Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text











Alleged would-be Delta bomber linked to al-Qaida


-. fLzp1~.


I -les to keep passengers in their seats

; he tried to warn U.S., Nation, 5A


.-C*t *I~


Gators' Meyer resigns


Florida coach
steps down amid
health concerns.
By MARK LONG
AP Sports Writer
GAINESVILLE - Urban
Meyer is stepping down as
coach at Florida because of
health concerns that came
to light when he was admit-
ted to a hospital because of
chest pains following the
Southeastern Conference
championship game.
The 45-year-old Meyer
resigned Saturday, calling
it quits after five seasons
in Gainesville and two
national titles. He leaves
Florida with a 56-10 record
that includes a 32-8 mark in
league play and a school-
record 22-game winning


INSIDE

m Local reactions to
Meyer's departure, I B
streak snapped early this
month against Alabama.
"I have given my heart
and soul to coaching col-
lege football and mentor-
ing young men for the last.
24-plus years and I have
dedicated most of my wak-
ing moments the last five
years to the Gator football
program," Meyer said in a
statement. "I have ignored
my health for years, but
recent developments have
forced me to re-evaluate my
priorities of faith and fam-
ily."
Meyer said he consulted
with his family, his doctors,
school president Bernie
Machen and athletic direc-


tor Jeremy Foley before
deciding it is in his best
interest to focus on his
health and family.
Meyer will 'hold a news
conference in New Orleans
on Sunday afternoon and
will coach his final game
in the Sugar Bowl against
Cincinnati on New Year's
Day.
"Coach Meyer and I have
talked this through and I
realize how hard this was for
him to reach this decision;"
Foley said. "But the bottom
line is that coach Meyer'
needed to make a choice
that is in the best interest
of his well being and his
family. I certainly appreci-
ate what he has meant to
the University of Florida,
our football program and
MEYER continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida coach Urban Meyer (left) and quarterback Tim Tebow react after an Alabama touch-
down in the first half of the SEC championship game at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta on
Dec. 5. The Associated Press reported Saturday that Meyer is stepping down as coach of the
University of Florida football team.


Returns now a hunt for bargains


Post-seasonal-
shopping takes
on new meaning.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

to local retail'
stores Saturday
not only to make
exchanges and
returns on their holiday
gifts - but for more shop-
ping. Many shoppers
were out early to take
advantage of the bargains
stores offered the day after
Christmas.
'There's great sales,
that's all I can say,"
said Sylvia Jenkins of
Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
"I traveled 30 miles to
shop today," said Kato
Webb of Union County.
"You have to take advan-
tage of the sales that are
going on. If you don't take
advantage of opportunity,
it'll pass you by."
William Batte, store
manager at Belk, said the
day-after-Christmas bustle
of customers this year is
more about shopping than
exchanges and returns.
"It's becoming a shop-
ping day instead of an
exchange-and-return day,"
Batte said. "People look
forward to the low prices
and are looking for a bar-
gain. There aren't so many
returns. People are here to
shop for themselves today."
Barbara Beck of Lake
City said she was out shop-
ping to find a good buy
and was thankful to have a
chance to shop for herself.
"I'm here to get a bet-
ter buy on something
that I didn't get around
Christmas time," she said.


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Mother and daughter Carol Underhill (left) and Carol Ann Beck shop for handbags together - instead of making returns - at
Belk on Saturday hoping to find a good sale after the holiday. Store managers say the day-after-Christmas bustle results more
from bargain-shopping now instead -of returns and exchanges.


'Today I'm shopping for
myself and not my fam-
ily. There's bargains that
wouldn't have been there
otherwise."
Carol Underhill of Lake
City said she was ready to
get out of the house and
find a sale.
'"We got tired of sitting
on the computer so we
came out for the bargains,"
said Underhill.
Underhill's daugh-


ter,,Carol Ann Beck of
Hollywood said she and
her mother weren't hitting
the stores to return items
- they were there for the
deals.
"We don't have any
returns," she said, "just all
bargain shopping."
Candy Douglas,
JCPenney store manager,
said her store opened at 5
a.m. for the first time ever
the day after Christmas,


and the heavy customer
traffic was slightly unex-
pected.
"We want to give the
customers an opportunity
to take advantage of the
value," Douglas said. "The
customer base has been
very strong, stronger than
expected."
Customers also said
they were out shopping as
a way to spend time with
their families.


Donna Hardin of
Branford said she came to
Lake City to shop with her
sisters for a "girls' day" to
make exchanges and find
sales.
Hardin's sister, Jerri
Byrd of Branford, said she
was enjoying the bargains
not only for herself, but for
others too.
"It's fun, and I love the
excitement of other people
shopping," Byrd said.


Home

sales up,

prices

down
$8,000 tax credit
attractive to new
homeowners.
By TODD WILSON
twilson@Ilakecityreporter.com
The number of sales were
up; median prices dropped.
That was the story in regard
to November's single-fam-
ily, existing homes sales
figures from the Lake City
Board of Realtors.
In the Lake City-Live Oak
market served by the orga-
nization, there were 32 sin-
gle-family, existing homes
sold during November 2009,
up from 23 sold during the
same month in 2008 - an
increase of 28 percent
The median price of these'
homes dropped to $133,3560
- down 11 percent from
the $150,000 median price
of November 2008.
"The good news is the
$8,000 tax credit came home
to roost in November,"
said LCBR Executive Vice
President Dan Gherna. "It
contributed to a portion of
the sales."
Gherna said the organi-
zation has hope that the
extension of the $8,000 first-
time homebuyer federal tax
credit and the $6,500 exist-
ing home buyer federal
tax credit will continue to
spark more movement in
the market. Both programs
are extended through April
contracts.
"I think we will see a
boost from this tax credit,"
Gherna said.
MEDIAN continued on 3A


1 . '. i : '. 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


60 35
Few showers
WEATHER, 6A


Opinion ................
Business ........... ....
Obituaries ..............
Advice .................
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
New license
laws begin Jan. I.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


(A1$H3. Play'4 .LORIDA

Friday. Saturday: Saturday: Friday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
7-28-31-42 9 Afternoon: 9-0-0 Afternoon: 5-2-3-3 3-7-9-15-21 14-27-30-33-37-38 x5 8-32-49-51-52
Evening: 7-1-8. Evening: 8-1-3-4 PB23 x4


AROUND THE NATION



Say ah: Minn. preps 1 st class of dental therapists


By CHRIS WILLIAMS
Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS
A s a hygienist at
the only non-
profit dental
clinic in a wide
swath of
southern Minnesota, Jodi
Hager sees close-up what
limited care means: chil-
dren from poor families
with decay in every tooth
and adults weary from
driving two hours to a
place that will take their
state insurance.
"I've gotten to know my
patients over the years,
and I see the need," she
said. "It's hard after a
while to look the other
"way. You want to do
something for them, to do
something to address this
problem that you're deal-,
ing with every day."
SThat's why Hager, 40,
is studying to become a
dental therapist - a mid-


Dental hygienist Jamee Rosel
n ie gelloC Edina Minn Denta


level provider who can do lower cost, like filling cavities,
simple invasive procedures dental therapists widely with tl
'currently done only by
*dentists. Dental therapists pushed for legislation
are common in Canada, allowing dental therapists
Great Britain and 50 other despite opposition from
countries, but Minnesota the American Dental
is the first U.S. state Association and other
to license them widely. groups. Lynch said the
Alaska has had a small but therapists were necessary
growing program since to help meet dental needs
2003 that limits therapists in rural Minnesota, in
to tribal lands. the inner city and among
Supporters say people on state-subsidized
Minnesota's program to insurance.
train therapists, launched Like other states,
this year, should improve Minnesota's rural areas
access to care by lowering -can't attract enough den-
the cost of providing it- tists. And many dentists
Sen.~nn Lyg.ch- a. ..,,. ,... won't take-enough patients
Democrat from Rochester, on Medicaid or other


ASSOCIATED PRESS
I along with other hygienists, studies to become a dental therapist Dec. 4 at Normandale
al Therapists are a mid-level provider that can perform simple invasiveprocedures at a much
that currently only dentists are licensed to do. Minnesota is the first state in the U.S. to license
he hope of improving access to dental care while l wearing the cost of it.


government insurance
because dentists say the
programs don't reimburse
them enough to cover
costs.
It's a problem some fear
will get worse as dental
school classes shrink and
dentists get older.
Shelly Gehshan, direc-
tor of the nonprofit Pew
Foundation's Children's
Dental Campaign, said
about a dozen state den-
tal associations around
the country are watch-
ing Minnesota's model..
"Minnesota is a couple of


years ahead of a wave of
activity across the states,"
she said. "It's an idea that
is sweeping the country."
In Connecticut, the
state dental association
approved a pilot project in
November so it could learn
more about the concept,
the group's president,. Dr.
Bruce Tandy, said.
Hager is among 16
students in Minnesota's
first class of dental thera-
pists in programs at the
University of Minnesota
and at Metropolitan State
University in St. Paul.


At the University of
Minnesota dental school,
therapy students train side-
by-side with the dental
students - same equip-
ment, instructors and tech-
niques,. said Dr. Patrick
Lloyd, the dental school
,dean. Though the future
dentists ultimately go on
to study more complex
techniques than the thera-
pists, the principle "is that
they should work together
and get an appreciation for
each other's competency
and skill set," Lloyd said.
After the first group


of therapists graduates..
in 2011, they will work
under the supervision of
dentists, but will be able to
do simple invasive proce-
dures that hygienists can't
- including drilling cavi-
ties, extracting baby teeth,
removing stitches and cap-
ping nerves. Tasks such
as diagnosing patients,
planning treatment, per-
forming root canals, surgi-
cal extractions, placing
crowns and bridges, and
implanting dental devices
will be left to dentists.
The American Dental
Association and other such
groups opposed therapists
for years, saying they
fear the therapists would
provide substandard care.
Kathleen T. O'Loughlin,
the ADA's executive direc-
tor, has been somewhat
reassured that the thera-
pists will be supervised by
dentists, although it hasn't
endorsed Minnesota's
approach.
'We're very supportive
of anything that improves
access to dental health
care to vulnerable popula-
tions," she said.
Dr. Michael Helgeson
runs the nonprofit Apple
Tree Dental, which oper-
ates three clinics, includ-
ing Hager's in Madelia.
Helgeson, a University of
Minnesota-trained dentist,
said he's excited about the
prospect of being able to
hire dental therapists who
can help him treat patients
more affordably. Apple
Tree Dental estimates it
would save $50,000 a year
for each therapist it hires.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Va. lab IDs Argentine 'dirty war' victims by DNA


By NAFEESA SYEED and
VANESSA HAND ORELLANA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
ictoria Avila was 1 when
her father went missing,
snatched up by agents of
Argentina's former mili-
tary dictatorship in 1977.
Now, Victor Hugo Avila is no
longer among the ranks of the
disappeared. Thanks to DNA tests
conducted at a lab in Lorton, Va.,
scientists are helping families of the
long-lost victims of a defunct junta
identify the remains of loved ones
- with 42 matches in 2009 alone.
Advances in DNA testing are mak-
ing it cheaper and faster to identify
victims of South American atrocities,
raising hopes among their relatives
-that in the years ahead science
will answer painful questions from
Argentina's 1976-83 dictatorship.
For Victoria Avila, 33, learning
of her father's fate has brought "a
strange feeling, a weird kind of hap-
piness, because after all, it's not like
he was alive, but at least his remains
-were with us,.
"After 32 years my mother can
Finally call herself a widow," Avila
said at her home on the outskirts of
Buenos Aires, the Argentine capital.
Victor Avila's identification began
*with bone fragments exhumed in
-Argentina and ended in the lab of
the Bode Technology Group Inc.,
' where samples from some 600 skel-
, etons are being compared with thou-
sands of blood samples supplied by
victims' relatives.
* Some 12,000 people are officially
listed as dead or missing from the
.junta's "Dirty War" on dissent;
human rights activists put the figure
at nearly 30,000.
An independent group called the,
Argentine Forensic Anthropology
Team has led efforts to exhume
graves and urged relatives to provide
blood samples.
Luis Fondebrider, a forensic
anthropologist and president of the
group, said he's often asked whether
the bones showed signs of torture
- something he says is almost


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this July 1 photo, Danielle Reed loads a gel to produce a DNA profile, at Bode
Techology in Lorton, Va. The lab is using genetic technology to identify the remains
of people killed nearly 30 years ago in Argentina, some of whom were found in
mass unmarked graves.


impossible to tell. He says loved
ones are given the option of viewing
the skeleton in the lab.
There's no hair or skin or feature
to remind them of the person they
knew, but identifications usually
unleash difficult emotions, tears and
relief.
Fondebrider recalls one man, who
upon learning his father had been
identified, asked to see the remains.
The man took his guitar to play a
song in front of the skeleton with his
young son present.
"I think the man, with that song,
was trying to link-those three gen-
erations," Fondebrider said.
About two years ago, the anthro-
pology team began a wide campaign
to solicit blood samples, posting ads
on TV and banners at soccer stadi-


ums.
Bode, a private facility whose
experts have helped identify victims
from Bosnia, Hurricane Katrina and
the Sept. 11 attacks, outbid several
labs to work for the Argentina team.
The U.S. Congress provided $1.4
million for the first two years of the
campaign, while Argentina is help-
ing cover costs in 2010. Scientists
store the bones in a freezer, helping
to preserve the remaining DNA that
has been exposed to soil for three
decades. To extract DNA, lab work-
ers pulverize bone samples, mix the
powder with liquids and use chemi-
cal reactions to generate many cop-
ies of the DNA.
That provides plenty of genetic
material to test, said Ed Huffine, vice
president for humanitarian missions
at Bode.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former U.S. Sen.
James A. McClure, R-
Idaho, is 85.
* Rockabilly musician
Scotty Moore is 78.
* Actor John Amos is'
70.
* Actress Charmiani
Carr ("The Sound of


Music") is 67.
* ABC News correspon-
dent Cokie Roberts is 66.
* Rock musician Mick
Jones (Foreigner) is 65.
* Singer Tracy Nelson
is 65.
* Actor Gerard
Depardieu is 61.


Thought for Today


"And when the time came for
their purification according to
the law of Moses, they brought
him up to Jerusalem to present
him to the Lord."

- Luke 2:22


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... .(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The LakeCity Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .......754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland . .754-0417
(lstrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.h. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m.. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters. .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks ... ............. . $48.79
52 Weeks . ................ $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks. .. .... ...... $41.40
24 Weeks . . . .............. $82.80
52 Weeks . ............... $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


Columbia County has talent, and

it shows with Top Talent finalists


Columbia's Top
Talent final round
March 26 at CHS.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Local students received
their chance at musical
stardom recently in the first
round of Columbia's Top
Talent. Finalists will vie for
the top spot in an upcoming
final round.
The annual singing com'-
petition featured 25 high
school students on Dec.
18 with 21 of them from
the Lake City area and four
from the Fort While area,
according to Ronnie Collins,
organizer of the event.
Collins said the contend-
ers competed against each
other by area, and eight


Lake City students along
with three Fort White stu-
dents will move on to the
final round where a winner
will be chosen.
The final round is
scheduled for March 26 at
Columbia High School.
Among the Lake City
finalists is student Alix
Williams, who had the
highest score in her area of
the first round, and student
Colby Craig, who had the
second highest Lake City
score.
Other Lake City final-
ists are students Shanniece
Griffin, Jordan Yarborough,
Lauren Ogburn, Shannon
Alexander, Star Mosley and
Akeem Collins.
Terrance Bryant, Roberto
Soto and John Gallart are
the Fort White students
selected to go to the final


round, with Bryant receiv-
ing the highest Fort White
score in the first round and
Soto receiving the second
highest.
Collins said there will
also be a junior division of
the competition offered for
any Columbia County stu-
dent in grades six through-
eight.
Junior division auditions
will begin Jan. 4.
Collins said the display of
talent at the first round of
the Columbia's Top Talent'
competition was "stagger-
ing," and he likes to pro-
vide this type of chance for
students.
"I love to give the kids
the opportunity to show-
case their musical talents,"
he said. "If you get up and
do your best, then anything
can happen."


Jeanette Varnes Boston
Ms. Jeanette Varnes
Boston, 70, of Lake City went
home to be with her Lord and
Savior, Thursday, December
24, 2009, at her home. She
was born in Sanderson but
had spent most of her life
here in Columbia County.
She was a loving mother and
grandmother who enjoyed
spending time with her fam-
ily and her four dogs. She is
preceded in death by her son,
Derek Boston.
Ms. Boston is survived
by her three sons, Dean
Boston (Peggy) of Jasper,
FL, Dennis Boston (Dedra)
& Danny Boston (Lucy) both
of Lake City, FL; her broth-
ers, William Vames (Mattie)
of Lulu, FL and Clyde Varnes
of Lake City, FL; sister, Betty
Davis of Jacksonville, FL,
four grandchildren, Dixie,
Seth, Zachary, & Zoe also
survive.
Funeral services for Ms.
Boston will be conducted on
Tuesday, December 29, 2009
at 2 p.m. at Gateway-Forest
Lawn Funeral Home.
Visitation will be held from
12 p.m. until service time.
Intermentwill follow in Forest
SLawn Memorial Gardens
Cemetery. Arrangements
are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 S. Highway 441, Lake
City. (386) 752-1954. Please
sign the guest book at www.
gatewayforestlawn.com.


Pamela K. 'Pam' Cribbs
Mrs. Pamela K. "Pam".
Cribbs, 49, of Lake City went
to be with her Lord and Savior
on Friday, December 25,
2009, following a lengthy ill-
ness. A native of Winchester,
TN, Mrs. Cribbs had been a
resident of Lake City since
1998. She was a travel agent
for 16 years, loved playing
the piano at Hopeful Baptist
Church, was a home school
teacher for her children, and
loved her husband, children,
and family with uncondition-
al love.
Mrs. Cribbs is survived by
her husband Rodney Cribbs;,
two children, D.J. Cribbs and
Callie Cribbs, all of Lake City;
mother and father, Lorene F.
and Donald R. Gregory of
Decherd, TN; brother and sis-
ter in law, Philip and Brenda
Gregory of Murfreesboro,
TN; grandmother, Thelma
Farris of Winchester, TN;
aunt and uncle, Martha and
Jess Voorhies of Winchester,
TN., who were her loving
caregivers.


Funeral services for Mrs.
Cribbs will be conducted at 11
a.m. Wednesday, December
30, 2009, at Hopeful Baptist
Church with Dr. Rodney
Baker officiating. Interment
will follow at Hopeful
Cemetery. Visitation with
.the family will be held from
5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at the
funeral home. Arrangements'
are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 South Highwvay 441,
Lake City. Please sign the
guest.book at www.gateway-
forestlawn. com.:
'Merri Alicia Cothern
Merri Alicia Cothem, 80,
a resident of Lake City, Fl.
passed away December 25,
2009 at the Suwannee Valley
Care Center, Lake City.
Private funeral services will
be conducted.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
.ments. For details, call the Lake
City Repqrter's classified depart-
mentat 752-1293. '


MAC JOHNSON ROOFING




104 SOUTHWEST 266TH STREET
NEWBERRY, FLORIDA 32669

352.472.4943'or 866.376.4943
vwebsite: www.macjohnsonroofing.com


MEDIAN: Prices down 11 percent


Continued From Page 1A
While November's sales
numbers did not surge, the
total was closer to the 35
units sold during November
2007, he said.
In the Lake City-Live Oak
market, Gherna said one-
third of all properties sold
locally this year have been
distressed sales - either
short sales or foreclosures
- but this ratio is stron-
ger than many markets in
Florida and the U.S.
The Fort Myers-Cape
Coral market continued
to lead the state in growth
percentage in November


with a 133 percent increase
above November 2008. In
November 2009, that mar-
ket recorded 1,530 sales.
The median sale price in
the Fort Myers-Cape Coral
market is $95,100, a 13 per-
cent price decrease com-
pared to the same month
in 2008.
"Cape Coral is the fore-
closure capital of Florida,"
Gherna said. '"That's why
the median prices are so
low. We're fortunate here."
Gainesville continues
to show strong real estate
gains, as well. Gainesville


recorded 166 sales in
November, up 84 percent
from a year ago. The medi-
an sales price in Gainesville
also increased in November
to $167,000, up 4 percent
from the same month in
2008.
Gherna said his outlook
for the Lake City-Live Oak
real estate market in 2010
is conservative.
, "I think we'll see a little
sales increase," he said.
"I think median price will
flatline in 2010 and maybe
drop 5 percent or so."


MEYER: Will coach in Sugar Bowl
Continued From Page, 1A

the Gator Nation. I have committed to his players, Above all, I appreciate our
never seen anyone more his family and his program. friendship."











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WE WILL BE OPEN ON
NEW YEARS DAY


OBITUARIES


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428

















OPINION


Sunday, December 27, 2009


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Gifts that

reach

beyond

Christmas

ith returns
of the season
- and post-
Christmas
shopping
- beginning as early as 5 a.m.
in some stores on Saturday, ifs
hard to accept that the holidays
are truly winding down.
For many of our friends and
neighbors in Columbia County,
this holiday season was an
especially harsh one. Limited
or no incomes replaced full-
time jobs for many, and for
others the struggle to provide
basic necessities dampened
Christmas presents and holiday
cheer.
. As we have in the past,
Columbia County residents
rose mightily to the occasion
and spread a cornucopia of food
and donations to charitable
groups who distribute to the
needy. For thousands of people
in our county, the holidays
were much brighter than they
might have been without such
generous giving.
The Christmas season will
soon be supplanted by a new
year, but the need that was so
prevalent during the holidays
will not disappear with a turn of
the calendar. The charge now is
to continue the Christmas spirit
that is in such high supply dur-
ing December, but seems to
falter as the year grows.
Christmas is not only a date
on our Advent calendars. It
is a reminder that our holi-
day returns mean more than
exchanging a present or spend-
ing a gift card.
The gifts we gave so freely
'to those in need during the
holiday season must also be on
our returns list if the magic of'
Christmas is to reach beyond
now-you-see-it, now-you-don't
HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday,
Dec. 27, the 361st day of
2009. There are four days left
in the year.
* On Dec. 27, 1968, Apollo 8
and its three astronauts made
a safe, nighttime splashdown in
the Pacific.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Finding Santa Claus at Winn-Dixie


Editor's note: This column is a
reprint from December 2006.
during the past
Christmas season,
you could see
Santa Claus most
anywhere - the
Christmas parade, the mall,
Christmas parties - but I found
Santa in a shopping aisle at
Winn-Dixie. Or so I thought.
It was Christmas Eve and
I was doing some last-minute
shopping at Winn Dixie when I
noticed a woman glancing in my
direction. I kept shopping, but
suddenly she ivalked over and
asked, "Do you write a column
for The Lake City Reporter?"
I said I did and she shook my
hand and said, "I have always
wanted to meet you. I just love
your column and wouldn't miss
it for anything. My husband and
I read everything you write and
you are our favorite columnist"
Well, naturally, her kind
words were music to my ears ....
and I thought, "This fine lady
is just making my Christmas
season. I have truly found Santa
Claus in, of all places, Winn-
Dixie."
She got a fresh breath of air
and continued, "Your column is
the first thing we turn to when
we get our paper and lots of our
friends do the same. Sometimes
we call each other and talk
about what you wrote that week.
Sometimes we even clip and
save your column."
I wasn't about to interrupt her
steady flow of sweet words so
she kept going, "Your columns
have made us laugh and 'cry and
be inspired. It's the main reason
we subscribe to the Reporter."
I was flattered and touched so
I told her how sincerely I appre-
ciated her compliments, that
she had made my day, and then
I started to move on to finish
my shopping.
But she said,; "Wait, don't
leave just yet. I want my hus-
band to meet you."
Then she called to her hus-
band standing nearby and said,


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williams_h2@firn.edu
372 W Duval St
Lake City, FL 32055


"Honey, come over here. I want
you to meet our all-time favorite
writer - Jack Exum!"
Oh well, I guess sometimes
even Santa screws up!

Lake Hiawatha?
Friend Elwood Tyre donated
a color post card to our School
Museum depicting the original
Red Barn Restaurant when
it was located beside June's
Junque Junction on US 441
South.
In the background is the
lake local people call Big Lake
or Alligator Lake but on the
postcard the lake is called Lake
Hiawatha. Have any of you read-
ers ever heard that lake called
Hiawatha?

Lake City Theater?
So many Lake City people
perform at the High Springs
Community Theater (HSCT)
that sometimes people kiddingly
refer to it as the Lake City
Community Theater. HSCT's
recent terrific production of "It's
A Wonderful Life" is a case in
point. The play's printed pro-
gram lists eight of the talented
cast of characters as:
* Zachary Krause: "... who
attends Lake City Middle
School."
* Brad Bullard: "... who cur-
rently resides in Lake City."
* Lorraine Kirkland: "... of
Lake City."
* Henry Martinez: "... who
now lives in Lake City."
* Willow Veda Russell-


Martinez: "...a n honor student
at Lake City Middle School."
* Ragan Thomas-Gravatt: "...
presently living in Lake City."
* Patricia Way: "... currently
living in Lake City."
* Amanda Willis Martinez:
"... a teacher at Summers
Elementary in Lake City."
And a lot of people working
backstage and sitting in the
audience are from Lake City,
too.

A president's death
James Montgomery reports
that his classmate Ann Barker
(CHS 1951), a former CHS
Student Council president, died
recently.
Ann was voted "Most Likely
to Succeed" her senior year and
succeed she did. She joined
the Navy and rose to the rank
of captain and at one point was
considered for promotion to
admiral.
A Registered Nurse by train-
ing, she once served as the'top
administrator at the huge navy
hospital at Subic Bay in the
Philippines.
Ann also had won two bronze
stars for bravery while serving
in Viet Nam.
She was residing in Virginia
prior to her death.

Lake City Book
About 50 copies of the
book "Lake City, Florida - A
Sesquicentennial Tribute", co-
authored by Kevin McCarthy
and me, are left. They are for
sale at Hunter Printing at 1330
SW Main Blvd. The book has
300 pages and 250 photos, and
costs $20, tax included.

Daffy definition
Procrastinator: A person with
a 'waif problem.

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and, long-time Columbia
County resident.


OTHER OPINION

We are now closing in on other Earths


Astronomers are
one step closer to
discovering another
Earth, a planet that
is roughly the same
size and at enough distance
from its star that it is in theory
habitable. It is not far-fetched to
say that this will very likely hap-
pen in the not-too-distant future.
The first extrasolar planets
were discovered 15 years ago,
and now more than 400 have
been found and at an accelerat-
ing pace. The early discoveries
were gas giants on the order
of Jupiter and Pluto and they
orbited far too close to their


stars. But as techniques have
improved, astronomers are able
to identify smaller, occasion-
ally rocky, planets, orbiting far
enough from their stars to be
close to what is considered a
habitable zone.
Especially sought are planets
in a category known as "super-
Earths," those that are within 10
times the mass of Earth.
Now a team from the �
Harvard-Smithsonian Center
for Astrophysics has discovered
a planet orbiting a star in the
Ophiuchus constellation that is
only 2.7 times the size of Earth
and 6.6 times as massive. And


it is mainly water, alas, at 400
degrees F clouds of superheat-
ed steam over boiling oceans.
Team leader David
Charbonneau told The New York
Times, with a certain under-
statement, "This probably is not
habitable, but it didn't miss the
habitable zone by that much."
Ophiuchus is 40 light-years
from Earth, a huge distance but
one that Charbonneau put into
an arresting perspective for the
Times: "Our own TV signals
have already passed this star."

* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com


Santa Harry's

gift of new

health taxes

W while hastily
ramming his
2,457-page,
$2.5 trillion
ObamaCare
package through the Seiate
, before Christmas, Majority
Leader Harry Reid (D, Nev.)
must see himself as Saint Nick.
High atop his sleigh, Santa
Harry has piled 12 brand-new
taxes and six tax-hikes totaling
$398.1 billion.
"If your family earns less
than $250,000 a year, you will
not see your taxes increased a
single dime," President Obama
told Congress on February 24.
"I repeat Not a single dime."
This remains technically
true. For families earning less
than $250,000, taxes would
rise between 2010 and 2019
by much more than a single
dime. According to Americans
for Tax Reform, seven of
Santa Harry's tax hikes violate
Obama'spledge and collec-
tively cost $81.8 billion. These
include:
* A $2.7 billion levy on
indoor tanning salons that
Reid imposed after ditching a
plastic-surgery tax. He just as
arbitrarily could tax haircuts,
or heirloom tomatoes, or Hula
Hoops. Why not a tax on guys
named Harry?
* A $5 billion Medicine
Cabinet Tax specifically per-
mits insulin purchases but oth-
erwise prohibits using money
in Health Savings Accounts,
Flexible Spending Accounts,
or Health Reimbursement
Accounts for non-prescription,
over-the-counter medications.
* A $15 billion indi-
vidual mandate would force
Americans to buy health insur-
ance. In 2014, those without
"qualifying," government-
approved coverage would pay
$495 or 0.5 percent of Adjusted
Gross Income whichever is
higher. In 2016, that rises to
2 percent of AGI, or approxi-
mately $640 today.
Beyond the $250,000 thresh-
old, Santa Harry's sleigh over-
flows with other new taxes:
* A $149.1 billion, 40 per-
cent excise tax awaits those
with "Cadillac" health plans
worth at least $8,500 per indi-
vidual' and $23,000 per family.
These taxes, the Congressional
Budget Office predicts, "would
be largely passed through
to consumers in the form
of higher premiums for pri-
vate coverage." Also - in an
affront to equality before the
law - Longshoremen are
exempt from this tax. Why not
ship captains, or nurses, or test
pilots?
* An additional $59.6 billion
tax on health insurance com-
panies also will make costly
coverage costlier.
* A $19.2 billion medical-
device tax would boost prices
of hearing aids, heart stents,
artificial limbs, and similar
implements and divert money
to Washington that could
refine such products and cre-
ate new therapeutic, life-saving
inventions.
' Despite this massive pick-
ing of citizens' empty pockets,
ObamaCare still would leave
24 million Americans unin-
sured.
All this is possible thanks
to the Senate's Kremlinesque
procedural vote last Sunday
night/Monday at 1:08 a.m.
Liberal Democrats once
chanted "The whole world is
watching." Santa Harry and
his snow-covered Democratic
elves built a sleigh full of tax
hikes while the whole world
was sleeping.
* New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.

















Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


BRIEFS


Prayers mark
. tsunami memory
PHUKET, Thailand
- Buddhist monks chanted
on white-sand beaches in
Thailand and thousands
prayed at mosques in
Indonesia to mark the fifth
anniversary of the Asian tsu-
nami that left 230,000 people
dead.
. The devastating
- Dec. 26, 2004, tsunami
struck a dozen countries
around the Indian Ocean rim.
Its towering waves wiped
out entire coastal communi-
ties, devastated families and
crashed over tourist-filled
beaches the morning after
Christmas. Survivors waded
through a liorror show of
corpse-filled waters.
In Thailand, hundreds
of residents and foreigners
returned to the beaches on
the island of Phuket to recall
one of the worst natural
disasters of modern times.
A moment of silence was
observed on Phuket's Patong
Beach, a popular strip of
hotels and restaurants, to
mark the moment the tsu-
nami struck.
Buddhist monks in bright
orange robes chanted
prayers. Onlookers wept and
embraced.

Officials: 3 Fatah
activists killed
NABLUS, West Bank -
Israeli soldiers on Saturday
shot dead three Palestinians
who the military says were
involved in a roadside
ambush that killed an Israeli
settler earlier in the week.
The operation in the West
Bank city of Nablus targeted
three activists of Palestinian
President Mahmoud Abbas'
Fatah movement. Palestinian
witnesses said troops, many
of them masked, opened fire
while storming the homes of
the men.
The West Bank has been
relatively calm in recent
months. Roadside ambushes
and army raids targeting
Fatah gunmen, common just
a few years ago, are now
rare.
This week's sudden spike
in violence could undercut
the security coordination
forged by Abbas and Israel's
military as they try to clamp
down on a shared foe, the
Islamic militant group Hamas.
The three men killed
Saturday were identified as
members of Fatah's violent
Al Aqsa Martyrs' Brigades, a
group that carried out many
shootings during the second
Palestinian uprising, which
erupted in 2000.

GOP lawmakers
called hypocrites
WASHINGTON
- Democrats are troubled
by the inconsistency of
Republican lawmakers who
approved a major Medicare
expansion six years ago that
has added tens of billions of
dollars to federal deficits, but
oppose current health over-
haul plans.
All current GOP sena-
tors, including the 24 who
voted for the 2003 Medicare
expansion, oppose the health
care bill that's backed by
President Barack Obama
and most congressional
Democrats.
The Democrats claim that
their plan moving through
Congress now will pay
for itself with higher taxes
and spending cuts and
they cite the nonpartisan
Congressional Budget Office
for support.
By contrast, when
Republicans controlled the
House, Senate and White
House in 2003, they over-
came Democratic opposition
to add a deficit-financed
prescription drug benefit to
Medicare. The program will
cost a half-trillion dollars over
10 years, or more by some
estimates.

Vatican to review
security breach
VATICAN CITY - The
Vatican will review security
procedures after a woman


jumped a barrier and rushed
at Pope Benedict XVI for the
second time in two years,
this time managing to knock
him down before being pulled
away by guards, the Vatican
spokesman said. Benedict,
82, wasn't hurt and delivered
his traditional Christmas Day
greetings in 65 languages
from the loggia overlooking
St. Peter's Square.
* Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This picture provided by J.P. Karas shows Northwest Airlines Flight 253 on. the runway after
arriving at Detroit Metropolitan Airport from Amsterdam on Friday. A 23-year-old Nigerian
passenger, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, with ties to a terrorist group, was allegedly trying to
ignite an explosive device Friday. Abdulmutallab was charged in the attack Saturday.


Nigerian man charged in


Christmas airliner attack


By LARRY MARGASAK and
COREY WILLIAMS
Associated Press Writers

DETROIT - A 23-
year-old Nigerian man
who claimed to have ties
to al-Qaida was charged
Saturday with trying to
destroy a Detroit-bound
airliner on Christmas Day,
as authorities around the
world urgently sought to
learn more about him.
Some airline passengers
traveling Saturday felt the
consequences of the fright-
ening attack. They were told
that new U.S. regulations
prevented them from leav-
ing their seats beginning an
hour before landing.
. The Justice Department
charged that Umar Farouk
Abdulmutallab had a device
containing a high explosive
attached to his body. An
affidavit with the indict-
ment said that as Northwest
Flight 253 descended
toward Detroit Metropolitan
Airport, Abdulmutallab set
off the device - sparking a


fire instead of'an explosion.
According to the affi-
davit filed in U.S. District
Court in Detroit, a prelimi-
nary analysis of the device
showed it contained PETN,
also known as pentaeryth-
ritol.
The government alleged
that Abdulmutallab told
passengers that his stom-
ach was upset, then pulled
a blanket over himself.
Passengers then heard pop-
ping noises.
. Abdulmutallab, who had
a valid 'U.S. visa, was in a
terrorism database but not
on a no-fly list. He lived in
a posh London neighbor-
hood, but a law enforcement
official said the suspect
acknowledged he received
training and instructions
from al-Qaida operatives in
Yemen.
President Barack Obama,
on vacation in Hawaii, was
briefed about developments
in the attack. National
Security Council chief of
staff Denis McDonough
was holed up in a secure


hotel room in Hawaii to
receive briefings, and other
traveling presidential aides
were kept shut away to
monitor new information.
Abdulmutallab appeared
on the Terrorist Identities
DatamartEnvironmentdata-
base maintained by the U.S.
National Counterterrorism
Center, said a U.S. official
who received a briefing..
Containing some 550,000
names, . the database
includes people with known
or suspected ties to a terror-
ist organization. However, it
is not a list. that would pro:
hibit a person from board-
ing a U.S.-bound airplane.
Rep. Peter King, R-
N.Y., ranking Republican
on the House Homeland
Security Committee, said
Abdulmutallab was not on
the no-fly list.
In Nigeria, Alhaji Umaru
Mutallab, the man's father,
told The Associated Press,
"I believe .he might have
been to Yemen, but we are
investigating to determine
that."


Airlines: New rules keep passengers

in seats 1-hour before flight lands


By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - Some
airlines were telling pas-
sengers on Saturday that
new government security'
regulations prohibit them
from leaving their seats
beginning an hour before
landing.
The regulations are
a response to a suspect-
.ed terrorism incident on
Christmas Day.
Air Canada said in a state-
mentthatnewrules imposed
by the Transportation
Security Administration
limit on-board activities by
passengers and crew in
U.S. airspace. The airline


Father of

would-be

bomber

warned U.S.

By PAMELA HESS and
MATTHEW LEE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - U.S.
government officials tell
The Associated Press that
the Nigerian man charged
with trying to destroy a
jetliner came to the atten-
tion of U.S. intelligence in
November when his father
went to the U.S. embassy in
Abuja, Nigeria, to express
his concerns about his son.
A congressional offi-
cial said Umar Farouk
Abdulmutallab, a 23-year- '
old Nigerian, popped up in
U.S. intelligence reports
about four weeks ago as
having a connection to both
al-Qaida and Yemen.
Another government offi-
cial said Abdulmutallab's
father went to the embassy
in Abuja with his concerns,
but did not have any spe-
cific information that would
put him on the "no-fly list"
at the airport.


said that during the final
hour of flight passengers
must remain seated. They
won't be allowed access to
carryon baggage or to have
any items on their laps.
Flight attendants on
some domestic flights are
informing passengers of
similar rules. Passengers
on a flight from New York
to Tampa Saturday morn-
ing were also told they
must remain in their seats
and couldn't have items in
their laps, including laptops
and pillows.
The TSA declined to con-.
firm the new restrictions.
Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano
said in a statement Saturday


that passengers flying to
the U.S. from overseas may
notice extra security, but
she said the. measures "are
designed to be unpredict-
able, so passengers should
not expect to see the same
thing everywhere."
A transportation security
official speaking on condi-
tion of anonymity because
the official wasn't autho-
rized to speak publicly
said passengers traveling
internationally could see
increased security screen-
ing at gates and when they
check their bags, as well
as additional measures on
flights such as stowing car-
ryons and. personal items
before the plane lands.


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h Florida
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FTRI Relay, Inc.


1*~


the phone?


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009

















LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


THE WEATHER



"\ FEW, PARTLY MOSTLY

SHOWERS CLOUDY ,, SUNNY



HI 60 LO HI 60L029 HI 61 L0341


Pensacola
59/38


S59/37
Talahassee LakeCity,
59/37 , 60/35
Sainesville .
Palam City 59/38
59/41 Ocala
8Q /A 1


acksonville
60/37

Daytona Beach
6245

* 0


City
Cape Canaveral
. Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


- 'Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral ke Cit
62/48 64/53 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
64/51 West Palm Beach Ocala
73/59 * Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers: 76/65 0 Pensacola
72/57 * Naples * Tallahassee
72/56 Miami Tampak
76/65 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
76/68


1*


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


55
41
67
43
82 in 2008
19 in 1985


0.00"
2.72"
46.90"
2.08"
47.88"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:25 a.m.
5:38 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
5:39 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 1:50 p.m.
Moonset today 3:00 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 2:36 p.m.
Moonset tom. 4:05 a.m.



Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
31 7 15 23
Full Last New First


2

60 mAiUtes to bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


SHOWERS




HI 65 L0 41


Monday
70/45/pc
66/38/s
76/55/pe
73/47/s
62/31/pc
60/32/s
79/70/pc
60/29/pc
76/55/pc
72/51/s
64/31/pc
68/41/s
56/37/s
53/33/s
58/31/s
67/43/s
57/29/pc
75/52/pc


Tuesday
63/48/s
60/45/s
71/61/s
68/48/s
61/36/s
58/38/pc
79/70/s
61/34/pc
72/61/s
69/51/s
61/36/s
63/47/s
56/43/s
55/40/s
56/37/s
62/48/s
57/36/s
70/57/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weather.com )


.... .a Forecasts, data and graph-
-- ' ics � 2009 Weather Central
' LC, Madison, Wis.
' - www.weatherpublisher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: A trough of low pressure will produce numerous snow showers over
the Upper Midwest, the eastern Great Lakes and the Ohio Valley today. A trough of low prps-
sure will also bring rain and higher elevation snow showers to western Oregon and northern
California. Meanwhile, high pressure will provide sunny to partly cloudy skies from the south-
ern Plains to the Southeast.


NAINLFRCST A 3 pIm.toda


" 10s - ci -hicaa_ 31/23 --e
i 1 , / . i l.,ke. Om3ha 20 i -o ' 3bS a49 i
57147 ! .. Dl . .30---St' Lols� w aS ngln






I " 'r. -V--- io, O_ if_._-- '----Cold Front
50s ., 32/21

n4 L " ue .W rmnmphts ,
S.76/65 Stonar
60s 51/4 3, m 40 ana,

48ewI 50s


45/-ColdFront
Housion 5503 Orlando .
58/34� " *6/48WarmFront
60s ' r _lMiami
Sp c76/55 Statin ary

Occluded

YESTERDAY'SI NATIONAL EXTREMES, :' High: ,72,1 Miami, FlaLow:'-150.Bryce Cary nUtah'-
,*J .i..'-AliCati.i t.12.=;!..0- i-r-. ^- ;- -i.;"- -. - - - -- - -- .-' -- --*-- - - '.- e.-:- .-^.ar ,^-.".e


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise " ,
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
DenVer


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W
;. 2 . ' I 42/26/pc
34/19/0 36/18/pc
]2 i31. ,1 36/28/r
46/30/0 52/30/pc
52/41/1.01 46/31/pc
1 20/7/0 28/8/s
48/27/0' 52/28/pc
20/18/.05 17/-3/pc
,r. 20'iI 31/17/c
.ii 3 , 47/30/r
44/33/.36. 35/25/c
57/46/0 59/36/pc
45/33/0 43/25/sn1
49/40/0 53/28/pc
2 1:' l ! '28/6/pc
2., ' i.t . 27/20/sf
J, 30'0 34 21 .,
40/30/.01 33/22/sn
'5':] 31-. 0 5S. 1 pc
46/24/0' ' 45/28/s
57/47/0 "62/45/sh
28/19/.14 30/8/c


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis-
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY
20/15/.01 23/12/pc Omaha
36/29/0 31/23/sn Orlando
45/27/0 50/29/s Philadelphia
18/4/.03 -2/-15/sf Phoenix
48/36/0 53/28/pc Pittsburgh
41/34/.09 47/28/pc Portland ME
79/67/0 81/67/s Portland OR
53/35/0 58/34/pc Raleigh
34/25/.01 31/18/sn Rapid City
54/28/0 52/29/pc Reno
54/42/0 60/37/sh Richmond
27/20/.01 25/13/pc Sacramento.
.48/32/0 52/37/pc St. Louis
49/30/0 46/24/pc Salt Lake City
57/47/0 62/49/c San Antonio
47/31/0 42/27/pc San Diego
72/63/0 76/65/pc San Francisco
23/17/0 25/12/sf Seattle
'51/31/0 57/34/pc Spokane
54/36/0 56/39/pc Tampa
41/37/.37 49/34/pc Tucson
37/21/0 33/20/pc Washington


Saturday Today


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
-25/17/.07
60/51/0
52/40/1.01
58/35/0
45/35/.01
31/26/.02
41/36/0
53/42/0
21/12/.41
28/11/0
56/50/.05
49/35/0
. 31/27/0.
25/13/0
,58/31/0
59/46/0
52/43/0
51/35/0
28/0/0
61/54/0
54/27/0
54/43/.87


Hi/Lo/W
23/6/pc
62/48/sh
48/34/pc
61/41/pc
36/24/c
44/35/r
42/34/c
55/29/pc
22/4/pc
36/19/sn
51/29/pc
54/40/sh
32/21/sf
28/18/c
61/33/s
61/49/c
57/47/sh
42/31/pc
28/17/pc
64/51/pc
60/36/s
48/33/pc


INERAIOA
oA~uruay TT1v audauoavStuay T d


7a Ip p . onda y 6a
Sunday Monday

. -
r ..


IHMFrcaistempat ireq "Feels ie'temperature ;
*, ... -- de~~muta~a


On this 'aIe ,in
1947. ,New rN Cily
received a record
26 4 inctesi rinow.v
in 24 hours, witr, as
much as, 32 nc.hes
reported in the
suDurbs. The head)
snow brought traffic
to a standstill.


Get Connected

Q:�a-


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BelJing
Berlin ,
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/72/0
43/36/0
na/55/0
73/59/0
21/7/0
43/36/0
81/70/0
73/57/0
.36/23/0
79/68/0
25/19/.07
70/63/0
82/75/0-


uuday
Hi/Lo/W
90/78/pc
39/29/c
71/56/c
69/54/s
21/5/pc
37/26/c
81/62/t
77/57/pc
36/25/c
80/63/t
24/13/sf
69/59/sh
84/76/t


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City.
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


HI/Lo/Pcp.
55/41/.24
81/68/0
48/43/.09
52/41/.88
73/48/0
32/25/0
39/28/.01
73/63/.11
82/73/.16
73/na/0
28/9/.35
94/74/0
45/30/0


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr=drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h=hazy, i=ice, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunny,
sh=showers, sn=snow, ts=thunderstorms, w=windy.


-. ..


. ., "-
.. . ^ ' f',;: -,-


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HutrsWak51.N 3dS. Twr- qae 7SW- 75th.S t. *Shad tU omH1S prnhS -Cm on 20. W 9h.v. 1
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Hi/Lo/W
69/49/sh
77/60/pc
.38/29/pc
51/38/s
76/51/pc
27/18/sn
28/18/sn
78/60/t
78/70/pc
72/44/s
34/27/rs
84/73/t
38/26/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


HI/Lo/Pcp.
91/77/0
55/46/.06
85/75/.57
85/74/0
84/54/0
21/12/0
88/77/.53
66/64/0
68/52/0
52/46/0
39/34/.84.
46/32/0
43/39/0


HI/Lo/W
82/67/t
49/37/c
83/77/r
84/74/r
82/55/s
25/11/c
87/75/t
75/65/sh
73/51/pc
42/32/pc
26/16/sf
36/25/rs
36/23/pc.


" T; .-Kamm-


,mm,,,,mmq


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


I


Im'















Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Sunday, December


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


27, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

CHS SOFFBALU
Tryouts planned
for Jan. 11
Columbia High
softball tryouts for
varsity and junior varsity
are 3:30 p.m. Jan. 11 at
the CHS field.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.
CHS BASEBALL
Alumni Day set
for Feb. 6
Columbia High
baseball has Alumni Day
planned for Feb. 6. There
will be a home run derby
and scrimmage game for
the alumni, followed by
the 2010 team's purple
and gold game.
For details, e-mail
columbiabaseball@gmail.
com.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Academy offers
skills camp
The Gatorball Baseball
Academy is offering a
defensive skills camp for
ages 13-18 from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Monday and
Tuesday at Buchholz
High. Cost is $100.
For details, call
Stephen Barton at
(352) 514-4414.

FLAG FOOTBALL, CHEER
Registration open
for league play
" Registration for flag
football, ages 5-12, and
cheerleading, ages 5-10,
is under way at Christ
Central Ministries. The
season begins in January.
Cost is $35.
For details, call Ronny
Busscher at 365-2128.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
* Columbia High girls
soccer vs..Clay High in
* Christmas tournament at
CYSA fields, 4 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Santa Fe High
in Christmas tournament
at CYSA fields, 6 p.m.
S*' Columbia High
boys basketball vs.
host Jeffersontown
High in Gaslight Holiday
* Classic in Louisville, Ky.,
9:15 p.m. ,
Tuesday
* .Columbia High
girls soccer vs. Pedro
Menendez High in
Christmas tournament at
CYSA fields, 11 a.m.
* Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Middleburg
High in Christmas
tournament at CYSA
fields, 3 p.m.
* Columbia High
boys soccer vs. Taylor
County High in Christmas
tournament at CYSA
fields, 11 a.m.
* Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Cornerstone
Academy in Christmas
tournament at CYSA
fields, 3 p.m.
* Columbia High girls
basketball hosts Palatka
High in Holiday Shootout,
7:30 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball in Gaslight
Holiday Classic in
S Louisville, Ky., TBD
Wednesday
* Columbia High girls
basketball hosts Union
County High in Holiday
Shootout, 7:30 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
basketball in Gaslight
Holiday Classic in


Louisville, Ky., TBD


COURTESY PHOTO
In this file photo, former Columbia High golfer, Blayne Barber, competes for UCF in a match
earlier this year. /


Shining stars


Local highlights .

and happenings

of the past year
By TIM KIRBY honored by an induction
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com into the Florida State
Athletics Hall of Fame.
olf seems to Wilson starred at
produce a Columbia High and was'
new prodigy an All-American at FSU,
every year, where he holds the record
only to have for career sacks. A first-
that person struggle in the . round draft choice, he
highly competitive sport. played seven seasons in
Blayne Barber of Lake the NFL for Cincinnati and
City is one golfer living Tampa Bay.
up to his expectations, Former CHS players
including a run-away win Jerome Carter and Vince
in the 2009 Florida State Anderson were given
Amateur. tryouts by Dalls and
As a freshman at UCF, the New York Giants,
Barber was on the All- respectively. Carter
Conference USA first team sponsored a youth football
and All-Freshman team. camp in Lake City and both
His 71.14 average was best players participated,
among the Knights, who Others still strapping
made an NCAA appearance on the pads are semi-pro '
and finished 10th. Barber players David Dunham,
placed seventh in the Mitchell George and
tournament. Jermaine Pye, who made
Barber was one of five the Minor League Football
golfers in the country News 2009 Winter/Spring
named to the National Golf All-American Team as
Association of American members of the Lake City
All-Freshmanyteam.
Reinard Wilson was ' PERFORMERS continued on 3B


MEYER RESIGNS
i MYERRESGN


oops


he artuland


Columbia will have 'opportunity of a lifetime.


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Under, coach Trey
Hosford the Columbia High
basketball team has become
accustomed to Christmas
basketball tournaments
near the beach. This year,
they'll go for something a
little different.
The Tigers travel to
the heartland of basket-
ball to compete in the
Gaslight Holiday Classic in
Louisville, Ky., on Dec. 28-
30. Coach Hosford hopes
the team 'gets something
more out of it than warm
weather and a possible win-
ter tan this season.
"We do a tournament
every year," he said.
"Usually, we're near beach.
I wanted to do something
different that we haven't
done before. Basketball
started in Kentucky. It's still.
the big thing there. I want-
ed to do something special,
and this hasn't been done
before. Eight of the 13 that
will travel have never flown.
I want to go to win games,
but I also want to give the
team an experience that
they'll never forget.
"There's a chance of
snow. We'll get to practice
at Bellarmine University,
which is a Division two
school on Monday morn-
ing, so that will give them
a chance to be on a col-
lege campus. Tuesday,
well get to visit Churchill
downs and do a walking
tour and Wednesday, we'll
visit the Louisville slugger
museum."
Hosford, in particular, is
looking forward to visiting


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High coach Trey Hosford (center) draws up a play as he speaks to the Tigers
on the sideline during a game played earlier this year in Lake City. The Tigers will travel to
Louisville, Ky., to compete in the Gaslight Holiday Classic.


the home of the Kentucky
Derby..
"A lot of people are unfa-
miliar with what it actually
is," Hosford said. "We'll
actually get to go behind
the scenes. They'll take
us down on the frack, and
the average person is just
unable to do that. It's going
to be a history lesson."
The tour of the Louisville
Slugger Museum isn't as
mapped out yet, but Hosford
intends for the team to see
memorabilia and the differ-


ent things involved in the
history of the game of base-
ball's most famous bat.
The trip isn't just a site-
seeing tour, however, as
the team is there to com-
pete against some of the
nation's best high school
basketball teams. Teams
from California, Texas and
.Florida will be among the
competition the Classic.
"When you think high
school basketball, you think
Kentucky," Hosford said.
'"They eat, sleep and breathe


basketball. It's basketball
heaven. It's like Hoosiers,
when there's a high school
basketball game, the entire
town shuts down. It's just
so rich in tradition."
Columbia will start off
against one of the most tra-
dition-rich teams involved in
the tournament on Monday.
Jeffersontown is off to a
10-0 start this season and
the Tigers will try to com-
pete against the seventh
TIGERS continued on 4B


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakedtyreporter.corrr -

Fans

react to

departure
I t was Saturday
night around
7 p.m. and
everything was
normal. That
was before news of
Urban Meyer resigning .
broke and the entire
Gatornation's heart
skipped a beat.
My phone, however,
didn't miss a ring.
Immediately it began
being hammered by :
calls and text of people.
wondering if the news :
was true and for "inside
information."
I was saddened not to6
have any. Like many of
you, I was left searching
for answers.
One of the first
people I spoke with
was Columbia High
basketball coach Trey
Hosford, and he put the
deal into real-life terms.
"I was just in shock,"
Hosford said. "I'll say .
this, however, with the
hours I put in at the
high school level, I can't.
imagine the wear and K
tear on a college coach's .
body. They eat, sleep
and breathe it. I went
in at 6:30 a.m. to begin
breaking down tape of
Jeffersontown and they
were probably already in ,
for two hours."
It's a shame to watch
the coach go, but if he's
battling for his health,
there's also sympathy for
his situation.
It was just one of many
questions fans were left.
wondering. There's also-
concern about where

REACTION continued on'iB .


Section B













Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
. ESPN - Music City Bowl, Kentucky
vs. Clemson, at Nashville. Tenn.
NFL FOOTBALL
. p I p.m.
CBS - Regional coverage
- FOX - Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX - Regional coverage
- - 4:15 p.m.
CBS - Doubleheader game
S 8:15 p.m.
NBC - Dallas.at Washington
Monday
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 - Independence Bowl, Texas
A&M vs. Georgia, at Shreveport, La.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - Rutgers at North Carolina
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
* ESPN - Minnesota at Chicago
NHL HOCKEY
- : . E . S 7p.m.
VERSUS - Detroit at Columbus
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
SESPN2 - Premier League,
Wolverhampton vs. Manchester City, at
Wolverhampton, England

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New Eng
Miami
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo

x-Indiana
Jacksonvi
Houston
Tennesse


East
W L
land 9 5
7 7
7 7
5 9
South
WL T
polis 14 0
lie 7 7"
7 7
e 7 8


T Pct PF PA
0.643 365 244
0.500316 333
0.500"282 221
0.357225 288
Pct PF PA
01.000394248
0.500 266 322
0.500327 286
0.467 337 389


North


W L TPct PF PA
Cincinnati 9 5 0.643 288 244
Baltimore 8 6 0.571 350 225
Pittsburgh 7 7 0.500315 280
Cleveland 3 II 0.214199 349
West
" -' W L TPct PF PA
y-San Diego 12 3 0.800431 300
DeWner 8 6 0.571 275 250
Oakland 5 9 0.357 175 335
Kansas City 3 II 0.214R240E383
-NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
y-Philadelphia 10 A4 0.714 399 286
Dallas 9 5 0.643 320 250
N.Y. Giants - 8 6 0.571 386 342
Washington 4 10 0.286 246 296
- -South
W L TPct PF PA
" -New Orleans 13 I 0.929483 298
' i___________


Atlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay

x-Minnesota
Green Bay
Chicago
Detroit

x-Arizona
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis


7 7
6 8
2 12
North
W L
II 3
9 5
5 9
2 12
West
W L
9 5
6 8
5 9
I 13


0.500312 312
0.429251 289
0.143 214 363
T Pct PF PA
0.786 396 269
0.643 380 280
0.357 254 322
0.143 233 437
T Pct PF PA
0.643 337 282
0.429 282 269
0.357 257 325
0.071 159 377


x-clinched division
y-clinched playoff spot
Friday's Game
San Diego 42,Tennessee 17
Today's Games
Buffalo at Atlanta; I p.m.
Houston at Miami, I p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay. I p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, I p.m.
Kansas City at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, I p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m.
Denver at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 3
Chicago at Detroit, I p.m..
Cincinnati at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Miami, I p.m.
New England at Houston, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Buffalo, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Cleveland, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, I p.m.
Tennessee at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Washington at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Oakland, 4:15 p.cn.
Green Bay at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.


Bowl games
Saturday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
Ohio vs. Marshall
Meineke Bowl
North Carolina vs. Pittsburgh
Emerald Bowl
Southern Cal vs. Boston College (n)
Today
Music City Bowl
At NashvilleTenn.
Clemson (8-5) vs. Kentucky (7-5),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Georgia (7-5),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday
.. EgleBank Bowl
At Washington
Temple (9-3) vs. UCLA (6-6),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Miami (9-3) vs. Wisconsin (9-3),


8 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Bowling Green (7-5) vs. Idaho (7-5),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Nebraska (9-4) vs. Arizona (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Stanford (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (7-5),
Noon (CBS)
Armed Forces Bowl
At FortWorth.Texas
Air Force (7-5) vs. Houston (10-3),
Noon (ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Missouri (8-4) vs. Navy (8-4),
3:30 p.m: (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Minnesota (6-6) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
6 p.m. (NFL)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia Tech (9-3) vs.Tennessee (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday
Outback Bowl
AtTampa
Northwestern (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5).
I I a.m. (ESPN)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Penn State (10-2) vs. LSU (9-3),
I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Florida State (6-6) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), I p.m. (CBS)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Ohio State (10-2) vs. Oregon.(10-2),
5 p.m. (ABC).
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Florida (12-1) vs. Cincinnati
(12-0), 8:30 p.m. (FOX)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Detroit at Toronto, I p.m.
San Antonio at NewYork, 6 p.m..
Indiana at Miami, 6 p.m.
Houston at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Dallas at Denver, 8 p.m.
Boston at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Milwaukee at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Jersey 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Memphis, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
, Philadelphia at Portland, 10 p.m.
Denver at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Boston at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Game
No. II Connecticut vs. Iona at the XL
Center, Hartford, Conn.. 2 p.m.
No. 22 Washington vs. San Francisco,
3 p.m.


No. 6 West Virginia needs


OT to remain unbeaten


By JIM O'CONNELL
Associated Press

NEWARK, N.J. - Devin
Banks scored 22 points,
Da'Sean Butier had 21 and
Kevin Jones added 19 to
lead No. 6 West Virginia
to a 90-84 overtime victory
over Seton Hall on Saturday,
keeping the Mountaineers
one of six unbeaten teams
in Division I.
Ebanks had 17 rebounds
and Jones grabbed 14 for
the Mountaineers (10-0)
in the Big East opener for
both teams.
� Jeremy Hazell had a
career-high 41 points for
the Pirates (9-2), who closed
regulation with a 12-2 run to


force the extra 5 minutes in
the only game in the coun-
try on Saturday involving a
Division I team.
Butler hit a 3-pointer 34
seconds into the overtime
to give West Virginia the
lead for good.
The biggest plays of the
overtime belonged to Jones,
a freshman forward.
Ebanks missed a jumper
as the shot clock wound
down with 56 seconds to
play and Jones grabbed the
rebound. With 32 seconds
left, Jones hit a 3 to give
West Virginia an 87-80 lead
and the Pirates didn't get
closer than six points the
rest of the way.
That Seton Hall even had


a chance to get the game
to overtime was surprising
considering the Pirates fin-
ished 6 of 30 from 3-point
range - 4 of 19 by Hazell
- and they shot less than
50 percent from the free
throw line (16 of 33), includ-
ing going 8 of 20 from the
line after halftime. ,
Butler's three-point
play with 57 seconds left
in regulation gave the
Mountaineers a 75-65 lead.
Hazell hit a 3 to cap a
9-0 run that brought Seton
Hall within 75-74 with 15
seconds left.
Butler made two free
throws for a three-point
lead with 12.9 seconds
left.


Pitt beats UNC in Meineke Bowl 40
Pitt beats UNC in Meineke Bowl40


By:MIKE CRANSTON
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C.
- Dion Lewis rushed for
159 yards and a touch-
down to pass Tony Dorsett
as Pittsburgh's top fresh-
man rusher, and Dan
Hutchins kicked a 33-yard
field goal with 52 sec-
onds left to give the 17th-
ranked Panthers a 19-17


win over North Carolina on
Saturday in the Meineke
Bowl.
Winning 10 games-for the
first time since Dan Marino
was the quarterback in
1981, Pitt (10-3) overcame
a disappointing loss to
Cincinnati three weeks ago
that cost it a Sugar Bowl
berth and staged a late
rally in front of a hostile
crowd.


Pitt. converted on fourth
down at its own 30 and took
advantage of a key offsides
penalty to set up Hutchins'
fourth field goal.
T.J. Yates jhrew two
touchdown passes to Greg
Little, but his incomplete
pass on fourth-and-10 from
his own 49 with 6 seconds
left sent the Tar Heels
(8-4) to their second straight
loss.


Vick remains sporting


world's Rorschach test


By JIM LITKE
Associated Press

The road back will
never be completely clear
for Michael Vick.
There's plenty of justice
in that.
Little more than two
years- have elapsed. since
he plead guilty to being the
ringleader of a dogfighting
operation where extreme
cruelty was the stock in
trade. There's no defend-
ing what he did then and
there's no chance it will
ever be forgotten.
That chapter of his life
remains part of nearly
every story involving
his name and, it will be
somewhere in the open-
ing paragraph of his obit.
What remains to be seen
is whether it will take him
that long to be forgiven.
Earlier this week, his
Philadelphia Eagles team-
mates unanimously voted
Vick to receive the team's
Ed Block Courage Award.
Every NFL team hands
out a similar award every
year, deciding which play-
er inside a locker room
exemplifies "commitment
to the principles of sports-
mnanship and courage."
But because the Eagles
settled onVick, what should
have been little more .than
a small signpost on his way
back became yet another
fork in the road.
The local papers were
not alone in pointing out
the Eagles had plenty of
other deserving candidates
to choose from - guys who
were longshots just to make
the NFL, or whose come-
backs they judged more
inspiring because the start-
ing point was injury and not
recklessness. 'People for
the Ethical Treatment of
Animals predictably piled
on, saying the decision by
Vick's teammates was "not
appropriate and does not
mark a joyous moment in
NFL history."
Fair enough. And to be
sure, both Vick himself and
the teammates who backed
him handed the critics


plenty of material.

ACROSS


Oomph
Riotous crowd
Grassy field
- you sure?
Kind of duty
Some
- de plume
Pedro's pal
Casual farewell
Pried
High plateaus
Escorted
Be victorious
Shopping
places
Bright butterfly
Charles Lamb
Valentine color
Anger
Knock
Sourdough's
strike
ASU rival
Plainly
Dental
photos (hyph.)
Note before la


L


REACTION: Confusion among news


Continued From Page 1B

Florida goes next. Who will
be the next coach? How
will it effect recruiting?
"Ifs surprising,"
Columbia High Assistant
Principal, Donnie Harrison
said. "I just got in and
it's breaking news. It's
not the best time in the


world with recruiting, but
maybe there was more
to the dehydration thing
than they were originally
leading on. If it's a health
thing, I can understand."
It' going to be hard to
come to closure on the
situation until Meyer


comes out and addresses
the issue. With Florida
losing Tim Tebow after
the Sugar Bowl against
Cincinnati and now adding
Meyer into the mix, this
chapter of Florida football
is coming to an end.
What comes next?


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 6 file photo, Philadelphia Eagles quarterback
Michael Vick smiles as he prepares for an NFL football
game against the Atlanta Falcons in Atlanta. Vick won the
Ed Block Courage Award, voted on by his teammates on the
Philadelphia Eagles, after the once-disgraced star
quarterback returned to the league after spending 18 months


"I've overcome a lot,
more than probably one
single individual can
handle or bear," Vick
began. "You ask certain
people to walk through
my shoes, they probably
couldn't do. Probably 95
percent of the people in
this world, because nobody
had to endure what I've
been through, situations
I've been put in, situations
I put myself in and deci-
sions I have made, whether
they have been good or
bad."
We're not going to parse
the words beyond suggest-
ing they sound angry and
devoid of some perspective.
He shouldn't need remind-
ing that people are dealing
with worse and unlike Vick,
because of things that were
beyond their control. And
as we said, his teammates
didn't do a much better job
of explaining themselves.


41 Calf locale
42 Greenhouse
trays
45 Like many
dens
49 Dawn
goddess
50 Handle
(2 wds.)
52 Chit
53 Deli units
54 Ready to drop
(2 wds.)
55 ER staffers
56 KO count
57 Natural elev.
58 Exaggerator's
suffix

DOWN

1 Furniture
movers
2 Heavy metal
3 Office note
4 Played
charades
5 Exiled Roman
poet


Eagles coach Andy Reid
conceded, "I'm not sure,
you can explain it, unless
you've kind of gone through
it here with him."
Donovan McNabb,
who's known Vick since he
served as his host during a
recruiting visit to Syracuse
more than a decade ago,
sounded more callous still.
"I don't care what peo-
ple say on the outside,"
McNabb said. "It was
something voted on by his
peers."
That's all it is. It's also
precisely the point.
Only Vick will ever know
whether his heart is still
as cold as those chilling
episodes from his past
.proved.
The rest of us, from
NFL commissioner Roger
Goodell to Vick's fiercest
haters, can only make judg-
ments based on what he
says and does.


Answer t6 Previous Puzzle

ARASIP P S7 M|A CE
ALTO BAT ASH Y
PAIL SMOGGIER
IRAQ PRO ALWE


ANA EASY YEA H
R EC OIUP ERASE






,SALTFLAT WRAP


SLOEF SST DALE


Kindhearted
Science rooms
Irish pop star
Nay opposites
Batman's clos-
etful


, .,


12 Funny
person
18 Clay pot
20 Chemical
suffix
22 Boundless
23 Mr. Griffin
24 Eurasian
range
25 Gloss
-target
26 Extremely
27 Costa -
28 Paris hub
29 Votes for
31 Wallpaper unit
35 Encourage
strongly
37 Devotee
38 - nova
39 Inert gas
41 Classical
language
42 Matted wool
43 Brain part
44 Part of NBA
45 Rain hard
-46 Trevi Fountain
coins
47 Billions of
years
48 Gold
deposit
51 Shade tree


12-28 � 2009 by NEA, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


I















Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009 3B


By LARRY LAGE
Associated Press
DETROIT - Martin
Ward ran for two touch-
downs in the first half
Saturday and Marshall held
off Ohio 21-17 in the Little
Caesars Pizza Bowl.
DeQuan Bembry's inter-
ception with 40 seconds
left sealed the victory for
the Thundering Herd (7-6),
who led by three touch-
downs midway through the
second quarter.
The Bobcats (9-5) rallied
. with Shannon Ballard's '75-
yard return off a fumble
in the second quarter,
Terrence McCrae's- TD
catch and Matt Weller's
field goal. Ohio had chanc-
es to complete the come-
back but was stunted on
the drive before its final
possession.
The game looked like
it was-going to be a route
when Ward's 2-yard run put
Marshall ahead 21-0 with-
7:21 left in the first half Ward
scored on,a 12-yard run late
in the first quarter and Andre
Booker had 58-yard punt
return for a touchdown at
the end of the quarter.
Just when it appeared as
if the Herd were going to
make the game lopsided,
/ Ballard" returned a fumble
75 yards and gave Ohio a
much-needed spark. The
Bobcats carried the momen-
tum into the second -half,
when Theo Scott connected
with a leaping McCrae in
the end zone on an 8-yard
pass midway through the
third quarter.
Weller's 46-yard field goal
made it 21-17.
Marshall didn't have a
first down after halftime
until its fourth possession,
then it negated a 20-yard
gain with a holding penalty
and was forced to punt.
Ohio drove to the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Marshall coach Rick Minter (left) addresses the Marshall fans.
as linebacker Mario Harvey (30) looks on after accepting
the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl championship trophy following
a 21-17 win over Ohio in a NCAA college football game on
Saturday in Detroit.


Marshall 13 'on the ensu-
ing drive - taking advan-.
tage of two late-hit penal-
ties against the Herd - but
stalled and missed a field
goal that would've pulled
the Bobcats within a point
early in the fourth quarter.
The Bobcats stayed in
the game despite just 123
yards of offense. -
Marshall didn't exactly
move up 'and down the
field, at will, but it scored
enough early in the game
to win. Brian Anderson was
12 of 17 for 85 yards for the
Herd, and Ward ran for 72
yards and two scores on
nine carries.
Scott was 14 of 26 for
111 yards with a TD and
an interception for Ohio.
Chris' Garrett was held to
30 yards on 10' carries and


Taylor Price caught four.
passes for 49 yards.
The schools, located 82
miles apart, played 52 times
between 1905 and 2004 in.
"The Battle .for the Bell,"
with the trophy symboliz-
ing the Ohio River separat-
ing Ohio and West Virginia.
They hadn't played since
Marshall left the Mid-
American Conference for
Conference USA in 2005.
Ohio was led by Frank
Solich, the former Nebraska
coach, while the Herd
had interim coach Rick
Minter on their sideline.
Mark Snyder resigned at
Marshall after the season
and will be replaced by John
"Doc" Holliday, who was an
assistant to .Urban Meyer
on Florida's 2006 national
championship team.


Pacquiao plans to sue Mayweather


SARANGANI,
Philippines -- Manny
Pacquiao says he is plan-
ning to file a defamation
lawsuit against Floyd
Mayweather Jr., the fight-
er's father, and Golden Boy
Promotions
In a statement post-
ed Friday on his Web


site, Pacquiao claims his
character has been dam-
aged and tarnished by
accusations he says are
untrue.
The proposed megafight
between Pacquiao and
Mayweather is in danger
because the sides have
failed to find a compromise


to a dispute over blood test-
ing. Promoter Bob Arum
declared the bout dead
Thursday.
Arum set a Thursday:
deadline for an
agreement on test-
ing, the only issue
not resolved for the
planned March 13 fight. .- *-


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I
I
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I
I




I


PERFORMERS: Shine in 09 ,
Continued From Page 1B I


Saints.
Dunham was first-team
outside linebacker, Dye
was second-team tight end,
and George was honorable
mention at defensive
tackle. Dunham and Dye
are on the current roster
of the Columbia County
Falcons. *
'Philadelphia 76ers
player Marreese Speights
made an appearance
for a grudge-match
basketball fundraiser at
Richardson Community
Center. Speights, who is
averaging 14.1 points and
6.4 rebounds this season
in the NBA, led a group of
Lake City players against
scored 40 points but his
team lost to the Gainesville
Untouchables.


"The Money Man" Steve
Briscoe was the driving
force behind the Gator
Chomp Romp season
kickoff and pep rally at
Spirit of the Suwannee.
"Gator Chomp" co-author
Mike Mullis introduced
new versions of the song at
the event.
Florida State coach
Bobby Bowden made his
final tour stop in Lake
City as head coach of the
Seminoles. The first of
what grew into the Bobby.
Bowden Day tours began
here when Bowden was
invited to a cookout when
he was first hired at FSU.
.NASCAR driver Ken
Schrader raced at North
Florida Speedway this
fall.


H" E G---
T E R R E

H Z E N G


IG R N E T
I A I Y B


K A M E ' S I O N SQ W II

A P M A H C M C V W ZT
- I
D N A S U 0 H T 0 W T TI
A B T S R I. F M L B E E
* . . * * ' " - ! * * -


IN E R A U Q S S E M. I T L P J U E
I? Y X Y E A R E N D R E V I E W N

I W N X M R W E T' G H T .L , O S S
M E S G N I N N I G E B W E N. H C
Y N E W Y E A R S K I S S M G V R
S N 0 I T U L 0 S E R J N 'Q Y I B I

W ,K Q G 0 F A T H E R T I M E V C.
0 J D R U E 0 L S G N I S S E L B.,

SRea yto0 wll? ENTRY FORM
II
Find all 15 of the'New Year'words Name: ':
hidden in the word search above. Phone Number: ___
Words can be found in the banners
o,.LtV, Lic. t h .\r d .- . i ,irt / ,blC t, Addra"ess:


auove Ue a1C sUOe I eiow. uompie I
the puzzle and retum it to the Lake
City Reporter, 180 E. Duval Street,
Lake City, FL by 5:00pm, for your
chance to win


Subscriber: M Yes E No community. I
S Source.
*1�D^ Lake City Reporter
Deadline is Monday, December 28, 2009 at 5:00 p.m. ... c ...


I. --------------------------------- .1


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


JUMBi2.
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to eath square,
to form four ordinary words.
DARRO


WHEN PAP GAVE H15
S-TEENAGER A DRIVING
SLE-55ON, IT TURNED
INTO---
SHORCC No-
- 1 - \ \ Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
A: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: HOIST DOUGH SPLEEN GENTRY
Answer: How the trumpet player managed to join the
exclusive gathering - HE "HORNED" IN


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New Year's Kiss


Marshall holds on to beat

Ohio 21-17 in Pizza Bowl


Emedmtmio


I Fthr TiffmeB


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


3B


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











--.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


Titans try to get Johnson 2k - ,


By TERESA M. WALKER
Associated Press

S NASHVILLE, Tenn.
The Tennessee Titans'
improbable playoff dreams
are finished for this season.
Now it's back to reality with
goals quickly set on two
other historic marks.
Finish 8-8, which no NFL
team has ever managed
after starting a season with
six straight losses. And
:get Chris Johnson to 2,000
yards rushing, making him
only the sixth player in
league history to reach that
mark.
That's all that's left
-for Tennessee (7-8) after
S:Friday night's 42-17 loss
to San Diego. The Titans'
orily hope of reaching the
playoffs for a third straight
season depended on them
Swnning out, and they still
Seeded plenty of help to


squeak into the AFC's final
wild-card slot.
"You go to 8-8," Titans
cornerback Cortland
Finnegan said. "You win the
next football game, and you
get Chris Johnson 2,000
yards rushing."
Johnson has 1,872 yards
after he ran for 142 yards
and a touchdown against
San Diego. That was his
10th straight 100-yard rush-
ing game, giving him the
third-longest streak behind
Barry Sanders (14 in 1997)
and Marcus Allen (11 in
1985-86). Jamal Lewis was
the last to run for 2,000
yards in 2003.
"That record would mean
a lot to me," Johnson said.
"That was one of my goals
that I set before this year
started, and a lot of people
didn't even think I would get
close or whatever. To get
that record would mean a lot


to me. So basically this team
will get back to work, and we
got one more game left so
hopefully we can get .500."
Johnson will have plenty
of help as he pursues 2,000
yards.
"Everyone is committed
to doing everything they
can to help CJ get 2,000,
and he deserves it," tight
end Bo Scaife said.
The second-year running
back out of East Carolina
already has bought gifts
for his offensive linemen,
tight end Alge- Crumpler
and fullback Ahmard Hall.
Johnson promised cars if
he reached 2,000 back in
November. He said Friday
night he 'didn't buy them
cars and wouldn't divulge
what the presents were.
Johnson isn't giving up
on Eric Dickerson's single-
season rushing record of
2,105 yards either.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tennessee Titans running back Chris Johnson (28) tries to get past San Diego Chargers
cornerback Antonio Cromartie (31) in the first quarter on Friday in Nashville, Tenn.


. BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
'Columbia High's Quantez Wilson draws a foul while
:attempting a shot against Union County on Dec. k2. Wilson
is one of 13 members of the Tigers' basketball team that will
travel to play in the Gaslight Holiday Classic.


TIGERS: Begin Monday
Continued From Page 1B


ranked team in the Blue
Grass Prep state basketball
poll. '
* "Kentucky only has one
classification and they are
.the seventh ranked team,"
Hosford said. "I've already
been told they're one of the
best teams and they are the
best in Louisville. I believe
they're 108-22 in last few
seasons."
Though Columbia is only
4-4 early in this season,
Hosford doesn't believe that
the Tigers will lay down for
any team.
Hosford does, howev-
er, acknowledge that the
Tigers will have to leave
everything on the court to
pull off the upset.
"We have to play good,"
he said. "Thomas Jackson
is among one of several
players with college offers.
We're going to have to
play at a high level. We
can't just play a good quar-
ter or a good half. We're
going to have to play four


quarters to have a chance.
We'll be playing against a
team that sometimes has
more than 2,000 people in
attendance."
Hosford is appreciative
that the team will get to
experience that style of bas-
ketball and acknowledges
it wouldn't have happened
without the help of the com-
munity.
"I want to thank the
community and especially
Scott Kischton for helping
with the golf tournament
(which raised approximate-
ly $7,800 towards the trip),"
Hosford said. "We're rep-
resenting the school, but
this is a community trip.
Every dime came from
the community. In these
economic times, it's the
opportunity of a lifetime.
It would not be possible
without the help of
everyone."
The community raised
approximately $10,000 for
the trip.


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ill ,,,jor


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009

















Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, December 27, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS


Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcostnet


Holiday

season

2009


If you can't feed a hun-
dred people, then just feed
one.
- Mother Teresa

A s the holidays
approach, now
is a wonderful
time to make
sure that your
staff knows that you and
your company care about
them. There are so many
ways that you can do this,
and there is no one right
way. However, you need
to find your way to ensure
that each employee feels
valued during this very
special season.
Given this tight eco-
nomic environment, you
can accomplish this with-
out spending a great deal
of money. The point is
not necessarily to spend,
money, .but rather to make
your staff feel appreciated.
One thing you can do to
make the season special for
your staff is to send each
employee a handwritten
note acknowledging the
contributions they have
made to your organization.
This will mean so much to
your staff, and it will cost
nothing but a little bit of
your time.
Another thing you can do
is to reach out to a family
that is experiencing tough
times and have your com-
pany sponsor them, allow-
ing staff members to help
with gifts for the family.
Getting together and giving
to a family that is really in
need will frequently build
team spirit, and giving is so
much better than receiving.
.Giving presents to some-
one that is in greater need
tends to minimize the hard-
.' - ships that your staff might
be feeling.
Consider holding a
staff gift exchange with
an established limit on
expenditures per gift.
There are so many ways
*- to do this, and by allowing
your staff to decide how
they would like to orga-
nize their gift exchange,
you can spread goodwill
and team building. The
gift exchange approach
allows your staff to get
presents without costing
the firm anything.
Another way to spread
holiday cheer is to do
something as a group that
does not cost much money.
For example, some firms
have a family movie night
where all staff members
and their families attend
a movie at a set time. Of
course, the movie should
not be R-rated as young
children will be present.
YNow go out and make
sure you have a plan in
place to make each of your
employees feel special dur-
ing this wonderful time of
year.
You can do this!

* FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.


Need a Florida license?


New paperwork requirements go into effect Jan. 1


From staff reports
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida residents wishing
to obtain a driver license or
identification card will need
to meet new documenta-
tion requirements begin-
ning Jan. 1, 2010.
A Florida Department of
Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles news release
stated that those wishing to
obtain a new license, legally
change their name before
their renewal date or replace
a lost or stolen license or
ID card will need to visit
a driver license office and
show the following items:
one proof of identification,
one proof of Social Security
number and two proofs of
residential address.
Residents only wanting
to renew their license can
do so by a convenience
method, the news release
stated.
The convenience meth-
od of renewal is by mail or
online, but residents can
only use this method once
between office renewals.
The renewal following a
mail or online renewal
must be done in a state
driver license office or in a
participating tax collector
office where the new docu-
mentation requirements
are in effect, stated the
news release.
The news release stated
that while these new
requirements begin Jan. 1,
2010, Florida residents do


JASON MATTHEW WALKERUL :r r , -.:.1cl
Carlos Hernandez, 18, holds up his driver's license outside of the Lake City DMV office on U.S. Highway 90.


not have to visit a driver
license or tax collector
office on or before this
date.
While the Department
of Homeland Security
recently extended its dead-
lines, their decision will not
impact Florida's planned
improvements, and the
state will continue in their
efforts to provide the
most secure credentials
and issuance processes


possible, stated the news
release.
A Web site is available to
aid residents in the process
- GatherGoGet.com -
and encouraged residents
to make use of the site.
The Web site allows
users to find out how and
when to gather the docu-
ments they will need, go to
a driver license office and
get a new card.
The site also provides


* information on where
residents can get the docu-
-mentation they will need,
allows users to create
personalized checklists of
their documentation and
find a local driver license
office, stated the news
release.
In the news release,
Sandra Lambert, Division
of Driver License Director,
said the Web site will be
helpful for residents in this


new process.
'These new require-
ments support the most
secure identification cre-
dential possible," Lambert
said in the news release. ,
"We are pleased to have a
convenient online tool in
place that takes Floridians
through a step-by-step
process, helping to identify
and obtain all required doc-
uments to prepare for their
next visit to an office."


Ford expects Volvo deal with Geely by early 2010


By LOUISE NORDSTROM
Associated Press
STOCKHOLM - Ford '
Motor Co. moved closer
Wednesday to selling its
loss-making Volvo unit to
China's Geely Group, say-
ing a final deal is expected
early next year if financing.
and government approvals
fall into place.
If the sale goes through
it would be another step


in the U.S. auto industry's
retrenchment from global
operations, and another
acquisition of such assets
by a Chinese company.
General Motors Co.,
is selling its rugged
. Hummer brand to con-
struction machinery maker
Sichuan Tengzhong Heavy
Industrial Machinery . ,
Corp., and China's Beijing
Automotive Industry
Holdings has agreed to


Apple CEO Jobs takes

$1 salary in 2009


By JESSICA MINTZ
AP Technology Writer
SEAITLE - Apple Inc.
Chief Executive Steve Jobs
was paid his customary $1
annual salary in 2099, but
Apple's strength through
a rough economic climate
returned the value of his
personal holdings in the
company to pre-meltdown
levels.
Jobs does not get a
bonus or reimbursement
for perks many other
CEOs accept, such as-per-
sonal security, according
to a regulatory filing made
Wednesday. Apple said it
reimbursed Jobs $4,000
for company travel on his
$90 million Gulfstream V
jet, which he received as a
bonus in 1999.
That's far less than the
$871,000 Apple reimbursed
Jobs in 2008. The CEO
took nearly six months off
in 2009 for medical leave,
during which time he
received a liver transplant.
He returned to work at
the company's Cupertino,
Calif., headquarters part-
time at the end of June.
Jobs, 54, holds 5.5 mil-
lion shares of Apple's
stock. He has not sold any


shares since he rejoined
the company in 1997, nor
has he been awarded any
new equity since 2003.
In 2008, the value of
Jobs' stake in the company
he founded was cut in
half as investors worried
Apple's pricey gadgets
might not fare well through
the U.S. recession. But
shares of the maker of
iPods, iPhones and Mac
computers gained about
42 percent during the 2009
fiscal year that ended in
September, and at the close
of trading Wednesday,
when Apple's stock
reached $202.10, Jobs'
holdings were worth about
$1.1 billion.
Jobs is also the largest
individual shareholder of
The Walt Disney Co. His
7.4 percent stake is cur-
rently worth about $4.5
billion.
At an annual meeting
scheduled for Feb. 25,
Apple shareholders will for
the first time have a chance
to cast an advisory vote on
the company's executive
compensation plans.
Shareholders have sub-
mitted two other proposals
to be voted on at the
meeting.


buy some powertrain tech-�
nology from GM's Swedish
Saab unit, which is being
closed down unless a
buyer is found by year
end.
BAIC was also involved
in the Swedish consortium
Koenigsegg Automotive
AB's failed attempt to take
over Saab.
Ford acquired Volvo in
1999 for $6.45 billion and
has wanted to unload the


Swedish carmaker since
last year to raise cash and.
focus its efforts on three
core brands: Ford, Lincoln.
and Mercury.
Work on financing and
government approvals
remains to be completed,
Dearborn, Michigan-based
Ford said in a statement,
adding it.expectsfo sign
the deal in the first quar-
ter of 2010 and close it
in the second quarter.


The announcement did
not reveal the amount of
Geely's offer.
For 10 years Ford
and Volvo have shared
safety and other technol-
ogy. For instance, Ford's
Taurus sedan is based on
Volvo underpinnings. Any
agreement with Geely is,
expected to include details
about sharing intellectual
property rights and engi-
neering.


Interested in saving time and money

this holiday, season?


* * - -. -


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time doing more important things like spending time with
family. Peoples State Bank. Now That's Banking!

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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


A Good Time
for 401(k)s
Q Is this a good time to start
contributing to a 401(k)
account at work? - G. W, online
A When it comes to retirement
savings, most of us should
be regularly saving and investing,
without much regard for the state
of the economy. When the market
is down, our dollars will buy more
shares, and vice versa. (That's
"dollar-cost averaging.") As we
dig out of a recession, now is
actually a particularly promising
time to invest. Many of us should
be saving and investing aggres-
sively, too, not just socking away 3
percent of our salaries. Crunch
some numbers, and see how much
you'll need in retirement and how �
much you'll need to save. You
might want to invest 10 or 15
percent of your income.


Q I found a company that seems
to be doing everything right:
Sales are up 47 percent, income is
up 64 percent, there's no debt ...
and yet the stock keeps going
down. Am I missing something
really obvious? -A.P.WR , online
A Well, you need to look at
more numbers. Even high
numbers may be down from
previous levels - perhaps, for
example, sales were up 60 percent
last year and their growth rate is
slipping. Check out expectations,
too. If the company and/or Wall
Street analysts expect slower
growth in the future.that can
dampen enthusiasm for a stock.
sending it down. Perhaps competi-
tors are fast advancing on the
company.
Then there's the stock price itself.


Since the company has been grow-
ing briskly, investors may have bid
up the stock to lofty heights, well
above its intrinsic value, and the
price may now be settling back to
more reasonable levels.,
Always look at a company's big
picture.


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The Fool Responds: You learned
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BlackBerry users beset by second outage in a week


By ROB GILLIES
Associated Press
TORONTO -When
Corey Marshall's
Blackberry mysteri-
ously stopped sending and
receiving messages, he
realized all too clearly just
how much he depends on
the device: He had no way
of contacting his friends
be cause he never bothers
to exchange phone num-
bers with anyone anymore.
"A lot of the times if I
meet someone and I see
they have .a BlackBerry,
I don't even want their
number or care. I just
want their BBM," or their
BlackBerry instant-mes-
saging ID, said the 23-year-
old tanning-salon manager
and student. "I didn't even
have my boss' number. I
only contact him through
BB."
He added: "I go to sleep
with it in my hands. It's
the first thing I do when I
wake up in the middle of
the night It's. the first thing
I do when I wake up in the
morning."
The second BlackBerry
outage in less than a week
disrupted service for
millions of users on two
continents Tuesday and
Wednesday, demonstrating
how vital - and how addic-


In this Nov. 10 file photo, the BlackBerry Storm2 for Verizon is shown in San Francisco. E-mail messaging delays plagued
BlackBerry users in North America for the second time in a week, though by early.Wednesday the problems appeared to be
resolved for some users.


tive - the device dubbed
the "CrackBerry" can be.
The company behind the
service, Canada's Research
in Motion Ltd., blamed a
software upgrade for the
problem, which it said
was confined'to North'and


South America.
RIM said BlackBerry
users were unable to send
or receive e-mails and
instant messages but did
not lose phone service.
Many users also found the
Internet inaccessible. RIM


said the disruptions began
around 1:45 p.m. Eastern
time on Tuesday, worsened
around 6:30 p.m. and began
to be fixed around 11:30
p.m. Service appeared
restored by Wednesday
afternoon. RIM would not


disclose exactly how many
subscribers were affected.
The glitch comes
after another outage last
Thursday and at least three
breakdowns in 2008. The
latest problems are hap-
.pening at an especially


bad time for RIM, which
is facing tougher competi-
tion than ever before in the
market it helped pioneer.
"One of RIM's big advan-
tages is that it's perceived
as a reliable device," said
Duncan Stewart, director
of research and analysis at
DSam Consulting. 'To lose
the advantage of reliability
would, in fact, be a very
big deal for this company."
CanDace Johnson, a
25-year-old nanny living
in New York, said her
BlackBerry lost'all Internet
service around 6 p.m. on
Tuesday, leaving her cut
off from the e-mail account
she uses to keep in touch
with her boss.
"If someone is watching
your child, you want them
to respond to your mes-
sages," she said.
Robert Hagler, a
46-year-old lawyer in
Daphne, Ala., noticed
around dinner time
Tuesday that the nor-
mal flow of e-mail and
Facebook updates on his
BlackBerry Curve had
petered out.
"So I went home that
evening, logged on to
my laptop, and there's
20 e-mails sitting there,"
he said. "All my iPhone
friends are just tickled to
death."


FTC to take closer look at Google's AdMob purchase
By MICHAEL LIEDTKE information about the of the Internet's lucrative the company remains con- regulatory approval., an unfair advantage in its
AP Technology Writer deal this week, according search advertising market. fident its AdMob purchase, Since its inception nearly quest to sell more mobil,
to a Wednesday post on Google is expected to pull announced last month, will four years ago, AdMob has phone ads.


5AN FIRANCISCO
- U.S. antitrust regulators
are taking a closer look
at Google Inc.'s proposed
$750 million purchase of
mobile phone marketer
AdMob, the latest sign
of greater government
vigilance as Google tries
to expand its advertising
empire.
The Federal Trade
Commission sought more


Google's blog.
This so-called "second
request" doesn't mean
regulators intend to block
Google's AdMob deal.
Most other acquisitions
that go through this stage
end up getting approved.
But the FTC's action
shows regulators are watch-
ing Google more carefully
as the company tries to
build upon its dominance


in more than $22 billion in
revenue this year, mostly
from ads shown alongside
search results and other
Web content.
"We know that closer
scrutiny has been one con-
sequence of Google's suc-
cess," Paul Feng, a Google
product manager, wrote in
Wednesday's blog posting.
Echoing previous manage-
ment comments, Feng said


be approved.
Google's huge lead in
Internet search triggered a
2008 government investiga-
tion that scuttled its plans
to enter into an advertising
partnership with rival Yahoo
Inc., which runs the second
most-popular search engine.
Yahoo plans to work with
Microsoft Corp. instead,
beginning next year if those
two companies can gain


built a thriving network
that sells and delivers ads
on applications and Web
sites designed for the
iPhone and other mobile
devices. It's still rela-
tively small with estimated
annual revenue of $45
million to $60 million, but
regulators apparently want
to understand whether its
technology and advertising
contacts would give Google


Google management has
indicated that it believes
mobile marketing eventual-
ly may become bigger than
advertising on Internet-
connected computers. That
tipping point still appears
to be many years away,
with U.S. mobile advertis-
ing expected to total $416
million this year, about 2
percent of overall Internet
ad spending in the country.


W-ITIM4


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


What Is This Thing Called
The Motley Fool?
Remember Shakespeare?
Remember "As You Like It"?
In Elizabethan days, Fools were the only
people who could get away with telling the
truth to the King or Queen.
The Motley Fool tells the truth about invest-
ing, and hopes you 'll laugh all
the way to the bank.



Teva Advances
Teva Pharmaceutical (Nasdaq:
TEVA) has tired of waiting for the
U.S. government to establish a path-
way for approval of generic ver-
sions of biologic drugs. Instead, it's
asking for approval for its copy of
Amgen's Neupogen under the nor-
mal branded-drug process.
Generic drugmakers can get ver-
sions of small-molecule drugs
approved through an Abbreviated
New Drug Application (ANDA). If
they prove that their version is similar
enough to the branded drug, the Food
and Drug Administration can use the
original data from the branded drug's
New Drug Application (NDA) to
establish safety and effectiveness.
. The NDA equivalent for
biologic drugs is a Biologic
License Application (BLA),
but Congress and the FDA '
never established the equivalent
abbreviated application for generics
- an ABLA, if you will.
Thus, Teva has just submitted a
BLA for XM02, its copycat of
Neupogen- a drug that stimulates
the production of a type of white
blood cells in cancer patients.
XM02 is already on the market in
Europe, where a pathway to
approve biosimilar drugs exists.
But does Teva have enough data to
support BLA approval? It doesn't.
mention having tested XM02 in acute
myeloid leukemia or severe chronic
neutropenia (approved indications for
Neupogen). It's likely settling for
fewer patients in exchange for a more
restrictive label. Interested investors.
should learn the FDA's decision soon.


s
e

















Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


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3 days h di

InsIdlH 2 Signs .nt 3ddbin ete. 65
GaraeSE


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ing only.
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Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified'ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 1860
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.,
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdisioAppear. Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mn., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Tiurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
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in error. Please call 755-5440,
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Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
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special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
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In Print

and Online
www.hlakeeityreporter.conm


Legal


COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
POST OFFICE BOX 1529
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32056-
1529
COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE
COMPLEX
372 WEST DUVAL STREET
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055
AGENDA
JANUARY 5, 2010
3:00 RP.M.
Invocation. (Commissioner Frisina)
Pledge to U.S. Flag
Public Comments
STAFF MATTERS:
HONORABLE RONALD W. WIL-
LIAMS, CHAIRMAN
(1) Consent Agenda
DISCUSSION AND ACTION
ITEMS:
(1) Economic Development Project:
Columbia Technology
SECOND PAGE
COMMISSIONERS COMMENTS
ADJOURNMENT
COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
POST OFFICE BOX 1529
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32056-
1529
CONSENT AGENDA
JANUARY 5, 2010
(1) Landscape & Parks - Request
Approval of Non-Grant Eligible Ex-
penses for Playground Equipment -
$12,000.00
(2) Landscape & Parks - Cooperative
Agreement - State of Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consumer
Services, Division of Forestry/ Co-
lumbia County- Cogongrass
(3) Division of Emergency Manage-
ment - Citizen Corps/Community
Emergency Response Team (CERT)
FY 09 Award Allocation -
$10,000.00
(4) Tourist Development Council -
Reappointment of Nick Patel
(5) Florida Department of Transpor-
tation Traffic Signal and Mainte-
nance
Agreement
(a) Approval of Amendment 1 -
Adding Intersection Control Beacons
(b) Approval of Authorizing Resolu-
tion
(6) Sheriff's Office - State of Florida
Office of Criminal Justice Grants -
Florida
Department of Law Enforcement -
Subgrant Award Certificate - 2010 -
JAGC-COLU-1-4X-231
$79,648.00
04536783
December 27, 2009


PUBLIC NOTICE
THE REGULAR .MEETING OF
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS TO BE HELD ON
THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 2010
BEGINNING AT 7:00 P.M. HAS
BEEN CHANGED TO TUESDAY,
JANUARY 5, 2010 COMMENC-
ING AT 3:00 P.M. AND WILL BE
HELD AT THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD AD-
MINISTRATIVE COMPLEX, 372
WEST DUVAL STREET, LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA 32055? COPIES
OF THE PROPOSED AGENDA IS
AVAILABLE FOR INSPECTION
AT.THE OFFICE OF THE COUN-
TY MANAGER LOCATED IN
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE ANNEX, 135 N.E.
HERNANDO AVENUE, LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA 32055, SUITE 203
BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 8:00
A.M. AND 5:00 P.M., MONDAY
THROUGH FRIDAY.
ANY PERSON WISHING TO AP-
PEAL ANY, DECISION OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS WITH RESPECT TO
ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT
THE ABOVE NOTICED MEET-
ING WILL NEED A RECORD OF
PROCEEDINGS, AND FOR SUCH
PURPOSES, THAT PERSON MAY
NEED TO ENSCfRE THAT A VER-
BATIM RECORD IS MADE OF
THE PROCEEDINGS, WHICH RE-
CORD INCLUDES THE TESTI-
MONY AND EVIDENCE UPON
WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE
BASED. IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH DISA-
BILITIES ACT, A PERSON NEED-
ING SPECIAL ACCOMMODA-
TIONS OR AN INTERPRETER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING SHOULD CONTACT
LISA ROBERTS 386-758-1006 OR
T.D.D. SERVICES 386-758-2139,
AT LEAST FIVE (5) DAYS PRIOR
TO THE MEETING.
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS,
PLEASE CONTACT THE BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA AT 386-758-1005.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS
BY: Ronald Williams, Chairman
ATTEST: P. Dewitt Cason, Clerk of
Court
(SEAL)
04536778
DEcember 27, 2009


Home Improvements


CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat; rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191


Legal


PUBLIC NOTICE
This is to inform you that Columbia
County will hold a pre-bid confer-
ence and walk-thru for the weatheri-
zation work of twelve (12) single-
family dwellings on the Columbia
County Weatherization program.
This meeting will be held Tuesday,
January 5th, 2010 the first six (6) be-
ginning at 8:00am and the second six
(6) beginning at 1:00pm at Suwan-
nee River Economic Council, Inc.
Outreach Office, 303 NW Quinten
Street, Lake City, Florida 32056.
The conference and walk-thru is
mandatory, no exceptions, for con-
tractors who plan to bid. Suwannee
River Economic Council, Inc. re-
quires each contractor to be properly
licensed, carry general liability insur-
ance of at least $1,000,000.00, POI
(Pollution Occurrence Insurance)
and Workers Comp Insurance (No
Exemptions) before bid opening.
Original bids for these will be due by
12:00 noon Friday, January 8, 2010,
at Suwannee River Economic Coun-
cil, Inc. Outreach Office, 303 NW
Quienten Street, Lake City, Florida
32056. Please mark envelope
"Sealed Bid of Name of Homeown-
er". Bids to be opened and awarded
Monday, January 8, 2010 at 12:30
p.m.
Suwannee River Economic Council,
Inc. has the right to reject any and all
bids. The bids will be awarded on the
most cost effective basis.
04536777
December 27, 2009


REQUEST FOR VOLUNTEERS
COLUMBIA COUNTY
The Columbia County Board of
County- Commissioners in seeking
volunteers for the following posi-
tions:
ANIMAL CONTROL BOARD
The Animal Control Board makes
recommendations to the Board of
County Commissioners regarding
rules and regulations pertaining to
operation of animal control facilities
owned or used by the County, stand-
ards and procedures for the control,
collection, care, custody or disposal
of animals at large, vicious or dan-
gerous animals at large and animals
creating or causing a public nui-
sance, standards for the maintenance
of any facilities owned, regulated,
controlled or used by the County, re-
view annually the proposed budget
for the operation of any animal shel-
ter facilities owned, controlled or
regulated by the County, hear and
determine appeals by any person,
firm, corporation aggrieved by the is-
suance of denial of a license or a per-
mit by the County animal control of-
ficial.
The Animal Control Board members
� shall be a resident of Columbia
County. The members of the Animal
Control Board shall serve without
compensation. The term of office
shall be for three years.
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT
AUTHORITY BOARD
The Industrial Development Authori-
ty (IDA), as authorized by Florida
Statutes 159.44-159.53, is created for
the purpose of financing and refi-
nancing projects for the public pur-
poses, described in, and in the man-
ner provided by, the Florida industri-
al Development Financing Act and
by ss. 159.44-159.53 and for the pur-
pose of fostering economic develop-
ment of the county. The IDA shall
study the advantages, facilities, re-,
sources, products, attractions, and
conditions concerning the county
with relation to the encouragement
of economic development. The IDA
Board is a dependant taxing authori-
ty appointed by the Columbia Coun-
ty Board of County Commissioners
to provide support and direction to
the IDA staff in carrying out Colum-
bia County's economic development
strategy and programs.
The IDA Board member shall be a
resident of Columbia County and
would fill the vacant position in
which the term would end January
2012. Members shall serve without
compensation.
Persons interested in volunteering for
appointment should submit their re-
sume to the Columbia County Board
of County Commissioners, P.O.
Drawer 1529, Lake City, Florida
32056-1529 on or before January 1,
2010.
04536576
December 18, 27, 2009


020 Lost & Found

FOUND CHIHUAHUA on East
Hwy 90 Saturday 12/19.
Please call to identify
386-288-4290

100 Job
Opportunities

04536549

SAVAGE

Drivers Wanted
Savage Services is seeking
professional exp. drivers for the
Lake City facility.
Class A CDL with HAZMAT &
Tanker endorsements required.
* Competitive Pay
* Complete Benefit
Package including
401K
* Home Everyday
* Paid Holidays and
Vacations
* Quarterly Incentive
Bonus
Only serious applicants need
apply in person at:
Florida Crown Career
Center*
1389W Hwy 90, Ste. 170.
Lake City, Florida.
* Located acrossfionm Florida
iltf'iway Patrol Station


100 Job
100 v Opportunities

04536756
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

A Terrific Opportunity
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company
$ 100,000+ Earning Potential,
Benefits, Pension, 401K & BCBS
Insurance for those who qualify!
Call 1-800-257-5500
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
PT ScienceTeacher needed for
private Christian School
BA required
Fax resume to: 386-755-3609

120 Medical
Employment

04536746


ft

MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
PRN / On-Call Needs :
Psych Exp RN
Varying'Shifts
LPN
Varying Shifts
Children's Outpatient
* Program Manager
Lake City
Mental Health & Substance
Abuse
Adult Case Manager
Lake City/Live Oak
Exp w/ SPMI population
Foster Parents Needed
'Please visit our website for
/ more details
www.mbhci.org
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP

04536765
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. - 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills.
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/
Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 SW McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

DENTAL ASSISTANT needed
F/T position Mon - Fri 9-5:
Salary based on experience.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3122


Dietician/nutritionist needed F/T
for new weight management
program in medical practice.
Fax resumes to 386-755-6828.

170 Business
SOpportunities
Earn Extra Income. UltraLuster
Waterless Car care Products. 50%
discount til 12/31. 386-984-6573.
www.ultraluster.com/bmcgrawjr

240 Schools &
40 Educationt

04536763
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstraihingservices.com

Welding
Enjoy working outdoors?
Like to earn a good income? Con-
sider welding at Lake City Com-
munity College. Classes
begin January 6, 2010. Financial
aid available. No high school
diploma required. We have day,
night and Saturday class.
Register now through
December 16 or January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.
HVAC
Enjoy doing repairs? Like to earn a
good income and/or Start your
business? Consider
Heating/AC and Commercial Re-
frigeration at Lake City
Community College. Classes be-
gin January 6, 2010. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma required. We have day
and night classes. Register now
through December 16
or January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


240 Schools &
2 Education
Wanted Career
Motivated Students!
If you are seeking a new career in
a high demand field, then get your
Degree or Certificate in Logistics
& Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available for
qualified students. Classes start
01/06/2009, call Lake City Com-
munity College, (386) 754-4492.


310 Pets & Supplies
Apricot TOY POODLE CKC
(w/papers), shots & health cert.,
hold w/dep. til Christmas,
8wks -12/18 $400. 386-719-4900.
FREE! Adorable Boxer/Am Bull-
dog mix 5 month old puppy. Neu-
tered, all shots, some supplies.
LOVES to play. 36-344-7999
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild- '
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
WANTED FREE Miniature
Poodle age 8wks to 18 months.
Will have loving home with senior
couple. 386-719-4827


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GAS STOVE
Good working condition.
Almond color. $100 OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295 ,


ROPER Washer (3.2 cu.) & Dryer
(6.5 cu:ft.)
Set. Good condition.
$275 OBO. 386-867-1106
UPRIGHT FREEZER.
Frost Free $165. 00
or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$135.00 or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.

405 Bicycles
Girls 16in. Bike: Orange
County Chopper Sting Ray.
Fuchsia Black. $50.
386-755-3350

408 Furniture

BLACK METAL frame futon
with cushion.
$85.00. OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.
BLUE TWEED, queen sleeper
.couch w/ accent pillows.
$100.00 Good shape.
386-755-3682.
GUN CABINET w/ glass dpor..
3' W x 80" H, handmade w/ unfin-
ished back. A must for gun collec-
tors. $75 OBO 386-867-1106.

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440
MIRIM.


411 Machinery &
411 Tools

Delta black toolbox.
67" L x 20" W x 14" D
$45.00
386-867-1106

420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

We Buy Junk: cars, trucks,
tractors, trailers, scrap metal,
AC's and batteries. NO MH's
Call 386-965-1423 or 365-4879


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
5-Men's wrist Watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) 1-Seiko, 1-Titan,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.

Full length ladies black leather
trench coat. sz. s/m.
asking $75 OBO
386-963-1211
Full length ladies red wool single
breasted coat. sz s/rm.
asking $75 OBO
386-963-1211
NEW VANITY COMBO.
18"X18"X32" Only $75.00
Call 7prti-10pm
386-752-3491
New weather proof, color security
camera, w/nite vision/microphone.
$100. before 11a 758-1358
7p-10p 758-1358
SMOKER/GRILL
Charcoal. Cast Iron.
$40.00
386-755-3350


� 450 Good Things
450to Eat

, PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420

The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

6 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 security deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243

3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL.
lbr in town. Close to shopping
$350. mo. No Pets!
386-397-0807 OR 386-752-2986
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL.
2BR/MH FOR SALE.
IN TOWN $500.
386-397-0807 OR 386-752-2986
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in
Branford area. $650.mo.
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
VERY CLEAN 2b/2ba. Covered
patio, front & back. No pets. State
Rd 100 @ Union County line.
$600 month. Call 904-966-0765.
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. rmo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or
credit card. Just include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
same vehicle in print and online.

[-.. �J i 7


For MoLreDetai-lsCall


BUY I


SELL IT

FINIT~il


I ,














4C

640 Mobile Homes
Sfor Sale
FORECLOSURE - 4 Bedroom
on Half Acre. $3000 down, $500.
mo. Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jmmartin23@yahoo.com
We will build and Beat any
MODULAR Floor Plan!
Have two with land included.
Save $$$ Thousands.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jmmartin23@yahoo.com
.1999 Repo. Great Shape 24X48
3br Doublewide Set-up on
your land. $21,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm martin23@yahoo.com
FOR SALE
2001 28X40 on 1 acre. $59,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
A650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
1800 s.f..Man. Home, 4bd/2ba,
plus retreat/office. 2 porches,
walks, concrete foundation, appli.,
plywood w/ ceramic floors, metal
roof, 5 acres, comer lot (treed).
Horses ok, Call Gary Hamilton
(386) 758-9824. Poss. owner
finance. $119K.
Owner Financing. Large. MH
w/3.32 acres. South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590-0642 /867-1833
710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts..and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423




2br Apt. in town.
Great location.
$500. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
2BR/1.5BA DUPLEX w/garage.
Luxury Apt. 5 min from VA
Hospital and Timco.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2br/1.5ba Duplex CH/A, W/D
hook up. Close to VA. $550.mo +
sec. 386-758-9351/352-208-2421
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$7�0 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
Ig master br, very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
Lg.'gar apt, 1/1 lots of space,.
privacy $500.mo,
deposit required
386-755-0819
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, lv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Studios & 1Br's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
S 720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Country Living. Furnished Effi-
ciency Park Model Trailers. $500
* per month all utilities provided.
Call 386-961-8540/386-755-4945
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
24 hour office; laundry & vending
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3br/lba house. CH/A, All appli-
ances, $750.mo. 1st, last & sec.
141 NE Montrose Ave.
(386)697-8893 or (305)962-2666
3BR/2BA BRICK Home
in town. $850/mo.
$500. security deposit.
386-365-8721
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
Owner Financing 3br/lba near
elementary school in LC.
Small down $575. mo.
386-867-1833 or 590-0642
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
Well Kept Craftsman Bungaloo,
3/2 plus many extras.
$775, deposit required
386-755-0819
740 Furnished
740 Homes for Rent
1600 sq. ft. 2/1 Furnished house in
town. Near duck pond. Remodled,
beautiful hardwood/ceremic floors.
$950/month + sec. No pets.
Includes lawn service. 961-8788.
750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
For Rent. 24X30 storgae bleg. lo-
cated off US 90 behind "Right way
* Automotive". $250. mo. has elec.
but for storage only. 386-755-2475
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135

770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd.
$1000mo,$$1000dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm
. St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
-custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
820 Farms &
Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


hunfing





* , , . '. , ,






Savvy home shoppers reach for the classified ads
before they hit the streets. The newspaper
classified section offers everything they-need to
make an informed purchasing decision.
Want to make a move?
Check the classified ads first.


classified



the first place to look for everything




Lake City Reporter


CLASSIFIED


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


Classified Department: 755-5440


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Lake City Reporter





LIFE



www.lakecityreporter.com


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Protecting

plants

from Jack

Frost

Tropical plants
'and subtropical
plants are often
used in our
North Florida
landscapes for the "feel" of
the tropics. Although they
have been pushed beyond
their northern limit, we can
effectively use these orna-
mental plants with some
degree of overwintering
success. But not always,
and with no guarantee.
Tropical plants and sum-
mer annuals will not accli-
mate to our winter freezes
and must be protected
during the winter. This usu-
ally means bringing them
indoors. Some people pre-
fer. to use tropicals as annu-
als, removing them after
cold weather kills them and
replacing them again in the
spring.
. Subtropicals can often
withstand freezing tem-
peratures if they have had
*- a chance to harden first. If
they have become slowly
accustomed to cold weath-
er before freezes occur,
there is more chance of
survival. An unseasonal
early freeze, however, can
severely injure plants that
are not protected. They
just aren't tough enough,
yet. Be prepared to protect
plants after a mid-winter
warm spell, also, because
the plants may have started
to break bud.
There are two types of
freezes that damage plants.
Frost occurs on clear
nights when surfaces lose
heat quickly into the air
and they actually become
colder that the air above. If
the air is moist, deposits of,
ice or frost can cover the
surfaces. The second type
of freeze occurs when cold'
air masses move in from
the north and the air tem-.
perature suddenly drops.
To make it worse, cold air
masses are often accompa-
nied by wind. Windbreaks
can help keep drying winds
from robbing plants of
moisture when the roots
are too cold to take in
enough water.
So what can you do to
help your marginally hardy
ornamental plants survive
winter frosts and freezes?
It is much easier to protect
plants from frost damage.
The usual way is to cover
the plants with sheets, frost
blankets or other cover-
ings. Plastic is not recom-
mended because injury to
foliage can occur where
the plastic touches the
plant. The covering should
extend to the ground to
keep in as much heat as
"possible. To retain the
most heat, cover plants
early before ground heat
escapes. During really
low temperatures, you can
even place a light bulb or a
string of Christmas lights
beneath the cover to pro-
duce heat.
Moist soil will absorb
and retain heat longer
than dry soil. If you water
underneath the plant
during the day before an
expected freeze, the sun
FROST continued on 2C


Out with the old...



And in with New Year's resolutions


JASON MATTHEW WALKERiLhe C.r, Rep.a.-r
With the new year fast approaching, people are revisiting those resolutions that they end up breaking only months after making them. A favorite resolution is
crushing the habit of smoking-. The average person quits seven times before succeeding. For those who need an added push, the Columbia County Health
Department offers a Quit Smoking Now class from Jan. 19 through Feb. 23, every Tuesday from 2-3:30 p.m.,at the Health Department.


Kicking bad habits, diets topllocals' lists
Kicking i o" c al


By ANTONIA ROBINSON.
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
W ith the
start of
2010 only
days away,
local resi-
dents along with millions.
around the nation are mak-
ing their resolutions for the,
new year.
Keeping them is a com-
pletely different matter.
As usual, popular New
Years resolutions include .
getting fit;, saving monry, '
drinking less alcohol and
quitting smoking, accord-
ing to USA.gov.
Lake City resident
Roseann Aiello already
has her resolution for the
new year-- to lose weight.
Although she didn't gain
any weight in 2009, she
said she didn't lose any
either.
"Its the same one I
made last year," she said.
Making a resolution
often proves easier than
actually keeping them for
some people, she said.
"You set them too high
sometimes," Aiello said.
"You lose touch with
reality."
Corrine Grier,,of Lake


Michele Halladay, the head trainer at Anytime Fitness, works out her abs with a set of-,
stomach. crunches. Promising to lose weight is a popular resolution that often gets neglected.
'The trick is to make it a lifestyle change. No quick fixes,' Halladay said. 'Everybody wants' it
fast, right now. Everyone has that mentality.' '


City, plans to begin good
habits for the new year,
she said.
"It's vague enough
where I won't disappoint,
myself," she said.
It's natural for people to
want to try to use the New
Year as a reason to make
changes in their lifestyles,
Grier said.


"Many people (make res-
olutions) just to do them,"
she said.
However, if people really
want to,change their life,
they shouldn't just wait
until the new year, Grier
said.
Change often starts on
his birthday, which is the.
beginning of a new year,


said Garrett Roberts of
Lake City. For the upcom-
ing year his resolution is to
live life in the present.
In the past, Roberts.
made a resolution to quit
smoking, but he still does
it, he said. So many resolu-
tions fall through because
of a lack of focus.
"People don't have long


attention spans," he said.
Also, people don't go
through the right steps
when making certain
resolutions such as quit-
ting smoking, drinking
or losing weight, said
Angelina Kelley, Columbia
County Health Department
tobacco prevention special-"
ist. If a resolution involves
quitting something, people
should plan ahead and
research ways to make
sure they stay successful in
,keeping it.
"A lot of people aren't
really prepared when they
make a decision to quit
something," she said. "They
just quit cold turkey."
When the clock strikes
midnight on Jan. 1, Robert
Wallace of Lake City won't
be making any resolutions,
he said.
"I usually forget about it
a month after New Years,"
he said.
Overall, resolutions can
help people realize what
they need to work,on in
their life, but the'person
must be willing to follow
through on the goal, he
said.
"Good luck to those
who do make resolutions,"
Wallace said.


Veterans and shelter animals meet with Pets2Vets


By LINDA LOMBARDI
For The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Dave
Sharpe was troubled by
thoughts he couldn't share
after he returned from
serving in Iraq. "I found
myself waking up in the
middle of the night, punch-
ing holes in walls, kicking
and beating the refrigera-
tor door," he said.
Then one day, the former


Air Force senior airman
went with a friend to a local
pit bull rescue and took
home a puppy, Cheyenne.
Next time he found himself
kicking something, "I saw
this puppy, cocking her
head, looking up at me,
like, what are you doing?"
Finally, Sharpe had
someone he could open
up to. "I froze. I put down
my drink, I picked her up
and laid with her in my


bed," he said. "I cried and I
told her the whole story. I
didn't feel judged."
The experience inspired
Sharpe, of Arlington, Va.,
to start Pets2Vets, a group
that pairs veterans with
homeless pets by arrang-
ing adoptions of shelter
animals. It has made two
or three matches a week
since its start in October.
One of the goals of
Pets2Vets is to raise aware-


ness about post-traumatic
stress disorder. Sharpe
says that while a few
groups provide veterans
with service dogs, many
PTSD and traumatic brain
injury patients don't qualify
for these programs. Even
when they do, because of
the stigma still attached to.
psychological problems,
they may hesitate to apply.
But Cheyenne showed
that even a "regular"


dog can work miracles,
Sharpe believes, and for-
mer Army Staff Sgt Will
"Ace" Acevedo agrees.
Acevedo took Xena, a Jack
Russell mix puppy, home
to Fayetteville, N.C. at the
beginning of December.
"She's done wonders for
me," he says.
, "Instead of you focusing
on yourself and your battle
wounds, you focus on the
dog," he says.


ID












Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


How a philosophy major becomes a mathematics professor


Y ou know how
there is always
some person in
the math class
who seems to
know the answers auto-
matically, without suffering
or hardship, who seems
to get.A's on tests without
studying at all, let alone
all weekend long? That
person was not me. When
I entered college and
was trying to decide on
a major, or a career path
(whichever is supposed
to precede the other) I
noticed that any avenue
that involved much math
(say more than one class)
was somehow mysteri-
ously off limits. I ended
up majoring in philosophy
and avoiding math. .-
My degree in philosophy
got me a job as a lifeguard.
As much as I did enjoy that
job and lifestyle, I noticed
something lacking in my
life. Strange as it may ,


S - .., -







Bill Batlle
LCCC associate professor of
developmental mathematics
seem, I actually missed
intellectual activity. I was
not joking when I said.
that I wanted to go back
for graduate school. Even
without knowing precisely,
or even generally, what
I would study or do, it
seemed highly likely that
it would involve computers
and math. Somehow those
two things would be tools
that I would need to know
how to use.
I started taking night
classes at the local com-


munity college. I would
just take one class per
semester in subjects such
as FORTRAN, statistics,
COBOL, and calculus,
you know-stuff that's fun
and interesting. Actually,
calculus was towards the
end and it was a disaster;
I dropped it. But that was
not the last I would see of
that subject. It was how-
ever the last of FORTRAN
and COBOL.
After several more
detours, I finally settled
on the idea of teaching in
the public high schools.
As I took graduate classes
in philosophical foun-
dations of education, I
started tackling one under-
graduate math class each
semester. While this did
not initially do much to
increase my understand-
ing of how mathematics
actually works, it did serve
to increase my resolve to
teach math. I grew increas-


ingly frustrated with (what
I saw as) incomplete
explanations of solutions to
homework and test ques-
tions. In fact sometimes
teachers seemed down-
right impatient and arro-
gant. I remember thinking
how I would enjoy helping
them learn something that
they found to be difficult,
say riding 30 foot walls of
water in Hawaii. It's simple,
just charge it. If you hold
back, you're toast Oh, and
remember to take a few
deep breaths before the
wave takes you under.
Over the years I took
various math classes,
some more than once. I
had to find the key. How
does it work? I can't just
follow formulas, I have to
.understand them. Not until
Numbers and Polynomials,
a class that consists of
doing proofs to develop the
various number systems,
did I finally see the light. It


is by a very small number
of assumptions, and moun-
tains of theorems that are
meticulously and logically
constructed, that math .
works. It is amazing and
beautiful.
Sadly, I "got it" just as
I was finishing my thesis
and having to leave school
to get a job. I had racked
up enough math classes
to teach high school math,
but the idea of taking more
math classes was in my
mind. After a year as a
substitute for all subjects
in a K-12 school, a year as
a math teacher at a high
school, and six years of
adjunct teaching (mostly
developmental math) at
two community colleges,
I finally was hired full,
time to teach develop-
mental math at Lake City'
Community College.
I am also back in school
studying more math. But
this time around, I have a


much better understanding
of how it works and I am
pleased to say that I am
doing much better. But the
frustrations that I endured
in getting to this level of
understanding will always
influence my approach
to teaching. Not only do
. I have a unique perspec-
tive from which to explain
.math, since it took so long
for me to get it, but I also
have a healthy respect for
demonstrating patience
with students who have.
to work hard to "get it." If
you think about it, what is
more impressive, someone
getting through a math
class who finds it easy, or
someone getting through
a math class who fears the
subject? I maintain the lat-
ter. And you are the person
to whom I direct most of
my energies.
Contact Batlle at batlleb@
lakecitycc.edu or by calling
754-4306.


ENGAGEMENT


Cortney Lee and Nicholas bavis.


Lee-Davis
Donna and Michael
Wingate and Ira and Nicole
Lee of Lake City, Fla.,
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Cortney
Nicole Lee, of Branford,
Fla., to Nicholas Lee Davis,
of Branford, Fla.
Davis is the son of Jodi
and Raymond Hall of Fort
White, Fla., and Curtis and
Vicky Davis of Branford,
Fla. The wedding is planned


for 4 p.m., Saturday, Jan.
16, 2010, at' the Church of
Christ in Live Oak, Fla.
A reception will follow at
The Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park in Live Oak, Fla.
The bride-elect is a
2005 graduate of Branford
High School and is cur-
rently attending Lake City
Community College. The
future groom is a 2003
graduate of Branford High
School.
All friends and family are
invited to the wedding.


Fashion fans know

how to pull it together


This photo taken Dec 11 shows developer Ronnie Gilley in front of the electronic bingo
pavilion at his Country Crossing entertainment and gambling complex in Dothah, Ala..


Alabama casinos go upscale


By PHILLIP RAWLS
Associated Press
SHORTER, Ala. -
Alabama casinos are mak-
ing a $500 million bet that
luxury hotels, celebrity
restaurants and big-name
entertainment will give
southbound tourists an
alternative to Mississippi's
Gulf Coast gambling
destinations.
Tourists headed through
Alabama to the Gulf can
now stop at top-line restau-
rants opened by country
singers John Anderson
and Lorrie Morgan, catch
big-name entertainers like
Hank Williams Jr. and Reba
MpEntire, and gamble in
pricey.new digs that look
like they belong in Las
Vegas rather, than rural,
Bible-belt Alabama.
"We' are not a pass-
through corridor any


more," developer Ronnie
Gilldy said ' *
Alabama's casinos
don't have. slot machines
Sand table games like the
casinos in Mississippi.
Instead, they are filled with
electronic bingo machines,
which resemble slot
machines with their flash-
ing lights and quick play.
The experience can be
much the same as slots.
Gambling expert Bill
Eadington of the University
of Nevada at Reno said
Alabama's new attractions
have a lot of potential '
because they are located
.on major travel routes,
and their' opening is likely
to be felt next door in
Mississippi, with its Gulf
Coast casino row.
"The more supply you
have, the more difficulty
you have capturing custom-
ers," Eadington said.


The Alabama develop-
ers' multimillion-dollar
gamble is not just about
pulling customers away
from Mississippi. Courts
in the state are hear-
ing lawsuits challenging
the legality of electronic
bingo in some counties,
and Eadington, director
,of UNR's Institute for the
Study of Gambling and
Commercial Gaming, said
some counties are on
shaky legal ground.
But that hasn't stopped
the growth in Alabama.
Milton McGregor cut
the ribbon Dec. 9 on a
300-room luxury hotel at
this Victoryland complex
in Shorter, about 20, miles
east of Montgomery on
Interstate 85. His Oasis
hotel will be followed in the
new year by a 1,500-seat
entertainment center and
convention complex.


Fewer

flights

and rising

fares

By HARRY R. WEBER
AP Airlines Writer
ST. LOUIS - Air travel
isn't as quick and cheap
as it used to be from some
big-city airports.
Airlines scrambling to
reverse their financial free-
fall by dropping unprofit-
able routes has left travelers
with fewer nonstop options
and, sometimes, higher
fares on remaining flights.
Blame the recession
and airlines that added too
many flights to too many
places in better times.
.In 2008, takeoffs and
landings at 86 of 100 top
U.S. airports declined an
average 6 percent from the
'year before, according to
the trade group Airports
Council International-
North America. As 2009
draws to a close, the cuts
have continued. Overall
flying has been reduced to
levels not seen since after
the 9/11 attacks.


By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL
AP Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Dressing
down --for the office,
special occasions and even
supposed black-tie affairs
- has been around so long
that today's teenagers and
20-somethings are over it.
Instead of embracing the
sloppy look that society
has come to expect from
its youth, this generation


will whrm the most soil.
The slowly radiated heat
from the soil at night can
keep the air around the
plant up to two degrees
warmer.
Plant roots are less
likely to freeze in mulched
Florida soil, but potted
plant soil can become
frozen and cause root
damage. The best way to
protect potted plants is to
bring them indoors or put
them in a shed or garage.
If you can't move them in,
move them under cover
or close to building walls
for protection. Group pots
closely together so there
will be less heat loss, and
cover plants with blankets
or sheets. Don't forget to
uncover plants in the morn-
ing before the heat builds


takes pride in pulling its
look together. There might.
not be a better occasion to;
pull out all the stops than
New Year's Eve, when
people are in the mood for
a party and everyone has
that new digital camera
tucked in the pocket.
"Young people are
really excited about get-
ting. dressed up," says Eric
Daman, costume designer
for "Gossip Girl."


up underneath.
For more information
about protecting plants in
the winter, visit the UF/
IFAS website http://solubi-
onsforyourlife.com, or call
the Master Gardeners at
352-5384. We are currently
taking applications for the
UF/IFAS Columbia County
Master Garden classes
which will begin on Feb.
10, 2010 and continue for
12 weeks. Applications
may be obtained at the UF
Extension Office located
at the fairgrounds in Lake
City. All applications are
due by Jan. 15, 2010.
* Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


* China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Shane'Russell
Dennis Thomson
February 6, 2010

Lindsey Morton
George Pridgeon
February 20, 2010

Carlee Wilson
Trey Beauchamp
March 6, 2010

Aimee Ronsonet
Brent Williams
March 20, 2010

Abigail Crow
Matt Dicks
April 10, 2010
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift, We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.
WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
Historic Downtown
156 N. Marion Ave.
752-5470


FROST: Protection
Continued From Page 1D


Copimentary



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complimenary engagement package


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2009


DEAR ABBY


Mother afraid to leave home


wants better options for kids


DEAR ABBY: I'm a
homemaker with two sweet
little girls. As precious as
they are to me,-I have a
probleni that is preventing
me from giving them the
kind of life they deserve.
I hate to leave my house.
Anytime I have to leave the
house I start sweating, my
heart starts pounding, and
by the time I return home
I'm exhausted and can do
nothing more for the rest of
the day.
My girls are asking to
go to parties, have me vol-
unteer in their classrooms,
and they want to join Girl
Scouts. I don't know what
to do! I want them to expe-
rience all of these things,
but the thought of how I'll
have to leave the house
and all the people I will
have to meet and try to
converse with brings me
to tears. I don't want my
anxieties to rub off onto
my children. What should I
do? - HOMEBOUND IN
ANDERSON, CALIF.
DEAR HOMEBOUND:
Call your doctor and have
a frank conversation about
how stressful it is for you to
leave the house and interact
with people. Then ask for a
referral to a mental health
professional who treats
panic and phobic disorders,
because it appears you have
at least one.
Fortunately, problems


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
such as yours are treatable
- but in order to get the
help you need, you will
have to ASK for it. Make it
your first New Year's reso-
lution.
DEAR ABBY: At a
recent social gathering I
was taking digital photos
and. handed my camera to a
* friend so she could view the
last shot.
She then proceeded to
scroll backward through a
large number of previous
shots I had taken, most of
them from other events..
She even questioned me
about one of them.
I think what she did was
uncalled-for and intrusive.'
What do you think? I have
since dumped the camera's
contents onto a computer'
and purged them from my
camera. --, ROBERT IN
PORTLAND, MAINE
DEAR ROBERT: Those
- must have been some "hot".
shots to have elicited such
a strong defensive reac-
tion. If you didn't want your
friend to see the pictures.
you had shot previously,


AM


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't be so hard on
yourself. You must let go. of
the past in order to move
forward. Now is not the
time to put demands on
yourself or on others. Relax
and regroup, rethink and
reevaluate. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't let what
others do get to you when
you have so much going for
you. Sit back with friends
or loved ones and plan your
vacations for the upcoming
year or strategize your game
plan. Love is in the stars.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Put a little effort into'
your surroundings. Tidy
up or make some altera-
tions. Expect to receive a
gift or cash from an unlikely
source. An added responsi-
bility will help you as much
as it hinders you. ***
: CANCER (June 21-July
22): The time spent with a
partner or peer will be eye-
opening. There is plenty to
learn by observing how oth-
ers react to situations. You
will discover the true mean-
ing of love and how impor-

CELEBRITY


THE LAST W(
Eugenia W<

tant it is to be a nurti
Patience will be requ

LEO (July 23-Au
Start to get your prof
al plans in order for t
year. It's vital, that yoi
well-prepared to mak
necessary changes as
as the opportunity op
Check out more effic
ways to take care of I
al responsibilities. *A
VIRGO (Aug. 23
22): Share your thou
and plans with others
you will get a new sla
old ideas. A trip will p
Love is on the rise an
social event will lead
interesting end to a g
evening. *****-
LIBRA (Sept. 23
22): You will face tro
home and with family
bers. Listen but don't
tell anyone how to do
or you will be shut ou
wise in how you deal
stubborn individuals.
SCORPIO (Oct.


CIPHER


you shouldn't have'handed
her the camera.
DEAR ABBY: I have
been keeping company with
a man for the past 10 years.
Our spouses are deceased.
He sometimes receives invi-
tations to weddings, parties,
etc. addressed 6nly to him.
Without consulting me, he
will call and tell these peo-
ple that if I am not invited,
then he will not attend - so
they are forced to tell him
it's OK if I come, too. I am
very uncomfortable about
these situations.
I feel that after 10 years
my name, or at least "and
guest," should appear on
* the invitation or I should
not go. Because I don't
want him to stay home, I
usually end up gqing. What
do you think about this?
- UNCOMFORTABLE
IN WISCONSIN
DEAR
UNCOMFORTABLE:
Your gentleman friend's
behavior is rude. Guest lists
are usually limited for eco-
nomic reasons. He should
.not be attempting to "black-
mail" his prospective hosts.
Many hosts handle situa-,
tions like this by cheerfully
telling the boor who tries
it, "Sorry you won't attend.
We'll miss you!"
I don't blame you for feel-
ing awkward. My advice
is not to do anything that
makes you uncomfortable.


ORD Nov. 21): Discuss your
plans with the person your
ord decisions will influence the
most. Don't hold back or
irer. try to spare someone the
ired. real truth. Change is head-
ing your way so clear-any
g. 22): unfinished business before
fession-. moving forward. ***
he new SAGITIARIUS (Nov.
u are 22-Dec.- 21): Take on a
e the challenge or get involved
s soon in something creative or
)ens up. unique. You are up for an
ient , adventure or a trip to visit
)erson- an- old friend or lover. You
A can find out where you
-Sept. stand and what the possibili-
ights ties are if you are straight-
s and forward about your feelings.
nt on ***
pay off. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
id a Jan. 19): Don't let anyone
to an limit you or hold you back.
great Get things out in the open
so you can move forward.
-Oct. Share your good fortune
)uble at with friends and family.-Your
y mem, kindness will be returned
try to many times over- in the new
things year. *****
it. Be AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
with Feb. 18): Don't get angry
,*-* about the way things are, do -.
23- something about it. Speak
up and you will find out
' where you stand. It's time
to be honest with yourself
- and others about your plans,
. -. expectations and goals. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
resent. March 20): Question your
motives. Decide what's
best for you and go after it.
,A R F Someone from your past will
R bring clarity to the confu-
sion you have been feeling.
G Prepare to make whatever
F adjustments are required.
****


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


No. 1220

INSIDE DOPE By Alan Arbesfeld / Edited by,Will Shortz . 11 12 13 14 5161718. 195 10 Ill 112 13 114 F5 716 I


Across
I Crib jry
5 N.B..A. Hall-of-
Famer Thomas
10 Like some waves
15 Pillow cover
19 Jessica of
"Fantastic Four";'
20 Where to go for
the big bucks?
21 Item on a
toothpick
22 La ___, Calif.
23 It has a large
canopy
25 Average Joes
27 Connected with
28 Rugby action
30 Where 7-Eleven
'is headquartered
31 Counter view?
33 Christmas sounds
34 "Finished!" '
35 Republicans in
2008
40 See 104-Across
41 William ___,
longtime editor
of The New
Yorker
42 Increase
43 Mastroianni's co-
star in "La Dole
Vita"
45 V.I.P. locale
46 Six-Day War hero
48 "Me too"
50 Battery option
53 Bruin great
54 Lab inspector?
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


55 Busboy's
assignment
59 Lincoln
trademark
62 One who might
be left holding
the bag?
63 Sesame Street
resident.
64 Lay to rest
65 N, E, W and S
66 Title role for
Arnold
Schwarzenegger
69 French seaport
72 Not orig.
74 "You bet"
78 Stop a trip?
82 Avenue __
. Champs-Elys6es
83 Charlotte of *
"Diff'rent
Strokes"
84 Big name in
kitchen utensils
85 Boy's name that
means "the king"
86 Horace, e.g.
88 Goes to hell
89 Attack, bear-
style
92 British gun
93 ___ Vivien,
British poet
known as the-
Muse of the.
Violets
94 Makeup boo-boo
96 Rafael Nadal
specialty
101 Associate
103 "Gotcha!"
104 With 40-Across,
some Election
Day prizes
105 Wild
106 Lead-in to
phobia


.108 "Fa la la la la la
la la la" and
others
112 Expect,
everything
considered
114 Unite
116 Whitaker's
Oscar-winning
role
117 Army of the
Potomac
'commander
during'the Civil
War
118 Seething
119 Put in the
ground, in a way
120 Director
Vittorio De _
121 Prize for
Paganini
122 Country singer
Travis
123 Tolkien tree
creatures

Down
1 Target of salicylic
.acid
2 Jai __
3 Title fellow in a
1922 Broadway
hit
4 Shop tools
5 Like some
transfers
6 In a way
7 Communism, for
one
8 Two-time loser to
D.D.E.
9 Intense attraction,
with "the."
10 1,,2, 3, 4, 5, etc.,
on a standard
keyboard
11 I Mistreatment


12 Geom. measure
13 Prefix with fauna
14 Three-time U.S.
Open champion
1 5 Barely contain
one s anger
16 "OGh, you're
back"
17 Obliquely
18 Hoi polloi, with
"the"
24 Belong
26 Like some starts
29 Dice
32 Everett of
"Citizen Kane"
34 Request from'
35 Windows
precursor
36 Patient record ,
37 Home of the
mask of King
.Tutankhamen
38 Old Coney
Island's _
Park
39 Frequent Borat
target
44 Library section,
for short
46 State, e.g.: Abbr.
'47 Play to ___
48 Takes to the
hills?
49 Meteor trailer?
51 "Wheel of'
Fortune" request
52 Obituary datum
54 20-ounce coffee
, size
56 Page of music
57 Does Rudolph's
job
58 1962 film set
partly on Crab
Key


60 Discover
alternative
61 Before
65 "A woman's __,
often opens the
door to love".:
Henry Ward
Beecher
67 Lib. references
68 Dmitri's denial
69 Good pal
70 Reagan White -
House dog
71 Having I trouble?


73 Jersey call .
74 Nash and others
75 Money in Malmoi
76 Put away
77 Was sycophantic
to
79 'Just out
80 Scruggs's partner
in bluegrass
81 "Don't look at
me!"
87 Second-rate,
88 Run through


90 Trattoria offering
91 Kitchen draw
92 Lock horns
(with)
93 Back in
94 Explores with a
tank
95 French term of
address
97 Taoists' locale
98 Held (up)
99 Low soccer score
100 Fund-raising
option


102 Old French
coronation city
106 Miles off
107 Stuck, after "in"
109 Che Guevara,
e.g.
1.10 House speaker
between Tom and
Dennis
111 S'ome
employment
records: Abbr.
113 It's not gross
115 U.K. award


Answers to last week's Sunday Crossword.

ATH|E|AIR T T PA|PWE DIEEP-E N
T A BELEIT 0 P 0 TE S P I D

IMA LB EWAYRE S SUPE S EA

AN Tc0LEN -HECT'O R ELMO
TARS CABLE SOCIAL
RI BISI FLATBUSHAVENUEE

APT 0 NITC 0 YLTS A II L ADDING
GOOGO A S A LEA_

TI S ASS LAPISLAZULI
ST NTON wIN I oI60

E I ATTAE NI FRIADR AMAN


ICE TRIP BOLOTIES TNT
POTATOFAMINE I POLITE
OMELET DELT OUTLIVES


9 Z 9 6 L 1 V 8 L


6 L L 9L 8 'lv I


8 7 L 9 Z S 6 9 L


9 6 L L V"1 8


Z L V 8 6 9 L C:9


� 9 8 L Z Z 6 9


" 9iLS 9 - 8 L 6


L.9 6 7 8 LZ 9 S


L 8 Z S 9 6 9 L V


6 2 1


2 4 7


9 7 3





3 1 9 8 7


5 6


9 5 4


4 8 3 1


7 1 2


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


I


DES


REN S IALON MI EAST


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and p
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U-equals P ..
"S G A R F J U H NY.G C C A N R JP A C X N
ML G MLARFC Z NW PN KG MN X N , N
ML G X JZ C Z NW X N R' M Y.GG.P PAE
X NARF ML GO." - TWPA W C -G HKAR
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There is only one fruitcake in the entire world
people keep sending it to each other." - Johnny Carson









Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY DECEMBER 27, 2009


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