Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text










75 years
Florida State Parks
prepare for anniversary
celebr "000021 1201D10
Local, LI IF FLORIDA
O BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OP
GAINESVILLE FL




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HISTORY
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City


The next level
A look at Columbia
County athletes playing
at the next level
Sports, IB


Reporter
A .r


Thursday, December 24, 2009 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 135, No. 292 0 75 cents




Santa comes tonight


JASON MATTHEW WALKERJL~ F'.i Pq.p:t'i
Alexander Davis, 5, thinks about what he wants for Christmas while taking photos with Santa Claus in the Lake.City Mall
Tuesday afternoon. Santa'will make his annual visit to Lake City tonight, so local boys and girls better spend today being nice,
not naughty. Do you believe in Santa? Read our opinion on Page 4A.


Preparingfo a Christmas meal

Soup kitchen
open five straight
Christmas days.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityrepohter.com
F or many people
it's hard to
find a meal on n
Christmas Day
because people want to
spend time with their
families.
However Lad's Soup
Kitchen, a service of the
Suwannee Valley Rescue
Mission, will have a
special meal available at
11 a.m. Friday. The ' Aij


kitchen is located at 129 E.
Escambia St.
Breakfast and lunch are
already served twice a day
at the soup kitchen for
those in need.
"Our door is open," said
the Rev. Cleopatra Steele,
director of the rescue mis-
sion. 'We're always there
to help."
This is the fifth year


ANTONIA ROBINSONI L ,l,- : , I..-A) ',-
Timothy Denson, cook for Lad's Soup Kitchen, prepares food for the fifth annual Christmas
dinner.


Lad's has hosted the if they prepared the food,
Christmas meal. Steele said.
Several years ago, "I said, 'Sure,'" she said.
an organization from "We served 145 that first
Gainesville asked if the year."
soup kitchen would feed . The story of one woman
those in need on Christmas touched Steele to keep the


meal an annual traditi
she said. The woman
her teenager son, fror
Lulu, had no food in t
home and were direct
MEAL continued


Locals concerned about health care pass


Final Senate vote
scheduled to take
place today.
From staff and wire reports
Senate Democratspushed
President Barack Obama's
landmark health care over-
haul past a final procedural
hurdle Wednesday, setting
up a vote today to pass the
legislation extending cover-
age to 30 million Americans.
However, many Americans
are still not convinced the
bill is the answer to health
care problems.
Democrats voted 60-39
to end a GOP filibuster
and move to a final vote


1 l . 26400I


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


"They would be taking away our
God-given right and violating our
constitutional rights to health care
and quality of care."

- Dustin Daniels,.
Lake City resident, in response to the proposed health
care bill


Thursday. All 58 Democrats
and two independents hung
together against unanimous
Republican opposition.
It was the 24th day of
debate on the 10-year, near-
ly $1 trillion bill.
"It is now only hours until
this Senate will pass mean-
ingful health care reform,"
said Finance Committee


72 57
Isolated Showers
WEATHER, 2A


Chairman Max Baucus,
D-Mont
"It has been a long time
coming," Baucus said. "I
thank God that I have lived
to see this day."
It was the third time
Democrats have put up
60 votes on procedural mea-
sures since Monday. Final
passage requires just a sim-


pie majority so Dem.
should triumph eas
will be a big victor
Obama and the Demo
although the Senate b
still have to be reco.
with a House-passec
sion before Obama
sign a final package.
The sweeping le
tion, crafted over m
of laborious negotia
would dramatically re
the country's health
system with new re
ments for nearly eve
to purchase insurance
government would pi
subsidies to help 1
HEALTH continued


Opinion ................
Business ................
Health ... ...
Advice & Comics ....
Puzzles ........


on,
and
m
heir
:ed to


JASON MATTHEW WALKERIL.i .Il F ep.l, '
Christian Service Center director Shirley McManus prays with
Dwayne Cray after supplying baskets for Christmas dinner.'
The Christian Service Center gave away food for 300 families'
Tuesday afternoon, and another 100 on Wednesday..


CSC provides

for more than

400 families


Center has been
helping for more
than 27 years.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Christian Service Center
helped brighten the holi-
days for more than 400
Columbia County families
in need through its holi-
day food basket giveaway,
which took place Tuesday
and Wednesday.
,"The baskets we give out
we hope bless all the fami-
lies," said Shirley McManus
CSC director.
Since the center opened
in 1982, it has been giving
out annual Christmas bas-
kets, McManus said. '
"It's a beautiful Christmas
dinner people may not have
had otherwise," McManus.
Families signed up in
advance to receive the bas-


kets, McManus said, and
each family received a ticket
to come collect the baskets
at the center.
Volunteers then prayed
with the families during
pickups.
'That's the important
part we do," she said.
The baskets included
everything needed for a full
Christmas dinner - turkey,
eggs, canned goods, bread,
dessert and sodas.
"It's everything that goes
with a Christmas dinner,"
McManus said.
More than 20 volunteers
assisted with the giveaway.
"Our volunteers work
real hard at this," she said.
'This is a big undertaking."
On Sunday, 174 children
representing the families
signed up for the baskets
were able to select gifts for
their parents, that also were
CENTER continued on 3A


HOLIDAY TRAVEL

Officials expect rise

in Christmas traffic


FHP to have
increased presence
on roadways.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com


In 2008, 1,169 people died
on 3A in alcohol-related motor
vehicle crashes in Florida.
To keep those num-
e e bers from increasing, Gov.
5 Charlie Crist has proclaimed
December as Drunk and
ocrats DruggedPreventionMonth.
ily. It As part of the state's focus
:y for on safe highway travel dur-
)crats, ing the holiday season, the
ill will FHP will join thousands of
nciled law enforcement agencies
d ver- across the nation in the
could "Drunk Driving. Over the
limit. Under Arrest" cam-
'gisla- paign. The nationwide cam-
lonths paign started Dec. 15 and
itions, ends Jan. 3.
'make Florida' Highway Patrol
care troopers will have an
quire- increased visibility on the
ryone state's roadways during the
e" The holiday period.
provide Florida Highway Patrol
lower- Troop B public information
officer Lt. Patrick Riordan
on 3A said the FHP will have addi-
-. t -* -. ",' ...*-;: - .. -. r' ~ s..SES .EB~lS<'Sar-
, TODAY II
S-- - HEALTH


He rt ieh,:ib
,,,,' ' -u r I . I -l


tional troopers on the road-
way for the holiday period.
"We try to have people
that normally are assigned
to administrative duties to
hit the road," he said. "We
suspend all office duties
and hit the roads."
Every sworn member of
the FHP will work a shift
this month to target people
driving under the influence
of drugs or alcohol. In addi-
tion, FHP auxiliary and
reserve troopers will aug-
ment the patrol effort dur-
ing the heightened period.
Riordan said DUI viola-
tions are one of the princi-
ple offenses authorities will
be focusing on.
"We're definitely focus-
ing on driving under the
influence," he said. "We're
going to enforce a lot of
what we enforce day in and
day out - aggressive driv-
ing, speed, following too
closely and improper lane
changes. In addition dur-
ing the holiday period we're
also going to focus on the
DUIs."
Riordan said people can
TRAFFIC continued on 3A
;r�Jwru 4 a uuBZ�


COMING
FRIDAY
I'lerr ,
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009


Thursday:
Afternoon: 8-4-1
Evening: 5-1-4


l -y4 Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-9-1-5
Evening: 4-5-1-8


eznatch.
Wednesday:
1-2-5-8-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Cameron: China should allow more movies in


BEIJING
ollywood director
James Cameron urged
China to open its doors
to more foreign films,
arguing it would boost
the local cinema industry after the
WTO ruled Beijing was illegally
restricting movie and other media
imports;
SIn Beijing to promote his latest sci-
fi extravaganza, "Avatar," Cameron
;said Wednesday that China's break-
nieck economic growth meant it no
:longer needed measures to protect
:its film industry. .
. "China's economy is expanding
, ery, very'rapidly. And I think the
-~eeling right now is that perhaps it
doesn'tt need to be protecting itself .y',
.quite as much," Cameron, the' direc-
:-tbr of blockbusters that include
'%Terminator 2: Judgment Day" and
'Titanic," told reporters. "Chinese
filmmakersare very strong ... they're
highly respected."
The Chinese government protects
local films by limiting the number of
film imports on a revenue-sharing
basis to 20 a year, a quota that effec-
tively limits Hollywood blockbusters
to 20 slots annually.
These and other restrictions have
been a key complaint by Western
'countries, who say that China's rapid
rise as a trade power has been in
part aided by unfair policies that
boost sales of Chinese goods abroad
while limiting imports into its mar-
ket.
"I think that by opening the doors
in China to other filmmakers, it
will raise the entire film industry in
. China," Cameron said. "It will get
people more excited, there will be
more seats, more cinemas, more
excitement about the cinema-going
experience, which will also raise the
- 'Chinese filmmakers' ability to play
' their films."
SOn Monday, a World Trade
Organization panel upheld a ruling


Film Director James Cameron speaks during a press conference of their new 3D
movie 'Avatar' in Beijing, Wednesday. James Cameron says China's film industry
stands to gain a lot if the country opened its doors to foreign films, after the World
Trade Organization upheld a ruling:this week that China was illegally, restricting
imports of movies and other medi.


in a case brought by the U.S. gov-
ernment that China was obstructing
trade by forcing foreign suppliers to
distribute movies, music and books
through state-owned companies.
China expressed disappointment
at the decision but gave no immedi-
ate sign'whether it could keep trying
to defend the controls. -

Murphy had several
movies in the works
LOS ANGELES - Brittany
Murphy was a hardworking actress
who was juggling multiple movie
projects in the. months leading up to
her unexpected death.
SWhile none of the films boasted
the big budgets of Murphy's "8 Mile"
or "Sin City," directors who recently
worked with the 32-year-old actress
say she was dedicated, insightful
and happy as she wrapped two indie


thrillers and prepared to start shoot-
ing a romantic comedy next month.
" " Murphy was pro- \
nounced dead at
,Cedars-Sinai Medical
Center after collaps-
ing at her Hollywood
Hills home Sunday
morning. The county
coroner's office is
Murphy awaiting theresults
of toxicology and tis-
sue tests before releasing an official
cause of death.
Murphy- spent the 'month of June
shooting "'Abandoned," a thriller in
which she stars as a woman who
embarks on a frantic search for
her boyfriend when he disappears
from a hospital after a routine
treatment.
Director Michael Feifer said the
actress was delightful to work with,
and dedicated to the project.
N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Author Mary Higgins
Clark is 82.
* Rock singer-musician
Lemmy (Motorhead) is 64.
.A Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-
Ala., is 63.
* Actor Grand L. Bush
-is 54.
* Actor Clarence


Gilyard is 54.
* Actor Diedrich Bader
is 43.
* Singer Ricky Martin
is 38.
* Author Stephenie
Meyer ('Twilight") is 36.
* "American Idol" host
Ryan Seacrest is 35.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US'
Main number ........ (386) 75~-1293
'Fax number ...............752-9400
Circulation..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press..
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in. whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher: U.S. Pdstal Service
No. 310-880. ., '
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box, 1709,-
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson! . .�.754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING ,
Director Lynda Strjckland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter ,
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30.a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday. -
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems withyour delivery service.
In Columbia 'Cunty, customers should
call before 10:30 a.Tm: to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all othercounties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters..754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks, .,. ............. $26.32
24 Weeks ...... ......... ...$48.79
52 Weeks..'. ........ ...... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax, .
Mail rates -
12 Weeks............. ....$41.40
24 Weeks............... . $82.80
52 Weeks...............:.. $179.40


CORRECTION .

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Mother: Burned
son in 'high spirits'
MIAMI-ASouth
Florida teen who was
doused with rubbing alco-
hol and set on fire suffers
from night terrors and won't
be returning to live in his
family's old neighborhood,
his mother said Wednesday.
Valerie Brewer, whose
son Michael was dis-
charged from Jackson
Memorial Hospital's burn
center Tuesday, praised
the teen's determination
and spirit at a press confer-
ence. Brewer's son was
the target of a gruesome
attack on Oct. 12 that left
him with burns on about
65 percent of his body.
"I'm just ecstatic," she'
told reporters. "He's just
so incredible. His strength,
his determination, his will
to survive. ... He's just
incredible."
On his first night out the
hospital, Brewer lounged
around on the couch and
watched a movie on televi-
sion with his family, his
mother said. He enjoyed
the night air and requested
a pizza for dinner.
"He had a very relax-
ing night," Valerie Brewer
said. "He's in very high
spirits today. Being out of
the hospital and being in
a homey environment is
incredibly uplifting, and
he's really looking forward
to spending Christmas
with his family."
Police say that Michael
Brewer, 15, was attacked
by other teens at a South
Florida apartment com-
plex. The incident hap-
pened a day after Michael
. called police when some
Sof the other boys tried
'to steal his father's bike.
SMichael might also have
owed one of the boys
.money for a video game.
Prosecutors have
charged Denver Colorado
:Jarvis, Jesus Mendez
-and Matthew Bent as
-.adults with second-degree


ISOLATED
SHOWERS


HI 72 LO 57


M/OQiUJIMI rnloo
In this photo provided by Jackson Memorial Hospital, Michael
Brewer, 15, of Deerfield Beach, does physical therapy in the
burn unit at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami on Tuesday.
Brewer'was burned in October by five classmates who.
attacked him after a dispute.


attempted murder in con-
nection to the attack.

Officer charged
with battery
ORIANDO -A central
Florida corrections officer
has been chargedwith bat-
tery after two female inmates
told.investigators he inappro-
priately touched them.
Michael Combs was
arrested at his home in
Lake County on Monday
and later released on bond.
The Orange County
Sheriff's Office says the
inmates claim Combs inap-
propriately touched them
while awaiting trial in hold-
ing cells. When contacted
by detectives, Combs
allegedly admitted to pat-
ting two of the women on
the buttocks, but said his
actions weren't sexually
motivated.
Combs has been placed
on paid administrative leave
and could not be reached
for comment. Jail records
did not indicate if he has
obtained an attorney.

Police: Suspect
was ready to flee
WEST PALM BEACH
- The South Florida


man accused of fatally
shooting four relatives on
Thanksgiving night with-
drew more than $12,000
from an account days
before the attack.
Investigators are wor-
ried 35-year-old Paul
Merhige had the where-
withal to flee the country
or hide away awhile. The
reward for information
leading to his capture has
been hiked to $100,000.
Billboards bearing his
image have been erected
in South Florida, and
the case will be featured
Saturday on "America's
Most Wanted."

Man sentenced
for mall shooting
WEST PALM BEACH
- A South Florida
man convicted of a fatal
Christmas Eve shooting
inside the Boynton Beach
mall has been sentenced to
40 years in prison.
Wilson Pierre Jr. was
sentenced Wednesday in
the 2006 slaying of 24-year-
old Berno Charlemond.
The Lantana man faced a
minimum sentence of 25
years and a maximum of
life in prison.

* Associated Press


Pensacola
'68/45


Tallahassee *
69/59 .-
".Panama City
68/54 :


SValdosta
68/58 * Jacksonville
Lake City, " ',71/63
72/57-
\, Gainesville * Daytona Beach
.774/62 '"771,65
. - Ocala . .
S 75/60,
Orlando CapeCanaveral
77/63 76/68


Tampa ,


77/


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
SMonth total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


66.
36
67
43
83 in 1931
22 in 1989


0.00"
2.46"
46.64"
1.81"
47.61"


-STORMS


PARTLY I. SUNNY
I CLOUDY


HI 60 LO34 HI 57 LO 31


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Nanles


--I- "c
'/ West Palm Beach Ocala
79/71 * Orlando
,* ' FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers, 79/73 * Pensacola
80/66 *Naples 1 Tallahassee
81/66 Miami Tampa
e 80/71 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
79/67


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:24 a.m.
5:36 p.m.
7:25 a.m..
5:37 p.m.


12:07 p.m.
12:06 a.m.
12:37 p.m.
1:01 a.m.


Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan.
24 31 7 15"
First Full Last New


7n, 1. l. [On this date in


1872, extreme
cold gripped the
Upper Midwest on
Christmas Eve.
Downtown Chicago
reported an all-time
record low of 23
degrees below zero,
which stood until
January 1982.


4

45miutestobm
Today's
ultra-viole?
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
o/


'* f *.' Forecasts, data and graph-
- Ics � 2009 Weather Central
y LLC, Madison, Wis.
9tr www.weatherpublisher.com


Get CoRnnected



^lii*er1 I


Thought for Today


"Today in the town of David a Savior
has been born to you; he is Christ the
Lord.This will be a sign to you:You will
find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying
in a manger." Suddenly a great com-
pany of the heavenly host appeared
with the angel, praising God and saying,
"Glory to God in the highest, and on
earth peace to men on whom his favor
rests."
- Luke 2:11-14
' . - . , . ft. , '


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


I . l* '' I II I:
-I.


Friday
77/60/sh
79/56/t
82/68/t
81/61/t
73/44/sh
74/44/t
78/68/sh
71/42/$h
83/68/t
80/64/t
75/47/sh
79/57/t
64/43/pc
55/37/s
67/38/c
76/56/t
69/39/t
83/64/t


Saturday
69/52/pc
67/47/pc
78/60/pc
71/51/pc
63/36/pc
62/37/pc
75/66/sh
62/35/pc
79/62/t
74/56/pc
64/39/pc
68/45/pc
57/43/pc
58/37/pc
61/32/pc
66/48/pc
60/32/pc
76/57/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


-I r~i~ I--~-~rrrr~


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


r2 ATURDIAMY


SUNDAY


~IE~ZP


1I1~T~i


r p Or7ay
brursday Pfda


,I H

















Jobs summit focuses on remedies


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE - A pair
of future Republican legisla-
tive leaders announced plans
Tuesday for a jobs summit
next month that will focus on
two conservative policy solu-


tions - cutting government
regulation and offering tax
incentives to businesses.
Senate President-desig-
nate Mike Haridopolos and
House Speaker-designate
Dean Cannon said they'll
be seeking ideas from all
sectors - left and right,


business and labor - as
.long as they fall mainly into
those two categories.
"I don't think it's any
secret that Sen. Haridopolos
and I believe that conserva-
tive economic theory is a
smart theory," said Cannon
of Winter Park.


MEAL: To be provided on Christmas


Continued From Page 1A
the kitchen.
"I said from that day
we would never close on
Christmas," Steele said.
"We would feed people just
like on a regular day."
The economy is espe-
cially rough right now and
people don't have anywhere
to stay, much less food for
Christmas, Steele said.


"People don't have right
now," she said. "I see it
everyday."
More than 560 people
are expected to be served
from the meal. About 250
meals will be delivered to
those without transporta-
tion.
The holiday menu will
include turkey, ham, candy


yams, pies, cakes and
more.
The soup kitchen pre-
viously served a special
meal on Thanksgiving Day.
Many volunteers from
Thanksgiving will return to
serve.
"The volunteers already
told me, "We'll see you on
Christmas," she said.


HEALTH: Care bill could be passed


Continued From Page 1A
income people pay for cov-
erage. Unpopular insurance
company practices such as
denying coverage to people
with pre-existing conditions
would be banned.
However, the proposed
bill has not been with-
out its critics. Residents
in Columbia County and
across the nation have spo-
ken up against the passage
of the bill, urging govern-
ment officials to find anoth-
er way to retool the health
care industry.
"From what I've seen
in the bills, I don't think
either of them have begun
to address the issues that
need to be addressed for
true health care reform,"
said Tyson Johnson of the
Parks Johnson Agency.
"They've only addressed
insurance issues, and insur-
ance is only an intermedi-
ary between patients and
providers. The real cost
is being borne at the pro-
vider level, and patients
have to be; better consum-
ers and doctors have to do
things.more efficiently, and
through that, insurance


rates will be kept in check.
Neither bill has addressed
any of that."
Johnson equated provid-
ing insurance to someone
with a. pre-existing condi-
tion is "akin to saying to a
home.insurer that you have
to insure anyone who walks
in the door, even if their
house is on fire."
"I just think it's not a
very well thought-out bill
because the issues aren't
addressed that are contrib-
uting to the problem," he
said. "My fear is that this is
a massive overhaul that rep-
resents one-sixth of the U.S.
economy. It's a hail mary,
and whatever happens, we
have to deal with it"
Some local residents
agreed with Johnson's side
of the argument, and Dustin
Daniels of Lake City said
the health care reform is a
violation of rights. -
'They would be taking
away our God-given right
and violating our constitu-
tional rights to health care
and quality of care," she
said.7'It's just another step-
ping stone for them to gain


control over the general
population."
Others disagreed.
"As much as I've seen
and heard about it," said
Bill Byrd of Lake City, "I
think it's wonderful. I think
it's good especially for old
people that need help. Old
people need the new health
care bill."
Some citizens felt the
government has. not pro-
vided enough information
about the new bill.
"Because we don't know
what's in it, it's frightening,"
said Deborah Freeman
of Lake City. "It appears
there will be major cuts in
Medicare, and that will not
be a good thing."
"I can't say for 100 per-
cent certainty whether I'm
for or against the health bill
because I don't know what's
in it," said Gary Laxton
of Lake City, "but I think
Congress should give the
American people the oppor-
tunity to know and under-
stand what we're fixing to
be saddled with."
SThe Associated Press con-
tributed to this article.


Randy Cox (right), a Christian Service Center volunteer, hands Roger Crawford and his son;
Lucas a basket of food.

CENTER: Passes out 400 baskets


Continued From Page 1A
wrapped by volunteers,
McManus said. Each child
received two new toys dur-
ing the event, which includ-
ed free food and other activ-
ities.


"I'm glad we can bless
families," she said.
This year the center has
seen an increase in fami-
lies needing assistance, but
the community has also


responded by providing
donations.
'The more (God) blesses
us, the more we can give
back to the folks in need,"
McManus said.


TRAFFIC: Will increase this week


Continued From Page 1A
do their part by staying
home and offering guests
something other than an
alcoholic beverage, and if
they are going to be serv-
ing alcohol, monitor the
guests before they leave.
He suggested taking their


keys and calling a taxi if
needed by the guests.
AAA .is projecting 87.7
million Americans will be
traveling' 50 miles or more
away from home during
the year-end holidays, a 3.8
percent increase from the


84.5 million who traveled
last year during the same
holiday period.
FHP troopers are sched-
uled to conduct sobriety
checkpoints and have satura-
tion patrols to remove drunk
drivers from the roads.


,- "'l " . t Connected
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3A


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009


















OPINION


Thursday, December


24,2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


0
OP


THEIR
INION


Yes Virginia,

there is a

Santa Claus

Reprinted from the Sept. 21,
1897 edition of the New York
Sun.

*'Dear Editor. I am 8 years old.
Some of my little friends say
there is no Santa Claus.
Papa says, 'If you see it in
The Sun it's so.'
.Please tell me the truth; is
there a Santa Claus?
Virginia O'Hanlon."

Virginia, your little
friends are.wrong.
They have been
affected by the
skepticism of a
skeptical age. They do not
believe except [what] they see.
They think that nothing can be
which is not comprehensible
by their little minds. All minds,
Virginia, whether they be
men's or children's, are little. In
this great universe of ours man
is a mere insect, an ant, in his
intellect, as compared with the
boundless world about him, as
measured by the intelligence
capable of grasping the whole
of truth and knowledge.
Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa.
Claus. He exists as certainly as
love and generosity and devo-
tion exist, and you know that
they abound and give to your life
its highest beauty and joy. Alas!
how dreary would be the world
if there were no Santa Claus. It
would be as dreary as if there
were no Virginias. There would
be no childlike faith then, no poet-
ry, no romance to make tolerable
this existence. We should have
no enjoyment, except in sense
and sight. The eternal light'with'".
which childhood fills the world
would be extinguished.
Not believe in Santa Claus!
You might as well not believe
in fairies! You might get your
papa to hire men to watch in
all the chimneys on Christmas
Eve to catch Santa Claus, but
even if they did not see Santa
Claus coming down, what would.
that prove? Nobody sees Santa
Claus, but that is no sign that
there is no Santa Claus. The
most real things in theworld are
those that neither children nor
men can see. Did you ever see
fairies dancing on the lawn? Of
course not, but that's no proof
that they are not there. Nobody
can conceive or imagine all the
wonders there are unseen and,
dnseeable in the world.
�: You may tear apart the baby's
little and see what makes the
noise inside, but there is a veil
covering the unseen world which
riot the strongest man, nor even
the united strength of all the
strongest men that ever lived,
could tear apart Only faith, fancy,
poetry, love, romance, can push
aside that curtain and view and
picture the supernal beauty and
glory beyond. Is it all real? Ah,
Virginia, in all this world there is
nothing else real and abiding.
' :No Santa Claus! Thank God! he
lives, and he lives forever. A thou-
ariid years from now, Virginia,
nay, ten times ten thousand years
make glad the heart of childhood.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
: The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
'Columbia and surrounding counties by
.Community Newspapers Inc.
* We believe strong newspapers build
.strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
*publish distinguished and profitable
.community-oriented newspapers.
: This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals.
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller


SDink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


A 2010 prediction for Iran


are prone to par-
take in New Year's
predictions. It is a
pursuit often done
lightheartedly. But every so
often facts align themselves
in ways that require genuine
assessment
And a willingness to make.a
prediction that may be so bold
that it cannot later be hemmed
or hawed or rationalized away. ,
That gives a pundit an advan-
tage over those other folks who
prognosticate for a living at the
CIA. They have so much intel-
ligence at their fingertips and
under their fedoras that they
are Very good at prophecies of
geopolitical nuance - but not
at sensing truly seismographic
regime changes that may be
at hand. Especially changes in
dictatorial regimes that seem
too powerful to be undone by
unarmed forces.
In past eras, I was fortunate
to be unencumbered by vast
intelligence resources - which
may be why I was able to pre-
dict two climactic changes that
surprised those far more skilled
at the intelligence game:
(1) In the last days of 1988,
as a panelist on CNN's year end
show, I evoked much chortling
from some colleagues when I
declared: "The Berlin Wall will
come down in 1989. Write it
down. It'll happen." (It did.)
(2) In a December, 1990
column, I predicted this for
1991: "The Fall of One Nobel
Laureate: Mikhail Gorbachev,
no longer able to keep together
his economically crumbling
and nationalistically clamoring
union, will resign. A KGB/.
military hard-liner will rule....
Moscow's new, repressive com-
munist regime will collapse in
just a few months. The Soviet
Union will break into a confed-


''




Martin Schram
mortin.schrom@gmoil.com I
eration of nation-states, sharing
a military but little else. The
world will worry about who con-
trols the nuclear weapons." (He
did. It did. We did.)
I will not bore you by citing
other predictions made over the
years that remain as yet uncon-
firmed. But I wanted to remind
frantic CIA Googlers of those
two credentials in order to focus
attention on what is happening
in Iran.
On Monday, a funeral
procession in Qum for
Grand Ayatollah Hossein Ali
Montazeri, an outspoken critic
of the iron-fisted Islamic regime,
was transformed into a massive
antigovernment rally. The New
York Times reported that tens
of thousands of his supporters
denounced President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad and the Islamic
rulers who pull his strings.
"Our shame, our shame, our-
idiot leader!" they chanted. And
"Dictator, this is your last mes-
sage: The people of Iran are
rising!"
Iran has a large, educated
middle class that has a broad
cultural affinity with the West.
Iran's defiance of Uiited
Nations nuclear inspectors is
leading to new sanctions for a
nation already reeling from eco-
nomic woes.
Ahmadinejad remains in
power only because Supreme
Leader Ayatollah Ai Khamenei
swept aside evidence of
widespread voting fraud in


June. After thousands defied
Khamenei's ban on protests,
leading to mass arrests, I wrote:
"The absolute moral authority
of Iran's supreme leader has
unraveled with the swiftness
and absolute irreversibility of
a turban caught in a ceiling fan
....Iran will never again be the
same." This week's defiant pro-
tests proved that.
But perhaps most important
was a little-noticed Obama
administration crackdown this
month: The Justice Department,
pursuing its crackdown on
Europe's most famous banks for
secret ties with Iran, won a half-
billion dollar settlement from
Credit Siisse Group which used
code words and other means to
hide transactions with Iran that
violated U.S. sanctions. Other
European institutions are being
investigated.
That crackdown will likely
cause big problems for Iran's
financial and business elite,
which will cascade down upon
the middle class like new fuel
tossed on old flames of disgust
with the ruling regime. Iran's
Supreme Leader rules not by
faith but by fear - and fists.
It is only a matter of time
before there will be a new
Iran, governed (but not ruled)
by leaders who may be secular
or Islamic, but will be genu-
inely democratic and eager
to pursue'a pro-West path to
prosperity.
America's job is to convince
the new Iran that the fastest
track to prosperity can be pow-
ered by a world of economic
partnerships - but never by a
nuclear bomb.


* Martin Schram writes
political analysis for Scripps
Howard News Service.


t was perhaps inevitable
that after two weeks of
heated deliberations the
U.N. conference on cli-
mate change would pro-
duce at the 11th hour a terse,
three-page document of good
intentions.
The major polluting nations,
and that includes the U.S.,
pledged to reduce their green-
house gas emissions but no
binding, enforceable targets and
timeframes were set. This was
far short of a binding 50 percent
reduction in emissions by 2050
that global warming activists
had demanded.
The polluting nations will vol-
untarily report and consult on
their emissions levels, but there
is no mandatory monitoring by
outside agencies, a key sticking
point for the Chinese.


The richer nations pledged
$10 billion a year over three
years to help poorer nations
cope with climate change. The
richer nations set a "goal" of
raising $100 billion a year by
2020, but nowhere was it speci-
fied where that money was com-
ing from.
As a practical matter, the
way the conference was set up
almost guaranteed that the final
product would be a terse, low-
est common denominator. Too
many nations - 193 - had a
say and insisted on saying it. It
was only when the U.S. got the
major players in emissions -
China, India, Brazil and South
Africa - in a room together for
31 hours that they reached even
token agreements.
It's probably easier said than
done but the'participants ought


to be restricted to the major
emitters of greenhouse gases
and those nations'that can be
empirically shown to suffer
adverse consequences from it.
Certainly the representative
from the low-lying Pacific island
nation of Tuvalu added a human
element to a rise in sea levels.
And even though China is the
globe's biggest polluter and big-
gest obstacle to an agreement,
the European nations seem to
think the U.S. should go first
with the steepest and most
economically damaging cuts in
emissions.
Absent changes in the format,
the outlook for the next climate
change conference in Mexico
City next December is much
the same as this one.

N Scripps Howard News Service


A look


back at


2009

t the end of a year,
before launching
into the next, I like
to look back at
where I've been.
There was a time when I
could do that from memory.
I don't recall when that time
was. It helps to keep a cal-
endar, or in my case, a list of
columns.
January - I began 2009 with
a mistake. In my first column of
the year, I described repapering
a bathroom and accidentally
pulling down all the plaster.
After hearing from a reader,
I wrote the following correc-
tion: "I've just been informed
of an error in my column.
Apparently I do not know a
'joist' from a 'stud.' According
to my informant, a 'joist' is a
horizontal structure in a floor
or ceiling; a vertical structure
' in a wall is called a 'stud.'
Thus, the sentence reading
'As I stood there staring at the
naked joists ...' could rightly
be corrected to 'As I stood
there staring at the naked
studs ...' However, to avoid
further confusion, I think it
best to say, 'As I stood there
staring at the gaping hole in
the wall.' I apologize for the
error."
February - For my birthday,
I told you that you didn't need
to send me a card ... unless you
really wanted to. (Thanks to all
those of you who really wanted
to, and most especially to those,
of you who sent cakes.)
March - I described doing
a "zip line," swinging through
the tops of redwood trees with
friends I had known for years;
what I didn't know was that one
of those friends - Sally, who
lead the way on the zip line, as
she did in most things - would
be gone by the end of the year.
April - A reader in Indiana
sent me a "player shawl" that
she said she knitted just for me.
(Linda, if you're reading this,
it's still keeping me warm.)
May - I spoke at the library
in Fort Smith, Ark., while hold-
ing 10-month-old Heidi Mae
West. (Heidi Mae, if you're
reading this, I'll count on your
help once again when I come
back to Fort Smith next May.)
June - Two fuzzy quail
chicks ran into my house and
I spent hours trying to get
them back to their mama. I
like to think they're those big
fat birds I see every day at the
feeder.
July - I bragged at length
about beating my stepsons ...
at cards. They keep whining
about a rematch. Fat chance.
August - I mourned the loss
of my childhood friend, Jane.
September - In Salado,
Texas, I met a whole lot of
lovely people and had more
fun than you would ever imag-
ine possible in a flood.
October - I asked you what
I should wear to a Halloween
party and, boy, did you tell me.
Thanks for all your sugges-
tions, and especially for all the
nifty costumes you sent. (For
those of you who've asked,
.I drew musical notes on a
bed sheet and went as "sheet
music.")
November - I was struck
by the death of my friend Sally.
December - 1 wrote about
the once-in-a-lifetime experience
of shopping with my daughter
for her wedding gown.
* Sharon Randall can be
contacted at PO. Box 777394,
Henderson NV 89077, or at
www.sharonrandall, corn.


4A


OTHER OPINION

Climate change: 3 pages of good intentions


~ilisi~ilabi-~c~














LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009,


Florida State Parks celebrate 75 years


From staff reports

TALLAHASSEE -
Governor Charlie Crist
and the Florida Cabinet
today signed a resolution,
sponsored by Agriculture
Commissioner Charles
Bronson, recognizing 2010
as the Year of Florida State
Parks in celebration of its
75th Anniversary. Created
in 1935 by the Florida
Legislature, Florida State
Parks has grown from eight
to 160 parks over the last 75
years, and are overseen by
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's
(DEP) Florida Park
Service.
"Florida State Parks not
only preserve our state's
beautiful natural environ-
ment, but also contribute
billions of dollars to state
and local economies, and
promote tourism to our
great state," said Governor
Charlie Crist "During the
last fiscal year, Florida State
Parks had an economic
impact of nearly $1 billion
and served more than 21.4
million visitors, illustrating
the importance of these nat-
ural treasures to Florida's
residents, visitors and wild-
life, as well as the beaches,
waterways and forests that
Florida State Parks protect"
"By acquiring and pre-
serving portions of Florida's
natural lands over the last 75
years, Florida State Parks
have added an invaluable
element of beauty to our
state and an abundance of
recreational opportunities
that those of us who enjoy
the outdoors can appreci-
ate," added Commissioner
Bronson.
Today, the Florida Park


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILa;e C yr Rep, R-r
A Confederate soldier prays over a fallen- comrade during the Battle of Olustee in 2009.
Florida State Parks will celebrate 75 years of operation in 2010.


Service manages more than
700,000 acres of Florida's
natural environment, includ-
ing 100 miles of beaches,
eight National Historic'
Landmarks and 39 sites
on the National Register of
HistoricPlaces. FloridaState
Parks has been recognized
by the National Recreation.
and Park Association as the
nation's first and only two-
time Gold Medal winner
for the nation's best park
service.
"Florida's state parks are
valuable gems that preserve
Florida's past while allowing
guests to experience ...the
Real FloridaSM," said DEP
'Secretary Michael W. Sole.
"We' are extremely proud
of this significant milestone
and encourage Floridians
and visitors alike to join us
in celebrating 75 years of
recreation and preservation
throughout 2010."


In 2010, Florida State
Parks will host special
activities and interpretive
events from coast to coast
to commemorate the 75th
Anniversary, including 25
signature events which'
highlight individual parks'
histories, as well as the his-
tory of the state park sys-
tem as a whole.
Dollar for dollar, state
parks provide a value that
is hard to beat, with 40 free
parks, and most day use
entrance, fees ranging from
just $2.00 to $8.00. Florida's
160 state parks offer white
sandy beaches, vast open
prairies, steep ravines, lush
semi-tropical forests, cul-
tural sites and crystal clear
lakes, rivers and springs.
State parks also offer count-
less locations to learn about
Florida's cultural history and
serve as outdoor classrooms
for students of all ages.


"We are excited to cel-
ebrate this important mile-
stone and to be part of.pre-
serving Florida's natural
and cultural resources," said
DEP's Florida Park Service
Director Mike Bullock.
'The staff and volunteers,
who last year contributed
more than 1.2 million hours
of service to state parks,
are a vital component in the
commitment to preserving
...the Real Florida."
' Affordable, family-friend-
ly activities, such as swim-
ming, hiking, bicycling,
paddling, diving, fishing,
camping, horseback rid-.
ing, birding, photography,
events and ranger-led tours
are just a few ways to enjoy
Florida's natural resources.
More than 3,400 campsites,
260 cabins and 14,000 park
programs are available for
people of all ages, state-
wide, 365 days a year.


Spending increases, but not on new homes


By ALAN ZIBEL
and MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Business Writers

WASHINGTON -
Americans are starting to
spend a bit more money,
but not enough to power a
strong economic recovery.
Consumer spending
posted its second straight
monthly increase in
November, rising 0.5 per-
cent, the government said
SWednesday. But new homes
clearly weren't on the shop-
ping list. New home sales
plunged unexpectedly to
the lowest level since April.
The reports were evidence
that the recovery from a deep
recession is proceeding in
fits and starts, with house-
holds struggling in a bleak.
job market At the same time,
economists said the economy
was much improved from
this time last year, when the
nation was gripped by the
Financial crisis.
"People are continuing
to pay down their debts,
and they remain concerned
about their financial futures
and whether they will have
jobs," said Sal Guatieri, an
economist at BMO Capital
Markets. "Santa's toy bag
won't exactly be brimming
with 'goodies this year, but

1.31C" | Idaipolik rteKos


CONNETED


* NEW

* WEATHER

* OPINION

* SPORTS

*ARCHIVES

* CLASSFIED8

COMMUNITY

* ENTERTAINMENT


STAN


CONNECTED


In this Oct. 26 photo, a new single family home for sale is
shown in Wakefield, Mass. New home sales fell 11.3 percent
in November to lowest level since March


at least he will show up,
unlike last year."
Americans' income,
meanwhile, ticked up at the
fastest rate in six months
last month, though the 0.4
percent increase was less
than economists expected.
That reflected a $16.1 billion
increase in wages and sala-
ries, helped by last month's
drop in unemployment.
But consumers are still
worried about job security,
and that weighs on deci-
sions about big purchases
like new homes.
The 11 percent slump
in new home sales from


October's pace shows that
consumers are taking their
time following an exten-
sion of a deadline for first-
time buyers to qualify for
a tax credit. The incentive,
worth up to $8,000, was
set to expire at the end of
November. But Congress
pushed back the date to.
April 30 and expanded the
program to include current
homeowners who move.
The only strong region
was the Midwest, where sales
rose 21 percent Sales fell
by 21 percent in the South,
9 percent in the West and
3 percent in the Northeast.


And buyers are putting
their dreams of palatial
McMansions aside. Vince
Napolitano, � president
of Napolitano Homes in
Virginia Beach, Va., is hop-
ing to sell 110 houses next
year, up from fewer than
70 this year, by focusing on
smaller homes that sell for
$400,000 or less. "
'Those who are out there
looking are buying something
that they truly can afford," he
said. 'They're having to settle
for smaller homes."
New home sales are con-
sidered a good barometer
of future real estate activity
because they reflect sales
agreements signed but not
yet completed. That's why
most economists expect
completed sales to' decline
during the winter months.
SWhile buyers of previ-
ously occupied homes were
rushing to close deals by
the end of November, buy--
ers of new homes were
aware early in the month
they could shop longer
because of the extension of
the tax credit. Though com-
pleted\ home resales rose
7 percent in November, most
economists. expect sales to
decline during the winter
months without the looming
tax credit deadline.


Official: FPL rates

to see small increase


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Public Service Commission
staffers Wednesday recom-
mended the panel approve
only about a third of a
$1 billion annual rate
increase being sought by
Florida Power & Light Co.
The staff's base rate rec-
ommendation for Florida's
largest electric utility is
$357 million.
The' case has gotten
caught up in politics and
been the focal point of accu-
sations some commission-
ers and staffers have been
too cozy with the' utilities
they regulate.
Gov. Charlie Crist, who
is in a heated. race for
Republican U.S. Senate
nomination, has been an
outspoken opponent of the
rate increase. The five-mem-
ber penal granted Crist's
request to delay decisions
on the FPL increase and
another being sought by
Progress Energy Florida
until the second of his
two new appointees to the
commission takes office in
January.
Attorney General Bill
McCollum, who is running
in the GOP gubernatorial
primary, has intervened in
the case, siding with Public
Counsel J.R. Kelly, who rep-
resents consumers. Kelly
has urged the commis-
sion to cut FPL's rates by
$1.3 billion.
"They obviously read
what our case was and fol-
lowed significant parts of
it," said Earl Poucher, a
senior analyst for the pub-
lic counsel's office. But, he
added, "It falls far short of
what we asked for."
FPL spokesman Mayco
Villafana said the compa-
ny already has the lowest
rates in the state. They also


are 10 percent under thel
national average while its.
reliability factor has been
47 percent above average,
he said.
"All we ask is that the
commissioners evaluate our
request on the merits and
the facts that were present-
ed, which clearly showed-
our proposal will help keep
our service reliability high:
and our bills low over the
long term," Villafana said in"
a statement.
The commission is not
bound by the staff recom-
mendation. The panel is
scheduled to make deci-'
sions Jan. 13 on more than
170 separate issues includ-
ed in the revenue recom-
mendation.
One of the most impor-
tant is the company's prof-
it margin. FPL sought a
12.5 percent rate of return'-
while the public counsel
proposed 9.5 percent. The
staff recommendation falls
in-between at 10.75 percent.
Once the .commission
resolves the revenue issues,'
staffers will make another
recommendation on what'
the company's new rates'
should be.
The commission will.
decide, that. issue on
Jan. 29.
Even if the commission'
approves FPL's full base'
rate increase, overall bills
would decline by $6 a month-
for .the typical customer
using 1,000 kilowatt hours
in 2010, Villafana.pointed
out. That's due to previ-
ously approved reductions
in separate rates covering-'
fuel, energy conservation,'
capacity and environmental"
expenses.
FPL serves about'
4.5 million homes, busi-'
nesses and'other customers
in 35 counties - mostly in"
South Florida and along the'
East Coast.


LOCAL STOCKS

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
YTD YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg Name Ex Dlv YId PE Last Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.68 6.0 14 28.04 +.14 -1.6 Intel Nasd .63 3.1 49 20.10 +.06 +37.1
Athersys Nasd ... ...... 5.28 -27+1,073.3 Lowes NY .36 1.5 20 23.56 -.30 +9.5
AutoZone NY ......13 160.28 +.76 +14.9 MGMMir NY ......... 9.67 +.54-29.7
BkofAm NY .04 .3... 15.19 -.14 +7.9 McDnlds NY 2.20 3.5 16 63.36 +39 +1.9
BobEvn Nasd .72 2.4 .. 29.89 +.34 +46.3 MicronT NY ......... 9.99 +.58+278.4
BrMySq NY 1.28 5.0 13 25.70 +.11 +10.5 Microsoft Nasd .52 1.7 20 30.92 +.10 +59.1
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 4.1 18 15.94 +.03 +42.5 Motorola NY ......... 7.93 -.17 479.0
CSX NY .88 1.8 18 49.95 +.47 +53.8 NYTimes NY ........ 12.10 +1.07 +65.1
ChampE h NY ... ... ... .20 ... -64.3 Nobltyrt Nasd .25 2.6... 9.80 ... +23.9
Chevron NY 2.72 3.5 13 77.04 -.45 +4.2 OcciPet NY 1.32 1.6 28 82.46 +1.05 75.
Cigp NY ......... 3.29 -.05-51.0 Penney NY .80 2.9 23 27.31 -.17 .0i
CocaCI NY 1.64 2.9 21 57.29 +.02 +26.6 PepsiCo NY 1.8W0 3.0 18 60.68 +.05 +10.8.
ColBgp NY ... ...... .41 ... -80.0 Pfizer NY '.2 3.9 13 18.58 -.03 +4.91
Delhaize NY 2.01 2.6 ... 76.68 -.19 +21.7 Potash NY .40 .4 22 111.44 +.50 +52.2;
ETrade Nasd ......:.. 1.80 +.03 +56.5 PwShsQQQNasd .21 .5 ... 45.56 +.33 +53.2
FPLGrp NY 1.89 3.6 13 52.95 -.87 +5.2 Ryder NY 1.00 2.3 37 43.32 +.10 +11.7
FamilyDIr NY .54 1.9 14 27.95 +.02 +7.2 SearsHldgs Nasd ... ...... 81.56 +1.75+109.8.
FordM NY ......... 10.08 +.18+340.2 SouthnCo NY' 1.75 5.3 17- 33.29 -.11 -10.0
GenElec NY .40 2.6 14 15.41 +.03 -4.9 SPDR NY 2.29 2.0 ...111.95 +.22 +24.1
HomeDp NY .90 3.1 22 29.00 -.29 +26.0 SPDRFncl NY, .25 1.7 ... 14.40 -.06 +15.0.
iShEMkts NY .57 1.4 ... 40.79 +.40 +63.4 TimeWmrs NY .75 2.6 ... 29.35 .-.18 +41.3
iShR2K NY .72 1.1 ... 63.12 +.81 +28.2 WalMar NY 1.09 2.0 15 53.32 -.02 -4.9


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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427














Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER. HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009


S, .__


Dr. Peter Gott

Chelation

wrong

for heart

disease

DEAR DR. GOIT: I
am a 76-year-old male who
has been diagnosed with
blocked coronary arteries.
One vessel is 40 percent
- to 59 percent blocked,
and another is 60 percent
to 70 percent occluded,
according to my last echo-
cardiogram At present, I
am taking Crestor, Cholest
Off twice daily, niacin 500
milligrams twice daily and
1,200 milligrams fish oil
twice daily.
I've read on the Internet
about intravenous or
oral EDTA chelation. It
states that it is effective
80 percent in cleansing
the arteries. What is your
opinion of chelation? Would
you advise me to try the
treatment? I am supposed
to return in six months
for another examination.
Thank you for answering
my letter.
DEAR READER:
EDTA chelation therapy
is a series of intravenous
infusions that contain.
disodium EDTA, along
with a variety of other
substances. Proponents
claim the process is effec-
tive against heart disease
and is purported to be a
valid alternative to coro-
nary-artery-bypass proce-
dures. The problem here
is that there is absolutely
no scientific evidence to
support the claim. It is
important to note that nei-
ther the American Heart
Association nor the-Food
and Drug Administration
recommend th' process for
any form of heart disease.
Having stated this, I will
now answer your ques-
tion: no. I cannot in clear
conscience advise you to
consider the process. You
have only one heart, and
you owe it to yourself to be
under the care of a reputa-
Sble cardiologist whom you
can trust. Unless standards
have changed, you are not
a candidate for bypass sur-
gery at this time. Modify '
your diet, exercise as much
as possible under physi-
cian direction, and take any
appropriate prescription
medication. I see no harm
in continuing your.Crestor
and the over-the-counters
you are presently taking.
I should also note that
chelation is a valid medical
treatment for heavy-metal
poisoning. The EDTA
binds with the metals, thus
removing them from the
body. Under these circum-
stances, it can be a lifesav-
ing medical procedure.
DEAR DR. GOTI:
Both of my great toes are
rather sore and have a hard
lump midway on the inside
nearest to the first toe.. I
read your articles faithfully,
but must have missed the
one on ingrown toenails.
I've always .tried to keep
my toenails cut straight
across, but I need some
help at this point.
DEAR READER: I am
not sure from your brief
description that I can iden-
tify your problem. Perhaps
* the lumps are ingrown
toenails, but they could
also be warts or abnormal
growths. Perhaps your


bumps are signs of joint
damage owing to arthritis.
* What has me puzzled is
that you indicate you have
these lesions bilaterally.
Make an appointment
with your primary-care
physician, who will exam-
ine you and then determine
what they might be, fol-
lowed by what the best
approach for treatment is.
If you fail to get a satisfac-
tory answer, request a
referral to a podiatrist or
orthopedic foot specialist.


Study: Sticking with heart rehab boosts survival

By MARILYNN MARCHIONE .'.- . . ' -
AP Medical Writer ' ' ' " . - . "


If you've had a heart
attack or a bypass opera-
tion, there's an easy way to
help prevent another one:
stick with rehab.
People who get all 36
sessions of cardiac rehabili-
tation that most Medicare
plans cover are less likely
to die or suffer a heart
attack in the next three to
four years than people who
have fewer sessions, a new
study finds.
The research could
encourage the multitudes
of heart patients who don't
follow doctors' orders to
heed their advice. Only
about one-fifth of heart
patients even try rehab. Of
those who do, few get all
the sessions that. are rec-
ommended.
The new study is one of
the first big efforts to look
at how survival is affected
by the "dose" of rehab
that heart patients get.
Researchers saw a clear
trend in this 65-and-older
group.
"What this study shows
in a very convincing man-
ner is that the more ses-
sions a cardiac patient goes
to, the better off they are,"
siid Dr. Stanley Hazen,
preventive cardiology and
rehabilitation chief at the
Cleveland Clinic.
He had no role in the
study, which was led by
Duke University scien-
tists and published online
Monday in Circulation,
an American Heart
Association journal.
Federal grants paid for the
work.
' Say "rehab" and many
people envision weak heart
patients being pushed
to run on a treadmill.
Exercise is crucial, but
"they don't need to be gri-
macing and jogging around
the track," Hazen said. "It
can be just a brisk walk or
swimming or a stationary
bike. That's the key: find
something you enjoy and
are willing to do."
To be covered by
Medicare, rehab also must
include lifestyle'counseling


I .,-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cleveland Clinic exercise physiologist Audra DiRauso sets up an exercise bike for Anthony Rugare during a cardiac
rehabilitation class on Monday, in Cleveland. Researchers found people who completed all 36 sessions of cardiac
rehabilitation that Medicare covers were less likely to die or suffer a heart attack in the following three to four years.


- nutrition advice, weight
management, help to
stop smoking, even cook- -
ing classes and pointers
on reducing stress, said
the study's leader, Duke
biostatistician Bradley'
Hammill.
Many patients find they
enjoy the counseling, he
said. For some, it's the first
time anyone has explained
the "how-to" of healthy liv-
ing.
"After you've been hospi-
talized and somebody then
talks to you about these
lifestyle changes, it might
be more likely to sink in.
It's the teachable moment,"
Hammill said.
His study used records
on more than 30,000
Medicare recipients who
went for at least one rehab
session after being hospi-
talized for a heart attack, a
bypass operation, or chron-
ic and severe chest pain
due to clogged arteries.
More than three years


later, 18 percent of those
who attended fewer than
12 cardiac rehab sessions'
had died versus 11 percent
of those who went to all 36
sessions. After taking into
account age and other dif-
ferences in these groups of
patients, that works out to
a 47 percent reduction in
the risk of death for those
attending 36 sessions.
Heart attacks also were
less common in that group.
There was a strong
trend: as the number of '
classes went up, the risk.
of having a heart attack or
dying in the next few years
went down.
Surprisingly, only 18 per-
cent of study participants
went to all 36 sessions,
even though Medicare
- the government health
care program for those 65
and over - was footing
'the bill. Researchers don't
know why so few stuck
with it.
"It can be everything


'Invisible bracelet' for health alerts?


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON -
Emergency health alerts
for the Facebook genera-
tion? The nation's ambu-
lance crews are pushing
a virtual medical ID
system to rapidly learn a
patient's health history
during a crisis - and
which can immediately
text-message loved ones
that the person is headed
for a hospital.
The Web-based registry,
invisibleBraceletorg, start-
ed in Oklahoma and got
a boost this fall when the
state's government made
the program an optional
health benefit for its 'own
employees.
Now the iBracelet
attempts to go nation-
wide as the American
Ambulance Association
next month begins training
its medics, who in turn will
urge people in their com-
munities to sign up.
For $5 a year, basic
health information and up
to 10 emergency contacts
are stored under a comput-
er-assigned PIN number
that's kept on a wallet card
with your driver's license,
I


a key fob or a sticker on an
insurance card.
It's a complement to
the medical alert jewelry
that people with diabetes,
asthma and a host of other
conditions have used for
decades to signal their
needs in an emergency.
And it comes as the
American College of
SEmergency Physicians is
trying to determine just
what information is the
most critical for medics
and ER doctors to find
when you're too ill or
injured to answer ques-
tions, so that competing
emergency-alert technolo-
gies don't miss any of the
essentials.
'Too many times, we
don't have the informa-
tion to help us treat the
patients correctly," says
James Finger, president of
the American Ambulance
Association, the largest
network of emergency
medical service providers.
Not everyone who
should wear a medical alert
bracelet does, costing EMS
workers precious minutes
determining, for example,
if someone's incoherent
because he's having a
stroke or because he's a


comprehensive

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diabetic with dangerously
low blood sugar.
Even someone too
healthy for those bracelets
may have some condition
that could help emergency
workers make a faster
diagnosis, avoid a medica-
tion reaction - or track
down their next-of-kin
faster.
The question is how to
make sensitive medical
data easily accessible to
emergency workers with-
out violating federal health-
privacy laws. Options range
from simple bracelets to
pricier key-chain flash
drives, implanted micro-
chips - and call-centers
that relay stored health
records and notify relatives
when an alarm or medic's
phone call activates the
system.
Rapid family notification
is crucial, says Stephen
Williainson, president of
Oklahoma's Emergency
Medical Services Authority
- and one reason his EMS
provider recently trained
to use the new Invisible
Bracelet.


from the time required
multiple times a week for
so long, or transportation
issues. Or it may just be
that they feel better and
don't feel fhe need to fin-
ish," Hammill said.
. That's the case with
Tony Rugare, an 84-year-
old Cleveland area man
who had a quadruple
bypass operation in
October. He attended
his fourth rehab class on
Monday and plans to do
only a dozen more.
"It's a hassle getting
here and parking," he said.
Once he's had 16 classes,
"by that time I think I
know what to do and can
go on my own."
However, it could be
that sicker patients drop
out of rehab sooner, Dr.
William Weintraub wrote in
an editorial in the journal.
He is a heart specialist at
Christiana Care Health
System in Newark, Del.
Because the study can't


account for why people
went to fewer or more ses-
sions, it cannot prove that
rehab alone accounted for
better survival, he wrote.
But there's good reason
to believe it did: research-
ers did a separate analysis
on only folks who went
to at least six sessions
and still saw the,trend of
fewer heart attacks and
deaths with greater atten-
dance.
Dorothy Roberts-went
to her seventh session at
the Cleveland Clinic on
Monday. She walks on a
treadmill and is trying to
quit smoking. Roberts, 62,
said that her artery-open-
ing angioplasty procedure
was a "very scary" experi-
ence, so she plans to com-
plete all 36 rehab sessions
covered by her private
insurer.
- "If you have a second
chance at life, you do what
you can to stay here," she
said.


Wednesday
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.6A













Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


7A"


LAKE CITY REPORTER - LOCAL & WORLD THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009


Local happenings
PHOTOS BYJASON MATTHEW WALKER . . .
Lake City Reporter
(LEFT) Bridget Lopez, the owner and
operator of Triple J Pony Rides; gives ;
Tinkerbell, a 15-year-old miniature .,
horse, a kiss Monday afternoon at the
Still Waters West Assisted Living Facility.
Lopez brought Tinkerbell to offer the
residents a bit of pet therapy. , .. �

(RIGHT) Ruby Williams (left), a 21-year
volunteer, and Angela Towns look for.
bags of presents for children during the '
Christmas Dream Machine on Tuesday. m .


Abortion

could

block bill
By ERICA'WERNER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
way abortions are covered
under health care reform is BELK.COM
a major obstacle to finalizing
the legislation, even though
the House and Senate both .,A
agree that no federal money
should be used. "'
The stumbling block is
whether insurance planTs . . ,:
that get federal money are ac
completely barred from cov- .
ering abortions, or whether
they can cover-it as long as
they require customers to -
write .separate checks for "iw
the procedure using their " \A
own money. wiwonder
Why does that matter?
Because the House and
Senate solved the dispute
in different ways, neither
of which makes everyone
happy, and now they have to
find a further compromise.
"Something's going to !
have to give," said Rep. Bart
Stupak, D-Mich.,, author of
the abortion language in
the House.
At this point it's not clear "
what that will be, although
talks to resolve the issue
have already begun and all
involved in the intraparty
dispute say they want to
be able to support a final 7.
health care bill.
"We want to see a health
care bill passed 'and we
don't think it's particularly
helpful for anyone to draw ators
line in the sand," said Rep. from our amily :
Diana DeGette, D-Colo.,- a
leader of the House .Pro- '
Choice Caucus.. . - The Belk Family of Stores
Abortion threatened to
derail both the House arid
Senate legislation' before
last-minute compromises
satisfied anti-abortion k
Democrats in both cham-
bers. But those hard-won
deals look very 'different.


Plane

overshoots

runway,

40 injured
By KIRK WRIGHT -
Associated Press
KINGSTON, Jamaica --
An American Airlines flight
carrying 154 people skid-
ded across a Jamaican run-
way in heavy rain, bouncing
across the tarmac and injur- .-\ . .
* ing more than 40 people
before it stopped just short ,
of the Caribbean Sea, offi- )
Scials and witnesses said.
Panicked passengers
screamed and baggage
burst from overhead bins . _. ' .. . .
as Flight 331 from Miami
careened down the runway
in the capital, Kingston, on -.
Tuesday night, one passen-,."
ger said.
The impact cracked open


the fuselage, crushed the
left landing gear and sepa-
rated both engines from
the Boeihg 737-800, airline
spokesman Tim Smith said.
Crews evacuated dazed
and bloodied passengers - . '
onto a beach from a cabin
that smelled of smoke and
jet fuel, passengers said.
Rain poured through the . L
plane's broken roof, one
said.
Some 44 people were
taken to hospitals with bro-
ken bones and back pains . "
and four were seriously .
hurt, airport and Jamaican .- '. ..I
government officials said. ..k ~


1A ,









Page Editor: Jerry Spaeder, 754-0424


I * W m M
VRAI 4


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ACURA TSX W/NAVIGATION .................$19,974 2008
CADILLAC CTS 3.6L.......................$14,178 2007
CADILLAC. XLR................................. $73,055 2007
CHEVROLET COBALT LT.......................... $11,956 2007
CHEVROLET COBALT LT..............................$8,988: 2004
CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT...........................$10,948 2007
CHEVROLET HHR LT............................... $13,894 2009
CHEVROLET IMPALA LT....................$13,999 2006
CHEVROLETSILVERADO.............................$23,615 2006
CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 LS.................$8,898 2009
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FORD EDGE LIMITED................................$31,872 2007
FORD ESCAPE LIMITED.......................$13,235 2007
FORD F-350 LARIAT 4X4 ......................$18,369 2006
FORD FOCUS SES................................. $11,558 2008
FORD FUSION HYBRID.............................$27,757 2007
GMC SIERRA 1500..................................... $8,011 2007
HONDA CIVIC EX...................... ........$11,873 2006
HONDA CIVIC LX....................................... $7,871 2008
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KIA SEDONA.........................$10,584
MAZDA CX-9 TOURING............................$21,004
MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS GS.................$9,988
MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS PRESIDENTIAL.$7,782
NISSAN 350Z TOURING...........................$23,212
NISSAN 370Z TOURING..........................$27,530
NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 S.............................$11,153
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NISSAN ARMADA SE.............................. $29,775


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MAXIMA 3.5 SL...........................$17,994
PATHFINDER W/ 3RD ROW..........$14,784
TITAN LE 4X4............................$25,771
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2007
2006


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LOCAL & STATE


LAKE CITY REPORTER


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009


00000 ��


:II


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�



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is' as


;;o















Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, December 24, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420,
bfinley@lakecityreportercom


Dear


Santa,


hve


been


good


will you
please bring
me a college
football
playoff?
I've been a good boy
this year and really think
I deserve it.
Santa, I watched every
game and even have
a system devised that
would suit such a playoff
if you'll please leave it
.under the Christmas
tree.
I can't begin to tell you
how much it would mean
to me to see that shiny,
glistening playoff setting
wrapped in festive paper
under thel ornament-
laden tre~.
Santa, could you
imagine how much fun
it would be to see eight
teams fight for the right
to be called national
champion?
How much fun would
it be to watch TCU try to
take on the Longhorns of
Texas?
Could you imagine a
better way to spend your
January after filling up
with milk and
cookies on your long
sleigh ride? Santa, I sure
can't.
Sure, peace on earth
and good will towards
man would be nice,
but there's nothing
that could generate
excitement in my
heart quite like college
football having its March
madness equivalent.
I know that there
have been plenty of
football players that.
have been naughty
this season, including
'Brandon Spikes with the
eye gauging, but let's
not punish all the good
boys of college like Tim
Tebow.
Tebow has been a
great ambassador to the
sport. I'm sure he's
hoping that you'll bring
a playoff down his
chimney as well.
So Santa, what will it
be? Will you grant me
this one last wish at the
age of 25?
I may not be a little
boy any more, but I do
believe in the miracles of
Christmas. So Santa, as
you pack your gift bags
tonight before you make
that night-long flight, just
think of me and the good
sports writer I've been
and wrap one up for all
the college football fans
(myself included).
Oh, please Santa,
grant me this one final
Christmas wish.

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


CHS breaking


from hoops


Hill leads the
Lady Tigers with
15 points.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High notched
a final -win before the
Christmas break against
Ed White High in a road
district game on Tuesday.
The Lady Tigers fell
behind early in the first
quarter, trailing 13-5 after
the period. Columbia bat-
tled back to take a 26-21
lead into the half before
coming away with a 5643


victory.
"We came back in the
second," coach Horace
Jefferson said. "Sharmayne
(Edwards) was able to
generate some turnovers
and it helped switch the
momentum. After that,
we were able to. kind of
coast the rest of theway.
Sharmayne played a heck
of a game."
Da'Brea Hill led the
Lady Tigers in scoring with
15 points in the contest.
Edwards was the only other
scorer in double-digits with
12 in the game.
Simone Williamson
scored nine points, Katrina


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Coach Horace Jefferson (center) speaks to.the Columbia High Lady Tigers during a timeout
against Fleming Island on Friday.


Goodbread had seven and return to the court on
Viki Hill scored six. .Tuesday in the Holiday
The Lady Tigers Shootout. Columbia hosts


the event and begins wi
a game against Palatka
7:30 p.m.
/' ' * ..


The

Sports provides
locals with college
opportunity.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com'
College scholarship sign-
ings usually are the cul-
mination of a successful
season, and fans have to
search- their memory files
to remember ihe pe rfor-
mances.
Columbia ldgi i followedis
this fall had the opportunity
to watch athletes already
bound for schools, and
there is more to come in
2010.
Two sighings for major
universities took place in
recent weeks.
Jacob Tillotson signed
to play baseball at Florida
and Celeste Gomez signed
to play softball at Florida
State. Both are expected to
take the field for CHS in the
spring.
In football, Columbia's
Tiger Powell and Brach Columb
Bessant announced before
the season their intentions
to sign with South Florida Marietl
and Troy University, respec- Montag
tively. . ted to S
Columbia had two foot- Colu
ball players who signed Lawrer
in, the more traditional baseball
way. Marquis Davis will Alexi H
go to Miles College and High si
Matt Knowles will attend at Lake


line


. . . BRANDON.FINLEY/Lake City Report4
ia High's Jacob Tillotson is one of the many college signees coming out of Columbia county this year.


ta College. Jamaal
gue recently commit-
South Florida,
Imbia's Austin
Ice signed to play
11 at Santa Fe College.
[odson of Fort White
signed to play softball
-Sumter Community


College.
Volleyball continues to
provide a conduit to col-
lege. Columbia's Symone
Carter signed with Palm
Beach Community College
and Fort White's Kristal
Butler signed with Lake-
Sumter.


Columbia's Michele
Allison signed with Tarleton
State to participate in
rodeo:
Columbia also had a
couple of successful walk-
ons for the fall - John
Robinson in football at
Huntingdon College and


Lauren Nelson in volleyball
and softball at Ava Maria
University.'
Former Fort White Higlj
running back Xavier Blake
also moved on to the next
level. He is a walk-on at
Antelope Valley College i
California.


STCU's Patterson is AP


.� Coach of the Year


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 28 file photo, TCU head coach Gary Patterson
holds the Mountain West championship trophy while
celebrating a 51-10 win over New Mexico after an NCAA
college football game in Fort Worth, Texas.


Will coach against
Boise State in
bowl game.
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
NEW YORK - Gary
Patterson guided TCU to
its best season in 70 years
on the way to becoming the
first Associated Press Coach
of the Year from outside the
six conferences with auto-
matic BCS bids..
Patterson led the Horned
Frogs to a perfect regular
season, their first Mountain
West Conference title, their
first BCS appearance and
even had them vying for a
spot in the national champi-
onship game.
"I'm really kind of hum-
bled by the whole thing,"
Patterson said in a tele-
phone interview. "The best
way I know how to deal with
it is to put my nose down


and keep getting ready for
Boise."
No. 3 TCU plays No. 6
Boise State (13-0) in the
Fiesta Bowl on Jan. 4.
In a close vote released
Wednesday, Patterson
received 21 votes from the
AP college football poll
panel to edge Brian Kelly.
The former Cincinnati
coach, now with Notre
Dame, received 19 votes
and Alabama's Nick Saban,
who won the award last sea-
son, got 14 votes.
Chip Kelly of Oregon
received three votes and
Boise State's Chris Petersen
and Texas' Mack Brown
each got one vote.
Patterson's ninth season
with the Horned Frogs has
been his best, but TCU's
success this season is no
great surprise. The Frogs
have consistently been
a threat to bust the BCS
under Patterson, who was
promoted from defensive


coordinator after Dennis
Franchione left Fort Worth
for Alabama in 2000.
Patterson is 85-27 at TCU
and has led the Horned
Frogs to five seasons of
at least 11 wins the past
seven years. This season,
the Horned Frogs went
12-0 for their first unde-
feated regular season since
1938, when TCU won its
only AP national champion-
ship.
Patterson said he's
become a more well-round-
ed coach during his time at
TCU,
"I had to change my per-
sonality. I'm a passionate
guy on game day. I'm all
over the place," he said.
"I'm better at helping kids
with their lives. When you
first become an assistant
you're all about Xs and Os
but I tried to become better
at (helping players) after.
COACH continued on 2B


dotted















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN - Hawaii Bowl, Nevada vs. SMU,
at Honolulu

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Friday's Game
San Diego at Tennessee, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Buffalo at Atlanta. I p.m.
Houstonat Miami, I p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay. I p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Giants. I p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, I p.m. ,
Kansas City at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, I p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis atArizona, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Indianapolis: 4:15 p.m.
Denver at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Washington, 8:20 p.m...
Monday's Game
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30 p.m..

Bowl games
New Mexico Bowl
Wyoming 35, Fresno State 28,20T
St. Petersburg Bowl
SRutgers 45, UCF 24
New Orleans Bowl
Mid.Tennessee 42, Southern Miss. 32
Tuesday
LasVegas Bowl
BYU 44, Oregon State 20
Wednesday
Poinsettia Bowl
Utah vs. California (n)
Today
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
SMU (7-5) vs. Nevada (8)4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Ohio (9-4) vs. Marshall (6-6), I p.m.
(ESPN)
Meineke Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina (8-4) vs. Pittsburgh
(9-3), 4 p.m. (ESPN)
Emerald Bowl
At San Francisco
Southern Cal (8-4) vs. Boston College
(8-4). 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Sunday


COACH
Continued From Page lB
practice." ,.. .:.::. :
The Horned Frogs came
into this season ranked
No. 17 in the country,. but
Patterson needed to replace
seven starters on a defense
that was one of the best in
the nation in 2008.
"We were not happy with
the way we played defense
in the spring," Patterson
said.
He and his staff quickly
rebuilt another fast, swarm-
ing defense around All-
American passrusher Jerry
Hughes. The Horned Frogs
ranked No. 1 in the country
in yards allowed and sixth
in points allowed.
Hughes is the perfect
example of TCU's ability to
spot and develop talent.
He was a 210-pound run-
ning in high school, but
Patterson switched him
to defensive end where
Hughes has blossomed into
a future NFL draft pick.
"We want to be known as
the best developmental pro-
gram in Texas," Patterson
said.
This season's TCU team
has developed into a domi-
nant one. The Frogs have
blown .out most of their
opposition - nine victories
by at least 25 points - and
come up big on the road.
TCU has won at Virginia,
Clemson and Utah.
"It's a very strong under-
neath current of confidence
and that's the reason they
have played on the road
so well," Patterson said
of his team's personality.
"Not a high emotion group,
not a bunch of yellers and
screamers."
TCU's success has turned
the 49-year-old Patterson
into a rising star in coach-
ing, a guy who's name fre-
quently comes up when
another job opens up.'Last
year, there was speculation
he'd end up at his alma
mater, Kansas State.
This season, when Notre
Dame was looking for a
coach, Patterson was men-
tioned as a possible candi-
date.
But he agreed to a new
contract earlier this month
intended to keep him at
TCU through 2016.


Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Clemson (8-5) vs. Kentucky (7-5),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Georgia (7-5),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday, Dec. 29
EagleBank Bowl
At Washington
Temple (9-3) vs. UCLA (6-6),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Champs Sports Bowl
.At Orlando
Miami (9-3) vs. Wisconsin (9-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday, Dec. 30
Humanitarian Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Bowling Green (7-5) vs. Idaho (7-5),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Nebraska (9-4) vs. Arizona (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
ThursdayDec. 31
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Stanford (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (7-5),
Noon (CBS)
Armed Forces Bowl
At FortWorth,Texas
Air Force (7-5) vs. 1-louston (10-3),
Noon (ESPN)
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Missouri (8-4) vs. Navy (8-4),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Minnesota (6-6) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
6 p.m. (NFL)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia Tech (9-3) vs.Tennessee (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Jan. I
Outback Bowl
AtTampa
Northwestern (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5),
II a.m. (ESPN)
Capital One Bowl
.At Orlando
Penn State (10-2) vs. LSU (9-3),
I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl -
SAtJacksonville
Florida State (6-6) vs. West
Virginia (9-3), I p.m. (CBS)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Ohio State (10-2) vs. Oregon (10-2),
5 pm..(ABC)
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Florida (12-1) vs. Cincinnati
(12-0), 8:30 p.m. (FOX).


Saturday, Jan. 2
International Bowl
At Toronto
South Florida (7-5) vs. Northern
Illinois (7-5), Noon (ESPN2)
Cotton Bowl
At Dallas
Oklahoma State (9-3) vs. Mississippi
(8-4), 2 p.m. (FOX)
Papajohns.com Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Connecticut (7-5) vs. South Carolina
(7-5), 2 p.m. (ESPN)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn..
East Carolina (9-4) vs.Arkansas (7-5),
5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Michigan State (6-6) vs. Texas Tech
(8-4), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan. 4
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale.Ariz.
Boise State (13-0) vs. TCU (12-0),
8 p.m. (FOX)
Tuesday, Jan. 5
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Iowa (10-2) vs. Georgia Tech (11-2),
8 p.m. (FOX)
Wednesday, Jan. 6
GMAC Bowl
Mobile.Ala.
Central Michigan (11-2) vs.Troy (9-3),
7 p.m. (ESPN)
Thursday,Jan.7
BCS National Championship
At Pasadena, Calif.
Alabama (13-0) vs. Texas (13-0),
8 p.m. (ABC)
Saturday, Jan. 23
East-West Shrine Classic .
At Orlando
East ys.West, 3 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 30
Senior Bowl
At Mobile.Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFL)
Saturday, Feb. 6
Texas vs.The Nation All-Star
Challenge
At El Paso,Texas
Texas vs. Nation, 3 p.m. (CBSC)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule


Today's Games
No games scheduled
Friday's Games
Miami at NewYork, 12 p.m.
Boston at Orlando, 2:30 p.m.
Cleveland at LA. Lakers, 5 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10:30 p.m.


Former Jags RB

Taylor says team

could be LA bound


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Former Jacksonville run-
ning back Fred 'Taylor
says the Jaguars might
be find themselves in Los
Angeles and jokingly said
he was putting in a bid for
a job.
Taylor, who played,with
the Jaguars from 1998
until being released after
the 2008 season, chal-
lenged Jaguars fans dur-
ing a conference call on
Wednesday by saying the
team probably would be
better off moving.
"Sometimes' the truth
hurts," said Taylor, who
gets his first crack'at his
old team when he and the
New England Patriots host
the Jaguars this week. "It
can be played either way in
that the fans want the team
.to, stay there, they have to
show that they want the
team to stay there."
Taylor said the league
has made it clear a team
eventually will be in Los
Angeles and because of
attendance problems,
the Jaguars might be the




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letterto each square,
to form four ordinary words. .
IEAZUG I


choice.
"I don't know what's
going to be a decision
maker or breaker but you
look at average attendance
and whatever have you at
the end of the day they're
going to find a team to
take out there," he said. "I
don't want to offend any-
one. Never do, but you've
got to be realistic."
Jaguars coach Jack Del
Rio said his former back
has always been one to
speak his mind.
"Fred has always been a
great interview because he
speaks straight from the
heart and he's not trying to
be politically correct," Del
Rio said. That's what he
feels and it's entertaining
reading."
As far as any potential
move goes, Del Rio said he
will support whatever deci-
sion team' owner Wayne
Weaver makes.
"I'm an employee of his,"
Del Rio said. "Whatever he
wants to do, my personal
feelings are not part of it,
my duty is to do the best
I can in my role as head
coach."

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


KUTBEC AT N N WITH THIS.J
SNow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
Suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: " I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: LILAC HONOR UNSAID STIGMA
Answer: When the ballet troupe performed on
television, they were - DANCING ON "AIR"


Bowden 'disappointed'


about leaving early


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
- Bobby Bowden said
Tuesday that while he
wanted to coach another
year at Florida State, "that
was out" as an option.
Bowden announced his
retirement Dec. 1 - a day
after expressing a desire
to coach in 2010 during
a meeting with university
officials.
"I wanted to, but that was
out," he told The Associated
Press as he motored his
golf cart onto Florida
State's practice field for the
final time Tuesday. "I'm dis-
appointed, but that wears
off."
Jimbo Fisher will offi-
cially become FSU's new
coach on Jan. 5.
Regardless of the uncer-
emonial ending to his 34
years at Florida State,


Bowden said he has no
regrets or hard feelings.
"No regrets whatsoever
with the whole picture, big
picture," the 80-year-old
coach said. "I look at it for.
the 56 years, not what hap-
pened last year or the last
four years or five years."
After an unprecedented
14-year run of top five sea-
sons that ended in 2000,
Florida State (6-6) has lost
six games in. a season,
three of the last four years.
The Seminoles need a win
Jan. 1 over West Virginia
in the Gator Bowl to give
Bowden a 33rd .straight
winning season.
"I' wish I could've done
better,". said Bowden,
whose 388 wins are second
all-time to Penn State's Joe.
Paterno among major col-
lege. coaches.;
"You're never satisfied,"
Bowden later told writ-
ers waiting for him after


Tuesday's practice. "I think
that's one reason you stay
in it as long as you do. I
always think there's one
more chance, one more
chance to have the big
year."
Besides preparing the
Seminoles for their bowl
date, Bowden has been
cleaning out his memora-
bilia-filled office.
"I'm just fixing to start a
new life," Bowden said. "At
my age it's the direction I
should be going. I've got
to see what's out there for
me.
"It's a change that comes
to ,everybody if you're.
lucky enough to live long
enough," said Bowden, who
plans to focus his future
efforts on young people.
And, .he said he'll be
keeping an eye on the
Seminoles.
"I'll always pull for Florida
State," Bowden said.


Blood remains issue for


Pacquiao-Mayweather


SBy TIM DAHLBER
Associated Press

LAS VEGAS
Pacquiao has al
willing to spill b
-a fight. He's no
Eager to give bl
a fight.
The fate of
planned Ma
megafight wi
Mayweather Jr.
the balance. B
traded jabs '
over Mayweath
tence that the '1
to Olympic-style
ing amid indic:
both were opera
sible compromise
With time run
though, Pacquia
er said he's not
negotiate much
make the fight.
"I think it's o
row- and we're
another oppone
is no agreement,

ACROSS

1 Eye color
6 Coffee
or island
10 Mount Hood
site
12 Element in sa
14 Appear
15 Winter apple
16 Throws out
18 Unser and Hi
19 Is, in Madrid
21 Solemn
promise
23 RN helper
24 Current
26 Piqued
29 GI
entertainers
30 Farm
enclosure
32 Hire
a caddie
34 Pierce with a
horn
36 Blasting mater
37 "The King an
I" name


G Bob Arum said. "It looks to
me like they want a way out
S of the fight. Mayweather
- Manny doesn't want to take a
[ways been chance of losing."
ldod to win A day after Mayweather's'
t nearly as camp threatened to scuttle
blood to get the fight unless the box-
ers were subject to random
Pacquiao's blood tests, Arum said his
arch 13 fighter would agree to just
th Floyd three blood tests. One would
hangs in be done in January during
3oth. sides the week the fight is for-
Wednesday mally announced, a second
ler's insis- would be done no later than
wo submit 30 days before the fight, and
Drug test- a final test would be done in
nations, that the locker room afterward.
a to a pos- Arum also said the tests
se. should be done by compa-
ning short, nies used by major sports
o's promot- leagues, like Major League
t willing to Baseball and the NFL, some-
longer to thing that so far is a major
sticking point in the talks.
ver tomor- Mayweather's camp wants
going to the tests done by the United
nt if there States Anti-Doping Agency,
,"promoter which operates under much

38 Honey wine
40 Happy sighs Answe
42 Fuss
43 Kitchen or den BLA
45 White as a T E AS
sheet R
47 Stag
lit attendees I T EM
50 Hide OSLO
(2 wds.)
52 Like some bat- V
rt ties T 0 Y
54 Gave the go- ODE
ahead 0 D
58 Coronets RI L E
59 Mariachiwear T E' L
60 Blacken with
heat P
61 View from A L K A
Everest K1OS

DOWN A I.D

1 Shed tool ' 5 Big pileup
2 Equip with 6 Medieval c
weapons 7 Billboards
ial 3 Last letter of 8 Passport
d the alphabet companion
4 Heron 9 -Novelist J


stricter rules that include
random blood tests.
Arum accused
Mayweather of trying to.
play mind games with
Pacquiao, saying that the
Filipino. sensation has
never failed urine tests for
performance-enhanciing
substances.
'They want to put it in
Manny's head that they can
come in any time and take
blood," Arum said. "Manny
believes taking blood will
weaken him. This is abso-
lutely outrageous. Who
does Floyd Mayweather
think he is, the commis-
sioner of boxing?"
Mayweather's promoter,
Richard Schaefer, said he
was willing to try and reach
a consensus between the two!
side. He cited comments by
Pacquiao's trainer, Freddie
Roach, that Pacquiao would
agree to blood tests up to
five days before the fight as
possible middle ground.


r to Previous Puzzle

BS FRUIT
ER FRESNO
DS RODENT
S RAGE
HEN YIPE
EAL E VES
K NIF F E ASP
EGGED NON

OTT EILIMIS
ETS MELEE
LI COLADA
KS APEMAN
S PEDAL


ontests


n
eari -


Want more puzzles?
Check 9ut the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 2I 5 9

SI11 12 I I


11 Once called
12 Tijuana Ms.
13 Geol.
formations
17 Spy's alias
(2 wds.)
19 England's -
Downs
20 Night
racket
22 Harley,
to some
23 Carry wearily
25 Decide on
27 Palace dweller
28 Dodge
31 Utmost
degree
33 Sitcom waitress
35 Corn serving
39 Sand -
41 Oral
44 Greases
46 Mindful
47 Shack
48 Hero's tale
49 Bygqne ruler
51 Part of LAX
53 Novelist
- Levin
55 Puppy sound
56 The green
bureau?
57 PC key


12-24


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


2B














ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST
IMra/71


DEAR ABBY


Deceased relative's letters

link different generations


DEAR ABBY: I'm writ-
ing in response, to "Stuck
for an Answer" (Oct 9),
whose wife found a box of
letters written by her late
mother to her father. She
didn't know whether to
read or destroy them.
If Mom had wanted
'the letters destroyed, she
would have already done it.
As a genealogist and histo-
rian, my advice is to keep
them in a safe place for
future generations. I have
correspondence between
my great-great-grandmoth-
er, her daughters and their
daughters that dates back
to the 1870s and extends
through the 1940s. I also
have her diaries, her daugh-
ter's autograph book from
high school graduation in
1880, and diaries written
by her granddaughter that
date from the time she was
16 until her death at the age
of 90 in 1998.
I am sure my great-
great-grandfather never
thought I'd be reading the
letter he wrote to his broth-
er during the Civil War in
1865, mentioning all the
women in the city he was
going to spend some time
with! Abby, "Stuck's" wife
should cherish the letters
she found, even if she never
reads them. They are pre-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
cious heirlooms for future
generations that will teach
them about the impact of
World War II on young
love. - HISTORICALLY
SPEAKING
DEAR HISTORICAL-
LY: I suggested to "Stuck"
that reading the letters
would allow his wife new in-
sight into her parents' early
life. Many readers, agreed
and offered personal anec-
dotes. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: My dear
friend "Zack's" father left
him letters he had ex-
changed with Zack's moth-
er during World War II. In
one of them was the infor-
mation that Zack had a half-
sister in Italy! If he had not
read those letters, he would
never have known about
this member of his family.
"Stuck's" letters have
survived 60 years. He can
rightfully suppose that his
mother-in-law saved them
with the intent of passing
them on. Those letters
have tremendous historical


significance. There are few
firsthand documents like
these remaining. I'm sure
th. World War II museum
in Washington, D.C., would
love to have them. Every
firsthand story helps us
construct our history. Can
you imagine what we would
have missed if 15-year-old
Anne Frank's diary had
remained unpublished?
- WELL-READ IN NEW
YORK
DEAR ABBY: My
mother asked if my sis-
ters and I wanted to read
the letters Dad had sent
her during the war. We
declined because we felt
the letters were private.
Mom requested that they
be buried with her when
she died. Whenshe passed
away, we could not imme-
diately locate them. Then'
just before interment, my
sister found the letters. The
funeral director allowed u'
to seal them in a box to be
placed in the ground witl
Mom's burial urn. They are
now, once again, close to
her and Dad, and everyone
finds that knowledge com-
forting. - BEVERLY IN
ALBANY ,

a Write Dear Abby at
www.DeerAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


' ARIES (March 21- THE LAST WORD-
April 19): Don't let friends Eugenia Word
or family upset you. Put the
past behind you and look to 'for your losses or short-
the future with optimism. A comings. Instead, forgive,
financial loss is apparent if forget and give thanks for
you are too generous. Ro- what you have and the peo-
mance is in the stars; show ple who have stood by you.
your true feelings. *** Extend help to those less
TAURUS (April 20- fortunate. *****
May 20): Put your plans VIRGO (Aug.23-Sept.
on the table and discuss 22): You can please every-
what you want to do with one by offering good advice
someone who shares your and practical presents. En-
life and your interests. Get tertain friends and family
back to your roots. Bring with class but within bud-
joy to older relatives who get Don't worry about the
have worked so hard on things you can't change.
your behalf. *** **
GEMINI(May 21-June LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
20): Consider what's been 22): Make this a very spe-
going on in your profes- cial day for the people you
sional life and you will real- care about. Put others at
ize why it was so important ease and make the most out
for you to work hard. Now of any situation you face. An
you can relax and enjoy the original idea will displace
moment with friends and some of the negativity that
family. **** surrounds you. ***
CANCER (June 21- SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
July 22): Thank family Nov. 21): Plan a shortjaunt
and friends for the support to visit and connect with old
they have shown you this friends or family members
past year. Now it's time for you don't see very often.
you to offer your assistance You will be sensitive to the
to those who don't have as thoughts and feelings of the
much as you. This is the people you talk with and
perfect time to give back to should reserve judgment
your community. ** until you assess what's ac-
LEO (July 23-Aug. tually happening. ***-.
22): This is not the time to SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
indulge or to blame others 22-Dec. 21): Don't hide


the way you feel. Do what's
in your heart and you will
send the perfect message.
A comforting smile, affect
tion or special offering will
show your, intentions pet-
fectly. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19):' Helping tle
underdog will pay off and
play a major role in the way
you view your own life and
your future. A commitment
made to a cause you be-
lieve in will bring you more
joy than you ever imagined
possible. It's time to break
old habits and ties. **
AQUARIUS (Jan.' 20-
Feb. 18): There are people
to whom you owe a lot and
you should accommodate
them at this time. Give your
time, your help and your
emotional support. Don't
end the year on a sad note
or begin the new one with
uncertainty. ****
PISCES. (Feb. 19-
March 20): This year
you should be focusing
on the people who really
need your help. You may
not please everyone with
your choices regarding fes-
tive events but, by giving
to those in need, you will
speak volumes about who
you have become and what
you will strive to be in the
future. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: T equals Y
"X E NA' Z ZFXAP OFWXJZLBJ XJ
AKOKJJBWXRT BSNMZ ZFXAUJ. XZ'J
BSNMZ SKXAU UNNE ZN NAK
BANZFKW." - OBWWXK YXJFKW

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The poetry of the earth is never dead." - Keats "The
world is mud-luscious and puddle-wonderful." - e.e. cummings


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE.CITY REPORTER


CLASSIC PEANUTS



















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!


755-5440


SADvantage -
A~vnt-


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 3RD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORI-
DA, IN AND FOR COLUMBIA
COUNTY
Case #: 2009-CA-000715
Division#:
UNC:
Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-
pany, as Trustee under Pooling and
Servicing Agreement dated as of
January 1, 2007 Securitized Asset -
Backed Receivables LLC
Trust 2007-HE1 Mortgage Pass-
Through Certificates; Series 2007-
HE1,
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Jeffrey W. Mamuzich and Kimberly
Mamuzich, Husband and Wife;
Mortgage Electronic Registrations
Systems, Inc., as Nominee for WMC
Mortgage Corp., Unknown Parties in
Possession #1; Unknown Parties in
Possession #2; If living, and all Un-
known Parties claiming by, through,
under and against the above named
Defendant(s) who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said Un-
known Parties may claim an interest
as Spouse Heirs, Devisees, Grant-
ees, or Other Claimants
S Defendant(s)
S NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLO-
SURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPER-
TY
TO:
Jeffrey W. Mamuzich; ADDRESS
UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 217 South-
west Boulder Glen, Fort White, FL
32038
Residence unknown, if living, in-
cluding any unknown spouse of the
said Defendants, if either has remar-
ried and if either or both of said De-
fendants are dead, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claim-
ing by, through, under or against the
named Defendant(s); and the afore-
mntioned named Defendant(s) and
such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendants and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendants as
may be infants, incompetents or oth-
erwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action has been commenced
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing real property, lying and being
and situated in Columbia County,
Florida, more particularly described
as follows:
COMMENCE THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST
1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4
AND RUN EAST ALONG THE
QUARTER SECTION LINE, 210
FEET FOR THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THEN AT RIGHT AN-
GLES TO THE SOUTH QUARTER
SECTION LINE'AND PARALLEL
TO THE WEST QUARTER SEC-
TION LINE RUN" NORTH'210
FEET; THENCE AT RIGHT AN-
GLES PARALLEL TO THE
SOUTH QUARTER -SECTION
LINE RUN EAST 210 FEET; THEN
AT RIGHT ANGLES RUN PAR-
ALLEL TO THE WEST QUARTER
SECTION LINE RUN SOUTH 210
FEET; MORE OR LESS, TO THE
SOUTH -QUARTER SECTION
LINE; THEN AT RIGHT ANGLES
RUN WEST ALONG THE SOUTH.
QUARTER SECTION LINE A DIS-
TANCE OF 210 FEET, MORE OR
LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, ALL LYING AND BEING
IN THE SOUTHEAST 174 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 7,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
more commonly known as 217
Southwest Boulder Glen, Fort White,
FL 32038.'
This action has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defense, if any,
upon SHAPIRO & FISHMAN, LLP,
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address
is 10004 N. Dale Mabry Highway,
Suite 112, Tampa, FL 33618, within
thirty (30) days after the first publi-
cation of this notice and file the orig-
inal with this clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately there after;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint. WITNESS my
hand and seal of this Court on the
10th day of December, 2009.
P. DEWITT CASON
Circuit and County Courts
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

04536666
December 24, 31, 2009


PUBLIC AUCTION to be held Jan-
uary 23, 2010 AT 8AM at Ozzie's
Towing & Auto, 2492 SE Baya Ave.
Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)755-0608
Following Vin Numbers:

1998 Chevy
VIN# 1GCCS 1448WK256961
1991 Dodge
VIN # 3B3XP45K1MT615727

04536752
December 24, 2009







Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331


Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.

New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COL M-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 09-0276-CA
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARY TUCK AKA MARY R.
TUCK et al.
Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated December 8, 2009, and
entered in Case No. 09-0276-CA, of
the Circuit Court of the third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for Columbia
County, Florida, wherein BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A., is a plaintiff and
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIE-
NORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS BY
AND THROUGH UNDER OR
AGAINST THE ESTATE OF
MARY TUCK AKA MARY R.
TUCK, DECEASED; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2 are the Defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at 173 NE HERNANDO AVE-
NUE, COURT ROOM 1, LAKE
CITY, FL 32055, at 13 on January,
2010, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT 1, FORT WHITE OAKS RE-
PLAT, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 41, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus frdm the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 9th day of December,
2009.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at' 904-958-2163,
P.O. BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Re-
lay System.-
Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff %
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329

04536573
December 17, 24, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR' COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 2007-000522-CA
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND
FINANCE, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, GRANT-
EES, DEVISEES, LIENORS,
TRUSTEES, AND CREDITORS OF
STELLA G. ENGMAN, DE-
CEASED, AND ALL CLAIM-
ANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES,
NATURAL OR CORPORATE,
AND WHOSE EXACT LEGAL,
STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST STELLA G. ENGMAN,
DECEASED, OR ANY OF THE
HEREIN NAMED OR DESCRI-
BED DEFENDANTS OR INTER-
EST IN AND TO THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated December 8, 2009, in this
cause, I will sell the property situated
in COLUMBIA County, Florida, de-
scribed as:
LOT #5 BLOCK A COLUMBIA
ESTATES, SUBDIVISION AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 PAGE
134, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN 1988 BRIGADIER DOUBLE-
WIDE MOBILE HOME HAVING
VIN NUMBER 90617A AND VIN
NUMBER 90617B.
a/k/a Rt. 14 Box 268, Lake City, FL
32024
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 NW Her-
nando Ave., Lake City, Florida, at
11:00 o'clock a.m., on January 13,
2009.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at Lake City, Florida, this 9
day of December, 2009.
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ R. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Douglas C. Zahm, P.A.
18820 U.S. Hwy. 19 N., #212
Clearwater, FL 33764
(727) 536-4911 phone
(727) 539-1094 fax
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES; IF YOU ARE A PER-
SON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION
IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN
THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO
YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF
CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT NANCY NYDAM AT
ROOM 205, COLUMBIA COUN-
TY COURTHOUSE, P.O. BOX
1569, LAKE CITY, FL 32056, (904)
758-2163; SUNCOM 839-2163,
WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NO-
TICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR


VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL (904)
758-2139.

04536570
December 17, 24, 2009


Gary D. Grunder
23349 Northwest CR 236, Suite 10
High Springs, Florida 32643
(386) 454-1298
Florida Bar I.D. 199486

04536719
December 24, 31, 2009


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
122008CA000605XXXXXX
THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF
THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
ASSIT-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2007-4,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MIGUEL A RODRIGUEZ; ET AL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Summary Final
Judgment of foreclosure dated De-
cember 8, 2009, and entered in Case
No. 122009CA000605XXXXXX of
the Circuit Court in and for Colum-
bia County, Florida, wherein THE
BANK OF NEW YORK, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF
THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2007-4 is Plaintiff and MI-
GUEL A. RODRIGUEZ; MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-
TION SYSTEMS, INC: AS NOMI-
NEE FOR AMERICA'S WHOLE-
SALE LENDER MIN NO. 1000157-
0007847755-7; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO 1; UNKNOWN TENANT
NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO--HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-
EST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at on the Courthouse Steps of
the Columbia County Courthouse,
145 N. Hemando Street, Lake City,
Florida 32055 at Columbia County,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 13 day
of January, 2010, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said
Order or Final Judgment, to wit:
LOTS 1 THROUGH 6, EXCEPT
THE EAST 50 FEET OF LOT 6,
AND EXCEPT EAST 50.2 FEET
OF LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4 AND 5; AND
LOTS 11 THROUGH 14 AND THE
NORTH 30.0 FEET OF LOTS 15
THROUGH 18, AND THAT POR-
TION OF A 20 FOOT WIDE UN-
NAMED ALLEY ADJACENT TO
AND WEST OF THE WEST LINE
OF LOTS 1-6, BLOCK 19, AND
ADJACENT TO AND EAST OF
THE LINE OF LOT 11, BLOCK 19,
AND THE NORTH 30 FEET OF
LOT 18, ALL LYING IN BLOCK
19 IN MASON CITY, A SUBDIVI-
SION ACCORDING TO PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1 PAGE 31, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-
sons needing special accommodation
to participate in this proceeding
should contact the Clerk of the Court
not later than five business days prior
to the proceeding at the Columbia
County Courthouse. Telephone 904-
758-1041 or 1-800-955-8770 via
Florida Relay Service.
DATED at Lake City, Florida on De-
cember 9, 2009.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk

04536571
December 17, 24, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 09-257-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
JANET M. CUNNINGHAM
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Janet M. Cunningham, deceased,
whose date of death was October 29,
2009, File Number 09-257-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Probate Division, the
.address of which is P.O. Box 2069,
Lake.City, Florida 32056. The names
and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claimsor demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice has been served
must file their claims with this court,
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS Decem-
ber 24, 2009.
Personal Representative:
Gary D. Grunder
23349 Northwest CR 236, Suite 10
High Springs, Florida 32643
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:


1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954)453-0365
Facsimile: (954)771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438

04536569
December 24, 31, 2009


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 09-261-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF FRANK R.
MCSHANE
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Frank R. McShane, deceased, whose
date of death was October 9, 2009, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below..
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-'
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is December 24,2009.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Lindsay Carter-Tidwell
Attorney for William J. McShane
Florida Bar No. 0028866
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A.
P.O. Box 1029 .
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone:(386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
Personal Representative:
William J. McShane
205 E. 78th Street, Apt. 8 G
New York, NY 10075
/
04536721
December 24 & 31, 2009.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.:
122009000561CAXXXX
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JANIE M. HARS; COLIE G. HARS;
UNKNOWN TENANTSS; IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT-
PROPERTY,
Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 8 day of December,
2009, and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000561, of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and
JANIE M. HARS; COLIE G. HARS;
UNKNOWN TENANTSS; JOHN
DOE; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are de-
fendants. I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the AT
COURTHOUSE at the Columbia
County Courthouse in Lake City,.,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10 day
of March 2010, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 23 of BLOCK B, NORTH-
WOOD ACRES, an unrecorded sub-
division, more particularly described
as;
Commence at the SE Corer, Section
2, Township 3 South, Range 16 East,
thence run S 89"25'39" W along the
South line of Section 2, 617.23 feet
to the Westerly Right-of-Way of
U.S. #41, thence N 31'33'11" W,
along said Right-of-Way, 791.98
feet; thence S 89'25'39" W, 1281.32
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING;
thence continue S 89'25'39" W,
141.00 feet to the East Right-of Way
of David Street, thence N 2"01'27"
W, along said Right-of Way, 309.54
feet to the South Right-of-Way of
Michelle Street, thence N 80*25'39"
E, along said Right-of-Way, 141.00
feet, thenceS 2"01'27" E 309.54 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Containing 1 acre, more or less. The
East 10 feet and the South 10 feet,
subject to drainage easement.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In Accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando.
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 o Tele-
phone (386)758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 8th day of December,
2009
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of The Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C.'Watson


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000492
ARCH BAY HOLDINGS, LLC -
SERIES 2009A,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL L. KRIEGHAUSER;
TARA M. KRIEGHAUSER A/K/A
TARA MERCHANT KRIE-
GHAUSER; UNKNOWN TENANT
(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF FORE-
CLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 7th day of December,
2009, and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000492, of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD.Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein ARCH BAY HOLDINGS,
LLC - SERIES 2009A is the Plaintiff
and MICHAEL L KRIEGHAUSER;
TARA M. KRIEGHAUSER A/K/A
TARA MERCHANT KRIE-


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000537
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LINDA D. BROOKS; STANLEY
M. MILLER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF LINDA M. BROOKS; UN-'
KNOWN SPOUSE OF STANLEY
M. MILLER; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 8 day of December,
2009, and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000537, of the Circuit
Court of the 3RD Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC. is the Plaintiff and LINDA D.
BROOKS; STANLEY M. MILLER;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LINDA
M. BROOKS; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF STANLEY M. MILL-
ER; UNKNOWN TENANTSS;
JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT PROPER-
TY are defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
the AT COURTHOUSE at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse in Lake
City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 20
day of January 2010, the following
described property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to wit:
Exhibit A
Commence at the Northwest comer
of the SE 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Section
16, Township 3 Range 16 East, Co-
lumbia County, Florida, and run
thence N 87'31'36" E, 833.00 feet to
the Point of Beginning; thence con-
tinue N-87'31'36" E, 100.00 feet;
thence S 2'03'31" E, 604.72 feet to
the Northerly right of way of Nash
Road; thence N 76'00'26" W, along
said right of way 61.55 feet to the
Point of Tangency of a curve con-
cave to the left, having a central an-
gle of 20'00'40" and a radius of
1662.02 feet; thence along a chord
bearing.of said curve, N 76'44'02"
W, 42.16 feet; thence N 2'03'31" W,
575.83 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning.
ALSO
Commence at the Northwest comer
of the SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Sec-
tion 16, Township 3 South; Range 16
East, Columbia County, Florida,
thence run N. 87'31'36" E, 933.0
feet; thence run 2�03'31" E, 355.0
feet to the Point of Beginning; thence
run N 87'31'36" E, 40.0 feet; thence
run S 2'03'31" E, 50 feet; thence run
S 9"15'02" W, 203.97 feet to the
Northerly right if way of Nash Road;
thence run N 2'03'31" W to the
Point of Beginning.
Parcel Identification Number:
R02161-011
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In Accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernand
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 o Tele-
phone (386)758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 8 day of December, 2009
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of The Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
,Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954)453-0365
Facsimile: (954)771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438

04536568
December 24, 31, 2009


New Home Sales


Consultant Wanted

Excellent Commission Based

Pay and Benefits

Fax Resume to 509-756-2869

or email mh newhomeiobs@vahoo.com


" Maronda Homes
P �7Mw<� t/ e-a-r� dwS�^ Y/^


Silii


Legal

GHAUSER; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S); JOHN DOE; JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN
POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the AT COURTHOUSE at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 3rd day of February, 2010, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
A PART OF THE NE 1/4 OF THE
NW 1/4 OF SECTION 21, TOWN-
SHIP 5. SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; BE-
GIN AT THE SW CORNER OF
THE NE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 21, AND RUN
THENCE N 01"14'41" E, ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF SAID NE 1/4
OF NW 1/4, A DISTANCE OF
473.65 FEET; THENCE RUN S
78�31'57" E, 438.15 FEET;
THENCE RUN S 01"15'14" W,
386.71 FEET TO THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4;
THENCE RUN N 89'58'27" W,
ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE,
431.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, OTHER THAN THE
PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE
DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
In Accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hernando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 o Tele-
phone (386)758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 25th day of November,
2009
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
In Accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA),
disabled persons who, because of
their disabilities, need special ac-
commodation to participate in this
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 145 N. Hemando
Street, Lake City, FL 32055 or Tele-
phone (386)758-1041 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 4th day of November,
2009
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04536776
December 24, 31, 2009
NOTICE OF SALE
Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc. will sell
at Public Sale at Auction the follow-
ing vehicles to satisfy lien pursuant
to Chapter 713.585 of the Florida
Statutes on January 07, 201.0 at 10
A.M.
*AUCTION WILL OCCUR
WHERE EACH VEHICLE/VESSEL
IS LOCATED*
Lot#: 011664 1996 CHRYSLER
SEBRING, VIN#
4C3AU52N9TE324573
Located at: WISHES AUTO SHOP
REPAIR, INC
1789 E. DUVAL STREET, LAKE
CITY, FL 32055-3679
Owner: PATRICK EDWARD POL-
LARD 1428 S. MARION AVE APT
102, LAKE CITY, FL 32025-1100
Customer: PATRICK EDWARD
POLLARD 2620 S. MARION ST,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Lienholder: AUTO CREDIT OF
FLORIDA 4545-3 SHIRLEY AVE,
JACKSONVILLE, FL 32210-2079
2nd Lienholder: AUTO CREDIT.
OF FLORIDA 6255 LAKE GRAY
BLVD STE 2, JACKSONVILLE,-
FL
.Lien Amount: $5,050.49
a) Notice to the owner or lien that he
has a right to a hearing prior to the
scheduled date of sale by filing with
the Clerk of the Court.
b) Owner has the right to recover
possession of vehicle by posting
bond in accordance with Florida
Statutes Section 559.917.
c) Proceeds from he dale of the vehi-
cle after payment lien claimed by lie-
nor will be deposited with the Clerk
of the Court.
Any persons) claiming any
interests) in the above vehicles con-
tact: Rainbow Title & Lien, Inc.,
(954)920-6020* ALL AUCTIONS
ARE HELD WITH RESERVE*
Some of the vehicles may have been
released prior to auction
LIC #AB-0001256
04536690
December 24, 2009


020 Lost&Found ,

FOUND CHIHUAHUA on East
Hwy 90 Saturday 12/19.
Please call to identify
386-288-4290

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.Ilakecityreporter.com

















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009


060 Services
Home Daycare: license #
F03C00007 & insured, food pro-
gram 441 (High Spgs/Ellisville),
Open 6:30a-7:30p 386-755-7875

001 Job
100 Opportunities;

04536549

SAVAGE

Drivers Wanted
Savage Services is seeking
professional exp. drivers for the
Lake City facility.
Class A CDL with HAZMAT &
Tanker endorsements required.
* Competitive Pay
* Complete Benefit
Package including
401K
* Home Everyday
* Paid Holidays and
Vacations
* Quarterly Incentive
Bonus
Only serious applicants need
apply in person at:
Florida Crown Career
, Center*
1389 W Hwy 90, Ste. 170.
Lake City, Florida.
* Located across from Florida
Highly ay Patrol Station

04536756
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

BLUE JEAN JOB $ CASH $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to -
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock-n-Roll
Environment. Call Kelly
1-800-201-3293.9am-6pm.
Must start Immediately!
TEMPORARY
# of openings: 10
Sod & General Agricultural Work-
ers Needed .�
Charles Williams and Associates,
LLC Lincoln, Monroe &
McCinn Counties, TN
02/23/2010-12/12/2010
Wages: $8.35- hour. 3/4 of hours
listed on job order guaranteed.
Work tools will be provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
those who cannot reasonably
return to their permanent
residence each working day.
Transportation & subsistence paid
when 50% of contract is met.
Physically able to meet & perform
all job specifications. May be
required to take random drug
and/or alcohol tests, May be
required to submit to a criminal
background check. Apply for this
job at the nearest One Stop Career
Center for further information.


TEMPOKAKY
/# of openings: 4
Tobacco, Hay/Straw, Row Crops
& General Agricultural Workers
Needed
Kermit & Ray Lewis Coffey
Partnership Wayne County, KY
02/15/2010-12/15/2010
Wages: $7.25- 8.00/hour. 3/4 of
hours listed on job order guaran-,
teed. Work tools will be provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to those who cannot reasonably re-
turn to their permanent residence
each working day. Transportation
& subsistence paid when 50% of
contract is met. Physically able to
meet & perform all job specifica-
tions. May be required to take ran-
dom drug and/or alcohol tests.
May be required to submit to a
criminal background check. Apply
for this job at the nearest One Stop
Career Center for further
information.
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
PT ScienceTeacher needed for
private Christian School
BA required
Fax resume to: 386-755-3609
12 Beekeepers needed.
Employment dates are 01/25/2010
- 09/30/2010. Workers must have
3 months exp. working as a
Beekeeper, possess a valid driver's
license. Have no fear of bees, not
allergic to bee stings or pollen.
Workers will raise bees to produce
honey & pollinate crops.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
All tools provided at no cost.
'Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation and subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is $9.17 per hour.
Worksites in Evans, Tattnall,
Bulloch, Bryan, Candler Counties.
Applicants should report or send a
resume to the nearest Florida
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office and reference job order #
GA7811410.
Wilbanks Apiaries - Claxton, GA

12 Medical
120 Employment

04536765
RN NEEDED
7:00 p.m. - 7:00 a.m.
The Health Center of Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills.
Excellent Salary
EOE/ADA/
DrugFree Workplace
Apply in person or
send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 SW McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

DENTAL ASSISTANT needed
F/T position Mon - Fri 9-5.
Salary based on experience.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3122

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


120 EMedical
120 Employment
MADISON COUNTY Memori-
al Hospital Now Hiring:
Case Manager
Laboratory Director
Laboratory Technologists
Respiratory Therapists
RN's & LPN's
Please contact (850)253-1906


240 Schools &
240 Education

04536763
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com
Wanted Career
Motivated Students!.-
If you are seeking a new career in
a high demand field, then get your
Degree or Certificate in Logistics
& Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available for
qualified students. Classes start
01/06/2009, call Lake City Com-
munity College, (386) 754-4492,


310 Pets & Supplies
Apricot TOY POODLE CKC
(w/papers), shots & health cert.,
hold w/dep. til Christmas,
8wks -12/18 $400. 386-719-4900.


FREE! Adorable Boxer/Am Bull-
dog mix 5 month old puppy. Neu-.
tered, all shots, some supplies.
LOVES to play. 36-344-7999
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
WANTED FREE Miniature
Poodle age 8wks to 18 months.
Will have loving home with senior
couple. 386-719-4827

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
GAS STOVE
Good working condition.
' Almond color. $100 OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295
ROPER Washer (3.2 cu.) & Dryer
(6.5 cu. ft.)
Set. Good condition.
$275 OBO. 386-867-1106
UPRIGHT FREEZER.
Frost Free $165.00
or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.
WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$135.00 or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.

405 Bicycles
Girls 16in. Bike. Orange
County Chopper Sting Ray.
Fuchsia Black. $50.
386-755-3350

408 Furniture
BLACK'METAL frame futon
with cushion.
$85.00. OBO
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.
BLUE TWEED, queen sleeper
couch w/ accent pillows.
$100.00 Good shape.
386-755-3682.
GUN CABINET w/ glass door.
3' W x 80" H, handmade w/ unfin-
ished back. A must for gun collec-
tors. $75 OBO 386-867-1106.


Toddler bed
red race car, with mattress,
rarely used. $100.00
386-623-4064


410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315

M 11 Machinery &
Tools
Delta black toolbox.
67" Lx 20"W x 14""D
$45.00
386-867-1106

418 Toys
New Great Railroad Empire train
Battery operated w/4'x9'6" oval
Sound & Its works $50. before 1 la
386-758-1358 or 7p-10p 752-3491

419 TV-Radio &
419 Recording
TV. 57" Zenith. High
Definition. Flat screen
projector. $450.
386-365-3212
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440.


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
We Buy Junk: cars, trucks,
tractors, trailers, scrap metal,
AC's and batteries. NO MH's
Call 386-965-1423 or 365-4879

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
2-15" ALUMINUM wheels
4 lug pattern, Ford Stock.
$100.00
386-365-1075
5-Mer's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) 1-Seiko, 1-Titan,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.
5-Men's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) 1-Seiko,,1-Titan,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.
Full length ladies black leather
trench coat. sz. s/m.
asking $75 OBO
386-963-1211
Full length ladies red wool single
breasted coat. sz s/m.
asking $75'OBO
386-963-1211
SMOKER/GRILL
Charcoal. Cast Iron.
$40.00
386-755-3350

4 Good Things
450 toEat
PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420
The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

630 Mobile Homes
S for Rent
2& 3br off 252 in Suwannee
County. No pets (horses OK)
1st month & deposit.
386-961-1482.
2BRI2BA SWMH.
$600. Ino + $600 security deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
'Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
4BR/2BA MH $600 mo.
1st, last and $400 dep. No pets.'
Available on Jan. 1st.
386- 288-4029
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in
Branford area. $650.mo.
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3br/2ba MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500. move in. $575. mo.
RENTED
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water & -
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
VERY CLEAN 2b/2ba. Covered
patio, front & back. No pets. State
Rd 100 @ Union County line.
$600 month. Call 904-966-0765.
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
FORECLOSURE - 4 Bedroom
on Half Acre. $3000 down, $500.
mo. Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
. jmimartin23@yahoo.com
We will build and Beat any .
MODULAR Floor Plan!
Have two with land included.
Save $$$ Thousands.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jmmartin23@yahoo.com
1999 Repo. Great Shape 24X48
3br Doublewide Set-up on
your land. $21,900.
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jmiamartin23@yahoo.com


FOR SALE
2001 28X40 on I acre. $59,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com


650 Mobile Home
650& Land
1800 s.f..Man. Home, 4bd/2ba,
plus retreat/office. 2 porches,
walks, concrete foundation, appli.,
plywood w/ ceramic floors, metal
roof, 5 acres, comer lot (treed).
Horses ok, Call Gary Hamilton
(386) 758-9824. Poss. owner
finance. $119K.
Owner Financing. Large. MH
w/3.32 acres. South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590-0642/867-1833

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
Ig master br, very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled , 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.


710 f Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES!
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649per mo. !!!

$299 MOVES YOU IN

FREE RENT
, 200 FREE CHANNELS
*? BAHAMA CRUISE
* 386-754-1800

!!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)




2br Apt. in town.
Great location.
$500. mo plus deposit.
386-344-2972
2BR/1.5BA DUPLEX w/garage.
Luxury Apt. 5 min from VA
Hospital and Timco.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BI/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, bav, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Studios & IBr's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location..
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

72 0 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Country Living. Furnished Effi-
ciency Park Model Trailers. $500
per month all utilities provided.
, all 386-961-8540/386-755-4945
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
24 hour office, laundry & vending
, Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax

730 Unfurnished
730.v Home For Rent
.3BR/2BA BRICK home for rent.
Nice subdivision w/large lot.
Close to town. $750. mo
plus security 386-752-2063


3BR/2BA BRICK Home
in town. $850/mo.
$500. security deposit.
386-365-8721
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.


Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
Owner Financing 3br/lba near
elementary school in LC.
Small down $575. mo.
386-867-1833 or 590-0642
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak.. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


Classified Department: 755-5440


4 Wheeler Yamaha Raptor 2002
6600RR. Loaded, New engine. Big
Bore $2,200. Also, 2006 Suzuki
GSX -R1000. 2200mi. Like new
$6,500. 386-365-3212


952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
c 2007 Dodge Caravan
13,200 miles
$16,500
Call 386-965-3075

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


740 Furnished
74 Homes for Rent

1600 sq. ft. 2/1 Furnished house in
town. Near duck pond. Remodled,
beautiful hardwood/ceremic floors.
$950/month + sec. No pets.
Includes lawn service. 961-8788.
7 0 Business &
7/5 Office Rentals
For Rent. 24X30 storgae bldg. lo-
cated off US 90 behind "Right way
Automotive". $250. mo. has elec.
but for storage only. 386-755-2475
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Retail Space
'Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135


770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$1000 mo, $1000 dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm
St. Augustine Beach.3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tise'd in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
, impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR THURSDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2009


SLaps led in 2009 by
Jimmie Johnson, tops
By RK M R / Cx among all drivers
By RICK MINTER / Cox Newspapers


Carl Edwards seeks a


Return


to Glory


After disappointing 2009, driver wants to


C arl Edwards proved most of the
prognosticators wrong this year,
but it's not something he's partic-
ularly proud of.
After leading the Sprint Cup Series in
victories with nine in 2008 and finish-
ing second in the points standings,
many picked him as the favorite to win
the '09 title.
Edwards didn't even come close. He
was winless all season, and even though
he made the cut for the Chase for the
Sprint Cup, he finished 11th and wasn't
even among the group that spoke at the
Awards Banquet. Only the top 10 appear
there.
Edwards' season wasn't a total disap-
pointment. He ran the entire
Nationwide Series schedule, won five
times and was second in points to Kyle
Busch.
But as with Busch and others who
double-dip into the Nationwide Series,
his primary focus is on the Cup effort.
And his challenge going forward is to
make the 2010 season more like '08 than
'09.
In last week's Ford release, Edwards
gave some insight how he and his No. 99
team are working to get better. He point-
ed out one thing that is fairly obvious to
those knowledgeable about the inner
workings of a race team.
"There's not one thing where every-
one says, 'Oh, this is what we're miss-
ing,' because that would be really sim-
ple and we'd fix it right away," Edwards
said. "But what I do know are the things
we don't need to do, and we don't need
to point fingers and change things
around - do wholesale changes."
Edwards also said his winless season
wasn't as bad as it might have looked to
some.
"It's so competitive right now," he
said. "I finished11th in points. I think if
things would have been a little different
on pit road and we had some little bit
different luck on the race track, we
could have finished sixth or seventh.
That's not too far from being a con-
tender for the championship, so we're
working on a lot of little things to try
and make us a little faster."
And, he said, so far everyone is stick-
ing together.
"The thing I'm most proud of is that
[crew chief] Bob [Osborne] and I aren't
yelling at each other," he said. "Jack
[Roush] is not freaking out. [Sponsor]
Aflac is behind us 100 percent. Ford is
behind us 100 percent. I think as long as
we keep everything pointed in the right
direction, we'll be alright."
He said the one race that seemed to
illustrate his whole season was the
spring race at Talladega
Superspeedway, where he was leading
in the final yards only to wreck with
Brad Keselowski and wind up in the
catch fence. And he said that just mak-
ing the Chase was an accomplishment
in itself.
"It did not look good 10-15 races in,
and we started working really hard and


reclaim success of'08


-NASCAR
Carl Edwards led the Sprint Cup Series with nine wins in 2008, includ-
ing the finale at Homestead, and finished second in points. In 2009 he
was winless and finished a disappointing 11th in the standings.


everybody rallied and we made it in,"
he said. "We didn't make very much of
it ... but making it is the thing I was
proud of."
After the 10th race of the season, at
Richmond, he was ninth in the stand-
ings, 237 points behind leader Jeff
Gordon.
, Edwards said it was his Nationwide
Series participation as much as any-
thing that allowed him to stay positive
even when the Cup results failed to
meet expectations.
"When I have that success [in
Nationwide], it keeps me going," he
said. "If I'm having a bad day in the
Cup car, I just think about the races like
[O'Reilly Raceway Park], Montreal and


the Phoenix race where we won - all
those races I performed really well -
and that keeps me going.
"I think that's why a lot of these
guys go race other stuff because it
helps you remember how-much fun rac-
ing is and that's what the Nationwide
Series does for me."
But for the next few weeks, Edwards
will trade his fast-paced life for a much
slower one, and he's looking forward to
that too.
"I'm not going to be very busy," he
said. "That's really good. Kate and I are
going to celebrate our first anniversary,
which is great, and we're going to pre-
pare for this baby, which is unbeliev-
able."


Report: No major races at

historic Milwaukee Mile

It's beginning to look like there will be no major
league races in the foreseeable future at one of the
sport's most historic tracks, the Milwaukee Mile.
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is reporting that
the Wisconsin State Park Fair officials who control
the track haven't been able to find a promoter to put
on the races.
NASCAR had scheduled both Nationwide and
Camping World Truck series races at the Mile for
next June, but series officials told the paper that
alternate scheduling plans were being formulated.

KentuckySpeedway court battle over
The legal battle for a Sprint Cup race date at
Kentucky Speedway appears to be ovdr, and that may
actually pave the way for a Cup race at the track in
the future. NASCAR officials have maintained that
there would be no discussions about a date as long as
the lawsuit was ongoing. Former Kentucky
Speedway Chairman Jerry Carroll announced last
week that he would not continue the legal battle.
"On behalf of the original partners of Kentucky
Speedway I have informed our attorneys we will not
pursue any remaining appeals in the case," Carroll
said in a statement. "While we still believe in the
merits of the case, it is time to accept the decision of
the courts and move on."
Now it's up to the track's current owner, Bruton
Smith and his company, Speedway Motorsports Inc.,
to negotiate a date for the track.

Mullet racing team leaving Nationwide Series
The CJM racing team owned by Tony and Bryan
Mullet announced last week that it would not return
to the Nationwide Series in 2010. The team employed
several drivers in its No. 11 Toyota in 2009 and posted
five top-five finishes including second-place runs by
Mike Bliss at Dover and Charlotte and a fifth by
Denny Hamlin in the season-ending race at
Homestead-Miami Speedway
The Mullets released a statement that read in part:
"It is really hard for us to see this great group of peo-
ple move in other directions, They haye done so
much to build this program and beyond that, it has
become like a family
"We have built many great relationships within
the industry and we want to thank everyone for
showing us support. We are thankful for the time we
have had to enjoy this great sport and are focused
intently on what the future will bring."
Crew chief Paul Wolfe already has moved to'
Penske Racing, where he will work with Brad
Keselowski in the Nationwide Series.

Chevrolet, Fod making changes
The shuffling of key positions affecting NASCAR
racing isn't being limited to race teams and the sanc-
tioning body In recent weeks, General Motors,
announced that Brent Dewar, the top person at
Chevrolet, was leaving his job just five months after
taking it. He's being replaced by James Campbell,
who had been in charge of GM's fleet and commer-
cial operations.
During his brief tenure as head of Chevrolet,
Dewar made a trip to Atlanta Motor Speedway on a
race weekend and used the time to assure Chevy
race teams - and the media - that Chevy was in
NASCAR to stayan t stay at its current level of
participation.
Over at Ford, Jamie Allison, a 22-year company
veteran with experience in engineering, product
planning and marketing, has been named director,
Ford North America Motorsports. He replaced Brian
Wolfe, a familiar face at both NASCAR and NHRA
race tracks. Wolfe is being promoted to anew posi-
tion in global product development.
Allison, who already was a part of Ford's racing
efforts, said in a statement that he's ready to move
forward with the program.
- "For a kid who wanted to work for Ford Motor
Company, to help carry forward a tradition that
Henry Ford himself started is something special,"
he said. "Brian Wolfe really made a great difference
in the program in his time as director, opening up so
many opportunities to reach out, not just the profes-
sional racers, but to the grassroots and sportsman
racers as well. He installed a philosophy that we
were going to be 'racer-friendly' in all that we do,
and we as a team will carry that forward."


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