Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

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000021 120110 **3-DIGIT 32
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Reporter


Sunday, December 20,2009 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 135, No. 289 $ 1.00


A winter wonderland


Seventh annual
event took place
downtown.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City was briefly
turned into a winter wonder-
land for the Seventh Annual
Snow Day on Saturday.
Within the event's first
hour, there were more than


500 people at Snow Day,
said Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council exec-
utive director.
The event was postponed
from Dec. 12 due to rain,
but this time around the
sun was shining.
"I couldn't have asked for
a prettier day," Campbell
said.
Snow Day featured 40


tons of snow


arranged in


two snow piles and a sleigh
hill.
Baya Pharmacy, after
hearing the event had been
initially canceled, came to
its rescue and paid for this
year's Snow Day, Campbell
said. Their donation said
"Merry Christmas" to the
entire community
"We just appreciated their
help in making it a reality,"
he said.
There were also 45 volun-


teers helping at the event,
Campbell said.
Snow Day is all about
bringing joy to children's
faces, said Jeff Bertram, past
president of the Downtown
Action Corporation.
"It's my favorite event
that the downtown does all
year," he said.
Other activities at Snow
Day include bounce houses
SNOW continued on 3A


S'.




ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Report -
Maxwell Garner, 3, of Lake City, plays in a snow pile at the
Seventh Annual Snow Day Saturday.


Highlighting history


Processional
leads to burial of
time capsule.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Festivities for the
City of Lake City
Sesquicentennial
Celebration
culminated at a
closing ceremony Saturday,
in Olustee Park.
"This has been a tremen-
dous success the entire
year," said Paulette Lord,
sesquicentennial chair.
Lord told those gathered
for the closing ceremony
that she was sad to see the
celebration end.
"You guys can take care
of it next time," she said.
Closing ceremony activi-
ties included the dedica-
tion of a bell in Olustee
Park. The bell was a gift on
behalf of the sesquicenten-
nial committee.
A processional led the
sesquicentennial time cap-
sule to the city hall vault. It
will be opened in 2059.
The time capsule has
more than 500 items.
Contents include: a
Snuggie, a pair of crocs,
items from the 1959 time
capsule, memorabilia from
the entire 150th anniversa-
ry celebration, magazines
and more. City of Lake
City Mayor Stephen Witt
also wrote a letter to' the
future.
"I'll be there when they
open it," he said
The ceremony ended
with the dedication of a
plaque for Fort Lancaster,
which was once located at
the present site of city hall
during the 1800s.
'This is a big honor,"
said Pat McAlhany, Lake
City/Columbia County
Historical Museum presi-


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter


(ABOVE) Mayor Stephen
Witt, (from left) City Manager
Wendell Johnson, City Clerk
Audrey Sikes and Jodi Witt
push the time capsule to the
City Hall vault where it will be
kept for 50 years.

(RIGHT) Mayor Stephen Witt
accepts a legislative resolu-
tion in honor of Lake City's
Sesquicentennial Celebration
from State Representative
Debbie Boyd (D-Newberry).


Second annual
event scheduled
for 6 p.m.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
Officials believe many
people don't realize the
extent of homelessness in
Columbia County, but the
Homeless Services Network


of Suwannee Valley is work-
ing to shed some light on
the issue.
A candlelight vigil
acknowledging the home-
less in Columbia County is
from 6 to 6:30 p.m. Monday,
in Olustee Park. This is the
second year the network
has hosted the event.
"We really want to raise
awareness in our area," said
Deborah Rivera, network


chair. "We have, unfortu-
nately, a growing number
of homeless and people in
danger of becoming home-
less."
Guest speakers at the
vigil will include Mayor
Stephen Witt, agency direc-
tors and a homeless person,
Rivera said. The Gateway
Baptist Church ensemble
will also sing.
Donations of pop-top
I


canned goods, new or gen-
tly used blankets, socks for
all ages and underwear for
children will also be accept-
ed during the vigil for peo-
ple in Columbia County.
"I think in these hard
economic times, those of
us who are sheltered need
to be very grateful for what
we have," Rivera said. "We
VIGIL continued on 3A


Prison finalists


ataleoftwo i

different cities.


Lake City,
Baldwin, Mich.,
are potential sites.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Federal Bureau of
Prisons is considering two
sites to which it may offer
contracts to house male
criminal illegal aliens.
Lake City has been listed
as one of the potential sites
where the Federal Bureau
of Prisons may contract to
have a privately owned and
operated prison to house
inmates.
.The, other facility under
consideration is in Baldwin,
Mich.
The Baldwin, Mich., site
is located in Lake County,
Michigan, and consists of
105 acres - 24 of those
acres are developed.
The. developed portion
of the property is com-
prised of the North Lake
Correctional Facility. The
remaining 81 acres consists
of woodlands and limited
rural residential develop-
ment occurs to the east and
south of the property.
According to informa-
tion from the Federal
Bureau of Prisons' Draft
Environmental Impact
Statement, Baldwin, Mich.,
has a population of 1,107,
based on information from
the U.S. Census Bureau in
June 2009. The majority of
the population are adults 18
years or older (861 people)
with the median age being
listed as 35 years old.
There are two villages in
Lake County, but no cities.
Each village has approxi-
mately 800 to 900 people.
The facility the Federal
Bureau of Prisons is consid-
ering for usage in the project
is in Webber Township - a
subdivision of a county.
The report says the most
recent information from
the Michigan Employment
Service Agency, in 2006,
indicated the total workforce
in Lake County was 4,515
and the unemployment rate
was 9.1 percent. The area's
unemployment rate is high-
er than the Michigan state-
wide unemployment rate of
6.9 percent.
The report says Lake
County and the Baldwin area
areeconomicallydepressed,
as are many other locations


INSIDE

E Residents and officials of
Lake County, Mich., offer
their opinion on the
proposed prison, 6A

in Michigan,
"Due to the recent col-
lapse of the U.S. auto indus-
try and the overall economy
in Michigan, local residents
have witnessed a significant
loss of jobs arid downrh-irn-
in the local economy," the
report reads.

The facility

The North Lake
Correctional Facility is
owned by GEO Group and
has the capacity to accom-
modate approximately 1,889
inmates - 1,725 beds. in
general population housing
and 164,segregation beds'",
The facility was clbsed
a few years ago, but since
then, GEO Group recently
completed new construc-
tion at the facility. The
expansion of the facility
comprises 217,208 square
feet, and the renovation of
the former Michigan Yoiuth
Correctional Facility.
The former Michigan
Youth Correctional Facility
was constructed between
1997-1999 and operated
as the Michigan Youth
Detention Center from
March 1999 - November
2005. The facility was for
480 boys between the ages
of 13-19 years old. It was'
originally ' operated by
Wackenhut Corrections of
Florida, but has been vacant
since October 2005. GEO
has maintained the facility
with a limited staff from its
closure to the present time.

Reaction from
Baldwin residents
While proponents for a
proposed privately owned
and operated prison in
Columbia County continue-
to offer a variety of opin-
ions, the attitude of several
Baldwin residents is con-
sistent.
"We would be enthusi-
astically in support of the
GEO Corporation getting
that contract," said Deborah
PRISON continued on 3A


1 9m4 i 00 aI


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


56 30
Mostly Sunny

WEATHER, 6A


Opinion ....... -A
Business...... IC
Life .............. .. ID
Sports ........ ..... I B
Puzzles ..... ...... 2B


.J TODAY IN
BUSINESS
S.' jhildd-.n read. ,
- to lead bj.u,, er17


COMING
TUESDAY
School ne,;.s tIrim
the district


,Z*s � s s k=iIj t Fla :1


I


150TH continued on 3A


Homeless vigil set for Monday evening


~


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Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday:- Wednesday:
10-14-18-37 20 2-14-26-30-36 Afternoon: 7-6-3 Afternoon: 9-6-8-8 N/A 6-15-25-37-40-52 13-23-25-35-43
. Evening: 4-2-4 Evening: 4-2-2-0 X4 PB15 X5


AROUND FLORIDA



Some schools dropping driver's ed to cut costs


3y CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press
MIAMI - Beginning
driver Ashley Crawford
grips the worn gray steer-
ing wheel and warily
begins maneuvering the
1999.Ford Escort through
a set:of bright orange traf-
fic cones outside Killian
Senior High School.
She considers herself
luck': Because of budget
cuts,'many schools around
the country are leaving
driver's ed by the side of
the road. They are cutting
back on behind-the-wheel
instruction or eliminating
it altogether, leaving it to
parents to either teach
their teenagers themselves
or send them to commer-
cial driving schools.
"If my parents would
.have taught me, it would
have been different,"
said Ashley, a 16-year-old
sophomore. "When I drive,
they try to tell me what to
do, and I get nervous."
Some educators and oth-
ers worry that such cut-
backs could prove tragic.
"As soon as people start
taking driver's educa-
tionr away from the kids,
we're going to pay for it
within lost lives, collisions,
and:ultimately that costs
everybody," said John
Boleni, past president of
the -Florida Professional
Driving School
Association.
Sbme worry also that
marly parents can't afford
the $350 to $700 that private
lessons can cost or don't
Shave-the skills to teach their
kidi themselves. Even for


In this Nov. 23 photo, driver's ed students drive a course at Miami Killian Senior High School in Miami. Because of budget
cuts, many schools around the country are leaving driver's ed by the side of the road. They are cutting back on behind-the-
wheel instruction or eliminating it altogether, leaving it to parents to either teach their teenagers themselves or send them to'


commercial driving schools.
those who can do it, the
combination of parents,
teenagers and learning how
to drive can be volatile,
In more than half.
the states, minors who
want a license must take
driver's education from a
certified instructor, said
Allen Robinson, CEO of,
the American Driver and
Traffic Safety Education
Association. However, that
doesn't necessarily mean
schools are required to
offer a class. (Generally,
after age 18, would-be driv-


ers do not have to undergo
any formal instruction.)
High schools started
rolling back driver's ed
after their effectiveness
was called into question in
the 1980s. The more recent
cutbacks have been driven
by school funding short-
ages, and the trend might
be accelerating because of
, the downturn in the econo-
my, said J. Peter Kissinger,
president and CEO of the
AAA Foundation"for Traffic
Safety.
Robinson said the


nation's schools have all but
eliminated driver's ed as an
elective course offered dur-
ing the school day.
Here in Miami-Dade
County, the nation's
fourth-largest school sys-
tem got rid of driver's ed
during the day at all but
Killian and another school.
Students can still enroll in
a free after-school course
at one of the district's
adult education centers.
But that is not an option
for the many thousands of
students who play sports


or are involved in other.
extracurricular activities,
or cannot get a ride.
About 10 high schools
in Georgia eliminated or
reduced driver's educa-
tion this school year. A
dozen more did the same
in Kansas last year. In
Volusia County, schools
eliminated daytime driv-
er's ed three years ago,'
replacing it with summer,
after-school and Saturday
classes. Enrollment plum-
meted two-thirds, saving,
about $400,000 a year.


"This is not because
they don't believe in
driver's ed," said Bob
Dallas, director of the
Georgia Governor's Office
of Highway Safety. "They
do, but they're facing the
same financial pressure
.that everybody in govern-
ment is facing."
In rural Pennsylvania,
the Titusville district got
rid of the behind-the-wheel
portion of its program
last spring, saving about
$20,000. In Blountville,
Tenn., the driver's educa-
tion program was cut in
half about five years ago
because of budget woes.
Administrators considered
eliminating the $130,000-a-
year program last spring,
but did not.
"It could save lives. It's
very simple," said Jack �
Barnes, director of schools
in Sullivan County, Tenn.
"We don't want any of our
students injured or killed
because of mistakes they
made that possibly a pro-
gram like this could help."
Motor vehicle crashes
are the leading cause of
death for U.S. teens; in
2007, an average of 1116- to
19-year-olds died every day.
But Russ Rader, a spokes-
man for the Insurance
Institute for Highway Safety,
said studies show there is
no difference in crash risk
between 16- and 17-year-
olds who take driver's ed
and those who don't.
"In some cases, driver's
education has a negative
effect because in some
states you can get a license
sooner if you take driver's
ed," he said.


One last day

NEW YORK
The final glimpse of
Charles Gibson found
him at his "ABC World
News" anchor desk, sur-
rounded by dozens of
applauding co-workers. He applaud-
ed back.
Signing off from the network's
flagship newscast Friday, Gibson
brought to a close 34 years at ABC.
He palled the job he's leaving "a
labor of love."
"It's hard to walk away from what
I honestly think is the best job in
the world," he said in brief farewell
remarks. "But my parents taught me
you; should understay, not overstay,
your welcome.
"And there is so much to do. In
the :years I have left, I don't want to
miss any of it."
The 66-year-old Gibson, who has
anchored "World News" since 2006,
announced his intention to retire sev-
eral months ago.
"I hope you've had a good day,"
he said in one last refrain of his sig-
nature signoff, his voice quavering.
"I've had so many good days here."
On .tape, luminaries paid him
tribute and wished him well. They
included President Barack Obama
as well as former presidents George
W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W.
Bush and Jimmy Carter. Singers
Sting and Julie Andrews sang his
praises, and comic actors Alec
Baldwin and Steve Martin sang a few
bars of "Happy Trails to You."
Even fellow TV journalists Brian
Williams and Katie Couric, his eve-
ning-news rivals on NBC and CBS,
plus Kermit, the Muppet 'hews
frog," weighed in warmly.
On Monday, Diane Sawyer, the
ABC colleague Gibson cited as "my
pal," will take over anchor duties at
"World News" in what is unfolding
as a low-key transition. That seems
in keeping with Gibson's reassuring,
nori-flashy style.
Considered one way, Gibson's
career in TV news seems to have
been a model of stability: 34 years
logged with one network, where he
did*:his job well and rose to the top of


at work for ABC's Gibson


In this photo provided by ABC, anchor Charles Gibson is is surrounded by friends
and colleagues at ABC News headquarters in New York, on Friday, during .his final
broadcast of 'World News with Charles Gibson.' Gibson is retiring after 35 years
with ABC News.


his profession.
On the other hand, he bows out as
more than an admired network news
star. Gibson has long proven himself
a utility player, game to handle a
range of positions and scramble to
the rescue when needed.
It was in 1975 that Gibson joined
ABC News, where he was named
White House correspondent a year
later. After numerous other assign-
ments, he began a lengthy stretch
as co-anchor of "Good Morning
America" in 1987, then left in .1998
to serve as a co-anchor of the
"Primetime Thursday" newsmaga-
zine for six years.
This might seem like a steady-
as-he-goes career climb. But in
1999, less than a year after exiting
"GMA" for prime-time prominence,
Gibson was summoned back for
supplementary service in the morn-
ing-show trenches. He and Sawyer
(a morning-TV veteran from her
days at CBS) were good soldiers and
resumed setting their alarm clocks
for the middle of the night.
Their mandate: to stanch the rat-


ings hemorrhage at "GMA" during
Gibson's brief time away. The chem-
istry between them worked, and what
was conceived as stopgap triage con-
tinued for more than seven years.
Then Gibson announced his
departure for a second time.
Demonstrating his versatility that
final week on "GMA," he reported
on terrorists and politicians. He also
furnished his audience with another
kind of news flash: You can potty
train your toddler in just 24 hours
(or so claimed his on-camera inter-
viewee, who had written a book on
the subject).
But Gibson was already involved
in another mission for ABC News.
A year earlier, in 2005, "World
News" anchor Peter Jennings had
died from lung cancer. Then, early in
2006, Jennings' co-successors were
both forced to give up their roles at
the anchor desk: Bob Woodruff was
gravely injured on assignment in
Iraq, and Elizabeth Vargas became
pregnant.
Again, the network turned to Gibson.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Rock musician Peter
Criss is 64.
* Psychic/illusionist Uri
Geller is 63.
* Producer Dick Wolf
("Law & Order") is 63.
.* Rock musician Alan
Parsons is 61.
* Actress Jenny Agutter.


is57.
* Actor Michael
Badalucco is 55.
* Actress Nicole deBoer
is 39.
* Movie director Todd
Phillips is 39.
* Singer David Cook
("American Idol") is 27.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ... (386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
.Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
Editor Tom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(listrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityieporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters. .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
+Iome delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks..................$26:32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks . ................ . $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks ............. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Daily Scripture

"And you, my child, will be called a
prophet of the Most High; for you will
go on before the Lord to prepare the
way for him, to give his people the
knowledge of salvation through the
forgiveness of their sins, because of the
tender mercy of our God, by which the'
rising sun will come to us from heaven"
- Luke 1:76-78


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT














LAKE CIY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


Locals turn out for 'Rally for Truth'


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Concerned citizens
gathered at the "Rally for
Truth" Saturday in Olustee
Park.
The Columbia County
Republican Executive
Committee sponsored the
non-partisan event.
Opinions on health
care reform legislation,
the stimulus plan and
the Constitution, were
shared from several citi-
zens.
The average American
doesn't know the truth
about government, said
Tony Buzzella,.event orga-
nizei. Citizens fail to do
their homework and get


informed on issues.
Issues in government
didn't just begin with the
current administration, he
said.
"You can't blame Bush
or Obama," Buzzella said.
"Who cares whose fault it
is? Let's quit pointing fin-
gers and take a look at
where America should
be."
The rally's purpose is to
bring the truth to light, he
said. The focus should not
be on which party line is,
right, but what is right for
America.
"All I want is the truth,"
Buzzella said;
The next "Rally forTruth"
is schedule to be held
Feb. 27.


U.S. Navy Airmen Michael Scott (left) and Columbia County
Republican Party event organizer Tony Buzzela salute during
the singing of the national anthem on Saturday during the
downtown 'Rally for Truth' event. The next 'Rally for Truth' is
set for Feb. 27.


VIGIL Set for Monday


Continued From Page 1A
need to recognize the grow-
ing number of community
members that are homeless
and at risk of being home-
less. They could be in line
in front of you at Wal-Mart
or next to you at church."


The community is invit-
ed to learn more about
the homeless in Columbia
County.
"Come out and show your
support," Rivera said. "Come
be a part of the solution."


SNOW: Day festivities
Continued From Page 1A


and a giant pinball machine.
The entire event was free.
"Everybody can come
out and it doesn't cost
them a thing," Bertram
said. "I hope we continue


to do it."
Festivities concluded
Saturday night with the".
Merry Christmas Lake City
Concert and Santa Photo '
Night in Olustee Park.



ken


150TH: Celebration concluded Saturday
Continued From Page 1A
dent. 'This is a lasting be the first of many to corn- , Seeing the 150th Johnson, he, said.
memory of what we did memorate historical places. anniversary celebra- "It's a privilege to me,"
this year." in downtown Lake City, she 'tion meant a lot to City he said. "I know I'll neyer
The plaque is hoped to said. Manager Wendell see it again."


PRISON: Two finalist cities different in many ways


Continued From Page 1A
Smith-Olson, chairman and
CEO of Lake-Osceola State
Bank in Baldwin. "We were
fortunate enough to have
the GEO Corporation in
business here previously.
They were contracting with
the State of Michigan and
the state pulled their con-
tract We have felt the severe
pinch of the closure."
Smith-Olson said that
pinch amounted to 10 per-
cent of the employment
opportunities in the county
- about 300 jobs 'at that
time.
She said the GEO
Corporation's addition was
completed last year and
changed the facility from
a maximum security facil-
ity to a medium security
facility.
Smith-Olson also noted
the Baldwin public hear-
ings were filled with more
than 100 people who spoke
in support of the proposed
facility.
"Former GEO employees
were speaking, and people
who had had to leave the
area because they couldn't
find work," she said. "This
will be a big economic boost
for us. We want jobs of any
kind in Michigan."
Lake County Commission
acting chairman Bob Myers'
also said the Baldwin-area
needs the prison.
"We're really high on it,"
he said. "It's really the kind
of thing we need here. Our
whole county is a tourist
county because we have so
much state and federal for-
est lands that were taken
off the tax rolls. We have
no big industry at all in this
county. It's well-received
to have the federal people.


7 /2
prW~�


WIN- - A .~,



9


come in here."
He said the Lake County
area has a number of trout
streams, lakes and road-
ways Route 10 and Route
7 - and yet the region
doesn't have a single stop
light in the county.
'The GEO prison that is
coming in here is a real
Godsend," Myers said. 'We
have the property, and the
building is already built. It's
a prison we had for teens
that was shut down by the
state three years ago. GEO
expanded the prison and
brought it up to federal
specs."
. Myers said the prison
will add to the area's econ-
omy.
"It will bring up our eco-
nomic base," he said. 'We
had a great loss when we
shut it down. We had a
certain amount of people,
and when they left it really
put a big whole in our econ-
omy. The feds bringing in
more jobs would enhance
it, too. We definitely want
the prison here. It's been
'100 percent positive. We've
had no negative response
to it."
Lake County clerk, regis-
ter of deeds and chief finan-
cial officer Shelly Myers
also said the proposal was
favorably received.
"Out of two public
meetings for the prison
to be located here in Lake
County, we had zero neg-
ative responses to this
being their selected loca-
tion," she said. "We would
gladly welcome such an
opportunity to be brought
back into our area. Our
question was mainly why
would they wish to spend


nioney and build a new
facility,. when this facility
is new and just been ren-
ovated to their specifica-
tions."

About GEO
Corporation
The GEO Group, Inc.
is deals in the delivery of
correctional, detention and
residential treatment ser-
vices to federal, state, and
local government agencies
internationally. GEO work
includes design,, construc-
tion, financing, and opera-
tions and the company
represents government cli-


ents in the United States,
Australia, South Africa,
Canada, and the United
Kingdom. GEO's opera-
tions include 67 correction-
al and residential treatment
facilities with a total design
capacity of approximately
60,000 beds.
Smith-Olson said GEO
Corporation was also a
good corporate neighbor
for the area.
"They were very involved
in fundraising, bought com-
puters for fourth graders
and people that worked
for them always made. an
effort to be involved in the
non-profit efforts that were
going on," she said.


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your written authorization. This
authorization has to meet Federal
law. An authorization form may be
obtained from your new physician
or requested by mail to
P. O. Box 2757, Lake City, FL 32056.


I ,.,.


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


'��~

;1 I

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U!'
'


















OPINION


Sunday, December 20, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


Public

input on

prison is

important

Monday marks
the final day
to offer public
comment on an
issue that has
drawn a sharp divide within our
community: a proposed private
prison to house male, low-secu-
rity, criminal illegal aliens.
It is important that the public
take this opportunity.
After months of debate and
reams of information from both
proponents and opponents of
,this $65 million project, the
facts now before the commu-
nity have been offered in a bal-
anced manner..In recent weeks,
our pages have been filled with
the positions of those for and'
against the prison project.
As recently as Thursday,
the community had the oppor-
tunity to listen .and ask ques-
tions of individuals with tested
interests on both sides of this
proposal.
Now is the time to review
that information and remove
emotion and politics from logi-
cal thoughts and comments.
Passionate arguments have
been drawn on both ends of
this discussion. But it is undeni-
able that a well-structured and
well-thought-out opinion will go
much farther than an irrational
and emotional diatribe.
The bottom line is that
Columbia County has an
opportunity.presented on its .
doorstep - the potential of
250 prison jobs. Whether we
choose to embrace or derail
that opportunity is not entirely
in our hands - the federal
government and the Bureau of
Prisons has the final say - but
failure to espouse a reasoned
opinion ensures only one
thing: Absolutely no voice in a
project that could bolster the
economic environment of our
community.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday,
Dec. 20, the 354th day of
2009. There are 11 days
left in the year.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Stolen car, Christmas angels


(Reprinted from December 26,
1995)
t came upon a midnight
clear two weeks ago in
Jacksonville that my car
was stolen.
Having your car stolen
anytime is a bad deal but when
it happens in a big city late on
a bitterly cold night leaving
you stranded and all alone, it is
much worse.
When it happens in a dark,
unfamiliar area and you don't
have access to a telephone, that
just adds to the anger and frus-
tration.
I saw no ready answers to my
most immediate questions that
bleak night. How can I get out
of this windy, freezing weather?
How can I get back home to
Lake City tonight?
I saw lots of Christmas deco-
rations at homes all around me
but there were no good tidings
of great joy that I could find that
miserable, cold night. Or so I
thought.
Then, lo and behold, the first
of three human angels miracu-
lously entered my life.

The first angel
I knew this much for sure. If
I knocked on anyone's door that
late at night, they would ignore
me - or, at best, talk to me
through their locked door and
tell me to go someplace else for
help. Who could blame them?
But, no, the first human
angel, a retired woman living
alone, answered the door, lis-
tened to my story, and, miracle
of miracles, invited me inside to
get out of the cold.
She then provided me


Morris Williams
Phone:(386) 755-8183
williams_h2@firn.edu
372 W. Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055

with a phone and helped
me call the police. Then she
helped me arrange a rental
car so I could drive home.
She even made steaming hot
coffee for me while I waited,
and wouldn't take the money
I offered her for her help. An
angel, indeed!

The second angel
Remember that rental car I
mentioned? Well, there was a
slight catch to that. The closest
place I could rent a car that time
of night was at the Jacksonville
International Airport, some 45
minutes away.
I was about to call a taxi -
and I was plenty worried about
the cost of such a long ride -
when the second angel entered
my life. A man living nearby
had somehow heard of my pre-
dicament, gotten dressed, and
offered to drive me, no charge,
to the airport.
Now I ask you - if y'u lived
in Jacksonville, would you even
stop and talk to a total stranger
in the late night hours, much
less invite him into your car for
a dark ride over mostly empty
roads through some pretty


desolate areas? Probably not,
but this angel did.
As we rode, I looked up at
the stars on this clear and silent'
night, and marveled at my good
luck. Two angels in one night!
Star of Wonder, Star of Night,
Star with Royal Beauty Bright!
Little did I know there was a
third angel just ahead.

The third angel
As soon as I was dropped off
at the airport, I headed for the
rental car agency. It was after
2 a.m. and I was exhausted and
sleepy. That's when I met the
third angel, a see~finigly_-6di- -.
nary man, and we struck up -a
conversation.
I told him about my stolen
car and the people who had,
been so helpful. Then, incred-
ibly, my good luck continued.
The man said he was at the air-
port to pick up a package and
would be driving toward Lake
City shortly and it wouldn't be
much out of his way to take me
home.
And so it came to pass
that, Westward Leading, Still
Proceeding, this third angel
guided me safely to the Perfect
Light of Lake City and the
warmth of home.
Was it Guardian Angels or
just extraordinarily kind human
beings who rescued me that
cold, difficult night? You tell
me.
Either way, it's nice to think
of protective angels and kind
people at Christmas time.

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


or decades, the ability
of the United States
to attract and keep
S the brightest minds
from other countries
has been a key to maintaining
a strong economy. Institutions
like Florida International
University have led the way in
bringing top achievers to this
country, creating a strong and
permanent link between them
and the United States.
But the security clampdown
that followed 9/11 has made it
significantly harder for foreign
students to study here - to
our collective detriment. This
puts the United States at a rela-
tive disadvantage at the precise
moment when the U.S. position
as the leader of the world's
economy is under challenge.
A study being released today
by NAFSA, a professional associa-
tion that promotes the exchange
of students and scholars to and
from the United States, says this
country is falling behind its conm-


petitors in the race to lure the
best and brightest from abroad.
In the past 10 years, the num-
ber of students studying abroad
has increased significantly.
However, the rate of international
student enrollment in U.S. insti-
tutions of higher learning has
increased by only 27 percent, but
international student mobility
worldwide has grown more than
twice as fast - 57 percent.
This, as the NAFSA report
dryly notes, is not entirely by
accident. While aspiring student
immigrants from overseas have
found it harder and harder to
study here, competitor coun-
tries have eagerly sought them.
Australia and the United
Kingdom have seen their enroll-
ments increase since 1999 by
77 percent and 183 percent,
respectively, by implementing
aggressive recruitment strate-
gies. Meanwhile traditional
"sending" country like China,
India and South Korea have
announced recruitment targets


and improved their higher edu-
cation systems.
To turn this trend around,
NAFSA recommends a number
of pragmatic steps that can be
taken to streamline the proce-
dure for students and scholars
applying for U.S. visas.
Recently, President Obama
referred to the value of foreign
students at U.S. universities:
"One of the great things about
this country is we get the best
and the brightest talent to study
here, and once they study here,
they start enjoying the intellectu-
al freedom and the entrepreneur-
ship, and they decide to stay and
they start new businesses."
But how long will they keep
coming if they think they're
not wanted? The administration
must develop policies covering
immigration and visas with a
view toward settling some of
the most troubling issues. The
NAFSA recommendations are a
good place to begin.
N Miami Herald


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


A letter to

the future

Wrote a letter to the
future last week, a first
for me in a career that
has seen me record
thoughts on nearly every-
thing at one time or another.
This was a new challenge.
My letter to the future was
part of the package of his-
torical documents the Lake
City Reporter provided to the
Lake City Sesquicentennial
Committee for placing inside:
the 150th anniversary time
capsule that was dedicated and
Sealed Saturday evening.
The time capsule is sched-:
uled for re-opening in 50 years.
My letter begins ... 'To the:
residents of Lake City and
Columbia County: Greetings
from the past! The fact there
is interest in opening this time
capsule and checking its con-:
tents should'tell you that Lake
City has a thirst for the heritage
of its community. It did in 2009
at our town's sesquicentennial
celebration and it still does ,
today - 50 years ahead of the
time this letter is written."
I went on to explain how the
Lake City Reporter is Columbia
County's oldest continually
operated business. Founded in
1874, this year we celebrated
our 135th anniversary. I also
explained that in our industry,
mostnewspapers in America
today publish on two plat-
forms, in print and on-linie, and
detailed our many magazine
niche products. A year's worth
of Currents magazine issues
and the Ichetucknee Promise
magazine we published also
were included to show future
residents the importance of
the natural beauty around us.
I hope when this time capsule
is opened in 2059, the springs,
around us still flow crystal clear.
and bountiful. I wonder if we
will have solved our water qual-
ity andquantity issues by then.
I talked about today's. .
economy, how we're on a
c slow rebound from The Great
Recession and that while we've
struggled in all sectors of our
economy, our region still is
in better shape than many in
other areas across the country.
I thought it was'important to
point out that Lake City today
is one of the most livable com-
munities in Florida. We have
the right amount of tourism
and the right amount of relo-
cated retirees and new working
residents to mix nicely with the
generational families that have
called Columbia County home
for more than a century..
We're a real home town, a
community that offers a sense
of place.
We placed several copies of
the newspaper in the time cap-:
sule and these chronicled several
large local and national events of
2009: The Gators football nation-
al championship in January;
Obama's inauguration; the 1959
Lake City Centennial time cap-
sule opening; Michael Jackson's
and Farrah Fawcetfs death on:
the same day; and others.
The 1959 time capsule open-
ing coverage includes a great
photo on the front page of local
residents Joe Persons and Tom
Brown, both graduates of the
class of 1959 at Columbia High
School. Both are examining
and displaying the contents of
the time capsule at the opening
ceremony in June. Their rich:
family legacies will live on at:
the next capsule opening.
, This year's sesquicentennial
event was a great year-long com-
munity project. Thanks to all the


volunteers for the hours of hard
work on this celebration.
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


OTHER OPINION

U.S. must continue to lure best, brightest








LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


THE WEATHER


I I'


SUNNY SUNNY


H156L030 HI58 L28


, PARTLY CHANCE
CLOUDY 1 OF RAIN


H168 L043 HIT70 441


,:I' ..'. .S ,MA. P............... I


M*dosta


Taahassee *
57/29 ,...
P ensa la * -Cty
55/35 -PaL
57/36


55/29 Jacksonville
Lake City- 56/32
56/30
Gainesvile * Daytona Beach
\K57/31,: . 59,40
S Ocala
8 - 3


Ta6
62,


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday :" 7
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday .
Month total
Year total
SNormal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


59
44
67
44
85 in 1967
26 inr 1963

0.00"�
2.46"
46.64"
1.46"
47.26"


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesville
Jacksonville


Monday
63/ 44/ pc
61/39/s
69/51/pc
68/43/s
59/29/pc
58/32/s
69/59/s
58/28/pc
69/52/pc
'66/46/pc
60/31/pc
61/35/s.
60/41/s
61/41/s
60/28/s
64/42/s
59/29/s
68/46/pc


Tuesday
66, 48,
62/43/s
71/60/pc
70/52/s
65/37/s
62/40/s
67/59/s
65/35/s
73/59/pc
68/54/pc
66/39/s
65/45/s
62/48/s
62/48/pc
64/37/s
66/49/s
64/35/s
71/56/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
MOIIRMI our readers
45 nuts to bu
Today's nby
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk channel
for the area on - n .
a scale from 0
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weather.com

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SIcs 0 2009 Weather Central
S - LLC, Madison, WIs. .
W = :^~ www.weatherpubllsher.com


i I :


SUN
Sunrise today 7:22 a.m.
Sunset today 5:34 p.m.
Sunrise tom. - 7:23 a.mr.
Sunset tom. 5:35 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 10:12 a.m.
Moonsettoday 9:26 p.m.
Moonrise tom.- 10:42 a.m.
Moonset tom. 10:19 p.m.

C00i
Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan.
24 31 7 15
First Full Last New


.1B -


J. 7a .un dlp
Sunday.


S 7p


On this dale in
S 1836. a famous
cola wave occurred
in cenorai Irlnnois.
A cold front with
70 mpr winds
swept mnrough at
Noon dropping the
. temperature from
40 degrees to near
zero in a matter of
minutes.


Michigan county

for prison contract
Editor's Note: This story "Anytime you have 90
appeared in the Nov. 25 people attending two days
edition of the Ludington before Thanksgiving ... that
Daily News, a Michigan says a lot," Gaston said
newspaper near Baldwin. about the hearing.
Reprinted with permission.


By KEVIN BRACISZESKI
Daily News Staff Writer
WEBBER TOWNSHIP
MICH. -Area residents
took turns Tuesday night to
tell Federal Bureau of Prisons
officials how important it
would be for the community
if the BOP starts housing
prisoners at a now-vacant and
recently expanded prison
facility near Baldwin.
No one attending
Tuesday's public hearing on
the issue spoke against reus-
ing the facility in Webber
Township. All the speakers
said how much they want
the BOP to bring the prison-
ers - and 327 jobs paying
about $20 an hour each - to
Lake County.
'This is a perfect fit for
our community," said Bob
Myers, acting chairman
for the Lake County Board
of Commissioners. "It is
very much needed for this
county."
People speaking Tuesday
want the BOP to choose
Lake County over Lake City,
Fla., the other community
being considered as the site
of a privately run prison to
house up to 2,500 male, low-
security prisoners who are
not American citizens.
The choice is currently
between a prison that was
built in 1998 and expand-
ed in 2008 in Webber
Township and a non-devel-
oped parcel of land near
Lake City, Fla.
The BOP officials will
accept comments on the
issue uAtil Dec. 21 and will
then prepare a decision that
is expected in early 2010.
"All the comments
tonight were very favor-
able." Isaac Gaston, chief
of the BOP's site selec-
tion and environmental
review branch, said about
'Tuesday's public hearing.


Prison's past
The Geo Group owns the
currently empty Webber
Township prison and spent
about $60 million to expand
the facility by 1,225 beds
to potentially attract con-
tracts to house prisoners
from different states or the
federal government. It now
has 1,725 beds.
Construction of the facil-
ity - which was formerly
known as the Michigan
Youth Correctional Facility
and originally operated by
Wackenhut Corrections of
Florida - began in 1998 and
it opened as a "punk prison"
for up to 480 13- to 19-year-
old boys and young men.
It closed in 2005 and
about 220 people had to
find new jobs.
The facility is now owned
by the GEO Group and is
being called the North Lake
Correctional Facility.

Among the
comments
Sandy Crandall, presi-
dent of the Lake County.
Chamber of Commerce,
said she believes reopening
the prison would be good
for Lake County because
it Would bring jobs to the
area, and would be good
for the BOP because the
county has a wealth of*
natural resources.
"We want the prison,"
said Rich Rybka, adding that
it would bring jobs to the
area and helpthe Baldwin
Community School District.
Mark Warba, mayor of
Big Rapids, traveled to
attend Tuesday's public
hearing and urge the BOP
to bring the prisoners to
Lake County.
".. Say yes to Michigan,"
Warba said, adding that he
failed to see a comparison


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/ n - ' Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
61/39 62/43 ake Ci
Miami
ipa ,* Naples
/40' West Palm Beach Ocala
66/45 Orlando
S' Ft. Lauderdal Panama City
Ft. Myers 68/47 * Pensacola
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. ,t ;-" 69/50 Valdosta
1ey6 ,* - W. Palm Beach
71/62


I


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SSEE
TUESDAY^^^


6|WDg;fl|


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


between the existing Lake
County prison and the undevel-
oped Florida site. He said the
Big Rapids City Commission
has adopted a resolution to
support Lake County's bid for
a prison contract
Connie Theunick-Perley
said Lake County has much
to offer and said local offi-
cials worked well with GEO
Group officials in the past.
She also said local agen-
cies can help people learn
Spanish if a large amount
of Hispanic people move to:
the area.
"... There is much need
here," Paul Griffith, execu-
tive director of Michigan
Works! West Central, said
about high unemployment
levels in Lake County and
surrounding areas.
Griffith said thousands
of people have called him
or stopped by his office to
ask when GEO will begin
hiring to staff the Webber
Township prison again,
and said "an overwhelming
majority" of people speak-
ing during a Lake City, Fla.,
public hearing about the
prison location issue spoke
against building one there.
Deborah Smith-Olson
read a letter from Baldwin
Community School District
Superintendent Randy
Howes into the record
Tuesday and also provided
comments of her own.
Howes' letter mentioned
the Baldwin Promise
Scholarship, which pro-
vides up to $5,000 a year
for four years for Baldwin'
High School graduates
- beginning with the class'
Sof 2010 - to attend college.
He said that would be good
for the families of people
who move to Lake County
to work at the prison.
Angela Serna of Ludington
said she is a former employ-
ee of the prison and would
like for it to reopen.
"We're ready for you to
come folks ... lets get going,
that's all we're asking for,"
Lake County Undersheriff
Mike Dermyer told the
BOP officials.


[IAKE CITY ALMANAC


*


r


^J













Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Sunday, December


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


20,2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Travel team 8U
tryout today
An open tryout for an
8-under travel baseball
team is 2 p.m. today at
the Southside Sports
Complex. The team will
emphasize fundamental
baseball skills and play
in monthly tournaments
from February through
May.
For details, call
manager Todd Gustavson
at 365-2133 or coach
David Williams at
(904) 2194577.

Academy offers
hitting camps,
The Gatorball Baseball
Academy in Gainesville is
hosting advanced hitting
camp for ages 8-13 from
9 a.m. to noon, and for
ages 14-18 from 1-4 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday.
Cost is $100.
For details, call
Stephen Barton at.
(352) 514-4414.
CHS SOFTBAU.
Tryouts planned
for Jan. 11
Columbia High
softball tryouts for
varsity and junior varsity
are 3:30 p.m. Jan. 11 at
the CHS field. Players
must have completed
physical, drug testing.
and consent forms to
participate. .
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at :.
303-1192.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
Boys Club hoops
registration open
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
taking registration for
its basketball program.
Three leagues are
offered: Training,.for
ages 5-8; Jr. Varsity, for
ages 6-10; Varsity, for
ages 11-14. Cost is $40.
For details, call the
club at 752-4184.
FLAG FOOTBALL, CHEER
Registration open
for league play
Registration for flag
football, ages 5-12, and
cheerleading, ages 5-10,
is under way at Christ
Central Ministries. The
season begins in January.
Cost is $35.
For details, call Ronny
Busscher at 365-2128.
ADUU BASEBALL
North Florida
teams forming,
The North Florida
Men's Adult Baseball
League is forming a team
in this area. Regional
leagues in Gainesville,
Jacksonville and Valdosta
are being planned.
Organizers, coaches
and players are needed.
Workouts begin in
January.
For details, call Greg
Vickers at (850) 253-5107
or visit www.leaguelineup.
com/northfloridamabl.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Tuesday
* Columbia High girls
basketball at Ed White
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
* Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Union


County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)


Richmond rallies past

No. 13 Florida 56-53


Gators lose
second game in a
row; fall to Spiders.
By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press
SUNRISE - With his
Florida Gators leading by
eight points at halftime,
coach Billy Donovan sensed
trouble.
He was right. No. 13
Florida stumbled through
the second half and lost to
Richmond 56-53 Saturday
night in the Orange Bowl
Basketball Classic.
"I saw it coming,"
Donovan said.
The game began to turn
in the final minute of the first
half after Florida took a 32-
19 lead. Richmond scored


S


five quick points before
halftime, and Donovan
could tell his Gators were.
going flat.
"You ,see the energy,
the passion, the enthusi-
asm kind of coming out
of them," he said. "I can
get them physically ready
to play, but they've got to
understand every game is
40 minutes."
The Gators (8-2), beaten
by No. 5 Syracuse last week,
have lost two in a row.
Kevin Anderson made
four free throws in the
final 5.4 seconds . for
Richmond (8-3), which beat
a Southeastern Conference
team for the second time
this season. The Spiders
defeated Mississippi State
on Nov. 27.
They beat a ranked oppo-


a


nent for the third season
in a row, but coach Chris
Mooney said the latest
upset was special.
"It's a very big win for
our team," Mooney said.
"Florida is going to end up
being a top 10 or .top 15
team, and when you beat
Them, that just says how
good you are."
Richmond's David
Gonzalvez made four 3-
pointers, scored 16 points
and was voted the game's
most .valuable player.
Anderson added 14 points.
After Donovan urged his
team at halftime to pick up
the energy level, the Gators
were outscored 20-5 to start
the second half. As their
lead vanished, the coach
GATORS continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Richmond's Dan Geriot (left) and Justin Harper celebrate
after a 56-53 win against Florida after an Orange Bowl
Classic NCAA college basketball game in Sunrise Saturday.


m


Dunk


Columbia knocks

offWolfsonin road

game Saturday


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High finished
off the latter part of back-
to-back wins by defeating
Wolfson High inJacksonville
on Saturday.
The Lady Tigers con-
trolled the game through-
out, gaining a big lead in
the first half and cruising to
a 48-40 victory on the road.
"We played extremely
well from the onset," coach
Horace . Jefferson said.
"For the most part. we did
alright. The score did not
indicate the way the game
went"
The win improved the
Lady Tigers to 6-4 on the
young season as they
head into a Tuesday game
against Ed White High in
Jacksonville. It will be the
Lady Tigers final game
before the Christmas
break.
Da'BreaHillled Columbia
in scoring as three Lady
Tigers found their way to
double-digits. Hill had 16.
points in the contest.


' Sarmayne Edwards con-
tinued to play wellfrom the
point, bouncing in 13 points
throughout, the game.
Katrina Goodbiead added
11 points in the game and
Jefferson likes what he's
seeing out of the Lady
Tigers.
"Katrina has given
us another big person."
Jefferson said. "That has
given us another legitimate
rebounder and we have
three. Katrina can play the
wing or the post "
Simone Williams and
Mariali Harrington each
tipped in with four points.
"I think our record is
misleading in the district."
Jefferson said. "That could
Sbe a good thing if it gives
other teams a false sense of
security.
The junior varsity lost its
first game of the season.
falling 36-19 in the lead-in
to varsity.
The Lady Tigers' junior
varsity squad is 5-1 on the
season.
Briya McGuire led with
11 points in the game. ,


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Sharmayne Edwards (20) goes up for a layup against Fleming Island in Lake
City on Friday.


Saints sacked


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dallas Cowboys running back Marion Barber (24) dives across the goal line to put them
ahead of the New Orleans Saints in the first quarter of an NFL football game on Saturday, at
the Superdome in New Orleans, La.


Cowboys win in
December, beat.
undefeated team.
By BRETT MARTEL
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - Drew
Brees and the New Orleans
Saints are marching toward
perfection no more.
Tony Romo and
DeMarcus Ware helped
Dallas end its December
doldrums and the Cowboys
held off a frenzied rally by
the Saints for a 24-17 vic-
tory Saturday night.
The loss by the Saints
(13-1) left the Indianapolis
Colts (14-0) as the NFL's


only unbeaten team this
season.
The high-scoring Saints
trailed 24-3 going into the
fourth quarter, then scored
two quick touchdowns.
After Dallas kicker Nick
Folk watched his 24-yard
field goal try clang off the
right upright shortly before
the 2-minute warning, Brees
got a final chance to tie it.
Brees moved the Saints
into Dallas territory. But on
second down, Ware sacked
Brees and forced a fumble
that was recovered by the
Cowboys with 6 seconds
left.
Romo passed for 312
yards, including a 49-yard
touchdown to Miles Austin.


Section B















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
, Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN - New Orleans Bowl, Southern
Miss. vs. Middle Tenn.
EXTREME SPORTS
4 p.m.
NBC - Winter Dew Tour, .at
Breckenridge, Colo.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC - European PGA Tour, South
African Open Championship, final round,
at Western Cape, South Africa (same-
day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5:30 p.m.
FSN - Florida St. at Georgia Tech
7:30 p.m.'
FSN - N.C. State at Wake Forest
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS - Regional coverage
FOX - Regional coverage
4 p.m.
CBS - Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX - Doubleheader game
8:15 p.m.
NBC - Minnesota at Carolina
Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - UTEP at Oklahoma
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 - La Salle at Oklahoma St.
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN - N.Y. Giants at Washington
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS - Buffalo atToronto
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 - Premier League, Wigan
Athletic vs. Bolton Wanderers, at Wigan,
England

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England.
Miami
N.Y.Jets
Buffalo

x-Indianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston


East
W L
8 5
7 6
7 6
5 8
South
W L
14 0
7, 7
6 7
6 7


TPct PF PA
0.615 348 234
0.538 292 306
0.538 275 211
0.385 215 271-
TPct PF PA
01.000394248
0.500266 322
0.462 293 323'
0.462311 273


North
W L TPct PF PA
Cincinnati 9 4 0.692264 217
Baltimore 7 6 0.538319 218
Pittsburgh 6 7 0.462278 244
Cleveland 2 11 0.154 158 315
West
W L TPct PF PA
San Diego 10 3 0.769362 259
Denver 8 5 0.615256 230
Oakland 4 9 0.308155 316
Kansas City 3 10 0.231206 342
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
S W L TPct PF PA
Philadelphia 9 4 0.692 372.273
Dallas 8 5 0.615296'233
N.Y. Giants 7 6 0.538341 330
Washington 4 9 0.308234 251
South
W L TPct PF PA
x-New Orleans 13 0 01.000466274
Atlanta 6 7' 0.462 302 305
Carolina 5 8 0.385225 282
Tampa Bay I 12 0.077 190 356
North
W L TPct PF PA
y-Minnesota .11 2 0.846 389 243
Green Bay 9 4 0.692 344 243
Chicago 5 8 0.385247 291
Detroit 2 II 0.154209406
West
W. L TPct PF PA
Arizona 8 5 '0.615 306 258
San Francisco 6 7 0.462269 242
Seattle 5 8 0.385250 301
St.Louis I. 12 0.077146361


x-clinched division
y-clinched playoff spot
Saturday's Game
Dallas at New Orleans (n)
Today's Games
Miami at Tennessee, I p.m.-
Arizona at Detroit, I p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y. pts, I p.m.
Houston at St. Louis, I p.m.
Chicago at Baltimore, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo. I p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game -,'
N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m.
SFriday's Game
San Diego at Tennessee. 7:30 p.m.,
Sunday, Dec. 27
Buffalo at Atlanta; I p.m.
Houston at Miami, I p.m.
Seattle at Green Bay, I p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, I p.m.
Kansas City at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, I p.m.
Detroit at San Francisco,4:05 p.m.
St Louis at Arizona, 4!05 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Indianapolis, 4:15 p.m.


Denver at Philadelphia. 4:15 p.m.
Dallas atWashington, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 28
Minnesota at Chicago. 8:30 p.m.

Bowl games
Saturday
New Mexico Bowl
Wyoming vs. Fresno State
St. Petersburg Bowl
Rutgers vs. UCF (n)
Today
New Orleans Bowl
Southern Miss. (7-5) vs. Middle
Tennessee (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday
Las Vegas Bowl
BYU (10-2) vs. Oregon State (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Utah (9-3) vs. California (8-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Thursday
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
SMU (7-5) vs. Nevada (8-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)

Playoffs
Football Championship Subdivision
Championship
Villanova 23, Montana 21
NCAA Division III
Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
Wisconsin-Whitewater 38, Mount
Union 28
NAIA
Championship
Sioux Falls 25, Lindenwood 22

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
SNew Orleans at Toronto, 12:30 p.m.
Denver at Memphis, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at Boston, 6 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Portland at Miami, 6 p.m. -
Cleveland at Dallas; 7:30 p.m.
SCharlotte at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Utah at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Chicago, 8 p.m.
SLA. Clippers at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Phoenix, p.m.

Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 14 Connecticut vs. UCF at the XL
Center, Hartford, Conn., I p.m. .
No. 22 Georgia Tech vs. Florida
State, 5:30 p.m.


Wyoming beats Fresno


State in two overtimes


in New Mexico B owl


By TIM KORTE
Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
- Freshman Austyn Carta-
Samuels threw three touch-
down passes, the last a 13-
yarder to David Leonard
in the second overtime
Saturday, and Wyoming
beat Fresno State 35-28 in
the New Mexico Bowl.
The first of 34 bowls was
a high-scoring matchup that
was decided by defense.
Wyoming (7-6) stopped
the nation's leading rush-
er, Fresno State's Ryan
Mathews, on three rushing
attempts from the 1 in the
first overtime. The Bulldogs
(8-5) tried a quarterback
sneak on third down, and
Mathews came up short
again on fourth down.
The Cowboys scored
on the first possession in
double overtime, then held
Fresno State on downs.
Wyoming fans spilled
out of the stands to cel-
ebrate as the school band
played "Cowboy Joe." This
was Wyoming's first bowl
appearance since 2005, and
it capped a winning season
for first-year coach Dave.
Christensen.
Mathews, who led the
nation in rushing average
at 151.3 yards per game, fin-
ished with 144 yards rush-
ing on 31 attempts with two
touchdowns. But he had a
big fumble midway through
the fourth quarter, setting
up Carta-Samuels to lead a
19-play drive that tied it up.
Wyoming's Ian Watts
kicked a 37-yard field goal
with 20 seconds left in
regulation. But after the
Cowboys stopped Mathews
in the first overtime, Watts
was wide left a 40-yard field
try that would have won it.
Carta-Samuels, the
Mountain West's freshman
of the year was picked the
game's offensive MVE


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wyoming wide receiver Greg Boiling (84) and teammate
Chris McNeill celebrate Bolling's two-point conversion during
the New Mexico Bowl Saturday in Albuquerque, N.M.

qq THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
1\ I 1 VAI, OiJ r ftA "by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each.square, | - . ir.-.. yet
to form four ordinary words. .
I HICED I I --


NATIVE
WHEN THE COAL WAS
A DI DIFFICULT TO
z EXTRACT, THE MINERS
PLINEP 5PITWA-
S Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: IN
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: ANNUL ELITE ASSURE SQUIRM
Answer: How he liked to treat his girlfriends -
AS SEQUELS


GATORS: Slip, fall in second half


Continued From Page 1

resisted any temptation to
call a timeout.
"I wasn't going to bail
them out," Donovan said.
"I almost wanted them to
stop the bleeding them-
selves. They needed to play
through that.
"I take responsibility
from the standpoint that
obviously what I'm say-
ipg to them is not getting
through."
The Gators totaled only
21 points in the second
half, when they shot 7 for
27 (26 percent), including
1 for 9 from 3-point range.
They led for the last time
at 49-48.
"We didn't shoot well,"
said Alex Tyus, who led
Florida with 15 points. "We
need to learn how to be a
team that when we don't
shoot well from the field,
we can do other things to
overcome that and still win
games." . .
Starting guards Erving
Walker and Kenny Boynton
shot a combined 5 for 23,


including 2 for 11 from 3-
point range..
"We came out flat in
the second half," forward
Chandler Parsons said.
'We've got to fight through
that. When teams make
runs, we have to keep bat-
tling."
Richmond sputtered
offensively in the second
half; too, missing 12 con-
secutive shots over a 9-min-
ute span before Gonzalvez's
23-footer with 1:33 left put
them ahead 52-49.
"The farther out he is,
the better his percentage
is," Mooney said. "I don't
think there was anybody
on our team surprised he
made the shot."
An earlier 3-pointer
by Gonzalvez . helped
Richmond build its biggest
lead at 46-37. The Gators
came into the game lead-
.ing the nation in 3-point
defense, but they allowed
the Spiders to shoot 5 for
12 from behind the line in
the second half.


l Ads o
*- '"S '
^^l-^'Stet~ra


ACROSS

1 Tractor-trailer
4 implores
8 31-day mo.
11 Accident
reminder
13 Descartes'
name
14 Ms. Merkel
15 Truthful
17 Periphery
18 Mind
19 Put into words
21 - Wieder-
sehen
22 Sci. class
23 Domain
26 Knocks for a
loop
29 Flag down
30 Motel sign
31 Shoe part
33 Fort near
Monterey
34 Breathing
organ
35 Amebas have
one


36 Brand names,
38 Gauguin's prop
39 Electric swimmer
40 RNs provide it
41 Kind
of shorts
44 Would
prefer
48 Sooner than
49 Hint at slyly
52 Caramel-
colored
53 Q.E.D. part
54 Catches some
rays
55 Winglike part
56 Go fast
57 Grabbed a
chair

DOWN

1 Invitation
addendum
2 Cools off.
3 Cooper of
"High Noon"
4 To the point
5 Want-ad abbr.


"It's a lack of awareness,"
Donovan said, "and almost
a. lack of respect for the
scouting report and under-
standing what we've got to
do to take away what they
do well."
Still, the Gators nearly
pulled the game out Trailing
52-50 with less than 15 sec-
onds left, they tried two shots
with a chance to erase the
deficit Walker missed a 3-
pointer, and Vernon Macklin
grabbed the rebound but
missed the follow.
When Florida's Dan
Werner snatched the
rebound he was stripped,
and Anderson drew a foul.
Anderson sank both ends of
a one-and-one with 5.4 sec-
onds to go for a 54-53 lead,
and after Walker 'made a
3-pointer, Anderson hit two
more free throws with 0.9
seconds remaining.
Miami beat Florida
Atlantic 87-69 in the first
game of the doublehead-
er at the NHL Florida
Panthers' arena.


G-i Cone.-c clrc-i
www.lakeoltyreporter.com
S "- Lake City
lll' Reporter


Answer to Previous Puzzle

UMA CART LTI
FEN AVON ETON
ORNAMENT MEWS
EAGER MOMS
HOT KEEN


RED FLAT P1O1
SiAN ORiE I IC



HAIMU P EA
H ILT P I R EIAPH
ALEIC I DLEI REIEB
MFESH P|A|DS CIEO10


6 Safari animal
7 Conference part
8 Faint glow
9 Apartment
10 Monopoly or
solitaire


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 2 13 4 15 16 17 M8 19 |10I


12 Bogart's love
16 Sidekick
20 Unduly
22 Online
journal
23 Frat letter
24 Husband of a
countess
25 Non-soap
opera
26 Quagmires
27 Tpks.
28 - amandine
30 Canceled
32 Annex
34 More doubtful
35 Prickly plant
37 Nectar gatherer
38 High spirits
40 Cliched
41 Sorority
letter
42 Sort of
tradition
43 Lucy Lawless
role
45 Herr's abode
46 Long-active
volcano
47 Take a
breather
50 Firearms
lobby
51 Pouch


12-21 � 2009 by NEA, Inc.


SMerry Christmas ,


' Happy New Year


Sand thank you for


�


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


Wild day in college hoops


Associated Press

LAWRENCE, Kan.
- Marcus Morris had a
career-high 23 points and
10 rebounds, and Sherron
Collins scored 19 to help
No. 1 Kansas beat Michigan
75-64 on Saturday.
Kansas (10-0) wasn't
always crisp in winning its
48th straight home game,
using a big first-half run to
take the lead. Xavier Henry
had 15 points and the
Jayhawks held Michigan
to 5-for-28 shooting from
3-point range to overcome
14 turnovers and numerous
defensive breakdowns.
Michigan (5-5) was again
hurt by sporadic defense,
playing well for stretches,
breaking down complete-
ly on others in losing to
Kansas fof the first time.
DeShawn 'Sims had 19
points and Manny Harris 16
for the Wolverines (5-5).

No. 2 Texas 103,
No. 10 North Carolina 90
ARLINGTON, Texas -
Damion James had 25 points
and 15 rebounds, Dexter
Pittman had 23 points and
15 rebounds, and Texas
rolled in the firstbasketball
game at Cowboys Stadium.
J'Covan Brown added 21
points and Avery Bradley


had 20 for the Longhorns
(10-0). It was the most
points the Tar Heels (8&3)
have allowed in regulation
since Roy Williams became
their coach in 2003-04.
Wake Forest scored 119 in
a triple-overtime victory in
December 2003.
Ed Davis had 21 points
and nine rebounds, Tyler
Zeller was 7 of 8 for 16
points, and Marcus Ginyard
returned from a one-game
absence to score 13.

No. 3 Kentucky 90,
Austin Peay 69
LEXINGTON, Ky. -
Patrick Patterson scored
21 points, and the Wildcats
moved within one victory
of becoming the first col-
lege basketball program to
reach 2,000.
John Wall added 17
points and six assists while
DeMarcus Cousins had 19
points and eight rebounds
for Kentucky (11-0). The
win pushed coach John
Calipari past Adolph Rupp
in the school record book
for thb best start by a first-
year head coach. Rupp won
his first 10 in 1931.

No. 4 Purdue 69,
Ball State 49
SINDIANAPOLIS-Robbie


Hummel had 19 points and
nine rebounds, and the
Boilermakers won their 10th
straight to start a season for
only the second time since
the 1936-37 season.
JaJuan Johnson scored
16 points and ETwaun
Moore added 12 for the
Boilermakers, who won
a game by at least 20 for
only the third time in the
10-year history of the
Wooden Tradition.

No. 5 Syracuse 85,
St. Bonaventure 72
SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Rick
Jackson scored 18 points,
Wes Johnson and Kris
Joseph added 17 each, and
the Orange pulled away in
the second half. -
St. Bonaventure (6-4)
trailed 39-35 at halftime, but
Andy Rautins hit consecu-
tive 3s during a 15-second
span to give Syracuse (11-0)
a 69-57 lead with 9:19 left.

No 6. West Virginia 80,
Cleveland State 78
CLEVELAND -Da'Sean,
Butler scored 18 points,
and his layup with 1.2
seconds left helped the
Mountaineers hold on after
the pesky Vikings rallied
from 17 points down.
Kevin Jones ,scored; a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fans and media look on as Texas guard Damion James (5) shoots in the first half of an
NCAA college basketball game against North Carolina Saturday in'Arlington, Texas.


career-high 23 points for
West Virginia (8-0). Jeremy
Montgomery's basket with
13.7 seconds left helped
Cleveland State tie it at 78.

No. 7 Duke.76, No. 15.
Gohzaga 41
NEW YORK - Nolan
Smith scored 24 points, Jon
Scheyer added 20 and the
Blue Devils held Gonzaga
'to its lowest, poifit total in
25 years in the Aeropostale


Classic.
Duke (9-1) missed 12 of its
first 15 shots from the field and
it was only that the Bulldogs
(8-3) were struggling as well
that the game was close for
the first 15 minutes.

No. 8 Villanova 96,
Fordham 58
EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. - Reggie Redding
returned from a suspen-
sion to score 15 points and


Villanova (10-1) rode 53 per-
cent shooting to rebound
from last Sunday's loss to
Temple.
/
Southern Cal 77,
No. 9 Tennessee 55
LOS ANGELES - Alex
Stepheson had 19 points and
a career-high 15 rebounds,
and the Trojans handed
the Vols their worst loss
under coach' Bruce
Pearl.


Sioux Falls wins


another NAIA title


Associated Press

ROME, Ga. -Sioux Fa]
won the NAIA champion
ship for the second straig
year thanks to a player wl
hasn't even been playii
football that long,.
Braden Wieking kick(
three field goals, inclu
ing a go-ahead 42-yard
in the fourth quarter
give Sioux Falls its secoi
straight NAIA champion
Ship with a 25-22 win ov
Lindenwood.
'This is my first year
playing football," Wieki
said. "I played 14 years
soccer. So this is all new
me. But I got my chani
and I'm trying to make tf
most of it."
Ryan Lomiller ran for 1:


Yards and a tying touch-
down that put Sioux Falls
lls in .position to win its 29th
n- game in a row.
ht Adam Lopez returned
o- the second-half kickoff 91
ig yards for a touchdown and
Shis .61-yard returnn set up
ed Lomiller's 1-yard touch-
d- down run that tied the
er game at 22.
to The Cougars (15-0) won
id their 29th straight game:
n- finishing the decade with a
er record of 120-12 and three
NAIAtitles. The South Dakota
of school also won last season
ng and in 2006, and was run-
of ner-up in 2001 and 2007. The
to Cougars, who are planning to,
ce move to Division II in 2011,.
he are 67-3 in Kalen DeBoer's
five seasons as coach.
15 "Winning a championship


never gets old," DeBoer said.
After Sioux Falls went
up .8-0, Lindenwood
(13-1) came back on two
TD passes from Philip
Staback to Matt Bramow.
He set a school record with
12 touchdown catches.
The Missouri school was
making its first appearance
in the title game.
It was the first time in the
NAIA championship game
for Lindenwood.
'They did what champion-
ship teams do," Lions coach
Patrick Ross said. "We fell
just short. I'm.proud of my
players."
1 Wieking also made kicks
from 41 and 37 yards in the
first half.
"He did a great job under
pressure," Lomiller said.


Dwyer

rou ts .

Niceville
'Associated Press
� / -, . " ,
ORLANDO- Mitt
Elam and Robert Clark
scored three touchdowns
apiece to lead Palm Beach
Gardens Dwyer to a 42-14
victory over Niceville. in
the Florida High School
Football Class 4A champi-
onship game.
Elam, considered by
many to be the top col-
lege prospect in.the state,
rushed for 187 yards on
14 carries and scored on
runs of 6, 69. and 26 yards
in the first half. Clark
finished with 191 all-pur-
pose yards and scored on
an 11-yard rush, 34-yard
reception and an 88-yard
kickoff return on the final
play of the game.


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SSanta will be'in take City to talk to boys & girls.
S The calls will be made between 6-8pm and carried live on
Wy ' Power Country 102.1 FM

If you would like for Santa to call your child, just fill out
the form below. Additional forms may be picked up at the
Lake City Reporter, the Lake City Police Department,
the Florida Highway Patrol or Power Country 102.1 FM
Mail or bring the completed forms to
the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055

Child's Name Age
Address: Phone:
Parent's Name:
Brothers & Sisters:
Ages:
Seen Santa this year? 0-Yes D No (Check One)
Where?
Pets? O Yes 0 No (Check One)
Type: Name:
Gifts he or she requested:
Good things the child has done through the year:




StCommunity.
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Lake City Reporter
Sponsored by: s ...
Florida Highway Patrol, Power Country 102.1 FM, the La!: . Dept. and the Lake City Reporter


- -- --- --


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


Villanova beats Montana



23-21 in FCS title game


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vil!anova's Chris Whitney (17) and Matt Szczur (4) hoist the
trophy after their team defeated Montana 23-21 in the NCAA
Division I FCS college football championship game against
Villanova Friday in Chattanooga, Tenn.



Tampa Plant beats

Bradenton Manatee

in Class 5A title game


Associated Press


ORLANDO - James
Wilder rushed for 137 yards
and a touchdown to lead
Tampa Plant to a 21-14 victory
Friday night over Bradenton
Manatee in the- Class 5A
Championship game.
The victory gives Plant
(13-1) its third state cham-
pionship in four years. The
Panthers stormed out to a
21-0 halftime lead on the legs
of Wilder and timely passing
by quarterback Philip Ely.
Plant scored on its first
two drives of the game when
wide receiver Eric Dungy
caught a 20-yard touch-
down pass and Deandre
Queen scored on a short


By BETH RUCKER
Associated Press

. CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. - Matt
Szczur caught two touchdown passes,
ran for 159 yards and had another
68 yards receiving, leading Villanova
to its first Football Championship
Subdivision title with a 23-21 victory
over Montana on Friday night.
No. 2 Villanova (14-1) won the title
in its first championship game appear-
ance and 25 seasons after coach Andy
Talley was hired to rebuild the pro-
gram after the school's four-year
absence from the sport
"Our guys played great. Montana is
a super team," Talley said..
Top-seeded Montana (14-1) was
making a record 17th consecutive
appearance -in the playoffs. The
Grizzlies, the 1995 and 2001 champi-
ons, lost to Richmond last year in the
title game. Montana also lost in the


final in 1996, 2000 and 2004.
Chris Whitney led an 81-yard drive,
running for 22 yards on one.play and
connecting with Szczur for 26 yards
on another.
Whitney hit Chris Farmer with a
3-yard TD pass to give Villanova 16-
14 lead with 5:26 left in the third
quarter. .
Whitney finished 10 for 13 for 142
yards, an interception and the touch-
down. He also ran for 102 yards.
Montana's Andrew Selle threw
a 53-yard touchdown pass to Jabin
Sambrano to pull the Grizzlies to,
23-21 with 1:07 left, but the onside
kick attempt went out of bounds, and
Villanova made a first down before
running out the clock.
The Wildcats were down 14-9 at
halftime after allowing the Grizzlies
246 yards passing in the first two
quarters. Talley made adjustments,
and the Wildcats found their pass


rush after taking the lead.
Selle finished 12 for 35 for 351 yards
and three touchdowns. Marc Mariani
had 178 yards on nine catches before
halftime, but didn't catch a single pass
in the second half.
"We played really well in the sec-
ond half and turned the tide," Talley
said. "In the locker room our guys
were pretty subdued, but we knew
what we had to do."
Marquis Kirkland sacked Selle for
a loss of 7 yards, ending Montana's
last drive of the third quarter. The
Grizzlies' next drive ended when
Villanova's Eric Loper hit Sambrano
so hard on third-and-12 he dropped a
first-down catch.
Villanova wouldn't be denied.
On fourth-and-1 at the Montana 3,
the Wildcats went for it and Szczur
plowed ahead into the end zone for
the 23-14 lead with 11:04 left in the
fourth quarter.


run. Wilder put a stamp
on the dominating first half
with a 41-yard touchdown
run where he broke sev-
eral tackles near the line of
,scrimmage before sprinting
to the end zone.
Manatee (13-2) came
back after the half when
Quarterback Brion Carnes
hooked up with Quenton
Bundrage for a 34-yard
touchdown and followed
with an 87-yard pass to runi-
ning back Mike Blakely.
The play led to Blakely's
short touchdown run at the
end of the third.
Dungy, the son of former
NFL coach .Tony Dungy,
had three catches for 64
yards for Plant


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1 !n((irniti)!
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incalo
Cud


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420















Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, December 20,2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS


Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
. ostery@comcast.net

Marketing

strategy

for your

business

However beautiful the
strategy, you should occa-
sionally look at the results.
- Winston Churchill
We are assist-
mg a new
Business
that sells
dental
. treats designed to clean
dogs' teeth and freshen
their breath. My dogs
really love these treats,
S as well. They love get-
ting something that tastes
good, and I love that their
dental hygiene is being
addressed.
This firm is a small sup-
plier of these dental treats,
selling predominantly to
the big box pet stores.
However, their brand is
typically located on the
STRATEGY continued on 2C


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
. oger Whiddon
has been
named Builder
of the Year by
the Columbia
County Builders' Association:,
for his dedication and ser-
vice to both the organization
and the community.
Whiddon said Builder of
the Year is voted on by the
members of the association
through an anonymous bal-
lot vote - and he said he
appreciates the recognition
of the members.
"It's great to be recognized
by your peers," Whiddon
said. 'To me, thafs special.
It's very humbling to be
nominated and chosen."
The award is a repre-
sentation of service, said
Whiddon.
"Its not about how many
houses you build," he said.
"It's about dedication to
the organization and time
spent in the community.
Its not based on how well
you build a house."
Whiddon also said ser-
vice to the community is
something he enjoys doing.
"I have a helping nature
about me," he said. "I like
to help people. That's one
of my gifts. That's in my
personality to try to help


JASUN MAI TI nVAW WLItEKILj- Cl .il, p) Flpo
Roger Whiddon, owner of Whiddon Construction Company Inc., poses in his homd-based office with a plaque for the 2009
Builder of the Year that was awarded to him by the Columbia County Builders Association on Tuesday, Dec. 8.


someone. This is a great
community and we're
fortunate to live here.
Therefore, we want to keep
it that way. We should give
back to the community in
which we live. If we're not
about helping each other,


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then what are we about?"
Whiddon said he will
lead the organization as
it's president for 2010 and
the experience of winning
Builder of the Year will aid
him in his leadership.
Whiddon'also said he
has been a member of
the Columbia County


Builders' Association since
2005, when he started his
own business, Whiddon
Construction Co., Inc.
"I've always been interest-
ed in the building industry,"
Whiddon said. "Not only do
I enjoy it and its challenges,
but the satisfaction custom-
ers have with their new


home is what its all about"
Winning the Builder of
the Year award is primarily
about helping others, said
Whiddon.
'This is our livelihood. This
is what we get paid to do,"
he said, "and if we can help
someone at the same time,
its a win-win relationship."


Books may be purchased at

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A humbling recognition

Award in hand, Whiddon set to lead builders association














Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


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raised my dividend each year since I Went snacks, beverages, dairy products, confectionery, baked goods, pharma-
public in 1970. I'm not a telecommunications ceuticals, beauty products, cleansers and oral care products. I sell noth-
uint on ing directly to the public, but I still rake in more than $2 billion annually.
equipment giant, but I sound like one. My Who am I? (Answer: International Flavors and Fragrances)
name is an acronym for Systems and Services
Co. Who am I? Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
o. oSmartest). Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Triyia on the top and to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
you'll be entered into a drawing for a nify prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individualfinancial advice.
: .; 2009 TiIL Mol U.vL ool Dii.LI UNI\JLRS.u UCLUCK (IO RI.ICASL 12/17/2009)


- GM to discontinue Saab


In this Nov. 2 file photo, a customer swipes a MasterCard debit card through a machine while
checking-out at a shop in Seattle.


Wary of credit cards? Get creative


By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer
NEW YORK-
Shoppers are doing all they
can to keep their credit
cards in their wallets this
holiday season.
They're paying with
cash, direct debits from
bank accounts, taking
advantage of free financing
and even cashing in fre-
quent flier miles.
A desire to stick to a
budget and to avoid interest
rates that have risen sharply
have helped drive a marked
shift away from credit cards.
Banks have also reduced
the amount of credit they're
making available, even to
low-risk clients.
"Consumers are look-
ing for discipline in their
spending levels that
they can achieve from
using cash," said Bryan
Eshelman, managing direc-
tor in the retail practice of
consultant AlixPartners,
whose recent survey of
shoppers revealed their top
concern was eliminating
personal debt.
Often, the switch to cash


or debit cards means lower
costs for stores, though
merchants miss out on get-
ting data on their custom-
ers' shopping habits from
credit card transactions.
Layaway and other pay-
ment methods increase
costs, but they can be off-
set by new opportunities to
grab sales from customers
who would otherwise not
able to buy.
Bill Hampel, chief econo-
mist at the Credit Union
National Association,
describes the consumer
switch as "seminal."
"People are trying a lot
of new behavior in how
they're spending and how
they are paying for it in
response to a very scary
economy," he added.
Some new habits, particu-
larly using more cash, will
likely linger, with unemploy-
ment expected to remain
high for several years and
credit lines less generous.


CASH AND ITS
COUSINS
Credit cards accounted


for 60 percent of transac-
tions at malls operated by
Taubman Centers so far
this holiday season, down.
from 70 percent last year,
according to an internal
survey.
Earlier this year, U.S.
debit payment volume
exceeded that of credit
for the first time, Visa Inc.
reported.
PayPal, an online pay-
ment service owned by
eBay Inc. that lets shoppers
pay directly from their bank
accounts in addition to tra-
ditional credit, saw its active
accounts surge 20 percent
in its latest quarter
compared with a year ago.
A report from the
Federal Reserve issued
Dec. 7 showed how' .
Americans borrowed less
for a record ninth straight
month in October.

ALTERNATIVE
PAYMENTS
Stores have responded
by promoting alternative
ways to pay and offers that
defer payment for several
months.


By DAN STRUMPF
AP Auto Writer
NEW YORK - General
Motors Co. said Friday it
will shutdown Saab after
talks to sell the brand to a
Dutch carmaker collapsed,
marking the third time this
year that a deal by GM to
sell an unwanted brand has
fallen through. ' '.
GM said it had a small
window of time to complete
the deal and issues arose
during the sale talkswith
Spyker Cars that could
not be resolved. GM Vice
President John Smith said
representatives from GM,
Spyker and the Swedish
government were still in
discussions Friday morn-
ing when talks fell apart.


Smith declined to elaborate
on the reasons.
"We've been trying
to restart, if you will, an
investment process with-
out a great deal of time,"
Smith, who is in charge of
GM's corporate planning
and alliances, said during a
conference call with report-
ers. "Like everybody, we
would have preferred a
different outcome, and we
all worked-very hard for
thatdifferent outcome and
we've come up short"
� Saab employs about
3,400 people worldwide,
most of whom work'at its
main plant in Trollhatten,
Sweden. It also has a parts
distribution center and a
design center in separate'
locations in Sweden and an


engine plant in Finland.
The brand has 1,100 deal-
ers, whom GM said will con-
tinue to honor warranties as
the brancdwinds down.
"It's devastating. It was
a very unique brand," said
Ray Ciccolo, owner of two
Saab dealerships in the
Boston area, one of which
has been in business since
1957. ,
The announcement
marks the death of brand
with a small yet loyal fol-
lowing. To enthusiasts, the
Swedish company became
appreciated for quirks like
placing the ignition lock
between the front seats
rather than on the steer-
ing column. It was the first
to offer heated seating in
1971.


STRATEGY: Needed for good business


Continued From Page 1C
bottom shelf as the larger
player, which is more than
200 times bigger, normally
commands all of the retail
space above.
Even though they scored
a coup by getting their
product onto the shelves
of these big box stores, the
firm is struggling with very
flat sales. They just cannot
get the momentum up to
increase sales.
Although the firm's prod-
uct is much better than its
major competitor, it just
does not have the advertis-
ing dollars to either create
demand or build a wider
market for its products.
While getting into the big
box stores was a major
achievement, it is question-
able that this will continue
as sales are below the mini-
mum amount required by
the stores to retain prod-
ucts on their shelves.
To date, the company
has used a marketing
strategy that had them
going head-to-head with
their big market competi-
tor. They thought this was


the appropriate strategy
as independent testing
showed their product really
is better than its competi-
tor. However, the firm just
does not have the financial
resources or infrastructure
to compete as such.
SAfter much discus-
sion with the company's
top staff, several things
became apparent. First, the
firm's products are supe-
rior to its competitor in
canine dental care. Second,
the firm maintains great
relationships with the buy-
ers at the big box stores.
Third, its large competitor
does not do any business
outside of the big box
stores. Finally, their treat
was not really a treat, but
an edible food item that
was dentally beneficial to
canines.
The firm rightly decided
that their current market-
ing strategy was not appro-
priate, and it now plans to
market it not as a treat,
but as a medically proven
way to help dogs deal with
plaque buildup and bad


breath. In addition, by
repositioning the product,.
the minimum sales require-
ments of the big box stores
will be greatly reduced.
Finally, the competition
in this niche will be much
less, making them the big
leader in this field.
The firm also decided to
expand into grocery stores
and other big box retailers
where their competitor had,
chosen not to compete.
Whilethis revised pro-
cess is just beginning, and
it is still too early to tell
how successful it will be,
continuing along their for-
mer path would have been
deadly at best.
Now go out and make
sure that your marketing
strategy remains the opti-
mal one for your company.
You can do this!

* FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.


*fI AskteFooIj


�9��~J/�


. I




















Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


SNYSE Amex
7,086.19 -38.93 1,767.04 -12.10


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
IntrstHtls 2.21 +.94 +74.0
SchiffNutr 7.50 +1.45 +24.0
FstBcpPR 2.68 +.51 +23.5
SteaknShk 14.55 +2.76 +23.4
CIBER 3.71 +.70 +23.3
CedarF 11.16 +2.09 +23.0
BasicEnSv 9.06 +1.69 +22.9
TRCCos 3.40 +.61 +21.9
ClearChOut11.06 +1.95 +21.4
JPM FTLgC26.70 +4.70 +21.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ZaleCp 2.08 -1.17 -36.0
KidBrands 3.64-1.04 -22.2
MarineP 3.88 -1.11 -22.2
Technitrl 4.18 -1.17 -21.9
GenCorp 6.62 -1.83 -21.7
WHIdrsIf 18.22 -4.76 -20.7
LDKSolar 6.85-1.71 -20.0
Aldlrish 3.17 -.77 -19.5
PlaybyB 3.29 -.74 -18.4
Spartch 9.56 -1.89 -16.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Citigrp 88523887 3.40 -.55
BkofAm 9354795 15.03 -.60
SPDR 6354946110.21 -.31
WellsFargo5747103 26.78+1.37
SPDRFnc13920850 14.22 -.11
FordM 3571553 9.68 +.68
GenElec 3385744 15.59 -.33
FannieMae3358476 1.10 +.06
BrMySq 3220201 25.78 -.02
ExxonMbl 3051178 68.21-4.62

Diary
Advanced 1,781
declinedd 1,397
lew Highs 572
NewLows 21
rotal issues 3,228
Jnchanged 50
Volume 30,039,953,693


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ExeterRg 8.50 +2.46 +40.7
TriValley 2.22 +.52 +30.6
CheniereEn 2.50 +.58 +30.2
SearchMwt 2.89 +.49 +20.4
NthnO&G 11.46 +1.93 +20.3
Wstmnd pf 16.50 +2.50 +17.9
NewConcEn 4.88 +.72 +17.3
EndvSilvg 4.16' +.61 +17.2
IntlAbsorb 4.60 +.65 +16.5
PionDrill 7.76 +1.05 +15.6

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TiensBio 2.55 -1.48 -36.7
TravelCtrs 3.43 -.86 -20.0
Cohen&Co 5.30 -1.20 -18.5
SinoHub n 3.81 -.79 -17.2
TanzRyg 3.00 -.57 -16.0
Geokinetics 9.18 -1.72 -15.8
Protalix 6.70 -1.11 -14.2
AlphaPro 4.14 -.66 -13.8
RELM 3.02 -.48 -13.7
ChinHldAcq 7.84 -1.22 -13.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
GoldStrg 264415 3.08 -.44
NwGoldg 258579 3.43 +.18
Rentech 241905 1.27-,36
GrtBasGg 189143 1.53 -.14
Taseko 172468 4.31 +.41
NthgtMg 168216 2.90 -.32
NovaGIdg 138799 5.13 -.38
TrianAcq 126261 9.83 -.03
KodiakOg.112212 2.41 +.24
JavelinPh 106574 1.30 -.02

Diary
Advanced 251
Declined 332
New Highs 46
New Lows 14
Total issues 605
Unchanged 22
Volume 785,004,706


I 2,211.69 +21.38


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChardCAwt 3.80 f2.60 +216.7
BkCarol 8.70 +5.10 +141.7
AlliancB 3.94 +1.56 +65.5
Manntch 3.89 +1.51 +63.4
CapCrspfD 10.50 +3.90 +59.1
Achillion 3.28 +1.18 +56.2
CalMicr 4.71 +1.66 +54.4
RXi Phrn 4.12 +1.44 +53.7
ChardCAun12.54 +4.27 +51.6
SuperiorBc 2.71 +.90 +49.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TransitnTg 3.86 -4.24 -52.3
CitizFst 5.12 -3.28 -39.0
AutoChwt 11.40 -5.38 -32.1
SevenArts n 2.08 -.81 -28.0
AutoChin 16.05 -5.80 -26.5
CenJrsyBc 3.65 -1.20 -24.7
Iridiumun 10.73 -3.27 -23.4
SmthtnBcp 4.95 -1.51 -23.4
Seanergy 3.26 -.94 -22.4
Elecsys 3.20 -.90 -22.0

Most Active ($1 ormore)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ343831244.46 +.41
Intel 3055637 19.63 -.27
Microsoft 2533289 30.36 +.51
SunMicro 2278712 9.33 +.97
Cisco 2253995 23.33 -.44
Oracle 2040965 24.34+1.56
ETrade 1994337 1.78 +.12
Dell Inc 1627156 13.74 +.62
RschMotn 1413227 70.00+6.16
DlaPtr 1396564 1.44 +.67

Diary
Advanced 1,467
Declined 1,400
New Highs 302
New Lows 80
Total issues 2,940
Unchanged 73
Volume 10,952,719,379


Name Ex Div Last


AT&T nc NY 1.64 27.32 -.69 -2.5 -4.1
Adventrx Amex ... 19 +.07+58.3+153.3
AutoZone NY ... 158.29 +2.51 +1.6 +13.5
BkofAm NY .04 15.03 -.60 -3.8 +6.7
BobEvn Nasd .72 28.74 ,+1.77 +6.6 +40.7
BrMySq NY 1.24 25.78 -.02 -0.1 +10.9
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 16.14 +1.05 +7.0 +44.3
CSX NY .88 48.47 -.47 -1.0.+49.3
ChampE h NY ... 20 . ... -64.3
Chevron NY 2.72 76.90 -.86 -1.1 +4.0
Cisco Nasd .23.33 -.44 -1.8 +43.1
Citigrp NY 3.40 -.55-13.9 -49.3
CocaCI NY 1.64 56.92 -2.19 -3.7 +25.7
ColBgp NY .. .41 . ... -80.0
Delhaize NY 2.01 75.26 -2.49 -3.2 +19.5
Dell nc Nasd .. 13.74 +.62 +4.7 +34.2
DirFBear rs NY ... 20.25 +.08 +0.4 -94.3
ETrade Nasd ... 1.78 +.12 +7.2 +54.8
ExxonMbl NY 1.68 68.21 -4.62 -6.3 -14.6
FPLGrp NY 1.89 54.62 -1.63 -2.9 +8.5
FamilyDir NY .54 28.29 +.09 +0.3 +8.5
FannieMaeNY ... 1.10 +.06 +5.8 +44.7
FordM NY 9.68 +.68 +7.6+322.7
FredMac NY ... 1.30 +.04 +3.2 +78.1
GenElec NY .40 15.59 -.33 -2.1 -3.8
HomeDp NY .90 28.65 +.16 +0.6 +24.5
iShEMkts.NY .59 40.36 -.99 -2.4 +61.6
iShR2K NY .83 61.18 +1.01 +1.7 +24.2


Wkly Wkly YTD
Cho %Cha %Chg


The Week in Review


.III.. ....m.I. may n I


WKly WKly TTD
Last Chg %Chg%Chg
19.63 -.27 -1.4 +33.9
40.95 -.01 ... +31.5
23.62 -.26 -1.1 +9.8
62.17 +.51 +0.8
30.36 +.51 +1.7 +56.2
8.53 -.02 -0.2 +92.6
10.40 +1.21 +13.2 +41.9
9.79 +.19 +2.0 +23.8
79.98 +3.98 +5.2 +33.3
24.34 +1.56 +6.8 +37.3
27.02 -1.59 -5.6 +37.2
59.48 -1.79 -2.9 +8.6
18.30 ... .... +3.3
105.01-13.89 -11.7 +43.4
44.46 +.41 +0.9 +49.5
4.24 +.14 +3.4 +16.5
43.06 +1.36, +3.3 +11.0
76.27 +1.95 +2.6 +96.2
33.79 -.43 '-1.3 -8.7
3.72 -.35 -8.6+103.3
110.21 -.31 -0.3 +22.1
14.22 -.11 -0.8 +13.6
9.33 +.97+11.6+144.2
29.45 -1.13 -3.7 +41.8
10.62 +1.05 +11.0 -54.2
52.85 -1.80 -3.3 -5.7
26.78 +1.37 +5.4 -9.2
46.68 +5.19 +12.5 +32.4


Name Ex Div
Intel Nasd .63
JPMorgCh NY .20
Lowes NY .36
McDnlds NY 2.20
Microsoft Nasd .52
Motorola NY
NY Times NY
NobltyH Nasd .25
OcciPet NY 1.32
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.80
Pfizer NY .72
Potash NY .40
PwShsQOQNasd .21
OwestCm NY .32
Ryder NY 1.00
SearsHldgsNasd
SouthnCo NY 1.75
SprintNex NY
SPDR NY 2.29
SPDRFnclNY .38
SunMicro Nasd
TimeWmrsNY .75
US NGsFd NY
WalMart NY 1.09
WellsFargo NY .20
XTO Engy NY .50


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and eamings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks, pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reversestock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption tee. f =frdnt load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA= not available. p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Ganer and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.
Fi


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.1234 .1.1272
Britain 1.6121 1.6156
Canada 1.0656 1.0702
Euro .6979 .6969
Japan 90.40 89.96
Mexico 12.8670. 12.9620
Switzerlnd 1.0429 1.0466
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones Industrials 29.55
Close: 10,328.89
1-week change: -142.61 (-1.4%) MON
11,000 ...... ....... ...


-49.05 -10.88 -132.86 20.63


TUES WED THUR FRI


10,000 ............



9 ,0 00 .. ...... .. ........... . ......... ... .. ..... ... ... .... ... . .. ... ... ... . .. .

9,000 .... ... .





MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pt Minnit
lame ObI ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMGO TotRefis'
American Funds GrthAmA m'
American Funds CaplncBuA m
Vanguard TotStldx
American Funds CpWIdGrlA m
Fidelity Contra x '
American Funds IncAmerA m
American Funds InvCoAmA m
Vanguard 5001nv
Vanguard Instldx
American Funds EurPacGrA m
Dodge & Cox Stock
American FundsWAMutlnvA m
Dodge & Cox IntlStk
American Funds NewPerspA m
Fidelity Divrlnt d
Arrieri;an Fund. FrlrvA m
PIuMO .TilRelAm D
Arrmnnijn Furni BalA m
Frau. Terr, -Fi ri Ilr IrI,,im A m
Vdigu.ird W-mltr
Vanguard 500Adml
American Funds BondA m
Fidelity GrowCo
Vanguard TotStlAdm
Vanguard Totlntl
Vanguard InstPlus


114,653
65,022
58,268
56,221
56,060
55,503
49,018
48,458
47,844
43,018
40,409
39,492
38,894
35,777
32,502
31,850
30,369
30,253
29,744
28,628
28,113
27,983
27,836
27,285
26,873
25,417
24,423


+16.2/C
+34.4/C
+18.9/D
+30.1/B
+31.9/C
+28.7/D
+26.7/B
+28.4/C
+27.6/C
+27.8/C
+37.7/A
+33.4/A
+20.0/D
+47.7/A
+37.4/B
+33.0/D
+33.4/B
+15.9/C
+21.7/D
+45.7/A
+23.9/C
+27.8/C
+16.8/B
+40.5/B
+38.2/B
+36.7/A
+27.8/C


NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL '2,500
5.75 . 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
4.25 1,000
NL - 10,000
NL 100,000
3.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 100,000
NL 3,000
NL 200,000,000


CA Conservative Allocat, CI -Intennediate-Termn Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign Largerowh, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -W d Allocation, LB -Large Blend. LG -Lare Growr , LV -Lare Value, MA-Moderate Alocat~o, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, W -
Mid-CapValue, SH -Spedatly-heath, WS-Wod Stock, Tol Retum: Chng in NAV wit dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund perform ..
otherswi same objecive:Aisintop20%, Einbottom 20%. Minnit Inv: Mnimum neededtoinvestinfund.Source:Moingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg


... +.30 +21.5
17 +.68 +67.0
15 -.39 +.7
... -.52+114.6
... -.08 -28.7
... -.86 -6.3
14 -.69 -4.1
... +.16 +51.3
15 -.43 -.1
17 -.63 +26.2
... +.41 +319.0
12 +.75 +14.1
... -6.81 +5.7
... -.04 +16.7
... -.09 +51.2
. -.03 +29.5
... -.77 -32.4
.. +.19 -12.0
79 +4.06 +168.7
11 +.13 +30.5
... -.10 -42.3
... -.48 +51.6
... +.51 +156.7
29 +.05 +73.8
12 -.50 +5.4
38 -.22+118.4
... -.18 -10.2
16 +1.24 +46.0
... +3.16 +58.6
15 -.02 +17.8
... +5.23 +34.0
... +1.10 +75.3.
.30 +.68 +30.2
17 +.06 +6.0
... +1.32 +94.5
13 +.36 +23.8
23 -1.98 +31.9
18 -.35 -7.0
36 +.50 +60.6
16 +1.21 +26.3
... -1.86+106.4
... -.28 +3.2
... -.60 +6.7
... -.58 -6.2
... -.17 -5.5
... -.06 +7.5
16 -1.90 +7.5
... +.81 +208.9
15 -4.84 +41.2
...-2.16 +25.2
+.23 +15.0
13 -.02 +10.9
19 -.26 +29.9
23 . -.19 +69.4
13 +.24+112.5-
... -2.14 -5.1
13 +.21 +55.0
12 -1.04 +8.5
15 -1.78 +10.0
... -.90 +23.9
14 -.06 +29.9
35 +2.36+196.3
13 -.21 +32.5
27 -.32 +28.0
... +.34 +32.1
...-2.29 +57.3
15 +.10 +15.3
10 -1.73 +28.4
... +3.03 +61.2
13 -.86 +4.0
10 -.03 +15.7
9 ' -.27 -5.8
-.55 -49.3
.+3.3
57 +.88 +71.7
19 +.50 +75.0

+.67 +69.8
21 -2.19 +25.7


ABB Ltd .44
AESCorp ...
AFLAC 1.12
AK Steel .20
AMR
AOLn
AT&T Inc 1.64
AU Optron .09
'AbtLab 1.60
Accenture .75
AMD
Aetna ..04
Agnicog .18
AirTran
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Aldlrish ...
Allstate .80
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.36
AmbacF
AMovilL 1.22
AmAxle
AEagleOut .40
AEP 1.64
AmExp .72
AlntlGp rs ...
AmeriBrg s .32
Anadarko .36
Annaly 2.54
Apache. .60
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .36
ArchDan .56
AssuredG .18
ATMOS 1.34
Avon .84
B&T Cp .60
BJ Svcs .20
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .75
BcSBrasiln ...
BkofAm .04
BkAm pfS ...
BkNYMel .36
BarrickG .40
Baxter 1.16-
BeazerHm..
BestBuy .56
Being 1.68
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.24
BurlNSF 1.60
CBS B .20
CIGNA .04
CIT Grp n
CMS Eng .50
CVS Care .31
CampSp 1.10
CapOne .20
CardnlHlt s .70
CarMax
Carnival
Caterpillar 1.68
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CntryTel 2.80
ChesEng .30
Chevron 2.72
Chimera .30
Chubb 1.40
/ Citigrp
CitiTdecsn7.50
CliffsNRs .35
Coach .30
CoballEn n ...
CocaCE .32
CocaCI 1.64


WlyNa
Last Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Coeurrs. ... ' ... ... -.30+115.9 19.00
ConAgra .80 3.6 14 -.31 +34.3 22.16
ConocRhil 2.00 4.0 ...-1.12 -8.9 49.80
Conseco ... ...... +.17 -5.0 4.92
ConEd 2.36 5.2 14 +.19. +16.5 45.37
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CtlAirB ... ... ... -.52 -4.4 17.27
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Coming .20 1.1'19 ... +93.8 18.47
DCTIndl .28 5.9 ... +.02 -6.5 4.73
DJIA Diam 2.73 2.6 ... -1.38 +17.8 103.14
DR Horton .15 1.4 ... +.67 +48.9 10.53
DTE 2.12'4.9 13 -.44 +20.5 42.98
DanaHIdg ... ...... +1.69+1354.1 10.76
Darden 1.00 2.8 13 +2.68 +24.7 35.13
Deere 1.12 2.0 18 +2.39 +43.1 54.83
DetaAir ... ... ... +.41 +1.7 11.66
DenburyR ... ... .. +1.20 +33.0 14.52
DevelDiv .08 .9 ... -.13 +83.4 8.95
DevonE .64 .9' ... +5.67 +5.9 69.56
DirxEMBear... ...... +.36-91.7 5.56
DirFBearrs ... ...... +.08 -94.3 20.25
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DirxLCBull 6.83 .6 ... -.26 +58.2 50.84
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FPLGrp 1.89 3.5 13 -1.63 +8.5 54.62
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ForestOil ... ..... +2.24 +35.5 22.34
FredMac ... ...... +.04 +78.1 1.30
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FronlierCm1.00 13.3 14 -.43 -14.1 7.51
GameStop... ... 10 +.76 +3.8 22.48
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GrtAtlPac ....... -.49 +71.1 10.73
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Honwillntl 1.21 3.1 13 -1.72 +19.3 39.15
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HovnanE ... ...... +.46+136.0 4.06
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IAMGIdg .06 ... 87 -.81+156.5 15.67


Name Div
IMS Hth .12
ING
iSAstla .94
iShBraz 2.03
iSh HK .54
iShJapn .12
iShSing .36
iSTaiwn .60
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .53
iSSP500 2.22
iShEMkts '.59
iShB20 T 3.70
iSEafe 1.49
iShR2K .83
iShREst 2.34
ITW 1.24
IBM 2.20
IntlGame .24
IntPap .10
Interpublic ...
Invesco .41
ItauUnibH .46
JPMorgCh .20
JPMCh wt ...
Jabil .28
JacobsEng ...
JohnJn 1.96
JohnsnCtl .52
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25
Keycorp .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


13 +.51 +35.6
+.64 -12.4
... -.43 +60.8
... -3.64+110.9
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Wkly YTD Wrly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Kimco .64
Kinrossg .10
Kohls
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar
LSI Corp
LVSands
LennarA .16
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LincNa .04
LloydBkg 1.43
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fncl 1.08
MGMMir ...
Macys .20
Manitowoc .08
Manpwl .74
MarathonO .96
MarinerEn ...
MktVGold ...
MarshM .80
Marshlls .04
MasseyEn .24
MeadJohnn.80
MedcoHlth ...
Midtrnic .82
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
MicronT
MitsuUFJ ...


5.0
.6 .
... 18
4.3 16



1.3
5.5
.2 .



14.6 8

1.2 12

1.4 84
3.1 21


3.7 42
.7
.6 23
1.9 21
... '25
1.9 21
4.1 10
2.1 16
... 17


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Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


Monsanto 1.06
Moodys .42
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
Motorola
NCRCorp ...
Nabors ....
NatGrid 2.89
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NY CmtyB 1.00
NewmtM .40
NiSource' .92
NobleCorp .20
NokiaCp .52
NorflkSo 1.36
Nucor 1.44
OcciPet 1.32
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 1.78
OshkoshCp ...
PG&ECp 1.68
PNC' .40
PatriotCoal...
PeabdyE .28
Penney .80
PepsiCo 1.80
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA .95
Petrobras 1.30
Pfizer .72
PhilipMor 2.32
Pier 1
PlainsEx
Potash .40
PS USDBulI.17
PrUShS&P11.47
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ9.50
ProUltSP .34
ProUShL20 ...
ProUShtRE4.57
ProUShtFn ...
ProUItRE .17
ProUltO&G .23
ProUtFin .06
ProUBasM .19
ProUSR2K25.00
ProUltCrude...
ProgsvCp ...
ProLogis .60
Prudentl .70
PSEG 1.33
PuteH
QuantaSvc ...
QksilvRes
QwestCm .32
RRI Engy ...
RangeRs .16
Raytheon 1.24
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola
RepubSvc .76
RiteAid
RylCarb ...
SAIC
SLM Cp ...
SpdrGold ...
SpdrHome .42
SpdrKbwBk .52
SpdrRetl .43
SpdrMetM .50
Safeway .40
StJude
Saks
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .44
Schlmbrg .84
SemiHTr ' .50


18 -2.32 +14.5 80.52
17 +.09 +33.3 26.78
-.57 +82.1 29.21
25 -3.77 +59.6 55.22
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58 +7.74 +48.6 51.12
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16 +.65 +86.0. 25.58
15 +.45 -3.2 18.85.
81 -.51 +27.1 11.31
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33 -1.53 +11.7 36.80
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Name Div
SiderNac 1.12
SilvWhtng ...
Smithlntl .48
SouthnCo 1.75
SwstAirl .02
SwstnEngy...
SpectraEn 1.00
SprintNex .
SPDR i 2.29
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SPTech .31
SP Util 1.26
StarwdHtl .20
StateStr .04
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Suntech
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TJX .48
TaiwSemi .46
Target .68
TeckResg ...
TenetHlth
Teradyn
Terra .40
Tesoro .20
Texlnst .48
Textron .08
3M Co 2.04
TimeWrnrs .75
Tian Intl .02
TitanMet -
Transocn
Travelers 1.32
USAirwy ...
UnionPac 1.08
UtdMicro
UPSB . 1.80
US Bancrp .20
US NGsFd....
USOilFd
USSteel | .20
UtdhfthGp .03
ValeSA 4.48
Vale SA pf .48
ValeroE .60
VangEmg 1.18
VerizonCml.90-
ViacomB ...
VimpelCm .33
Visa .50
Walgm .55
Weathfntl ...
WellPoint ...
WellsFargo .20
WendyArby .06
WDigital
WstnUnion .24
Weyerh .20
WmsCos .44
XL Cap .40
XTO Engy .50
XcelEggy .98
Xerox .17
Yamanag .04
YingliGm ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
3.5 ... -3.01 +148.2 31.79
... -.54+124.8 14.59
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2.8 ... -.91 -14.5 12.48
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2.5 20 -.78 +40.7 80.97' .
2.5 ...-1.13 +41.8 29.45
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31 +.74 +28.4 11.31'. '.
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2.7 9 -2.56 +6.5 48.14.
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3.1 34 -.03 +5.1 57.98
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Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ActivsBliz ...
AdobeSy ...
Airvana"
AkamaiT
AlteraCp If .20
Amazon
AmCapLtd .19
Amgen
A123Sysn ...
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .24
ArrayBio
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.36
BMC Sft ...
Biogenldc .
BrigExp
Broadcom ...
BrcdeCm .
CA'Inc .16
Cadence ...
CareerEd ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CentAl
ChrmSh
CienaCorp ...
Cisco
CitizReph ...
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Come spcl .38
Compuwre ...
CorinthC ...
Coslco .72


+.31 +28.0
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


vjdecodGen...
Dell Inc
DIaPtr
DirecTV A ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DryShips ...
ETrade
eBay
ElectArts
EngyXXI .02
EricsnTel .23
EvrgrSlr
Expedia
ExpScripts ...
FGX Intl ...
FifthThird .04
FstSolar ...
Flextrn
FocusMda ...
FosterWhl ...
GenBiotch ...
Genzyme ...
GileadSci ...
Google
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .60
HumGen ...
IAC Inter ...
Incyte
Intel .63
Intuit
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ..
JetBlue
JdyGibl .70
KLATnc .60
LaJollPhh ..


... +.06 -10.8 .17
19 +.62 +34.2 13.74
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Name
LeapWirlss
Level3
LibGlobA
LibtyMlntA
LinearTch
MarvellT
Mattel
Maximlntg
MelcoCrwn
MesaAir h
Microchp 1
Microsoft
NetApp
Netlist
NewsCpA
NewsCpB
NexMed
NorTrst 1
NwstBcsh
Novell
Nvidia
OceanFrt
OnSmcnd
Oracle
PDLBio 1
PMCSra
Paccar
Palm Inc
PattUTI
Paychex 1
PeopUtdF
Popular
PwShs QQQ
PriceTR 1
QIAGEN
Qualcom
RF MicD
Rambus


Div


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


. ... +2.29 -34.7
... ... +.04 +110.0
... ... -.45 +29.8
... ... -.43+234.3
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Symantec ...
TDAmeritr ...
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3Com
TibcoSft .
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UAL
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VertxPh
VirgnMdah .16
Vivus
Vodafone 1.30
Windstrm 1.00
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ZionBco .04


.. 17
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1.3 22


4.3 ...

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1.3 22
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1.7 ...



... 17

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1.0

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Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
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AlldNevG
AmO&G
ApolloG g
Aurizong ...
BMB Munai ...
BPWAcq
BPW Acqwt...
BarcGSOil.
BrclndiaTR ...
BootsCoots .
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn...
ChNEPetn ...
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DejourE g ...
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Endvrlnt
EndvSilvg ...
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GascoEngy...
GenMoly
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GranTrrag ..
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IntlRylty g .04
JavelinPh..
KodiakOg ...
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AMEX Most Active


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Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


MadCatzg ...
Metalico ...
MdwGoldg ...
Minefnd g ...
NBRESec .24
Neuralstem ...
Nevsun g ...
NDragon
NwGold g ...
NA Pall g ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
NovaDelP ...
NovaGd g ...
Oilsandsg ...
On2 Tech ...
Palatin
ParaG&S ...
PionDrill ...
Protalix
RadientPh
Rentech
Rubicon g
SamsO&G ...
Sapphire wt ...
TanzRyg
Taseko
TmsatlPtn ...
TrianAcq ..
USDatawk ...
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Uluru
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VistaGold ...
WizzardSft ...


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Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights I STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


3C


We..ky Dw

Weekly Dow Jones


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week


Discount Rate 0.50 0.50
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.04 0.03
6-month 0.16 0.16
5-year' 2.27 2.23
10-year 3.54 3.54
S30-year '4.46 4.49


[


I


mirP e Rate


I �


3.25 3.25
















Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


Lake City Reporter




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Legal

ATTENTION
SUBCONTRACTORS
COOK BROTHERS, INC. IS BID-
DING THE FOLLOWING PROJ-
ECT AND WOULD APPRECIATE
A BID FROM YOUR FIRM:
SUBJECT: DEPARTMENT OF
CORRECTIONS WORK RELEASE
CENTER
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
PLEASE HAVE ALL PRICING IN
BY 4PM ON 12/22/09 DUE TO
EARLY BID TIME
FAX BIDS TO 850-514-1007
SCOPES OF WORK INCLUDED
ARE AS FOLLOWS:
SITEWORK
MISC METALS
LANDSCAPING
CONCRETE
MASONRY
FRAMING
CURTAIN WALL STOREFRONT
INSULATION
DRYWALL
ACOUSTICAL CEILINGS
PAINTING
CERAMIC TILE / FLOORING
CABINETS
DOORS/FRAMES/HARDWARE
DEMOLITION
PLUMBING
HVAC
ELECTRICAL
SPECIALITIES
FIRE SPRINKLER
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS,
PLEASE CONTACT PETE MAB-
RY @ phm@c6okbrothersinc.com.
LICENSE NUMBER GCCO001712
04536688
December 19, 20, 22, 2009
Request For Proposals
The Union County Housing Authori-
ty is requesting proposals from quali-
fied individuals or firms for Techni-
cal Assistance. All interested persons
must be familiar with HUD regula-
tions. Proposals should be accompa-
nied by.references and a resume for
consideration. The "Scope of Work"
can be obtained by contacting the
Union County Housing Authority
main office which is located at 715
West Main Street, Lake Butler, Flor-
ida 32054. Resumes, references and
proposals will be accepted until 4:00
PM December 30, 2009 and should
be sent to the Attention of the Execu-
tive Director using the above refer-
enced address.
04536579
December 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22,
23, 2009

060 Services.
Home Daycare: license #
F03CO0007 & insured, food pro-
-gram 441 (High Spgs/Ellisville),
Open 6:30a-7:30p 386-755-7875
100 Job
Opportunities

04536655.
Aaron's is hiring
Manager Trainees
Must be 21 or older, have clean
DVR, pass Criminal bckgrd &
drug test, work 45 hrs. wk,
Sunday off. Salary+Comm,
bonus, benefits
Rebecca.Sosa@aaronrents.com
or apply in person:
2658.S.W. Main Blvd. Lake
City, FL. 32025

04536657
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is accepting applications
for the following positions:
* LPN
* Clerk
* Deputy Sheriff
* Detention Officer
All applicants must have a high
school diploma or its equivalent.
All Duties, LPN's, and
Corrections Officers must be
Florida State Certified. The
C.C.S.O. is an EEO Employer.
APplications may be obtained at
the Columbia County Sheriff's
Office Operations Center at
4917 East U.S. Hwy 90
or online at www.columbiasher-
iff.com. Deadline for accepting
applications are Thursday, De-
cember 31, 2009 by 5:00 p.m.

04536715





Lake City's only full service hotel
is seeking the following:
BANQUET CHEF
CAFE SERVER P/T
DISHWASHER P/T
SECURITY OFFICER P/T

Apply in person. Mon-Wed 12-
5pm 213 SWCommerce Dr.
EOE DFWP.






Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 lv msg.


New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191


100 Job
100 OOpportunities
BLUE JEAN JOB $ CASH $
Seeking sharp go getters, Able to
TRAVEL USA. Demo chemical
products. Good people skills &
enjoy working in a Rock-n-Roll
Environment. Call Kelly
1-800-201-3293.9am-6pm.
Must start Immediately!
CLASS A CDL Long haul driver.
Must have frameless dump exp.
Must pass drug test. Requires out
of town travel. 386-719-9482
between 9a & 5p
A Terrific Opportunity
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company
$100,000+ Earning Potential,
Benefits, Pension, 401K & BCBS
Insurance for those who qualify,
Call 1-800-257-5500
Gainesville/Ocala Plaintiffs
Personal Injury Firm seeking
litigation associate with 3-5 years
trial experience, preferably in Civil
Litigation. Salary and bonuses
commensurate with experience.
Please fax resume and cover, letter
to (352)379-9007.
International Company seeking
self motivated individuals for
direct marketing business.
$500-$1500/mo PT/FT Free info
www.income2profits.com
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
We are growing again!!




Join our family of
caring professionals
in our Branford Office

Community Education
Manager
Responsible for development
and implementation of a
program to increase awareness
and referral activity for Hospice
of the Nature Coast's Services
throughout service area.
Minumum of h Bachelor's
degree with at least 3 to 5 years
experience and a proven track
record within the development
services arena.
Job summary as well and
application can be found at:
www.hospiceoftheinaturecoast.org
email:
hrl@hospiceofcitruscounty.org
Hospice of the Nature Coast
P.O. Box 641270
Beverly Hills, FL 34464
Fax: 352-527-9366
DFWP/EOE

120 Medical
Employment

04536638
RN NEEDED
The Health Center if Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills.
Excellent Salary.
EOE/ADA/Drug Free
Workplace. Apply in
person or send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560SW McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

MADISON COUNTY Memori-
al Hospital Now Hiring:
Case Manager
Laboratory Director
Laboratory Technologists
Respiratory Therapists
RN's & LPN's
Please contact (850)253-1906

DENTAL ASSISTANT needed
F/T position Mon - Fri 9-5.
Salary based on experience.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3122



Iompca Roofing

Es i lo





111 flPAI PT..


120 Medical
120 Employment

04536674
RN, LPN, OT, PT
expect
REWARDS
The homecare industry is
revolutionizing healthcare in
America. And Gentiva is
leading that revolution as a
progressive, employee-focused
organization with an innovative
Pay Per Visit and Per
Diem Program.
expect more rewards at
, Gentiva
* Control your financial rewards
with flexible scheduling to meet
your goals.
* Put your mind at ease with
weekly paychecks and
streamlined payroll process.
***Also seeking FT Payroll/
Data Entry for Lake City
location***
For more info contact your local
Recruiter, Annissia, at
1.866.GENTIVA or visit us at
www.gentiva.com/jobs.
*Gentiva Health Services, Inc. is
an Affirmative Action/Equal
Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V
encouraged to apply.


SGENTIVA""

home health


2A A Schools &
24 Education

04536136
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
, Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books,'
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

Welding .
Enjoy working outdoors?
Like to earn a good income? Con-
sider welding at Lake City Com-
munity College. Classes
begin January 6, 2010. Financial
aid available. No high school
diploma required. We have day,
night and Saturday class..
Register now through
December 16 or January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.

HVAC
Enjoy doing repairs? Like to earn a
good income and/or Start your
business? Consider
Heating/AC and Commercial Re-
frigeration at Lake City
Community College. Classes be-
gin January 6, 2010. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma required. We have day
and night classes. Register now
through December 16
6r January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.
Wanted Career
I Motivated Students!
If you are seeking a new career in
a high demand field, then get your
Degree or Certificate in Logistics
& Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available for
qualified students. Classes start
01/06/2009, call Lake City Com-
munity College, (386) 754-4492.

310 Pets & Supplies
AMERICAN
Singing Canary
$50
386-961-9188.


BEAUTIFUL CONGO
African Gray. 5 mo. old.
$650
386-961-9188
BEVERLY HILLS Chihuahua
look a like ,Female white. $200.
Cannot keep due to illness.
Has papers. 386-755-0340
Female Poodle
White $400. Cannot keep
due to illness. Has papers.
386-755-0340
Free bird/hunting dog
of some sort.
Female, 1-2 y/old, stray.
Very good dog. 386-752-0523


310 Pets & Supplies

Mini Dachshunds. Puppies. Christ-
mas Special $295. Black & Tans,
Dapple Health Cert., Papers,
Shots, Adorable 386-755-7177
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local ,
office for information.

A30 Livestock &
. Supplies
CATTLE - Cows, Angus hulls,
bred heffers & yearlings.
PIGS Beautiful white Yorkshire.
(4mos.)386-755-3500 or 365-1352

360 Feed, Seed
3 & Plants
LIVING CHRISTMAS TREES
Beautiful Leyland Cypress 15 gal,
locally grown, delivery available.
386-688-2057.

401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621

402 Appliances
FROST FREE Refrigerator.
White 18 cu ft.
Works good. $150.00
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

408 Furniture

Like New: Simmons sofas, end
tables, Dixie Wicker Bedroom
Suite, Broyhill China/Hutch, Table
& Chairs; 15' Glass/Brass Wall
Units & More. Please call to set an
appointment, 1-386-438-0285
or 1-813-951-7289
Toddler bed
'red race car, with mattress,
rarely used. $100.00
386-623-4064

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment


New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315

418 Toys
New Great Railroad Empire train
Battery operated w/4'x9'6" oval
Sound & Its works $50. before 11a
386-758-1358 or 7p-10p 752-3491

419 TV-Radio &
.4 Recording
TV. 57" Zenith. High
Definition. Flat screen
projector. $450.
386-365-3212

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.'
Call 386-961-1961.
We Buy Junk: cars, trucks,
tractors, trailers, scrap metal,
AC's and batteries. NO MH's
Call 386-965-1423 or 365-4879

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
2-15" ALUMINUM wheels
4 lug pattern, Ford Stock.
$100.00
386-365-1075


4 Aluminum wheels.
265/75 R16 w/tires; 6 lug pattern
Chevrolet Escalade Stock $250.
386-365-1075
5-Men's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) 1-Seiko, 1-Titan,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.

450 Good Things
to Eat
PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans.'386-752-6896 or 697-6420
The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2 br/2 full bath MH
ready to rent Ft White & on
private property. $600.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2& 3br off 252 in Suwannee
County. No pets (horses OK)
1st month & deposit.
386-961-1482.
2br/2ba MH. on 1/2 ac. lot.
Nice area. Call.to see!
$600 mo. $600 security
386-752-5911 or 466-2266


630t Mobile Homes
6 . for Rent
2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 security deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in
Branford area. $650.mo.
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3br/2ba MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500. move in. $575. mo.
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Nice 4b/2ba on 3 ac. 3 mi out Ft
White, off CR 18. Niblack Ave.
New CH/A. porch. $750. mo plus
dep. no pets 386-497-1144. Jerry
Remodeled 3/2 DWMH's. Include
yard maint. & yearly carpet clean-
ing Shady Oaks. S of town on 441.
$650.mo. 386-208-4702
VERY CLEAN 2b/2ba. Covered
patio, front & back. No pets. State
-Rd 100 @ Union County line.
$600 month. Call 904-966-0765.
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830

640 Mobile Homes
.0 for Sale
04 PALM 2000sf. 3br/2ba (Never
lived in) Was $88K now $60K.
$450mo w/$3200 cash. First Home
Buyer. Plywood floors, Smart
Panel lap siding, (2) patio doors,
. office retreat. Includes: Del & Set.
Gary Hamilton (386)758-9824
6 Mobile Home
6 & Land
1800 s.f .Man. Home, 4bd/2ba,
plus retreat/office. 2 porches,
walks, concrete foundation, appli.,
plywood w/ ceramic floors, metal
roof, 5 acres, comer lot (treed).
Horses ok, Call Gary Hamilton
(386) 758-9824. Poss. owner
finance. $119K.


Owner Financing. Large. MH
w/3.32 acres. South of Lake City.
Small down & $850mo.
386-590-0642 /867-1833

'710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES !
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649 per mo. !!!

$299 MOVES YOU IN

FREE RENT
-;P 200 FREE CHANNELS
* BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

!!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)
2BR/1BA DUPLEX Apt.
$565. mo includes water,
sewer and garbage.
386-965-2922
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Extremely Clean
$650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Landlords You Can Love!
2br/1.5ba Duplex CH/A, W/D
hook up. Close to VA. $550.mo +
sec. 386-758-9351/352-208-2421
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
Ig master br, very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, Iv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled , 2br/lba Duplex
w/garige. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Studios & IBr's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2^ For Rent
1 ROOM furnished
efficiency. Lights, water
and cable included.
$350. mo. 386-758-5671


-l BU I
BSELLl


FIND IT


New Home Sales


Consultant Wanted

Excellent Commission Based

Pay and Benefits

Fax Resume to 509-756-2869
or email mh newhomejobs@vahoo.com

Maronda Homes
~~~~~~~IB^ M/ IIv/f^-yf w w S^,^S ^^fVS^/


4C















Classified Department: 755-5440


5C


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
24 hour office, laundry & vending
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax

730 Unfurnished
730 HomeFor Rent
3BR/2BA
Double car garage. Great location.
Newer home. $1000. mo.
386-755-2672
3BR/2BA BRICK home for rent.
Nice subdivision w/large lot.
Close to town. $750. mo
plus security 386-752-2063
3BR/2BA BRICK Home
in town. $850/mo.
$500. security deposit.
386-365-8721
3BR/2BA Brick w/2 car garage,
CH/A, at 101 SW Hummingbird
Glen. $900. mo. $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
3BR/2BA on 10 ac., LR, DR,
fireplace, deck, CH/A, shed w/
shop area. $650. mo $650. dep.
904-964-2210 or 904-796-7777
A 4BR 2BA HUD Home!
ONLY $215/m6!!
5%dn 15yrs @ 8%apr for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7782
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517;0522.
Cute 2/1,414 SE Lomond. CH/A,
Washer/Dryer, Fenced, Dogs OK.
$625 per mo +.utils OR $250 wk
including the utils. Go look .
through the windows & then call
Florida Homes & Land 755-5936
or email john()johnstanford.com
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease-req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 3.86-752-6082
House for Rent. Everything new.
4br/2ba plus study. Carport, great
location. $1100. mo. last +
sec.386-867-2283
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
212Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
WELLBORN AREA. 2 HOMES
Lg 3br/2ba, also avail. 2br/lba
Jape S. Usher, Lic. Real Estate
Broker. 386-755-3500/365-1352

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
For Rent. 24X30 storgae bldg. lo-
cated off US 90 behind "Right way
Automotive". $250. mo. has elec.
but for storage only. 386-755-2475
Office Space For Rent near down-
town Lake City. Single offices or
whole Building. - Very affordable.
Please Call 386-628-2228
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135

770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$1000 mo,$1000 dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm

805 Lots for Sale


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
* All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitAtion, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
.custodians, pregnant women and
People securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
. the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
1800 s.f..Man. Home, 4bd/2ba,
plus retreat/office. 2 porches,
walks, concrete foundation, appli.,
plywood w/ ceramic floors, metal
roof, 5 acres, comer lot (treed).
Horses ok, Call Gary Hamilton
(386) 758-9824. Poss. owner
finance. $119K.
3/2 2000+sf on acree built 2007
many extras,.stonehenge S/D,
privacy fence, sprink. sale/rent/
lease. $185k. 850-380-0275

820 Farms &
SAcreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
SWell, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

840 Out of Town
O8 0Property
Steinhatchee River-Dixie County
1/2 ac. w/remodeled 3br MH.
Lg trees, walk to River. Has rental
income! $89,000. (352)498-2687

930 Motorcycles
4 Wheeler Yamaha Raptor 2002
6600RR. Loaded, New engine. Big
Bore $2,200. Also, 2006 Suzuki
GSX -R1000. 2200 mi. Like new
$6,500. 386-365-3212

940 Trucks
1996-3500 CHEVROLET, 4WD
Dually, 454 motor, AT, Good
mechanical condition. $5,900. obo
386-755-4896 or 397-4849
2007 Toyota Tundra SR5 Double
Cab 26,000 miles 8 Cylinder
TRD 4X4 $22000 firm
Call 386-688-1023 for details
952 Vans & Sport
95 Util. Vehicles


2000 Chevy Blazer LT
58,000 Miles, new tires, fully
powered, showroom condition.
$5,800. Call 386-623-3417


2007 Dodge Caravan
, 13,200 miles
$16,500
Call 386-965-3075
Pi at P.fnnarad I


REPORTER Classifieds *o1

In Print and On Line


www.lakecityreporter.6om


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.
- -. . - i ....-== -. a ---'


2003 VW Jetta
GL


$4,300


(386)365-3326


0 ..0n Prin nline

2007 Toyota 1996 3500
Tindra SR5 Chevrolet
Double Cab, 26,000 miles, 8 4WD dually, 454 motor, AT,
cylinder, TRD 4x4. good mechanical condition.,
$22,000 firm $5,900 obo "W 1
Call (386)755-4896
(386)688-1023 (386)397-4849 _


at 3B-75-54


"t Us Write
IEEZ> HELP




Classified Ad


Fo vo! an75-540Toa


L-ak Cit Reporterff









.LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


I


" *m I:


*'


Any New
Nissan Frontier SE
Crew Cab or King Cab
$3,123 OFF


2010 Nissan Maxima SV
TOP OF THE LINE! 'LOADED PLUS
ws $34,250
pay 28,876


2009 Nissan Altima
2.5S Loaded
Was $22,570 18 9
NOW $108,993
Sr, __-JIl *


2010 Nissan Titan King Cab SE
was 31,275

s8,:483 OFF O


I/ ALL SIX DAYS
2009 Nissan Versa
5 TO CHOOSE FROM
$2,042 OFF ANY MODEL


2010 Nissan Cube 1.85wlAerokit
was .17,820
You 16,620'
S1, 200 OFF


2010 Nissan X-Terra S, X or SE
42 or 4x4
$2,823
j - 3


NBC l
-^l-^-la"


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r


$5,256 OFF


LOADED'


LOADED'


.Classified Departmeht: 755-5440


AMM


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayet@lakecityreporter.com

Sunday, December 20, 2009


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


www.lakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Where the

mistletoe

grows

Mistletoe,
or festive
"kissing
balls," are
decking.
the halls of many homes
this time of year. Hanging
mistletoe has become part
of our traditional d6cor for
Christmas in American and
New Year's in Europe. But
take a leisurely country
drive and notice the decidu-
ous trees that are leafless
during the winter. Those
green balls of mistletoe are
also adorning many of our
deciduous hardwoods such
as oaks, elms, sycamores
and pecans. These trees
are all "decked out" for the
holidays, too.
That pretty green ball
of little green leaves and
white berries is actually a
semi-parasitic plant. They
are healthy and growing all
year but we really become '
aware of them during the
winter dormant season.
They are camouflaged by
the tree's green leaves in
summer, but when the tree
leaves fall, the evergreen
mistletoe plant stands out
against the sky. The dor-
mant trees are adorned
with green balls making
our winter Florida land-
scape so much more inter-
esting.
These semi-parasitic
plants obtain water and
minerals from inside the
host tree. It does produce
its own food through pho-
tosynthesis, however, so
damage to the host is less
severe. When mistletoe
grows on a tree, it'sends
out a special root-like struc-
ture that penetrates the
bark and extends into the
circulatory system of the
tree. This clever water thief
usually doesn't cause seri-
ous harm to the tree unless
the host tree is already
weakened from pests,
weather, or old age.
So how does a peren-
nial evergreen plant start
growing way up in the
treetops? Although the
white berry is poisonous to
humans and other animals,
they make a great meal
for birds. The single seed
inside the white mistletoe
berry is very sticky. Birds
discard the berries while
eating them or deposit
them on the branches in
droppings. The seeds stick'
to the bark while they ger-
minate and set down roots.
Once established, mistletoe
can grow rapidly and can
often reach a diameter of
three feet.
Removal of mistletoe
may be deemed appropri-
ate for trying to revive
a valued tree. Pruning
back the ball won't work
because it will just cause
accelerated growth and
spread. Total removal of
the branch in which the
mistletoe is growing is
necessary. To get all of the
structures growing in the
tree's wood, remove the
entire branch about 6 to 12
inches below the point of
attachment. If your tree is
large, this might be a dan-
gerous undertaking unless
you hire a professional tree
service. Another alternative
MISTLETOE continued on 2D


An inflatable Santa riding a train is one of the many inviting scenes in front of Brad and Lorrie Wheeler's home at 197 NW Brookside Court. Motorists and i
pedestrians are welcome to enjoy the displays in their Christmas drive-thru from now until Jan. 1.Those willing to donate to Happy House and Christian
Service Center can do so while driving through the displays. The Wheelers will match all donations made.




Light up the season

boDqw~-wo~


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

50 holiday
light struc-
tures bring
Bill and
Ruth Behrenwald's front
yard to life this holiday sea-
son, and each one of them
is handmade.
The Behrenwald's home
is one of many in Lake City
and Columbia County that
illuminate the night, giving
passers-by reason to stop
and admire the brightly lit
Christmas lights.
Bill Behrenwald said the
tallest structure in his yard
this year is a giant stocking -
that reaches to a height of
12- to 13-feet, and the run-
ners-up include a 12-foot
waving snowman and a 12-
foot waving Santa.
Because all of the fix-
tures are self-supporting,
Bill Behrenwald said it only
takes about three hours to
decorate the yard with the
displays and run electricity
to them.
"We're pretty well
decked out," Bill
Behrenwald said.
It takes a lot of creativity
and hard work to fashion
one of these structures.
Ruth Behrenwald said
all of the structures are
made of heavy steel, and .
Bill Behrenwald said he
purchases the steel in 20-
foot links and then bends it
by hand to fit the shape of
what he's making;
"You can do things by
hand quicker," said Bill
Behrenwald.
After the structure is
bent to the desired shape,
Bill Behrenwald said he
arc welds it, primes it,
adds two coats of industrial
enamel, wires it and uses
commercial bulbs to make
the structure light up.
"I've always worked with
metal and welding," Bill
Behrenwald said. 'This
was something I could do
on my own without too
much cost."
While Bill Behrenwald
does all the handiwork
on his own, his wife Ruth
Behrenwald is still a strong

UGHTS continued on 5D


PHOTOS BY
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter

(ABOVE) A wise man leads
a camel to meet baby Jesus
in.one of the many Christmas
scenes adorning Bill and
Ruth Behrenwald's home,
located,at 1568 NW Turner
Ave..

(RIGHT) A Christmas wreath
illuminates a lion statue in the -
Behrenwald's front yard.


For more local
Christmas lights:

1. At 235 SW Little Road,
Lake City: Go Highway 47
South to Columbia City, turn
left at 240 and then go two
miles. Look to the left and
you will see the decorations.
2. The Bailey family
presents a drive-through
light display at their home
on CR 131 (Tustenuggee
Road). Take U.S. Highway
41 South to CR 131,
travel approximately
'four miles to4738 SW
Tustenuggee Road, Lake
City.
3. The Butlers present
holiday lights at 693 NW
Palm Dr., Lake City.


.~..-


I- �t ,














LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


Teach and change the world


Editor's Note: Chris
Pattersok, a LCCC
Educator Preparation
Institute graduate, is a sci-
ence teacher at Bell High
School in Gilchrist County.
He holds a B.A. in Biology/
Exercise-Chemistry, with
minors in Sports Science
and Latin, an M.S. in
Exercise Physiology, and
a Professional Teaching
Certificate in Biology.

ne of the most
important
jobs today
is teaching.
Some have
said, 'Those who can do.
Those that can't, teach."
I prefer the 21st century
version by Sharon Rhea
Ford, "I think; therefore, I
am ... and I teach; there- .
fore, I can!" Becoming a
teacher can be a daunting
task. Whether you are
currently an undergradu-
ate education major or a
college graduate thinking
about changing careers, no
matter your situation, there
are people willing to help.
- Who? Teachers!
The Educator '-
Preparation Institute (EPI)
at Lake City Community
College (LCCC) is a com-
prehensive, competency-;j
based alternative-teacher
certification program
where individuals who
Possess a baccalaureate
degree or higher can com-
plete the training required
by the state of Florida for
a Professional Teaching
Certificate within one year
or less.
LCCC's EPI is filled
with professors who have
a wealth of knowledge
and experience and share
it with everyone they
encounter. The EPI pro-
gram is designed to have
a group of students, or
cohort, take classes togeth-
er until they complete the
program. The relation-
ships formed among the'
students in the cohort are
by far. one of the.highlights .
of the program. Since
students have their own
unique experiences and
educational backgrounds,
they are able to share
ideas and suggestions to
cope with the work and
classroom experiences
that teachers may encoun-
ter. As a recent EPIgradu-
ate and a teacher with sev-


MISLETOE
Continued From Page 1D
is to have a special
growth regulator applied to
the mistletoe by a licensed
pest control operator.
If you bring some pretty,-
mistletoe indoors for deco-
rating, keep in mind that
the leaves and berries are
toxic if ingested. Wash
your hands after handling
the plant and place those
"kissing balls" well out of
the reach of children afid
pets. Stay happy and safe,
and have a loving holiday
season.
We are currently tak-
ing applications for the
UF/IFAS Columbia County
Master Garden classes
which will begin on Feb.
10, 2010 and continue for
12 weeks. Applications
may be obtained at the UF
Extension Office located
at the fairgrounds in Lake
City. All applications are.
due by Jan. 15, 2010.



CONNECTED


* NEIRw


Chris Patterson


table behavior issues that
arise. We don't become


teachers
and sumi
delusions
wealthy. ]
the stude
they fall a
guide the
odic rough
inspire th
dreams t
have set R
PIPT's


eral years experience, my my opni
cohort members remain sors'fir
valuable resources to call Thsfiares
in times of need. Although classroom
they were once strangers, knowledge
then classmates, these new is why so
friends are ones I'm glad to graduate
know. a step in
If you'are thinking about tion. The
changing careers and/or skills req
becoming a teacher, then an immeq
know that you have an with stud
incredible opportunity in a combine
your own neighborhood. and "age-
Although many might have technique
reservations about going integrate
back to school because' tec
of family or time commit- technolf
LCCC's EPI youth of
ments, LCCC's EPI pro- These s
gram is offered in a hybrid reach stu
online/face-to-face format, them for
and is scheduled at night. education
Additionally, EPI advisors clssroo
will work with you to find William's
a schedule that meets your 'he me
individual needs. In my te. Tie
experience, Ineeded to explains
. ..-. , CAU1C explains.
complete all the courses teacher d
within a small amount;of geate
time, and the EPI staff The EPI
coordinated my schedule inspired
so that it could be com- best we c
pleted quickly. Although us with e
the work load was heavy they could
in comparison to my peers years of
who were taking only one truly fort
class at a time, the acceler- been a pa
ated scheduling was exact- and high]
ly what I needed., it to othei
LCCC's tuition for the beco
EPI program is significant- Contac
ly lower than that of a uni- executive
versity or four-year college. Preparati
As well, some individuals teacherac
may be eligible for scholar- edu or by
ships that could reduce the 4266 to le
cost of the program. the Educ
Being a teacher is about;. ,Insttte.
more te direct instruc-
tion anrading papers.
It's more than guided prac-
tice and battles with inevi- Z








0'
. . 4i F


China, Crystal,.
SFlatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
:i ea Sche nck
'Wil Posey
December 19, 2009

Shane Russell
Dennis Thomson
SFebruary 6, 2010


Lindsey Morton
George Pridgeon
February 20, 2010


Carlee Wilson
Trey Beauchamp
March 6, 2010


Aimee Ronsonet
Brent Williams
'March 20, 2010


Abigail Crow
Matt Dicks
April 10, 2010
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
Historic Downtown
156'N. Marion Ave.
752-5470


to have weekends
ners off or with
Sof becoming
It is our job to lift
nts' spirits when
nud want to quit,
;m through peri-
gh patches, and
Lem to levels and
hey would never
for themselves.
greatest asset, in
on, is the profes-
-hand experience.
veterans of the
a and share their
ge freely. That
,many students
with more than
the right direc-
y also have the
uired to make
diate difference
ents. LCCC uses
ation of modern
old" teaching
es that are fully.
d in 21st century
gy to impact the
this generation.
ills are needed to
dents and prepare
their nextAlevel of
with a rigorous
a environment. As
ArthurWard said,
diocre teacher
good teacher
The superior
emonstrys. The,
cher inspires."
staff at LCCC
us to become the
wouldd and provided
very advantage
d offer, from their
experience. I'm
unate to have
irt of this program
ly recommend
rs interested in
g educators.
t Pam Carswell,
director Teacher
on Academy, at
ademy@lakecitycc.
Calling (386) 754-
earn more about
ator Preparation



H. T' A

o Y G


Obama Christmas no small feat


By NANCY BENAC
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
- Christmas at the White
House isn't for sissies.
Take quantities that
might work in a private
home - guests, cookies,
parties, cards, whatever -
and add some extra zeros
to get a feel for a White
House-sized holiday season.
As in 50,000 guests, 28
parties and open houses, a
couple hundred thousand
holiday cards and untold


-l ' 1 0, - ~ i


E R W D V

I'N"" G -E R

Y-. R ,N

S E R P G


quantities of cookies,
cakes, brownies, truffles
and the like to feed the
Obamas' holiday throng.
'They eat like crazy,"
says former White House
executive chef Walter
Scheib, who cooked for the
masses under presidents
Bill Clinton and George W.
Bush. "Christmas at the
White House is the single
most mentally and physi-
cally challenging thing that
you can do."
Scheib said the staff
used to joke during the hol-


idays about "White House
flextime" - when "you can
work any 100 hours you
want this week."
As far back as October,
pastry chef Bill Yosses'
team was plotting strategy
and going over drawings
for this year's gingerbread
house - a 390-pound behe-
moth whose construction
required the use of a band
saw. Before Halloween,
Yosses already was joking
about doing "mental push-
ups" to prepare for the com-
ing holiday season.


M J I N G L

B R E A D E


----II
Kt Fl

.B ~TI


I
A M E N T S R B

U Q M B. X S T E'
I


A'L "IG H:: T' S ..:,G A N G EL L


L E


P


P S

'G I ,


D B C H

*S T-O C'

IS N O W

CC J D N


Ready to will?

Find.all 16 of the'Christmas
Trimmings' words hidden in the word
search above. Words can be found
in the banners above the ads listed
below. Complete the puzzle and
return it to the Lake City Reporter,
180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, FL by
5:00pm, for your chance to win


*G. , P R


E :/L


S E


E E D N

L N N K


O X HI
I
I E RI

H EX


,.K I N G G Q C H I M N E

U E T J Z K J L A T M T KI
SI
A R. A G Y PS A N T |


ENTRY FORM

Name:

Phone Number:

Address:

Subscriber: - Yes * No community.
DiLSource.
Lake City Reporter
Deadline is Monday, December 21, 2009 at 5:00 p.m. " fr (:1k,1.ITumaS,.


L-----------------




Teimmhnee



A'b, 3322W US Hw 90
- 1 386-755-2502


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BB iE i
^^H^W fL^^^^


GWHunter, Inc.

Chfvro Chevron
Oil
Jobber:

178US9 Ws


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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427














LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


Dog gives hope to
By SUE MANNING upright walker. When she
Associated Press runs, every so often she
adds a hop or skip to her
LOS ANGELES step, but she stumbles less
- For several years, Jude often than most humans.
Stringfellow and her Lab- She takes vitamins and
chow mix have toured the joint supplements, and vets
country with a simple mes- have declared her very
sage: Faith walks. healthy, Stringfellow said.
Born without front legs Since her first step on
to a junkyard dog around March 22, 2003, Faith
Christmas 2002, Faith the has done the talk show
puppy was rejected and circuit, gone on tour with
abused by her mother. She Ozzy Osbourne and been
was rescued by Reuben named an honorary Army
Stringfellow, now an Army sergeant. Jude Stringfellow
E-4 specialist, who had has become a motivational
been asked to bury other speaker and written two
puppies in the litter, books. Next year, the two
"Can we fix her? are moving from Ardmore,
Stringfellow, then 17, asked Okla., to Chicago where
his mom. "No, but maybe they plan to write a third
we can help her," she said. called "Faith Walks."
So Reuben turned They get more than
Faith over to his mother, 200 letters and e-mails a
English professor Judle day, run a Web site and
Stringfellow. At first the make dozens of appear-
family hadto carry Faith ances every year, including
to keep her off her chest stops at veterans' hospitals
and chin. But with peanut across the country to cheer
butter and practice, Faith injured soldier-s.
learned to walk on her two That mission is special
hind legs. for Stringfellow, whose
Today Faith is a brisk, son left Iraq in September


Holiday M ...

dressing

for warm *,

weather


disabled veterans


and is stationed at Fort
Wainwright in Alaska. He,
is scheduled to get outof
the Army and head home
on Jan. 1.
For many, Faith brings
a powerful message about
overcoming adversity.
"Faith has shown me that
different is beautiful, that it
is not the body you are in
but the soul that you have,"
Jill Salomon of Montreal,
Canada, wrote on Faith's
Web site.
Stringfellow will never
forget a woman from New
York who happened to see
Faith on a street corner.
She was depressed and had
lost both legs to diabetes.
"She was in her wheel-
chair and saw us. She'
was crying. She had seen
Faith on television. She
just held her and said she
wished she had that kind
of courage." Stringfellow
said. "She told us: 'I was
on my way to pick up the
gun.' She handed the pawn
ticket to a police officer
and said she didn't need it
anymore."


That sense of hope is
especially important for
Faith's visits to Army
bases. Last weekend she
headed to Washington
state, where she met with
as many as 5,000 soldiers
at McChord Air Force
Base and Fort Lewis.
Some of the soldiers were
headed to war, some were
coming back.
"She just walks around
barking and laughing and
excited to see them all,"
Jude Stringfellow said.
'There is a lot of crying,
pointing and surprise.
From those who have lost
friends or limbs, there
can be silence. Some will
shake my hand and thank
me, some will pat her on
the head. There is a lot of
quiet, heartfelt, really deep
emotion."
Faith never fails to bring
a smile to a soldier's face,
said Patrick Mcghee,
general manager at Fort
Lewis.
'To see the children
interact with Faith is sim-
ply priceless," he said.


This photo released-by Anthony M. Tortoriello shows Faith, a
two-legged dog.


By LISA ORKIN EMMANUEL.
Associated Press
MIAMI - Pity the
warm-weather fashionista
in winter.
Sure, it's hard to feel
sympathy for the celebri-
ties, trendsetters and
snowbirds who gather for
the holidays in Miami,
where a cold day is con-
sidered around 60 degrees
Fahrenheit. It's the same
story in Las Vegas and
resorts in the Caribbean
and Mexico.
But what about those
holiday-season traditions
- like shearling boots and
puffy winter coats? Don't
the jet-setters miss them?
Never fear, there
are alternatives. The
Associated Press chose
tropics-worthy looks that.
can be substituted for their
cold-weather cousins. We
solicited advice from styl-
ists and fashion editors on
how to wear them:

SCARF
Instead of cashmere
scarves, choose a silk or
cotton version that can be
worn over long flowing lay-
ers. Leopard prints are also
very stylish right.now.
"I personally always bring
scarves with me," said
Michelle McCool, fashion
director at Cosmopolitan
magazine. "I use it as a
pareo if I am at the beach ...
I use it with everything. If
I am cold in the airplane, I
use it as a blanket"
McCool, a Miami native,
said Echo scarves are a
good choice.
SWEATER DRESS
Switch out that sweater
dress for a maxi or mini in
a floaty fabric. Materials
matter here, and so does
a light color. Black, seem-
ingly the staple color any-
where else, can look out of
place at a resort.
If you to go for the hip,
unique look, Taylor Tomasi
Hill, style and accessories
director at Marie Claire,
said to buy a silk slip and
pair it with a long cardigan
and belt. Wear the look
with a masculine shoe, like
a tough high heeled bootie.
"Because of the car-
digan, I honestly think
women of all ages can wear
it," she said.
PUFFY COAT
Substitute the thick
nylon jacket - think of
those quilted ones on the
cover of all those catalogs
- for a lightweight pea
coat. Tara Swennen, styl-
ist to stars like Kristen
Stewart, suggests black,
plaid or even tan.
"A great red pea coat
would be fantastic for the
holidays," she said.


ck up your Redneck Pepper
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rticipating merchants.
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Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427



















SPOTLIGHT


Sunday, December 20, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this film publicity image released by 20th Century Fox, the character Neytiri, voiced by Zoe Saldana (right), and the character Jake, voiced by Sam Worthington are shown in a scene from,
'Avatar.' The film was nominated for a Golden Globe award for best motion picture drama, ohTuesday. The Golden Globe awards will be held Jan. 17 in Beverly Hills, Calif


Effects wow but store


.1


)S in'Avatar'


By JAKE COYLE
AP Entertainment Writer.
hen a film
brashly *
asserts
that it will
change
moviemaking forever, one
feels the urge to either
take its "king of the world"
arrogance down a notch or
hail it as the masterpiece it
claims to.be.
But - and forgive us if
this sounds too much like
the dialogue in President
Obama's -war room - what
if there's a third option?
James Cameron's 3-D
"Avatar" has all the smack
of a Film Not To Miss - a
movie whose effects are
clearly revolutionary, a
spectacle that millions will
find adventure in. But it
nevertheless feels unsatisfy-
ing and somehow lacks the
pulse of a truly alive film.
"Avatar" takes place
in the year 2154 on the
faraway moon of Pandora,
where, befitting its mytho-
logical name, the ills of
human life have been
released. The Earth deplet-
ed, humans have arrived
to mine an elusive mineral,
wryly dubbed Unobtainium.
The Resources
Developmental
Administration, a kind
of military contractor, is
running the operation..
At the top of the chain of
command is the CEO-like
Carter Selfridge (an excel-
lent, ruthless Giovanni
Ribisi), who's hellbent on
showing quarterly profits
for shareholders. His mus-
cle and head of security is
the rock-jawed Col. Miles
Quaritch (Stephen Lang),
who curses Pandora's
inhabitants (the Na'vi) as
savages.and considers the
place worse than.hell.
In fact, its a paradise.
In Pandora, Cameron has
fashioned a sensual, neon-
colored, dreamlike world of
lush jungle, gargantuan trees


In this film publicity image released by 20th Century Fox, the character Neytiri, voiced by Zoe Saldana, is shown in a scene
from, 'Avatar.'


and floating mountains. Its
splendor is easily the most
wondrous aspect of "Avatar."
Cameron, like the deep
.sea diver that he is (his
only films since 1997's
'Titanic" have been under-
water documentaries),
lets his camera peer with
.fascination at the glow-
in-the-dark plant life, the
six-legged horses and -
especially beautiful - the
nighttime frog-like crea-.
tures that, when touched,
open a bright white sail
and spiral into the air.
It's this sense of discov-
ery - in Pandora, in the
wizardry of the filmmaking
- that makes "Avatar"
often thrilling.
Our main charac-
ter is Jake Sully (Sam
Worthington), a brawny
former Marine who lost
the power of his legs in
battle on Earth. His sci-
entist twin brother has
just died and Sully, having
a matching genome, is


invited to replace him in a
mission to Pandora.
He joins a small group of,
scientists lead by Dr. Grace
Augustine (Sigourney
Weaver) who are attempt-
ing to learn more about
the Na'vi by conducting
field studies and doing a
bit of undercover science.
They've created avatars
of themselves to go about
Pandora as a living, breath-
ing Na'vi, while their
human bodies lie dormant-
in a sort of tanning bed
(they return to them when
their avatars sleep).
The Na'vi are a 10-foot-
tall species with. translu-
cent, aqua-colored skin,
3-fingered hands and
smooth, lean torsos. They
have long, neat dreadlocks
for hair and wide, feline
foreheads. The smart
freckles on their brow
faintly light up like tiny
constellations.
With beady headdresses
and skimpy sashes, the Na'vi


are clearly meant to evoke
Native Americans, as well as
similarly exploited tribes of
South America and Africa.
They pray over.a slayed
Animal and feel at one with
nature. Their tails (oh, yes,
they also have tails) even
connect - like nature's USB
port - to things like mysti-
cal willow branches, horse
manes or the hair of ptero-
dactyl-like birds.
It's no coincidence that
the Na'vi chief Eyukan is
played by the Cherokee
actor Wes Studi, whose '
credits include "Dances
with Wolves," perhaps the
film most thematically akin
to "Avatar."
"Avatar" is essentially a
fairy tale that imagines a
more favorable outcome
for the oppressed fight-
ing against the technol-
ogy and might of Western
Civilization. Sully, who
quickly takes to life as a
Na'vi, begins to feel his
allegiance blurred.


Though he has promised
Quaritch to spy on the Na'vi
(their home lies atop an
Unobtainium deposit), he
begins to appreciate their
ways. He also falls for Neytiri
(Zoe Saldana), the Na'vi prin-
cess and the one who intro-
duces him to the tribe.
Many Na'vi are suspi-
cious of Sully - "a demon
in a fake body" - but
they eventually embrace
him. They accept him as
a leader, even though he
occasionally goes limp and
vacant when his human
body isn't connected. This
off-switch makes for ques-
tionable leadership skills
- as if George Washington
had been a narcoleptic.
The inevitable battle has
overt shades of current
wars. Quaritch, drinking
coffee during a bombing
with a cavalier callous-
ness like Robert Duvall in
"Apocalypse Now," drops
phrases like "pre-emptive
strike,"'"fight terror-with


terror" and even "shock
and awe," a term apparent-
ly destined to survive for
centuries in the lexicon.
These historical and con-
temporary overtones bring
Sthe otherworldly "Avatar"
down to Earth and down
to cliche. The message of
environmentalism and of
(literal) tree-hugging reso-
nates, but such a plainly just
cause also saps "Avatar" of
drama and complexity.
It's also a funny message
coming from such a swag-
gering behemoth of tech-
nology like "Avatar." As for
the effects, they are unde-
niable. 3-D has recently
become en vogue, but only
know has it been used with
such a depth of field.
The movie is also a
notable advance for per-
formance capture, which
is how the Na'vi were cre-
ated. As was done with
Gollum in "The Lord of
the Rings" and King Kong
in "King Kong," the Na'vi
were made with cameras
'and sensors recording the
movements of the actors
and transposing them onto
the CGI creatures.
Seldom has this been
done in a way that captured
the most important thing
- the eyes - but Cameron
employed a new technol-
ogy (a camera rigged like
a helmet on the actors) to
capture their faces up close.
The green, flickering eyes
of the Na'vi are a big step
forward, but there's still an
unmistakable emptiness to
a movie so filled with digital
creations.
Ultimately, the technology
of "Avatar" isn't the problem
- moviemaking, itself, is
an exercise in technology.
But one need look no fur-
ther than Wes Anderson's
"Fantastic Mr. Fox" to see
how technique - whether it
be antique stop-motion ani-
mation or state-of-the-art 3-D
performance capture - can
find soulfulness at 24 frames
per second.


Cast 'gleeful' over Globe nods AM


By MICHAEL CIDONI
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - The
mood on the set was appro-
priately gleeful.
The musical-dramedy
"Glee" got some serious
Golden Globe love Tuesday,
with more nominations
than any show. Among the
Fox series' four nomina-
tions: best television series
- comedy or musical.
On the Paramount
Studios lot, where "Glee"
is filmed, the show's cast
could be found Tuesday
hugging and laughing after
hearing the news.
"Amazing," said Corey
Monteith, who plays foot-


ball hunk Finn Hudson.
"It is kind of like it is like
Christmas morning."
'The four best presents
ever," added actor Kevin
McHale.
Besides the nod to the
series, "Glee" received
nominations for Matthew
Morrison and Lea Michele,
two Broadway veterans
who are TV newcomers.
Veteran stage and screen
actress Jane Lynch also
earned a bid for best sup-
porting actress in a series,
miniseries or movie.
"I slept through (the
nominations announce-
ment)," Lynch said. "But, I
got up to six messages and
went, 'Ah! I wonder if there


is some good news for us?'
And there was. My agent
called me three times and
said, TWhy aren't you up?'
So, yeah. I called my mom,
and she said, The golden
what?"'
Michele said she and her
mother used to dress up
just to watch awards shows
at home. So, no surprise
that Michele was at a loss
for words upon hearing of
her nomination.
"I can't, I can't even
believe it," said Michele,
also a Tony nominee for
"Spring Awakening." "My
mother just said to me,
'When I get out of this
shock, I will congratulate
you properly.'"


Lea Michele (right) is greeted by fellow cast members on the set of 'Glee,' after she received
a Golden Globes nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series -
Comedy or Musical, on Tuesday at Paramount Studios in Los Angeles.


4D















Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LIFE


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


JASON MATTHEW WALKER.L i Uily Reporter COuuRcI T rP-Hnui

Serenading the crowd Despang completes West Point boot camp
Tony Buzzella plays Eddie Miller's 'Street of Dreams' for Gussie Henderson (from left), Diane Former Columbia High School JROTC member Adam Despang poses with his sister, Sara
George and Claretha Bradley Wednesday night at the Golden Age Christmas Party at the South, at the United States Military Academy at West Point in New York on Aug. 15. Despang
LifeStyle Enrichment Center. successfully completed boot camp and has been classified as a cadet at the ceremony.


LIGHTS: For the holiday season


Continued From Page 1L
factor in the light creations.
Ruth Behrenwald said
she draws out the design
for the structures, and then
Bill Behrenwald makes
the structure based on his
wife's drawings.
"I get my ideas for
my drawings from col-
oring books, Sunday
School lessons or just my
imagination," said Ruth
Behrenwald. .
Ruth Behrenwald also
said creating these lit
structures gave her hus-
band something interesting
and different to do.
"He's always wanted to
do something just to see
if he could do'it," Ruth
Behrenwald said.
Both Bill and Ruth
Behrenwald have achieved
success through their


homemade light struc-
tures, and said they have
been making and selling
them since 1993.
Bill and Ruth Behrenwald
said they've sold their
Christmas fixtures to
people in 17 or 18 different-
states including Alaska and
have some of their fixtures
in Canada, too.
Ruth Behrenwald said
that a couple from Canada
flew down to the Lake City
area one year, and wanted
to buy one of their holiday
light fixtures, so they flew
the light fixture they pur-
chased back with them.
Bill Behrenwald said
he used to make between
1,200 to 1,500 light struc-
tures a year and now
makes them only accord-
ing to order, but at one


point he and his wife were
selling 125 different fix-
tures for their holiday line.
"Anything. that you could
imagine we've made on
the Christmas line," Bill
Behrenwald said, includ-
ing helicopters, merry-go-
rounds and Cinderella and
her pumpkin coach.
"You've got to make
what people want," said Bill-
Behrenwald.
Ruth Behrenwald said
,that what she and her hus-
band have enjoyed most
about their business is the
people they've met along
the way.
'"We've met a lot of
people through doing this,"
Ruth Behrenwald said.
"That's what we miss the
most about doing business,
meeting all these people."


Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer grazes along with a group of reindeer at the Roberts
residence..


HOLIDAY SIGHTS FROM AROUND COLUMBIA COUNTY


PHOTOS BY JASON MATTHEW WALKERIL;�: ,H, l'. :..'
(LEFT) A nativity scene is reflected in a retention pond along Bascom Norris Driv6. (TOP RIGHT) Angels spread holiday cheer through Christmas songs at the Wheeler residence. (BOTTOM
RIGHT) A Christmas tree, wreaths, 3-D animated reindeer and other holiday decorations adorn the front porch of Herbet and Ann Darby's home at 1118 S. Marion Ave.


PHOTOS BY JASON MATTHEVW WALKER- ,i. .'"
(TOP LEFT) Santas, nutcrackers, snowmen and angels populate the front lawn of Patsy and Mike Roberts home, located at 619 SW County Road 242. (BOTTOM LEFT) Christmas
ornaments dangle off of a rotating Christmas tree in the front lawn of Ruben Gruda's home at 199 SW Courtesy Way. (RIGHT) Visitors can drive through to view a nativity scene,and other
holiday displays at the Roberts' home.


y Reporter

















German Christmas markets mix history, charm


By LAURA STEVENS
Associated Press
ROTHENBURG OB
DER TAUBER, Germany
- The run-up to Dec. 25
in Germany is marked not
just by a rush of shopping,
but also by the nation's
many convivial Christmas
markets.
While the most
renowned are the massive
markets in Dresden and
Nuremberg, many find the
season is best celebrated at
the dozens of smaller mar-
kets across the nation, like
the one in Rothenburg ob
der Tauber.
Here, locals and visi-
tors alike pack the central
Reiterlesmarkt square to
enjoy the intimate nature
of the quaint town.
Surrounded by medieval
walls that date back to the
12th century, Rothenburg
is also home to Kaethe
Wohlfahrt, makers of orna-
ments and wooden carv- �
ings that are popular year-
round with tourists, but


Don't be a

forsythia

butcher

By LEE REICH
S' For The Associated Press
"I brake for butchered
plants."
Perhaps that's what my
bumper sticker should
read, because I did
almost slam on my brakes
recently to try and save a
forsythia bush - a whole
row of them, in fact --
from being butchered. An
obviously well-intentioned
homeowner was attacking
the bushes on his front
lawn with loppers.
A few things were
wrong with this scene.
While loppers are, in
fact, the main tool in prun-
ing forsythia, this guy,
unfortunately, was stand-
ing upright and using
them at chest height.
Lopping all branches to
this height creates a bush
that rises up like a grace-
ful fountain, then loses
that grace in a wild burst
of chest-high growth.
As with shortening a
stem on any plant, from
a mum to an apple to an
indoor avocado, buds
just behind the cut are
awakened to grow out into
shoots.
Some people use hedge
shears on forsythia, with
equally ungraceful results.
All that a hedge shears
does is coax lots of new.
growth right where all
those cuts are made.
Why not let a forsythia
bush be the graceful foun-
tain of growth that it's try-
ing to be?
It does need pruning,
of course, to rid it periodi-
cally of decrepit old stems
and make way for young,
flowering ones,
But the way to prune
and maintain that grace-
ful, arching form is by
using a lopper at ground
level, cutting away the
old stems there. A few
snips with a hand shears
to shorten any stems that
are too lanky completes
the job.
A second problem with
This pruning/butchering
job was timing. Forsythia
blooms first thing in the
spring, not on shoots that
start growing early in the
S- season but on stems that
" grew last season. So any-
thing cut off now trans-
lates to that many fewer
flowers next spring.
For the most abun-
dant flower show from
S forsythia or any other


early-spring flowering
shrub, wait to prune until
after the burst of color-
ful blossoms subsides,
in the spring. (Summer
blooming shrubs, such as
butterfly bush and rose-of-
sharon, blossom on new
shoots, so nothing is sac-
rificed by cutting off old
ones in winter or anytime
before growth begins.)


This photo taken Dec. 10, shows more than 200 booths which offer traditional Thuringian
handcrafts and sweets and a big Ferris wheel stands on the Christmas Fair in front of the
Mariendom (Cathedral of Mary) and St. Severi's Church in Erfurt, central Germany. The Erfurt
Christmas Market is one of the most beautiful Christmas Markets in the whole of Germany
and the square is beautifully decorated with a huge, candle-lit Christmas tree.


that really grab attention in
the Christmas season.
. A couple of hours south-
west of Rothenburg, visitors
to Esslingen have the choice
of visiting either a modern
or a medieval Christmas *
market - which takes all


the fantasy of medieval
dress, customs, traditions
and food and places it in a
market atmosphere.
Steffi Fasora, dressed in
a long, blue robe, invited
children to play a game
with a live mouse that is set


down in the middle of a ring
, of wooden boxes, each of
which is claimed by a child.
The rodent, dubbed
a "magical mouse from
India," ducks into one of
the boxes, making that
child the winner.


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' Come and join us for the

. holidays!

We Cater All Year
SBanquet Facilities
(Please Call for Reservations)

Gift Certificates Available
Open Thanksgiving
10am-4pm
Open Christmas Eve
10 am-4pm

CLOSED CHRISTMAS DAY


C
-,,


386-752-1670 * Located in the Lake City Mall


Bringing joy into
Germany is what
Christmas markets are all
about, said Fasora, who
works at medieval markets
across the region.
December are dark and
gloomy, "and people are
usually sitting in the house
and being depressed," she
said. '"That is why we set
up a Christmas market
- to bring the people out
here, to have fun, to meet
each other, to spend their
money of course! This is
what it's all about"
A couple of stalls down,
bakers baked bread sticks
in a wood-burning oven,
while a shoemaker sewed
together his wares. A
bagpiper in a long brown
robe strolled around and
children made their own
hand-dipped candles.
A roughly 20-foot-high
Ferris wheel, which two
burly men turned by
hand, attracted Roberta
Morrissey's children, aged
12, 9 and 6 - all having
the time of their lives.


Morrissey, who moved to
Germany last summer when
her husband was stationed
there with the U.S. military,
shouted over the bagpipes,
"It's actually an old-world
feel, old-world culture,
extremely family friendly."
Just an hour northwest
of Esslingen by train, the
Heidelberg market is set up
in several spots along the
city's mile-long pedestrian
street through the heart of
the old city. At the far end,
skaters glide on a rink below
the ruins of the city's famous
castle, built in the 1200s.
Handcrafts are among
the most popular items
sold at the markets, includ-
ing wooden bowls, nativity
figurines, ornaments and
beeswax candles.
In Konstanz, on the
Swiss border, the twinkling
lights of the Christmas
market stretch through the
heart of downtown to the
shores of Lake Constance,
where a "Christmas Boat"
floated with handcrafted
items for sale.


f ~ YOUR HARIS DSIR[







BY.........'Maiie sHcareat.-th the hopeorouchin vours


4 0i, g M c

Ask about A
SCustom Embroidery
6 * ii :e a - :
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| 218 N. Marion * (386) 754-3741 i
Downtown (NEXT TO BLANCHE HOTEL)
fBBBBB i8BBS8B~fB^BB


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


















Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


DEAR ABBY



Friend gives tardy co-ed


failing grade for punctuality
DEAR ABBY: "Hayley" but I don't want to destroy
is one of the few good our relationship either. I
friends I have at college. love them both, but I have a
We take a class together. . life of my own. Did I make a
It's in a building across mistake, or is it normal for
campus, so I drive. I always relatives to visit for months?
contact Haylby to 'see if she - CONFOUNDED IN
wants me to take her. (She Abigail Van Buren FLORIDA
typically does.) Because the DEAR CONFOUNDED:
classrequires physical activ- wwdeorbby.com You did not make a mistake,
ity, we dress in appropriate under the impression that and it is not "normal" for
clothing, you don't mind. Tell your people to invite themselves
When I pick Hayley up, friend you are no longer to be houseguests as your
I am already dressed and willing to be late to class, sister did. Her attitude was
ready to go. The problem you expect her to be ready presumptuous. Your reac-
is, she isn't. She is either to leave at the time you get tion was honest. What she
eating or on her computer there, and if she isn't, you proposed was an imposition.
when I arrive. Once I come will leave without her. THEN If defending your privacy
in, she begins to get ready. FOLLOW THROUGH. I "destroys" your relation-
This has made us late for predict Hayley won't be late ship, your sibling bond
class several times. It has after that. wasn't strong to begin with.
reached the point that I DEAR ABBY: I am a Frankly, I think your sis-
have to arrive earlier and single man living in Florida. ter had a lot of nerve, and
earlier to get her to be on Without being invited, my her son has my sympathy
time. sister called to inform me .because it's going to be a
I understand that I am that she and her husband long winter in Las Vegas.
more organized than she is, . would be coming to visit me DEAR ABBY: I am in
but it grates on my nerves, over the Christmas/New my 70s, and I honestly do
I am the one giving her a Year holiday. She said they not know how to respond
ride, and she causes us both planned to stay "a month when people ask me, "How
to be late. I think she should or so" to escape the harsh are you?" I have had many
be ready to leave when I get northern winter. Caught off health problems in the last
there. I know she has a busy guard, I said I'd love to have few years, and I don't think
schedule, but this is driv- them come for a week or 10 anyone really wants to hear:
ing me crazy. I care about days, but I didn't want them about them. - I'M JUST
Hayley dearly, and I don't to move in with me. At that SAYIN'
want to hurt her feelings, point, she became miffed. DEAR JUST SAYIN' :
Should I say something to and said not to worry.about - Ifyou have any reason to
her? - CAMPUS CLOCK- it - she and my brother-in: thinkthat the person asking
WATCHER - law would visit her son in the question really doesn't
DEAR CLOCK- Las Vegas instead, care how you are, then
WATCHER: Yes, absolutely, Now I'm wondering if I spare him or her an organ
because Hayley isn't a mind was rude. I don't want them recital. Convey the expected
reader and if you haven't planting themselves in my response, which is, "I'm fine
spoken up, she may be . home for months on end, - jow are you?"


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Think things through
on your'own. Once you have
established what you are
trying'to do, you can ask
people with experience to
offer suggestions. Someone
you like will do something
special for you.-****
TAURUS (April 20-
May. 20): Don't worry so
much a'boui the things you
haven't been able to finish.
Reconnecting with fam-
ily will be.enough for the
people who love you. A few
kind words, a helping hand
and your presence will be all
that's required. **
GEMIfNI (May 21-June
20): Your versatility and
ability to know what oth-
ers like, need and want will
put you in a good position.
Forming a partnership with
someone you have feelings
for will bring all sorts of.
new possibilities for the new
year. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You don't have to
go all-out this year. A little
will go a long way. Your
memories and family his-
tory will be entertaining and
appreciated. Don't get upset


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word.

with someone who is snippy
- offer warmth and kind-
ness regardless. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Your desire to please,
coupled with your generos-
ity, will lead to overspending.
However, the joy you receive
from giving will make it
all worthwhile. You have a
big heart but must be very
selective. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Problems will develop
at home due to mounting
tension. Avoid anyone look-
ing for a fight. An unex-
pected change regarding
someone you care for will
make you rethink your plans
for the new year. ***
SLIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You may want to be out
and about and having some
fun but don't leave someone
out or you will face problems
when you get home. Travel
and visiting old friends
will lead to a situation that
may not be welcomed by
everyone who knows you.
*****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Ci;. t, Ci: p . rY3t . -,3ir'm? ar? i'd from qIjnatinnO ty fsnamnus p pnin at and prO" ent
Ir . , ' r1 . .. . 1.:l.r.. ... 1.
Today's clue: C equals P . " ,
" YW''H OH JN F B' NH XN BF ND I W
Z H S JT W Y IX F L OJ FT, / XN NDRRHO,
XD Y D R F, U J F Y H O XF Z .Y WH NCO JFT. "
- U J S S JX R LOBU F H
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There are two different kinds of people in this world:
those who finish what they start, and" - Brad Ramsey


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Visit with friends
and the people you may not
'get to see over the festive
season. Whether you travel
in spirit or in person, touch-
ing base and letting people
Know you care will set the
stage for a stellar year. Avoid
Overindulgence. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Share memo-
ries with friends and family
or travel to be with someone
you miss. This is a good
time to let someone you love
know how you feel. Making
Sa commitment will.help to
stabilize your life. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Do something
really special for someone
you know needs your help.
Make a point of finding out
about people from your past
whom you haven't seen for
some time but think of often.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Pitch in and help
in your community. An old
lover will be happy to see
you and will share informa-
Stion that will change the way
you think and what you do
in the future. You'll come
up with the perfect way to ' -'
please someone who has
always been there for you.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Secrets must
be kept, regardless of who
wants to know. Avoid overin- .-
dulgence or being tempted
by those who have bad
habits. An opportunity to
make a good lifestyle change
should be welcomed and will
ensure that the upcoming
year starts off well. * .


SUNDAY CROSSWORD



SSOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION By Mike Shenk'/ Edited by Will Shortz 1 23415 6 7 114 15 16 17 18

NOTE: THE WORDS IN THE SHADED SPACES WILL SPELL A QUOTATION FROM LINUS PAULING.. 19 0 lo1', - 22 l


Across
I Intrinsically
8 Purple-flowering
tree
- 13 Inti-ri - -.. .
19 R6~vS of buttons-
21 Superior group';
22 __Nehru-
Gandhi.
23 Setting setting
24 "That's patently
'ridiculous!"
26 The Beatles'
"_ Loser"
.27 He played Dr.
Kildare in
1930s-'40s films
29 Apartment
manager,
familiarly
30 Leviathan's home
31 Atkins diet no-no
33 Artoo-_
34 TV networks,
e.g.
36 Caper
38 Cariou of
Broadway's
"Sweeney Todd"
39 Victim of
Achilles
41 Muppet with a
goldfish named
Dorothy
45 Swabbies
47 Remote
possibility?
48 Kind of butterfly
50 Giovanni of
"Lost in
,Translation"
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


53 It borders the
SBrooklyn
Botanic Garden
56 Unstresse' ,
-7 Qive i nthe", i
': %~' nny pages.
58 Wishful thinkert
of story
59 Band with the
1998 #1 hit
"Iris"
62 Set the price at
64 Where a flock
flocks
65 300-cubit-long
craft
66 Activity for
good-looking
people?
69 Femur terminus
72 Carol contraction
75 Muttonhead
76 Rich blue stone
79 Hold back
82 Carry the day
83 Easily
identifiable
84 All out
89 Birthplace of
Jules Verne
90 White Rabbit"s
lament
91 Spring site
92 Piddling
93 College
freshman,
usually
94 Turned informer
96 Night "The Wild
Wild West" was
shown in 1960s
TV: Abbr.
98 Pulitzer category
102 Seeks water, in
a way
104 Related groups
106 Dry cleaner's
challenge


107 Sculpting
medium
110 Junket
111.Western' :

114 \\re, king . ll .
alt'ernjtii e
115 Cause of Irish'
emigration in the
'1840s-'50s
118 Churlish
120 Dish often
served folded
over
121 Mouth feature
LLIS, runuA Inn - r


122 Is around longer
than
i23 Yen
124 Business that;
.. makes the cut?
125 Frequent
Security Cou'ncil
topic

.Down
1 Region of Greete
containing the
capital ,
2 Without exception
3 Tasmania's capital
4 Perpendicular
wing
5 Early shepherd
6 Like bonds and
movies
7 Helps in planting.
8 Director
Almod6var
9 Sunscrpen additive
10 They may be
bowled over
11 Brief writer, in
brief


12 Net ass
13 Riot pc
14 Key in
15 Part of
address


sets?
lice goal

a dean's
s


16 Deck spots
17 Niagara River's.
source
18 Squat ,
-20 ',iJdden rusfr.;
"25 100 cents ,.
28 Over there
32 Heavily satirical
34 "Because
'Freedom Can't
Protect Itself"
~, org.
35 Break off
37 Digital watch
brand


39 Skimmer, e.g.
40 Lose intensity
42 She won.her Best
Supporting
Actress Oscar
for playing a
man
43 Haleakala ,
National Park
setting
.44,Author Robert
Butler '.
S46 Big name in
copiers
47 Lily variety
49 Amphitheater
shape
50 Ravi Shankar
performance
51 "Believe -
' Not!"
'2 Spine feature
5'3 Nutritionists'
topics
54 Actor Waggoner
and others
55 Codlike fishes
60 Lane in
' Hollywood.
61 Long-running
NBC show, for
short
62 Meat-stock jelly


63 The Pont Neuf
spans it
67 Begins
68 "In & Out" star,
1997
70 Netman Nastase
71 Snaps
73 Under control
74 "No.w!"
77 Have ___ up
one's sleeve
78 Members of some
city commissions


79 "M*A*S*H" co-
star
80 Proctor's call
81 Replaced, on a
hard drive
85 List holders
86 G-men's weapons
87 Jargon ender
88 Support
92 Low point
95 "Like that'll ever
happen!"
96 Sitcom waitress


97 Numerical
comparison
99 I.B.M. computer
of the 1990s
100 Peaks, to Pedro
101 Bear witness
103 Web-footed
mammal.
104 All washed up?
105 Three more than
quadri-
107 It can carry a
tune


108 Turn up
109 Busy times on
the French .
Riviera
111 Platypus part
112 Aboard
113 Cry
accompanied by
a gavel rap
116 2001 biopic
117 ___ culpa
119 Creative story


Answers to last week's Sunday Crossword.

SCIAILIED G MIL II CIOIBIR A
CARNERA A EAT 0 U BT LARES
CH A N GI NGGR O A TM E N
CANAAN N ERN SPORTSSCAR
PRE L UL T EL PLS H-MO
AJLR I C~- S T EL i


^^AT|E|L|YE EIpInO 0 E RB
STATELY TWEED FOOTER
P LES GEHRY NEWWAGER
TM N GLORIA WOVEN ODE
REB TROOPPLEADERS T WTA
ALA HEADS MATERS GRIP



LABBRA TS LI X TS SE I
YI AN0 SPR O VEE A

R'OT MAIN DEERE RAHAB
ATOM ICCAGE END PATRIA
MANAGE MIXEDDEMOT IONS

ARILIES SIHIORITR ST RE SET


4 2 3


2 5 3 6


8 16 3 2


54 69 7


9 2


6 8


9 8 7 4


8 1 4 2


7 3 9


Z 9 9 6 L 8 L S







8 9 9 LL 6 ZL 9
9 Z C 6 9 8 V L L


L L 6 9 z V 9 88

9 6 L Z 6 9 L 8 V


L 9 i i 8 L 6 6 9Z


C 8 ZL 9 L 9 6


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427






Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


*u -F--\





~~4.


"M"K : ..


I,;


Time

is Precious

SWhen faced
with a.
* life-threatening



.,o ,. -, '-
or illness,


* Fast Service

* Quality Care

* Caring Hands


:*,','.* , .,,..* ,.v i: . -l . .....
j ..-- ,,-'--,,, , ._ a, . ',, . , .


For ER waiting times, text ER to 23000
or visit
lakecitymedical.com


LAKE CITY

MEDICAL CENTER


386-


7


19-9000


Consult-A-Nurse� 800-525-3248


LOCAL & STATE


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2009


j

5




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