Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text











Limoo000021 120110 ****3-DIGIT 32
Lf LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
d~flt~l1' ev~x 117007
de oIo205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
.4_ - GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


rioriaa mai
beyond fo, a, Yvn
State, 3A





Lake


Business, 5A


City


About face
Meyer opts for leave of
absence, expected to
return for 2010 season
Sports, I B






Reporter


Tuesday, December 29, 2009 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 135, No. 296 - 75 cents


Stressing safety


Brandi O'Neal (center) and her daughter, Cassidy, 2, push Kailie, 4, on her bike'Monday afternoon in the parking lot of First
United Methodist Church. 'As a mother, I would feel much more comfortable about having a helmet protecting her head,'
Brandi O'Neal said. 'And she likes to wear the helmetbecause it has Barbie onit' ," .


Helmets vital for bicycles, skateboards

From staff reports .


Many chil-
dren
will roll
through
the final
week of their Christmas
holiday on new bicycles,
scooters, skateboards
and roller blades - shiny
gifts of speed that provide
newfound freedom and
mobility.
With these come the
responsibility of safety to
ensure a wonderful holiday
memory doesn't turn into
an unfortunate trip to the
emergency room.
According to bicycle
safety statistics, in the U.S.,
approximately 300,000
children under the age of
14 are injured in bicycle
crashes each year and
require emergency medical
attention. Many of these
incidents occur imme-
diately after Christmas,
when the collection of new
bicycles on the streets is
greatest.
Since 2001, averages
show that between 125 and
150 children die in bicycle-
related injuries each year
in the U.S. and nearly half
of these are from traumatic


Lauren Wilson, 8, rides her. bicycle on a street in Lake City. With many children riding new bicy-
cles, scooters, roller blades and skateboards after Christmas, the Florida Highway Patrol urges
parents to follow bicycle helmet laws in the state and teach their children about safe operation.


brain injuries.
Most bicycle accidents
of any kind occur within
1 mile of a person's resi-
dence.
'The studies show with-
out a doubt that wearing
a bicycle helmet definitely


reduces the risk for any
kind of head injury or
concussion," said Lt. Pat
Riordan of the Florida
Highway Patrol.
Many serious injury
crashes involving children
without bicycle.helmets


occur in slow-speed topples
where children are thrown
from their bicycles and
hit their head on. the pave-
ment, according to reports.
According to Florida
SAFETY continued on 3A


Bed tax increase

beneficialto

local tourism


A 1 percent tax
increase will go
into effect April 1.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County officials.
have adopted a 1 percent
bed tax increase, a move,
which is expected to be
beneficial to the county and
its Tourist Develdpment
Council.
The 1 percent bed tax
increase will become effec- "
tive April 1, 2010. Earlier
this year, 'the Tourist
Development Council unan-
imously adopted the pro-
posed bed tax increase.
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council direc-
tor Harvey Campbell said
increasing the bed tax will
be a two-fold benefit for the
county.
The increase from the
bed tax is expected to gener-
ate approximately $180,000
more than last year's bed
tax. 'Last year the Columbia
County bed tax generated
$370,000-$380,000. The rev-
enues from this year's bed
tax increase will be split
equally among the TDC and
the county commission.
"Half of the increased
revenue will be going to
help landscape at-parks and
maintaining the Southside
Sports Complex and the


other half is to- enhance
the marketing programs of
the TDC for advertising,"
Campbell said.
Although the increase
takes place April 1, the
Tourist Development
Council is not expecting to
. see any of
* .. - the �fund-
"ing until
mid-year or
July.
"Iunty," Campbell s typi-
cally three
m not play mucn t h sof a
Campbell bet ween
the time it's
collected and the time second
remitted back to Columbia
County," Campbell said. "Iwas


factor in our budget for the
current fiscal year, but it
certainly willbe beneficial
for us starting the second
half of next year."
In 1991 the Columbia
County bed . tax was
increased from 2 percent to
3 percent. But, by August
of 1994 the bed tax was
decreased to 2 percent.
"'It decreased because at
that time Columbia County
had just added the seven
penny to the local sales tax
and there was concern that
a double-digit tax would be
detrimental to the lodging.
TAX continued on 3A


SRWMD changes

focus on water

conservation


New restrictions
go into effect on
Jan. 6.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Suwannee River
Water Management District
is implementing voluntary
landscape irrigation restric-
tions for residents and busi-
nesses on Jan. 6.
The restrictions apply
to landscape irrigation
- such as lawns, plants,
shrubs - done by busi-
nesses and residents, said
Vanessa Fultz, business
resource specialist III for
the SRWMD. Farmers are
not affected by the rules.
Water conservation is


a statewide issue, and the
district is being proactive
by implementing the rule,.
Fultz said
"The main thing is we're
doing year-round irrigation
conservation measures just
to do our part to conserve,"
she said.
The SRWMD covers all or
parts of 15 counties includ-
ing Columbia, Gilchrist,
Hamilton and Suwannee.
This is the first year for a
a year-round conservation
rule, Fultz said. Previously,
voluntary restrictions
were only applied during a
drought.
Water users will be
allowed to set their own
schedules for the restiction.
WATER continued on 3A


Better airport scanners delayed by privacy fears _? . U I


Technology only
used in about 19
U.S. airports.
By JOELLE TESSLER
and ARTHUR MAX
Associated Press Writers
WASHINGTON - High-
tech security scanners that
might have prevented the
Christmas Day attempt


S1 11


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


to blow up a jetliner have
been installed in only a
small number of airports
around the world, in large
part because of privacy
concerns over the way
the machines see through
clothing.
The body-scanning tech-
nology is in at least 19 U.S.
airports, while European
officials have generally lim-
ited it to test runs.


5733
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Umar Farouk
Abdulmutallab, the
Nigerian accused of trying
to ignite explosives aboard
a Northwest Airlines jet
as it was coming in for a
landing in Detroit, did not
go through such a scan
where his flight began,
at Amsterdam's Schiphol
airport.
The full-body scanner
"could have been help-


ful in this case, absolute-
ly," said Evert van Zwol,
head of the Dutch Pilots
Association.
But the technology
has raised significant
concerns among privacy
watchdogs because it can
show the body's contours
with embarrassing clarity.
Those fears have slowed
the introduction of. the
machines.


O pinion .......... .....
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .. . ...........


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A TSA employee directs a passenger through the scanner at
DFW Airport in Terminal D, in Fort Worth, Texas, on Monday.


TODAY IN
SCHOOL
I '..',ter;, artists.
Sof the month


COMING
WEDNESDAY
coIt ne.-'. front l the
1, 1cal linh sr,


.., " t " ' ' , I


-- - - 0 - I..,


r-i _ ,_


� ' -' _ . . '" � , � '7. " .; ,_. " " e:. ,,." .
















LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2009


Monday:
a 3. Afternoon: 4-5-2
'94,_ . Evening: 1-3-1


Monday:
Afternoon: 2-8-1-0
Evening: 6-2-6-4


F LO RID A

J43Y,


Saturday:
2-3-23-38-43-48
X3


.enamtch..
. Sunday:
2-8-18-28-32


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Gosselin's apartment'trashed over holidays


NEW YORK
on Gosselin's apartment was
ransacked by someone who
slashed furniture, stole his,
TV and left a note pinned to
his dresser with a butcher
knife while he visited his chil-
dren for Christmas, his lawyer said
Sunday.
The reality show star was "devas-
tated" by the destruction he found
when he returned Saturday from
Pennsylvania, attorney Mark Jay
Heller said in a statement.
Gosselin's clothes, bed and other
furniture were cut up, and a fam-
ily-heirloom vase was shattered,
Heller said. His TV, other electron-
ics and his dishes were taken by a
"very troubled and sick perpetrator,"
Heller said.
He wouldn't disclose who signed
the note or what it said, adding that
police were examining it. Police
declined to comment.
The burglary marksthe latest
real-life drama for the 32-year-old
Gosselin, who was half of the couple
who rose to fame as the prolific par-
ents of TLC's "Jon & Kate Plus 8"
before splitting up this year.

Nelly offers reward in
burglary of his home
ST. LOUIS - The rapper Nelly
is offering a $10,000 reward for
information leading to the arrest of
the man who broke
into his suburban St.
Louis hoithe earlier
this month.
Someone forced
his way through a
locked window at
Nelly's Wildwood
Nelly home in the early
hours of Dec. 11 and got away with a
duffel bag full of items that included
electronics and other goods.
Nelly, whose real name is Cqrnell
Haynes Jr., was hot home at the !


. . . AsulrAI u rEa'
This Oct. 26, file photo shows Jon Gosselin after he exited the Montgomery County
courthouse in Norristown, Pa. ,


time. Police say one of three occu-
pants saw and confronted the. intrud-
er, a male in his 20s or 30s.

Charlie Sheen accused
of using weapon
- ASPEN, Colo. - Authorities say
actor Charlie Sheen is accused of
using a weapon in an alleged case of
domestic violence in Aspen.'. .
Sheen spent part of Christmas
Day in jail. after
being arrested
at a home in the
Colorado ski resort
town.
Police spokes-
Woman Stephanie
Sheen a Dasaro did not pro-
Sheen vide details on what
kind of weapon Sheen is accused of
using.
Sheen also was arrested on inves-
tigation of second-degree assault, a
felony, and criminal mischief, a mis-
demeanor.
Sheen hasn't been charged and


was released Friday after posting 'an
$8,500. bond. Prosecutors will deter-.
mine whether to file charges.

Perry to take 'Madea'
play on the road
ATLANTA - Movie producer
and actor Tyler Perry says he is
taking his sharp-tongued character,
"Madea" back on tour.
. Perry posted a message on his
Web site Saturday that said he had
taken some time off in the past
few months "so I could spend my
mother's final days at her side." His
mother, Willie Maxine Perry, died
Dec. 8 at age 64.
Perry says he will begin tour-
ing with his new play, "Madea's
1.Big Happy Family," the iron-willed
Southern matriarch he portrays in a
wig and padded suit.,She is the cen-
tral character of many of his films,
including "Tyler Perry's Madea
Goes to Jail." Perry says he is eager
to have Madea on stage.
* Associated Press


SCelebrity Birthdays


* Actress Inga Swenson is
77.
* ABC newscaster Tom
Jarriel is 75.
* Actress Mary Tyler Moore
is 73.
* Actor Jon Voight is 71.
* Country singer Ed Bruce
is 70.
* Rock musician Ray
Thomas is 68.
* Singer Marianne Faithfull


* Actor Ted Danson is 62.
* Actor Jon Polito is 59.
* Singer-actress Yvonne
Elliman is 58.
* Actress Patricia Clarkson
is 50.
* Comedian Paula
Poundstone is 50.
* Actor-comedian Mystro
Clark is 43.
* Actor Jude Law is 37.
* Actor Mekhi Phifer is 35.
J Actor Diego Luna is 30.


Daily Scripture

"Come to me, all you who are
weary and burdened, and I will
give you rest."
- Matthew 11:28
Thought for Today
"The wise man must be wise
before, not after."
- Epicharmus,
SSicilian Greek comic poet (? - c,450 B.C.)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US .CLASSIFIED
Main number.......(386) 752-1293 To place a classified ad, call 755-5440,
Fax number .............752-9400 BUSINESS
Circulatio ............755-5445 U 'SS '
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com ' Controller Sue. Brannon... .754-0419
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of (sbrannon@aecityreporte.cor)
Community:Newspapers Inc., is pub-, CIRCULATION " C 'R epo
lished Tuesday through Sunday at. 180 . Home delivery of the Lake City Reporer
E. DuVal St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. should be completed by 6 30 a.mw
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. Tuesday through Saturday. and by 7 30
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and am. on Sunday. f "
The Associated Press. . _. . ,


All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
-in 'part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you Pave a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295. .
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakedfityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland . .754-0417
(lstickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Please can 3B8,7a-54. to, report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters. .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter:com).
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks........ ...... ......$48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates.
12 Weeks.............. $41.40
24 Weeks .................... $82.80
52 Weeks....................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact.in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Janitor lands
Olympic gig
NEW SMYRNA BEACH
- Tony Hamilton, 57, a
New Smyrna Beach jani-
tor is headed to the 2010
Olympic Games.
Hamilton won't be
competing in Vancouver,
hell be helping clean '
up. Hamilton has been
selected as one of eight
housekeeping supervisors
who will oversee cleaning
.crews working in athletes'
rooms.
Hamilton says he thinks
the gig is a "great opportu-
nity." He'll be taking three
months off his regular job
at the Bert Fish Medical
Center to attend the
Vancouver Games.

Agent arrested
after standoff
WEST PALM BEACH
- Authorities say a U.S.
Border Patrol agent
remains hospitalized after
a weekend standoff with
sheriff's deputies in Palm
Beach County.
Luis Paul Rodriguez, 52,
was arrested early Sunday
morning at his suburban
West Palm Beach home.
Authorities say a
domestic dispute between
Rodriguez and his wife
escalated into an armed
standoff that ended with
Rodriguez being shot by
a sheriff's deputy with a
non-lethal weapon.
They say Rodriguez
pointed a gun at deputies.

Endangered birds
learn to migrate
OCALA - Twenty
endangered birds are
learning how to migrate to
Florida.
Operation Migration
pilots in ultralight aircraft
have been leading whoop-
ing crane chicks from
Necedah, Wis., since Oct.
16. Half the chicks will end
their flight at St. Marks


SUNNY



HI 57O 33


, s MOSTLY MOSTLY
" SUNNY I SUNNY


HI 56L031 H1491026


* I . I ' I : ; :. I� . I :


Ready to rumble
In this photo taken on Dec. 7, William 'Bud' Hallman wrestles
a steer as he practices at his ranch in Webster. Hallman,
56, a Circuit Court Judge in Sumter County, has qualified for
the Dodge National Circuit Rodeo Finals in steer wrestling in
Pocatello, Idaho on April 7-10, 2010.


National Wildlife Refuge
in the Florida Panhandle.
The other half will stop
at the Chassahowitzka
National Wildlife Refuge in
central Florida.
In the spring, the birds
will return north on their
own.

Charges pending
in fatal collision
TAVARES - Florida
Highway Patrol says
charges are pending after
a collision with a fire truck
killed a woman on the
Florida Turnpike.
According to FHP,
-Virginia Sellitto, 88, of
Titusville, was riding in a
car behind a fire truck on
the turnpike through Lake
County on Friday morn-
ing.
Witnesses told investi-
gators that the fire truck
abruptly slowed to make a
U-turn through the medi-
an. FHP says the truck
was responding to a call
for service.
Sellitto's car struck the
rear of the fire truck. At


least two other vehicles
then struck Sellitto's car.

Man shoots boy
with pellet gun
FORT PIERCE - A
.St. Lucie County man has
been accused of trying to
teach a boy a lesson by
shooting him with a pellet
gun.
According to a St. Lucie
County Sheriff's Office
arrest report, Christopher
Fred Cady, 39, shot the
boy in the chest with the
pellet gun, a Christmas
gift, after the child shot
an autistic cousin with the
gun.
Cady reportedly was try-
ing to show the boy that
getting shot with a pellet
gun can hurt.
According to online
records, Cady was booked
into St. Lucie County jail
Friday. He was charged
with cruelty toward child
without great harm and
was being held on $500
bond. It's unclear if he
already has an attorney.
* Associated Press


Tallahassee*
� . .: "56/33 ,,
Pensacola 5/
54/39 Panaama Cy
56/39


* Valdosta
55/33
Lake City
57/33
" Gainesville .
,57/35
Ocala
58/36

Tampa' .
60/44/


FtL Mye
65/46


*


Jacksonville
,55/36 .
-\ . , ,'.


City Wednesday
Cape Canaveral 1,'57, pc
Daytona Beach .68/54/pc


D -na Bea Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach' Ft
5943 ,Fort Myers
3* Gainesville
0 * Jacksonville
Orlan4o Cape Canaveral Key West
61/44 62/49 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
67/56 * Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
,. 68/59 0 Pensacola
Naples * Tallahassee
65/48 Miami Tampa


S6/59 Valdosta
6Key West -, W. Palm Beach
74/67


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high.
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


59
37
66
43
82 in 1942
24 in 1925


0.00"
2.72"
46.90"
2.26"
48.06"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tornm.


7:26 a.m.
5:40 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
5:40 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 3:3i p.m.
Moonset today 5:11 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 4:35 p.m.
Moonset tom. 6:16 a.m.


Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
31 7 15 23
Full Last New First


1'_h___ - ,J ,


7a lp
Tuesday


7p dnesday 6a
Wednesday


- For.csteitemrpaen * "Feds ite temperabe


W F.


On this date in
1989, half a
dozen cities in the
northeastern U.S.
reported record low
temperatures for
the date, including
Elkins, W. Va. with
a reading of 13
degrees below zero.


4
MODERJEm
45 nitesto 1bm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


76/66/pc
76/58/pc
66/49/pc
63/48/pc
76/66/s
64/46/pc
76/65/pc
76/60/pc
68/49/pc
72/53/pc
58/50/sh
57/50/r
59/42/c
71/57/pc
58/40/r
75/63/pc


Thursday
76, 58, sn
76/52/pc
80/65/pc
79/59/sh
71/46/sh
68/46/sh
80/71/t
,69/43/sh
80/66/pc
79/63/pc
73/49/sh
78/54/pc
64/45/sh
64/40/sh
67/40/sh
. 75/57/sh
. 67/40/sh
79/64/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


-. . . Forecasts, data and graph-
S" Ics @ 2009 Weather Central
, LLC, Madison, Wis.
\ -r www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected


I


0 WED'ESlJA


THRSA


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


RDAY


KE' CITY ALMANAC













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2009


Manatee Co. man's

devotion to wife

seems limitless


By BILLY COX
Sarasota Herald Tribune
SARASOTA - When
their fears were confirmed
and Phyllis DeSofi was
given a diagnosis in 1980 of
progressive multiple scle-
rosis, husband Oliver knew
what he had to do. Banking
memories was at the top of
the list
They had always enjoyed
traveling, at home and
abroad. Now, there would
.be no "golden years" retire-
ment adventures in their
future. In 1982, they start-
ed taking trips around the
world. By 1984, their quest
to visit every state in the
union was on.
Phyllis was still ambula-
tory then; the worst was
years' away. When, they
moved to Manatee County
in 1983, Oliver built a house
for the day her feet would
surrender to wheels.
Her, deterioration
descended as anticipat-
ed, in slow but decisive
increments. She lost her
mobility in 1992. The next
year 'she lost her. bladder
control. By 2005 she was
unable to speak. But every
setback provoked a coun-
termove, each designed to
keep Phyllis from relaying
the message Oliver knows
would crush him: "I want
to die."
So here's the scene today,
inside a home where the tem-
perature is always 82 degrees
and the humidity hovers at a
comfortable 50 percent'
' Phyllis is 67 years old,
weighs 90 pounds, and
is paralyzed. Neither her
nurse nor her neurologist
have ever seen her with a
bedsore. Her bed faces a
big-screen TV, but just as
important are the surveil-
lance monitors allowing her
to see outside. Oliver wired
each door and window to


an audio motion-sensor that
announces all movement in
the house.
Oliver is 79 and trying
to keep the weight off.
After a heart attack in 2008
informed him he needed to
make more adjustments, he
installed a portable electric
ceiling lift to hoist her out
of bed without strain. He
put a 24-hour camera in the
bedroom to review record-
ings of his own home-care
performance, just in case
something goes wrong.
Things can always go
wrong. That's why Oliver
bought a backup generator.
And the inflatable, boat in
the garage, in case all hell
breaks loose.
But the six hours or so he
spends grooming her each
day, feeding her, medicating
her, checking her urine for
infection those are check-
lists for survival, not living.
"I remember when my
dad called me from the air-
port one day and he said
listen, I'm recording planes
taking off,'" said their daugh-
ter, Kerri Hansen. "I said,
You're doing what? Why?"'
Because her mom and
dad still take flights of fan-
tasy, which are incomplete
without sound effects.
When the DeSofis trav-
el today, it starts with the
boarding passes Oliver
saved from years ago. He
narrates their way through
security and pre-flight
announcements.
With jet engines whirring
in the background, he pulls
out the menus from their
trans-Atlantic journeys and
serves up typical fare he
prepared himself: a glass of
champagne, maybe, smoked
salmon with capers, onions,
sour cream and sliced hard-
boiled egg on rye bread.
Coffee ice cream for des-
sert. And a James Bond
movie or two.


WATER: Restrictions
Continued From Page 1A


After Daylight Savings
Time begins on the second
Sunday in March, irriga-
tion.can take place two days
per week. When Daylight
Savings Time ends in
November, residents can
only water one day per
week. Irrigation should not
occur between 10 a.m. and
4 p.m., the time when most
water is evaporated, Fultz
said.
Anyone who wants to
deviate from the water con-
servation rule must apply
for a water use permit,
which includes paying a
fee.
Fines will not be issued
for the restrictions at this


point, Fultz said. In. the
future, the district will
encourage and work with
local governments to adopt
an ordinance reflecting the
rules.
"The district believes this
in a step in the right direc-
tor for water conservation,"
she said.
Visit the district's Web
site to view the new rules at
www.mysuwanneerivercom/
rulesandregs and click on
40B-2. For more informa-
tion contact Linda Welch,
rules coordinator, at (386)
362-1001.
"We're counting on peo-
ple to 'do the right thing,"
Fultz said.


Retiring after 31 years on the job
In a Wednesday photo, Jim Burkhart, a ranger at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge,
stands near a new concession building and environmental education classroom. He is retiring
Jan. 2 after more than 31 years at the refuge


SAFETM Helmets not optional for kids


Continued From Page 1A
statutes, children under the
age of 16 must wear a hel-
met that meets national safe-
ty standards when they are
riding on public roadways.
"It's not optional for
kids," Riordan said. "If they
ride on a street or public
roadway, it's Florida law
that they must wear a
helmet."
Helmets must fit prop-
erly and sit square on the
top of the head without
tilting to help protect the
forehead.
The Florida Bicycle


Association recommends
that adults who ride with.
their children also wear
helmets to help promote
safety and set an example.
"There is plenty of safety
equipment available,"
Riordan said. 'There are a
.lot of different styles and.
colors our there. Let your'
kids pick out the helmet
they want. If they find the
color they like, they will
wear it. Parents have to
take the responsibility, use
good judgment and be
proactive."


Six out of every 10 skate-
board injuries are suffered
by children under, the age
of 15, according to the
Consumer Product Safety
Commission. Helmets,
Riordan said, are always a
good idea for skateboard-
ers, foot-powered scooter
riders, and rollerblade
enthusiasts, but current
Florida law only has' guide-
lines for bicycle riding.
"I would urge parents to
research the various safety
equipment available for their
children," Riordan said.


I


TAX
Continued From Page 1A
industry," Campbell said,
noting there was a fear peo-
ple would go elsewhere if
they were paying 10 percent
tax here. "Since then that
has changed .dramatically.
We are the only county in
the state that lowered its
bed tax."
'i ne local bed tax increase
only brings Columbia
County on par with other
surrounding counties. The
bed tax in Hamilton County,
is 3 percent, in Lowndes
County, Ga., (Valdosta) it's
5 percent and in Alachua
County it's 3 percent.
Alachua County is con-
sidering increasing its bed
tax by 4 or 5 percent in'
January.
Campbell said the tax will
increase local hotel room
costs by a penny per dollar
to visitors.
Campbell said last year
the Southside Recreation
Complex hosted approx-
imately 25 sports
tournaments.
"We already have that
many booked for the first
half of next year," he said.
"We did all that from word-
of-mouth without any paid
advertising. Now we'P
be able to do some paia
advertising and secondly,
we'll be able to do tdlevi-
sion and radio advertis-
ing that the budget just
didn't allow us to do in
the past."


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THE GIFT OF KNOWLEDGE

. This holiday season, give a friend or loved
one such a special gift.
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Everything that happens in Lake City and
Columbia County will be placed in their
hands every morning.

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Limited time offer. Call today!

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Dr. Jerry Register, Chiropractic Physician,
Is Now Accepting AV-M ED Insurance
Most insurances accepted - BCBS
Medicare, United Health Care, Cigna,
Workers Comp and Personal Injury
Call to inquire if your insurance covers our care
(386)755-4379
Dr Register is celebrating
29 years of practice in 2010.


Columbia County
Industrial Development

Authority Meeting
Date: Wednesday, January 6, 2010
L Time: 8:30am
Location: Lake Shore Hospital Authority
Administrative Complex Meeting Room
259 NE Franklin St., Lake City



TheKids Putch


SCoigC. .. . h -T s


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


_6 D ,/ r


T


















OPINION


Tuesday, December 29, 2009


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


$290 B

only buys

6 weeks

A s one of its very last
acts of the year, the
Senate voted to raise
the ceiling on how
S much money the
Treasury can borrow by $290
billion to $12.4 trillion.
The increase sounds like
a lot but actually it's not. The
increased borrowing author-
ity will only last until mid-
February and, in fact, the
Senate is scheduled'to vote on
another increase Jan. 20. Had
the Senate not acted, Treasury
would have hit the limit on New
Year's Eve.
The regular increase in the
debt is always an occasion for
political fun and games but
failure to increase the limit
could put the U.S. government
in technical default on its many
financial obligations. No one
quite knows what would hap-
pen in technical default and no
responsible lawmaker wants to
find out.
The Democrats had planned
on an increase of $2 trillion
and may yet try again. That
amount would have postponed
the next increase in the limit.
until after the November con-
gressional elections but the
Republicans quite naturally
balked. Increasing the debt
limit is always an opportunity
to dramatize the other party's
profligacy.
The Senate vote was 60 to
39, and, with two exceptions, it
broke exactly along party lines
with the Republicans voting no.
While the Republicans derided
the bill, as the Associated Press
pointed out, "they routinely
supplied votes for eight previ-
ous increases totaling $5.4 tril-
lion under President George W.
Bush."
Various lawmakers are.
vowing to use future votes
on raising the debt ceiling to
enact deficit-fighting measures.
Following a year in which the
government went a scary $1.4
trillion into the red to halt a
financial meltdown that would
be an excellent idea.
* Scripps Howard News Service
HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, Dec.
29, the 363rd day of 2009.
There are 2 days left in the
year.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished ,with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Internet tool for turning out terrorists


Want to learn how
to build some-
thing destruc-
tive like a bomb,
steal something,
cheat somebody or buy some-
thing dangerous or become a
terrorist? It's easy. Just turn on
your computer.
There is ample evidence to
back up those who contend that
the Internet is a major contribu-
tor to the terrorist movement,
linking impressionable young
� men and women on the cusp of
radicalization with those already
there and increasing the possi-
bility of them ultimately turning
into everyone's worst nightmare
- the free lancer who is dif-
ficult to discover until it is too
late.
The air disaster averted
over Detroit the other day, the
arrest of five young Americans
from Virginia who had gone to
Pakistan apparently to launch
their own jihadist careers, and
the Army psychiatrist who mur-
dered 13 and wounded many
more at Ft. Hood, Texas, are
examples of the reach of those
who use cyberspace to enhance
recruitment to their causes.
Before the pervasiveness of the
worldwide net, susceptibility to
violent ideology was hindered
by isolation and lack of commu-
nication. Now one seeking sup-
port for such activity need only
turn to the computer to discover
thousands who are like minded.
In addition to the persuasive-
ness of those who preach vio-.
lence as a legitimate religious
expression, the knowledge that
you are not alone in your radi-
cal positions creates an illusion
that in fact you are a member
of a very large army. That many
people couldn't be wrong.
The wealthy son of a Nigerian
banker thus became so increas-


Dan K.Thomasson
ingly dangerous that his family's
growing alarm caused his father
to warn U.S. authorities. He
,was placed on a watch list with
a half million others yet he was
able to board a U.S. airliner in
Amsterdam carrying explosive
material that could have killed
nearly 300 aboard had it not
been for the quick action of a
Dutch passenger who jumped
him. It is unclear whether the
Nigerian terrorist had received
bomb instruction over the
Internet or firsthand in Yemen
as he told authorities.
The shooter at Ft. Hood
was in touch repeatedly with
a radical imam in Yemen. The
Nigerian apparently also had
connections in Yemen where his
mother was born. The young
college-age men in Virginia
obviously were part of the
Internet recruitment efforts of
al-Qaeda. Their families also
had expressed concerns about
their beliefs.
While moderate Muslim
clerics and organizations
worry about how to curtail the
influence of the relatively few
extremists here who preach
jihad and condemn America's
efforts in the Middle East, there
is little that can be done about
the Internet and its reach under
this nation's Constitutional guar-
antees of free speech. Direct
calls for the violent overthrow
of the government can be pros-
ecuted but it is difficult unless
that exhortation results in


action or conspiracy to do so.
Obviously, the Internet isn't
the sole culprit in the radi-
calization of young Muslims.
There are extremists who move
around college campuses, lining
up converts among the more
socially isolated, which many
Muslims are. Efforts to reduce
the vulnerability of restless
Muslim youths are hindered by
the adventurous appeal of those
who misinterpret the Koran. But
certainly the Internet is at near-
ly ever youngster's fingertips
and most possesses skills and
a familiarity with its intricacies
that far surpass those charged
with debunking radical appeals.
Another disturbing factor is
the willingness of most young
people and many adults to
believe anything they read on
their computer screens, no
matter how outlandish. For
instance, scurrilous attacks on
Barack Obama's American citi-
zenship and alleged connections
to Islam have gained steady
currency among millions who
blithely pass them on as gospel.
No manner of evidence to the
contrary seems to satisfy them
about this or a half dozen other
allegations without foundation.
Is it any wonder then that
young men and women become
extremists, following claims that
must be true or they wouldn't
be on the screen? The other
day, I even was asked why I
had ignored the fact that Bush
administration agents had actu-
ally blown up a building during
9/11, another enduring Internet
myth. I replied my computer
was broken so I missed this
startling news.


* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


OTHER OPINION

Bypassing doctors, going direct to the lab


While Washington
is deep in the
throes of trying
to overhaul the
nation's health-
care system, another develop-
ment is fast gathering momen-
tum that shows the lawmakers
in many ways are pursuing a
moving target.
As Lee Bowman of Scripps
Howard News Service reports, a
growing number of Americans
are bypassing doctors and going
directly to online and storefront
labs for diagnostic testing. Most
often they pay for these tests
out of their own pocket. The
results may persuade the con-
sumer to pursue the matter fur-
ther with a personal physician
but, in any case, the consumer
is in charge of who sees the
results.
So far, the testing is generally
basic stuff - sex, drugs and
cholesterol - with sensitive


privacy issues. The labs can
test for STDs and paternity. Job
seekers can find out whether
they'll pass the pre-employ-
ment drug test many companies
demand. And the labs can test
the DNA of evidence brought in
by a suspicious spouse.
The name of one fast-growing
chain of walk-in labs encapsu-
lates the field's business model,
Any Lab Test Now. The com-
pany says it can generally have
testing results within 24 hours
and at a cost that is as much
as 80 percent less than going
through a doctor. The lab fran-
chises offer up to 1,500 tests,
from a simple cholesterol check
to more sophisticated packages
of tests that address complex
medical issues.
Medical testing is a $55 bil-
libn-a-year business and lab test-
ing sold directly to consumers
accounts for only $100 million
of that market, but it is set for


rapid expansion because of cost,
convenience and a growing
sense that people need to be
their own health advocates.
The medical profession views
this development with some
skepticism, fearing that con-
sumers will order the wrong
kinds of tests or misdiagnose
the results. Major physicians
organizations like the American
Medical Association have cau-
tioned against any kind of clini-
cal or genetic testing done with-
out a doctor's consultation.
There is no federal oversight
over medical testing other than
requiring that the labs that do
the actual testing for the store-
fronts be properly certified.
State regulations vary widely. As
so often happens, the consum-
ers seem to be far out in front of
the lawmakers and regulators.

* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


X w


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


Small towns:

Some things

change,

some won't
.".You've heard those
worn-out wise-
cracks about small
towns: "Don't blink
or you'll miss it"
And, "The town is so small, the
zip code is a decimal point"
And, "They're too small to
have a town drunk, so they all
take turns."
They grow old after a while.
But let me tell you: I've
worked at least temporarily in
about three dozen small towns
in four southern states, and
every one of them has some-
thing going for it. You might
not be able to see it; but some-
body does. That something
often is just one thing: it's
home. And home, especially at
this time of year, is where most
people want to be.
Just the other day, I was
shopping for a scarf - for my.
sister-in-law, not for me - in
one of those old Victorian
homes that somebody convert-
ed into a little restaurant and
shop that sells women's acces-
sories. It's in a town where'
most of the old businesses
have been shuttered for years.
The town council meets occa-
sionally, but mainly because
the town charter demands it.
Business is good, however, in
more specialized businesses
in or near town, including this .
charming restaurant.
The woman who waited
on me had grown up in this
town, but moved off up north
years ago. As retirement eased
closer, however, she wanted to
come home. And she did.
Thomas Wolfe said you-can't
go home again, but a lot of
small-town people are doing it
anyway. They're finding some
things changed, some things
just as they left them.
Some of the changes are
obvious. If the town has grown
at all, it probably has a newer,
bigger water tank that hasn't
been initialed like the old one.
One of those dollar stores has
opened up, and there's a strip
mall that includes a cleaners,
a nail salon and a Subway. A
Waffle House is just down the
road.
Other changes are less
obvious. The pool room has
closed, but visitors don't
notice because some guy who
carves wooden bears with a
chainsaw has set up shop out
front. The town grocery store
is struggling after a supermar-
ket opened a few miles away.
(You need to check the sell-by
date on the soda crackers.)
The locally owned hardware
store is gone, and so are the
men who sat around the stove
spitting tobacco juice at a sand-
filled box and missing, and tell-
ing the same stories they told
the week before.
But some small-town things
don't change. When somebody
dies or gets sick, food galore
appears miraculously. If your
car breaks down, somebody
will ask if he can help. If hay
is on the ground and rain is
coming, you can expect extra
hands in the field that day. If
the church folks are holding
a yard sale, they'll sell stuff
nobody will ever use.
It must be the things that
never change that make small-
town living so attractive. I
believe it's called being neigh-
borly.
And nobody can make fun of
a home like that.



















Report: Holiday sales better than expected LOCAL STOCKS


By MAE ANDERSON
AP Retail Writer

ATLANTA - Retailers
have thin inventories after
coming out of Christmas
with slightly better-than-
expected sales.
Some retailers kept inven-
tory so low they've had
to bring in new merchan-
dise to restock shelves, a
rare move this soon after
Christmas.
That's good news for their
bottom lines. But it means
slim pickings- for shoppers
hoping for after-Christmas
clearance sales. Shoppers
looking for big sales should
act quickly because there
are relatively few leftovers
to clear out.
"Retailers are much more
nimble this year," NPD ana-
lyst Marshal Cohen said.
'Their 'Plan B' is to have
new receipts at the ready."
Cohen said he noticed J.
Crew and Coach were two
that had restocked shelves
with new items last week.
Because their ordering was
in line with weak demand,'
retailers were able to sell
more items at higher prices,
which is critical to profits.
Last year, profits were ham-
mered by fire-sale discounts
to get rid of the excess.
"The latest holiday shop-
ping season wasn't a rip-roar-
ing success, butatleastitmet
or slightly exceeded expec-
tations," said John Lonski,
chief economist of Moody's
Capital Markets Research
Group. "Consumer spend-
ing is indeed in a recov-
ery mode, which brightens
prospects for 2010."
Spending rose 3.6 per-
cent in November and


In this Dec. 21 photo, sale signs are displayed inside a clothing store at the CambridgeSide
Galleria mall in Cambridge, Mass. Holiday shoppers spent a little more this season, according
to data released Monday, giving merchants some reason for cheer.


December, according to
MasterCard Advisors'.
SpendingPulse, which esti-
mates all forms of payment
including cash. Adjusted
for an extra shopping day
between Thanksgiving and
Christmas, the number was
closer to a 1 percent rise.
That was still better than
the flat sales analysts had
predicted.
Some retail stocks rose
on Monday. American
Eagle Outfitters shares
rose 48 cents, or 3 percent,
to $16.80 during midday
trading. Macy's Inc. shares
rose 39 cents to $17.96.
J.C. Penney shares rose 37
cents to $27.39.
Amazon.com Inc.'s
shares rose $2.23 to $140.70,


buoyed by SpendingPulse
numbers that showed online
sales rose 15.5 percent.
The Dow Jones U.S.
Retail Index edged up less.
than 1 percent.
After-Christmas traffic
also appeared to be relative-
ly robust, though it wasn't
clear how much people
were actually spending.
Roth Capital Partners
analyst -Elizabeth Pierce
visited six malls Saturday.
in southern California and
saw many shoppers without
bags. It's likely shoppers
who went looking for bar-
gains left without buying
much, she said.
Shoppers over the week-
end certainly focused on
deals.


BessieLylesofHuntsville,
Ala.', arrived at Lenox
Square Mall in Atlanta at
6 a.m. to hunt for deals. The
57-year-old left Macy's with
two tops, sweaters and two
pairs of jeans, including one
pair for $4, marked down
from $34.'
In order to entice shop-
pers like Lyles through
the rest of the week and
into January, retailers are
expected to steeply dis-
count what leftovers they
do have.
After last year's dismal
season, when unplanned
discounts 70 percent off or
more began appearing well
before Christmas, retailers
vowed they wouldn't get
caught that way again.


OBITUARIES


Mrs. Pamela K. "Pam"
Cribbs
Mrs. Pamela K. "Pam" Cribbs,
49, of Lake City went to be
with her Lord and Savior on
Friday, December 25, 2009
following a lengthy illness. A
native of Winchester, TN, Mrs.
Cribbs had been -a resident of
Lake City since 1998. She was
a travel agent for 16 years, loved
playing the piano at Hopeful
Baptist Church, was a home
school teacher for her children,
and loved her husband, children,
and family with unconditional
love. Mrs. Cribbs is survived
by her husband Rodney Cribbs;
two children, D.J. Cribbs' and
Callie Cribbs, all of Lake City;
mother and father, Lorene F. and
Donald R. Gregory of Decherd,
TN; brother and sister in law,
Philip and Brenda Gregory of
Murfreesboro, TN; grandmother,
Thelma Farris of Winchester,
TN; aunt and uncle, Martha and
Jess Voorhies of Winchester, TN.,
who were her loving caregivers.
Funeral services for Mrs. Cribbs
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday, December 30, 2009
at Hopeful Baptist Church with.
Dr. Rodney Baker officiating.
Interment will follow at Hopeful
Cemetery.. Visitation with the
family will be held from 5:00-
7:00 P.M. Tuesday evening at
the funeral home. Arrangements
are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South HWY 441, Lake City.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. cornm

Vera Newbern Lanier
November 3, 1915 - December
24, 2009
Vera Newbem Lanier, 94, of
Live Oak, Florida, passed away
peacefully on December 24,
2009 at Haven Hospice in Lake
City, FL. She was a loving wife,
mother, grandmother and friend
to many and will be so very
missed this holiday season and
always. She enjoyed spending
time with the people she loved,
her family was very important
to her and she was always
available for her children and
grandchildren. She touched the
lives of many people. She is
predeceased by her parents,
William Barney Cheshire and
Mamie Cheshire; her husband
and father of her children, Jessie
Irvin Newbern, and husband,
Francis Malcolm lanier. She is
survived by her four children,
Lavaughn Newbern (Ednell),
Linda.Smith (W.R. "Bud"), Jerry
Newbem (Martha), and Brenda
Sanders (Ed); five grandchildren,
Len Newbern, Brad Newbern,
Monica Smith, Ryan Smith, and
Phillip Newbern; seven great-
grandchildren, Jack Newbern,
Hamp Newbern, Rae Newbern,
Karis Smith, Rachel Smith,
Matthew Newbern and Jessie
Newbem; and one greatreat-
grandchild: Ashley Newbern.
Visitation will be held at Daniels
Funeral Home on Tuesday,
December 29, 2009 from 5:00-


7:00 pm and graveside services
will be held at Philadelphia
Baptist Church on Wednesday,
December 30, 2009 at 11:00
am. Memorial contributions
may be made to Haven Hospice;
6037 US Hey 90 West, Lake
City, FL 32055, 1-800-759-
6357, www.havenhospice..
org. DANIELS FUNERAL
HOMES & CREMATORY,
INC., 1126 Ohio Avenue
North, Live Oak, FL 32064 is
in charge of all arrangements.


Ms. Eva Mae Sparks
Ms. Eva Mae Sparks 77, of
MacClemny died December 28,
2009, following an extended
illness. She was a life long
resident of Lake City and was of
the Pentecostal faith. Ms. Sparks
enjoyed traveling all over the
United States and was preceded
in death by her husband, Harry
P. Sparks. She is survived, by
one sister-in-law, Louise Geiger,
several nieces and nephews
also survive. Graveside funeral
services will be conducted on
Wednesday December 30,


2009 at Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens Cemetery at 2:00 P.M.
with the Reverend Chris Drum
officiating. Visitation with the
family will be held one hour prior
to service time. Arrangements
are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S.
HWY 441, Lake City. (386) 752-
1954. Please sign the guest book
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2009


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


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Journalism still attractive career choice for students


By BEN FISCHER
The Cincinnati Enquirer
CINCINNATI - It's
quite possible that Lakota
East seniors Kevin Li and
Dana Sand will never earn
a paycheck for journalism
in their lives.
But that's irrelevant
when the monthly dead-
line approaches for the
duo's award-winning news
magazine, Spark. Just as
generations of high school
journalists before them,
the coeditors stay at school
past 11 p.m. for weeks,
corralling a staff of doz-
ens, proofreading pages
and making sure that last
graphic is just right.
Spark - one of the coun-
try's best high school jour-
nalism publications - faces
many of the same struggles
professional journalism has:


Advertising sales are down
more than 30 percent since
2005. Printing costs soared.
The staff struggles with
how to adapt to an evolving
media environment and
keep the attention of an elu-
sive audience.
But at Lakota East, and
many other high schools
across the region, inter-
est in student publications
is resilient, even robust,
despite professional
journalism's deep financial
challenges.
Lakota East adviser
Dean Hume says the wait-
ing list is growing for his
classes. Membership in
the Ohio branch of the
Journalism Education
Association is up. Even at
Little Miarmii High School,
beset by a severe financial
crisis, journalism courses
are still full without a print-


ed newspaper.
Cincinnati's Walnut Hills
High School - ranked by
multiple publications as one
of the country's best public
schools - will restore a
journalism class to its pro-
gram in 2010 for the first
time in a generation.
The interest in scholas-
tic journalism is easy to
explain, said Sand, who
plans to minor in journal-
ism in college while pursu-
ing a medical career, which
might include writing for a
science journal.
"I would say I've learned
more from Spark than I
have in any other class I've
taken," Sand said. "Even
for somebody not going
into journalism, everything.
you learn or experience is
something you can use in
any field. And they're life
skills that are necessary for


anyone to be successful."
While newspapers aren't
hiring much, the educa-
tional establishment is
pushing schools to teach
more of the so-called
"21st Century Skills," a
collection of higher-level
academic traits experts say
will be at least as important
as basic subject content
knowledge in the future.
Among them: media lit-
eracy, critical thinking and
problem solving, collabora-
tion and social and cross-
cultural skills.
All of those are crucial
skills learned at a student
publication, students and
advisers said. Li remem-
bers being afraid of calling
a stranger on the phone as
a sophomore. Now he man-
ages dozens of students.
"Does it really matter
that I got a 5 on my AP


bio test? Not really," Li
said. "Does it matter if I
know how to be a good
leader and how to manage
people? I think that's a lot
more important in life."
Spark has never been
intended only for profes-
sional preparation, Hume
said. Even before the
recent decline in the news-
paper industry, only about
one in 10 staffers pursued
it professionally. Li is a
classic case: He's unde-
cided about his future, but
said his parents might not


pay for college if he goes
into journalism.
As a result, Hume said,
he doesn't worry too much
about teaching all of the
latest trends in communi-
cations, believing that the.
core skills of analyzing,
questioning, synthesizing
knowledge and then com-
municating that informa-
tion is most important.
"We're constantly trying
to educate, but the best way
to educate is to let them
apply the knowledge they're
learning," Hume said.


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Eastside's Young Writers of the Month
Eastside Elementary School's Young Writers of the Month for December are (front row,
from left) Madison Register, Andrew Dabbs, Emily Lamoreaux, (back row, from left) Micah
Henderson, Jack Riley, Mix 94.3 morning co-host, and Taylor Williams. The Young.Wrtiers of
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Fort White's Young Artists of the Month
Fort White Elementary School's Young Artists of the Month for December are (front row, from
left) art teacher Stephanie Wilcox, Bethany Harris, Chloe Stevenson, Zoey Love, Alyssa
Penniman, Sage Moseley and Ryan Ray (not pictured). The Young Artist of the Month
program is a business partnership activity between the Columbia County School System,
Sunstate Federal Credit Union and local businesses.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2009


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


i


m
















Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby '
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@Jakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Tuesday, December


29, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B,


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White
meeting Sunday
The annual meeting
of the Fort White Youth
Baseball Association is
2 p.m. Sunday at the
sports complex meeting
room in Fort.White.
For details, call
Tammy Sharpe at
867-3825.

Travel team
tryouts Jan. 9
Diamond Extreme
i2-under baseball
travel team has tryouts
set for 1 p.m. Jan 9 at
the Southside Sports
Complex baseball
practice fields.
For details, call Kevin
Stalter at 754-3667:

CHS SOFTBALL
Tryouts planned
for Jan. 11
Columbia High
softball tryouts for
varsity and junior varsity
are 3:30 p.m. Jan. 11 at
the CHS field. Players
must have completed
physical, drug testing
and consent forms to
participate.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.

CHS BASEBALL
Alumni Day
set for Feb. 6
Columbia High
baseball has Alumni Day
planned for Feb. 6. There
will be a home run derby
and scrimmage game for
the alumni, followed by
the 2010 team's purple
and gold game.
For details, e-mail
columbiabaseball@gmail.
com.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Boys Club hoops
registration open.
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
taking registration for its
basketball program.. Cost
is $40.
For details, call the
club at 752-4184.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
* Columbia High
girls soccer vs. Pedro
Menendez High in
Christmas tournament at
CYSA fields, 11 a.m.
* Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Middleburg
High in Christmas
tournament at CYSA
fields, 3 p.m.
* Columbia High
boys soccer vs. Taylor
County High in Christmas
tournament at CYSA
fields, 11 a.m.
* Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Cornerstone
Academy in Christmas
tournament at CYSA
fields, 3 p.m.
* Columbia High girls
basketball hosts Palatka
High in Holiday Shootout,
7:30 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball in Gaslight
Holiday Classic in
Louisville, Ky., TBD
Wednesday
* Columbia High girls
basketball hosts Union
County High in Holiday
Shootout, 7:30 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball in Gaslight
Holiday Classic in


Louisville, Ky., TBD


Bulldogs bite Aggies


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Georgia tailback Washaun Ealey (25) runs past Texas A&M defenders in
the first quarter of the Independence Bowl in Shreveport, La., on Monday.


Meyer changes his

mind; what about

his intensity?


It took a lot of pain to
teach Urban Meyer
a simple lesson:
He needed to slow
down.
Whether it sticks is
another matter.
Peel back the drama
of the last 48 hours and
the only thing that's
really changed is Meyer's
acknowledgment that
he couldn't go on like
this forever. He is still
the head football coach
at Florida. He will coach
the team's last game this
season and his gut tells
him. he'll be back on the
sideline when the Gators.
kick off the next one.
Never mind what
Meyer said about
resigiiing to deal with
the stress that caused
his heart to ache often
and his soul on occasion.
Sobering words from a
doctor, family and friends
can have that kind of
effect on anybody,
especiafly a driven,
145 ear-old who just
climbed to the peak of
his profession. Yet once
Meyer convinced himself
that the healing process
could be fast-tracked
- like everything else in
his view of coaching - he
decided a few months
would be plenty.
Officially, he's taking
an indefinite leave of .
absence; unofficially, it
sounds like anything but.
Meyer has no idea when
that leave will begin,
let alone end. He hasn't
stopped getting ready for
Florida's Sugar Bowl date
with Cincinnati. He hasn't
adjusted his recruiting
schedule or made plans
what to do once the
season is over.
One thing Meyer
knows for sure: He wants
the questions about his
health and the
distractions they caused
to go away.
"I'm trying - and I did
a bad job of this - let's
get off of me and let's go
play this game," he said
Sunday in New Orleans.
That was as close to an.
apology as he came.
"Let's go have fun. Let's
go enjoy our time here in
a great city and go play.
... I'm not going to give
it any thought," Meyer
added, "because we've got
a game to go win."
Right.
Winning might solve
all kinds of problems, but
in Meyer's case, it always
creates new ones.
Usually it's losing that
turns coaches inside out.
Meyer took every loss
hard, to be sure, but he
minimized that pain by


AP COLUMNIST


Jim Litke
jlitke@aop.org
winning early and often
at each of his three stops.
Yet the smoother the road
ahead looked, the more
Meyer focused
obsessively on cracks the
rest of us barely noticed.
Worse, he was intent on
fixing every problem
himself. After nine
seasons - five in Florida
- and two national
championships, it should
have surprised no one
that Meyer was wearing
out.
Florida athletic director
Jeremy Foley, who was
sitting alongside Meyer
on Sunday, also occupies
the office next door to
his coach in the Gators'
athletic complex. He has
seen firsthand the
countless hours Meyer
put in, the sacrifices large
and small. "Relentless"
was the first word that
came to Foley's mind.
"Every single facet of
this program, every detail,
every player issue, staff
issue, game-planning, just
an unbelievable amount of
preparation, then
recruiting - it never
ceases," he said.
"Is Urban Meyer going
to be coaching football
when he's 60 doing it the
way he's doing it now?"
Foley asked a moment
later without waiting for
an answer. "No. I knew
that when he signed
the new contract. ... You
can't keep up that kind of
pace."
Apparently it won't stop
Meyer from trying. He
vowed to change
something upon his
return without being sure
what that would be. It was
the least convincing part
of the entire afternoon.
"That's something I've
got to figure out," he said.
"There's obviously other
coaches that had great
careers and have done
great things for a long
time. ... I'm going to get
that fixed."
Meyer understood long
before this episode that
the money and pressure it
brought have altered the
college football landscape
for the worse.


Cox's two touchdown
passes leads Georgia in
Independence Bowl.
By CHRIS TALBOTT
Associated Press
SHREVEPORT, La. - Joe Cox
threw two touchdown passes, Caleb
King added two rushing scores
and Georgia beat mistake-prone
Texas A&M 44-20 on Monday in the
Independence Bowl.
Cox hit Aron White on touchdown
passes of 24 and 2 yards in the
second half as the Bulldogs (8-5)
pulled away for their fourth straight
bowl victory. It was the fourth
straight postseason loss for. the
Aggies (6-7), who have not won a


About


bowl since 2001.
Georgia blocked two ltcks,
BrandonBoykintiedtheSoutheastern
Conference' record with his third
kickoff return of the season and Cox
threw his first touchdown pass after
the snap sailed over the Texas A&M
punter's head in the third quarter.
The Bulldogs sealed the win by
intercepting Jerrod Johnson twice in
the third quarter.
White tied the Independence Bowl
record for touchdown receptions,
sharing it with four others.
Special teams led directly to 24
points for the Bulldogs, who also
blocked an early field goal attempt
and got a 49-yard field goal from
Blair Walsh.
BOWL continued on 2B


face


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida coach Urban Meyer arrives in New Orleans for a news conference Sunday. Meyer
announced that he would be taking a leave of absence as head coach. At right is quarterback
Tim Tebow. Florida will face Cincinnati in the Sugar Bowl on New Year's Day.

Meyer opts for leave of absence,.

expected back for 2010 season


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -
Florida coach Urban Meyer
tried it his way for years.
Long days, late nights,
seemingly endless recruit-
ing trips and little time for
his health and family.
After countless head-
aches, four years of chest
pain and an alarming trip to
hospital three weeks ago,
it was time for a different
approach.
How much Meyer's
routine varies remains to
be seen. But with his well-
being still a major concern,
Meyer withdrew his brief
resignation and decided to
take an indefinite leave of
absence from Florida. He
will coach the fifth-ranked
Gators in the Sugar Bowl
against No. 4 Cincinnati on
Friday, then take some time
off in hopes of alleviating


recurring chest pains.
How will he handle being
away from football?
"We're going to find
out," said his wife, Shelley.
"We've just got to see how
he handles his leisure time.
I've never seen him handle
leisure time. That's like an
oxymoron."
Meyer's announcement
Sunday capped a wild week-
end for Florida. He stunned
college football twice in
a 20-hour span, first by
saying he planned to
walk away from coaching
and then by revealing he
expects to be back on the
sideline next season.
"I do in my gut believe
that will happen," Meyer
said.
Flanked by athletic
director Jeremy Foley and
quarterback Tim Tebow,
the 45-year-old Meyer stoi-
cally responded to repeated
questions about his health,


his heart and his head. With
his wife and three children'
seated a few feet in front
of him, Meyer declined to
reveal much detail about
his condition.
He acknowledged the
possibility he might need a
procedure to alleviate chest
pains that started four years
ago, but would not say if
he had a heart condition.
He insisted he didn't have
a heart attack and refused
to say whether doctors
told him he needed to step
away.
"I'd rather not get into
that," he said.
This much he made
clear: Players prompted his
about-face.
First, he witnessed their
tearful reaction to his res-
ignation Saturday evening.
Then he spent a few hours
with them during a "spirited
GATORS continued on 2B

















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2009


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TY sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
4:30 p.m.
ESPN - EagleBank Bowl, UCLA vs.
Temple, at Washington
8 p.m.
ESPN - Champs Sports Bowl, Miami
vs. Wisconsin, at Orlando
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 - Hartford at Kentucky
9 p.m.
ESPN2 - Penn St. at Minnesota
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
'VERSUS - Chicago at Dallas

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East -
W L TPct PF PA
x-New England 10 5 0.667400 251
N.Y.Jets 8 7 0.533311 236
Miami 7 8 0.467336 360
Buffalo 5 10 0.333228 319
South
W L TPct PF PA
x-Indianapolis 14 I 0.933409 277
Houston 8 7 0.533 354 306
Jacksonville 7 8 0.467 273 357
Tennessee 7 8 0.467 337 389
North
W L TPct PF PA
x-Cincinnati 10 5- 0.667305 254


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


x-San Diego
Denver
Oakland
Kansas City


y-Ph
y-Da
N.Y.
Was


x-N
Atla
Carol
Tam


8 7
8 7
4 I1
West
W L
12 3
8 7
5 10
3 12


0.533 370 248
0.533 338 300
0.267 222 358

TPct PF PA
0.800431 300
0.533 302 280
0.333 184 358
0.200 250 400


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


East
"W L
iladelphia I1 4
allas 10 5
Giants 8 7
shington 4. II
South
W L
ew Orleans 13 2
nta . 8 7
olina 7 8
ipa Bay 3 12


T Pct PF PA
0.733429 313
0.667 337 250
0.533 395 383
0.267246 313

T Pct PF PA
0.867 500 318
0.533 343 315
0.467292 298
0.200 234 380


North .
W L. T Pct PF PA


x-Minnesota
y-Green Bay
Chicago
Detroit


II 3
10 5
5 9
2 13
West


0.786 396 269
0.667428 290
0.357 254 322
0.133 239 457


W L T Pct PF PA
x-Arizona 10 5 0.667 368 292
San Francisco 7 8 0.467 302 275
Seattle , 5 10 0.333 267 373
St. Louis ' I 14 0.067 169 408
x-clinched division �
y-clinched playoff spot
', ) Sunday's Games
Atlanta 31, Buffalo 3
Houston 27, Miami 20 -
lGreen Bay 48, Seattle 10
Carolina 41, N.Y. Giants 9
Pittsburgh 23, Baltimore 20
Tampa Bay 20, New Orleans 17, OT.
Cleveland 23, Oakland 9
Cincinnati 17, Kansas City 10
New England 35, Jacksonville 7
. San Francisco 20, Detroit 6
Arizona 31, St. Louis 10


N.Y. ets 29. Indianapolis 15
Philadelphia 30, Denver 27
Dallas 17,Washington 0
Monday's Game
Minnesota at Chicago (n)
Sunday, Jan. 3
Chicago at Detroit, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
New England at Houston, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Buffalo, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
Atlanta atTampa Bay, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Cleveland, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, I p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at San Diego. 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.

Bowl games


Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
Marshall 21, Ohio 17
Meineke Bowl
Pittsburgh 19, North Carolina 17
Emerald Bowl
Southern Cal 24, Boston College 13
Sunday
Music City Bowl
Clemson 21, Kentucky 13
Monday
Independence Bowl
Georgia 44,Texas A&M 20
Today
EagleBank Bowl
At Washington
Temple (9-3) vs. UCLA (6-6),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Miami (9-3) vs. Wisconsin (9-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN).


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City atWashington,7 p.m.
New York at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m.
. Minnesota at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.r
New Orleans at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Milwaukee at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New York at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Utah at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Boston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Portland, 10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

APTop 25
i.Th6 top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' college basketball poll, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Dec. 27, total points and
previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
I. Kansas (52) 11-0 1,607 I
2.Texas (I I) 11-0 1,556 2
3. Kentucky (I) 13-0 1,476 3
4.Purdue 11-0 .1,407 4
5. Syracuse (I) 12-0 1,398 5
6.WestVirginia 10-0 .1,309 6
7. Duke 9- I 1,241 7
8.Villanova 11-1 1,177 8
9. North Carolina 9-3 1,033 10
10. Connecticut 9-2 1,002 II
11. Michigan St. 9-3 910 9


12. Kansas St.
13. Georgetown
14.Tennessee.
15. Ohio St.
16. Mississippi
17.Washington
18.Temple
19. New Mexico
20. Texas Tech
2 -.Clemson
22. Florida St.
23.Wisconsin
*24. UAB
25. Northwestern


Others receiving votes: Gonzaga 129,
Georgia Tech 102, Dayton 94,Texas A&M
91, Florida 76, Miami 60, BYU 55,
Oklahoma St. 37,Wichita St. 35, Southern
Cal 27, UNLV 26, Butler 19, Memphis
16, Mississippf St. 13, Wake Forest 12, St.
John's 10, Baylor 7, California 7, Cincinnati
7,Virginia Tech 7, Cornell 5, Missouri St. 5,
N. Iowa 5, Rhode Island 5,William & Mary
5, Seton Hall 2,Army I.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Kansas vs. Belmont, 9 p.m.
No. 2 Texas'vs. Gardner-Webb, 6 p.m.
SNo. 3 Kentucky vs. Hartford, 7 p.m.
No. 4 Purdue at Iowa, 7:05 p.m.
No. 5 Syracuse at Seton Hall, 9 p.m.
No. 6 West Virginia vs. Marquette,
7 p.m..
No. 7 Duke vs. Long Beach State,
7 p.m.
No. 12 Kansas State vs. Cleveland
State, 8 p.m.
No. 16 Mississippi vs. Jacksonville
State, 8 p.m.
No. 19 New Mexico vs. No. 20 Texas
Tech, 9 p.m.
No. 21 Clemson vs. South Carolina
State, 7:30 p.m.

USA Today/ESPN Top 25

The top 25 teams in the USA Today-
ESPN men's college basketball poll, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records*


through Dec. 27, points


ranking:.
R,
I. Kansas (28)
2.Texas (3)
3. Kentucky
4. Purdue
5. Syracuse
6.West Virginia
7. Duke
8.Villanova
9. North Carolina
10. Connecticut
11. Michigan State
12. Kansas State
13. Georgetown
14.Tennessee
15. Ohio State
1 6.Washington
17. New Mexico
18. Clemson
19.Temple
20. Georgia Tech
21. Mississippi
22. Gonzaga
23. Butler
24. Texas Tech
25. Florida State


record
S1-0
11-0
13-0
11-0
12-0
10-0
9-1
I1-1
9-3
9-2
9-3
11-1
9-1
9-2
10-2
9-2
12-1
11-2
9-2
9-2
10-2
8-3
8-4
10-1
11-2


and previous

Pts Pvs '
772 I
743 2
702 3
677 4
657 5
630 6
585 7
553 8
489 10
471 . II
436 9
409 15
407 13
313 14
290 17
274 19
241 12
192 23
164 25
140 22
137 21
96 24
85 16
68 -
67 -


Others receiving votes: Florida 60,
UNLV 51, Brigham Young 49, Wisconsin
49, Northwestern 43. UAB 33, Dayton
25, Oklahoma State 22, Texas A&M 16,
William & Mary 13, Illinois 12, Saint Mary's
12, Southern California 12, Cincinnati I I,
Washington State II, Cornell 8, Northern'
Iowa 8, Wake Forest 8, Richmond 6,
St. John's 6, California 5, Louisville 5, Old
Dominion 4, Arizona State 2, Charlotte
2. Virginia Tech 2, Minnesota I, Wichita
State I.


GATORS: Prepared for recruit wars


Continued From Page 1B

practice" Sunday morning.
'Ift's very simple," Meyer
said. "The love that I have
for these players, I think
that's well documented.
Maybe one of the issues
that I deal with is that I care
so deeply abbut each indi-
vidual. ... We've had a heck
of a run, a run that we're
very proud of. And when I
sat back and watched those
young guys go at it today
and our coaching staff and
the program we've built, to
not try would be not the
.right thing to do."
Meyer called Foley from
the practice field and told
him he wanted to talk



BOWL

Continued From Page 1B

The game was billed
as an ' offensive show-
down, but a shootout never
developed. The teams had
more punts than first downs
in the first 25 minutes of the
game.
Texas A&M finally got
moving in the waning
moments of the second
quarter behind Johnson.
He led a nine-play, 75-yard
drive that included passes
of 14 and 41 yards before
the quarterback was flushed
from the pocket, rolled left
and fired a 15-yard touch-
down pass to Jamie McCoy
with 2:33 left in the half.
Georgia answered imme-
diately, however, when
Boykin returned the kickoff
81 yards up the middle of
the field to tie the score.


about a leave of absence
- something school presi-
dent Bernie Machen first
mentioned a week earlier.
Foley and several assistant
coaches also tried to per-
suade Meyer to take an
extended break, but the
coach thought it would be
better for the program, his
health and his family to get
away for good.
Meyer changed his mind
in a hurry.
Meyer and Foley settled
on a rough plan after prac-
tice. Meyer told his family
as they arrived for the char-
ter flight to New Orleans,
then informed the team of




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. E

PODOR I I


his possible return.
"He just didn't want this
program to fail," his oldest
daughter, Nicki, said.
Offensive coordina-
tor Steve Addazio will run
the team during Meyer's
absence.
Meyer's flip-flop drew
some criticism and leaves
Florida in coaching limbo
for the final push for the
nation's top recruits. Surely
others will use Florida's
unsettled coaching situa-
tion to lure recruits away
from Gainesville.
Foley said he wasn't con-
cerned about the impact it.
might have.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: A

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: ARDOR SUITE CHOSEN SCORCH
I Answer: When Dad gave his teenager a driving lesson,
it turned into - A "CRASH" COURSE


Addazio given warm



welcome by Gators


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS - As
Steve Addazio listened to
Florida coach Urban Meyer
talk about his health and his
future, it never crossed his
mind what kind of reaction
players would have when
he was picked to be the
Gators' interim coach.
Addazio was unprepared
for their response.
They gave the longtime
assistant an overwhelming
reception, an ovation so
long and loud that it even,
caught superstar quarter-
back Tim Tebow off guard.
"It was one of the
loudest rounds of ovation
and applause that I have
been a part of in my entire
life," Tebow said Monday.
"The team, the players
clapped probably for three
or four minutes and didn't
stop. You could see coach
Addazio getting emotional
while we were doing that
because it meant so much
to him. I think that was one
of the coolest parts of the
last twq days."
Addazio will take over
next week, filling in
during Meyer's indefinite
leave of absence brought
on by recurring chest pains,
and an alarming hospital
visit three weeks ago.
Addazio has one goal in
mind: Keep the humming
along until Meyer returns.
Although Addazio
received his share of criti-
cism during his first year
as Florida's offensive coor-
dinator, he has been given
nothing. but votes of con-
fidence from players and
peers since arriving in
New Orleans for the Sugar
Bowl.
,"He knows how to lead a
team and get a team going,"
center Maurkice Pouncey
said. "We love Addazio
to death. I almost teared
up for him. It was a great
moment"
Addazio's coaching
resume includes stops
at Syracuse (1995-98),
Notre Dame (1999-01)


ACROSS

1 Become one
4 Mysterious
8 Princess Di's
niece
11 Eroded
12 Bear
constellation
13 Large vases
15 City rtes.
16 Nodding
18 Zen poem
20 Icy precip
21 Emulate
23 Not sociable
24 Internet fan
27 Feel sympathy for
29 Thoughtful
murmur
32 Respite
33 Bellow
34 Perfume
label word
35 Ballpoint point
36 Had debts
37 Noisy birds
38 - -
premium


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida offensive coordinator Steve Addazio watches
his players during their football practice at the Louisiana
Superdome in New Orleans on Monday.


and Indiana (2002-04).
He also spent three years
'at Western Connecticut
State (1985-87) and seven
seasons at a Connecticut
high school.
This will be considerably
different.
The fifth-ranked Gators
haven't worked out details
regarding Meyer's absence.
Will he still be involved in
recruiting? Will he be in
charge of hiring a defen-
sive coordinator to replace
Charlie Strong? Or will
. Addazio handle most of the
big decisions involving one
of the premier programs in
college football?
And what. happens if
Meyer- doesn't return at
all? Would athletic director
Jeremy Foley really turn
things over to a guy whose
only head-coaching experi-
ence came at Cheshire High
about two decades ago?
"I feel great about the
fact that they trusted me
with this role, but I haven't
t


Produced
Bryce Canyon
site
Negligent
Switch to low
beams
Indian prince
Kind of plug
Cats and owls
Trigger's rider
Hubby
Karachi
language
Mongrel
Bunk
Nuzzle
Octopus abode

DOWN

Laundry load
James or Kett
Mr. Arnaz
Found
(2 wds.)
Before now
Winding curve
Caress
Big and strong


spent a lot of time think-
ing about it," said Addazio,
whose known for his
"Vitamin Addazio" speech-
es during pregame break-
fasts. "Ift's not about me.
It's not. It sounds corny,
but that's how I feel about
it. I'm not really interested
in the other stuff. I'm just
interested in making sure
our players are good, our
coaches are good, coach
Meyer is good. We've got a
lot of work to do now."
Addazio expects other
schools to use Florida's
unsettled coaching situa-
tion to try to sway some of
the nation's prized recruits.
It's something he knows he
will have to counter, and
his pitch could be simple.
"At the end of the day,
everything's going to stay
the way it's supposed to
stay and it will all be back
to the way it's supposed
to be back," Addazio said.
"It's nothing to overreact to
right now."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

V IIM MOB LEIA

L ADCWI

SIAI





RAP OR UCLA
VISI L-Y X A Y S

PS[AL LLEG
VH U



LBS RNS
TE N EST


Huron neighbor
Mrs.
Shakespeare
Bilko's rank
Flashlight carrier
A Marx


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


22 Q-Tip target
23 Screened
24 Forearm bone
25 Business
attire
26 Isle off Italy
28 Woman on
campus
29 Solar
radiation
30 Ms. Angelou
31 Sled dog com-
mand
36 Buffett's town
37 Checkers
move
41 Did dock work
43 Newsstand
buy
44 Tach
reading
45 Bedouin
46 "Swan Lake"
leap
48 Orbit seg-
ments
49 Rake
50 Actress -
Sedgwick
52 Large cask
53 Gold, in
Cancun
54 Hwys.


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


12-29


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I


I


k


WAHELI/




SNELET /
7^~ 7~ 7^
^^ _ ^ -^ _ _


















Lessons learned on

road to perfection


,ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning (18) scratches his head on the sidelines after being taken out in the second
half of the New York Jets' 29-15 win in Indianapolis on Sunday. It was the first loss of the season for the Colts..



Debate rages over Colts'



decision to pull starters


By MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS - Colts
coach Jim Caldwell will not
second-guess the decision
to rest his starters Sunday.
He'll let everybody else
do it for him.
One day after Indianapolis
pulled the plug on its
perfect season by sitting
Peyton Manning and oth-
ers with 5:36 left in the third
quarter of a 15-10 game,
the great debate raged in
Indianapolis.
NFL purists expressed
disappointment that thde
Colts sidestepped their shot
at perfection. Other ana-
lysts suggested the Colts
had an obligation to play
it straight, and hometown
fans expressed their anger
with strong critiques on
local radio shows.,
None of it fazed
Caldwell.
"I'm one of those guys,
it's probably my greatest
strength and my greatest
weakness, I can focus in, I
can narrow my scope, and
once you make a decision
you have to live with it," he
said. "Certainly you weigh
all the options before. You
tpke a look at all the things
that could occur, but once
that decision is done you
just keep moving."
Indy fans aren't ready to
move on just yet.
After celebrating record
after record during an
unprecedented 23-game
regular-season winning


streak and feeling like they
had a personal stake in
the pursuit of perfection,
they showered Lucas Oil
Stadium with boos over the
-final 20 minutes Sunday.
Pro Bowl receiver Reggie
Wayne joked to a local
television station that Indy
might be the first 14-1 team
to get booed at home. -
In time, fans will likely
calm down, and if the Colts
win the Super Bowl, all will
be forgiven.
, "Ultimately, what matters
the most is what happens
in the postseason," Denver
coach Josh 1yIcDaniels said.
"So, I think their season
is going to be determined
by what they do once the
playoffs start, not what hap-
pened yesterday."
The controversy has
stoked passions among
Indy sports fans and on the
national stage unlike any-
thing this community has
seen since the firing of Bob
Knight in 2000 or The Brawl
in Detroit in 2004.
Yes, everybody has an
opinion, but the only ones
that really matter are voiced
in the locker room - and
they support Caldwell.
"You get people who
think you should have
gone for it and people who
think we did a disservice
to the NFL by not playing
our guys," said left tackle
Charlie Johnson, who was
deactivated for Sunday's
game because of a foot inju-
ry. "But I think you have to
look at the decisions coach


Caldwell has made up to
this point and trust him."
The decision also could
have ramifications on the'
playoff race.
The Jets now have con-
trol, thanks to Sunday's
victory, and teams such
as Pittsburgh or Houston
could end up missing the
postseason because the
Colts rested key players.
"Obviously I would have
loved to have seen them
win that game," Houston
coach Gary Kubiak said.
"But for us it really doesn't
matter. We have to worry
about taking care of our
business. ... They've got to
do what they think they
got to do. But we've got to
worry about ourselves."
Caldwell and team presi-
dent Bill Polian, the archi-
tect of the Colts, insist they
did what was best for the
team. Their goal, Polian
and Caldwell continue to
insist, is to win the Super
Bowl - not go 16-0. And
the best way to accomplish
that, they believe, is to be
healthy,
So they sat the starters
for the final 20 minutes,
allowing the Jets to rally
for a 29-15 victory. They're
likely to sit even longer this
weekend in Buffalo.
"The perfect season was
never an issue with us,"
Polian said after the game.
"We've said it time and time
and time again. It's some-
body else's issue, but not
ours. That was of no con-
cern. Football logic has to


come into play, and that
logic is it makes no sense
to have guys out there with
the potential for injuries."
Callers to radio shows
repeatedly questioned
Indy's tack. Some asked for
refunds. Others described
Polian as "arrogant" and
one fan said the team "spit
in our face." One talk show
host read an e-mail on
th? air that said the Colts
didn't lose Sunday's game,
they forfeited it, and many
brought up the Colts' previ-
ous postseason failures.
In three of the last four
years, Indianapolis has not
won a playoff game. The
other time, the Colts won
the Lombardi Trophy.
It's a tricky question.
Oakland' defensive line-
man Richard Seymour,
who played on the perfect
Patriots in 2007, and Titans
coach Jeff Fisher, who had
the last team to lose a game
in 2008, believe organiza-
tions have to make the deci-
sion that is best for them,
even though Fisher said he
would play his starters if he
were 14-0.
So will Caldwell's deci-
sion be worth it? Maybe.
"I think everybody really
had the sense that if they
played their players they
would win the next two
games. They didn't," Fisher
said. "'But I think we have
to wait and see and then
go back and ask yourself
that question. Just wait and
see what .happens in the
playoffs."


By HOWARD ULMAN
Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- The quarterback of
the only 16-0 team in NFL
history says there's only
one way to approach per-
fection: Don't even think
about it.
Don't focus on what one
more victory will achieve.
Instead, zero in on the
smaller steps that will get
you there. That's what the
New England Patriots did
two years ago when they
also were just a win away.
It's something neither
the Saints not the Colts
need be concerned with
anymore.
"Every time we came in,
we focused on what our
job was that day, the things
that we could handle that
day," Tom Brady said. "For
practice days, it was about
how we could have a great
practice and meetings and
walkthroughs and so forth.
And then when the game
came, the game came. I
think we, as a team, were
mature enough to handle
that, but every team is
different"
Going undefeated was
hardly a hot topic of con-
versation among the 2007
Patriots even as the wins
piled up, not with coach
Bill Belichick discourag-
ing such talk.
"It was more of trying
to eliminate the, distrac-
tions than create more for
ourselves," said Denver
Broncos coach Josh
McDaniels, the coordina-
tor of the Patriots record-
setting 2007 offense. "We
were focused for the next
game."t
Safety Rodney Harrison
was the go-to guy for quote-
seeking reporters. From
his locker at the end of a
row with plenty of space
for them to congregate, he
would comment directly
on almost any subject.
But 16-0? Oh, no.


"I can be 100 percenthon-
estwith you," said Harrison,
now an analyst for Football
Night in America on NBC.
"I never had one discus-
sion with anyone about it
because we were in such a
zone and we had been bred
and taught since I got there,
in '03 to play one game at a .
time."
It's the mantra of all
coaches. Look ahead' at
your own peril. But it takes
on added weight coming
from the no-nonsense
Belichick. The Patriots'
wins in the Super Bowls
in the 2001, 2003 and 2004
seasons just reinforced ,
that
Then came 2007.
The Patriots won their
first eight games by at
least 17 points. They had,
a close call the following
week when Brady threw
two of his NFL-record 50
touchdown passes in the
last eight minutes to beat.
the Colts 24-20.
They reached 11-0 with a
31-28 win over Philadelphia,
but needed Laurence
Maroney's touchdown
run midway through the
fourth quarter to overtake
the Eagles. It was even
tighter the following week
in a 27-24 win at Baltimore
with Brady's scoring pass
to Jabar Gaffney with 44
seconds left.
, After they reached 15-0
with the top seed in the
'AFC East clinched, the
question arose: Rely on the
starters the next week or
rest them and avoid poten-
tial injuries?
"Play your people. Play
to win," insisted Mike
Ditka, the coach of the
1985 Chicago Bears who
started at 12-0. "If you're
afraid of' injuries, you
shouldn't play football in
the first place."
Belichick played them.
Colts coach Jim Caldwell
did not late in the game
with the Jets, and the
perfect was gone.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) shakes
hands with Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback David Garrard
after the Patriots' 35-7 in Foxborough, Mass., on Sunday.


Texas Tech suspends coach


By BETSY BLANEY
Associated Press

LUBBOCK, Texas -
Texas Tech suspended Mike
Leach on Monday while the
school investigated com-
plaints from receiver Adam
James and his family about
how the coach treated the
player after a concussion.
James is the son of
former NFL player arid
current television analyst
Craig James.
The school said in a
release that defensive coor-
dinator Ruffin McNeill will
be the interim coach and
lead the team in the Alamo
Bowl on Jan. 2 against
Michigan State.
Texas Tech officials
declined to identify the
player, but James' fam-
ily released a statement to
The Associated Press iden-
tifying Adam as the player
involved.
"Mr. and Mrs. James took
the step with great regret
and after consideration and
prayer to convey to the
Texas Tech Administration
that their son had been
subjected to actions and


treatment not consistent
. with common sense, rules
for safety and health," the
statement said.
"Over the past year,
there has been a greatly
enhanced recognition of
the dangers of concussions
and the potential for long
term physical damage to
players. At virtually every
level of football coaching,
cases where children and
young men have sustained
concussions have gener-
ated serious discussion of
the importance of correct
treatment and diagnosis."
A person familiar with
James' case said James
suffered a concussion dur-
ing a Dec. 16 practice. The
person, who spoke on con-
dition of anonymity, was not
authorized to speak publicly
about the investigation.
Leach does not acknowl-
edge player injuries to the
media nor does he allow his
players to do so.
Leach did not immedi-
ately return a call or a text
message seeking comment.
A message left on McNeill's
cell phone was not immedi-
ately returned.


McNeill will remain in
charge of the team until the
investigation is complete.
Craig James was sched-
uled to announce the Alamo
Bowl from San Antonio,
Texas. ESPN spokesman
Josh Krulewitz said James
no longer will work the
game.
There's been -internal
strife this season with the
Red Raiders (8-4), and
Leach has resorted to some
tongue-lashing.
He chastised players
after a loss to Texas A&M
in October for listening to
"their fat little girlfriends,"
and thinking theAggies were
a pushover. And after the
Red Raiders loss at then-No.
12 Houston in September,
Leach suspended indefinite-
ly starting offensive lineman
Brandon Carter for violating
team rules.
The loss to the Cougars
was the second straight for
the Red Raiders, who had
fallen 34-24 at No. 2 Texas
in an early Big 12 matchup.
This season is the first since
2002 that the Red Raiders
dropped two of their first
four games.


Ten wins on the line in


Champs Sports Bowl


By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Associated Press

ORLANDO - The first
time Miami coach Randy
Shannon watched film on
Wisconsin, he thought he
was watching another team
run his playbook.
"You look at a team that
resembles what you can
do," Shannon said.
The more he studied the
more similarities he saw.
Shannon and Badgers
coach Brett Bielema are
former defensive coordi-
nators who run the same
scheme. Each rely on
the run to setup the play-
action pass and both have
improved on last season's
lowly 7-6 records.
When the 14th-ranked
Hurricanes face No. 24
Wisconsin in the Champs
Sports Bowl on Tuesday
night, the schools will also
will be chasing an even
bigger goal: a 10-win sea-
son to help propel their
programs back to national
prominence.


"It's one win," Bielema
said. "But 10-win seasons
are special, because not
very many people get it
done."
This game might be an
even bigger hurdle for
Miami.
After dipping into medi-
ocrity, the Hurricanes have
a chance for their first
10-win season since 2003
and can position them-
selves for a big run next
year. The milestone would
be a big step on the road
back for a program that
was dominant at times ear-
lier this decade, won five
national titles between
1983-2001 and captured
the eyes of college football
fans with so much speed
and swagger.
Miami has improved
in each of the first three
seasons under Shannon -
with regular seasons of 5-7,
7-5 and 9-3 - and made
perhaps the biggest jump
this year. The Hurricanes
went 3-1 to start the sea-
son in a brutal stretch


against four ranked teams,
jumped back into the top
10 briefly before fizzling
out and again missing the
Atlantic Coach Conference
title game.
By Miami standards,.
any bowlthat doesn't start
with BCS is a disappoint-
ment. Still, the Hurricanes
believe they have more at
stake in this year's bowl.:
than any time in recent .
memory.
"A win and we're going to
be all set for next season,"
Hurricanes quarterback
Jacory Harris said. 'To fin-
ish the regular season 9-3,
we feel like there's no point
not finishing with a victory.
To get 10 wins, I don't see
how we wouldn't start next
year in the top 10."
Wisconsin is looking to
make its own statements.
Even with all the similar-
ities the coaches outlined,
there is a big contrast with
how these teams get things.
done.
It's a classic matchup of
speed vs. power.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2009


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421













Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2009 4B


DILBERT
MORGAN: THE MAN WITH
NO COMMUNICATION
SKILLS.


DID YOU GET THE
RESULTS FROM THE
STRESS TESTS
YET?


.1"


STRESS TESTS HAVE
TO BE PERFORMED
UNDER CONTROLLED
CONDITIONS.


HAS ANYONE EVER
EXPLAINED TO YOU
THE YES-NO FORM
OF QUESTIONS?
IS IT MY

J/ TURN TO


10 - -I _----------_Caa


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE '
SI'D LIKE TO RETURN DO YOU
THIS SWEATER, BECAUSE LIKE THE
NOBODY IN MY FAMILY WA OU
LIKES TE WAY I LOOK
-I LOOKINIT (INIt

.........


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


-SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


-GARFIELD


d


WELL, SURE...I THINK I
LOOK GREAT IN IT!


B.C.


FRANK &.ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


'Multitasking' drivers should

have only one job in mind


DEAR ABBY: I applaud
'Terrified Mama in Califor-
nia" (Oct. 30) on her stance
with her "multitasking"
daughter who texts and
phones while driving. I re-
cently swore off cell phone
use in my vehicle after I
saw the dramatic BBC pub-
lic service ad on YouTube
discouraging it, a re-enact-
ment of an actual event. -I
am forever changed for the
better, and so are my two
daughters who ride with
me.
If there is an emergency,
my family now knows that
if I don't answer my phone,
they should call right back
and I'll pull over to take the
call. Otherwise, I will call
later. This has worked like
a ciarm.
I still notice all the other
phone conversations go-
ing on while people oper-
ate thousands of pounds of
steel, glass and plastic con-
taining their most precious
cargo. What are they talk-
Siig about? I'll bet it could
wait. Driving time for me is
now spent conversing with
my kids, singing along, to
music or just chilling out.
As moms, we are con-
cerned about lead in our
children's toys, the safety
of flu vaccines and additives
in the foods they eat. But it


many cell phone users are
completely oblivious to
anything but their conver-
sation. It should be obvious
that phones and driving
don't go together.
Earlier this year a wom-
an on a cell phone here hit
a motorcyclist Apparently
clueless to having just been
in an accident, she pro-
ceeded to drive over him,
and that's what killed him.
Witnesses said she was still
talking bn her phone when
she got out of her SUV.
Abby, you missed a
golden opportunity to call
for state or federal regula-
tions banning the use of
cell phones while driving..It
would make the world safer
for everyone. - LARRY
IN KANSAS CITY
DEAR ABBY: I was
shocked that yoh told that
mother that there isn't
much she can do if her
daughter doesn't want to
shape up. You said yourself
the practice could be com-
pared to driving drunk. She
is endangering her child
every time she's behind the
wheel "multitasking." That
grandmother should not
give up trying to save her

0 Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Stop bickering.
Take time to think about
your future plans and to con-
sider how they will affect all
the people you love and who
love you. Don't leave prob-
lems unsolved. ****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Do not overre-
act to things that you can
do nothing about or about
which you don't have all the
information. Focus on fun,
travel and getting together
with friends. Close the year
with a joyful gesture and de-.
termined attitude. ***
GEMINI (MAY 21-
JUNE 20): You must ig-
nore any legal, financial or
contractual problems for
the moment. The only thing
that will help you right now
is to distance yourself from
the mayhem and focus on
bringing in the year on a
happy note. Avoid pressure
and arguments. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Think before you
act or prepare to face a head-
on battle with someone
looking for trouble. Minor
accidents or mishaps will
occur if you are careless or
preoccupied. Avoid respon-
sibilities that don't belong to
you. ***
LEO .(July 23-Aug.
22): Make plans to enter-
tain or 'do something spe-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

cial for the people you care
about the most. Your high
energy will help to lift the
spirits of someone who has
been through a difficult
time. Expect your expenses
to be more than anticipated
but worth every penny.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You don't have to take
on responsibilities that
aren't meant to be yours
alone. If you work as a team
player, you will gain respect
and end up with the best of
everything. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): It's the time spent with
family and friends that will
help you revisit an old idea
that can fit quite nicely into
your plans for the new year.
Have patience with some-
one older - there is some-
thing to be learned from the
experience being offered.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): A special offer
is heading your way. Share
your thoughts with friends
and you will get the inside
scoop you need to take a
different path. A move or
change at home will give
you greater security and
the opportunity to do some-
thing you've been wanting


to do. ***
SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): It's time to
make a choice instead of
avoiding the inevitable. By
being noncommittal,' you
are painting yourself as
someone afraid to make a
move. Surprise everyone
by stepping up, voicing your
opinion and being honest

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't hold
back if you have an attentive
audience and the chance to
drum up .support for some-
thing you want to pursue in
the new year. Your original-
ity coupled with a little pres-
sure will be tempting. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You will enjoy
getting together with friends
who appreciate your wis-
dom and knowledge. Don't
be surprised if a friendship
you've been enjoying turns
into a partnership of some
sort Time spent discussing
future plans will be enter-
taining. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You'll be
tempted to make impul-
sive moves. You mustn't be
fooled by anyone offering
something that is too good
to be true. You will be vul-
nerable and easily taken for
granted. Say no if you are
unsure. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals B
"BPJKNOWYJ NMY KTB.J.Y
EMSDTKECW KTSXDJ ABC JYY FTYX
ABC KNUY ABCM YAYJ BEE KTY


D B N W . "


- TYXMA EBMZ


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Being a professional is doing the things you love to
do, on the days you don't feel like doing them." - Julius Erving


(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc.


12-29


4 FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


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Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
never occurs to us that, in
the blink of an eye, life can
change forever because of
that call or text that "had"
to be made.
You CANNOT do it 'all.
Be present in the moment
when you operate your ve-
hicle. The life you save may
be your own. - SUSAN
IN PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR SUSAN: Thank
you for your persuasive re-
minder. Many readers were
eager to share their views
on this topic, which is so of-
ten in the news today. Read
on:
DEAR ABBY: If "Terri-
fied's" daughter were only
a danger to herself, I'd be
all in favor of allowing her
to .compete for a Darwin
award. Unfortunately, she's
a danger to everyone.
I have seen amazingly
mindless behavior by
people on cell phones who
were not driving - includ-
ing one who paid for and
walked away from her
purchases at a store. Too


















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2009


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


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Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
I which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


In Print

and Online
www.liike ityreporter.conl


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AN
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 09-255-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF GEORGE A.
MABRY, SR.,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
GEORGE A. MABRY, SR., de-
ceased, -whose date of death was Oc-
tober 24, 2009; is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division; File Num-
ber 09-255-CP; the address of which
is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and "
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or tinliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT. SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS DE-
CEMBER 22, 2009.
/s/ George A. Mabry, Jr.
Personal Representative
77 Sparks Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
/s/ TERRY McDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal
Representative

04536704
December 22, 29, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 09-267-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF PHILIP J. MO-
SES, SR.,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
PHILIP J. MOSES, SR., deceased,
whose date of death was December
4, 2009; is pending in the Circuit
Court for Columbia County, Florida,
Probate Division; File Number 09-
267-CP; the address of which is 173
NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representa-
tives and the personal representa-
tives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-.
er persons, who have claims or de-
mand against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM..
All other creditors of the decendent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS'AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
.THE DATE OF PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE IS DECEMBER 22,
2009.
/s/ Philip J. Moses, Jr.
Personal Representative
383 S.W. Sweetbreeze Drive
Lake City, FL 32024







Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191

Services


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
** i;i!* g **** :i'*if: :* ***** ** *d ^ *1'^ ^^ |


Legal

/s/ Michael C. Moses
Personal Representative
798 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025
/s/ James G. Moses
Personal Representative
696 S.W. Ridge Street
Lake City, FL 32024
/s/ TERRY McDAVID
Post Office-Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal
Representatives
04536702
December 22, 29, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 09-275-CP
DIVISION:
IN RE: ESTATE OF
COLVIN S. CARTER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
COLVIN S. CARTER, deceased,
File Number. 09-275-CP is pending
in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 North-
east Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below,
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidat-
ed claims, on whom a copy of this
notice is served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LAT-
ER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must, file their.
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. "
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is December 29, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Kathleen Holbrook Cold, Attorney
Florida Bar No. 0305111
One Independent Drive, Suite 2301
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904)356-6311
Personal Representative:
JOHN MICHAEL CARTER
5815 SE Country Club Road
Lake City, FL 32025
04536786
December 29, 2009
January 5, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed. States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
v.
CASE NO. 09-590-CA
JUANA JO LYTTE; any and all un-
known parties claiming by, through,
under, or against the herein named
individual Defendant(s) who are not
known to be dead or alive, whether
said unknown parties may claim an
interest as spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees or other claimants; John
Doe and Jane Doe as unknown ten-
ants in possession,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF FORE-
CLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-
ida, will on the 13TH day of January,
2010, at 11:00 a.m. in Courtroom 1
in the Columbia County courthouse
in the City of Lake City, Florida, of-
fer. for sale and sell at public outcry
to the highest and best bidder for
cash, the following described proper-
ty situated in Columbia County,
Florida, to-wit:
LOT 52, EMERALD COVE,
PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 8, PAGES 68-69, PUBLIC
RECORDS, COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
pursuant to the Amended Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered in a
case pending in said Court, the style
of which is as set out above, and the
docket number of which is 09-590-
CA. Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, this 29 day of De-
cember, 2009.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: Deputy Clerk

04536770
December 29, 2009
January 5, 2010


To place your
classified ad call


*Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE'NO.: 12 2009 CA 000099
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS
SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
BRENT D. HANDY; AMANDA,J.
HANDY; UNKNOWN
TENANTSS; IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE.
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 10 day of December,
2009, and entered in Case No. 12
2009 CA 000099, of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING LP,. is the
Plaintiff and BRENT D. HANDY;
AMANDA J.. HANDY; UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS; JOHN DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defend-
ants. I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the AT
COURTHOUSE at the Columbia
County . Courthouse in Lake City,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 17 day
of March 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final.
Judgment, to wit:
FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSUR-
ANCE COMPANY
EXHIBIT "A"
THE LAND REFERRED TO .IN
THIS EXHIBIT IS LOCATED IN
THE COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
AND THE STATE OF FLORIDA
IN DEED BOOK 1041 AT PAGE
1783 AND DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SE 1/4
OF THE SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4, SEC-
TION 12, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH,
RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIA
COUNTY, ' FLORIDA; THENCE
RUN S 89"19'30" W, ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF
SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4, 113.85 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUES 89�19'30"
W, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE,
344.92/ FEET; THENCE N
00'03'21" W, 409.13 FEET TO THE
SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY OF
COUNTY ROAD NO. 240,
THENCE S 86'49'36" E. ALONG
SAID SOUTH RIGHT. OF WAY,
348.24 FEET, THENCE S 00'21 '26"
W. 385.80 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING
3.16 ACRES MORE OR LESS.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF. THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In Accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386)758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 14th day of December,
S2009
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of The Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309.
Telephone: (954)453-0365
Facsimile: (954)771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438

04536693
December 22, 29, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL- CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 09-223-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF WILFRED J.
VEGA,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
WILFRED .J. VEGA, deceased,
whose death was September 9, 2009;
File Number 09-223-CP, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando' Street, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate, on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served, must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THE NOTICE.
THE CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION ,733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
By:/s/
Mark Feagle
Attorney for Petitioner
FL Bar No.: 0576905
P.O. Box 1653


Legal

Lake City , Florida 32055
By:/s/
Jeffrey K. Vega
Personal Representative
597 NW Spring Hollow Boulevard
Lake City, Florida 32055
04536701
December 22 & 29, 2009


020 Lost & Found

FOUND CHIHUAHUA on East
Hwy 90 Saturday 12/19.
Please call to identify
386-288-4290

LOST LARGE men's gold brace-
let on December 22 -23, 2009.
REWARD $300.00.
Please call 386-755-7145.

100 Job
Opportunities

04536756
NOW HIRING
.Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High ,
* Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

Mystery Shoppers earn up to.
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.

PT ScienceTeacher needed for
private Christian School
BA required
Fax resume to: 386-755-3609

1 Medical
120 Employment

04536765
RN NEEDED
7:00 p:m. - 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills.
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/
Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person or
.send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 SW McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

DENTAL ASSISTANT needed
F/T position Mon - Fri 9-5.
Salary based on experience.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3122
Dietician/nutritionist needed F/T
for new weight management
program in medical practice.
Fax resumes to 386-755-6828.
240 Schools &
Education
04536763
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education

Fees idrcl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com

Welding
Enjoy working outdoors?
Like to earn a good income? Con-
sider welding at Lake City Com-
munity College. Classes
begin January 6, 2010. Financial
aid available. No high school
diploma required. We have day,
night and Saturday class.
Register now through
December 16 or January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.


. HVAC
Enjoy doing repairs? Like to earn a
good income and/or Start your
business? Consider
Heating/AC and Commercial Re-
frigeration at Lake City
Community College. Classes be-
gin January 6, 2010. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma required. We have day
and night classes. Register now
through December 16
or January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.


310 Pets & Supplies

FREE! Adorable Boxer/Am Bull-
dog mix 5 month old puppy. Neu-
tered, all shots, some supplies.
LOVES to play. 36-344-7999

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


REPORTER Classifieds 401 Antiques
In Print and On Line ANTIQUES W
www.lakecityreporter.con Line Furn, China, Silver,
ity m Costume Jewelry & G
www,.lakecitreportercom exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 3.


ANTED
Glassware,
Sold. 35 years
86-963-2621


402 Appliances

GAS'STOVE
Good working condition.
Almond color. $100 OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295
ROPER Washer (3.2 cu.) & Dryer
(6.5 cu. ft.)
Set. Good condition.
$275 OBO. 386-867-1106


405 Bicycles

Girls 16in. Bike. Orange -
County Chopper Sting Ray.
Fuchsia Black. $50.
386-755-3350


408 Furniture

BLACK METAL frame futon
with cushion.
$85.00. OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.
BLUE TWEED,, queen sleeper
couch w/ accent pillows.
$100.00 Good shape.
386-755-3682.
GUN CABINET w/ glass door.
3' W x 80" H, handmade w/ unfin-
ished back. A must for gun collecT
tors. $75 OBO 386-867-1106..

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment *

New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315

4 1 Machinery &
411 Tools

Delta black toolbox.
67" L-x 20" W x 14" D
$45.00
386-867-1106


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
We Buy Junk: cars, trucks,
tractors, trailers, scrap metal,
AC's and batteries. NO MH'9
Call 386-965-1423 or 365-4879


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

5-Men's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) 1-Seiko, 1-Titai,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.
Full length ladies black leather
trench coat. sz. s/m.
asking $75 OBO
386-963-1211
Full length ladies red wool single
breasted coat. sz s/m.
asking $75 OBO
386-963-1211
NEW VANITY COMBO.
18"X18"X32" Only $75.00
Call 7pm-10pm
386-752-3491
New weather proof, color security
camera, w/nite vision/microphone.
'$100. before 1 la 758-1358 2
7p-10p 758-1358
SMOKER/GRILL
Charcoal. Cast Iron.
$40.00
386-755-3350

450 Good Things
5E to Eat
PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville .
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420
The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

630 Mobile Homes
3v for Rent

2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 security deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
3BR/2BA Double wide. -
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in
Branford area. $650.mo.
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
VERY CLEAN 2b/2ba. Covered
patio, front & back. No pets. State
Rd 100 @ Union County line.
$600 month. Call 904-966-0765.
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830

640 2Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

FORECLOSURE - 4 Bedroom
on Half Acre. $3000 down, $500.
mo. Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com


755-5440


IBUY

SE LLa IT


FIND 14Tg


Classified Department: 755-5440
















6B

~640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
We will build and Beat any
MODULAR Floor Plan!
Have two with land included.
- Save $$$ Thousands.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm martin23@yahoo.com
1999 Repo. Great Shape 24X48
3br Doublewide Set-up on
your land. $21,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560-
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
FOR SALE
2001 28X40.on I acre. $59,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com

65 Mobile Home
650 &Land
.1800 s.f. .Man. Home, 4bd/2ba,
plus retreat/office. 2 porches,
walks, concrete foundation, appli.,
plywood w/ ceramic floors, metal
roof, 5 acres, comer lot (treed).
Horses ok, Call Gary Hamilton "
S(386) 758-9824. Poss. owner
finance. $119K.
Owner Financing. Large. MH
w/3.32 acres. South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590-0642 /867-1833

71 t Unfurnished Apt.
./71 For Rent
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
I or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423




2br Apt. in town.
Great location.
$500. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
2BR/1.5BA DUPLEX w/garage.
Lfxury Apt. 5 min from VA
Hospital and Timco.
386-755-4590 or 365-51'50
CONDO for rent. $750 mo. *
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD; 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
Ig master br, very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
.of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, lv,.din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Studios & IBr's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2U For Rent
Country'Living. Furnished Effi-
ciency Park Model Trailers. $500
per month all utilities provided.
Call 386-961-8540/386-755-4945
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
24 hour office, laundry & vending
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk I prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
3br/lba house. CH/A, All appli-
ances, $750.mo. 1st, last & sec.
141 NE Montrose Ave.
(386)697-8893 or (305)962-2666
3BR/2BA BRICK Home
in town. $850/mo.
$500. security deposit.
386-365-8721
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.
Forest Country S/D2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
Owner Financing 3br/lba near
elementary school in LC.
Small down $575. mo.
386-867-1833 or 590-0642
Rural beauty ana privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of LiveOak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
74O Furnished
S Homes for Rent
1600 sq. ft. 2/1 Furnished house in
town. Near duck pond. Remodled,
beautiful hardwood/ceremic floors.
$950/month + sec. No pets.
Includes lawn service. 961-8788.

750A Business &
Office Rentals


For Rent. 24X30 storgae bldg. lo-
cated off US 90 behind "Right way
Automotive". $250. mo. has elec.
but for storage only. 386-755-2475
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1.800-342-0135

770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$1000 mo,.$1000 dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm


LAKE CITY REPORTER

770 Condos For Rent
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf. T
Weekends/weekly/monthly -
Nice, clean & affordable ',
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE -
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of .
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa- . '' -
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

820 Farms &
S Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, powep pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com



Contact us

at the paper.





CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


CLASSIFIED


-Near Gainesville, partially
wooded property includes
workshop w/electric. Large
rooms, fireplace, built-in
media cabinets, appliances
and more. Only $59,000 -
C !


%.-,, j . ome e11 e- ;

Call Luke Sparks BURBACH
t 386-269-4687 REALTY SERVICES


Perfect Starter Home
2 Bedroom, 1 bath in Lake City. Only $42,108



.'. - . - - .



L Call Rob Stewart -----
C3863758-1BBO BURBACH


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10.consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.


.- --


2007 Dodge
Caravan

13,200 miles
$16,500

(386)965-3075


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2009


Classified Department: 755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445

ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293

ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
ads@lakecityreporter.com

Mon.-Fri.: 8 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU!
LakeCit Reprte


180 East Duval St.
Lake City, FLorida 32055


Announcements


Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout
Florida. Advertising Networks of Florid ,,Put
us to work for You! (866)742-1373 www.florida-
classifieds.com.


Adoption


Are you pregnant? Considering adoption. A
childless, young, loving, single woman seeks to
adopt & needs your help! Financial security. Ex-
penses paid. Call Yael (ask for adam). (800)790-
5260.


Apartment for Rent


HUD HOMES! 4bdr 3ba $217/mo! 3 bdrm only
$199/mo! Stop Renting! 5% dw, 15 yrs @ 8% apr
For Listings (800)366-9783 ext 5669


Building Supplies


METAL ROOFING TAX CREDIT! 40 yr War-
ranty. Direct from manufacturer. 30 colors in
stock Quick turnaround. Delivery available. Gulf
Coast Supply & Manufacturing, (888)393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com

Business Opportunities

ALL CASH VENDING! Do you earn $800 in
a day? 25 Local Machines and Candy $9,995.
(888)629-9968 B02000033 CALL US: We will
not be undersold!

Cars for Sale

2000 Honda Civic $800! 2001 Nissan Altima
$350! 2000 Acura Integra $300! POLICE IM-
POUNDS! for listings call (800)366-9813 ext
9271


Help Wanted


PTL OTR Drivers. NEW PAY PACKAGE!
Great Miles! Up to 46cpm. 12 months experi-
ence required. No felony or DUI past 5 years.
(877)740-6262. www.ptl-inc.com

Heating/Air Tech Training. 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environment. State ofArt Lab.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Place-
ment Assistance! CALL NOW: (877)994-9904.

Travel, Travel, Travel! $500 Sign-on-bonus.
Seeking sharp guys and gals, Rock-n-Roll At-
mosphere, Blue Jean Environment! Call Ally
(800)716-0048 today.

Homes For Rent


4Br 3Ba Foreclosure! $11,500! Only $217/Mo!
5% down 15 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 3 Br $199/
Mo! for listings (800)366-9783 ext 5798

Homes For Sale

6Br ABa Foreclosure! $19,900! Only $225/Mo!
5% d8Wn 30 years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4 Br $269/
Mo! for listings (800)366-9783 ext 5760

Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high-pay-
ing Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing
available. CALL Aviation Institute of Mainte-
nance (888)349-5387.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
.*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (888)203-3179, www.Centura.Online.com.

Real Estate

LAND OR DEVELOPMENTS WANTED. We
buy or market development lots. Mountain or
Waterfront Communities in NC, SC, AL, GA and
FL. Call (800)455-1981, Ext.1034

LOTS FROM $13,9K! Waterfront community
on Georgia Coast. Access to Ocean. Hurricane
Free Zone. Limited Release on lots from $13,9K.
Best Value. Call (888)506-6707!! www.peninsu-
la-goldenisles.com

Real Estate Auctions

FORECLOSED HOME AUCTION 200+
FLORIDA Homes Auction: Jan 23 REDC I
View Full Listings www.Auction.com RE No.
CQ1031187

RV's/Mobile Homes

PUBLIC AUCTION 400+ FEMAMobile Homes
& Campers - Many Unused All selling no reserve
January 9th Lafayette, LA www.hendersonauc-
tions.com (225)686-2252 la lic 136-09



ANF
ADI!'A I I', ; N VOIK 1, 0! H 1ORDA


SWeek of December 28, 2009


3BR/2BA on 1 Acre


In Print,


Online.


1 Low


Price!


For More Details Cal


N


( i I '(t . oMIy MenL I 0 v




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