979
118 Strapped
119 Topsy-turvy
120 Hickman who
played 58-
Across
121 Subject of a
a Scottish mystery,
informally
122 Good outcome
123 Carpenter ___

Down
1 Recording period
2 "Anna Christie"
playwright
3 Web site for
Charlotte
4 Paper that dishes
dirt
5 "'Knock it off!"
6 Lumber
dimensions
7 "No more, thanks"
8 Shout at a bowl
9 W.W. 11 command
area
10 Voiced, in
phonetics


11 Quark/antiquark
particle
12 Suffix with
cruciverbhal
13 Exterminator,
� often
14 Handel oratorio
king
15 Starting stake
16 Bert who was a
Leo, aptly
17 Name on the
street
18 Algerian port
19 Debugger's
mission?
24 Stars can have
big ones
26 Free
32 Romance lang.
33 Eye layer
34 Galloping
35 Living ___
37 Touch, e.g.
40 Damage to a
paperback
edition?
41 Nocturnal
fledgling
42 College course,
briefly
43 Radar image
44 City neat old
silver mines
46 Scan for slips
47 "West Side
Story" girl
49 ___ of Souls,
Na'vi temple in
"Avatar"
50 Composer Satie
51 Like a ___ bricks
52 Language from
which "sky" and
"egg" are
derived
53 Skeptical
rejoinder


56 Arthur with a
racket
61 She-vat or Sivan
62 Poetry contests
64 Exterminator's
target
66 Zoo
67 ___ cloud (solar
system outlier)
68 Cross out
69 Opposite of stout
70 "Is that ?"
71 Eric Clapton love
song


75 Once, formerly
76 Variety
78 Its crown is in
your head
79 Waste line
81 Cocktail party
serving
82 College course,
briefly
85 Karma
86 ___ avis
89 Pivots
92 Attic scurrier


94 Galoots
95 Ethnic group
including Zulus
96 Walked boldly
97 Port sights
98 Nonplussed
100 Duck
101 "This I Promise
You" band, 2000
103 Ken of
"thirtysomething

104 Good situation
for a server


105 Unattended
106 Imarets, e.g.
110 "___ partridge
in ..."
111 V.1.-to-Trinidad
dir.
113 King, in
Portuguese
114 Toon for which
Hank Azaria won
a 1998 Emmy
115 Japanese I.T.
giant
116 Mag. team


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
S TIEIEILIER AGIHAS SHADES
N O SCIOIRE RH O N E TA S UPESUP
ALITOONA MOTOR ELANTRA
PLANNED R UE DE P ART I AL
SESSO SMELL IING STUMN
MAP ISS ZERO RANG
BEMYGU ES T PER 0 N TET ON
EIT ATM SRS WIINI0 E
LUNAR ITALO FLOOREDIT
LITH BLEWOVER NOSElM
IASHOR E PRAIRIE SOREAT
RATA ANNMAR I E IAGO
ORGAN ST OP CAROL T N LEGI A R
MHO DYES DES DUPE LIE
ET BY 0T0ES REPRESENT

SODS ATOMISTS ACHS
CALCIUM ALERO WEATHER
ELEKTRA WATER ANT I ART
ISLEE K L Y AIT EST G 0 T 0 S E S
I S P R A Y S N E R T SS L Y N Ev SS


7 2


6385





4 1 9


95 74


1 3 7


9 5


6 9


24 3


6 9 9.L-L8VZ L L

8 1 L Z 6 L 9 C 9



9 L Z 9 L E 8 6 17


9 Z 9 L V 6 8 8 L


V7 LL 8 8 9 6 9


8 8 6 LE 9 L 9L


L 6 8 C7 9 L 9 Z 8


L 9 8 E 9 Z L V 6


Z 9 V 6 L 8 L 9 8















SPOTLIGHT


Sunday, January 24, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Spencers present'Theatre of Illusion'


S- By LEANNE TYO
i eporterzcomn
usban
'-"- andI w
Sdt uo K
S-*and C
' " Spenc
... . ..ll ..... Lake Cit'


goal of the show is to 'reach
the audience that isn't
captivated by magic, but to
also attract the audience
that loves magic and to
give them the unexpected."
The show breaks away
from the traditional magic
show, said Spencer, and
will include both new illu-
sions and twists on classic
tricks.
Spencer said he is most
excited to perform an
illusion where he walks
through a solid concrete
wall, a trick that no other
magician has performed
since Houdini in 1914.
Audience participation is
Spencer's favorite part of
the show, he said.
"I'm gonna read people's
minds, make a few people
disappear," said Spencer.
"But I will never use any-
body on the stage that


doesn't want to volunteer. I
never make anybody look
stupid on stage, I just think
that's a terrible thing to do.
If people come to our show
and want to help, I promise
we'll make them the star of
the show and they'll have a
good time."
Spencer and his
wife Cindy have been
awarded Performing Arts
Entertainers of the Year for
six consecutive years and
were named International
Magicians of the Year,
according to a "Theatre of
Illusion" news release.
"I think they'll be a big
hit here," said Mark Kirby,
coordinator of Community
Cultural Services at Levy
Performing Arts Center.
"It's one of those shows
that's good for all ages.
The little kid in you always
comes back to the surface


when you see a show like
this."
"We are looking forward
to being in Lake City,"
Spencer said. "Come ready
to have a good time."
The Spencers will per-
form "Theatre of Illusion"
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.
26 at Levy Performing
Arts Center at Lake City
Community College.
Tickets are $15 for
adults, $14 for seniors
age 55 and up and $13 for
community college staff,
students, children and stu-
dents from other schools.
Call the box office for tick-
ets at (386) 754-4340.
Dinner will be served
prior to the performance
at LCCC's Lobo Cafe. For
reservations call (888) 845-
0925 or (386) 438-5440.
Visit www.spencersmagic.
comn.






COURTESY PHOTOS

(FAR LEFT) Kevin and Cindy
Spencer will perform their
magic show, 'Theatre of
Illusion,' on Tuesday at Lake
City Community College.
The performance takes place
at 7:30 p.m. at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.


(LEFT) Kevin Spencer
performs a routine during one
of his magic shows.


First-time novelist

a paperback hit


By HILLEL ITALIE
AP National Writer
NEW YORK - Novelist
Janice Y.K. Lee is flying in
a better class.
"I came in here from
HongKong and decided to
treat myself and upgrade
to business," Lee said dur-
ing a recent interview from
Los Angeles, where she
arrived for a promotional
tour (her publisher paid for
coach) for the paperback
of her debut novel, "The
Piano Teacher."
Lee received strong criti-
cal attention and respect-
able sales for the hardcover
of her book, but she may
well be the latest author
published by Penguin
Group (USA) to become a
major seller in paperback.
According to Nielsen
BookScan, which tracks
around 75 percent of indus-
try sales, the paperback has
sold 151,000 copies since
its release in November,
already far above the 47,000
for the hardcover, which
came out a year ago.
The success shocked
Lee, who likens her experi-
ence to "giving birth to an
extraordinary child; you
can't take all the credit."
But it's most familiar for
Penguin, where paperback
smashes in the past few
years include Elizabeth
Gilbert's "Eat, Pray, Love,"
Greg Mortenson's "Three
C.ups of Tea" and Kim
Edwards' "The Memory
Keeper's Daughter."
"Right from the time the
hardcover group started
promoting this book, the
paperback group had its
eye on it," says Patrick
Nolan, Penguin's director
and vice president of trade
paperback sales. "We made
sure that our sales reps


had manuscripts and gal-
leys the same time as hard-
cover folks and it remained
on our radar screen."
"Penguin is pretty smart
with marketing their
paperback books," says
Sue Boucher, owner of the
Lake Forest Book Store in
Lake Forest, Ill.
"And one thing they do
is resend the book as a
reader's copy to remind us
the paperback is coming.
I've told other publishers
this is smart, because it
gives the book a whole
new life. That happened
with 'Memory Keeper's
Daughter.' Few of us had,
read it in hardcover, but
when we got the chance to
later on, we loved it and we
sold it like crazy."
Lee's novel begins in
Hong Kong after World
War II, in the early 1950s.
Claire Pendleto' i is 1 28-
year-old newlywed who
has moved from Britain
with her husband and is
hired by the Chens, an
affluent Chinese couple, to
teach piano to their daugh-
ter. More fatefully, she
meets the Chens' chauf-
feur, Englishman Will
Truesdale, who is haunted
by an affair that began a
decade earlier.
Lee has lived all over the
world and says she's fas-
cinated by what people do
when they are unmooredd,"
away from who and what
they know. Booksellers
praise "The Piano Teacher"
as ideal for a cherished cus-
tomer base: the book club.
"The story raises a lot
of questions about what
would you do in certain
kinds of situations. And
that's bread and butter for
a book club," says Barnes
& Noble Inc. fiction buyer
Sessalee Hensley.


ASSOCIATED PRE
In this TV publicity image released by Starz, Andy Whitfield portrays Spartacus in the Starz original series, 'Spartacus.'



Starz thrills, shocks with new 'Spartacus'


By FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer
NEW YORK-
"Spartacus: Blood and
Sand" isn't exactly put-your-
feet-up-and-relax television.
The show, which pre-
miered on cable's Starz
network Friday, is a new
action-adventure series
that grabs you with its raci-
ness, derring-do and visual
pizazz.
It's based on the real-life
Thracian slave-turned-rab-
blerouser from the first
century B.C. (and, a couple
of millenniums later, on the
Stanley Kubrick film star-
ring Kirk Douglas). But
more, this TV reimagin-
ing teems with the sort of
fabulousness that thrilled,
inspired and grossed out
fans of Zack Snyder's digi-
tized masterpiece, "300."


Like that 2006 film,
"Spartacus: Blood and
Sand" is a blend of
hyper-realism and epic
fantasy where, during
battle, ragged streams of a
victim's spilled blood pause
lazily in mid-air before
soaking the ground.
It's a world where
brawny gym rats clad them-
selves in circa-B.C. thongs,
or less; where steamy
trysts and orgies are the
rage; where even leading
lady Lucy Lawless ("Xena:
Warrior Princess") has her
moments in the buff.
One spicy scene finds
her, as Lucretia, about to
get romantic with husband
Batiatus (John Hannah),
a Roman sports impresa-
rio whose "ludus" - an
extreme training camp
for gladiators - is where
Spartacus is enslaved.


Lucretia and Batiatus are
hot for each other, that's
clear. But to get things
started with maximum
ease, each spouse calls
upon an attendant to sup-
ply the needed foreplay.
In short, "Spartacus:
Blood and Sand" is a series
guaranteed to make you sit
up and take notice.
Andy Whitfield stars as
Spartacus, who is power-
ful, rebellious and char-
ismatic. He's a warrior
who seemingly can't be
defeated, which means in
the arena he could prove to
be a valuable attraction for
Batiatus.
He's a crowd-pleaser all
right. But he's also a hand-
ful, the sort of guy who
- if you remember your
history - just might go
and stir up a slave revolt.
That presumably comes


later in the series, which
already has been picked up
for another season.
But early in this first
13-episode cycle, he and
Batiatus form a tense slave-
master bond. Spartacus
can help bolster Batiatus'
shaky revenue, while
Batiatus agrees to help
Spartacus get what he
wants most: not the fame
and glory most gladiators
seek, but a reunion with
his beloved wife, Sura (Erin
Cummings), who, early on,
is torn from his arms and,
like him, sold into slavery.
Visions of Sura infuse
his dreams. During his
life of almost indescrib-
able hardship at the ludus
- "where men are forged
into gods, with blood their
ambrosia," roars their
trainer - it is Sura who
keeps Spartacus going.


4D




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