Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text










Strange? It Prices rise
must be FIorLIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
A look at some of 205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
bizarre state happen GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943
State, 3A





Lake Cit
I


Sweet victory
Columbia Tigers win
sixth annual soccer
tournament
Sports, IB


Reporter


Wednesday, December 30, 2009 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 135, No. 297 U 75 cents


Interstate crash injures 2 n


TAKING UP HIS CROSS


Wreck delays
interstate traffic
for several hours.
From staff reports
A Fort Meyers cou-
ple was injured during a
crash Tuesday morning on
Interstate 75, leaving one of
the motorists in critical con-
dition at a Gainesville hos-
pital, according to reports.
The wreck delayed traffic
on the interstate for more


than two hours.
Arthur L. Berry, 75, and
Yvonne Berry, 84, were
injured when their vehicle
was struck from behind by
a semi truck while traveling
through Columbia County.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Arthur Berry was in critical
condition on Tuesday and
Yvonne Berry was in seri-
ous condition. They were
both taken to Shands at
the University of Florida in


Gainesville for treatment.
FHP reports state that
the Berrys were traveling
southbound on Interstate
75, near the U.S. Highway
441 onramp, at approxi-
mately 7:36 a.m. Tuesday.
They were traveling in the
right hand lane, and a 2005
Mack semi truck, driven by
David Lamar Mobley, 52,
of Live Oak, was traveling
behind them.
According to reports,
for unknown reasons, the


truck struck the rear of the
Berrys' 2001 Dodge van,
causing the van to overturn
in the middle of the road.
The semi truck jackknifed
and struck a concrete bar-
rier, causing the cab and
trailer to separate and come
to rest in interstate trav-
el lanes. Mobley suffered
minor injuries, as a result of
the crash.
Charges are pending the
outcome of the FHP inves-
tigation.


Summer Tomasello, 18, and Alabama, 13, get set to ride on the 'Way Down Upon the Suwannee River Trail Ride' at the Spirit
of the Suwannee Music Park starting today through Jan. 3.

Trail ride begins today at Spirit of the Suwannee


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK
Horse riders
from across
North Florida
and South
Georgia will
come out for the "Way
Down Upon the Suwannee
River Trail Ride," which
starts at 5 p.m. today
through Sunday, at the
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park. Also part of
the event is a New Year's
Eve party, taking place at 7
p.m. Wednesday.
This is the seventh year
for the event, said Robin
White, SOSMP associate.
"It's a lot of fun," she
said. "We've got a lot of
interest."
Roy Cornette started the
ride. The park has several
facilities available to accom-
modate horses.
"He was looking for ways
to expand .the different
opportunities in the park,"
White said. "For the holi-
days, a trail ride was a great
idea."
Riders can bring their
own horses to the trails


JPh UII r NEWIm I I KII V ll Jl*mlr 1 . ii". ' 'E..,"'-*
Babette Burke (from left), of Mims, Roger Arrowood, of Erwin, Tenn., and Peggy Donelan, of
Fort Worth, Texas, ride along the trail Tuesday afternoon.


along the Suwannee River
for half or a full day, White
said. There are hundreds of
miles of trails in the park on
the Spirit of the Suwannee
and Suwannee River Water
Management lands.
Larry Harper, horse camp
host, and Cornette will lead
people on the trails. Time
will also be set aside for


self- guided rides.
John Paul Snyder helped
put together a route for the
trail rides.
Horse riding isn't the
only thing taking place dur-
ing the five days. There also
will be entertainment and
activities, such as an auc-
tions, live music and more.
"You can participate on


a ride or other activities,"
White said.
Another highlight of the
event is the New Year's Eve
party.
'We're having a big New
Year's Eve celebration," she
said.
The David Cooler will
TRAIL continued on 3A


L MANiNl I TUiL.3i .11; r'|-..
Chuck Johnson stops in Lake City on Tuesday during his
walk across America. He has traveled across America 12
times, carrying his cross and preaching the word of God.


Spreading the

gospel, one

step at a time


California man
has traveled across
America 12 times.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
A homeless man laden
with a handmade cross and
donning a cowboy hat trav-
eled on foot through Lake
City .qn. U.S. Highway 90
Tuesday.
His mission? To spread
the words of Jesus
Christ. .
Chuck Johnson, of
Anaheim, Calif., said he has
been across America 12 dif-
ferent times, and said he
has been on this particu-
lar journey since March 1,
2000, carrying his cross the
entire time.
Johnson said this venture
began in Tijuana, Mexico,
when he received a calling
from the Lord to take $55
and begin his journey. It
took only $53 and some odd


change to build his cross,
said Johnson.
Johnson said that by car-
rying his cross, he carries
a message for people- to
receive.
"This is 365 days a year
of awareness that people
need Jesus in their lives,"
said Johnson. "I carry the
cross to 'keep a message
out of serving and helping
others.
"People always ask,
'When are you going to>
quit?' 'and I say, 'Will Jesus
quit on you?'"
Johnson said he travels
around the north in the sum-
mer and came to Florida
because of the state's sunny
winter weather.
"I'm a homeless guy who
walks with a cross," he said.
"I've got to play the weath-
er."
Johnson also said there
isn't really a special reason
why he wears a cowboy hat
along his journey.
"It's just me," he said.


CCFD receives fire

prevention grant


Grant will go for
new equipment,
training.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County Fire
Rescue has been awarded
a $1,750 fire prevention
grant from FM Global. The
grant will be used ,for fire
prevention equipment and
training seminars for the
agency.
Assistant Chief Jim Cason
will accept the award today.
Cason said the money will
be used to purchase a lap-
top computer and LCD pro-
jector that will be used to
assist with fire department
training and fire preven-
tion activities in ,the com-
munity.
"With this equipment
we can project in remote
areas," said Cason. "We
didn't have a projector or
a computer available to
make our training mobile.
In these economic times,
it's hard to justify a luxury
like that equipment.
"This grant money


will help us to make our
training more accessible,"
he said.
A Columbia County Fire
Rescue news release stat-
ed that FM Global is a
leading property insurer
of the world's largest busi-
nesses, and the company
has awarded grants to a
number of Florida-based
organizations.
"At FM Global, we
believe the majority of
property damage is pre-
ventable - not inevitable,
- and we are pleased, to
make funding available
to organizations like the
Columbia County Fire
Rescue that -share that
same philosophy," said
Michael Spaziani, man-
ager of FM Global's Fire
Prevention Grant Program.
"After all, it's much better
to prevent a disaster than
to recover from one."
The news release stat-
ed that FM Global rep-
resentative Bob Terkoski
will present the award to
Cason at 10 a.m. at the
Fire Rescue Headquarters
Station 48 at 370 SE Race
Track Lane.


II!1 11l111 CALL US:6 5
(386)752-1293 65 50
SUBSCRIBE TO Partly Cloudy
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
....... ' Fax: 7S2-9400 WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ............ . 4A
Business ............... 5A
O bituaries .............. 3A
Advice & Comics ......... 8A
Puzzles ........ ...... 7A


P TODAY IN
NATION
-,=bile pa, mernt


gga^^B^IB^if'^COMINGwy^^wga�^*


COMING
THURSDAY
200I, the ,ear
i~n i'e. ii?..,.















LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


A$H 3 Tuesday:
SAfternoon: 1-9-3
-'1 Evening: 9-9-7


.y 4) Tuesday:
" Afternoon: 7-3-6-0
- - Evening: 5-6-8-3


eimatch-
Monday:
3-11-28-30-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Allen goes 'Crazy' directing feature film


BIRMINGHAM, Mich.
im Allen is one of
America's favorite comics.
e's ithe guy who par-
layed years of standup
into the top-rated "Home
Improvement" sitcom and "The
Santa Clause" and "Galaxy Quest"
films.
So why does the 56-year-old fun-
nyman turn all serious when asked
about his latest project? Maybe it
has something to do with his level of
involvement.
Allen makes his directorial
debut in the comedy "Crazy on the
Outside," which opens Jan. 8. He
also stars in the movie.
"I've got a lot on the line here.
I financed this thing - private
financing," Allen said. "I used Kevin
Costner's model. He helped me
through this -- on how to direct it,
how to put it out"
Besides Costner, Allen also
consulted with director Barry
. Sonnenfeld and read books on
directing written by Francis Ford
Coppola, an Allen favorite.
Not only did he seek out advice
from industry pals about working
* behind the camera, Allen also per-
suaded friends to get in front of it.

Lil Wayne has hometown
farewell show before jail
NEW ORLEANS - Lil Wayne
emerged as a top-selling musician
known for his clever wordplay and
risque lyrics, but like rappers before
him, he's staring
down a year behind
bars at the peak of
his career.
The artist
returned to his
hometown of New
Lil Wayne Orleans for a perfor-
mance Monday on,
what he's calling his farewell tour.
"I'm nothing without you," he told


Actor/comedian Tim Allen is interviewed at the Palladium 12 Theatre in
Birmingham, Mich. on Thursday. Allen returned to his home state of Michigan to
tell a couple of jokes, meet some fans and introduce his new film, 'Crazy on the
Outside.'


the screaming crowd of thousands
of fans at the New Orleans Arena
after opening the concert with."A
Milli," which last year earned him a
Grammy for best rap solo.
The 27-year-old rapper, whose real
name is Dwayne Carter, pleaded
guilty in October to a weapons pos-
session charge and will be sentenced
Feb. 9. His plea deal calls for a year
in jail.

Lautner headed to
People's Choice Awards
LOS ANGELES - Hugh Jackman,:
Taylor Lautner, Mariah Carey and.
Sandra Bullock are
among the stars
expected at next
week's People's
Choice Awards.
Steve Carell,.
Carrie Underwood,
Ellen DeGeneres
Lautner and LL Cool J are


also set to attend the celebrity-filled
ceremony on Jan. 6 at the Nokia
Theatre in Los Angeles. The show
will be broadcast live on CBS.

Marilyn Manson, former
bandmate settle lawsuit
LOS ANGELES - A contentious
lawsuit between Marilyn Manson
and former bandmate Stephen Bier
has been settled without the mul-.
timillion judgment the keyboardist
initially sought, court records, show.
An agreement calls for attorneys
representing former Bier to be paid
$380,000. Manson's insurance com-
pany will pay $175,000 while the rest',
will be paid by Bier's former busi-
ness managers, Manson's attorney,
Howard King'said. -
'Bier sued the shock rocker for.$20
million in 2007, claiming the singer
..kept money from him and spent it to
furnish a lavish lifestyle.
SI, Associated Press


, Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Joseph Bologna is
75.
* Actor Russ Tamblyn is 75.
* Singer Davy Jones is 64.
U "Today" show anchor Matt
Lauer is 52.
* Radio-TV commentator
Sean Hannity is 48.
Daily Scripture


* Golfer Tiger Woods is 34.
* TV personality-boxer Laila
Ali is 32.
* Singer-actor Tyrese Gibson
is 31.
* Actress Eliza Dushku is 29.
* Cleveland Cavaliers
forward LeBron James is 25.


"Do not let your hearts be trou-
bled.Trust in God; trust also in
me."
- John 14:1
Thought for Today
"Work is a dull thing; you can-
not get away from that.The only
agreeable existence is one of idle-
ness, and that is not, unfortunately,
always compatible with continuing
to exist at all."
- Rose Macaulay,
English poet and essayist (1881-1958)

Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..,...........752-9400
Circulation ........... . ..755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ha. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press..
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O.. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter,com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer ....... .754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland . .754-0417
(lstickland@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... ,754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
To report a missed delivery, please call
(386) 754-0406. For all other circulation
issues, please call (386) 755-5445.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report'a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............754-5445 '
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................... $26.32
24 Weeks....... .......$48.79
52 Weeks 5$8346
Rates include 7% sales tax:
Mail rates
12 Weeks.............. $41.40
24 Weeks............... $82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

A story in the Dec. 29 issue of the Lake City Reporter
stated the Suwannee River Water Management District's new
year-round landscape irrigation rule is voluntary. The rule is
mandatory, effective Jan. 6. We regret the error.


Truck filled with
cheesecake stolen.
ORLANDO -
Authorities are looking for
whoever stole a refriger-
ated truck and more than
$40,000 worth of cheese-
cake in Orlando.
Police say the truck's
owner had parked the
semitrailer trailer Saturday
afternoon near Orlando
International Airport. The
victim told officers that he
left the refrigerated trailer
running, but the truck
was turned off. When he
returned the next day, the
semi, valued at $50,000,
and the trailer, valued at
$120,000, were both miss-'
ing.

Sailor used false
name for 22 years
JACKSONVILLE --
State Department inves-
tigators say a chief petty
officer at Jacksonville's
Mayport Naval Station has
used a false name for the
last 22 years while working
at U.S. embassies in Rome
and Panama.
An arrest warrant
accuses him of using the
name on an application for
a diplomatic passport.
The sailor goes by
Arturo Puente, 41. He
used the name when he
entered the Navy in 1987.
Investigators say that
name is from a birth cer-
tificate of a child who died
in Oregon in 1980.

Father pleads in
kidnapping case
ORLANDO -The
Florida man accused of
abducting his toddler son
and then taking off on
a sailboat in the Gulf of
Mexico has pleaded not
guilty to the charges.
Paul Martikainen
entered the plea Tuesday
morning to a federal
charge of international
parental kidnapping. He


THE WEATHER



- PARTLY < CHANCE . MOSTLY
S CLOUDY OF SUNNY
IT-STORMS

HI 65LO 50 HI69LO046 HI'5lLO30


- -SAffiS


-/IOALFRC TMPo *."d ", 'cb 3


Pose for the picture
Dong Chun and Jain Kim take an action self portrait in
Daytona Beach on Monday.


faces up to three years in
prison if convicted.
Martikainen allegedly
took his son, Luke Finch,
3, during a court-super-
vised visit on Nov. 28. The
two were fouhd on a boat
140 miles southwest of
Fort Myers Beach three
days later.

Police: Man threw
baby into wall
TAMPA- Police say
Lonnie Ash, 26, threw a
baby against a wall dur-
ing an argument with the
child's mother.
Authorities have
charged Ash with
aggravated child abuse
in connection to the
Tuesday morning inci-
dent. According to online
records, Ash was booked
into Hillsborough County
jail and is being held with-
out bond. Jail records do
not list an attorney.
The 10-month old
girl hit the wall with
enough force to dent the
Sheetrock.

Pizza delivery
man shot
MIAMI - Miami-Dade


police say a pizza delivery
man was taken to a local
hospital in stable condition
after he was shot in the
foot during an attempted
robbery.
According to the
Miami-Dade Police -
Department, the shooting
happened Monday night.
Investigators say Agelon
Innocent, 46, was con-
-fronted by four men while
he was delivering a pizza.
A struggle began after one
suspect pulled out a gun,
and Innocent was shot.

Elderly Walmart
greeter punched
PALM BAY - A Palm
Bay man has been charged
with punching an elderly
Walmart greeter who
asked to see the man's
receipt as he was leaving
the store.
Police say Skyler
Lowery, 23, was walk-
ing through the exit the
Palm Bay store Saturday
morning when the alarm
went off. The 69-year-old
employee asked to see
Lowery's receipt. Lowery
reportedly punched the
employee in the head.
* Associated Press


Tallahassee *
62/50 ..,
Pensacola * 6 /5
61/53 Panama City
62/55


SValdosta
62/48
Lake City,
65/50
- Gainesville *
,,67/51
SOcala


Tami
� 71/5


* Jacksonville
\63/51

Daytona Beach
67/55
* \


City Thursday
Cape Canaveral 78, 59, -hr
Daytona Beach 75/55/t


Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesvllle
Jacksonville


Beach


80/64/pc
78/60/pc
71/49/sh
70/48/t
77/66/pc
69/46/sh
81/65/pc
78/63/pc
73/51/sh
77/55/c
66/46/t
66/43/pc
69/44/t
74/57/c
68/44/r
h 79/61/pc


Friday
o.6, 44, pc
62/38/s
74/51/pc
69/45/pc
58/31/pc
57/33/pc
78/67/s
57/30/pc
76/52/sh
70/49/pc
60/34/s
65/39/s
56/37/s
57/36/s
57/28/pc
63/42/s
57/28/pc
76/49/sh


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather corm


S 7/66 Valdosta
Key West* -" w. Palml
74/64


[''AK CTYALMANA


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-dat
Normal year-to-date


Wednesday


- Forecasted temperature


58
31
66
43
82 in 1946
23 in 1961


0.00"
2.72"
46.90"
te 2.36"
48.16"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.


7:26 a.m.
5:40 p.m.
7:27 a.m.
5:41 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today, 4:35 p.m.
Moonset today 6:16 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 5:45 p.m.
Moonset tom. 7:18 a.m.

03 OO
Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
31 7 15 23
Full Last New First


7p a ursd 6a
SThursday


TFeels hietempeatur


187.9, the tem-
perature at Dayville,
Ore. hit 81 degrees
to establish a
state record for
December.


45 mutes t 01
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


a .v Forecasts, data and graph-
'- Ics � 2009 Weather Central
w.-a r LLC, Madison, WIs.
\www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected
/--*>

g-c
^imi^u.jj.i.ijj.m
-----^*I^^^--H
jfl^^^3ffl^^ffl


AROUND FLORIDA


o * ; Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
S 71/55 70/59 LakeCty
S \ Miami
la, Naples
5 West Palm Beach Ocala
75/64 * Orlando
S .. FL. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 76/67 * Pensacola
75/58 " Naples *.. Tallahassee
'76/59 Miami Tampa


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


*r ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ O t ^^^^�^^"�""^^^^^^^^*f his� dlate in I *


















Fla. child abuse deaths


rise in bad economy


By KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE
- About 200 children were
fatally abused in Florida
in 2008, roughly a 20 per-
cent increase from 2007.
Unemployment rates and
drug use also increased in
the state - a factor in many
of the deaths, according to
a preliminary report.
The number of kids
fatally abused who had
involvement with the state
child welfare agency' also
increased 20 percent, the
State Child Abuse Death
Review Committee deter-
mined in a report obtained
by The Associated Press.
In 2008, 79 children were


killed who had some type
of involvement with the
Department of Children
and Families in the past five
years, compared with 66
children who died in 2007.
It marks a return to 2006
levels, when 76 kid� who
had DCF contact died.
"The numbers should be
a call for careful scrutiny
and accountability, especial-
ly when so many of the chil-
dren were already known to
the department or the hot-
line," said Andrea Moore,
child advocate and Broward
County attorney who repre-
sents foster children.
The investigation verified
198 child, abuse deaths in
2008 and six deaths from
previous years that weren't


verified until 2008. That's
an increase from 163 child
deaths in 2007 and 170 in
2006.
Florida has one of the
highest per-capita rates of
child deaths reported to the
state abuse hotline in the
country, partly because its
figures count such events as
car accidents, drownings and
suicides, which aren't includ-
ed in most other states.
Twelve of the children
died while in foster care,
the Department of Children
and Families said. Eighty-
six percent of the deaths
could have been prevented
by a state agency like DCF
or a caretaker. Seven per-
cent were not preventable,
according to the report.


Strange? Bizarre? That's Florida!


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE - You
know you're living in a
weird state when the gov-
ernor promotes a pay-per-
minute sex chat line.
Or when a congressman
asks the House speaker to
move a day's worth of votes
so he can watch a college
football game.
Or when employees at
not just one, not two, but
three state prisons use stun
guns on their kids as part of
'Take Our Daughters and
Sons to Work Day."
That's Florida, once again
making people snicker at its
dumb criminals, strange ani-
mals and all-around oddness.
Gov. Charlie Crist was
embarrassed when an on-
hold recording he made
transposed two numbers for
an uninsured child helpline
and callers instead were led
to "horny" girls willing to
talk about anything for just
$2.99 a minute.
It wasn't the only odd
moment in politics. Rep.
Cliff Stearns asked Speaker
Nanicy Pelosi to basi-
cally shut down Congress
early so he and some of
the Florida and Oklahoma
House guys could go watch
their teams in the national
championship game. She
said no.
Candidates for local offic-
'' es were also embarrassed
in 2009. A Miami Beach
* mayoral candidate was
disqualified from the race
after his qualifying check
bounced, and a minister


Richard C.Mason, Sr.,
Richard C. Mason, Sr., 77, ofLake
City, died Wednesday, December
. 23, 2009, at Kindred Hospital. He
.' is survived by a loving family. A
LIFETRIBUTE-GULFPORT

Marie Rachel Hewett Stone
Marie Rachel Hewett Stone
of Clermont, Florida, shed the
frailties and suffering of earthly
existence on Christmas Eve,
December 24;
2009. A true
Southern lady,
Marie was born
in Southport, p
N.C. on
February 20,
1917, to Troy
Hewett -and
Florence Hewett, who died of
complications resulting from
childbirth. Marie was adopted by
Troy's twin brother, Coy Hewett,
and his loving wife, Dena Stanley
Hewett, Marie's dear "Mother".'
Marie was raised in Wilmington,
N.C., where she graduated from'
New Hanover High School during
the difficult era of The Great
Depression and during her youth,
reigned as "Miss Wilmington".
Marie and her family re-located
to Jacksonville, Florida in 1950
where she lived for 54 years and
was employed and volunteered
in various endeavors outside
the home, but her priority was
always her capacity as wife,
homemaker and mother. Marie
was predeceased by her devoted
husband of 34 years, W.A.
"Red" Stone (10-11-73). She is
survived by her son, William H.
"Billy" Stone, and his wife Sally,
of Clermont-Minneola, Florida
and her daughter, Dottie Stone
(Taylor) and her husband, Bill, of
High Springs, FL; grandson Andy
Stone (Michele) of Micanopy,
Florida, grandson, Rob Ravndal
(Lisa) of Lincoln, Nebraska,
and granddaughter, Christian


running for Belle Glade City
Commission was charged
with swinging a bat at a
woman outside a polling
place. He lost the election.
Two 8-year-old Alachua
County boys 'made better
use of their baseball bats -
they successfully fought off
a man armed with a gun who
was threatening to kill the
mother of one of the boys.
Among other parents and
children making odd news,
a North Miami woman was
arrested after leaving her
2- and 14-year-old grand-
children in the car while
she went into a casino to
gamble, and Hillsborough
County deputies charged a
21-year-old Tampa woman
with leaving her 4-month-
old son in a hot car while
she burglarized a home.
At least a Stuart woman
had the common sense not
to leave her kids in the car
during her crime spree. She
stayed in the car with her
2- and 5-year-old children
while acting as a getaway
driver during two armed
robberies. . -... __ .. I
Alcohol seems to lead to a
lot of Florida's oddest stories.
Tampa police arrested a
man who let his 12-year-old
son drive his SUV so he
could drink, in the passen-
ger seat.
A Marion County man
was charged with driving
under the influence after
crashing a stolen riding
lawnmower into a school
bus.
A 22-year-old - South
Florida man climbed
aboard a locomotive with


OBITUARIES

Bubemak of Wilmington, N.C.
and predeceased by her grandson,
Chris Stone (3-29-98), formerly
of Clermont-Minneola, Florida.
Marie was so proud and thankful
during' her a years for her
four great grandsons, Andrew
and Sam Stone of Micanopy,
.,Braxton Ravndal of Lincoln,
Nebraska and Nicolas Bubernak
of Wilmington, N.C. Marie was
also predeceased by her brother,
Coy Hewett, Jr., formerly of
Oak Island, N.C. and her sister,
Dorothy McDonald, formerly
of Boiling Springs, N.C, but is
survived by her sister-in-law,
Thelma "Aunt Ted" Hewett of
Oak Island, who Marie always
fondly referred to as her "little
sister". A memorial service will


a friend and took it seven
miles down the tracks for a
joy ride. They came up with
the idea while heading to a
local bar.
A Clearwater man was
charged with drunk driving
after police pulled him over
for driving a car with only
three tires.
Pasco County deputies
arrested two men they said
were fighting over $3 in gas
money on the way home
from a strip club. The weap-
ons involved: a fish tank
and a beer bottle.
A Bay County man
arrested for shoplifting had
a request for deputies: let
him drink the beer he stole.
He became combative when
,they refused.
A Marion County deputy
pulled over a naked man
riding a motorcycle. Turns
out the cyclist was drunk.
He was. one of many
naked people in the news.
A naked 21-year-old man
covered in feces was arrest-
ed in Martin County after
jumping into a neighbor's
.pool., A. Clearwater woman
knocked on a stranger's
door in the middle of the
night asking for cigarettes.
She was naked.
A naked 91-year-old Lake
Worth man held a 26-year-
old burglar at gunpoint until
police arrived.
Another burglar trying to
rob an elderly man wasn't
so lucky. The 24-year-old
broke in to a Liberty County
home waving a toy gun and
was shot and killed by an
82-year-old homeowner
with the real thing..


be conducted at 11:00 A.M. on
Saturday, January 9, 2010, at
Lakewood Presbyterian Church
in Jacksonville, Florida, where
Marie had been a member for
over 57 years and where she and
"Red" had both served as elders.
Interment will follow at Oaklawn
Cemetery in Jacksonville. In
lieu of flowers, Marie asks that
memorial contributions should
be made to the building fund
at Lakewood Presbyterian
Church, 2001 University
Blvd. W., Jacksonville, Florida
32217-2015, (904-733-8055).

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


752-6306

Residential * Commercial * Industrial
Licensed & Insured CFC1427643

2744 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL


MAC JOHNSON ROOFING (,

.


104 SOUTHWEST 266TH STREET
NEWBERRY, FLORIDA 32669

352.472.4943 or 866.376.4943
website: www.macjohnsonroofing.com


In this Dec. 18 photo, Willo O'Brien demonstrates Square on her iPhone in San Francisco.
Willo is a designer and illustrator that uses Square for credit card transactions with her
customer.


Twitter co-founder takes

aim at mobile payments


By RACHEL METZ
AP Technology Writer

SAN FRANCISCO -
Jack Dorsey revolutionized
online socializing by co-
founding Twitter in 2006.
Now he wants to transform
the way people exchange
money.
Dorsey is leading a new
startup called Square. Its
first product resembles
a cube: a tiny credit card
terminal that plugs into
the headphone jack of an
iPhone. The goal is to make
it easier to complete a cred-
it card transaction, whether
you're a street vendor sell-
ing T-shirts or an individual
settling a lunch tab with a
friend.
Dorsey, who wasTwitter's
CEO until October 2008
and remains the social net-
work's chairman, said he
came/ up with the idea for
Square nearly' a year ago
with Jim McKelvey, a glass
artist who was frustrated
after losing out on a $2,000
sale because he was unable
to accept a credit card from
a customer. .. .........
The two started brain-
storming about how busi-
nesses and individuals
could quickly start accept-
ing credit, debit and pre-
paid cards over the iPhone
and other small electron-
ics, and came up with the
idea for a credit card read-
er that connects to a cell
phone.
Eventually, McKelvey


and a group of engineers
decided they should build
a gizmo that hooks up to a
standard audio jack, which
is common on all sorts of
consumer electronics from
iPhones to BlackBerrys to
laptops.
Many businesses already
use eBay Inc.'s online pay-
ment system, PayPal, so
that they can take plastic on
their Web sites, and iPhone
applications such as iSwipe
and Credit Card Terminal
are available for on-the-go
transactions.
In January, electronic
payment services company
VeriFone Holdings Inc.
plans to release a service
similar to Square's. That
service, PayWare Mobile, is
aimed at small businesses
and fits a credit card ter-.
minal and small stylus (for
signatures) into an iPhone
case.
A business often needs
to have its own merchant
account with a credit card
company to use one of these
methods, though. Square
Inc. takes a different tack:
It. has its-.own, anerchant
account, so it takes on the
responsibility for minimiz-
ing risk and fraud, Dorsey
said.
.This also means that any-
one can use the service.
"We're trying to build a
utility that scales not just
to someone selling .coffee'
in a store but also some-
one selling their couch or
buying a MacBook Pro on


Craigslist," Dorsey said.
Using the so-called
"square" is pretty simple.
Swipe a card through a slit
on its side, and the device
will read your credit card
number and convert it into
an audio signal thatcan be
sent to the iPhone through
the audio jack. Software in
the iPhone then decodes
the signal and sends the
transaction data out over
the cell phone network to
Square's servers so the pur-
chase can be authorized..-.
Information is encrypted on
the iPhone before it gets
sent.
Customers can sign for
purchases by writing .with
a finger on the iPhone's
touch screen. Once the
transaction goes through,
credit card information is
deleted from the phone,
Dorsey said.
Square also works with
Apple Inc.'s iPod Touch,'
and Dorsey would like to
soon have its software run-
ning on phones that use
Google Inc.'s Android oper-
ating software, too.
S.Just.abo.ut 100 of these
squares are being tested by
merchants in several cities
across the country, and the
company expects to release
its first product to the gen-
eral public in early 2010. It
would give away the micro
terminals and make money
by charging transaction
fees to those accepting pay-
ments. The fees have yet to
be determined.


TRAIL: Ride begins today


Continued From Page 1A
perform. Party favors and
a finger food buffet will be
included. The celebration
is open to the public even if
they are not attending the
trail rides, White said.
More than 65 riders and
100 ,horses are expected
to come out for the ride,
Harper said.
"It's a fun place to be,"
he said. "You can bring
your kids and have a good
time."
Horse riders don't have
to wait until a special event


to visit the park,-. White
said. Stalls are available to
accommodate horses.
"We're open 365 days,"
she said. "There's always
something going on."
Harper said riders come
in .year-round with their
horses. The park has so
many activities aside from
the horses. ,
"It's just a great place to
be," he said.
Tickets for the five-day
trail ride are $175, which
includes five nights of


camping on a water and
electric site, stall for one
horse, the New Year's Eve
party and guided rides. The
New Year's Eve party alone
is $30.
Visit the Web site at
musicliveshere.com or call
(386)364-1683 for more
information.
"It's a great, one-of-a-kind
and unique experience,"
White said. "We're nestled
in the banks of Suwannee
River and our trails are the
best."


.-. ,4 TAN:D


S PLUMBING O., INC.

General Manager: Mark Dawson 386-867-4490
We are there when you need us!!
Ready to take care of any problem that you may have with your plumbing systems.
We know your time is valuable. That is why when you call, we will arrive when you
need us with a skilled service technician. Your problem is our number one concern.
Standard Plumbing Offers:


* 24 hour Plumbing/ 7 days a week * Septic Tank Pump Outs
* Emergency Service * Backflow Prevention
* Residential Service * Bathroom & Kitchen Remoc
* Business Service * Home Additions
* Preventative Maintenance * Residential New Constructio
* Video Camera Line Inspection * Commercial New Construct
We are Licensed & Insured
Standard Plumbing & Su
1944 E Duval St., Lake City, FL
(386) 752-471
1-866-752-4716
Lic. # CFC1427245
www.Standard-plumbing.com mark@standardplumb.com
"IF ITS PLUMBING WE DO IT"


leling

ons
ion


applies
., 32055
6


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION
















OPINION


Wednesday, December


30, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


LCPD

must alert

public to

situations

City five days.
before Christmas
places a spotlight
on Lake City Police
Department's failure to fulfill its
core mission of public safety.
In what has been reported as
nothing less than a coldly calcu-
lated robbery attempt, two Lake
City teenagers lured a man to a
convenience store. Once there,
one of the teens reportedly
. brandished a pistol while the
other proceeded with the physi-
cal robbery. When thd crime
began to go wrong, the victim
was shot without hesitation.
The charge against the teens:
Attempted murder. Our charge
against LCPD: Negligence of
duty to the community.
Although officers did eventu-
ally capture two suspects alleg-
' edly involved in the robbery,
these arrests came more than
a day after the crime. During
those 24 hours, LCPD failed to
issue any public notice about
the incident. Much worse, the
agency tasked with the public's
physical safety purposely failed
to alert the community that
two gunmen were on the loose
in the Lake Jeffery Road area
- despite physical descrip-
tions provided by the victim.
* The response to this failure
from the LCPD is that the
crime was kept quiet in order
not to hamper the investigation.
We agree that in some cases
an overly-publicized investigation
can be a detriment to the public's
best interest But a crime that
leaves two armed and dangerous
men in a city neighborhood is
not one of these cases.
Surely, anyone with a family in
that area would have appreciated
knowing that a man with a loaded
gun was loose on the streets. It.
was LCPD's responsibility to proj-
ect, not protect that information.
This was not LCPD's finest
hour. Their actions placed the
public at risk and in more jeop-
ardy than safeguard.
The current policy regarding
the release of information is
faulty at best, fatal at worst, and
must immediately be revised
by Chief Argatha Gilmore. Only
then will LCPD be able to fulfill
its stated mission to establish a
"community environment char-
acterized by physical safety."

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
" typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


The coming debt crisis


This past year has
been one of run-
away, crazed political
recklessness, we
now face extraordi-
nary dangers as a country, and
President Obama gives no sign
of planning to apply the brakes.
Sooner or later, get ready for a
crash if he doesn't.
Not that Obama is wholly
responsible for the truly fright-
ening rise in federal debt that
we see - all kinds of factors
are at work, from a welfare
state going awry to a recession
more devastating than some.
predicted.
But instead of addressing
this debt crisis, he has exac-
erbated it, giving us an inef-
fectual, politically instructed
stimulus package costing as
much as the war in Iraq, for
example, and working to ram a
multi-trillion-dollar health plan
down our throats.
Despite applause from the.
left, this extravagance is worse
than irresponsible.
Considering that its chief
objectives could have been
achieved at virtually no addi-
tional costs and how it worsens
our plight, it is insane.
The latest warning about our
peril comes from the Peterson-
Pew Commission on Budget
Reform, composed of 34 former
government officials of both
parties, people respected on
both sides of the aisle. Here is
their conclusion: With a total
debt now at.$11.9 trillion, the
worst could happen over time
or immediately, such. as buyers
of Treasury securities demand-
ing higher interest rates, a
declining standard of living,
lower wages and fewer safety
nets.


Jay Ambrose
Speoktojoy@aol.com


The authors of the commis-
sion report agree that steep
spending reductions before
the recession has lifted might
not be advisable, but do want
a series of stabilizing steps to
begin right away and to contin-
ue over the years to come. Tax
increases alone won't do the
job - you can only go so high,
they realize, and others of us
would insist that high taxes can
be as economically destructive
as deficits. What's crucial are
spending controls of the kind
wholly anathema to our leftist
leaders.
Obama and congressional
Democrats talk as if they want
to control health costs, for
instance, but that's all it is -
talk. There is absolutely no way
the planned extension of health
insurance through the vari-
ous techniques they favor will
decrease government health
expenditures that are already a
foremost cause of our budget-
ary mess.
What we're likely going to
see by the time the dust has
settled is a new health entitle-
ment - this is a right, say
Democrats wholly baffled
about the concept of rights and
who don't get it that they are
about to make life far worse for
millions and millions.
The leftist pretense has been


that ours has been a nation
neglectful of people's needs
and just out to make the rich
richer, all of which is utter, total
nonsense. We already have a
welfare state that is at the heart
of what's leading us to the
cliff's edge.
Look at a pie chart of the
federal budget and you'll
notice that when you add up
the expenditures on Social
Security, Medicare, Medicaid,
unemployment, welfare, food
stamps, housing subsidies and
more, the total for entitlements
goes well over 50 percent of
the whole.
That's a whopping amount of
money, but there's, more, the
so-called hidden welfare state,
identified by some economists
as all the ways in which the tax
code is used to help buy insur-
ance policies, provide cash
outright to low-income earners
and much more.
It has been estimated, I read
in an Internet article, that the.
budgetary cost is at least half
of what shows up in the pie
chart.
Obama wants more of the
same while also subscribing to
the notion that cap-and-trade
will boost our economy and �
help control temperatures
when, in fact, it could cost us
a fortune and do next to noth-
ing to control temperatures.
There's at least this - 2010 is
an election year, a chance to
reverse policies.


N Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-�
papers and theeditor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado. '


Batterers deserve stiff
penalties for per-
petrating domestic
violence - a crime
that feeds on fear,
shatters lives, and keeps com-
munities in denial.
As it stands now, most mis-
demeanor offenses for battery
don't qualify the accused for
prison time and too many bat-
terers, upon arrest, spend, per-
haps, only a night in jail.
Then, they have an opportuni-
ty to go back and terrorize their
victims. That's not right.
Law enforcement, attorneys
and victim advocates acknowl-
edge that prevention is the best
solution. That's true, but the
person who commits the crime
needs to know the act comes
with a high price.
Probation time and weeks of
batterers' intervention may help
some, but this crime needs to
be stigmatized more.
Legislators should consider


prison time and extended sen-
tences, appropriate to the sever-
ity of the crime.
In a roundtable discussion
on domestic violence hosted
recently by The News-Press, a
fascinating exchange revealed
two disparate points of view on
the issue of punishment.
On the one hand Assistant
State Attorney Paul Poland
argued: "We don't need tougher
laws - we have adequate laws."
He suggested the community
needed to step up, and that one
of the biggest challenges in
prosecutions is getting the coop-
eration of the victim, who may
not show up to court.
"Most victims we talk to have
no intention of leaving the rela-
tionship," he said.
He rightfully said that to pun-
ish the victim with contempt
of court would likely keep her
or him from reporting it in the
future.
On the other hand, Linda


Oberhaus, executive director for
the Shelter for Abused Women
and Children in Naples, took
issue with Poland's stance on
the severity of our laws.
"I do think that if there were
tougher penalties for domestic
violence crimes, people would
be less likely to commit them.
"They get a slap on the hand,
they're out the next day. I think
that's terrible," she added.
We agree, and perhaps
beyond strengthening penalties,
we should also consider stigma-
tizing the abuser.
No, we can't lock up abusers
forever.
It would be ideal if society
could successfully rehabilitate
abusers and prevent potential
abusers from ever acting out. It
would also be ideal if abusers
would keep their hands - and
harsh words - to themselves.

* The News-Press


Sharon Randall


A dream

for the

New Year


never understand
why my mother
went to bed before
midnight on New
Year's Eve.
In my opinion, grown-ups
were supposed to get all done
up and go out dancing at fancy
parties and drink fizzy water
from tall skinny glasses and
kiss each other on the lips at
midnight to usher in the New
Year. At least, that's how they,
did it in the movies.
My mother was never big on
movies. All she ever learned
from movies, she said, was
how to smoke and she was
waiting for the sequel on how
to quit.
I knew she worked long
hours at the mill. I knew that
she was tired. And old. I often
. told her, in my opinion, if she
didn't want to stay up to cele-
brate, she could at least let me
stay up to celebrate for her.
She'd always reply that I was
* too young to have an opinion
and send me.sulking off to bed.
So on New Year's Eve, I'd
sneak a flashlight out of the
closet, check the batteries, and
hide it under my pillow. ,
And late that night -. while
my mother slept and my stepfa-
ther snored and my brothers lay
tangled up like a litter of pups
- I'd switch on the flashlight,
pull the covers over my head
and hold my breath, waiting to
welcome in the New Year.
I didn't have a clock., Didn't
need one. In the town where I
grew up, people weren't much
for parties on our side of the
tracks, but you could be sure
at the stroke of midnight on
New Year's Eve, some fool
would fire off a shotgun, or
maybe a few firecrackers, if I
was lucky. �
I always felt lucky on New
Year's Eve, even stuck in bed
with my head under a blan-
ket, waving a flashlight like a
.bandleader with a fat baton. I
felt lucky just to be alive.
. I would whisper-sing a verse
of "Auld Lang Syne," then do a
quick review of the year, listing
all major events of the past 12
months of my life. That never
took long. Then I'd move on to
give thanks by name, one by
one, for all the people I loved.
As the flashlight grew dim
and my eyes tried to close, I'd
drift off to sleep picturing what
wonders the New Year might
bring, all the places I'd go, all
the things I'd see, all the opin-
ions I wouldn't get to have.
SI'd lay it all out, season by
season, month by month, in
my mind and heart and soul
exactly as I wanted and needed
it to be.
Then I'd send it flying off to
God, a picture-perfect prayer
for the New Year.
The New Year is a time for
dreaming, so why not dream big?
Someday, I could be sitting
in a rest home with my head
under a blanket and a flashlight
in my hand trying to remember
2010, the things I did, all the
people who gave it meaning.
But for now, it is a clean slate,
a blank check, an empty com-
puter screen, a promise that
says, yes, anything is possible.
So I will picture it as best I
can, perfect as can be, and send
it flying off to God, a prayer.
I think you should, too.
That is my opinion. And I am
old enough now to have one.
* Sharon Randall can be
contacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson NV 89077, or at www.
sharonrandall.com.


4A


OTHER OPINION

Stiff penalties needed on domestic violence
















Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


Oil nears

$79, pump

prices

inching up

By CHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK - Energy
prices rose slightly Tuesday
with a majority of futures
traders taking the holiday
week off, though a stronger
dollar helped keep a barrel
of oil below $79.
Benchmark crude for
February delivery added
a dime to settle at $78.87
a barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange, still
the highest close since
mid-November. In London,
Brent crude for- February
delivery increased 32 cents
to settle at $77.64 a barrel on
the ICE Futures exchange.
A rise in the dollar versus
other currencies tends to
push oil prices lower. Crude
is priced in dollars, and
investors holding foreign
money can't buy as much
when the dollar rises.
Still, oil has pressed high-
er for four straight days.
Crude is getting close to
the high for the year of $82
a barrel, and that's tugging
other fuels higher as well.
Retail gas prices increased
for the fourth straight day,
the first time it's done that
since October. The nation-
al average climbed a half
penny. overnight to a new
national average of $2.608,
according to auto club AAA,.
Wright Express and Oil
Price Information Service.
Agallon of regular unlead-
ed is 2.1 cents cheaper than
a month ago, but nearly $1
more expensive than a year
ago.


Network

woes could

be trouble

for free TV

By ANDREW VANACORE
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK - For more
than 60 years, TV stations
have broadcast news, sports
and entertainment for free
and made their money by
showing commercials. That
might not work much Ion-
ger.
The business model is
unraveling at ABC, CBS,
NBC and Fox and the local
stations that carry the
networks' programming.
Cable TV and the Web have
fractured the audience for
free TV and siphoned its
ad dollars. The recession
has squeezed advertising
further, forcing broadcast-
ers to accelerate their push
for new revenue to pay for
programming.
That will play out in liv-
ing rooms across the coun-
try. The changes could
mean higher cable or sat-
ellite TV bills, as the net-
works and local stations
squeeze more fees from
pay-TV providers such as
Comcast and DirecTV for
the right to show broadcast
TV channels in their line-
ups. The networks might
even ditch free broadcast
signals in the next few
years. Instead, they could
operate as cable chan-
nels - a move that could
spell the end of free TV as
Americans have known it
since the 1940s.
"Good programing
is expensive," Rupert
Murdoch, whose News
Corp. owns Fox, told a
shareholder meeting this
fall. "It can no longer be
supported solely by adver-


tising revenues."
Fox is pursuing its
strategy in public, warn-
ing that its broadcasts -
including college football
bowl games - could go
dark Friday for subscrib-
ers of Time Warner Cable,
unless the pay-TV opera-
tor gives Fox higher fees.
For its part, Time Warner
Cable is asking custom-
ers whether it should "roll
over" or "get tough" in
negotiations.


Consumer confidence extends rise in December


By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK - A more
upbeat outlook on jobs
pushed Americans' con-
fidence in the economy
higher in December for the
second month in a row, a
survey released Tuesday
said.
Consumers' expecta-
tions for the job market
over the next six months
reached their highest level
in two years, but Americans
remain gloorfly about their
current prospects.
Meanwhile, a closely
Watched home price index
released Tuesday showed
that home prices rose for
the fifth month in a row
in October, but the recov-
ery continues to be uneven
with only 11 of the 20
metro areas tracked show-
ing gains.
The Conference
Board said its Consumer
Confidence Index rose to
52.9, up from a revised 50.6
in November, but the read-
ing is still' far short of the
90 that would signify a solid
economy. In October, con-
sumer confidence was 48.7.
Economists surveyed
by Thomson Reuters pre-
dicted a reading of 52 for
December.,
The index, which hit
a historic low of 25.3 in
February, had enjoyed a
three-month climb from
March through May, fueled
by signs that the economy
might be stabilizing. The
road has been bumpier
since June as rising unem-
ployment has taken a toll on
consumers.
Economists watch con-


In this Dec. 19 file photo, shoppers jam Michigan Ave., as-they rush to find last minute deals in Chicago. A monthly survey
said Tuesday consumers' confidence in the economy rose again in December.


summer sentiment because
spending on goods and
services for consumers
accounts for about 70 per-
cent of U.S. economic activ-
ity by federal measures.
Stocks extended their
increases into a seventh
day following readings. In
morning trading, the Dow
Jones industrial average
rose 23.05, or 0.2 percent,
to 10,570.13.
One key component of
the Confidence index that
measures consumers'
outlook over the next six
months rose to 75.6 from
70.3 last month, the high-
est level since December
2007, when the index was


75.8. But the survey's other
main component, which
measures shoppers' cur-
rent assessment, actually
fell to 18.8 from 21.2.
The survey of 5,000
households ran Dec.. 1
through 21.
"Regarding income, how-
ever, consumers remain
rather pessimistic about
their short-term prospects
and this will likely continue
to play a key role in spend-
ing decisions in early 2010,"
Lynn Franco,. director of
The Conference Board
Consumer Research Center
said in a statement.
Still, many retailers are
breathing sighs of relief


after the holiday selling
season turned out better
than expected, according
to MasterCard Advisors'
SpendingPulse, which
track all forms of payment,
including cash.
However, even though
shoppers saw. their con-
fidence improve slightly
and bought a bit more,
they've been cautious. in
their spending. During
the Christmas season,
they focused on practical
items for loved ones and
even for themselves, while
shying away from buying
gift cards and opting for
deeply discounted items
instead.


Experts say such patterns
might remain for several
years amid unemployment
that could be stubbornly
high.
The unemployment rat
dipped in November to DJ
percent, down from a 26-
year. high of 10.2 percent
in October. Some analysts
worry it will again start to
rise in coming months and
won't peak until hitting 10.5
percent next summer.
Still, businesses cut their -
payrolls by a net of just
11,000 jobs in November,
the sm?'lest decrease since
the recession started two
years ago, according to the
November, job report.


Report: Home prices rise for fifth straight month


By J.W. ELPHINSTONE
AP Real Estate Writer

NEW YORK. - Home
prices rose for the fifth
month in a row in October,
but the recovery contin-
ues to be uneven with only
11 of the 20 metro areas
tracked showing gains.
The Standard & Poor's/
Case-Shiller home price
index released Tuesday
edged up 0.4 percent to a
seasonally adjusted read-
ing of 145.36 in October
from September. Without
adjusting for seasonal fac-


tors the index was flat from
September.
The index was off 7.3
percent from October
last year, nearly match-
ing expectations of
economists surveyed by
Thomson Reuters. Many
economists, however, are
predicting a double dip in
prices this winter as fore-
closures increase and gov-
ernment support wanes.
"I'd be very surprised if
we don't go below the lows
we hit this year," Dean
Baker, co-director of the
Center for Economic and


LOCAL STOCKS

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


YTD
Name Ex Div TId PE Last Chg%Chg Name


AT&TInc NY 1.68
Adventrx Amex ...
AutoZone NY
3kofAm NY .04
BobEvn Nasd .72
3rMySq NY 1.28
CNBFnPA Nasd .66
;SX NY .88
;hampEh NY ...
Chevron NY 2.72
;isco Nasd ...
iRigrp NY
CocaCl NY 1.64
ColBgp NY ...
Delhaize NY 2.01
FPLGrp NY 1,89
amilyDIr NY .54
FannieMae NY ..
FordM NY ...
FredMac NY ...
SenElec NY . 40
HomeDp NY .90


5.9 14 28.34
.43
... 13159.47
.3 ... 15.12
2.4 ... 29.93
5.0 13 25.85
4.1 18 16.26
1.8 18 49.16
... ... ,20
3.5 13 77.21
... 25 24.10
3.37
2.8 21 57.74
... ... .41
2.6 ... 76.18
3.5 13 53.39
1.9 13 27.89
... ... 1.25
... ... 10.11
... ... 1.50
2.6 14 15.44
3.1 22 29.27


+.01 -.6
+.09+473.3
-.12 +14.3
-.17 +7.4
+.12 +46.5
-.10 +11.2
-.03 +45.4
-.42 +51.4
... -64.3
-.56 +4.4
+.02 +47.9
-.02 -49.8
+.30 +27.5
... -80.0
-1.22 +20.9
-.03 +6.1
... +7.0
-.02 +64.5
-.09+341.5
-.10+105.5
+.10 -4.7
+.09 +27.2


The Lod saw thatyou were tired and
wanted to rest. He summoned the angels
to come as he coded out your name. Left
behind your children wept...praeifulty
watch as you slept.
We have loving memories of the years of
joy' and love, a life well spent caring and
prayingfor those you loved.
And now to God a Mother's scent.
On angel wings you took a heavenlyflight.
Its been (10 Years) Mother; since you've
been gone. Yet we know you are resting
in your masters ann.
L We love you. j


YTD
Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


iShEMkts NY .58 1.4 ... 41.18-
iShR2K NY .72 1.1 ... 63.23
Jntel Nasd .63 3.1 50 20.40
Lowes NY .36 1.5 20 23.61
McDnlds NY 2.20 3.5 16 63.59
MironT NY ... ... ... 10.38
Microsoft Nasd .52 1.7 20 31.39
NY Times NY ...... ...12.13
NobltyH Nasd .25 2.4 .. 10.53
OcciPet NY 1.32 1.6 27 82.10
Penney NY .80 3.0 23 27.03
PepsiCo NY 1.80 2.9 19 61.10
Potash NY .40 .4 22 109.50
PwShs QQQ Nasd .21 .5 ... 46.03
Ryder NY 1.00 2.3 37 42.74
SearsHldgs Nasd ......... 84.71
SouthnCo NY 1.75 5.2 17 33.52
SprinlNex NY ... ... ... 3.81
SPDR NY 2.29 2.0 ...112.56
SPDRFncl NY .25 1.7 .. 14.42
TimeWrnrs NY .75 2.5 ... 29.45
WalMart NY 1.09 2.0 16 54.11


-.14 +64.9
-.03 +28.4
+.10 +39.2
-.04 +9.7
-.02 +2.3
+.34+293.2
+.22 +61.5
-.09 +65.5
+.48 +33.1
-.41 +36.9
-.35 +37.2
-.06 +11.6
-2.21 +49.5
-.19 +54.8
-.20 +10.2
-.73+117.9
+.08 -9.4
+.16+108.2
-.16 +24.7
-.06 +15.2
+.22 +41.8
+.13 -3.5


755-5440 or

755-5441

between 8:00am & 5:00pm


Policy Research, a left-
leaning Washington think
tank. "We still have a very
glutted housing market."
The index is now up 3.4
percent from its bottom
in May, but still almost 30
percent below its peak in
April 2006.
There are also wide
variations from city to city.
Prices have climbed for at
least six months in a row
in Denver, Washington,
Minneapolis and San
Francisco.
But in Chicago and
Tampa, prices are down
by more than a percent
from September.
And there's no sign of
a bottom in Las Vegas,
where prices have tumbled
by more than 56 percent
from their peak in April
2006.
Home prices play a
key role in the economy.


Homeowners feel wealth-
ier when property values
rise and are more Vikely
to spend money. Rising
prices also help millions
of homeowners who owe
more to the banks than
their houses are worth.
The positive trend in
home prices and a bet-
ter employment outlook
helped raise the Consumer
Confidence Index to 52.9
in December, up from a
revised 50.6 the. month
before, the. Conference
Board reported Tuesday.
While far below a 90 read-
ing that would signify a
solid economy, consumers'
outlook on jobs over the
next six months reached
its * highest level in two
years.
The federal government
has stepped in with far
reaching programs to cre-
ate jobs and make hom-


eownership more afford-
able.
Home.price gains since
the summer reflect the
rush of homebuyers try-
ing to close their deals
before the original expira-
tion date of a federal tax
credit.
The Nov. 30 deadline
was extended last month
to April 30.
Besides a credit of up to
$8,000 for first-time buy-
ers, Congress expanded
the program to include
homeowners who have
lived' in their current
properties for at least five
years. They can now claim
a tax credit of up to $6,500
if they relocate.
The Federal Reserve is
also buying up $1.25 tril-
lion in mortgage-backed
securities to help keep
interest rates at historical
lows.


4BR/2BR Home in Summer Ridge neighborhood. Beautiful exterior
stone work. Split plan with cathedral ceilings give this home a very
open feel. 2 car garage with fenced back yard and screened porch.
1,919sf Heated/Cooled and 2,631sf total.


DIRECTIONS: From the intersection of Hwy 41 mnd Baya Aye, go West on Bays Ave for .6 miles. Turn


DIRECTIONS: From the intersection of Hwy 41 and Baya Ave, go West on Baya Ave for .6 miles. Turn
Left onto McFarlane Ave and go .9 miles. Turn Right onto Grandview St. Make first Right onto Sunbeam
Way. Home on Left - Look for Campen Auctions sign.
Terms & Conditions: To register to bid, you must present a Cashier's Check, Certified Check, or Cash in the amount of $5.000 made payable to Peterson Law
Firm Escrow Account. Winning Bidder must provide the balance of 10% as a Binder Deposit by check immediately after being announced the winning bidder,
with the balance due on or before February 23rd, 2010. Not Subject To Financing. 10% Buyer's Premium. Insurable title to the property is guaranteed Should
you not be the successful bidder, your check will be promptly returned to you.
FOR MORE INFORMATION & PHOTOS, go to www.CampenAuctlons.com







Broker Participation Invited: Visit www CampenAucllons corn for a moker/Client Reglstration Form and rerms. All Informnallon is believed o be correct but Is not guaranteed
All announcements made the day of the Auction shall supercede any previously printed material or statements made,


(352) 505-0560 * P.O. Box 140907 * Gainesville, FL, 326 14

For More Info Visit: www.CampenAuctions.com AB #2820 AU #3085


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427













Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


6A


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


Wednesday, December 30, 2009


BRIEFS
RUNNING
Registration open
for Olustee 5K
The 2010 Step Fitness
Blue Grey 5K is
7:30 a.m. on Feb. 13.
The race will benefit *
the March of Dimes in
honor of Alexander Ross
McCollum. Business
and personal*
donations are being
sought,
Registration is
available online at www.
active.corn (search
Lake City) and by mail.
Student, senior and team
discounts are offered.
For details, call Step
Fitness at (386) 438-5830
or race manager Michelle
McCollum Richards at
(386) 208-2447.
ADULT BASEBALL
North Florida
teams forming
The North Florida
Men's Adult Baseball
League is forming a team
in this area. Organizers,
coaches and players are '
being sought. Workouts
begin in January.
For details, call Greg-
Vickers at (850) 253-5107
or visit www.leaguelineup.
com/northfloridamabl.
CHS SOCCER
Alumni game
fundraiser set
Columbia High's boys
soccer is organizing an
ali rnni game 'fnaiger '
for January. All former
Tiger soccer players
who graduated from
1990-2009 are invited. -
Proceeds will benefit the
soccer program.
For details, e-mail
Justin Lang at
justlang@firn. edu.
YOUTH SOCCER
Coed 10-under
team forming
Gateway Lions Athletic
Club is forming a
10-under coed soccer
team. The CYSA fee of
$70 includes shirt, shorts
and socks. Shin guards
and cleats are extra and
required. There also is a
$10 fundraiser card.
For details, call
(386) 697-2224.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White
meeting Sunday
The annual meeting
of the Fort White Youth
Baseball Association is
2 p.m. Sunday at the
sports complex meeting
room in Fort White.
For details, call Tammy
Sharpe at 867-3825.

Travel team
tryouts Jan. 9
Diamond Extreme
12-under baseball
travel team has tryouts
set for 1 p.m. Jan 9 at
the Southside Sports
Complex baseball
practice fields.
For details, call Kevin
Stalter at 754-3667.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
* Columbia High girls
basketball hosts Union
County High in Holiday
Shootout, 7:30 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball in Gaslight
Holiday Classic in


Louisville, Ky., TBD


Holiday




shootout


Lady Tigers dominate

Santa Fe, 62-45, Tuesday


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High had to do
some reshuffling to begin the
Holiday Shootout, which con-
cludes today at Richardson
Gym. The Lady Tigers were
originally scheduled to compete
at Columbia High School, but
moved the game to Richardson
prior to tip-off.
The move didn't seem to dis-
tract the Lady Tigers, which
used two double-digit runs to
pick off the Lady Raiders, 62-45,
on Tuesday.
Columbia was tied at the end
of the first quarter, 13-13, but
started the second quarter on
a 10-0 run. The run took place
over the duration of the first 2:39
of the quarter.
The Lady Tigers ended the
half with Sharmayne Edwards
dribbling the length of the court
and connecting on a three-point
shot from 10-feet behind the
three-point line. '


The Lady Tigers led 32-23 at
the half, but the Lady Raiders
closed the differential to two
points late in the third quarter.
Columbia lead 47-41 heading
into the final period.
Columbia's final period was
their finest as the Lady Tigers
shut down Santa Fe, limiting the
Lady Tigers to four points in the
fourth quarter. The Lady Tigers
ended the game on a 15-4 run.
"We played well in spots,"
coach Horace Jefferson said.
"The pressure helped to set the
pace. We still have to work on
things. Da'Brea (Hill) hit some
good shots. We were able to
steal the ball and get in transi-
tion. The girls played hard."
Edwards scored 19 points in
the contest to lead the Lady
Tigers in points. Hill added
18 points in the game. Katrina
Goodbread had nine points.
Columbia (8-4) will play
against Palatka High in tonight's
matchup at Richardson. Tip-off
is set for 7:30 p.m.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
dolumbia High's Sharmayne Edwards goes up for a lay-up against Santa'Fe High.
at Richardson Gym on Tuesday.


Columbia takes home


tournament title


Tigers win 6th
annual CHS
Christmas tourney.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
For the first time since
the 04-05 seasons, the
Columbia High Tigers have.
won the Columbia High
School Christmas Soccer
Tournament. In its sixth
season of existence, the
Tigers have now won half
of the tournaments.
Columbia swept its three
opponents over two days
to take home the tourna-
ment title. The Tigers
defeated Sante Fe, 4-0, on
Monday before beating
Taylor County, 2-1, and
Cornerstone Academy, 7-1,
on Tuesday to take home


CHS continued on 7A


Members of the Columbia High soccer team stand next to their first-place trophy after the 6th
Christmas Soccer Tournament.


COURTESY PHOTO
annual Columbia High School


Tigers compete in

.F.. Gaslight Classic


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the Columbia High basketball team attempt to make a snowman at Churchill
Downs in Louisville, Ky. on Tuesday. The Tigers are competing in the Gaslight Holiday
Classic.


Columbia gathers
experience in
Kentucky.
From staff reports

Columbia High has been
snowed in during its first
two days of competition in
the Gaslight Holiday Classic
in Louisville, Ky. The Tigers
fell against Jeffersontown,
73-45, on Monday and
Newport Central Catholic,
66-39, on Tuesday.
Columbia was led by
Marcus Amerson against
Jeffersontown, which
is ranked seventh in
Kentucky's prep poll,


with 18 points and eight
rebounds.
The Tigers trailed 25-9 at
the end of the first quarter,
but pulled the lead within 15
after trailing 42-10 midway
through the second quarter.
"We just started play-
ing smarter," coach Trey
Hosford said. "After the
first 12 minutes, we played
close to even with them."
The Tigers were out-
scored 8-0 over the last few
minutes of the contest to
pull away at the end and
win 73-45. Columbia start-
ed Tuesday with a tour of
Churchill Down, home of
TIGERS continued on 7A















WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
4:30 p.m.
ESPN - Humanitarian Bowl, Bowling
Green vs. Idaho, at Boise, Idaho
8 p.m.
ESPN - Holiday Bowl, Arizona vs.
Nebraska, at San Diego
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - Connecticut at Cincinnati
9 p.m.
ESPN2 - Baylor vs.Arkansas, at Little
Rock,Ark.

FOOTBALL

--. NFL schedule
Monday's Game
Chicago 36, Minnesota 30, OT
Sunday's Games
Chicago at Detroit, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
New England at Houston, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Buffalo, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
Atlanta atTampa Bay, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Cleveland, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, I p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.

Bowl games
Monday
Independence Bowl
Georgia 44,Texas A&M 20
Tuesday
EagleBank Bowl
Temple vs. UCLA
Champs Sports Bowl
Miami vs.Wisconsin (n)
Today
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Bowling Green (7-5) vs. Idaho (7-5),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl


At San Diego
Nebraska (9-4) vs. Arizona (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday
Sun Bowl
At El Paso.Texas
Stanford (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (7-5).
Noon (CBS)
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth,Texas
Air Force (7-5) vs. Houston (10-3),
Noon (ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Missouri (8-4) vs. Navy (8-4),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe, Ariz.
Minnesota (6-6) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
6 p.m. (NFL)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia Tech (9-3) vs.Tennessee (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Northwestern (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5),
II a.m. (ESPN)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Penn State (10-2) -vs. LSU (9-3),
I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Florida State (6-6) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), I p.m. (CBS)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Ohio State (10-2) vs. Oregon (10-2)',
5 p.m. (ABC)
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Florida (12-1) vs. Cincinnati
(12-0), 8:30 p.m. (FOX)
Saturday
International Bowl
AtToronto
South Florida (7-5) vs. Northern
Illinois (7-5), Noon (ESPN2)
Cotton Bowl
At Dallas
Oklahoma State (9-3) vs. Mississippi
(8-4), 2 p.m. (FOX)
Papajohns.com Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Connecticut (7-5) vs. South Carolina
(7-5), 2 p.m. (ESPN)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
East Carolina (9-4) vs. Arkansas (7-5),
5:30 p.m. (ESPN)


Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Michigan State (6-6) vs. Texas Tech
(8-4), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 4
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ari.-
Boise State (13-0) vs. TCU (12-0),
8 p.m. (FOX)
Tuesday, Jan. 5
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Iowa (10-2) vs. Georgia Tech (11-2),
8 p.m. (FOX)
Wednesday, Jan. 6
GMAC Bowl
Mobile.Ala.
Central Michigan (11-2) vs.Troy (9-3),
7 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Alabama (13-0) vs. Texas (13-0),
8 p.m. (ABC)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Milwaukee at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Cleveland, 7 p.n.
Charlotte at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New York at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Utah at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Boston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Portland, 10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 3 p.m.
Miami at San Antonio, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Houston, 7 p.m.
Utah at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 9 North Carolina vs. Albany, N.Y.,
7 p.m.
7 No. 10 Connecticut at Cincinnati,
7 p.m.
No. II Michigan State vs. Texas-
Arlington, 7 p.m.
No. 18 Temple at Northern Illinois,
8 p.m.
No. 24 UAB atVirginia, 7 p.m.
No. 25 Northwestern at Illinois,
9 p.m.


CHS: Takes home Christmas title
Continued From Page 6A


the title.
The Lady Tigers were
shorthanded two players as
captains Shelby Widergren
and Chelsey Waters weren't
available for action. Coach
Keith Mcloughlin's team
finished the tournament
with a 1-2 record as Clay
High won the champion-
ship.
"The younger players
gained some valuable expe-
rience," Mcloughlin said.
"There were some good
performances and they're
- - the future of CHS soccer. It
was a good event and great
to have an event in town for
the girls."
The Lady Tigers began
the tournament with a 3-
0 defeat at the hands of
the eventual champion,
Clay, before falling to Pedro
Menedez, 6-1, in Tuesday's
early game.
Columbia rebounded to
win its final game against
Middleburg, 2-0, to end the
tournament.
S. Michaela Burton scored
on an assist from Michelle
Pope. Pope followed it up
with a goal later in the
game.


It was coach Trevor
Tyler's team, however, that
gained the biggest honor.
in the tournament as it
claimed its. third title.
Chris Beardsley was
named the MVP of the tour-
nament.
"It felt nice, but I
thought everyone did
great," Beardsley said. "I
thought my brother Geoff
(Beardsley) deserved it.
We played tough and stuck
it out for a good victory.
It's always good to win a
tournament, especially after
finishing second last.year. It
was one of our goals com-
ing into the season."
Columbia started the
tournament with a 4-0
win over Santa Fe. Geoff
Beardsley led the Tigers
with two goals. Carlos
Ruiz and Hunter Tilton
scored the other goals for
Columbia.
Jordan Lehman opened
up the scoring for Columbia
in its second game against
Taylor County. The goal
was assisted by Chris
Beardsley.
Columbia won the game
2-1 after Geoff Beardsley


scPred his third goal of the
tournament off an assist by
Ruiz.
The Tigers saved their
best for last, beating
Cornerstone Academy, 7-1,
in their final match.
Geoff Beardsley. opened
the scoring with a goal in
the second minute off an
assist by Chris Beardsley.
Lehman scored his sec-
ond goal of the tourna-
ment off of an assist by
Ruiz and Geoff Beardsley
added his fifth goal of the
tournament in the first
half off an assist by Chase
Stamper. Bo Krantz was
assisted by Chris Beardsley,
who had three in the game
for the fourth goal of the
game.
Columbia rounded out
the contest with goals from
Stamper, Cody Beadles
and Dillon Sessions.
Jimmy Rukab and Conner
Widergren also had assists
in the game.
"We can't complain,"
coach Tyler said. "It
doesn't .matter what kind
of championship you're
winning, you're winning a
championship."


GetCont-d.u , w wl
,Get Colit www.lakecityreporter.com
.- Lake City
|11 r Reporter


TIGERS
Continued From Page 6A

the Kentucky Derby, and
finished it with their second
game of the Classic.
"We had a behind-the-
scenes tour that covered
every part of the tourna-
ment," Hosford said. "I was
shocked how big it was.
It was huge. We went into
the jockey's locker room,
and they haven't touched it
since 1968."
Hosford was more pleased
with the effort at Churchill
Downs than on the basket-
ball court. The Tigers fell to
Newport Central Catholic
in a one-sided contest.
The Tigers finish the tour-
nament against Louisville
Central today at 4 p.m.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, .
to form four ordinary words.
SCERS i


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


A: BY I I 53
(Answers tomorrow) 55---
Yesterday's I Jumbles: DROOP LYING AWHILE NESTLE
I Answer: What her husband acquired after he
retired - A NEW "POSITION" 12-30


GOLF REPORTS



Lights-out in blitz play


Wednesday Blitz action
produced the best scores
in recent months. Scores
were so good that a sub-par
71 by Jordan Hale sent him
home empty-handed.
Southpaw Bob Randall
rolled in two birdies on the
back nine to secure the
winner's spot with +10.
Charlie Timmons came
close with a late birdie of his
own to take second place
with +8. Mike McCranio,
posted +6 to finish third.
WednesdaySkinsfeatured
winning eagles by Travis
Timmons and McCranie.
Charlie Timmons, Keith
Shaw, Randall and Hale each
had one winning birdie.
The Pot Hole carried
over for the 17th week.
Roberta Whitaker and
Cathy Steen tied for first in
the LGA low net event.
Lots of special Christmas


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

prizes were also awarded
for most 1-putts, most
3-putts and most trips into
the sand traps.
Both Good Old Boys team
matches were walkovers. Eli
Witt, Jim Stevens, Jim Bell
,and Dan Stephens set the
pace with an 11-4 win over
Monty Montgomery, Merle
Hibbard and Carl Jones.
Jerry West, Stan
Woolbert, Paul Davis and
Dave Berhheim were
almost as dominant in
Match 2 with a 94 victory
over Ed Snow, Joe Person,
Don Christensen and Mike
Spencer.
Montgomery was medal-
ist with a 37-36-73 followed
by Snow 'and West, each


with 76. Hibbard took a
solo win in nine-hole action
with 39 on the front side.
Person, Woolbert, and
Jones split the back nine
with scores of 39.
Jim Carr found the cold
to his liking in the Saturday
Blitz. He lapped. the field
with a +7 for the win. Travis
Green and Tony Kent tied
for second with +1.
In the skins game, Dennis
Crawford paired an eagle
with a birdie for two win-
ners. Jim Carr and *Charlie
Timmons each had a win-
ning birdie. No. 10 showed
why it is the course's No. 1
handicap hole when a par
by Scott Kishton stood up
for a skin.
The Member-Prospective
Member two-man best ball
tournament and lunch is
January 16, with a shotgun
start at 9 a.m.


V.A. hosts scramble Friday


The Wednesday Blitz
winners:
A Division - Lynn
Smith, first; Mike Kahlich,
second; Chet Carter, third;
B Division - Rocky
Ford, first; Stan Musgrove
and Bob Wheary, tied for
second;
C Division - Wallace
Christie, first; John Rajer,


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
J.D. Dedge

second; Jack Tuggle, third;
D Division - Chuck
Slaymaker, first; Chuck
White, second; Larry
Boone, third.
Skins winners were


Carter and Smith with two
each, and A. J. Lavin, Ed
Higgs and Tim Tortorice
with one.
Upcoming events:
* Friday, VA scramble,
everyone is invited, 10 a.m.
shotgun start;
* Jan. 16, Men's Golf
Association's Super Bowl
Scramble.


By BETSY BLANEY
Associated Press

LUBBOCK, Texas -
Texas Tech coach Mike
Leach is seeking a tempo-
rary restraining order that
would allow him to coach in
the Alamo Bowl on Jan. 2.
The motion was filed
Tuesday in Lubbock,
Texas. An in-cham-
bers hearing was set for
8:30 a.m. Wednesday in the
99th District Court.
University officials sus-


pended Leach on Monday
while the school investi-
gates a complaint from
receiver Adam James and
his family. James is the son
of former NFL player Craig
James, now a television
sports analyst for ESPN.
A person close to James
with direct knowledge of the
situation contends the player
was twice forced to stand in
a small, dark place while the
team practiced. The person
spoke to The AP on the con-
dition on anonymity because


ACROSS 40 Al of Indy fame
42 Wasted no
Wind-factor time
Eggs', 43 Sneaky
partner 44 Gladiator's
Trouble afoot? hello
Hoarder 46 Read to the
Exacting class
Take a breath 49 Lama's chant
Drops on the 53 Convey
grass 54 Whimper
Green parrot 55 Myanmar, once
TV brand 56 Roll with the
Fastens punches


Brown of big
bands
Get wrong
Vanity
Easy win
Pharaohs, now
Town meetings
McClurg of
sitcoms
Attitude
Lockbox
document
Kyoto sash
Barely get by
Soph. and jr.


DOWN


NBC rival
Blue or green
Packing slip
Told a fib
Rhine nymph
Nuisances
Ottoman
title
1040 pro
Lubricate
Before
marriage.


of the sensitive nature of the
complaint
And a person close to
the inquiry said Leach was
"begged to work something
out to avoid a confrontation."
The person spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because
the investigation is ongoing.
Thatpersonalso said Leach
late last week postponed a
meeting related to the inquiry
and refused to sign a letter
saying "no. one injured would
be returned to work out with-
out doctors' permission."'


Answer to Previous Puzzle

WE D D P 1B EA
AITE URSAIURNS
S S GEST R ING1
H I KU SL EIET
AP E SH Y2
E A HE HMM
LU LL RO R S EAR U
NIB W'EOW D J A Y S
A TA MADE U TAIH
AX DIM

PREDATORS RO
RS





MA TE U
INOSE SEA


12 Enya's music
(2 wds.)
13 Podium
feature
18 Cure
19 More uncouth


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


1 1213 1 1


20 Troops
22 Universe
23 More baggy
24 Archimedes'
shout
25 New York
island
28 Rural addr.
30 Kind of
student
34 Steel girders
(hyph.)
35 1990sGrunge
band
40 Very very
41 Boris'
refusal
43 Where Anna
taught
45 Oklahoma
town
46 Barbecue
tidbit
47 Outback bird
48 EMT
technique
50 Water-
power org.
51 Gym
iteration
52 Hgt.


: 56
� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


Leach seeks court order


to coach Alamo Bowl


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


\
E













Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Romance is cooled by torch

woman carries for 'friend'


DEAR ABBY: I am 80,
and "Doreen" is 72. When we
started dating seven years
ago, I "simply wanted to be her
friend." Now the tables have
turned, and she just wants to
be MY friend.
Doreen has a male friend in
Florida with whom she com-
municates through letters and
phone calls. Although she tells
me she loves me, she also says
that if this "friend" comes back
and asks her out, she wants to
be free to date him.
I told her that most 72-year-
olds would be happy to have
one man to date, but if she
plans on dating someone else,
I should be free to do the same.
Her last remark was for me to
"be gentle with her." We are af-
fectionate, loving friends, and I
care about her a great deal.
Your observations, please.
- EDDIE IN MAINE
DEAR EDDIE: Your state-
ment that if Doreen plans to
date someone else, you should
be free to do the same seems
logical to me. Continue to
have an affectionate, loving
friendship with her - and by all
means "be gentle"- but keep
your options open and date
others in the knowledge that if
her snowbird flies home, she'll
be billing and cooing with him,
and you'll be flying solo.
DEAR ABBY: I have a big
problem - my father-in-law,
"Hal." He has lived with us
more than eight years and has
never - contributed anything
toward his keep. I asked him
once to pay some rent, but he


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
refused. This not only caused
a rift between my wife and me,
but her two siblings - who are
well off - said Hal was "liv-
ing on the poverty line;" so we
should keep him for nothing.
I wouldn't mind so much,
, but my wife has to clean up
after him, do his laundry and
take him to his medical ap-
pointments, More than that,
having Hal underfoot all the
time has completely destroyed
our privacy.
Hal spends most of his pen-
sion buying presents for his
other children who never even
come to see him. All we get
from him are complaints.
What do you suggest? -
RESENTFUL IN IDAHO
DEAR RESENTFUL:
Enough is enough. You and
your wife are long overdue for
a meeting with her siblings
to discuss this problem. They
should have started chipping
in to pay for their father's
care eight years ago and also
seen to it that you have some
respite. Unless and until this
is brought out into the open,
nothing will change.
DEAR ABBY: My wife,
"Audrey," was molested by


her step-grandfather when she
was a little girl. She told her
mother about it, but because
of her age she wasn't taken
seriously.
Audrey and I are now
talking about starting a fam-
ily. Abby, I am uncomfortable
about bringing children into
this family unless everyone
understands the reason I will
not allow this man to touch our
children. The problem is, the
information will be devastat-
ing to Audrey's grandmother.
A child's innocence is worth
whatever hard feelings I might
create, but how do we handle
this without destroying a fam-
ily? - TAKING CARE OF
MY OWN IN HUNTSVILLE,
AIA.
DEAR TAKING CARE:
Was your wife the only child
in the family her step-grand-
father had access to? Will the
baby -you're planning be the
first in the family - or has this
man had unsupervised contact
with others? Keep in mind that
if he would molest Audrey, he
may also have done it to others
- neighbors, etc. .
Not only should the fam-
ily be informed about what
happened by you and Audrey
now that she is "old enough
to be believed," but also ask
if anyone else may have been
victimized because other chil-
dren may have been- afraid to
speak up.
M Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You cannot
leave anything undone. An-
swer questions being asked
and you will discover exact-
ly what you must do to turn
around a stressful situation.
A strict budget, along with
lowering your overhead will
bring good results. ****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Someone from
your past will offer a dif-
ferent opinion that makes
sense to you and comple-
ments your own plans.
Clear your head of any
temptation and follow the,
road that leads to stability
and a better future. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You won't be
too clear about your past,
present or future but you
will have some interesting
ideas to run by someone in
the know and who may be
able to help you. This is the
time to lower debt, not take
on more. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Visiting someone
you don't see often will help
to clear up some uncertain-
ty about your future..A part-
nership will open up doors
that have been closed in
the past, allowing you some
financial and geographical
maneuverability. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Don't sit back waiting


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

for things to come to you.
You can -start anew if you
line up the people you need
to pursue your goals. Your
contributions in the past
will put you in a stellar po-
sition. A change of location
will lead to an important
discovery. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Network all you can
and offer your opinions,
suggestions and friendship
in return for the same. The
more outlets you have and
connections you make, the
easier it will be' to obtain
the goals you have set for
the new year. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): A good idea will devel-
op with someone who has
an unusual way of looking
at situations. Socialize with
people you don't get to see
often. It's never too late to
reunite with someone who
inspires you. *****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Lower your
overhead so you can di-
minish the stress you've
been experiencing and get
back to what you enjoy do-
ing most. A move can help
you reconnect with some of
your talents, allowing you
greater options in the new
year. ***


SAGITTARIUS" (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't lose
sight of your goals but
don't neglect anyone who
may be able to help you in
the future. You have to walk
a fine line, allowing others
freedom so you can main-
tain your own. Money or a
deal is heading your way.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't back
down even if someone begs
for your support or finan-
cial assistance. Stick to
your own game plan if you
want to enter the new year
feeling good about your fu-
ture and confident you can
finish whatever you start

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Spend time with
friends or colleagues. You
will make the most head-
way by sharing your views
and taking part as a team
player. An interesting sur-
prise will help you make a
decision you've been labor-
ing over. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't let envy
be your downfall. Making
assumptions based on what
others tell you is a waste
of time. Do your best and
show everyone that you
measure up to whatever
challenge or competition
you face. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: X equals Y
"FR NYLR UKTDKEERB NKF EK JR
DKKS DPRIEI, NKF EK F Y H A
HODNEHX KB ENR RYTEN YI 0 E I


KENRT VTRYEPTRI S K."
J Y T J Y T Y FYTS


-, YPENKT


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Obstacles are those'frightful things you see when
you take your eyes off the goal." - Henry Ford
(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 12-30


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


SHE IS A'lTFV"R'-TE= -HTTS WHAT I'M F AF l
To yCfHIL .SHE - vrr-- OF.T
IS VULNERABLE, AND W L--
yOU /f LE'DING- - TD qo- 1
-A-OR! 'V V T RE
T 7R)ST- H F OR
Me,SlSl SHE'S \4 - RI^0^e "
auST COMING- 1 .
flLONi5FOfK 1 ^^

M51. "44.F


THEONLWW
TO BEATTRE CU
UWEATNER I$TO
NIt~ j


I WILL NOW SETTLE DOWN
IN A DEN, AND NOT COME
OUT UNTIL....


0777


8A


















olumbia,

Your marketplace source for Lake City a


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Customer service makes paying bills less taxing


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
, arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Stthe Columbia
." ;'" County Tax
Collector's
office, pro-
frey. viding good,
"- - friendly service is the goal.
"Nobody likes to pay
money," said Ronnie
. Brannon, tax collector. "We
try to make it as conve-
nient as possible."
The office is an agent for
the Department of Motor
Vehicles and Department
of Revenue, Brannon said.
. Ad valorem taxes are col-
,. elected and tags and titles
. are issued at the office.
'"We're the front-line
.. between:the taxpayer and
the government," he said.
The office is estab-
S. lished by the constitution,
Brannon said. He is elected
by the citizens.
"It's their office," he
said. "I refer to it as 'your
tax collector office.' I work
for the people."
S-. Brannon served under
the former tax collector
and has been in office
since 2004. He has 23
. years of experience in the
A office.
. A staff of 19 is divided
into four departments,
including -motor vehicles,
property taxes, technology
and financing.
The office has worked to
improve its level of service
by upgrading computer
* - software, increasing office
" hours and more, Brannon
said. There is a substation
: - in Fort White one day out
the week.
'qThe things that we do
behind the scenes try to


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County tax collector Ronnie Brannon says providing strong customer service is a priority among his 19 staff
members. The public is legally obligated to use his services, he said, but his employees are motivated to make it as pleasant


an experience as possible.
increase the level, of ser-
vice," he said. '"We try to
be more accessible to the
people." -
There is also a drive-
through window at the
office.
"It's a very useful tool,"
he said. 'The public loves
it. I love it It's really


convenient."
Another new feature
at the office is the ability
to take partial payment
for taxes, Brannon said.
Before this, payment had
to be in full or in quarterly
installments.
Cullecting taxes is a pro .
cess, Brannon explained:


Property is assessed by an
- appraiser; taxing authori-
ties set the millage rate;
the tax collector's office
prepares the tax roll and
mails out tax bills; taxpay-
ers receive the bills and
pay; and money received
is distributed-tu the tax-.
ing authorities to provide


services.
Taxing authorities in
Columbia County are
the Board of County
Commissioners, school
board, Suwannee River
Water Management
District, City of Lake .
City, Lake Shore Hospia ,.
Authority and Indu.strial


Development Authority.
In 2008, the office had
102,000 transactions for the
DMV alone, Brannon said.
It collected tax rolls on
39,000 parcels.
"Generally, we see 400
transactions per day,"'he
said.
The office tries to have
tax bills out by Nov. 1,
Brannon said. Bills become
delinquent April 1.
Bills can be paid in per-
son, by mail, online or at a
night deposit.
"We try to make it as
easy as possible for .people
to-pay their taxes," he said.
Renewal notices for tags
are sent out as a courtesy
at the office, Brannon said.
Tags can be renewed by
mail, online or at the drive-
through.
Future services at the
tax collector's office will
include driver's license
issuance, Brannon said.
The state has decided to be
out the business by 2012.
Initially, Brannon was
hesitant to go into that
business.
"I feel if I don't (do it),
someone will come in that
doesn't know my people,"
he said. "I think I can do a
better job than a stranger
coming into town,"
. The keys to providing
quality service at the office
are listening to the cus-
tomer and smiling when
talking, Brannon said. If
there is an issue with ser-
vice, the offices gets it cor-
rected right away,
"The idea is to carry
out the law and do it as
plea ant and efficient a.....
possible," he said.


Sectional With Chaise, plus...FREE Cocktail Ottoman! CLEARANCE PRICE...

". ' I '
~ ,"t ,",is


*~rel$ 1 3401
rS S 'lrrieb *,'l

tIre nna

vffe


II Home Furnishings


461 SW Deputy J Davis Lane
'Lake City * FL 32024
386-752-3910
Hours: Mon - Fri: 9am - 6pm * Sat 9am - 5pm


,nd Columbia County


a-


I
















2B


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


one1tmper snad addona
4 lines. 6 days li 11
Ri nippiln to ipdvate ndivlduals selln |
pi ui Merichiandld tolling 500 or Iea.
S Each tie b mst Include a pc.




One Item per ad additional
4 lines * 6 days Ehne t5n
Rate appliesto private Individuals selling
Personal merchandlse totalling s00 or IMs.
Each item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.








One item per ad
4 lines. 6 days Each additional



line $1.55
Rate applies to private individuals ailing
penonal merchandise totalling 52_00 or Is.
SEach Item must Include a pdce.








One Item perad 26
4 lines * 6 days Eachadditional







line $1.655
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,000 or ess.






I ines dayst Eacl adpitional
* personal merchandise totalling 000000 o s
S Each" Item mut include a price.

This isa nniund rate
Jj Sale


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$90.20
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $1.55 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.-
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdistoAppear Call by: . FaxEmail by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mot.,itam.
Wednesday Mon,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:110a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00 a.. Thu .,9:10am,
Saturday Fr., 1000:1 am. Fr., 9:00 a.m.
.Sunday F., 1010 a.m. .f., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding. payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
'appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the,
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed forthe first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for, any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print

and Online
www.lakecityreporter.coin


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-255-CA .
COLUMBIA BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
* SULOON, INC, d/b/a LEGENDS;
WILLIAM D. KOON, Jr.; and THE
PACKAGE SHACK, LLC,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that the
real property located in Columbia
County Florida, described as fol-
lows: *
TOWNSHIP 4, SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST
SECTION 5: Commence at the
Northeast comer of the NW 1/4 of
NW 1/4 of Section 5; thence S
88*05' W along the North line of
said Section 5, a distance of 496.8
feet to the East line of Lake Villas
Subdivision, unit No. 5; thence S 01'
44'W, along the East line of said
Lake Villas Subdivision Unit 5, a
distance of 542.2 feet to the South-
west comer of the Hosae Delong
tract for a Point of Beginning; thence
N 89*43' E, a distance of 45.8 feet to
the West right of way line of U.S.
Highway No. 41; thence S 06'50'W
along said West right of way of U. S.
Highway No. 41, a distance of 129.0
feet; thence S 89"43' -W, a distance
of 456.6 feet; thence N 09*28' E, a
distance of 129.3 feet to the Point of
Beginning.
AND
Parcel 2:
Commence at the Southeast comer
of Addition No. 5 of Lake Villas
Subdivision as per plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 2, page 108G,
public records .of Columbia County,
Florida, and run thence S 09'48' 00"
W, 71.10 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning; thence continue S 90*48'00"
W, 150.13 feet; N. 88"25'19" E,
220.66 feet; thence N 88'23'15" E;
107.16 feet; thence N 07"41'20" E;
143.29 feet; thence S 89"26'13" W,
321.53 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in
the above styled action, dated De-
cember 16, 2009, at the Columbia
County Courthouse in Lake City,
Columbia County, Florida, at 11:00
A.M. on January 20, 2010, to the
best and highest bidder for cash.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
22 day of December, 2009.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/B, Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04536790
December-30, 2009
January 6, 010

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED.
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax" Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 351
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 33
TWN 2S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 01816-005 THE N 192.64 FT
OF THE S951.37 FT OF SW 1/4 OF
NW 1/4. ORB .463-168, 566-051,
633-694..
Name in which assessed: JEFFREY-
D. SHELTON
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 25th day
of January, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04536611
December 16, 23, 30, 2009
January 6, 2010



i I tl ii.a-ro


Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
, estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191


. Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 ES.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 1109
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 01
TWN 7S RNG 15 PARCEL NUM-
BER 04149-711 LOT 11 WILSON
SPRINGS COMMUNITY PHASE 2
UNRECORDED: COMM NE COR
OF SE 1/4 OF SEC 1 & RUN S
942.90 FT, S 46 DG W 48.56 FT TO
POB, CONT S 46 DG W 225 FT,
-THENCE N 35 DG W 566.54 FT,
THENCE N 20 DG W 50 FT,
THENCE N 69 DG E 30 FT,
THENCE N 6 DG E 33.54 FT,
THENCE N 69 DG E 65.34 FF,
THENCE N 65 DG E 65.34
THENCE N 65TDG E 89.78 FF,
THENCE S 36 DG E 565.06 FT TO
POB. WD 1026-1566, WD 1046-
1084.
Name in which assessed: KELLY D.
DELONG
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 25th day
of January, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
, a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate. in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32Q56, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04536613
December 16, 23, 30, 2009
January 6, 2010


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 1128
,,Year of Issuance: 2007, ,
Description of Property: SEC 13
TWN 7S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 04193-003
E 1/2 OF E 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF NE.
1/4
Name in which assessed: MICHAEL
MALDONADO & LISA AVALOS
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 25th day
of January, 2010, at ll;00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the.
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired dall (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04536599
December 16, 23, 30, 2009
January 6, 2010


NOTICE OF BOARD MEETING
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
The District Board of Trustees, Lake
City Community College, will hold a
public meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tues-
day, January 12, 2010, in the Board
Room of the Administration Build-
ing, '(Building 001) of Lake City
Community College.
Topics of consideration will be rou-
tine college business. Any person
wishing to be heard on any agenda
matter will be provided an opportu-
nity to do so by appearing before the
Board in the Board Room of the Ad-
ministration Building of Lake City
Community College.
All objections to this notice and pro-
priety of the scheduled meeting
should be filed with Lake City Com-
munity College prior to noon, Fri-
day, January 8, 2010. All legal is-
sues should be brought to the Trust-
ees' attention and an attempt made to
resolve them prior to the meeting.
Please notify the President's Office
immediately if you require accom-
modation for' participation, in the
meeting.
A reception will be held at 3:30 p.m.
in the lobby of the Administration
Building prior to the regular Board
meeting.

04536716
December 30, 2009
Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 01/12/2010
Time: 8:00 A.M.
1991 Dodge
Vin # 1B7GG26Y5MS323991
1980 Dodge Country Squire Motor
Home
Vin # F44CT9V706513
1997 Saturn
Vin # 1G8ZK5270VZ165214
1994 Cadillac
Vin # 1G6KD52B4RU253940
04536861
December 30, 2009


Legal

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Anna
Fertic Foundation of the following
certificate has filed said certificate
for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of
issuance, the description of the prop-
erty and name'.in which it was as-
sessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 29
Year of Issuance: 2002
Description of Property: SEC 24
TWN 3S RNG 15 PARCEL NUM-
BER 00188-001 & 00188-005
COMM SE COR OF SEC, RUN W
2651.17 FT FOR POB, RUN N 1500
FT, W 623.80 FF, S 1500 FEET TO
S LINE OF SEC, RUN E ALONG S
LINE TO POB. ORB 772-506.
JOINS 00214-000.
Name in which assessed: TLC MIN-
ISTRIES
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 25th day
of January, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04536598
December 16, 23, 30, 2009
January 6, 2010

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 193 .
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 00
TWN 00 RNG 00 PARCEL NUM-
BER 00961-000 LOT 50, 51, 52 &
53 UNIT 17 THREE RIVERS ES-
TATES.
Name in which assessed: WILLIAM
STEWART
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday' the 25th day
of January, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this .proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance., Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box'1569,
Lake City, FL32056, 2056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04536612
December 16, 23, 30, 2009
January 6, 2010


020 Lost & Found

LOST LARGE men's gold brace-
let on December 22 -23,2009.
REWARD $300.00.
Please call 386-755-7145.

100 n Job
100 Opportunities

04535969
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY,
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
Mechanic II applications. Pri-
mary responsibility is skilled
mechanical work in maintence
& repair on automotive, drag-
lines, trucks, tractors, graders,
bulldozers, front-end loaders,
fire & rescue vehicles & other
construction & maintence equip-
ment. Includes both gasoline &
diesel fueled apparatus. Min. re-
quirements: High School Diplo-
ma/GED, & 2 years jourenymen
level experience in automotive
mechanics, or graduation from
an approved course in the trade,
or equivalent combination of
training & experience. Valid FL
CDL Class B License required
w/in first ninety days of initial
employment. Salary if $11.59
per hr. plus benefits. Successful
applicant must pass pre-employ-
ment physical & drug screening.
Applications may be obtained at
Human Resources Office,
Board of County
Commissioners,
135 NE Hemando, #203, Lake
City, FL 32055, (386)719-2025,
TDD (386)758-2139 or online at
www.columbiacountvfla.com,.
Deadline: 01/08/10.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.


Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.


100 Job
100 Opportunities
PT ScienceTeacher needed for
private Christian School
BA required
Fax resume to: 386-755-3609

120 Medical
120 Employment

04536765
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. - 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills.
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/
Drug Free Workplace
Apply .in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 SW McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

DENTAL ASSISTANT needed
F/T position Mon - Fri 9-5.
Salary based on experience.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3122

Dietician/nutritionist needed F/T
for new weight management
program in medical practice.
Fax resumes to 386-755-6828.

240 Schools &
240 Education

04536763.
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
SContinuing education

Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE! Adorable Boxer/Am Bull-
dog mix 5 month old puppy. Neu-
tered, all shots, some supplies.
LOVES 'to play. 36-344-7999

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

ROPER Washer (3.2 cu.) & Dryer
(6.5 cu. ft.)
Set. Good cofidition.
$275 OBO. 386-867-1106

4 10 Lawn & Garden
41- Equipment

New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315 �


420. Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

We Buy Junk: cars, trucks,
tractors, trailers, scrap metal,
AC's and batteries. NO MH's
Call 386-965-1423 or 365-4879


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

ESTATE SALE: Queen'size ad-
justa-magic, elec. bed w/brass
'headboard, sofa,, lamps, end tables
& occasional table, 2 dble beds,
cedar chest. 386-752-3165

450 Good Things
to Eat

PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420

The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

f630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 security deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243


Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in
Branford area. $650.mo.
386-5.90-0642 or 867-1833
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
. from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
VERY CLEAN 2b/2ba. Covered
patio, front & back. No pets. State
Rd 100 @ Union County line.
$600 month. Call 904-966-0765.
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830

640/. Mobile Homes
for Sale

FORECLOSURE - 4 Bedroom
on Half Acre. $3000 down, $500.
mo. Call Jared @ 38.6-719-5560
jmmartin23@yahoo.com
We will build and Beat any
MODULAR Floor Plan!
Have two with land included.
Save $$$ Thousands.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm.martin23@yahoo.com
1999 Repo. Great Shape 24X48
3br Doublewide Set-up oni
your land. $21,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
FOR SALE
2001 28X40 on 1 acre. $59,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jmmartin23@yahoo.com
Palm Harbor-Foreclosures,
Dealer Repo's and short sales.
Never lived in! 4/2
On your property.Financing
Avail, up to $94k off
1-800-622-2832

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land

1800 s.f. .Man. Home, 4bd/2ba,
plus retreat/office. 2 porches,
walks, concrete foundation, appli.,
plywood w/ ceramic floors, metal
roof, 5 acres, comer lot (treed).
Horses ok, Call Gary Hamilton
(386) 758-9824. Poss. owner
finance. $119K.
Owner Financing. Large. MH
w/3.32 'acres South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590-0642/867-1833

'710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423





2br Apt. in town.
Great location.
$500. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
2BR/1.5BA DUPLEX w/garage.
Luxury Apt. 5 min from VA
Hospital and Timco.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D'
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
Ig master br, very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, lv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.


Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled , 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Studios & IBr's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
A& fresh paint. Excellent location.
.From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Country Living. Furnished Effi-
ciency Park Model Trailers. $500
per month all utilities provided.
Call 386-961-8540/386-755-4945
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax

730\ Unfurnished
Home For Rent
3br/lba house. CH/A, All appli-
ances, $750.mo. 1st, last & sec.
141 NE Montrose Ave.
(386)697-8893 or (305)962-2666
3BR/2BA BRICK Home
in town. $850/mo.
$500. security deposit.
386-365-8721





\I


BU IT



SELL I


h�Lll













Classified Department: 755-5440

7 Unfurnished
JV Home For Rent
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
Owner Financing 3br/lba near
elementary school in LC.
Small down $575. mo.
386-867-1833 or 590-0642
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
7 740 Furnished
4tU Homes for Rent
1600 sq. ft. 2/1 Furnished house in
town. Near duck pond. Remodled,
beautiful hardwood/ceremic floors.
$950/month + sec. No pets.
Includes lawn service. 961-8788.
7' : Business &
750 Office Rentals
For Rent. 24X30 storgae bldg. lo-
cated off US 90 behind "Right way
Automotive". $250. mo. has elec.
but for storage only. 386-755-2475
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135

770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$1000 mo, $1000 dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm


St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
*. custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
S' tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
- , formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
. the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

820 Farms&
2 O Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, 'septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.

In Print,

2007 Dodge Online
Caravan
13,200 miles 1 LOW
$16,500

(386)965-3075 Price!

Mor Dtais al


All You Can Eat Finger Food Buffet * Party F
Toast at Midnight * Cash Bar
Stay the night in a cabin, Start 2010 at
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
"S3^2 ~ - "^l" !W 'L J


ADVERTISE YOUR

Job Opportunities in the

Lake City Reporter

Classifieds.

Enhance Your Ad with

Your Individual Logo

For just pennies a day.

Call today,

755-5440.

Lae City Rporte








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2009


Oil Chonge


I


WI'!

i


Silverado 1500 Ext Cab
2 Wheel Drive ,
s389mo.
Plus tax, tag,
0% for 72
monti ' W

[ . ...

T UF '..^p0


I'l I I


NEW 2009 NEW 2010
Anthlok brake, lot" st m
*Nlaam" uaal.SS Nlssan * iemraS
$15,335
-"$2,336 For details see
S $4 ~fltII$ one of our'
12,9 I 99 consultants at the dealership -



-$3,739
$1,386
' New 0 iNrossan

AIUma Loaded
rND = 21570o
-RSF*9,-


2010 rrsu.
Chevron ALL o
0%fr .7IDILAZ rs. ourin
' gt, '"v '-. $40,08
$219mo 37 0
Plus tax, tag, tite d 1 I8

2 q44 ;, A :#MIRM*
2007 ACURA TSX W/NAVIGATION ...................$19,974 :2008 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS.............................. $10,893
2006 CADILLAC 'CTS 3.6L.............................$14,178 :2007 KIA SEDONA...... .............................$10,584
2009 CADILLAC XLR.............. ................... $73,055: 2007 MAZDA CX-9 TOURING............................$21,004
2009 CHEVROLET COBALT LT..........................$11,956: 2007 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS GS..............$9,988
2008 CHEVROLET COBALT LT............................... $8,988 :2004 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS PRESIDENTIAL.$7,782
2006 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT...........................$10,948 :2007 NISSAN 350Z TOURING...... ..............$23,212


CHEVROLET HHR LT.............................,$13,894
CHEVROLET IMPALA LT...........................$13,999:
CHEVROLET SILVERADO........................$23,615:
CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 LS................ $8,898:
CHEVROLET TAHOE LT..........................$23,467
FORD EDGE LIMITED................................$31,872
FORD ESCAPE LIMITED............. .............$13,21'5 :
FORD F-350 LARIAT4X4........................... $18,369
FORD FOCUS SES.............................$11,558
FORD FUSION HYBRID.........................$27,757"
GMC SIERRA 1500...................................$8,011
HONDA CIVIC EX.......... .......................$11,873:
HONDA CIVIC LX........................................$7,871
HONDA CR-V EX-L.............................$21,193
HONDA CR-V LX......................................... $7,445
HONDA RIDGELINE RTX 4X4..................$20,961


2009
2006
2006
2009
2008
2007
2007
2006
2008
2007
2007
2006
2008
2008
2006
2007


NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN
NISSAN


370Z TOURING...........................$27,530
ALTIMA 2.5 S............................ $11,153
ALTIMA 2.5 S............................. $11,968
ARMADA SE.............................$29,775
ARMADA SE,...............................$25,365
FRONTIER SE........................�.... $15,985
MAXIMA 3.5 SL.......................... $17,994
PATHFINDER W/ 3RD ROW..........$14,784
TITAN LE 4X4.............................$25,771
TITAN SE.................................$14,499


ng
5
0
5


NISSAN VERSA S..................................$11,475
PONTIAC G6 GTP....................................... $9,643
PONTIAC TORRENT.............................$12,325
SUZUKI SX4 SPORT................................,$11,967
TOYOTA 4RUNNER LIMITED.....................$21,946
TOYOTA CAMRY HYBRID.........................$17,704


OUNTREE MOORE
4316 W Hwy 90, Lake City, FL

752-5050 * 752-6933


wV-r-


FBI


ND
lIT


I y

I
I


201


STK10C9199


fLvrolet
Impalas
$6,500
0 FF


2009
2009
2008
2002
2007
2010
2006
2005
2008
2010
2003
2006
S2004
2008
2002
2007


Classified Department: 755-5440


ovo�


A




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ELA3PRNMR_V11AFJ INGEST_TIME 2011-05-16T20:49:51Z PACKAGE UF00028308_01130
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES