Citation
The Lake City reporter

Material Information

Title:
The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title:
Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. : 1967)
Creator:
Lake City reporter
Place of Publication:
Lake City, Fla
Publisher:
John H. Perry
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily (Monday through Friday)[<1969>-]
Weekly[ FORMER 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Community Newspapers Inc., Todd Wilson - Publisher. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
ABZ6316 ( LTUF )
33283560 ( OCLC )
000358016 ( AlephBibNum )
sn 95047175 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text









Suwannee Lights Christmas trees


Trip the ii 000021 120110 ****3-DIGIT 32
than 5 LIBOF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
before 205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


Sunday, December 13, 2009


.ping


well.
C


City


Winner is...
Mark Ingram hands Tide
first- Heisman Trophy.
Sports, IB







Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 135, No. 283 0 $1.00


Joining ranks across America


"71,'


TONY BRITTILake City Reporter
Veteran John Henry Douglas (sitting) places his hat over his heart while Columbia High School JROTC cadets salute as a
wreath is laid in honor of Purple Heart Medal recipients. More than 50 people attended a Wreaths Across America ceremony


in Olustee Park Saturday.



HONOR RING


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter,com
r ore than
150 people
gathered
at Olustee
_A V Park
Saturday afternoon in the
cold rain to pay homage to
veterans during a wreath-
laying ceremony.
The ceremony was part
of the Wreaths Across
America ceremony in
which American Legion
posts across the coun-
try simultaneously laid
wreaths at more than 300
sites to remember fallen
soldiers, to honor troops
and veterans and to teach
children the value of free-
dom. The program is tra-
ditionally held the second
Saturday of December.
"It's important to hold
this event annually because


all the veterans here'each
has an incredible story,"
said American Legion
Post 57 historian Susan
Palmer. "The veterans are
very humble people and
they don't brag and talk to .
people about their exploits,
but they've done some
amazing things and this is
the least thing that we can
do to honor what they've
done for our country and
the sacrifices they've made
over the years."
During the hour-long
ceremony, guests of honor
laid holiday wreaths for the
Army, Navy, U.S. Marine
Corps, Coast Guard,
Merchant Marines, Air
Force, POW and MIAs,
as well as veterans who
earned the Purple Heart
Medal. The wreaths were
laid at the various markers
in Olustee Park.'


TRADITION


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Veteran Alma Decker and a Columbia High School JROTC
,cadet prepare to place a holiday wreath on the U.S. Army
marker in Olustee Park during Saturday's wreath-laying pro-
gram.


Laying the groundwork

Private prison:

would impact

public services


Prison would
require water,
other purchases.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The possibility of having
a new private correctional
facility built in Coluinbia
County has the potential to
impact the area's infrastruc-
ture as the project involves
water, sewage and utility
needs.
The Federal Bureau of
Prisons is considering one
or more contractors to build
a privately owned and oper-
ated, 1,250-bed correctional
facility in Columbia County.
The. prison would house
male, criminal, non-violent,
illegal aliens and could pro-
vide up to 250 non-federal
jobs at no taxpayer expense,
according to a public meet-
ing Nov. 17.
!t


INSIDE
* Construction dollars
kept local, exec. says, 3A,
Columbia County is one;
of two proposed sites for
the prison. Alternately,
federal officials are also
considering contracting
the prison at a location in:
Baldwin, Mich., or using
both'the Columbia County"
and Baldwin, Mich., sites. ;
During a public hearing
last month at the Columbia
County Public Library West
Branch, 'Isaac J. Gaston
of the U.S. Department
of Justice Federal Bureau
of Prisons said due to an
increase in the federal
inmate population, the
Federal Bureau of Prisons
has a-need for additional
.bed space to accommodate -
up to 2,500 low security,
PRISON continued on 6A


Weather doesn't'

dampen drive of

Dream Machine,


Motorcyclists
turn out, collect
hundreds of toys.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Despite dreary weather
that canceled a scheduled
ride for many, a local fund-
raiser" received several
hundred toys from motor-
cyclists Saturday as part of
the Eighth Annual Dream
Machine Toy Ride.
Christmas Dream
Machine, a charitable orga-,
nization which provides
toys and clothes to children
meeting its criteria, is cel-
ebrating its 21st Christmas
as community agency.
Christmas Dream


Machine founder and direc-
tor Mealy Jenkins said the
donations will help to-fill
the lists of children's names
that have not been chose
from the organization'
Christmas tree.
'We have 323 names still"
left and we're hoping these
donations will help take
up a large sum of those,"
she said. "This is just a big
help with the toys and the
money. We'll shop with the
money they gave us, aid
toys we'll match-up With
the children and we'll take,
the money and go buy the
clothes."
Ralph Murray, an orga-
nizer of the Dream Machine
Toy Ride, said contributions
DREAMS continued on 3A


Community responds to annual food drive :


Reporter effort
collects 7 pallets
of food locally.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Local newspaper carriers
collected several pallets of
food for the local food bank
Saturday, successfully end-
ing the Lake City Reporter
Second Annual Community


Food Drive.
Lake City Reporter's cir-
culation manager, Russell
Waters, said seven pallets
of food were collected dur-
ing this year's event.
"The food is going to the
Food Bank of Suwannee
Valley' and all the food will
be earmarked for Columbia
County use only," he said.
The Second Annual Lake
City Reporter Community
Food Drive took place from


Dec. 6 through Saturday.
During the food- drive,
Lake City Reporter news-
paper carriers collected
canned goods and non-per-
ishable food items from
customers, subscribers and
local businesses. Much of
the food items were left by
subscribers who placed the
canned goods and other
foods next to their mailbox-
es; and the carriers brought
the food to the Lake City


Reporter office.
"It was important to hold
the community food drive
for another year because of
its success the first year and
the fact that there's actually
more need this year than
ever," Waters said. "We're
very pleased with our turn-
out."
Food Bank of Suwannee
Valley operations manager
FOOD continued on 3A


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter'
Lake City Reporter employees Joe Smith (from left), Priscilla
Jaime, Lynda Strickland, Russell Waters and Sangia Cothran'
prepare'and pack donated food items to be given to the Food
Bank of Suwannee Valley for Columbia County needs.


1 84264 002 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


78 6
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, I OA


c~"p


Opinion .................
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles ................


TODAY IN
NATION
A 'godless' politician
can't hold N.C. office?


COMING
TUESDAY-
What's happening
at your school.:


........ "' . .. . . .2 3 0 0 0


LAKE CITY � . V Fi? ]r J

'MEDICAL CENTER VVj. i i 4 GIl ei i,


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


12P H FLORIDA
ezmatch (. A3. Lol . iP

Friday: Friday: Saturday: - Saturday: Saturday: , Saturday:
12-22-36-43 12 6-8-21-24-35 Afternoon: 3-6-8 Afternoon: 8-8-4-6 5-33-46-47-49-52 X5 1-5-12-13-58-21
Evening: 0-2-4 Evening: 9-5-3-8 x5


AROUND THE NATION



N.C. Constitution: No God, no city council seat


SBy ALYSIA PATTERSON0
Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C.
A sheville City
Councilman
Cecil Bothwell
believes in end-
ing the death
penalty, conserving water
and reforming government
- but he doesn't believe in
God. His political opponents
say that's a .sin that makes
him unworthy of serving in
office, and they've got the
North Carolina Constitution
on their side.
Bothwell's detractors are
threatening to take the city
to court for swearing him
in, even though the state's
antiquated requirement
that officeholders believe
in God is unenforceable
because it violates the U.S.
Constitution.
"The question of wheth-
er or not God exists is not
particularly interesting to
me and it's certainly not
relevant to public office,"
the recently elected 59-
year-old said.
Raised a Presbyterian,
Bothwell began question-
ing Christian beliefs at a
young age and considered
himself an atheist by the
time he was 20. He's an
active member of the
Unitarian Universalist
Church of Asheville and he
still celebrates Christmas,
often hanging ornaments
on his Fishhook cactus.
Bothwell ran this fall on
a platform that also includ-
ed limiting the height of
downtown buildings and
saving trees in the city's
core, views that appealed
to voters in the liberal-


leaning community at the
foot of the Appalachian
Mountains. When Bothwell
was sworn into office on
Monday, he used an alter-
native oath that doesn't
require officials to swear
on a Bible or reference
"Almighty God."
That has riled conserva-
tive activists, who cite a
little-noticed quirk in North
Carolina's Constitutiori that
disqualifies officeholders
"who shall deny the being
of Almighty God." The pro-
vision was included when
the document was drafted
in 1868 and wasn't revised
when North Carolina
amended its constitution
in 1971. One foe, H.K.
Edgerton, is threatening to
file a lawsuit in state court
against the city to chal-
lenge Bothwell's appoint-
ment.
"My father was a Baptist
minister. I'm a Christian
man. I have problems with
people who don't believe
in God," said Edgerton,
a former local NAACP
president and founder of
Southern Heritage 411, an
organization that promotes
the interests of black
southerners.
The head of a conserva-
tive weekly newspaper
says city officials shirked
their duty to uphold the
state's laws by swearing in
Bothwell. David Morgan,
editor of the Asheville
Tribune, said he's tired of
seeing his state constitu-
tion "trashed."
Bothwell can't be forced
out of office over his athe-
ist views because the .
North Carolina provision is
unenforceable, according


to the supremacy clause
of the U.S. Constitution.
Six other.states, Arkansas,
Maryland,-Pennsylvania,
South Carolina, Tennessee
and Texas, have similar
provisions barring atheist
officeholders.
In 1961, the U.S.
Supreme Court reaffirmed
that federal law prohib-
its states from requiring
any kind of religious test
to serve in office when
it ruled in favor of a
Maryland atheist seeking
appointment as a notary
public.
But the federal protec-
tions don't necessarily
spare atheist public offi-
cials from spending years
defending themselves in
court. Avowed atheist Herb
Silverman won an eight-
year court battle in 1997
when South Carolina's
highest court granted him
the right to be appointed as
a notary, despite the state's
law.
Bothwell said a legal
challenge to his appoint-i
ment would be "fun," but
believes his opponents'
efforts have more to do
with politics than religious
beliefs.
"It's local political oppo-
nents seeking to change
the outcome of an election
they lost," Bothwell said.
Bothwell, who's lived
in Asheville nearly three
decades and wrote the
city's best-selling guide
book, said his spiri-
tual views don't matter to
most of his constituents.
Bothwell is a registered
Democrat but didn't run on
a party ticket in the non-
partisan Council election.


In this December 8 photo Cecil Bothwell takes the oath of office for the AshevilleCity Council.
What's widely regarded as an outdated quirk in North Carolina's Constitution has Bothwell
fighting for his political life. Asheville councilman Cecil Bothwell's opponent.says the admitted
athiest can't serve because the law disqualifies candidates who "deny the being of Almighty
God."


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Stars turn out to honor producer


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - The
A-list dinner party drew top perform-
ers and singing legends.
George Clooney, Matt Damon,'
Bruce Willis, Larry David, Brad Pitt
Sand Angelina Jolie gathered around
}jrry Weintraub's table at the posh
:;UNICEF Ball in the Beverly Wilshire
-Hotel ballroom Thursday night to
Honor the legendary producer's phil-
anthropic work. Clooney presented
Weintraub with the Danny Kaye
SHumanitarian Award, named after
,the late singer-actor.
"When it comes to charities,
;nobody guilts better," Clooney joked
about Weintraub to the crowd.
Weintraub's wife, singer Jane
'Morgan, serenaded her husband
,with the tunes "Ten Cents a Dance"
,and "Big Spender" as hundreds of
*attendees noshed dessert: chocolate
:lava cakes and waffle cone sundaes.
Other performers at the benefit
'included Tony Bennett, Frankie Valli
land Paul Anka, who rewrote the lyr-
;ics to Frank Sipatra's "My Way" in
,Weintraub's honor.
SBorn in the Bronx in 1937,
:Weintraub began working in show
:business in the 1950s and '60s,
;managing musical acts such as John
,Denver, The Four Seasons and The
,Moody Blues.-He went on to pro-
duce Hollywood films like "Diner,"
"Nashville," "The Karate Kid" and
'"Oh, God!" Weintraub produced all
'three of the "Ocean's Eleven" movies
-starring Clooney, Pitt and Damon.

Kendra Wilkinson
delivers baby boy
INDIANAPOLIS - Former
Playboy Playmate Kendra Wilkinson
Sand her NFL hus-
band Hank Baskett
are the new parents
', of a baby boy.
Kira Costello,
Wilkinson's pub-
Slicist, says Hank
Randall Baskett IV
Wilkinson was delivered Friday
in Indianapolis,
where his father is a wide receiver
for the Indianapolis Colts. He
weighed in at 9 pounds, 5 ounces.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
George Clooney (left) and producer Jerry Weintraub pose together at the UNICEF
Ball honoring Weintraub in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Thursday.


It's the first child for the 24-year-
old reality TV star and former Hugh
Hefner girlfriend and the 27-year-old
Baskett. The two wed June 27 in a
ceremony at the Playboy mansion
in Los Angeles, where Wilkinson
lived for four years and starred with
Hefner in the E! reality show "The
Girls Next Door."
Hefner posted a congratulatory
message on Twitter, saying, "What a
wonderful Christmas present."

Burglary reported at
Nicky Hilton's home
LOS ANGELES - Police say they
are investigating a burglary at the
Los Angeles home of Nicky Hilton.
Officer Gregory
Baek says police
were called Tuesday
afternoon and were
told that some
Unidentified items
Were missing from
the home. He had no
Hilton further details.
Nicky Hilton, a
clothing designer, is the younger sis-
ter of Paris Hilton and granddaugh-
ter of hotel magnate Barron Hilton.
Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan and
Orlando Bloom are among several


young celebrities whose homes have
been burglarized in recent months.
Four people have pleaded not guilty
to charges involving the theft of $3
million in jewelry, designer clothes
and other items.

Eelections board ends
exam of 'Idol' runner-up
RALEIGH, N.C. - Elections
officials dropped an investigation
into 2003 "American Idol" runnerup
Clay Aiken's voter registration on
Wednesday, weeks after the singer
ruffled feathers by slamming some
local school board candidates on his
blog.
The Wake County Board of
Elections agreed there was enough
evidence to indicate Aiken likely
voted unlawfully there while living
in a neighboring county. But the
board declined to seek a more thor-
ough review with the State Board
of Elections, which had the small
potential to lead to a criminal pros-
ecution.
There was no evidence presented
that Aiken deliberately sought to vio-
late election law,'and Aiken wrote a
letter asking officials to remove him
from their voting rolls.
* Associated Press


* Actor-comedian Dick
Van Dyke is 84.
* Actor Christopher
Plummer is 80.
* Country singer Buck
White is 79.
* Music/film producer
Lou Adler is 76.
* Movie producer


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation .............. 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of'
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ffa. 32055.
Periodipal postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056. .
Publisher Todd Wilson.... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
If you have a news tip, call any member
of the news staff or 752-5295.
EditorTom Mayer .........754-0428
(tmayer@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Lynda Strickland ..754-0417
(Istrickland@lakecityreporter.com)


Richard Zanuck is 75.,
* Singer John Davidson
is 68.
* Actress Kathy Garver
("Family Affair").is 64.
* Rock musician Ted
Nugent is 61.
* Rock musician Jeff
"Sktnk" Baxter is 61..


Reporter
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Director A. Russell Waters: .754-0407
(rwaters@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks.................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .............. .. $41.40
24 Weeks. .. ............... $82.80
52 Weeks .................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture

"But when the time had fully
come, God sent his Son, born
of a woman, born under law, to
redeem those under law, that
we might receive the full rights
of sons."

- Galatians 4:4-5


'-; -�----- - � � � �


Page Editor: Nicole Back, 754-0424











Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Exec.: Federal prison project

would need local contractors


Overall cost of
manufacturing
projected: $120M
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Construction of a pri-
vately owned and operated
prison to house 1,250 male,.
non-violent, criminal, illegal
aliens in Columbia County
could have a significant
impact on the local work-
force and-environment.
In Columbia County, the
Bureau of Prisons is look-
ing at possibly having a
correctional facility built on
an 80-acre parcel of unde-
veloped land located 1.1
miles east of the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office on
SE Tyre Road - on an'
unpaved roadway, approxi-
mately two miles south of



DREAMS
From Page 1A

of toys and other items
for this year's event were
placed in a 16-foot trailer
- and the contents filled
half of that.
"We'd like to thank
everybody for their help
- all the businesses, indi-
viduals, Lake City Police
Department," he said. "We
just can't say enough about
the heart of the people who
participated today.. The
weather was something
else and to get out and ride
your bike today, you had to
be brave or foolish, but they
did it and we showed them
our appreciation."
Polly Murray, a fellow
organizer of the annual
Dream Machine Toy Ride,
said she was proud of the
participation.
"We had 16 brave rid-
ers who rode their motor-
cycles in the rain," she
said. "We really appreciate
that because not every-
body rode, but these guys
showed bikers help the
community and they are
not bad people. You just
can't say enough about the.
people coming together for
the community."
Jenkins said the motor-
cyclist's commitment to the
organization was evident
with their participation in
Saturday's inclement weath-.
er that featured a cold, hard
rain for much of the day.
'That says these are some
fine people and some good
people," she said. 'They
are committed to the cause.
They support their commu-
nity and that they come out
in the rain, snow and no
matter what the weather is
to offer help and support."
Christmas Dream
Machine is headquartered
at Lake City Mall, 2469
West U.S. Highway 90.


FOOD
From Page 1A

Scott Elkins said the inau-
gural Lake City Reporter
Community Food Drive last
year brought is more than
7,000 pounds of food on 10 '
pallets.
He said this year's contri-
bution comes in at a critical
time.
"At this time of the year,
this donation is going to
be a real shot in the arm
because a lot of our agen-
cies are into their last cou-
ple of weeks of distributing
food, and they are trying
to get the food to give out
now, but they are also try-
ing to get the food so they
can stock the pantries to


begin January with," Elkins
said. "The food-we're gath-
ering now would not only
go directly out to the public'
immediately, but a lot of it
will be ready go after the
first of the year when a lot
of the agencies take a break
for Christmas."


U.S. Highway 90.
The property is pine for-
est and grassland that has
been used as such for more
than 50 years.
Municipal Capital
Markets Group, Inc.'s
executive vice president,
Michael W. Harling, whose
group is hoping to finance
the project, said the general
contractor for the proposed
facility would be Hale-
Mills Construction. The
Hale-Mills Construction
Company has its corporate
office is in Houston, Texas.
"They're obviously not
going to haul in people,
equipment and everything
else," Harling said. "They're
like the orchestra leader
and they'll be using sub-
contractors, laborers and
materials from the area."
He said the number of
local contractors used


would be contingent upon
what services could be pro-
vided by local sub-contrac-
tors.
"Some of the communi-
ties we go into are very
rural and they don't have
the contractors needed,"
Harling said. "Assuming
those types of trades are
Within your economic area,
you're probably going to
see 70-80 percent of the
construction dollars com-
ing into the area."
The total anticipated
manufacturing costs for the
proposed Lake City facility
has been listed at $120 mil-
lion, with about $65 million'
of that for construction, and
the build time for the facil-
ity has been listed as 12
months.
"It's a quick up-and-
running type of project,"
Harling said.


009-1949=Happy 60" Birthday


Pat Hartley

- We love you -
Tammy, Robert,
Patrick, Joanna,
Lindi, Jessie,
Keirston,
Amaris,
& Angel
. ,. -,.


Top teacher
'Miami Vice'
TV cop first

By KATHLEEN McGRORY
The Miami Herald
MIAMI - To see
Florida's top teacher, turn
on the TV and find an old
episode of "Miami Vice."
Joe Underwood appeared
a number of times on the
show, sometimes as a nar-
cotics officer, other times as
a dancing bar patron.
But when the series went
off the air, Underwood took
on a new role: He became
an educator.
Twenty-five years later,
Underwood is an institution
at Miami High. He runs the
school's TV and film pro-
duction academy - a pro-
gram he created.


Wh


the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In an Oct. 3 photo, Joe Underwood (left) who is the state
teachers' Union Teacher of the Year, talks to Remy Martinez,
who is the sports anchor for the Miami high TV show in
Miami. Underwood has reached another milestone: He has
won the prestigious Award for Teaching Excellence from the
Florida Education Association. He will represent the Sunshine'
State in the National Education Association's competition in.''
SFebruary.





at to do after


mammogram.


Your surgeon's role in evaluating breast disease.

FREE SEMINAR
Monday, December 21st, 11:30 am-12:30 pm
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- GUEST SPEAKER
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Reservations requested. Lunch will be provided.


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r s e is, . .18 5.r oo5 . org/WA


O 4 On Tuesday, December 22
S Santa will be in Lake City to talk to boys & girls.
The calls will be made between 6-8pm and carried live on.
S ; Power Country 102.1 FM

If you would like for Santa to call your child, just fill out
the form below. Additional forms may be picked up at the
Lake City Reporter, the Lake City Police Department,
the Florida Highway Patrol or Power Country 102.1 FM
Mail or bring the completed forms to
the Lake City Reporter, 180 E.Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055

Child's Name Age
Address: Phone:__
Parent's Name:
Brothers & Sisters:
Ages:
Seen Santa this year? 0 Yes 0 No (Check One)
Where?
Pets? 0 Yes a No (Check One)
Type: Name:
Gifts he or she requested:
Good things the child has done through the year:



t ' ' ," Community.
Source.

Sponsored by: 'g ---
Florida Highway Patrol, Power Country 102.1 FM, the Lake City Police Dept. and the Lake City Repor'tei


� ^^ i\ ^| ,



752-6306

Residential * Commercial * Industrial
Licensed & Insured CFC1427643

2744 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL


eg V 5VC1t
Your Pet's Favorite Spot
Christmas Gift Lots of Sweater
To Your Pet & Christmas
S5OFF ' Outfits
oFFr
Grooming! fo 0)
Dec. 9t^-Dec. 30'. _
J 386-754-5553.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428














OPINION


Sunday, December 13, 2009


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Good

fences -

and good

neighbors

Debate about the
* possibility of a new
private prison in
Columbia County
continues to
,churn, but the official line from.
a company vice president close,
to the project does much to
calm the waters.
On several occasions, and
most recently in a Lake City
Reporter story published
Wednesday, Municipal Capital
Markets Group, Inc.'s, Michael
Harling said no county money
would be involved in construct-
ing the $65 million facility. For
the record, he said, "It's all pri-
vately funded."
We've gone on record saying
that the possibility of a project
which will create as many as
250 recession-proof jobs at no
. taxpayer expense is one worth
pursuing. Add possible ancil-
lary benefits such as short-term
contractor opportunities and
long-term public and private:
service contracts and the explo-
ration of this opportunity is that
much more attractive.
Columbia County is home
to two correctional facilities <
which have proved to be excel-
lent community and business
partners. The positive and
quiet impact, financially and
otherwise, these two facilities
make continues .to be a boon to
the county. All tongue-in-cheek
poetics aside, it appears good
fences do make good neigh- ...-
bors.
We can't deny that the
Federal Bureau of Prison's pro-
posed project has fueled con-
tention within our community.
But an informational meeting
scheduled for Thursday with a
consultant, local officials and
the community will allow for
much of that pressure to be
released. ,
It is in the best interest of
community, and all concerned,
that this meeting be made a pri-
ority event on our calendars. -


Lake City Reporter

Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
.Columbia and surrounding counties by
'Community Newspapers Inc.
, We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
-. This mission will be accomplished
Through the teamwork of professionals
-' dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
w ork.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Tom Mayer, editor
Troy Roberts, assistant editor
SSue Brannon, controller
S- Dink NeSmith, president
. - Tom Wood, chairman


:- LETTERS
POLICY

S Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and .telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


I am the 'C' in Christmas


' Editor's note: The follow-
,ing column is a reprint from
Dec. 30, 2006.

W hen I was in
fifth grade, I '
was in a school
play called
'The 'C' in
Christmas." I got stage fright
and forgot my lines, but I
got help from an unexpected
source. Here is the story.
Mrs. Lucille Inman, our
teacher, told our class that
we would be putting on a
school play called "The 'C'
in Christmas." It would be a
simple play with a customary
Christian theme, and we would
be presenting- it in front of the
other elementary classes:
' She selected nine students
to be in the play - one student
for each letter in the word
Christmas - and each student
was assigned one of the letters
that spells Christmas.
For example, one kid would
be the "C" in Christmas, anoth-
er would be the "H," another
the "R" and so on.
The idea was that we kids
would lineup across the
stage holding a large cut-out
of their letter and the letters
seen all together would spell
"Christmas."
Then each kid would recite
his assigned part, beginning
with a Christmas word that
started with the letter they were
holding.
Parts in the play were
assigned. Friend Cleveland
Brock would be, the "C," I would
be the "H," another friend,
Beanie Bryant, would be the
"R", etc.
Cleve was a large, outgoing
boy but Beanie was the smallest
girl in our class and the quiet-
est. She had polio and wore a
heavy metal brace on her left


OTHER


Morris Williams
Phone: (386) 755-8183
williams h2@firn.edu
372 W Duval St.
Lake City, FL 32055

leg. Her brace made a soft,
clinking sound as she limped
along.
Everybody liked Beanie and
helped her when she needed
help.
We loved play rehearsal and
practiced our parts so much
that some of us came to know
each other's linesas well as our
own.
Time passed fast and soon
there we were standing on the
stage in front of all the other
kids, holding our letters.
Our narrator stepped forward
and said, "We are Mrs. Inman's
fifth grade class and our play is
called "The 'C' in Christmas."
Then Cleve stepped for-
ward holding a big "C" and
said confidently, "I am the 'C'
in Christmas. 'C' stands for
Christ. We celebrate Christmas
because of the birth of Christ."
Then I stepped forward hold-
ing my 'H', but as soon as I
looked out into the sea of faces,
I froze in my tracks. My mind
went completely blank and I
just stood there not knowing
what to do.
But, after a minute of utter
hopelessness, I heard the famil-
iar, soft clink of metal and out of
the corner of my eye, I saw little
Beanie limping out to stand
beside me.
She leaned toward me and
whispered, "Say 'I am the 'H'


in Christmas' " and I did. She
knew my part an'd was going to
help me! Then, line-by-line, she
slowly whispered my part and
line-by-line I repeated what she
said.
" 'H' Stands for Holy. Christ is
holy. Holy means Christ is pure,
perfect, free from sin." I was
done. My nightmare was over.
Beanie stayed out front and
said her part perfectly. So did -
all the other students and the
short play was over. Then we
all held our letters high over
our heads for the final spelling
of "Christmas" and shouted,
"Merry Christmas, everybody!"
The students clapped and
we marched off stage and back
to our classroom. Mrs. Inman
gave us all a big hug and told us
how proud she was of us.
Then she went to Beanie and
thanked her for helping me,
and Beanie said, 'Mrs. Inman,
you told us to always help
others when they need help.
Everybody here helps me every
day and I try to help them when
I can."
With that, we'all bounded
out of the room and ran home
for two weeks of glorious
Christmas vacation.
Cleve and Beanie, both now
long gone from this earth, can
still remind us of the two essen-
tial lessons to remember at
Christmas and throughout the
year: From Cleve, 'The 'C' in
Christmas stands for Christ. We
celebrate Christmas because of
the birth of Christ." And from
Beanie, "Help others when they
need help."
Christmas is just as simple
and eloquent as that.

* Morris Williams is a local
historian and long-time Columbia
County resident.


OPINION


The dangerous allure of terrorism


sons case. Five young -
ages 19 to 25 - Muslim
Americans abruptly
disappeared in late
November from Washington's
Northern Virginia suburbs.
They turned up in the custody
of the Pakistani police, who
say the five had tried to link
up with terrorist groups, some
of them linked to al Qaeda, for
training with the goal of wag-.
ing jihad against U.S. troops in
Afghanistan.
Pakistan says it plans to
deport the five, of Pakistani,
Ethiopian and Egyptian descent,
and they likely will face criminal
charges. An FBI investigation in
Pakistan and the U.S. is ongo-
ing.
What is alarming is that there
seems nothing exceptional


about the five young men to
distinguish them from the other
offspring of immigrant fami-
lies. They were perhaps more
devout than most and seemed
to feel that Muslims worldwide
were under siege, but there is a
long stretch from that to want-
ing to sign up to kill American
soldiers. And their friends and
fellow members of their mosque
were described as "incredulous"
that they had become radical-
ized.
Also this past week, David
Headley, 49, of Chicago, the son
of an American mother and a
Pakistani father, was accused of
casing Mumbai in advance of
last year's lethal terrorist attack
arid of conspiring to attack the
Danish newspapers that pub-
lished cartoons some Muslims
consider blasphemous.


According to the charges
against him, Headley, who
changed his name from Daood
Gilani, did succeed in linking up
with terrorist groups and attend-
ing militant training camps in
Pakistan. India says it will seek
his extradition in connection
with the Mumbai attack.
This flirtation of American
citizens with radical Islamic
groups presents an extraordi-
narily delicate task for U.S. intel-
ligence and law-enforcement
agencies. In the cases that have
come to light, the Americans
seem to have sought out the
radicals through social-network-
ing sites. But sooner or later
the terrorists may wake up to a
source of fluent English speak-
ers with U.S. passports and
begin seeking them out.
M Scripps,Howard News Service


4A


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org


I REMAIN
COMMITTED ,s
TO HALVING "HA
THE DEFICIT. "HA







ISPEND/iN


A time of


universal


deceit

Americans, not sur-
prisingly, are feel-
ing cynical.
Gallup's just
released Honesty
and Ethics of Professions poll
shows that for the first time, a
majority - 55 percent - rate
members of the U.S. House
of Representatives low/very
low for honesty and ethics.
Senators come in slightly bet-
ter at 49 percent
A whopping 9 percent of the
house and 11 percent of the
Senate get high/very high rat-
ings in honesty and ethics.
Even members of the clergy
do not escape this cynical.
cloud hanging over the nation.
Although 50 percent rate the
clergy as high/very high in
honesty and.ethics, this is the
lowest since Gallup started
reporting it.
This prevailing mood of
.distrust is understandable
given how commonplace it has
become for so many in public
life to lie to us.
What is so troubling is that
all this is not about human
error or fallibility. It's the
Opposite. It's about individu-
als intentionally manipulating
information to deceive the pub-
lic in order to advance their
own personal agendas.
Similarly in the health care
reform push, simple exercise
of common sense would put
the brakes on what is going
on.
Before us is proposed mas-
sive new government expen-
ditures and intervention into
. health care markets under the
assumption that the benefits of
all this government activity will
exceed the costs.
But simple honesty would
recognize that if this were true
it would be unprecedented.
When Medicare was enacted
in 1967, the projections then
were that its annual expendi-
tures by 1990 would be $12
billion. Actual expenditures in
1990 were $110 billion.
Medicaid started as a pro-
posed modest program with $1
billion in annual expenditures.
It's now $280 billion.
We're told that health care
reform won't cost more than
$900 billion over the next 10
years. This is accomplished
on paper by sleight of hand.
Taxes are assumed to start
in 2010, but expenditures not
until 2014. Starting the meter
when the expenditures actually
begin shows that over the first
ten years the costs are more
like $2.5 trillion.
If's not that we no longer
know how to conduct hon-
est inquiry in America. It's
that our interest in doing so
is disappearing. How can you
search for truth in a society
that increasingly denies that
truth exists?
Our national history began
by asserting "self evident
truths." Now we have a
president who, in his inter-
pretation of our constitutional
history, writes: "Implicit in its
structure, in the veryidea of
ordered liberty, was a rejection
of absolute truth...."
It must have been times like
this that George Orwell had
in mind when he wrote: "In a
time of universal deceit, telling
- the truth is a revolutionary
act."

* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.





LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009 5A








I-It' s TruI
onder ul

Chances are
ItSfrom
t " "" W


752-5470
* 156 North Marion Avenue
'Downtown Lake City




I -.1
','.


WARD-1Sm
JEWELRY & GIFT












LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


PRISON: 'We would be purchasing water,' company executive says


Continued From Page 1A
adult inmate beds. The pur-
pose of the project is to
contract with a private cor-
rectional facility to provide
the needed bed space.
Municipal Capital
Markets Group, Inc.'s
executive vice president,
Michael W. Harling, is with
the group attempting to
finance the proposed facil-
ity.
During his initial presen-
tation in July, Harling said
the prison would run on a
$14 million annual opera-
tions budget with $10.4 mil-
lion going towards annual
salaries, wages and ben-
efits.
"We would be purchas-
ing water," he said. 'We are
. a for-profit business, we're
not government So, it's a
private business coming
into Columbia County."
According to information
from the Federal Bureau
of Prisons, the electricity
demands for the proposed
correctional facility would
be provided by Florida
Power and Light, which has
sufficient capacity to meet
the facility's requirements.
Solid Waste generated
during the construction,
operation and maintenance
of the correctional facil-
ity would be disposed of
at the Winfield Solid Waste
Facility.

Wastewater
The draft environmental
impact statement indicates
the St. Margarets Street
wastewater treatment plant
which serves the residents
of Lake City does not have
capacity for the additional


Ralph 0. Brooks
Mr. Ralph 0. Brooks born Jan.
26, 1951 in Lake City, son of
Harold Chester & Doris Crawford
Brooks. Ralph graduated in 1969
from Clarkston High School in
Clarkston, Ga., and attended the
Univ. of Georgia. Ralph began
working for the Postal Service
in 1970 and continued until his
retirement in 2007. Ralph served
as Postmaster at the Kennesaw,
Cedartown, GA., and High
Springs, Fl., locations. He died
on Wednesday, Dec. 9th at the
age of 58 at his home, Fort White,
FL., surrounded by his family
and beloved dog, Fitzgerald.
Ralph was a hard working,
devoted, and loving father who
could always be counted on to
help those in need. He was
an avid youth sports coach who
often personally sponsored
underprivileged children. Ralph
loved to travel with his wife
Lisa. Survived by his wife, Lisa
Ann Brooks, Ft. White, FL.,
mother, Doris Crawford Brooks,
Lake City, FL., brothers, Richard
Crawford Brooks, Ft. White, FL.,
and Randy Dewayne Brooks,
Loganville, GA., children,
Obadiah Cainnen Brooks,
Chattanooga, TN., and Zachary
Harold Brooks, Woodstock, Ga.,
step-children, William Thomas
Chastain and Lindsay Michelle
Chastain; daughter-in-law, wife of
Zachary Brooks, Kelly Boughton
Brooks; granddaughter, daughter
of Obadiah Cainnen Brooks,
Allie Lavada Brooks. A memorial
service has been planned for
Saturday, Jan. 2nd, 2010 at 3:00
PM in Lake City, FL. Contact
Zachary Harold Brooks, 404-424-
2936 for location information.
Please send thoughts, memories,
and photographs to Obadiah
Brooks at ocbrooks@gmail.com.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests that contributions be
made to the American Cancer
Society, P.O. Box 22718,
Oklahoma City, OK 73123-1718.

Joseph "Peter" Williamson
Mr. Joseph "Peter" Williamson,
25, of Gainesville passed away
Friday morning, following an
extended illness. Peter was
born in Alachua County, then
moved to the
Lake City area
in 1993, and
was a member . ,
of the 2003
graduating
class ofm
Col0umbia mbi
High School.
Peter moved to the Gainesville
area in 2004 to attend classes at
Santa Fe Community College,
after receiving a Bright Futures
Scholarship. Peter was a very
artistic person and enjoyed the
theater, movies, and poetry. He
will always be remembered as a
very outgoing person who had lots
of friends. Peter was a member
of the Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints. Peter is
survived by his parents Douglas
and Angelia Brannon Williamson
of Lake City, three brothers
Thomas Williamson, James


wastewater generated by
the operation of the pro-
posed correctional facility.
The estimated discharge
to the wastewater system
from the operation of a cor-
rectional facility would be
approximately 107,780 gal-
lons per day. Wastewater
from the correctional facil-
ity would be treated by a
package plant built for the
correctional facility to treat
sewage on-site. The pack-
age plant would treat sew-
age and the treated water
would then be reused in the
correctional facility.
'We're going to do our
own wastewater treatment
plant - what you would.
call a package (treatment
plant) site system right
there," Harling said. "There
would be no negative effect
on the utility capabilities of
the county and should the
local wastewater treatment
plant want it, we would be
glad to, but the plan right
now is to build our own
treatment plant."
In three to five years,
when the new Kicklighter
Road wastewater treat-
merit plant is operational,
the correctional facility
would connect- to existing
sewer lines provided by
the wastewater treatment
plant. The Kicklighter Road
waste water treatment plant
would readily accommo-
date the wastewater gen-
erated at the correctional
facility as the wastewater
treatment plant would be
designed to and permitted
to discharge up to 6 million
gallons daily.
City of Lake City execu-
tive director of utilities, Dave


OBITUARIES

Williamson both of Gainesville,
and John Williamson (Amy) of
Albuquerque, New Mexico, a
sister Marianne Kirby (Ed) of
Orlando, Florida, a paternal
grandmother Mary Margaret
Williamson of Gainesville,
maternal grandparents Laverne
and June Brannon of Lake City,
and a paternal great-grandmother
�Rebecca Williamson of
Titusville, Florida. Numerous
aunts, uncles, and other family
. members also survive. Private
family funeral services were
held Saturday morning. In lieu
of flowers the family requests
memorial donations be made to
The Leukemia & Lymphoma
Society, Donor Services, P.O.
Box 4072, Pittsfield, MA
01202 or to St. Jude Children's
Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude
Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
Arrangements are under the
direction of DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 South Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32025
(386)752-1234. Please sign
the family guest book at www.
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com

Betty Jean North
Mrs. Betty Jean North, age
82, of Lake City, Florida died
Friday, Dec. 11 at the Shands at
Lake Shore Hospital, Lake City,
Fla., following a sudden illness.
"She was born in the Hopewell
community of north Colombia
County and had resided in Lake
City all of her life. She was the
daughter of the late Benjamin
Franklin Christie and Ludie
Crews Christie. She worked for


Clanton, said the initial con-
struction of the Kicklighter
wastewater treatment facil-
ity would allow 1.5 million
gallons of wastewater per
day and the system w6uld
-be expandable for up to
3 million gallons per day
for future uses. The plan
is to be able to expand the
plant's capacity up to 6 mil-
lion gallons per day.
Clanton said if the prison
is built in Columbia County
it would have an impact on
local wastewater services.
"Initially, when the new
Kicklighfer Road Plant is
built, we'll take a lot of the
waste water flow from the
interstate interchange at
U.S. 90 and Interstate 75
and divert that flow to the
new plant, which will open
up about a million gallons
a day (capacity) at the St.
Margarets Street plant, and
the flow from the new pris-
on could come there," he
said. "However, we've got
some infrastructure issues
to solve between the St.
Margaret's Street plant and
the airport to be able to
allow that kind of addition-
al flow to be transmitted
through the system." .
If the funding was avail-
able immediately, Clanton
said the infrastructure
needs could be addressed
in three to four years with
construction of the new
wastewater treatment
plant.
"I'm hoping to be able to
work on those infrastruc-
ture problems during that
process (of building the
new wastewater treatment
plant)," he said.
Clanton said adding the
Correctional facility and its
estimated 107,780 gallons


numerous businesses in Lake
City as a bookkeeper and then
retired'after 20 years as a billing
clerk with the City of Lake
City, Fla. She was a total family
person, loving her husband,
children and grandchildren and
her church. She was preceded
in death by 11 brothers and
sisters. She was a- member of
the Parkview Baptist Church,
Lake City, Fla. She is survived
by her husband of 61 years,
Buck North of Lake City,
Fla.; three daughters, Debbie
(Renny) Eadie, Nancy (Rickey)
Smith and Kim North all of
Lake City, Fla.; two sons, Rusty
North, of Lake City, Fla. and
Tim (Monica) North of Orlando,
Fla.; seven grandchildren, Chris
Cox, Melanie (Brad) Fasold,
Jeremy (Michelle) Cox, Amie
Snmith, Blake Smith, Jacob
North and Benjamin North;
three great-grandchildren, Ethan
Pieker, Austin Nash and Leah
Cox. Numerous nieces and
nephews also survive. Funeral
services will be conducted at 2
p.m. Monday, Dec. 14, in the
Parkview Baptist Church with
the Rev. Mike Tatum, Pastor,
officiating. Interment will be in
Memorial Cemetery, Lake City,
Fla. Visitation will be from noon
to 2 p.m. Monday (two hours
before services) at her church.
Please make memorials to the
Parkview Baptist Church, 268
N.W. Lake Jeffrey Road, Lake
City, Fla. 32055. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659 W.W.
Main Blve., Lake City, Fla.


Obituaries are paid adve
ments. For details, call the
City Reporter's classified de
ment at 752-1293.


rtise
Lake
part


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of wastewater a day would
not adversely impact the
new wastewater treatment's
capacity level.
"It really wouldn't affect
it that much," he said.
"Since we're talking about
1.5 million-gallon capacity
and it's a new plant, diver-
sion of the flow from the
U.S. Highway 90 and 1-75
interchange is going to be
about 1 million gallons per
day. So the flow from the
prison is basically about
one-tenth of that amount.
It's a significant amount of
flow but it wouldn't affect
the treatment capacity of
the plant that much."
Reports indicate a pack-
age sewage treatment plant
will be used when the cor-
rection facility is construct-
ed to handle the detention
center's .sewage needs.
Clanton said from the initial
information he's received,
the package plant could
handle the correctional
facility's sewage needs.
"The. package plant,
designed and built for the.
prison itself, will have reuse
water capability, which will
also help offset the con-
sumptive use of water from
the new Price Creek Water
Plant," he said."Rather than


furnishing a lot of ozone
treated water for flushing
toilets or irrigation, they
can use the reuse water
from that wastewater facil-
ity for flushing toilets', irri-
gation, general wash down
of the facility and things of
that nature."

Water Supply
If the facility is built in
Columbia County, an impact
study stated the correc-
tional facility would require
approximately 126,800 gal-
lons per day (100 gallons
per person per day for 1,268
inmates) of water.
The Price Creek Water
Treatment Plant has been
listed as the water supplier
by withdrawing water from
the Floridan Aquifer.
In August, Stephen
Roberts, City of Lake City
water system director,
stated that the correctional
facility water requirements,
when added to the current
water demands placed on
this water supply, is with-,
in the available capacity
of the Price Creek Water
Treatment Plant, the report
says.
He reportedly said water
lines could be extended
onto the site on SE Tyre
Road from an existing water


line that runs along U.S.
Highway 90.
The water connection
permits would be obtained
by the contractor respon-
sible for construction of the
facility.
Clanton agreed with
Roberts' assessment.
"We would be able to han-
dle the additional demand
for the water consumption,"
Clanton said. "More than
likely, we would run .an
additional 12-inch line out
to the new prison and then
loop it back into an existing
12-inch line, which 'would
insure there would be ade-
quate flow and pressure."
The Tyre Road location
being considered for the
proposed prison is less than
two miles away from the
city's Price Creek Water
Treatment Plant
'"We have a 12-inch line
running down U.S. Highway
90 that serves one prison
now, and will eventually
serve a second prison that
is abutting the first one (the
Corrections Corporation
of America facility and
Columbia Correctional
Institute)," Clanton said. "A
third prison being built in
that vicinity would require
an additional 12-inch line
just to increase the flow and
pressure out there."


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-v



- - - - - -'









Share Your Holiday.Spirit

Tell us .our . -ddress so others can .
'"ll u s1N. .

*view' your lightinlgC display.


S Send to:Tom Mayer, Editor
Email: tmayer@lakecityreporter.com *
S orcall 754-0428
You can also bring your information 0'tiigU
to the Reporter office.


Lake City Reporter

180 E. Duval St., Lake City FL


Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428







LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


- -I


McRae, McRae & Douglas

has made a charitable

contribution to


International, Inc. of Lake
(through the Altrusa District Three Foundation)


whose efforts at improving literacy in
Columbia County are great appreciated

Mr Christmas


& y a


Ycar


City, FL


The Law Offices of
McRae, McRae & Douglas


318 E.


Duval Street


Lake City, Florida
(386) 755-HELP

PRACTICE LIMITED TO PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH


Du toteeooy hrial raiain


Altrusa


LAKE CITY REPORTER


On Behalf of our Injured Clients


Xe-iv'














LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION & WORLD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Iran agrees to
nuclear fuer swap
MANAMA, Bahrain - Iran
is ready to exchange the bulk
of its stockpile of enriched
uranium for nuclear fuel rods
- as proposed by the U.N.
- but according to its own
mechanisms and timetable,
the foreign minister said
Saturday. .
The minister's remarks
come just days before an
expected meeting between
the U.S. and allies to discuss
new sanctions against Iran
over its nuclear program. The
offer, however, falls far short
of the conditions set by the
international community.
Speaking to reporters at
a regional security confer-
ence in Bahrain, Manochehr
Mottaki said Iran agreed
with a U.N. deal proposed in
October in which up to 2,600
pounds of its uranium would
be exchanged for fuel rods to
power its research reactor.
"We accepted the proposal
in principle," he said through
a translator. "We suggestedd
in the first phase we give you
400 kilograms of 3.5 percent
enriched uranium and you
give us the equivalent in 20
percent uranium."
Iran has about 3,300
pounds of low-enriched urani-
um and needs to refine to 20
percent to operate a research
reactor that produces medical
isotopes.

Spending filibuster
attempt denied
WASHINGTON - The
Democratic-controlled Senate
on Saturday cleared away
a Republican filibuster of a
huge end-of-year spending
bill that rewards most federal
agencies with generous bud-
get boosts.
The $1.1 trillion mea-
sure combines much of the
year's unfinished budget
work - only a $626 billion
Pentagon spending mea-
sure would remain - into
a 1,000-plus-page spend-
ing bill that would give the
Education Department,
the State Department, the
Department of Health and
Human Services and others
increases far exceeding infla-
tion.
The 60-34 vote met the
minimum threshold to end
the GOP filibuster. A final


vote is set for today to send
the measure to President
Barack Obama.

Pakistan eyes
Taliban front
ISLAMABAD- Pakistan
may launch a new military
offensive in a district near the
Afghan border where insur-
gent leaders are believed to
have fled to escape a gov- .
ernment onslaught against
the Taliban in nearby South
Waziristan, the prime minister
said Saturday.
The suggestion of another
anti-Taliban.operation illus-
trates the intractable chal-
lenge facing this nuclear-
armed U.S. ally: Even as
it squeezes one extremist
stronghold in its northwest,
insurgents simply regroup
in other parts of the rugged,
loosely governed region.

Monkey meat nets
probation sentence
.NEW YORK - A New
York City woman who was
caught smuggling monkey
meat through Customs has
been sentenced to probation.
Mamie Manneh was
arrested in 2006 after agents
seized a shipment of dozens
of primate parts hidden in a
batch of smoked fish.
Manneh's lawyers argued
that she and other African
immigrants on Staten Island
needed the meat for religious
reasons.
The judge ultimately reject-
ed that defense but gave
Manneh a lenient sentence
because she has 11 children
and is mentally ill.

Police: Missing
mom 'suspicious'
SALT LAKE CITY - Utah
police are putting more inves-
tigators into the search for
a 28-year-old mother whose
disappearance has been-
termed "highly suspicious."
Since Susan Powell was
reported missing Monday,
authorities have questioned
her husband and searched
a desert area where he said
he took the couple's two
young children, ages 2 and
4, camping last weekend in
freezing conditions.

* Associated Press


Rich nations slam climate draft


By KARL RITTER and
ARTHUR MAX
Associated Press

COPENHAGEN -
Industrial countries criti-
cized a draft global warm-
ing pact Saturday for not
making stronger demands
on major developing coun-
tries as tens of thousands
of banner-waving protesters
demanding "climate justice"
marched toward the U.N.
conference.
As night fell on the
Danish capital, police said
they rounded up more than
300 people in a preventive
action against a group of
black-clad youth at the back
of the mostly peaceful dem-
onstration.
Initial reaction to the
negotiating text submitted
Friday underscored the
split between the U,S.-led


wealthy countries and coun-
tries still struggling to over-
come poverty and catch up
with the modern world.
The tightly focused docu-
ment was. meant to lay out
the crunch themes for envi-
ronment ministers to wres-
tle with as they prepare for
a summit of some 110 heads
of state and government at
the end of next week.
U.S. delegate Jonathan
Pershing said the draft failed
to address the contentious
issue of carbon emissions
by emerging economies.
"The current draft didn't
work in terms of where it is
headed," Pershing said in
the plenary, supported by
the European Union, Japan
and Norway. But the EU'
also directed criticism at
the U.S., insisting it could
make greater commitments
to push the talks forward.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Some of thousands of people demonstrating on the street
in central Copenhagen, Denmark, Saturday: Large crowds
turned out for a demonstration from the city center to the
Bella center, the conference venue where the largest and
most important U.N. climate change conference is underway
aiming to secure an agreement on how to protect the world
from calamitous global warming.


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Page Editor: Tom Mayer, 754-0428













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


SHSMOMENTS
SITS MOMENTS..


PSzLe tnft...


...MAKE THEM
UNFORGETTABLE


CHASTAIN
JEWELERS
(386) 961-8000

LAKE CITY MALL


PANDORATM
UNFORGETTABLE MOMENTS


US Plat o 7,00750 - AI- 1 lhtreserved . PANDORA-IEWELRY.COM


WE WILL PAY THE






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FORYOUR GOLD
























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LAKE CITY MALL


LIF
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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


LAKE CITY REPORTER


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LOCAL & STATE















LAKE CITY REPORTER


WEATHER


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Page Editor: Nicole Back, 754-0424


THE WEATHER


ISOLATED ISOLATED ISOLATED I ISOLATED , PARTLY
T-STORMS j T-STORMS | l T-STORMS SHOWERS ! CLOUDY



HI 78 LO61 HI 79 1063 HI 78 LO 52 H166L039 HI 64 LO41


Pensacola
72/62


75.
Tallahassee * Lake
75/60 78
SCGa
PanamaCity
74/63


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date' �


S64
49
69
45
88 in 1913
16 in 1934


0.17"
2.13"
46.31"
0.90"
46.7Q"


lost
/58 - .
SCity.
/61


Jacksonville
79/62


City
Cape Canavera
Daytona Beac
Ft. Lauderdale


al
)1


ainesville * Daytona Beach Fort Myers
80/62 83/62 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
81/63 * Key West
Orlando apeCa naveral Ke West
85/63 83/64 Lake ty
Miami
Tampa * Naples
83/66 West Palm Beach Ocala
85/72 * Orlando
* Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers. 85/74 * Pensacola
86/67 *Naples * Tallahassee
85/68 Miami Tampa
eyw est 86/73 Vallosta
Key West W.Palm Beaph
80/691


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:18 a.m.
5:32 p.m.
7:19 a.m.
5:32 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 4:42 a.m.
Moonset today 3:15 p.m.
Moonrise tom: 5:42 a.m.
Moonset tom. 4:00 p.m.


Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan.
16 24 "31 7
New First Full Last


4
Hr'lllm 'Il
45mniutestolxn
Today's
ultra-violet.
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+


Monday
81/67/pc
82/64/pc
84/75/pc
86/67/pc
80/65/pc
7t/64/t
74/70/sh
70/63/pc
15/73/pc
6/68/pc
2/66/pc
84/64/pc
75/64/t
73/63/t
78/60/t
82/67/pc
77/60/sh
83/72/pc


Tuesday
82/65/sh
82/63/pc
83/72/pc
83/61/sh
80/58/pc
78/56/sh
78/68/pc
78/52/sh
84/71/pc
84/67/pc
81/62/pc
83/63/pc
72/55/t
74/51/t
75/51/t
79/59/pc
76/52/t
84/68/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
odr readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



Sweather.com
i,.,.R * m.


Forecasts, data and
F i graphics � 2009 Weather
SCentral, Inc., Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


E3 'B


SNATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system departing the Carolinas will be responsible for
areas of heavy rain from the Mid-Atlantic to the Southeast today. A warmer, unstable air mass
will fuel a few showers and thunderstorms over the eastern Gulf Coast. Meanwhile, tempera-
tures will be bitterly cold from Montana into the northern Plains and the Upper Midwest.



NATIOAFR


SSlo'eis,





^- -^ ^ ^




Warm Front

Stationary
Front

Occluded
Front


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES
" *, ' -. ' .. '' .. - ,._'* -* -a . . .. '


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
,Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


Hi/Lo/Pcp.
30/16/0
49/29/0
18/14/0
39/33/0
42/23/0
32/24/0
43/37/.01
14/1/0
23/16/.03
32/22/0
34/17/0.
47/35/.01
42/14/0
42/23/0
38/20/0
36/16/0,
44/16/0
40/19/0
43/34/0
47/41/.01
;;7J 65F0
4 4; , l,0


HI/Lo/W CITY
36/31/rs Des
49/33/pc Detroi
18/12/c El PRa
49/42/r Falrba
.45/35/r Green
6/-4/sn Hartfo
59/46/sh Honol
-6/-13/c Houst
37/24/rs Indian
43/38/sh Jacks
41/32/i Jacks
65/53/t Kansa
49/36/r Las Vi
46/34/r' Little
39/22/pc Los A!
37/29/c' Memp
43/32/sh Miami
41/32/i Minne
50/39/r Mobil
74/54/s New
83/62/c NewY
52/25/pc Oklah


loines
It
so
inks
sboro
ord
ulu
on
napolls
on MS
onville
is City
egas
Rock
ngeles
ihis
eapolls
e
Orleans
York
oma City


High: 840, Naples, Fla: Low -14�, Big,Piney, Wyo..
.." " - C. e:


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY
36/12/0 28/23/pc .Omah
38/15/0 38/32/sh Orlan
62/35/0 64/42/pc Phllac
-8/-14/0 -12/-21/c Phoer
41/22/0 44/32/r Pittsb
34/20/0 41/32/r Portla
80/66/0 81/67/s Portla
56/46/.73 73/61/pc Raleil
40/19/0 41/34/sh, Rapid
49/36/.58 63/51/c Reno
61/47/.51 79/62/t Richn
37/27/0. 39/34/c Sacra
44/41/.01 58/37/sh St. Lo
41/31/.17, 55/45/pc Salt L
62/56/.37 62/47/sh .San A
45/33/0 57/48/c San D
83/73/.01 86/73/pc San F
29/6/.01 18/9/c SeattI
52/39/1.61 72/59/sh Spoka
57/44/1.09 74/59/sh. Tampa
36/25/0 46/37/r Tucso
48/25/0 60/45/pc Washl


a
do
lelphia
lix
lurgh
nd ME
md OR
Igh
City
iond
mento
iuis
ake City
Antonio
ilego
rancisco
le
ne
a
in ,
ington


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
32/10/0
79/60/0
40/28/0
61/45/0
38/17/0
29/20/0
34/31/0
42/22/0
40/4/.01
34/19/.10
' 44/23/0
54/43/.11
39/30/0
29/17/.05
54/45/.05
.61/59/.08
55/51/.39
35/23/0
22/7/0
79/58/0
65/38/0.
43/27/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
26/15/c
85/63/pc
46/38/r
66/49/sh
43/33/i
40/33/rs
39/32/sh
52/37/r
13/-3/sn
38/22/sn
47/34/r
54/38/sh
45/37/c
36/26/sn
73/59/pc
61/51/sh
56/46/sh
38/32/sn
25/16/sn.
83/66/pc
67/47/pc
45/36/r,,


Saturday Today Saturday, Today Saturday Today
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W CITY Hi/Lo/Pdp. Hi/Lo/W
Acapulcob , 90/73/0 89/79/pc La Paz 64/39/0 65/42/sh Rio 95/79/0 89/77/t
Amsterdam 45/39/0 41/30/c Lima 72/66/0 81/61/t Rome 55/41/0 45/35/c
Athens na/na/0 47/35/sh London 48/39/0 40/30/sh St. Thomas VI' 87/76/.12 84/74/pc
Auckland 72/61/0: 64/48/pc Madrid 59/30/0" 65/46/c San Juan PR 85/74/.05 84/73/pc
Beljing 37/18/0' 34/17/pc Mexico City 73/48/0 73/48/sh Santiago 90/54/0 67/41/pc
Berlin 34/30/0 34/25/c, Montreal 23/14/0 30/14/sf Seoul 46/32/0. 39/23/c
Buenos AIres 75/57/0 68/52/s Moscow . 19/12/0 18/8/c Singapore 88/77/0 89/77/sh
Cairo 68/57/0 - 66/52/s Nairobi 81/48/0 78/59/t Sydney 81/63/0 70/56/pc
Geneva 41/37/0 36/27/c Nassau 82/77/.05 81/71/pc Tel Aviv 66/55/0 65/46/s
Havana 88/68/0 83/64/pc New Delhi 75/na/0 74/53/pc Tokyo 63/50/0 51/40/pc
Helsinkl . 30/23/0 28/19/c Oslo 37/28/0 37/30/c Toronto 36/18/0, 33/17/sf
Hong Kong" 5 20 0 69 56/s Panama 91/79/0 88/79/t Vienna 37/32/.d6 35/25/c
.Kingston " '86'; 0 88': 6 ip Paris 43/37/0 40/27/c Warsaw 30/27/0 29/13/c.
KEY TO CONDITIONS: .:-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f=fair, fg=fog, h=hazy, i-ice, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s=sunny,
*,r .h.. '�. r;.,t� l! ' i ...


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10A


_ I I�-I I


LAKE CITY ALMANAC


114 MOl


TUESf


fWENfl TTf


7BIURB


13fl DIB


I


clrr














Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreporter.com


Sunday, December


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


13, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

C"S SOCCER
u.s soccr
Moe's Night
set for Monday
Columbia High's
soccer teams have a
Moe's Night fundraiser .
from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday
at Moe's Southwest Grill
on U.S. Highway 90 west.
For details, call Debbie
Rix at 365-1877.

Alumni game
fundraiser invite
Columbia High's boys
soccer is organizing an
alumni game fundraiser
for January. All former
Tiger soccer players
who graduated from
1990-2009 are invited.
Proceeds will benefit the
soccer program,
For details, e-mail
Justin Lang at
justlang@firn. edu.

ADULT BASEBALL.
North Florida
teams forming
The North Florida
Men's Adult Baseball
League is forming a team
in this area.
Organizers, coaches
and players are being
sought. Workouts begin
in January.
For details, call Greg
Vickers at (850) 253-5107
or visit www.leaguelineup.
com/northfloridamabl.

FLAG FOOTBALL, CHEER
Registration open
,for league play
Registration for flag
football, ages 5-12, and
cheerleading, ages 5-10,
is under way at Christ
Central Ministries. The
season begins in January.
Cost is $35.
For details, call Ronny
at 365-2128.

E From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
* Fort White High
boys soccer at Melody
Christian . Academy,
4 p.m.
* Fort White High girls
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Fort White High
basketball at Trenton
High, ' p.m. (girls-5:30,
JV-4)
* Columbia High girls
soccer at Fleming Island
High, 7:20 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Tuesday
* Columbia High girls
weightlifting vs. Fort
White High; Santa Fe
High, 4 p.m.
* Columbia High boys
soccer at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Fort White High boys
soccer vs. Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Fort White High girls
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
* Columbia High boys
basketball at Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
* Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Thursday
* Columbia High girls
weightlifting at Baker
County High, 4:30 p.m.
Friday
* Fort White High girls
basketball vs. St. Francis
Catholic High, 6 p.m.
* Columbia High
basketball vs. Fleming
Island High, 7:30 p.m.
(girls-6)
Saturday
* Columbia High girls
basketball at Wolfson


High, 4:30 p.m. (JV-3)


Navy continues


rule over Army


Midshipman win
in 110th meeting
is eighth straight.
By DAN GELSTON
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA- Navy
has turned sports' most
patriotic rivalry into one of
the most one-sided.
The Mids did more
than extend Army's series
misery in the 110th
meeting between the two
service academies, they
denied the Black Knights
their first bowl bid in 13
years.


Ricky Dobbs ran and
threw for a score to help
Navy beat Army 17-3 on
Saturday for their eighth
straight win in the series.
The loss ended the Black
Knights' chances of play-
ing in their first bowl game
since 1996.
Dobbs set an NCAA
single-season record for
touchdowns scored by a
quarterback .with 24, and
threw the go-ahead TD to
help Navy improve to 54-49-
7 overall against Army and
take its biggest lead ina ASSOCIATED PRESS
series that began in 1890. ASSOCIATED PRESS
series that began in 1890. Navy's Ram Vela (34) and Chase Burge celebrate after Vela intercepted an Army pass in the
NAW continued on 2B 'end zone during the football game Saturday in, Philadelphia.


Engraved for Ingram


Alabama running
back is Heisman
Trophy winner.

By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

NEW YORK - Mark
Ingram completed the
trophy case at Alabama,
delivering the first Heisman
to a school that boasts one
of the richest histories in
college football.
The tough-running
sophomore tailback
turned tearful after win-
ning the Heismarn Trophy
on Saturday night in the
closest vote in the award's
75-year history. Next, he'll
try to lead the most storied
program in the South to a
national championship.
Ingram finished 28 points
ahead of Stanford running
back Toby Gerhart.
Ingram wiped away
tears and took a moment
to steady himself before
starting his speech. His
voice wavered throughout.
"I'm a little overwhelmed
right now," he said. "I'm
just so excited to bring
Alabama their first Heisman
winner."
Ingram received 227
first-place votes and 1,304
points. Gerhart got 222
first-place votes and 1,276
points, while Texas quar-
terback Colt McCoy, last
season's- runner-up,
received 203 and 1,145.
Nebraska defensive
tackle Ndamukong Suh was
fourth and Florida quarter-
back Tim Tebow, who won
the Heisman two years ago,
was fifth.
The previous closest vote
in Heisman history came


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama running back Mark Ingram speaks after being named the 75th -leismap Trophy winner Saturday in New York.


in 1985, when Auburn's Bo
Jackson beat Iowa quar-
terback Chuck Long by 45
points.
Ingram won four of the
six regions. Gerhart took
the far west and Suh won
the southwest.
Ingram has been the
backbone of Alabama's
offense all season, rushing
for a school-record 1,542
yards, gaining 6.2 yards per
carry and scoring 18 touch-
downs.
And in his final chance


to make a case for the
Heisman, facing Florida's
then-top-ranked defense,
Ingram ran for 113 yards
and scored three touch-
downs to punctuate his
season.
The win sent the top-
ranked Crimson Tide to
the BCS national title game
against McCoy and No. 2
Texas on Jan. 7 at the Rose
Bowl.
Ingram is the third con-
secutive sophomore to win
the Heisman since Tebow


Lady Tigers fall to FAMU


CHS girls soccer
roars back for win
over Middleburg.
From staff reports

Columbia High's girls
basketball lost, 59-52, to
FAMU High on Saturday in
a game played at P.. Yonge
School.
It was the third straight
defeat for the Lady Tigers,
but coach Horace Jefferson
saw improvement.
"We played a pretty good
team and we played much
harder than in our last two
games," Jefferson said.
"We battled and battled
today and I was proud of
the effort. I couldn't ask for
anything better, except for


a win."
Sharmayne Edwards
scored 27 points and per-
formed what Jefferson
called a "wonderful job."
Viki Hill scored nine
points, with six from
Katrina Goodbread, five
from Da'Brea Hill, four from
Simone Williamson and one
from Mariah Harrington.
Columbia (4-4, 0-3) hosts
Fleming Island High at
6 p.m. Friday.

Lady Tigers soccer
Columbia's girls soccer
team beat host Middleburg
High, 4-3, in a district game
on Friday.
The Lady Tigers trailed
1-0 at halftime, then blitzed
the Broncos with four goals


in the first 10 minutes .of
the second half to take a
4-1 lead.
Shelby Widergren scored
two goals, with assists from
Michelle Pope and Brittany
Strickland.
Strickland also scored'
two goals, with assists from
Chelsey Waters and Pope.
"li was a good perfor-
mance," coach Keith
Mclaughlin said. "I am
especially happy we stayed
in the game when we were
one down and really pushed
Middleburg. It was a bit
hair-raising in the .last 10
minutes, but it was another
good district win."
SColumbia (10-4, 5-1)
plays at Fleming Island at
7:20 p.m. Monday in a game
moved up from Thursday.


became the first in 2007
,and he will be the sixth
winner in the last seven
years to go on to play in the
BCS national championship
game.
Few college football
teams can match Alabama's
history, of success. The
Crimson Tide dominated the
SoutheasterA Conference
for decades: With six AP.
nationalchampionships, only
Notre Dame and Oklahoma
have won more..
But at Alabama, it's a


coach who has towered
over the program more
. than any player.
Bear Bryant led some of
college football's greatest
players, but never had a
player even finish in the top
three of the Heisman voting
over his more than three
decades at Alabama.
"Everybody that's been
in the Alabama family
has been supporting me,"
Ingram said. "Walking to
class, students flashed me
the Heisman pose."


Fisher taps Stoops


Arizona defensive
coordinator will
replace Andrews.

By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
Florida State has its new
defensive coordinator. -
Arizona's Mark Stoops.
A university official
familiar with the agree-
ment told The Associated
Press on Saturday that
Stoops has agreed to join
new Florida State coach
Jimbo Fisher in early
January.
The official spoke on
condition of anonymity
because neither Stoops or
Fisher has signed new


contracts yet.
Stoops, 42, is Arizona's
defensive coordinator. He"
is the younger brother
of Oklahoma coach Bob
Stoops and Arizona coach
Mike Stoops.
Mark Stoops inherits
a Seminole defense that
ranked 110th nationally in
2009, surrendering 444.3
yards and 30.8 points a
game. He succeeds
Mickey Andrews, who is
retiring after 26 seasons as
Florida State's defensive
coordinator.
.Arizona's defense ranks
21st nationally, giving up
315 yards a game a game.
Stoops in not unfamil-
iar with Florida, having
coached three seasons at
Miami as secondary coach.


Section B


-














Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
BOWLING
I p.m.
ESPN - PBA World Championship,
at Wichita, Kan.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
,'GC - European PGA Tour, Alfred
Dunhill Championship, final round,.at
Mpumalanga: South Africa (same-day
tape)-
3 p.m.
NBC -- The Shark Shootout. final
round, at Naples
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6:30 p.m.;
FSN - Rhode Island at Boston
College
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS - Regional coverage
FOX - Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX - Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS - Doubleheaddr game
8:15 p.m.
NBC - Philadelphia at N.Y Giants
SOCCER
I p.m.
SESPN2 - NCAA Division I,. men's
College Cup, championship match, Akron
vs.Virginia, at Cary, N.C.
SPEED SKATING
II p.m.
VERSUS - ISU, Lbng Track World
Cup, at Kearns, Utah (same-day tape)
Monday
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN -Arizona at San Francisco
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
S VERSUS - Buffalo at Montreal

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
, W L, TPct PF PA,
New England. 7 5 0.583 32$ 224


6 '6 0.500278296
6 6 0.500249 208
4 8 0,333 199 261
South
W L.T'Pct PF PA
12 0 01.000331,201
7 5 0.583 225 273
5 7 0.417246316:
5 7 0,417277266
North'
W L TPct PF PA
9 3 0.750254'187
6 6 0,500271 215
6 7 0.462278 244,
2 II 0.154158 315-'
West


W L TPct PF PA
San Diego 9 3 0.750 342 242
Denver 8 4 0.667 240 202
Oakland 4 8 0.333 142 282
Kansas City 3 9 0.250 196 326
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East


Dallas
Philadelphia
N.Y. Giants
Washington

x-New Orlean
Atlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay

Minnesota
Green Bay
Chicago
Detroit

Ari�ona
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis


W L TPct PF PA
8 4 0.667279 213
8 4 0.667327 235
7 5 0.583 303 285
3 9 0.250200 238
South
W L TPct PF PA
s 12 0 01.000440251
. 6 6 0.500279 279
5 7 0.417215 262
I II 0.083187330
'North
W. L TP'ct. PF PA
10 2 .833359 233
8 44 0.667323 229
5 '7 0.417233 270'
2 10 0.167206 358
West
W L...Pct PF'PA
8 4 6.667297 234
5 7 0.417245 233
;.5 ' 7 0.417243 267'
S 1 II 0.083139 314


ic-clinched division
Todayc s Games
Seattle at Houston, I p.m.
' Green Bay at Chicago, I p.m.
Detroit at Baltimore, I p.m.
New Orleans atAtlanta, I p.m:
SBuffalo at Kansas City, I p.m. ,
Denver at Indianapolis, I p.rti.
Carolina at New England, . p.m.
N.Y.Jets atTampa Bay.'l p.m. . ..
Miami at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Minnesota, I p.m.
St. Louis at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Dallas. 4:'15 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Arizona at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday's Game
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday's Game
Dallas at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 20
Miami atTennessee, I p.m.
Arizona at Detroit, I p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Houston at.St. Louis, I p.m.
,Chicago at Baltimore, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, I p.m. .
SSan Francisco at Philadelphia, I p.m. ,
Oakland atlDenver, 4:05 p-m. : "
SCincinnati at San Diego,4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay atSeatle,'4;:5 p.m.' '
SGreen Bay at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Minhesota at Carolina 8:20 p.m.
- * Monday.Dec.21
N.Y. Giants.at Washington, 830 p.m.

'Playoffs

Football Championship Subdivision
Semifinals . i
. ' Friday
Villanovai14,Williain & Mary 13
Saturday


Montana 24,Appalachian State 17
NCAA Division II
Championship
Saturday
Northwest Missouri State 30, Grand
Valley State 23 �
NCAA Division III
Semifinals
Saturday
Mount Union 24,Wesley 7
Wisconsin-Whitewater 27, Linfield 17
NAIA
Championship
Saturday, Dec. 19
At Barron Stadium
Rome, Ga.
Sioux Falls (14-0) vs. Lindenwood
(13-0), Noon

FHSAA playoffs
Class IA
'State Championship
Delray American Heritage 30, Trinity
Christian-Jacksonville 20
Class lB
State Championship
Glades .ay 27, Warner Christian 20,
OT
"Class 3A
State Semifinal
Miami Belen Jesuit Prep 21, Lake
"Wales 14
Pensacola 20 Jefferson 0
:,'., " ' "Class 4A
:i State.Semifinal'
S Dwyer41,Armwood 15
Niceville34, Edgewater 20
Class 5A
S State Semifinal..
Manatee 28, St.Thomas Aquinas 20
Plant 20, .Lakeland 0
Class 6A
State Semifinal
DeLand 20,Apopka 7
Miramar 21, Miami Central 14

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Houston atToronto, I p.m.
New Jersey at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
Meniphis at Miami; 6 p.m.
Cleveland at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
San Antonio atj.A. Clippers, 0:30 p.m.
M' onday's Gamed'
SGolden State at Philadelphia, 7'p.m .
Indiana at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Boston at Memphis,8 p.m.' . '.
New Orleans'at Dallas,8:30 p.m.. ,
Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Denver, 9 p.m.:
Washington at L.A. -;Clippers,
10:30 p.m.

AP'Top 25 scheduled
Today'sGames
No. 3 Villanova atTemple, 3 p.m.
No. 7 Syracuse vs. St. Franci. NY,
I p.m. ' , '
S'No. 19 Cincinnati at Xavier, 7p.m.


FHSAA.FOOTBALL


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2009-10 Lake City Middle School boys basketball team are (front row, from
left) Michael Fluellen, Benjamin Roe, Jason Bernard, Tre Simmons, Joshua Higgins,
Gary Alvin Key, Tamarick Vanover, Jordan Coppock and Kyron Jones. Back row (from left)
are coach Mardell Jackson, Jeremy Bradley, Jamarea Frierson, Karry Rossin, Trey Marshall,
Wayne Broom, Terry Calloway, Gabe Kimble, Kelvin Jonas and coach Casharo Thomas.
Bobby Fulton is coach and team manager:


Strong start for Falcons


From staff reports

Lake City Middle
School's boys basket-
ball team claimed a
44-33 road win over
Richardson Middle School
on.Monday.
Michael Fluellen led the
Falcons with 13 points.
Trey Marshall scored
11 points andt had nine
rebounds.
S Tre Simmons chipped in
eight points, with six from
Karry Rossin and two each
from. Tamarick Vanover,


Stricker,

'Associated Press

'N 'APLES ' Steve
Stricker and Jerry Kelly
fell out of the lead for
most of the day before
rebounding nicely at the
end of the Shark Shootout's
second round. .
,,Stricker . birdied' '.No.
18 to.finish. a run of five
birdies in six holes that got
the team to 13-undei 131 at
Tiburon Golf Club at .the
Ritz-Carlton GolfResort on
.Saturday.
SStricker's 5-foot. birdie


Wayne Broom and Gabe
Kimble.
Lake City lost, 46-23, at
Madison County Central
on Dec. 1.
Kimble led LCMS with
seven points. Jason Bernard
scored four points, with
three each from Kelvin
Jonas and Fluellen, and two
apiece from Gary Alvin Key
and Jordan Coppock.
The 'Falcons opened
the season with back-to-
back wins over the middle
schools of Trenton High
(53-16 on the road on


Nov. 23) and. Hamilton
County High (37-31 at
home on Nov. 24).
Lake City scorers in
the Trenton game were
Marshall, 10, Simmons,
9, Jamarea Frierson, 8,
Rossin, 6, Vanover, 6, Jonas,
4, Fluellen, 3, Bernard,
3, Kimble, 2, and Jeremy
Bradley, 2.
.Scoring against Hamilton
were Simmons, 8, Jonas,
8, Rossin, 6, Fluellen, 5,
Frierson; 4, Kimble, 2,
Vanover, 2, and Marshall,
2 plus 11 rebounds).


Kelly lead Shootout


prevented a four-way tie.
Kenny Perry and . J.B.
Holmes, Steve Flesch and
Dustin Johnson; and Justin
Leonard and Scott Verplank
were all at 12 under after,
the better-ball format.-
Stricker and Kelly and
Verplank and Leonard
started the day tied after
shooting 66s in Friday's
modified alternate-shot
round. Teams will play a
scramble today.
Holmes eagled No. 17
and he and Perry complet-
ed a 7-under 29 on the back


nine to finish with a 62 in
the better ball format.
Perry is attempting to
win his third Shootout title
with his third different
partner.
He won' the unofficial
PGA Tour event last year
\with Scott Hoch, but Hoch
was unable to play this year
after having wrist surgery.
Tournament host Greg
Norman is not playing
for'the first time in the.
event's 21 years because
of shoulder surgery in
September.


Bolles adds another state tile S l e>aie C
o r,.ate.iteS6.


" Cat e 2 - s a y t....so, , 'u :.G d *: *..;s ' ,
Associated Press .. rushed for 272 yards on 43 Trinity Christian (13-1),
attempts. locited in Jacksonville, was A1 R a
0QRLANDO - Jawan . -t yingto.win its first cham- - ACROSS
.Jamiso rushed for 112 ?American Heritage 30, pionpiship since 2003; It had . it of 39
yards and Jcob Stenson trinity Christian 20 two 100-yard rushersin members 40
had two rushing touch- Ahmad Christian (143)and 5 Grounded bird 41
downs as Jacksonville Quarterback' Darius Andrew Buie (133). ' . 8 Forest unit 43
BolleS defeated 'Taii.pa Millines rushed for 182 , 12 Wingless . 46
Catholic 21-7 Saturday .at yards and'four toichdowi Glades Day School 27 ' 'insect, .. ' 48
the Citrus Bowli the Class as Delray Beach American Warner Christiarn 20 i :Energy' 50
2B state football final. Heritage beat Trinity .14 Chopped down
The championship is the Christian Academy 30-20 to Kelvin Taylor, son ofNFL 15 - Jones' locker 51
second straight and 10th claim the Class 1A football running back Fred Taylor, 16 Gave, as 52
overall for Bolles, the most title Friday night. rushed for 213 yards and knowledge 53
in Florida history. Bulldogs Millines, who is commit- four touchdowns 'to lead 18 Future groom 54
coach Charles Corky ted to West Virginia, scored Glades Day School to a 20 Stage prompts 55
Rogers has guided the pro- on runs of 5, 49, 22 and 2 27-20 overtime win over 21 Funny one
gram to nine of its titles. yards. His final touchdown Warner Christian Academy 22 Cityrtes.
Jamison, a senior, did his camewith 1:55 left and put in Friday's Class 1B football 3Darkline on
damage on only 13 carries. his team ahead by 10. championship. 26 Cheered 2
Stenson, also a senior, fin- Millines also passed for 'Taylor's last score came 29 Rock . 3
ished with 88 yards on nine' 39 yards and totaled 221 on a three-yard run in over- 30 Less than fair
attempts, with a long rush of American Heritage's time. Warner Christian 31 Noon, to 4
'of 43 yards. His touchdown 3.18 yards. As, a team, the (12-2) had a chance to Caesar 5
runs, both of which came in Stallions (11-3) gained answer and' either tie or 33 Mr. Danson 6
the, third quarter, covered 279 yards on 55 rushing win it, but was intercepted 34 Smell - -
43 and 4 yards, and helped attempt's. Greg Bryant, the near the goal line on second (2 wds.) 7
the Bulldogs (12-1) turn a second-leading rusher for down by Gators defensive 35 Gripe 8
7-0 halftime game into a American Heritage, fin- back J.T Thornton. 36 Patted on
21-0 lead. ished with 85 yards on 13 The title is the sixth for Wa
As a team, Bolles attempts. I Glades Day (12-2). Check out the "Ju


NAW

Continued From Page 1B
Navy won the
Commander-In-Chief's
Trophy, awarded to the
team with the best record
in games between the
three service academies,
for a school-record seventh
straight year.
"This isn't the biggest
college football rivalry in
sports," Navy coach Ken
Niumatalolo said.'This is the
biggest rivalry in sports."
The Mids (9-4) have a
postseason date against
Missouri in the Texas Bowl
on Dec. 31.
Navy has won a service
academy-record 15 con-
secutive gamesand is one
win shy of tying its single-
season record (1905, 2004).


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

ILANVA


(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: DALLY LITHE CAUCUS BECAME
S Answer: Although many get the fishing bug, it's not -
EASY TO "CATCH"


at
i 2 13 14


Fence
supports
Bark
Tempe sch.
Dissolve
Put up with
Mercy
Word of mouth

zebra
Fabric meas.
- - sorry!
Compelled
Vaccine amts.
Fan noise

DOWN

Rural addr.
Viking name
Strauss of blue
jeans
Payment plan
Throw out
Play
charades
Strike caller
, Rocket
engine force


r "-1ed Ads Onlii


�1( � , , www.lakecityreporter.com
S .- Lake City
An-swe tot Pei Reporter


Answer to Previous Puzzle


.Solar plexus
Dolly and her
clones
Wrap up
Oscar
nominee


nt more puzzles?
st Right Crossword Puzzles" books
QuillDriverBooks.com
5 16 17 8 19 110 Ill I


19 Zilch-
22 Chimney
deposit
23 Des Moines
hrs.
24 Overcome
25 Nothing, to.
Pedro
26 Pothole
locale
27 Alimony
getters
28 Usual food
30 Boarding
school
32 Conditions
34 Become less
intense
35 Lady's room
37 Writer's credit
38 Frat letter
40 Vast chasm
41 Flat-topped
hill
42 Camelot lady
43 "Back in'
Black" group
44 Ms. Bombeck
45 Pinch of salt
46 Take it on the -
47 UN locale
49 Part of UCLA


12-14 2009 by NEA, Inc.


Miami.
N.Y.Jets
Buffalo

x-lnd;anapol;
Jacksonr,.ll
Tennessee
Houston

Cicyinat
Baltimore
. PTtburgh ",
Clivelahd


P E AJL S L.IAIG A MP
E LIclE-E INE RO I
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LAKE CITY REPORTER BASKETBALL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Ohio State upset;



top teams roll on


Associated Press

KANSAS CITY,
- Freshman Xavier He
scored a season-high
points, Markieff Mo
had a double-double
No. 1 Kansas beat La 5
90-65 on Saturday at
Sprint Center.
' Kansas (9-0) 'u
defense to overcome e
rebounding problem
turning a tight game
a rout by holding its eig
opponent under 40 pen
shooting.this season.
Morris had 12 po
and 12 rebounds and (
Aldrich added 19 points
the Jayhawks, who v
playing about 45 miles f
campus.
Jerrell Williams had
points and Rodney Gi
added 19 for La Salle (i
which fell to 0-7 all-1
against No. 1'teams.

No. 2 Texas 87,
Texas St. 54
..AUSTIN, Texas.
Damion James got his
career double-double
21 points and 16 rebou
to lead Texas.
-Avery Bradley added(
points, in a win that c
be costly for the Longhi
(8-0).
Freshman J'Co
Brown, who has sta
four games at guard
Texas this season, had t
helped off the court al
6 minutes into the.,sec
half and was favoring
left leg after a fall near
basket. Trainers wrap
the ankle and he left
court on crutches
J.B: Conley had 10 p(
to lead Texas State (3-7
Texas has won its
eight games by at leas
points, the first time tf
happened.

No. 4 Kentucky 90,
Indiana 73
BLOOMINGTON,
- Eric Bledsoe sc
23 points 'and Pat
Patterson had 19 pc
and 11 rebounds to
Kentucky.
John Calipari mate
Adolph Rupp's record
for a first-year Kehti
coach by improving
10-0, and the Wild
moved within two win
becoming the first Divi
I men's basketball prog
with 2,000 victories.
Freshman Maurice C:
had a season-high 31 p(


s or '
vere
rom ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kentucky forward Patrick.
1 21 Patterson puts up a-shot
-een against Indiana during a,
6-3), game in Bloomington, Ind.,
ime on Saturday.
,for the Hoosiers (4-5), who
S have lost seven of eight in
this series.
Kentucky had a 49-24
- rebound advantage overall,
40th 21-8 on the offensive end.
with ,
inds No. 22 Butler 74,
S No. 13 Ohio St.'66
d 15
would INDIANAPOLIS -
rins Gordon Hayward scored
24 points, and Butler beat
5van a ranked team 'for the
rted' "first time in four tries this
for season..
obe Willie Veasley 'had 15
bout points and 10 rebounds for
:ond the Bulldogs (7-3), who had
his lost to Minnesota, Clemson
the and.Georgetown. ;
)ped William Buford scored
the 20 points and David Lighty
added 17 for the Buckeyes
)ints (7-2), who played for the
), -'first time without Evan
first Turner, who was averaging
t 15 a double-double this season.
hat's He fractured his lower back
.when he hit the court on a
dunk attempt on Dec. 5.
. Butler led by 17 points in
the final 5 minutes, but Ohio
State used a fullcourt press
Ind. to get back into the game.
ored A layup by Jon Diebler cut
rick Butler's lead to 69-66 with
Dints 46 seconds to play, but the
lead Buckeyes got no closer.

:hed No. 15 Georgetown 74,'
start No. 17 Washington 66
icky
. to ANAHEIM, Calif. -
cats Julian Vaughn scored a
is of career-high 18 points, and
.sion Georgetown pulled away in
,am the in the Wooden Classic.
Greg Monroe had 15
reek points and seven rebounds
)ints for the Hoyas (8-0), who


scored 12 straight points
after halftime during a
21-2 run. The impressive
surge abruptly blew open a
previously tight game in the
annual doubleheader held
to honor John Wooden,
UCLA's famed 99-year-old
coach.
Isaiah Thomas scored
15 of his 21 points after
halftime for the Huskies
(6-2) While leading a late
15-3 run, but Washington
couldn't close a 20-point
deficit.
Quincy Pondexter,
the ohly senior on either
roster, scored 23 points for
the Huskies, who haven't
beaten a Big East team in
20 years.

-No. 20 Wisconsin 72,
Marquette 63
MADISON, Wis. - Jori
Leuer scored 24 points 'to
lead Wisconsin over, its,
in-state rival.
It was 'career victory
No. 200 at Wisconsin for
Bo Ryan and the second
straight big scoring per-'
formance by Leuer for the
Badgers (7-2), who jumped
Into the Top 25 after beat-
ing Duke last week -- only,
to lose at Wisconsin-Green:
SBay on Wednesday despite
getting a career-high 26
.points from Leuer.'
Lazar Hayward scored 21
points for Marquette (7-3),'
which has lost three of four.
Wisconsin snapped a two-
game losing streak to their
in-state rivals and now leals
the all-time series 63-53..

No. 25 Mississippi 83,
S.McNeese St. 67
.-OXFORD, Miss.-- Chris
Warren scored 20 points
and Eniel Polynice had all 12
points and four steals over
the final 10 minutes of the
game to rally Mississippi.
The Rebels (8-1) -trailed
by as many as 15 points
early in the second half of
their first game since enter-
ing the.Top .25, but they
used defense to blow past
the, Cowboys, (3-5) in the
closing minutes.
The Cowboys built their
largest lead with a 29-10
run' that spanned halftime
'and featured seven 3-point-
ers, including four by Diego
Kapelan.
Mississippiansweredwith
an 18-2 run that included
eight points from Polynice
and gave the Rebels their
first lead of the second half,
61-59 with 6:30 left.


COURTESY PHOT(

Hoop Shoot champions
The annual Elks Hoop Shoot competition, sponsored locally byB.P.O.E. 893 under the.
direction Of Hoop Shoot Chairman Trey Hosford, was Dec. 5 at the Columbia High gym. All
Columbia County middle schools and elementary schools participated. Winners are (front
row, from left): Skylar Parnell of Lake City Middle School, girls ages 10-11; Kahnayla Taylor
of Fort.White Elementary, girls ages 8-9; Ryan Matthews of Pinemount Elementary, boys
ages 8-9. Back row (from left) are: Jamarcus/Howard of LCMS, boys ages 12-13;
Ashley Cordner of LCMS,"girls ages 12-13; Ryan Guyton of Eastside Elementary, boys
ages 10-11.,Lake City was the only Elks lodge in the district to sponsor the competition, so
winners advance to region'in Live Oak in February.


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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I













Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


�~I
-d3 r'
r .h. �i:
:d~fi~ii":
�n;


SFrom staff reports

Lake City Middle School:.
runners' competed in
the AAU National cross
-country meet at Disney's
Wide World of Sports in
Orlando on Dec. 5, and
Emma Tucker came away
with a medal.
Tucker placed 22nd
in- the . girls Sub-Midget
category (ages 11-12) and
was awarded a medallion
for finishing in the top 25.
Tucker sloshed to a 3,000-
meter time of 12:46, well off
her best of 12:35. "
"The conditions at Disney
were miserably cold, wet
and muddy," coach April
Morse said. "Parts of the
course were calf-deep


"It was a good
effort for the
kids in spite of
the mentally
tough
conditions."

-April Morse,
cross country coach

iii mud. I had to tape th&
shoes to their feet so the
shoes wouldn't be supked
into the mud - something
I learned in college."
Other Lake City runners
competing at nationals were
Samantha Ziegaus, 40th in
Sub-Miidget at 13:16; Nicole
Morse, .53rd in Midget


category (age 12); Timothy
Pierce, 51st in Midget at
12:51; Aaron Barber, 66th
in Midget at 13:38; Abby
Williams, 47th in Youth at
18:03; Ashlyn Martin, 78th
in Youth at 20:46.
Morse took to the wet
conditions, breaking her
personal best mark by 30
seconds with 13:03.
"Since it was a national
meet, pretty much the
nation's best of the .best
were there," Morse said.
'This was a preview for the
kids on what it will be like
fo run inm college. It was
a big honor for Emma to
place in the top 25. It was a
good effort for the kids in
spite of the mentally tough
conditions."


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City Middle School's Emma Tucker shows the medallion presented her for placing in the
top 25 at the AAU National cross country meet at Disney's Wide World of Sports on Dec. 5.
Tucker ran in a 3,000-meter national competition.


Visit www.lakecityreporter.com


Gillette trims


use of Tiger


By EMILY FREDRIX
Associated Press

One of Tiger Woods'
major sponsors won't
feature the world's most
valuable , athlete in its
marketing while he takes
time off to repair his
personal life.
Gillette's announcement
Saturday marks the first
major sponsor of the super-
star athlete and corporate
pitchman to distance itself
from Woods.
"As Tiger takes a break
from the public eye, we will
support his desire for pri-
vacy by limiting his role in
our marketing programs,"
said Gillette, a division of
Procter & Gamble.
Other sponsors are
mulling their options- and
trying to gauge the fall-
out from the man who has
become the face of golf, as
he drops off the circuit for
an unspecified period.
AT&T said it is evalu-
ating its relationship with
the golfer. Representatives
from Accenture won't
say what its plans are
regardingWoods, whom the
consulting firm has used
to personify its claimed
attributes of integrity and
high performance.
"I think you will see the
handful or so of companies
S that he has relationships
with doing some real soul
searching and making some
probably, for them, difficult
decisions in the next few
days," said Lairy L Smith,
president of the Institute
for Crisis Management, in
Louisville, Ky.
Late Friday, Woods
announced an indefinite
leave from golf and public
life to try to rescue his mar-
riage after two weeks of
intense coverage of his infi-
delity sullied his carefully
cultivated good guy image.


'The decision and contrite
tone of his statement was
seen by.marketing experts
as a smart step to repairing
his public image.
His previous brief and
vague statements on the
matter were criticized as
insufficient to quell the.
intense scrutiny 'and : to'
lessen the damage from
more than a handful of
women who claim to have
had affairs with him.
"It's just like your most
beautiful fashion brand
is being trashed," said
John Sweeney, director of.
sports communication at
the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill's
School of Journalism ,and
Mass Communication. "I
'don't expect Tiger to be the
gold standard anymore, but
he's not going out of busi-
ness ... He's too big and too
talented to be fired, but he
will have significant declines
from what he was."
Woods, 33, spent 13 years
burnishing his personal
brand.
His good looks and
multiracial heritage gave
him broad appeal. His
domination of the game and
fist-pumping flair for the
dramatic established .his
tournament appearances as
must-see TV. His work ethic
is admirable. Marketers
were drawn to his image as
a clean-cut family man who
mourned the death of the
father who taught lim the
game, doted on his moth-
er 'and married a former
Swedish model with whom
he has two young children.
Woods is the pitchman
for brands ranging from
AT&T to Accenture to
Nike. His array of endorse-
ments helped him become
the first sports star to earn
$1 billion. Michael Jordan,
Woods' closest contempo-
rary, is a distant second.


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In this Feb. 3 file photo provided by Gillette, golfer
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Gamer razor during the Gillette-EA SPORTS Champions
of Gaming Finals in Orlando.


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fC,n,,,4,~
Kwrri.o


LCMS's Tucker wins


cross country medal


j















Story ideas?

Contact
Tom Mayer
Editor
754-0428
tmayer@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, December


13, 2009


www.lakecityreportee.com


Section C


ON BUSINESS


Jerry Osteryoung
(850) 644-3372
jostery@comcost.net

Small

business

and

banking
If we had no winter, the
spring would not be so pleas-
ant; if we did not sometimes
taste of adversity, prosperity
would not be so welcome.
- Anne Dudley
Bradstreet
G . tting a small
business
loan now is
extremely
difficult as so
many financial institutions
- both community and
national - are not giving
them out at all. If loans are
being offered, the require-
ments are onerous with
heavy collateral require-
ments and a heavy commit-
ment to a down payment.
Our government has
done so much to bail out
big business and big banks,
but little of this has shown
up to help small business,
which is the lifeblood of
our country. We had one
firm that had just gotten a
contract from the state of
Florida to provide work-
ers in the medical field.
They had a purchase order
obligating them to supply
more than 100 jobs employ-
ment for over nine months,
but they needed additional
funding to cover the initial
payroll, which amounted to
about $150,000.
The state was going to
guarantee payment once
the'workers were found,
but this young firm just
could not get the initial
financing necessary to
sustain them until they got
the first payment from the
state. The firm had tried
almost every bank, but
none were willing to loan
them funds. They were just
unwilling to take the risk
required to create jobs that
are so vital to our economy.
Our national govern-
ment is throwing trillions
of dollars into the Troubled
Assets Relief Program
BANKING continued on 2C


William Leo Wright.(right) and John Musselman, the manager of Severt's Tree Farm, pose for a photo on Thursday. The tree farm sells trees starting at 18
inches to 12 to 14 feet tall, and reports that, contrary to.beliefs, live tregs are still very.popular among locals even as fake trees continue to gain traction
nationally.

Live Christmas trees still popular locally


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com.

12 days
remain-
ing until
Christmas,
most people have already
purchased and decorated
trees, and despite the lag-:


g ing econoniy, real trees
-have stayed~relatively
popular among holiday
customers.
In 2008, $709 million
was spent on fake trees
and 28.2 million were pur-
chased, compared to $1.03
billion for real trees and
TREES continued on 2C


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake Uity Reporter
Musselman and Wright pop out a tree from a grid.'Tree farms
are the best off the lot,' Musselman said. 'None of these are
fake trees, and all of them are made in America.'


Times Maronda Homes
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Seasons Greetings to our pacirnts,
their families and the North Florida community -
thatc %e are privileged to serve.


~--L 1 111-yl 111 IC- ~---


_~~~~~ ~,~i,,.lu~-~--~'�mJrr~.~*~"~~- "~^C"y~L~L- Y~L�L~-I__-_II- /�Y��~�*L~.~ylylll~�Y�~i~*ly4*


A














LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Stick With Your Mix
I've heard that when stocks fall,
investors move their money to
bon s, and vice versa. Should I do
that? - B.E., online
A Think for yourself and don't
follow the crowd. Decide, for
example, how much of your nest egg
you want to keep in bonds. Young
people might want to be close to 100
percent in stocks, while those near
or in retirement might want to have a
chunk of their money in bonds.
Whatever your desired allocation is,
stick with it until you have a good
reason to change it. The whole point
of having some money in each cate-
gory is so that when one slumps, the
other might offset that effect (though
that doesn't always happen). So give
the categories a chance to do their
thing.
***
Q I've recently learned that it's
OK to have multiple IRA
,accounts, but I'm wondering why I
would want to have more than one.
;:--O., online
A Well, you might open a tradi-
- tional or Roth IRA account
with a regular brokerage so that you
can invest in individual stocks '
.through it. (Learn more about bro-
kerages at www.broker.Fool.com.)
meanwhilee, youniight open
another IRA account with a mutual
Fund company, if it's the best way for
'yo6 toinvest in a particular fund
S(some furids are not available
through brokerages).'Also, if you
,chang jobs, you might roll over: '`
money from your old 401(k) into a'
new IRA account, so you can keep,
track of that money separately.'
It generally doesn't matterpif you
have multiple accounts -just know
that if your contribution limit for the
year is $5,000, that's all you can
contribute in total - it's not $5,000
per account.


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Sposed deal that's in the works B i 'I| -Tellit-ly IT1 F ol T1 ak1
"Points to HUGE Profits for early
shareholders," be wary.
s n professional eb sitefor My BOOM Disney Knows Best
the company. If it features poor Went Boom Fourth-quarter results at entertain-
grammar and misspellings, and, ment giant Disney (NYSE: DIS)
th- pages "under construction" or I became an individual stock showed revenue up 4 percent over
vn absent, that's a bad sign. You should investor last year. After the market year-ago levels, to $9.9 billion.
nt? find clear, honest communication crashed, looking for, bargains, I Gains at its steady cable networks
t from the company and be able to bought stock in Dynamic Materials and a rebound in its broadcasting
to find its financial statements, too. based on a Fool newsletter recom-' division were more than enough to
oilers Ask yourself this: If these tiny mendation. It soon doubled, from offset declines at its theme parks
companies with relatively few $10 to $20 per share, so I put four and consumer products - and
o shares really are such mind-bog- times more money into it, expect- operating deficits at its
. gling bargains, why would they ing it to double again, to $40. Well, studio and software arms.
S need to advertise? Wouldn't knowl- the stock then fell In an interesting
edgeable folks already have discov- more than 30 per- I switcheroo, CFO Tom
rs: ered them? And if there were such cent. What was my Staggs and theme parks chief Jay
c, steady demand for the shares, favorite stock is now Rasulo will be swapping gigs come
leal wouldn't their price have risen, . my least favorite, not - ' January.-A logical suspicion is-that
rather than fallen to bargain levels? because of the com- both are being groomed to eventu-
ure A seemingly inexpensive share pany, but because of how I ally succeed CEO Bob Iger, so they
ian price doesn't mean a stock is a good invested. Lesson learned: Don't get are being immersed into new lead-
At value. A 50-cent stock can soon greedy. When a stock is soaring, ership positions to have a better
,000 become a five-cent one, while a $50. it's tempting to buy more, but stick command of the entire company.
than stock can double to $100 and keep to value and fundamentals. - . This doesn't mean that Iger has'to
u'd . growing. In companies you con- Kevin, Austin, Texas be checking his back, though, as
d'to side, seek track records of accomj The Fool Responds: Here's hop- the company is doing well, topping
.. plishments, healthy growth (of sales . ing you hung on to your shares analyst expectations in each of the
;la- and earnings), financial health (lit- ,after. writing that to us in August. past three quarters.
ds. If tie debt,'ample cash), and sustain- 'The explosives company Dynamic : The futures bright at Disney.
"an able competitive advantages. Don't Materials..(with the terrific ticker 'Beyond the juicy possibilities of its
up just fall for an exciting story of pos-, symbol BOOM) recovered and was 'p ending Marvel Entertainment
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Name That Company . more to your stake can be effective, ."Toy Story," "Cars" and "Pirates of
S\ , : too, if you believe the company is the Caribbean" hit the silver screen
SMy roots can,.be traced back still worth much more. The fate of its theme parks is tied
S to 1833. Today, based in Manhiat- " ' Do youhave an embarrassing to the global economy, but major
S tan I'.a world leader in ods . lesson learned the hard way? additions at Disney's California
tan I o-a WOrld leader in odors, .. Boil it doin to 100words (or Adventire Park and Florida's
V, and tastes. About 54 percent of less)and send itto The Motley Fool co My Magic Kingdom are on the way.
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my 2008 revenue came from fra . Submit to MySmartetlnvestment. If we about Disney (and thousands of
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S " .LAST.WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
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Tl I:***************** ***I*i )I*. Ii.** *UN *r * *I '***ln****k ( )RRi**ASi 12e101/20*9) ,** . *
Tei2()o Ir, l/Dl nv UNI~iHu nl (1oRI Ai 12/10/2009)


- OApple countersues

Nokia over patent


Associated Press
NEW YORK - Apple
Inc. is suing cell phone
maker Nokia Corp. for pat-
ent infringement, a coun-
termove to Nokia's earlier
suit against technologies
used in Apple's iPhone. ,


Apple's lawsuit claims
Nokia is infringing on 13 of
Apple's patents, and says
the Finland-based company
chose to "copy the iPhone,"
' especially its user inter-
face, to make up for its
declining share of the high-
end phone market


BANKING: Programs


Wright and Musselman carry a freshly cut tree to the display area for potential customers. 'This is going to be the last
Christmas tree you are ever going to need,' Musselman said. 'These are cut one week before we sell them. When you go to
the stores, they have the trees that are in cold storage since October.'


TREES: Sales are steady, despite economy


Continued From Page 1C
28.2 million purchased,
according to consumer
survey results from the
National Christmas Tree
Association.
Both results are declines
from 2007. There were
17.4 million fake trees pur-
chased that year, which is
a 35 percent decline. Real
trees only dropped from
31.3 million, just 10 percent
The economy has slight-
ly affected tree sales at
Severt's Tree Farm stands,
said John Musselman,
Lake City lot manager.
"Sales are down some-
what at most stands," he
said. "It depends a lot on
the area."
Bigger cities, such
as Gainesville and
Jacksonville, still are big
sellers.
This is Severt's first year
in Lake City, Musselman
said. The company will be


JASON MAT THEW WALKER&I. : '.I~ I'.....i-'
Wright (left) holds a six-foot high Scotch pine tree stable while
Musselman trims the bottom of a tree Thursday afternoon.


better able to see the effects
of the economy of sales after
Christmas season ends.
Sales are pretty decent
and about the, same as last
year at Food Lion, said
Mike Williams, store man-
ager. Stable tree sales have
been the trend for the last


five years.
"We haven't seen a large
increase," he said. "We
don't see a decrease either."
Severt's will get in some
more trees, but Food Lion
has its total inventory.
"We're at just about
the stop selling point,"


Williams said.
Typically real trees
are purchased from the
day after Thanksgiving
onward to two weeks after,
Musselman said. Sales
start slowing after that
time period.
"This weekend is the
end of the time span to buy
before Christmas," he said
People are in the spirit
of the season right after
Thanksgiving, Williams
said. Christmas lights are
put up and families go to
get the tree.
"I thihk everybody is
geared up at the time," he
said. "They're usually off
from work."
By Christmas, Williams
said he expects all the
trees to be gone at Food
Lion.
"We typically sell all
down to the last handful,"
he said.


Continued From Page 1C
(TARP), stimulus spending
and now into health care,
but these dollars have been
ineffective at reducing'
the unemployment rate.
These dollars are missing
the mark because they are
bypassing small business,
which is the job-generating
engine for our economy.
If we are to get out of this.
recession and get people to
work, we have to find some
way to finance the growth
of small business.
For most small busi-
nesses, there are, however,
several avenues to acquire
the funds that are needed
to grow and build the infra-
structure for the coming
recovery. Firstly, look to
credit unions as many of
these financial institutions
have funds available and
are now offering small,
business loans with very
attractive rates.
Additionally, the Small
Business Administration
(SBA) has a great pro-
gram called the "504" loan
program, which furnishes
loans to small businesses.
SBA "504" loans offer
small business owners
and manufacturers access
to low interest, long-term
and fixed-rate financing
with only 10 percent down
payment requirements for
the purchase, construction
or renovation of owner-
occupied commercial real
estate and/or the acquisi-
tion of industrial equip-
ment or other fixed assets.


"504" loans are delivered
exclusively by non-profit
Certified Development
Companies (CDCs) regu-
lated by the SBA. A firm
called Florida First Capital
Finance, which has offices
throughout Florida, offers
these services as well.
Finally, if you need
financing, consider raising
funds from your friends or
relatives, a method that is
typically called bootstrap
financing. There are so
many wealthy investors
that love to loan money to -
small businesses if the deal
is right. Obviously, these
lenders or "angels" do not
carry signs that say, "We
have money to loan"; rath-
er, you need to find them
by asking your accountant
and possibly your banker if
they know of any.
While the opportuni-
ties for acquiring funds
to expand your business
are exceedingly limited
right now, there are still
vehicles available to you to
raise money. It takes much
more work than it used to,
but it can be done! Like
most things, raising funds
- especially in this market
- is tough, but with a plan
it can happen.
You can do this!
* FSU Finance Professor
Dr. Jerry Osteryoung is
Executive Director of the Jim
Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship at Florida
State University's College of
Business.


0


=_In Fa iT


_ i;�I I � _����(I


I


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


V



















Phge Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427 LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009 3C




1 The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlghts STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones


3 NYSE Amex
125.12 -57.59 1,779.14 -13.34


Gainers ($2 or more)'
Name Last Chg %Chg
RELM 3.50 +1.25 +55.6
IntlRyltyg 6.82 +2.37 +53.3
Invitel 5.26 +1.71 +48.2
HKHighpw 8.18 +1.93 +30.9
CaracoP 5.95 +1.37 +29.9
DocuSec 2.59 +.46 +21.6
SinoHubn 4.60 +.80 +21.1
ChNEPetn 6.85 +1.15 +20.2
SL nd 7.70 +1.29 +20.1
ChMdawt 5.00 +.76 +17.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
OverhillF 4.85 -.98 -16.8
NwGoldg 3.25 -.55 -14.5
KeeganRg 5.96 -.94 -13.6
GeoGloblR 2.15 -.30 -12.2
Geokinetics10.90 -1.52 -12.2
MinesMgt 2.75 -,35 -11.3
KodiakOg 2.17 -.26 -10.7
MAGSIvg 5.97 -.71 -10.6
GenMoly 2.04 -.24 -10.5
Banrog 2.04 -.23 -10.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
GoldStrg 254450 3.52 -.19
BPWAcq 225942*10.37 +.52
Rentech 176522 1.63 +.08
NovaGldg 166764 5.51 -.59
Taseko 146106 3.90 -.08
CelSci 141005 1.09 -.12
NthgtMg 138005 3.22 -.05
GrtBasGg 119864 1.67 -.02
RELM 114250 3.50+1.25
NwGoldg 107869 325 -.55

Diary
Advanced 277
Declined 311
New Highs 43
New Lows 8
Total issues 610
Unchanged 22
Volume 571,521,735


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
WHidrs f 22.98 +6.04 +35.7
FstBcpPR 2.17 +.55 +34.0
McClatchy 3.31 +.76 +29.8
Gannet 13.16 +2.91 +28.4
JacksnHew 5.16 +1.07 +26.2
ChrisBnk 7.64 +1.36 +21.7
Duoyuann 8.34 +1.36 +19.5
Sparton 5.09 +.79 +18.4
CtigrppfP 16.65 +2.57 +18.3
GenSteel 5.08 +.75 +17.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ZaleCp 3.25 -1.71 -34.5
NBkGreece 5.10 -1.22 -19.3
DoverDG 3.60 -.84 -18.9
Bklrelnd 8.48 -1.66 -16.4
Aldlrish 3.94 -.77 -16.3
IDTCpCrs 3.10 -.59 -16.0
IntlCoal 3.63 -.65 -15.2
ProSUtSilv 58.62 -9.81 -14.3
ProUftCrudelO.70 -1.72 -13.8
UnivTravn 9.07 .1.43 -13.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Ciigrp 15361962 3.95 -.11
BkofAm 12122691 15.63 -.65
SPDR 6236988111.11 +.10
SprintNex 4900095 4.07 +.38
SPDR Fan3802423 14.39 -.24
GenElec 3116788 15.92 -.28
Pfizer 2951597 18.30 -.19
iShEMkts 2831482 41.35 -.49
FordM 2754805 9.00 +.06
DirFBear rs2539053 20.17 +.68

Diary
Advanced 1,841
Declined 1,332
New Highs 465
New Lows 20
Total issues 3,214
Unchanged 41
Volume 20,930,511,918


S2,190.31 -4.04


Gainers ($2 or moreY
Name Last Chg %Chg
Kingstone 2.35 +.58 +32.8
QuadraMed 8.42 +1.77 +26.6
Yuhe ntln 7.58 +1.58 +26.3
ColonyBk 4.65 +.96 +26.0
BioFuelEn 3.64 +.73 +25.1
Pharmacyc 2.78 +.55 +24.7
NMTMed 2.44 +48 +24.5
FstBkshVA 5.68 +1.11 +24.2
Aslainfo 31.06 +5.96 +23.7
BTU Int 4.90 +.93 +23.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SigaTechh 524 -3.82 -42.2
DeerCons 12.20 -5.29 -30.2
FstChestrn 5.10 -1.93 -27.5
NaugatVly 5.35 -2.00 -27.2
ProvFnH 2.55 -.95 -27.1
MoleclnPh 2.49 -.80 -24.3
SIntl 2.49 -.77 -23.6
FstCalifFn 276 -.82 -22.9
SCmntyFn 2.17 -,55 -20.2
e-Future 6.55 -1.65 '-20.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ362653844.13 +.01
Intel 2457220 19.90 -.56
Comcast 2220538'17.64 +1.51
Microsoft 2082404 29.85,-.13
Cisco 1762370 23.77 -.39
DellInc 1643107 13.12 -.34
BrcdeCm 1525505 7.41 +.37
Oracle 1403130 22.78 -.05
Nvidia 1301258 15.21 +.95
ETrade 1291133 1.66 -.04


Diary
Advanced 1,254
Declined 1,629
New Highs 215
New Lows 57
Total issues 2,949
Unchanged 66
Volume 9,527,669,145


Name Ex Div


Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.64 28.01 +.41 +1.5 -1.7
AMD NY ... 8.64 +.78 +9.9+300.0
Alcoa NY .12 14.61 +1.62 +12.5 +29.8
AutoZone NY ... 155.78 +3.70 +2.4 +11.7
BkofAm NY .04 15.63 -.65 -4.0 +11.0
BkAmpfS NY ... 15.53 -.41 -2.6 -2.6
BobEvn Nasd .72 26.97 +.19 +0.7 +32.0
BrMySq NY 1.24 25.80 +.66 +2.6 +11.0
BrcdeCm Nasd ... 7.41 +.37 +5.3+161.8
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 15.09 -.83 -5.2 +34.9
CSX NY .88.48.94 -1.19 -2.4 +50.7
ChampE h NY .. .20 ...... -64.3
Chevron NY 2.72 77.76 -.31 -0.4 +5.1
Cisco Nasd ... 23.77 -.39 -1.6 +45.8
CitFgrp NY .. 3.95 -.11 -2.7 -41.1
CocaCI NY 1.64 59.11 +1.62 +2.8 +30.6
ColBgp NY .. .41 ... ... -80.0
Comcast Nasd .38 17.64 +1.51 +9.4 +4.5
Delhaize NY 2.01 77.75 -1.55 -2.0 +23.4
Dell Inc Nasd ... 13.12 -.34 -2.5 +28.1
DirFBearrsNY 20.17 +.68 +3.5 -94.4
FPLGrp NY 1.89 56.25 +3.50 +6.6 +11.8
FamilyDIr NY .54 28.20 +.06 +0.2 +8.2
FordM NY 9.00 +.06 +0.7+293.0
GenElec NY .40 15.92 -.28 -1.7 -1.7
HomeDp NY .90 28.49 +.41 +1.5 +23.8
iShJapn NY .12 9.95 -.04 -0.4 +3.9
iShEMkts NY .59 41.35 -.49 -1.2 +65.6


iShR2K NY .83
Intel Nasd .63
JPMorgCh NY .20
Lowes NY .36
McDnlds NY 2.20
Microsoft Nasd .52
NY-Times NY
NobltyH Nasd .25
OccPet NY 1.32
Oracle Nasd .20
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 1.80
Pfizer NY .64
Potash NY .40
PwShs OQQNasd .18
PrUShS&PNY 11.47
QwestCm NY .32
Ryder NY 1.00
SpdrGold NY
SearsHldgsNasd
SouthnCo NY 1.75
SpdrntNex NY
SPDR NY 2.42
SPDR FnclNY .38
TimeWm rsNY .75
US NGsFd NY
WalMart NY 1.09
WellsFargo NY .20


-.25 -0.4 +22.2
-.56 -2.7 +35.7
-.78 -1.9 +31.5
+1.00 +4.4 +11.0
+.07 +0.1 -.9
-.13 -0.4 +53.5
+.47 '+5.4 +25.4
-.46 -4.6 +21.4
-2.32 -3.0 +26.7
-.05 -0.2 +28.5
+.71 +2.6 +45.2
-2.58 -4.0 +11.9
-.19 -1.0 +3.3
+1.84 +1.6 +62.4
+.01 ... +48.4
-.12 -0.3 -49.7
+.19 +4.9 +12.6
-.83 =2.0 +7.5
-4.43 -3.9 +26.4
+1.61 +2.2 +91.2
+1.39 +4.2 -7.5
.+.38 +10.3+122.4
+.10 +0.1;+23.1
-.24 -1.6 +14.9
+1.32 +4.5 +47.2
+.93 +10.8 -58.7
+.69. +1.3 -2.5'
-1.55 -5.7 -13.8


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars, h= Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks, pf = Preferred. rs= Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at q specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. uan Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership, wd = When distributed. wl =
When Issued. wt= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges), m e Multiple fees are charged. NA= not available.'p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed In tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last PvsWeek


Prime Rate


I - .,


.3.25 3.25


Discount ate 0.50 0.50ou
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasures
3-month 0.03 0.05
6-month 00.16 0.17
5-year 2.23 , 2.24
10-year ,3.54 3.48
30-year 4.49 4.41


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0980 1.0905
Britain 1.6241 1.6264
Canada . 1.0606 1.0504
Euro .6841 .6793
Japari 89.18 88.20
Mexico 12.9340 12.9820
Switzerlnd 1.0341 . 1.0266
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency..


Dow Jones industrials
Close: 10,471.50
1-week change: 82.60 (0.8%)
11,000... .....


1.21 -104.14 51.08 68.78


65.67


MON TUES WED THUR FRI


.. . . . . .. . . . . .


10,000


0 N D


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pet Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCOTotRetls CI
AmericanFunds GrthAmA m LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Vanguard TotStldx LB
American Funds CpWIdGrlA m WS
Fidelity Contra . LG
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Vanguard 5001nv LB
Vanguard Instldx LB
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Dodge & Cox Stock LV
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
Fidelity Divrlntl d FG
Arri;.cran Furm.i FnlnvA m LB
PiMCO TOlRetlA.l,. P Cl
American Funds BalA m MA
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA
Vanguard Welltn MA
Vanguard 500Adml LB
American Funds BondA m CI
Fidelity GrowCo x LG
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB
Vanguard Totlntl FB
Vanguard InstPlus . LB


114,653
65,022
58,268
56,221
56,060
55,503
49,018
48,458
47,844
43,018
40,409
39,492
38,894
35,777
32,502
31,850
30,369
30,253
29,744
28,628
28,113
27,983
27,836
27,285
26,873
25,417
24,423


+17.0/C
+35.9/C
+23.8/D
+32.7/B
+36.8/C
+32.1/D
+29.7/B
+30.0/C
+29.8/C
+30.0/C
+44.3/A
+36.6/A
+23.0/D
+51.5/A
+42.1/B
+39.3/D
+35.8/B
+16.7/C
+24.4/D
+46.2/A
+27.5/C
+30.0/C
+18.8/B
+42.9/B
+32.9/B
+43.5/A
+30.0/C


+6.9/A
+3.1/A
+4.3/C
+1.1/B
+6.8/A
+4.8/A
+3.31/
+2.0,'
+0.6/(,
+0.7/C
+8.7/A
-0.2/D
+0.7/C
+6.5/A
+6.3/A
+4.6/D
+4.4/A
+6.6/A
+2.3/C
+3.9/A
+5.2/A
+0.7/C
+2.6/E
+4.2/A
+1.2/B
+6.3/A
+0.7/C


NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 . 250
5.75 , 250
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 . 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
4.25 . 1,000
NL 10,000
NL 100,000
3.75' 250
NL 2,500
NL 100,000
NL 3,000
NL 200,000,000


CA ConseAvaive Allocan, CI -IntenediateTerm Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LageGrow, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -Wodd Allocaon, LB -Large Bend, LG -Large Grwt, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allcatn, MB -Mi-Cap Blend, MV
Md-Cap Value SH -Spedalty-heath, WS -World Stod Tota Relum: Chng in V wil dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed,
others wi same objecie: A is in op 20%, E in boom 20%. n In nvt: Minimum needed to invest innd. Source: Mongsar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div ld PE Chg %Chg Last
ABB Ltd .44 2.5 ... -.60 +19.5 17.94
AESCorp ... ... 16. -.28 +58.7 13.08
AFLAC 1.12 2.4 15 +.72 +1.5 46.55
AKSteel .20 1.0 .. +1.14+120.2 20.52
AMR ..... ..... +.32 -27.9 . 7.69
AOLn ... ...... -.15 -2.9 24.35
AT&T Inc 1.64 5.9 14 +.41 -1.7 28.01
AUOptron .09 .8 ... +.38 +49.1 11.12
AbtLab 1.60 3.0 15 -.01 +.7 53.77
AberRtc .70 2.0 75 -.90 +52.7 35.23
Accenture .75 .1.8 17 -.54 +28.1 42.00
AMD ... ...... +.78+300.0 8.64
Aeropostl ...' ... 13 +3.02 +98.6 31.97
Aetna '.04 .1 11 +2.78 +11.4 31.76
Agnicog, .18 .3 ... -2.07 +19.0 61.09
Agriumg .11 .2 21 +5.32 +84.2 62.88
AirTran ... ... ... +.06 +17.6 5.22
AlcatelLuc ... ...... -.09 +55.3 3.34
Alcoa .12 .8 ... +1.62 +29.8 14.61
Allstate .80 2.8 ... +.03-12.6 28.63
AlphaNRs ... ... 72 +2.22+143.6 39.44
Altria 1.36 7.0 11 +.20 +29.6 19.52
AmbacF ... ...... -.02 -34.6 .85
AMovilL 1.22 2.6 ... -.85 +53.1 47.46
AmAxle ... ... ... -.24+139.1 6.91
AEagleOut .40 2.5 28 +.32 +73.3 16.22
AEP 1.64 4.6 12 +1.79 +6.9 35.58
AmExp .72 1.8 38 +1.43 +119.6 40.73
AlntlGprs ... ... ... -1.75 - -9.6 28.37
AmTower ... ... 60 -.96 +36.6 40.04
AmeriBrgs .32 1.3 15 +.12 +39.0 24.79
Anadarko .36 .6 ... -2.17 +50.4 57.99
AnalogDev .80 2.6 39 -.11 +60.3 30.49
AnglogldA .13 .3 ... -1.61 +51.7 42.04
Annaly 2.29 12.2 15 +.54 +17.9 18.71
Apache .60 .6 ... +.43 +27.0 94.63
ArcelorMit .75 1.8 ...+2.04 +70.8 42.00.
ArchCoal .36 1.8 29 +.50 +26.0 20.53
ArchDan .56 1.8 17 -1.10 +5.8 30.49
ATMOS 1.34 4.6 13 +.75 +22.3 28.99
Avon .84 2.5 25 -1.69 +40.1 33.67
BB&TCp .60 2.3 18 -.73 -5.8 25.88
BHPBiILt 1.64 2.2 ... -1.52 +71.9 73.75
BJSvcs. .20 1.1 35 +.12 +56.3 18.24
BakrHu .60 1.5 16 +.31 +22.5 39,30
BcoBrades .75 3.4 ... +.49+125.2 22.23
BcoSantand.87 5.3 ...-1.35 +72.3 16.35
BcSBrasiln ... ... ... +.07 +5.4 13.71
BkofAm .04 .3 ... -.65 +11.0 15.63
BkAmpfS ... ...... -.41 -2.6 15.53
BkNYMel .36 1.3 ... +.01 -4.9 26.94
BaprickG .40 1.0 ...-3.10 +7.6 39.58
Baxter 1.16 1.9 17 +3.10 +11.0 59.50
BestBuy .56 1.3 20 +.55 +58.5 44.34
BlockHR ,60 2.9 13 +.55 -9.2 20.62
Boeing 1.68 3.0 ... +.92 +30.3 55.60
Borders ......... +.23 +247.5 1.39
BostonSci ... ..... +.15 +12.0 8.67
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BurlNSF 1.60 1.6 19.+.32 +30.2 98.58
CBS B .20 1.4 23 +.65 +71.7 14.06
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CITGrpn ... ... ... ... +2.2 29.64
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SCSX - .88 1.8 18 -1.19 +50.7 48.94
CVSCare .31 1.0 13 +1.46 +12.1 32.22
Calpine ... ... ... +.44 +57.3 11.45
Cameron ... ... 17 +.60 +85.1 37.95
CapOne .20 .5 ... +2.48 +26.7 40.40
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Citigrp ... ... ... -.11 -41.1 3.95
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yid PE Chg %Chg Last


ActivsBliz ...
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AkeenaSol ...
AllosThera ...
AlteraCp If .20
Amazon
AmCapLtd .19
Amgen
AmkorT If ...
Apollolnv 1.12
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl ' .24
.AriadP
Asialnfo
Atmel ..
Autodesk
AutoData 1.36
BedBath
Biogenldc ...
BrigExp
Broadcom ...
BrcdeCm
CAInc .16
Cadence
Celgene ...
CellTher rsh...
CentAl
CienaCorp ...
Cisco
CitizReph ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .38
Come spcl .38
CorinthC
Costco .72
Cyclacel
CvpSemi


43 -.28 +24.4
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Coach .30
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DirxEMBear...
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DirxEnBear ...
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Dynegy
EMCCp ...
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ForestOil
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AREA MORTGAGE RATES
Institution Phn 30fixed 15fixed 5/1ARM FHA/
Institution Phone rate / pts rate /pts rate I pts VA

AAAMortgage (800)764-7598 6.13/0.00 5.75/0.00 5.88'10.00 No Quote


AAXA Discount Mortgage (877)728-3569 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote


Absolute Mortgage Co. (888) 90-HOMES 6.38/0.00 5.88/0.00 6.13/0.00 No Quote


AmCap Funding.Corp. (800) 289-6516 No Quote No Quote No Quote No Quote


Capital Financial Mtg. Corp. (888) 328-9328 6.50 /0.00 6.00/ 0.00 No Quote No Quote


Earth Mortgage (877) 327-8450 No Quote Nd Quote No Quote No Quote


Ist Metropolitan Mortgage (800) 548-5988 5.99/2.00 5.38/2.00 5.50 /0.00 No Quote


Heidelberg Capital Corp. (80())968-2240 6.13 / 1.00 5.75/ 1.00 5.50 / 1.00 No Quote


Nationwide Mrg. Lending Grp. .(866) 548-6535 6.25 /0.00 5.88 / 0.00 5.50 / O.)0 No Quote


Webb Mortgage Direct (800)952-8706 6.38/0.00 5.88/0.00 6.13/0.00 No Quote

Rates provided by Shoptate.com. Rates are valid as of August 12,2008. Rates are inclusive of all
fees and are subject to change without notice. Call lender directly for APR's. Lenders wishing to
participate in this service, please call 877-429-0940. For additional information on mortgages, go to:
www.shoprate.com/lakecity.aspx


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


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vjdecodGen...
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Level3
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Netlist
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Popular
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Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


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SeagateT .
Sequenom ..
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Symantec ..
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TriQuint
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YId PE Chg %Chg Last


... 25
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... 31
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1.0
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Aurizon g .
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BPWAcqwt...
BarcUBS36...
BarcGSOil ..
BrclndiaTR .:.
CardiumTh...
CelSci '
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CheniereEn...
ChinaEd n ..
ChMarFdn ...
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ClaudeRg ...
Continucre ...
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Crystallxg ...
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Endvrlnt
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Name Div
Kraft 1.16
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LSICorp
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Mechel
Medtrnic .82
Merck 1.52
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MicronT


Wkly YTD
Yld PE Chg %Chg
4.3 16 +.22 -.2
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Name Div YId PE


Monsanto 1.06 1.3
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OfficeDpt
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PS USDBu.17 ..
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PrUIShDow6.03 ...
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ProUSSP00...
ProUTtCrude... .
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SpdrMetM .50 1.0
Safeway .40 1.8
StJude
Saks ...
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Name Div
Schlmbrg .84
SemiHTr .50
SilvWhtng ...
SimonProp .80
Smithlntl .48
SmithF ...
SouthnCo 1.75
SthnCopper .44
SwstAirl .02
SwstnEngy ..
SprintNex
SPDR 2.42
SP Malls .68
SP HIthC , .57
SPCnSt .68
SP Consume .28
SP Engy .73
SPDR Fncl .38
SP Inds .67
SPTech .31
SP Util 1.26
StateStr .04
Suncorgs .40
Suntech
SunTrst '.04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.00
TJX .48
TaiwSemi .46
Talbots
Target .68
TeckResg ...
TenetHlih
Teradyn
Terra .40
Tesoro .20
Texlnst .48
3M Co 2.04
TimeWm rs .75
TollBros ...
Iransocn
Travelers 1.32
Tyson .16
US Airwy ...
UnionPac 1.08
UtdMicro
UPSB 1.80
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USNGsFd...
US OilFd
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .03
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ValeSApf .48
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ViacomB ...
VimpelCm .33
Visa .50
Walgm .55
Weathflntl..
WellPoint
WellsFargo .20
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WstnUnion .24
WmsCos' .44
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Yamanag .04
YingliGrn
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YId PE Chg
1.4 20 +.01
1.9 ... -.38
... ... -1.09 +
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31 -1.50
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. +.73 +
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... -.27
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... +.40
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.. -.04
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... +.93
... -2.85
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2.9 ... -.38
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2.2 23 -.05
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YTD Wkly
%Chg Last.
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.133.1 15.13
+44.5 76.75.
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.104.5 32.84 .
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-19.4 3.98
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+17.6 41.49
-.5 7.93
+56.1 12.05
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AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg
6.5 ... -.05 +50.7
... ... ... +60.0
... ...-1.24+149.2
... 19 -.25+384.8
... ... -.05+102.2
... -.30 +47.2
... ... +.52 +15.6
... +57 +480.0
... -.51 +14.4
. ... -1.92 +.4
... ... +.31 +101.2
... -.09 -30.7
... -.12 +282.5
.1 ... -.83 +22.9
... +.04 -32.6
.. 11 +.05 +11.0
... 14 +.66 +51.5
... 9 +1.15 +17.7
... ... +.06 +300.0
... 12 +.34 +77.3
... ... ... -73.9
... ... -.05+105.9
... ... -.05 +11.9
... ... +.03 -61.1
-.04 +69.2
7 -.09 +86.0
... -.04+248.0
... -.07 +209.7
6.1 34 -.29 -15.1
... -.14 +105.1
10.3 ... -.20 +24.9
... -.04 +2.8
2 -.06+165.9
.-.24 +72.9
... -.19+252.0
.. ... -.31 +102.9
... -.02 +30.5
... -.03 +63.9


Wkly
Last Name


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IntlRyltyg .04
KodiakOg ...
LadThalFn '.
LibertyAcq ...
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UtdRefEwt ...
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S Wkly YTD Wkly
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27 +1.93+156.4
.. ... -38.8
.. +237+401.5
-.26 +600.0
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8.18
.03
6.82
2.17
.69
9.56
4.37
1.01
10.49
2.85
.13
3.25
3.04
8.24
9.53
3.22 -
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5.51
1.11
.60
1.05
.29
1.30
1.21
6.71
7.81
3.50
1.63
4.09
.20
3.90
4.14
2.58
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.02
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....... ,F r


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

S755-5440


Legal

ATTENTION COMCAST CABLE
CUSTOMERS
Effective January 17, 2010, Style
will change from the Digital Classic
level of service to the Digital Starter
level of service. Some customers
may preview this channel before-
hand.
This affects current and ndw residen-
tial and commercial subscribers serv-
iced by Comcast in Jacksonville,
Callahan, MacClenny, Femandina
Beach, St. Augustine, Palatka, Lake
City, Live Oak, Yulee, Fl., St.
Mary's, Ga. and surrounding areas.
A digital set-top box provided by
Comcast is required to view this
channel. Full Basic service custom-
ers thay subscribe to Digital Starter
at the same price. Digital Starter in-
eludes a digital set-top box at no ad-
ditional cost.
For more information, please call 1-
800-266-2278.
04536563
December 13, 2009
NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA,
COUNTY
TO ADOPT RULE AND SET PUB-
LIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia
County will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday,January 12, 2010, at 7:00
p.m., at the School Board Adminis-
trative Complex, 372 West Duval
,Street, Lake City, Florida, on pro-
posed amendments to rules; regula-
tions and procedures for the opera-
tion of the Columbia County School
System. The public is invited to at-
tend. Action is anticipated at this
. , meeting.
Persons with disabilities who require
assistance to participate in the public
hearing are requested to notify the
Office of the Superintendent at 755-
8000 at least 48 hours in advance so
that their needs can be accommodat-
S ed.
TITLE: Policy 3.05 ^ Administrative
Organization
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Word-
ing to align Administrative positions
with Organizational Chart.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 120.53;
1012.22; 1012.27, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 3.12 ^ Public Infor-
mation and Inspection of Records
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Exemp-
tion of records of dependent children
of former or current employees.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1002.22;
1002.221; 1012.31; 1013.14; 119.07;
447.605, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 3.16 - Charter
Schools
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: States
application process and oversite of a
Charter School will be 'iraccerdance.:
with Florida Statutes.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1001.02;
1002.33; 1002.345,
Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 4.12 ^ Instructional
Materials Selection
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Imple-
ments requirements of Florida Stat-
utes
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1000.21;
1006.28; 1 006.29(5); 1006.31;
1006.32; 1006.42, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 5.022 ^ Home-
less Students - NEW
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:' Imple-
ments requirements of Florida Stat-
utes.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1003.21;
1000.21; 1003.01; 1003.21; 1003.22,
Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 5.10^ Zero Tolerance
for School Related Crimes
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Policy
revisions to implement the policy as
outlined in Florida Statutes and State
Board of Education rules.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 120.57;
775.08; 784.081: 1001.54; 1003.31;
1006.07; 1006.08; 1006.09; 1006.13;
1006.135; 1006.14; 1012.28;
790.162; 790.163, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 5.19 - Corporal Pun-
ishment
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Provi-
sions for review of corporal punish-
ment.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1003.32; 1002.20, Florida
Statutes
TITLE: Policy 6.18 ^ Contracts: In-
structional and Administrative Per-
sonnel
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Admin-
istrator limits on contract year.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1011.60;
1012.22; 1012.32; 1012.34; 1012.56;
120.57, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 6.23 - Personal Leave'
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Addi-
tion to allow for extenuating circum-
stances of unpaid leave.







Home Improvements

CARPENTER WORK
Remodeling, framing, sheetrock,
cabinets, painting, flooring,
Call Dean @ 386-965-5331

Lawn & Landscape Service

Custom Cuts Lawn & Landscape.
Customized lawn care, trimming,
sod, design. Comm'l & Res'd. Lie.
& ins. 386-719-2200 Iv msg.
New Beginnings Lawn Service
Mow, weedeat, rake. Call for
estimates on any lawn job.
386-438-9191l

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.


other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.
****************************


Legal

SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1012.23;
741.313; 1012.61; 1012.66, Florida
Statutes
TITLE: Policy 6.242 " Family and
Medical Leave
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:
Changes to clarify exigency that aris-
es due to family member in military
service.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1012.66;
Florida Statute
TITLE: Policy 6.44 Tele-
phone Calls, Electronic Communica-
tions and Facsimiles
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Adds
expenditure of public funds for cellu-
lar phones shall be consistent with
the provisions of Florida Statutes.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1011.09;
-1012.22; 1012.23; Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 6.441 ^ Em-
ployee Use of Cellular Telephones
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Adds
expenditure of public funds for cellu-
lar phones shall be consistent with
the provisions of Florida Statutes.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1011.09;
1012.22; 1012.23; Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 7.14 ^Purchasing Pol-
icies and Bidding
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Revised
for issuance of a Purchase Order in
the threshold provided in Florida
Statutes.
SPECIFIC 'LEGAL AUTHORITY:
337.11; 1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43;
112.312; 120.57; 212.0821; 255.04;
274.02; 287.017; 287.057; 287.133;
1010.01; 1010.04; 1013.47, Florida
Statutes
TITLE: Policy 7.17 ^ Authorized
Travel Expenses
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:. Expen-
diture of funds to be consistent with
provisions of Florida Statutes.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.39; 1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43;
1011.09; 112.061, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 7.20 ^Invest-
ment of Funds
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Finan-
cial deposit instruments insured by
FDIC.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
218.415; 1001.32; 1001.41; 1001.42;
1001.43; 1011.09, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 8.01 ^ Safety .
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Adds
headgear for school sponsored
equine activity.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41;1001.42; 1001.43; 316.614;
773.06; 1006.062(3); 1006.07, Flori-
da Statutes
TITLE: Policy 8.011 ^ School
Health Services Manual ^ NEW
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Imple-
ments requirements of Florida, Stat-
utes
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43, Florida
Statutes
TITLE: Policy 8.12 ^ Purpose and
Functions of the Transportation Pro-
gram
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:
Transportation Supervisor shall de-
velop a manual for the District,s
transportation system. SPECIFIC
.LEGAL AUTHORITY: 1001.41;
1001.42;1.4; 1001.43; 1006.21; 1006.22;
1006.23; 1011.68, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 8.17 ^ Bus Emergen-
cy Evacuation Drills- NEW
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Imple-
ments requirements of Florida Stat-
utes.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1006.21,
Florida Statutes
A complete text of the proposed
amended rules, regulations and pro-
cedures can be obtained at the Office
of the Superintendent of Schools,
372 W. Duval St., Lake City, FL, be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. Monday ^ Friday. Econom-
ic impact statements, where applica-
ble, are on file in the Office of Su-
perintendent at the above listed ad-
dress.
DATED THIS 8TH DAY OF DE-
CEMBER, 2009.
SCHOOL BOARI OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
BY: Keith Hudson, Chairman
ATTEST: Michael F. Millikin, Su-
perintendent
04536537
DEcember 13, 2009


020 Lost & Found

Lost your dog
about one week ago?
Call with correct description for
return. 386-623-2050


060 Services

Lawn & Welding Service
Please call Joe Thomas
386-961-2527 or
386-752-0286

'To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


100 Job
0 Opportunities
HELP WANTED: Exp breakfast
cook and wait staff needed. Apply
in person at Quail Height CC
Hwy 247 between 9am - 2pm.
Homestead Farms, Coldwater, MS.
needs 6 temporary laborers 2/2/10
- 11/30/10 to plant, harvest &
transplant trees, shrubs & plants.
Farm, field & shed sanitation.
6am-1.pm M-F & 5hr. Sat. 3/4ths
average of 35 hr. /wk guaranteed.
No cost for tools, supplies &
equipment Free housing provided
if outside commuting area. Trans-
portation & subsistence expense to
job paid no later than when 50% of
work period completed. $7.25hr.
Report or send resumes to your
nearest FL SWA office
850-921-3828 JO# 8196.












i So m pi, 3














'- [liiEMMUI NII CLLEE

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING 2010
SCollege Level Mathematics
Requires Master's degree in mathematics or a
Master's degree with 18 graduate credit hours
in mathematics. For more information or to
apply contact I'aula Cifientes at 386-754-4260
or ciftentesp@lakecitycc.edu.
Medical Billing and Insurance
Night course. Minimum education requirement
is Certificate in Medicald killing and Coding.
Prefer AS in headal related lield with emphasis
in Medical Billing and Coding. Qualified
applicants calli send resulme to 'Tracy Ilickn;lla
at hickmant@laecitycc.edu.
Medical Terminology
Online course. Minimum education
requirement is AS in health related held.
Certification in Billing/Coding or Transcription
with at least 4 years of experience considered.
Qualified applicants can send resume to Tracy
S lickman at hickmant@lakecitycc.edui.
Pharmacology for Health Care Providers
Online course. Minimum education
requirement is AS in health related field.
Certification iniincoding or transcription
with at least 4 years of experience considered.
Qualified applicants can send resume to Tracy
Hickman at hickmant@lakecitvcc.edu.
Principles of Six Sigma
Must have Master's degree in industrial
engineering, management, or safety or
Master's degree with 18 graduate hours
in some combination of the above fields.
acihelor's degree with PE or five years
experience in the field will be considered. For
more information contact Bob Deckon at 386-
754-4442 or deckor@lkec ilycc.edu.
Esthetics Specialty
Evening classes (Mon-Thurs 5-9). License
in area with at least three years of experience
required. Contact Carol Mclean at 386-754-
4411 or micleanc@lakecitycc.edu or Michelle
Jones at 386-754-4264 or
ionesnm@lakecitycc.edn.
Educator Preparation Institute
Must he able to teach at night and online.
Requires Master's of Arts in Education.
Contact Pamela Carswell at 386-754-4469) or
carswellp@llak ecityc.edu.
Psychology
Day classes. Must have Master's degree int
psychology or Master's degree in related
subject area plus 18 graduate hours in
psychology. Contact Tim Moses at 386-754-
4267 or mosest@lakecilycc.edtu
Business
Internet based courses in Records
Management, Introduction to Customer
Service, Keyboarding, Machine Transcription,
and related courses. Bachelor's degree in
business or relate areare qunired, Master's
degree preferred. Contact Tim Moses at
386-754-4267 or mosest@lakeciltcc edu.
College applications anid copies of transcripts
required. Alljbreign Irtanscripls must ibe
submitted with a translation and evaluation.
Application available at
w ' wv.lakecilvcc.edu
t.Ct: is accrledited by lie Soenliernt ,ssocialioll of
'Colleges alni Sclools
VI'/ADMiwVI College in EIt:hcalnool & EImplornent


100 Job
100 Opportunities

04536385
Enrollment/Family Services
Analyst
Non-Profit organization is
seeking highly motivated
professional for VPK/School
Readiness Part-time Position.
Experience in Social Services
or related field preferred.
Salary: $9.62 -$12.98
no benefits.
Submit resume by:
December 15, 2009 to:
SEarly Learning Coalition of
Florida's Gateway, Inc.
Attn: HR
1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or Fax to:
386-628-9321
Temporary Funding.
Not Guaranteed Employment
beyond 6/30/2010.

04536482



COTTAGE PARENTS
The Florida Sheriffs Boys
Ranch is looking for couples to
be full-time Cottage Parents.
Responsibilities include the
direct care and development of
10 boys, ages 8-18.
Professional skill based training
& support provided. Help
children develop social,
academic, and independent
living skills. Salary $47,000.00
per couple with housing,
utilities, board, and benefits
provided. High school diploma
or GED required. For more
information contact Linda
Mather at (386) 842-5555
lmather@youthranches.org
Fax resume to (386) 842-1029
(EOE/DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE)

04536536
Position: Delivery Driver
Applicants must be at least 21
years old, have 6 points or less.
on your license and have
NO misdemeanors or felonies.
Must possess a Class A CDL.
Apply within & please no phone
calls. Apply in person: North
Florida Sales, 467 SW Ring Ct.
Lake City, Fl 32025

04536549

SAVAGE

Drivers Wanted
Savage Sehvices is seeking
professional exp. drivers for the
Lake City facility.
Class A CDL with HAZMAT &
Tanker endorsements required.
* Competitive Pay
* Complete Benefit
Package including
401K
* Home Everyday
* Paid Holidays and
Vacations
0 Quarterly Incentive
Bonus
Only serious applicants need
apply in person at:
Florida Crown Career
Center*
1389 W Hwy 90, Ste. 170.
Lake City, Florida.
* Located across flom Florida
Highway Patrol Station

04536592
Customer Service
Representative
Busy office needs self
motivator for a fast paced call
Center, great customer service
skills. Call center experience a
plus. Hours 8-5 Mon. - Fri.
Background check req'd.
Bilingual a plus (please
indicate). Send resume
to Joey Kitaif; P.O. Box 3116
Lake City, Fl. 32056.


Busy Law Office seeking highly
motivated dependable secretary for
FT position. Experience preferred,
salary based on experience.
Mail resume to PO Box 2064,
Lake City, Florida 32t)56
A Terrific Opportunity
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company
$100,000+ Earning Potential,
Benefits, Pension, 401K & BCBS
Insurance for those who qualify!
Call 1-800-257-5500
DRIVER
Seven-Up Snapple Southeast is
seeking an experienced Route
Driver with a Class A CDL and
previous DSD experience for a
local Lake City route. Requires a
good driving record, pass -
background check, drug and
driving tests. Salary based on
experience and benefits! E-mail
resume to kevin.kennyvtdpsg.com.
DFWP-EOE/M/F/H/V.
Gainesville/Ocala Plaintiffs
Personal Injury Firm seeking
litigation associate with 3-5 years
trial experience, preferably in Civil
Litigation. Salary and bonuses
commensurate with experience.
Please fax resume and cover letter
to (352)379-9007.
Group Fitness Instructor needed
at Anytime Fitness. Experience
req. Please call Leah @
386-754-1528 or pick up an
application at Anytime Fitness.
International Company seeking
self motivated individuals for
direct marketing business.
$500-$1500/mo PT/FT Free info
www.income2profits.com


100 Job
100 Opportunities

Mystery Shoppers earn up to
$100 per day. Under cover shop-
pers needed to judge retail &
dining establishments. Experience
NOT req'd. Calll- 888-697-6576.
Personal Trainers needed at
Anytime Fitness. Certification
and experience required.
Call Leah @ 754.1528
TOWER CLIMBER wanted.
Must be experienced:
Must have drivers license.
Call Don at 386-752-1100. '

0 Medical
2 Emiployment

04536538
Baya Pointe Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center is
currently hiring for LPN's
and CNA's. Full and part time
positions available. All Shifts..
Please apply 587 SE Erhine
Ave., Lake City, FI' 32025 or.
fax resume to
386-752-7337 EOE/DFWP

04536564




MERIDIAN
BEHAVIORAL
HEALTHCARE
Lake City
PRN On-Call Needs:
Psych Exp RN
Varying Shifts
LPN
Varying Shifts
Children's Outpatient
Program Manager
Lake City
Mental Health & Substance
Abuse
Adult Case Managers
Lake City
Exp w/ SPMI population
Foster Parents Needed '
Please visit our website for
more details
www.mbhci.ore
to see our current needs and
online applications
EOE, DFWP


Busy Outpatient Surgery Center
has immediate openings. for
FT/PT RNs and Certified Surgical
Technicians. with previous
multi-specialty experience.
'Please e-mail resumes to:
adrlm;n;tratatnn lIurrprrvpnter ncom


or fax: 386-487-3935
DENTAL ASSISTANT needed
F/T position Mon - Fri 9-5.
Salary based on experience.
Fax resume to: 386-752-3122
LPN or RN needed On-call
3PM-11PM Lake City Cluster
ICF for Developmentally
Disabled Persons.
673 NW Cluster Drive,
386-755-6104
EEO/M/F/D/V
Pff Nedical Assistant for
busy medical clinic. Lake City
area. Send resume to:
836 SW Main Blvd. Ste. 102,
Lake City, Florida 32025


140 Work Wanted

Exp. Caregiver. Retired LPN
Refined lady. Desires live in
Position Good cook! Honest &
dependable (863)382-8187

A24 Schools &
240 Education

04536136
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training
offers courses for both
beginners & experienced.
* Nursing Assistant, $409
next class-01/04/09
* Phlebotomy national
certification,
$800 next class-01/23/09
* Pharm Tech'national
certification
$900 next class-01/26/09.
* Continuing education

Fees incl. books,
supplies, exam fees.
Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainin services.com

Welding
Enjoy working outdoors?
Like to earn a good income? Con-
sider welding at Lake City Com-
munity College. Classes
begin January 6, 2010. Financial
aid available. No high school
diploma required. We have day,
night and Saturday class.
Register now through
December 16 or January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.
HVAC
Enjoy doing repairs? Like to earn a
good income and/or Start your
business? Consider
Heating/AC and Commercial Re-
frigeration at Lake City
Community College. Classes be-
gin January 6, 2010. Financial aid
available. No high school
diploma required. We have day
and night classes. Register now
through December 16
or January 4-5.
Call (386) 754-4214 for details.


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


240 Schools &
240 Education
Wanted Career
Motivated Students!
If you are seeking a new career in
a high demand field, then get your
Degree or Certificate in Logistics
& Supply Chain Management!
Instant scholarships available for
qualified students. Classes start
01/06/2009, call Lake City Com-
munity College, (386) 754-4492.


310 Pets & Supplies

Apricot TOY POODLE CKC
(w/papers), shots & health cert.,
Should w/dep. til Christmas,
8wks -12/18 $400. 386-719-4900.
BLUE PIT bull puppy, male.
ADBA. Parents on Premisis. Shots
and health certs. $400.00
386-365-1740
: BOSTON TERRIER
Puppy AKC
Female. $500.
386-623-4720
Christmas Puppies Home raised
Mini Dachshunds. Dapples, Black
& Tans, Health Cert., Papers,
Shots, Adorable. $350. 755-7177
CKC Toy Pekingese female.
Fawn/black mask. Under 10 lbs.
8 months. Spayed, all shots til
10/2010. $300. 386-963-1211
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
Weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies

LOOK, Registered Quarter horse,
mare withpapers, plus 2 horse
trailer with tack room, $2,500
OBO, Call 386-752-6724

360 Feed,Seed
6 & Plants


LIVING CHRISTMAS TREES
Beautiful Leyland Cypress 15 gal,
locally grown, delivery available.
386-688-2057


401 Antiques

ANTIQUES WANTED
Furn., China, Silver, Glassware,
Costume Jewelry & Gold. 35 years
exp. Cash Pd. Pete. 386-963-2621


402 Appliances

LIKE NEW White matching
washer & Dryer. $250. 00.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

WHITE ELECTRIC stove. GE
works well & looks good.
$100.00 or best offer. Please call
386-754-9295 or 386-984-0387.


403 Auctions

04536471
S PUBLIC AUCTION'
Trucks, Vehicles, Tractors,
Misc. Tools.
Consignments Welcome
Sat. Dec. 19th at 9am.
6 mi. West of 1-75 on US 90
Atkinson Realty & Auction
AB 1141 800-756-4098
www.atkinsononline.com



408 Furniture

LIKE NEW! Nice King Size
Pillow top bed. Matching set
$250.00. or make offer.
386-984-0387 or 386-754-9295.
Regular size Bedroom set.
S2 night stands & dresser
$300.00
386-623-4720

if Lawn & Garden
410 Equipment

BOLENS RIDING Mower.
15hp 38"cut $350. OBO
Runs'good. Looks good.
386-754-9295 or 984-0387
New and Used Tractors
Zero turn mowers, lawn
maintenance equipment & trailers.
386-758-2315

411 Machinery&
411 Tools
Craftsman 10in radial arm saw.
Excellent condition on Craftsman
rolling cabinet, asking $275.00.
386-754-1747


418 Toys

.Dino Spike Remote Control.
Normally $119.
Asking $80.00obo
386-719-8989 or 697-6112
New Great Railroad Empire train
Battery operated w/4'x9'6" oval
Sound & Its works $50. before Ila
386-758-1358 or 7p-10p 752-3491


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.


Attn: Sales Professionals

If you have automotive sales

experience. - Let's Talk!
We offer:
An Unlimited Earning Potential
Paid Vacations * 5 Day Work Week
401 K, Bonus 8 Spiff Programs
Health 8 Life Insurance

Apply in Person - No phone calls


SUni�&f Hwy 90 West

Chrysler-Dodge-Jeep Lake City


FINDIIJT~
lhIYIT^















Clhpified, Department: 755-5'


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
12 CHRISTMAS dinner plates,
pine cone design.
$10.00.
Call 386-754-5536.
5-Men's wrist watches. 2-Timex 1
is a Ironman. 1-Seiko, 1-Titan, 1-
Accutime. All for $75.00. (H) 386-
754-3726 or (C) 904-246-3857.
Hip length black suede fringed
jacket, great for jeans, just for fun.
Pd $150.00 up North, will sell for
$75.00. obo 386-963-1211
New weather proof, color security
camera, w/nite vision/microphone.
Power inverter. $100. before 1 la
758-1358/7p-10p 758-1358
Nice Lazyboy Recliner
$125 obo
386-754-9295 or 984-0387

Queen size white goose down
comforter. Asking $60.00
Make reasonable offer 963-1211

0 Good Things
45 toEat
PECAN HOUSE in Ellisville
1-75 & Hwy 441 @ Exit 414.
We buy, Crack and also sell
pecans. 386-752-6896 or 697-6420
The Nutcracker We buy and sell
Cracked & shelled Pecans.
Pinemount Rd (252, Taylorville)
2738 CR 252 W. Robert Taylor
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

6 0 Mobile Homes
for Rento
2B/2BA HOUSE
$500 a month.
$500 deposit
Call 954-258-8841
2br/lba, clean & quiet, trees,
large lot. No animals. Turner Rd.
Call: 386-752-6269 -
or leave message if no answer.
2br/2ba MH. on 1/2 ac. lot.
Nice area. Call to see!
$600 mo. $600 security
386-752-5911 or 466-2266
2BR/2BA SWMH.
$600. mo + $600 security deposit.
386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243


3/2, w/ screened porch. Quiet,
clean country park. No pets.
$550.mo + Deposit. References
required. 386-758-2280.
3b/2ba in Wood Gate also
2&3br's in 5 Points area
Nopets. 1st month & deposit.
386-961-1482.
3BR/2BA Double wide.
$650 a month. 1st, & security.
Please call 386-397-2619 or
386-365-1243.


Available NowflRent/Sale DWI_
2br/2ba. CH/A, 2 decks, carport w/
shed on 2.5 fenced ac: outside'o
Live Oak. $550mo. 386-365-1439


FREE ELECTRIC! And all
utilities. Nice 3br/2ba in Branford
area.$500 security, $700.mo
386-590-0642 or 867-1833
FREE RENT 1st month. Spacious
3br/2ba MH. Quiet park. Small
pets ok. $500. move in. $575. mo.
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
FURNISHED lbr. ,
mobile home. Large living
Room . $400. mo.
386-752-9382
Late Model Mobile Homes .Quiet
area. 2br/lba from $400 & 3br/2ba
from $500 Includes water &
sewer. No Pets! 386-961-0017
Nice 4b/2ba on 3 ac. 3 mi out Ft
White, off CR 18. Niblack Ave.
New CH/A. porch. $750. mo plus
dep. no pets 386-497-1144. Jerry
Remodeled 3/2 DWMH's. Include
yard maint. & yearly carpet clean-
ing Shady.Oaks. S of town on 441.
$650.mo. 386-208-4702 �
Why Rent when you can own?
Beautiful Lake Harper Villas MHP
Near Publix & Walmart. Own as
little as $450. mo. Rentals availa-
ble from $350. mo. Call now,
Move in tomorrow 386-344-0830

I640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
04 PALM 2000sf. 3br/2ba (Never
lived in) Was $88K now $60K.
$450mo w/$3200 cash. First Home
Buyer. Plywood floors, Smart
Panel lap siding, (2) patio doors,
office retreat. Includes: Del & Set.
Gary Hamilton (386)758-9824
BY OWNER 3br/2ba Fleetwood
Doublewide. Many extras,
$19,000. You Move! 3
86-454-4195
1999 REPO 24X48
Good Shape. $15,000. OBO
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
FOR SALE
-4 Bedroom/2 Bath
on half acre Lot.
$3,000 down/ $550. month
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
NO MONEY DOWN
When you own your own Land.
-3 Bed $227/month
-4 Bed $333/ month
-5 Bed $559/month
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm.martin23@yahoo.com
2010 SINGLEWIDE
Set up on your Land
'$21,900
Call Jared @ 386-719-5560
jm_martin23@yahoo.com
650 Mobile Home
& Land
Modular, New, 3br/2ba,
1/2 acre close in, Higher insulated
plus windows, driveway, decks,
and much more. Reduced to sell.
Possible Owner Finance.
Gary 386- 758-9824
www.garyhamiltonhomes.com
Owner Financing. 3 Ig. MH's
w/acreage. Jasper, LC, Mayo. .
pond, p rte river access. $675-
$900rrio. 386-590-0642/867-1833


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


705 Rooms for Rent
Room for Rent. Furnished.
$400. mo.
Utilities included.
386-752-9382


Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
LUXURY HOMES!

* NEW *
2 BEDROOMS
!!! $649 per mo.!!!

$299 MOVES YOU IN,

FREE RENT
" 200 FREE CHANNELS
* BAHAMA CRUISE
386-754-1800

!!Sister Properties!!
!One BR $499!
!Two BR$525!
POOL
386-758-8029-
(Bad Credit OK)
$400 MOVES YOU IN!
1 or 2 BR apts. and
2 or 3 BR Mobile Homes
. (386) 755-2423




04536086
Sugarmill Apts
Lake City, FL
386-758-5505
Move in Special $500. dep
1st month Rent Free!
t / 2Br/2Ba.
Rent $725 - Deposit $500
/ 3Br/2Ba
Rent $795. ~ Deposit $500
Pets are Welcome

1700 sf X-Clean 2/2 second
story, deck, trees, private country
acre on NW side. $600 mo + dep.
No dogs 386.961.9181
3BR/2BA DUPLEX
Extremely Clean
$650. per month.
Call 386-867-1212 for details.
Close to VA! 2br/1.5ba
Duplex CH/A, W/D hook up.
Convenient location. $550.mo +
sec. 386-758-9351/352-208-2421


CONDO for rent. $750 mo.
w/$750 deposit. 2br/l.5ba
screened porch. Walking dis-
tance to shopping. 386-752-7578
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
new 2BR/2BA apts., garage, W/D
hook up. patio. $600 and up, plus
SD, 386-466-7392 or 965-0276


Huge apt, Ib/lb, great area, ,quiet,
Private parking. laundry area, -
kitchen furijished. $500, deposit
and references required. 755-0819 I D
LARGE TOWNHOUSE APT '
2 story townhouse apt. 2br/1.5ba,
lg master br, very conveniently I Ii
located in central Lake City on
McFarlane. WD hookup w/plenty I
of storage. Quiet. Pets under I
201b allowed w/pet dep.
(386)752-7781 or/397-5880 I


Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled,
kit., (1) bd, ba, Iv, din. & xtra rm.
Ref. req. $450.00 mo & sec. 386-
362-8075 or 386-754-2951.
Now Available Immaculate
completely tiled , 2br/lba Duplex
w/garage. all electric. AC, washer
/dryer hook up dishwasher, patio
area. $650. mo. 386-397-2108
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332.
Studios & IBr's from $125 week.
Utilities & cable incl. Full size
kitchen, fridge & range.
386-752-2741 or 352-538-0292
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $525 plis security
Call Michelle 386-752-9626
720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
1 ROOM furnished
efficiency apartment. Lights, water
and cable included.
$350. mo. 386-758-5671
Great Country Living. Furnished
Park Model Trailers. $500 per
month all utilities provided. Call
386-961-8540/386-755-4945
"The Apartment Alternative"
NO Lease, NO Deposits, ROOMS
Utilities, Cable, WI-FI, maid,
micro-fridge, phone, Pool.
24 hour office, laundry & vending
Motel 6 (386)755-4664
Wk 1 prs. $169., 2 ppl $179 + tax
730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2 newer home, close to town.
2 car garage. References required.
$1000/mo, plus deposit.
386-965-2267.
3br/lba house. CH/A, All appli-
ances,. $750.mo. 1st, last & sec.
141 NE Montrose Ave.,
(386)697-8893 or (305)962-2666
3BR/2BA BRICK Home
in town. $850/mo.
$500. security deposit.
386-365-8721
3BR/2BA Brick w/2 car garage,
CH/A, at 101 SW Hummingbird
Glen. $900. mo. $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
A 4BR 2BA HUD Home!
ONLY $215/mo!!
5%dn 15yrs @ 8%apr for listings
800-366-9783 ext 7782
Charming 3bd/2ba home near
downtown. No pets.
$850/mo.
864-517-0522.
Forest Country S/D 2br/2ba
Brick, w/2 car garage. Lawn
service incl. Great school district.
Screened in patio. 1 Yr lease req'd.
No pets. $1,100 mo. 386-752-6082


'C
I

D

|0


I

ID
I
D


I
I
I
I
I


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Lg 3BR/2BA on 1.3 ac. on the
Westside. Water, trash
& lawn maint.included. $875. mo
plus security. 386-719-9702

NEWER HOME
3br/2ba. 2 car garage.
Great location.
386-755-2672
Nice area, 3/2 plus bonus room,.
fire place, c/h/a, laundry room,
$775. Deposit/references required
386-755-0819
Rent with option to buy. 3br/2ba
house on 5 fenced acres, approx
2000 sq ft. Appliances.
386-935-3095 or 386-438-9635
Rural beauty and privacy near
I-10/US90 NW of Live Oak. 3BR,
2Ba, $725/mo. Optional pasture
available. (626) 512-5374
WELLBORN AREA
Lg 3br/2ba
Jane S. Usher Lic. Real Estate
Broker 386-755-3500/365-1352
750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
Office Space located At Oakhill
Plaza on Hwy 41. 900 sqft.
$650/mo. plus tax.
Call Tom 386-964-1086
Retail Space
Heavy traffic area
800 Sf. & 1600 Sqft.
Call for quotes 1-800-342-0135

770 Condos For Rent


3BR/2BA Excellent location, close
to town, pool, no pets. Ref. req'd
$1200 mo, $1200 dep.
386-752-9144 (daytime),
752-2803 or 397-3500 after 5pm
GOLF CONDO. Southern Oaks
Golf Club. 2br/2ba. Pool, tennis,
cable & water, included. $950. mo.
386-867-1948
St. Augustine Beach 3 Bi 1600 sf.
Weekends/weekly/monthly
Nice, clean & affordable
Call 386-961-1961 or 758-7560


805 Lots for Sale

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

3/2 2000+sf on .5acre built 2007
many extras, stonehenge S/D,
privacy fence, sprink. sale/rent/
lease. $185k. 850-380-0275

Custom Built 2900 sqft.3br/2.5ba
Brick. Many upgrades, must see!
Forest Country S/D. $374,900
352-538-0544 or 386-755-5097
HURRY LAST CHANCE
$8000 F.T.HB credit
New 3/2 Modular 1200 sf
1/2 acre.upscale& close-in
loaded Decks Driveway A/C
well septic concrete foundation ,
$665 mo w/ 4K dn Owner finance
avail Gary (386) 758-9824 or
garyhamiltonhomes.com

820 Farms &
SAcreage

10 acres. Owner Financed
Well, septic, power pole
Deas Bullard BKL Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


New Home Sales

Consultant Wanted

Excellent Commission Based

Pay and Benefits

Fax Resume to 509-7,56-2869/
or e-mail mh newhomeiobs@vahoo.com

m Maronda Homes
-k^H ^^SI4. a wvw6!. ^ThMv. (^4,*


--------------


940 Trucks
05 FORD F-150 XLT Super Cab.
4 Wheel Drive. Only 26,000
I-Owner mi. Excellent condition..
$19,500 386-752-1364/ 965-4340
1995 FORD XLT extra cab.
Centurion pkg. Matching topper.
Auto., showroom cond. $3,500.
(352)339-5158

950 Cars for Sale
2003 VW JETTA GL
$4,300.00
386-365-3326

97 Lincoln Towncar
108.345 miles. AC,
Runs great. $2695.00 obo.
386-752-4855
Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
Great work truck in fair cond.
1991 4X4 Jeep Cherokee Laredo.
$700. obo 850-361-9926 or
williamdees08pvahoo.com

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


SContact us

Sat the paper.





. CLASSIFIED ADS '
386-755-5440

" SUBSCRIPTION 1
386-755-5445

AALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293

ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
1adsi'l kecityrepo rter.cpm






1- ~80,uptDuval S
' .o--- - * a ---,_ f....


ADVERTISE IT HERE!
Bring the picture in or we will take it for you!
Advertise your car, truck, motorcycle, recreation vehicle or
boat here for 10 consecutive days. If your vehicle does not sell
within those 10 days, for an additional $15 you can place your
. ad for an additional 10 days. A picture will run everyday with
a description of your vehicle. The price of the vehicle must be
, listed in the ad. Your ad must be prepaid with cash, .check or
credit card. Just include asnapshot or bring your vehicle by
and we will take the picture for you. Private party only!
Price .includes a 6 day/ 4 line classified ad of the
Same vehicle in print and online.


2005 Ford F-150 XLT 1991 4x4 Jeep
Super Cab, 4 wheel drive, U J
26,000 miles, 1 owner, Cherokee Laredo
excellent condition. Great work truck in fair
$19,500 consider trade-in condition.
Call $700 OBO
386-752-1364 (850)361-9926 or
386-965-4340 williamdees08@yahoo.com


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S C L E T R E H T A F D N A R GI

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A L U N K P N S I S T E R V N A

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P N C C N E R D L I H C E D Y A

V U F F .S E H C N A R B W I F E


N A B S U H E I B


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Find all 16 of the 'Family' words Name:
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Lake City, FL by 5:00pm, for your Source.
chnc"I' Lake City Reporter
.- chance to win Deadline is Monday, December 14, 2009 at 5:00 p.m. l RN


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Ll==1=1E U AI n tc - it. t .u
Maintenance * Remodel *
Equipment & Leak Repair IVM artin.
Kris Weeks ORTHODONTICS
WkCELIA MARTIN, D.M.D.
FA M ILY 3322WUS HwV90 386-623-1197
S386-755-2502 386-497-4558 o, 7LakeCity, FL3202S
CPC 1457781 www.inartinorthodonties.com,,


Fathe


GWHunter, Inc.

Chw*ft Chevron
Oil
Jobber


HARRY'S
Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President




Puron.

752-2308
Cousins


Central States
COLUMBIA COUNTY'S
FEED HEADQUARTERS

FEED - PET SUPPLIES - LAWN
& GARDEN - ANIMAL HEALTH

668 NW Waldo St.
386-755-7445

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CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Classified Department: 75 5(440


LAKE CITY REPORTER


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Story ideas?


SContact
Tom Mayer
SEditor
754-0428
tmayer@lakecityreportercom

Sunday, December 13, 2009


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


www.lakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

'Tis the

season for

poinsettias

Chances are you
will give or get
a poinsettia
this holiday
season; they
are the most popular holi-
day flower and the No. 1
one flowering plant in the
U.S. Enjoy the pure colors
indoors this winter, and
then move your plant out-
side in the spring. With the
proper care, a dedicated
plantsman will get a repeat
performance next year -
from his pampered plant'
When you go shopping
for your poinsettia, choose
wisely and you will have
several months to enjoy
the colorful flower bracts.
Avoid plants that have been
on display outside the store
if temperatures have been.
below 50 degrees. Cold,
windy temperatures drasti-
cally shorten the display
time inside your home.
Pass up plants that are
tightly crowded together
in plastic sleeves. Look for
plants that have tight green
true flowers, the small cen-
ter of the showy bracts. If
the small true flower shows
any yellow pollen, the blos-
som is old and won't last
much longer.
You may have more
trouble than you thought in
selecting that perfect plant.
SThere are more than 100
commercially grown culti-
vars, ranging in size from
mini plants to specimen
sized trees. And there are
so many wonderful colors
that you can just about
color coordinate them to
any room d6cor. Twenty-
five new irresistible culti-
vars were introduced in the
National Poinsettia Trials
this year. The showy bracts
of the new "Cinnamon
Stick" are cinnamon yel-
low with pink flecks.
The bracts of "Christmas
Angel Marble" have dark
pink centers with boldly
contrasting creamy white
'edges. With a dozen new
red cultivars, we won't be
running low on new and
exciting traditional reds
this year, either.
Now take your carefully
chosen plant home and fol-
low a few care instructions.
Just remember that your
plant is a tropical desert
plant Place your poinsettia
in a warm location, in bright
sunlight and out of drafts.
Temperatures ranging from
65 degrees at night to 75
degrees during the day are
best Remove the foil or
cut out the bottom section
so excess water can drain
away. Water only when the
top inch of soil is dry to the
touch, and empty any water
from the saucer. You new
poinsettia should not be
fertilized during the winter
months.
If you want to continue
the fun outdoors, go to
http://solutionsforyourlife.
corn and search poinset-
tia. Master Gardeners are
available to answer your
gardening questions and
provide free pH soil tests.
Call them at 752-5384.
* Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of'Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


A 3-D display of musicians playing a Christmas tune is seen at the Spirit Ampitheatre along the two-mile trail at Suwannee Lights at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park, where over five million lights illuminate the park. ,





Fantastic lights


From staff reports
LIVE OAK - More than
5 million Christmas lights
brighten the trails around
Spirit of the Suwannee
State Park in Live Oak this
year, turning the music
park into a festive winter
wonderland.
The annual lights
display runs from now
until Christmas Eve. The
event is sponsored by the .,
Lake City Reporter, Poole -, : ' . '
Realty, Lowes, Suwannee ' '
County TDC, First Street
Music, WQHL, WQIK
Jacksonville, Lake City
Advertiser, and Florida
Times- Union.
After the ride, visitors
to the park are invited to
the park's arts and crafts
.village to visit with Santa,
listen to live entertainment
or sample hot chocolate
and cookies.
Admission is $8 for adults
and $2 for children nightly.
For more pictures from
the annual Suwannee
Lights, see Page 4D.


PHOTOS BY
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter


(ABOVE) A motorist creeps
through the Wall of Lights ,
display where thousands of
lights reflect off of passing
vehicles. More than 5 million
lights decorate the annual
lighting festivity, which runs
from now until Christmas
Eve.


(LEFT) A nativity scene is
displayed among dozens of
the Suwanriee Lights
exhibits. This is one of
many exhibits that decorate
Suwannee Lights, and after
visitors to the park have their
fill of Christmas lights, they
can visit the park's arts and
crafts square for more
entertainment.


ID













Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Some mostly forgotten Christmas movies for your pleasure


n a perfect world we
would all have the
month of December
off to have plenty
of time for attend-
ing parties, gazing at
Christmas trees, sending
cards to loved ones, cel-
ebrating with hot apple
cider, and watching doz-
ens of yuletide-themed
movies; (Of course this
would be with pay!) But
time constraints on us
during December mean,
at least as far as watching
Christmas movies go, we
would rather stick with a
few proven favorites than
experiment with something
different..
I myself know that no
matter what, I'll make time.
to watch my favorites,
"The Bishop's Wife" and
"The Cheaters" (and at
least the last'half-hour of.
the Alastair Sim version
of "A'Christias Carol"),
but whentime permits I
usually attempt to watch a
great many others. Here
are some that I think are
, , �, .i .. :.- ,


Mark Kirby
LCCC coordinator for
community and cultural
services


definitely worth a view
ing:
S'"The Gathering"
(1977). Dying tycodn
Edward Asner enlists
Sthe help of his estranged
wife (Maureen Stapleton,
rarely better) to bring all
Four children and families
back hdme for one last.
Christmas. An Emmy win-
ner for best drama special,
"The Gathering" avoids
mawkishness and is a vir-
tual encyclopedia of ubiq-
uitous actors from the 70s
(you'll know them when
you see them).
* "Prancer" (1989).


Another film which avoids
sloppy sentiment, thanks
mainly to the presence of
a gruff actor playing the
father (in this case Sam
Elliot). The daughter,
played by the charming
Rebecca Harrell, is a lonely
girl who nurses a reindeer,
which she believes is
Santa's very own Prancer,
back to health.
* "National Lampoon's
Christmas Vacation"
(1989). Another delight
from two decades ago, the
father in this opus (Chevy
Chase) tries so hard to
have the perfect family.
Christmas you can't help
but empathize with him
every time something
Goes awry. It's amazing
how genuinely touching
this movie is at times, but
" the belly laughs more
than dominate, especially,
Chase's climactic and hilar-
ious tirades.
*."Bad Santa" (2003).
1 No father in THIS film h
- just Willie, a.scumbag
who each year robs the


department stores in which
he plays Santa. And yet you
can't help but like the guy,
as played in a knockout
performance by Billy Bob
SThornton. I truly think that
next to his work in "Sling
Blade" this is Thornton's
shining hour on film. The
scenes with Thornton and
Brett Kelly, who plays the
kid who shelters him, are
just bliss; the kid is unflap-
pable, no matter how much
Willie loses his cool. (Note:
This one is NOT for the
kids! I had to. include it, if
only for Thornton.)
* "Christmas in
Connecticut" (1945). A
movie that only improves .
with age, with the pro-, .,
liferation of TV chefs, .
decorators and other -' * 7
such kiiow-it-alls. Barbara
Stanwyck plays a Martha
Stewart-like character who
beguiles millions of Smart
Housekeeping magazine
readers with her recipes
and such, but whom in
reality can't even boil an
egg. The masquerade she


must go through when a
war hero (Dennis Morgan)
wants to spend a nice
Christmas with her makes
for a merry romp, and
Stanwyck shows how funny
she could be.
* "The Holly and the
Ivy" (1952). Back to
fathers again, this one an
English parson with three
unhappy children, all of
whom try and keep their
misery from him. Since
the parson is played by'
Ralph Richardson and
the children are played
by Margaret Leighton, -
Denholm Elliott, and Celia
Johnson, four of England's
best actors ever-plus
the fact that this realistic'
drama is finally coming
back into circulation again
after years of never being
,seen-it's one you shouldn't
,miss: .
' "The Nutcracker: the
Motion Picture" (1986).
If you'want to see a ver-
Sion of the legendary bal-
let-rand there are many
"Nutcrackers" to choose


from-this live-action per-
formance by the Pacific
Northwest Ballet is the
one I recommend. Carroll
Ballard, who directed such
great-for-all ages films "The
Black Stallion" and "Fly
Away Home," helms this
"Nutcracker" and Maurice
Sendak, Mr. "Where the
Wild Things Are" himself,
is one of the writers..
S'"The Dead" (1987).
This should wind up your
Christmas movie viewing,
since it's really set at the
Epiphany instead. Watch it
twice - its short, and the
second time you know the
characters and can closer
watch their happiness and
heartbreak, especially
Gretta (Anjelica Huston),
who confesses to her hus-
band about her first love
who died and the sadness
she still feels for him. This
was John Huston's last
film, and he went out in
glory.
Contact Kirby at kir-
bym@lakecitycc.edu or by
calling (386) 754-4274.


ENGAGEMENT


Renea Ellis and Randy Townserd.


Ellis Townsend'
S'Mr. and 'Mrs. Stanley and
PatriciaEllis of Lake City
announce .the engagement
and approaching marriage
of their daughter, Renea
Lynn Ellis of Lake City to
Randy Lewis Townsend
of Branford. Townsend is
the son ofMr.:and Mrs. !


Marshall and Linda Dai;is
and Mr. and Mrs. Paul and
Teresa Townsend of Lake
City.
The wedding is planned
for 3 p.m. March 27, 2010,
at the First Full Gospel
Church. A reception will
follow at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center of Lake
City.:


By MEGAN K. SCOTT
Associated Press.
NEW YORK - Pam
Vetter's 15-year-old son
balked when'she told
him she was opting for a
healthier holiday season
-this year: fish rather than
turkey, fewer carbs arid"
sweets.
He threatened to pur,.
chase a turkey,, stuffing;
potatoes and pies and put
together his own tradi-
tional meal.
"It's a moral challenge,"
said Vetter, 44, a nonre-
ligious celebrant in West
Hills, Calif., who conducts
funerals. She also has a
14-year-old son. "Do you
make part of your fam-
ily angry for the holiday
season by cutting out the,
carbs and sweets?"
Many parents are try-
ing to figure out how to
have a healthier holiday
without depriving their
kids of Christmas cookies,
potato latkes and other
treats. About a third of
American kids are over-
weight. or obese, accord-
'ing to Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
estimates.
Jill Houk, 41, a chef in
Chicago, said she is wor-
ried her 10-year-old will
regain some of the 10
pounds he recently lost.
:She said her son loves
food and tends to overeat
unless she's watching


� . ' E , c






4-V_


This photo released by Wellspring Academies shows staff and students fixing a meal during a
nutrition segment of the camp in Reedley, CA.


him.
.He has four sets of
grandparents (she and
her ex-husband are both
remarried) sending him
chocolate Santas, cousins
with no weight issues
whom he'll be hanging
out with and a wedding
to attend the day after
Christmas with an elabo-
,rate buffet.
"Of course, 'we're going
to be dining out all the:
time," she said.
Studies show
Americans gain about.
.a pound between. :
Thanksgiving and. New
Year's; people who are"
overweight or obese are
at-risk of gaining five


pounds, said Dr. Susan
Z. Yanoyski, an obesity .
expert at the National
Institutes of Health. She
said the weight gain is
slight, but it accumulates
over time.
While there is little
research on children and
holiday pounds, an Ohio
State University study.
found that young children
are prone to gainr more
weight in the summer
than the school year
when there is more time
to snack and zone out in
front of the television.
Likewise, during the
winter holidays many
children are "indulging
in their favorite foods


BIRTH ..I.. . I
** ' ___ ' : 1"" . . __ " .

Eadie C Cameron, 19, Amanda,
S17, Hanna, 11, Ben,. 5,
Steke and Ashley.Eadie and Olivia, 3. The grand-
of Lincoln, Ca., announce parents are Renny and'
the birth of.their son, Debbie Eadie, Connie
Weston Michael-Bozeman and Gerald Cook, Dewey
Eadie, on Oct. 26, 2009, and Linda Cribbs, and
at Sutter Med Center , Mike and Elaine Laid.
in Roseville, Ca. He The great grandparents
weighed 8 pounds, 4 are Vonda Dicks, Theda
ounces, and measured Eadie, Rhea M. Stokes
20 inches. He joins and Efma Owens.



Pop culture blamed

for Chihuahua crisis


By SUE MANNING
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES
- California has more
Chihuahuas than it
can handle, and it has
Hollywood to blame.
There are so many
Chihuahuas at shelters in
Oakland, they have started
shipping the dogs out of
state, said Megan Webb,
director of Oakland Animal
Services. They have sent
about 100 to Washington,
Oregon and Arizona, she
said, "and as soon as they
get them, they are ready
for new ones."
Chihuahuas make up
30 percent or more of the
dog populations at many
California shelters. And


experts say pop culture
is to blame, with fans'
imitating Chihuahua-tot-
ing celebrities like Paris "
Hilton and Miley Cyrus,
then abandoning the dogs.
The problem appears to
be specific to California -,
shelters elsewhere would
love to share the wealth,
said Gail Buchwald, senior
vice president overseeing
the ASPCA adoption center
in New York City.
."We never have enough
supply for the huge con-
sumer demand for small
dogs," she said.
One of Webb's big-
gest problems is a lack
of money to fly the dogs
to other states. Buchwald
said she would be happy to
help.


and sitting around with
nothing to-do," said Dr. .
Joanna Dolgoff, a pedia-
trician and author of the
forthcoming "Red Light,
Green Light, Eat Right:
The Fbod Solution That
Lets Kids Be Kids."
"Then there's the fact
that kids realize it's the
holiday season," she said.
"'I deserve to indulge.
How come everyone
else is indulging?' They
start to feel resentful and
entitled.".












China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:

Lea Schenck
Wil Posey
December 19, 2009

Linidsey Morton
.George Pridgeon
February 20, 2010

Carlee Wilson
Trey Beauchamp
March 6, 2010

Aimee Ronsonet
Brent Williams
March 20, 2010


We know exactly
what they want in
a wedding or shower
gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and
gift wrap.


JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N.'Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


Parents strgle to watch kid diets


; � . . - � �


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SPOTLIGHT


Sunday, December 13, 2009


www.lakecityreporter.com


By DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer
O dd as it
sounds, Peter
Jackson need-
ed to come
down to Earth
a bit more in 'The Lovely
Bones," his adaptation of
Alice Sebold's best-seller
about a murdered girl look-
ing back on her life from
beyond.
* The visionary filmmaker
behind "The Lord of the
Rings" trilogy still is in
fantasyland, still in the
grip of Middle-earth, and
the film suffers for it as
Jackson crafts lovely but
ineffectual dreamscapes of
the afterlife that eviscerate
much of the human side of
the story.
It's certainly a smaller,
more intimate tale than
his "Lord of the Rings"
trilogy and his "King
Kong" remake. Yet the
hope among fans of
Jackson's early work was
that "The Lovely Bones"
would hark back to his
1994 drama "Heavenly
Creatures," which put
S Kate Winslet on the road
to stardom.
With modest produc-
tion, "Heavenly Creatures"
presented striking fantasy
visuals that complemented
Jackson's'dark story of
two teenage women whose
compulsive relationship
results in murder.
Now working on a.
grander Hollywood scale,
Jackson loses the spark of
Sebold's story - a young
girl's lament over a life '
never lived, a family's bot-
tomless grief over a child
and sister lost - amid his
expensive pretty pictures.


ASSOCIATED P
In this film publicity image released by Paramount Pictures, Saoirse Ronan stars as Susie
Salmon in a scene from 'The Lovely Bones.'


Like the book, the film
merges first-person and,
omniscient narration as
Susie Salmon (Saoirse
Ronan, an Academy
Award nominee for 2007's
"Atonement") chronicles
her journey from sensitive
14-year-old schoolgirl to
shattered soul stuck in a
nether zone between earth
and heaven.
Sweet and somewhat
shy, Susie is just develop-
ing a passion for photog-
raphy and on the verge
of her first kiss when a
creepy neighbor (Stanley
Tticci) with a serial-killer
past lures her into his
secret lair and murders'
her.
For her family - includ-
ing parents (Mark
Wahlberg and Rachel
Weisz); grandmother
(Susan Sarandon) and
younger sister (Rose
McIver) - Susie has sim-
ply vanished, her body hid-


den away by her killer.
Years pass, and Susie.
watches the family crum-
ble, her mom running off
to work on a farm, her dad
obsessed with finding his
daughter's murderer, to
the exasperation of the cop
(Michael Imperioli) han-
dling the case.-.
Through death, Susie
gains a razor-sharp focus
on what's truly important,
all those glorious little
snapshot moments that,
for the living, can become
lost and forgotten in the
cacophony of everyday life.
Jackson's focus is
fuzzier, the film flitting dis-
jointedly from the Salmons'
lingering sorrow to Susie's
limbo, a realm that alter-
nates between her anger
and melancholy over what
she's left behind and her
wonder over what's yet to
come in her larger exis-
tence.
Earth and limbo don't


really seem as though
they're part of the same
movie. The vibrant, some-
times ominous fantasyland
where Susie dwells discon-
nects her from the life on
which she reflects, puts
her at a distance from
the people she loves and
misses.
We're.supposed to think
she can't let go, when
much of the time, it feels
as though she's already
gone.
The images often are
striking - ships inside
giant bottles shattering
on the rocks of a forlorn
shore, candy-colored land-
scapes where Susie romps
as she begins to sense the
freedom of passing into the
cosmos.
But the spectacle
Jackson creates is show-
manship, not storytelling,
distracting from the mortal
drama of regret and heart-
ache he's trying to tell.


Hollywood hopes for a'Blu' Christmas


By RYAN NAKASHIMA
AP Business Writer
LOS ANGELES-
Although prices for some
Blu-ray players dropped
below $100 this holiday
season, customers are
hesitating to jump into
the next-generation video
format. Even people who
already own Blu-ray play-
ers are still buying movies
on DVDs.
One big reason: Blu-ray
discs won't play on stan-
dard DVD players found in
cars, computers and bed-
rooms.
Now Hollywood
- which is banking on
the pricier Blu-ray discs
to help lift sagging home
video sales - is stepping
up its efforts to win cus-
tomers. Studios are pack-
aging Blu-ray discs with
regular versions on DVDs,
and throwing in so-called
"digital copies," which can
play on computers and
iPods.
Over the past month or
so, "Up," "Harry Potter
and the Half-Blood Prince"
and many other hit mov-


ASSOCIATED PRE'
Ii this photo made Nov. 27, a customer browses Blu-ray movies during at Best Buy in West
Hollywood, Calif. Although prices for some Blu-ray players dropped below $100 this holiday
season, customers are hesitating to jump into the next-generation video format.


ies were released in such
combo packs. Universal is
releasing its "Bourne" mov-
ies on "flipper" discs with
Blu-ray on one side and
DVD on the other.
Such combos generally
cost about $20 - some-
times 50 percent to 70
percent less than what it
would cost to buy a Blu-ray


disc and DVD separately.
Movie studios have
been pushing Blu-ray for
its crystal-clear sound -
and images, which can be
enjoyed even without the
best flat-panel TVs. Yet
DVDs remain more conve-
nient because players and
computer drives that read
DVD discs are ubiquitous.


Two-thirds of the 92 mil-
lion U.S. households that
have a DVD player have
more than one.
There are now Blu-ray
players, in nearly 12 million
U.S. homes. But you still
need td think hard about
where you'd want to play
a Blu-ray disc before you
buy one.


DECADE IN REVIEW

Fear and fantasy,

a decade in books


By HILLEL ITALIE
AP National Writer
Some representative
books of the 2000s -
about fear of the real world
and dreams about other
worlds, whether the histori-
cal past, the unreachable
future or a supernatural
present.
* The "Harry Potter"
series, J.K Rowling. The
record-setting fantasy
series defied and defined
the times. It stunned cyn-
ics by unearthing millions
of young readers who only
needed the right book
to get them started. It
scorned the digital market
by remaining unavailable in
electronic form. And, with
millions of Potter readers
21 or older, it revealed
a generation that didn't
- and doesn't - want to
grow up.
* The 'Twilight" series,
Stephenie Meyer. After'
Rowling rested, in 2007,
the masses turned to
romance and vampires.
Most of the readers were
girls, but by the end of
the decade women were
caught up, too.
* "Founding Brothers,"
Joseph Ellis. Released ,
in 2000, a lively, even-
handed history book that
helped set off a long run
of popular works about
the American Revolution,
a quest intensified by the
Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist
attacks. Ellis' book is about
some key moments in the
birth of the country, about
the debate over the goals
of the United States and.


the words used to achieve
them.
* "The Audacity of
Hope," Barack Obama. A
lively, evenhanded mem-
oir/policy book by a sena-
tor who had ideas about
running the United States
and a notion that words
might help him achieve
them.
S'"The Da Vinci Code,"
Dan Brown. A novel, and a
metaphor - for escape and
word of mouth, for history .
as conspiracy and wish
fulfillment, for world travel.
and the monster under
your bed, for success as a
symbol of success.
* "A Million Little
Pieces," James Frey. A
memoir, and a metaphor
- for real life not being
strange enough; for the
innocence of publishers
and of Oprah Winfrey;
for a need so undying to
believe in rede nption that
the book kept on selling
well after Frey's facade had.
been torn down.
* 'Threatening Storm,"
Kenneth Pollack; "A
Disorder Peculiar to the -
Country," Ken Kalfus. The.
first a policy book, the
second a novel. The first is
a call for war in Iraq that
found it "unimaginable that
the United States would
have to contribute hun- .
dreds of billions of dollars." "-
The second is a 9/11 novel
that imagined what would
have happened if the war
had turned-out the way
Pollack and others thought
it would. The first book is
unintentional tragedy, the
second intentional farce.


In this image originally released by Anchor Books, the
paperback version of 'The Da Vinci Code,' is shown.


GAME REVIEW

Avatar' a stunning,

average shooter


By DIRK LAMMERS
Associated Press
Video games based on
movies are often pushed
through as afterthoughts,
so word that director
James Cameron and
Ubisoft have been col-
laborating for years on his
sci-fi epic, "Avatar," offered
hope to gamers longing to
explore the lush, brightly
colored jungles of Pandora.
"James Cameron's Avatar:
The Game" ($59.99 for the
Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3,
$49.99 for the Wii and PC)
does nail the visuals, but it


falls a bit short on gameplay -
as just an average third-per-
son shooter.
The story line is a prequel"
to the movie, which opens in
theaters next week.
The game is visually
stunning, and the chro-
matic landscape is filled
with myriad plants and
creatures to encounter and
identify.
But the linear quests
grow tedious, and the
story doesn't draw you in
enough to make you feel
engaged while gathering
a list of objects or killing
multiple enemies.


3D


*~~~~ - L R
*h h - '- t-.. I
:.? -* - ^ v * ., / ^ ^ ,
^ ., ".:*: "*:. ' J -. *' . .* ^ -^ - . ^ .
->~ .�.^ *w '< '*^ *.-<


In this film publicity image released by Paramount Pictures, Saoirse Ronan stars as Susie Salmon in a scene from 'The
Lovely Bones.'


'Lovely Bones' trades soul for spectacle














LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Tom
Mayer at 754-0428 or by
e-mail at tmayer@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Christmas Cantata at
First Presbyterian
The First Presbyterian
Church will have one morn-
ing worship service at 11
a.m.. today The Chancel
Choir with soloists will pres-
ent a cantata titled "Sing
Noel." It will be accompa-
nied by organ, piano, flute,
bells and timpani. Many
familiar carols will be includ-
ed in the service. The com-
munity is invited to attend
the cantata.

Meet the Author
Jessie Wise, author of
family saga books, will
be at the main branch
of the Columbia.County
Public Library at 2 p.m.
today. Her titles include "At
the River's Edge," "Tainted
Blood," Mender of Souls"
and "Searching for Peace."
She grew up in rural North
Central Florida and currently
lives in Jacksonville Beach
with her dog, Gypsy. There
will be a drawing for an auto-
graphed copy of one of her
novels.

Santa Claws Family
Picture Day
Santa Claus is taking pic-
tures with pets from 12 to 5
p.m. today at Lake City Mall.
Pictures are $10. All pro-
ceeds benefit the Lake City
Animal Shelter. Photos com-
pliments of Fotographic.net.

- Monday
S: MLB umpire visits the
.VA
Major League Baseball
Umpire Jerry Layne is visit-
ing the Lake City VA Medical
Center at 1 p.m. Dec. 14. He
will tell baseball anecdotes
Sto sick and disabled veter-
ans at VA medical centers
as part of a special celebrity
visit.


A Centennial Belle
This 1959 photo, obtained from Pat Castillo Couch of Lake City, shows the Castillo family.
(back row, from left), Herbert and Emma Castillo, and (froht row, from left) Pat Casillo Couch,
Jack Castillo and Helen Castillo Morgan. Emma Castillo was one of Lake City's Centennial


Belles.
Tuesday
NARFE Christmas
meeting
The National Active and
Retired Federal Employees
Association is hosting a
Christmas party and lunch
with entertainment at 12:30
p.m. Dec. 15 at Parkview
Baptist Church, 268 NW
Lake Jeffery Road. The
cost is $8 per person. All
active and retired federal
employees are invited to
attend. Contact Miriam


Stanford (386) 755-0907,
Jim Purvis (386)752-8570
or Ralph Hurst (386)752-
6593.

Adoption Orientation
Children's Home Society is
hosting an adoption orienta-
tion at 6 p.m. Dec. 15 at the
-Lake City location, 1389 US
Highway 90 West, Suite 100.
Case managers will speak
about adoption services and
the children currently looking
for a family. Call (352)334-
0955.


Master Gardeners are at the
Columbia County Extension
Office from 9 a.m. to noon
every Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday. They answer garden-
ing questions and conduct
soil pH tests free of charge.
Call (386) 752-5384, or stop
at the UF/IFAS Extension
Office at the Columbia
County fairgrounds.


Wednesday


Cultural Society of Lake
City is hosting its annual
Christmas Party/Dance from
6:30 to 10 p.m. Dec. 19, at
Epiphany Catholic Church
Social Hall. All FACS mem-
bers and guest are invited.
There will be a play, caroling,
entertainment, cultural food,
music, dancing and more.
Bring your favorite covered
dish to share. Contact Bob
Gavette at 965-5905.


Fundraiser for Lake City Annual Christmas
Woman's Club Dinner scheduled


The Lake City Woman's
Club will be holding a lun-
Scheon for their monthly fund-
raiser from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Dec. 16.

Thursday
SHINE assistance
available
SHINE, a volunteer
Program with the FL Dept.
of Elder Affairs, is answering
questions about Medicare
Part D's annual enroll-
ment period from 12:30
-5 p.m. Dec. 17 at the
Lifestyle Enrichment Center.
Assistance is free, unbiased,
and confidential. Bring your
Medicare Card, your current
Part D Plan card and your
prescription drug bottles.
There will be a worksheet
to complete. Call the Elder
Helpline at 1-800-262-2243.


Saturday
Diabetes support group
to meet Blank-Fest set for
Saturdav u


Shands Lake Shore
Hospital's Diabetic Support
Group is scheduled to meet
at 9:30 a.m. on Dec. 15 at
the hospital, 368 NE Franklin
St. The topic is "Stress Free
Diabetes Management." Call
(386) 292-8000 for more
information.'


WULU UUf
The second annual Lake'
City Blank-Fest is at 3 p.m.
Dec. 19 at RockStar Lounge,
723 E. Duval Street. Blank-Fest
is an annual benefit concert,
which raises blankets for the
homeless. Admission is one
new or gently used blanket.


UF Master Gardeners Christmas Party and
/are available dance


The University of Florida


The Filipino American


Faith in Christ Anglican,
Church and the Christian
Mission in Action is spon-
soring a free annual
Christmas Dinner from 11
a.m. until 2 p.m. Dec. 19,
at the Suwannee County
Coliseum, in Live Oak.
The dinner will be a tradi-
tion Christmas dinner with
turkey, ham, beans, sweet
potatoes, greens, cranberry
sauce and desserts. There
will be singing, gifts, and a
. gospel message. A prayer
team will also circulate for
individual prayer needs.
Everyone is welcome and
the dinner is free.

Community College
closing for holiday
Lake City Community
College will be closed for
the winter holidays from
Dec. 19 through Jan. 3.
Campus offices will reopen
Jan. 4. Late registration and
add/drop is Jan. 4-5, with all
fees due each day. Spring
semester classes will begin
Jan. 6. For more information
call the Registrar at (386)
754-4205.

Magic: The Gathering
league play
A Magic: The Gathering
league Play occurs from
noon to 6 p.m. each
Saturday, at American Legion
Post 57 on U.S. Highway 41
South. Everyone is invited.
Call (386) 365-8743 for more
information.


MORE FROM THE SUWANNEE LIGHTS


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


I.A - - - -


[I

















PaeEito:To oet,7402 AECT EOTR A VC R SW R UDY EEBR1,20


DEAR ABBY: For the
first time in eight years, my
husband and I will be stay-
ing in a hotel when we visit
his parents for Christmas.
While I love his family, their
home is small, and we are
relegated to a trundle bed
and must share the sole
bathroom with the entire
family. It's impossible for us
to be comfortable with so
many people in such close
quarters. We assumed that
sleeping in a nearby hotel
and visiting during the days
and evenings would be a
fair compromise.
We were shocked at their
reaction when we discussed
our plans with the family.
They are very hurt about
our decision and extremely
offended. They are begging
us to reconsider and stay in
their home.
Are our actions self-
ish and cold-hearted? We
mean no harm, and are
so surprised at the strong
reaction that we're starting
to question our judgment.
Should we travel and stay
in the hotel, or just scrap
the trip altogether? -
STAYING HOME NEXT
YEAR
DEAR STAYING
HOME: No, you, your
husband and his parents
should discuss this more
fully. You didn't mention
how many family members
will be spending the holi-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
days in that small house.
While I sympathize with
family traditions, as chil-
dren grow into adulthood
certain realities come into
play.
If you prefer to sleep in
a hotel and have a private
bathroom and the ability to
have a private conversation
if you wish, I don't think
it's too much to ask. But
I'd hate to see you cancel
a family visit because of
the pressure that is being
exerted. That's in no one's
best interests.
DEAR ABBY: I'd like to
offer another example of an.
act of kindness that might
be worthy of your column.
My youngest daughter and
her little girl were traveling
across several states after
visiting her two brothers, a
sister and me.
My daughter had a CB in
her car and while she was
driving, was talking on and
off with different truckers
on the road. A car full of
young men began to harass
her by tailgating, passing
her dangerously close, then


pulling sharply in front
of her and slowing down.
Each time she'd manage to
pass them, the harassment
would begin again.
She related her problem
over the CB to a trucker.
As if by magic, three trucks
appeared! One got behind
her, and another maneu-
vered in front - while a
third sort of "nudged" the
offending car out of her
way, then positioned his rig
alongside my daughter's -
car. Those truckers talked
to her the whole time and
continued in formation until
the men who'd been has-
sling her gave up and took
off.
The,truckers continued
to maintain contact with,
my daughter until she
reached her exit, and I am
deeply grateful to them.
Because I never got to
thankthem personally, I
hope they'll read this in
your column.
Abby, may God continue
to guide you as you strive
to assist others, and watch
over you always. - MOM
MC C. IN OHIO
DEAR MOM MC C.:
Thank you for the blessing,
and for the testimonial that
acts of chivalry still occur
on our highways. Perhaps
your letter will motivate ,
other motorists to watch
out for the other guy - or
gal, as the case may be.


HOROSCOPES


DEAR ABBY



Couple opts to visit home


for holidays from a hotel


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You have the talent
and the skills to get ahead.
All you need to do is market
and present what you have
to offer. There is money
to be made, so follow your
dreams and you will surpass
your goals. ***-
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Get involved in
something that will help
you see things from a differ-
ent angle. Cultural events
or networking with unique
people will motivate you to
take what you have to offer
and give it an original spin.
A surprise is heading your
way. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Put your talents to
work for a good cause. Your
ability to find solutions and
act quickly and efficiently
will enhance.your reputation
and lead to an interesting
partnership. Don't limit the
possibilities if opportunity
knocks. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Put the past behind
you. Look at yourself and
decide what you can do to
make your life better. Set
your agenda to suit the

CELEBRITY


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: C equals I
"AFZ NOCYZOV F D Y Z JXZ LJ J A JX
AFZ RODMZ, J X Z JX AFZ TWSATF,
DXN J X Z JX AF Z AFOJAAWZ." - AY
DXXJSXTZO RJR YDOVFD
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The sad truth is that most evil is done by people who
never make up their minds to be either good or evil." - Hannah Arendt


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

needs of yourself and your
family. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Socializing or networking.
will lead to an interesting
possibility with someone
unusual. Don't make an
impulsive decision until you
are sure it works into your
plans. Update your look and
your attitude. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): When it comes to
home and family, tread care-
fully. Say little but do a lot
and you will get the recep-
tion you are looking for from
someone who counts. A day
trip or planning a fun event
will pave the way to a good
time and help ward off com-
plaints. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take part in com-
munity or neighborhood
affairs and you will make
new friends. Your ideas will
* be well received and the
help you require offered.
Confirmation will come from
outsiders, not the people you
are close to. ***

CIPHER


SUNDAY CROSSWORD



DOUBLE BREAK POINT By Patrick Berry / Edited by Will Shortz 1123 45910112131141516


Across
I Like mountains
and maps


7 "The Lord of the
Rings" dwarf
12 Attack helicopter
17 1930s
heavyweight
champ known as
the Ambling Alp
18 Choose not, to
cook, say
19 Plays at
maximum
volume
20 Deciding the best
man is better,
perhaps?
22 As yet'
unactualized
23 Where Caleb was
sent as a spy
24 Seaside bird
25 Memento of an
old athletic
injury?
27 Suave competitor
28 Many a shipment
to Detroit
30 Air play?
31 Med. care
provider
32 Nitpicks?
36 Uses as a source
38 Like a
foreboding sky.
39 What white flour
lacks


40 West Bank grp.
41 Majestic
45 Professorial
material?
47 Bottom line?
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


50 Sorters'
formations
51 Architect of the
Guggenheim
Museum in
Bilbao
52 Double or
nothing, say?
54 Gambler's
declaration
55 Hymn starter
57 Like many rugs
58 Keats's " on
Indolence"
59 Pickett's Charge
participant
60 Begging
soldiers?
62'Co. of which
Howard Hughes
became the
principal
shareholder in
1939
63 ___ rigueur
(literally)
64 Call before a
football game
65 Manchester
Smoms
66 Handle
67 Young scientists
who are
impossible to
work with?
69 Tips
70 View from the
Quai d'Orsay
71 Sir___, nephew
of King Arthur
72 X-ray view
73 Gave birth to a
Litter
75 Triumphant cry
76 Kick in.the rear,
maybe
77 Senate tie
breaker
78 Country whose
name means
"warrior king"


81 Things heard
after thumbs are
hit with
hammers?
87 Languish
88 Water carrier
90 Maker of "the
plow that broke
the Plains"
91 Prostitute who
protected
Israelite spies,
in Joshua
93 Holder of pet
electrons,
protons and
neutrons?
97 Windup
98 Pro ___ (for
one's country)
99 Get by somehow
100 Reductions in
rank that aren't
entirely bad?
103 Key holders
104 Spectacular
autumn trees
105 Up
106 Setting of Van
Gogh's "Cafe
Terrace at
Night"
107 Shy
108 Adjusts for
daylight saving,
e.g.

Down
1 Large hot spot
2 Heavy lifters
3 Archival material
4 They're set for
drinking and
smoking
5 John-Boy Walton's
sister
6 Brown who wrote
"The Lost
Symbol"
7 Earn
8 Skater Midori


9 Farmyard chorus
10 Mattress problem
11 "Come on in!"
12 School cards
13 Muesli
ingredients
14 ."Mother Courage
and Her
Children"
playwright
15 Call again?
16 Minute Maid
Park players
17 Letters on old
rubles
18 Great white
19 Lunch orders that
are typically
sliced in half
21 Los Angeles
museum, with
"the"
26 Coll. dorm
overseers
28 Off
29 Tolerant of other
opinions
-33 It might have an
extension: Abbr.
34-James who wrote
"A Million Little
Pieces"
35 Boyo
37 Trace
40 Superheroes have
them
41 Galaxy shape
42 Delay
43 "Arabian Nights"
opener?
44'Olympics ideal
45 Competitors of
Wahoos and Tar
Heels
46'It's most useful
when it's
cracked
47 Peggy Lee's
signature song
48 Vanity case?


49 M6doc, for one'
51 Stock in trade
52 Stem joints
53 Brought in
55 Hall-of-Famers
56 Reluctant
57 South Los
Angeles district
60 1986 film
featuring Chevy
Chase as Dusty
Bottoms
61 Affluence


66 Cream
alternative
68 __Mawr
College
69 Ankh's top
70 Becomes layered
while settling
72 Shaker's sound
73 " here!"
74 "Away From
___" (Julie
Christie film)
76 Headwear also
known as
jipijapas


77 Colorado's Mesa

78 Rocking chair
storyteller
79 Empty 'words
80 Keyless
81 Pres. title
82 "You bother"
83 Looks after
84 Best guide
around town,
probably
85 Dewlap's place


86 They're all good
89 Bullets, in Texas
hold'em
92 Dishonorable
94 Horsehair source
95 "Intolerance"
actress Lillian
96 Fair
98 Subway car
feature
101 Suffix with
slogan
102 France's Belle-
Ile-en-__


Answers to last week's Sunday Crossword.

DO SoQP1uO OJL Z IINEE V SE
OPAH PLNANA TONAL INCA
SQUEALOFAPPROVAL SMOG
S P T 0 111) E ABDN S H A W L
SPN IT IDE M AN E S A WL
NEHITWEERW BE GGENTIS
ROWE SEX WILDEBEQUEST
GUARD DEBt IT EIMU
SNYDER COD OMAN EVIAN
SNI P BEAVI S FLANGE
SIF SNIS BEAN C NE NCAA
I Q UIE AIS GE DIEIR QM U P
SDANUBE L ETSGO TATIMURS

ENTER BETH AL I TASMAN
EAU INFRA CHICA
QUALMSGI VI NG OUT ISMS
UNDIES MERE IIND IANTEA
ASHEN APROPOS IMAGO0
FEEL Q UAINTMISBEHAV IN
FAR BELILIY ATOLL CED
STEW SLAY RI LEY TROD


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You will be drawn
to events that have to do
with personal improvement.
Speaking openly will help
you clear up a misconcep-
tion about you or your
beliefs. Plan a surprise for
someone late in the day to
ensure you are still on good
terms. ***
SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Be careful
who you trust with the infor-
mation you've been,given. A
challenge, keeping busy or
traveling about will stimulate
you mentally and physically
but may cause some back-
lash emotionally. A change
may not be welcome but it
Swill be necessary. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Look for a profes-
sional challenge that will
stimulate you and help you
build a stronger resume. A
money deal can lead to a bet-
ter living situation. Don't be
fooled by someone playing
with your emotions. ****
'AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Keep a lid on
what you think. If you share
your thoughts, you are
likely to hurt someone's
feelings and look bad in
front of friends and family.
A promise you make must
be kept, regardless of time
-constraints. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Your heart is in
the right place but someone
Sis likely to take advantage
of you and what you are
offering. You will overspend
on someone who doesn't
deserve your generosity. Set
a new budget and stick to it.
A-*-f -*-* " ' ' -


5 6 3


1 5 6


.2 48 5


3 4 7


4 7 8


8 9 7 1 3 6


96 7


4 21 89


3


9 L C 6 9 Z- 8 L


6 8 9 L 9 C7V


S L E 81 9 6 9 L


v 96 E 9 L L 6 8


8 z L L969 1IS


9 6 L 7 � 8 L Lz 9


L 9 69 81t SLZ


z 7 9 9LL S 8 L 6


L S 86 L 79 9


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


Page Editor: Troy Roberts, 754-0427


*










6D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2009


,-


Both
as


Congratulations on his

93rd birthday to Brother Meade!

And thanks for a lifetime of service-



i"1 " and.. '
S1 . m g A ' a


Ssoolder


in His Ministry


When Brother Charles Meade was a young man
during WWII, he answered the call and
volunteered for service to this country.

He served as a first class front line soldier for
4 years, taking part in 5 major invasions with
campaigns in Africa, Sicily, Italy, France and
Germany.

The extraordinary success of American
Forces in World War II was in large part a
result of the support of the Army Engineers,

He served with the 343rd Army Engineer
General Service Regiment. This was one of the
most appreciated and needed units at the time,
but is often overlooked in the history books.


Brother Meade personally and his regiment
Became one of the most decorated units in the
war and He received many commendations and
medals from the highest headquarters.

Here are some of his medals:


, . �,"i
* '.

* i




t 4
i
.i
r
\

I.

. I
�


8 campaign
Bronze Stars
for bravery
and service.


As the pastor at Meade Ministries,
Brother Meade has dedicated his
life to helping everyone he can by
preaching the truth of God's Word in
the Bible to the fullness.

Thank you Brother Meade for all
you have done for this people, this
church, and for this community.

Also thank you for over 40 years of
your ministering to God's people, for
the millions of miles you have driven,
and the thousands of prayers you
have prayed._ ,


the Best is
yet to come.


This Silver Star was awarded to hi
for valor and gallantry in action.


The Presidential Unit
Citation was for accomplishing
their mission under [
extremely difficult and & -_"R
hazardous conditions. .

eived the European-
-Middle Eastern theater
nations campaign medal
Indian Arrowhead medal for
nation in amphibious assault.
3rd . ;
er Rt. His regiment received a
commendation for outstanding -
performance of duty from
General Mark Clark commander
Sof the US 5th Army.

nmR7 -


The Meade Minisries worship center.


He was awarded the Good
Conduct Medal for his years
of honorable and faithful service,
and for being so distinguished
among his fellow soldiers.


He received seven WWII
Overseas Service stripes or
bars for serving the years
he did in overseas combat
zone.


With seating for over 2,000, the
44,000 square foot structure is an
engineering marvel.

Meade Ministries is a Bible based
family fellowship. I ,


-Public Welcome.

Sun: 10 am & 7 pm
Thursday: 8 pm


There were more medals and awards that
he received. This is just a few of them.


deade
4linistries
Worship
Center
c~~r~p.�c~~oaJr


Meade
Ministries


He rece
African-
of oper
and an
particip
342
-Engine


.is
'42
.5


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~11"~-'- 111 1


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