Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text













000021 120110 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


Friday, December 25, 2009


Senate

approves

health

overhaul

Democrats avoid
filibuster, vote
along partylines.
By DAVID ESPO
AP Special Correspondent
WASHINGTON - In
an epic struggle settled at
dawn, the Democratic-con-
trolled Senate passed health
care legislation Thursday,
a triumph for President
Barack Obama that clears
the way for compromise
talks with the House on a.
bill to reduce the ranks of
the uninsured and rein in
the insurance industry.
The vote was 60-39, strict-
ly along party lines, one day
after Democrats succeeded
in crushing a filibuster by
Republicans eager - yet
unable - to inflict a year-
end political defeat on the
White House.
At the White House,
Obama called the vote his-
toric,, and said because of
it, "we are incredibly close
to making health insurance
reform a reality in this coun-
try. Our challenge now is to
finish the job."
Democrats, led by
Majority Leader Harry
Reid of Nevada, said they
would, by early in the new
year. Even before they held
a celebratory news confer-
ence, Speaker Nancy Pelosi
issued a statement pledg-
ing, "We will soon produce
a final bill that is founded on
the core principles of health
insurance reform: afford-
ability for the middle class,
security for our seniors,
responsibility to our chil-
dren by reducing the defi-
cit, and .accountability for
the insurance industry."
The House passed its
bill'in November, and offi-
cials said it was likely to
be February before the
two sides can sort out their
differences over issues as
HEALTH continued on 3A


Trash pick-up to
resume Saturday
From staff reports

Regularly scheduled
trash pick-ups will not take
place today due to the
Christmas holiday. Pick-up
will resume Satruday for
homes in Columbia County
and the City of Lake City.


City


sRep -ort ier






Reporter


Vol. 135, No. 293 0 75 cents


JASUN MAI IIT ne wVALK'LRKLaKe Luly Reponer
This Christmas scene, located at thehome of Brad Wheeler, shows the birth of Jesus in a manger, as well as Santa kneeling
at a cross. Christmas will be celebrated today by residents of Columbia County, as well by millions around the world.



LCFD, LCPD spread Christmas cheer


Agencies pack -
Christmas boxes
for local families.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson-,laahciro reporter.com
The Lake City
Police and Fire
departments
teamed up to
provide last
minute Christmas items
to families in need for it's
giveaway program.
Right up to Christmas
Eve, more than 20 volun-
teers worked to put orders
together. said Lavaughn
Wynn. community
resource crime preven-
tion officer for the police
department. They received
lists with names and ages
of families in need. and
picked out items for the
gift boxes.
Boxes included food.
toys or whatever else was
needed, and most were
picked up by the families,
Wynn said.
Some were delivered
to those without
transportation:
Some families also
received one of more than
18 bicycles assembled
at the fire department.
Each shift worked on
bike orders to put them


Peacocks a colorful sco


Officials trapping,
moving colorful
birds.
By TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press
LONGBOAT KEY - Kip
O'Neill is worried that pea-
cocks will ruin her family's
Christmas.
Her Gulf coast neighbor-
hood is overrun with them:
large, regal, noisy, messy


birds. Some mornings,
O'Neill finds 30 of them on
her roof.
O'Neill said the pesky
fowl have pecked her
Lexus so much it had to be
repainted - twice.
"They poop all in my pool
and on my porch," O'Neill
said, as two birds wandered
onto her front lawn. "They
are so destructive and noisy."
The Longboat Key flock,
at least 80 birds strong,
attacks dark-colored cars


ANTONIA ROBINSONi La ii, ' I, p( :,,-
Blaiy4e Neeley, a Lake City firefighter, works on a bicycle that
will be donated to an underprivileged child. The fire
department and police department worked together for a
Christmas giveaway.
together. the fire department could
Tle bicycles were found repair them, said LCFD Lt.
property from the police Dwight Boozer.
department that needed "It's been fun," he said.
repairs, and Wynn asked if '"We're glad to be able to.


urge on Florida island

because they see their female birds - lazed in a
reflection and think, it's driveway and on a fence of
another bird. large home. One male bird
Because of repeated displayed his plumage in
complaints from people the sun atop a roof.
like O'Neill, officials on this "I don't hate the birds, bu
Florida island have started I know 80 is too many for a
trapping and moving the tiny village," said Michae
colorful birds. They're plan- Drake, president of the
ningi another roundup in homeowners' association
the jext month to cull the on the section of Longboa
population. Key that is plagued by the
On a recent day, about peacocks. There are abou
two dozen peafowl - that's 200 homes on that part o:
the word for both male and the island.


a
I


t
a
1


t
I

t
f


help citizens in the com-
munity and help kids have
a good Christmas."
This is the third year for
the giveaway.
'The need was so great
two years ago," he said.
"We were getting an
overwhelming number
of phone calls and people
walking in asking for help."
Families were referred
to the police depart-
ment from agencies that
had already finished its
Christmas donation
programs.
"Other agencies get
bombarded and people
don't know where to go or
who to call for assistance,"
Wynn said. "Automatically
they're referred to us."
SDonations came from'
businesses, organizations
and individuals in the
community.
The giving doesn't end
on Christmas, Wynn said.
Many of the families also
will receive clothing
donations after the holiday.
'We'll box them up later
and call the families back,"
, he said.
The department may
also find families in need of
assistance who missed the
programs.
'We do it because it
could be us just as easily,"
he said.


SRWMD

imposes,

water

rules

District to impose
mandatory use
restrictions.
From staff reports
The Suwannee River-:,.
Water.Management District'f:
has implemented year--.':
round water use restric:-;
tions on landscape irriga-
tion. The new water ruleH:i7
go into effect Jan. 6. -'"
SThe information wa,
released from the Waterf-
Management District after
5 p.m. Wednesday and nod
water management dis:
trict representatives were
available for . comment
Thursday.
The water management
district is asking homeown-
ers and others in the district
to limit landscape irrigation
to one or two days per week,
depending on the time of
the year.
The move marks the first
time the water management
district has implemented: a
year-round water conserva-
tion rule and a water restric-
tion use that isn't voluntary.
In the past, the district has
enacted only short-term
voluntary restrictions in
response to drought condi-
tions.
WATER continued on 3A


Changes

in store for

Farmers'

Market

Name, hours, day
of the week could
change.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The Marion Street
Farmers' Market is under-
going some changes.
The name of the mar-
ket has changed to the
Marion Street Market, and
the date the market occurs
will change at the end of
January, said Cliff Neukari,
market manager.
Gene Perry, Downtown
Action Corporation presi-
MARKET continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A peacock fans his feathers in a courtship display to a
peahen as they roam freely on a rooftop in Longboat Key on
Wednesday. Some residents want the birds removed because
they are noisy and destructive.


1 84264I 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


71 *I3
Thunderstorms .
WEATHER, 2A /


Opinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
NATION
Economy shows
signs of rebound.
**.,.. �-.*>**.* � . -,.* -*; ",c S� '-S

www.lakecityreporter.com


I �


~~"1~


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009


Thursday:
Afternoon: 1-1-8
Evening: N/A


iThursday:
S Afternoon: 7-1-9-5
. Evening: N/A


e^satc.z_
" -, Wednesday:
5-23-28-29-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Small, private funeral for Murphy


LOS ANGELES
A actress Brittany Murphy
waslaid to rest at a
small, private funeral on
Christmas Eve, while a
Larger memorial service
may be held early next year.
Family spokesman Alex Ben Block
Said the Thursday funeral for the
'.Clueless" and Girl, Interrupted"
actress will be by invitation-only
at Forest Lawn Memorial Park;
Hollywood Hills.
The 32-year-old actress died after
collapsing at her Hollywood Hills
home on Sunday.
Authorities continue to investigate
the death. An autopsy performed
Monday was inconclusive, and the
coroner's office is awaiting results
of toxicology and tissue tests before
determining an official cause of
death.
Murphy moved with her mother,
Sharon, to Los Angeles when she
waS a teenager to pursue an acting
career. She started out in sitcoms
and commercials in the early 1990s
before winning starring roles in sev-
Seral films.
She played Eminem's love inter-
est.in "8 Mile" and Ashton Kutcher's
wife in "Just Married." She starred
as a suspicious girlfriend in 2004's
"Little Black Book" a barmaid with
an abusive ex-boyfriend in 2005's
"Sih City."
Murphy was juggling multiple
movie projects in the months before
her unexpected death, wrapping two
indie thrillers over the summer and
preparing to shoot a romantic com-
edy next month.
Michael Feifer, who directed
Murphy in her final role, described
the actress as professional, kind and
healthy on the set of "Abandoned."
Murphy's husband, screenwriter
Simon Monjack, accompanied her
on set and served as her hair and


This photo provided by'Hybrid Productions shows Brittany Murphy while working
on the set of 'Abandoned' in Los Angeles in June, 2009. The film is Murphy's final
starring role before her recent death. The film is expected to be released in 2010.,


makeup artist
. "The two of them really took care
of each other," Feifer recalled. "He
was her teddy bear, and she was just
his little princess."
The future of that film and
Murphy's other thriller, "Something
Wicked," is uncertain. Neither has
secured theatrical distribution.
The private funeral Thursday :
afternoon is to be an intimate affair,
Block said, noting the irony that
Murphy loved Christmas and would
be buried on Christmas Eve. .
Other stars buried at Forest Lawn
include Liberace, Bette Davis, Lucille'
Ball, Gene Aftry and Freddie Prinze.

'American Idol' returns
Jan. 12 for 9th season
NEW YORK - "American Idol"
will return next month with a two-
night, four-hour premiere featuring
auditions in Boston and Atlanta, the


Fox network says.
The Boston auditions will air Jan;
12 and the Atlanta auditions will
air Jan. 13,.the network announced
Wednesday. Auditions for the ninth
season of the popular singing com-
petition will also be held in Chicago;
.Orlando, Fla.; Dallas; Los Angeles
and Denver.
This year's big change: Ellen
DeGeneres is replacing Paula Abdul
as judge. DeGeneres will join the '
show in February, after the tryotit
rounds, Fox says.
Guest judges joining Simon
Cowell, Randy Jackson and
Kara DioGuardi include Victoria
Beckham, MaryJ. Blige, Kristin
Chenoweth, Neil Patrick Harris, Joe
Jonas, Avril Lavigne, Katy Perry and
Shania Twain.
Abdul announced she was quitting
amid a contract dispute earlier this
year.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Tony Martin
is 96.
* Actor Dick Miller is 81.
* Actress Hanna
Schygulla is 66.


* R&B singer John
Edwards (The Spinners)
is 65.
* Singer Jimmy Buffett
is 63.


Daily Scripture

"So they hurried off and found Mary
and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying
in the manger.When they had seen
him, they spread the word concern-
ing what had been told them about
this child, and all who heard it were
amazed at what the shepherds said to
them. But Mary treasured up all these
things and pondered them in her heart.
The shepherds returned, glorifying and
praising God for all the things they had
heard and seen, which were just as they.
had been told."
-Luke 2:16-20


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St. Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated .Press.
,AII material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880. .
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fa. 32056.'
PublisherTodd Wilson.. ...754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295. '.
EditorTom Mayer..... .754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lyhda Strickland ..754-0417
(istrickland@lakqcityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
To report a missed delivery, please call
(386) 754-0406. For all other circulation
issues, please call (386) 755-5445.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-deliver, or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters. .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................. $48.79
52 Weeks ...................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ............... .. $82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Officials probe
plane wreck
S KINGSTON, Jamaica
- Jamaican and U.S.
authorities launched a
probe Thursday examin-
ing whether the pilot of
American Airlines Flight
331 could have avoided an
accident that cracked open
the plane and sent nearly
100 people to the hospital.
Oie alternative could
have been to abort the
landing and circle around
for another attempt, Oscar
Derby, director general
of Jamaica's Civil Aviation
Authority, told The.
Associated Press.
"We would want to look
at why that option was not
selected," he said, adding
that he was not sure it would
have been possible. "Runway
excursions are responsible
for-many of the fatalities in
modern aviation."
The Boeing 737-800
skidded off the runway
of Kingston's Norman
Manley International
Airport late Tuesday,
lurching as it stopped at
the edge of the Caribbean
Sea. The flight originated
froin Reagan National
Airport in Washington and
left Miami International
Airport about an hour late.
The plane's fuselage
br6ke open, its left main
landing gear collapsed and
itsliose was crushed.
AH 154 people aboard
survived, with 92 taken to
hospitals, but none of the
injuries were considered life-
threatening. The U.S. State
Department said 76 of the
Passengers were Americans.
Many on board clapped
as the plane landed, said
Anthony Davis, who was
traveling with his wife.
"The landing wasn't
snrooth, but I think with
the weather and the rain,
people were so happy
they came down from the
skr," he said. "Next thing
I know, I hit my head vio-
lently on the seat. It was



\


MOSTLY
' SUNNY


HI 62 LO 33


I ' I'FORCAS.MA- frfiftDI. I 2


An aerial view of the cracked fuselage of American Airlines
flight AA331, which crashed landed overnight on a flight from
Miami to Jamaica, just beyond the runway of Norman Manley
international airport in Kingston, on Wednesday. More than
40 people were injured, at-least 4 seriously, and there were
no fatalities, according to officials, after the plane overshot
the runway when it landed in heavy rain.


as if somebody had picked
me up and threw me."

Man arrested in
fatal hit-and-run
MIAMI - Authorities
have arrested a 32-year-
old man in connection to a
fatal hit-and-run collision
in Miami.
Geraldo Pagan was
struck on a Miami cause-
way bridge on Dec. 17.
According to a news
release, Pagan, an Orlando
tourist visiting South
Florida, lost control of a
scooter he was driving
and fell to-the roadway. He
picked himself up but was
then hit by a vehicle.
Pagan was taken to a
hospital, where he died.
The vehicle fled the scene.
Authorities eventually.
tracked down and arrest-
ed Gaston Henriquez.
According to an arrest
affidavit, Henriquez is
charged with leaving the
scene of an accident with a
death. Online jail records
indicate that he is being
held on $100,000 bond.
An arraignment hearing
has been scheduled for
January.


Police shoot
robbery suspect
APOPKA - Apopka
police shot a robbery sus-
pect after he reportedly
rammed his truck into sev-
eral patrol cars.
Police had been look-
ing for 36-year-old Shawn
Chapman Wednesday in
connection to a string
of store robberies in
Orange and Lake counties.
Officers spotted a stolen
truck that he had been
suspected of using and
tried to approach the man.
Police say that's when
Chapman got into the
truck and rammed several
police cars.
Officers began shoot-
ing at the vehicle, and
Chapman drove away. He
was caught shortly after
crashing.
Chapman was taken
to a nearby hospital with
wounds that were not con-
sidered life-threatening.
Once he's discharged, he'll
face charges of aggravated
assault and battery on a
law enforcement officer,
grand theft and fleeing and
eluding.


Valdosta
*n /I'


"Pensacola
52/35


ob/
Tallahassee Lake
66/37 ....' 71/
'o . , .Gai
,'Panama City -7
61/38


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


76
51
67
43
85 in 1956
16 in 1989

0.00"
2.46"
46.64"
1.90"
47.70"*


City


Ct * Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
, City 3/42 Daytona Beach
l39 D Ft. Lauderdale
inesville * Daytona Beach Myers
'3/42 7'6/51 ainFort Myers
Ol * .Gainesville
Ocala l Jacksonville
'74/45 *
Orlando CapetCanaveral KeyWst
79/54 77/57 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
75/55, West Palm Beach Ocala
S82/61 * Orlando
' "i Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myersa 80/64 * Pensacola
80/60 " Naples Tallahassee
'80/61 Miami Tampa
. 8/66 Valdosta
KeyWest* ' W. Palm Beach
80/68


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:25 a.m.
5:37 p.m.
7:25 a.m.
5:38 p.m.

12:37 p.m.
1:01 a.m.
1:11 p.m.
1:59 a.m.


Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
31 7 15 23
Full Last New First


[7 l 70 la : al


J Friday


S Saturday:


* Associated Press


On this date in
1980, it was the
coldest Christmas
ay of modern
record in the
northeastern U.S.
Temperatures as
cold as 36 degrees
below zero were
reported in New
York State.


2

60nitles to bu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+,
,.A ,
j-^ ..4.
^>^ ~' =T�


Saturday
68'52 pc
65/45/pc
75/60/sh
70/51/c
59/33/pc
59/34/pc
77/67/sh
58/31/pc
77/62/sh
73/57/sh
61/36/
67/45/pc
56/42/s
56/38/s
58/31/s
66/50/pc
58/30/pc
74/57/sh


Sunday
68, 19 p.:
65/43/pc
74/57/pc
71/50/pc
63/35/s
62/35/s
76/66/t
62/33/s
74/58/pc
71/55/pc
65/38/s
66/45/pc
S57/41/s
55/34/pc
59/33/s
66/50/pc
59/33/pc
74/53/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


I , Forecasts, data and graph-
'*' Ics 2009 Weather Central
S/ - hLLC, Madison, Wis.
J - www.weatherpubllsher.com


Get Connected



MIATa m LmMit
. nagagaa


CA$H3


*1









.41


-~ II -- -~i--_- ---�I I I-~-


SATURDAY


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


[28 MO


29 TESDAY
MOSTLY
SUNNY


HI 60 LO 34


lr E CITY ALMANAC


I













LAKE CITY REPOR-ER. LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009


Victoria Kennedy, widow of Sen. Ted Kennedy hugs Senator MajorityLeader Harry Reid of
Nev. on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Thursday, as Sen. Banking Committee Chairman Sen..
Christopher Dodd, D-Conn, looks on at center, after the Senate passed the health care reform
bill.

HEALTH: Care bill approved, 60-39


Continued From Page 1A
diverse as government's
role in a remade health
care system, coverage for
abortion and federal subsi-
dies for lower and middle-
income families who would
be required to purchase
insurance.
Senate Republicans
attacked the bill to the
end, and citing public opin-
ion polls, said they would
use it as an issue in the
i 2010 congressional elec-
tions. "This debate was
supposed to produce a
bill that reformed health
care in America. Instead,
we're left with party-line
votes in the -middle of the
night, a couple of sweet-
heart deals to get it over
the finish line, and a pub-
lic that's outraged," said
S. the Republican leader, Sen.
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. -
The Senate vote unfolded
as the sun rose over the
-- Capitol on the day before
Christmas, and marked the


culmination of a battle that.
lasted months and included
failed bipartisan negotia-
tions, a last-minute flurry of
Democratic dealmaking
to lock in 60 votes and a
highly partisan debate that
held lawmakers in. session
a near-record 25 consecu-
tive days.
For the third time since
Sunday night, Sen. Robert
C. Byrd of West Virginia,
92, was wheeled into the
Senate so he could cast a
vote Democrats could not
do without.
For Democrats there was
an air of bittersweet cele-
bration, underscored by the
presence of Vicki Kennedy
in the visitor's gallery that
overlooks the Senate floor.
Her husband, the late
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy
of Massachusetts, died in
August after a career spent
working relentlessly for
universal health care.
"With Sen. Ted Kennedy's


booing voice in our
ears, with his passion in
our hearts, we say, as he
said The work goes on, the
cause endures," said Reid,'
echoing words Kennedy
utte ed in his most famous
speech.
Beginning in 2014, the
Semte bill would estab-
lish insurance exchanges
where consumers could
shp? for private coverage
sold under federal guide-
lines. Most Americans
woud be required to pur-
chase insurance or face
pendties, and hundreds of
billions of dollars in fed-
eral subsidies would be
available to families up to
incomes of about $88,000
a year. Insurance compa-
nieswould be banned from
denying benefits or charg-
ing higher fees on the basis
of pre-existing medical
conditions. That provision
woull take effect in 2013 in
the House version.


POLICE REPORTS


Arrest Log
The following information
was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. The
following people have been.
arrested but not convicted.
All people are presumed
innocent until proven guilty.
Monday, Dec. 21
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Matthew James
Harrington, no age provid-
ed, 459 SE Lomond Ave.,
warrant Violation of proba-'
tion on original charge of
battery.
* Santos Gomez, 39,
6254 Balboa Drive, posses-
sion of less than 20 grams
of marijuana.
Tuesday, Dec. 22
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
* Nicholas James Nash,
21, 1468 SW Main Blvd.,
resisting an officer without


violence iad disbrderly
intoxication.
* Brian Shane
Williamson, 21, 219 NW
Canton Lane, battery.
* Tammi Marie
Albrecht, 39, 2375 SW
County Road 349, driving
while license suspended/
revoked (fourth offense).
* Donavan Dumaurier
Turner, 30, 18210 NW
22nd Ave., Miami, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charge of driving
while license suspended/
revoked.
* Christina Mae
Stalnaker, 24, 870 SE
St Johns St., warrant:
Resisting arrest without
violence.
* Bobby Keith
Hutchinson, 47,
93 Lawvane Drive,
Crawfordville, warrant:
Non support.


.- itmanuel M. Rentz,'21,
528 IfW Long St., warrant:
Violaion of probation on
original charge of posses-
sion ,f less than 20 grams
of ma-ijuana, possession of
less than 20 grams of mari-
juana and possession of
drugparaphernalia.
Wednesday, Dec. 23
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office-
* Pasquale John
Piccirillo, 34, 107 NW
Helei Dr., warrant: Failure
to appear for charges of
drivirg while license sus-
pended/revoked.
* Timothy James
Stearns, 37, 10263 Adams
Road, Wellborn, criminal
mischief and disorderly
intoxiation.
. Corey Edward
Robinson, 22, 1682 SE
ClineFeagle Road, battery.
From staff reports


Congress raises debt

ceiling to $12.4 trillion


By LAURIE KELLMAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - The
Senate voted Thursday to
raise the ceiling on the gov-
ernment debt to" $12.4 tril-
lion, a massive increase over
the current limit and a politi-
cal problem that President
Barack Obama has prom-
ised to address next year.
The Senate's rare
Christmas Eve vote,' 60-
39, follows House passage
last week and raises the
debt ceiling by $290 billion.
The vote split mainly down
party lines, with Democrats
voting to raise the limit and
Republicans voting/ against
doing so. There was one


defection on each side, by.
senators whose seats will be
on the ballot next year: GOP
Sen. George Voinovich of
Ohio and Democratic Sen.'
Evan Bayh of Indiana.
"I would not support rais-
ing the debt ceiling because
Congress has not adopted a
credible process to restrain
spending and eliminate red
ink," Bayh said a statement
after the vote.
The bill permits the
TreasuryDepartmenttoissue
enough bonds to fund the
government's operations and
programs until mid-February.
The Senate will vote again on
the issue Jan. 20.
Obama must sign the
measure into law to prevent


a market-rattling, first-ever
default on U.S. obligations.
The government piled up
a record $1.4 trillion deficit
in 2009 to counter a melt-
down in financial, markets
and help bring the nation
out of its worst recession in
seven decades.
The early-morning vote
followed the Senate's pas-
sage of a landmark bill to
overhaul the nation's health
care system.
With the exception of
Voinovich, Republicans
uniformly derided the bill,
though they routinely sup-
plied votes for eight previ-
ous increases totaling $5.4
trillion under President
George W. Bush.


MARKET: Could undergo changes
Continued From Page 1A


dent, said the name change
stemmed from an issue
raised by a citizen concern-
ing the products sold at the
market.
"There, was some con-
fusion as to what we're
about," Neukam said, "so
we took the word 'farmers'
out of the name."
Neukam. said he hopes
the name change will make
the market more attractive
to the public.
The ,market is cur-
rently held from 1 p.m. to
6 p.m. on Fridays and from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays
in Olustee Park, and the


date the market occurs will
switch to either just Friday
or Saturday, depending on
which day is more success-
ful, said Neukam.
"It all depends on, what
the customer support. is,"
he said. "At the end of
January we will revisit a
decision of which market is
preferred."
The market offers a vari-
ety of products such as
produce, plants, gifts and
shrimp, said Perry, and
Neukam said arts and crafts
also are offered.
Neukam said the market
is in its fourth year and


growing, and hosts an aver-
age of eight to 12 vendors'.
each day it is open.
Perry said he encourag-
es the local people to take
advantage of the market.
"We'd love to have more
vendors and more'people .
visit the market;" he said.,,
"Why go to WalMart and' "
get something made fromni
China when you can get
something made from Lake
City? There are some bar-.
gains available with some
-of the vendors. We would. ,
encourage people to spend,
locally and spend with '
friends."


WATER: Rules to go into effect Jan.


Continued From Page .1
The water management
district is implementing a
year-round water conser-
vation rule which applies
to residential landscaping,
public or commercial recre-
ation areas, and public and
commercial businesses that
aren't regulated by ,a dis-
trict-issued permit,
In a prepared statement,
Jon Dinges, the district's,
director of resource man-
agement, said the new
requirement will help
address water needs within
the district.
"Water supply is a state-
wide issue," he said. "We
all must do our part to con-
serve."
Unlike other areas of
the 'state where irrigation


schedules are set according
to addresses, water users in
the SRWMD will be allowed
to set their own schedules as
follows: Choose one day per
week to water landscapes
during Eastern Standard
Time, which begins the
first Sunday in November;.,
choose two days per week
during Daylight Savings
Time, beginning the second
Sunday'in March. In both
cases, irrigation should not
occur between 10 a.m. and
4 p.m..
Newly planted landscapes
may be watered more fre-
quently for 60 days follow-
ing planting.
"Reducing landscape irri-
gation and watering more
efficiently helps us makes


6


the most of our resources.
and it reduces irrigation
costs," Dinges said.
Those who wish to devi-
ate from the water conser-
vation rule must apply for"
a water use permit. The
.requirement is part of the
district's new water use per-
mitting rules.
In addition to water con-
servation for landscape
irrigation, the new rules.
require anyone applying for"
a water use permit to imple-
ment a water conservation
plan.
Dinges said only new per-
mit applicants are required
to adopt a conservation
plan; existing permit hold-
ers must adhere to their
current permits


SI I n I I I n lml 1-A



REMEMBER, YOUR FLEX PLAN INSURANCE COVERS EYECARE


F4REEg GLASSES USE IT O I
BUY ONE COMPLETE PAIR OF EE EA

GLASSES AT REGULAR PRICE LOSE IT





AND RECEIVE A... SUNGLA I
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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427

















OPINION


Friday, December 25, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Remember

the true

meaning of

Christmas


oday is Christmas
Day, the day set
aside by Christians
worldwide to
celebrate the birth
of the Baby Jesus, the Christ
child sent forth by God to save
'the world.
-The Christmas story is told
in detail in the Gospel of Luke,
Chapter 2, verses 9-11.
"And lo, the angel of the Lord
came upon them, and the glory
of the Lord shone round about
them: and they were sore afraid.
And the angel said to them, Fear
not:for, behold, I bring you good
* tidings ofgreat joy, which shall
'be to all people. For unto you is
born this day in the city of David
a. Saviour, which is Christ the
--:Lord."
S As Christians exchange gifts
" today, the gesture is symbolic
to the first Christmas and the
;gift of Jesus to the world, the
precious gift from God and the
Opportunity for the salvation of
inankind for those who believe
'and follow the teachings of
Christ
The Christmas season is a
'time of renewal, a time of pure
hearts and actions, a time for
''focused appreciation for the
blessings each of our lives
contains.
Rejoice in the true meaning
of Christmas and the promise
Sof hope it brings to all of us.


H I G H L I G H T.S
I N :H. HI sT.OR Y ..
Today is Friday, Dec.
25th, the 359th day of
2009. There are 6 days
left in the year. This is
SChristmas Day.
* Today's Highlight in
'History:
U On Dec. 25, 1818, "Silent
Night," written by Franz Gruber
and Father Joseph Mohr, was
performed for the first time, at
Sthe Church of St Nikolaus in
Oberndorf, Austria.
On this date:
* In AD. 336, the first
Recorded celebration of
Christmas on Dec. 25 took
place in Rome.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
wo Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

L LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
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length and libel. Letters must be
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and guest columns are the opinion of
The writers and not necessarily that of
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BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
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SBY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


How womn fard ths AYR st de



How women fared this past decade


n a few days we launch
the beginning of a new
decade and close the
book on the 'OOs - the
first 10 years of the sec-
ond millennium. As a full-time,
cultural critic and follower
of women's issues, my first
thought was that women have
not made much progress this
decade, certainly not as much
as some of us would have liked
to have witnessed.
Sexism was clearly more
acceptable than racism in the
'08 campaign. And while I'm
thrilled we're starting to
conquer racism, I'm saddened
by the fact that sexism is still
alive and well in American
media and culture. There was
ample evidence in the presiden-
tial campaign when then-Sen.
Hillary Clinton was called a
she-goat and all manner of
sexist insults without fel-
low partisans protesting the
abuse. There was the cho-
rus of Democrats calling on
her to give up her campaign
before she was ready to do so.
Nonetheless, she became the
first woman to win 20 state pri-
maries.
On the GOP ticket, former
Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin became
the first woman to run for vice
president on the Republican
side. She, too, has suffered
sexist treatment in the media.
There were other indications
women have not achieved basic
indicators of success that many
of us assumed we would be
beyond at this point. A report by
Catalyst just this month found
five years of stagnation in terms
of women being appointed to
Fortune 500 corporate boards.
The percentage has remained
at just above 13 percent since
2003. And so on.
On the national front, early


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


in the decade the brouhaha
in Congress over the death of
Terry Schiavo prompted con-
servatives to push through the
Unborn Victims of Violence Act.
This was the first time federal
law recognized personhood
for fetuses and a major blow to
women's rights.
But there are also areas in
which we've made real and
substantive progress. One area
is in the military, which is often
first to break down barriers.
The decade began with the clos-
est presidential race in history,
resulting in a win for Republican
President George W. Bush. Less
than a year later the country
witnessed the deadliest terrorist
attack on U.S. soil. As a result,
the country launched two wars,
with thousands of women, more,
than 190,000 in fact, joining the
services. No longer behind the
scenes, today's female soldiers
are taking on jobs once labeled
men-only.
Hurricane Katrina, as
devastating as it was to New
Orleans and the Gulf Coast, had
the indirect effect of helping to
elect the first female speaker
of the U.S. House. The Bush
Administration's delayed,
reaction to the catastrophe
caused Republicans to lose
control of both the House and
the Senate. The architect of
the Democratic congressional


victory, Nancy Pelosi, became
the first woman Speaker of the
House.
In 2)06, Katie Couric became
the firnt and only female anchor
of a nightly newscast, the "CBS
, Evening News." This year it
was announced she would
face female competition from
another network anchor. Diane
Sawyer took over the anchor
seat it ABC's "World News
Tonight"'
This year President Barack
Obana took office filling his
Cabiet with a number of
women, most notably former
rival Secretary of State Hillary
Clinbn. Obama also selected
Sonia Sotomayor for Supreme .
Court justice, making her the
first Latina and third woman to
sit oi the highest court in the
land..
The first bill signed into
law ly Obama was the Lilly
Ledletter Act, adding strength
to equality laws, and just in
time as women are on the
verge of outnumbering men
in the workforce. That in itself
is historic as working women,
at the end of the decade about
equded, due in part to the
recession, men in the work-
force. Increased female partici-
paticn in the workforce is a side
effect of the recession, which
hit nale-dominated fields par-
ticuhrly hard.
Sc as the '00s draw to a
close with some major ups and
major downs for women's
advancement, let us hope we
make up some lost ground in
the second decade of the new
milleAnium.


* Ebnnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Hovard News Service. .


he United States has
a population problem
and it's not people.
It's pigs. Wild pigs.
Feral hogs have
been around since Spanish
explorer Hernando de Soto
brought their ancestors to the
New World in 1539. But over
the last 20 years their num-
bers and range have exploded.
Wildlife experts put their num-
bers at between 2 million and
6 million. In 1982, they were in
17 states.
Today, they are in 44, and in
21 of those states their popula-
tion is large enough that the
hogs can't be eradicated. In
Florida they have been docu-
mented in every county, and in
Texas they are in almost every
county.
These are not the cute little
pigs of storybook and car-
toon. They are big - up to 750


pounds. And, as Scripps Howard
News Service reporters Isaac
Wolf and Jason Bartz found in
researching them, enormously
destructive.
They have voracious appe-
tites and not just for plants.
They also eat sheep, cattle,
goats and chickens. Like the
deer before them, they are
increasingly drawn to the lush
landscaping and gardens of
the suburbs. Unlike the deer,
they leave behind a torn up
mess.
The wild hogs each year do
an estimated $800 million in
property and crop damage and
are involved in 27,000 collisions
with autos. And they are prone
to diseases that can spread to
domestic livestock.
One factor in the spread of
the feral hogs is that hunters
truck them from Texas and
Florida, releasing them into


the wild or on private game
reserves for hunting.
Tie hogs that escape spread
andbreed. There are federal
rules against transporting feral
hogs but they are widely
ignored. Other than that,
there is no national policy on
presenting their proliferation.
What little control there is of
thei: numbers is largely up to
a patchwork of state hunting
laws.
Various means have been
suggested for controlling the
feral hog population - stepped
up hunting, male birth control,
coxodinated eradication cam-
paigns - but little action has
been taken.
Ii the meantime, the wild
pigs eat and breed and eat.


* Scripps Howard News Service


Reg Henry
rhenry@~ost-gazette.com


Something

worth

more than

presents


P perhaps it was the
Three Wise Men
who started all
the trouble. They
brought presents
with them when they followed
the star to Bethlehem to see
the baby Jesus.
Ever since, we have been
giving presents to each other-
to celebrate the holiday,
although in truth people in
many cultures find excuses t6
give gifts, much to the joy of ,
storeowners.
In the Christmas story, the
Three Wise Men brought
gold, frankincense and
myrrh. Gold is still very
acceptable, frankincense
and myrrh less sp. (For one:
thing, these items are hard
to find at Wal-Mart.) If the
three kings of Orient had -
been as wise as advertised, .
they might have brought a.
stout broom to the stable, but
in any age it's hard to.know
what people need.'
One of the sadnesses of
growing older.is that there
comes a time when you don't
feel the need for any more
presents. You become gifted
out.
When you are young, Santa
can gift-wrap' a brick and make
you happy. "Oh, oh, a brick!"
you shout, clapping your tiny
hands with glee.
As you grow older, the
happy scene is repeated in
different ways, "Oh, oh, a toy
car!" or "Oh, oh, an electric
train!" (my favorite at age 13).
Yet, sadly, the freshness of
early Christmas' Day excite-
ment slowly wanes as the
years go by. Sure, it is always
nice to receive a sweater, a tie
or socks - these are useful
gifts and reassuring tokens
that somebody cares - but
year after year, something that
might be called sweater fatigue
sets in. It is probably a sign of.
being spoiled but, after a while;
it's hard to clap hands and
say, "Oh, oh, a sweater!" My
father, who lived in Australia,
was 96 when he died and in his
final years it was nearly impos-
sible to buy him a suitable
Christmas gift. His eyes were
not what they were, so a book
was hard to read. He didn't
need power tools or a tennis:
racket - and, as you can imag-
ine, roller skates were out.
At my wit's end.'I bought
him underwear because he
needed a supply. Yes, there's
nothing like a pair of festive -
underpants, but even then he'
did not clap his old hands in
joy. He did not shout: "Oh, oh,
underpants!" He had moved
beyond presents. What he
needed was presence, mine
and others, family and friends,
and, yes, according to his faith
tradition, the One whose birth-
day was being celebrated.
Perhaps the Wise Men knew
this. It wasn't the gold,
frankincense and myrrh that
were important. It was simply
their presence for the
adoration.
All I want for Christmas is.
to be home with my family. All
I want is for the servicemen
and women to come home
safely, their duty done. All I
want is for the lonely to be
visited, neglected parents to be
called and estranged friends"
to be reunited. Presents are
fine, presence is better. Merry
Christmas.

* Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


4A


OTHER OPINION

The wild hogs are here, and hungry


m a














LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009


By STEPHEN BERNARD
and SARA LEPRO
AP Business Writers

NEW YORK -.Stocks
ended a holiday-shortened
session Thursday at new
highs for the year follow-
ing upbeat reports on
unemployment and durable
goods orders.
A weaker dollar also
helped buoy the market,
lifting energy and materials
stocks. Christmas Eve trad-
ing was extremely light
The encouraging signs
of the labor market and
consumer, demand helped
assuage investors who
were disappointed the day
before by an unexpected
plunge in new home sales
last month.
New claims for unemploy-
ment benefits fell 28,000 to
452,000 last week, the Labor
Department reported, the
latest sign of improvement
in the job market It was the
best figure since September
2008, just before the credit
crisis peaked, and better
than the 470,000 new claims
economists had predicted.
Separately, the Commerce
Department said orders to
factories for durable goods
excluding the volatile trans-
portation sector jumped 2
percent last month, double
what analysts expected.
Stocks have managed to
push higher in December
on optimism about the
economy, but at a more sub-
dued pace than in recent
months. As the year winds
to a close, the Standard &
Poor's 500 index up 66.5
percent since hitting 12-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 10 file photo, trader Andrew Walsh (left) works on the floor of the New York Stock
Exchange. Stocks rose Thursday after reports on unemployment and durable goods orders
showed the economy is continuing its recovery. Major indexes all touched new 2009 highs in
morning trading.


year lows in March.
This week's trading pat-
tern reflected the market's
recent cautious tone. On
Monday, stocks shot high-
er as another wave of cor-
porate dealmaking boosted
investors' optimism. Two
days later, shares barely
budged after the disap-.
pointing report on hous-
ing.
"The news on balance
is pretty good," said


Uri Landesman, head
of global growth, ING
Investment Management.
"The market continues to
inch higher."
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average rose 53.66, or
0.5 percent, to 10,520.10.
The Standard & Poor's 500
index rose 5.89, or 0.5 per-
cent, to 1,126.48, while the
Nasdaq composite index
rose 16.05, or 0.7 percent,
to 2,285.69.


Rising shares outnum-
bered decliners by about 3
to 1 on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consoli-
dated volume came to 1.2
billion shares.
Trading has been slow
throughout the week head-
ing into the holiday, which
.can exaggerate swings in
stock prices. The market
closed at 1 p.m. Thursday
and will remain closed
today for Christmas.


Shoppers give stores last-minute sales surge


By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

NEWYORK -Shoppers
appear to have given the
nation's stores a needed
last-minute sales surge.
Early readings from Toys
R Us, Sears Holdings Corp.
and several mall operators
show packed stores on
Christmas Eve following a
busy week fueled by shop-
pers who delayed buying,
waiting for bigger discounts
that never came or slowed
by last weekend's big East
Coast snowstorm.
Stores. are counting on
these stragglers in a season
that so far appears slight-
ly better than.last. year's
disaster. The jury is-still
out, because the week after
Christmas accounts for
about 15 percent. of sales
as gift card-toting shoppers
return to malls.
"The procrastinators
were really out in force,"
says David Bassuk, man-
aging director in the retail
practice of AlixPartners, a
global business advisory
firm. "But I think retail-
ers needed to be more
aggressive to fight for
those sales. A lot of peo-
ple are still willing to hold
out until after Christmas
because the deals weren't
as good."
A Christmas Eve snow-
storm in the nation's heart-
land were slowing some
shoppers after snarling
roads in the mountain states
a day earlier.
At the Mall of America in
Bloomington, Minn., shop-
pers were scarce and those


ASSOCIATED F
Last minute shopper Raedele Cubbage shops for Christmas gifts for her grandchildren at
Target in the Lakewood Center mall in Lakewood, Calif., on Thursday.


who showed up had entire company spokesman at the
stores to themselves. . mall's operator, Macerich


Steve Burns, 42, and
his 15-year-old daughter,
Amber, of Hastings, Minn.,
took advantage of the empty
stores to browse for shirts
and other last-minute gifts.
Burns said the snow wasn't
a problem and traffic was
light because others stayed
home.
"It doesn't bother me
any," he said.
Some shoppers had
challenges finding what
they wanted as stores had
slashed their inventories
heading into the season. An
AnnTaylor store atWestside
Pavilion in West Los Angeles
pulled in 33 cartons of
January merchandise ear-
lier than planned, accord-
ing to Rebecca Stenholm, a


Apple's stock hits new

high as buzz builds


By ANDREW VANACORE
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK - Apple
Inc. shares hit an all-time
high Thursday after a pub-
lished report suggested the
intensely scrutinized yet
secretive company may be
getting ready for a major
product announcement.
Citing unnamed people
familiar with the prepara-
tions, the Financial Times
reported on its Web site
Wednesday that Apple has
rented space for several days
in late January at an arts


center in San Francisco.
The company is famed for
its highly staged launches.
CEO Steve Jobs has used
past events to introduce
groundbreaking - and
lucrative - gadgets.
Although Apple has not
acknowledged working on
a tablet computer - the
company is notorious for
keeping upcoming prod-
uct plans closely guarded
- analysts expect the com-
pany's next blockbuster to
be something of a cross
between a laptop and an
iPod Touch.


Co.
Joe Roberts, 59, left a
RadioShack at a mall in.
Madison, Wis., with a huge
smile and the PlayStation3
his teenage son insisted on
for Christmas.
He said he. delayed mak-
ing the $300 purchase
because of economic con-
cerns. A self-employed
designer of manufacturing
equipment, Roberts is get-
ting less business every
year and his wife. might
soon lose her job as an
office manager.
"I don't feel good about
our outlook," he said.
Roberts said they none-
theless decided Wednesday
to grant their son's wish,
but then learned the video-



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game system was sold out
at Best Buy, Walmart and
other stores. Roberts finally
connected with RadioShack
early Thursday and braved
icy roads to buy the store's
last one.
Snowy weather can take
a toll on sales. Research
firm ShopperTrak reported
Saturday's snow helped fuel
a 12.6 percent drop in sales
Saturday compared with a
year earlier.
Wally Brewster, spokes-
man at General Growth
Properties said merchants
in his centers said they had
made up for lost sales. Still,
he expects overall holiday
sales will be only about
even with a year ago.


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Treasury removes cap

for Fannie, Freddie aid


By J.W. ELPHINSTONE
AP Real Estate Writer

.NEW YORK - The gov-
ernment has handed its
ATM card to beleaguered
mortgage giants Fannie
Mae and Freddie Mac.
The Treasury
Department said Thursday
it removed the $400 billion
financial cap on the money
it will provide to keep the
companies afloat. Already,
taxpayers have shelled out
$111 billion to the pair, and
a senior Treasury official
said losses are not expected
to exceed the government's
estimate this summer of
$170 billion over 10 years.
Treasury Department
officials said it will now use
a flexible formula to ensure
the two agencies can stand
behind the billions of dol-
lars in mortgage-backed
securities they sell to inves-
tors. Under the formula,
financial support would
increase according to how
much each firm loses in a
quarter. The cap in place
at the end of 2012 would
apply thereafter.
By making the change
before year-end, Treasury
sidestepped the iheed for.
-an OK from a bailout-weary
Congress. But the' timing
of the announcement on a
traditionally slow news day"
raised eyebrows .
"The .companies are.
nowhere close to using the
$400 billion they had before,
so why do this now?," said
Bert Ely,. a banking con-
sultant in Alexandria, Va.
"It's possible we may see
some horrendous numbers
for the fourth quarter and,
thus 2009, and Treasury
wants to calm the mar-
kets."
Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac provide vital liquid-
ity to the mortgage indus-
try by purchasing home
loans from lenders and
selling them to investors.
Together, they own or
guarantee almost 31 million
home loans worth about
$5.5 trillion, or about half
of all mortgages. Without
government aid, the firms
would have gone broke,
leaving millions of people
unable to get a mortgage.
The biggest headwind
facing the housing recovery
has been the rise in fore-
closures as unemployment
remains high. Treasury
said its latest move could
allow Fannie and Freddie
to play a bigger role in
restructuring mortgages
for troubled borrowers.
Treasury officials will
provide an updated esti-
mate for Fannie and Freddie
losses in February when


The Loirsaw that you were tired and
wanted to rest He summoned the angels
to come as he coded outyour name. Left
behind your children wept..prayerfully
watches youslept.
We have living memories of theyears of
jqv and love, a lifewellspent caring and
pravingfor those youloved.
And now to GodaMother's scent.
On angel wings iu took heavenlyfight.
Its been (10 Years)Mother since you've
been gone. Yet we know you a resting
in loVr laster's am.
We love you.


President Barack Obama
sends his 2011 budget to
Congress. Though the
administration has yet to
disclose its long-term plans
for the- two companies,
they are unlikely to return
to their former power and'*
influence.
The news followed an
announcement Thursday
that the CEOs of Fannie
and Freddie could get paid
as much as $6 million for.
2009, despite the compa-.,. -'"
nies' dismal performances
this year.
Fannie's CEO, Michael
Williams, and Freddie CEO
Charles "Ed" Haldeman Jr.
each will receive $900,000.
in salary, $3.1 million in
deferred payments next
year and another $2 mil-
lion if they meet certain
performance goals, accord-
ing to filings with the
Securities and Exchange
Commission.
The pay packages were
approved by the Treasury
Department and the
Federal Housing Finance
Agency, which regulates
Fannie and Freddie.
That pay is far less than
.what their predecessors
earned. Former 'Fannie
CEO Daniel Mudd received.
$10.2 million in 2008, and
former Freddie .:CEO C -
SRichard Syron. pocketed
'$13.1 million. Both execs
were ousted when federal
regulators seized the com-
panies in September 2008.
The federal government
'blocked exit packages for
the pair worth up to $24
'million.
The chief executives' pay
could spark new criticism
about the government's
numerous bailouts, but
that may be unfounded,
said Mark Borges,. princi-
pal with management con-.
sulting firm Compensia.
Haldeman and, Williams
each could command
between $5-million and $10
million in a similar posi-
Stion in the private sector,
*Borges .estimated;, and
without the notable chal-
lenges and public scrutiny
they face at these compa-
nies.
"I doubt too many people
Should look at these jobs and
say, 'Gosh, I. would love to
go there for my next career
move,"' Borges said. "The
government is getting top
notch executives to solve .-
problems that are not easy .
to solve."
The bulk of their pay is
Also not guaranteed, Borges
said, so these executives
can't pocket and run and
must meet certain long-.
term goals or risk giving
some of it back.


755-5440 or
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�^ ,).



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Stocks reach new 2009 highs


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Officials react to Senate passage of health care bill


Associated Press

Remarks on the Senate's
passage of health care legis-
lation Thursday:
* "We are now finally
poised - to
deliver on
the prom-
ise of real,
me aning-
ful health
insurance
reform that
will bring Obama
additional
security and stability to the
American people. ... This
will be the most important
piece of social legislation
since Social Security passed
.ih the 1930s." - President
Barack Obama.
N "It is about people.
It's about life and death in
America. It's a question
of morality, of right and.
wrong. It's about human
suffering. And given the
chance to relieve this suf-
fering, we must take it."
- Senate Majority Leader
SHarry Reid, D-Nev.


* "We stand with the mil-
lions of American families
who have been forced into
bankruptcy to cover the cost
of caring for a loved one who.
is sick. We stand on behalf
of the 45,000 Americans
who die each year simply
because they do not have
health insurance and the
millions more who live in
fear." - Senate Finance
Committee Chairman Max
'Baucus; D-Mont
* "This debate was sup-
posed to produce a bill that
reformed health care. in
, America. Instead, we're left
with party-line votes in the
middle of the night, a couple
of sweetheart deals to get
it over the finish line, and
a public that's outraged."
- Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.
* "We will soon produce
a final bill that is founded
on the core principles of
health insurance reform:
affordability for the mid-
dle class, security for our
seniors, responsibility to
our children by reducing


the deficit, and account-
ability for the insurance
industry. I look forward to
working with members of
the House, the Senate and
President Obama to recon-
cile our bills and send the
final legislation to the pres-
ident's desk as soon as pos-
sible." - House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.
a "Not even Ebenezer
'Scrooge himself could
devise a scheme as cruel
and greedy as Democrats'
govern-
ment take-
over of
health care.
Sen. Reid's
health.
care bill
increases
premiums Boehner
for families
and small businesses, rais-
es taxes during a recession,
cuts seniors' Medicare ben-
efits, adds to our skyrocket-
ing debt, and puts bureau-
crats in charge of deci-
sions that should be made
by patients and doctors."


- House Minority Leader
John Boehner, D-Ohio.
m "The Senate health
care bill is far from perfect
I am deeply disappointed it
does not include a public
option to help keep down
costs, and I also don't
like the dealmaking that
secured votes with unjus-
tifiable provisions. I will
work to improve the bill,
including restoring the pub-
lic option, when the final
version is drafted." - Sen.
Russ Feingold, D-Wis.
* "The bill passed by
the Senate makes needed
.progress to prevent cover-
age denials due to health
status and limit insurance
companies from charging
older Americans much
more for coverage because
of their age. It also begins
to close the dangerous gap
in Medicare drug coverage
known as the doughnut
hole, and Senate leaders
have committed that a final
bill will close the gap entire-
ly by 2019, in keeping with
the president's pledge."


- AARP Chief Executive
A. Barry Rand.
* "Specific provisions in
this legislation will increase,
rather than decrease, health
care costs, reduce coverage
options and disrupt existing
coverage for families, seniors
and small businesses." -
Karen Ignagni, president and
chief executive of America's
Health Insurance Plans.
* "What we asked for
and what Congress prom-
ised was a plan that would
bring costs under control
and make health care more
accessible by making it
more affordable. What we
received are employer man-
dates and other provisions
that will drive up costs that
are already far- too high
and that will endanger the
employer-provided health
insurance system that mil-
lions of American families
depend on." - National
Retail Federation Vice
President Neil Trautwein.
* "It makes no sense to
tax the benefits of hardwork-
ing Americans to pay for


health reform. The House
bill curbs insurance compa-
nies and taxes the wealthy
who benefited so richly
from the Bush tax cuts: The
Senate bill instead includes
exorbitant new taxes on
middle class health benefits
that would affect one in five
workers with employer-pro-
vided health coverage - or
about 31 million people - in
2016. That's the wrong way
to pay for health care reform
and ifs political suicide." -
AFL-CIO President Richard
Trumka
S'"This bill lays the
groundwork to expand
coverage to the uninsured,
place an increased empha-
sis on preventing disease
and improve the delivery
of care - all measures that
will enable us to reduce
soaring health care costs
and relieve the stress and
anxiety of patients who have
run out of options in secur-
ing quality and affordable
health care." - American
Heart Association Chief
Executive Nancy Brown.


S . ASSOCIATED PRESS
In:this Dec. 22 photo, Diane Linpoan watches in the mirror
as owner Cristiano Cora cuts her hair for free at his spa and
salon in New York, where haircuts normally start at $100.
T-I number of newly laid-off workers filing claims for
unemployment benefits has fallen more than expected as
thielabor market makes a fitful recovery


Jobless claims,good

orders signal rebound

By DANIEL WAGNER category, the gans were
and MARTIN CRUTSINGE".a Wtr what economists had


WASHINGTON-Afitful
economic recovery is draw-.
ing strength from a stabiliz-
Sing job market and signs
that manufacturing will con-
tribute to the rebound.
The latest sign was a gov-
ernment report Thursday
that the number, of newly"
laid-off workers filing claims
for unemployment benefits
fell more than expected last
Week.
SAnd the four-week aver-
age for claims, which
smooths out fluctuations,
fell for the 16th straight
-week, to its lowest point'
since September 2008,
when the financial crisis hit
with full force.
Further evidence. of a
gradually healing economy
was a report that orders.
to U.S. factories for big-'
ticket durable goods rose
in November. The over-
all increase was less than
expected, But excluding
the volatile transportation


forecast.
The Labor Department
said the number of new job-
less claims fell to a 452,000
last week,, down 28,000
from the previous week, on
a seasonally adjusted basis.
That's a better performance
than the decline to 470,000
that economists had
expected. ,
SAnd the four-week aver-
age for claims, which
smooths out fluctuations,
fell to 465,250 - the 16th
straight weekly decline.
Stocks rose after the pos-
itive reports on unemploy-
ment and durable goods
orders. Major indexes all
touched new 2009 highs in
midmorning trading. The
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age rose about 40 points, or
.0.4 percent.
Unemployment claims
have been falling uneven-
ly since summer. That
improvement is seen as a
sign that jobs cuts are slow-
ing and hiring could pick up
early next year.


OBITUARIES


Charles Allen Deas
Charles Allen Deas, age 44,
of Live Oak, FL. passed away
Saturday, December 19, 2009
from injuries sustained in an
automobile accident. Charles was
born in Atlanta, Georgia. He was
employed by Peelers Transport
in Lake City, FL. Charles was
preceded in death by his mother,
Betty Deas and sister, Terry Cuvo.
Survivors include , Mary Ann
Deas, the mother of his daughter,
CoIrtney Deas; his companion,
Shawnee Black, the mother of his
daughter Madeline Deas; parents,
Reat and Jean Deas; father-in-
law and mother-in-law, Larry and
Patty Green; brother, Billy Deas;


sisters, Tonnie Deas, Angela
Roberts, and Shawnda Childs.
The family will receive friends
on Monday, December 28th
from 11:00-12:00 at Stowers
Funeral Home, Brandon, FL.
Funeral services will be held
at 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday,
December, 29th at Harry T.
Reid Funeral Home, Jasper,
FL. with interment to follow
at New Hope Baptist Church
Cemetery. HARRY T. REID
FUNERAL HOME, Jasper, FL.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Call 1.888.640.8776


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009















Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@aokecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, December 25, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS

B


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom

Death and

inspiration


an all-time
Columbia
High football
team was
considered at the turn
of the century and again
this sesquicentennial
year, but it was never a
serious proposition.
How can you
compare eras for a
football program that
goes back 100 years?
Who is left to speak for
players from the 20s, 30s
and 40s?
Any list of CHS top
running backs would
include Gene Cox and
Craig Busby and both
died suddenly this year.
The twosome
produced dozens of
touchdowns, but
football is judged by
Steam performance. Both
were surrounded by a lot
of talent and they made
teammates better.
S In their final three.
years in high school, the
Tigers were 24-5-1 while
Cox played and 32-3 with
Busby. Both played on
undefeated teams their
senior season.
Cox was always
gracious to deal with
and Busby was a
life-long friend.
Another 2009 death
that diminished me in the
sense of John Donne's
meditation was that of
Carson Brittain. He was a
great inspiration.
Brother Brittain was
a long-time preacher at
the First Baptist Church
and was there during my
growing-up years. He
was the man who
baptized me.
Brittain's soft voice
was strong and special.
It seerned to be a direct
link to the Lord.
It is told that Mel
Tannenbaum (Lovely
Shop family) sent a
postcard from Paris
addressed Carson the
Parson, Lake City, Fla.,
and it was delivered.
Seems right.
One Sunday, a lady in
the choir fainted. Brittain
reacted like this
happened every week.
He signaled up the
deacons to care for her
and took charge of the
hymn in progress.
Our age group had
10-12 regulars at Sunday
School and one week
my best buddy, Eddie
Bennett, and I decided
we would join the
church.
When the day came,
we walked to the altar
as "Softly and Tenderly"
was sung.
We had made our
decision in a
matter-of-fact manner,
but the Spirit was at work
that day. When we looked
up, there was my mama,
daddy and sister - all in
tears - and many of our
friends standing with us:
Brittain ushered us all
through the ceremonies
that followed. He is now
in that better place, and
the hope is we will join
him one day.
' Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Win puts Pats in playoffs,

Jags still have a shot


Jacksonville
alive in hunt for
postseason.

By HOWARD ULMAN
Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- The last time the New
England Patriots faced the
Jacksonville Jaguars, Tom
Brady completed 26 of 28
passes in a playoff game. :
That- kind of perfor-
mance by Brady on Sunday
should be enough to get
the Patriots back into the
postseason and, depending
Son the outcomes of other
games, knock the Jaguars
out of contention.
The Patriots won that
divisional playoff game two


seasons ago 31-20. This
season, they haven't lost
at home and another win
would clinch the AFC East
after they missed last sea-
son's playoffs despite going
11-5.
"It doesn't matter what
everybody else does,"
coach Bill Belichick said.
"If we win on Sunday, then
we've achieved one of our
goals this year."
Jacksonville needs help
from others to have a shot
at the playoffs after losing
three of four games follow-
ing a 6-4 start.
"They can't be must-wins
and you keep losing," quar-
terback David Garrard said.
"They've got to be must-
wins and you win one. That
time is here and hopefully it


happens,this weekend, but
there are no guarantees."
Denver and Baltimore
lead the.crowded race for
the two AFC wild-card
spots at,. 8-6. Jacksonville
is one of six teams at
7-7. The Jaguars missed
the playoffs last year with
a 5-11 record after getting
eliminated the previous sea-
son when Brady threw for
three touchdowns and two
incompletions.
'Their defensive identity
has changed quite a bit,"
Brady said. 'They have a
new coordinator who's
brought, definitely, a differ-
ent style to their defense
and they're much more of a
blitzing defense."'

JAGUARS continued on 4B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacksonville Jaguars wide receiver Mike Thomas (80)
celebrates with teammate Mike Sims-Walker on Dec. 17 in
Jacksonville.


Taking one for the team


CHS, Fort White

were represented

in the playoffs -J


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

The Florida High School
Athletic Association devel-
oped its first district realign-
ment in four years for this
school term. Fort White
High and Columbia High
sports had success, under
the old and new systems
during 2009.
Columbia High's foot-
ball team was the district
champion in the new 5-4A
and won its first-round play-
off game over Leon High,
24-14. Lincoln High elimi-
nated the Tigers in the sec-
ond round, 20-14.
The Lady Tigers soft-
ball team won district in its
old. 4-5A. Columbia lost to
Ed White High in the first
round of the playoffs, 5-3.
It was the first district
title for CHS football since
2003 and.the first in softball
since 2005.
Fort \%Wite continued a
couple of playoff streaks.
. The Lady Indians soccer
team was district runner-up
in its. old 5-3A for a third
consecutive season. Fort
White lost to Bolles School
in the playoffs, 9-0.
Fort White's volleyball
team spanned the district
realignment with runner-
up finishes in 2008 and
2009. Trinity Catholic High
eliminated the Lady Indians
in the first round of the
playoffs.
Lady Tigers basketball
returned to the playoffs for
the first time since 1999,


as a district runner-up in
old 4-5A. Columbia lost to
Bartram Trail High, 71-37.
Columbia's baseball team
also was runner-up in the
old-4-6A. Making their first
playoff .appearance since
2005, the Tigers were elim-
inated by Fleming Island
High, 2-1.
Columbia's girls golf
(third) and boys cross
country (fourth) teams
advanced to region after
district performances.
Columbia's girls weight-
lifting team placed third
at state. Columbia's boys
track team was second at
district, and Lady Indians
track placed third.
Lake City and Richardson
middle schools also went
through realignments of
sorts. The teams played
under the kaput Florida
Crown Conference in the
spring and now are in the
Star"Conference.
Lake City's baseball and
volleyball teams won con-
ference and both went unde-
feated. Football was second
in the new conference and
softball was runner-up in the
old. Boys soccer was first in
the new conference and the
Lady Falcons were runners-
up. The Lady Falcons cross
country team qualified for
the AAU Nationals.
Richardson was confer-
ence runner-up in volley-
ball, and Fort White Middle
School football played
in' the Suwannee Middle
School Athletic Conference
championship game.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Tiger Powell led the Tigers to a.District 5-4A championship in the fall football
season. The Tigers advanced to the second round of the FHSAA 4A high school playoffs.


Spin, spin on the coaching carousel


Cowher among
names passed
around in cycle.

By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

The coaching carousel]
has begun to spin in the
NFL, with seven teams pos-
sibly stepping on once the
season ends. Those teams
certainly know who is out
there for the hiring: Bill
Cowher, Mike Shanahan,
Jon Gruden and Brian
Billick for starters.
Mike Holmgren already


has landed in Cleveland,
although he is not likely
to be on the Browns' side-
line in 2010. Holmgren
was hired as president of
the team, even though the
coaching bug has never
really left him. But don't
expect to see him wearing
a headset next year.
What might we expect in
coaching moves? Here's a
look at teams that might be
headed for the merry-go-
round, not including Tampa
Bay or Dallas.
Some believe Raheem
Morris is a one-year fill-
in before the Buccaneers


go for a bigger name with
more experience, but
there's been little evidence
ownership is thinking that
way. And Jerry Jones wants
to rind every reason to.
keep Wade Phillips at the
Cowboys' helm, although
failing to make the playoffs
surely could change Jones'
approach.
CLEVELAND
Holmgren's coaching
genes tell him it's unfair to
fire a coach after one sea-
son, no matter how disap-
pointing and dysfunctional
that season has been. But
Holmgren also understands


holding on to Eric Mangini
for 2010 could mean delay-
ing Holmgren's own pro-
gram for rebuilding the
Browns by another year.
When Bill Parcells took
over in Miami, he weighed
the same options before
firing Cam Cameron and
bringing in his own guy -
Parcells has a lot of "guys"
- in Tony Sparano. That's
worked out pretty well, and
Holmgren is likely to want a
coach of his choosing.
Besides, Mangini hardly
has been the most popular,
diplomatic or understand-
ing coach in the league,


both in Cleveland and New
York. All three of those
traits defined Holmgren
when he led the Packers
and Seahawks.
They probably will define
whoever he seeks to replace
Mangini.
OAKLAND
Don't be surprised to
see Tom Cable return. Yes,
the Raiders remain losers,
and JaMarcus Russell has
made virtually no progress
at quarterback. But remem-
ber that Cable had nothing
to do with Al Davis select-

COACHES continued on 2B


-- � ,,

















2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
NBA BASKETBALL
I Noon
ESPN - Miami at NewYork
2:30 p.m.
ABC - Boston at Orlando
5 p.m.
ABC - Cleveland at L.A. Lakers
8 p.m.
ESPN - L.A. Clippers at Phoenix
10:30 p.m.
ESPN - Denver at Portland

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule ,
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Miami
N.Y. ets
Buffalo

x-Indianapolis
Jacksonville


East
W L
9 5
7 7
7 7
5 9
South
WL T
14 0
7 7


TPct PF PA
0.643 365 244
0.500316 333
0.500 282 221
0.357 225 288

Pct PF PA
01.000394248
0.500 266 322


Tennessee 7 7. 0.500320 347
Houston 7 7 0,500327 286
North
W L TPct PF PA
Cincinnati 9 .5 0.643 288 244
Baltimore 8 6. 0.571 350 225
Pittsburgh 7 7 0.500315 280'
Cleveland 3 11 0.214 199 349
West
W L TPct PF PA
x-San Diego 11 3 0.786 389 283
penver 8 6 0.571 275 250
Oakland 5 9 0.357 175 335
Kansas City 3 II 0.214240 383
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


East
W L
y-Philadelphia 10 4
Dallas 9 5
N.Y. Giants 8 6
Washington 4 10
South
W L
x-New Orleans 13 I
Atlanta. 7 7
Carolina 6 8
Tampa Bay 2 12
, North
W L
x-Minnesota 1I ' 3
Green Bay '9 5
Chicago . 5
Detroit 2 12
West
W L
x-Arizona 9 5
San Francisco 6 8
Seattle 5 9
St. Louis I 13


TPct PF PA
0.714 399 286
0.643 320 250
0.571 386 342
0.286 246 29.6

TPct PF PA
0.929483 298
0.500312 312
0.429 251 289
0.143 214 363.
T Pct PF- PA
0.786 396.269
0.643 380 280
0.357254 322
0.143 233 437
TPct PF PA
0.643 337 282
0.429 282 269
0.357 257 325
0.071 159 377


x-clinched division
y-clinched playoff spot
Today's Game
San Diego at Tennessee, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Buffalo at Atlanta, I p.m.
Houston at Miami, I p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay, I p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, I p.m:
Kansas City at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, I p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco. 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona,4:05 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m.
Denver at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at WaShington, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30 p.m..

Comiebacks from 0-5

List of NFL teams that have started
0-5 and finished the season at .500 or
better, according to STATS. No NFL team
has finished a season at .500 or better


after starting 0-6:
Year Team
1962 Buffalo Bills
1981 Washington Redskins
1984 Cincinnati Bengals
2001 Washington Redskins
2006 Tennessee Titans


Record
7-6-1
8-8-0
8-8-0
8-8-0
8-8-0


Temple (9-3) vs. UCLA (6-6).
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Miami (9-3) vs. Wisconsin (9-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 22 5 .815 -
Toronto 14 17 .452 10
NewYork II 17 .393 II'
Philadelphia 7 21 .250 15'h
New Jersey 2 27 .069 21
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Orlando 22 7 .759
Atlanta 20 8 .714 1'
Miami 14 12 .538 6'
Charlotte II 16 .407 10
Washington 10 17 .370 II
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 22 8 .733 -
Milwaukee 12 15 .444 8/2
Detroit II 18 .379 10'h
Chicago 10 17 .370 10'/2
Indiana 9 18 .333 11'/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division


Dallas
Houston
San Anto
New Or
Memphi:

Denver
Portland
Utah .
Oklahon
Minneso


W L Pct GB
20 9 .690 -
17 12 .586 3
onio 15' 11 .577 3hA
leans 13 14 .481 6
S13 15 .464 6/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
20 9 .690 -
19 12 .613 2
16 13 .552 4
na City 14 14 .500 5'h
ta 6 24 .200 14'h


Pacific Division
SW L Pct G
L.A. Lakers 23 4 .852 -
Phoenix 18 II . .621
Sacramento 13 15 .464 10
L.A. Clippers 12 16 .429 II
Golden State 7 21 .250 16
Today's Games
Miami at NewYork, 12 p.m.
Boston at Orlando, 2:30 p.m.
Cleveland at LA. Lakers, 5 p.m. '
L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Memphis at Dallas, 3 p.m.
Atlanta at Indiana. 7 p.m.
SHouston at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Washington at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Phoenix at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.


Romo gone from wild


gunslinger to Mr. Efficiency


By JAIME ARON
Associated Press'

IRVING,, Texas -.Tony
Romo is putting' up big
numbers again, closing
in on 4,000 yards passing
while averaging more yards
per attempt than Peyton
Manning.
His most, impressive
number? Zero, as in having
no passes intercepted in his
last four games and in nine
games overall this season.
Put the stats together
and the result is'what every:
coach wants: a quarterback
who maximizes yards and
minimizes turnovers.
"He's riot gone to all check-
downs or throwing all, quote,
safe, short passes," Cowboys
coach Wade Phillips said.
"That's the hardest part of
this kind of streak."
Romo has thrown just
seven interceptions this
season. Only Green Bay's
Aaron Rodgers has a lower
percentage of interceptions
per attempt; at .1.5. per-
cent, Romo has more than
chopped in half last year's
3.1 percent, and that had
been the best of his career.
Making it all the more
remarkable is that Romo
rose to stardom as a cau-
tion-be-damned gunslinger
whose mistakes were toler-
ated as a trade-off for all the
big plays he made - and
that he came into this sea-
son vowing to make wiser,
safer decisions.
He claimed to have spent
the offseason working on
it, which seemed strange
because there's no way to
simulate those split-second
situations with large, angry
men chasing you. It espe-
cially seemed like a bunch
of blather when he threw
three interceptions in Week
2.
But look at what he's
done since: Just four inter-
ceptions the last 12 games,
never more than one in any
game. He had a streak of
three straight without an


interception, which was the
best of his career until this
current four-game run. He's
also on a roll of four straight
games with .a passer rat-
ing over 100, his best since
doing it in six straight in
2007.
"I'm doing some things
a little differently - that
I'm not going to tell you
- but they've helped me to
minimize certain decisions
that I've made in the past,"
Romo .said. "That's part
'of growing up and being
experienced on the football
field.".
.. As solid as Romo's been,
.Dallas needs two more
clean outings from him.
The Cowboys will win
the NFC East,and get a
home playoff game if they
win their' last two games.
It also would give them
a winning record after
SThanksgiving for the first
time since 1996, which also
was the last time they won a
playoff game. Anything less
than two more wins could
keep Dallas (9-5) out of the
playoffs.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -

I CATUE


POEQUA



VERYUP
7~ 7
^^ ^ _ __ __ _


Romo's reputation would
benefit greatly from a late-
season surge, too.
Even after pulling off an
upset win in New Orleans
last weekend, he's 6-12 in
December and January,
counting two playoff loss-
es. No matter how many
or how few interceptions
he throws, wins and play-
off appearances will always
trump interception ratio
and any other stat:
Then again, the fewer
interceptions he throws,
the better Dallas' chance of
winning. The Cowboys are
2-3 this season in games
he's thrown an interception,
7-2 when he hasn't.
So it really does come
back to Romo making the
right throws at the right
time, and, perhaps even
more importantly, avoiding
the wrong ones at all times.
: "If it's there, you've got
to aggressively fire it and
let it go," Romo said. "The
game's too fast. Things hap-
pen in the blink of an eye
that you've got to trust what
you see and let it go."

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GAUZE NERVY SEETHE BUCKET
Answer: She drew the brainy student's attention with
this - HER EYE CUE


COACHES: Story of the offseason


Continued From Page 1L

ing Russell at the top of
the draft in 2007, and his
decision to go with Bruce
Gradkowski late this sea-
son worked well enough.
Oakland plays hard, if
not with consistent efficien-
cy, and the players seem
to respond to Cable. One
thing that could hurt his
future coaching opportuni-
ties: off-the-field issues that
surfaced this year.
Plus, nobody can predict
the whims of Davis, who
might just decide a Super
Bowl-winning coach needs
to be brought to Oakland.
Of course, Shanahan and
Gruden already have been
down that Black Hole.
CHICAGO
Three seasons back,
Lovie Smith was the toast of
Chitown, as secure as any
coach or manager in the
Windy City. Now, followers
of Da Bears are ready to
bring out Da Ax.
And not just for Smith,
but. for general manager
Jerry Angelo.
The Bears' frugality was
legendary, but Angelo has
spent big time on some
of his stars, who have not
played like stars, and he did
get aggressive in acquiring
Jay Cutler. Unfortunately
for the GM and his coach,
Cutler has been the sea:
son's biggestindividualflop,
more a franchise scourge
than franchise quarterback
thus far.
Chicago has looked inept
and disinterested at times
this season, about the worst
indictment a coaching staff
can be handed. If Smith
goes, don't look for a big
name to replace him.


CAROLINA
John Fox is an excel-
lent coach who has been
hamstrung by some poor
contract situations (Julius
Peppers) and decisions
(Jake Delhomme). Fox was
part of those choices by the
Panthers, of course.
Carolina has been up
and down for most of
the decade, going 7-9,
11-5 (and a last-second loss
in the Super Bowl), 7-9,
11-5 (and a trip to the NFC
title game), 8-8, 7-9 and
12-4 under Fox. That might
be too much inconsistency
for owner Jerry Richardson
and GM Marty Hurney,
and if Fox is fired, he easily
could wind up with anoth-
er head coaching position
quickly.
The Cowher factor plays
heavily here. Does the for-
mer Steelers coach and
superb TV studio analyst
want to leave his comfort-
able gig? Cowher lives in
North Carolina and 'would
be a popular choice.
WASHINGTON
Since Daniel Snyder
bought the Redskins in
1999, he has had six head
coaches, one of them inter-
im. It's clear that Jim Zorn
won't be around for 2010,
and new GM Bruce Allen
had a long working rela-
tionship with Gruden in
Oakland and Tampa Bay.
Snyder loves big names,
doesn't mind spending big
bucks, but Gruden has
indicated he will stay in
the broadcast booth next
year. Plus, there's another
megacoach out there in
Shanahan, who wants back
in. This looks like his land-


ing spot, particularly if he's
willing to have less say over
personnel than he did in
Denver.
One question: Would he
have as much say about
personnel as the owner?
BUFFALO
DickJauron couldn't stick
around long enough to go
7-9 for a fourth successive
season. Perry Fewell has
to win his -last two, includ-
ing beating the Colts, to get
that high as he finishes out
Jauron's term.
Owner Ralph Wilson says
he will spend to get,a qual-
ity coach and he had a long
meeting with Shanahan
after firing Jauron. This
team desperately needs an
infusion of offense regard-
less of who takes over, and
Shanahan would be a good
choice if he slips out of
Snyder's grasp.
HOUSTON
This was supposed to
be the Texans' year after
not making the playoffs or
managing a winning record
since their 2002 inception. It
hasn't happened, although
victories over Miami and
-New England would give
them a 9-7 mark and at
least slim hope of making
the postseason.
Gary Kubiak has built a
strong passing offense, but
the Texans don't make the
big plays in tight spots. He
is 29-33 since taking charge,
hardly the return on his
investment that owner Bob
McNair expects.
McNair, one of the
league's most respected
owners, could make a run
at the big names if he parts
with Kubiak.


Older and wiser, Michael


Beasley has a new outlook


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI - Michael
Beasley insists that father-
hood has changed his life.
There was a time, and it
wasn't long ago, where the
Miami Heat forward would
blow through $20,000 in
a night, awaken and want


ACROSS

1 Horse's morsel
4 Actual rather
than imaginary
8 Not very many
11 Prefix with
directional
12 Montreal
athlete, once
13 Versatile
vehicle
14 Mortgage
consideration
15 Leading man
16 Plunder
17 Rivercrossers
19 Helsinki
citizens
21 - Kippur
22 Dry
watercourse
23 Fossil resin
26 Spanish explorer
(2 wds.),
28 Rawls or Gehrig
29 Round dwelling
31 Grease job
33 Float downriver


to do it again. Spend fast,
drive fast, party fast. He was
an NBA millionaire after
one year playing at Kansas
State, living like reper-
cussions need not apply,
trusting almost every-
body, listening to almost


nobody.
Beasley
7-month-old


35 Trick
37 Narrow inlet
38 Waning
40 Awfully nice
42 Laird's daughter
43 EMT
technique
44 Listens to
46 Maxims
50 Gas-pump
abbr.
51 Foul-ball
callers
53 Shadow
54 - de cologne
55 Put out heat
56 Begrudge
57 It may be tidy
58 Feast
59 Future fish

DOWN

1 - Khayyam
2 Opposed
3 Wild tee shirt
(hyph.)
4 Alter a skirt
5 Former spouses


says his
daughter,


Mikaiya, and 4-month-old
Pierce are big reasons
why he decided to try
escaping his destructive
patterns.
So far, the native
of Frederick, Md., is
succeeding, yet says he
needs to think of his kids
every step of the way along
this new path.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

HAZEL V AVA
OREGON SODI UM
EMER GE RUSSET
EJECTS ALS
ESTA OATH
LPN MOD SORE
USO PEN GOL F
GORE TNT YUL
MEAD AHS ADO
ROOM PALE
HES LIELO W
UPHILL OKAYED
TIARAS SERAPE
CHAR NEPAL


6 Aries mo.
7 Veggy sponges
8 Homeowner's
need
9 Thames school
10 Spider creations


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


12-25


11 Poet's eye
18 Like horror
flicks
20 Adored one
22 Licks, say
23 Elev.
24 Wry face
25 Junk food buy
26 Antibiotic
27 Oscar's
cousin
30 Tall vases
32 Absorb, as
costs
34 Online
auction
36 Catch a
glimpse of
39 Flowed out
41 Journalist
43 Social
stratum
44 Crude
metals
45 Belle's
boyfriend
46 Joy ride
47 Prefix for
second
48 Hand over
49 Stallone
nickname
52 2001,
to Livy


� 2009 by NEA, Inc.


Bowl games
Wednesday
Poinsettia Bowl
. Utah 37, California 27
Today
. Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
SMU (7-5) vs. Nevada (8-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Ohio (9-4) vs. Marshall (6-6), I p.m.
(ESPN)
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina (8-4) vs. Pittsburgh
(9-3), 4 p.m. (ESPN)
Emerald Bowl
At San Francisco
Southern Cal (8-4) vs. Boston College
(8-4), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
S.. . Sunday .
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn: .
Clemson (8-5) vs. Kentucky (7-5),
8 p.m.(ESPN) '
Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Georgia (7-5),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday
EagleBank Bowl
AtWashington


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


2B '


3 9 ., 10


.-














Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009 3B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.
o


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Get thee to a consignment

shop with late mom's togs


DEAR ABBY: Will you
please advise me what to do
with a lot of really gorgeous
women's apparel? I'm talking
about top-of-the-line shoes,
handbags - everything you
could imagine.
My mother left all of her
things to me. I have already
donated some to charity,
but selling some would be
nice, too. Any suggestions?
- VANESSA IN AUSTIN
DEAR VANESSA:
Check around to see if there
are any consignment stores
in your .area that deal in
high-end merchandise: I am
sure they would be very in-
terested in helping you sell
the items. With the econo-
my down, many women are'
on the prowl looking for the
kinds of bargains you have
described. You might also
consider offering them on
eBay.
DEAR ABBY: My cousin
."Stacie" and Ihave sons who
are the same age. The boys
Love playing together and
spending the night at each
other's house. The prob-
lem is that Stacie and her
husband fight all the time.
They stream and curse at
each other at the top of their
lungs, and they do it in front
of the kids. Her husband
also screams at their son,
calling him "stupid" and oth-
er things that are not fit for a


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
family newspaper..
My husband and I do not
want our son exposed to
that kind of behavior, but I
don't know how to tell Stacie
that this is why I can't allow
my son to stay at her house
anymore. Any suggestions?
- STICKY WICKET IN
TENNESSEE
DEAR STICKY WICK-
ET: Yes. Host the sleepovers
at your house. That way
cousin Stacie and her hus-
band can have more "private
time" to continue their bat-
tles, and their poor son will
have some relief from the
emotional abuse he is suf-
fering at the hands of both
of them.
DEAR ABBY: A friend'
forwarded me an item she
had read on the Internet. I
have learned a lot during my
38 years of living, and think
these important life lessons
might be something you'd
like *to pass along to your
many readers.
1. Respect others, even if
they don't respect you. Later
, : , '


in life they may remember
that respect.
2. Love with your whole
heart. It may be broken, but
you can't say that you never
loved.
3. Treat animals with kind-
ness, and it will be repaid to
you a hundredfold.
4. Be honest with the peo-
ple you love. Honesty really
IS the best policy.
5. Admit your mistakes; it
shows you are human.
6. Learn from your mis-
takes, but don't dwell on
them. Negative thinking will
only make you depressed
- and that's not good for you
or those around you.
7. Tell your family often
that you love them. You nev-
er know when it will be the
last time you get to say it.
8. Never tell others that
their dreams are stupid or
dumb. Each of us is entitled
to our dreams. Who are we
to say they won't come true?
9. Realize that the only
person you can change is
yourself.
10. Be thankful for every-
thing you have. Knowing you
are blessed isn't arrogant or
cocky if you're truly thankful
for your blessings. '- JEN-
NIFER IN COLORADO

N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Take pride in
what you do and. refuse
to let anyone rain on your
parade. You have to keep
your emotions out of the
equation, regardless of the
comments or reactions of
others. Put negativity aside
and focus on the positive.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You'll be pleas-
antly surprised by what
someone does or says.
Getting together with the
people you love will help
you realize how much you
have. A little romance is in
order. ***-
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You can help a
worthy cause without let-
ting it break your budget.
Offer your time and assis-
tance instead of your cash.
Someone you need to take
care of will cost you emo-
tionally, physically and fi-
nancially if you aren't well
organized. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Folding under
pressure will not help your
cause. Take a different ap-
proach and you can push
your way past anyone who
is standing in your way.
Don't feel obligated to take
on someone else's burden.
**
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

22): What you don't know
won't hurt you. You have
enough to contend with al-
ready, so don't feel guilty
when you should be enjoy-
ing a little time with the
ones you love. Don't take
on everyone else's troubles.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You've been very gen-
erous and the appreciation
you receive will make it
well worth your while. The
social events you attend will
lead to interesting talks that
will play into your plans for
the future. Youngsters and
elders in the family will add
to your joy. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You will face opposi-
tion, emotional turmoil and
controversy. Try not to say
too much to anyone who
may be looking to pick- a
fight. If something in your
life really isn't working, con-
sider alternatives. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Turn a blind eye
to what aggravating people
are doing. Instead, -spend
more time interacting with
the people who inspire and
support your ideas and
goals. Overindulgence will
not be the answer if you are
disgruntled about some-


one's actions. ***
SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Your dedica-
tion, loyalty and hard work
will raise your profile and
bring you into the center of
the events that unfold. Plan
to do a little traveling about
if it will help someone who
can't get around that easily.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Settle down
- not everyone will share
your enthusiasm. Talking
about your accomplish-
ments will humiliate some-
one who has been working
hard and getting nowhere.
Be gracious and handle
your friends and relatives
with kindness. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't feel pres-
sured to make a decision
that will alter your personal
life. Take your time and
discuss your dilemma with
someone who has always
given you good advice.
Rely on family and friends
to come through for you
now. -**r
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Someone will
try to take advantage of
your generosity and good
will if you aren't careful.
Don't worry if someone
gives you an ultimatum. It's
time to take a pass and go
your separate ways. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: V equals G
"L G P IT Y W M F X O L G X, WT O WC R V W O,
ACTXK'O YCLT DMCL G XOCMT.
L G P IT Y W M F X O L G X . . . ET M WG E X . . .
LTGKX G HFOOHT IFO LCMT."
AM. X T R X X
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I don't think Christmas is necessarily about things.
It's about being good to one another." - Carrie Fisher


FOR BETTER ORWORSE
EI, P-E-. IZZ LE
SPEELoK
IEL 50L B ' / AKe

^:j:L


S-T �E T/ B s, OPN ( -'A ,',; / '
SThE WIN, O.Ie& ON '0''-' f'l-s N11"
DESSESMAKEG VY, ' F
MASH THE SPUDS, CcK


I .. ..


ONCE. ALUTHE
PRESENTS AtRE
OPENED--.
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CLASSIC PEANUTS













Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009


JAGUARS: Patriots have won two straight games heading into matchup
Continued From Page 1B


Brady, whose 2008 season ended with a
knee injury in the opener, has played far
below his level of 2007, when he threw an
NFL-record 50 touchdown passes. In his
last two games, he has totals of 307 yards
passing with two touchdowns and two
interceptions, but the Patriots won both to
take a two-game lead in the AFC East with
two games left.
"Our goals are still ahead of us and we
have some great opportunities. Like all of
us, I've battled some adversities," Brady
said. "A lot of it is being mentally tough



Vick

wins

courage

award

By ROB MAADDI
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA -
Michael Vick's peers appre-
ciate his tough journey back
to the NFL.
Vick won the Ed Block
Courage Award, voted on
by his teammates on the
Philadelphia Eagles. The
once-disgraced star quarter-
back returned to the league
after spending 18 months in
a federal prison for his'role
in a dogfighting ring,
"It means a great deal to
me," Vick said Wednesday.
"I was voted unanimously by
my teammates. They know
what I've been through. I've
been through a lot It's been
great to come back and
have an opportunity to play
and be with a great group of
guys. I'm just ecstatic about
that and I enjoy every day."
A three-time Pro Bowl pick
in six seasons with Atlanta,
Vick has played sparingly
with the Eagles. He has two
touchdowns rushing and one
passing in 12 games.
The Ed Block Award hon-
ors players who exemplify
commitment to the princi-
ples of sportsmanship and
courage. All 32 NFL teams
select a recipient, and each
winner will be honored at
an awards ceremony in
Baltimore on March 9.
"I've overcome a lot,
more than probably one
single individual can han-
dle or bear," Vick said...
"You ask certain people to
walk through my shoes,
they probably couldn't do.
Probably 95 percent of the
people in this world because
nobody had to endure what
I've been through, situations
I've been put in, situations I
put myself in and decisions
I have made, whether they
Shave been good or bad.
"There's always conse-
quences behind certain
things and repercussions
behind them, too. And then
you have to wake up every Ca
day and face' the world,
whether they perceive you
in the right perspective,
it's a totally different out-
look on you. You have to be
strong, believe in yourself,
be optimistic. That's what
I've been able to do. That's
what I display."
The Eagles were criti-
cized by animal rights
activists for signing Vick
less than a month after he
was released from prison.
Dozens of protesters voiced
their outrage outside the
team's practice facility the
day after Vick was signed, l''' ''"'
and many fans threatened *Gainesvill
to give up their tickets. *6110 NW
But Vick got a warm
reception in his first game
with the Eagles and by most
accounts has been a model *AT&T impose
citizen off the field. regulations; S
The animal rights group,
People for the Ethical Map depicts ar
Treatment of Animals, coverage area
issued a statement repri- equipment, anm
manding the Eagles for giv- Other condition
36 activation fi
ing Vick the award. up to $35 res
'"The Philadelphia Eagles between two i


fumbled when they gave consecutive m
Michael Vick the Ed Block charges for off
Courage Award, which the KB inc'd w
was named after a man 174.99,5149.9
who advocated in behalf of service. Card
abused children," the PETA minimum $30
Blackberry dat
statement read. "Michael agreement is5
Vick should not be the per- ATMs or author
son anyone points to as a unactivated eq
model of sportsmanship." contained here


and bouncing back from things that don't
necessarily go our way and then being able
to just continue to respond."
The Patriots -(9-5) have bounced back
from three losses in four games. But their
latest wins were against two of the NFL's
weaker teams, 20-10 over Carolina and
17-10 over Buffalo.
Brady has been dealing with injuries
to his ribs and a finger on his right hand.
The running game, behind Laurence
Maroney, has been productive, and the
young defense has come through after


some mediocre performances.
The Jaguars could be just the opponent
for Brady to regain his old touch. They're
last in the NFL with 14 sacks and have
three rookie starters on defense, including
cornerback Derek Cox. He'll have to stop
Brady from completing passes to Randy
Moss, who is tied for fifth in the league
with 1,144 yards receiving and has 74
catches, 10 for touchdowns.
"Its not like I can get away from that,"
Cox said. "I've seen these guys before on
TV. I'm not in awe at all. I'm here to play


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football."
These are not the dominant Patriots who
went 18-0 before losing the Super Bowl at
the end of the 2007 season.
"They're finding ways to win without
blowing teams out," Jaguars cornerback
Rashean Mathis said. "We commend them
on that effort, but we can't think in our
head that we're playing the 'championship
Patriots.' We're playing the Patriots of '09,
and that's how you look at it.If you give a
team too much respect, you're going to get
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ee applies. Equipment price and availability may vary by market and may not be available from independent retailers. Early Termination Fee: None if cancelled in the first 30 days, but
stocking fee may apply to equipment returns; thereafter up to 5175. Some agents impose add'l fees. Unlimited voice services: Unltd.volce svcs are provided solely for live dialog
individuals. No additional discounts are available with unlimited plan. Offnet Usage: If your mins of use (including unild svcs) on other carriers' networks ("offnet usage") during any two
months exceed your offnet usage allowance, AT&T may at its option terminate your svc, deny your contd use of other carriers' coverage, or change your plan to one imposing usage
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"�-pt-
















Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


1C


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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. One pe Each additional
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personal merchandise totalling S,500 or less.
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One Item per ad h t
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One item per ad 2 i
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Rate applies to private individuals selling
Personal merchandise totaling $,000 o e.
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lnaest lis F Eachadditional
4 lines, oe mo . ine $1.. 5
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Personal merchandise totalling 6,500 or less.
















4 lines, one month....m90.20


Includes an additional $1.55 per





Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.nm. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to lace their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
,East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter,
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
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only the charge for the ad space
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pmmeditely for prompt correc-
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deadlines apply for cancellation.
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. Should further information be
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credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.n., 9:


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
dvertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for publish errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
tion and billing adjustments.





















omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad mray
not be abbreviated.


In Print

and Online
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DARRELL POPE
Deceased.
File No. 09-266-CP
Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
DARRELL POPE, deceased, whose
date of death was
May 5, 2009, and whose social se-
curity number is 264-43-1782, is
pending in the Circuit Court
for COLUMBIA County, Florida;
Probate Division, the address of
which is 173 NE Hernando
Ave, Lake City, Florida 32055. The-
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is required to be served
must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LAT-
ER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other .creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is December 18, 2009
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/: Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr., Attor-
ney
FBN 798797
905 SW Baya Drive, Lake City, FL
32025
386-961-9959(phone);386-961-
9956(fax)
Personal Representative:
By:/s/: ALLEN B..POPE
Personal Representative
144 SE Wilderness Drive
Lake City, FL. 32025
04536639
December 18, 25,2009


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The North Florida Broadband Au-
thority ("NFBA") announces a public
meeting to which all interested per-
sons are invited. The NFBA is a le-
gal entity and public body created
pursuant to the provisions of Section
163.01, Florida Statutes, and an In-
terlocal Agreement among: Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Ham-
ilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy,
Madison, Putnam, Suwannee, Taylor
. and Union Counties and municipali-
ties of Cedar Key, Cross City, Lake
City, Live Oak, Monticello, Perry,
White Springs and Worthington
Springs, Florida. The regular meet-
ing will be held at 2:00 p.m. E.T. on
Wednesday, January 6, 2010 at the
Suwannee River Water Management
District, Suwannee Room, 9225
County Road 49, Live Oak, Florida
32060. The NFBA Board will ad-
Sdress general operating issues of the
NFBA. If a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the NFBA
.with respect to any matter considered
at the meeting, such person will need
a record of the proceedings and may
need to ensure that a verbatim record
is made, including the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be made. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing special accommoda-
tions or an interpreter to participate
in this proceeding, or if you have any
questions regarding this meeting,
please contact the Clerk to the NFBA
Board at (877) 552-3482, at least two
business days prior to the date of the
meeting.
04536773
December 25, 2009
Notice is hereby given that on
1/4/2010 at 10:30 am the following
mobile home will be sold at public
auction pursuant to FS. 715.104. 75
GLENNHS 522L079185S250u &
522L079185S250X Last. Tennant
:Ann Margaret Bargy Sale to be
held at: Snowbirdland Vistas Inc
dba Mid Florida Lakes 199 Forest
Dr Leesburg, FL 34778 813-241-
8269
04536653
December 18, 25, 2009


Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l& Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
S 386-438-9191


Legal

IN' THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GLENN ESTER BOSWELL
File No.: 09-171-CP
Division: PROBATE
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
GLENN ESTER BOSWELL, de-
ceased, whose date of
death was July 16, 2009, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Ave., Lake City, Flori-
da 32025. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's
estate on whom a copy.of this notice
is required to be served must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is December 18, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive: Personal Representative:
By:/s/ SANDRA H. PETERSON,
FBN: 798800
905 SW Baya Drive
Lake City, FL. 32025
Telephone: (386) 961-9928
By:/s/ LATOYA R. BOSWELL,
1447 NW Wayne Place, Apt. #105
Lake City, FL. 32055
Telephone: (386) 344-2097
04536640
December 18, 25, 2009


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 09-256-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FLORENCE C. REAGAN
a/k/a FLORENCE. ELINDA REA-
GAN
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Florence C. Reagan, a/k/a Florence
Elinda. Reagan, deceased, whose
date of death was September 5, 2009,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Columbia County, Florida, Probate
Division, the addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED..
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET. FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is December 18, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ Lindsay Carter-Tidwell
Attorney for Carolyn Ogbum
Florida Bar No. 0028866
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A.
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386)752-3213
.Fax: (,386)755-4524
Personal Representative:
Carolyn Ogbumrn
323 SE.Emerson Court
Lake City, Florida 32025
04536662
December 18, 25, 2009,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD.
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-273-CP
PROBATE DIVISION:
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF:
GILBERT MCDUFFIE,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
GILBERT MCDUFFIE, deceased,
whose date of death was November
17, 2009, is pending in the Circuit
Court for COLUMBIA County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, Case No. 09-
273-CP, the address of which is 173
NE Hernando Street, Post Office
Box 2049, Lake City, Florida 32056.
The names and addresses of the Co-
Personal Representatives' and the
Co-Personal Representatives' attor-
ney are set forth below.
All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against Decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their


Legal

claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE IF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is December 18, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ John E. Norris
Florida Bar Number 058998
Norris & Norris, P.A.
253 NW Main Blvd.
Post Office Box 2349
Lake. City, Florida 32056-2349
Telephone (386)752-7240
Personal Representative:
By:/s/ ALLESSA DUREN ALLI-
SON, f/k/a ALLEN DUREN
901 kiggins Rd.
Tallahassee, FL. 32308
04536664
December 18, 25, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 09-268-CP
PROBATE DIVISION:
IN RE: THE'ESTATE OF:
'HAROLD J. FRANKEL,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
HAROLD J. FRANKEL, deceased,
whose date of death was October 13,
2009, is pending in the Circuit Court
for COLUMBIA County, Florida,
Probate Division, Case No.' 09-268-
CP, the address of which is 173 NE
Hemando Street, Post Office Box
2049, Lake City, Florida 32056. The
names and addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal Rep-
resentatives' attomey are set forth
below.
All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against Decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
, quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE IF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having clainis' or
demands against Decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE' TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED'TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is December 18, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ John E. Norris
Florida Bar Number 058998
Norris & Norris, P.A.
253 NW Main Blvd.
Post Office Box 2349
Lake City, Florida 32056-2349
Telephone (386)752-7240
Personal Representative:
By:/s/ CYNTHIA M. FRANKEL
115 SW Bonanza Glen
Lake City, Florida. 32025
04536665
December 18, 25, 2009


NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF
ORDINANCE BY THE CITY
COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the ordinance, which title hereinafter
appears, will be considered for enact-
ment by the City Council of the City
of Lake City, Florida, at a public
hearing on January 4, 2010 at 7:00
p.m., or as soon thereafter as the
matter can be heard, in the City
Council Meeting Room, City Hall lo-
cated at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida. Copies of said
ordinance may be inspected by any
member of.the public at the Office of
the City Clerk, City Hall located at
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours. On the date, time and place
first above mentioned, all interested
persons may appear and be heard
with respect to the ordinance.
ORDINANCE NO. 2009-1197
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING THE OFFICIAL
ZONING ATLAS OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY LAND DEVELOP-
MENT REGULATIONS, AS
AMENDED; RELATING TO THE
REZONING OF LESS THAN TEN
CONTIGUOUS ACRES OF LAND,
PURSUANT TO AN APPLICA-
TION, LDR 09-7 BY THE PROP-
ERTY OWNER OF SAID ACRE-
AGE; PROVIDING FOR REZON-
ING FROM RESIDENTIAL, SIN-
GLE FAMILY-2 (RSF-2) TO RESI-
DENTIAL/OFFICE (RO) OF CER-
TAIN LANDS WITHIN THE COR-
PORATE LIMITS OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY; PROVIDING
SEVERABILITY; REPEALING
ALL ORDINANCES IN CON-
FLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall


Legal

be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
ceming the matter will be published.
All persons are advised that, if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the public hearing, they will need
a record of the proceedings and, for
such purpose, they may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made, which
record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
04536757
December 25, 2009


Legal.

04536760
December 25, 2009



020 Lost & Found

FOUND CHIHUAHUA on East
Hwy 90 Saturday 12/19.
Please call to identify
386-288-4290


060 Services


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Home Daycare: license #
CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT,. FO3CO0007 & insured, food pro-
TO THE CITY OF LAKE CITY gram 441 (High Spgs/Ellisville),
LAND DEVELOPMENT REGU Open 6:30a-7:30p 386-755-7875
LATIONS BY THE PLANNING Open 630a-30p 386-55-85
AND ZONING BOARD OF CITY .
OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, 1 1 J
SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL - Opportunities'
PLANNING AGENCY OF THE.
CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, 04536549
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,.
pursuant to Sections .163.3161
through 163.3215, Florida Statutes,VA
as amended, and the City of Lake
City Land Development Regulations,
as amended, hereinafter referred to Drivers Wanted
as the Land Development Regula-
tions, objections, recommendations Savage Services is seeking
and comments concerning the professional exp. drivers for the
amendment, as.described below, will Lake City facility.
#be heard by the Planning and Zoning Class A CDL with HAZMAT &
Board of the City of Lake City, Flor-. Tanker endorsements required.
ida, serving also as the Local Plan-
ning Agency of the City of Lake * Competitive Pay
City, Florida, at a public hearing on 0 Complete Benefit
January 5, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. or as Package including
soon thereafter as the matter can be 401K
heard, in the City Hall located at 205 * Home Everyday
North Marion Avenue, Lake City, * Paid Holidays.and
Florida. ' Vacations
LDR 08-3, an application by Chad- , Quarterly Incentive
wick Williams, as agent for HUD Bonus
Properties, LLC, to amend the Offi- B us
cial Zoning Atlas of the Land Devel- , Only serious applicants need
opment Regulations by changing the apply in person at:
zoning district from RESIDENTIAL, Florida Crown Career
SINGLE FAMILY-2 (RSF-2) to Center*
RESIDENTIAL, MULTI-FAMILY- 1389W Hw 90, Ste. 170
2 (RMF-2) on property described, as Lake CitW Floria.
follows: Lake City, Florida.
A parcel of land lying within Section Located across fom Florida
6, Township 4 South, Range 17 East, Highway Patrol Son
Columbia County, Florida, Being
more particularly described, as fol- 04536756
lows; Commence at the Northeast . NOW HIRING
comer of the Southeast 1/4 of the Cashiers & Baggers for High
Northwest 1/4 of said Section 6; Springs fruit & gift stores.
thence South 00'18'51" East, along Apply in Person at Florida
the East line of the Northwest 1/4 of Citrus Center (Chevron)
said Section 6, a distance of 135:12 18603 NW CR 236, High
feet to the North right-of-way line of Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)
Grandview Avenue, said point being __
concaved Northwesterly, having a" t
radius of 5,704.58 feet; thence along Mystery Shoppers earn up to
and around said curve and the North $100 per day. Under cover shop-
right-of-way line of said Grandview pers needed to judge retail ,&
Avenue, a chord bearing and dis- dining establishments. Experience
tance of South 85'3638" West NOTreq'd. Calll-.888-697-6576.
236.34 feet to the point of.tangency PT ScienceTeacher needed for
of said curve; thence continue, along private Christian School
the North right-of-way line of said BA required
Grandview Avenue, South 86'27'55" BA required
West 134.55 feet to the Point of Be- Fax resume to: 386-755-3609
ginning; thence South 86�27'55"
West, along the North right-of-way 1 Medical
line of said Grandview Avenue, 12. Employment
289.19 feet; thence North 00"17'37" .
West 142.09 feet; thence North 04536765
86'45'50" East 289.05 feet; thence RN NEEDED
South 00"19'10" East 140.58 feet to .. 700 a.m
the Point of Beginning. 7:00 p.m. - 7:00 a.m.
Containing 0.94 acre, more or less. The Health Center of Lake City
The public hearing may be continued has an opening for an RN with
to one or more future date. Any in- good assessment skills.
terested party shall be advised that Excellent Salary
the date, time and place of any con- EOE/ADA/
tinuation of the public hearing shall Drug Free Workplace
be announced during the public hear- Apply in person or
ing and that no further-notice con- send resume to:
cerning the matters will be publish- The Health Center
ed, unless said continuation exceeds of Lake City
six calendar weeks from the date of 560 SW McFarlane Ave.
the above referenced public hearing. Lake City, FL 32025
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear DETAL ASSISTANT needed
to be heard with respect to the DENTAL Aositio STAMon - Fri 9-5.
amendment. F ositi Mon - Fri 9-5.
A copy of the amendment is availa- - Salary based:onexperience.
ble for public inspection at'the Office Fax resume to: 386-752-3122
of Growth Management, City Hall Dietician/nutritionist needed F/T
located at 205 North MarioniAvenue, for newweight management
Lake City, Florida, during regular prograni in medical practice.
business hours. Fax resumes to 386-755-6828.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public.hear- T l o r
ing, they will need a record of the place your
proceedings, and that, for such pur- classified ad call
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is 155 5 44e
made, which record includes the tes- 5
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.



SUWANNNEE-E

HAMILTON
TECHNICAL CENTER


















HAMILTONC 9
TECHNICAL CENTER P
I i SUWAN


I


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IBUI^





FIND IIJTY
ru53jj^













2C

120 Medical
20 Employment
MADISON COUNTY Memori-
al Hospital Now Hiring:
Case Manager
Laboratory Director
Laboratory Technologists
Respiratory Therapists
RN's & LPN's
Please contact (850)253-1906


240 Schools &
2 Education
04536763
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com
Welding


Enjoy working outdoors?
Like to earn a good income? Con-
sider welding at Lake City Com-
munity College. Classes
begin January 6, 2010. Financial
aid available.. No high school
diploma required. We have day,
night and Saturday class.'
Register now through
December 16 or January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.
HVAC
Enjoy doing repairs? Like to earn a
good income and/or Start your
business? Consider
Heating/AC and Commercial Re-
frigeration at Lake City
Community College. Classes be-
gin January 6, 2010. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma required. We have day
and night classes. Register now
through December 16
or January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.
Wanted Career
Motivated Students!
If you are seeking a new career in
S- a high demand field, then get your
Degree or Certificate in Logistics
& Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available for
qualified students. Classes start
01/06/2009, call Lake City Com-
munity College, (386) 754-4492.

310 Pets & Supplies
.' Apricot TOY POODLE CKC
(w/papers), shots & health cert.,
. hold w/dep. til Christmas,
8wks.-12/18 $400. 386-719-4900.


FREE! Adorable Boxer/Am Bull-
dog mix 5 month old puppy. Neil-
teted, all shots, some supplies.
LOVES to play. 36-344-7999
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida.
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
WANTED FREE Miniature
Poodle age 8wks to' 18 months.
Will have loving home with senior
couple. 386-719-4827

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fur., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
GAS STOVE
Good working condition.
Almond color. $100 OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295
ROPER Washer (3.2 cu.) & Dryer
(6.5 cu. ft.)
Set. Good condition.
$275 OBO. 386-867-1106
UPRIGHT FREEZER.
Frost Free $165. 00
or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$135.00 or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.

405 Bicycles
Girls 16in. Bike. Orange
County Chopper Sting Ray.
Fuchsia Black. $50.
386-755-3350

408 Furniture
BLACK METAL frame futon
with cushion.
$85.00. OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.


LAKE CITY REPORTER


408 Furniture
BLUE TWEED, queen sleeper
couch w/ accent pillows. -
$100.00 Good shape.
386-755-3682.
GUN CABINET w/ glass door.
3' W x 80" H, handmade w/ unfin-
ished back. A must for gun collec-
tors. $75 OBO 386-867-1106.
a4o Lawn & Garden
Equipment
New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315
11 Machinery &
411 Tools
Delta black toolbox.
67," Lx 20" W x 14"D
$45.00
386-867-1106

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypiess. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
We Buy Junk: cars, trucks,
tractors; trailers, scrap metal,
AC's and batteries. NO MH's
Call 386-965-1423 or 365-4879

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
5-Men's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Jronman) 1-Seiko, 1-Titan,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.
Full length ladies black leather
trench coat. sz. s/m.
asking $75 OBO
386-963-1211
Full length ladies red wool single
breasted coat. sz s/m.
asking $75 OBO
386-963-1211
SMOKER/GRILL
Charcoal, Cast Iron.'
$40.00
386-755-3350

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420


The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
63 Mobile Homes
630.faor Rent
2& 3br off 252 in Suwannee
County. No pets,(horses OK)
1st month & deposit.
386-961-1482.
2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 security deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
4BR/2BA MH $600 mo.
1st, last and $400 dep. No pets.
Available on Jan. 1st.
386-288-4029
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL.
lbr in town Close to shopping
S$350. mo. No Pets!
386-397-0807 OR 386-752-2986
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL.
2BR/MH FOR SALE.
IN TOWN $500.
386-397-0807 OR 386-752-2986
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in
Branford area.,$650.mo.
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3br/2ba MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500. move in. $575. mo.
S RENTED
VERY CLEAN 2b/2ba. Covered
patio, front & back. No pets. State
Rd 100 @ Union County line.
$600 month; Call 904-966-0765.
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830
6 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
FORECLOSURE -4 Bedroom
on Half Acre. $3000 down, $500.
mo. Call Jared@ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
We will build and Beat any
MODULAR Floor Plan!
Have two with land included.
Save $$$ Thousands.
Call Jared@ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
1999 Repo. Great Shape 24X48
3br Doublewide Set-up on
your land. $21,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jmmartin23@yahoo.com


CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009


Classified Department: 755-5440


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New Home Sales

Consultant Wanted

Excellent Commission Based

Pay and Benefits

Fax Resume to 509-756-2869
or emailnih newhomeiobs@vahoo.com

IMaronda Homes
Pf j /i~el j^ S rotlor-t^^kr i ^flrrw^/'j


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25,2009


71 Unfurnished Apt. 750 Business &
0 For Rent 5 Office Rentals


640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale
SFOR SALE
2001 28X40 on I acre. $59,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm.martin23@yahoo.com

650 Mobile Home
. & Land
1800 s.f .Man. Home, 4bd/2ba,
plus retreat/office. 2 porches,
* walks, concrete foundation, appli.,
plywood w/ ceramic, floors, metal
roof, 5 acres, corer lot (treed).
Horses ok, Call Gary Hamilton
(386) 758-9824. Poss. owner
finance. $119K.
Owner Financing. Large. MH
Sw/3.32 acres. South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590,-0642 /867-1833

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES!
* NEW*


2 BEDROOMS Furnished Apts.
!!! $649 per mo. !!! ForRent
S LCr., T ou ivin Futnischd ffi-


$299 MOVES YOU IN

FREE RENT
" 200 FREE CHANNELS
* BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800


t-ounlry ulrug. ,
ciency Park Model Trailers. $500
per month all utilities provided.,
Call 386-961-8540/386-755-4945
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
24 hour office, laundry & vending
Motel 6 (386)755-4664


!!Sister Properties!! Wk 1 prs. $169., 2pp $179 + tax
!One BR $499! 730 Unfurnished
!TwoBR$525! 7 Home For Rent
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8) 3br/lba house. CHA, All appli-
ances, $750.mo. 1st, last & sec.
POOL 141 NE Montrose Ave.
386-758-8029 (386)697-8893 or (305)962-2666
(Bad Credit OK)A R IC ,, I. nm,,


$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
-2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423


2br Apt. in town.
Great location.
$500. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
2BR/1.5BA DUPLEX w/garage..
Luxury Apt. 5 min from VA
Hospital and Timco.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
* A Landlord You Can Love!
2br/1.5ba Duplex CH/A, W/D
hook up. Close to VA. $550.mo +
sec. 386-758-9351/352-208-2421
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking lis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276


in town. $850/mo.
$500. security deposit.
386-365-8721


Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
Owner Financing 3br/lba near
elementary school in LC.
Small down $575. mo.
* 386-867-1833 or 590-0642
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
740 Furnished
Homes for Rent
1600 sq. ft. 2/1 Furnished house in
.town. Near duck pond. Remodled,
beautiful hardwood/ceremic floors.
$950/month + sec. No pets.
' Includes lawn service. 961-8788.


For Rent. 24X30 storgae bldg. lo-
cated off US 90 behind "Right way
Automotive". $250. mo. has elec.
but for storage only. 386-755-2475


Office Space located at Oakhill -
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086 A E
Retail Space ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Heavy traffic area t ei for
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135 Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
77t If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
770 Condos For Rent an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must.be prepaid with.cash, check or credit card. Just
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
to tow ool, no e00. Re q'd Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf. 7 -


LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
Ig master br, very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, Iv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled , 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Studios & 1Br's from $125. week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
: All real estate advertising in this,
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant Women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This '
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-,
ble on an equal opportunity bdsis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 2000+sf on .5acre built 2007
many extras,,stonehenge S/D,
privacy fence, sprink. sale/rent/
lease. $185k. 850-380-0275
820 Farms&
8o2V Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
: 'Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties:
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

952 Vans & Sport
9 Util. Vehicles
2007 Dodge Caravan
13,200 miles.
$16,500
Call 386-965-3075


S2003 VW Jetta 2007 Toyota 1996 3500
108a345 mis AGL Tundra SR5 Chevrolet
108,345 miles, A, Double Cab, 26,000 miles, 8 4WD dually, 454 motor, AT,
Runs great. cylinder, TRD 4x4.. good mechanical condition.
$2,695 OBO $4,300 $22,000 firm $5,900 obo
call (386)365-3326 Call (386)755-4896
' 386-752-4855 (386)688-1023 (386)397-4849




*In Print Online




, 1i Low Price!
2007 Dodge
Caravan
13,200 miles p
$16,500o

(386)965-3075,

F MrD iCl,

at36-5-54


NE




3..


'ED HELP!


S.


Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

805 Lots for Sale


�.1


u Ca75-5-


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009 Classified Department: 755-5440


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THIS IS THE LARGEST END OF THE YEAR

INVENTORY SALE IN GAINESVILLE! I


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DON'T MAKE YOUR NEXT PAYMENT!
WE COULD POWER YOUR PAYMENT WITH... REERIESHMI TS



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Advertised prices are plus ta tag and $69850 dealer fee, are before any dealer talle opts and Ide all alvabe manufacture rebates & incei Veht to pr s t ed ct a cnno bine +N UR SENEC;ES . A PU SEWItL NOIMPROE
YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. LEGAL RESIDENTS OF 50 U.S. (INCL. DC.) 18 AND OLDER, Void where prohibited. S~ stakes ends 12131%9 For Offcial Rules, prize desclp al~mate methods f enbt and Sweepstaks evil misiaEdri~w i. e e at poit of entf SpQsoePri , LLC
34405W. 12 MileRd, Ste. 123, Famington Hills, MI 4331. ++EmployeesoGalinesville CtryserogeJeep,therailatest&faNilmemnbers inaiibetopaticpate No o esrch aoue ~ werieptbbde. Odddse fwiinning15 Q r b~ean, SPRe aBluScaQV �paeract s aren t
of winning 5 gold coins are 14,995:15,000. While supplies a. Winners must be 18yearsor older, hae a validd drive's tensesand socials cyesd aare w"epoaite ste atsa teo r pres ri
number exists, award will be prented on a first come f serve basis to oe winner Allpries while sppesast Dealerip and its agency not iesp flate, nest or ms mail typ ph rmeor eproductioneasee r f c d er expires at l id abnr a day iesln
Offers cannot be combined with any otheroffers. Photos are for ilusrationpurposes only,


BAD CREDIT NO CREDIT - 24 HOUR APPROVALHOTLINE
1-877-4 LOANSNOW (456-2676)


LOOK FSE
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CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2009


Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER


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