Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text










Too Wo A2 wave f
Hundreds of B 120110 ***3-DIGIT 32
Hundreds of L'B OF FLORIDA HISTORy
PO BOX 117007
of children's 20 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
vaccine dosGAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943
Health, 6A -


aith


Big win
Undefeated no more:
Tigers unload
on Bulldogs, 4-2.
Sports, IB


Lake


City


Reporter


Thursday, December 17, 2009 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 135, No. 286 E 75 cents


SDNA evidence leads to arrest


COURTESY PHOTO
Trucks sit on wooden blocks at the Nextran Corporationr
Building after their tires and rims were stolen on the week-
end of Oct. 8. Authorities arrested a man from Miami-Dade
County in connection with the crime and are looking for
another suspect from the same area.


Tires and rims
stolen; one
suspect at large.
From staff reports
Two Miami-Dade County
men face multiple burglary
charges for allegedly steal-
ing more than. $30,000
worth of tires and rims
from trucks at a local busi-
,ness. One of the suspects
has. been arrested, while
the other is at large.


The
burglary
occurred
on the
weekend
of Oct.
8 at the
Ward Nextran
Corpora-
tion build-
ing, 328 SW Ring Court.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
reports, the suspects stole
36 sets of rims and .tires


- from semi-
trucks
Offiparked at
ofthe. busi-
ness.
" Th e
r i ms
Parris and tires
were on
Nextran-
owned trucks as well as
customer trucks,"' said
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office public information
officer Sgt. Ed. Seifert.


"The value of the stolen
property is estimated to be
over $30,000."
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office detective
Calvin Fenner, who is also
the agency's Crime Scene
Technician, was assigned to
investigate the case. He col-
lected evidence at the scene
and then processed it at the
sheriff's office.
"Fenner was able, to
THEFTS continued on 3A


Prison

would

offer

training

Informational
meeting 4 p.m.
today at LCCC.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
If Federal Bureau of
Prisons officials determine
Columbia County will be
the future location to house
male, low security, criminal
illegal aliens, the facility will
be operated by Community
Education Centers.
Although the propos-
al calls for 1,250 inmates
to be housed in the pro-
posed Lake City facility, the
facility would not be the
largest correctional facil-
ity Community Education
Centers operate, but would
bring about 250 jobs, com-
pany officials say.
"We operate a facility
in Pennsylvania called the
George W. Hill Correctional
Facility that's located in
Delaware County," said
Community Education
Centers' senior vice presi-
dent of administration and
operational support, Mike
Pelletier. "That facility has
1,883 beds."
Pelletier said the com-
pany was recently awarded
a three-year contract with
two, one year annual con-
tracts for the Delaware
County facility.
Community Education
Centers officials say there
won't be any specialized
training needed to deal
with the anticipated size of
a Lake City facility.
They say if the prison
is to come to Columbia
County, the Federal Bureau
of Prisons will issue a notice
to proceed.
"During that notice to
proceed we begin recruiting
for the positions, establish-
ing our training guidelines
which meet state and feder-
al requirements," Pelletier
said. "What we do is train
and have all our staff on
board and ready to accept
the inmates during facility
completion."
Community Education
Centers operates a wide
array of facilities ranging in
a variety of sizes.
"We operate small jails
in Texas to the size of 107

CEC continued on 3A


A gift of time for the future Sink


SJASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Lake City 150th Sesquicentennial Committee begins placing items in a time capsule, which will be sealed and interred
in the Lake City City Hall vault on Saturday. Pictured are committee members Harvey Campbell (from left), History Events
Committee member Tina Roberts, Jackie Kite and Faye Warren-Bowling.

- City hopes to make it personal


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Committee chair Paulette Lord reviews a list of
items that will be sealed for the next 50 years.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The City of Lake City's 150th
SSesquicentennial Celebration
comes to an end at a closing cer-
emony from 4 to 6 p.m.,Saturday
in Olustee Park.
The 2009 time capsule, as well
as contents from 1959, will be
placed into the city vault for 50
years, said Paulette Lord, com-
mittee chair.
Contents include memorabil-
ia, photographs, CDs.and more
from over the years. Items came
from groups in the community,
,the city and Columbia County.
"I really like the variety and
diversity of the items we have


reflected," said Sean McMahon,
Columbia County Historical
Society president "It shows we
were very active and had inter-
esting events."
But one area of content for
the capsule is still needed, an.
official said.
' "I think what's been gathered
is important, but I would like to
'see more personal items," said
Jackie Kite, City of Lake City
redevelopment manager.
The community can still bring
personal items such as letters,
pictures or writings to Kite's
office at City Hall by Friday.
"It can be anything the future
would be interested in," Kite
said.


opens


near


PCS

Sinkhole releases,
84 M gallons of
process water.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
WHITE SPRINGS - A
large- sinkhole discovered
Dec. 10 at PCS Phosphate
Company released tens of
millions of gallons of pro-
cess water into groundwa-
ter, a company official said.
The sinkhole is inside the
company's phophogypsum
stack system. at the Swift
Creek Chemical Complex.
The system stores process
wastewater and gypsum
resulting from PCS' phos-
phate fertilizer manufactur-
ing operations.
Phophogypsum is a
byproduct of processing
phosphate ore.
An estimated 84 million
gallons of process water
was released into ground-
water through the sink-
hole, said Mike Williams,
PCS public affairs manag-
er. The company notified
the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection,
Hamilton County
Department of Health and
the Suwannee River Water
Management District
Data samples from the
sinkhole have been collect-
ed to determine any c6n-
tamination to the aquifer
or nearby wells, Williams
NEARBY continued on 3A


Service project gives to seniors


JROTC cadets host
annual Golden Age
Christmas Party.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The Junior Reserve Officer
Training Corps from Columbia
High Schoolserved 150 seniors at
The LifeStyle Enrichment Center
with a Christmas party and gifts
Wednesday.
The Golden Age Christmas
Party included live music, gifts
for the seniors donated from the


community and a sit-down dinner
prepared by a Columbia High
School culinary operations class.
Maj. Daniel Burch of the
Columbia High School JROTC
said the cadets have been doing
this event for m6re than 20 years.
The cadets plan the entire
event themselves, and the event
is a service learning project for
them, he said.
"Our mission is to motivate
young people to become better
citizens," said Burch. "I try to
make this event a learning experi-
ence."


Alexis Kinzer, JROTC Battalion
Cmdr. and a senior at Columbia,
said the Christmas party is an
opportunity for both service and
learning.
"It's a way for us to help out in
our community," Kinzer said. 'We
get to use a lot of leadership skills
we learn in JROTC."
David Rountree, facility man-
ager for the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center, said this type of an event
is a "two way street" for both the
seniors and the cadets because
the cadets and the seniors have a'
chance to enjoy interacting with
one another.


JAmoUlll I I nfMA v T �ML.W-A LFo c A, a y fre uyp tr
Columbia High School JROTC 2nd Lt.
James Earls, 17, dances with Jewel
Tunstill, 72, Wednesday at the Golden
Age Christmas Party at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


62 54
Showers
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ... . . ......... 4A
Health.. .......... .. 6A
Obituaries .......... .. 5A
Advice & Comics. ...... 3B
Puzzles . ........ 2B


TODAY IN
HEALTH
k . r' d i lr. 1 e
kdne, ;.-.' .


COMING
FRIDAY
Proposed prison
meeting update.


��


-�


Illa~u~a~~


I















LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009


CA$H3.

Wednesday:
Afternoon: 9-1-0
Evening: 7-8-4


PlIay4

Wednesday:
Afternoon: 2-9-5-0
Evening: 4-7-2-5


-e.SmatchL

Tuesday:
3-19-25-27-33


Tuesday:
11-14-22-42 22


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


The cop genre lives
LOS ANGELES
-Il f any series has a shot at
single-handedly reviving the.
buddy cop genre, it's "NCIS:
Los Angeles."
A spinoff of the durable
"NCIS,: the newcomer is a hit that
Ranks as one of the fall season's top-
rated shows. Chris O'Donnell and
LL Cool J, who star as slick federal
agents, understand that their on-
screen chemistry is a big part of the
L.A version's appeal.
Their off-screen charm isn't shab-
by, either.
SWhen O'Donnell is quizzed about
what his co-star's stage name (he
was born James Todd Smith) stands
for, he doesn't hesitate: "Ladies Love
Cool James," O'Donnell shoots back. -
"Ah, got ya! My man, Chris," . -
actor-rapper LL Cool J said, smiling.
Ask the pair if their wardrobe on In this publicity ima
"NCIS: Los Angeles" (9 p.m. EST CBS, LL Cool J (left
Tuesday, CBS) will approach the Agent Sam Hanna
trendsetting fashions of Crockett and portrays Special Ag
Tubbs on the uber buddy cop show scene from, 'NCIS I
of the 1980s, "Miami Vice," and
they're off and running. of Garner's two da
"You never know.-If we go under- band Ben Affleck,
. cover in a club and gotta shake it Police say Burki
up a little, and Chris has to put his $150,000 bail at th(
Flavor Flav clock on, I'm sure he'll Jail.
do it," LL Cool J said. "They have a - Garner was grain
clock ready for him." order against Burl


Alleged Jennifer Garner
stalker in custody
SANTA MONICA, Calif. - A man
is in custody in California on accusa-
tions that he violated a restraining
order preventing him from coming
within 100 yards
| of actress Jennifer
S Garner-and her fain-
I'A ily.
Police say Steveri
Burky was arrested
Monday at the nurs-
ery school where
Burky . Violet Affleck, one


on in 'NCIS' spinoff


ASSOCIATED PRES!
ge released by
:) portrays Special
and Chris O'Donnell
ent 'G' Callen, in a
Los Angeles.'
ughters with hus-
is enrolled.
y is being held on
e Santa Monica

ited a restraining
ky in November


2008 after she told the court she
believed he posed a threat to her
and her family. Garner alleged that
SBurky had been stalking her since
2002.

Rapper Lil Wayne to be
sentenced on Feb. 9
NEW YORK - Lil Wayne heads
to court in February for sentencing.
in his New York gun case, just days
after his next album comes out..
The rap star's sentencing date
is Feb. 9, set in a Manhattan state
court Tuesday. The Grammy winner
said nothing during his brief court ,


appearance.
He pleaded
guilty in October
to attempted crimi-
nal possession of a
weapon.'�he charge
stemmed from a
Lil Wayne 2007 traffic stop of
his tour bus. His
plea deal calls for a year in jail.

Quaid and wife no-show
in California court
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. -
Arrest warrants have been issued for
actor Randy Quaid and his wife after
they failed to appear for a court hear-
ing, a prosecutor said Tuesday..
The couple didn't show up in
a Santa Barbara criminal court
Tuesday on a felony charge that they
defrauded an innkeeper. The no-
show will cost the couple $40,000 in
forfeited bail.
It was the most recent in a string
of court absences that have resulted
in arrest warrants and an aborted
attempt to extradite the pair from
Randy Quaid's home state of Texas.

Fitness guru LaLanne
undergoes surgery
LOS ANGELES - Fitness pioneer
Jack LaLanne, 95, is recovering from
heart valve surgery at his home in
Morro Bay.
LaLaiine's publicist, Ariel Hankin,
said Tuesday that he underwent the
Procedure at a Los Angeles hospital
on Dec. 8.
The weightlifting guru is doing
Fine and expected t? make a full
recovery.
He became famous for his phy-,
sique and for outrageous stunts,
such as towing boats while swim-
ming across Long Beach Harbor
handcuffed. He hosted an exercise
show, on television from 1951-85.
i Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor George Lindsey is 74.
* MSNBC commentator Chris
Matthews is 64.
* Comedian-actor Eugene
Levy is 63.
* Actress Marilyn Hassett is
62.
* Actor Wes Studi is 62.
* Pop musician Jim Bonfanti
(The Raspberries) is 61.
* Actor Bill Pullman is 56.
* Actor Barry Livingston is
56.


a Country musician Tim
Chewning is 47.
* Country musician Duane
Propes is 43.
* DJ Homicide (Sugar.Ray)
is 39.
* Actor Sean Patrick Thomas
is 39.
* Actress Milla Jovovich is
34.
A Actress Jennifer Carpenter
is 30.
* Actor-singef Nat Wolff is 15.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online,.. www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc:, is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayr ......754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
S(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Reporters
CLASSIFIED *
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake Cify Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday. '
To report a missed delivery, please call
(386) 754-0406. For all other circulation
issues, please call (386) 755-5445.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m.,'next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters..754-0407
(rwaters@lakecitfyeporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................ $26.32
24 Weeks .................. $48.79
52 Weeks............. .....$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks ............... $41.40
24 Weeks................ $82.80
52 Weeks ................$179.40


CORRECTION

SThe Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in 'this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Man's medals go
to great grandson
FORT WALTON
BEACH - Camden
Quick, 11, of Freeport, has
received three medals his .
great grandfather earned
in World War II
Quick received the
medals in a ceremony on
Tuesday. Quick never met
his great grandfather, Lt.
James Duncan.
The B-17 pilot was shot
down over France and
became a German prisoner
of war. Duncan survived
World War II and went on
to fly during the Korean
War. His B-29 was shot
down over North Korea
in 1950 and his body was
never found.
Duncan's great grand-
son received an Army Air
Force Air Medal and two
Oak Leaf Clusters in rec-
ognition of his service.

Man gets triple
organ transplant
TAMPA - A rare triple
organ transplant has saved
Louie Olivarez, 43, who
suffers from diabetes and
cancer.
Olivarez was the first
person to receive the pan-
creas-liver-kidney trans-
plant recently at Tampa
General Hospital. He said
at a press conference
Wednesday that he wasn't
sure "how to respond to
such a great gift."
The procedure was
spread out over two days
late last month. It involved
a medical team of as many
as 75 health care profes-
sionals.
Olivarez was on the
transplant waiting list for
only four days, and offi-
cials say it was extremely
unusual to have all three
organs available so quickly.


On the dotted line
Florida Gov. Charlie Crist, flanked by Florida Lt. Gov. Jeff
Kottkamp (left) and other local politicians, signs a Florida high
speed rail bill Wednesday morning in Tampa.


longest serving federal
court interpreters is retir-
ing in Miami after a
35-year career.
Angel Luis Nigaglioni,
70, provided the Spanish
language voice-over of
presidential speeches dur-
ing the Reagan administra-
tion and he translated on
behalf of Pope John Paul
II when he visited Miami
in 1987.

2 more diagnosed
with brain tumors
THE ACREAGE - Two
more children from the
same Palm Beach County
community have been
diagnosed with brain
tumors.
The news comes as
the Florida Department
of Health investigates a
possible brain cancer clus-
ter in the area. Thirteen
children were diagnosed
with brain tumors or brain
cancer from 1995 to 2008.
Parents have expressed
concern that environmen-
tal hazards, including well
water, could have caused
the diseases.


A longtime court Man in underwear
interpreter retires run from police
MIAMI - One of the NAPLES - A Collier


County man wearing only
his underwear was arrest-
ed after authorities say he
broke into a Naples home
and spent the night.
The sheriff's office
reports that a renter was
going to the home with a
handyman Tuesday morn-
ing when they realized
someone was sleeping
inside. They called police,
but Eric Bratt, 23, woke up
and ran off.
Bratt was charged with
criminal mischief for
breaking into the home,
trespassing and resisting
arrest without violence.

Burglar steals
from churches
MIAMI BEACH -A
burglar is targeting houses
of worship in Miami
Beach.
Police say the suspect
has burglarized at least six
locations since October,
stealing mostly expensive
audio equipment and cash
from collection boxes.
Miami Beach Police
spokeswoman Deborah
Doty says the suspect is
well-groomed and blends
in with worshippers. He
has even been seen put-
ting on a yarmulke.
* Associated Press


-18 FI


!�I '," Q


. SHOWERS I T-STORMS BREEZY, SUNNY, SUNNY
COOLER COOL


HI 62 L0 54 X HI 69 L 45 HI 58 L0 34 HI 56 LO 31 HI 56 10 31





... 59/52 * -.- cksonlle Cape Canaveral 76/60/t 70/46/pc
Tallahassee Lake City ' 6255 Daytona Beach 74/57/t 67/43/pc
58/50 , 62/54 Ft. Lauderdale 81/64/t 77/54/pc
Pensacola *. . Gainesville Datona Beach FortMyers 77/59/t 71/51/pc
56/49 .Panama City 65/56; 7o63 Gainesvlle 69/48/sh 61/36/pc
60/51 O.cala Jacksonville 68/48/t 59/37/pc
",68/59, "
9, o Ce anaveral Key West 80/70/t 75/66/s
a72/61 Ca 8 iLake City 69/45/sh 58/34/pc
Miami 82/65/t 78/54/pc
Tam a Naples 77/65/t 70/52/pc
74/ ' West-Palm Beach Ocala 71/51/sh 62/38/pc
78/70 * Orlando 76/58/t 68/43/pc
S Ft. Lauderdaie Panama City 59/44/r 55/36/pc
Ft. Myeri 80/71 * Pensacola 57/41/sh 56/33/pc
. 78/65 'Naples Tallahassee 58/43/t 55/33/pc
'80/66 Miami Tampa 74/57/t .68/50/pc
SW 't 81/72 Valdosta 57/44/r 53/34/pc
Key West ,. W' . Palm Beach 81/62/t 75/50/pc
S0/69


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


64
56
68
44
85 in 1956
22 in 1968

0.00"
2.17"
46.35"
1.22"
47.02"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torm.
Sunset torm.

MOON


7:21 a.m.
5:33 p.m.
7:21 a.m.
5:33 p.m.


1
LW.
60 mites to bn
Today's
ultra-violet


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather


Moonrise today 8:20 a.m. radiation risK Channel.
Moonset today 6:40 p.m. for the area on
a scale from 0
Moonrise tom. 9:02 a.m. to 10+
Moonset tom. 7:36 p.m.

OO.GO _ - weather.com
Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan. ,Forecasts, data and grah-
24 31 7 15 - :' Ics � 2009 Weather Central
First Full Last New " . -: LC, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


On this date in
1884, a three week
blockade of snow
began at Portland,
Ore. A record
December total
of 34 inches was
received.


Get CoMectel


czl#
n~~ ~ i .ijii .ia a


Daily Scripture
"And Mary said:'My soul glorifies
the Lord and my spirit rejoices in
God my Savior.'"
Luke 1:46-47
Thought for Today
"A fool and his money are soon
parted, but you never call him a
fool till,the money is gone."
S- Anonymous


�� �


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


1! THU9S


[! AULA


'���UDA


R 'kK. .. ',-"ITY, "LMAN I- I II I


WEMBBY11-HU














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009


State Farm to remain in Florida


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.corn

State Farm Insurance
and the Florida Office of
Insurance. Regulation
reached an agreement
Wednesday which would
allow State Farm to con-
tinue as a Florida insurance
provider.
According to State Farm
Insurance officials, the
insurance carrier serves
810,000 customers in
Florida with 780 agents.
"This stabilizes our dete-


riorating financial condition
and reduces our exposure,"
said Justin Glover, State
Farm Insurance spokes-
man. "We continue to have
challenges in the state of
Florida due to hurricanes.
So, it's important that there
is a regulatory framework
in Florida that creates a
viable property insurance
market in the future."
Columbia County has
three State Farm insurance
offices and the local agents�
are pleased with the news.
"I'm just very happy that


State Farm Insurance is
going to be able to stay in
this market," said Lake City
State Farm insurance agent
John W. Burns III.
Burns' sentiments were
echoed by local agent John
Kasak.
"I'm thrilled State Farm
Insurance is staying in
Florida and I know my
customers are going to be
thrilled as well," he said
during a telephone inter-
view. "This means we can
continue to take care of our
customers homeowners


and auto insurance needs."
Kasak said officials have
been working toward reach-
ing the agreement since
February.
'"This was a very big con-
cern for our customers," he
said. 'They want the quality
of State Farm and they want
to know they're going to
have home insurance with
State Farm. This is a happy
day for our customers and
for us."
Local State'Farm agent
Ken Cox was unavailable
for comment.


THEFTS: Of tires, rims in excess of $30,000


Continued From Page 1A
obtain fingerprints and DNA
from the collected items
of evidence," Seifert said.
"The fingerprints and DNA
samples were sent to the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement in Tallahassee
for further examination.
Laboratory technicians at
FDLE were able to match
the fingerprints and DNA to
the two suspects."


Seifert said Fenner net-
worked with' other law
enforcement agencies
throughout the state which
led to the arrest of Don
Alvin Parris, 52, 2370 48th
St., Miami.
Authorities discov-
ered that Parris and Gary
Ward, 59, 13436 SW 262
St., Homestead, were previ-
ously arrested for similar


burglaries in Sarasota and
Bradenton.
Parris is currently in
custody at the Columbia
County Detention Facility
and is being held on $50,000
bond after being booked
into the jail on Tuesday.
He was transported from
Miami-Dade.
Authorities are continu-
ing their search for Ward.


Both Parris and Ward
face second-degree grand
theft charges and burglary
charges. To date none of
the stolen property has
been recovered.
Anyone with information
aboutthis or another crime
may call Crime Stoppers of
Columbia County at (386)
754-7099. You may remain
anonymous.


CEC: Operates 18 secure detention facilities
Continued From Page 1A


beds, to other facilities
in excess of 1,000 beds,"
Pelletier said. "We have the
capability of handling all
security levels. We have 18
secure detention facilities."
Community Education
Centers has been in busi-
ness for more than 15 years
and operates in 19 states,
housing about30,000 offend-
ers. According to informa-
tion from the company's
Web site, www.cecintl.com,


the company has seven in-
prison treatment programs
in Florida at various loca-
tions including the Mayo
Correctional Institution,
Taylor Correctional
Institution and Gainesville
Correctional Institution.
The company only pro-
vides treatment services at
those facilities. The facili-
ties are run by Florida
Department of Corrections
and the programs are con-
tracted through Community


Education Centers.
If the Columbia County
contract is awarded, the
facility will offer a variety
of rehab and educational
programs.
Community Education
Centers public relations
manager Chris Greeder
said Community Education'
Center proposes to provide
a number of programs at the
Lake City facility including
substance abuse treatment,


health education, self-help
groups such as narcotics
anonymous and alcoholic
anonymous, life skills train-
ing classes, religious ser-
vices, recreation services,
library service, adult lit-
eracy classes, English as
a second language classes
and vocational programs.
The company is planning
to open another correction-
al facility within the next 30
days in Waco, Texas.


County looks forward

on prison and projects


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.cont
For the past few months,
Columbia County officials
have been able to start the
initial parts of projects, but
unable to complete them
or move to the next step
because of technicalities.
During today's 7 p.m.
Columbia County Commis-
sionmeeting atthe Columbia
School Board Complex
Auditorium, 372 W. Duval
St, county officials are hop-
ing to eradicate those tech-
nicalities and make deci-
sions alout the new Fort
White Library, a 1 percent
bed tax increase and a pro-
posed privately owned and
operated prison contracted
for by the Federal Bureau
of Prisons.

Proposed prison
Columbia County
Industrial Development
Authority Executive
Director Jim Poole is sched-
uled to address the com-
mission about issues for a
proposed privately owned
and operated prison which
may come to Columbia.
County, as well as address
information found in the
Federal Bureau of Prisons
Draft Environment Impact
statement for the facility.
'There are some omis-
sion of facts in the EIS
that we are going to cor-
rect," County Manager
Dale Williams said, noting
county officials plan to turn
the information in by the
public comment deadline of
Dec. 21.
The county issued a let-
ter of support for the pro-
posed facility in 2008, sub-


ject to several factors being
addressed, including fund-
ing.
Fort White library.
For years, Columbia
County officials have voiced
an opinion to have a new
public library built in Fort
White, but were waiting for
state library construction
funding. Earlier this year,
officials decided to move
forward with plans to con-
structthebuilding, although
several questions about the
structure, its architecture
and other work associated
with the, project went unan-
swered.
The project's budget is
estimated at $800,000which
excludes land, furniture,
fixtures and equipment. No
state dollars will be used in
the project.
"We would like to have
this out for bid in January,"
Williams said.

Bed tax increase
County officials will hold
a public hearing to take
comments on a proposed 1
percent increase on Tourist
Development Tax. The tax
originated in the county's
2009-2010 fiscal budget
workshops and if it is adopt-
ed, it is projected to gener-
ate approximately $180,000
in new revenue annually.
'That revenue, as it cur-
rently exists, is proposed to
be split between Columbia
County and the Tourist
Development Council,"
Williams said. The county
currently levies a 2 percent
bed tax; the tax has been as
high as 3 percent.


NEARBY: Wells tested, show no contamination, health official says


Continued From Page 1A
said.
'There are no traces of
contamination off-site," he
said.
Had there been contami-


nation, the health depart-
ment would have advised
residents to not drink the
water, said Hugh Giebeig,
health department admin-


istrator. Residents with con-
taminated wells would have
been provided water.
There was a sinkhole
three years ago at the


'company's Suwannee River
Chemical Complex that was
successfully remediated,
Williams said..
An engineering firm


based in Orlando, Ard-
aman and Associates, is
working to determine the
exact size of the sinkhole
area, he said. Engineers


,twill then come up with a
solution to fix it and PCS
will continue to monitor the
sinkhole, in conjunction
with the DEP


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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


J-
"- "
�r


'^^s^^,


















OPINION


Thursday, December


OTHER


OTHER
OPINION


Insurance:

Gambling

with lives

Sheen two sides
disagree,
it's often the
loophole in
W legislation, the
give and take, the compromise
that ensures passage. In the
case of health-care legislation,
however, one loophole could be
a noose.
As recently amended, the
Senate Democratic health-care
bill would permit insurance
companies to place annual
limits on the dollar value of
medical care, according to the
Associated Press. The caveat
is that the limits cannot be
"unreasonable," but there is no
definition of what constitutes
"unreasonable." We all know
that treating serious illnesses
can be costly. If you haven't
experienced it yourself, prob-
ably a friend or family member
or co-worker has seen savings
disappear and coverage restrict-
ed - even canceled - when
a serious illness strikes within
the family circle.
S The Senate is playing with
people's lives putting this
S amendment into the bill, with
S the additional insult that it is
hidden in a provision that is
still headlined "No lifetime or
annual limits."
S The idea that an accountant
or an insurance clerk - or a
bureaucrat - can decide what
S is medically necessary and if
its costs are justified is ridicu-
i lous. Yet it happens every day.
S- Isn't that one of the'flaws that
- healthna MfbhfomWas sup-
posed to correct?
Insurance, whether for
health-care costs or for one's
home, automobile or other
personal property, is something
consumers purchase with the
hope it will never be used. We
pay the premiums each month
with the desire that we will
never recover that money, that
there will never be a need to
.' file a claim.
Insurance is essentially a
gamble. Limits on coverage,
despite years, even decades, of
paying premiums will make it
even more so. But unlike a visit
to Vegas, all any of us can hope
for - until meaningful reform
is in place - is that we never
hit the jackpot
N Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


17,2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


A Christmas tale of two dolls


I think I was 8 or 9 years
old when bride dolls
became popular. Up until
then, I had had the tradi-
tional baby dolls; but my
friends all seemed to have bride
dolls and I longed for one, too.
As the oldest of five children,
I knew not to expect more
than two or three Christmas
presents. My parents were fun-
damental Christians who didn't
teach us to believe in Santa
Claus. We knew they provided
the gifts and that they worked
hard to be able to do that But
they did make a tradition of not
placing them under the tree
until Christmas Eve, long after
,Wpx children were in bed. I guess
-itwas.their way of coaxing us to
go to sleep, because we knew
presents wouldn't appear until
after we did.
Internal excitement would
prevent us from sleeping very
long, though, and usually by
4 a.m. on Christmas we were
wide awake, eagerly anticipating
what we would find under the
tree. We would wait as long as
we possibly could, then go and
wake Mama and Daddy so we
could all go to the living room
together to open presents.
Wanting to prolong the
pleasure and excitement, we
would look each box over care-
fully, lifting it to feel the weight,
and trying to guess what was
inside. Sure enough, that year
there was a longish box with
my name on it, and I just knew
it had to be that long-awaite'd.
bride doll. Before I could
open it, though, Daddy said,
"Carolyn, looks like you got
a stool to stand on when you
wash dishes."
I was crushed. I had recently
started performing this chore,
and being so young, had trouble


Carolyn Abell
reaching the sink to do it prop-
erly. Daddy had mentioned
before that I needed a stool to
stand on, but I never imagined
he would actually wrap one up
as a Christmas present./I felt
so hurt, that I just said, "I don't
even want it, Daddy. You can
have it."
Well,, he took the wrapping
off, opened the box, and then
acted so surprised to find a
beautiful doll wearing a long,
white, lacy bridal gown. He gave
it to me, of course, but would
jokingly refer to it later as "his"
doll.
I kept that doll until I was
well into adulthood, and at some
point it disappeared during one
of my moves with the military.
I've missed it ever since.
Sometime after that
Christmas when I received my
doll, my mother confessed that
she had never had a doll as a
child. As one of 11 children of a
south Georgia farm family, their
Christmas gifts were usually
more practical - a new dress
sewn by her mother late at
night on that old treadle sewing
machine, or perhaps a new pair
of shoes her father had bought
with money from a good cot-
ton crop. Dolls were simply a
luxury they couldn't afford.
One December about 20
years ago I was stationed in
Stuttgart, Germany, and had
gone to the Post Exchange to
do my Christmas shopping.


Some of my friends had been
buying hand-painted China dolls
with real hair and gorgeous old-
fashioned dresses. Browsing
through the small PX mall, I
spotted the concession selling
those dolls, and in a moment of
reckless spontaneity, decided
to buy a doll for Mama. I chose
one with a beautiful long dark
dress trimmed in velvet, ecru
lace and small pink roses, with a
matching hat to set off the long
blond curls. She looked like a
fashionable lady in 1900 dressed
for a carriage ride.
At home, I carefully wrapped
it and put it in the larger box of
things I was sending to Mama
and Daddy in Florida.
About a month lafer, I
received the letter from Mama,
thanking me for the doll. She
told how it had been several
days before Christmas, and she
was in a "blue mood," since
I wouldn't be there that year,
and some of the others weren't
going to make it either. She was
at home alone, looking at the
Christmas tree, and decided
she just had to do something to
beat the blues, so she picked up
the long box from where she
had placed it under the tree,
and decided to open it early.
Carefully removing the wrap-
ping, she gasped with delight.
as she gazed at the lovely doll
- her first one! She wrote me
that it was the most beautiful
doll she had ever seen, and she
cried for joy that day.
When Mama went to heaven
almost two years ago, her doll
became mine. I love to look at
it around Christmas time, and
think of the joy it had brought
her as a woman in her 70s who
finally had her own doll.
N Carolyn Abell writes from
Lake City.


OTHER OPINION

Fallen idols may have been held too high


h, how far the
mighty can fall.
And, oh, how we
lesser mortals like
to watch (and help)
them do it
Exhibit No. 1: More than four
in 10 Americans hold an "unfa-.
vorable view" of Tiger Woods
since he confessed to "personal
sins." For anyone who doesn't
read newspapers, watch televi-
sion, surf the Web or overhear.
other people talking while wait-
ing to renew a driver's license,
Woods had an affair, probably
more than one. (By the way,
when it comes to sins, are
there any that aren't "personal"
ones? There are crimes against
nature and man's inhumanity to
man, but it seems to us a sin is
intensely personal. It's not like
someone can sin for you.)
While we're sure millions
worldwide were disappointed
about Woods' woes, we heard
one individual say she "could
never forgive him." Good news,
dearie: Only a few have the
power to forgive or not forgive


Woods for his transgressions
- and you're not one of them.
So move on.
The new Washington Post-
ABC News poll also points out
that men have a more positive
view of Woods than women do,
especially among those who are
golf fans. The poll noted that
62 percent of golfers still think
Tiger's got some life left in his
image yet. Yet we understand
why some businesses might
consider severikg ties with the
world's most famous athlete.
It's pretty ironic, though. The
public's tendency to idolize him
led corporations to offer him
mega-money in endorsement
contracts in the first place. And
any potential losses have been
minimized by Tiger himself,
who said he was taking an
"indefinite" break from golf.
OK, let's just get to the point:
What he did or didn't do is
between Tiger and Mrs. Tiger,
with the children of the union
(and, maybe a few other family
members) having the ability to
point fingers (or shake them)


and say "tsk, tsk."
Members of the general
public might want to remind
themselves that this always hap-
pens when we set up a public
figure to be a role model when
we know nothing about said
public figure except that he or
she has: a) an ability to play a
sport, b) an ability to act on the
screen - both large and small
- like somebody that he or she
is not or c) an ability to make a
bucket-load of money for said
ability.
So here's the deal: Let Tiger
get his own house in order with-
out interference from the public
(and the media) and let's all find
some better role models to hold
up for consideration. How about
a teacher, a family member, a
police officer or a firefighter?
Just about anybody that you
know personally would be bet-
ter than someone who receives
accolades only for what he can
do, not what kind of person he
is.

* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Sharon Randall


A different

kind of

Christmas

This will be a dif-
ferent kind of
Christmas for me
and mine, and for
a lot of us, really,
maybe even for you and yours.
Each year I tell my children
not to overspend on gifts.
Telling them is my tradition.
Not listening to me is theirs.
A month ago, when we got
together for Thanksgiving, I
tried telling them again. And
this time I really meant it.
Like so many families, we've
seen our share of financial
"challenges" this year. Jobs
were lost Hours were cut
Budgets were stretched. Belts
were tightened. It made me
proud to watch my children
and their others learn to make
do, and to make more of less.
This time, when I said they
shouldn't overspend, they all
agreed in theory. But they
couldn't quite agree in fact
For them, the best part of
Christmasis not the getting,
but the giving. They truly love
to give each other gifts.
When I suggested drawing
names, you'd have thought I
said, "Let's hog-tie Santa and
stab him in the gut!"
(I would never say that
I might joke about it, but I
wouldn't really mean it)
Finally, I, and the economy,
began to win 'them over and we
agreed, at last, to draw names.
The plan was simple: We
would each buy one gift with
a $25 limit We might have to
shop for days to find some-
thing at that price, but, halle-
lujah, we would not go deeper
in debt
Then a funny thing
happened on the way to
Christmas. My husband lost
his job. He was laid off two
weeks ago with dozens of his
co-workers.
We were planning to have
a Christmas party. Instead,
we had a "pink slip" party for
everyone who'd been fired.
A few days later my hus-
band, God bless him, found
another job. I wish I could say
the same for everyone at that
party. I can't, of course. Not
yet And probably not anytime
soon.
Statistics are only numbers
until they have faces and
names. It is one thing to know
that unemployment in your
state stands at 13 percent; its
another thing entirely to know
35 people who just lost their
jobs and could lose their health
insurance and their homes.
- Today I spoke with my
daughter-in-law, who would
love to give Christmas pres-
ents to every soul on Earth,
but can't quite swing it this
year.
I wish you could have heard
the excitement in her voice.
Instead of buying gifts that she
can't afford, she has poured
her heart into organizing
drives for the needy. I recall
a Christmas in my childhood
when my family hit hard times.
Some people from our church
brought us a ham and a box of
groceries. I was so mortified
I wanted to go hide under the
porch with the dogs.
After they left, my mother
sliced the ham and said, "Life
is a bank. Sometimes you put
in, other times you take out;
either way, it's all the same
bank."
Giving, she told me, is easy;
taking is hard. "Remember
how it feels," she said,
"because one day you will do
the giving."
Whether blessed to give or
blessed to take, all that mat-
ters, really, is that we do so
with a sense of our abundance,
and an open and grateful heart.
And it will be a different
kind of Christmas for us all.
a Sharon Ranidall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson NV 89077.

















Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009


Eartha L. Burton
Eartha L. Burton, 52 of St.
Petersburg, Florida died on
December 8, 2009. A native
of Lake City,
Florida, she
had been
employed at
All Children's
Hospital for 10
years and was
studying for
her , Certified
Nurse Assistant certification.
She attended the 20th Street
Church of Christ. Survivors:
son, George Foster, Jr.; brothers,
Charles Marable (Linda) and
Alonzo Marable', Steve Bell,
Jr. (Vanessa), Solomon Bell
(Melissa) and Winston. Bell;
sisters, Linda Walker, Wanda
Hall (Richard), Jackie Henderson
(James), Steve Ann and Laura
Bell, and Gloria Spellman; aunts,
Mary, Jessie Mae James, Bertha
Smiley and Willard Bell; other
relatives and friends. Funeral
services will be held Saturday
December 19, 2009 11:00 A.M.
at Mt. Zion. Primitive Baptist
Church. 3700 22nd Ave..South.
St. Petersburg, FL. Visitation:
Friday December 18, 2009
from 4:00 - 7:00 P.M. at Smith
Funeral Home. St. Petersburg,
Florida. Obituary compliments of
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.

Alyce Jones Caesar
Mrs.AlyceJones Caesar, Licensed
Embalmer, Funeral Director and
Owner of Caesar Funeral Home
,passed away peacefully Friday,
December
11, 2009 at
Suwannee
Health Care
Center in Live
oak, FL. She
was 94 and
a. Columbia
County native.
She was a graduate of Columbia
County Public School System.
She chose Mortuary Science as
her life career and received a
degree in funeral service from
Eckels College of Mortuary
Science, Philadelphia, PA. Mrs.
Caesar was a very active in the
community having served as a
former member ofThe Lake City
Community College Minority
Advisory Committee and as
an advisory board member of
Richardson Day Care Center.
Mrs. Caesar was a member of The
Florida Morticians Association
4th Regional District and The
National Funeral Directors and
Embalmers Association. She was
the Worthy Matron of the Eastern
SStar Chapter #68, and,was listed
on Who's Who book for 1992-
S 93. She was also a member of
Mt. PisgahA.M.E: Church where
she served faithfully. Funeral
services for Mrs. Caesar will
be held on Friday, December"
18, 2009 at ll:00am at Mt.
Pisgah A.M.E. Church.with the
pastor Rev. Patrick Sasnett, and
Res. James Houson, Eulogist.
Entombment will follow in
Memorial Cemetery under the
care of Chestnut Funeral Home
18N.W. 8thAve., Gainesville, FL
Visitation, Thursday, December
17, 2009, 6:00 - 8:00pm, Bethel
AME Church 838 SW CR 242
and on Friday at the church one
hour before the service. There
will be no viewing after the
eulogy. Flowers may be sent to
Combs Funeral Home, 292 N.E.
Washington Street. Survivors
include: Nephew Hilton Jones,
(Abbie) Niece, Ella Mae Jones,
Nurtured one son, David
Cummings, (Mary) Two cousins
Charlie Kimble, (Mary Alice)
Willis Joe Merrell (Myrtle).
Great nieces & nephew Mary
Carter, Clara Jones and Eddie
Jones, The cortege will form. at
the home of her niece, Ms. :Ella
Mae Jones, 1258 Massie Street at

Guy A. Crawford
Mr. Guy A. Crawford, 76 of
Lake City, FL. passed away
Tuesday, December 15, 2009
in Avalon Healthcare & Rehab.
Center. He was a professional
truck driver. He was a member
of the Baptist faith. His
survivors are (4).Daughters, Ida
Johnson (Sylvester), Lake City,
Ethel Cobb (Billy) Jacksonville,
FL., Elnora Anthony (George)
and Rosie McCutcheon all of
Lake City. BT Bennett (Carol)
Ft. Lauderdale, FL. One brother
Paul Crawford (Margaret), A
sister Lois Furlow all of Atlanta,
GA. (13) grandchildren, (26)
Great Grand .children, (8) great-
great grandchildren. A host of
nieces, nephews, cousin and
other relatives and friends.
Visitation for family and friends
will be Friday December 18,
from 6-7:30 PM. At the funeral
home. Funeral Services will be
held Saturday, December 19,
2009 at 11:00 A.M. at the Mizell
Funeral Home Chapel with
Rev. 1.L. Williams officiating.
MIZELL FUNERAL HOME
365 N.W. Washington St.,
Lake City is in charge of
arrangements. Ph.# (386)752-
3166. Please sign guest register
at www.mizellfuneralhome.com


Willie "Clyde" Kelly
Mr. Willie "Clyde" Kelly was
born on
October 17,
1938 in Lake
City, Florida
to the late
Mr. Lonnie
Sr. and the
late Eulamae


Lucille Kelly. "Clyde"
answered the call of God on
Friday, December 11, 2009 after
a short illness. He had received
Christ as the leader of his life
and was a member of Greater
Truevine Missionary Baptist
Church, Dr. Antonio Carlisle,
Pastor. He attended Richardson
High School in Lake City, FL.
"Clyde" worked for Anderson
Columbia for more than forty
years. He enjoyed watching
sports and spending time with
family. "Clyde" was joined in
holy matrimony to Laura Pate
Kelly, who he leaves to cherish
his memories. He was preceded
in death by his daughter, Curtice.
He will be dearly missed by
six sons: James (Shandra),
Sedric, Arthur, Calvin (Darline),
Michael (Deborah), and John;
six daughters: Beulah (Oscar),
Emma, Josie, Diane, Patricia and
Laura; four brothers: Deacon
Narvell Kelly (Betty) and Deacon
DeLeon Kelly (Marilyn), Lake
City, FL., Maxwell Kelly, West
Palm Beach, FL., David Kelly
(Edna), Lakeland, FL; three
sisters: Alma Owens (Wallace),
Lake City, FL., May Ella
Blankenship and Verner Preston
(David), West Palm Beach, FL.;
one sister-in-law: Emma B.
Kelly, Lake City, FL.; two aunts:
Lucille Kelly, Lake City, FL. and
Marie Kelly, Tuskegee, AL. and
a host of devoted grandchildren,
great-grandchildren, nieces,


nephews, cousins and friends.
Funeral services for "Clyde"
will be Saturday December 19,
2009 11:00 A.M. at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church.
550 NE Martin Luther King
Street. The family will receive
friends Friday, December 18,
2009 from 5:00 - 7:00 P.M. at
Greater Truevine Missionary
Baptist Church. Okinawa Street.
Arrangements entrusted .to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street. Lake
City, Florida. (386) 7524366.
Marq . Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Porter Howard (Harry)
Koger, Jr.
Mr. Porter Howard (Harry)
Koger, Jr., Beloved husband of
Vincenza Koger, went home to
be with the lord on Monday,
December 14, 2009 in Lake
City, Florida. Porter was born in
Terre Haute, Indiana, on January
7, 1932 and lived in Albany,
Kentucky for many years. In
addition to his loving wife, Porter
leaves behind sisters; Marie
(Deloyd) Harrell, of Lake City,
FL, Helen Stephon, of Ohio,
Lou Ann Guinn of Lake City,
FL, Barbara Thomley of Perry,
FL, brother; Joe Koger, of Lake
City, FL, sons; Mark and Paul
Koger, of Seattle, Washington,
Jeffrey (Sara) Koger of Norton,
Ohio, daughters; Darlene Lemay


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of Akron, Ohio and Kathleen
Guthrie of Uniontown, Ohio,
brother-in-law Sam (Marilyn)
Volpe and Stan Volpe, sister-
in-law Maria Cesaria (Wilf )
Lancaster, 9 grandchildren 4
great grandchildren and many
nieces and nephews also survive.
He was preceded in death by his
mother; Vela Pearl Guinn, father;
Porter Harrison Koger, sisters;
Martha Davis and Emma Lee
Evans and brother; Johnny Paul
Koger recently of Lake City, FL,
Porter was a long time resident
of Deming, New Mexico and
Akron, Ohio with many friends
in both cities. He will be missed
greatly by all the loving family
and friends he left behind. In lieu
of flowers, the family requests
donations be made to your
favorite charity in memory of
Porter. A memorial service will
be held 12:00 noon on Tuesday,
December 22, 2009 at Watertown
Congregational Methodist
Church with Rev. Randy Ogburn,
officiating. Arrangements are
under, the care and direction
of ICS CREMATION
AND FUNERAL HOME,
Lake City, FL 386-752-3436.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Local author celebrates

150 years of Lake City


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

In celebration of Lake
City's 150th anniversary,
local historian Morris
Williams co-wrote and
recently published the
book, "Lake City Florida: A
Sesquicentennial Tribute."
"I've lived all my life in
Lake City," he said. "I have
exactly one hometown and
Lake City, Florida, will have
exactly one sesquicenten-
nial."
Williams collaborated
with retired University
of Florida professor of
English Kevin McCarthy of
Gainesville.
They did not know each
other prior to working on
the book, Williams said.
Each man brought his own
expertise.
"He knew a lot about put-
ting together a book and I
knew a lot about Lake City,"
he said.


LIVING PLANTS,


A GIFT REMEMBERED!
I've never met anyone that doesn't have at
least one plant memory. Building a fort in your
favorite tree, your Grandma's sweet smelling
roses, picking grapes as a child or planting
a spring garden with your Dad. All of these
memories bring back warm feelings of persons
or places that we love. This Christmas start
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Work on the book began
in.January, and the goal was
to finish before the end of
the year.
"We wanted to get it out
before the sesquicentennial
ended," Williams said. "That
was, our driving force."
The two researched dif-
ferent archives and con-
ducted oral interviews for
the book.
It features 300 pages cov-
ering 'significant parts of
Lake City's history, such
as Coach Paul Quinn,
Richardson High School
and McKinley Jeffers.
There are 250 photographs
and 14 pages of index.
The book is $20 and avail-
able at Hunter's Printing.
Copies will also be available
at the sesquicentennial clos-
ing ceremony Saturday.
"I hope people read the
book and somewhere along
the way have a greater
appreciation of our town,"
Williams said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


*B8I0I0-72l059�


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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009


Patients meet donors from kidney swap


Dr. Peter Gott
Speoktojoy@ool.com


UTI needs

physician's

treatment

DEAR DR. GOTT: I am
a 78-year-old woman who
reads your column every
day. I now have a question
for you. I had a urine test
and got the report back
from the lab. When I asked
my doctor about it, he
said he had never heard
of the test before. I have
enclosed the report for you
to review. Also, my doc-
tor didn't do anything to
treat me because he didn't
know what to do. Is there
anything that I can use to
treat this?

DEAR READER: The
lab report that you have
enclosed is a urine culture
and sensitivity test, also
known as a urine C&S.
This is a common test used
to determine whether a uri-
nary tract infection is pres-
ent, what type of bacteria
are causing it, and which
antibiotics are best used to
eradicate the infection. The
report indicates that you
have an infection caused by
pseudomonas aeruginosa
and that it is susceptible to
most antibiotics."
I hope that you were
mistaken in your under-
standing, because I cannot
believe that your physician
did not know what the test
was or how to interpret the
results to provide treat-
ment. This test is common,
and every physician, even
medical students, should
know and understand what
it is for. If your doctor did
not order the test, there
may be some understand-
able confusion about why it
was ordered, but that does
not excuse his refusal to
treat your UTI.
This is a hospital labora-
tory test, meaning it must
be ordered by a physician,
otherwise the lab techni-
cians would have refused
to carry out the test with-
out proper documentation
that you needed the work-
up. You would have had to
either hand deliver a form
or the ordering physician
would have had to fax it to
the hospital. Another con-
sideration is how you knew
to arrive at the hospital to
have the testing done if
you were not told ahead
of time by a physician or
nurse that you needed to.
Somehow, there was
a huge mix-up, and you
are suffering because of
it. You clearly have a UTI
and need treatment with
antibiotics. You will then
need to have repeat testing
to determine whether the
infection has been elimi-
nated or whether further
treatment is necessary.
Untreated urinary-tract
infections can lead to
potentially serious conse-
quences, such as a kidney
infection, which is much
harder to treat, requires
longer courses of antibiot-
ics and, if left untreated,
may cause permanent
kidney damage. That is not
to mention the symptoms
you may have of frequent
urination, pain or burning
during urinating, fever,
abdorpinal pain or blood in
the urine.


I urge you to return to
your physician to discuss
the situation. You need to
be treated, and if he truly
does not know what this
test is for and how to use
it to provide appropriate
treatment, he should not
be a doctor. This is prob-
ably just a misunderstand-
ing, but regardless of
who ordered the test, the
results are clear.
* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet."


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON
Thirteen patients with
healthy new kidneys from
what's believed to be the
world's largest kidney
exchange met the donors
who made it happen
Tuesday - including three
who are sure to face the
question, "Why?"
A hospice nurse who
handed homemade cook-
ies to her operating team.
A retired stockbroker who
had volunteered with the
National Kidney Foundation
and decided to walk the talk.
And a woman inspired by
President Barack Obama's
call to volunteer. They all
donated a kidney with noth-
ing to gain - they didn't
have a friend or loved one
in the marathon chain of
transplants that they helped
make possible.
"It feels wonderful,"
Sylvia Glaser, 69, the hos-
pice nurse, said Tuesday at
a news conference where
most of the donors and
recipients met for the first
time. "You are giving some-
one a life, and there is no
substitute for that"


*" / ' -
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. Keith Melancon (right) Georgetown's kidney transplant director, performs the surgery to
harvest the kidney from donor Tom Otten, at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington,
Dec. 4. Beside Dr. Melancon is Lee Cummings, transplant surgery fellow.


"It's not like I'm doing
anything courageous," Bill
Singleton, 62, the kidney
foundation volunteer, told
The Associated Press before
his surgery. "If I don't vol-
unteer, who will?"
Kidney exchanges widen
the pool of potential donors
for the hardest-to-trans-
plant patients - minorities
as well as people whose


immune systems have
become abnormally primed
to attack a donated kidney.
What happens: Patients find
a friend or relative who isn't
compatible with them but
will donate on their behalf,
and the pairs are mixed to
find the most matches..
But a donor whose kidney
isn't directed to a particular
patient - a so-called altru-


Kids' swine flu shots recalled


By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer

ATLANTA - Hundreds
of thousands of swine flu
shots for children have
been recalled because tests
indicate the vaccine doses
lost some strength, govern-
ment health officials said
Tuesday.
The shots, made by
Sanofi Pasteur, were dis-
tributed across the coun-
try last month and most
have already been used,
according to the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention. The 800,000
pre-filled syringes that
were recalled are for young
children, ages 6 months to
nearly 3 years.
Dr. Anne Schuchat, a
CDC flu expert, stressed
that parents don't need to


do anything or to worry if
their child got one - or
even two - of the recalled
shots. The vaccine is safe
and effective, she said.
The issue is the vaccine's
strength. Tests done before


the shots were shipped
showed that the vaccines
were strong enough. But
tests done weeks later indi-
cated the strength had fall-
en slightly belowrequired
levels.


istic or non-directed donor
- multiplies the number
of operations that can be
done in a kidney swap.
And Dr. Keith Melancon
at Georgetown University
Hospital had three such
donors; people he calls
"pieces of gold."
"People keep wanting
to know why, why, why,"
Glaser, the Gaithersburg,


Md., nurse said before her
surgery. "It sounds very
trite but you pass through
this world, and what do you
ever do that makes a differ-
ence?"
The AP documented
weeks of the complex
logistics as Melancon's
team initially planned for a
16-way exchange, juggled
donors and recipients for
the best matches - and
emerged with a record-set-
ting exchange: Twenty-six
operations over six days
at Georgetown and near-
by Washington. Hospital
Center.
Ten of the 13 recipi-
ents were black, Asian or
Hispanic. And five were
patients who never would
have received a kidney
under the traditional, sys-
tem, because they needed
an extra blood-cleansing
treatment to remove those
hyperactive immune cells;
treatment that only a hand-
ful of hospitals in the coun-
try offer.
"I cannotexplain in words.
I can raise my-childreh
now. He gave me life," said
Solomon Weldeghebriel,
42, aWashington cabdriver.


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I I


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009 ,


Faith


groups


preach


health

From staff reports

It is estimated that almost
half of all Americans are liv-
ing with at least one chronic
disease. According to the
U.S. Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention,
chronic diseases such as
diabetes and heart disease
are highly prevalent and
costly, yet most are prevent-
able.
Many people lack the
resources, knowledge, and
support to prevent illness,
manage chronic .disease,
and make informed deci-
sions with regards to adopt-
ing a healthier. lifestyle,
CDC officials say.
Across the country, the
faith community is working
to address health concerns
through a congregational
health ministry. Health min-
istry is an opportunity for
congregations to use their
time and talents to pro-
vide for the health needs
of members and the com-
munity.
Suwannee River Area
Health Education Center,
the Columbia County
Health Department and
Well Florida Council are
collaborating to assist con-
gregations in Columbia
County in the develop-
ment of health ministries.:
The Congregational Health
Ministry program will help
congregations develop and
sustain viable health min-
istries by offering training,
networking opportuni-
ties and ongoing support
Training and other activi-
ties are free and are pro-
vided in collaboration with
The Center for Community
Health Ministry at Florida
Hospital.
Those interested in hear-
ing more about develop-
ing a health ministry can
attend an information ses-
sion from 6-8 p.m. today at
The LifeStyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison
Court For more informa-
tion, contact Carolyn Alred
at (352) 281-1629.
A 2006-2007 survey
conducted by the National
Council of Churches USA
found that 65 percent of
responding churches'
reported providing health
education programs in their
communities. The survey
also revealed that churches
are providing direct health
care services and advocacy
on behalf of health-related
policy issues.
Within a congregation,
a health ministry team is
made up of members who
coordinate health programs
and services by identifying
individual member's heath
concerns and the health
interests of the congrega-
tion and community.


Event will

warm the

homeless
From staff reports

The second annual
Lake City Blank-Fest will
be held 3 p.m. Saturday at
RockStar Lounge, 723 E.
Duval Street. Blank-Fest is
an annual benefit concert
which raises blankets for
the homeless.
Bands performing at the


event include SwampKat,
Margo West, Gainesville
Bullet, Krazy Horse and
others. Raffle prizes will
also be given out between
performances.
Last year more than 150
blankets were collected
which were donated to
United Way. Organizers
want to match or exceed
that number this year.
Admission is one new or
gently used blanket for any-
one 21 or older.


Space available now for home show participants


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Slots have now opened
for businesses interested in
participating in the North
Florida Home and Patio
Show for the first time.
The seventh annual show
is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
March 6 and 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. March 7. Previous
participants had the first


chance to. sign up for the
show.
"Anybody looking to pro-
mote their business, this
is the perfect opportunity,"
said George Degler, home
and patio show committee
vice chairman.
Presented by the
Rotary Club of Lake City
Downtown, the event is also
sponsored by the Lake City
Reporter, Newman Media'


and Sunstate Federal Credit
Union.
More than 13,000 people
were in attendance at the
show last year, and Degler
said he is looking forward
to the same turnout in
2010.
"We had a spectacular
turnout," he said. "Every
year it gets bigger."
More than a third of the
vendor spots have been


filled, Degler said. Booths
are open to anyone in home
construction or areas such
as yard, patio and garage.
Participation in the event
pays off in the long run,
Degler said.
"It's a way to get face to
face contact with consum-
ers interested in your ser-
vice," he said.
Degler was in the show
last year with his business,


A Proud Plumber, and
said he got more than 100
phones calls from being in
the show.
"Its an excellent oppor-
tunity to get your name out,
especially if you're the new
guy in town," Degler said.
For more information on
the show, call Mike Gordon
at (386) 365-5798 or visit
www. rotarycluboflakecity-
ddwntown.com.


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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428


*
*
*
*










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009


The


ames


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby.
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityr eporertcom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, December 17, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Woods voted top

athlete of the decade


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Time for

Tiger to

speak up

Tiger Woods
has garnered
more media
attention
than Michael
Jackson in these last few,
weeks and the question
remains: Can Woods
repair his broken image?
Even before the entire
infidelity scandal rocked
the media over the last
couple of weeks, Woods
had lost some of his
charm. Since coming on
the scene in the 1997
Masters victory, Woods
has done more to detract
fans than he has to
embrace them.
Those that chose to
like Woods did based on
the success he's had in
the sport, and his ability
to attract a new audience
to the game that had
previously been ruled by
octogenarian, rich, white
men. Woods had the
ability to bridge that gap,
but now he's burning
down the bridge.
Woods has done more
by doing nothing to ruin
his image following his
transgressions.
In a career that hasn't
had public backlash,
Woods is allowed a
mulligan.
It's just harder to
forgive a man for going
outside his marriage
than it is to forgive a man
for throwing a golf club.
Still, there is a need to
hear remorse.
As a public, we are
still left wondering if
Tiger feels anything. So
often the golfer conducts
himself like a robot on
the course, except for
the occasional smile after
winning a green jacket
or pulling off a shot that
bewilders the masses.
What we want from
Tiger is an ounce of
humility. We need to see
that Woods is vulnerable.
One of the greatest
moments in sports to me
was watching Tim Tebow
break down emotionally
following a loss. It
showed that he, too, is
human.. It showed that he
feels something.
Tiger has run into
solitude. It may very well
be his way of showing
remorse, but as a public
figure, he's showing
cowardice.
Charles Barkley said
that he's not a role
model; but, the truth is, if
you're a sports figure in
the public eye, you don't
have the choice. Woods
is perhaps the biggest of
the role models.
It's time to become
a model for everyone
and express remorse
for walking outside
the marriage. If he's
not remorseful and the
marriage was dead either
way, it's time to say that.
Either way, Tiger is
better served by playing
this one as it lies and
not just walking off the
course.

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


12 major titles in
10 years lifts Tiger
toward honor.
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

As sports go, it wasn't
close: Tiger Woods was
famous for his golf long
before he became infamous
for his personal life.
For 10 incomparable
years, no one ruled a
sport like Woods. He won
64 tournaments, includ-
ing 12 major champion-
ships. He hoisted a trophy
on every continent where
golf is played. And those 56
titles in one decade on the
PGA Tour? Consider that
.nly four of golf's greatest
players won more in their
entire careers.
Even as a shocking sex
scandal changed the way


people look at Woods, the
records he set could not be
ignored.
Woods. was selected
Wednesday as the Athlete
of the Decade by mem�
bers of The Associated Press
in a vote that was more
about his performance on
the course than the self-,
described transgressions as
a person.
"The only reason I
wouldn't vote for Tiger
Woods is because of the
events of the last three
weeks," said Mike Strain,
sports editor of the Tulsa
(Okla.) World. "And I didn't
think that was enough to
change my vote. I thought
he was a transcendent
sports figure."
He received 56 of the 142
,votes cast since last month
by editors at U.S. newspa-

WOODS continued on 2B


Undefeated


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 20, 2006, file photo Tiger Woods celebrates after winning 88th PGA
Championship golf tournament at Medinah Country Club Sunday, in Medinah, II1.


no,


more


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's senior captain Carlos Ruiz looks to pass up field in the Tigers' 4-2 victory against Suwannee High in Live Oak on Wednesday.



Tigers unload on Bulldogs, 4-2


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

LIVE OAK - Columbia
High was a day late, but
it wasn't a goal short as
the Tigers came up with a
4-2 win against previously
undefeated Suwannee
High.
The Tigers were
originally scheduled to play
the Bulldogs on Tuesday,
but a rescheduling of a
district game against Lee
High pushed the game back
until Wednesday. It didn't
affect the Tigers play.
Columbia went up
1-0 early in the game off
a goal by Geoff Beardsley.
Beardsley played with
a chip on his shoulder
against the previously
unbeaten Bulldogs after
having to miss the Tigers'
game against Bolles, who
he badly wanted to play
against with an injury
earlier this season.
Suwannee High knocked
off Bolles earlier in the
season.
"I wanted to come out
and play my best against
the best competition,"
Beardsley said. "We wanted
to get a win in a borderline
game against a tough
team."
The Bulldogs battled


back to take a 2-1 lead in
what coach Trevor Tyler
called a "shaky first half for
Cameron (Harper)," but the
Tigers went into the half
tied after Chris Beardsley
followed up a shot as the
Bulldogs' goal keeper was
caught out of position to tie
the game at 2-2.
Austin O'Conner and
Stewart ,Brown had
Suwannee's goals.
Harperbattledbackwith a
strong second half and held
Columbia's lead for the final
35 minutes of the contest
after Geoff Beardsley
scored his second goal of
the evening on a header.
Minutes before he had
another header waived off
due to an offside penalty.
The Bulldogs'had more
than a few chances to keep
their undefeated 8-0-1 mark
alive, but Harper was the
difference in a defensive
second half.
"I was a little shaky in
the first half," he said. "It
was nice to pick it up, and
I wouldn't be able to do
it without my defensive
core."
The Tigers played eight
men back in the box after
Beardsley's second goal for
most of the second half to
retain their lead, but made
a strong run with under


four minutes to play. Chase
Stamper capped off the
scoring with a goal to make
it 4-2 and close out the
Bulldogs.
"The midfield played very
well in the begging," Tyler
said. "They had two outside
midfielders who were very
good and very fast. They
broke free on our defense
and that's how they scored
their two goals. The defense
played tremendous in the
second half and held on
to their shell to make sure
that they marked up better.
This was a win against a
very good team."

Tigers basketball
Columbia High played
with the defending 5A
state champion Gainesville
Hurricanes for a quarter,
only trailing 17-16, on
Tuesday before falling 72-49
on the road in Gainesville.
"We played good in the
first quarter," coach Trey
Hosford said. "We took
good shots. We were 6-of-14
from the field. We shot well.
Then in the second quarter
we were 3-of-ll from the
field, and didn't make good
decisions offensively."
Columbia was again
outscored in the third
quarter as Gainesville


played better according
to coach Hosford, and the
Hurricanes took a 19-point
lead into the final period.
Despite falling to 0-2
in the district, the Tigers
have played some stellar
competition in their first two
games. Gainesville is the
defending state champion
and the Tigers other loss,
to Lee, was against a team
5-0 in the district.
"It will prepare us for
what's ahead," Hosford said.
There's still some very good
teams remaining, including
Fleming Island, who lost to
Gainesville 53-51. We're still
learning and it will help us
if we're willing to learn. We
just can't make the same
mistakes over and over. I
have no doubt that we'll
come out and work hard,
but we have to also work
smart."
The Tigers were led
by Dexter Dye and Ian
Benjamin, who scored 14
points each.

Lady Tigers weightlifting
Columbia High was
back in action on Tuesday
in a tri-meet against Fort
White and Suwannee high
.schools. The Lady Tigers
dominated the meet
defeating Suwannee 76-12


and Fort White 76-8.
Columbia placed . first
and second in every weight
class but the 119-pound
class, where the Lady
Tigers placed .first and
third.
Individual champions
were: Amanda Faulkner
(101), Phoebe Johnson
(110), Ashley Shaw (119);
Tara Stephens (129),
Alaina Timmons (139), Alix
Williams (154), Celeste
Gomez (169), Amanda
Roach (183), Dana Roberts
(199) and Shely Peloni in
the unlimited class.
The Lady Tigers meet in
Baker County at 4:30 p.m.
today.

Lady Indians soccer
The Lady Indians soccer
team lost, 6-0, in a district
matchup at Santa Fe High
on Monday.
Santa Fe improved to
6-4-1, while Fort White fell
to 2-6-4 overall and 0-4-3 in
District 5-3A.
The Lady Indians are off
until Jan. 6.

Fort White soccer
Fort White High's boys
soccer team squandered
PREP continued on 2B















Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
9:30 am.
STGC - European PGA Tour, South
African Open Championship, first round,
at Western Cape, South Africa (same-day
tale)
. NBA BASKETBALL
8:15 p.m.
. TNT - Orlando at Miami
10:30 p.m.
' TNT - Phoenix at Portland
PREP BASKETBALL
, P 7 p.m.
SESPN - Findlay Prep (Nev.) vs.
Northland (Ohio), at Westerville, Ohio
9 p.m.
SESPN - Waukegan (III.) vs. Ames
(Iowa), at Ames, Iowa
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
VOLLEYBALL
7 p.m.
'ESPN2 - NCAA Division I
tournament semifinal, Minnesota vs.Texas,
at Tampa
9 p.m.
ESPN2 - NCAA Division I
tournament, semifinal, Hawaii vs. Penn
State, at Tampa

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
- AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Mipmi
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo

x-lndianapolis
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Houston

Cincinnati
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


East
W L TPct PF PA
8 5 0.615348 234
7 6 0.538292 306
7 6 0.538275 211
5 8 0.385215 271
South
W L TPct PF PA
13 0 01.000359217
7 6 0.538235 287
6 7 0.462 293 323
6 7 0.462311 273
North
W L TPct PF PA
9 4 0.692264217
7 6 0.538319 218
6 7' 0.462 278 244
2 II 0.154158315


West
W L TPct PF PA
San Diego 10 3 0.769362 259
Denver 8 5 .0.615256 230
Oakland 4 9 0.308155 316
Kansas City 3 10 0.231206 342
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Philadelphia
Dallas
N.Y. Giants
Washington

x-New Orleans
Atlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay

y-Minnesota
Green Bay
Chicago
Detroit

Arizona
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis


East
W L TPct PF PA
9 4 0.692372 273
8 5 0.615296 233
7 6 0.538341 330
4 9 0.308234 251
South
W L TPct PF PA
13 0 01.000466274
6 7 0.462 302 305
5 8 0.385225 282
I 12 0.077 190 356
North
W L TPct PF PA
11 2 0.846 389 243
9 4 0.692 344 243
5 8 0.385247 291
2 II 0.154209406
West
W L TPct PF PA
8 5 0.615306258
6 7 0.462269 242
5 8 0.385250 301
I 12 0.077 146 361


x-clinched division
y-clinched playoff spot
: Today's Game
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday's Game
'Dallas at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Miami atTennessee, I p.m.
Arizona at Detroit, I p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Houston at St. Louis, I p.m.
Chicago at Baltimore, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants atWashington, 8:30 p.m.

Bowl games

Saturday
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque


Wyoming (6-6) vs. Fresno State (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)
St. Petersburg Bowl
Rutgers (8-4) vs. UCF (8-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Sunday
New Orleans Bowl
Southern Miss. (7-5) vs. Middle
Tennessee (9-3), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday
LasVegas Bowl
BYU (10-2) vs. Oregon State (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
Wednesday
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Utah (9-3) vs. California (8-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)

Playoffs

Football Championship Subdivision
Championship
Friday
At Finley Stadium/Davenport Field
Chattanooga,Tenn.
Villanova (13-1) vs. Montana (14-0),
8 p.m.

NCAA Division III
Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
Saturday
At Salem (Va.) Stadium
Wisconsin-Whitewater (14-0) vs.
Mount Union (14-0), II a.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Orlando at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
New Jersey atToronto, 7 p.m.
Utah at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Memphis, 8 p.m.
LA. Clippers at New York, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Denver at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland, 8 p.m.
Houston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Washington at Golden State,
10:30 p.m.


PREP: Indians return to action Jan. 5

Continued From Page 1B


an early 2-0 lead and- lost
to Lafayette High, 3-2, at
home on Tuesday.
The Indians scored both
goals before the first-half
water break.
On the first goal, Mac
Collins played a ball from
the right side to Brandon
Brooks who- got it to
Trevor Stout. Stout nailed


it from point-blank range.
Collins scored the second
goal with an assist from
Stout.
The Hornets tied the
game by halftime and
scored the winning goal
with .15 minutes left in the
game.
"I'm very disappointed
in our performance this


evening," coach Pete
Blanchard said. "We cannot
seem to put together 80
minutes of quality soccer."
Blanchard praised the
play of Anthony Fuller and
keeper Jbel Glenn.
Fort White's junior
varsity won, 3-0.
Fort White (1-5-3, 0-3-0)
returns to action on Jan. 5.


Get Cne.ctci www.lakecltyreporter.com

Oo 11 R eLake City
)fnil' Reporter


WOODS: Beat out Armstrong for 1st


Continued From Page 1B
pers that, are members of
the AP. More than half the
ballots were returned after
the Nov. 27 car accident
outside his Florida home
that set off sensational tales
of infidelity.
Lance Armstrong, a can-
der survivor who won the
Tour de France six times
this decade, finished sec-,
ond with 33 votes. He
was followed by Roger
Federer, who has won more
Grand Slam singles titles
than any other man, with
25 votes.
' Record-setting Olympic
simmerr Michael Phelps
came in fourth with 13 votes,
followed by New England
quarterback Tom Brady (6)
and world-record sprinter
Usain Bolt (4). Five other
athletes received one vote
apiece.
'Woods, who has not been
seen since the accident and
has issued only statements
on his Web site, was not
made available to comment


about the award.
Seattle Times sports edi-
tor Don Shelton discussed
the vote with his staff,
which he said was torn
among Woods, Armstrong
and Federer. He voted for
Woods in the early stages of
the scandal.
"I'm not sure I would
change my vote," Shelton
said. "I looked at him as an
athlete, I really did. I sepa-
rated him a little bit. If this
had happened three years
ago and his performance
had dropped off, that's a
different factor."
Allegations of rampant
affairs starting come out
just 10 days after Woods
won the Australian Masters
before record crowds for
the 82nd worldwide victory
of his career. He received a
$3 million appearance fee in
Australia, and the govern-
ment estimated a return of
$20 million from the number
of fans Woods attracted.
Few other athletes


changed their sport, from
TV ratings to galleries to
prize money.
A new image emerged
quickly in the days follow-
ing his middle-of-the-night
accident, when he ran his
SUV over a fire hydrant and
into a tree. He became the
butt of late-night TV jokes,
eventually confessed to infi-
delity and lost a major spon-
sorship from Accenture.
"Seems an unlikely time
to vote for him, but he had
more influence and impact
on the complete' decade,
2000 to 2009, than any of
the other athletes," said
Paul Vigna, sports editor
of The (Harrisburg, Pa.)
Patriot-News.
AP members found
Woods' work on the golf
course over the last 10 years
without much of a blemish.
He took an early lead in
the balloting, and contin-
ued to receive roughly the
same percentage of votes
throughout the process.'


BRIEFS


YOUTH BASEBALL
Travel team tryout

for 8U on Sunday
SAn open tryout for an
8-under travel baseball
team is 2 p.m. Sunday
at the Southside Sports
Complex. The team will
emphasize fundamental
baseball skills and play in
monthly tournaments from
February through May.
-For details, call
manager Todd Gustavson
at 365-2133 or coach David
Williams at (904) 2194577.


Gatorball Academy
offers camps
The Gatorball Baseball
Academy in Gainesville is
hosting camps
during December:
advanced pitcher and
catcher camp for ages
10-18 is 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday;
advanced hitting camp for
ages 8-13 is 9 a.m. to noon
Monday and Tuesday;
advanced hitting camp
for ages 14-18 is 1-4 p.m.
Monday and Tuesday;
defensive skills camp for
ages 13-18 is
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 28-29
at Buchholz High. Cost of


each camp is $100.
For details, call Stephen
Barton at (352) 514-4414.

CHS BASEBALL

Alumni Day events
set for Feb. 6

Columbia High baseball
has Alumni Day planned
for Feb. 6, beginning at



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

LYMAN


2009 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
AKARP



PHORTY
/i n


TANSEF
' ^\ ' " r^ -
__ / L__ 71 / _


10 a.m. There will be a
home run derby and
scrimmage game for the
alumni, followed by the
2010 team's purple and
gold game.
For details, see the CHS
Tigers Baseball Facebook
page or e-mail columbia
baseball@gmail.com.

* From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


WHAT THE SPACE
WALKER RESORTEP
TO WHEN A TOOL
FLOATED AWAY.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: "IT
(Answers tomorrow)
terda's Jumbles: KITTY BANDY GARLIC PALLID
Yesterday's
IAnswer: She quit working at the coffee shop because
of the - DAILY."GRIND"


ACROSS

1 Mountain pass
6 Pound sounds
11 Baking potato
12 Windy City airport
13 Seek to
persuade
15 Half-shell item
16 Arms.
position
18 Iris locale
19 Tiny circle
21 Pursue
22 Stand up
23 Caesar's
worst day
25 Metal in bronze
28 Stay clear of
30 NASA
counterpart
31 Kimono sash
32 Cartoon shriek
33 - ammoniac
35 Brush off'
37 Watchdog org.
38 Acorn, to an
oak
40 Toward shelter


41 Menacing
sound
42 Form 1.040 info
43 Possess
46 Skinflints
48 Sports palaces
50 Roman ship
54 More
unusual
55 Vee makers
56 Laundry
problems
57 Mandate

DOWN


Pen part
Kind of poem
Skosh
Fudged'
Horse's
ankle :
Toy on a string
(hyph.)
Querying
sounds
Overdue
Mice, to cats
Desiccated


Answer to Previous- Puzzle

SNIPE Q UARR


A. A D

T EIN IAN I IRA
O W LRR STALE


ETN AGO T R






S I E SI IO
MESSES SIEIAILIS


14 Emu relative
15 Reed
instruments
17 Workers in
clay
19 Did a belly-flop


Want more puzzles?
Check dut the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 12 13 14 15 6 17 18 19 110 I


20 Honshu port
22 Great Barrier-
24 Gazed upon
25 Labors
arduously
26 Peer Gynt cre-
ator
27 Reebok
rival
29 Lisper's
problem
34 Auspices
36 Gave a hard
time
39 Remnant
43 Paddle
cousins
44 Outer
garment
45 Despot who
fiddled
46 Fourth planet
47 Come unglued
49 Hockey goal
51 Grass skirt
go-with
52 PC key
53 Up till now


12-17 @2009 by NEA, Inc.


"'-j K . r< AdS 0


w














Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009 3B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


JUST THINK, HONEY...EIGHT TOP
COMPANIES 010 WORSE
THAN YOU 010

^--^ f
71 -I"
^ :^'^ ' I


DEAR ABBY


Elf's helpful hints ease kids'

first visit to Santa Claus


DEAR ABBY: It's that
time of year again when
parents take their kids to
see Santa. As a professional
Santa's helper, for many
years, may I offer some sug-
gestions?
Let your children ap-
proach Santa on their own.
Do not force your child to
sit on Santa's lap. Santa has
been seen in books and on
TV, but he is now real, big
and loud. That can be scary
to a child. If he or she wants'
to stand at a distance and
talk to Santa, that is OK.
Sometimes just holding the
child and standing next to
Santa is all it takes for a child
to warm up to the idea of sit-
ting on his lap.
If your little one is up-
set and you want a picture
with Santa, have someone
else snap the photo while
you stand by your child. Let
Santa talk to your children-
while you hold their hands.
Santa (if any good) will pace
the visit and stop it if it's tak-
ing too long. If children are '
afraid, do not let Santa grab
at them to put them on his
lap. That will only make the
problem worse.
I hope this helps to make
the visit easier. - SANTA'S
HELPER IN CENTRAL
ILLINOIS
DEAR SANTA'S HELP-
ER: Ho-ho-ho! Thank you for
being ABBY's helper today. I
hope parents will take your
sound suggestions to heart


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
when introducing their little
ones to the jolly man in the
red suit.
DEAR ABBY: I'm a re-
tired waitress who worked-
for years in a family restau-
rant. Many elderly people
would come in alone, and I
.could see they were hungry
for conversation as well as
food,. so I'd talk to them as
much as possible.
As the restaurant became
'more crowded, I had less
time to chat, so I set up a
table for four and asked the
seniors if they might like to
sit at the "senior table." So
many of the customers said
yes that it turned into a table
for 12!
It would be great if restau-
rants would set up senior ta-
bles so everyone could have
a dinner partner if they want-
ed to visit. It's also a great
way to make newi friends.
Now that I'm a senior myself
I notice a lot of us.sit alone,
watching families enjoy be-
ing together. - KATHY IN
BREMERTON, WASH.
DEAR KATHY: You're
a sweet 'and compassionate
woman. A few years ago I


heard about some restau-
rants here in Los Angeles of-
fering a "community dining"*
table for singles -' but they,
were intended to help young
singles mingle. Your idea of
a table for solo seniors is a
good one, and I hope restau-
rateurs agree and give it a
try. Food tastes better when
it's seasoned with good fel-
lowship.
DEAR ABBY: My ex-
wife recently remarried and
has decided to keep my last
name and hyphenate it with
her new husband's. She says
she's doing it "for the sake of
our children."
I don't buy'that for a min-
ute, Abby. She was unfaith-
ful many times during our
marriage, and I want her to
stop using my name so some
dignity and honor can be re-.
stored to it.
Do you agree that she
should drop my name, or
does she have a right to it? -
WANTS MY NAME BACK
IN MAINE
DEAR WANTS: Al
though I understand your
anger, try' to take comfort
in the fact that your ex still
finds prestige in the associa-
tion with you. Honor and dig-
nity will be restored to your
name by the way you and the
children conduct yourselves
in the future.
. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't take the
blame for/ something that
is out of your jurisdiction.
Follow a path that is doable
and you will excel. Use your
experience to acquire what
you want in the future. **,
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Spending on
something you really can-
Snot afford will lead to stress
but, if you use your imagina-
tion, you will come up with
an alternative that allows
you to please someone you
love and also save cash. A
trip will be the best'gift you
can offer. *****
GEMINI (May -21-
June 20): Don't confuse
issues by giving a false im-
.pression regarding the way
you feel about someone.
Get to the point. Honesty
and patience will pay off.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Emotions will
cause problems, especially
if you find it difficult to com-
plete a job someone is wait-
ing for you to finish. Time
is on your side and love is
likely to find its way back
into your heart if you are
patient. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You have to save your
money. It's never a good
thing to spend impulsively


THE LASr WORD
.EugeniaWord

or you let someone guilt
you into paying for his or
her needs.' Be strong and
budget wisely. ***.,*
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): A look at what's trans-
pired over the past year will
give you some good ideas
as to how you can make
next year better. Formulate
.your strategy and make
sure your goals are feasi-
ble. Let the people you care
about know how you feel.,

LIBRA (Sept. 23-
Oct. 22): An argument
will lead to a devastating
turn of events, so don't let
a disagreement turn into
something ugly. Back off,
compromise or do whatev-
er is necessary to keep the
peace. Use your insight and
creative awareness. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You will have to
spend a little time and mon-
ey in order to set' things
up for the future. You can
obtain the information or
skills required to get ahead
in the new year. Question
everything and everyone
before you make - your
move. ****
SAGITrARIUS (Nov.'
22-Dec. 21): Consider


who and what has been a
help and who and what has
been a hindrance this past
year and, eliminate whatev-
er is working against you.
Change, along with a sur-
prise, is heading your way.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): It may be
time to get rid of some of
the hangers-on. You have
more on the line than
you realize and, if you are
bogged down with other
people's problems, you
can't take advantage of the
opportunities heading your
way. Clear up unfinished
business. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan.
20-Feb. 18): Make your-
own choices but don't do
so without thinking mat-
ters through carefully. You
can do something that you
enjoy or you can continue
down the same old path that
leads nowhere. Set your
goals and stick to them and
help will be offered. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Mixing your
personal and professional
life can have its assets but
only if you feel secure.
Someone you think you can
trust will surprise you by
taking unexpected action.
Don't let anyone limit or
burden you. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: N equals W
"H DJJT X HBCPBCD PJ EL FHR
HZNHGR VLLC ZBUL H OWBLCT. BP
U L L X R .EL IJ E X H C G, .I J EOJWP R H C T
BCRXBWLR." - FLTG ZHEHWW

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "A thing of beauty is a joy forever." - John Keats
"For art may err, but nature cannot miss." - John Dryden

(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc. 12-17


FOR BETTER ORWORSE CLASSIC PEANUTS


4Tj.v

















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


-ADvantage
A~vant-


4lnes r6 days addional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling 500 or less





One item per ad
4 lines * 6 days h additional







4- lin es*6 yS line $1.45
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling SI,000 or less.
Each item must include a price.




S One ite per ad
4 lines 6 daysEach additional
Rate applies t private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling S2,5 or less.
Each Item must include a price.
This Is a nonrefundable rate.Ia




One item per ad I -
4 lines dayss ch additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling 4,0 or less. 0
S Each item must include a price




One item perad

iRate apple to private individuals selling














to m o h m d th in.
S personal merchandise totalling 6,000 or less.
I Eac u te an must Ince al pce.
This is a nonrefundab se rate.






$s2l750

IluedEI Siins l ,ttt iLir adt id er,,; 5



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s90.20
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $1.55 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.
CBSCline$.55


You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
SEMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
'porter.com


AdistoAppear. Call by: FaxEmail by:
Tuesday IVon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
.-W dnesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
-liday urs., 10:00 a.m. This.,9:00a.m.
Saturdayy Fri., 10:00 m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
*'*unday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
*These deadlines are subject to change mthout notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
Sment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
Reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print

and Online
w w.lalkecitvreporter.coin


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CASE NO; 09-0276-CA
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARY TUCK AKA MARY R.
TUCK et al.
Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated December 8, 2009, and
entered in Case No. 09-0276-CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Third Judi-
cial Circuit in and for Columbia
County, Florida, wherein BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A., is a plaintiff and
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIE-
NORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS BY
AND THROUGH UNDER OR
AGAINST THE ESTATE OF
MARY TUCK AKA MARY R.
TUCK, DECEASED; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2 are the Defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at 173 NE HERNANDO AVE-
NUE, COURT ROOM 1, LAKE
CITY, FL 32055, at 13 on'January,
2010, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT 1, FORT WHITE OAKS RE-
PLAT, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 41, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 9th day of December,
2009.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than seven (7) days prior,
contact the Clerk of the Court's disa-
bility coordinator at 904-958-2163,
P.O. BOX 1569, LAKE CITY, FL
32056. If hearing impaired, contact
(TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Re-
lay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
04536573
December 17, 24, 2009
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of M and M
Auto Sales at 1518 US 90 West,
Lake City, Florida 32055
Contact Phone Number: 386-755-
0630 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: Rountree Ford Lincoln Mer-
cury
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Grady Moore
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 14th day of December, A.D.
2009.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
04536619
December 17, 2009

Request For Proposals
The Union County Housing Authori-
ty is requesting proposals from quali-
fied individuals or firms for Techni-
cal Assistance. All interested persons
must be familiar with HUD regula-
tions. Proposals should be accompa-
nied by references and a resume for
consideration. The "Scope of Work"
can be obtained by contacting the
Union County Housing Authority
main office which is located at 715
West Main Street, Lake Butler, Flor-
ida 32054. Resumes, references and
proposals will be accepted until 4:00
PM December 30, 2009 and should
be sent to the Attention of the Execu-
tive Director using the above refer-
enced address.
04536579
December 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22,
23,2009
Public Auction
2000 Mercury UT
VIN# 4M2ZU66P5YUJ0003Z

in Columbia County.on January 11,
2009, at 10:00am at Auto Emporium,
2832 SE Main Blvd
Lake City Fl. 32025
04536628
December 17, 2009







Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service


Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
122008CA000605XXXXXX
THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF
THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2007-4,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MIGUEL A RODRIGUEZ; ET AL.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Summary Final
Judgment of foreclosure dated De-
cember 8, 2009, and entered in Case
SNo. 122009CA000605XXXXXX of
the Circuit Court in and for Colum-
bia County, Florida; wherein THE
BANK OF NEW YORK, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF
THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
SASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2007-4 is Plaintiff and MI-
GUEL A. RODRIGUEZ; MORT-
GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-
TION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMI-
NEE FOR AMERICA'S WHOLE-
SALE LENDER MIN NO. 1000157-
0007847755-7; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT NO 1; UNKNOWN TENANT
NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-
EST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at on the Courthouse Steps of
the Columbia County Courthouse,
145 N. Hemando Street, Lake City,
Florida 32055 at Columbia County,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 13 day
of January, 2010, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said
Order ot Final Judgment, to wit:
LOTS 1 THROUGH 6, EXCEPT
THE EAST 50 FEET OF LOT 6,
AND EXCEPT EAST 50.2 FEET
OF LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4 AND 5; AND
LOTS 11 THROUGH 14 AND THE
NORTH 30.0 FEET OF LOTS 15
THROUGH 18, AND THAT POR-
TION OF A 20 FOOT WIDE UN-
NAMED ALLEY ADJACENT TO
AND WEST OF THE WEST LINE
OF LOTS 1-6, BLOCK 19, AND
ADJACENT TO AND EAST OF
THE LINE OF LOT 11, BLOCK 19,
AND THE NORTH 30 FEET OF
LOT 18, ALL LYING IN BLOCK
19 IN MASON CITY, A SUBDIVI-
SION ACCORDING TO PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1 PAGE 31, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-'
sons needing special accommodation
to participate in this proceeding
should contact the Clerk of the Court
not later than five business days prior
to the proceeding at the Columbia
County Courthouse. Telephone 904-
758-1041 or 1-800-955-8770 via
Florida Relay Service.
DATED at Lake City, Florida on De-
cember 9, 2009.
P. DEWITT CASONy
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
04536571
December 17, 24, 2009

PUBLIC AUCTION
1988 FORD
VIN#2FABP73FOJX 116417
1999 TOY
VIN# NXBR12E1X7250097
1995 N1SSAN
VIN#1N4BU31DOSC167126
1998 FORD
VIN#1FAFP52U6WA 119747
1995 FORD
VIN#1 FMDU32X5SUA4/7873
To be held 12/30/09, 8:00 am at Bry-
ant's Tire and Towing 1165 East
Duval St. Lake City, FL 32055
04536626
December 17, 2009.

PUBLIC AUCTION
92 Dodge PU
VIN# 3B7ME33G2NM548659
90 Chevy PU
VIN# 1GCDK 14K4LZ216057
CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861
SALE DATE: January 5,,.2010
8:00AM

04536617
Decembber 17, 2009

PUBLIC AUCTION
1999 Ford
VIN# 3FAKP1133XR228755
CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861
SALE DATE: December 30, 2009
8:00AM
04536620
December 17, 2009

PUBLIC AUCTION
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 12/29/2009
Time: 8:00 A.M.
1994 Nissan


VIN# JN8HD17YORW217068
1993 Ford
VIN# 1FMDU32X2PUA40600
04536629
December 17, 2009


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 2007-000522-CA
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND
FINANCE, INC.
Plaintiff,
V.
THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, GRANT-
EES, DEVISEES, LIENORS,
TRUSTEES, AND CREDITORS OF
STELLA G. ENGMAN, DE-
CEASED,' AND ALL CLAIM-
ANTS, PERSONS OR PARTIES,
NATURAL OR CORPORATE,
AND WHOSE EXACT LEGAL
STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST STELLA G. ENGMAN,
DECEASED, OR ANY OF THE
HEREIN NAMED OR DESCRI-
BED DEFENDANTS OR INTER-
EST IN AND TO THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, et al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated December 8, 2009, in this
cause, I will sell the property situated
in COLUMBIA County, Florida, de-
scribed as:
LOT #5 BLOCK A COLUMBIA
ESTATES, SUBDIVISION AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 PAGE
134, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN 1988 BRIGADIER DOUBLE-
WIDE MOBILE HOME HAVING
VIN NUMBER 90617A AND VIN
NUMBER 90617B.
a/k/a Rt. 14 Box 268, Lake City, FL
32024
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 NW Her-
nando Ave., Lake City, Florida, at
,11:00 o'clock a.m., on January.13,
2009.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at Lake City, Florida, this 9
day of December, 2009.
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ R. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Douglas C. Zahm, P.A.
18820 U.S. Hwy. 19 N., #212
Clearwater, FL 33764
(727) 536-4911 phone
(727) 539-1094 fax
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES; IF YOU ARE A PER-
SON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION
IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN
THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO
YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF
CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE
CONTACT NANCY NYDAM AT
ROOM 205, COLUMBIA CQUN-
TY COURTHOUSE, P.O. BOX
1569, LAKE CITY, FL 32056, (904)
758-2163; SUNCOM 839-2163,
WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NO-
TICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR
VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL (904)
758-2139.
04536570
December 17, 24, 2009


020 Lost & Found

Lost your dog
about one week ago?
Call with correct description for
return. 386-623-2050

1 00n Job
A1 0 Opportunities

04536549

SAVAGE

Drivers Wanted
Savage Services is seeking
professional exp. drivers for the
Lake City facility.
Class A CDL with HAZMAT &
Tanker endorsements required.
* Competitive Pay
* Complete Benefit
Package including
401K
* Home Everyday
* Paid Holidays and
Vacations
* Quarterly Incentive
Bonus
Only serious applicants need
apply in person at:
Florida Crown Career
Center*
1389 W Hwy 90, Ste. 170.
Lake City, Florida.
* Located aross from Floridal
Highway Patrol Sltation

Gainesville/Ocala Plaintiffs
Personal Injury Firm seeking
litigation associate with 3-5 years
trial experience, preferably in Civil
Litigation. Salary and bonuses
commensurate with experience.
Please fax resume and cover letter
to (352)379-9007.


100 Job
Opportunities

04536592
Customer Service
Representative
Busy office needs self
motivator for a fast paced call
Center, great customer service
skills. Call center experience a
plus. Hours 8-5 Mon. - Fri.
Background check req'd.
Bilingual a plus (please
indicate). Send resume
to Joey Kitaif; P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, Fl. 32056.

Busy Law Office seeking highly
motivated dependable secretary for
FT position. Experience preferred,
salary based on experience.
Mail resume to PO Box 2064,
Lake City, Florida 32056
CLASS A CDL Long haul driver.
Must have frameless dump exp.
Must pass drug test. Requires out
of town travel . 386-719-9482
between 9A & 5p
International Company seeking
self motivated individuals for
direct marketing business.
$500-$1500/mo PT/FT Free info
www.income2profits.com
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.

120 Medical
2 Employment

04536638
RN NEEDED
The Health Center if Lake City
has an opening for an RN with
good assessment skills.
Excellent Salary.
EOE/ADA/Drug Free
Workplace. Apply in
person or send resume to:
The Health Center
of Lake City
560 SW McFarlane Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025

Busy Outpatient Surgery Center
has immediate openings. for
FT/PT RNs and Certified Surgical
Technicians. with previous
multi-specialty experience.
Please email resumes to:
administration Icsurgerycenter.com
or fax: 386-487-3935
DENTAL ASSISTANT needed
F/T position Mon - Fri 9-5.
Salary based on experience.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3122
LPN or RN needed On-call
3PM-11PM Lake CityCluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V
PT Medical Assistant for
busy medical clinic. Lake City
area. Send resume to:
836 SW Main Blvd. Ste. 102,
Lake City, Florida 32025

240 Schools &
2 0 Education

04536136
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

Wanted Career
Motivated Students!
If you are seeking a new career in
a high demand field, then get your
Degree or Certificate in Logistics
& Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available for
qualified students. Classes start
01/06/2009, call Lake City Com-
munity College, (386) 754-4492.


310 Pets & Supplies

AMERICAN
Singing Canary
$50
386-961-9188.
Apricot TOY POODLE CKC
(w/papers), shots & health cert.,
hold w/dep. til Christmas,
8wks -12/18 $400. 386-719-4900.
BEAUTIFUL CONGO
African Gray. 5 mo. old.
$650
386-961-9188 .
BEVERLY HILLS Chihuahua
look a like ,Female white. $200.
Cannot keep due to illness.
Has papers. 386-755-0340


310 Pets & Supplies

BLUE PIT bull puppy, male.
ADBA. Parents on Premisis. Shots
and health certs. $400.00
386-365-1740

CKC Toy Pekingese female.
Fawn/black mask. Under 10 lbs.
8 months. Spayed, all shots til
10/2010. $300. 386-963-1211
Female Poodle
White $400. Cannot keep
due to illness. Has papers.
386-755-03.40
Free bird/hunting dog
of some sort.
Female, 1-2 y/old, stray.
Very good dog. 386-752-0523
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
LOOK, Registered Quarter horse,
mare with papers, plus 2 horse
trailer with tack room, $2,500
OBO, Call 386-752-6724

360 Feed, Seed
3J60 & Plants

LIVING CHRISTMAS TREES
Beautiful Leyland Cypress 15 gal,
locally grown, delivery available.
386-688,2057


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

FROST FREE Refrigerator.
White 18 cu ft.
Works godd. $150.00
386-754-9295 or 984-0387


403 Auctions

04536471
PUBLIC AUCTION
Trucks, Vehicles, Tractors,
Misc. Tools.
Consignments Welcome
Sat. Dec. 19th at 9am
6 mi. West of 1-75 on US 90'
Atkinson Realty & Auction
AB 1141 800-756-4098
www.atkinsononline.com'


408 Furniture

LIKE NEW! Nice King Size
Pillow top bed. Matching set
$250.00. or make offer.
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.

Like New: Simmons sofas, end
tables, Dixie Wicker Bedroom
Suite, Broyhill China/Hutch, Table
& Chairs; 15' Glass/Brass Wall
Units & More. Please call to set an
appointment, 1-386-438-0285
or 1-813-951-7289
Toddler bed
red race car, with mattress,
rarely used. $100.00
386-623-4064

41 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315

411 Machinery &
411- Tools

Craftsman 10in radial arm saw.
Excellent condition on Craftsman
rolling cabinet, asking $275.00.
386-754-1747


416 Sporting Goods

GUN SHOW
Live Oak Armory
Dec. 19th Sat. 9-5 Dec 20 Sun 9-4.
CANCELED WEAPONS
CLASSES DAILY.
BRING YOUR GUNS TO
SELL OR TRADE.
GunTraderGunShows.com


taah lh WIh hroIIn exp [Hien
Fa Rsmet


New Home Sales


Consultant Wanted

Excellent Commission Based

Pay and Benefits

Fax Resume to 509-756-2869

or email mh newhomeiobs@vahoo.com


I Maronda, Homes
p L^ /<� /^^H, �?^iAu-w^r ^^^-^*k A fwi^


BUY IT


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Classified Department: 755-5440


418 Toys
New Great Railroad Empire train
Battery operated w/4'x9'6" oval
Sound & Its works $50. before 1 la
386-758-1358 or 7p-10p 752-3491

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER.
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
We Buy Junk: cars, trucks,
tractors, trailers, scrap metal,
AC's and batteries. NO MH's
Call 386-965-1423 or 365-4879

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat. 8am-noon. 441N, Rt on Gum
Swamp, 3rd House on Left. Furni-
ture, electronics, kids & women
clothes, toys, books & more.

440 Miscellaneous
12 CHRISTMAS dinner plates,
pine cone design.
$10.00.
Call 386-754-5536.
2-15" ALUMINUM wheels
4 lug pattern, Ford Stock.
$100.00
386-365-1075
4 Aluminum wheels.
265/75 R16 w/tires; 6 lug pattern
Chevrolet Escalade Stock $250.
386-365-1075
5-Men's wrist watches. 2-Timex 1
is a Ironman. 1-Seiko, 1-Titan, 1-
Accutime. All for $75.00. (H) 386-
754-3726 or (C) 904-246-3857.
5-Men's wrist watches. 3-Timex
(1 is an Ironman) 1-Seiko, 1-Titan,
All for $60. (H) 386-754-3726 or
(C) 904-246-3857.
New weather proof, color security
camera, w/nite vision/microphone.
$100. before 1la 758-1358 .
7p-10p 758-1358
Queen size white goose down
comforter. Asking $60.00
Make reasonable offer 963-1211


450 Good Things
to Eat
PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-7.52-6896 or 697-6420
The Nutcracker We buy and sell ,
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

63 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2 br/2 full bath MH
ready to rent Ft White & on
private property. $600.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2& 3br off 252 in Suwannee
County. No pets (horses OK)
1st month & deposit.
386-961-1482.
2B/2BA HOUSE
$500 a month.
$500 deposit
Call 954-258-8841
2br/2ba MH. on 1/2 ac. lot.
Nice area. Call to see!
$600 mo. $600 security
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 security deposit.,
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
3/2, w/ screened porch. Quiet,
clean country park. No pets.
$550.mo + Deposit. References
required. 386-758-2280.
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. lst,'& security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in Branford
area.$500 security, $700.mo
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3br/2ba MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500. move in. $575. mo.
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Nice 4b/2ba on 3 ac. 3 mi.out Ft
White, off CR 18. Niblack Ave.
Ne* CH/A. porch. .$750. mo plus
dep. no pets 386-497-1144. Jerry
Remodeled 3/2 DWMH's. Include
yard maint. & yearly carpet clean-
ing Shady Oaks. S of town on 441.
$650.mo. 386-208-4702
VERY CLEAN 2b/2ba. Covered
patio, front & back. No pets. State
Rd 100 @ Union County line.
$600 month. Call 904-966-0765.
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830

-Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
04 PALM 2000sf. 3br/2ba (Never
lived in) Was $88K now $60K.
$450mo w/$3200 cash. First Home
Buyer. Plywood floors, Smart
Panel lap siding, (2) patio doors,
office retreat. Includes: Del & Set.
Gary Hamilton (386)758-9824
650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
Modular, New, 3br/2ba,
1/2 acre close in, Higher insulated
plus windows, driveway, decks,
and much more. Reduced to sell.
Possible Owner Finance.
Gary 386- 758-9824
www.garyhamiltonhomes.com
Owner Financing. 2 Ig. MH's
w/acreage. Jasper, Lake City.
Pond. $725-$900mo.
386-590-0642/867-1833


LAKE CITY REPORTER


71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

! LUXURY HOMES !
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649 per mo. !!!

$299 MOVES YOU IN

FREE RENT
* 200 FREE CHANNELS
. BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

!!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423


m


04536086
Sugarmill Apts
Lake City, FL
386-758-5505
Move in Special $500. dep
1st month Rent Free!
/ 2Br/2Ba.
Rent $725 ~ Deposit $500
/ 3Br/2Ba
Rent $795.~ Deposit $500
Pets are Welcome

1700 sf X-Clean 2/2 second
story, deck, trees, private country
acre on NW side. $600 mo + dep.
No dogs 386.961.9181
2BR/1BA DUPLEX Apt.
$565. mo includes water,
sewer and garbage.
386-965-2922
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Extremely Clean
$650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
Ig master br, very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, Iv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Studios & IBr's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

7 0 Furnished Apts.
2 v For Rent
1 ROOM furnished
efficiency. Lights, water
and cable included.
$350. mo. 386-758-5671
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT
Cable & all utilities included.
$500. mo. & $150. Sec Dep.
386-697-9950
Great Country Living. Furnished
Park Model Trailers. $500 per
month all utilities provided. Call
386-961-8540/386-755-4945
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
24 hour office, laundry & vending
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/2.5BA, Fireplace, fenced
back yard, hardwood floors.
Lake Forest area. $900. mo.
386-755-2672
3BR/2BA BRICK Home
in town. $850/mo.
$500. security deposit.
386-365-8721
3BR/2BA Brick w/2 car garage,
CH/A, at 101 SW Hummingbird
Glen. $900. mo. $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
3BR/2BA on 10 ac., LR, DR,
fireplace, deck, CH/A, shed w/
shop area. $650. mo $650. dep.
904-964-2210 or 904-796-7777
A 4BR 2BA HUD Home!
ONLY $215/mo!!
5%dn 15yrs @ 8%apr for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7782
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.
Cute 2/1, 414 SE Lomond. CH/A,
Washer/Dryer, Fenced, Dogs OK.
$625 per mo + utils OR $250 wk
including the utifs. Go look
through the windows & then call
Florida Homes & Land 755-5936
or email john@johnstanford.com
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082


CLASSIFIED


73 Unfurnished
730lHome For Rent
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/JS90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
Office Space For Rent near down-
town Lake City. Single offices or
whole Building. - Very affordable.
Please GCall 386-628-2228
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135


770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$1000 mo, $1000 dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 2000+sf on .5acre built 2007
many extras, stonehenge S/D,
privacy fence, spring. sale/rent/
lease. $185k. 850-380-0275
HURRY LAST CHANCE
$8000 F.T.HB credit
New 3/2 Modular 1200 sf
1/2 acre upscale& close-in
loaded Decks Driveway A/C
well septic concrete foundation
$665 mo w/ 4K dn Owner finance
avail Gary (386) 758-9824 or
garyhamiltonhomes.com

820 Farms&
Acreage
10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

940 Trucks
1995 FORD XLT extra cab.
Centurion pkg. Matching topper.
Auto., showroom cond. $3,500.
(352)339-5.158
1996-3500 CHEVROLET, 4WD
Dually, 454 motor, AT, Good
mechanical condition. $5,900. obo
386-755-4896 or 397-4849
2007 Toyota Tundra SR5 Double
Cab 26,000 miles 8 Cylinder
TRD 4X4 $22000 firm
Call 386-688-1023 for details

950 cars for Sale
2003 VW JETTA GL
$4,300.00
386-365-3326

97 Lincoln Towncar
108.345 miles. AC,
Runs great. $2695.00 obo.
386-752-4855

952 Vans & Sport
S952Util; Vehicles
2000 Chevy Blazer LT
58,000 Miles, new tires, fully
powered, showroom condition.4
$5,800. Call 386-623-3417



Contact us

at the paper.





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SUBSCRIPTION
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Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of.
the vehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2005 Ford F-150 XLT
Super Cab, 4 wheel drive,
26,000 miles, 1 owner,
excellent condition.
$19,500 consider trade-in
Call
386-752-1364
386-965-4340



*' - --

2007 Toyota
Tundra SR5
Double Cab, 26,000 miles, 8
cylinder, TRD 4x4.
$22,000 firm
Call
(386)688-1023


4WD dually, 454.motor, AT,
good mechanical condition,
$5,900 obo
(386)755-4896


2003 VW Jetta
GL

$4,300

(386)365-3326





Online


1 low Price!


Fo MreDeais al Mr
at3B-75-54













6B LAKE CITY REPORTER NASCAR THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2009


By RICK MINTER / Cox Newspapers







Getting ready for






Danica's arrival


Indy star announces she will drive part


S anta came early for
NASCAR in the form of
an announcement by
Danica Patrick that she
would be working in a par-
tial Nationwide Series sched-
ule around her full-time gig
in IndyCar.
The news comes at a time
when interest in NASCAR,
both at the track and on the
tube, seems to have stalled.
And for a sport that has
faced complaints about its
drivers being too "vanilla" to
suit many fans, Patrick like-
ly will be anything but.
Without ever turning a lap
in her No. 7 JR Motorsports
Chevrolet, Patrick has
become the talk of the
NASCAR town.
Will she be able to succeed
in a form of racing where
Many other, more experi-
enced and better creden- .
tialed Indy car veterans have
-failed miserably? How will
those inside the NASCAR
.garage react to her? How will
'fans react? Will she at some
:point advance to the Cup cir-
cuit and how will she do
there?
NASCAR champion driv-
er-turned-TV commentator.
Darrell Waltrip said in a
Speed TV interview that
Patrick faces a rough road
ahead.
"It's going to be an incredi-
bly challenging undertaking
and not just from the pure
difficulty of racing two com-
pletely different race cars,"
Waltrip said. "The schedul-
ing and the pressure to per-
form will be demanding as
well. Stock cars are like
wrestling bears. They're not
precise and quick-responding
like an Indy car."
Waltrip also pointed out
that Patrick will be in
Hendrick Motorsport� equip-
ment, which means there
will be no blaming the car
for poor performances.
"She'll have all the right
equipment and ingredients
to have a fair chance to suc-
ceed," he said. "I just think
the pressure of performing
and being as good as people
expect her to be is probably
more than any person can
handle."
Patrick acknowledged on a
NASCAR teleconference last
week that the task ahead will
be challenging, but she said
she's ready for it.
"I think as a naturally
competitive person - you
can pretty much ask anyone


time in Nationwide Series


Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Danica Patrick will work in a partial Nationwide Series schedule around her full-
time gig in IndyCar.


- you're always looking for
the next challenge," she said.
"There are still plenty of
challenges in IndyCar. I want
to win a lot more races, and I
want to win the Indy 500.
But I've had the ability to go
beyond that right now, and I
think that's really exciting."
She said one of the things
that attracted her to
NASCAR was the style of
racing, which is similar in
some ways but otherwise
very different from what
she's used to on the open-
wheel circuit.
"It's very side-by-side, lots
of passing, lots going on all
the time," she said. "I enjoy
that part of IndyCar racing.
So it's really an extension of


that.
"Obviously it's going to
feel much different, and
that's part of the process of
learning. I'm going to have to
figure out what that means
[and] how that translates
into a feeling for me. It's
going to be a challenge.
There's no doubt about it.
But that's one of the things
I'm looking forward to - the
racing."
Patrick's crew chief will be
Tony Eury Jr., who has spent
time working for his cousin
Dale Earnhardt Jr. and is
considered one of the
smartest strategists in
NASCAR, and a good people
person.
Patrick found that out for


herself during a recent photo
shoot.
"I couldn't eat the pizza
that was there, so [Eury]
said, After your photo shoot,
I'm going to send you some
Krispy Kreme doughnuts,'"
she said. "And sure enough, I
was at a photo shoot the day
after, and I had eight boxes of
Krispy Kreme doughnuts
[show up]. Eight boxes!"
Patrick also seems to have
developed a good relation-
ship with one of her new
bosses and team owners,
Dale Earnhardt Jr.
"He's a really nice guy,"
Patrick said. "I have a lot of
respect for him, and I have a
lot to learn from him. We get
along great."


5 Bonus points earned by
David Starr for leading laps
in the Camping World Truck
Series, the fewest of any
driver in the top 10 in the
final points standings


Lowe's Motor Speedway

seeking fan feedback

Almost anyone who has ever attended a NASCAR
race has things they like and dislike about the expe-
rience. The folks at Lowe's Motor Speedway want
your irput. Track officials are recruiting race fans
to join the 2010 Lowe's Motor Speedway Fan
Council, a 30-member group that has been in exis-
tence since 2008.
An application is available on the speedway's
Web site, www.lowesmotorspeedwaycom. Submit
the form by Jan. 8.
Members of the fan council join speedway man-
agement for conference calls, participate in post-
race surveys, attend meetings at the speedway dur-
ing race weekends and are a part of online fan
forums.
"We strive to be the greatest speedway in the
world, and with the help of our Fan Council we're
working on improvements to be even more fan-
friendly," Marcus Smith, president and general
manager of Lowe's Motor Speedway, said in a press
release. "The fans are the backbone of our speed-
way, and we try to do everything with them in
mind."

Awards show sees spike in TV ratings
While'TV ratings for Sprint Cup races sagged for
much of the season, the numbers for the Awards
Ceremony from Las Vegas posted the highest num-
bers in three years. The four-hour show on SPEED
drew a Nielsen rating of .65 (484,000 households).
and peaked at .79 (588,000 households).
A release from SPEED said the ratings were up 44
percent year-to-year among households and 52 per-
cent among men age 18-49.
"We've seen some very encouraging NASCAR rat-
ings trends on SPEED this year," network president
Hunter Nickell said in a statement. "Getting a solid
Number out of the gate with the Awards Ceremony
has us very excited about what this event can
become in the very near future for the network and
for the sport."
SPEED also saw ratings increases for many of its
NASCAR-related programs including broadcasts of
Camping World Truck Series, which posted ani aver-
age Nielsen rating of .81 (597,000 households). That
was one percent better than last year and 35 percent
better than 2003, the first year that the network car-
ried the truck series.

Fuge named crew chief for Hornaday
The off-season shuffling of crew chiefs isn't just
in the Cup series.
Kevin Harvick Inc. announced last week that
Dave Fuge would take over the crew chief duties on
the team's championship-winning No. 33 driven by .
Ron Hornaday Jr.
Rick Ren, who had held that job, moved to Kyle
Busch's new truck team. And Doug George, who
worked with Busch at Billy Ballew Motorsports ear-
lier this year, moves over to KHI as crew chief of
the No. 2 truck, which is driven by several drivers
including the team owner, Harvick.
The changes mean that all three crew chiefs at
KHI, including Ernie Cope with the team's No. 33
Nationwide Series entry, as well as Harvick and
Hornaday are from the West Coast.

Farm Bureau ending sponsorship
Rumors of increased participation in NASCAR
by Farm Bureau Insurance apparently are not true.
A statement on the Farm Bureau Racing Web site
indicated that the insurer, which had been backing
a NationWide Series team and a Cup team on a part-
time basis at Joe Gibbs Racing, was leaving the
sport.

Addington swapping Busch brothers
NASCAR crew chief Steve Addington'has moved
.from working with one Busch brother to the other.
After being relieved from his duties overseeing
Kyle Busch's No. 18 team at Joe Gibbs Racing,
Addington is moving to Penske Racing, where he'll
run the No. 2 Dodge team for the older Busch broth-
er, Kurt. The 45-year-old Addington, who worked
with Kyle Busch to score 12 Sprint Cup victories
over the last two seasons, will take the job vacated
by Pat Tryson, who led Kurt Busch to two wins and
a fourth-place finish in the 2009 Cup standings.


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