Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text











1 ndians fall
12011 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIE OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


City


Pioneer lost
Renowned evangelist
Oral Roberts dies at
the age of 91.
Nation, 6A






Rep


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 135, No. 285 0 75 cents


Dress for success


Department of Motor Vehicles Supervisor Jana Cribbs (left) and deputy clerks Lacie Blakley and Sherrie Gail Thomas, of
the Dress Down Committee, pack children's presents for local organizations. The Committee raised $1,450 for local
organizations.

Wearing jeans to work raises $1,45


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakbcityreporter.com

the Columbia
County Tax
Collector's
office have
raised $1,450 this year just
-by wearing blue jeans to
work.
Deputy Clerk Lacie
Blakley, DMV Supervisor
Jana Cribbs and Deputy
Clerk Sherrie Thomas are
the co-chairs of the office's
Dress Down Committee
and said they presented
the idea of wearing blue .
jeans at work in order to
raise money for local orga-
nizations.
"They liked to wear blue
jeans so much they were
willing to pay for it," said
Ronnie Brannon, Columbia
County tax collector.
Brannon said the office
has always had dress
down Fridays, and now
office workers pay $2 on
Monday and Wednesdays
if they want to wear blue
jeans to work.
This tradition has contin-
ued for the past six years,


Columbia County Tax Collector Ronnie Brannon poses with Cribbs, Thomas and Blakley, who
are among some of the office workers that pay $2 oh Mondays and Wednesdays. The
donations raised were given to local chapters of the March of Dimes, the American Cancer
Society, the Dream Machine and the United Way.


said Brannon, and Blakley
said that some employees
will donate money to the
Dress Down Committee's
fund without even dressing


d6wn.
The money aised this
year was given to local
chapters of the March
of Dimes, the American


Cancer Society, Dream
Machine and United Way,
and the majority of the
JEANS continued on 3A


Chamber to host

prison meeting

on Thursday


Informational
meeting at 4 p.m.
Thursday at LCCC.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Federal Bureau, of
Prisons proposal to con-
tract for a privately owned
and operated prison :in
Columbia County �has
drawn much attention
during the past. six
months.
The, proposal to house
1,268 male, low security
criminal illegal aliens in
the privately operated cor-
rectional facility has led to
numerous questions from
local and state officials who
have cited concerns about
funding, inmates, facility
location and infrastructure
needs.
During the Federal
Bureau of Prisons last pub-
lic hearing on Nov. 17, offi-
cials noted they would not
be answering any questions
about the proposed facility,
but were there to record
comments.
To get more information
about the proposed prison
out.to the local public, the
Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce has
scheduled an informational
meeting.
That meeting is 'sched-
uled for 4 p.m. Thursday at
the Lake City Community
CollegeMedicalTechnology
Building.
'The meeting is mainly
going to be an open ques-
tion format," said Lake City
Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce Board of
Directors President Chris
Bullard. "We have a con-
sultant from a construction
company for the proposed
prison coming and we have
a handful of municipal lead-
ers invited that have con-
firmed their attendance.
It's going to be more of an
open forum/question-and-
answer session."
Bullard would not elabo-
rate on who has confirmed
attendance for the public
meeting, but noted invi-
tations were sent to rep-
resentatives . from the
Columbia County Industrial
Development Authority,
county commissioners, the


INSIDE

* IDA officials meet
with state, national
representatives, 3A

city manager, representa-
tives from the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board,
chamberof commerce mem- :
bers and Columbia County
Sheriff Mark Hunter.
"We're going to try to
present the pro and the con
side for the proposed pris-
on," Bullard said.
Columbia County IDA
executive
director
Jim Poole
said he is
'"' i uncertain
" whether
he'll be
able to
Bullard attend the
meeting.
"I'm still trying to juggle
this schedule to see wheth-
er I can get there," he said.
"It was scheduled before
they checked to see wheth-
er we were available."
Poole said Marc Vann,
who is chairman of the Lake
Shore Hospital Authority
Board and also a member of
the Columbia County IDA
board of directors, is sched-
uled to attend the meeting,
but Poole could not verify
that Vann would represent
IDA in addition to the hos-
pital authority.
The meeting is expected
to last at least an hour and
LCCC executive director of
media and community infor-,
mation, Mike McKee, will
serve as the event's emcee
and facilitate the meeting.
.Bullard will introduce the
consultant from Texas and
tell the audience how the
meeting is going to flow.
"McKee will actually go
around with the micro-
phone and let people ask
questions and respond to
comments," Bullard said.
'The chamber of commerce
has not really opened up a
venue for its members to
get information on the pro-
posed prison. The cham-
ber of commerce board of
directors believed it was
important to have some-
thing for chamber mem-
bership to be informed on
the proposed prison."


Grinch won't ruin Christmas for local group Mi 0


Thieves steal
gifts from local
organization.
By TROY ROBERTS
troberts@lakecityreporter.com
When Sandra Tice dis-
covered in August that her
Christmas gifts for local chil-
dren had been stolen, she
said it brought her to tears.
When she found out Friday
that the decorations for the
Christmas party also had
been taken, it almost ruined
her Christmas spirit
Almost.
Authorities are still


searching for the culprits
behind the two incidents,
but Tice is still going
ahead with this week-
end's Christmas party for
local children, thanks in
part to support 'from the
community.
Tice, who is involved
in various programs local-
ly, runs the "Chances for
Children" program, a faith-
based initiative that works
with family services to help
keep children out of foster
care and in the home, as
well as ensuring the safety
of children. The annual
Christmas party is sched-
uled to take place from 2:30


p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Sunday
at the old Hopkins 'Motor
Company building.
But the party was in
doubt in August after Tice
discovered that many of the
toys - which were stored
in a barn on her property
- had.been stolen. Many
of the gifts had been pur-
chased throughout the year,
she said, and stored for the
annual Christmas party.
But local residents helped
out, making donations and
sponsoring children for the
event.
"I've always been very
proud of this community,"
Tice said. "They've always


stepped up for my kids and
whatever programs I've
represented."
But then during the week-
end, Tice made another dis-
covery - the Christmas
decorations for the event
also had been stolen.
"I would just like for.
them to think about what
they have done and how it
is affecting the children,"
Tice said about thos6 who'
stole the items. "A lot of
that stuff had sentimental
value. I've had children
who would buy me items
that were decorations on
GRINCH continued on 3A


Firefighters respond to fire
Lake City Fire Department firefighters exit a Lomond Avenue
home Tuesday morning after being dispatched to the home
for an oven fire. Lake City Fire Department assistant chief
Frank Armijo said the only damage was to the home's stove
and noted there were no flames to extinguish.
6rI3�3.,aiW*vaaa-Ej w 'IA rrrf - -*r^ iva ws


1 84264002 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


64 43
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


'Opinion ......... ......
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles :......... ......


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Rebound may
not last.


COMING
THURSDAY
Time capsule
memories.


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Lake


Wednesday, December 16, 2009


_ � 1. I II II


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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009 Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430
Celebrity Birth ys
Celebrity Birthdays


Z H 3 .Tuesday: *
Afternoon: 8-1-6
Evening: 1-5-3


risk of signing multimil-
lion-dollar contracts with
celebrity endorsers? The
self-destruction of Tiger
Inc. has some saying the billion-dol-
lar athlete may be a thing of the'past
Celebrity endorsers can help
boost both the sale of products
and their maker's image. But
Woods' hasty and stunning down-
fall shows how quickly things
can sour when a superstar ath-
lete's life choices are exposed in
a negative light by today's real-
time tabloid news culture.
Companies "want a safe choice
'and it seems like there's almost
no safe choice out there," said
Laura Ries, president of market-
ing consulting firm Ries & Ries.
Woods and his advisers spent
years cultivating a good-guy
image to go along with his win-
ning ways, which is how he
became sports' first - and per-
haps last - $1 billion earner. It's
also what has made his fall even
more jarring.
Most of Woods' $100 million in
annual earnings came not from
tournament winnings but from
companies like Accenture that
wanted to be associated with his
persona. These image ads are
the types that are least likely to
endure. Ultimately that could
mean few other sports figures
will follow in Tiger Woods' lucra-
tive footsteps..

Chapman of '30 Rock'
needs kidney transplant
LOS ANGELES - Actor Grizz
Chapman of "30 Rock" said
Monday he needs a kidney trans-
plant and wants to raise aware-
ness of the dangers of high blood
pressure, which led to his condi-
tion.
Chapman said he is receiving


Tu:e, ' Tuesday:
Afternoon: 4-4-7-7
Evening: 9-4-9-1


ezrnatchz
Monday:
3-11-12-13-16


1H


A passenger walks past an Accenture advertisement featuring Tiger Woods at San
Francisco International Airport, Monday. Accenture, which pinned its entire identity
on the golfer, severed its ties with Woods on Sunday, days after he announced an
indefinite leave from golf to work on his marriage after allegations of infidelity sur-
faced in recent weeks.


SDdialysis treat-
ments and will
continue to play
Grizzwald on the
NBC sitcom. He
and Kevin Brown,
as the character
Chapman Dot Com, appear
Chapman as the two-man _
entourage for a hapless comedian
played by Tracy Morgan.

Sports Illustrated puts
Colbert on cover
NEW YORK - Stephen
Colbert has joined
the legions of
Athletes and swim-
suit models to
grace the cover of
Sports Illustrated.
The host of
S Comedy Central's
Colbert "The Colbert


Report" appears on the front of
the magazine's, latest issue'wear-
ing an Olympic speedskating
Uniform. The issue is devoted to
sports media, It's on newsstands
today.

Cobain's mother becomes
granddaughter's guardian
SLOS ANGELES - The only
daughter of Kurt Cobain and
Courtney Love has been placed in
a temporary guardianship, court
records show. .
A Los Angeles Superior Court.
commissioner granted control over
Frances Bean Cobain, 17, to Kurt
Cobain's mother Wendy O'Connor
and his sister Kimberly Dawn
Cobain.
The court filing does not mention
Love or give a reason for the guard-
ianship.
* Associated Press


* Civil rights attorney Morris
Dees is 73.
* CBS news correspondent
Lesley Stahl is 68.
* TV producer Steven
Bochco is 66.
* Actress Alison LaPlaca is


.50.
* Actor Sam Robards is 48.
* Actor Jon Tenney is 48.
* Actor Benjamin Bratt is 46.
* R&B singer Michael
McCary is 38.
* Actress Hallee Hirsh is 22.


Daily Scripture

"But the angel said to her,'Do not
be afraid, Mary, you have found
favor with God.You will be with
child and give birth to a son, and


you are to give him
-1 Jesus."'


the name


- Luke 1:30-31
Thought for Today
"Any sufficiently advanced tech-
nology is indistinguishable from
magic."
-- Arthur C. Clarke,
British science-fiction author (1917-2008)

Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an..affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
Ilshed.Tueday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra.' 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press. :
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla 32056.
Published Todd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityTeporter.com)
NEWS
SIf you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
S(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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' should .be completed .by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Sa.rxfion Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
� In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day.re-delivery. After
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v ice related credits will be issued.
SIn all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued. :
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(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com) !
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks........... ..,. . $26.32
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Rates include 7% salestax. '
Mail rates
S12Weeks................ . 1.40
24 Weeks.................$82.804
52 Weeks..... ........ .$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Informant murder
case goes to jury
TALLAHASSEE -
Jurors have begun deliber-
ating the fate of one of two
men charged with murder-
ing a recent Florida State
University graduate while
acting as an undercover
police informant in a drug
sting that went bad.
In closing arguments,
a defense lawyer said
Deneilo Bradshaw, 24,
was guilty of no more than
theft because two jailhouse
informants testified his co-
defendant admitted he was
the killer.
Prosecutors said it didn't
matter who pulled the trig-
ger because both robbed
Rachel Hoffman, 23, of her
car and $13,000 police had
given her to buy drugs in
May 2008.

Reggae star denies
drug charges
MIAMI - Buju
Banton's attorney says his
client "vigorously denies"
charges that he tried to
buy a large amount of
cocaine from an under-
cover police officer.
Herbert E. Walker III
said he looks forward to
representing Banton in
court, but he would not
discuss the case further.
A U.S. Drug
Enforcement
Administration affidavit
says Banton and two other
men traveled to Sarasota
last week to make the pur-
chase.

Man killed by
dinner train
NORTH FORT MYERS
- A man lying on train
tracks in southwest Florida
was struck and killed by a
dinner train hosting a holi-
day-themed party.
Lee County Sheriff's
Office detectives said the
crash happened shortly
after 9 p.m. Monday night.


MOSTLY CHANCE
CLOUDY T-STORMS


HI 64 LO 45 HI 63 L040


. I I I I. : I


The takeover begins
Florida State offensive coordinator Jimbo Fisher speaks at..
a news conference, Monday in Tallahassee. Fisher will take
over as head coach of the Seminoles following the Gator
Bowl game.


Seminole Gulf Railway
spokesman Harry Neeves
said the victim was lying
on the tracks in a fenced
in area.

Man hit by bear,
may face charges
LONGWOOD -A bear
that swatted Ernest David
Stamm, 49, in the face
has been euthanized, and
officials say the man may
have been illegally feeding
the bears.
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
spokeswoman Joy Hill
says the 200-pound female
bear had to be euthanized
because it was a public
risk.
The bear matched the
description of the one that
struck Stamm outside
his front door last week.
Stamm was treated for
lacerations to one eye and
his nose.

Wayward manatee
to be released
MIAMI - Ilya, the way-
ward manatee, is being
released into the South
Florida waters.
Ilya's release from the
Miami Seaquarium was


.planned for Tuesday morn-
ing. The 1,300-pound sea
cow has been undergoing
rehabilitation there.
Ilya was flown south
aboard a Coast Guard
C-130 cargo plane after
being rescued from a small
waterway between north-
ern New Jersey and Staten
Island, N.Y.

Officer cleared in
man's shooting
NORTH PORT - A
North Port police officer
has been cleared in the
shooting death of a man in
November.
Officer William Carter
has been on administra-
tive leave since the late
November shooting while
the Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office and state
prosecutors reviewed the
case. Monday's determina-
tion by the state attorney
clears Carter to return to
work.
The Sarasota County
Sheriff's Office says Alan
Provencal shot his wife
in a courthouse parking
lot near Venice in late
November. Carter was the
only officer to fire a weap-
on during the standoff.
* Associated Press-


Valdosta
. 65/41 . Jackson
Tallahassee. * LakeCity, 162/
..�, ; 66/43 ... 64/43.
S, . ' Gainesville . at
enLsacla - "66/49 71
61/43 Panama Ciy 66/49
66/46 . : ". Ocala *
'... ,71/53 *
- . * , . . ' " . ' ' .'.- .. - ' Odarndo
S', " /. 75/59
Tampa *
76/61./ W


nville
45

na Beach
957 ,/ ,


est Palm
82/6


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Thursday
;3 65, i,
7 0/6/t
78/69/t
78/62/t
66/50/sh
64/49/c
77/67/sh
64/45/pc
80/69/t
79/66/t
70/53/sh
73/60/t
62/50/t
61/49/s
63/49/t
74/59/t
64/47/c
78/69/t


Friday
74:59 sr,
71/55/sh
81/63/t
76/58/pc
67/42/sh
63/44/sh
79/68/t
63/40/sh
80/64/t
77/65/t
69/46/sh
75/57/sh
60/46/pc
59/40/pc
57/44/pc
74/55/pc
S58/45/s
81/64/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


'*, Miami
\ Naples
Beach Ocala
38 * Orlando-


*L Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers,. 83/71 ! Pensacola
81/62 o Naples * Tallahassee
83/65 Miami Tampa
W 84/72 Valdosta
ey West . W. Palm Beach
80/69.


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
.Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date .


81
59
68
44
85 in 1948
26 in 1989


0.00"
2.17"
46.35"
1.14"
46.94"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:20 a.m.
5:33 p.m.
7:21 a.m.
5:33 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 7:32 a.m.
Moonset today 5:44 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 8:20 a.m.
Moonset tom. 6:40 p.m.


Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan.
16 24 31 7
New First Full Last


Wednesday Taursday








S Fmrecaated temperabnu, E "Feels Ikteamperature


On this date in
1988, Fairbanks,
Alaska reported
freezing rain.and
record warm tem-
peratures. The
afternoon high of
41 degrees was
43 degrees above
normal.


3
MODOEMIE:
45 items to bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


S Forecasts, data and graph-
S cs � 2009 Weather Central
- ' e LLC, Madison, Wls.
\ ?' ~ www.weatherpubllsher.com


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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Tiger Inc.'s image makes sponsors cautious


Ca Key West
Cape Canaveralae
75/64 Lake City


!6 ENLI Y


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LAKEITY AMANAC


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.


MOSTLY
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HI 58 LO 31













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Science on display at Brain Bowl
Richardson Middle School student, Kyle O'Quinn (from left), Lake City Middle School student,
Alvin Key, Fort White Middle School student, Johnita Patillo and Richardson Middle School
student Serenity Morse answer questions during a Science Brain Bowl competition Tuesday
morning at Lake City Middle School. More than 60 local middle school students competed at
the event.


Continued From Page 1A
money was saved until
the holiday season to pur-
chase gifts for 12 needy
children through Guardian
Ad Litem and Chances for
Children.
"It's the season for giv-
ing," Brannon said, "and
this is the time of year
people need help."
The members of the
Dress Down Committee.
said they enjoy helping the.
community and have per-
sonal reasons for organizing
the money that they donate.
"We like to do anything


that we can to help out with
the community," said Cribbs.
"It makes me feel good that
we're giving back."
Thomas said she enjoys
helping to provide holiday
gifts for underprivileged
children.
"It's a joy to see children
get Christmas even when
they can't afford it," said
Thomas.
"Each organization does
so much for the people
they help," said Cribbs.
"I'fs nice to be a part of
that."


GRINCH: Thieves strike
Continued From Page 1A


our trees, and a lot of blow-
up things the kids liked to
have their photos taken
with. If it was needed for a
family, then I'm okay with it
being taken, but if they just
took it to resell, then they're
depriving children of what
small enjoyment they may
get. Some of these children
have had so many problems
and traumas in their lives,
I. don't even know how to
word it at times."
Tice said she isn't going


to let the thefts get the best
of her, though, and plans
for Sunday's event to be a
success.
"I have about 18 more
kids who haven't been spon-
sored, but I have faith in
our community," she said.
"We'll get there."
For - more -informa-
tion about "Chances for
Children" or to inquire
about volunteering for the
event, call Tice at 6234732
or 438-5333.


752-6306

Residential * Commercial * Industrial.
Licensed & Insured CFC1427643
2744 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL










NT1NLBLE


$50 billion

proposed

for new job

projects
By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Responding to calls among
rank-and-file Democrats for
more infrastructure spend-
ing, House leaders Tuesday
unveiled a plan to add
almost $50 billion in spend-
ing on highways, housing
and school repair as part
of a year-end plan to create
jobs.The measure is aimed
at keeping the fragile eco-
nomic recovery on track.


COACH , IDA officials meet with state,


national representatives
By TONY BRITT national officials) going to "His goal is to secure
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com do 'some checking on the detailed information from
questions for us with the the Federal Bureau of
Questions and concerns Federal Bureau of Prisons Prisons so that local and
conveyed by local residents and we hope to be able state officials can formulate
and officials about the pos- to give them some ques- the most informed posi-
sibility of a privately owned tions and get some direct tion possible on the proj-
and operated prison corn- answers," he said. ect," she said. "He will con-
ing to Columbia County Poole said officials hope tinue to monitor progress
have reached the state and to have the answers in time of discussions with an eye
national level. for Thursday's Chamber of toward ensuring the com-
The proposal was to Commerce Prison informa- munity has data it needs,
house 1,250 male, low secu- tional meeting on the pro- particularly on the source
rity criminal illegal aliens in posed prison. The Lake City- . of project funding."
the facility until they could Columbia County Chamber On several occasions
be deported. of Commerce has sched- local officials have said
The initial meeting uled a meeting for 4 p.m. at they've been contacted by
spawned many questions the Lake City Community Columbia County residents
about the proposed facility College Medical Technology who say they don't want the
from some local residents Building where a prison con- facility here, however, Boyd
and local officials, some sultant will field questions said she hasn't had much
of which have not been about the proposed facility contact from citizens har-
addressed yet. from the audience. boring those concerns.
As the end to the pub- District 11 State Rep. "I get tons of e-mail, but
lic comment period for the Boyd, Rep. Bembry and rep- I don't recall a citizen con-
proposal nears, on Dec. 21, resentatives from U.S. sena- acting me," she said. "I've
local officials have gone to tors Ander Crenshaw's and been contacted by officials
officials at the next level in Bill Nelson's office attended wanting to make me aware
an attempt to get some of the meeting Monday. of what's going on.
those questions answered. "From the information I 'Two-hundred-fifty jobs
Industrial Development have been given it looks is what I'm hearing it would
Authority Executive like this is a local issue create for the area, of
Director. Jim Poole and - local land use issue and course you always, in tight
selected local officials met a potential public, private economic times, like to be
with representatives from partnership," Boyd said. "It able to create jobs for local
the state and national level is the responsibility of our people," Boyd continued.
Monday morning to have elected officials to gather "With that said, they need
some of the questions and all the information, -do the to be able to make sure
concerns about the poten- research and make deci- those jobs that are being
tial prison answered, sions based on facts in the created are not coming with
"Representative Boyd best interest of the public." a hefty price tag and a lot of
asked us to put the meet- The communica- risks and liability - that's
ing together to tell Rep. tions director for U.S where the elected officials
(Leonard) Bembry about Congressman Ander at the local level need to do
what was going on," Poole Crenshaw, Barbard Riley, their homework and make
said, noting the meeting said Crenshaw continues to sure they are making good
lasted about 90 minutes, facilitate responses to ques- decisions in the public's
*He said the meeting was tions and concerns regard- best interest."
scheduled in an attempt to ing funding for and con- - Repeated calls to Nelson
get more details on the pro- struction of a private prison and Bembry's offices for
posed prison project. . in either Lake City and/or comment were notreturned
"They're (state and Baldwin, Mich. by press time Tuesday.


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OPINION


Wednesday, December 16, 2009


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Prison

meeting

will settle

rumors

A proposal to build a
prison to house fed-
eral inmates at no
taxpayer expense
continues to rattle
our community. Much of that
noise comes from the rumor
and innuendo that is typically
generated when information is
-in short supply.
Thursday, the community has
the opportunity - and com-
munity leaders have the respon-
sibility - to attend an informa-
tional meeting designed to dispel
rumors, get answers to lingering
questions and voice an opinion.
At 4 p.m., prison consultant
Bill Bryan will be available at a
meeting hosted by Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber
Sof Commerce in Lake City
Community College's Medical
Technology building. Bryan
will be on hand to present the
opportunities such a facility
could offer the county and to
provide answers to concerns
from the community at large.
There is no doubt Bryan will
come prepared. The onus is on
those who would support, as well
as those who would disparage an
opportunity to bring this facility
and its 250 recession-proof jobs
to our county. Those interested
should be equally ready to pres-
ent their viewpoints.
That burden should be espe-
cially felt by our community's
movers and shakers and those
individuals tasked with the
authority to develop new indus-
try in the county.
The development of this poten-
tial business is in the interest of
all local lawmakers, law enforce-
ment and those entities given the
responsibility for the economic
climate of our county as it relates
to business promotion.
In addition to the general pub-
lic, the guest list for Thursday's
meeting includes officials from
Lake City Police Department,
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office, City of Lake City, -
Columbia County and Industrial
Development Authority.
This list is solid and impor-
tant - and with so much as
stake it would be both remiss
and a disservice to the com-
munity they serve for these
groups not to be represented at
this public forum. After all, this
meeting is an opportunity not
only to ask questions of Bryan,
but of our community leaders.
Thursday's meeting is the
final public opportunity for our
community to present an opinion
and voice questions before the
ending date of public comment
on Dec. 21. After that, the matter
falls to the federal government
Rumors and innuendo are
borne when information is
in short supply. The fear and
do much damage to the health
of a community. Thursday's
meeting will promote a healthy
dialogue and go far to erase
such disparities in our county.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Sinde 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will 'be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Panhandling does serve a purpose


Downtown Atlanta is
an excellent loca-
tion for a confer-
ence. The hotels
are built on a grand
scale, the meeting rooms are
spacious and well appointed,
and sky bridges connect many
of the buildings. In fact, visitors
needn't go outside, at all: They
move effortlessly among hotels,
conference rooms, shops, and
restaurants, protected from the
weather and the traffic.
And apparently from the city
itself. A serious young woman
on the hotel TV admonishes the
visitor to be vigilant about his
personal security, a message
she repeats in a 24/7 continu-
ous loop. Don't leave valuables
in your room, she says, or in
your vehicle. Use the security'
locks on your hotel room door
at all times. Don't allow strang-
ers into your room. If someone
knocks on your door, check
with the front desk before let-
ting him in. If you return to the
hotel after dark, avoid unlighted
areas. Nothing to do? Consider
staying in your hotel room and
watching a movie.
Now, I don't accept that
Atlanta is really as dangerous
as this earnest young woman
would have us believe. It's a
big city, andcone naturally puts
one's guard up a bit, probably
without needing to be told. In
any case, the foreboding atmo-
sphere she generates comple-
ments nicely the other public
service announcement that also
plays 24/7 on the hotel TV:
Don't, under any circumstances,
give money to panhandlers.
In fact, panhandling is illegal
in downtown Atlanta at all times

LETTERS TO

Prison issue needs
your input
To the Editor:
The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce
is sponsoring an informational
session regarding a federal
prison that is' being proposed
to be built in Columbia County
by a firm with some questioned
experiences regarding this type
of facility in other parts of the
United States. The meeting
will be held at 4 p.m. Thursday
in the Lake City Community
College Technology Building.
Large segments of Columbia
County residents are opposed
to a federal prison in our county
that will house illegal alien fel-
ons.
I implore all of you that are
opposed to the prison to be
present to express your views
and the reasons behind your
opposition. Failure to take an
active part could cause our com-
munity to have the prison locat-
ed here, which could potentially
cost the taxpayers of our county
a lot of money.
This is too important to let
your neighbor take care of it
for you. Every citizen should be


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmaredu
and'in the surrounding areas
after dark. Visitors are strongly
urged not to slip spare change
into outstretched hands on the
street. Doing so only encour-
ages bad behavior and feeds the
addictions of the weak-willed.
Visitors who can't overcome the
impulse to give are encouraged
to support organized programs'
designed to assist the home-
less. Some areas have "parking
meters" into which givers can
deposit spare change, a part of
which will later reach the home-
less in more wholesome ways.
Atlanta's anti-panhandling
efforts are part of a national
trend of several years to crack
down on begging in public plac-
es. Cities from St. Petersburg
to Honolulu have passed ordi-
nances that either ban begging
outright or saddle the practice
with restrictions that make it
much more difficult.
And maybe this is a good
thing. No one enjoys being
approached by a shabby charac-
ter on a public street and asked
for money. Sometimes the expe-
rience can be threatening. At
best, for people of conscience,
saying no to the destitute can be
mildly guilt provoking.
On the other hand, few
behaviors are more human and
more ancient than begging, in


THE


all of its forms. Begging is firm-
ly embedded in the Bible, for
example, which assumes that
there's no solution for poverty
and that part of what righteous
people do is to give directly to
the poor. In fact, no injunction
in the Bible is more regularly
rationalized and ignored by the
modern American Christian
than Christ's directive to the
self-righteous rich man to sell
all of his possessions and to
give the money to the poor.
(Matthew 19:21)
Proponents of anti-begging
laws argue that giving money
directly to the poor encourages
their shiftless behavior and
addictions. Perhaps. But I won-
der if this isn't merely a ratio- -
nalization intended to assuage
some of the guilt that we might
feel for tolerating poverty in a
land of plenty.
In fact, I doubt that anti-pan-
handling laws actually do the
poor much good. Their primary
effect - and" no doubt, their
intended purpose - is to hide
the poverty and destitution that
we'd probably rather not be
reminded of while we're trying
to have a good time. And with
the unemployment rate linger-
ing at about 10 percent, there
will likely be more of it to hide
in coming years.
Panhandling is an unseemly
business, but at least it serves
to remind us occasionally that
our paradise isn't perfect. Or
we could just stay in our hotel
rooms and watch a movie.


* John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


EDITOR


present to express their opposi-
tion to a prison housing illegal
alien felons at our doorsteps.
I also invite you to contact the
Bureau of Prisons no later than
Dec. 21 to express your opposi-
tion: Richard A Cohn, Chief Site
Selection and Environmental
Review Branch, 320 1st Street
NW, Washington, D.C. 20534-
0002.
William J. Haley
Lake City

Hunting a humane
alternative
To the Editor:
In response to a column by
Bonnie Erbe, "On the hunt, ani-
mals have feelings, too" (Dec.
4), I'm a NRA life-member and
I grew up around hunters and
guns. I know that no ethical
hunter ever kills an animal for
the sick "thrill" of shedding that
animal's blood. Ethical hunters
shoot animals to help supple-
ment their food budgets: A wise
move in these hard economic
times. Or they shoot for self-
defense of themselves or others.
Responsible hunters make
conscientious efforts to dis-
patch game animals quickly and


humanely.
The hundreds of millions of
dollars hunters annually pump
into the economy through the
purchase of hunting licenses,
firearms, ammunition, archery
equipment, outdoor clothing
and camping equipment furnish-
es jobs for thousands of people.
Also, that money helps to hire
trained wildlife biologists, who
help to ensure the future of
game herds through selective
and supervised hunting.
There are worse ways for an
animal to die than a Well-placed
arrow or bullet. If Bonnie Erbe
and her bleeding-heart liberals
ever succeed in having all hunt-
ing banned, they, not hunters,.
will have condemned the game
herds of America to two agoniz-
ing and lingering forms of death
- starvation and disease from
over-population.
To Erbe and her crowd I
say, "If you don't want to hunt,
that's your business. And you're
entitled to your opinions. But
don't try to cram your liberal
ideas down my throat, or, the
throats of millions of other law-
ful hunters.
Weldon A. Russ
Lake City


4A


Tom Mayer
tmoyer@oakecityreportercom


Speaking

up for the

needy

Afew days ago I was
asked to speak at
a volunteer appre-
ciation lunch for
Catholic Charities.
It was my privilege. My fam-
ily and I believe strongly in the
good and vital works this orga-
nization provides to Columbia
County. My wife supports the
charity in myriad ways. Twice
a week, my girls volunteer in
the trenches. A short speech
was the least I could do.
And because I believe the
unsung heroes of Catholic
Charities deserve a larger plat-
form than what I could provide
during their annual event, I
want to share of few of the
remarks I made that day:
"Several days ago, I was
asked a question that I had
been asked several years ago,
in New Bern, N.C. During
a discussion with a friend of
mine, an old priest close to
retirement, I was asked what
inspires me to get through the
day during times of adversity.
"My answer was threefold.
"First, I live my life by one
simple rule, a mandate found
in multiple places throughout
the Bible: Pray constantly.
It's said in a variety of ways
throughout the Good Book,
but "pray constantly" is what
it comes down to. Keeping a
constant and open line of com-
munication with God is the
best way I know to get through
any day - bad or good.
"Second, I'm guided by my
faith in one simple prayer.
Prayed honestly, I have never
failed to receive an immediate
answer: Lord, I tried and tried
but I can't find a solution to
this problem. But I know you
can, please take over and help
me find it
'Third, I'm guided by the
people I meet in my life. Next
to prayer, people are ny daily
inspiration. People like you.
'Two, days a week when I
drop my girls off at your door-
step, I get a brief glimpse into
what you do on a daily basis.
It's amazing. I honestly don't
know if I could do what you do
every day.
"I have watched you daily
face the poorest of the poor as
you attempt to help the most
needy people in our county.
"I have watched you do
this with passion and concern
- and most of all, without
judgment.
"I have seen you look at the
people who come to you not
as problems, but as answers
to your prayer to help those in
need.
"I have seen you hug indi-
viduals that many of us pass
by, individuals who I know
have not been hugged in a
very long time.
"I have seen you feed the
hungry, and clothe those with
warm coats or shoes on their
feet.
"More than this, I have seen
you restore respect and dignity
to those people who live daily
without these basic human
rights.
"In our church, we admon-
ish one another to put faith in
action. Each of you does this
daily and you are an inspira-
tion to us all.
"Each one of you in this
room is my inspiration, and the
answer to that simple prayer:
I don't have the answer Lord,
but I know you do.
'Thank you, each of you, for
giving selflessly to those who
need so much, but ask for so
little."
* Tom Mayer is editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman















Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Wholesale inflation rise unlikely to last


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
and DANIEL WAGNER
AP Economics Writers

WASHINGTON -
Evidence that the economic
rebound could eventually
raise inflationary pres-
sures emerged in a report
Tuesday that wholesale
prices surged last month.
Most economists aren't
worried, though. They think
the economy remains too
weak for the price increases
to last.
The Federal Reserve
began a two-day meet-
ing Tuesday and is likely
weighing the higher-than-
expected wholesale infla-
tion. Should inflation pres-
sures mount, the central
bank could be forced to
start raising interest rates
sooner than expected.
But Fed policymakers
aren't likely to raise a key
rate at the end of their
meeting Wednesday. The


A steel worker at MRP in South Plainfield, N.J., fabricates a
steel beam destined for the World Trade Center, on Dec. 4.
According to company president David Floyd, the company
had 75 employees at the facility a year ago and now has 130.


Fed has kept rates at record.
lows to bolster the shaky
recovery.
An eventual Fed rate
increase could help defuse
inflation and boost the
value of the dollar against
other currencies. But it car-
ries risks. Higher interest


rates would raise borrow-
ing costs and squeeze cor-
porate profits. They could
send stock prices falling.
And they risk derailing the
economic recovery.
The economy is grow-
ing steadily but slowly. The
latest sign was a report


Tuesday that industrial
production rose a better-
than-expected 0.8 percent
in November. The portion
of industrial capacity in use
rose to 71.3 percent, from
70.6 percent in October. It
shows that factories, mines
and utilities are using more
of their plants as the recov-
ery takes root.
Still, even with the gain,
capacity use remains far
below its long-run average of
around 80 percent Analysts
said industrial spare capac-
ity remains so. large and
demand still so soft that
inflationary pressures are
likely to remain tame.
"Despite. today's nasty
numbers, the chances of
runaway inflation remain
small," Paul Dales of
Capital Economics said in a
research note.


LOCAL STOCKS

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


AT&Tlnc NY 1.64
AutoZone NY
BkofAm NY .04
BobEvn Nasd .72
BrMySq NY 1.24
CNBFnPA Nasd .66
CSX NY .88
ChampEh NY ...
Chevron NY 2.72
Cisco Nasd ...
Citgrp NY
CocaCI NY 1.64
ColBgp * NY ...
Delhaize NY 2.01
ExxonMbl NY 1.68
FPLGrp NY 1.89
FamilyDIr NY .54
FannieMae NY
FordM NY .
FredMac NY
GenElec NY .40
HomeDp NY .90


5.9 14 27.60 -.45 -3.2
... 13 156.91 -1.65 +12.5
.3 ... 15.19 -.44 +7.9
2.6 ... 27.24 +.01 +33.3
4.8 13 25.74 -.22 +10.7
4.3 17 15.23 -.36 +36.2
1.8 18 49.60 +.24 +52.8
... .20 ... -64.3
3.5 13 77.37 +.11 +4.6
... 24 23.48 .-.36 +44.0
3.56 -.14 -46.9
2.8 22 59.06 +.02 +30.5
... ... 41 ... -80.0
2.6 ... 77.92 -.10 +23.7
2.4 16 69.17 -.52 -13.4
3.4 13 55.40 -.37 +10.1
1.9 14 27.98 -.17 +7.3
... 1.18 +.05 +55.3
9.39 +.31+310.0
1.48 +.04+102.7
2.5 14 15.75 -.20 -2.8
3.1 22 29.02 +.15 +26.1


YTD
Name Ex Div YId PE Last Chg%Chg


iShEMkts NY .59
iShR2K NY .83
Lowes NY .36
McDnkls NY 220
NY Times NY ...
NobltyH Nasd .25
OcciPel NY 1.32
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.80
Potalh NY .40
PwShsUQQNasd .18
QweslCm NY .32
Ryder NY 1.00
SearsHldgs Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.75
SPDR NY 2.42
SPDRFncl NY .38
SunMicro Nasd
TimeWm rs NY .79
WalMart NY 1.09
WellsFargo NY .20
XTOEngy NY .50


... 41,20 -.43 +65.0
60.91 -.17 +23.7
20 24.00 -.17 +11.5
16 62.00 -.14 -.3
.10.10 +.41 +37.8
... 9.41 -.19 +19.0
26 78.87 +1.46 +31.5
24 27.69 -1.22 +40.6
19 60.99 +.01 +11.4
23 116.96 +.40 +59.7
. 44.30 -.25 +49.0
10 4.26' +.18 +17.0
37 43.00 +.01 +10.9
... 75.14 -.85 +93.3
17 34.10 -.07 -7.8
... 111.35 -.52 +23.4
.. 14.24 -.23 +13.7
9.32 +.04+144.0
30.14 -.28 +45.1
16 53.98 -09 -3.7
30 25.66 +.17-13.0
15 47.66 -.20 +35.1


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427













Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009 -


OBITUARIES

Noel Popovich
Noel Popovich, 89, passed away
on December 13, 2009 at Lake
City Medical Center. He was
born in Cleveland, Ohio to Elijah
and Cecilia Popovich on April
2, 1920. He was a diesel auto
mechanic, a member of Isaiah
58:6-7 Ministries of Fort White,
FL. He is survived by his wife,
Patricia Popovich of Ft. White; a
daughter, Sharon (Richard) Nation
of Ft. White; two sisters, Helen
Bennett of Kansas, MO and Anna
Munhollan ofMO; one grandchild
and one great-grandchild. A
graveside service will be held
on Wednesday, December 16,
2009 at 11:00 AM at Jacksonville
National Cemetery, 4083 Lannie
Road, Jacksonville with Pastor
James 'Morrison officiating.
Arrangements are entrusted to
EVANS-CARTER FUNERAL
HOME, High Springs, FL.

Angela Cardella Tambasco
Mrs. Angela Cardella Tambasco,
75 of Folkston. GA passed away
peacefully at the St. Vincent's
Medical Center in Jacksonville,
FL after extended illness. Angela
was born in Alia, Sicily and lived
in Rochester, New York with her
family for many years. Angela
then moved to Winter Garden, FL
and about a year ago she resided
in Folkston, GA. Angela was the
daughter of Antonio Cardella and
SMaria Louisa Cardella. She was
preceded in death by her husband,
Joseph Tambasco. Angela enjoyed
gardening, cooking, sewing and
was very artistic. Angela special
family included the Constanza's
and the Tambasco's and their
extended families of Rochester,
NY. Angela was Roman Catholic,
Angela is survived by: One
daughter; Marylisa Tambasco
of 'Fort White, FL., one son;
Anthony Tambasco of Rochester,
New York, two brothers;
Anthony "Nino" Cardella and
Joseph "Pino" Cardella, three
Grandchildren: Mia Tambasco,
Mary Jo Bonner, Terrence
Bonner. Special Friends: Carol &
Corbin Carnell, James & Maria
Campbell and Antoinette Malene-
Gacia. A memorial service and
burial will be held at a later date in
Rochester, New York. ARCHER
FUNERAL HOME of Lake
Butleris inchargeofarrangements.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


; ;


�F� �.
if

r
.I~


Evangelist Oral

Roberts dies at 91


By JUSTIN JUOZAPAVICIUS
Associated Press

TULSA, Okla. - Oral
Roberts, a pioneer in tel-
evangelism who founded a
multimillion-dollar ministry
and a university that bears
his name, died Tuesday. He
was 91.
Roberts died of compli-
cations from pneumonia
in Newport Beach, Calif.,
according to his spokes-
man, A. Larry Ross. The
evangelist was hospitalized
after a fall on Saturday. He
had survived two heart
attacks in the 1990s and a
broken hip in 2006..
Roberts was a pioneer
who broadcast his spirit-
filled revivals on television,
a new frontier for reli-


gion when he started in
the 1950s. He was also a
forerunner of the contro-
versial "prosperity gospel"
that has come to dominate
televangelism. The evange-
list's "Seed-Faith" theology
held that those who give
to God will get things in
return.
"If God had not, in His
sovereign will, raised
up the ministry of Oral
Roberts, the entire charis-
matic movement might not
have occurred," said Jack
Hayford, president of the
International Church of the
Foursquare Gospel, in a
statement.
Roberts rose from hum-
ble tent revivals to become
one of the country's most
famous preachers.


MAC JOHNSON ROOFING


352.472.4943 or 866.376.4943
website: www.macjohnsonroofing.com


J GUANG DONG
SChinese Restaurant
Book our Banquet Room

now for all your

Holiday Parties!
No room fee w/party of 20 6r more.
Holiday Gift Cards Available




We cater all year round
Located in the Lake City Mall

961-8181


S. seSc-'- .',u



- ,.... ~ '
' .. ' ,'

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*to i C
-7-


Lake City Florida
A Sesquicentennial Tribute

Written by
Morris Williams
and M
Kevin McCarthy i


be purchased at


Hunter Printing

1330 SW Mai, Blvd * Lake City, FL
1:330 Ma-... �- FL --�


Santa visits the Lake City Shrine Club
Santa Claus, portrayed by Joe Chancy, and Lory Chancy hand out gifts during the annual
'Shriners Kids Day' on Sunday at the Lake City Shrine Club. More than two dozen children
were in attendance, which included nine children treated at Shriners hospitals. The event was
hosted by the Lake City Shrine Club Lady's Auxiliary and the Lake City Shriners.


General Manager: Mark Dawson 386-867-4490
We are there when you need us!!
Ready to take care of any problem that you may have with your plumbing systems.
We know your time is valuable. That is why when you call, we will arrive when you
need us with a skilled service technician. Your problem is our number one concern.
Standard Plumbing Offers:
* 24 hour Plumbing/ 7 days a week * Septic Tank Pump Outs
* Emergency Service * Backflow Prevention
* Residential Service * Bathroom & Kitchen Remodeling
* Business Service - Home Additions
* Preventative Maintenance * Residential New Constructions
* Video Camera Line Inspection * Commercial New Construction
We are Licensed & Insured
S'. ' " "'J;' Standard Plumbing & Supplies
r,., ,, ^ 1944 E Duval St., Lake City, FL, 32055
E^^i^: /(386) 752-4716
.. , . . 1-866-752-4716
Lic. # CFC1427245
www.Standard-plumbing.com mark@standardplumb.com
"IF ITS PLUMBING WE DO IT"

Since 999...
J.L. DuPree Construction Services, Inc.
At J.L. DuPree Construction we are committed to
assist individuals, businesses, and organizations in
meeting their construction needs in an economical and
timely manner. As a full service General Contractor
we are experienced in all aspects of the construction
industry. Our goal is to be recognized for our reliabil-
ity, honesty, and outstanding quality that we provide
not only to our clients but out employees and the
communities in which we do business.



S"' teWr
R . ovain '
Remode
ReietalBidns


J.L. DuPree
Construction Servies
(386) 754-5678
www.JLDCS.com
CGCo60631


Books may


,OHRISTMAS

LIGHTING DISPLAYS



iShare Your Holiday Spirit


Tell us your address so others can
view your lighting display.


SSend to:Tom Mayer, Editor
:.Email:tmayer@lakecityreporter.com ;
or call 754-0428 . "
. You can also bring your information IIlIsiy 1u ':
to the Reporter office.


Lake City Reporter
180 E.Duval St., Lake City FL


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009 -


- ''


-�-,- �k.








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Columbia County

HIN1 Flue Vaccine Clinic Schedules








The following is a list of FREE vaccine
clinics Open To The General Public in
Columbia County.

All clinics will be held at the Columbia County Health Department.
For more information call 386-758-1068.


DATE:
TIME:
LOCATION:
ADDRESS


DATE:
TIME:
LOCATION:
ADDRESS

DATE:
TIME:
LOCATION:
ADDRESS


Saturday, December 16, 2009
5:00 PM to 7:00 PM
Columbia County Health Department
217 NE Franklin St.
Lake City, FL 32055

Thursday, December 17, 2009
5:00 Pm to 7:00 PM
Columbia County Health Department
217 NE Franklin St.
Lake City, FL 32055
Saturday, December 19, 2009
8:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Columbia County Health Department
217 NE Franklin St.
Lake City, FL 32055


Please note the clinics listed above will
be the 1st clinics for this year.

Future clinics will be scheduled next year.
For the dates and times of those clinics
please visit www.ccflu.com.


This vaccination
program is FREE to.
the public.


For more information on H1N1 (Swine Flu)

please visit www.ccflu.com.


I =NMI


Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424









Page Editor: Brandon Lockett, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


rusted Buyers of


Jewelry and Coins


QJoe Bowman








Paul Barattini


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XWednesday, December 16, 10amn-7pm
Thursday, December 17, 10am-7pm
SFriday, December 18, 10am-7pm
Saturday, December 19, 10am-7pm'


We Buy Jewelry new or broken. Gold watches: (pocket or wrist),
Designer glass, figurines and art. Ivory or jade carvings .
American eagles (gold or silver). Proof and mint sets. Certified
coins. Marble and bronze statues. All Rolex watches.


.......-...........


1964 and earlier:
Halves............ 50 &ti Dimes...... . 90
Quarters ...2... 25 & "'


1965- 1969:
Kennedy Halves..s1.50c


- r , r i li


Now Paying
S1 151
Per:Omtce -
SUS Proof Gold


Silver Dollars
1878-1904..... .14.00 &"
1921-1935..... 13.00 &u


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lokecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesday, December 16, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Travel team 8U
tryout Sunday
An open tryout for an
8-under travel baseball
team is 2 p.m. Sunday
at the Southside Sports
Complex. The team will
emphasize fundamental
baseball skills and play
in monthly tournaments
froni February through
May.
For details, call
manager Todd Gustavson
at 365-2133 or coach
David Willaims at
(904) 2194577.
CHS WRESTLNG
Raffle offered
as fundraiser
The CHS Wrestling
Booster Club has a
season-long raffle for a
certificate at Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park.
It includes a stay at the
park, plus disc golf, mini
golf and a golf cart.
Columbia High's
boosters and coaches
are seeking all former
CHS wrestlers to form an
alumni club.
For details, call Stacey
Ross at 984-9569 or Glen
Ross at 984-5420.

CHSSOCCER
Alumni game
fundraiser set
Columbia High's boys
soccer is organizing an
alumni game fundraiser -
for Ja4agry. All former
Tiger soccer players who
graduated from
1990-2009 are invited.
For details, e-mail
Justin Lang at
justlang@firn. edu.

ADULT BASEBALL
North Florida
teams forming
The North Florida
Men's Adult Baseball
League is forming a team
in this area. Organizers,
coaches and players are
being sought. Workouts
begin in January.
For details, call Greg
Vickers at (850) 253-5107
or visit www.leaguelinetp.
com/northfloridamabl.

FLAG FOOTBALL, CHEER
Registration open
for league play
Registration for flag
football, ages 5-12, and .
cheerleading, ages 510,
is under way at Christ
Central Ministries. The
season begins in January.
Cost is $35.
For details, call Ronny
at 365-2128.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Thursday
* Columbia High girls
Weightlifting at Baker
County High, 4:30 p.m.
Friday
* Fort White High girls
basketball vs. St. Francis
Catholic High, 6 p.m.
* Columbia High
basketball vs. Fleming
Island High, 7:30 p.m.
(girls-6)
Saturday
* Columbia High girls
basketball at Wolfson
High, 4:30 p.m. (JV-3)
Tuesday
* Columbia High girls
basketball at Ed White
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
* Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Union


County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)


Ingram, McClain lead six

Alabama AP All-Americans


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 29 file photo, Alabama running back Mark
Ingram (22) carries the ball during the second half of an
NCAA college football game in Tuscaloosa, Ala.


Florida's Tebow
finishes on
second team.
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
NEW YORK - Alabama
will bring a lineup powered
by a record number of AP
All-Americans to the nation-
al championship game.
Six players on the top-
ranked Crimson Tide,
including Heisman Trophy
winner Mark Ingram,
made The Associated Press
All-America team released
Tuesday.
Ingram was a unanimous
choice, as was linebacker
Rolando McClain. Defensive
tackle Terrence Cody'was
voted to the team for the
second consecutive season.,
Cornerback Javier Arenas,
guard Michael Johnson
and kicker Leigh Tiffin also


Columbia
reschedules
Suwannee High.
From staff reports

Columbia High didn't
beat Suwannee High on
Wednesday, but it did pick
up a 6-0 win after resched-
uling against Robert E.
\Lee in Jacksonville.
The game against the
Generals was a make-up for
a district contest that was
canceled due to inclement
weather earlier this season.
Columbia controlled the
match from the beginning.
"We controlled the
game," coach Trevor
Tylei said. "We played,
really well. There were a
couple of shots on goal; so
Cameron Harper's consec-
utive games without a shot
on goal streak ended, but
wve played really well."
Carlos Ruiz scored on
the first of six goals for
the Tigers in the game as
Jimmy Rukab came through
with the assist. Ruiz fol-
lowed up with a second
goal in the first half. This
time, the assist came from
Geoff Beardsley. Beardsley
came through with the next
assist to give Columbia a
3-0 lead at the half on Jordan
Lehman's goal.
C.J. McRae got his first
goal of the season on a
pass from Chris Beardsley
out of the backfield to
build Columbia's lead to


JASON MATTHEW WA'LKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Wes Osterhoudt posts up against Hamilton County High on Dec. 4.



Indians downed


Fort White splits
last two games
with district loss.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE - Fort
White High's basketball
team had a solid win at
Trenton High on Monday,
but couldn't carry it over to
district play.
Newberry High beat
Fort White, 80-69, at home
on Tuesday in a District
5-3A game.
The teams pressed each
other up and down the


court, with the Panthers
holding a 19-18 lead at the
end of the first quarter.
Dustin Stout paced Fort
White with six points.
The, second quarter
started the same way,
but Newberry's press
soon paid dividends. Four
straight steals led to a 16-0
run, despite a time out by
Indians coach Isiah Phillips
midway through the surge.
Newberry led 53-30 at the
half.
Fort White turned the
tables a bit in the third
quarter, as seven Indians
chipped in points. The
Panthers' lead was 66-44 at


the end of the quarter.
The Indians cut the lead
to 10 points late in the game
after unleashing a long-
range weapon in Roy Blake.
Normally battling under the
basket, Blake stepped out
and hit two 3-pointers in the
fourth quarter. A.J. Legree
and Wes Osterhoudt also
had treys in the quarter.
Legree led Fort White
with 13 points, with 12 each
from Roy Blake and Stout. �
Chris Griffith scored
nine points, with eight from
Kyle Raulerson, seven from
Alexis Blake, four from
HOOPS continued on 2B


were on the squad.
Oklahoma twice (1987,
2003) had five first-team
All-Americans, according
to STATS. But no team
has had more since 1964,
when the AP started select-
ing both an offensive and.
defensive team.
"I think having six
Alabama players on the first
team says a lot about all of
the players on our entire
roster and is an indication
of the-hard work we put in
and the togetherness we
have on this team," Arenas
said in a statement to the
AP. through the school.'
"You aren't going to have
six guys make first-team All-
American unless your team
is playing at a high level
week in and week out.- It's
a credit to our entire team
and our coaching staff."
Stanford running
back Toby Gerhart, the
Heisman runner-up, and


Nebraska defensive tackle
Ndamukong Suh, fourth in
Heisman voting, were also
unanimotis first-team All-,
Americans.
Texas quarterback
Colt McCoy was the All-
American quarterback,
selected to the first team
by a panel of 14 AP college
football poll voters. Florida
quarterback Tim Tebow
was a second-team choice.
Boise State's Kellen Moore
was the third-team quarter-
back..
McCoy finished' third
in the Heisman voting last
weekend and was a sec-
ond-team All-American last
year. The senior was joined
by his longtime pal and
favorite receiver, Jordan
Shipley, on the first team'.
Texas safety Earl Thomas'
gave the Longhorns tire:
players on the first team,;


FOOTBALL continued on 2B'
.1-,
_' -in

down -


dsin I
, . - . i -


district game


4-0 early in the second
half.Nick Tuttle scored
the final two goals for the
Tigers off assists by Geoff
and Chris Beardsley..
Columbia (11-2-1, 4-0-1
district) has a non-district
game against Suwannee at
6 p.m. today.

Lady Tigers soccer
Columbia High'wrapped'
up the .pre-Christmas .
tournament portion bf '
its schedule in a game
originally scheduled for
Thursday against Fleming
Island. The Lady Tigers
fell 5-2 in the district road
match on Monday.
Fleming Island jumped
out to a 2-0 lead early in,
the contest, before the
Lady Tigers battled back
to tie the game at 2-2.
Michelle Pope scored
the first goal and Shelby
Widergren tied the game
for Columbia.
"I'm proud of the per-
formance against a strong
Fleming Island team,"
coach Keith Mclouglin.
"It helped develop more
character and determina-
tion in our team to bring it
back and tie it at 2-2. Our
freshman, Keeley Murray,
played a great game at goal
keeper. She made some
great saves to keep us in
the game."
Columbia (11-6,
5-2 district) host the CHS
Christmas Tournament at
CYSA fields on Dec. 28.-


Doctor probed in doping case


Tiger treated on Canadian authorities have
four separate been investigating Dr.
u seperAnthony Galea, who was
occassionS. arrested Oct. 15 in Toronto,
and the FBI has been
By DEVLIN BARRETT brought into the case.
Associated Press The official said Tuesday
the investigation was being
WASHINGTON - A conducted by the Royal
Canadian doctor who has Canadian Mounted 'Police.
treated golfer Tiger Woods The official was not autho-
and many other pro ath- rized to discuss the case
letes is under a joint U.S.- and therefore spoke on con-
Canadian investigation for edition of anonymity.
possibly providing perfor- The New York Times first
mance-enhancing drugs, a reported on the investiga-
U.S. official said. tion. Galea's lawyer denied
The official familiar any wrongdoing at a news
with the investigation said conference in Toronto on


Tuesday.
Attorney Brian H.
Greenspan said he expects
Galea will face three charg-
es in Canadian court Friday,
but said he was unaware of
the FBI's involvement.
"He looks forward
to being vindicated,"
Greenspan said. "He's a
physician who has always
engaged in lawful practices.
He's never been involved
in any improprieties, any
misconduct, any unlawful
conduct."
Greenspan said one
WOODS continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 11 file photo, United States team player Tiger � -
Woods (right) is joined by wife, Elin Nordegren, at the closing
ceremonies for the Presidents Cup in San Francisco, Calif.


--


. .-.-.-.-. .-.-.-.-.

Ti ers (

General


''















Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


- 2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


The Country Club atLake
City pro Carl Ste-Marie
overcame North Florida
PGA Player of the Year
Cary Splane by a stroke to
win the Jacksonville Area
-Golf Association tourna-
ment at Golf Club of Amelia
Island.
Despite a closing bogey,
Ste-Marie posted the tour-
S. nament's only sub-70 round
'to bring home the $500
winner's purse.
It took a while - 20 years
to be exact - but Martin
Hatcher finally scored his
:second career hole-in-one.
SHatcher aced No. 15 from
162 yards using a 5 wood.
Jerry Wilson witnessed the
shot.
Buddy Slay's birdie on
the final hole gave him
the boost he needed for a



WOODS
Continued From Page 1B
charge would be for con-
spiracy, with the other two
coming from the Food and
DrugAct and the Controlled
Substances Act. He did not
Snow the specific charges.
"We can't conceive of
them being anything other
than minor," he said.
RCMP spokesman Sgt.
Marc LaPorte said Galea
was arrested in October
after a search warrant was
executed at the Institute
of Sports Medicine Health
and Wellness Centre
near Toronto. Greenspan
said the investigation
began when the doctor's
assistant, who often
drove around Galea, was
stopped at the Canada-U.S.
border.
Human growth hormone
and Actovegin, a drug
extracted from calf's blood,
were found in Galea's bag in
the car, The Times reported.
Using, selling or importing
Actovegin is illegal in the
United States.
SGreenspan confirmed
Galea has used HGH him-
self and prescribed it to
non-athlete patients over
the age of 40 to improve
their quality of life, but said
he has never given it to
athletes.


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -Wright St. at Mississippi St.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 - Ark.-Little Rock at South
Alabama
II p.m.
FSN - Oklahoma St. at Stanford
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN - Dallas at Oklahoma City
10:30 p.m.
ESPN -Washington at Sacramento

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Monday's Game
San Francisco 24.Arizona 9
Thursday's Game
Indianapolis at Jacksonville. 8:20 p.m.
Saturday's Game
Dallas at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Miami atTennessee. I p.m.
Arizona at Detroit. I p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Houston at St. Louis, I p.m.
Chicago at Baltimore, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo. I p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, I p.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia. I p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
- Tampa Bay at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
' Green Bay at Pittsburgh, 4: 15 p.m.
. Minnesota at Carolina, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec.21
N.Y. Giants atWashington, 8:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

SNBA schedule
Today's Games
Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Memphis atAtlanta 7 p.m1.
Utah at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
S-Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
LA Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 9 p.m.


Washington at Sacramento, 10:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Golden. State,
10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Orlando at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
NewYork at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Portland, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25
The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' college basketball poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Dec. 13, total points and


previous ranking:
Re
I. Kansas (61)
2.Texas (I)
3. Kentucky (1)
4.Purdue
5. Syracuse (2)
6.WestVirginia
7. Duke
8.Villanova
9.Tennessee
10. North Carolina
II. Georgetown
12: Michigan St.
13. Florida
14. Connecticut
15. Gonzaga
16.Texas Tech
17. Kansas St.
18. Ohio St.
19. New Mexico
20. Mississippi
21. Butler
22. Geprgia Tech
23.Texas A&M
24.Washington
25. Cincinnati


record
9-0
8-0
10-0
9-0
10-0
8-0
7-1
9-1
7-1
8-2
8-0
8-2
8-1
6-2
8-2
9-0
9-1
7-2
10-0
8-1
7-3
6-1
8-2
6-2
6-2


Pts Pvs
1,620 I
1,512 2
1,486 4
1,426 5
1,388 7
1.315 6
1,137 8
1,107 3
1,104 9
1,039 II
S1,008 15
922 12
864 10
762 14
505 21
492 23
391 -
383 13
364 -
334 25
257 22
253 24
221 16
179 17
174 19


Others receiving votes: Memphis 129,
Wisconsin 110. UNLV 96, Clemson 84,
Temple 83, Northwestern 59, Illinois 44,
Miami 40, St. John's 30, Oklahoma -St.
29, Charlotte 24, Dayton 24, Seton Hall
24, Florida St. 23, Missouri St. 20, BYU
14, Mississippi St. 9,Virginia Tech 7. Baylor
6, Minnesota 5, Cornell 3. N.C. State
3, Rhode Island 3, Tulsa 3,.N. Iowa 2,
Pittsburgh 2,W. Carolina 2,Wake Forest
2,Army I,William & Mary I.

AP Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 18 Ohio State vs. Presbyterian,
7 p.m.
No. 19 New Mexico vs. Northern
Arizona, 9 p.m.
No. 20 Mississippi at UTEP, 7 p.m.
No. 22 Georgia Tech vs.Arkansas-Pine
Bluff, 8:30 p.m..
No. 25 Cincinnati at UAB, 7 p.m.


USA Today/ESPN Top 25
The top 25 teams in the USA Today-
ESPN men's college basketball poll, with
.first-place votes in parentheses, records


through Dec. 13, points
ranking:
Record
I. Kansas (30) 9-0
2.Texas 8-0
3. Kentucky (I) 10-0
4.Purdue 9-0
5. Syracuse 10-0
6.WestVirginia 7-0
7. Duke 7-I
8.Tennessee . 7-1
9.Villanova 9-1
10. North Carolina 8-2
I1. Georgetown 8-0
12. Michigan State 8-2
13. Florida 8-1
14. Connecticut 6-2
15. GeorgiaTech 6-1
15.Gonzaga 8-2
17. Butler 7-3
18. Ohio State 7-2
19. New Mexico 10-0
20.Texas Tech 9-0
21.Washington 6-2
22. Kansas State 9-1
23. UNLV 7-1
24. Clemson 8-2
25. Mississippi 8-1


Others receiving votes: Cincinnati 76,
Texas A&M 58, Wisconsin 58, Illinois 25,
Temple 24, Memphis 21, Florida State
20, Brigham Young 17, Saint Mary's 17,
Oklahoma State 15, Wake Forest 15,
Charlotte 14, StJohn's 14, Northwestern
13, Dayton 9, Seton Hall 9, Tulsa 9,
Washington State 9, William & Mary 9.
California 7, Missouri State 3, Western
Carolina 3, Mississippi State 2,.Baylor I,
Coastal Carolina I, Northern Iowa I.

GOLF

Golf week
SOUTH AFRICAN GOLF
ASSOCIATION
South African Open
Site: Paarl, South Africa.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Pearl Valley Golf Estate (7,309
yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.46 million. Winner's share-.
$229,920.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.).
Net: http://www.southafriconopen.com
Sunshine Tour site: http://www.sun-
shinetour.com


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


+8 to +7 win over Jordan
Hale in Wednesday's Blitz.
Steve Patterson rolled in
two birdies-of his own to
take third place at +5.
SHale's lack of luck con-
tinued into the skins game
where all four of his birdies
i were covered to send him
home empty-handed.'
Chet Carter left no doubt
about his winning skin by
posting an eagle on No. 9.
Both of Patterson's birdies
held up for winners, along
with one by Bob Budwick.
The Pot Hole had no
taker and carried over for
the 14th week.
Team skins were scarce


in Good Old Boys play
despite -a spate of good
individual scores.
Merle Hibbard, Nick
Whitehurst and Dan
Stephens took Match 1
over Joe Person, Howard
Whitaker and Carl Wilson,
3-1. Monty Montgomery,
Bobby Simmons and Dale
Gronauer won Match 2 over
Ed Snow, Stan Woolbert
and Jim Bell, also 3-1.
Montgomery shot 37-
38-75 for medalist honors,
followed by Woolbert with
41-35-76, Snow with 40-37-
77 and Stephens with 30-39-
79. Hibbard's 37 was good
for a back-nine win over
Whitaker's 39. Wilson eked
out a front-nine win with a
38 to Joe Person's 39.
The Adult Christmas
Party is 7-9 p.m. Thursday.


HOOPS: Next play Jan. 5


Continued From Page 1
Osterhoudt, and two each
from Chandler Kitzman
and Jordan Talley.
Newberry (3-1, 1-0)
had five players in dou-
ble figures: Yance Enoch,
17, Chris Gillyard, 17,
Bacarius Dinkins, 12,
Anthony Manlove, 10, and
Josh Robinson, 10.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I TYTIK I


Fort White scorers
in the 59-17 win over
Trenton were Stout, 21,
Raul Colon, 9, Kitzman, 7,
Roy Blake, 7, Legree, 6,
Raulerson, 4, Alexis Blake,
2, Osterhout, 2, and Jachin
SAlexander, 1.
Fort White (3-5, 0-4) is
off until Jan. 5.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


W \SHE QUIT
S, ' WORKING AT THE
S- COFFEE SHOP
1 BECAUSE OF THE ---
DIPALL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
S 7 - suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: JUROR HOUSE LIKELY ATTAIN
YAnswer: What the audience looked forward to when
the comedian performed - THE LAST JOKE


and previous


23 S&L offering
26 Athena's
symbol
27 Subzero
comment
28 Musty
30 Green veggie
31 PIN prompter
32 Overpraised
33 Wyoming
range
35 Back when
37 Hex halved


I


DOWN


1 Eur. airline
2 Utmost degree
3 Henri's island
4 Joyous outburst
5 Como-
usted?
6 Zorba
portrayer
7 Open
8 Dryness


FELT fBEA TRk ICE
ALAS OK RAIMOA
DIP NESS A NT


9 Where Ipanema is
10 Tach,
reading
11 Toady's answer.
13 Casual wear
(hyph.)


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 Chirps
20 Fills with
happiness
22 Naval force
24 Eagle or hawk
25 Raises the
alarm
26 Makes choices
27 Keeps off the air
28 Whiskey
measure
29 Shorten an
article
34 Brunch fare
36 Huge ones
42 Juicy pears
43 Crusoe's creator
45 Pennsylvania
port
47 Zillions of
years
48 Rear-end
49 Bartender's
rocks
50 Some, to
Yvette
52 Monk's title
53 Conger
54 Koch and
Wynn


12-16 � 2009 by NEA, Inc.


GOLF REPORTS



Ste-Marie wins JAGA event


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


-2B


FOOTBALL

Continued From Page 1B


second only to Alabama.
The Crimson Tide and
Longhorns play in the BCS
national championship
game at the Rose Bowl on
Jan. 7.
Alabama safety Mark
Barren made the third-team,
givingthe Tide seven players
who received APAll-America
honors. Texas put three "'
players - kicker Hunter , ,
Lawrence, center Chris Hall
and linebacker Sergio Kindle
- on the third team for a
total of six overall.
Florida also had six play-
ers make the three teams, r,
including cornerback Joe
Haden and tight endAaron
Hernandez as first-teamers.
, The SEC was the most
represented conference on
the first team, with'll play-
ers, including Tennessee
safety Eric Berry, South
Carolina linebacker Eric
Norwood and Georgia L
punter Drew Butler.
The Big 12 has seven SU
first-team selections, includ-
ing three of the five offed-
sive linemen. l
The tackles were
Oklahoma State's Russell
Okung and Oklahoma's
Trent Williams. Okung is
projected to be a first-round Old I
draft pick in the NFL.
"He's definitely one of.
the best that's ever played of G:
here, there's no question," A$4(
Oklahoma State coach Mike
Gundy said. Yours
Baylor's J.D. Walton was h
the center. Completing the -
offensive line was Idaho
guard Mike luapti.
Notre Dame receiver * New o
Golden Tate and Clemson
running back C.J. Spiller,ferxpi
selected' as an, all-pur- Offer pi
pose-player, round.out the
offense. Lake CLa Re
TCU defensive end Jerry ub criber:
Hughes was the lone repre- n'7 a,,
sentative on all three teams 24 1 hours
from the unbeaten and
No. 3HornedFrogs. Georgia
Tech's Derrick Morgan was P
the other defensive end. ,.'
SFlorida's twin brother Le
offensive linemen, Mike
and. Maurkice Pouncey,
were selected to the second
team.



S Sfl Archable


ACROSS 38 Flower stalks
39 Morse click
1 Marsh bird 40 Slugger Mel -'
6 Granite mine 41 Compass dir;
12 Finally 42 Pasture plaint
(2 wds.) 43 JAMA
14 Green readers
15 Bedding 44 August sign
16 Figures of 46 Once named
speech 48 Jockeys
17 Contented sigh 51 Peanut
18 High sign brittle base
19 Decade 55 Acid in vinegar
number 56 Sawed logs
21 Holm or 57 Jumbles
Woosnam 58 Applies caulk


Get Connecteda
..Getc.nn.^ www.lakecityreprter.com
* Lake City
Oljll, ". Cb Reporter


Answer to Previous Puzzle

SPIA MODE MRS
CQAIMNA.BED BRA .G.
UNERRING I IN T
DEBATE Y'OU
SASIH H E A D
HAINISIOM J AN
HA UL ALII HAZ E
ONLY V OL AREA
CNN JETSAM
OAHU KIMIAIRIT
















Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


DEAR ABBY


Woman is hot and bothered

by husband who means well


DEAR ABBY: How do
you explain to a man how
uncomfortable hot flashes
are? I'm a perimenopausal-
woman who has been mar-
ried for 12 years to a sweet
husband who loves to "shug-
gle." But when I'm having
a hot flash, the last thing I
want is a warm body touch-
ing me. My husband thinks
I'm "mean" and that I'm one
of those "freaky females."
SHow can I make him un-
derstahd that hot flashes hap-
pen, and that it should be OK
for me to ask for some space
until the feeling passes? -
HOT FLASH HILDA
DEAR HILDA: Start
with the basics. Tell him (if
he hasn't already noticed)
that when a woman experi-
ences a hot flash, her skin
suddenly 'feels intensely
warm and she often begins
to perspire - sometimes pro-
fusely. The feeling of heat
can be so strong that some
women suddenly remove
their jackets, and others also
feel an overwhelming urge
to remove their jewelry. For-
tunately, the feeling usually
passes within a few minutes.
If your husband doesn't
get the message, then pre-
heat your oven to 450 de-
grees for 15 minutes, open
the door and ask him to lean
in. Ladies, have you anything
to add?
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I are in our 80s.


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
For many years we used to
entertain during the holi-
days. Now.we wonder where
all our former guests have
disappeared to.
Our annual parties grew
to include' more than 80
friends. Dinner was prepared
by a chef; we had a bartend-
er and a pianist. People said
they looked forward to those
gatherings year after year.
We never expected anry-
one to:entertain us in the
same way, yet even being.
asked out for hamburgers
would have Been such a
treat. Very few reciprocated
in any way except to bring a
few bottles of wine. We miss
-them and.wonder if people
realize that a simple get-to-
gether is always appreciated.
- FOOD FORTHOUGHT,
SPARKS, NEV.
DEAR FOOD FOR'
THOUGHT: Some of the
guests you entertained so,
beautifully may have'been
intimidated because it .was
done oh such a grand scale.
But if my mail is any indica-
tion, it also appears many
people have "forgotten" that


there is a social obligation
that goes with accepting in-
vitations, and that the guests
must reciprocate with an
invitation of some sort in're-
turn.
DEAR ABBY: I work at a
public library and live not far
from where I work. A lot of
people who use the library
live in my apartment build-
ing and I run into them often.
These people never hesitate
to stop me when I'm clearly
off the clock to ask me a slew
of library questions.
.I confess I'm a bit of a
doormat, and I'm afraid to
ask them to leave me alone.
Is there a way to tell those
people to quit harassing me
when I'm not working? I'd'
feel so much better about
myself if I learned how.
- THE ANSWER LADY
DEAR ANSWER LADY:
Look the person in the eye
and say, "That may take
some researching, but I'll be
glad to answer that when I'm
at the library. Ask me then."
However, if you can't find
the courage to say this, then
what you need more than
an answer from an advice
columnist is assertiveness
training. A psychologist: can
give.you a referral or some
pointers.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


.HOROSCOPES


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


THWY'Ig BUILDING ANOTI5E $SUL/AY.---
TIAT R ALt.Y G6TS UNP6D MY SKINF.
vIWAS k.A IAPPI ,g.*!


AIIES (March 21-
April 19): Get involved
in conversations or events
that will help you gain ex-
perience, information or
lkow-how. Love is in the
stars and an interesting
encounter will develop into
something greater if you
frequent old familiar places..

TAURUS (April .20-
May 20): Hold on to your
money. Just because you
see something that some-
one might like doesn't
mean you have to purchase:
it. Impulsive purchases
will cause stress later on
when you are short of cash.

GEMINI : (May 21-
June 20): Openyourhome
to friends and colleagues
who share some of your in-
terests. Creative ideas-put
into practice at home and
work will bring you greater-
opportunities and a part-:
nership' that enables you
to pursue important goals.

CANCER .(June 21-.
July .22): Don't give in..to
anyone trying:to push you
to take on responsibilities
that don't belong to you.
Speak up and let everyone
you have to deal with know
you will not deviate for
someone else's gain. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Watch your back. Not
everyone will be on your
side or willing to do for you
what you would in return.
Love is on the rise and there
can be a happy ending to a
stressful day. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't leave anything
!to chance. You have to take
charge and follow through
with your plans. Accom-
pli:shAent can be yours but
not if you let emotional mat-
ters escalate and stand in
the way of your productiv-
ity.'*****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Avoid pushy people
trying to get you to do
:things you don't want to
do. Keep.busy traveling or
shopping. It will. be much
easier to buy your way out
of, a situation than to talk
your way out -****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Put things aside
that aren't working for you.
Don't trust anyone who -
doesn't have the vision to
give you proper advice. It
will take a creative person
to recognize your potential.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Put your


personality, skills and expe-
rience to work for you and
you will find financial suc-
cess when and where tou
least expect Talks may-be
limited if you aren't willing
to speak from the heart. A
ydea you've been working
on will pay off now. .**
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19):.You may have
plenty of information but to
dole it out for free is not the
answer. Bide your time and
make what you have to of-
fer worth something. Don't
share information regard-
ing your financial position
until you have stabilized
your situation. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Impress some-
one you want to get to
know better by offering as-
sistance or volunteering for
a' cause. Love is in the stars
and a change you make to
your place of residence, or
your everyday routine will
enhance a relationship that
means a lot to you. i****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Don't fall for
compliments or offerings
that are just a ploy to get
your. attention. Change may
be tempting but it isn't like-
ly to fix any existing prob-
lems.. Face facts and deal
with issues head-on. -**


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
SEach letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: P equals U
" K RCZMO FT WB KPRI Z L K GFI
F DBABD. " - G F M Y B K R L " T F D K'D R
HK I DD, W P R M K R P D B NKMMFR
H Z L L ." - GFCM S D I S B M
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I amr an ordinary person who has been blessed with
extraordinary opportunities and experiences." - Sonia Sotomayor


(c) 2009 by NEA, Inc.


12-16


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


IT WOULD MAKE A 600D ToC
FR5 A PANEL DISCUSSION '



*-//. [^ ^ ^g .ryif


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16,2009


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0404 LAKE CITY REPORTER


=�.
;~l~iY


4///1





LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


4B:


A hearing device


for the holidays
� .r; !. . '
Don't skip a beat this holiday season __ ,.^_.
Enjoy improved hearing during every ... JI, - - S URROUND
moment with your friends and family this ' ,, . SOUND
"by ReSound'"
holiday season. b
ReSound Live" is an exclusive
hearing device with appealing ReSound Live
- design. It's virtually invisible, incredibly
lightweight and has astounding battery life.
' And, you enjoy the most cutting-edge digital
F. technology with great sound quality available
f from ReSound.


































Wednesday, December 16,2009


Light up your home

for the holidays, 2C
www.lakecityreporter.com


SDebby Freeman


Unique

offerings,

upcoming

events


directors
and staff of
Columbia
County Senior
Services, Inc., continue to
search for ways in which to
serve the needs of senior
adults and their families in
Columbia County.
We will soon be publi-
cizing events to be pre-
sented early next year at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Beginning in
January, Wellness con-
sultant Carol Ross will
be presenting a series of
classes dealing with dia-
betes. You will also see
an announcement for a
unique training opportu-
nity being jointly presented
by the University of Florida
Memory Disorder Clinic
and the Mayo Memory
Disorder Clinic. This four-
hour training will give fami-
ly and professional caregiv-
ers up-to-date information
on dementia research and
medical trials, legal issues
and caregiver stress.
Beginning Jan. 14, the
Altrusa Club of Lake
City will begin a six-
week Caregiver Summit
designed to give current
caregivers critical informa-
tion about legal, nutritional,
financial and emotional
issues affecting the 24/7
caregiver. The Caregiver
Summit is also designed
to prepare a person who is
not currently a caregiver
to more easily assume
this role in the event of an
unforeseen crisis situation.
S This is a.unique opportu-
nity to hear physicians,
social workers and other
experts in the field of
S aging and caregiver issues.
The Caregiver Summit is a
free gift to the community
from the Altrusa Club of
Lake City. Due to the fact
that these sessions will be
presented in the evenings,
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center staff will be offering
dinner service. The cost
of the meal will be $10.
The LifeStyle Enrichment
. Center staff will also pro-
vide a free respite care ser-
vice for people who cannot
leave their adult loved ones
at home during these train-
ing sessions. Professional
and family caregivers will
learn valuable information
about how to handle the
stresses of caregiving.
To make your reserva-
tions, please contact Debby
Freeman or Carol Shanklin
at (386) 755-0235 or (386)
752-5655.
* Debby Freeman is
the executive director of
Columbia County Senior
Services, Inc.


SFor good health, companionship or just plain fun


ALK


rxa~r~l~rs~sear-~ - ~ -aru -- a - ~~-~ --3~�l I- - � - - ~ -~- --
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Walkers stroll through the Lake City Mall. Many local residents find mall walking a simple and easy form of exercise that is not dependent on the weather.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
(n many days,
people are
waiting to get
inside Lake
City Mall not
just to shop, but to walk.
There are several people
who are "Lake City Mall
Walkers," said Janice
Dorminey, operations and
marketing manager. The
entire perimeter of the mall
is a quarter mile long.
"It's not an organized
walk, but an open walk,"
she said.
Many elderly people
come early mornings
or afternoons to walk,
Dorminey said.
"They like walking in
a safe environment," she
said. "There are no bugs or
dogs and it's comfortable."
Several people from
local senior groups go
to the Mall on Mondays
and. Friday, said Kathy
Wisner, a mall walker coor-
dinator. Safety is an impor-
tant issue for them.
"It's cool in the summer
and warm in the winter,"
she said. "It's always a dry
and safe place."
Lake City Mall is also
located in a nice central
area, and in addition to


exercise, mall walkers do
some window shopping,
shop owners said.
"They stop and look at
my stuff," said Radhika


Dasa, Personal Touch man-
ager.,:
Mall walkers can put in
as much dedication and
consistency to the exercise


as they want, Dasa said.
Some malls have walkers :
come out at the crack of
dawn every morning.
"In Lake City, it's more


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Report
Jane Hess, a manager at The Shoe Dept., explains the features in a pair of sneakers which
are designed to promote weight loss, tone muscle and improve posture - perfect for the
sport of mall walking.


relaxed and a leisure activ-
ity," she said.
"It's fun when people
are with you," Wisner said.
"It's really neat in that


way."
Exercising is critical no
matter what age, Wisner
said. Walking is something
that is not too strenuous.
"We're too sedentary
and spend too much time
in front of computers," she
said. "When people get to
a certain age they sit more.
We encourage anyone to
walk."
Aside from just exercis-
ing, mall walking gives
participants something to
do, Kaitlynne Home, Artsy
Abode sales representative.
A lot of older people sit
around and do nothing,
Horne said. Those that
walk stay healthy, moving
and motivated.
"It's good to see the peo-
ple walking around," she
said. "I hope more people
come to walk the mall."
The mall is open at 7
a.m. Monday-Saturday and
10 a.m. Sunday. Call the
office for more information
about the Lake City Mall
er Walkers at 7554848.
"It's a safe ahd clean
environment for good exer-
cise," Dorminey said.


.i�



��

�.











LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Your Wo"wI' for the Hl liiday


Tips for Decorating

With Candles
FAMILY FEATURES
nothing captures the warmth of the holidays quite *
like the gentle glow of candlelight. This season,
set the mood with delicious holiday scents and .
decorations by making fragrance your centerpiece.
Mom and lifestyle expert Amy Clark says, "I love adding
candles to my mantle or dining room table to create a cozy
atmosphere." She suggests using the new Glade" Candles
Holiday Collection in Apple Cinnamon or limited-edition
Bayberry Spice scents. "These seasonal fragrances will
transform your home into a haven for you and your guests," 3
says Clark. "They are an elegant and affordable way to add
that extra little touch to your holiday d6cor."
Clark offers up simple tips to help you light up your home -
for the holidays with well-designed displays at an affordable
price.

Choose a
Festive Space
Holiday centerpieces on the dining
room table are a beautiful tradition.
But don't limit your creativity to just
one place. Look around your house
for other areas you'can dress up for
the season, including the:
. Mantle
* * m Inside of the fireplace or
on the hearth
m Entry table Lifestyle expert
n Bathroom Amy Clark
m Kitchen
A good rule of thumb is to take up no more than one-third
of a table with. your display, unless the table won't be used
for anything else. This will leave room for people to set down
items without bumping into the display.

Cover Your Bases .,
For surfaces that need to be protected from candle oils, heat
and wax, choose an interesting base for the display. Trays,
beveled mirrors and candle plates are often used. If you are
feeling creative, purchase Epsom salts from the local discount
store to spread around the mirror, creating a snowscape look.

Candle Griupings
Many designers believe that odd-numbered groupings are .,
more pleasing to the eye than even-numbered ones. So gather
candles in groups of three, five or seven.
If you plan to display a.single line of candles, down the
center of a table for example, purchase candles of varying
heights and widths for a more interesting display. If-you don't .
have different sized candles, create different levels with cake
stands or other household items.

Creative Touches
You don't need to buy a lot of extras to make an attractive
display. Loqk through what you already have to get inspired.
Some things to look for:
n Ornaments .. .,...
m Holiday books
n Fabrics and ribbon
a Confetti and beads
. Old holiday cards .
- Natural elements, such as
pine cones, greenery,.
interesting branches or
stones. .
Dress up candles by placing
candy canes or cinnamon sticks
around the display at a'safe - ,
distance from the candle.

With a little imagination, you
can create holiday displays that
make you feel a little merrier all .
season long. " ,




Hostess Gifts -
on Hand
An easy way to ensure that
you have a great hostess gift
is to keep a gift closet. This '
will help you easily pull , .
together a thoughtful gift
when you are invited to a . .
last minute event. GivingL|
* the gift of scent is an excel-
lent way to show a hostess
that you appreciate her. Put
together a cozy gift bag with
Glade Scented Oil Candles
in Apple Cinnamon, a home-
made scarf, bubble bath or a
few of your favorite holiday
recipes. Keeping these items


at your fingertips ensures
you will give a beautiful gift
your hostess will love.


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428















IDon't give a gift to thieves this holiday season


Pierce Kelley


Don't


bank on


a deed


A. B. of Williston asks,
My lender has sued to fore-
close the mortgage on my
home. Due to the current
real estate market, I am
now "upside down" on the
mortgage and I have decid-
ed it is best to just let it go.
I have heard of the terms
"short sale" and "Deed in
Lieu," but I really don't
understand them too well,
as far as what can happen
to me if I agree to one of
those things. What's the deal
with them?

Dear A.B.: First of all,
let's define our terms. A
"short sale" is selling the
home for less than the
mortgage balance, or for
less than what is still owed
on the mortgage. The term
: "Deed in Lieu" means sign-
ing a Deed to your prop-
erty, giving it back to your
mortgage holder, instead
of, or in lieu of, requiring
the mortgage holder to go
through with a mortgage
foreclosure lawsuit, obtain-
ing a judgment for foreclo-
sure and then selling the
house on the courthouse
steps.
Now, with both situ-
ations, the real issue is
whether or not the mort-
gage holder is going to
come after you to recover
the moneys owed and to
obtain a deficiency judg-
ment Anyone who signs a
Deed under a "short sale"
situation without knowing,
for certain, if the mortgage
holder intends to recover
the difference between
,what the house sold'for
and what was owed to the
mortgage holder is mak-
ing a mistake. Generally.
speaking,'however, when
a mortgage holder agrees
to a "short sale" it is also
agreeing to forgive the
unpaid balance. However,
one must be sure of that
before signing.
In a "Deed in Lieu"
situation, a mortgage
holder could still attempt
to recover the difference
between what it sells the
property for and what was
still owing on the property.
By giving a "Deed in Lieu
of Foreclosure," you essen-
tially are giving back the
title to the property in lieu
of requiring the mortgage
holder to go through the
'foreclosure process. It
does not necessarily mean
that waiving or relinquish-
ing its right to sue to recov-
er for the moneys due after
the property is sold. Again,
one must make sure of that
before signing the deed.
The good news, if there
is any good news in any
of this, is that lawmakers
passed a law a couple of
years ago which declared
that the moneys that you
did not have to pay under
either the-"short sale" or
the "Deed in Lieu" sce-
nario could not be taxed
as income. Before that law
took effect, and it became
law in January of 2007
and remains in effect until
Dec. 31, 2012, the debt that
was "forgiven" was consid-
ered as "income" by the
IRS and, therefore, taxable.
I hope I have answered
your question, AB., and, I
hope that your mortgage
holder will either agree to
a "short sale" assumingg
you can find a buyer at any
price) or a "Deed in Lieu,"
without coming after you
for the difference between
the sale price and the mon-
eys you still owe on your
home.
Good luck.

* 'Ask a lawyer' is writ-


ten by attorney Pierce Kelley,
who is a member of the
Florida Bar Association. The
contents reflect his personal
opinions and beliefs.


By DONNA MAITLAN
Special to the Reporter
It's been said that the
true spirit of the holiday
season is in giving, not
receiving.- With this in
mind, it's likely that you
will be spending a bit of
time shopping for presents
with your credit card flying
out of your wallet or purse
like wind-blown snow.
But as you shop in
stores and online, be sure
you're not giving a surprise
gift to an identity thief.
Because the surprise will
be on you - and it won't
be a good one.
Sometimes when you
do business, you may


be asked for your Social
Security number. In many
cases, those asking don't
really need it. If anyone
asks for your Social
Security number or other
identifying information, ask
them why they want it and
whether they absolutely
need it. They can refuse
you service if you don't.
provide it, but consider
whether the service is
worth the risk.
Identity theft is one of
the fastest growing crimes
in America. Someone who
steals your Social Security
number can use it to get
other personal information
about you. Identity thieves
can use your number to


apply for more credit in
your name. Then, they use
the credit cards but leave
the bills for you. Falling
victim to identity theft can
ruin your credit rating and
make things difficult for
months or years to come.
Identity thieves can
obtain your Social Security
number, credit card num-
bers, and personal informa-
tion in a number of ways,
including:
* Stealing wallets, purs-
es, and mail.
* Intercepting personal
information you provide
on an unsecured Web site,
from business or personnel
records at work, and per-
sonal information in your


home.
* Rummaging through
your trash, and public
trash dumps, for personal
information.
* Posing as someone
who needs your informa-
tion, such as a government
agency, employer, bank, or
landlord.
* Buying personal
information from store
clerks, employees, or other
individuals who have the
information.
There are things you can
do to protect your iden-
tity. Don't give out your
Social Security number to
just anyone. Don't carry.
your card in your wallet
or purse; keep your Social


Security card locked away
in a safe place with your
other important papers.
Check your credit
reports once a year, which
you can do for free at
www.annualcreditreport.
com.
Want to learn more?
Read our online fact sheet,
Identity Theft And Your
Social Security Number at
www.ssa.gov/pubs/10064.
html.
If you think someone is
using your number or iden-
tity, contact the Federal
Trade Commission at
(877) 438-4338.
Protect your informa-
tion and you'll enjoy a little
more "peace on earth."


Making your list, and checking it twice - at least


SBy MAE ANDERSON
AP Retail Writer
NEW YORK
S hoppers were
making lists and
checking them
twice this week-
end - and then
sticking to them, holding
out for good deals that ana-
lysts say could be coming
this week.
While heavy traffic and
little sign of clearance dis-
counts during the weekend
are clear improvements for
retailers from last year's
dismal season, many are
still taking a wait-and-see
approach.
"I'm playing chicken
with retailers, still, until
next weekend," said Matt
Schuld, a shopper at a
Target in Portland, Ore.
He said a good deal is
"imperative, as always."
Schuld might win the
staredown. Retailers will
begin amping up deals
this week, NPD analyst
Marshal Cohen said.
'This weekend is the last
weekend for retailers to try
to get whatever they could.
Now it's the consumer's
turn," he said. "Every
retailer will pick a-different
day this week to deepen
the discounts. Fifty percent
off will be the starting
point, and it will go up to
60 percent and 75 percent
off within the store."
He expects shoppers
to spend marginally more
than last year. Electronics
and cold-weather clothing
like sweaters and scarves
are among the most popu-
lar sellers.
Retailers have cut down
on inventory all year and
planned holiday sales well
in advance this year.
BMO Capital Markets
analyst John Morris, who
tracks the amount and the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shoppers walk around the upscale Pembroke Gardens shopping center in Pembroke Pines, Sunday. Shoppers,are shopping,
new research shows, but they ate sticking to their holiday gift lists.


depth of sales through his
"sale rack index" said the
index was up 8 percent
this year but said it wasn't
accelerating like last year.
'"We're still riot seeing
retailers,hit the panic but-
ton," he said. "It's still rela-
tively controlled."
.Grappling with the
weak economy and high
unemployment, consum-
ers have been skittish on
spending this year. But
there are signs that is
improving. The Commerce
Department reported
Friday sales rose 1.3 per-
cent last month, after a 1.1
percent October gain, the
healthiest advance since
August and more than -
double the increase econo-
mists had expected.
In addition,
Thanksgiving weekend


sales were modestly posi-
tive, raising hopes for the
shopping season.
Consumer spending,
which drives 70 percent
'ofU.S. economic activity, .
is crucial to any sustained
rebound.
Meanwhile, online sales
were positive. For the
week ended Friday, online
sales rose 4 percent to
$4.64 billion. From Nov. 1
through Friday, sales rose
3 percent to $19.94 billion,
Internet research firm
comScore said Sunday.
"We saw above average
growth rates, including a
strong end to the week,"
said comScore Chairman
Gian Fulgoni.
Malls across the coun-
try reported full parking
lots but careful shoppers.
"There are definitely


New laws for charitable deductions


From staff reports
WASHINGTON -
Individuals and businesses
making contributions to -
charity should keep in
mind several important
tax law provisions that
have taken effect in recent
years.


Special charitable
contributions
SThis provision, cur-
rently scheduled to expire
at the end of 2009, offers
older owners of individual
retirement accounts a dif-,
ferent way to give to char-
ity. An IRA owner, age 70
or older, can directly trans-
fer tax-free upto $100,000
per year to an eligible
charity. This option, creat-
ed in 2006; is available for
distributions from IRAs,
regardless of whether
the owners itemize their
deductions. Distributions
from employer-sponsored
retirement plans, includ-
ing SIMPLE IRAs and sim-
plified employee pension
plans, are not eligible.
To qualify, the funds
must be contributed
directly by the IRA trustee
to the eligible charity.


Amounts so transferred
are not taxable and no
deduction is available' for
the transfer.
Not all charities are eli-
gible. For example, donor-
advised funds and support-
ing organizations are not
eligible recipients.
Amounts transferred to
a charity from an IRA are
counted in determining
whether the owner has


met the IRA's required
minimum distribution.
Where individuals have
made nondeductible con-
tributions to their tradi-
tional IRAs, a special rule
treats transferred amounts
as coming first from tax-
able funds, instead of
proportionately from tax- '
able and nontaxable funds,

CHARITY continued on 4C


Specializing in adult medical care including:
*High Blood Pressure * Heart Disease
SLung Disease * Gastrointestinal`
SHigh Cholesterol . Diabetes
- Women's Health
Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance plans accepted
* - -e h S - ouhen e 5 l
404 iBN.W Hall f Fme Drive, fLake CityiH FLR^
^^KK386-719.4-2540 ^


more people out there
shopping," said Hana
Ben-Shabat, a partner in
the retail practice at A.T.
Kearney, a global manage-
ment consultant. But she
said they are still looking
for the next wave of dis-
counts.
Traci Ness, 41, at a
Kohl's in Milwaukee, said
she is focused on taking
advantage of discounts.
"I'm using my coupons
more than ever and look-
ing for coupons more,"
she said. "It's almost like a


game in a way to be able to
use your coupons."
At the Mall at Short
Hills, N.J., on Saturday,
traffic was heavy with
shoppers focusing on big
discounts. Bloomingdale's
let shoppers take an
extra 30 percent off on all
reduced handbags, for a
total savings of anywhere
from 45 percent to 65 per-
cent For Saturday only,
AnnTaylor offered custom-
ers a 40 percent discount
off any single full-price
item:


Florida Skin Cancer &
SDermatology Specialists, PA
Robert A. Skidmore, M.D.
Dermatologist
Board Certified
Skin Cancers * General Skin Screening
Now accepting patients
Siat our Lake City Office
Call for appointment: (352) 371-7546
'Dr Skidmore received his medical training at the University of Florida, College
ofMedicine, completed a surgery internship at Bethesda Naval Hospital and
bis residency at the University ofNorth Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Dr Skidmore specializes inmobs skin cancer surgery. ,
Comprehensive Care with Compassion & Professionalism





FREE REVIEW

Do you have the right investments in place to help-you
meet your financial goals?
At Edward Jones, our business is to help people find -
solutions for their long-term financial goals.

If you would like a free review of your retirement account or any of
your other investments to see if they are appropriate for your
long-term goals, please call or stop by today.


H1


Steve Jones, CFP�
Financial Advisor
846 S W Baya Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
386-752-3847


www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428











Page Editor: Tom Mayer 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


Family Features
Life expectancy has
grown dramatically over
'the last century, but not
all those living longer are
living well. But it's never
: too late to make behavior
changes and get preventive


Tips and hints for staying healthy at 50-plus


screenings to help you live
a better and longer life.
* Be tobacco free. To
talk to someone about how,
call the National Quitline at
1-800-QUITNOW.


* Get active. Start small
and work up to 30 minutes
or more of moderate activ-
ity several days a week.
Talk to your doctor first.
* Eat healthy. Lean


meats, fish, vegetables,
fruits, whole grains and fat
free or low fat milk prod-
ucts are best.
* Get immunized.
The right immunizations


can prevent not only the
flu and pneumonia, but
whooping cough and shin-
gles as well.
Screening tests help
check for problems before


symptoms are apparent.
Health experts recommend
the following screenings
for anyone over age 50:
* Colorectal cancer.
* Depression.
* High blood pressure.
* High cholesterol.
* Breast cancer, women.


CHARITY: Deductions and the law
Continued From Page 1A


as would be the case with
regular distributions.

Clothing and
household items
To be deductible, cloth-
ing and household items
donated to charity gen-
erally must be in good
used condition or better.
A clothing or household
item for which a taxpayer
claims a deduction of over
$500 does not have to
meet this standard if the
taxpayer includes a quali-
fied appraisal of the item
with the return. Household
items include furniture,
furnishings, electronics,
appliances and linens.

Monetary
donations
To deduct any charitable
donation of money, regard-
less of amount, a taxpayer
must have a bank record
or a written communication
from the charity showing
the name of the charity
and the date and amount
of the contribution. Bank
records include canceled
checks, bank or credit
union statements, and
credit card statements.
Bank or credit union state-
ments should show the
name of the charity, the
date, and the amount paid.
Credit card statements
should show the name of
S. the charity, the date, and
the transaction posting
S date.
Donations of money
S'-: include those made in
cash or by check, electron-
ic funds transfer, credit


card and payroll deduction.
For payroll deductions,
the taxpayer should retain
a pay stub, a Form W-2
wage statement or other
document furnished by the
employee showing the total
amount withheld for char-
ity, along with the pledge
card showing the name of
the charity.
These requirements for
the deduction of monetary
donations do not change
the long-standing require-
ment that a taxpayer obtain
an acknowledgment from a
charity for each deductible
donation (either money
or property). f $250 or
more. However, one state-
ment containing all of the
required information may
meet both requirements.

Reminders
To help taxpayers plan
their holiday-season and
year-end giving, the IRS
offers the following addi-
tional reminders:
* Contributions are




OMNI n%


deductible in the year'
made. Thus, donations
charged to a credit card
before the end of 2009
count for 2009. This is
true even if the credit card
bill isn't paid until 2010.
Also, checks count for
2009 as long as they are
mailed in 2009 and clear,
shortly thereafter.
* Check that the orga-
nization is qualified. Only
donations to qualified
organizations are tax-
deductible.
* For all donations
of property, including
clothing and household
items, get from the char-
ity, if possible, a receipt
that includes the name
of the charity, date of the
contribution, and a reason-
ably-detailed description of
Sthe donated property. If a
donation is left at a chari-
ty's unattended drop site,
keep a written record of
the donation that includes
this information, as well
as the fair market value of
the property at the time.


e 6are


Home Furnishings


SW Deputy J. Davis Lane,

Lake City (386) 752-3910

www.morrells.com


,� , .. ,
'1 "� '



ii

Spend $99


an gt 1


















olumia

Your marketplace source for Lake City a


H^ggr*a


'nd Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Building a successful business


while the
organiza-
tion may
have gone
through
various phases during the
years, the Columbia County
Builders Association contin-
ues to strive to assist build-
ers and associates - such
as bankers, Realtors and
sub-contractors - at the
local level.
The Columbia County
Builders Association is
comprised of more than 60
builders and associates who
work together for a com-
mon cause - to continue
S growth in Columbia County
and ensure developers and
businesses are aware of
issues that could affect the
construction industry.
"It's important because
this is an association where
people in our industry can
get together, understand
the issues, be kept abreast
of what's going on in the
industry and have a stron-
ger voice," said Roger
Whiddon, incoming asso-
ciation president for 2010.
"I think we're stronger as
a group when we have one
voice per issue, rather than.
have a bunch of us out
there separated."
The association will
continue to push forward
next year with Whiddon
at the helm, taking over
for current president


The 2010 officers for the Columbia County Builder's Association pose for a photograph at the Year End Banquet on Dec. 8.
Pictured are Board of Directors member Alan Moody (from left), program director Jim Curry, membership committee member
Teena Peavey, secretary Lynda Yeany, treasurer Eddie Kurtz, board members Lynda Strickland, Bryan Zecher, Matt Cason,
Don Reed, membership committee member Will Myers and program director Matt Rocco.


Bryan Zecher. The
Columbia County Builder's
Association in 2010 also
will be led by Sammy L.
Keen, first vice president;
Eddie Kurtz, secretary and
treasurer; Teena Peavey
and Will Myers, member-
ship committee; program


directors Jim Curry and
Matt Rocco and its board
of directors, Matt Cason,
Travis Hunter, Don.Reed,
Mark Disosway, Glenn
Jones, Lynda Strickland,
,Douglas Edgley, Alan
Moody, Zecher and execu-
tive officer Lynda M. Yeany.


Zecher said the organiza-
tion helps keep local build-
-ers at the forefront of the
industry, as well as helps
to develop new concepts
and ideas for local builders
to be successful.
"It's gqod for the associa-
tion to be up to par on the


issues important to our
industry," Zecher said.
In the coming year,
the Columbia County
Builders Association plans
to continue its community
involvement. Zecher said
the organization is in the
permitting stage of devel-


oping a new spec-house
that serves as a fundraiser
for the group.
Whiddon said the
group's community involve-
ment won't end there.
"One of the community
service projects we've done
is with the Pregnancy Care
Center, where we helped
remodel an old home into
their new offices, and to
me, that is what we should
be about as an organiza-
tion," Whiddon said. "I'd
like to see us do more
of that. I know times are
tough and people are i
spending a lot, of money to
stay in business ard don't
have a lot of time to donate
to volunteer projects, but.
I think one project a year'
would be good for the asso-
ciation."
Whiddon,'who also was
recently named the organi-
zation's builder of the year,
said he was humbled by
the award.
S"It's great to be recog-
nized by your'peers, obvi-
ously,.and I feelit's a great
honor to be the builder of*
the year especially in these
times," he said:. 'But it just
goes to show, if you're ded-
icated to the association,
you don't have to build a
bunch of houses - that's:
not what builder of the ,,
year is about. It's about
being involved in the asso-
ciation and giving back."


www.hungrvhowies.com


LAKE CITY LAKE CITY LIVE OAK
857 Southwest Main Blvd. 5735 SW State Rd. 247 6852 Suwannee Plaza Lane
in Lake City Plaza comer of SR 242 & SR 247 In Walmart Plaza.
inside the B&B Food Store
755-7050 752-3111 330-0331
DELIVERY * CARRYOUT CARRYOUT ONLY CARRYOUT ONLY


LAKE BUTLER FT. WHITE
280 West Main Street 7905 S.W. Hwy 27
next to Mercantile Bank comer of Hwy. 27 & Hwy. 47
inside the B&B Food Store
496-2878 497-1484
CARRYOUT ONLY CARRYOUT ONLY


1D


,~6f~


.�
�
i.
�II t
'ii
;�s ~.-


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1
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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009

Lake City Reporter





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In Print

and Online
wwVv.lali ecilyreporter.comn


Legal

Request For Proposals
The Union County Housing Authori-
ty is requesting proposals from qualf-
fied individuals or firms for Techni-
cal Assistance. All interested persons
must be familiar with HUD regula-
tions. Proposals should be accompa-
nied by references and a resume for
consideration. The "Scope of Work"
can be obtained by contacting the
Union County Housing Authority
main office which is located at 715
West Main Street, Lake Butler, Flor-
ida 32054. Resumes, references and
proposals will be accepted until 4:00
PM December 30, 2009 and should
be sent to the Attention of the Execu-
tive Director using the above refer-
enced address.


04536579
December 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22
23,2009
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD WILL RECEIVE
BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING: '
SUMMERS :. 'ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL WINDOW REPLACE
MENT LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
ARCHITECT'S PROJECT NO
0926
Date and Time for Receiving Bids
Tuesday, January 19, 2010 at 2:00
pm CCSB Bid File No. 3214
Contractor's Prequalification:
ALL .GENERAL CONTRACTORS
WISHING TO BID THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUALIFIED
NOTE: All construction personnel
who will be working on Schoo
Board of Columbia County property
as part of this project are required b;
Florida law, F.S. 1012.32, to mee
Level 2 criminal background screen
ing requirements. -
Date, Time & Place for Mandator
Pre-Bid Conference: ALL BID
DERS MUST ATTEND THE MAN
DATORY PRE-BID. CONFER
ENCE AT SUMMERS ELEMEN
TARY SCHOOL ADMINISTRA
TION BUILDING, LAKE CITY
FLORIDA, TO BE HELD AT 10:0(
A.M., THURSDAY, JANUARY 7
2010.
)Place for Receiving Bids: Columbia
County School Board, Administra
tive Complex
Purchasing Office, Room 233 - 2nd
Floor, East Wing, 372 West Duva
Street, Lake City, Florida 32055
Telephone (386) 755-8030
Bid Documents Prepared By
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES







-- -hHome Improvemenls...-


CARPENTER rORK
SRemodeling, training, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
. :Call Dean @ 386-965-5331


&LLawn &Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lic
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191


Legal

ARCHITECTS,
3911 Newbeny Road, Suite D, Gain-
esville, FL 32607, (352) 372-8424,
FAX (352) 377-4945
Bid Documents Available from:
Please register at the following web
address to view and print Bid Docu-
ments. http://www.csa-
architect.com/bid_documents.htm
Project Description:
The work includes, but is not limited
to, the replacement of existing win-
dows in three classroom wings at
Summers Elementary School in Lake
City, Florida.
This work includes, but is not limited
to, the removal of existing steel
framed windows and the installation
in the same openings with new alu-
minum window units, with single


hung windows at bottom
, three fixed glass lites abo
poaching and painting is a
work required.
Work will be ongoing wh
Y is in session, with a maxim
E .(2) classrooms being temp
dated as the work schedule
This nrmi t tmv nnlv be


I of units;
yve. Minor
part of the
ile school
um of two
orarily va-
requires.
e hid hv a


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-258-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN JACKIE BUIEY,
deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
HELEN JACKIE BUIEY,' deceased,.
whose date of death was October 27,
2009; File Number 09-258-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
.and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE F PRT PITRI.ATION OP


Legal

da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 25th day
of January, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWTIT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-.
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, PO. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770. : :
04536~11
December 16,23, 30, 2009
January 6, 2010


Florida licensed General Contractor. THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
Dates of Advertisement: December TER THE DATE OF, SERVICE O TAXDEED
)- 16,2009 A COPY OF THIS. NOTICE ON Sec. 197.241F.S.
FOR THE COLUMBIA COUNTY THEM. . Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
SSCHOOL BOARD . All other creditors of the decedent pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
0 Mike Millikin, Superintendent , and other persons having claims or cate- has filed said certificate for a
By: R.M. "Mike" Null, Director of demands against decedent's estate Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
SPurchasing . must file their claims with this court: certificate number and year of issu-
S WTHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE .ance, the description of the property
T 04536542 .DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- and name in which it was assessed is
' December 16, 2009. TION OF THIS NOTICE. as follows.,
1 OF AP ICA N ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED ITH- Certicate Number 1109
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR IN .THE TIME PERIODS SET Year of Issuance. 2007
y TAX DEED - FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF Description of Property: SEC .01
y Sec. 197.241F.S. THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE TWN 7S RNG 15 PARCEL NUM-.
:t Notice is hereby gien 'that the Anna WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. ' BER 04149-711 LOT 11 WILSON
- Fertic Foundation of the- following' NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME SPRINGS COMMNlITY PHASE.
certificate has filed said certificate PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, 2 UNRECORDED: :COMM NE
y for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon. ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) COR OFSE1/4 OF SEC I & RUN
- The certificate number and year of YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE S 942.90 FT, S 46 DG W 48.56 FT
- issuance, the description of the prop- DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH TO POB, CONT S 46 DG W 225
- erty andname in.which it was as- IS BARRED. FT, THENCE N 35 DG W 566.54'
- sessed is as follows: " The date of first publication of this FT THENCE N 20 DG W 50 FT,
- Certificate Number 29 notice is: December 16, 2009. THENCE N 69 DG E 30 FT,
, Year ofIssuance: 2002' Personal Representative: THENCE N 6 DG E 33.54 FT,
3 Description of Property: SEC 24 By: /s/JacquelynBuiey Williams THENCE N 69 DG E 65.34 FT,
, TWN 3S RNG 15 PARCEL NUM- JACQUELYN BUIEY WILLIAMS THENCE N 65 DG E 65.34 89.78
BER 00188-001 & 00188-005 1203 NE Coastline Street FT, THENCE S 36 DG E 565.06 FT
a COMM SE COR OF SEC, RUN W Lake City, Florida 32055 TO POB. WD 1026-1566, WD
- 2651 7 FT FOR POB, RUN N1500 Attorney for Personal Representa-; 1046-1084.
FT, W 623.80 FT, S 1500 FEET TO tive: ' Name in which assessed: KELLY D.
d S LINE OF SEC, RUNE ALONG S EAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR- DELONG
1 LINE TO POB. ORB 772-506. NEYS, P.A. All of said property being in the
, JOINS 00214-000. By //: /" Marlin M. Feagle County of Columbia, State of Flori-
Name in which assessed: TLC MIN- rlin M. Feagle da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
: ISTRIES Florida Bar No. 0173248 deemed according to law, the proper-
SAll of said property being in the 153 NE Madison'Street ty described in such certificate will
County of Columbia, State of Flori- Post Office Box 1653 be sold to the highest bidder at the
da. Unless said certificate shall be re- Lake City, Florida 32056-1653 Courthouse on Monday the 25th day
deemed according to law, the proper- 386/752-7191 of January, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
ty described in such cerulficale will P. DEWITT CASON
be sold to the. highest bidder at the 04536601 :. CLERK OF COURTS
Courthouse on Monday the 25th day Decemberi6, 23,2009 AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
of January, 2010, at 11:00 A.M. ' ' ' TIES ACT; If you are a person with
P.DEWIT CASON . NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR a disability who needs any accom-
CLERK OF COURTS T.X V DEED in order tparticiate in
T... IESA C Sf yotu are t perS.n with ec 197,241 FS. - i . ei ent ,
TISO-Aiyou are a person wth ce is hereby given that tihe i- no cost to you, :t'6- pov5slo of
- a disability wlho.needs ,nyvacLom-.,, n IV, LLCoftherfollowingcertifi.. certain assistance. Peldh ot h a
modation in order to participate in ca has field said certificate for a disability who need any accommoda-
this proceeding, you are entitled, at Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The tion to participate should contact the
'no cost to you, to the provision of certificate number and year of issu- ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
certain assistance. Persons with' a: ance, the description of the property Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
: disability who need any accommoda- and name in which it was assessed is within two (2) working' days of your
tion to.participate should contact the as follows: receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569, Certificate Number; 351 ing impaired call (8001 955-8771 if
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428, Year of Issuance: 2007 you are voice impaired call (800)
Within two (2) working days of your Description of Property: SEC 33 955-8770.
receipt of this notice; you are hear- TWN 2 RNG 16 PARCELNUM
ing impaired call (800)905-8771; if.' TWN 2S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
ng spared call (800)BER 01816-005 THE N 192.64 FT 04536613
you are voice impaired' call (800) OFTHES951.37FTOFSW 1/4 OF December 16,23, 30,2009 ,
955-8770. . NW 1/4. ORB 463-168, 566-051, January 6, 2010
045 46598 633-694.' NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
04 r 16, 2 , 29 Name in which assessed: JEFFREY TAX DEED
December 16, 23,30, 2009 D. SHELTON Sec. '197.241 FS.'
January 6, 2010 All of said property being in the Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
S County of Columbia, State of Flori- pon IV, LLC of the following certifi-
I ..h. i le o ds..;A su UAUIO(4L uo


" 5On Tuesday, December 22
SSanta will be in Lake City to talk to boys & girls.
The calls will be made between 6-8pm and carried live on
SPowir Country 102.1 FM


If yqu would like for Sant. to call your child, just fill out
the form below. Additional forms may be picked up at the
S Lake City Reporter, the Lake City Police department,
the Florida Highway Patrol or Power Country 102.1 FM
Mail or bring the completed forms to
the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval St., Lake City,. FL 32055


Child's Name Age

Address: ' Phone:__

Parent's Name:. ''

Brothers & Sisters: -

Ages:

Seen Santa this year? 0 Yes 3 No (Check One)

Where?

Pets? 1 Yes 0 No (Check One)

Type: Name: ' __

Gifts he or she requested:

Good things the child has done through the year:






c' community.
Source.
S lake City Reporter
Sponsored by: .
Florida Highway Patrol, Power Country 102.1 FM, the Lake City Police Dept. and the Lake City Reporter


,cace has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 1128
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 13
TWN 7S RNG 16 PARCEL NUM-
BER 04193-003
E 1/2 OF E 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF NE
S1/4
Name inwhich assessed: MICHAEL
,MALDONADO & LISA AVALOS
All of said -property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da.'Unless said certificate shall be re-
'deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse'on Monday the 25th day
of January, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any. accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within twq '(2) working days of your
receipt if this notice; if youitre hear-'
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04536599
December 16, 23, 30, 2009
January 6, 2010
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the Tar-
pon IV, LLC of thelfollowing certifi-
cate has filed said certificate for a
Tax Deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate number and year of issu-
ance, the description of the property
and name in which it was assessed is
as follows:
Certificate Number: 193
Year of Issuance: 2007
Description of Property: SEC 00
TWN 00 RNG 00 PARCEL NUM-
BER 00961-000 LOT 50, 51, 52 &
53 UNIT 17 THREE RIVERS ES-
TATES.
Name in which assessed: WILLIAM
STEWART
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 25th day


Legal

of January, 2010, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT; If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771;.if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.
04536612
December 16, 23, 30, 2009
January 6, 2010


100 n Job
100 Opportunities


04536549

SAVAGE

Drivers Wanted
Savage Services is seeking
professional exp. drivers for the
Lake City facility.
Class A CDL with.HAZMAT &
Tanker endorsements required.
* Competitive Pay
* Complete Benefit
Package including
401K
* Home Everyday
* Paid Holidays and
Vacations ,
* Quarterly Incentive
Bonus
Only serious applicants need
apply in person at:
Florida Crown Career
Center*
- 1389 W Hwy 90,Ste. 170.
Lake City, Florida.
* Located across from Florida
Highway Patrol Station

04536592
Customer Service
Representative
Busy office needs self
motivator for a fast paced call
Center, great customer service,
skills. Call center experience a
� plus. Hours 8-5 Mon. - Fri.
Background chepk req'd.
Bilingual a plus (please
indicate) Sendresume
,qp "- E-L ,-Crty.FI. 320.6-_,

Busy Law Office seekfhig'ly '
motivated dependable secretary for
FT position. Experience preferred,
salary based on experience. ;:;
Mail resume to PO Box 2064,."
. Lake City, Florida 32056 '.
CLASS A CDL Long haul.driver.
Must have frameless'dump exp.,
Must pass drug test. Requires out
of town travel. 386-719-9482.
between 9a & 5p , :
DRIVER .
Seven-Up Snapple Southeast is :,
seeking an experienced Route
Driver with a Class A CDL and.
� previous DSD experience fora a:
local Lake City route. Requires ai ;
good driving record,,pass,
background check, drug and: . ..
driving tests. Salary'based on
experience and benefits! E-mail.'
resume to kevin.keinyv(dpsg.com. .
SPFWP-EOE/M/F/HV ;


Gainesville/Ocala Plaintiffs
Personal Injury Firm seeking .'
litigation associate with 3-5 years
trial experience, preferably in Civil
Litigation. Salary and bonuses,
commensurate with experience.*.
Please fax resume and cover letter
to (352)379-9007., ,
Group Fitness Instructor.needed
at Anytime Fitness. Experience
req. Please call Leah @ '
386-754-1528 or pick up an
application at Anytime Fitness.
HELP WANTED: Exp breakfast
cook and wait staff needed. Apply
in person at Quail Height CC
Hwy 247 between 9am - 2pmi.
International Company seeking
self motivated individuals for
direct marketing business, '
$500-$1500/mo PT/FT Free info
www.income2profits.com
Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
Personal Trainers needed at
Anytime Fitness. Certification
and experience required.
Call Leah @ 754.1528

















RI I fIiS :yem
& t pl ication.


2D


'T#li TTJ


Rnmgi^u-


hiuiiii^








Classified Department: 755-5440
''. 17.


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009
iaijj mmtwia*tzwnag wg v -r1^i>MrfJ^^'-^


N1T


A11)


Any New
Nissan Frontier SE
Crew Cab or King Cab
$3,123 OFF


2010 Nissan Maxima SV
TOP OF THE LINE! 'LOADED PLUS'
as 34,250
y 28,876


2009 Nissan Altima
2.5S Loaded
O2w18,993 I
" SC77 1 cc


2010 NissanTitan King Cab Si
... 31,275
,ym22,792
S8.483 OFF


ALL SIAX DAYS
S2009 Nissan Versa
5 TO CHOOSE FROM
1 $2,042 OFF ANY MODEL


2010 Nissan Cube 1.85wlAerokit
..as17,820
5m16,620
-1.200 OFF


2010 Nissan X-Terra , X or SE
'4x2or,4x4
$2,823


NMI'
pp -


$5,256 OFF


1ADED'


DED'


* r..


~ri~ll~
.9r-


<"*�..,


:*4l i














4D

10 Job
100 Opportunities
TOWER CLIMBER wanted.
Must be experienced.
Must have drivers license.
Call Don at 386-752-1100.

120 Medical
1 Employment
Busy Outpatient Surgery Center
has immediate openings. for
FT/PT RNs and Certified Surgical
Technicians. with previous
multi-specialty experience.
Please email resumes to:
administration(lcsurgervcenter.com
or fax: 386-487-3935
DENTAL ASSISTANT needed
F/T position Mon - Fri 9-5.
Salary based on experience.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3122
LPN or RN needed On-call
3PM-11PM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V
PT Medical Assistant for
.busy medical clinic. Lake City
area. Send resume to:
836 SW Main Blvd. Ste. 102,
Lake City, Florida 32025

240 'Schools &
2 Education,

04536136
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced
* Nursing Assistant, $429
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstraintiegservices.com
: Wanted Career
Motivated Students!
If you are seeking a new career in
a high demand field, then get your
Degree or Certificate in Logistics
& Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available for
qualified students. Classes start
01/06/2009, call Lake City Com-.
munity College, (386) 754-4492.

310 Pets & Supplies
AMERICAN
Singing Canary
$50'
386-961-9188.
Apricot TOY POODLE CKC
(w/papers), shots & health cert.,
hold w/dep. til Christmas,
Swks -12/18 $400. 386-719-4900.
BEAUTIFUL CONGO
' African Gray. 5 mbtbld.
$650 .
' 386-961-9188
BLUE PIT bull puppy, male. -
ADBA. Parents on Premisis. Shots
and health certs. $400.00
386-3t5-1740
CKIC Toy Pekingese female..
Fawn/black mask. Under 10 lbs.
8 months. Spayed, all shots til
10/2010. $300. 386-963-1211
Free bird/hunting dog
of some sort.
SFemale, 1-2 y/old, stray.
Very good dog. 386-752-0523


Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free fronl intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
3 Supplies
LOOK, Registered Quarter horse,
mare with papers, plus 2 horse
trailer with tack room, $2,500
OBO, Call 386-752-6724


401 Antiques
ANTIQUES WANTED
Fum., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

FROST FREE Refrigerator.
White 18 cu ft.,
Works good. $150.00
386-754-9295 or 984-0387


403 Auctions

0453(6471
PUBLIC AUCTION
Trucks, Vehicles, Tractors,
Misc. Tools.
Consignments Welcome
Sat. Dec. 19th at 9am
6 mi. West of 1-75 on US 90
Atkinson Realty & Auction
AB:1141 800-756-4098
www.atkinsononline.com


408 Furniture
LIKE NEW! Nice King Size
Pillow top bed. Matching set
$250.00. or make offer.
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.


Like New: Simmons sofas, end
tables, Dixie Wicker Bedroom
Suite, Broyhill China/Hutch, Table
& Chairs; 15' Glass/Brass Wall
Units & More. Please call to set an
appointment, 1-386-438-0285
or 1-813-951-7289

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
New and Used Tractors
SZero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315

Machinery &
411 Tools
SCraftsman 10in radial arm saw.
Excellent condition on Craftsman
rolling cabinet, asking $275.00.
386-754-1747


416 Sporting Goods
GUN SHOW
Live Oak Armory
Dec. 19th Sat. 9-5 Dec 20 Sun 9-4.
CANCELED WEAPONS
CLASSES DAILY.
BRING YOUR GUNS TO
SELL OR TRADE.
GunTraderGunShows.com


New Home Sales

Consultant Wanted

Excellent Commission Based

Pay and Benefits

Fax Resume to 509-756-2869
or email mh newhomeiobs@vahoo.com

I Maronda Homes























If you have automotive sales
experience.- Lets Talk!


An Unlimited Earning Potential



Health 8 Life Insurance
Apply in Person - No phone al

We offer 90West

Chrysler-Dodge-Jeep Lake City


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
We Buy Junk: cars, trucks,
tractors, trailers, scrap metal,
AC's and batteries. NO MH's
Call 386-965-1423 or 365-4879

430 'Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
-Must be Pie-Paid.


450 GoodThings
to Eat
PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420
The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorvillc)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

630 Mobile Homes
J630 for Rent
2 br/2 full bath MH
ready to rent Ft White & on
private property. $600.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2& 3br off 252 in Suwannee
County. No pets (horses OK)
1st month & deposit.
386-961-1482.
2B/2BA HOUSE
$500 a month.
$500 deposit
Call 954-258-8841


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent .
S2br/2ba MH. on 1/2 ac. lot.
Nice area. Call to see!
$600 mo. $600 security
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 security deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243
3/2, w/ screened porch. Quiet,
clean country park. No pets.
$550.mo + Deposit. References
required. 386-758-2280.
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.
FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in Branford
area.$500 security, $700.mo
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3br/2ba MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500. move in. $575. mo.
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Nice 4b/2ba on 3 ac. 3 mi out Ft
White, pff CR 18. Niblack Ave.
New CH/A. porch. $750. mo plus
dep. no pets 386-497-1144. Jerry
Remodeled 3/2 DWMH's. Include
yard maint. & yearly carpet clean-
ing Shady Oaks. S of town on 441.:
$650.mo. 386-208-4702
VERY CLEAN 2b/2ba. Covered
patio, front & back. No pets. State
Rd 100 @ Union County line.
$600 month. Call 904-966-0765.
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as .
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
move in tomorrow 386-344-0830


Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
04 PALM 2000sf. 3br/2ba (Never
lived in) Was $88K now $60K.
$450mo w/$3200 cash. First Home
Buyer. Plywood floors, Smart
Panel lap siding, (2) patio doors,
office retreat. Includes: Del & Set.
Gary Hamilton (386)758-9824
BY OWNER 3br/2ba Fleetwood
Doublewide. Many extras,
,$19,000. You Move! 3
86-454-4195
1999 REPO 24X48
Good Shape. $15,000. OBO
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
FOR SALE
-4 Bedroom/2 Bath
. on half acre Lot.
$3,000 down/ $550. month
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
NO MONEY DOWN.
When you own your own Land.
-3 Bed $227/month
-4 Bed $333/ month.
-5 Bed $559/month
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
2010 SINGLEWIDE
Set up on your Land
$21,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yalioo.com
Palm Harbor
3/2 HUGE, Loaded
14 houses to choose from
On Your Lot!
Starting at $399 per month
800-622-2832

Mobile Home
650 & Land
Owner Financing. 2 Ig. MH's
w/acreage. Jasper, Lake City.
Pond. $725-$900mo.
386-590-0642/867-1833


{650 Mobile Home
J650 & Land
Modular, New, 3br/2ba,
1/2 acre close in, Higher insulated
plus windows, driveway, decks,
and much more. Reduced to sell.
Possible Owner Finance.
Gary 386- 758-9824
www.garyhamiltonhomes.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

!LUXURY HOMES!
* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649 per mo. !!

$299 MOVES YOU IN

FREE RENT
? 200 FREE CHANNELS
* BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

!!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
(Accepting Secion 8)
POOL
386-758-8029
(Bad Credit OK)

$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
(386) 755-2423


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Classified Department: 755-5440


710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent
04536086
Sugarmill Apts
Lake City, FL
386-758-5505
Move in Special $500. dep
1st month Rent Free!
/ 2Br/2Ba.
Rent $725 ~ Deposit $500
. 3Br/2Ba
Rent $795. - Deposit $500
Pets are Welcome
1700 sf X-Clean 2/2 second
story, deck, trees, private country
acre on NW side. $600 mo + dep.
No dogs 386.961.9181
2BR/1BA DUPLEX Apt.
$565. mo includes water,
sewer and garbage.
386-965-2922
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Extremely Clean
$650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
CONDO for rent. $750,mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/1.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578 �
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
Ig master br, very conveniently
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty
- of storage. Quiet. Pets under
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, Iv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled, 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Studios & 1Br's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size �
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
. From $525 plus security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
1 ROOM furnished
efficiency. Lights, water
and cable included.
$350. mo. 386-758-5671
Great Country Living. Furnished
Park Model Trailers. $500 per
month all utilities provided. Call
386-961-8540/386-755-4945
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool..
24 hour office, laundry & vending
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
730 Unfurnished
1730 Home For Rent
3br/lba house. CH/A, All appli-
ances, $750.mo. 1st, last & sec.
141 NE Montrose Ave.
(386)697-8893 or (305)962-2666.


3BR/2.5BA, Fireplace, fenced
back yard, hardwood floors.
Lake Forest area. $900. mo.
386-755-2672 1
3BR/2BA Brick w/2 car garage,
CH/A, at 101 SW Hummingbird
Glen. $900. mo. $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
3BR/2BA on 10 ac., LR, DR,
fireplace, deck, CH/A, shed w/
shop area. $650. mo $650. dep.
904-964-2210 or 904-796-7777


A4BR 2BA HUD Home!
*ONLY $215/mo!!
5%dn 15yrs @ 8%apr for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7782 .


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


730 f Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.
Cute 2/1,414 SE Lomond. CH/A,
Washer/Dryer, Fenced, Dogs OK.
$625 per mo + utils OR $250 wk
including the utils. Go look
through the windows & then call
Florida Homes & Land 755-5936
or email john@johnstanford.com
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres. approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
Office Space located at Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-961-1086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135

770 Condos For Rent
3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets: Ref. req'd
$1000 mo, $1000 dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm
St. Augustine Beach 3 Br 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable �
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
-newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
Sto advertise "any preference,
imitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing'custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
State which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale.
3/2'2000+sf on .5acre built 2007
many extras, stonehenge S/D,
privacy fence, sprink. sale/rent/
lease. $185k. 850-380-0275


HURRY LAST CHANCE
$8000 FT.HB credit
New 3/2 Modular 1200 sf
1/2 acre upscale& close-in
loaded Decks Driveway A/C .
well septic concrete foundation
$665 mo w/ 4K dn Owner finance
avail Gary (386) 758-9824 or
garyhamiltonhomes.com
820 Farms &
Acreage


10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


940 Trucks
1995 FORD XLT extra cab.
Centurion pkg. Matching topper.
Auto., showroom cond. $3,500.
(352)339-5158
1996-3500 CHEVROLET, 4WD
Dually, 454 motor, AT, Good
mechanical condition. $5,900. obo
386-755-4896 or 397-4849
2007 Toyota Tundra SR5 Double
Cab 26,000 miles 8 Cylinder
TRD 4X4 $22000 firm
Call 386-688-1023 for details

950 Cars for Sale
2003 VW JETTA GL
$4,300.00
386-365-3326

97 Lincoln Towncar
108.345 miles. AC,
Runs great. $2695.00 obo.
386-752-4855

952 Vans & Sport
95 Util. Vehicles
Great work truck in fair cond.
1991 4X4JeepCherokehoe Laredo.
$700. obo 850-361-9926 or
williamdees08(5vahoo.com


SI www.lakecityreporter.com
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...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


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^^^^^^^^^^


ADVERTISE IT HERE!

Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or boat here for 10 consecutive days.
If your vehicle does not sell within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your ad for
an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with a description of your vehicle. The price of
thevehicle must be listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, check or credit card. Just
include a snapshot or bring your vehicle by and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the same vehicle in print and online.


2005 Ford F-150 XLT
Super Cab, 4 wheel drive,
26,000 miles, 1 owner,
excellent condition.
$19,500 consider trade-in
Call
386-752-1364
386-965-4340


1991 4x4 Jeep 1u9 L-lnco1n
Cherokee Laredo 'Town Car
Cherokee Laredo 108,345 miles, AC,
Great work truck in fair runs great.
condition.
$700 OBO $2,695 OBO
(850)361-9926 or call
williamdeesO8@yahoo.com 386-752-4855


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2003 VW Jetta
GL

$4,300

(386)365-3326


In Print, Online




1 Low Price!


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2009


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