Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2010
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








Senior showcase:
West and East Squads positioned for Saturday play.
.. . , Sports, I B









Lake Cwwey



Thursday, January 14, 2010 www.Iakec .


DO


Vol.


SWreck claims 1


PATRICK SCOTT Special to Lake City Reporter
Two vehicles, a Jeep SUV and a motorcycle, involved in a fatal crash Wednesday are towed
away after an early morning collision on SW Baya Drive.


Two-vehicle
collision between
motorcycle, SUV
From staff reports
A Lake City man died
early Wednesday morning
in a two-vehicle crash after
his motorcycle collided
with another vehicle on SW
Baya Drive, according to
reports.
John Russel Fry, 47, died


of injuries suffered in the
crash.
According to reports
from the Florida Highway
-Patrol, Fry was traveling
east on SW Baya Drive at
approximately 6:55 a.m.
Wednesday. A 1991 Jeep
SUV, driven by Christopher
Robert Davis, 36, of Lake
City, was traveling west
on the roadway, with
Christopher Robert Davis
Jr., 17, as a passenger.


Reports state that Davis
was attempting a turn onto
SW McFarlane Avenue and
turned directly into the path
of Fry. Evidence collected
at the scene by investiga-
tors determined that Fry
attempted to avoid the col-
lision by swerving to the
right, but was unsuccessful
and collided with the front
left portion of Davis' Jeep.
WRECK continued on 3A


Tabletop
training

drills first
responders

Event designed
to improve
response times.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
More than 30 representa-
tives from state and local
first responder agencies
took part in a command and
management tabletop exer-
cise Wednesday. The event
was 'designed to improve
local emergency respon-
siveness.
The emergency prepared-
ness exercise was based on
a scenario in which a truck
carrying hazardous chemi-
cals overturned, resulting in
a chemical spill that closed
roadways. During the exer-
cise, which was facilitated
by Chip Patterson, a consul-
tant with the Management
Experts Consulting firm,
first responders discussed
an effective way to handle
the hypothetical situation.
The planning session
allowed the agencies to see
the role the other agencies
play in resolving emergency
situations from beginning
to end.
The hazardous materials
incident training took place
at the Columbia County
Emergency operation cen-
ter.
Columbia County
Emergency Management
Director Ronnie McCardle
said the incident is prob-
able and it's important to
have training sessions of
this nature.
'This training was so that
all agencies would learn
the responsibilities of each
other department within
the Incident Command
System structure to help
them operate on the scene,"
McCardle said.
DRILL continued on 3A


SCIENCE


SUCCESS


IA


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Eastside Elementary student Rhianna Ratliff (right), 8, explains her science fair submission to judge Lori Cole Tuesday morn-
ing at the Columbia County Science Fair at Lake City Community College. Ratliff's Super Stain Study determines which stain


remover would best eliminate grape juice

Annual science
fair winners will be
announced today.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@Iakecityreporter. corn
Hundreds of science
projects were on display
Wednesday at Lake City
Community College dur-
ing the Columbia County
Science Fair, and now students .are
patiently awaiting word on who will
advance to the next round of compe-
tition.
Organizers will announce the win-
ners at the junior and senior levels
today. The senior level winners -
middle and high school students -
will be announced at 10 a.m., and the
junior level winners - elementary
school students - will be announced


at 6:30 p.m. Both awards ceremonies
will take place at the college's Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Students began setting up proj-
ects on Tuesday, and were around
most of the day on Wednesday as
more than a dozen judges - which
included instructors from LCCC,
engineers from PCS, and employ-
ees of Progress Energy and Florida
Department of Transportation -
moved around from project to proj-
ect, asking questions of each student.
Judging coordinator Dave
Murdock said that, when analyzing
the projects, judges don't just look
for one that demonstrates science
- they look for projects that show-
case the "scientific method," asking
a question, forming a hypothesis and
devising a plan to either support or
deny it.
"We want them to collect data,
analyze it and tome to a conclusion,"


he said.
Projects are graded on various
criteria, which include creative abil-
ity, scientific thought, thoroughness;
skill and clarity. Those that reach
those high benchmarks may move
on to the regional round, scheduled
to take place next month at LCCC
and involve more than just local
schools.
Student projects ran the gamut
across the science spectrum on
Wednesday, ranging from "What
makes popcorn pop?" to "What are
the best Band-Aids for the beach?"
Megan Dees, a sixth grade stu-
dent at Richardson Middle School,
focused her science fair project on a
rising problem nationwide - cellular
phone use while driving. Her project
asked if cell phone use contributed
to distracted driving. She said the
SCIENCE continued on 3A


Pastor

plans

to help

in Haiti

Rescue dog could
be part of search,
recovery efforts.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Relief efforts for Haitian
victims of Tuesday's cata-
strophic earthquake are
mobilizing from several
countries
around the
world.
Relief
efforts
have also
spawnedin
Columbia
Brown Coun ty,
where a
local pas-
tor is planning to travel to
Haiti to participate in search
and rescue efforts.
Haiti was struck by an
earthquake which mea-
sured 7.0 on the Richter
scale, killed tens of thou-
sands of people and left
thousands of others lost
and unaccounted for in the
rubble.
Jeff Brown, a pastor with
the Community Christian
Center, is making plans to
go to Haiti to help look for
earthquake survivors.
"We're doing search and
rescue in a foreign coun-
try to try to get our foot
in the door," Brown said.
"It's an opportunity to go
places that you might not
be allowed to go into oth-
erwise."
Brown said he and his
dog, Sars, will head to Haiti
as soon as possible. The
first few days are the criti-
cal time for search and res-
cue efforts to bring people
HAITI continued on 3A


Realtor event builds on future


2 organizations
name officers,
directors for 2010.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Leadership for the Lake
City Board of Realtors and
the North Florida Multiple
Listing Service shifted for
the new year as both groups


1 84264 00020 1'


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


installed their 2010 officers
and directors at their annual
luncheon Wednesday.
Dan Gherna, executive
vice president for the Board
of Realtors and CEO of the
MLS, said the event -
sponsored by First Federal
Savings Bank of Florida
- exists to induct the new
officers and directors and
to begin the new year for


66
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


the organizations.
'"This event is to try to set
the tone for the year," he
said. "It also gives the mem-
bers an opportunity to fel-
lowship with one another."
The new officers and
directors are elected for
their positions through the
votes of the members, said
EVENT continued on 3A


\ iO pinion ................
__ % Briefing.................
Obituaries ..............
fj Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter


TODAY IN
LOCAL
NAACP speaker to
honor King.


Teena Peavey (right)
accepts a plaque for
the 2009 Realtor of
the Year from Anita
Handy, the outgoing
president of Lake City
Board of Realtors,
Tuesday afternoon at
the Lake City Board of
Realtors and the North
Florida Multiple Listing
Service Installation of
Officer and Directors
Luncheon.


COMING
FRIDAY
It's Your Weekend:
Plan ahead.


"\










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2010


(A$H

Wednesday:
Afternoon: 5-9-8
Evening: 1-5-5


4,

Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-4-8-8
Evening: 5-0-5-3


ezn(atch-

Tuesday:
9-11-16-32-35


A m

Tuesday:
4-11-36-37 21


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Conan O'Brien says no thanks to NBC move


LOS ANGELES
Tonight Show" host Conan
O'Brien used his best
material for his statement
that said he wouldn't play
ball with NBC's plan for
him to make room for Jay Leno to
come back to late night.
By the time O'Brien arrived on
stage Tuesday night for his 'Tonight
Show" monologue, his remarks
about the scheduling debacle took
the form of a few swipes at NBC.
"When I was a little boy, I remem-
ber watching The Tonight Show
With Johnny Carson' and thinking,
'Someday, I'm going to host that
show for seven months,"' cracked
O'Brien, who took over "Tonight"
from Leno last June.
"Welcome to NBC," he added -
"where our new slogan is, 'No longer
just screwing up prime time."'
Leno, of course, has been starring
weeknights at 10 p.m. EST in a little-
watched show that NBC announced
earlier this week will be canceled.
"As I'm sure you know," Leno told
viewers Tuesday in his own mono-
logue, "NBC announced they are
pulling the plug on this show Feb.
12. Here's the amazing part: That is
the exact date that the Mayan calen-
dar predicted we would go off the
air."

Wyclef Jean's tweeting
for Haiti galvanizes Web
NEW YORK - Wyclef Jean is one
of Haiti's most famous sons, and his
tweeting about the earthquake there
has been a galvanizing force on the
Web.
Jean is most
famously a member
of the now-defunct
Fugees. Publicist
Leslie Chasky
says he arrived
Wednesday in Haiti
Jean and is focusing on


In this June 1, 2009, file photo provided by NBC, Conan O'Brien makes his debut
as the host of NBC's 'The Tonight Show' in Universal City, Calif.


his family, his Haitian charity and
pser ending to the disaster


assaulted her.


S . .'Slumdog' child star has
Rape investigation of $145,000 in new deals
avid C nnenrfield closed


SEATTLE - Federal prosecutors
have closed a two-year investigation
into rape allegations against magi-
cian David Copperfield without filing
charges.
The notice came
in a brief court docu-
ment filed Tuesday
r by Assistant U.S.
Attorney Susan Roe.
F The woman who
made the com-
Copperfield plaint, a former
Miss Washington contestant, said
in a related civil lawsuit against
Copperfield, whose real name is
David Kotkin, that she met him dur-
ing a performance in Kennewick and
was invited to visit his private island
in the Bahamas in July 2007.
The woman claimed that once
she arrived, Copperfield sexually


MUMBAI, India - "Slumdog
Millionaire" child star Rubina Ali
played a poverty-stricken child in
the Oscar-winning film, but the real-
life daughter of India's shantytowns
now has a small fortune in book and
movie deals.
The 10-year-old's publisher and
a producer say she is already com-
mitted to projects worth more than
$145,000, and her family will soon
move out of the slums and into a
new apartment paid for by a trust
set up by the film's director, Danny
Boyle.
Rubina and her "Slumdog" co-star
Azharuddin Mohammed Ismail, 11,
have both landed roles in the inde-
pendent film "Lord Owen's Lady,"
a romantic comedy by Dragons
Productions (Wales) Ltd., chairman
Martin Pennell said.
N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* CBS commentator Andy
Rooney is 91.
* Blues singer Clarence
Carter is 74.
* Country singer Billie Jo
Spears is 73.
* Singer-songwriter Allen
Toussaint is 72.
* Actress Faye Dunaway is


69.
* Actress Holland Taylor is
67.
* Actor Carl Weathers is 62.
* Rapper Slick Rick is 45.
* Rapper-actor LL Cool J is
42.
* Actor Jason Bateman is
41.


Daily Scripture
"That God was reconciling the world
to himself in Christ, not counting
men's sins against them. And he has
committed to us the message of rec-
onciliation."
2 Corinthians 5:19
Thought for Today
"If you limit your actions in life to
things that nobody can possibly find
fault with, you will not do much."
- Charles Lutwidge Dodgson,
English author (1832-1898)

Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number.........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .............. . . . $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks ............. . . . . $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


FHP arrests 537
in DUI sweep
TALLAHASSEE - The
Florida Highway Patrol
arrested 537 motorists for
driving under the influence
during a 19-day holiday
crackdown.
The Dec. 16 to Jan.
3 stretch of heightened
enforcement throughout
Florida also included
16,213 speeding tickets
and 4,531 tickets to drivers
for not wearing their seat
belts.

Officers fired for
filing fake report
HOLLYWOOD - Five
people have been fired
from the Hollywood Police
Department after an inves-
tigation into a fake-police
report.
The employees, includ-
ing three officers, have
been on paid leave since
July after a dashboard
police video surfaced
showing officers faking a
police report so another
officer wouldn't get in
trouble for rear-ending a
woman's car in February.
A six-month internal
investigation and state
review found the officers
violated department poli-
cies.

740 pounds of
cocaine seized
FORT LAUDERDALE
- Two men have been
arrested on drug traf-
ficking charges after fed-
eral authorities reportedly
found about 740 pounds
of cocaine on at 32-foot
sailboat.
Officials say Ronald Earl
Landrum, 61, of Miramar,
and Charles Edward
Norman, 59, of Rotunda
West, were arrested
Saturday and charged with
conspiracy to possess with
intent to distribute and
possession with intent to
distribute 5 kilograms or


* I,
S


Pick them while they're fresh
A worker picks strawberries in a Plant City field Tuesday.
Freezing temperatures have stunted the growth of much of
the crops. Although some of the fruit will continue to grow and
be harvested later in the season, many have been irreparably


damaged from the freeze.

more of cocaine.

Inquiry ordered in
death of teen
PENSACOLA - A
Panhandle state attorney
has ordered a special med-
ical examiner's investiga-
tion or coroner's inquest in
the death of a 17-year-old
who fell from his bicycle
and was run over and
dragged 35 feet after being
hit with a stun gun fired
from a police cruiser.
State Attorney Bill
Eddins said on Tuesday
that he will decide whether
to file criminal charges
against the officer or any-
one else after the inves-
tigation into the October
death of Victor Steen.

Boy, 13, won't
face charges
FORT LAUDERDALE
- A 13-year-old arrested
after a South Florida boy
was doused with an acce-
lerant and burned won't
face criminal charges.
Jeremy Jarvis was the
youngest of five arrested
for the alleged attack
on Michael Brewer in


October.
Sheriff's deputies
recommended charges
of aggravated battery
because Jarvis watched
the attack but did nothing
to stop it.

Woman wears sign
as punishment
ORLANDO -An
Orlando police officer
wanted a unique pun-
ishment for Alexandra
Espinosa-Amaya, 24, who
pushed her palm to his
face.
Amaya wore a sign read-
ing "I battered a police
officer. I was wrong. I
apologize." for four hours
Tuesday outside the police
station.
It was part of a plea
agreement on simple
battery and resisting an
officer without violence
charges. The judge also
ordered an apology letter,
anger management coun-
seling, 50 hours of commu-
nity service and two years'
probation.
Espinosa-Amaya was
arrested after clashing
with bouncers in 2008.
* Associated Press


PARTLY PARTLY HUNDER-
CLOUDY CLOUDY STORMS


HI 66LO 3 HI 71 LO 5 1700 52




, Valdosta
, 64/41 * Jacksonville
Tallahassee * Lake City, 64/47
64/39 66/43
S- Pensacola * Gainesville * Daytona Beach
60/41 Padama City 66/45 65/,50
| 61/43 Ocala
|68/46 *


Tampa *
69/51


Ft Myer
74/54


City Friday
Cape Canaveral 72/63/sh


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Kev West


Orlando Cape Canaveral . a C.ity
69/50 68/55 Mia mi
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
72/64 * Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
s 73/63 * Pensacola
0 Naples * Tallahassee
72/56 Miami Tampa


Key West . 73/65 Valdosta
Key West, W. Palm Beach


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


57
24
66
42
86 in 1932
21 in 1918


0.00"
0.81"
0.81"
1.38"
1.38"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:28 a.m.
5:52 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:53 p.m.


MOO
45
Tod


MOON ulti
Moonrise today 7:01 a.m. rad
Moonset today 5:29 p.m. for
Moonrise tom. 7:39 a.m. a
Moonset tom. 6:24 p.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb.
15 23 30 5
New First Full Last



On this date in
friday 1882, southern
California received
its greatest amount
of snow. Fifteen
inches blanketed
San Bernardino and
wtSKi even San Diego
reported a trace.


4

iMtestolbun
day's
ra-violet
liation risk
the area on
scale from 0
10+.


71/59/pc
77/70/pc
72/62/pc
72/53/sh
68/53/pc
72/60/c
71/51/sh
77/67/pc
76/64/pc
73/55/sh
73/59/pc
65/55/pc
63/54/sh
69/53/pc
71/61/pc
68/50/pc
77/70/pc


PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 65 LO41


Saturday
77/62/sh
75/59/sh
80/67/sh
76/64/t
72/54/sh
70/54/sh
75/63/c
70/52/sh
80/66/sh
77/63/sh
74/54/sh
78/60/sh
65/52/r
65/50/sh
67/51/r
75/60/t
69/51/r
79/71/sh


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


r Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics � 2010 Weather Central
-- LLC, Madison, WIs.
S www.weatherpubllsher.com






Get Connected





JI--


mm


70/8A


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


azmml









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY. JANUARY 14, 2010


DRILL: Funded by grant SCIENCE: On display


Continued From Page 1A

Columbia County
Emergency Management
specialist Shayne Morgan
said the training is also ben-
eficial because it's done in a
low-pressure atmosphere.
"You can discuss the
scenario as it's playing out
and talk about things the
other agency does that real-
ly allow other agencies to
become familiar with how
you operate as an agency,"
he said. "EVerybody worked
well together and we real-


ized some areas where
improvements are needed
and stuff we can work on in
the future. We really want-
ed to learn where we could
improve our plan."
The exercise is held annu-
ally, and this year's train-
ing was funded through a
grant.
Wednesday's training
session also served as a
prelude for a functional
exercise which has been
scheduled for April 15.


Continued Fromn Page IA
idea came about because
she believes many major
crashes are caused by dis-
tracted driving, and tested
her hypothesis by check-
ing reaction times of people
catching a ruler while on
the phone.
Other science projects
could eventually ben-
efit their makers. Ashley
Shoup, a seventh grader at
Lake City Middle School.
and Emma Tucker, a 6th


1rade student( at LCMS,
hestcd projects that could
help them in school sports.
Shop's project tested
a hypothesis that stride
length improved the speed
on a softball pitch, while
I ucker's project focused on
lie best type of food to
eat before a cross country
race.
This is the seventh year
the county science fair has
taken place at Lake City
Community College.


EVENT: Designed to position officers, directors


Continued. From Page 1A

Gherna.
"We definitely appreciate
them," Gherna said. "It's
not a paid position, and they
take a lot of time away from
their business to volunteer
for our organization."
Hank Oltmanns, Florida
Realtors district vice presi-
dent for District One, swore
in the new leaders, and wel-
comed them to the task of
leading and representing
their members.
Sandy Kishton, sworn
in by her broker, Daniel


Crapps of Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc., will succeed
Anita Handy as the 2010
Board of Realtors president.
Kishton said she wanted to
honor Handy for, her ser-
vice to the board in 2009,
and said one of her goals
as president is to increase
the levels of participation
and involvement from the
members.
"My goal is to get every-
one involved," Kishton
said.
Teena Peavey received


the 2009 Realtor of the Year
award, and Gherna was rec-
ognized with a plaque for
his 10th.,anniversary with
the Board of Realtors.
,Handy also presented(l
plaques of appreciation to
Amber Roberts Crawford,
2009 MLS secretary, Elaine
Tolar, 2009 MLS president
and Lori Simpson, 2009
Board of Realtors secretary.
The Board of Realtors' 2010
officers and directors are
president Kishton, presi-
dent-elect Darrell Hunt,


secretary Peavey, ex offi-
cio Handy and directors
Stan lBatlen, Janet Creel,
Travis Land, Kellie Shirah,
Simpson, Susan Sloan and
Jeff Taylor. The MLS' 2010
officers and directors are
president Tolar, vice presi-
dent and secretary Roberts
Crawford, Board of Realtors
president Kishton and
directors Jim Curry, Thom
Duncan, Lisa Hicks, Martha
Jo Khachigan, Charles
.Reagor, Robin Schwartz
and John Stanford.


HAITI: Trip will be part of pastor's mission work


Continued From Page 1A

out alive, he said. Brown is
financing the trip himself.
He said the operation is
independent, but Sars has
received training through a
kennel in Lake City.
Brown is expecting to
leave from Jacksonville, and
head to Miami before Haiti.
"I literally have just got-
ten the cursory information
and tried to get hooked up
with the right people," he
said, noting he has already
spoken with the Haitian
consulate. "The most cru-
cial thing is not to just go in
there blind."
As part the search and
rescue effort, Brown, who


has served as a missionary
in other countries, includ-
ing China, said the first goal
is to find people alive.
'"The second mission is
to counsel and console
people, because it's just
like the tsunami in 2005,"
he said. "People's lives are
turned upside down."
Brown said he may stay
in Haiti for at least a week
as part of the search and
rescue efforts. Brown, who
has military experience,
said camping out in bad
situations is nothing new
to him.
I "When these things
come up you drop every-


thing, but you still have the
other obligations," he said.
"It's one of the missions
in the ministries that we've
set up.


"In a way, from the prodi-
gal story in the Bible to
help find lost people - we
do it physically and we try
to do it spiritually."


New year, new president
Daniel Crapps (right) swears in Sandy Kishton as the incom-
ing president of Lake City Board of Realtors Tuesday at the
Lake City Board of Realtors and the North Florida Multiple
Listing Service Installation of Officer and Directors Luncheon.

WRECK: On SW Bava
Continued From Page 1A


After impact, Fry's motor-
cycle struck a raised con-
crete curb and ejected him
onto the sidewalk of the
south side of the roadway.
Reports state Fry was wear-


ing a helmet at the time of
the crash.
No charges were made
as of press time, but charg-
es are pending the outcome
of the FHP investigation.


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OPINION


Thursday, January 14, 2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


OU
OPIN


R
ION


Send your

support,

but watch

for scams

There is no com-
parison in times
of crisis with the
generosity of the
American people.
Despite our sluggish economy,
double-digit unemployment
rates and finding ourselves
mired in recession, Americans
are the most giving people on
earth.
We will undoubtedly show-
case this spirit of benevolence
now, with Haiti's overwhelming
need following a devastating
earthquake that has affected
the lives of nearly 3 million
Haitians.
Sadly, there are those individ-
uals who would prey on such a
financial outpouring of concern.
Now that Americans are again
willing to open their hearts, and
wallets, to the cause of disaster
relief, the scams and phony
pleas for appeals are surely not
far behind.
To ensure that your gift is
given and utilized by legiti-
mate groups and agencies, it is
important to check the history
of any organization to which
you donate.
A safe bet in this current
crisis is the American Red
Cross. This organization has
its own history in dealing with
Haiti's natural disasters, and
has already released $200,000
and full relief supplies from
its Panama warehouse to aid
search, rescue and recovery
efforts.
Much more will surely be
needed. And just as surely the
American people will respond.
As we look for ways to help our
'global neighbors, the American
Red Cross is an excellent place
to start.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, Jan.
14, the 14th day of 2010.
There are 351 days left in
the year.
* On Jan. 14, 1784, the
United States ratified a peace
treaty with England, ending
the Revolutionary War.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


ft I ADMIT USING
STEROIDS,
WHICH I'VE
ALWAYS
(HIDDEN FROM
FANS...
xFA


YES/
WE
HAD
I NO
IDEA.


Reid triggers rush for low ground


Here in the pro
wrestling capi-
tal of the world,
Washington's star
performers are
once again pounding the mat
and wailing in feigned pain.
This time it is Washington's
Republicans who are pound-
ing and wailing. They want
the Democratic leader of the
Senate, Harry Reid, to resign
because they are shocked,
shocked that he said something
stupid.
So we need to begin this
column by telling some basic
truths about the man we
elected president: We elected
a man who has light skin. And
who does not speak in the dia-
lect of his people, unless wants
to do so - like when courting
voters in African-American
churches.
He is, of course, Bill Clinton.
Our 42nd president was a
master at speaking with intel-
lectual precision to academic
elites one day, then heading
down home - and suddenly
the "Gs" would fall from his
gerunds. When talking to white
folks in the rural south, Clinton
was talking" ' about running" ' and
winning'. " He did the same in
the pulpits of African-American
church congregations, where
he often basked in the glory of
being introduced as "America's
first black president."
It stood as a good political
joke until America finally elect-
ed a real one in 2008.
Barack Obama is another
Ivy-educated lawyer who can
out-Clinton Bill Clinton when it
comes to talking upscale on a
college campus and then auto-
shift smoothly into a patter of
G-less gerunds at an African-
American church.
Everyone in your hometown
and also in your nation's capi-
tal was smart enough to know


Martin Schram
mortin.schirm@gmail.com
Obama would benefit politically
in the 2008 campaign because,
as a light-complexioned African-
American, he'd be more eas-
ily accepted by many white
Americans who are unaccus-
tomed to keeping company with
African-Americans and might be
less willing to vote for a dark-
complexioned African-American
as their leader. Those who best
knew this are Africa-Americans
who have experienced this first-
hand.
But no one in your home-
town was stupid enough to get
themselves quoted as actually
saying this political-incorrect
truth. And no one in your town
would have ever been so stupid
as to not just say it but also
tack on a political third-rail of
an anachronism - such as
"Negro dialect."
But your hometown is not
your government's town, where
Harry Reid hangs his hat. So,
having urged Obama to run for
president, the Senate Majority
Leader got himself quoted by
bragging about his personal
insight of why Obama was
electable. In the book, "Game
Change," by John Heilemann
and Mark Halperin, Reid said
Obama was electable because
he is "light-skinned.. .with no
Negro dialect. Unless he wanted
to have one." No wonder you
and everyone in your town
think Reid's Senate hat rack is
the only place fit for his hat.
Enter the Grand Old Party's
pro wrestlers, pounding, wail-


ing and demanding Reid resign
as Majority Leader - because
in 2002 then-Majority Leader
Trent Lott, R-Miss., was forced
to resign for his comments at
Sen. Strom Thurmond's 100th
birthday.
But that is nonsense. Reid
was urging the election of a
black president. But Lott had
praised the notion of a seg-
regationist America. He said
Mississippi is "proud" of hav-
ing voted for Thurmond, the
segregationist Dixiecrat Party
presidential candidate in 1948,
adding: "And if the rest of the
country had followed our lead,
we wouldn't have had all these
problems over all these years,
either."
Here's what Thurmond pro-
claimed in 1948: "All the laws
of Washington and all the bayo-
nets of the Army cannot force
the Negro into our homes, our
schools, our churches."
This week, Republican sena-
tors rushed to call for Reid to
resign - saying it was a double
standard for him to stay on.
Republican National Committee
Chairman Michael Steele was
among citing Lott's example
as their moral standard.
Never mind that as an African-
American, Steele could never
have joined Lott for dinner at
a Mississippi restaurant in the
America promised by President
Thurmond.
Once again, Washington's
Republicans could not resist
their own undoing. Bequeathed
the moral high ground by Harry
Reid's stupidity, they raced to
leap to the low ground - and
set another standard - one -
that only shames the party of
Abraham Lincoln.


* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


OTHER OPINION


2009 banner year for Fed, at least


At least one major
financial institution
had a banner year in
the recession - the
Federal Reserve
Board.
The Fed's holdings in bonds
and securities earned it $52.1
billion in 2009, the best perfor-
mance in the central bank's 96-
year history.
Of that, the Fed will hand
over $46.1 billion, also a record,
to the Treasury. The remainder
goes to operating expenses for
the agency.
The Fed's previous record
payout to the Treasury was
$34.6 billion in 2007.
The recession officially


started in September of that
year.
The Washington Post notes
that the Fed's earnings easily
topped the combined earnings
of three banks that also had
good years, Bank of America,
Goldman Sachs and J.P Morgan
Chase.
And, as the Post pointed
out, Fed chairman Ben
Bernanke is paid a compara-
tively modest $199,700, far
less than those CEOs, and he
gets no bonus.
The Fed's profit is separate
from whatever it earns from the
$700 billion in bailout money it
has spread around.
The portfolio contains


$300 billion in Treasury bonds,
$1.25 trillion in
mortgage-backed securities
and $175 billion in
government-backed mortgage
agency debt, which it acquired
in an attempt to revive the
economy and encourage institu-
tions to resume lending.
The Fed has to be careful
when the time comes to wind
down those holdings.
If the Fed sold them off like
any other bank, it would drive
down the price. In that sense,
the Fed is the bank too big to
succeed.

* Scripps Howard News Service


Sharon Randall


--N 4/


4A


Leaky


tent


miracle


In a rush to do a long
list of errands, I tried
to plan my stops in an
orderly fashion to make
the most of mileage and
time.
Pulling out of the driveway,
I waved to the gardeners next
door and started making a
mental list of stops:
The bank for money. The post
office for stamps. The cheese
shop to get a surprise gift for
never-mind-who. The market
to get something to go with the
gift, never mind what And the
dry cleaners to drop off....
Wait. My husband's shirts. I
forgot them. Making a U-turn,
I doubled back, waved again at
the gardeners and ran in the
house to get the shirts.
I wanted to drop the shirts
off first (my husband was near
the point of going to work
naked), but I got distracted by
a passing car that appeared,
I swear, to be driven by a
poodle, and I drove right past
'the cleaners. So I had to play
traffic-light roulette and make
yet another U-turn.
Next, at the post office, the
15 folks in line looked like
a scene from "Night of the
Living Dead." So I tried to
buy stamps from a vending
machine. Big mistake.
Apparently, the machine did
not like me or my credit card.
I tried not to take this person-
ally. It did, however, seem to
like the young woman behind
me, who rolled her eyes and
showed me, duh, the proper
way to use it.
Suddenly, I was tired. And
hollow-eyed hungry. So I took
a break for lunch, tomato soup,
and while I ate, I opened mail.
A reader in Alabama mourn-
ed the death of her brother.
A grandfather in Arkansas
reminisced about his youth. A
woman in Ohio, in a faltering
relationship, said she longs to
have a baby and fears she's
running out of time. A single
mother in Texas lost her job
and worries that she and her
children will be homeless.
Remarkably, in every letter,
each one of them found rea-
sons to be thankful.
An hour later, on my way to
the cheese shop, I kept think-
ing about the people who'd
written and how our lives
- theirs and mine and yours
- seldom seem to go accord-
ing to plan.
We try hard to put them in
order, to line up the milestones
like planes on a runway, like
errands on a list: First, we'll
grow up. Next, we'll get mar-
ried. Then we'll have children
and live happily ever after.
But life defies order, laughs
at our plans. It's full of forgot- ,
ten laundry, long lines, U-turns,
missed opportunities and all
sorts of machines that don't
seem to like us much at all.
Years ago, when my children
were small, I had a revelation.
We were camping. It was rain-
ing. I was miserable.
Then I looked down at my
2-year-old, who was sopping
wet, caked with mud. And he
was beaming up at me as if it
were a miracle, the best day of
his life, and I alone had made
it happen.
Life is not the dream vacation
we plan. It's what happens in a
leaky tent in the pouring rain.
* Sharon Randall can be
contacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson NV 89077.


&_I











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2010


Multiple groups, events to honor Martin Luther King Jr.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityrepor ter. com
Various groups in
Columbia County will pay
tribute to Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. through upcoming
programs and events.
The Columbia County
NAACP is sponsoring the
25th annual Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. Observance
Program, at 4 p.m. Sunday,
at Mt. Pisgah A. M. E.
Church.


The Rev. Jeffrey D.
Robinson Sr., pastor of
Mount Carmel Missionary
Baptist of Daytona Beach,
is the guest speaker.
The program was cre-
ated to help the community
understand the importance
of King in the fight for
civil rights, said Glynnell
Presley, NAACP secretary.
"He showed what can be
accomplished if a person is
willing to be non-violent,"
he said. "It breaks down


barriers."
The celebration contin-
ues with a parade in honor
of King at 10 a.m. Monday,
starting at the Department
of . Transportation on
Marion Avenue and ending
at Memorial Stadium.
Lake City Police Chief
Argatha Gilmore is the
parade marshal.
Parade entries are still
being accepted. The entry
fee is $50. Call Anthony
Newton at 365-1870 or


Richard Anders at 752-
0959.
Following the parade is
a church service at 12:30
p.m. at Trinity UMC. The
speaker will be the Rev.
Fatha M. DeSue, pastor.
"Come out a be a part of
it," said Audre' Washington,
local NAACP first vice pres-
ident.
"If you can't be in the
parade, be there to watch
it and come to the church
service," she said.


Children will also com-
memorate King.
The Presley-Lane
Community Youth Group is
hosting a Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Youth Extravaganza
at 4 p.m. Monday at
Olivet Missionary Baptist
Church.
Interested participants,
such as youth choirs,
praise dance teams and oth-
ers, can call Bettye Lane
at 752-9329 or Bernice D.
Presley at 752-4070.


COURTESY PHOTO
The Rev. Jeff Robinson is the
scheduled guest speaker on
Sunday for Columbia County
NAACP's Martin Luther King
Jr. observance program.


OBITUARIES


Mr. Armour Larry Burls

Mr. Armour Larry Burls was born
October 20, 1930 in Bradenton,
Florida to the late James Burls,
Sr. and Elnora Riley Bullock.
He departed
this life to be
with our Lord
and Savior on
Friday, Janu-
ary 8, 2010.
Mr. Burls was
united in mar-
riage in 1954
to Delores Williams Burls (de-
ceased), that union produced five
children. 1970 he married/Ruth
Ellis Burls (deceased), and on
March 27, 2000 he married Rosa
Lee Hopkins Burlfs. Armour
grew Lup in the Bradenton / Tampa
area where he attended the local
schools. In October 1951 he en-
listed in the U.S. Army.where he
served faithfully until his honor-
able discharge on March 2, 1954.
Armour worked in Jacksonville
for many years; Bono's Barbe-
cue on Beach Blvd. and Jack-
sonville Yacht Club. After leav-
ing Jacksonville, he worked in
Construction in Tampa, Florida.
Later he moved to Lake City and
continued working in construc-
tion until he retired. In passing
he leaves his wife of nine years
Rosa Lee' Burls; his five daugh-
ters; three brothers; Alex Bull-
ock (Tasha), Johnny Lee Jones,
James Burls, Jr. (Essie); two
sisters, Brenda Joyce Josephs,
Mary E. Jennings; mother-in-
law, Lizzie Hopkins; sisters-in-
law, Rutha M. Bing (Eugene),
Patricia Cook, Ruby Major, Ma-
rie Laster (David), Mary Jelks
(Hayward); brothers-in-law,
Biner Julks (Phyllis), George
Cook, James Patterson (Bev-
erly), Alphonso Cook, Alfred
Smith; a host of nephews, cous-
ins, and many sorrowing friends;
a devoted neighbor, Mrs. Gwen-
dolyn Reed;. devoted friends,
Jeff Gaskins and June Holly.
Funeral services for Mr. Burls
will be Saturday January 16,
2010 at 11:00 A.M. and the
wake Friday, January 15, 2010
from 5:00 - 7:00 P.M. Both ser-
vices will be held at Olivet Mis-
sionary Baptist Church. 901 NE
Davis Street. Lake City, Florida.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street. Lake
City, Florida. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Lt. Donald M. Dolan
Lt. Donald M. Dolan, USNR,
82, of Lake City, a longtime
resident of Jacksonville, died
late Tuesday evening, January
12, 2010 in the Shands at Lake
Shore Hospital following an ill-
ness of several months. A native
of Coral Gables, Florida, Mr.
Dolan was the son of the late
Henry Thomas Dolan and Eliza-
beth Marvin Dolan and had been
a resident of Columbia County
since 1995. Mr. Dolan was a vet-
eran of the United States Navy
having served in both W.W.
II and Korea and many more
years in the Naval Reserve. He
earned his Bachelors Degree in
Economics from the University
of Virginia and worked as an
auditor for the Florida National
Bank for many years. He also
worked for the State of Florida
and Blue Cross and Blue Shield
during his career. In his spare
time Mr. Dolan enjoyed playing
tennis at Boone Park in Jack-
sonville, swimming and travel-
ing. Mr. Dolan attended both
Prince of Peace Catholic Church
in Jacksonville and Epiphany
Catholic Church in Lake City.
Mr. Dolan is survived by his
wife of fifty-seven years, Win-
ifred Dolan; a son, Mark Dolan
(Amy) of Oxford, Missssssippi
and a daughter, Leslie Hodges
(Louis) of Folsom, Louisiana.
Two grand-daughters, Amanda
Weir and Elizabeth- Hodges
and a great-grand-daugh-
ter, Lily Weir also survive.
A funeral mass for Mr. Dolan
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.,
Friday, January 15, 2010 in the
Epiphany Catholic Church with
Father Michael Pendergraft offi-
ciating. Interment services with
Military Honors will follow at
2:00 P.M. in the Jacksonville
National Cemetery located at
4083 Lannie Road, Jacksonville,
Florida. There will be no visita-
tion. The family requests that
memorial donations be made to
the Jacksonville Human Soci-
ety, 8464 Beach Blvd., Jackson-
ville, FL 32216 (please note in
memory of Mr. Dolan) or to the
American Cancer Society 2119
S.W. 16th St., Gainesville, FL
32608 (please note the Colum-
bia County Unit in memory of
Mr. Dolan). Arrangements are
under the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY FUNER-


AL HOME, 458 S. Marion
Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234 Please sign the
on-line family guestbook at
parrish/faminlyIfierilhome. corn

Reather Mae Fleming
Reather Mae Fleming de-
parted this earth on Janu-
ary 10, 2010 at the age of 89.
Born March 21, 1920 in Co-
lumbia County to the late Frank
and Florence Fleming, the last
child of 14 children of which 10
preceded her in death. She re-
ceived her education in the pub-
lic schools of Columbia County.
She accepted
Christ at an
early age
and became
a member of
Little Baptist .
now known
as Philadel- .
phia Baptist
Church. She
later married the late Morris Lee
and to this union three children
were born. Everlee (Simmie)
McKire, Ruthie (Amos) Stan-
ton, who preceded her in death.
Reather went to Washington, PA
with her oldest sister and resided
there until her sister's death.
Upon returning to Lake City,
she joined New Bethel Mission-
ary Baptist Church under the
pastorate of the late Rev. CC
Rawls. She was a member of the
Life Style Enrichment Center
where she played in the kitchen
band until her health failed. She
leaves to cherish her memories;
one son, Willie Franklin Lee;
one daughter-in-law, Joann G.
Lee, Lake City, FL.; 15 grand-
children; a host of great-grand-
children; one brother, Thomas
Fleming, Ft. Lauderdale, FL.;
two sisters, Florrie Grigger, Es-


tella Mayo, both of Lake City,
FL; special In-laws, Carrie Gib-
son, Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Julie
Lewis, Lake City, FL; devoted
nephew and niece, Hayward and
Corrine Lofton and David and
Dorothy Lofton, all of Lake City,
FL; special niece, Queen Mayo;
Lake City, FL, Barbara Love,
New York; and a host of other
relatives and sorrowing friends.
Funeral services will be Satur-
day January 16, 2010 at 2:00
P.M. at New Bethel Mission-
ary Baptist Church. 550 NE
Martin Luther King Street.
The family will receive
friends Friday, Janu-
ary 15, 2010 at the church.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street. Lake
City, Florida. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Mrs. Ruth Hagen
Mrs. Ruth Hagen, 74 departed
this life to be with her Lord on
Thursday, December 31, 2009
at her residence. Ruth was born
to Pete and Thelma Ciuhan, on
June 1, 1935 in Hemphill West
Virginia. She is preceded in
death by her husband of 14 years
John Hagen. Ruth was a found-
ing member of Trinity Praise and
Worship Center. She is survived
by her two sons; Albert William-
son (Gail) of East Haven, CT
and James Williamson of Dan-
ville, GA, one daughter; Linda
Ann Hiendl of Sanford, FL six
grandchildren and three sisters;
Mary Ann McManus of Tennes-
see, Lois Ciuhan, of California
and Margaret Talmage of Lake
City. Ruth was a loving and car-
ing individual always trying to
help when she could, she will
be missed by her children, her


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A.I.S.F., S.A.C.S., C.I.T.A. & N.C.P.S.A.

Call today 386-752-8874


sisters, her church family and all
of her friends. A memorial ser-
vice will be held at Trinity Praise
and Worship Center, Lake City,
Saturday, January 16, 2010 at
11:00 AM with Joyce Hunter,
Murray Reeves and Wendell
Norris officiating. Arrangements
are under the care and direction
of ICS CREMATION AND
FUNERAL HOME, Lake
City, FL 386-752-3436.

Nellie Mae
Webber-Simmons
Nellie Mae Webber Sim-
mons, 71, retired nurse
died January 12, 2010.
She is preceded in death by,
one son, Andrew Simmons.
Survivors includes: Children,
Kenneth O'Neal (Joi), Pau-
line O'Neal, Ronald Simmons,
Richard Simmons; brother, Ber-
nard Clayton; grandchildren,
great-grandchildren, and a host
of other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Mrs. Sim-
mons will be Saturday January
16, 2010, 1:00 P.M. at Mt. Pisgah
AME Church. 519 NE Washing-
ton Street. Lake City, Florida.
Visitation with the family will be
FridayJanuary 15,2010from5:00
- 7:00 P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted
to COMBS FUNERAL
HOME. 292 NE Washing-
ton Street. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals".

Mr. Kenyon Swilley
Mr. Kenyon Swilley, age 79, of
Lake City, FL. died Tuesday,
January 12, 2010 in the V.A.
Medical Center, Lake City, FL.


following an extended illness. He
was a native of Camilla, Georgia
and had resided in Lake City,
FL. for the past 41 years. He was
the son of the late George Swil-
ley and Edna Holton Swilley. He
served in the U.S. Army for 20
years until his retirement as E-
6 Sgt. in 1968. He then worked
and retired as a correctional
officer with the Mayo Correc-
tional Center and the Columbia
Correctional after 16 years of
service. He was a deacon with
the Fellowship Baptist Church,
and Army Veteran of the Korean
War and the Vietnam War and
enjoyed gardening and camping
with his family. He is survived
by his wife, Ethel Swilley of
Lake City, FL.: three daughters,
Barbara (Lafayette) Price, De-
nise (Mike) Schwartz and Pam
(Ty) Carswell all of Lake City,
FL.: one brother, Roy Johnson
of Leesburg, GA: eleven grand-
children. and 13 great-grand-
children also survive. Funeral
services will be conducted at
2:00 p.m. Saturday, January 16,
2010 in the Chapel of Guerry
Funeral Home with Rev. Tommy
Cannon officiating and assisted
by Mr. Dwight Law. Interment
will be in Fellowship Cemetery,
Suwannee County, FL. Visita-
tion will be from 5:00 to 7:00
p.m. Friday, January 15, 2010 at
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 S.W. Main Blvd., Lake
City, FL. Phone 386-752-2111.


Tonya K. Harris
Townsend
Tonya K. Harris Townsend
beloved wife of James Townsend,
born on May 31, 1957 in Bly-
theville, AK, died January 11,


2010. She was a twenty year
veteran of the U.S. Army retir-
ing in 2002 and moving to Lake
City. She de-
voted her life
as a nurse to
the care of
others while '
serving in the
Army and at
the Lake City
Veterans Hos- --
pital. Tonya was
a passionate ad- -
vocate for ani-
mal rights and
an avid gardener. Tonya was a
member of the Lake City Church
of Christ She is preceded in death
by her father Lynn "Red" Harris.
She is survived by her mother
Marilyn Harris Schooner, one
daughter Kelli Sue Hamilton
son-in-law Kregg Hamilton;
two brothers Gary and Daniel
and two grandchildren Jess and
Elle; numerous aunts and un-
cles and nephews also survive.
Funeral services for Tonya
will be conducted on Saturday,
January 16, 2010, 2:00 p.m at
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home with Preacher Ryan Tuten
and Missionary Bart Biddle of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
at Forest Lawn Memorial Gar-
dens Cemetery. Visitation with
the family will be held Friday
evening from 5:00 - 7:00 P.M.
at- the funeral home. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of the GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 South US Hwy 441,
Lake City. 386-752-1954
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428












LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2010


Report: Weekend snooze

may not combat sleep loss


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 24, 2004, picture, cancer patient Christopher Campbell uses an eye dropper for
hashish hemp oil in Portland, Ore. Some Oregon citizens are pushing a November ballot to
allow medical marijuana sales in the state.

Pot dispensaries on state's ballot


By BRAD CAIN measure, and backers have
Associated Press until July to collect up the.
remainder.
SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon is one of 13
Obama administration's states that have legalized
decision not to interfere in medical marijuana. On
states' medical marijuana Monday, the New Jersey
laws has emboldened a Legislature approved a bill
citizens' initiative to get the that would make it the 14th
state of Oregon involved in state to allow chronically
providing the drug for resi- ill patients access to mari-
dents who have permission juana for medical reasons,
to use it. and Democratic Gov. Jon
Medical marijuana advo- Corzine, who supports the
cates are seeking to put legislation, could sign it
on the November ballot a before leaving office next
measure to create a system week, making it law.
in which state-licensed pot Of the 13 states that have
growers would distribute legalized medical marijua-
their crops to dispensaries na, five of them - including
where people could buy California - , make provi-
the drug to treat their ail- sion for dispensaries where
ments. patients can get the pot.
Currently, those people Because of earlier con-
either have an approved cerns about possible fed-
provider grow it for them eral intervention, there had
or grow it themselves, been no serious movement
On Monday, backers in Oregon to join the medi-
of the initiative turned in cal marijuana states with
61,000 petition signatures dispensaries.
in hopes of qualifying the But things changed last
issue for the ballot. A total October, when the Obama
of 82,769 valid signatures administration announced
are needed to qualify the it would not go after people



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in states who use medical
marijuana legally.
"It was a watershed event.
It's really the thing that has
made this ballot initiative
viable," said John Sajo,
executive director of the
Voter Power Foundation,
which is backing the mea-
sure and which helped draft
Oregon's 1998 law.
Keith Stroup, spokes-
man for the National
Organization for the
Reform of Marijuana Laws
in Washington D.C, said
that the Obama adminis-
tration's stance will prompt
other states to also consider
marijuana dispensaries.
'Within a very few years,
any state that has legal med-
ical marijuana will certainly
have a legal supply. They
will all allow some kind
of regulated dispensary,"
said Stroup, who founded
NORML and is the group's
legal counsel.
Current Oregon law
allows registered patients
to grow up to six mature
marijuana plants or a grow-
er to do it for them.


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By LAURAN NEERGAARD
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WASHINGTON -
Sleeping in on Saturday
after a few weeks of too little
shuteye may feel refresh-
ing, but it can give a false
sense of security.
New research shows
chronic sleep loss can't be
cured that easily. Scientists
teased apart the effects of
short- and long-term sleep
loss - and found that the
chronically sleep-deprived
may function normally soon
after waking up, but experi-
ence steadily slower reac-
tion times as the day wears
on, even if they had tried
to catch up the previous
night.
It's work with important
safety implications in our
increasingly 24/7 society,
not just for shift-workers
but for the roughly one in
six Americans who regu-
larly get six hours or less of
sleep a night.
"We know that staying
awake 24 hours in a row
impairs performance to a
level comparable to a blood-
alcohol content beyond the


legal limit to drive," said
lead researcher Dr. Daniel
Cohen of Boston's Brigham
and Women's Hospital.
But when the already
chronically sleep-deprived
pull an all-nighter, "the
deterioration is increased
tenfold," Cohen said.
The National Institutes
of Health says adults need
seven hours to nine hours
of sleep for good health.
Regularly getting too lit-
tle increases the risk of
health problems, including
memory impairment and a
weakened immune system.
More immediately, too little
sleep affects reaction times;
sleepiness is to blame for
car crashes and other acci-
dents.
Cohen wondered how
both acute and chronic
sleep loss interact with our
bodies' natural circadian
rhythms, the 24-hour bio-
logical clock that signals
when it's time to sleep and
wake.
He recruited nine young,
healthy volunteers and
messed up their normal-
ly good sleep habits for
three weeks. They stayed


awake for 33-hour stretches
with 10 hours of sleep in
between, a radical enough
schedule that their internal
circadian clocks couldn't
adjust. Their sleep depriva-
tion was comparable to that
of someone who gets about
5 1/2 hours of sleep a night,
Cohen said, but the extra-
long wake-sleep schedule
also allowed him to test the
value of catch-up sleep.
The volunteers' reaction
times were tested every
few waking hours, and com-
pared to similar volunteers
getting a normal amount
of sleep.
The well-rested can catch
up from the occasional all-
nighter fairly easily. But as
the study wore on and the
volunteers became more
sleep-deprived,therejuvena-
tion they felt each time they
awoke increasingly proved
a facade, Cohen reported
Wednesday in the jour-
nal Science Translational
Medicine. They functioned
OK during their first few
waking hours, especially
that first week. But then
their reaction times steadily
worsened.


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Page Editor:-Tom Mayer, 754-0428











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreporter:com


Thursday, January


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


14,2010


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

CHS BASEBALL
Dugout Club
meets today
The CHS Dugout Club
will meet at 6 p.m. today
in the Career Center at
the school.
For details, call Greg
Bailey at 755-6316.

WOLVES BASKETBALL
Fundraiser dance
at Richardson
The Columbia County
Recreation Department is
sponsoring a fundraising
dance for the Richardson
Middle School boys and
girls basketball teams
from 7-11 p.m. Friday in
the school's cafeteria.
The dance is open to all
middle school aged
students. Cost is $5.
For details, call Wendy
Dohrn at 623-3641 or
Mario Coppock at
754-7095.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Boys Club hoops
registration open
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
taking registration for
its basketball program.
Three leagues are
offered. Cost is $40.
For details, call the
club at 7524184.

FLAG FOOTBALL, CHEER
Registration open
for league play
Registration for flag
football, ages 5-12, and
cheerleading, ages 5-10,
is under way at Christ
Central Ministries.
Cost is $35.
For details, call Ronny
Busscher at 365-2128.

CHS TRACK
Fundraiser set
for Jan. 30
Columbia High girls
track has a breakfast
fundraiser at
Kazbor's Grille from
7:30-10:30 a.m. on
Jan. 30.
For tickets, e-mail
coach April Morse at
eanbz@bellsouth.net.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
* Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Newberry
High, 6 p.m.
* Fort White High.boys
soccer vs. Newberry
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Wolfson
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
* Columbia High
wrestling at Suwannee
High tournament, noon
* Fort White High girls
basketball at St. Francis
Catholic High, 6 p.m.
* Fort White High
soccer vs. Interlachen
High, 7 p.m. (girls-5)
* Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Fleming Island
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
* Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Ridgeview
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
* Columbia High
wrestling at Suwannee
High tournament, 8 a.m.
* Columbia High girls
weightlifting at Keystone
High Invitational, 11 a.m.
* Columbia High girls
basketball at Middleburg
High, 5:30 p.m. (JV-4)
* Columbia High boys
basketball at Newberry


High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


AlI-Stars


abound


West puts in work for game in Lake City


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
BRANFORD - The West is putting
in its work to turn the tables from last
year in the annual all-star game.
The West and East squads play
in the third annual Baker Sports/
Columbia Youth Football Association
East/West All-Star Game on Saturday
in Lake City. Kickoff is 4 p.m. at
Memorial Stadium.
Branford High football coach Bill
Wiles has participated in the game
and this year is head coach of the
West.
'"The main thing is to get the kids
to play hard and have fun," Wiles
said at his home field on Tuesday.
"When they turn that scoreboard on
Saturday, we will try to win it."
Teams only have four days to practice,
and the West is splitting time between
Branford and Suwannee High.


"We get to see all the coaches from
the other schools," Wiles said. "It
is a different atmosphere - more
relaxed. Lafayette is our big rival, but
out here there is no rivalry."
The game was conceived as a show-
case for seniors at smaller schools,
and perhaps to help get notice from
scouts.
"Some kids might be moving on to
the next level and for some this will
be the last game they will play," Wiles
said. "I can promise you, these guys
can play. The bottom line is to make it
an enjoyable experience, one they will
remember."
The two teams gather at 6 p.m.
Friday for a banquet at Richardson
Community Center.
"I enjoy the banquet with the coach-
es and players from both teams,"
Wiles said. "It is a good experience.
They talk and share a little bit. It
makes the big picture smaller."


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Coach Joseph Pearson of Lafayette High gives instruction to defensive lineman during the West squad practice on Tuesday
at Branford High. The Baker Sports/Columbia Youth Football Association East/West All-Star Football Game is 4 p.m. Saturday
at Memorial Stadium in Lake City.



Brown takes over Lady Tigers


New coach leads
soccer team into
district tourney.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityteporter.com
Columbia High has bro-
ken in a new coach for Lady
Tigers soccer over the last
three matches with Ashley
Brown taking the reins.
Coach Keith Mcloughlin
has been removed from
head coaching duties of
the Lady Tigers, as it was
revealed that the former
coach had issues with his
visa to work in America.
Brown has coached the
Lady Tigers to a 2-1 record
since she learned that
Mcloughlin would not be
in charge of Columbia prior
to the Senior Night game
against Ed White High.
Columbia Athletic Director
Trey Hosford believes that
Brown was an excellentchoice
to replace Mcloughlin.
"She's going to be our
coach the rest of the sea-
son and will do an excellent
job," Hosford said. "Keith's
departure had something
to do with his visa. He did
everything he had to do
to be employed with the
Columbia County school
SOCCER continued on 2B


. , , . - . . .
. ," , .. ., . .- " ' - ,; ,*---1
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Haley Dicks (23) tries to intercept a ball in a game played earlier this
season. The Lady Tigers have been competiting under coach Ashley Brown, who took over
for coach Keith Mcloughlin, the last three games and compiled a 2-1 record.


BorderWars set
to take stage on
Saturday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com


"I enjoy the banquet
with the coaches and
players from both
teams. It is a good
experience.They talk
and share a little bit. It
makes the big picture
smaller."
- Bill Wiles,
West head coach

"Everybody is going to play and
some will play on both sides," Wiles
said. "It is not any problem getting
these kids to play hard. These guys
love to play football."
The West includes players from
Trenton, Taylor County, Bell,
Lafayette, Suwannee, Branford,
Madison County and Dixie County
high schools.


Section B


Robbie Klees and Bobby
Latmore noticed something -
that many people close
to the game realize when
it comes to outgoing ,
high school football players: I
there aren't enough '
chances for some players
to be seen on a stage to
get noticed and earn a
scholarship to play
football at the collegiate .
level.
As former football
coaches, the two noticed
a need to help ihe
youth so that they might
have a scholarship offer and
have a chance to commit
to a school at the next
level.
Their brainchild was
the Florida-Georgia -
Border Wars, which
will play its fourth game
at 2 p.m. on Saturday in
Lowndes, Ga.
The two founders enlisted
coaches from area schools
to help get the game off
the ground, and Columbia
High head coach Craig
Howard was chosen to
head the Florida squad in a
game'-that will highlight
players from both Columbia
and Fort White high
schools.
The Georgia group will
be coached by Tony Long
from Berrian, Ga.
Players such as
quarterback Cameron
Sweat (CHS), quarterback
Alex Gilmer (FW),
running back Tiger Powell
(CHS), offensive lineman
Matt Thomas (FW) and
wide receiver Jamaal
Montague (CHS) will
represent the area on
the Florida squad on
Saturday, with a chance
to get noticed in a game
against players of equal
caliber.
"We went in to the first
game not expecting much,"
said Latmore. "When we
looked into the stands,
there were more than
5,000 people. We saw it
as a way to get the kids
that aren't the ESPN top
150 to get noticed. It's an
extra advantage for the kids
from a smaller school to be
seen when the competition
is equal. They'll compete
against kids that are college-
level talents.' Out of the 100
kids we had competing, we '
had 72 offered after the
game."
Latmore, who serves
as president of the game,
said the game is more for
the kids that haven't made
their commitment yet,
rather than the ones that
have already pledged their
allegiance to schools on the
next level.
Coach Howard's goal
is to help some of. those
prospects garner some
attention and possibly earn
a scholarship.
"There are very
few kids locked into a
scholarship," he said. "It
allows coaches to have
more film on them playing
against like competition.
It's one more game to be
looked at by .college
recruiters. Our ultimate
goal is to get a kid that
exposure. It's more
for the kids from the
state of Florida to have a
chance to play and show
their skills. I hope
the fans support the
games."













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2010


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

_ TV sports
Today
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, Joburg
Open, first round, at Johannesburg, South
Africa (same-day tape)
7 p.m.
. TGC - PGA Tour, Sony Open, first
rbund, at Honolulu
*MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN - Seton Hall at Georgetown
or Auburn at Tennessee
ESPN2 - Seton Hall at Georgetown
or Auburn at Tennessee
9 p.m.
ESPN - Providence at DePaul or
Indiana at Michigan
ESPN2 - Providence at DePaul or
Indiana at Michigan
10:30 p.m.
FSN - Stanford at Washington
. II p.m.
ESPN2 - Gonzaga at Saint Mary's,
Calif.
NBA BASKETBALL
- 8:15 p.m.
. TNT - Chicago at Boston
10:30 p.m.
TNT - Cleveland at Utah
SOCCER
2 p.m.


ESPN2 - MLS, Draft, at Philadelphia

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday
Arizona at New Orleans, 4:30 p.m.
(FOX)
Baltimore at Indianapolis, 8:15 p.m.
(CBS)
Sunday
Dallas at Minnesota, I p.m. (FOX)
N.Y. Jets at San Diego, 4:40 p.m.
(CBS)

Player of the Year
OFFENSE
NEW YORK - Voting for the 2009
NFL Offensive Player of the Year selected
by The Associated Press in balloting by a
nationwide panel of the media:
Chris Johnson, RB,Tennessee 38'4
Drew Brees, QB, New Orleans 9
Peyton Manning. QB, Indianapolis I
Philip Rivers, QB, San Diego I

All-Star games
Saturday, Jan. 23
East-West Shrine Classic
At Orlando
East vs.West, 3 p.m.


Saturday, Jan. 30
Senior Bowl
At Mobile,Ala
North vs. South, 4 p m. (NFL)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Chicago at Boston, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Utah, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
San Antonio at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Atlanta, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Indiana at New Jersey, 8 p.m.
Toronto at NewYork, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Miami at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Orlando at Portland, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 9 Tennessee vs.Auburn, 7 p.m.
No. I I Georgetown vs. Seton Hall,
7 p.m.
No. 17 Gonzaga at Saint Mary's, Calif.,
II p.m.


Stepping out at Disney
Step Fitness Running'members Tony Richards (from left), Michelle McCollum Richards
and Bill Griffin participated in the Disney Marathon Weekend's Goofy Marathon and a Half
..Challenge. The Goofy Challenge required each runner to finish both the half marathon
.(13.1 miles), which is run on Saturday morning, and also run the full marathon (26.2 miles)
on Sunday morning. Step Fitness team members finished in the top 10 percent. Michelle
- Richards completed the Qoofy Challenge with a half marathon time of 1:44, and a marathon
time of 3:43. Tony Richards had a half marathon time of 1:44, and his first marathon time of
'.3:49. Griffin had a half marathon time of 2:05, and his first marathon time of 4:35. Another
member, David Robison, competed in the half marathon with a finish time of 1:40.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's girls soccer team showed its youth when Casey DuBose (center) was
the only honoree for Senior Night on Tuesday. Joining the celebration are Principal Keith
Hatcher (from left), mom Sondra DuBose, dad Lennard DuBose and coach Perry Sauls.


Lady Indians soccer falls to

Wave, eyes district tourney


From staff reports

Fort White High's girls
soccer has prided itself on
playing PK. Yonge School
tough. The teams were
district rivals the last four
years.
The Blue Wave has
pulled away a bit since a
1-0 win on Dec. 4, as the
visitors beat Fort White,
3-0, on Tuesday. P.K. Yonge
improved to 14-2-1.
The Lady Indians fell to
3-10-4 and at 0-5-3 in District
5-3A are the No. 5 seed
for the district tournament
next week at Newberry
High.
Fort White plays No. 4
Williston High in the 7 p.m.
Tuesday play-in game. The
winner will play No. 1 seed
Suwannee High at 5 p.m.
Jan. 21.
No. 2 Santa Fe High and


No. 3 Newberry High play
at 7 p.m. Jan. 21 in the
other semifinal.
The championship game
is 7 p.m: Jan. 22.
Fort White's boys lost a
district game at Suwannee
on Tuesday, 4-0. The
Bulldogs moved to 12-3-1.
The Indians (2-8-3, 0-5-0)
wrap up the district regu-
lar season when Newberry
visits at 7 p.m. today.

Lady Tigers weightlifting

Columbia High continued
its undefeated season lifting
the weights on Tuesday by
defeating Gainesville High
in a home meet.
The Lady Tigers won
eight of 10 classes on their
way to a 52-36 victory in
Lake City.
Ashley Thomas won
the 101-pound class for


Columbia with a 170-pound
total. Stephanie Pilkington
had a 215-pound total in the
119-pound class.
Tara Stephens had a
310-pound total in the
129-pound class, Amber
Thomas won the 139-pound
class with a 280 pound total
and Alaina Timmons won
the 154-pound class with
a combined total of 330
pounds on the bench, and
clean and jerk.
Alix Williams won the
169-pound class with a 280
total and Dana Roberts won
the 199-pound class with a
285-pound total.
Celeste Gomez had a
match-high total of 410
pounds in the 183-pound
class to lead the Lady
Tigers.
Columbia (8-0) par-
ticipates in the Keystone
Invitational this weekend.


GOLF REPORTS


Super Bowl tournament Saturday


The MGA Super Bowl
two-man tournament is
Saturday.
The MGA Championship
is Jan. 23-24, along with a
Get Out of Town event.
Wednesday winners:
A Division - Don Horn,
first; Randy Heavrin,


COUNTRY CLUB
J.D. Dedge

second;
B Division - Jack
Tuggle, first; Gerald Smithy
and Jerry Perkins, tied for


second.
Horn led the way with
four skins. Chet Carter,
David Crawford, Lynn
Smith and Heavrin had one
each. The pot carried over.
Monday's Top of the
Hill was canceled due to
weather.


Titans RB Johnson voted


APs top offensive player 1
il


.By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK - That
,.blur speeding away from
.opposing defenses and run-
ning off with The Associated
Press 2009 NFL Offensive
Player of the Year award is
"Chris Johnson.
Considered the fastest
'man in pro football, Johnson
'was uncatchable in setting a
league mark for yards from
scrimmage (2,509) and
-becoming the sixth player
with a 2,000-yard rushing
season.
He is the first NFL player
to finish with at least 2,000
yards rushing and 500
receiving (503).


SOCCER
Continued From Page 1B
system as far as we knew,
and did a good job as far as
coaching the girls. Ashley
had been the assistant all
year and has done an out-
standing job. I was at the
game against Buchholz, too,
and that was a very good
team they almost knocked
off. I have no doubt she'll do
a wonderful job."
In Brown's most recent
game as coach of the Lady
Tigers, Columbia respond-
e'd to .the loss with an 8-0
mercy-rule victory in a game
where Shelby Widergren
led with six goals.
Brown's next role will be
:'leading the Lady Tigers into
the district tournament.
. The district tourna-
ment begins for Columbia
(14-9, 5-2) on Monday.


That earned the sec-
ond-year pro 38'/2 votes
Wednesday from a nation-
wide panel of 50 sports writ-
ers and broadcasters who
cover the NFL. Johnson
easily beat New Orleans
quarterback Drew Brees,
who received nine votes.
"I kind of realize what
I did and I feel like I had
a dream season," said
Johnson, who scored 16
touchdowns (14 rushing),
second to Minnesota's
Adrian Peterson, and tied
the NFL mark with six con-
secutive games rushing for
at least 125 yards.
Johnson, who has run
a 4.2 40 and believes he'll
remain the NFL's fast-




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. Z
ORDOB E


�2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 3
All Rights Reserved. -.
NAGGI |



DIBORM E



CHARNB


est player unless a team
signs Usain Bolt, has big-
ger dreams, too: breaking
Eric Dickerson's single-
season rushing record of
2,105 yards, and winning
the league MVP award.
I didn't even get one vote at
all (for MVP)," Johnson said.
Of course, if Johnson
keeps posting phenomenal
numbers, all kinds of hon-
ors and records should
keep coming.
'That gives me some-
thing to look forward to next
year," he said before focus-
ing on Dickerson's mark.
"You go for 2,000 yards. I
don't know what you can
really say that makes you
want to work harder."


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CARGO FETID PRISON BOYISH
Answer: How the rock star ran for office -
ON HIS "RECORD"


12
13
15
16

18
19
21
22
23

25
28

30
31
32

33
35

37


ACROSS

Feinted
Kingston and
others
Miss by--
Macho sort
Cereal topper
Flowed slowly
Choir
selections
UNIX or DOS
Fabric meas.
Shogun's yes
Billion add-on
Former JFK
arrivals
Humor
What book-
worms do
Week da.
"Exodus" hero
Affection,
briefly
Call loudly
Main house on.
an estate
Tokyo,
formerly


38 Ground
breakers
40 Heredity factor
41 Moo
companion
42 Ben & Jerry
rival
43 NASA
destination
46 Go downhill
48 Gizmo
50 Bike seat
54 Hold the floor
55 Skywalker's
father
56 Did a fall chore
57 Ruhr Valley
city

DOWN

1 Quick punch
2 Ms. Thurman
3 Nieces and
cousins
4 Passed by
5 Studies
6 Uno y dos
7 - Dawn Chong


Answer to Previous Puzzle


L UGOSTN BBNAFBORA
0ANT OR LEN

E D AE R
ERR GNE |T T
V I N EC REPRIO
AD ASH IDEAL
DDIE OBS NNE
EEDS ERE EG G
SNO ADA ADE
LAM HAD
RECIPE MIDGES
TARZAN SNEAKY
SPIELS URGED


8 Troublesome
ones
9 Submit
10 Puts in a lawn
14 Long sighs
15 Anvil user


17 Fairly recently
(2 wds.)
19 Bond return
20 Dragon
constellation
22 "Laugh-In"
name
24 Bottom line
25 Diminished
26 Socrates' forte
27 Poop out
29 Acad.
34 Unpaid
factory worker
36 Slates
39 Talk back
43 Borodin
prince
44 Name in
cheesecake
45 Wyo.
neighbor
46 Lawn
invader
47 Gutter
locale
49 Former
telecom
giant
51 Tooth pro's
deg.
52 Grant foe
53 Osprey
relative


1-14 @2010 by UFS, Inc.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


-"2B


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2010 3B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
HOW DID YOUR WIFE NOT AT
LIKE THE BIRTHDAY ALL
CUPCAKES YOU
SURPRISED /
HER WITH? (( ,
7r. "- v, j
|- " :-- -',


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


WHEN I'M IN
BIG TROUBLE
I HIDE UNDER
TH' PORCH !!



^ +- .Lt


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


DEAR ABBY


Parents fear son's tag-along

girlfriend will hold him back


DEAR ABBY: Our son,
"Sam," is a senior in high
school and has chosen a
college that will suit his ma-
jor. Now, all of a sudden, his
girlfriend, "Amanda," has
decided she wants to attend
the same school. We'd like
to discourage it because
we know she's only going
there to be close to our son.
We feel she needs to get out
on her own as much as Sam
does.
Sam has tried to break
up with her in the past, but
she makes him feel guilty
about breaking it off. We
have talked to our son about
her and her behavior. He is
a bright kid, but seems not
to be smart where Amanda
is concerned.
Please help. us figure
out a way to make Sam
understand the kind of po-
sition he's putting himself
in. Amanda is needy and
spoiled. She has never had
to work for anything. Our
son holds down two jobs
and seems very indepen-
dent - so why is he coddling
her? - HELP NEEDED
IN WISCONSIN
DEAR HELP NEED-
ED: Sam may be emotional
about Amanda, or just so
soft-hearted he can't get
past her guilt trips. Please
remain calm, because col-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
lege is almost a year away
and a lot can happen be-
tween now and then. If
Amanda's focus is on Sam
and not her grades, al-
though she may want to at-
tend the same college, she
may not be accepted for en-
rollment.
If she is, then your hus-
band needs to have a man-
to-man talk with Sam and
point out that when he gets
to college he is going to be
exposed to many different
experiences and people,
that he's quickly going to
grow emotionally and intel-
lectually, and that is why it's
important that he keeps his
options open.
DEAR ABBY: My prob-
lem is I attract needy peo-
ple. I don't have a problem
setting boundaries. How-
ever, those boundaries are
frequently crossed because
the person is so self-ab-
sorbed that he/she "can't
hear" me.
How does one draw
the line with a complete


stranger who wants to tell
me her whole life story
the first time we meet, and
sucks away my energy and
my time? I feel like the in-
dividual isn't even talking
to me. She might as well
be talking to herself or to a
wall for all I care.
Abby, I do not want
to continue being taken
hostage by these kinds of
people. I'm not interested
in their lives or troubles. I
have enough of my own. I
don't want to be unkind,
but I haven't found a way
to protect myself from be-
ing forced to invest time in
needy acquaintances with
whom I do not wish to pur-
sue a relationship. I am not
a total (rhymes with witch),
but I am definitely ... BAF-
FLED IN VERO BEACH,
FLA.
DEAR BAFFLED: If I
understand your descrip-
tion correctly, the type of
person you describe is a
"sapper." These are indi-
viduals who talk until they
completely drain the ener-
gy from their "victim" - not
unlike vampires in Stephe-
nie Meyer's novels.


E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069. -


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Find out all you
can about the people you
are dealing with so you can
work your way around a
sticky situation that has the
potential to damage your
position or your reputation.
Letting someone else make
the first move will be detri-
mental. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Your persistence
in the past, coupled with
your strong beliefs and
somewhat stubborn atti-
tude will pay off now. Busi-
ness travel, conferences or
communication will help to
flush out any problem areas
and allow you to stay in con-
trol. *****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): It's important
to be creative when you
are trying to put your plans
into motion. However, keep
your costs down. Modera-
tion and practicality are two
factors you must incorpo-
rate if you want to be suc-
cessful. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You are facing
changes that will benefit
you in the end. Don't let
your personal responsibili-
ties stop you from taking
advantage of an offer. Your
success will be a good thing
for everyone to whom you
are close. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Avoid being too gen-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

erous with your time and
money if you want to im-
press people who can make
a difference to your profes-
sional future. Make a stra-
tegic move that will guaran-
tee your success. There is
money heading your way.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Children, friends and
activities that interest you
will all help direct you to a
bigger and brighter future.
Get out shopping or look
for something to enhance
you physically, mentally or
financially. Plan a little ro-
mance for late in the day.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Keep a low profile, es-
pecially if there are people
who are not heading in the
same direction as you try-
ing to infiltrate your space.
When you have everything
in place, you will stand a
better chance of getting
what you want or moving
on without as much opposi-
tion. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): The more you
experience and share your
thoughts with others, the
more you will realize how
much you have to offer.
Love is on the rise and an
interesting partnership
that offers something very


unique will develop. Make
positive geographic or etyio-
tional moves. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You don't
have to take a back seat if
you don't agree with some-
thing, but be diplomatic.
Someone you are dealing
with will remind you of an
old acquaintance. Use simi-
lar tactics to get this person
to act on your behalf. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): If you owe
someone something, pay it
back and, if you are owed
something, ask for its re-
turn. Finish undone matters
that are holding you back.
Recognition is heading
your way - take full credit
for your efforts. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Clear up matters
concerning institutions,
government agencies or
personal business matters.
Don't leave anything 'to
chance. A relationship that
is not out in the open may
be exciting but will cause
damage if you don't face is-
sues head-on. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You don't have
to wait for someone else to
make the first move. Get-
ting involved in an organi-
zation that complements
your own agenda will pay
off. Love is in the stars and
better times are heading
your way. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals Y
"P MAZ DJTPGI IEAZI XAD T P Z PLM
ZEG EGJY AXX J TJZ, TKZ Z E J Z' I A R
- ZEG TJZ EJY ZA MGZ AUUV IEAZI. "
- AUUV AITAKDLG

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Those things are better which are perfected by
nature than those which are finished by art." - Cicero

(c) 2010 by NEA, Inc. 1-14


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


OH, NO! WAS THERE I'LL |
SOMETHING WRONG SAV
WITH THEM?

-.- * " I C -


K-- ^ ^


SEEING ALL 50 CUPCAKES U
LINED UP WITH CANDLES IN THEM
REALLY FREAKED HER OUT!




J &iBr' S

]h--:^ , B


FRANK & ERNEST


CLASSIC PEANUTS












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2010

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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 09-287-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF BILLIE S.
SCHMID A/K/A BILLIE SUE
SCHMID A/K/A BILLIE SUE H.
SCHMID
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Billie S. Schmid a/k/a Billie Sue
S.chmid a/k/a Billie Sue H. Schmid,
deceased, whose date of death was
November 6, 2009, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other cred-
itors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED. The date of
first publication of this notice is Jan-
uary 14, 2010.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Estelle M. Scannella
2 Meadowlark Drive
Hamilton Square, New Jersey 08690
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
/s/ John J. Kendron
Attorney for Estelle M. Scannella
Florida Bar No. 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
P.O. Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334

04537070
January 14, 21, 2010
PUBLIC NOTICE
ON
INVITATION TO BID
ITB-009-2010
Sealed bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until February 4, 2010 at
11:00 A.M. All bids will be opened
and read aloud at 11:15 A.M. in the
City Council Chambers located on
the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
TREE TRIMMING AND REMOV-
AL ANNUAL TERM CONTRACT
Documents may be viewed on the
City website
http://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
m; by contacting
purchasing(S)lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818.

04537069
January 14, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA .COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 08-817-CA
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plantiff,
vs.
WALTER HAINES A/K/A WAL-
TER V. HAINES,
DECEASED; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF WALTER
HAINES A/K/A WALTER V.
HAINES; UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA; STATE
OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE;
CANNON
CREEK AIRPARK HOMEOWN-
ERS,
ASSOCIATION, INC., SUCCES-
SOR BY
MERGER WITH CANNON
CREEK
HOMEOWNERS, ASSOCIATION,
INC.;
BROTHERS, WELCOME HOME-
OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.; RAYMOND
R.
SESSIONS; MARTHA JANE SIS-
SON HAINES;
JEFFREY ROBIN HAINES; JAN-
ICE NOREEN








Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 lv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191

Services


Legal

TAYLOR; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JANICE NOREEN TAYLOR,
and any unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and other un-
known persons or unknown spouses
claiming by, through and under any
.of the above-named Defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that the un-
dersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Columbia County, Florida, will on
the 10th day of February, 2010, at
11:00 A.M. at the Front steps of the
Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, offer for sale and
sell at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash, the follow-
ing-described property situate in Co-
lumbia County, Florida:
Lot 6, CANNON CREEK AIR-
PARK, as recorded in Plat Book
5, Page 38, Public records of Colum-
bia County, Florida pursuant to the
Final Judgment entered in a case
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above
Any person or entity claiming an in-
terest in the surplus, if any, resulting
from the foreclosure sale, other than
the property owner as of the date.of
the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on
same with the Clerk of Court within
60 days after the foreclosure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
of said Court this 5th day of January,
2010.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact the Court
Administrator at P.O. Box 2069,
Lake City, Florida 32056-1965, tele-
phone (904) 755-4100 Ext. 250, not
later than seven (7) days prior to the
proceeding, If hearing impaired,
(TTD) 1,800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay
Service.
P. DeWitt Cason
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/ B Scippio
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
Emily Jane Hansen
Butler & Hosch, P.A.
3185 S, Conway Rd., Ste. E
Orlando, Florida 32812
(407) 381-5200

04537055
January 14, 21, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 09-788-CA
COLUMBIA BANK, f/k/a
COLUMBIA COUNTY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHELLE MOORE; CITIFINAN-
CIAL, INC.; COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA; AND THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, LEGATEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-
ITORS, OR TRUSTEES OF MI-
CHAEL W. SAVAGE, DE-
CEASED,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
Michelle Moore
4615 E. Hall Road
Gainesville, Georgia 30507
AND ALSO to Defendants the un-
known spouse, heirs, devisees, lega-
tees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, or trustees of Michael W.
Savage, deceased, whose addresses
are' unknown;
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing described property in Colum-
bia County, Florida;
Lot 22 of Pine Ridge, a subdivision
according, to the Plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 102
of the public records of Columbia
County, Florida. Together with and
including a 2000 Grand Manor Mo-
bile Home, ID No. GAGMTS06387
which is located on and affixed to
the property.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Ed-
die M. Anderson, Plaintiff's attor-
ney, whose address is Post Office
Box 1179, Lake City, Florida 32056-
1179, no later than thirty (30) days
after the first publication of this no-
tice, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court Either before
service on Plaintiffs' attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint.
If you are the owner of real estate
that is being foreclosed, there may be
money owed to you after the sale
You may contact the Clerk of the
Court, Columbia County, 173 NE
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055, phone number (386) 758-
1031, for the information on what
you need to do to get the funds. You
do not need to hire an attorney or
other representative to get this mon-
ey.
DATED ON December 28, 2009
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Court
By:/s/: J. Harris
as Deputy Clerk.

05522854
January 7 and 14, 2010


020 Lost & Found

LOST DOG
Boston Terrier
His name is Harley. He is black
and white, around 20-25 lbs and
should be wearing an orange col-
lar. He is very friendly and very
approachable. Please call Brian at
386-365-6171 or Tori at 352-221-
5995 if you find him. $100 RE-
WARD.
LOST DOGS 2 beagles.
.Lost Monday January 4, 2010.
On Lake Jeffery Highway.
386-365-4520 or 386-623-1100.


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


020 Lost & Found

SMALL TAN & WHITE dog lost
at Wendy's in Lake City. Our dog
was rescued by a man in a red
Dodge Ram truck hauling a wood-
en trailer. We would love to have
our little dog back. Please call
Tamie at work 386-362-1040 or
home 386-842-2165.


100 Opportunities
BLUE JEAN JOB $ CASH $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock-n-Roll
Environment. Call Mrs. Fletcher
1-321-432-4142. 9am-6pm.
Must start Immediately!
20 TEMPORARY Farmworkers
needed. Employment dates 2/15/1I0 -
12/15/10. Workers will plant, culti-
vate, & harvest soybeans, corn, cot-
ton & peanuts. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for non-
commuting workers. Transportation
& subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $7.25/hr to $8.12/hr de-
pending on crop activity/work loca-
tion. Worksite in George Co. MS &
Mobile Co. AL. Applicants should
report or send a resume to the nearest
Florida Agency of Workforce Inno-
vation office & reference job order #
AL 510652.
Driskell Cotton Farm - Grand Bay,
AL
DUMP TRUCK Driver
w/Asphalt experience.
386-497-3131

EXPERIENCED BOOKKEEPER
Friendly fast-paced company located
off CR 137 seeking organized multi-
tasker. Quickbooks exp. a must.
Please fax resume to 386-935-2289.
FARM WORKERS - planting,
maintenance, harvest of fruits and
vegs. $9.00/hr. 6 positions. Tempora-
ry employment from mid March -
mid Dec. There will be work for at
least 3/4 of the work period. Tools
provided. Housing at no cost and,
transportation & subsistence expens-
es to worksite provided for workers
whose permanent residence is out of
area. Employer: Lynn Moore, 2415
Woodbine Rd., Woodbine, MD
21797. Apply/report to your closest
SWA or DLLR, 7161 Columbia
Gateway Dr., Suite D, Columbia,
MD, 21046, phone 410-290-2601.
Job order #0975139.
11 TEMPORARY Nursery'
Workers needed. Employ-
ment dates 2/15/10 -
12/12/10. Workers will plant,
cultivate, prune, & harvest
trees & shrubs, all duties are
performed outdoors. Tools
provided at no cost. Free
housing provided for non-
commuting workers. Trans-
portation & subsistence reim-
bursed to worker upon com-
pletion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $8.52/hr. Appli-
cants should report or send a
resume to.the nearest Florida
Agency of Workforce Inno-
vation office & reference job
order # PA 669444.
Geissler Tree Farm - Lee-
sport, PA
INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for self motivated goal
oriented sales person in both
life/health and property/casualty
ins. A 220 and 215 license a plus
but not reqd. Must have exc.
comm. skills, be organized and de-
pendable. Must be team oriented
and have computer skills.
Send reply to
Box 04086, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
TEMPORARY
#of openings: 14
Tobacco, Hay/Straw. Row Crops &
General Agricultural Workers Need-
ed
James Dale Seay
Christian County, KY
03/16/2010-01/16/2011
Wages: $8.00 /hour. 3/4 of hours list-
ed on job order guaranteed. Work
tools will be provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to those who
cannot reasonably return to their per-
manent residence each working day.
Transportation & subsistence paid
when 50% of contract is met. Physi-
cally able to meet & perform all job
specifications. May be required to
take random drug. snd/or alcohol
tests. May be required to submit to a
criminal background check. Apply
for this job at the nearest One Stop
Career Center for further details.
OWNER OPERATORS WANTED
Flatbed, stepdeck OTR operation
based out of Fort White, FL. Good $.
Must have good equipment, and be
willing to work it!
Call Mike at 386-623-4801.


100 Job
Opportunities

TEMPORARY
# of openings: 22
Tobacco, Hay/Straw, Row Crops &
General Agricultural Workers Need-
ed
Jeff Moore Farms
Christian County, KY
03/05/2010-12/30/2010
Wages: $8.00 /hour. 3/4 of hours list-
ed on job order guaranteed. Work
tools will be provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to those who
cannot reasonably return to their per-
manent residence each working day.
Transportation & subsistence paid
when 50% of contract is met. Physi-
cally able to meet & perform all job
specifications. May be required to
take random drug and/or alcohol
tests. May be required to submit to a
criminal background check. Apply
for this job at the nearest One Stop
Career Center for further details.




BELL
JOB FAIR
Taco Bell & Krystal will
host a Job Fair on
Tuesday, Januray 19, 2010
from 9:00 a.m.-Noon &
3:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. at
Howard Johnson's for
Management Applicants.
Two years of management
experience is required.
LOOKING FOR a mortgage pro-
cessor. Prior experience a huge
plus. At least some mortgage
knowledge required. Competitive
salary and good growth potential.
Email resume to
lakecityresume@yahoo.com

TEMPORARY
# of openings: 26
Tobacco, Hay/Straw, Row Crops,
Greenhouse & General' Agricultural
Workers Needed
Maplebreeze Farms
Christian County, KY
03/05/2010-12/31/2010
Wages: $8.00 /hour. 3/4 of hours list-
ed on job order guaranteed. Work
tools will be provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to those who
cannot reasonably return to their per-
manent residence each working day.
Transportation & subsistence paid
when 50% of contract is met. Physi-
cally able to meet & perform all job
specifications. May be required to
take random drug and/or alcohol
tests. May be required to submit to a
criminal background check. Apply
for this job at the nearest One Stop
Career Center for further details.
TEMPORARY
# of openings: 20
Tobacco, Hay/Straw, Row Crops &
General Agricultural Workers Need-
ed
Mark Cunningham
Christian County, KY
03/01/2010-12/31/2010
Wages: $8.00 /hour. 3/4 of hours
listed on job order guaranteed. Work
tools will be provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to those who
cannot reasonably return to their per-
manent residence each working day.
Transportation & subsistence paid
when 50% of contract is met. Physi-
cally able to meet & perform all job
specifications. May be required to
take random drug and/or alcohol
tests. May be required to submit to a
criminal background check. Apply
for this job at the nearest One Stop
Career Center for further details.
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.

TEMPORARY
# of openings: 5
Tobacco, Hay, Row Crops, & Gener-
al Agricultural Workers Needed
Orville Hail, Jr.
Pulaski County, KY
03/18/2010-01/15/2011
Wages: -$7.25 - 8.00 /hour. 3/4 of
hours listed on job order guaranteed.
Work tools will be provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to those
who cannot reasonably return to their
permanent residence each working
day. Transportation & subsistence
paid when 50% of contract is met.
Physically able to meet & perform
all job specifications. May be re-
quired to take random drug and/or al-
cohol tests. May be required to sub-
mit to a criminal background check.
Apply for this job at the nearest One
Stop Career Center for further de-
tails.
WANTED! Truck driver over the
road experience from
coast to coast and in produce.
Call Frank 386-984-5082.

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


$2,000 Sign On Bonus
If you are self-motivated, you could make
$70,000 this year. Plus, we have the BEST
compensation package in the business.

New Car Sales Earn 30%-$200 min.

Health Insurance - Including Dental

Paid Vacation, 401 K 8 Bonuses

Self Starters, Please Apply in Person

fH Hwy 90 West

ST (3/4 mi. past 1-75)

dCrysler-Dodge-Jeep Lake City


100 Job
o100 Opportunities

7 TEMPORARY Farm Workers &
Laborers needed. Employment dates
2/1/10 - 12/01/10. Workers will
plant, cultivate, & harvest:, cotton,
peanuts, pecans, corn, rice, & wheat.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Tools provided at no cost. Free
housing provided for non-commut-
ing workers. Transportation & sub-
sistence reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract. Pay
rate is $7.25/hr & up to $8.12/hr de-
pending on crop activity or work lo-
cation. Worksites are in Mobile Co.
AL & Jackson Co. MS. Applicants
should report or send a resume tb the
nearest Florida Agency or Workforce
Innovation office & reference job or-
der # AL 510940.
Seward & Shumock Farms & Darr-
ylMiller Nursery - Wilmer, AL.






SPECIAL EVENTS
MANAGER
Responsible for working with
multiple individuals and organi-
zations in the planning and coor-
dinating of special events and
other statewide fundraising activ-
ities. Extensive travel is required
***************************
Bachelor degree in Marketing, Busi-
ness, or related field is required.
Experience in special event manage-
ment, marketing, or related
experience is preferred.

$32,000 annual salary with
Excellent Benefits
SEND/FAX APPLICATION:
Maria Knapp
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
Fax: (386) 842-1055
EOE/DFWP

TEMPORARY # of openings: 8
Tobacco, Hay/Straw, Row Crops,
Greenhouse & General Agricultural
Workers Needed
Stephen Tobacco Company & Clint
Hardy
Daviess & McClean Counties, KY
03/10/2010-12/2112010
Wages: $7.25 - 8.00 /hour. 3/4 of
hours listed on job order guaranteed.
Work tools will be provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to those
who cannot reasonably return to their
permanent residence each working
day. Transportation & subsistence
paid when 50% of contract is met.
Physically able to meet & perform
all job specifications. May be re-
quired to take random drug and/or al-
cohol tests. May be required to sub-
mit to a criminal background check.
Apply for this job at the nearest One
Stop .Career .Center for further de-
tails.

TEMPORARY
# of openings: 8
Tobacco, Hay/Straw, Row Crops,
Greenhouse & General Agricultural
Workers Needed
Wilson Cedar Point Farms, LLC &
William Douglas Wilson
Pulaski County, KY
03/01/2010-11/30/2010
Wages: $7.25 - 8.00 /hour. 3/4 of
hours listed on job order guaranteed.
Work tools will be provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to those
who cannot reasonably return to their
permanent residence each working
day. Transportation & subsistence
paid when 50% of contract is met.
Physically able to meet & perform
all job specifications. May be re-
quired to take random drug and/or al-
cohol tests. May be required to sub-
mit to a criminal background check.
Apply for this job at the nearest One
Stop Career Center for further de-
tails.

110 Sales
Employment

)4536903
SALESMAN NEEDED
Must be aggressive and self moti-
vated. Also must be willing to
travel and work some weekends.
Fax resume to (386) 963-2809 or
email it to: srlh()syloghomes.com


120 Medical
120 Employment

FULLTIME LPN
needed, for medical office.
IV cert. & computer skills a plus.
Fax resume to 386-754-1712.

LPN or RN needed Fulltime
3PM-11PM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V

MEDICARE AGENCY seeking
RN homecare experience required.
Part time now, may increase. Great
pay/flexibility. On call one week-
end a month. Suwannee Homecare
386-755-1544.

OFFICE MANGER,
Multi-task req., insurance billing
exp. preferred, e-mail Resume to:
sleepsolutionsfl@gmail.com

L AKE CITY REPORTER


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


IBUYI



SELL


FIND II IT










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2010


240 Schools &
240 Education

Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
o0Ters courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification.
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharmn Tcch national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books.
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
-expresstrainineservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Mini Dachshund.
Puppy, Long hair, black/tan, fe-
male. Health Certificate, shots, pa-
pers, $295. 386-755-7177
SIBERIAN HUSKY puppies, 9
weeks old, health certificates,
3 female, I mail, $400. Good
homes only 386-362-5795 or
386-688-0962
TOY POODLE, black, male,
4 months, with papers, shots, etc.
$300 OBO
Call 386-752-2572

402 Appliances
FRIDGIDAIRE UPRIGHT
freezer. 13.7 cubic ft. Good work-
ing condition,'$ 100.00
386-755-0918
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$150.00 Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.

408 Furniture
2 CHILDREN Racing Car Beds
(Blue) sold as a set $100.00
Call 386-754-9295 or
386-984-0387
BLACK METAL frame futon
with cushion.
$65.00. OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.
NICE ROLLING Microwave
Table with slide out meat cutting
board $35.00 Call 386-754-9295
or 386-984-0387
RECTANGULAR OAK Coffee
table with six shaded panes
(rollers optional). $50 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

410 Lawn & Garden
4 Equipment
BARELY USED BOLENS
19" electric mulching mower,
with leaf bag, $125 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$150 & up CASH! No title need-
.ed. Free Pick Up! 386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
WANTED TO BUY
Good used car, truck tires and
customs rims. Will pay top dollar.
386-752-4215

430 Garage Sales
FLEA MARKET
Inside Lake City Shrine Club-
Brown Rd. Jan 29, 30 31. Rain or
shine/hot or cold. Rent table for
$10/day, $25 for 3 days. Call Lory
at 758-5814

440 Miscellaneous
100 FOOT ROLL RED TOP
WIRE, 4 foot. with 4 inch squares,
never used, $120 or best offer.
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387
BARRELL TYPE SMOKER
Black (never been used)
papers inside. $50 OBO
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387

4 Good Things
450 to Eat
PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
I-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420
The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420


520 Boats for Sale
2004 SEA PRO
21', 150 hp 4-stroke.
Engine well kept. Must See!
$12,000. 386-292-9156.
630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
IBR FURNISHED
All utilities included plus satellite.
$135 week. $135 Deposit
Call 386-758-9455
2.5 acres fenced in Olustee.
SWMH 2006 furnished. Verifiable
income & deposit required.
$750/month. 904-349-5192.
2B/2BA $525 mo. 1st & Sec. req.
last negotionable. Easy access
to 1-75 & 441 Between Lake
City & G'ville. (352)317-1326
3/2 BDR CH&A Mobile Home
21400 33rd Road.
$550 rent $500 dep.
352-493-3487 or 386-963-2032
3/2, w/ screened porch. Quiet,
clean country park. No pets.
$550.mo + Deposit. References
required. 386-758-2280.
3BR/2BA, 1 Acre, close to 1-10
and 1-75, 10 minutes to Lake City,
$500 mo. with $500 sec.
Call 386-330-2316 after 5:30 p.m.
DWMH 2br/2ba. CH/A, Water in-
cluded. Quiet location, across from
elementary school. $600. mo + de-
posit. 386-752-8484 or 755-3649
DWMH 3BR/2BA on 4 acres.
Suwannee County
$500mo. 1st, last & security.
386-963-1157
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3/2, & 2/2 MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500.dep. $575./mo
752-1971 or 3521-2450
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 305-984-5511
640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
FORECLOSURE - 4 Bedroom
on Half Acre. $3000 down, $500.
mo. Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
We will build and Beat any
MODULAR Floor Plan!
Have two with land included.
Save $$$ Thousands.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
1999 Repo. Great Shape 24X48
3br Doublewide Set-up on
your land. $21,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
FOR SALE
2001 28X40 on 1 acre. $59,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
650 Mobile Home
65V & Land
Owner Financing. Large. MH
w/3.32 acres. South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590-0642 /867-1833
710 8Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES!
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649 per mo. !!!

$299 MOVES YOU IN
Law Enforcement Discounts
Teacher Discounts
Veteran Discounrits
Student Discounts

FREE RENT
7 200 FREE CHANNELS
* BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

S!Sister Properties.!!
*One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423


710 iUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
***LIMITED TIME ONLY***
WINDSONG APARTMENT
HOMES
I BD $499
2 BD $535
3 BD $617
NO DEPOSITS .
2 MONTHS FREE
EXPIRES 02/28/2010
*Some Restrictions Apply
Tel: (386) 758-8455
2 br/lba w/garage on the West side
1st, last &security.
Call
386-755-6867
2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$600 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2br Apt. in town.
Great location.
$500. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/l.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
Immaculate, 2br/lba Duplex w/ga-
rage. all electric. AC, W/D hook
up DW. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, Iv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
IBr Apt For Rent! Fully
Furnished w/washer/dryer.
$600/Mo. + $200 Sec. Dep.
Near VA. 386-961-0346
Country Living. Furnished Effi-
ciency Park Model Trailers. $500
per month all utilities provided.
Call 386-961-8540/386-755-4945
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
1 BED $350, 2 BED $475, 3 BED
$500-550. Central A/C, small/
quiet community. 352-505-9264 or
800-805-7379. Only 4 left!
2B/1BA CH&A, carport,
water/sewer included.
Near elementary school. $700 mo.
plus dep. 386-755-3649.
3 OR 4 BDR CH&A
488 Melrose Way, LC.
$800 rent $500 dep.
352-493-3487 or 386-963-2032
3/1 HOME in town close to VA.
W/D, CHA, 1st & $600 Sec. Dep.
$600/mo. Mike Lienemann. West-
field Reality Group 386-867-9053.
3/2 BDR. CH&A House.
1102 Ashley St.
$700 rent $500 dep.
352-493-3487 or 386-963-2032.
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$800/mo.
864-517-0522.
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

770 Condos For Rent
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

810 Home for Sale
3/1 INVESTORS SPECIAL!
Currently rented. $25,000.
Mike Lienemann. Westfield
Reality Group. 386-867-9053.
82O Farms &
2 Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

890 Resort Property
SMOKIES MTN/TOP RESORT
For Sale as 2 Bedroom real estate
timeshare. $18,900 OBO
(386) 623-7347

940 Trucks
1996-3500 CHEVROLET, 4WD
Dually, 454 motor, AT, Good
mechanical condition. $5,400. obo
386-755-4896 or 397-4849


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6B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2010


/ ) Drivers who
: I ' ' started a Sprint
J -' 6 7 _ J Cup race in 2009
By RICK MINTER / Cox Newspapers 3..-_3g
DAY T tONA200 CHDLE: Dayto�a.ooto eb.6(ox;Dyona e I DVelFe. 1"(SPED)"Datona500 Fe. I 14 (Fox)


Reed Sorenson gets






Back


to


basics


NASCAR
Reed Sorenson (right) greets a fan during the Sprint Sound and Speed Fan Festival in Nashville, Tenn., on Saturday.


Hopes 'little step back' to partial schedule leads to 'big step forward'
1 1


F or most of his 23 years, Reed
Sorenson's story was a textbook
lesson on how to groom an aspir-
ing young race driver and propel him to
a ride on the elite Sprint Cup Series.
But the latest chapter in his career, one
in which he's having to step back to the
Nationwide Series, may be the most
interesting yet.
The story started when Sorenson was
just six years old and began racing
Quarter Midgets. His father, Brad, a top
Late Model driver in the Southeast at
the time, parked his own driving ambi-
tions to steer his son's career. Reed's
mom, Becky, cranked up a public rela-
tions machine that spread news of the
youngster's progress far and wide, espe-
cially to the movers and shakers around
the NASCAR hub in Charlotte.
Young Reed excelled in Quarter
Midgets then moved to Legends cars as
soon as he reached the minimum age.
He continued right on winning races
and championships. He took the step to
Late Models as soon as he was allowed
to race them and then was on to the
ASA circuit, then the highest profile
stock car circuit short of ARCA and
NASCAR..
By the time he was old enough to race
in NASCAR, teams were lining up to
court him. He chose Chip Ganassi and
rewarded him with two wins in the
Nationwide Series in 2005, his first full
season out.


By 2006, at age 20, he was a Sprint
-Cup regular. But the upward career
movement stalled out there. In 145
career Cup starts, Sorenson's best result
has been five top-five finishes. His best
points finish has been 22nd in 2007.
Sensing his career at Ganassi had
reached a plateau after the 2008 season,
Sorenson moved to the Gillett
Evernham team that soon morphed into
Richard Petty Motorsports. That turned
out to be not the best choice. By the
middle of the 2009 season, he was a
lame duck there. He finished the season
29th in the standings, with just one top-
10 finish.
Now, just a few weeks shy of his 24th
birthday, he's preparing to run a par-
tial, 23-race schedule for Braun Racing
in the Nationwide Series, sharing the
ride with Cup driver Brian Vickers.
In a phone interview last week, he
sounded upbeat and confident about
taking a job that some might look on as
a demotion.
"I look at it as taking a little step back
so I can make a big step forward," he
said, explaining that he believes the
Braun team and promising young crew
chief Trent Owens are plenty capable of
providing him cars that can carry him
to Victory Lane and build back his
stock's value.
"It'll be nice to get back that feeling of
being one of the cars to beat every time
out," Sorenson said. "I haven't had that


in a few years."
Sorenson said that after working with
Owens at Gateway International
Raceway and at Phoenix last year,
where he finished second and third
respectively, he believes he and Owens
can be a winning duo.
"He's dedicated," Sorenson said. "He
gives all he's got to make the car the
best it can be."
Sorenson said that he's found his new
team to be hungry to show the Cup-affil-
iated competitors in the Nationwide
garage that they're as good as any other
outfit.
"Most of the guys at Braun have
been together a few years, and they feel
like they have something to prove.
They're the best stand-alone team."
But Sorenson's enthusiasm about his
upcoming Nationwide schedule isn't a
sign that he's surrendered any hope of
returning to the Cup circuit full-time..
He said the timing may have worked out
just right as far as he's concerned. He
believes that the current economic woes
are making it tough for any driver to
get a good Cup deal right now. But he
doesn't believe that will still be the case
a year from now.
"If we run good this year, I'll be in a
better position next year. especially if.
we can win some races," he said.
And he's pretty sure that he'll get a
few chances in Cup this year.
"We're working hard on it," he said.


Rumor: First big change

to Car of Tomorrow soon
Rumors are rampant that NASCAR is about to
make its first major change to the Car of Tomorrow,
replacing the wing on the rear with a more conven-
tional spoiler like the one on the conventional car
the COT replaced.
Tony Stewart, who is both driver and team owner,
told reporters in Nashville last week that the
changes won't be a cause for great concern, but they
will mean a lot of work for team engineers and
mechanics.
He said crew members will head to wind tunnels
to find out exactly how the changes are going to
affect the car downforce-wise.
"Everybody will be making adjustments accord-
ingly with the parameters we are allowed to
change," he said. "Whatever it is, it is. The thing is
NASCAR has been through changes for 60 years,
just like the economy just like technology So this
will be just another step in that equation. That's the
fun part of our sport, is that it makes everybody
have to go work. That's what makes it gratifying if
you figure it out and become successful with it."
Carl Edwards said he's for radical change. "My
opinion is what they need to do is take all the down-
force away from the race cars, then you don't have
any downforce to lose," he said. "If I don't have any-
thing to start with, it sure can't get any worse.
That's what I think they need to do.
"The blade [rear spoiler] is a good idea. Taking
the front splitter away is a good idea. Taking the
cars, make them drive like they used to at
Darlington, like they do at Atlanta, places like that,
where you to drive the race car, that's what I think
needs to be done.
"I don't like to go down the corner, turn the wheel,
find out how great my engineers are or aren't.
That's not what I want to do in a racecar. I want to
go drive."
' Any changes are expected to be announced on
Jan. 21.

NASCAR Scene closes shop
The NASCAR media corps, already reeling from
the recent decisions by many news organizations to
scale back coverage, suffered another big blow last
week with news that NASCAR Scene was being
dropped, a move that left many veteran reporters
and photographers without jobs.
Street and Smith's Sports Group said it will
merge its longtime weekly paper, NASCAR Scene, a
major player in the NASCAR market for decades,
with its monthly magazine, NASCAR Illustrated.
The company also plans to continue its Web site,
scenedailycom.
� Many in the industry see the changes as a loss for
fans and for the sport as a whole. SpeedTVcom edi-
tor Tom Jensen wrote that "The news that NASCAR
Scene's editorial staff was decimated by layoffs was
a sucker punch to the gut, a terrible blow to the fine
and dedicated men and women who worked there,
as well as to readers. They will be poorer for the loss
of stock-car racing's best weekly"
NASCAR Illustrated publisher Michael J. Fresina
tried to put a positive spin on the situation in his
published remarks.
"We're excited about the opportunity to offer our
expanded subscriber base NASCAR Illustrated's
special look at the fun and excitement that the sport
offers," he said. "With the opening of the NASCAR
Hall of Fame in spring and what should be one of
the most competitive seasons ever on the track, 2010
promises to be a special year for the sport's fans and
our readers, and we're looking forward to it."

Former driver Larry Frank dies
Larry Frank, who got his only Cup win in the 1962
Southern 500, died last week at his home in
Greenville, S.C. Frank's victory was memorable in
many ways, mostly because series officials sent
Junior Johnson to Victory Lane even though many
at the track thought Frank had won.
After the celebration had ended, a scoring review
found that Frank indeed was the winner He got the
news while recovering from dehydration and blis-
ters at a Florence, S.C., motel.
In 'publications that came out in the year after
Frank's win, some advertisements that mentioned
Frank's win carried Victory Lane photos that had
been altered, with Frank's narrow face pasted onto
Johnson's bulky body


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