Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


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Coming
What ... anc
Parade's B,


of'
Inside Sunday's paper





Lak


000021 120110
LIB OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF
GAINESVILLE FL


**3 DIGIT 32
HISTORY
FLORIDA
32611-1943



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Powerful
High School athletes
excel across the board.
Sports, IB







Reporter


Saturday, December 26, 2009 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 135, No. 294 U 75 cents


Christmas brings hope around the world ... and

a security breach against the pope in Vatican


AITH


UNITED


S; ' , ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pope Benedict XVI is seen next to the statuette of baby Jesus (in foreground) during Christmas Mass in St. Peter's Basilica
at the Vatican, on Thursday. A woman jumped the barriers in St. Peter's Basilica and knocked down the pontiff as he walked
down the main aisle to begin Christmas EVe Mass on Thursday, a Vatican spokesman said. The Rev. Ciro Benedettini said
the 82-year-old pope quickly got up and was unhurt..

Woman jumps barrier, knocks down Pope Benedict XVI
* ump


By NICOLE WINFIELD
Associate Press
VATICAN CITY
.The Vatican will
review secu-
Srity procedures
after a woman
jumped a bar-
rier and rushed at Pope
Benedict XVI for the sec-
ond time in two years, this
time managing to knock
him down before being
"' pulled away by guards, the
Vatican spokesman said '
Friday.
Benedict, 82, wasn't hurt
and delivered his tradi-
tional Christmas Day greet-
ings in 65 languages from
the loggia overlooking St.
Peter's Square. While a bit
unsteady at first, he also
delivered a short speech
about the world's trouble
spots without problem.
The incident in St.
Peter's Basilica raised
fresh questions about
security for the pontiff,


however, after officials
said the woman involved
had jumped the barrier at
the 2008 Midnight Mass
in a failed bid to get to the
pope. She even wore the
same red-hooded sweat
shirt.
Italian officials also
remarked on the odd simi-
-larityof th breach fto - an
assault two weeks ago on
Preniier Slvio Berlusconi
by a man with a history of
psychological problems.
The attack in Milan broke
the premier's nose and two
teeth.
The Vatican identified
the woman involved in
Thursday night's incident
as Susanna Maiolo, 25,
a Swiss-Italian national
with psychiatric problems
who was immediately
taken to a clinic f6r treat-
ment. Interior Ministry
officials said she lived in
Switzerland and the ANSA
VATICAN continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bulgarian Patriarch Maksim leads a Christmas mass at the
Golden domed Alexander Nevski cathedral in the Bulgarian
capital Sofia, on Friday. Bulgaria's Orthodox Church turned
to the reformed Julian calendar in 1968, and since then,
Bulgaria has celebrated Christmas on Dec. 25 in line with
most of the Christian world.


DEP examines sinkhole contamination threat


Most recent DEP
update: Water still
safe to drink.
From staff reports

WHITE SPRINGS -
Drinking water wells in
White Springs still show no
sign of contamination after
a sinkhole was discovered


at PCS Phosphate Company
Dec. 10, according to the
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.
PCS operates phosphate
fertilizer manufacturing.
It is estimated that 84
million gallons of process
water were released into
the ground from the sink-
hole. Process water is con-
taminated water used by


industries and business to
produce a product.
The sinkhole is approxi-
mately 100 feet across, nar-
rowing to approximately 40
feet and was found inside
the company's phospho-
gypsum stack system at
it's Swift Creek Chemical
Complex, according to the
DEP. The stack system
stores the process water


and gypsum from the com-
pany's operations.
There are no reported
adverse changes in the
sinkhole's original forma-
tion. Sinkholes are a com-
mon feature of Florida's
landscape, according to the
DEP. They are depressions
or holes in the land surface


DEP continued on 3A


Door opens on

Blanche, city

may take a look


City gains access
to better evaluate
possible buy.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lagecityreporter.com


its reportedly overcrQwded
offices there in an effort to
remain downtown.
ColumbiaCounty'soffices
are currently located in the
Courthouse
S Annex on
TT- ,- - 1 -


Opening the door, City L Avernanao
of Lake City Manager Avenue,next
Wendell Johnson presented to the court
an update on downtown's T house
Blanche Hotel to city coun- B I an c h e
cil members earlier in the Johnson H a n e1
week. H t
The city received a letter ree oos withnc de25,000s
from Stephen A. Smith, the
attorney representing the square, feet on each level.
Downtown Development The bottom floor is occu-
Downtown Development
Trust, which owns the. pied by local shops, and
Blanche Hotel, Johnson organizations rent office
said Monday. The letter space on the second floor.
gave the city and all of its The third floor is in need
employees complete access of extensiveremodeling.
to the hotel. If the city remains an
This access also extends interested partying purchas-
to structural engineers, ing the building, it will need
architects and other profes- to have a structural engi-
sional services to evaluate neer lodk at the building,
the building for purchase. Johnson said. More infor-
Previously, the council mation needs to be gath-
had expressed an inter- ered before a final decision
est in purchasing the on obtaining a contractor for
Blanche Hotel and leas- estimates is made. The mat-
ing it to Columbia County. ter will be' brought before
The county would move the council on Jan. 4.


Swine flu vaccinations


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Swine flu vaccines are sorted at the Bill Graham Civic
Auditorium in San Francisco, on Tuesday. Locally in Florida,
to date, more than 5,000 Columbia County residents have
been vaccinated against the-flu. Almost 30 percent of
Columbia County's elementary school children have had the
H1N1 vaccination.

Health department

wants to boost flu

vaccinations locally

About 20 percent ics were completed earlier
. in the month, with close to
of school district 30 percent of local elemen-
receives injection. tary school children being
vaccinated. For the entire
By TONY BRITT school system, officials
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com estimate that 20 percent of
the district's student were
More than . 5,000 . vaccinated.
Columbia County resi- Health department offi-
dents have been vaccinated cials didn't have a specific
against the H1N1 flu dur- goal for the number of local
ing the past six months, residents they planned to
but health department offi- vaccinate.
cials aie continuing to pro- "I would wish that we had
mote the H1N1 vaccination done 10,000 vaccinations
campaign. by now, because there are
"We finished the clin- 65,000 or more people in
ics ... and we're going Columbia County," Giebeig
to take a break over the said. "The larger percent-
Christmas holidays," said age of people that we get
Columbia County Health vaccinated, if things do take
Department administrator a turn for the worse when
Hugh Giebeig, who estimat- the flu season really kicks
ed that 5,500 residents have in, then the more people we
been vaccinated, have vaccinated, the better
School vaccination clin- off we are going to be."
.. ... . --7-resume a m m m an m m m m a


(3 -CALL US: 5 5 L People........ .......... 2A
(386) 752-1293- 7 3 -5f7'6 Opinion ................ 4A
SUBSCRIBE TO Partly cloudy Faith ................... 5A
THE REPORTER.: Advice & Comics......... 3B
SVoice: 755-5445 W EATHER, 2A Puzzles ................. 28
1 6 . . . . 1 Fax: 752-9400


TODAY IN
FAITH
Financial "Book
of Wisdom"


COMING
SUNDAY
Bike safety for that
new 2-wheeler















LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2009


Friday:
Afternoon: 2-4-9
Evening: 0-6-6


. ,V ) Friday:
SAfternoon: 0-3-74
Evening: 1-1-1-9


ezmatc h
T- Thursday:
6-7-15-18-32


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Fees stain welcome mat for filmmakers


NEW YORK

production companies
choosing to work in
some New York City
buildings have taken
effect with no clear word on whether
it will tarnish the city's popular-
ity as one of Hollywood's favorite
backdrops.
One critic calls the $3,200 price
tag for a permit to film at one of the
city's buildings the highest fee in the
nation by a municipality.
But the city, which attracts about
$5 billion in business each year
through the film trade, defends it
as a small increase affecting a slim
percentage of productions in a place
that has long been among the friend-
liest filming venues in the country.
The city came up with the fee over
the summer as it looked to cover
more costs related to film produc-
tions, according to Marybeth Ihle, a
spokeswoman for the Mayor's Office
of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting.
The fee took effect Wednesday.
"Private locations can charge
$10,000 a day so 'this is pretty nomi-
nal," she said, adding that the fee
affects only about 5 percent of pro-
ductions that shoot scenes in New
York City.
Among the biggest users of the
,city buildings is the long-running
dramatic series "Law & Order,"
which films frequently inside court-
houses and other city buildings.
NBC Universal did not immediately
respond to a call for comment on
reports that the show might seek to
shoot some scenes in other cities.
'This one thing itself is not going
to chase productions out of the
city," said John Johnston, executive
director of the New York Production
Alliance, which represents more
than half of the 100,000 people
employed in New York by the film,
television and commercial produc-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 3, 2004, file photo released by the New York City Mayor's Office,
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg (center) is joined by former Sen. Fred
Thompson (R-Tenn.) (left) who plays District Attorney Arthur Branch, actor Sam
Waterson (right foreground) who plays Assistant District Attorney Jack McCoy and.
other cast and crew members of the television series 'Law and Order' while film-
ing in the Blue Room at New York City Hall. On Wednesday, New York City began
imposing a $3,200 fee to film in city buildings, which the city says will affect only
about 5 percent of filming done citywide.


tion industry.
But he said he spoke out against
the fees at a public hearing earlier �
this year because it sets a dangerous
precedent that may cause other city
agencies to also impose fees that col-
lectively would cause productions to
look elsewhere to film.
Ihle said the city has moved
steadily since the 1960s to make
it ever more comfortable for film-
ing in the city, including providing
free locations to shoot scenes on
city streets. She said it does not
charge for police officers, permits,,
or parking and it covers many of the
administrative costs. associated with
filming.
She said productions also receive


discounts on purchases at every-
thing from hotels to lumber yards to
restaurants along with a 5 percent
tax credit and free bus shelter ads
when their production is ready to be
advertised.
The city has become so friendly
that the volume of films produced in
the city has risen considerably over
the last decade, she said. Mark Daly,
a spokesman.for the Department of.
Citywide Administrative Services,
said the city's buildings are such.
popular locations for filming that.
160 productions used them last year.
With.that mdch filming, hundreds,
of thousands'of dollars can be raised
with the newfee. -
' Associated Press .


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Donald Moffat is
79.
* Actor Caroll Spinney
(Big Bird on "Sesame
Street") is 76.
* R&B singer Abdul
"Duke" Fakir (The Four
Tops) is 74.
* Record producer Phil
Spector is 70.


* "America's Most
Wanted" host John Walsh
is 64.
* Country musician Bob.
Carpenter (The Nitty Gritty
Dirt Band) is 63.
* Baseball Hall of Fame
catcher Carlton Fisk is 62.
* All-Star baseball player
Chris Chambliss is 61.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... (386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING'
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30,
a.m. onSunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters..754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................ $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks ................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks... ...........".. $41.40
24 Weeks................... $82.80
52 Weeks ................ $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please.
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Plane crashes
near Bahamas
MIAMI - The U.S.
Coast Guard is searching
for two people after a small
plane apparently crashed
near the Bahamas..
Coast Guard officials in
Miami said Friday that the
plane's last known loca-
tion was about 10 miles
northeast of Plana Cays,
Bahamas.
Travis Compton and
Bancroft Nyack departed
the Fort Lauderdale
Executive Airport on
Thursday in a Piper.
PA-27 twin engine-aircraft.
Officials say the men were
flying to Grenada.
According to the Coast
Guard,' a Federal Aviation
Administration control-
ler reported losing radar
and radio contact with the
plane around 11:30 a.m.
Thursday. Around the
same time, a civilian pilot
flying in the same area
contacted the FAA and
reported hearing a plane's
emergency distress call.

Deputy shoots
after Taser fails
RIVERVIEW - A
Hillsborough County depu-
ty fatally shot a man follow-
ing a reported domestic
disturbance at a Riverview
supermarket.
The sheriff's office
reports that Cpl. Mark
Clark responded to the
Publix Thursday after-
noon and saw a man and
a woman arguing in the
parking lot. The woman
waved the deputy away,
and the couple drove off
with three children'in the
back seat of their car.
Clark reportedly fol-
lowed the family, believing
there might be something
wrong. The couple pulled
over as they fought, and
Clark brought them out of
the car to talk. After a few
minutes, authorities say


-I

PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 57 LO 36


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Florida fliers' Christmas Story

Adam Legg, from Jacksonville, plays with his child, Cailin,
after they spent the night in the Dallas Fort Worth Airport near
Dallas Friday. As he ate his McDonald's Christmas breakfast,
he joked that it reminded him of the-film 'A Christmas Story,'
when the Parker family went to a Chinese restaurant after the
dogs ate their meal. He is trying to get to Reno today.


the man ran back to the
car and grabbed a pistol.
Clark tried unsuccessfully
Tried to subdue the man
,with a Taser.
Clark then shot the man
once in the chest. The man
died at the scene.


scene, FHP says Richard.
F Bouch II was driving
past the crash when he
swerved to miss a truck.
Bouch hit firefighter
William Truax and the
back of a parked fire truck.


DUI charge
Firefighter injured 5 tis l l
at site of crashtimes legal mt
at isite of crash


BETTS - A Panhandle
firefighter working the
site of a fatal crash was
injured when he was hit by
another driver.
The Florida Highway
Patrol says 46-year-old
Dean Alan Barnes was
driving through Calhoun
County Wednesday when
he lost control, went off
the road and hit two trees.
He was not wearing a seat
belt, and the injuries were
fatal.
About an hour later,
with rescuers still at the


DUNEDIN - A Pinellas
County woman charged
with driving under the
influence reportedly had
a blood-alcohol level that
was more than five times
the legal limit.
The sheriff's office
reports that 51-year-old
Candace Rhul Spathelf was
only charged Tuesday for
the Nov. 23 incident, when
she was taken to a hospital
for possible alcohol poison-
ing instead of the jail.

* Associated Press


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7aSaturdaylp
Saturday


" Forecastedtemperatre


Pensacola
55/40


to' "I.i


FEW SUNNY MOSTLY SHOWERS
SHOWERS SUNNY


HI 56 L35 . HI 57 L 30 HI60LO 60HI 61 LO 37
HI [ 35 6 L O]354, ,H


Saldosta
56, 36


*


Tallahassee * Lake City
55/36 '..: ' 57/36
� /- ' "'. Gainesville
.anria City, ',57/38
55/40 " " Ocala
\,60/39"
. 0
S 6
Tampa *
65/5 /
* \

Ft Myers,
70/52


lacksonville
59/38

Daytona Beach
64/46


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
SFt. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
If_. =-_W -


drando Cape Canaveral Ley west
5/47 fi 68/53 Lake City


D-u -


*


u7/5/4 Miai
4 76
Key West 76/6
75/67


72
66
67
43
82 in 1964
19 in 1989


0.26"
2.72"
46.90"
1.99"
47.79"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:25 a.m.
5:38 p.m.
7:25 a.m.
5:38 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 1:11 p.m.
Moonset today ' 1:59 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 1:50 p.m.
Moonset tom. 3:00 a.m.

030�
Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
31 7 15 23
Full Last New First'


1la 6a1
Sunday ,


"Feebs e" temperature


1988, a massive
winter storm made
for a very white
Christmas in the
western U.S. Las
Vegas, Nev. report-
ed snow on the .
ground for the first
time of record.


ni Tampa
;2 Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


Sunday
71 53'.:
67/47/pc
78/67/sh
73/57/pc
58/36/pc
58/36/sh
80/70/pc
56/35/pc
78/66/sh
74/61/pc
62/36/c
71/50/pc
55/40/sh
56/35/sh
55/35/sh
71/54/pc
55/35/c
76/63/pc


4
MODEM
45muitestobn'
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


S.r Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics � 2009 Weather Central
S" LLC, Madison, Wis.
' www.weatherpubllsher.com
'I


Get Connected


Gp~~~ m ecM.


C$H3.
14,. -fe


Daily Scripture


"Jesus took Peter, James
and John with him up a high
mountain and was transfigured
before them, (his garments)
become ... whiter than the work
of any bleacher could make
them.
-Mark 9:2-10



Lake City Reporter


Monday
68.4"6 pc
65/39/s
77/55/pc
72/47/pc
58/31/s
57/32/s
79/70/pc
57/30/s
77/56/s
73/51/pc
60/33/pc
66/41/s
54/38/s
55/35/s
56/28/s
64/43/s
55/29As
77./50/s


Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala -
73/58 * Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
76/62 'Pensacola
Nanles * Tallahassee


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


�


- -- L I - c-----~-~-----F1


% a


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


S. UNB3A


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IL
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2009


ASSOCIATED PRESS
An unidentified nativity scene participant (left) is consoled following a accident
involving two vehicles and people viewing the live nativity scene Wednesday night at the
Trinity Presbyterian Church in Ashtabula, Ohio.


Truck crashes at Ohio nativity,


Associated Press
ASHTABULA, Ohio
- A traffic accident sent a
truck crashing into people
observing a northeast Ohio
church's live outdoor nativ-
ity scene, killing a man.
The crash happened
Wednesday night as
groups were watching the
nativity display at Trinity


Presbyterian Church in
Ashtabula, a city of-about
21,000 residents on Lake
Erie's coastline.
Witness Norman Jepson
was participating in the
nativity scene. He said a car
struck a pickup truck and
the truck then crashed into
people at the scene, pinning
a 57-year-old man against a
utility pole.


That man died later at a
hospital.
Jepson is the city's retired
fire chief and was playing
one. of the three wise men
in the nativity scene. He
said Friday the accident has
been very unsettling for
members of his church.
Police are investigating
the accident.


Boy, American dad arrive in U.S.


By BRADLEY BROOKS and
MICHAEL SCHNEIDER
Associated Press

ORLANDO - The father
of a 9-year-old boy at the
center of a five-year custody
battle across two continents
looked at his son sleeping
peacefully on a flight to. the
U.S. and said he loves him.


Sean Goldman and his
dad, David Goldman of
Tinton Falls, N.J., landed in
Orlando Thursday evening
on a jet chartered by NBC.
In an interview with NBC,
Goldman said, "My little
boy is 5 feet away, sound
asleep, peaceful. We're on
our way. My heart is just
melting. I love him."


The scene earlier was
much different, when the
two were reunited in Rio de
Janeiro. The youngster was
forced to squeeze though a
jostling crowd of reporters
and photographers.
The arrival ends a battle
that pitted Sean's father
against the boy's Brazilian
stepfather.


DEP: Sinkhole no threat to wells
Continued From Page 1A


and can be shallow or deep,
small or large. All are the
result of the dissolving of
the underlying limestone.
Water conditions, includ-
ing lack of rainfall, lowered


water levels or excessive
rainfall in a short period of
time can all contribute to
sinkhole development.
PCS is continuing to mon-
itor the sinkhole for possi-


ble contamination of nearby
drinking wells, according
to the DEP The company
has hired an engineering
firm to work at resolving
the sinkhole.


M 136 Silver Alerts in system's 1Ist year


Associated Press

FORT LAUDERDALE -
Since the statewide Silver
Alert program began last
fall, 136 alerts have been
issued for missing Florida
seniors, authorities said.
Silver Alerts began in
October 2008 after Gov.
Charlie Crist signed an
executive order to establish
the system that helps find
missing seniors with men-
tal impairments such as
dementia and Alzheimer's.
The alerts also can be
usedto help locate missing
younger adults suffering
from cognitive disorders.
The system has been used
to locate persons from 54 to
94, said Florida Department
of Law Enforcement spokes-
man Mike Morrison.
The FDLE disseminates
a blast of alerts to the public


through local law enforce-
ment agencies, media out-
lets and along roadside and
interstate electronic mes-
sage boards.
There have been 136
Silver Alerts issued state-
wide as of Monday. An aver-
age of 11 Silver Alerts are
issued per month.
To compare, Amber
Alerts issued for endan-
gered children have totaled
about 150 during that pro-
gram's nine-year run.
At least, five seniors
statewide were found dead
after being reported miss-
ing since the program was
launched, Morrison said. At
least one adult in a Silver
Alert case was found in
South Carolina.
"The Silver Alert is one of
those resources you hope
you never have to use, but
when you do need it, it is a


tremendous safety net for
the elders covered by the
alert," said Jon Peck, com-
munications director for
the state's department of
elder affairs.
Demand for the system
could increase in years to
come. Peck's department
projects the state's popula-
tion of elders over the age
of 85 to grove; at a rate of
118 percent through 2020.
It's the fastest growing age
demographic in the state,
Peck said. There are an
estimated 502,000 seniors
in Florida with Alzheimer's
and more than 115,000
Floridians diagnosed with
dementia, officials said.
They can wander and forget
how to return home.
Enlisting motorists and
the community to help
in these cases is crucial,
authorities said.


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VATICAN: Security slips


Continued From Page 1A
news agency said she had
traveled to Rome specifi-
cally for the Mass as she
did last year.
In the 2008 case, Maiolo
never managed to reach
the pope and was quietly
tackled by security. During
Thursday night's service,
she launched herself over
the barricade as Benedict
walked down the aisle
at the start of Christmas
Eve service. As security
guards wrestled her to
the ground, she grabbed
onto Benedict's vestments,
bringing him down with
her.
Virtually anyone can
get into a papal Mass: tick-
ets are required but are
easy to get if requested
in advance. Identification
cards are not necessary
to gain entrance, although
visitors must pass through


a metal detector. The Rev.
Federico Lombardi said it's
not realistic to think the
Vatican can ensure 100 per-.
cent security for the pope
considering he is regu-
larly surrounded by tens of
thousands of people for his,
weekly audiences, Masses,
papal greetings and other
events.
"It seems that they inter-
vened at the earliest pos-
sible moment in a situation
in which 'zero risk' cannot
be achieved," he said.
The Vatican's security
officials will nonetheless
review the episode and
"try to learn from experi-
enc'e," Lombardi told The
Associated Press.
It was the first time
a potential attacker has
come into direct contact
with Benedict during his
nearly five-year papacy.


SNofinergift


THE GIFT OF KNOWLEDGE

SThis holiday season,'give a friend or loved
one such a special gift.


Everything that happens in Lake City and
Columbia County will be placed in their
hands every morning.

/ 4 .l


0io Ho Ho... old On! i

Santa has something in his bag for you!
When you purchase a Gift Subscription
at the regular home delivery rates,
Santa will give YOU a subscription for
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The maximun length for Gift-Giver Subscriptions is limited to
one year: This includes renewals and new subscriptions.

Limited time offer. Call today!

(386) 755-5445
or come by the office located at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City
Offer Expires: 12-31-09
Must be paid in advance.


^ Lake City Reporter


Give them the
Lake City Reportei.


M t/ 4 Pl-mb ng , .

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Licensed & Insured CFC1427643
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OPINION


Saturday, December 26, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


O
O P


TH ER
I N ION


SunRail

bill, law

dishes up

concerns

Gov. Charlie Crist signed
the SunRail bill into law
Wednesday, but not before
ordering an investigation
into whether Department of
Transportation officials' use of
breakfast-related code words in
the subject lines of e-mail mes-
sages was an effort to evade
open-records laws.
Call the flap "Wafflegate."
During debate on the legisla-
tion, State Sen. Paula Dockery,
R-Lakeland, an opponent of
SunRail (and a candidate for
governor), requested from the
DOT all of its 8,000 e-mails per-
taining to the project. She didn't
get them until the bill passed
last week. Three contained
cryptic subject lines: "pancake,"
"pancakes" and "French toast"
The DOT said its search for
SunRail e-mails was hampered
by a data-entry error. As for
the nonrail-related headers,
Transportation Secretary
Stephanie Kopelousos said a
staffer used the breakfast items
as a way to grab her attention,
separating the important rail
messages from all the other
e-mails that filled her inbox.
Dockery and other SunRail
opponents, however, have
alleged the headers were coded
to avoid being grabbed in the
search for public records.
First Amendment Foundation
President Barbara Petersen told
The News Service of Florida
that Kopelousos' explanation
"doesn't pass the sniff test."
The DOTs excuse does have
a "dog ate my homework" qual-
ity to it. Its delay in complying
with a public-records request
is troublesome. Its conduct
deserves a thorough and hon-
est accounting.
* The News Herald

HIGHLIGHTS
IN H HISTORY
Today is Saturday,
Dec. 26th, the 360th day
of 2009. There are 5 days
left in the year. The seven-
day African-American holiday
Kwanzaa begins today.
This is Boxing Day.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This niission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
*Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
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typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
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BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
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THE TIrES.- PI CAYEu rIf
MY HEALTH
REFORM PLAN
IS OF THE PEOPLE/
FOR THE PEOPLE... ...BUY
PTHE O
PEOPLE.


7'\

CDiVE
O"s/^
;;


A good man who did evil?


returned two days
early. The double
garage door was
closed and another
car was parked in the drive.
As she entered her home she
heard voices from the bedroom.
She picked up a loaded pistol,
found her husband in bed with a
strange woman and on impulse
shot them both dead.
I.attended the trial. I was
early and the courtroom was
empty. I found the best seat
where I could see all and hear
all. They filled the room an
that's when a policeman came
to me and said, "You'll have
to move, sir." There were no
empty seats left.
I said, "I got here first, go find
your own seat!" About that time
a tall man in his middle age,
dressed in a long black flowing
robe, stood before me and said,
"Boy, what are you doing in my
chair?"
That's what I thought when I
saw the empty courtroom and
that large leather bound over-
sized black rocking chair on the
rostrum. Who among us can sit
in the Judge's Chair?
Another case comes to mind.
It also occurred a long tirpe ago.
and in another part of the south.
A good man married a beautiful
woman. She was a head-turner
who after awhile seemed to
grow tired of the marriage.
Over a too-long period of time,
she would flirt and court differ-
ent men and seemed to enjoy
putting her husband to shame
and a public disgrace. He was
just a good man, not good look-
ing. He ran his own little busi-
ness from their country house.
He killed her.
There were 127 people at
the bond hearing. The county
judge was shocked. They filled
the courtroom. They were
good people in support of a
good man. The bond was set,
secured, and he was freed until
the trial.
Another good man, a coun-


� '" "-7'~
F .. , .--

1



Jack Exum
Phone:(386) 755-9525
jhe@netzero.net
try bumpkin-type lawyer was
retained.
As a good friend of the
accused, I was asked to be a
character witness. I accepted.
He could have ask a hundred
others and none would have
refused.
.The trial began early on a
Friday morning. As a character
witness I was not permitted in
the trial hearing. The evidence
was an A-B-C affair. Cut and
dried. No unusual plea of insan-
ity or adultery was submitted. It
was a prosecutor walk-through.
"Did you go to her office on
that particular day?" 'Yes."
"Did you have a gun in your
pocket?" "Yes."
"Was it loaded?" "Yes."
'Tell the jury how you just
happened to get the gun out
of your pocket and it just hap-
pened to accidentally go off and
in so doing killed your wife."
The trial would last only one
day. The defendant was a good
man but didn't have a chance.
My name was called and an
officer led me into the court
room. I was shocked. There
wasn't an empty seat in the
room. Most in the audience
were men.
g"Mr. Exum," the young dis-
trict attorney approached the
witness chair. I had a fairly good
idea of what he was going to
ask. "Mr. Exum, have you ever
known a good man to do evil?"
He smiled as he turned gen-
tly to the juror box.'
* "No sir," I answered look-
ing him straight in the eye. He
knew that I was a long time min-
ister. He hesitated then pressed


the question again.
"Mr. Exum, are you saying
you have never known a good
man to do an evil deed."
'Yes sir," I replied, "That's
exactly what I am saying."
He looked at me and you
could see his thinking. I don't
know whether if I had said "yes"
to his initial question, I would
have become "his witness."
Oh,,how I wanted him to ask
me to explain my answer. He
couldn't take the chance and I
was dismissed with the wave of
his hand. If he had asked me to
explain, what would I have said?
I would have opened my New
Testament and read where
Jesus said, "Every good tree
brings forth good fruit; but a
corrupt tree brings forth evil
fruit. A good tree cannot bring
forth evil fruit, neither can a
corrupt tree bring forth good
fruit. Every tree that does not
brings forth not good fruit is cut
down, and thrown into the fire.
For by their fruits you will know
them" (Matthew 7:17-20).
You and I know that killing
is wrong. The only thing we
don't know is what we would
do in the same circumstances.
The constant betrayal, the daily
shame. The openness of the
sin and the laughing nature of
the sinner. Does this count in
the balance? It makes you won-
der what the jury said behind
closed doors. "Guilty." All say
yes. An6thei question came.
Will we put a good man in pris-
on for life?
"Has the jury reached a
verdict," the judge asked. "We
have, your Honor." They gave it
to the clerk, and the clerk gave
the signed and written docu-
ment to the judge. The judge
read what was written, "We find
the defendant not guilty, so say
we all."
Justice or mercy?
N Jack Exum has two books
available free at the Lake City
Reporter office. He is an
Amy-Award-winning religious
writer and resides in Lake City.


t looks like the
Guantanamo Bay prison
will remain a reproach to
the United States and a
rallying point for Islamic
extremists for at least another
year and perhaps longer.
Barack Qbama had commit-
ted, as one of his first acts as
president, to closing the prison
by Jan. 22. He has conceded he
' will not meet that deadline.
And now a sensible plan for
closing Guantanamo - housing
the remaining 211 detainees in
a new state prison in Illinois that
never fully opened because of
budget problems - is bogged
down by political opposition,
funding issues at the federal
level and the congressional
calendar.
Obama had instructed the


U.S. Bureau of Prisons to buy,
for a price believed to be around
$150 million, the largely vacant
1,600-cell Thomson Correctional
Facility in western Illinois. The
plan had both state and local
support for the 3,000 jobs it
would bring and the cost of
operating Thomson, about $75
million a year, was half that of
Guantanamo Bay.
But the congressional leader-
ship refused to include $200
million for the deal in a defense-
spending bill and later struck
$100 million to at least start the
process from the same bill.
The next chance the Obama
administration will have to
pay for the move will be a
supplemental war-funding bill
that Congress will take up in
March or April. If that doesn't


work, the prison purchase will
have to go through the regular
appropriations process, which,
even if it's successful, means
the money won't be available
until next fall or winter. And
then, authorities tell The New
York Times, it will take eight
to 10 months to install security
upgrades. The problem with
that timetable is that voting
would be close to the 2010
congressional elections and not
many lawmakers want to run
on bringing alleged terrorists to
the heartland, even if the heart-
land wants them. This would
put any transfer of the detain-
ees from Guantanamo Bay to
Thomson well into 2011.

* Scripps Howard News Service


Jose De La Isla
joseisIa3@yohoo.com

Old sounds

of NewYear

Immaculate Heart of
SMary was the family
church. My brothers
and I were baptized,
made our first holy com-
munion, and were confirmed
there. We continued attend-
ing even after we moved two
blocks from the old neighbor-
hood.
My father's custom was to
stop at one of the several near-
by panaderias or the grocery
store, one of the cafes, or at
the tortilleria after church. To
this day, I wake up on Sunday
expecting pan dulce or French
bread on Sunday morning that
my father picked up on the
way home.
Mostly, I remember the
sound of the church bells.
ringing right before midnight
on New Year's Eve. Lalo, the
church assistant, would bbgin
ringing the bells at Immaculate
Heart right before midnight.
The foghorns from the ships
in port began blowing long,
breathy baritone and bass
calls for two minutes or more.
Then, from up the street, came
an explosion of fireworks and
shooting rockets from the
corner Chinese grocery store
operated by Mr. and Mrs.
Shew, Ham Lu and Bobby.
We witnessed this from the
front porch, gave each other a
New Year's abrazo and waved
to any passing cars blowing
their horns. Then we went
back to the dining room for
bunuelos with chocolate or
coffee. Guy Lombardo and The
Royal Canadians were on the
radio with the "Sweetest Music
This.Side of Heaven" and the
Sbig band sounds of Glenn
Miller, even though this was
long after the height of their
popularity.
The tradition continued long
after I left home, first to go
away to school, then to start a
career, later just to follow the
roads of opportunity.
I remembered all this
the other day when I was in
another neighborhood, not
terribly far from the old one,
Where my parents settled after
my brothers and I had moved
away. Immaculate Heart was
no longer convenient and they
began attending mass at St.
Christopher's. The community
was no longer almost exclu-
sively Mexican and Central
American. Now Anglos,
Vietnamese, Nigerians and
Latinos formed the new tapes-
try of people and customs.
At communion, the Latinos
look diminutive beside
Nigerian women with textile
headgear of vibrant tropical
colors that sit high on their
heads. The Vietnamese chant
the _oc kinh, the words of Hail
Mary intoned, forming what
liturgical music composer
Rufino Zaragoza, OFM, calls "a
sonic environment." The famil-
iar traditions contrast with new
sights and sounds that make
me think my father, an artist in
his later years, who was happy
here.
As I have put it off for a '
long time, I am still deciding
what to do with some of the
things in my father's desk
now that he is gone. One of
them is a cassette recording.
The first several seconds are
silent, then you hear the bells
of Immaculate Heart of Mary
ringing. Then the foghorns of
the ships in port go off. A min-
ute or two later the fireworks
begin, with Guy Lombardo and
The Royal Canadians playing
"Auld Lang Syne" in the back-
ground.


Then it all goes silent again.

* Jose de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


4A


OTHER OPINION

Living with Guantanamo until 2011


I I -I -


'k


















FAITH


Saturday, December 26, 2009 v


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


Angie Land
angielond3@windstream.net

Look ahead

when you

look behind


Year! Now
I know that
lots of folks
enjoy their
Christmas lights and
decorations until after
New Year's, and don't get
S me wrong, no one enjoys
Christmas more than me,
but the day after and I'm
ready for that tree to come
down. Even as a little girl
I remember going back to
our Christmas tree after
the presents were opened
and the family celebration
was over. That tree seemed
so sad standing there all
alone.
Maybe thats because
I like moving forward.
After Christmas, I imme-
diately start anticipating
the fresh clean pages of
the New Year's calendar.
Depending on how you
look at it, those pages can
represent days full of dread
and demands or they can
shine with possibility and
opportunities.
The Bible records the
Apostle Paul saying it best:
"I press on to take hold of
-that for which Christ Jesus
took hold of me ... but one
thing I do: forgetting what
is behind and straining
toward what is ahead, I
press on toward the goal
to win the prize for which
God has called me heav-
enward in Christ Jesus."
(Philippians 3:13-14)
Paul says we have to
"press on" or keep moving
forward to fulfill that plan.
What that means is that the
past shouldn't take prior-
ity over the present and
future.
* Too many of us struggle
continually with the hurt
and failures of the past and
can't seem to move ahead
in forgiveness, or on to suc-
cess. Or maybe we dwell
on the past because we
believe they were our best
days, and the rest of our
years will pale in compari-
son - and they absolutely
will as long as we choose
to stay behind.
The second part of the
instruction is just as impor-
tant: We need to pay spe-
cial attention to "straining
toward what is ahead."
, Webster's dictionary
defines "strain" as "to
struggle; to make a desper-
S ate effort." This is our first
clue that pressing on and
moving forward will not
always be an easy thing
to do. "Easy" often means
staying right in that same
comfortable spot; it may
not even be a great spot,
but at least we know what
to expect.
We have the choice: We
can do "easy" and spend
the rest of our lives won-
dering what we missed, or
we can start making that
intentional effort to find
and live in the purpose for
which God planned our
whole life.
I hope so much that you
will grab those fresh pages
of a 2010 calendar and see
them as brand new oppor-
tunities to be everything
that God created you to
be ... because your heart
really does matter!
Blessings for an amazing
New Year!
* Heart Matters is a
weekly column'written by
Angie Land, director of the
Family Life Ministries of the
Lafayette Baptist Association,
where she teaches bible
studies, leads marriage and
family conferences and offers
biblical counseling to individu-
als, couples and families.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This July 29 file photo shows financial guru Dave Ramsey in his broadcasting studio irt Brentwood, Tenn. Ramsey doesn't deny mixing religion and business,
and he doesn't apologize for getting rich doing it, either.


Mining the Bible for money wisdom


By JAY LINDSAY
Associated Press
BOSTON
A Hummer, a
1957 hot rod,
a comfortable
house in a
gated com-
munity - if Bob Vigliotti
wanted something, he
bought it. Cash or credit
didn't matter. As a success-
ful commercial real estate
developer from Naples, he
could afford it. Until he
couldn't
In 2007, the budding
economic downturn
claimed one of his major
projects. For two years,
Vigliotti, 58, battled depres-
sion as he-bled $1 million
cash. But Vigliotti said just
when he.thought there
were no answers, he found
them in the Bible: debt
reduction, simpler living
and, most of all, faith that
God would provide what
he needed. Vigliotti won't
buy on credit now, is sell-
ing his pricey vehicles and
is looking to downsize to a
condo.
"The angst, anxiety and
the depression is gone,
and that's huge," Vigliotti
said. "(The Bible's words)
are alive today, and not just
history book words."
Depending on your
view, the Bible is divinely
inspired or a collection of
tall tales. But many see
it as a source of financial
wisdom that transcends
individual faith and the
centuries between when
it was written and today's
tough times.


"All sound profes-
sional advice, I found, ...
has its roots someplace
in Scripture," said Ron
Blue, author of "Surviving
Financial Meltdown" and
founder of the jKingdom
Advisors, which trains
Christian financial profes-
sionals. Blue uses the
Bible for guidance on
everything from budgeting
to long-term investing and
handling an inheritance.
But Robert Manning,
author of "Credit Card
SNation," said biblically
based financial advice isn't
sophisticated enough in a
world of rising health care,
housing and retirement-
costs, where people need
to learn to take advantage
of complicated credit and
tax laws.
"If you're going to
go pre-New Deal, 1924
America, that's basically
what this advice is driven
by," Manning said. "It
sounds so good and plau-
sible until you actually put
it into reality, and it just
* doesn't work." ,
Purveyors of bibli-
cally based financial advice
count up to 2,300.verses
on money management.
Frequently,cited verses in
the Old Testament book
of Proverbs urge careful
spending, including 'The
plans of the diligent lead,
to profit, as surely as haste
leads to poverty." Another
warns debtors that "the'
borrower is servant to the
lender."
Blue sees advice to
diversify-stock portfolios
in a verse about a man's


"bread" from Ecclesiastes:
"Give portions to seven,
yes to eight, for you do not
know what disaster may
come upon the land."
But the many verses can
be interpreted in different
ways.
For instance, in the gos-
pel of John, Jesus says "I
havecome that they might
have life, and have it to the
full," which some "prosper-
ity gospel" preachers see
as a promise of material
wealth to faithful givers.
Others say it's an assur-
ance. of joy or contentment.
The Bible's core finan-
cial principles aren't pli-
able, as the varied interpre-
tations might suggest, said
Matt Bell, Christian author
of "Money Strategies for
Tough Times." But during
an economic downturn,
people can be pulled every
which way by someone
holding up a Bible and
handing down their ver-
sion of financial wisdom,
he said.
"Any time someone is
in a point of pain, they're
especially vulnerable,"
Bell said. 'That's where
they especially need wise
counsel."
,Plenty are willing to
give it. Financial guru
Dave Ramsey's Financial
Peace University course
has enrolled more than
750,000 families. Crown
Financial Ministries, based
in Gainesville, Ga., says it
will give 300 seminars and
"coach" 10,000 people this
year.
Regional events and
workshops are offered by


authors such as Bell and
Kevin Cross, a Florida
accountant whose book
"Building Your Financial
Fortress in 52 Days"
changed Vigliotti's view of
money.
Whatever brand of
financial philosophy they,
offer, Manning sees self-
interest in church-based
advice on money manage-
ment because struggling
members give less to
the church and also take
more away in the form of
financial aid. He said such
ministries can be a way to
impose "social control" by
convincing churchgoers
to use their money only-
in church-approved ways.
They're also "a hook to
bring people in, to have
them rejoin the flock," he
said.
"They went on their way-
ward ways, and look what
it got them into," Manning
said. "But if they come
back to the church and
they follow the prescrip-
tion, life is going to be on
autopilot again."
Blue said reaching peo-
ple with biblical financial
principles is much more
about affecting what's in
people's hearts than what's
in their pockets. Money
and the pursuit of wealth
are huge sources of stress,
and God wants us to han-
dle it properly so that we
can be at peace, he said.
"The way you spend
money is a function really
of your character, your
values and your priori-
ties in life," Blue said. "So
when the Bible speaks


about money, it's not as
interested in making you a
millionaire as it is helping
you shape the character of
your life."
Sally Geckeler of Johns
Creek, Ga., turned to bib-
lical financial principles
after her husband died in
a ultralight plane crash in
2004, leaving her his busi-
ness and three boys to
raise. When she began to
view money as God's pos-
session, and not hers, her
fears eased and now she
makes better financial deci-
sions, she said.
"I have to have goals and
reasons I do things, not
just go frivolously spending
it on whatever I desire,"
said Geckeler, 48.
James Hudnut-Beumler,
Dean of the Divinity School
at Vanderbilt University
and author of "In Pursuit of
the Almighty's Dollar," said
he respects many Christian
financial advisers for taking
the "magic" out of faith-
based money management
by emphasizing sound
choices, and valuing things
that can't be bought.
But he said the Bible
is ultimately a profound
account of God's relation-
ship and enduring love for
humanity. There's a danger
its greatness can be dimin-
ished if it comes to be
viewed as a sort of finan-
cial fix-it book for helping
people manage personal
finances. *
"Suddenly, you're credit-
ing the Bible for something
quite less than what it
might have done for you,"
he said.


CHURCH NOTES


Sunday
Biblical drama
The Rev. Stephen
Ahrens will perform
"Joseph, the Father to the
Savior," a biblical drama
at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at
First Baptist Church. The
church is located at 182
NE Justice Street.
Thursday
New Bethel watch night
The New Bethel


Missionary Baptist Church
family invites the commu-
nity to Watch Night service
at 9:30 p.m. Dec. 31. The
service will consist of tes-
timonies, prayers, songs
and a special message by
Pastor Alvin J. Baker. The
church is located at 550
NE Martin Luther King
Street.


Dec. 31, at New Dayspring
Missionary Baptist
Church. The church is
located at 709 NW Long
Street. The community is
invited. Attire is casual and
breakfast will be served.
The Rev. Lantz G. Mills is
pastor.
I .l l a_ __m . ...


uaySpring missionary
New Dayspring watch Baptist watch night
night service ,..
Th DI S~y.p iu


A Watch Night Praise
Service starts at 10 p.m.


ie vay pri ng
Missionary Baptist Church
will have watch night at


9:30 p.m. Dec. 31. The
Rev. Aaron Thomas Lewis
Sr., pastor, will deliver the
sermon. The church is
located on North Congress
Avenue. The community is
invited to come out and be
a part of the service.

Watertown watch night
The Watertown
Congregational Methodist
Church is hosting a watch
night service at 7:30 p.m.
Dec. 31 with Stepbh


Jones, as we sing and wor-
ship the Lord. There will
be refreshments. Call 752-
1329 for more information.

* Submit events and
announcements to be
included in the Lake City,
Reporter's Church Notes in
writing no later than 5 p.m.
Tuesday to Tom Mayer at
tmayer@lakecityreporter.
com, (386) 754-0428, fax to
(386) 752-9400 or visit 180
E. Duval St., Lake City.


5A















LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2009


Clearing the Clutter


The ringing in of a brand new year is at hand. and %with it
the resolutions. One might be to clear away the clutter - and
that includes deciding what to do %with it. Material things aside,
you may be feeling the same disorder in your life. Today's
iorld is a barrage of input that seems to clutter our very souls.
How will you decide what is ,worth retaining?
What is most important to know in order to like a useful,
peaceful, and joyous life? God's Word should be of utmost
consideration when we establish priorities. When we follow His
advice, everything else falls into place. We know what is
important and what is not. The result is a sense of peace and
jo), even amid the confusion of life.
Won't 3ou begin this year with worship in God's House? It
is the best resolution of them all.






Scriprures Se.ecred o The Amrer.can BtlE S,.eetvr
;Copyrgrt 200o9 Kester-Will.arrm rewsPape, Services. P O Box 8187. CrarlohllevIIe VA 22'06. wwwk.kkrewsc.m


PHONtE i ,36' 752T57i7
FPr FA IJ ,I - ..I024
O'NEAL .
ROOFING COMPANY
ROOFING . INSULATION

North Florida
Pharmacy
-" lxotion lto Senre ou
La . ir-,r Fil vh e Brart.:.rd
Chitilanrid .j ,:'. & K*c, iln H- iht




386-754-
W WW. . W I N E: RHO M F. . OM

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this Directory
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755-5440



Supercenter
LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427


G\
Chevron
biy


V


Hunter, Inc.
Chevron Oil
Jobber


aHolly/Aecbc, Inc.
"Quality ork at a reasonable price"

(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
I can do all thing throw l Christ h5ch strcngtheneth me
Phillppian 4:13

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this Directory
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755-5440




366-754-5553
642 5. rarion Ive., Lake City
crosss from i llospital)

RICK'S (RANE SERVICE
Located at 25A ,( .
(Old Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

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this Directory
Call Mary
755-5440


First Advent Christian
18Il SW McFailane Ale
386-752-3900
Sunday school: 9'45AM
Sunday Senrv. I 1.00A
Wednesday Service: 7 IIPM

FAITH IN CHRIST ANGLICAN CHURCH
9317 90 West, 6 mds Wesa of 1-75
386-7M.:82 ,.
- M28 Praykr Bioo
"A Tradi ial Episcopal Church"
Rev Don Wdiln

BEREA BAPIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School' 9.30AM
Sunday Wor.hip 10 15AM1& 6PM
Wednesday Eve Scrnce 7PM
Pastor: LarryE. Sweat

EASTSIDEBAPTISTCHfURCH
196SE James Ave.* 386-752-2860 .
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM &6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Pastor Hugh Dampier
FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. Sephen Shav * 386-963-1028
Sun Sthool i.iiOAM
MorningWorship ' li:00AM '
EveningWorship 600PM
Wed. Prdyer Semrve 00PM
FIRST BAFTISTCHURCH -.: ..
Sunday Bible Srudy 9.15AM
SundayWorship 10:M310AM &6.00PM
.- Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service,'&, :&
.Childrens Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor
FT.WHITEBAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday School 10AM
Worship ' 1AM
Sun. Evening Worship 6PM
Prayer & Bible Study 7PM
Yough Group Meeting 7PM
Need a ride call the church: 386-497-1388
OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 75 .1990
Ronald V.Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship ll:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God'sWord, Will &Way"

PARKVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH
268NWLakeJefferyRd. *752-0681.
Lake City, Florida 32055
www.pbclc.com
Sunday School 8:30,9:45 & HIAM
SundayWorship 9:45 & 11AM & 6PM
AWANA 5:30PM
EveningWorship 6:00 PM
Wed. Eve. Schedule
Family Supper (Reservation) 5PM
Children's Ministry 6PM
YouthWorship 6:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 6:00PM
Thursday Evening Schedule - St. 8/21/08
Parkview Edge 8:30PM
Pastor: Michael A. Tatem


PINE GROVE BAPTISTCHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386 :52.'2464
Sunday Bible Stud 94.45AM
Sunday Worship Il'AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & i:uth Minitry 6 30PM
Pajtor Roln ihompson

CELEBRATION COMMUNITY CHURCH
Hwy 47 between Fi.While & Columbia City
Sunday Services
i Bible STidy ��.- l.r.: .Wedne~.da) Evenin g.hediil?' ''';r'7...
AWANA - .."*-"*
Prayer and Bible Study 7:PM
Pasi.i Dick Shorr* 751-1144
SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Serices 10 310 AM
* Pastor Elder Herman Gnfin i
75' .4 198
SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH.
388 S.E. Bav Drive 755 5553
Sunday:
Bible Study . 915 Af
MorningWorship li.3riAM
EveningWorship b.15PM
Wednesday:


A U NA
Prayer & Bible Study


5:45PM
6:15PM


- TABERNACLEBAPTIST CHURCH :
Ilndepeende( april
144 SE Minnuse Ave. * 752.4274 '.
Sunday School . 10.AM
Sun. Morn. Worship . AM
Sunday Eve. . .. 6 PM
Wed. Pd) er Meeting 7 30 PM
Pastor Mike Norman

THEVINEYARD : "
A Southern Baptist Church
2091 SW Main Blvd. * 623-0026
SundayWorship 10:00AM
Where Jesus is Preached
and jeans are appropriate.
Pastor, Bo Hammock

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court - 752-4470
SaturdayVigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
'5:00 PM (Spanish/Enlglish) '
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00AM-10:15AM

LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.* 755-9436
.Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7PM

CENTRAL CHURCH OF CHRIST
Directions & Times 755-1320
SJohn Lit Cole
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
3614 Hwy 47 South*752-6010
Sun. Bible Study 9 AM
Sun, Morn. Worship 10 AM
Sun. Evening Worship 6 PM
Wed. Bible Study 7:00 PM
Minister: Ryan Tuten


LAKECITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.* 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School : . 9:45 AM
SundayWorship. .10:50'&6:30
Wed. SpiritualEnrichment 7PM
"ShockYouthChurch"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor- ]ohri R. Hatlaway


ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr., Lake
Cit.y.l 320125- 386 752 2218
Email %ntamesepi'30@Dbellsouth.net
Holy Eucharist
Sun. 8 lOAvI
Wednreday: 6-U0pi
Yoga Classes Mon.4-30pm
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong
Diacon The Rev. Ilmmie Hunnger
Dirmiior oAfullir Dr Alfonso Levy

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
I 2 mdesS ot 1-75onSR147
755.4299
Sunday Serices 9-30AM
(Nuisery Pruvided)
Chnsian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Re'. Bruce Alkie

* SPIRITOFCHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90, 1 miles Wst o Il. ;5,752-380;
Sunday Worship 10-00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM MWorship 7PM
Pastor. David E Winter

LAK CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School , 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10-45AM, 6:30PM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adultl,outh Minitry, Chddren's Ministry
Pasior: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
41869 US441 South
Sunday Worship Services,
Traditonal Services 830 & 1: J OAM
S386-755-1353
trychnst@eanhlnknet
First Uniled Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488


U lcolna] Service ' u"' t.U00^M
Program opportunities available in all
areas for all age.
For a complete hedule
contact church offie at
752.4488
WTSLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
2300 SW "McFarlaine 752-3513
(Adlaceii to Summers Sihuoli
SSunddy School 9 0I)A
Sunday Worhip 81AM & uAM
bVuth Meeting 4-30PM
Praise & Worship 6PM
Nursery Ptcvided
Pastir. Loue Mabrey
ivwW mvresleyTriemI c)m

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E rurn on Corez (nex to Quality
Ind right onOkinawa
Sunday Sihool 9.45AM
Sun. Woiship II Wl&6 PMN
Wed Night Servce '.' " *' P i'
Sunday Training* ' 5PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbuni

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive* 752-0670
Sunday ContemporaryWorship 9:00AM
Sunday Schol 10:00 AM
*Traditional Services . : 11:00AM
NURSERYPROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin "
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St.
SundaySchool 10:00 AM
Morning Worship . 1:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services -Wednesday 7:00PM
Mfd-week Service - Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408* Everyone WelkOnie :
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis


CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Sunday 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 10:30AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
Saturday Nite Services 5:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters.Welcome Rd:, go 5 miles, South,
church on left.* 755-2525 ,.
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns


"A Church on the Move"
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle-
Sunday Celebiation 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119
FAILING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road* 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel


MEADE MINISTRIES
Dir: Hwy47 to Columbia City,
one mile East on CR 240
Sunday 10AM and 7PM-
Thursday 8PM
No NurseryAvailable
Spirit Filled Worship
Healing and Deliverance
FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
Sunday @ 10:00 AM
GENUINE* FUN* DIFFERENT
We are a non-denominational,
non-charismatic church meeting in
homes, park, and community
Centers throughout Columbia
Country www.FellowshipStuff.com
386-365-8535


To List


Your





.Church





on the





Church





Directory


Call


* ' t'v~~..
v. -


752-1293!
/ju i y


To advertiseinthgis, C- ur Dircyal lB755544


Cilay Electric Cooperative,Inc,
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
S clayelectric.com

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755-5440

�:GENTIVXK
a great heicare has caom homne

h1�ll0 M o rrel l'sh.e r. 1




IYor imlete decor ting t and
Tires lor every need
US 90 VVesi across Ilom VVal-Mart




52386-961- -0054

orth de Motors, Inc.
Your Complete decoraiing and



IGodme WeTrusngstore
a ['':[".ri jfieff Nl� L IIi ci i m,.r i -iji..ui Rd.)


Patty Register ;.'
386-961-9100 ^
Northside Motors, Inc.
In God We Trust
19JIE DuI l SI Mori n Fn i m 50i[u m.
Lair, [r . FL i3r5 (Iiad Wednl icday

A~ND ERSOh COLUMBIA CO., INC.
S ASPHALT PAVING
COMMER(LU. INDiUSTRIAL
Sue Prcpar.u'ri * R...i Build'ir.g * P.alrig L)ts
ridingg & Draiii e
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St. Lake City

2 HARRY'S
Heating S Air Crdonidnigin Inc.
Hairr, f.i -s P Miai4 r

plnO 752-2308

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Central States
Enterprises
Columbia Count)'s Feed Headquarters
FEED - PE T SUPPLE - LWaN & GARDEN
.5NIlMA HLUJJH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lavn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS i CHIIN SAWS * TRIMMERS
1 '1USn liEST - L KE CiTI FL
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
"7r' 755-7050


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Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424















Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


Saturday, December 26, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


S Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Emotional

farewells

expected
B owl season
7 really heats
up over the
next week,
ut but it's not
until Friday when we'll
start to see the cream of
the crop.
Among the two biggest
bowl games of the
football season will be
S fond farewells to coach
Bobby Bowden of the
Florida State Seminoles
and quarterback
Tim Tebow of the
Florida Gators.
Perhaps no other-
individuals stand more:
for what's right with the
game of college football
than these two.
Bowden has stood
for what's right with the
game, and for what's
right with humanity in
general for the last four
decades.
Tebow has only done
it for thedlast four years,
but both of these icons
will be long remembered
for their roles in the
game.
If ever there was a
team at 6-6 that deserved
a high-caliber bowl trip,
it's the Seminoles, in part
due to their long-time
coach. Bowden deserves
the shot to go out a
winner (since he won't *
be afforded the dignity
of going out on his own
terms).
Tebow stands in much
of the same boat, as his
dream of being the first
to deliver Florida to an
undefeated
season was cut short.
The quarterback will
have a chance to add to
his legacy (and perhaps
help his draft stock)
against a Cincinnati team
that has plenty to play
for. Motivation is the key
to the Gators' chance at
winning..
Motivation shouldn't
be hard to come by for
the Seminoles as they
only need to look into the
eyes of their head coach
before the game.
If ever there was a
reason to have a little
teary-eyed speech before
a bowl game, Bowden .
has the reason. It will be
a speech to sum up the
importance of a historical
career. Something tells
me that words won't be
able to express what he's
meant to the game.
The same can be said
for Tebow. We've come
through a decade where
the game has become
about the "me" player.
With guys like Chad
Ochocinco catching all of
the headlines, it's
important that we pay
amble tribute to a
person who's more
about giving back than
receiving.
One of the main
lessons in Christmas is
it's better to give than
receive.
Both of these people
have given more to us
then they'll ever get back.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Heat, Wade cool off Knicks


Wade scores 30 in
opening game of
Christmas marathon.
Associated Press

NEW YORK - Dwyane
Wade had 30 points and nine
rebounds, and the Miami Heat
spoiled New York's return to
Christmas competition, snap-
ping the Knicks' three-game
winning streak with a 93-87
victory Friday.
Michael Beasley added 13 of
his 19 points after halftime for
the Heat, who opened a comfort-
able lead by limiting New York
to 31 points across the middle
two quarters. Then Miami held
on after the Knicks finally got
on track in the final minutes.
Jermaine O'Neal finished with
11 points and eight boards, mak-
ing a jumper with 51 seconds
left after Miami's lead had been
sliced to three points.


Danilo Gallinari scored 26
.points and David Lee had 19
points and 16 rebounds for the
Knicks, who had a six-game
home winning streak .snapped
and lost for just the third time
in 10 games overall. They were
playing in their NBA-leading
45th Christmas game, but first
since beating Toronto in 2001.
Coach Mike D'Antoni said the
Knicks' rare nationally televised
game was a chance to send a
message about how well they
were playing - only the Lakers,
Celtics and Cavaliers had better
records in December than the
8-3 New York entered with.
Instead, the viewing audi-
ence saw the Knicks go just 5
of 28 on 3-pointers and finish
with a season-low 11 assists.
Al Harrington missed 15 of 20
shots while scoring 12 points.
Beasley had three buckets
early in the fourth quarter that
helped Miami open a 14-point
cushion. Wade had a series of


baskets late in the period that
restored a double-digit lead,
including a drive and powerful
dunk that made it 81-71 with 3b
minutes to play.

Celtics 86, Magic 77
ORLANDO - Rajon Rondo
had 17 points, 13' rebounds and
eight assists, and the Boston
Celtics bullied the Orlando
Magic with strong defense.
Ray Alien added 18 points and
Tony Allen scored 16 in place of
the injured Paul Pierce for the
Celtics, who rolled to their 14th
win in the last 15 games.
The only big blow for the
Celtics came in the final minutes,
when Kevin Garnett jumped to
block a shot by Vince Carter,
only to land awkwardly and go
tumbling to the ground. He hob-
bled back to the bench holding
his back and didn't return.

NBA continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
.Miami Heat forward Michael Beasley (30),
blocks New York Knicks forward Jared Jeffries -
(20) during their.NBA basketball game at
Madison Square Garden in New York on Friday:


Powerful performances


Reporter file photo
Celeste Gomez is cheered on by her Columbia High weightlifting teammates during a clean-and-jerk lift last season.
Gomez was champion in the 183-pound weight class at the 2009 FHSAA State Finals.

High school athletes excelled in sports


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Several high school
students excelled in sports
during the calendar year,
starting with Columbia
High's Celeste Gomez who
was a state champion in
weightlifting.
Gomez won the 183-
pound eight class with a
210 bench press and 215
clean and jerk for a 425
total. Her clean and jerk set
a state record in the weight
class and her total tied the
state mark. She won by 25
pounds over second place.
The Lady Tigers had
seven other state qualifiers
- Tara Stephens (second
place), Alaina Timmons
(third place), Ashley Shaw,
Phoebe Johnson, Jennifer
Kondrach, Amber Thomas
and Jessica Bullock.
Fort White High lifters'
Chris Griffith and Steven
Griffith placed second at
state, and Tyler Howard
also qualified.
Columbia's Brach
Bessant placed second at


state in weightlifting and
Todd Steward was fourth.
Marquis Davis qualified.
Fort White's Jordan
Dewhirst was named first-
team all-state in football.
Other all-state Indians were
second-teamers Xavier
Blake and Joseph Johnson,
and honorable mentions
Alex Gilmer and Roy
Blake.
SAll-state for the Tigers,
Tim Jernigan was named
to the second team and
Bessant was third team.
Columbia bowlers
Courtney Schmitt and
Christine Peters qualified
for the state tournament.
LadyTigers softball catch-
er Stephanie Pilkington
was named to the Miracle
Sports 2009 Florida High
School 5A All-State Team.
Columbia's Brandon
Scott earned all-state
honors in cross country
with his 12th-place finish.
Scott also won district in
track in the 1,600 meters
and 3,200 meters. He was
joined by Shayne Foote,
Jason Harrison and Seth


Peterson as district cham-
pions in the 4x800 relay.
Columbia's Charles
Jenkins was district cham-
pion in the triple jump.
Other region qualifiers
for CHS track were Kamarus
Bryant (100 hurdles, 300
high hurdles), Tiger Powell
(discus), Jamaal Montague
(400 meters) Foote (800
meters), Phoebe Johnson
(200 meters, 400 meters)
and. Perla Valdez (400
meters).
Clare Russell and Cierra
Timmons qualified with
Johnson and Valdez in the,
4x400 relay. Columbia's
boys 4x400 team of Jabari
Thompson, Clyde Coker,
Peterson and Montague
also qualified for region.
Fort White had three dis-
trict track champions in five
events. Sitia Martinez won
the 100 meters and the 300-
meter hurdles. Matthew
Waddington won the 1,600
meters and 3.200 meters,
and Tara Miller won the
400 meters.
Martinez also qualified
for region in the long jump,


as did Miller in the high
jump.
Other Lady Indians mak-
ingregionwere Raven Major
(400 meters), Ashley Cason
(3,200 meters), Brittani
Cason (high jump), Nikeria
Soloman (triple jump) and
Karie Coffee (discus).
'Fort White's 4x100 relay
team of Desma Blake,
Miller, Jasmine Robinson
and Soloman, and the 4x800
relay team of Rykia Jackson,
Cason, Danielle Wooley and
Shania Pelham advanced to
region.
Columbia's Chrissie
Reichert and Kelsey Mercer
were district champions
in No. 2 tennis doubles,
winning a rousing three-set
final by tiebreakers in the
second and third sets.
Darian Ste-Marie earned
all-district honors in golf.
Columbia school records
were set by Phoebe
Johnson and Scott in cross
country, and swimmer
Heather Burns in the 100
backstroke.

PREP continued on 2B


Champs

billed as

'Shalala

Bowl'

Miami president
helped resurrect.
Badgers football.

By RYAN J. FOLEY -
Associated Press
MADISON, Wis. - If
Wisconsin beats Miami in
the Champs Sports Bowl,
Hurricanes fans may .
have an unlikely figure
to blame: University of
Miami president Donna
Shalala.
Before she served as
President Bill Clinton's
health and human ser-
vices secretary, Shalala
was the University of
Wiscorisin-Madison chan-
cellor who helped .turn
an embarrassing football
program into a perennial
Big 10 contender.
Some are calling
Tuesday's matchup in
Orlando between No.
14 Miami and No. 24
Wisconsin "the Shalala
Bowl." Shalala, for her
part, isn't making any
predictions.
"I knew this was goiigt
to happen eventually -
but I hoped it would 1
for the national chanm4i
ionship," she said of hir-
current and former
schools playing.
A bowl appearance was
a dream for Wisconsini
fans when Shalala arrived
in Madison in 1988. Z
In her first two seasofis
as chancellor, Wisconsin
had a combined 3-19
record, (including a 51-3
home drubbing to Miaiti
in 1989 in the school
last meeting) and finished
last in the conference.
The, athletic department
had a multimillion dollar
deficit. Even farmers
wrote Shalala letters
asking for change arid
state pride was suffering.-
"Itwas a great university
and they knew-it, but they
wanted their Badgers to.
be a great football team"
Shalala said.
And so, in 1989, Shalala
fired athletics director
Ade Sponberg and three-
year football coach Don
Morton. Shalala said
firing both men was risky
because, while change
was necessary, some
doubted the academically
strong Wisconsin would
ever succeed in athletics.

CHAMPS continued on 2B


- --� -~--------,















Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2009


SCOREBOARD


. TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
I p.m.
ESPN - Little Caesars Pizza Bowl,
Marshall vs. Ohio, at Detroit
4:30 p.m.
SESPN - Meineke Car Care Bowl,
Pittsburgh vs. North Carolina, at
C Gharlotte, N.C.
8 p.m.
ESPN-EnmeraldBowl,BostonCollege
vs Southern Cal, at San Francisco
' MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL-
. 3:30 p.m.
.- _ BS -WestVirginia at Seton Hall
NBA BASKETBALL
,8 p.m.
" WGN - New Orleans at Chicago
SOCCER
S 7:30 a.m.
S ESPN2-Premier League,Birmingham
S. ty vs. Chelsea at Birmingham, England

: FOOTBALL

N FL schedule

Friday's Game
SSan Diego atTennessee (n)
Sunday's Games
Buffalo atAtlanta, I p.m.
S' Houston at Miami, I p.m.
'-Seattle at Green Bay. I p.nm.
: Carolina at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
.- Baltimore at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
, Tampa Bayat New Orleans, I p.m.
SOakland at Cleveland, I p.m.
SKansas City at Cincinnati, I i.m.
-- Jacksonville at New England, I p.m.
SDetroit at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
S- St. Louis at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
,- N.Y.Jets at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m.
.Denver at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
SDallas at Washington, 8:20 p.m.
'Monday's Game
'-' Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.

Bowl games

New Mexico Bowl
Wyoming 35, Fresno State 28; 20T
St. Petersburg Bowl
Rutgers 45, UCF 24
New Orleans Bowl
Mid.Tennessee 42, Southern Miss. 32
LasVegas Bowl
BYU 44, Oregon State 20
Poinsettia Bowl
Utah 37, California 27
Tuesday
Hawaii Bowl
SMU 45, vs. Nevada 10
Today
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
" At Detroit
S Ohio (9-4) vs. Marshall (6-6), I p.m.
(ESPN)
Meineke Bowl
. At Charlotte, N.C.
i,; North Carolina (8-4) vs. Pittsburgh
., ' , . .


(9-3), 4 pm. (ESPN)
Emerald Bowl
At San Francisco
Southern Cal J8-4) vs. Boston College
(8-4), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Sunday
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Clemson (8-5) vs. Kentucky (7-5).
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Georgia (7-5),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
STuesday
EagleBank Bowl
AtWashington
Temple (9-3) vs. UCLA (6-6),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Miami (9-3) vs. Wisconsin (9-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Bowling Green (7-5) vs. Idaho (7-5),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diegp
Nebraska (9-4) vs. Arizona (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday, Dec. 31
Sun Bowl
At El PasoTexas
Stanford (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (7-5),
Noon (CBS)
Armed Forces Bowl
At FortWorth,Texas
Air Force (7-5) vs. Houston (10-3),
Noon (ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Missouri (8-4) vs. Navy (8-4),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe.Ariz.
Minnesota (6-6) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
6 p.m. (NFL)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia Tech (9-3) vs.Tennessee (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Jan. I
Outback Bowl
AtTampa
Northwestern (8-4) vs. Aubur (7-5),
II a.m. (ESPN)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando '.'
Penn: Sate (10-2) vs. LSU (9-3).
I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At jacksonville
Florida,'State (6-6) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), I p.m.(CBS).
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Ohio State (10-2) vs. Oregon (10-2),
5 p.m. (ABC)
Sugar Bowl
SAt New Orleans
Florida (12-1) vs. Cincinnati
(12-0), 8:30 p.m. (FOX)
Saturday, Jan. 2
'": . .. ' :" :'::: " :':':. ": '


International Bowl
At Toronto
South Florida (7-5) vs. Northern
Illinois (7-5), Noon (ESPN2)
Cotton Bowl
At Dallas
Oklahoma State (9-3) vs. Mississippi
(8-4), 2p.m. (FOX)
Papajohns.com Bowl
At Birmingham.Ala.
Connecticut (7-5) vs. South Carolina
(7-5),2 p.m. (ESPN)
Liberty Bowl *
At Memphis,Tenn..
East Carolina (9-4) vs.Arkansas (7-5).
5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Michigan State (6-6) vs. Texas Tech'
(8-4), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 4
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Boise State (13-0) vs. TCU (12-0),
8 p.m:(FOX)
Tuesday, Jan. 5
Orange Bowl
,t At Miami
Iowa (10-2) vs. Georgia Tech (11-2),
8 p.m. (FOX)
Wednesday,Jan. 6
GMAC Bowl
Mobile,Ala.
Central Michigan (11-2) vs.Troy (9-3),
7 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday, Jan. 7
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena. Calif.
Alabama (13-0) vs. Texas (13-0),
8 pm. (ABC)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
Miami 93, New York 87
Boston 86, Orlando 77
Cleveland 102, LA. Lakers 87
LA. Clippers at Phoenix (n)
Denver at Portland (n)
' Today's Games
Memphis at Dallas, 3 p.m.
Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Houston at NewJersey, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Washington at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
SPhiladelphia at Utah, 9 p.m.
I -A. Lakers at Sacramento, 10 pm;.
Phoenix at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
.Sunday's Games :
Detroit atToronto, I pm. m " .
SSan Antonio at New York, 6 p.m.
Houstonat Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 6 p.m.
Dallas.at Denver, 8 p.m.
Boston at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

AP Top25 schedule

Today Game
No. 6 West Virginia at Seton Hall,
3:30p.m,. . , :


:NBA: Cavs snap Lakers' win streak

Continued From Page 1B


Carter finished with 27
points, and Rashard Lewis
had 19 points for the Magic.
SOrlando had no answer
to Boston's relentless
pressure, . which held
Dwight Howard to five
points and Orlando to a
season low in points.
Even with all that, the
-Magic had a chance.
Lewis' 3-pointer with 1:02
;remaining - the same play
(Garnett went down - cut
' BBoston's lead to 78-75. Then
-.Ray Allen connected with
Sa- jumper and made a pair
..o free throws to seal the
win, perhaps cementing the
, eltics as the top contend-
ers to dethrone the defend-
ing Eastern Conference
"'champions.

'"Cavs 102, Lakers 87

:*- LOS ANGELES - After
,-'the Cleveland Cavaliers
.,made the defending NBA
.,-champions look ordinary,
..the Los Angeles. Lakers'
fans threw up their foam
hands in frustration.




PREP

Continued From Page 1B

Alan Henry (500 free-
style) and Lauren Lee (200
free, 500 free) joined Burns
(200 IM, 100 breast) as
region qualifiers in swim-
ming. Katherine Mathis and
Michaela Polhamus were
on the 400 freestyle relay
team with Lee and Burns
that qualified for region.
Fort White High hosted
and won the United States
Girls Wrestling Association
:state meet. Katelynn
Cormier was state cham-
pion in her weight class and
Rebecca Stahnke placed
third.
Columbia's Josh Hook,
Kody Ross, Michael Roberts
and Monterrance Allen
made region in wrestling.


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follows.
DRIFTERS
Team standings: 1. Eric's Green
Machine; 2. PCP's; 3. Pin Busters.
High scratch game: 1. Judy Currie
200; 2. Cythe Shiver 178; 3. Jennifer
Freeman 173. 1. Adam Alford 221;
2. Eric Pope 211; 3. Paul Benton
185.
High scratch series: 1. Judy
Currie 514; 2. Jennifer Freeman 495;
3. Cythe Shiver 442. 1. Adam Afford
571; 2. Eric Pope 536; 3. Bill Dolly
524.
High handicap game: 1. Judy
Currie 263; 2. Jennifer Freeman 213;
3. (tie) Lori Zuccola, Oni Allen 207.
1. Eric Pope 239;.3. Paul Benton 235;
3. Adam Afford 228.
' High handicap series: 1. Judy
Currie 703; 2. Jennifer Freeman 615;
3. Oni Allen 571. 1. Paul Benton 636;
2. Eric Pope 620; 3. Adam Alford
592.
High average: 1. Cythe Shiver
167; 2. Jennifer Freeman 156.
1. AdamAlford 192; 2. Bill Dolly 179.
(results from Dec. 15)
MONDAY LADIES
Team standings: 1. (tie) Lake City
Bowl, Evi' Divas, Gator Gals.
High scratch game: 1. Jackie
Young 216; 2. Julia Myers 208;
3. Jeanette Willcox 204.
High scratch series: 1. Jackie
Young 554; 2. Jeanette Willcox 545;
3. Julia Myers 543.
High handicap game: 1. Jeanette
Willcox 252; 2. Juliana Griffis 244;
3. Nancy Torres 237. .
High handicap series: 1. Jeanette
Willcox 689; 2. Ruth Tillman 677;
3. Nancy Torres 650.
High average: 1. Jackie Young
186; 2. Julia Myers 184.
(results from Dec. 14)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Farmers


BOWLING

(84-60); 2. Jo's Crew (82-62);
3. (tie) The Pink Panthers, Perky Pals,
Golden Oldies (80-64).
High scratch game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 190; 2. Barbara Griner 172;
3. Louise Atwood 168. 1. Dan Ritter
224; 2. Art Joubert 193; 3. Mike
Helvey 189.
High scratch series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 515; 2. Louise Atwood 450;
3. Barbara Griner 442. 1. Art Joubert
572; 2. Dan Ritter 552; 3. (tie) Ric
Yates, Lee Evert 501.
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 241; 2. Barbara Griner 226;
3. Ruth Lott 225. 1. Dan Ritter 245;
2. Keith Herbster 228; 3. Art Joubert
224.
High handicap series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 668; 2. Barbara Griner 604;
3. Sandi Johns 598. 1. Art Joubert
655; 2. Ray Denton 649; 3. Jim
Hawkins 607.
High Average: 1. Phyllis Benton
159; 2. Louise Atwood 153; 3. Yvonne
Finley 145. 1; Lee Evert 186; 2. Dan
Ritter 176; 3. Johnnie Croft 167.
(results from Dec. 15)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. 3 Gators & A
Nole (38-26, 39,193 pins); 2..Alvin &
the Chickmonks (38-26, 38,756 pins);
3. Lake City Bowl (36.5-27.5).
High scratch game: 1. Karen
Coleman 226; 2. Shannon Howard
201; 3. Shannon Brown 195. 1. Zech
Strohl 268; 2. Wally Howard 246;
3. Jeff Brown 233.
High scratch series: 1. Karen
Coleman 564; 2. Shannon Brown 526;
3. Ida Hollingsworth 515. 1. (tie) Zech
.Strohl, Wally Howard 641; 3., Jim
Pauwels Sr. 571.
High. handicap game: 1. Karen'
Coleman 254; 2. Dorinda Feasel 245;
3. Jeanette Willcox 241. 1. Zech
Strohl 272; 2. (tie) Jeff Brown, Wally
Howard 264.
High handicap series: 1. Jamie
Shrum 695; 2. Jeanette Willcox
693; 3. Dorinda Feasel 672. 1. Wally


Howard 695; 2. Jim Pauwels Sr. 667;
3. Dann Shepard 663.
(results from Dec. 11)

Youth league
MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Blame It On
Karen (40-12); 2. Fried Chicken
(27-25); 3. Mac Attack (25-27).
High scratch game: 1. Sara
Sykes 202; 2. Christine Peters 199;
3. Christine Peters 195. 1. Dale
Coleman 236; 2. Cody Stuart 211;
3. Cody Howard 202.
High scratch series: 1. Christine
Peters 586;.2. Courtney. Schmitt
505; 3. Chrissie Fancy 466. 1. Dale
Coleman 612; 2. Cody Howard 569;
3. Colin Madden 558.
MAJORS
Team standings: 1. The Iron
Bowlers (38-14); 2. Gimme Ten
(30-22, 562 average); 3. Jackie's
Angels (30-22, 505 average).
High handicap game: 1. Jeri
Simpson 254; 2. Jackie DelCastillo
238; 3. Cheyenne Patterson 230.
1. Madison Stephens 240; 2. Dustin
White 239; 3. Brandon Willis 235.
High handicap series: 1. Jeri
Simpson 652; 2. Cheyenne Patterson
627; 3. Chelsea Uston 617. 1. Bobby
Trimble 664! 2. Madison Stephens
647; 3. Brandon Shrum 639.
JUNIORS
Team standings; 1. Strikers (33.5-
18.5); 2. The King Pins (31-21,20,684
pins); 3. 3 Aces (31-21, 20,525 pins).
High handicap game:' 1. Noel
Kieckhafer 202; 2. Amanda Schmitt
189; 3. Callie Pierce 172. 1. Jared
Scott 249; 2. -Josh Pettigrew 235;
3. Jacob Wheeler 215.
High handicap series: 1. Noel
Kieckhafer 539; 2. Amanda Schmitt
538; 3. Callie Pierce 502. 1. Jared
Scott 649; 2. Josh Pettigrew 638;
3. Jacob Wheeler 565.'
(results from Dec. 12)


CHAMPS: Game Tuesday in Orlando


Continued From Page 11

Shalala rejected that view
and replaced Sponberg
with the mian she felt was
perfect -to turn things
around: Pat Riichter, a
former .All-America tight
end at Wiscoisin who had
started on its last Rose
Bowl team, in 19.63 and
played in the NFL. '
Richter vas reluctant to
leave his job as an execu-
tive at Oscar Mayer Co. in,
Madison. Shalala lobbied.
him hard to take the job
after he led a committee that
reviewed the department's
finances and emerged as a
leader among former play-
ers who wanted change.
'"I told him he couldn't
say no." said Shalala,


Mo Williams scored 28 points for the Lakers, who recalling how sh
points, LeBronJames added had won 16 of 17 before talked to Richter
26 and the Cavaliers beat Cleveland's decisive victory
Los Angeles in a game that behindWilliams,James and ACROSS
ended with angry Lakers the Cavs' impressive inte-
fans throwing dozens of rior play, which negated the 1 Say hoarsely
giveaway foam hands onto Lakers' usual' advantages 5 Vinyl records
the court, down low. 8 Knight's
Shaquille O'Neal had With Williams leading weapon
11 points in his latest Los the way in his third straight 12 Low voice
Angeles return with the impressive road game, the 13 Flying
Cavaliers,. who dominated Cavs forced Bryant, and mammal
the Lakers with sharp shoot- the Lakers into their least, 14 Wan :
ing and physical defense, impressive performance in 15 Scuttle :
prompting several technical six weeks. 16 More hazy
fouls and retaliation hits in The loss dropped .the 18 Jordan neighbor
a one-sided matchup of title Lakers (23-5) backinto atie 20' NFL player
contenders. with Boston atop the overall 21 'Dazzle
The Lakers' crowd lost NBA standings. 22 Go 'ild
its holiday spirit with 4:04 If this was an NBA finals (2 wds.)i
left when Lamar Odom's preview of the matchup that 28 A piece of
ejection and another T on many expected to materi-, ak
the Lakers'infuriated bench alize last summer before 29 Uh-huh
prompted. many fans to Orlando crashed the party, 33 Get back.
throw their pregame pres- the Lakers should be wary. 35 Strike out
ents onto the court After Cleveland's big men - 36 Dipper
another foul with 3:45 left, O'Neal, Zydrunas lgauskas 37 Athens rival
several more foam hands and Anderson Varejao 38 Whale like
were thrown along with a - allowed them to neutral- Shamu
full water bottle, which skit- ize 7-foot starters Andrew 39 Golfer's yell
tered between players with- Bynum, who managed just 41 Zilch
out hitting anyone. four points, and Pau Gasol,
Kobe Bryant scored 35 who had 11. Check out the


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 1 2 3 4
S by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, 12
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. 15


HOW THE TRUMPET
PLAYER MANAGER TO
JOIN THE EXCLUSIVE
GATHERING .
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: HE " m "
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ACUTE INLET OPAQUE PURVEY
I Answer: When the witches played poker, they had -
QUITE A "POT'


e 'even
's wife


about the position. "I did
not have a Plan B."
Richter took the job and
moved quicklyto hire Barry
Alvarez, then the 'defen-
sive coordinator at Notre
Dame. Alvarez, Richter and
Shalala toured the state and
nation meeting with alumni
and prqmising a new era in'
Wisconsin football.
'We were out some-
times three times a day
- at breakfast, lunch and
in the evenings," Alvarez'
recalled. 'We had. to. sell
our program and we had
to reinvigorate our alums.
The athletic department
was bankrupt"
Alvarez said he involved
Shalala in recruiting,
asking her to speak to
players and their parents,


42 Some
godmothers?
45 New Deal o g..
48 Chair part
49 Observed
52 Utah sight (2
wds.)
55 Coat or
sweater
57 Gas main.
58 Means of ID
59 Sheik col-'
..,league :
60 Ginfizzilavor
61 Former JFK
,/ arrival
62 Cartoon,.
chipmunk.,

DOWN

1 Music genre
2 Jai-
3 Cooler or jug
4 Kind of bear
5 Scale meas.
6 Gaucho's
prairie
7 Unsettled


when they visited campus.
Shalala, he said, "would do
anything we asked."
Shalala left the uni-
versity to join Clinton's
cabinet, where she served
all eight years of his presi-
dency, just as Wisconsin
was returning to greatness.
Wisconsin was Big Ten
co-champion in 1993 and
earned a trip to the Rose
Bowl, where the. Badgers
defeated UCLA Wisconsin
won two more Rose Bowls
during. Alvarez's .16-year
tenure as coach.
Shalala said she has got-
ten too much credit for
Wisconsin's resurgence,
praising ,fans who "urged
me to do the right thing"
and boosters who helped
financially.


Answer to Previgus Puzzle

O| AT REAL FEW
OMNI EXPO UTE
RATE HERO ROB
BRIDGES FINJNS
YOM WADI




UBE RUSE R I GI






E U IM I sT ENV

SUM D'I KINIE R O0E


8 Hot-rod wheel
9 Vast region
10 Tobacco plug
11 Bronte
governess
17 Slime


Want more puzzles?
"Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 Waiting line
23 Forty winks
24 Actress
- Sedgwick
25 The younger
Guthrie
26 Get closer to
27 "Back in
Black" group
30 Deserve
31 - spumante
32 Be a doctor
34 Viking name
35 Fencers'
blades
37 Delhi
honorific
39 Meadows
40 Eye and ear
43 Classic
sitcom alien
44 Worked on a
quilt
45 Cookbook
amts.
46 Ski mecca
47 Mighty Dog
rival
50 Funny
Bombeck
51 Picture holder
53 Kickoff stand
54 Edge a doily
56 Before,
in combos


12-26 � 2009 by NEA, Inc.


�


_


- w


ENGRYT
< ^" , |-














Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2009


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
LVCKYv/ OI7,,NV JfRlO'L7E A MAN
,LFT M LINTII- you'YE w4I.eP
Yo, l6oM A MAitJ.N Hi46
A- PVI... SHO







SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


PLIM STUCK.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Couples are not destined to

grow apart with time


DEAR ABBY: I have
Only recently realized how
unhappy my parents' mar-
riage is. On the way home
from a concert one night,
my mom started crying and
said how much she wanted
to be with a man who could
stay awake throughout a
performance. Then she told
me I should never get mar-
ried. She said people "always
grow apart." She has been
saying it repeatedly over the
last few weeks and has even
had some of her friends tell
me the same thing.
I began asking other
people about it, and they all
act like they're not happy in
their marriages, either. I am
now genuinely afraid to get
married.
I am 18 and have just
started dating a man you
would consider marriage
material. But I'm holding
back my feelings because
I'm afraid one day he might
propose. Is "happily ever af-
ter" achievable anymore in
a marriage? - UPSET IN
GRAND RAPIDS
DEAR UPSET: Your
parents' marriage appears
to have hit a rough patch.
When your mother started
crying after the concert, I
guarantee she wasn't crying
because your father couldn't
stay awake until the end.
She was crying because she
was disappointed in him for
something else.
While the intensity of
feelings can fluctuate over


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
time in a marriage, couples
do not "always" grow apart.
The fact that your mother's
friends are echoing. those
sentiments makes me won-
der what kind of a crowd
she's surrounding herself
with, because unhappy
people usually attract other,
negative people. /
While I know from expe-
rience that a lasting, loving
relationship/marriage is
possible, allow me to point
South that the qualities that.
attract someone at 18 may
not be necessarily the same
ones you'll find important
when you're older. That is
why it's important that be-
fore you start thinking about
marriage, you first establish
yourself as an independent,
self-supporting young wom-
an and take your time before
committing yourself to any-
one.
DEAR ABBY: A former
professor of mine was a
good friend and very sup-
portive last year when I was
experiencing some personal
difficulties. Recently I have
heard that he has not been
acting like himself. I was
told he has developed a bad


attitude, curses in class, and
uses his degree to demean
his students' opinions oh
topics. One of his current
students told me he's sur-
prised the professor hasn't
been thrown out of class' for-
his behavior.
This is not the same pro-
fessor who helped me last
year. It seems like his evil
twin. I suspect he may be
having some personal prob-'
lems. Because of our preyi-
ous professor/student rela-
tionship, -I don't think I can
get involved. However, be- -
cause of the help he gave me
when I needed it, I care and
would like to offer support
Is there anything I can do?. I
want my friend back. - STU-
DENT WHO CARES
DEAR STUDENT:
While it might not be appro-
priate for you to reach out
to your former professor di-
rectly, it still may be possible
to get him some help. Tell
the student who spoke to
you that he and some of the
other members of the class
should talk to the head of
the department or the dean
about what has been go-
ing on and the fact that the
professor may be in need of
help. If the man is, indeed,
having personal problems,
his supervisor would be in a
better position to see he gets
it than you are.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't let the
pressure/ you are feeling
put a damper on your day.
Set aside a project that will
help take your mind off the
little things that have been
bothering you. It's the time
for new beginnings. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Friends and rela-
tives will bffer you some
interesting information,
leading to an opportunity in
the new year. Avoid organi-
zations trying to get you to
contribute. Your money is
better spent on knowledge;
travel or communications.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Relax, take a
break or spend time mak-
ing . some personal or
physical changes. A secret
must be kept even if you
are tempted to blurt it out.
Someone you are attracted
to will be more trouble than
he or she is worth. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Stop hovering
and smothering. You will
not be appreciated for your
thoughtfulness and hard
work. Do something to
please yourself. A little ro-
mance late in the day will
enhance your current rela-
tionship. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Don't spend on items
that promise the impos-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

sible or entertainment that
is overpriced. Curb your
habits,'evaluate your past
and figure out a way to get
ahead in the new year. It's
time to diversify if you want
to gain back what you've
lost in the past. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Socialize and
entertain but, most of all,
relax and. have fun. You
will meet some interesting
people if you get out and
mingle. Take part in com-
munity events or attend a
function that includes fam-
ily. Communications, travel
and sharing your thoughts
will lead to good fortune.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll be drawn into
emotional situations. Stay
out of other people's affairs
unless you are asked to
listen. Find-a new creative
outlet that can also make
you extra cash. Focus on
yourself and your future.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): If you reflect
on the past and realize you
have fallen short of your
goals, get back on track.
Between now and mid-Jan-
uary, you will enter a period
of good fortune. Prepare
now and you- will not have


to worry about the future.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't wait
for excitement to come to
you. End the year on a hap-
py and fun-filled note. Visit
friends, fall in love all over
again or challenge your-
self with something you've
wanted to try for some
time. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't make a
move that might cause con-
cern to family and friends.
Keep a low profile and don't
reveal your latest plans un-
til everything is ready to go.
Sharing too much informa-
tion will lead to obstacles.
**
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Start the year
off right by making chang-
es to your professional and
your personal life. You will
get some good suggestions
from someone who has giv-
en you great advice in the
past, Your partner of choice
will stand behind your de&i-
sions. ***
PISCES (Feb. i9-
March 20): A change:
of heart will allow you-.to
move on to bigger and Ibet-
ter things. Set yourself up
for the new year but focus
on the people who canof-
fer you the most in return.
Curb your habits now.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: A equals U
"VFJCJ HR UTIK UTJ PCAHVYLOJ HT
VFJ J T VH C J B U C I M , L T M E J U E I J
OJ J E RJTMHTZ HV VU JLYF lF VFJC."
- DUFTTK YLCRUT
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Maybe Christmas, he thought, doesn't come from a
store. Maybe Christmas... perhaps... means a little bit more." - Dr. Seuss


fc) 2009 by NEA, Inc.


12-26


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


I


3B


CLASSIC PEANUTS














Classified Department: 755-5440


. 4B


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2009


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage-


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SOne item per ad
Lines. 6 days , IneSt."
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling5 or less.
Each iem must include a prie
This is a non-refundable rate.




One iem per ad ."16
4 lines * 6 daysE adine t l
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S,000 or less.






4 lines * 6 days ine $1tional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling 2,500 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.


One item per ad a d
�4 linpQ � fi rdavuEach additional
4 lines * 6 days line $1.55
Personal merchandise totalling 4,000 or less.
* Each tem must include a price.








This isa nonlrelcndahie rain.
I $


One item p ter ad . 2
lines, 6 days inoe 1.l'65
Rate applies to private individuals selling
pe1 onal merchandise totalling S6,00 or less.
S ach iem must include a price.
isYou can call us at 755-5440ndablete






4 4linOes$ 50
da. 3o 50
me peole ignsprefr ato ddplae teir


cLimited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s90.20
S$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $1.55 per










ment. Our office is located at 180
ad fo r eah Wednesday insertion.

You can also fax or e-mail your adt 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00



copy to the 5:00 p.m.er.
FAX: 386-7le prefer to plae their
direct your copy to the Classified
ad categories will require prepay-


Department. Our office is located at 180
East Duval classifids@akecityre-



YoAdistan also fax or emai l your ad
cTuesdy Mto the reporter. .,9
Wednesday M38-752-9400 Please M.,
direct your copy to the Classifi Wed
Department.
EMAIL: classifibds@lakecityre-
porter.com





i Ad is o Appear: Call by: Faxkmail by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., :00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon.,3:00a.m,
Thursday * Wid.,10:00a.m. Wed, S:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Turs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fi., 10:00 a . F., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday i., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the.first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the- right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first da4 of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
q -ever, the first word of each ad may
,, not be abbreviated.

SIn Print

,: and Online
r" lwv.lalecityreporter.eoin


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000756
DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WELLS FARGO. BANK, N.A., et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: FRANCISCO RELOVA
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 314
S.W. Daisy Road
Lake City, FL 32056
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DE-.
VISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS.
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in COLUMBIA
County, Florida:
PARCEL #4: THE NORTH 1167.68
FEET OF THE WEST 1321.64
FEET OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE
QUARTER OF SECTION 23
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 15
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, LESS AND EXCEPT
THE WEST 991.23 FEET THERE-
OF AND SUBJECT TO THE
COUNTRY GRADE MAIN-
TAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY
ALONG THE. NORTH BOUN-
DARY THEREOF
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses within 30 days after
the first publication, if any, on Flori-
da Default Law Group, P.L., Plain-
tiff's attorney, whose address is 9119
Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the
original with this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for two consecutive
weeks in the Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court on this 16 day of Decem-
ber, 2009.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the' Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
NMNC-SPECFHLMC-F7031199
NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida relay Service, not later than
.seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
04536717
December 26, 2009
January 2, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 05-270-CA
DIVISION
LASALLE BANK NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR
SECURITIZED ASSET INVEST-
MENT LOAN TRUST MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIF-
ICATES SERIES 2004-4,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANGELA COLE, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated December 11,
2009 and entered in Case No. 05-270
CA of the Circuit Court of the
THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for
COLUMBIA County, Florida where-
in LASALLE BANK NATIONAL'
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR SECURITIZED ASSET IN-
VESTMENT LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-4, is
the Plaintiff and ANGELA COLE:
DUANE COLE: ROBERT P.
BENTLEY; E. NAOMI BENTLEY;
RICHARD BICKNELL; CAPITAL
ONE BANK; are the Defendants, I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at FRONT STEPS OF
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on
the 20th day of January, 2010, the







Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring, �
Call Dean @ 386-965-53.31

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.


New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191


Legal

following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 3, BLOCK A, OF SOUTH-
WOOD MEADOWS, UNIT II, A
SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,
PAGE 84, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A Route 9, Box 785-32, Lake
City, FL 32024
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus form the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as f the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on December 16, 2009.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk ofthe Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerkl
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F05016274 FIDOPTIONONE-
CONV-
NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
Eat Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Services, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
04536718
December 26, 2009
January 2, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 09-271-CP
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
KENNETH D. CHANCE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
KENNETH D. CHANCE, de-
ceased, whose date of death was De-
cember 2, 2009; File Number 09-
271-CP, is pending in the. Circuit
Court for Columbia County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 173 NE Hemando Street,
Lake City, "Florida 32055. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH- .
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
/S/
Mark E. Feagle
Attorney for Petitioner
FL Bar No.: 0576905
P.O. Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32055
/S/ Chad N. Chancey
Personal Representative
173 SW Wise Drive
Lake City, Florida 32024
04536689
December 19, 26, 2009


020 Lost & Found

FOUND CHIHUAHUA on East
Hwy 90 Saturday 12/19.
Please call to identify
386-288-4290


100 Job
0 Opportunities

04536549

SAVAGE

Drivers Wanted
Savage Services is seeking
professional exp. drivers for the
Lake City facility.
Class A CDL with HAZMAT &
Tanker endorsements required.
* Competitive Pay
* Complete Benefit
Package including
401K
* Home Everyday
* Paid Holidays and
Vacations
* Quarterly Incentive
Bonus
Only serious applicants need
apply in person at:
Florida Crown Career
Center*
1389 W Hwy 90, Ste. 170.
Lake City, Florida.
: Located across Iinfv,n FI;rti
IHighway Iatlrol Station


Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.


100 Job
1 Opportunities

04536756
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

TEMPORARY
# of openings: 20
Tobacco, Hay/Straw, Row Crops
& General Agricultural Workers
Needed
Caseland Inc. Harrison County,
KY 02/15/2010-10/15/2010
Wages: $7.37- 8.00/hour. 3/4 of
hours listed on job order
guaranteed. Work tools will be
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to those who cannot
reasonably return to their
permanent residence each working
day. Transportation & subsistence
paid when 50% of contract is met.
Physically able to meet & perform
all job specifications. May be
required to take random drug
and/or alcohol tests. May be
required to submit to a criminal
background check. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Career
Center for further details.
PT ScienceTeacher needed for
private Christian School
F BA required
Fax resume to: 386-755-3609

120 Medical
1 Employment

04536765
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. - 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills.
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/
Drug Free Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:.
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 SW McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

DENTAL ASSISTANT needed
F/T position Mon - Fri 9-5.
Salary based on experience.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3122


Dietician/nutritionist needed F/T
for new weight management
program in medical practice.
Fax resumes to 386-755-6828.


24 Schools &
240 Education

04536763
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
- Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

Wanted Career
Motivated Students!
If you are seeking a new career in
a high demand field, then get your
Degree or Certificate in Logistics
& Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available for
qualified students. Classes start
01/06/2009, call Lake City Com-
munity College, (386) 754-4492.


310 Pets & Supplies

Apricot TOY POODLE CKC
(w/papers), shots & health cert.,
hold w/dep. til Christmas,
8wks -12/18 $400. 386-719-4900.
FREE! Adorable Boxer/Am Bull-
dog mix 5 month old puppy. Neu-
tered, all shots, some supplies.
LOVES to play. 36-344-7999
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
WANTED FREE Miniature
Poodle age 8wks to 18 months.
Will have loving home with senior
couple. 386-719-4827


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

GAS STOVE
Good working condition.
Almond color. $100 OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295
ROPER Washer (3.2 cu.) & Dryer
(6.5 cu. ft.)
Set. Good condition.
$275 OBO. 386-867-1106
UPRIGHT FREEZER.
Frost Free $165. 00
or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.


402 Appliances

WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$135.00 or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.


405 Bicycles

Girls 16in. Bike. Orange
County Chopper Sting Ray.
Fuchsia Black.,$50.
386-755-3350


408 Furniture

BLACK METAL frame futon
with cushion.
$85.00. OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.

BLUE TWEED, queen sleeper
couch w/ accent pillows.
$100.00 Good shape.
386-755-3682.
GUN CABINET w/ glass door.
S3' W x 80" H, handmade w/ unfin-
ished back. A must for gun collec-
tors. $75 OBO 386-867-1106.

4 10 Lawn & Garden
0 Equipment
New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315

411 Machinery &
411 Tools

Delta black toolbox.
67" L x 20" W x 14" D
$45.00
386-867-1106


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

We Buy Junk: cars, trucks,
tractors, trailers, scrap metal,
AC's and batteries. NO MH's
Call 386-965-1423 or 365-4879


430 Garage Sales


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
SAll Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

5-Men's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) 1-Seiko, 1-Titan,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.

Full length ladies black leather
trench coat. sz. s/m.
asking $75 OBO
386-963-1211
Full length ladies red wool single
breasted coat. sz s/m.
asking $75 OBO
386-963-1211
NEW VANITY COMBO.
18"X18"X32" Only $75.00
Call 7pm-10pm
386-752-3491
New weather proof, color security
camera, w/nite vision/microphone.
$100. before Ila 758-1358
7p-10p 758-1358
SMOKER/GRILL
Charcoal. Cast Iron.
$40.00
386-755-3350

450 Good Things
450 toEat

PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit'414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420

The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

r3n Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 security deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243

3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL.
lbr in town. Close to shopping
$350. mo. No Pets!
386-397-0807 OR 386-752-2986
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL.
2BR/MH FOR SALE.
IN TOWN $500.
386-397-0807 OR 386-752-2986
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in
Branford area. $650.mo.
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3br/2ba MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500. move in. $575. mo.
RENTED
VERY CLEAN 2b/2ba. Covered
patio, front & back. No pets. State
Rd 100 @ Union County line.
$600 month. Call 904-966-0765.
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830


640 Mobile Homes
640 ~ for Sale
FORECLOSURE - 4 Bedroom
on Half Acre. $3000 down, $500.
mo. Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jmmartin23@yahoo.com
We will build and Beat any
MODULAR Floor Plan!
Have two with land included.
Save $$$ Thousands.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
1999 Repo..Great Shape 24X48
.3br Doublewide Set-up on
your land. $21,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
FOR SALE
2001 28X40 on 1 acre. $59,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jmmartin23@yahoo.com.

650 Mobile Home
& Land
1800 s.f..Man. Home, 4bd/2ba,
plus retreat/office. 2 porches,
walks, concrete foundation, appli.,
-plywood w/ ceramic floors, metal
roof, 5 acres, comer lot'(treed).
Horses ok, Call Gary Hamilton
(386) 758-9824. Poss. owner
finance. $119K.
Owner Financing. Large. MH
w/3.32 acres. South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590-0642 /867-1833

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423





2br Apt. in town.
Great location.
$500. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
2BR/1.5BA DUPLEX w/garage.
SLuxury Apt. 5 min from VA
Hospital and Timco.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2br/1.5ba Duplex CH/A, W/D
hook up. Close to VA. $550.mo +
sec. 386-758-9351/352-208-2421
CONDO for rent. $750'mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
Ig master br, very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, Iv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951..
Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled , 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650..mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Studios & 1Br's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent

Country Living. Furnished Effi-
ciency Park Model Trailers. $500
per month all utilities provided.
Call 386-961-8540/386-755-4945
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
24 hour office, laundry & vending
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax

730 Unfurnished
SHome For Rent

3br/lba house. CH/A, All appli-
ances, $750.mo. 1st, last & sec.
141 NE Montrose Ave.
(386)697-8893 or (305)962-2666
3BR/2BA BRICK Home
in town. $850/mo.
$500. security deposit.
386-365-8721 .
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082

Owner Financing 3br/lba near
elementary school in LC.
Small down $575. mo.
386-867-1833 or 590-0642
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


74 Furnished
4 Homes for Rent

1600 sq. ft. 2/1 Furnished house in
town. Near duck pond. Remodled,
beautiful hardwood/ceremic floors.
$950/month + sec. No pets.
Includes lawn service. 961-8788.


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FIND IT











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26, 200.9


750 Business &
S Office Rentals


For Rent. 24X30 storgae bldg. lo-
cated off US 90 behind "Right way
Automotive". $250. mo. has elec.
but for storage only. 386-755-2475
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135

770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$1000 mo, $1000 dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
SNice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560


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S805 Lots for Sale


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
' impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


820 Farms &
Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


Lake City Reporter


One Bedroom



Two Bedroom


$299 Moves You In!

FREE RENT
pet Friendly
(4 Complexes)
Bad Credit OK
Deposits May Vary
Open Saturdays
11-3
758-8029
Now Accepting Section 8


T www.lakecityreporter.


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*NEWS . -


* WEATHER




* OPINION
* SPORTS : ,:


* ARCHIVES


* CLASSIFIED


* COMMUNITY


* ENTERTAINMENT




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ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle byand we will take the picture for you, Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2003 VW Jetta
GL


$4,300


(386)365-3326


2007 Dodge
Caravan
13,200 miles
$16,500


(386)965,3075


2007


cylinder, TRD 4x
$22,000 fir
Call


ta 19963500
15 . Chevrolet
niles, 8 4WD dually, 454 motor, AT,-
4. good mechanical condition.
m $5,900 obo
(386)755-4896
123 (386)397-4849.


In Print, Online


1 Low Price!


FrMrDeisClMa



at 86-55-44


It's quick and


*1


easy.


1.) Go to www.lakecityreporter.com
2.) Click the "Share Photos" icon

Your Communiity
][fi y


SShare Photos
of your family,
I'friends and
Community


3.) Click: [


Submit Events
to be posted on
our.online
Scalernlr

Submt Photo� :


Comment and
connect with
other local
online users on
our guest book


4.) Attach your photo (Choose Pile)
5.) Select the best albumfor your photo
6.) Complete the form and Submit-
Albumi will charge during the year.
Most photos will remain online for at least one month.
Photo Gallery > Submit a Photo _
Please submit your photo to our online photo gallery. All photos must be approved by our Web staff before they will appear on th
Web site. .
Submit a photo to this Galleryl (Currentlywe only accept Images In the Jpeg format, thank youl)
( Choose File no file selected
Pet Photos - Birds '
Name:
Emallr
Title: The title is the name of your photo.
Photographer:
Caption:
The caption is the description of your photo
that will be seen by viewers.

SPhoto Gallery Home

Send in your favorite photos
and share them with everyone!


Brand New
2 Bedrooms
Security Gate * Pet Friendly
Washer/Dryer Hookups * Pool

FREE RENT
200 Channels . Bahama Cruise

Fall Special

$649 per MO

Limited Availability
Open Saturdays 11-3
Bad Credit OK * Deposits May Vary


4/r/s


754-1800
Next to Lake City Middle School


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Classified Department: 755-5440


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