Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text






Gifts for soldiers
A local bank collected items and
donated tFh ' .:

'L I- i i I - - I I
S I[, _ 'LL , IL _., I- . .


ake


Thursday, January 21, 2010


Senior Bowl bound
Florida quarterback Tim Tebow
t week's game as
:L audition
1rts, I B


1


www.Iakecityreporterxcomtii


Arbor

Day to

honor

McDuffie

Ceremony
takes place at
11 a.m. Friday.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
Known for his love of
the outdoors and commu-
nity involvement, William
C. "Billy" McDuffie will
be honored at the Florida
Arbor Day Ceremony at
11 a.m. Friday in Olustee
Park.
Coordinated by the City
of Lake City/Columbia
County Beautification
Committee, the ceremo-
ny honors a person, living
or dead, who has made
substantial contributions
to the community, said
Bettye Lane, committee
chair.
Billy McDuffie founded
McDuffie's Marine and
Sporting Goods in 1950,
she said, and he readily
shared his knowledge of
sports and the-outdoors.
The. outdoors was his
life, said his son, Lee
McDuffie, adding that his
father spent as much time
as he could on the water
fishing or out in the woods
hunting.
"He enjoyed teaching
people to learn about the
outdoors," he said.
During the ceremo-
ny, the mayor will read
a proclamation declar-
ing it Florida Arbor Day,
James Montgomery will
offer reflections on Billy
McDuffie, and Dr. Ian
Rodriguez will talk about
trees and their impor-
tance.
A live oak tree and a
marker will also be pre-
sented to the family, Lane
said. The tree will be plant-
ed at Southside Recreation
Center.
The family is very
appreciative of the honor,
Lee McDuffie, said. His
father would be very
proud and happy about the
tribute.
"It's one of the nicest
honors he's gotten," he
said.
The community is invit-
ed to participated in the
Florida Arbor Day festivi-
ties.
"They can remember and
in their own way pay honor
to a gentleman and con-
tributing member of our
community and learn about
trees," Lane said.


aith


rewarded


Locals make contact with family in Haiti
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.corn
A after nearly a
week playing
the waiting
game, local
residents with
Haitian ties were able to
make contact with relatives
and loved ones in Haiti on
Monday.
As more communication
lines become available to
earthquake ravaged Haiti,
native Haitians in America
are able to discover the
fates of their families. -
For the Rev. Louis
Joseph of First Haitian
Baptist Church and his - .
wife, Marie, Monday
brought about some good
news - their family was -
alive.
"They lost their home
but everyone is fine,"
Marie Joseph said.
The couple thanked God
for keeping their families
safe.
"The house is destroyed
but a house can be
replaced," Louis Joseph
said. "A life cannot be 4Q
replaced."
Lake City's Tim
Williams, direc-
tor of Healing Hands
International Missions who
oversees an orphanage in "' .
Haiti, said he too was able
to speak with loved ones in JASON MATTHEWV WALKERIL�, I-,:0, ,-4-,:,
Louis Joseph, a Haiti native and the pastor at the First Haitian Baptist Church in Lake City, organizes donated goods
HAITI continued on 5A Wednesday afternoon that will eventually make its way down to the earthquake-stricken people of Haiti.


Local organizations team up for Haiti relief efforts


LCPD, Beulah
Baptist collect
donations.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Police
Department and Beulah
Baptist Association are
teaming up for Haiti relief
efforts.
Both groups are collect-
ing items to be sent to the
country after it was devas-
tated by a 7.0 magnitude
earthquake Jan. 12.
The department is set-
ting up a collection bin in
its lobby for people to drop
off items, said Sgt. John
Blanchard, police depart-
ment public information
officer.
Beulah Baptist


Association is also accept-.
ing donations at its office,
located at 189 NW Cali
Drive.
Items being sought
include canned food, dia-
pers, toothpaste/tooth-
brushes, bottled water,
underwear, socks, small
first aid kits, soap, nonper-
ishable food items, medi-
cines, creams, lotions and
more. Donations will then
be shipped to Haiti.
"Everybody can do some-
thing," said James Roberts,
Beulah Baptist Association
director of missions.
"Everybody can participate.
The needs are so great."
Items will be shipped in
about a month to Port-au-
Prince and held in storage
until then, he said.
RELIEF continued on 5A


JASON MATTHEVW WALKERLil 1, i - ,,.ii :'
Lake City Police Sgt. Chris Barfield and Chief Argatha Gilmore sift through bags of donated
clothes for the earthquake victims.


County commission to discuss proposed spring festival-


Montgomery
Building upgrades
on agenda.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The Board of County
Commissioners will discuss
the proposal of a new spring
festival, change orders to
the Montgomery Building


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


and the restructuring of the
Public Works Department,
among other agenda items,
at their meeting tonight.
County Manager Dale
Williams said a proposal to
hold a new spring festival
at Alligator Lake on April
24 has been submitted for
approval by Four Rivers
Audubon Society.
The festival will be a day-
long family event to high-


74 57
Thunderstorms
WEATHER, 2A


light the park as a natural
resource and will offer out-
door educational activities.
"I think this would be
a tremendous benefit to
both the community and
the park in terms of aware-
ness," Williams said.
Williams also said change
orders to the Montgomery
Building in downtown Lake
City will be proposed.
. The building was built


in 1940 and is in need of
a new roof, a cleaning to
get rid of mold and mildew
and rejointed brick mortar
joints, he said.
"The purpose of the
change orders is to clean
that building up and reseal
the bricks," Williams said.
A proposal to restruc-
ture the Public Works
Department to account for
upcoming retiring person-


* _ O pinion ................ 4A
Obituaries .............. 3A
H ealthm.................. 6A
S Advice & Comics......... 3B
" -, Puzzles ................. 2B


nel and an added utility
division will also be on the
agenda, Williams said.
Within the next two
years, five managerial per-
sonnel will be retiring, said
Williams, and the depart-
ment will have the added
responsibility of the utitili-
ties to take care of.
"We're trying to address the
upcoming vacancies as well as
the utility need," he said.

TODAY II
S^1 HEALTH
Warnings or
tanning beds


Williams said that the
restructuring would also
save $3,300 annually. '
"The main purpose. "
the restructuring is to me>t
the future needs of Public
Works," he said.
The Board of County
Commissioners will meet
at 7 p.m. tonight at .the
Columbia County SchoolQ
Board Administratiive
auditorium, 372 W Duval St

N COMING
I FRIDAY :
I Tigers, Indians::.*
? square off in soccer


Vol. 13.6


75 cents


I �


,r









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JANUARY 21,2010


(AC$ &

Wednesday:
Afternoon: 1-0-6
Evening: 2-6-5


4

Wednesday:
Afternoon: 9-9-9-9
Evening: 1-3-6-9


ezjld(lcih.

Tuesday:
1-2-7-11-14


Tuesday:
9-15-35-40 7


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Wrestler John Cena talks about latest film


NEW ORLEANS
Wrestling star John
Cena said he's enjoy-
ing the challenge of
acting in his very
first dramatic film.
The "WWE Monday Night RAW"
star's only two previous movies
- 2006's "The Marine" and last
year's "12 Rounds" - were action
films that involved "blowing things
up" and "dodging bullets," Cena said
Wednesday.
While in New Orleans for the film-
ing of "Brother's Keeper," a World
Wrestling Entertainment movie that
also stars Danny Glover, Patricia
Clarkson and Devon Graye, Cena
called the project "a great change of
pace.
'"This one is a lot less physically
demanding," he said. "I feel like
I've been able to get involved in
the story, and it's an easy story to
embrace. I think everybody will be
able to pull something from it."
The plot centers on a socially awk-
ward teenage boy, played by Graye,
who tries to reconnect his family
after the death of his collegiate wres-
tling star father by following in his
father's footsteps. In a scene being
filmed Wednesday, Cena, who plays
Graye's estranged older brother,
shows up at the younger boy's high
school to watch him compete in a
wrestling match.

Charlie Daniels suffers
mild stroke in Colorado
:DURANGO, Colo. - Fiddler-gui-
tarist Charlie Daniels said he suf-
fered a mild stroke
while snowmobiling
in Colorado and has
some stiffness and
numbness in his left
hand and arm.
Daniels, 73, suf-
fered the stroke
Daniels Friday just outside


In this March 25, 2009, file photo, professional wrestler and actor John Cena
poses for a portrait in New York.


Durango, about 230 miles southwest
of Denver. He was treated at a local
hospital then airlifted to a Denver
hospital, where he was released on
Sunday.

Gun stays as evidence
in Ja Rule's NYC case
NEW YORK - Rapper Ja Rule
has lost a bid to keep a loaded gun
found in his luxury car from being
used against him in
a New York weap-
ons-possession case.
A judge said "no"
Wednesday to the
- argument by the
platinum-selling
Ja Rule artist's that the gun
was found during
an unjustified police stop of his
Maybach sports car after a July 2007
concert.
Prosecutors say the stop was war-


ranted because the car had no insur-
ance and a suspended registration.

Marc Webb to direct
next 'Spider-Man'
LOS ANGELES - Marc Webb
has caught the job of "Spider-Man".
director.
Sony Pictures and Marvel Studios
announced Tuesday that the "(500)
Days of Summer" director will helm
the next "Spider-Man" film follow-
ing the departure of Sam Raimi and
Tobey Maguire, the director and star
who worked on the previous three
Spidey films. The fourth installment
is set for a 2012 release and will
focus on a younger version of the
superhero.
Webb previously directed music
videos, including Green Day's "21
Guns" and The All-American Rejects'
"Move Along."
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Ann Wedgeworth
is 76.
* World Golf Hall of Famer
Jack Nicklaus is 70.
* Opera singer Placido
Domingo is 69.
* Singer Richie Havens is
69.
* Singer Mac Davis is 68.
* Actress Jill Eikenberry is
63.


* Singer-songwriter Billy
Ocean is 60.
* Microsoft co-founder Paul
Allen is 57.
* Actress Geena Davis is 54.
* Basketball Hall of Famer
Hakeem Olajuwon is 47.
* Actress Karina Lombard
is 41.
* Rapper Levirt (B-Rock and
the Bizz) is 40.


Daily Scripture
"Consider it pure joy, my brothers,
whenever you face trials of many
kinds, because you know that the
testing of your faith develops
perseverance."
James 1:2-3
Thought for Today
"Know yourself, and your neighbor
will not mistake you."
- Scottish proverb


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... .(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fa. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
rAll material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
(sbrannon @lakecityreportercom)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
. problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks..... ........... $26.32
24 Weeks .................. $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ..... . . . .... . ... . . . $82.80
52 Weeks ............. . . . . $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Man testifies in
mistress' trial
PENSACOIA - A for-
mer Panhandle sheriff in
federal prison for using
Homeland Security money
to fund lavish Las Vegas
gambling trips has testi-
fied against his former
mistress.
Former Okaloosa
County Sheriff Charlie
Morris testified Tuesday
in the grand theft trial of
Sabra Thornton.
Prosecutors allege she
collected $80,000 for a
job she didn't do while
employed by the sheriff's
office.

High number
of manatees
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida wildlife officials say
they counted more than
5,000 manatees in the state
during their annual survey,
an all-time high.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission says the pre-
liminary numbers came
from a statewide survey
during the week of Jan.
11. The agency says the
recent cold temperatures
in Florida made it easier to
count manatees this year
because many more were
gathered at warm water
sites and the skies were
clear for aerial observa-
tion.

" Dead fish wash
up on beaches
TAMPA - Tampa Bay
residents are starting to
see the results of a cold
snap that killed thousands
of-fish as the decaying
bodies begin to wash up in
canals and on beaches.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission reports that
they've received a number
of-reports about dead fish
since last week. That's
when the state agency can-


Flying in for help
Florida governor Charlie Crist (second from right) DCF
Secretary George Sheldon (third from right) and Florida
National Guard Maj. Gen. Douglas Burnett (right) walk on
the tarmac behind a C-17 transport aircraft during a visit to
the temporary processing facility set up for Haiti earthquake
survivors at Orlando-Sanford International Airport, in Sanford,
Wednesday.


celed the upcoming snook
season and banned the
harvest and possession of
bonefish and tarpon until
April. An FWC spokesman
says the action was taken
to protect the fish popula-
tions.

Woman arrested
for animal cruelty
PALM BAY - Officials
have cited Christine
Hogle, 31, for 17 counts of
animal cruelty for leaving
more than a dozen dogs,
cats and other animals in
a home to fend for them-
selves.
Officials say five dogs,
eight cats, a rabbit and a
gecko lizard were found
Tuesday morning inside
a home reeking of animal
waste. Two dead hamsters
and a dog that appeared
to be emaciated were also
found inside.

Neighbor stabbed
60 times over $5
LAUDERDALE LAKES
- An arrest report says
a South Florida teenager
is accused of stabbing a


62-year-old neighbor more
than 60 times over $5.
The Broward Sheriff's
Office released the report
Tuesday saying the
16-year-old had entered
Vibbins Williams' apart-
ment Saturday night in
Lauderdale Lakes and
asked her for $5 so he
could buy marijuana.
Williams refused and told
him to leave.
The police report says
the teen then grabbed a
knife from his pocket and
stabbed her.

Twin brothers
fall into pool, die
PORT CHARLOTTE -
Authorities say a
13-month-old has died
hours after his twin
brother, Joshua, was pro-
nounced dead following a
swimming pool accident in
Port Charlotte.
The Charlotte County
Sheriff's Office issued a
statement saying Christian
DeMello died Tuesday
night. The boys were
found by their mother
lying face down.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER



THUNDER- PARTLY, PARTLY
STORMS, CLOUDY CLOUDY


HI 74LO .' H1I72LO H1I71L0O51


* Valdosta
.72/54
Tallahassee * Lake City
72/53 74/57


Pensacola .
69/51 Panama City
67/54


Gainesville *
S.76/59
Ocala
78/61


Tampa *
75/64


Ft. Myei
80/66


City
* Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
74/57 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
91�65 Gainesville
0 Jacksonville
* Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
80/63 80/67 Miami
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
82/68 * Orlando
* Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
rs 82/71 * Pensacola
6 0 Naples * Tallahassee
81/69 Miami Tampa


TEMPERATURES

LOw Wednesdoay
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


71
37
66
42
85 in 1937
22 in 1985


0.00"
1.93"
1.93."
2.19"
2.19"


SUN
.unrrise [lO,
ounsetL tOday
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
* Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7 2. a n',
5.58 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
5:59 p.m.


10:37 a.m.
11:48 p.m.
11:09 a.m.


Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb.
23 30 5 13
First Full Last New


On this date in
1990, rain in south-
ern New England
changed to freez-
ing rain, sleet, and
then to heavy snow
during the late
morning. Most of
Massachusetts was
blanketed with 6 to
10 inches of snow.


5
MOOEUrE
30mnutestolbun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 68 LO 40


Friday
78/53/sh
78/50/sh
84/64/sh
78/59/sh
73/46/pc
72/47/pc
78/67/t
72/45/pc
84/63/sh
78/63/sh
74/46/pc
79/53/sh
69/50/pc
69/47/s
70/43/pc
73/56/sh
70/43/pc
83/60/sh


Saturday
73/61/s
70/55/s
78/70/pc
79/63/s
73/53/pc
68/55/pc
78/68/s
71/51/pc
80/69/pc
77/66/pc
74/55/pc
75/57/s
67/57/s
64/56/pc
71/52/s
74/62/s
70/52/s
78/67/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


f ., Forecasts, data and graph-
-. -- Ics @ 2010 Weather Centrat
S LLC, Madison, WIs.
\ " ^ www.weatherpublisher.com


AROUND FLORIDA


83/71 Valdosta
KeyWes * W. Palm Beach
79/72


IPit


T, 7p la 6a
7aThursdayp 7p Friday 6a


..'. \.


.. :


Forew.t.led lelep3e Fee lie" temperad l


- ---4---~ ----


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


I www~lakeeityreporterncom


4









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2010


Local bank employees send


items to troops for holidays


_-

COURTES? PhOTO
Theresa Goodrich (left) and Shannon McRae pack boxes to
be shipped to soldiers serving overseas. Columbia Bank sent
18 boxes to soldiers in Iraq.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

A U.S. Army unit was
the recipient of Columbia
Bank employees generos-
ity during the Christmas
Holidays.
Racheal Hatch, branch
manager of Columbia
Bank's south office, said
bank employees collected
items and donated them to
a U.S. Army unit in Iraq.
Hatch said the effort
started with one her
employees, Theresa
Goodrich, whose son-in-
law is stationed in Iraq. She


said she and Goodrich were
talking about sending him
packages, and they talked
about the south office send-
ing packages as well.
"That offer turned into
the south office sending
packages as well and that
turned into the bankwide
effort," Hatch said.
As a result of the effort,
packages were sent to the
25 soldiers in her son-in-
law's unit.
Bank employees sent
18 boxes over to Iraq, 13
of the boxes contained
Christmas stockings that
have travel-sized toilet-


ries, books, pencils, play-
ing cards, snacks, candy
and other items, while the
other five boxes contained
group items like trail mix,
games, more books and
things the troops could use
as a group.
The drive began before
Thanksgiving and culmi-
nated Dec. 3, lasting about
two weeks. Hatch said
more than 40 bank employ-
ees from all Columbia Bank
branches participated in the
collection drive.
"They received their
items Dec. 24," she said.
"Right before Christmas


they ended up getting all
of them."
The boxes were sent
to Deucemen of Charlie
Company, a unit in the U.S.
Army.
"We really wanted to
show the reason for the
season and contribute to
our U.S. military because
of what they do for us,"
Hatch said of the effort.
"We felt doing this for one
of our own is the reason
for the season and to give.
to the men and women of
the military who serve for
us year 'round no matter
what holiday it is."


Brandon Wesley Eggleton
Brandon Wesley Eggleton, age
22, of Fort White, FL died on
Thursday January 14, 2010. He
was a graduate of Fort White
High School
Class of 2005
and was a
member of
Hopeful Bap-

tist Church.vived by his mother
Father Darrell Eggleton of Forton
had a pas-



White, FL, sister Shannon Mer-mu-
sic and was a gifted writer
and composer. He was dearly
loved and brought joy and
sunshine to all who knew him.

father Darrell Eggleton of Fort
White, FL, sister Shannon Mer-
shon of Lake City, FL, brother
Eric Roberts of Panama City,
FL and maternal grandmother
Martha Young of Brooks-
ville, FL. and a host of
aunts, uncles and cousins.
Memorial service will
be held Saturday, Janu-
ary 23, 2010 at 2:00 P.M.
at Hopeful Baptist Church.
In lieu of flowers donations
can be made to Hopeful Baptist
Church for the Childrens Music
Ministry. Mail checks to Hope-
ful Baptist Church, 289 Hope-
ful Drive, Lake City, FL 32025.

Eli Mason Little
Eli Mason Little, seven month
old son of Brandy DuPree &
Jake Little, lost a valiant battle
with a heart defect on Monday,
January 18, 2010. Born on June


OBITUARIES

12, 2009 in the Shands at the
University of '
Florida, Eli
was diagnosed .
with the de-
fect prior to
his birth. He . . '2
along with his
team of physi-
cians fought
the problem
courageously to the end. Eli
will forever be remembered
by his family for his undying
courage and beautiful spirit.
He is survived by his parents,
Brandy DuPree and Jake Little;
a brother, Steven Little of Bran-
ford, Florida; his grandparents,
Mitch DuPree of Lake City;
Prudence Armijo of California;
Sharon Clifton of Lake City
and Steve Little of Lake City;
his great-grandparents, Ann Du-
Pree and Finley & Eloise Little
all of Lake City. Two aunts,
Cheyenne DuPree of Lake City
and Lynn LeGault of Gaines-
ville, Florida and an uncle, Joe
Little of Lake City also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Eli will be conducted at Noon
on Friday, January 22, 2010 in
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens
with Bishop John Luthie pre-
siding. Interment will follow.
The family will receive friends
from 5-7:00 Thursday evening
at the funeral home. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234 Please sign the
on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.comrn


Marion A. Youngs
On 14 January 2010, Marion A.
Youngs, 95, passed away peace-
fully at her home in East Side
Village, Lake City, Florida, with
family members and friends
near by. Marion is survived by
her husband Lee, 96, her five
children, twelve grandchildren,
and eleven great grandchildren.
Marion was born in Brook-
lyn, New York, and grew up in
Middletown, New York, with
her mother and three brothers,
all deceased. Marion and Lee
were high school sweethearts
who celebrated their seventy-
third wedding anniversary in
November. Marion was a de-
voted homemaker, amateur art-
ist and craftsman who enjoyed
painting, tying rugs, embroi-
dery, and quilting. Marion
and Lee moved to'Florida from
Virginia in the mid-sixties and
were one of the original home
owners in East Side Village.
Private family services are
planned for t later date. The
family asks in lieu of flowers
that donations be sent to the
SPCA. Arrangements are under
the direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. 'Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025. (386)752-
1234 Please sign the on-
line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Fla. Senate president:


no new taxes or fees


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Senate PresidentJeff
Atwater told his chamber's
budget writers Wednesday
not to raise taxes or fees
during this election year to
close a projected spending
gap of up to $3.2 billion.
The potential deficit is
the difference between
anticipated revenue and
the growing cost of meet-
ing high-priority demands
such as public schools and
Medicaid, the state-feder-
al program that provides
health care to low-income
citizens.
Lawmakers last year
relied on $2.2 billion in fee
and tax increases as well
as spending cuts and fed-
eral stimulus dollars to bal-
ance a $66.5 billion bud-
get, but Atwater told the
Senate Ways and Means
Committee that Floridians
"do not have one more dime
to send us."
"We will not extract one
more dollar from the small
business owner of this state or


from any Floridian's wallet,"
said the North Palm Beach
Republican, also a candidate
for chief financial officer.
Ways and Means
Chairman JD Alexander,
R-Lake Wales, said the
Legislature would have to
cut or reorder spending by
3 or 4 percent to close the
budget gap.
Atwater invited all 40 sen-
ators to the meeting that
included reports on the sta-
tus of Florida's economy.
Legislative economist
Amy Baker said Florida will
lag the rest of the nation in
recovering from the Great
Recession due largely to
the state's housing surplus.
She said unemployment,
which hit 11.4 percent in
November, likely will peak
at 12 percent later this year.
Baker also had some
advice for budget writers.
"Do nothing that adds any
more houses to Florida's
inventory until it can work
itself down some," she said.
"Be wary of anybody prom-
ising a panacea or quick fix
because they do not exist."
Alexander said the budget


gap is being driven mainly
by growing Medicaid rolls
and state employee retire-
ment costs as well as a drop
in property tax revenue
that's a big part of the state
public school financing sys-
tem. Taxes collected at the.
local level are down due
to declines in real estate
values and the slowdown in
new construction.
"We should be able to
make it work, but we're.
going to have some serious,
decisions to work through,"
Alexander said.
He said lawmakers need
to look hard at Medicaid to
make sure money is spent-
efficiently and root out
fraud and abuse that have ;
plagued the program.
Education is the big-,
gest part of the budget,'
but Alexander and Atwater
said they'd prefer not to :,
cut public school spending.
Alexander said he couldn't-',
make any promises but:
they'd "do everything we
can to maintain the good
work that's being done"
particularly by community
colleges.


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OPINION


Thursday, January 21, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


Quick

response

to shooting

was vital


local law enforce-
ment officials last
week put a quick
end to what could
have been a potentially deadly
situation.
Lake City Police officers and
Columbia County Sheriff's dep-
uties worked quickly on Friday
after receiving reports of gun-
shots fired in the area of Dade
and Avalon streets. After
officers were alerted to
the make and model of car
involved, they swiftly arrested
a pair of suspects. According to
reports, the shooting
allegedly took place after a
racially-charged argument
between two sets of men.
If the arrests had not been
made quickly, the results could
have been catastrophic. Armed
and dangerous men would
have been left on the streets
following an unsuccessful
drive-by attempt, and one of the
suspects would have possibly
returned to work - driving
our local children to and from
school - only hours after
allegedly taking part in the
shooting incident.
It's an image most parents
don't want to picture. But
thankfully that wasn't the case,
due to good teamwork between
two local agencies.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, Jan.
21, the 21st day of 2010.
There are 344 days left in
the year.
* Jan. 21, 1910, shortly
before 11 a.m., the Great
Paris Flood began as the
rain-swollen Seine River burst
its banks, sending water into
the French capital for more
than a week.
* In 1793, during the French
Revolution, King Louis XVI,
condemned for treason, was
. executed on the guillotine.
* In 1858, Felix Maria
Zuloaga became president of
Mexico upon the ouster of
SIgnacio Comonfort.
g In 1915, the first Kiwanis
Club was founded, in Detroit.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
* Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
. Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
:* letters per month published. Letters
- and guest columns are the opinion of
. the writers and not necessarily that of
Sthie Lake City Reporter.
S BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
. BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Bankers their own worst enemies


WASHINGTON
History is replete
with dumb moves
but in recent times
few are more so
than plans by the
nation's top banking officials
to hand out almost $146 billion
in increased pay and bonuses.
What in the world are they
thinking? To paraphrase a
' distinguished lawyer's famous
rejoinder to the late Sen. Joseph
McCarthy, 'Have they no
shame?'
The answer is as plain to
everyone as the latest increase
in credit card fees. With the
money sucked from the souls
and tax accounts of desperate �
Americans and bolstered by the
Federal Reserve's determina-
tion to keep the interest rates
down, the top 50 lending - if
they only would - and invest-
ment institutions have amassed
profits unimaginable two years
ago. While this has allowed
them to repay with interest the
money they were lent to keep
them afloat, that alone is not
enough to cover the actual cost
of the government bailout nor
does it absolve them from their
obligations and responsibilities
in the overall recovery process.
Nothing so much comes
to mind as the humorist
Will Rogers' address to the
American Bankers Association
in the midst of the Great
Depression. Thanking them for
inviting him, Rogers added that
he hoped he would be invited
back when the "other half of
your membership gets out of
jail." It was, of course,. a time
when much of the population
felt exactly that way, rooting for
the likes of John Dillinger to put
things right.
It is clearly that kind of public


Dan K.Thomasson

relations disaster and is likely
to cost them $90 billion in new
taxes over the next 10 years
if the Obama administration
has its way. That's the fee the
president would impose on the
leading institutions a few of
which would be hit for as much
or more than $2 billion a year.
Is it fair and might not some of
this ultimately be passed on to
customers? Whatever, all the
lobbying effort the banks can
manage in an effort to keep it
from happening probably won't
succeed in an atmosphere of
general outrage.
Seizing on this widespread
public unhappiness, the presi-
dent has used his bully pulpit
aggressively as a way of bolster-
ing his own declining approval
ratings. In his latest Saturday
radio address he blistered the
bankers as selfish and came
close to accusing them of delib-
erately putting their own inter-
ests ahead of the nation's, a sort
of financial treason, as it were.
"Now, like clockwork, the
banks - and politicians who
curry their favor - are already
trying to stop this fee from
going into effect," he said. '"The
very same firms reaping billions
of dollars in profits and report-
edly handing out more money
in bonuses and compensation
than ever before in history, are
now pleading poverty. It is a
sight to see."


In the face of such wither-
ing attacks, the bankers have
remained grim-faced, stubborn
and generally unresponsive. But
a few of the big 50 have decided
. to give the lavish bonuses in the
form of stock rather than cash
in what has been criticized as a
distinction without a difference.
For whatever reason,
Congress seems reluctant to
follow Great Britain's lead in
dealing with a similar situa-
tion. Responding to their own
bankers' intentions to dole out
large bonuses, British lawmak-
ers adopted a new tax levy on
bonuses above $40,000.
The American bankers' cause
is also being damaged by the
fact that their commercial sides
- most of their enormous prof-
its come on the investment side
- have been unusually tight fist-
ed in their lending to small busi-
nesses and individuals, demand-
ing far more collateral and
certification for repayment than
is normal even in good times. It
is an obvious overreaction to the
kind of wild, irresponsible lend-
ing, practices that brought down
the housing market and forced
millions of Americans into fore-
closure and bankruptcy.
Until now the White House
has been cautious about its
criticism of the banking system
because of the potential impact
on what many still believe is a
tenuous recovery. But histori-
cally it has been the bankers in
tough times that have been an
easy target for the dispossessed
and this is no different except
that rarely have the gnomes of
Wall Street given their enemies
such an opportunity.

0 Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


OTHER OPINION


Poe's night of brandy, roses may be over


A spooky ritual that
rather aptly
honored America's
master of the
macabre may have
come to a quiet, unannounced
end.
For the past 61 years, in the
hours between midnight and
5:30 a.m. of Jan. 19, a
mysterious, dark-clad figure
has slipped into the
churchyard of Westminster
Presbyterian in Baltimore to
leave three roses and a
half-empty bottle of cognac on
the grave of Edgar Allan Poe.
On Tuesday, for the first time
since 1949, the "Poe Toaster"
failed to show.
By tradition, the Toaster
is allowed to enter and leave
the gravesite un-accosted and
the identity remains a secret.


Several dozen hard-core Poe
buffs from as far away as Texas
and Georgia had gathered
outside the churchyard to wit-
ness the annual rite, passing
the time by reading aloud from
his works and singing "Happy
Birthday" to Poe. It fell to Jeff
Jerome to inform the assembly
that the Toaster was likely not
coming.
Perhaps the faithful visitor
had the flu or had an
accident or was otherwise
incapacitated, because if the
ritual were going to stop, it
was speculated that last year,
the 200th anniversary of
Poe's birth, would have been
a more suitable stopping
point.
Jerome is the curator of the
Poe House and Museum and
has been in annual attendance


since 1977. Jerome has to con-
tend with periodic efforts by
Richmond, Va., where Poe was
born and the home of another
museum, and Philadelphia,
where he did most of his work,
to make the case that they
should have the remains rather
than Baltimore, where he died
in a tavern.
Poe's descendants say he
should remain in Baltimore.
Notes left at the grave
indicate that the Toaster's
ritual may have been passed
on to new hands at least once,
and perhaps twice, before.
Just in case, Jerome plans to
continue his vigil for another
two years.


* Scripps Howard News Service


Martin Schram
martin.schram@gmail.com

Lincoln,

King saved

us from us

at our worst



at this place that
represents the
best of the vision
of America. Four
young women are sitting on
the cold stone steps, several
other people are standing near-
by, and no one is talking.
All are savoring the most
eloquent message of a three-
day weekend that is now in its
final hour. The message too
is silent: it is one small floral
bouquet, wrapped in a cone
of white paper, placed there
by someone unknown who
climbed the 39 steps from the
roadway and laid the flowers
on the landing, next to words
that are chiseled into the stone.
step: "I Have a Dream."
It was on that spot, in 1963,
that the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr. had spoken those
words. Abe Lincoln had his
back, sculptured huge and yet
always seeming understated,
even sitting there in the mas-
sive granite of his monument.
Tonight, to the east, the
Washington Monument gleams
impressively white against a
black sky and its image also
shimmers impressionistically
in the black water of the long
Reflecting Pool, around which
a quarter of a million people
crowded in to hear Dr. King's
message.
Abe Lincoln and Martin
Luther King Jr. Two men who
saved America from itself, a
century apart. We can only
wonder and wish we knew
what they would say to us
about how we have turned out,
so far.
What would Abraham and
Martin say upon learning that
we are a nation that is led by
an African-American man who
is president? With a First Lady
who is the great-great-great
granddaughter of a woman
who was a slave in South
Carolina?
What would these men say
upon learning that we are a
nation at war in two countries
half a world away. And that our
elected representatives have
once again willfully plunged
itself into political gridlock at
home - while millions can-
not find work or afford health
care?
It was almost 11 p.m. when
a man carrying a rolled up
poster walked up the first 39
steps of the Lincoln Memorial
and stopped beside the bou-
quet. He said his girlfriend was
in London and feeling down
and this was her favorite place
on the planet. So he asked
a bystander.to take a feel-
good picture he could email
to her. Then he posed: Dr.
King's flowers at his feet, Abe
Lincoln's countenance over his
shoulder and his poster - a
big red heart lettered "Sarah"
- overhead.
So here's our plan: Dispatch
a tour bus to the Capitol and
drive all 535 members of
Congress back to this special
place. Let them spend one
midnight hour in mandatory
reflection. Just one hour, in
silence, just once.
Hopefully many will recall
what they once found inspir-
ing about those two men who
saved us from the worst within
us. Hopefully, some can rekin-
dle that spirit anew. For, here
we are heading toward our


own undoing, once again.

* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A


I - - I - - -









Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2010 5A


Obama, Dems consider pared-back health care bill


By RICARDO ALONSO-
ZALDIVAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTO N
- Chastened by the
Democratic Senate loss in
Massachusetts, President
Barack Obama and con-
gressional allies signaled
Wednesday they may try
to scale back his sweeping
health care overhaul in an
effort to at least keep parts
of it alive.
A simpler, less ambi-
tious bill emerged as an
alternative only hours
after the loss of the party's
crucial 60th Senate seat
forced the Democrats to
slow their all-out drive to
pass Obama's signature
legislation despite fierce
Republican opposition.
The White House is still
hoping the House can pass
the Senate bill in a quick
strike, but Democrats are
now considering other
options.
No decisions have been
made, lawmakers said,
but they laid out a new
approach that could still


ASSOCIATED PF
Massachusetts State Sen. Scott Brown, R-Wrentham, holds up a copy of the Boston Herald as he celebrates in Boston on
Tuesday, after winning a special election held to fill the U.S. Senate seat left vacant by the death of Sen. Edward Kennedy.


include these provisions:
limiting the ability of insur-
ance companies to deny
coverage to people with
medical problems, allow-
ing young adults to stay
on their parents' policies,
helping small businesses
and low-income people pay
premiums and changing


Medicare to encourage
payment for quality care
instead of sheer volume of
services.
Obama said the election
results wouldn't sour his
interest in passing a health
.care bill.
"Now, I could have said,
'Well, we'll just do what's


safe, we'll just take on those
things that are completely
non-controversial,"' Obama
said in an interview with
ABC News. "The problem
is: the things that are non-
controversial end up being
the things that don't solve
the problem."
Yet, the goal of trying to


cover nearly all Americans
would be put off further
into the future.
Obama urged lawmak-
ers not to try to jam a bill
through, but scale the
proposal down to what he
called "those elements of
the package that people
agree on."


"We know that we( need
insurance reform, tilt the
health insurance compa-
nies are taking advantage
of people," the president
said. "We know that we
have to have some form of
cost containment because
if we don't then our bud-
gets are going to blow up.
And we know that small
businesses are going to
need help."
One pot enti a
Republican convert for
health care legislation
remained an enigma. Sen.
Olympia Snowe of Maine.
who has been in regu-
lar contact with Oba.ia,
roundly criticized -the
Democrats' hard push "to
pass their bill. But shei
would not rule out voting
for something in the end.
Asked if the Democratic
bills are dead, Snowe
responded: "I never
say anything is dead,
but clearly I think they
have to revisit the entire
issue."
Some Democrats weren't
ready for that, despite ,the
president's new words.


HAITI: Prayers answered


Continued From Page 1A
Haiti. Williams had initially
received a text message
indicating everyone was
OK, but received no verbal
communication.
"For several days I
couldn't hear anything," he
said. "It was an emotional
time."
This week, Williams was
finally able to reach the
pastor at the orphanage.
"The building was
destroyed but no one was
hurt," he said. '"The kids
are camping out like every-
one else."
Although they know the
status of their families, the
Josephs said their focus
remains on rebuilding the
country.
"We still think about the
others," Louis Joseph said.
"We don't only think about


our family. Our heart goes
out to the Haitian people."
Any contribution can
help the country, Marie
Joseph said.
"Nothing is too much or
too little," she said.
Williams is on his
way over to Haiti and
will work with a team to
bring supplies and build
a makeshift house for
the orphanage, he said.
Williams plans to stay
there for at least a week
before coming back to get
more of what the orphan-
age will need.
Helping the country is
far from over, he said.
"There's a need for
people to keep giving for
the long term," Williams
said. "It's going to take a
long time."


RELIEF: Still needed
Continued From Page 1A


Prior to the shipping, the
Rev. Louis Joseph, pastor of
First Haitian Baptist Church
of Lake City, and his wife,
Marie, will go to the coun-
try. The church is a part of
the association, and they
want to get in touch with
local people to help with the
distribution of supplies..
"The big organizations
are helping, but we still
need leaders from the local
people," Louis Joseph said.
The Josephs will return
on a second trip with sup-
plies.
Roberts said his goal is to
go with the Josephs on their


second trip to help assess
the country's needs.
More information about
both collections is available
at www.lsthaitianbaptistc
hurchoflakecity.org, love-
andserve.com or calling
.Blanchard at 758-5471.
The collection will be an
ongoing process for both
locations and as needs are
evaluated, requested items
may change, Blanchard
said. Donations will help
the country rebuild.
"This is something they
are going to need for years
and definitely over the next
few months," he said.


LOCAL STOCKS

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.68 6.5 13 25.83 -.37 -7.8
AutoZone NY ... 13 156.37 -.91 -1.1
BkoflAm NY .04 .2 ... 16.49 +.17 +9.5
BobEvn Nasd .72 2.5 ... 29.32 -.57 +1.2
CN8FnPA Nasd .66 4.2 17 15.56 -.17 -2.7
CSX NY .88 1.9 16 47.35 -3.16 -2.4
Chevron NY 2.72 3.5 13 78.15 -1.53 +1.5
Csco Nasd ... ... 25 24.41 -.44 +2.0
Citigrp NY ...... ...3.46 -.08 +4.5
CocaCI NY 1.64 3.0 21 55.50 -.92 -2.6
Delhaize NY 2.01 2.6 ... 76.09 +.06 -.8
DirFBearrs NY ...... ...16.94 +.04 -12.8
ExxonMbI NY 1.68 2.5 16 68.03 -1.24 -.2
FPLGrp NY 1.89 3.8 12 49.98 -.91 -5.4
FamilyDIr NY .54 1,8 14 30.57 -.25 +9.8
FordM NY ... ... ... 11.51 -.24 +15.1
GenElec NY .40 2.4 15 16.50 -.04 +9.1
HomeDp NY .90 3.1 21 28.66 -.22 -.9
iShEMkts NY .58 1.4 .. 41.77 -1.03 +.7
iShR2K NY .72 1.1 ... 63.91 -.94 +2.4
Intel Nasd .63 3.0 27 21.08 +.03 +3.3
JPMorgCh NY .20 .5 19 43.40 +.12 +4.3


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg
Lowes NY .36 1.6 19 22.80 -.31 -2.5
McDnlds NY 2.20 3.5 16 63.01 -.47 +.9
MicronT Nasd ......... 9.98 -.30 -5.5
Microsoft Nasd .52 1.7 20 30.59 -.52 +.3
NYTimes NY ........ 13.31 -.39 +7.7
NobltyH Nasd ......... 10.27 -.52 -1.7
OcciPel NY 1.32 1.7 26 78.21 -1.15 -3.9
Penney NY .80 3.1 22 25.78 -.34 -3.1
PepsiCo NY 1.80 2.9 19 61,95 -.38 +1.9
Pfizer NY .72 3.6 14 19.94 -.06 +9.6
Potash NY .40 .4 23 113,34 -1.61 +4.5
PwShs 00QQQNasd .21 .5 ., 45.92 -.67 +.4
Ryder NY 1.00 2.5 34 39.61 -.51 -3,8
SeatsHIdgs Nasd ......... 102.55 -3.40 +22.9
SidusXM h Nasd ......... .73 +.06 +20.8
SouthnCo NY 1.75 5.2 17 33.43 -.22 +.3
SprinlNex NY ... ... ... 3.55 -.13 -3.0
SPDR NY 2.29 2.0 ... 113.89 -1.17 +2.2
SPDR Fncl NY .25 1.7 ., 15.09 -.04 +4,8
TimeWmrs NY .75 2.6 ... 28.62 -.11 -1.8
WalMart NY 1.09 2.0 16 53.86 -.17 +.8
WellsFargo NY .20 .7 33 27.82 -.46 +3.1


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L-AITUL


6A LAKE C'IY RHUEP H I l-H f III THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2010 Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


FDA debates tougher cancer warning on tanning beds


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON - Just
as millions head to tanning
beds to prepare for spring
break, the Food and Drug
Administration will be
debating how to toughen
warnings that those sun-
lamps pose a cancer risk.
Yes, sunburns are par-
ticularly dangerous. But
there's increasing scientific
consensus that there's no
such thing as a safe tan,
either.
* This is a message that
Katie Donnar, 18, dismissed
until a year ago when, pre-
paring for the Miss Indiana
pageant, she discovered a
growth on her leg - an
early-stage melanoma, the
most dangerous form of
skin cancer.
She can't prove tanning
beds are to blame, but start-
ed using them as a sixth-
grade cheerleader, she says
stepped under the bulbs
about every other day dur-
ing parts of high school,
and at one point even owned
one. No more.
"It seemed somewhat
of a myth that I was put-
ting myself at risk," says
Donnar, of Bruceville, Ind.,
who found the melanoma
before it spread.
"The warning label was
so small, nothing to make


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Katie Donnar, 18, shows her scar from where the melanoma was removed from the calf of her leg Jan. 14 in Vincennes, Ind.,
in front of a tanning bed like the on she used at her home and at the tanning salons. Donnar was in the sixth grade when she
started using tanning beds


me stop and think, 'This is radiation that both they
real,"' she said of the tan- and the sun emit. They'd
ning bed. long been considered
The World Health "probable" carcinogens,
Organization's cancer divi- but what tipped the scales:
sion last summer listed An analysis of numerous
tanning beds as defini- studies that concluded the
tive cancer-causers, right risk of melanoma jumps by
alongside the ultraviolet 75 percent in people who


used tanning beds in their Tanning beds do bear some
teens and 20s. warnings about the cancer
Next comes the U.S. Food link, but the FDA recently
and Drug Administration, decided those labels aren't
which has long regulated visible enough to consum-
tanning beds as "Class I ers and don't fully convey
devices," a category of the risk, especially to young
low-risk medical devices people.
that includes bandages. So in March, the FDA's


scientific advisers open a
public hearing to explore
stricter tanning bed regula-
tion, both stiffer warnings
and reclassifying them to
allow other steps.
"We don't recommend
using them at all, but we
know people do use them
so we want to make them as
low-risk as possible," says
FDA UV radiation specialist
Sharon Miller.
The Indoor Tanning
Association, already
fighting pending legisla-
tion that would tax tan-
ning salons to help pay
for Congress' health care
overhaul, argues there's
no new science to justify
increased FDA regula-
tion. Any risk is to people
who overdo it, says ITA
President Dan Humiston,
arguing that's easier to do
in the sun.
The industry is open to
some change in warning
labels, Humiston says, to
ensure customers "under-
stand the whole process,
so there's no chance they
could be overexposed, no
chance they could get a
sunburn."
But the FDA also says
some people go too often,
using tanning beds three
times a week, for example,
when its research shows
once a week would provide
visually the same tan.


By MARIA CHENG
AP Medical Writer

LONDON - Here's a
new warning from health
experts: Sitting is deadly.
Scientists are increasing-
ly warning that sitting for
prolonged periods - even
if you also exercise regular-
ly - could be bad for your
health. And it doesn't mat-
ter where the sitting takes
place - at the office, at
school, in the car or before
a computer or TV - just
the overall number of hours
it occurs.
Research is preliminary,
but several studies suggest
people who spend most of
their days sitting are more
likely to be fat, have a heart
attack or even die.
In an editorial published
this week in the British
Journal of Sports Medicine,
Elin Ekblom-Bak of the
Swedish School of Sport and
Health Sciences suggested
that authorities rethink how
they-define physical activity
to highlight the dangers of
sitting.
While health officials
have issued guidelines
recommending minimum
amounts of physical activ-
ity, they haven't suggest-
ed people try to limit how
much time they spend in a


Study:

Obesity

rate not

rising

By LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO - Raise
a glass of diet soda: The
nation's obesity rate appears
to have stalled. But the lat-
est numbers still show that
more than two-thirds of
adults and almost a third of
kids are overweight, with
no sign of improvement.
According to govern-
ment data from the years
2007-08 published
Wednesday, the obesity rate
has held steady for about
* five years, reflecting earlier
signs that it had stalled after
steadily climbing.
Dr. William Dietz, an
obesity expert with the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, cautiously
called the results promis-
- ing. "We're at the corner;
we haven't turned the cor-
ner," he said.


seated position.
"After four hours of sit-
ting, the body starts to send
harmful signals," Ekblom-
Bak said. She explained
that genes regulating the
amount of glucose and fat
in the body start to shut
down.
Even for people who
exercise, spending long
stretches of time sitting
at a desk is still harmful.
Tim Armstrong, a physical
activity expert at the-World
Health Organization, said
people who exercise every
day - but still spend a lot
of time sitting - might get
more benefit if that exer-
cise were spread across the
day, rather than in a single
bout.
That wasn't welcome
news for Aytekin Can, 31,
who works at a London
financial company, and
spends most of his days sit-
ting in front of a computer.
Several evenings a week,
Can also teaches jiu jitsu, a
Japanese martial art involv-
ing wrestling, and also do-es
Thai boxing.
"I'm sure there are some
detrimental effects of stay-
ing still for too long, but
I hope that being active
when I can helps," he said.
"I wouldn't want to thihk
the sitting could be that


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Still, in a study published
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than 17,000 Canadians
for about a dozen years,
researchers found people
who sat more had a higher
death risk, independently
of whether or not they
exercised..
"We don't have enough
evidence yet to say how
much sitting is bad," said
Peter Katzmarzyk of the
Pennington Biomedical
Research Center in Baton
Rouge, who led the
Canadian study. "But it
seems the more you can
get up and interrupt this
sedentary behavior, the
better."
Figures from a U.S.
survey in 2003-2004 found
Americans -spend more
than half their time sitting,
from working at their desks
to sitting in cars.
Experts said more
research is needed to figure
out just how much sitting is
dangerous, and what might
be possible to -offset those
effects.
"People should keep
exercising because that has
a lot of benefits," Ekblom-
Bak said. "But when they're
in the office, they should
try to interrupt sitting as
often as possible," she said.


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Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
t iiby @lC keczityiepotrtetcom


SPORTS


Thursday, January


21,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Tebow heads to Senior Bowl


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakeatyreport ercon

Jets


are no

favorite
I don't know
how, but there
seems to be this
growing opinion
that the New
York Jets hold some
sort of physiological
edge against the
Indianapolis Colts
heading into Sunday's
game.
The question is simply
how?
What have the Jets
accomplished to show
that they hold a premium
advantage against the
Colts? Was it their 14-
point win against Peyton
Manning and company
to break their undefeated
streak that warrants such
backing?
Memory serves that
the Jets were on the edge
of playoff elimination
heading into that week.
New York may have
walked out with a win,
but the Colts walked out
at halftime.
Coach Jim Caldwell
may be a first-season
coach, but the guy has
his lid screwed on pretty
tight. There's so much
hype surrounding an
undefeated season these
days that many coaches
get caught up in fantasies.
Caldwell chose to keep
his team rooted in reality.
The only thing that
has mattered to the Colts
this season is reaching a
Super Bowl and winning
the whole thing. With
minor injuries throughout
their football team,
Caldwell chose to get
the Colts ready for the
postseason with home-
field advantage wrapped
up against the Jets.
This time, we'll see
what both teams really
have to offer. Though
the Jets shouldn't be
considered a favorite by
any means, New York
does have a talented
team worthy of being
involved in the game,
although, it has needed a
little luck.
The Jets do things
in an opposite, yet
effective manner than
the Colts. While Peyton
and company win with
offensive firepower,
the Jets concentrate
on dismantling their
opponents with
stabilizing defense.
Rex Ryan's team has
exemplified defense over
the first two weeks of the
playoffs, but they still
needed a little luck to
pull off the upset against
Phillip Rivers and the
San Diego Chargers last
week.
Nate Kaeding has been
the most accurate kicker
in the NFL during the
regular season, but the
veteran missed three field
goals when it mattered to
let the Jets advance. Don't
look for another gift from
the Colts.

Indianapolis 23,,
New York 13

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter:


Quarterback will
use game as
NFL audition.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE - Tim
Tebow's NFL potential has
been debated for years.
His throwing motion,
arm strength and pocket
presence have been dis-
sected, examined and
critiqued. His determi-
nation, leadership skills
and work ethic have been
commended, lauded and
revered.
Some have little doubt he
will be a star quarterback
in the pros. Others believe
he would be better suited at
tight end or H-back.
The former Gators' stand-
out has made his intentions
clear. Next week, at the
Senior Bowl in Mobile, Ala.,
he gets a chance to prove to
NFL scouts, coaches and
general managers that he
can play the game's most
prominent position at its
highest level.
"I've heard it once or
twice," Tebow said recently,
when asked about people
questioning his NFL pros-
pects. "I'm excited about it.
I've heard a lot of it. Kind
of heard that since high
school, though. People
didn't think I could throw
at Florida, and we did OK
at that.
"And going to the next
level, just try to prove peo-
ple wrong. That's my goal.
It's fun. It'll be exciting. I
just want an opportunity
to be a quarterback at the
next level and to get that
chance."
Tebow may have silenced
some critics with his perfor-
mance in the Sugar Bowl
earlier this month. The 2007
Heisman Trophy winner
completed 31 of 35 passes
for a school-record 482
yards and three touchdowns
in a 51-24 victory that was
considerably more lopsided


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida quarterback Tim Tebow does the chomp after beating Tennessee on Sept. 19 in Gainesville.


than the final score.
He also ran for 51 yards
and a score, and finished
with more yards (533) than
anyone in the history of the
Bowl Championship Series.
After the game, Tebow
declined to speculate on
what the best passing game
of his career might do for
his NFL draft stock. But
before Tebow completed
his thoughts, Florida coach
Urban Meyer chimed in.
"I'll help you answer
that question," Meyer
said. 'Thirty-one of 35, 482
yards, three touchdowns,
one of the most efficient
quarterbacks ever to play


the game, a part of two
national championships.
He's a winner, and unless
the job description changes
at some other level of foot-
ball, he's a winner and he'll
win at the next level, too.
That's the way I feel about
it."
Tebow left Florida
with several NCAA pass-
ing records, even more
Southeastern Conference
marks and his name all over
the school record book.
His college football leg-
acy is secure. But that has
done little to solidify his
NFL future. Scouts can
rattle off concerns regard-


ing the 6-foot-3, 245-pound
Tebow: He has taken just
about every snap from
shotgun formation, has a
long windup, throws sort of
sidearm, has average arm
strength and holds the ball
too long at times.
Some believe Tebow will
be the latest in long list of
star college quarterbacks
who failed to have the same
impact in the NFL, join-
ing guys like Nebraska's
Eric Crouch, Miami's Ken
Dorsey and Florida's Danny
Wuerffel.
Others insist Tebow will
be different, saying his
athleticism and willingness


to do whatever it takes to
find success will transcend
talent.
"I'll be surprised if work-
outs and all-star games
change teams' opinions on
Tebow," ESPN draft ana-
lyst Todd McShay said. "I
think the one thing that will
help the most for him is
sitting down in those inter-
view rooms. Remember, all
it takes is one team and
one decision-maker to fall
in love with him to take him
a half-round or maybe a full
round ahead of where he
should go.
TEBOW continued on 2B


Fort White advances in

district tournament


Fort White High's Bobby Tremble heads a
Taylor County Highon Dec. 30.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ball during a game against


Lady Tigers run
undefeated record to
9-0 during season.
From staff reports

Fort White High's girls soccer
team has struggled this season, but
the Lady Indians are going down
swinging in an attempt to extend
their playoff streak to four years.
Fort White advanced to the
District 5-3A semifinals with a 3-2
win in the Nos. 4-5 seed play-in game
against Williston High on Tuesday at
Newberry High.
The Lady Indians led off the scor-
ing with Casey DuBose scoring on a
penalty kick.
Williston tied the game, then took
a 2-1 lead into halftime.
Christine Weddle scored an
unassisted goal to even the game at
2-2.
Fort White reclaimed the lead with
Caitlin Congi scoring from 35 yards
out and held on for the win.
"I'm really proud of them; it's a
young team," coach Perry Sauls
said. "We only have one senior and
two juniors. We were able to step up in
the second half and shut them down
with our defense. Alison Wrench
played well and Virginia Vasquez had
her best game of the season."
Fort White (4-11-4) plays top-seed
Suwannee High at 5 p.m. Thursday
in Newberry.
The host Panthers (No. 3
seed) play No. 2 Santa Fe High at
7 p.m.


Lady Tigers weightlifting

Columbia High ran its undefeat-
ed record to 9-0 against Keystone
Heights High on Tuesday in Lake
City.
The Lady Tigers came away with
a 66-20 victory to keep their unde-
feated season in tact.
"This was our last regular-season
game before the sectional meet and
it helped up attain one of our goals,"
coach Mitch Shoup said. "We said
before the season that we wanted to
be undefeated in the regular season.
I'm proud of the way all of our girls
have competed and improved over
the course of the year. We'll drop
to about 10 to 15 girls form the sec-
tional tournament. After that, we're
looking for eight to 10 of them to
qualify for state."
Columbia competes at Belleview
High in the sectional tournament
on Jan. 30. Weigh-ins begin at 8 a.m.
Lifting begins at 10 a.m.
Winners against Keystone Heights
were: Ashley Thomas (101), Pheobe
Johnson (110), Tara Stephens
(119), Ashley Shaw (129), Alaina
Timmons (139), Alix Williams (154),
Celeste Gomez (169), Amanda
Roach (183) and Dana Roberts
(Unlimited).

Fort White soccer
Fort White's boys soccer team lost,
8-0, to Oak Hall School on Tuesday
in Gainesville.
The Indians (2-10-4) play at
Columbia High at 7 p.m. today.


_ _L I













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, Abu
Dhabi Championship, first round, at Abu
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (same-day
tape)
3 p.m.
TGC - PGA Tour, Bob Hope Classic,
second round, at La Quinta, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN - Louisville at Seton Hall
ESPN2 - Indiana at Penn St.
9 p.m.
ESPN - Florida at Arkansas
. 10:30 p.m.
FSN -Washington at UCLA
NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m.
TNT - L.A. Lakers at Cleveland
10:30 p.m.
TNT - LA. Clippers at Denver
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, second
round, at Melbourne, Australia (same-
day tape)
9 p.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, third
round, at Melbourne, Australia
3 a.m.
ESPN2 - Australian Open, third
round, at Melbourne,Australia

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Conference Championships
Sunday
N.Y. Jets at Indianapolis, 3 p.m. (CBS)
Minnesota at New Orleans, 6:40 p.m.
(FOX)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 31
At Miami
AFC vs. NFC, 7:20 p.m. (ESPN)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 7
At Miami
NFC champion vs. AFC champion,
6:25 p.m. (CBS)

All-Star games
Saturday
East-West Shrine Classic
At Orlando
East vs. West, 3 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
LA. Lakers, at Cleveland, 8 p.m.


L.A Clippers at Denver, 10 30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Miami at Washington, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Toronto. 7 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis. 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Detroit, 8 p.m.
LA. Lakers at New York, 8 p.ih.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Golden State,
10:30 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m

NBA 20,000-point club

Through Monday
(x-active)
I. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 38,387
2. Karl Malone 36,928
3. Michael Jordan 32,292
4.Wilt Chamberlain 31,419
5. x-Shaquille O'Neal 28,014
6. Moses Malone 27,409
7. Elvin Hayes 27,313
8. Hakeem Olajuwon 26,946
9. Oscar Robertson 26,710
10. Dominique Wilkins 26,668
I I.John Havlicek 26,395
12. Alex English 25,613
13. Reggie Miller 25,279
14. Jerry West 25,192
15. x-Kobe Bryant 24,981
16. Patrick Ewing 24,815
17. x-Allen Iverson 24,247
18. Charles Barkley 23,757
19. Robert Parish 23,334
20.Adrian Dantley 23,177
21. Elgin Baylor 23,149
22. Clyde Drexler 22,195
23. Gary Payton 21,813
24. Larry Bird 21,791
25 x-Kevin Garnett 21,721
26. Hal Greer 21,586
27.Walt Bellamy 20,941
28. Bob Pettit 20,880
29. David Robinson 20,790
30. George Gervin 20,708
3 I. Mitch Richmond 20,497
32. x-Ray Allen 20,298
33. x-Dirk Nowitzki 20,102
34.Tom Chambers 20,049

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Game
No. 15 Gonzaga vs. Pepperdine, 9 p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open seeds
At Melbourne Park
Melbourne,Australia
Wednesday
Men
Second Round
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Lukas
Lacko, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2.
Juan Martin del Potro (4), Argentina,


def. James Blake, United States, 6-4, 6-7
(3), 5-7, 6-3, 10-8
Andy Murray (5), Britain, def Marc
Gicquel, France. 6- I, 6-4, 6-3
Andy Roddick (7), United States, def
Thomaz Bellucci. Brazil, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4
Fernando Gonzalez (I I), Chile, def
Marsel IlhanTurkey, 6-3, 6-4.7-5.
Gael Monfils (12), France, def. Ahtonio
Veic, Croatia, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4.
Marin Cilic (14), Croatia, def. Bernard
Tomic,Australia, 6-7 (6), 6-3. 4-6, 6-2, 6-4.
Stanislas Wawrinka (19), Switzerland,
def. Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2.
Tomas Berdych (21), Czech Republic,
lost to Evgeny Korolev, Kazakhstan, 6-4,
6-4, 7-5.
Ivan Ljubicic (24), Croatia, def.Andrey
Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 6-3.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (27), Germany,
def. Wayne Odesnik, United States, 6-4,
3-6, 6-3. 6-2.
Viktor Troicki (29), Serbia, lost to
Florian Mayer, Germany, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6
(2),6-1.
John Isner (33), United States, def.
Louk Sorensen, Ireland, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 7-5.

Women
First Round
Caroline Wozniacki (4). Denmark, def.
Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, 6-4, 6-2.
Victoria Azarenka (7), Belarus, def.
Stephanie Cohen-Aloro, France, 6-2, 6-0.
Vera Zvonareva (9), Russia, def. Kristina
Kucova, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-0.
Li Na (16), China, def. Marina Erakovic,
New Zealand, 6-2, 6-0.
Daniela Hantuchova (22), Slovakia, def.
Viktoriya Kutuzova, Ukraine, 3-6, 6-1, 7-5.
Elena Vesnina (28), Russia, lost to
Tathiana Garbin, Italy, 7-6 (5), 6-4.
Shahar Peer (29), Israel, def. Lucie
Hradecka, Czech Republic, 6-7 (5), 6-2,
6-1.
Second Round
Dinara Safina (2), Russia, def. Barbora
Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic,
6-3,6-4.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (3), Russia, def.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 6-2,
6-2.
Elena Dementieva (5), Russia, lost to
Justine Hehin, Belgium, 7-5, 7-6 (6).
Jelena Jankovic (8), Serbia, def. Katie
O'Brien, Britain, 6-2, 6-2.
. Marion Bartoli (I t), France, def.Sandra
Zahlavova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4.
Flavia Pennetta (12), Italy, lost toYanina
Wickmayer, Belgium, 7-6 (2), 6- I.
Kim Clijsters (15), Belgium, def.
Tamarine Tanasugarn,Thailand, 6-3, 6-3.
Nadia Petrova (19), Russia, def. Kaia
Kanepi, Estonia, 6-4, 6-4.
Maria *Jose Martinez Sanchez (24),
Spain, lost to Zheng Jie, China, 2-6, 6-2,
6-3.
Aravane Rezai (26), France, lost to
Angelique Kerber, Germany, 6-2, 6-3.
Alisa Kleybanova (27), Russia, def.
Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 6-4, 6-3.
Kateryna Bondareko (30), Ukraine,
lost to Elena Baltacha, Britain, 6-2, 7-5.
Alona Bondarenko (31), Ukraine, def.
Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-4, 7-5.


BRIEFS


CHS BASEBALL
Booster club

meeting today
The CHS Dugout Club
has a meeting at 6 p.m.
today at the school's
Career Center. A field
clean-up day is planned on
Saturday.
For details, call Greg
Bailey at 755-6316.

CHS TRACK
Fundraiser meal
set for Jan. 30
Columbia High girls
track has a breakfast
fundraiser at Kazbor's
Grille from 7:30-10:30 a.m.
on Jan. 30. Proceeds also
will benefit the Eye of the
Tiger middle school team.
. For tickets, e-mail coach
April Morse at ,
eanbz@bellsouth.net.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Falcons open
season Saturday
The Columbia County
Falcons semi-pro football
team opens its season
against the First Coast
Cardinals at 7 p.m.
Saturday at Memorial
Stadium. The team is
offering a free football
camp for players ages
5-13, beginning at
2:15 p.m., followed by a
camp flag football game.
The top flag teams will play
at halftime. Local bands
will entertain prior to
kickoff.
Admission is $6. There
, is no charge for children
ages 5-13 and military
personnel in uniform or
with ID.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fort White
registration set
The Fort White Girls
Softball Association has
league registration for girls
age 4-16 set for 10 a.m. to


2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 30,
and Feb. 6. Sign-up is at
the South Columbia Sports
Park Concession Stand in
Fort White. Cost is $40
per player.
For details, call Rodney
Cole at (904) 813-8910.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
USSSA tryouts
set for February
Richardson Community
Center is hosting tryouts
for its boys 14-under
USSSA basketball team
from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on
Feb. 1-5, and
3:30-5:30 p.m. on Feb. 6.
Permission forms must be
signed in order to try out.
For details, call Varion
Coppock at 754-7095.


Tryouts set for
girls travel teams
The AAU Streethawks
travel basketball teams
for boys 13-and-under and
girls 15-and-under has
tryouts planned for 6-8 p.m.
Feb. 4-5 at the Richardson
Middle School gym.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ALGIE I


For details, call Joel
Thomas at 623-2018 or
(386) 963-2343, or Melissa
Thomas at (386) 269-1476.

RUNNING
Registration open
for Olustee 5K
The 2010 Step Fitness
Blue Grey 5K is 7:30 a.m.
on Feb. 13. The race will
benefit the March of Dimes
in honor of Alexander Ross
McCollum. Business and
personal donations are
being sought. Registration
is available online at www.
active.com and by mail.
For details, call Step
Fitness at (386) 438-5830.

CHS TENNIS
Girls tryouts
begin Monday
Columbia High girls
tennis has tryouts set
for Monday through
Wednesday.
For details, call coach
Tabitha McMahon at
755-8080, Ext. 238.

* From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


SN I ONE 15 NEEEUP . J
S - - - Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon,

Print your answer here: L I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PENCE DUCAT PUNDIT UNHOOK
Answer: What the quack doctor did when the police
arrived - "DUCKED" OUT


MIDDLE SCHOOL ROUNDUP


Lake City wrestling dominates

North Florida Championships


From staff reports

Lake City Middle School
wrestling hosted the North
Florida Championships on
Saturday and Falcons came
away with much of the
trophy hardware.
Lake City placed 16
wrestlers in the top four
and won the championship
with 287.5 team points.
Lake Asbury Junior High
was second at 237.5, and
Lakeside Junior High was
third with 221.5 points.
Four Lake City
wrestlers won their weight
class - Daniel Devers at


130 pounds, Lucas Bradley
at 171 pounds, Carlos Vega-
Santiago at 215 pounds,
and Marcus Zieghler at 285
pounds.
Devers and Bradley
were 3-0 for the tourna-
ment, while Vega-Santiago
and Zieghler were 2-0.
Lake City runners-up
were Blake Blevins (2-1
tournament record) at 75
pounds, Kaleb Warner (2-1)
at 90 pounds, Alex-Enriquez
(3-1) at 95 pounds, Edriech
Rosa-Fernandez (3-1) at 103
pounds and William Walker
(2-1) at 145 pounds,
Consolation final winners


(third place) for Lake City
were Jacob Dicks (3-1) at
80 pounds, Cody Culbreth
(4-1) at 119 pounds, Robbie
Holmes (3-1) at 125 pounds
and Timmy Thompson
(3-1) at 140 pounds.
Consolation runners-up
(fourth place) were DeSean
Mann (2-2) at 85 pounds,
Cody Pritchard (2-2) at 135
pounds and Josh Walker
(2-2) at 160 pounds.
Ben Kuykendall (112
pounds) was 1-2 with two
injury defaults. Marshall
Stewart (152 pounds) also
was 1-2..Both earned team
points.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter

Dance donation

Columbia County Recreation Department sponsored a dance at Richardson Middle School
with proceeds going to the Richardson basketball program. Columbia County Recreation
Director Mario Coppock (second from left) presents a check for $442 to Lady Wolves coach
David Tompkins. They are joined by Principal Keith Couey (far left) and Assistant Principal
Seth Thoreson (right). Team mom Shelia Pierce and booster club president Wendy Dohrn
were instrumental in planning the fundraiser.



TEBOW: Needs to go under center


Continued From Page 13


"I think there will be
plenty of teams that will
look at it and say if he's
still on the board at pick
35 or 40 or 45 - wher-
ever that is - they'll go
ahead and take him. He'll


ACROSS

1 Whale's diet
6 Look
radiant
10 More uncanny
12 Relish-tray
items
14 Meeting outline
15 Kind of tire
16 Richer, as batter
18 Thirsty
19 Evergreen
scent
21 Greeting-card
word
23 Loud
clamor
24 Blue
26 Adds sound
effects
29 Woodland
creature
30 Except
32 Mannerly chap
34 Grass
36 Chem. or geology
37 Society
column word


probably be overdrafted for
what you're gonna get out
of him for several years and
maybe for his entire
career."
There are other, factors
to consider, too.


Tebow's too-good-to-be-
true image included more
than 700 hours of community
service in 2009, and it seems
unlikely that he would come
with any off-the-field prob-
lems or distractions.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

L K NIC K


MAPLES ELAINES T




STONY BOER
FUR LUCID ORE


ANIL YOWL
MANE ANN EBAY


CANAPE ERRATA
ORATES CAESAR
WIPED ODDER


Roman poet
Fray
Dust cloth
Chocolate cookie
Stallone nick-
name


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 New Hall-
of-Famer
19 Devout
20 Dormant
22 Wheel nut
23 Banned bug
spray
25 Crunch
targets
27 Film canine
28 Contemptuous
look
31 Equal score
33 Lunar new
year
35 A long way off
39 Colombian
city
41 Lone Star nine
44 Presses for
payment
46 Major
Japanese port
47 NBA player
48 Left Bank
chums
49 Home, to Jose
51 ,Peace offering
53 Quick turn
55 Pen part
56 Toothpaste
choice
57 Poet's
before


1-21 �2010 by UFS, Inc.


38 Iffy attempt
40 Asian export
42 Jacuzzi feature
43 Was driven
45 Evening in
Cannes
47 Fleetwood -
50 Company
52 Book source
54 Rainbow band
58 Stays with as a
guest
59 Slower
60 "Beowulf," for
one
61 Luxury fur

DOWN

1 Green parrot
2 Gas-pump
abbr.
3 Umbrage
4 White-sale buy
5 Projecting
ridges
6 Stared
balefully
7 Box top


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-.0420










Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2010 3B


DILBERT
ALICE, I'M SENDING
YOU TO CULTURAL
SENSITIVITY TRAIN-
ING BEFORE WJE r\EET
WITH THE ELBONIANS.


BABY BLUES


ts
FU N!


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE

PROMI660 IF I JjjjR
L AP-9/op Yol.-


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


121 -JohnHartStudios 'on


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Men find plenty to love in


big, beautiful women


DEAR ABBY: "Happy
Being Me in Massachu-
setts" (Nov. 20) is a large
girl whose mother told her
"heavy women are not de-
sirable." Well, I was a size
18/20 and weighed more
than 200 pounds when I
met my husband while out
with mutual friends. He's
good-looking, smart, witty,
affectionate and passionate.
He's everything a woman
looks for in a life partner.
He had never dated a
plus-size woman before,
but he was smitten from
the moment he saw me,
and pursued me from the
start because he thought I
have a beautiful face and a
great personality. We have
one child and another on
the way, and he finds me as
appealing now as he did the
night we met.
No woman should ever
"settle" for a partner, and
"Happy" should not do so
just because her mother
thinks she's "too heavy."
That mother is trying to
pass her low self-esteem is-
sues along to her daughter,
and I hope "Happy" is sav-
vy enough to brush it off.
Big girls can be sexy, too,
because there's nothing
sexier than confidence. -
MICHELLE IN
MICHIGAN
DEAR MICHELLE:
The letters of encourage-
ment in support of "Happy"


Abigail Van Buren
www.deoraobby.com
have far outweighed her
mother's negative stance.
Read on:
DEAR ABBY: "Happy
Being Me" needs to know
that there are men like
me who prefer plus-size
women. My wife weighs
275 pounds, and I think
she's gorgeous. "Happy"
just needs to put herself
out there, and one of us will
find her. - HAPPY WITH
MY LARGE LADY
DEAR ABBY: I met my
first husband when I wore
a much smaller size. As the
years went on, my size in-
creased. He ended up leav-
ing me for a smaller girl.
After our split, I moved
home and the first words
out of my mother's mouth
were, "You need to work on
yourself because you're not
going to find someone new
looking like you do." It was
extremely hurtful, but be-
yond that, it was WRONG.
Less than a year after my
divorce, I was in a healthy
relationship with a man
who loved me for myself.
We married, have a baby


pi


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't fold under
pressure. You cannot let
-emotional restrictions slow
you down or interfere with
your plans. A personal rela-
tionship will offer you en-
couragement and support
and help you establish what
it is you want to do. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Stop wasting
time and get on with busi-
ness. Someone you have
worked with or met in the
past will offer you an oppor-
tunity worth considering. A
geographical move may not
be a bad idea. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Pick up skills
or improve your lifestyle or
your future in any way pos-
sible. You have plenty go-
ing for you. Don't settle for
anything less than what you
want. A favor will be grant-
ed for something you've
done in the past. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Don't take any-
one who is playing emo-
tional games too seriously.
A change of plans will turn
out to be to your benefit, so
don't make a fuss. Altera-
tions at home will be better
than anticipated and will be
cost-efficient. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): A change at work will
help you determine what


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

direction you should take in
order to advance. Take ac-
tion. Waiting around to see
what everyone else does
will cost you personally and
professionally. *****.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Make a commitment
to someone you want to
have in your corner. A
change at home will come
about if you discuss your
plans. There is money to be
made if you make a move
or invest in something or
someone to make a profit.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't limit what you
can do because someone
is trying to make you feel
guilty. Use your intuition
to guide you in the right
direction and you will not
go wrong. Someone from
your past will provide you
with information you need.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You can make
some drastic changes that
will allow you to do more
things that interest you. An
emotional relationship may
need a little extra attention.!
Plan a romantic evening
and you can make amends.

SAGYITARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Your emo-
tional outlook will catch
the attention of someone
you've known a long time.
Travel plans will give you
greater incentive to work
hard. You will receive rec-
ognition for a job well done
if you pay close attention to
detail. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Look into the
possibility of making some
personal changes that allow
you to be closer to work or
to make a professional jump
to another field of interest
Don't limit yourself. Oppor-
tunities exist. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't give in to
someone putting demands
on you or asking for unrea-
sonable favors. It may be
time to start thinking about
your recent choices - de-
cide whom you do or don't
want in your life. The peo-
ple you associate with can
make a difference to your
reputation. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Take a chance
on someone or something
offered to you. A profes-
sional change may lead you
down an altogether differ-
ent path. A challenge will
raise your confidence and
prove you have something
worth offering. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: T equals L
"E SAERH ES SBHFY W K Y FYYEWR,
SBHFY YFBLVAERP CWL SAF
JFSBETY CWL BRD BLSEYS SW KF


P W W J.


KBLKLB YSLFEYBRJ


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The wise man must remember that while he is a
descendant of the past, he is a parent of the future." - Herbert Spencer


(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 1-21


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


E
LAST I MADE
TIME YOU ONE
@ ALMOST LITTLE
I STARTED MISTAKE.
S AWAR.


- FLASHBACK
AND HERE'S ANO
W JAY THE LOMNE
S MY COUNTRY A
DIFFERENT.


THEIR
N IN
.RE

1 je


FL -U-, IT tC65K;
V 'lClgrA9 c


and are living happily ever
after. The size of my jeans
has never mattered to my
hubly - only the size of
my heart. - BIG JEANS,
BIGGER HEART
DEAR ABBY: In the
past, I admit I was one of
those men who wouldn't
look twice at a large girl.
Then I met my wife. She
wasn't exactly petite, but it
didn't matter. She truly is
the girl of my dreams.
We have both gained
some weight over the years,
but size really doesn't mat-
ter. "Happy's" mother is
wrong. The right woman
can always find the right
man. - LUCKY MAN IN
ALBUQUERQUE
DEAR ABBY: I attend
dances every month that
support women of size. I
met my dream man at one
of them a few months ago.
He is kind, supportive,
handsome and loves my
body. (And I love his!)
Because society says
that a larger woman isn't
attractive doesn't mean
EVERYONE thinks so.
When I started going to
functions for plus-sized
women at the age of 26, I
found a whole new world
where I was accepted and
welcomed.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


CLASSIC PEANUTS










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2010


Lake City Reporter





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In Print and Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 09-287-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF BILLIE S.
SCHMID A/K/A BILLIE SUE
SCHMID A/K/A BILLIE SUE H.
SCHMID
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Billie S. Schmid a/k/a Billie Sue
Schmid a/k/a Billie Sue H. Schmid,
deceased, whose date of death was
November 6, 2009, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
� Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of 'the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other cred-
itors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED. The date of
first publication of this notice is Jan-
uary 14, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Estelle M. Scannella
2 Meadowlark Drive
Hamilton Square, New Jersey 08690
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ John J. Kendron
Attorney for Estelle M. Scannella
Florida Bar No. 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
P.O. Box 1178 "
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
04537070
January 14, 21, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-539-CA
AMERICAN GENERAL HOME
EQUITY, INC.,
Plaintiff
vs.
HENRY K. GODBOLT, III, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to an order or a final judgment of
foreclosure entered in the above-cap-
tioned action,. I will sell the property
situated in Columbia County, Flori-
da, described as: The land referred to
in this exhibit is located in the Coun-
ty of Columbia and the State of Flor-
ida in deed book 837 at page 639 and
described as follows:
Lot 15, Block A of Olivia Addition
No. I, a subdivision according to the
plat thereof as recorded in plat book
3, page 38 of the public records of
Columbia County, Florida
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder for cash, in Courtroom 1, Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on the
17th day of February, 2010. That any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property, owner as of the
date of the liHs pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said
Court on January 14, 2010.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK CIRCUIT COURT
By:/S/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Sidney E. Lewis, P.A.
Attorney for Plaintiff
300 W. Adams Street
Suite 300
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904)-355-9003

045372-29
January 21 and 28, 2010


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www. lakecityreporter.com







Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191


Services

COOPERS MOBILE HOME
set up and repair. Lie/Ins.
386-752-7108 386-623-7820
Ask for Jesse


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 08-817-CA
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plantiff,
vs.
WALTER HAINES A/K/A WAL-
TER V. HAINES,
DECEASED; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF WALTER-
HAINES A/K/A WALTER V.
HAINES; UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA: STATE
OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE;
CANNON
CREEK AIRPARK HOMEOWN-
ERS,
ASSOCIATION, INC., SUCCES-
SOR BY
MERGER WITH CANNON
CREEK
HOMEOWNERS, ASSOCIATION,
INC.;
BROTHERS, WELCOME HOME-
OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.; RAYMOND
R.
SESSIONS; MARTHA JANE SIS-
SON HAINES;
JEFFREY ROBIN HAINES; JAN-
ICE NOREEN
TAYLOR; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JANICE NOREEN TAYLOR,
and any unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and other un-
known persons or unknown spouses
claiming by, through and under any
of the above-named Defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that the un-
dersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Columbia County, Florida, will on
the 10th day of February, 2010, at
11:00 A.M. at the Front steps of the
Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, offer for sale and
sell at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash, the follow-
ing-described property situate in Co-
lumbia County, Florida:
Lot 6, CANNON CREEK AIR-
PARK, as recorded in Plat Book
5, Page 38, Public records of Colum-
bia County, Florida pursuant to the
Final Judgment entered in a case
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above
Any person or entity claiming an in-
terest in the surplus, if any, resulting
from the foreclosure sale, other than
the property owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on
same with the Clerk of Court within
60 days after the foreclosure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
of said Court this 5th day of January,
2010.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact the Court ,
Administrator at P.O. Box 2069,
Lake City, Florida 32056-1965, tele-
phone (904) 755-4100 Ext. 250, not
later than seven (7) days prior to the
proceeding, If hearing impaired,
(TTD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay
Service.
P. DeWitt Cason
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/ B Scippio
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
Emily Jane Hansen
Butler & Hosch, P.A.
3185 S, Conway Rd., Ste. E
Orlando, Florida 32812
(407) 381-5200
04537055
January 14, 21, 2010

LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL
AUTHORITY
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
ARCHITECT/ENGINEERING
SERVICES
The Lake Shore Hospital Authority,
located in Lake City, Florida, is so-
liciting proposals from consultants
with health facilities planning and
design expertise and experience to
develop plans for a two to three
building complex on Authority-
owned vacant property for the Lake
Shore Hospital Authority.'All appli-
cants must have proper licensing and
have a history of quality experience
for similar work in Florida.
A Request for Proposal Specifica-
tions document is available upon re-
quest from Sue Fraze, Administra-
tive Director, at 386-755-1090, ext.
101, or sue(@lakeshoreha.org. It can
also be accessed online at
www.lakeshoreha.ore. To be consid-
ered, proposals must be received by
Thursday, February 4, 2010 at 3:00
p.m. in the LSHA office as stated in
the Request for Proposal.
05522933
Januray 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 2010

We will sell the following units at
Ellisville Mini Storage 14373 S US
Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32024 on
February 6, 2010 at 9:00 A.M. We
reserve the right to refuse any and all
bids. WE SELL FOR CASH ONLY!
Nerone, Donny E. 10xl0, B-4
Murdie, Dean O. 10xl0, C-40
Estep, Nicole M. 10xl0, D-31 C.C.
05522993
January 21, 2010


020 Lost & Found

AFRICAN GRAY w/ red tail lost
01/19 around Gwen Lake down by
the Workcamp. REWARD! Call
386-755-1464 or 386-288-3687

LOST WEDDING ring. Across
the street from Say-A-Lot or
Wendy's pkng lot on Friday 01/15.
REWARD! 386-965-3472


100 Opportunities

AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,


1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies


Apply In Person
Only to:
2744 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City - DFWP


100 Job
100 ~Opportunities

0453703







Now Accepting
Resumes for
MANAGEMENT AND ALL
HOURLY POSITIONS
Please bring your resume and visit
us from 9am to 1I am
Thursday, January 21, 2010
3177 W. Hwy. 90
Lake City, FL
DFWP EOE

04517127
GOOD OPPORTUNITY!
NOW HIRING An Experi-
enced Stylist with clientele
Southern Exposure
386-752-4614

05522944
FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY
Guest Services Position
Currently Part time potential for
fulltime employment. Newest
Hotel, great working environment
MUST have good customer
service skills, strong work ethic,
typing skills preferred. Must be a
team player, able to work a
flexible schedule including
weekends, holidays and nights.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply at Comfort
Suites located next to Bob Evans
at US 90 & 1-75
interchange.

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
White Springs Florida Consulting
firm Must have ability to deal with,
clients in a positive manner.
Must have solid computer skills.
Must want a career not just a job.
Must have a strong work back-
ground and excellent references.
Must be a high school graduate.
Email resume to hr@speced.org
4 TEMPORARY Farmworkers
needed. Employment dates 2/15/10 -
11/30/10. Workers will care for hors-
es to protect their health & improve
their appearance; will plant, cultivate
& harvest hay. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for non-
commuting workers. Transportation
& subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $9.39/hr.' Applicants
should report or send a resume to the
nearest Florida Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & reference job or-
der # KY 0393781.
Dunraven LLC - Georgetown, KY
EXPERIENCED BOOKKEEPER
Friendly fast-paced company located
off CR 137 seeking organized multi-
tasker. Quickbooks exp. a must.
Please fax resume to 386-935-2289.
Gotta Go Transport a flatbed Co.
in High Springs needs Class A
CDL Driver. Min. 2 years exp.
Home weekends, safety bonus and
vacation pay. Call 386-454-0532.
INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for self motivated goal
oriented sales person in both
life/health and property/casualty
ins. A 220 and 215 license a plus
but not reqd. Must have exc.
comm. skills, be organized and de-
pendable. Must be team oriented
and have computer skills.
Send reply to
Box 04086, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
"LIVE OAK TRACTOR CO. in
Live Oak, FL is now hiring a SALES
REP. to sell AG. EQUIPMENT in
the N. FL area. Ag sales experience
and bachelor's degree preferred.
Please email resumes to
matthew(@)bostontractorco.com or
fax to 229-263-9178,
Attn: Matthew"
LOOKING FOR a mortgage pro-
cessor. Prior experience a huge
plus. At least some mortgage
knowledge required. Competitive
salary and good growth potential.
Email resume to
lakecityresume@yahoo.com
Mechanical Maintenance
� Techanician
World Class cement Manufacture in
need of experienced Mechanical
Maintenance Techanician for hands-
on results oriented, motivated team
player to join fast paced manufactur-
ing operation. Basic mechanical
skills, welding and fabrication skills,
millwright and/or machinist skills
not necessary, but a plus. Position re-
ports to the Maintenance Supervisor
and works in team to maintain ma-
chinery in reliable condition. Operate
mobile equipment and assist with de-
partment needs as necessary. Must
be willing to work rotating shift,
overtime and accept call-ins after
hours. Suwannee American Cement
offers a competative salary and an
excellent benefits package. EOE &
Drug Free Workplace
Mail resume & cover letter to:
Suwannee American Cement-HR
PO Box 410, Branford, FL 32008; or
Fax: 386-935-5071; Email:
resumes@suwanneecement.com

Service Plumber
Wanted
Must have valid DL
and at least 2 yrs.
experience as a
Service Plumber


per hour- 25 Hours/week-
The person occupying this position
will be taught a variety of craft skills
to interpret to the public including
but not limited to: pottery, quilting,
basket and broom making, black-
smithing, canning, woodworking,
etc. This position will also create a
wide variety of hand made crafts and
items for sale in Cousin Thelma Bol-
tin's gift shop. The person occupy-
ing this position should have some
level of experience with making
hand made items and working with
the public in an educational setting.
This position will serve as a liaison
with the Gift shop and Craft Square
Manager in supporting the volunteer
demonstration program in the craft
square and will assist with schedul-
ing and occasionally collecting fees
and operate a cash register in the gift
shop. Provide routine maintenance
and cleaning of craft buildings and
gift shop. Answers phone and oper-
ates two way radio. Other related du-
ties as required.
Both Applicants Must Posses a valid
Class E Florida Drivers License and
be willing to work weekends and
holidays. Interested Applicants must
complete and submit a State of Flori-
da Employment Application. Appli-
cations are available online at
https://peoplefirst.mvflorida.com.
Applications must be submitted by
Friday, January 29, 2010 to the per-
son below:
Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park
Attention: Ben Faure, Park Manager
Post Office Drawer G
White Springs, Florida 32096

DEP only hires US Citizens or au-
thorized aliens and is an
EEO/ADAIVP employer. Section
110.128, F.S. prohibits the employ-
ment of any male required to register
with Selective Service System under
the US Military Selective Service
Act.


To place your
classified ad call

70M5.L5

IImm


00 Job
Opportunities
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
OWNER OPERATORS WANTED
Flatbed, stepdeck OTR operation
based out of Fort White, FL. Good $.
Must have good equipment, and be
willing to work it!
Call Mike at 386-623-4801.
PT Teacher Head Start Ft. White
(Temporary) - HS Dip/GED,
FCCPC/CDA or minimum of 2 yr.
degree in early childhood educa-
tion or child development prefer-
red; Bilingual (Spanish/English)
preferred, 5 hour Literacy as re-
quired by DCF. Must pass physi-
cal/DCF background requirements.
Current I st Aid/CPR preferred.
SV4Cs, PO Box 2637, Lake City,
FL 32056, By email:
arobinson@sv4cs.org
TEMPORARY: # of openings: 7
Tobacco, Hay/Straw & General Ag-
ricultural Workers Needed Employ-
er: Rex Hix- Allen County, KY
Dates: 03/15/2010-12/31/2010 Wag-
es: $7.25 - 8.00/hour. 3/4 of hours
listed on job order guaranteed. Work
tools will be provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to those who
cannot reasonably return to their per-
manent residence each working day.
Transportation & subsistence paid
when 50% of contract is met. Physi-
cally able to meet & perform all job
specifications. May be required to
take random drug and/or - alcohol
tests. May be required to submit to a
criminal background check. Apply
for this job at the nearest One Stop
Career Center for further details.
STEPHEN FOSTER Folk Culture'
Center State Park
Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center
State Park located in White Springs,
Florida is seeking applicants to fill
two Part Time positions which do
not include benefits:
OPS Secretary Specialist- $8.00 per
hour- 40 Hours/week Entry Level
Knowledge, Skills and abilities in-
clude: Ability to answer customer
questions and provide information to
the public in a tactful and friendly
manner, Knowledge of Computers
and Related Software (Microsoft
Word, Excel, Internet, and E-mail),
ability to collect data and complete
various reports, ability to operate
multi lined phone system, cash regis-
ters and provide general office sup-
port functions and other related du-
ties as required. This position sup-
ports all administrative functions and
needs of the park.
OPS Craft Square Interpreter- $7.25


310 Pets & Supplies

BLUE HEELER mix puppies.
Free to a good home. 8 weeks old.
Please call & leave a message.
386-234-0101


$2,000 Sign On Bonus
If you are self-motivated, you could make
7o0,000 this year. Plus, we have the BEST
compensation package in the business.

New Car Sales Earn 30%-O200 min.

Health Insurance - Including Dental

Paid Vacation, 401 K & Bonuses

Self Starters, Please Apply in Person

, Hwy 90 West
ftu l (3/4 mi. past 1-75)

Chrysler-Dodge-Jeep Lake City


I


100 Job
Opportunities
Wanted: Heavy Truck Mechanic
for busy shop. Only experienced
need apply. Call between 8am &
Noon. Mon. - Fri. 386-752-9754

1 0 Sales
u110 Employment

05522947
* SALESMAN NEEDED
Must be aggressive and self moti-
vated. Also must be willing to
travel and work some weekends.
Fax resume to (386) 963-2809 or
email it to: srlh@ srloghomes.com

Are You Earning What You Are
Worth?
Growing company looking for
SUPER STAR sales representative
386-487-1742 or email resume to
industrialsupplyjobs@gmail.com

Medical
120v Employment

)4537240
RN Needed
Experience Preferred.
Full Time with Benefits.
Email Resume to:
Angela Akins RN/SDC
At
aakins@gulfcoasthealthcare.com
Or
Fax Resume to:
386-364-5174
EOE/V/D/M/F

AUTHORITY MANAGER
POSITION LAKE SHORE
HOSPITAL AUTHORITY
The Lake Shore Hospital Authority,
located in Lake City, FL is seeking
applicants with Healthcare Manage-
ment experience to serve as Manager
for the Authority. This executive-
level position is salaried, and can be
full-time or part-time and is for an
initial 12-month term. A Position
Description document is available
upon request from Sue Fraze, Ad-
ministrative Director, at 386-755-
1090, ext. 101, or
sue@lakeshoreha.ore. It can also be
accessed online at
www.lakeshoreha.ore. To be consid-
ered, resumes and accompanying
documents must be received by
Thursday, February 4, 2010 at 3:00
p.m. in the LSHA office as stated in
the Position Description.
CNA/Medical Assistant wanted
for local medical office. Send re-
sume to 184 S.W. Macon Street
Madison, FL 32340
FULLTIME LPN
needed, for medical office.
IV cert. & computer skills a plus.
Fax resume to 386-754-1712.
LPN or RN needed Fulltime
3PM-11PM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V
04537216
Service Representative
One of the Nation's major
suppliers of in-home oxygen &
respiratory therapy seeks a
service representative.
Responsibilities include making
oxygen deliveries (cylinder and
concentrator) and equipment
checks to a patient bases on a
daily route. Also instruct
patients in the safe and proper
use of respiratory equipment.
MAy perform minor equipment
repairs. Will be responsible for
the maintenance of a company
vehicle. Works on-call evenings
and weekends on an as
scheduled basis. Must be 21
years of age, able to lift or move
up to 120 Ilbs. and have good
interpersonal skills. Must have
or be able to obtain a
Commercial Drivers license
(CDL) and be DOT qualified or
DOT certifiable. Drug-free
Workplace. EOE
Fax: 386-754-2795

RECEPTIONIST/
WARD CLERK
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Receptionist/Ward Clerk.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon Healthcare
and Rehabilitation Center
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900
EOE
---- --_>^^^_^^-i


BUY T


I-SELL aIIT


I F I T
IND IT










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2010


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE TO GOOD HOME. one
boxer 7 yrs. old female.
2 female mini-dachshund,
Call 386-623-4720
HORSE BLANKETS
Excellent condition call for sizes.
$40.00 each.
386-719-9934

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621
FINE CHINA Japan Circa 1950.
Never used, complete set for 8.
Andora Pattern #6509 $300.00
Call 386-623-6198 .

402 Appliances
FRIGIDAIRE DISHWASHER
Black
$65
Call 386-755-3350

408 Furniture
RUSTIC STYLE twin beds
2 headboards footboards &
mattresses.
SOLD!


420 Wanted to Buy
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$150 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
386-878-9260 After 5pm
386- 752-3648.
WANTED TO BUY
Good used car, truck tires and
customs rims. Will pay top dollar.
386-752-4215

430 Garage Sales
FLEA MARKET
Inside Lake City Shrine Club-
Brown Rd. Jan 29, 30 31. Rain or
shine/hot or cold. Rent table for
$10/day, $25 for 3 days. Call Lory
at 758-5814
GARAGE SALE
Fri, Sat, Sun, Furniture, lamps,
clothes, computer parts,
828 S.E. St. Johns Lake City.
MOVING SALE,
Fri. 1/22, Sat. 1/23 & Sun. 1/24,
10-5 p.m.
244 S.E. Brown Street,

440 Miscellaneous
5-Men's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) 1-Seiko, 1-Titan,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.,
REMINGTON 1100 SHOT
GUN, 12 gauge with two barrels,
$500 OBO
Call 386-965-5580
REMINGTON 7400, .308,
Auto, with 3.9 x 40 scope,
like new $450
Call 386-623-3923


450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252. Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-14201

520 Boats for Sale
1979 CHECKMATE
ENCHANTER, 18.5 open bow,
150 evinrude. new tires/rims.
$2,500 Call 386-623-3923

630 Mobile Homes
J630 for Rent
14 wide 2/2
Quiet, clean country park.
$475.mo + Deposit.&References
No pets. 386-758-2280.
IBR FURNISHED
All utilities included plus satellite.
$135 week. $135 Deposit
Call 386-758-9455
2/2 CH&A Mobile Home
21400 33rd Road.
$550 rent $500 dep.
352-493-3487
2B/2BA $525 mo. 1st & Sec. req.
last negotionable. Easy access
to 1-75 & 441 Between Lake
City & G'ville. (352)317-1326
2BR/2BA, MH
On 5 acres, References, first & se-
curity, lease, Avail. January 28th
Call 386-755-0300.
3B/2BA DWMH w/ carport &
back porch in nice cond. Good lo-
cation. $700 mo., Ist, last, $500
dep. Small dog. 386-752-6333
DW 2/2 CH&A, carport.
Located, Woodgate Village.
$650 mo., plus dep.
386-755-3649
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3/2, & 2/2 MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 352-281-2450


KELLY'S RV Park. Furnished
Mobile Home for Rent. $500 +
electric. Includes TV. 1 st, last &
deposit. 386-397-2616
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
M/H 2 BR, new carpet completely
furn. linens, dishes etc. or unfurn.
Carport, patio & utility shed.
Quite, safe clean park.
Special discounts. $550
386-752-0981 or 386-755-4965
Mobile Home at Wilson Springs
in Ft. White. $400. mo or
$100. per week.
386-623-9026 or 497-1315
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511
\640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
2010 BRANDNEW 4/2 DW,
CH&A, skirting, steps, set-up &
delv. All this for only $39,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452.
jetdec@windstream.net


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
4/2 ONLY
$289.00 per month.
with set/up.
Call John T. 386-752-1452.
BRAND NEW 2010
4br/2ha on your property. for
pyunls of only $321.56 a mo.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
FACTORY REPO'S,
built two many 28x40's.
Only 2 left for $28,500.
Call John T. 386-752-1452
REPO'S REPO'S REPO's
We have many to choose from!
Homes starting @ $10,500.
These homes won't last long!
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net

650 Mobile Home
650J & Land
BANK FORECLOSURE! 2001
3/2 DW on 1 acre of land! banks
loss your gain @ only $49,995.
Call Eric @ 386-752-1452 or
jetdec@windstream.net
FOR SALE OR RENT, 10 acres
fenced in Columbia Cty. with
1997 DW Mobile home. Close to
schools and town. 386-623-4606
FSBO - 4BD 2BA DWMH on +/-5
high & dry acres at end of paved
cul-de-sac. Convenient to Itchne-
tucknee Springs State Park. Bank
financing available to qualified
buyer. Seller agrees to pay up to
$1,500 of closing cost. Sale Price
$65,000, appraised for $70,000
Call 386-755-7932 & leave mes-
sage. All calls will be answered.
NO OWNER FINANCING.
Only 2 left, turn key packages. In
nice, up scale community. These
Jackobsons won't last long.
Call John 386-344-5234.
Owner financing available.
Owner Financing. Large. MH
w/3.32 acres. South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590-0642 /867-1833

71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423


limitedTED 'TIME ONLY***
WINDSONG APARTMENT
HOMES
1 BD $499
2 BD $535
3 BD $617
NO DEPOSITS
2 MONTHS FREE
EXPIRES 02/28/2010
*Some Restrictions Apply
Tel: (386) 758-8455
Share Pool Home! Full use kitch-
en, laundry, separate bedroom and
bath. $500/mo. + 1/3 electric.
Call Derek 386-344-3261
www.bigfloridahome.com
2 br/lba w/garage on the West side
'Ist, last &security.
Call
386-755-6867
2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$600 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456


7 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

LUXURY HOMES!
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649per mo. !!!

$299 MOVES YOU IN
Law Enforcement Discounts
Teacher Discounts
Veteran Discounts
Student Discounts

FREE RENT
0 200 FREE CHANNELS
* BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

!!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)
2Br Apt. Gorgeous lake view.
Great location.
$485. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
Immaculate, 2br/lba-Duplex w/ga-
rage. all electric. AC, W/D hook
up DW. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, lv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
NO Lease. NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands.
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135.,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
73 Home For Rent
1 BED $350, 2 BED $475, 3 BED
. $500-550. Central A/C, small/
quiet community. 352-505-9264 or
800-805-7379. Only 4 left!
2B/1BA CH&A, carport,
water/sewer included.
Near elementary school. $700 mo.
plus dep. 386-755-3649.


7 tUnfurnished
Home For Rent
3/1 lHOME in to\ I close to VA.
W/D. Cl1A. st & 5600 Sec. Dep.
00111/mo. Mike iicnemiann. West-
field Reality Group 386-867-9053.
3/2 CI 1&A, w/ garage.
I ghlanld Loop. No pets.
$750 a 1mo. plus dep.
386-755-3649.
Beautiful Newer 3BR/2BA. on
CR 18, 30 mins. to Gville.. 30
mins. to L.C., $950 p/m + last +
sec., go to website for photo at
www.piroperly4you.biz.
Call 386-365-65-3865.
Cabin for rent near Branford.
Small Ibr/lba in the woods, on 8
acres. $600 mo. + $600 sec. dep.
Call 386-590-4050
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$800/mo.
864-517-0522.
FOR RENT Newly remodeled
house 3BR/2BA
Ceramic tile
$775 mo. 386-755-2423.

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on IIwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086

820 Farms &
SAcreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

930 Motorcycles
2007 YAMAHA Raptor 700.
4 Wheeler, $3,900, MUST SEE,
Excellent Condition
386-754-5564

940 Trucks
2005 CHEVROLET Silverado 1500
Z71, 4WD, Reg Cab Beautiful Truck
One Owner, $13.000
Call 386-688-0334

950 Cars for Sale
1991 CORVETTE conv. white
w/blue flames. 80.000 mi. Full
power, V-8. Z06 wheels, custom
exhaust, $9,995 386-497-4763
1996 BUICK ROADMASTER,
Excellent condition, elderly owner,
116k miles, $2,500
Call 386-755-7541.
1999 HONDA CIVIC, 2 Door,,
Automatic, 138k, sunroof,
good A/C, reliable car, $3,500
Call 352--339-5158

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
31' TRAVEL TRAILER with
2 slide outs. 2007 Mountaineer Ed-
ition by Montana, very nice, sacri-
fice at $21,500. 386-752-1874


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2007 Yamaha 1991 Corvette Cony.
Raptor 700 White w/blue flames, 80k miles,
4 Wheeler, must see. full power V8. 206 wheels,
Excellent condition. custom exhaust, Vortex Ram air
system, new A/C
$3,900 $9,995
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386-754-5564 386-497-4763


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Lake Ciety Reporter-
1 11 1












Sr Years between first
and final Daytona 500
victories by Richard

I .i1 L ) JJ I - Petty (1964-1981), the
By RICK MINTER / Cox Newspapers most of any driver

3 * A * 3 0 0* -e S I. . - . I ~ .... g .........


Junior Nation looking for a






Change of luck


NASCAR


Dale Earnhardt Jr. hopes to give his loyal fans more to cheer about in 2010.


Earnhardt teammates think his fortune is turning around


ASCAR's "Junior
Nation" - that large
chunk of the sport's
fan base that is so loyal to
Dale Earnhardt Jr. and has
been fairly quiet for a season
or so - may be about to rise
again.
Based on comments from
Earnhardt himself and from
his Hendrick-Motorsports
teammates, there are reasons
to believe that Earnhardt's.
surprising slump is nearing
an end.
It couldn't come too soon
for Earnhardt arid his sup-
porters. His 2009 season was a
nightmare.
His longtime dream of rac-
ing at the top levels of the
sport with his cousin Tony
Eury Jr. as his crew chief
came to an end because of
their lousy results. Even with
the midseason switch to
Lance McGrew, he still fin-
ished the year 25th in points
with just two top-5 and five
top-10 finishes while his
Hendrick teammates Jimmie
Johnson, Mark Martin and
Jeff Gordon swept the top


threat spots in the standings
and combined to win 13 races.
The general thinking
among Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s
fellow drivers, especially
those at Hendrick. is that
Earnhardt is overdue for a
change of luck.
Martin, whose No. 5
Chevrolet is prepared under
the same Hendrick
Motorsports roof as
Earnhardt's No. 88, said
Earnhardt's luck is bound to
change soon. He said
Earnhardt ran better than
many realized last year, even
though the final results indi-
cated otherwise.
"They ran better than the
[No. 5] car in numerous races,
but nobody really noticed
because they got wrecked or
something broke or whatever
happened, happened," Martin
said. "They had a lot of things
happen and go bad for them
when they were faster than
we were in the [No. 5] car.... It
won't take an enormous
amount of performance to get
them in the hunt."
But it will take a change of


fortunes.
"Everybody's luck turns
around," Martin said.
"Nobody has got the horse-
shoe forever either. It goes
both ways. And certainly Dale
Jr. is due for some good days."
Earnhardt said he senses
some real change at his race
shop, and a lot of it has to do
with stability, especially when
it comes to his crew chief
Lance McGrew.
"It really wasn't that long
ago when we didn't know
what was going to happen
with Lance," said Earnhardt,
referring to the "interim"
label that McGrew carried
until last fall at Talladega.
But that's not the case any-
more. Earnhardt said that
based on his own observa-
tionsand what he hears from
McGrew, he has reason to
believe that the newfound sta-
bility at the shop will trans-
late into better results at the
race track.
"Lance is telling me, being
the guy that's there every day,
that it's completely different,
and he seems far more enthu-


siastic about the beginning of
the season and what our
chances are than I anticipated
him feeling, if I had to guess
at the end of last year," he
said. "I knew we would make
some changes, and I knew we
would try again at Daytona
this year, but I feel even better
now after just hearing him
and understanding how much
has changed, how much has
really changed.
"It helps my confidence that
we'll be where we need to be."
Jeff Gordon said that just
getting Earnhardt's mojo
back will fix a lot of things for
his teammate.
"The [Hendrick] organiza-
tion puts so much effort into
every team and every car that
the ingredients are certainly
there," he said. "I think that
probably what's left is just to
get that confidence up. It hap-
pens with everybody If the
driver is confident, then the
crew chief is confident, and if
the crew chief is confident.
the pit crew is confident. It
just trickles all the way
down."


Drivers return to the

track for tire testing
Atlanta Motor Speedway, lying quiet and cold for
the past few weeks as the South experienced a rare
cold snap, heated up in a hurry last week as four
Sprint Cup drivers participated in a two-day
Goodyear tire test.
Mark Martin, Carl Edwards, Martin Truex Jr. and
Sam Hornish Jr. seemed happy to be back at work
after a brief winter break. Track president Ed Clark
said the veteran drivers seemed excited to be back
on track, as happy as kids on Christmas morning.
The test was more of a tweaking exercise, nothing
like the work that was done in the wake of a tire
fiasco in 2008, one that caused Tony Stewart to lead
a chorus of complaints about the tire compound
selection.
The drivers explained that the first day of the test
consisted of short runs using various compounds,
with the second day devoted to longer, 30- to 40-lap
runs so engineers could get an indication of the
tire's durability
"[Goodyear] has some stuff that grips better than
the tires we ran here last fall," Martin said. "That
tire had great durability They're trying to find
something that has that same durability and be a lit-
tle bit more grip-friendly"
AMS presents a rather unique challenge to tire
engineers because of its worn racing surface. But in
racing, worn asphalt is generally considered a good
thing because it lends itself to multiple racing
grooves, whereas a freshly paved surface often finds
drivers running single file in the fastest groove.
"I think all drivers love the aged pavement to race
on, but it's a challenge when it comes to making
grip," Martin said. "I think they've found some
things that are an improvement."

Busch hires Veteran crew chiefs


It remains to be seen just what kind of team
owner Kyle Busch will turn out to be, but one
thing's already for sure - he doesn't mind doing
whatever it takes to attract top talent.
Busch's Camping World Truck Series team last
week announced the hiring of two veteran crew
chiefs, Eric Phillips and Dan Stillhnan. Already,
Busch had hired the defending championship-win-
ning crew chief Rick Ren away from Kevin Harvick
Inc. to be his competition director.
Phillips comes to Busch's team after leading Mike
Skinner to three wins last year. Stillman comes
from Roush Fenway Racing, where he led Carl
Edwards' team to a second-place points finish.
Phillips will lead the No. 18 crew for Busch and
Brian Ickler who will share the driving duties.
Stillman will work with the No. 56 of Tayler
Malsam.

Harvick mum on contract
Kevin Harvick, whose driving contract with
Richard Childress Racing ends at the conclusion of
the 2010 season, shed absolutely no light on his
future plans during the media portion of his
appearance at Preseason Thunder at Daytona
International Speedway
"I'm not getting in the middle of it," he said.
"When it all boils down to it, it's all about winning
races, and that's all I care about."
If it indeed is all about winning Cup races for
Harvick, a change could be in store. He hasn't won a
Cup race since February 2007, at Daytona.

Day'tona time change boosts ticket sales
Daytona International Speedway president Robin
Braig said that moving the starting time of the
Daytona 500 back to around 1 p.m. already is paying
off for the speedway He said that he attributes 5,000
to 8,000 ticket sales because of the change.
Braig said fans complained to speedway officials
that the later starting times ofrecent races had
forced them to add an extra day of travel and motel
costs and in some cases caused the races to end
thunder cautions caused by late-afternoon rains.
Braig also indicated that he doesn't expect a sell-
out for the 500, even though 12,000 seats on the back-
stretch have been removed and replaced by a fan
deck. He said he anticipated a "full house."
One fan he is counting on is.former vice presiden-
tial candidate Sarah Palin. Braig said Palin has
requested credentials, and that the track security
staff and Palin's staff are working out the details.


Home-Cooking




.*,. , ^ '


Located.inside these S&S Food Store Locations:

Hwy 90 East & Colburn Ave. * Lake City * 386-755-0288

Hwy 441 N. (Marion St.) & Bascom Norris Dr.* Lake City * 386-755-5842

Hwy 90 East & CR49 * Live Oak * 386-362-3685


paily Entrees - Made bo Order lreakPasb


Fried gizzards & Livers - Fried Chicken


Potbao Logs - Chicken Wings


VIscuibs and pmre



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THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 2010




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